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Sample records for pet camera optimized

  1. Characterization of a PET Camera Optimized for ProstateImaging

    SciTech Connect

    Huber, Jennifer S.; Choong, Woon-Seng; Moses, William W.; Qi,Jinyi; Hu, Jicun; Wang, G.C.; Wilson, David; Oh, Sang; Huesman, RonaldH.; Derenzo, Stephen E.

    2005-11-11

    We present the characterization of a positron emission tomograph for prostate imaging that centers a patient between a pair of external curved detector banks (ellipse: 45 cm minor, 70 cm major axis). The distance between detector banks adjusts to allow patient access and to position the detectors as closely as possible for maximum sensitivity with patients of various sizes. Each bank is composed of two axial rows of 20 HR+ block detectors for a total of 80 detectors in the camera. The individual detectors are angled in the transaxial plane to point towards the prostate to reduce resolution degradation in that region. The detectors are read out by modified HRRT data acquisition electronics. Compared to a standard whole-body PET camera, our dedicated-prostate camera has the same sensitivity and resolution, less background (less randoms and lower scatter fraction) and a lower cost. We have completed construction of the camera. Characterization data and reconstructed images of several phantoms are shown. Sensitivity of a point source in the center is 946 cps/mu Ci. Spatial resolution is 4 mm FWHM in the central region.

  2. An Educational PET Camera Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johansson, K. E.; Nilsson, Ch.; Tegner, P. E.

    2006-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) cameras are now in widespread use in hospitals. A model of a PET camera has been installed in Stockholm House of Science and is used to explain the principles of PET to school pupils as described here.

  3. Performance of the Tachyon Time-of-Flight PET Camera

    DOE PAGES

    Peng, Q.; Choong, W. -S.; Vu, C.; Huber, J. S.; Janecek, M.; Wilson, D.; Huesman, R. H.; Qi, Jinyi; Zhou, Jian; Moses, W. W.

    2015-01-23

    We have constructed and characterized a time-of-flight Positron Emission Tomography (TOF PET) camera called the Tachyon. The Tachyon is a single-ring Lutetium Oxyorthosilicate (LSO) based camera designed to obtain significantly better timing resolution than the ~ 550 ps found in present commercial TOF cameras, in order to quantify the benefit of improved TOF resolution for clinically relevant tasks. The Tachyon's detector module is optimized for timing by coupling the 6.15 ×25 mm2 side of 6.15 ×6.15 ×25 mm3 LSO scintillator crystals onto a 1-inch diameter Hamamatsu R-9800 PMT with a super-bialkali photocathode. We characterized the camera according to the NEMAmore » NU 2-2012 standard, measuring the energy resolution, timing resolution, spatial resolution, noise equivalent count rates and sensitivity. The Tachyon achieved a coincidence timing resolution of 314 ps +/- 20 ps FWHM over all crystal-crystal combinations. Experiments were performed with the NEMA body phantom to assess the imaging performance improvement over non-TOF PET. We find that the results show that at a matched contrast, incorporating 314 ps TOF reduces the standard deviation of the contrast by a factor of about 2.3.« less

  4. Performance of the Tachyon Time-of-Flight PET Camera

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, Q.; Choong, W. -S.; Vu, C.; Huber, J. S.; Janecek, M.; Wilson, D.; Huesman, R. H.; Qi, Jinyi; Zhou, Jian; Moses, W. W.

    2015-01-23

    We have constructed and characterized a time-of-flight Positron Emission Tomography (TOF PET) camera called the Tachyon. The Tachyon is a single-ring Lutetium Oxyorthosilicate (LSO) based camera designed to obtain significantly better timing resolution than the ~ 550 ps found in present commercial TOF cameras, in order to quantify the benefit of improved TOF resolution for clinically relevant tasks. The Tachyon's detector module is optimized for timing by coupling the 6.15 ×25 mm2 side of 6.15 ×6.15 ×25 mm3 LSO scintillator crystals onto a 1-inch diameter Hamamatsu R-9800 PMT with a super-bialkali photocathode. We characterized the camera according to the NEMA NU 2-2012 standard, measuring the energy resolution, timing resolution, spatial resolution, noise equivalent count rates and sensitivity. The Tachyon achieved a coincidence timing resolution of 314 ps +/- 20 ps FWHM over all crystal-crystal combinations. Experiments were performed with the NEMA body phantom to assess the imaging performance improvement over non-TOF PET. We find that the results show that at a matched contrast, incorporating 314 ps TOF reduces the standard deviation of the contrast by a factor of about 2.3.

  5. Performance of the Tachyon Time-of-Flight PET Camera

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Q.; Choong, W.-S.; Vu, C.; Huber, J. S.; Janecek, M.; Wilson, D.; Huesman, R. H.; Qi, Jinyi; Zhou, Jian; Moses, W. W.

    2015-01-01

    We have constructed and characterized a time-of-flight Positron Emission Tomography (TOF PET) camera called the Tachyon. The Tachyon is a single-ring Lutetium Oxyorthosilicate (LSO) based camera designed to obtain significantly better timing resolution than the ~ 550 ps found in present commercial TOF cameras, in order to quantify the benefit of improved TOF resolution for clinically relevant tasks. The Tachyon’s detector module is optimized for timing by coupling the 6.15 × 25 mm2 side of 6.15 × 6.15 × 25 mm3 LSO scintillator crystals onto a 1-inch diameter Hamamatsu R-9800 PMT with a super-bialkali photocathode. We characterized the camera according to the NEMA NU 2-2012 standard, measuring the energy resolution, timing resolution, spatial resolution, noise equivalent count rates and sensitivity. The Tachyon achieved a coincidence timing resolution of 314 ps +/− ps FWHM over all crystal-crystal combinations. Experiments were performed with the NEMA body phantom to assess the imaging performance improvement over non-TOF PET. The results show that at a matched contrast, incorporating 314 ps TOF reduces the standard deviation of the contrast by a factor of about 2.3. PMID:26594057

  6. Septa design for a prostate specific PET camera

    SciTech Connect

    Qi, Jinyi; Huber, Jennifer S.; Huesman, Ronald H.; Moses, William W.; Derenzo, Stephen E.; Budinger, Thomas F.

    2003-11-15

    The recent development of new prostate tracers has motivated us to build a low cost PET camera optimized to image the prostate. Coincidence imaging of positron emitters is achieved using a pair of external curved detector banks. The bottom bank is fixed below the patient bed, and the top bank moves upward for patient access and downward for maximum sensitivity. In this paper, we study the design of septa for the prostate camera using Monte Carlo simulations. The system performance is measured by the detectability of a prostate lesion. We have studied 17 septa configurations. The results show that the design of septa has a large impact on the lesion detection at a given activity concentration. Significant differences are also observed between the lesion detectability and the conventional noise equivalent count (NEC) performance, indicating that the NEC is not appropriate for the detection task.

  7. Design of a variable field prototype PET camera

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, W.H.; Uribe, J.; Lu, W.; Hu, G.; Hicks, K.

    1996-06-01

    A prototype PET camera has been designed and is being constructed to test the concept, and develop the engineering design and production methodology for a variable field PET camera. The long term goal of the design is to develop a lower cost, high resolution PET camera. The camera has eight detector heads which form a closely packed octagon detector ring with an average diameter of 44cm for brain/breast and animal model imaging. The heads can be translated radially to a maximum ring diameter of 70cm for whole body imaging. In the larger diameter modes, the camera rotates 45{degree} during imaging. The camera heads can be set to intermediate positions to fit the camera to the subject size to maximize detection sensitivity and sampling uniformity. Special design features for imaging the breast and the axillary metastases have been incorporated. The detector design implemented is the quadrant sharing photomultiplier (PMT) design using circular 19mm PMT. The BGO detector pitch size is 2.7 x 2.7mm. The prototype camera images 27 slices simultaneously with an axial field of view (FOV) of 39mm. The prototype`s limited axial FOV, which is appropriate for testing the camera concept, would be expanded in a next-generation clinical camera implementation. Preliminary simulation studies have been performed to evaluate the resolution, sensitivity, and sampling uniformity.

  8. Advantages of improved timing accuracy in PET cameras using LSOscintillator

    SciTech Connect

    Moses, William W.

    2002-12-02

    PET scanners based on LSO have the potential forsignificantly better coincidence timing resolution than the 6 ns fwhmtypically achieved with BGO. This study analyzes the performanceenhancements made possible by improved timing as a function of thecoincidence time resolution. If 500 ps fwhm coincidence timing resolutioncan be achieved in a complete PET camera, the following four benefits canbe realized for whole-body FDG imaging: 1) The random event rate can bereduced by using a narrower coincidence timing window, increasing thepeak NECR by~;50 percent. 2) Using time-of-flight in the reconstructionalgorithm will reduce the noise variance by a factor of 5. 3) Emissionand transmission data can be acquired simultaneously, reducing the totalscan time. 4) Axial blurring can be reduced by using time-of-flight todetermine the correct axial plane that each event originated from. Whiletime-of-flight was extensively studied in the 1980's, practical factorslimited its effectiveness at that time and little attention has been paidto timing in PET since then. As these potential improvements aresubstantial and the advent of LSO PET cameras gives us the means toobtain them without other sacrifices, efforts to improve PET timingshould resume after their long dormancy.

  9. A practical block detector for a depth encoding PET camera

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, J.G.; Moisan, C.; Hoskinson, E.M.; Andreaco, M.S.; Williams, C.W.; Nutt, A.

    1995-10-01

    The depth-of-interaction effect in block detectors degrades the image resolution in commercial PET cameras and impedes the natural evolution of smaller, less expensive cameras. A method for correcting the measured position of each detected gamma ray by measuring its depth-of-interaction was tested and found to recover 38% of the lost resolution in a table-top 50 cm diameter camera. To obtain the desired depth sensitivity, standard commercial detectors were modified by a simple and practical process, which is suitable for mass production of the detectors. The impact of the detector modifications on central image resolution and on the ability of the camera to correct for object scatter were also measured.

  10. Evaluation of a dual-panel PET camera design to breast cancer imaging.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jin; Chinn, Gary; Foudray, Angela M K; Habte, Frezghi; Olcott, Peter; Levin, Craig S

    2006-01-01

    We are developing a novel, portable dual-panel positron emission tomography (PET) camera dedicated to breast cancer imaging. With a sensitive area of approximately 150 cm(2), this camera is based on arrays of lutetium oxyorthosilicate (LSO) crystals (1x1x3 mm(3)) coupled to 11x11-mm(2) position-sensitive avalanche photodiodes (PSAPD). GATE open source software was used to perform Monte Carlo simulations to optimize the parameters for the camera design. The noise equivalent counting (NEC) rate, together with the true, scatter, and random counting rates were simulated at different time and energy windows. Focal plane tomography (FPT) was used for visualizing the tumors at different depths between the two detector panels. Attenuation and uniformity corrections were applied to images. PMID:17646005

  11. Performance modeling of a wearable brain PET (BET) camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidtlein, C. R.; Turner, J. N.; Thompson, M. O.; Mandal, K. C.; Häggström, I.; Zhang, J.; Humm, J. L.; Feiglin, D. H.; Krol, A.

    2016-03-01

    Purpose: To explore, by means of analytical and Monte Carlo modeling, performance of a novel lightweight and low-cost wearable helmet-shaped Brain PET (BET) camera based on thin-film digital Geiger Avalanche Photo Diode (dGAPD) with LSO and LaBr3 scintillators for imaging in vivo human brain processes for freely moving and acting subjects responding to various stimuli in any environment. Methods: We performed analytical and Monte Carlo modeling PET performance of a spherical cap BET device and cylindrical brain PET (CYL) device, both with 25 cm diameter and the same total mass of LSO scintillator. Total mass of LSO in both the BET and CYL systems is about 32 kg for a 25 mm thick scintillator, and 13 kg for 10 mm thick scintillator (assuming an LSO density of 7.3 g/ml). We also investigated a similar system using an LaBr3 scintillator corresponding to 22 kg and 9 kg for the 25 mm and 10 mm thick systems (assuming an LaBr3 density of 5.08 g/ml). In addition, we considered a clinical whole body (WB) LSO PET/CT scanner with 82 cm ring diameter and 15.8 cm axial length to represent a reference system. BET consisted of distributed Autonomous Detector Arrays (ADAs) integrated into Intelligent Autonomous Detector Blocks (IADBs). The ADA comprised of an array of small LYSO scintillator volumes (voxels with base a×a: 1.0 <= a <= 2.0 mm and length c: 3.0 <= c <= 6.0 mm) with 5-65 μm thick reflective layers on its five sides and sixth side optically coupled to the matching array of dGAPDs and processing electronics with total thickness of 50 μm. Simulated energy resolution was 10.8% and 3.3% for LSO and LaBr3 respectively and the coincidence window was set at 2 ns. The brain was simulated as a sphere of uniform F-18 activity with diameter of 10 cm embedded in a center of water sphere with diameter of 10 cm. Results: Analytical and Monte Carlo models showed similar results for lower energy window values (458 keV versus 445 keV for LSO, and 492 keV versus 485 keV for LaBr3

  12. Quality controls for gamma cameras and PET cameras: development of a free open-source ImageJ program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlier, Thomas; Ferrer, Ludovic; Berruchon, Jean B.; Cuissard, Regis; Martineau, Adeline; Loonis, Pierre; Couturier, Olivier

    2005-04-01

    Acquisition data and treatments for quality controls of gamma cameras and Positron Emission Tomography (PET) cameras are commonly performed with dedicated program packages, which are running only on manufactured computers and differ from each other, depending on camera company and program versions. The aim of this work was to develop a free open-source program (written in JAVA language) to analyze data for quality control of gamma cameras and PET cameras. The program is based on the free application software ImageJ and can be easily loaded on any computer operating system (OS) and thus on any type of computer in every nuclear medicine department. Based on standard parameters of quality control, this program includes 1) for gamma camera: a rotation center control (extracted from the American Association of Physics in Medicine, AAPM, norms) and two uniformity controls (extracted from the Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine, IPEM, and National Electronic Manufacturers Association, NEMA, norms). 2) For PET systems, three quality controls recently defined by the French Medical Physicist Society (SFPM), i.e. spatial resolution and uniformity in a reconstructed slice and scatter fraction, are included. The determination of spatial resolution (thanks to the Point Spread Function, PSF, acquisition) allows to compute the Modulation Transfer Function (MTF) in both modalities of cameras. All the control functions are included in a tool box which is a free ImageJ plugin and could be soon downloaded from Internet. Besides, this program offers the possibility to save on HTML format the uniformity quality control results and a warning can be set to automatically inform users in case of abnormal results. The architecture of the program allows users to easily add any other specific quality control program. Finally, this toolkit is an easy and robust tool to perform quality control on gamma cameras and PET cameras based on standard computation parameters, is free, run on

  13. Towards optimal imaging with PET: an in silico feasibility study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNamara, A. L.; Toghyani, M.; Gillam, J. E.; Wu, K.; Kuncic, Z.

    2014-12-01

    The efficacy of Positron Emission Tomography (PET) imaging relies fundamentally on the ability of the system to accurately identify true coincidence events. With existing systems, this is currently accomplished with an energy acceptance criterion followed by correction techniques to remove suspected false coincidence events. These corrections generally result in signal and contrast loss and thus limit the PET system’s ability to achieve optimum image quality. A key property of annihilation radiation is that the photons are polarised with respect to each other. This polarisation correlation offers a potentially powerful discriminator, independent of energy, to accurately identify true events. In this proof of concept study, we investigate how photon polarisation information can be exploited in PET imaging by developing a method to discriminate true coincidences using the polarisation correlation of annihilation pairs. We implement this method using a Geant4 PET simulation of a GE Advance/Discovery LS system and demonstrate the potential advantages of the polarisation coincidence selection method over a standard energy criterion method. Current PET ring detectors are not capable of exploiting the polarisation correlation of the photon pairs. Compton PET systems, however are promising candidates for this application. We demonstrate the feasibility of a two-component Compton camera system in identifying true coincidences with Monte Carlo simulations. Our study demonstrates the potential of improving signal gain using polarisation, particularly for high photon emission rates. We also demonstrate the ability of the Compton camera at exploiting this polarisation correlation in PET.

  14. Evaluation of 3D reconstruction algorithms for a small animal PET camera

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, C.A.; Gandler, W.R.; Seidel, J.

    1996-12-31

    The use of paired, opposing position-sensitive phototube scintillation cameras (SCs) operating in coincidence for small animal imaging with positron emitters is currently under study. Because of the low sensitivity of the system even in 3D mode and the need to produce images with high resolution, it was postulated that a 3D expectation maximization (EM) reconstruction algorithm might be well suited for this application. We investigated four reconstruction algorithms for the 3D SC PET camera: 2D filtered back-projection (FBP), 2D ordered subset EM (OSEM), 3D reprojection (3DRP), and 3D OSEM. Noise was assessed for all slices by the coefficient of variation in a simulated uniform cylinder. Resolution was assessed from a simulation of 15 point sources in the warm background of the uniform cylinder. At comparable noise levels, the resolution achieved with OSEM (0.9-mm to 1.2-mm) is significantly better than that obtained with FBP or 3DRP (1.5-mm to 2.0-mm.) Images of a rat skull labeled with {sup 18}F-fluoride suggest that 3D OSEM can improve image quality of a small animal PET camera.

  15. Optimization of PET system design for lesion detection

    SciTech Connect

    Qi, Jinyi

    2000-10-13

    Traditionally, the figures of merit used in designing a PET scanner are spatial resolution, noise equivalent count rate, noise equivalent sensitivity, etc. These measures, however, do not directly reflect the lesion detectability using the PET scanner. Here we propose to optimize PET scanner design directly for lesion detection. The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of lesion detection can be easily computed using the theoretical expressions that we have previously derived. Because no time consuming Monte Carlo simulation is needed, the theoretical expressions allow evaluation of a large range of parameters. The PET system parameters can then be chosen to achieve the maximum SNR for lesion detection. The simulation study shown in this paper was focused a single ring PET scanner without depth of interaction measurement. Randoms and scatters were also ignored.

  16. A 3D HIDAC-PET camera with sub-millimeter resolution for imaging small animals

    SciTech Connect

    Jeavons, A.P.; Chandler, R.A.; Dettmar, C.A.R.

    1999-06-01

    A HIDAC-PET camera consisting essentially of 5 million 0.5 mm gas avalanching detectors has been constructed for small-animal imaging. The particular HIDAC advantage--a high 3D spatial resolution--has been improved to 0.95 mm fwhm and to 0.7 mm fwhm when reconstructing with 3D-OSEM methods incorporating resolution recovery. A depth-of-interaction resolution of 2.5 mm is implicit, due to the laminar construction. Scatter-corrected sensitivity, at 8.9 cps/kBq (i.e. 0.9%) from a central point source, or 7.2 cps/kBq (543 cps/kBq/cm{sup 3}) from a distributed (40 mm diameter, 60 mm long) source is now much higher than previous, and other, work. A field-of-view of 100 mm (adjustable to 200 mm) diameter by 210 mm axially permits whole-body imaging of small animals, containing typically 4MBqs of activity, at 40 kcps of which 16% are random coincidences, with a typical scatter fraction of 44%. Throughout the field-of-view there are no positional distortions and relative quantitation is uniform to {+-} 3.5%, but some variation of spatial resolution is found. The performance demonstrates that HIDAC technology is quite appropriate for small-animal PET cameras.

  17. Detection of the optimal region of interest for camera oximetry.

    PubMed

    Karlen, Walter; Ansermino, J Mark; Dumont, Guy A; Scheffer, Cornie

    2013-01-01

    The estimation of heart rate and blood oxygen saturation with an imaging array on a mobile phone (camera oximetry) has great potential for mobile health applications as no additional hardware other than a camera and LED flash enabled phone are required. However, this approach is challenging as the configuration of the camera can negatively influence the estimation quality. Further, the number of photons recorded with the photo detector is largely dependent on the optical path length, resulting in a non-homogeneous image. In this paper we describe a novel method to automatically detect the optimal region of interest (ROI) for the captured image to extract a pulse waveform. We also present a study to select the optimal camera settings, notably the white balance. The experiments show that the incandescent white balance mode is the preferable setting for camera oximetry applications on the tested mobile phone (Samsung Galaxy Ace). Also, the ROI algorithm successfully identifies the frame regions which provide waveforms with the largest amplitudes. PMID:24110175

  18. Real-time optimizations for integrated smart network camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desurmont, Xavier; Lienard, Bruno; Meessen, Jerome; Delaigle, Jean-Francois

    2005-02-01

    We present an integrated real-time smart network camera. This system is composed of an image sensor, an embedded PC based electronic card for image processing and some network capabilities. The application detects events of interest in visual scenes, highlights alarms and computes statistics. The system also produces meta-data information that could be shared between other cameras in a network. We describe the requirements of such a system and then show how the design of the system is optimized to process and compress video in real-time. Indeed, typical video-surveillance algorithms as background differencing, tracking and event detection should be highly optimized and simplified to be used in this hardware. To have a good adequation between hardware and software in this light embedded system, the software management is written on top of the java based middle-ware specification established by the OSGi alliance. We can integrate easily software and hardware in complex environments thanks to the Java Real-Time specification for the virtual machine and some network and service oriented java specifications (like RMI and Jini). Finally, we will report some outcomes and typical case studies of such a camera like counter-flow detection.

  19. Optimal Rebinning of Time-of-Flight PET Data

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Sangtae; Cho, Sanghee; Li, Quanzheng; Lin, Yanguang

    2012-01-01

    Time-of-flight (TOF) positron emission tomography (PET) scanners offer the potential for significantly improved signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and lesion detectability in clinical PET. However, fully 3D TOF PET image reconstruction is a challenging task due to the huge data size. One solution to this problem is to rebin TOF data into a lower dimensional format. We have recently developed Fourier rebinning methods for mapping TOF data into non-TOF formats that retain substantial SNR advantages relative to sinograms acquired without TOF information. However, mappings for rebinning into non-TOF formats are not unique and optimization of rebinning methods has not been widely investigated. In this paper we address the question of optimal rebinning in order to make full use of TOF information. We focus on FORET-3D, which approximately rebins 3D TOF data into 3D non-TOF sinogram formats without requiring a Fourier transform in the axial direction. We optimize the weighting for FORET-3D to minimize the variance, resulting in H2-weighted FORET-3D, which turns out to be the best linear unbiased estimator (BLUE) under reasonable approximations and furthermore the uniformly minimum variance unbiased (UMVU) estimator under Gaussian noise assumptions. This implies that any information loss due to optimal rebinning is as a result only of the approximations used in deriving the rebinning equation and developing the optimal weighting. We demonstrate using simulated and real phantom TOF data that the optimal rebinning method achieves variance reduction and contrast recovery improvement compared to nonoptimized rebinning weightings. In our preliminary study using a simplified simulation setup, the performance of the optimal rebinning method was comparable to that of fully 3D TOF MAP. PMID:21536530

  20. TU-A-18A-01: Basic Principles of PET/CT, Calibration Methods and Contrast Recovery Across Multiple Cameras

    SciTech Connect

    Kappadath, S; Nye, J

    2014-06-15

    This continuing education session will discuss the physical principles of PET/CT imaging and characterization of contrast recovery using accreditation phantoms. A detailed overview will be given on the physical principles of PET including positron decay physics, 2D and 3D data acquisition, time-of-flight, scatter correction, CT attenuation correction, and image reconstruction. Instrument quality control and calibration procedures will be discussed. Technical challenges, common image artifacts and strategies to mitigate these issues will also be discussed. Data will be presented on acquisition techniques and reconstruction parameters affecting contrast recovery. The discussion will emphasize the minimization of reconstruction differences in quantification metrics such as SUV and contrast recovery coefficients for the NEMA and ACR clinical trial phantoms. Data from new and older generation scanners will be shown including comparison of contrast recovery measurements to their analytical solutions. The goal of this session is to update attendees on the quality control and calibration of PET/CT scanners, on methods to establish a common calibration for PET/CT scanners to control for instrument variance across multiple sites. Learning Objectives: Review the physical principles of PET/CT, quality control and calibration Gain further understanding on how to apply techniques for improving quantitative agreement across multiple cameras Describe the differences between measured and expected contrast recovery for the NEMA and ACR PET phantoms.

  1. Tolerance optimization of a mobile phone camera lens system.

    PubMed

    Jung, Sangjin; Choi, Dong-Hoon; Choi, Byung-Lyul; Kim, Ju Ho

    2011-08-10

    In the manufacturing process for the lens system of a mobile phone camera, various types of assembly and manufacturing tolerances, such as tilt and decenter, should be appropriately allocated. Because these tolerances affect manufacturing cost and the expected optical performance, it is necessary to choose a systematic design methodology for determining optimal tolerances. In order to determine the tolerances that minimize production cost while satisfying the reliability constraints on important optical performance indices, we propose a tolerance design procedure for a lens system. A tolerance analysis is carried out using Latin hypercube sampling for evaluating the expected optical performance. The tolerance optimization is carried out using a function-based sequential approximate optimization technique that can reduce the computational burden and smooth numerical noise occurring in the optimization process. Using the proposed design approach, the optimal production cost was decreased by 28.3% compared to the initial cost while satisfying all the constraints on the expected optical performance. We believe that the tolerance analysis and design procedure presented in this study can be applied to the tolerance optimization of other systems. PMID:21833148

  2. Initial experience in primal-dual optimization reconstruction from sparse-PET patient data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zheng; Ye, Jinghan; Chen, Buxin; Perkins, Amy E.; Rose, Sean; Sidky, Emil Y.; Kao, Chien-Min; Xia, Dan; Tung, Chi-Hua; Pan, Xiaochuan

    2016-03-01

    There exists interest in designing a PET system with reduced detectors due to cost concerns, while not significantly compromising the PET utility. Recently developed optimization-based algorithms, which have demonstrated the potential clinical utility in image reconstruction from sparse CT data, may be used for enabling such design of innovative PET systems. In this work, we investigate a PET configuration with reduced number of detectors, and carry out preliminary studies from patient data collected by use of such sparse-PET configuration. We consider an optimization problem combining Kullback-Leibler (KL) data fidelity with an image TV constraint, and solve it by using a primal-dual optimization algorithm developed by Chambolle and Pock. Results show that advanced algorithms may enable the design of innovative PET configurations with reduced number of detectors, while yielding potential practical PET utilities.

  3. Performance evaluation and optimization of the MiniPET-II scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lajtos, Imre; Emri, Miklos; Kis, Sandor A.; Opposits, Gabor; Potari, Norbert; Kiraly, Beata; Nagy, Ferenc; Tron, Lajos; Balkay, Laszlo

    2013-04-01

    This paper presents results of the performance of a small animal PET system (MiniPET-II) installed at our Institute. MiniPET-II is a full ring camera that includes 12 detector modules in a single ring comprised of 1.27×1.27×12 mm3 LYSO scintillator crystals. The axial field of view and the inner ring diameter are 48 mm and 211 mm, respectively. The goal of this study was to determine the NEMA-NU4 performance parameters of the scanner. In addition, we also investigated how the calculated parameters depend on the coincidence time window (τ=2, 3 and 4 ns) and the low threshold settings of the energy window (Elt=250, 350 and 450 keV). Independent measurements supported optimization of the effective system radius and the coincidence time window of the system. We found that the optimal coincidence time window and low threshold energy window are 3 ns and 350 keV, respectively. The spatial resolution was close to 1.2 mm in the center of the FOV with an increase of 17% at the radial edge. The maximum value of the absolute sensitivity was 1.37% for a point source. Count rate tests resulted in peak values for the noise equivalent count rate (NEC) curve and scatter fraction of 14.2 kcps (at 36 MBq) and 27.7%, respectively, using the rat phantom. Numerical values of the same parameters obtained for the mouse phantom were 55.1 kcps (at 38.8 MBq) and 12.3%, respectively. The recovery coefficients of the image quality phantom ranged from 0.1 to 0.87. Altering the τ and Elt resulted in substantial changes in the NEC peak and the sensitivity while the effect on the image quality was negligible. The spatial resolution proved to be, as expected, independent of the τ and Elt. The calculated optimal effective system radius (resulting in the best image quality) was 109 mm. Although the NEC peak parameters do not compare favorably with those of other small animal scanners, it can be concluded that under normal counting situations the MiniPET-II imaging capability assures remarkably

  4. Edge-Preserving PET Image Reconstruction Using Trust Optimization Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guobao; Qi, Jinyi

    2014-01-01

    Iterative image reconstruction for positron emission tomography (PET) can improve image quality by using spatial regularization. The most commonly used quadratic penalty often over-smoothes sharp edges and fine features in reconstructed images, while non-quadratic penalties can preserve edges and achieve higher contrast recovery. Existing optimization algorithms such as the expectation maximization (EM) and preconditioned conjugate gradient (PCG) algorithms work well for the quadratic penalty, but are less efficient for high-curvature or non-smooth edge-preserving regularizations. This paper proposes a new algorithm to accelerate edge-preserving image reconstruction by using two strategies: trust surrogate and optimization transfer descent. Trust surrogate approximates the original penalty by a smoother function at each iteration, but guarantees the algorithm to descend monotonically; Optimization transfer descent accelerates a conventional optimization transfer algorithm by using conjugate gradient and line search. Results of computer simulations and real 3D data show that the proposed algorithm converges much faster than the conventional EM and PCG for smooth edge-preserving regularization and can also be more efficient than the current state-of-art algorithms for the non-smooth ℓ1 regularization. PMID:25438302

  5. Optimized Bayes variational regularization prior for 3D PET images.

    PubMed

    Rapisarda, Eugenio; Presotto, Luca; De Bernardi, Elisabetta; Gilardi, Maria Carla; Bettinardi, Valentino

    2014-09-01

    A new prior for variational Maximum a Posteriori regularization is proposed to be used in a 3D One-Step-Late (OSL) reconstruction algorithm accounting also for the Point Spread Function (PSF) of the PET system. The new regularization prior strongly smoothes background regions, while preserving transitions. A detectability index is proposed to optimize the prior. The new algorithm has been compared with different reconstruction algorithms such as 3D-OSEM+PSF, 3D-OSEM+PSF+post-filtering and 3D-OSL with a Gauss-Total Variation (GTV) prior. The proposed regularization allows controlling noise, while maintaining good signal recovery; compared to the other algorithms it demonstrates a very good compromise between an improved quantitation and good image quality. PMID:24958594

  6. Investigation of optimization-based reconstruction with an image-total-variation constraint in PET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zheng; Ye, Jinghan; Chen, Buxin; Perkins, Amy E.; Rose, Sean; Sidky, Emil Y.; Kao, Chien-Min; Xia, Dan; Tung, Chi-Hua; Pan, Xiaochuan

    2016-08-01

    Interest remains in reconstruction-algorithm research and development for possible improvement of image quality in current PET imaging and for enabling innovative PET systems to enhance existing, and facilitate new, preclinical and clinical applications. Optimization-based image reconstruction has been demonstrated in recent years of potential utility for CT imaging applications. In this work, we investigate tailoring the optimization-based techniques to image reconstruction for PET systems with standard and non-standard scan configurations. Specifically, given an image-total-variation (TV) constraint, we investigated how the selection of different data divergences and associated parameters impacts the optimization-based reconstruction of PET images. The reconstruction robustness was explored also with respect to different data conditions and activity up-takes of practical relevance. A study was conducted particularly for image reconstruction from data collected by use of a PET configuration with sparsely populated detectors. Overall, the study demonstrates the robustness of the TV-constrained, optimization-based reconstruction for considerably different data conditions in PET imaging, as well as its potential to enable PET configurations with reduced numbers of detectors. Insights gained in the study may be exploited for developing algorithms for PET-image reconstruction and for enabling PET-configuration design of practical usefulness in preclinical and clinical applications.

  7. Comparison of Imaging Characteristics of 124I PET for Determination of Optimal Energy Window on the Siemens Inveon PET

    PubMed Central

    Yu, A Ram; Kim, Hee-Joung; Lim, Sang Moo; Kim, Jin Su

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. 124I has a half-life of 4.2 days, which makes it suitable for imaging over several days over its uptake and washout phases. However, it has a low positron branching ratio (23%), because of prompt gamma coincidence due to high-energy γ-photons (602 to 1,691 keV), which are emitted in cascade with positrons. Methods. In this study, we investigated the optimal PET energy window for 124I PET based on image characteristics of reconstructed PET. Image characteristics such as nonuniformities, recovery coefficients (RCs), and the spillover ratios (SORs) of 124I were measured as described in NEMA NU 4-2008 standards. Results. The maximum and minimum prompt gamma coincidence fraction (PGF) were 33% and 2% in 350~800 and 400~590 keV, respectively. The difference between best and worst uniformity in the various energy windows was less than 1%. The lowest SORs of 124I were obtained at 350~750 keV in nonradioactive water compartment. Conclusion. Optimal energy window should be determined based on image characteristics. Our developed correction method would be useful for the correction of high-energy prompt gamma photon in 124I PET. In terms of the image quality of 124I PET, our findings indicate that an energy window of 350~750 keV would be optimal. PMID:27127782

  8. Simultaneous Camera Path Optimization and Distraction Removal for Improving Amateur Video.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fang-Lue; Wang, Jue; Zhao, Han; Martin, Ralph R; Hu, Shi-Min

    2015-12-01

    A major difference between amateur and professional video lies in the quality of camera paths. Previous work on video stabilization has considered how to improve amateur video by smoothing the camera path. In this paper, we show that additional changes to the camera path can further improve video aesthetics. Our new optimization method achieves multiple simultaneous goals: 1) stabilizing video content over short time scales; 2) ensuring simple and consistent camera paths over longer time scales; and 3) improving scene composition by automatically removing distractions, a common occurrence in amateur video. Our approach uses an L(1) camera path optimization framework, extended to handle multiple constraints. Two passes of optimization are used to address both low-level and high-level constraints on the camera path. The experimental and user study results show that our approach outputs video that is perceptually better than the input, or the results of using stabilization only.

