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Sample records for perturbative early dark

  1. On dark energy isocurvature perturbation

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Jie; Zhang, Xinmin; Li, Mingzhe E-mail: limz@nju.edu.cn

    2011-06-01

    Determining the equation of state of dark energy with astronomical observations is crucially important to understand the nature of dark energy. In performing a likelihood analysis of the data, especially of the cosmic microwave background and large scale structure data the dark energy perturbations have to be taken into account both for theoretical consistency and for numerical accuracy. Usually, one assumes in the global fitting analysis that the dark energy perturbations are adiabatic. In this paper, we study the dark energy isocurvature perturbation analytically and discuss its implications for the cosmic microwave background radiation and large scale structure. Furthermore, with the current astronomical observational data and by employing Markov Chain Monte Carlo method, we perform a global analysis of cosmological parameters assuming general initial conditions for the dark energy perturbations. The results show that the dark energy isocurvature perturbations are very weakly constrained and that purely adiabatic initial conditions are consistent with the data.

  2. Perturbation-induced dynamics of dark solitons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kivshar, Yuri S.; Yang, Xiaoping

    1994-02-01

    We study analytically and numerically the effect of perturbations on (spatial and temporal) dark optical solitons. Our purpose is to elaborate a general analytical approach to describe the dynamics of dark solitons in the presence of physically important effects which break integrability of the primary nonlinear Schrödinger equation. We show that the corresponding perturbation theory differs for the cases of constant and varying backgrounds which support the dark solitons. We present a general formalism describing the perturbation-induced dynamics for both cases and also analyze the influence of several physically important effects, such as linear and two-photon absorption, Raman self-induced scattering, gain with saturation, on the propagation of the dark soliton. As we show, the perturbation-induced dynamics of a dark soliton may be treated as a result of the combined effect of the background evolution and internal soliton dynamics, the latter being characterized by the soliton phase angle. A similar approach is applied to the problem of the dark-soliton propagation on a finite-width background. We analyze adiabatic modification of a dark pulse propagating on a dispersively spreading finite-width background, and we prove analytically that a frequency chirp of the background does not affect the soliton motion. As a matter of fact, the results obtained describe the perturbation-induced dynamics of dark solitons in the so-called adiabatic approximation and, as we show for all the cases analyzed, they are in excellent agreement with direct numerical simulations of the corresponding perturbed nonlinear Schrödinger equation, provided the effects produced by the emitted radiation are small.

  3. Cosmological explosions from cold dark matter perturbations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scherrer, Robert J.

    1992-01-01

    The cosmological-explosion model is examined for a universe dominated by cold dark matter in which explosion seeds are produced from the growth of initial density perturbations of a given form. Fragmentation of the exploding shells is dominated by the dark-matter potential wells rather than the self-gravity of the shells, and particular conditions are required for the explosions to bootstrap up to very large scales. The final distribution of dark matter is strongly correlated with the baryons on small scales, but uncorrelated on large scales.

  4. Anisotropic perturbations due to dark energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battye, Richard A.; Moss, Adam

    2006-08-01

    A variety of observational tests seem to suggest that the Universe is anisotropic. This is incompatible with the standard dogma based on adiabatic, rotationally invariant perturbations. We point out that this is a consequence of the standard decomposition of the stress-energy tensor for the cosmological fluids, and that rotational invariance need not be assumed, if there is elastic rigidity in the dark energy. The dark energy required to achieve this might be provided by point symmetric domain wall network with P/ρ=-2/3, although the concept is more general. We illustrate this with reference to a model with cubic symmetry and discuss various aspects of the model.

  5. Dark matter dispersion tensor in perturbation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aviles, Alejandro

    2016-03-01

    We compute the dark matter velocity dispersion tensor up to third order in perturbation theory using the Lagrangian formalism, revealing growing solutions at the third and higher orders. Our results are general and can be used for any other perturbative formalism. As an application, corrections to the matter power spectrum are calculated, and we find that some of them have the same structure as those in the effective field theory of large-scale structure, with "EFT-like" coefficients that grow quadratically with the linear growth function and are further suppressed by powers of the logarithmic linear growth factor f ; other corrections present additional k dependence. Due to the velocity dispersions, there exists a free-streaming scale that suppresses the whole 1-loop power spectrum. Furthermore, we find that as a consequence of the nonlinear evolution, the free-streaming length is shifted towards larger scales, wiping out more structure than that expected in linear theory. Therefore, we argue that the formalism developed here is better suited for a perturbation treatment of warm dark matter or neutrino clustering, where the velocity dispersion effects are well known to be important. We discuss implications related to the nature of dark matter.

  6. Computing model independent perturbations in dark energy and modified gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Battye, Richard A.; Pearson, Jonathan A. E-mail: jonathan.pearson@durham.ac.uk

    2014-03-01

    We present a methodology for computing model independent perturbations in dark energy and modified gravity. This is done from the Lagrangian for perturbations, by showing how field content, symmetries, and physical principles are often sufficient ingredients for closing the set of perturbed fluid equations. The fluid equations close once ''equations of state for perturbations'' are identified: these are linear combinations of fluid and metric perturbations which construct gauge invariant entropy and anisotropic stress perturbations for broad classes of theories. Our main results are the proof of the equation of state for perturbations presented in a previous paper, and the development of the required calculational tools.

  7. Non-Gaussian isocurvature perturbations in dark radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Kawakami, Etsuko; Kawasaki, Masahiro; Miyamoto, Koichi; Nakayama, Kazunori; Sekiguchi, Toyokazu E-mail: kawasaki@icrr.u-tokyo.ac.jp E-mail: kazunori@hep-th.phys.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2012-07-01

    We study non-Gaussian properties of the isocurvature perturbations in the dark radiation, which consists of the active neutrinos and extra light species, if exist. We first derive expressions for the bispectra of primordial perturbations which are mixtures of curvature and dark radiation isocurvature perturbations. We also discuss CMB bispectra produced in our model and forecast CMB constraints on the non-linearity parameters based on the Fisher matrix analysis. Some concrete particle physics motivated models are presented in which large isocurvature perturbations in extra light species and/or the neutrino density isocurvature perturbations as well as their non-Gaussianities may be generated. Thus detections of non-Gaussianity in the dark radiation isocurvature perturbation will give us an opportunity to identify the origin of extra light species and lepton asymmetry.

  8. How clustering dark energy affects matter perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehrabi, A.; Basilakos, S.; Pace, F.

    2015-09-01

    The rate of structure formation in the Universe is different in homogeneous and clustered dark energy models. The degree of dark energy clustering depends on the magnitude of its effective sound speed c2_eff and for c2_eff=0 dark energy clusters in a similar fashion to dark matter while for c2_eff=1 it stays (approximately) homogeneous. In this paper we consider two distinct equations of state for the dark energy component, wd = const and w_d=w_0+w_1(z/1+z) with c2_eff as a free parameter and we try to constrain the dark energy effective sound speed using current available data including Type Ia supernovae, baryon acoustic oscillation, cosmic microwave background shift parameter (Planck and WMAP), Hubble parameter, big bang nucleosynthesis and the growth rate of structures fσ8(z). At first we derive the most general form of the equations governing dark matter and dark energy clustering under the assumption that c2_eff=const. Finally, performing an overall likelihood analysis we find that the likelihood function peaks at c2_eff=0; however, the dark energy sound speed is degenerate with respect to the cosmological parameters, namely Ωm and wd.

  9. Perturbations from cosmic strings in cold dark matter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albrecht, Andreas; Stebbins, Albert

    1992-01-01

    A systematic linear analysis of the perturbations induced by cosmic strings in cold dark matter is presented. The power spectrum is calculated and it is found that the strings produce a great deal of power on small scales. It is shown that the perturbations on interesting scales are the result of many uncorrelated string motions, which indicates a much more Gaussian distribution than was previously supposed.

  10. Perturbations from cosmic strings in cold dark matter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albrecht, Andreas; Stebbins, Albert

    1991-01-01

    A systematic linear analysis of the perturbations induced by cosmic strings in cold dark matter is presented. The power spectrum is calculated and it is found that the strings produce a great deal of power on small scales. It is shown that the perturbations on interesting scales are the result of many uncorrelated string motions, which indicates a much more Gaussian distribution than was previously supposed.

  11. Cosmic-string-induced hot dark matter perturbations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Dalen, Anthony

    1990-01-01

    This paper investigates the evolution of initially relativistic matter, radiation, and baryons around cosmic string seed perturbations. A detailed analysis of the linear evolution of spherical perturbations in a universe is carried out, and this formalism is used to study the evolution of perturbations around a sphere of uniform density and fixed radius, approximating a loop of cosmic string. It was found that, on scales less than a few megaparsec, the results agree with the nonrelativistic calculation of previous authors. On greater scales, there is a deviation approaching a factor of 2-3 in the perturbation mass. It is shown that a scenario with cosmic strings, hot dark matter, and a Hubble constant greater than 75 km/sec per Mpc can generally produce structure on the observed mass scales and at the appropriate time: 1 + z = about 4 for galaxies and 1 + z = about 1.5 for Abell clusters.

  12. Structure formation in inhomogeneous Early Dark Energy models

    SciTech Connect

    Batista, R.C.; Pace, F. E-mail: francesco.pace@port.ac.uk

    2013-06-01

    We study the impact of Early Dark Energy fluctuations in the linear and non-linear regimes of structure formation. In these models the energy density of dark energy is non-negligible at high redshifts and the fluctuations in the dark energy component can have the same order of magnitude of dark matter fluctuations. Since two basic approximations usually taken in the standard scenario of quintessence models, that both dark energy density during the matter dominated period and dark energy fluctuations on small scales are negligible, are not valid in such models, we first study approximate analytical solutions for dark matter and dark energy perturbations in the linear regime. This study is helpful to find consistent initial conditions for the system of equations and to analytically understand the effects of Early Dark Energy and its fluctuations, which are also verified numerically. In the linear regime we compute the matter growth and variation of the gravitational potential associated with the Integrated Sachs-Wolf effect, showing that these observables present important modifications due to Early Dark Energy fluctuations, though making them more similar to the ΛCDM model. We also make use of the Spherical Collapse model to study the influence of Early Dark Energy fluctuations in the nonlinear regime of structure formation, especially on δ{sub c} parameter, and their contribution to the halo mass, which we show can be of the order of 10%. We finally compute how the number density of halos is modified in comparison to the ΛCDM model and address the problem of how to correct the mass function in order to take into account the contribution of clustered dark energy. We conclude that the inhomogeneous Early Dark Energy models are more similar to the ΛCDM model than its homogeneous counterparts.

  13. Sub-horizon evolution of cold dark matter perturbations through dark matter-dark energy equivalence epoch

    SciTech Connect

    Piattella, O.F.; Martins, D.L.A.; Casarini, L. E-mail: denilsonluizm@gmail.com

    2014-10-01

    We consider a cosmological model of the late universe constituted by standard cold dark matter plus a dark energy component with constant equation of state w and constant effective speed of sound. By neglecting fluctuations in the dark energy component, we obtain an equation describing the evolution of sub-horizon cold dark matter perturbations through the epoch of dark matter-dark energy equality. We explore its analytic solutions and calculate an exact w-dependent correction for the dark matter growth function, logarithmic growth function and growth index parameter through the epoch considered. We test our analytic approximation with the numerical solution and find that the discrepancy is less than 1% for 0k = during the cosmic evolution up to a = 100.

  14. Semi-dynamical perturbations of unified dark energy

    SciTech Connect

    Lombriser, Lucas; Taylor, Andy E-mail: ant@roe.ac.uk

    2015-11-01

    Linear cosmological perturbations of a large class of modified gravity and dark energy models can be unified in the effective field theory of cosmic acceleration, encompassing Horndeski scalar-tensor theories and beyond. The fully available model space inherent to this formalism cannot be constrained by measurements in the quasistatic small-scale regime alone. To facilitate the analysis of modifications from the concordance model beyond this limit, we introduce a semi-dynamical treatment extrapolated from the evolution of perturbations at a pivot scale of choice. At small scales, and for Horndeski theories, the resulting modifications recover a quasistatic approximation but account for corrections to it near the Hubble scale. For models beyond Horndeski gravity, we find that the velocity field and time derivative of the spatial metric potential can generally not be neglected, even in the small-scale limit. We test the semi-dynamical approximation against the linear perturbations of a range of dark energy and modified gravity models, finding good agreement between the two.

  15. Dark matter perturbations and viscosity: A causal approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acquaviva, Giovanni; John, Anslyn; Pénin, Aurélie

    2016-08-01

    The inclusion of dissipative effects in cosmic fluids modifies their clustering properties and could have observable effects on the formation of large-scale structures. We analyze the evolution of density perturbations of cold dark matter endowed with causal bulk viscosity. The perturbative analysis is carried out in the Newtonian approximation and the bulk viscosity is described by the causal Israel-Stewart (IS) theory. In contrast to the noncausal Eckart theory, we obtain a third-order evolution equation for the density contrast that depends on three free parameters. For certain parameter values, the density contrast and growth factor in IS mimic their behavior in Λ CDM when z ≥1 . Interestingly, and contrary to intuition, certain sets of parameters lead to an increase of the clustering.

  16. Linear perturbation constraints on multi-coupled dark energy

    SciTech Connect

    Piloyan, Arpine; Marra, Valerio; Amendola, Luca; Baldi, Marco E-mail: valerio.marra@me.com E-mail: l.amendola@thphys.uni-heidelberg.de

    2014-02-01

    The Multi-coupled Dark Energy (McDE) scenario has been recently proposed as a specific example of a cosmological model characterized by a non-standard physics of the dark sector of the universe that nevertheless gives an expansion history which does not significantly differ from the one of the standard ΛCDM model. Thanks to a dynamical screening mechanism, in fact, the interaction between the Dark Energy field and the Dark Matter sector is effectively suppressed at the background level during matter domination. As a consequence, background observables cannot discriminate a McDE cosmology from ΛCDM for a wide range of model parameters. On the other hand, linear perturbations are expected to provide tighter bounds due to the existence of attractive and repulsive fifth-forces associated with the dark interactions. In this work, we present the first constraints on the McDE scenario obtained by comparing the predicted evolution of linear density perturbations with a large compilation of recent data sets for the growth rate fσ{sub 8}, including 6dFGS, LRG, BOSS, WiggleZ and VIPERS. Confirming qualitative expectations, growth rate data provide much tighter bounds on the model parameters as compared to the extremely loose bounds that can be obtained when only the background expansion history is considered. In particular, the 95% confidence level on the coupling strength |β| is reduced from |β| ≤ 83 (background constraints only) to |β| ≤ 0.88 (background and linear perturbation constraints). We also investigate how these constraints further improve when using data from future wide-field surveys such as supernova data from LSST and growth rate data from Euclid-type missions. In this case the 95% confidence level on the coupling further reduce to |β| ≤ 0.85. Such constraints are in any case still consistent with a scalar fifth-force of gravitational strength, and we foresee that tighter bounds might be possibly obtained from the investigation of nonlinear

  17. Cold dark matter isocurvature perturbations: Constraints and model selection

    SciTech Connect

    Sollom, Ian; Hobson, Michael P.; Challinor, Anthony

    2009-06-15

    We use cosmic microwave background radiation (WMAP and ACBAR), large-scale structure (SDSS luminous red galaxies), and supernova (SNLS) data to constrain the possible contribution of cold dark matter isocurvature modes to the primordial perturbation spectrum. We consider three different admixtures with adiabatic modes in a flat {lambda}CDM cosmology with no tensor modes: fixed correlations with a single spectral index; general correlations with a single spectral index; and general correlations with independent spectral indices for each mode. For fixed correlations, we verify the WMAP analysis for fully uncorrelated and anticorrelated modes, while for general correlations with a single index we find a small tightening of the constraint on the fractional contribution of isocurvature modes to the observed power over earlier work. For generally correlated modes and independent spectral indices our results are quite different to previous work, needing a doubling of prior space for the isocurvature spectral index in order to explore adequately the region of high likelihood. Standard Markov-Chain Monte Carlo techniques proved to be inadequate for this particular application; instead, our results are obtained with nested sampling. We also use the Bayesian evidence, calculated simply in the nested-sampling algorithm, to compare models, finding the pure adiabatic model to be favored over all our isocurvature models. This favoring is such that the logarithm of the Bayes factor, lnB<-2 for all models and lnB<-5 in the cases of fully anticorrelated modes with a single spectral index (the curvaton scenario) and generally correlated modes with a single spectral index.

  18. Early-matter-like dark energy and the cosmic microwave background

    SciTech Connect

    Aurich, R.; Lustig, S. E-mail: sven.lustig@uni-ulm.de

    2016-01-01

    Early-matter-like dark energy is defined as a dark energy component whose equation of state approaches that of cold dark matter (CDM) at early times. Such a component is an ingredient of unified dark matter (UDM) models, which unify the cold dark matter and the cosmological constant of the ΛCDM concordance model into a single dark fluid. Power series expansions in conformal time of the perturbations of the various components for a model with early-matter-like dark energy are provided. They allow the calculation of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy from the primordial initial values of the perturbations. For a phenomenological UDM model, which agrees with the observations of the local Universe, the CMB anisotropy is computed and compared with the CMB data. It is found that a match to the CMB observations is possible if the so-called effective velocity of sound c{sub eff} of the early-matter-like dark energy component is very close to zero. The modifications on the CMB temperature and polarization power spectra caused by varying the effective velocity of sound are studied.

  19. The signature of dark energy perturbations in galaxy cluster surveys

    SciTech Connect

    Abramo, L.R.; Batista, R.C.; Rosenfeld, R. E-mail: rbatista@fma.if.usp.br

    2009-07-01

    Models of dynamical dark energy unavoidably possess fluctuations in the energy density and pressure of that new component. In this paper we estimate the impact of dark energy fluctuations on the number of galaxy clusters in the Universe using a generalization of the spherical collapse model and the Press-Schechter formalism. The observations we consider are several hypothetical Sunyaev-Zel'dovich and weak lensing (shear maps) cluster surveys, with limiting masses similar to ongoing (SPT, DES) as well as future (LSST, Euclid) surveys. Our statistical analysis is performed in a 7-dimensional cosmological parameter space using the Fisher matrix method. We find that, in some scenarios, the impact of these fluctuations is large enough that their effect could already be detected by existing instruments such as the South Pole Telescope, when priors from other standard cosmological probes are included. We also show how dark energy fluctuations can be a nuisance for constraining cosmological parameters with cluster counts, and point to a degeneracy between the parameter that describes dark energy pressure on small scales (the effective sound speed) and the parameters describing its equation of state.

  20. Growth of perturbations in an expanding universe with Bose-Einstein condensate dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chavanis, P. H.

    2012-01-01

    We study the growth of perturbations in an expanding Newtonian universe with Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) dark matter. We first ignore special relativistic effects and derive a differential equation that governs the evolution of the density contrast in the linear regime. This equation, which takes quantum pressure and self-interaction into account, can be solved analytically in several cases. We argue that an attractive self-interaction can enhance the Jeans instability and fasten the formation of structures. Then, we take pressure effects (coming from special relativity) into account in the evolution of the cosmic fluid and add the contribution of radiation, baryons, and dark energy (cosmological constant). For BEC dark matter with repulsive self-interaction (positive pressure) the scale factor increases more rapidly than in the standard ΛCDM model where dark matter is pressureless, while it increases less rapidly for BEC dark matter with attractive self-interaction (negative pressure). We study the linear development of the perturbations in these two cases and show that the perturbations grow faster in BEC dark matter than in pressureless dark matter. Finally, we consider a "dark fluid" with a generalized equation of state p = (αρ + kρ2)c2 having a component p = kρ2c2 similar to BEC dark matter and a component p = αρc2 mimicking the effect of the cosmological constant (dark energy). We find optimal parameters that give good agreement with the standard ΛCDM model that assumes a finite cosmological constant.

  1. Cosmological perturbations during the Bose-Einstein condensation of dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Freitas, R.C.; Gonçalves, S.V.B. E-mail: sergio.vitorino@pq.cnpq.br

    2013-04-01

    In the present work, we analyze the evolution of the scalar and tensorial perturbations and the quantities relevant for the physical description of the Universe, as the density contrast of the scalar perturbations and the gravitational waves energy density during the Bose-Einstein condensation of dark matter. The behavior of these parameters during the Bose-Einstein phase transition of dark matter is analyzed in details. To study the cosmological dynamics and evolution of scalar and tensorial perturbations in a Universe with and without cosmological constant we use both analytical and numerical methods. The Bose-Einstein phase transition modifies the evolution of gravitational waves of cosmological origin, as well as the process of large-scale structure formation.

  2. Temporal morphology and cap formation in Acetabularia--I. Light-dark cycle perturbations.

    PubMed

    Vanden Driessche, T

    1984-01-01

    Cap formation, a major developmental process in the alga Acetabularia, is influenced by a single perturbation of the entraining light-dark schedule and thus, presumably, of the circadian rhythms. This perturbation is brought about several weeks before cap formation, the most conspicuous expression of morphogenesis in Acetabularia. The effect is more pronounced on cap formation than on growth. It varies in importance with the circadian time at which the perturbation was brought about. The effect is dependent on the developmental state of the alga: transfer carried out during the logarithmic phase of growth produces a delay whose importance decreases with time. When carried out during the phase of slow terminal growth, the transfer induces a transitory acceleration of cap formation. When the algae approach their final length, no effect is elicited. Photoperiodism seems to be involved.

  3. Early massive clusters and the bouncing coupled dark energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldi, Marco

    2012-02-01

    The abundance of the most massive objects in the Universe at different epochs is a very sensitive probe of the cosmic background evolution and of the growth history of density perturbations, and could provide a powerful tool to distinguish between a cosmological constant and a dynamical dark energy field. In particular, the recent detection of very massive clusters of galaxies at high redshifts has attracted significant interest as a possible indication of a failure of the standard Λ cold dark matter model. Several attempts have been made in order to explain such detections in the context of non-Gaussian scenarios or interacting dark energy models, showing that both these alternative cosmologies predict an enhanced number density of massive clusters at high redshifts, possibly alleviating the tension. However, all the models proposed so far also overpredict the abundance of massive clusters at the present epoch, and are therefore in contrast with observational bounds on the low-redshift halo mass function. In this paper we present for the first time a new class of interacting dark energy models that simultaneously account for an enhanced number density of massive clusters at high redshifts and for both the standard cluster abundance at the present time and the standard power spectrum normalization at cosmic microwave background (CMB). The key feature of this new class of models is the 'bounce' of the dark energy scalar field on the cosmological constant barrier at relatively recent epochs. We present the background and linear perturbations evolution of the model, showing that the standard amplitude of density perturbations is recovered both at CMB and at the present time, and we demonstrate by means of large N-body simulations that our scenario predicts an enhanced number of massive clusters at high redshifts without affecting the present halo abundance. Such behaviour could not arise in non-Gaussian models, and is therefore a characteristic feature of the

  4. The Dark Matter Conspiracy in Early-type Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanowsky, Aaron J.; Cappellari, Michele; Brodie, Jean P.; SLUGGS Team

    2016-01-01

    The extended mass profiles of early-type galaxies, including their dark matter distributions, have remained uncertain many decades after dark matter was established in late-type galaxies, owing to the lack of cold gas disks as dynamical tracers. We have combined kinematics data from the ATLAS^3D and SLUGGS surveys over wide fields in 14 early-type galaxies, providing strong and unique constraints on their mass distributions out to 4 effective radii. We find ubiquitous near-isothermal total mass profiles in these galaxies, from their central to outer regions. This result is remarkably similar to the constant rotation curves found for late-type galaxies, and implies a "conspiracy" between stellar and dark matter distributions in both galaxy types. Further examination of the implications for dark matter distributions will be presented.

  5. The sensitivity of BAO dark energy constraints to general isocurvature perturbations

    SciTech Connect

    Kasanda, S. Muya; Zunckel, C.; Moodley, K.; Bassett, B.A.; Okouma, P. E-mail: caroline.zunckel@gmail.com E-mail: bruce.a.bassett@gmail.com

    2012-07-01

    Baryon Acoustic Oscillation (BAO) surveys will be a leading method for addressing the dark energy challenge in the next decade. We explore in detail the effect of allowing for small amplitude admixtures of general isocurvature perturbations in addition to the dominant adiabatic mode. We find that non-adiabatic initial conditions leave the sound speed unchanged but instead excite different harmonics. These harmonics couple differently to Silk damping, altering the form and evolution of acoustic waves in the baryon-photon fluid prior to decoupling. This modifies not only the scale on which the sound waves imprint onto the baryon distribution, which is used as the standard ruler in BAO surveys, but also the shape, width and height of the BAO peak. We discuss these effects in detail and show how more general initial conditions impact our interpretation of cosmological data in dark energy studies. We find that the inclusion of these additional isocurvature modes leads to a decrease in the Dark Energy Task Force figure of merit (FoM) by 46% i.e., FoM{sub ISO} = 0.54 × FoM{sub AD} and 53% for the BOSS and ADEPT experiments respectively when considered in conjunction with PLANK data. We also show that the incorrect assumption of adiabaticity has the potential to bias our estimates of the dark energy parameters by 2.7σ (2.2σ) for a single correlated isocurvature mode (CDM isocurvature), and up to 4.9σ (5.7σ) for three correlated isocurvature modes in the case of the BOSS (ADEPT) experiment. We find that the use of the large scale structure data in conjunction with CMB data improves our ability to measure the contributions of different modes to the initial conditions by as much as 95% for certain modes in the fully correlated case.

  6. Luminous and Dark Matter in Early-type Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonnenfeld, Alessandro

    2015-10-01

    Three open problems in our understanding of early-type galaxies are 1) identifying the process(es) responsible for their rapid size evolution, 2) accurately constraining the stellar IMF and its variations in the population, 3) measuring the density profile of their dark matter halo. We use strong lensing as the main diagnostic tool to address these issues. We first dissected a massive elliptical galaxy in its stellar and dark matter components, measuring both its IMF and the inner slope of the dark matter halo. We then collected a sample of 45 strong lenses in the redshift interval 0.2 < z < 0.8 and used them, in combination with lenses from other surveys, to measure the slope of the total density profile, the stellar IMF and the dark matter mass in the population of massive early-type galaxies, and their time evolution. Finally, we used our measurements of the evolution of the density slope to test a galaxy growth scenario based on purely dissipationless mergers. Our main results are: the stellar IMF of massive early-type galaxies is significantly heavier than that of the Milky Way and correlates with galaxy mass; the dark matter halo has a steep slope in at least one system; more compact galaxies have less dark matter than their extended counterparts at fixed redshift and stellar mass; early-type galaxies evolve while keeping the slope of their total density profile approximately constant. This last result cannot be reproduced with purely dissipationless mergers, therefore a little amount of dissipation is required.

  7. Discriminating dark energy models by using the Statefinder hierarchy and the growth rate of matter perturbations

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Jun; Yang, Rongjia; Chen, Bohai E-mail: yangrj08@gmail.com

    2014-12-01

    We apply the Statefinder hierarchy and the growth rate of matter perturbations to discriminate modified Chaplygin gas (MCG), generalized Chaplygin gas (GCG), superfluid Chaplygin gas (SCG), purely kinetic k-essence (PKK), and ΛCDM model. We plot the evolutional trajectories of these models in the Statefinder plane and in the composite diagnostic plane. We find that GCG, MCG, SCG, PKK, and ΛCDM can be distinguished well from each other at the present epoch by using the composite diagnostic (ε(z), S{sup (1)}{sub 5}). Using other combinations, such as (S{sup (1)}{sub 3}, S{sup (1)}{sub 4}), (S{sup (1)}{sub 3}, S{sub 5}), (ε(z), S{sup (1)}{sub 3}), and (ε(z), S{sub 4}), some of these five dark energy models cannot be distinguished.

  8. Can we distinguish early dark energy from a cosmological constant?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Difu; Baugh, Carlton M.

    2016-07-01

    Early dark energy (EDE) models are a class of quintessence dark energy with a dynamically evolving scalar field which display a small but non-negligible amount of dark energy at the epoch of matter-radiation equality. Compared with a cosmological constant, the presence of dark energy at early times changes the cosmic expansion history and consequently the shape of the linear theory power spectrum and potentially other observables. We constrain the cosmological parameters in the EDE cosmology using recent measurements of the cosmic microwave background and baryon acoustic oscillations. The best-fitting models favour no EDE; here we consider extreme examples which are in mild tension with current observations in order to explore the observational consequences of a maximally allowed amount of EDE. We study the non-linear evolution of cosmic structure in EDE cosmologies using large-volume N-body simulations. Many large-scale structure statistics are found to be very similar between the Λ cold dark matter (ΛCDM) and EDE models. We find that EDE cosmologies predict fewer massive haloes in comparison to ΛCDM, particularly at high redshifts. The most promising way to distinguish EDE from ΛCDM is to measure the power spectrum on large scales, where differences of up to 15 per cent are expected.

  9. Dark Matter Production in Non-Standard Early Universe Cosmologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rehagen, Thomas Joseph

    Many dark matter candidates, including asymmetric Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs) and sterile neutrinos, are produced in the very early Universe, prior to Big Bang Nucleosynthesis (BBN). We show that the relic abundance of asymmetric WIMPs and sterile neutrinos can be very sensitive to the expansion rate of the Universe prior to BBN. In particular, we find that if the production of asymmetric WIMPs occurs during a non-standard cosmological phase, a larger WIMP annihilation cross section is required to produce the present dark matter density than if the WIMPs were produced during a standard, radiation dominated phase. Because of this, the present dark matter annihilation rate could be larger than that of symmetric dark matter produced in the standard cosmology. We also show that if the production of sterile neutrinos occurs during a non-standard cosmological phase, the relic number density of sterile neutrinos could be reduced with respect to the number expected in the standard cosmology, consequently relaxing current bounds on active-sterile neutrino mixing. Finally, we examine whether low reheating temperature cosmologies are allowed by current Cosmic Microwave Background measurements. We find the allowed range of reheating temperatures using monomial and binomial inflationary potentials, and a variety of reheating models. We show that an inflationary model with a φ1 potential and canonical reheating allows the possibility that dark matter could be produced during the reheating epoch, instead of when the Universe is radiation dominated.

  10. Distribution function approach to redshift space distortions. Part IV: perturbation theory applied to dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Vlah, Zvonimir; Seljak, Uroš; Baldauf, Tobias; McDonald, Patrick; Okumura, Teppei E-mail: seljak@physik.uzh.ch E-mail: teppei@ewha.ac.kr

    2012-11-01

    We develop a perturbative approach to redshift space distortions (RSD) using the phase space distribution function approach and apply it to the dark matter redshift space power spectrum and its moments. RSD can be written as a sum over density weighted velocity moments correlators, with the lowest order being density, momentum density and stress energy density. We use standard and extended perturbation theory (PT) to determine their auto and cross correlators, comparing them to N-body simulations. We show which of the terms can be modeled well with the standard PT and which need additional terms that include higher order corrections which cannot be modeled in PT. Most of these additional terms are related to the small scale velocity dispersion effects, the so called finger of god (FoG) effects, which affect some, but not all, of the terms in this expansion, and which can be approximately modeled using a simple physically motivated ansatz such as the halo model. We point out that there are several velocity dispersions that enter into the detailed RSD analysis with very different amplitudes, which can be approximately predicted by the halo model. In contrast to previous models our approach systematically includes all of the terms at a given order in PT and provides a physical interpretation for the small scale dispersion values. We investigate RSD power spectrum as a function of μ, the cosine of the angle between the Fourier mode and line of sight, focusing on the lowest order powers of μ and multipole moments which dominate the observable RSD power spectrum. Overall we find considerable success in modeling many, but not all, of the terms in this expansion. This is similar to the situation in real space, but predicting power spectrum in redshift space is more difficult because of the explicit influence of small scale dispersion type effects in RSD, which extend to very large scales.

  11. Evolution of perturbations and cosmological constraints in decaying dark matter models with arbitrary decay mass products

    SciTech Connect

    Aoyama, Shohei; Sekiguchi, Toyokazu; Sugiyama, Naoshi; Ichiki, Kiyotomo E-mail: toyokazu.sekiguchi@nagoya-u.jp E-mail: naoshi@nagoya-u.jp

    2014-07-01

    Decaying dark matter (DDM) is a candidate which can solve the discrepancies between predictions of the concordance ΛCDM model and observations at small scales such as the number counts of companion galaxies of the Milky Way and the density profile at the center of galaxies. Previous studies are limited to the cases where the decay particles are massless and/or have almost degenerate masses with that of mother particles. Here we expand the DDM models so that one can consider the DDM with arbitrary lifetime and the decay products with arbitrary masses. We calculate the time evolutions of perturbed phase-space distribution functions of decay products for the first time and study effects of DDM on the temperature anisotropy in the cosmic microwave background and the matter power spectrum at present. From a recent observational estimate of σ{sub 8}, we derive constraints on the lifetime of DDM and the mass ratio between the decay products and DDM. We also discuss implications of the DDM model for the discrepancy in the measurements of σ{sub 8} recently claimed by the Planck satellite collaboration.

  12. Distribution function approach to redshift space distortions. Part V: perturbation theory applied to dark matter halos

    SciTech Connect

    Vlah, Zvonimir; Seljak, Uroš; Okumura, Teppei; Desjacques, Vincent E-mail: seljak@physik.uzh.ch E-mail: Vincent.Desjacques@unige.ch

    2013-10-01

    Numerical simulations show that redshift space distortions (RSD) introduce strong scale dependence in the power spectra of halos, with ten percent deviations relative to linear theory predictions even on relatively large scales (k < 0.1h/Mpc) and even in the absence of satellites (which induce Fingers-of-God, FoG, effects). If unmodeled these effects prevent one from extracting cosmological information from RSD surveys. In this paper we use Eulerian perturbation theory (PT) and Eulerian halo biasing model and apply it to the distribution function approach to RSD, in which RSD is decomposed into several correlators of density weighted velocity moments. We model each of these correlators using PT and compare the results to simulations over a wide range of halo masses and redshifts. We find that with an introduction of a physically motivated halo biasing, and using dark matter power spectra from simulations, we can reproduce the simulation results at a percent level on scales up to k ∼ 0.15h/Mpc at z = 0, without the need to have free FoG parameters in the model.

  13. Rapid Dark Recovery of the Invertebrate Early Receptor Potential

    PubMed Central

    Hillman, Peter; Dodge, F. A.; Hochstein, S.; Knight, B. W.; Minke, B.

    1973-01-01

    The recovery in the dark of the early receptor potential, as a direct manifestation of the state of the visual pigments, has been studied by intracellular recording in the ventral photoreceptors of Limulus and lateral photoreceptors of Balanus. The recovery is exponential with 1/e time constants of about 80 ms at 24°C for both preparations and 1800 ms at 4°C for Balanus. The 24°C rate extrapolates to total recovery of the pigment within 2 s. The later part of the dark adaptation of the late receptor potential, which may take from seconds to minutes in these preparations, appears thus to be unrelated to the state of the pigment. PMID:4713724

  14. Dark Matter Benchmark Models for Early LHC Run-2 Searches. Report of the ATLAS/CMS Dark Matter Forum

    SciTech Connect

    Abercrombie, Daniel

    2015-07-06

    One of the guiding principles of this report is to channel the efforts of the ATLAS and CMS collaborations towards a minimal basis of dark matter models that should influence the design of the early Run-2 searches. At the same time, a thorough survey of realistic collider signals of Dark Matter is a crucial input to the overall design of the search program.

  15. Subionospheric early VLF perturbations observed at Suva: VLF detection of red sprites in the day?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sushil; Kumar, Abhikesh; Rodger, Craig J.

    2008-03-01

    First observations of early Very Low Frequency (VLF) perturbations on signals from NWC (19.8 kHz) and NPM (21.4 kHz) monitored at Suva, in the month of November 2006, are presented. The early/fast, early/slow, early/short (RORD), and step-like early VLF perturbations are observed on signals from both the transmitters. The early/fast VLF events are found to occur more often in the nighttime than in the daytime whereas step-like early events predominantly occur in the daytime. Most of the early VLF events are associated with amplitude changes between 0.2-0.8 dB with only a few cases > 0.8 dB. In general, the recovery time of daytime early/fast VLF events is less when compared to the nighttime early/fast VLF events. The lightning location data provided by the World-Wide Lightning Location Network and broadband VLF data recorded at Suva have been analyzed to identify the location of causative lighting discharges along the great circle paths between transmitter and receiver, and the sferics associated with causative lightning of early VLF events. This research is the first to report both daytime early/fast VLF perturbations with faster recovery and also step-like early VLF perturbations initiated and ended by the lightnings which are most likely associated with red sprites and/or elves occurring in the daytime.

  16. Investigating the role of vibrotactile noise in early response to perturbation.

    PubMed

    Hur, Pilwon; Wan, Yao-Hung; Seo, Na Jin

    2014-06-01

    Timely reaction to perturbation is important in activities of daily living. Modulation of reaction time to and early recovery from perturbation via vibrotactile noise was investigated. It was hypothesized that subthreshold vibrotactile noise applied to the upper extremity can accelerate a person's reaction to and recovery from handle perturbation. This intervention was developed based on previous studies in which the earliest cue available for people to detect handle perturbation was somatosensation detecting changes in pressure on the hand whose sensitivity can improve with subthreshold vibrotactile noise. To induce a handle perturbation, a sudden upward load was applied to the handle that subjects were lightly grasping. Eighteen healthy subjects were instructed to stop the handle from moving up when they detected the perturbation. The muscle reaction time and handle stabilization time with and without vibrotactile noise were determined. The results showed that the muscle reaction time and handle stabilization time significantly decreased by 3 ms ( ) and 6 ms ( ), respectively, when vibrotactile noise was applied to the upper extremity, regardless of where the noise was applied among four different locations within the upper extremity ( p > 0.05). In conclusion, the application of subthreshold vibrotactile noise enhanced persons' muscle reaction time to handle perturbation and led to early recovery from the perturbation. Use of the vibrotactile noise may increase a person's ability to rapidly respond to perturbation of a grasped object in potentially dangerous situations such as holding onto ladder rungs from elevation or manipulating knives.

  17. Early Science Results from the Dark Energy Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, Ashley

    2015-04-01

    The Dark Energy Survey (DES) is a next-generation large galaxy survey designed to unravel the mystery of the nature of the dark energy that powers the current accelerated expansion of the Universe. The DES collaboration built and participated in the installation and commissioning of DECam, a 570 mega-pixel optical and near-infrared camera with a large 3 deg2 field of view, set at the prime focus of the Víctor M. Blanco 4-meter telescope in at the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory in Chile. Using DECam, DES will map 5000 deg2 to a depth IAB ~ 24 and observe designated supernova survey fields at high cadence. These data will allow DES to measure positions, approximate redshifts, and shapes for 300 million galaxies, the light-curves of several thousand supernovae, and the masses of tens of thousands of galaxy clusters. Using these data, DES will use four main probes to study the properties of dark energy: galaxy clustering on large scales, weak gravitational lensing, galaxy-cluster abundance, and supernova distances. I describe the early progress of the survey and provide highlights of the science analyses that have been completed so far. These include: large-scale galaxy clustering measurements; significant detection of a cross-correlation with SPT CMB lensing maps; galaxy-shear and shear-shear correlation function measurements; discoveries of super-luminous supernovae, dozens of strong lenses, and redshift > 6 quasars; and characterization of DES galaxy clusters and SNe1a light-curves.

  18. Central dark matter trends in early-type galaxies .

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tortora, C.; Napolitano, N. R.; Romanowsky, A. J.; Jetzer, Ph.

    We analyze the correlations between the central dark matter content of early-type galaxies and their sizes and ages, using a sample of intermediate-redshift (z˜ 0.2) gravitational lenses from the SLACS survey, and by comparing them to a larger sample of z˜0 galaxies. For a given stellar mass, we find that for galaxies with larger sizes, the DM fraction increases and the mean DM density decreases, consistently with the cuspy halos expected in cosmological formation scenarios. The DM fraction also decreases with stellar age, which can be partially explained by the inverse correlation between size and age. The residual trend may point to systematic dependencies on formation epoch of halo contraction or stellar initial mass functions.

  19. A study of early/slow VLF perturbations observed at Agra, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, Uma; Singh, Ashutosh K.; Singh, Om P.; Singh, Birbal; Saraswat, Vibhav K.

    2016-06-01

    We present here the results of sub-ionospheric VLF perturbations observed on NWC (19.8 kHz) transmitter signal propagating in the Earth-ionosphere waveguide, monitored at our low latitude station Agra. During the period of observation (June-December 2011), we found 89 cases of VLF perturbation, while only 73 cases showing early character associated with strong lightning discharges. Out of 73 events, 64 (~84%) of the early VLF perturbations are found to be early/slow in nature; the remaining 9 events are early/fast. The onset duration of these early/slow VLF perturbations is up to ~ 5 s. A total of 54 observed early events show amplitude change lying between ± 3.0 dB, and phase change ± 12 degree, respectively, and found to occur mainly during nighttime. One of the interesting results we found is that the events with larger recovery time lie far away from the VLF propagation path, while events with smaller duration of recovery are within the ± 50-100 km of signal path. The World Wide Lightning Location Network (WWLLN) data is analysed to find the location of causative lightning and temporal variation. The lightning discharge and associated processes that lead to early VLF events are discussed.

  20. DARK MATTER HEATING AND EARLY CORE FORMATION IN DWARF GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Madau, Piero; Shen, Sijing; Governato, Fabio

    2014-07-01

    We present more results from a fully cosmological ΛCDM simulation of a group of isolated dwarf galaxies that has been shown to reproduce the observed stellar mass and cold gas content, resolved star formation histories, and metallicities of dwarfs in the Local Volume. Here we investigate the energetics and timetable of the cusp-core transformation. As suggested by previous work, supernova-driven gas outflows remove dark matter (DM) cusps and create kiloparsec-size cores in all systems having a stellar mass M {sub *} > 10{sup 6} M {sub ☉}. The {sup D}M core mass removal efficiency{sup —}dark mass ejected per unit stellar mass—ranges today from a few to a dozen, and increases with decreasing host mass. Because dwarfs form the bulk of their stars prior to redshift 1 and the amount of work required for DM heating and core formation scales approximately as M{sub vir}{sup 5/3}, the unbinding of the DM cusp starts early and the formation of cored profiles is not as energetically onerous as previously claimed. DM particles in the cusp typically migrate to 2-3 core radii after absorbing a few percent of the energy released by supernovae. The present-day slopes of the inner DM mass profiles, Γ ≡ dlog M/dlog R ≅ 2.5-3, of the simulated ''Bashful'' and ''Doc'' dwarfs are similar to those measured in the luminous Fornax and Sculptor dwarf spheroidals. None of the simulated galaxies has a circular velocity profile exceeding 20 km s{sup –1} in the inner 1 kpc, implying that supernova feedback is key to solve the ''too-big-to-fail'' problem for Milky Way subhalos.

  1. On the reach of perturbative methods for dark matter density fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldauf, Tobias; Schaan, Emmanuel; Zaldarriaga, Matias

    2016-03-01

    We study the mapping from Lagrangian to Eulerian space in the context of the Effective Field Theory (EFT) of Large Scale Structure. We compute Lagrangian displacements with Lagrangian Perturbation Theory (LPT) and perform the full non-perturbative transformation from displacement to density. When expanded up to a given order, this transformation reproduces the standard Eulerian Perturbation Theory (SPT) at the same order. However, the full transformation from displacement to density also includes higher order terms. These terms explicitly resum long wavelength motions, thus making the resulting density field better correlated with the true non-linear density field. As a result, the regime of validity of this approach is expected to extend that of the Eulerian EFT, and match that of the IR-resummed Eulerian EFT. This approach thus effectively enables a test of the IR-resummed EFT at the field level. We estimate the size of stochastic, non-perturbative contributions to the matter density power spectrum. We find that in our highest order calculation, at redshift z = 0 the power spectrum of the density field is reproduced with an accuracy of 1% (10%) up to k = 0.25 hMpc-1 (k = 0.46 hMpc-1). We believe that the dominant source of the remaining error is the stochastic contribution. Unfortunately, on these scales the stochastic term does not yet scale as k4 as it does in the very low k regime. Thus, modeling this contribution might be challenging.

  2. Dark coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Gavela, M.B.; Hernández, D.; Honorez, L. Lopez; Mena, O.; Rigolin, S. E-mail: d.hernandez@uam.es E-mail: omena@ific.uv.es

    2009-07-01

    The two dark sectors of the universe—dark matter and dark energy—may interact with each other. Background and linear density perturbation evolution equations are developed for a generic coupling. We then establish the general conditions necessary to obtain models free from non-adiabatic instabilities. As an application, we consider a viable universe in which the interaction strength is proportional to the dark energy density. The scenario does not exhibit ''phantom crossing'' and is free from instabilities, including early ones. A sizeable interaction strength is compatible with combined WMAP, HST, SN, LSS and H(z) data. Neutrino mass and/or cosmic curvature are allowed to be larger than in non-interacting models. Our analysis sheds light as well on unstable scenarios previously proposed.

  3. Background history and cosmic perturbations for a general system of self-conserved dynamical dark energy and matter

    SciTech Connect

    Gómez-Valent, Adrià; Karimkhani, Elahe; Solà, Joan E-mail: e.karimkhani91@basu.ac.ir

    2015-12-01

    We determine the Hubble expansion and the general cosmic perturbation equations for a general system consisting of self-conserved matter, ρ{sub m}, and self-conserved dark energy (DE), ρ{sub D}. While at the background level the two components are non-interacting, they do interact at the perturbations level. We show that the coupled system of matter and DE perturbations can be transformed into a single, third order, matter perturbation equation, which reduces to the (derivative of the) standard one in the case that the DE is just a cosmological constant. As a nontrivial application we analyze a class of dynamical models whose DE density ρ{sub D}(H) consists of a constant term, C{sub 0}, and a series of powers of the Hubble rate. These models were previously analyzed from the point of view of dynamical vacuum models, but here we treat them as self-conserved DE models with a dynamical equation of state. We fit them to the wealth of expansion history and linear structure formation data and compare their fit quality with that of the concordance ΛCDM model. Those with C{sub 0}=0 include the so-called ''entropic-force'' and ''QCD-ghost'' DE models, as well as the pure linear model ρ{sub D}∼H, all of which appear strongly disfavored. The models with C{sub 0}≠0 , in contrast, emerge as promising dynamical DE candidates whose phenomenological performance is highly competitive with the rigid Λ-term inherent to the ΛCDM.

  4. Axion as a cold dark matter candidate: analysis to third order perturbation for classical axion

    SciTech Connect

    Noh, Hyerim; Hwang, Jai-chan; Park, Chan-Gyung E-mail: jchan@knu.ac.kr

    2015-12-01

    We investigate aspects of axion as a coherently oscillating massive classical scalar field by analyzing third order perturbations in Einstein's gravity in the axion-comoving gauge. The axion fluid has its characteristic pressure term leading to an axion Jeans scale which is cosmologically negligible for a canonical axion mass. Our classically derived axion pressure term in Einstein's gravity is identical to the one derived in the non-relativistic quantum mechanical context in the literature. We present the general relativistic continuity and Euler equations for an axion fluid valid up to third order perturbation. Equations for axion are exactly the same as that of a zero-pressure fluid in Einstein's gravity except for an axion pressure term in the Euler equation. Our analysis includes the cosmological constant.

  5. Electro-Weak Dark Matter: Non-perturbative effect confronting indirect detections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chun, Eung Jin; Park, Jong-Chul

    2015-11-01

    We update indirect constraints on Electro-Weak Dark Matter (EWDM) considering the Sommerfeld-Ramsauer-Townsend (SRT) effect for its annihilations into a pair of standard model gauge bosons assuming that EWDM accounts for the observed dark matter (DM) relic density for a given DM mass and mass gaps among the multiplet components. For the radiative or smaller mass splitting, the hypercharged triplet and higher multiplet EWDMs are ruled out up to the DM mass ≈ 10- 20 TeV by the combination of the most recent data from AMS-02 (antiproton), Fermi-LAT (gamma-ray), and HESS (gamma-line). The Majorana triplet (wino-like) EWDM can evade all the indirect constraints only around Ramsauer-Townsend dips which can occur for a tiny mass splitting of order 10 MeV or less. In the case of the doublet (Higgsino-like) EWDM, a wide range of its mass ≳ 500 GeV is allowed except Sommerfeld peak regions. Such a stringent limit on the triplet DM can be evaded by employing a larger mass gap of the order of 10 GeV which allows its mass larger than about 1 TeV. However, the future CTA experiment will be able to cover most of the unconstrained parameter space.

  6. Astronomical Constraints on the Duration of Early Jurassic Stages and Global Carbon Cycle and Climatic Perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruhl, M.; Hesselbo, S. P.; Hinnov, L.; Jenkyns, H. C.; Storm, M.; Xu, W.; Riding, J. B.; Ullmann, C. V.

    2015-12-01

    The Early Jurassic (201.3 to 174.1 Ma) is bracketed by the end-Triassic mass extinction and global warming event, and the Toarcian-Aalenian shift to (global) icehouse conditions (McElwain et al., 1999; Hesselbo et al., 2002; Ruhl et al., 2011; Korte et al., in review). It is further marked by the early Toarcian Oceanic Anoxic Event (T-OAE), with possibly the largest exogenic carbon cycle perturbation of the Mesozoic and related perturbations in global geochemical cycles, climate and the environment, which are linked to large igneous province emplacement in the Karoo-Ferrar region (Jenkyns, 2010; Burgess et al., 2015). Furthermore, Early Jurassic continental rifting and the break-up of Pangaea and subsequent Early Jurassic opening of the Hispanic Corridor and Viking Strait respectively linked the equatorial Tethys Ocean to Eastern Panthalassa and the high-latitude Arctic Boreal realm. This initiated changes in (global) ocean currents and Earth's heat distribution and ultimately was followed by the opening of the proto-North Atlantic (Porter et al., 2013; Korte et al., in review). Here, we present high-resolution (sub-precession scale) elemental concentration data from the Mochras borehole (UK), which represents ~1300m of possibly the most complete and expanded lower Jurassic hemi-pelagic marine sedimentary archive known. We construct a floating ~9 Myr astronomical time-scale for the complete Early Jurassic Pliensbachian stage and biozones. Combined with radiometric and astrochronological constraints on early Jurassic stage boundaries, we construct a new Early Jurassic Time-Scale. With this we assess the duration and rate of change of early Jurassic global carbon cycle and climatic perturbations and we asses fundamental changes in the nature and expression of Early Jurassic long (100 - 1000 kyr) eccentricity cycles.

  7. Study of the early signal perturbations due to GJ and Elves using the LWPC code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nait Amor, Samir; Ghalila, Hassen; Bouderba, Yasmina

    2015-04-01

    Early events are a Very Low Frequencies (VLF) signal perturbations recorded during a lightning activity. The properties of these signal perturbations and their association to the lightning peak current and/or Transient Luminous Events (TLEs) were widely studied. In a recently analysis a new early signal perturbations whose recovery time persists for several minutes were discovered. The underlying cause of these events is still unclear. In a recently published work, these events were attributed to the lightning peak current and the type of associated TLE. In others, and newly published papers, analyzes were done where all kind of early events were considered. Statistical results showed that the occurrence of long recovery events is independent of the lightning current amplitude and/or TLEs type. To understand which is the main cause of these events, we analyzed two types of early signal perturbations: One was a typical event (~200s time duration) in association with a Gigantic Jet and the second was a long recovery event in association with an elve recorded on December 12 2009 during the EuroSprite campaign. In addition to the VLF signal analysis, we used the Long Wave Propagation Capability (LWPC) code to simulate the unperturbed and perturbed signal parameters (amplitude and phase), to determine the signal modes attenuation coefficient and then to infer the electron density increases in the disturbed region. The results showed that the reference height was reduced from its ambient value (87km) to 66.4 km in the case of the GJ and 74.3 km for the elve. These reference heights decreases affected the propagating signal at the disturbed region by increasing the modes attenuation coefficient. Effectively, the number of modes was reduced from 28 at ambient condition to 9 modes (in the case of GJ) and 17 (in the case of elve). This high attenuation of modes leads to the appearance of null signal perturbations positions due to the interferences. Between two null positions

  8. Early Galaxy Formation in Warm Dark Matter Cosmologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dayal, Pratika; Mesinger, Andrei; Pacucci, Fabio

    2015-06-01

    We present a framework for high-redshift (z≳ 7) galaxy formation that traces their dark matter (DM) and baryonic assembly in four cosmologies: cold dark matter (CDM) and warm dark matter (WDM) with particle masses of {{m}x} = 1.5, 3, and 5 keV. We use the same astrophysical parameters regulating star formation and feedback, chosen to match current observations of the evolving ultraviolet luminosity function (UV LF). We find that the assembly of observable (with current and upcoming instruments) galaxies in CDM and {{m}x}≥slant 3 keV WDM results in similar halo mass-to-light ratios (M/L), stellar mass densities (SMDs), and UV LFs. However, the suppression of small-scale structure leads to a notably delayed and subsequently more rapid stellar assembly in the 1.5 keV WDM model. Thus, galaxy assembly in {{m}x}≲ 2 keV WDM cosmologies is characterized by (1) a dearth of small-mass halos hosting faint galaxies and (2) a younger, more UV-bright stellar population, for a given stellar mass. The higher M/L (effect 2) partially compensates for the dearth of small-mass halos (effect 1), making the resulting UV LFs closer to CDM than expected from simple estimates of halo abundances. We find that the redshift evolution of the SMD is a powerful probe of the nature of DM. Integrating down to a limit of {{M}UV}=-16.5 for the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), the SMD evolves as log (SMD) \\propto -0.63(1+z) in {{m}x}=1.5 keV WDM, as compared to log (SMD) \\propto -0.44(1+z) in CDM. Thus, high-redshift stellar assembly provides a powerful test bed for WDM models, accessible with the upcoming JWST.

  9. A normalized contrast-encoding model exhibits bright/dark asymmetries similar to early visual neurons.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Emily A

    2016-04-01

    Biological sensory systems share a number of organizing principles. One such principle is the formation of parallel streams. In the visual system, information about bright and dark features is largely conveyed via two separate streams: theONandOFFpathways. While brightness and darkness can be considered symmetric and opposite forms of visual contrast, the response properties of cells in theONandOFFpathways are decidedly asymmetric. Here, we ask whether a simple contrast-encoding model predicts asymmetries for brights and darks that are similar to the asymmetries found in theONandOFFpathways. Importantly, this model does not include any explicit differences in how the visual system represents brights and darks, but it does include a common normalization mechanism. The phenomena captured by the model include (1) nonlinear contrast response functions, (2) greater nonlinearities in the responses to darks, and (3) larger responses to dark contrasts. We report a direct, quantitative comparison between these model predictions and previously published electrophysiological measurements from the retina and thalamus (guinea pig and cat, respectively). This work suggests that the simple computation of visual contrast may account for a range of early visual processing nonlinearities. Assessing explicit models of sensory representations is essential for understanding which features of neuronal activity these models can and cannot predict, and for investigating how early computations may reverberate through the sensory pathways. PMID:27044852

  10. A normalized contrast-encoding model exhibits bright/dark asymmetries similar to early visual neurons.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Emily A

    2016-04-01

    Biological sensory systems share a number of organizing principles. One such principle is the formation of parallel streams. In the visual system, information about bright and dark features is largely conveyed via two separate streams: theONandOFFpathways. While brightness and darkness can be considered symmetric and opposite forms of visual contrast, the response properties of cells in theONandOFFpathways are decidedly asymmetric. Here, we ask whether a simple contrast-encoding model predicts asymmetries for brights and darks that are similar to the asymmetries found in theONandOFFpathways. Importantly, this model does not include any explicit differences in how the visual system represents brights and darks, but it does include a common normalization mechanism. The phenomena captured by the model include (1) nonlinear contrast response functions, (2) greater nonlinearities in the responses to darks, and (3) larger responses to dark contrasts. We report a direct, quantitative comparison between these model predictions and previously published electrophysiological measurements from the retina and thalamus (guinea pig and cat, respectively). This work suggests that the simple computation of visual contrast may account for a range of early visual processing nonlinearities. Assessing explicit models of sensory representations is essential for understanding which features of neuronal activity these models can and cannot predict, and for investigating how early computations may reverberate through the sensory pathways.

  11. Cold Dark Matter Substructures in Early-type Galaxy Halos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiacconi, Davide; Madau, Piero; Potter, Doug; Stadel, Joachim

    2016-06-01

    We present initial results from the “Ponos” zoom-in numerical simulations of dark matter substructures in massive ellipticals. Two very highly resolved dark matter halos with M vir = 1.2 × 1013 {M}⊙ and M vir = 6.5 × 1012 {M}⊙ and different (“violent” versus “quiescent”) assembly histories have been simulated down to z = 0 in a ΛCDM cosmology with a total of 921,651,914 and 408,377,544 particles, respectively. Within the virial radius, the total mass fraction in self-bound M sub > 106 {M}⊙ subhalos at the present epoch is 15% for the violent host and 16.5% for the quiescent one. At z = 0.7, these fractions increase to 19% and 33%, respectively, as more recently accreted satellites are less prone to tidal destruction. In projection, the average fraction of surface mass density in substructure at a distance of R/R vir = 0.02 (˜5-10 kpc) from the two halo centers ranges from 0.6% to ≳2%, significantly higher than that measured in simulations of Milky Way-sized halos. The contribution of subhalos with M sub < 109 {M}⊙ to the projected mass fraction is between one-fifth and one-third of the total, with the smallest share found in the quiescent host. We assess the impact of baryonic effects via twin, lower-resolution hydrodynamical simulations that include metallicity-dependent gas cooling, star formation, and a delayed-radiative-cooling scheme for supernova feedback. Baryonic contraction produces a super-isothermal total density profile and increases the number of massive subhalos in the inner regions of the main host. The host density profiles and projected subhalo mass fractions appear to be broadly consistent with observations of gravitational lenses.

  12. Cold Dark Matter Substructures in Early-type Galaxy Halos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiacconi, Davide; Madau, Piero; Potter, Doug; Stadel, Joachim

    2016-06-01

    We present initial results from the “Ponos” zoom-in numerical simulations of dark matter substructures in massive ellipticals. Two very highly resolved dark matter halos with M vir = 1.2 × 1013 {M}ȯ and M vir = 6.5 × 1012 {M}ȯ and different (“violent” versus “quiescent”) assembly histories have been simulated down to z = 0 in a ΛCDM cosmology with a total of 921,651,914 and 408,377,544 particles, respectively. Within the virial radius, the total mass fraction in self-bound M sub > 106 {M}ȯ subhalos at the present epoch is 15% for the violent host and 16.5% for the quiescent one. At z = 0.7, these fractions increase to 19% and 33%, respectively, as more recently accreted satellites are less prone to tidal destruction. In projection, the average fraction of surface mass density in substructure at a distance of R/R vir = 0.02 (˜5–10 kpc) from the two halo centers ranges from 0.6% to ≳2%, significantly higher than that measured in simulations of Milky Way-sized halos. The contribution of subhalos with M sub < 109 {M}ȯ to the projected mass fraction is between one-fifth and one-third of the total, with the smallest share found in the quiescent host. We assess the impact of baryonic effects via twin, lower-resolution hydrodynamical simulations that include metallicity-dependent gas cooling, star formation, and a delayed-radiative-cooling scheme for supernova feedback. Baryonic contraction produces a super-isothermal total density profile and increases the number of massive subhalos in the inner regions of the main host. The host density profiles and projected subhalo mass fractions appear to be broadly consistent with observations of gravitational lenses.

  13. The Early Eocene equable climate problem: can perturbations of climate model parameters identify possible solutions?

    PubMed

    Sagoo, Navjit; Valdes, Paul; Flecker, Rachel; Gregoire, Lauren J

    2013-10-28

    Geological data for the Early Eocene (56-47.8 Ma) indicate extensive global warming, with very warm temperatures at both poles. However, despite numerous attempts to simulate this warmth, there are remarkable data-model differences in the prediction of these polar surface temperatures, resulting in the so-called 'equable climate problem'. In this paper, for the first time an ensemble with a perturbed climate-sensitive model parameters approach has been applied to modelling the Early Eocene climate. We performed more than 100 simulations with perturbed physics parameters, and identified two simulations that have an optimal fit with the proxy data. We have simulated the warmth of the Early Eocene at 560 ppmv CO2, which is a much lower CO2 level than many other models. We investigate the changes in atmospheric circulation, cloud properties and ocean circulation that are common to these simulations and how they differ from the remaining simulations in order to understand what mechanisms contribute to the polar warming. The parameter set from one of the optimal Early Eocene simulations also produces a favourable fit for the last glacial maximum boundary climate and outperforms the control parameter set for the present day. Although this does not 'prove' that this model is correct, it is very encouraging that there is a parameter set that creates a climate model able to simulate well very different palaeoclimates and the present-day climate. Interestingly, to achieve the great warmth of the Early Eocene this version of the model does not have a strong future climate change Charney climate sensitivity. It produces a Charney climate sensitivity of 2.7(°)C, whereas the mean value of the 18 models in the IPCC Fourth Assessment Report (AR4) is 3.26(°)C±0.69(°)C. Thus, this value is within the range and below the mean of the models included in the AR4.

  14. Baryons do trace dark matter 380,000 years after the big bang: Search for compensated isocurvature perturbations with WMAP 9-year data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grin, Daniel; Hanson, Duncan; Holder, Gilbert P.; Doré, Olivier; Kamionkowski, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Primordial isocurvature fluctuations between photons and either neutrinos or nonrelativistic species such as baryons or dark matter are known to be subdominant to adiabatic fluctuations. Perturbations in the relative densities of baryons and dark matter (known as compensated isocurvature perturbations or CIPs), however, are surprisingly poorly constrained. CIPs leave no imprint in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) on observable scales, at least at linear order in their amplitude and zeroth order in the amplitude of adiabatic perturbations. It is thus not yet empirically known if baryons trace dark matter at the surface of last scattering. If CIPs exist, they would spatially modulate the Silk damping scale and acoustic horizon, causing distinct fluctuations in the CMB temperature/polarization power spectra across the sky: this effect is first order in both the CIP and adiabatic mode amplitudes. Here, temperature data from the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) are used to conduct the first CMB-based observational search for CIPs, using off-diagonal correlations and the CMB trispectrum. Reconstruction noise from weak lensing and point sources is shown to be negligible for this data set. No evidence for CIPs is observed, and a 95% confidence upper limit of 1.1×10-2 is imposed to the amplitude of a scale-invariant CIP power spectrum. This limit agrees with CIP sensitivity forecasts for WMAP and is competitive with smaller-scale constraints from measurements of the baryon fraction in galaxy clusters. It is shown that the root-mean-squared CIP amplitude on 5-100° scales is smaller than ˜0.07-0.17 (depending on the scale) at the 95% confidence level. Temperature data from the Planck satellite will provide an even more sensitive probe for the existence of CIPs, as will the upcoming ACTPol and SPTPol experiments on smaller angular scales.

  15. Constraints on a f(R) gravity dark energy model with early scaling evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Chan-Gyung; Hwang, Jai-chan; Noh, Hyerim E-mail: jchan@knu.ac.kr

    2011-09-01

    The modified gravity with f(R) = R{sup 1+ε} (ε > 0) allows a scaling solution where the energy density of gravity sector follows the energy density of the dominant fluid. We present initial conditions of background and perturbation variables during the scaling evolution regime in the modified gravity. As a possible dark energy model we consider a gravity with a form f(R) = R{sup 1+ε}+qR{sup −n} (−1 < n ≤ 0) where the second term drives the late-time acceleration. We show that our f(R) gravity parameters are very sensitive to the baryon perturbation growth and baryon density power spectrum, and present observational constraints on the model parameters. We consider full perturbations of f(R) gravity. Our analysis suggests that only the parameter space extremely close to the ΛCDM model is allowed with ε∼<5 × 10{sup −6} and n∼>−10{sup −4}.

