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Sample records for perspectives structural problems

  1. Alternative Perspectives on Risk: Individual Differences in Problem Structuring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orasanu, Judith; Fischer, Ute; Connors, Mary M. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Team decision making involves contributions of multiple players toward a common goal. While much has been written about the importance of developing shared mental models in order for teams to work together effectively, little has been done to determine the value of alternative perspectives on problem solving and decision making. Early studies of expertise contrasted experts with novices and noted that the two groups differ in the way they structure problems and in their selection of information as salient. Little attention has been given to differences among experts who differ in their specializations. A series of experiments was conducted to determine: (1) what dimensions of flight-related problem situations pilots judge to be most important when making flight-relevant decisions; and (2) whether pilots in different crew positions differ in the way they interpret problems relating to flight decisions. A sorting task was used to identify underlying dimensions judged as salient to individual pilots. Captains, first officers, and flight engineers from two major carriers participated in the study. Twenty-two flight scenarios were developed based on ASRS reports. Pilots were required to make judgments about how they would respond in each case and to sort the scenarios on the basis of similarity of decision factors. They were also asked to provide a verbal label that described each of their sorted categories. A second study required a different group of pilots (also captains, first officers and flight engineers) to sort on predetermined bases.

  2. Algorithmic Perspectives on Problem Formulations in MDO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexandrov, Natalia M.; Lewis, Robert Michael

    2000-01-01

    This work is concerned with an approach to formulating the multidisciplinary optimization (MDO) problem that reflects an algorithmic perspective on MDO problem solution. The algorithmic perspective focuses on formulating the problem in light of the abilities and inabilities of optimization algorithms, so that the resulting nonlinear programming problem can be solved reliably and efficiently by conventional optimization techniques. We propose a modular approach to formulating MDO problems that takes advantage of the problem structure, maximizes the autonomy of implementation, and allows for multiple easily interchangeable problem statements to be used depending on the available resources and the characteristics of the application problem.

  3. Comparing Multiple Solutions in the Structured Problem Solving: Deconstructing Japanese Lessons from Learner's Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hino, Keiko

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to enhance our understanding of how students listen and attend to multiple solutions proposed by their classmates during the activity of comparison. This study examines ten consecutive lessons in each of the two eighth-grade classrooms in Tokyo that are organized in the style of "structured problem solving".…

  4. Problem-Framing: A perspective on environmental problem-solving

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bardwell, Lisa V.

    1991-09-01

    The specter of environmental calamity calls for the best efforts of an involved public. Ironically, the way people understand the issues all too often serves to discourage and frustrate rather than motivate them to action. This article draws from problem-solving perspectives offered by cognitive psychology and conflict management to examine a framework for thinking about environmental problems that promises to help rather than hinder efforts to address them. Problem-framing emphasizes focusing on the problem definition. Since how one defines a problem determines one's understanding of and approach to that problem, being able to redefine or reframe a problem and to explore the “problem space” can help broaden the range of alternatives and solutions examined. Problem-framing incorporates a cognitive perspective on how people respond to information. It explains why an emphasis on problem definition is not part of people's typical approach to problems. It recognizes the importance of structure and of having ways to organize that information on one's problem-solving effort. Finally, problem-framing draws on both cognitive psychology and conflict management for strategies to manage information and to create a problem-solving environment that not only encourages participation but can yield better approaches to our environmental problems.

  5. Structural dynamics problems of future spacecraft systems - New solution methods and perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breitbach, E.; Hueners, H.

    The mechanical and thermal loads imposed on spacecraft and payloads during launch and reentry, the methods used to predict and simulate these loads, and the design implications of typical loading levels are reviewed, with reference to the FRG Planning Framework for High Technology and Space Flight. A typical satellite mission profile is shown; the structural-dynamic qualification process is outlined; system identification methods are described in detail; and the fundamental principles of passive and active vibration control are discussed. Extensive diagrams, drawings, graphs, and photographs are provided.

  6. Perspectives on Problem Solving and Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Merrienboer, Jeroen J. G.

    2013-01-01

    Most educators claim that problem solving is important, but they take very different perspective on it and there is little agreement on how it should be taught. This article aims to sort out the different perspectives and discusses problem solving as a goal, a method, and a skill. As a goal, problem solving should not be limited to well-structured…

  7. [Addiction therapy. Limits, problems, perspectives].

    PubMed

    Kalapos, Miklós Péter

    2014-01-01

    In health care, tending is a process, which offers for the patients a continuous watching on, a control, a treatment, and the prevention of worsening of their medical status as well as the reduction of their complaints. In the article, some fundamental segments of tending in addictology are reviewed, particularly paying attention to whom, how, where and how long to take care. On the basis of literature, the author stresses whatever method is used to treat addict patients it is more beneficial to society than the avoidance of any intervention due to the negligence of the problem. Addictology has lost a lot from its power in Hungary. The author recommends the introduction of the methods of health quality assurance to decrease the effect of negative trends seen in addictology. The paper also deals with special patient groups including homeless clients, adolescents, elderly and pregnant patients as well as health care professionals. The author critically mentions the double communication of society, the dual-face character of politics and has the opinion that competences are not clear making the situation confused. As a mistake of the point of view is it regarded that the addictological problems are classified as to belonging to the authority of psychiatry. It is emphasized that multidisciplinary approach is needed to understand the problem and to treat the client. General screening for addictological diseases does not seem possible in the light of low capacity of the system, but the screening of adolescents and pregnant women is definitely recommended. And finally, a financial support for medicines to prevent craving, a moratorium for the continuous changing of rules and law, the sponsoring of harm reduction programs as well as a better utilization of opportunities offered by local drug coordinating boards are proposed.

  8. Food sustainability: problems, perspectives and solutions.

    PubMed

    Garnett, Tara

    2013-02-01

    The global food system makes a significant contribution to climate changing greenhouse gas emissions with all stages in the supply chain, from agricultural production through processing, distribution, retailing, home food preparation and waste, playing a part. It also gives rise to other major environmental impacts, including biodiversity loss and water extraction and pollution. Policy makers are increasingly aware of the need to address these concerns, but at the same time they are faced with a growing burden of food security and nutrition-related problems, and tasked with ensuring that there is enough food to meet the needs of a growing global population. In short, more people need to be fed better, with less environmental impact. How might this be achieved? Broadly, three main 'takes' or perspectives, on the issues and their interactions, appear to be emerging. Depending on one's view point, the problem can be conceptualised as a production challenge, in which case there is a need to change how food is produced by improving the unit efficiency of food production; a consumption challenge, which requires changes to the dietary drivers that determine food production; or a socio-economic challenge, which requires changes in how the food system is governed. This paper considers these perspectives in turn, their implications for nutrition and climate change, and their strengths and weaknesses. Finally, an argument is made for a reorientation of policy thinking which uses the insights provided by all three perspectives, rather than, as is the situation today, privileging one over the other.

  9. Ciguatera: Australian perspectives on a global problem.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Richard J

    2006-12-01

    Ciguatera is a global disease caused by the consumption of certain warm-water fish that have accumulated orally effective levels of sodium channel activator toxins (ciguatoxins) through the marine food chain. Symptoms of ciguatera arising from the consumption of ciguateric fish include a range of gastrointestinal, neurological and cardiovascular disturbances. This review examines progress in our understanding of ciguatera from an Australian perspective, especially the laboratory-based research into the problem that was initiated by the late "Bob" Endean at the University of Queensland.

  10. Aha: A Connectionist Perspective on Problem Solving

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-06-08

    DOCUMENTATION PAGE 7, -REPORtT SEC.𔃾l CASPFC.A’C ON R7ESRtC’ vE %MARK.%GS Unclassif led 22 SECRITY C ASSPFCATION Aur~oRifv 3 ; S’R @Bu ON AjALA81L 3 F...Typically, the search perspective has been used to desc ,.,e problem solving behavior occurring on a macro-level time scale of seconds as opposed to the...unit /. The constants S, E and / (all set to .05 for the simulations described below) scale the strength of the external input, the excitatory input from

  11. A Set-Oriented Perspective on Solving Counting Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lockwood, Elise

    2014-01-01

    In this article, I present the notion of a set-oriented perspective for solving counting problems that emerged during task-based interviews with postsecondary students. Framing the findings within Harel's "ways of thinking", I argue that students may benefit from this perspective, in which they view attending to sets of outcomes as…

  12. New Perspectives on Human Problem Solving

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldstone, Robert L.; Pizlo, Zygmunt

    2009-01-01

    In November 2008 at Purdue University, the 2nd Workshop on Human Problem Solving was held. This workshop, which was a natural continuation of the first workshop devoted almost exclusively to optimization problems, addressed a wider range of topics that reflect the scope of the "Journal of Problem Solving." The workshop was attended by 35…

  13. Perspectives on the Consecutive Pages Problem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Srinivasan, V. K.

    2011-01-01

    This article presents different approaches to a problem, dubbed by the author as "the consecutive pages problem". The aim of this teaching-oriented article is to promote the teaching of abstract concepts in mathematics, by selecting a challenging amusement problem and then presenting various solutions in such a way that it can engage the attention…

  14. [Non-statistical biomathematics: opinions, perspectives, problems].

    PubMed

    Peil, J

    1981-01-01

    By way of tracing the position of biomathematics and its main subjects a discussion is given of the mutual relations between the branches of natural sciences and mathematics within the hierarchically structured building of science. The general possibilities of a mathematical expressing and description of the biological features "complexity", "variability", and "discontinuity" and the limits are shown of validity of mathematical formulations in the field of biology. To this point representative opinions of research workers are quoted. The only direct ways of application of mathematics in biology seems to be the treatment of "variability" by statistical biomathematical means which offers the mathematical services in the design of experiments as well as in the quantitative-descriptive evaluation of experimental results. Aside from these ways a direct mathematical approach to biology is thought of being questionable because of the large differences between the levels of abstraction on which these two disciplines work. But the thesis is stated and supported that biophysics and biocybernetics as mediators provide an appropriate approach of the mathematics to such biological problems which arise from "complexity" and from "discontinuity". The kind of biomathematical tools, the goal of a biomathematical analysis, and the results of such an analysis get their meaning from the biophysical or biocybernetical modelling in which they are embedded. Example of working out of biomathematical methods and of application these methods are added.

  15. The Moro Problem: An Historical Perspective

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-06-01

    Contemporary Problems (Manila: Solidaridad Publishing House, 1974), p. 187. 1 2 Majul, Cesar Adib., Muslims in the Philippines (Manila: St. Mary’s Publishing...Rcbert D. McAmis (eds.), The Muslim Filipinos: Their History, Society and Contemporary Problems (Manila: Solidaridad Publishing House, 1974), p. 271. 17...Filipinos: Their History, Society, and Contemporary Problems (Manila: Solidaridad Publishing House, 1974), p. 246. 117 :4 S. N N I , •..- t 2 9 Wulff

  16. International Student Mobility: Problems and Perspectives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Escolano, Agustin

    1986-01-01

    An examination of international student mobility looks at the general trend toward increased mobility, problems of conflicting attitudes and expectations, and considerations of curriculum and credentials. (MSE)

  17. Dynamic Problem Solving: A New Assessment Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greiff, Samuel; Wustenberg, Sascha; Funke, Joachim

    2012-01-01

    This article addresses two unsolved measurement issues in dynamic problem solving (DPS) research: (a) unsystematic construction of DPS tests making a comparison of results obtained in different studies difficult and (b) use of time-intensive single tasks leading to severe reliability problems. To solve these issues, the MicroDYN approach is…

  18. A Cognitive Perspective Applied to Emancipation Problems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, William D.

    1980-01-01

    Problems described include over-dependency, vacillation about dependency, and resistance to authority. The plan for intervention entails accurate reflection of cognitions, capitalizes on anti-expectation, and minimizes complications that a vigorously confrontive method often intensifies with adolescents. (Author/RH)

  19. Rio Grande rift: problems and perspectives

    SciTech Connect

    Baldridge, W.S.; Olsen, K.H.; Callender, J.F.

    1984-01-01

    Topics and ideas addressed include: (1) the regional extent of the Rio Grande rift; (2) the structure of the crust and upper mantle; (3) whether the evidence for an axile dike in the lower crust is compelling; (4) the nature of faulting and extension in the crust; and (5) the structural and magmatic development of the rift. 88 references, 5 figures.

  20. PREFACE: The random search problem: trends and perspectives The random search problem: trends and perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Luz, Marcos G. E.; Grosberg, Alexander; Raposo, Ernesto P.; Viswanathan, Gandhi M.

    2009-10-01

    very important to solve computationally complex problems (e.g., protein folding), which involve optimizations in very high dimensional energy landscapes. On the other hand, random searches can also be studied from the perspective of diffusion and transport properties which is an important topic in condensed matter and statistical physics. For instance, the features of light scattered in a media, where the scatterers have a power-law distribution of sizes in many aspects, may resemble the patterns generated by a searcher performing Lévy walks. There are many questions related to random searches: how the searcher moves or should move, what are the patterns generated during the locomotion, how do the encounter rates depend on parameters of the search, etc. But perhaps, the most well known issue is how to optimize the search for specific target scenarios. The optimization can be in either continuous or discrete environments, when the information available is limited. The answer to this question determines specific strategies of movement that would maximize some properly defined search efficiency measure. The relevance of the question stems from the fact that the strategy-dynamics represents one of the most important factors that modulate the rate of encounters (e.g., the encounter rate between predator and prey). In the general context, strategy choices can be essential in determining the outcome and thus the success of a given search. For instance, realistic searches—and locomotion in general—require the expenditure of energy. Thus, inefficient search could deplete energy reserves (e.g., fat) and lead to rates of encounters below a minimum acceptable threshold (resulting in extinction of a species, for example). The framework of the random search `game' distinguishes between the two interacting players in a context of pursuit and chance. They are either a `searcher' (e.g., predator, protein, radar, `crawler') or a `target' (e.g., prey, DNA sequence, a missing

  1. A geometrical perspective for the bargaining problem.

    PubMed

    Wong, Kelvin Kian Loong

    2010-04-26

    A new treatment to determine the Pareto-optimal outcome for a non-zero-sum game is presented. An equilibrium point for any game is defined here as a set of strategy choices for the players, such that no change in the choice of any single player will increase the overall payoff of all the players. Determining equilibrium for multi-player games is a complex problem. An intuitive conceptual tool for reducing the complexity, via the idea of spatially representing strategy options in the bargaining problem is proposed. Based on this geometry, an equilibrium condition is established such that the product of their gains over what each receives is maximal. The geometrical analysis of a cooperative bargaining game provides an example for solving multi-player and non-zero-sum games efficiently.

  2. Solving Math Problems Approximately: A Developmental Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Ganor-Stern, Dana

    2016-01-01

    Although solving arithmetic problems approximately is an important skill in everyday life, little is known about the development of this skill. Past research has shown that when children are asked to solve multi-digit multiplication problems approximately, they provide estimates that are often very far from the exact answer. This is unfortunate as computation estimation is needed in many circumstances in daily life. The present study examined 4th graders, 6th graders and adults’ ability to estimate the results of arithmetic problems relative to a reference number. A developmental pattern was observed in accuracy, speed and strategy use. With age there was a general increase in speed, and an increase in accuracy mainly for trials in which the reference number was close to the exact answer. The children tended to use the sense of magnitude strategy, which does not involve any calculation but relies mainly on an intuitive coarse sense of magnitude, while the adults used the approximated calculation strategy which involves rounding and multiplication procedures, and relies to a greater extent on calculation skills and working memory resources. Importantly, the children were less accurate than the adults, but were well above chance level. In all age groups performance was enhanced when the reference number was smaller (vs. larger) than the exact answer and when it was far (vs. close) from it, suggesting the involvement of an approximate number system. The results suggest the existence of an intuitive sense of magnitude for the results of arithmetic problems that might help children and even adults with difficulties in math. The present findings are discussed in the context of past research reporting poor estimation skills among children, and the conditions that might allow using children estimation skills in an effective manner. PMID:27171224

  3. Finite Optimal Stopping Problems: The Seller's Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hemmati, Mehdi; Smith, J. Cole

    2011-01-01

    We consider a version of an optimal stopping problem, in which a customer is presented with a finite set of items, one by one. The customer is aware of the number of items in the finite set and the minimum and maximum possible value of each item, and must purchase exactly one item. When an item is presented to the customer, she or he observes its…

  4. [Problems and perspectives in child health care].

    PubMed

    Nikolić, N; Gebauer, E; Jovanović, M; Rakić, D; Katanić, D

    1997-01-01

    Health care protection of children in Vojvodina is of particular importance regarding the negative natural birth rate. In spite of difficult economic situation, health care of children in Vojvodina is permanently carried out and would be significantly better in quality if the education of subspecialized personnel, space facilities, technological innovations, computerization and continuous education were available. Introduction of microanalytic laboratory techniques is essential for monitoring of prematures. Propagation of natural nutrition is an obligation of pediatricians. Respiratory diseases are still on the top of morbidity pyramid but tuberculosis is evidently in increase. An important health care problem is the expansion of allergic diseases. The progressive incidence of insulin-dependent diabetes is also evident. The spheres of juvenile gynecological endocrinology and andrology are still underdeveloped and that also applies to adolescent medicine. Toxicology remains an ongoing problem in pediatrics due to an increased number of accidental poisoning. Pediatricians-gastroenterologists are lacking while paediatric hepatology should be brought into more advanced state. Bone marrow and stem cells transplantation is in the responsibility of the Centre for haematology and oncology. Nephrology department lacks children's haemodialysis, ultrasound biopsy of kidneys, urodynamic analyses and new staff facilities. The increased number of survivals in case of children with with sequeles inevitably asks for better development of rehabilitation, prolonged treatment and teamwork. Intensive care and therapy department requires new staff and high technology capacities. Development of children's surgery department inevitably means the reconstruction of space facilities, modern equipment and new subspecializations. Preventive outpatient service is performed through systematic examinations. ultrasound diagnostics of hips, auditive screening and educational program activities

  5. [Aquaculture in the Netherlands: problems and perspectives].

    PubMed

    Hogendoorn, H

    1986-11-15

    New interest is being focussed on the more than 100-year-old field of fish culture in the Netherlands. The systems of production available show varying degrees of control of the fish and their environment, and they have a corresponding yield: 0.01-250 kg/m3/year. The recently developed recirculation systems (40-80 kg/m3) make possible the commercial production of luxury species of fish, independently of climatological conditions and having minimum effects on the environment. Some technical aspects of reproduction, housing, nutrition, growth, health control and marketing of the fish require further attention. But the absence of a solid tradition of fish culture is the main problem in the development of fish culture in the Netherlands today. Good fish stockmanship is required at farmers' level. And the organisation and governmental support, that turned agriculture into a highly successful industry, are also essential. For the moment, the most promising commercial prospects are provided by a number of luxury fish species: trout, salmon, eel, sole, turbot, tilapia, catfish, seabass and seabream. A joint effort may help to overcome the remaining technical and logistical uncertainties.

  6. Problems of Teaching the Behaviorist Perspective in the Cognitive Revolution

    PubMed Central

    Abramson, Charles I.

    2013-01-01

    This article offers some personal reflections on the difficulty of teaching the behaviorist perspective in the psychology classroom. The problems focus on the inadequacy of introductory textbooks—which mischaracterize behaviorism, only present the most extreme behaviorist positions, make no mention of the neobehaviorist perspective, fail to discuss that there is no accepted criteria for determining what type of behavior is cognitive, and provide a definition of cognition that is, not only inconsistent across texts, but so broad as to overshadow the behaviorist contributions. Suggestions are provided for instructors on how to present to their students an accurate portrayal of behaviorism. PMID:25379226

  7. Parenting Education in Australia: A Structural Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allan, June

    This paper offers critical reflections on parenting education in its social context. The paper is informed by a feminist perspective, and by a structural approach to practice that emphasizes the importance of changing social structures. An introductory section explores the impact of the ideologies of the traditional family, and of motherhood and…

  8. Nursing Instructor and Students’ Perspectives on Clinical Education Apprenticeship Problems

    PubMed Central

    Hasanpour-Dehkordi, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Different problems might lead to reduction in the efficiency of nursing students’ apprenticeship education and solving those problems. Aim This study was conducted to determine nursing internship problems from the perspective of trainers and students. Materials and Methods In this descriptive cross-sectional study, 20 trainers and 43 senior students of nursing were selected using census method. A researcher-made questionnaire was used to collect data. Total internal consistency (α) of the questionnaire was 0.88 and had proper convergent validity. SPSS was used to analyse data with applying descriptive and inferential statistics. Results More than 50% considered their course relatively weak or weak in helping intern nurses to acquire comprehensive view of the nursing profession that takes a social perspective into account, skills required for the processes of nursing and instructing patients. Problems such as insufficient access to welfare and educational facilities, lack of co-operation among clinical team and scattering of internship sessions during a course were mentioned by nurses and their trainers. They believed that changes must take place in the way internship courses are carried out. Conclusion Although the internship courses seem to achieve their aim of improving students’ skills and independence in providing different nursing services to students and their trainers generally have a positive attitude towards such courses, there are still problems in effective exercise of the training. PMID:27790467

  9. Three P's in Cosmology: Progress, Problems, and Perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolgov, A. D.

    2014-04-01

    A review on the development of cosmology for a diverse audience is presented. The first historical part is devoted to the works done half a century ago with an emphasize to those performed in Russia (or more precisely, in the Soviet Union). Then the recent data on the cosmic microwave background raditation is discussed and the impact of these data on the neutrino mass and the number of neutrino species is considered. The latter is compared with the results obtained from the big bang nucleosynthesis. Next, a short description and history of the cosmological inflation is presented. The basics of the standard cosmological model and the problems of dark matter and dark energy are considered at the end of the fist section entitled "Progress". In the next short section, "Problems", one can find a list of the unsolved cosmological and astrophysical problems, which is by no means fully comprehensive. The last supershort section contains a few words about the perspectives of future development.

  10. Structural perspectives on antimicrobial chemokines

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Leonard T.; Vogel, Hans J.

    2012-01-01

    Chemokines are best known as signaling proteins in the immune system. Recently however, a large number of human chemokines have been shown to exert direct antimicrobial activity. This moonlighting activity appears to be related to the net high positive charge of these immune signaling proteins. Chemokines can be divided into distinct structural elements and some of these have been studied as isolated peptide fragments that can have their own antimicrobial activity. Such peptides often encompass the α-helical region found at the C-terminal end of the parent chemokines, which, similar to other antimicrobial peptides, adopt a well-defined membrane-bound amphipathic structure. Because of their relatively small size, intact chemokines can be studied effectively by NMR spectroscopy to examine their structures in solution. In addition, NMR relaxation experiments of intact chemokines can provide detailed information about the intrinsic dynamic behavior; such analyses have helped for example to understand the activity of TC-1, an antimicrobial variant of CXCL7/NAP-2. With chemokine dimerization and oligomerization influencing their functional properties, the use of NMR diffusion experiments can provide information about monomer-dimer equilibria in solution. Furthermore, NMR chemical shift perturbation experiments can be used to map out the interface between self-associating subunits. Moreover, the unusual case of XCL1/lymphotactin presents a chemokine that can interconvert between two distinct folds in solution, both of which have been elucidated. Finally, recent advances have allowed for the determination of the structures of chemokines in complex with glycosaminoglycans, a process that could interfere with their antimicrobial activity. Taken together, these studies highlight several different structural facets that contribute to the way in which chemokines exert their direct microbicidal actions. PMID:23293636

  11. OPEN PROBLEM: Spatially localized structures in dissipative systems: open problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knobloch, E.

    2008-04-01

    Stationary spatially localized structures, sometimes called dissipative solitons, arise in many interesting and important applications, including buckling of slender structures under compression, nonlinear optics, fluid flow, surface catalysis, neurobiology and many more. The recent resurgence in interest in these structures has led to significant advances in our understanding of the origin and properties of these states, and these in turn suggest new questions, both general and system-specific. This paper surveys these results focusing on open problems, both mathematical and computational, as well as on new applications.

  12. Spider pheromones - a structural perspective.

    PubMed

    Schulz, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Spiders use pheromones for sexual communication, as do other animals such as insects. Nevertheless, knowledge about their chemical structure, function, and biosynthesis is only now being unraveled. Many studies have shown the existence of spider pheromones, but the responsible compounds have been elucidated in only a few cases. This review focuses on a structural approach because we need to know the involved chemistry if we are to understand fully the function of a pheromonal communication system. Pheromones from members of the spider families Pholcidae, Araneidae, Linyphiidae, Agenelidae, and Ctenidae are currently being identified and will be discussed in this review. Some of these compounds belong to compound classes not known from other arthropod pheromones, such as citric acid derivatives or acylated amino acids, whereas others originate from more common fatty acid metabolism. Their putative biosynthesis, their function, and the identification methods used will be discussed. Furthermore, other semiochemicals and the chemistry of apolar surface lipids that potentially might be used by spiders for communication are described briefly.

  13. Trinucleotide Repeats: A Structural Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Bruno; Fernandes, Sara; Abreu, Isabel A.; Macedo-Ribeiro, Sandra

    2013-01-01

    Trinucleotide repeat (TNR) expansions are present in a wide range of genes involved in several neurological disorders, being directly involved in the molecular mechanisms underlying pathogenesis through modulation of gene expression and/or the function of the RNA or protein it encodes. Structural and functional information on the role of TNR sequences in RNA and protein is crucial to understand the effect of TNR expansions in neurodegeneration. Therefore, this review intends to provide to the reader a structural and functional view of TNR and encoded homopeptide expansions, with a particular emphasis on polyQ expansions and its role at inducing the self-assembly, aggregation and functional alterations of the carrier protein, which culminates in neuronal toxicity and cell death. Detail will be given to the Machado-Joseph Disease-causative and polyQ-containing protein, ataxin-3, providing clues for the impact of polyQ expansion and its flanking regions in the modulation of ataxin-3 molecular interactions, function, and aggregation. PMID:23801983

  14. Structural Perspective on Enzymatic Halogenation

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Simple halogen substituents frequently afford key structural features that account for the potency and selectivity of natural products, including antibiotics and hormones. For example, when a single chlorine atom on the antibiotic vancomycin is replaced by hydrogen, the resulting antibacterial activity decreases by up to 70% (HarrisC. M.; KannanR.; KopeckaH.; HarrisT. M.J. Am. Chem. Soc.1985, 107, 6652−6658). This Account analyzes how structure underlies mechanism in halogenases, the molecular machines designed by nature to incorporate halogens into diverse substrates. Traditional synthetic methods of integrating halogens into complex molecules are often complicated by a lack of specificity and regioselectivity. Nature, however, has developed a variety of elegant mechanisms for halogenating specific substrates with both regio- and stereoselectivity. An improved understanding of the biological routes toward halogenation could lead to the development of novel synthetic methods for the creation of new compounds with enhanced functions. Already, researchers have co-opted a fluorinase from the microorganism Streptomyces cattleya to produce 18F-labeled molecules for use in positron emission tomography (PET) (DengH.; CobbS. L.; GeeA. D.; LockhartA.; MartarelloL.; McGlincheyR. P.; O’HaganD.; OnegaM.Chem. Commun.2006, 652−654). Therefore, the discovery and characterization of naturally occurring enzymatic halogenation mechanisms has become an active area of research. The catalogue of known halogenating enzymes has expanded from the familiar haloperoxidases to include oxygen-dependent enzymes and fluorinases. Recently, the discovery of a nucleophilic halogenase that catalyzes chlorinations has expanded the repertoire of biological halogenation chemistry (DongC.; HuangF.; DengH.; SchaffrathC.; SpencerJ. B.; O’HaganD.; NaismithJ. H.Nature2004, 427, 561−56514765200). Structural characterization has provided a basis toward a mechanistic understanding of the specificity

  15. Organizational Structure and Complex Problem Solving

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Becker, Selwyn W.; Baloff, Nicholas

    1969-01-01

    The problem-solving efficiency of different organization structures is discussed in relation to task requirements and the appropriate organizational behavior, to group adaptation to a task over time, and to various group characteristics. (LN)

  16. A combinatorial perspective of the protein inference problem.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chao; He, Zengyou; Yu, Weichuan

    2013-01-01

    In a shotgun proteomics experiment, proteins are the most biologically meaningful output. The success of proteomics studies depends on the ability to accurately and efficiently identify proteins. Many methods have been proposed to facilitate the identification of proteins from peptide identification results. However, the relationship between protein identification and peptide identification has not been thoroughly explained before. In this paper, we devote ourselves to a combinatorial perspective of the protein inference problem. We employ combinatorial mathematics to calculate the conditional protein probabilities (protein probability means the probability that a protein is correctly identified) under three assumptions, which lead to a lower bound, an upper bound, and an empirical estimation of protein probabilities, respectively. The combinatorial perspective enables us to obtain an analytical expression for protein inference. Our method achieves comparable results with ProteinProphet in a more efficient manner in experiments on two data sets of standard protein mixtures and two data sets of real samples. Based on our model, we study the impact of unique peptides and degenerate peptides (degenerate peptides are peptides shared by at least two proteins) on protein probabilities. Meanwhile, we also study the relationship between our model and ProteinProphet. We name our program ProteinInfer. Its Java source code, our supplementary document and experimental results are available at: >http://bioinformatics.ust.hk/proteininfer.

  17. Structural damage assessment as an identification problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hajela, Prabhat; Soeiro, F. J.

    1989-01-01

    Damage assessment of structural assemblies is treated as an identification problem. A brief review of identification methods is first presented with particular focus on the output error approach. The use of numerical optimization methods in identifying the location and extent of damage in structures is studied. The influence of damage on eigenmode shapes and static displacements is explored as a means of formulating a measure of damage in the structure. Preliminary results obtained in this study are presented and special attention is directed at the shortcomings associated with the nonlinear programming approach to solving the optimization problem.

  18. Unifying Temporal and Structural Credit Assignment Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agogino, Adrian K.; Tumer, Kagan

    2004-01-01

    Single-agent reinforcement learners in time-extended domains and multi-agent systems share a common dilemma known as the credit assignment problem. Multi-agent systems have the structural credit assignment problem of determining the contributions of a particular agent to a common task. Instead, time-extended single-agent systems have the temporal credit assignment problem of determining the contribution of a particular action to the quality of the full sequence of actions. Traditionally these two problems are considered different and are handled in separate ways. In this article we show how these two forms of the credit assignment problem are equivalent. In this unified frame-work, a single-agent Markov decision process can be broken down into a single-time-step multi-agent process. Furthermore we show that Monte-Carlo estimation or Q-learning (depending on whether the values of resulting actions in the episode are known at the time of learning) are equivalent to different agent utility functions in a multi-agent system. This equivalence shows how an often neglected issue in multi-agent systems is equivalent to a well-known deficiency in multi-time-step learning and lays the basis for solving time-extended multi-agent problems, where both credit assignment problems are present.

  19. Ecological effects of oil shale development: problems, perspectives, and approaches

    SciTech Connect

    Hakonson, T.E.; White. G.C.

    1980-01-01

    Although current oil shale developments in the Piceance Basin appear to have had little impact on ecosystems, it is important to recognize that planned expansion of the industry in the Basin will greatly magnify the potential for serious perturbations of the Piceance environs. The relatively small scale of the present oil shale activities in the Basin provides the biologist with a unique opportunity to establish and conduct quantitative studies designed to measure impacts as they occur. This paper is intended to focus attention on some of the problems, perspectives and recommended approaches to conducting ecosystem effects studies that will provide criteria for evaluation and mitigation of impacts should they occur. The purpose of this paper is not to criticize past and current environmental studies on oil shale, but in light of anticipated growth of the industry, to focus attention on the need to carefully define, design and execute ecological effects studies to quantify and provide mitigation criteria for impacts that will undoubtedly result from accelerated industry activities.

  20. Two-particle problem in comblike structures.

    PubMed

    Agliari, Elena; Cassi, Davide; Cattivelli, Luca; Sartori, Fabio

    2016-05-01

    Encounters between walkers performing a random motion on an appropriate structure can describe a wide variety of natural phenomena ranging from pharmacokinetics to foraging. On homogeneous structures the asymptotic encounter probability between two walkers is (qualitatively) independent of whether both walkers are moving or one is kept fixed. On infinite comblike structures this is no longer the case and here we deepen the mechanisms underlying the emergence of a finite probability that two random walkers will never meet, while one single random walker is certain to visit any site. In particular, we introduce an analytical approach to address this problem and even more general problems such as the case of two walkers with different diffusivity, particles walking on a finite comb and on arbitrary bundled structures, possibly in the presence of loops. Our investigations are both analytical and numerical and highlight that, in general, the outcome of a reaction involving two reactants on a comblike architecture can strongly differ according to whether both reactants are moving (no matter their relative diffusivities) or only one is moving and according to the density of shortcuts among the branches.

  1. Two-particle problem in comblike structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agliari, Elena; Cassi, Davide; Cattivelli, Luca; Sartori, Fabio

    2016-05-01

    Encounters between walkers performing a random motion on an appropriate structure can describe a wide variety of natural phenomena ranging from pharmacokinetics to foraging. On homogeneous structures the asymptotic encounter probability between two walkers is (qualitatively) independent of whether both walkers are moving or one is kept fixed. On infinite comblike structures this is no longer the case and here we deepen the mechanisms underlying the emergence of a finite probability that two random walkers will never meet, while one single random walker is certain to visit any site. In particular, we introduce an analytical approach to address this problem and even more general problems such as the case of two walkers with different diffusivity, particles walking on a finite comb and on arbitrary bundled structures, possibly in the presence of loops. Our investigations are both analytical and numerical and highlight that, in general, the outcome of a reaction involving two reactants on a comblike architecture can strongly differ according to whether both reactants are moving (no matter their relative diffusivities) or only one is moving and according to the density of shortcuts among the branches.

  2. Solving subsurface structural problems using a computer

    SciTech Connect

    Witte, D.M. )

    1987-02-01

    Until recently, the solution of subsurface structural problems has required a combination of graphical construction, trigonometry, time, and patience. Recent advances in software available for both mainframe and microcomputers now reduce the time and potential error of these calculations by an order of magnitude. Software for analysis of deviated wells, three point problems, apparent dip, apparent thickness, and the intersection of two planes, as well as the plotting and interpretation of these data can be used to allow timely and accurate exploration or operational decisions. The available computer software provides a set of utilities, or tools, rather than a comprehensive, intelligent system. The burden for selection of appropriate techniques, computation methods, and interpretations still lies with the explorationist user.

  3. Techniques of structural family assessment: a qualitative analysis of how experts promote a systemic perspective.

    PubMed

    Nichols, Michael; Tafuri, Sydney

    2013-06-01

    The trajectory of assessment in structural family therapy moves from a linear perspective, in which problems are located in the identified patient, to an interactional perspective, in which problems are seen as involving other members of the family. Minuchin, Nichols, & Lee (2007) developed a 4-step model for assessing couples and families consisting of: (1) broadening the definition of the presenting complaint to include its context, (2) identifying problem-maintaining interactions, (3) a structurally focused exploration of the past, and (4) developing a shared vision of pathways to change. To study how experts actually implement this model, judges coded video recordings of 10 initial consultations conducted by three widely recognized structural family therapists. Qualitative analyses identified 25 distinct techniques that these clinicians used to challenge linear thinking and move families toward a systemic understanding of their problems. We discuss and locate these techniques in the framework of the 4-step model.

  4. The relativistic inverse stellar structure problem

    SciTech Connect

    Lindblom, Lee

    2014-01-14

    The observable macroscopic properties of relativistic stars (whose equations of state are known) can be predicted by solving the stellar structure equations that follow from Einstein’s equation. For neutron stars, however, our knowledge of the equation of state is poor, so the direct stellar structure problem can not be solved without modeling the highest density part of the equation of state in some way. This talk will describe recent work on developing a model independent approach to determining the high-density neutron-star equation of state by solving an inverse stellar structure problem. This method uses the fact that Einstein’s equation provides a deterministic relationship between the equation of state and the macroscopic observables of the stars which are composed of that material. This talk illustrates how this method will be able to determine the high-density part of the neutron-star equation of state with few percent accuracy when high quality measurements of the masses and radii of just two or three neutron stars become available. This talk will also show that this method can be used with measurements of other macroscopic observables, like the masses and tidal deformabilities, which can (in principle) be measured by gravitational wave observations of binary neutron-star mergers.

  5. Computational strategies to address chromatin structure problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perišić, Ognjen; Schlick, Tamar

    2016-06-01

    While the genetic information is contained in double helical DNA, gene expression is a complex multilevel process that involves various functional units, from nucleosomes to fully formed chromatin fibers accompanied by a host of various chromatin binding enzymes. The chromatin fiber is a polymer composed of histone protein complexes upon which DNA wraps, like yarn upon many spools. The nature of chromatin structure has been an open question since the beginning of modern molecular biology. Many experiments have shown that the chromatin fiber is a highly dynamic entity with pronounced structural diversity that includes properties of idealized zig-zag and solenoid models, as well as other motifs. This diversity can produce a high packing ratio and thus inhibit access to a majority of the wound DNA. Despite much research, chromatin’s dynamic structure has not yet been fully described. Long stretches of chromatin fibers exhibit puzzling dynamic behavior that requires interpretation in the light of gene expression patterns in various tissue and organisms. The properties of chromatin fiber can be investigated with experimental techniques, like in vitro biochemistry, in vivo imagining, and high-throughput chromosome capture technology. Those techniques provide useful insights into the fiber’s structure and dynamics, but they are limited in resolution and scope, especially regarding compact fibers and chromosomes in the cellular milieu. Complementary but specialized modeling techniques are needed to handle large floppy polymers such as the chromatin fiber. In this review, we discuss current approaches in the chromatin structure field with an emphasis on modeling, such as molecular dynamics and coarse-grained computational approaches. Combinations of these computational techniques complement experiments and address many relevant biological problems, as we will illustrate with special focus on epigenetic modulation of chromatin structure.

  6. Reading Multimodal Texts: Perceptual, Structural and Ideological Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Serafini, Frank

    2010-01-01

    This article presents a tripartite framework for analyzing multimodal texts. The three analytical perspectives presented include: (1) perceptual, (2) structural, and (3) ideological analytical processes. Using Anthony Browne's picturebook "Piggybook" as an example, assertions are made regarding what each analytical perspective brings to the…

  7. Perspective-Taking in Structured and Unstructured Online Discussions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chadwick, Scott; Ralston, Ekaterina

    2010-01-01

    This study analyzes the extent to which students using web-based discussion boards show an increase in perspective-taking in structured and unstructured discussions. Messages from fifty-six students enrolled in one of two courses were content analyzed using Jarvela and Hakkinen's (2003) expansion of Selman's (1980) perspective-taking coding…

  8. Firefighter Hand Anthropometry and Structural Glove Sizing: A New Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Hsiao, Hongwei; Whitestone, Jennifer; Kau, Tsui-Ying; Hildreth, Brooke

    2015-01-01

    Objective We evaluated the current use and fit of structural firefighting gloves and developed an improved sizing scheme that better accommodates the U.S. firefighter population. Background Among surveys, 24% to 30% of men and 31% to 62% of women reported experiencing problems with the fit or bulkiness of their structural firefighting gloves. Method An age-, race/ethnicity-, and gender-stratified sample of 863 male and 88 female firefighters across the United States participated in the study. Fourteen hand dimensions relevant to glove design were measured. A cluster analysis of the hand dimensions was performed to explore options for an improved sizing scheme. Results The current national standard structural firefighting glove-sizing scheme underrepresents firefighter hand size range and shape variation. In addition, mismatch between existing sizing specifications and hand characteristics, such as hand dimensions, user selection of glove size, and the existing glove sizing specifications, is significant. An improved glove-sizing plan based on clusters of overall hand size and hand/finger breadth-to-length contrast has been developed. Conclusion This study presents the most up-to-date firefighter hand anthropometry and a new perspective on glove accommodation. The new seven-size system contains narrower variations (standard deviations) for almost all dimensions for each glove size than the current sizing practices. Application The proposed science-based sizing plan for structural firefighting gloves provides a step-forward perspective (i.e., including two women hand model–based sizes and two wide-palm sizes for men) for glove manufacturers to advance firefighter hand protection. PMID:26169309

  9. Sound absorption by subwavelength membrane structures: A geometric perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Min; Li, Yong; Meng, Chong; Fu, Caixing; Mei, Jun; Yang, Zhiyu; Sheng, Ping

    2015-12-01

    Decorated membranes comprising a thin layer of elastic film with small rigid platelets fixed on top have been found to be efficient absorbers of low-frequency sound. In this work we consider the problem of sound absorption from a perspective aimed at deriving upper bounds under different scenarios, i.e., whether the sound is incident from one side only or from both sides, and whether there is a reflecting surface on the back side of the membrane. By considering the negligible thickness of the membrane, usually on the order of a fraction of one millimeter, we derive a relation showing that the sum of the incoming sound waves' (complex) pressure amplitudes, averaged over the area of the membrane, must be equal to that of the outgoing waves. By using this relation, and without going to any details of the wave solutions, it is shown that the maximum absorption achievable from one-sided incidence is 50%, while the maximum absorption with a back-reflecting surface can reach 100%. The latter was attained by the hybridized resonances. All the results are shown to be in excellent agreement with the experiments. This generalized perspective, when used together with the Green function's formalism, can be useful in gaining insights into the constraints on what are achievable in scatterings and absorption by thin film structures and delineating them.

  10. Team-Based Complex Problem Solving: A Collective Cognition Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hung, Woei

    2013-01-01

    Today, much problem solving is performed by teams, rather than individuals. The complexity of these problems has exceeded the cognitive capacity of any individual and requires a team of members to solve them. The success of solving these complex problems not only relies on individual team members who possess different but complementary expertise,…

  11. Problem Solving in the School Curriculum from a Design Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toh, Tin Lam; Leong, Yew Hoong; Dindyal, Jaguthsing; Quek, Khiok Seng

    2010-01-01

    In this symposium, the participants discuss some preliminary data collected from their problem solving project which uses a design experiment approach. Their approach to problem solving in the school curriculum is in tandem with what Schoenfeld (2007) claimed: "Crafting instruction that would make a wide range of problem-solving strategies…

  12. Human pharmaceutical products in the environment - the "problem" in perspective.

    PubMed

    Taylor, David; Senac, Thomas

    2014-11-01

    Concerns about the potential for significant environmental impact from residues of human pharmaceuticals emerged at the beginning of the 21st century. Since then there has been an exponential rise in the number of publications and conferences on this "problem". However, this intense focus on human pharmaceuticals is misplaced. Pharmaceuticals do not consist of a coherent group of substances with similar chemical, structural, biological or toxicological properties. Pharmaceuticals are only identifiable from their use: in other words substances can be divided into two classes, those that are used as pharmaceuticals and those for which a possible pharmaceutical use has not yet been discovered. For example, nitro-glycerine, Warfarin and dimethyl fumarate, initially sold respectively as an explosive, a rodenticide and a mould inhibitor have subsequently all been used as pharmaceuticals. As analytical science advances, an increasing range of environmental contaminants, including pharmaceuticals, is being identified at sub μgL(-1) concentrations. Although, human and environmental exposure to these contaminants will be low, all of them need to be subjected to risk assessment on a case by case basis. Many of these substances, including human pharmaceuticals, may have little, if any, impact on human health or the environment, however for some substances there may be a significant risk and in these cases appropriate action should be taken. However considering all human pharmaceuticals as a special case, isolated from the wider range of emerging contaminants, is scientifically unjustifiable and diverts resources away from the consideration of other substances that may be of considerably more significance.

  13. The Perspective Structure of Visual Space.

    PubMed

    Erkelens, Casper J

    2015-10-01

    Luneburg's model has been the reference for experimental studies of visual space for almost seventy years. His claim for a curved visual space has been a source of inspiration for visual scientists as well as philosophers. The conclusion of many experimental studies has been that Luneburg's model does not describe visual space in various tasks and conditions. Remarkably, no alternative model has been suggested. The current study explores perspective transformations of Euclidean space as a model for visual space. Computations show that the geometry of perspective spaces is considerably different from that of Euclidean space. Collinearity but not parallelism is preserved in perspective space and angles are not invariant under translation and rotation. Similar relationships have shown to be properties of visual space. Alley experiments performed early in the nineteenth century have been instrumental in hypothesizing curved visual spaces. Alleys were computed in perspective space and compared with reconstructed alleys of Blumenfeld. Parallel alleys were accurately described by perspective geometry. Accurate distance alleys were derived from parallel alleys by adjusting the interstimulus distances according to the size-distance invariance hypothesis. Agreement between computed and experimental alleys and accommodation of experimental results that rejected Luneburg's model show that perspective space is an appropriate model for how we perceive orientations and angles. The model is also appropriate for perceived distance ratios between stimuli but fails to predict perceived distances.

  14. Triumph or Triage? The World Food Problem in Geographical Perspective. Resource Paper No. 75-3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knight, C. Gregory; Wilcox, R. Paul

    Emphasizing a problem-solving perspective, the document investigates the world food scene. Simply defined, the world food problem is the apparent inability of the world's people to feed themselves adequately and consistently. Intended for use by college level geography instructors as they develop courses on human uses of the environment, the…

  15. Perspectives of Disciplinary Problems and Practices in Elementary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huger Marsh, Darlene P.

    2012-01-01

    Ill-discipline in public schools predates compulsory education in the United States. Disciplinary policies and laws enacted to combat the problem have met with minimal success. Research and recommendations have generally focused on the indiscipline problems ubiquitous in intermediate, junior and senior high schools. However, similar misbehaviors…

  16. Problem-Based Learning: A Critical Rationalist Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parton, Graham; Bailey, Richard

    2008-01-01

    Although problem-based learning is being adopted by many institutions around the world as an effective model of learning in higher education, there is a surprising lack of critique in the problem-based learning literature in relation to its philosophical characteristics. This paper explores epistemology as a starting point for investigating the…

  17. Problems and Opportunities in School Financial Management: A Consultant's Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chabotar, Kent John

    1987-01-01

    Summarizes major problems in school financial management and suggests practical improvements to aid external reporting of financial data and internal management. Sections of the article describe these categories of problems: (1) budget presentation; (2) management control; (3) cost accounting; and (4) financial reporting. (PS)

  18. Dyscalculia and Other Learning Problems in Arithmetic: A Historical Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharma, Mahesh C.

    1986-01-01

    Evidence on learning problems due to dyscalculia is surveyed. Definitions, factors responsible for dyscalculia, split-brain research and hemispheric roles, mathematics learning problems and personality, materials for instruction, and levels of knowing mathematics are among the topics discussed with an extensive list of references. (MNS)

  19. Effects of Exposure to Microwaves: Problems and Perspectives*

    PubMed Central

    Michaelson, Sol M.

    1974-01-01

    During the last 25 years, there has been a remarkable development and increase in the number of processes and devices that utilize or emit microwaves. Such devices are used in all sectors of our society for military, industrial, telecommunications, and consumer applications. Although there is information on biologic effects and potential hazard to man from exposure to microwaves, considerable confusion and misinformation has permeated not only the public press but also some scientific and technical publications. The purpose of this review is to place the available information on biologic effects of microwaves in proper perspective and to suggest approaches to future studies. PMID:4620329

  20. Melt Structure and Properties: a Spectroscopic Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stebbins, J.

    2006-12-01

    Entropy, volume, and their P/T derivatives are at the heart of models of the thermodynamics of silicate melts and magmas. Quantitative characterization of glass structure is leading to important new insights into the links from "Microscopic to Macroscopic" that can at least guide interpretations of data and in some cases even have predictive power. A few recent examples will be discussed here. The often-large configurational components to heat capacities, thermal expansivities, and compressibilities of melts strongly indicate that structural changes with temperature and pressure are of key importance. At least some aspects of thermal increases in configurational (as opposed to vibrational) disorder are amenable to spectroscopic detection, either with in situ methods or on glasses with varying quench rates and thus varying fictive temperatures. In some systems, such changes are now clear, and can be shown to make significant contributions to properties. These include network cation coordination in systems such as borate liquids (BO4 to BO3 at higher T), and Al-Si disordering in aluminosilicates. In general, however, progress in this rich problem has only begun. It has long been suspected from thermodynamic analyses (and theoretical simulations) that configurational changes in melts play a key role in volume compression at high pressure, over and above that which can be expressed in "normal" equations of state or from those expected from bond compression and bending. Scattering and spectroscopic studies have revealed some of the important aspects of pressure-induced structural changes, but again we are just at the beginning of full understanding. For example, binary silicate glasses quenched from high-P melts clearly record some systematic increases in Si coordination, while aluminosilicates record systematic pressure and compositional (modifier cation field strength) effects on Al coordination in recovered samples with large, quenched-in density increases

  1. Acoustic-structure interaction problems. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Love, E.; Taylor, R.L.

    1993-12-01

    The purpose of this report is to compare and evaluate different numerical methods for solving problems of interaction between elastic solids and acoustic fluids. In particular, we concentrate our efforts on solution techniques involving the finite element method. To that end, in Chapter 2 we discuss different options for analysis of infinite fluids. In particular, the method of mesh trunction and the use of radiation elements and the use of infinite elements are discussed. Also discussed is the analysis of scattering from rigid boundaries. Chapter 3 is a brief discussion of finite element formulations for elastic solids. We review the development, of two dimensional plane strain elements and one dimensional plate and shell elements. In Chapter 4, there is a discussion of the method used to couple the solid and the fluid. We give examples for solution of scattering of pressure waves from thin elastic shell structures. Chapter 5 is a brief conclusion of results and includes recommendations for the best methods of solution and additional research.

  2. Marital Jealousy: A Structural Exchange Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonald, Gerald W.

    Although the experience of jealously is among the most common of experiences in intimate relationships, little theoretical or empirical work has been done from a sociologial perspective to increase our understanding of this aspect of male-female relationships. An investigation of marital jealousy as a sociological rather than a psychological…

  3. Child maltreatment, parent alcohol and drug-related problems, polydrug problems, and parenting practices: a test of gender differences and four theoretical perspectives.

    PubMed

    Locke, Thomas F; Newcomb, Michael

    2004-03-01

    The authors tested how adverse childhood experiences (child maltreatment and parent alcohol- and drug-related problems) and adult polydrug use (as a mediator) predict poor parenting in a community sample (237 mothers and 81 fathers). These relationships were framed within several theoretical perspectives, including observational learning, impaired functioning, self-medication, and parentification-pseudomaturity. Structural models revealed that child maltreatment predicted poor parenting practices among mothers. Parent alcohol- and drug-related problems had an indirect detrimental influence on mothers' parenting and practices through self-drug problems. Among fathers, emotional neglect experienced as a child predicted lack of parental warmth more parental neglect, and sexual abuse experienced as a child predicted a rejecting style of parenting.

  4. Adolescent Health Problems: Behavioral Perspectives. Advances in Pediatric Psychology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallander, Jan L., Ed.; Siegel, Lawrence J., Ed.

    This book examines the relationship between adolescent risk-taking behaviors and health. The health-related problems of adolescents frequently are manifestations of social, economic, or behavioral factors. Following an overview (Siegal), the chapters in the first section of the book explore general and conceptual issues: (1) "Epidemiology of…

  5. The Problem of Underqualified Teachers: A Sociological Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ingersoll, Richard M.

    2005-01-01

    Few educational problems have received more attention than has the failure to ensure that the nation's classrooms are staffed by qualified teachers. Many states have pushed for more-rigorous preservice teacher education, training, and certification standards. Moreover, a host of recruitment initiatives have attempted to increase the supply of…

  6. How Problem Solving Can Develop an Algebraic Perspective of Mathematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Windsor, Will

    2011-01-01

    SProblem solving has a long and successful history in mathematics education and is valued by many teachers as a way to engage and facilitate learning within their classrooms. The potential benefit for using problem solving in the development of algebraic thinking is that "it may broaden and develop students' mathematical thinking beyond the…

  7. A Neuropsychological Perspective on Attention Problems in Neurofibromatosis Type 1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Templer, Alexandra K.; Titus, Jeffrey B.; Gutmann, David H.

    2013-01-01

    Cognitive problems are common in children with neurofibromatosis type 1 and they can often complicate treatment. The current literature review examines cognitive functioning in neurofibromatosis type 1, with a specific focus on executive functioning. This includes exploration of how deficits in executive functioning are expressed in children with…

  8. Constructive field theory and applications: Perspectives and open problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivasseau, V.

    2000-06-01

    In this paper we review many interesting open problems in mathematical physics which may be attacked with the help of tools from constructive field theory. They could give work for future mathematical physicists trained with constructive methods well into the 21st century.

  9. A Historical Perspective on Problems in Botany Teaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hershey, David R.

    1996-01-01

    Discusses how the many problems in botany teaching are interrelated and most have existed since at least the early 1900s. Considers botany teaching at both the precollege and introductory college levels. Discusses botany neglect in biology teaching, botanical illiteracy, uninteresting or irrelevant botany teaching, zoochauvinism, research…

  10. New Perspectives on Contingency Corps Force Structure

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-04-15

    documnent mazy not bd reead f01 open POISIlcAtif 020 it has been deand by te Wrptiflts na mIits Ofcea gov~erntment Mpfcy. NEW PERSPECTIVES ON...would then be feasible without the previous layers of traditional infrastructure.6 Airborne, air-assault, mechanized , armor, or light infantry...responsibility (AOR) within the past two years. Force projection offers our President an effective instrument of national power. The recent successes by these

  11. Structural Learning Theory: Current Status and New Perspectives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scandura, Joseph M.