  9. A Sparse Representation-Based Deployment Method for Optimizing the Observation Quality of Camera Networks

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chang; Qi, Fei; Shi, Guangming; Wang, Xiaotian

    2013-01-01

    Deployment is a critical issue affecting the quality of service of camera networks. The deployment aims at adopting the least number of cameras to cover the whole scene, which may have obstacles to occlude the line of sight, with expected observation quality. This is generally formulated as a non-convex optimization problem, which is hard to solve in polynomial time. In this paper, we propose an efficient convex solution for deployment optimizing the observation quality based on a novel anisotropic sensing model of cameras, which provides a reliable measurement of the observation quality. The deployment is formulated as the selection of a subset of nodes from a redundant initial deployment with numerous cameras, which is an ℓ0 minimization problem. Then, we relax this non-convex optimization to a convex ℓ1 minimization employing the sparse representation. Therefore, the high quality deployment is efficiently obtained via convex optimization. Simulation results confirm the effectiveness of the proposed camera deployment algorithms. PMID:23989826

  10. Optimal imaging protocols for lung cancer staging: CT, PET, MR imaging, and the role of imaging.

    PubMed

    Paul, Narinder S; Ley, Sebastian; Metser, Ur

    2012-09-01

    Chest radiography, the most commonly performed imaging technique for the detection of lung disease, is limited in accurately detecting early lung cancer. The main imaging modality for the staging of lung cancer is computed tomography (CT), supplemented by positron emission tomography (PET), usually as a hybrid technique in conjunction with CT (PET/CT). Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is a useful diagnostic tool for specific indications and has the advantage of not using ionizing radiation. This article discusses the optimal imaging protocols for lung cancer staging using CT, PET (PET/CT), and MR imaging, and the role of imaging in patient management.

  11. Optimization of precision localization microscopy using CMOS camera technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fullerton, Stephanie; Bennett, Keith; Toda, Eiji; Takahashi, Teruo

    2012-02-01

    Light microscopy imaging is being transformed by the application of computational methods that permit the detection of spatial features below the optical diffraction limit. Successful localization microscopy (STORM, dSTORM, PALM, PhILM, etc.) relies on the precise position detection of fluorescence emitted by single molecules using highly sensitive cameras with rapid acquisition speeds. Electron multiplying CCD (EM-CCD) cameras are the current standard detector for these applications. Here, we challenge the notion that EM-CCD cameras are the best choice for precision localization microscopy and demonstrate, through simulated and experimental data, that certain CMOS detector technology achieves better localization precision of single molecule fluorophores. It is well-established that localization precision is limited by system noise. Our findings show that the two overlooked noise sources relevant for precision localization microscopy are the shot noise of the background light in the sample and the excess noise from electron multiplication in EM-CCD cameras. At low light conditions (< 200 photons/fluorophore) with no optical background, EM-CCD cameras are the preferred detector. However, in practical applications, optical background noise is significant, creating conditions where CMOS performs better than EM-CCD. Furthermore, the excess noise of EM-CCD is equivalent to reducing the information content of each photon detected which, in localization microscopy, reduces the precision of the localization. Thus, new CMOS technology with 100fps, <1.3 e- read noise and high QE is the best detector choice for super resolution precision localization microscopy.

  12. Design Optimization of a TOF, Breast PET Scanner

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eunsin; Werner, Matthew E.; Karp, Joel S.; Surti, Suleman

    2013-01-01

    A dedicated breast positron emission tomography (PET) scanner with limited angle geometry can provide flexibility in detector placement around the patient as well as the ability to combine it with other imaging modalities. A primary challenge of a stationary limited angle scanner is the reduced image quality due to artifacts present in the reconstructed image leading to a loss in quantitative information. Previously it has been shown that using time-of-flight (TOF) information in image reconstruction can help reduce these image artifacts arising due to missing angular projections. Our goal in this work is to optimize the TOF, breast scanner design by performing studies for estimating image uniformity and lesion activity uptake as a function of system timing resolution, scanner angular coverage and shape. Our results show that (i) 1.5 × 1.5 × 15 mm3 lutetium oxy-orthosilicate (LSO) crystals provide a high spatial resolution and system sensitivity relative to clinical scanners, (ii) 2/3 angular coverage scanner design with TOF timing resolution less than 600 ps is appropriate for providing a tomographic image with fewer artifacts and good lesion uptake estimation relative to other partial ring designs studied in this work, (iii) a flat scanner design with 2/3 angular coverage is affected more by larger parallax error than a curved scanner geometry with the same angular coverage, but provides more uniform lesion contrast estimate over the imaging field-of-view (FOV), (iv) 2/3 angular coverage, flat, 300 ps TOF scanner design (for short, practical scan times of ≤ 5 mins per breast) provides similar precision of contrast recovery coefficient (CRC) values to a full curved, non-TOF scanner, and (v) employing depth-of-interaction (DOI) measuring detector and/or implementing resolution modeling (RM) in image reconstruction lead to improved and more uniform spatial resolution and lesion contrast over the whole FOV. PMID:24078744

  13. Optimization of microfluidic PET tracer synthesis with Cerenkov imaging†

    PubMed Central

    Dooraghi, Alex A.; Keng, Pei Y.; Chen, Supin; Javed, Muhammad R.; Kim, Chang-Jin “CJ”; Chatziioannou, Arion F.; van Dam, R. Michael

    2013-01-01

    Microfluidic technologies provide an attractive platform for the synthesis of radiolabeled compounds. Visualization of radioisotopes on chip is critical for synthesis optimization and technological development. With Cerenkov imaging, beta particle emitting isotopes can be localized with a sensitive CCD camera. In order for Cerenkov imaging to also serve as a quantitative tool, it is necessary to understand how material properties relevant to Cerenkov emission, namely, index of refraction and beta particle stopping power, affect Cerenkov light output. In this report, we investigate the fundamental physical characteristics of Cerenkov photon yield at different stages of [18F]FDG synthesis on the electrowetting on dielectric (EWOD) microfluidic platform. We also demonstrate how Cerenkov imaging has enabled synthesis optimization. Geant4, a Monte Carlo program applied extensively in high energy physics, is used to simulate Cerenkov photon yield from 18F beta particles traversing materials of interest during [18F]FDG synthesis on chip. Our simulations show that the majority (approximately two-thirds) of the 18F beta particle energy available to produce Cerenkov photons is deposited on the glass plates of the EWOD chip. This result suggests the possibility of using a single calibration factor to convert Cerenkov signal to radioactivity, independent of droplet composition. We validate our simulations with a controlled measurement examining varying ratios of [18O]H2O, dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), and acetonitrile (MeCN), and find a consistent calibration independent of solvent composition. However, the calibration factor may underestimate the radioactivity in actual synthesis due to discoloration of the droplet during certain steps of probe synthesis. In addition to the attractive quantitative potential of Cerenkov imaging, this imaging strategy provides indispensable qualitative data to guide synthesis optimization. We are able to use this imaging technique to optimize the

  14. Optimization of microfluidic PET tracer synthesis with Cerenkov imaging.

    PubMed

    Dooraghi, Alex A; Keng, Pei Y; Chen, Supin; Javed, Muhammad R; Kim, Chang-Jin C J; Chatziioannou, Arion F; van Dam, R Michael

    2013-10-01

    Microfluidic technologies provide an attractive platform for the synthesis of radiolabeled compounds. Visualization of radioisotopes on chip is critical for synthesis optimization and technological development. With Cerenkov imaging, beta particle emitting isotopes can be localized with a sensitive CCD camera. In order for Cerenkov imaging to also serve as a quantitative tool, it is necessary to understand how material properties relevant to Cerenkov emission, namely, index of refraction and beta particle stopping power, affect Cerenkov light output. In this report, we investigate the fundamental physical characteristics of Cerenkov photon yield at different stages of [(18)F]FDG synthesis on the electrowetting on dielectric (EWOD) microfluidic platform. We also demonstrate how Cerenkov imaging has enabled synthesis optimization. Geant4, a Monte Carlo program applied extensively in high energy physics, is used to simulate Cerenkov photon yield from (18)F beta particles traversing materials of interest during [(18)F]FDG synthesis on chip. Our simulations show that the majority (approximately two-thirds) of the (18)F beta particle energy available to produce Cerenkov photons is deposited on the glass plates of the EWOD chip. This result suggests the possibility of using a single calibration factor to convert Cerenkov signal to radioactivity, independent of droplet composition. We validate our simulations with a controlled measurement examining varying ratios of [(18)O]H2O, dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), and acetonitrile (MeCN), and find a consistent calibration independent of solvent composition. However, the calibration factor may underestimate the radioactivity in actual synthesis due to discoloration of the droplet during certain steps of probe synthesis. In addition to the attractive quantitative potential of Cerenkov imaging, this imaging strategy provides indispensable qualitative data to guide synthesis optimization. We are able to use this imaging technique to

  15. Dynamic imaging with high resolution time-of-flight pet camera - TOFPET I

    SciTech Connect

    Mullani, N.A.; Bristow, D.; Gaeta, J.; Gould, K.L.; Hartz, R.K.; Philipe, E.A.; Wong, W.H.; Yerian, K.

    1984-02-01

    One of the major design goals of the TOFPET I positron camera was to produce a high resolution whole body positron camera capable of dynamically imaging an organ such as the heart. TOFPET I is now nearing completion and preliminary images have been obtained to assess its dynamic and three dimensional imaging capabilities. Multiple gated images of the uptake of Rubidium in the dog heart and three dimensional surface displays of the distribution of the Rubidium-82 in the myocardium have been generated to demonstrate the three dimensional imaging properties. Fast dynamic images of the first pass of a bolus of radio-tracer through the heart have been collected with 4 second integration time and 50% gating (2 second equivalent integration time) with 18 mCi of Rb-82.

  16. Resolution limitations and optimization of the LLNL streak camera focus

    SciTech Connect

    Lerche, R.A.; Griffith, R.L.

    1987-09-01

    The RCA C73435 image tube is biased at voltages far from its original design in the LLNL ultrafast (10 ps) streak camera. Its output resolution at streak camera operating potentials has been measured as a function of input slit width, incident-light wavelength, and focus-grid voltage. The temporal resolution is insensitive to focus-grid voltage for a narrow (100 ..mu..m) input slit, but is very sensitive to focus-grid voltage for a wide (2 mm) input slit. At the optimum wide-slit focus voltage, temporal resolution is insensitive to slit width. Spatial resolution is nearly independent of focus-grid voltage for values that give good temporal resolution. Both temporal and spatial resolution depend on the incident-light wavelength. Data for 1.06-..mu..m light show significantly better focusing than for 0.53-..mu..m light. Streak camera operation is simulated with a computer program that calculates photoelectron trajectories. Electron ray tracing describes all of the observed effects of slit width, incident-light wavelength, and focus-grid voltage on output resolution. 7 refs.

  17. A descriptive geometry based method for total and common cameras fields of view optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salmane, H.; Ruichek, Y.; Khoudour, L.

    2011-07-01

    The presented work is conducted in the framework of the ANR-VTT PANsafer project (Towards a safer level crossing). One of the objectives of the project is to develop a video surveillance system that will be able to detect and recognize potential dangerous situation around level crossings. This paper addresses the problem of cameras positioning and orientation in order to view optimally monitored scenes. In general, adjusting cameras position and orientation is achieved experimentally and empirically by considering geometrical different configurations. This step requires a lot of time to adjust approximately the total and common fields of view of the cameras, especially when constrained environments, like level crossing environments, are considered. In order to simplify this task and to get more precise cameras positioning and orientation, we propose in this paper a method that optimizes automatically the total and common cameras fields with respect to the desired scene. Based on descriptive geometry, the method estimates the best cameras position and orientation by optimizing surfaces of 2D domains that are obtained by projecting/intersecting the field of view of each camera on/with horizontal and vertical planes. The proposed method is evaluated and tested to demonstrate its effectiveness.

  18. Optimal Co-segmentation of Tumor in PET-CT Images with Context Information

    PubMed Central

    Song, Qi; Bai, Junjie; Han, Dongfeng; Bhatia, Sudershan; Sun, Wenqing; Rockey, William; Bayouth, John E.; Buatti, John M.

    2014-01-01

    PET-CT images have been widely used in clinical practice for radiotherapy treatment planning of the radiotherapy. Many existing segmentation approaches only work for a single imaging modality, which suffer from the low spatial resolution in PET or low contrast in CT. In this work we propose a novel method for the co-segmentation of the tumor in both PET and CT images, which makes use of advantages from each modality: the functionality information from PET and the anatomical structure information from CT. The approach formulates the segmentation problem as a minimization problem of a Markov Random Field (MRF) model, which encodes the information from both modalities. The optimization is solved using a graph-cut based method. Two sub-graphs are constructed for the segmentation of the PET and the CT images, respectively. To achieve consistent results in two modalities, an adaptive context cost is enforced by adding context arcs between the two subgraphs. An optimal solution can be obtained by solving a single maximum flow problem, which leads to simultaneous segmentation of the tumor volumes in both modalities. The proposed algorithm was validated in robust delineation of lung tumors on 23 PET-CT datasets and two head-and-neck cancer subjects. Both qualitative and quantitative results show significant improvement compared to the graph cut methods solely using PET or CT. PMID:23693127

  19. A novel optimization method of camera parameters used for vision measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Fuqiang; Cui, Yi; Peng, Bin; Wang, Yexin

    2012-09-01

    Camera calibration plays an important role in the field of machine vision applications. During the process of camera calibration, nonlinear optimization technique is crucial to obtain the best performance of camera parameters. Currently, the existing optimization method aims at minimizing the distance error between the detected image point and the calculated back-projected image point, based on 2D image pixels coordinate. However, the vision measurement process is conducted in 3D space while the optimization method generally adopted is carried out in 2D image plane. Moreover, the error criterion with respect to optimization and measurement is different. In other words, the equal pixel distance error in 2D image plane leads to diverse 3D metric distance error at different position before the camera. All the reasons mentioned above will cause accuracy decrease for 3D vision measurement. To solve the problem, a novel optimization method of camera parameters used for vision measurement is proposed. The presented method is devoted to minimizing the metric distance error between the calculated point and the real point in 3D measurement coordinate system. Comparatively, the initial camera parameters acquired through linear calibration are optimized through two different methods: one is the conventional method and the other is the novel method presented by this paper. Also, the calibration accuracy and measurement accuracy of the parameters obtained by the two methods are thoroughly analyzed and the choice of a suitable accuracy evaluation method is discussed. Simulative and real experiments to estimate the performance of the proposed method on test data are reported, and the results show that the proposed 3D optimization method is quite efficient to improve measurement accuracy compared with traditional method. It can meet the practical requirement of high precision in 3D vision metrology engineering.

  20. A sinogram warping strategy for pre-reconstruction 4D PET optimization.

    PubMed

    Gianoli, Chiara; Riboldi, Marco; Fontana, Giulia; Kurz, Christopher; Parodi, Katia; Baroni, Guido

    2016-03-01

    A novel strategy for 4D PET optimization in the sinogram domain is proposed, aiming at motion model application before image reconstruction ("sinogram warping" strategy). Compared to state-of-the-art 4D-MLEM reconstruction, the proposed strategy is able to optimize the image SNR, avoiding iterative direct and inverse warping procedures, which are typical of the 4D-MLEM algorithm. A full-count statistics sinogram of the motion-compensated 4D PET reference phase is generated by warping the sinograms corresponding to the different PET phases. This is achieved relying on a motion model expressed in the sinogram domain. The strategy was tested on the anthropomorphic 4D PET-CT NCAT phantom in comparison with the 4D-MLEM algorithm, with particular reference to robustness to PET-CT co-registrations artefacts. The MLEM reconstruction of the warped sinogram according to the proposed strategy exhibited better accuracy (up to +40.90 % with respect to the ideal value), whereas images reconstructed according to the 4D-MLEM reconstruction resulted in less noisy (down to -26.90 % with respect to the ideal value) but more blurred. The sinogram warping strategy demonstrates advantages with respect to 4D-MLEM algorithm. These advantages are paid back by introducing approximation of the deformation field, and further efforts are required to mitigate the impact of such an approximation in clinical 4D PET reconstruction.

  1. Optimal Design of Anger Camera for Bremsstrahlung Imaging: Monte Carlo Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Walrand, Stephan; Hesse, Michel; Wojcik, Randy; Lhommel, Renaud; Jamar, François

    2014-01-01

    A conventional Anger camera is not adapted to bremsstrahlung imaging and, as a result, even using a reduced energy acquisition window, geometric x-rays represent <15% of the recorded events. This increases noise, limits the contrast, and reduces the quantification accuracy. Monte Carlo (MC) simulations of energy spectra showed that a camera based on a 30-mm-thick BGO crystal and equipped with a high energy pinhole collimator is well-adapted to bremsstrahlung imaging. The total scatter contamination is reduced by a factor 10 versus a conventional NaI camera equipped with a high energy parallel hole collimator enabling acquisition using an extended energy window ranging from 50 to 350 keV. By using the recorded event energy in the reconstruction method, shorter acquisition time and reduced orbit range will be usable allowing the design of a simplified mobile gantry. This is more convenient for use in a busy catheterization room. After injecting a safe activity, a fast single photon emission computed tomography could be performed without moving the catheter tip in order to assess the liver dosimetry and estimate the additional safe activity that could still be injected. Further long running time MC simulations of realistic acquisitions will allow assessing the quantification capability of such system. Simultaneously, a dedicated bremsstrahlung prototype camera reusing PMT–BGO blocks coming from a retired PET system is currently under design for further evaluation. PMID:24982849

  2. Optimal design of anger camera for bremsstrahlung imaging: monte carlo evaluation.

    PubMed

    Walrand, Stephan; Hesse, Michel; Wojcik, Randy; Lhommel, Renaud; Jamar, François

    2014-01-01

    A conventional Anger camera is not adapted to bremsstrahlung imaging and, as a result, even using a reduced energy acquisition window, geometric x-rays represent <15% of the recorded events. This increases noise, limits the contrast, and reduces the quantification accuracy. Monte Carlo (MC) simulations of energy spectra showed that a camera based on a 30-mm-thick BGO crystal and equipped with a high energy pinhole collimator is well-adapted to bremsstrahlung imaging. The total scatter contamination is reduced by a factor 10 versus a conventional NaI camera equipped with a high energy parallel hole collimator enabling acquisition using an extended energy window ranging from 50 to 350 keV. By using the recorded event energy in the reconstruction method, shorter acquisition time and reduced orbit range will be usable allowing the design of a simplified mobile gantry. This is more convenient for use in a busy catheterization room. After injecting a safe activity, a fast single photon emission computed tomography could be performed without moving the catheter tip in order to assess the liver dosimetry and estimate the additional safe activity that could still be injected. Further long running time MC simulations of realistic acquisitions will allow assessing the quantification capability of such system. Simultaneously, a dedicated bremsstrahlung prototype camera reusing PMT-BGO blocks coming from a retired PET system is currently under design for further evaluation.

  3. Optimized dynamic framing for PET-based myocardial blood flow estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolthammer, Jeffrey A.; Muzic, Raymond F.

    2013-08-01

    An optimal experiment design methodology was developed to select the framing schedule to be used in dynamic positron emission tomography (PET) for estimation of myocardial blood flow using 82Rb. A compartment model and an arterial input function based on measured data were used to calculate a D-optimality criterion for a wide range of candidate framing schedules. To validate the optimality calculation, noisy time-activity curves were simulated, from which parameter values were estimated using an efficient and robust decomposition of the estimation problem. D-optimized schedules improved estimate precision compared to non-optimized schedules, including previously published schedules. To assess robustness, a range of physiologic conditions were simulated. Schedules that were optimal for one condition were nearly-optimal for others. The effect of infusion duration was investigated. Optimality was better for shorter than for longer tracer infusion durations, with the optimal schedule for the shortest infusion duration being nearly optimal for other durations. Together this suggests that a framing schedule optimized for one set of conditions will also work well for others and it is not necessary to use different schedules for different infusion durations or for rest and stress studies. The method for optimizing schedules is general and could be applied in other dynamic PET imaging studies.

  4. Optimizing modelling in iterative image reconstruction for preclinical pinhole PET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goorden, Marlies C.; van Roosmalen, Jarno; van der Have, Frans; Beekman, Freek J.

    2016-05-01

    The recently developed versatile emission computed tomography (VECTor) technology enables high-energy SPECT and simultaneous SPECT and PET of small animals at sub-mm resolutions. VECTor uses dedicated clustered pinhole collimators mounted in a scanner with three stationary large-area NaI(Tl) gamma detectors. Here, we develop and validate dedicated image reconstruction methods that compensate for image degradation by incorporating accurate models for the transport of high-energy annihilation gamma photons. Ray tracing software was used to calculate photon transport through the collimator structures and into the gamma detector. Input to this code are several geometric parameters estimated from system calibration with a scanning 99mTc point source. Effects on reconstructed images of (i) modelling variable depth-of-interaction (DOI) in the detector, (ii) incorporating photon paths that go through multiple pinholes (‘multiple-pinhole paths’ (MPP)), and (iii) including various amounts of point spread function (PSF) tail were evaluated. Imaging 18F in resolution and uniformity phantoms showed that including large parts of PSFs is essential to obtain good contrast-noise characteristics and that DOI modelling is highly effective in removing deformations of small structures, together leading to 0.75 mm resolution PET images of a hot-rod Derenzo phantom. Moreover, MPP modelling reduced the level of background noise. These improvements were also clearly visible in mouse images. Performance of VECTor can thus be significantly improved by accurately modelling annihilation gamma photon transport.

  5. Optimizing modelling in iterative image reconstruction for preclinical pinhole PET.

    PubMed

    Goorden, Marlies C; van Roosmalen, Jarno; van der Have, Frans; Beekman, Freek J

    2016-05-21

    The recently developed versatile emission computed tomography (VECTor) technology enables high-energy SPECT and simultaneous SPECT and PET of small animals at sub-mm resolutions. VECTor uses dedicated clustered pinhole collimators mounted in a scanner with three stationary large-area NaI(Tl) gamma detectors. Here, we develop and validate dedicated image reconstruction methods that compensate for image degradation by incorporating accurate models for the transport of high-energy annihilation gamma photons. Ray tracing software was used to calculate photon transport through the collimator structures and into the gamma detector. Input to this code are several geometric parameters estimated from system calibration with a scanning (99m)Tc point source. Effects on reconstructed images of (i) modelling variable depth-of-interaction (DOI) in the detector, (ii) incorporating photon paths that go through multiple pinholes ('multiple-pinhole paths' (MPP)), and (iii) including various amounts of point spread function (PSF) tail were evaluated. Imaging (18)F in resolution and uniformity phantoms showed that including large parts of PSFs is essential to obtain good contrast-noise characteristics and that DOI modelling is highly effective in removing deformations of small structures, together leading to 0.75 mm resolution PET images of a hot-rod Derenzo phantom. Moreover, MPP modelling reduced the level of background noise. These improvements were also clearly visible in mouse images. Performance of VECTor can thus be significantly improved by accurately modelling annihilation gamma photon transport. PMID:27082049

  6. Camera simulation engine enables efficient system optimization for super-resolution imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fullerton, Stephanie; Bennett, Keith; Toda, Eiji; Takahashi, Teruo

    2012-02-01

    Quantitative fluorescent imaging requires optimization of the complete optical system, from the sample to the detector. Such considerations are especially true for precision localization microscopy such as PALM and (d)STORM where the precision of the result is limited by the noise in both the optical and detection systems. Here, we present a Camera Simulation Engine (CSE) that allows comparison of imaging results from CCD, CMOS and EM-CCD cameras under various sample conditions and can accurately validate the quality of precision localization algorithms and camera performance. To achieve these results, the CSE incorporates the following parameters: 1) Sample conditions including optical intensity, wavelength, optical signal shot noise, and optical background shot noise; 2) Camera specifications including QE, pixel size, dark current, read noise, EM-CCD excess noise; 3) Camera operating conditions such as exposure, binning and gain. A key feature of the CSE is that, from a single image (either real or simulated "ideal") we generate a stack of statistically realistic images. We have used the CSE to validate experimental data showing that certain current scientific CMOS technology outperforms EM-CCD in most super-resolution scenarios. Our results support using the CSE to efficiently and methodically select cameras for quantitative imaging applications. Furthermore, the CSE can be used to robustly compare and evaluate new algorithms for data analysis and image reconstruction. These uses of the CSE are particularly relevant to super-resolution precision localization microscopy and provide a faster, simpler and more cost effective means of system optimization, especially camera selection.

  7. Vehicle occupancy detection camera position optimization using design of experiments and standard image references

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, Peter; Hoover, Martin; Rabbani, Mojgan

    2013-03-01

    Camera positioning and orientation is important to applications in domains such as transportation since the objects to be imaged vary greatly in shape and size. In a typical transportation application that requires capturing still images, inductive loops buried in the ground or laser trigger sensors are used when a vehicle reaches the image capture zone to trigger the image capture system. The camera in such a system is in a fixed position pointed at the roadway and at a fixed orientation. Thus the problem is to determine the optimal location and orientation of the camera when capturing images from a wide variety of vehicles. Methods from Design for Six Sigma, including identifying important parameters and noise sources and performing systematically designed experiments (DOE) can be used to determine an effective set of parameter settings for the camera position and orientation under these conditions. In the transportation application of high occupancy vehicle lane enforcement, the number of passengers in the vehicle is to be counted. Past work has described front seat vehicle occupant counting using a camera mounted on an overhead gantry looking through the front windshield in order to capture images of vehicle occupants. However, viewing rear seat passengers is more problematic due to obstructions including the vehicle body frame structures and seats. One approach is to view the rear seats through the side window. In this situation the problem of optimally positioning and orienting the camera to adequately capture the rear seats through the side window can be addressed through a designed experiment. In any automated traffic enforcement system it is necessary for humans to be able to review any automatically captured digital imagery in order to verify detected infractions. Thus for defining an output to be optimized for the designed experiment, a human defined standard image reference (SIR) was used to quantify the quality of the line-of-sight to the rear seats of

  8. Flow optimization study of a batch microfluidics PET tracer synthesizing device

    PubMed Central

    Elizarov, Arkadij M.; Meinhart, Carl; van Dam, R. Michael; Huang, Jiang; Daridon, Antoine; Heath, James R.; Kolb, Hartmuth C.

    2010-01-01

    We present numerical modeling and experimental studies of flow optimization inside a batch microfluidic micro-reactor used for synthesis of human-scale doses of Positron Emission Tomography (PET) tracers. Novel techniques are used for mixing within, and eluting liquid out of, the coin-shaped reaction chamber. Numerical solutions of the general incompressible Navier Stokes equations along with time-dependent elution scalar field equation for the three dimensional coin-shaped geometry were obtained and validated using fluorescence imaging analysis techniques. Utilizing the approach presented in this work, we were able to identify optimized geometrical and operational conditions for the micro-reactor in the absence of radioactive material commonly used in PET related tracer production platforms as well as evaluate the designed and fabricated micro-reactor using numerical and experimental validations. PMID:21072595

  9. A neutron pinhole camera for PF-24 source: Conceptual design and optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bielecki, J.; Wójcik-Gargula, A.; Wiacek, U.; Scholz, M.; Igielski, A.; Drozdowicz, K.; Woźnicka, U.

    2015-07-01

    A fast-neutron pinhole camera based on small-area (5mm × 5 mm) BCF-12 scintillation detectors with nanosecond time resolution has been designed. The pinhole camera is dedicated to the investigation of the spatial and temporal distributions of DD neutrons from the Plasma Focus (PF-24) source. The geometrical parameters of the camera have been optimized in terms of maximum neutron flux at the imaging plane by means of MCNP calculations. The detection system consists of four closely packed scintillation detectors coupled via long optical fibres to Hamamatsu H3164-10 photomultiplier tubes. The pinhole consists of specially designed 420 mm long copper collimator with an effective aperture of 1.7 mm mounted inside a cylindrical polyethylene tube. The performance of the presented detection system in the mixed (hard X-ray and neutron) radiation field of the PF-24 plasma focus device has been tested. The results of the tests showed that the small-area BCF-12 scintillation detectors can be successfully applied as the detection system of the neutron pinhole camera for the PF-24 device.

  10. SU-D-9A-01: Listmode-Driven Optimal Gating (OG) Respiratory Motion Management: Potential Impact On Quantitative PET Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, K; Hristov, D

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the potential impact of listmode-driven amplitude based optimal gating (OG) respiratory motion management technique on quantitative PET imaging. Methods: During the PET acquisitions, an optical camera tracked and recorded the motion of a tool placed on top of patients' torso. PET event data were utilized to detect and derive a motion signal that is directly coupled with a specific internal organ. A radioactivity-trace was generated from listmode data by accumulating all prompt counts in temporal bins matching the sampling rate of the external tracking device. Decay correction for 18F was performed. The image reconstructions using OG respiratory motion management technique that uses 35% of total radioactivity counts within limited motion amplitudes were performed with external motion and radioactivity traces separately with ordered subset expectation maximization (OSEM) with 2 iterations and 21 subsets. Standard uptake values (SUVs) in a tumor region were calculated to measure the effect of using radioactivity trace for motion compensation. Motion-blurred 3D static PET image was also reconstructed with all counts and the SUVs derived from OG images were compared with SUVs from 3D images. Results: A 5.7 % increase of the maximum SUV in the lesion was found for optimal gating image reconstruction with radioactivity trace when compared to a static 3D image. The mean and maximum SUVs on the image that was reconstructed with radioactivity trace were found comparable (0.4 % and 4.5 % increase, respectively) to the values derived from the image that was reconstructed with external trace. Conclusion: The image reconstructed using radioactivity trace showed that the blurring due to the motion was reduced with impact on derived SUVs. The resolution and contrast of the images reconstructed with radioactivity trace were comparable to the resolution and contrast of the images reconstructed with external respiratory traces. Research supported by Siemens.

  11. Trends in PET imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Moses, William W.

    2000-11-01

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) imaging is a well established method for obtaining information on the status of certain organs within the human body or in animals. This paper presents an overview of recent trends PET instrumentation. Significant effort is being expended to develop new PET detector modules, especially those capable of measuring depth of interaction. This is aided by recent advances in scintillator and pixellated photodetector technology. The other significant area of effort is development of special purpose PET cameras (such as for imaging breast cancer or small animals) or cameras that have the ability to image in more than one modality (such as PET / SPECT or PET / X-Ray CT).

  12. Motion correction of PET brain images through deconvolution: II. Practical implementation and algorithm optimization.

    PubMed

    Raghunath, N; Faber, T L; Suryanarayanan, S; Votaw, J R

    2009-02-01

    Image quality is significantly degraded even by small amounts of patient motion in very high-resolution PET scanners. When patient motion is known, deconvolution methods can be used to correct the reconstructed image and reduce motion blur. This paper describes the implementation and optimization of an iterative deconvolution method that uses an ordered subset approach to make it practical and clinically viable. We performed ten separate FDG PET scans using the Hoffman brain phantom and simultaneously measured its motion using the Polaris Vicra tracking system (Northern Digital Inc., Ontario, Canada). The feasibility and effectiveness of the technique was studied by performing scans with different motion and deconvolution parameters. Deconvolution resulted in visually better images and significant improvement as quantified by the Universal Quality Index (UQI) and contrast measures. Finally, the technique was applied to human studies to demonstrate marked improvement. Thus, the deconvolution technique presented here appears promising as a valid alternative to existing motion correction methods for PET. It has the potential for deblurring an image from any modality if the causative motion is known and its effect can be represented in a system matrix.

  13. Dynamic whole-body PET parametric imaging: I. Concept, acquisition protocol optimization and clinical application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karakatsanis, Nicolas A.; Lodge, Martin A.; Tahari, Abdel K.; Zhou, Y.; Wahl, Richard L.; Rahmim, Arman

    2013-10-01

    Static whole-body PET/CT, employing the standardized uptake value (SUV), is considered the standard clinical approach to diagnosis and treatment response monitoring for a wide range of oncologic malignancies. Alternative PET protocols involving dynamic acquisition of temporal images have been implemented in the research setting, allowing quantification of tracer dynamics, an important capability for tumor characterization and treatment response monitoring. Nonetheless, dynamic protocols have been confined to single-bed-coverage limiting the axial field-of-view to ˜15-20 cm, and have not been translated to the routine clinical context of whole-body PET imaging for the inspection of disseminated disease. Here, we pursue a transition to dynamic whole-body PET parametric imaging, by presenting, within a unified framework, clinically feasible multi-bed dynamic PET acquisition protocols and parametric imaging methods. We investigate solutions to address the challenges of: (i) long acquisitions, (ii) small number of dynamic frames per bed, and (iii) non-invasive quantification of kinetics in the plasma. In the present study, a novel dynamic (4D) whole-body PET acquisition protocol of ˜45 min total length is presented, composed of (i) an initial 6 min dynamic PET scan (24 frames) over the heart, followed by (ii) a sequence of multi-pass multi-bed PET scans (six passes × seven bed positions, each scanned for 45 s). Standard Patlak linear graphical analysis modeling was employed, coupled with image-derived plasma input function measurements. Ordinary least squares Patlak estimation was used as the baseline regression method to quantify the physiological parameters of tracer uptake rate Ki and total blood distribution volume V on an individual voxel basis. Extensive Monte Carlo simulation studies, using a wide set of published kinetic FDG parameters and GATE and XCAT platforms, were conducted to optimize the acquisition protocol from a range of ten different clinically

  14. Optimized flash light-emitting diode spectra for mobile phone cameras.

    PubMed

    Kimme, Felix; Brick, Peter; Chatterjee, Sangam; Tran, Quoc Khanh

    2013-12-20

    Flash light-emitting diodes (LEDs) of modern mobile phones lack red and cyan spectral parts, however, the color gamut of their respective displays has increased in recent years. The influence of this discrepancy on the color reproduction of smart phones is investigated in this paper. Based on the CIECAM02 color appearance model, a metric is introduced to judge color reproduction of mobile phones under flash LED illumination. An evaluation method is established to compare the visual appearance of a scene under various surrounding illuminations with the reproduction of that scene. To facilitate a comparison with measurements, the evaluation method is based on the raw data of two test cameras and a Digital ColorChecker SG. To reduce the color shift between perception and reproduction, optimized flash LED spectra are presented. A single-LED and a double-LED concept with adjustable color temperature are derived from these results. Additionally, the common characteristics of flash LED spectra giving good results is investigated, identifying the spectral parts with the most influence on camera color reproduction and showing the spectral parts not contributing or even resulting in poor color reproduction. Finally the efficiency of optimized flash LED spectra is compared to standard flash LEDs.

  15. Optimization of Rb-82 PET acquisition and reconstruction protocols for myocardial perfusion defect detection.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jing; Rahmim, Arman; Lautamäki, Riikka; Lodge, Martin A; Bengel, Frank M; Tsui, Benjamin M W

    2009-05-21

    The purpose of this study is to optimize the dynamic Rb-82 cardiac PET acquisition and reconstruction protocols for maximum myocardial perfusion defect detection using realistic simulation data and task-based evaluation. Time activity curves (TACs) of different organs under both rest and stress conditions were extracted from dynamic Rb-82 PET images of five normal patients. Combined SimSET-GATE Monte Carlo simulation was used to generate nearly noise-free cardiac PET data from a time series of 3D NCAT phantoms with organ activities modeling different pre-scan delay times (PDTs) and total acquisition times (TATs). Poisson noise was added to the nearly noise-free projections and the OS-EM algorithm was applied to generate noisy reconstructed images. The channelized Hotelling observer (CHO) with 32x32 spatial templates corresponding to four octave-wide frequency channels was used to evaluate the images. The area under the ROC curve (AUC) was calculated from the CHO rating data as an index for image quality in terms of myocardial perfusion defect detection. The 0.5 cycle cm(-1) Butterworth post-filtering on OS-EM (with 21 subsets) reconstructed images generates the highest AUC values while those from iteration numbers 1 to 4 do not show different AUC values. The optimized PDTs for both rest and stress conditions are found to be close to the cross points of the left ventricular chamber and myocardium TACs, which may promote an individualized PDT for patient data processing and image reconstruction. Shortening the TATs for

  16. Optimization of Rb-82 PET acquisition and reconstruction protocols for myocardial perfusion defect detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Jing; Rahmim, Arman; Lautamäki, Riikka; Lodge, Martin A.; Bengel, Frank M.; Tsui, Benjamin M. W.