  16. Darkness during early postnatal development is required for normal circadian patterns in the adult rat.

    PubMed

    Cambras, T; Canal, M M; Cernuda-Cernuda, R; García-Fernández, J M; Díez-Noguera, A

    2015-03-01

    Early light experience influences the brain during development. Perinatal light exposure has an important effect on the development of the circadian system, although the role of quantity versus quality of light in this process is still unclear. We tested the development of the circadian rhythm of locomotor activity under constant bright light from the day of weaning, of six groups of rats raised under different light conditions during suckling. Results indicated that when rats received daily darkness during suckling (rats reared under constant darkness or light-dark cycles with dim or bright light) became arrhythmic when exposed to continuous bright light after weaning. However, those rats reared in the absence of darkness (constant dim or bright light, or alternating dim and bright light) developed a circadian rhythm, which was stronger and had a shorter period depending on the quantity of light received during suckling. Vasointestinal polypeptide immunoreactivity in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) was higher in those rats with weaker rhythms. However, no apparent differences among these groups were found in the melanopsin-expressing retinal ganglion cells, which provide the SCN with light input in the photoentrainment process. When bright light was shifted to dim light in three of the groups on day 57 after weaning, all of them generated a circadian rhythm with a longer period in those rats previously arrhythmic. Our results indicate the importance of the amount of light received at the early stages of life in the development of the circadian system and suggest that darkness is needed for the normal development of circadian behaviour.

  17. Predicting cortical dark/bright asymmetries from natural image statistics and early visual transforms.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Emily A; Norcia, Anthony M

    2015-05-01

    The nervous system has evolved in an environment with structure and predictability. One of the ubiquitous principles of sensory systems is the creation of circuits that capitalize on this predictability. Previous work has identified predictable non-uniformities in the distributions of basic visual features in natural images that are relevant to the encoding tasks of the visual system. Here, we report that the well-established statistical distributions of visual features--such as visual contrast, spatial scale, and depth--differ between bright and dark image components. Following this analysis, we go on to trace how these differences in natural images translate into different patterns of cortical input that arise from the separate bright (ON) and dark (OFF) pathways originating in the retina. We use models of these early visual pathways to transform natural images into statistical patterns of cortical input. The models include the receptive fields and non-linear response properties of the magnocellular (M) and parvocellular (P) pathways, with their ON and OFF pathway divisions. The results indicate that there are regularities in visual cortical input beyond those that have previously been appreciated from the direct analysis of natural images. In particular, several dark/bright asymmetries provide a potential account for recently discovered asymmetries in how the brain processes visual features, such as violations of classic energy-type models. On the basis of our analysis, we expect that the dark/bright dichotomy in natural images plays a key role in the generation of both cortical and perceptual asymmetries.

  18. Early life stress perturbs the maturation of microglia in the developing hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Delpech, Jean-Christophe; Wei, Lan; Hao, Jin; Yu, Xiaoqing; Madore, Charlotte; Butovsky, Oleg; Kaffman, Arie

    2016-10-01

    Children exposed to abuse or neglect show abnormal hippocampal development and similar findings have been reported in rodent models. Using brief daily separation (BDS), a mouse model of early life stress, we previously showed that exposure to BDS impairs hippocampal function in adulthood and perturbs synaptic maturation, synaptic pruning, axonal growth and myelination in the developing hippocampus. Given that microglia are involved in these developmental processes, we tested whether BDS impairs microglial activity in the hippocampus of 14 (during BDS) and 28-day old mice (one week after BDS). We found that BDS increased the density and altered the morphology of microglia in the hippocampus of 14-day old pups, effects that were no longer present on postnatal day (PND) 28. Despite the normal cell number and morphology seen at PND28, the molecular signature of hippocampal microglia, assessed using the NanoString immune panel, was altered at both ages. We showed that during normal hippocampal development, microglia undergo significant changes between PND14 and PND28, including reduced cell density, decreased ex vivo phagocytic activity, and an increase in the expression of genes involved in inflammation and cell migration. However, microglia harvested from the hippocampus of 28-day old BDS mice showed an increase in phagocytic activity and reduced expression of genes that normally increase across development. Promoter analysis indicated that alteration in the transcriptional activity of PU.1, Creb1, Sp1, and RelA accounted for most of the transcriptional changes seen during normal microglia development and for most of the BDS-induced changes at PND14 and PND28. These findings are the first to demonstrate that early life stress dysregulates microglial function in the developing hippocampus and to identify key transcription factors that are likely to mediate these changes. PMID:27301858

  19. Early life stress perturbs the maturation of microglia in the developing hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Delpech, Jean-Christophe; Wei, Lan; Hao, Jin; Yu, Xiaoqing; Madore, Charlotte; Butovsky, Oleg; Kaffman, Arie

    2016-01-01

    Children exposed to abuse or neglect show abnormal hippocampal development and similar findings have been reported in rodent models. Using brief daily separation (BDS), a mouse model of early life stress, we previously showed that exposure to BDS impairs hippocampal function in adulthood and perturbs synaptic maturation, synaptic pruning, axonal growth and myelination in the developing hippocampus. Given that microglia are involved in these developmental processes, we tested whether BDS impairs microglial activity in the hippocampus of 14 (during BDS) and 28-day old mice (one week after BDS). We found that BDS increased the density and altered the morphology of microglia in the hippocampus of 14-day old pups, effects that were no longer present on postnatal day (PND) 28. Despite the normal cell number and morphology seen at PND28, the molecular signature of hippocampal microglia, assessed using the NanoString immune panel, was altered at both ages. We showed that during normal hippocampal development, microglia undergo significant changes between PND14 and PND28, including reduced cell density, decreased ex vivo phagocytic activity, and an increase in the expression of genes involved in inflammation and cell migration. However, microglia harvested from the hippocampus of 28-day old BDS mice showed an increase in phagocytic activity and reduced expression of genes that normally increase across development. Promoter analysis indicated that alteration in the transcriptional activity of PU.1, Creb1, Sp1, and RelA accounted for most of the transcriptional changes seen during normal microglia development and for most of the BDS-induced changes at PND14 and PND28. These findings are the first to demonstrate that early life stress dysregulates microglial function in the developing hippocampus and to identify key transcription factors that are likely to mediate these changes. PMID:27301858

  20. Early and Late Components of Feed-forward Postural Adjustments to Predictable Perturbations

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Vennila; Latash, Mark L.; Aruin, Alexander S.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives The purpose was to investigate two types of feed-forward postural adjustments associated with preparation to predictable external perturbations. Methods Nine subjects stood on a wedge, toes-up or toes-down while a pendulum impacted their shoulders. EMGs of leg and trunk muscles were analyzed within the framework of the uncontrolled manifold hypothesis. Results Early postural adjustments (EPAs) were seen 400–500 ms and anticipatory postural adjustments (APAs), 100–150 ms prior to the impact. EPAs and APAs were also seen in the time profiles of muscle modes representing muscle groups with linear scaling of the activation levels. Center of pressure shifts were stabilized by co-varied adjustments in muscle mode magnitudes across trials. The index of these multi-muscle synergies showed two drops (anticipatory synergy adjustments, ASAs), prior to EPA and APA in each subject. The findings were consistent between the two conditions. Conclusions The results show that feed-forward postural adjustments represent a sequence of two phenomena, EPAs and APAs. Each of those is preceded by ASAs that reduce stability of a variable that is to be adjusted during the EPAs and APAs. The findings fit a hierarchical scheme with synergic few-to-many mappings at each level of the hierarchy based on the referent body configuration hypothesis. Significance The results show the complexity of the postural preparation to action. Potentially, they have implications for the current strategies of rehabilitation of patients with neuro-motor disorders characterized by impaired postural control. PMID:21983281

  1. Perturbation of copper homeostasis is instrumental in early developmental arrest of intraerythrocytic Plasmodium falciparum

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Malaria continues to be a devastating disease. The elucidation of factors inducing asexual growth versus arrest of Plasmodium falciparum can provide information about the development of the parasite, and may help in the search for novel malaria medication. Based on information from genome-wide transcriptome profiling of different developmental stages of P. falciparum, we investigated the critical importance of copper homeostasis in the developmental succession of P. falciparum with regard to three aspects of copper function. These were:1) inhibition of copper-binding proteins, 2) copper-ion chelation, and 3) down-regulated expression of genes encoding copper-binding proteins associated with a specific growth-promoting factor. Results Inhibition of copper-binding proteins with tetrathiomolybdate (TTM) caused cessation of growth of the parasite. TTM arrested the parasite irreversibly during the trophozoite to schizont stage progression. Target molecules for TTM may be present in P. falciparum. The involvement of copper ions in developmental arrest was also investigated by copper-ion chelating methods, which indicated a critical function of reduced copper ions (Cu1+) in the parasite during the early developmental stage. Copper ions, not only in the parasite but also in host cells, were targets of the chelators. Chelation of Cu1+caused blockage of trophozoite progression from the ring stage. Profound growth arrest was detected in parasites cultured in a chemically defined medium containing hexadecanoic acid alone as a growth-promoting factor. This developmental arrest was associated with down-regulated expression of genes encoding copper-binding proteins. Cis-9-octadecenoic acid completely prevented the down-regulation of gene expression and developmental arrest that were observed with the use of hexadecanoic acid. Conclusions The critical importance of copper homeostasis in early developmental stages of P. falciparum was confirmed. Perturbation of copper

  2. Dark matter inside early-type galaxies as function of mass and redshift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nigoche-Netro, A.; Ramos-Larios, G.; Lagos, P.; Ruelas-Mayorga, A.; de la Fuente, E.; Kemp, S. N.; Navarro, S. G.; Corral, L. J.; Hidalgo-Gámez, A. M.

    2016-10-01

    We study the behaviour of the dynamical and stellar mass inside the effective radius (re) of early-type galaxies (ETGs). We use several samples of ETGs - ranging from 19 000 to 98 000 objects - from the ninth data release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We consider Newtonian dynamics, different light profiles and different initial mass functions (IMF) to calculate the dynamical and stellar mass. We assume that any difference between these two masses is due to dark matter and/or a non-universal IMF. The main results for galaxies in the redshift range 0.0024 < z < 0.3500 and in the dynamical mass range 9.5 < log(M) < 12.5 are: (i) a significant part of the intrinsic dispersion of the distribution of dynamical versus stellar mass is due to redshift; (ii) the difference between dynamical and stellar mass increases as a function of dynamical mass and decreases as a function of redshift; (iii) the difference between dynamical and stellar mass goes from approximately 0 to 70 per cent of the dynamical mass depending on mass and redshift; (iv) these differences could be due to dark matter or a non-universal IMF or a combination of both; (v) the amount of dark matter inside ETGs would be equal to or less than the difference between dynamical and stellar mass depending on the impact of the IMF on the stellar mass estimation; (vi) the previous results go in the same direction of some results of the Fundamental Plane (FP) found in the literature in the sense that they could be interpreted as an increase of dark matter along the FP and a dependence of the FP on redshift.

  3. Predicting cortical dark/bright asymmetries from natural image statistics and early visual transforms.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Emily A; Norcia, Anthony M

    2015-05-01

    The nervous system has evolved in an environment with structure and predictability. One of the ubiquitous principles of sensory systems is the creation of circuits that capitalize on this predictability. Previous work has identified predictable non-uniformities in the distributions of basic visual features in natural images that are relevant to the encoding tasks of the visual system. Here, we report that the well-established statistical distributions of visual features--such as visual contrast, spatial scale, and depth--differ between bright and dark image components. Following this analysis, we go on to trace how these differences in natural images translate into different patterns of cortical input that arise from the separate bright (ON) and dark (OFF) pathways originating in the retina. We use models of these early visual pathways to transform natural images into statistical patterns of cortical input. The models include the receptive fields and non-linear response properties of the magnocellular (M) and parvocellular (P) pathways, with their ON and OFF pathway divisions. The results indicate that there are regularities in visual cortical input beyond those that have previously been appreciated from the direct analysis of natural images. In particular, several dark/bright asymmetries provide a potential account for recently discovered asymmetries in how the brain processes visual features, such as violations of classic energy-type models. On the basis of our analysis, we expect that the dark/bright dichotomy in natural images plays a key role in the generation of both cortical and perceptual asymmetries. PMID:26020624

  4. Lunar dark-haloed impact craters - Origin and implications for early mare volcanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, J. F.; Hawke, B. R.

    1984-01-01

    Spectral, thermal, radar, and photogeologic data were used to determine the composition and origin of lunar dark-haloed craters. Analyses of reflectance spectra (near-infrared) of dark-haloed craters on light plains indicate that in every instance these craters exposed mare basalts which had previously been covered by varying thicknesses of highlands debris. In the Schiller-Schickard region a relatively thick highlands unit was emplaced as a result of the Orientale impact event. The results of recent remote sensing photogeologic and lunar samples studies indicate that mare volcanism was a significant process during much of the pre-Imbrian epoch and may have been initiated as early as 4.2-4.3 Ga. The very early volcanic episodes contributed materials to the lunar surface which were later incorporated into the upper portion of the highlands crust by subsequent impact mixing. On the basis of the data it is concluded that current models of the extent and duration of mare volcanisms, as well as those involving the composition of thermal evolution of the lunar interior will have to be revised.

  5. Copper and thermal perturbations on the early life processes of the hard coral Platygyra acuta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwok, C. K.; Lam, K. Y.; Leung, S. M.; Chui, A. P. Y.; Ang, P. O.

    2016-09-01

    Anthropogenic pollutants and climate change are major threats to coral reefs today. Yet interactions between chemical and thermal perturbations have not been fully explored in reef studies. Here, we present the single and combined effects of copper (Cu) with thermal stress on five early life-history stages/processes (fertilization, larval mortality, swimming ability, metamorphosis and growth of juvenile recruits) of the massive coral Platygyra acuta in Hong Kong. In the first four experiments, coral gametes and larvae were exposed to different Cu doses (0-200 μg L-1, apart from the fertilization assay in which 0-1000 μg L-1 was used) and temperature treatments (ambient and ambient +2 or +3 °C as a thermal stress treatment) following a factorial experimental design. Exposure time was 5 h for the fertilization assay and 48 h for the other experiments. The last experiment on growth of coral recruits was conducted over 56 d with 0-80 μg L-1 Cu used. Cu significantly reduced percent fertilization success, percentage of active swimming larvae and larval survivorship (EC50s, the half maximal effective concentrations, for percent fertilization success and percentage of active swimming larvae were 92-145 and 45-47 μg L-1 respectively. While LC50, the lethal concentration that kills 50% of the population, was 101-110 μg L-1), while growth of coral recruits was not affected at 80 μg L-1 Cu for 56 d. No settling cues were used in the settlement experiment. In their absence, percent metamorphosis increased with Cu doses, in sharp contrast to earlier findings. Settlement and metamorphosis may thus be strategies for coral larvae to escape from Cu toxicity. Thermal treatment did not significantly affect any experimental end points. This is likely because the thermal regimes used in the experiments were within the range experienced by local corals. The high variability in Cu toxicities indicates differential susceptibilities of the various life-history stages/processes of P

  6. Constraining early and interacting dark energy with gravitational wave standard sirens: the potential of the eLISA mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caprini, Chiara; Tamanini, Nicola

    2016-10-01

    We perform a forecast analysis of the capability of the eLISA space-based interferometer to constrain models of early and interacting dark energy using gravitational wave standard sirens. We employ simulated catalogues of standard sirens given by merging massive black hole binaries visible by eLISA, with an electromagnetic counterpart detectable by future telescopes. We consider three-arms mission designs with arm length of 1, 2 and 5 million km, 5 years of mission duration and the best-level low frequency noise as recently tested by the LISA Pathfinder. Standard sirens with eLISA give access to an intermediate range of redshift 1 lesssim z lesssim 8, and can therefore provide competitive constraints on models where the onset of the deviation from ΛCDM (i.e. the epoch when early dark energy starts to be non-negligible, or when the interaction with dark matter begins) occurs relatively late, at z lesssim 6. If instead early or interacting dark energy is relevant already in the pre-recombination era, current cosmological probes (especially the cosmic microwave background) are more efficient than eLISA in constraining these models, except possibly in the interacting dark energy model if the energy exchange is proportional to the energy density of dark energy.

  7. Generalizing a unified model of dark matter, dark energy, and inflation with a noncanonical kinetic term

    SciTech Connect

    De-Santiago, Josue; Cervantes-Cota, Jorge L.

    2011-03-15

    We study a unification model for dark energy, dark matter, and inflation with a single scalar field with noncanonical kinetic term. In this model, the kinetic term of the Lagrangian accounts for the dark matter and dark energy, and at early epochs, a quadratic potential accounts for slow roll inflation. The present work is an extension to the work by Bose and Majumdar [Phys. Rev. D 79, 103517 (2009).] with a more general kinetic term that was proposed by Chimento in Phys. Rev. D 69, 123517 (2004). We demonstrate that the model is viable at the background and linear perturbation levels.

  8. Dilaton dominance in the early universe dilutes dark matter relic abundances

    SciTech Connect

    Lahanas, A. B.

    2011-05-15

    The role of the dilaton field and its coupling to matter may result in a dilution of dark matter (DM) relic densities. This is to be contrasted with quintessence scenarios in which relic densities are augmented, due to modification of the expansion rate, since the Universe is not radiation dominated at DM decoupling. The dilaton field, besides this, affects relic densities through its coupling to dust which tends to decrease relic abundances. Thus two separate mechanisms compete with each other resulting, in general, in a decrease of the relic density. This feature may be welcomed and can help the situation if direct dark matter experiments point towards small neutralino-nucleon cross sections, implying small neutralino annihilation rates and hence large relic densities, at least in the popular supersymmetric scenarios. In the presence of a diluting mechanism, both experimental constraints can be met. The role of the dilaton for this mechanism has been studied in the context of the noncritical string theory but in this work we follow a rather general approach assuming that the dilaton dominates only at early eras long before big bang nucleosynthesis.

  9. Early corrective reactions of the leg to perturbations at the torso during walking in humans.

    PubMed

    Misiaszek, J E; Stephens, M J; Yang, J F; Pearson, K G

    2000-04-01

    The contribution of afferent feedback to the regulation of locomotion in humans is not well understood. Animal experiments have suggested that loading of the leg during the stance phase may enhance the magnitude of extensor burst activity and delay the onset of swing phase. The aim of the present study was to determine whether transient loading of the leg at the end of stance would enhance extensor-muscle activity and delay the onset of swing in walking humans. To test this hypothesis, we applied loads to the hips of subjects so that the load was applied along the long axis of the leg at the end of stance (down-back unsupported, DBU). This resulted in an unexpectedly complex reaction characterised by rapid co-contraction of antagonist pairs of muscles around the ankle and knee and a prolongation of the stance phase. We speculated that the complexity of the reaction was, in part, due to a disturbance in equilibrium. To address this possibility, two additional perturbation paradigms were tested: (1) subjects held a rail during the loading paradigm (down-back supported, DBS), or (2) subjects received only a posteriorly directed perturbation of the hips, which added no additional load to the leg (backward unsupported, BU). As predicted, the DBS perturbation resulted in an enhancement of the ongoing soleus-muscle activity, and the unexpected tibialis anterior burst that was observed during the DBU paradigm was absent. Allowing the subjects to hold a rail substantially reduced the change in the timing of the step cycle observed in the DBU paradigm. The BU perturbation prolonged the stance phase duration and, as expected, resulted in a burst of activity in tibialis activity. This was usually accompanied by a reduction in the ongoing soleus activity. Two important conclusions are drawn from the present study. First, loading of the leg at the end of stance phase enhances the ongoing extensor-muscle activity. We suggest that afferent feedback responding to the increase load

  10. Dark Matter: The "Gravitational Pull" of Maternalist Discourses on Politicians' Decision Making for Early Childhood Policy in Australia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bown, Kathryn; Sumsion, Jennifer; Press, Frances

    2011-01-01

    The article reports on a study investigating influences on Australian politicians' decision making for early childhood education and care (ECEC) policy. The astronomical concept of dark matter is utilised as a metaphor for considering normalising, and therefore frequently difficult to detect and disrupt, influences implicated in politicians'…

  11. The WIMP Capture Process for Dark Stars in the Early Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivertsson, Sofia; Gondolo, Paolo

    2011-03-01

    The first stars to form in the universe may have been dark stars, powered by dark matter annihilation instead of nuclear fusion. The initial amount of dark matter gathered by the star gravitationally can sustain it only for a limited period of time. It has been suggested that capture of additional dark matter from the environment can prolong the dark star phase even to the present day. Here we show that this capture process is ineffective to prolong the life of the first generation of dark stars. We construct a Monte Carlo simulation that follows each weakly interacting massive particle (WIMP) in the dark matter halo as its orbit responds to the formation and evolution of the dark star, as it scatters off the star's nuclei, and as it annihilates inside the star. A rapid depletion of the WIMPs on orbits that cross the star causes the demise of the first generation of dark stars. We suggest that a second generation of dark stars may in principle survive much longer through capture. We comment on the effect of relaxing our assumptions.

  12. Quantitative perturbation-based analysis of gene expression predicts enhancer activity in early Drosophila embryo.

    PubMed

    Sayal, Rupinder; Dresch, Jacqueline M; Pushel, Irina; Taylor, Benjamin R; Arnosti, David N

    2016-01-01

    Enhancers constitute one of the major components of regulatory machinery of metazoans. Although several genome-wide studies have focused on finding and locating enhancers in the genomes, the fundamental principles governing their internal architecture and cis-regulatory grammar remain elusive. Here, we describe an extensive, quantitative perturbation analysis targeting the dorsal-ventral patterning gene regulatory network (GRN) controlled by Drosophila NF-κB homolog Dorsal. To understand transcription factor interactions on enhancers, we employed an ensemble of mathematical models, testing effects of cooperativity, repression, and factor potency. Models trained on the dataset correctly predict activity of evolutionarily divergent regulatory regions, providing insights into spatial relationships between repressor and activator binding sites. Importantly, the collective predictions of sets of models were effective at novel enhancer identification and characterization. Our study demonstrates how experimental dataset and modeling can be effectively combined to provide quantitative insights into cis-regulatory information on a genome-wide scale. PMID:27152947

  13. On the relationship between lightning peak current and Early VLF perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salut, M. M.; Cohen, M. B.; Ali, M. A. M.; Graf, K. L.; Cotts, B. R. T.; Kumar, Sushil

    2013-11-01

    Lightning strokes are known to cause direct heating and ionization of the D region, some of which are detected via scattering of VLF transmitter signals and are known as Early VLF events. The disturbed ionosphere typically recovers in many tens of seconds. New experimental evidence is presented demonstrating that the scattering pattern and onset amplitude of Early VLF events are strongly related to both the magnitude and polarity of causative lightning peak current. Observations of Early VLF events at nine Stanford VLF receiver sites across the continental United States are combined with lightning geolocation data from the National Lightning Detection Network (NLDN). During January and March 2011, NLDN recorded 7769 intense lightning discharges with high peak currents (>100 kA) generating 1250 detected Early VLF events. We show that the size of the scattered field due to the ionospheric disturbance increases with the peak current intensity of the causative lightning discharge. The most intense peak currents of >+200 and <-250 kA disturb VLF transmitter signals as far as ˜400 km away from the lightning stroke. Early VLF event detection probability also increases rapidly with peak current intensity. On the other hand, the observed VLF amplitude change is not significantly dependent on the peak current intensity. Stroke polarity is also important, with positive strokes being ˜5 times more likely to generate Early VLF disturbances than negative strokes of the same intensity. Intense positive cloud-to-ground lightning discharges, especially when occurring over the sea, are also more likely to produce Early VLF events with long recovery (many minutes).

  14. Distribution of CCS and HC3N in L1147, an Early Phase Dark Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Taiki; Ohishi, Masatoshi; Hirota, Tomoya

    2014-06-01

    We used the Nobeyama 45 m radio telescope to reveal spatial distributions of CCS and HC3N in L1147, one of the carbon-chain producing region (CCPR) candidates, where carbon-chain molecules are dominant rather than NH3. We found that three cores (two CCS cores and one HC3N core), which are away from a very low luminosity object (a source that may turn into a sub-stellar mass brown dwarf), exist along the NE-SW filament traced by the 850 μm dust continuum. The column densities of CCS are 3-7 × 1012 cm-2 and those of HC3N are 2-6 × 1012 cm-2, respectively, much lower than those previously reported toward other CCPRs. We also found that two CCS peaks are displaced from the peaks of HC3N. In order to interpret such interleaved distributions, we conducted chemical reaction network simulations and found that slightly different gas densities could lead to large variation of the CCS-to-HC3N ratio in the early phase of dark cloud evolution. Such a chemical "variation" may be seen in other CCPRs. Finally, we were able to confirm that the L1147 filament can be regarded as a CCPR.

  15. Environmental and climatic changes during Valanginian (Early Cretaceous) perturbations of the carbon cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kujau, A.; Heimhofer, U.; Hochuli, P. A.; Schouten, S.; Thierry, A.; Morales, C.; Mutterlose, J.

    2011-12-01

    After a long-lasting period of relatively stable conditions during the late Jurassic to earliest Cretaceous, the Valanginian was a time of climatic and environmental perturbations. Proposed changes include fluctuations in atmospheric pCO2, an accelerated hydrologic cycling, a cooling phase, and changes in composition and abundances of the marine fauna. A prominent perturbation of the global carbon cycle is documented in a globally recorded positive δ13C shift. Widespread storage of Corg-rich sediments in ocean basins, probably accompanied by anoxic conditions has long been supposed to explain for the positive carbon isotope anomaly. However, no widespread deposition of black shales has been shown for the Valanginian. Research on the Valanginian carbon cycle has focused on marine environmental changes, while studies on continental archives are scarce. This study deals with stable isotope chemostratigraphy, spore-pollen assemblages, palynofacies, and organic geochemistry of two successions located in the northwestern Tethyan realm (Vocontian Basin, SE France) and the Carpathian seaway (Polish Trough, central Poland). For both sites no evidence for anoxic conditions in the form of the occurrence of specific biomarkers like isoreniratene are found. Spore-pollen assemblages from both localities show many similarities in terms of composition, diversity and abundances of taxa. Both are dominated by conifer pollen and fern spores. During the initial phase of the δ13C shift the palynological compositions of both sites are quite diverging. Here, the French site is characterized by a decrease in spore abundances not being observed for the Polish site. This is followed by a peak in fern spores for both sites. Bulk Corg and algal-derived pristane and phytane follow the positive isotope shift of Ccarb with a lead of ~200 kyrs. Land plant derived long chain C27 n-alkanes for the Vocontian Basin as well show this positive shift while for the site at the Carpathian seaway the

  16. Quantitative perturbation-based analysis of gene expression predicts enhancer activity in early Drosophila embryo

    PubMed Central

    Sayal, Rupinder; Dresch, Jacqueline M; Pushel, Irina; Taylor, Benjamin R; Arnosti, David N

    2016-01-01

    Enhancers constitute one of the major components of regulatory machinery of metazoans. Although several genome-wide studies have focused on finding and locating enhancers in the genomes, the fundamental principles governing their internal architecture and cis-regulatory grammar remain elusive. Here, we describe an extensive, quantitative perturbation analysis targeting the dorsal-ventral patterning gene regulatory network (GRN) controlled by Drosophila NF-κB homolog Dorsal. To understand transcription factor interactions on enhancers, we employed an ensemble of mathematical models, testing effects of cooperativity, repression, and factor potency. Models trained on the dataset correctly predict activity of evolutionarily divergent regulatory regions, providing insights into spatial relationships between repressor and activator binding sites. Importantly, the collective predictions of sets of models were effective at novel enhancer identification and characterization. Our study demonstrates how experimental dataset and modeling can be effectively combined to provide quantitative insights into cis-regulatory information on a genome-wide scale. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.08445.001 PMID:27152947

  17. Dark matter and IMF normalization in Virgo dwarf early-type galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tortora, C.; La Barbera, F.; Napolitano, N. R.

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we analyse the dark matter (DM) fraction, fDM, and mass-to-light ratio mismatch parameter, δIMF (computed with respect to a Milky Way-like initial mass function), for a sample of 39 dwarf early-type galaxies in the Virgo cluster. Both fDM and δIMF are estimated within the central (one effective radius) galaxy regions, with a Jeans dynamical analysis that relies on galaxy velocity dispersions, structural parameters, and stellar mass-to-light ratios from the SMAKCED survey. In this first attempt to constrain, simultaneously, the initial mass function (IMF) normalization and the DM content, we explore the impact of different assumptions on the DM model profile. On average, for an Navarro, Frenk & White (NFW) profile, the δIMF is consistent with a Chabrier-like normalization ({δ _IMF}˜ 1), with {f_DM}˜ 0.35. One of the main results of this work is that for at least a few systems the δIMF are heavier than the Milky Way-like value (i.e. either top- or bottom-heavy). When introducing tangential anisotropy, larger δIMF and smaller fDM are derived. Adopting a steeper concentration-mass relation than that from simulations, we find lower δIMF ( ≲ 1) and larger fDM. A constant M/L profile with null fDM gives the heaviest δIMF (˜2). In the MONDian framework, we find consistent results to those for our reference NFW model. If confirmed, the large scatter of δIMF for dEs would provide (further) evidence for a non-universal IMF in early-type systems. On average, our reference fDM estimates are consistent with those found for low-σe (˜ 100 km s^{-1}) early-type galaxies (ETGs). Furthermore, we find fDM consistent with values from the SMAKCED survey, and find a double-value behaviour of fDM with stellar mass, which mirrors the trend of dynamical M/L and global star formation efficiency (from abundance matching estimates) with mass.

  18. Isotopic and palynological evidence for a new Early Jurassic environmental perturbation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riding, James B.; Leng, Melanie J.; Kender, Sev; Hesselbo, Stephen P.; Feist-Burkhardt, Susanne

    2013-04-01

    The Early Jurassic Epoch was a predominantly greenhouse phase of Earth history, but a comprehensive understanding of its climate dynamics is hampered by a lack of high resolution multi-proxy environmental records. Here we report a geologically brief (approximately several hundred thousand years) negative carbon isotope excursion (CIE) of 2-3‰ in both marine and terrestrial materials, recognised for the first time for the Late Sinemurian Substage (Early Jurassic, ~194 Ma) of eastern England. The Late Sinemurian carbon isotope excursion, which is termed the S-CIE herein, is accompanied by peaks in the abundance of the pollen grain Classopollis classoides and the dinoflagellate cyst Liasidium variabile. Classopollis classoides was thermophilic and is a reliable proxy for hot/warm climatic conditions. Liasidium variabile is interpreted as thermophilic and eutrophic using multivariate statistics, its fluorescence properties being similar to living heterotrophic dinoflagellate cysts, and its association with Classopollis classoides. Moreover, the morphological and ecological similarities of Liasidium variabile to the Cenozoic genus Apectodinium are noteworthy. The co-occurrence of the acmes of Classopollis classoides and Liasidium variabile with a negative CIE is interpreted here as having wide geographical significance due to the marine and terrestrial carbon isotope signals being precisely in phase within an open marine setting. This is consistent with an oceanic-atmospheric injection of isotopically-light carbon, coupled with global warming and increased marginal marine nutrient supply, possibly the result of increased precipitation due to an enhanced hydrological cycle or a seasonally-stratified water column. A probable sea level rise of at least regional extent has been identified at the Liasidium variabile event in other records, which supports this putative phase of global warming. All these features are common to the Paleocene/Eocene thermal maximum (PETM, ~56

  19. Ten scenarios from early radiation to late time acceleration with a minimally coupled dark energy

    SciTech Connect

    Fay, Stéphane

    2013-09-01

    We consider General Relativity with matter, radiation and a minimally coupled dark energy defined by an equation of state w. Using dynamical system method, we find the equilibrium points of such a theory assuming an expanding Universe and a positive dark energy density. Two of these points correspond to classical radiation and matter dominated epochs for the Universe. For the other points, dark energy mimics matter, radiation or accelerates Universe expansion. We then look for possible sequences of epochs describing a Universe starting with some radiation dominated epoch(s) (mimicked or not by dark energy), then matter dominated epoch(s) (mimicked or not by dark energy) and ending with an accelerated expansion. We find ten sequences able to follow this Universe history without singular behaviour of w at some saddle points. Most of them are new in dark energy literature. To get more than these ten sequences, w has to be singular at some specific saddle equilibrium points. This is an unusual mathematical property of the equation of state in dark energy literature, whose physical consequences tend to be discarded by observations. This thus distinguishes the ten above sequences from an infinity of ways to describe Universe expansion.

  20. Cosmological magnetic field: a fossil of density perturbations in the early universe.

    PubMed

    Ichiki, Kiyotomo; Takahashi, Keitaro; Ohno, Hiroshi; Hanayama, Hidekazu; Sugiyama, Naoshi

    2006-02-10

    The origin of the substantial magnetic fields that are found in galaxies and on even larger scales, such as in clusters of galaxies, is yet unclear. If the second-order couplings between photons and electrons are considered, then cosmological density fluctuations, which explain the large-scale structure of the universe, can also produce magnetic fields on cosmological scales before the epoch of recombination. By evaluating the power spectrum of these cosmological magnetic fields on a range of scales, we show here that magnetic fields of 10(-18.1) gauss are generated at a 1-megaparsec scale and can be even stronger at smaller scales (10(-14.1) gauss at 10 kiloparsecs). These fields are large enough to seed magnetic fields in galaxies and may therefore have affected primordial star formation in the early universe.

  1. A parametrization of the growth index of matter perturbations in various Dark Energy models and observational prospects using a Euclid-like survey

    SciTech Connect

    Belloso, Alicia Bueno; García-Bellido, Juan; Sapone, Domenico E-mail: juan.garciabellido@uam.es

    2011-10-01

    We provide exact solutions to the cosmological matter perturbation equation in a homogeneous FLRW universe with a vacuum energy that can be parametrized by a constant equation of state parameter w and a very accurate approximation for the Ansatz w(a) = w{sub 0}+w{sub a}(1−a). We compute the growth index γ = log f(a)/log Ω{sub m}(a), and its redshift dependence, using the exact and approximate solutions in terms of Legendre polynomials and show that it can be parametrized as γ(a) = γ{sub 0}+γ{sub a}(1−a) in most cases. We then compare four different types of dark energy (DE) models: wΛCDM, DGP, f(R) and a LTB-large-void model, which have very different behaviors at z∼>1. This allows us to study the possibility to differentiate between different DE alternatives using wide and deep surveys like Euclid, which will measure both photometric and spectroscopic redshifts for several hundreds of millions of galaxies up to redshift z ≅ 2. We do a Fisher matrix analysis for the prospects of differentiating among the different DE models in terms of the growth index, taken as a given function of redshift or with a principal component analysis, with a value for each redshift bin for a Euclid-like survey. We use as observables the complete and marginalized power spectrum of galaxies P(k) and the Weak Lensing (WL) power spectrum. We find that, using P(k), one can reach (2%, 5%) errors in (w{sub 0},w{sub a}), and (4%, 12%) errors in (γ{sub 0},γ{sub a}), while using WL we get errors at least twice as large. These estimates allow us to differentiate easily between DGP, f(R) models and ΛCDM, while it would be more difficult to distinguish the latter from a variable equation of state parameter or LTB models using only the growth index.

  2. Cosmological constraints on axionic dark radiation from axion-photon conversion in the early Universe

    SciTech Connect

    Higaki, Tetsutaro; Nakayama, Kazunori; Takahashi, Fuminobu E-mail: kazunori@hep-th.phys.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2013-09-01

    Axions seem ubiquitous in string theories and some of them may be produced non-thermally by heavy scalar decays, contributing to dark radiation. We study various cosmological effects of photons produced from the axionic dark radiation through axion-photon conversion in the presence of primordial magnetic fields, and derive tight constraints on the combination of the axion-photon coupling and the primordial magnetic field.

  3. Perturbations for transient acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Vargas, Cristofher Zuñiga; Zimdahl, Winfried; Hipólito-Ricaldi, Wiliam S. E-mail: hipolito@ceunes.ufes.br

    2012-04-01

    According to the standard ΛCDM model, the accelerated expansion of the Universe will go on forever. Motivated by recent observational results, we explore the possibility of a finite phase of acceleration which asymptotically approaches another period of decelerated expansion. Extending an earlier study on a corresponding homogeneous and isotropic dynamics, in which interactions between dark matter and dark energy are crucial, the present paper also investigates the dynamics of the matter perturbations both on the Newtonian and General Relativistic (GR) levels and quantifies the potential relevance of perturbations of the dark-energy component. In the background, the model is tested against the Supernova type Ia (SNIa) data of the Constitution set and on the perturbative level against growth rate data, among them those of the WiggleZ survey, and the data of the 2dFGRS project. Our results indicate that a transient phase of accelerated expansion is not excluded by current observations.

  4. Perturbation of bile acid homeostasis is an early pathogenesis event of drug induced liver injury in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Yamazaki, Makoto; Miyake, Manami; Sato, Hiroko; Masutomi, Naoya; Tsutsui, Naohisa; Adam, Klaus-Peter; Alexander, Danny C.; Lawton, Kay A.; Milburn, Michael V.; Ryals, John A.; Wulff, Jacob E.; Guo, Lining

    2013-04-01

    Drug-induced liver injury (DILI) is a significant consideration for drug development. Current preclinical DILI assessment relying on histopathology and clinical chemistry has limitations in sensitivity and discordance with human. To gain insights on DILI pathogenesis and identify potential biomarkers for improved DILI detection, we performed untargeted metabolomic analyses on rats treated with thirteen known hepatotoxins causing various types of DILI: necrosis (acetaminophen, bendazac, cyclosporine A, carbon tetrachloride, ethionine), cholestasis (methapyrilene and naphthylisothiocyanate), steatosis (tetracycline and ticlopidine), and idiosyncratic (carbamazepine, chlorzoxasone, flutamide, and nimesulide) at two doses and two time points. Statistical analysis and pathway mapping of the nearly 1900 metabolites profiled in the plasma, urine, and liver revealed diverse time and dose dependent metabolic cascades leading to DILI by the hepatotoxins. The most consistent change induced by the hepatotoxins, detectable even at the early time point/low dose, was the significant elevations of a panel of bile acids in the plasma and urine, suggesting that DILI impaired hepatic bile acid uptake from the circulation. Furthermore, bile acid amidation in the hepatocytes was altered depending on the severity of the hepatotoxin-induced oxidative stress. The alteration of the bile acids was most evident by the necrosis and cholestasis hepatotoxins, with more subtle effects by the steatosis and idiosyncratic hepatotoxins. Taking together, our data suggest that the perturbation of bile acid homeostasis is an early event of DILI. Upon further validation, selected bile acids in the circulation could be potentially used as sensitive and early DILI preclinical biomarkers. - Highlights: ► We used metabolomics to gain insights on drug induced liver injury (DILI) in rats. ► We profiled rats treated with thirteen hepatotoxins at two doses and two time points. ► The toxins decreased the

  5. Early-Life Stress Perturbs Key Cellular Programs in the Developing Mouse Hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Wei, Lan; Hao, Jin; Lacher, Richard K; Abbott, Thomas; Chung, Lisa; Colangelo, Christopher M; Kaffman, Arie

    2015-01-01

    Conflicting reports are available with regard to the effects of childhood abuse and neglect on hippocampal function in children. While earlier imaging studies and some animal work have suggested that the effects of early-life stress (ELS) manifest only in adulthood, more recent studies have documented impaired hippocampal function in maltreated children and adolescents. Additional work using animal modes is needed to clarify the effects of ELS on hippocampal development. In this regard, genomic, proteomic, and molecular tools uniquely available in the mouse make it a particularly attractive model system to study this issue. However, very little work has been done so far to characterize the effects of ELS on hippocampal development in the mouse. To address this issue, we examined the effects of brief daily separation (BDS), a mouse model of ELS that impairs hippocampal-dependent memory in adulthood, on hippocampal development in 28-day-old juvenile mice. This age was chosen because it corresponds to the developmental period in which human imaging studies have revealed abnormal hippocampal development in maltreated children. Exposure to BDS caused a significant decrease in the total protein content of synaptosomes harvested from the hippocampus of 28-day-old male and female mice, suggesting that BDS impairs normal synaptic development in the juvenile hippocampus. Using a novel liquid chromatography multiple reaction monitoring mass spectrometry (LC-MRM) assay, we found decreased expression of many synaptic proteins, as well as proteins involved in axonal growth, myelination, and mitochondrial activity. Golgi staining in 28-day-old BDS mice showed an increase in the number of immature and abnormally shaped spines and a decrease in the number of mature spines in CA1 neurons, consistent with defects in synaptic maturation and synaptic pruning at this age. In 14-day-old pups, BDS deceased the expression of proteins involved in axonal growth and myelination, but did not

  6. Precueing time but not direction of postural perturbation induces early muscular activation: comparison between young and elderly individuals.

    PubMed

    Silva, Marina Brito; Coelho, Daniel Boari; de Lima-Pardini, Andrea Cristina; Martinelli, Alessandra Rezende; Baptista, Thais da Silva; Ramos, Renato Teodoro; Teixeira, Luis Augusto

    2015-02-19

    In this study, we evaluated the effect of precueing characteristics of an impending perturbation to upright stance on reactive responses of distal leg muscles. Young and older individuals were compared in a task of recovering stable upright stance following rotation of the supporting platform to induce anterior or posterior body sway. Directions of the supporting platform rotation were randomized across trials. Immediately before postural perturbation participants were cued about direction and/or time of platform rotation, or performed the task under directional and temporal uncertainty of the impending perturbation. Results showed that precueing time of perturbation led to earlier muscular activation onset, while precueing perturbation direction did not modulate either latency or magnitude of muscular activation. Those effects were similar between age groups. Our findings suggest that awareness of the perturbation time favored shorter response latencies in both the young and older individuals.

  7. A sulfate starved ocean and the perturbation of the global carbon and sulfur cycles in the Early Cretaceous

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wortmann, U. G.; Chernyavsky, B.

    2006-12-01

    Recent high resolution δ13C and δ^{34}S data show that the onset of the Aptian δ13C and δ^{34}S excursions are contemporaneous and inversely correlated. This negative correlation is difficult to explain if we assume a modern ocean chemistry. However, new data suggest that during most of the last 550~Ma, the ocean had much lower sulfate concentrations than today. Here we show that the evaporites deposited during the opening of the South Atlantic removed enough sulfate from the ocean to decrease microbial sulfate reduction rates in the sedimentary column, resulting in a ~50% decrease of pyrite burial rates. As microbial sulfate reduction is also the major pathway for organic matter oxidation in the sedimentary system, this also decreased organic matter remineralization rates, causing the observed inverse relationship between the burial flux of organic matter and pyrite observed in their respective isotope signatures. Analyzing the Early Cretaceous perturbations of the global carbon and sulfur cycles as a response of the microbial biosphere to transient changes in seawater chemistry provides an elegant explanation of the existing data, without the need for dramatic changes in volcanic fluxes or the oceanic alkalinity budget.

  8. Dark matter in early-type spiral galaxies: the case of NGC 2179 and of NGC 2775

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corsini, E. M.; Pizzella, A.; Sarzi, M.; Cinzano, P.; Vega Beltrán, J. C.; Funes, J. G.; Bertola, F.; Persic, M.; Salucci, P.

    1999-02-01

    We present the stellar and ionized-gas velocity curves and velocity-dispersion profiles along the major axis for six early-type spiral galaxies. Two of these galaxies, namely NGC 2179 and NGC 2775, are particularly suited for the study of dark matter halos. Using their luminosity profiles and modeling their stellar and gaseous kinematics, we derive the mass contributions of the luminous and the dark matter to the total potential. In NGC 2179 we find that the data (measured out to about the optical radius R_opt) unambiguously require the presence of a massive dark halo. For the brighter and bigger object NGC 2775, we can rule out a significant halo contribution at radii R <~ 0.6 R_opt. Although preliminary, these results agree with the familiar mass distribution trend known for late-type spirals of comparable mass. Based on observations carried out at ESO, La Silla (Chile) (ESO N. 52, 1-020) and on observations obtained with the VATT: the Alice P. Lennon Telescope and the Thomas J. Bannan Astrophysics Facility. Tables 4 to 42 are only available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/Abstract.html.

  9. Record of Early Toarcian carbon cycle perturbations in a nearshore environment: the Bascharage section (easternmost Paris Basin)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermoso, M.; Delsate, D.; Baudin, F.; Le Callonnec, L.; Minoletti, F.; Renard, M.; Faber, A.

    2014-08-01

    In order to understand the significance of the worldwide deposition of black shale facies in the Early Toarcian (~ 183 Ma), considerable attention has been drawn to this Early Jurassic sub-stage over the last 3 decades. The discovery of a pronounced negative carbon isotope excursion (CIE) within the black shales disrupting the generally positive trend in carbon isotopes has stimulated many studies, particularly with a view to establish the local versus global nature of this major geochemical phenomenon. Here we document the sedimentological and chemostratigraphic evolution of a proximal environment in the Luxembourgian sedimentary area. At Bascharage, Lower Toarcian sediments record the isotopic signature of the Early Toarcian oceanic anoxic event (OAE) by a pronounced positive trend that testifies for widespread anoxia. The expression of the carbon isotope perturbation in this section, however, is unusual compared to adjacent NW European sections. A first -7‰ negative CIE, whose onset is recorded at the top of the tenuicostatum zone, can be assigned to the well-documented and potentially global Toarcian carbon isotope excursion (T-CIE) with confidence using the well-constrained ammonite biostratigraphic framework for this section. In this interval, facies contain only a limited amount of carbonate as a result of intense detrital supply in such a proximal and shallow environment. Stratigraphically higher in the section, the serpentinum zone records a subsequent CIE (-6‰) expressed as four negative steps, each being accompanied by positive shifts in the oxygen isotopic composition of carbonate. The preservation state of coccoliths and calcareous dinoflagellates in the second CIE is excellent and comparable to that observed in under- and overlying strata, so this cannot be an artefact of diagenesis. Considering the nature of this record, and the lack of such a pronounced event in the serpentinum zone in coeval sections in Europe, we hypothesise that this second

  10. Record of Early Toarcian carbon cycle perturbations in a nearshore environment: the Bascharage section (easternmost Paris Basin)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermoso, M.; Delsate, D.; Baudin, F.; Le Callonnec, L.; Minoletti, F.; Renard, M.; Faber, A.

    2014-04-01

    In order to understand the significance of worldwide deposition of black shale facies in the Early Toarcian (~ 183 Ma), considerable attention has been drawn to this Early Jurassic sub-Stage over the last three decades. The discovery of a pronounced negative carbon isotope excursion (CIE) within the black shales disrupting the generally positive trend in carbon isotopes has stimulated many studies, particularly with a view to establish the local vs. global nature of this major geochemical phenomenon. Here we document the sedimentological and chemostratigraphic evolution of a proximal environment in the Luxembourgian sedimentary area, the so-called Gutland. At Bascharage, Lower Toarcian sediments record the isotopic signature of the Early Toarcian Oceanic Anoxic Event (OAE) by a pronounced positive trend that testifies for widespread anoxia. The expression of the carbon isotope perturbation in this section however, is unusual compared to adjacent NW European sections. A first -7 ‰ negative CIE, whose onset is recorded at the top of the tenuicostatum zone, can be assigned to the well-documented and potentially global T-CIE with confidence using the well-constrained ammonite biostratigraphic framework for this section. In this interval, facies contain only a limited amount of carbonate as a result of intense detrital supply in such a proximal and shallow environment. Stratigraphically higher in the section, the serpentinum zone records a subsequent CIE (-6 ‰) that is expressed by four negative steps, each being accompanied by positive shifts in the oxygen isotopic composition of carbonate. The preservation state of coccoliths and calcareous dinoflagellates in the second CIE is excellent and comparable to that observed in under- and overlying strata, so this cannot be an artefact of diagenesis. Considering the nature of this record, and the lack of such a pronounced event in the serpentinum zone in coeval sections in Europe, we hypothesise that this second CIE was

  11. Constraints on the very early universe from thermal WIMP dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Drees, Manuel; Kakizaki, Mitsuru; Iminniyaz, Hoernisa

    2007-11-15

    We investigate the relic density n{sub {chi}} of nonrelativistic long-lived or stable particles {chi} in nonstandard cosmological scenarios. We calculate the relic abundance starting from arbitrary initial temperatures of the radiation-dominated epoch, and derive the lower bound on the initial temperature T{sub 0}{>=}m{sub {chi}}/23, assuming that thermally produced {chi} particles account for the dark matter energy density in the Universe; this bound holds for all {chi} annihilation cross sections. We also investigate cosmological scenarios with modified expansion rate. Even in this case an approximate formula similar to the standard one is capable of predicting the final relic abundance correctly. Choosing the {chi} annihilation cross section such that the observed cold dark matter abundance is reproduced in standard cosmology, we constrain possible modifications of the expansion rate at T{approx}m{sub {chi}}/20, well before big bang nucleosynthesis.

  12. Fingerprinting dark energy

    SciTech Connect

    Sapone, Domenico; Kunz, Martin

    2009-10-15

    Dark energy perturbations are normally either neglected or else included in a purely numerical way, obscuring their dependence on underlying parameters like the equation of state or the sound speed. However, while many different explanations for the dark energy can have the same equation of state, they usually differ in their perturbations so that these provide a fingerprint for distinguishing between different models with the same equation of state. In this paper we derive simple yet accurate approximations that are able to characterize a specific class of models (encompassing most scalar-field models) which is often generically called 'dark energy'. We then use the approximate solutions to look at the impact of the dark energy perturbations on the dark matter power spectrum and on the integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect in the cosmic microwave background radiation.

  13. the Important Role of Dark Matter Halo in Retaining Hot Gas Content in Early-type Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Yuanyuan; Irwin, Jimmy; White, Raymond Edwin; Buote, David A.; Gu, Liyi

    2014-08-01

    It has been an ongoing puzzle as to why there is a large scatter in the amount of hot X-ray gas in optically-similar early-type galaxies. With Chandra observations, we investigated the hot gas content of a sample of early-type galaxies. We found their hot X-ray gas per stellar light (L_X/L_opt) is highly correlated with their total masses estimated through stellar kinematics. Furthermore, we found no difference in the scatter in L_X/L_opt between galaxies in the field and in groups and clusters. This suggests that a dark matter halo is the primary factor in determining the hot gas content, as smaller galaxies are more vulnerable to mechanisms that remove hot gas from galaxies such as galactic winds. Other factors such as flattening, environment, rotation, and star formation history may have played a relatively secondary role.

  14. Detecting early stage pressure ulcer on dark skin using multispectral imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Dingrong; Kong, Linghua; Sprigle, Stephen; Wang, Fengtao; Wang, Chao; Liu, Fuhan; Adibi, Ali; Tummala, Rao

    2010-02-01

    We are developing a handheld multispectral imaging device to non-invasively inspect stage I pressure ulcers in dark pigmented skins without the need of touching the patient's skin. This paper reports some preliminary test results of using a proof-of-concept prototype. It also talks about the innovation's impact to traditional multispectral imaging technologies and the fields that will potentially benefit from it.

  15. Generalizing a unified model of dark matter, dark energy, and inflation with a noncanonical kinetic term

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de-Santiago, Josue; Cervantes-Cota, Jorge L.

    2011-03-01

    We study a unification model for dark energy, dark matter, and inflation with a single scalar field with noncanonical kinetic term. In this model, the kinetic term of the Lagrangian accounts for the dark matter and dark energy, and at early epochs, a quadratic potential accounts for slow roll inflation. The present work is an extension to the work by Bose and Majumdar [Phys. Rev. DPRVDAQ1550-7998 79, 103517 (2009).10.1103/PhysRevD.79.103517] with a more general kinetic term that was proposed by Chimento in Phys. Rev. DPRVDAQ0556-2821 69, 123517 (2004).10.1103/PhysRevD.69.123517 We demonstrate that the model is viable at the background and linear perturbation levels.

  16. The formation and evolution of dark matter halos early in cosmic history

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ernest, Alllan David; Collins, Matthew P.

    2015-08-01

    Observational evidence points to the formation of super-massive black holes, heavy elements and halo structure much earlier in cosmic history than expected [1], and this is challenging for Lambda Cold Dark Matter (LCDM) theory. However, if photon scattering cross sections were less than expected it becomes possible for halos to form at earlier times and relax the tensions that exist with LCDM theory. This may indeed be the case: it has recently been shown [2,3] that photon-particle scattering cross sections vary significantly with the eigenspectral distribution of the scattering particle in deep gravity wells, an effect that depends on the degree of localization of the particle wavefunction and the proximity of the halo to thermal equilibrium. Cross sections tend to be lower the larger and deeper the gravitational well. This purely quantum effect means that accepted cross sections, as measured on Earth and used to determine the rate and timing of halo formation, may not be applicable to deep gravity wells, not only at the present epoch but throughout cosmic history.By combining reduced photon scattering cross sections with Carr’s primordial black hole mass spectrum formulation[4] calculated at the last phase transition (t = 1 s), it is possible to provide a scenario of halo formation that enables galaxies and halos to form much earlier in cosmic history, yet maintain consistency with cosmic microwave background observations and primordial nucleosynthesis. In addition this scenario provides a unified model relating globular clusters, dwarf spheroidal galaxies and bulges, enables an understanding of the black hole-bulge/black hole-dark halo relations, and enables prediction of dark to visible matter, based on the physical parameters of a halo. This scenario will be presented and discussed.[1] Xue-Bing Wu et al, 2015, Nature, 518,512-515 doi: 10.1038/nature14241[2] Ernest A. D., 2009, J. Phys. A: Math. Theor. 42 115207, 115208[3] Ernest A. D, 2012, in Advances in

  17. Warped Universe: Analysis of Strong Lens Candidates from Early Dark Energy Survey Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nord, Brian; Buckley-Geer, Elizabeth J.; Lin, Huan; Diehl, H. Thomas; Gaitsch, Hallie

    2015-01-01

    Over five observing seasons, which started in August 2013, the Dark Energy Survey (DES) will carry out a wide field survey of 5000 square degrees of the Southern Galactic Cap. As much of the wide-field area has not yet been systematically surveyed, we expect to discover many new strongly lensed galaxies and quasars.DES has identified 24 strong lens candidate objects (galaxy- and galaxy clusters-scale) in data from the Science Verification season and has performed spectroscopic follow-up on a subset of these candidates as part of a Gemini Large and Long program. We present the current state of progress on the photometric and spectroscopic analysis of the lens candidate systems.One of the main objectives of the strong lensing science program in DES is to derive constraints on dark energy. The two major components of this part of the program will be exploiting (1) lenses with background sources at multiple redshifts and (2) lensed quasars. In addition to cosmology, we will use the cluster-scale lens sample to study dark matter mass profile, along with the large sample of sources at varying redshifts to study of galaxy evolution and substructure.To obtain precise lens and source positions and to verify the candidate system as a lensing system, we must obtain spectroscopic redshifts. In order to model the lens potential to the required level of precision, we also require high-resolution imaging, both available at the Gemini South facility.To select lenses with arc-like features we use a combination of automated arc-finders, catalog searches and visual scans. We carry out these searches on the annual DES data release. The first target list of 24 candidates comes from the Science Verification season, which was undertaken during the 2012/2013 observing season and is about 300 square degrees. Using the upgraded GMOS spectrographs at Gemini South, we have begun spectroscopic observations through the Gemini Large and Long program, awarded to PI Liz Buckley-Geer to follow

  18. Foreword: Dark energy and CMB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dodelson, Scott; Huterer, Dragan

    2015-03-01

    Maps of the Universe when it was 400,000 years old from observations of the cosmic microwave background and over the last ten billion years from galaxy surveys point to a compelling cosmological model. This model requires a very early epoch of accelerated expansion, inflation, during which the seeds of structure were planted via quantum mechanical fluctuations. These seeds began to grow via gravitational instability during the epoch in which dark matter dominated the energy density of the universe, transforming small perturbations laid down during inflation into nonlinear structures such as million light-year sized clusters, galaxies, stars, planets, and people. Over the past few billion years, we have entered a new phase, during which the expansion of the Universe is accelerating presumably driven by yet another substance, dark energy.

  19. From Dark to Bright: First-Order Perturbation Theory with Analytical Mode Normalization for Plasmonic Nanoantenna Arrays Applied to Refractive Index Sensing.

    PubMed

    Weiss, T; Mesch, M; Schäferling, M; Giessen, H; Langbein, W; Muljarov, E A

    2016-06-10

    We present a first-order perturbation theory to calculate the frequency shift and linewidth change of photonic resonances in one- and two-dimensional periodic structures under modifications of the surrounding refractive index. Our method is based on the resonant state expansion, for which we extend the analytical mode normalization to periodic structures. We apply this theory to calculate the sensitivity of bright dipolar and much darker quadrupolar plasmonic modes by determining the maximum shift and optimal sensing volume. PMID:27341256

  20. From Dark to Bright: First-Order Perturbation Theory with Analytical Mode Normalization for Plasmonic Nanoantenna Arrays Applied to Refractive Index Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, T.; Mesch, M.; Schäferling, M.; Giessen, H.; Langbein, W.; Muljarov, E. A.

    2016-06-01

    We present a first-order perturbation theory to calculate the frequency shift and linewidth change of photonic resonances in one- and two-dimensional periodic structures under modifications of the surrounding refractive index. Our method is based on the resonant state expansion, for which we extend the analytical mode normalization to periodic structures. We apply this theory to calculate the sensitivity of bright dipolar and much darker quadrupolar plasmonic modes by determining the maximum shift and optimal sensing volume.

  1. The SL2S Galaxy-scale Lens Sample. V. Dark Matter Halos and Stellar IMF of Massive Early-type Galaxies Out to Redshift 0.8

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonnenfeld, Alessandro; Treu, Tommaso; Marshall, Philip J.; Suyu, Sherry H.; Gavazzi, Raphaël; Auger, Matthew W.; Nipoti, Carlo

    2015-02-01

    We investigate the cosmic evolution of the internal structure of massive early-type galaxies over half of the age of the universe. We perform a joint lensing and stellar dynamics analysis of a sample of 81 strong lenses from the Strong Lensing Legacy Survey and Sloan ACS Lens Survey and combine the results with a hierarchical Bayesian inference method to measure the distribution of dark matter mass and stellar initial mass function (IMF) across the population of massive early-type galaxies. Lensing selection effects are taken into account. We find that the dark matter mass projected within the inner 5 kpc increases for increasing redshift, decreases for increasing stellar mass density, but is roughly constant along the evolutionary tracks of early-type galaxies. The average dark matter slope is consistent with that of a Navarro-Frenk-White profile, but is not well constrained. The stellar IMF normalization is close to a Salpeter IMF at log M * = 11.5 and scales strongly with increasing stellar mass. No dependence of the IMF on redshift or stellar mass density is detected. The anti-correlation between dark matter mass and stellar mass density supports the idea of mergers being more frequent in more massive dark matter halos.

  2. THE SL2S GALAXY-SCALE LENS SAMPLE. V. DARK MATTER HALOS AND STELLAR IMF OF MASSIVE EARLY-TYPE GALAXIES OUT TO REDSHIFT 0.8

    SciTech Connect

    Sonnenfeld, Alessandro; Treu, Tommaso; Marshall, Philip J.; Suyu, Sherry H.; Gavazzi, Raphaël; Auger, Matthew W.; Nipoti, Carlo

    2015-02-20

    We investigate the cosmic evolution of the internal structure of massive early-type galaxies over half of the age of the universe. We perform a joint lensing and stellar dynamics analysis of a sample of 81 strong lenses from the Strong Lensing Legacy Survey and Sloan ACS Lens Survey and combine the results with a hierarchical Bayesian inference method to measure the distribution of dark matter mass and stellar initial mass function (IMF) across the population of massive early-type galaxies. Lensing selection effects are taken into account. We find that the dark matter mass projected within the inner 5 kpc increases for increasing redshift, decreases for increasing stellar mass density, but is roughly constant along the evolutionary tracks of early-type galaxies. The average dark matter slope is consistent with that of a Navarro-Frenk-White profile, but is not well constrained. The stellar IMF normalization is close to a Salpeter IMF at log M {sub *} = 11.5 and scales strongly with increasing stellar mass. No dependence of the IMF on redshift or stellar mass density is detected. The anti-correlation between dark matter mass and stellar mass density supports the idea of mergers being more frequent in more massive dark matter halos.

  3. Environmental perturbations at the early Eocene ETM2, H2, and I1 events as inferred by Tethyan calcareous plankton (Terche section, northeastern Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Onofrio, Roberta; Luciani, Valeria; Fornaciari, Eliana; Giusberti, Luca; Boscolo Galazzo, Flavia; Dallanave, Edoardo; Westerhold, Thomas; Sprovieri, Mario; Telch, Sonia

    2016-09-01

    Several early Eocene hyperthermals have been recently investigated and characterized in terms of temperature anomalies and oceanographic changes. The effects of these climatic perturbations on biotic communities are much less constrained. Here we present new records from the Terche section (northeastern Italy) that, for the first time, integrates data on planktic foraminifera and calcareous nannofossils across three post-Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum negative carbon isotope excursions (CIEs). The biomagnetostratigraphic framework generated at Terche allows us to confidently relate such CIEs to the Eocene Thermal Maximum 2 (ETM2), H2, and I1 events. Each of these events coincides with lithological anomalies characterized by significantly lower calcium carbonate content (marly units, MUs). We interpret these MUs as mainly linked to an effect of increased terrigenous dilution, as dissolution proxies do not display significant variations. Calcareous plankton assemblages change significantly across these events and radiolarians increase. Observed changes suggest that transient warming and environmental perturbations, though more intense during ETM2, occurred during each of the three investigated perturbations. Variations among calcareous plankton suggest increase in surface-water eutrophication with respect to the pre-event conditions, coupled with a weakening of the upper water-column thermal stratification. Higher nutrient discharge was related to intensification of the hydrological cycle as a consequence of the warmer climate. These conditions persisted during the early CIE recovery, implying slower recovery rates for the environment and biota than for the carbon cycle.

  4. Advances in Early Memory Development Research: Insights about the Dark Side of the Moon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Courage, Mary L.; Howe, Mark L.

    2004-01-01

    Over the past three decades impressive progress has been made in documenting the development of encoding, storage, and retrieval processes in preverbal infants and children. This literature includes an extensive and diverse database as well as theoretical conjecture about the underlying processes that drive early memory development. A selective…

  5. Evolution of central dark matter of early-type galaxies up to z ˜ 0.8

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tortora, C.; Napolitano, N. R.; Saglia, R. P.; Romanowsky, A. J.; Covone, G.; Capaccioli, M.

    2014-11-01

    We investigate the evolution of dark and luminous matter in the central regions of early-type galaxies up to z ˜ 0.8. We use a spectroscopically selected sample of 154 cluster and field galaxies from the ESO Distant Clusters Survey (EDisCS), covering a wide range in redshifts (z ˜ 0.4-0.8), stellar masses (log M⋆/M⊙ ˜ 10.5-11.5 dex) and velocity dispersions (σ⋆ ˜ 100-300 km s-1). We obtain central dark matter (DM) fractions by determining the dynamical masses from Jeans modelling of galaxy aperture velocity dispersions and the M⋆ from galaxy colours, and compare the results with local samples. We discuss how the correlations of central DM with galaxy size (i.e. the effective radius, Re), M⋆ and σ⋆ evolve as a function of redshift, finding clear indications that local galaxies are, on average, more DM dominated than their counterparts at larger redshift. This DM fraction evolution with z can be only partially interpreted as a consequence of the size-redshift evolution. We discuss our results within galaxy formation scenarios, and conclude that the growth in size and DM content which we measure within the last 7 Gyr is incompatible with passive evolution, while it is well reproduced in the multiple minor merger scenario. We also discuss the impact of the initial mass function (IMF) on our DM inferences and argue that this can be non-universal with the look-back time. In particular, we find that the Salpeter IMF can be better accommodated by low-redshift systems, while producing stellar masses at high z which are unphysically larger than the estimated dynamical masses (particularly for lower σ⋆ systems).