    2001-01-01

    Presents the current status and new perspectives on the Structured Learning Theory (SLT), with special consideration given to how SLT has been influenced by recent research in software engineering. Topics include theoretical constructs; content domains; structural analysis; cognition; assessing behavior potential; and teaching and learning issues,…

  12. Modelling Ill-Structured Problem Solving with Schema Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nagy, Philip

    This study assesses the ability of schema theory to address ill-structured problems without becoming unwieldy. Prior to addressing the study proper, the paper reviews the literature on memory for complex phenomena, ill-structured problems, expert-novice differences, administration as problem solving, and assessment of complex learning outcomes.…

  13. Pre-Service Teachers' Free and Structured Mathematical Problem Posing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silber, Steven; Cai, Jinfa

    2017-01-01

    This exploratory study examined how pre-service teachers (PSTs) pose mathematical problems for free and structured mathematical problem-posing conditions. It was hypothesized that PSTs would pose more complex mathematical problems under structured posing conditions, with increasing levels of complexity, than PSTs would pose under free posing…

  14. Perspective on Microfluidic Cell Separation: A Solved Problem?

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The purification and sorting of cells using microfluidic methodologies has been a remarkably active area of research over the past decade. Much of the scientific and technological work associated with microfluidic cell separation has been driven by needs in clinical diagnostics and therapeutic monitoring, most notably in the context of circulating tumor cells. The last several years have seen advances in a broad range of separation modalities ranging from miniaturized analogs of established techniques such as fluorescence- and magnetic-activated cell sorting (FACS and MACS, respectively), to more specialized approaches based on affinity, dielectrophoretic mobility, and inertial properties of cells. With several of these technologies nearing commercialization, there is a sense that the field of microfluidic cell separation has achieved a high level of maturity over an unusually short span of time. In this Perspective, we set the stage by describing major scientific and technological advances in this field and ask what the future holds. While many scientific questions remain unanswered and new compelling questions will undoubtedly arise, the relative maturity of this field poses some unique challenges. PMID:25350696

  15. Protein aggregate spreading in neurodegenerative diseases: Problems and perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung-Jae; Lim, Hee-Sun; Masliah, Eliezer; Lee, He-Jin

    2014-01-01

    Progressive accumulation of specific protein aggregates is a defining feature of many major neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, fronto-temporal dementia, Huntington’s disease, and Creutzfeldt–Jakob disease (CJD). Findings from several recent studies have suggested that aggregation-prone proteins, such as tau, α-synuclein, polyglutamine-containing proteins, and amyloid-β, can spread to other cells and brain regions, a phenomenon considered unique to prion disorders, such as CJD and bovine spongiform encephalopathy. Cell-to-cell propagation of protein aggregates may be the general underlying principle for progressive deterioration of neurodegenerative diseases. This may also have significant implications in cell replacement therapies, as evidenced by the propagation of α-synuclein aggregates from host to grafted cells in long-term transplants in Parkinson’s patients. Here, we review recent progress in protein aggregate propagation in experimental model systems and discuss outstanding questions and future perspectives. Understanding the mechanisms of this pathological spreading may open the way to unique opportunities for development of diagnostic techniques and novel therapies for protein misfolding-associated neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:21624403

  16. [New perspectives for an old problem: premature labor].

    PubMed

    Barrón Vallejo, J; Kably Ambe, A; Limón Luque, L; Barroso Villa, G; Jurado Jurado, M; Blank Goldenberg, C

    1997-08-01

    Preterm birth has been and continues to be one of the most serious problems in Obstetrics. It is the most common cause of neonatal death, and morbidity in surviving infants. The presence of bacterial vaginosis, and other genital infections is associated with increased risk of preterm labor. Cytokines promote the release of prostaglandin, and have been implicated as cause of uterina activity. Recently, new methods of detection as transvaginal ultrasonography, and measures of cervical fetal fibronectin have been acclaimed as useful to detect the problem. Atosiban, cytokines, glyceril trinitrate, and many others agents have been proposed as treatments and are under investigation. Such drugs, will allow an effective management of preterm labor with lower side effects. Antenatal TRH administration cannot be recommended for widespread clinical use. However, the antenatal administration of corticosteroids to fetuses at risk of preterm delivery include not only a reduction in the risk of respiratory distress syndrome but also a significative reduction in intraventricular hemorrhage mortality.

  17. Searching for hard instances of CVP problem-cryptographic perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pardyak, Jacek

    2008-01-01

    Lattice is regular arrangement of points in R n. The Closest Vector Problem (CVP) is defined as follow: given a point y in Rn and a lattice basis B find lattice vector Bx closest to y . The CVP problem is believed to be computationally intractable in average. Here we propose a new way to generate hard instances of CVP and a method that allows us to construct a cryptographic trapdoor function based on it. We start with brief introduction to lattices. Next we present a very natural application of lattices in cryptography, i.e. GGH cryptosystem and the way the system was broken. Finally we present our modifications way to generate hard instances of CVP, harder than previously proposed in GGH.

  18. JOSPT Perspectives for Patients. Concussions: an underdiagnosed problem for athletes?

    PubMed

    2012-07-01

    Ignoring symptoms of a concussion and continuing to play after receiving a blow or jolt to the head can be dangerous, make symptoms worse, and delay recovery. Repeated concussions can lead to a longer recovery and may result in long-term problems. Screening tools include checklists of symptoms or quick tests that can help detect a concussion. A study published in the July 2012 issue of used these screening tools to measure changes in player function both before and after a football season.

  19. Preventive Intervention for Early Childhood Behavioral Problems: An Ecological Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Shepard, Stephanie A.; Dickstein, Susan

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to highlight the importance of preventive interventions targeting parents when addressing early childhood behavior problems. We briefly review evidence-based parent management training programs (PMT), focusing on one particular program, the Incredible Years Series (IY). Next, we discuss the barriers to embedding evidence-based practice like IY in community contexts, and demonstrate how early childhood mental health consultation can be used to enhance community capacity to adopt evidence-based practice and improve outcomes for the large number of young children and their families in need. PMID:19486845

  20. Bioinformatics education dissemination with an evolutionary problem solving perspective.

    PubMed

    Jungck, John R; Donovan, Samuel S; Weisstein, Anton E; Khiripet, Noppadon; Everse, Stephen J

    2010-11-01

    Bioinformatics is central to biology education in the 21st century. With the generation of terabytes of data per day, the application of computer-based tools to stored and distributed data is fundamentally changing research and its application to problems in medicine, agriculture, conservation and forensics. In light of this 'information revolution,' undergraduate biology curricula must be redesigned to prepare the next generation of informed citizens as well as those who will pursue careers in the life sciences. The BEDROCK initiative (Bioinformatics Education Dissemination: Reaching Out, Connecting and Knitting together) has fostered an international community of bioinformatics educators. The initiative's goals are to: (i) Identify and support faculty who can take leadership roles in bioinformatics education; (ii) Highlight and distribute innovative approaches to incorporating evolutionary bioinformatics data and techniques throughout undergraduate education; (iii) Establish mechanisms for the broad dissemination of bioinformatics resource materials and teaching models; (iv) Emphasize phylogenetic thinking and problem solving; and (v) Develop and publish new software tools to help students develop and test evolutionary hypotheses. Since 2002, BEDROCK has offered more than 50 faculty workshops around the world, published many resources and supported an environment for developing and sharing bioinformatics education approaches. The BEDROCK initiative builds on the established pedagogical philosophy and academic community of the BioQUEST Curriculum Consortium to assemble the diverse intellectual and human resources required to sustain an international reform effort in undergraduate bioinformatics education.

  1. Problem-Based Learning in a Physical Therapy Program and Subsequent Clinical Practice: The Practitioners' Perspectives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Stanley H.; Gallagher, Jo D.; Elbaum, Leonard; Smith, Douglas H.

    This study examined the perspectives of three graduates of a problem-based learning (PBL) physical therapy (PT) program about their clinical practice. Researchers used qualitative methods of observation, interview, and journaling to gather the data. Three sessions of audiotaped interviews and two observation sessions were conducted with the three…

  2. Inclusion Strategies for Students with Learning and Behavior Problems: Perspectives, Experiences, and Best Practices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zionts, Paul, Ed.

    This book presents discussions of the practical implementation of inclusion principles with students having learning and/or behavioral problems and disorders. The chapters, arranged under two topical units, "Perspectives and Experiences" and "Best Practices" are: (1) "Inclusion: Chasing the Impossible Dream? Maybe"…

  3. Learner Perspectives of Online Problem-Based Learning and Applications from Cognitive Load Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Ruth

    2016-01-01

    Problem-based learning (PBL) courses have historically been situated in physical classrooms involving in-person interactions. As online learning is embraced in higher education, programs that use PBL can integrate online platforms to support curriculum delivery and facilitate student engagement. This report describes student perspectives of the…

  4. International Perspectives on Problem-Based Learning: Contexts, Cultures, Challenges, and Adaptations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hmelo-Silver, Cindy E.

    2012-01-01

    The theme of this special issue is timely as the world becomes increasingly flat and globally connected (Friedman, 2007). By focusing on an international perspective in problem-based learning (PBL), it puts culture squarely in the center, whether it is a national or disciplinary culture. The articles in this special issue represent Thailand, South…

  5. The Problems of "Competence" and Alternatives from the Scandinavian Perspective of "Bildung"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willbergh, Ilmi

    2015-01-01

    The paper aims to show how competence as an educational concept for the 21st century is struggling with theoretical problems for which the concept of "Bildung" in the European tradition can offer alternatives, and to discuss the possibility of developing a sustainable educational concept from the perspectives of competence and…

  6. Using Ontological Engineering to Overcome AI-ED Problems: Contribution, Impact and Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mizoguchi, Riichiro; Bourdeau, Jacqueline

    2016-01-01

    This article reflects on the ontology engineering methodology discussed by the paper entitled "Using Ontological Engineering to Overcome AI-ED Problems" published in this journal in 2000. We discuss the achievements obtained in the last 10 years, the impact of our work as well as recent trends and perspectives in ontology engineering for…

  7. Developing My Perspectives on Scaffolding and Problem-Based Learning: A Retrospective View

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belland, Brian R.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, I describe the iterative development of my perspectives on scaffolding and problem-based learning through interactions with other scholars and research. Such influences include doctoral experiences, funded projects, and exposures to research from a variety of traditions.

  8. Heuristic Research: A New Perspective on Ethics and Problems in Adult Education Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beckstrom, Edward S.

    1993-01-01

    Heuristic research is a highly autobiographical investigation of one's experience with a question or problem. This article examines the basic concepts and processes of heuristic research (in adult education), including self-dialog, tacit knowing, inverted perspective, intuition, indwelling, and focusing. Heuristic research design phases involve…

  9. Discovering the structure of mathematical problem solving.

    PubMed

    Anderson, John R; Lee, Hee Seung; Fincham, Jon M

    2014-08-15

    The goal of this research is to discover the stages of mathematical problem solving, the factors that influence the duration of these stages, and how these stages are related to the learning of a new mathematical competence. Using a combination of multivariate pattern analysis (MVPA) and hidden Markov models (HMM), we found that participants went through 5 major phases in solving a class of problems: A Define Phase where they identified the problem to be solved, an Encode Phase where they encoded the needed information, a Compute Phase where they performed the necessary arithmetic calculations, a Transform Phase where they performed any mathematical transformations, and a Respond Phase where they entered an answer. The Define Phase is characterized by activity in visual attention and default network regions, the Encode Phase by activity in visual regions, the Compute Phase by activity in regions active in mathematical tasks, the Transform Phase by activity in mathematical and response regions, and the Respond phase by activity in motor regions. The duration of the Compute and Transform Phases were the only ones that varied with condition. Two features distinguished the mastery trials on which participants came to understand a new problem type. First, the duration of late phases of the problem solution increased. Second, there was increased activation in the rostrolateral prefrontal cortex (RLPFC) and angular gyrus (AG), regions associated with metacognition. This indicates the importance of reflection to successful learning.

  10. Problem-based learning in medical school: A student's perspective.

    PubMed

    Chang, Bliss J

    2016-12-01

    Problem-based learning (PBL) has been a concept in existence for decades yet its implementation in medical student education is limited. Considering the nature of a physician's work, PBL is a logical step towards developing students' abilities to synthesize and integrate foundational concepts into clinical medicine. Harvard's recently redesigned Pathways curriculum has shifted almost exclusively towards PBL in its one-year preclinical curriculum. This piece provides my thoughts, both derived from my own reflections as well as conversations and observations of my peers, on the effectiveness, advantages, and disadvantages of a PBL curriculum. All in all, the feelings of my peers and I regarding PBL has been overwhelmingly positive despite potential areas of improvement and continued fine-tuning.

  11. Conceptual Structures in Mathematical Problem Solving.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cifarelli, Victor

    The processes by which conceptual knowledge is constructed during mathematical problem solving were studied, focusing on the cognitive activity of learners (i.e., the ways they elaborate, reorganize, and reconceptualize their solution activity). Underlying this research is the view that learners' mathematical conceptions evolve from their activity…

  12. On some structure-turbulence interaction problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maekawa, S.; Lin, Y. K.

    1976-01-01

    The interactions between a turbulent flow structure; responding to its excitation were studied. The turbulence was typical of those associated with a boundary layer, having a cross-spectral density indicative of convection and statistical decay. A number of structural models were considered. Among the one-dimensional models were an unsupported infinite beam and a periodically supported infinite beam. The fuselage construction of an aircraft was then considered. For the two-dimensional case a simple membrane was used to illustrate the type of formulation applicable to most two-dimensional structures. Both the one-dimensional and two-dimensional structures studied were backed by a cavity filled with an initially quiescent fluid to simulate the acoustic environment when the structure forms one side of a cabin of a sea vessel or aircraft.

  13. [Health system in Afghanistan: problems and institutional perspectives].

    PubMed

    Lejars, M

    2008-10-01

    Afghanistan has been ravaged by years of conflict. To provide emergency services and restore access health services, the Public Health Ministry with the assistance of partners developed first a package of basic health services delivered by NGO contractors and second a package of essential hospital services. The Ministry's role consists of providing guidance. To reduce the many issues and problems affecting this role, reforms are now being undertaken and a new national health care strategy is being developed within the framework of the National Development Strategy. An institution-building project has been initiated with European Union funding to allow the Health Ministry to carry out its stewardship and management functions with greater effectiveness and transparency. This project is essential for the successful outcome of all future strategies and programs planned by the Health Ministry to enhance its institutional effectiveness. The objectives of this project are to strengthen planning and auditing activities, promote quality assurance, implement funding mechanisms for health-related activities, organize management of human resources, maintain ongoing efforts to reform the administration and fight against corruption, and lay the foundations for managing finances and procurement. The scope of this project underlines the importance of its outcome. However the institution-building process will be long and constantly threatened by political instability and insecurity.

  14. Problem-Based Learning Research in Anesthesia Teaching: Current Status and Future Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Chilkoti, G.; Mohta, M.; Wadhwa, R.; Saxena, A. K.

    2014-01-01

    The teaching curriculum in anesthesia involves traditional teaching methods like topic-based didactic lectures, seminars, and journal clubs; intraoperative apprenticeship; and problem-based learning (PBL) and simulation. The advantages of incorporating PBL in anesthesia teaching include development of skills like clinical reasoning, critical thinking, and self-directed learning; in addition it also helps in developing a broader perspective of case scenarios. The present paper discusses the characteristics, key elements, and goals of PBL; various PBL methods available; lacunae in the existing knowledge of PBL research; its current status and future perspectives in anesthesia teaching. PMID:24982673

  15. Structural Learning Theory: Current Status and New Perspectives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scandura, Joseph M.

    This paper discusses the current status of and new perspectives on the Structural Learning Theory (SLT). Special consideration is given to how SLT has been influenced by recent research in software engineering, and the range of possibilities it opens for instructional research and practice in the 21st century. Starting with fundamental precepts of…

  16. Perspective view. Fivestory reinforced concrete factory building reveals the structural ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Perspective view. Five-story reinforced concrete factory building reveals the structural frame on the exterior of the facade. Twelve bay facade facing onto Clay Avenue (north facade) has first floor openings bricked up. Mix of typical factory windows and glass block windows fill the majority of the openings on the rest of building - Russell Industrial Center, 1600 Clay Avenue, Detroit, MI

  17. Perspectives on communication problems in the English-speaking Caribbean.

    PubMed

    Okwesa, B A

    1984-03-01

    The Caribbean is experiencing a host of serious socioeconomic problems that prevent the majority of the population from realizing and maintaining a satisfactory standard of living. Food and Nutrition Surveys of some countries identified a lack of information on health, food, and nutrition as a primary reason for the prevalence of malnutrition, infectious diseases, and nutrition related diseases. "Misinformation" creates an often insurmountable barrier to effective communication between source and receiver, in this case the health, food, and nutrition sector and the wider community. Misinformation occurs when the message is either incorrect, incomplete, inconsistent with other messages in the same program, or contradictory. This element of "misinformation" can negate the effectiveness of the message and an entire communication program. Some examples are cited which show that in programs aimed at effecting change in attitude or behavior it is essential to ensure that messages are clearly communicated to avoid misunderstanding and the right infrastructure is in place for the innovation proposed by the message to be carried out. In the Jamaica Nutrition Education Program (JNEP) were used to communicate the messages. Evaluation revealed that health staff were providing incorrect and contradictory advice about breastfeeding, which showed that they lacked basic information on the subject. In Barbados, despite an intensified health education campaign, face to face instruction in the clinics, and extensive use of the Caribbean Food and Nutrition Institute (CFNI) Breastfeeding Package as well as other locally developed materials, a marked decline in breastfeeding was recorded over the 1969-81 survey period. Misinformation and misunderstanding among mothers were identified as the key reasons for the failure of breastfeeding. In relation to the decline in breaastfeeding and incorrect weaning practices, mass media was implicated as luring mothers away from natural feeding

  18. Water quality objectives for mixtures of toxic chemicals: problems and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Vighi, M; Altenburger, R; Arrhenius, A; Backhaus, T; Bödeker, W; Blanck, H; Consolaro, F; Faust, M; Finizio, A; Froehner, K; Gramatica, P; Grimme, L H; Grönvall, F; Hamer, V; Scholze, M; Walter, H

    2003-02-01

    The need to develop water quality objectives not only for single substances but also for mixtures of chemicals seems evident. For that purpose, the conceptual basis could be the use of the two existing biometric models: concentration addition (CA) and independent action (IA), which is also called response addition. Both may allow calculation of the toxicity of mixtures of chemicals with similar modes of action (CA) or dissimilar modes of action (IA), respectively. The joint research project Prediction and Assessment of the Aquatic Toxicity of Mixtures of Chemicals (PREDICT) within the framework of the IVth Environment and Climate Programme of the European Commission, provided the opportunity to address (a) chemometric and QSAR criteria to classify substances as supposedly similarly or dissimilarly acting; (b) the predictive values of both models for the toxicity of mixtures at low, statistically nonsignificant effect concentrations of the individual components; and (c) the predictability of mixture toxicity at higher levels of biological complexity. In this article, the general outline, methodological approach, and some preliminary findings of PREDICT are presented. A procedure for classifying chemicals in relation to their structural and toxicological similarities has been developed. The predictive capabilities of CA and IA models have been demonstrated for single species and, to some extent, for multispecies testing. The role of very low effect concentrations in multiple mixtures has been evaluated. Problems and perspectives concerning the development of water quality objectives for mixtures are discussed.

  19. A Topological Perspective of Neural Network Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sizemore, Ann; Giusti, Chad; Cieslak, Matthew; Grafton, Scott; Bassett, Danielle

    The wiring patterns of white matter tracts between brain regions inform functional capabilities of the neural network. Indeed, densely connected and cyclically arranged cognitive systems may communicate and thus perform distinctly. However, previously employed graph theoretical statistics are local in nature and thus insensitive to such global structure. Here we present an investigation of the structural neural network in eight healthy individuals using persistent homology. An extension of homology to weighted networks, persistent homology records both circuits and cliques (all-to-all connected subgraphs) through a repetitive thresholding process, thus perceiving structural motifs. We report structural features found across patients and discuss brain regions responsible for these patterns, finally considering the implications of such motifs in relation to cognitive function.

  20. Interface Problems: Structural Constraints on Interpretation?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frazier, Lyn; Clifton, Charles; Rayner, Keith; Deevy, Patricia; Koh, Sungryong; Bader, Markus

    2005-01-01

    Five experiments investigated the interpretation of quantified noun phrases in relation to discourse structure. They demonstrated, using questionnaire and on-line reading techniques, that readers in English prefer to give a quantified noun phrase in (VP-external) subject position a presuppositional interpretation, in which the noun phrase limits…

  1. Solving Fluid Structure Interaction Problems with an Immersed Boundary Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barad, Michael F.; Brehm, Christoph; Kiris, Cetin C.

    2016-01-01

    An immersed boundary method for the compressible Navier-Stokes equations can be used for moving boundary problems as well as fully coupled fluid-structure interaction is presented. The underlying Cartesian immersed boundary method of the Launch Ascent and Vehicle Aerodynamics (LAVA) framework, based on the locally stabilized immersed boundary method previously presented by the authors, is extended to account for unsteady boundary motion and coupled to linear and geometrically nonlinear structural finite element solvers. The approach is validated for moving boundary problems with prescribed body motion and fully coupled fluid structure interaction problems. Keywords: Immersed Boundary Method, Higher-Order Finite Difference Method, Fluid Structure Interaction.

  2. Conceptualizing international labor migration: a structuration perspective.

    PubMed

    Goss, J D; Lindquist, B

    1995-01-01

    "This article applies the theory of structuration to international labor migration using case study material from the Philippines. It first provides a brief review of the functional and structural approaches to understanding labor migration and the theoretical impasse that has been created between them. It then reviews several attempts to resolve this impasse, including systems and networks approaches; these solutions are rejected on theoretical and empirical grounds. We suggest that migrant institutions may be a more appropriate mid-level concept than households or social networks to articulate various levels of analysis. We develop this concept in the context of the structuration theory of Anthony Giddens and attempt to apply this to the Philippines, concluding that this framework is eminently suited for further research on international labor migration."

  3. New perspectives on the Popigai impact structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garvin, J. B.; Deino, A. L.

    1992-01-01

    The record of large-scale cratering on Earth is scant, and the only currently 'proven' 100-km-class impact structure known to have formed within the Cenozoic is Popigai, located in the Siberian Arctic at 71.5 deg N, 111 deg E. Popigai is clearly a multiringed impact basin formed within the crystalline shield rocks (Anabar) and platform sediments of the Siberian taiga, and estimates of the volume of preserved impact melt typically exceed 1700 cu km, which is within a factor of 2-3 of what would be predicted using scaling relationships. We present the preliminary results of an analysis of the present-day topography of the Popigai structure, together with refined absolute age estimates, in order to reconstruct the pre-erosional morphology of the basin, as well as to quantify the erosion or sediment infill rates in the Popigai region.

  4. Human sulfatases: a structural perspective to catalysis.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, D

    2007-08-01

    The sulfatase family of enzymes catalyzes hydrolysis of sulfate ester bonds of a wide variety of substrates. Seventeen genes have been identified in this class of sulfatases, many of which are associated with genetic disorders leading to reduction or loss of function of the corresponding enzymes. Amino acid sequence homology suggests that the enzymes have similar overall folds, mechanisms of action, and bivalent metal ion-binding sites. A catalytic cysteine residue, strictly conserved in prokaryotic and eukaryotic sulfatases, is post-translationally modified into a formylglycine. Hydroxylation of the formylglycine residue by a water molecule forming the activated hydroxylformylglycine (a formylglycine hydrate or a gem-diol) is a necessary step for the enzyme's sulfatase activity. Crystal structures of three human sulfatases, arylsulfatases A and B(ARSA and ARSB), and estrone/dehydroepiandrosterone sulfatase or steroid sulfatase (STS), also known as arylsulfatase C, have been determined. While ARSA and ARSB are water-soluble enzymes, STS has a hydrophobic domain and is an integral membrane protein of the endoplasmic reticulum. In this article, we compare and contrast sulfatase structures and revisit the proposed catalytic mechanism in light of available structural and functional data. Examination of the STS active site reveals substrate-specific interactions previously identified as the estrogen-recognition motif. Because of the proximity of the catalytic cleft of STS to the membrane surface, the lipid bilayer has a critical role in the constitution of the active site, unlike other sulfatases.

  5. [Individuals and their peers: a structural perspective].

    PubMed

    Schäfer, Mechthild; von Salisch, Maria

    2013-01-01

    Peer relationships are diverse in the sense that their degree of obligation, their intensity, their stability and even their number of participants vary. At the same time they have effects on the intraindividual and interindividual development of children and adolescents who tend to value them highly. Sociometric peer nominations provide one way of describing the complexity of peer relationships and of analyzing their various determinants. Peers are sources of information in the context of a defined system like a classroom in school. The consistency of this information (how many children like A and how many children like B), its reciprocity, and its stability are structural parameters that--in concert with other psychological constructs--may provide valuable cues and predictions about the optimal conditions for a positive peer socialization. The present article attempts to use these structural elements as the point of departure by navigating through the complexity, in order to delineate existing knowledge before the background of open questions and important question marks.

  6. Interface problems: Structural constraints on interpretation?

    PubMed Central

    Frazier, Lyn; Clifton, Charles; Rayner, Keith; Deevy, Patricia; Koh, Sungryong; Bader, Markus

    2006-01-01

    Five experiments investigated the interpretation of quantified noun phrases in relation to discourse structure. They demonstrated, using questionnaire and on-line reading techniques, that readers in English prefer to give a quantified noun phrase in (VP-external) subject position a presuppositional interpretation, in which the noun phrase limits or restricts the interpretation of an already available set, rather than giving it a nonpresuppositional or existential interpretation, in which it introduces completely new entities into the discourse. Experiment 1 showed that readers prefer a presuppositional interpretation of three ships over the existential interpretation in Five ships appeared on the horizon. Three ships sank. Experiment 2 showed longer reading times in sentences that are disambiguated toward the existential interpretation than in sentences that permit the presuppositional interpretation. Experiment 3 suggested that the presuppositional preference is greater when the phrase three ships occurs outside the verb phrase than when it occurs inside the verb phrase. Experiment 4 showed that Korean subjects marked with a topic marker received more presuppositional interpretations than subjects marked with a nominative marker. Experiment 5 showed that German subjects in VP-external (but nontopic) position received more presuppositional interpretations than VP-internal subjects. The results suggest the syntactic position of a phrase is one determinant of its interpretation, as expected according to the mapping hypothesis of Diesing (1990). PMID:16050443

  7. Model Structure Determination and Identifiability Problems in System Identification.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    System identification has become one of the most active areas in system theory and its applications. In many engineering applications where the...estimation. As the authors extend the concept of system identification to those classes of problems where prior knowledge on structure is limited, some...basic problems other than parameter estimation become important. System identification consists of three basic sub-problems: (1) pre-estimation

  8. Structural qualia: a solution to the hard problem of consciousness

    PubMed Central

    Loorits, Kristjan

    2014-01-01

    The hard problem of consciousness has been often claimed to be unsolvable by the methods of traditional empirical sciences. It has been argued that all the objects of empirical sciences can be fully analyzed in structural terms but that consciousness is (or has) something over and above its structure. However, modern neuroscience has introduced a theoretical framework in which also the apparently non-structural aspects of consciousness, namely the so called qualia or qualitative properties, can be analyzed in structural terms. That framework allows us to see qualia as something compositional with internal structures that fully determine their qualitative nature. Moreover, those internal structures can be identified which certain neural patterns. Thus consciousness as a whole can be seen as a complex neural pattern that misperceives some of its own highly complex structural properties as monadic and qualitative. Such neural pattern is analyzable in fully structural terms and thereby the hard problem is solved. PMID:24672510

  9. Center of Gravity within the Ill-Structured Problem

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-05-04

    the Army, TRADOC 525-5-500, 9 9 Ibid., 9 10 TRADOC 525-5-500 identifies 11 characteristics of ill-structured problems based on Horst Rittel and...RI: Naval War College, 2010. —. Problem Solving and the Military Professional. Newport, RI: U.S. Naval War College, 2010. Horst Rittel and Melvin

  10. Analytic semigroups: Applications to inverse problems for flexible structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, H. T.; Rebnord, D. A.

    1990-01-01

    Convergence and stability results for least squares inverse problems involving systems described by analytic semigroups are presented. The practical importance of these results is demonstrated by application to several examples from problems of estimation of material parameters in flexible structures using accelerometer data.

  11. Exploring Teacher and School Resilience as a New Perspective to Solve Persistent Problems in the Educational Sector

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schelvis, Roosmarijn M. C.; Zwetsloot, Gerard I. J. M.; Bos, Evelien H.; Wiezer, Noortje M.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we will explore the relevance, meaning and perspectives of teacher, team and school resilience. The central research questions are: does the concept of teacher, team and school resilience offer new and promising perspectives on persistent problems in the educational sector? And secondly; how can resilience at individual, team and…

  12. Is epidemiology correcting its vision problem? A perspective on our perspective: 2012 presidential address for American College of Epidemiology.

    PubMed

    McKeown, Robert E

    2013-10-01

    Epidemiology, like all disciplines, exists within and is shaped by a culture that frames its ways of understanding. In the last 60 years epidemiology as a discipline and scientific approach has undergone major transition, but remains challenged by vestiges of the limiting frameworks of our origins which shape the way we approach questions, and even the questions we choose to investigate. A part of the current transformation is a reframing of our perspective and a broadening of our methods to encourage creativity and to encompass new types of evidence and new approaches to investigation and interpretation. Epidemiologists are developing innovative ways to approach increasingly complex problems and becoming more open to multi-disciplinary approaches to solving epidemiologic challenges.

  13. Recent advances in numerical analysis of structural eigenvalue problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, K. K.

    1973-01-01

    A wide range of eigenvalue problems encountered in practical structural engineering analyses is defined, in which the structures are assumed to be discretized by any suitable technique such as the finite-element method. A review of the usual numerical procedures for the solution of such eigenvalue problems is presented and is followed by an extensive account of recently developed eigenproblem solution procedures. Particular emphasis is placed on the new numerical algorithms and associated computer programs based on the Sturm sequence method. Eigenvalue algorithms developed for efficient solution of natural frequency and buckling problems of structures are presented, as well as some eigenvalue procedures formulated in connection with the solution of quadratic matrix equations associated with free vibration analysis of structures. A new algorithm is described for natural frequency analysis of damped structural systems.

  14. Supporting teachers who introduce curricular innovations into their classrooms: A problem-solving perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yerushalmi, Edit; Eylon, Bat-Sheva

    2013-06-01

    When classroom teachers introduce curricular innovations that conflict with their former deeply rooted practices, the teachers themselves experience a process of change. One professional development framework intended to support this change is the customization workshop, in which teachers cooperatively customize innovations to their own classroom contexts, reflect on the strengths and weaknesses of classroom implementation, and refine their innovations. Two goals sometimes conflict in such workshops: developing teachers’ skills as reflective practitioners (process) and maintaining crucial characteristics of the original innovations (product). This paper explores how to meet both challenges using the insights from a perspective that provides a striking parallel: developing expertlike problem-solving skills (process) as well as conceptual understanding (product) in the physics classroom. We apply this perspective by (a) characterizing an expertlike approach to pedagogical problem solving in the context of customization workshops, (b) determining the nature of pedagogical problems best suited for developing such an expertlike approach, (c) suggesting how to design customization workshops that support teachers to develop an expertlike approach to pedagogical problem solving. In particular, we hypothesize that applying cognitive apprenticeship in customization workshops in a manner similar to its application in the teaching of expertlike problem solving in the physics classroom should effectively help teachers approach the pedagogical problem of customization in an expertlike manner. We support our hypothesis with an empirical study of three year-long cooperative customization workshops for physics teachers that differed in terms of mentoring approach. We examined the questions (a) under which mentoring approaches did teachers perform an expertlike pedagogical problem-solving process and (b) which practices and perceptions emerged through execution of this process?

  15. Whither Ribosome Structure and Dynamics Research? (A Perspective).

    PubMed

    Frank, Joachim

    2016-09-11

    As high-resolution cryogenic electron microscopy (cryo-EM) structures of ribosomes proliferate, at resolutions that allow atomic interactions to be visualized, this article attempts to give a perspective on the way research on ribosome structure and dynamics may be headed, and particularly the new opportunities we have gained through recent advances in cryo-EM. It is pointed out that single-molecule FRET and cryo-EM form natural complements in the characterization of ribosome dynamics and transitions among equilibrating states of in vitro translational systems.

  16. Solving a generalized distance geometry problem for protein structure determination.

    PubMed

    Sit, Atilla; Wu, Zhijun

    2011-12-01

    We propose a new approach to the problem of determining an ensemble of protein structures with a set of interatomic distance bounds in NMR protein modeling. Similarly to X-ray crystallography, we assume that the protein has an equilibrium structure and the atoms fluctuate around their equilibrium positions. Then, the problem can be formulated as a generalized distance geometry problem, to find the equilibrium positions and maximal possible fluctuation radii for the atoms in the protein, subject to the condition that the fluctuations should be within the given distance bounds. We describe the scientific background of the work, the motivation of the new approach and the formulation of the problem. We develop a geometric buildup algorithm for an approximate solution to the problem and present some preliminary test results as a first step concept proofing. We also discuss related theoretical and computational issues and potential impacts of this work in NMR protein modeling.

  17. The Lunar Internal Structure Model: Problems and Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nefedyev, Yuri; Gusev, Alexander; Petrova, Natalia; Varaksina, Natalia

    The report is devoted the problems of the internal structure and gravitational field of the Moon. New data received from 14 newest instruments installed on low-orbit satellite Kaguya essentially enriched our knowledge of the Moon. Chinese satellite ChagE-1 and Indian Сhandrayan-1 have demonstrated strong potential of China and India in the field of lunar research and obtained new data on gravitational field, mascons, crust, and geochemical composition of the circumlunar space. Internal structure of the Moon: There are some essential arguments in favor of existence of a small-sized Moon’s core made of metallic iron alloyed with a small amount of sulfur and/or oxygen, and availability of hot viscous lower mantle. Structure of gravitational field of the Moon, determined by the comparison of high-precision trajectory measurements by Lunar Prospector (1998- 1999) with the results of laser altimetry obtained by Clementine (1994), as well as with data sets of laser ranging of the Moon (1970-2006), assumes the presence of a metal core. Interpretation of the polar moment value within the framework of chemical, thermal and density models of lunar crust and mantle informed conclusions about the weight and size of the core. LLR analysis of dissipation of rotation of the Moon points at two possible sources of dissipation: monthly solid-state inflows and liquid core, rotation of which differs from viscous-elastic mantle. Liquid (melted) core has its unique impact on the Moon’s rotation. In particular, there are two force moments due to topographical and phase interaction at the boundary between liquid core and elastic mantle (CMB). Liquid core can rotate independently from solid mantle Selenoid satellites (SS) open new and most perspective opportunities in the study of gravitational field and the Moon’s figure. SSs “Moon 10”, “Apollo”, “Clementine”, “Lunar Prospector” trajectory tracking data processing has allowed for identification of coefficients in

  18. Home care assistants’ perspectives on detecting mental health problems and promoting mental health among community-dwelling seniors with multimorbidity

    PubMed Central

    Grundberg, Åke; Hansson, Anna; Religa, Dorota; Hillerås, Pernilla

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Elderly people with multiple chronic conditions, or multimorbidity, are at risk of developing poor mental health. These seniors often remain in their homes with support from home care assistants (HCAs). Mental health promotion by HCAs needs to be studied further because they may be among the first to observe changes in clients’ mental health status. Aim To describe HCAs’ perspectives on detecting mental health problems and promoting mental health among homebound seniors with multimorbidity. Methods We applied a descriptive qualitative study design using semi-structured interviews. Content analyses were performed on five focus group interviews conducted in 2014 with 26 HCAs. Results Most HCAs stated that they were experienced in caring for clients with mental health problems such as anxiety, depression, sleep problems, and high alcohol consumption. The HCAs mentioned as causes, or risk factors, multiple chronic conditions, feelings of loneliness, and social isolation. The findings reveal that continuity of care and seniors’ own thoughts and perceptions were essential to detecting mental health problems. Observation, collaboration, and social support emerged as important means of detecting mental health problems and promoting mental health. Conclusion The HCAs had knowledge of risk factors, but they seemed insecure about which health professionals had the primary responsibility for mental health. They also seemed to have detected early signs of mental health problems, even though good personal knowledge of the client and continuity in home visits were crucial to do so. When it came to mental health promotion, the suggestions related to the aim of ending social isolation, decreasing feelings of loneliness, and increasing physical activity. The results indicate that the HCAs seemed dependent on supervision by district nurses and on care managers’ decisions to support the needed care, to schedule assignments related to the detection of mental health

  19. Environmental Policies and Problems in Japan, China, and Hong Kong: Travel Perspectives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Therivel, Riki; Wrisberg, Mette

    1988-01-01

    Compared are some of the environmental planning policies and developmental policies of three regions of the Far East. Discusses the relationship between social structures and environmental problems such as pollution, erosion, waste disposal, and the uses of technology. (CW)

  20. [Methodology and problems in home monitoring of children with sleep-related respiratory disorders--perspectives].

    PubMed

    Wiater, A; Götz, W; Niewerth, H J

    1996-01-01

    In a pilot study we interviewed parents of 100 formerly home monitored infants about problems during the monitoring period. The duration of home monitoring was between 1 and 48 months (median 15 months). 95% of the parents reported false alarms. 66% of the infants had real alarms, in 50% of the infants interventions were necessary. 3% of the infants had to be resuscitated. Only 47% of the parents felt safe in the practice of resuscitation even though all parents had been trained before. Perspectives of improvement of home monitoring are discussed.

  1. Hydrates of natural gases and small molecules: structures, properties, and exploitation perspectives.

    PubMed

    Barone, Guido; Chianese, Elena

    2009-01-01

    Starting from the discovery, in the mid-1930s, that petroleum pipelines in the colder regions of the Northern hemisphere contained crusts of some crystals, and were often blocked by them, a short history of the development of research on the structures, properties, and possible exploitation of the class of inclusion compounds known as gas hydrates is given. The state of the assessment of the natural reservoirs and their perspectives for exploitation are presented, together with an analysis of the hypotheses on the origins of the hydrates. Finally, the phase diagrams are shown in relation to environmental problems arising from the instability of the hydrate fields due to global warming or geological activity.

  2. A Qualitative Approach to a Better Understanding of the Problems Underlying Drug Shortages, as Viewed from Belgian, French and the European Union's Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Bogaert, Petronille; Bochenek, Tomasz; Prokop, Anna; Pilc, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    The problem of drug shortages has been reported worldwide, gaining prominence in multiple domains and several countries in recent years. The aim of the study was to analyze, characterise and assess this problem in Belgium and France, while also adopting a wider perspective from the European Union. A qualitative methodological approach was employed, including semi-structured interviews with the representatives of respective national health authorities, pharmaceutical companies and wholesalers, as well as hospital and community pharmacists. The research was conducted in early 2014. Four themes, which were identified through the interviews, were addressed in the paper, i.e. a) defining drug shortages, b) their dynamics and perception, c) their determinants, d) the role of the European and national institutions in coping with the problem. Three groups of determinants of drug shortages were identified throughout this study: manufacturing problems, distribution and supply problems, and problems related to economic aspects. Currently, the Member States of the European Union are striving to resolve the problem very much on their own, although a far more focused and dedicated collaboration may well prove instrumental in coping with drug shortages throughout Europe more effectively. To the best of the authors' knowledge, this is the first qualitative study to investigate the characteristics, key determinants, and the problem drivers of drug shortages, focusing on this particular group of countries, while also adopting the European Union's perspective.

  3. A Qualitative Approach to a Better Understanding of the Problems Underlying Drug Shortages, as Viewed from Belgian, French and the European Union’s Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Prokop, Anna; Pilc, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    The problem of drug shortages has been reported worldwide, gaining prominence in multiple domains and several countries in recent years. The aim of the study was to analyze, characterise and assess this problem in Belgium and France, while also adopting a wider perspective from the European Union. A qualitative methodological approach was employed, including semi-structured interviews with the representatives of respective national health authorities, pharmaceutical companies and wholesalers, as well as hospital and community pharmacists. The research was conducted in early 2014. Four themes, which were identified through the interviews, were addressed in the paper, i.e. a) defining drug shortages, b) their dynamics and perception, c) their determinants, d) the role of the European and national institutions in coping with the problem. Three groups of determinants of drug shortages were identified throughout this study: manufacturing problems, distribution and supply problems, and problems related to economic aspects. Currently, the Member States of the European Union are striving to resolve the problem very much on their own, although a far more focused and dedicated collaboration may well prove instrumental in coping with drug shortages throughout Europe more effectively. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first qualitative study to investigate the characteristics, key determinants, and the problem drivers of drug shortages, focusing on this particular group of countries, while also adopting the European Union’s perspective. PMID:25942432

  4. Can the Stark-Einstein law resolve the measurement problem from an animate perspective?

    PubMed

    Thaheld, Fred H

    2015-09-01

    Analysis of the Stark-Einstein law as it applies to the retinal molecule, which is part of the rhodopsin molecule within the rod cells of the retina, reveals that it may provide the solution to the measurement problem from an animate perspective. That it represents a natural boundary where the Schrödinger equation or wave function automatically goes from linear to nonlinear while remaining in a deterministic state. It will be possible in the near future to subject this theory to empirical tests as has been previously proposed. This analysis provides a contrast to the many decades well studied and debated inanimate measurement problem and would represent an addition to the Stark-Einstein law involving information carried by the photon.

  5. Handling Decision Problems: Structuring Language and Interactive Modules

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-06-01

    want to have expressed in these scenarios; This tool would implement procedures first described by Var, Vecsenyi and Paprika (1986), and which have...been used successfully in our own work on this project. Vari, Vecsenyi and Paprika (1986) identify two basic object categories to be structured in...and aiding decision processes. Amsterdam: North Holland. Vari, A., Vecsenyi, J. and Paprika , Z., 1986. Supporting problem structuring in high level

  6. Understanding congestion in China's medical market: an incentive structure perspective.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zesheng; Wang, Shuhong; Barnes, Stephen R

    2016-04-01

    Congestion has become one of the most important factors leading to patient dissatisfaction and doctor-patient conflicts in the medical market of China. In this study, we explore the causes and effects of structural congestion in the Chinese medical market from an incentive structure perspective. Our analysis reveals that prior medical system reforms with price regulation in China have induced hospitals to establish incentives for capital-intensive investments, while ignoring human capital, and have driven medical staff and patients to higher-level hospitals, reinforcing an incentive structure in which congestion in higher-level hospitals and idle resources in lower-level hospitals coexist. The existing incentive structure has led to cost increases and degradation of human capital and specific factor effects. Recent reforms to reduce congestion in the Chinese medical market were not effective. Most of them had no impact on and did not involve the existing distorted incentive structure. Future reforms should consider rebalancing expectations for medical quality, free flow of human capital and price regulation reforms to rebuild a new incentive structure.

  7. Family Structure, Community Context, and Adolescent Problem Behaviors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffman, John P.

    2006-01-01

    A number of models have been proposed to explain the relationship between family structure and adolescent problem behaviors, including several that consider parent-child relations, family income, stress, and residential mobility. However, studies have not explored whether the different types of communities within which families reside affect the…

  8. PARTI primitives for unstructured and block structured problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sussman, Alan; Saltz, Joel; Das, Raja; Gupta, S.; Mavriplis, Dimitri; Ponnusamy, Ravi; Crowley, Kay

    1992-01-01

    Described here is a set of primitives (PARTI) developed to efficiently execute unstructured and block structured problems on distributed memory parallel machines. We present experimental data from a 3-D unstructured Euler solver run on the Intel Touchstone Delta to demonstrate the usefulness of our methods.

  9. Detection of structural deterioration and associated airline maintenance problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henniker, H. D.; Mitchell, R. G.

    1972-01-01

    Airline operations involving the detection of structural deterioration and associated maintenance problems are discussed. The standard approach to the maintenance and inspection of aircraft components and systems is described. The frequency of inspections and the application of preventive maintenance practices are examined. The types of failure which airline transport aircraft encounter and the steps taken to prevent catastrophic failure are reported.

  10. Structural DNA nanotechnology: state of the art and future perspective.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fei; Nangreave, Jeanette; Liu, Yan; Yan, Hao

    2014-08-13

    Over the past three decades DNA has emerged as an exceptional molecular building block for nanoconstruction due to its predictable conformation and programmable intra- and intermolecular Watson-Crick base-pairing interactions. A variety of convenient design rules and reliable assembly methods have been developed to engineer DNA nanostructures of increasing complexity. The ability to create designer DNA architectures with accurate spatial control has allowed researchers to explore novel applications in many directions, such as directed material assembly, structural biology, biocatalysis, DNA computing, nanorobotics, disease diagnosis, and drug delivery. This Perspective discusses the state of the art in the field of structural DNA nanotechnology and presents some of the challenges and opportunities that exist in DNA-based molecular design and programming.

  11. Structural DNA Nanotechnology: State of the Art and Future Perspective

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Over the past three decades DNA has emerged as an exceptional molecular building block for nanoconstruction due to its predictable conformation and programmable intra- and intermolecular Watson–Crick base-pairing interactions. A variety of convenient design rules and reliable assembly methods have been developed to engineer DNA nanostructures of increasing complexity. The ability to create designer DNA architectures with accurate spatial control has allowed researchers to explore novel applications in many directions, such as directed material assembly, structural biology, biocatalysis, DNA computing, nanorobotics, disease diagnosis, and drug delivery. This Perspective discusses the state of the art in the field of structural DNA nanotechnology and presents some of the challenges and opportunities that exist in DNA-based molecular design and programming. PMID:25029570

  12. An Event-Based Solution to the Perspective-n-Point Problem.

    PubMed

    Reverter Valeiras, David; Kime, Sihem; Ieng, Sio-Hoi; Benosman, Ryad Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    The goal of the Perspective-n-Point problem (PnP) is to find the relative pose between an object and a camera from a set of n pairings between 3D points and their corresponding 2D projections on the focal plane. Current state of the art solutions, designed to operate on images, rely on computationally expensive minimization techniques. For the first time, this work introduces an event-based PnP algorithm designed to work on the output of a neuromorphic event-based vision sensor. The problem is formulated here as a least-squares minimization problem, where the error function is updated with every incoming event. The optimal translation is then computed in closed form, while the desired rotation is given by the evolution of a virtual mechanical system whose energy is proven to be equal to the error function. This allows for a simple yet robust solution of the problem, showing how event-based vision can simplify computer vision tasks. The approach takes full advantage of the high temporal resolution of the sensor, as the estimated pose is incrementally updated with every incoming event. Two approaches are proposed: the Full and the Efficient methods. These two methods are compared against a state of the art PnP algorithm both on synthetic and on real data, producing similar accuracy in addition of being faster.

  13. An Event-Based Solution to the Perspective-n-Point Problem

    PubMed Central

    Reverter Valeiras, David; Kime, Sihem; Ieng, Sio-Hoi; Benosman, Ryad Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    The goal of the Perspective-n-Point problem (PnP) is to find the relative pose between an object and a camera from a set of n pairings between 3D points and their corresponding 2D projections on the focal plane. Current state of the art solutions, designed to operate on images, rely on computationally expensive minimization techniques. For the first time, this work introduces an event-based PnP algorithm designed to work on the output of a neuromorphic event-based vision sensor. The problem is formulated here as a least-squares minimization problem, where the error function is updated with every incoming event. The optimal translation is then computed in closed form, while the desired rotation is given by the evolution of a virtual mechanical system whose energy is proven to be equal to the error function. This allows for a simple yet robust solution of the problem, showing how event-based vision can simplify computer vision tasks. The approach takes full advantage of the high temporal resolution of the sensor, as the estimated pose is incrementally updated with every incoming event. Two approaches are proposed: the Full and the Efficient methods. These two methods are compared against a state of the art PnP algorithm both on synthetic and on real data, producing similar accuracy in addition of being faster. PMID:27242412

  14. Quantum inferring acausal structures and the Monty Hall problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurzyk, Dariusz; Glos, Adam

    2016-12-01

    This paper presents a quantum version of the Monty Hall problem based upon the quantum inferring acausal structures, which can be identified with generalization of Bayesian networks. Considered structures are expressed in formalism of quantum information theory, where density operators are identified with quantum generalization of probability distributions. Conditional relations between quantum counterpart of random variables are described by quantum conditional operators. Presented quantum inferring structures are used to construct a model inspired by scenario of well-known Monty Hall game, where we show the differences between classical and quantum Bayesian reasoning.

  15. Dynamic Programming for Structured Continuous Markov Decision Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dearden, Richard; Meuleau, Nicholas; Washington, Richard; Feng, Zhengzhu

    2004-01-01

    We describe an approach for exploiting structure in Markov Decision Processes with continuous state variables. At each step of the dynamic programming, the state space is dynamically partitioned into regions where the value function is the same throughout the region. We first describe the algorithm for piecewise constant representations. We then extend it to piecewise linear representations, using techniques from POMDPs to represent and reason about linear surfaces efficiently. We show that for complex, structured problems, our approach exploits the natural structure so that optimal solutions can be computed efficiently.

  16. Finite element solution of transient fluid-structure interaction problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Everstine, Gordon C.; Cheng, Raymond S.; Hambric, Stephen A.

    1991-01-01

    A finite element approach using NASTRAN is developed for solving time-dependent fluid-structure interaction problems, with emphasis on the transient scattering of acoustic waves from submerged elastic structures. Finite elements are used for modeling both structure and fluid domains to facilitate the graphical display of the wave motion through both media. For the liquid, the use of velocity potential as the fundamental unknown results in a symmetric matrix equation. The approach is illustrated for the problem of transient scattering from a submerged elastic spherical shell subjected to an incident tone burst. The use of an analogy between the equations of elasticity and the wave equation of acoustics, a necessary ingredient to the procedure, is summarized.

  17. A framework for solving ill-structured community problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, William Cotesworth

    A multifaceted protocol for solving ill-structured community problems has been developed. It embodies the lessons learned from the past by refining and extending features of previous models from the systems thinkers, and the fields of behavioral decision making and creative problem solving. The protocol also embraces additional features needed to address the unique aspects of community decision situations. The essential elements of the protocol are participants from the community, a problem-solving process, a systems picture, a facilitator, a modified Delphi method of communications, and technical expertise. This interdisciplinary framework has been tested by a quasi experiment with a real world community problem (the high cost of electrical power on Long Island, NY). Results indicate the protocol can enable members of the community to understand a complicated, ill-structured problem and guide them to action to solve the issue. However, the framework takes time (over one year in the test case) and will be inappropriate for crises where quick action is needed.

  18. MSClique: Multiple Structure Discovery through the Maximum Weighted Clique Problem

    PubMed Central

    Alquézar, René; Serratosa, Francesc; Moreno-Noguer, Francesc; Andrade-Cetto, Juan; González Ballester, Miguel Ángel

    2016-01-01

    We present a novel approach for feature correspondence and multiple structure discovery in computer vision. In contrast to existing methods, we exploit the fact that point-sets on the same structure usually lie close to each other, thus forming clusters in the image. Given a pair of input images, we initially extract points of interest and extract hierarchical representations by agglomerative clustering. We use the maximum weighted clique problem to find the set of corresponding clusters with maximum number of inliers representing the multiple structures at the correct scales. Our method is parameter-free and only needs two sets of points along with their tentative correspondences, thus being extremely easy to use. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our method in multiple-structure fitting experiments in both publicly available and in-house datasets. As shown in the experiments, our approach finds a higher number of structures containing fewer outliers compared to state-of-the-art methods. PMID:26766071

  19. MSClique: Multiple Structure Discovery through the Maximum Weighted Clique Problem.

    PubMed

    Sanroma, Gerard; Penate-Sanchez, Adrian; Alquézar, René; Serratosa, Francesc; Moreno-Noguer, Francesc; Andrade-Cetto, Juan; González Ballester, Miguel Ángel

    2016-01-01

    We present a novel approach for feature correspondence and multiple structure discovery in computer vision. In contrast to existing methods, we exploit the fact that point-sets on the same structure usually lie close to each other, thus forming clusters in the image. Given a pair of input images, we initially extract points of interest and extract hierarchical representations by agglomerative clustering. We use the maximum weighted clique problem to find the set of corresponding clusters with maximum number of inliers representing the multiple structures at the correct scales. Our method is parameter-free and only needs two sets of points along with their tentative correspondences, thus being extremely easy to use. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our method in multiple-structure fitting experiments in both publicly available and in-house datasets. As shown in the experiments, our approach finds a higher number of structures containing fewer outliers compared to state-of-the-art methods.

  20. Mathematical theory of a relaxed design problem in structural optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kikuchi, Noboru; Suzuki, Katsuyuki

    1990-01-01

    Various attempts have been made to construct a rigorous mathematical theory of optimization for size, shape, and topology (i.e. layout) of an elastic structure. If these are represented by a finite number of parametric functions, as Armand described, it is possible to construct an existence theory of the optimum design using compactness argument in a finite dimensional design space or a closed admissible set of a finite dimensional design space. However, if the admissible design set is a subset of non-reflexive Banach space such as L(sup infinity)(Omega), construction of the existence theory of the optimum design becomes suddenly difficult and requires to extend (i.e. generalize) the design problem to much more wider class of design that is compatible to mechanics of structures in the sense of variational principle. Starting from the study by Cheng and Olhoff, Lurie, Cherkaev, and Fedorov introduced a new concept of convergence of design variables in a generalized sense and construct the 'G-Closure' theory of an extended (relaxed) optimum design problem. A similar attempt, but independent in large extent, can also be found in Kohn and Strang in which the shape and topology optimization problem is relaxed to allow to use of perforated composites rather than restricting it to usual solid structures. An identical idea is also stated in Murat and Tartar using the notion of the homogenization theory. That is, introducing possibility of micro-scale perforation together with the theory of homogenization, the optimum design problem is relaxed to construct its mathematical theory. It is also noted that this type of relaxed design problem is perfectly matched to the variational principle in structural mechanics.

  1. Nonlinear Transient Problems Using Structure Compatible Heat Transfer Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hou, Gene

    2000-01-01

    The report documents the recent effort to enhance a transient linear heat transfer code so as to solve nonlinear problems. The linear heat transfer code was originally developed by Dr. Kim Bey of NASA Largely and called the Structure-Compatible Heat Transfer (SCHT) code. The report includes four parts. The first part outlines the formulation of the heat transfer problem of concern. The second and the third parts give detailed procedures to construct the nonlinear finite element equations and the required Jacobian matrices for the nonlinear iterative method, Newton-Raphson method. The final part summarizes the results of the numerical experiments on the newly enhanced SCHT code.

  2. A structural and functional perspective of alphavirus replication and assembly.

    PubMed

    Jose, Joyce; Snyder, Jonathan E; Kuhn, Richard J

    2009-09-01

    Alphaviruses are small, spherical, enveloped, positive-sense ssRNA viruses responsible for a considerable number of human and animal diseases. Alphavirus members include Chikungunya virus, Sindbis virus, Semliki Forest virus, the western, eastern and Venezuelan equine encephalitis viruses, and the Ross River virus. Alphaviruses can cause arthritic diseases and encephalitis in humans and animals and continue to be a worldwide threat. The viruses are transmitted by blood-sucking arthropods, and replicate in both arthropod and vertebrate hosts. Alphaviruses form spherical particles (65-70 nm in diameter) with icosahedral symmetry and a triangulation number of four. The icosahedral structures of alphaviruses have been defined to very high resolutions by cryo-electron microscopy and crystallographic studies. In this review, we summarize the major events in alphavirus infection: entry, replication, assembly and budding. We focus on data acquired from structural and functional studies of the alphaviruses. These structural and functional data provide a broader perspective of the virus lifecycle and structure, and allow additional insight into these important viruses.