    2009-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to optimize the dynamic Rb-82 cardiac PET acquisition and reconstruction protocols for maximum myocardial perfusion defect detection using realistic simulation data and task-based evaluation. Time activity curves (TACs) of different organs under both rest and stress conditions were extracted from dynamic Rb-82 PET images of five normal patients. Combined SimSET-GATE Monte Carlo simulation was used to generate nearly noise-free cardiac PET data from a time series of 3D NCAT phantoms with organ activities modeling different pre-scan delay times (PDTs) and total acquisition times (TATs). Poisson noise was added to the nearly noise-free projections and the OS-EM algorithm was applied to generate noisy reconstructed images. The channelized Hotelling observer (CHO) with 32× 32 spatial templates corresponding to four octave-wide frequency channels was used to evaluate the images. The area under the ROC curve (AUC) was calculated from the CHO rating data as an index for image quality in terms of myocardial perfusion defect detection. The 0.5 cycle cm-1 Butterworth post-filtering on OS-EM (with 21 subsets) reconstructed images generates the highest AUC values while those from iteration numbers 1 to 4 do not show different AUC values. The optimized PDTs for both rest and stress conditions are found to be close to the cross points of the left ventricular chamber and myocardium TACs, which may promote an individualized PDT for patient data processing and image reconstruction. Shortening the TATs for <~3 min from the clinically employed acquisition time does not affect the myocardial perfusion defect detection significantly for both rest and stress studies.

  17. An energy-optimized collimator design for a CZT-based SPECT camera

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Fenghua; Bagchi, Srijeeta; Zan, Yunlong; Huang, Qiu; Seo, Youngho

    2015-01-01

    In single photon emission computed tomography, it is a challenging task to maintain reasonable performance using only one specific collimator for radio-tracers over a broad spectrum of diagnostic photon energies, since photon scatter and penetration in a collimator differ with the photon energy. Frequent collimator exchanges are inevitable in daily clinical SPECT imaging, which hinders throughput while subjecting the camera to operational errors and damage. Our objective is to design a collimator, which independent of the photon energy performs reasonably well for commonly used radiotracers with low- to medium-energy levels of gamma emissions. Using the Geant4 simulation toolkit, we simulated and evaluated a parallel-hole collimator mounted to a CZT detector. With the pixel-geometry-matching collimation, the pitch of the collimator hole was fixed to match the pixel size of the CZT detector throughout this work. Four variables, hole shape, hole length, hole radius/width and the source-to-collimator distance were carefully studied. Scatter and penetration of the collimator, sensitivity and spatial resolution of the system were assessed for four radionuclides including 57Co, 99mTc, 123I and 111In, with respect to the aforementioned four variables. An optimal collimator was then decided upon such that it maximized the total relative sensitivity (TRS) for the four considered radionuclides while other performance parameters, such as scatter, penetration and spatial resolution, were benchmarked to prevalent commercial scanners and collimators. Digital phantom studies were also performed to validate the system with the optimal square-hole collimator (23 mm hole length, 1.28 mm hole width, 0.32 mm septal thickness) in terms of contrast, contrast-to-noise ratio and recovery ratio. This study demonstrates promise of our proposed energy-optimized collimator to be used in a CZT-based gamma camera, with comparable or even better imaging performance versus commercial collimators

  18. Thermal regulation for APDs in a 1 mm(3) resolution clinical PET camera: design, simulation and experimental verification.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Jinjian; Vandenbroucke, Arne; Levin, Craig S

    2014-07-21

    We are developing a 1 mm(3) resolution positron emission tomography camera dedicated to breast imaging. The camera collects high energy photons emitted from radioactively labeled agents introduced in the patients in order to detect molecular signatures of breast cancer. The camera comprises many layers of lutetium yttrium oxyorthosilicate (LYSO) scintillation crystals coupled to position sensitive avalanche photodiodes (PSAPDs). The main objectives of the studies presented in this paper are to investigate the temperature profile of the layers of LYSO-PSAPD detectors (a.k.a. 'fins') residing in the camera and to use these results to present the design of the thermal regulation system for the front end of the camera. The study was performed using both experimental methods and simulation. We investigated a design with a heat-dissipating fin. Three fin configurations are tested: fin with Al windows (FwW), fin without Al windows (FwoW) and fin with alumina windows (FwAW). A Fluent® simulation was conducted to study the experimentally inaccessible temperature of the PSAPDs. For the best configuration (FwW), the temperature difference from the center to a point near the edge is 1.0 K when 1.5 A current was applied to the Peltier elements. Those of FwoW and FwAW are 2.6 K and 1.7 K, respectively. We conclude that the design of a heat-dissipating fin configuration with 'aluminum windows' (FwW) that borders the scintillation crystal arrays of 16 adjacent detector modules has better heat dissipation capabilities than the design without 'aluminum windows' (FwoW) and the design with 'alumina windows' (FwAW), respectively.

  19. Evaluation and optimization of occupational eye lens dosimetry during positron emission tomography (PET) procedures.

    PubMed

    Guiu-Souto, Jacobo; Sánchez-García, Manuel; Vázquez-Vázquez, Rubén; Otero, Carlos; Luna, Victor; Mosquera, Javier; Busto, Ramón Lobato; Aguiar, Pablo; Ruibal, Álvaro; Pardo-Montero, Juan; Pombar-Cameán, Miguel

    2016-06-01

    The last recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection for eye lens dose suggest an important reduction on the radiation limits associated with early and late tissue reactions. The aim of this work is to quantify and optimize the eye lens dose associated to nurse staff during positron emission tomography (PET) procedures. PET is one of the most important diagnostic methods of oncological and neurological cancer disease involving an important number of workers exposed to the high energy isotope F-18. We characterize the relevant stages as preparation and administration of monodose syringes in terms of occupational dose. A direct reading silicon dosimeter was used to measure the lens dose to staff. The highest dose of radiation was observed during preparation of the fluorodesoxyglucose (FDG) syringes. By optimizing a suitable vials' distribution of FDG we find an important reduction in occupational doses. Extrapolation of our data to other clinical scenarios indicates that, depending on the work load and/or syringes activity, safety limits of the dose might be exceeded.

  20. Study and optimization of positioning algorithms for monolithic PET detectors blocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia de Acilu, P.; Sarasola, I.; Canadas, M.; Cuerdo, R.; Rato Mendes, P.; Romero, L.; Willmott, C.

    2012-06-01

    We are developing a PET insert for existing MRI equipment to be used in clinical PET/MR studies of the human brain. The proposed scanner is based on annihilation gamma detection with monolithic blocks of cerium-doped lutetium yttrium orthosilicate (LYSO:Ce) coupled to magnetically-compatible avalanche photodiodes (APD) matrices. The light distribution generated on the LYSO:Ce block provides the impinging position of the 511 keV photons by means of a positioning algorithm. Several positioning methods, from the simplest Anger Logic to more sophisticate supervised-learning Neural Networks (NN), can be implemented to extract the incidence position of gammas directly from the APD signals. Finally, an optimal method based on a two-step Feed-Forward Neural Network has been selected. It allows us to reach a resolution at detector level of 2 mm, and acquire images of point sources using a first BrainPET prototype consisting of two monolithic blocks working in coincidence. Neural networks provide a straightforward positioning of the acquired data once they have been trained, however the training process is usually time-consuming. In order to obtain an efficient positioning method for the complete scanner it was necessary to find a training procedure that reduces the data acquisition and processing time without introducing a noticeable degradation of the spatial resolution. A grouping process and posterior selection of the training data have been done regarding the similitude of the light distribution of events which have one common incident coordinate (transversal or longitudinal). By doing this, the amount of training data can be reduced to about 5% of the initial number with a degradation of spatial resolution lower than 10%.

  1. Optimization, evaluation, and comparison of standard algorithms for image reconstruction with the VIP-PET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhaylova, E.; Kolstein, M.; De Lorenzo, G.; Chmeissani, M.

    2014-07-01

    A novel positron emission tomography (PET) scanner design based on a room-temperature pixelated CdTe solid-state detector is being developed within the framework of the Voxel Imaging PET (VIP) Pathfinder project [1]. The simulation results show a great potential of the VIP to produce high-resolution images even in extremely challenging conditions such as the screening of a human head [2]. With unprecedented high channel density (450 channels/cm3) image reconstruction is a challenge. Therefore optimization is needed to find the best algorithm in order to exploit correctly the promising detector potential. The following reconstruction algorithms are evaluated: 2-D Filtered Backprojection (FBP), Ordered Subset Expectation Maximization (OSEM), List-Mode OSEM (LM-OSEM), and the Origin Ensemble (OE) algorithm. The evaluation is based on the comparison of a true image phantom with a set of reconstructed images obtained by each algorithm. This is achieved by calculation of image quality merit parameters such as the bias, the variance and the mean square error (MSE). A systematic optimization of each algorithm is performed by varying the reconstruction parameters, such as the cutoff frequency of the noise filters and the number of iterations. The region of interest (ROI) analysis of the reconstructed phantom is also performed for each algorithm and the results are compared. Additionally, the performance of the image reconstruction methods is compared by calculating the modulation transfer function (MTF). The reconstruction time is also taken into account to choose the optimal algorithm. The analysis is based on GAMOS [3] simulation including the expected CdTe and electronic specifics.

  2. Analytical study of the effect of collimation on the performance of PET cameras in 3-D imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Maze, A.; Lecomte, R. )

    1990-04-01

    This paper presents an analytical model developed to evaluate the 3-d imaging performance of cylindrical PET systems with the multi-slice and the volumetric configurations. Point source event rates for singles and for true and scattered coincidences were obtained by numerical integration of the equations for probability of incidence on the detectors. Data were subsequently combined to extract the sensitivity and background (scatters + accidentals) count rates for various source dimensions and activity densities. Event rates before detection were evaluated and an ideal tomograph geometry was assumed in order to investigate the fundamental properties inherent to the two tomograph designs. For small sources placed in a scattering cylinder, results indicate higher scatter and accidental fractions in the volumetric system.

  3. SU-D-201-05: Phantom Study to Determine Optimal PET Reconstruction Parameters for PET/MR Imaging of Y-90 Microspheres Following Radioembolization

    SciTech Connect

    Maughan, N; Conti, M; Parikh, P; Faul, D; Laforest, R

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Imaging Y-90 microspheres with PET/MRI following hepatic radioembolization has the potential for predicting treatment outcome and, in turn, improving patient care. The positron decay branching ratio, however, is very small (32 ppm), yielding images with poor statistics even when therapy doses are used. Our purpose is to find PET reconstruction parameters that maximize the PET recovery coefficients and minimize noise. Methods: An initial 7.5 GBq of Y-90 chloride solution was used to fill an ACR phantom for measurements with a PET/MRI scanner (Siemens Biograph mMR). Four hot cylinders and a warm background activity volume of the phantom were filled with a 10:1 ratio. Phantom attenuation maps were derived from scaled CT images of the phantom and included the MR phased array coil. The phantom was imaged at six time points between 7.5–1.0 GBq total activity over a period of eight days. PET images were reconstructed via OP-OSEM with 21 subsets and varying iteration number (1–5), post-reconstruction filter size (5–10 mm), and either absolute or relative scatter correction. Recovery coefficients, SNR, and noise were measured as well as total activity in the phantom. Results: For the 120 different reconstructions, recovery coefficients ranged from 0.1–0.6 and improved with increasing iteration number and reduced post-reconstruction filter size. SNR, however, improved substantially with lower iteration numbers and larger post-reconstruction filters. From the phantom data, we found that performing 2 iterations, 21 subsets, and applying a 5 mm Gaussian post-reconstruction filter provided optimal recovery coefficients at a moderate noise level for a wide range of activity levels. Conclusion: The choice of reconstruction parameters for Y-90 PET images greatly influences both the accuracy of measurements and image quality. We have found reconstruction parameters that provide optimal recovery coefficients with minimized noise. Future work will include the effects

  4. Dual-Modality PET/Ultrasound imaging of the Prostate

    SciTech Connect

    Huber, Jennifer S.; Moses, William W.; Pouliot, Jean; Hsu, I.C.

    2005-11-11

    Functional imaging with positron emission tomography (PET)will detect malignant tumors in the prostate and/or prostate bed, as well as possibly help determine tumor ''aggressiveness''. However, the relative uptake in a prostate tumor can be so great that few other anatomical landmarks are visible in a PET image. Ultrasound imaging with a transrectal probe provides anatomical detail in the prostate region that can be co-registered with the sensitive functional information from the PET imaging. Imaging the prostate with both PET and transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) will help determine the location of any cancer within the prostate region. This dual-modality imaging should help provide better detection and treatment of prostate cancer. LBNL has built a high performance positron emission tomograph optimized to image the prostate.Compared to a standard whole-body PET camera, our prostate-optimized PET camera has the same sensitivity and resolution, less backgrounds and lower cost. We plan to develop the hardware and software tools needed for a validated dual PET/TRUS prostate imaging system. We also plan to develop dual prostate imaging with PET and external transabdominal ultrasound, in case the TRUS system is too uncomfortable for some patients. We present the design and intended clinical uses for these dual imaging systems.

  5. Optimal camera exposure for video surveillance systems by predictive control of shutter speed, aperture, and gain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres, Juan; Menéndez, José Manuel

    2015-02-01

    This paper establishes a real-time auto-exposure method to guarantee that surveillance cameras in uncontrolled light conditions take advantage of their whole dynamic range while provide neither under nor overexposed images. State-of-the-art auto-exposure methods base their control on the brightness of the image measured in a limited region where the foreground objects are mostly located. Unlike these methods, the proposed algorithm establishes a set of indicators based on the image histogram that defines its shape and position. Furthermore, the location of the objects to be inspected is likely unknown in surveillance applications. Thus, the whole image is monitored in this approach. To control the camera settings, we defined a parameters function (Ef ) that linearly depends on the shutter speed and the electronic gain; and is inversely proportional to the square of the lens aperture diameter. When the current acquired image is not overexposed, our algorithm computes the value of Ef that would move the histogram to the maximum value that does not overexpose the capture. When the current acquired image is overexposed, it computes the value of Ef that would move the histogram to a value that does not underexpose the capture and remains close to the overexposed region. If the image is under and overexposed, the whole dynamic range of the camera is therefore used, and a default value of the Ef that does not overexpose the capture is selected. This decision follows the idea that to get underexposed images is better than to get overexposed ones, because the noise produced in the lower regions of the histogram can be removed in a post-processing step while the saturated pixels of the higher regions cannot be recovered. The proposed algorithm was tested in a video surveillance camera placed at an outdoor parking lot surrounded by buildings and trees which produce moving shadows in the ground. During the daytime of seven days, the algorithm was running alternatively together

  6. Optimization of fixed titanium dioxide film on PET bottles and visual indicator for water disinfection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heredia-Munoz, Manuel Antonio

    Water is perhaps the most important resource that sustains human life. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), almost two billion people do not have access to the required water that is needed to satisfy their daily needs and one billion do not have access to clean sources of water for consumption, most of them living in isolated and poor areas around the globe. Poor quality water increases the risk of cholera, typhoid fever and dysentery, and other water-borne illness making this problem a real crisis that humankind is facing. Several water disinfection technologies have been proposed as solutions for this problem. Solar water disinfection using TiO2 coated PET bottles was the alternative that is studied in this work. This technology does not only inactivate bacteria but also disintegrates organic chemicals that can be present in water. The objectives of this work address the optimization of the TiO 2 coated PET bottles technologies. The improvement on the bottle coating process, using two coats of 10% W/V of TiO2 in a solution of vinegar and sodium bicarbonate to form the TiO2 film, the use of a different indigo carmine (1.25 X 10-1mg/pill) concentration in the pill indicator of contamination, the increase of the disinfection rate through shaking the bottles, degradation under intermittent UV radiation and the effect of bottle size on photocatalytic water disinfection were among the most important findings. A new mathematical model that describes better photocatalytic water disinfection in TiO2 coated bottles and simulates water disinfection under different working conditions was another important achievement. These results can now be used to design a strategy for disseminating this technology in areas where it is required and, in that way, generate the greatest positive impact on the people needing safe drinking water.

  7. Optimal and sub-optimal post-detection timing estimators for PET

    SciTech Connect

    Hero, A.O.; Antoniadis, N. . Dept. of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science); Clinthorne, N.; Rogers, W.L.; Hutchins, G.D. . Div. of Nuclear Medicine)

    1990-04-01

    In this paper the authors derive linear and non-linear approximations to the post-detection likelihood function for scintillator interaction time in nuclear particle detection systems. The likelihood function is the optimal statistic for performing detection and estimation of scintillator events and event times. The authors derive the likelihood function approximations from a statistical model for the post-detection waveform which is common in the optical communications literature and takes account of finite detector bandwidth, random gains, and thermal noise. They then present preliminary simulation results for the associated approximate maximum likelihood timing estimators which indicate that significant MSE improvements may be achieved for low post-detection signal-to-noise ratio.

  8. Evaluation of lung lesions using FDG gamma-camera PET equipped with a one-inch crystal.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Hong-Wei; Cheng, Hai-Feng; Ye, Xiao-Juan; Zhao, Chun-Lei; Zhang, Hong; Liu, Hong-Biao; He, Gang-Qiang

    2008-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical value of 18-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) imaging with gamma-camera positron emission tomography (GCPET) equipped with a one-inch crystal for diagnosing lung lesions and determining the stage of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in regions with a high prevalence of inflammatory disease and tuberculosis. FDG-GCPET was used to examine 103 patients with suspected malignant lesions in the lung. The results of FDG-GCPET and conventional workup (CWU) including computed tomography (CT), ultrasonography and radionuclide bone scintigraphy were compared. The final diagnosis was based on the results of a histological analysis or follow-up of at least six months. The results showed 82 patients with malignant and 21 patients with benign lesions. If a lesion to background ratio > or = 2.0 was used as the threshold, then the diagnostic sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) of FDG-GCPET for NSCLC were 93.9, 57.1, 86.4, 89.5 and 70.6%, respectively. In 36 patients who underwent open-chest surgery, the diagnostic positive values of FDG-GCPET and CT for lymph-node involvement were 85% (17/20) and 65% (13/20), respectively. The diagnostic sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, PPV and NPV of FDG imaging were 85, 81.3, 83.3, 85 and 81.3%, respectively compared to the CT values of 65, 75, 69.4, 76.5 and 63.2%, respectively (NS). For the evaluation of distant metastases, 31 true-positive patients were identified during the follow-up. FDG imaging correctly identified 28 patients compared to 25 by CWU. In conclusion, FDG imaging with GCPET equipped with a one-inch crystal revealed a high lesion detection capability but a low level of clinical effectiveness for differentiating between malignant and benign lesions in the lung in regions with a high prevalence of inflammatory disease and tuberculosis. For N and M staging of NSCLC, this method may provide additional data that are not

  9. Optimization of Multimodal Imaging of Mesenchymal Stem Cells Using the Human Sodium Iodide Symporter for PET and Cerenkov Luminescence Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Wolfs, Esther; Holvoet, Bryan; Gijsbers, Rik; Casteels, Cindy; Roberts, Scott J.; Struys, Tom; Maris, Michael; Ibrahimi, Abdelilah; Debyser, Zeger; Van Laere, Koen; Verfaillie, Catherine M.; Deroose, Christophe M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The use of stably integrated reporter gene imaging provides a manner to monitor the in vivo fate of engrafted cells over time in a non-invasive manner. Here, we optimized multimodal imaging (small-animal PET, Cerenkov luminescence imaging (CLI) and bioluminescence imaging (BLI)) of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), by means of the human sodium iodide symporter (hNIS) and firefly luciferase (Fluc) as reporters. Methods First, two multicistronic lentiviral vectors (LV) were generated for multimodal imaging: BLI, 124I PET/SPECT and CLI. Expression of the imaging reporter genes was validated in vitro using 99mTcO4− radioligand uptake experiments and BLI. Uptake kinetics, specificity and tracer elution were determined as well as the effect of the transduction process on the cell's differentiation capacity. MSCs expressing the LV were injected intravenously or subcutaneously and imaged using small-animal PET, CLI and BLI. Results The expression of both imaging reporter genes was functional and specific. An elution of 99mTcO4− from the cells was observed, with 31% retention after 3 h. After labeling cells with 124I in vitro, a significantly higher CLI signal was noted in hNIS expressing murine MSCs. Furthermore, it was possible to visualize cells injected intravenously using BLI or subcutaneously in mice, using 124I small-animal PET, CLI and BLI. Conclusions This study identifies hNIS as a suitable reporter gene for molecular imaging with PET and CLI, as confirmed with BLI through the expression of Fluc. It supports the potential for a wider application of hNIS reporter gene imaging and future clinical applications. PMID:24747914

  10. Optimal relaxation parameters of DRAMA (dynamic RAMLA) aiming at one-pass image reconstruction for 3D-PET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Eiichi; Kudo, Hiroyuki

    2010-05-01

    We have reported a block-iterative algorithm named DRAMA for image reconstruction for emission tomography (Tanaka and Kudo 2003 Phys. Med. Biol. 48 1405-22). DRAMA is a modified version of the row-action maximum likelihood algorithm (RAMLA), in which the relaxation parameter is subset dependent and is changed in such a way that the noise propagation from subsets to the reconstructed image is substantially independent of the access order of the subsets. The algorithm provides fast convergence with a reasonable signal-to-noise ratio. The optimal relaxation parameter has been derived assuming a two-dimensional (2D)-PET model, and detailed performance in three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction has not been clear enough. We have developed the new version 'DRAMA-3D', based on the 3D-PET model. The optimal relaxation parameter is a function of the access order of the subsets and the ring difference, and its value is determined by simple formulas from the design parameters of the PET scanner, the operating conditions and the post-smoothing resolution. In this paper, we present the theory of DRAMA-3D, the results of simulation studies on the performance of DRAMA-3D and the comparative studies of the related algorithms. It is shown that DRAMA-3D is robust for various access orders of subsets and is suitable to realize one-pass (single-iteration) reconstruction.

  11. Application of Two Phase (Liquid/Gas) Xenon Gamma-Camera for the Detection of Special Nuclear Material and PET Medical Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    McKinsey, Daniel Nicholas

    2013-08-27

    The McKinsey group at Yale has been awarded a grant from DTRA for the building of a Liquid Xenon Gamma Ray Color Camera (LXe-GRCC), which combines state-of-the-art detection of LXe scintillation light and time projection chamber (TPC) charge readout. The DTRA application requires a movable detector and hence only a single phase (liquid) xenon detector can be considered in this case. We propose to extend the DTRA project to applications that allow a two phase (liquid/gas) xenon TPC. This entails additional (yet minimal) hardware and extension of the research effort funded by DTRA. The two phase detector will have better energy and angular resolution. Such detectors will be useful for PET medical imaging and detection of special nuclear material in stationary applications (e.g. port of entry). The expertise of the UConn group in gas phase TPCs will enhance the capabilities of the Yale group and the synergy between the two groups will be very beneficial for this research project as well as the education and research projects of the two universities. The LXe technology to be used in this project has matured rapidly over the past few years, developed for use in detectors for nuclear physics and astrophysics. This technology may now be applied in a straightforward way to the imaging of gamma rays. According to detailed Monte Carlo simulations recently performed at Yale University, energy resolution of 1% and angular resolution of 3 degrees may be obtained for 1.0 MeV gamma rays, using existing technology. With further research and development, energy resolution of 0.5% and angular resolution of 1.3 degrees will be possible at 1.0 MeV. Because liquid xenon is a high density, high Z material, it is highly efficient for scattering and capturing gamma rays. In addition, this technology scales elegantly to large detector areas, with several square meter apertures possible. The Yale research group is highly experienced in the development and use of noble liquid detectors for

  12. Optimization of a Model Corrected Blood Input Function from Dynamic FDG-PET Images of Small Animal Heart In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Min; Kundu, Bijoy K.

    2013-01-01

    Quantitative evaluation of dynamic Positron Emission Tomography (PET) of mouse heart in vivo is challenging due to the small size of the heart and limited intrinsic spatial resolution of the PET scanner. Here, we optimized a compartment model which can simultaneously correct for spill over and partial volume effects for both blood pool and the myocardium, compute kinetic rate parameters and generate model corrected blood input function (MCBIF) from ordered subset expectation maximization – maximum a posteriori (OSEM-MAP) cardiac and respiratory gated 18F-FDG PET images of mouse heart with attenuation correction in vivo, without any invasive blood sampling. Arterial blood samples were collected from a single mouse to indicate the feasibility of the proposed method. In order to establish statistical significance, venous blood samples from n=6 mice were obtained at 2 late time points, when SP contamination from the tissue to the blood is maximum. We observed that correct bounds and initial guesses for the PV and SP coefficients accurately model the wash-in and wash-out dynamics of the tracer from mouse blood. The residual plot indicated an average difference of about 1.7% between the blood samples and MCBIF. The downstream rate of myocardial FDG influx constant, Ki (0.15±0.03 min−1), compared well with Ki obtained from arterial blood samples (P=0.716). In conclusion, the proposed methodology is not only quantitative but also reproducible. PMID:24741130

  13. A risk-based coverage model for video surveillance camera control optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hongzhou; Du, Zhiguo; Zhao, Xingtao; Li, Peiyue; Li, Dehua

    2015-12-01

    Visual surveillance system for law enforcement or police case investigation is different from traditional application, for it is designed to monitor pedestrians, vehicles or potential accidents. Visual surveillance risk is defined as uncertainty of visual information of targets and events monitored in present work and risk entropy is introduced to modeling the requirement of police surveillance task on quality and quantity of vide information. the prosed coverage model is applied to calculate the preset FoV position of PTZ camera.

  14. GISMO, a 2 mm Bolometer Camera Optimized for the Study of High Redshift Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Staguhn, J.

    2007-01-01

    The 2mm spectral range provides a unique terrestrial window enabling ground based observations of the earliest active dusty galaxies in the universe and thereby allowing a better constraint on the star formation rate in these objects. We present a progress report for our bolometer camera GISMO (the Goddard-IRAM Superconducting 2-Millimeter Observer), which will obtain large and sensitive sky maps at this wavelength. The instrument will be used at the IRAM 30 m telescope and we expect to install it at the telescope in 2007. The camera uses an 8 x 16 planar array of multiplexed TES bolometers, which incorporates our recently designed Backshort Under Grid (BUG) architecture. GISMO will be very efficient at detecting sources serendipitously in large sky surveys. With the background limited performance of the detectors, the camera provides significantly greater imaging sensitivity and mapping speed at this wavelength than has previously been possible. The major scientific driver for the instrument is to provide the IRAM 30 m telescope with the capability to rapidly observe galactic and extragalactic dust emission, in particular from high-zeta ULI RGs and quasar s, even in the summer season. The instrument will fill in the SEDs of high redshift galaxies at the Rayleigh-Jeans part of the dust emission spectrum, even at the highest redshifts. Our source count models predict that GISMO will serendipitously detect one galaxy every four hours on the blank sky, and that one quarter of these galaxies will be at a redshift of zeta 6.5.

  15. Optimization of Early Response Monitoring and Prediction of Cancer Antiangiogenesis Therapy via Noninvasive PET Molecular Imaging Strategies of Multifactorial Bioparameters

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Xiao; Wang, Ming-Wei; Luo, Jian-Min; Wang, Si-Yang; Zhang, Yong-Ping; Zhang, Ying-Jian

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Antiangiogenesis therapy (AAT) has provided substantial benefits regarding improved outcomes and survival for suitable patients in clinical settings. Therefore, the early definition of therapeutic effects is urgently needed to guide cancer AAT. We aimed to optimize the early response monitoring and prediction of AAT efficacy, as indicated by the multi-targeted anti-angiogenic drug sunitinib in U87MG tumors, using noninvasive positron emission computed tomography (PET) molecular imaging strategies of multifactorial bioparameters. Methods: U87MG tumor mice were treated via intragastric injections of sunitinib (80 mg/kg) or vehicle for 7 consecutive days. Longitudinal MicroPET/CT scans with 18F-FDG, 18F-FMISO, 18F-ML-10 and 18F-Alfatide II were acquired to quantitatively measure metabolism, hypoxia, apoptosis and angiogenesis on days 0, 1, 3, 7 and 13 following therapy initiation. Tumor tissues from a dedicated group of mice were collected for immunohistochemical (IHC) analysis of key biomarkers (Glut-1, CA-IX, TUNEL, ανβ3 and CD31) at the time points of PET imaging. The tumor sizes and mouse weights were measured throughout the study. The tumor uptake (ID%/gmax), the ratios of the tumor/muscle (T/M) for each probe, and the tumor growth ratios (TGR) were calculated and used for statistical analyses of the differences and correlations. Results: Sunitinib successfully inhibited U87MG tumor growth with significant differences in the tumor size from day 9 after sunitinib treatment compared with the control group (P < 0.01). The uptakes of 18F-FMISO (reduced hypoxia), 18F-ML-10 (increased apoptosis) and 18F-Alfatide II (decreased angiogenesis) in the tumor lesions significantly changed during the early stage (days 1 to 3) of sunitinib treatment; however, the uptake of 18F-FDG (increased glucose metabolism) was significantly different during the late stage. The PET imaging data of each probe were all confirmed via ex vivo IHC of the relevant biomarkers

  16. PET optimization for improved assessment and accurate quantification of {sup 90}Y-microsphere biodistribution after radioembolization

    SciTech Connect

    Martí-Climent, Josep M. Prieto, Elena; Elosúa, César; Rodríguez-Fraile, Macarena; Domínguez-Prado, Inés; Vigil, Carmen; García-Velloso, María J.; Arbizu, Javier; Peñuelas, Iván; Richter, José A.

    2014-09-15

    Purpose: {sup 90}Y-microspheres are widely used for the radioembolization of metastatic liver cancer or hepatocellular carcinoma and there is a growing interest for imaging {sup 90}Y-microspheres with PET. The aim of this study is to evaluate the performance of a current generation PET/CT scanner for {sup 90}Y imaging and to optimize the PET protocol to improve the assessment and the quantification of {sup 90}Y-microsphere biodistribution after radioembolization. Methods: Data were acquired on a Biograph mCT-TrueV scanner with time of flight (TOF) and point spread function (PSF) modeling. Spatial resolution was measured with a{sup 90}Y point source. Sensitivity was evaluated using the NEMA 70 cm line source filled with {sup 90}Y. To evaluate the count rate performance, {sup 90}Y vials with activity ranging from 3.64 to 0.035 GBq were measured in the center of the field of view (CFOV). The energy spectrum was evaluated. Image quality with different reconstructions was studied using the Jaszczak phantom containing six hollow spheres (diameters: 31.3, 28.1, 21.8, 16.1, 13.3, and 10.5 mm), filled with a 207 kBq/ml {sup 90}Y concentration and a 5:1 sphere-to-background ratio. Acquisition time was adjusted to simulate the quality of a realistic clinical PET acquisition of a patient treated with SIR-Spheres{sup ®}. The developed methodology was applied to ten patients after SIR-Spheres{sup ®} treatment acquiring a 10 min per bed PET. Results: The energy spectrum showed the{sup 90}Y bremsstrahlung radiation. The {sup 90}Y transverse resolution, with filtered backprojection reconstruction, was 4.5 mm in the CFOV and degraded to 5.0 mm at 10 cm off-axis. {sup 90}Y absolute sensitivity was 0.40 kcps/MBq in the center of the field of view. Tendency of true and random rates as a function of the {sup 90}Y activity could be accurately described using linear and quadratic models, respectively. Phantom studies demonstrated that, due to low count statistics in {sup 90}Y PET

  17. Optimization of Early Response Monitoring and Prediction of Cancer Antiangiogenesis Therapy via Noninvasive PET Molecular Imaging Strategies of Multifactorial Bioparameters

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Xiao; Wang, Ming-Wei; Luo, Jian-Min; Wang, Si-Yang; Zhang, Yong-Ping; Zhang, Ying-Jian

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Antiangiogenesis therapy (AAT) has provided substantial benefits regarding improved outcomes and survival for suitable patients in clinical settings. Therefore, the early definition of therapeutic effects is urgently needed to guide cancer AAT. We aimed to optimize the early response monitoring and prediction of AAT efficacy, as indicated by the multi-targeted anti-angiogenic drug sunitinib in U87MG tumors, using noninvasive positron emission computed tomography (PET) molecular imaging strategies of multifactorial bioparameters. Methods: U87MG tumor mice were treated via intragastric injections of sunitinib (80 mg/kg) or vehicle for 7 consecutive days. Longitudinal MicroPET/CT scans with 18F-FDG, 18F-FMISO, 18F-ML-10 and 18F-Alfatide II were acquired to quantitatively measure metabolism, hypoxia, apoptosis and angiogenesis on days 0, 1, 3, 7 and 13 following therapy initiation. Tumor tissues from a dedicated group of mice were collected for immunohistochemical (IHC) analysis of key biomarkers (Glut-1, CA-IX, TUNEL, ανβ3 and CD31) at the time points of PET imaging. The tumor sizes and mouse weights were measured throughout the study. The tumor uptake (ID%/gmax), the ratios of the tumor/muscle (T/M) for each probe, and the tumor growth ratios (TGR) were calculated and used for statistical analyses of the differences and correlations. Results: Sunitinib successfully inhibited U87MG tumor growth with significant differences in the tumor size from day 9 after sunitinib treatment compared with the control group (P < 0.01). The uptakes of 18F-FMISO (reduced hypoxia), 18F-ML-10 (increased apoptosis) and 18F-Alfatide II (decreased angiogenesis) in the tumor lesions significantly changed during the early stage (days 1 to 3) of sunitinib treatment; however, the uptake of 18F-FDG (increased glucose metabolism) was significantly different during the late stage. The PET imaging data of each probe were all confirmed via ex vivo IHC of the relevant biomarkers

  18. Optimization of the Energy Window for PETbox4, a Preclinical PET Tomograph With a Small Inner Diameter

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Z.; Bao, Q.; Taschereau, R.; Wang, H.; Bai, B.; Chatziioannou, A. F.