  6. A view of the early universe

    SciTech Connect

    Kolb, E.W. |

    1999-07-01

    During this conference we have heard a great deal about recent progress in understanding the development of cosmic structures from small initial seed perturbations. In these concluding remarks, I would like to comment on the two parts of the picture involving elementary-particle physics: 1) the generation of the seed perturbations in the early universe during inflation, and 2) the nature of the dark matter. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  7. The VLF fingerprint of elves: Step-like and long-recovery early VLF perturbations caused by powerful ±CG lightning EM pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haldoupis, Christos; Cohen, Morris; Arnone, Enrico; Cotts, Benjamin; Dietrich, Stefano

    2013-08-01

    Subionospheric VLF recordings are investigated in relation with intense cloud-to-ground (CG) lightning data. Lightning impacts the lower ionosphere via heating and ionization changes which produce VLF signal perturbations known as early VLF events. Typically, early events recover in about 100 s, but a small subclass does not recover for many minutes, known as long-recovery early events (LORE). In this study, we identify LORE as a distinct category of early VLF events, whose signature may occur either on its own or alongside the short-lived typical early VLF event. Since LORE onsets coincide with powerful lightning strokes of either polarity (±), we infer that they are due to long-lasting ionization changes in the uppermost D region ionosphere caused by electromagnetic pulses emitted by strong ± CG lightning peak currents of typically > 250 kA, which are also known to generate elves. The LORE perturbations are detected when the discharge is located within ~250 km from the great circle path of a VLF transmitter-receiver link. The probability of occurrence increases with stroke intensity and approaches unity for discharges with peak currents ≥ ~300 kA. LOREs are nighttime phenomena that occur preferentially, at least in the present regional data set, during winter when strong ± CG discharges are more frequent and intense. The evidence suggests LORE as a distinct signature representing the VLF fingerprint of elves, a fact which, although was predicted by theory, it escaped identification in the long-going VLF research of lightning effects in the lower ionosphere.

  8. Long-lived light mediator to dark matter and primordial small scale spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yue

    2015-05-06

    We calculate the early universe evolution of perturbations in the dark matter energy density in the context of simple dark sector models containing a GeV scale light mediator. We consider the case that the mediator is long-lived, with lifetime up to a second, and before decaying it temporarily dominates the energy density of the universe. We show that for primordial perturbations that enter the horizon around this period, the interplay between linear growth during matter domination and collisional damping can generically lead to a sharp peak in the spectrum of dark matter density perturbation. As a result, the population of the smallest DM halos gets enhanced. Possible implications of this scenario are discussed.

  9. Long-lived light mediator to dark matter and primordial small scale spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yue

    2015-05-01

    We calculate the early universe evolution of perturbations in the dark matter energy density in the context of simple dark sector models containing a GeV scale light mediator. We consider the case that the mediator is long-lived, with lifetime up to a second, and before decaying it temporarily dominates the energy density of the universe. We show that for primordial perturbations that enter the horizon around this period, the interplay between linear growth during matter domination and collisional damping can generically lead to a sharp peak in the spectrum of dark matter density perturbation. As a result, the population of the smallest DM halos gets enhanced. Possible implications of this scenario are discussed.

  10. DARK MATTER CONTRACTION AND THE STELLAR CONTENT OF MASSIVE EARLY-TYPE GALAXIES: DISFAVORING 'LIGHT' INITIAL MASS FUNCTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Auger, M. W.; Treu, T.; Gavazzi, R.; Bolton, A. S.; Koopmans, L. V. E.; Marshall, P. J.

    2010-10-01

    We use stellar dynamics, strong lensing, stellar population synthesis models, and weak lensing shear measurements to constrain the dark matter (DM) profile and stellar mass in a sample of 53 massive early-type galaxies. We explore three DM halo models (unperturbed Navarro, Frenk, and White (NFW) halos and the adiabatic contraction models of Blumenthal and Gnedin) and impose a model for the relationship between the stellar and virial mass (i.e., a relationship for the star formation efficiency as a function of halo mass). We show that, given our model assumptions, the data clearly prefer a Salpeter-like initial mass function (IMF) over a lighter IMF (e.g., Chabrier or Kroupa), irrespective of the choice of DM halo. In addition, we find that the data prefer at most a moderate amount of adiabatic contraction (Blumenthal adiabatic contraction is strongly disfavored) and are only consistent with no adiabatic contraction (i.e., an NFW halo) if a mass-dependent IMF is assumed, in the sense of a more massive normalization of the IMF for more massive halos.

  11. Distribution of CCS and HC{sub 3}N in L1147, an early phase dark cloud

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Taiki; Ohishi, Masatoshi; Hirota, Tomoya

    2014-06-20

    We used the Nobeyama 45 m radio telescope to reveal spatial distributions of CCS and HC{sub 3}N in L1147, one of the carbon-chain producing region (CCPR) candidates, where carbon-chain molecules are dominant rather than NH{sub 3}. We found that three cores (two CCS cores and one HC{sub 3}N core), which are away from a very low luminosity object (a source that may turn into a sub-stellar mass brown dwarf), exist along the NE-SW filament traced by the 850 μm dust continuum. The column densities of CCS are 3-7 × 10{sup 12} cm{sup –2} and those of HC{sub 3}N are 2-6 × 10{sup 12} cm{sup –2}, respectively, much lower than those previously reported toward other CCPRs. We also found that two CCS peaks are displaced from the peaks of HC{sub 3}N. In order to interpret such interleaved distributions, we conducted chemical reaction network simulations and found that slightly different gas densities could lead to large variation of the CCS-to-HC{sub 3}N ratio in the early phase of dark cloud evolution. Such a chemical 'variation' may be seen in other CCPRs. Finally, we were able to confirm that the L1147 filament can be regarded as a CCPR.

  12. Quantitative study of the development of neurons and synapses in rats reared in the dark during early postnatal life. 1. Superior colliculus.

    PubMed Central

    Fukui, Y; Bedi, K S

    1991-01-01

    Rearing animals in dark conditions during early postnatal life has been shown to affect both the morphology and the normal functioning of the visual system. We have investigated the effects on the synapse-to-neuron ratios in the superior colliculi of rearing male rats in the dark from birth until 30 days of age, followed in some cases by a 35 day period of rehabilitation in control lighting conditions. Control lighting conditions consisted of a room on a 12 hour light/12 hour dark cycle. Synapse-to-neuron ratios were calculated from estimates of the numerical densities of neurons and synapses. These estimates were made using the 'disector' method at the light and electron microscopical levels. Neuronal nuclei were used as the counting unit for neurons and paramembranous densities for synapses. There were no significant differences in the numerical densities of neurons, synapses or synapse-to-neuron ratios between dark-reared and control rats at 30 days of age. Sixty five days old rats, previously raised in the dark, had a significantly smaller numerical density of neurons than light-reared controls. Two-way analysis of variance techniques showed significant effects of age on the estimates of the numerical densities of neurons and synapses. However, there were no significant main effects of the lighting conditions, nor any significant interaction for any of the measures. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:2032942

  13. Dark stars: a review.

    PubMed

    Freese, Katherine; Rindler-Daller, Tanja; Spolyar, Douglas; Valluri, Monica

    2016-06-01

    Dark stars are stellar objects made (almost entirely) of hydrogen and helium, but powered by the heat from dark matter annihilation, rather than by fusion. They are in hydrostatic and thermal equilibrium, but with an unusual power source. Weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs), among the best candidates for dark matter, can be their own antimatter and can annihilate inside the star, thereby providing a heat source. Although dark matter constitutes only [Formula: see text]0.1% of the stellar mass, this amount is sufficient to power the star for millions to billions of years. Thus, the first phase of stellar evolution in the history of the Universe may have been dark stars. We review how dark stars come into existence, how they grow as long as dark matter fuel persists, and their stellar structure and evolution. The studies were done in two different ways, first assuming polytropic interiors and more recently using the MESA stellar evolution code; the basic results are the same. Dark stars are giant, puffy (∼10 AU) and cool (surface temperatures  ∼10 000 K) objects. We follow the evolution of dark stars from their inception at  ∼[Formula: see text] as they accrete mass from their surroundings to become supermassive stars, some even reaching masses  >[Formula: see text] and luminosities  >[Formula: see text], making them detectable with the upcoming James Webb Space Telescope. Once the dark matter runs out and the dark star dies, it may collapse to a black hole; thus dark stars may provide seeds for the supermassive black holes observed throughout the Universe and at early times. Other sites for dark star formation may exist in the Universe today in regions of high dark matter density such as the centers of galaxies. The current review briefly discusses dark stars existing today, but focuses on the early generation of dark stars. PMID:27214049

  14. Dark stars: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freese, Katherine; Rindler-Daller, Tanja; Spolyar, Douglas; Valluri, Monica

    2016-06-01

    Dark stars are stellar objects made (almost entirely) of hydrogen and helium, but powered by the heat from dark matter annihilation, rather than by fusion. They are in hydrostatic and thermal equilibrium, but with an unusual power source. Weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs), among the best candidates for dark matter, can be their own antimatter and can annihilate inside the star, thereby providing a heat source. Although dark matter constitutes only ≲ 0.1% of the stellar mass, this amount is sufficient to power the star for millions to billions of years. Thus, the first phase of stellar evolution in the history of the Universe may have been dark stars. We review how dark stars come into existence, how they grow as long as dark matter fuel persists, and their stellar structure and evolution. The studies were done in two different ways, first assuming polytropic interiors and more recently using the MESA stellar evolution code; the basic results are the same. Dark stars are giant, puffy (˜10 AU) and cool (surface temperatures  ˜10 000 K) objects. We follow the evolution of dark stars from their inception at  ˜1{{M}⊙} as they accrete mass from their surroundings to become supermassive stars, some even reaching masses  >{{10}6}{{M}⊙} and luminosities  >{{10}10}{{L}⊙} , making them detectable with the upcoming James Webb Space Telescope. Once the dark matter runs out and the dark star dies, it may collapse to a black hole; thus dark stars may provide seeds for the supermassive black holes observed throughout the Universe and at early times. Other sites for dark star formation may exist in the Universe today in regions of high dark matter density such as the centers of galaxies. The current review briefly discusses dark stars existing today, but focuses on the early generation of dark stars.

  15. Dark stars: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freese, Katherine; Rindler-Daller, Tanja; Spolyar, Douglas; Valluri, Monica

    2016-06-01

    Dark stars are stellar objects made (almost entirely) of hydrogen and helium, but powered by the heat from dark matter annihilation, rather than by fusion. They are in hydrostatic and thermal equilibrium, but with an unusual power source. Weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs), among the best candidates for dark matter, can be their own antimatter and can annihilate inside the star, thereby providing a heat source. Although dark matter constitutes only ≲ 0.1% of the stellar mass, this amount is sufficient to power the star for millions to billions of years. Thus, the first phase of stellar evolution in the history of the Universe may have been dark stars. We review how dark stars come into existence, how they grow as long as dark matter fuel persists, and their stellar structure and evolution. The studies were done in two different ways, first assuming polytropic interiors and more recently using the MESA stellar evolution code; the basic results are the same. Dark stars are giant, puffy (∼10 AU) and cool (surface temperatures  ∼10 000 K) objects. We follow the evolution of dark stars from their inception at  ∼1{{M}ȯ} as they accrete mass from their surroundings to become supermassive stars, some even reaching masses  >{{10}6}{{M}ȯ} and luminosities  >{{10}10}{{L}ȯ} , making them detectable with the upcoming James Webb Space Telescope. Once the dark matter runs out and the dark star dies, it may collapse to a black hole; thus dark stars may provide seeds for the supermassive black holes observed throughout the Universe and at early times. Other sites for dark star formation may exist in the Universe today in regions of high dark matter density such as the centers of galaxies. The current review briefly discusses dark stars existing today, but focuses on the early generation of dark stars.

  16. Dark stars: a review.

    PubMed

    Freese, Katherine; Rindler-Daller, Tanja; Spolyar, Douglas; Valluri, Monica

    2016-06-01

    Dark stars are stellar objects made (almost entirely) of hydrogen and helium, but powered by the heat from dark matter annihilation, rather than by fusion. They are in hydrostatic and thermal equilibrium, but with an unusual power source. Weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs), among the best candidates for dark matter, can be their own antimatter and can annihilate inside the star, thereby providing a heat source. Although dark matter constitutes only [Formula: see text]0.1% of the stellar mass, this amount is sufficient to power the star for millions to billions of years. Thus, the first phase of stellar evolution in the history of the Universe may have been dark stars. We review how dark stars come into existence, how they grow as long as dark matter fuel persists, and their stellar structure and evolution. The studies were done in two different ways, first assuming polytropic interiors and more recently using the MESA stellar evolution code; the basic results are the same. Dark stars are giant, puffy (∼10 AU) and cool (surface temperatures  ∼10 000 K) objects. We follow the evolution of dark stars from their inception at  ∼[Formula: see text] as they accrete mass from their surroundings to become supermassive stars, some even reaching masses  >[Formula: see text] and luminosities  >[Formula: see text], making them detectable with the upcoming James Webb Space Telescope. Once the dark matter runs out and the dark star dies, it may collapse to a black hole; thus dark stars may provide seeds for the supermassive black holes observed throughout the Universe and at early times. Other sites for dark star formation may exist in the Universe today in regions of high dark matter density such as the centers of galaxies. The current review briefly discusses dark stars existing today, but focuses on the early generation of dark stars.

  17. The Dark Matter Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanders, Robert H.

    2014-02-01

    1. Introduction; 2. Early history of the dark matter hypothesis; 3. The stability of disk galaxies: the dark halo solutions; 4. Direct evidence: extended rotation curves of spiral galaxies; 5. The maximum disk: light traces mass; 6. Cosmology and the birth of astroparticle physics; 7. Clusters revisited: missing mass found; 8. CDM confronts galaxy rotation curves; 9. The new cosmology: dark matter is not enough; 10. An alternative to dark matter: Modified Newtonian Dynamics; 11. Seeing dark matter: the theory and practice of detection; 12. Reflections: a personal point of view; Appendix; References; Index.

  18. Impact of Early Aptian carbon cycle perturbations on evolution of a marine shelf system in the Basque-Cantabrian Basin (Aralar, N Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millán, M. I.; Weissert, H. J.; Fernández-Mendiola, P. A.; García-Mondéjar, J.

    2009-10-01

    The Aptian Oceanic Anoxic Event 1a (OAE1a, ca.120 Ma ago) is one of the most prominent of a series of geologically brief intervals in the Cretaceous reflecting a major perturbation in the global carbon cycle. This carbon cycle perturbation is recorded in the C-isotope stratigraphy. In this study we present a new carbonate and organic carbon isotope record across OAE1a from expanded shallow marine sections (Igaratza and Iribas) in the Basque-Cantabrian Basin (N Spain). The sediments studied were accumulated on a mixed carbonate-siliciclastic and carbonate shelf. The δ13C carb and δ13C org curves obtained show a pronounced negative spike in the Deshayesites weissi Zone and a subsequent positive excursion within the newly described D. deshayesi-D. furcata transition Zone, approximately equivalent to the upper D. deshayesi Zone of other sections. Specific changes in facies patterns and a reduction in neritic carbonate production predate the negative C-isotope perturbation. These changes coincide with global carbonate crises in neritic and pelagic environments. Corresponding with the beginning of OAE1a (Selli level) a condensed interval rich in ammonites is observed. This horizon is linked to a major transgression with high biodiversity. The "ammonite bloom" suggests enhanced primary productivity in the surface waters of the Basque-Cantabrian Basin at improving environmental conditions for selected biocalcifiers. The ultimate recovery of shelf carbonate deposition occurred after OAE1a and it coincided in time with the most positive values of the carbon-isotope excursion. Based on carbon-isotope stratigraphy it has been deduced that black shales corresponding to Selli Level are missing in Aralar, so that anoxia is not recorded in the studied sections of the marine shelf environment. An organic-rich interval (Aparein level) postdates the Early Aptian major positive excursion. The Aparein event should be considered in the future research of OAEs.

  19. Nonthermal dark matter models and signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okada, Hiroshi; Orikasa, Yuta; Toma, Takashi

    2016-03-01

    Many experiments exploring weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) such as direct, indirect and collider searches have been carried out until now. However, a clear signal of a WIMP has not been found yet and it makes us to suspect that WIMPs are questionable as a dark matter candidate. Taking into account this situation, we propose two models in which dark matter relic density is produced by decay of a metastable particle. In the first model, the metastable particle is a feebly interacting massive particle, which is the so-called FIMP, produced by freeze-in mechanism in the early universe. In the second model, the decaying particle is thermally produced the same as the usual WIMP. However decay of the particle into dark matter is led by a higher dimensional operator. As a phenomenologically interesting feature of nonthermal dark matter discussed in this paper, a strong sharp gamma-ray emission as an indirect detection signal occurs due to internal bremsstrahlung, although some parameter space has already been ruled out by this process. Moreover combining other experimental and theoretical constraints such as dark matter relic density, big bang nucleosynthesis, collider, gamma-rays and perturbativity of couplings, we discuss the two nonthermal DM models.

  20. Modulated preheating and isocurvature perturbations

    SciTech Connect

    Enqvist, Kari; Rusak, Stanislav E-mail: stanislav.rusak@helsinki.fi

    2013-03-01

    We consider a model of preheating where the coupling of the inflaton to the preheat field is modulated by an additional scalar field which is light during inflation. We establish that such a model produces the observed curvature perturbation analogously to the modulated reheating scenario. The contribution of modulated preheating to the power spectrum and to non-Gaussianity can however be significantly larger compared to modulated perturbative reheating. We also consider the implications of the current constraints on isocurvature perturbations in case where the modulating field is responsible for cold dark matter. We find that existing bounds on CDM isocurvature perturbations imply that modulated preheating is unlikely to give a dominant contribution to the curvature perturbation and that the same bounds suggest important constraints on non-Gaussianity and the amount of primordial gravitational waves.

  1. Resonant SIMP dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Soo-Min; Lee, Hyun Min

    2016-07-01

    We consider a resonant SIMP dark matter in models with two singlet complex scalar fields charged under a local dark U(1)D. After the U(1)D is broken down to a Z5 discrete subgroup, the lighter scalar field becomes a SIMP dark matter which has the enhanced 3 → 2 annihilation cross section near the resonance of the heavier scalar field. Bounds on the SIMP self-scattering cross section and the relic density can be fulfilled at the same time for perturbative couplings of SIMP. A small gauge kinetic mixing between the SM hypercharge and dark gauge bosons can be used to make SIMP dark matter in kinetic equilibrium with the SM during freeze-out.

  2. Coupling dark energy to dark matter inhomogeneities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marra, Valerio

    2016-09-01

    We propose that dark energy in the form of a scalar field could effectively couple to dark matter inhomogeneities. Through this coupling energy could be transferred to/from the scalar field, which could possibly enter an accelerated regime. Though phenomenological, this scenario is interesting as it provides a natural trigger for the onset of the acceleration of the universe, since dark energy starts driving the expansion of the universe when matter inhomogeneities become sufficiently strong. Here we study a possible realization of this idea by coupling dark energy to dark matter via the linear growth function of matter perturbations. The numerical results show that it is indeed possible to obtain a viable cosmology with the expected series of radiation, matter and dark-energy dominated eras. In particular, the current density of dark energy is given by the value of the coupling parameters rather than by very special initial conditions for the scalar field. In other words, this model-unlike standard models of cosmic late acceleration-does not suffer from the so-called "coincidence problem" and its related fine tuning of initial conditions.

  3. Sea-floor carbonate fans from the Early Jurassic (Pliensbachian-Toarcian): a sedimentological signature of carbon cycle perturbation in deep time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martindale, R. C.; Them, T. R.; Gill, B. C.; Knoll, A. H.

    2013-12-01

    Carbon cycle perturbations at the end of the Permian and Triassic periods are linked to immense volcanism and mass extinction. The Early Jurassic Toarcian Ocean Anoxic Event (T-OAE) also appears to be correlated with the emplacement of a large igneous province (Karoo-Ferrar), but its biological consequences were more modest. Despite only limited extinction, widespread reef collapse suggests that, like the end-Permian and end-Triassic events, the T-OAE event may have been an instance of ancient ocean acidification. Testing such a hypothesis requires the development and implementation of new proxies for ocean acidification events in deep time. Primary aragonite seafloor fans are a common occurrence in Archean and Paleoproterozoic carbonates, as well as in cap carbonates above Neoproterozoic glaciogenic deposits. They are relatively rare, however, in Phanerozoic successions and until recently were thought to occur almost exclusively during the Permo-Triassic interval. In the last few years, cm-scale carbonate fans (pseudomorphs of aragonite) that formed within the sediment (before compaction) have been discovered in Triassic-Jurassic boundary successions and are posited to reflect an acidified water column. We have identified broadly comparable fibrous calcite layers (roughly 2 - 10 cm thick) in Pliensbachian-Toarcian (Early Jurassic) cores from Alberta, Canada. At the macroscale the layers exhibit a fan-like (and sometimes cone-in-cone) structure and appear to have displaced the sediment around them as they grew in an upward direction. At the microscale, the carbonate crystals (pseudomorphs of aragonite) often initiate on a condensed horizon or shell material and grow in multiple directions (suggesting growth within the sediment). However, the predominant crystal growth direction is upward, towards the sediment-water interface. Resedimentation of broken fans is evidence that crystal growth was penecontemporaneous with sedimentation and occurred within centimeters of

  4. DoE Early Career Research Program: Final Report: Model-Independent Dark-Matter Searches at the ATLAS Experiment and Applications of Many-core Computing to High Energy Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Farbin, Amir

    2015-07-15

    This is the final report of for DoE Early Career Research Program Grant Titled "Model-Independent Dark-Matter Searches at the ATLAS Experiment and Applications of Many-core Computing to High Energy Physics".

  5. Osmium isotope perturbations during the Pliensbachian-Toarcian (Early Jurassic): Relationships between volcanism, weathering, and climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Percival, Lawrence; Cohen, Anthony; Davies, Marc; Dickson, Alexander; Jenkyns, Hugh; Hesselbo, Stephen; Mather, Tamsin; Xu, Weimu; Storm, Marisa

    2016-04-01

    The Mesozoic Era marked a time of greenhouse conditions on Earth, punctuated by a number of abrupt perturbations to the carbon cycle, such as Ocean Anoxic Events (OAEs). OAEs are typically marked in the stratigraphic record by the appearance of organic-rich shales, and excursions in carbon-isotope ratios registered in carbonates and organic matter. A range of geochemical evidence indicates changes to global temperatures, typically featuring abrupt warming possibly caused by CO2 emissions resulting from Large Igneous Province (LIP) volcanism. A warmer atmosphere is thought to have led to changes in the global hydrological cycle, which would likely have enhanced global weathering rates. The Toarcian OAE (T-OAE) is inferred, from osmium isotope ratios in organic-rich mudrocks from Yorkshire and western North America, to have been a time of such increased weathering rates. However, it is likely that the sediments at these locations were deposited in relatively hydrographically restricted environments, potentially more susceptible to the influence of local input; consequently, they may not offer the best representation of the global seawater Os-isotope composition at that time. In this study, we have measured the osmium isotope composition of siciliclastic mudrocks in a core from the Mochras borehole (Llanbedr Farm, Cardigan Bay Basin, Wales), which constitutes a sedimentary record for a fully open-marine seaway that connected Tethys to the Boreal ocean during the Toarcian. We analysed samples from strata including both the T-OAE and preceding Pliensbachian-Toarcian boundary (Pl-To), both of which record multiple geochemical excursions and records of elevated extinction amongst benthic fauna. We find that the latest Pliensbachian records seawater 187Os/188Os of ~0.35-0.4, rising to ~0.5 at the Pl-To boundary, before a further rise to ~0.7 during the T-OAE. We conclude that such increases in radiogenic Os flux to the ocean system resulted from enhanced continental

  6. Dark coupling and gauge invariance

    SciTech Connect

    Gavela, M.B.; Honorez, L. Lopez; Rigolin, S. E-mail: llopezho@ulb.ac.be E-mail: stefano.rigolin@pd.infn.it

    2010-11-01

    We study a coupled dark energy-dark matter model in which the energy-momentum exchange is proportional to the Hubble expansion rate. The inclusion of its perturbation is required by gauge invariance. We derive the linear perturbation equations for the gauge invariant energy density contrast and velocity of the coupled fluids, and we determine the initial conditions. The latter turn out to be adiabatic for dark energy, when assuming adiabatic initial conditions for all the standard fluids. We perform a full Monte Carlo Markov Chain likelihood analysis of the model, using WMAP 7-year data.

  7. The dark matter annihilation boost from low-temperature reheating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erickcek, Adrienne L.

    2015-11-01

    The evolution of the Universe between inflation and the onset of big bang nucleosynthesis is difficult to probe and largely unconstrained. This ignorance profoundly limits our understanding of dark matter: we cannot calculate its thermal relic abundance without knowing when the Universe became radiation dominated. Fortunately, small-scale density perturbations provide a probe of the early Universe that could break this degeneracy. If dark matter is a thermal relic, density perturbations that enter the horizon during an early matter-dominated era grow linearly with the scale factor prior to reheating. The resulting abundance of substructure boosts the annihilation rate by several orders of magnitude, which can compensate for the smaller annihilation cross sections that are required to generate the observed dark matter density in these scenarios. In particular, thermal relics with masses less than a TeV that thermally and kinetically decouple prior to reheating may already be ruled out by Fermi-LAT observations of dwarf spheroidal galaxies. Although these constraints are subject to uncertainties regarding the internal structure of the microhalos that form from the enhanced perturbations, they open up the possibility of using gamma-ray observations to learn about the reheating of the Universe.

  8. Perturbation of the carbon cycle during the late Pliensbachian - early Toarcian: New insight from high-resolution carbon isotope records in Morocco

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodin, Stéphane; Krencker, Francois-Nicolas; Kothe, Tim; Hoffmann, René; Mattioli, Emanuela; Heimhofer, Ulrich; Kabiri, Lahcen

    2016-04-01

    Preceding the early Toarcian Oceanic Anoxic Event by ∼1 Myr, the Pliensbachian-Toarcian boundary event is in many aspects as severe and disturbing for the environment as its better-studied successor. Both events are associated with rapid and pronounced global warming, major faunal and floral turnover, increased hydrological cycling and dramatic collapses of carbonate production. To better characterize the Pliensbachian-Toarcian boundary event, a high-resolution, paired carbonate and organic matter carbon isotope survey of three sections from the Central High Atlas Basin of Morocco has been undertaken. A pronounced negative shift in the carbonate carbon-isotope record, not paralleled by a similar excursion in the organic carbon, can be linked to the collapse of the neritic carbonate factory in the earliest Toarcian. These results show that, contrary to the Toarcian Oceanic Anoxic Event, a rapid and massive injection of 13C-depleted carbon into the atmosphere is not responsible for the environmental perturbations observed during the Pliensbachian-Toarcian boundary event. However, input of isotopically non-depleted carbon such as mantle source CO2 into the atmosphere as a potential cause for the Pliensbachian-Toarcian boundary event cannot be excluded. This would most probably be sourced from an early pulse of the Karoo-Ferrar Large Igneous Province.

  9. New Efforts to Identify Dark Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-09-01

    among them.In the early universe, small density perturbations on sub-galactic scales produce dwarf galaxies in the lambda-CDM model. But in the warm dark matter model, the longer free streaming length of the dark matter particles smooth out some of those small perturbations. This results in the formation of fewer dwarf galaxies which fits better with our current observations.Limits on Warm Dark MatterSo how can we test this alternative model? The maximum number density of dark-matter halos predicted by the warm dark matter model at a given redshift depends on the mass of the candidate dark matter particle: a larger particle mass means that more halos form. We therefore can set lower limits on the mass of dark matter particles in a two-step process:Calculate the maximum number density of dark matter halos predicted by models, andCompare this to the measured abundance of the faintest galaxies at a given redshift.Another way of looking at it: for different values of the dark matter particle mass mX, this shows the maximum number density of dark matter halos predicted at z = 6. The shaded areas represent the observed number density of faint galaxies at different confidence levels. [Menci et al. 2016]Recently, unprecedented new Hubble observations of ultra-faint, lensed galaxies in the Hubble Frontier Fields at z~6 have allowed for the discovery of more faint galaxies at this redshift than ever before. Now, a team of scientists led by Nicola Menci (INAF Rome) have used these observations to set a new limit on the lowest mass that candidate dark matter particles can have.Menci and collaborators find that these new observations constrain the particle masses to be above 2.9 keV at the 1 confidence level. These constitute the tightest constraints on the mass of candidate warm dark matter particles derived to date, and they even allow us to rule out some production mechanisms for theorized particles.Extending this analysis to other clusters with deep observations will only

  10. New Efforts to Identify Dark Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-09-01

    among them.In the early universe, small density perturbations on sub-galactic scales produce dwarf galaxies in the lambda-CDM model. But in the warm dark matter model, the longer free streaming length of the dark matter particles smooth out some of those small perturbations. This results in the formation of fewer dwarf galaxies which fits better with our current observations.Limits on Warm Dark MatterSo how can we test this alternative model? The maximum number density of dark-matter halos predicted by the warm dark matter model at a given redshift depends on the mass of the candidate dark matter particle: a larger particle mass means that more halos form. We therefore can set lower limits on the mass of dark matter particles in a two-step process:Calculate the maximum number density of dark matter halos predicted by models, andCompare this to the measured abundance of the faintest galaxies at a given redshift.Another way of looking at it: for different values of the dark matter particle mass mX, this shows the maximum number density of dark matter halos predicted at z = 6. The shaded areas represent the observed number density of faint galaxies at different confidence levels. [Menci et al. 2016]Recently, unprecedented new Hubble observations of ultra-faint, lensed galaxies in the Hubble Frontier Fields at z~6 have allowed for the discovery of more faint galaxies at this redshift than ever before. Now, a team of scientists led by Nicola Menci (INAF Rome) have used these observations to set a new limit on the lowest mass that candidate dark matter particles can have.Menci and collaborators find that these new observations constrain the particle masses to be above 2.9 keV at the 1 confidence level. These constitute the tightest constraints on the mass of candidate warm dark matter particles derived to date, and they even allow us to rule out some production mechanisms for theorized particles.Extending this analysis to other clusters with deep observations will only

  11. Quantitative study of the development of the optic nerve in rats reared in the dark during early postnatal life.

    PubMed Central

    Fukui, Y; Hayasaka, S; Bedi, K S; Ozaki, H S; Takeuchi, Y

    1991-01-01

    Male rats were placed in complete darkness from birth until 30 days of age, followed in some cases by a 35 days period of rehabilitation in control lighting conditions. Groups of control and experimental animals were killed at 30 and 65 days of age by perfusion with buffered 2.5% glutaraldehyde. The right optic nerve was dissected out from each animal and processed for embedding in Epon. Quantitative stereological procedures were used to estimate the total number of both myelinated and non-myelinated optic nerve fibres and their mean minimum diameters. There were no significant differences in the total number of optic nerve fibres between dark- and light-reared rats. However dark-reared rats had myelinated and non-myelinated fibres with significantly larger fibre diameters than those in age-matched light-reared rats. The proportion of optic nerve fibres which were myelinated increased with age in both groups of animals. However by 65 days of age the degree of myelination was slightly but significantly greater in the previously dark-reared rats than in the light-reared controls. These results indicate that rats reared in complete darkness for the first 30 days of postnatal life show morphological changes in the optic nerves. The possible significance of these changes is discussed. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:2032941

  12. Major perturbations in the global carbon cycle and photosymbiont-bearing planktic foraminifera during the early Eocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luciani, Valeria; Dickens, Gerald R.; Backman, Jan; Fornaciari, Eliana; Giusberti, Luca; Agnini, Claudia; D'Onofrio, Roberta

    2016-04-01

    A marked switch in the abundance of the planktic foraminiferal genera Morozovella and Acarinina occurred at low-latitude sites near the start of the Early Eocene Climatic Optimum (EECO), a multi-million-year interval when Earth surface temperatures reached their Cenozoic maximum. Stable carbon and oxygen isotope data of bulk sediment are presented from across the EECO at two locations: Possagno in northeast Italy and Deep Sea Drilling Project (DSDP) Site 577 in the northwest Pacific. Relative abundances of planktic foraminifera are presented from these two locations, as well as from Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Site 1051 in the northwest Atlantic. All three sections have good stratigraphic markers, and the δ13C records at each section can be correlated amongst each other and to δ13C records at other locations across the globe. These records show that a series of negative carbon isotope excursions (CIEs) occurred before, during and across the EECO, which is defined here as the interval between the J event and the base of Discoaster sublodoensis. Significant though ephemeral modifications in planktic foraminiferal assemblages coincide with some of the short-term CIEs, which were marked by increases in the relative abundance of Acarinina, similar to what happened across established hyperthermal events in Tethyan settings prior to the EECO. Most crucially, a temporal link exists between the onset of the EECO, carbon cycle changes during this time and the decline in Morozovella. Possible causes are manifold and may include temperature effects on photosymbiont-bearing planktic foraminifera and changes in ocean chemistry.

  13. Causal compensated perturbations in cosmology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veeraraghavan, Shoba; Stebbins, Albert

    1990-01-01

    A theoretical framework is developed to calculate linear perturbations in the gravitational and matter fields which arise causally in response to the presence of stiff matter sources in a FRW cosmology. It is shown that, in order to satisfy energy and momentum conservation, the gravitational fields of the source must be compensated by perturbations in the matter and gravitational fields, and the role of such compensation in containing the initial inhomogeneities in their subsequent evolution is discussed. A complete formal solution is derived in terms of Green functions for the perturbations produced by an arbitrary source in a flat universe containing cold dark matter. Approximate Green function solutions are derived for the late-time density perturbations and late-time gravitational waves in a universe containing a radiation fluid. A cosmological energy-momentum pseudotensor is defined to clarify the nature of energy and momentum conservation in the expanding universe.

  14. Remote sensing studies of lunar dark-halo impact craters - Preliminary results and implications for early volcanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hawke, B. R.; Bell, J. F.

    1982-01-01

    A summary of the nature and origin of lunar dark-halo craters is presented. New remote sensing data for dark-haloed impact craters were obtained and interpreted. A variety of spectral, thermal, radar, and photogeologic data are presented which confirm the hypothesis that Copernicus H crater excavated mare basalt from beneath lighter deposits emplaced by the Copernicus impact event. Multispectral imagery suggests that analogous impact re-exposure of basaltic material on the ejecta blankets of other large Copernican and Eratosthenian craters resulted in the formation of other dark-halo craters. Preliminary analyses of near-infrared spectra of dark-haloed impact craters in the Schickard-Schiller region are consistent with the hypothesis that basaltic material was excavated from beneath light plains. These light plains may have been emplaced as a result of the Orientale impact event. Additional evidence is presented which suggests that both pre- and post-Orientale volcanic activity was more prevalent in this region than has previously been recognized.

  15. The structure and early evolution of massive star forming regions. Substructure in the infrared dark cloud SDC13

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGuire, C.; Fuller, G. A.; Peretto, N.; Zhang, Q.; Traficante, A.; Avison, A.; Jimenez-Serra, I.

    2016-10-01

    Context. Investigations into the substructure of massive star forming regions are essential for understanding the observed relationships between core mass distributions and mass distributions in stellar clusters, differentiating between proposed mechanisms of massive star formation. Aims: We study the substructure in the two largest fragments (i.e. cores) MM1 and MM2, in the infrared dark cloud complex SDC13. As MM1 appears to be in a later stage of evolution than MM2, comparing their substructure provides an insight in to the early evolution of massive clumps. Methods: We report the results of high resolution SMA dust continuum observations towards MM1 and MM2. Combining these data with Herschel observations, we carry out RADMC-3D radiative transfer modelling to characterise the observed substructure. Results: SMA continuum data indicates 4 sub-fragments in the SDC13 region. The nature of the second brightest sub-fragment (B) is uncertain as it does not appear as prominent at the lower MAMBO resolution or at radio wavelengths. Statistical analysis indicates that it is unlikely to be a background source, an AGB star, or the free-free emission of a HII region. It is plausible that B is a runaway object ejected from MM1. MM1, which is actively forming stars, consists of two sub-fragments A and C. This is confirmed by 70 μmHerschel data. While MM1 and MM2 appear quite similar in previous low resolution observations, at high resolution, the sub-fragment at the centre of MM2 (D) is much fainter than sub-fragment at the centre of MM1 (A). RADMC-3D models of MM1 and MM2 are able to reproduce these results, modelling MM2 with a steeper density profile and higher mass than is required for MM1. The relatively steep density profile of MM2 depends on a significant temperature decrease in its centre, justified by the lack of star formation in MM2. A final stellar population for MM1 was extrapolated, indicating a star formation efficiency typical of regions of core and cluster

  16. Assessing offsets between the δ13C of sedimentary components and the global exogenic carbon pool across early Paleogene carbon cycle perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sluijs, Appy; Dickens, Gerald R.

    2012-12-01

    Negative stable carbon isotope excursions (CIEs) across the Paleocene-Eocene thermal maximum (PETM; ˜56 Ma) range between 2‰ and 7‰, even after discounting sections with truncated records. Individual carbon isotope records differ in shape and magnitude from variations in the global exogenic carbon cycle through changes in (1) the relative abundance of mixed components with different δ13C within a measured substrate, (2) isotope fractionation through physiological change, and (3) the isotope composition of the carbon source. All three factors likely influence many early Paleogene δ13C records, especially across the PETM and other hyperthermal events. We apply these concepts to late Paleocene-early Eocene (˜58-52 Ma) records from Lomonosov Ridge, Arctic Ocean. Linear regression analyses show correlations between the δ13C of total organic carbon (TOC) and two proxies for the relative contribution of terrestrial organic components to sediment TOC: the branched and isoprenoid tetraether index and palynomorphs. We use these correlations to subtract the terrestrial component from δ13CTOC and calculate marine organic matter δ13C. The results show that the magnitude of the CIE in δ13CTOC across the PETM is exaggerated relative to the magnitude of the CIE in δ13CMOM by ˜3‰ due to increased contributions of terrestrial organic carbon during the event. Collectively, all carbon isotope records across the PETM and other major climate-carbon cycle perturbations in Earth's history are potentially biased through one or more of the above factors. Indeed, it is highly unlikely that any δ13C record shows the true shape and magnitude of the CIE for the global exogenic carbon cycle. For the PETM, we conclude that CIE in the exogenic carbon cycle is likely <4‰, but it will take additional analyses and modeling to obtain an accurate value for this CIE.

  17. On dark degeneracy and interacting models

    SciTech Connect

    Carneiro, S.; Borges, H.A. E-mail: humberto@ufba.br

    2014-06-01

    Cosmological background observations cannot fix the dark energy equation of state, which is related to a degeneracy in the definition of the dark sector components. Here we show that this degeneracy can be broken at perturbation level by imposing two observational properties on dark matter. First, dark matter is defined as the clustering component we observe in large scale structures. This definition is meaningful only if dark energy is unperturbed, which is achieved if we additionally assume, as a second condition, that dark matter is cold, i.e. non-relativistic. As a consequence, dark energy models with equation-of-state parameter −1 ≤ ω < 0 are reduced to two observationally distinguishable classes with ω = −1, equally competitive when tested against observations. The first comprises the ΛCDM model with constant dark energy density. The second consists of interacting models with an energy flux from dark energy to dark matter.

  18. Voids of dark energy

    SciTech Connect

    Dutta, Sourish; Maor, Irit

    2007-03-15

    We investigate the clustering properties of a dynamical dark energy component. In a cosmic mix of a pressureless fluid and a light scalar field, we follow the linear evolution of spherical matter perturbations. We find that the scalar field tends to form underdensities in response to the gravitationally collapsing matter. We thoroughly investigate these voids for a variety of initial conditions, explain the physics behind their formation, and consider possible observational implications. Detection of dark energy voids will clearly rule out the cosmological constant as the main source of the present acceleration.

  19. The 2010-2011 Revival of Jupiter's South Equatorial Belt: Perturbations of Temperatures, Clouds and Composition from Infrared Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orton, G.; Fletcher, L.; Yanamandra-Fisher, P.; Sanchez-Lavega, A.; Perez-Hoyos, S.; Baines, K.; de Pater, I.; Wong, M.; Goetz, R.; Valkov, S.; Greco, J.; Edwards, M.; Rogers, J.

    2011-01-01

    On 2010 November 9, a perturbation appeared in Jupiter's South Equatorial Belt (SEB), which began a classical "revival" of the SEB, returning the entire axisymmetric region to its normal dark color from its anomalous, light, "faded" state. The early revival is marked by strong upwelling gas at the outbreak location, to the west of which appear alternating clear and cloudy regions. Clear regions are correlated with dark clouds near the outbreak and in a southern retrograding branch but less so in a northern prograding branch. A 5-micrometer image from 2010 March 1 shows much of the SEB closer to a pre-faded state.

  20. CDM/baryon isocurvature perturbations in a sneutrino curvaton model

    SciTech Connect

    Harigaya, Keisuke; Kawasaki, Masahiro; Hayakawa, Taku; Yokoyama, Shuichiro E-mail: taku1215@icrr.u-tokyo.ac.jp E-mail: shuichiro@rikkyo.ac.jp

    2014-10-01

    Matter isocurvature perturbations are strictly constrained from cosmic microwave background observations. We study a sneutrino curvaton model where both cold dark matter (CDM)/baryon isocurvature perturbations are generated. In our model, total matter isocurvature perturbations are reduced since the CDM/baryon isocurvature perturbations compensate for each other. We show that this model can not only avoid the stringent observational constraints but also suppress temperature anisotropies on large scales, which leads to improved agreement with observations.

  1. Matter perturbations in Galileon cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    De Felice, Antonio; Kase, Ryotaro; Tsujikawa, Shinji

    2011-02-15

    We study the evolution of matter density perturbations in Galileon cosmology where the late-time cosmic acceleration can be realized by a field kinetic energy. We obtain full perturbation equations at linear order in the presence of five covariant Lagrangians L{sub i} (i=1,{center_dot}{center_dot}{center_dot},5) satisfying the Galileon symmetry {partial_derivative}{sub {mu}}{phi}{yields}{partial_derivative}{sub {mu}}{phi}{sup +}b{sub {mu}} in the flat space-time. The equations for a matter perturbation as well as an effective gravitational potential are derived under a quasistatic approximation on subhorizon scales. This approximation can reproduce full numerical solutions with high accuracy for the wavelengths relevant to large-scale structures. For the model parameters constrained by the background expansion history of the Universe, the growth rate of matter perturbations is larger than that in the {Lambda}-cold dark matter model, with the growth index {gamma} today typically smaller than 0.4. We also find that, even on very large scales associated with the integrated-Sachs-Wolfe effect in cosmic microwave background temperature anisotropies, the effective gravitational potential exhibits a temporal growth during the transition from the matter era to the epoch of cosmic acceleration. These properties are useful to distinguish the Galileon model from the {Lambda}-cold dark matter model in future high-precision observations.

  2. Nearly Supersymmetric Dark Atoms

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Behbahani, Siavosh R.; Jankowiak, Martin; Rube, Tomas; Wacker, Jay G.

    2011-01-01

    Theories of dark matter that support bound states are an intriguing possibility for the identity of the missing mass of the Universe. This article proposes a class of models of supersymmetric composite dark matter where the interactions with the Standard Model communicate supersymmetry breaking to the dark sector. In these models, supersymmetry breaking can be treated as a perturbation on the spectrum of bound states. Using a general formalism, the spectrum with leading supersymmetry effects is computed without specifying the details of the binding dynamics. The interactions of the composite states with the Standard Model are computed, and several benchmarkmore » models are described. General features of nonrelativistic supersymmetric bound states are emphasized.« less

  3. Nearly Supersymmetric Dark Atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Behbahani, Siavosh R.; Jankowiak, Martin; Rube, Tomas; Wacker, Jay G.; /SLAC /Stanford U., ITP

    2011-08-12

    Theories of dark matter that support bound states are an intriguing possibility for the identity of the missing mass of the Universe. This article proposes a class of models of supersymmetric composite dark matter where the interactions with the Standard Model communicate supersymmetry breaking to the dark sector. In these models supersymmetry breaking can be treated as a perturbation on the spectrum of bound states. Using a general formalism, the spectrum with leading supersymmetry effects is computed without specifying the details of the binding dynamics. The interactions of the composite states with the Standard Model are computed and several benchmark models are described. General features of non-relativistic supersymmetric bound states are emphasized.

  4. Dark Matters

    ScienceCinema

    Joseph Silk

    2016-07-12

    One of the greatest mysteries in the cosmos is that it is mostly dark.  Astronomers and particle physicists today are seeking to unravel the nature of this mysterious, but pervasive dark matter which has profoundly influenced the formation of structure in the universe.  I will describe the complex interplay between galaxy formation and dark matter detectability and review recent attempts to measure particle dark matter by direct and indirect means.

  5. Dark Matters

    SciTech Connect

    Joseph Silk

    2009-09-23

    One of the greatest mysteries in the cosmos is that it is mostly dark.  Astronomers and particle physicists today are seeking to unravel the nature of this mysterious, but pervasive dark matter which has profoundly influenced the formation of structure in the universe.  I will describe the complex interplay between galaxy formation and dark matter detectability and review recent attempts to measure particle dark matter by direct and indirect means.

  6. Nonthermal production of dark radiation and dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reece, Matthew; Roxlo, Thomas

    2016-09-01

    Dark matter may be coupled to dark radiation: light degrees of freedom that mediate forces between dark sector particles. Cosmological constraints favor dark radiation that is colder than Standard Model radiation. In models with fixed couplings between dark matter and the Standard Model, these constraints can be difficult to satisfy if thermal equilibrium is assumed in the early universe. We construct a model of asymmetric reheating of the visible and dark sectors from late decays of a long-lived particle (for instance, a modulus). We show, as a proof of principle, that such a model can populate a sufficiently cold dark sector while also generating baryon and dark matter asymmetries through the out-of-equilibrium decay. We frame much of our discussion in terms of the scenario of dissipative dark matter, as in the Double-Disk Dark Matter scenario. However, our results may also be of interest for other scenarios like the Twin Higgs model that are in danger of overproducing dark radiation due to nonnegligible dark-visible couplings.

  7. Familon model of dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burdyuzha, V.; Lalakulich, O.; Ponomarev, Yu.; Vereshkov, G.

    2004-05-01

    If the next fundamental level of matter occurs (preons), then dark matter must consist of familons containing a 'hot' component from massless particles and a 'cold' component from massive particles. During the evolution of the Universe this dark matter occurred up to late-time relativistic phase transitions the temperatures of which were different. Fluctuations created by these phase transitions had a fractal character. As a result the structuration of dark matter (and therefore the baryon subsystem) occurred, and in the Universe some characteristic scales which have caused this phenomenon arise naturally. Familons are collective excitations of non-perturbative preon condensates that could be produced during an earlier relativistic phase transition. For structuration of dark matter (and the baryon component), three generations of particles are necessary. The first generation of particles produced the observed baryon world. The second and third generations produced dark matter from particles that appeared when symmetry between the generations was spontaneously broken.

  8. Status and Early Results from the Axion Dark Matter eXperiment - High Frequency (ADMX-HF)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Samantha; ADMX-HF Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    The axion was originally proposed as a solution to the Strong-CP problem of the Standard Model. A sufficiently light axion (1 - 1000 μ eV) also represents an excellent cold dark matter candidate. Such axions may be detected by their resonant conversion to photons in a high- Q microwave cavity permeated by a strong magnetic field. Previous experiments have probed the first decade in mass using this method. ADMX-HF was designed and built as an innovation test-bed and a data pathfinder for the second decade in mass range. The experiment, initially configured with a 9-tesla magnet, dilution refrigerator, 2-liter tunable copper cavity, and a Josephson Parametric Amplifier, is now operational with a system noise temperature approximately twice the Standard Quantum Limit. Preliminary data in the 25 μ eV range (on the order of 6 GHz in resonant frequency) will be presented, as well as an overview of ongoing R&D on new cavity and amplifier technologies that will be validated in situ within the next few years. This work was supported by the NSF, under Grants PHY-1067242 and PHY-1306729, the US DOE under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344, and an award from the Heising-Simons Foundation.

  9. Dark matters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steigman, Gary

    The observational evidence for dark matter in the universe is reviewed. Constraints on the baryon density from primordial nucleosynthesis are presented and compared to the dynamical estimates of the mass on various scales. Baryons can account for the observed luminous mass as well as some, perhaps most, of the 'observed' dark mass. However if, as inflation/naturalness suggest, the total density of the universe is equal to the critical density, then nonbaryonic dark matter is required. The assets and liabilities of, as well as the candidates for, hot and cold dark matter are outlined. At present, there is no completely satisfactory candidate for nonbaryonic dark matter.

  10. THE SL2S GALAXY-SCALE LENS SAMPLE. II. COSMIC EVOLUTION OF DARK AND LUMINOUS MASS IN EARLY-TYPE GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Ruff, Andrea J.; Marshall, Philip J.; Treu, Tommaso; Auger, Matthew W.; Gavazzi, Raphael; Brault, Florence

    2011-02-01

    We present a joint gravitational lensing and stellar-dynamical analysis of 11 early-type galaxies (median deflector redshift z{sub d} = 0.5) from Strong Lenses in the Legacy Survey (SL2S). Using newly measured redshifts and stellar velocity dispersions from Keck spectroscopy with lens models from Paper I, we derive the total mass-density slope inside the Einstein radius for each of the 11 lenses. The average total density slope is found to be ({gamma}') = 2.16{sup +0.09}{sub -0.09} ({rho}{sub tot}{proportional_to}r{sup -}{gamma}'), with an intrinsic scatter of 0.25{sup +0.10}{sub -0.07}. We also determine the dark matter fraction for each lens within half the effective radius, R{sub eff}/2, and find the average-projected dark matter mass fraction to be 0.42{sup +0.08}{sub -0.08} with a scatter of 0.20{sup +0.09}{sub -0.07} for a Salpeter initial mass function. By combining the SL2S results with those from the Sloan Lens ACS Survey (median z{sub d} = 0.2) and the Lenses Structure and Dynamics Survey (median z{sub d} = 0.8), we investigate cosmic evolution of {gamma}' and find a mild trend {partial_derivative}({gamma}')/{partial_derivative}z{sub d} = -0.25{sup +0.10}{sub -0.12}. This suggests that the total density profile of massive galaxies has become slightly steeper over cosmic time. If this result is confirmed by larger samples, it would indicate that dissipative processes played some role in the growth of massive galaxies since z {approx} 1.

  11. SPIDER - VI. The central dark matter content of luminous early-type galaxies: Benchmark correlations with mass, structural parameters and environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tortora, C.; La Barbera, F.; Napolitano, N. R.; de Carvalho, R. R.; Romanowsky, A. J.

    2012-09-01

    We analyse the central dark-matter (DM) content of ˜4500 massive (M★ ≳ 1010 M⊙), low-redshift (z < 0.1), early-type galaxies (ETGs), with high-quality ugrizY JHK photometry and optical spectroscopy from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and the UKIRT Infrared Deep Sky Survey (UKIDSS). We estimate the 'central' fraction of DM within the K-band effective radius, Reff, using spherically symmetric isotropic galaxy models. We discuss the role of systematics in stellar mass estimates, dynamical modelling, and velocity dispersion anisotropy. The main results of the present work are the following: (1) DM fractions increase systematically with both structural parameters (i.e. Reff and Sérsic index, n) and mass proxies (central velocity dispersion, stellar and dynamical mass), as in previous studies, and decrease with central stellar density. (2) All correlations involving DM fractions are caused by two fundamental ones with galaxy effective radius and central velocity dispersion. These correlations are independent of each other, so that ETGs populate a central-DM plane (DMP), i.e. a correlation among fraction of total-to-stellar mass, effective radius, and velocity dispersion, whose scatter along the total-to-stellar mass axis amounts to ˜0.15 dex. (3) In general, under the assumption of an isothermal or a constant M/L profile for the total mass distribution, a Chabrier initial mass function (IMF) is favoured with respect to a bottom-heavier Salpeter IMF, as the latter produces negative (i.e. unphysical) DM fractions for more than 50 per cent of the galaxies in our sample. For a Chabrier IMF, the DM estimates agree with Λ cold dark matter toy-galaxy models based on contracted DM-halo density profiles. We also find agreement with predictions from hydrodynamical simulations. (4) The central DM content of ETGs does not depend significantly on the environment where galaxies reside, with group and field ETGs having similar DM trends.

  12. Inflatable Dark Matter.

    PubMed

    Davoudiasl, Hooman; Hooper, Dan; McDermott, Samuel D

    2016-01-22

    We describe a general scenario, dubbed "inflatable dark matter," in which the density of dark matter particles can be reduced through a short period of late-time inflation in the early Universe. The overproduction of dark matter that is predicted within many, otherwise, well-motivated models of new physics can be elegantly remedied within this context. Thermal relics that would, otherwise, be disfavored can easily be accommodated within this class of scenarios, including dark matter candidates that are very heavy or very light. Furthermore, the nonthermal abundance of grand unified theory or Planck scale axions can be brought to acceptable levels without invoking anthropic tuning of initial conditions. A period of late-time inflation could have occurred over a wide range of scales from ∼MeV to the weak scale or above, and could have been triggered by physics within a hidden sector, with small but not necessarily negligible couplings to the standard model.

  13. Asymmetric Dark Matter and Dark Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Blennow, Mattias; Martinez, Enrique Fernandez; Mena, Olga; Redondo, Javier; Serra, Paolo E-mail: enfmarti@cern.ch E-mail: redondo@mppmu.mpg.de

    2012-07-01

    Asymmetric Dark Matter (ADM) models invoke a particle-antiparticle asymmetry, similar to the one observed in the Baryon sector, to account for the Dark Matter (DM) abundance. Both asymmetries are usually generated by the same mechanism and generally related, thus predicting DM masses around 5 GeV in order to obtain the correct density. The main challenge for successful models is to ensure efficient annihilation of the thermally produced symmetric component of such a light DM candidate without violating constraints from collider or direct searches. A common way to overcome this involves a light mediator, into which DM can efficiently annihilate and which subsequently decays into Standard Model particles. Here we explore the scenario where the light mediator decays instead into lighter degrees of freedom in the dark sector that act as radiation in the early Universe. While this assumption makes indirect DM searches challenging, it leads to signals of extra radiation at BBN and CMB. Under certain conditions, precise measurements of the number of relativistic species, such as those expected from the Planck satellite, can provide information on the structure of the dark sector. We also discuss the constraints of the interactions between DM and Dark Radiation from their imprint in the matter power spectrum.

  14. Dark matter universe.

    PubMed

    Bahcall, Neta A

    2015-10-01

    Most of the mass in the universe is in the form of dark matter--a new type of nonbaryonic particle not yet detected in the laboratory or in other detection experiments. The evidence for the existence of dark matter through its gravitational impact is clear in astronomical observations--from the early observations of the large motions of galaxies in clusters and the motions of stars and gas in galaxies, to observations of the large-scale structure in the universe, gravitational lensing, and the cosmic microwave background. The extensive data consistently show the dominance of dark matter and quantify its amount and distribution, assuming general relativity is valid. The data inform us that the dark matter is nonbaryonic, is "cold" (i.e., moves nonrelativistically in the early universe), and interacts only weakly with matter other than by gravity. The current Lambda cold dark matter cosmology--a simple (but strange) flat cold dark matter model dominated by a cosmological constant Lambda, with only six basic parameters (including the density of matter and of baryons, the initial mass fluctuations amplitude and its scale dependence, and the age of the universe and of the first stars)--fits remarkably well all the accumulated data. However, what is the dark matter? This is one of the most fundamental open questions in cosmology and particle physics. Its existence requires an extension of our current understanding of particle physics or otherwise point to a modification of gravity on cosmological scales. The exploration and ultimate detection of dark matter are led by experiments for direct and indirect detection of this yet mysterious particle.

  15. Dark matter universe

    PubMed Central

    Bahcall, Neta A.

    2015-01-01

    Most of the mass in the universe is in the form of dark matter—a new type of nonbaryonic particle not yet detected in the laboratory or in other detection experiments. The evidence for the existence of dark matter through its gravitational impact is clear in astronomical observations—from the early observations of the large motions of galaxies in clusters and the motions of stars and gas in galaxies, to observations of the large-scale structure in the universe, gravitational lensing, and the cosmic microwave background. The extensive data consistently show the dominance of dark matter and quantify its amount and distribution, assuming general relativity is valid. The data inform us that the dark matter is nonbaryonic, is “cold” (i.e., moves nonrelativistically in the early universe), and interacts only weakly with matter other than by gravity. The current Lambda cold dark matter cosmology—a simple (but strange) flat cold dark matter model dominated by a cosmological constant Lambda, with only six basic parameters (including the density of matter and of baryons, the initial mass fluctuations amplitude and its scale dependence, and the age of the universe and of the first stars)—fits remarkably well all the accumulated data. However, what is the dark matter? This is one of the most fundamental open questions in cosmology and particle physics. Its existence requires an extension of our current understanding of particle physics or otherwise point to a modification of gravity on cosmological scales. The exploration and ultimate detection of dark matter are led by experiments for direct and indirect detection of this yet mysterious particle. PMID:26417091

  16. Dark matter universe.

    PubMed

    Bahcall, Neta A

    2015-10-01

    Most of the mass in the universe is in the form of dark matter--a new type of nonbaryonic particle not yet detected in the laboratory or in other detection experiments. The evidence for the existence of dark matter through its gravitational impact is clear in astronomical observations--from the early observations of the large motions of galaxies in clusters and the motions of stars and gas in galaxies, to observations of the large-scale structure in the universe, gravitational lensing, and the cosmic microwave background. The extensive data consistently show the dominance of dark matter and quantify its amount and distribution, assuming general relativity is valid. The data inform us that the dark matter is nonbaryonic, is "cold" (i.e., moves nonrelativistically in the early universe), and interacts only weakly with matter other than by gravity. The current Lambda cold dark matter cosmology--a simple (but strange) flat cold dark matter model dominated by a cosmological constant Lambda, with only six basic parameters (including the density of matter and of baryons, the initial mass fluctuations amplitude and its scale dependence, and the age of the universe and of the first stars)--fits remarkably well all the accumulated data. However, what is the dark matter? This is one of the most fundamental open questions in cosmology and particle physics. Its existence requires an extension of our current understanding of particle physics or otherwise point to a modification of gravity on cosmological scales. The exploration and ultimate detection of dark matter are led by experiments for direct and indirect detection of this yet mysterious particle. PMID:26417091

  17. Bringing isolated dark matter out of isolation: Late-time reheating and indirect detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erickcek, Adrienne L.; Sinha, Kuver; Watson, Scott

    2016-09-01

    In standard cosmology, the growth of structure becomes significant following matter-radiation equality. In nonthermal histories, where an effectively matter-dominated phase occurs due to scalar oscillations prior to big bang nucleosynthesis, a new scale at smaller wavelengths appears in the matter power spectrum. Density perturbations that enter the horizon during the early matter-dominated era (EMDE) grow linearly with the scale factor prior to the onset of radiation domination, which leads to enhanced inhomogeneity on small scales if dark matter (DM) thermally and kinetically decouples during the EMDE. The microhalos that form from these enhanced perturbations significantly boost the self-annihilation rate for dark matter. This has important implications for indirect detection experiments: the larger annihilation rate may result in observable signals from dark matter candidates that are usually deemed untestable. As a proof of principle, we consider binos in heavy supersymmetry with an intermediate extended Higgs sector and all other superpartners decoupled. We find that these isolated binos, which lie under the neutrino floor, can account for the dark matter relic density and decouple from the standard model early enough to preserve the enhanced small-scale inhomogeneity generated during the EMDE. If early forming microhalos survive as subhalos within larger microhalos, the resulting boost to the annihilation rate for bino dark matter near the pseudoscalar resonance exceeds the upper limit established by Fermi-LAT's observations of dwarf spheroidal galaxies. These DM candidates motivate the N -body simulations required to eliminate uncertainties in the microhalos' internal structure by exemplifying how an EMDE can enable Fermi-LAT to probe isolated dark matter.

  18. Correlation between dark matter and dark radiation in string compactifications

    SciTech Connect

    Allahverdi, Rouzbeh; Cicoli, Michele; Dutta, Bhaskar; Sinha, Kuver E-mail: mcicoli@ictp.it E-mail: kusinha@syr.edu

    2014-10-01

    Reheating in string compactifications is generically driven by the decay of the lightest modulus which produces Standard Model particles, dark matter and light hidden sector degrees of freedom that behave as dark radiation. This common origin allows us to find an interesting correlation between dark matter and dark radiation. By combining present upper bounds on the effective number of neutrino species N{sub eff} with lower bounds on the reheating temperature as a function of the dark matter mass m{sub DM} from Fermi data, we obtain strong constraints on the (N{sub eff}, m{sub DM})-plane. Most of the allowed region in this plane corresponds to non-thermal scenarios with Higgsino-like dark matter. Thermal dark matter can be allowed only if N{sub eff} tends to its Standard Model value. We show that the above situation is realised in models with perturbative moduli stabilisation where the production of dark radiation is unavoidable since bulk closed string axions remain light and do not get eaten up by anomalous U(1)s.

  19. PYESSENCE: Generalized Coupled Quintessence Linear Perturbation Python Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leithes, Alexander

    2016-09-01

    PYESSENCE evolves linearly perturbed coupled quintessence models with multiple (cold dark matter) CDM fluid species and multiple DE (dark energy) scalar fields, and can be used to generate quantities such as the growth factor of large scale structure for any coupled quintessence model with an arbitrary number of fields and fluids and arbitrary couplings.

  20. Dark strings

    SciTech Connect

    Vachaspati, Tanmay

    2009-09-15

    Recent astrophysical observations have motivated novel theoretical models of the dark matter sector. A class of such models predicts the existence of GeV scale cosmic strings that communicate with the standard model sector by Aharonov-Bohm interactions with electrically charged particles. We discuss the cosmology of these 'dark strings' and investigate possible observational signatures. More elaborate dark sector models are argued to contain hybrid topological defects that may also have observational signatures.

  1. Perturbative QUANTUM GRAVITY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    't Hooft, Gerard

    2003-12-01

    A good understanding of Perturbative Quantum Gravity is essential for anyone who wishes to proceed towards any kind of non-perturbative approach. This lecture is a brief resumé of the main features of the perturbative regime.

  2. Cosmological perturbations: Vorticity, isocurvature and magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christopherson, Adam J.

    2014-10-01

    In this paper, I review some recent, interlinked, work undertaken using cosmological perturbation theory — a powerful technique for modeling inhomogeneities in the universe. The common theme which underpins these pieces of work is the presence of nonadiabatic pressure, or entropy, perturbations. After a brief introduction covering the standard techniques of describing inhomogeneities in both Newtonian and relativistic cosmology, I discuss the generation of vorticity. As in classical fluid mechanics, vorticity is not present in linearized perturbation theory (unless included as an initial condition). Allowing for entropy perturbations, and working to second order in perturbation theory, I show that vorticity is generated, even in the absence of vector perturbations, by purely scalar perturbations, the source term being quadratic in the gradients of first order energy density and isocurvature, or nonadiabatic pressure perturbations. This generalizes Crocco's theorem to a cosmological setting. I then introduce isocurvature perturbations in different models, focusing on the entropy perturbation in standard, concordance cosmology, and in inflationary models involving two scalar fields. As the final topic, I investigate magnetic fields, which are a potential observational consequence of vorticity in the early universe. I briefly review some recent work on including magnetic fields in perturbation theory in a consistent way. I show, using solely analytical techniques, that magnetic fields can be generated by higher order perturbations, albeit too small to provide the entire primordial seed field, in agreement with some numerical studies. I close this paper with a summary and some potential extensions of this work.

  3. Testing the interaction between dark energy and dark matter via the latest observations

    SciTech Connect

    He Jianhua; Wang Bin; Abdalla, Elcio

    2011-03-15

    Cosmological analyses based on currently available observations are unable to rule out a sizeable coupling between dark energy and dark matter. However, the signature of the coupling is not easy to grasp, since the coupling is degenerate with other cosmological parameters, such as the dark energy equation of state and the dark matter abundance. We discuss possible ways to break such degeneracy. Based on the perturbation formalism, we carry out the global fitting by using the latest observational data and get a tight constraint on the interaction between dark sectors. We find that the appropriate interaction can alleviate the coincidence problem.