  3. Structural patterns in Swedish health policy: a 30-year perspective.

    PubMed

    Saltman, Richard B

    2015-04-01

    This perspective reviews key institutional and organizational patterns in Swedish health care over the last 30 years, probing the roots of several complicated policy questions that concern present-day Swedish decision-makers. It explores in particular the ongoing structural tension between stability, on the one hand, and the necessary levels of innovation and dynamism demanded by the current period of major clinical, technological, economic, social and supranational (EU) change. Where useful, the article compares Swedish developments with those in the other three European Nordic countries as well as other northern European health systems. Sweden's health sector evolution can provide valuable insight for other countries into the complexity involved in re-thinking tradeoffs between policies that emphasize stability as against those that encourage innovation in health sector governance and provision.

  4. Potential structural material problems in a hydrogen energy system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, H. R.; Nelson, H. G.; Johnson, R. E.; Mcpherson, B.; Howard, F. S.; Swisher, J. H.

    1975-01-01

    Potential structural material problems that may be encountered in the three components of a hydrogen energy system - production, transmission/storage, and utilization - were identified. Hydrogen embrittlement, corrosion, oxidation, and erosion may occur during the production of hydrogen. Hydrogen embrittlement is of major concern during both transmission and utilization of hydrogen. Specific materials research and development programs necessary to support a hydrogen energy system are described.

  5. Gauging the Potential of Socially Critical Environmental Education (EE): Examining Local Environmental Problems through Children's Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsoubaris, Dimitris; Georgopoulos, Aleksandros

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this qualitative research work is to detect the needs, aspirations and feelings of pupils experiencing local environmental problems and elaborate them through the prism of a socially critical educational approach. Semi-structured focus group interviews are used as a research method applied to four primary schools located near…

  6. A Benchmark Problem for Development of Autonomous Structural Modal Identification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pappa, Richard S.; Woodard, Stanley E.; Juang, Jer-Nan

    1996-01-01

    This paper summarizes modal identification results obtained using an autonomous version of the Eigensystem Realization Algorithm on a dynamically complex, laboratory structure. The benchmark problem uses 48 of 768 free-decay responses measured in a complete modal survey test. The true modal parameters of the structure are well known from two previous, independent investigations. Without user involvement, the autonomous data analysis identified 24 to 33 structural modes with good to excellent accuracy in 62 seconds of CPU time (on a DEC Alpha 4000 computer). The modal identification technique described in the paper is the baseline algorithm for NASA's Autonomous Dynamics Determination (ADD) experiment scheduled to fly on International Space Station assembly flights in 1997-1999.

  7. Extended ALE Method for fluid-structure interaction problems with large structural displacements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basting, Steffen; Quaini, Annalisa; Čanić, Sunčica; Glowinski, Roland

    2017-02-01

    Standard Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) methods for the simulation of fluid-structure interaction (FSI) problems fail due to excessive mesh deformations when the structural displacement is large. We propose a method that successfully deals with this problem, keeping the same mesh connectivity while enforcing mesh alignment with the structure. The proposed Extended ALE Method relies on a variational mesh optimization technique, where mesh alignment with the structure is achieved via a constraint. This gives rise to a constrained optimization problem for mesh optimization, which is solved whenever the mesh quality deteriorates. The performance of the proposed Extended ALE Method is demonstrated on a series of numerical examples involving 2D FSI problems with large displacements. Two-way coupling between the fluid and structure is considered in all the examples. The FSI problems are solved using either a Dirichlet-Neumann algorithm, or a Robin-Neumann algorithm. The Dirichlet-Neumann algorithm is enhanced by an adaptive relaxation procedure based on Aitken's acceleration. We show that the proposed method has excellent performance in problems with large displacements, and that it agrees well with a standard ALE method in problems with mild displacement.

  8. Recent advances, trends and new perspectives via enthalpy-based finite element formulations for applications to solidification problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tamma, Kumar K.; Namburu, Raju R.

    1990-01-01

    The present paper describes recent advances and trends in finite element developments and applications for solidification problems. In particular, in comparison to traditional methods of approach, new enthalpy-based architectures based on a generalized trapezoidal family of representations are presented which provide different perspectives, physical interpretation and solution architectures for effective numerical simulation of phase change processes encountered in solidification problems. Various numerical test models are presented and the results support the proposition for employing such formulations for general phase change applications.

  9. REVIEWS OF TOPICAL PROBLEMS: 21st century: what is life from the perspective of physics?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanitskii, Genrikh R.

    2010-07-01

    The evolution of the biophysical paradigm over 65 years since the publication in 1944 of Erwin Schrödinger's What is Life? The Physical Aspects of the Living Cell is reviewed. Based on the advances in molecular genetics, it is argued that all the features characteristic of living systems can also be found in nonliving ones. Ten paradoxes in logic and physics are analyzed that allow defining life in terms of a spatial-temporal hierarchy of structures and combinatory probabilistic logic. From the perspective of physics, life can be defined as resulting from a game involving interactions of matter one part of which acquires the ability to remember the success (or failure) probabilities from the previous rounds of the game, thereby increasing its chances for further survival in the next round. This part of matter is currently called living matter.

  10. Employability Skills, Personal Qualities, and Early Employment Problems of Entry-Level Auditors: Perspectives from Employers, Lecturers, Auditors, and Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lim, Yet-Mee; Lee, Teck Heang; Yap, Ching Seng; Ling, Chui Ching

    2016-01-01

    The authors examine the issue of employability of university accounting students from the perspectives of accounting firm employers, junior auditors, accounting lecturers, and accounting students. Areas of investigation include perceived importance of employability skills and desirable personal qualities; and early employment problems encountered…

  11. "Nobody Can Sit There": Two Perspectives on How Mathematics Problems in Context Mediate Group Problem Solving Discussions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zahner, William

    2012-01-01

    This study examines how a group of bilingual ninth grade algebra students discussed two word problems stated in terms of "real life" contexts. Using a lens of mediated action (Wertsch, 1998), the analysis reveals two distinct ways that the problem contexts influenced the group's mathematical reasoning. In one problem, the problem context…

  12. Perspective: Explicitly correlated electronic structure theory for complex systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grüneis, Andreas; Hirata, So; Ohnishi, Yu-ya; Ten-no, Seiichiro

    2017-02-01

    The explicitly correlated approach is one of the most important breakthroughs in ab initio electronic structure theory, providing arguably the most compact, accurate, and efficient ansatz for describing the correlated motion of electrons. Since Hylleraas first used an explicitly correlated wave function for the He atom in 1929, numerous attempts have been made to tackle the significant challenges involved in constructing practical explicitly correlated methods that are applicable to larger systems. These include identifying suitable mathematical forms of a correlated wave function and an efficient evaluation of many-electron integrals. R12 theory, which employs the resolution of the identity approximation, emerged in 1985, followed by the introduction of novel correlation factors and wave function ansätze, leading to the establishment of F12 theory in the 2000s. Rapid progress in recent years has significantly extended the application range of explicitly correlated theory, offering the potential of an accurate wave-function treatment of complex systems such as photosystems and semiconductors. This perspective surveys explicitly correlated electronic structure theory, with an emphasis on recent stochastic and deterministic approaches that hold significant promise for applications to large and complex systems including solids.

  13. Reconsideration of Plant Morphological Traits: From a Structure-Based Perspective to a Function-Based Evolutionary Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Shu-Nong

    2017-01-01

    This opinion article proposes a novel alignment of traits in plant morphogenesis from a function-based evolutionary perspective. As a member species of the ecosystem on Earth, we human beings view our neighbor organisms from our own sensing system. We tend to distinguish forms and structures (i.e., “morphological traits”) mainly through vision. Traditionally, a plant was considered to be consisted of three parts, i.e., the shoot, the leaves, and the root. Based on such a “structure-based perspective,” evolutionary analyses or comparisons across species were made on particular parts or their derived structures. So far no conceptual framework has been established to incorporate the morphological traits of all three land plant phyta, i.e., bryophyta, pteridophyta and spermatophyta, for evolutionary developmental analysis. Using the tenets of the recently proposed concept of sexual reproduction cycle, the major morphological traits of land plants can be aligned into five categories from a function-based evolutionary perspective. From this perspective, and the resulting alignment, a new conceptual framework emerges, called “Plant Morphogenesis 123.” This framework views a plant as a colony of integrated plant developmental units that are each produced via one life cycle. This view provided an alternative perspective for evolutionary developmental investigation in plants. PMID:28360919

  14. Reconsideration of Plant Morphological Traits: From a Structure-Based Perspective to a Function-Based Evolutionary Perspective.

    PubMed

    Bai, Shu-Nong

    2017-01-01

    This opinion article proposes a novel alignment of traits in plant morphogenesis from a function-based evolutionary perspective. As a member species of the ecosystem on Earth, we human beings view our neighbor organisms from our own sensing system. We tend to distinguish forms and structures (i.e., "morphological traits") mainly through vision. Traditionally, a plant was considered to be consisted of three parts, i.e., the shoot, the leaves, and the root. Based on such a "structure-based perspective," evolutionary analyses or comparisons across species were made on particular parts or their derived structures. So far no conceptual framework has been established to incorporate the morphological traits of all three land plant phyta, i.e., bryophyta, pteridophyta and spermatophyta, for evolutionary developmental analysis. Using the tenets of the recently proposed concept of sexual reproduction cycle, the major morphological traits of land plants can be aligned into five categories from a function-based evolutionary perspective. From this perspective, and the resulting alignment, a new conceptual framework emerges, called "Plant Morphogenesis 123." This framework views a plant as a colony of integrated plant developmental units that are each produced via one life cycle. This view provided an alternative perspective for evolutionary developmental investigation in plants.

  15. Rethinking policy perspectives on childhood stunting: time to formulate a structural and multifactorial strategy

    PubMed Central

    Mejía‐Guevara, Iván; Krishna, Aditi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Stunting and chronic undernutrition among children in South Asia remain a major unresolved global health issue. There are compelling intrinsic and moral reasons to ensure that children attain their optimal growth potential facilitated via promotion of healthy living conditions. Investments in efforts to ensure that children's growth is not faltered also have substantial instrumental benefits in terms of cognitive and economic development. Using the case of India, we critique three prevailing approaches to reducing undernutrition among children: an over‐reliance on macroeconomic growth as a potent policy instrument, a disproportionate focus on interpreting undernutrition as a demand‐side problem and an over‐reliance on unintegrated single‐factorial (one at a time) approaches to policy and research. Using existing evidence, we develop a case for support‐led policy approach with a focus on integrated and structural factors to addressing the problem of undernutrition among children in India. Key messages Eliminating child undernutrition is important from an intrinsic perspective and offers considerable instrumental benefits to individual and society.Evidence suggests that an exclusive reliance on a growth‐mediated strategy to eliminate stunting needs to be reconsidered, suggesting the need for a substantial support‐led strategy.Interpreting and addressing undernutrition as a demand‐side problem with proximal single‐factorial interventions is futile.There is an urgent need to develop interventions that address the broader structural and upstream causes of child undernutrition. PMID:27187918

  16. CALL FOR PAPERS: Special issue on the random search problem: trends and perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Luz, Marcos G. E.; Grosberg, Alexander Y.; Raposo, Ernesto P.; Viswanathan, Gandhi M.

    2008-11-01

    field. The subject can be approached from the perspective of different fields: ecology, networks, transport problems, molecular biology, etc. The study of the problem is particularly suited to the concepts and methods of statistical physics and stochastic processes; for example, fractals, random walks, anomalous diffusion. Discrete landscapes can be approached via graph theory, random lattices and complex networks. Such topics are regularly discussed in Journal of Physics A: Mathematical and Theoretical. All such aspects of the problem fall within the scope and focus of this special issue on the random search problem: trends and perspectives. Editorial policy All contributions to the special issue will be refereed in accordance with the refereeing policy of the journal. In particular, all research papers will be expected to be original work reporting substantial new results. The issue will also contain a number of review articles by invitation only. The Guest Editors reserve the right to judge whether a contribution fits the scope of the special issue. Guidelines for preparation of contributions We aim to publish the special issue in August 2009. To realize this, the DEADLINE for contributed papers is 15 January 2009. There is a page limit of 15 printed pages (approximately 9000 words) per contribution. For papers exceeding this limit, the Guest Editors reserve the right to request a reduction in length. Further advice on document preparation can be found at www.iop.org/Journals/jphysa. Contributions to the special issue should if possible be submitted electronically by web upload at www.iop.org/Journals/jphysa, or by email to jphysa@iop.org, quoting 'J. Phys. A Special Issue— Random Search Problem'. Please state whether the paper has been invited or is contributed. Submissions should ideally be in standard LaTeX form. Please see the website for further information on electronic submissions. Authors unable to submit electronically may send hard-copy contributions to

  17. Hierarchical Multiobjective Linear Programming Problems with Fuzzy Domination Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yano, Hitoshi

    2010-10-01

    In this paper, we focus on hierarchical multiobjective linear programming problems with fuzzy domination structures where multiple decision makers in a hierarchical organization have their own multiple objective linear functions together with common linear constraints. After introducing decision powers and the solution concept based on the α-level set for the fuzzy convex cone Λ which reflects a fuzzy domination structure, we propose a fuzzy approach to obtain a satisfactory solution which reflects not only the hierarchical relationships between multiple decision makers but also their own preferences for their membership functions. In the proposed method, instead of Pareto optimal concept, a generalized Λ˜α-extreme point concept is introduced. In order to obtain a satisfactory solution from among a generalized Λ˜α-extreme point set, an interactive algorithm based on linear programming is proposed, and an interactive processes are demonstrated by means of an illustrative numerical example.

  18. Debates—Perspectives on socio-hydrology: Changing water systems and the "tyranny of small problems"—Socio-hydrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivapalan, Murugesu

    2015-06-01

    We are well and truly in the Anthropocene. Humans can no longer be considered as mere external drivers or boundary conditions in the hydrologic systems we study. The interactions and feedbacks between human actions and water cycle dynamics on the planet, combined with the evolution of human norms/values in relation to water, are throwing up a range of emergent "big problems." Understanding and offering sustainable solutions to these "big problems" require a broadening of hydrologic science to embrace the perspectives of both social and natural scientists. The new science of socio-hydrology was introduced with this in mind, yet faces major challenges due to the wide gulf that separates the knowledge foundations and methodologies of natural and social sciences. Yet, the benefits of working together are enormous, including through adoption of natural science methods for social science problems, and vice versa. Bringing together the perspectives of both social and natural scientists dealing with water is good for hydrologic science, having the salutary effect of revitalizing it as use-inspired basic science. It is good for management too, in that the broader, holistic perspectives provided by socio-hydrology can help recognize potential "big" problems that may otherwise be unforeseen and, equally, identify potential "alternative" solutions to otherwise intractable problems.

  19. On path-following methods for structural failure problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanić, Andjelka; Brank, Boštjan; Korelc, Jože

    2016-08-01

    We revisit the consistently linearized path-following method that can be applied in the nonlinear finite element analysis of solids and structures in order to compute a solution path. Within this framework, two constraint equations are considered: a quadratic one (that includes as special cases popular spherical and cylindrical forms of constraint equation), and another one that constrains only one degree-of-freedom (DOF), the critical DOF. In both cases, the constrained DOFs may vary from one solution increment to another. The former constraint equation is successful in analysing geometrically nonlinear and/or standard inelastic problems with snap-throughs, snap-backs and bifurcation points. However, it cannot handle problems with the material softening that are computed e.g. by the embedded-discontinuity finite elements. This kind of problems can be solved by using the latter constraint equation. The plusses and minuses of the both presented constraint equations are discussed and illustrated on a set of numerical examples. Some of the examples also include direct computation of critical points and branch switching. The direct computation of the critical points is performed in the framework of the path-following method by using yet another constraint function, which is eigenvector-free and suited to detect critical points.

  20. The Influence of Family Structure, the TPH2 G-703T and the 5-HTTLPR Serotonergic Genes upon Affective Problems in Children Aged 10-14 Years

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nobile, Maria; Rusconi, Marianna; Bellina, Monica; Marino, Cecilia; Giorda, Roberto; Carlet, Ombretta; Vanzin, Laura; Molteni, Massimo; Battaglia, Marco

    2009-01-01

    Background: Both genetic and psychosocial risk factors influence the risk for depression in development. While the impacts of family structure and of serotonergic polymorphisms upon individual differences for affective problems have been investigated separately, they have never been considered together in a gene-environment interplay perspective.…

  1. Indoor climate problems in day institutions for children. Practical, Administrative and policy perspectives.

    PubMed

    Steensberg, J

    1985-01-01

    Based on case material from the late 1970s and early 1980s from the Institution of Medical Officers of Health covering a Danish county some examples of practical indoor climate problems in day institutions for children are given. Insufficient ventilation of premises is probably the single most important factor in the development of indoor climate problems. An effective cleaning generally improves the indoor air. The study particularly illustrates the administrative and policy perspectives of the decision making process. Those that make decisions on indoor climate problems unfortunately seem to favour a narrow definition of health, i.e. the absence of overt disease; and they are not always aware that the relationship between indoor climate factors and health effects cannot be proven in an absolute sense. Experts on the scientific aspects are needed but their statements are influenced by personal values and their perception of the reasonable balance between health protection and social costs. One of the main factors influencing the indoor climate situation in Danish day institutions for children has been the lack of an adequate regulatory framework; and the central administration and responsible ministers have failed to use the already existing legislative powers to prevent problems. Decision making in cases on the indoor climate of institutions should be accelerated; we cannot wait for proof before taking preventive measures. The indoor air of institutions is a "public good" to the same extent as the ambient air and the responsible authorities have an obligation to regulate accordingly. When building regulations prove insufficient other central authorities must support local decision makers with more specific directions. Testing of building materials, hazard rating and an approval system is needed. Guidelines on indoor climate requirements for public institutions should be developed. In countries with a built-up system of child institutions and a decreasing birth

  2. Resolving defence mechanisms: A perspective based on dissipative structure theory.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Guo, Ben-Yu

    2017-04-01

    Theories and classifications of defence mechanisms are not unified. This study addresses the psychological system as a dissipative structure which exchanges information with the external and internal world. When using defence mechanisms, the cognitive-affective schema of an individual could remain stable and ordered by excluding psychological entropy, obtaining psychological negentropy or by dissipating the energy of self-presentation. From this perspective, defences can be classified into three basic types: isolation, compensation and self-dissipation. However, not every kind of defence mechanisms can actually help the individual. Non-adaptive defences are just functioning as an effective strategy in the short run but can be a harmful approach in the long run, while adaptive defences could instead help the individual as a long-term mechanism. Thus, we would like to suggest that it is more useful for the individual to use more adaptive defence mechanisms and seek out social or interpersonal support when undergoing psychic difficulties. As this model of defences is theoretical at present, we therefore aim to support and enrich this viewpoint with empirical evidence.

  3. [Factorial structure and reliability of Zimbardo Time Perspective Inventory].

    PubMed

    Díaz-Morales, Juan Francisco

    2006-08-01

    Time orientation is a fundamental psychological variable, what it flows all aspects of human behaviour. Past, present, and future orientation decomposed of allocated into different temporal frames the continual flow of behaviour, providing meaning and coherence. It has been proposed the Zimbardo Time Perspective Inventory (ZTPI) so multidimensional measure of time orientation, which include positive and negative evaluation of past and present, as well as future evaluation. The factorial structure and reliability of ZTPI was analysed on Spanish adult population. The participants were 756 adults with age range 19-67 years old ( M = 40.1, SD = 15.45). The principal components analyses showed five factors, very similar to obtain on nort-american undergraduate samples, even thought a little difference in composition of the present-fatalist factor. The reliability of each factor was suitable. Age and gender differences analysis showed that older groups were more future oriented and less present hedonist, female were high orientation to past negative, past positive and present fatalist, while young females were more future oriented than older females.

  4. Consumption, Ecological Footprints and Global Inequality: A Lesson in Individual and Structural Components of Environmental Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Obach, Brian K.

    2009-01-01

    As evidence of the growing ecological crisis mounts, it is imperative that sociologists speak to this social problem and incorporate a sociological perspective on environmental issues into the curriculum. Central to understanding how social issues relate to environmental problems is an examination of the ties between consumption and its ecological…

  5. Perspectives of Urban Corner Store Owners and Managers on Community Health Problems and Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Young, Candace R.; Cannuscio, Carolyn C.; Karpyn, Allison; Kounaves, Sarah; Strupp, Emily; McDonough, Kevin; Shea, Judy A.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Urban corner store interventions have been implemented to improve access to and promote purchase of healthy foods. However, the perspectives of store owners and managers, who deliver and shape these interventions in collaboration with nonprofit, government, and academic partners, have been largely overlooked. We sought to explore the views of store owners and managers on the role of their stores in the community and their beliefs about health problems and solutions in the community. Methods During 2013 and 2014, we conducted semistructured, in-depth interviews in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and Camden, New Jersey, with 23 corner store owners/managers who participated in the Healthy Corner Store Initiative spearheaded by The Food Trust, a nonprofit organization focused on food access in low-income communities. We oversampled high-performing store owners. Results Store owners/managers reported that their stores served multiple roles, including providing a convenient source of goods, acting as a community hub, supporting community members, working with neighborhood schools, and improving health. Owners/managers described many challenging aspects of running a small store, including obtaining high-quality produce at a good price and in small quantities. Store owners/managers believed that obesity, diabetes, high cholesterol, and poor diet are major problems in their communities. Some owners/managers engaged with customers to discuss healthy behaviors. Conclusion Our findings suggest that store owners and managers are crucial partners for healthy eating interventions. Corner store owners/managers interact with community members daily, are aware of community health issues, and are community providers of access to food. Corner store initiatives can be used to implement innovative programs to further develop the untapped potential of store owners/managers. PMID:27736054

  6. Visualizing the Structure of Medical Informatics Using Term Co-Occurrence Analysis: II. INSPEC Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Theodore

    2001-01-01

    Term co-occurrence analysis of INSPEC classification codes and thesaurus terms used to index Medical Informatics literature reveals an information science and technology perspective on the field, to accompany the biomedical perspective previously reported. This study continues the search for a better understanding of the structure of Medical…

  7. Potentials and problems in space applications of smart structures technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eaton, D. C.; Bashford, D. P.

    1994-09-01

    The well known addage 'don't run before you can walk emerging materials. It typically takes ten years before a material is sufficiently well characterized for commercial aerospace application. Much has to be learnt not only about the material properties and their susceptibility to the effects of their working environment but also about the manufacturing process and the most effective configuration related application. No project will accept a product which has no proven reliability and attractive cost effectiveness in its application. The writers firmly believe that smart structures and their related technologies must follow a similar development pattern. Indeed, faced with a range of interdisciplinary problems it seems likely that 'partially smart' techniques may well be the first applications. These will place emphasis on the more readily realizable features for any structural application. Prior use may well have been achieved in other engineering sectors. Because ground based applications are more readily accessible to check and maintain, these are generally the front runners of smart technology usage. Nevertheless, there is a strong potential for the use of smart techniques in space applications if their capabilities can be advantageously introduced when compared with traditional solutions. This paper endeavors to give a critical appraisal of the possibilities and the accompanying problems. A sample overview of related developing space technology is included. The reader is also referred to chapters 90 to 94 in ESA's Structural Materials Handbook (ESA PSS 03 203, issue 1.). It is envisaged that future space applications may include the realization and maintenance of large deployable reflector profiles, the dimensional stability of optical payloads, active noise and vibration control and in orbit health monitoring and control for largely unmanned spacecraft. The possibility of monitoring the health of items such as large cryogenic fuel tanks is a typical longer

  8. Interactions in Bacterial Biofilm Development: A Structural Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Garnett, James A; Matthews, Steve

    2012-01-01

    A community-based life style is the normal mode of growth and survival for many bacterial species. These cellular accretions or biofilms are initiated upon recognition of solid phases by cell surface exposed adhesive moieties. Further cell-cell interactions, cell signalling and bacterial replication leads to the establishment of dense populations encapsulated in a mainly self-produced extracellular matrix; this comprises a complex mixture of macromolecules. These fascinating architectures protect the inhabitants from radiation damage, dehydration, pH fluctuations and antimicrobial compounds. As such they can cause bacterial persistence in disease and problems in industrial applications. In this review we discuss the current understandings of these initial biofilm-forming processes based on structural data. We also briefly describe latter biofilm maturation and dispersal events, which although lack high-resolution insights, are the present focus for many structural biologists working in this field. Finally we give an overview of modern techniques aimed at preventing and disrupting problem biofilms. PMID:23305361

  9. Topographic mapping of oral structures - problems and applications in prosthodontics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, John M.; Altschuler, Bruce R.

    1981-10-01

    The diagnosis and treatment of malocclusion, and the proper design of restorations and prostheses, requires the determination of surface topography of the teeth and related oral structures. Surface contour measurements involve not only affected teeth, but adjacent and opposing surface contours composing a complexly interacting occlusal system. No a priori knowledge is predictable as dental structures are largely asymmetrical, non-repetitive, and non-uniform curvatures in 3-D space. Present diagnosis, treatment planning, and fabrication relies entirely on the generation of physical replicas during each stage of treatment. Fabrication is limited to materials that lend themselves to casting or coating, and to hand fitting and finishing. Inspection is primarily by vision and patient perceptual feedback. Production methods are time-consuming. Prostheses are entirely custom designed by manual methods, require costly skilled technical labor, and do not lend themselves to centralization. The potential improvement in diagnostic techniques, improved patient care, increased productivity, and cost-savings in material and man-hours that could result, if rapid and accurate remote measurement and numerical (automated) fabrication methods were devised, would be significant. The unique problems of mapping oral structures, and specific limitations in materials and methods, are reviewed.

  10. Summer Sessions in Colleges and Universities: Perspectives, Practices, Problems, and Prospects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Raymond J.; McDougall, William P.

    This book offers normative information about various operational facets of collegiate summer activities, places the role of the modern day collegiate summer session in evolutionary perspective, and provides baseline information produced by four national studies and one regional study. The book's chapters focus on: (1) a global perspective and…

  11. Children's Use of Feature Descriptions to Solve Spatial Perspective and Rotation Problems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ives, S.W.; Rakow, J.

    1983-01-01

    Among young children, verbalization led to many correct responses on a spatial perspective task (indicating views of an object from different positions), but produced few correct responses in a rotation task (imagining different views of a rotating object). Results suggested that language enhances perspective task performance by allowing feature…

  12. Symplectic structures related with higher order variational problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kijowski, Jerzy; Moreno, Giovanni

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, we derive the symplectic framework for field theories defined by higher order Lagrangians. The construction is based on the symplectic reduction of suitable spaces of iterated jets. The possibility of reducing a higher order system of partial differential equations to a constrained first-order one, the symplectic structures naturally arising in the dynamics of a first-order Lagrangian theory, and the importance of the Poincaré-Cartan form for variational problems, are all well-established facts. However, their adequate combination corresponding to higher order theories is missing in the literature. Here we obtain a consistent and truly finite-dimensional canonical formalism, as well as a higher order version of the Poincaré-Cartan form. In our exposition, the rigorous global proofs of the main results are always accompanied by their local coordinate descriptions, indispensable to work out practical examples.

  13. Introduction to the special issue on aquifer-sedimentology: problems, perspectives and modern approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huggenberger, Peter; Aigner, Tom

    1999-12-01

    Progress towards a better understanding of groundwater circulation and transport processes in aquifers demands a multidisciplinary approach to a host of unresolved problems. Although much progress has been made within recent years in interpreting the dynamic character of groundwater systems, many key issues remain to be addressed. In particular, several areas demand attention: the role of sedimentological information (heterogeneity) in groundwater and transport models, the scaling-up of observations from outcrop scale to larger scales and the integration of geological and geophysical information of different quality into the description of an aquifer structure. Still nowadays many of the heterogeneities cannot be recognized directly because of the limitation of measurement techniques. This is probably one of the reasons for the limited application of aquifer-sedimentology and geophysics in practical cases. In order to consolidate, expand, and make a larger number of people aware of the contribution of modern aquifer-sedimentology, including modelling and ultra-high resolution geophysical methods, several lines of intervention were identified: (1) a better collaboration of the different disciplines on site-specific applied problems; (2) development of new modelling techniques combining data of different quality; (3) development of optimizing tools (position and number of wells, additional geophysical methods, baysian techniques); (4) development of a `common language' among sedimentologists and hydrogeologists to overcome communication problems.

  14. Solving Optimal Control Problems by Exploiting Inherent Dynamical Systems Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flaßkamp, Kathrin; Ober-Blöbaum, Sina; Kobilarov, Marin

    2012-08-01

    Computing globally efficient solutions is a major challenge in optimal control of nonlinear dynamical systems. This work proposes a method combining local optimization and motion planning techniques based on exploiting inherent dynamical systems structures, such as symmetries and invariant manifolds. Prior to the optimal control, the dynamical system is analyzed for structural properties that can be used to compute pieces of trajectories that are stored in a motion planning library. In the context of mechanical systems, these motion planning candidates, termed primitives, are given by relative equilibria induced by symmetries and motions on stable or unstable manifolds of e.g. fixed points in the natural dynamics. The existence of controlled relative equilibria is studied through Lagrangian mechanics and symmetry reduction techniques. The proposed framework can be used to solve boundary value problems by performing a search in the space of sequences of motion primitives connected using optimized maneuvers. The optimal sequence can be used as an admissible initial guess for a post-optimization. The approach is illustrated by two numerical examples, the single and the double spherical pendula, which demonstrates its benefit compared to standard local optimization techniques.

  15. Gas phase structures of peroxides: experiments and computational problems.

    PubMed

    Oberhammer, Heinz

    2015-02-02

    Gas-phase structures of several organic and inorganic peroxides X-O-O-X and X-O-O-X', which have been determined experimentally by gas electron diffraction and/or microwave spectroscopy, are discussed. The OO bond length in these peroxides varies from 1.481(8) Å in Me3 SiOOSiMe3 to 1.214(2) Å in FOOF and the dihedral angle ϕ(XO-OX) between 0° in HC(O)O-OH and near 180° in Bu(t) O-OBu(t) . Some of the peroxides cause problems for quantum chemistry, since several computational methods fail to reproduce the experimental structures. Extreme examples are MeO-OMe and FO-OF. In the case of MeO-OMe only about half of the more than 100 computational methods reported in the literature reproduce the experimentally determined double-minimum shape of the torsional potential around the OO bond correctly. For FO-OF only a small number of close to 200 computational methods reproduce the OO and OF bond lengths better than ±0.02 Å.

  16. Perspectives on Sleep, Sleep Problems, and Their Treatment, in People with Serious Mental Illnesses: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Faulkner, Sophie; Bee, Penny

    Sleep problems are common in people with serious mental illness, and impact negatively on functioning and wellbeing. To understand the development of sleep problems, their maintenance, and their treatment, an in depth understanding of patient perspectives is crucial. A systematic literature review was conducted using Medline, AMED, PsychInfo, Embase and CINAHL. Qualitative and quantitative studies were included if they explored or measured patient perspectives on sleep, sleep problems or sleep treatments in people with serious mental illness. Of the 2,067 hits, only 22 met review inclusion criteria, and high quality evidence was sparse. The limited findings suggested sleep was seen as highly interlinked with mental health. Evaluations of treatments varied, however perceived efficacy and personalisation of treatments were valued. Some evidence suggested patient priorities and conceptualisations regarding sleep may diverge from those of validated screening tools developed in general population and sleep medicine samples. More rigorous research is needed to support adaptation and development of interventions and outcome measures for use in specialist mental health settings. Qualitative studies exploring the experience of sleep disturbance in particular diagnostic groups and contexts are urgently required, as are patient perspectives on sleep interventions.

  17. Perspectives on Sleep, Sleep Problems, and Their Treatment, in People with Serious Mental Illnesses: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Bee, Penny

    2016-01-01

    Sleep problems are common in people with serious mental illness, and impact negatively on functioning and wellbeing. To understand the development of sleep problems, their maintenance, and their treatment, an in depth understanding of patient perspectives is crucial. A systematic literature review was conducted using Medline, AMED, PsychInfo, Embase and CINAHL. Qualitative and quantitative studies were included if they explored or measured patient perspectives on sleep, sleep problems or sleep treatments in people with serious mental illness. Of the 2,067 hits, only 22 met review inclusion criteria, and high quality evidence was sparse. The limited findings suggested sleep was seen as highly interlinked with mental health. Evaluations of treatments varied, however perceived efficacy and personalisation of treatments were valued. Some evidence suggested patient priorities and conceptualisations regarding sleep may diverge from those of validated screening tools developed in general population and sleep medicine samples. More rigorous research is needed to support adaptation and development of interventions and outcome measures for use in specialist mental health settings. Qualitative studies exploring the experience of sleep disturbance in particular diagnostic groups and contexts are urgently required, as are patient perspectives on sleep interventions. PMID:27657927

  18. An embodied perspective on expertise in solving the problem of making a geologic map

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callahan, Caitlin Norah

    The task of constructing a geologic map is a cognitively and physically demanding field-based problem. The map produced is understood to be an individual's two-dimensional interpretation or mental model of the three-dimensional underlying geology. A popular view within the geoscience community is that teaching students how to make a geologic map is valuable for preparing them to deal with disparate and incomplete data sets, for helping them develop problem-solving skills, and for acquiring expertise in geology. Few previous studies have focused specifically on expertise in geologic mapping. Drawing from literature related to expertise, to problem solving, and to mental models, two overarching research questions were identified: How do geologists of different levels of expertise constrain and solve an ill-structured problem such as making a geologic map? How do geologists address the uncertainties inherent to the processes and interpretations involved in solving a geologic mapping problem? These questions were answered using a methodology that captured the physical actions, expressed thoughts, and navigation paths of geologists as they made a geologic map. Eight geologists, from novice to expert, wore a head-mounted video camera with an attached microphone to record those actions and thoughts, creating "video logs" while in the field. The video logs were also time-stamped, which allowed the visual and audio data to be synchronized with the GPS data that tracked participants' movements in the field. Analysis of the video logs yielded evidence that all eight participants expressed thoughts that reflected the process of becoming mentally situated in the mapping task (e.g. relating between distance on a map and distance in three-dimensional space); the prominence of several of these early thoughts waned in the expressed thoughts later in the day. All participants collected several types of data while in the field; novices, however, did so more continuously throughout

  19. Effects of a Problem-Based Structure of Physics Contents on Conceptual Learning and the Ability to Solve Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Becerra-Labra, Carlos; Gras-Marti, Albert; Torregrosa, Joaquin Martinez

    2012-01-01

    A model of teaching/learning is proposed based on a "problem-based structure" of the contents of the course, in combination with a training in paper and pencil problem solving that emphasizes discussion and quantitative analysis, rather than formulae plug-in. The aim is to reverse the high failure and attrition rate among engineering…

  20. Detangling the Interrelationships between Self- Regulation and Ill-Structured Problem Solving in Problem-Based Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ge, Xun; Law, Victor; Huang, Kun

    2016-01-01

    One of the goals for problem-based learning (PBL) is to promote self-regulation. Although self-regulation has been studied extensively, its interrelationships with ill-structured problem solving have been unclear. In order to clarify the interrelationships, this article proposes a conceptual framework illustrating the iterative processes among…

  1. Problems in understanding the structure and assembly of viruses

    SciTech Connect

    King, J.

    1997-12-01

    Though viruses infect the cells of all groups of animals, plants, and microorganisms, their structures follow a limited number of general themes; spherical or cylindrical shells built of hundreds of repeated protein subunits enclosing a nucleic acid - DNA or RNA - genome. Since the 1960s it has been known that the protein shells of spherical viruses in fact conform to icosahedral symmetry or to subtle deviations from icosahedral symmetry. The construction of the shell lattices and the transformations they go through in the different stages of the viral life cycle are not fully understood. The shells contain the nucleic in a highly condensed state, of unknown coiling/organization. Features of the well studied bacterial viruses will be reviewed, with examples from adenoviruses, herpesviruses, poliovirus, and HIV. The emergence of new viral disease has led to increased interest in the development of agents which interfere with virus reproduction at the level of the assembly or function of the organized particle. Recently computational approaches to the problem of virus assembly have made important contributions to clarifying shell assembly processes. 1 ref.

  2. How scientific is the science in ethnopharmacology? Historical perspectives and epistemological problems.

    PubMed

    Gertsch, Jürg

    2009-03-18

    This commentary is based on a general concern regarding the low level of self-criticism (-evaluation) in the interpretation of molecular pharmacological data published in ethnopharmacology-related journals. Reports on potentially new lead structures or pharmacological effects of medicinal plant extracts are mushrooming. At the same time, nonsense in bioassays is an increasing phenomenon in herbal medicine research. Only because a dataset is reproducible does not imply that it is meaningful. Currently, there are thousands of claims of pharmacological effects of medicinal plants and natural products. It is argued that claims to knowledge in ethnopharmacology, as in the exact sciences, should be rationally criticized if they have empirical content as it is the case with biochemical and pharmacological analyses. Here the major problem is the misemployment of the concentration-effect paradigm and the overinterpretation of data obtained in vitro. Given the almost exponential increase of scientific papers published it may be the moment to adapt to a falsificationist methodology.

  3. Assisting Workers Displaced by Structural Change. An International Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leigh, Duane E.

    This monograph takes the perspective that increased awareness of how active labor market programs operate in other nations can substantially improve the way in which the United States deals with worker displacement. Chapter 1 considers the costs of worker displacement and how government programs designed to reduce these costs are evaluated.…

  4. Incremental Validity and Informant Effect from a Multi-Method Perspective: Assessing Relations between Parental Acceptance and Children’s Behavioral Problems

    PubMed Central

    Izquierdo-Sotorrío, Eva; Holgado-Tello, Francisco P.; Carrasco, Miguel Á.

    2016-01-01

    This study examines the relationships between perceived parental acceptance and children’s behavioral problems (externalizing and internalizing) from a multi-informant perspective. Using mothers, fathers, and children as sources of information, we explore the informant effect and incremental validity. The sample was composed of 681 participants (227 children, 227 fathers, and 227 mothers). Children’s (40% boys) ages ranged from 9 to 17 years (M = 12.52, SD = 1.81). Parents and children completed both the Parental Acceptance Rejection/Control Questionnaire (PARQ/Control) and the check list of the Achenbach System of Empirically Based Assessment (ASEBA). Statistical analyses were based on the correlated uniqueness multitrait-multimethod matrix (model MTMM) by structural equations and different hierarchical regression analyses. Results showed a significant informant effect and a different incremental validity related to which combination of sources was considered. A multi-informant perspective rather than a single one increased the predictive value. Our results suggest that mother–father or child–father combinations seem to be the best way to optimize the multi-informant method in order to predict children’s behavioral problems based on perceived parental acceptance. PMID:27242582

  5. What Does (and Doesn't) Make Analogical Problem Solving Easy? A Complexity-Theoretic Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wareham, Todd; Evans, Patricia; van Rooij, Iris

    2011-01-01

    Solving new problems can be made easier if one can build on experiences with other problems one has already successfully solved. The ability to exploit earlier problem-solving experiences in solving new problems seems to require several cognitive sub-abilities. Minimally, one needs to be able to retrieve relevant knowledge of earlier solved…

  6. Semantic Annotation of Complex Text Structures in Problem Reports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malin, Jane T.; Throop, David R.; Fleming, Land D.

    2011-01-01

    Text analysis is important for effective information retrieval from databases where the critical information is embedded in text fields. Aerospace safety depends on effective retrieval of relevant and related problem reports for the purpose of trend analysis. The complex text syntax in problem descriptions has limited statistical text mining of problem reports. The presentation describes an intelligent tagging approach that applies syntactic and then semantic analysis to overcome this problem. The tags identify types of problems and equipment that are embedded in the text descriptions. The power of these tags is illustrated in a faceted searching and browsing interface for problem report trending that combines automatically generated tags with database code fields and temporal information.

  7. A Cognitive Architecture for Solving Ill-Structured Problems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-08-01

    and the " lightbulb problem" requires using a laser to fuse a filament in a lightbulb without breaking the surrounding bulb. Each proposition consists...Calculus Representations of Radiation and Lightbulb Problems RADIATION PROBLEM (target) Start: (ray-source (obj.ray) ri) (tissue (obj.tissue) r2) (tumor...tumor) r2i) (not-destroyed (obj.tissue) r22) LIGHTBULB PROBLEM (source) Start: (laser (obj-laser) bl) (bulb (obj-bulb) b2) (filament (obj-filament) b3

  8. On Multilevel Model Reliability Estimation From the Perspective of Structural Equation Modeling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raykov, Tenko; Marcoulides, George A.

    2006-01-01

    A covariance structure modeling perspective on reliability estimation can be used to construct a formal approach to estimation of reliability in multilevel models. This article presents a didactic discussion of the relation between a structural modeling procedure for scale reliability estimation and the notion of reliability of observed means in…

  9. The Use of Video Cases in a Multimedia Learning Environment for Facilitating High School Students' Inquiry into a Problem from Varying Perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zydney, Janet Mannheimer; Grincewicz, Amy

    2011-12-01

    This study investigated the connection between the use of video cases within a multimedia learning environment and students' inquiry into a socio-scientific problem. The software program was designed based on principles from the Cognitive Flexibility Theory (CFT) and incorporated video cases of experts with differing perspectives. Seventy-nine 10th-grade students in an urban high school participated in this study. After watching the expert videos, students generated investigative questions and reflected on how their ideas changed over time. This study found a significant correlation between the time students spent watching the expert videos and their ability to consider the problem's perspectives as well as their ability to integrate these perspectives within their questions. Moreover, problem-solving ability and time watching the videos were detected as possible influential predictors of students' consideration of the problem's perspectives within their questions. Although students watched all video cases in equivalent ways, one of the video cases, which incorporated multiple perspectives as opposed to just presenting one perspective, appeared most influential in helping students integrate the various perspectives into their own thinking. A qualitative analysis of students' reflections indicated that many students appreciated the complexity, authenticity, and ethical dimensions of the problem. It also revealed that while the majority of students thought critically about the problem, some students still had naïve or simplistic ways of thinking. This study provided some preliminary evidence that offering students the opportunity to watch videos of different perspectives may influence them to think in alternative ways about a complex problem.

  10. Mathematical Abstraction in the Solving of Ill-Structured Problems by Elementary School Students in Korea

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hong, Jee Yun; Kim, Min Kyeong

    2016-01-01

    Ill-structured problems can be regarded as one of the measures that meet recent social needs emphasizing students' abilities to solve real-life problems. This study aimed to analyze the mathematical abstraction process in solving such problems, and to identify the mathematical abstraction level ([I] Recognition of mathematical structure through…

  11. Pre-Service Elementary Teachers' Motivation and Ill-Structured Problem Solving in Korea

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Min Kyeong; Cho, Mi Kyung

    2016-01-01

    This article examines the use and application of an ill-structured problem to pre-service elementary teachers in Korea in order to find implications of pre-service teacher education with regard to contextualized problem solving by analyzing experiences of ill-structured problem solving. Participants were divided into small groups depending on the…

  12. The Problem of Data in the Cognitive Linguistic Research on Metonymy: A Cross-Linguistic Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brdar-Szabo, Rita; Brdar, Mario

    2012-01-01

    The general goal of the present paper is to demonstrate how cross-linguistic (contrastive) data can broaden the perspective in cognitive linguistic research on metonymy, which may raise a host of questions calling for a revision of some widely accepted views. A more specific, methodological goal is to show how the introspection-driven research and…

  13. "The Problem of Trinity College Dublin": A Historical Perspective on Rationalisation in Higher Education in Ireland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walsh, John

    2014-01-01

    This paper offers a historical perspective on government policies for the rationalisation of higher education (HE) in Ireland through a critical re-appraisal of the initiative for "merger" of Trinity College and University College Dublin. The initiative launched by Donogh O'Malley in 1967 was the first significant attempt by an Irish…

  14. The Problem of the Pyramid or Egyptian Mathematics from a Postmodern Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shutler, Paul M. E.

    2009-01-01

    We consider Egyptian mathematics from a postmodern perspective, by which we mean suspending judgement as to strict correctness in order to appreciate the genuine mathematical insights which they did have in the context in which they were working. In particular we show that the skill which the Egyptians possessed of obtaining the general case from…

  15. Challenges Experienced by Korean Medical Students and Tutors during Problem-Based Learning: A Cultural Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ju, Hyunjung; Choi, Ikseon; Rhee, Byoung Doo; Tae-Lee, Jong

    2016-01-01

    How people learn is influenced by the cultural contexts in which their learning occurs. This qualitative case study explored challenges Korean medical students and tutors experienced during their PBL sessions from a cultural perspective using Hofstede's cultural dimensions. Twelve preclinical medical students and nine tutors from a large Korean…

  16. Solution to certain problems in the failure of composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodsell, Johnathan

    The present work contains the solution of two problems in composite structures. In the first, an approximate elasticity solution for prediction of the displacement, stress and strain fields within the m-layer, symmetric and balanced angle-ply composite laminate of finite-width subjected anticlastic bending deformation is developed. The solution is shown to recover classical laminated plate theory predictions at interior regions of the laminate and thereby illustrates the boundary layer character of this interlaminar phenomenon. The results exhibit the anticipated response in congruence with the solutions for uniform axial extension and uniform temperature change, where divergence of the interlaminar shearing stress is seen to occur at the intersection of the free-edge and planes between lamina of +theta and -theta orientation. The analytical results show excellent agreement with the finite-element predictions for the same boundary-value problem and thereby provide an efficient and compact solution available for parametric studies of the influence of geometry and material properties. The solution is combined with previously developed solutions for uniform axial extension and uniform temperature change of the identical laminate and the combined solution is exercised to compare the relative magnitudes of free-edge phenomenon arising from the different loading conditions, to study very thick laminates and laminates where the laminate width is less than the laminate thickness. Significantly, it was demonstrated that the solution is valid for arbitrary stacking sequence and the solution was exercised to examine antisymmetric and non-symmetric laminates. Finally, the solution was exercised to determine the dimensions of the boundary layer for very large numbers of layers. It was found that the dimension of the boundary layer width in bending is approximately twice that in uniform axial extension and uniform temperature change. In the second, the intrinsic flaw concept is

  17. Parent and Teacher Perspectives about Problem Behavior in Children with Williams Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klein-Tasman, Bonita P.; Lira, Ernesto N.; Li-Barber, Kirsten T.; Gallo, Frank J.; Brei, Natalie G.

    2015-01-01

    Problem behavior of 52 children with Williams syndrome ages 6 to 17 years old was examined based on both parent and teacher report. Generally good inter-rater agreement was found. Common areas of problem behavior based both on parent and teacher report included attention problems, anxiety difficulties, repetitive behaviors (e.g., obsessions,…

  18. How Can One Learn Mathematical Word Problems in a Second Language? A Cognitive Load Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moussa-Inaty, Jase; Causapin, Mark; Groombridge, Timothy

    2015-01-01

    Language may ordinarily account for difficulties in solving word problems and this is particularly true if mathematical word problems are taught in a language other than one's native language. Research into cognitive load may offer a clear theoretical framework when investigating word problems because memory, specifically working memory, plays a…

  19. Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tarone, Elaine

    2013-01-01

    The topic of this "Perspectives" column is "Requiring a Proficiency Level as a Requirement for U.S. K-12 Teacher Licensure." In 1998, the American Council of Teachers of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) began to work with the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE), which accredits teacher education programs…

  20. Elimination of Leprosy as a public health problem by 2000 AD: an epidemiological perspective

    PubMed Central

    Nsagha, Dickson Shey; Bamgboye, Elijah Afolabi; Assob, Jules Clement Nguedia; Njunda, Anna Longdoh; Kamga, Henri Lucien Foumou; Zoung-Kanyi Bissek, Anne-Cécile; Tabah, Earnest Nji; Oyediran, Alain Bankole OO; Njamnshi, Alfred Kongnyu

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Leprosy is caused by Mycobacterium leprae and manifests as damage to the skin and peripheral nerves. The disease is dreaded because it causes deformities, blindness and disfigurement. Worldwide, 2 million people are estimated to be disabled by leprosy. Multidrug therapy is highly effective in curing leprosy, but treating the nerve damage is much more difficult. The World Health Assembly targeted to eliminate leprosy as a public health problem from the world by 2000. The objective of the review was to assess the successes of the leprosy elimination strategy, elimination hurdles and the way forward for leprosy eradication. Methods A structured search was used to identify publications on the elimination strategy. The keywords used were leprosy, elimination and 2000. To identify potential publications, we included papers on leprosy elimination monitoring, special action projects for the elimination of leprosy, modified leprosy elimination campaigns, and the Global Alliance to eliminate leprosy from the following principal data bases: Cochrane data base of systematic reviews, PubMed, Medline, EMBASE, and the Leprosy data base. We also scanned reference lists for important citations. Key leprosy journals including WHO publications were also reviewed. Results The search identified 63 journal publications on leprosy-related terms that included a form of elimination of which 19 comprehensively tackled the keywords including a book on leprosy elimination. In 1991, the 44th World Health Assembly called for the elimination of leprosy as a public health problem in the world by 2000. Elimination was defined as less than one case of leprosy per 10000-population. Elimination has been made possible by a confluence of several orders of opportunities: the scientific (the natural history of leprosy at the present state of knowledge), technological (multi-drug therapy and the blister pack); political (commitment of governments) and financial (support from NGOs for example

  1. "We want the world and we want it now": Materialism, time perspectives and problem spending tendency of Chinese.

    PubMed

    Ku, Lisbeth; Wu, Anise M S; Lao, Angie K P; Lam, Kerwin I N

    2016-10-06

    Chinese consumers' spending has been expanding rapidly in the past decade, and along with it household and credit card debt. The present research collected evidence to triangulate the contention that materialism is positively related with Chinese's problem spending tendency (PST), and that present-time-perspective (PTP) and future-time perspectives (FTP) interact systematically with materialism to affect PST. A survey of the general population in Macao, China (Study 1; N = 239) confirmed that materialism was positively correlated with PST. An interaction between materialism and PTP intensified the relationship, whereas an interaction with FTP weakened the relationship. Another survey with a sample of university students (Study 2; N = 223) again found positive relationships among PST, materialism, and PTP, as measured by temporal discount rate. But further exploration showed that PST was only related with temporal discounting among high materialists, but not among low materialists. Study 3 experimentally examined the causal effects of materialism and FTP on PST. When being primed of an orientation towards materialism (n = 33), the participants' planned consumption doubled that of the control group (n = 31). A FTP prime interacted with materialism prime and put a "damper" on participants' planned spending (n = 29), compared to their counterparts who were not primed of such a time perspective.

  2. The structure of problem behaviours among Irish adolescents.

    PubMed

    Grube, J W; Morgan, M

    1990-05-01

    Problem behaviour theory proposes that adolescent substance use and other problem behaviours comprise a single dimension reflecting a general underlying tendency towards deviance. This general deviance hypothesis was tested with survey data obtained from 2731 adolescents from Dublin, Ireland. A series of hierarchical maximum likelihood factor analyses indicated that three specific factors were necessary to account for the covariation among problem behaviour measures. These factors corresponded to substance use (drinking, smoking, marijuana use, and other drug use), relatively minor problem behaviours (swearing, lying), and relatively serious problem behaviours (stealing, vandalism). Contrary to the general deviance hypothesis, a second order factor representing general deviance accounted for only 14% of the variance in substance use, on the average, as opposed to 74% of the variance in minor and serious problem behaviours. These findings thus indicate that substance use among these Irish adolescents is relatively independent of a general tendency toward deviance. They also suggest that the general deviance hypothesis, as it usually is applied, may be culturally specific and relevant only for adolescents from the United States and similar cultural contexts.

  3. Embellishing Problem-Solving Examples with Deep Structure Information Facilitates Transfer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Hee Seung; Betts, Shawn; Anderson, John R.

    2017-01-01

    Appreciation of problem structure is critical to successful learning. Two experiments investigated effective ways of communicating problem structure in a computer-based learning environment and tested whether verbal instruction is necessary to specify solution steps, when deep structure is already embellished by instructional examples.…

  4. Hybrid schemes based on quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics simulations goals to success, problems, and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Ferrer, Silvia; Ruiz-Pernía, Javier; Martí, Sergio; Moliner, Vicent; Tuñón, Iñaki; Bertrán, Juan; Andrés, Juan

    2011-01-01

    The development of characterization techniques, advanced synthesis methods, as well as molecular modeling has transformed the study of systems in a well-established research field. The current research challenges in biocatalysis and biotransformation evolve around enzyme discovery, design, and optimization. How can we find or create enzymes that catalyze important synthetic reactions, even reactions that may not exist in nature? What is the source of enzyme catalytic power? To answer these and other related questions, the standard strategies have evolved from trial-and-error methodologies based on chemical knowledge, accumulated experience, and common sense into a clearly multidisciplinary science that allows one to reach the molecular design of tailor-made enzyme catalysts. This is even more so when one refers to enzyme catalysts, for which the detailed structure and composition are known and can be manipulated to introduce well-defined residues which can be implicated in the chemical rearrangements taking place in the active site. The methods and techniques of theoretical and computational chemistry are becoming more and more important in both understanding the fundamental biological roles of enzymes and facilitating their utilization in biotechnology. Improvement of the catalytic function of enzymes is important from scientific and industrial viewpoints, and to put this fact in the actual perspective as well as the potentialities, we recommend the very recent report of Sanderson [Sanderson, K. (2011). Chemistry: enzyme expertise. Nature 471, 397.]. Great fundamental advances have been made toward the ab initio design of enzyme catalysts based on molecular modeling. This has been based on the molecular mechanistic knowledge of the reactions to be catalyzed, together with the development of advanced synthesis and characterization techniques. The corresponding molecular mechanism can be studied by means of powerful quantum chemical calculations. The catalytic

  5. Integrated Force Method Solution to Indeterminate Structural Mechanics Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patnaik, Surya N.; Hopkins, Dale A.; Halford, Gary R.