    2015-01-01

    Small animal positron emission tomography (PET) systems are often designed by employing close geometry configurations. Due to the different characteristics caused by geometrical factors, these tomographs require data acquisition protocols that differ from those optimized for conventional large diameter ring systems. In this work we optimized the energy window for data acquisitions with PETbox4, a 50 mm detector separation (box-like geometry) pre-clinical PET scanner, using the Geant4 Application for Tomographic Emission (GATE). The fractions of different types of events were estimated using a voxelized phantom including a mouse as well as its supporting chamber, mimicking a realistic mouse imaging environment. Separate code was developed to extract additional information about the gamma interactions for more accurate event type classification. Three types of detector backscatter events were identified in addition to the trues, phantom scatters and randoms. The energy window was optimized based on the noise equivalent count rate (NECR) and scatter fraction (SF) with lower-level discriminators (LLD) corresponding to energies from 150 keV to 450 keV. The results were validated based on the calculated image uniformity, spillover ratio (SOR) and recovery coefficient (RC) from physical measurements using the National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA) NU-4 image quality phantom. These results indicate that when PETbox4 is operated with a more narrow energy window (350-650 keV), detector backscatter rejection is unnecessary. For the NEMA NU-4 image quality phantom, the SOR for the water chamber decreases by about 45% from 15.1% to 8.3%, and the SOR for the air chamber decreases by 31% from 12.0% to 8.3% at the LLDs of 150 and 350 keV, without obvious change in uniformity, further supporting the simulation based optimization. The optimization described in this work is not limited to PETbox4, but also applicable or helpful to other small inner diameter geometry

  19. Optimization of spectral sensitivities of mosaic five-band camera for estimating chromophore densities from skin images including shading and surface reflections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirose, Misa; Akaho, Rina; Maita, Chikashi; Sugawara, Mai; Tsumura, Norimichi

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, the spectral sensitivities of a mosaic five-band camera were optimized using a numerical skin phantom to perform the separation of chromophore densities, shading and surface reflection. To simulate the numerical skin phantom, the spectral reflectance of skin was first calculated by Monte Carlo simulation of photon migration for different concentrations of melanin, blood and oxygen saturation levels. The melanin and hemoglobin concentration distributions used in the numerical skin phantom were obtained from actual skin images by independent component analysis. The calculated components were assigned as concentration distributions. The spectral sensitivities of the camera were then optimized using a nonlinear technique to estimate the spectral reflectance for skin separation. In this optimization, the spectral sensitivities were assumed to be normally distributed, and the sensor arrangement was identical to that of a conventional mosaic five-band camera. Our findings demonstrated that spectral estimation could be significantly improved by optimizing the spectral sensitivities.

  20. TRIDENT: an Infrared Differential Imaging Camera Optimized for the Detection of Methanated Substellar Companions

    SciTech Connect

    Marois, C; Doyon, R; Nadeau, D; Racine, R; Riopel, M; Vallee, P; Lafreniere, D

    2005-04-08

    A near-infrared camera in use at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) and at the 1.6-m telescope of the Observatoire du Mont-Megantic is described. The camera is based on a Hawaii-1 1024 x 1024 HgCdTe array detector. Its main feature is to acquire three simultaneous images at three wavelengths across the methane absorption bandhead at 1.6 {micro}m, enabling, in theory, an accurate subtraction of the stellar point spread function (PSF) and the detection of faint close methanated companions. The instrument has no coronoagraph and features fast data acquisition, yielding high observing efficiency on bright stars. The performance of the instrument is described, and it is illustrated by laboratory tests and CFHT observations of the nearby stars GL526, {nu}-And and {chi}-And. TRIDENT can detect (6{sigma}) a methanated companion with {Delta}H = 9.5 at 0.5'' separation from the star in one hour of observing time. Non-common path aberrations and amplitude modulation differences between the three optical paths are likely to be the limiting factors preventing further PSF attenuation. Instrument rotation and reference star subtraction improve the detection limit by a factor of 2 and 4 respectively. A PSF noise attenuation model is presented to estimate the non-common path wavefront difference effect on PSF subtraction performance.

  1. TRIDENT: an infrared camera optimized for the detection of methanated substellar companions of nearby stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marois, Christian; Doyon, Rene; Nadeau, Daniel; Racine, Rene; Riopel, Martin; Vallee, Philippe

    2003-02-01

    A near-infrared camera in use at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope and at the 1.6m telescope of the Observatoire du Mont-Mégantic is described. The camera is based on a Hawaii-1 1024×1024 HgCdTe array detector. Its main feature is to acquire three simultaneous images at three wavelengths (simultaneous differential imaging) across the methane absorption bandhead at 1.6 micron, enabling an accurate subtraction of the stellar point spread function (PSF) and the detection of faint close methanated companions. The instrument has no coronagraph and features a fast (1 MHz) data acquisition system without reset anomaly, yielding high observing efficiencies on bright stars. The performance of the instrument is described, and it is illustrated by CFHT images of the nearby star Ups And. TRIDENT can detect (3 sigma) a methanated companion with Delta H=10 at 0.5" from the star in one hour of observing time. Non-common path aberrations between the three optical paths are the limiting factors preventing further PSF attenuation. Reference star subtraction and instrument rotation improve the detection limit by one order of magnitude.

  2. Calibration of laser scanner and camera fusion system for intelligent vehicles using Nelder-Mead optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osgood, Thomas J.; Huang, Yingping

    2013-03-01

    A novel method is presented here for the calibration of a sensor fusion system for intelligent vehicles. In this example, the sensors are a camera and a laser scanner which observe the same scene from different viewpoints. The method employs the Nelder-Mead direct search algorithm to minimize the sum of squared errors between the image coordinates and the re-projected laser data by iteratively adjusting and improving the calibration parameters. The method is applied to a real set of data collected from a test vehicle. Using only 11 well-spaced target points observable by each sensor, 12 intrinsic and extrinsic parameters indicating the position relationship between the sensors can be estimated to give an accurate projection. Experiments show that the method can project the laser points onto the image plane with an average error of 1.01 pixels (1.51 pixels worst case).

  3. Designing of High-Volume PET/CT Facility with Optimal Reduction of Radiation Exposure to the Staff: Implementation and Optimization in a Tertiary Health Care Facility in India

    PubMed Central

    Jha, Ashish Kumar; Singh, Abhijith Mohan; Mithun, Sneha; Shah, Sneha; Agrawal, Archi; Purandare, Nilendu C.; Shetye, Bhakti; Rangarajan, Venkatesh

    2015-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) has been in use for a few decades but with its fusion with computed tomography (CT) in 2001, the new PET/CT integrated system has become very popular and is now a key influential modality for patient management in oncology. However, along with its growing popularity, a growing concern of radiation safety among the radiation professionals has become evident. We have judiciously developed a PET/CT facility with optimal shielding, along with an efficient workflow to perform high volume procedures and minimize the radiation exposure to the staff and the general public by reducing unnecessary patient proximity to the staff and general public. PMID:26420990

  4. SU-C-9A-01: Parameter Optimization in Adaptive Region-Growing for Tumor Segmentation in PET

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, S; Xue, M; Chen, W; D'Souza, W; Lu, W; Li, H

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To design a reliable method to determine the optimal parameter in the adaptive region-growing (ARG) algorithm for tumor segmentation in PET. Methods: The ARG uses an adaptive similarity criterion m - fσ ≤ I-PET ≤ m + fσ, so that a neighboring voxel is appended to the region based on its similarity to the current region. When increasing the relaxing factor f (f ≥ 0), the resulting volumes monotonically increased with a sharp increase when the region just grew into the background. The optimal f that separates the tumor from the background is defined as the first point with the local maximum curvature on an Error function fitted to the f-volume curve. The ARG was tested on a tumor segmentation Benchmark that includes ten lung cancer patients with 3D pathologic tumor volume as ground truth. For comparison, the widely used 42% and 50% SUVmax thresholding, Otsu optimal thresholding, Active Contours (AC), Geodesic Active Contours (GAC), and Graph Cuts (GC) methods were tested. The dice similarity index (DSI), volume error (VE), and maximum axis length error (MALE) were calculated to evaluate the segmentation accuracy. Results: The ARG provided the highest accuracy among all tested methods. Specifically, the ARG has an average DSI, VE, and MALE of 0.71, 0.29, and 0.16, respectively, better than the absolute 42% thresholding (DSI=0.67, VE= 0.57, and MALE=0.23), the relative 42% thresholding (DSI=0.62, VE= 0.41, and MALE=0.23), the absolute 50% thresholding (DSI=0.62, VE=0.48, and MALE=0.21), the relative 50% thresholding (DSI=0.48, VE=0.54, and MALE=0.26), OTSU (DSI=0.44, VE=0.63, and MALE=0.30), AC (DSI=0.46, VE= 0.85, and MALE=0.47), GAC (DSI=0.40, VE= 0.85, and MALE=0.46) and GC (DSI=0.66, VE= 0.54, and MALE=0.21) methods. Conclusions: The results suggest that the proposed method reliably identified the optimal relaxing factor in ARG for tumor segmentation in PET. This work was supported in part by National Cancer Institute Grant R01 CA172638; The

  5. Simulation-based evaluation and optimization of a new CdZnTe gamma-camera architecture (HiSens)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robert, Charlotte; Montémont, Guillaume; Rebuffel, Véronique; Buvat, Irène; Guérin, Lucie; Verger, Loïck

    2010-05-01

    A new gamma-camera architecture named HiSens is presented and evaluated. It consists of a parallel hole collimator, a pixelated CdZnTe (CZT) detector associated with specific electronics for 3D localization and dedicated reconstruction algorithms. To gain in efficiency, a high aperture collimator is used. The spatial resolution is preserved thanks to accurate 3D localization of the interactions inside the detector based on a fine sampling of the CZT detector and on the depth of interaction information. The performance of this architecture is characterized using Monte Carlo simulations in both planar and tomographic modes. Detective quantum efficiency (DQE) computations are then used to optimize the collimator aperture. In planar mode, the simulations show that the fine CZT detector pixelization increases the system sensitivity by 2 compared to a standard Anger camera without loss in spatial resolution. These results are then validated against experimental data. In SPECT, Monte Carlo simulations confirm the merits of the HiSens architecture observed in planar imaging.

  6. Optimization of Acquisition time of 68Ga-PSMA-Ligand PET/MRI in Patients with Local and Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lütje, Susanne; Blex, Sebastian; Gomez, Benedikt; Schaarschmidt, Benedikt M.; Umutlu, Lale; Forsting, Michael; Jentzen, Walter; Bockisch, Andreas; Poeppel, Thorsten D.; Wetter, Axel

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of this optimization study was to minimize the acquisition time of 68Ga-HBED-CC-PSMA positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance imaging (PET/MRI) in patients with local and metastatic prostate cancer (PCa) to obtain a sufficient image quality and quantification accuracy without any appreciable loss. Methods Twenty patients with PCa were administered intravenously with the 68Ga-HBED-CC-PSMA ligand (mean activity 99 MBq/patient, range 76–148 MBq) and subsequently underwent PET/MRI at, on average, 168 min (range 77–320 min) after injection. PET and MR imaging data were acquired simultaneously. PET acquisition was performed in list mode and PET images were reconstructed at different time intervals (1, 2, 4, 6, 8, and 10 min). Data were analyzed regarding radiotracer uptake in tumors and muscle tissue and PET image quality. Tumor uptake was quantified in terms of the maximum and mean standardized uptake value (SUVmax, SUVmean) within a spherical volume of interest (VOI). Reference VOIs were drawn in the gluteus maximus muscle on the right side. PET image quality was evaluated by experienced nuclear physicians/radiologists using a five-point ordinal scale from 5–1 (excellent—insufficient). Results Lesion detectability linearly increased with increasing acquisition times, reaching its maximum at PET acquisition times of 4 min. At this image acquisition time, tumor lesions in 19/20 (95%) patients were detected. PET image quality showed a positive correlation with increasing acquisition time, reaching a plateau at 4–6 min image acquisition. Both SUVmax and SUVmean correlated inversely with acquisition time and reached a plateau at acquisition times after 4 min. Conclusion In the applied image acquisition settings, the optimal acquisition time of 68Ga-PSMA-ligand PET/MRI in patients with local and metastatic PCa was identified to be 4 min per bed position. At this acquisition time, PET image quality and lesion detectability reach a maximum

  7. [Harmonization of Standardized Uptake Value among Different Generation PET/ CT Cameras Based on a Phantom Experiment -Utility of SUV(peak)].

    PubMed

    Akamatsu, Go; Nishida, Hiroyuki; Fujino, Akira; Ohnishi, Akihito; Ikari, Yasuhiko; Nishio, Tomoyuki; Maebatake, Akira; Sasaki, Masayuki; Senda, Michio

    2015-09-01

    Standardized uptake value (SUV) has been widely used as a semi-quantitative metric of uptake in FDGPET/ CT for diagnosis of malignant tumors and evaluation of tumor therapies. However, the SUV depends on various factors including PET/CT scanner specifications and reconstruction parameters. The purpose of this study is to harmonize the SUV among two PET/CT models of different generation: two units of Discovery ST Elite Performance(DSTEP) and Discovery 690 (D690) PET/CT scanners. The NEMA body phantom filled with 18F solution was scanned for 30 minutes in list-mode. The D690 PET images were reconstructed with OSEM, OSEM+TOF, and OSEM+PSF. Gaussian post-filters of 4-9 mm FWHM were applied to find the parameters that provides harmonized SUV. We determined the SUV-harmonized parameter for each reconstruction algorithm. Then, the 10 PET images simulating clinical scan conditions were respectively generated to evaluate the bias and variability of SUV(max) and SUV(peak). The SUV(max) strongly depended not only on spatial resolution but also on image noise. On the other hand, the SUV(peak) was a robust metric to image noise level. TOF improved the variability of SUV(max) and SUV(peak). Thus, we were able to harmonize the spatial resolution using SUV(peak) based on the phantom study. Because SUV(max) was also strongly affected by image noise, sufficient count statistics is essential for SUV(max) harmonization. We recommended that TOF reconstruction and SUV(peak) metric should be used to harmonize SUV.

  8. Optimized design and research for cylindrical electrically controlled box of space camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hai-ping; Li, Yan-chun; Dong, Ji-hong; Guo, Quan-feng; Wang, Kejun; Wang, Yi-jian

    2014-09-01

    The object of study is the electric control box of a certain type of space remote sensor. In view of the existing shortcomings of the original electric control box, the electric control box is designed reasonably. In the result, the design of electronic control box supported by the cylindrical multi-point is proposed, which can solve the series of problem of the original program, such as the large volume, heavy weight, large signal interference. The camera control box is made of magnesium alloy which has light weight and high strength; by the structure design of stacked, the electronics system is classified integration; through the local shielding program, the problem of anti radiation and interference of electronics system is solved; by using the multi supporting structure scheme , the structural rigidity of the electric control box is improved, the modal by 57Hz increased to more than 120Hz, which meet the 100Hz technology of the design specifications; the box body is adopted by nickel for protection, which eliminating the possibility of air and humid environment on the corrosion of magnesium alloy. At present, the electric control box designed has been completed the

  9. Optimized light sharing for high-resolution TOF PET detector based on digital silicon photomultipliers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcinkowski, R.; España, S.; Van Holen, R.; Vandenberghe, S.

    2014-12-01

    The majority of current whole-body PET scanners are based on pixelated scintillator arrays with a transverse pixel size of 4 mm. However, recent studies have shown that decreasing the pixel size to 2 mm can significantly improve image spatial resolution. In this study, the performance of Digital Photon Counter (DPC) from Philips Digital Photon Counting (PDPC) was evaluated to determine their potential for high-resolution whole-body time of flight (TOF) PET scanners. Two detector configurations were evaluated. First, the DPC3200-44-22 DPC array was coupled to a LYSO block of 15  ×  15 2  ×  2 × 22 mm3 pixels through a 1 mm thick light guide. Due to light sharing among the dies neighbour logic of the DPC was used. In a second setup the same DPC was coupled directly to a scalable 4  ×  4 LYSO matrix of 1.9  ×  1.9  ×  22 mm3 crystals with a dedicated reflector arrangement allowing for controlled light sharing patterns inside the matrix. With the first approach an average energy resolution of 14.5% and an average CRT of 376 ps were achieved. For the second configuration an average energy resolution of 11% and an average CRT of 295 ps were achieved. Our studies show that the DPC is a suitable photosensor for a high-resolution TOF-PET detector. The dedicated reflector arrangement allows one to achieve better performances than the light guide approach. The count loss, caused by dark counts, is overcome by fitting the matrix size to the size of DPC single die.

  10. Clinical NECR in 18F-FDG PET scans: optimization of injected activity and variable acquisition time. Relationship with SNR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlier, T.; Ferrer, L.; Necib, H.; Bodet-Milin, C.; Rousseau, C.; Kraeber-Bodéré, F.

    2014-10-01

    The injected activity and the acquisition time per bed position for 18F-FDG PET scans are usually optimized by using metrics obtained from phantom experiments. However, optimal activity and time duration can significantly vary from a phantom set-up and from patient to patient. An approach using a patient-specific noise equivalent count rate (NECR) modelling has been previously proposed for optimizing clinical scanning protocols. We propose using the clinical NECR on a large population as a function of the body mass index (BMI) for deriving the optimal injected activity and acquisition duration per bed position. The relationship between the NEC and the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) was assessed both in a phantom and in a clinical setting. 491 consecutive patients were retrospectively evaluated and divided into 4 BMI subgroups. Two criteria were used to optimize the injected activity and the time per bed position was adjusted using the NECR value while keeping the total acquisition time constant. Finally, the relationship between NEC and SNR was investigated using an anthropomorphic phantom and a population of 507 other patients. While the first dose regimen suggested a unique injected activity (665 MBq) regardless of the BMI, the second dose regimen proposed a variable activity and a total acquisition time according to the BMI. The NEC improvement was around 35% as compared with the local current injection rule. Variable time per bed position was derived according to BMI and anatomical region. NEC and number of true events were found to be highly correlated with SNR for the phantom set-up and partially confirmed in the patient study for the BMI subgroup under 28 kg m-2 suggesting that for the scanner, the nonlinear reconstruction algorithm used in this study and BMI < 28 kg m-2, NEC, or the number of true events linearly correlated with SNR2.

  11. Optimization of a multiple-scattering Compton camera as a photon-tracking imager for 6-MV photon therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Taewoong; Yoon, Changyeon; Lee, Wonho

    2014-06-01

    During radiation therapy, the irradiated position and the energy deposited in a patient must be monitored. In general, calculations before photon exposure or 2D measurements of the transmitted photons have been widely used for making dose estimates. In this paper, we propose a real-time 3D dose measurement using Compton imaging technology. On the basis of the Monte-Carlo method, we designed a multiple-scattering Compton camera system (MSCC) with semiconductor and scintillation detectors. The MSCC was constructed with two semiconductor detectors as scattering detectors and a cadmium-tungstate (CWO) scintillator detector as an absorber detector. The two planar semiconductor arrays, and the CWO array consisted of 40 × 40 pixels, each with a size of 1 × 1 × ɛ mm3, where ɛ is the variable thickness of the detectors. The design parameters, such as the types of semiconductors, detector thicknesses and distances between detectors, were optimized on the basis of the detection efficiency and angular resolution of reconstructed images for a point source. Under the optimized conditions, uncertainty factors in geometry and energy were estimated for various inter-detector distances. We used a source corresponding to photons scattered from a water phantom exposed to 6-MeV peak X-rays. According to our simulation results, the figure of merit, reached its maximum value when the inter-detector distance was 3 cm. In order to achieve a high FOM, we chose 1 cm as the optimum thickness for the scattering and absorbed detectors. A cadmium-zinc-telluride (CZT) detector showed the best performance among the simulated semiconductors. The position uncertainty caused by the pixelization effect was the major factor in degrading the angular resolution of the reconstructed images, and the degradation caused by energy broadening was less than expected. The angular uncertainties caused by Doppler broadening and incorrect sequencing were minimal compared with that of pixelization. Our

  12. Optimizing Detection Rate and Characterization of Subtle Paroxysmal Neonatal Abnormal Facial Movements with Multi-Camera Video-Electroencephalogram Recordings.

    PubMed

    Pisani, Francesco; Pavlidis, Elena; Cattani, Luca; Ferrari, Gianluigi; Raheli, Riccardo; Spagnoli, Carlotta

    2016-06-01

    Objectives We retrospectively analyze the diagnostic accuracy for paroxysmal abnormal facial movements, comparing one camera versus multi-camera approach. Background Polygraphic video-electroencephalogram (vEEG) recording is the current gold standard for brain monitoring in high-risk newborns, especially when neonatal seizures are suspected. One camera synchronized with the EEG is commonly used. Methods Since mid-June 2012, we have started using multiple cameras, one of which point toward newborns' faces. We evaluated vEEGs recorded in newborns in the study period between mid-June 2012 and the end of September 2014 and compared, for each recording, the diagnostic accuracies obtained with one-camera and multi-camera approaches. Results We recorded 147 vEEGs from 87 newborns and found 73 episodes of paroxysmal facial abnormal movements in 18 vEEGs of 11 newborns with the multi-camera approach. By using the single-camera approach, only 28.8% of these events were identified (21/73). Ten positive vEEGs with multicamera with 52 paroxysmal facial abnormal movements (52/73, 71.2%) would have been considered as negative with the single-camera approach. Conclusions The use of one additional facial camera can significantly increase the diagnostic accuracy of vEEGs in the detection of paroxysmal abnormal facial movements in the newborns.

  13. Cardiac applications of PET.

    PubMed

    Sarikaya, Ismet

    2015-10-01

    Routine use of cardiac positron emission tomography (PET) applications has been increasing but has not replaced cardiac single-photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT) studies yet. The majority of cardiac PET tracers, with the exception of fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG), are not widely available, as they require either an onsite cyclotron or a costly generator for their production. 18F-FDG PET imaging has high sensitivity for the detection of hibernating/viable myocardium and has replaced Tl-201 SPECT imaging in centers equipped with a PET/CT camera. PET myocardial perfusion imaging with various tracers such as Rb-82, N-13 ammonia, and O-15 H2O has higher sensitivity and specificity than myocardial perfusion SPECT for the detection of coronary artery disease (CAD). In particular, quantitative PET measurements of myocardial perfusion help identify subclinical coronary stenosis, better define the extent and severity of CAD, and detect ischemia when there is balanced reduction in myocardial perfusion due to three-vessel or main stem CAD. Fusion images of PET perfusion and CT coronary artery calcium scoring or CT coronary angiography provide additional complementary information and improve the detection of CAD. PET studies with novel 18F-labeled perfusion tracers such as 18F-flurpiridaz and 18F-FBnTP have yielded high sensitivity and specificity in the diagnosis of CAD. These tracers are still being tested in humans, and, if approved for clinical use, they will be commercially and widely available. In addition to viability studies, 18F-FDG PET can also be utilized to detect inflammation/infection in various conditions such as endocarditis, sarcoidosis, and atherosclerosis. Some recent series have obtained encouraging results for the detection of endocarditis in patients with intracardiac devices and prosthetic valves. PET tracers for cardiac neuronal imaging, such as C-11 HED, help assess the severity of heart failure and post-transplant cardiac

  14. Instrumentation optimization for positron emission mammography

    SciTech Connect

    Moses, William W.; Qi, Jinyi

    2003-06-05

    The past several years have seen designs for PET cameras optimized to image the breast, commonly known as Positron Emission Mammography or PEM cameras. The guiding principal behind PEM instrumentation is that a camera whose field of view is restricted to a single breast has higher performance and lower cost than a conventional PET camera. The most common geometry is a pair of parallel planes of detector modules, although geometries that encircle the breast have also been proposed. The ability of the detector modules to measure the depth of interaction (DOI) is also a relevant feature. This paper finds that while both the additional solid angle coverage afforded by encircling the breast and the decreased blurring afforded by the DOI measurement improve performance, the ability to measure DOI is more important than the ability to encircle the breast.

  15. Engineering high-affinity PD-1 variants for optimized immunotherapy and immuno-PET imaging.

    PubMed

    Maute, Roy L; Gordon, Sydney R; Mayer, Aaron T; McCracken, Melissa N; Natarajan, Arutselvan; Ring, Nan Guo; Kimura, Richard; Tsai, Jonathan M; Manglik, Aashish; Kruse, Andrew C; Gambhir, Sanjiv S; Weissman, Irving L; Ring, Aaron M

    2015-11-24

    Signaling through the immune checkpoint programmed cell death protein-1 (PD-1) enables tumor progression by dampening antitumor immune responses. Therapeutic blockade of the signaling axis between PD-1 and its ligand programmed cell death ligand-1 (PD-L1) with monoclonal antibodies has shown remarkable clinical success in the treatment of cancer. However, antibodies have inherent limitations that can curtail their efficacy in this setting, including poor tissue/tumor penetrance and detrimental Fc-effector functions that deplete immune cells. To determine if PD-1:PD-L1-directed immunotherapy could be improved with smaller, nonantibody therapeutics, we used directed evolution by yeast-surface display to engineer the PD-1 ectodomain as a high-affinity (110 pM) competitive antagonist of PD-L1. In contrast to anti-PD-L1 monoclonal antibodies, high-affinity PD-1 demonstrated superior tumor penetration without inducing depletion of peripheral effector T cells. Consistent with these advantages, in syngeneic CT26 tumor models, high-affinity PD-1 was effective in treating both small (50 mm(3)) and large tumors (150 mm(3)), whereas the activity of anti-PD-L1 antibodies was completely abrogated against large tumors. Furthermore, we found that high-affinity PD-1 could be radiolabeled and applied as a PET imaging tracer to efficiently distinguish between PD-L1-positive and PD-L1-negative tumors in living mice, providing an alternative to invasive biopsy and histological analysis. These results thus highlight the favorable pharmacology of small, nonantibody therapeutics for enhanced cancer immunotherapy and immune diagnostics. PMID:26604307

  16. Engineering high-affinity PD-1 variants for optimized immunotherapy and immuno-PET imaging

    PubMed Central

    Maute, Roy L.; Gordon, Sydney R.; Mayer, Aaron T.; McCracken, Melissa N.; Natarajan, Arutselvan; Ring, Nan Guo; Kimura, Richard; Tsai, Jonathan M.; Manglik, Aashish; Kruse, Andrew C.; Gambhir, Sanjiv S.; Weissman, Irving L.; Ring, Aaron M.

    2015-01-01

    Signaling through the immune checkpoint programmed cell death protein-1 (PD-1) enables tumor progression by dampening antitumor immune responses. Therapeutic blockade of the signaling axis between PD-1 and its ligand programmed cell death ligand-1 (PD-L1) with monoclonal antibodies has shown remarkable clinical success in the treatment of cancer. However, antibodies have inherent limitations that can curtail their efficacy in this setting, including poor tissue/tumor penetrance and detrimental Fc-effector functions that deplete immune cells. To determine if PD-1:PD-L1–directed immunotherapy could be improved with smaller, nonantibody therapeutics, we used directed evolution by yeast-surface display to engineer the PD-1 ectodomain as a high-affinity (110 pM) competitive antagonist of PD-L1. In contrast to anti–PD-L1 monoclonal antibodies, high-affinity PD-1 demonstrated superior tumor penetration without inducing depletion of peripheral effector T cells. Consistent with these advantages, in syngeneic CT26 tumor models, high-affinity PD-1 was effective in treating both small (50 mm3) and large tumors (150 mm3), whereas the activity of anti–PD-L1 antibodies was completely abrogated against large tumors. Furthermore, we found that high-affinity PD-1 could be radiolabeled and applied as a PET imaging tracer to efficiently distinguish between PD-L1–positive and PD-L1–negative tumors in living mice, providing an alternative to invasive biopsy and histological analysis. These results thus highlight the favorable pharmacology of small, nonantibody therapeutics for enhanced cancer immunotherapy and immune diagnostics. PMID:26604307

  17. Radiolabeling optimization and characterization of (68)Ga labeled DOTA-polyamido-amine dendrimer conjugate - Animal biodistribution and PET imaging results.

    PubMed

    Ghai, Aanchal; Singh, Baljinder; Panwar Hazari, Puja; Schultz, Michael K; Parmar, Ambika; Kumar, Pardeep; Sharma, Sarika; Dhawan, Devinder; Kumar Mishra, Anil

    2015-11-01

    The present study describes the optimization of (68)Ga radiolabeling with PAMAM dendrimer-DOTA conjugate. A conjugate (PAMAM-DOTA) concentration of 11.69µM, provided best radiolabeling efficiency of more than 93.0% at pH 4.0, incubation time of 30.0min and reaction temperature ranging between 90 and 100°C. The decay corrected radiochemical yield was found to be 79.4±0.01%. The radiolabeled preparation ([(68)Ga]-DOTA-PAMAM-D) remained stable (radiolabeling efficiency of 96.0%) at room temperature and in serum for up to 4-h. The plasma protein binding was observed to be 21.0%. After intravenous administration, 50.0% of the tracer cleared from the blood circulation by 30-min and less than 1.0% of the injected activity remained in blood by 1.0h. The animal biodistribution studies demonstrated that the tracer excretes through the kidneys and about 0.33% of the %ID/g accumulated in the tumor at 1h post injection. The animal organ's biodistribution data was supported by animal PET imaging showing good 'non-specific' tracer uptake in tumor and excretion is primarily through kidneys. Additionally, DOTA-PAMAM-D conjugation with αVβ3 receptors targeting peptides and drug loading on the dendrimers may improve the specificity of the (68)Ga labeled product for imaging and treating angiogenesis respectively. PMID:26232562

  18. Ringfield lithographic camera

    DOEpatents

    Sweatt, William C.

    1998-01-01

    A projection lithography camera is presented with a wide ringfield optimized so as to make efficient use of extreme ultraviolet radiation from a large area radiation source (e.g., D.sub.source .apprxeq.0.5 mm). The camera comprises four aspheric mirrors optically arranged on a common axis of symmetry with an increased etendue for the camera system. The camera includes an aperture stop that is accessible through a plurality of partial aperture stops to synthesize the theoretical aperture stop. Radiation from a mask is focused to form a reduced image on a wafer, relative to the mask, by reflection from the four aspheric mirrors.

  19. LSST Camera Optics Design

    SciTech Connect

    Riot, V J; Olivier, S; Bauman, B; Pratuch, S; Seppala, L; Gilmore, D; Ku, J; Nordby, M; Foss, M; Antilogus, P; Morgado, N

    2012-05-24

    The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) uses a novel, three-mirror, telescope design feeding a camera system that includes a set of broad-band filters and three refractive corrector lenses to produce a flat field at the focal plane with a wide field of view. Optical design of the camera lenses and filters is integrated in with the optical design of telescope mirrors to optimize performance. We discuss the rationale for the LSST camera optics design, describe the methodology for fabricating, coating, mounting and testing the lenses and filters, and present the results of detailed analyses demonstrating that the camera optics will meet their performance goals.

  20. Transmission electron microscope CCD camera

    DOEpatents

    Downing, Kenneth H.

    1999-01-01

    In order to improve the performance of a CCD camera on a high voltage electron microscope, an electron decelerator is inserted between the microscope column and the CCD. This arrangement optimizes the interaction of the electron beam with the scintillator of the CCD camera while retaining optimization of the microscope optics and of the interaction of the beam with the specimen. Changing the electron beam energy between the specimen and camera allows both to be optimized.

  1. 18F-FDG PET-CT after Neoadjuvant Chemoradiotherapy in Esophageal Cancer Patients to Optimize Surgical Decision Making

    PubMed Central

    Anderegg, Maarten C. J.; de Groof, Elisabeth J.; Gisbertz, Suzanne S.; Bennink, Roel J.; Lagarde, Sjoerd M.; Klinkenbijl, Jean H. G.; Dijkgraaf, Marcel G. W.; Bergman, Jacques J. G. H. M.; Hulshof, Maarten C. C. M.; van Laarhoven, Hanneke W. M.; van Berge Henegouwen, Mark I.

    2015-01-01

    Background Prognosis of esophageal cancer patients can be significantly improved by neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (nCRT). Given the aggressive nature of esophageal tumors, it is conceivable that in a significant portion of patients treated with nCRT, dissemination already becomes manifest during the period of nCRT. The aim of this retrospective study was to determine the value and diagnostic accuracy of PET-CT after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy to identify patients with metastases preoperatively in order to prevent non-curative surgery. Methods From January 2011 until February 2013 esophageal cancer patients deemed eligible for a curative approach with nCRT and surgical resection underwent a PET-CT after completion of nCRT. If abnormalities on PET-CT were suspected metastases, histological proof was acquired. A clinical decision model was designed to assess the cost-effectiveness of this diagnostic strategy. Results 156 patients underwent a PET-CT after nCRT. In 31 patients (19.9%) PET-CT showed abnormalities suspicious for dissemination, resulting in 17 cases of proven metastases (10.9%). Of the patients without proven metastases 133 patients were operated. In 6 of these 133 cases distant metastases were detected intraoperatively, corresponding to 4.5% false-negative results. The standard introduction of a post-neoadjuvant therapy PET-CT led to a reduction of overall health care costs per patient compared to a scenario without restaging with PET-CT ($34,088 vs. $36,490). Conclusion In 10.9% of esophageal cancer patients distant metastases were detected by standard PET-CT after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy. To avoid non-curative resections we advocate post-neoadjuvant therapy PET-CT as a cost-effective step in the standard work-up of candidates for surgery. PMID:26529313

  2. Single-camera stereo-digital image correlation with a four-mirror adapter: optimized design and validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Liping; Pan, Bing

    2016-12-01

    A low-cost, easy-to-implement but practical single-camera stereo-digital image correlation (DIC) system using a four-mirror adapter is established for accurate shape and three-dimensional (3D) deformation measurements. The mirrors assisted pseudo-stereo imaging system can convert a single camera into two virtual cameras, which view a specimen from different angles and record the surface images of the test object onto two halves of the camera sensor. To enable deformation measurement in non-laboratory conditions or extreme high temperature environments, an active imaging optical design, combining an actively illuminated monochromatic source with a coupled band-pass optical filter, is compactly integrated to the pseudo-stereo DIC system. The optical design, basic principles and implementation procedures of the established system for 3D profile and deformation measurements are described in detail. The effectiveness and accuracy of the established system are verified by measuring the profile of a regular cylinder surface and displacements of a translated planar plate. As an application example, the established system is used to determine the tensile strains and Poisson's ratio of a composite solid propellant specimen during stress relaxation test. Since the established single-camera stereo-DIC system only needs a single camera and presents strong robustness against variations in ambient light or the thermal radiation of a hot object, it demonstrates great potential in determining transient deformation in non-laboratory or high-temperature environments with the aid of a single high-speed camera.