  4. Unified dark energy-dark matter model with inverse quintessence

    SciTech Connect

    Ansoldi, Stefano; Guendelman, Eduardo I. E-mail: guendel@bgu.ac.il

    2013-05-01

    We consider a model where both dark energy and dark matter originate from the coupling of a scalar field with a non-canonical kinetic term to, both, a metric measure and a non-metric measure. An interacting dark energy/dark matter scenario can be obtained by introducing an additional scalar that can produce non constant vacuum energy and associated variations in dark matter. The phenomenology is most interesting when the kinetic term of the additional scalar field is ghost-type, since in this case the dark energy vanishes in the early universe and then grows with time. This constitutes an ''inverse quintessence scenario'', where the universe starts from a zero vacuum energy density state, instead of approaching it in the future.

  5. Dark matter: Theoretical perspectives

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, M.S. . Enrico Fermi Inst. Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL )

    1993-01-01

    I both review and make the case for the current theoretical prejudice: a flat Universe whose dominant constituent is nonbaryonic dark matter, emphasizing that this is still a prejudice and not yet fact. The theoretical motivation for nonbaryonic dark matter is discussed in the context of current elementary-particle theory, stressing that: (1) there are no dark matter candidates within the standard model of particle physics; (2) there are several compelling candidates within attractive extensions of the standard model of particle physics; and (3) the motivation for these compelling candidates comes first and foremost from particle physics. The dark-matter problem is now a pressing issue in both cosmology and particle physics, and the detection of particle dark matter would provide evidence for new physics.'' The compelling candidates are: a very light axion ( 10[sup [minus]6] eV--10[sup [minus]4] eV); a light neutrino (20 eV--90 eV); and a heavy neutralino (10 GeV--2 TeV). The production of these particles in the early Universe and the prospects for their detection are also discussed. I briefly mention more exotic possibilities for the dark matter, including a nonzero cosmological constant, superheavy magnetic monopoles, and decaying neutrinos.

  6. Dark matter: Theoretical perspectives

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, M.S. |

    1993-01-01

    I both review and make the case for the current theoretical prejudice: a flat Universe whose dominant constituent is nonbaryonic dark matter, emphasizing that this is still a prejudice and not yet fact. The theoretical motivation for nonbaryonic dark matter is discussed in the context of current elementary-particle theory, stressing that: (1) there are no dark matter candidates within the standard model of particle physics; (2) there are several compelling candidates within attractive extensions of the standard model of particle physics; and (3) the motivation for these compelling candidates comes first and foremost from particle physics. The dark-matter problem is now a pressing issue in both cosmology and particle physics, and the detection of particle dark matter would provide evidence for ``new physics.`` The compelling candidates are: a very light axion ( 10{sup {minus}6} eV--10{sup {minus}4} eV); a light neutrino (20 eV--90 eV); and a heavy neutralino (10 GeV--2 TeV). The production of these particles in the early Universe and the prospects for their detection are also discussed. I briefly mention more exotic possibilities for the dark matter, including a nonzero cosmological constant, superheavy magnetic monopoles, and decaying neutrinos.

  7. Dark matter: theoretical perspectives.

    PubMed Central

    Turner, M S

    1993-01-01

    I both review and make the case for the current theoretical prejudice: a flat Universe whose dominant constituent is nonbaryonic dark matter, emphasizing that this is still a prejudice and not yet fact. The theoretical motivation for nonbaryonic dark matter is discussed in the context of current elementary-particle theory, stressing that (i) there are no dark-matter candidates within the "standard model" of particle physics, (ii) there are several compelling candidates within attractive extensions of the standard model of particle physics, and (iii) the motivation for these compelling candidates comes first and foremost from particle physics. The dark-matter problem is now a pressing issue in both cosmology and particle physics, and the detection of particle dark matter would provide evidence for "new physics." The compelling candidates are a very light axion (10(-6)-10(-4) eV), a light neutrino (20-90 eV), and a heavy neutralino (10 GeV-2 TeV). The production of these particles in the early Universe and the prospects for their detection are also discussed. I briefly mention more exotic possibilities for the dark matter, including a nonzero cosmological constant, superheavy magnetic monopoles, and decaying neutrinos. PMID:11607395

  8. Dark matter and dark radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Ackerman, Lotty; Buckley, Matthew R.; Carroll, Sean M.; Kamionkowski, Marc

    2009-01-15

    We explore the feasibility and astrophysical consequences of a new long-range U(1) gauge field ('dark electromagnetism') that couples only to dark matter, not to the standard model. The dark matter consists of an equal number of positive and negative charges under the new force, but annihilations are suppressed if the dark-matter mass is sufficiently high and the dark fine-structure constant {alpha}-circumflex is sufficiently small. The correct relic abundance can be obtained if the dark matter also couples to the conventional weak interactions, and we verify that this is consistent with particle-physics constraints. The primary limit on {alpha}-circumflex comes from the demand that the dark matter be effectively collisionless in galactic dynamics, which implies {alpha}-circumflex < or approx. 10{sup -3} for TeV-scale dark matter. These values are easily compatible with constraints from structure formation and primordial nucleosynthesis. We raise the prospect of interesting new plasma effects in dark-matter dynamics, which remain to be explored.

  9. Investigating dark matter substructure with pulsar timing - II. Improved limits on small-scale cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Hamish A.; Lewis, Geraint F.; Scott, Pat

    2016-02-01

    Ultracompact minihaloes (UCMHs) have been proposed as a type of dark matter substructure seeded by large-amplitude primordial perturbations and topological defects. UCMHs are expected to survive to the present era, allowing constraints to be placed on their cosmic abundance using observations within our own Galaxy. Constraints on their number density can be linked to conditions in the early Universe that impact structure formation, such as increased primordial power on small scales, generic weak non-Gaussianity, and the presence of cosmic strings. We use new constraints on the abundance of UCMHs from pulsar timing to place generalized limits on the parameters of each of these cosmological scenarios. At some scales, the limits are the strongest to date, exceeding those from dark matter annihilation. Our new limits have the added advantage of being independent of the particle nature of dark matter, as they are based only on gravitational effects.

  10. X-RAY SCALING RELATION IN EARLY-TYPE GALAXIES: DARK MATTER AS A PRIMARY FACTOR IN RETAINING HOT GAS

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Dong-Woo; Fabbiano, Giuseppina

    2013-10-20

    We have revisited the X-ray scaling relations of early-type galaxies (ETG) by investigating, for the first time, the L{sub X,Gas}-M{sub Total} relation in a sample of 14 ETGs. In contrast to the large scatter (a factor of 10{sup 2}-10{sup 3}) in the L{sub X,Total}-L{sub B} relation, we found a tight correlation between these physically motivated quantities with an rms deviation of a factor of three in L{sub X,Gas} = 10{sup 38}-10{sup 43} erg s{sup –1} or M{sub Total} = a few × 10{sup 10} to a few × 10{sup 12} M{sub ☉}. More striking, this relation becomes even tighter with an rms deviation of a factor of 1.3 among the gas-rich galaxies (with L{sub X,Gas} > 10{sup 40} erg s{sup –1}). In a simple power-law form, the new relation is (L{sub X,Gas}/10{sup 40} erg s{sup –1}) = (M{sub Total}/3.2 × 10{sup 11} M{sub ☉}){sup 3}. This relation is also consistent with the steep relation between the gas luminosity and temperature, L{sub X,Gas} ∼ T{sub Gas} {sup 4.5}, identified by Boroson et al., if the gas is virialized. Our results indicate that the total mass of an ETG is the primary factor in regulating the amount of hot gas. Among the gas-poor galaxies (with L{sub X,Gas} < a few × 10{sup 39} erg s{sup –1}), the scatter in the L{sub X,Gas}-M{sub Total} (and L{sub X,Gas}-T{sub Gas}) relation increases, suggesting that secondary factors (e.g., rotation, flattening, star formation history, cold gas, environment, etc.) may become important.

  11. Disformal scalar fields and the dark sector of the universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zumalacárregui, M.; Koivisto, T. S.; Mota, D. F.; Ruiz-Lapuente, P.

    2010-05-01

    Disformal transformations have proven to be very useful to devise models of the dark sector. In the present paper we apply such transformation to a single scalar field theory as a way to drive the field into a slow roll phase. The canonical scalar field Lagrangian, when coupled to a disformal metric, turns out to have relations to bimetric dark matter theories and to describe many specific dark energy models at various limits, thus providing a surprisingly simple parametrisation of a wide variety of models including tachyon, Chaplygin gas, K-essence and dilatonic ghost condensate. We investigate the evolution of the background and linear perturbations in disformal quintessence in order to perform a full comparison of the predictions with the cosmological data. The dynamics of the expansion, in particular the mechanism of the transition to accelerating phase, is described in detail. We then study the effects of disformal quintessence on cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropies and large scale structures (LSS). A likelihood analysis using the latest data on wide-ranging SNIa, CMB and LSS observations is performed allowing variations in six cosmological parameters and the two parameters specifying the model. We find that while a large region of parameter space remains compatible with observations, models featuring either too much early dark energy or too slow transition to acceleration are ruled out.

  12. WISPy cold dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arias, Paola; Cadamuro, Davide; Goodsell, Mark; Jaeckel, Joerg; Redondo, Javier; Ringwald, Andreas

    2012-06-01

    Very weakly interacting slim particles (WISPs), such as axion-like particles (ALPs) or hidden photons (HPs), may be non-thermally produced via the misalignment mechanism in the early universe and survive as a cold dark matter population until today. We find that, both for ALPs and HPs whose dominant interactions with the standard model arise from couplings to photons, a huge region in the parameter spaces spanned by photon coupling and ALP or HP mass can give rise to the observed cold dark matter. Remarkably, a large region of this parameter space coincides with that predicted in well motivated models of fundamental physics. A wide range of experimental searches — exploiting haloscopes (direct dark matter searches exploiting microwave cavities), helioscopes (searches for solar ALPs or HPs), or light-shining-through-a-wall techniques — can probe large parts of this parameter space in the foreseeable future.

  13. Dark matter candidates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, Michael S.

    1989-01-01

    The types of particles which may provide the nonluminous mass required by big-bang cosmological models are listed and briefly characterized. The observational evidence for the existence of dark matter (outweighing the luminous component by at least a factor of 10) is reviewed; the theoretical arguments favoring mainly nonbaryonic dark matter are summarized; and particular attention is given to weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) remaining as relics from the early universe. The WIMPs are classified as thermal relics (heavy stable neutrinos and lighter neutralinos), asymmetric relics (including baryons), nonthermal relics (superheavy magnetic monopoles, axions, and soliton stars), and truly exotic relics (relativistic debris or vacuum energy). Explanations for the current apparent baryon/exotica ratio of about 0.1 in different theoretical scenarios are considered, and the problems of experimental and/or observational dark-matter detection are examined.

  14. Early spring sex differences in luteinizing hormone response to gonadotropin releasing hormone in co-occurring resident and migrant dark-eyed juncos (Junco hyemalis).

    PubMed

    Greives, Timothy J; Fudickar, Adam M; Atwell, Jonathan W; Meddle, Simone L; Ketterson, Ellen D

    2016-09-15

    To optimally time reproduction, animals must coordinate changes in the hypothalamo-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis. The extent of intra-species variation in seasonal timing of reproductive function is considerable, both within and among populations. Dark-eyed junco (Junco hyemalis) populations are known to differ in their reproductive timing response to cues experienced in the same habitat in late winter/early spring. Specifically in juncos cohabitating on shared wintering grounds, residents initiate breeding and reproductive activity but migrants delay reproductive development and prepare to migrate before breeding. Here, we test the hypothesis that the pituitary gland acts as a 'control point' to modulate differential HPG axis activity across populations. We sampled free-living resident and migrant juncos on their shared over-wintering grounds in March, thus all individuals were experiencing the same environmental cues, including photoperiod. We predicted that during this critical time of transition, residents would more readily respond to repeated gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) stimulation with increases in luteinizing hormone (LH), in contrast to migrants, which should delay full reproductive activity. Our data indicate that migrant females, while still on the overwintering grounds, have a reduced LH response to repeated GnRH injections compared to resident females. Male migrant and resident birds did not differ in their responsiveness to repeated GnRH. Our results suggest a sex difference in the costs of mistimed activation of the HPG axis, with female migrants being less responsive than residents females and males to repeated stimulation. Further, our data implicate a key role for the pituitary in regulating appropriate reproductive timing responses. PMID:27374492

  15. APEX/SABOCA observations of small-scale structure of infrared-dark clouds . I. Early evolutionary stages of star-forming cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ragan, Sarah E.; Henning, Thomas; Beuther, Henrik

    2013-11-01

    Infrared-dark clouds (IRDCs) harbor the early phases of cluster and high-mass star formation and are comprised of cold (~20 K), dense (n > 104 cm-3) gas. The spectral energy distribution (SED) of IRDCs is dominated by the far-infrared and millimeter wavelength regime, and our initial Herschel study examined IRDCs at the peak of the SED with high angular resolution. Here we present a follow-up study using the SABOCA instrument on APEX which delivers 7.8″ angular resolution at 350 μm, matching the resolution we achieved with Herschel/PACS, and allowing us to characterize substructure on ~0.1 pc scales. Our sample of 11 nearby IRDCs are a mix of filamentary and clumpy morphologies, and the filamentary clouds show significant hierarchical structure, while the clumpy IRDCs exhibit little hierarchical structure. All IRDCs, regardless of morphology, have about 14% of their total mass in small scale core-like structures which roughly follow a trend of constant volume density over all size scales. Out of the 89 protostellar cores we identified in this sample with Herschel, we recover 40 of the brightest and re-fit their SEDs and find their properties agree fairly well with our previous estimates (⟨ T ⟩ ~ 19 K). We detect a new population of "cold cores" which have no 70 μm counterpart, but are 100 and 160 μm-bright, with colder temperatures (⟨ T ⟩ ~ 16 K). This latter population, along with SABOCA-only detections, are predominantly low-mass objects, but their evolutionary diagnostics are consistent with the earliest starless or prestellar phase of cores in IRDCs. Based on observations carried out with the Atacama Pathfinder Experiment (APEX). APEX is a collaboration between Max Planck Institut für Radioastronomie (MPIfR), Onsala Space Observatory (OSO), and the European Southern Observatory (ESO).Appendices are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  16. Dark Matter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lincoln, Don

    2013-01-01

    It's a dark, dark universe out there, and I don't mean because the night sky is black. After all, once you leave the shadow of the Earth and get out into space, you're surrounded by countless lights glittering everywhere you look. But for all of Sagan's billions and billions of stars and galaxies, it's a jaw-dropping fact that the ordinary kind of…

  17. Quantum Yang-Mills Dark Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasechnik, Roman

    2016-02-01

    In this short review, I discuss basic qualitative characteristics of quantum non-Abelian gauge dynamics in the non-stationary background of the expanding Universe in the framework of the standard Einstein--Yang--Mills formulation. A brief outlook of existing studies of cosmological Yang--Mills fields and their properties will be given. Quantum effects have a profound impact on the gauge field-driven cosmological evolution. In particular, a dynamical formation of the spatially-homogeneous and isotropic gauge field condensate may be responsible for both early and late-time acceleration, as well as for dynamical compensation of non-perturbative quantum vacua contributions to the ground state of the Universe. The main properties of such a condensate in the effective QCD theory at the flat Friedmann--Lema\\'itre--Robertson--Walker (FLRW) background will be discussed within and beyond perturbation theory. Finally, a phenomenologically consistent dark energy can be induced dynamically as a remnant of the QCD vacua compensation arising from leading-order graviton-mediated corrections to the QCD ground state.

  18. Dark GPC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bañas, Andrew R.; Villangca, Mark J.; Palima, Darwin; Glückstad, Jesper

    2016-03-01

    Generalized Phase Contrast (GPC) is an efficient method for efficiently shaping light into speckle-free contiguous optical distributions useful in diverse applications such as static beam shaping, optical manipulation and recently, for excitation in two-photon optogenetics. GPC typically results in a 3x intensified user defined input mask shape against a dark background. In this work, we emphasize GPC's capability of optimal destructive interference, normally used to create the dark background surrounding the shaped light. We also study input parameters wherein the locations of light and darkness are interchanged with respect to typical GPC output, thus resulting to a well-defined structured darkness. The conditions that give destructive interference for the output are then applied to near-arbitrary shapes. Preliminary experimental results are presented using dynamic spatial light modulator to form scaled arbitrary darkness shapes. Supporting demonstrations that reverse the light and dark regions of amplitude-modulated input are also presented as a related case of structuring destructive interference. Our analysis and experimental demonstrations show a simplified approach in the generation of extended regions of destructive interference within coherent beams.

  19. Perturbation in protein expression of the sterile salmonid hybrids between female brook trout Salvelinus fontinalis and male masu salmon Oncorhynchus masou during early spermatogenesis.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Liang; Senda, Yoshie; Abe, Syuiti

    2013-05-01

    Most males and females of intergeneric hybrid (BM) between female brook trout (Bt) Salvelinus fontinalis and male masu salmon (Ms) Oncorhynchus masou had undeveloped gonads, with abnormal germ cell development shown by histological examination. To understand the cause of this hybrid sterility, expression profiles of testicular proteins in the BM and parental species were examined with 2-DE coupled with MALDI-TOF/TOF MS. Compared with the parental species, more than 60% of differentially expressed protein spots were down-regulated in BM. A total of 16 up-regulated and 48 down-regulated proteins were identified in BM. Up-regulated were transferrin and other somatic cell-predominant proteins, whereas down-regulated were some germ cell-specific proteins such as DEAD box RNA helicase Vasa. Other pronouncedly down-regulated proteins included tubulins and heat shock proteins that are supposed to have roles in spermatogenesis. The present findings suggest direct association of the observed perturbation in protein expression with the failure of spermatogenesis and the sterility in the examined salmonid hybrids.

  20. Viscous dark fluid universe

    SciTech Connect

    Hipolito-Ricaldi, W. S.; Velten, H. E. S.; Zimdahl, W.

    2010-09-15

    We investigate the cosmological perturbation dynamics for a universe consisting of pressureless baryonic matter and a viscous fluid, the latter representing a unified model of the dark sector. In the homogeneous and isotropic background the total energy density of this mixture behaves as a generalized Chaplygin gas. The perturbations of this energy density are intrinsically nonadiabatic and source relative entropy perturbations. The resulting baryonic matter power spectrum is shown to be compatible with the 2dFGRS and SDSS (DR7) data. A joint statistical analysis, using also Hubble-function and supernovae Ia data, shows that, different from other studies, there exists a maximum in the probability distribution for a negative present value q{sub 0{approx_equal}}-0.53 of the deceleration parameter. Moreover, while previous descriptions on the basis of generalized Chaplygin-gas models were incompatible with the matter power-spectrum data since they required a much too large amount of pressureless matter, the unified model presented here favors a matter content that is of the order of the baryonic matter abundance suggested by big-bang nucleosynthesis.

  1. Cosmological anisotropy from non-comoving dark matter and dark energy

    SciTech Connect

    Harko, Tiberiu; Lobo, Francisco S. N. E-mail: flobo@cii.fc.ul.pt

    2013-07-01

    We consider a cosmological model in which the two major fluid components of the Universe, dark energy and dark matter, flow with distinct four-velocities. This cosmological configuration is equivalent to a single anisotropic fluid, expanding with a four-velocity that is an appropriate combination of the two fluid four-velocities. The energy density of the single cosmological fluid is larger than the sum of the energy densities of the two perfect fluids, i.e., dark energy and dark matter, respectively, and contains a correction term due to the anisotropy generated by the differences in the four-velocities. Furthermore, the gravitational field equations of the two-fluid anisotropic cosmological model are obtained for a Bianchi type I geometry. By assuming that the non-comoving motion of the dark energy and dark matter induces small perturbations in the homogeneous and isotropic Friedmann-Lemaitre-Robertson-Walker type cosmological background, and that the anisotropy parameter is small, the equations of the cosmological perturbations due to the non-comoving nature of the two major components are obtained. The time evolution of the metric perturbations is explicitly obtained for the cases of the exponential and power law background cosmological expansion. The imprints of a non-comoving dark energy - dark matter on the Cosmic Microwave Background and on the luminosity distance are briefly discussed, and the temperature anisotropies and the quadrupole are explicitly obtained in terms of the metric perturbations of the flat background metric. Therefore, if there is a slight difference between the four-velocities of the dark energy and dark matter, the Universe would acquire some anisotropic characteristics, and its geometry will deviate from the standard FLRW one. In fact, the recent Planck results show that the presence of an intrinsic large scale anisotropy in the Universe cannot be excluded a priori, so that the model presented in this work can be considered as a

  2. Unified Dark Matter scalar field models with fast transition

    SciTech Connect

    Bertacca, Daniele; Bruni, Marco; Piattella, Oliver F.; Pietrobon, Davide E-mail: marco.bruni@port.ac.uk E-mail: davide.pietrobon@jpl.nasa.gov

    2011-02-01

    We investigate the general properties of Unified Dark Matter (UDM) scalar field models with Lagrangians with a non-canonical kinetic term, looking specifically for models that can produce a fast transition between an early Einstein-de Sitter CDM-like era and a later Dark Energy like phase, similarly to the barotropic fluid UDM models in JCAP01(2010)014. However, while the background evolution can be very similar in the two cases, the perturbations are naturally adiabatic in fluid models, while in the scalar field case they are necessarily non-adiabatic. The new approach to building UDM Lagrangians proposed here allows to escape the common problem of the fine-tuning of the parameters which plague many UDM models. We analyse the properties of perturbations in our model, focusing on the the evolution of the effective speed of sound and that of the Jeans length. With this insight, we can set theoretical constraints on the parameters of the model, predicting sufficient conditions for the model to be viable. An interesting feature of our models is that what can be interpreted as w{sub DE} can be < −1 without violating the null energy conditions.

  3. Signatures of dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baltz, Edward Anthony

    It is well known that most of the mass in the universe remains unobserved save for its gravitational effect on luminous matter. The nature of this ``dark matter'' remains a mystery. From measurements of the primordial deuterium abundance, the theory of big bang nucleosynthesis predicts that there are not enough baryons to account for the amount of dark matter observed, thus the missing mass must take an exotic form. Several promising candidates have been proposed. In this work I will describe my research along two main lines of inquiry into the dark matter puzzle. The first possibility is that the dark matter is exotic massive particles, such as those predicted by supersymmetric extensions to the standard model of particle physics. Such particles are generically called WIMPs, for weakly interacting massive particles. Focusing on the so-called neutralino in supersymmetric models, I discuss the possible signatures of such particles, including their direct detection via nuclear recoil experiments and their indirect detection via annihilations in the halos of galaxies, producing high energy antiprotons, positrons and gamma rays. I also discuss signatures of the possible slow decays of such particles. The second possibility is that there is a population of black holes formed in the early universe. Any dark objects in galactic halos, black holes included, are called MACHOs, for massive compact halo objects. Such objects can be detected by their gravitational microlensing effects. Several possibilities for sources of baryonic dark matter are also interesting for gravitational microlensing. These include brown dwarf stars and old, cool white dwarf stars. I discuss the theory of gravitational microlensing, focusing on the technique of pixel microlensing. I make predictions for several planned microlensing experiments with ground based and space based telescopes. Furthermore, I discuss binary lenses in the context of pixel microlensing. Finally, I develop a new technique for

  4. The Dark Matter Problem: A Historical Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanders, Robert H.

    2010-04-01

    1. Introduction; 2. Early history of the dark matter hypothesis; 3. The stability of disk galaxies: the dark halo solutions; 4. Direct evidence: extended rotation curves of spiral galaxies; 5. The maximum disk: light traces mass; 6. Cosmology and the birth of astroparticle physics; 7. Clusters revisited: missing mass found; 8. CDM confronts galaxy rotation curves; 9. The new cosmology: dark matter is not enough; 10. An alternative to dark matter: Modified Newtonian Dynamics; 11. Seeing dark matter: the theory and practice of detection; 12. Reflections: a personal point of view; Appendix; References; Index.

  5. Cosmological perturbations in a mimetic matter model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Jiro; Odintsov, Sergei D.; Sushkov, Sergey V.

    2015-03-01

    We investigate the cosmological evolution of a mimetic matter model with arbitrary scalar potential. The cosmological reconstruction—which is the method for constructing a model for an arbitrary evolution of the scale factor—is explicitly performed for different choices of potential. The cases where the mimetic matter model shows the evolution as cold dark matter (CDM), the w CDM model, dark matter and dark energy with a dynamical O m (z ) [where O m (z )≡[(H (z )/H0)2-1 ]/[(1 +z )3-1 ] ], and phantom dark energy with a phantom-nonphantom crossing are presented in detail. The cosmological perturbations for such evolutions are studied in the mimetic matter model. For instance, the evolution behavior of the matter density contrast (which is different than the usual one, i.e., δ ¨+2 H δ ˙-κ2ρ δ /2 =0 ) is investigated. The possibility of a peculiar evolution of δ in the model under consideration is shown. Special attention is paid to the behavior of the matter density contrast near the future singularity, where the decay of perturbations may occur much earlier than the singularity.

  6. Density perturbation theory

    SciTech Connect

    Palenik, Mark C.; Dunlap, Brett I.

    2015-07-28

    Despite the fundamental importance of electron density in density functional theory, perturbations are still usually dealt with using Hartree-Fock-like orbital equations known as coupled-perturbed Kohn-Sham (CPKS). As an alternative, we develop a perturbation theory that solves for the perturbed density directly, removing the need for CPKS. This replaces CPKS with a true Hohenberg-Kohn density perturbation theory. In CPKS, the perturbed density is found in the basis of products of occupied and virtual orbitals, which becomes ever more over-complete as the size of the orbital basis set increases. In our method, the perturbation to the density is expanded in terms of a series of density basis functions and found directly. It is possible to solve for the density in such a way that it makes the total energy stationary even if the density basis is incomplete.

  7. Cosmological Consequences of Dark Matter Interactions and Vacuum Fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boddy, Kimberly K.

    This thesis is divided into two parts: interacting dark matter and fluctuations in cosmology. There is an incongruence between the properties that dark matter is expected to possess between the early universe and the late universe. Weakly-interacting dark matter yields the observed dark matter relic density and is consistent with large-scale structure formation; however, there is strong astrophysical evidence in favor of the idea that dark matter has large self-interactions. The first part of this thesis presents two models in which the nature of dark matter fundamentally changes as the universe evolves. In the first model, the dark matter mass and couplings depend on the value of a chameleonic scalar field that changes as the universe expands. In the second model, dark matter is charged under a hidden SU(N) gauge group and eventually undergoes confinement. These models introduce very different mechanisms to explain the separation between the physics relevant for freezeout and for small-scale dynamics. As the universe continues to evolve, it will asymptote to a de Sitter vacuum phase. Since there is a finite temperature associated with de Sitter space, the universe is typically treated as a thermal system, subject to rare thermal fluctuations, such as Boltzmann brains. The second part of this thesis begins by attempting to escape this unacceptable situation within the context of known physics: vacuum instability induced by the Higgs field. The vacuum decay rate competes with the production rate of Boltzmann brains, and the cosmological measures that have a sufficiently low occurrence of Boltzmann brains are given more credence. Upon further investigation, however, there are certain situations in which de Sitter space settles into a quiescent vacuum with no fluctuations. This reasoning not only provides an escape from the Boltzmann brain problem, but it also implies that vacuum states do not uptunnel to higher-energy vacua and that perturbations do not decohere

  8. Effective field theory of cosmological perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piazza, Federico; Vernizzi, Filippo

    2013-11-01

    The effective field theory of cosmological perturbations stems from considering a cosmological background solution as a state displaying spontaneous breaking of time translations and (adiabatic) perturbations as the related Nambu-Goldstone modes. With this insight, one can systematically develop a theory for the cosmological perturbations during inflation and, with minor modifications, also describe in full generality the gravitational interactions of dark energy, which are relevant for late-time cosmology. The formalism displays a unique set of Lagrangian operators containing an increasing number of cosmological perturbations and derivatives. We give an introductory description of the unitary gauge formalism for theories with broken gauge symmetry—that allows us to write down the most general Lagrangian—and of the Stückelberg ‘trick’—that allows to recover gauge invariance and to make the scalar field explicit. We show how to apply this formalism to gravity and cosmology and we reproduce the detailed analysis of the action in the ADM variables. We also review some basic applications to inflation and dark energy.

  9. Ischemic Acute Kidney Injury Perturbs Homeostasis of Serine Enantiomers in the Body Fluid in Mice: Early Detection of Renal Dysfunction Using the Ratio of Serine Enantiomers

    PubMed Central

    Sasabe, Jumpei; Suzuki, Masataka; Miyoshi, Yurika; Tojo, Yosuke; Okamura, Chieko; Ito, Sonomi; Konno, Ryuichi; Mita, Masashi; Hamase, Kenji; Aiso, Sadakazu

    2014-01-01

    The imbalance of blood and urine amino acids in renal failure has been studied mostly without chiral separation. Although a few reports have shown the presence of D-serine, an enantiomer of L-serine, in the serum of patients with severe renal failure, it has remained uncertain how serine enantiomers are deranged in the development of renal failure. In the present study, we have monitored serine enantiomers using a two-dimensional HPLC system in the serum and urine of mice after renal ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI), known as a mouse model of acute kidney injury. In the serum, the level of D-serine gradually increased after renal IRI in parallel with that of creatinine, whereas the L-serine level decreased sharply in the early phase after IRI. The increase of D-serine was suppressed in part by genetic inactivation of a D-serine-degrading enzyme, D-amino acid oxidase (DAO), but not by disruption of its synthetic enzyme, serine racemase, in mice. Renal DAO activity was detected exclusively in proximal tubules, and IRI reduced the number of DAO-positive tubules. On the other hand, in the urine, D-serine was excreted at a rate nearly triple that of L-serine in mice with sham operations, indicating that little D-serine was reabsorbed while most L-serine was reabsorbed in physiological conditions. IRI significantly reduced the ratio of urinary D−/L-serine from 2.82±0.18 to 1.10±0.26 in the early phase and kept the ratio lower than 0.5 thereafter. The urinary D−/L-serine ratio can detect renal ischemia earlier than kidney injury molecule-1 (KIM-1) or neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) in the urine, and more sensitively than creatinine, cystatin C, or the ratio of D−/L-serine in the serum. Our findings provide a novel understanding of the imbalance of amino acids in renal failure and offer a potential new biomarker for an early detection of acute kidney injury. PMID:24489731

  10. Inflation, Dark Matter, Dark Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolb, Edward W.

    2005-06-01

    Remarkable 20th-century cosmological discoveries and theoretical ideas led to the development of the present cosmological "standard model." In this lecture I will focus on one of the more recent ideas that may now be regarded as part of the framework of the standard big-bang model; namely, that structure in the universe results from the growth of small seed density fluctuations produced during the inflationary universe. In order to complete this picture, I will also discuss the idea that the present mass density is dominated by dark matter and that there is now a preponderance of dark energy.

  11. Light and dark matter in the universe

    SciTech Connect

    2010-01-01

    This simulation follows the growth of density perturbations in both gas and dark matter components in a volume 1 billion light years on a side beginning shortly after the Big Bang and evolved to half the present age of the universe. It calculates the gravitational clumping of intergalactic gas and dark matter modeled using a computational grid of 64 billion cells and 64 billion dark matter particles. The simulation uses a computational grid of 4096^3 cells and took over 4,000,000 CPU hours to complete. Read more: http://www.anl.gov/Media_Center/News/2010/news100104.html

  12. Effective theory of interacting dark energy

    SciTech Connect

    Gleyzes, Jérôme; Mancarella, Michele; Vernizzi, Filippo; Langlois, David E-mail: langlois@apc.univ-paris7.fr E-mail: filippo.vernizzi@cea.fr

    2015-08-01

    We present a unifying treatment of dark energy and modified gravity that allows distinct conformal-disformal couplings of matter species to the gravitational sector. In this very general approach, we derive the conditions to avoid ghost and gradient instabilities. We compute the equations of motion for background quantities and linear perturbations. We illustrate our formalism with two simple scenarios, where either cold dark matter or a relativistic fluid is nonminimally coupled. This extends previous studies of coupled dark energy to a much broader spectrum of gravitational theories.

  13. Asymmetric condensed dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguirre, Anthony; Diez-Tejedor, Alberto

    2016-04-01

    We explore the viability of a boson dark matter candidate with an asymmetry between the number densities of particles and antiparticles. A simple thermal field theory analysis confirms that, under certain general conditions, this component would develop a Bose-Einstein condensate in the early universe that, for appropriate model parameters, could survive the ensuing cosmological evolution until now. The condensation of a dark matter component in equilibrium with the thermal plasma is a relativistic process, hence the amount of matter dictated by the charge asymmetry is complemented by a hot relic density frozen out at the time of decoupling. Contrary to the case of ordinary WIMPs, dark matter particles in a condensate must be lighter than a few tens of eV so that the density from thermal relics is not too large. Big-Bang nucleosynthesis constrains the temperature of decoupling to the scale of the QCD phase transition or above. This requires large dark matter-to-photon ratios and very weak interactions with standard model particles.

  14. Inflatable Dark Matter

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Davoudiasl, Hooman; Hooper, Dan; McDermott, Samuel D.

    2016-01-22

    We describe a general scenario, dubbed “Inflatable Dark Matter”, in which the density of dark matter particles can be reduced through a short period of late-time inflation in the early universe. The overproduction of dark matter that is predicted within many otherwise well-motivated models of new physics can be elegantly remedied within this context, without the need to tune underlying parameters or to appeal to anthropic considerations. Thermal relics that would otherwise be disfavored can easily be accommodated within this class of scenarios, including dark matter candidates that are very heavy or very light. Furthermore, the non-thermal abundance of GUTmore » or Planck scale axions can be brought to acceptable levels, without invoking anthropic tuning of initial conditions. Additionally, a period of late-time inflation could have occurred over a wide range of scales from ~ MeV to the weak scale or above, and could have been triggered by physics within a hidden sector, with small but not necessarily negligible couplings to the Standard Model.« less

  15. Massive and permanent decline of symbiont bearing morozovellids and δ13C perturbations across the Early Eocene Climatic Optimum at the Possagno section (Southern Alps of northeastern Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luciani, V.; Backman, J.; Fornaciari, E.; Giusberti, L.; Agnini, C.; D'Onofrio, R.

    2015-03-01

    The Early Eocene Climatic Optimum (EECO) records the highest prolonged global temperatures over the past 70 Ma. Understanding the causes and timing of Eocene climate change remains a major challenge in Cenozoic paleoceanography, which includes the biotic response to climate variability and the changes among planktic foraminiferal assemblages across the EECO. The symbiont bearing and shallow dwelling genera Morozovella and Acarinina were important calcifiers in the tropical-subtropical early Paleogene oceans but almost completely disappeared at about 38 Ma, near the Bartonian/Priabonian boundary. We show here that morozovellids record a first critical step across the EECO through a major permanent decline in relative abundance from the Tethyan Possagno section and ODP Site 1051 in the western subtropical North Atlantic. Possible causes may include increased eutrophication, weak water column stratification, changes in ocean chemistry, loss of symbiosis and possible complex interaction with other microfossil groups. Relative abundances of planktic foraminiferal taxa at Possagno parallel negative shifts in both δ13C and δ18O of bulk sediment from Chron C24r to basal Chron C20r. The post-EECO stable isotopic excursions towards lighter values are of modest intensity. Significant though ephemeral modifications in the planktic foraminiferal communities occur during these minor isotopic excursions. These modifications are marked by pronounced increases in relative abundance of acarininids, in a manner similar to their behaviour during pre-EECO hyperthermals in the Tethyan settings, which suggest a pronounced biotic sensitivity to climate change of planktic foraminifera even during the post-EECO interval.

  16. Dark matter with a late decaying dark partner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fairbairn, Malcolm; Zupan, Jure

    2009-07-01

    We explain the PAMELA positron excess and the PPB-BETS/ATIC e++e- data using a simple two component dark sector model (2CDS). The two particle species in the dark matter sector are assumed to be in thermal equilibrium in the early universe. While one particle is stable and is the present day dark matter, the second one is metastable and decays after the universe is 10-8 s old. In this model it is simple to accommodate the large boost factors required to explain the PAMELA positron excess without the need for large spikes in the local dark matter density. We provide the constraints on the parameters of the model and comment on possible signals at future colliders.

  17. Dark matter with a late decaying dark partner

    SciTech Connect

    Fairbairn, Malcolm; Zupan, Jure E-mail: Jure.Zupan@cern.ch

    2009-07-01

    We explain the PAMELA positron excess and the PPB-BETS/ATIC e{sup +}+e{sup −} data using a simple two component dark sector model (2CDS). The two particle species in the dark matter sector are assumed to be in thermal equilibrium in the early universe. While one particle is stable and is the present day dark matter, the second one is metastable and decays after the universe is 10{sup −8} s old. In this model it is simple to accommodate the large boost factors required to explain the PAMELA positron excess without the need for large spikes in the local dark matter density. We provide the constraints on the parameters of the model and comment on possible signals at future colliders.

  18. Automated Lattice Perturbation Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Monahan, Christopher

    2014-11-01

    I review recent developments in automated lattice perturbation theory. Starting with an overview of lattice perturbation theory, I focus on the three automation packages currently "on the market": HiPPy/HPsrc, Pastor and PhySyCAl. I highlight some recent applications of these methods, particularly in B physics. In the final section I briefly discuss the related, but distinct, approach of numerical stochastic perturbation theory.

  19. Perturbative tests of non-perturbative counting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabholkar, Atish; Gomes, João

    2010-03-01

    We observe that a class of quarter-BPS dyons in mathcal{N} = 4 theories with charge vector ( Q, P) and with nontrivial values of the arithmetic duality invariant I := gcd( Q∧ P) are nonperturbative in one frame but perturbative in another frame. This observation suggests a test of the recently computed nonperturbative partition functions for dyons with nontrivial values of the arithmetic invariant. For all values of I, we show that the nonperturbative counting yields vanishing indexed degeneracy for this class of states everywhere in the moduli space in precise agreement with the perturbative result.

  20. Dark scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahonen, Pasi; Alahuhta, Petteri; Daskala, Barbara; Delaitre, Sabine; Hert, Paul De; Lindner, Ralf; Maghiros, Ioannis; Moscibroda, Anna; Schreurs, Wim; Verlinden, Michiel

    In this chapter, we present four "dark scenarios" that highlight the key socio-economic, legal, technological and ethical risks to privacy, identity, trust, security and inclusiveness posed by new AmI technologies. We call them dark scenarios, because they show things that could go wrong in an AmI world, because they present visions of the future that we do not want to become reality. The scenarios expose threats and vulnerabilities as a way to inform policy-makers and planners about issues they need to take into account in developing new policies or updating existing legislation. Before presenting the four scenarios and our analysis of each, we describe the process of how we created the scenarios as well as the elements in our methodology for analysing the scenarios.

  1. The Cosmology of Composite Inelastic Dark Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Spier Moreira Alves, Daniele; Behbahani, Siavosh R.; Schuster, Philip; Wacker, Jay G.; /SLAC

    2011-08-19

    Composite dark matter is a natural setting for implementing inelastic dark matter - the O(100 keV) mass splitting arises from spin-spin interactions of constituent fermions. In models where the constituents are charged under an axial U(1) gauge symmetry that also couples to the Standard Model quarks, dark matter scatters inelastically off Standard Model nuclei and can explain the DAMA/LIBRA annual modulation signal. This article describes the early Universe cosmology of a minimal implementation of a composite inelastic dark matter model where the dark matter is a meson composed of a light and a heavy quark. The synthesis of the constituent quarks into dark hadrons results in several qualitatively different configurations of the resulting dark matter composition depending on the relative mass scales in the system.

  2. Dark matter

    PubMed Central

    Peebles, P. James E.

    2015-01-01

    The evidence for the dark matter (DM) of the hot big bang cosmology is about as good as it gets in natural science. The exploration of its nature is now led by direct and indirect detection experiments, to be complemented by advances in the full range of cosmological tests, including judicious consideration of the rich phenomenology of galaxies. The results may confirm ideas about DM already under discussion. If we are lucky, we also will be surprised once again. PMID:24794526

  3. Dark matter.

    PubMed

    Peebles, P James E

    2015-10-01

    The evidence for the dark matter (DM) of the hot big bang cosmology is about as good as it gets in natural science. The exploration of its nature is now led by direct and indirect detection experiments, to be complemented by advances in the full range of cosmological tests, including judicious consideration of the rich phenomenology of galaxies. The results may confirm ideas about DM already under discussion. If we are lucky, we also will be surprised once again.

  4. Dark matter.

    PubMed

    Peebles, P James E

    2015-10-01

    The evidence for the dark matter (DM) of the hot big bang cosmology is about as good as it gets in natural science. The exploration of its nature is now led by direct and indirect detection experiments, to be complemented by advances in the full range of cosmological tests, including judicious consideration of the rich phenomenology of galaxies. The results may confirm ideas about DM already under discussion. If we are lucky, we also will be surprised once again. PMID:24794526

  5. Dark matter detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baudis, Laura

    2016-08-01

    More than 80 years after its first postulation in modern form, the existence and distribution of dark matter in our Universe is well established. Dark matter is the gravitational glue that holds together galaxies, galaxy clusters and structures on the largest cosmological scales, and an essential component to explain the observed fluctuations in the cosmic microwave background. Yet its existence is inferred indirectly, through its gravitational influence on luminous matter, and its nature is not known. A viable hypothesis is that dark matter is made of new, elementary particles, with allowed masses and interaction strengths spanning a wide range. Two well-motivated classes of candidates are axions and weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs), and experimental efforts have now reached sensitivities that allow them to test this hypothesis. Axions, produced non-thermally in the early Universe, can be detected by exploiting their predicted couplings to photons and electrons. WIMPs can be detected directly by looking for their collisions with atomic nuclei ultra-low background detectors, or indirectly, through the observation of their annihilation products such as neutrinos, gamma rays, positrons and antiprotons over the astrophysical background. A complementary method is the production of dark matter particles at colliders such as the Large Hadron Collider, where they could be observed indirectly via missing transverse energy, or via associated particle production. I will review the main experimental efforts to search for dark matter particles, and the existing constraints on the interaction cross sections. I will also discuss future experiments, their complementarity and their ability to measure the properties of these particles.

  6. TASI 2008 Lectures on Dark Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Hooper, Dan; /Fermilab /Chicago U., Astron. Astrophys. Ctr.

    2009-01-01

    Based on lectures given at the 2008 Theoretical Advanced Study Institute (TASI), I review here some aspects of the phenomenology of particle dark matter, including the process of thermal freeze-out in the early universe, and the direct and indirect detection of WIMPs. I also describe some of the most popular particle candidates for dark matter and summarize the current status of the quest to discover dark matter's particle identity.

  7. Dark Matter Jets at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Bai, Yang; Rajaraman, Arvind; /UC, Irvine

    2012-03-28

    We argue that dark matter particles which have strong interactions with the Standard Model particles are not excluded by current astrophysical constraints. These dark matter particles have unique signatures at colliders; instead of missing energy, the dark matter particles produce jets. We propose a new search strategy for such strongly interacting particles by looking for a signal of two trackless jets. We show that suitable cuts can plausibly allow us to find these signals at the LHC even in early data.

  8. KICKSTARTING REIONIZATION WITH THE FIRST BLACK HOLES: THE EFFECTS OF SECOND-ORDER PERTURBATION THEORY IN PRE-REIONIZATION VOLUMES

    SciTech Connect

    Holley-Bockelmann, Kelly; Sinha, Manodeep; Wise, John H. E-mail: manodeep.sinha@vanderbilt.edu

    2012-12-10

    We explore structure formation in the dark ages (z {approx} 30-6) using two well-known methods for initializing cosmological N-body simulations. Overall, both the Zel'dovich approximation and second-order Lagrangian perturbation theory (2LPT) are known to produce accurate present-day dark matter halo mass functions. However, since the 2LPT method drives more rapid evolution of dense regions, it increases the occurrence of rare massive objects-an effect that is most pronounced at high redshift. We find that 2LPT produces more halos that could harbor Population III stars and their black hole remnants, and they produce them earlier. Although the differences between the 2LPT and Zel'dovich approximation mass functions are nearly erased by z = 6, this small boost to the number and mass of black holes more than doubles the reionized volume of the early universe. We discuss the implications for reionization and massive black hole growth.

  9. Distinguishing modified gravity from dark energy

    SciTech Connect

    Bertschinger, Edmund; Zukin, Phillip

    2008-07-15

    The acceleration of the Universe can be explained either through dark energy or through the modification of gravity on large scales. In this paper we investigate modified gravity models and compare their observable predictions with dark energy models. Modifications of general relativity are expected to be scale independent on superhorizon scales and scale dependent on subhorizon scales. For scale-independent modifications, utilizing the conservation of the curvature scalar and a parametrized post-Newtonian formulation of cosmological perturbations, we derive results for large-scale structure growth, weak gravitational lensing, and cosmic microwave background anisotropy. For scale-dependent modifications, inspired by recent f(R) theories we introduce a parametrization for the gravitational coupling G and the post-Newtonian parameter {gamma}. These parametrizations provide a convenient formalism for testing general relativity. However, we find that if dark energy is generalized to include both entropy and shear stress perturbations, and the dynamics of dark energy is unknown a priori, then modified gravity cannot in general be distinguished from dark energy using cosmological linear perturbations.

  10. Cosmological perturbations on the phantom brane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bag, Satadru; Viznyuk, Alexander; Shtanov, Yuri; Sahni, Varun

    2016-07-01

    We obtain a closed system of equations for scalar perturbations in a multi-component braneworld. Our braneworld possesses a phantom-like equation of state at late times, weff < ‑1, but no big-rip future singularity. In addition to matter and radiation, the braneworld possesses a new effective degree of freedom—the `Weyl fluid' or `dark radiation'. Setting initial conditions on super-Hubble spatial scales at the epoch of radiation domination, we evolve perturbations of radiation, pressureless matter and the Weyl fluid until the present epoch. We observe a gradual decrease in the amplitude of the Weyl-fluid perturbations after Hubble-radius crossing, which results in a negligible effect of the Weyl fluid on the evolution of matter perturbations on spatial scales relevant for structure formation. Consequently, the quasi-static approximation of Koyama and Maartens provides a good fit to the exact results during the matter-dominated epoch. We find that the late-time growth of density perturbations on the brane proceeds at a faster rate than in ΛCDM. Additionally, the gravitational potentials Φ and Ψ evolve differently on the brane than in ΛCDM, for which Φ = Ψ. On the brane, by contrast, the ratio Φ/Ψ exceeds unity during the late matter-dominated epoch (z lesssim 50). These features emerge as smoking gun tests of phantom brane cosmology and allow predictions of this scenario to be tested against observations of galaxy clustering and large-scale structure.

  11. Cosmological perturbations on the phantom brane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bag, Satadru; Viznyuk, Alexander; Shtanov, Yuri; Sahni, Varun

    2016-07-01

    We obtain a closed system of equations for scalar perturbations in a multi-component braneworld. Our braneworld possesses a phantom-like equation of state at late times, weff < -1, but no big-rip future singularity. In addition to matter and radiation, the braneworld possesses a new effective degree of freedom—the `Weyl fluid' or `dark radiation'. Setting initial conditions on super-Hubble spatial scales at the epoch of radiation domination, we evolve perturbations of radiation, pressureless matter and the Weyl fluid until the present epoch. We observe a gradual decrease in the amplitude of the Weyl-fluid perturbations after Hubble-radius crossing, which results in a negligible effect of the Weyl fluid on the evolution of matter perturbations on spatial scales relevant for structure formation. Consequently, the quasi-static approximation of Koyama and Maartens provides a good fit to the exact results during the matter-dominated epoch. We find that the late-time growth of density perturbations on the brane proceeds at a faster rate than in ΛCDM. Additionally, the gravitational potentials Φ and Ψ evolve differently on the brane than in ΛCDM, for which Φ = Ψ. On the brane, by contrast, the ratio Φ/Ψ exceeds unity during the late matter-dominated epoch (z lesssim 50). These features emerge as smoking gun tests of phantom brane cosmology and allow predictions of this scenario to be tested against observations of galaxy clustering and large-scale structure.

  12. Seeded hot dark matter models with inflation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gratsias, John; Scherrer, Robert J.; Steigman, Gary; Villumsen, Jens V.

    1993-01-01

    We examine massive neutrino (hot dark matter) models for large-scale structure in which the density perturbations are produced by randomly distributed relic seeds and by inflation. Power spectra, streaming velocities, and the Sachs-Wolfe quadrupole fluctuation are derived for this model. We find that the pure seeded hot dark matter model without inflation produces Sachs-Wolfe fluctuations far smaller than those seen by COBE. With the addition of inflationary perturbations, fluctuations consistent with COBE can be produced. The COBE results set the normalization of the inflationary component, which determines the large-scale (about 50/h Mpc) streaming velocities. The normalization of the seed power spectrum is a free parameter, which can be adjusted to obtain the desired fluctuations on small scales. The power spectra produced are very similar to those seen in mixed hot and cold dark matter models.

  13. Frame independent cosmological perturbations

    SciTech Connect

    Prokopec, Tomislav; Weenink, Jan E-mail: j.g.weenink@uu.nl

    2013-09-01

    We compute the third order gauge invariant action for scalar-graviton interactions in the Jordan frame. We demonstrate that the gauge invariant action for scalar and tensor perturbations on one physical hypersurface only differs from that on another physical hypersurface via terms proportional to the equation of motion and boundary terms, such that the evolution of non-Gaussianity may be called unique. Moreover, we demonstrate that the gauge invariant curvature perturbation and graviton on uniform field hypersurfaces in the Jordan frame are equal to their counterparts in the Einstein frame. These frame independent perturbations are therefore particularly useful in relating results in different frames at the perturbative level. On the other hand, the field perturbation and graviton on uniform curvature hypersurfaces in the Jordan and Einstein frame are non-linearly related, as are their corresponding actions and n-point functions.

  14. Analysis of dark matter and dark energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yongquan, Han

    2016-05-01

    As the law of unity of opposites of the Philosophy tells us, the bright material exists, the dark matter also exists. Dark matter and dark energy should allow the law of unity of opposites. The Common attributes of the matter is radiation, then common attributes of dark matter must be absorb radiation. Only the rotation speed is lower than the speed of light radiation, can the matter radiate, since the speed of the matter is lower than the speed of light, so the matter is radiate; The rotate speed of the dark matter is faster than the light , so the dark matter doesn't radiate, it absorbs radiation. The energy that the dark matter absorb radiation produced (affect the measurement of time and space distribution of variations) is dark energy, so the dark matter produce dark energy only when it absorbs radiation. Dark matter does not radiate, two dark matters does not exist inevitably forces, and also no dark energy. Called the space-time ripples, the gravitational wave is bent radiation, radiation particles should be graviton, graviton is mainly refers to the radiation particles whose wavelength is small. Dark matter, dark energy also confirms the existence of the law of symmetry.

  15. Dark Matter Annihilation at the Galactic Center

    SciTech Connect

    Linden, Timothy Ryan

    2013-06-01

    Observations by the WMAP and PLANCK satellites have provided extraordinarily accurate observations on the densities of baryonic matter, dark matter, and dark energy in the universe. These observations indicate that our universe is composed of approximately ve times as much dark matter as baryonic matter. However, e orts to detect a particle responsible for the energy density of dark matter have been unsuccessful. Theoretical models have indicated that a leading candidate for the dark matter is the lightest supersymmetric particle, which may be stable due to a conserved R-parity. This dark matter particle would still be capable of interacting with baryons via weak-force interactions in the early universe, a process which was found to naturally explain the observed relic abundance of dark matter today. These residual annihilations can persist, albeit at a much lower rate, in the present universe, providing a detectable signal from dark matter annihilation events which occur throughout the universe. Simulations calculating the distribution of dark matter in our galaxy almost universally predict the galactic center of the Milky Way Galaxy (GC) to provide the brightest signal from dark matter annihilation due to its relative proximity and large simulated dark matter density. Recent advances in telescope technology have allowed for the rst multiwavelength analysis of the GC, with suitable e ective exposure, angular resolution, and energy resolution in order to detect dark matter particles with properties similar to those predicted by the WIMP miracle. In this work, I describe ongoing e orts which have successfully detected an excess in -ray emission from the region immediately surrounding the GC, which is di cult to describe in terms of standard di use emission predicted in the GC region. While the jury is still out on any dark matter interpretation of this excess, I describe several related observations which may indicate a dark matter origin. Finally, I discuss the

  16. A two-parameter matching scheme for massive galaxies and dark matter haloes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulier, Andrea; Ostriker, Jeremiah P.

    2015-10-01

    Halo abundance matching has been used to construct a one-parameter mapping between galaxies and dark matter haloes by assuming that halo mass and galaxy luminosity (or stellar mass) are monotonically related. While this approach has been reasonably successful, it is known that galaxies must be described by at least two parameters, as can be seen from the two-parameter Fundamental Plane on which massive early-type galaxies lie. In this paper, we derive a connection between initial dark matter density perturbations in the early Universe and present-day virialized dark matter haloes by assuming simple spherical collapse combined with conservation of mass and energy. We find that z = 0 halo concentration, or alternatively the inner slope of the halo density profile α, is monotonically and positively correlated with the collapse redshift of the halo. This is qualitatively similar to the findings of some previous works based on numerical simulations, with which we compare our results. We then describe how the halo mass and concentration (or inner slope α) can be used as two halo parameters in combination with two parameters of early-type galaxies to create an improved abundance matching scheme. In a forthcoming paper, we will show an application of this scheme to galaxies on the Fundamental Plane.

  17. Thermal fluctuations of dark matter in bouncing cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Changhong

    2016-09-01

    We investigate the statistical nature of the dark matter particles produced in bouncing cosmology, especially, the evolution of its thermal fluctuations. By explicitly deriving and solving the equation of motion of super-horizon mode, we fully determine the evolution of thermal perturbation of dark matter in a generic bouncing background. And we also show that the evolution of super-horizon modes is stable and will not ruin the background evolution of a generic bouncing universe till the Planck scale. Given no super-horizon thermal perturbation of dark matter appears in standard inflation scenario such as WIMP(-less) miracles, such super-horizon thermal perturbation of dark matter generated during the generic bouncing universe scenario may be significant for testing and distinguishing these two scenario in near future.

  18. Cosmological scalar field perturbations can grow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alcubierre, Miguel; de la Macorra, Axel; Diez-Tejedor, Alberto; Torres, José M.

    2015-09-01

    It has been argued that the small perturbations to the homogeneous and isotropic configurations of a canonical scalar field in an expanding universe do not grow. We show that this is not true in general, and clarify the root of the misunderstanding. We revisit a simple model in which the zero mode of a free scalar field oscillates with high frequency around the minimum of the potential. Under this assumption the linear perturbations grow like those in the standard cold dark matter scenario, but with a Jeans length at the scale of the Compton wavelength of the scalar particle. Contrary to previous analyses in the literature our results do not rely on time averages and/or fluid identifications, and instead we solve both analytically (in terms of a well-defined series expansion) and numerically the linearized Einstein-Klein-Gordon system. Also, we use gauge-invariant fields, which makes the physical analysis more transparent and simplifies the comparison with previous works carried out in different gauges. As a byproduct of this study we identify a time-dependent modulation of the different physical quantities associated to the background as well as the perturbations with potential observational consequences in dark matter models.

  19. Baryonic matter perturbations in decaying vacuum cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Marttens, R.F. vom; Zimdahl, W.; Hipólito-Ricaldi, W.S. E-mail: wiliam.ricaldi@ufes.br

    2014-08-01

    We consider the perturbation dynamics for the cosmic baryon fluid and determine the corresponding power spectrum for a Λ(t)CDM model in which a cosmological term decays into dark matter linearly with the Hubble rate. The model is tested by a joint analysis of data from supernovae of type Ia (SNIa) (Constitution and Union 2.1), baryonic acoustic oscillations (BAO), the position of the first peak of the anisotropy spectrum of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) and large-scale-structure (LSS) data (SDSS DR7). While the homogeneous and isotropic background dynamics is only marginally influenced by the baryons, there are modifications on the perturbative level if a separately conserved baryon fluid is included. Considering the present baryon fraction as a free parameter, we reproduce the observed abundance of the order of 5% independently of the dark-matter abundance which is of the order of 32% for this model. Generally, the concordance between background and perturbation dynamics is improved if baryons are explicitly taken into account.

  20. Dark degeneracy and interacting cosmic components

    SciTech Connect

    Aviles, Alejandro; Cervantes-Cota, Jorge L.

    2011-10-15

    We study some properties of the dark degeneracy, which is the fact that what we measure in gravitational experiments is the energy-momentum tensor of the total dark sector, and any split into components (as in dark matter and dark energy) is arbitrary. In fact, just one dark fluid is necessary to obtain exactly the same cosmological and astrophysical phenomenology as the {Lambda}CDM model. We work explicitly the first-order perturbation theory and show that beyond the linear order the dark degeneracy is preserved under some general assumptions. Then we construct the dark fluid from a collection of interacting fluids. Finally, we try to break the degeneracy with a general class of couplings to baryonic matter. Nonetheless, we show that these interactions can also be understood in the context of the {Lambda}CDM model as between dark matter and baryons. For this last investigation we choose two independent parametrizations for the interactions, one inspired by electromagnetism and the other by chameleon theories. Then, we constrain them with a joint analysis of CMB and supernovae observational data.

  1. Dark matter and dark energy interactions: theoretical challenges, cosmological implications and observational signatures.

    PubMed

    Wang, B; Abdalla, E; Atrio-Barandela, F; Pavón, D

    2016-09-01

    Models where dark matter and dark energy interact with each other have been proposed to solve the coincidence problem. We review the motivations underlying the need to introduce such interaction, its influence on the background dynamics and how it modifies the evolution of linear perturbations. We test models using the most recent observational data and we find that the interaction is compatible with the current astronomical and cosmological data. Finally, we describe the forthcoming data sets from current and future facilities that are being constructed or designed that will allow a clearer understanding of the physics of the dark sector.

  2. Dark matter and dark energy interactions: theoretical challenges, cosmological implications and observational signatures.

    PubMed

    Wang, B; Abdalla, E; Atrio-Barandela, F; Pavón, D

    2016-09-01

    Models where dark matter and dark energy interact with each other have been proposed to solve the coincidence problem. We review the motivations underlying the need to introduce such interaction, its influence on the background dynamics and how it modifies the evolution of linear perturbations. We test models using the most recent observational data and we find that the interaction is compatible with the current astronomical and cosmological data. Finally, we describe the forthcoming data sets from current and future facilities that are being constructed or designed that will allow a clearer understanding of the physics of the dark sector. PMID:27517328

  3. Dark matter and dark energy interactions: theoretical challenges, cosmological implications and observational signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, B.; Abdalla, E.; Atrio-Barandela, F.; Pavón, D.

    2016-09-01

    Models where dark matter and dark energy interact with each other have been proposed to solve the coincidence problem. We review the motivations underlying the need to introduce such interaction, its influence on the background dynamics and how it modifies the evolution of linear perturbations. We test models using the most recent observational data and we find that the interaction is compatible with the current astronomical and cosmological data. Finally, we describe the forthcoming data sets from current and future facilities that are being constructed or designed that will allow a clearer understanding of the physics of the dark sector.

  4. What Are the Moon's Dark Areas?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bar, Varda; Evry, Zipora; Zinn, Barbara

    2000-01-01

    Presents activities designed to help children experimentally determine what the dark areas of the moon consist of, and compares primary children's ideas about the moon with those of early scientists. (WRM)

  5. Primordial perturbations during a slow expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piao, Yun-Song

    2007-10-01

    Recently, it has been shown that a slow expansion, which is asymptotically a static state in infinite past and may be described as an evolution with γ≪-1, of early universe may lead to the generation of primordial perturbation responsible for the structure formation of observable universe. However, its feasibility depends on whether the growing mode of Bardeen potential before phase transition can be inherited by the constant mode of curvature perturbation after phase transition. In this paper, we phenomenally regard this slow expansion as that driven by multi-NEC (null energy condition) violating scalar fields. We calculate the curvature perturbation induced by the entropy perturbation before phase transition and find that the spectrum is naturally scale invariant with a slight red tilt. The result has an interesting similarity to that of slow roll inflation.

  6. The Perturbed Puma Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rong, Shu-Jun; Liu, Qiu-Yu

    2012-04-01

    The puma model on the basis of the Lorentz and CPT violation may bring an economical interpretation to the conventional neutrinos oscillation and part of the anomalous oscillations. We study the effect of the perturbation to the puma model. In the case of the first-order perturbation which keeps the (23) interchange symmetry, the mixing matrix element Ue3 is always zero. The nonzero mixing matrix element Ue3 is obtained in the second-order perturbation that breaks the (23) interchange symmetry.

  7. GLOBULAR CLUSTERS AND DARK SATELLITE GALAXIES THROUGH THE STREAM VELOCITY

    SciTech Connect

    Naoz, Smadar; Narayan, Ramesh

    2014-08-10

    The formation of purely baryonic globular clusters with no gravitationally bound dark matter is still a theoretical challenge. We show that these objects might form naturally whenever there is a relative stream velocity between baryons and dark matter. The stream velocity causes a phase shift between linear modes of baryonic and dark matter perturbations, which translates to a spatial offset between the two components when they collapse. For a 2σ (3σ) density fluctuation, baryonic clumps with masses in the range 10{sup 5}-2.5 × 10{sup 6} M {sub ☉} (10{sup 5}-4 × 10{sup 6} M {sub ☉}) collapse outside the virial radii of their counterpart dark matter halos. These objects could survive as long-lived, dark-matter-free objects and might conceivably become globular clusters. In addition, their dark matter counterparts, which were deprived of gas, might become dark satellite galaxies.

  8. Present and future evidence for evolving dark energy

    SciTech Connect

    Liddle, Andrew R.; Mukherjee, Pia; Parkinson, David; Wang Yun

    2006-12-15

    We compute the Bayesian evidences for one- and two-parameter models of evolving dark energy, and compare them to the evidence for a cosmological constant, using current data from Type Ia supernova, baryon acoustic oscillations, and the cosmic microwave background. We use only distance information, ignoring dark energy perturbations. We find that, under various priors on the dark energy parameters, {lambda}CDM is currently favored as compared to the dark energy models. We consider the parameter constraints that arise under Bayesian model averaging, and discuss the implication of our results for future dark energy projects seeking to detect dark energy evolution. The model selection approach complements and extends the figure-of-merit approach of the Dark Energy Task Force in assessing future experiments, and suggests a significantly-modified interpretation of that statistic.

  9. Decoupling dark energy from matter

    SciTech Connect

    Brax, Philippe; Davis, Anne-Christine; Martin, Jérôme E-mail: c.vandebruck@sheffield.ac.uk E-mail: jmartin@iap.fr

    2009-09-01

    We examine the embedding of dark energy in high energy models based upon supergravity and extend the usual phenomenological setting comprising an observable sector and a hidden supersymmetry breaking sector by including a third sector leading to the acceleration of the expansion of the universe. We find that gravitational constraints on the non-existence of a fifth force naturally imply that the dark energy sector must possess an approximate shift symmetry. When exact, the shift symmetry provides an example of a dark energy sector with a runaway potential and a nearly massless dark energy field whose coupling to matter is very weak, contrary to the usual lore that dark energy fields must couple strongly to matter and lead to gravitational inconsistencies. Moreover, the shape of the potential is stable under one-loop radiative corrections. When the shift symmetry is slightly broken by higher order terms in the Kähler potential, the coupling to matter remains small. However, the cosmological dynamics are largely affected by the shift symmetry breaking operators leading to the appearance of a minimum of the scalar potential such that dark energy behaves like an effective cosmological constant from very early on in the history of the universe.

  10. Constraints on the coupling between dark energy and dark matter from CMB data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murgia, R.; Gariazzo, S.; Fornengo, N.