    2004-01-01

    Strength of materials problems have been classified into determinate and indeterminate problems. Determinate analysis primarily based on the equilibrium concept is well understood. Solutions of indeterminate problems required additional compatibility conditions, and its comprehension was not exclusive. A solution to indeterminate problem is generated by manipulating the equilibrium concept, either by rewriting in the displacement variables or through the cutting and closing gap technique of the redundant force method. Compatibility improvisation has made analysis cumbersome. The authors have researched and understood the compatibility theory. Solutions can be generated with equal emphasis on the equilibrium and compatibility concepts. This technique is called the Integrated Force Method (IFM). Forces are the primary unknowns of IFM. Displacements are back-calculated from forces. IFM equations are manipulated to obtain the Dual Integrated Force Method (IFMD). Displacement is the primary variable of IFMD and force is back-calculated. The subject is introduced through response variables: force, deformation, displacement; and underlying concepts: equilibrium equation, force deformation relation, deformation displacement relation, and compatibility condition. Mechanical load, temperature variation, and support settling are equally emphasized. The basic theory is discussed. A set of examples illustrate the new concepts. IFM and IFMD based finite element methods are introduced for simple problems.

  6. The Structure of the Help-Seeking Process in Collaboratively Using a Computer Coach in Problem-Based Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mercier, Julien; Frederiksen, Carl

    2008-01-01

    Research on help seeking with a computer coach providing on-demand help has not produced fully adequate models of the process from a cognitive perspective. The present study postulates a model of help seeking from a cognitive perspective and tests this model in a learning situation characterized as problem-based and computer-supported. The…

  7. Mapping brain structure and function: cellular resolution, global perspective.

    PubMed

    Zupanc, Günther K H

    2017-04-01

    A comprehensive understanding of the brain requires analysis, although from a global perspective, with cellular, and even subcellular, resolution. An important step towards this goal involves the establishment of three-dimensional high-resolution brain maps, incorporating brain-wide information about the cells and their connections, as well as the chemical architecture. The progress made in such anatomical brain mapping in recent years has been paralleled by the development of physiological techniques that enable investigators to generate global neural activity maps, also with cellular resolution, while simultaneously recording the organism's behavioral activity. Combination of the high-resolution anatomical and physiological maps, followed by theoretical systems analysis of the deduced network, will offer unprecedented opportunities for a better understanding of how the brain, as a whole, processes sensory information and generates behavior.

  8. Structuring Video Cases to Support Future Teachers' Problem Solving

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kale, Ugur; Whitehouse, Pamela

    2012-01-01

    This study examined preservice teachers' problem-solving skills through the use of an online video case study. Eighty preservice teachers participated in the study with a three-level video presentation by a two-grade-level between-subjects factorial design. The study incorporates a content analysis framework to examine both the components and the…

  9. Provide Structure for Children With Learning and Behavior Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swanson, Terri Cooper

    2005-01-01

    Children with learning and behavior problems often have difficulty getting through their day, to a great extent because they have difficulty organizing themselves and understanding the organization of the environment around them. Neurotypical children and adults organize themselves in many ways by using calendars, planners, lists, and so forth.…

  10. Developing Physics Concepts through Hands-On Problem Solving: A Perspective on a Technological Project Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hong, Jon-Chao; Chen, Mei-Yung; Wong, Ashley; Hsu, Tsui-Fang; Peng, Chih-Chi

    2012-01-01

    In a contest featuring hands-on projects, college students were required to design a simple crawling worm using planning, self-monitoring and self-evaluation processes to solve contradictive problems. To enhance the efficiency of problem solving, one needs to practice meta-cognition based on an application of related scientific concepts. The…

  11. Problems and Perspectives on the Evaluation of Regional and National Computer-Related Educational Activity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collis, Betty

    Although the importance of systematic evaluation of educational policy and practice is well established, various problems confound the intention of evaluating regional or national activity with regard to computer-related activities in education. At least two of these problems relate to a general conception of the appropriate entry points for…

  12. Valuation of Child Behavioral Problems from the Perspective of US Adults

    PubMed Central

    Craig, Benjamin M.; Brown, Derek S.; Reeve, Bryce B.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To assess preferences between child behavioral problems and estimate their value on a quality-adjusted life year (QALYs) scale. METHODS Respondents, age 18 or older, drawn from a nationally representative panel between August 2012 and February 2013 completed a series of paired comparisons, each involving a choice between 2 different behavioral problems described using the Behavioral Problems Index (BPI), a 28-item instrument with 6 domains (Anxious/Depressed, Headstrong, Hyperactive, Immature Dependency, Anti-social, and Peer Conflict/Social Withdrawal). Each behavioral problem lasted 1 or 2 years for an unnamed child, age 7 or 10 years, with no suggested relationship to the respondent. Generalized linear model analyses estimated the value of each problem on a QALY scale, considering its duration and child’s age. RESULTS Among 5207 eligible respondents, 4155 (80%) completed all questions. Across the 6 domains, problems relating to antisocial behavior were the least preferred, particularly the items related to cheating, lying, bullying, and cruelty to others. CONCLUSIONS The findings are the first to produce a preference-based summary measure of child behavioral problems on a QALY scale. The results may inform both clinical practice and resource allocation decisions by enhancing our understanding of difficult tradeoffs in how adults view child behavioral problems. Understanding US values also promotes national health surveillance by complementing conventional measures of surveillance, survival, and diagnoses. PMID:26209476

  13. Solving the Teacher Shortage Problem in Ghana: Critical Perspectives for Understanding the Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cobbold, Cosmas

    2015-01-01

    The problem of getting sufficient numbers of qualified teachers to staff classrooms is one of the most significant public policy issues facing many countries. In Ghana, the problem of teacher shortage has been a perennial one, necessitated by educational expansion as well as adverse socio-economic and political circumstances, and exacerbated by…

  14. Cognitive Load for Configuration Comprehension in Computer-Supported Geometry Problem Solving: An Eye Movement Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, John Jr-Hung; Lin, Sunny S. J.

    2014-01-01

    The present study investigated (a) whether the perceived cognitive load was different when geometry problems with various levels of configuration comprehension were solved and (b) whether eye movements in comprehending geometry problems showed sources of cognitive loads. In the first investigation, three characteristics of geometry configurations…

  15. Saudi English-Major Undergraduates' Academic Writing Problems: A Taif University Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Khairy, Mohamed Ali

    2013-01-01

    This study attempted to investigate Saudi English-major undergraduates studying at Taif University to identify a) the types of academic writing Saudi English-major undergraduates carry out at English departments, b) Saudi English-major undergraduates' writing problems, c) the reasons behind Saudi English-major undergraduates' writing problems and…

  16. A Developmental Perspective on Peer Rejection, Deviant Peer Affiliation, and Conduct Problems Among Youth.

    PubMed

    Chen, Diane; Drabick, Deborah A G; Burgers, Darcy E

    2015-12-01

    Peer rejection and deviant peer affiliation are linked consistently to the development and maintenance of conduct problems. Two proposed models may account for longitudinal relations among these peer processes and conduct problems: the (a) sequential mediation model, in which peer rejection in childhood and deviant peer affiliation in adolescence mediate the link between early externalizing behaviors and more serious adolescent conduct problems; and (b) parallel process model, in which peer rejection and deviant peer affiliation are considered independent processes that operate simultaneously to increment risk for conduct problems. In this review, we evaluate theoretical models and evidence for associations among conduct problems and (a) peer rejection and (b) deviant peer affiliation. We then consider support for the sequential mediation and parallel process models. Next, we propose an integrated model incorporating both the sequential mediation and parallel process models. Future research directions and implications for prevention and intervention efforts are discussed.

  17. A Developmental Perspective on Peer Rejection, Deviant Peer Affiliation, and Conduct Problems among Youth

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Diane; Drabick, Deborah A. G.; Burgers, Darcy E.

    2015-01-01

    Peer rejection and deviant peer affiliation are linked consistently to the development and maintenance of conduct problems. Two proposed models may account for longitudinal relations among these peer processes and conduct problems: the (a) sequential mediation model, in which peer rejection in childhood and deviant peer affiliation in adolescence mediate the link between early externalizing behaviors and more serious adolescent conduct problems; and (b) parallel process model, in which peer rejection and deviant peer affiliation are considered independent processes that operate simultaneously to increment risk for conduct problems. In this review, we evaluate theoretical models and evidence for associations among conduct problems and (a) peer rejection and (b) deviant peer affiliation. We then consider support for the sequential mediation and parallel process models. Next, we propose an integrated model incorporating both the sequential mediation and parallel process models. Future research directions and implications for prevention and intervention efforts are discussed. PMID:25410430

  18. Perspective: Role of structure prediction in materials discovery and design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Needs, Richard J.; Pickard, Chris J.

    2016-05-01

    Materials informatics owes much to bioinformatics and the Materials Genome Initiative has been inspired by the Human Genome Project. But there is more to bioinformatics than genomes, and the same is true for materials informatics. Here we describe the rapidly expanding role of searching for structures of materials using first-principles electronic-structure methods. Structure searching has played an important part in unraveling structures of dense hydrogen and in identifying the record-high-temperature superconducting component in hydrogen sulfide at high pressures. We suggest that first-principles structure searching has already demonstrated its ability to determine structures of a wide range of materials and that it will play a central and increasing part in materials discovery and design.

  19. Optimal structural design via optimality criteria as a nonsmooth mechanics problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tzaferopoulos, M. Ap.; Stravroulakis, G. E.

    1995-06-01

    In the theory of plastic structural design via optimality criteria (due to W. Prager), the optimal design problem is transformed to a nonlinear elastic structural analysis problem with appropriate stress-strain laws, which generally include complete vertical branches. In this context, the concept of structural universe (in the sense of G. Rozvany) permits the treatment of complicated optimal layout problems. Recent progress in the field of nonsmooth mechanics makes the solution of structural analysis problems with this kind of 'complete' law possible. Elements from the two fields are combined in this paper for the solution of optimal design and layout problems for structures. The optimal layout of plane trusses with various specific cost functions is studied here as a representative problem. The use of convex, continuous and piecewise linear specific cost functions for the structural members leads to problems of linear variational inequalities or equivalently piecewise linear, convex but nonsmooth optimization problems, which are solved by means of an iterative algorithm based on sequential linear programming techniques. Numerical examples illustrate the theory and its applicability to practical engineering structures. Following a parametric investigation of an optimal bridge design, certain aspects of the optimal truss layout problem are discussed, which can be extended to other types of structural systems as well.

  20. Reference Map Technique for Incompressible Fluid-Structure Interaction Problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rycroft, Chris; Wu, Chen-Hung; Yu, Yue; Kamrin, Ken

    2016-11-01

    We present a fully Eulerian approach to simulate soft structures immersed in an incompressible fluid. The flow is simulated on a fixed grid using a second order projection method to solve the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations, and the fluid-structure interfaces are modeled using the level set method. By introducing a reference map variable to model finite-deformation constitutive relations in the structure on the same grid as the fluid, the interfacial coupling is highly simplified. This fully Eulerian approach provides a computationally efficient alternative to moving mesh approaches. Example simulations featuring many-body contacts and flexible swimmers will be presented.

  1. Sampling problems: The small scale structure of precipitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crane, R. K.

    1981-01-01

    The quantitative measurement of precipitation characteristics for any area on the surface of the Earth is not an easy task. Precipitation is rather variable in both space and time, and the distribution of surface rainfall data given location typically is substantially skewed. There are a number of precipitation process at work in the atmosphere, and few of them are well understood. The formal theory on sampling and estimating precipitation appears considerably deficient. Little systematic attention is given to nonsampling errors that always arise in utilizing any measurement system. Although the precipitation measurement problem is an old one, it continues to be one that is in need of systematic and careful attention. A brief history of the presently competing measurement technologies should aid us in understanding the problem inherent in this measurement task.

  2. Theoretical Borderlands: Using Multiple Theoretical Perspectives to Challenge Inequitable Power Structures in Student Development Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abes, Elisa S.

    2009-01-01

    This article is an exploration of possibilities and methodological considerations for using multiple theoretical perspectives in research that challenges inequitable power structures in student development theory. Specifically, I explore methodological considerations when partnering queer theory and constructivism in research on lesbian identity…

  3. Cognitive Structures of the Gifted: Theoretical Perspectives, Factor Analysis, Triarchic Theories of Intelligence, and Insight Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaughnessy, Michael F.

    The paper reviews research on the cognitive structures of gifted students. Theories of R. Sternberg and his triarchic model of intelligence are described. Sternberg asserts that three processes appear to account for insight: selective encoding, selective combination, and selective comparison. H. Gardner's perspective citing six types of…

  4. A Structure-Agency Perspective on Young Children's Engagement in School Science: Carlos's Performance and Narrative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Varelas, Maria; Tucker-Raymond, Eli; Richards, Kimberly

    2015-01-01

    Guided by sociological perspectives that view (young) children as agents who are shaped by and shape the structures of social systems in which they live, we studied forms that agency of young children from historically marginalized groups may take in science class when offered opportunities to engage in science in a variety of ways, how curricular…

  5. Atomic and Molecular Structure in Chemical Education: A Critical Analysis from Various Perspectives of Science Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsaparlis, Georgios

    1997-01-01

    Provides a critical analysis of the role that atomic theory plays in the science curriculum from elementary through secondary school. Examines structural concepts from the perspective of the theory of meaningful learning, information processing theory, and the alternative conceptions movement. Contains 54 references. (DDR)

  6. No-Regret Algorithms for Structured Prediction Problems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-12-21

    perhaps the best known recent related papers are those of Kalai and Vempala [4] and Zinkevich [5]. The online convex program- ming problem has a much...contributions include: our bounds are better than those of previous algo- rithms such as that of Kalai and Vempala, since (unless p = 1 in Theorem 3) we do not...1956. [4] Adam Kalai and Santosh Vempala. Geometric algorithms for online optimization. Technical Report MIT-LCS-TR-861, MIT, 2002. [5] Martin

  7. Characterising Responsibility in Organisational Structures: The Problem of Many Hands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mastop, Rosja

    Sometimes it is impossible to attribute responsibility to individuals when something goes wrong, or right, especially when many different agents are involved. Moral norms may dictate that certain events are not to happen, but responsibility can only be attributed to an agent if this agent was able to do the right thing, she knew what she ought to do, and she did not accidentally fail in completing her task. The fact that we cannot attribute responsibility for certain unfortunate events due to the absence of these conditions is called the problem of many hands. This contribution presents a logical analysis of the problem of many hands in the framework of XSTIT with intentions, as developed by Jan Broersen. The problem of many hands is analysed in terms of an inference from the existence of a norm and the fact that all agents are acting responsibly to the conclusion that the norm is obeyed. To make that inference valid, additional assumptions are necessary, to ensure that the fairness conditions are met. As the formal analysis shows, tasks can be distributed so as to minimize the gap in this inference, but it cannot be completely bridged: at some point we have to acknowledge that moral responsibility falls short of guaranteeing moral norm fulfilment.

  8. Advances in understanding glycosyltransferases from a structural perspective

    PubMed Central

    Gloster, Tracey M

    2014-01-01

    Glycosyltransferases (GTs), the enzymes that catalyse glycosidic bond formation, create a diverse range of saccharides and glycoconjugates in nature. Understanding GTs at the molecular level, through structural and kinetic studies, is important for gaining insights into their function. In addition, this understanding can help identify those enzymes which are involved in diseases, or that could be engineered to synthesize biologically or medically relevant molecules. This review describes how structural data, obtained in the last 3–4 years, have contributed to our understanding of the mechanisms of action and specificity of GTs. Particular highlights include the structure of a bacterial oligosaccharyltransferase, which provides insights into N-linked glycosylation, the structure of the human O-GlcNAc transferase, and the structure of a bacterial integral membrane protein complex that catalyses the synthesis of cellulose, the most abundant organic molecule in the biosphere. PMID:25240227

  9. Parent and teacher perspectives about problem behavior in children with Williams syndrome.

    PubMed

    Klein-Tasman, Bonita P; Lira, Ernesto N; Li-Barber, Kirsten T; Gallo, Frank J; Brei, Natalie G

    2015-01-01

    Problem behavior of 52 children with Williams syndrome ages 6 to 17 years old was examined based on both parent and teacher report. Generally good inter-rater agreement was found. Common areas of problem behavior based both on parent and teacher report included attention problems, anxiety difficulties, repetitive behaviors (e.g., obsessions, compulsions, picking nose or skin), and social problems, reflecting a robust behavioral phenotype in Williams syndrome present across contexts. Some rater differences were observed; most notably, parents reported more attention and mood difficulties than did teachers, while teachers reported more oppositionality and aggression than did parents. Relations to intellectual functioning, age, and gender were examined. The implications of the findings for understanding the behavioral phenotype associated with Williams syndrome are discussed.

  10. Hydrological problems of water resources in irrigated agriculture: A management perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Ajay

    2016-10-01

    The development of irrigated agriculture is necessary for fulfilling the rising food requirements of the burgeoning global population. However, the intensification of irrigated agriculture causes the twin menace of waterlogging and soil salinization in arid and semiarid regions where more than 75% of the world's population lives. These problems can be managed by either adopting preventive measures which decrease the inflow of water and salt or by employing remedial measures which increase the outflow. This paper presents an overview of various measures used for the management of waterlogging and salinity problems. The background, processes involved, and severity of waterlogging and salinity problems are provided. The role of drainage systems, conjunctive use of different water sources, use of computer-based mathematical models, and the use of remote sensing and GIS techniques in managing the problems are discussed. Conclusions are provided which could be useful for all the stakeholders.

  11. Using Jigsaw-Style Spectroscopy Problem-Solving to Elucidate Molecular Structure through Online Cooperative Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winschel, Grace A.; Everett, Renata K.; Coppola, Brian P.; Shultz, Ginger V.

    2015-01-01

    Cooperative learning was employed as an instructional approach to facilitate student development of spectroscopy problem solving skills. An interactive online environment was used as a framework to structure weekly discussions around spectroscopy problems outside of class. Weekly discussions consisted of modified jigsaw-style problem solving…

  12. Problem-Solving Instruction and Students' Acquisition, Retention and Structuring of Economics Knowledge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Son, Byungro; VanSickle, Ronald L.

    The effectiveness of problem-solving instruction in promoting high school students' acquisition, retention, and structuring of economics knowledge was studied through six economics classes. The problem-solving instruction model was developed based on problem-based learning in medical education, following similar work by H. S. Barrows and R. M.…

  13. Transfer from Structured to Open-Ended Problem Solving in a Computerized Metacognitive Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kapa, Esther

    2007-01-01

    A new computerized environment introducing a variety of metacognitive support mechanisms (MSMs) in different phases of the problem-solving process was designed to influence students' transfer from solving structured problems (near transfer) to solving open-ended problems (far transfer). Two hundred and thirty one students (aged 13-14 years) were…

  14. Analyzing Pre-Service Primary Teachers' Fraction Knowledge Structures through Problem Posing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kilic, Cigdem

    2015-01-01

    In this study it was aimed to determine pre-service primary teachers' knowledge structures of fraction through problem posing activities. A total of 90 pre-service primary teachers participated in this study. A problem posing test consisting of two questions was used and the participants were asked to generate as many as problems based on the…

  15. Bioinformatics and variability in drug response: a protein structural perspective

    PubMed Central

    Lahti, Jennifer L.; Tang, Grace W.; Capriotti, Emidio; Liu, Tianyun; Altman, Russ B.

    2012-01-01

    Marketed drugs frequently perform worse in clinical practice than in the clinical trials on which their approval is based. Many therapeutic compounds are ineffective for a large subpopulation of patients to whom they are prescribed; worse, a significant fraction of patients experience adverse effects more severe than anticipated. The unacceptable risk–benefit profile for many drugs mandates a paradigm shift towards personalized medicine. However, prior to adoption of patient-specific approaches, it is useful to understand the molecular details underlying variable drug response among diverse patient populations. Over the past decade, progress in structural genomics led to an explosion of available three-dimensional structures of drug target proteins while efforts in pharmacogenetics offered insights into polymorphisms correlated with differential therapeutic outcomes. Together these advances provide the opportunity to examine how altered protein structures arising from genetic differences affect protein–drug interactions and, ultimately, drug response. In this review, we first summarize structural characteristics of protein targets and common mechanisms of drug interactions. Next, we describe the impact of coding mutations on protein structures and drug response. Finally, we highlight tools for analysing protein structures and protein–drug interactions and discuss their application for understanding altered drug responses associated with protein structural variants. PMID:22552919

  16. The Quality of High School Students' Problem Solving from an Expertise Development Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elvira, Quincy; Imants, Jeroen; deMaeyer, Sven; Segers, Mien

    2015-01-01

    The ability to solve problems is a key skill and is essential to our day-to-day lives, at home, at school and at work. The present study explores the quality of managerial problem-solving of participants who are in secondary education. We studied 10th, 11th, and 12th graders following a business track in the Netherlands. Participants were asked to…

  17. Mountain Warfare and Other Lofty Problems: Foreign Perspectives on High-Altitude Combat

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    is often a problem. The rarefied atmosphere permits increased ultraviolet ray exposure, which creates problems with sunburn and snow blindness... measure to capture personnel and equipment, destroy installations, bait traps to draw enemy reaction, and attack morale. Since 8 Mountain Warfare and... measures . In Kashmir, stone or wooden bunkers, which double as living accommodations and fighting bunkers, are found at posts below 13,000 feet, but

  18. The growing problems of dental caries and obesity: an Australian perspective.

    PubMed

    Hopcraft, M S; Beaumont, S

    2016-10-07

    Preventable diet-related diseases such as dental caries and obesity are a growing global problem, causing a significant burden on public health systems. Although there has been good evidence for the links between sugar consumption and dental caries for many decades, we are now seeing stronger links implicating sugar in obesity. There is a growing worldwide movement to tackle these problems by targeting the consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages through a range of public policy measures.

  19. Insulin-Like Growth Factor Binding Proteins: A Structural Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Forbes, Briony E.; McCarthy, Peter; Norton, Raymond S.

    2012-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor binding proteins (IGFBP-1 to -6) bind insulin-like growth factors-I and -II (IGF-I and IGF-II) with high affinity. These binding proteins maintain IGFs in the circulation and direct them to target tissues, where they promote cell growth, proliferation, differentiation, and survival via the type 1 IGF receptor. IGFBPs also interact with many other molecules, which not only influence their modulation of IGF action but also mediate IGF-independent activities that regulate processes such as cell migration and apoptosis by modulating gene transcription. IGFBPs-1 to -6 are structurally similar proteins consisting of three distinct domains, N-terminal, linker, and C-terminal. There have been major advances in our understanding of IGFBP structure in the last decade and a half. While there is still no structure of an intact IGFBP, several structures of individual N- and C-domains have been solved. The structure of a complex of N-BP-4:IGF-I:C-BP-4 has also been solved, providing a detailed picture of the structural features of the IGF binding site and the mechanism of binding. Structural studies have also identified features important for interaction with extracellular matrix components and integrins. This review summarizes structural studies reported so far and highlights features important for binding not only IGF but also other partners. We also highlight future directions in which structural studies will add to our knowledge of the role played by the IGFBP family in normal growth and development, as well as in disease. PMID:22654863

  20. Solving Ill-Structured Problems in Asynchronous Online Discussions: Built-in Scaffolds vs. No Scaffolds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ng, Connie Siew Ling; Cheung, Wing Sum; Hew, Khe Foon

    2010-01-01

    Solving ill-structured problems is regarded as an important learning outcome in education as it allows learners to apply theories learnt into real practice. An asynchronous online discussion, with extended time for reflection, is an appropriate learning environment to engage learners in solving ill-structured problems. However, scaffolds may be…

  1. Fusion proteins as alternate crystallization paths to difficult structure problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Daniel C.; Rueker, Florian; Ho, Joseph X.; Lim, Kap; Keeling, Kim; Gilliland, Gary; Ji, Xinhua

    1994-01-01

    The three-dimensional structure of a peptide fusion product with glutathione transferase from Schistosoma japonicum (SjGST) has been solved by crystallographic methods to 2.5 A resolution. Peptides or proteins can be fused to SjGST and expressed in a plasmid for rapid synthesis in Escherichia coli. Fusion proteins created by this commercial method can be purified rapidly by chromatography on immobilized glutathione. The potential utility of using SjGST fusion proteins as alternate paths to the crystallization and structure determination of proteins is demonstrated.

  2. Perspectives for the structure-based design of acetylcholinesterase reactivators.

    PubMed

    Ochoa, Rodrigo; Rodriguez, Carlos A; Zuluaga, Andres F

    2016-07-01

    Rational design of active molecules through structure-based methods has been gaining adepts during the last decades due to the wider availability of protein structures, most of them conjugated with relevant ligands. Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) is a molecular target with a considerable amount of data related to its sequence and 3-dimensional structure. In addition, there are structural insights about the mechanism of action of the natural substrate and drugs used in Alzheimer's disease, organophosphorus compounds, among others. We looked for AChE structural data useful for in silico design of potential interacting molecules. In particular, we focused on information regarding the design of ligands aimed to reactivate AChE catalytic activity. The structures of 178 AChE were annotated and categorized on different subsets according to the nature of the ligand, source organisms and experimental details. We compared sequence homology among the active site from Torpedo californica, Mus musculus and Homo sapiens with the latter two species having the closest relationship (88.9% identity). In addition, the mechanism of organophosphorus binding and the design of effective reactivators are reviewed. A curated data collection obtained with information from several sources was included for researchers working on the field. Finally, a molecular dynamics simulation with human AChE indicated that the catalytic pocket volume stabilizes around 600 Å(3), providing additional clues for drug design.

  3. Zika Virus Methyltransferase: Structure and Functions for Drug Design Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Coutard, Bruno; Barral, Karine; Lichière, Julie; Selisko, Barbara; Martin, Baptiste; Aouadi, Wahiba; Lombardia, Miguel Ortiz; Debart, Françoise; Vasseur, Jean-Jacques; Guillemot, Jean Claude; Canard, Bruno; Decroly, Etienne

    2017-03-01

    The Flavivirus Zika virus (ZIKV) is the causal agent of neurological disorders like microcephaly in newborns or Guillain-Barre syndrome. Its NS5 protein embeds a methyltransferase (MTase) domain involved in the formation of the viral mRNA cap. We investigated the structural and functional properties of the ZIKV MTase. We show that the ZIKV MTase can methylate RNA cap structures at the N-7 position of the cap, and at the 2'-O position on the ribose of the first nucleotide, yielding a cap-1 structure. In addition, the ZIKV MTase methylates the ribose 2'-O position of internal adenosines of RNA substrates. The crystal structure of the ZIKV MTase determined at a 2.01-Å resolution reveals a crystallographic homodimer. One chain is bound to the methyl donor (S-adenosyl-l-methionine [SAM]) and shows a high structural similarity to the dengue virus (DENV) MTase. The second chain lacks SAM and displays conformational changes in the αX α-helix contributing to the SAM and RNA binding. These conformational modifications reveal a possible molecular mechanism of the enzymatic turnover involving a conserved Ser/Arg motif. In the second chain, the SAM binding site accommodates a sulfate close to a glycerol that could serve as a basis for structure-based drug design. In addition, compounds known to inhibit the DENV MTase show similar inhibition potency on the ZIKV MTase. Altogether these results contribute to a better understanding of the ZIKV MTase, a central player in viral replication and host innate immune response, and lay the basis for the development of potential antiviral drugs.IMPORTANCE The Zika virus (ZIKV) is associated with microcephaly in newborns, and other neurological disorders such as Guillain-Barre syndrome. It is urgent to develop antiviral strategies inhibiting the viral replication. The ZIKV NS5 embeds a methyltransferase involved in the viral mRNA capping process, which is essential for viral replication and control of virus detection by innate immune

  4. Illuminating the dark matter of social neuroscience: Considering the problem of social interaction from philosophical, psychological, and neuroscientific perspectives.

    PubMed

    Przyrembel, Marisa; Smallwood, Jonathan; Pauen, Michael; Singer, Tania

    2012-01-01

    Successful human social interaction depends on our capacity to understand other people's mental states and to anticipate how they will react to our actions. Despite its importance to the human condition, the exact mechanisms underlying our ability to understand another's actions, feelings, and thoughts are still a matter of conjecture. Here, we consider this problem from philosophical, psychological, and neuroscientific perspectives. In a critical review, we demonstrate that attempts to draw parallels across these complementary disciplines is premature: The second-person perspective does not map directly to Interaction or Simulation theories, online social cognition, or shared neural network accounts underlying action observation or empathy. Nor does the third-person perspective map onto Theory-Theory (TT), offline social cognition, or the neural networks that support Theory of Mind (ToM). Moreover, we argue that important qualities of social interaction emerge through the reciprocal interplay of two independent agents whose unpredictable behavior requires that models of their partner's internal state be continually updated. This analysis draws attention to the need for paradigms in social neuroscience that allow two individuals to interact in a spontaneous and natural manner and to adapt their behavior and cognitions in a response contingent fashion due to the inherent unpredictability in another person's behavior. Even if such paradigms were implemented, it is possible that the specific neural correlates supporting such reciprocal interaction would not reflect computation unique to social interaction but rather the use of basic cognitive and emotional processes combined in a unique manner. Finally, we argue that given the crucial role of social interaction in human evolution, ontogeny, and every-day social life, a more theoretically and methodologically nuanced approach to the study of real social interaction will nevertheless help the field of social cognition

  5. Illuminating the dark matter of social neuroscience: Considering the problem of social interaction from philosophical, psychological, and neuroscientific perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Przyrembel, Marisa; Smallwood, Jonathan; Pauen, Michael; Singer, Tania

    2012-01-01

    Successful human social interaction depends on our capacity to understand other people's mental states and to anticipate how they will react to our actions. Despite its importance to the human condition, the exact mechanisms underlying our ability to understand another's actions, feelings, and thoughts are still a matter of conjecture. Here, we consider this problem from philosophical, psychological, and neuroscientific perspectives. In a critical review, we demonstrate that attempts to draw parallels across these complementary disciplines is premature: The second-person perspective does not map directly to Interaction or Simulation theories, online social cognition, or shared neural network accounts underlying action observation or empathy. Nor does the third-person perspective map onto Theory-Theory (TT), offline social cognition, or the neural networks that support Theory of Mind (ToM). Moreover, we argue that important qualities of social interaction emerge through the reciprocal interplay of two independent agents whose unpredictable behavior requires that models of their partner's internal state be continually updated. This analysis draws attention to the need for paradigms in social neuroscience that allow two individuals to interact in a spontaneous and natural manner and to adapt their behavior and cognitions in a response contingent fashion due to the inherent unpredictability in another person's behavior. Even if such paradigms were implemented, it is possible that the specific neural correlates supporting such reciprocal interaction would not reflect computation unique to social interaction but rather the use of basic cognitive and emotional processes combined in a unique manner. Finally, we argue that given the crucial role of social interaction in human evolution, ontogeny, and every-day social life, a more theoretically and methodologically nuanced approach to the study of real social interaction will nevertheless help the field of social cognition

  6. PREDICTORS OF EMOTIONAL AND BEHAVIORAL PROBLEMS IN 1-YEAR-OLD CHILDREN: A LONGITUDINAL PERSPECTIVE.

    PubMed

    Sirvinskiene, Giedre; Zemaitiene, Nida; Jusiene, Roma; Markuniene, Egle

    2016-07-01

    Emotional and behavioral problems at an early age can reasonably be considered a high-risk factor for later mental health disorders. The aim of the article is to reveal predictive factors of 1½-year-old children's emotional and behavioral problems. The study was a part of a prospective birth-cohort study. The study sample consisted of 172 full-term infants (born during Gestational Weeks 37-42) and their mothers. Emotional and behavioral problems at the age of 1½ years were measured using the Child Behavior Checklist for Ages 1½-5 (T. Achenbach & L. Rescorla, 2000), which was completed by mothers. Emotional and behavioral problems at age of 1½ years were more prevalent in infants born via cesarean section, as compared to infants born vaginally without administration of medication. Newborns' suboptimal functioning after birth, complicated emotional acceptance of pregnancy, a couple's nonsatisfactory relationship during pregnancy, maternal distress during pregnancy and in the first months after childbirth, and inflexible and parent-oriented attitudes toward infant-rearing also predicted children's emotional and behavioral problems independent of sociodemographic factors. Results suggest that biomedical and psychosocial factors which manifest themselves in the prenatal and perinatal periods can have associations with later infant and child mental health.

  7. Problems of providing services to people affected by HIV/AIDS: service providers and recipients perspectives.

    PubMed

    Moradi, G; Mohraz, M; Gouya, M M; Dejman, M; Alinaghi, S S; Rahmani, K; Malekafzali-Ardakani, H

    2015-02-25

    This qualitative study aimed to identify the health-care problems of people living with HIV (PLHIV) in 2 large cities: Tehran and Kermanshah. Two main groups of stakeholders - service providers (policy-makers, managers, physicians and counsellors) and service recipients (PLHIV and their relatives) - participated in focus group discussions and in-depth interviews. We identified 24 themes covering the major health problems of PLHIV, including: incomplete and inadequate coverage of health-care services; patients' substance abuse; patients' fear of stigma; occupational burnout of certain service providers; patients' dissatisfaction with some of the services provided by counselling centres/clinics; medical staff's failure to observe confidentiality; and patients' lack of access to required specialized services. The problems and needs identified can inform the design and implementation of health programmes in our country and elsewhere in the Eastern Mediterranean Region.

  8. Influence of Height in Simulation of Soil Structure Interaction Problems with Dampers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogdanovic, Aleksandra; Edip, Kemal; Stojmanovska, Marta

    2016-12-01

    In numerical simulation of soil structure interaction problems the presence of dampers in the frame is an advantage yet a special topic to be considered. This paper presents valuable observation on the dynamic soil structure interaction analysis of multi storey frames and considers the effect of height in simulation of soil structure interaction problems. Comparison of these problems has been done by comparing the obtained results from different set up in the software ANSYS. The results of numerical analysis illustrate that it has to be paid more attention when considering the structures not alone but also considering the effect of soil medium.

  9. NASA Langley's Approach to the Sandia's Structural Dynamics Challenge Problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horta, Lucas G.; Kenny, Sean P.; Crespo, Luis G.; Elliott, Kenny B.

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this challenge is to develop a data-based probabilistic model of uncertainty to predict the behavior of subsystems (payloads) by themselves and while coupled to a primary (target) system. Although this type of analysis is routinely performed and representative of issues faced in real-world system design and integration, there are still several key technical challenges that must be addressed when analyzing uncertain interconnected systems. For example, one key technical challenge is related to the fact that there is limited data on target configurations. Moreover, it is typical to have multiple data sets from experiments conducted at the subsystem level, but often samples sizes are not sufficient to compute high confidence statistics. In this challenge problem additional constraints are placed as ground rules for the participants. One such rule is that mathematical models of the subsystem are limited to linear approximations of the nonlinear physics of the problem at hand. Also, participants are constrained to use these models and the multiple data sets to make predictions about the target system response under completely different input conditions. Our approach involved initially the screening of several different methods. Three of the ones considered are presented herein. The first one is based on the transformation of the modal data to an orthogonal space where the mean and covariance of the data are matched by the model. The other two approaches worked solutions in physical space where the uncertain parameter set is made of masses, stiffnesses and damping coefficients; one matches confidence intervals of low order moments of the statistics via optimization while the second one uses a Kernel density estimation approach. The paper will touch on all the approaches, lessons learned, validation 1 metrics and their comparison, data quantity restriction, and assumptions/limitations of each approach. Keywords: Probabilistic modeling, model validation

  10. The role of perspective information in the recovery of 3D structure-from-motion.

    PubMed

    Eagle, R A; Hogervorst, M A

    1999-05-01

    When investigating the recovery of three-dimensional structure-from-motion (SFM), vision scientists often assume that scaled-orthographic projection, which removes effects due to depth variations across the object, is an adequate approximation to full perspective projection. This is so even though SFM judgements can, in principle, be improved by exploiting perspective projection of scenes on to the retina. In an experiment, pairs of rotating hinged planes (open books) were simulated on a computer monitor, under either perspective or orthographic projection, and human observers were asked to indicate which they perceived had the larger dihedral angle. For small displays (4.6 x 6.0 degrees) discrimination thresholds were found to be similar under the two conditions, but diverged for all larger stimuli. In particular, as stimulus size was increased, performance under orthographic projection declined and by a stimulus size of 32 x 41 degrees performance was at chance for all subjects. In contrast, thresholds decreased under perspective projection as stimulus size was increased. These results show that human observers can use the information gained from perspective projection to recover SFM and that scaled-orthographic projection becomes an unacceptable approximation even at quite modest stimulus sizes. A model of SFM that incorporates measurement errors on the retinal motions accounts for performance under both projection systems, suggesting that this early noise forms the primary limitation on 3D discrimination performance.

  11. Normative and Structural Perspectives on Age in a Work Organization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawrence, Barbara S.

    Age grading, the differentiation of social groups by members' age judgments, is widely regarded to be a universal aspect of social life. Most studies have examined age structurally (demographically), rather than normatively (modally). This study presents survey data measuring employees' age judgments of managerial careers collected from an…

  12. Human IgG4: a structural perspective

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Anna M; Sutton, Brian J

    2015-01-01

    IgG4, the least represented human IgG subclass in serum, is an intriguing antibody with unique biological properties, such as the ability to undergo Fab-arm exchange and limit immune complex formation. The lack of effector functions, such as antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity and complement-dependent cytotoxicity, is desirable for therapeutic purposes. IgG4 plays a protective role in allergy by acting as a blocking antibody, and inhibiting mast cell degranulation, but a deleterious role in malignant melanoma, by impeding IgG1-mediated anti-tumor immunity. These findings highlight the importance of understanding the interaction between IgG4 and Fcγ receptors. Despite a wealth of structural information for the IgG1 subclass, including complexes with Fcγ receptors, and structures for intact antibodies, high-resolution crystal structures were not reported for IgG4-Fc until recently. Here, we highlight some of the biological properties of human IgG4, and review the recent crystal structures of IgG4-Fc. We discuss the unexpected conformations adopted by functionally important Cγ2 domain loops, and speculate about potential implications for the interaction between IgG4 and FcγRs. PMID:26497518

  13. Research Articles in Applied Linguistics: Structures from a Functional Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruiying, Yang; Allison, Desmond

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents the main lines of a genre analysis of the macro-structures of research articles (RAs) in applied linguistics, an area that deserves more attention both for pedagogic and research reasons. The analysis is based upon a detailed study of a corpus of 40 RAs, selected as random sets of 10 drawn from four leading journals in the…

  14. Using Problem-Based Case Studies to Learn about Knowledge Translation Interventions: An Inside Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bhogal, Sanjit K.; Murray, Mary Ann; McLeod, Katherine M.; Bergen, Anne; Bath, Brenna; Menon, Anita; Kho, Michelle E.; Stacey, Dawn

    2011-01-01

    Knowledge translation (KT) interventions can facilitate the successful implementation of best practices by engaging and actively involving various stakeholders in the change process. However, for novices, the design of KT interventions can be overwhelming. In this article, we describe our experience as participants in a problem-based case study on…

  15. Multiple Imputation for Multivariate Missing-Data Problems: A Data Analyst's Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schafer, Joseph L.; Olsen, Maren K.

    1998-01-01

    The key ideas of multiple imputation for multivariate missing data problems are reviewed. Software programs available for this analysis are described, and their use is illustrated with data from the Adolescent Alcohol Prevention Trial (W. Hansen and J. Graham, 1991). (SLD)

  16. Children's Comprehension Problems in Oral and Written Language: A Cognitive Perspective. Challenges in Language and Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cain, Kate, Ed.; Oakhill, Jane, Ed.

    2007-01-01

    Comprehension is the ultimate aim of reading and listening. How do children develop the ability to comprehend written and spoken language, and what can be done to help those who are having difficulties? This book presents cutting-edge research on comprehension problems experienced by children without any formal diagnosis as well as those with…

  17. The Effects of Teaching Programming via Scratch on Problem Solving Skills: A Discussion from Learners' Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalelioglu, Filiz; Gülbahar, Yasemin

    2014-01-01

    Computer programming is perceived as an important competence for the development of problem solving skills in addition to logical reasoning. Hence, its integration throughout all educational levels, as well as the early ages, is considered valuable and research studies are carried out to explore the phenomenon in more detail. In light of these…

  18. Medical education and cognitive continuum theory: an alternative perspective on medical problem solving and clinical reasoning.

    PubMed

    Custers, Eugène J F M

    2013-08-01

    Recently, human reasoning, problem solving, and decision making have been viewed as products of two separate systems: "System 1," the unconscious, intuitive, or nonanalytic system, and "System 2," the conscious, analytic, or reflective system. This view has penetrated the medical education literature, yet the idea of two independent dichotomous cognitive systems is not entirely without problems.This article outlines the difficulties of this "two-system view" and presents an alternative, developed by K.R. Hammond and colleagues, called cognitive continuum theory (CCT). CCT is featured by three key assumptions. First, human reasoning, problem solving, and decision making can be arranged on a cognitive continuum, with pure intuition at one end, pure analysis at the other, and a large middle ground called "quasirationality." Second, the nature and requirements of the cognitive task, as perceived by the person performing the task, determine to a large extent whether a task will be approached more intuitively or more analytically. Third, for optimal task performance, this approach needs to match the cognitive properties and requirements of the task. Finally, the author makes a case that CCT is better able than a two-system view to describe medical problem solving and clinical reasoning and that it provides clear clues for how to organize training in clinical reasoning.

  19. Facilitators' Perspectives of the Factors That Affect the Effectiveness of Problem-Based Learning Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chan, Cecilia K. Y.

    2016-01-01

    Many educational researchers have established problem-based learning (PBL) as a total approach to education--both a product and a process--from a pedagogical instructional strategy to skills development to assessment. This study provides qualitative evidences from educational practitioners in various professional disciplines, namely, Medicine,…

  20. ESP Teaching at the Institutions of Higher Education in Modern Russia: Problems and Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prudnikova, Nadezhda

    2013-01-01

    The author analyses ESP teaching at the institutions of higher education in modern Russia, explains the main problems and suggests the ways of their solving, details the quality control system of the students' progress improvement, presents the complex approach to interactive ESP teaching and views it as an integral part of up-to-date…

  1. Do Students Trust in Mathematics or Intuition during Physics Problem Solving? An Epistemic Game Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yavuz, Ahmet

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to investigate (1) students' trust in mathematics calculation versus intuition in a physics problem solving and (2) whether this trust is related to achievement in physics in the context of epistemic game theoretical framework. To achieve this research objective, paper-pencil and interview sessions were conducted. A paper-pencil…

  2. Students' Perspectives on Problem-Based Learning in a Transitional Doctorate of Physical Therapy Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larin, Helene M.; Buccieri, Kathleen M.; Wessel, Jean

    2010-01-01

    Doctor of physical therapy (DPT) graduates are expected to be competent in professional behaviors, communication, critical inquiry, clinical decision making, and evidence-based practice. The purpose of this qualitative study was to describe the experience of students enrolled in a single, problem-based learning (PBL) course within a conventional…

  3. A Historical Perspective and Overview of Protein Structure Prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wooley, John C.; Ye, Yuzhen

    Carrying on many different biological functions, proteins are all composed of one or more polypeptide chains, each containing from several to hundreds or even thousands of the 20 amino acids. During the 1950s at the dawn of modern biochemistry, an essential question for biochemists was to understand the structure and function of these polypeptide chains. The sequences of protein, also referred to as their primary structures, determine the different chemical properties for different proteins, and thus continue to captivate much of the attention of biochemists. As an early step in characterizing protein chemistry, British biochemist Frederick Sanger designed an experimental method to identify the sequence of insulin (Sanger et al., 1955). He became the first person to obtain the primary structure of a protein and in 1958 won his first Nobel Price in Chemistry. This important progress in sequencing did not answer the question of whether a single (individual) protein has a distinctive shape in three dimensions (3D), and if so, what factors determine its 3D architecture. However, during the period when Sanger was studying the primary structure of proteins, American biochemist Christian Anfinsen observed that the active polypeptide chain of a model protein, bovine pancreatic ribonuclease (RNase), could fold spontaneously into a unique 3D structure, which was later called native conformation of the protein (Anfinsen et al., 1954). Anfinsen also studied the refolding of RNase enzyme and observed that an enzyme unfolded under extreme chemical environment could refold spontaneously back into its native conformation upon changing the environment back to natural conditions (Anfinsen et al., 1961). By 1962, Anfinsen had developed his theory of protein folding (which was summarized in his 1972 Nobel acceptance speech): "The native conformation is determined by the totality of interatomic interactions and hence, by the amino acid sequence, in a given environment."

  4. Structural problems of the Brooks Range ophiolite, Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, R.A.; Bickerstaff, D. . Dept. of Geology); Stone, D.B. . Geophysical Inst.)

    1993-04-01

    Structural and paleogeographic restorations of the Brooks Range ophiolite (hereafter BRO) and other associated mafic and ultramafic bodies of N. Alaska are difficult because of ambiguous relations between sheeted dikes, cover sediments, and steep NW and SE dipping magmatic flow fabrics. Paleomagnetically enhanced structural studies at Misheguk, Avan, and Siniktanneyak Mountains provide new constraints for the initial dip and sequence of deformation for various structural features of the BRO. The angle between magmatic layers near the petrologic moho and the paleomagnetic inclination of these layers is 50--63[degree] at Misheguk. High level gabbro layers that are disrupted by syn- and post-cooling intrusions display a greater variation. Assuming that the characteristic magnetization is primary, and that the primary inclination was > 80[degree], magmatic layers and the moho had initial dips from 17--40[degree]. These layers now dip 40--70[degree]SE suggesting some post-magmatic tilt. The variation of inclinations with depth in the ophiolite suggest that high level gabbro has tilted most. Sheeted dikes are documented at the Maiyumerak and Siniktanneyak ophiolite bodies. At both locations the dikes dip steeply and strike NE-SW. Sedimentary and volcanic flow layers associated with the dikes have the same strike and dip 0--30[degree]. Parallelism between various planar features throughout the BRO indicates that rotations about a vertical axis are either uniform throughout the ophiolite belt or negligible. Assuming the later, the BRO may represent a linear zone of SSZ magmatism that was oriented NE-SW prior to collision. Post-emplacement long wavelength folding of the ophiolite lid can account for its variation in facing direction and some steepening of magmatic layers.

  5. Molecular solutes in ionic liquids: a structural perspective.

    PubMed

    Pádua, Agílio A H; Costa Gomes, Margarida F; Canongia Lopes, José N A

    2007-11-01

    Understanding physicochemical properties of ionic liquids is important for their rational use in extractions, reactions, and other applications. Ionic liquids are not simple fluids: their ions are generally asymetric, flexible, with delocalized electrostatic charges, and available in a wide variety. It is difficult to capture their subtle properties with models that are too simplistic. Molecular simulation using atomistic force fields, which describe structures and interactions in detail, is an excellent tool to gain insights into their liquid-state organization, how they solvate different compounds, and what molecular factors determine their properties. The identification of certain ionic liquids as self-organized phases, with aggregated nonpolar and charged domains, provides a new way to interpret the solvation and structure of their mixtures. Many advances are the result of a successful interplay between experiment and modeling, possible in this field where none of the two methodologies had a previous advance.

  6. Evolutionary perspectives of telomerase RNA structure and function

    PubMed Central

    Podlevsky, Joshua D.; Chen, Julian J.-L.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Telomerase is the eukaryotic solution to the ‘end-replication problem’ of linear chromosomes by synthesising the highly repetitive DNA constituent of telomeres, the nucleoprotein cap that protects chromosome termini. Functioning as a ribonucleoprotein (RNP) enzyme, telomerase is minimally composed of the highly conserved catalytic telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) and essential telomerase RNA (TR) component. Beyond merely providing the template for telomeric DNA synthesis, TR is an innate telomerase component and directly facilitates enzymatic function. TR accomplishes this by having evolved structural elements for stable assembly with the TERT protein and the regulation of the telomerase catalytic cycle. Despite its prominence and prevalence, TR has profoundly diverged in length, sequence, and biogenesis pathway among distinct evolutionary lineages. This diversity has generated numerous structural and mechanistic solutions for ensuring proper RNP formation and high fidelity telomeric DNA synthesis. Telomerase provides unique insights into RNA and protein coevolution within RNP enzymes. PMID:27359343

  7. Buckling of structures with uncertain imperfections - Personal perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elishakoff, Isaac

    1998-01-01

    The previous review on stochastic buckling of structures was written by Amazigo in 1976. This review summarizes some of the developments which took place in recent two decades. A brief overview is given of the effect on uncertainty in the initial geometric imperfections, elastic moduli, applied forces, and thickness variation. For the benefit of the thinking reader, the review has a critical nature. It should be noted that this manuscript has yet to be completed.

  8. Technological Change and Social Progress: Some Problems and Perspectives. Report of the Director-General No. I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Labour Office, Geneva (Switzerland).

    This report examines economic and social developments in Europe since 1950 in terms of structural change, productivity, economic integration and planning, regional development, and human problems and social policy-making. Evolving policies concerning income levels and distribution, conditions of work and life, and labor relations in Europe are…

  9. A biomechanical perspective on stress fiber structure and function☆

    PubMed Central

    Kassianidou, Elena; Kumar, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    Stress fibers are actomyosin-based bundles whose structural and contractile properties underlie numerous cellular processes including adhesion, motility and mechanosensing. Recent advances in high-resolution live-cell imaging and single-cell force measurement have dramatically sharpened our understanding of the assembly, connectivity, and evolution of various specialized stress fiber subpopulations. This in turn has motivated interest in understanding how individual stress fibers generate tension and support cellular structure and force generation. In this review, we discuss approaches for measuring the mechanical properties of single stress fibers. We begin by discussing studies conducted in cell-free settings, including strategies based on isolation of intact stress fibers and reconstitution of stress fiber-like structures from purified components. We then discuss measurements obtained in living cells based both on inference of stress fiber properties from whole-cell mechanical measurements (e.g., atomic force microscopy) and on direct interrogation of single stress fibers (e.g., subcellular laser nanosurgery). We conclude by reviewing various mathematical models of stress fiber function that have been developed based on these experimental measurements. An important future challenge in this area will be the integration of these sophisticated biophysical measurements with the field’s increasingly detailed molecular understanding of stress fiber assembly, dynamics, and signal transduction. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Mechanobiology. PMID:25896524

  10. [Volunteering in end-of-life care : Challenges, problems and perspectives].

    PubMed

    Schneider, Werner

    2017-01-01

    Volunteering in the hospice movement has had a profound impact on generating awareness of hospice work and palliative care in the context of supporting dying persons and their relatives as well as on integrating respective services in the existing health care system. This paper focuses on two specific questions: First, it asks how society is changing with respect to dealing with dying and death, and more precisely with dying persons, which is recognizable by the integration of hospice work and palliative care in the healthcare system and related to the relevance of volunteering in the sense of a citizens' movement. Second, this paper asks what the specific roles of volunteers are as well as the possibilities and limits of voluntary practice in end-of-life care and accompaniment. To answer these questions, the pivotal objectives of the hospice movement - the transformation of the social awareness regarding dying and death, as well as the reorganization of "institutions of dying" - will first be outlined by reference to the concept of "good dying", a specific hospice attitude together with hospice culture and palliative competence. In a second step, the relevance of volunteering and the specific role of volunteers in the actual practice of hospice work and palliative care will be outlined alongside current indicators and recognizable alteration tendencies, before concluding with a discussion of the perspectives of hospices as a citizens' movement.

  11. Perspective: Closing the Dietary Fiber Gap: An Ancient Solution for a 21st Century Problem.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Henry J; Brick, Mark A

    2016-07-01

    An important gap exists between the daily amounts of fiber recommended in the human diet (28-42 g/d) and that which is actually consumed (median intake, 12-14 g/d). In fact, <5% of Americans meet the recommended intake for dietary fiber, and the magnitude of the gap is large, approximately a 50-70% shortfall. Because considerable evidence indicates that dietary fiber affects normal physiologic function and the onset of chronic diseases and their progression, the fiber gap represents an opportune target at which dietary interventions can be directed. This perspective considers whether a scientific basis exists for the current lack of emphasis on pulse crops, that is, grain legumes (common bean, chickpea, lentils, and garden pea) as a concentrated, inexpensive, and widely available source of dietary fiber. Attention is directed to this topic because the fiber gap has existed for decades with little improvement despite nutrition labeling, consumer education about the value of whole-grain cereal crop-based products, and the introduction of many fiber-enriched foods. The time is long overdue to identify additional approaches that have the potential to close the dietary fiber gap. To this end, the potential role of pulse crops in remediating this gap is examined.

  12. Strengths and weaknesses of Problem Based Learning from the professional perspective of registered nurses 1

    PubMed Central

    Cónsul-Giribet, María; Medina-Moya, José Luis

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: to identify competency strengths and weaknesses as perceived by nursing professionals who graduated with a integrated curriculum and competency-based through Problem Based Learning in small groups. METHOD: an intrinsic case study method was used, which analyzes this innovation through former students (from the first class) with three years of professional experience. The data were collected through a questionnaire and discussion groups. RESULTS: the results show that their competency level is valued in a very satisfactory manner. This level paradoxically contrasts with the lack of theoretical knowledge they perceived at the end of their education, when they started working in clinical practice. CONCLUSIONS: the teaching strategy was key to motivate an in-depth study and arouse the desire to know. In addition, Problem Based Learning favors and reinforces the decision to learn, which is that necessary in the course of professional life. PMID:25493666

  13. Cognitive conflict as a teaching strategy in solving chemistry problems: A dialectic-constructivist perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niaz, Mansoor

    The main objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of teaching experiments within a dialectic-constructivist framework based on the following considerations: (a) Cognitive conflicts used in the teaching experiments must be based on problem-solving strategies that students find relatively convincing: (b) after having generated a cognitive conflict, it is essential that the students be provided with an experience that could facilitate the resolution of the conflict; and (c) the teaching strategy developed is used by an interactive constructivist approach within an intact classroom. The study was based on two sections of freshman students who had registered for Chemistry I at the Universidad de Oriente, Venezuela. One of the sections was randomly designated as the control group and the other as the experimental group. To introduce cognitive conflict, the experimental group was exposed to two teaching experiments dealing with stoichiometry problems based on the concept of limiting reagent. Students in the control group were exposed to the same problems - however, without the cognitive conflict teaching experiments format. To evaluate the effect of the teaching experiments, both groups were evaluated on five different problems at different intervals during the semester, referred to as posttests. All posttests formed part of the regular evaluation of the students. Results obtained show the advantage of the experimental group on four of the posttests. It is concluded that the experimental treatment was effective in improving performance on the immediate posttests. It was observed that some students protect their core belief [see Lakatos, I. (1970). Falsification and the methodology of scientific research programmes. In I. Lakatos & A. Musgrave (Eds.), Criticism and the growth of knowledge (pp. 91-196). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press] in stoichiometry (establishing equivalent relations between different elements or compounds) by ignoring the conflicting

  14. Perspectives of pupils, parents, and teachers on mental health problems among Vietnamese secondary school pupils

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Secondary school can be a stressful period for adolescents, having to cope with many life changes. Very little research has been conducted on the mental health status of secondary school pupils in South East Asian countries, such as Vietnam. The study aimed to explore perceptions of mental health status, risk factors for mental health problems and strategies to improve mental health among Vietnamese secondary school students. Methods A qualitative design was used to address the main study question including: six in-depth interviews conducted with professionals (with two researchers, two psychiatrists, and two secondary school teachers) to learn about their experience of mental health problems among secondary school pupils; 13 focus group discussions (four with teachers, four with parents, and five with pupils); and 10 individual in-depth interviews with pupils who did not take part in the FGDs, to reflect on the collected data and to deepen the authors’ understanding. All interviews and FGDs were audio-taped, transcribed and analyzed for the identification of emerging issues using qualitative techniques of progressive coding, analytic memoing and ongoing comparison. Results Our study confirms the need to pay attention to mental health of pupils in Vietnam. Depression, anxiety, stress, suicidal thoughts and suicide attempts were seen as major problems by all stakeholders. Mental health problems were mainly associated with academic pressure, resulting from an overloaded curriculum and pressure from teachers and parents to succeed. The study found that pupils’ mental health demands interventions at many levels, including at the level of government (Ministry of Education and Training), schools, communities, families and pupils themselves. Conclusions Vietnamese secondary school pupils feel that their mental health status is poor, because of many risk factors in their learning and living environment. The need now is to investigate further to identify and

  15. Screening for alcohol problems: an epidemiological perspective and implications for primary care.

    PubMed

    Grucza, Richard A; Przybeck, Thomas R; Cloninger, C Robert

    2008-01-01

    In a random sample of 917 adults from the general population greater St. Louis, 19.6% of respondents screened positive for "probable alcohol abuse or dependence". Screening positive is indicative of unhealthy drinking patterns. The regular use of such instruments in primary care settings could facilitate patient-physician communication regarding alcohol problems, thereby improving detection and leading to greater utilization of appropriate medical treatment, including pharmacotherapy.