  3. MO-G-BRF-02: Enhancement of Texture-Based Metastasis Prediction Models Via the Optimization of PET/MRI Acquisition Protocols

    SciTech Connect

    Vallieres, M; Laberge, S; Levesque I, R; El Naqa, I

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: We have previously identified a prediction model of lung metastases at diagnosis of soft-tissue sarcomas (STS) that is composed of two textural features extracted from FDG-PET and T1-weighted (T1w) MRI scans. The goal of this study is to evaluate whether the optimization in FDGPET and MRI acquisition parameters would enhance the prediction performance of texture-based models. Methods: Ten FDG-PET and T1w- MRI digitized tumor models were generated from imaging data of STS patients who underwent pre-treatment clinical scans between 2005 and 2011. Five of ten patients eventually developed lung metastases. Numerically simulated MR images were produced using echo times (TE) of 2 and 4 times the nominal clinical parameter (TEc), and repetition times (TR) of 0.5, 0.67, 1.5 and 2 times the nominal clinical parameter (TRc) found in the DICOM headers (TEc range: 9–13 ms, TRc range: 410-667 ms). PET 2D images were simulated using Monte-Carlo and were reconstructed using an ordered-subsets expectation maximization (OSEM) algorithm with 1 to 32 iterations and a post-reconstruction Gaussian filter of 0, 2, 4 or 6 mm width. For all possible combinations of PET and MRI acquisition parameters, the prediction model was constructed using logistic regression with new coefficients, and its associated prediction performance for lung metastases was evaluated using the area under the ROC curve (AUC). Results: The prediction performance over all simulations yielded AUCs ranging from 0.7 to 1. Notably, TR values below or equal to TRc and higher PET post-reconstruction filter widths yielded higher prediction performance. The best results were obtained with a combination of 4*TEc, TRc, 30 OSEM iterations and 2mm filter width. Conclusion: This work indicates that texture-based metastasis prediction models could be improved using optimized choices of FDG-PET and MRI acquisition protocols. This principle could be generalized to other texture-based models.

  4. Camera Optics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruiz, Michael J.

    1982-01-01

    The camera presents an excellent way to illustrate principles of geometrical optics. Basic camera optics of the single-lens reflex camera are discussed, including interchangeable lenses and accessories available to most owners. Several experiments are described and results compared with theoretical predictions or manufacturer specifications.…

  5. Comparison of {sup 18}F-Fluorothymidine and {sup 18}F-Fluorodeoxyglucose PET/CT in Delineating Gross Tumor Volume by Optimal Threshold in Patients With Squamous Cell Carcinoma of Thoracic Esophagus

    SciTech Connect

    Han Dali; Yu Jinming; Yu Yonghua; Zhang Guifang; Zhong Xiaojun; Lu Jie; Yin Yong; Fu Zheng; Mu Dianbin; Zhang Baijiang; He Wei; Huo Zhijun; Liu Xijun; Kong Lei; Zhao Shuqiang; Sun Xiangyu

    2010-03-15

    Purpose: To determine the optimal method of using {sup 18}F-fluorothymidine (FLT) positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) simulation to delineate the gross tumor volume (GTV) in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma verified by pathologic examination and compare the results with those using {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET/CT. Methods and Materials: A total of 22 patients were enrolled and underwent both FLT and FDG PET/CT. The GTVs with biologic information were delineated using seven different methods in FLT PET/CT and three different methods in FDG PET/CT. The results were compared with the pathologic gross tumor length, and the optimal threshold was obtained. Next, we compared the simulation plans using the optimal threshold of FLT and FDG PET/CT. The radiation dose was prescribed as 60 Gy in 30 fractions with a precise radiotherapy technique. Results: The mean +- standard deviation pathologic gross tumor length was 4.94 +- 2.21 cm. On FLT PET/CT, the length of the standardized uptake value 1.4 was 4.91 +- 2.43 cm. On FDG PET/CT, the length of the standardized uptake value 2.5 was 5.10 +- 2.18 cm, both of which seemed more approximate to the pathologic gross tumor length. The differences in the bilateral lung volume receiving >=20 Gy, heart volume receiving >=40 Gy, and the maximal dose received by spinal cord between FLT and FDG were not significant. However, the values for mean lung dose, bilateral lung volume receiving >=5, >=10, >=30, >=40, and >=50 Gy, mean heart dose, and heart volume receiving >=30 Gy using FLT PET/CT-based planning were significant lower than those using FDG PET/CT. Conclusion: A standardized uptake value cutoff of 1.4 on FLT PET/CT and one of 2.5 on FDG PET/CT provided the closest estimation of GTV length. Finally, FLT PET/CT-based treatment planning provided potential benefits to the lungs and heart.

  6. [Microeconomics of introduction of a PET system based on the revised Japanese National Insurance reimbursement system].

    PubMed

    Abe, Katsumi; Kosuda, Shigeru; Kusano, Shoichi; Nagata, Masayoshi

    2003-11-01

    It is crucial to evaluate an annual balance before-hand when an institution installs a PET system because the revised Japanese national insurance reimbursement system set the cost of a FDG PET study as 75,000 yen. A break-even point was calculated in an 8-hour or a 24-hour operation of a PET system, based on the total costs reported. The break-even points were as follows: 13.4, 17.7, 22.1 studies per day for the 1 cyclotron-1 PET camera, 1 cyclotron-2 PET cameras, 1 cyclotron-3 PET cameras system, respectively, in an ordinary PET system operation of 8 hours. The break-even points were 19.9, 25.5, 31.2 studies per day for the 1 cyclotron-1 PET camera, 1 cyclotron-2 PET cameras, 1 cyclotron-3 PET cameras system, respectively, in a full PET system operation of 24 hours. The results indicate no profit would accrue in an ordinary PET system operation of 8 hours. The annual profit and break-even point for the total cost including the initial investment would be respectively 530 million yen and 2.8 years in a 24-hour operation with 1 cyclotron-3 PET cameras system. PMID:14733110

  7. Ringfield lithographic camera

    DOEpatents

    Sweatt, W.C.

    1998-09-08

    A projection lithography camera is presented with a wide ringfield optimized so as to make efficient use of extreme ultraviolet radiation from a large area radiation source (e.g., D{sub source} {approx_equal} 0.5 mm). The camera comprises four aspheric mirrors optically arranged on a common axis of symmetry. The camera includes an aperture stop that is accessible through a plurality of partial aperture stops to synthesize the theoretical aperture stop. Radiation from a mask is focused to form a reduced image on a wafer, relative to the mask, by reflection from the four aspheric mirrors. 11 figs.

  8. Region specific optimization of continuous linear attenuation coefficients based on UTE (RESOLUTE): application to PET/MR brain imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ladefoged, Claes N.; Benoit, Didier; Law, Ian; Holm, Søren; Kjær, Andreas; Højgaard, Liselotte; Hansen, Adam E.; Andersen, Flemming L.

    2015-10-01

    The reconstruction of PET brain data in a PET/MR hybrid scanner is challenging in the absence of transmission sources, where MR images are used for MR-based attenuation correction (MR-AC). The main challenge of MR-AC is to separate bone and air, as neither have a signal in traditional MR images, and to assign the correct linear attenuation coefficient to bone. The ultra-short echo time (UTE) MR sequence was proposed as a basis for MR-AC as this sequence shows a small signal in bone. The purpose of this study was to develop a new clinically feasible MR-AC method with patient specific continuous-valued linear attenuation coefficients in bone that provides accurate reconstructed PET image data. A total of 164 [18F]FDG PET/MR patients were included in this study, of which 10 were used for training. MR-AC was based on either standard CT (reference), UTE or our method (RESOLUTE). The reconstructed PET images were evaluated in the whole brain, as well as regionally in the brain using a ROI-based analysis. Our method segments air, brain, cerebral spinal fluid, and soft tissue voxels on the unprocessed UTE TE images, and uses a mapping of R2* values to CT Hounsfield Units (HU) to measure the density in bone voxels. The average error of our method in the brain was 0.1% and less than 1.2% in any region of the brain. On average 95% of the brain was within  ±10% of PETCT, compared to 72% when using UTE. The proposed method is clinically feasible, reducing both the global and local errors on the reconstructed PET images, as well as limiting the number and extent of the outliers.

  9. Region specific optimization of continuous linear attenuation coefficients based on UTE (RESOLUTE): application to PET/MR brain imaging.

    PubMed

    Ladefoged, Claes N; Benoit, Didier; Law, Ian; Holm, Søren; Kjær, Andreas; Højgaard, Liselotte; Hansen, Adam E; Andersen, Flemming L

    2015-10-21

    The reconstruction of PET brain data in a PET/MR hybrid scanner is challenging in the absence of transmission sources, where MR images are used for MR-based attenuation correction (MR-AC). The main challenge of MR-AC is to separate bone and air, as neither have a signal in traditional MR images, and to assign the correct linear attenuation coefficient to bone. The ultra-short echo time (UTE) MR sequence was proposed as a basis for MR-AC as this sequence shows a small signal in bone. The purpose of this study was to develop a new clinically feasible MR-AC method with patient specific continuous-valued linear attenuation coefficients in bone that provides accurate reconstructed PET image data. A total of 164 [(18)F]FDG PET/MR patients were included in this study, of which 10 were used for training. MR-AC was based on either standard CT (reference), UTE or our method (RESOLUTE). The reconstructed PET images were evaluated in the whole brain, as well as regionally in the brain using a ROI-based analysis. Our method segments air, brain, cerebral spinal fluid, and soft tissue voxels on the unprocessed UTE TE images, and uses a mapping of R(*)2 values to CT Hounsfield Units (HU) to measure the density in bone voxels. The average error of our method in the brain was 0.1% and less than 1.2% in any region of the brain. On average 95% of the brain was within  ±10% of PETCT, compared to 72% when using UTE. The proposed method is clinically feasible, reducing both the global and local errors on the reconstructed PET images, as well as limiting the number and extent of the outliers.

  10. Optimization of methods for quantification of rCBF using high-resolution [15O]H2O PET images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, M. D.; Feldmann, M.; Matthews, J. C.; Anton-Rodriguez, J. M.; Wang, S.; Koepp, M. J.; Asselin, M.-C.

    2012-04-01

    This study aimed to derive accurate estimates of regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) from noisy dynamic [15O]H2O PET images acquired on the high-resolution research tomograph, while retaining as much as possible the high spatial resolution of this brain scanner (2-3 mm) in parametric maps of rCBF. The PET autoradiographic method and generalized linear least-squares (GLLS), with fixed or extended to include spatially variable estimates of the dispersion of the measured input function, were compared to nonlinear least-squares (NLLS) for rCBF estimation. Six healthy volunteers underwent two [15O]H2O PET scans with continuous arterial blood sampling. rCBF estimates were obtained from three image reconstruction methods (one analytic and two iterative, of which one includes a resolution model) to which a range of post-reconstruction filters (3D Gaussian: 2, 4 and 6 mm FWHM) were applied. The optimal injected activity was estimated to be around 11 MBq kg-1 (800 MBq) by extrapolation of patient-specific noise equivalent count rates. Whole-brain rCBF values were found to be relatively insensitive to the method of reconstruction and rCBF quantification. The grey and white matter rCBF for analytic reconstruction and NLLS were 0.44 ± 0.03 and 0.15 ± 0.03 mL min-1 cm-3, respectively, in agreement with literature values. Similar values were obtained from the other methods. For generation of parametric images using GLLS or the autoradiographic method, a filter of ⩾4 mm was required in order to suppress noise in the PET images which otherwise produced large biases in the rCBF estimates.

  11. Optimizing the input and output transmission lines that gate the microchannel plate in a high-speed framing camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lugten, John B.; Brown, Charles G.; Piston, Kenneth W.; Beeman, Bart V.; Allen, Fred V.; Boyle, Dustin T.; Brown, Christopher G.; Cruz, Jason G.; Kittle, Douglas R.; Lumbard, Alexander A.; Torres, Peter; Hargrove, Dana R.; Benedetti, Laura R.; Bell, Perry M.

    2015-08-01

    We present new designs for the launch and receiver boards used in a high speed x-ray framing camera at the National Ignition Facility. The new launch board uses a Klopfenstein taper to match the 50 ohm input impedance to the ~10 ohm microchannel plate. The new receiver board incorporates design changes resulting in an output monitor pulse shape that more accurately represents the pulse shape at the input and across the microchannel plate; this is valuable for assessing and monitoring the electrical performance of the assembled framing camera head. The launch and receiver boards maximize power coupling to the microchannel plate, minimize cross talk between channels, and minimize reflections. We discuss some of the design tradeoffs we explored, and present modeling results and measured performance. We also present our methods for dealing with the non-ideal behavior of coupling capacitors and terminating resistors. We compare the performance of these new designs to that of some earlier designs.

  12. Pet Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... Before getting a pet, think carefully about which animal is best for your family. What is each ... Does anyone have pet allergies? What type of animal suits your lifestyle and budget? Once you own ...

  13. Gallium-68 EDTA PET/CT for Renal Imaging.

    PubMed

    Hofman, Michael S; Hicks, Rodney J

    2016-09-01

    Nuclear medicine renal imaging provides important functional data to assist in the diagnosis and management of patients with a variety of renal disorders. Physiologically stable metal chelates like ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) and diethylenetriamine penta-acetate (DTPA) are excreted by glomerular filtration and have been radiolabelled with a variety of isotopes for imaging glomerular filtration and quantitative assessment of glomerular filtration rate. Gallium-68 ((68)Ga) EDTA PET usage predates Technetium-99m ((99m)Tc) renal imaging, but virtually disappeared with the widespread adoption of gamma camera technology that was not optimal for imaging positron decay. There is now a reemergence of interest in (68)Ga owing to the greater availability of PET technology and use of (68)Ga to label other radiotracers. (68)Ga EDTA can be used a substitute for (99m)Tc DTPA for wide variety of clinical indications. A key advantage of PET for renal imaging over conventional scintigraphy is 3-dimensional dynamic imaging, which is particularly helpful in patients with complex anatomy in whom planar imaging may be nondiagnostic or difficult to interpret owing to overlying structures containing radioactive urine that cannot be differentiated. Other advantages include accurate and absolute (rather than relative) camera-based quantification, superior spatial and temporal resolution and integrated multislice CT providing anatomical correlation. Furthermore, the (68)Ga generator enables on-demand production at low cost, with no additional patient radiation exposure compared with conventional scintigraphy. Over the past decade, we have employed (68)Ga EDTA PET/CT primarily to answer difficult clinical questions in patients in whom other modalities have failed, particularly when it was envisaged that dynamic 3D imaging would be of assistance. We have also used it as a substitute for (99m)Tc DTPA if unavailable owing to supply issues, and have additionally examined the role of

  14. AX-PET: A novel PET concept with G-APD readout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolle, E.; Casella, C.; Chesi, E.; De Leo, R.; Dissertori, G.; Fanti, V.; Gillam, J. E.; Heller, M.; Joram, C.; Lustermann, W.; Nappi, E.; Oliver, J. F.; Pauss, F.; Rafecas, M.; Rudge, A.; Ruotsalainen, U.; Schinzel, D.; Schneider, T.; Séguinot, J.; Solevi, P.; Stapnes, S.; Tuna, U.; Weilhammer, P.

    2012-12-01

    The AX-PET collaboration has developed a novel concept for high resolution PET imaging to overcome some of the performance limitations of classical PET cameras, in particular the compromise between spatial resolution and sensitivity introduced by the parallax error. The detector consists of an arrangement of long LYSO scintillating crystals axially oriented around the field of view together with arrays of wave length shifter strips orthogonal to the crystals. This matrix allows a precise 3D measurement of the photon interaction point. This is valid both for photoelectric absorption at 511 keV and for Compton scattering down to deposited energies of about 100 keV. Crystals and WLS strips are individually read out using Geiger-mode Avalanche Photo Diodes (G-APDs). The sensitivity of such a detector can be adjusted by changing the number of layers and the resolution is defined by the crystal and strip dimensions. Two AX-PET modules were built and fully characterized in dedicated test set-ups at CERN, with point-like 22Na sources. Their performance in terms of energy (Renergy≈11.8% (FWMH) at 511 keV) and spatial resolution was assessed (σaxial≈0.65 mm), both individually and for the two modules in coincidence. Test campaigns at ETH Zurich and at the company AAA allowed the tomographic reconstructions of more complex phantoms validating the 3D reconstruction algorithms. The concept of the AX-PET modules will be presented together with some characterization results. We describe a count rate model which allows to optimize the planing of the tomographic scans.

  15. Advances in Clinical PET/MRI Instrumentation.

    PubMed

    Herzog, Hans; Lerche, Christoph

    2016-04-01

    In 2010, the first whole-body PET/MRI scanners installed for clinical use were the sequential Philips PET/MRI with PMT-based, TOF-capable technology and the integrated simultaneous Siemens PET/MRI. Avalanche photodiodes as non-magneto-sensitive readout electronics allowed PET integrated within the MRI. The experiences with these scanners showed that improvements of software aspects, such as attenuation correction, were necessary and that efficient protocols combining optimally PET and MRI must be still developed. In 2014, General Electric issued an integrated PET/MRI with SiPM-based PET detectors, allowing TOF-PET. Looking at the MRI components of current PET/MR imaging systems, primary improvements come from sequences and new coils.

  16. Optimization of a Pretargeted Strategy for the PET Imaging of Colorectal Carcinoma via the Modulation of Radioligand Pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Zeglis, Brian M; Brand, Christian; Abdel-Atti, Dalya; Carnazza, Kathryn E; Cook, Brendon E; Carlin, Sean; Reiner, Thomas; Lewis, Jason S

    2015-10-01

    Pretargeted PET imaging has emerged as an effective strategy for merging the exquisite selectivity of antibody-based targeting vectors with the rapid pharmacokinetics of radiolabeled small molecules. We previously reported the development of a strategy for the pretargeted PET imaging of colorectal cancer based on the bioorthogonal inverse electron demand Diels-Alder reaction between a tetrazine-bearing radioligand and a transcyclooctene-modified huA33 immunoconjugate. Although this method effectively delineated tumor tissue, its clinical potential was limited by the somewhat sluggish clearance of the radioligand through the gastrointestinal tract. Herein, we report the development and in vivo validation of a pretargeted strategy for the PET imaging of colorectal carcinoma with dramatically improved pharmacokinetics. Two novel tetrazine constructs, Tz-PEG7-NOTA and Tz-SarAr, were synthesized, characterized, and radiolabeled with (64)Cu in high yield (>90%) and radiochemical purity (>99%). PET imaging and biodistribution experiments in healthy mice revealed that although (64)Cu-Tz-PEG7-NOTA is cleared via both the gastrointestinal and urinary tracts, (64)Cu-Tz-SarAr is rapidly excreted by the renal system alone. On this basis, (64)Cu-Tz-SarAr was selected for further in vivo evaluation. To this end, mice bearing A33 antigen-expressing SW1222 human colorectal carcinoma xenografts were administered huA33-TCO, and the immunoconjugate was given 24 h to accumulate at the tumor and clear from the blood, after which (64)Cu-Tz-SarAr was administered via intravenous tail vein injection. PET imaging and biodistribution experiments revealed specific uptake of the radiotracer in the tumor at early time points (5.6 ± 0.7 %ID/g at 1 h p.i.), high tumor-to-background activity ratios, and rapid elimination of unclicked radioligand. Importantly, experiments with longer antibody accumulation intervals (48 and 120 h) yielded slight decreases in tumoral uptake but also concomitant

  17. Optimization of a Pretargeted Strategy for the PET Imaging of Colorectal Carcinoma via the Modulation of Radioligand Pharmacokinetics

    PubMed Central

    Zeglis, Brian M.; Brand, Christian; Abdel-Atti, Dalya; Carnazza, Kathryn E.; Cook, Brendon E.; Carlin, Sean; Reiner, Thomas; Lewis, Jason S.

    2015-01-01

    Pretargeted PET imaging has emerged as an effective strategy for merging the exquisite selectivity of antibody-based targeting vectors with the rapid pharmacokinetics of radiolabeled small molecules. We previously reported the development of a strategy for the pretargeted PET imaging of colorectal cancer based on the bioorthogonal inverse electron demand Diels–Alder reaction between a tetrazine-bearing radioligand and a transcyclooctene-modified huA33 immunoconjugate. Although this method effectively delineated tumor tissue, its clinical potential was limited by the somewhat sluggish clearance of the radioligand through the gastrointestinal tract. Herein, we report the development and in vivo validation of a pretargeted strategy for the PET imaging of colorectal carcinoma with dramatically improved pharmacokinetics. Two novel tetrazine constructs, Tz-PEG7-NOTA and Tz-SarAr, were synthesized, characterized, and radiolabeled with 64Cu in high yield (>90%) and radiochemical purity (>99%). PET imaging and biodistribution experiments in healthy mice revealed that although 64Cu-Tz-PEG7-NOTA is cleared via both the gastrointestinal and urinary tracts, 64Cu-Tz-SarAr is rapidly excreted by the renal system alone. On this basis, 64Cu-Tz-SarAr was selected for further in vivo evaluation. To this end, mice bearing A33 antigen-expressing SW1222 human colorectal carcinoma xenografts were administered huA33-TCO, and the immunoconjugate was given 24 h to accumulate at the tumor and clear from the blood, after which 64Cu-Tz-SarAr was administered via intravenous tail vein injection. PET imaging and biodistribution experiments revealed specific uptake of the radiotracer in the tumor at early time points (5.6 ± 0.7 %ID/g at 1 h p.i.), high tumor-to-background activity ratios, and rapid elimination of unclicked radioligand. Importantly, experiments with longer antibody accumulation intervals (48 and 120 h) yielded slight decreases in tumoral uptake but also concomitant increases in

  18. Experimental evaluation and basis function optimization of the spatially variant image-space PSF on the Ingenuity PET/MR scanner

    SciTech Connect

    Kotasidis, Fotis A.; Zaidi, Habib

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: The Ingenuity time-of-flight (TF) PET/MR is a recently developed hybrid scanner combining the molecular imaging capabilities of PET with the excellent soft tissue contrast of MRI. It is becoming common practice to characterize the system's point spread function (PSF) and understand its variation under spatial transformations to guide clinical studies and potentially use it within resolution recovery image reconstruction algorithms. Furthermore, due to the system's utilization of overlapping and spherical symmetric Kaiser-Bessel basis functions during image reconstruction, its image space PSF and reconstructed spatial resolution could be affected by the selection of the basis function parameters. Hence, a detailed investigation into the multidimensional basis function parameter space is needed to evaluate the impact of these parameters on spatial resolution. Methods: Using an array of 12 × 7 printed point sources, along with a custom made phantom, and with the MR magnet on, the system's spatially variant image-based PSF was characterized in detail. Moreover, basis function parameters were systematically varied during reconstruction (list-mode TF OSEM) to evaluate their impact on the reconstructed resolution and the image space PSF. Following the spatial resolution optimization, phantom, and clinical studies were subsequently reconstructed using representative basis function parameters. Results: Based on the analysis and under standard basis function parameters, the axial and tangential components of the PSF were found to be almost invariant under spatial transformations (∼4 mm) while the radial component varied modestly from 4 to 6.7 mm. Using a systematic investigation into the basis function parameter space, the spatial resolution was found to degrade for basis functions with a large radius and small shape parameter. However, it was found that optimizing the spatial resolution in the reconstructed PET images, while having a good basis function

  19. Optimization of high filler loading on tensile properties of recycled HDPE/PET blends filled with rice husk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ruey Shan; Ahmad, Sahrim; Ghani, Mohd Hafizuddin Ab; Salleh, Mohd Nazry

    2014-09-01

    Biocomposites of recycled high density polyethylene / recycled polyethylene terephthalate (rHDPE/rPET) blend incorporated with rice husk flour (RHF) were prepared using a corotating twin screw extruder. Maleic anhydride polyethylene (MAPE) was added as a coupling agent to improve the fibre-matrix interface adhesion. The effect of high filler loadings (50-90 wt%) on morphology and tensile properties of compatibilized rHDPE/rPET blend was investigated. The results of our study shown that composite with 70 wt% exhibited the highest tensile strength and Young's modulus, which are 22 MPa and 1752 MPa, respectively. The elongation at break decreased with increasing percentage of RHF. SEM micrograph confirmed fillers dispersion, morphological interaction and enhanced interfacial bonding between recycled polymer blends and rice husk. It can be concluded that the optimum RHF content is 70 wt% with maximum tensile strength.

  20. Single Particle and PET-based Platform for Identifying Optimal Plasmonic Nano-Heaters for Photothermal Cancer Therapy.

    PubMed

    Jørgensen, Jesper Tranekjær; Norregaard, Kamilla; Tian, Pengfei; Bendix, Poul Martin; Kjaer, Andreas; Oddershede, Lene B

    2016-08-02

    Plasmonic nanoparticle-based photothermal cancer therapy is a promising new tool to inflict localized and irreversible damage to tumor tissue by hyperthermia, without harming surrounding healthy tissue. We developed a single particle and positron emission tomography (PET)-based platform to quantitatively correlate the heat generation of plasmonic nanoparticles with their potential as cancer killing agents. In vitro, the heat generation and absorption cross-section of single irradiated nanoparticles were quantified using a temperature sensitive lipid-based assay and compared to their theoretically predicted photo-absorption. In vivo, the heat generation of irradiated nanoparticles was evaluated in human tumor xenografts in mice using 2-deoxy-2-[F-18]fluoro-D-glucose ((18)F-FDG) PET imaging. To validate the use of this platform, we quantified the photothermal efficiency of near infrared resonant silica-gold nanoshells (AuNSs) and benchmarked this against the heating of colloidal spherical, solid gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). As expected, both in vitro and in vivo the heat generation of the resonant AuNSs performed superior compared to the non-resonant AuNPs. Furthermore, the results showed that PET imaging could be reliably used to monitor early treatment response of photothermal treatment. This multidisciplinary approach provides a much needed platform to benchmark the emerging plethora of novel plasmonic nanoparticles for their potential for photothermal cancer therapy.

  1. Single Particle and PET-based Platform for Identifying Optimal Plasmonic Nano-Heaters for Photothermal Cancer Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jørgensen, Jesper Tranekjær; Norregaard, Kamilla; Tian, Pengfei; Bendix, Poul Martin; Kjaer, Andreas; Oddershede, Lene B.

    2016-08-01

    Plasmonic nanoparticle-based photothermal cancer therapy is a promising new tool to inflict localized and irreversible damage to tumor tissue by hyperthermia, without harming surrounding healthy tissue. We developed a single particle and positron emission tomography (PET)-based platform to quantitatively correlate the heat generation of plasmonic nanoparticles with their potential as cancer killing agents. In vitro, the heat generation and absorption cross-section of single irradiated nanoparticles were quantified using a temperature sensitive lipid-based assay and compared to their theoretically predicted photo-absorption. In vivo, the heat generation of irradiated nanoparticles was evaluated in human tumor xenografts in mice using 2-deoxy-2-[F-18]fluoro-D-glucose (18F-FDG) PET imaging. To validate the use of this platform, we quantified the photothermal efficiency of near infrared resonant silica-gold nanoshells (AuNSs) and benchmarked this against the heating of colloidal spherical, solid gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). As expected, both in vitro and in vivo the heat generation of the resonant AuNSs performed superior compared to the non-resonant AuNPs. Furthermore, the results showed that PET imaging could be reliably used to monitor early treatment response of photothermal treatment. This multidisciplinary approach provides a much needed platform to benchmark the emerging plethora of novel plasmonic nanoparticles for their potential for photothermal cancer therapy.

  2. Single Particle and PET-based Platform for Identifying Optimal Plasmonic Nano-Heaters for Photothermal Cancer Therapy.

    PubMed

    Jørgensen, Jesper Tranekjær; Norregaard, Kamilla; Tian, Pengfei; Bendix, Poul Martin; Kjaer, Andreas; Oddershede, Lene B

    2016-01-01

    Plasmonic nanoparticle-based photothermal cancer therapy is a promising new tool to inflict localized and irreversible damage to tumor tissue by hyperthermia, without harming surrounding healthy tissue. We developed a single particle and positron emission tomography (PET)-based platform to quantitatively correlate the heat generation of plasmonic nanoparticles with their potential as cancer killing agents. In vitro, the heat generation and absorption cross-section of single irradiated nanoparticles were quantified using a temperature sensitive lipid-based assay and compared to their theoretically predicted photo-absorption. In vivo, the heat generation of irradiated nanoparticles was evaluated in human tumor xenografts in mice using 2-deoxy-2-[F-18]fluoro-D-glucose ((18)F-FDG) PET imaging. To validate the use of this platform, we quantified the photothermal efficiency of near infrared resonant silica-gold nanoshells (AuNSs) and benchmarked this against the heating of colloidal spherical, solid gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). As expected, both in vitro and in vivo the heat generation of the resonant AuNSs performed superior compared to the non-resonant AuNPs. Furthermore, the results showed that PET imaging could be reliably used to monitor early treatment response of photothermal treatment. This multidisciplinary approach provides a much needed platform to benchmark the emerging plethora of novel plasmonic nanoparticles for their potential for photothermal cancer therapy. PMID:27481537

  3. Single Particle and PET-based Platform for Identifying Optimal Plasmonic Nano-Heaters for Photothermal Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Jørgensen, Jesper Tranekjær; Norregaard, Kamilla; Tian, Pengfei; Bendix, Poul Martin; Kjaer, Andreas; Oddershede, Lene B.

    2016-01-01

    Plasmonic nanoparticle-based photothermal cancer therapy is a promising new tool to inflict localized and irreversible damage to tumor tissue by hyperthermia, without harming surrounding healthy tissue. We developed a single particle and positron emission tomography (PET)-based platform to quantitatively correlate the heat generation of plasmonic nanoparticles with their potential as cancer killing agents. In vitro, the heat generation and absorption cross-section of single irradiated nanoparticles were quantified using a temperature sensitive lipid-based assay and compared to their theoretically predicted photo-absorption. In vivo, the heat generation of irradiated nanoparticles was evaluated in human tumor xenografts in mice using 2-deoxy-2-[F-18]fluoro-D-glucose (18F-FDG) PET imaging. To validate the use of this platform, we quantified the photothermal efficiency of near infrared resonant silica-gold nanoshells (AuNSs) and benchmarked this against the heating of colloidal spherical, solid gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). As expected, both in vitro and in vivo the heat generation of the resonant AuNSs performed superior compared to the non-resonant AuNPs. Furthermore, the results showed that PET imaging could be reliably used to monitor early treatment response of photothermal treatment. This multidisciplinary approach provides a much needed platform to benchmark the emerging plethora of novel plasmonic nanoparticles for their potential for photothermal cancer therapy. PMID:27481537

  4. Space Camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Nikon's F3 35mm camera was specially modified for use by Space Shuttle astronauts. The modification work produced a spinoff lubricant. Because lubricants in space have a tendency to migrate within the camera, Nikon conducted extensive development to produce nonmigratory lubricants; variations of these lubricants are used in the commercial F3, giving it better performance than conventional lubricants. Another spinoff is the coreless motor which allows the F3 to shoot 140 rolls of film on one set of batteries.

  5. Optimizing light transport in scintillation crystals for time-of-flight PET: an experimental and optical Monte Carlo simulation study

    PubMed Central

    Berg, Eric; Roncali, Emilie; Cherry, Simon R.

    2015-01-01

    Achieving excellent timing resolution in gamma ray detectors is crucial in several applications such as medical imaging with time-of-flight positron emission tomography (TOF-PET). Although many factors impact the overall system timing resolution, the statistical nature of scintillation light, including photon production and transport in the crystal to the photodetector, is typically the limiting factor for modern scintillation detectors. In this study, we investigated the impact of surface treatment, in particular, roughening select areas of otherwise polished crystals, on light transport and timing resolution. A custom Monte Carlo photon tracking tool was used to gain insight into changes in light collection and timing resolution that were observed experimentally: select roughening configurations increased the light collection up to 25% and improved timing resolution by 15% compared to crystals with all polished surfaces. Simulations showed that partial surface roughening caused a greater number of photons to be reflected towards the photodetector and increased the initial rate of photoelectron production. This study provides a simple method to improve timing resolution and light collection in scintillator-based gamma ray detectors, a topic of high importance in the field of TOF-PET. Additionally, we demonstrated utility of our Monte Carlo simulation tool to accurately predict the effect of altering crystal surfaces on light collection and timing resolution. PMID:26114040

  6. k-space sampling optimization for ultrashort TE imaging of cortical bone: Applications in radiation therapy planning and MR-based PET attenuation correction

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Lingzhi E-mail: raymond.muzic@case.edu; Traughber, Melanie; Su, Kuan-Hao; Pereira, Gisele C.; Grover, Anu; Traughber, Bryan; Muzic, Raymond F. Jr. E-mail: raymond.muzic@case.edu

    2014-10-15

    Purpose: The ultrashort echo-time (UTE) sequence is a promising MR pulse sequence for imaging cortical bone which is otherwise difficult to image using conventional MR sequences and also poses strong attenuation for photons in radiation therapy and PET imaging. The authors report here a systematic characterization of cortical bone signal decay and a scanning time optimization strategy for the UTE sequence through k-space undersampling, which can result in up to a 75% reduction in acquisition time. Using the undersampled UTE imaging sequence, the authors also attempted to quantitatively investigate the MR properties of cortical bone in healthy volunteers, thus demonstrating the feasibility of using such a technique for generating bone-enhanced images which can be used for radiation therapy planning and attenuation correction with PET/MR. Methods: An angularly undersampled, radially encoded UTE sequence was used for scanning the brains of healthy volunteers. Quantitative MR characterization of tissue properties, including water fraction and R2{sup ∗} = 1/T2{sup ∗}, was performed by analyzing the UTE images acquired at multiple echo times. The impact of different sampling rates was evaluated through systematic comparison of the MR image quality, bone-enhanced image quality, image noise, water fraction, and R2{sup ∗} of cortical bone. Results: A reduced angular sampling rate of the UTE trajectory achieves acquisition durations in proportion to the sampling rate and in as short as 25% of the time required for full sampling using a standard Cartesian acquisition, while preserving unique MR contrast within the skull at the cost of a minimal increase in noise level. The R2{sup ∗} of human skull was measured as 0.2–0.3 ms{sup −1} depending on the specific region, which is more than ten times greater than the R2{sup ∗} of soft tissue. The water fraction in human skull was measured to be 60%–80%, which is significantly less than the >90% water fraction in

  7. Clinical applications with the HIDAC positron camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frey, P.; Schaller, G.; Christin, A.; Townsend, D.; Tochon-Danguy, H.; Wensveen, M.; Donath, A.