    2016-04-01

    We investigate a phenomenological non-gravitational coupling between dark energy and dark matter, where the interaction in the dark sector is parameterized as an energy transfer either from dark matter to dark energy or the opposite. The models are constrained by a whole host of updated cosmological data: cosmic microwave background temperature anisotropies and polarization, high-redshift supernovae, baryon acoustic oscillations, redshift space distortions and gravitational lensing. Both models are found to be compatible with all cosmological observables, but in the case where dark matter decays into dark energy, the tension with the independent determinations of H0 and σ8, already present for standard cosmology, increases: this model in fact predicts lower H0 and higher σ8, mostly as a consequence of the higher amount of dark matter at early times, leading to a stronger clustering during the evolution. Instead, when dark matter is fed by dark energy, the reconstructed values of H0 and σ8 nicely agree with their local determinations, with a full reconciliation between high- and low-redshift observations. A non-zero coupling between dark energy and dark matter, with an energy flow from the former to the latter, appears therefore to be in better agreement with cosmological data.

  11. Dark radiation and inflationary freedom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gariazzo, Stefano

    2016-05-01

    A relaxed primordial power spectrum (PPS) of scalar perturbations arising from inflation can impact the dark radiation constraints obtained from Cosmic Microwave Background and other cosmological measurements. If inflation produces a non-standard PPS for the initial fluctuations, a fully thermalized light sterile neutrino can be favoured by CMB observations, instead of being strongly disfavoured. In the case of a thermal axion, the constraints on the axion mass are relaxed when the PPS is different from the standard power law. Based on Refs. [1, 2].

  12. The Evolution of Dwarf Galaxy Satellites with Different Dark Matter Density Profiles in the ErisMod Simulations. I. The Early Infalls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomozeiu, Mihai; Mayer, Lucio; Quinn, Thomas

    2016-02-01

    We present the first simulations of tidal stirring of dwarf galaxies in the Local Group carried out in a fully cosmological context. We use the ErisDARK cosmological simulation of a Milky Way (MW)-sized galaxy to identify some of the most massive subhalos (Mvir > 108 M⊙) that fall into the main host before z = 2. Subhalos are replaced before infall with extremely high-resolution models of dwarf galaxies comprising a faint stellar disk embedded in a dark matter halo. The set of models contains cuspy halos as well as halos with “cored” profiles (with the cusp coefficient γ = 0.6) consistent with recent results of hydrodynamical simulations of dwarf galaxy formation. The simulations are then run to z = 0 with as many as 54 million particles and resolutions as small as ∼4 pc using the new parallel N-body code ChaNGa. The stellar components of all satellites are significantly affected by tidal stirring, losing stellar mass, and undergoing a morphological transformation toward a pressure supported spheroidal system. However, while some remnants with cuspy halos maintain significant rotational flattening and disk-like features, all the shallow halo models achieve vrot/σ⋆ < 0.5 and round shapes typical of dSph satellites of the MW and M31. Mass loss is also enhanced in the latter, and remnants can reach luminosities and velocity dispersions as low as those of ultra-faint dwarfs.

  13. Gravitational Waves from a Dark Phase Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwaller, Pedro

    2015-10-01

    In this work, we show that a large class of models with a composite dark sector undergo a strong first order phase transition in the early Universe, which could lead to a detectable gravitational wave signal. We summarize the basic conditions for a strong first order phase transition for SU (N ) dark sectors with nf flavors, calculate the gravitational wave spectrum and show that, depending on the dark confinement scale, it can be detected at eLISA or in pulsar timing array experiments. The gravitational wave signal provides a unique test of the gravitational interactions of a dark sector, and we discuss the complementarity with conventional searches for new dark sectors. The discussion includes the twin Higgs and strongly interacting massive particle models as well as symmetric and asymmetric composite dark matter scenarios.

  14. Gravitational Waves from a Dark Phase Transition.

    PubMed

    Schwaller, Pedro

    2015-10-30

    In this work, we show that a large class of models with a composite dark sector undergo a strong first order phase transition in the early Universe, which could lead to a detectable gravitational wave signal. We summarize the basic conditions for a strong first order phase transition for SU(N) dark sectors with n_{f} flavors, calculate the gravitational wave spectrum and show that, depending on the dark confinement scale, it can be detected at eLISA or in pulsar timing array experiments. The gravitational wave signal provides a unique test of the gravitational interactions of a dark sector, and we discuss the complementarity with conventional searches for new dark sectors. The discussion includes the twin Higgs and strongly interacting massive particle models as well as symmetric and asymmetric composite dark matter scenarios. PMID:26565451

  15. Light's Darkness

    ScienceCinema

    Padgett, Miles [University of Glasgow, Glasgow, Scotland

    2016-07-12

    Optical vortices and orbital angular momentum are currently topical subjects in the optics literature. Although seemingly esoteric, they are, in fact, the generic state of light and arise whenever three or more plane waves interfere. To be observed by eye the light must be monochromatic. Laser speckle is one such example, where the optical energy circulates around each black spot, giving a local orbital angular momentum. This talk with report three on-going studies. First, when considering a volume of interfering waves, the laser specs map out threads of complete darkness embedded in the light. Do these threads form loops? Links? Or even knots? Second, when looking through a rapidly spinning window, the image of the world on the other side is rotated: true or false? Finally, the entanglement of orbital angular momentum states means measuring how the angular position of one photons sets the angular momentum of another: is this an angular version of the EPR (Einstein, Podolsky, and Rosen) paradox?

  16. The traces of anisotropic dark energy in light of Planck

    SciTech Connect

    Cardona, Wilmar; Kunz, Martin; Hollenstein, Lukas E-mail: lukas.hollenstein@zhaw.ch

    2014-07-01

    We study a dark energy model with non-zero anisotropic stress, either linked to the dark energy density or to the dark matter density. We compute approximate solutions that allow to characterise the behaviour of the dark energy model and to assess the stability of the perturbations. We also determine the current limits on such an anisotropic stress from the cosmic microwave background data by the Planck satellite, and derive the corresponding constraints on the modified growth parameters like the growth index, the effective Newton's constant and the gravitational slip.

  17. Geometrical aspects on the dark matter problem

    SciTech Connect

    Capistrano, A.J.S.; Cabral, L.A.

    2014-09-15

    In the present paper we apply Nash’s theory of perturbative geometry to the study of dark matter gravity in a higher-dimensional space–time. It is shown that the dark matter gravitational perturbations at local scale can be explained by the extrinsic curvature of the standard cosmology. In order to test our model, we use a spherically symmetric metric embedded in a five-dimensional bulk. As a result, considering a sample of 10 low surface brightness and 6 high surface brightness galaxies, we find a very good agreement with the observed rotation curves of smooth hybrid alpha-HI measurements. - Highlights: • The metric perturbation and the embedding lead naturally to a “brane-world”-like higher dimensional structure. • Nash’s theorem as a cornerstone of the formation of geometrical structures. • The dark matter gravitational perturbations at local scale can be explained by the extrinsic curvature. • A good agreement was found with the observed rotation curves of smooth hybrid alpha-HI measurements.

  18. Dark matter freeze-out in a nonrelativistic sector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pappadopulo, Duccio; Ruderman, Joshua T.; Trevisan, Gabriele

    2016-08-01

    A thermally decoupled hidden sector of particles, with a mass gap, generically enters a phase of cannibalism in the early Universe. The Standard Model sector becomes exponentially colder than the hidden sector. We propose the cannibal dark matter framework, where dark matter resides in a cannibalizing sector with a relic density set by 2-to-2 annihilations. Observable signals of cannibal dark matter include a boosted rate for indirect detection, new relativistic degrees of freedom, and warm dark matter.

  19. Constraining the dark fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Kunz, Martin; Liddle, Andrew R.; Parkinson, David; Gao Changjun

    2009-10-15

    Cosmological observations are normally fit under the assumption that the dark sector can be decomposed into dark matter and dark energy components. However, as long as the probes remain purely gravitational, there is no unique decomposition and observations can only constrain a single dark fluid; this is known as the dark degeneracy. We use observations to directly constrain this dark fluid in a model-independent way, demonstrating, in particular, that the data cannot be fit by a dark fluid with a single constant equation of state. Parametrizing the dark fluid equation of state by a variety of polynomials in the scale factor a, we use current kinematical data to constrain the parameters. While the simplest interpretation of the dark fluid remains that it is comprised of separate dark matter and cosmological constant contributions, our results cover other model types including unified dark energy/matter scenarios.

  20. Is Cold Dark Matter a Vacuum Effect?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houlden, Michael A.

    Current theories about the Universe based on an FLRW model conclude that it is composed of ~4% normal matter, ~28 % dark matter and ~68% Dark Energy which is responsible for the well-established accelerated expansion: this model works extremely well. As the Universe expands the density of normal and dark matter decreases while the proportion of Dark Energy increases. This model assumes that the amount of dark matter, whose nature at present is totally unknown, has remained constant. This is a natural assumption if dark matter is a particle of some kind - WIMP, sterile neutrino, lightest supersysmmetric particle or axion, etc. - that must have emerged from the early high temperature phase of the Big Bang. This paper proposes that dark matter is not a particle such as these but a vacuum effect, and that the proportion of dark matter in the Universe is actually increasing with time. The idea that led to this suggestion was that a quantum process (possibly the Higgs mechanism) might operate in the nilpotent vacuum that Rowlands postulates is a dual space to the real space where Standard Model fundamental fermions (and we) reside. This could produce a vacuum quantum state that has mass, which interacts gravitationally, and such states would be `dark matter'. It is proposed that the rate of production of dark matter by this process might depend on local circumstances, such as the density of dark matter and/or normal matter. This proposal makes the testable prediction that the ratio of baryonic to dark matter varies with redshift and offers an explanation, within the framework of Rowlands' ideas, of the coincidence problem - why has cosmic acceleration started in the recent epoch at redshift z ~0.55 when the Dark Energy density first became equal to the matter density?. This process also offers a potential solution to the `missing baryon' problem.

  1. The Dark Disk of the Milky Way

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purcell, Chris W.; Bullock, James S.; Kaplinghat, Manoj

    2009-10-01

    Massive satellite accretions onto early galactic disks can lead to the deposition of dark matter in disk-like configurations that co-rotate with the galaxy. This phenomenon has potentially dramatic consequences for dark matter detection experiments. We utilize focused, high-resolution simulations of accretion events onto disks designed to be Galaxy analogues, and compare the resultant disks to the morphological and kinematic properties of the Milky Way's thick disk in order to bracket the range of co-rotating accreted dark matter. In agreement with previous results, we find that the Milky Way's merger history must have been unusually quiescent compared to median Λ cold dark matter expectations and, therefore, its dark disk must be relatively small: the fraction of accreted dark disk material near the Sun is about 20% of the host halo density or smaller and the co-rotating dark matter fraction near the Sun, defined as particles moving with a rotational velocity lag less than 50 km s-1, is enhanced by about 30% or less compared to a standard halo model. Such a dark disk could contribute dominantly to the low energy (of order keV for a dark matter particle with mass 100 GeV) nuclear recoil event rate of direct detection experiments, but it will not change the likelihood of detection significantly. These dark disks provide testable predictions of weakly interacting massive particle dark matter models and should be considered in detailed comparisons to experimental data. Our findings suggest that the dark disk of the Milky Way may provide a detectable signal for indirect detection experiments, contributing up to about 25% of the dark matter self-annihilation signal in the direction of the center of the Galaxy, lending the signal a noticeably oblate morphology.

  2. Instability in interacting dark sector: an appropriate holographic Ricci dark energy model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrera, Ramón; Hipólito-Ricaldi, W. S.; Videla, Nelson

    2016-08-01

    In this paper we investigate the consequences of phantom crossing considering the perturbative dynamics in models with interaction in their dark sector. By mean of a general study of gauge-invariant variables in comoving gauge, we relate the sources of instabilities in the structure formation process with the phantom crossing. In order to illustrate these relations and its consequences in more detail, we consider a specific case of an holographic dark energy interacting with dark matter. We find that in spite of the model is in excellent agreement with observational data at background level, however it is plagued of instabilities in its perturbative dynamics. We reconstruct the model in order to avoid these undesirable instabilities, and we show that this implies a modification of the concordance model at background. Also we find drastic changes on the parameters space in our model when instabilities are avoided.

  3. Dark goo: bulk viscosity as an alternative to dark energy

    SciTech Connect

    Gagnon, Jean-Sebastien; Lesgourgues, Julien E-mail: julien.lesgourgues@cern.ch

    2011-09-01

    We present a simple (microscopic) model in which bulk viscosity plays a role in explaining the present acceleration of the universe. The effect of bulk viscosity on the Friedmann equations is to turn the pressure into an 'effective' pressure containing the bulk viscosity. For a sufficiently large bulk viscosity, the effective pressure becomes negative and could mimic a dark energy equation of state. Our microscopic model includes self-interacting spin-zero particles (for which the bulk viscosity is known) that are added to the usual energy content of the universe. We study both background equations and linear perturbations in this model. We show that a dark energy behavior is obtained for reasonable values of the two parameters of the model (i.e. the mass and coupling of the spin-zero particles) and that linear perturbations are well-behaved. There is no apparent fine tuning involved. We also discuss the conditions under which hydrodynamics holds, in particular that the spin-zero particles must be in local equilibrium today for viscous effects to be important.

  4. The Not-so-Dark Ages: ecology for human growth in medieval and early twentieth century Portugal as inferred from skeletal growth profiles.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Hugo F V; Garcia, Susana

    2009-02-01

    This study attempts to address the issue of relative living standards in Portuguese medieval and early 20th century periods. Since the growth of children provides a good measure of environmental quality for the overall population, the skeletal growth profiles of medieval Leiria and early 20th century Lisbon were compared. Results show that growth in femur length of medieval children did not differ significantly from that of early 20th century children, but after puberty medieval adolescents seem to have recovered, as they have significantly longer femora as adults. This is suggestive of greater potential for catch-up growth in medieval adolescents. We suggest that this results from distinct child labor practices, which impact differentially on the growth of Leiria and Lisbon adolescents. Work for medieval children and adolescents were related to family activities, and care and attention were provided by family members. Conversely, in early 20th century Lisbon children were more often sent to factories at around 12 years of age as an extra source of family income, where they were exploited for their labor. Since medieval and early 20th century children were stunted at an early age, greater potential for catch-up growth in medieval adolescents results from exhausting work being added to modern adolescent's burdens of disease and poor diet, when they entered the labor market. Although early 20th century Lisbon did not differ in overall unfavorable living conditions from medieval Leiria, after puberty different child labor practices may have placed modern adolescents at greater risk of undernutrition and poor growth. PMID:18785651

  5. Silk damping at a redshift of a billion: new limit on small-scale adiabatic perturbations.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Donghui; Pradler, Josef; Chluba, Jens; Kamionkowski, Marc

    2014-08-01

    We study the dissipation of small-scale adiabatic perturbations at early times when the Universe is hotter than T≃0.5  keV. When the wavelength falls below the damping scale k(D)(-1), the acoustic modes diffuse and thermalize, causing entropy production. Before neutrino decoupling, k(D) is primarily set by the neutrino shear viscosity, and we study the effect of acoustic damping on the relic neutrino number, primordial nucleosynthesis, dark-matter freeze-out, and baryogenesis. This sets a new limit on the amplitude of primordial fluctuations of Δ(R)(2)<0.007 at 10(4)  Mpc(-1)≲k≲10(5)  Mpc(-1) and a model-dependent limit of Δ(R)(2)≲0.3 at k≲10(20-25)  Mpc(-1). PMID:25148313

  6. Can cosmic structure form without dark matter?

    PubMed

    Dodelson, Scott; Liguori, Michele

    2006-12-01

    One of the prime pieces of evidence for dark matter is the observation of large overdense regions in the Universe. To account for this observation, perturbations had to have grown since recombination by a factor greater than (1+z*) approximately 1180 where z* is the epoch of recombination. This enhanced growth does not happen in general relativity, and so dark matter is needed in the standard theory. We show here that enhanced growth can occur in alternatives to general relativity, in particular, in Bekenstein's relativistic version of modified Newtonian dynamics. PMID:17280192

  7. Vortex perturbation dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Criminale, W. O.; Lasseigne, D. G.; Jackson, T. L.

    1995-01-01

    An initial value approach is used to examine the dynamics of perturbations introduced into a vortex under strain. Both the basic vortex considered and the perturbations are taken as fully three-dimensional. An explicit solution for the time evolution of the vorticity perturbations is given for arbitrary initial vorticity. Analytical solutions for the resulting velocity components are found when the initial vorticity is assumed to be localized. For more general initial vorticity distributions, the velocity components are determined numerically. It is found that the variation in the radial direction of the initial vorticity disturbance is the most important factor influencing the qualitative behavior of the solutions. Transient growth in the magnitude of the velocity components is found to be directly attributable to the compactness of the initial vorticity.

  8. Yang-Mills condensate as dark energy: A nonperturbative approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donà, Pietro; Marcianò, Antonino; Zhang, Yang; Antolini, Claudia

    2016-02-01

    Models based on the Yang-Mills condensate (YMC) have been advocated for in the literature and claimed as successful candidates for explaining dark energy. Several variations on this simple idea have been considered, the most promising of which are reviewed here. Nevertheless, the previously attained results relied heavily on the perturbative approach to the analysis of the effective Yang-Mills action, which is only adequate in the asymptotically free limit, and were extended into a regime, the infrared limit, in which confinement is expected. We show that if a minimum of the effective Lagrangian in θ =-Fμν aFa μ ν/2 exists, a YMC forms that drives the Universe toward an accelerated de Sitter phase. The details of the models depend weakly on the specific form of the effective Yang-Mills Lagrangian. Using nonperturbative techniques mutated from the functional renormalization-group procedure, we finally show that the minimum in θ of the effective Lagrangian exists. Thus, a YMC can actually take place. The nonperturbative model has properties similar to the ones in the perturbative model. In the early stage of the Universe, the YMC equation of state has an evolution that resembles the radiation component, i.e., wy→1 /3 . However, in the late stage, wy naturally runs to the critical state with wy=-1 , and the Universe transitions from a matter-dominated into a dark energy dominated stage only at latest time, at a redshift whose value depends on the initial conditions that are chosen while solving the dynamical system.

  9. Evolution of perturbations in an inflationary universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frieman, J. A.; Will, C. M.

    1982-01-01

    The evolution of inhomogeneous density perturbations in a model of the very early universe that is dominated for a time by a constant energy density of a false quantum-mechanical vacuum is analyzed. During this period, the universe inflates exponentially and supercools exponentially, until a phase transition back to the true vacuum reheats the matter and radiation. Focus is on the physically measurable, coordinate-independent modes of inhomogeneous perturbations of this model and it is found that all modes either are constant or are exponentially damped during the inflationary era.

  10. The growth of structure in interacting dark energy models

    SciTech Connect

    Caldera-Cabral, Gabriela; Maartens, Roy; Schaefer, Bjoern Malte E-mail: roy.maartens@port.ac.uk

    2009-07-01

    If dark energy interacts with dark matter, there is a change in the background evolution of the universe, since the dark matter density no longer evolves as a{sup −3}. In addition, the non-gravitational interaction affects the growth of structure. In principle, these changes allow us to detect and constrain an interaction in the dark sector. Here we investigate the growth factor and the weak lensing signal for a new class of interacting dark energy models. In these models, the interaction generalises the simple cases where one dark fluid decays into the other. In order to calculate the effect on structure formation, we perform a careful analysis of the perturbed interaction and its effect on peculiar velocities. Assuming a normalization to today's values of dark matter density and overdensity, the signal of the interaction is an enhancement (suppression) of both the growth factor and the lensing power, when the energy transfer in the background is from dark matter to dark energy (dark energy to dark matter)

  11. How cold is cold dark matter?

    SciTech Connect

    Armendariz-Picon, Cristian; Neelakanta, Jayanth T. E-mail: jtneelak@syr.edu

    2014-03-01

    If cold dark matter consists of particles, these must be non-interacting and non-relativistic by definition. In most cold dark matter models however, dark matter particles inherit a non-vanishing velocity dispersion from interactions in the early universe, a velocity that redshifts with cosmic expansion but certainly remains non-zero. In this article, we place model-independent constraints on the dark matter temperature to mass ratio, whose square root determines the dark matter velocity dispersion. We only assume that dark matter particles decoupled kinetically while non-relativistic, when galactic scales had not entered the horizon yet, and that their momentum distribution has been Maxwellian since that time. Under these assumptions, using cosmic microwave background and matter power spectrum observations, we place upper limits on the temperature to mass ratio of cold dark matter today (away from collapsed structures). These limits imply that the present cold dark matter velocity dispersion has to be smaller than 54 m/s. Cold dark matter has to be quite cold, indeed.

  12. Excitation of dark plasmonic modes in symmetry broken terahertz metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Dibakar Roy; Su, Xiaofang; Zeng, Yong; Chen, Xiaoshuang; Taylor, Antoinette J; Azad, Abul

    2014-08-11

    Plasmonic structures with high symmetry, such as double-identical gap split ring resonators, possess dark eigenmodes. These dark eigenmodes are dominated by magnetic dipole and/or higher-order multi-poles such as electric quadrapoles. Consequently these dark modes interact very weakly with the surrounding environment, and can have very high quality factors (Q). In this work, we have studied, experimentally as well as theoretically, these dark eigenmodes in terahertz metamaterials. Theoretical investigations with the help of classical perturbation theory clearly indicate the existence of these dark modes in symmetric plasmonic metamaterials. However, these dark modes can be excited experimentally by breaking the symmetry within the constituting metamaterial resonators cell, resulting in high quality factor resonance mode. The symmetry broken metamaterials with such high quality factor can pave the way in realizing high sensitivity sensors, in addition to other applications.

  13. Unified Dark Matter and Dark Energy Description in a Chiral Cosmological Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbyazov, Renat R.; Chervon, Sergey V.

    2013-03-01

    We show the way of dark matter and dark energy presentation via ansatzs on the kinetic energies of the fields in the two-component chiral cosmological model (CCM). To connect a kinetic interaction of dark matter and dark energy with observational data the reconstruction procedure for the chiral metric component h22 and the potential of (self-)interaction V has been developed. The reconstruction of h22 and V for the early and later inflation have been performed. The proposed model is confronted to ΛCDM model as well.

  14. A single administration of methamphetamine to mice early in the light period decreases running wheel activity observed during the dark period.

    PubMed

    Kitanaka, Nobue; Kitanaka, Junichi; Hall, F Scott; Uhl, George R; Watabe, Kaname; Kubo, Hitoshi; Takahashi, Hitoshi; Tatsuta, Tomohiro; Morita, Yoshio; Takemura, Motohiko

    2012-01-01

    Repeated intermittent administration of amphetamines acutely increases appetitive and consummatory aspects of motivated behaviors as well as general activity and exploratory behavior, including voluntary running wheel activity. Subsequently, if the drug is withdrawn, the frequency of these behaviors decreases, which is thought to be indicative of dysphoric symptoms associated with amphetamine withdrawal. Such decreases may be observed after chronic treatment or even after single drug administrations. In the present study, the effect of acute methamphetamine (METH) on running wheel activity, horizontal locomotion, appetitive behavior (food access), and consummatory behavior (food and water intake) was investigated in mice. A multi-configuration behavior apparatus designed to monitor the five behaviors was developed, where combined measures were recorded simultaneously. In the first experiment, naïve male ICR mice showed gradually increasing running wheel activity over three consecutive days after exposure to a running wheel, while mice without a running wheel showed gradually decreasing horizontal locomotion, consistent with running wheel activity being a positively motivated form of natural motor activity. In experiment 2, increased horizontal locomotion and food access, and decreased food intake, were observed for the initial 3h after acute METH challenge. Subsequently, during the dark phase period decreased running wheel activity and horizontal locomotion were observed. The reductions in running wheel activity and horizontal locomotion may be indicative of reduced dopaminergic function, although it remains to be seen if these changes may be more pronounced after more prolonged METH treatments. PMID:22079320

  15. A single administration of methamphetamine to mice early in the light period decreases running wheel activity observed during the dark period.

    PubMed

    Kitanaka, Nobue; Kitanaka, Junichi; Hall, F Scott; Uhl, George R; Watabe, Kaname; Kubo, Hitoshi; Takahashi, Hitoshi; Tatsuta, Tomohiro; Morita, Yoshio; Takemura, Motohiko

    2012-01-01

    Repeated intermittent administration of amphetamines acutely increases appetitive and consummatory aspects of motivated behaviors as well as general activity and exploratory behavior, including voluntary running wheel activity. Subsequently, if the drug is withdrawn, the frequency of these behaviors decreases, which is thought to be indicative of dysphoric symptoms associated with amphetamine withdrawal. Such decreases may be observed after chronic treatment or even after single drug administrations. In the present study, the effect of acute methamphetamine (METH) on running wheel activity, horizontal locomotion, appetitive behavior (food access), and consummatory behavior (food and water intake) was investigated in mice. A multi-configuration behavior apparatus designed to monitor the five behaviors was developed, where combined measures were recorded simultaneously. In the first experiment, naïve male ICR mice showed gradually increasing running wheel activity over three consecutive days after exposure to a running wheel, while mice without a running wheel showed gradually decreasing horizontal locomotion, consistent with running wheel activity being a positively motivated form of natural motor activity. In experiment 2, increased horizontal locomotion and food access, and decreased food intake, were observed for the initial 3h after acute METH challenge. Subsequently, during the dark phase period decreased running wheel activity and horizontal locomotion were observed. The reductions in running wheel activity and horizontal locomotion may be indicative of reduced dopaminergic function, although it remains to be seen if these changes may be more pronounced after more prolonged METH treatments.

  16. Cosmological perturbations in antigravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oltean, Marius; Brandenberger, Robert

    2014-10-01

    We compute the evolution of cosmological perturbations in a recently proposed Weyl-symmetric theory of two scalar fields with oppositely signed conformal couplings to Einstein gravity. It is motivated from the minimal conformal extension of the standard model, such that one of these scalar fields is the Higgs while the other is a new particle, the dilaton, introduced to make the Higgs mass conformally symmetric. At the background level, the theory admits novel geodesically complete cyclic cosmological solutions characterized by a brief period of repulsive gravity, or "antigravity," during each successive transition from a big crunch to a big bang. For simplicity, we consider scalar perturbations in the absence of anisotropies, with potential set to zero and without any radiation. We show that despite the necessarily wrong-signed kinetic term of the dilaton in the full action, these perturbations are neither ghostlike nor tachyonic in the limit of strongly repulsive gravity. On this basis, we argue—pending a future analysis of vector and tensor perturbations—that, with respect to perturbative stability, the cosmological solutions of this theory are viable.

  17. Scalar cosmological perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uggla, Claes; Wainwright, John

    2012-05-01

    Scalar perturbations of Friedmann-Lemaitre cosmologies can be analyzed in a variety of ways using Einstein’s field equations, the Ricci and Bianchi identities, or the conservation equations for the stress-energy tensor, and possibly introducing a timelike reference congruence. The common ground is the use of gauge invariants derived from the metric tensor, the stress-energy tensor, or from vectors associated with a reference congruence, as basic variables. Although there is a complication in that there is no unique choice of gauge invariants, we will show that this can be used to advantage. With this in mind our first goal is to present an efficient way of constructing dimensionless gauge invariants associated with the tensors that are involved, and of determining their inter-relationships. Our second goal is to give a unified treatment of the various ways of writing the governing equations in dimensionless form using gauge-invariant variables, showing how simplicity can be achieved by a suitable choice of variables and normalization factors. Our third goal is to elucidate the connection between the metric-based approach and the so-called 1 + 3 gauge-invariant approach to cosmological perturbations. We restrict our considerations to linear perturbations, but our intent is to set the stage for the extension to second-order perturbations.

  18. Effective gravitational couplings for cosmological perturbations in generalized Proca theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Felice, Antonio; Heisenberg, Lavinia; Kase, Ryotaro; Mukohyama, Shinji; Tsujikawa, Shinji; Zhang, Ying-li

    2016-08-01

    We consider the finite interactions of the generalized Proca theory including the sixth-order Lagrangian and derive the full linear perturbation equations of motion on the flat Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker background in the presence of a matter perfect fluid. By construction, the propagating degrees of freedom (besides the matter perfect fluid) are two transverse vector perturbations, one longitudinal scalar, and two tensor polarizations. The Lagrangians associated with intrinsic vector modes neither affect the background equations of motion nor the second-order action of tensor perturbations, but they do give rise to nontrivial modifications to the no-ghost condition of vector perturbations and to the propagation speeds of vector and scalar perturbations. We derive the effective gravitational coupling Geff with matter density perturbations under a quasistatic approximation on scales deep inside the sound horizon. We find that the existence of intrinsic vector modes allows a possibility for reducing Geff. In fact, within the parameter space, Geff can be even smaller than the Newton gravitational constant G at the late cosmological epoch, with a peculiar phantom dark energy equation of state (without ghosts). The modifications to the slip parameter η and the evolution of the growth rate f σ8 are discussed as well. Thus, dark energy models in the framework of generalized Proca theories can be observationally distinguished from the Λ CDM model according to both cosmic growth and expansion history. Furthermore, we study the evolution of vector perturbations and show that outside the vector sound horizon the perturbations are nearly frozen and start to decay with oscillations after the horizon entry.

  19. Warm dark matter effects in a spherical collapse model with shear and angular momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marciu, Mihai

    2016-03-01

    This paper investigates the nonlinear structure formation in a spherical top-hat collapse model based on the pseudo-Newtonian approximation. The system is composed of warm dark matter and dark energy and the dynamical properties of the collapsing region are analyzed for various parametrizations of the dark matter equation of state which are in agreement with current observations. Concerning dark energy, observational constraints of the Chevallier-Polarski-Linder model and the Jassal-Bagla-Padmanabhan equation of state have been considered. During the collapse, the positive dark matter pressure leads to an increase of growth for dark matter and dark energy perturbations and an accelerated expansion for the spherical region. Hence, in the warm dark matter hypothesis, the structure formation is accelerated and the inconsistencies of the Λ CDM model at the galactic scales could be solved. The results obtained are applicable only to adiabatic warm dark matter physical models which are compatible with the pseudo-Newtonian approach.

  20. Liouvillian perturbations of black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couch, W. E.; Holder, C. L.

    2007-10-01

    We apply the well-known Kovacic algorithm to find closed form, i.e., Liouvillian solutions, to the differential equations governing perturbations of black holes. Our analysis includes the full gravitational perturbations of Schwarzschild and Kerr, the full gravitational and electromagnetic perturbations of Reissner-Nordstrom, and specialized perturbations of the Kerr-Newman geometry. We also include the extreme geometries. We find all frequencies ω, in terms of black hole parameters and an integer n, which allow Liouvillian perturbations. We display many classes of black hole parameter values and their corresponding Liouvillian perturbations, including new closed-form perturbations of Kerr and Reissner-Nordstrom. We also prove that the only type 1 Liouvillian perturbations of Schwarzschild are the known algebraically special ones and that type 2 Liouvillian solutions do not exist for extreme geometries. In cases where we do not prove the existence or nonexistence of Liouvillian perturbations we obtain sequences of Diophantine equations on which decidability rests.

  1. Interaction between bosonic dark matter and stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brito, Richard; Cardoso, Vitor; Macedo, Caio F. B.; Okawa, Hirotada; Palenzuela, Carlos

    2016-02-01

    We provide a detailed analysis of how bosonic dark matter "condensates" interact with compact stars, extending significantly the results of a recent Letter [1]. We focus on bosonic fields with mass mB , such as axions, axion-like candidates and hidden photons. Self-gravitating bosonic fields generically form "breathing" configurations, where both the spacetime geometry and the field oscillate, and can interact and cluster at the center of stars. We construct stellar configurations formed by a perfect fluid and a bosonic condensate, and which may describe the late stages of dark matter accretion onto stars, in dark-matter-rich environments. These composite stars oscillate at a frequency which is a multiple of f =2.5 ×1014(mBc2/eV ) Hz . Using perturbative analysis and numerical relativity techniques, we show that these stars are generically stable, and we provide criteria for instability. Our results also indicate that the growth of the dark matter core is halted close to the Chandrasekhar limit. We thus dispel a myth concerning dark matter accretion by stars: dark matter accretion does not necessarily lead to the destruction of the star, nor to collapse to a black hole. Finally, we argue that stars with long-lived bosonic cores may also develop in other theories with effective mass couplings, such as (massless) scalar-tensor theories.

  2. Lorentz invariant dark-spinor and inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Basak, Abhishek; Bhatt, Jitesh R. E-mail: jeet@prl.res.in

    2011-06-01

    We investigate the possibility of the inflation driven by a Lorentz invariant non-standard spinor field. As these spinors are having dominant interaction via gravitational field only, they are considered as Dark Spinors. We study how these dark-spinors can drive the inflation and investigate the cosmological (scalar) perturbations generated by them. Though the dark-spinors obey a Klein-Gordon like equation, the underlying theory of the cosmological perturbations is far more complex than the theories which are using a canonical scalar field. For example the sound speed of the perturbations is not a constant but varies with time. We find that in order to explain the observed value of the spectral-index n{sub s} one must have upper bound on the values of the background NSS-field. The tensor to scalar ratio remains as small as that in the case of canonical scalar field driven inflation because the correction to tensor spectrum due to NSS is required to be very small. In addition we discuss the relationship of results with previous results obtained by using the Lorentz invariance violating theories.

  3. Using Lagrangian Perturbation Theory for Precision Cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugiyama, Naonori S.

    2014-06-01

    We explore the Lagrangian perturbation theory (LPT) at one-loop order with Gaussian initial conditions. We present an expansion method to approximately compute the power spectrum LPT. Our approximate solution has good convergence in the series expansion and enables us to compute the power spectrum in LPT accurately and quickly. Non-linear corrections in this theory naturally satisfy the law of conservation of mass because the relation between matter density and the displacement vector of dark matter corresponds to the conservation of mass. By matching the one-loop solution in LPT to the two-loop solution in standard perturbation theory, we present an approximate solution of the power spectrum which has higher order corrections than the two-loop order in standard perturbation theory with the conservation of mass satisfied. With this approximation, we can use LPT to compute a non-linear power spectrum without any free parameters, and this solution agrees with numerical simulations at k = 0.2 h Mpc-1 and z = 0.35 to better than 2%.

  4. Using Lagrangian perturbation theory for precision cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Sugiyama, Naonori S.

    2014-06-10

    We explore the Lagrangian perturbation theory (LPT) at one-loop order with Gaussian initial conditions. We present an expansion method to approximately compute the power spectrum LPT. Our approximate solution has good convergence in the series expansion and enables us to compute the power spectrum in LPT accurately and quickly. Non-linear corrections in this theory naturally satisfy the law of conservation of mass because the relation between matter density and the displacement vector of dark matter corresponds to the conservation of mass. By matching the one-loop solution in LPT to the two-loop solution in standard perturbation theory, we present an approximate solution of the power spectrum which has higher order corrections than the two-loop order in standard perturbation theory with the conservation of mass satisfied. With this approximation, we can use LPT to compute a non-linear power spectrum without any free parameters, and this solution agrees with numerical simulations at k = 0.2 h Mpc{sup –1} and z = 0.35 to better than 2%.

  5. Cosmic perturbations through the cyclic ages

    SciTech Connect

    Erickson, Joel K.; Gratton, Steven; Steinhardt, Paul J.; Turok, Neil

    2007-06-15

    We analyze the evolution of cosmological perturbations in the cyclic model, paying particular attention to their behavior and interplay over multiple cycles. Our key results are: (1) galaxies and large scale structure present in one cycle are generated by the quantum fluctuations in the preceding cycle without interference from perturbations or structure generated in earlier cycles and without interfering with structure generated in later cycles; (2) the ekpyrotic phase, an epoch of gentle contraction with equation of state w>>1 preceding the hot big bang, makes the universe homogeneous, isotropic and flat within any given observer's horizon; and (3) although the universe is uniform within each observer's horizon, the structure of the cyclic universe on very large scales is more complex, owing to the effects of superhorizon length perturbations, and cannot be described globally as a Friedmann-Robertson-Walker cosmology. In particular, we show that the ekpyrotic contraction phase is so effective in smoothing, flattening and isotropizing the universe within the horizon that this phase alone suffices to solve the horizon and flatness problems even without an extended period of dark energy domination (a kind of low energy inflation). Instead, the cyclic model rests on a genuinely novel, noninflationary mechanism (ekpyrotic contraction) for resolving the classic cosmological conundrums.

  6. Accretion of dark matter by stars.

    PubMed

    Brito, Richard; Cardoso, Vitor; Okawa, Hirotada

    2015-09-11

    Searches for dark matter imprints are one of the most active areas of current research. We focus here on light fields with mass m_{B}, such as axions and axionlike candidates. Using perturbative techniques and full-blown nonlinear numerical relativity methods, we show the following. (i) Dark matter can pile up in the center of stars, leading to configurations and geometries oscillating with a frequency that is a multiple of f=2.5×10^{14}(m_{B}c^{2}/eV)  Hz. These configurations are stable throughout most of the parameter space, and arise out of credible mechanisms for dark-matter capture. Stars with bosonic cores may also develop in other theories with effective mass couplings, such as (massless) scalar-tensor theories. We also show that (ii) collapse of the host star to a black hole is avoided by efficient gravitational cooling mechanisms.

  7. Accretion of dark matter by stars.

    PubMed

    Brito, Richard; Cardoso, Vitor; Okawa, Hirotada

    2015-09-11

    Searches for dark matter imprints are one of the most active areas of current research. We focus here on light fields with mass m_{B}, such as axions and axionlike candidates. Using perturbative techniques and full-blown nonlinear numerical relativity methods, we show the following. (i) Dark matter can pile up in the center of stars, leading to configurations and geometries oscillating with a frequency that is a multiple of f=2.5×10^{14}(m_{B}c^{2}/eV)  Hz. These configurations are stable throughout most of the parameter space, and arise out of credible mechanisms for dark-matter capture. Stars with bosonic cores may also develop in other theories with effective mass couplings, such as (massless) scalar-tensor theories. We also show that (ii) collapse of the host star to a black hole is avoided by efficient gravitational cooling mechanisms. PMID:26406817

  8. Quintessence with quadratic coupling to dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Boehmer, Christian G.; Chan, Nyein; Caldera-Cabral, Gabriela; Lazkoz, Ruth; Maartens, Roy

    2010-04-15

    We introduce a new form of coupling between dark energy and dark matter that is quadratic in their energy densities. Then we investigate the background dynamics when dark energy is in the form of exponential quintessence. The three types of quadratic coupling all admit late-time accelerating critical points, but these are not scaling solutions. We also show that two types of coupling allow for a suitable matter era at early times and acceleration at late times, while the third type of coupling does not admit a suitable matter era.

  9. Accretionary dark rims in unequilibrated chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, T. V. V.; King, E. A.

    1981-12-01

    Textural and qualitative EDX investigations of dark-rimmed particles in six low petrologic type chondrites indicate that the rims accreted on host particles over a wide range of temperatures prior to initial accumulation and lithification of the meteorites in which the rimmed particles are now contained. Many dark rims are enriched in moderately volatile trace elements such as Na, Cl, P, and K, relative to the host particles and matrix. The range of physical/chemical environments associated with hypervelocity impacts may have offered the setting for the formation of dark-rimmed particles early in solar system history.

  10. Alternative to particle dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khoury, Justin

    2015-01-01

    We propose an alternative to particle dark matter that borrows ingredients of modified Newtonian dynamics (MOND) while adding new key components. The first new feature is a dark matter fluid, in the form of a scalar field with small equation of state and sound speed. This component is critical in reproducing the success of cold dark matter for the expansion history and the growth of linear perturbations, but does not cluster significantly on nonlinear scales. Instead, the missing mass problem on nonlinear scales is addressed by a modification of the gravitational force law. The force law approximates MOND at large and intermediate accelerations, and therefore reproduces the empirical success of MOND at fitting galactic rotation curves. At ultralow accelerations, the force law reverts to an inverse-square law, albeit with a larger Newton's constant. This latter regime is important in galaxy clusters and is consistent with their observed isothermal profiles, provided the characteristic acceleration scale of MOND is mildly varying with scale or mass, such that it is 12 times higher in clusters than in galaxies. We present an explicit relativistic theory in terms of two scalar fields. The first scalar field is governed by a Dirac-Born-Infeld action and behaves as a dark matter fluid on large scales. The second scalar field also has single-derivative interactions and mediates a fifth force that modifies gravity on nonlinear scales. Both scalars are coupled to matter via an effective metric that depends locally on the fields. The form of this effective metric implies the equality of the two scalar gravitational potentials, which ensures that lensing and dynamical mass estimates agree. Further work is needed in order to make both the acceleration scale of MOND and the fraction at which gravity reverts to an inverse-square law explicitly dynamical quantities, varying with scale or mass.

  11. An interacting dark energy model with nonminimal derivative coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nozari, Kourosh; Behrouz, Noushin

    2016-09-01

    We study cosmological dynamics of an extended gravitational theory that gravity is coupled non-minimally with derivatives of a dark energy component and there is also a phenomenological interaction between the dark energy and dark matter. Depending on the direction of energy flow between the dark sectors, the phenomenological interaction gets two different signs. We show that this feature affects the existence of attractor solution, the rate of growth of perturbations and stability of the solutions. By considering an exponential potential as a self-interaction potential of the scalar field, we obtain accelerated scaling solutions that are attractors and have the potential to alleviate the coincidence problem. While in the absence of the nonminimal derivative coupling there is no attractor solution for phantom field when energy transfers from dark matter to dark energy, we show an attractor solution exists if one considers an explicit nonminimal derivative coupling for phantom field in this case of energy transfer. We treat the cosmological perturbations in this setup with details to show that with phenomenological interaction, perturbations can grow faster than the minimal case.

  12. Aspects of perturbative unitarity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anselmi, Damiano

    2016-07-01

    We reconsider perturbative unitarity in quantum field theory and upgrade several arguments and results. The minimum assumptions that lead to the largest time equation, the cutting equations and the unitarity equation are identified. Using this knowledge and a special gauge, we give a new, simpler proof of perturbative unitarity in gauge theories and generalize it to quantum gravity, in four and higher dimensions. The special gauge interpolates between the Feynman gauge and the Coulomb gauge without double poles. When the Coulomb limit is approached, the unphysical particles drop out of the cuts and the cutting equations are consistently projected onto the physical subspace. The proof does not extend to nonlocal quantum field theories of gauge fields and gravity, whose unitarity remains uncertain.

  13. Renormalized Lie perturbation theory

    SciTech Connect

    Rosengaus, E.; Dewar, R.L.

    1981-07-01

    A Lie operator method for constructing action-angle transformations continuously connected to the identity is developed for area preserving mappings. By a simple change of variable from action to angular frequency a perturbation expansion is obtained in which the small denominators have been renormalized. The method is shown to lead to the same series as the Lagrangian perturbation method of Greene and Percival, which converges on KAM surfaces. The method is not superconvergent, but yields simple recursion relations which allow automatic algebraic manipulation techniques to be used to develop the series to high order. It is argued that the operator method can be justified by analytically continuing from the complex angular frequency plane onto the real line. The resulting picture is one where preserved primary KAM surfaces are continuously connected to one another.

  14. Degenerate density perturbation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palenik, Mark C.; Dunlap, Brett I.

    2016-09-01

    Fractional occupation numbers can be used in density functional theory to create a symmetric Kohn-Sham potential, resulting in orbitals with degenerate eigenvalues. We develop the corresponding perturbation theory and apply it to a system of Nd degenerate electrons in a harmonic oscillator potential. The order-by-order expansions of both the fractional occupation numbers and unitary transformations within the degenerate subspace are determined by the requirement that a differentiable map exists connecting the initial and perturbed states. Using the X α exchange-correlation (XC) functional, we find an analytic solution for the first-order density and first- through third-order energies as a function of α , with and without a self-interaction correction. The fact that the XC Hessian is not positive definite plays an important role in the behavior of the occupation numbers.

  15. Dynamics of minimally coupled dark energy in spherical halos of dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novosyadlyj, Bohdan; Tsizh, Maksym; Kulinich, Yurij

    2016-03-01

    We analyse the evolution of scalar field dark energy in the spherical halos of dark matter at the late stages of formation of gravitationally bound systems in the expanding Universe. The dynamics of quintessential dark energy at the center of dark matter halo strongly depends on the value of effective sound speed c_s (in units of speed of light). If c_s˜ 1 (classical scalar field) then the dark energy in the gravitationally bound systems is only slightly perturbed and its density is practically the same as in cosmological background. The dark energy with small value of sound speed (c_s<0.1), on the contrary, is important dynamical component of halo at all stages of their evolution: linear, non-linear, turnaround, collapse, virialization and later up to current epoch. These properties of dark energy can be used for constraining the value of effective sound speed c_s by comparison the theoretical predictions with observational data related to the large scale gravitationally bound systems.

  16. Flooded Dark Matter and S level rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randall, Lisa; Scholtz, Jakub; Unwin, James

    2016-03-01

    Most dark matter models set the dark matter relic density by some interaction with Standard Model particles. Such models generally assume the existence of Standard Model particles early on, with the dark matter relic density a later consequence of those interactions. Perhaps a more compelling assumption is that dark matter is not part of the Standard Model sector and a population of dark matter too is generated at the end of inflation. This democratic assumption about initial conditions does not necessarily provide a natural value for the dark matter relic density, and furthermore superficially leads to too much entropy in the dark sector relative to ordinary matter. We address the latter issue by the late decay of heavy particles produced at early times, thereby associating the dark matter relic density with the lifetime of a long-lived state. This paper investigates what it would take for this scenario to be compatible with observations in what we call Flooded Dark Matter (FDM) models and discusses several interesting consequences. One is that dark matter can be very light and furthermore, light dark matter is in some sense the most natural scenario in FDM as it is compatible with larger couplings of the decaying particle. A related consequence is that the decay of the field with the smallest coupling and hence the longest lifetime dominates the entropy and possibly the matter content of the Universe, a principle we refer to as "Maximum Baroqueness". We also demonstrate that the dark sector should be colder than the ordinary sector, relaxing the most stringent free-streaming constraints on light dark matter candidates. We will discuss the potential implications for the core-cusp problem in a follow-up paper. The FDM framework will furthermore have interesting baryogenesis implications. One possibility is that dark matter is like the baryon asymmetry and both are simultaneously diluted by a late entropy dump. Alternatively, FDM is compatible with an elegant non

  17. The Dark Energy Survey: more than dark energy - an overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dark Energy Survey Collaboration; Abbott, T.; Abdalla, F. B.; Aleksić, J.; Allam, S.; Amara, A.; Bacon, D.; Balbinot, E.; Banerji, M.; Bechtol, K.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernstein, G. M.; Bertin, E.; Blazek, J.; Bonnett, C.; Bridle, S.; Brooks, D.; Brunner, R. J.; Buckley-Geer, E.; Burke, D. L.; Caminha, G. B.; Capozzi, D.; Carlsen, J.; Carnero-Rosell, A.; Carollo, M.; Carrasco-Kind, M.; Carretero, J.; Castander, F. J.; Clerkin, L.; Collett, T.; Conselice, C.; Crocce, M.; Cunha, C. E.; D'Andrea, C. B.; da Costa, L. N.; Davis, T. M.; Desai, S.; Diehl, H. T.; Dietrich, J. P.; Dodelson, S.; Doel, P.; Drlica-Wagner, A.; Estrada, J.; Etherington, J.; Evrard, A. E.; Fabbri, J.; Finley, D. A.; Flaugher, B.; Foley, R. J.; Fosalba, P.; Frieman, J.; García-Bellido, J.; Gaztanaga, E.; Gerdes, D. W.; Giannantonio, T.; Goldstein, D. A.; Gruen, D.; Gruendl, R. A.; Guarnieri, P.; Gutierrez, G.; Hartley, W.; Honscheid, K.; Jain, B.; James, D. J.; Jeltema, T.; Jouvel, S.; Kessler, R.; King, A.; Kirk, D.; Kron, R.; Kuehn, K.; Kuropatkin, N.; Lahav, O.; Li, T. S.; Lima, M.; Lin, H.; Maia, M. A. G.; Makler, M.; Manera, M.; Maraston, C.; Marshall, J. L.; Martini, P.; McMahon, R. G.; Melchior, P.; Merson, A.; Miller, C. J.; Miquel, R.; Mohr, J. J.; Morice-Atkinson, X.; Naidoo, K.; Neilsen, E.; Nichol, R. C.; Nord, B.; Ogando, R.; Ostrovski, F.; Palmese, A.; Papadopoulos, A.; Peiris, H. V.; Peoples, J.; Percival, W. J.; Plazas, A. A.; Reed, S. L.; Refregier, A.; Romer, A. K.; Roodman, A.; Ross, A.; Rozo, E.; Rykoff, E. S.; Sadeh, I.; Sako, M.; Sánchez, C.; Sanchez, E.; Santiago, B.; Scarpine, V.; Schubnell, M.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Sheldon, E.; Smith, M.; Smith, R. C.; Soares-Santos, M.; Sobreira, F.; Soumagnac, M.; Suchyta, E.; Sullivan, M.; Swanson, M.; Tarle, G.; Thaler, J.; Thomas, D.; Thomas, R. C.; Tucker, D.; Vieira, J. D.; Vikram, V.; Walker, A. R.; Wechsler, R. H.; Weller, J.; Wester, W.; Whiteway, L.; Wilcox, H.; Yanny, B.; Zhang, Y.; Zuntz, J.

    2016-08-01

    This overview paper describes the legacy prospect and discovery potential of the Dark Energy Survey (DES) beyond cosmological studies, illustrating it with examples from the DES early data. DES is using a wide-field camera (DECam) on the 4 m Blanco Telescope in Chile to image 5000 sq deg of the sky in five filters (grizY). By its completion, the survey is expected to have generated a catalogue of 300 million galaxies with photometric redshifts and 100 million stars. In addition, a time-domain survey search over 27 sq deg is expected to yield a sample of thousands of Type Ia supernovae and other transients. The main goals of DES are to characterize dark energy and dark matter, and to test alternative models of gravity; these goals will be pursued by studying large-scale structure, cluster counts, weak gravitational lensing and Type Ia supernovae. However, DES also provides a rich data set which allows us to study many other aspects of astrophysics. In this paper, we focus on additional science with DES, emphasizing areas where the survey makes a difference with respect to other current surveys. The paper illustrates, using early data (from `Science Verification', and from the first, second and third seasons of observations), what DES can tell us about the Solar system, the Milky Way, galaxy evolution, quasars and other topics. In addition, we show that if the cosmological model is assumed to be Λ+cold dark matter, then important astrophysics can be deduced from the primary DES probes. Highlights from DES early data include the discovery of 34 trans-Neptunian objects, 17 dwarf satellites of the Milky Way, one published z > 6 quasar (and more confirmed) and two published superluminous supernovae (and more confirmed).

  18. The Dark Energy Survey: More than dark energy - An overview

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Abbott, T.

    2016-03-21

    This overview article describes the legacy prospect and discovery potential of the Dark Energy Survey (DES) beyond cosmological studies, illustrating it with examples from the DES early data. DES is using a wide-field camera (DECam) on the 4m Blanco Telescope in Chile to image 5000 sq deg of the sky in five filters (grizY). By its completion the survey is expected to have generated a catalogue of 300 million galaxies with photometric redshifts and 100 million stars. In addition, a time-domain survey search over 27 sq deg is expected to yield a sample of thousands of Type Ia supernovae andmore » other transients. The main goals of DES are to characterise dark energy and dark matter, and to test alternative models of gravity; these goals will be pursued by studying large scale structure, cluster counts, weak gravitational lensing and Type Ia supernovae. However, DES also provides a rich data set which allows us to study many other aspects of astrophysics. In this paper we focus on additional science with DES, emphasizing areas where the survey makes a difference with respect to other current surveys. The paper illustrates, using early data (from `Science Verification', and from the first, second and third seasons of observations), what DES can tell us about the solar system, the Milky Way, galaxy evolution, quasars, and other topics. In addition, we show that if the cosmological model is assumed to be Lambda+ Cold Dark Matter (LCDM) then important astrophysics can be deduced from the primary DES probes. Lastly, highlights from DES early data include the discovery of 34 Trans Neptunian Objects, 17 dwarf satellites of the Milky Way, one published z > 6 quasar (and more confirmed) and two published superluminous supernovae (and more confirmed).« less

  19. Perturbed Trojan satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morais, M. H. M.; Murray, C. D.

    1999-09-01

    We present some mechanisms that can lead to instability of initially small eccentricity Trojan-type orbits associated with planetary satellites. Dermott & Murray (1981) showed that in the context of the hierarchical restricted three-body problem (M>> m), stable small eccentricity coorbital motion associated with the mass m, occurs within a region of relative width in semi-major axis a_s=0.74 epsilon (where epsilon is the dimensionless Hill's radius). However, for large eccentricities, the size of the stable coorbital region shrinks as a_s=4 (epsilon /e)(1/2) epsilon (Namouni 1999). The perturbations from other nearby bodies can cause increases in both eccentricity and semi-major axis, leading to ejection from the coorbital region via collisions with the parent body or a nearby perturber. We show that mean motion resonances among saturnian satellites can cause chaotic diffusion of both the eccentricity and the semi-major axis of their associated Trojan orbits. Moreover, we show that secular resonances inside the coorbital regions of some uranian and saturnian satellites can induce significant increases in the eccentricity of Trojan objects. A better insight into the complicated dynamics exhibited by Trojan objects when they are being subject to perturbations is fundamental to be able to assess the likelihood of finding real examples of these configurations. Dermott & Murray (1981). Icarus 48, 1-11. Namouni (1999). Icarus 137, 293-314.

  20. Covariant Bardeen perturbation formalism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitenti, S. D. P.; Falciano, F. T.; Pinto-Neto, N.

    2014-05-01

    In a previous work we obtained a set of necessary conditions for the linear approximation in cosmology. Here we discuss the relations of this approach with the so-called covariant perturbations. It is often argued in the literature that one of the main advantages of the covariant approach to describe cosmological perturbations is that the Bardeen formalism is coordinate dependent. In this paper we will reformulate the Bardeen approach in a completely covariant manner. For that, we introduce the notion of pure and mixed tensors, which yields an adequate language to treat both perturbative approaches in a common framework. We then stress that in the referred covariant approach, one necessarily introduces an additional hypersurface choice to the problem. Using our mixed and pure tensors approach, we are able to construct a one-to-one map relating the usual gauge dependence of the Bardeen formalism with the hypersurface dependence inherent to the covariant approach. Finally, through the use of this map, we define full nonlinear tensors that at first order correspond to the three known gauge invariant variables Φ, Ψ and Ξ, which are simultaneously foliation and gauge invariant. We then stress that the use of the proposed mixed tensors allows one to construct simultaneously gauge and hypersurface invariant variables at any order.

  1. Dark energy and dark matter from hidden symmetry of gravity model with a non-Riemannian volume form

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guendelman, Eduardo; Nissimov, Emil; Pacheva, Svetlana

    2015-10-01

    We show that dark energy and dark matter can be described simultaneously by ordinary Einstein gravity interacting with a single scalar field provided the scalar field Lagrangian couples in a symmetric fashion to two different spacetime volume forms (covariant integration measure densities) on the spacetime manifold - one standard Riemannian given by √{-g} (square root of the determinant of the pertinent Riemannian metric) and another non-Riemannian volume form independent of the Riemannian metric, defined in terms of an auxiliary antisymmetric tensor gauge field of maximal rank. Integration of the equations of motion of the latter auxiliary gauge field produce an a priori arbitrary integration constant that plays the role of a dynamically generated cosmological constant or dark energy. Moreover, the above modified scalar field action turns out to possess a hidden Noether symmetry whose associated conserved current describes a pressureless "dust" fluid which we can identify with the dark matter completely decoupled from the dark energy. The form of both the dark energy and dark matter that results from the above class of models is insensitive to the specific form of the scalar field Lagrangian. By adding an appropriate perturbation, which breaks the above hidden symmetry and along with this couples dark matter and dark energy, we also suggest a way to obtain growing dark energy in the present universe's epoch without evolution pathologies.

  2. The dark side of cosmology: dark matter and dark energy.

    PubMed

    Spergel, David N

    2015-03-01

    A simple model with only six parameters (the age of the universe, the density of atoms, the density of matter, the amplitude of the initial fluctuations, the scale dependence of this amplitude, and the epoch of first star formation) fits all of our cosmological data . Although simple, this standard model is strange. The model implies that most of the matter in our Galaxy is in the form of "dark matter," a new type of particle not yet detected in the laboratory, and most of the energy in the universe is in the form of "dark energy," energy associated with empty space. Both dark matter and dark energy require extensions to our current understanding of particle physics or point toward a breakdown of general relativity on cosmological scales.

  3. The dark side of cosmology: dark matter and dark energy.

    PubMed

    Spergel, David N

    2015-03-01

    A simple model with only six parameters (the age of the universe, the density of atoms, the density of matter, the amplitude of the initial fluctuations, the scale dependence of this amplitude, and the epoch of first star formation) fits all of our cosmological data . Although simple, this standard model is strange. The model implies that most of the matter in our Galaxy is in the form of "dark matter," a new type of particle not yet detected in the laboratory, and most of the energy in the universe is in the form of "dark energy," energy associated with empty space. Both dark matter and dark energy require extensions to our current understanding of particle physics or point toward a breakdown of general relativity on cosmological scales. PMID:25745164

  4. Light chiral dark sector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harigaya, Keisuke; Nomura, Yasunori

    2016-08-01

    An interesting possibility for dark matter is a scalar particle of mass of order 10 MeV-1 GeV, interacting with a U (1 ) gauge boson (dark photon) which mixes with the photon. We present a simple and natural model realizing this possibility. The dark matter arises as a composite pseudo-Nambu-Goldstone boson (dark pion) in a non-Abelian gauge sector, which also gives a mass to the dark photon. For a fixed non-Abelian gauge group, S U (N ) , and a U (1 ) charge of the constituent dark quarks, the model has only three free parameters: the dynamical scale of the non-Abelian gauge theory, the gauge coupling of the dark photon, and the mixing parameter between the dark and standard model photons. In particular, the gauge symmetry of the model does not allow any mass term for the dark quarks, and the stability of the dark pion is understood as a result of an accidental global symmetry. The model has a significant parameter space in which thermal relic dark pions comprise all of the dark matter, consistently with all experimental and cosmological constraints. In a corner of the parameter space, the discrepancy of the muon g -2 between experiments and the standard model prediction can also be ameliorated due to a loop contribution of the dark photon. Smoking-gun signatures of the model include a monophoton signal from the e+e- collision into a photon and a "dark rho meson." Observation of two processes in e+e- collision—the mode into the dark photon and that into the dark rho meson—would provide strong evidence for the model.

  5. Cosmological signatures of tilted isocurvature perturbations: reionization and 21cm fluctuations

    SciTech Connect

    Sekiguchi, Toyokazu; Sugiyama, Naoshi; Tashiro, Hiroyuki; Silk, Joseph E-mail: hiroyuki.tashiro@asu.edu E-mail: naoshi@nagoya-u.jp

    2014-03-01

    We investigate cosmological signatures of uncorrelated isocurvature perturbations whose power spectrum is blue-tilted with spectral index 2∼early formation of small-scale structure, notably dark matter halos and galaxies, and may thereby resolve the shortage of ionizing photons suggested by observations of galaxies at high redshifts (z ≅ 7−8) but that are required to reionize the universe at z ∼ 10. We mainly focus on how the formation of dark matter halos can be modified. Based on the Δχ{sup 2} analysis with other cosmological parameters being fixed, we explore the connection between the spectral shape of CMB anisotropies and the reionization optical depth as a powerful probe of a highly blue-tilted isocurvature primordial power spectrum. We also study the consequences for 21cm line fluctuations due to neutral hydrogens in minihalos. Combination of measurements of the reionization optical depth and 21cm line fluctuations will provide complementary probes of a highly blue-tilted isocurvature power spectrum.

  6. Bose-Einstein Condensation of Dark Matter Axions

    SciTech Connect

    Sikivie, P.; Yang, Q.

    2009-09-11

    We show that cold dark matter axions thermalize and form a Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC). We obtain the axion state in a homogeneous and isotropic universe, and derive the equations governing small axion perturbations. Because they form a BEC, axions differ from ordinary cold dark matter in the nonlinear regime of structure formation and upon entering the horizon. Axion BEC provides a mechanism for the production of net overall rotation in dark matter halos, and for the alignment of cosmic microwave anisotropy multipoles.

  7. Bose-Einstein condensation of dark matter axions.

    PubMed

    Sikivie, P; Yang, Q

    2009-09-11

    We show that cold dark matter axions thermalize and form a Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC). We obtain the axion state in a homogeneous and isotropic universe, and derive the equations governing small axion perturbations. Because they form a BEC, axions differ from ordinary cold dark matter in the nonlinear regime of structure formation and upon entering the horizon. Axion BEC provides a mechanism for the production of net overall rotation in dark matter halos, and for the alignment of cosmic microwave anisotropy multipoles.

  8. Minimal semi-annihilating Bbb ZN scalar dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bélanger, Geneviève; Kannike, Kristjan; Pukhov, Alexander; Raidal, Martti

    2014-06-01

    We study the dark matter from an inert doublet and a complex scalar singlet stabilized by Bbb ZN symmetries. This field content is the minimal one that allows dimensionless semi-annihilation couplings for N > 2. We consider explicitly the Bbb Z3 and Bbb Z4 cases and take into account constraints from perturbativity, unitarity, vacuum stability, necessity for the electroweak Bbb ZN preserving vacuum to be the global minimum, electroweak precision tests, upper limits from direct detection and properties of the Higgs boson. Co-annihilation and semi-annihilation of dark sector particles as well as dark matter conversion significantly modify the cosmic abundance and direct detection phenomenology.

  9. Properties and uncertainties of scalar field models of dark energy with barotropic equation of state

    SciTech Connect

    Novosyadlyj, Bohdan; Sergijenko, Olga; Apunevych, Stepan; Pelykh, Volodymyr

    2010-11-15

    The dynamics of expansion and large scale structure formation in the multicomponent Universe with dark energy modeled by the minimally coupled scalar field with generalized linear barotropic equation of state are analyzed. It is shown that the past dynamics of expansion and future of the Universe - eternal accelerated expansion or turnaround and collapse - are completely defined by the current energy density of a scalar field and relation between its current and early equation of state parameters. The clustering properties of such models of dark energy and their imprints in the power spectrum of matter density perturbations depend on the same relation and, additionally, on the 'effective sound speed' of a scalar field, defined by its Lagrangian. It is concluded that such scalar fields with different values of these parameters are distinguishable in principle. This gives the possibility to constrain them by confronting the theoretical predictions with the corresponding observational data. For that we have used the 7-year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe data on cosmic microwave background anisotropies, the Union2 data set on Supernovae Ia and the seventh data release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey data on luminous red galaxies space distribution. Using the Markov Chain Monte Carlo technique the marginalized posterior and mean likelihood distributions are computed for the scalar fields with two different Lagrangians: Klein-Gordon and Dirac-Born-Infeld ones. The properties of such scalar field models of dark energy with best fitting parameters and uncertainties of their determination are also analyzed in the paper.

  10. Nonthermal Supermassive Dark Matter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, Daniel J. H.; Kolb, Edward W.; Riotto, Antonio

    1999-01-01

    We discuss several cosmological production mechanisms for nonthermal supermassive dark matter and argue that dark matter may he elementary particles of mass much greater than the weak scale. Searches for dark matter should ma be limited to weakly interacting particles with mass of the order of the weak scale, but should extend into the supermassive range as well.

  11. NUV Detector Dark Monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Wei

    2010-09-01

    Perform routine monitoring of MAMA detector dark current. The main purpose isto look for evidence of a change in the dark rates, both to track on-orbit timedependence and to check for a detector problem developing. The spatial distribution of dark rates on the detector and the effect of SAA will also be studied.

  12. NUV Detector Dark Monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ely, Justin

    2013-10-01

    Perform routine monitoring of MAMA detector dark current. The main purpose isto look for evidence of a change in the dark rates, both to track on-orbit timedependence and to check for a detector problem developing. The spatial distribution of dark rates on the detector and the effect of SAA will also be studied.