  16. The effect of visual representation style in problem-solving: a perspective from cognitive processes.

    PubMed

    Nyamsuren, Enkhbold; Taatgen, Niels A

    2013-01-01

    Using results from a controlled experiment and simulations based on cognitive models, we show that visual presentation style can have a significant impact on performance in a complex problem-solving task. We compared subject performances in two isomorphic, but visually different, tasks based on a card game of SET. Although subjects used the same strategy in both tasks, the difference in presentation style resulted in radically different reaction times and significant deviations in scanpath patterns in the two tasks. Results from our study indicate that low-level subconscious visual processes, such as differential acuity in peripheral vision and low-level iconic memory, can have indirect, but significant effects on decision making during a problem-solving task. We have developed two ACT-R models that employ the same basic strategy but deal with different presentations styles. Our ACT-R models confirm that changes in low-level visual processes triggered by changes in presentation style can propagate to higher-level cognitive processes. Such a domino effect can significantly affect reaction times and eye movements, without affecting the overall strategy of problem solving.

  17. Corynebacterium diphtheriae: genome diversity, population structure and genotyping perspectives.

    PubMed

    Mokrousov, Igor

    2009-01-01

    The epidemic re-emergence of diphtheria in Russia and the Newly Independent States (NIS) of the former Soviet Union in the 1990s demonstrated the continued threat of this thought to be rare disease. The bacteriophage encoded toxin is a main virulence factor of Corynebacterium diphtheriae, however, an analysis of the first complete genome sequence of C. diphtheriae revealed a recent acquisition of other pathogenicity factors including iron-uptake systems, adhesins and fimbrial proteins as indeed this extracellular pathogen has more possibilities for lateral gene transfer than, e.g., its close relative, mainly intracellular Mycobacterium tuberculosis. C. diphtheriae appears to have a phylogeographical structure mainly represented by area-specific variants whose circulation is under strong influence of human host factors, including health control measures, first of all, vaccination, and social economic conditions. This framework core population structure may be challenged by importation of the endemic and eventually toxigenic strains from new areas thus leading to localized or large epidemics caused directly by imported strains or by bacteriophage-lysogenized indigenous strains converted into toxin production. A feature of C. diphtheriae co-existence with humans is its periodicity: following large epidemic in the 1990s, the present period is marked by increasing heterogeneity of the circulating populations whereas re-emergence of new toxigenic variants along with persistent circulation of invasive non-toxigenic strains appear alarming. To identify and rapidly monitor subtle changes in the genome structure at an infraclonal level during and between epidemics, portable and discriminatory typing methods of C. diphtheriae are still needed. In this view, CRISPRs and minisatellites are promising genomic markers for development of high-resolution typing schemes and databasing of C. diphtheriae.

  18. Pilins in gram-positive bacteria: A structural perspective.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Vengadesan

    2015-07-01

    Pilins or fimbrilins are a class of proteins found in bacterial surface pilus, a hair-like surface appendage. Both the Gram-negative and -positive bacteria produce pilins to assemble pili on their cell-surface for different purposes including adherence, twitching motility, conjugation, immunomodulation, biofilm formation, and electron transfer. Immunogenic properties of the pilins make them attractive vaccine candidates. The polymerized pilins play a key role in the initiation of host adhesion, which is a critical step for bacterial colonization and infection. Because of their key role in adhesion and exposure on the cell surface, targeting the pilins-mediated adhesion (anti-adhesion therapy) is also seen as a promising alternative approach for preventing and treating bacterial infections, one that may overcome their ever-increasing repertoires of resistance mechanisms. Individual pilins interact with each other non-covalently to assemble the pilus fiber with the help of associated proteins like chaperones and Usher in Gram-negative bacteria. In contrast, the pilins in Gram-positive bacteria often connect with each other covalently, with the help of sortases. Certain unique structural features present on the pilins distinguish them from one another across different bacterial strains, and these dictate their cellular targets and functions. While the structure of pilins has been extensively studied in Gram-negative pathogenic bacteria, the pilins in Gram-positive pathogenic bacteria have been in only during the last decade. Recently, the discovery of pilins in non-pathogenic bacteria, such as Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG, has received great attention, though traditionally the attention was on pathogenic bacteria. This review summarizes and discusses the current structural knowledge of pilins in Gram-positive bacteria with emphasis on those pilins which are sortase substrates.

  19. Anti-cancer chalcones: Structural and molecular target perspectives.

    PubMed

    Mahapatra, Debarshi Kar; Bharti, Sanjay Kumar; Asati, Vivek

    2015-06-15

    Chalcone or (E)-1,3-diphenyl-2-propene-1-one scaffold remained a fascination among researchers in the 21st century due to its simple chemistry, ease of synthesis and a wide variety of promising biological activities. Several natural and (semi) synthetic chalcones have shown anti-cancer activity due to their inhibitory potential against various targets namely ABCG2/P-gp/BCRP, 5α-reductase, aromatase, 17-β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase, HDAC/Situin-1, proteasome, VEGF, VEGFR-2 kinase, MMP-2/9, JAK/STAT signaling pathways, CDC25B, tubulin, cathepsin-K, topoisomerase-II, Wnt, NF-κB, B-Raf and mTOR etc. In this review, a comprehensive study on molecular targets/pathways involved in carcinogenesis, mechanism of actions (MOAs), structure activity relationships (SARs) and patents granted have been highlighted. With the knowledge of molecular targets, structural insights and SARs, this review may be helpful for (medicinal) chemists to design more potent, safe, selective and cost effective anti-cancer chalcones.

  20. A Conceptual Framework Mapping the Application of Information Search Strategies to Well and Ill-Structured Problem Solving

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laxman, Kumar

    2010-01-01

    Problem-based learning (PBL) is an instructional approach that is organized around the investigation and resolution of problems. Problems are neither uniform nor similar. Jonassen (1997, 2000) in his design theory of problem solving has categorized problems into two broad types--well-structured and ill-structured. He has also described a host of…

  1. Structure-property relationships of multiferroic materials: A nano perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Feiming

    The integration of sensors, actuators, and control systems is an ongoing process in a wide range of applications covering automotive, medical, military, and consumer electronic markets. Four major families of ceramic and metallic actuators are under development: piezoelectrics, electrostrictors, magnetostrictors, and shape-memory alloys. All of these materials undergo at least two phase transformations with coupled thermodynamic order parameters. These transformations lead to complex domain wall behaviors, which are driven by electric fields (ferroelectrics), magnetic fields (ferromagnetics), or mechanical stress (ferroelastics) as they transform from nonferroic to ferroic states, contributing to the sensing and actuating capabilities. This research focuses on two multiferroic crystals, Pb(Mg1/3Nb 2/3)O3-PbTiO3 and Fe-Ga, which are characterized by the co-existence and coupling of ferroelectric polarization and ferroelastic strain, or ferro-magnetization and ferroelastic strain. These materials break the conventional boundary between piezoelectric and electrostrictors, or magnetostrictors and shape-memory alloys. Upon applying field or in a poled condition, they yield not only a large strain but also a large strain over field ratio, which is desired and much benefits for advanced actuator and sensor applications. In this thesis, particular attention has been given to understand the structure-property relationships of these two types of materials from atomic to the nano/macro scale. X-ray and neutron diffraction were used to obtain the lattice structure and phase transformation characteristics. Piezoresponse and magnetic force microscopy were performed to establish the dependence of domain configurations on composition, thermal history and applied fields. It has been found that polar nano regions (PNRs) make significant contributions to the enhanced electromechanical properties of PMN-x%PT crystals via assisting intermediate phase transformation. With increasing PT

  2. Materials by Design-A Perspective From Atoms to Structures.

    PubMed

    Buehler, Markus J

    2013-02-01

    Biological materials are effectively synthesized, controlled, and used for a variety of purposes-in spite of limitations in energy, quality, and quantity of their building blocks. Whereas the chemical composition of materials in the living world plays a some role in achieving functional properties, the way components are connected at different length scales defines what material properties can be achieved, how they can be altered to meet functional requirements, and how they fail in disease states and other extreme conditions. Recent work has demonstrated this by using large-scale computer simulations to predict materials properties from fundamental molecular principles, combined with experimental work and new mathematical techniques to categorize complex structure-property relationships into a systematic framework. Enabled by such categorization, we discuss opportunities based on the exploitation of concepts from distinct hierarchical systems that share common principles in how function is created, linking music to materials science.

  3. Ran-dependent nuclear export mediators: a structural perspective.

    PubMed

    Güttler, Thomas; Görlich, Dirk

    2011-08-31

    Nuclear export is an essential eukaryotic activity. It proceeds through nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) and is mediated by soluble receptors that shuttle between nucleus and cytoplasm. RanGTPase-dependent export mediators (exportins) constitute the largest class of these carriers and are functionally highly versatile. All of these exportins load their substrates in response to RanGTP binding in the nucleus and traverse NPCs as ternary RanGTP-exportin-cargo complexes to the cytoplasm, where GTP hydrolysis leads to export complex disassembly. The different exportins vary greatly in their substrate range. Recent structural studies of both protein- and RNA-specific exporters have illuminated how exportins bind their cargoes, how Ran triggers cargo loading and how export complexes are disassembled in the cytoplasm. Here, we review the current state of knowledge and highlight emerging principles as well as prevailing questions.

  4. Structural and Electronic Properties of Isolated Nanodiamonds: A Theoretical Perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Raty, J; Galli, G

    2004-09-09

    Nanometer sized diamond has been found in meteorites, proto-planetary nebulae and interstellar dusts, as well as in residues of detonation and in diamond films. Remarkably, the size distribution of diamond nanoparticles appears to be peaked around 2-5 nm, and to be largely independent of preparation conditions. Using ab-initio calculations, we have shown that in this size range nanodiamond has a fullerene-like surface and, unlike silicon and germanium, exhibit very weak quantum confinement effects. We called these carbon nanoparticles bucky-diamonds: their atomic structure, predicted by simulations, is consistent with many experimental findings. In addition, we carried out calculations of the stability of nanodiamond which provided a unifying explanation of its size distribution in extra-terrestrial samples, and in ultra-crystalline diamond films. Here we present a summary of our theoretical results and we briefly outline work in progress on doping of nanodiamond with nitrogen.

  5. Raman-based geobarometry of ultrahigh-pressure metamorphic rocks: applications, problems, and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Korsakov, Andrey V; Zhukov, Vladimir P; Vandenabeele, Peter

    2010-08-01

    Raman-based geobarometry has recently become increasingly popular because it is an elegant way to obtain information on peak metamorphic conditions or the entire pressure-temperature-time (P-T-t) path of metamorphic rocks, especially those formed under ultrahigh-pressure (UHP) conditions. However, several problems need to be solved to get reliable estimates of metamorphic conditions. In this paper we present some examples of difficulties which can arise during the Raman spectroscopy study of solid inclusions from ultrahigh-pressure metamorphic rocks.

  6. Structure, function and evolution of the gas exchangers: comparative perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Maina, JN

    2002-01-01

    Over the evolutionary continuum, animals have faced similar fundamental challenges of acquiring molecular oxygen for aerobic metabolism. Under limitations and constraints imposed by factors such as phylogeny, behaviour, body size and environment, they have responded differently in founding optimal respiratory structures. A quintessence of the aphorism that ‘necessity is the mother of invention’, gas exchangers have been inaugurated through stiff cost–benefit analyses that have evoked transaction of trade-offs and compromises. Cogent structural–functional correlations occur in constructions of gas exchangers: within and between taxa, morphological complexity and respiratory efficiency increase with metabolic capacities and oxygen needs. Highly active, small endotherms have relatively better-refined gas exchangers compared with large, inactive ectotherms. Respiratory structures have developed from the plain cell membrane of the primeval prokaryotic unicells to complex multifunctional ones ofthe modern Metazoa. Regarding the respiratory medium used to extract oxygen from, animal life has had only two choices – water or air – within the biological range of temperature and pressure the only naturally occurring respirable fluids. In rarer cases, certain animalshave adapted to using both media. Gills (evaginated gas exchangers) are the primordial respiratory organs: they are the archetypal water breathing organs. Lungs (invaginated gas exchangers) are the model air breathing organs. Bimodal (transitional) breathers occupy the water–air interface. Presentation and exposure of external (water/air) and internal (haemolymph/blood) respiratory media, features determined by geometric arrangement of the conduits, are important features for gas exchange efficiency: counter-current, cross-current, uniform pool and infinite pool designs have variably developed. PMID:12430953

  7. Near Earth Objects and Cascading Effects from the Policy Perspective: Implications from Problem and Solution Definition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindquist, Eric

    2016-04-01

    The characterization of near-Earth-objects (NEOs) in regard to physical attributes and potential risk and impact factors presents a complex and complicates scientific and engineering challenge. The societal and policy risks and impacts are no less complex, yet are rarely considered in the same context as material properties or related factors. Further, NEO impacts are typically considered as discrete events, not as initial events in a dynamic cascading system. The objective of this contribution is to position the characterization of NEOs within the public policy process domain as a means to reflect on the science-policy nexus in regard to risks and multi-hazard impacts associated with these hazards. This will be accomplished through, first, a brief overview of the science-policy nexus, followed by a discussion of policy process frameworks, such as agenda setting and the multiple streams model, focusing events, and punctuated equilibrium, and their application and appropriateness to the problem of NEOs. How, too, for example, does NEO hazard and risk compare with other low probability, high risk, hazards in regard to public policy? Finally, we will reflect on the implications of alternative NEO "solutions" and the characterization of the NEO "problem," and the political and public acceptance of policy alternatives as a way to link NEO science and policy in the context of the overall NH9.12 panel.

  8. The Dreyfus model of clinical problem-solving skills acquisition: a critical perspective

    PubMed Central

    Peña, Adolfo

    2010-01-01

    Context The Dreyfus model describes how individuals progress through various levels in their acquisition of skills and subsumes ideas with regard to how individuals learn. Such a model is being accepted almost without debate from physicians to explain the ‘acquisition’ of clinical skills. Objectives This paper reviews such a model, discusses several controversial points, clarifies what kind of knowledge the model is about, and examines its coherence in terms of problem-solving skills. Dreyfus' main idea that intuition is a major aspect of expertise is also discussed in some detail. Relevant scientific evidence from cognitive science, psychology, and neuroscience is reviewed to accomplish these aims. Conclusions Although the Dreyfus model may partially explain the ‘acquisition’ of some skills, it is debatable if it can explain the acquisition of clinical skills. The complex nature of clinical problem-solving skills and the rich interplay between the implicit and explicit forms of knowledge must be taken into consideration when we want to explain ‘acquisition’ of clinical skills. The idea that experts work from intuition, not from reason, should be evaluated carefully. PMID:20563279

  9. Characterization of NEOs from the Policy Perspective: Implications from Problem and Solution Definitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindquist, E.

    2015-12-01

    The characterization of near-Earth-objects (NEOs) in regard to physical attributes and potential risk and impact factors presents a complex and complicates scientific and engineering challenge. The societal and policy risks and impacts are no less complex, yet are rarely considered in the same context as material properties or related factors. The objective of this contribution is to position the characterization of NEOs within the public policy process domain as a means to reflect on the science-policy nexus in regard to risks associated with NEOs. This will be accomplished through, first, a brief overview of the science-policy nexus, followed by a discussion of several policy process frameworks, such as agenda setting and the multiple streams model, focusing events, and punctuated equilibrium, and their application and appropriateness to the problem of NEOs. How, too, for example, does NEO hazard and risk compare with other low probability, high risk, hazards in regard to public policy? Finally, we will reflect on the implications of alternative NEO "solutions" and the characterization of the NEO "problem," and the political and public acceptance of policy alternatives as a way to link NEO science and policy in the context of the overall NH004 panel.

  10. Some New Problems on Shells and Thin Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vlasov, V. S.

    1949-01-01

    Cylindrical shells of arbitrary section, reinforced by longitudinal and transverse members (stringers and ribs) are considered by us, for a sufficiently close spacing of the ribs, as in our previously published papers (references 1 end 2), as thin-walled orthotropic spatial systems at the cross-sections of which only axial (normal and shearing) forces can arise. The longitudinal bending and twisting moments, due to their weak effect on the stress state of the shell, are taken equal to zero. Along the longitudinal sections of the shell there may arise transverse forces in addition to the normal d shearing forces. Under the so-called static assumptions there is taken for the computation model of the shell a thin-walled spatial system consisting along its length (along a generator) of an infinite number of elementary strips capable of bending. Each of these strips is likened to a curved rod operating in each of its sections not only in tension (compression)but also in transverse bending and shear. The interaction between two adjoining transverse strips in the shell expresses itself in the transmission from one strip to the other of only the normal and shearing stresses. The static structure of the computation model here described is shown in figure 1, where the connections through which the normal and shearing stresses transmitted from one transverse strip to smother are indicated schematically by the rods located in the middle surface of the shell. In addition to the static hypothesis we introduce also geometric hypotheses. According to the latter the elongational deformations of the shell along lines parallel to the generator of its middle surface and the shear deformations in the middle surface, as ma+gitudes having . little effect on the state of the fundamental internal forces of the shell, are taken equal to zero. The deformations of the shell in our computational model are such that in the first place the lines of this surface perpendicular to the generator are

  11. A Perspective: Engineering Periosteum for Structural Bone Graft Healing

    PubMed Central

    Awad, Hani A.; O’Keefe, Regis J.; Guldberg, Robert E.; Schwarz, Edward M.

    2008-01-01

    Autograft is superior to both allograft and synthetic bone graft in repair of large structural bone defect largely due to the presence of multipotent mesenchymal stem cells in periosteum. Recent studies have provided further evidence that activation, expansion and differentiation of the donor periosteal progenitor cells are essential for the initiation of osteogenesis and angiogenesis of donor bone graft healing. The formation of donor cell-derived periosteal callus enables efficient host-dependent graft repair and remodeling at the later stage of healing. Removal of periosteum from bone autograft markedly impairs healing whereas engraftment of multipotent mesenchymal stem cells on bone allograft improves healing and graft incorporation. These studies provide rationale for fabrication of a biomimetic periosteum substitute that could fit bone of any size and shape for enhanced allograft healing and repair. The success of such an approach will depend on further understanding of the molecular signals that control inflammation, cellular recruitment as well as mesenchymal stem cell differentiation and expansion during the early phase of the repair process. It will also depend on multidisciplinary collaborations between biologists, material scientists and bioengineers to address issues of material selection and modification, biological and biomechanical parameters for functional evaluation of bone allograft healing. PMID:18509709

  12. Composites for Cryotank Structures. Present and Future: MSFC Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughn, Timothy P.

    1999-01-01

    The development of reusable launch vehicle systems for a single stage to orbit vehicle requires vehicles at liftoff with 85% to 94% of its mass consisting exclusively of propellants. These dry mass requirements drive designs to utilize stronger, lighter weight materials for structures. This technology development focus has allowed the introduction of composite materials in lieu of conventional metallic materials due to their higher specific strengths. Composite materials were successfully used for the liquid hydrogen tanks for the DC-XA, and a multi-lobed liquid hydrogen tank will be employed for the X-33. Another potential non-traditional application for composite materials is for liquid oxygen tanks, which is still being investigated. Traditionally, organic materials have been avoided wherever possible, due the potential fire hazard and the fact that composites fail conventional oxygen compatibility requirements. However, the potential weight savings warrant the investigation of the use of polymeric composite materials in oxygen environments. Since composites fail the conventional, time-proven test methods because they are considered flammable by test, we have embarked on an innovative approach to oxygen compatibility testing and evaluation focused on the use environments and attempts to eliminate or "design away" all potential ignition sources. Oxygen compatibility is defined as the ability of a material to coexist with oxygen and potential ignition sources with an acceptable, manageable degree of risk.

  13. Clinician and Parent Perspectives on Parent and Family Contextual Factors that Impact Community Mental Health Services for Children with Behavior Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker-Ericzen, Mary J.; Jenkins, Melissa M.; Brookman-Frazee, Lauren

    2010-01-01

    The present study employed qualitative methods to examine multiple stakeholder perspectives regarding the role of parent and family contextual factors on community child mental health treatment for children with behavior problems. Findings suggest agreement between clinicians and parents on the number, types and importance of parent and family…

  14. Upper error bounds on calculated outputs of interest for linear and nonlinear structural problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ladevèze, Pierre

    2006-07-01

    This Note introduces new strict upper error bounds on outputs of interest for linear as well as time-dependent nonlinear structural problems calculated by the finite element method. Small-displacement problems without softening, such as (visco)plasticity problems, are included through the standard thermodynamics framework involving internal state variables. To cite this article: P. Ladevèze, C. R. Mecanique 334 (2006).

  15. Solving the Phase Problem in Crystal Structure Determination: A Simple Introduction to Direct Methods.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schenk, H.

    1979-01-01

    Presents a simple way to introduce Direct Methods program systems to solve phase problems in x-ray crystal structure determination. It is intended for the undergraduate chemistry student laboratory. (Author/SA)

  16. Modeling of III-nitride light-emitting diodes: progress, problems, and perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpov, Sergey Yu.

    2011-02-01

    Recent progress in III-nitride LED modeling is reviewed with the focus on physical models that provide a better understanding of such hot issues, as factors limiting the internal quantum efficiency of light emission and high-current efficiency droop, polarization doping in graded-composition III-nitride alloys and its utilization in LEDs, current crowding in LED dice and its impact on the light extraction efficiency, and optimal light conversion in white LED lamps. Specific features of III-nitride materials, their impact on the LED operation, and models accounting for these features are considered. Insufficient understanding of transport mechanisms of non-equilibrium electrons and holes and their localization in InGaN inhomogeneous active regions are discussed along with other still unsolved problems. Influence of technological factors on LED heterostructures and their operation is argued in the context of further model developments.

  17. Richat Structure, Mauritania, Perspective View, Landsat Image over SRTM Elevation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This prominent circular feature, known as the Richat Structure, in the Sahara desert of Mauritania is often noted by astronauts because it forms a conspicuous 50-kilometer-wide (30-mile-wide) bull's-eye on the otherwise rather featureless expanse of the desert. Initially mistaken for a possible impact crater, it is now known to be an eroded circular anticline (structural dome) of layered sedimentary rocks.

    Extensive sand dunes occur in this region and the interaction of bedrock topography, wind, and moving sand is evident in this scene. Note especially how the dune field ends abruptly short of the cliffs at the far right as wind from the northeast (lower right) apparently funnels around the cliff point, sweeping clean areas near the base of the cliff. Note also the small isolated peak within the dune field. That peak captures some sand on its windward side, but mostly deflects the wind and sand around its sides, creating a sand-barren streak that continues far downwind.

    This view was generated from a Landsat satellite image draped over an elevation model produced by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM). The view uses a 6-times vertical exaggeration to greatly enhance topographic expression. For vertical scale, note that the height of the mesa ridge in the back center of the view is about 285 meters (about 935 feet) tall. Colors of the scene were enhanced by use of a combination of visible and infrared bands, which helps to differentiate bedrock (browns), sand (yellow, some white), minor vegetation in drainage channels (green), and salty sediments (bluish whites). Some shading of the elevation model was included to further highlight the topographic features.

    Elevation data used in this image was acquired by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour, launched on February 11, 2000. SRTM used the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR

  18. The adaptability rating for military aeronautics: an historical perspective of a continuing problem.

    PubMed

    Mills, J G; Jones, D R

    1984-06-01

    Healthy candidates for military flying training may vary considerably in their ability and in their motivation to fly. A variety of tests are used to predict flying ability, but motivation may be assessed only through such subjective measures as a semi-structured interview. This paper reviews the historical background of such interviews in the U.S. Army and the U.S. Air Force, and suggests some possible improvements.

  19. The mediating role of perceived peer support in the relation between quality of attachment and internalizing problems in adolescence: a longitudinal perspective.

    PubMed

    Pace, Ugo; Zappulla, Carla; Di Maggio, Rosanna

    2016-10-01

    The study was aimed to verify, from a longitudinal perspective, whether perceived peer support would mediate the relationship between attachment and internalizing problems. Longitudinal participants included 482 adolescents (245 boys) aged 14-15 years in Wave 1 and 17-18 years in Wave 2. Participants in Wave 1 completed the Relationship Questionnaire, and those in Wave 2 completed the Social Support Questionnaire and the Youth Self-Report. Results showed that secure attachment positively predicted high levels of perceived peer support and negatively predicted internalizing problems, whereas fearful and preoccupied attachment negatively predicted perceived peer support and positively predicted internalizing problems. The mediation models showed that perceived peer support partially mediated the relationship between secure attachment and internalizing problems as well as between preoccupied attachment and internalizing problems and between fearful attachment and internalizing problems. Our results confirm the role of subjective perception of peer support in contributing to the prediction of internalizing problems beyond attachment styles.

  20. How Instructional Design Experts Use Knowledge and Experience to Solve Ill-Structured Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ertmer, Peggy A.; Stepich, Donald A.; York, Cindy S.; Stickman, Ann; Wu, Xuemei (Lily); Zurek, Stacey; Goktas, Yuksel

    2008-01-01

    This study examined how instructional design (ID) experts used their prior knowledge and previous experiences to solve an ill-structured instructional design problem. Seven experienced designers used a think-aloud procedure to articulate their problem-solving processes while reading a case narrative. Results, presented in the form of four…

  1. Percentages: The Effect of Problem Structure, Number Complexity and Calculation Format

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baratta, Wendy; Price, Beth; Stacey, Kaye; Steinle, Vicki; Gvozdenko, Eugene

    2010-01-01

    This study reports how the difficulty of simple worded percentage problems is affected by the problem structure and the complexity of the numbers involved. We also investigate which methods students know. Results from 677 Year 8 and 9 students are reported. Overall the results indicate that more attention needs to be given to this important topic.…

  2. Perceptual Learning in Early Mathematics: Interacting with Problem Structure Improves Mapping, Solving and Fluency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thai, Khanh-Phuong; Son, Ji Y.; Hoffman, Jessica; Devers, Christopher; Kellman, Philip J.

    2014-01-01

    Mathematics is the study of structure but students think of math as solving problems according to rules. Students can learn procedures, but they often have trouble knowing when to apply learned procedures, especially to problems unlike those they trained with. In this study, the authors rely on the psychological mechanism of perceptual learning…

  3. Structured Parenting of Toddlers at High versus Low Genetic Risk: Two Pathways to Child Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leve, Leslie D.; Harold, Gordon T.; Ge, Xiaojia; Neiderhiser, Jenae M.; Shaw, Daniel; Scaramella, Laura V.; Reiss, David

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Little is known about how parenting might offset genetic risk to prevent the onset of child problems during toddlerhood. We used a prospective adoption design to separate genetic and environmental influences and test whether associations between structured parenting and toddler behavior problems were conditioned by genetic risk for…

  4. The cosmological {sup 7}Li problem from a nuclear physics perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Broggini, C.; Canton, L.; Fiorentini, G.; Villante, F.L. E-mail: luciano.canton@pd.infn.it E-mail: francesco.villante@lngs.infn.it

    2012-06-01

    The primordial abundance of {sup 7}Li as predicted by Big Bang Nucleosynthesis (BBN) is more than a factor 2 larger than what has been observed in metal-poor halo stars. Herein, we analyze the possibility that this discrepancy originates from incorrect assumptions about the nuclear reaction cross sections relevant for BBN. To do this, we introduce an efficient method to calculate the changes in the {sup 7}Li abundance produced by arbitrary (temperature dependent) modifications of the nuclear reaction rates. Then, considering that {sup 7}Li is mainly produced from {sup 7}Be via the electron capture process {sup 7}Be+e{sup −} → {sup 7}Li+ν{sub e}, we assess the impact of the various channels of {sup 7}Be destruction. Differently from previous analysis, we consider the role of unknown resonances by using a complete formalism which takes into account the effect of Coulomb and centrifugal barrier penetration and that does not rely on the use of the narrow-resonance approximation. As a result of this, the possibility of a nuclear physics solution to the {sup 7}Li problem is significantly suppressed. Given the present experimental and theoretical constraints, it is unlikely that the {sup 7}Be+n destruction rate is underestimated by the 2.5 factor required to solve the problem. We exclude, moreover, that resonant destruction in the channels {sup 7}Be+t and {sup 7}Be+{sup 3}He can explain the {sup 7}Li puzzle. New unknown resonances in {sup 7}Be+d and {sup 7}Be+α could potentially produce significant effects. Recent experimental results have ruled out such a possibility for {sup 7}Be+d. On the other hand, for the {sup 7}Be+α channel very favorable conditions are required. The possible existence of a partially suitable resonant level in {sup 11}C is studied in the framework of a coupled-channel model and the possibility of a direct measurement is considered.

  5. Studies on clonogenic hemopoietic cells of vertebrate in space: problems and perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domaratskaya, E. I.; Michurina, T. V.; Bueverova, E. I.; Bragina, E. V.; Nikonova, T. A.; Starostin, V. I.; Khrushchov, N. G.

    Hemopoietic tissues were studied in vertebrates launched aboard the Soviet (Russian) biosatellites ("Cosmos-1129, 1514, 1667, 1887 and 2044"; "Bion-10 and 11") between 1980 and 1996. In the bone marrow of rats exposed to spaceflight conditions, a statistically significant decrease in cell number was revealed in the progenitor cell compartment accounting for the compensatory response of granulocyte—macrophage (CFU-gm) and erythrocyte lineages (BFU-e and CFU-e) and in the compartment of multipotent hemopoietic stem cells (CFU-s), which is responsible for the permanent renewal of hemopoietic tissue. The number of stromal fibroblastic progenitors (CFC-f) in the bone marrow of these rats was also reduced. Apparently, changes in the hemopoietic stroma damage the hemopoietic microenvironment and, hence, may be responsible for changes observed in the hemopoietic tissue proper. Attempts were made to develop methods for analyzing morphologically indiscernible clonogenic hemopoietic cells of newts, and studies on the effects of spaceflight factors on these cells were performed. The results showed that the numbers of clonogenic cells in newts of the flight group newts were significantly lower than in control newts. The data obtained are used as the basis for formulating the problems to be studied, drawing up a program for further research on the effects of spaceflight factors on stem and other clonogenic hemopoietic cells, and developing new experimental models for analyzing stem cells, the state of the hemopoietic stroma, etc.

  6. The effects of neglect on academic achievement and disciplinary problems: a developmental perspective.

    PubMed

    Kendall-Tackett, K A; Eckenrode, J

    1996-03-01

    The present study examines the effect of child neglect, alone and in combination with abuse, on academic achievement and school disciplinary problems for elementary, junior high, and senior high students. The sample included 324 neglected children and adolescents, and a matched nonmaltreated sample of 420 children and adolescents. All subjects were in grades K through 12 in a small city in New York state. The results revealed that neglected children did perform more poorly than their nonmaltreated counterparts, having lower grades, more suspensions, more disciplinary referrals, and more grade repetitions, even when controlling for gender of child and SES. Neglect alone and neglect in combination with physical or sexual abuse was related to lower grades and more suspensions. The combination of abuse and neglect had a particularly strong effect on the number of disciplinary referrals and grade repetitions. Abused/neglected students in junior high had the highest number of grade repetitions. The number of disciplinary referrals continued to increase through senior high for both neglected and abused/neglected students. Interestingly, the academic performance of all subjects dropped during junior high. Neglect and neglect in combination with abuse appeared to exacerbate a decline in academic performance that occurs as children enter junior high school.

  7. Debates—Perspectives on socio-hydrology: Modeling flood risk as a public policy problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gober, Patricia; Wheater, Howard S.

    2015-06-01

    Socio-hydrology views human activities as endogenous to water system dynamics; it is the interaction between human and biophysical processes that threatens the viability of current water systems through positive feedbacks and unintended consequences. Di Baldassarre et al. implement socio-hydrology as a flood risk problem using the concept of social memory as a vehicle to link human perceptions to flood damage. Their mathematical model has heuristic value in comparing potential flood damages in green versus technological societies. It can also support communities in exploring the potential consequences of policy decisions and evaluating critical policy tradeoffs, for example, between flood protection and economic development. The concept of social memory does not, however, adequately capture the social processes whereby public perceptions are translated into policy action, including the pivotal role played by the media in intensifying or attenuating perceived flood risk, the success of policy entrepreneurs in keeping flood hazard on the public agenda during short windows of opportunity for policy action, and different societal approaches to managing flood risk that derive from cultural values and economic interests. We endorse the value of seeking to capture these dynamics in a simplified conceptual framework, but favor a broader conceptualization of socio-hydrology that includes a knowledge exchange component, including the way modeling insights and scientific results are communicated to floodplain managers. The social processes used to disseminate the products of socio-hydrological research are as important as the research results themselves in determining whether modeling is used for real-world decision making.

  8. Neutralization of Virus Infectivity by Antibodies: Old Problems in New Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Klasse, P. J.

    2016-01-01

    Neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) can be both sufficient and necessary for protection against viral infections, although they sometimes act in concert with cellular immunity. Successful vaccines against viruses induce NAbs but vaccine candidates against some major viral pathogens, including HIV-1, have failed to induce potent and effective such responses. Theories of how antibodies neutralize virus infectivity have been formulated and experimentally tested since the 1930s; and controversies about the mechanistic and quantitative bases for neutralization have continually arisen. Soluble versions of native oligomeric viral proteins that mimic the functional targets of neutralizing antibodies now allow the measurement of the relevant affinities of NAbs. Thereby the neutralizing occupancies on virions can be estimated and related to the potency of the NAbs. Furthermore, the kinetics and stoichiometry of NAb binding can be compared with neutralizing efficacy. Recently, the fundamental discovery that the intracellular factor TRIM21 determines the degree of neutralization of adenovirus has provided new mechanistic and quantitative insights. Since TRIM21 resides in the cytoplasm, it would not affect the neutralization of enveloped viruses, but its range of activity against naked viruses will be important to uncover. These developments bring together the old problems of virus neutralization—mechanism, stoichiometry, kinetics, and efficacy—from surprising new angles. PMID:27099867

  9. The proterozoic and earliest cambrian trace fossil record; patterns, problems and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Sören

    2003-02-01

    The increase in trace fossil diversity across the Neoproterozoic-Cambrian boundary often is presented in terms of tabulations of ichnogenera. However, a clearer picture of the increase in diversity and complexity can be reached by combining trace fossils into broad groups defined both on morphology and interpretation. This also focuses attention on looking for similarites between Neoproterozoic and Cambrian trace fossils. Siliciclastic sediments of the Neoproterozoic preserve elongate tubular organisms and structures of probable algal origin, many of which are very similar to trace fossils. Such enigmatic structures include Palaeopascichnus and Yelovichnus, previously thought to be trace fossils in the form of tight meanders.A preliminary two or tripartite terminal Neoproterozoic trace fossil zonation can be be recognized. Possibly the earliest trace fossils are short unbranched forms, probably younger than about 560 Ma. Typical Neoproterozoic trace fossils are unbranched and essentially horizontal forms found associated with diverse assemblages of Ediacaran organisms. In sections younger than about 550 Ma a modest increase in trace fossil diversity occurs, including the appearance of rare three-dimensional burrow systems (treptichnids), and traces with a three-lobed lower surfaces.

  10. Molecular dynamics simulations of G-DNA and perspectives on the simulation of nucleic acid structures

    PubMed Central

    šponer, Jiří; Cang, Xiaohui; Cheatham, Thomas E.

    2013-01-01

    The article reviews the application of biomolecular simulation methods to understand the structure, dynamics and interactions of nucleic acids with a focus on explicit solvent molecular dynamics simulations of guanine quadruplex (G-DNA and G-RNA) molecules. While primarily dealing with these exciting and highly relevant four-stranded systems, where recent and past simulations have provided several interesting results and novel insight into G-DNA structure, the review provides some general perspectives on the applicability of the simulation techniques to nucleic acids. PMID:22525788

  11. A perspective on large eddy simulation of problems in the nuclear industry

    SciTech Connect

    Hassan, Y.A.; Pruitt, J.M.; Steininger, D.A.

    1995-12-01

    Because of the complex nature of coolant flow in nuclear reactors, current subchannel methods for light water reactor analysis are insufficient. The large eddy simulation method has been proposed as a computational tool for subchannel analysis. In large eddy simulation, large flow structures are computed while small scales are modeled, thereby decreasing computational time as compared with direct numerical simulation methods. Large eddy simulation has been used in complex geometry calculations providing good results in tube bundle cross-flow situations in steam generators. It is proposed that the large eddy simulation method be extended from single- to two-phase flow calculations to help in the prediction of the thermal diffusion of energy between adjacent subchannels.

  12. Geographic variation in plant community structure of salt marshes: species, functional and phylogenetic perspectives.

    PubMed

    Guo, Hongyu; Chamberlain, Scott A; Elhaik, Eran; Jalli, Inder; Lynes, Alana-Rose; Marczak, Laurie; Sabath, Niv; Vargas, Amy; Więski, Kazimierz; Zelig, Emily M; Pennings, Steven C

    2015-01-01

    In general, community similarity is thought to decay with distance; however, this view may be complicated by the relative roles of different ecological processes at different geographical scales, and by the compositional perspective (e.g. species, functional group and phylogenetic lineage) used. Coastal salt marshes are widely distributed worldwide, but no studies have explicitly examined variation in salt marsh plant community composition across geographical scales, and from species, functional and phylogenetic perspectives. Based on studies in other ecosystems, we hypothesized that, in coastal salt marshes, community turnover would be more rapid at local versus larger geographical scales; and that community turnover patterns would diverge among compositional perspectives, with a greater distance decay at the species level than at the functional or phylogenetic levels. We tested these hypotheses in salt marshes of two regions: The southern Atlantic and Gulf Coasts of the United States. We examined the characteristics of plant community composition at each salt marsh site, how community similarity decayed with distance within individual salt marshes versus among sites in each region, and how community similarity differed among regions, using species, functional and phylogenetic perspectives. We found that results from the three compositional perspectives generally showed similar patterns: there was strong variation in community composition within individual salt marsh sites across elevation; in contrast, community similarity decayed with distance four to five orders of magnitude more slowly across sites within each region. Overall, community dissimilarity of salt marshes was lowest on the southern Atlantic Coast, intermediate on the Gulf Coast, and highest between the two regions. Our results indicated that local gradients are relatively more important than regional processes in structuring coastal salt marsh communities. Our results also suggested that in

  13. Geographic Variation in Plant Community Structure of Salt Marshes: Species, Functional and Phylogenetic Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Hongyu; Chamberlain, Scott A.; Elhaik, Eran; Jalli, Inder; Lynes, Alana-Rose; Marczak, Laurie; Sabath, Niv; Vargas, Amy; Więski, Kazimierz; Zelig, Emily M.; Pennings, Steven C.

    2015-01-01

    In general, community similarity is thought to decay with distance; however, this view may be complicated by the relative roles of different ecological processes at different geographical scales, and by the compositional perspective (e.g. species, functional group and phylogenetic lineage) used. Coastal salt marshes are widely distributed worldwide, but no studies have explicitly examined variation in salt marsh plant community composition across geographical scales, and from species, functional and phylogenetic perspectives. Based on studies in other ecosystems, we hypothesized that, in coastal salt marshes, community turnover would be more rapid at local versus larger geographical scales; and that community turnover patterns would diverge among compositional perspectives, with a greater distance decay at the species level than at the functional or phylogenetic levels. We tested these hypotheses in salt marshes of two regions: The southern Atlantic and Gulf Coasts of the United States. We examined the characteristics of plant community composition at each salt marsh site, how community similarity decayed with distance within individual salt marshes versus among sites in each region, and how community similarity differed among regions, using species, functional and phylogenetic perspectives. We found that results from the three compositional perspectives generally showed similar patterns: there was strong variation in community composition within individual salt marsh sites across elevation; in contrast, community similarity decayed with distance four to five orders of magnitude more slowly across sites within each region. Overall, community dissimilarity of salt marshes was lowest on the southern Atlantic Coast, intermediate on the Gulf Coast, and highest between the two regions. Our results indicated that local gradients are relatively more important than regional processes in structuring coastal salt marsh communities. Our results also suggested that in

  14. Butane Hash Oil Burns: A 7-Year Perspective on a Growing Problem.

    PubMed

    Romanowski, Kathleen S; Barsun, Alura; Kwan, Peter; Teo, Esther H; Palmieri, Tina L; Sen, Soman; Maguina, Pirko; Greenhalgh, David G

    With the legalization of marijuana in four states, and decriminalization in many others, marijuana is becoming easier to obtain. The authors have experienced an increase in burn injuries related to the production of butane hash oil (BHO; a concentrated tetrahydrocannabinol product produced by the distillation of marijuana plant products with pressurized butane). This article updates our experience and highlights the increasing public health problem associated with these burns. Charts of patients who presented to the burn center with suspicion of BHO-related injuries between January 2007 and December 2014 were examined. Data collected included demographics, injury characteristics, treatment utilized, and outcomes. Charts of 101 patients were identified as having BHO-related burn injury. The mean age of these patients was 30.5 ± 10.6 years (mean ± standard deviation, range: 2-55 years) and 93.1% were male. Patients sustained a mean of 26.8 ± 24.1% TBSA burn with 14.3 ± 25.1% third degree burns. Three patients died as the result of their injuries. Patients required a mean of 12 ± 48.4 ventilator days, and 27.1 ± 59.4 days in the hospital. The number of patients presenting with these burns increased over the past 7 years. BHO burns occur most commonly in February (12 patients), on Wednesday (19 patients), and between 18:00 and 06:00 (58 patients). There has been a sharp increase in the number of patients presenting with burn-associated BHO production in the region over the past 7 years. The authors as burn care providers need to increase public awareness of this issue and aid in the development of legislation to help prevent these burns before it becomes a public health crisis.

  15. The Role of Content Knowledge in Ill-Structured Problem Solving for High School Physics Students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milbourne, Jeff; Wiebe, Eric

    2017-03-01

    While Physics Education Research has a rich tradition of problem-solving scholarship, most of the work has focused on more traditional, well-defined problems. Less work has been done with ill-structured problems, problems that are better aligned with the engineering and design-based scenarios promoted by the Next Generation Science Standards. This study explored the relationship between physics content knowledge and ill-structured problem solving for two groups of high school students with different levels of content knowledge. Both groups of students completed an ill-structured problem set, using a talk-aloud procedure to narrate their thought process as they worked. Analysis of the data focused on identifying students' solution pathways, as well as the obstacles that prevented them from reaching "reasonable" solutions. Students with more content knowledge were more successful reaching reasonable solutions for each of the problems, experiencing fewer obstacles. These students also employed a greater variety of solution pathways than those with less content knowledge. Results suggest that a student's solution pathway choice may depend on how she perceives the problem.

  16. Opportunity Structure for Gambling and Problem Gambling among Employees in the Transport Industry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Revheim, Tevje; Buvik, Kristin

    2009-01-01

    Working conditions for employees in the transport sector might present an opportunity structure for gambling by providing access to gambling during the workday. This study investigates connections between opportunity structure, gambling during the workday, and gambling problems among employees in the transport sector. Data has been collected from…

  17. Analysis, preliminary design and simulation systems for control-structure interaction problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, K. C.; Alvin, Kenneth F.

    1991-01-01

    Software aspects of control-structure interaction (CSI) analysis are discussed. The following subject areas are covered: (1) implementation of a partitioned algorithm for simulation of large CSI problems; (2) second-order discrete Kalman filtering equations for CSI simulations; and (3) parallel computations and control of adaptive structures.

  18. Using a Semantic Diagram to Structure a Collaborative Problem Solving Process in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cai, Huiying; Lin, Lin; Gu, Xiaoqing

    2016-01-01

    This study provides an in-depth look into the implementation process of visualization-based tools for structuring collaborative problem solving (CPS) in the classroom. A visualization-based learning platform--the semantic diagram for structuring CPS in a real classroom was designed and implemented. Metafora, the preliminary vehicle of the semantic…

  19. The social construction of fibromyalgia as a health problem from the perspective of policies, professionals, and patients.

    PubMed

    Briones-Vozmediano, Erica

    2016-01-01

    This article is a review of the PhD thesis written by Erica Briones-Vozmediano, entitled, 'The social construction of fibromyalgia as a health problem from the perspective of policies, professionals, and patients'. The findings show that in Spain, the fact that fibromyalgia (FM) lacks recognition still remains: in policies, in the clinical and professional fields, and in the patients' social circle. These three spheres have an influence on how this disease is constructed on a social level. International health policy has not yet taken steps to reflect the emergence of this recently diagnosed disease. The care for patients suffering from FM, who are mainly women, leads to frustration among the healthcare professionals and desperation among the patients themselves, as a resolutive treatment for the disease is not existing. Patients show resistance at assuming the sick role. They want to carry on undertaking their daily activities, both in the public sphere and in the private one. Roles involving the gendered division of labour were found to follow a rigid pattern, both prior to and subsequent to the disease, as the causes that led to frustration for men or women differ according to activities that are socially assigned to them. In practice, FM is conceived exclusively as a women's health problem, which may result in a gender-biased patient healthcare attention. It is recommended that the implementation of specific policies for FM which could resolve this evident shortcoming should take place. To draw attention on a social level to certain illnesses considered to be attributed to women, such as FM, is of utmost importance, in order to allow the patients to be socially recognised as suffering a real and disabling disease.

  20. The social construction of fibromyalgia as a health problem from the perspective of policies, professionals, and patients

    PubMed Central

    Briones-Vozmediano, Erica

    2016-01-01

    This article is a review of the PhD thesis written by Erica Briones-Vozmediano, entitled, ‘The social construction of fibromyalgia as a health problem from the perspective of policies, professionals, and patients’. The findings show that in Spain, the fact that fibromyalgia (FM) lacks recognition still remains: in policies, in the clinical and professional fields, and in the patients’ social circle. These three spheres have an influence on how this disease is constructed on a social level. International health policy has not yet taken steps to reflect the emergence of this recently diagnosed disease. The care for patients suffering from FM, who are mainly women, leads to frustration among the healthcare professionals and desperation among the patients themselves, as a resolutive treatment for the disease is not existing. Patients show resistance at assuming the sick role. They want to carry on undertaking their daily activities, both in the public sphere and in the private one. Roles involving the gendered division of labour were found to follow a rigid pattern, both prior to and subsequent to the disease, as the causes that led to frustration for men or women differ according to activities that are socially assigned to them. In practice, FM is conceived exclusively as a women’s health problem, which may result in a gender-biased patient healthcare attention. It is recommended that the implementation of specific policies for FM which could resolve this evident shortcoming should take place. To draw attention on a social level to certain illnesses considered to be attributed to women, such as FM, is of utmost importance, in order to allow the patients to be socially recognised as suffering a real and disabling disease. PMID:27989274

  1. Outpatients' Perspectives on Problems and Needs Related to Female Genital Mutilation/Cutting: A Qualitative Study from Somaliland

    PubMed Central

    Fried, Sarah; Mahmoud Warsame, Amina; Berggren, Vanja; Isman, Elisabeth; Johansson, Annika

    2013-01-01

    Aim. To explore female outpatients' perspectives on problems related to female genital mutilation/cutting (FGM/C) and their views on information, care, and counseling. Setting. An FGM/C support center at a maternity clinic in Hargeisa, Somaliland. Methods. A qualitative, descriptive study, using content analysis of seven semistructured interviews with female outpatients. Results. All participants had been ignorant of the etiology of their FGM/C-related complications and hesitant to seek care. All had undergone infibulation but did not wish the same for their daughters. In recent years they had learnt through religious leaders and media campaigns that infibulation was unapproved by Islam. A less severe FGM/C type, “Sunna,” was more accepted; however, few could define what “Sunna” meant. Condemning and ridiculing attitudes against uncircumcised women prevailed in their community. Conclusions. New ideas and concepts related to FGM/C enter the common discourse in the Somali society while traditional norms and values still prevail. Religion was shown to have a strong impact on FGM/C practices and beliefs. Interventions aiming to raise awareness of health consequences of all types of FGM/C, as well as where to seek care for complications, are needed in Somaliland. Involvement of religious leaders in anti-FGM/C programs is essential. PMID:24151505

  2. Exact solution to the problem of N bodies forming a multi-layer rotating structure.

    PubMed

    Smulsky, Joseph J

    2015-01-01

    Exact solutions to the problem of the Newtonian gravitational interaction of N material points moving around N 2 concentric circular orbits are considered. Each circular orbit contains N 3 axisymmetrically located bodies having identical masses. The structure as a whole rotates around its symmetry axis. Such structures are identical to the homographic-dynamics configurations, or planar central configurations, known from literature. Conceptually, those structures can be considered as structures formed by mutually embedded polygons with point bodies placed at polygon vortices. For structures involving less than 20 bodies, solutions were obtained using Hamiltonian-mechanics methods. In the study, the forces acting on each body in the rotating structure from the side of all other bodies were found. The differential motion equations of the bodies were reduced to a system of linear algebraic equations for the body masses. Solutions in various forms were obtained. For specifying the initial parameters and for calculating all other characteristics of the structures, a computer program RtCrcSt2.for has been developed. Structures comprising up to one million bodies have been calculated. Graphical images of obtained structures are presented, and their properties are described. Stability problems for examined structures are considered, and possible application of obtained results to celestial- and space-mechanics problems is discussed.

  3. Vortex methods for fluid-structure interaction problems with deforming geometries and their application to swimming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gazzola, Mattia; Chatelain, Philippe; Koumoutsakos, Petros

    2010-11-01

    We present a vortex particle-mesh method for fluid-structure interaction problems. The proposed methodology combines implicit interface capturing, Brinkmann penalization techniques, and the self-consistent computation of momentum transfer between the fluid and the structure. In addition, our scheme is able to handle immersed bodies characterized by non-solenoidal deformations, allowing the study of arbitrary deforming geometries. This attractively simple algorithm is shown to accurately reproduce reference simulations for rigid and deforming structures. Its suitability for biological locomotion problems is then demonstrated with the simulation of self-propelled anguilliform swimmers.

  4. Finite element analysis of structural engineering problems using a viscoplastic model incorporating two back stresses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arya, Vinod K.; Halford, Gary R.

    1993-01-01

    The feasibility of a viscoplastic model incorporating two back stresses and a drag strength is investigated for performing nonlinear finite element analyses of structural engineering problems. To demonstrate suitability for nonlinear structural analyses, the model is implemented into a finite element program and analyses for several uniaxial and multiaxial problems are performed. Good agreement is shown between the results obtained using the finite element implementation and those obtained experimentally. The advantages of using advanced viscoplastic models for performing nonlinear finite element analyses of structural components are indicated.

  5. Exploring the views of people with mental health problems' on the concept of coercion: Towards a broader socio-ethical perspective.

    PubMed

    Norvoll, Reidun; Pedersen, Reidar

    2016-05-01

    In mental health care, coercion is a controversial issue that has led to much debate and research on its nature and use. Yet, few previous studies have explicitly explored the views on the concept of coercion among people with first-hand experiences of being coerced. This study includes semi-structured focus-groups and individual interviews with 24 participants who had various mental health problems and experiences with coercion. Data were collected in 2012-2013 in three regions of Norway and analysed by a thematic content analysis. Findings show that participants had wide-ranging accounts of coercion, including formal and informal coercion across health- and welfare services. They emphasised that using coercion reflects the mental health system's tendency to rely on coercion and the lack of voluntary services and treatment methods that are more helpful. Other core characteristics of coercion were deprivation of freedom, power relations, in terms of powerlessness and 'counter-power,' and coercion as existential and social life events. Participants' views are consistent with prevailing theories of coercion and research on perceived coercion. However, this study demonstrates a need for broader existential and socio-ethical perspectives on coercion that are intertwined with treatment and care systems in research and practice. Implications for mental health policy and services are discussed.

  6. Palaeo sea-level and ice-sheet databases: problems, strategies and perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rovere, Alessio; Düsterhus, André; Carlson, Anders; Barlow, Natasha; Bradwell, Tom; Dutton, Andrea; Gehrels, Roland; Hibbert, Fiona; Hijma, Marc; Horton, Benjamin; Klemann, Volker; Kopp, Robert; Sivan, Dorit; Tarasov, Lev; Törnqvist, Torbjorn

    2016-04-01

    Databases of palaeoclimate data have driven many major developments in understanding the Earth system. The measurement and interpretation of palaeo sea-level and ice-sheet data that form such databases pose considerable challenges to the scientific communities that use them for further analyses. In this paper, we build on the experience of the PALSEA (PALeo constraints on SEA level rise) community, which is a working group inside the PAGES (Past Global Changes) project, to describe the challenges and best strategies that can be adopted to build a self-consistent and standardised database of geological and geochemical data related to palaeo sea levels and ice sheets. Our aim in this paper is to identify key points that need attention and subsequent funding when undertaking the task of database creation. We conclude that any sea-level or ice-sheet database must be divided into three instances: i) measurement; ii) interpretation; iii) database creation. Measurement should include postion, age, description of geological features, and quantification of uncertainties. All must be described as objectively as possible. Interpretation can be subjective, but it should always include uncertainties and include all the possible interpretations, without unjustified a priori exclusions. We propose that, in the creation of a database, an approach based on Accessibility, Transparency, Trust, Availability, Continued updating, Completeness and Communication of content (ATTAC3) must be adopted. Also, it is essential to consider the community structure that creates and benefits of a database. We conclude that funding sources should consider to address not only the creation of original data in specific research-question oriented projects, but also include the possibility to use part of the funding for IT-related and database creation tasks, which are essential to guarantee accessibility and maintenance of the collected data.