    1988-06-01

    A high density avalanche chamber (HIDAC) positron camera has been used for positron emission tomographic (PET) imaging in three different human studies, including patients presenting with: (I) thyroid diseases (124 cases); (II) clinically suspected malignant tumours of the pharynx or larynx (ENT) region (23 cases); and (III) clinically suspected primary malignant and metastatic tumours of the liver (9 cases, 19 PET scans). The positron emitting radiopharmaceuticals used for the three studies were Na 124I (4.2 d half-life) for the thyroid, 55Co-bleomycin (17.5 h half-life) for the ENT-region and 68Ga-colloid (68 min half-life) for the liver. Tomographic imaging was performed: (I) 24 h after oral Na 124I administration to the thyroid patients, (II) 18 h after intraveneous administration of 55Co-bleomycin to the ENT patients and (III) 20 min following the intraveneous injection of 68Ga-colloid to the liver tumour patients. Three different imaging protocols were used with the HIDAC positron camera to perform appropriate tomographic imaging in each patient study. Promising results were obtained in all three studies, particularly in tomographic thyroid imaging, where a significant clinical contribution is made possible for diagnosis and therapy planning by the PET technique. In the other two PET studies encouraging results were obtained for the detection and precise localisation of malignant tumour disease including an estimate of the functional liver volume based on the reticulo-endothelial-system (RES) of the liver, obtained in vivo, and the three-dimensional display of liver PET data using shaded graphics techniques. The clinical significance of the overall results obtained in both the ENT and the liver PET study, however, is still uncertain and the respective role of PET as a new imaging modality in these applications is not yet clearly established. To appreciate the clinical impact made by PET in liver and ENT malignant tumour staging needs further investigation

  8. Infrared Camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    A sensitive infrared camera that observes the blazing plumes from the Space Shuttle or expendable rocket lift-offs is capable of scanning for fires, monitoring the environment and providing medical imaging. The hand-held camera uses highly sensitive arrays in infrared photodetectors known as quantum well infrared photo detectors (QWIPS). QWIPS were developed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Center for Space Microelectronics Technology in partnership with Amber, a Raytheon company. In October 1996, QWIP detectors pointed out hot spots of the destructive fires speeding through Malibu, California. Night vision, early warning systems, navigation, flight control systems, weather monitoring, security and surveillance are among the duties for which the camera is suited. Medical applications are also expected.

  9. High-Resolution PET Detector. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Karp, Joel

    2014-03-26

    The objective of this project was to develop an understanding of the limits of performance for a high resolution PET detector using an approach based on continuous scintillation crystals rather than pixelated crystals. The overall goal was to design a high-resolution detector, which requires both high spatial resolution and high sensitivity for 511 keV gammas. Continuous scintillation detectors (Anger cameras) have been used extensively for both single-photon and PET scanners, however, these instruments were based on NaI(Tl) scintillators using relatively large, individual photo-multipliers. In this project we investigated the potential of this type of detector technology to achieve higher spatial resolution through the use of improved scintillator materials and photo-sensors, and modification of the detector surface to optimize the light response function.We achieved an average spatial resolution of 3-mm for a 25-mm thick, LYSO continuous detector using a maximum likelihood position algorithm and shallow slots cut into the entrance surface.

  10. The CAMCAO infrared camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amorim, Antonio; Melo, Antonio; Alves, Joao; Rebordao, Jose; Pinhao, Jose; Bonfait, Gregoire; Lima, Jorge; Barros, Rui; Fernandes, Rui; Catarino, Isabel; Carvalho, Marta; Marques, Rui; Poncet, Jean-Marc; Duarte Santos, Filipe; Finger, Gert; Hubin, Norbert; Huster, Gotthard; Koch, Franz; Lizon, Jean-Louis; Marchetti, Enrico

    2004-09-01

    The CAMCAO instrument is a high resolution near infrared (NIR) camera conceived to operate together with the new ESO Multi-conjugate Adaptive optics Demonstrator (MAD) with the goal of evaluating the feasibility of Multi-Conjugate Adaptive Optics techniques (MCAO) on the sky. It is a high-resolution wide field of view (FoV) camera that is optimized to use the extended correction of the atmospheric turbulence provided by MCAO. While the first purpose of this camera is the sky observation, in the MAD setup, to validate the MCAO technology, in a second phase, the CAMCAO camera is planned to attach directly to the VLT for scientific astrophysical studies. The camera is based on the 2kx2k HAWAII2 infrared detector controlled by an ESO external IRACE system and includes standard IR band filters mounted on a positional filter wheel. The CAMCAO design requires that the optical components and the IR detector should be kept at low temperatures in order to avoid emitting radiation and lower detector noise in the region analysis. The cryogenic system inclues a LN2 tank and a sptially developed pulse tube cryocooler. Field and pupil cold stops are implemented to reduce the infrared background and the stray-light. The CAMCAO optics provide diffraction limited performance down to J Band, but the detector sampling fulfills the Nyquist criterion for the K band (2.2mm).

  11. CCD Camera

    DOEpatents

    Roth, R.R.

    1983-08-02

    A CCD camera capable of observing a moving object which has varying intensities of radiation emanating therefrom and which may move at varying speeds is shown wherein there is substantially no overlapping of successive images and wherein the exposure times and scan times may be varied independently of each other. 7 figs.

  12. CCD Camera

    DOEpatents

    Roth, Roger R.

    1983-01-01

    A CCD camera capable of observing a moving object which has varying intensities of radiation eminating therefrom and which may move at varying speeds is shown wherein there is substantially no overlapping of successive images and wherein the exposure times and scan times may be varied independently of each other.

  13. Nikon Camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Nikon FM compact has simplification feature derived from cameras designed for easy, yet accurate use in a weightless environment. Innovation is a plastic-cushioned advance lever which advances the film and simultaneously switches on a built in light meter. With a turn of the lens aperture ring, a glowing signal in viewfinder confirms correct exposure.

  14. Positron Emission Tomography (PET)

    SciTech Connect

    Welch, M.J.

    1990-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) assesses biochemical processes in the living subject, producing images of function rather than form. Using PET, physicians are able to obtain not the anatomical information provided by other medical imaging techniques, but pictures of physiological activity. In metaphoric terms, traditional imaging methods supply a map of the body's roadways, its, anatomy; PET shows the traffic along those paths, its biochemistry. This document discusses the principles of PET, the radiopharmaceuticals in PET, PET research, clinical applications of PET, the cost of PET, training of individuals for PET, the role of the United States Department of Energy in PET, and the futures of PET. 22 figs.

  15. Positron Emission Tomography (PET)

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Welch, M. J.

    1990-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) assesses biochemical processes in the living subject, producing images of function rather than form. Using PET, physicians are able to obtain not the anatomical information provided by other medical imaging techniques, but pictures of physiological activity. In metaphoric terms, traditional imaging methods supply a map of the body's roadways, its, anatomy; PET shows the traffic along those paths, its biochemistry. This document discusses the principles of PET, the radiopharmaceuticals in PET, PET research, clinical applications of PET, the cost of PET, training of individuals for PET, the role of the United States Department of Energy in PET, and the futures of PET.

  16. Optimising rigid motion compensation for small animal brain PET imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spangler-Bickell, Matthew G.; Zhou, Lin; Kyme, Andre Z.; De Laat, Bart; Fulton, Roger R.; Nuyts, Johan

    2016-10-01

    Motion compensation (MC) in PET brain imaging of awake small animals is attracting increased attention in preclinical studies since it avoids the confounding effects of anaesthesia and enables behavioural tests during the scan. A popular MC technique is to use multiple external cameras to track the motion of the animal’s head, which is assumed to be represented by the motion of a marker attached to its forehead. In this study we have explored several methods to improve the experimental setup and the reconstruction procedures of this method: optimising the camera-marker separation; improving the temporal synchronisation between the motion tracker measurements and the list-mode stream; post-acquisition smoothing and interpolation of the motion data; and list-mode reconstruction with appropriately selected subsets. These techniques have been tested and verified on measurements of a moving resolution phantom and brain scans of an awake rat. The proposed techniques improved the reconstructed spatial resolution of the phantom by 27% and of the rat brain by 14%. We suggest a set of optimal parameter values to use for awake animal PET studies and discuss the relative significance of each parameter choice.

  17. Development of a novel depth of interaction PET detector using highly multiplexed G-APD cross-strip encoding

    SciTech Connect

    Kolb, A. Parl, C.; Liu, C. C.; Pichler, B. J.; Mantlik, F.; Lorenz, E.; Renker, D.

    2014-08-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to develop a prototype PET detector module for a combined small animal positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging (PET/MRI) system. The most important factor for small animal imaging applications is the detection sensitivity of the PET camera, which can be optimized by utilizing longer scintillation crystals. At the same time, small animal PET systems must yield a high spatial resolution. The measured object is very close to the PET detector because the bore diameter of a high field animal MR scanner is limited. When used in combination with long scintillation crystals, these small-bore PET systems generate parallax errors that ultimately lead to a decreased spatial resolution. Thus, we developed a depth of interaction (DoI) encoding PET detector module that has a uniform spatial resolution across the whole field of view (FOV), high detection sensitivity, compactness, and insensitivity to magnetic fields. Methods: The approach was based on Geiger mode avalanche photodiode (G-APD) detectors with cross-strip encoding. The number of readout channels was reduced by a factor of 36 for the chosen block elements. Two 12 × 2 G-APD strip arrays (25μm cells) were placed perpendicular on each face of a 12 × 12 lutetium oxyorthosilicate crystal block with a crystal size of 1.55 × 1.55 × 20 mm. The strip arrays were multiplexed into two channels and used to calculate the x, y coordinates for each array and the deposited energy. The DoI was measured in step sizes of 1.8 mm by a collimated {sup 18}F source. The coincident resolved time (CRT) was analyzed at all DoI positions by acquiring the waveform for each event and applying a digital leading edge discriminator. Results: All 144 crystals were well resolved in the crystal flood map. The average full width half maximum (FWHM) energy resolution of the detector was 12.8% ± 1.5% with a FWHM CRT of 1.14 ± 0.02 ns. The average FWHM DoI resolution over 12 crystals was 2.90

  18. Current Status of Hybrid PET/MRI in Oncologic Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Rosenkrantz, Andrew B.; Friedman, Kent; Chandarana, Hersh; Melsaether, Amy; Moy, Linda; Ding, Yu-Shin; Jhaveri, Komal; Beltran, Luis; Jain, Rajan

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE This review article explores recent advancements in PET/MRI for clinical oncologic imaging. CONCLUSION Radiologists should understand the technical considerations that have made PET/MRI feasible within clinical workflows, the role of PET tracers for imaging various molecular targets in oncology, and advantages of hybrid PET/MRI compared with PET/CT. To facilitate this understanding, we discuss clinical examples (including gliomas, breast cancer, bone metastases, prostate cancer, bladder cancer, gynecologic malignancy, and lymphoma) as well as future directions, challenges, and areas for continued technical optimization for PET/MRI. PMID:26491894

  19. Pet Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kavanagh, Kim

    1994-01-01

    This resource guide presents information on a variety of ways that animals can be used as a therapeutic modality with people having disabilities. Aspects addressed include: pet ownership and selection criteria; dogs (including service dogs, hearing/signal dogs, seeing leader dogs, and social/specialty dogs); horseriding for both therapy and fun;…

  20. Proceedings of the cardiac PET summit meeting 12 may 2014: Cardiac PET and SPECT instrumentation.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Ernest V

    2015-06-01

    Advances in PET and SPECT and imaging hardware and software are vastly improving the noninvasive evaluation of myocardial perfusion and function. PET perfusion imaging has benefitted from the introduction of novel detectors that now allow true 3D imaging, and precise attenuation correction (AC). These developments have also resulted in perfusion images with higher spatial and contrast resolution that may be acquired in shorter protocols and/or with less patient radiation exposure than traditional PET or SPECT studies. Hybrid PET/CT cameras utilize transmission computed tomographic (CT) scans for AC, and offer the additional clinical advantages of evaluating coronary calcium and myocardial anatomy but at a higher cost than PET scanners that use (68)Ge radioactive line sources. As cardiac PET systems continue to improve, dedicated cardiac SPECT systems are also undergoing a profound change in their design. The scintillation camera general purpose design is being replaced with systems with multiple detectors focused on the heart yielding 5 to 10 times the sensitivity of conventional SPECT. As a result, shorter acquisition times and/or lower tracer doses produce higher quality SPECT images than were possible before. This article reviews these concepts and compares the attributes of PET and SPECT instrumentation. PMID:25824018

  1. Proceedings of the cardiac PET summit meeting 12 may 2014: Cardiac PET and SPECT instrumentation.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Ernest V

    2015-06-01

    Advances in PET and SPECT and imaging hardware and software are vastly improving the noninvasive evaluation of myocardial perfusion and function. PET perfusion imaging has benefitted from the introduction of novel detectors that now allow true 3D imaging, and precise attenuation correction (AC). These developments have also resulted in perfusion images with higher spatial and contrast resolution that may be acquired in shorter protocols and/or with less patient radiation exposure than traditional PET or SPECT studies. Hybrid PET/CT cameras utilize transmission computed tomographic (CT) scans for AC, and offer the additional clinical advantages of evaluating coronary calcium and myocardial anatomy but at a higher cost than PET scanners that use (68)Ge radioactive line sources. As cardiac PET systems continue to improve, dedicated cardiac SPECT systems are also undergoing a profound change in their design. The scintillation camera general purpose design is being replaced with systems with multiple detectors focused on the heart yielding 5 to 10 times the sensitivity of conventional SPECT. As a result, shorter acquisition times and/or lower tracer doses produce higher quality SPECT images than were possible before. This article reviews these concepts and compares the attributes of PET and SPECT instrumentation.

  2. Optimization of injection dose based on noise-equivalent count rate with use of an anthropomorphic pelvis phantom in three-dimensional 18F-FDG PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Kazumasa; Kurosawa, Hideo; Tanaka, Takashi; Fukushi, Masahiro; Moriyama, Noriyuki; Fujii, Hirofumi

    2012-07-01

    The optimal injection dose for imaging of the pelvic region in 3D FDG PET tests was investigated based on the noise-equivalent count (NEC) rate with use of an anthropomorphic pelvis phantom. Count rates obtained from an anthropomorphic pelvis phantom were compared with those of pelvic images of 60 patients. The correlation between single photon count rates obtained from the pelvic regions of patients and the doses per body weight was also evaluated. The radioactivity at the maximum NEC rate was defined as an optimal injection dose, and the optimal injection dose for the body weight was evaluated. The image noise of a phantom was also investigated. Count rates obtained from an anthropomorphic pelvis phantom corresponded well with those from the human pelvis. The single photon count rate obtained from the phantom was 9.9 Mcps at the peak NEC rate. The coefficient of correlation between the single photon count rate and the dose per weight obtained from patient data was 0.830. The optimal injection doses for a patient with weighing 60 kg were estimated to be 375 MBq (6.25 MBq/kg) and 435 MBq (7.25 MBq/kg) for uptake periods of 60 and 90 min, respectively. The image noise was minimal at the peak NEC rate. We successfully estimated the optimal injection dose based on the NEC rate in the pelvic region on 3D FDG PET tests using an anthropomorphic pelvis phantom.

  3. Using triple gamma coincidences with a pixelated semiconductor Compton-PET scanner: a simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolstein, M.; Chmeissani, M.

    2016-01-01

    The Voxel Imaging PET (VIP) Pathfinder project presents a novel design using pixelated semiconductor detectors for nuclear medicine applications to achieve the intrinsic image quality limits set by physics. The conceptual design can be extended to a Compton gamma camera. The use of a pixelated CdTe detector with voxel sizes of 1 × 1 × 2 mm3 guarantees optimal energy and spatial resolution. However, the limited time resolution of semiconductor detectors makes it impossible to use Time Of Flight (TOF) with VIP PET. TOF is used in order to improve the signal to noise ratio (SNR) by using only the most probable portion of the Line-Of-Response (LOR) instead of its entire length. To overcome the limitation of CdTe time resolution, we present in this article a simulation study using β+-γ emitting isotopes with a Compton-PET scanner. When the β+ annihilates with an electron it produces two gammas which produce a LOR in the PET scanner, while the additional gamma, when scattered in the scatter detector, provides a Compton cone that intersects with the aforementioned LOR. The intersection indicates, within a few mm of uncertainty along the LOR, the origin of the beta-gamma decay. Hence, one can limit the part of the LOR used by the image reconstruction algorithm.

  4. Caught on Camera.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milshtein, Amy

    2002-01-01

    Describes the benefits of and rules to be followed when using surveillance cameras for school security. Discusses various camera models, including indoor and outdoor fixed position cameras, pan-tilt zoom cameras, and pinhole-lens cameras for covert surveillance. (EV)

  5. OSSI-PET: Open-Access Database of Simulated [(11)C]Raclopride Scans for the Inveon Preclinical PET Scanner: Application to the Optimization of Reconstruction Methods for Dynamic Studies.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Marie-Paule; Charil, Arnaud; Callaghan, Paul; Wimberley, Catriona; Busso, Florian; Gregoire, Marie-Claude; Bardies, Manuel; Reilhac, Anthonin

    2016-07-01

    A wide range of medical imaging applications benefits from the availability of realistic ground truth data. In the case of positron emission tomography (PET), ground truth data is crucial to validate processing algorithms and assessing their performances. The design of such ground truth data often relies on Monte-Carlo simulation techniques. Since the creation of a large dataset is not trivial both in terms of computing time and realism, we propose the OSSI-PET database containing 350 simulated [(11)C]Raclopride dynamic scans for rats, created specifically for the Inveon pre-clinical PET scanner. The originality of this database lies on the availability of several groups of scans with controlled biological variations in the striata. Besides, each group consists of a large number of realizations (i.e., noise replicates). We present the construction methodology of this database using rat pharmacokinetic and anatomical models. A first application using the OSSI-PET database is presented. Several commonly used reconstruction techniques were compared in terms of image quality, accuracy and variability of the activity estimates and of the computed kinetic parameters. The results showed that OP-OSEM3D iterative reconstruction method outperformed the other tested methods. Analytical methods such as FBP2D and 3DRP also produced satisfactory results. However, FORE followed by OSEM2D reconstructions should be avoided. Beyond the illustration of the potential of the database, this application will help scientists to understand the different sources of noise and bias that can occur at the different steps in the processing and will be very useful for choosing appropriate reconstruction methods and parameters. PMID:26863655

  6. OSSI-PET: Open-Access Database of Simulated [(11)C]Raclopride Scans for the Inveon Preclinical PET Scanner: Application to the Optimization of Reconstruction Methods for Dynamic Studies.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Marie-Paule; Charil, Arnaud; Callaghan, Paul; Wimberley, Catriona; Busso, Florian; Gregoire, Marie-Claude; Bardies, Manuel; Reilhac, Anthonin

    2016-07-01

    A wide range of medical imaging applications benefits from the availability of realistic ground truth data. In the case of positron emission tomography (PET), ground truth data is crucial to validate processing algorithms and assessing their performances. The design of such ground truth data often relies on Monte-Carlo simulation techniques. Since the creation of a large dataset is not trivial both in terms of computing time and realism, we propose the OSSI-PET database containing 350 simulated [(11)C]Raclopride dynamic scans for rats, created specifically for the Inveon pre-clinical PET scanner. The originality of this database lies on the availability of several groups of scans with controlled biological variations in the striata. Besides, each group consists of a large number of realizations (i.e., noise replicates). We present the construction methodology of this database using rat pharmacokinetic and anatomical models. A first application using the OSSI-PET database is presented. Several commonly used reconstruction techniques were compared in terms of image quality, accuracy and variability of the activity estimates and of the computed kinetic parameters. The results showed that OP-OSEM3D iterative reconstruction method outperformed the other tested methods. Analytical methods such as FBP2D and 3DRP also produced satisfactory results. However, FORE followed by OSEM2D reconstructions should be avoided. Beyond the illustration of the potential of the database, this application will help scientists to understand the different sources of noise and bias that can occur at the different steps in the processing and will be very useful for choosing appropriate reconstruction methods and parameters.

  7. A slanting light-guide analog decoding high resolution detector for positron emission tomography camera

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, W.H.; Jing, M.; Bendriem, B.; Hartz, R.; Mullani, N.; Gould, K.L.; Michel, C.

    1987-02-01

    Current high resolution PET cameras require the scintillation crystals to be much narrower than the smallest available photomultipliers. In addition, the large number of photomultiplier channels constitutes the major component cost in the camera. Recent new designs use the Anger camera type of analog decoding method to obtain higher resolution and lower cost by using the relatively large photomultipliers. An alternative approach to improve the resolution and cost factors has been proposed, with a system of slanting light-guides between the scintillators and the photomultipliers. In the Anger camera schemes, the scintillation light is distributed to several neighboring photomultipliers which then determine the scintillation location. In the slanting light-guide design, the scintillation is metered and channeled to only two photomultipliers for the decision making. This paper presents the feasibility and performance achievable with the slanting light-guide detectors. With a crystal/photomultiplier ratio of 6/1, the intrinsic resolution was found to be 4.0 mm using the first non-optimized prototype light-guides on BGO crystals. The axial resolution will be about 5-6 mm.

  8. PAU camera: detectors characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casas, Ricard; Ballester, Otger; Cardiel-Sas, Laia; Castilla, Javier; Jiménez, Jorge; Maiorino, Marino; Pío, Cristóbal; Sevilla, Ignacio; de Vicente, Juan

    2012-07-01

    The PAU Camera (PAUCam) [1,2] is a wide field camera that will be mounted at the corrected prime focus of the William Herschel Telescope (Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos, Canary Islands, Spain) in the next months. The focal plane of PAUCam is composed by a mosaic of 18 CCD detectors of 2,048 x 4,176 pixels each one with a pixel size of 15 microns, manufactured by Hamamatsu Photonics K. K. This mosaic covers a field of view (FoV) of 60 arcmin (minutes of arc), 40 of them are unvignetted. The behaviour of these 18 devices, plus four spares, and their electronic response should be characterized and optimized for the use in PAUCam. This job is being carried out in the laboratories of the ICE/IFAE and the CIEMAT. The electronic optimization of the CCD detectors is being carried out by means of an OG (Output Gate) scan and maximizing it CTE (Charge Transfer Efficiency) while the read-out noise is minimized. The device characterization itself is obtained with different tests. The photon transfer curve (PTC) that allows to obtain the electronic gain, the linearity vs. light stimulus, the full-well capacity and the cosmetic defects. The read-out noise, the dark current, the stability vs. temperature and the light remanence.

  9. Pet Bonding and Pet Bereavement among Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Brenda H.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Studied adolescent-pet bonding and bereavement following pet loss (n=55). Hypothesized that highly-bonded adolescents experience more intense grief when a pet dies than do those less bonded; degree of bonding is greater for girls than for boys; and intensity of bereavement is greater for girls than for boys. Results supported the hypotheses. (RB)

  10. Pet Problems at Home: Pet Problems in the Community.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soltow, Willow

    1984-01-01

    Discusses problems of pets in the community, examining the community's role related to disruptive pets and pet overpopulation. Also discusses pet problems at home, offering advice on selecting a pet, meeting a pet's needs, and disciplining pets. Includes a list of books, films/filmstrips, teaching materials, and various instructional strategies.…

  11. Fundamental Limits of Spatial Resolution in PET

    PubMed Central

    Moses, William W.

    2010-01-01

    The fundamental limits of spatial resolution in positron emission tomography (PET) have been understood for many years. The physical size of the detector element usually plays the dominant role in determining resolution, but the combined contributions from acollinearity, positron range, penetration into the detector ring, and decoding errors in the detector modules often combine to be of similar size. In addition, the sampling geometry and statistical noise further degrade the effective resolution. This paper describes quantitatively describes these effects, discusses potential methods for reducing the magnitude of these effects, and computes the ultimately achievable spatial resolution for clinical and pre-clinical PET cameras. PMID:21804677

  12. Determining Camera Gain in Room Temperature Cameras

    SciTech Connect

    Joshua Cogliati

    2010-12-01

    James R. Janesick provides a method for determining the amplification of a CCD or CMOS camera when only access to the raw images is provided. However, the equation that is provided ignores the contribution of dark current. For CCD or CMOS cameras that are cooled well below room temperature, this is not a problem, however, the technique needs adjustment for use with room temperature cameras. This article describes the adjustment made to the equation, and a test of this method.

  13. Perceptual Color Characterization of Cameras

    PubMed Central

    Vazquez-Corral, Javier; Connah, David; Bertalmío, Marcelo

    2014-01-01

    Color camera characterization, mapping outputs from the camera sensors to an independent color space, such as XY Z, is an important step in the camera processing pipeline. Until now, this procedure has been primarily solved by using a 3 × 3 matrix obtained via a least-squares optimization. In this paper, we propose to use the spherical sampling method, recently published by Finlayson et al., to perform a perceptual color characterization. In particular, we search for the 3 × 3 matrix that minimizes three different perceptual errors, one pixel based and two spatially based. For the pixel-based case, we minimize the CIE ΔE error, while for the spatial-based case, we minimize both the S-CIELAB error and the CID error measure. Our results demonstrate an improvement of approximately 3% for the ΔE error, 7% for the S-CIELAB error and 13% for the CID error measures. PMID:25490586

  14. Short-lived positron emitters in beam-on PET imaging during proton therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dendooven, P.; Buitenhuis, H. J. T.; Diblen, F.; Heeres, P. N.; Biegun, A. K.; Fiedler, F.; van Goethem, M.-J.; van der Graaf, E. R.; Brandenburg, S.

    2015-12-01

    The only method for in vivo dose delivery verification in proton beam radiotherapy in clinical use today is positron emission tomography (PET) of the positron emitters produced in the patient during irradiation. PET imaging while the beam is on (so called beam-on PET) is an attractive option, providing the largest number of counts, the least biological washout and the fastest feedback. In this implementation, all nuclides, independent of their half-life, will contribute. As a first step towards assessing the relevance of short-lived nuclides (half-life shorter than that of 10C, T1/2  =  19 s) for in vivo dose delivery verification using beam-on PET, we measured their production in the stopping of 55 MeV protons in water, carbon, phosphorus and calcium The most copiously produced short-lived nuclides and their production rates relative to the relevant long-lived nuclides are: 12N (T1/2  =  11 ms) on carbon (9% of 11C), 29P (T1/2  =  4.1 s) on phosphorus (20% of 30P) and 38mK (T1/2  =  0.92 s) on calcium (113% of 38gK). No short-lived nuclides are produced on oxygen. The number of decays integrated from the start of an irradiation as a function of time during the irradiation of PMMA and 4 tissue materials has been determined. For (carbon-rich) adipose tissue, 12N dominates up to 70 s. On bone tissue, 12N dominates over 15O during the first 8-15 s (depending on carbon-to-oxygen ratio). The short-lived nuclides created on phosphorus and calcium provide 2.5 times more beam-on PET counts than the long-lived ones produced on these elements during a 70 s irradiation. From the estimated number of 12N PET counts, we conclude that, for any tissue, 12N PET imaging potentially provides equal to superior proton range information compared to prompt gamma imaging with an optimized knife-edge slit camera. The practical implementation of 12N PET imaging is discussed.

  15. PET-Specific Parameters and Radiotracers in Theoretical Tumour Modelling

    PubMed Central

    Marcu, Loredana G.; Bezak, Eva

    2015-01-01

    The innovation of computational techniques serves as an important step toward optimized, patient-specific management of cancer. In particular, in silico simulation of tumour growth and treatment response may eventually yield accurate information on disease progression, enhance the quality of cancer treatment, and explain why certain therapies are effective where others are not. In silico modelling is demonstrated to considerably benefit from information obtainable with PET and PET/CT. In particular, models have successfully integrated tumour glucose metabolism, cell proliferation, and cell oxygenation from multiple tracers in order to simulate tumour behaviour. With the development of novel radiotracers to image additional tumour phenomena, such as pH and gene expression, the value of PET and PET/CT data for use in tumour models will continue to grow. In this work, the use of PET and PET/CT information in in silico tumour models is reviewed. The various parameters that can be obtained using PET and PET/CT are detailed, as well as the radiotracers that may be used for this purpose, their utility, and limitations. The biophysical measures used to quantify PET and PET/CT data are also described. Finally, a list of in silico models that incorporate PET and/or PET/CT data is provided and reviewed. PMID:25788973

  16. CARTOGAM: a portable gamma camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gal, O.; Izac, C.; Lainé, F.; Nguyen, A.

    1997-02-01

    The gamma camera is devised to establish the cartography of radioactive sources against a visible background in quasi real time. This device is designed to spot sources from a distance during the preparation of interventions on active areas of nuclear installations. This implement will permit to optimize interventions especially on the dosimetric level. The camera consists of a double cone collimator, a scintillator and an intensified CCD camera. This chain of detection provides the formation of both gamma images and visible images. Even though it is wrapped in a denal shield, the camera is still portable (mass < 15 kg) and compact (external diameter = 8 cm). The angular resolution is of the order of one degree for gamma rays of 1 MeV. In a few minutes, the device is able to measure a dose rate of 10 μGy/h delivered for instance by a source of 60Co of 90 mCi located at 10 m from the detector. The first images recorded in the laboratory will be presented and will illustrate the performances obtained with this camera.

  17. Imaging and PET-PET/CT imaging.

    PubMed

    Von Schulthess, Gustav K; Hany, Thomas F

    2008-03-01

    PET-CT has grown because the lack of anatomic landmarks in PET makes "hardware-fusion" to anatomic cross-sectional data extremely useful. Addition of CT to PET improves specificity, but also sensitivity, and adding PET to CT adds sensitivity and specificity in tumor imaging. The synergistic advantage of adding CT is that the attenuation correction needed for PET data can also be derived from the CT data. This makes PET-CT 25-30% faster than PET alone, leading to higher patient throughput and a more comfortable examination for patients typically lasting 20 minutes or less. FDG-PET-CT appears to provide relevant information in the staging and therapy monitoring of many tumors, such as lung carcinoma, colorectal cancer, lymphoma, gynaecological cancers, melanoma and many others, with the notable exception of prostatic cancer. For this cancer, choline derivatives may possibly become useful radiopharmaceuticals. The published literature on the applications of FDG-PET-CT in oncology is still limited but several well-designed studies have demonstrated the benefits of PET-CT.

  18. Optimising camera traps for monitoring small mammals.

    PubMed

    Glen, Alistair S; Cockburn, Stuart; Nichols, Margaret; Ekanayake, Jagath; Warburton, Bruce

    2013-01-01

    Practical techniques are required to monitor invasive animals, which are often cryptic and occur at low density. Camera traps have potential for this purpose, but may have problems detecting and identifying small species. A further challenge is how to standardise the size of each camera's field of view so capture rates are comparable between different places and times. We investigated the optimal specifications for a low-cost camera trap for small mammals. The factors tested were 1) trigger speed, 2) passive infrared vs. microwave sensor, 3) white vs. infrared flash, and 4) still photographs vs. video. We also tested a new approach to standardise each camera's field of view. We compared the success rates of four camera trap designs in detecting and taking recognisable photographs of captive stoats (Mustelaerminea), feral cats (Felis catus) and hedgehogs (Erinaceuseuropaeus). Trigger speeds of 0.2-2.1 s captured photographs of all three target species unless the animal was running at high speed. The camera with a microwave sensor was prone to false triggers, and often failed to trigger when an animal moved in front of it. A white flash produced photographs that were more readily identified to species than those obtained under infrared light. However, a white flash may be more likely to frighten target animals, potentially affecting detection probabilities. Video footage achieved similar success rates to still cameras but required more processing time and computer memory. Placing two camera traps side by side achieved a higher success rate than using a single camera. Camera traps show considerable promise for monitoring invasive mammal control operations. Further research should address how best to standardise the size of each camera's field of view, maximise the probability that an animal encountering a camera trap will be detected, and eliminate visible or audible cues emitted by camera traps.

  19. SmartPET: Applying HPGe and pulse shape analysis to small-animal PET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, R. J.; Boston, A. J.; Boston, H. C.; Cresswell, J. R.; Grint, A. N.; Mather, A. R.; Nolan, P. J.; Scraggs, D. P.; Turk, G.; Hall, C. J.; Lazarus, I.; Berry, A.; Beveridge, T.; Gillam, J.; Lewis, R. A.

    2007-08-01

    The SmartPET project is the development of a prototype small-animal imaging system based on the use of Hyperpure Germanium (HPGe) detectors. The use of digital electronics and application of Pulse Shape Analysis (PSA) techniques provide fine spatial resolution, while the excellent intrinsic energy resolution of HPGe detectors makes the system ideal for multi-nuclide imaging. As a result, the SmartPET system has the potential to function as a dual modality imager, operating as a dual-head Positron Emission Tomography (PET) camera or in a Compton Camera configuration for Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) imaging. In this paper, we discuss how the use of simple PSA techniques greatly improves the position sensitivity of the detector yielding improved spatial resolution in reconstructed images. The PSA methods presented have been validated by comparison to data from high-precision scanning of the detectors. Results from this analysis are presented along with initial images from the SmartPET system, which demonstrates the impact of these techniques on PET images.

  20. Vacuum Camera Cooler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laugen, Geoffrey A.

    2011-01-01

    Acquiring cheap, moving video was impossible in a vacuum environment, due to camera overheating. This overheating is brought on by the lack of cooling media in vacuum. A water-jacketed camera cooler enclosure machined and assembled from copper plate and tube has been developed. The camera cooler (see figure) is cup-shaped and cooled by circulating water or nitrogen gas through copper tubing. The camera, a store-bought "spy type," is not designed to work in a vacuum. With some modifications the unit can be thermally connected when mounted in the cup portion of the camera cooler. The thermal conductivity is provided by copper tape between parts of the camera and the cooled enclosure. During initial testing of the demonstration unit, the camera cooler kept the CPU (central processing unit) of this video camera at operating temperature. This development allowed video recording of an in-progress test, within a vacuum environment.

  1. Making Ceramic Cameras

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Squibb, Matt

    2009-01-01

    This article describes how to make a clay camera. This idea of creating functional cameras from clay allows students to experience ceramics, photography, and painting all in one unit. (Contains 1 resource and 3 online resources.)

  2. Constrained space camera assembly

    DOEpatents

    Heckendorn, Frank M.; Anderson, Erin K.; Robinson, Casandra W.; Haynes, Harriet B.

    1999-01-01

    A constrained space camera assembly which is intended to be lowered through a hole into a tank, a borehole or another cavity. The assembly includes a generally cylindrical chamber comprising a head and a body and a wiring-carrying conduit extending from the chamber. Means are included in the chamber for rotating the body about the head without breaking an airtight seal formed therebetween. The assembly may be pressurized and accompanied with a pressure sensing means for sensing if a breach has occurred in the assembly. In one embodiment, two cameras, separated from their respective lenses, are installed on a mounting apparatus disposed in the chamber. The mounting apparatus includes means allowing both longitudinal and lateral movement of the cameras. Moving the cameras longitudinally focuses the cameras, and moving the cameras laterally away from one another effectively converges the cameras so that close objects can be viewed. The assembly further includes means for moving lenses of different magnification forward of the cameras.