  13. NUV Detector Dark Monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ely, Justin

    2012-10-01

    Perform routine monitoring of MAMA detector dark current. The main purpose isto look for evidence of a change in the dark rates, both to track on-orbit timedependence and to check for a detector problem developing. The spatial distribution of dark rates on the detector and the effect of SAA will also be studied.

  14. NUV Detector Dark Monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, Colin

    2011-10-01

    Perform routine monitoring of MAMA detector dark current. The main purpose isto look for evidence of a change in the dark rates, both to track on-orbit timedependence and to check for a detector problem developing. The spatial distribution of dark rates on the detector and the effect of SAA will also be studied.

  15. Discrete reductive perturbation technique

    SciTech Connect

    Levi, Decio; Petrera, Matteo

    2006-04-15

    We expand a partial difference equation (P{delta}E) on multiple lattices and obtain the P{delta}E which governs its far field behavior. The perturbative-reductive approach is here performed on well-known nonlinear P{delta}Es, both integrable and nonintegrable. We study the cases of the lattice modified Korteweg-de Vries (mKdV) equation, the Hietarinta equation, the lattice Volterra-Kac-Van Moerbeke equation and a nonintegrable lattice KdV equation. Such reductions allow us to obtain many new P{delta}Es of the nonlinear Schroedinger type.

  16. Self-interacting asymmetric dark matter coupled to a light massive dark photon

    SciTech Connect

    Petraki, Kalliopi; Pearce, Lauren; Kusenko, Alexander E-mail: lpearce@ucla.edu

    2014-07-01

    Dark matter (DM) with sizeable self-interactions mediated by a light species offers a compelling explanation of the observed galactic substructure; furthermore, the direct coupling between DM and a light particle contributes to the DM annihilation in the early universe. If the DM abundance is due to a dark particle-antiparticle asymmetry, the DM annihilation cross-section can be arbitrarily large, and the coupling of DM to the light species can be significant. We consider the case of asymmetric DM interacting via a light (but not necessarily massless) Abelian gauge vector boson, a dark photon. In the massless dark photon limit, gauge invariance mandates that DM be multicomponent, consisting of positive and negative dark ions of different species which partially bind in neutral dark atoms. We argue that a similar conclusion holds for light dark photons; in particular, we establish that the multi-component and atomic character of DM persists in much of the parameter space where the dark photon is sufficiently light to mediate sizeable DM self-interactions. We discuss the cosmological sequence of events in this scenario, including the dark asymmetry generation, the freeze-out of annihilations, the dark recombination and the phase transition which gives mass to the dark photon. We estimate the effect of self-interactions in DM haloes, taking into account this cosmological history. We place constraints based on the observed ellipticity of large haloes, and identify the regimes where DM self-scattering can affect the dynamics of smaller haloes, bringing theory in better agreement with observations. Moreover, we estimate the cosmological abundance of dark photons in various regimes, and derive pertinent bounds.

  17. Can dark matter be a scalar field?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jesus, J. F.; Pereira, S. H.; Malatrasi, J. L. G.; Andrade-Oliveira, F.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper we study a real scalar field as a possible candidate to explain the dark matter in the universe. In the context of a free scalar field with quadratic potential, we have used Union 2.1 SN Ia observational data jointly with a Planck prior over the dark matter density parameter to set a lower limit on the dark matter mass as m>=0.12H0‑1 eV (c=hbar=1). For the recent value of the Hubble constant indicated by the Hubble Space Telescope, namely H0=73±1.8 km s‑1Mpc‑1, this leads to m>=1.56×10‑33 eV at 99.7% c.l. Such value is much smaller than m~ 10‑22 eV previously estimated for some models. Nevertheless, it is still in agreement with them once we have not found evidences for a upper limit on the scalar field dark matter mass from SN Ia analysis. In practice, it confirms free real scalar field as a viable candidate for dark matter in agreement with previous studies in the context of density perturbations, which include scalar field self interaction.

  18. Can dark matter be a scalar field?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jesus, J. F.; Pereira, S. H.; Malatrasi, J. L. G.; Andrade-Oliveira, F.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper we study a real scalar field as a possible candidate to explain the dark matter in the universe. In the context of a free scalar field with quadratic potential, we have used Union 2.1 SN Ia observational data jointly with a Planck prior over the dark matter density parameter to set a lower limit on the dark matter mass as m>=0.12H0-1 eV (c=hbar=1). For the recent value of the Hubble constant indicated by the Hubble Space Telescope, namely H0=73±1.8 km s-1Mpc-1, this leads to m>=1.56×10-33 eV at 99.7% c.l. Such value is much smaller than m~ 10-22 eV previously estimated for some models. Nevertheless, it is still in agreement with them once we have not found evidences for a upper limit on the scalar field dark matter mass from SN Ia analysis. In practice, it confirms free real scalar field as a viable candidate for dark matter in agreement with previous studies in the context of density perturbations, which include scalar field self interaction.

  19. Non-linear dark energy clustering

    SciTech Connect

    Anselmi, Stefano; Ballesteros, Guillermo; Pietroni, Massimo E-mail: ballesteros@pd.infn.it

    2011-11-01

    We consider a dark energy fluid with arbitrary sound speed and equation of state and discuss the effect of its clustering on the cold dark matter distribution at the non-linear level. We write the continuity, Euler and Poisson equations for the system in the Newtonian approximation. Then, using the time renormalization group method to resum perturbative corrections at all orders, we compute the total clustering power spectrum and matter power spectrum. At the linear level, a sound speed of dark energy different from that of light modifies the power spectrum on observationally interesting scales, such as those relevant for baryonic acoustic oscillations. We show that the effect of varying the sound speed of dark energy on the non-linear corrections to the matter power spectrum is below the per cent level, and therefore these corrections can be well modelled by their counterpart in cosmological scenarios with smooth dark energy. We also show that the non-linear effects on the matter growth index can be as large as 10–15 per cent for small scales.

  20. Dark-disk universe.

    PubMed

    Fan, JiJi; Katz, Andrey; Randall, Lisa; Reece, Matthew

    2013-05-24

    We point out that current constraints on dark matter imply only that the majority of dark matter is cold and collisionless. A subdominant fraction of dark matter could have much stronger interactions. In particular, it could interact in a manner that dissipates energy, thereby cooling into a rotationally supported disk, much as baryons do. We call this proposed new dark matter component double-disk dark matter (DDDM). We argue that DDDM could constitute a fraction of all matter roughly as large as the fraction in baryons, and that it could be detected through its gravitational effects on the motion of stars in galaxies, for example. Furthermore, if DDDM can annihilate to gamma rays, it would give rise to an indirect detection signal distributed across the sky that differs dramatically from that predicted for ordinary dark matter. DDDM and more general partially interacting dark matter scenarios provide a large unexplored space of testable new physics ideas.

  1. Dark-disk universe.

    PubMed

    Fan, JiJi; Katz, Andrey; Randall, Lisa; Reece, Matthew

    2013-05-24

    We point out that current constraints on dark matter imply only that the majority of dark matter is cold and collisionless. A subdominant fraction of dark matter could have much stronger interactions. In particular, it could interact in a manner that dissipates energy, thereby cooling into a rotationally supported disk, much as baryons do. We call this proposed new dark matter component double-disk dark matter (DDDM). We argue that DDDM could constitute a fraction of all matter roughly as large as the fraction in baryons, and that it could be detected through its gravitational effects on the motion of stars in galaxies, for example. Furthermore, if DDDM can annihilate to gamma rays, it would give rise to an indirect detection signal distributed across the sky that differs dramatically from that predicted for ordinary dark matter. DDDM and more general partially interacting dark matter scenarios provide a large unexplored space of testable new physics ideas. PMID:23745856

  2. Embrace the Dark Side: Advancing the Dark Energy Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suchyta, Eric

    The Dark Energy Survey (DES) is an ongoing cosmological survey intended to study the properties of the accelerated expansion of the Universe. In this dissertation, I present work of mine that has advanced the progress of DES. First is an introduction, which explores the physics of the cosmos, as well as how DES intends to probe it. Attention is given to developing the theoretical framework cosmologists use to describe the Universe, and to explaining observational evidence which has furnished our current conception of the cosmos. Emphasis is placed on the dark sector - dark matter and dark energy - the content of the Universe not explained by the Standard Model of particle physics. As its name suggests, the Dark Energy Survey has been specially designed to measure the properties of dark energy. DES will use a combination of galaxy cluster, weak gravitational lensing, angular clustering, and supernovae measurements to derive its state of the art constraints, each of which is discussed in the text. The work described in this dissertation includes science measurements directly related to the first three of these probes. The dissertation presents my contributions to the readout and control system of the Dark Energy Camera (DECam); the name of this software is SISPI. SISPI uses client-server and publish-subscribe communication patterns to coordinate and command actions among the many hardware components of DECam - the survey instrument for DES, a 570 megapixel CCD camera, mounted at prime focus of the Blanco 4-m Telescope. The SISPI work I discuss includes coding applications for DECam's filter changer mechanism and hexapod, as well as developing the Scripts Editor, a GUI application for DECam users to edit and export observing sequence SISPI can load and execute. Next, the dissertation describes the processing of early DES data, which I contributed. This furnished the data products used in the first-completed DES science analysis, and contributed to improving the

  3. Origin of ΔN{sub eff} as a result of an interaction between dark radiation and dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Bjaelde, Ole Eggers; Das, Subinoy; Moss, Adam E-mail: subinoy@physik.rwth-aachen.de

    2012-10-01

    Results from the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP), Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT) and recently from the South Pole Telescope (SPT) have indicated the possible existence of an extra radiation component in addition to the well known three neutrino species predicted by the Standard Model of particle physics. In this paper, we explore the possibility of the apparent extra dark radiation being linked directly to the physics of cold dark matter (CDM). In particular, we consider a generic scenario where dark radiation, as a result of an interaction, is produced directly by a fraction of the dark matter density effectively decaying into dark radiation. At an early epoch when the dark matter density is negligible, as an obvious consequence, the density of dark radiation is also very small. As the Universe approaches matter radiation equality, the dark matter density starts to dominate thereby increasing the content of dark radiation and changing the expansion rate of the Universe. As this increase in dark radiation content happens naturally after Big Bang Nucleosynthesis (BBN), it can relax the possible tension with lower values of radiation degrees of freedom measured from light element abundances compared to that of the CMB. We numerically confront this scenario with WMAP+ACT and WMAP+SPT data and derive an upper limit on the allowed fraction of dark matter decaying into dark radiation.

  4. Origin of ΔNeff as a result of an interaction between dark radiation and dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eggers Bjaelde, Ole; Das, Subinoy; Moss, Adam

    2012-10-01

    Results from the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP), Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT) and recently from the South Pole Telescope (SPT) have indicated the possible existence of an extra radiation component in addition to the well known three neutrino species predicted by the Standard Model of particle physics. In this paper, we explore the possibility of the apparent extra dark radiation being linked directly to the physics of cold dark matter (CDM). In particular, we consider a generic scenario where dark radiation, as a result of an interaction, is produced directly by a fraction of the dark matter density effectively decaying into dark radiation. At an early epoch when the dark matter density is negligible, as an obvious consequence, the density of dark radiation is also very small. As the Universe approaches matter radiation equality, the dark matter density starts to dominate thereby increasing the content of dark radiation and changing the expansion rate of the Universe. As this increase in dark radiation content happens naturally after Big Bang Nucleosynthesis (BBN), it can relax the possible tension with lower values of radiation degrees of freedom measured from light element abundances compared to that of the CMB. We numerically confront this scenario with WMAP+ACT and WMAP+SPT data and derive an upper limit on the allowed fraction of dark matter decaying into dark radiation.

  5. Evolution of density perturbations in f(R) gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Carloni, S.; Dunsby, P. K. S.; Troisi, A.

    2008-01-15

    We give a rigorous and mathematically well defined presentation of the covariant and gauge invariant theory of scalar perturbations of a Friedmann-Lemaitre-Robertson-Walker universe for fourth order gravity, where the matter is described by a perfect fluid with a barotropic equation of state. The general perturbations equations are applied to a simple background solution of R{sup n} gravity. We obtain exact solutions of the perturbations equations for scales much bigger than the Hubble radius. These solutions have a number of interesting features. In particular, we find that for all values of n there is always a growing mode for the density contrast, even if the universe undergoes an accelerated expansion. Such behavior does not occur in standard general relativity, where as soon as dark energy dominates, the density contrast experiences an unrelenting decay. This peculiarity is sufficiently novel to warrant further investigation of fourth order gravity models.

  6. 'Swiss-cheese' inhomogeneous cosmology and the dark energy problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, Tirthabir; Notari, Alessio

    2008-06-01

    We study an exact Swiss-cheese model of the universe, where inhomogeneous LTB patches are embedded in a flat FLRW background, in order to see how observations of distant sources are affected. We focus mainly on the redshift, both perturbatively and non-perturbatively: the net effect given by one patch is suppressed by (L/RH)3 (where L is the size of one patch and RH is the Hubble radius). We disentangle this effect from the Doppler term (which is much larger and has been used recently (Biswas et al 2007 J. Cosmol. Astropart. Phys. JCAP12(2007)017 [astro-ph/0606703]) to try to fit the SN curve without dark energy) by making contact with cosmological perturbation theory. Then, the correction to the angular distance is discussed analytically and estimated to be larger, {\\cal O}(L/R_{\\mathrm {H}})^2 , perturbatively and non-perturbatively (although it should go to zero after angular averaging).

  7. Maps of CMB lensing deflection from N-body simulations in Coupled Dark Energy Cosmologies

    SciTech Connect

    Carbone, Carmelita; Baldi, Marco; Baccigalupi, Carlo E-mail: marco.baldi5@unibo.it E-mail: bacci@sissa.it

    2013-09-01

    We produce lensing potential and deflection-angle maps in order to simulate the weak gravitational lensing of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) via ray-tracing through the COupled Dark Energy Cosmological Simulations (CoDECS), the largest suite of N-body simulations to date for interacting Dark Energy cosmologies. The constructed maps faithfully reflect the N-body cosmic structures on a range of scales going from the arcminute to the degree scale, limited only by the resolution and extension of the simulations. We investigate the variation of the lensing pattern due to the underlying Dark Energy (DE) dynamics, characterised by different background and perturbation behaviours as a consequence of the interaction between the DE field and Cold Dark Matter (CDM). In particular, we study in detail the results from three cosmological models differing in the background and perturbations evolution at the epoch in which the lensing cross section is most effective, corresponding to a redshift of ∼ 1, with the purpose to isolate their imprints in the lensing observables, regardless of the compatibility of these models with present constraints. The scenarios investigated here include a reference ΛCDM cosmology, a standard coupled DE (cDE) scenario, and a ''bouncing'' cDE scenario. For the standard cDE scenario, we find that typical differences in the lensing potential result from two effects: the enhanced growth of linear CDM density fluctuations with respect to the ΛCDM case, and the modified nonlinear dynamics of collapsed structures induced by the DE-CDM interaction. As a consequence, CMB lensing highlights the DE impact in the cosmological expansion, even in the degenerate case where the amplitude of the linear matter density perturbations, parametrised through σ{sub 8}, is the same in both the standard cDE and ΛCDM cosmologies. For the ''bouncing'' scenario, we find that the two opposite behaviours of the lens density contrast and of the matter abundance lead to

  8. Dark matter superfluid and DBI dark energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Rong-Gen; Wang, Shao-Jiang

    2016-01-01

    It was shown recently that, without jeopardizing the success of the Λ cold dark matter model on cosmic scales, the modified Newtonian dynamics (MOND) can be derived as an emergent phenomenon when axionlike dark matter particles condense into superfluid on the galactic scales. We propose in this paper a Dirac-Born-Infeld (DBI) scalar field conformally coupled to the matter components. To maintain the success of MOND phenomenon of dark matter superfluid on the galactic scales, the fifth force introduced by the DBI scalar should be screened on the galactic scales. It turns out that the screening effect naturally leads to a simple explanation for a longstanding puzzle that the MOND critical acceleration coincides with present Hubble scale. This galactic coincidence problem is solved, provided that the screened DBI scalar also plays the role of dark energy on the cosmic scales.

  9. The darkness of spin-0 dark radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Marsh, M.C. David

    2015-01-01

    We show that the scattering of a general spin-0 sector of dark radiation off the pre-recombination thermal plasma results in undetectably small spectral distortions of the Cosmic Microwave Background.

  10. Dark Atoms: Asymmetry and Direct Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, David E.; Krnjaic, Gordan Z.; Rehermann, Keith R.; Wells, Christopher M.

    2011-10-01

    We present a simple UV completion of Atomic Dark Matter (aDM) in which heavy right-handed neutrinos decay to induce both dark and lepton number densities. This model addresses several outstanding cosmological problems: the matter/anti-matter asymmetry, the dark matter abundance, the number of light degrees of freedom in the early universe, and the smoothing of small-scale structure. Additionally, this realization of aDM may reconcile the CoGeNT excess with recently published null results and predicts a signal in the CRESST Oxygen band. We also find that, due to unscreened long-range interactions, the residual un recombined dark ions settle into a diffuse isothermal halo.

  11. Darks are processed faster than lights.

    PubMed

    Komban, Stanley Jose; Alonso, Jose-Manuel; Zaidi, Qasim

    2011-06-01

    Recent physiological studies claim that dark stimuli have access to greater neuronal resources than light stimuli in early visual pathway. We used two sets of novel stimuli to examine the functional consequences of this dark dominance in human observers. We show that increment and decrement thresholds are equal when controlled for adaptation and eye movements. However, measurements for salience differences at high contrasts show that darks are detected pronouncedly faster and more accurately than lights when presented against uniform binary noise. In addition, the salience advantage for darks is abolished when the background distribution is adjusted to control for the irradiation illusion. The threshold equality suggests that the highest sensitivities of neurons in the ON and OFF channels are similar, whereas the salience difference is consistent with a population advantage for the OFF system. PMID:21653869

  12. k-essence model of inflation, dark matter, and dark energy

    SciTech Connect

    Bose, Nilok; Majumdar, A. S.

    2009-05-15

    We investigate the possibility for k-essence dynamics to reproduce the primary features of inflation in the early universe, generate dark matter subsequently, and finally account for the presently observed acceleration. We first show that for a purely kinetic k-essence model the late-time energy density of the universe when expressed simply as a sum of a cosmological constant and a dark matter term leads to a static universe. We then study another k-essence model in which the Lagrangian contains a potential for the scalar field as well as a noncanonical kinetic term. We show that such a model generates the basic features of inflation in the early universe, and also gives rise to dark matter and dark energy at appropriate subsequent stages. Observational constraints on the parameters of this model are obtained.

  13. Dark Forces and Light Dark Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Hooper, Dan; Weiner, Neal; Xue, Wei

    2012-09-01

    We consider a simple class of models in which the dark matter, X, is coupled to a new gauge boson, phi, with a relatively low mass (m_phi \\sim 100 MeV-3 GeV). Neither the dark matter nor the new gauge boson have tree-level couplings to the Standard Model. The dark matter in this model annihilates to phi pairs, and for a coupling of g_X \\sim 0.06 (m_X/10 GeV)^1/2 yields a thermal relic abundance consistent with the cosmological density of dark matter. The phi's produced in such annihilations decay through a small degree of kinetic mixing with the photon to combinations of Standard Model leptons and mesons. For dark matter with a mass of \\sim10 GeV, the shape of the resulting gamma-ray spectrum provides a good fit to that observed from the Galactic Center, and can also provide the very hard electron spectrum required to account for the observed synchrotron emission from the Milky Way's radio filaments. For kinetic mixing near the level naively expected from loop-suppressed operators (epsilon \\sim 10^{-4}), the dark matter is predicted to scatter elastically with protons with a cross section consistent with that required to accommodate the signals reported by DAMA/LIBRA, CoGeNT and CRESST-II.

  14. Chilly dark sectors and asymmetric reheating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adshead, Peter; Cui, Yanou; Shelton, Jessie

    2016-06-01

    In a broad class of theories, the relic abundance of dark matter is determined by interactions internal to a thermalized dark sector, with no direct involvement of the Standard Model (SM). We point out that these theories raise an immediate cosmological question: how was the dark sector initially populated in the early universe? Motivated in part by the difficulty of accommodating large amounts of entropy carried in dark radiation with cosmic microwave background measurements of the effective number of relativistic species at recombination, N eff , we aim to establish which admissible cosmological histories can populate a thermal dark sector that never reaches thermal equilibrium with the SM. The minimal cosmological origin for such a dark sector is asymmetric reheating, when the same mechanism that populates the SM in the early universe also populates the dark sector at a lower temperature. Here we demonstrate that the resulting inevitable inflaton-mediated scattering between the dark sector and the SM can wash out a would-be temperature asymmetry, and establish the regions of parameter space where temperature asymmetries can be generated in minimal reheating scenarios. Thus obtaining a temperature asymmetry of a given size either restricts possible inflaton masses and couplings or necessitates a non-minimal cosmology for one or both sectors. As a side benefit, we develop techniques for evaluating collision terms in the relativistic Boltzmann equation when the full dependence on Bose-Einstein or Fermi-Dirac phase space distributions must be retained, and present several new results on relativistic thermal averages in an appendix.

  15. Perturbative unidirectional invisibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mostafazadeh, Ali

    2015-08-01

    We outline a general perturbative method of evaluating scattering features of finite-range complex potentials and use it to examine complex perturbations of a rectangular barrier potential. In optics, these correspond to modulated refractive index profiles of the form n (x ) =n0+f (x ) , where n0 is real, f (x ) is complex valued, and |f (x ) | ≪1 ≤n0 . We give a comprehensive description of the phenomenon of unidirectional invisibility for such media, proving five general theorems on its realization in P T -symmetric and non-P T -symmetric material. In particular, we establish the impossibility of unidirectional invisibility for P T -symmetric samples whose refractive index has a constant real part and show how a simple scaling transformation of a unidirectionally invisible P T -symmetric index profile with n0=1 may be used to generate a hierarchy of unidirectionally invisible P T -symmetric index profiles with n0>1 . The results pertaining to unidirectional invisibility for n0>1 open the way for the experimental studies of this phenomenon in a variety of active materials. As an application of our general results, we show that a medium with n (x ) =n0+ζ ei K x , ζ and K real, and |ζ |≪1 can support unidirectional invisibility only for n0=1 . We then construct unidirectionally invisible index profiles of the form n (x ) =n0+∑ℓzℓei Kℓx with zℓ complex, Kℓ real, | zℓ|≪1 , and n0>1 .

  16. On finite density effects on cosmic reheating and moduli decay and implications for Dark Matter production

    SciTech Connect

    Drewes, Marco

    2014-11-01

    We study the damping of an oscillating scalar field in a Friedmann-Robertson-Walker spacetime by perturbative processes, taking into account the back-reaction of the plasma of decay products on the damping rate. The scalar field may be identified with the inflaton, in which case this process resembles the reheating of the universe after inflation. It can also model a modulus that dominates the energy density of the universe at later times. We find that the finite density corrections to the damping rate can have a drastic effect on the thermal history and considerably increase both, the maximal temperature in the early universe and the reheating temperature at the onset of the radiation dominated era. As a result the abundance of some Dark Matter candidates may be considerably larger than previously estimated. We give improved analytic estimates for the maximal and the reheating temperatures and confirm them numerically in a simple model.

  17. Density perturbations in general modified gravitational theories

    SciTech Connect

    De Felice, Antonio; Tsujikawa, Shinji; Mukohyama, Shinji

    2010-07-15

    We derive the equations of linear cosmological perturbations for the general Lagrangian density f(R,{phi},X)/2+L{sub c}, where R is a Ricci scalar, {phi} is a scalar field, and X=-{partial_derivative}{sup {mu}{phi}{partial_derivative}}{sub {mu}{phi}/}2 is a field kinetic energy. We take into account a nonlinear self-interaction term L{sub c}={xi}({phi}) {open_square}{phi}({partial_derivative}{sup {mu}{phi}{partial_derivative}}{sub {mu}{phi}}) recently studied in the context of ''Galileon'' cosmology, which keeps the field equations at second order. Taking into account a scalar-field mass explicitly, the equations of matter density perturbations and gravitational potentials are obtained under a quasistatic approximation on subhorizon scales. We also derive conditions for the avoidance of ghosts and Laplacian instabilities associated with propagation speeds. Our analysis includes most of modified gravity models of dark energy proposed in literature; and thus it is convenient to test the viability of such models from both theoretical and observational points of view.

  18. Signatures of non-gaussianity in the isocurvature modes of primordial black hole dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Young, Sam; Byrnes, Christian T. E-mail: C.Byrnes@sussex.ac.uk

    2015-04-01

    Primordial black holes (PBHs) are black holes which may have formed very early on during the radiation dominated era in the early universe. We present here a method by which the large scale perturbations in the density of primordial black holes may be used to place tight constraints on non-gaussianity if PBHs account for dark matter (DM) . The presence of local-type non-gaussianity is known to have a significant effect on the abundance of primordial black holes, and modal coupling from the observed CMB scale modes can significantly alter the number density of PBHs that form within different regions of the universe, which appear as DM isocurvature modes. Using the recent Planck constraints on isocurvature perturbations, we show that PBHs are excluded as DM candidates for even very small local-type non-gaussianity, |f{sub NL}|≈0.001 and remarkably the constraint on g{sub NL} is almost as strong. Even small non-gaussianity is excluded if DM is composed of PBHs. If local non-Gaussianity is ever detected on CMB scales, the constraints on the fraction of the universe collapsing into PBHs (which are massive enough to have not yet evaporated) will become much tighter.

  19. The effective field theory of dark energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gubitosi, Giulia; Piazza, Federico; Vernizzi, Filippo

    2013-02-01

    We propose a universal description of dark energy and modified gravity that includes all single-field models. By extending a formalism previously applied to inflation, we consider the metric universally coupled to matter fields and we write in terms of it the most general unitary gauge action consistent with the residual unbroken symmetries of spatial diffeomorphisms. Our action is particularly suited for cosmological perturbation theory: the background evolution depends on only three operators. All other operators start at least at quadratic order in the perturbations and their effects can be studied independently and systematically. In particular, we focus on the properties of a few operators which appear in non-minimally coupled scalar-tensor gravity and galileon theories. In this context, we study the mixing between gravity and the scalar degree of freedom. We assess the quantum and classical stability, derive the speed of sound of fluctuations and the renormalization of the Newton constant. The scalar can always be de-mixed from gravity at quadratic order in the perturbations, but not necessarily through a conformal rescaling of the metric. We show how to express covariant field-operators in our formalism and give several explicit examples of dark energy and modified gravity models in our language. Finally, we discuss the relation with the covariant EFT methods recently appeared in the literature.

  20. Neutrinos and dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Ibarra, Alejandro

    2015-07-15

    Neutrinos could be key particles to unravel the nature of the dark matter of the Universe. On the one hand, sterile neutrinos in minimal extensions of the Standard Model are excellent dark matter candidates, producing potentially observable signals in the form of a line in the X-ray sky. On the other hand, the annihilation or the decay of dark matter particles produces, in many plausible dark matter scenarios, a neutrino flux that could be detected at neutrino telescopes, thus providing non-gravitational evidence for dark matter. More conservatively, the non-observation of a significant excess in the neutrino fluxes with respect to the expected astrophysical backgrounds can be used to constrain dark matter properties, such as the self-annihilation cross section, the scattering cross section with nucleons and the lifetime.

  1. Inflationary tensor perturbations after BICEP2.

    PubMed

    Caligiuri, Jerod; Kosowsky, Arthur

    2014-05-16

    The measurement of B-mode polarization of the cosmic microwave background at large angular scales by the BICEP experiment suggests a stochastic gravitational wave background from early-Universe inflation with a surprisingly large amplitude. The power spectrum of these tensor perturbations can be probed both with further measurements of the microwave background polarization at smaller scales and also directly via interferometry in space. We show that sufficiently sensitive high-resolution B-mode measurements will ultimately have the ability to test the inflationary consistency relation between the amplitude and spectrum of the tensor perturbations, confirming their inflationary origin. Additionally, a precise B-mode measurement of the tensor spectrum will predict the tensor amplitude on solar system scales to 20% accuracy for an exact power-law tensor spectrum, so a direct detection will then measure the running of the tensor spectral index to high precision.

  2. Inflationary tensor perturbations after BICEP2.

    PubMed

    Caligiuri, Jerod; Kosowsky, Arthur

    2014-05-16

    The measurement of B-mode polarization of the cosmic microwave background at large angular scales by the BICEP experiment suggests a stochastic gravitational wave background from early-Universe inflation with a surprisingly large amplitude. The power spectrum of these tensor perturbations can be probed both with further measurements of the microwave background polarization at smaller scales and also directly via interferometry in space. We show that sufficiently sensitive high-resolution B-mode measurements will ultimately have the ability to test the inflationary consistency relation between the amplitude and spectrum of the tensor perturbations, confirming their inflationary origin. Additionally, a precise B-mode measurement of the tensor spectrum will predict the tensor amplitude on solar system scales to 20% accuracy for an exact power-law tensor spectrum, so a direct detection will then measure the running of the tensor spectral index to high precision. PMID:24877926

  3. Canonical density matrix perturbation theory.

    PubMed

    Niklasson, Anders M N; Cawkwell, M J; Rubensson, Emanuel H; Rudberg, Elias

    2015-12-01

    Density matrix perturbation theory [Niklasson and Challacombe, Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 193001 (2004)] is generalized to canonical (NVT) free-energy ensembles in tight-binding, Hartree-Fock, or Kohn-Sham density-functional theory. The canonical density matrix perturbation theory can be used to calculate temperature-dependent response properties from the coupled perturbed self-consistent field equations as in density-functional perturbation theory. The method is well suited to take advantage of sparse matrix algebra to achieve linear scaling complexity in the computational cost as a function of system size for sufficiently large nonmetallic materials and metals at high temperatures. PMID:26764847

  4. Cosmological perturbations in massive bigravity

    SciTech Connect

    Lagos, Macarena; Ferreira, Pedro G. E-mail: p.ferreira1@physics.ox.ac.uk

    2014-12-01

    We present a comprehensive analysis of classical scalar, vector and tensor cosmological perturbations in ghost-free massive bigravity. In particular, we find the full evolution equations and analytical solutions in a wide range of regimes. We show that there are viable cosmological backgrounds but, as has been found in the literature, these models generally have exponential instabilities in linear perturbation theory. However, it is possible to find stable scalar cosmological perturbations for a very particular choice of parameters. For this stable subclass of models we find that vector and tensor perturbations have growing solutions. We argue that special initial conditions are needed for tensor modes in order to have a viable model.

  5. Canonical density matrix perturbation theory.

    PubMed

    Niklasson, Anders M N; Cawkwell, M J; Rubensson, Emanuel H; Rudberg, Elias

    2015-12-01

    Density matrix perturbation theory [Niklasson and Challacombe, Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 193001 (2004)] is generalized to canonical (NVT) free-energy ensembles in tight-binding, Hartree-Fock, or Kohn-Sham density-functional theory. The canonical density matrix perturbation theory can be used to calculate temperature-dependent response properties from the coupled perturbed self-consistent field equations as in density-functional perturbation theory. The method is well suited to take advantage of sparse matrix algebra to achieve linear scaling complexity in the computational cost as a function of system size for sufficiently large nonmetallic materials and metals at high temperatures.

  6. Clumpy cold dark matter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silk, Joseph; Stebbins, Albert

    1993-01-01

    A study is conducted of cold dark matter (CDM) models in which clumpiness will inhere, using cosmic strings and textures suited to galaxy formation. CDM clumps of 10 million solar mass/cu pc density are generated at about z(eq) redshift, with a sizable fraction surviving. Observable implications encompass dark matter cores in globular clusters and in galactic nuclei. Results from terrestrial dark matter detection experiments may be affected by clumpiness in the Galactic halo.

  7. Interacting warm dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Cruz, Norman; Palma, Guillermo; Zambrano, David; Avelino, Arturo E-mail: guillermo.palma@usach.cl E-mail: avelino@fisica.ugto.mx

    2013-05-01

    We explore a cosmological model composed by a dark matter fluid interacting with a dark energy fluid. The interaction term has the non-linear λρ{sub m}{sup α}ρ{sub e}{sup β} form, where ρ{sub m} and ρ{sub e} are the energy densities of the dark matter and dark energy, respectively. The parameters α and β are in principle not constrained to take any particular values, and were estimated from observations. We perform an analytical study of the evolution equations, finding the fixed points and their stability properties in order to characterize suitable physical regions in the phase space of the dark matter and dark energy densities. The constants (λ,α,β) as well as w{sub m} and w{sub e} of the EoS of dark matter and dark energy respectively, were estimated using the cosmological observations of the type Ia supernovae and the Hubble expansion rate H(z) data sets. We find that the best estimated values for the free parameters of the model correspond to a warm dark matter interacting with a phantom dark energy component, with a well goodness-of-fit to data. However, using the Bayesian Information Criterion (BIC) we find that this model is overcame by a warm dark matter – phantom dark energy model without interaction, as well as by the ΛCDM model. We find also a large dispersion on the best estimated values of the (λ,α,β) parameters, so even if we are not able to set strong constraints on their values, given the goodness-of-fit to data of the model, we find that a large variety of theirs values are well compatible with the observational data used.

  8. Planck 2015 results. XIV. Dark energy and modified gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planck Collaboration; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartolo, N.; Battaner, E.; Battye, R.; Benabed, K.; Benoît, A.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bock, J. J.; Bonaldi, A.; Bonavera, L.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R. C.; Calabrese, E.; Cardoso, J.-F.; Catalano, A.; Challinor, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chiang, H. C.; Christensen, P. R.; Church, S.; Clements, D. L.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Combet, C.; Couchot, F.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B. P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Désert, F.-X.; Diego, J. M.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Ducout, A.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Elsner, F.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Fergusson, J.; Finelli, F.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A. A.; Franceschi, E.; Frejsel, A.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Giard, M.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; Gjerløw, E.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gratton, S.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Gudmundsson, J. E.; Hansen, F. K.; Hanson, D.; Harrison, D. L.; Heavens, A.; Helou, G.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W. A.; Hornstrup, A.; Hovest, W.; Huang, Z.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Hurier, G.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jaffe, T. R.; Jones, W. C.; Juvela, M.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T. S.; Knoche, J.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Lawrence, C. R.; Leonardi, R.; Lesgourgues, J.; Levrier, F.; Lewis, A.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Ma, Y.-Z.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maggio, G.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Mangilli, A.; Marchini, A.; Maris, M.; Martin, P. G.; Martinelli, M.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Matarrese, S.; McGehee, P.; Meinhold, P. R.; Melchiorri, A.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschênes, M.-A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Moss, A.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Narimani, A.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Netterfield, C. B.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Oxborrow, C. A.; Paci, F.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paoletti, D.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Pearson, T. J.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrotta, F.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Pietrobon, D.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Popa, L.; Pratt, G. W.; Prézeau, G.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J.-L.; Rachen, J. P.; Reach, W. T.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Renzi, A.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Rossetti, M.; Roudier, G.; Rowan-Robinson, M.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Rusholme, B.; Salvatelli, V.; Sandri, M.; Santos, D.; Savelainen, M.; Savini, G.; Schaefer, B. M.; Scott, D.; Seiffert, M. D.; Shellard, E. P. S.; Spencer, L. D.; Stolyarov, V.; Stompor, R.; Sudiwala, R.; Sunyaev, R.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A.-S.; Sygnet, J.-F.; Tauber, J. A.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Tuovinen, J.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Viel, M.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; Wehus, I. K.; White, M.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.

    2016-09-01

    We study the implications of Planck data for models of dark energy (DE) and modified gravity (MG) beyond the standard cosmological constant scenario. We start with cases where the DE only directly affects the background evolution, considering Taylor expansions of the equation of state w(a), as well as principal component analysis and parameterizations related to the potential of a minimally coupled DE scalar field. When estimating the density of DE at early times, we significantly improve present constraints and find that it has to be below ~2% (at 95% confidence) of the critical density, even when forced to play a role for z < 50 only. We then move to general parameterizations of the DE or MG perturbations that encompass both effective field theories and the phenomenology of gravitational potentials in MG models. Lastly, we test a range of specific models, such as k-essence, f(R) theories, and coupled DE. In addition to the latest Planck data, for our main analyses, we use background constraints from baryonic acoustic oscillations, type-Ia supernovae, and local measurements of the Hubble constant. We further show the impact of measurements of the cosmological perturbations, such as redshift-space distortions and weak gravitational lensing. These additional probes are important tools for testing MG models and for breaking degeneracies that are still present in the combination of Planck and background data sets. All results that include only background parameterizations (expansion of the equation of state, early DE, general potentials in minimally-coupled scalar fields or principal component analysis) are in agreement with ΛCDM. When testing models that also change perturbations (even when the background is fixed to ΛCDM), some tensions appear in a few scenarios: the maximum one found is ~2σ for Planck TT+lowP when parameterizing observables related to the gravitational potentials with a chosen time dependence; the tension increases to, at most, 3σ when external

  9. Dark matter and cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Schramm, D.N.

    1992-03-01

    The cosmological dark matter problem is reviewed. The Big Bang Nucleosynthesis constraints on the baryon density are compared with the densities implied by visible matter, dark halos, dynamics of clusters, gravitational lenses, large-scale velocity flows, and the {Omega} = 1 flatness/inflation argument. It is shown that (1) the majority of baryons are dark; and (2) non-baryonic dark matter is probably required on large scales. It is also noted that halo dark matter could be either baryonic or non-baryonic. Descrimination between cold'' and hot'' non-baryonic candidates is shown to depend on the assumed seeds'' that stimulate structure formation. Gaussian density fluctuations, such as those induced by quantum fluctuations, favor cold dark matter, whereas topological defects such as strings, textures or domain walls may work equally or better with hot dark matter. A possible connection between cold dark matter, globular cluster ages and the Hubble constant is mentioned. Recent large-scale structure measurements, coupled with microwave anisotropy limits, are shown to raise some questions for the previously favored density fluctuation picture. Accelerator and underground limits on dark matter candidates are also reviewed.

  10. Searching for dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mateo, Mario

    1994-01-01

    Three teams of astronomers believe they have independently found evidence for dark matter in our galaxy. A brief history of the search for dark matter is presented. The use of microlensing-event observation for spotting dark matter is described. The equipment required to observe microlensing events and three groups working on dark matter detection are discussed. The three groups are the Massive Compact Halo Objects (MACHO) Project team, the Experience de Recherche d'Objets Sombres (EROS) team, and the Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment (OGLE) team. The first apparent detections of microlensing events by the three teams are briefly reported.

  11. Dark U (1)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Chia-Feng; Ma, Ernest; Yuan, Tzu-Chiang

    2015-06-01

    In this talk we will explore the possibility of adding a local U(1) dark sector to the standard model with the Higgs boson as a portal connecting the visible standard model sector and the dark one. We will discuss existing experimental constraint on the model parameters from the invisible width of Higgs decay. Implications of such a dark U(1) sector on phenomenology at the Large Hardon Collider will be addressed. In particular, detailed results for the non-standard signals of multi-lepton-jets that arise from this simple dark sector will be presented.

  12. Dark matter in cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luković, Vladimir; Cabella, Paolo; Vittorio, Nicola

    2014-07-01

    In this paper we review the main theoretical and experimental achievements in the field of dark matter from the cosmological and astrophysical point of view. We revisit it from the very first surveys of local astrophysical matter, up to the stringent constraints on matter properties, coming from the last release of data on cosmological scales. To bring closer and justify the idea of dark matter, we will go across methods and tools for measuring dark matter characteristics, and in some cases a combination of methods that provide one of the greatest direct proofs for dark matter, such as Bullet cluster.

  13. Dark matter and cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Schramm, D.N.

    1992-03-01

    The cosmological dark matter problem is reviewed. The Big Bang Nucleosynthesis constraints on the baryon density are compared with the densities implied by visible matter, dark halos, dynamics of clusters, gravitational lenses, large-scale velocity flows, and the {Omega} = 1 flatness/inflation argument. It is shown that (1) the majority of baryons are dark; and (2) non-baryonic dark matter is probably required on large scales. It is also noted that halo dark matter could be either baryonic or non-baryonic. Descrimination between ``cold`` and ``hot`` non-baryonic candidates is shown to depend on the assumed ``seeds`` that stimulate structure formation. Gaussian density fluctuations, such as those induced by quantum fluctuations, favor cold dark matter, whereas topological defects such as strings, textures or domain walls may work equally or better with hot dark matter. A possible connection between cold dark matter, globular cluster ages and the Hubble constant is mentioned. Recent large-scale structure measurements, coupled with microwave anisotropy limits, are shown to raise some questions for the previously favored density fluctuation picture. Accelerator and underground limits on dark matter candidates are also reviewed.

  14. Dark energy and extended dark matter halos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernin, A. D.; Teerikorpi, P.; Valtonen, M. J.; Dolgachev, V. P.; Domozhilova, L. M.; Byrd, G. G.

    2012-03-01

    The cosmological mean matter (dark and baryonic) density measured in the units of the critical density is Ωm = 0.27. Independently, the local mean density is estimated to be Ωloc = 0.08-0.23 from recent data on galaxy groups at redshifts up to z = 0.01-0.03 (as published by Crook et al. 2007, ApJ, 655, 790 and Makarov & Karachentsev 2011, MNRAS, 412, 2498). If the lower values of Ωloc are reliable, as Makarov & Karachentsev and some other observers prefer, does this mean that the Local Universe of 100-300 Mpc across is an underdensity in the cosmic matter distribution? Or could it nevertheless be representative of the mean cosmic density or even be an overdensity due to the Local Supercluster therein. We focus on dark matter halos of groups of galaxies and check how much dark mass the invisible outer layers of the halos are able to host. The outer layers are usually devoid of bright galaxies and cannot be seen at large distances. The key factor which bounds the size of an isolated halo is the local antigravity produced by the omnipresent background of dark energy. A gravitationally bound halo does not extend beyond the zero-gravity surface where the gravity of matter and the antigravity of dark energy balance, thus defining a natural upper size of a system. We use our theory of local dynamical effects of dark energy to estimate the maximal sizes and masses of the extended dark halos. Using data from three recent catalogs of galaxy groups, we show that the calculated mass bounds conform with the assumption that a significant amount of dark matter is located in the invisible outer parts of the extended halos, sufficient to fill the gap between the observed and expected local matter density. Nearby groups of galaxies and the Virgo cluster have dark halos which seem to extend up to their zero-gravity surfaces. If the extended halo is a common feature of gravitationally bound systems on scales of galaxy groups and clusters, the Local Universe could be typical or even

  15. How to save the WIMP: global analysis of a dark matter model with two s-channel mediators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duerr, Michael; Kahlhoefer, Felix; Schmidt-Hoberg, Kai; Schwetz, Thomas; Vogl, Stefan

    2016-09-01

    A reliable comparison of different dark matter (DM) searches requires models that satisfy certain consistency requirements like gauge invariance and perturbative unitarity. As a well-motivated example, we study two-mediator DM (2MDM). The model is based on a spontaneously broken U(1)' gauge symmetry and contains a Majorana DM particle as well as two s-channel mediators, one vector (the Z') and one scalar (the dark Higgs). We perform a global scan over the parameters of the model assuming that the DM relic density is obtained by thermal freeze-out in the early Universe and imposing a large set of constraints: direct and indirect DM searches, monojet, dijet and dilepton searches at colliders, Higgs observables, electroweak precision tests and perturbative unitarity. We conclude that thermal DM is only allowed either close to an s-channel resonance or if at least one mediator is lighter than the DM particle. In these cases a thermal DM abundance can be obtained although DM couplings to the Standard Model are tiny. Interestingly, we find that vector-mediated DM-nucleon scattering leads to relevant constraints despite the velocity-suppressed cross section, and that indirect detection can be important if DM annihilations into both mediators are kinematically allowed.

  16. Darkness and depth in early Renaissance painting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyler, Christopher

    2010-02-01

    Contrast has always been appreciated as a significant factor in image quality, but it is less widely recognized that it is a key factor in the representation of depth, solidity and three-dimensionality in images in general, and in paintings in particular. This aspect of contrast was a key factor in the introduction of oil paint as a painting medium at the beginning of the fifteenth century, as a practical means of contrast enhancement. However, recent conservatorship efforts have established that the first oil paintings were not, as commonly supposed, by van Eyck in Flanders in the 1430s, but by Masolino da Panicale in Italy in the 1420s. These developments led to the use of chiaroscuro technique in various forms, all of which are techniques for enhanced shadowing.

  17. 4. DARK CANYON SIPHON VIEW ACROSS DARK CANYON AT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. DARK CANYON SIPHON - VIEW ACROSS DARK CANYON AT LOCATION OF SIPHON. VIEW TO NORTHWEST - Carlsbad Irrigation District, Dark Canyon Siphon, On Main Canal, 1 mile South of Carlsbad, Carlsbad, Eddy County, NM

  18. Cosmological constraints on coupled dark energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Weiqiang; Li, Hang; Wu, Yabo; Lu, Jianbo

    2016-10-01

    The coupled dark energy model provides a possible approach to mitigate the coincidence problem of cosmological standard model. Here, the coupling term is assumed as bar Q = 3Hξxbar rhox, which is related to the interaction rate and energy density of dark energy. We derive the background and perturbation evolution equations for several coupled models. Then, we test these models by currently available cosmic observations which include cosmic microwave background radiation from Planck 2015, baryon acoustic oscillation, type Ia supernovae, fσ8(z) data points from redshift-space distortions, and weak gravitational lensing. The constraint results tell us there is no evidence of interaction at 2σ level, it is very hard to distinguish different coupled models from other ones.

  19. Can Cosmic Structure form without Dark Matter?

    SciTech Connect

    Dodelson, Scott; Liguori, Michele; /Fermilab /Padua U. /INFN, Padua

    2006-08-01

    One of the prime pieces of evidence for dark matter is the observation of large overdense regions in the universe. Since we know from the cosmic microwave background that the regions that contained the most baryons when the universe was {approx} 400, 000 years old were overdense by only one part in ten thousand, perturbations had to have grown since then by a factor greater than (1 + z{sub *}) {approx_equal} 1180 where z{sub *} is the epoch of recombination. This enhanced growth does not happen in general relativity, so dark matter is needed in the standard theory. We show here that enhanced growth can occur in alternatives to general relativity, in particular in Bekenstein's relativistic version of Modified Newtonian Dynamics (MOND). The vector field introduced in that theory for a completely different reason plays a key role in generating the instability that produces large cosmic structures today.

  20. Simple implementation of general dark energy models

    SciTech Connect

    Bloomfield, Jolyon K.; Pearson, Jonathan A. E-mail: jonathan.pearson@durham.ac.uk

    2014-03-01

    We present a formalism for the numerical implementation of general theories of dark energy, combining the computational simplicity of the equation of state for perturbations approach with the generality of the effective field theory approach. An effective fluid description is employed, based on a general action describing single-scalar field models. The formalism is developed from first principles, and constructed keeping the goal of a simple implementation into CAMB in mind. Benefits of this approach include its straightforward implementation, the generality of the underlying theory, the fact that the evolved variables are physical quantities, and that model-independent phenomenological descriptions may be straightforwardly investigated. We hope this formulation will provide a powerful tool for the comparison of theoretical models of dark energy with observational data.

  1. Falsification of dark energy by fluid mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, Carl H.

    2011-11-01

    The 2011 Nobel Prize in Physics has been awarded for the discovery from observations of increased supernovae dimness interpreted as distance, so that the Universe expansion rate has changed from a rate decreasing since the big bang to one that is now increasing, driven by anti-gravity forces of a mysterious dark energy material comprising 70% of the Universe mass-energy. Fluid mechanical considerations falsify both the accelerating expansion and dark energy concepts. Kinematic viscosity is neglected in current stan- dard models of self-gravitational structure formation, which rely on cold dark matter CDM condensations and clusterings that are also falsified by fluid mechanics. Weakly collisional CDM particles do not condense but diffuse away. Photon viscosity predicts su- perclustervoid fragmentation early in the plasma epoch and protogalaxies at the end. At the plasma-gas transition, the plasma fragments into Earth-mass gas planets in trillion planet clumps (proto-globular-star-cluster PGCs). The hydrogen planets freeze to form the dark matter of galaxies and merge to form their stars. Dark energy is a systematic dimming error for Supernovae Ia caused by dark matter planets near hot white dwarf stars at the Chandrasekhar carbon limit. Evaporated planet atmospheres may or may not scatter light from the events depending on the line of sight.

  2. Perturbation theory in electron diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakken, L. N.; Marthinsen, K.; Hoeier, R.

    1992-12-01

    The Bloch-wave approach is used for discussing multiple inelastic electron scattering and higher-order perturbation theory in inelastic high-energy electron diffraction. In contrast to previous work, the present work describes three-dimensional diffraction so that higher-order Laue zone (HOLZ) effects are incorporated. Absorption is included and eigenvalues and eigenvectors are calculated from a structure matrix with the inclusion of an absorptive potential. Centrosymmetric as well as non-centrosymmetric crystal structures are allowed. An iteration method with a defined generalized propagation function for solving the inelastic coupling equations is described. It is shown that a similar iteration method with the same propagation function can be used for obtaining higher-order perturbation terms for the wave-function when a perturbation is added to the crystal potential. Finally, perturbation theory by matrix calculations when a general perturbation is added to the structure matrix is considered.

  3. Condensate dark matter stars

    SciTech Connect

    Li, X.Y.; Harko, T.; Cheng, K.S. E-mail: harko@hkucc.hku.hk

    2012-06-01

    We investigate the structure and stability properties of compact astrophysical objects that may be formed from the Bose-Einstein condensation of dark matter. Once the critical temperature of a boson gas is less than the critical temperature, a Bose-Einstein Condensation process can always take place during the cosmic history of the universe. Therefore we model the dark matter inside the star as a Bose-Einstein condensate. In the condensate dark matter star model, the dark matter equation of state can be described by a polytropic equation of state, with polytropic index equal to one. We derive the basic general relativistic equations describing the equilibrium structure of the condensate dark matter star with spherically symmetric static geometry. The structure equations of the condensate dark matter stars are studied numerically. The critical mass and radius of the dark matter star are given by M{sub crit} ≈ 2(l{sub a}/1fm){sup 1/2}(m{sub χ}/1 GeV){sup −3/2}M{sub s}un and R{sub crit} ≈ 1.1 × 10{sup 6}(l{sub a}/1 fm){sup 1/2}(m{sub χ}/1 GeV){sup −3/2} cm respectively, where l{sub a} and m{sub χ} are the scattering length and the mass of dark matter particle, respectively.

  4. Working the Dark Edges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weston, Anthony

    2014-01-01

    Environmentalism's wider and wilder possibilities today appear as regions of seeming darkness that bracket or frame acceptable environmental thinking. One of these barely-mentionable darknesses is outer space--the cosmos. Another is the inner and chthonic powers of the land and natural beings generally. This essay aims to bring these two kinds of…

  5. Dark Energy, or Worse

    ScienceCinema

    Professor Sean Carroll

    2016-07-12

    General relativity is inconsistent with cosmological observations unless we invoke components of dark matter and dark energy that dominate the universe. While it seems likely that these exotic substances really do exist, the alternative is worth considering: that Einstein's general relativity breaks down on cosmological scales. I will discuss models of modified gravity, tests in the solar system and elsewhere, and consequences for cosmology.

  6. Dark matter and dark energy: The critical questions

    SciTech Connect

    Michael S. Turner

    2002-11-19

    Stars account for only about 0.5% of the content of the Universe; the bulk of the Universe is optically dark. The dark side of the Universe is comprised of: at least 0.1% light neutrinos; 3.5% {+-} 1% baryons; 29% {+-} 4% cold dark matter; and 66% {+-} 6% dark energy. Now that we have characterized the dark side of the Universe, the challenge is to understand it. The critical questions are: (1) What form do the dark baryons take? (2) What is (are) the constituent(s) of the cold dark matter? (3) What is the nature of the mysterious dark energy that is causing the Universe to speed up.

  7. Stealth Dark Matter: Model, lattice calculations, and constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaich, David; Lattice Strong Dynamics Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    A new strongly coupled dark sector can produce a well-motivated and phenomenologically interesting composite dark matter candidate. I will review a model recently proposed by the Lattice Strong Dynamics Collaboration in which the composite dark matter is naturally ``stealthy'': Although its constituents are charged the composite particle itself is electroweak neutral with vanishing magnetic moment and charge radius. This results in an extraordinarily small direct detection cross section dominated by the dimension-7 electromagnetic polarizability interaction. I will present direct detection constraints on the model that rely on our non-perturbative lattice calculations of the polarizability, as well as complementary constraints from collider experiments. Collider bounds require the stealth dark matter mass to be m > 300 GeV, while its cross section for spin-independent scattering with xenon is smaller than the coherent neutrino scattering background for m > 700 GeV.

  8. Cold dark matter halos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubinski, John Joseph

    The dark halos arising in the Cold Dark Matter (CDM) cosmology are simulated to investigate the relationship between the structure and kinematics of dark halos and galaxies. Realistic cosmological initial conditions and tidal field boundary conditions are used in N-body simulations of the collapse of density peaks to form dark halos. The core radii of dark halos are no greater than the softening radius, rs = 1.4 kpc. The density profiles can be fit with an analytical Hernquist (1990) profile with an effective power law which varies between -1 in the center to -4 at large radii. The rotation curves of dark halos resemble the flat rotation curves of spiral galaxies in the observed range, 1.5 approximately less than r approximately less than 30 kpc. The halos are strongly triaxial and very flat with (c/a) = 0.50 and (b/a) = 0.71. The distribution of ellipticities for dark halos reaches a maximum at epsilon = 0.5 in contrast to the distribution for elliptical galaxies which peaks at epsilon = 0.2 suggesting that ellipticals are much rounder than dark halos. Dark halos are generally flatter than their progenitor density peaks. The final shape and orientation of a dark halo are largely determined by tidal torquing and are sensitive to changes in the strength and orientation of a tidal field. Dark halos are pressure supported objects with negligible rotational support as indicated by the mean dimensionless spin, lamda = 0.042 +/- 0.024. The angular momentum vector tends to align with the true minor axis of dark halos. Elliptical galaxies have a similar behavior implied by the observation of the tendency for alignment of the rotation vector and the apparent minor axis. The origin of this behavior may be traced to the tendency for tidal torques to misalign with the major axis of a density peak. Tidal torques are found to isotropize the velocity ellipsoids of dark halos at large radii, contrary to the expectation of radially anisotropic velocity ellipsoids in cold collapse

  9. Holographic vortices in the presence of dark matter sector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogatko, Marek; Wysokinski, Karol I.

    2015-12-01

    The dark matter seem to be an inevitable ingredient of the total matter configuration in the Universe and the knowledge how the dark matter affects the properties of superconductors is of vital importance for the experiments aimed at its direct detection. The homogeneous magnetic field acting perpendicularly to the surface of (2+1) dimensional s-wave holographic superconductor in the theory with dark matter sector has been modeled by the additional U(1)-gauge field representing dark matter and coupled to the Maxwell one. As expected the free energy for the vortex configuration turns out to be negative. Importantly its value is lower in the presence of dark matter sector. This feature can explain why in the Early Universe first the web of dark matter appeared and next on these gratings the ordinary matter forming cluster of galaxies has formed.

  10. Essential building blocks of dark energy

    SciTech Connect

    Gleyzes, Jerome; Vernizzi, Filippo; Langlois, David; Piazza, Federico E-mail: langlois@apc.univ-paris7.fr E-mail: filippo.vernizzi@cea.fr

    2013-08-01

    We propose a minimal description of single field dark energy/modified gravity within the effective field theory formalism for cosmological perturbations, which encompasses most existing models. We start from a generic Lagrangian given as an arbitrary function of the lapse and of the extrinsic and intrinsic curvature tensors of the time hypersurfaces in unitary gauge, i.e. choosing as time slicing the uniform scalar field hypersurfaces. Focusing on linear perturbations, we identify seven Lagrangian operators that lead to equations of motion containing at most two (space or time) derivatives, the background evolution being determined by the time-dependent coefficients of only three of these operators. We then establish a dictionary that translates any existing or future model whose Lagrangian can be written in the above form into our parametrized framework. As an illustration, we study Horndeski's — or generalized Galileon — theories and show that they can be described, up to linear order, by only six of the seven operators mentioned above. This implies, remarkably, that the dynamics of linear perturbations can be more general than that of Horndeski while remaining second order. Finally, in order to make the link with observations, we provide the entire set of linear perturbation equations in Newtonian gauge, the effective Newton constant in the quasi-static approximation and the ratio of the two gravitational potentials, in terms of the time-dependent coefficients of our Lagrangian.

  11. Disformal transformation of cosmological perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minamitsuji, Masato

    2014-10-01

    We investigate the gauge-invariant cosmological perturbations in the gravity and matter frames in the general scalar-tensor theory where two frames are related by the disformal transformation. The gravity and matter frames are the extensions of the Einstein and Jordan frames in the scalar-tensor theory where two frames are related by the conformal transformation, respectively. First, it is shown that the curvature perturbation in the comoving gauge to the scalar field is disformally invariant as well as conformally invariant, which gives the predictions from the cosmological model where the scalar field is responsible both for inflation and cosmological perturbations. Second, in case that the disformally coupled matter sector also contributes to curvature perturbations, we derive the evolution equations of the curvature perturbation in the uniform matter energy density gauge from the energy (non)conservation in the matter sector, which are independent of the choice of the gravity sector. While in the matter frame the curvature perturbation in the uniform matter energy density gauge is conserved on superhorizon scales for the vanishing nonadiabatic pressure, in the gravity frame it is not conserved even if the nonadiabatic pressure vanishes. The formula relating two frames gives the amplitude of the curvature perturbation in the matter frame, once it is evaluated in the gravity frame.

  12. Light Dark Matter from Forbidden Channels.

    PubMed

    D'Agnolo, Raffaele Tito; Ruderman, Joshua T

    2015-08-01

    Dark matter (DM) may be a thermal relic that annihilates into heavier states in the early universe. This forbidden DM framework accommodates a wide range of DM masses from keV to weak scales. An exponential hierarchy between the DM mass and the weak scale follows from the exponential suppression of the thermally averaged cross section. Stringent constraints from the cosmic microwave background are evaded because annihilations turn off at late times. We provide an example where DM annihilates into dark photons, which is testable through large DM self-interactions and direct detection.

  13. SFT non-locality in cosmology: solutions, perturbations and observational evidences

    SciTech Connect

    Koshelev, Alexey S.

    2010-06-23

    In this note cosmological models coming out of the String Field Theory (SFT) in application to the Dark Energy are reviewed. A way of solution construction in case of linear models is outlined, cosmological perturbations and observational evidences of such models are explored.

  14. SFT non-locality in cosmology: solutions, perturbations and observational evidences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koshelev, Alexey S.

    2010-06-01

    In this note cosmological models coming out of the String Field Theory (SFT) in application to the Dark Energy are reviewed. A way of solution construction in case of linear models is outlined, cosmological perturbations and observational evidences of such models are explored.

  15. Unified model of k-inflation, dark matter, and dark energy

    SciTech Connect

    Bose, Nilok; Majumdar, A. S.

    2009-11-15

    We present a k-essence model where a single scalar field is responsible for the early expansion of the Universe through the process of k inflation and at appropriate subsequent stages acts both as dark matter and dark energy. The Lagrangian contains a potential for the scalar field as well as a noncanonical kinetic term, and is of the form F(X)V({phi}) which has been widely used as a k-essence Lagrangian. After the period of inflation is over the model can be approximated as purely kinetic k essence, generating dark matter and dark energy at late times. We show how observational results are used to put constraints on the parameters of this model.

  16. Exothermic dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, Peter W.; Saraswat, Prashant; Harnik, Roni; Rajendran, Surjeet

    2010-09-15

    We propose a novel mechanism for dark matter to explain the observed annual modulation signal at DAMA/LIBRA which avoids existing constraints from every other dark matter direct detection experiment including CRESST, CDMS, and XENON10. The dark matter consists of at least two light states with mass {approx}few GeV and splittings {approx}5 keV. It is natural for the heavier states to be cosmologically long-lived and to make up an O(1) fraction of the dark matter. Direct detection rates are dominated by the exothermic reactions in which an excited dark matter state downscatters off of a nucleus, becoming a lower energy state. In contrast to (endothermic) inelastic dark matter, the most sensitive experiments for exothermic dark matter are those with light nuclei and low threshold energies. Interestingly, this model can also naturally account for the observed low-energy events at CoGeNT. The only significant constraint on the model arises from the DAMA/LIBRA unmodulated spectrum but it can be tested in the near future by a low-threshold analysis of CDMS-Si and possibly other experiments including CRESST, COUPP, and XENON100.

  17. Supernovae and Dark Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domínguez, I.; Bravo, E.; Piersanti, L.; Straniero, O.; Tornambé, A.

    2009-08-01

    A decade ago the observations of thermonuclear supernovae at high-redhifts showed that the expansion rate of the Universe is accelerating and since then, the evidence for cosmic acceleration has gotten stronger. This acceleration requires that the Universe is dominated by dark energy, an exotic component characterized by its negative pressure. Nowadays all the available astronomical data (i.e. thermonuclear supernovae, cosmic microwave background, barionic acoustic oscillations, large scale structure, etc.) agree that our Universe is made of about 70% of dark energy, 25% of cold dark matter and only 5% of known, familiar matter. This Universe is geometrically flat, older than previously thought, its destiny is no longer linked to its geometry but to dark energy, and we ignore about 95% of its components. To understand the nature of dark energy is probably the most fundamental problem in physics today. Current astronomical observations are compatible with dark energy being the vacuum energy. Supernovae have played a fundamental role in modern Cosmology and it is expected that they will contribute to unveil the dark energy. In order to do that it is mandatory to understand the limits of supernovae as cosmological distance indicators, improving their precision by a factor 10.

  18. Contributions to cosmic reionization from dark matter annihilation and decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hongwan; Slatyer, Tracy R.; Zavala, Jesús

    2016-09-01

    Dark matter annihilation or decay could have a significant impact on the ionization and thermal history of the universe. In this paper, we study the potential contribution of dark matter annihilation (s -wave- or p -wave-dominated) or decay to cosmic reionization, via the production of electrons, positrons and photons. We map out the possible perturbations to the ionization and thermal histories of the universe due to dark matter processes, over a broad range of velocity-averaged annihilation cross sections/decay lifetimes and dark matter masses. We have employed recent numerical studies of the efficiency with which annihilation/decay products induce heating and ionization in the intergalactic medium, and in this work extended them down to a redshift of 1 +z =4 for two different reionization scenarios. We also improve on earlier studies by using the results of detailed structure formation models of dark matter haloes and subhaloes that are consistent with up-to-date N -body simulations, with estimates on the uncertainties that originate from the smallest scales. We find that for dark matter models that are consistent with experimental constraints, a contribution of more than 10% to the ionization fraction at reionization is disallowed for all annihilation scenarios. Such a contribution is possible only for decays into electron/positron pairs, for light dark matter with mass mχ≲100 MeV , and a decay lifetime τχ˜1 024- 1 025 s .

  19. Self-scattering for Dark Matter with an excited state

    SciTech Connect

    Schutz, Katelin; Slatyer, Tracy R. E-mail: tslatyer@mit.edu

    2015-01-01

    Self-interacting dark matter scenarios have recently attracted much attention, as a possible means to alleviate the tension between N-body simulations and observations of the dark matter distribution on galactic and sub-galactic scales. The presence of internal structure for the dark matter—for example, a nearly-degenerate state in the spectrum that could decay, or be collisionally excited or de-excited—has also been proposed as a possible means to address these discrepancies. Such internal structure can be a source of interesting signatures in direct and indirect dark matter searches, for example providing a novel explanation for the 3.5 keV line recently observed in galaxies and galaxy clusters. We analyze a simple model of dark matter self-scattering including a nearly-degenerate excited state, and develop an accurate analytic approximation for the elastic and inelastic s-wave cross sections, which is valid outside the perturbative regime provided the particle velocity is sufficiently low (this condition is also required for the s-wave to dominate over higher partial waves). We anticipate our results will be useful in incorporating inelastic self-scattering into N-body simulations, in order to study the quantitative impact of nearly-degenerate states in the dark matter spectrum on galactic structure and dynamics, and in computing the indirect signatures of multi-state dark matter.