  7. Family Structure and Adolescent Alcohol Use Problems: Extending Popular Explanations to American Indians.

    PubMed

    Eitle, Tamela McNulty; Johnson-Jennings, Michelle; Eitle, David J

    2013-11-01

    Competing explanations of the relationship between family structure and alcohol use problems are examined using a sample of American Indian adolescents from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health. Living in a single-parent family is found to be a marker for the unequal distribution of stress exposure and parental alcohol use, but the effects of other family structures like non-parent families and the presence of under 21-year-old extended family or non-family members emerge or remain as risk or protective factors for alcohol use problems after a consideration of SES, family processes, peer socialization, and social stress. In particular, a non-parent family structure that has not been considered in prior research emerged as a protective family structure for American Indian adolescent alcohol use problems.

  8. Perspective - Open problems in earth surface dynamics require innovative new methodologies from graph theory and non-linear analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foufoula-Georgiou, Efi; Schwenk, Jon; Tejedor, Alejandro

    2015-04-01

    Are the dynamics of meandering rivers non-linear? What information does the shape of an oxbow lake carry about its forming process? How to characterize self-dissimilar landscapes carrying the signature of larger-scale geologic or tectonic controls? Do we have proper frameworks for quantifying the topology and dynamics of deltaic systems? What can the structural complexity of river networks (erosional and depositional) reveal about their vulnerability and response to change? Can the structure and dynamics of river networks reveal potential hotspots of geomorphic change? All of the above problems are at the heart of understanding landscape evolution, relating process to structure and form, and developing methodologies for inferring how a system might respond to future changes. We argue that a new surge of rigorous methodologies is needed to address these problems. The innovations introduced herein are: (1) gradual wavelet reconstruction for depicting threshold nonlinearity (due to cutoffs) versus inherent nonlinearity (due to underlying dynamics) in river meandering, (2) graph theory for studying the topology and dynamics of deltaic river networks and their response to change, and (3) Lagrangian approaches combined with topology and non-linear dynamics for inferring sediment-driven hotspots of geomorphic change.

  9. Formal analysis, hardness, and algorithms for extracting internal structure of test-based problems.

    PubMed

    Jaśkowski, Wojciech; Krawiec, Krzysztof

    2011-01-01

    Problems in which some elementary entities interact with each other are common in computational intelligence. This scenario, typical for coevolving artificial life agents, learning strategies for games, and machine learning from examples, can be formalized as a test-based problem and conveniently embedded in the common conceptual framework of coevolution. In test-based problems, candidate solutions are evaluated on a number of test cases (agents, opponents, examples). It has been recently shown that every test of such problem can be regarded as a separate objective, and the whole problem as multi-objective optimization. Research on reducing the number of such objectives while preserving the relations between candidate solutions and tests led to the notions of underlying objectives and internal problem structure, which can be formalized as a coordinate system that spatially arranges candidate solutions and tests. The coordinate system that spans the minimal number of axes determines the so-called dimension of a problem and, being an inherent property of every problem, is of particular interest. In this study, we investigate in-depth the formalism of a coordinate system and its properties, relate them to properties of partially ordered sets, and design an exact algorithm for finding a minimal coordinate system. We also prove that this problem is NP-hard and come up with a heuristic which is superior to the best algorithm proposed so far. Finally, we apply the algorithms to three abstract problems and demonstrate that the dimension of the problem is typically much lower than the number of tests, and for some problems converges to the intrinsic parameter of the problem--its a priori dimension.

  10. Screening the Personal Need for the Structure and solving word problems with fractions.

    PubMed

    Svecova, Valeria; Pavlovicova, Gabriela

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a pilot study of the impact of Personal Need for Structure of the selected mathematical competence. We were interested whether there is a relationship between cognitive-personal variable (Personal Need for Structure) and the mathematical knowledge about fractions of freshmen. We realized the experiment with 113 students of the Constantine the Philosopher University in Nitra, Slovakia. We examined statistically significant dependencies between the cognitive-personality variable of the Personal Need for Structure and its subfactors F1 (the wish of the structure) and F2 (the reaction to the lack of the structure) and the success rate of solving tasks and word problems with fractions. We used statistical Cochrane Q test to detect dependencies between factors of the Personal Need for Structure scale and the Mathematical knowledge. We proved that the success rate of solving word problems with fractions is inversely proportional to the need for the structure. This means that the higher the overall score on the Personal Need for Structure scale and its subfactors is, the lower is the success rate of solving the word problems.

  11. ATLAS, an integrated structural analysis and design system. Volume 5: System demonstration problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samuel, R. A. (Editor)

    1979-01-01

    One of a series of documents describing the ATLAS System for structural analysis and design is presented. A set of problems is described that demonstrate the various analysis and design capabilities of the ATLAS System proper as well as capabilities available by means of interfaces with other computer programs. Input data and results for each demonstration problem are discussed. Results are compared to theoretical solutions or experimental data where possible. Listings of all input data are included.

  12. Psychosocial Problems Among Truant Youth: A Multi-Group, Exploratory Structural Equation Modeling Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Dembo, Richard; Briones-Robinson, Rhissa; Barrett, Kimberly; Winters, Ken C.; Ungaro, Rocio; Karas, Lora; Wareham, Jennifer; Belenko, Steven

    2012-01-01

    Truant youth represent a critical group needing problem-oriented research and involvement in effective services. The limited number of studies on the psychosocial functioning of truant youths have focused on one or a few problem areas, rather than examining co-morbid problem behaviors. The present study addresses the need to examine the interrelationships of multiple domains of psychosocial functioning, including substance involvement, mental health, and delinquency, among truant youth. Exploratory structural equation modeling on baseline data collected on 219 truant youths identified two major factors reflecting psychosocial functioning, and found the factor structure was similar across major sociodemographic subgroups. Further analyses supported the validity of the factor structure. The research and service delivery implications of the findings are discussed. PMID:23243383

  13. Approximate analysis for repeated eigenvalue problems with applications to controls-structure integrated design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenny, Sean P.; Hou, Gene J. W.

    1994-01-01

    A method for eigenvalue and eigenvector approximate analysis for the case of repeated eigenvalues with distinct first derivatives is presented. The approximate analysis method developed involves a reparameterization of the multivariable structural eigenvalue problem in terms of a single positive-valued parameter. The resulting equations yield first-order approximations to changes in the eigenvalues and the eigenvectors associated with the repeated eigenvalue problem. This work also presents a numerical technique that facilitates the definition of an eigenvector derivative for the case of repeated eigenvalues with repeated eigenvalue derivatives (of all orders). Examples are given which demonstrate the application of such equations for sensitivity and approximate analysis. Emphasis is placed on the application of sensitivity analysis to large-scale structural and controls-structures optimization problems.

  14. Effects of problem structure and dialogue type on the performance of the man/machine interface

    SciTech Connect

    Palko, J.B.

    1986-01-01

    This research project is intended to provide guidance for software designers who must decide on a dialogue style for interactive problem solving support for new or infrequent users. In addition, it examines the relative performance of these dialogues in environments with a varying amount of problem structure. The three dialogue styles that are recommended by various writers in the field of information systems are: (1) menu driven, (2) question/response, and (3) form filling. It is concluded that if an interface is properly designed it probably does not matter which dialogue style is used in some problem settings. It is also clear that adding problem parameters reduces the ability of the problem solver to determine the best solution.

  15. Fast Algorithms for Structured Least Squares and Total Least Squares Problems

    PubMed Central

    Kalsi, Anoop; O’Leary, Dianne P.

    2006-01-01

    We consider the problem of solving least squares problems involving a matrix M of small displacement rank with respect to two matrices Z1 and Z2. We develop formulas for the generators of the matrix M HM in terms of the generators of M and show that the Cholesky factorization of the matrix M HM can be computed quickly if Z1 is close to unitary and Z2 is triangular and nilpotent. These conditions are satisfied for several classes of matrices, including Toeplitz, block Toeplitz, Hankel, and block Hankel, and for matrices whose blocks have such structure. Fast Cholesky factorization enables fast solution of least squares problems, total least squares problems, and regularized total least squares problems involving these classes of matrices. PMID:27274922

  16. Fast Algorithms for Structured Least Squares and Total Least Squares Problems.

    PubMed

    Kalsi, Anoop; O'Leary, Dianne P

    2006-01-01

    We consider the problem of solving least squares problems involving a matrix M of small displacement rank with respect to two matrices Z 1 and Z 2. We develop formulas for the generators of the matrix M (H) M in terms of the generators of M and show that the Cholesky factorization of the matrix M (H) M can be computed quickly if Z 1 is close to unitary and Z 2 is triangular and nilpotent. These conditions are satisfied for several classes of matrices, including Toeplitz, block Toeplitz, Hankel, and block Hankel, and for matrices whose blocks have such structure. Fast Cholesky factorization enables fast solution of least squares problems, total least squares problems, and regularized total least squares problems involving these classes of matrices.

  17. Solving inverse problems with piecewise linear estimators: from Gaussian mixture models to structured sparsity.

    PubMed

    Yu, Guoshen; Sapiro, Guillermo; Mallat, Stéphane

    2012-05-01

    A general framework for solving image inverse problems with piecewise linear estimations is introduced in this paper. The approach is based on Gaussian mixture models, which are estimated via a maximum a posteriori expectation-maximization algorithm. A dual mathematical interpretation of the proposed framework with a structured sparse estimation is described, which shows that the resulting piecewise linear estimate stabilizes the estimation when compared with traditional sparse inverse problem techniques. We demonstrate that, in a number of image inverse problems, including interpolation, zooming, and deblurring of narrow kernels, the same simple and computationally efficient algorithm yields results in the same ballpark as that of the state of the art.

  18. Use of a structured descriptive assessment methodology to identify variables affecting problem behavior.

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Cynthia M; Long, Ethan S

    2002-01-01

    This study evaluated a variation of functional assessment methodology, the structured descriptive assessment (SDA). The SDA is conducted in an individual's natural environment and involves systematically manipulating antecedent variables while leaving consequences free to vary. Results were evaluated by comparing the results of an SDA with results obtained from an analogue functional analysis with 4 children who exhibited problem behavior. For 3 of 4 participants, the results of the two assessments suggested similar hypotheses about variables maintaining problem behavior. Interventions based on the results of the SDA were implemented for 3 children and resulted in significant reductions in rates of problem behavior. PMID:12102134

  19. Understanding ill-structured engineering ethics problems through a collaborative learning and argument visualization approach.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Michael; Borenstein, Jason

    2014-03-01

    As a committee of the National Academy of Engineering recognized, ethics education should foster the ability of students to analyze complex decision situations and ill-structured problems. Building on the NAE's insights, we report about an innovative teaching approach that has two main features: first, it places the emphasis on deliberation and on self-directed, problem-based learning in small groups of students; and second, it focuses on understanding ill-structured problems. The first innovation is motivated by an abundance of scholarly research that supports the value of deliberative learning practices. The second results from a critique of the traditional case-study approach in engineering ethics. A key problem with standard cases is that they are usually described in such a fashion that renders the ethical problem as being too obvious and simplistic. The practitioner, by contrast, may face problems that are ill-structured. In the collaborative learning environment described here, groups of students use interactive and web-based argument visualization software called "AGORA-net: Participate - Deliberate!". The function of the software is to structure communication and problem solving in small groups. Students are confronted with the task of identifying possible stakeholder positions and reconstructing their legitimacy by constructing justifications for these positions in the form of graphically represented argument maps. The argument maps are then presented in class so that these stakeholder positions and their respective justifications become visible and can be brought into a reasoned dialogue. Argument mapping provides an opportunity for students to collaborate in teams and to develop critical thinking and argumentation skills.

  20. Social problem solving among depressed adolescents is enhanced by structured psychotherapies

    PubMed Central

    Dietz, Laura J.; Marshal, Michael P.; Burton, Chad M.; Bridge, Jeffrey A.; Birmaher, Boris; Kolko, David; Duffy, Jamira N.; Brent, David A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Changes in adolescent interpersonal behavior before and after an acute course of psychotherapy were investigated as outcomes and mediators of remission status in a previously described treatment study of depressed adolescents. Maternal depressive symptoms were examined as moderators of the association between psychotherapy condition and changes in adolescents’ interpersonal behavior. Method Adolescents (n = 63, mean age = 15.6 years, 77.8% female, 84.1% Caucasian) engaged in videotaped interactions with their mothers before randomization to cognitive behavior therapy (CBT), systemic behavior family therapy (SBFT), or nondirective supportive therapy (NST), and after 12–16 weeks of treatment. Adolescent involvement, problem solving and dyadic conflict were examined. Results Improvements in adolescent problem solving were significantly associated with CBT and SBFT. Maternal depressive symptoms moderated the effect of CBT, but not SBFT, on adolescents’ problem solving; adolescents experienced increases in problem solving only when their mothers had low or moderate levels of depressive symptoms. Improvements in adolescents’ problem solving were associated with higher rates of remission across treatment conditions, but there were no significant indirect effects of SBFT on remission status through problem solving. Exploratory analyses revealed a significant indirect effect of CBT on remission status through changes in adolescent problem solving, but only when maternal depressive symptoms at study entry were low. Conclusions Findings provide preliminary support for problem solving as an active treatment component of structured psychotherapies for depressed adolescents and suggest one Pathway by which maternal depression may disrupt treatment efficacy for depressed adolescents treated with CBT. PMID:24491077

  1. Relation between parent psychiatric symptoms and youth problems: moderation through family structure and youth gender.

    PubMed

    Schleider, Jessica L; Chorpita, Bruce F; Weisz, John R

    2014-02-01

    Links between parents' psychiatric symptoms and their children's behavioral and emotional problems have been widely documented in previous research, and the search for moderators of this association has begun. However, family structure (single versus dual-parent households) has received little attention as a potential moderator, despite indirect evidence that risk may be elevated in single-parent homes. Two other candidate moderators-youth gender and age-have been tested directly, but with inconsistent findings across studies, perhaps in part because studies have differed in whether they used youth clinical samples and in which informants (parents vs. youths) reported on youth problems. In the present study, we examined these three candidate moderators using a sample of exclusively clinic-referred youths (N = 333, 34 % girls, aged 7-14,) and assessing youth problems through both parent- and youth-reports. Both family structure and youth gender emerged as robust moderators across parent and youth informants. Parent symptoms were associated with youth internalizing and externalizing problems in single-parent but not dual-parent homes; and parent symptoms were associated with youth internalizing problems among boys, but not girls. The moderator findings suggest that the risks associated with parent psychopathology may not be uniform but may depend, in part, on family structure and youth gender.

  2. A perspective on coherent structures and conceptual models for turbulent boundary layer physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Stephen K.

    1990-01-01

    Direct numerical simulations of turbulent boundary layers have been analyzed to develop a unified conceptual model for the kinematics of coherent motions in low Reynolds number canonical turbulent boundary layers. All classes of coherent motions are considered in the model, including low-speed streaks, ejections and sweeps, vortical structures, near-wall and outer-region shear layers, sublayer pockets, and large-scale outer-region eddies. The model reflects the conclusions from the study of the simulated boundary layer that vortical structures are directly associated with the production of turbulent shear stresses, entrainment, dissipation of turbulence kinetic energy, and the fluctuating pressure field. These results, when viewed from the perspective of the large body of published work on the subject of coherent motions, confirm that vortical structures may be considered the central dynamic element in the maintenance of turbulence in the canonical boundary layer. Vortical structures serve as a framework on which to construct a unified picture of boundary layer structure, providing a means to relate the many known structural elements in a consistent way.

  3. Time dependent adjoint-based optimization for coupled fluid-structure problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Asitav; Mani, Karthik; Mavriplis, Dimitri; Sitaraman, Jay

    2015-07-01

    A formulation for sensitivity analysis of fully coupled time-dependent aeroelastic problems is given in this paper. Both forward sensitivity and adjoint sensitivity formulations are derived that correspond to analogues of the fully coupled non-linear aeroelastic analysis problem. Both sensitivity analysis formulations make use of the same iterative disciplinary solution techniques used for analysis, and make use of an analogous coupling strategy. The information passed between fluid and structural solvers is dimensionally equivalent in all cases, enabling the use of the same data structures for analysis, forward and adjoint problems. The fully coupled adjoint formulation is then used to perform rotor blade design optimization for a four bladed HART2 rotor in hover conditions started impulsively from rest. The effect of time step size and mesh resolution on optimization results is investigated.

  4. Finding the Optimal Scaffoldings for Learners' Epistemological Beliefs during Ill-Structured Problem Solving

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shin, Suhkyung; Song, Hae-Deok

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates how scaffolding type and learners' epistemological beliefs influence ill-structured problem solving. The independent variables in this study include the type of scaffolding (task-supported, self-monitoring) and the student's epistemological belief level (more advanced, less advanced). The dependent variables include three…

  5. Case Designs for Ill-Structured Problems: Analysis and Implications for Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dabbagh, Nada; Blijd, Cecily Williams

    2009-01-01

    This study is a third in a series of studies that examined students' information seeking and problem solving behaviors while interacting with one of two types of web-based representations of an ill-structured instructional design case: hierarchical (tree-like) and heterarchical (network-like). A Java program was used to track students' hypermedia…

  6. Developing Ill-Structured Problem-Solving Skills through Wilderness Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Rachel H.; Sibthorp, Jim; Gookin, John

    2016-01-01

    In a society that is becoming more dynamic, complex, and diverse, the ability to solve ill-structured problems (ISPs) has become an increasingly critical skill. Students who enter adult roles with the cognitive skills to address ISPs will be better able to assume roles in the emerging economies. Opportunities to develop and practice these skills…

  7. Structured Medication Review to Improve Pharmacotherapy in People with Intellectual Disability and Behavioural Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scheifes, Arlette; Egberts, Toine C. G.; Stolker, Joost Jan; Nijman, Henk. L. I.; Heerdink, Eibert R.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Polypharmacy and chronic drug use are common in people with intellectual disability and behavioural problems, although evidence of effectiveness and safety in this population is lacking. This study examined the effects of a structured medication review and aimed to improve pharmacotherapy in inpatients with intellectual disability.…

  8. Solving the Problems of Iowa Food Deserts: Food Insecurity and Civic Structure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morton, Lois Wright; Bitto, Ella Annette; Oakland, Mary Jane; Sand, Mary

    2005-01-01

    Rural regions include places where food sources are not evenly distributed, leading to areas of concentration and food desert--places where few or no grocery stores exist. Individuals are hypothesized to depend on personal connections and the civic structure of where they live to help them solve the problem of food insecurity. We find that…

  9. Epistemological Beliefs and Ill-Structured Problem-Solving in Solo and Paired Contexts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Angeli, Charoula; Valanides, Nicos

    2012-01-01

    A mixed-method exploratory approach was employed to examine the relationship between epistemological beliefs and quality of thinking when participants first thought about an ill-structured problem alone, and then with another person in a dyad. The results showed that there was not a systematic connection between epistemological beliefs and…

  10. Hybrid preconditioning for iterative diagonalization of ill-conditioned generalized eigenvalue problems in electronic structure calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Yunfeng; Bai, Zhaojun; Pask, John E.; Sukumar, N.

    2013-12-15

    The iterative diagonalization of a sequence of large ill-conditioned generalized eigenvalue problems is a computational bottleneck in quantum mechanical methods employing a nonorthogonal basis for ab initio electronic structure calculations. We propose a hybrid preconditioning scheme to effectively combine global and locally accelerated preconditioners for rapid iterative diagonalization of such eigenvalue problems. In partition-of-unity finite-element (PUFE) pseudopotential density-functional calculations, employing a nonorthogonal basis, we show that the hybrid preconditioned block steepest descent method is a cost-effective eigensolver, outperforming current state-of-the-art global preconditioning schemes, and comparably efficient for the ill-conditioned generalized eigenvalue problems produced by PUFE as the locally optimal block preconditioned conjugate-gradient method for the well-conditioned standard eigenvalue problems produced by planewave methods.

  11. Response to Masafumi Ogawa, "Music Teacher Education in Japan: Structure, Problems, and Perspectives"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wheeler, Peggy

    2004-01-01

    Masafumi Ogawa's paper presents challenge after challenge facing the teacher and the teacher educator in Japan. One has the sense that a lifetime of frustrations with the national curriculum, the set-up of student teaching, and the definition of music as a school subject each made its way into the paper. Even choosing to focus on teacher training…

  12. The analytic solution of the structural analysis problem and its use in structural synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, M. B.

    An overview is presented of the analytic expressions for the inverse of the stiffness matrix, the nodal displacements, and the internal forces in linear elastic redundant structures. The inverse of the stiffness matrix and the nodal displacements are obtained using Binet and Cauchy's theorem on the product of compound matrices. The formula for the internal forces is derived from the principles of structural mechanics. This approach is shown to apply to all framed structures via the unimodal stiffnesses of its elements. Approximate models are constructed which are exact at preselected points along a line in the analysis space. An argument is also made for the use of multilinear polynomials as an alternative to Taylor expansion-based approximations.

  13. The Effect of Community Stress and Problems on Psychopathology: A Structural Equation Modeling Study

    PubMed Central

    Lyu, Juncheng; Zhang, Jie

    2015-01-01

    This research aimed to estimate the effect of perceived social factors in the community stress and problems on the residents’ psychopathology such as depression and suicidal behaviors. Subjects of this study were the informants (N=1618) in a psychological autopsy (PA) study with a case-control design. We interviewed two informants (a family member and a close friend) for 392 suicides and 416 living controls, which came from 16 rural counties randomly selected from three provinces of China. Community stress and problems were measured by the WHO SUPRE-MISS scale. Depression was measured by CES-D scale, and suicidal behavior was assessed by NCS-R scale. Multivariable liner and logistic regression models and the Structural Equation Modeling (SEM) were applied to probe the correlation of the depression and the suicidal behaviors with some major demographic variables as covariates. It was found that community stress and problems were directly associated with rural Chinese residents’ depression (Path coefficient =0.127, P<0.001). There was no direct correlation between community stress and problem and suicidal behaviors, but community stress and problem can affect suicidal behaviors indirectly through depression. The path coefficient between depression and suicidal behaviors was 0.975. The current study predicts a new research viewpoint, that is, the depression is the intermediate between community stress and problem and suicidal behaviors. It might be an effective route to prevent depression directly and suicidal behaviors indirectly by reducing the community stress and problems. PMID:26773987

  14. The effect of community stress and problems on psychopathology: A structural equation modeling study.

    PubMed

    Lyu, Juncheng; Shi, Hong; Wang, Suzhen; Zhang, Jie

    2016-02-01

    This research aimed to estimate the effect of perceived social factors in the community stress and problems on the residents' psychopathology such as depression and suicidal behaviors. Subjects of this study were the informants (N=1618) in a psychological autopsy (PA) study with a case-control design. We interviewed two informants (a family member and a close friend) for 392 suicides and 416 living controls, which came from 16 rural counties randomly selected from three provinces of China. Community stress and problems were measured by the WHO SUPRE-MISS scale. Depression was measured by CES-D scale, and suicidal behavior was assessed by NCS-R scale. Multivariable liner and logistic regression models and the Structural Equation Modeling (SEM) were applied to probe the correlation of the depression and the suicidal behaviors with some major demographic variables as covariates. It was found that community stress and problems were directly associated with rural Chinese residents' depression (Path coefficient=0.127, P<0.001). There was no direct correlation between community stress and problem and suicidal behaviors, but community stress and problem can affect suicidal behaviors indirectly through depression. The path coefficient between depression and suicidal behaviors was 0.975. The current study predicts a new research viewpoint, that is, the depression is the intermediate between community stress and problem and suicidal behaviors. It might be an effective route to prevent depression directly and suicidal behaviors indirectly by reducing the community stress and problems.

  15. The reduced order model problem in distributed parameter systems adaptive identification and control. [large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, C. R., Jr.; Lawrence, D.

    1981-01-01

    The basic assumption that a large space structure can be decoupled preceding the application of reduced order active control was considered and alternative solutions to the control of such structures (in contrast to the strict modal control) were investigated. The transfer function matrix from the actuators to the sensors was deemed to be a reasonable candidate. More refined models from multivariable systems theory were studied and recent results in the multivariable control field were compared with respect to theoretical deficiencies and likely problems in application to large space structures.

  16. A conforming to interface structured adaptive mesh refinement technique for modeling fracture problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soghrati, Soheil; Xiao, Fei; Nagarajan, Anand

    2016-12-01

    A Conforming to Interface Structured Adaptive Mesh Refinement (CISAMR) technique is introduced for the automated transformation of a structured grid into a conforming mesh with appropriate element aspect ratios. The CISAMR algorithm is composed of three main phases: (i) Structured Adaptive Mesh Refinement (SAMR) of the background grid; (ii) r-adaptivity of the nodes of elements cut by the crack; (iii) sub-triangulation of the elements deformed during the r-adaptivity process and those with hanging nodes generated during the SAMR process. The required considerations for the treatment of crack tips and branching cracks are also discussed in this manuscript. Regardless of the complexity of the problem geometry and without using iterative smoothing or optimization techniques, CISAMR ensures that aspect ratios of conforming elements are lower than three. Multiple numerical examples are presented to demonstrate the application of CISAMR for modeling linear elastic fracture problems with intricate morphologies.

  17. A conforming to interface structured adaptive mesh refinement technique for modeling fracture problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soghrati, Soheil; Xiao, Fei; Nagarajan, Anand

    2017-04-01

    A Conforming to Interface Structured Adaptive Mesh Refinement (CISAMR) technique is introduced for the automated transformation of a structured grid into a conforming mesh with appropriate element aspect ratios. The CISAMR algorithm is composed of three main phases: (i) Structured Adaptive Mesh Refinement (SAMR) of the background grid; (ii) r-adaptivity of the nodes of elements cut by the crack; (iii) sub-triangulation of the elements deformed during the r-adaptivity process and those with hanging nodes generated during the SAMR process. The required considerations for the treatment of crack tips and branching cracks are also discussed in this manuscript. Regardless of the complexity of the problem geometry and without using iterative smoothing or optimization techniques, CISAMR ensures that aspect ratios of conforming elements are lower than three. Multiple numerical examples are presented to demonstrate the application of CISAMR for modeling linear elastic fracture problems with intricate morphologies.

  18. Discontinuous Galerkin method for coupled problems of compressible flow and elastic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosík, A.; Feistauer, M.; Hadrava, M.; Horáček, J.

    2013-10-01

    This paper is concerned with the numerical simulation of the interaction of 2D compressible viscous flow and an elastic structure. We consider the model of dynamical linear elasticity. Each individual problem is discretized in space by the discontinuous Galerkin method (DGM). For the time discretization we can use either the BDF (backward difference formula) method or also the DGM. The time dependence of the domain occupied by the fluid is given by the deformation of the elastic structure adjacent to the flow domain. It is treated with the aid of the Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) method. The fluid-structure interaction, given by transient conditions, is realized by an iterative process. The developed method is applied to the simulation of the biomechanical problem containing the onset of the voice production.

  19. Partitioned semi-implicit methods for simulation of biomechanical fluid-structure interaction problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naseri, A.; Lehmkuhl, O.; Gonzalez, I.; Oliva, A.

    2016-09-01

    This paper represents numerical simulation of fluid-structure interaction (FSI) system involving an incompressible viscous fluid and a lightweight elastic structure. We follow a semi-implicit approach in which we implicitly couple the added-mass term (pressure stress) of the fluid to the structure, while other terms are coupled explicitly. This significantly reduces the computational cost of the simulations while showing adequate stability. Several coupling schemes are tested including fixed-point method with different static and dynamic relaxation, as well as Newton-Krylov method with approximated Jacobian. Numerical tests are conducted in the context of a biomechanical problem. Results indicate that the Newton-Krylov solver outperforms fixed point ones while introducing more complexity to the problem due to the evaluation of the Jacobian. Fixed-point solver with Aitken's relaxation method also proved to be a simple, yet efficient method for FSI simulations.

  20. Current and Future Perspectives on the Structural Identification of Small Molecules in Biological Systems

    PubMed Central

    Dias, Daniel A.; Jones, Oliver A.H.; Beale, David J.; Boughton, Berin A.; Benheim, Devin; Kouremenos, Konstantinos A.; Wolfender, Jean-Luc; Wishart, David S.

    2016-01-01

    Although significant advances have been made in recent years, the structural elucidation of small molecules continues to remain a challenging issue for metabolite profiling. Many metabolomic studies feature unknown compounds; sometimes even in the list of features identified as “statistically significant” in the study. Such metabolic “dark matter” means that much of the potential information collected by metabolomics studies is lost. Accurate structure elucidation allows researchers to identify these compounds. This in turn, facilitates downstream metabolite pathway analysis, and a better understanding of the underlying biology of the system under investigation. This review covers a range of methods for the structural elucidation of individual compounds, including those based on gas and liquid chromatography hyphenated to mass spectrometry, single and multi-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and high-resolution mass spectrometry and includes discussion of data standardization. Future perspectives in structure elucidation are also discussed; with a focus on the potential development of instruments and techniques, in both nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and mass spectrometry that, may help solve some of the current issues that are hampering the complete identification of metabolite structure and function. PMID:27983674

  1. Behavior problems among children from different family structures: the influence of genetic self-selection.

    PubMed

    Cleveland, H H; Wiebe, R P; van den Oord, E J; Rowe, D C

    2000-01-01

    To examine both genetic and environmental influences on children's behavior problems in households defined by marital status and sibling relatedness, this study applied behavioral genetic methodology to four groups totalling 1524 sibling pairs drawn from 796 households: (1) two-parent full siblings, (2) two-parent half siblings, (3) mother-only full siblings, and (4) mother-only half siblings. Model-fitting procedures found that within-group variation on four subscales from the Behavior Problems Index was best explained by a model including both genetic and shared environmental factors. This model was then fit to the behavior problems means of the four groups. Its successful fit to these mean structures suggested that mean-level differences between groups were explained with the same influences that accounted for within-group variation. Genetic influences accounted for 81% to 94% of the mean-level difference in behavior problems between the two-parent, full sibling and the mother-only, half sibling groups. In contrast, shared environmental influences accounted for 67% to 88% of the mean-level difference in behavior problems between the two-parent, full sibling and mother-only, full sibling groups. The genetic influences are interpreted in terms of genetic self-selection into family structures.

  2. Gastropod diversification and community structuring processes in ancient Lake Ohrid: a metacommunity speciation perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauffe, T.; Albrecht, C.; Wilke, T.

    2015-09-01

    The Balkan Lake Ohrid is the oldest and most speciose freshwater lacustrine system in Europe. However, it remains unclear whether the diversification of its endemic taxa is mainly driven by neutral processes, environmental factors, or species interactions. This calls for a holistic perspective involving both evolutionary processes and ecological dynamics. Such a unifying framework - the metacommunity speciation model - considers how community assembly affects diversification and vice versa by assessing the relative contribution of the three main community assembly processes, dispersal limitation, environmental filtering, and species interaction. The current study therefore used the species-rich model taxon Gastropoda to assess how extant communities in Lake Ohrid are structured by performing process based metacommunity analyses. Specifically, the study aimed at (i) identifying the relative importance of the three community assembly processes and (ii) to test whether the importance of these individual processes changes gradually with lake depth or whether they are distinctively related to eco-zones. Based on specific simulation steps for each of the three processes, it could be demonstrated that dispersal limitation had the strongest influence on gastropod community structures in Lake Ohrid. However, it was not the exclusive assembly process but acted together with the other two processes - environmental filtering, and species interaction. In fact, the relative importance of the three community assembly processes varied both with lake depth and eco-zones, though the processes were better predicted by the latter. The study thus corroborated the high importance of dispersal limitation for both maintaining species richness in Lake Ohrid (through its impact on community structure) and generating endemic biodiversity (via its influence on diversification processes). However, according to the metacommunity speciation model, the inferred importance of environmental

  3. Global space-group optimization problem: Finding the stablest crystal structure without constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trimarchi, Giancarlo; Zunger, Alex

    2007-03-01

    Finding the most stable structure of a solid is one of the central problems in condensed matter physics. This entails finding both the lattice type (e.g., fcc, bcc, and orthorhombic) and (for compounds) the decoration of the lattice sites by atoms of types A , B , etc. (“configuration”). Most approaches to this problem either assumed that both lattice type and configuration are known, optimizing instead the cell volume and performing local relaxation. Other approaches assumed that the lattice type is known, searching for the minimum-energy decoration. We present here an approach to the global space-group optimization (GSGO) problem, i.e., the problem of predicting both the lattice structure and the atomic configuration of a crystalline solid. This search method is based on an evolutionary algorithm within which a population of crystal structures is evolved through mating and mutation operations, improving the population by substituting the highest total-energy structures with new ones. The crystal structures are not represented by bit strings as in conventional genetic algorithms. Instead, the evolutionary search is performed directly on the atomic positions and the unit-cell vectors after a similarity transformation is applied to bring structures of different unit-cell shapes to a common basis. Following this transformation, we can define a crossover operation that treats, on the same footing, structures with different unit-cell shapes. Once a new structure has been generated by mating or mutation, it is fully relaxed to the closest local total-energy minimum. We applied our procedure for the GSGO in the context of pseudopotential total-energy calculations to the semiconductor systems Si, SiC, and GaAs and to the metallic alloy AuPd with composition Au8Pd4 . Starting from random unit-cell vectors and random atomic positions, the present search procedure found for all semiconductor systems studied the correct lattice structure and configuration. In the case of

  4. Enhancing sexual desire and intimacy via the metaphor of a problem child: utilizing structural-strategic family therapy.

    PubMed

    Young, Teresa L; Negash, Sesen M; Long, Rhonda M

    2009-01-01

    This article explores structural-strategic family therapy as a treatment modality for couples with problems of intimacy and sexual desire. Parents whose presenting problem involves a child with problematic behavior may also struggle with problems in their intimate relationship. Instead of speaking to these problems directly, however, the couple may communicate about their intimate problems via the metaphor of their "problem" child. Structural-strategic family therapy can then be utilized to strengthen the parental subsystem by establishing a parenting team, which in turn nourishes the partner subsystem. Success is then measured not only by improvements in the child's behavior, but also by the enhancement of intimacy and sexual desire between partners.

  5. Single-parent family structure and sleep problems in black and white adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Troxel, Wendy M.; Lee, Laisze; Hall, Martica; Matthews, Karen A.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Sleep is critical for adolescent health and is influenced by the family environment. In our study, we examined if family structure defined as single- vs 2-parent households affected adolescent sleep. Methods Participants were 242 (57% black; 47% boys) healthy adolescents (mean age, 15.7 years). Sleep was measured using self-report and wrist actigraphy over 7 consecutive nights. Outcomes were actigraphy-assessed sleep duration and sleep efficiency (SE) for the full week and weekends and weekdays separately, as well as self-reported sleep-wake problems and variability in bedtimes. Linear regression examined the relationship between family structure and sleep, after adjusting for age, sex, race, body mass index, and depressive symptoms, parental education, family conflict, and financial strain. Race and sex were examined as potential moderators. Results After adjusting for covariates, adolescents from single-parent households had poorer SE across the week and shorter sleep duration on weekends. White adolescents from 2-parent households had the fewer sleep-wake problems and lower bedtime variability, whereas black adolescents from single-parent households had the lowest weekend SE. There were no significant differences in family structure*sex interactions. Conclusion Our findings are the first to demonstrate that single-parent family structure is an independent correlate of sleep problems in adolescents, and they highlight the moderating role of race. PMID:24424100

  6. Investigating information-processing performance of different command team structures in the NATO Problem Space.

    PubMed

    Stanton, Neville A; Rothrock, Ling; Harvey, Catherine; Sorensen, Linda

    2015-01-01

    The structure of command teams is a significant factor on their communications and ability to process, and act upon, information. The NATO Problem Space was used in this study to represent three of the main dimensions in the battle-space environment: familiarity, rate of change, and strength of information position. Results show that the five common team structures (chain, Y, circle, wheel and all-connected) did not generally perform as predicted in team literature. Findings suggest that under dynamic and highly variable conditions, high levels of synchronisation and trust should be present. On the other hand, synchronisation and trust are less important in hierarchical, highly centralised structures, because team members are more willing to accept the authority of a single leader and this tight control ensures that these teams can perform well as long as the Problem Space is familiar, information is explicit and the environment does not change. Practitioner Summary: Some types of team structures are better suited to particular constraints of the battle-space than others. This research has shown that the much touted all-connected structure is often the worst performing structure and that the traditional hierarchy of command and control has much merit in the digital information age.

  7. Stochastic Models of Composite Mechanics in the Problems of Designing Structural Elements in Aerospace Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolkin, Yu. V.; Makarova, E. Yu.

    2002-09-01

    The present-day trends and development prospects of stochastic averaging methods in composite mechanics are analyzed. The following methods are considered: the traditional one (the medium of comparison is homogeneous), the method of periodic components (the medium of comparison has a regular structure), the numerical method of local approximation with regard for the short-range order in the arrangement and interaction of inhomogeneities, and a synthesis of the periodic-component and local-approximation methods. A detailed procedure is presented for calculating the functionals of second, third, and higher orders of the stochastic problem. The results obtained are used for evaluating, in an explicit form, corrections to the effective elastic moduli found for quasi-isotropic and unidirectional fiber composites by the traditional averaging method and the method of periodic components. Analytical formulas for the second-order moment functions of structural stresses and strains are derived. It is shown that the fields of structural stresses and strains are locally ergodic. A new multilevel approach is proposed for designing composites, which takes into account the effect of structurally technological factors. Thus, unidirectional fiber composites are calculated by a two-level model, layered structures - by a three-level model, and carbon-carbon structures - by a five-level model. A stage-by-stage solution procedure is suggested for the boundary-value problem of micromechanics of composites. For a wide class of composites, the effective elastic moduli are calculated and the strength surfaces are constructed.

  8. Correlations among knowledge structures, force concept inventory, and problem-solving behaviors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malone, Kathy L.

    2008-12-01

    The modeling instruction pedagogy for the teaching of physics has been proven to be quite effective at increasing the conceptual understanding and problem-solving abilities of students to a much greater extent than that of nonmodeling students. Little research has been conducted concerning the cognitive and metacognitive skills that modeling students develop that allow for these increases. Two studies were designed to answer the following question: In what ways do the knowledge structures, metacognitive skills, and problem-solving abilities differ between modeling and nonmodeling students? In study 1, the knowledge structures developed by two groups of high school physics students taught using differing pedagogies (modeling instruction in physics and traditional methods) were determined using a card-sort task. The student’s knowledge structures were then correlated with the scores they obtained on two measures: the force concept inventory (FCI) and a problem-solving task (PS task) developed for this study. The modeling students had a more expertlike knowledge structure, while the nonmodeling students produced structures that were novicelike. In addition, the expert score correlated highly with performance on both the FCI and PS task scores demonstrating that a higher expert score predicted a higher value on each of these measures while a higher surface feature score predicted a lower score on both of these measures. In study 2, a verbal protocol design allowed for a detailed study of the problem-solving and metacognitive skills utilized by the two groups. It was determined that the skills utilized by the modeling instruction students were more expertlike. In addition, the modeling students produced significantly fewer physics errors while catching and repairing a greater percentage of their errors.

  9. Parallel-vector computation for structural analysis and nonlinear unconstrained optimization problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Duc T.

    1990-01-01

    Practical engineering application can often be formulated in the form of a constrained optimization problem. There are several solution algorithms for solving a constrained optimization problem. One approach is to convert a constrained problem into a series of unconstrained problems. Furthermore, unconstrained solution algorithms can be used as part of the constrained solution algorithms. Structural optimization is an iterative process where one starts with an initial design, a finite element structure analysis is then performed to calculate the response of the system (such as displacements, stresses, eigenvalues, etc.). Based upon the sensitivity information on the objective and constraint functions, an optimizer such as ADS or IDESIGN, can be used to find the new, improved design. For the structural analysis phase, the equation solver for the system of simultaneous, linear equations plays a key role since it is needed for either static, or eigenvalue, or dynamic analysis. For practical, large-scale structural analysis-synthesis applications, computational time can be excessively large. Thus, it is necessary to have a new structural analysis-synthesis code which employs new solution algorithms to exploit both parallel and vector capabilities offered by modern, high performance computers such as the Convex, Cray-2 and Cray-YMP computers. The objective of this research project is, therefore, to incorporate the latest development in the parallel-vector equation solver, PVSOLVE into the widely popular finite-element production code, such as the SAP-4. Furthermore, several nonlinear unconstrained optimization subroutines have also been developed and tested under a parallel computer environment. The unconstrained optimization subroutines are not only useful in their own right, but they can also be incorporated into a more popular constrained optimization code, such as ADS.

  10. Examining the structure of emotional intelligence at the item level: new perspectives, new conclusions.

    PubMed

    Maul, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    Despite twenty years of research, many unknowns remain regarding the Mayer-Salovey (e.g., 1997) model of emotional intelligence (EI) and the validity of tests that have been designed to measure it. Evidence relevant to the internal structure of EI has come mainly from factor-analytic studies of the MSCEIT and the MEIS, utilising parcelled task scores rather than individual test items. This approach has several deficiencies: in addition to the loss of item-level information, it results in an insufficient number of observed variables per factor and an inability to separate structural sources of local item dependence (i.e., method variance) from construct-related variance. The present study (N=707) employed multidimensional item response modelling to investigate the dimensional structure of the MSCEIT, at the item level, for the first time. It is shown that item format and the specific choice of task explain far more of the variance in response patterns than does the hypothesised dimensional structure of EI, to the point that there is no empirical reason to prefer a higher-dimensional model of EI over a unidimensional model. It is argued that the advantage of an item-level perspective can be fundamental, rather than merely incremental.

  11. Protein production from the structural genomics perspective: achievements and future needs

    PubMed Central

    Almo, Steven C; Garforth, Scott J; Hillerich, Brandan S; Love, James D; Seidel, Ronald D; Burley, Stephen K

    2014-01-01

    Despite a multitude of recent technical breakthroughs speeding high-resolution structural analysis of biological macromolecules, production of sufficient quantities of well-behaved, active protein continues to represent the rate-limiting step in many structure determination efforts. These challenges are only amplified when considered in the context of ongoing structural genomics efforts, which are now contending with multi-domain eukaryotic proteins, secreted proteins, and ever-larger macromolecular assemblies. Exciting new developments in eukaryotic expression platforms, including insect and mammalian-based systems, promise enhanced opportunities for structural approaches to some of the most important biological problems. Development and implementation of automated eukaryotic expression techniques promises to significantly improve production of materials for structural, functional, and biomedical research applications. PMID:23642905

  12. Perspective: Structure and dynamics of water at surfaces probed by scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jing; Bian, Ke; Lin, Zeren; Jiang, Ying

    2016-10-28

    The detailed and precise understanding of water-solid interaction largely relies on the development of atomic-scale experimental techniques, among which scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) has proven to be a noteworthy example. In this perspective, we review the recent advances of STM techniques in imaging, spectroscopy, and manipulation of water molecules. We discuss how those newly developed techniques are applied to probe the structure and dynamics of water at solid surfaces with single-molecule and even submolecular resolution, paying particular attention to the ability of accessing the degree of freedom of hydrogen. In the end, we present an outlook on the directions of future STM studies of water-solid interfaces as well as the challenges faced by this field. Some new scanning probe techniques beyond STM are also envisaged.

  13. Perspective: Structure and dynamics of water at surfaces probed by scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jing; Bian, Ke; Lin, Zeren; Jiang, Ying

    2016-10-01

    The detailed and precise understanding of water-solid interaction largely relies on the development of atomic-scale experimental techniques, among which scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) has proven to be a noteworthy example. In this perspective, we review the recent advances of STM techniques in imaging, spectroscopy, and manipulation of water molecules. We discuss how those newly developed techniques are applied to probe the structure and dynamics of water at solid surfaces with single-molecule and even submolecular resolution, paying particular attention to the ability of accessing the degree of freedom of hydrogen. In the end, we present an outlook on the directions of future STM studies of water-solid interfaces as well as the challenges faced by this field. Some new scanning probe techniques beyond STM are also envisaged.

  14. On a numerical solution of the plastic buckling problem of structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, K. K.

    1978-01-01

    An automated digital computer procedure is presented for the accurate and efficient solution of the plastic buckling problem of structures. This is achieved by a Sturm sequence method employing a bisection strategy, which eliminates the need for having to solve the buckling eigenvalue problem at each incremental (decremental) loading stage that is associated with the usual solution techniques. The plastic buckling mode shape is determined by a simple inverse iteration process, once the buckling load has been established. Numerical results are presented for plate problems with various edge conditions. The resulting computer program written in FORTRAN V for the JPL UNIVAC 1108 machine proves to be most economical in comparison with other existing methods of such analysis.

  15. Numerical solution of singular ODE eigenvalue problems in electronic structure computations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammerling, Robert; Koch, Othmar; Simon, Christa; Weinmüller, Ewa B.

    2010-09-01

    We put forward a new method for the solution of eigenvalue problems for (systems of) ordinary differential equations, where our main focus is on eigenvalue problems for singular Schrödinger equations arising for example in electronic structure computations. In most established standard methods, the generation of the starting values for the computation of eigenvalues of higher index is a critical issue. Our approach comprises two stages: First we generate rough approximations by a matrix method, which yields several eigenvalues and associated eigenfunctions simultaneously, albeit with moderate accuracy. In a second stage, these approximations are used as starting values for a collocation method which yields approximations of high accuracy efficiently due to an adaptive mesh selection strategy, and additionally provides reliable error estimates. We successfully apply our method to the solution of the quantum mechanical Kepler, Yukawa and the coupled ODE Stark problems.

  16. An optimization approach for minimum norm and robust partial quadratic eigenvalue assignment problems for vibrating structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brahma, Sanjoy; Datta, Biswa

    2009-07-01

    The partial quadratic eigenvalue assignment problem (PQEVAP) concerns the reassignment of a small number of undesirable eigenvalues of a quadratic matrix pencil, while leaving the remaining large number of eigenvalues and the corresponding eigenvectors unchanged. The problem arises in controlling undesirable resonance in vibrating structures and in stabilizing control systems. The solution of this problem requires computations of a pair of feedback matrices. For practical effectiveness, these feedback matrices must be computed in such a way that their norms and the condition number of the closed-loop eigenvector matrix are as small as possible. These considerations give rise to the minimum norm partial quadratic eigenvalue assignment problem (MNPQEVAP) and the robust partial quadratic eigenvalue assignment problem (RPQEVAP), respectively. In this paper we propose new optimization based algorithms for solving these problems. The problems are solved directly in a second-order setting without resorting to a standard first-order formulation so as to avoid the inversion of a possibly ill-conditioned matrix and the loss of exploitable structures of the original model. The algorithms require the knowledge of only the open-loop eigenvalues to be replaced and their corresponding eigenvectors. The remaining open-loop eigenvalues and their corresponding eigenvectors are kept unchanged. The invariance of the large number of eigenvalues and eigenvectors under feedback is guaranteed by a proven mathematical result. Furthermore, the gradient formulas needed to solve the problems by using the quasi-Newton optimization technique employed are computed in terms of the known quantities only. Above all, the proposed methods do not require the reduction of the model order or the order of the controller, even when the underlying finite element model has a very large degree of freedom. These attractive features, coupled with minimal computational requirements, such as solutions of small

  17. Finite element analysis of structural components using viscoplastic models with application to a cowl lip problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arya, V. K.

    1990-01-01

    The viability of advanced viscoplastic models for nonlinear finite element analyses of structural components is investigated. Several uniaxial and a multiaxial problem are analyzed using the finite element implementation of Freed's viscoplastic model. Good agreement between the experimental and calculated uniaxial results validates the finite element implementation and gives confidence to apply it to more complex multiaxial problems. A comparison of results for a sample structural component (the cowl lip of a hypersonic engine inlet) with the earlier elastic, elastic-plastic, and elastic-plastic-creep analyses available in the literature shows that the elastic-viscoplastic analyses yield more reasonable stress and strain distributions. Finally, the versatility of the finite-element-based solution technology presented herein is demonstrated by applying it to another viscoplastic model.

  18. REVIEWS OF TOPICAL PROBLEMS: Minimal chaos, stochastic webs, and structures of quasicrystal symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaslavskiĭ, G. M.; Sagdeev, Roal'd. Z.; Usikov, D. A.; Chernikov, A. A.

    1988-10-01

    The relationship between the problem of the symmetry of a plane tiling and the properties of nonintegrable dynamic systems is reviewed. The formation of stochastic layers and a stochastic web in the motion of linear and nonlinear oscillators subjected to a perturbation is discussed in detail. Emphasis is placed on research on the symmetry properties of a stochastic web with a fractal structure of a quasicrystal type. Structures with a quasicrystal symmetry form as a result of an interaction of two types of symmetries: translational and rotational. Various characteristics of structures with a quasicrystal symmetry are discussed: the distributions of stable and unstable points, the state density, and the Fourier spectrum. Quasicrystal structures in solid state physics, hydrodynamics, botany, and ornamental art are discussed.

  19. A tabu search approach for the NMR protein structure-based assignment problem.

    PubMed

    Cavuşlar, Gizem; Çatay, Bülent; Apaydın, Mehmet Serkan

    2012-01-01

    Spectroscopy is an experimental technique which exploits the magnetic properties of specific nuclei and enables the study of proteins in solution. The key bottleneck of NMR studies is to map the NMR peaks to corresponding nuclei, also known as the assignment problem. Structure-Based Assignment (SBA) is an approach to solve this computationally challenging problem by using prior information about the protein obtained from a homologous structure. NVR-BIP used the Nuclear Vector Replacement (NVR) framework to model SBA as a binary integer programming problem. In this paper, we prove that this problem is NP-hard and propose a tabu search (TS) algorithm (NVR-TS) equipped with a guided perturbation mechanism to efficiently solve it. NVR-TS uses a quadratic penalty relaxation of NVR-BIP where the violations in the Nuclear Overhauser Effect constraints are penalized in the objective function. Experimental results indicate that our algorithm finds the optimal solution on NVRBIP’s data set which consists of seven proteins with 25 templates (31 to 126 residues). Furthermore, it achieves relatively high assignment accuracies on two additional large proteins, MBP and EIN (348 and 243 residues, respectively), which NVR-BIP failed to solve. The executable and the input files are available for download at http://people.sabanciuniv.edu/catay/NVR-TS/NVR-TS.html.

  20. Spatio-Temporal Complexity and Large-Scale Structures in Problems of Continuum Mechanic

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-07-15

    TEMPORAL COMPLEXITY & LARGE SCALE STRUCTURES IN PROBLEMS OF CONTINUUM MECHANICS" (U) 61103D 3484/D7 (URI) 6. AUTHOR(S) Drs. Basil Nicolaenko, Dieter...orbits on-the attractor. We have applied our method to two experimental data sets from Taylor-Couette flows . 14. SUBJECT TERMS -WS.-UMBER OF PAGES’ 14 S...8217 .. . .,16. PRICE CODE 17. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION 1. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION 19., SECURITY CLASSIFICATION 20. LIMITATION OFA. OF REPORT OF THIS

  1. Acquisition and Resilience Under Test Stress of Structurally Different Problem Solving Procedures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1973-05-01

    markedly different structures during the learning of the same new concept." For the "how much" theories of the acquisition process, there is...which is the main determinate of learning outcome. However, a crucial question for the "what kind" theories is: How can the internal...memory and the process of solving problems. June 1972. 38. Greeno, J. G. 6 Bjork, R. A. Mathematical learning theory and the new "montal forestry

  2. Teachers' Perspectives on Principal Mistreatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blase, Joseph; Blase, Jo

    2006-01-01

    Although there is some important scholarly work on the problem of workplace mistreatment/abuse, theoretical or empirical work on abusive school principals is nonexistent. Symbolic interactionism was the theoretical structure for the present study. This perspective on social research is founded on three primary assumptions: (1) individuals act…

  3. Parents’ Perceived Similarity to Their Children, and Parents’ Perspective Taking Efforts: Associations of Cross-Informant Discrepancies with Adolescent Problem Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Vierhaus, Marc; Rueth, Jana E.; Lohaus, Arnold

    2016-01-01

    The main goal of this study is to provide empirical evidence for a theoretical mechanism underlying cross-informant discrepancies (CID), which occur between reports of different informants (e.g., children/adolescents and parents) of children’s/adolescents’ problem behavior. Studies comprehensively corroborate the existence of CID. However, an explanation of CID is rudimentary and inconsistent. Respective research often suffers from methodological problems and is often atheoretical. Addressing these critics, this study uses polynomial regression and is based on research on mind perception and anchoring-and-adjustment theory. It was assumed that higher CID are associated with parents’ perceived similarity to their children, whereas lower CID are related to parents’ perspective-taking efforts. Analyses were based on N = 168 parent–child dyads (children’s mean age: 12.50 years). Reports on problem behavior displayed substantial mean differences and medium-sized correlations. Polynomial regressions on CID partly supported the influence of parents’ perceived similarity and perspective taking efforts on CID. Results are discussed in the context of a possible theoretical fundament for CID. PMID:27014169

  4. The "Prisoners Are People" Perspective--And the Problems of Promoting Learning Where This Outlook Is Rejected.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warner, Kevin

    1998-01-01

    Explores the philosophy in the Council of Europe's European Prison Rules and a report advocating a transformative adult education orientation in corrections. Contrasts this perspective with current Anglo-American penal policy, in which negative stereotypes, vengeful attitudes, and massive increases in incarceration are inimical to genuine…

  5. Hybrid state vector methods for structural dynamic and aeroelastic boundary value problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lehman, L. L.