  3. Graphic design of pinhole cameras

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, H. B.; Chu, W. P.

    1979-01-01

    The paper describes a graphic technique for the analysis and optimization of pinhole size and focal length. The technique is based on the use of the transfer function of optical elements described by Scott (1959) to construct the transfer function of a circular pinhole camera. This transfer function is the response of a component or system to a pattern of lines having a sinusoidally varying radiance at varying spatial frequencies. Some specific examples of graphic design are presented.

  4. Nanosecond frame cameras

    SciTech Connect

    Frank, A M; Wilkins, P R

    2001-01-05

    The advent of CCD cameras and computerized data recording has spurred the development of several new cameras and techniques for recording nanosecond images. We have made a side by side comparison of three nanosecond frame cameras, examining them for both performance and operational characteristics. The cameras include; Micro-Channel Plate/CCD, Image Diode/CCD and Image Diode/Film; combinations of gating/data recording. The advantages and disadvantages of each device will be discussed.

  5. Positron emission particle tracking using a modular positron camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, D. J.; Leadbeater, T. W.; Fan, X.; Hausard, M. N.; Ingram, A.; Yang, Z.

    2009-06-01

    The technique of positron emission particle tracking (PEPT), developed at Birmingham in the early 1990s, enables a radioactively labelled tracer particle to be accurately tracked as it moves between the detectors of a "positron camera". In 1999 the original Birmingham positron camera, which consisted of a pair of MWPCs, was replaced by a system comprising two NaI(Tl) gamma camera heads operating in coincidence. This system has been successfully used for PEPT studies of a wide range of granular and fluid flow processes. More recently a modular positron camera has been developed using a number of the bismuth germanate (BGO) block detectors from standard PET scanners (CTI ECAT 930 and 950 series). This camera has flexible geometry, is transportable, and is capable of delivering high data rates. This paper presents simple models of its performance, and initial experience of its use in a range of geometries and applications.

  6. Development of PhytoPET: A plant imaging PET system

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, H; Lee, S J; McKisson, J; Xi, W; Zorn, C; Howell, C R; Crowell, A S; Cumberbatch, L; Reid, C D; Smith, M F; Stolin, A

    2012-02-01

    The development and initial evaluation of a high-resolution positron emission tomography (PET) system to image the biodistribution of positron emitting tracers in live plants is underway. The positron emitting {sup 11}CO{sub 2} tracer is used in plant biology research investigating carbon sequestration in biomass, optimization of plant productivity and biofuel development. This PhytoPET design allows flexible arrangements of PET detectors based on individual standalone detector modules built from single 5 cm x 5 cm Hamamatsu H8500 position sensitive photomultiplier tubes. Each H8500 is coupled to a LYSO:Ce scintillator array composed of 48 x 48 elements that are 10 mm thick arranged with a 1.0 mm pitch. An Ethernet based 12-bit flash analog to digital data acquisition system with onboard coincident matrix definition is under development to digitize the signals. The detector modules of the PhytoPET system can be arranged and stacked to accommodate various sized plants and plant structures.

  7. Harpicon camera for HDTV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanada, Jun

    1992-08-01

    Ikegami has been involved in broadcast equipment ever since it was established as a company. In conjunction with NHK it has brought forth countless television cameras, from black-and-white cameras to color cameras, HDTV cameras, and special-purpose cameras. In the early days of HDTV (high-definition television, also known as "High Vision") cameras the specifications were different from those for the cameras of the present-day system, and cameras using all kinds of components, having different arrangements of components, and having different appearances were developed into products, with time spent on experimentation, design, fabrication, adjustment, and inspection. But recently the knowhow built up thus far in components, , printed circuit boards, and wiring methods has been incorporated in camera fabrication, making it possible to make HDTV cameras by metbods similar to the present system. In addition, more-efficient production, lower costs, and better after-sales service are being achieved by using the same circuits, components, mechanism parts, and software for both HDTV cameras and cameras that operate by the present system.

  8. Digital Pinhole Camera

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lancor, Rachael; Lancor, Brian

    2014-01-01

    In this article we describe how the classic pinhole camera demonstration can be adapted for use with digital cameras. Students can easily explore the effects of the size of the pinhole and its distance from the sensor on exposure time, magnification, and image quality. Instructions for constructing a digital pinhole camera and our method for…

  9. 2. VAL CAMERA CAR, VIEW OF CAMERA CAR AND TRACK ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. VAL CAMERA CAR, VIEW OF CAMERA CAR AND TRACK WITH CAMERA STATION ABOVE LOOKING WEST TAKEN FROM RESERVOIR. - Variable Angle Launcher Complex, Camera Car & Track, CA State Highway 39 at Morris Reservior, Azusa, Los Angeles County, CA

  10. 6. VAL CAMERA CAR, DETAIL OF COMMUNICATION EQUIPMENT INSIDE CAMERA ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. VAL CAMERA CAR, DETAIL OF COMMUNICATION EQUIPMENT INSIDE CAMERA CAR WITH CAMERA MOUNT IN FOREGROUND. - Variable Angle Launcher Complex, Camera Car & Track, CA State Highway 39 at Morris Reservior, Azusa, Los Angeles County, CA

  11. 7. VAL CAMERA CAR, DETAIL OF 'FLARE' OR TRAJECTORY CAMERA ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. VAL CAMERA CAR, DETAIL OF 'FLARE' OR TRAJECTORY CAMERA INSIDE CAMERA CAR. - Variable Angle Launcher Complex, Camera Car & Track, CA State Highway 39 at Morris Reservior, Azusa, Los Angeles County, CA

  12. Optimization of dynamic measurement of receptor kinetics by wavelet denoising.

    PubMed

    Alpert, Nathaniel M; Reilhac, Anthonin; Chio, Tat C; Selesnick, Ivan

    2006-04-01

    The most important technical limitation affecting dynamic measurements with PET is low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Several reports have suggested that wavelet processing of receptor kinetic data in the human brain can improve the SNR of parametric images of binding potential (BP). However, it is difficult to fully assess these reports because objective standards have not been developed to measure the tradeoff between accuracy (e.g. degradation of resolution) and precision. This paper employs a realistic simulation method that includes all major elements affecting image formation. The simulation was used to derive an ensemble of dynamic PET ligand (11C-raclopride) experiments that was subjected to wavelet processing. A method for optimizing wavelet denoising is presented and used to analyze the simulated experiments. Using optimized wavelet denoising, SNR of the four-dimensional PET data increased by about a factor of two and SNR of three-dimensional BP maps increased by about a factor of 1.5. Analysis of the difference between the processed and unprocessed means for the 4D concentration data showed that more than 80% of voxels in the ensemble mean of the wavelet processed data deviated by less than 3%. These results show that a 1.5x increase in SNR can be achieved with little degradation of resolution. This corresponds to injecting about twice the radioactivity, a maneuver that is not possible in human studies without saturating the PET camera and/or exposing the subject to more than permitted radioactivity.

  13. Tower Camera Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Moudry, D

    2005-01-01

    The tower camera in Barrow provides hourly images of ground surrounding the tower. These images may be used to determine fractional snow cover as winter arrives, for comparison with the albedo that can be calculated from downward-looking radiometers, as well as some indication of present weather. Similarly, during spring time, the camera images show the changes in the ground albedo as the snow melts. The tower images are saved in hourly intervals. In addition, two other cameras, the skydeck camera in Barrow and the piling camera in Atqasuk, show the current conditions at those sites.

  14. Birds Kept as Pets

    MedlinePlus

    ... restricts the importation of pet birds from certain countries and enforces a 30-day quarantine for all imported birds except those that come from Canada. People interested in importing pet birds should visit the USDA non-US Origin Pet Bird Importation website . Choosing a bird Match ...

  15. AAPM Task Group 108: PET and PET/CT shielding requirements.

    PubMed

    Madsen, Mark T; Anderson, Jon A; Halama, James R; Kleck, Jeff; Simpkin, Douglas J; Votaw, John R; Wendt, Richard E; Williams, Lawrence E; Yester, Michael V

    2006-01-01

    The shielding of positron emission tomography (PET) and PET/CT (computed tomography) facilities presents special challenges. The 0.511 MeV annihilation photons associated with positron decay are much higher energy than other diagnostic radiations. As a result, barrier shielding may be required in floors and ceilings as well as adjacent walls. Since the patient becomes the radioactive source after the radiopharmaceutical has been administered, one has to consider the entire time that the subject remains in the clinic. In this report we present methods for estimating the shielding requirements for PET and PET/CT facilities. Information about the physical properties of the most commonly used clinical PET radionuclides is summarized, although the report primarily refers to fluorine-18. Typical PET imaging protocols are reviewed and exposure rates from patients are estimated including self-attenuation by body tissues and physical decay of the radionuclide. Examples of barrier calculations are presented for controlled and noncontrolled areas. Shielding for adjacent rooms with scintillation cameras is also discussed. Tables and graphs of estimated transmission factors for lead, steel, and concrete at 0.511 MeV are also included. Meeting the regulatory limits for uncontrolled areas can be an expensive proposition. Careful planning with the equipment vendor, facility architect, and a qualified medical physicist is necessary to produce a cost effective design while maintaining radiation safety standards. PMID:16485403

  16. Automated Camera Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Siqi; Cheng, Yang; Willson, Reg

    2006-01-01

    Automated Camera Calibration (ACAL) is a computer program that automates the generation of calibration data for camera models used in machine vision systems. Machine vision camera models describe the mapping between points in three-dimensional (3D) space in front of the camera and the corresponding points in two-dimensional (2D) space in the camera s image. Calibrating a camera model requires a set of calibration data containing known 3D-to-2D point correspondences for the given camera system. Generating calibration data typically involves taking images of a calibration target where the 3D locations of the target s fiducial marks are known, and then measuring the 2D locations of the fiducial marks in the images. ACAL automates the analysis of calibration target images and greatly speeds the overall calibration process.

  17. PET imaging of adoptive progenitor cell therapies.

    SciTech Connect

    Gelovani, Juri G.

    2008-05-13

    stem cell imaging is proposed to circumvent the major limitation of in vitro radiolabeling – the eventual radiolabel decay. Stable transduction of stem cells in vitro would allow for the selection of high quality stem cells with optimal functional parameters of the transduced reporter systems. The use of a long-lived radioisotope 124I to label a highly specific reporter gene probe will allow for ex vivo labeling of stem cells and their imaging immediately after injection and during the following next week. The use of short-lived radioisotopes (i.e., 18F) to label highly specific reporter gene probes will allow repetitive PET imaging for the assessment of to stem cell migration, targeting, differentiation, and long-term viability of stem cell-derived tissues. Qualifications of the research team and resources. An established research team of experts in various disciplines has been assembled at MD Anderson Cancer Center (MDACC) over the past two years including the PI, senior co-investigators and collaborators. The participants of this team are recognized internationally to be among the leaders in their corresponding fields of research and clinical medicine. The resources at MDACC are exceptionally well developed and have been recently reinforced by the installation of a microPET and microSPECT/CT cameras, and a 7T MRI system for high resolution animal imaging; and by integrating a synthetic chemistry core for the development and production of precursors for radiolabeling.

  18. Depth Estimation Using a Sliding Camera.

    PubMed

    Ge, Kailin; Hu, Han; Feng, Jianjiang; Zhou, Jie

    2016-02-01

    Image-based 3D reconstruction technology is widely used in different fields. The conventional algorithms are mainly based on stereo matching between two or more fixed cameras, and high accuracy can only be achieved using a large camera array, which is very expensive and inconvenient in many applications. Another popular choice is utilizing structure-from-motion methods for arbitrarily placed camera(s). However, due to too many degrees of freedom, its computational cost is heavy and its accuracy is rather limited. In this paper, we propose a novel depth estimation algorithm using a sliding camera system. By analyzing the geometric properties of the camera system, we design a camera pose initialization algorithm that can work satisfyingly with only a small number of feature points and is robust to noise. For pixels corresponding to different depths, an adaptive iterative algorithm is proposed to choose optimal frames for stereo matching, which can take advantage of continuously pose-changing imaging and save the time consumption amazingly too. The proposed algorithm can also be easily extended to handle less constrained situations (such as using a camera mounted on a moving robot or vehicle). Experimental results on both synthetic and real-world data have illustrated the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm. PMID:26685238

  19. Depth Estimation Using a Sliding Camera.

    PubMed

    Ge, Kailin; Hu, Han; Feng, Jianjiang; Zhou, Jie

    2016-02-01

    Image-based 3D reconstruction technology is widely used in different fields. The conventional algorithms are mainly based on stereo matching between two or more fixed cameras, and high accuracy can only be achieved using a large camera array, which is very expensive and inconvenient in many applications. Another popular choice is utilizing structure-from-motion methods for arbitrarily placed camera(s). However, due to too many degrees of freedom, its computational cost is heavy and its accuracy is rather limited. In this paper, we propose a novel depth estimation algorithm using a sliding camera system. By analyzing the geometric properties of the camera system, we design a camera pose initialization algorithm that can work satisfyingly with only a small number of feature points and is robust to noise. For pixels corresponding to different depths, an adaptive iterative algorithm is proposed to choose optimal frames for stereo matching, which can take advantage of continuously pose-changing imaging and save the time consumption amazingly too. The proposed algorithm can also be easily extended to handle less constrained situations (such as using a camera mounted on a moving robot or vehicle). Experimental results on both synthetic and real-world data have illustrated the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm.

  20. Microchannel plate streak camera

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Ching L.

    1989-01-01

    An improved streak camera in which a microchannel plate electron multiplier is used in place of or in combination with the photocathode used in prior streak cameras. The improved streak camera is far more sensitive to photons (UV to gamma-rays) than the conventional x-ray streak camera which uses a photocathode. The improved streak camera offers gamma-ray detection with high temporal resolution. It also offers low-energy x-ray detection without attenuation inside the cathode. Using the microchannel plate in the improved camera has resulted in a time resolution of about 150 ps, and has provided a sensitivity sufficient for 1000 KeV x-rays.

  1. Microchannel plate streak camera

    DOEpatents

    Wang, C.L.

    1984-09-28

    An improved streak camera in which a microchannel plate electron multiplier is used in place of or in combination with the photocathode used in prior streak cameras. The improved streak camera is far more sensitive to photons (uv to gamma-rays) than the conventional x-ray streak camera which uses a photocathode. The improved streak camera offers gamma-ray detection with high temporal resolution. It also offers low-energy x-ray detection without attenuation inside the cathode. Using the microchannel plate in the improved camera has resulted in a time resolution of about 150 ps, and has provided a sensitivity sufficient for 1000 keV x-rays.

  2. Microchannel plate streak camera

    DOEpatents

    Wang, C.L.

    1989-03-21

    An improved streak camera in which a microchannel plate electron multiplier is used in place of or in combination with the photocathode used in prior streak cameras is disclosed. The improved streak camera is far more sensitive to photons (UV to gamma-rays) than the conventional x-ray streak camera which uses a photocathode. The improved streak camera offers gamma-ray detection with high temporal resolution. It also offers low-energy x-ray detection without attenuation inside the cathode. Using the microchannel plate in the improved camera has resulted in a time resolution of about 150 ps, and has provided a sensitivity sufficient for 1,000 KeV x-rays. 3 figs.

  3. GRACE star camera noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, Nate

    2016-08-01

    Extending results from previous work by Bandikova et al. (2012) and Inacio et al. (2015), this paper analyzes Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) star camera attitude measurement noise by processing inter-camera quaternions from 2003 to 2015. We describe a correction to star camera data, which will eliminate a several-arcsec twice-per-rev error with daily modulation, currently visible in the auto-covariance function of the inter-camera quaternion, from future GRACE Level-1B product releases. We also present evidence supporting the argument that thermal conditions/settings affect long-term inter-camera attitude biases by at least tens-of-arcsecs, and that several-to-tens-of-arcsecs per-rev star camera errors depend largely on field-of-view.

  4. Analytical multicollimator camera calibration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tayman, W.P.

    1978-01-01

    Calibration with the U.S. Geological survey multicollimator determines the calibrated focal length, the point of symmetry, the radial distortion referred to the point of symmetry, and the asymmetric characteristiecs of the camera lens. For this project, two cameras were calibrated, a Zeiss RMK A 15/23 and a Wild RC 8. Four test exposures were made with each camera. Results are tabulated for each exposure and averaged for each set. Copies of the standard USGS calibration reports are included. ?? 1978.

  5. Polarization encoded color camera.

    PubMed

    Schonbrun, Ethan; Möller, Guðfríður; Di Caprio, Giuseppe

    2014-03-15

    Digital cameras would be colorblind if they did not have pixelated color filters integrated into their image sensors. Integration of conventional fixed filters, however, comes at the expense of an inability to modify the camera's spectral properties. Instead, we demonstrate a micropolarizer-based camera that can reconfigure its spectral response. Color is encoded into a linear polarization state by a chiral dispersive element and then read out in a single exposure. The polarization encoded color camera is capable of capturing three-color images at wavelengths spanning the visible to the near infrared. PMID:24690806

  6. A modular positron camera for the study of industrial processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leadbeater, T. W.; Parker, D. J.

    2011-10-01

    Positron imaging techniques rely on the detection of the back-to-back annihilation photons arising from positron decay within the system under study. A standard technique, called positron emitting particle tracking (PEPT) [1], uses a number of these detected events to rapidly determine the position of a positron emitting tracer particle introduced into the system under study. Typical applications of PEPT are in the study of granular and multi-phase materials in the disciplines of engineering and the physical sciences. Using components from redundant medical PET scanners a modular positron camera has been developed. This camera consists of a number of small independent detector modules, which can be arranged in custom geometries tailored towards the application in question. The flexibility of the modular camera geometry allows for high photon detection efficiency within specific regions of interest, the ability to study large and bulky systems and the application of PEPT to difficult or remote processes as the camera is inherently transportable.

  7. Clear-PEM, a dedicated PET camera for mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lecoq, P.; Varela, J.

    2002-06-01

    Preliminary results suggest that Positron Emission Mammography (PEM) can offer a noninvasive method for the diagnosis of breast cancer. Metabolic images from PEM contain unique information not available from conventional morphologic imaging techniques and aid in expeditiously establishing the diagnosis of cancer. A dedicated machine seems to offer better perspectives in terms of position resolution and sensitivity. This paper describes the concept of Clear-PEM, the system presently developed by the Crystal Clear Collaboration at CERN for an evaluation of this approach. This device is based on new crystals introduced by the Crystal Clear as well as on modern data acquisition techniques developed for the large experiments in high energy physics experiments.

  8. Camera Operator and Videographer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Pam

    2007-01-01

    Television, video, and motion picture camera operators produce images that tell a story, inform or entertain an audience, or record an event. They use various cameras to shoot a wide range of material, including television series, news and sporting events, music videos, motion pictures, documentaries, and training sessions. Those who film or…

  9. The Camera Cook Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Education Development Center, Inc., Newton, MA.

    Intended for use with the photographic materials available from the Workshop for Learning Things, Inc., this "camera cookbook" describes procedures that have been tried in classrooms and workshops and proven to be the most functional and inexpensive. Explicit starting off instructions--directions for exploring and loading the camera and for taking…

  10. Constrained space camera assembly

    DOEpatents

    Heckendorn, F.M.; Anderson, E.K.; Robinson, C.W.; Haynes, H.B.

    1999-05-11

    A constrained space camera assembly which is intended to be lowered through a hole into a tank, a borehole or another cavity is disclosed. The assembly includes a generally cylindrical chamber comprising a head and a body and a wiring-carrying conduit extending from the chamber. Means are included in the chamber for rotating the body about the head without breaking an airtight seal formed therebetween. The assembly may be pressurized and accompanied with a pressure sensing means for sensing if a breach has occurred in the assembly. In one embodiment, two cameras, separated from their respective lenses, are installed on a mounting apparatus disposed in the chamber. The mounting apparatus includes means allowing both longitudinal and lateral movement of the cameras. Moving the cameras longitudinally focuses the cameras, and moving the cameras laterally away from one another effectively converges the cameras so that close objects can be viewed. The assembly further includes means for moving lenses of different magnification forward of the cameras. 17 figs.

  11. CCD Luminescence Camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janesick, James R.; Elliott, Tom

    1987-01-01

    New diagnostic tool used to understand performance and failures of microelectronic devices. Microscope integrated to low-noise charge-coupled-device (CCD) camera to produce new instrument for analyzing performance and failures of microelectronics devices that emit infrared light during operation. CCD camera also used to indentify very clearly parts that have failed where luminescence typically found.

  12. Dry imaging cameras

    PubMed Central

    Indrajit, IK; Alam, Aftab; Sahni, Hirdesh; Bhatia, Mukul; Sahu, Samaresh

    2011-01-01

    Dry imaging cameras are important hard copy devices in radiology. Using dry imaging camera, multiformat images of digital modalities in radiology are created from a sealed unit of unexposed films. The functioning of a modern dry camera, involves a blend of concurrent processes, in areas of diverse sciences like computers, mechanics, thermal, optics, electricity and radiography. Broadly, hard copy devices are classified as laser and non laser based technology. When compared with the working knowledge and technical awareness of different modalities in radiology, the understanding of a dry imaging camera is often superficial and neglected. To fill this void, this article outlines the key features of a modern dry camera and its important issues that impact radiology workflow. PMID:21799589

  13. Limits of Tumor Detectability in Nuclear Medicine and PET

    PubMed Central

    Erdi, Yusuf Emre

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Nuclear medicine is becoming increasingly important in the early detection of malignancy. The advantage of nuclear medicine over other imaging modalities is the high sensitivity of the gamma camera. Nuclear medicine counting equipment has the capability of detecting levels of radioactivity which exceed background levels by as little as 2.4 to 1. This translates to only a few hundred counts per minute on a regular gamma camera or as few as 3 counts per minute when using coincidence detection on a positron emission tomography (PET) camera. Material and Methods: We have experimentally measured the limits of detectability using a set of hollow spheres in a Jaszczak phantom at various tumor-to-background ratios. Imaging modalities for this work were (1) planar, (2) SPECT, (3) PET, and (4) planar camera with coincidence detection capability (MCD). Results: When there is no background (infinite contrast) activity present, the detectability of tumors is similar for PET and planar imaging. With the presence of the background activity , PET can detect objects in an order of magnitude smaller in size than that can be seen by conventional planar imaging especially in the typical clinical low (3:1) T/B ratios. The detection capability of the MCD camera lies between a conventional nuclear medicine (planar / SPECT) scans and the detection capability of a dedicated PET scanner. Conclusion: Among nuclear medicine’s armamentarium, PET is the closest modality to CT or MR imaging in terms of limits of detection. Modern clinical PET scanners have a resolution limit of 4 mm, corresponding to the detection of tumors with a volume of 0.2 ml (7 mm diameter) in 5:1 T/B ratio. It is also possible to obtain better resolution limits with dedicated brain and animal scanners. The future holds promise in development of new detector materials, improved camera design, and new reconstruction algorithms which will improve sensitivity, resolution, contrast, and thereby further diminish

  14. Action selection for single-camera SLAM.

    PubMed

    Vidal-Calleja, Teresa A; Sanfeliu, Alberto; Andrade-Cetto, Juan

    2010-12-01

    A method for evaluating, at video rate, the quality of actions for a single camera while mapping unknown indoor environments is presented. The strategy maximizes mutual information between measurements and states to help the camera avoid making ill-conditioned measurements that are appropriate to lack of depth in monocular vision systems. Our system prompts a user with the appropriate motion commands during 6-DOF visual simultaneous localization and mapping with a handheld camera. Additionally, the system has been ported to a mobile robotic platform, thus closing the control-estimation loop. To show the viability of the approach, simulations and experiments are presented for the unconstrained motion of a handheld camera and for the motion of a mobile robot with nonholonomic constraints. When combined with a path planner, the technique safely drives to a marked goal while, at the same time, producing an optimal estimated map.

  15. Action selection for single-camera SLAM.

    PubMed

    Vidal-Calleja, Teresa A; Sanfeliu, Alberto; Andrade-Cetto, Juan

    2010-12-01

    A method for evaluating, at video rate, the quality of actions for a single camera while mapping unknown indoor environments is presented. The strategy maximizes mutual information between measurements and states to help the camera avoid making ill-conditioned measurements that are appropriate to lack of depth in monocular vision systems. Our system prompts a user with the appropriate motion commands during 6-DOF visual simultaneous localization and mapping with a handheld camera. Additionally, the system has been ported to a mobile robotic platform, thus closing the control-estimation loop. To show the viability of the approach, simulations and experiments are presented for the unconstrained motion of a handheld camera and for the motion of a mobile robot with nonholonomic constraints. When combined with a path planner, the technique safely drives to a marked goal while, at the same time, producing an optimal estimated map. PMID:20350845

  16. Laboratory and cyclotron requirements for PET research

    SciTech Connect

    Schlyer, D.J.

    1993-06-01

    This report describes four types of PET facilities: Clinical PET with no radionuclide production; clinical PET with a small accelerator; clinical PET with research support; and research PET facilities. General facility considerations are also discussed.

  17. 3. VAL CAMERA CAR, VIEW OF CAMERA CAR AND TRACK ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. VAL CAMERA CAR, VIEW OF CAMERA CAR AND TRACK WITH THE VAL TO THE RIGHT, LOOKING NORTHEAST. - Variable Angle Launcher Complex, Camera Car & Track, CA State Highway 39 at Morris Reservior, Azusa, Los Angeles County, CA

  18. 7. VAL CAMERA STATION, INTERIOR VIEW OF CAMERA MOUNT, COMMUNICATION ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. VAL CAMERA STATION, INTERIOR VIEW OF CAMERA MOUNT, COMMUNICATION EQUIPMENT AND STORAGE CABINET. - Variable Angle Launcher Complex, Camera Stations, CA State Highway 39 at Morris Reservior, Azusa, Los Angeles County, CA

  19. A PET system based on 2-18FDG production with a low energy electrostatic proton accelerator and a dual headed PET scanner.

    PubMed

    Sandell, A; Ohlsson, T; Erlandsson, K; Hellborg, R; Strand, S E

    1992-01-01

    We have developed a comparatively inexpensive PET system, based on a rotating scanner with two scintillation camera heads, and a nearby low energy electrostatic proton accelerator for production of short-lived radionuclides. Using a 6 MeV proton beam of 5 microA, and by optimization of the target geometry for the 18O(p,n)18F reaction, 750 MBq of 2-18FDG can be obtained. The PET scanner shows a spatial resolution of 6 mm (FWHM) and a sensitivity of 80 s-1kBq-1ml-1 (3 kcps/microCi/ml). Various corrections are included in the imaging process, to compensate for spatial and temporal response variations in the detector system. Both filtered backprojection and iterative reconstruction methods are employed. Clinical studies have been performed with acquisition times of 30-40 min. The system will be used for clinical experimental research with short- as well as long-lived positron emitters. Also the possibility of true 3D reconstruction is under evaluation.

  20. Capillary electrophoresis investigations of pET3aPAI-1 DNA involving optimized restriction digestion, laser-induced fluorescence detection, and micropreparative separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sepaniak, Michael J.; Stebbins, Michael; Todd, April; Gibson, Timothy; Peterson, Cynthia; Diack, Moustopha

    1998-05-01

    This work centers around developing methodologies to isolate the PAI-1 coding sequence of the DNA plasmid pET3a-PAI-1. Size Selective Capillary Electrophoresis (SSCE), using entangled polymer filled small i.d. capillaries, is used to develop digestion conditions (time and enzyme concentration) that provide single cuts (at variable positions) of the plasmid using BstYI restriction enzyme. After obtaining optimum partial digest conditions for this enzyme, digestion with Ndel will produce a mixture of fragments that includes the fragment (1354 bp) which contains the intact region of interest. Sensitive detection is achieved via laser induced fluorescence using running buffers containing intercalating dye. Using small i.d. capillary conditions as a starting point, the SSCE system is increased to the micro-preparative scale using various larger i.d. capillaries. The effects of capillary diameter, applied voltage, injection amount, and sample buffer concentration on separation performance are studied. Subsequently, single or limited numbers of injections of the single cut sample using a relatively large i.d. capillary should prove adequate material for digestion with Ndel prior to PCR amplification of the 1354 bp fragment.

  1. Imaging and dosimetric errors in 4D PET/CT-guided radiotherapy from patient-specific respiratory patterns: a dynamic motion phantom end-to-end study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowen, S. R.; Nyflot, M. J.; Herrmann, C.; Groh, C. M.; Meyer, J.; Wollenweber, S. D.; Stearns, C. W.; Kinahan, P. E.; Sandison, G. A.

    2015-05-01

    Effective positron emission tomography / computed tomography (PET/CT) guidance in radiotherapy of lung cancer requires estimation and mitigation of errors due to respiratory motion. An end-to-end workflow was developed to measure patient-specific motion-induced uncertainties in imaging, treatment planning, and radiation delivery with respiratory motion phantoms and dosimeters. A custom torso phantom with inserts mimicking normal lung tissue and lung lesion was filled with [18F]FDG. The lung lesion insert was driven by six different patient-specific respiratory patterns or kept stationary. PET/CT images were acquired under motionless ground truth, tidal breathing motion-averaged (3D), and respiratory phase-correlated (4D) conditions. Target volumes were estimated by standardized uptake value (SUV) thresholds that accurately defined the ground-truth lesion volume. Non-uniform dose-painting plans using volumetrically modulated arc therapy were optimized for fixed normal lung and spinal cord objectives and variable PET-based target objectives. Resulting plans were delivered to a cylindrical diode array at rest, in motion on a platform driven by the same respiratory patterns (3D), or motion-compensated by a robotic couch with an infrared camera tracking system (4D). Errors were estimated relative to the static ground truth condition for mean target-to-background (T/Bmean) ratios, target volumes, planned equivalent uniform target doses, and 2%-2 mm gamma delivery passing rates. Relative to motionless ground truth conditions, PET/CT imaging errors were on the order of 10-20%, treatment planning errors were 5-10%, and treatment delivery errors were 5-30% without motion compensation. Errors from residual motion following compensation methods were reduced to 5-10% in PET/CT imaging, <5% in treatment planning, and <2% in treatment delivery. We have demonstrated that estimation of respiratory motion uncertainty and its propagation from PET/CT imaging to RT planning, and RT

  2. Imaging and dosimetric errors in 4D PET/CT-guided radiotherapy from patient-specific respiratory patterns: a dynamic motion phantom end-to-end study

    PubMed Central

    Bowen, S R; Nyflot, M J; Hermann, C; Groh, C; Meyer, J; Wollenweber, S D; Stearns, C W; Kinahan, P E; Sandison, G A

    2015-01-01

    Effective positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) guidance in radiotherapy of lung cancer requires estimation and mitigation of errors due to respiratory motion. An end-to-end workflow was developed to measure patient-specific motion-induced uncertainties in imaging, treatment planning, and radiation delivery with respiratory motion phantoms and dosimeters. A custom torso phantom with inserts mimicking normal lung tissue and lung lesion was filled with [18F]FDG. The lung lesion insert was driven by 6 different patient-specific respiratory patterns or kept stationary. PET/CT images were acquired under motionless ground truth, tidal breathing motion-averaged (3D), and respiratory phase-correlated (4D) conditions. Target volumes were estimated by standardized uptake value (SUV) thresholds that accurately defined the ground-truth lesion volume. Non-uniform dose-painting plans using volumetrically modulated arc therapy (VMAT) were optimized for fixed normal lung and spinal cord objectives and variable PET-based target objectives. Resulting plans were delivered to a cylindrical diode array at rest, in motion on a platform driven by the same respiratory patterns (3D), or motion-compensated by a robotic couch with an infrared camera tracking system (4D). Errors were estimated relative to the static ground truth condition for mean target-to-background (T/Bmean) ratios, target volumes, planned equivalent uniform target doses (EUD), and 2%-2mm gamma delivery passing rates. Relative to motionless ground truth conditions, PET/CT imaging errors were on the order of 10–20%, treatment planning errors were 5–10%, and treatment delivery errors were 5–30% without motion compensation. Errors from residual motion following compensation methods were reduced to 5–10% in PET/CT imaging, < 5% in treatment planning, and < 2% in treatment delivery. We have demonstrated that estimation of respiratory motion uncertainty and its propagation from PET/CT imaging to RT

  3. Night Vision Camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    PixelVision, Inc. developed the Night Video NV652 Back-illuminated CCD Camera, based on the expertise of a former Jet Propulsion Laboratory employee and a former employee of Scientific Imaging Technologies, Inc. The camera operates without an image intensifier, using back-illuminated and thinned CCD technology to achieve extremely low light level imaging performance. The advantages of PixelVision's system over conventional cameras include greater resolution and better target identification under low light conditions, lower cost and a longer lifetime. It is used commercially for research and aviation.

  4. Gamma camera purchasing.

    PubMed

    Wells, C P; Buxton-Thomas, M

    1995-03-01

    The purchase of a new gamma camera is a major undertaking and represents a long-term commitment for most nuclear medicine departments. The purpose of tendering for gamma cameras is to assess the best match between the requirements of the clinical department and the equipment available and not necessarily to buy the 'best camera' [1-3]. After many years of drawing up tender specifications, this paper tries to outline some of the traps and pitfalls of this potentially perilous, although largely rewarding, exercise. PMID:7770241

  5. Kitt Peak speckle camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breckinridge, J. B.; Mcalister, H. A.; Robinson, W. G.

    1979-01-01

    The speckle camera in regular use at Kitt Peak National Observatory since 1974 is described in detail. The design of the atmospheric dispersion compensation prisms, the use of film as a recording medium, the accuracy of double star measurements, and the next generation speckle camera are discussed. Photographs of double star speckle patterns with separations from 1.4 sec of arc to 4.7 sec of arc are shown to illustrate the quality of image formation with this camera, the effects of seeing on the patterns, and to illustrate the isoplanatic patch of the atmosphere.

  6. Optimism

    PubMed Central

    Carver, Charles S.; Scheier, Michael F.; Segerstrom, Suzanne C.