  20. Inflation, dark matter, and dark energy in the string landscape.

    PubMed

    Liddle, Andrew R; Ureña-López, L Arturo

    2006-10-20

    We consider the conditions needed to unify the description of dark matter, dark energy, and inflation in the context of the string landscape. We find that incomplete decay of the inflaton field gives the possibility that a single field is responsible for all three phenomena. By contrast, unifying dark matter and dark energy into a single field, separate from the inflaton, appears rather difficult.

  1. Shedding light on baryonic dark matter.

    PubMed

    Silk, J

    1991-02-01

    Halo dark matter, if it is baryonic, may plausibly consist of compact stellar remnants. Jeans mass clouds containing 10(6) to 10(8) solar masses could have efficiently formed stars in the early universe and could plausibly have generated, for a suitably top-heavy stellar initial mass function, a high abundance of neutron stars as well as a small admixture of long-lived low mass stars. Within the resulting clusters of dark remnants, which eventually are tidally disrupted when halos eventually form, captures of neutron stars by non-degenerate stars resulted in formation of close binaries. These evolve to produce, by the present epoch, an observable x-ray signal associated with dark matter aggregations in galaxy halos and galaxy cluster cores.

  2. Can sterile neutrinos be the dark matter?

    PubMed

    Seljak, Uros; Makarov, Alexey; McDonald, Patrick; Trac, Hy

    2006-11-10

    We use the Ly-alpha forest power spectrum measured by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and high-resolution spectroscopy observations in combination with cosmic microwave background and galaxy clustering constraints to place limits on a sterile neutrino as a dark matter candidate in the warm dark matter scenario. Such a neutrino would be created in the early Universe through mixing with an active neutrino and would suppress structure on scales smaller than its free-streaming scale. We ran a series of high-resolution hydrodynamic simulations with varying neutrino masses to describe the effect of a sterile neutrino on the Ly-alpha forest power spectrum. We find that the mass limit is m(s) >13 keV at 95% C.L. (9 keV at 99.9%), which is above the upper limit allowed by x-ray constraints, excluding this candidate from being all of the dark matter in this model. PMID:17155611

  3. Shedding light on baryonic dark matter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silk, Joseph

    1991-01-01

    Halo dark matter, if it is baryonic, may plausibly consist of compact stellar remnants. Jeans mass clouds containing 10 to the 6th to 10 to the 8th solar masses could have efficiently formed stars in the early universe and could plausibly have generated, for a suitably top-heavy stellar initial mass function, a high abundance of neutron stars as well as a small admixture of long-lived low mass stars. Within the resulting clusters of dark remnants, which eventually are tidally disrupted when halos eventually form, captures of neutron stars by nondegenerate stars resulted in formation of close binaries. These evolve to produce, by the present epoch, an observable X-ray signal associated with dark matter aggregations in galaxy cluster cores.

  4. Sources and distributions of dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Sikivie, P. |

    1995-12-31

    In the first section, the author tries to convey a sense of the variety of observational inputs that tell about the existence and the spatial distribution of dark matter in the universe. In the second section, he briefly reviews the four main dark matter candidates, taking note of each candidate`s status in the world of particle physics, its production in the early universe, its effect upon large scale structure formation and the means by which it may be detected. Section 3 concerns the energy spectrum of (cold) dark matter particles on earth as may be observed some day in a direct detection experiment. It is a brief account of work done in collaboration with J. Ipser and, more recently, with I. Tkachev and Y. Wang.

  5. Cold dark matter: Controversies on small scales

    PubMed Central

    Weinberg, David H.; Bullock, James S.; Governato, Fabio; Kuzio de Naray, Rachel; Peter, Annika H. G.

    2015-01-01

    The cold dark matter (CDM) cosmological model has been remarkably successful in explaining cosmic structure over an enormous span of redshift, but it has faced persistent challenges from observations that probe the innermost regions of dark matter halos and the properties of the Milky Way’s dwarf galaxy satellites. We review the current observational and theoretical status of these “small-scale controversies.” Cosmological simulations that incorporate only gravity and collisionless CDM predict halos with abundant substructure and central densities that are too high to match constraints from galaxy dynamics. The solution could lie in baryonic physics: Recent numerical simulations and analytical models suggest that gravitational potential fluctuations tied to efficient supernova feedback can flatten the central cusps of halos in massive galaxies, and a combination of feedback and low star formation efficiency could explain why most of the dark matter subhalos orbiting the Milky Way do not host visible galaxies. However, it is not clear that this solution can work in the lowest mass galaxies, where discrepancies are observed. Alternatively, the small-scale conflicts could be evidence of more complex physics in the dark sector itself. For example, elastic scattering from strong dark matter self-interactions can alter predicted halo mass profiles, leading to good agreement with observations across a wide range of galaxy mass. Gravitational lensing and dynamical perturbations of tidal streams in the stellar halo provide evidence for an abundant population of low-mass subhalos in accord with CDM predictions. These observational approaches will get more powerful over the next few years. PMID:25646464

  6. Cold dark matter: Controversies on small scales.

    PubMed

    Weinberg, David H; Bullock, James S; Governato, Fabio; Kuzio de Naray, Rachel; Peter, Annika H G

    2015-10-01

    The cold dark matter (CDM) cosmological model has been remarkably successful in explaining cosmic structure over an enormous span of redshift, but it has faced persistent challenges from observations that probe the innermost regions of dark matter halos and the properties of the Milky Way's dwarf galaxy satellites. We review the current observational and theoretical status of these "small-scale controversies." Cosmological simulations that incorporate only gravity and collisionless CDM predict halos with abundant substructure and central densities that are too high to match constraints from galaxy dynamics. The solution could lie in baryonic physics: Recent numerical simulations and analytical models suggest that gravitational potential fluctuations tied to efficient supernova feedback can flatten the central cusps of halos in massive galaxies, and a combination of feedback and low star formation efficiency could explain why most of the dark matter subhalos orbiting the Milky Way do not host visible galaxies. However, it is not clear that this solution can work in the lowest mass galaxies, where discrepancies are observed. Alternatively, the small-scale conflicts could be evidence of more complex physics in the dark sector itself. For example, elastic scattering from strong dark matter self-interactions can alter predicted halo mass profiles, leading to good agreement with observations across a wide range of galaxy mass. Gravitational lensing and dynamical perturbations of tidal streams in the stellar halo provide evidence for an abundant population of low-mass subhalos in accord with CDM predictions. These observational approaches will get more powerful over the next few years.

  7. Cold dark matter: Controversies on small scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinberg, David H.; Bullock, James S.; Governato, Fabio; Kuzio de Naray, Rachel; Peter, Annika H. G.

    2015-10-01

    The cold dark matter (CDM) cosmological model has been remarkably successful in explaining cosmic structure over an enormous span of redshift, but it has faced persistent challenges from observations that probe the innermost regions of dark matter halos and the properties of the Milky Way's dwarf galaxy satellites. We review the current observational and theoretical status of these "small-scale controversies." Cosmological simulations that incorporate only gravity and collisionless CDM predict halos with abundant substructure and central densities that are too high to match constraints from galaxy dynamics. The solution could lie in baryonic physics: Recent numerical simulations and analytical models suggest that gravitational potential fluctuations tied to efficient supernova feedback can flatten the central cusps of halos in massive galaxies, and a combination of feedback and low star formation efficiency could explain why most of the dark matter subhalos orbiting the Milky Way do not host visible galaxies. However, it is not clear that this solution can work in the lowest mass galaxies, where discrepancies are observed. Alternatively, the small-scale conflicts could be evidence of more complex physics in the dark sector itself. For example, elastic scattering from strong dark matter self-interactions can alter predicted halo mass profiles, leading to good agreement with observations across a wide range of galaxy mass. Gravitational lensing and dynamical perturbations of tidal streams in the stellar halo provide evidence for an abundant population of low-mass subhalos in accord with CDM predictions. These observational approaches will get more powerful over the next few years.

  8. Cold dark matter: Controversies on small scales.

    PubMed

    Weinberg, David H; Bullock, James S; Governato, Fabio; Kuzio de Naray, Rachel; Peter, Annika H G

    2015-10-01

    The cold dark matter (CDM) cosmological model has been remarkably successful in explaining cosmic structure over an enormous span of redshift, but it has faced persistent challenges from observations that probe the innermost regions of dark matter halos and the properties of the Milky Way's dwarf galaxy satellites. We review the current observational and theoretical status of these "small-scale controversies." Cosmological simulations that incorporate only gravity and collisionless CDM predict halos with abundant substructure and central densities that are too high to match constraints from galaxy dynamics. The solution could lie in baryonic physics: Recent numerical simulations and analytical models suggest that gravitational potential fluctuations tied to efficient supernova feedback can flatten the central cusps of halos in massive galaxies, and a combination of feedback and low star formation efficiency could explain why most of the dark matter subhalos orbiting the Milky Way do not host visible galaxies. However, it is not clear that this solution can work in the lowest mass galaxies, where discrepancies are observed. Alternatively, the small-scale conflicts could be evidence of more complex physics in the dark sector itself. For example, elastic scattering from strong dark matter self-interactions can alter predicted halo mass profiles, leading to good agreement with observations across a wide range of galaxy mass. Gravitational lensing and dynamical perturbations of tidal streams in the stellar halo provide evidence for an abundant population of low-mass subhalos in accord with CDM predictions. These observational approaches will get more powerful over the next few years. PMID:25646464

  9. Time arrow is influenced by the dark energy.

    PubMed

    Allahverdyan, A E; Gurzadyan, V G

    2016-05-01

    The arrow of time and the accelerated expansion are two fundamental empirical facts of the universe. We advance the viewpoint that the dark energy (positive cosmological constant) accelerating the expansion of the universe also supports the time asymmetry. It is related to the decay of metastable states under generic perturbations, as we show on example of a microcanonical ensemble. These states will not be metastable without dark energy. The latter also ensures a hyperbolic motion leading to dynamic entropy production with the rate determined by the cosmological constant. PMID:27300848

  10. Disformal couplings and the dark sector of the universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van de Bruck, C.; Morrice, J.

    2015-04-01

    Interactions between dark matter and dark energy, allowing both conformal and and disformal couplings, are studied in detail. We discuss the background evolution, anisotropies in the cosmic microwave background and large scale structures. One of our main findings is that a large conformal coupling is not necessarily disallowed in the presence of a general disformal term. On the other hand, we find that negative disformal couplings very often lead to instabilities in the scalar field. Studying the background evolution and linear perturbations only, our results show that it is observationally challenging to disentangle disformal from purely conformal couplings.

  11. The phenomenological approach to modeling the dark energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunz, Martin

    2012-07-01

    In this mini-review we discuss first why we should investigate cosmological models beyond ΛCDM. We then show how to describe dark energy or modified gravity models in a fluid language with the help of one background and two perturbation quantities. We review a range of dark energy models and study how they fit into the phenomenological framework, including generalizations like phantom crossing, sound speeds different from c and non-zero anisotropic stress, and how these effective quantities are linked to the underlying physical models. We also discuss the limits of what can be measured with cosmological data, and some challenges for the framework.

  12. Standard model Higgs boson-inflaton and dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, T. E.; Liu Boyang; Love, S. T.; Veldhuis, T. ter

    2009-10-01

    The standard model Higgs boson can serve as the inflaton field of slow roll inflationary models provided it exhibits a large nonminimal coupling with the gravitational scalar curvature. The Higgs boson self interactions and its couplings with a standard model singlet scalar serving as the source of dark matter are then subject to cosmological constraints. These bounds, which can be more stringent than those arising from vacuum stability and perturbative triviality alone, still allow values for the Higgs boson mass which should be accessible at the LHC. As the Higgs boson coupling to the dark matter strengthens, lower values of the Higgs boson mass consistent with the cosmological data are allowed.

  13. Relativistic perturbations in ΛCDM: Eulerian and Lagrangian approaches

    SciTech Connect

    Villa, Eleonora; Rampf, Cornelius E-mail: cornelius.rampf@port.ac.uk

    2016-01-01

    We study the relativistic dynamics of a pressure-less and irrotational fluid of dark matter (CDM) with a cosmological constant (Λ), up to second order in cosmological perturbation theory. In our analysis we also account for vector and tensor perturbations and include primordial non-Gaussianity. We consider three gauges: the synchronous-comoving gauge, the Poisson gauge and the total matter gauge, where the first is the unique relativistic Lagrangian frame of reference, and the latters are convenient gauge choices for Eulerian frames. Our starting point is the metric and fluid variables in the Poisson gauge up to second order. We then perform the gauge transformations to the synchronous-comoving gauge and subsequently to the total matter gauge. Our expressions for the metrics, densities, velocities, and the gauge generators are novel and coincide with known results in the limit of a vanishing cosmological constant.

  14. Non-scale-invariant density perturbations from chaotic extended inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Mollerach, S. ); Matarrese, S. )

    1992-03-15

    Chaotic inflation is analyzed in the frame of scalar-tensor theories of gravity. Fluctuations in the energy density arise from quantum fluctuations of the Brans-Dicke field and of the inflaton field. The spectrum of perturbations is studied for a class of models: it is non-scale-invariant and, for certain values of the parameters, it has a peak. If the peak appears at astrophysically interesting scales it may help to reconcile the cold-dark-matter scenario for structure formation with large-scale observations.

  15. Non scale-invariant density perturbations from chaotic extended inflation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mollerach, Silvia; Matarrese, Sabino

    1991-01-01

    Chaotic inflation is analyzed in the frame of scalar-tensor theories of gravity. Fluctuations in the energy density arise from quantum fluctuations of the Brans-Dicke field and of the inflation field. The spectrum of perturbations is studied for a class of models: it is non scale-invarient and, for certain values of the parameters, it has a peak. If the peak appears at astrophysically interesting scales, it may help to reconcile the Cold Dark Matter scenario for structure formation with large scale observations.

  16. Ghost dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Furukawa, Tomonori; Yokoyama, Shuichiro; Ichiki, Kiyotomo; Sugiyama, Naoshi; Mukohyama, Shinji E-mail: shu@a.phys.nagoya-u.ac.jp E-mail: naoshi@a.phys.nagoya-u.ac.jp

    2010-05-01

    We revisit ghost dark matter, the possibility that ghost condensation may serve as an alternative to dark matter. In particular, we investigate the Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (FRW) background evolution and the large-scale structure (LSS) in the ΛGDM universe, i.e. a late-time universe dominated by a cosmological constant and ghost dark matter. The FRW background of the ΛGDM universe is indistinguishable from that of the standard ΛCDM universe if M∼>1eV, where M is the scale of spontaneous Lorentz breaking. From the LSS we find a stronger bound: M∼>10eV. For smaller M, ghost dark matter would have non-negligible sound speed after the matter-radiation equality, and thus the matter power spectrum would significantly differ from observation. These bounds are compatible with the phenomenological upper bound M∼<100GeV known in the literature.

  17. RECONSTRUCTING COSMOLOGICAL MATTER PERTURBATIONS USING STANDARD CANDLES AND RULERS

    SciTech Connect

    Alam, Ujjaini; Sahni, Varun; Starobinsky, Alexei A. E-mail: varun@iucaa.ernet.i

    2009-10-20

    For a large class of dark energy (DE) models, for which the effective gravitational constant is a constant and there is no direct exchange of energy between DE and dark matter (DM), knowledge of the expansion history suffices to reconstruct the growth factor of linearized density perturbations in the non-relativistic matter component on scales much smaller than the Hubble distance. In this paper, we develop a non-parametric method for extracting information about the perturbative growth factor from data pertaining to the luminosity or angular size distances. A comparison of the reconstructed density contrast with observations of large-scale structure and gravitational lensing can help distinguish DE models such as the cosmological constant and quintessence from models based on modified gravity theories as well as models in which DE and DM are either unified or interact directly. We show that for current supernovae (SNe) data, the linear growth factor at z = 0.3 can be constrained to 5% and the linear growth rate to 6%. With future SNe data, such as expected from the Joint Dark Energy Mission, we may be able to constrain the growth factor to 2%-3% and the growth rate to 3%-4% at z = 0.3 with this unbiased, model-independent reconstruction method. For future baryon acoustic oscillation data which would deliver measurements of both the angular diameter distance and the Hubble parameter, it should be possible to constrain the growth factor at z = 2.5%-9%. These constraints grow tighter with the errors on the data sets. With a large quantity of data expected in the next few years, this method can emerge as a competitive tool for distinguishing between different models of dark energy.

  18. Reconstructing cosmological matter perturbations using standard candles and rulers

    SciTech Connect

    Alam, Ujjaini; Sahni, Varun; Starobinsky, Alexei A

    2008-01-01

    For a large class of dark energy (DE) models, for which the effective gravitational constant is a constant and there is no direct exchange of energy between DE and dark matter (DM), knowledge of the expansion history suffices to reconstruct the growth factor of linearized density perturbations in the non-relativistic matter component on scales much smaller than the Hubble distance. In this paper, we develop a non-parametric method for extracting information about the perturbative growth factor from data pertaining to the luminosity or angular size distances. A comparison of the reconstructed density contrast with observations of large-scale structure and gravitational lensing can help distinguish DE models such as the cosmological constant and quintessence from models based on modified gravity theories as well as models in which DE and DM are either unified or interact directly. We show that for current supernovae (SNe) data, the linear growth factor at z = 0.3 can be constrained to 5% and the linear growth rate to 6%. With future SNe data, such as expected from the Joint Dark Energy Mission, we may be able to constrain the growth factor to 2%-3% and the growth rate to 3%-4% at z = 0.3 with this unbiased, model-independent reconstruction method. For future baryon acoustic oscillation data which would deliver measurements of both the angular diameter distance and the Hubble parameter, it should be possible to constrain the growth factor at z = 2.5%-9%. These constraints grow tighter with the errors on the data sets. With a large quantity of data expected in the next few years, this method can emerge as a competitive tool for distinguishing between different models of dark energy.

  19. Cosmic Radiation Fields: Sources in the early Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raue, Martin; Kneiske, Tanja; Horns, Dieter; Elsaesser, Dominik; Hauschildt, Peter

    The workshop "Cosmic Radiation Fields - Sources in the Early Universe" (CRF 2010) focuses on the connection between the extragalactic infrared background and sources in the early universe, in particular stars powered by dark matter burning (Dark Stars; DS). The workshop covers the following topics: the cosmic infrared background, formation of early stars, dark stars, effect of dark matter in the early universe, dark matter halos, primordial star formation rate, and reionization. Further information can be found on the conference webpage: http://www.desy.de/crf2010/. Organizing committee: Tanja Kneiske, Martin Raue, Dominik Elsaesser, Alexander Gewering-Peine, Peter Hausschildt, Dieter Horns, and Andreas Maurer.

  20. Elastically Decoupling Dark Matter.

    PubMed

    Kuflik, Eric; Perelstein, Maxim; Lorier, Nicolas Rey-Le; Tsai, Yu-Dai

    2016-06-01

    We present a novel dark matter candidate, an elastically decoupling relic, which is a cold thermal relic whose present abundance is determined by the cross section of its elastic scattering on standard model particles. The dark matter candidate is predicted to have a mass ranging from a few to a few hundred MeV, and an elastic scattering cross section with electrons, photons and/or neutrinos in the 10^{-3}-1  fb range. PMID:27314712

  1. Elastically Decoupling Dark Matter.

    PubMed

    Kuflik, Eric; Perelstein, Maxim; Lorier, Nicolas Rey-Le; Tsai, Yu-Dai

    2016-06-01

    We present a novel dark matter candidate, an elastically decoupling relic, which is a cold thermal relic whose present abundance is determined by the cross section of its elastic scattering on standard model particles. The dark matter candidate is predicted to have a mass ranging from a few to a few hundred MeV, and an elastic scattering cross section with electrons, photons and/or neutrinos in the 10^{-3}-1  fb range.

  2. Dark Matter Effective Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Nobile, Eugenio; Sannino, Francesco

    2012-05-01

    We organize the effective (self-)interaction terms for complex scalar dark matter candidates which are either an isosinglet, isodoublet or an isotriplet with respect to the weak interactions. The classification has been performed ordering the operators in inverse powers of the dark matter (DM) cutoff scale. We assume Lorentz invariance, color and charge neutrality. We also introduce potentially interesting DM induced flavor-changing operators. Our general framework allows for model independent investigations of DM properties.

  3. Compensated isocurvature perturbations and the cosmic microwave background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grin, Daniel; Doré, Olivier; Kamionkowski, Marc

    2011-12-01

    Measurements of cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropies constrain isocurvature fluctuations between photons and nonrelativistic particles to be subdominant to adiabatic fluctuations. Perturbations in the relative number densities of baryons and dark matter, however, are surprisingly poorly constrained. In fact, baryon-density perturbations of fairly large amplitude may exist if they are compensated by dark-matter perturbations, so that the total density remains unchanged. These compensated isocurvature perturbations (CIPs) leave no imprint on the CMB at observable scales, at linear order. B modes in the CMB polarization are generated at reionization through the modulation of the optical depth by CIPs, but this induced polarization is small. The strongest known constraint ≲10% to the CIP amplitude comes from galaxy-cluster baryon fractions. Here, it is shown that modulation of the baryon density by CIPs at and before the decoupling of Thomson scattering at z˜1100 gives rise to CMB effects several orders of magnitude larger than those considered before. Polarization B modes are induced, as are correlations between temperature/polarization spherical-harmonic coefficients of different lm. It is shown that the CIP field at the surface of last scatter can be measured with these off-diagonal correlations. The sensitivity of ongoing and future experiments to these fluctuations is estimated. Data from the WMAP, ACT, SPT, and Spider experiments will be sensitive to fluctuations with amplitude ˜5-10%. The Planck satellite and Polarbear experiment will be sensitive to fluctuations with amplitude ˜3%. SPTPol, ACTPol, and future space-based polarization methods will probe amplitudes as low as ˜0.4%-0.6%. In the cosmic-variance limit, the smallest CIPs that could be detected with the CMB are of amplitude ˜0.05%.

  4. GUTzilla dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harigaya, Keisuke; Lin, Tongyan; Lou, Hou Keong

    2016-09-01

    Motivated by gauge coupling unification and dark matter, we present an extension to the Standard Model where both are achieved by adding an extra new matter multiplet. Such considerations lead to a Grand Unified Theory with very heavy WIMPzilla dark matter, which has mass greater than ˜ 107 GeV and must be produced before reheating ends. Naturally, we refer to this scenario as GUTzilla dark matter. Here we present a minimal GUTzilla model, adding a vector-like quark multiplet to the Standard Model. Proton decay constraints require the new multiplet to be both color and electroweak charged, which prompts us to include a new confining SU(3) gauge group that binds the multiplet into a neutral composite dark matter candidate. Current direct detection constraints are evaded due to the large dark matter mass; meanwhile, next-generation direct detection and proton decay experiments will probe much of the parameter space. The relic abundance is strongly dependent on the dynamics of the hidden confining sector, and we show that dark matter production during the epoch of reheating can give the right abundance.

  5. Symmetryless dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kajiyama, Yuji; Kannike, Kristjan; Raidal, Martti

    2012-02-01

    It is appealing to stabilize dark matter by the same discrete non-Abelian symmetry that is used to explain the structure of quark and lepton mass matrices. However, to generate exact tribimaximal neutrino mixing at tree level, the non-Abelian flavor symmetry must necessarily be broken by vacuum expectation values of flavon scalars, rendering dark matter unstable. We study singlet, doublet, and triplet SU(2) multiplets of both scalar and fermion dark matter candidates and enumerate the conditions under which no d<6 dark matter decay operators are generated even in the case if the flavor symmetry is broken to nothing. We show that under the assumptions that the flavor group is fully broken and that the dark matter decay operators are suppressed only by a high scale, the vacuum expectation values of flavon scalars transforming as higher multiplets (e.g., triplets) of the flavor group must be at the electroweak scale. The most economical way for that is to use standard model Higgs boson(s) as flavons. Such models can be tested by the LHC experiments. This scenario requires the existence of additional Froggatt-Nielsen scalars that generate hierarchies in Yukawa couplings. We study the conditions under which large and small flavor breaking parameters can coexist without destabilizing the dark matter.

  6. Dark-matter QCD-axion searches.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, Leslie J

    2015-10-01

    In the late 20th century, cosmology became a precision science. Now, at the beginning of the next century, the parameters describing how our universe evolved from the Big Bang are generally known to a few percent. One key parameter is the total mass density of the universe. Normal matter constitutes only a small fraction of the total mass density. Observations suggest this additional mass, the dark matter, is cold (that is, moving nonrelativistically in the early universe) and interacts feebly if at all with normal matter and radiation. There's no known such elementary particle, so the strong presumption is the dark matter consists of particle relics of a new kind left over from the Big Bang. One of the most important questions in science is the nature of this dark matter. One attractive particle dark-matter candidate is the axion. The axion is a hypothetical elementary particle arising in a simple and elegant extension to the standard model of particle physics that nulls otherwise observable CP-violating effects (where CP is the product of charge reversal C and parity inversion P) in quantum chromo dynamics (QCD). A light axion of mass 10(-(6-3)) eV (the invisible axion) would couple extraordinarily weakly to normal matter and radiation and would therefore be extremely difficult to detect in the laboratory. However, such an axion is a compelling dark-matter candidate and is therefore a target of a number of searches. Compared with other particle dark-matter candidates, the plausible range of axion dark-matter couplings and masses is narrowly constrained. This focused search range allows for definitive searches, where a nonobservation would seriously impugn the dark-matter QCD-axion hypothesis. Axion searches use a wide range of technologies, and the experiment sensitivities are now reaching likely dark-matter axion couplings and masses. This article is a selective overview of the current generation of sensitive axion searches. Not all techniques and experiments

  7. Dark-matter QCD-axion searches.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, Leslie J

    2015-10-01

    In the late 20th century, cosmology became a precision science. Now, at the beginning of the next century, the parameters describing how our universe evolved from the Big Bang are generally known to a few percent. One key parameter is the total mass density of the universe. Normal matter constitutes only a small fraction of the total mass density. Observations suggest this additional mass, the dark matter, is cold (that is, moving nonrelativistically in the early universe) and interacts feebly if at all with normal matter and radiation. There's no known such elementary particle, so the strong presumption is the dark matter consists of particle relics of a new kind left over from the Big Bang. One of the most important questions in science is the nature of this dark matter. One attractive particle dark-matter candidate is the axion. The axion is a hypothetical elementary particle arising in a simple and elegant extension to the standard model of particle physics that nulls otherwise observable CP-violating effects (where CP is the product of charge reversal C and parity inversion P) in quantum chromo dynamics (QCD). A light axion of mass 10(-(6-3)) eV (the invisible axion) would couple extraordinarily weakly to normal matter and radiation and would therefore be extremely difficult to detect in the laboratory. However, such an axion is a compelling dark-matter candidate and is therefore a target of a number of searches. Compared with other particle dark-matter candidates, the plausible range of axion dark-matter couplings and masses is narrowly constrained. This focused search range allows for definitive searches, where a nonobservation would seriously impugn the dark-matter QCD-axion hypothesis. Axion searches use a wide range of technologies, and the experiment sensitivities are now reaching likely dark-matter axion couplings and masses. This article is a selective overview of the current generation of sensitive axion searches. Not all techniques and experiments

  8. Dark-matter QCD-axion searches

    PubMed Central

    Rosenberg, Leslie J

    2015-01-01

    In the late 20th century, cosmology became a precision science. Now, at the beginning of the next century, the parameters describing how our universe evolved from the Big Bang are generally known to a few percent. One key parameter is the total mass density of the universe. Normal matter constitutes only a small fraction of the total mass density. Observations suggest this additional mass, the dark matter, is cold (that is, moving nonrelativistically in the early universe) and interacts feebly if at all with normal matter and radiation. There’s no known such elementary particle, so the strong presumption is the dark matter consists of particle relics of a new kind left over from the Big Bang. One of the most important questions in science is the nature of this dark matter. One attractive particle dark-matter candidate is the axion. The axion is a hypothetical elementary particle arising in a simple and elegant extension to the standard model of particle physics that nulls otherwise observable CP-violating effects (where CP is the product of charge reversal C and parity inversion P) in quantum chromo dynamics (QCD). A light axion of mass 10−(6–3) eV (the invisible axion) would couple extraordinarily weakly to normal matter and radiation and would therefore be extremely difficult to detect in the laboratory. However, such an axion is a compelling dark-matter candidate and is therefore a target of a number of searches. Compared with other particle dark-matter candidates, the plausible range of axion dark-matter couplings and masses is narrowly constrained. This focused search range allows for definitive searches, where a nonobservation would seriously impugn the dark-matter QCD-axion hypothesis. Axion searches use a wide range of technologies, and the experiment sensitivities are now reaching likely dark-matter axion couplings and masses. This article is a selective overview of the current generation of sensitive axion searches. Not all techniques and

  9. Instability of Interacting Ghost Dark Energy Model in an Anisotropic Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azimi, N.; Barati, F.

    2016-07-01

    A new dark energy model called "ghost dark energy" was recently suggested to explain the observed accelerating expansion of the universe. This model originates from the Veneziano ghost of QCD. The dark energy density is proportional to Hubble parameter, ρ Λ = α H, where α is a constant of order {Λ }3_{QCD} and Λ Q C D ˜ 100 M e V is QCD mass scale. In this paper, we investigate about the stability of generalized QCD ghost dark energy model against perturbations in the anisotropic background. At first, the ghost dark energy model of the universe with spatial BI model with/without the interaction between dark matter and dark energy is discussed. In particular, the equation of state and the deceleration parameters and a differential equation governing the evolution of this dark energy model are obtained. Then, we use the squared sound speed {vs2} the sign of which determines the stability of the model. We explore the stability of this model in the presence/absence of interaction between dark energy and dark matter in both flat and non-isotropic geometry. In conclusion, we find evidence that the ghost dark energy might can not lead to a stable universe favored by observations at the present time in BI universe.

  10. Production of scalar and tensor perturbations in inflationary models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, Michael S.

    1993-10-01

    Scalar (density) and tensor (gravity-wave) perturbations provide the basis for the fundamental observable consequences of inflation, including CBR anisotropy and the formation of structure in the Universe. These perturbations are nearly scale invariant (Harrison-Zel'dovich spectrum), though a slight deviation from scale invariance (``tilt'') can have significant consequences for both CBR anisotropy and structure formation. In particular, a slightly tilted spectrum of scalar perturbations may improve the agreement of the cold dark matter scenario with the observational data. The amplitude and spectrum of the scalar and tensor perturbations depend upon the shape of the inflationary potential in the small interval where the scalar field responsible for inflation was between about 46 and 54 e-folds before the end of inflation. By expanding the inflationary potential in a Taylor series over this interval we show that the amplitudes of the perturbations and the power-law slopes of their spectra can be expressed in terms of the value of the potential 50 e-folds before the end of inflation, V50, its steepness x50≡mPlV'50/V50, and the rate of change of its steepness, x'50 (a prime denotes a derivative with respect to the scalar field). In addition, the power-law index of the cosmic-scale factor at this time is q50≡[dlnR/dlnt]50~=16π/x250. (Formally, our results for the perturbation amplitudes and spectral indices are accurate to lowest order in the deviation from scale invariance.) In general, the deviation from scale invariance is such to enhance fluctuations on large scales, and is only significant for steep potentials, large x50, or potentials with rapidly changing steepness, large x'50. In the latter case, only the spectrum of scalar perturbations is significantly tilted. Steep potentials are characterized by a large tensor-mode contribution to the quadrupole CBR temperature anisotropy, a similar tilt in both scalar and tensor perturbations, and a slower expansion

  11. Nonthermal dark matter from cosmic strings

    SciTech Connect

    Cui Yanou; Morrissey, David E.

    2009-04-15

    Cosmic strings can be created in the early universe during symmetry-breaking phase transitions, such as might arise if the gauge structure of the standard model is extended by additional U(1) factors at high energies. Cosmic strings presented in the early universe form a network of long horizon-length segments, as well as a population of closed string loops. The closed loops are unstable against decay, and can be a source of nonthermal particle production. In this work we compute the density of weakly-interacting massive particle dark matter formed by the decay of gauge theory cosmic string loops derived from a network of long strings in the scaling regime or under the influence of frictional forces. We find that for symmetry-breaking scales larger than 10{sup 10} GeV, this mechanism has the potential to account for the observed relic density of dark matter. For symmetry-breaking scales lower than this, the density of dark matter created by loop decays from a scaling string network lies below the observed value. In particular, the cosmic strings originating from a U(1) gauge symmetry broken near the electroweak scale, that could lead to a massive Z{sup '} gauge boson observable at the LHC, produces a negligibly small dark matter relic density by this mechanism.

  12. Base case and perturbation scenarios

    SciTech Connect

    Edmunds, T

    1998-10-01

    This report describes fourteen energy factors that could affect electricity markets in the future (demand, process, source mix, etc.). These fourteen factors are believed to have the most influence on the State's energy environment. A base case, or most probable, characterization is given for each of these fourteen factors over a twenty year time horizon. The base case characterization is derived from quantitative and qualitative information provided by State of California government agencies, where possible. Federal government databases are nsed where needed to supplement the California data. It is envisioned that a initial selection of issue areas will be based upon an evaluation of them under base case conditions. For most of the fourteen factors, the report identities possible perturbations from base case values or assumptions that may be used to construct additional scenarios. Only those perturbations that are plausible and would have a significant effect on energy markets are included in the table. The fourteen factors and potential perturbations of the factors are listed in Table 1.1. These perturbations can be combined to generate internally consist.ent. combinations of perturbations relative to the base case. For example, a low natural gas price perturbation should be combined with a high natural gas demand perturbation. The factor perturbations are based upon alternative quantitative forecasts provided by other institutions (the Department of Energy - Energy Information Administration in some cases), changes in assumptions that drive the quantitative forecasts, or changes in assumptions about the structure of the California energy markets. The perturbations are intended to be used for a qualitative reexamination of issue areas after an initial evaluation under the base case. The perturbation information would be used as a "tiebreaker;" to make decisions regarding those issue areas that were marginally accepted or rejected under the base case. Hf a

  13. Identification of perturbation modes and controversies in ekpyrotic perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Jai-Chan; Noh, Hyerim

    2002-10-01

    If the linear perturbation theory is valid through the bounce, the surviving fluctuations from the ekpyrotic scenario (cyclic one as well) should have very blue spectra with suppressed amplitude for the scalar-type structure. We derive the same (and consistent) result using the curvature perturbation in the uniform-field (comoving) gauge and in the zero-shear gauge. Previously, Khoury et al. interpreted results from the latter gauge condition incorrectly and claimed the scale-invariant spectrum, thus generating controversy in the literature. We also correct similar errors in the literature based on wrong mode identification and joining condition. No joining condition is needed for the derivation.

  14. Relation between the standard perturbation theory and regularized multi-point propagator method

    SciTech Connect

    Sugiyama, Naonori S.; Futamase, Toshifumi

    2013-06-01

    We investigate the relation between the regularized multi-propagator method, called 'Reg PT', and the standard perturbation theory. Reg PT is one of the most successful models to describe nonlinear evolution of dark matter fluctuations. However, Reg PT is a mathematically unproven interpolation formula between the large-scale solution calculated by the standard perturbation theory and the limiting solution in the small scale calculated by the multi-point propagator method. In this paper, we give an alternative explanation for Reg PT in the context of the standard perturbation theory, showing that Reg PT does not ever have more effective information on nonlinear matter evolution than the standard perturbation theory. In other words, the solutions of the standard perturbation theory reproduce the results of N-body simulations better than those of Reg PT, especially at the high-k region. This fact means that the standard perturbation theory at the two-loop level is still one of the best predictions of the nonlinear power spectrum to date. Nevertheless, the standard perturbation theory has not been preferred because of the divergent behavior of the solution at small scales. To solve this problem, we also propose a modified standard perturbation theory which avoids the divergence.

  15. Signatures of Majorana dark matter with t-channel mediators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garny, Mathias; Ibarra, Alejandro; Vogl, Stefan

    2015-04-01

    Three main strategies are being pursued to search for nongravitational dark matter signals: direct detection, indirect detection and collider searches. Interestingly, experiments have reached sensitivities in these three search strategies which may allow detection in the near future. In order to take full benefit of the wealth of experimental data, and in order to confirm a possible dark matter signal, it is necessary to specify the nature of the dark matter particle and of the mediator to the Standard Model. In this paper, we focus on a simplified model where the dark matter particle is a Majorana fermion that couples to a light Standard Model fermion via a Yukawa coupling with a scalar mediator. We review the observational signatures of this model and we discuss the complementarity among the various search strategies, with emphasis in the well motivated scenario where the dark matter particles are produced in the early universe via thermal freeze-out.

  16. Jet Perturbation by HE target

    SciTech Connect

    Poulsen, P; Kuklo, R M

    2001-03-01

    We have previously reported the degree of attenuation and perturbation by a Cu jet passing through Comp B explosive. Similar tests have now been performed with high explosive (HE) targets having CJ pressures higher than and lower than the CJ pressure of Comp B. The explosives were LX-14 and TNT, respectively. We found that the measured exit velocity of the jet where it transitions from perturbed to solid did not vary significantly as a function of HE type for each HE thickness. The radial momentum imparted to the perturbed jet segment did vary as a function of HE type, however, and we report the radial spreading of the jet and the penetration of a downstream target as a function of HE type and thickness.

  17. Levitating dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Kaloper, Nemanja; Padilla, Antonio E-mail: antonio.padilla@nottingham.ac.uk

    2009-10-01

    A sizable fraction of the total energy density of the universe may be in heavy particles with a net dark U(1)' charge comparable to its mass. When the charges have the same sign the cancellation between their gravitational and gauge forces may lead to a mismatch between different measures of masses in the universe. Measuring galactic masses by orbits of normal matter, such as galaxy rotation curves or lensing, will give the total mass, while the flows of dark matter agglomerates may yield smaller values if the gauge repulsion is not accounted for. If distant galaxies which house light beacons like SNe Ia contain such dark particles, the observations of their cosmic recession may mistake the weaker forces for an extra 'antigravity', and infer an effective dark energy equation of state smaller than the real one. In some cases, including that of a cosmological constant, these effects can mimic w < −1. They can also lead to a local variation of galaxy-galaxy forces, yielding a larger 'Hubble Flow' in those regions of space that could be taken for a dynamical dark energy, or superhorizon effects.

  18. Levitating dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaloper, Nemanja; Padilla, Antonio

    2009-10-01

    A sizable fraction of the total energy density of the universe may be in heavy particles with a net dark U(1)' charge comparable to its mass. When the charges have the same sign the cancellation between their gravitational and gauge forces may lead to a mismatch between different measures of masses in the universe. Measuring galactic masses by orbits of normal matter, such as galaxy rotation curves or lensing, will give the total mass, while the flows of dark matter agglomerates may yield smaller values if the gauge repulsion is not accounted for. If distant galaxies which house light beacons like SNe Ia contain such dark particles, the observations of their cosmic recession may mistake the weaker forces for an extra `antigravity', and infer an effective dark energy equation of state smaller than the real one. In some cases, including that of a cosmological constant, these effects can mimic w < -1. They can also lead to a local variation of galaxy-galaxy forces, yielding a larger `Hubble Flow' in those regions of space that could be taken for a dynamical dark energy, or superhorizon effects.

  19. MAMA Dark Monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Wei

    2010-09-01

    This proposal monitors the behavior of the dark current in each of the MAMA detectors, to look for evidence of change in the dark rate, indicative of detector problems developing.The basic monitor takes two 1300s TIME-TAG darks bi-weekly with each detector. The pairs of exposures for each detector are linked so that they are taken at opposite ends of the same SAA free interval. This pairing of exposures will make it easier to separate long and short term temporal variability from temperature dependent changes.For both detectors, additional blocks of exposures are taken once a year. These are groups of three 1314 s TIME-TAG darks for each of the MAMA detectors, distributed over a single SAA free interval. This will give more information on the brightness of the FUV MAMA dark current as a function of the amount of time that the HV has been on, and for the NUV MAMA will give a better measure of the short term temperature dependence.

  20. MAMA Dark Monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, Colin

    2011-10-01

    This proposal monitors the behavior of the dark current in each of the MAMA detectors, to look for evidence of change in the dark rate, indicative of detector problems developing.The basic monitor takes two 1300s TIME-TAG darks bi-weekly with each detector. The pairs of exposures for each detector are linked so that they are taken at opposite ends of the same SAA free interval. This pairing of exposures will make it easier to separate long and short term temporal variability from temperature dependent changes.For both detectors, additional blocks of exposures are taken once a year. These are groups of three 1314 s TIME-TAG darks for each of the MAMA detectors, distributed over a single SAA free interval. This will give more information on the brightness of the FUV MAMA dark current as a function of the amount of time that the HV has been on, and for the NUV MAMA will give a better measure of the short term temperature dependence.

  1. Perturbation theory in thermosphere dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayr, H. G.; Volland, H.

    1976-01-01

    It is shown that density and pressure throughout the thermosphere can be adequately described in a logarithmic expansion that provides a sound basis for the application of perturbation theory. This expansion eliminates most of the important nonlinearities associated with density variations. On the basis of this expansion, the validity of perturbation theory can be extended to cover a large variety of atmospheric conditions in which the relative temperature amplitude is less than 0.5 and wind velocities are significantly less than the speed of sound.

  2. Matter density perturbation and power spectrum in running vacuum model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Chao-Qiang; Lee, Chung-Chi

    2016-10-01

    We investigate the matter density perturbation δm and power spectrum P(k) in the running vacuum model (RVM) with the cosmological constant being a function of the Hubble parameter, given by Λ = Λ0 + 6σHH0 + 3νH2, in which the linear and quadratic terms of H would originate from the QCD vacuum condensation and cosmological renormalization group, respectively. Taking the dark energy perturbation into consideration, we derive the evolution equation for δm and find a specific scale dcr = 2π/kcr, which divides the evolution of the universe into the sub and super-interaction regimes, corresponding to k ≪ kcr and k ≫ kcr, respectively. For the former, the evolution of δm has the same behavior as that in the ΛCDM model, while for the latter, the growth of δm is frozen (greatly enhanced) when ν + σ > ( < )0 due to the couplings between radiation, matter and dark energy. It is clear that the observational data rule out the cases with ν < 0 and ν + σ < 0, while the allowed window for the model parameters is extremely narrow with ν , |σ | ≲ {O}(10^{-7}).

  3. Axion dark matter searches

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Stern, Ian P.

    2014-01-01

    We report nearly all astrophysical and cosmological data point convincingly to a large component of cold dark matter in the Universe. The axion particle, first theorized as a solution to the strong charge-parity problem of quantum chromodynamics, has been established as a prominent CDM candidate. Cosmic observation and particle physics experiments have bracketed the unknown mass of the axion between approximately a μeV and a meV. The Axion Dark Matter eXperiement (ADMX) has successfully completed searches between 1.9 and 3.7 μeV down to the KSVZ photon-coupling limit. ADMX and the Axion Dark Matter eXperiement High-Frequency (ADMX-HF) will search for axionsmore » at weaker coupling and/or higher frequencies within the next few years. Status of the experiments, current research and development, and projected mass-coupling exclusion limits are presented.« less

  4. Asymmetric twin Dark Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Farina, Marco

    2015-11-09

    We study a natural implementation of Asymmetric Dark Matter in Twin Higgs models. The mirroring of the Standard Model strong sector suggests that a twin baryon with mass around 5 GeV is a natural Dark Matter candidate once a twin baryon number asymmetry comparable to the SM asymmetry is generated. We explore twin baryon Dark Matter in two different scenarios, one with minimal content in the twin sector and one with a complete copy of the SM, including a light twin photon. The essential requirements for successful thermal history are presented, and in doing so we address some of the cosmological issues common to many Twin Higgs models. The required interactions we introduce predict signatures at direct detection experiments and at the LHC.

  5. Big Questions: Dark Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Lincoln, Don

    2013-12-05

    Carl Sagan's oft-quoted statement that there are "billions and billions" of stars in the cosmos gives an idea of just how much "stuff" is in the universe. However scientists now think that in addition to the type of matter with which we are familiar, there is another kind of matter out there. This new kind of matter is called "dark matter" and there seems to be five times as much as ordinary matter. Dark matter interacts only with gravity, thus light simply zips right by it. Scientists are searching through their data, trying to prove that the dark matter idea is real. Fermilab's Dr. Don Lincoln tells us why we think this seemingly-crazy idea might not be so crazy after all.

  6. Big Questions: Dark Matter

    ScienceCinema

    Lincoln, Don

    2016-07-12

    Carl Sagan's oft-quoted statement that there are "billions and billions" of stars in the cosmos gives an idea of just how much "stuff" is in the universe. However scientists now think that in addition to the type of matter with which we are familiar, there is another kind of matter out there. This new kind of matter is called "dark matter" and there seems to be five times as much as ordinary matter. Dark matter interacts only with gravity, thus light simply zips right by it. Scientists are searching through their data, trying to prove that the dark matter idea is real. Fermilab's Dr. Don Lincoln tells us why we think this seemingly-crazy idea might not be so crazy after all.

  7. Asymmetric twin Dark Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Farina, Marco

    2015-11-01

    We study a natural implementation of Asymmetric Dark Matter in Twin Higgs models. The mirroring of the Standard Model strong sector suggests that a twin baryon with mass around 5 GeV is a natural Dark Matter candidate once a twin baryon number asymmetry comparable to the SM asymmetry is generated. We explore twin baryon Dark Matter in two different scenarios, one with minimal content in the twin sector and one with a complete copy of the SM, including a light twin photon. The essential requirements for successful thermal history are presented, and in doing so we address some of the cosmological issues common to many Twin Higgs models. The required interactions we introduce predict signatures at direct detection experiments and at the LHC.

  8. Axion dark matter searches

    SciTech Connect

    Stern, Ian P.; Collaboration: ADMX Collaboration; ADMX-HF Collaboration

    2014-06-24

    Nearly all astrophysical and cosmological data point convincingly to a large component of cold dark matter in the Universe. The axion particle, first theorized as a solution to the strong charge-parity problem of quantum chromodynamics, has been established as a prominent CDM candidate. Cosmic observation and particle physics experiments have bracketed the unknown mass of the axion between approximately a μeV and a meV. The Axion Dark Matter eXperiement (ADMX) has successfully completed searches between 1.9 and 3.7 μeV down to the KSVZ photon-coupling limit. ADMX and the Axion Dark Matter eXperiement High-Frequency (ADMX-HF) will search for axions at weaker coupling and/or higher frequencies within the next few years. Status of the experiments, current research and development, and projected mass-coupling exclusion limits are presented.

  9. Dark matter possibilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Orvin

    2015-04-01

    In my research I observe signals that penetrate dense matter and I hypothesize that they are due to waves in dark matter. Since they readily penetrate thick matter I hypothesize that they are due to small dark matter particles instead of the usual hypothesized Wimps. For example I observed signals that penetrate my local hill at near 77 m/s. In addition the solar cycle appears to be due to to dark matter oscillating in the sun producing standing waves that have to due with planet placement and stability of the solar system. Dozens of experiments, over the past 20 years, confirm the penetrating waves. Examples of the experiments are presented on my website darkmatterwaves.com and US patent number 8,669,917 B1.

  10. Dark Energy. What the ...?

    SciTech Connect

    Wechsler, Risa

    2007-10-30

    What is the Universe made of? This question has been asked as long as humans have been questioning, and astronomers and physicists are finally converging on an answer. The picture which has emerged from numerous complementary observations over the past decade is a surprising one: most of the matter in the Universe isn't visible, and most of the Universe isn't even made of matter. In this talk, I will explain what the rest of this stuff, known as 'Dark Energy' is, how it is related to the so-called 'Dark Matter', how it impacts the evolution of the Universe, and how we can study the dark universe using observations of light from current and future telescopes.

  11. Axion dark matter searches

    SciTech Connect

    Stern, Ian P.

    2014-01-01

    We report nearly all astrophysical and cosmological data point convincingly to a large component of cold dark matter in the Universe. The axion particle, first theorized as a solution to the strong charge-parity problem of quantum chromodynamics, has been established as a prominent CDM candidate. Cosmic observation and particle physics experiments have bracketed the unknown mass of the axion between approximately a μeV and a meV. The Axion Dark Matter eXperiement (ADMX) has successfully completed searches between 1.9 and 3.7 μeV down to the KSVZ photon-coupling limit. ADMX and the Axion Dark Matter eXperiement High-Frequency (ADMX-HF) will search for axions at weaker coupling and/or higher frequencies within the next few years. Status of the experiments, current research and development, and projected mass-coupling exclusion limits are presented.

  12. Dark-Skies Awareness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Constance E.

    2009-05-01

    The arc of the Milky Way seen from a truly dark location is part of our planet's natural heritage. More than one fifth of the world population, two thirds of the United States population and one half of the European Union population have already lost naked eye visibility of the Milky Way. This loss, caused by light pollution, is a serious and growing issue that impacts astronomical research, the economy, ecology, energy conservation, human health, public safety and our shared ability to see the night sky. For this reason, "Dark Skies” is a cornerstone project of the International Year of Astronomy. Its goal is to raise public awareness of the impact of artificial lighting on local environments by getting people worldwide involved in a variety of programs that: 1. Teach about dark skies using new technology (e.g., an activity-based planetarium show on DVD, podcasting, social networking on Facebook and MySpace, a Second Life presence) 2. Provide thematic events on light pollution at star parties and observatory open houses (Dark Skies Discovery Sites, Nights in the (National) Parks, Sidewalk Astronomy) 3. Organize events in the arts (e.g., a photography contest) 4. Involve citizen-scientists in naked-eye and digital-meter star hunting programs (e.g., GLOBE at Night, "How Many Stars?", the Great World Wide Star Count and the radio frequency interference equivalent: "Quiet Skies") and 5. Raise awareness about the link between light pollution and public health, economic issues, ecological consequences, energy conservation, safety and security, and astronomy (e.g., The Starlight Initiative, World Night in Defense of Starlight, International Dark Sky Week, International Dark-Sky Communities, Earth Hour, The Great Switch Out, a traveling exhibit, downloadable posters and brochures). The presentation will provide an update, describe how people can become involved and take a look ahead at the program's sustainability. For more information, visit www.darkskiesawareness.org.

  13. Growth of Cosmic Structure: Probing Dark Energy Beyond Expansion

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Huterer, Dragan; Kirkby, David; Bean, Rachel; Connolly, Andrew; Dawson, Kyle; Dodelson, Scott; Evrard, August; Jain, Bhuvnesh; Jarvis, Michael; Linder, Eric; et al

    2014-03-15

    The quantity and quality of cosmic structure observations have greatly accelerated in recent years, and further leaps forward will be facilitated by imminent projects. These will enable us to map the evolution of dark and baryonic matter density fluctuations over cosmic history. The way that these fluctuations vary over space and time is sensitive to several pieces of fundamental physics: the primordial perturbations generated by GUT-scale physics; neutrino masses and interactions; the nature of dark matter and dark energy. We focus on the last of these here: the ways that combining probes of growth with those of the cosmic expansionmore » such as distance-redshift relations will pin down the mechanism driving the acceleration of the Universe.« less

  14. Nonrelativistic approach for cosmological scalar field dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ureña-López, L. Arturo

    2014-07-01

    We derive nonrelativistic equations of motion for the formation of cosmological structure in a scalar field dark matter (SFDM) model corresponding to a complex scalar field endowed with a quadratic scalar potential. Starting with the equations of motion written in the Newtonian gauge of scalar perturbations, we separate out the involved fields into relativistic and nonrelativistic parts and find the equations of motion for the latter that can be used to build up the full solution. One important assumption will be that the SFDM field is in the regime of fast oscillations, under which its behavior in the homogeneous regime is exactly that of cold dark matter. The resultant equations are quite similar to the Schrödinger-Poisson system of Newtonian boson stars plus relativistic leftovers, and they can be used to study the formation of cosmological structure in SFDM models, and others alike, to ultimately prove their viability as complete dark matter models.

  15. Growth of Cosmic Structure: Probing Dark Energy Beyond Expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Huterer, Dragan; Kirkby, David; Bean, Rachel; Connolly, Andrew; Dawson, Kyle; Dodelson, Scott; Evrard, August; Jain, Bhuvnesh; Jarvis, Michael; Linder, Eric; Mandelbaum, Rachel; May, Morgan; Raccanelli, Alvise; Reid, Beth; Rozo, Eduardo; Schmidt, Fabian; Sehgal, Neelima; Slosar, Anze; Van Engelen, Alex; Wu, Hao-Yi; Zhao, Gongbo

    2014-03-15

    The quantity and quality of cosmic structure observations have greatly accelerated in recent years, and further leaps forward will be facilitated by imminent projects. These will enable us to map the evolution of dark and baryonic matter density fluctuations over cosmic history. The way that these fluctuations vary over space and time is sensitive to several pieces of fundamental physics: the primordial perturbations generated by GUT-scale physics; neutrino masses and interactions; the nature of dark matter and dark energy. We focus on the last of these here: the ways that combining probes of growth with those of the cosmic expansion such as distance-redshift relations will pin down the mechanism driving the acceleration of the Universe.

  16. The scalar singlet-triplet dark matter model

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, O.; Van der Bij, J.J. E-mail: vdbij@physik.uni-freiburg.de

    2014-01-01

    We consider a model for cold dark matter, which combines a real scalar singlet and a real scalar SU(2){sub L} triplet field, both of which are residing in the odd representation of a global Z{sub 2} symmetry. The parameter space of the model is constrained by the inferred dark matter abundance from the WMAP and Planck data, the most recent results from the direct dark matter search experiment LUX, the Z boson decay width from LEP-I and perturbativity of the coupling parameters. The phenomenology of the remaining parameter space is studied. We find that the model allows for DM masses near the electroweak scale and a variety of decay scenarios.

  17. Breit-Wigner Enhancement of Dark Matter Annihilation

    SciTech Connect

    Ibe, Masahiro; Murayama, Hitoshi; Yanagida, T.T.; /Tokyo U. /Tokyo U., IPMU

    2009-06-19

    We point out that annihilation of dark matter in the galactic halo can be enhanced relative to that in the early universe due to a Breit-Wigner tail, if the dark matter annihilates through a pole just below the threshold. This provides a new explanation to the 'boost factor' which is suggested by the recent data of the PAMELA, ATIC and PPB-BETS cosmic-ray experiments.

  18. Signatures of Horndeski gravity on the dark matter bispectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellini, Emilio; Jimenez, Raul; Verde, Licia

    2015-05-01

    We present a detailed study of second-order matter perturbations for the general Horndeski class of models. Being the most general scalar-tensor theory having second-order equations of motion, it includes many known gravity and dark energy theories and General Relativity with a cosmological constant as a specific case. This enables us to estimate the leading order dark matter bispectrum generated at late-times by gravitational instability. We parametrize the evolution of the first and second-order equations of motion as proposed by Bellini and Sawicki (2014), where the free functions of the theory are assumed to be proportional to the dark energy density. We show that it is unnatural to have large gtrsim 10% (gtrsim 1%) deviations of the bispectrum introducing even larger ~ 30% (~ 5%) deviations in the linear growth rate. Considering that measurements of the linear growth rate have much higher signal-to-noise than bispectrum measurements, this indicates that for Horndeski models which reproduce the expansion history and the linear growth rate as predicted by GR the dark matter bispectrum kernel can be effectively modelled as the standard GR one. On the other hand, an observation of a large bispectrum deviation that can not be explained in terms of bias would imply either that the evolution of perturbations is strongly different than the evolution predicted by GR or that the theory of gravity is exotic (e.g., breaks the weak equivalence principle) and/or fine-tuned.

  19. Big Mysteries: Dark Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Lincoln, Don

    2014-04-15

    Scientists were shocked in 1998 when the expansion of the universe wasn't slowing down as expected by our best understanding of gravity at the time; the expansion was speeding up! That observation is just mind blowing, and yet it is true. In order to explain the data, physicists had to resurrect an abandoned idea of Einstein's now called dark energy. In this video, Fermilab's Dr. Don Lincoln tells us a little about the observations that led to the hypothesis of dark energy and what is the status of current research on the subject.

  20. Big Mysteries: Dark Energy

    ScienceCinema

    Lincoln, Don

    2016-07-12

    Scientists were shocked in 1998 when the expansion of the universe wasn't slowing down as expected by our best understanding of gravity at the time; the expansion was speeding up! That observation is just mind blowing, and yet it is true. In order to explain the data, physicists had to resurrect an abandoned idea of Einstein's now called dark energy. In this video, Fermilab's Dr. Don Lincoln tells us a little about the observations that led to the hypothesis of dark energy and what is the status of current research on the subject.

  1. Dark Energy and The Dark Matter Relic Abundance

    SciTech Connect

    Rosati, Francesca

    2004-11-17

    Two mechanisms by which the quintessence scalar could enhance the relic abundance of dark matter particles are discussed. These effects can have an impact on supersymmetric candidates for dark matter.

  2. Disformal invariance of curvature perturbation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motohashi, Hayato; White, Jonathan

    2016-02-01

    We show that under a general disformal transformation the linear comoving curvature perturbation is not identically invariant, but is invariant on superhorizon scales for any theory that is disformally related to Horndeski's theory. The difference between disformally related curvature perturbations is found to be given in terms of the comoving density perturbation associated with a single canonical scalar field. In General Relativity it is well-known that this quantity vanishes on superhorizon scales through the Poisson equation that is obtained on combining the Hamiltonian and momentum constraints, and we confirm that a similar result holds for any theory that is disformally related to Horndeski's scalar-tensor theory so long as the invertibility condition for the disformal transformation is satisfied. We also consider the curvature perturbation at full nonlinear order in the unitary gauge, and find that it is invariant under a general disformal transformation if we assume that an attractor regime has been reached. Finally, we also discuss the counting of degrees of freedom in theories disformally related to Horndeski's.

  3. VHS Movies: Perturbations for Morphogenesis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holmes, Danny L.

    This paper discusses the concept of a family system in terms of an interactive system of interrelated, interdependent parts and suggests that VHS movies can act as perturbations, i.e., change promoting agents, for certain dysfunctional family systems. Several distinct characteristics of a family system are defined with particular emphasis on…

  4. Adaptation Strategies in Perturbed /s/

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brunner, Jana; Hoole, Phil; Perrier, Pascal

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to investigate the role of three articulatory parameters (tongue position, jaw position and tongue grooving) in the production of /s/. Six normal speakers' speech was perturbed by a palatal prosthesis. The fricative was recorded acoustically and through electromagnetic articulography in four conditions: (1) unperturbed,…

  5. Basics of QCD perturbation theory

    SciTech Connect

    Soper, D.E.

    1997-06-01

    This is an introduction to the use of QCD perturbation theory, emphasizing generic features of the theory that enable one to separate short-time and long-time effects. The author also covers some important classes of applications: electron-positron annihilation to hadrons, deeply inelastic scattering, and hard processes in hadron-hadron collisions. 31 refs., 38 figs.

  6. Seven topics in perturbative QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Buras, A.J.

    1980-09-01

    The following topics of perturbative QCD are discussed: (1) deep inelastic scattering; (2) higher order corrections to e/sup +/e/sup -/ annihilation, to photon structure functions and to quarkonia decays; (3) higher order corrections to fragmentation functions and to various semi-inclusive processes; (4) higher twist contributions; (5) exclusive processes; (6) transverse momentum effects; (7) jet and photon physics.

  7. PERTURBATION APPROACH FOR QUANTUM COMPUTATION

    SciTech Connect

    G. P. BERMAN; D. I. KAMENEV; V. I. TSIFRINOVICH

    2001-04-01

    We discuss how to simulate errors in the implementation of simple quantum logic operations in a nuclear spin quantum computer with many qubits, using radio-frequency pulses. We verify our perturbation approach using the exact solutions for relatively small (L = 10) number of qubits.

  8. Models for SIMP dark matter and dark photon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyun Min; Seo, Min-Seok

    2016-06-01

    We give a review on the SIMP paradigm and discuss a consistent model for SIMP dark mesons in the context of a dark QCD with flavor symmetry. The Z'-portal interaction is introduced being compatible with stable dark mesons and is responsible for making the SIMP dark mesons remain in kinetic equilibrium with the SM during the freeze-out process. The SIMP parameter space of the Z' gauge boson can be probed by future collider and direct detection experiments.

  9. Dark energy and dark matter from primordial QGP

    SciTech Connect

    Vaidya, Vaishali Upadhyaya, G. K.

    2015-07-31

    Coloured relics servived after hadronization might have given birth to dark matter and dark energy. Theoretical ideas to solve mystery of cosmic acceleration, its origin and its status with reference to recent past are of much interest and are being proposed by many workers. In the present paper, we present a critical review of work done to understand the earliest appearance of dark matter and dark energy in the scenario of primordial quark gluon plasma (QGP) phase after Big Bang.

  10. Isocurvature constraints and anharmonic effects on QCD axion dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, Takeshi; Kurematsu, Ryosuke; Takahashi, Fuminobu E-mail: rkurematsu@tuhep.phys.tohoku.ac.jp

    2013-09-01

    We revisit the isocurvature density perturbations induced by quantum fluctuations of the axion field by extending a recently developed analytic method and approximations to a time-dependent scalar potential, which enables us to follow the evolution of the axion until it starts to oscillate. We find that, as the initial misalignment angle approaches the hilltop of the potential, the isocurvature perturbations become significantly enhanced, while the non-Gaussianity parameter increases slowly but surely. As a result, the isocurvature constraint on the inflation scale is tightened as H{sub inf}∼dark matter window. We also derive useful formulae for the power spectrum and non-Gaussianity of the isocurvature perturbations.

  11. Lyman-α forest constraints on decaying dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Mei-Yu; Croft, Rupert A. C.; Peter, Annika H. G.; Zentner, Andrew R.; Purcell, Chris W.

    2013-12-01

    We present an analysis of high-resolution N-body simulations of decaying dark matter cosmologies focusing on the statistical properties of the transmitted Lyman-α (Lyα) forest flux in the high-redshift intergalactic medium (IGM). In this type of model a dark matter particle decays into a slightly less massive stable dark matter daughter particle and a comparably light particle. The small mass splitting provides a nonrelativistic kick velocity Vk=cΔM/M to the daughter particle resulting in free-streaming and subsequent damping of small-scale density fluctuations. Current Lyα forest power spectrum measurements probe comoving scales up to ˜2-3h-1Mpc at redshifts z˜2-4, providing one of the most robust ways to probe cosmological density fluctuations on relatively small scales. The suppression of structure growth due to the free-streaming of dark matter daughter particles also has a significant impact on the neutral hydrogen cloud distribution, which traces the underlying dark matter distribution well at high redshift. We exploit Lyα forest power spectrum measurements to constrain the amount of free-streaming of dark matter in such models and thereby place limits on decaying dark matter based only on the dynamics of cosmological perturbations without any assumptions about the interactions of the decay products. We use a suite of dark-matter-only simulations together with the fluctuating Gunn-Peterson approximation to derive the Lyα flux distribution. We argue that this approach should be sufficient for our main purpose, which is to demonstrate the power of the Lyα forest to constrain decaying dark matter models. We find that Sloan Digital Sky Survey 1D Lyα forest power spectrum data place a lifetime-dependent upper limit Vk≲30-70km/s for decay lifetimes ≲10Gyr. This is the most stringent model-independent bound on invisible dark matter decays with small mass splittings. For larger mass splittings (large Vk), Lyα forest data restrict the dark matter

  12. The Search for Dark Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Orrell, John

    2013-11-20

    More than 25 years ago, PNNL scientists began the first underground measurements searching for dark matter using specialized radiation detector technology. Dark matter is yet to be discovered says Physicist John L. Orrell.

  13. The Search for Dark Matter

    ScienceCinema

    Orrell, John

    2016-07-12

    More than 25 years ago, PNNL scientists began the first underground measurements searching for dark matter using specialized radiation detector technology. Dark matter is yet to be discovered says Physicist John L. Orrell.