    1982-01-01

    A computational technique is developed that is suitable for performing preliminary design aeroelastic and structural dynamic analyses of large aspect ratio lifting surfaces. The method proves to be quite general and can be adapted to solving various two point boundary value problems. The solution method, which is applicable to both fixed and rotating wing configurations, is based upon a formulation of the structural equilibrium equations in terms of a hybrid state vector containing generalized force and displacement variables. A mixed variational formulation is presented that conveniently yields a useful form for these state vector differential equations. Solutions to these equations are obtained by employing an integrating matrix method. The application of an integrating matrix provides a discretization of the differential equations that only requires solutions of standard linear matrix systems. It is demonstrated that matrix partitioning can be used to reduce the order of the required solutions. Results are presented for several example problems in structural dynamics and aeroelasticity to verify the technique and to demonstrate its use. These problems examine various types of loading and boundary conditions and include aeroelastic analyses of lifting surfaces constructed from anisotropic composite materials.

  6. Hybrid Self-Adaptive Evolution Strategies Guided by Neighborhood Structures for Combinatorial Optimization Problems.

    PubMed

    Coelho, V N; Coelho, I M; Souza, M J F; Oliveira, T A; Cota, L P; Haddad, M N; Mladenovic, N; Silva, R C P; Guimarães, F G

    2016-01-01

    This article presents an Evolution Strategy (ES)--based algorithm, designed to self-adapt its mutation operators, guiding the search into the solution space using a Self-Adaptive Reduced Variable Neighborhood Search procedure. In view of the specific local search operators for each individual, the proposed population-based approach also fits into the context of the Memetic Algorithms. The proposed variant uses the Greedy Randomized Adaptive Search Procedure with different greedy parameters for generating its initial population, providing an interesting exploration-exploitation balance. To validate the proposal, this framework is applied to solve three different [Formula: see text]-Hard combinatorial optimization problems: an Open-Pit-Mining Operational Planning Problem with dynamic allocation of trucks, an Unrelated Parallel Machine Scheduling Problem with Setup Times, and the calibration of a hybrid fuzzy model for Short-Term Load Forecasting. Computational results point out the convergence of the proposed model and highlight its ability in combining the application of move operations from distinct neighborhood structures along the optimization. The results gathered and reported in this article represent a collective evidence of the performance of the method in challenging combinatorial optimization problems from different application domains. The proposed evolution strategy demonstrates an ability of adapting the strength of the mutation disturbance during the generations of its evolution process. The effectiveness of the proposal motivates the application of this novel evolutionary framework for solving other combinatorial optimization problems.

  7. The Introduction of Inversion of Polarity Sites in DNA G-Quadruplex Structures: Effects and Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Virgilio, Antonella; Esposito, Veronica; Filosa, Rosanna; Mayol, Luciano; Galeone, Aldo

    2016-01-01

    The natural sequences of nucleic acids generally consist of nucleotides linked together by canonical 3'-5' phosphodiester bonds. An inversion of polarity site (IPS) can be defined as the point of the sequence in which a 3'-3' or a 5'-5' phosphodiester bond occurs. By extending this definition, an IPS can be described as that part of the sequence in which two 3'- or two 5'-hydroxyl groups are connected by a linker, variable in size or in chemical nature. In G-quadruplex structures an IPS can be introduced in three different positions: inside a non G-tract, inside a G-tract and just between a non Gtract and a G-tract. Investigations have been reported concerning all the three types of modification. This review describes the effects of the presence of one or more IPSs in G-quadruplex structures, particularly regarding their topological and structural characteristics, glycosidic bond preference, and thermal stability, with special attention to biologically active Gquadruplex forming aptamers. The perspectives and potential developments of this research area are also discussed.

  8. Coulombic Interaction in Finnish Middle School Chemistry: A Systemic Perspective on Students' Conceptual Structure of Chemical Bonding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joki, Jarkko; Lavonen, Jari; Juuti, Kalle; Aksela, Maija

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to design a novel and holistic way to teach chemical bonding at the middle school level according to research on the teaching and learning of bonding. A further aim was to investigate high achieving middle school students' conceptual structures concerning chemical bonding by using a systemic perspective. Students in one…

  9. Structural and Psychological Empowerment Climates, Performance, and the Moderating Role of Shared Felt Accountability: A Managerial Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallace, J. Craig; Johnson, Paul D.; Mathe, Kimberly; Paul, Jeff

    2011-01-01

    The authors proposed and tested a model in which data were collected from managers (n = 539) at 116 corporate-owned quick service restaurants to assess the structural and psychological empowerment process as moderated by shared-felt accountability on indices of performance from a managerial perspective. The authors found that empowering leadership…

  10. Arylamine N-acetyltransferases: a structural perspective. Comments regarding the BJP paper by Zhou et al., 2013

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Ximing; Kubiak, Xavier; Dupret, Jean-Marie; Rodrigues-Lima, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    This letter is a comment on Zhou et al. (2013). Arylamine N-acetyltransferases: a structural perspective. Br J Pharmacol 169: 748–760. To view this article visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.12182 PMID:24328723

  11. Naturalistic and Structured Assessments of Prosocial Behavior in Preschool Children: The Influence of Empathy and Perspective Taking.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iannotti, Ronald J.

    1985-01-01

    Interrelationship of different categories of prosocial behavior different assessment procedures, and role of empathy and perspective taking were examined. Prosocial behavior in preschool children was assessed using three different approaches: naturalistic observation, structured measures, and teacher ratings. Results indicated preschool children…

  12. Current Crisis in Science Education? Women in Science and Problems for the Behavioral Scientists. Some Perspectives of a Physicist.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dresselhaus, Mildred S.

    A number of problems exist in society which require the cooperation of physical and social scientists. One of these problems is the current crisis in science education. There are several aspects to this problem, including the declining interest of students in math and science at a time when functioning in our society requires more, not less,…

  13. Transformation of vector magnetograms and the problems associated with the effects of perspective and the azimuthal ambiguity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gary, G. Allen; Hagyard, M. J.

    1990-01-01

    Off-center vector magnetograms which use all three components of the measured field provide the maximum information content from the photospheric field and can provide the most consistent potential field independent of the viewing angle by defining the normal component of the field. The required transformations of the magnetic field vector and the geometric mapping of the observed field in the image plane into the heliographic plane have been described. Here we discuss the total transformation of specific vector magnetograms to detail the problems and procedures that one should be aware of in analyzing observational magnetograms. The effect of the 180-deg ambiguity of the observed transverse field is considered as well as the effect of curvature of the photosphere. Specific results for active regions AR 2684 (September 23, 1980) and AR 4474 (April 26, 1984) from the Marshall Space Flight Center Vector magnetograph are described which point to the need for the heliographic projection in determining the field structure of an active region.

  14. Who Is Your Champion? A Close Look at How Plant and Animal Structures Can Help Solve a Problem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Caryn; Ethington, Roberta L.; Stark, Alyssa Y.

    2016-01-01

    Everyone has problems, from the smallest ant competing for a food source to the largest elephant needing to cool down. Fortunately, organisms have structures that function to help them solve these problems. So when a group of fourth-grade students look for solutions to their problems, who do they turn to? A biological champion, of course! Plants…

  15. Structural mapping in statistical word problems: A relational reasoning approach to Bayesian inference.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Eric D; Tubau, Elisabet

    2016-09-27

    Presenting natural frequencies facilitates Bayesian inferences relative to using percentages. Nevertheless, many people, including highly educated and skilled reasoners, still fail to provide Bayesian responses to these computationally simple problems. We show that the complexity of relational reasoning (e.g., the structural mapping between the presented and requested relations) can help explain the remaining difficulties. With a non-Bayesian inference that required identical arithmetic but afforded a more direct structural mapping, performance was universally high. Furthermore, reducing the relational demands of the task through questions that directed reasoners to use the presented statistics, as compared with questions that prompted the representation of a second, similar sample, also significantly improved reasoning. Distinct error patterns were also observed between these presented- and similar-sample scenarios, which suggested differences in relational-reasoning strategies. On the other hand, while higher numeracy was associated with better Bayesian reasoning, higher-numerate reasoners were not immune to the relational complexity of the task. Together, these findings validate the relational-reasoning view of Bayesian problem solving and highlight the importance of considering not only the presented task structure, but also the complexity of the structural alignment between the presented and requested relations.

  16. Application of Composite Structures in Bridge Engineering. Problems of Construction Process and Strength Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flaga, Kazimierz; Furtak, Kazimierz

    2015-03-01

    Steel-concrete composite structures have been used in bridge engineering from decades. This is due to rational utilisation of the strength properties of the two materials. At the same time, the reinforced concrete (or prestressed) deck slab is more favourable than the orthotropic steel plate used in steel bridges (higher mass, better vibration damping, longer life). The most commonly found in practice are composite girder bridges, particularly in highway bridges of small and medium spans, but the spans may reach over 200 m. In larger spans steel truss girders are applied. Bridge composite structures are also employed in cable-stayed bridge decks of the main girder spans of the order of 600, 800 m. The aim of the article is to present the cionstruction process and strength analysis problems concerning of this type of structures. Much attention is paid to the design and calculation of the shear connectors characteristic for the discussed objects. The authors focused mainly on the issues of single composite structures. The effect of assembly states on the stresses and strains in composite members are highlighted. A separate part of problems is devoted to the influence of rheological factors, i.e. concrete shrinkage and creep, as well as thermal factors on the stresses and strains and redistribution of internal forces.

  17. REVIEWS OF TOPICAL PROBLEMS: Prediction and discovery of new structures in spiral galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fridman, Aleksei M.

    2007-02-01

    A review is given of the last 20 years of published research into the nature, origin mechanisms, and observed features of spiral-vortex structures found in galaxies. The so-called rotating shallow water experiments are briefly discussed, carried out with a facility designed by the present author and built at the Russian Scientific Center 'Kurchatov Institute' to model the origin of galactic spiral structures. The discovery of new vortex-anticyclone structures in these experiments stimulated searching for them astronomically using the RAS Special Astrophysical Observatory's 6-meter BTA optical telescope, formerly the world's and now Europe's largest. Seven years after the pioneering experiments, Afanasyev and the present author discovered the predicted giant anticyclones in the galaxy Mrk 1040 by using BTA. Somewhat later, the theoretical prediction of giant cyclones in spiral galaxies was made, also to be verified by BTA afterwards. To use the observed line-of-sight velocity field for reconstructing the 3D velocity vector distribution in a galactic disk, a method for solving a problem from the class of ill-posed astrophysical problems was developed by the present author and colleagues. In addition to the vortex structure, other new features were discovered — in particular, slow bars (another theoretical prediction), for whose discovery an observational test capable of distinguishing them from their earlier-studied normal (fast) counterparts was designed.

  18. Understanding comorbidity among internalizing problems: Integrating latent structural models of psychopathology and risk mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Hankin, Benjamin L.; Snyder, Hannah R.; Gulley, Lauren D.; Schweizer, Tina H.; Bijttebier, Patricia; Nelis, Sabine; Toh, Gim; Vasey, Michael W.

    2016-01-01

    It is well known that comorbidity is the rule, not the exception, for categorically defined psychiatric disorders, and this is also the case for internalizing disorders of depression and anxiety. This theoretical review paper addresses the ubiquity of comorbidity among internalizing disorders. Our central thesis is that progress in understanding this co-occurrence can be made by employing latent dimensional structural models that organize both psychopathology as well as vulnerabilities and risk mechanisms and by connecting the multiple levels of risk and psychopathology outcomes together. Different vulnerabilities and risk mechanisms are hypothesized to predict different levels of the structural model of psychopathology. We review the present state of knowledge based on concurrent and developmental sequential comorbidity patterns among common discrete psychiatric disorders in youth, and then we advocate for the use of more recent bifactor dimensional models of psychopathology (e.g., p factor, Caspi et al., 2014) that can help to explain the co-occurrence among internalizing symptoms. In support of this relatively novel conceptual perspective, we review six exemplar vulnerabilities and risk mechanisms, including executive function, information processing biases, cognitive vulnerabilities, positive and negative affectivity aspects of temperament, and autonomic dysregulation, along with the developmental occurrence of stressors in different domains, to show how these vulnerabilities can predict the general latent psychopathology factor, a unique latent internalizing dimension, as well as specific symptom syndrome manifestations. PMID:27739389

  19. You Need to Know: There Is a Causal Relationship between Structural Knowledge and Control Performance in Complex Problem Solving Tasks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goode, Natassia; Beckmann, Jens F.

    2010-01-01

    This study investigates the relationships between structural knowledge, control performance and fluid intelligence in a complex problem solving (CPS) task. 75 participants received either complete, partial or no information regarding the underlying structure of a complex problem solving task, and controlled the task to reach specific goals.…

  20. Analysis of random structure-acoustic interaction problems using coupled boundary element and finite element methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mei, Chuh; Pates, Carl S., III

    1994-01-01

    A coupled boundary element (BEM)-finite element (FEM) approach is presented to accurately model structure-acoustic interaction systems. The boundary element method is first applied to interior, two and three-dimensional acoustic domains with complex geometry configurations. Boundary element results are very accurate when compared with limited exact solutions. Structure-interaction problems are then analyzed with the coupled FEM-BEM method, where the finite element method models the structure and the boundary element method models the interior acoustic domain. The coupled analysis is compared with exact and experimental results for a simplistic model. Composite panels are analyzed and compared with isotropic results. The coupled method is then extended for random excitation. Random excitation results are compared with uncoupled results for isotropic and composite panels.

  1. A Philosophical Perspective on the Relation between Cortical Midline Structures and the Self

    PubMed Central

    Musholt, Kristina

    2013-01-01

    In recent years there has been increasing evidence that an area in the brain called the cortical midline structures (CMSs) is implicated in what has been termed self-related processing. This article will discuss recent evidence for the relation between CMS and self-consciousness in light of several important philosophical distinctions. First, we should distinguish between being a self (i.e., being a subject of conscious experience) and being aware of being a self (i.e., being able to think about oneself as such). While the former consists in having a first-person perspective on the world, the latter requires the ability to explicitly represent one’s own perspective as such. Further, we should distinguish between being aware of oneself “as subject” and being aware of oneself “as object.” The focus of existing studies investigating the relation between CMS and self has been predominantly on the ability to think about oneself (and in particular thinking of oneself “as object”), while the more basic aspects involved in being a self have been neglected. However, it is important to widen the scope of the cognitive neuroscience to include the latter, not least because this might have important implications for a better understanding of disorders of the self, such as those involved in schizophrenia. In order to do so, cognitive neuroscience should work together with philosophy, including phenomenology. Second, we need to distinguish between personal and subpersonal level explanations. It will be argued that although it is important to respect this distinction, in principle, some subpersonal facts can enter into constitutive conditions of personal-level phenomena. However, in order for this to be possible, one needs both careful conceptual analysis and knowledge about relevant cognitive mechanisms. PMID:24032013

  2. Semi-analytic approach for electromagnetic problems of large arrays structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rostami-Angas, Masoud

    helps us in finding the microscopic charactristics of the structure. Building on the theory that the molecules can be modeled by electric dipoles; a semi-analytic and semi-classical approach is developed to solve the electromagnetic problem of large array of dipoles and simulate the optical response of molecular aggregates. In chapter 3, a double negative (DNG) metamaterial structure is designed by unit cells of multilayer (concentric) spheres. The dispersion diagram is analyzed to find the frequency band with negative group velocity and the losses in DNG region. Basically, the combination of a positive permittivity dielectric and a negative permittivity plasmonic material can control the resonances of unit cells and therefore the effective permittivity of the 3-D structure. It is also discussed how a novel design of multilayer sphere unit cells leads to the DNG performance at the desired frequency band. In chapter 4, analytical solution to the problem of electromagnetic wave scattering by an arbitrary array of non-concentric spheres is derived. A full wave multipole expansion method is applied to express the electromagnetic fields in terms of the electric and magnetic dipole modes and the higher order moments. Vector spherical wave functions are used as the basis functions of the multipole expansions and the translation addition theorem is implemented to expand fields in desired coordinate systems. The accuracy and computational performance of the model are investigated and some interesting applications are discussed.

  3. Self-interacting inelastic dark matter: a viable solution to the small scale structure problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blennow, Mattias; Clementz, Stefan; Herrero-Garcia, Juan

    2017-03-01

    Self-interacting dark matter has been proposed as a solution to the small-scale structure problems, such as the observed flat cores in dwarf and low surface brightness galaxies. If scattering takes place through light mediators, the scattering cross section relevant to solve these problems may fall into the non-perturbative regime leading to a non-trivial velocity dependence, which allows compatibility with limits stemming from cluster-size objects. However, these models are strongly constrained by different observations, in particular from the requirements that the decay of the light mediator is sufficiently rapid (before Big Bang Nucleosynthesis) and from direct detection. A natural solution to reconcile both requirements are inelastic endothermic interactions, such that scatterings in direct detection experiments are suppressed or even kinematically forbidden if the mass splitting between the two-states is sufficiently large. Using an exact solution when numerically solving the Schrödinger equation, we study such scenarios and find regions in the parameter space of dark matter and mediator masses, and the mass splitting of the states, where the small scale structure problems can be solved, the dark matter has the correct relic abundance and direct detection limits can be evaded.

  4. Correcting the planar perspective projection in geometric structures applied to forensic facial analysis.

    PubMed

    Baldasso, Rosane Pérez; Tinoco, Rachel Lima Ribeiro; Vieira, Cristina Saft Matos; Fernandes, Mário Marques; Oliveira, Rogério Nogueira

    2016-10-01

    The process of forensic facial analysis may be founded on several scientific techniques and imaging modalities, such as digital signal processing, photogrammetry and craniofacial anthropometry. However, one of the main limitations in this analysis is the comparison of images acquired with different angles of incidence. The present study aimed to explore a potential approach for the correction of the planar perspective projection (PPP) in geometric structures traced from the human face. A technique for the correction of the PPP was calibrated within photographs of two geometric structures obtained with angles of incidence distorted in 80°, 60° and 45°. The technique was performed using ImageJ(®) 1.46r (National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland). The corrected images were compared with photographs of the same object obtained in 90° (reference). In a second step, the technique was validated in a digital human face created using MakeHuman(®) 1.0.2 (Free Software Foundation, Massachusetts, EUA) and Blender(®) 2.75 (Blender(®) Foundation, Amsterdam, Nederland) software packages. The images registered with angular distortion presented a gradual decrease in height when compared to the reference. The digital technique for the correction of the PPP is a valuable tool for forensic applications using photographic imaging modalities, such as forensic facial analysis.

  5. The ErbB Kinase Domain: Structural Perspectives into Kinase Activation and Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Bose, Ron; Zhang, Xuewu

    2009-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and its family members, ErbB2, ErB3 and ErB4, are receptor tyrosine kinases which send signals into the cell to regulate many critical processes including development, tissue homeostasis, and tumorigenesis. Central to the signaling of these receptors is their intracellular kinase domain, which is activated by ligand-induced dimerization of the receptor and phosphorylates several tyrosine residues in the C-terminal tail. The phosphorylated tail then recruits other signaling molecules and relays the signal to downstream pathways. A model of the autoinhibition, activation and feedback inhibition mechanisms for the ErbB kinase domain has emerged from a number of recent structural studies. Meanwhile, recent clinical studies have revealed the relationship between specific ErbB kinase mutations and the responsiveness to kinase inhibitor drugs. We will review these regulation mechanisms of the ErbB kinase domain, and discuss the binding specificity of kinase inhibitors and the effects of kinase domain mutations found in cancer patients from a structural perspective. PMID:18761339

  6. Key technological issues in LMFBR high-temperature structural design - the US perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Corum, J.M.

    1984-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is: (1) to review the key technological issues in LMFBR high-temperature structural design, particularly as they relate to cost reduction; and (2) to provide an overview of activities sponsored by the US Department of Energy to resolve the issues and to establish stable, standardized, and defensible structural design methods and criteria. Specific areas of discussion include: weldments, structural validation tests, simplified design analysis procedures, design procedures for piping, validation of the methodology for notch-like geometries, improved life assessment procedures, thermal striping, extension of the methodology to new materials, and ASME high-temperature Code reform needs. The perceived problems and needs in each area are discussed, and the current status of related US activities is given.

  7. SEMI-DEFINITE PROGRAMMING TECHNIQUES FOR STRUCTURED QUADRATIC INVERSE EIGENVALUE PROBLEMS

    PubMed Central

    LIN, MATTHEW M.; DONG, BO; CHU, MOODY T.

    2014-01-01

    In the past decade or so, semi-definite programming (SDP) has emerged as a powerful tool capable of handling a remarkably wide range of problems. This article describes an innovative application of SDP techniques to quadratic inverse eigenvalue problems (QIEPs). The notion of QIEPs is of fundamental importance because its ultimate goal of constructing or updating a vibration system from some observed or desirable dynamical behaviors while respecting some inherent feasibility constraints well suits many engineering applications. Thus far, however, QIEPs have remained challenging both theoretically and computationally due to the great variations of structural constraints that must be addressed. Of notable interest and significance are the uniformity and the simplicity in the SDP formulation that solves effectively many otherwise very difficult QIEPs. PMID:25392603

  8. Algorithmic Perspectives of Network Transitive Reduction Problems and their Applications to Synthesis and Analysis of Biological Networks

    PubMed Central

    Aditya, Satabdi; DasGupta, Bhaskar; Karpinski, Marek

    2013-01-01

    In this survey paper, we will present a number of core algorithmic questions concerning several transitive reduction problems on network that have applications in network synthesis and analysis involving cellular processes. Our starting point will be the so-called minimum equivalent digraph problem, a classic computational problem in combinatorial algorithms. We will subsequently consider a few non-trivial extensions or generalizations of this problem motivated by applications in systems biology. We will then discuss the applications of these algorithmic methodologies in the context of three major biological research questions: synthesizing and simplifying signal transduction networks, analyzing disease networks, and measuring redundancy of biological networks. PMID:24833332

  9. Traveling salesman problems with PageRank Distance on complex networks reveal community structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Zhongzhou; Liu, Jing; Wang, Shuai

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, we propose a new algorithm for community detection problems (CDPs) based on traveling salesman problems (TSPs), labeled as TSP-CDA. Since TSPs need to find a tour with minimum cost, cities close to each other are usually clustered in the tour. This inspired us to model CDPs as TSPs by taking each vertex as a city. Then, in the final tour, the vertices in the same community tend to cluster together, and the community structure can be obtained by cutting the tour into a couple of paths. There are two challenges. The first is to define a suitable distance between each pair of vertices which can reflect the probability that they belong to the same community. The second is to design a suitable strategy to cut the final tour into paths which can form communities. In TSP-CDA, we deal with these two challenges by defining a PageRank Distance and an automatic threshold-based cutting strategy. The PageRank Distance is designed with the intrinsic properties of CDPs in mind, and can be calculated efficiently. In the experiments, benchmark networks with 1000-10,000 nodes and varying structures are used to test the performance of TSP-CDA. A comparison is also made between TSP-CDA and two well-established community detection algorithms. The results show that TSP-CDA can find accurate community structure efficiently and outperforms the two existing algorithms.

  10. Predicting Change in Early Adolescent Problem Behavior in the Middle School Years: A Mesosystemic Perspective on Parenting and Peer Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veronneau, Marie-Helene; Dishion, Thomas J.

    2010-01-01

    The transition into middle school may be a risky period in early adolescence. In particular, friendships, peer status, and parental monitoring during this developmental period can influence the development of problem behavior. This study examined interrelationships among peer and parenting factors that predict changes in problem behavior over the…

  11. Enhancing Grade 10 Thai Students' Stoichiometry Understanding and Ability to Solve Numerical Problems via a Conceptual Change Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dahsah, Chanyah; Coll, Richard K.; Sung-ong, Sunan; Yutakom, Naruemon; Sanguanruang, Sudjit

    2008-01-01

    The international literature suggests students frequently resort to the use of formulae when solving stoichiometry problems without understanding the concepts. In prior work we identified Thai student alternative conceptions and ability to solve numerical problem for stoichiometry. The results indicate that many Thai students also hold alternative…

  12. Analysis of factors affecting satisfaction level on problem based learning approach using structural equation modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain, Nur Farahin Mee; Zahid, Zalina

    2014-12-01

    Nowadays, in the job market demand, graduates are expected not only to have higher performance in academic but they must also be excellent in soft skill. Problem-Based Learning (PBL) has a number of distinct advantages as a learning method as it can deliver graduates that will be highly prized by industry. This study attempts to determine the satisfaction level of engineering students on the PBL Approach and to evaluate their determinant factors. The Structural Equation Modeling (SEM) was used to investigate how the factors of Good Teaching Scale, Clear Goals, Student Assessment and Levels of Workload affected the student satisfaction towards PBL approach.

  13. First-passage problems: A probabilistic dynamic analysis for degraded structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shiao, Michael C.; Chamis, Christos C.

    1990-01-01

    Structures subjected to random excitations with uncertain system parameters degraded by surrounding environments (a random time history) are studied. Methods are developed to determine the statistics of dynamic responses, such as the time-varying mean, the standard deviation, the autocorrelation functions, and the joint probability density function of any response and its derivative. Moreover, the first-passage problems with deterministic and stationary/evolutionary random barriers are evaluated. The time-varying (joint) mean crossing rate and the probability density function of the first-passage time for various random barriers are derived.

  14. Fractal structures for the Jacobi Hamiltonian of restricted three-body problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rollin, G.; Lages, J.; Shepelyansky, D. L.

    2016-08-01

    We study the dynamical chaos and integrable motion in the planar circular restricted three-body problem and determine the fractal dimension of the spiral strange repeller set of non-escaping orbits at different values of mass ratio of binary bodies and of Jacobi integral of motion. We find that the spiral fractal structure of the Poincaré section leads to a spiral density distribution of particles remaining in the system. We also show that the initial exponential drop of survival probability with time is followed by the algebraic decay related to the universal algebraic statistics of Poincaré recurrences in generic symplectic maps.

  15. Teaching ill-structured problem solving using occupational therapy practice epistemology.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Anita Witt

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Epistemic and ontological cognition (EOC) have to do with an individual's beliefs about knowledge and knowing. Research has shown that EOC have an influence on learning and achievement. EOC may be discipline-specific with a profession being defined by its practice epistemology. If an individual's EOC is inconsistent with the profession's practice epistemology, the student or practitioner may struggle with effectively solving ill-structured occupational performance problems. The purpose of this paper is to increase awareness of the constructs of EOC, to describe its importance to occupational therapy education and practice, and to provide recommendations for educators and researchers. Specific examples are detailed and recommendations for future research are proposed.

  16. The intentional stance as structure learning: a computational perspective on mindreading.

    PubMed

    Dindo, Haris; Donnarumma, Francesco; Chersi, Fabian; Pezzulo, Giovanni

    2015-10-01

    Recent theories of mindreading explain the recognition of action, intention, and belief of other agents in terms of generative architectures that model the causal relations between observables (e.g., observed movements) and their hidden causes (e.g., action goals and beliefs). Two kinds of probabilistic generative schemes have been proposed in cognitive science and robotics that link to a "theory theory" and "simulation theory" of mindreading, respectively. The former compares perceived actions to optimal plans derived from rationality principles and conceptual theories of others' minds. The latter reuses one's own internal (inverse and forward) models for action execution to perform a look-ahead mental simulation of perceived actions. Both theories, however, leave one question unanswered: how are the generative models - including task structure and parameters - learned in the first place? We start from Dennett's "intentional stance" proposal and characterize it within generative theories of action and intention recognition. We propose that humans use an intentional stance as a learning bias that sidesteps the (hard) structure learning problem and bootstraps the acquisition of generative models for others' actions. The intentional stance corresponds to a candidate structure in the generative scheme, which encodes a simplified belief-desire folk psychology and a hierarchical intention-to-action organization of behavior. This simple structure can be used as a proxy for the "true" generative structure of others' actions and intentions and is continuously grown and refined - via state and parameter learning - during interactions. In turn - as our computational simulations show - this can help solve mindreading problems and bootstrap the acquisition of useful causal models of both one's own and others' goal-directed actions.

  17. An explicit solution to the optimal LQG problem for flexible structures with collocated rate sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balakrishnan, A. V.

    1993-01-01

    We present a class of compensators in explicit form (not requiring numerical computer calculations) for stabilizing flexible structures with collocated rate sensors. They are based on the explicit solution, valid for both Continuum and FEM Models, of the LQG problem for minimizing mean square rate. They are robust with respect to system stability (will not destabilize modes even with mismatch of parameters), can be instrumented in state space form suitable for digital controllers, and can be specified directly from the structure modes and mode 'signature' (displacement vectors at sensor locations). Some simulation results are presented for the NASA LaRC Phase-Zero Evolutionary Model - a modal Trust model with 86 modes - showing damping ratios attainable as a function of compensator design parameters and complexity.

  18. Structuring policy problems for plastics, the environment and human health: reflections from the UK.

    PubMed

    Shaxson, Louise

    2009-07-27

    How can we strengthen the science-policy interface for plastics, the environment and human health? In a complex policy area with multiple stakeholders, it is important to clarify the nature of the particular plastics-related issue before trying to understand how to reconcile the supply and demand for evidence in policy. This article proposes a simple problem typology to assess the fundamental characteristics of a policy issue and thus identify appropriate processes for science-policy interactions. This is illustrated with two case studies from one UK Government Department, showing how policy and science meet over the environmental problems of plastics waste in the marine environment and on land. A problem-structuring methodology helps us understand why some policy issues can be addressed through relatively linear flows of science from experts to policymakers but why others demand a more reflexive approach to brokering the knowledge between science and policy. Suggestions are given at the end of the article for practical actions that can be taken on both sides.

  19. Structuring policy problems for plastics, the environment and human health: reflections from the UK

    PubMed Central

    Shaxson, Louise

    2009-01-01

    How can we strengthen the science–policy interface for plastics, the environment and human health? In a complex policy area with multiple stakeholders, it is important to clarify the nature of the particular plastics-related issue before trying to understand how to reconcile the supply and demand for evidence in policy. This article proposes a simple problem typology to assess the fundamental characteristics of a policy issue and thus identify appropriate processes for science–policy interactions. This is illustrated with two case studies from one UK Government Department, showing how policy and science meet over the environmental problems of plastics waste in the marine environment and on land. A problem-structuring methodology helps us understand why some policy issues can be addressed through relatively linear flows of science from experts to policymakers but why others demand a more reflexive approach to brokering the knowledge between science and policy. Suggestions are given at the end of the article for practical actions that can be taken on both sides. PMID:19528061

  20. A memory structure adapted simulated annealing algorithm for a green vehicle routing problem.

    PubMed

    Küçükoğlu, İlker; Ene, Seval; Aksoy, Aslı; Öztürk, Nursel

    2015-03-01

    Currently, reduction of carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions and fuel consumption has become a critical environmental problem and has attracted the attention of both academia and the industrial sector. Government regulations and customer demands are making environmental responsibility an increasingly important factor in overall supply chain operations. Within these operations, transportation has the most hazardous effects on the environment, i.e., CO2 emissions, fuel consumption, noise and toxic effects on the ecosystem. This study aims to construct vehicle routes with time windows that minimize the total fuel consumption and CO2 emissions. The green vehicle routing problem with time windows (G-VRPTW) is formulated using a mixed integer linear programming model. A memory structure adapted simulated annealing (MSA-SA) meta-heuristic algorithm is constructed due to the high complexity of the proposed problem and long solution times for practical applications. The proposed models are integrated with a fuel consumption and CO2 emissions calculation algorithm that considers the vehicle technical specifications, vehicle load, and transportation distance in a green supply chain environment. The proposed models are validated using well-known instances with different numbers of customers. The computational results indicate that the MSA-SA heuristic is capable of obtaining good G-VRPTW solutions within a reasonable amount of time by providing reductions in fuel consumption and CO2 emissions.

  1. Modulation of Epigenetic Targets for Anticancer Therapy: Clinicopathological Relevance, Structural Data and Drug Discovery Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Andreol, Federico; Barbosa, Arménio Jorge Moura; Daniele Parenti, Marco; Rio, Alberto Del

    2013-01-01

    Research on cancer epigenetics has flourished in the last decade. Nevertheless growing evidence point on the importance to understand the mechanisms by which epigenetic changes regulate the genesis and progression of cancer growth. Several epigenetic targets have been discovered and are currently under validation for new anticancer therapies. Drug discovery approaches aiming to target these epigenetic enzymes with small-molecules inhibitors have produced the first pre-clinical and clinical outcomes and many other compounds are now entering the pipeline as new candidate epidrugs. The most studied targets can be ascribed to histone deacetylases and DNA methyltransferases, although several other classes of enzymes are able to operate post-translational modifications to histone tails are also likely to represent new frontiers for therapeutic interventions. By acknowledging that the field of cancer epigenetics is evolving with an impressive rate of new findings, with this review we aim to provide a current overview of pre-clinical applications of small-molecules for cancer pathologies, combining them with the current knowledge of epigenetic targets in terms of available structural data and drug design perspectives. PMID:23016851

  2. Cranial shape and size variation in human evolution: structural and functional perspectives.

    PubMed

    Bruner, Emiliano

    2007-12-01

    A GLIMPSE INTO MODERN PALEOANTHROPOLOGY: In the last decades, paleoanthropology has been deeply modified, changing from a descriptive and historical science to a more quantitative and analytical discipline. The covariation of multiple traits is investigated to study the evolutionary changes of the underlying anatomical models, mostly through the introduction of digital biomedical imaging procedures and of computed geometrical analyses supported by multivariate statistics. FUNCTIONAL CRANIOLOGY: The evolution of the human cranium is consequently considered in terms of functional and structural relationships between its components, largely influenced by the allometric variations associated with the increase in the relative cranial capacity. In the human genus, the changes in the face, base, and neurocranium are characterised by a mosaic variation, in which adaptations, secondary consequences, and stochastic factors concur to generate a set of anatomical possibilities and constraints. SYSTEMIC PERSPECTIVES TO THE EVOLUTION OF THE HUMAN CRANIAL MORPHOLOGY: Concepts like morphological modularity, anatomical integration, and heterochrony represent key issues in the development of the current human evolutionary studies.

  3. A Cultural Perspective on the Structure of Student Interest in Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ainley, Mary; Ainley, John

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we examine the nature of interest in science as represented in the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) 2006 data. We discuss the interconnections between measures of knowledge, affect, and value as components of interest in science. Working from a perspective acknowledging that many of the models of motivation represented in the literature have been developed in Western countries, we investigated whether the ways that knowledge, affect, and value combine in the structure of students' interest in science might vary in line with historical and cultural traditions. Four countries were chosen to represent contrasting cultural values as defined in analyses of the World Values Surveys and the European Values Surveys-Colombia, Estonia, USA, and Sweden. Models are described showing variations in fit across the four countries. Efforts to increase the attractiveness of science to students should take heed of the fact that all models indicated a central role for enjoyment of science in the paths linking personal value, interest, and current science activities with intentions for future participation in science. Differences in the strength of the associations between science knowledge and interest in science support the proposition that the interconnections between knowledge, affect, and value need to be understood in relation to students' broader historical and cultural context.

  4. Addressing the problem of interruptability in the construction of large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidson, Roger A.; Morgenthaler, George W.

    1989-01-01

    Large scale space missions of the near future will depend upon successful multi-launch coordination and construction in the space environment. One of the main challenges is how to accomplish a valid global analysis of a construction project with the intent of improving safety, reducing overall mission cost, and total construction time. These three items are dependent on the interruptability of the project, which is the ability of the project to recover from unplanned interruptions; such as failure of the launch vehicle; sudden, on-orbit, crew illness; or damage from a space debris impact on the partially completed space structure. A new method for addressing and analyzing this type of problem is being developed. The method is called Program Interruptability and Risk Evaluation Technique, or PIRET. PIRET has been developed in order to model and analyze potential interruptability concerns of the construction of the U.S. Space Station Freedom (SSF), although PIRET is applicable to any complex, multi-launch structural assembly. This paper is a progress report on the continuing research of the NASA Center for Space Construction at the University of Colorado, Boulder into this area of space construction interruptability. The paper will define the problem of interruptability, will diagram the PIRET approach to space construction, will share results from a preliminary PIRET analysis of SSF, and will show that PIRET is a useful tool for modelling space construction interruptability.

  5. Multi-stage approach for structural damage detection problem using basis pursuit and particle swarm optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerist, Saleheh; Maheri, Mahmoud R.

    2016-12-01

    In order to solve structural damage detection problem, a multi-stage method using particle swarm optimization is presented. First, a new spars recovery method, named Basis Pursuit (BP), is utilized to preliminarily identify structural damage locations. The BP method solves a system of equations which relates the damage parameters to the structural modal responses using the sensitivity matrix. Then, the results of this stage are subsequently enhanced to the exact damage locations and extents using the PSO search engine. Finally, the search space is reduced by elimination of some low damage variables using micro search (MS) operator embedded in the PSO algorithm. To overcome the noise present in structural responses, a method known as Basis Pursuit De-Noising (BPDN) is also used. The efficiency of the proposed method is investigated by three numerical examples: a cantilever beam, a plane truss and a portal plane frame. The frequency response is used to detect damage in the examples. The simulation results demonstrate the accuracy and efficiency of the proposed method in detecting multiple damage cases and exhibit its robustness regarding noise and its advantages compared to other reported solution algorithms.

  6. Differential evolution: Global search problem in LEED-IV surface structural analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Nascimento, V.B.; Plummer, E.W.

    2015-02-15

    The search process associated with the quantitative theory–experiment comparison in Low Energy Electron Diffraction surface structural analysis can be very time consuming, especially in the case of complex materials with many atoms in the unit cell. Global search algorithms need to be employed to locate the global minimum of the reliability factor in the multi-dimensional structural parameter space. In this study we investigate the use of the Differential Evolution algorithm in Low Energy Electron Diffraction structural analysis. Despite the simplicity of its mechanism the Differential Evolution algorithm presents an impressive performance when applied to ultra-thin films of BaTiO{sub 3}(001) in a theory–theory comparison. A scaling relation of N{sup (1.47} {sup ±} {sup 0.08)} was obtained, where N is the total number of parameters to be optimized. - Highlights: • We investigated the use of the Differential Evolution algorithm (DE) for the LEED search problem. • The DE method was applied to the optimization of the surface structure of the BaTiO{sub 3}(001) ultra-thin films. • A very favorable scaling relation of N{sup 1.47} was obtained, where N is the total number of parameters to be optimized.

  7. Climate-Change Problem Solving: Structured Approaches Based on Real-World Experiences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rood, R. B.; Briley, L. J.; Brown, D. A.

    2012-12-01

    Nearly two decades of experience using both seasonal and long-term climate model projections has led to the identification of a set of characteristics of the successful use of climate knowledge in planning and adaptation applications. These characteristics include end-to-end knowledge systems, co-generation or co-production of solution approaches by scientists and practitioners, and tailoring climate model information to the decision-making processes of the specific application. Glisaclimate.org strives to apply the growing body of research into the successful use of climate knowledge using a set of prototype, real-world applications. We describe an online problem-solving environment whose design is based on the characteristics of the successful use of climate predictions and projections by practitioners such as resource managers, urban planners, public health professionals, and policy makers. Design features of Glisaclimate.org include: Based on principles extracted from social science studies of the use of climate information. Anchored on structured templates of problem solving with the identification of common steps in problem solving that are repeated in one application to the next. Informed by interviews with real-world users who desire to incorporate climate-science knowledge into their decision making. Built with open-source tools to allow participation of a community of developers and to facilitate the sustainability of the effort. A structured approach to problem solving is described by four functions of information management. At the foundation of problem solving is the collection of existing information, an inventory stage. Following the collection of the information there are analysis and evaluation stages. In the analysis stage interfaces are described and knowledge gaps are identified. The evaluation stage assesses the quality of the information and the relevance of the information to the specific attributes of the problem. The development of plans

  8. Associations between Psychological Problems and Quality of Life in Pediatric Short Stature from Patients’ and Parents’ Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Bullinger, Monika; Sommer, Rachel; Rohenkohl, Anja Christine; Bernardino Da Silva, Neuza Maria

    2016-01-01

    Short stature has been associated with psychosocial impairments, but whether treatments and achieved height impact on health-related quality of life (HrQoL) and psychological functioning of children/adolescents is still controversial. This study aimed to examine the effects of height deviation and treatment status on psychosocial adaptation outcomes and to identify clinical and psychosocial determinants of internalizing/externalizing problems in a large cohort of short statured children/adolescents from seven European countries. Participants were 345 children aged 8–18 years with a clinical diagnosis of short stature and 421 parents of 4–18 year-old patients. Children and parents reported on psychological problems (Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire), generic (KIDSCREEN) and condition-specific HrQoL (QoLISSY). According to analyses of covariance, children/adolescents with current short stature presented more parent-reported internalizing problems and lower self- and parent-reported condition-specific HrQoL, compared to patients with an achieved height above -2SD. Treated children self-reported better HrQoL than the untreated group. Hierarchical regression analysis showed that, rather than height–related clinical variables, children’s sex, younger age and poorer HrQoL were the best predictors of psychological problems, explaining 39% of the variance in patient- and 42% in parent-reported internalizing problems, and 22% of the variance in patient- and 24% in parent-reported externalizing problems. Treatment status also moderated the negative links between patient-reported HrQoL and internalizing problems, explaining 2% of additional variance. These results suggest that children with current short stature are at greater risk for internalizing problems. Routine assessment of HrQoL in pediatric healthcare may help identify children for referral to specialized psychological assessment and intervention. PMID:27097033

  9. The role of nuclear shapes in nuclear structure (from the perspective of the Daresbury Tandem)

    SciTech Connect

    Nazarewicz, W.

    1993-06-01

    In specific regions of the nuclear periodic chart, large multipole moments are observed and the low-lying excitations have a rotational character. These features are understood if the nuclei in question are assumed to have a stable deformation, i.e., a non-spherical distribution of the nuclear matter. In other (transitional) regions the quasi-rotational bands are present; they are strongly coupled to low-lying vibrational modes. Those nuclei are best understood in terms of small static deformations but large dynamic fluctuations around local equilibria. As a matter of fact, the vast majority of nuclei are deformed; even in those which are spherical or almost spherical, the dynamical couplings to shape vibrations are crucial. The issue of nuclear deformation is many-faceted. If the nuclear shape (nuclear mean field) is deformed, characteristic excitation modes are present, such as rotations and vibrations built upon the non-spherical equilibrium. Through the particle-core coupling, nuclear deformations can dramatically influence the single-particle properties of nucleons moving in the average nuclear potential. Many experimental investigations using the Daresbury Tandem were related in one way or another to the physics of nuclear shapes. Fundamental discoveries from Daresbury include the observation of superdeformed structures in rapidly rotating nuclei, the observation of identical ({open_quotes}twinned{close_quotes}) rotational bands, various studies of structural changes induced by very fast rotation (band-crossings, band-terminations), the observation of the oblate-deformed {open_quotes}dipole{close_quotes} bands, studies of reflection-asymmetric shapes, studies of (quasimolecular) cluster configurations in light nuclei, and many, many others. The author reviews the forefront research at Daresbury from the global perspective; the common denominator being the nuclear shape deformation.

  10. Structural geology practice and learning, from the perspective of cognitive science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shipley, Thomas F.; Tikoff, Basil; Ormand, Carol; Manduca, Cathy

    2013-09-01

    Spatial ability is required by practitioners and students of structural geology and so, considering spatial skills in the context of cognitive science has the potential to improve structural geology teaching and practice. Spatial thinking skills may be organized using three dichotomies, which can be linked to structural geology practice. First, a distinction is made between separating (attending to part of a whole) and combining (linking together aspects of the whole). While everyone has a basic ability to separate and combine, experts attend to differences guided by experiences of rock properties in context. Second, a distinction is made between seeing the relations among multiple objects as separate items or the relations within a single object with multiple parts. Experts can flexibly consider relations among or between objects to optimally reason about different types of spatial problems. Third, a distinction is made between reasoning about stationary and moving objects. Experts recognize static configurations that encode a movement history, and create mental models of the processes that led to the static state. The observations and inferences made by a geologist leading a field trip are compared with the corresponding observations and inferences made by a cognitive psychologist interested in spatial learning. The presented framework provides a vocabulary for discussing spatial skills both within and between the fields of structural geology and cognitive psychology.

  11. The Caudal Skeleton of the Zebrafish, Danio rerio, from a Phylogenetic Perspective: A Polyural Interpretation of Homologous Structures

    PubMed Central

    Wiley, Edward O.; Fuiten, Allison M.; Doosey, Michael H.; Lohman, Brian K.; Merkes, Christopher; Azuma, Mizuki

    2016-01-01

    The structure of the caudal skeleton of extant teleost fishes has been interpreted in two different ways. In a diural interpretation, a caudal skeleton is composed of two centra articulated with one to six hypurals. Most subsequent authors have followed this interpretation. In contrast, a polyural interpretation considers the teleost fin to be derived from a fully metameristic ancestral bauplan originally composed of a one-to-one relationship between neural arches, centra (when present), and hypurals. Three different interpretations of the identity and homology of skeletal components of the caudal skeleton of the teleost fish Danio rerio have been proposed, two from a diural perspective and one from a polyural perspective. We examine each caudal skeletal component of Danio rerio from both a developmental and phylogenetic perspective. We propose that a polyural interpretation of structures is consistent with the current interpretation of the basal neopterygian caudal fin for this model organism rather than the older diural interpretation that does not take into account the metamerism observed in caudal structures during development. The polyural interpretation suggests several shared evolutionary innovations of major clades that would remain undiscovered under the older diural naming paradigm and makes the terminology of the parts of the caudal fin of Danio rerio strictly comparable to more basal fishes. PMID:28250540

  12. A systematic review of qualitative research on the contributory factors leading to medicine-related problems from the perspectives of adult patients with cardiovascular diseases and diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Al Hamid, A; Ghaleb, M; Aljadhey, H; Aslanpour, Z

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To synthesise contributing factors leading to medicine-related problems (MRPs) in adult patients with cardiovascular diseases and/or diabetes mellitus from their perspectives. Design A systematic literature review of qualitative studies regarding the contributory factors leading to MRPs, medication errors and non-adherence, followed by a thematic synthesis of the studies. Data sources We screened Pubmed, EMBASE, ISI Web of Knowledge, PsycInfo, International Pharmaceutical Abstract and PsycExtra for qualitative studies (interviews, focus groups and questionnaires of a qualitative nature). Review methods Thematic synthesis was achieved by coding and developing themes from the findings of qualitative studies. Results The synthesis yielded 21 studies that satisfied the inclusion and exclusion criteria. Three themes emerged that involved contributing factors to MRPs: patient-related factors including socioeconomic factors (beliefs, feeling victimised, history of the condition, lack of finance, lack of motivation and low self-esteem) and lifestyle factors (diet, lack of exercise/time to see the doctor, obesity, smoking and stress), medicine-related factors (belief in natural remedies, fear of medicine, lack of belief in medicines, lack of knowledge, non-adherence and polypharmacy) and condition-related factors (lack of knowledge/understanding, fear of condition and its complications, and lack of control). Conclusions MRPs represent a major health threat, especially among adult patients with cardiovascular diseases and/or diabetes mellitus. The patients’ perspectives uncovered hidden factors that could cause and/or contribute to MRPs in these groups of patients. PMID:25239295

  13. Some major problems with existing models and terminology associated with kimberlite pipes from a volcanological perspective, and some suggestions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cas, R. A. F.; Hayman, P.; Pittari, A.; Porritt, L.

    2008-06-01

    Five significant problems hinder advances in understanding of the volcanology of kimberlites: (1) kimberlite geology is very model driven; (2) a highly genetic terminology drives deposit or facies interpretation; (3) the effects of alteration on preserved depositional textures have been grossly underestimated; (4) the level of understanding of the physical process significance of preserved textures is limited; and, (5) some inferred processes and deposits are not based on actual, modern volcanological processes. These issues need to be addressed in order to advance understanding of kimberlite volcanological pipe forming processes and deposits. The traditional, steep-sided southern African pipe model (Class I) consists of a steep tapering pipe with a deep root zone, a middle diatreme zone and an upper crater zone (if preserved). Each zone is thought to be dominated by distinctive facies, respectively: hypabyssal kimberlite (HK, descriptively called here massive coherent porphyritic kimberlite), tuffisitic kimberlite breccia (TKB, descriptively here called massive, poorly sorted lapilli tuff) and crater zone facies, which include variably bedded pyroclastic kimberlite and resedimented and reworked volcaniclastic kimberlite (RVK). Porphyritic coherent kimberlite may, however, also be emplaced at different levels in the pipe, as later stage intrusions, as well as dykes in the surrounding country rock. The relationship between HK and TKB is not always clear. Sub-terranean fluidisation as an emplacement process is a largely unsubstantiated hypothesis; modern in-vent volcanological processes should initially be considered to explain observed deposits. Crater zone volcaniclastic deposits can occur within the diatreme zone of some pipes, indicating that the pipe was largely empty at the end of the eruption, and subsequently began to fill-in largely through resedimentation and sourcing of pyroclastic deposits from nearby vents. Classes II and III Canadian kimberlite models

  14. The Male Role, Alcohol Use, and Alcohol Problems: A Structural Modeling Examination in Adult Women and Men.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCreary, Donald R.; Newcomb, Michael D.; Sadava, Stanley W.

    1999-01-01

    Utilizes structural model to examine relationships between three male-role variables, alcohol consumption, and alcohol-related problems in sample of men and women. For men, traditional attitudes led to more alcohol consumption, whereas agentic traits protected them from experiencing alcohol-related problems and from experiencing masculine…

  15. QUANTITATIVE STRUCTURE-ACTIVITY RELATIONSHIP METHODS: PERSPECTIVES ON DRUG DISCOVERY AND TOXICOLOGY. (R826133)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  16. English for Academic Study, With Special Reference to Science and Technology: Problems and Perspectives. An ETIC Occasional Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    British Council, London (England). English-Teaching Information Centre.

    The four articles in this volume address themselves to issues in the teaching of English for science and technology (EST). H.G. Widdowson, in "EST in Theory and Practice," argues that teaching that is not informed by a functional approach to language can oversimplify pedagogical problems. "Designing English for Science and…

  17. Developing Resiliency in Students with Behavioural Problems in Hong Kong Secondary Schools: Teachers' Narratives from a School Guidance Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hue, Ming-Tak

    2011-01-01

    Hong Kong schools are concerned about how students with behavioural problems could be supported. This article reports the findings of a study investigating teachers' constructs of students' resilience. Specifically it examines how it could be promoted through school guidance and factors affecting the development of students' resilient capability.…

  18. Learning to Research Environmental Problems from a Functional Socio-Cultural Constructivism Perspective: The Transdisciplinary Case Study Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stauffacher, M.; Walter, A. I.; Lang, D. J.; Wiek, A.; Scholz, R. W.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to present the transdisciplinary case study (TCS) as a learning framework based on what we call functional socio-cultural constructivism and project-based learning (PBL). In doing so, the paper attempts to illustrate the applicability of TCS to learn competencies and skills necessary to research problems of…

  19. A Perspective Evaluation of Problem-Based Learning in ESL Classroom in the Malaysian Higher School Certificate Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rashid, Radzuwan Ab.

    2011-01-01

    This study was initiated to explore how pre-university students who enrolled in the Malaysian Higher School Certificate program perceived their experiences in learning ESL through Problem-Based Learning (PBL). This small scale study involved 35 pre-university students in an upper sixth form in a secondary school in Kelantan, Malaysia. Participants…

  20. A Geographer's Perspective of Contemporary Problems and Human Survival: An Introductory Course in Human Geography and Motorcycle Maintenance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McConnell, James E.

    The scientific community needs to reappraise its actions and become concerned with the real world problems that threaten existence in society. These include world poverty, starvation, and declining quality of life. Geographers need to develop greater concern resulting in evaluating their research, curricula, educational goals and course content in…

  1. Interagency Collaboration in Vocational Rehabilitation for Persons with Mental Health Problems: The Perspective of the Service Users and the Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Germundsson, Per; Hillborg, Helene; Danermark, Berth

    2011-01-01

    There is an aspiration and policy within the European Union to fully involve persons with disabilities in the community; this implies an opportunity to gainful employment. A large percentage of disabled persons remain unemployed despite this policy, especially persons with mental health problems. This study aims at investigating how people with…

  2. Graph theory approach to the eigenvalue problem of large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, A. S. S. R.; Bainum, P. M.

    1981-01-01

    Graph theory is used to obtain numerical solutions to eigenvalue problems of large space structures (LSS) characterized by a state vector of large dimensions. The LSS are considered as large, flexible systems requiring both orientation and surface shape control. Graphic interpretation of the determinant of a matrix is employed to reduce a higher dimensional matrix into combinations of smaller dimensional sub-matrices. The reduction is implemented by means of a Boolean equivalent of the original matrices formulated to obtain smaller dimensional equivalents of the original numerical matrix. Computation time becomes less and more accurate solutions are possible. An example is provided in the form of a free-free square plate. Linearized system equations and numerical values of a stiffness matrix are presented, featuring a state vector with 16 components.

  3. Method of adiabatic modes in studying problems of smoothly irregular open waveguide structures

    SciTech Connect

    Sevastianov, L. A.; Egorov, A. A.; Sevastyanov, A. L.

    2013-02-15

    Basic steps in developing an original method of adiabatic modes that makes it possible to solve the direct and inverse problems of simulating and designing three-dimensional multilayered smoothly irregular open waveguide structures are described. A new element in the method is that an approximate solution of Maxwell's equations is made to obey 'inclined' boundary conditions at the interfaces between themedia being considered. These boundary conditions take into account the obliqueness of planes tangent to nonplanar boundaries between the media and lead to new equations for coupled vector quasiwaveguide hybrid adiabatic modes. Solutions of these equations describe the phenomenon of 'entanglement' of two linear polarizations of an irregular multilayered waveguide, the appearance of a new mode in an entangled state, and the effect of rotation of the polarization plane of quasiwaveguide modes. The efficiency of the method is demonstrated by considering the example of numerically simulating a thin-film generalized waveguide Lueneburg lens.

  4. Beyond static structures: Putting forth REMD as a tool to solve problems in computational organic chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Petraglia, Riccardo; Nicolaï, Adrien; Wodrich, Matthew D.