  14. Dark matter on top

    SciTech Connect

    Gómez, M.A.; Jackson, C.B.; Shaughnessy, G. E-mail: chris@uta.edu

    2014-12-01

    We consider a simplified model of fermionic dark matter which couples exclusively to the right-handed top quark via a renormalizable interaction with a color-charged scalar. We first compute the relic abundance of this type of dark matter and investigate constraints placed on the model parameter space by the latest direct detection data. We also perform a detailed analysis for the production of dark matter at the LHC for this model. We find several kinematic variables that allow for a clean signal extraction and we show that the parameter space of this model will be well probed during LHC Run-II. Finally, we investigate the possibility of detecting this type of dark matter via its annihilations into gamma rays. We compute the continuum and the line emission (which includes a possible ''Higgs in Space!'' line) and its possible discovery by future gamma-ray telescopes. We find that the annihilation spectrum has distinctive features which may distinguish it from other models.

  15. Dark Sky Scotland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillier, D.

    2008-06-01

    Dark Sky Scotland (DSS) 2006-2008 is a nationwide programme of public and educational astronomy events. It demonstrates successful national partnerships with non-astronomy organisations and effective ways of delivering events in remote rural communities. DSS is looking for international partners for IYA2009.

  16. Dark matter candidates

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, M.S.

    1989-01-01

    One of the simplest, yet most profound, questions we can ask about the Universe is, how much stuff is in it, and further what is that stuff composed of. Needless to say, the answer to this question has very important implications for the evolution of the Universe, determining both the ultimate fate and the course of structure formation. Remarkably, at this late date in the history of the Universe we still do not have a definitive answer to this simplest of questions---although we have some very intriguing clues. It is known with certainty that most of the material in the Universe is dark, and we have the strong suspicion that the dominant component of material in the Cosmos is not baryons, but rather is exotic relic elementary particles left over from the earliest, very hot epoch of the Universe. If true, the Dark Matter question is a most fundamental one facing both particle physics and cosmology. The leading particle dark matter candidates are: the axion, the neutralino, and a light neutrino species. All three candidates are accessible to experimental tests, and experiments are now in progress. In addition, there are several dark horse, long shot, candidates, including the superheavy magnetic monopole and soliton stars. 13 refs.

  17. FUV MAMA Dark Monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, Colin

    2012-10-01

    The monitor takes six 1300s TIME-TAG darks every six weeks. The exposures are distributed over about six hours from initial turn-on to characterize the rate increase as a function of turn-on time and temperature. The frequency has been reduced from bi-weekly to once every six weeks to stay within a reasonable orbit count.

  18. NUV MAMA Dark Monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, Colin

    2013-10-01

    The basic monitor takes two 1300s TIME-TAG darks bi-weekly.. The pairs of exposures are linked so that they are taken about 6 hours apart in the same SAA free interval. This pairing of exposures will make it easier to separate long and short term temporal variability from temperature dependent changes.

  19. FUV MAMA Dark Monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, Colin

    2013-10-01

    The monitor takes six 1300s TIME-TAG darks every six weeks. The exposures are distributed over about six hours from initial turn-on to characterize the rate increase as a function of turn-on time and temperature.

  20. NUV MAMA Dark Monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, Colin

    2012-10-01

    The basic monitor takes two 1300s TIME-TAG darks bi-weekly.. The pairs of exposures are linked so that they are taken about 6 hours apart in the same SAA free interval. This pairing of exposures will make it easier to separate long and short term temporal variability from temperature dependent changes.

  1. Numerical Relativity as a tool for studying the Early Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrison, David

    2013-04-01

    Numerical simulations are becoming a more effective tool for conducting detailed investigations into the evolution of our universe. In this presentation, I show how the framework of numerical relativity can be used for studying cosmological models. We are working to develop a large-scale simulation of the dynamical processes in the early universe. These take into account interactions of dark matter, scalar perturbations, gravitational waves, magnetic fields and a turbulent plasma. The code described in this report is a GRMHD code based on the Cactus framework and is structured to utilize one of several different differencing methods chosen at run-time. It is being developed and tested on the Texas Learning and Computation Center's Xanadu cluster.

  2. Transient gravity perturbations from a double-couple in a homogeneous half-space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harms, J.

    2016-05-01

    Seismic waves produced by fault ruptures give rise to gravity perturbations. So far, these perturbations have either been modelled as permanent coseismic gravity change in a half-space or spherical Earth model, or as full time-domain model in infinite space. In this paper, we present the explicit solution of gravity perturbations in time domain produced by a double-couple buried in a homogeneous half-space. This result is especially suited to study gravity perturbations up to a few hundreds of kilometres from the epicentre. It facilitates detailed parametric studies of gravity perturbations from fault rupture, and predicts gravity perturbations of real earthquakes with greatly improved accuracy. The results may serve to develop first designs of gravity-assisted earthquake early-warning systems, made possible by a new generation of ultrasensitive gravity gradiometers, which is currently under development.

  3. Unitarisation of EFT amplitudes for dark matter searches at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Nicole F.; Busoni, Giorgio; Kobakhidze, Archil; Long, David M.; Schmidt, Michael A.

    2016-08-01

    We propose a new approach to the LHC dark matter search analysis within the effective field theory framework by utilising the K-matrix unitarisation formalism. This approach provides a reasonable estimate of the dark matter production cross section at high energies, and hence allows reliable bounds to be placed on the cut-off scale of relevant operators without running into the problem of perturbative unitarity violation. We exemplify this procedure for the effective operator D5 in monojet dark matter searches in the collinear approximation. We compare our bounds to those obtained using the truncation method and identify a parameter region where the unitarisation prescription leads to more stringent bounds.

  4. Reconstruction of the interaction term between dark matter and dark energy using SNe Ia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cueva Solano, Freddy; Nucamendi, Ulises

    2012-04-01

    We apply a parametric reconstruction method to a homogeneous, isotropic and spatially flat Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (FRW) cosmological model filled of a fluid of dark energy (DE) with constant equation of state (EOS) parameter interacting with dark matter (DM)\\@. The reconstruction method is based on expansions of the general interaction term and the relevant cosmological variables in terms of Chebyshev polynomials which form a complete set orthonormal functions. This interaction term describes an exchange of energy flow between the DE and DM within dark sector. To show how the method works we do the reconstruction of the interaction function expanding it in terms of only the first six Chebyshev polynomials and obtain the best estimation for the coefficients of the expansion assuming three models: (a) a DE equation of the state parameter w = -1 (an interacting cosmological Λ), (b) a DE equation of the state parameter w = constant with a dark matter density parameter fixed, (c) a DE equation of the state parameter w = constant with a free constant dark matter density parameter to be estimated, and using the Union2 SNe Ia data set from ``The Supernova Cosmology Project'' (SCP) composed by 557 type Ia supernovae. In both cases, the preliminary reconstruction shows that in the best scenario there exist the possibility of a crossing of the noninteracting line Q = 0 in the recent past within the 1σ and 2σ errors from positive values at early times to negative values at late times. This means that, in this reconstruction, there is an energy transfer from DE to DM at early times and an energy transfer from DM to DE at late times. We conclude that this fact is an indication of the possible existence of a crossing behavior in a general interaction coupling between dark components.

  5. Reconstruction of the interaction term between dark matter and dark energy using SNe Ia

    SciTech Connect

    Solano, Freddy Cueva; Nucamendi, Ulises E-mail: ulises@ifm.umich.mx

    2012-04-01

    We apply a parametric reconstruction method to a homogeneous, isotropic and spatially flat Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (FRW) cosmological model filled of a fluid of dark energy (DE) with constant equation of state (EOS) parameter interacting with dark matter (DM)\\@. The reconstruction method is based on expansions of the general interaction term and the relevant cosmological variables in terms of Chebyshev polynomials which form a complete set orthonormal functions. This interaction term describes an exchange of energy flow between the DE and DM within dark sector. To show how the method works we do the reconstruction of the interaction function expanding it in terms of only the first six Chebyshev polynomials and obtain the best estimation for the coefficients of the expansion assuming three models: (a) a DE equation of the state parameter w = −1 (an interacting cosmological Λ), (b) a DE equation of the state parameter w = constant with a dark matter density parameter fixed, (c) a DE equation of the state parameter w = constant with a free constant dark matter density parameter to be estimated, and using the Union2 SNe Ia data set from ''The Supernova Cosmology Project'' (SCP) composed by 557 type Ia supernovae. In both cases, the preliminary reconstruction shows that in the best scenario there exist the possibility of a crossing of the noninteracting line Q = 0 in the recent past within the 1σ and 2σ errors from positive values at early times to negative values at late times. This means that, in this reconstruction, there is an energy transfer from DE to DM at early times and an energy transfer from DM to DE at late times. We conclude that this fact is an indication of the possible existence of a crossing behavior in a general interaction coupling between dark components.

  6. Sterile neutrinos as subdominant warm dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Palazzo, A.; Cumberbatch, D.; Slosar, A.; Silk, J.

    2007-11-15

    In light of recent findings which seem to disfavor a scenario with (warm) dark matter entirely constituted of sterile neutrinos produced via the Dodelson-Widrow mechanism, we investigate the constraints attainable for this mechanism by relaxing the usual hypothesis that the relic neutrino abundance must necessarily account for all of the dark matter. We first study how to reinterpret the limits attainable from x-ray nondetection and Lyman-{alpha} forest measurements in the case that sterile neutrinos constitute only a fraction f{sub s} of the total amount of dark matter. Then, assuming that sterile neutrinos are generated in the early universe solely through the Dodelson-Widrow mechanism, we show how the x-ray and Lyman-{alpha} results jointly constrain the mass-mixing parameters governing their production. Furthermore, we show how the same data allow us to set a robust upper limit f{sub s} < or approx. 0.7 at the 2{sigma} level, rejecting the case of dominant dark matter (f{sub s}=1) at the {approx}3{sigma} level.

  7. Constraining supersymmetric dark matter with synchrotron measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Hooper, Dan

    2008-06-15

    The annihilations of neutralino dark matter (or other dark matter candidate) generate, among other standard model states, electrons and positrons. These particles emit synchrotron photons as a result of their interaction with the galactic magnetic field. In this paper, we use the measurements of the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe satellite to constrain the intensity of this synchrotron emission and, in turn, the annihilation cross section of the lightest neutralino. We find this constraint to be more stringent than that provided by any other current indirect detection channel. In particular, the neutralino annihilation cross section must be less than {approx_equal}3x10{sup -26} cm{sup 3}/s (1x10{sup 25} cm{sup 3}/s) for 100 GeV (500 GeV) neutralinos distributed with a Navarro-Frenk-White halo profile. For the conservative case of an entirely flat dark matter distribution within the inner 8 kiloparsecs of the Milky Way, the constraint is approximately a factor of 30 less stringent. Even in this conservative case, synchrotron measurements strongly constrain, for example, the possibility of wino or Higgsino neutralino dark matter produced nonthermally in the early universe.

  8. Falsification of Dark Energy by Fluid Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, Carl H.

    2012-03-01

    The 2011 Nobel Prize in Physics was awarded for the discovery of accelerating super- novae dimness, suggesting a remarkable reversal in the expansion rate of the Universe from a decrease to an increase, driven by anti-gravity forces of a mysterious dark energy material comprising 70% of the Universe mass-energy. Fluid mechanics and Herschel- Planck-Spitzer-Hubble etc. space telescope observations falsify both the accelerating ex- pansion rate and dark energy concepts. Kinematic viscosity is neglected in models of self-gravitational structure formation. Large plasma photon viscosity predicts protosu- perclustervoid fragmentation early in the plasma epoch and protogalaxies at the end. At the plasma-gas transition, the gas protogalaxies fragment into Earth-mass rogue plan- ets in highly persistent, trillion-planet clumps (proto-globular-star-cluster PGCs). PGC planets freeze to form the dark matter of galaxies and merge to form their stars, giving the hydrogen triple-point (14 K) infrared emissions observed. Dark energy is a system- atic dimming error for Supernovae Ia caused by partially evaporated planets feeding hot white dwarf stars at the Chandrasekhar carbon limit. Planet atmospheres may or may not dim light from SNe-Ia events depending on the line of sight.

  9. The Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument (DESI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flaugher, Brenna; Bebek, Chris

    2014-07-01

    The Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument (DESI) is a Stage IV ground-based dark energy experiment that will study baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO) and the growth of structure through redshift-space distortions with a wide-area galaxy and quasar spectroscopic redshift survey. The DESI instrument consists of a new wide-field (3.2 deg. linear field of view) corrector plus a multi-object spectrometer with up to 5000 robotically positioned optical fibers and will be installed at prime focus on the Mayall 4m telescope at Kitt Peak, Arizona. The fibers feed 10 three-arm spectrographs producing spectra that cover a wavelength range from 360-980 nm and have resolution of 2000-5500 depending on the wavelength. The DESI instrument is designed for a 14,000 sq. deg. multi-year survey of targets that trace the evolution of dark energy out to redshift 3.5 using the redshifts of luminous red galaxies (LRGs), emission line galaxies (ELGs) and quasars. DESI is the successor to the successful Stage-III BOSS spectroscopic redshift survey and complements imaging surveys such as the Stage-III Dark Energy Survey (DES, currently operating) and the Stage-IV Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST, planned start early in the next decade).

  10. How dark chocolate is processed

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This month’s column will continue the theme of “How Is It Processed?” The column will focus on dark chocolate. The botanical name for the cacao tree is Theobroma cacao, which literally means “food of the Gods.” Dark chocolate is both delicious and nutritious. Production of dark chocolate will be des...

  11. Dynamics of dark energy with a coupling to dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Boehmer, Christian G.; Caldera-Cabral, Gabriela; Maartens, Roy; Lazkoz, Ruth

    2008-07-15

    Dark energy and dark matter are the dominant sources in the evolution of the late universe. They are currently only indirectly detected via their gravitational effects, and there could be a coupling between them without violating observational constraints. We investigate the background dynamics when dark energy is modeled as exponential quintessence and is coupled to dark matter via simple models of energy exchange. We introduce a new form of dark sector coupling, which leads to a more complicated dynamical phase space and has a better physical motivation than previous mathematically similar couplings.

  12. Visible and dark matter from a first-order phase transition in a baryon-symmetric universe

    SciTech Connect

    Petraki, Kalliopi; Trodden, Mark; Volkas, Raymond R.

    2012-02-28

    The similar cosmological abundances observed for visible and dark matter suggest a common origin for both. By viewing the dark matter density as a dark-sector asymmetry, mirroring the situation in the visible sector, we show that the visible and dark matter asymmetries may have arisen simultaneously through a first-order phase transition in the early universe. The additional scalar particles in the theory can mix with the standard Higgs boson and provide other striking signatures.

  13. Dark matter and dark energy: summary and future directions.

    PubMed

    Ellis, John

    2003-11-15

    This paper reviews the progress reported at the Discussion Meeting and advertises some possible future directions in our drive to understand dark matter and dark energy. Additionally, a first attempt is made to place in context the exciting new results from the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe satellite, which were published shortly after this meeting. In the first part of this paper, pieces of observational evidence shown here that bear on the amounts of dark matter and dark energy are reviewed. Subsequently, particle candidates for dark matter are mentioned, and detection strategies are discussed. Finally, ideas are presented for calculating the amounts of dark matter and dark energy, and possibly relating them to laboratory data.

  14. Hydrodynamic representation of the Klein-Gordon-Einstein equations in the weak field limit: General formalism and perturbations analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suárez, Abril; Chavanis, Pierre-Henri

    2015-07-01

    Using a generalization of the Madelung transformation, we derive the hydrodynamic representation of the Klein-Gordon-Einstein equations in the weak field limit. We consider a complex self-interacting scalar field with a λ |φ |4 potential. We study the evolution of the spatially homogeneous background in the fluid representation and derive the linearized equations describing the evolution of small perturbations in a static and in an expanding Universe. We compare the results with simplified models in which the gravitational potential is introduced by hand in the Klein-Gordon equation, and assumed to satisfy a (generalized) Poisson equation. Nonrelativistic hydrodynamic equations based on the Schrödinger-Poisson equations or on the Gross-Pitaevskii-Poisson equations are recovered in the limit c →+∞. We study the evolution of the perturbations in the matter era using the nonrelativistic limit of our formalism. Perturbations whose wavelength is below the Jeans length oscillate in time while perturbations whose wavelength is above the Jeans length grow linearly with the scale factor as in the cold dark matter model. The growth of perturbations in the scalar field model is substantially faster than in the cold dark matter model. When the wavelength of the perturbations approaches the cosmological horizon (Hubble length), a relativistic treatment is mandatory. In that case, we find that relativistic effects attenuate or even prevent the growth of perturbations. This paper exposes the general formalism and provides illustrations in simple cases. Other applications of our formalism will be considered in companion papers.

  15. Neptune's story. [Triton's orbit perturbation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldreich, P.; Murray, N.; Longaretti, P. Y.; Banfield, D.

    1989-01-01

    It is conjectured that Triton was captured from a heliocentric orbit as the result of a collision with what was then one of Neptune's regular satellites. The immediate post-capture orbit was highly eccentric. Dissipation due to tides raised by Neptune in Triton caused Triton's orbit to evolve to its present state in less than one billion years. For much of this time Triton was almost entirely molten. While its orbit was evolving, Triton cannibalized most of the regular satellites of Neptune and also perturbed Nereid, thus accounting for that satellite's highly eccentric and inclined orbit. The only regular satellites of Neptune that survived were those that formed well within 5 Neptune radii, and they move on inclined orbits as the result of chaotic perturbations forced by Triton.

  16. Cosmological perturbations in unimodular gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Caixia; Brandenberger, Robert H.; Cai, Yifu; Chen, Pisin E-mail: rhb@hep.physics.mcgill.ca E-mail: chen@slac.stanford.edu

    2014-09-01

    We study cosmological perturbation theory within the framework of unimodular gravity. We show that the Lagrangian constraint on the determinant of the metric required by unimodular gravity leads to an extra constraint on the gauge freedom of the metric perturbations. Although the main equation of motion for the gravitational potential remains the same, the shift variable, which is gauge artifact in General Relativity, cannot be set to zero in unimodular gravity. This non-vanishing shift variable affects the propagation of photons throughout the cosmological evolution and therefore modifies the Sachs-Wolfe relation between the relativistic gravitational potential and the microwave temperature anisotropies. However, for adiabatic fluctuations the difference between the result in General Relativity and unimodular gravity is suppressed on large angular scales. Thus, no strong constraints on the theory can be derived.

  17. The status of perturbative QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, R.K.

    1988-10-01

    The advances in perturbative QCD are reviewed. The status of determinations of the coupling constant ..cap alpha../sub S/ and the parton distribution functions is presented. New theoretical results on the spin dependent structure functions of the proton are also reviewed. The theoretical description of the production of vector bosons, jets and heavy quarks is outlined with special emphasis on new results. Expected rates for top quark production at hadronic colliders are presented. 111 refs., 8 figs.

  18. Quantum fields with classical perturbations

    SciTech Connect

    Dereziński, Jan

    2014-07-15

    The main purpose of these notes is a review of various models of Quantum Field Theory (QFT) involving quadratic Lagrangians. We discuss scalar and vector bosons, spin 1/2 fermions, both neutral and charged. Beside free theories, we study their interactions with classical perturbations, called, depending on the context, an external linear source, mass-like term, current or electromagnetic potential. The notes may serve as a first introduction to QFT.

  19. Perturbation growth in accreting filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarke, S. D.; Whitworth, A. P.; Hubber, D. A.

    2016-05-01

    We use smoothed particle hydrodynamic simulations to investigate the growth of perturbations in infinitely long filaments as they form and grow by accretion. The growth of these perturbations leads to filament fragmentation and the formation of cores. Most previous work on this subject has been confined to the growth and fragmentation of equilibrium filaments and has found that there exists a preferential fragmentation length-scale which is roughly four times the filament's diameter. Our results show a more complicated dispersion relation with a series of peaks linking perturbation wavelength and growth rate. These are due to gravo-acoustic oscillations along the longitudinal axis during the sub-critical phase of growth. The positions of the peaks in growth rate have a strong dependence on both the mass accretion rate onto the filament and the temperature of the gas. When seeded with a multiwavelength density power spectrum, there exists a clear preferred core separation equal to the largest peak in the dispersion relation. Our results allow one to estimate a minimum age for a filament which is breaking up into regularly spaced fragments, as well as an average accretion rate. We apply the model to observations of filaments in Taurus by Tafalla & Hacar and find accretion rates consistent with those estimated by Palmeirim et al.

  20. R evolution: Improving perturbative QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Hoang, Andre H.; Jain, Ambar; Stewart, Iain W.; Scimemi, Ignazio

    2010-07-01

    Perturbative QCD results in the MS scheme can be dramatically improved by switching to a scheme that accounts for the dominant power law dependence on the factorization scale in the operator product expansion. We introduce the ''MSR scheme'' which achieves this in a Lorentz and gauge invariant way and has a very simple relation to MS. Results in MSR depend on a cutoff parameter R, in addition to the {mu} of MS. R variations can be used to independently estimate (i.) the size of power corrections, and (ii.) higher-order perturbative corrections (much like {mu} in MS). We give two examples at three-loop order, the ratio of mass splittings in the B*-B and D*-D systems, and the Ellis-Jaffe sum rule as a function of momentum transfer Q in deep inelastic scattering. Comparing to data, the perturbative MSR results work well even for Q{approx}1 GeV, and power corrections are reduced compared to MS.

  1. Dilaton-assisted dark matter.

    PubMed

    Bai, Yang; Carena, Marcela; Lykken, Joseph

    2009-12-31

    A dilaton could be the dominant messenger between standard model fields and dark matter. The measured dark matter relic abundance relates the dark matter mass and spin to the conformal breaking scale. The dark matter-nucleon spin-independent cross section is predicted in terms of the dilaton mass. We compute the current constraints on the dilaton from LEP and Tevatron experiments, and the gamma-ray signal from dark matter annihilation to dilatons that could be observed by Fermi Large Area Telescope.

  2. Dilaton-Assisted Dark Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Bai Yang; Lykken, Joseph; Carena, Marcela

    2009-12-31

    A dilaton could be the dominant messenger between standard model fields and dark matter. The measured dark matter relic abundance relates the dark matter mass and spin to the conformal breaking scale. The dark matter-nucleon spin-independent cross section is predicted in terms of the dilaton mass. We compute the current constraints on the dilaton from LEP and Tevatron experiments, and the gamma-ray signal from dark matter annihilation to dilatons that could be observed by Fermi Large Area Telescope.

  3. Dark matter as a trigger for periodic comet impacts.

    PubMed

    Randall, Lisa; Reece, Matthew

    2014-04-25

    Although statistical evidence is not overwhelming, possible support for an approximately 35×106  yr periodicity in the crater record on Earth could indicate a nonrandom underlying enhancement of meteorite impacts at regular intervals. A proposed explanation in terms of tidal effects on Oort cloud comet perturbations as the Solar System passes through the galactic midplane is hampered by lack of an underlying cause for sufficiently enhanced gravitational effects over a sufficiently short time interval and by the time frame between such possible enhancements. We show that a smooth dark disk in the galactic midplane would address both these issues and create a periodic enhancement of the sort that has potentially been observed. Such a disk is motivated by a novel dark matter component with dissipative cooling that we considered in earlier work. We show how to evaluate the statistical evidence for periodicity by input of appropriate measured priors from the galactic model, justifying or ruling out periodic cratering with more confidence than by evaluating the data without an underlying model. We find that, marginalizing over astrophysical uncertainties, the likelihood ratio for such a model relative to one with a constant cratering rate is 3.0, which moderately favors the dark disk model. Our analysis furthermore yields a posterior distribution that, based on current crater data, singles out a dark matter disk surface density of approximately 10M⊙/pc2. The geological record thereby motivates a particular model of dark matter that will be probed in the near future.

  4. Dark matter as a trigger for periodic comet impacts.

    PubMed

    Randall, Lisa; Reece, Matthew

    2014-04-25

    Although statistical evidence is not overwhelming, possible support for an approximately 35×106  yr periodicity in the crater record on Earth could indicate a nonrandom underlying enhancement of meteorite impacts at regular intervals. A proposed explanation in terms of tidal effects on Oort cloud comet perturbations as the Solar System passes through the galactic midplane is hampered by lack of an underlying cause for sufficiently enhanced gravitational effects over a sufficiently short time interval and by the time frame between such possible enhancements. We show that a smooth dark disk in the galactic midplane would address both these issues and create a periodic enhancement of the sort that has potentially been observed. Such a disk is motivated by a novel dark matter component with dissipative cooling that we considered in earlier work. We show how to evaluate the statistical evidence for periodicity by input of appropriate measured priors from the galactic model, justifying or ruling out periodic cratering with more confidence than by evaluating the data without an underlying model. We find that, marginalizing over astrophysical uncertainties, the likelihood ratio for such a model relative to one with a constant cratering rate is 3.0, which moderately favors the dark disk model. Our analysis furthermore yields a posterior distribution that, based on current crater data, singles out a dark matter disk surface density of approximately 10M⊙/pc2. The geological record thereby motivates a particular model of dark matter that will be probed in the near future. PMID:24815633

  5. Multi-Component Dark Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Zurek, Kathryn M.

    2008-11-01

    We explore multi-component dark matter models where the dark sector consists of multiple stable states with different mass scales, and dark forces coupling these states further enrich the dynamics. The multi-component nature of the dark matter naturally arises in supersymmetric models, where both R parity and an additional symmetry, such as a Z{sub 2}, is preserved. We focus on a particular model where the heavier component of dark matter carries lepton number and annihilates mostly to leptons. The heavier component, which is essentially a sterile neutrino, naturally explains the PAMELA, ATIC and synchrotron signals, without an excess in antiprotons which typically mars other models of weak scale dark matter. The lighter component, which may have a mass from a GeV to a TeV, may explain the DAMA signal, and may be visible in low threshold runs of CDMS and XENON, which search for light dark matter.

  6. The early universe. Facts and fiction.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Börner, G.

    This book (for the first edition 1988 see 46.003.028) is concerned with the connections which have been developed in recent years between particle physics and cosmology. The standard big bang model and modifications introduced by the fundamental interactions of elementary particles, such as inflation baryon synthesis, are described. The author presents an up-to-date picture of this rapidly changing field, taking care to sort out speculations from well-established results. Contents: Part I. The standard big-bang model. 1. The cosmological models. 2. Facts - observations of cosmological significance. 3. Thermodynamics of the early universe in the classical hot-big-bang picture. 4. Can the standard model be verified experimentally? Part II. Particle physics and cosmology. 5. Gauge theories and the standard model. 6. Grand unification schemes. 7. Relic particles from the early universe. 8. Baryon synthesis. 9. The inflationary universe. Part III. Dark matter and galaxy formation. 10. Typical scales - from observation and theory. 11. The evolution of small perturbations. 12. Computer simulations and the large-scale structure. Appendix. Recent developments.

  7. Complex Dark Matter

    ScienceCinema

    Lincoln, Don

    2016-07-12

    After a century of study, scientists have come to the realization that the ordinary matter made of atoms is a minority in the universe. In order to explain observations, it appears that there exists a new and undiscovered kind of matter, called dark matter, that is five times more prevalent than ordinary matter. The evidence for this new matter’s existence is very strong, but scientists know only a little about its nature. In today’s video, Fermilab’s Dr. Don Lincoln talks about an exciting and unconventional idea, specifically that dark matter might have a very complex set of structures and interactions. While this idea is entirely speculative, it is an interesting hypothesis and one that scientists are investigating.

  8. Methanol in dark clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friberg, P.; Hjalmarson, A.; Madden, S. C.; Irvine, W. M.

    1988-01-01

    The first observation of methanol in cold dark clouds TMC 1, L 134 N, and B 335 is reported. In all three clouds, the relative abundance of methanol was found to be in the range of 10 to the -9th (i.e., almost an order of magnitude more abundant than acetaldehyde), with no observable variation between the clouds. Methanol emission showed a complex velocity structure; in TMC 1, clear indications of non-LTE were observed. Dimethyl ether was searched for in L 134 N; the upper limit of the column density of dimethyl ether in L 134 N was estimated to be 4 x 10 to the 12th/sq cm, assuming 5 K rotation temperature and LTE. This limit makes the abundance ratio (CH3)2O/CH3OH not higher than 1/5, indicating that dimethyl ether is not overabundant in this dark cloud.

  9. Temporal dark polariton solitons.

    PubMed

    Kartashov, Yaroslav V; Skryabin, Dmitry V

    2016-04-15

    We predict that strong coupling between waveguide photons and excitons of quantum well embedded into waveguide results in the formation of hybrid-dark and antidark light-matter solitons. Such temporal solitons exist due to interplay between repulsive excitonic nonlinearity and giant group-velocity dispersion arising in the vicinity of excitonic resonance. Such fully conservative states do not require external pumping to counteract losses and form continuous families parameterized by the power-dependent phase shift and velocity of their motion. Dark solitons are stable in the considerable part of their existence domain, while antidark solitons are always unstable. Both families exist outside the forbidden frequency gap of the linear system. PMID:27082338

  10. Dark Skies Rangers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doran, Rosa

    2015-08-01

    Creating awareness about the importance of the protection of our dark skies is the main goal of the Dark Skies Rangers project, a joint effort from the NOAO and the Galileo Teacher Training Program. Hundreds of schools and thousands of students have been reached by this program. We will focus in particular on the experience being developed in Portugal where several municipalities have now received street light auditing produced by students with suggestions on how to enhance the energy efficiency of illumination of specific urban areas. In the International Year of Light we are investing our efforts in exporting the successful Portuguese experience to other countries. The recipe is simple: train teachers, engage students, foster the participation of local community and involve local authorities in the process. In this symposium we hope to draft the cookbook for the near future.

  11. Complex Dark Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Lincoln, Don

    2015-04-16

    After a century of study, scientists have come to the realization that the ordinary matter made of atoms is a minority in the universe. In order to explain observations, it appears that there exists a new and undiscovered kind of matter, called dark matter, that is five times more prevalent than ordinary matter. The evidence for this new matter’s existence is very strong, but scientists know only a little about its nature. In today’s video, Fermilab’s Dr. Don Lincoln talks about an exciting and unconventional idea, specifically that dark matter might have a very complex set of structures and interactions. While this idea is entirely speculative, it is an interesting hypothesis and one that scientists are investigating.

  12. Distance to Dark Bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Using the unique orbit of NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope and a depth-perceiving trick called parallax, astronomers have determined the distance to an invisible Milky Way object called OGLE-2005-SMC-001. This artist's concept illustrates how this trick works: different views from both Spitzer and telescopes on Earth are combined to give depth perception.

    Our Milky Way galaxy is heavier than it looks, and scientists use the term 'dark matter' to describe all the 'heavy stuff' in the universe that seems to be present but invisible to our telescopes. While much of this dark matter is likely made up of exotic materials, different from the ordinary particles that make up the world around us, some may consist of dark celestial bodies -- like planets, black holes, or failed stars -- that do not produce light or are too faint to detect from Earth. OGLE-2005-SMC-001 is one of these dark celestial bodies.

    Although astronomers cannot see a dark body, they can sense its presence from the way light acts around it. When a dark body like OGLE-2005-SMC-001 passes in front of a bright star, its gravity causes the background starlight to bend and brighten, a process called gravitational microlensing. When the observing telescope, dark body, and star system are closely aligned, the microlensing event reaches maximum, or peak, brightness.

    A team of astronomers first sensed OGLE-2005-SMC-001's presence when it passed in front of a star in a neighboring satellite galaxy called the Small Magellanic Cloud. In this artist's rendering, the satellite galaxy is depicted as the fuzzy structure sitting to the left of Earth. Once they detected this microlensing event, the scientists used Spitzer and the principle of parallax to figure out its distance. Humans naturally use parallax to determine distance. Each eye sees the distance of an object differently. The brain takes each eye's perspective and instantaneously calculates how far away the object is.

    To determine OGLE

  13. Bound-state formation for thermal relic dark matter and unitarity

    SciTech Connect

    Harling, Benedict von; Petraki, Kalliopi E-mail: kpetraki@nikhef.nl

    2014-12-01

    We show that the relic abundance of thermal dark matter annihilating via a long-range interaction, is significantly affected by the formation and decay of dark matter bound states in the early universe, if the dark matter mass is above a few TeV . We determine the coupling required to obtain the observed dark matter density, taking into account both the direct 2-to-2 annihilations and the formation of bound states, and provide an analytical fit. We argue that the unitarity limit on the inelastic cross-section is realized only if dark matter annihilates via a long-range interaction, and we determine the upper bound on the mass of thermal-relic dark matter to be about 197 (139) TeV for (non)-self-conjugate dark matter.

  14. Natural Neutrino Dark Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Gurwich, Ilya

    2010-06-23

    1 construct a general description for neutrino dark energy models, that do not require exotic particles or strange couplings. With the help of the above, this class of models is reduced to a single function with several constraints. It is shown that these models lead to some concrete predictions that can be verified (or disproved) within the next decade, using results from PLANK, EUCLID and JDEM.

  15. Dark energy from QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Urban, Federico R.; Zhitnitsky, Ariel R.

    2010-08-30

    We review two mechanisms rooted in the infrared sector of QCD which, by exploiting the properties of the QCD ghost, as introduced by Veneziano, provide new insight on the cosmological dark energy problem, first, in the form of a Casimir-like energy from quantising QCD in a box, and second, in the form of additional, time-dependent, vacuum energy density in an expanding universe. Based on [1, 2].

  16. THE DARK MOLECULAR GAS

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfire, Mark G.; Hollenbach, David; McKee, Christopher F. E-mail: dhollenbach@seti.or

    2010-06-20

    The mass of molecular gas in an interstellar cloud is often measured using line emission from low rotational levels of CO, which are sensitive to the CO mass, and then scaling to the assumed molecular hydrogen H{sub 2} mass. However, a significant H{sub 2} mass may lie outside the CO region, in the outer regions of the molecular cloud where the gas-phase carbon resides in C or C{sup +}. Here, H{sub 2} self-shields or is shielded by dust from UV photodissociation, whereas CO is photodissociated. This H{sub 2} gas is 'dark' in molecular transitions because of the absence of CO and other trace molecules, and because H{sub 2} emits so weakly at temperatures 10 K dark mass and find that the fraction of the molecular mass in this dark component is remarkably constant ({approx}0.3 for average visual extinction through the cloud A-bar{sub V{approx_equal}}8) and insensitive to the incident ultraviolet radiation field strength, the internal density distribution, and the mass of the molecular cloud as long as A-bar{sub V}, or equivalently, the product of the average hydrogen nucleus column and the metallicity through the cloud, is constant. We also find that the dark mass fraction increases with decreasing A-bar{sub V}, since relatively more molecular H{sub 2} material lies outside the CO region in this case.

  17. Dynamics of Dark Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Copeland, Edmund J.

    2007-11-20

    I briefly review attempts that have been made to model dark energy. These include models of a cosmological constant, dynamical models where a scalar field may be responsible for the observed late time acceleration through to the possibility that we are not fully in control of the gravity sector and the acceleration may be some manifestation of modified gravity. In all cases we will see some degree of fine tuning is required with the current models.

  18. Stealth dark matter: Dark scalar baryons through the Higgs portal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appelquist, T.; Brower, R. C.; Buchoff, M. I.; Fleming, G. T.; Jin, X.-Y.; Kiskis, J.; Kribs, G. D.; Neil, E. T.; Osborn, J. C.; Rebbi, C.; Rinaldi, E.; Schaich, D.; Schroeder, C.; Syritsyn, S.; Vranas, P.; Weinberg, E.; Witzel, O.; Lattice Strong Dynamics LSD Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    We present a new model of stealth dark matter: a composite baryonic scalar of an S U (ND) strongly coupled theory with even ND≥4 . All mass scales are technically natural, and dark matter stability is automatic without imposing an additional discrete or global symmetry. Constituent fermions transform in vectorlike representations of the electroweak group that permit both electroweak-breaking and electroweak-preserving mass terms. This gives a tunable coupling of stealth dark matter to the Higgs boson independent of the dark matter mass itself. We specialize to S U (4 ), and investigate the constraints on the model from dark meson decay, electroweak precision measurements, basic collider limits, and spin-independent direct detection scattering through Higgs exchange. We exploit our earlier lattice simulations that determined the composite spectrum as well as the effective Higgs coupling of stealth dark matter in order to place bounds from direct detection, excluding constituent fermions with dominantly electroweak-breaking masses. A lower bound on the dark baryon mass mB≳300 GeV is obtained from the indirect requirement that the lightest dark meson not be observable at LEP II. We briefly survey some intriguing properties of stealth dark matter that are worthy of future study, including collider studies of dark meson production and decay; indirect detection signals from annihilation; relic abundance estimates for both symmetric and asymmetric mechanisms; and direct detection through electromagnetic polarizability, a detailed study of which will appear in a companion paper.

  19. Axion dark matter: strings and their cores

    SciTech Connect

    Fleury, Leesa; Moore, Guy D. E-mail: guy.moore@physik.tu-darmstadt.de

    2016-01-01

    Axions constitute a well-motivated dark matter candidate, and if PQ symmetry breaking occurred after inflation, it should be possible to make a clean prediction for the relation between the axion mass and the axion dark matter density. We show that axion (or other global) string networks in 3D have a network density that depends logarithmically on the string separation-to-core ratio. This logarithm would be about 10 times larger in axion cosmology than what we can achieve in numerical simulations. We simulate axion production in the early Universe, finding that, for the separation-to-core ratios we can achieve, the changing density of the network has little impact on the axion production efficiency.

  20. CTE characterization with post-flashed darks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Jay

    2013-10-01

    This internal-orbit calibration program will take a combination of short {100s} and long {800s} darks with various levels of post-flash in order to re-calibrate the WFC3/UVIS CTE model. When a similar set of these images was taken in mid-2012, there were not as many warm pixels as there are now and CTE losses were lower. Furthermore, this program will explore a finer spacing of charge injection to help us understand exactly what happens above the "sweet-spot" background of 12 electrons. Once the model is recalibrated using this data set {which should be taken in early 2014}, we can feel confident in making the pixel-based correction part of the pipeline.The observations will be straightforward. We will take short 100s darks with PF levels of: 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 10, 12, 15, 20, 25, 30, 35, 40, 45, 50, 55, 60, 65, 70, 75, 80, 85, 90, 100, 115, and 130, and 150 electrons -- 30 levels in all. We will also take 800s darks {can't fit longer} with a PF level of about 100e. We should be able to take two shorts and one deep in each orbit, this will take a total of 15 orbits. This will give us 15 long darks, which can be averaged together to get the noise down.It would be best if this program could be scheduled to be executed over the course of only a few days, since I would prefer not to have much change in the dark during acquisition of the data set.

  1. Dark matter axions revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Visinelli, Luca; Gondolo, Paolo

    2009-08-01

    We study for what specific values of the theoretical parameters the axion can form the totality of cold dark matter. We examine the allowed axion parameter region in the light of recent data collected by the WMAP5 mission plus baryon acoustic oscillations and supernovae, and assume an inflationary scenario and standard cosmology. We also upgrade the treatment of anharmonicities in the axion potential, which we find important in certain cases. If the Peccei-Quinn symmetry is restored after inflation, we recover the usual relation between axion mass and density, so that an axion mass ma=(85±3)μeV makes the axion 100% of the cold dark matter. If the Peccei-Quinn symmetry is broken during inflation, the axion can instead be 100% of the cold dark matter for ma<15meV provided a specific value of the initial misalignment angle θi is chosen in correspondence to a given value of its mass ma. Large values of the Peccei-Quinn symmetry breaking scale correspond to small, perhaps uncomfortably small, values of the initial misalignment angle θi.

  2. Unparticle dark energy

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, D.-C.; Stojkovic, Dejan; Dutta, Sourish

    2009-09-15

    We examine a dark energy model where a scalar unparticle degree of freedom plays the role of quintessence. In particular, we study a model where the unparticle degree of freedom has a standard kinetic term and a simple mass potential, the evolution is slowly rolling and the field value is of the order of the unparticle energy scale ({lambda}{sub u}). We study how the evolution of w depends on the parameters B (a function of unparticle scaling dimension d{sub u}), the initial value of the field {phi}{sub i} (or equivalently, {lambda}{sub u}) and the present matter density {omega}{sub m0}. We use observational data from type Ia supernovae, baryon acoustic oscillations and the cosmic microwave background to constrain the model parameters and find that these models are not ruled out by the observational data. From a theoretical point of view, unparticle dark energy model is very attractive, since unparticles (being bound states of fundamental fermions) are protected from radiative corrections. Further, coupling of unparticles to the standard model fields can be arbitrarily suppressed by raising the fundamental energy scale M{sub F}, making the unparticle dark energy model free of most of the problems that plague conventional scalar field quintessence models.

  3. The First dark microhalos

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, HongSheng; Taylor, James E.; Silk, Joseph; Hooper, Dan; /Oxford U. /Fermilab

    2005-08-01

    Earth-mass dark matter halos are likely to have been the first bound structures to form in the Universe. Whether such objects have survived to the present day in galaxies depends on, among other factors, the rate of encounters with normal stars. In this letter, we estimate the amount of tidal heating and mass loss in microhalos as a result of stellar encounters. We find that while microhalos are only mildly heated in dwarf galaxies of low stellar density, and they should have been completely destroyed in bulge or M32-like regions of high stellar density. In disk galaxies, such as the Milky Way, the disruption rate depends strongly on the orbital parameters of the microhalo; while stochastic radial orbits in triaxial Galactic potential are destroyed first, systems on non-planar retrograde orbits with large pericenters survive the longest. Since many microhalos lose a significant fraction of their material to unbound tidal streams, the final dark matter distribution in the solar neighborhood is better described as a superposition of microstreams rather than as a set of discrete spherical clumps in an otherwise homogeneous medium. Different morphologies of microhalos have implications for direct and indirect dark matter detection experiments.

  4. Dark matter and alternative recipes for the missing mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tortora, Crescenzo; Jetzer, Philippe; Napolitano, Nicola R.

    2012-03-01

    Within the standard cosmological scenario the Universe is found to be filled by obscure components (dark matter and dark energy) for ~ 95% of its energy budget. In particular, almost all the matter content in the Universe is given by dark matter, which dominates the mass budget and drives the dynamics of galaxies and clusters of galaxies. Unfortunately, dark matter and dark energy have not been detected and no direct or indirected observations have allowed to prove their existence and amount. For this reason, some authors have suggested that a modification of Einstein Relativity or the change of the Newton's dynamics law (within a relativistic and classical framework, respectively) could allow to replace these unobserved components. We will start discussing the role of dark matter in the early-type galaxies, mainly in their central regions, investigating how its content changes as a function of the mass and the size of each galaxy and few considerations about the stellar Initial mass function have been made. In the second part of the paper we have described, as examples, some ways to overcome the dark matter hypothesis, by fitting to the observations the modified dynamics coming out from general relativistic extended theories and the MOdyfled Newtonian dynamics (MOND).

  5. Geometric Hamiltonian structures and perturbation theory

    SciTech Connect

    Omohundro, S.

    1984-08-01

    We have been engaged in a program of investigating the Hamiltonian structure of the various perturbation theories used in practice. We describe the geometry of a Hamiltonian structure for non-singular perturbation theory applied to Hamiltonian systems on symplectic manifolds and the connection with singular perturbation techniques based on the method of averaging.

  6. Superconvergent perturbation method in quantum mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Scherer, W. )

    1995-02-27

    An analog of Kolmogorov's superconvergent perturbation theory in classical mechanics is constructed for self-adjoint operators. It is different from the usual Rayleigh-Schroedinger perturbation theory and yields expansions for eigenvalues and eigenvectors in terms of functions of the perturbation parameter.

  7. Toward physical cosmology: focus on inhomogeneous geometry and its non-perturbative effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchert, Thomas

    2011-08-01

    We outline the key steps toward the construction of a physical, fully relativistic cosmology. The influence of inhomogeneities on the effective evolution history of the Universe is encoded in backreaction terms and expressed through spatially averaged geometrical invariants. These are absent and potential candidates for the missing dark sources in the standard model. Since they can be interpreted as energies of an emerging scalar field (the morphon), we are in a position to propose a strategy of how phenomenological scalar field models for dark energy, dark matter and inflation, that are usually added as fundamental sources to a homogeneous-geometry (FLRW) cosmology, can be potentially traced back to the inhomogeneous geometrical properties of space and its embedding into spacetime. We lay down a line of arguments that is—thus far only qualitatively—conclusive, and we address open problems of quantitative nature, related to the interpretation of observations. We discuss within a covariant framework (i) the foliation problem and invariant definitions of backreaction effects; (ii) the background problem and the notion of an effective cosmology; (iii) generalizations of the cosmological principle and generalizations of the cosmological equations; (iv) dark energies as energies of an effective scalar field; (v) the global gravitational instability of the standard model and basins of attraction for effective states; (vi) multiscale cosmological models and volume acceleration; (vii) effective metrics and strategies for effective distance measurements on the light cone, including observational predictions; (viii) examples of non-perturbative models, including explicit backreaction models for the LTB solution, extrapolations of the relativistic Lagrangian perturbation theory and scalar metric inhomogeneities. The role of scalar metric perturbations is critically examined and embedded into the non-perturbative framework.

  8. Extensive investigation of the generalized dark matter model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopp, Michael; Skordis, Constantinos; Thomas, Dan B.

    2016-08-01

    The cold dark matter (CDM) model, wherein the dark matter is treated as a pressureless perfect fluid, provides a good fit to galactic and cosmological data. With the advent of precision cosmology, it should be asked whether this simplest model needs to be extended, and whether doing so could improve our understanding of the properties of dark matter. One established parametrization for generalizing the CDM fluid is the generalized dark matter (GDM) model, in which dark matter is an imperfect fluid with pressure and shear viscosity that fulfill certain postulated closure equations. We investigate these closure equations and the three new parametric functions they contain: the background equation of state w , the speed of sound cs2 and the viscosity cvis2. Taking these functions to be constant parameters, we analyze an exact solution of the perturbed Einstein equations in a flat GDM-dominated universe and discuss the main effects of the three parameters on the cosmic microwave background (CMB). Our analysis suggests that the CMB alone is not able to distinguish between the GDM sound speed and viscosity parameters, but that other observables, such as the matter power spectrum, are required to break this degeneracy. In order to elucidate further the meaning of the GDM closure equations, we also consider other descriptions of imperfect fluids that have a nonperturbative definition and relate these to the GDM model. In particular, we consider scalar fields, an effective field theory (EFT) of fluids, an EFT of large-scale structure, nonequilibrium thermodynamics and tightly coupled fluids. These descriptions could be used to extend the GDM model into the nonlinear regime of structure formation, which is necessary if the wealth of data available on those scales is to be employed in constraining the model. We also derive the initial conditions for adiabatic and isocurvature perturbations in the presence of GDM and standard cosmological fluids and provide the result in a

  9. 'Swiss-cheese' inhomogeneous cosmology and the dark energy problem

    SciTech Connect

    Biswas, Tirthabir; Notari, Alessio E-mail: notari@hep.physics.mcgill.ca

    2008-06-15

    We study an exact Swiss-cheese model of the universe, where inhomogeneous LTB patches are embedded in a flat FLRW background, in order to see how observations of distant sources are affected. We focus mainly on the redshift, both perturbatively and non-perturbatively: the net effect given by one patch is suppressed by (L/R{sub H}){sup 3} (where L is the size of one patch and R{sub H} is the Hubble radius). We disentangle this effect from the Doppler term (which is much larger and has been used recently (Biswas et al 2007 J. Cosmol. Astropart. Phys. JCAP12(2007)017 [astro-ph/0606703]) to try to fit the SN curve without dark energy) by making contact with cosmological perturbation theory. Then, the correction to the angular distance is discussed analytically and estimated to be larger, O(L/R{sub H}){sup 2}, perturbatively and non-perturbatively (although it should go to zero after angular averaging)

  10. Non-adiabatic dark fluid cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Hipólito-Ricaldi, W.S.; Velten, H.E.S.; Zimdahl, W. E-mail: velten@cce.ufes.br

    2009-06-01

    We model the dark sector of the cosmic substratum by a viscous fluid with an equation of state p = −ζΘ, where Θ is the fluid-expansion scalar and ζ is the coefficient of bulk viscosity for which we assume a dependence ζ∝ρ{sup ν} on the energy density ρ. The homogeneous and isotropic background dynamics coincides with that of a generalized Chaplygin gas with equation of state p = −A/ρ{sup α}. The perturbation dynamics of the viscous model, however, is intrinsically non-adiabatic and qualitatively different from the Chaplygin-gas case. In particular, it avoids short-scale instabilities and/or oscillations which apparently have ruled out unified models of the Chaplygin-gas type. We calculate the matter power spectrum and demonstrate that the non-adiabatic model is compatible with the data from the 2dFGRS and the SDSS surveys. A χ{sup 2}-analysis shows, that for certain parameter combinations the viscous-dark-fluid (VDF) model is well competitive with the ΛCDM model. These results indicate that non-adiabatic unified models can be seen as potential contenders for a General-Relativity-based description of the cosmic substratum.

  11. On extended sign-changeable interactions in the dark sector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forte, Mónica

    2014-10-01

    We extend the cosmological couplings proposed in Sun et al. and Wei, where they suggested interactions with change of signs along the cosmological evolution. Our extension liberates the changes of sign of the interaction from the deceleration parameter and from the relation of energy densities of the dark sector and considers the presence of non interactive matter. In three cases we obtain the general solutions and the results obtained in models fitted with Hubble's function and SNe Ia data, are analyzed regarding the problem of the cosmological coincidence, the problem of the crisis of the cosmological age and the magnitude of the energy density of dark energy at early universe. Also we graphically study the range of variation of, the actual dark matter density parameter, the effective equation of state of the dark energy and the redshift of transition to the accelerated regimen, generated by variations at order $1\\sigma$ in the coupling parameters.

  12. Identifying Network Perturbation in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Logsdon, Benjamin A.; Gentles, Andrew J.; Lee, Su-In

    2016-01-01

    We present a computational framework, called DISCERN (DIfferential SparsE Regulatory Network), to identify informative topological changes in gene-regulator dependence networks inferred on the basis of mRNA expression datasets within distinct biological states. DISCERN takes two expression datasets as input: an expression dataset of diseased tissues from patients with a disease of interest and another expression dataset from matching normal tissues. DISCERN estimates the extent to which each gene is perturbed—having distinct regulator connectivity in the inferred gene-regulator dependencies between the disease and normal conditions. This approach has distinct advantages over existing methods. First, DISCERN infers conditional dependencies between candidate regulators and genes, where conditional dependence relationships discriminate the evidence for direct interactions from indirect interactions more precisely than pairwise correlation. Second, DISCERN uses a new likelihood-based scoring function to alleviate concerns about accuracy of the specific edges inferred in a particular network. DISCERN identifies perturbed genes more accurately in synthetic data than existing methods to identify perturbed genes between distinct states. In expression datasets from patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML), breast cancer and lung cancer, genes with high DISCERN scores in each cancer are enriched for known tumor drivers, genes associated with the biological processes known to be important in the disease, and genes associated with patient prognosis, in the respective cancer. Finally, we show that DISCERN can uncover potential mechanisms underlying network perturbation by explaining observed epigenomic activity patterns in cancer and normal tissue types more accurately than alternative methods, based on the available epigenomic data from the ENCODE project. PMID:27145341

  13. Perturbation analyses of intermolecular interactions.

    PubMed

    Koyama, Yohei M; Kobayashi, Tetsuya J; Ueda, Hiroki R

    2011-08-01

    Conformational fluctuations of a protein molecule are important to its function, and it is known that environmental molecules, such as water molecules, ions, and ligand molecules, significantly affect the function by changing the conformational fluctuations. However, it is difficult to systematically understand the role of environmental molecules because intermolecular interactions related to the conformational fluctuations are complicated. To identify important intermolecular interactions with regard to the conformational fluctuations, we develop herein (i) distance-independent and (ii) distance-dependent perturbation analyses of the intermolecular interactions. We show that these perturbation analyses can be realized by performing (i) a principal component analysis using conditional expectations of truncated and shifted intermolecular potential energy terms and (ii) a functional principal component analysis using products of intermolecular forces and conditional cumulative densities. We refer to these analyses as intermolecular perturbation analysis (IPA) and distance-dependent intermolecular perturbation analysis (DIPA), respectively. For comparison of the IPA and the DIPA, we apply them to the alanine dipeptide isomerization in explicit water. Although the first IPA principal components discriminate two states (the α state and PPII (polyproline II) + β states) for larger cutoff length, the separation between the PPII state and the β state is unclear in the second IPA principal components. On the other hand, in the large cutoff value, DIPA eigenvalues converge faster than that for IPA and the top two DIPA principal components clearly identify the three states. By using the DIPA biplot, the contributions of the dipeptide-water interactions to each state are analyzed systematically. Since the DIPA improves the state identification and the convergence rate with retaining distance information, we conclude that the DIPA is a more practical method compared with the

  14. Transport Studies Using Perturbative Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Hogeweij, G.M.D.

    2004-03-15

    By inducing a small electron temperature perturbation in a plasma in steady state one can in principle determine the conductive and convective components of the electron heat ux, and the associated thermal diffusivity and convection velocity. The same can be done for other plasma parameters, like density or ion temperature.In this paper experimental and analysis techniques are briey reviewed. The fundamental question whether the uxes are linear functions of the gradients or not is discussed. Experimental results are summarized, including so-called 'non-local' phenomena.

  15. Perturbation analyses of intermolecular interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koyama, Yohei M.; Kobayashi, Tetsuya J.; Ueda, Hiroki R.

    2011-08-01

    Conformational fluctuations of a protein molecule are important to its function, and it is known that environmental molecules, such as water molecules, ions, and ligand molecules, significantly affect the function by changing the conformational fluctuations. However, it is difficult to systematically understand the role of environmental molecules because intermolecular interactions related to the conformational fluctuations are complicated. To identify important intermolecular interactions with regard to the conformational fluctuations, we develop herein (i) distance-independent and (ii) distance-dependent perturbation analyses of the intermolecular interactions. We show that these perturbation analyses can be realized by performing (i) a principal component analysis using conditional expectations of truncated and shifted intermolecular potential energy terms and (ii) a functional principal component analysis using products of intermolecular forces and conditional cumulative densities. We refer to these analyses as intermolecular perturbation analysis (IPA) and distance-dependent intermolecular perturbation analysis (DIPA), respectively. For comparison of the IPA and the DIPA, we apply them to the alanine dipeptide isomerization in explicit water. Although the first IPA principal components discriminate two states (the α state and PPII (polyproline II) + β states) for larger cutoff length, the separation between the PPII state and the β state is unclear in the second IPA principal components. On the other hand, in the large cutoff value, DIPA eigenvalues converge faster than that for IPA and the top two DIPA principal components clearly identify the three states. By using the DIPA biplot, the contributions of the dipeptide-water interactions to each state are analyzed systematically. Since the DIPA improves the state identification and the convergence rate with retaining distance information, we conclude that the DIPA is a more practical method compared with the

  16. Testing Early Universe Theories Using Large Scale Structure: Moving Beyond Phenomenology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shandera, Sarah

    Current observational evidence favors inflation, a very early era of accelerated expansion, as the origin of the Large Scale Structure of the universe. Although compelling, this evidence comes mainly from the amplitude of primordial perturbations as a function of scale. More detailed and definitive information is contained in higher order statistics, collectively labelled `non- Gaussianity', which is of unparalleled importance to theorists who study inflation or its competitors. Analogously to collider physics studies, non-Gaussianity probes the interactions of the fields active in the very early universe and so will allow us to uncover the particle physics identity of the components that give rise to the very early pattern of density fluctuations. Primordial non-Gaussianity generates many non-trivial signals in Large Scale Structure, thanks largely to the non-linear evolution of the primordial perturbations. The distribution of objects in mass and redshift and their spatial clustering together contain information about the complete set of statistics of the primordial fluctuations. Predictions for those observables rely on numerical simulations of the dark matter evolution, which so far have been carried out almost entirely for a simple phenomenological model of primordial non-Gaussianity. However, it is now clear that interesting constraints or detection of non-Gaussianity are possible with next generation surveys: to use this data to its fullest extent we must understand clearly what those constraints will mean for fundamental theories of the origin of the perturbations. We propose to make a direct connection between theoretical ideas for the primordial fluctuations, including non-Gaussianity, and predictions from those theories for details of the Large Scale Structure of the Universe. Our goal is to find a prescription for setting up initial conditions for N-body simulations that match as closely as possible the predictions from a variety of particle physics

  17. Effects of vestibular loss on head stabilization in response to head and body perturbations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shupert, C. L.; Horak, F. B.; Peterson, B. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    Control of head position during postural responses is important to facilitate both the interpretation of vestibular signals and the stabilization of gaze. In these experiments, we compared head stabilization for two different postural tasks: 1) in response to perturbations at the head, and 2) in response to perturbations induced at the support surface, which perturb both body and head position. To determine whether normal vestibular function is necessary for head stabilization in these two tasks, responses to forward and backward mechanical perturbations of the head and body were compared for 13 normal subjects and 4 patients with profound bilateral vestibular loss (two with vestibular loss in adulthood and two in infancy). Normal subjects showed little neck muscle activity for body perturbations, but large, early activations in both neck extensors and flexors for head perturbations. In contrast, vestibular patients showed excessive neck muscle activation for body perturbations and reduced or absent neck muscle activity for head perturbations. Patients with vestibular loss in adulthood also showed increased head acceleration in response to both head and body perturbations, but patients with vestibular loss in infancy showed more normal head accelerations. For body perturbations, the differences in head acceleration between patients and normals were greater for later head acceleration peaks, indicating poor head control during the execution of the postural response. Trunk angle changes were also higher in the patients for forward body perturbations, indicating that poorer control of trunk position could have contributed to their poorer head stabilization. These results indicate that the vestibular system plays an important role in head and trunk stabilization for both head and body perturbations. However, the more normal head accelerations of the patients with infant vestibular loss also indicate that other mechanisms, possibly involving neck reflexes, can at least

  18. Milli-interacting dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallemacq, Quentin

    2013-09-01

    We present a dark matter model reproducing well the results from DAMA/LIBRA and CoGeNT and having no contradiction with the negative results from XENON100 and CDMS-II/Ge. Two new species of fermions F and G form hydrogenlike atoms with standard atomic size through a dark U(1) gauge interaction carried out by a dark massless photon. A Yukawa coupling between the nuclei F and neutral scalar particles S induces an attractive shorter-range interaction. This dark sector interacts with our standard particles because of the presence of two mixings, a kinetic photon-dark photon mixing, and a mass σ-S mixing. The dark atoms from the halo diffuse elastically in terrestrial matter until they thermalize and then reach underground detectors with thermal energies, where they form bound states with nuclei by radiative capture. This causes the emission of photons that produce the signals observed by direct-search experiments.

  19. The DarkSide awakens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davini, S.; Agnes, P.; Agostino, L.; Albuquerque, I. F. M.; Alexander, T.; Alton, A. K.; Arisaka, K.; Back, H. O.; Baldin, B.; Biery, K.; Bonfini, G.; Bossa, M.; Bottino, B.; Brigatti, A.; Brodsky, J.; Budano, F.; Bussino, S.; Cadeddu, M.; Cadonati, L.; Cadoni, M.; Calaprice, F.; Canci, N.; Candela, A.; Cao, H.; Cariello, M.; Carlini, M.; Catalanotti, S.; Cavalcante, P.; Chepurnov, A.; Cocco, A. G.; Covone, G.; D'Angelo, D.; D'Incecco, M.; De Cecco, S.; De Deo, M.; De Vincenzi, M.; Derbin, A.; Devoto, A.; Di Eusanio, F.; Di Pietro, G.; Edkins, E.; Empl, A.; Fan, A.; Fiorillo, G.; Fomenko, K.; Foster, G.; Franco, D.; Gabriele, F.; Galbiati, C.; Giganti, C.; Goretti, A. M.; Granato, F.; Grandi, L.; Gromov, M.; Guan, M.; Guardincerri, Y.; Hackett, B. R.; Herner, K. R.; Hungerford, E. V.; Ianni, Aldo; Ianni, Andrea; James, I.; Jollet, C.; Keeter, K.; Kendziora, C. L.; Kobychev, V.; Koh, G.; Korablev, D.; Korga, G.; Kubankin, A.; Li, X.; Lissia, M.; Lombardi, P.; Luitz, S.; Ma, Y.; Machulin, I. N.; Mandarano, A.; Mari, S. M.; Maricic, J.; Marini, L.; Martoff, C. J.; Meregaglia, A.; Meyers, P. D.; Miletic, T.; Milincic, R.; Montanari, D.; Monte, A.; Montuschi, M.; Monzani, M. E.; Mosteiro, P.; Mount, B. J.; Muratova, V. N.; Musico, P.; Napolitano, J.; Orsini, M.; Ortica, F.; Pagani, L.; Pallavicini, M.; Pantic, E.; Parmeggiano, S.; Pelczar, K.; Pelliccia, N.; Perasso, S.; Pocar, A.; Pordes, S.; Pugachev, D. A.; Qian, H.; Randle, K.; Ranucci, G.; Razeto, A.; Reinhold, B.; Renshaw, A. L.; Romani, A.; Rossi, B.; Rossi, N.; Rountree, S. D.; Sablone, D.; Saggese, P.; Saldanha, R.; Sands, W.; Sangiorgio, S.; Savarese, C.; Segreto, E.; Semenov, D. A.; Shields, E.; Singh, P. N.; Skorokhvatov, M. D.; Smirnov, O.; Sotnikov, A.; Stanford, C.; Suvorov, Y.; Tartaglia, R.; Tatarowicz, J.; Testera, G.; Tonazzo, A.; Trinchese, P.; Unzhakov, E. V.; Vishneva, A.; Vogelaar, B.; Wada, M.; Walker, S.; Wang, H.; Wang, Y.; Watson, A. W.; Westerdale, S.; Wilhelmi, J.; Wojcik, M. M.; Xiang, X.; Xu, J.; Yang, C.; Yoo, J.; Zavatarelli, S.; Zec, A.; Zhong, W.; Zhu, C.; Zuzel, G.

    2016-05-01

    The DarkSide program at LNGS aims to perform background-free WIMP searches using two phase liquid argon time projection chambers, with the ultimate goal of covering all parameters down to the so-called neutrino floor. One of the distinct features of the program is the use of underground argon with has a reduced content of the radioactive 39Ar compared to atmospheric argon. The DarkSide Collaboration is currently operating the DarkSide-50 experiment, the first such WIMP detector using underground argon. Operations with underground argon indicate a suppression of 39Ar by a factor (1.4 ± 0.2) × 103 relative to atmospheric argon. The new results obtained with DarkSide-50 and the plans for the next steps of the DarkSide program, the 20t fiducial mass DarkSide-20k detector and the 200 t fiducial Argo, are reviewed in this proceedings.

  20. "Phonon" scattering beyond perturbation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, WuJie; Ke, XueZhi; Xi, LiLi; Wu, LiHua; Yang, Jiong; Zhang, WenQing

    2016-02-01

    Searching and designing materials with intrinsically low lattice thermal conductivity (LTC) have attracted extensive consideration in thermoelectrics and thermal management community. The concept of part-crystalline part-liquid state, or even part-crystalline part-amorphous state, has recently been proposed to describe the exotic structure of materials with chemical- bond hierarchy, in which a set of atoms is weakly bonded to the rest species while the other sublattices retain relatively strong rigidity. The whole system inherently manifests the coexistence of rigid crystalline sublattices and fluctuating noncrystalline substructures. Representative materials in the unusual state can be classified into two categories, i.e., caged and non-caged ones. LTCs in both systems deviate from the traditional T -1 relationship ( T, the absolute temperature), which can hardly be described by small-parameter-based perturbation approaches. Beyond the classical perturbation theory, an extra rattling-like scattering should be considered to interpret the liquid-like and sublattice-amorphization-induced heat transport. Such a kind of compounds could be promising high-performance thermoelectric materials, due to the extremely low LTCs. Other physical properties for these part-crystalline substances should also exhibit certain novelty and deserve further exploration.