    2016-01-01

    Computational studies of organic systems are frequently limited to static pictures that closely align with textbook style presentations of reaction mechanisms and isomerization processes. Of course, in reality chemical systems are dynamic entities where a multitude of molecular conformations exists on incredibly complex potential energy surfaces (PES). Here, we borrow a computational technique originally conceived to be used in the context of biological simulations, together with empirical force fields, and apply it to organic chemical problems. Replica‐exchange molecular dynamics (REMD) permits thorough exploration of the PES. We combined REMD with density functional tight binding (DFTB), thereby establishing the level of accuracy necessary to analyze small molecular systems. Through the study of four prototypical problems: isomer identification, reaction mechanisms, temperature‐dependent rotational processes, and catalysis, we reveal new insights and chemistry that likely would be missed using static electronic structure computations. The REMD‐DFTB methodology at the heart of this study is powered by i‐PI, which efficiently handles the interface between the DFTB and REMD codes. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Computational Chemistry Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26228927

  5. Beyond static structures: Putting forth REMD as a tool to solve problems in computational organic chemistry.

    PubMed

    Petraglia, Riccardo; Nicolaï, Adrien; Wodrich, Matthew D; Ceriotti, Michele; Corminboeuf, Clemence

    2016-01-05

    Computational studies of organic systems are frequently limited to static pictures that closely align with textbook style presentations of reaction mechanisms and isomerization processes. Of course, in reality chemical systems are dynamic entities where a multitude of molecular conformations exists on incredibly complex potential energy surfaces (PES). Here, we borrow a computational technique originally conceived to be used in the context of biological simulations, together with empirical force fields, and apply it to organic chemical problems. Replica-exchange molecular dynamics (REMD) permits thorough exploration of the PES. We combined REMD with density functional tight binding (DFTB), thereby establishing the level of accuracy necessary to analyze small molecular systems. Through the study of four prototypical problems: isomer identification, reaction mechanisms, temperature-dependent rotational processes, and catalysis, we reveal new insights and chemistry that likely would be missed using static electronic structure computations. The REMD-DFTB methodology at the heart of this study is powered by i-PI, which efficiently handles the interface between the DFTB and REMD codes.

  6. ALPS: The Age-Layered Population Structure for Reducing the Problem of Premature Convergence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hornby, Gregory S.

    2006-01-01

    To reduce the problem of premature convergence we define a new attribute of an individual, its age, and propose the Age-Layered Population Structure (ALPS), in which age is used to restrict competition and breeding between members of the population. ALPS differs from a typical EA by segregating individuals into different age-layers by their age - a measure of how long the genetic material has been in the population - and by regularly replacing all individuals in the bottom layer with randomly generated ones. The introduction of new, randomly generated individuals at regular intervals results in an EA that is never completely converged and is always looking at new parts of the fitness landscape. By using age to restrict competition and breeding search is able to develop promising young individuals without them being dominated by older ones. We demonstrate the effectiveness of the ALPS algorithm on an antenna design problem in which evolution with ALPS produces antennas more than twice as good as does evolution with two other types of EAs. Further analysis shows that the ALPS model does allow the offspring of newly generated individuals to move the population out of mediocre local-optima to better parts of the fitness landscape.

  7. Tackling pseudosymmetry problems in electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) analyses of perovskite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mariani, Elisabetta; Kaercher, Pamela; Mecklenburgh, Julian; Wheeler, John

    2016-04-01

    Perovskite minerals form an important mineral group that has applications in Earth science and emerging alternative energy technologies, however crystallographic quantification of these minerals with electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) is not accurate due to pseudosymmetry problems. The silicate perovskite Bridgmanite, (Mg,Fe)SiO3, is understood to be the dominant phase in the Earth's lower mantle. Gaining insight into its physical and rheological properties is therefore vital to understand the dynamics of the Earth's deep interior. Rock deformation experiments on analogue perovskite phases, for example (Ca,Sr)TiO3, combined with quantitative microstructural analyses of the recovered samples by EBSD, yield datasets that can reveal what deformation mechanisms may dominate the flow of perovskite in the lower mantle. Additionally, perovskite structures have important technological applications as new, suitable cathodes for the operation of more efficient and environmentally-friendly solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC). In recent years they have also been recognised as a potential substitute for silicon in the next generation of photovoltaic cells for the construction of economic and energy efficient solar panels. EBSD has the potential to be a valuable tool for the study of crystal orientations achieved in perovskite substrates as crystal alignment has a direct control on the properties of these materials. However, perovskite structures currently present us with challenges during the automated indexing of Kikuchi bands in electron backscatter diffraction patterns (EBSPs). Such challenges are represented by the pseudosymmetric character of perovskites, where atoms are subtly displaced (0.005 nm to 0.05 nm) from their higher symmetry positions. In orthorhombic Pbnm perovskites, for example, pseudosymmetry may be evaluated from the c/a unit cell parameter ratio, which is very close to 1. Two main types of distortions from the higher symmetry structure are recognised: a

  8. Effects of structural and dynamic family characteristics on the development of depressive and aggressive problems during adolescence. The TRAILS study.

    PubMed

    Sijtsema, J J; Oldehinkel, A J; Veenstra, R; Verhulst, F C; Ormel, J

    2014-06-01

    Both structural (i.e., SES, familial psychopathology, family composition) and dynamic (i.e., parental warmth and rejection) family characteristics have been associated with aggressive and depressive problem development. However, it is unclear to what extent (changes in) dynamic family characteristics have an independent effect on problem development while accounting for stable family characteristics and comorbid problem development. This issue was addressed by studying problem development in a large community sample (N = 2,230; age 10-20) of adolescents using Linear Mixed models. Paternal and maternal warmth and rejection were assessed via the Egna Minnen Beträffande Uppfostran for Children (EMBU-C). Aggressive and depressive problems were assessed via subscales of the Youth/Adult Self-Report. Results showed that dynamic family characteristics independently affected the development of aggressive problems. Moreover, maternal rejection in preadolescence and increases in paternal rejection were associated with aggressive problems, whereas decreases in maternal rejection were associated with decreases in depressive problems over time. Paternal and maternal warmth in preadolescence was associated with fewer depressive problems during adolescence. Moreover, increases in paternal warmth were associated with fewer depressive problems over time. Aggressive problems were a stable predictor of depressive problems over time. Finally, those who increased in depressive problems became more aggressive during adolescence, whereas those who decreased in depressive problems became also less aggressive. Besides the effect of comorbid problems, problem development is to a large extent due to dynamic family characteristics, and in particular to changes in parental rejection, which leaves much room for parenting-based interventions.

  9. On Index Structures in Hybrid Metaheuristics for Routing Problems with Hard Feasibility Checks: An Application to the 2-Dimensional Loading Vehicle Routing Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strodl, Johannes; Doerner, Karl F.; Tricoire, Fabien; Hartl, Richard F.

    In this paper we study the impact of different index structures used within hybrid solution approaches for vehicle routing problems with hard feasibility checks. We examine the case of the vehicle routing problem with two-dimensional loading constraints, which combines the loading of freight into the vehicles and the routing of the vehicles to satisfy the demands of the customers. The problem is solved by a variable neighborhood search for the routing part, in which we embed an exact procedure for the loading subproblem. The contribution of the paper is threefold: i) Four different index mechanisms for managing the subproblems are implemented and tested. It is shown that simple index structures tend to lead to better solutions than more powerful albeit complex ones, when using the same runtime limits. ii) The problem of balancing the CPU budget between exploration of different solutions and exact solution of the loading subproblem is investigated; experiments show that solving exactly hard subproblems can lead to better solution quality over the whole solution process. iii) New best results are presented on existing benchmark instances.

  10. Parents' and Adolescents' Perspectives on Parenting: Evaluating Conceptual Structure, Measurement Invariance, and Criterion Validity.

    PubMed

    Janssens, Annelies; Goossens, Luc; Van Den Noortgate, Wim; Colpin, Hilde; Verschueren, Karine; Van Leeuwen, Karla

    2015-08-01

    Uncertainty persists regarding adequate measurement of parenting behavior during early adolescence. The present study aimed to clarify the conceptual structure of parenting by evaluating three different models that include support, psychological control, and various types of behavioral control (i.e., proactive, punitive, and harsh punitive control). Furthermore, we examined measurement invariance of parenting ratings by 1,111 Flemish adolescents from Grade 7 till 9, their mother, and father. Finally, criterion validity of parenting ratings was estimated in relation to adolescent problem behavior. Results supported a five-factor parenting model indicating multiple aspects of behavioral control, with punitive and harsh punitive control as more intrusive forms and proactive control as a more supportive form. Similar constructs were measured for adolescents, mothers, and fathers (i.e., configural and metric invariance), however on a different scale (i.e., scalar noninvariance). Future research and clinical practices should acknowledge these findings in order to fully grasp the parenting process.

  11. Discontinuous Galerkin method for the problem of linear elasticity with applications to the fluid-structure interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadrava, M.; Feistauer, M.; Horáček, J.; Kosík, A.

    2013-10-01

    The paper is concerned with the numerical solution of static and dynamic elasticity problems. The purpose of this subject is the computation of the so-called ALE mapping (representing the mesh deformation) in the solution of flow in time-dependent domains and the computation of the time-dependent deformation of an elastic body. These two problems represent important ingredients in the fluid-structure interaction (FSI). They are discretized by the discontinuous Galerkin method (DGM). Here we describe the method and present some test problems. The developed method is applied to the FSI problem treated in [2].

  12. Self-directed learning readiness of Asian students: students perspective on a hybrid problem based learning curriculum

    PubMed Central

    Susilo, Astrid P.; van Berkel, Henk

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To identify the student’s readiness to perform self-directed learning and the underlying factors influencing it on the hybrid problem based learning curriculum. Methods A combination of quantitative and qualitative studies was conducted in five medical schools in Indonesia. In the quantitative study, the Self Directed Learning Readiness Scale was distributed to all students in all batches, who had experience with the hybrid problem based curriculum. They were categorized into low- and high -level based on the score of the questionnaire. Three focus group discussions (low-, high-, and mixed level) were conducted in the qualitative study with six to twelve students chosen randomly from each group to find the factors influencing their self-directed learning readiness. Two researchers analysed the qualitative data as a measure of triangulation. Results The quantitative study showed only half of the students had a high-level of self-directed learning readiness, and a similar trend also occurred in each batch. The proportion of students with a high level of self-directed learning readiness was lower in the senior students compared to more junior students. The qualitative study showed that problem based learning processes, assessments, learning environment, students’ life styles, students’ perceptions of the topics, and mood, were factors influencing their self-directed learning. Conclusion A hybrid problem based curriculum may not fully affect the students’ self-directed learning. The curriculum system, teacher’s experiences, student’s background and cultural factors might contribute to the difficulties for the student’s in conducting self-directed learning. PMID:27915308

  13. A new fluid-solid interface algorithm for simulating fluid structure problems in FGM plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eghtesad, A.; Shafiei, A. R.; Mahzoon, M.

    2012-04-01

    The capability to track material interfaces, especially in fluid structure problems, is among the advantages of meshless methods. In the present paper, the Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) method is used to investigate elastic-plastic deformation of AL and ceramic-metal FGM (Functionally Graded Materials) plates under the impact of water in a fluid-solid interface. Instead of using an accidental repulsive force which is not stable at higher pressures, a new scheme is proposed to improve the interface contact behavior between fluid and solid structure. This treatment not only prevents the interpenetration of fluid and solid particles significantly, but also maintains the gap distance between fluid and solid boundary particles in a reasonable range. A new scheme called corrected smooth particle method (CSPM) is applied to both fluid and solid particles to improve the free surface behavior. In order to have a more realistic free surface behavior in fluid, a technique is used to detect the free surface boundary particles during the solution process. The results indicate that using the proposed interface algorithm together with CSPM correction, one can predict the dynamic behavior of FGM plates under the impact of fluid very promisingly.

  14. Designing a Beryllium-Free Deep-Ultraviolet Nonlinear Optical Material without a Structural Instability Problem.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Sangen; Kang, Lei; Shen, Yaoguo; Wang, Xiaodong; Asghar, Muhammad Adnan; Lin, Zheshuai; Xu, Yingying; Zeng, Siyuan; Hong, Maochun; Luo, Junhua

    2016-03-09

    A beryllium-free deep-ultraviolet (deep-UV) nonlinear optical (NLO) material K3Ba3Li2Al4B6O20F is developed mainly by the element substitution of Be for Al and Li from Sr2Be2B2O7 that was considered as one of the most promising deep-UV NLO materials. K3Ba3Li2Al4B6O20F preserves the structural merits of Sr2Be2B2O7 and thus exhibits no layering growth tendency and possesses the optical properties required for deep-UV NLO applications, including deep-UV transparency, phase-matchability, and sufficiently large second-harmonic generation (1.5 × KH2PO4). Furthermore, it overcomes the structural instability problem of Sr2Be2B2O7, which is confirmed by the obtainment of large single crystals and phonon dispersion calculations. These attributes make it very attractive for next-generation deep-UV NLO materials. The substitution of Be for Al and Li in beryllium borates provides a new opportunity to design beryllium-free deep-UV NLO materials with good performance.

  15. Environmental problem-solving and land-use management: A proposed structure for Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conacher, Arthur

    1980-09-01

    A three-tiered structure of land-use and environmental management is here proposed for Australia. The structure is based on the idea that “environment” means the environment of people, and that “environmental problems” arise when a change in the interaction between people and their environment leads to conflicts about the use of land and resources. The heterogeneity of society means that a range of human aspirations and value systems must be satisfied by environmental managers. Existing methods of environmental management fail to achieve these objectives, due to inadequate perception of environmental problems by decision-makers, and the inability of currently available impact assessment techniques to resolve human conflicts associated with the use of land and resources. The main work of planning and managing land use and the environment would be carried out by regional authorities, supported by federal and state policy. Examples are given of moves towards regional administration in England and Wales, Western Australia, Australia and New Zealand. Community participation in the decision-making process is essential and can be achieved by electoral representation to the authoritative bodies and through procedures that ensure informed public comment on planning proposals.

  16. Key Problems in Organizing and Structuring University Research in Vietnam: The Lack of an Effective Research "Behaviour Formalization" System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nguyen, Huong Thi Lan; Meek, Vincent Lynn

    2016-01-01

    Structure and organization seems to be at the root of many of the questions raised about institutional behaviour; however, with respect to research on university capacity building, few studies have examined research organizational problems, particularly in developing countries. This study investigates academic reactions to the structure and…

  17. Error and Uncertainty in the Structure of a Model: A Philosophical Perspective (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, B.; Lin, Z.

    2009-12-01

    Working before the advent of the now commonplace computational model, American pragmatist philosopher Lewis held that there were three elements to the growth of knowledge: the set of concepts; the given data; and those acts which reconcile the data with the concepts. Today, we might call this third element the matter of system identification, or, more precisely, model structure identification. We review briefly the historical developments in dealing with structural error, structural uncertainty, and structural change in models of the behavior of environmental systems. Our focus, however, is on scientific visualization of model structure and the way in which such can assist the process of model structure identification. It is obvious that there has been literally a huge expansion over the decades in our capacity to realize Lewis’s “set of concepts”, as in the ever expanding scope and complexity of our computer-based models, i.e., very high order models (or VHOMs). Together with the oncoming environmental cyber-infrastructure, including novel sensors and sensor technologies, the Environmental Observatories (EOs) of the US National Science Foundation (NSF) share the collective ambition of bringing unprecedented streams of observations to bear on Environmental Science in the decades to come. In short, we can expect a yet further massive expansion in the “given data”. Under such prospects, it has to be the case that Lewis’s “acts” — system identification and, more especially, model structure identification — will likewise be presented with new opportunities for progress and (just as much) confronted with new barriers to be overcome in achieving such progress. Current developments in addressing some of these problems of model structure identification are illustrated using a field case study of nutrient cycling and biomass dynamics in a manipulated aquaculture pond and a simple, hypothetical, biotechnical system. We employ the latter for sharpening our

  18. [Gender identity disorder and related sexual behavior problems in children and adolescents: from the perspective of development and child psychiatry].

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    exaggerates to gender-related problems. However, these views do not explain all cases; true comorbidity of ASD and GID should be considered. A full assessment including evaluation of the family, school, and social environment is essential as other emotional and behavioral problems are very common and unresolved issues in the child's environment are often present e. g., loss. Separation problems are particularly common in the younger group. Intervention should aim to assist development, particularly that of gender identity. It should focus on ameliorating the comorbid problems and difficulties in the child's life and reducing the distress experienced by the child.

  19. Nonlinear dynamics and neo-piagetian theories in problem solving: perspectives on a new epistemology and theory development.

    PubMed

    Stamovlasis, Dimitrios

    2011-04-01

    In this study, an attempt is made to integrate Nonlinear Dynamical Systems theory and neo-Piagetian theories applied to creative mental processes, such as problem solving. A catastrophe theory model is proposed, which implements three neo-Piagetian constructs as controls: the functional M-capacity as asymmetry and logical thinking and the degree of field dependence independence as bifurcation. Data from achievement scores of students in tenth grade physics were analyzed using dynamic difference equations and statistical regression techniques. The cusp catastrophe model proved superior comparing to the pre-post linear counterpart and demonstrated nonlinearity at the behavioral level. The nonlinear phenomenology, such as hysteresis effects and bifurcation, is explained by an analysis, which provides a causal interpretation via the mathematical theory of self-organization and thus building bridges between NDS-theory concepts and neo-Piagetian theories. The contribution to theory building is made, by also addressing the emerging philosophical, - ontological and epistemological- questions about the processes of problem solving and creativity.

  20. "Teacher Talk": The Problems, Perspectives and Possibilities of Developing a Comprehensive Sexual Health Education Curriculum for Australian Muslim Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanjakdar, Fida

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports on a study that examines how a group of teachers at a Victorian Islamic College deliberated on how to develop an appropriate sexual health education curriculum for their Muslim students. Teachers found themselves challenged by the current restrictive curriculum structures, policies and practices at their school. They also found…

  1. Factor structure and item level psychometrics of the Social Problem Solving Inventory-Revised: Short Form in traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Li, Chih-Ying; Waid-Ebbs, Julia; Velozo, Craig A; Heaton, Shelley C

    2016-01-01

    Social problem-solving deficits characterise individuals with traumatic brain injury (TBI), and poor social problem solving interferes with daily functioning and productive lifestyles. Therefore, it is of vital importance to use the appropriate instrument to identify deficits in social problem solving for individuals with TBI. This study investigates factor structure and item-level psychometrics of the Social Problem Solving Inventory-Revised: Short Form (SPSI-R:S), for adults with moderate and severe TBI. Secondary analysis of 90 adults with moderate and severe TBI who completed the SPSI-R:S was performed. An exploratory factor analysis (EFA), principal components analysis (PCA) and Rasch analysis examined the factor structure and item-level psychometrics of the SPSI-R:S. The EFA showed three dominant factors, with positively worded items represented as the most definite factor. The other two factors are negative problem-solving orientation and skills; and negative problem-solving emotion. Rasch analyses confirmed the three factors are each unidimensional constructs. It was concluded that the total score interpretability of the SPSI-R:S may be challenging due to the multidimensional structure of the total measure. Instead, we propose using three separate SPSI-R:S subscores to measure social problem solving for the TBI population.

  2. A fundamental approach to the problem of domain decomposition in structured grid generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piperni, Pasquale

    2003-10-01

    A new approach is presented for the automation of structured grid generation in multiply-connected domains. In this approach, the domain decomposition problem is cast as a classical boundary value problem in which the mesh topology is defined through the imposition of appropriate boundary conditions on the domain boundaries. The automation of the domain decomposition process is achieved by transferring it from the physical space to the topological space, where it is amenable to a rigorous solution. Once the domain is decomposed in the topological space, the mesh is generated in the physical space via the solution of a non-linear elliptic partial differential operator which takes into account the curvature of the physical space. The forms of the decomposition surfaces are obtained as part of the solution of the differential operator. The latter is solved iteratively in a system of overlapping sub-domains in which the decomposition surfaces are left floating, and in which only the shape of the domain boundaries and the point distribution thereon influence the form of the final mesh. It is shown that the proper representation of domain curvature is an essential element to the success of the domain decomposition strategy. In any curved space, the curvature of the decomposition surfaces must closely mirror the curvature of the space in order to yield a high quality mesh. Since the decomposition of the multiply-connected domain is done in the topological space, the curvature of the physical space must be re-injected into the system through the solution of an appropriate differential operator. A new mathematical formulation is derived for this purpose and takes the form of a new forcing function in the elliptic grid generation equations. This new Curvature term is completely general and can be applied to both two- and three-dimensional domains of arbitrary shape. The combination of the new grid generation equations and the domain decomposition strategy provides a

  3. [Violence and impunity in check: problems and perspectives under the optics of the forensic anthropology in Brazil].

    PubMed

    Lessa, Andrea

    2009-01-01

    Forensic anthropology is playing an increasingly important role facing violence and impunity in many countries. A research performed at police stations of Civil Police and Forensic Institutes of six Brazilian capitals demonstrated that the practice of recover and positive identification of human remains has been neglected in different levels. The main problem is the lack of specific training of the professionals that accomplish the expertise in field and laboratory, but also the fact that no anthropological database of disappeared people is available. As a result of this situation, an expressive number of human remains leave the forensic institutes without positive identification, and criminal inquiries of homicides stay without resolution, contributing to the aggravation of the violence and impunity scenery that devastates the country.

  4. Limitations of cadaveric organ donation on judicial cases and problems confronted in autopsy: Istanbul data in comparative perspective.

    PubMed

    Arslan, M N; Esen Melez, I; Melez, D O; Cavlak, M; Gur, A

    2014-04-01

    Organ transplantation is one of the most important services of modern medicine to the humanity. In judicial death cases the interaction between judicial needs and transplantation needs is inevitable and both should be provided in a short time before the decomposition of the body. Thus, the description of this interaction and the algorithm which should be carried out to manage these cases are important. Aim of this study is to determine the problems confronted in forensic autopsies and to determine what to do for both judicial processes' and cadaveric organ donations' not becoming limited due to each other. With these aims, autopsy case archive of the Council of Forensic Medicine Istanbul Morgue Department was reviewed, between the years 2009 and 2011, to reveal the number of organ donors among autopsy cases and also to find out the judicial problems confronted during autopsies. Among 12,016 judicial death cases referred to Istanbul Morgue Department in 3 years, 35 cases were found to have undergone cadaveric solid organ harvesting procedure and 307 cases cornea-only harvesting procedure. Manner of deaths for organ donor cases were blunt trauma due to traffic accident in 20 cases, firearm injury in 3 cases, stabbing in 2 cases, suspicious criminal battery in 4 cases and fatal falls in 5 cases. Only 1 case was suspected to have died due to high dose insulin administration. Through the whole data presented in this study, it can be concluded that consulting with the Forensic Medicine Expert not only for the autopsies but also during the clinical process of a judicial case, who is a candidate to be an organ donor, is absolutely important. The early contribution of the Forensic Medicine Expert would provide help to plan both the judicial process and the transplantation process which needs urgent decisions. A Forensic Medicine Expert may be an organ harvest team member performing initial investigations on the cause of death and collecting some of the toxicological

  5. Clustering analysis of the ground-state structure of the vertex-cover problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barthel, Wolfgang; Hartmann, Alexander K.

    2004-12-01

    Vertex cover is one of the classical NP-complete problems in theoretical computer science. A vertex cover of a graph is a subset of vertices such that for each edge at least one of the two endpoints is contained in the subset. When studied on Erdös-Rényi random graphs (with connectivity c ) one observes a threshold behavior: In the thermodynamic limit the size of the minimal vertex cover is independent of the specific graph. Recent analytical studies show that on the phase boundary, for small connectivities cstructure of the solution landscape. For this purpose, we have also developed an algorithm, which allows the calculation of the backbone, without the need to enumerate all solutions. We study exact solutions found with a branch-and-bound algorithm as well as configurations obtained via a Monte Carlo simulation. We analyze the cluster structure of the solution landscape by direct clustering of the states, by analyzing the eigenvalue spectrum of correlation matrices and by using a hierarchical clustering method. All results are compatible with a change at c=e . For small connectivities, the solutions are collected in a finite small number of clusters, while the number of clusters diverges slowly with system size for larger connectivities and replica symmetry breaking, but not one-step replica symmetry breaking (1-RSB) occurs.

  6. Class Differences in Family Problem Solving: The Effects of Verbal Ability, Hierarchical Structure, and Role Expectations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tallman, Irving; Miller, Gary

    1974-01-01

    Reports on a study which used propositions drawn from small group problem-solving research, combined and modified, to explain social class differences in family problem solving with externally generated, rule-bound, conjunctive, puzzle-like problems. (Author/SF)

  7. Psychosocial Problems among Truant Youths: A Multi-Group, Exploratory Structural Equation Modeling Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dembo, Richard; Briones-Robinson, Rhissa; Barrett, Kimberly; Winters, Ken C.; Ungaro, Rocio; Karas, Lora; Wareham, Jennifer; Belenko, Steven

    2012-01-01

    Truant youths represent a critical group needing problem-oriented research and involvement in effective services. The limited number of studies on the psychosocial functioning of truant youths have focused on one or a few problem areas, rather than examining comorbid problem behaviors. The present study addresses the need to examine the…

  8. A Cultural Perspective on the Structure of Student Interest in Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ainley, Mary; Ainley, John

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we examine the nature of interest in science as represented in the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) 2006 data. We discuss the interconnections between measures of knowledge, affect, and value as components of interest in science. Working from a perspective acknowledging that many of the models of motivation…

  9. Child Development within Culturally Structured Environments. Volume 3: Comparative-Cultural and Constructivist Perspectives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valsiner, Jaan, Ed.

    Using a comparative-cultural perspective, this collection of essays examines the co-constructivist nature of human development in culturally organized environments. The contributions also cover a large age span--infancy to adulthood. Chapters in part 1 cover two different directions in the study of early adult-infant interaction from a comparative…

  10. Addiction in developmental perspective: influence of conduct disorder severity, subtype, and attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder on problem severity and comorbidity in adults with opioid dependence.

    PubMed

    Carpentier, Pieter-Jan; Knapen, Lieke J M; van Gogh, Mijke T; Buitelaar, Jan K; De Jong, Cornelis A J

    2012-01-01

    This retrospective cross-sectional study examines whether conduct disorder and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder are associated with problem severity and psychiatric comorbidity in 193 middle-aged, opioid-dependent patients. Conduct disorder history, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, psychiatric comorbidity, and problem severity were assessed by structured interviews and validated instruments. A conduct disorder history was confirmed in 116 (60.1%) participants. Conduct disorder patients had significantly higher problem severity scores, more frequent comorbid substance use disorders, and more severe psychiatric comorbidity. Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder was found to increase the risk for psychiatric comorbidity. Conduct disorder persistence is a useful model for elucidating complex psychiatric comorbidity of opioid-dependent patients.

  11. The problem of effect size heterogeneity in meta-analytic structural equation modeling.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jia Joya; Downes, Patrick E; Carter, Kameron M; O'Boyle, Ernest H

    2016-10-01

    Scholars increasingly recognize the potential of meta-analytic structural equation modeling (MASEM) as a way to build and test theory (Bergh et al., 2016). Yet, 1 of the greatest challenges facing MASEM researchers is how to incorporate and model meaningful effect size heterogeneity identified in the bivariate meta-analysis into MASEM. Unfortunately, common MASEM approaches in applied psychology (i.e., Viswesvaran & Ones, 1995) fail to account for effect size heterogeneity. This means that MASEM effect sizes, path estimates, and overall fit values may only generalize to a small segment of the population. In this research, we quantify this problem and introduce a set of techniques that retain both the true score relationships and the variability surrounding those relationships in estimating model parameters and fit indices. We report our findings from simulated data as well as from a reanalysis of published MASEM studies. Results demonstrate that both path estimates and overall model fit indices are less representative of the population than existing MASEM research would suggest. We suggest 2 extension MASEM techniques that can be conducted using online software or in R, to quantify the stability of model estimates across the population and allow researchers to better build and test theory. (PsycINFO Database Record

  12. Low Dimensional Tools for Flow-Structure Interaction Problems: Application to Micro Air Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmit, Ryan F.; Glauser, Mark N.; Gorton, Susan A.

    2003-01-01

    A low dimensional tool for flow-structure interaction problems based on Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD) and modified Linear Stochastic Estimation (mLSE) has been proposed and was applied to a Micro Air Vehicle (MAV) wing. The method utilizes the dynamic strain measurements from the wing to estimate the POD expansion coefficients from which an estimation of the velocity in the wake can be obtained. For this experiment the MAV wing was set at five different angles of attack, from 0 deg to 20 deg. The tunnel velocities varied from 44 to 58 ft/sec with corresponding Reynolds numbers of 46,000 to 70,000. A stereo Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) system was used to measure the wake of the MAV wing simultaneously with the signals from the twelve dynamic strain gauges mounted on the wing. With 20 out of 2400 POD modes, a reasonable estimation of the flow flow was observed. By increasing the number of POD modes, a better estimation of the flow field will occur. Utilizing the simultaneously sampled strain gauges and flow field measurements in conjunction with mLSE, an estimation of the flow field with lower energy modes is reasonable. With these results, the methodology for estimating the wake flow field from just dynamic strain gauges is validated.

  13. Combined aerodynamic and structural dynamic problem emulating routines (CASPER): Theory and implementation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, William H.

    1985-01-01

    The Combined Aerodynamic and Structural Dynamic Problem Emulating Routines (CASPER) is a collection of data-base modification computer routines that can be used to simulate Navier-Stokes flow through realistic, time-varying internal flow fields. The Navier-Stokes equation used involves calculations in all three dimensions and retains all viscous terms. The only term neglected in the current implementation is gravitation. The solution approach is of an interative, time-marching nature. Calculations are based on Lagrangian aerodynamic elements (aeroelements). It is assumed that the relationships between a particular aeroelement and its five nearest neighbor aeroelements are sufficient to make a valid simulation of Navier-Stokes flow on a small scale and that the collection of all small-scale simulations makes a valid simulation of a large-scale flow. In keeping with these assumptions, it must be noted that CASPER produces an imitation or simulation of Navier-Stokes flow rather than a strict numerical solution of the Navier-Stokes equation. CASPER is written to operate under the Parallel, Asynchronous Executive (PAX), which is described in a separate report.

  14. From video to computation of biological fluid-structure interaction problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dillard, Seth I.; Buchholz, James H. J.; Udaykumar, H. S.

    2016-04-01

    This work deals with the techniques necessary to obtain a purely Eulerian procedure to conduct CFD simulations of biological systems with moving boundary flow phenomena. Eulerian approaches obviate difficulties associated with mesh generation to describe or fit flow meshes to body surfaces. The challenges associated with constructing embedded boundary information, body motions and applying boundary conditions on the moving bodies for flow computation are addressed in the work. The overall approach is applied to the study of a fluid-structure interaction problem, i.e., the hydrodynamics of swimming of an American eel, where the motion of the eel is derived from video imaging. It is shown that some first-blush approaches do not work, and therefore, careful consideration of appropriate techniques to connect moving images to flow simulations is necessary and forms the main contribution of the paper. A combination of level set-based active contour segmentation with optical flow and image morphing is shown to enable the image-to-computation process.

  15. Invariants and Other Structural Properties of Biochemical Models as a Constraint Satisfaction Problem

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background We present a way to compute the minimal semi-positive invariants of a Petri net representing a biological reaction system, as resolution of a Constraint Satisfaction Problem. The use of Petri nets to manipulate Systems Biology models and make available a variety of tools is quite old, and recently analyses based on invariant computation for biological models have become more and more frequent, for instance in the context of module decomposition. Results In our case, this analysis brings both qualitative and quantitative information on the models, in the form of conservation laws, consistency checking, etc. thanks to finite domain constraint programming. It is noticeable that some of the most recent optimizations of standard invariant computation techniques in Petri nets correspond to well-known techniques in constraint solving, like symmetry-breaking. Moreover, we show that the simple and natural encoding proposed is not only efficient but also flexible enough to encompass sub/sur-invariants, siphons/traps, etc., i.e., other Petri net structural properties that lead to supplementary insight on the dynamics of the biochemical system under study. Conclusions A simple implementation based on GNU-Prolog's finite domain solver, and including symmetry detection and breaking, was incorporated into the BIOCHAM modelling environment and in the independent tool Nicotine. Some illustrative examples and benchmarks are provided. PMID:22642806

  16. Iterative solution of multiple radiation and scattering problems in structural acoustics using the BL-QMR algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Malhotra, M.

    1996-12-31

    Finite-element discretizations of time-harmonic acoustic wave problems in exterior domains result in large sparse systems of linear equations with complex symmetric coefficient matrices. In many situations, these matrix problems need to be solved repeatedly for different right-hand sides, but with the same coefficient matrix. For instance, multiple right-hand sides arise in radiation problems due to multiple load cases, and also in scattering problems when multiple angles of incidence of an incoming plane wave need to be considered. In this talk, we discuss the iterative solution of multiple linear systems arising in radiation and scattering problems in structural acoustics by means of a complex symmetric variant of the BL-QMR method. First, we summarize the governing partial differential equations for time-harmonic structural acoustics, the finite-element discretization of these equations, and the resulting complex symmetric matrix problem. Next, we sketch the special version of BL-QMR method that exploits complex symmetry, and we describe the preconditioners we have used in conjunction with BL-QMR. Finally, we report some typical results of our extensive numerical tests to illustrate the typical convergence behavior of BL-QMR method for multiple radiation and scattering problems in structural acoustics, to identify appropriate preconditioners for these problems, and to demonstrate the importance of deflation in block Krylov-subspace methods. Our numerical results show that the multiple systems arising in structural acoustics can be solved very efficiently with the preconditioned BL-QMR method. In fact, for multiple systems with up to 40 and more different right-hand sides we get consistent and significant speed-ups over solving the systems individually.

  17. Perspectives in the application of residual dipolar couplings in the structure elucidation of weakly aligned small molecules.

    PubMed

    Schmidts, Volker

    2017-01-01

    This perspective article aims to review the general methodology in the application of residual dipolar couplings (RDCs) in the structure elucidation of small molecules and give the author's view on challenges for future applications. Recent improvements in the availability of alignment media, new pulse sequences for the measurement of couplings and improvements in the analysis software have garnered widespread interest in the technique. However, further generalization is needed in order to make RDC analysis into a truly "routine" method. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Medicinal mushrooms for glycemic control in diabetes mellitus: history, current status, future perspectives, and unsolved problems (review).

    PubMed

    Lo, Hui-Chen; Wasser, Solomon P

    2011-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a chronic metabolic disease characterized by hyperglycemia with defects in insulin secretion and/or insulin resistance. Despite great efforts that have been made in the understanding and management of diabetes, its prevalence continues to grow. Recent discoveries have opened up an exciting opportunity for developing new types of therapeutics from medicinal mushrooms to control DM and its complications. To date, more and more active components including polysaccharides and their protein complexes, dietary fibers, and other compounds extracted from fruiting bodies, cultured mycelium, or cultured broth of medicinal mushrooms have been reported as to having anti-hyperglycemic activity. These compounds exhibit their antidiabetic activity via different mechanisms. This article presents an overview of the multiple aspects of diabetes mellitus and the efficacy and mechanism of medicinal mushrooms for glucose control in diabetes, including the inhibition of glucose absorption, protection of beta-cell damage, increase of insulin release, enhancement of antioxidant defense, attenuation of inflammation, modulation of carbohydrate metabolism pathway, and regulation of insulin-dependent and insulin-independent signaling pathways. However, there is insufficient evidence to draw definitive conclusions about the efficacy of individual medicinal mushrooms for diabetes. In addition, the wide variability, the lack of standards for production, and the lack of testing protocols to assess product quality are still problems in producing medicinal mushroom products. Moreover, well-designed randomized controlled trials with long-term consumption are needed to guarantee the bioactivity and safety of medicinal mushroom products for diabetic patients.

  19. Studying illicit drug trafficking on Darknet markets: Structure and organisation from a Canadian perspective.

    PubMed

    Broséus, J; Rhumorbarbe, D; Mireault, C; Ouellette, V; Crispino, F; Décary-Hétu, D

    2016-07-01

    Cryptomarkets are online marketplaces that are part of the Dark Web and mainly devoted to the sale of illicit drugs. They combine tools to ensure anonymity of participants with the delivery of products by mail to enable the development of illicit drug trafficking. Using data collected on eight cryptomarkets, this study provides an overview of the Canadian illicit drug market. It seeks to inform about the most prevalent illicit drugs vendors offer for sale and preferred destination countries. Moreover, the research gives an insight into the structure and organisation of distribution networks existing online. In particular, we provide information about how vendors are diversifying and replicating across marketplaces. We inform on the number of listings each vendor manages, the number of cryptomarkets they are active on and the products they offer. This research demonstrates the importance of online marketplaces in the context of illicit drug trafficking. It shows how the analysis of data available online may elicit knowledge on criminal activities. Such knowledge is mandatory to design efficient policy for monitoring or repressive purposes against anonymous marketplaces. Nevertheless, trafficking on Dark Net markets is difficult to analyse based only on digital data. A more holistic approach for investigating this crime problem should be developed. This should rely on a combined use and interpretation of digital and physical data within a single collaborative intelligence model.

  20. Rationale for a GRAVSAT-MAGSAT mission: A perspective on the problem of external/internal transient field effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hermance, J. F.

    1985-01-01

    The Earth's magnetic field at MAGSAT altitudes not only has contributions from the Earth's core and static magnetization in the lithosphere, but also from external electric current systems in the ionosphere and magnetosphere, along with induced electric currents flowing in the conducting earth. Hermance assessed these last two contributions; the external time-varying fields and their associated internal counter-parts which are electromagnetically induced. It is readily recognized that during periods of magnetic disturbance, external currents often contribute from 10's to 100's of nanoteslas (gammas) to observations of the Earth's field. Since static anomalies from lithospheric magnetization are of this same magnitude or less, these external source fields must be taken into account when attempting to delineate gross structural features in the crust.

  1. Structural Damage Prediction and Analysis for Hypervelocity Impact. BUMPERII Suggestion and Problem Reports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    In the course of preparing the SD_SURF space debris analysis code, several problems and possibilities for improvement of the BUMPERII code were documented and sent to MSFC. These suggestions and problem reports are included here as a part of the contract final report. This includes reducing BUMPERII memory requirements, compiling problems with BUMPERII, FORTRAN-lint analysis of BUMPERII, and error in function PRV in BUMPERII.

  2. Can ill-structured problems reveal beliefs about medical knowledge and knowing? A focus-group approach

    PubMed Central

    Roex, Ann; Clarebout, Geraldine; Dory, Valerie; Degryse, Jan

    2009-01-01

    Background Epistemological beliefs (EB) are an individual's cognitions about knowledge and knowing. In several non-medical domains, EB have been found to contribute to the way individuals reason when faced with ill-structured problems (i.e. problems with no clear-cut, right or wrong solutions). Such problems are very common in medical practice. Determining whether EB are also influential in reasoning processes with regard to medical issues to which there is no straightforward answer, could have implications for medical education. This study focused on 2 research questions: 1. Can ill-structured problems be used to elicit general practice trainees' and trainers' EB? and 2. What are the views of general practice trainees and trainers about knowledge and how do they justify knowing? Methods 2 focus groups of trainees (n = 18) were convened on 3 occasions during their 1st year of postgraduate GP training. 2 groups of GP trainers (n = 11) met on one occasion. Based on the methodology of the Reflective Judgement Interview (RJI), participants were asked to comment on 11 ill-structured problems. The sessions were audio taped and transcribed and an adapted version of the RJI scoring rules was used to assess the trainees' reasoning about ill-structured problems. Results Participants made a number of statements illustrating their EB and their importance in clinical reasoning. The level of EB varied widely form one meeting to another and depending on the problem addressed. Overall, the EB expressed by trainees did not differ from those of trainers except on a particular ill-structured problem regarding shoulder pain. Conclusion The use of focus groups has entailed some difficulties in the interpretation of the results, but a number of preliminary conclusions can be drawn. Ill-structured medical problems can be used to elicit EB. Most trainees and trainers displayed pre-reflective and quasi-reflective EB. The way trainees and doctors view and justify knowledge are likely to be

  3. The 3D structure of the nucleon in momentum space: status and perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacchetta, Alessandro

    2017-01-01

    The distribution of partons inside the nucleon can be described in terms of partonic Transverse Momentum Distributions (TMDs), which extend the concept of standard parton distribution functions (PDFs). We aim at obtaining a precise determination of these quantities based on global fits. A concise overview of this active field of research will be presented, illustrating a selection of recent achievements, current open issues, and future perspectives. Supported by European Research Council (ERC) grant agreement No. 647981, 3DSPIN.

  4. Large and small-scale structures and the dust energy balance problem in spiral galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saftly, W.; Baes, M.; De Geyter, G.; Camps, P.; Renaud, F.; Guedes, J.; De Looze, I.

    2015-04-01

    The interstellar dust content in galaxies can be traced in extinction at optical wavelengths, or in emission in the far-infrared. Several studies have found that radiative transfer models that successfully explain the optical extinction in edge-on spiral galaxies generally underestimate the observed FIR/submm fluxes by a factor of about three. In order to investigate this so-called dust energy balance problem, we use two Milky Way-like galaxies produced by high-resolution hydrodynamical simulations. We create mock optical edge-on views of these simulated galaxies (using the radiative transfer code SKIRT), and we then fit the parameters of a basic spiral galaxy model to these images (using the fitting code FitSKIRT). The basic model includes smooth axisymmetric distributions along a Sérsic bulge and exponential disc for the stars, and a second exponential disc for the dust. We find that the dust mass recovered by the fitted models is about three times smaller than the known dust mass of the hydrodynamical input models. This factor is in agreement with previous energy balance studies of real edge-on spiral galaxies. On the other hand, fitting the same basic model to less complex input models (e.g. a smooth exponential disc with a spiral perturbation or with random clumps), does recover the dust mass of the input model almost perfectly. Thus it seems that the complex asymmetries and the inhomogeneous structure of real and hydrodynamically simulated galaxies are a lot more efficient at hiding dust than the rather contrived geometries in typical quasi-analytical models. This effect may help explain the discrepancy between the dust emission predicted by radiative transfer models and the observed emission in energy balance studies for edge-on spiral galaxies.

  5. Coding for quality measurement: the relationship between hospital structural characteristics and coding accuracy from the perspective of quality measurement.

    PubMed

    Rangachari, Pavani

    2007-04-16

    This study examines the relationship between hospital structural characteristics and coding accuracy from the perspective of quality measurement. To measure coding accuracy for quality measurement, the study utilizes the "present on admission" indicator, a data element in the New York state hospital administrative database. This data element is used by hospitals across New York state to indicate if a particular secondary diagnosis is "present on admission," "not present on admission," or "uncertain." Since the accurate distinction between comorbidities (present at admission) and complications (not present at admission,) is critical for risk adjustment in comparative hospital quality reports, this study uses the occurrence of the value "uncertain" in the "present on admission" indicator as the primary measure of coding accuracy. A lower occurrence of the value "uncertain" is considered to be reflective of better coding accuracy. Moreover, since coding accuracy of the "present on admission" indicator links back to the accuracy of physician documentation, a focus on the occurrence of the value "uncertain," also helps gain insight into physician documentation efficacy within the facility. By utilizing this approach, therefore, the study serves the twin purpose of 1) addressing the gap in the literature with respect to large-scale studies of "coding for quality," and 2) providing insight into the structural characteristics of institutions that are likely facing organizational challenges of physician documentation from the perspective of quality measurement.

  6. Structuring an Adult Learning Environment. Part IV: Establishing an Environment for Problem Solving.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frankel, Alan; Brennan, James

    Through the years, many researchers have advanced theories of problem solving. Probably the best definition of problem solving to apply to adult learning programs is Wallas' (1926) four-stage theory. The stages are (1) a preparation, (2) an incubation period, (3) a moment of illumination, and (4) final application or verification of the solution.…

  7. Hypersonic structures: An aerodynamicist's perspective, or one man's dream is another man's nightmare

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watts, J. D.; Jackson, L. R.; Hunt, J. L.

    1978-01-01

    The relationship between hypersonic aerodynamic and structural design is reviewed. The evolution of the hypersonic vehicle design is presented. Propulsion systems, structural materials, and fuels are emphasized.

  8. Issues in Implementing a Structured Problem-Based Learning Strategy in a Volcano Unit: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Hyunju; Bae, Sungah

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to understand how an 8th grade science class used a structured problem-based learning (PBL) strategy to study volcanoes and to discuss some of the issues that science teachers might encounter when designing and implementing the PBL strategy. This study took place at Collins Middle School, which is located in a…

  9. Identifying Configurations of Perceived Teacher Autonomy Support and Structure: Associations with Self-Regulated Learning, Motivation and Problem Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vansteenkiste, Maarten; Sierens, Eline; Goossens, Luc; Soenens, Bart; Dochy, Filip; Mouratidis, Athanasios; Aelterman, Nathalie; Haerens, Leen; Beyers, Wim

    2012-01-01

    Grounded in self-determination theory, the aim of this study was (a) to examine naturally occurring configurations of perceived teacher autonomy support and clear expectations (i.e., a central aspect of teacher structure), and (b) to investigate associations with academic motivation, self-regulated learning, and problem behavior. Based on…

  10. A method and knowledge base for automated inference of patient problems from structured data in an electronic medical record

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Justine; Feblowitz, Joshua C; Maloney, Francine L; Wilcox, Allison R; Ramelson, Harley Z; Schneider, Louise I; Bates, David W

    2011-01-01

    Background Accurate knowledge of a patient's medical problems is critical for clinical decision making, quality measurement, research, billing and clinical decision support. Common structured sources of problem information include the patient problem list and billing data; however, these sources are often inaccurate or incomplete. Objective To develop and validate methods of automatically inferring patient problems from clinical and billing data, and to provide a knowledge base for inferring problems. Study design and methods We identified 17 target conditions and designed and validated a set of rules for identifying patient problems based on medications, laboratory results, billing codes, and vital signs. A panel of physicians provided input on a preliminary set of rules. Based on this input, we tested candidate rules on a sample of 100 000 patient records to assess their performance compared to gold standard manual chart review. The physician panel selected a final rule for each condition, which was validated on an independent sample of 100 000 records to assess its accuracy. Results Seventeen rules were developed for inferring patient problems. Analysis using a validation set of 100 000 randomly selected patients showed high sensitivity (range: 62.8–100.0%) and positive predictive value (range: 79.8–99.6%) for most rules. Overall, the inference rules performed better than using either the problem list or billing data alone. Conclusion We developed and validated a set of rules for inferring patient problems. These rules have a variety of applications, including clinical decision support, care improvement, augmentation of the problem list, and identification of patients for research cohorts. PMID:21613643

  11. Effect of structure in problem based learning on science teaching efficacy beliefs and science content knowledge of elementary preservice teachers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasser, Selena Kay

    This study examined the effects of differing amounts of structure within the problem based learning instructional model on elementary preservice teachers' science teaching efficacy beliefs, including personal science teaching efficacy and science teaching outcome expectancy, and content knowledge acquisition. This study involved sixty (60) undergraduate elementary preservice teachers enrolled in three sections of elementary science methods classes at a large Midwestern research university. This study used a quasi-experimental nonequivalent design to collect and analyze both quantitative and qualitative data. Participants completed instruments designed to assess science teaching efficacy beliefs, science background, and demographic data. Quantitative data from pre and posttests was obtained using the science teaching efficacy belief instrument-preservice (STEBI-B) developed by Enochs and Riggs (1990) and modified by Bleicher (2004). Data collection instruments also included a demographic questionnaire, an analytic rubric, and a structured interview; both created by the researcher. Quantitative data was analyzed by conducting ANCOVA, paired samples t-test, and independent samples t-test. Qualitative data was analyzed using coding and themes. Each of the treatment groups received the same problem scenario, one group experienced a more structured PBL setting, and one group experienced a limited structure PBL setting. Research personnel administered pre and posttests to determine the elementary preservice teachers' science teaching efficacy beliefs. The results show elementary preservice teachers'science teaching efficacy beliefs can be influence by the problem based learning instructional model. This study did not find that the amount of structure in the form of core ideas to consider and resources for further research increased science teaching efficacy beliefs in this sample. Results from the science content knowledge rubric indicated that structure can increase

  12. An ALE formulation of embedded boundary methods for tracking boundary layers in turbulent fluid-structure interaction problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farhat, Charbel; Lakshminarayan, Vinod K.

    2014-04-01

    Embedded Boundary Methods (EBMs) for Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) are usually constructed in the Eulerian setting. They are particularly attractive for complex Fluid-Structure Interaction (FSI) problems characterized by large structural motions and deformations. They are also critical for flow problems with topological changes and FSI problems with cracking. For all of these problems, the alternative Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) methods are often unfeasible because of the issue of mesh crossovers. However for viscous flows, Eulerian EBMs for CFD do not track the boundary layers around dynamic rigid or flexible bodies. Consequently, the application of these methods to viscous FSI problems requires either a high mesh resolution in a large part of the computational fluid domain, or adaptive mesh refinement. Unfortunately, the first option is computationally inefficient, and the second one is labor intensive. For these reasons, an alternative approach is proposed in this paper for maintaining all moving boundary layers resolved during the simulation of a turbulent FSI problem using an EBM for CFD. In this approach, which is simple and computationally reasonable, the underlying non-body-fitted mesh is rigidly translated and/or rotated in order to track the rigid component of the motion of the dynamic obstacle. Then, the flow computations away from the embedded surface are performed using the ALE framework, and the wall boundary conditions are treated by the chosen Eulerian EBM for CFD. Hence, the solution of the boundary layer tracking problem proposed in this paper can be described as an ALE implementation of a given EBM for CFD. Its basic features are illustrated with the Large Eddy Simulation using a non-body-fitted mesh of a turbulent flow past an airfoil in heaving motion. Its strong potential for the solution of challenging FSI problems at reasonable computational costs is also demonstrated with the simulation of turbulent flows past a family of

  13. Relativity of Scales: Application to AN Endo-Perspective of Temporal Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nottale, Laurent; Timar, Pierre

    The theory of scale relativity is an extension of the principle of relativity to scale transformations of the reference system, in a fractal geometry framework where coordinates become explicitly dependent on resolutions. Applied to an observer perspective, it means that the scales of length and of time, usually attributed to the observed object as being intrinsic to it, have actually no existence by themselves, since only the ratio between an external scale and an internal scale, which serves as unit, is meaningful. Oliver Sacks' observations on patients suffering from temporal and spatial distortions in Parkinson's and encephalitis lethargica disease offer a particularly relevant field of application for such a scale-relativistic view.

  14. Smart and hybrid materials: perspectives for their use in textile structures for better health care.

    PubMed

    Carosio, Stefano; Monero, Alessandra

    2004-01-01

    High tech materials such as Shape Memory Alloys can be effectively integrated in textiles, thus providing multifunctional garments with potential application to the health care industry or for simply improving the quality of life. The objective of the present paper is to describe the development of a novel hybrid fabric with embedded shape memory (Nitinol) wires, and the related clothing application with the capability of recovering any shape depending upon the environment and becoming superelastic. The use of these smart garments for biomedical applications will be illustrated, thus opening new perspectives for enhanced health care provision.

  15. On the interaction structure of linear multi-input feedback control systems. M.S. Thesis; [problem solving, lattices (mathematics)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong, P. K.

    1975-01-01

    The closely-related problems of designing reliable feedback stabilization strategy and coordinating decentralized feedbacks are considered. Two approaches are taken. A geometric characterization of the structure of control interaction (and its dual) was first attempted and a concept of structural homomorphism developed based on the idea of 'similarity' of interaction pattern. The idea of finding classes of individual feedback maps that do not 'interfere' with the stabilizing action of each other was developed by identifying the structural properties of nondestabilizing and LQ-optimal feedback maps. Some known stability properties of LQ-feedback were generalized and some partial solutions were provided to the reliable stabilization and decentralized feedback coordination problems. A concept of coordination parametrization was introduced, and a scheme for classifying different modes of decentralization (information, control law computation, on-line control implementation) in control systems was developed.

  16. Rediscovery in a Course for Nonscientists: Use of Molecular Models to Solve Classical Structural Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, Gordon W.

    1975-01-01

    Describes exercises using simple ball and stick models which students with no chemistry background can solve in the context of the original discovery. Examples include the tartaric acid and benzene problems. (GS)

  17. Computational Methods for Nonlinear Dynamics Problems in Solid and Structural Mechanics: Models of Dynamic Frictional Phenomena in Metallic Structures.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-03-31

    generation, and the resulting thermomechanical response. Examine role of thermomechanical effects in damage processes such as fatigue and wear. 4.) Conduct...deformations, rotations, large strains, and thermomechanical inter- actions, with due consideration of frictional resistance. 2.) Conduct preliminary...studies of simple quasi-static problems with the characteristics listed above. 3.) Investigate dynamic friction mechanisms, their role in heat

  18. Development and Applications of a Modular Parallel Process for Large Scale Fluid/Structures Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guruswamy, Guru P.; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A modular process that can efficiently solve large scale multidisciplinary problems using massively parallel supercomputers is presented. The process integrates disciplines with diverse physical characteristics by retaining the efficiency of individual disciplines. Computational domain independence of individual disciplines is maintained using a meta programming approach. The process integrates disciplines without affecting the combined performance. Results are demonstrated for large scale aerospace problems on several supercomputers. The super scalability and portability of the approach is demonstrated on several parallel computers.

  19. Development and Applications of a Modular Parallel Process for Large Scale Fluid/Structures Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guruswamy, Guru P.; Byun, Chansup; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A modular process that can efficiently solve large scale multidisciplinary problems using massively parallel super computers is presented. The process integrates disciplines with diverse physical characteristics by retaining the efficiency of individual disciplines. Computational domain independence of individual disciplines is maintained using a meta programming approach. The process integrates disciplines without affecting the combined performance. Results are demonstrated for large scale aerospace problems on several supercomputers. The super scalability and portability of the approach is demonstrated on several parallel computers.

  20. A modular perspective of protein structures: application to fragment based loop modeling.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Fuentes, Narcis; Fiser, Andras

    2013-01-01

    Proteins can be decomposed into supersecondary structure modules. We used a generic definition of supersecondary structure elements, so-called Smotifs, which are composed of two flanking regular secondary structures connected by a loop, to explore the evolution and current variety of structure building blocks. Here, we discuss recent observations about the saturation of Smotif geometries in protein structures and how it opens new avenues in protein structure modeling and design. As a first application of these observations we describe our loop conformation modeling algorithm, ArchPred that takes advantage of Smotifs classification. In this application, instead of focusing on specific loop properties the method narrows down possible template conformations in other, often not homologous structures, by identifying the most likely supersecondary structure environment that cradles the loop. Beyond identifying the correct starting supersecondary structure geometry, it takes into account information of fit of anchor residues, sterical clashes, match of predicted and observed dihedral angle preferences, and local sequence signal.