    2010-01-01

    Optimism is an individual difference variable that reflects the extent to which people hold generalized favorable expectancies for their future. Higher levels of optimism have been related prospectively to better subjective well-being in times of adversity or difficulty (i.e., controlling for previous well-being). Consistent with such findings, optimism has been linked to higher levels of engagement coping and lower levels of avoidance, or disengagement, coping. There is evidence that optimism is associated with taking proactive steps to protect one's health, whereas pessimism is associated with health-damaging behaviors. Consistent with such findings, optimism is also related to indicators of better physical health. The energetic, task-focused approach that optimists take to goals also relates to benefits in the socioeconomic world. Some evidence suggests that optimism relates to more persistence in educational efforts and to higher later income. Optimists also appear to fare better than pessimists in relationships. Although there are instances in which optimism fails to convey an advantage, and instances in which it may convey a disadvantage, those instances are relatively rare. In sum, the behavioral patterns of optimists appear to provide models of living for others to learn from. PMID:20170998

  7. Profits from precious pets.

    PubMed

    Pennisi, E

    2000-06-01

    In 1998, an anonymous millionaire, hoping to clone his pet dog Missy, awarded a Texas A&M University animal scientist $2.3 million to develop the necessary techniques. Now several companies are cashing in on the boom in frozen-tissue storage of pets for future cloning.

  8. My Pet Rock

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lark, Adam; Kramp, Robyne; Nurnberger-Haag, Julie

    2008-01-01

    Many teachers and students have experienced the classic pet rock experiment in conjunction with a geology unit. A teacher has students bring in a "pet" rock found outside of school, and the students run geologic tests on the rock. The tests include determining relative hardness using Mohs scale, checking for magnetization, and assessing luster.…

  9. Advanced CCD camera developments

    SciTech Connect

    Condor, A.

    1994-11-15

    Two charge coupled device (CCD) camera systems are introduced and discussed, describing briefly the hardware involved, and the data obtained in their various applications. The Advanced Development Group Defense Sciences Engineering Division has been actively designing, manufacturing, fielding state-of-the-art CCD camera systems for over a decade. These systems were originally developed for the nuclear test program to record data from underground nuclear tests. Today, new and interesting application for these systems have surfaced and development is continuing in the area of advanced CCD camera systems, with the new CCD camera that will allow experimenters to replace film for x-ray imaging at the JANUS, USP, and NOVA laser facilities.

  10. The MKID Camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maloney, P. R.; Czakon, N. G.; Day, P. K.; Duan, R.; Gao, J.; Glenn, J.; Golwala, S.; Hollister, M.; LeDuc, H. G.; Mazin, B.; Noroozian, O.; Nguyen, H. T.; Sayers, J.; Schlaerth, J.; Vaillancourt, J. E.; Vayonakis, A.; Wilson, P.; Zmuidzinas, J.

    2009-12-01

    The MKID Camera project is a collaborative effort of Caltech, JPL, the University of Colorado, and UC Santa Barbara to develop a large-format, multi-color millimeter and submillimeter-wavelength camera for astronomy using microwave kinetic inductance detectors (MKIDs). These are superconducting, micro-resonators fabricated from thin aluminum and niobium films. We couple the MKIDs to multi-slot antennas and measure the change in surface impedance produced by photon-induced breaking of Cooper pairs. The readout is almost entirely at room temperature and can be highly multiplexed; in principle hundreds or even thousands of resonators could be read out on a single feedline. The camera will have 576 spatial pixels that image simultaneously in four bands at 750, 850, 1100 and 1300 microns. It is scheduled for deployment at the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory in the summer of 2010. We present an overview of the camera design and readout and describe the current status of testing and fabrication.

  11. The Complementary Pinhole Camera.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bissonnette, D.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Presents an experiment based on the principles of rectilinear motion of light operating in a pinhole camera that projects the image of an illuminated object through a small hole in a sheet to an image screen. (MDH)

  12. Miniature TV Camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Originally devised to observe Saturn stage separation during Apollo flights, Marshall Space Flight Center's Miniature Television Camera, measuring only 4 x 3 x 1 1/2 inches, quickly made its way to the commercial telecommunications market.

  13. Gamma ray camera

    SciTech Connect

    Robbins, C.D.; Wang, S.

    1980-09-09

    An anger gamma ray camera is improved by the substitution of a gamma ray sensitive, proximity type image intensifier tube for the scintillator screen in the anger camera, the image intensifier tube having a negatively charged flat scintillator screen and a flat photocathode layer and a grounded, flat output phosphor display screen all of the same dimension (Unity image magnification) and all within a grounded metallic tube envelope and having a metallic, inwardly concaved input window between the scintillator screen and the collimator.

  14. Thoracic cancer imaging with PET/CT in radiation oncology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chi, Pai-Chun Melinda

    Significance. Respiratory motion has been shown to cause artifacts in PET/CT imaging. This breathing artifact can have a significant impact on PET quantification and it can lead to large uncertainties when using PET for radiation therapy planning. We have demonstrated a promising solution to resolve the breathing artifact by acquiring respiration-averaged CT (ACT) for PET/CT. The purpose of this work was to optimize the ACT acquisition for clinical implementation and to evaluate the impact of ACT on PET/CT quantification. The hypothesis was that ACT is an effective method in removing the breathing artifact when compared to our current clinical protocol. Methods. Phase and cine approaches for acquiring ACT were investigated and the results of these two approaches were compared to the ACT generated from clinical 4DCT data sets (abbreviated as ACT10phs ). In the phase approach, ACT was generated based on combinations of selected respiratory phases; in the cine approach, ACT was generated based on cine images acquired over a fixed cine duration. The phase combination and cine duration that best approximated the ACT10phs were determined to be the optimized scanning parameters. 216 thoracic PET/CT patients were scanned with both current clinical and the ACT protocols. The effects of ACT on PET/CT quantification were assessed by comparing clinical PET/CT and ACT PET/CT using 3 metrics: PET/CT image alignment, maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax), and threshold segmented gross tumor volume (GTV). Results. ACT10phs can be best approximated to within 2% of SUV variation by phase averaging based on 4 representative phases, and to within 3% by cine image averaging based on >3s of cine duration. We implemented the cine approach on the PET/CT scanners and acquired 216 patient data sets. 68% of patients had breathing artifacts in their clinical PET/CT and the artifacts were removed/reduced in all corresponding ACT PET/CT. PET/CT quantification for lesions <50 cm3 and

  15. Compton imaging with AGATA and SmartPET for DESPEC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, S.; Arnés, B. Q.; Boston, A. J.; Boston, H. C.; Cresswell, J. R.; Davinson, T.; Gadea, A.; Harkness, L. J.; Judson, D. S.; Lazarus, I.; Nolan, P. J.; Page, R. D.; Prieto, A. H.; Simpson, J.

    2011-12-01

    DESPEC (DEcay SPECtroscopy) is a spectrometer, currently under construction, which is to be used at the FAIR (Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research) facility at GSI Darmstadt, Germany, as part of the NuSTAR (Nuclear STructure, Astrophysics and Reactions) project. Its goal is to analyse the decay of exotic nuclei produced via the Super-FRS (SUPERconducting FRagment Separator). The optimal configuration of certain elements of the spectrometer, namely a HPGe (High Purity Germanium) tracking array, is still under consideration. Work currently being carried out at the University of Liverpool using a segmented, coaxial HPGe detector (AGATA B009) and a pixelated, planar HPGe detector (SmartPET 1) in a Compton camera configuration aims to inform this process by providing insight into the potential performance of such a configuration. This will determine its suitability for the intended purpose, i.e. Compton reconstruction of gamma rays emitted from exotic nuclei implanted into the DESPEC implantation detector, AIDA (Advanced Implantation Detector Array). Preliminary results from this investigation, along with plans for the future direction of this work, are presented.

  16. 1. VARIABLEANGLE LAUNCHER CAMERA CAR, VIEW OF CAMERA CAR AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. VARIABLE-ANGLE LAUNCHER CAMERA CAR, VIEW OF CAMERA CAR AND TRACK WITH CAMERA STATION ABOVE LOOKING NORTH TAKEN FROM RESERVOIR. - Variable Angle Launcher Complex, Camera Car & Track, CA State Highway 39 at Morris Reservior, Azusa, Los Angeles County, CA

  17. 9. VIEW OF CAMERA STATIONS UNDER CONSTRUCTION INCLUDING CAMERA CAR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. VIEW OF CAMERA STATIONS UNDER CONSTRUCTION INCLUDING CAMERA CAR ON RAILROAD TRACK AND FIXED CAMERA STATION 1400 (BUILDING NO. 42021) ABOVE, ADJACENT TO STATE HIGHWAY 39, LOOKING WEST, March 23, 1948. (Original photograph in possession of Dave Willis, San Diego, California.) - Variable Angle Launcher Complex, Camera Stations, CA State Highway 39 at Morris Reservior, Azusa, Los Angeles County, CA

  18. Development of a high resolution beta camera for a direct measurement of positron distribution on brain surface

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, S.; Seki, C.; Kashikura, K.

    1996-12-31

    We have developed and tested a high resolution beta camera for a direct measurement of positron distribution on brain surface of animals. The beta camera consists of a thin CaF{sub 2}(Eu) scintillator, a tapered fiber optics plate (taper fiber) and a position sensitive photomultiplier tube (PSPMT). The taper fiber is the key component of the camera. We have developed two types of beta cameras. One is 20mm diameter field of view camera for imaging brain surface of cats. The other is 10mm diameter camera for that of rats. Spatial resolutions of beta camera for cats and rats were 0.8mm FWHM and 0.5mm FWHM, respectively. We confirmed that developed beta cameras may overcome the limitation of the spatial resolution of the positron emission tomography (PET).

  19. Deployable Wireless Camera Penetrators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badescu, Mircea; Jones, Jack; Sherrit, Stewart; Wu, Jiunn Jeng

    2008-01-01

    A lightweight, low-power camera dart has been designed and tested for context imaging of sampling sites and ground surveys from an aerobot or an orbiting spacecraft in a microgravity environment. The camera penetrators also can be used to image any line-of-sight surface, such as cliff walls, that is difficult to access. Tethered cameras to inspect the surfaces of planetary bodies use both power and signal transmission lines to operate. A tether adds the possibility of inadvertently anchoring the aerobot, and requires some form of station-keeping capability of the aerobot if extended examination time is required. The new camera penetrators are deployed without a tether, weigh less than 30 grams, and are disposable. They are designed to drop from any altitude with the boost in transmitting power currently demonstrated at approximately 100-m line-of-sight. The penetrators also can be deployed to monitor lander or rover operations from a distance, and can be used for surface surveys or for context information gathering from a touch-and-go sampling site. Thanks to wireless operation, the complexity of the sampling or survey mechanisms may be reduced. The penetrators may be battery powered for short-duration missions, or have solar panels for longer or intermittent duration missions. The imaging device is embedded in the penetrator, which is dropped or projected at the surface of a study site at 90 to the surface. Mirrors can be used in the design to image the ground or the horizon. Some of the camera features were tested using commercial "nanny" or "spy" camera components with the charge-coupled device (CCD) looking at a direction parallel to the ground. Figure 1 shows components of one camera that weighs less than 8 g and occupies a volume of 11 cm3. This camera could transmit a standard television signal, including sound, up to 100 m. Figure 2 shows the CAD models of a version of the penetrator. A low-volume array of such penetrator cameras could be deployed from an

  20. Development of a PET/Cerenkov-light hybrid imaging system

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Seiichi Hamamura, Fuka; Kato, Katsuhiko; Ogata, Yoshimune; Watabe, Tadashi; Ikeda, Hayato; Kanai, Yasukazu; Hatazawa, Jun; Watabe, Hiroshi

    2014-09-15

    Purpose: Cerenkov-light imaging is a new molecular imaging technology that detects visible photons from high-speed electrons using a high sensitivity optical camera. However, the merit of Cerenkov-light imaging remains unclear. If a PET/Cerenkov-light hybrid imaging system were developed, the merit of Cerenkov-light imaging would be clarified by directly comparing these two imaging modalities. Methods: The authors developed and tested a PET/Cerenkov-light hybrid imaging system that consists of a dual-head PET system, a reflection mirror located above the subject, and a high sensitivity charge coupled device (CCD) camera. The authors installed these systems inside a black box for imaging the Cerenkov-light. The dual-head PET system employed a 1.2 × 1.2 × 10 mm{sup 3} GSO arranged in a 33 × 33 matrix that was optically coupled to a position sensitive photomultiplier tube to form a GSO block detector. The authors arranged two GSO block detectors 10 cm apart and positioned the subject between them. The Cerenkov-light above the subject is reflected by the mirror and changes its direction to the side of the PET system and is imaged by the high sensitivity CCD camera. Results: The dual-head PET system had a spatial resolution of ∼1.2 mm FWHM and sensitivity of ∼0.31% at the center of the FOV. The Cerenkov-light imaging system's spatial resolution was ∼275μm for a {sup 22}Na point source. Using the combined PET/Cerenkov-light hybrid imaging system, the authors successfully obtained fused images from simultaneously acquired images. The image distributions are sometimes different due to the light transmission and absorption in the body of the subject in the Cerenkov-light images. In simultaneous imaging of rat, the authors found that {sup 18}F-FDG accumulation was observed mainly in the Harderian gland on the PET image, while the distribution of Cerenkov-light was observed in the eyes. Conclusions: The authors conclude that their developed PET/Cerenkov-light hybrid

  1. Synthesis optimization of 2-(4-N-[11C]methylaminophenyl)-6-hydroxybenzothiazole ([11C]PIB), β-amyloid PET imaging tracer for Alzheimer's disease diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Coliva, A; Monterisi, C; Apollaro, A; Gatti, D; Penso, M; Gianolli, L; Perani, D; Gilardi, M C; Carpinelli, A

    2015-11-01

    [11C]PIB is the most used amyloid plaques-specific positron-emitting radiotracers. The radiosynthesis of this compound, carried out by methylation of its precursor with [11C]methyl triflate in 2-butanone, has been improved optimizing the initial concentration and the purification method. Two HPLC methods were compared: good radiochemical yields, specific activities, and chemical purity above 98% were achieved by using as eluant acetonitrile/citrate and formulation in 10% ethanol.

  2. Characterization and optimization of image quality as a function of reconstruction algorithms and parameter settings in a Siemens Inveon small-animal PET scanner using the NEMA NU 4-2008 standards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Visser, Eric P.; Disselhorst, Jonathan A.; van Lier, Monique G. J. T. B.; Laverman, Peter; de Jong, Gabie M.; Oyen, Wim J. G.; Boerman, Otto C.

    2011-02-01

    The image reconstruction algorithms provided with the Siemens Inveon small-animal PET scanner are filtered backprojection (FBP), 3-dimensional reprojection (3DRP), ordered subset expectation maximization in 2 or 3 dimensions (OSEM2D/3D) and maximum a posteriori (MAP) reconstruction. This study aimed at optimizing the reconstruction parameter settings with regard to image quality (IQ) as defined by the NEMA NU 4-2008 standards. The NEMA NU 4-2008 image quality phantom was used to determine image noise, expressed as percentage standard deviation in the uniform phantom region (%STD unif), activity recovery coefficients for the FDG-filled rods (RC rod), and spill-over ratios for the non-radioactive water- and air-filled phantom compartments (SOR wat and SOR air). Although not required by NEMA NU 4, we also determined a contrast-to-noise ratio for each rod (CNR rod), expressing the trade-off between activity recovery and image noise. For FBP and 3DRP the cut-off frequency of the applied filters, and for OSEM2D and OSEM3D, the number of iterations was varied. For MAP, the "smoothing parameter" β and the type of uniformity constraint (variance or resolution) were varied. Results of these analyses were demonstrated in images of an FDG-injected rat showing tumours in the liver, and of a mouse injected with an 18F-labeled peptide, showing a small subcutaneous tumour and the cortex structure of the kidneys. Optimum IQ in terms of CNR rod for the small-diameter rods was obtained using MAP with uniform variance and β=0.4. This setting led to RC rod,1 mm=0.21, RC rod,2 mm=0.57, %STD unif=1.38, SOR wat=0.0011, and SOR air=0.00086. However, the highest activity recovery for the smallest rods with still very small %STD unif was obtained using β=0.075, for which these IQ parameters were 0.31, 0.74, 2.67, 0.0041, and 0.0030, respectively. The different settings of reconstruction parameters were clearly reflected in the rat and mouse images as the trade-off between the recovery of

  3. THE DARK ENERGY CAMERA

    SciTech Connect

    Flaugher, B.; Diehl, H. T.; Alvarez, O.; Angstadt, R.; Annis, J. T.; Buckley-Geer, E. J.; Honscheid, K.; Abbott, T. M. C.; Bonati, M.; Antonik, M.; Brooks, D.; Ballester, O.; Cardiel-Sas, L.; Beaufore, L.; Bernstein, G. M.; Bernstein, R. A.; Bigelow, B.; Boprie, D.; Campa, J.; Castander, F. J.; Collaboration: DES Collaboration; and others

    2015-11-15

    The Dark Energy Camera is a new imager with a 2.°2 diameter field of view mounted at the prime focus of the Victor M. Blanco 4 m telescope on Cerro Tololo near La Serena, Chile. The camera was designed and constructed by the Dark Energy Survey Collaboration and meets or exceeds the stringent requirements designed for the wide-field and supernova surveys for which the collaboration uses it. The camera consists of a five-element optical corrector, seven filters, a shutter with a 60 cm aperture, and a charge-coupled device (CCD) focal plane of 250 μm thick fully depleted CCDs cooled inside a vacuum Dewar. The 570 megapixel focal plane comprises 62 2k × 4k CCDs for imaging and 12 2k × 2k CCDs for guiding and focus. The CCDs have 15 μm × 15 μm pixels with a plate scale of 0.″263 pixel{sup −1}. A hexapod system provides state-of-the-art focus and alignment capability. The camera is read out in 20 s with 6–9 electron readout noise. This paper provides a technical description of the camera's engineering, construction, installation, and current status.

  4. CAOS-CMOS camera.

    PubMed

    Riza, Nabeel A; La Torre, Juan Pablo; Amin, M Junaid

    2016-06-13

    Proposed and experimentally demonstrated is the CAOS-CMOS camera design that combines the coded access optical sensor (CAOS) imager platform with the CMOS multi-pixel optical sensor. The unique CAOS-CMOS camera engages the classic CMOS sensor light staring mode with the time-frequency-space agile pixel CAOS imager mode within one programmable optical unit to realize a high dynamic range imager for extreme light contrast conditions. The experimentally demonstrated CAOS-CMOS camera is built using a digital micromirror device, a silicon point-photo-detector with a variable gain amplifier, and a silicon CMOS sensor with a maximum rated 51.3 dB dynamic range. White light imaging of three different brightness simultaneously viewed targets, that is not possible by the CMOS sensor, is achieved by the CAOS-CMOS camera demonstrating an 82.06 dB dynamic range. Applications for the camera include industrial machine vision, welding, laser analysis, automotive, night vision, surveillance and multispectral military systems.

  5. The Dark Energy Camera

    SciTech Connect

    Flaugher, B.

    2015-04-11

    The Dark Energy Camera is a new imager with a 2.2-degree diameter field of view mounted at the prime focus of the Victor M. Blanco 4-meter telescope on Cerro Tololo near La Serena, Chile. The camera was designed and constructed by the Dark Energy Survey Collaboration, and meets or exceeds the stringent requirements designed for the wide-field and supernova surveys for which the collaboration uses it. The camera consists of a five element optical corrector, seven filters, a shutter with a 60 cm aperture, and a CCD focal plane of 250-μm thick fully depleted CCDs cooled inside a vacuum Dewar. The 570 Mpixel focal plane comprises 62 2k x 4k CCDs for imaging and 12 2k x 2k CCDs for guiding and focus. The CCDs have 15μm x 15μm pixels with a plate scale of 0.263" per pixel. A hexapod system provides state-of-the-art focus and alignment capability. The camera is read out in 20 seconds with 6-9 electrons readout noise. This paper provides a technical description of the camera's engineering, construction, installation, and current status.

  6. CAOS-CMOS camera.

    PubMed

    Riza, Nabeel A; La Torre, Juan Pablo; Amin, M Junaid

    2016-06-13

    Proposed and experimentally demonstrated is the CAOS-CMOS camera design that combines the coded access optical sensor (CAOS) imager platform with the CMOS multi-pixel optical sensor. The unique CAOS-CMOS camera engages the classic CMOS sensor light staring mode with the time-frequency-space agile pixel CAOS imager mode within one programmable optical unit to realize a high dynamic range imager for extreme light contrast conditions. The experimentally demonstrated CAOS-CMOS camera is built using a digital micromirror device, a silicon point-photo-detector with a variable gain amplifier, and a silicon CMOS sensor with a maximum rated 51.3 dB dynamic range. White light imaging of three different brightness simultaneously viewed targets, that is not possible by the CMOS sensor, is achieved by the CAOS-CMOS camera demonstrating an 82.06 dB dynamic range. Applications for the camera include industrial machine vision, welding, laser analysis, automotive, night vision, surveillance and multispectral military systems. PMID:27410361

  7. Satellite camera image navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamel, Ahmed A. (Inventor); Graul, Donald W. (Inventor); Savides, John (Inventor); Hanson, Charles W. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    Pixels within a satellite camera (1, 2) image are precisely located in terms of latitude and longitude on a celestial body, such as the earth, being imaged. A computer (60) on the earth generates models (40, 50) of the satellite's orbit and attitude, respectively. The orbit model (40) is generated from measurements of stars and landmarks taken by the camera (1, 2), and by range data. The orbit model (40) is an expression of the satellite's latitude and longitude at the subsatellite point, and of the altitude of the satellite, as a function of time, using as coefficients (K) the six Keplerian elements at epoch. The attitude model (50) is based upon star measurements taken by each camera (1, 2). The attitude model (50) is a set of expressions for the deviations in a set of mutually orthogonal reference optical axes (x, y, z) as a function of time, for each camera (1, 2). Measured data is fit into the models (40, 50) using a walking least squares fit algorithm. A transformation computer (66 ) transforms pixel coordinates as telemetered by the camera (1, 2) into earth latitude and longitude coordinates, using the orbit and attitude models (40, 50).

  8. The Dark Energy Camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flaugher, B.; Diehl, H. T.; Honscheid, K.; Abbott, T. M. C.; Alvarez, O.; Angstadt, R.; Annis, J. T.; Antonik, M.; Ballester, O.; Beaufore, L.; Bernstein, G. M.; Bernstein, R. A.; Bigelow, B.; Bonati, M.; Boprie, D.; Brooks, D.; Buckley-Geer, E. J.; Campa, J.; Cardiel-Sas, L.; Castander, F. J.; Castilla, J.; Cease, H.; Cela-Ruiz, J. M.; Chappa, S.; Chi, E.; Cooper, C.; da Costa, L. N.; Dede, E.; Derylo, G.; DePoy, D. L.; de Vicente, J.; Doel, P.; Drlica-Wagner, A.; Eiting, J.; Elliott, A. E.; Emes, J.; Estrada, J.; Fausti Neto, A.; Finley, D. A.; Flores, R.; Frieman, J.; Gerdes, D.; Gladders, M. D.; Gregory, B.; Gutierrez, G. R.; Hao, J.; Holland, S. E.; Holm, S.; Huffman, D.; Jackson, C.; James, D. J.; Jonas, M.; Karcher, A.; Karliner, I.; Kent, S.; Kessler, R.; Kozlovsky, M.; Kron, R. G.; Kubik, D.; Kuehn, K.; Kuhlmann, S.; Kuk, K.; Lahav, O.; Lathrop, A.; Lee, J.; Levi, M. E.; Lewis, P.; Li, T. S.; Mandrichenko, I.; Marshall, J. L.; Martinez, G.; Merritt, K. W.; Miquel, R.; Muñoz, F.; Neilsen, E. H.; Nichol, R. C.; Nord, B.; Ogando, R.; Olsen, J.; Palaio, N.; Patton, K.; Peoples, J.; Plazas, A. A.; Rauch, J.; Reil, K.; Rheault, J.-P.; Roe, N. A.; Rogers, H.; Roodman, A.; Sanchez, E.; Scarpine, V.; Schindler, R. H.; Schmidt, R.; Schmitt, R.; Schubnell, M.; Schultz, K.; Schurter, P.; Scott, L.; Serrano, S.; Shaw, T. M.; Smith, R. C.; Soares-Santos, M.; Stefanik, A.; Stuermer, W.; Suchyta, E.; Sypniewski, A.; Tarle, G.; Thaler, J.; Tighe, R.; Tran, C.; Tucker, D.; Walker, A. R.; Wang, G.; Watson, M.; Weaverdyck, C.; Wester, W.; Woods, R.; Yanny, B.; DES Collaboration

    2015-11-01

    The Dark Energy Camera is a new imager with a 2.°2 diameter field of view mounted at the prime focus of the Victor M. Blanco 4 m telescope on Cerro Tololo near La Serena, Chile. The camera was designed and constructed by the Dark Energy Survey Collaboration and meets or exceeds the stringent requirements designed for the wide-field and supernova surveys for which the collaboration uses it. The camera consists of a five-element optical corrector, seven filters, a shutter with a 60 cm aperture, and a charge-coupled device (CCD) focal plane of 250 μm thick fully depleted CCDs cooled inside a vacuum Dewar. The 570 megapixel focal plane comprises 62 2k × 4k CCDs for imaging and 12 2k × 2k CCDs for guiding and focus. The CCDs have 15 μm × 15 μm pixels with a plate scale of 0.″263 pixel-1. A hexapod system provides state-of-the-art focus and alignment capability. The camera is read out in 20 s with 6-9 electron readout noise. This paper provides a technical description of the camera's engineering, construction, installation, and current status.

  9. Efficient methodologies for system matrix modelling in iterative image reconstruction for rotating high-resolution PET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortuño, J. E.; Kontaxakis, G.; Rubio, J. L.; Guerra, P.; Santos, A.

    2010-04-01

    A fully 3D iterative image reconstruction algorithm has been developed for high-resolution PET cameras composed of pixelated scintillator crystal arrays and rotating planar detectors, based on the ordered subsets approach. The associated system matrix is precalculated with Monte Carlo methods that incorporate physical effects not included in analytical models, such as positron range effects and interaction of the incident gammas with the scintillator material. Custom Monte Carlo methodologies have been developed and optimized for modelling of system matrices for fast iterative image reconstruction adapted to specific scanner geometries, without redundant calculations. According to the methodology proposed here, only one-eighth of the voxels within two central transaxial slices need to be modelled in detail. The rest of the system matrix elements can be obtained with the aid of axial symmetries and redundancies, as well as in-plane symmetries within transaxial slices. Sparse matrix techniques for the non-zero system matrix elements are employed, allowing for fast execution of the image reconstruction process. This 3D image reconstruction scheme has been compared in terms of image quality to a 2D fast implementation of the OSEM algorithm combined with Fourier rebinning approaches. This work confirms the superiority of fully 3D OSEM in terms of spatial resolution, contrast recovery and noise reduction as compared to conventional 2D approaches based on rebinning schemes. At the same time it demonstrates that fully 3D methodologies can be efficiently applied to the image reconstruction problem for high-resolution rotational PET cameras by applying accurate pre-calculated system models and taking advantage of the system's symmetries.

  10. Monte Carlo simulations of a scintillation camera using GATE: validation and application modelling.

    PubMed

    Staelens, Steven; Strul, Daniel; Santin, Giovanni; Vandenberghe, Stefaan; Koole, Michel; D'Asseler, Yves; Lemahieu, Ignace; Van de Walle, Rik

    2003-09-21

    Geant4 application for tomographic emission (GATE) is a recently developed simulation platform based on Geant4, specifically designed for PET and SPECT studies. In this paper we present validation results of GATE based on the comparison of simulations against experimental data, acquired with a standard SPECT camera. The most important components of the scintillation camera were modelled. The photoelectric effect. Compton and Rayleigh scatter are included in the gamma transport process. Special attention was paid to the processes involved in the collimator: scatter, penetration and lead fluorescence. A LEHR and a MEGP collimator were modelled as closely as possible to their shape and dimensions. In the validation study, we compared the simulated and measured energy spectra of different isotopes: 99mTc, 22Na, 57Co and 67Ga. The sensitivity was evaluated by using sources at varying distances from the detector surface. Scatter component analysis was performed in different energy windows at different distances from the detector and for different attenuation geometries. Spatial resolution was evaluated using a 99mTc source at various distances. Overall results showed very good agreement between the acquisitions and the simulations. The clinical usefulness of GATE depends on its ability to use voxelized datasets. Therefore, a clinical extension was written so that digital patient data can be read in by the simulator as a source distribution or as an attenuating geometry. Following this validation we modelled two additional camera designs: the Beacon transmission device for attenuation correction and the Solstice scanner prototype with a rotating collimator. For the first setup a scatter analysis was performed and for the latter design. the simulated sensitivity results were compared against theoretical predictions. Both case studies demonstrated the flexibility and accuracy of GATE and exemplified its potential benefits in protocol optimization and in system design.

  11. Solid state television camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The design, fabrication, and tests of a solid state television camera using a new charge-coupled imaging device are reported. An RCA charge-coupled device arranged in a 512 by 320 format and directly compatible with EIA format standards was the sensor selected. This is a three-phase, sealed surface-channel array that has 163,840 sensor elements, which employs a vertical frame transfer system for image readout. Included are test results of the complete camera system, circuit description and changes to such circuits as a result of integration and test, maintenance and operation section, recommendations to improve the camera system, and a complete set of electrical and mechanical drawing sketches.

  12. HIGH SPEED CAMERA

    DOEpatents

    Rogers, B.T. Jr.; Davis, W.C.

    1957-12-17

    This patent relates to high speed cameras having resolution times of less than one-tenth microseconds suitable for filming distinct sequences of a very fast event such as an explosion. This camera consists of a rotating mirror with reflecting surfaces on both sides, a narrow mirror acting as a slit in a focal plane shutter, various other mirror and lens systems as well as an innage recording surface. The combination of the rotating mirrors and the slit mirror causes discrete, narrow, separate pictures to fall upon the film plane, thereby forming a moving image increment of the photographed event. Placing a reflecting surface on each side of the rotating mirror cancels the image velocity that one side of the rotating mirror would impart, so as a camera having this short a resolution time is thereby possible.

  13. Selective-imaging camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szu, Harold; Hsu, Charles; Landa, Joseph; Cha, Jae H.; Krapels, Keith A.

    2015-05-01

    How can we design cameras that image selectively in Full Electro-Magnetic (FEM) spectra? Without selective imaging, we cannot use, for example, ordinary tourist cameras to see through fire, smoke, or other obscurants contributing to creating a Visually Degraded Environment (VDE). This paper addresses a possible new design of selective-imaging cameras at firmware level. The design is consistent with physics of the irreversible thermodynamics of Boltzmann's molecular entropy. It enables imaging in appropriate FEM spectra for sensing through the VDE, and displaying in color spectra for Human Visual System (HVS). We sense within the spectra the largest entropy value of obscurants such as fire, smoke, etc. Then we apply a smart firmware implementation of Blind Sources Separation (BSS) to separate all entropy sources associated with specific Kelvin temperatures. Finally, we recompose the scene using specific RGB colors constrained by the HVS, by up/down shifting Planck spectra at each pixel and time.

  14. Electronic Still Camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holland, S. Douglas (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A handheld, programmable, digital camera is disclosed that supports a variety of sensors and has program control over the system components to provide versatility. The camera uses a high performance design which produces near film quality images from an electronic system. The optical system of the camera incorporates a conventional camera body that was slightly modified, thus permitting the use of conventional camera accessories, such as telephoto lenses, wide-angle lenses, auto-focusing circuitry, auto-exposure circuitry, flash units, and the like. An image sensor, such as a charge coupled device ('CCD') collects the photons that pass through the camera aperture when the shutter is opened, and produces an analog electrical signal indicative of the image. The analog image signal is read out of the CCD and is processed by preamplifier circuitry, a correlated double sampler, and a sample and hold circuit before it is converted to a digital signal. The analog-to-digital converter has an accuracy of eight bits to insure accuracy during the conversion. Two types of data ports are included for two different data transfer needs. One data port comprises a general purpose industrial standard port and the other a high speed/high performance application specific port. The system uses removable hard disks as its permanent storage media. The hard disk receives the digital image signal from the memory buffer and correlates the image signal with other sensed parameters, such as longitudinal or other information. When the storage capacity of the hard disk has been filled, the disk can be replaced with a new disk.

  15. Healthy Pets and People

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pregnant women should avoid adopting or handling stray cats, especially kittens. They particularly should not clean litter ... may be sick. Many pets, such as dogs, cats, reptiles, rodents, and birds, carry germs that can ...

  16. Pets and Parasites

    MedlinePlus

    ... make me sick? Household pets such as dogs, cats, birds and reptiles can carry diseases or parasites ... might be used as litter boxes by neighborhood cats. Keep your children out of the dirt in ...

  17. Heart PET scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... large tunnel-shaped scanner. Electrodes for an electrocardiogram ( ECG ) will be placed on your chest. The PET ... often used when other tests, such as echocardiogram (ECG) and cardiac stress tests do not provide enough ...

  18. Household Hazards to Pets

    MedlinePlus

    ... health by becoming aware of the most common health hazards found in many pet-owning households. Hazards in the Kitchen Foods Many foods are perfectly safe for humans, but could be harmful or potentially deadly to ...

  19. Brain PET scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... tests, such as magnetic resonance imaging ( MRI ) and computed tomography ( CT ) scans only reveal the structure of the ... a PET/CT. Alternative Names ... PT, Rijntjes M, Weiller C. Neuroimaging: Functional neuroimaging. In: Daroff RB, Fenichel GM, Jankovic ...

  20. GROT in NICMOS Cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sosey, M.; Bergeron, E.

    1999-09-01

    Grot is exhibited as small areas of reduced sensitivity, most likely due to flecks of antireflective paint scraped off the optical baffles as they were forced against each other. This paper characterizes grot associated with all three cameras. Flat field images taken from March 1997 through January 1999 have been investigated for changes in the grot, including possible wavelength dependency and throughput characteristics. The main products of this analysis are grot masks for each of the cameras which may also contain any new cold or dead pixels not specified in the data quality arrays.

  1. Wide angle pinhole camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franke, J. M.

    1978-01-01

    Hemispherical refracting element gives pinhole camera 180 degree field-of-view without compromising its simplicity and depth-of-field. Refracting element, located just behind pinhole, bends light coming in from sides so that it falls within image area of film. In contrast to earlier pinhole cameras that used water or other transparent fluids to widen field, this model is not subject to leakage and is easily loaded and unloaded with film. Moreover, by selecting glass with different indices of refraction, field at film plane can be widened or reduced.

  2. Artificial human vision camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goudou, J.-F.; Maggio, S.; Fagno, M.

    2014-10-01

    In this paper we present a real-time vision system modeling the human vision system. Our purpose is to inspire from human vision bio-mechanics to improve robotic capabilities for tasks such as objects detection and tracking. This work describes first the bio-mechanical discrepancies between human vision and classic cameras and the retinal processing stage that takes place in the eye, before the optic nerve. The second part describes our implementation of these principles on a 3-camera optical, mechanical and software model of the human eyes and associated bio-inspired attention model.

  3. PET studies in epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Sarikaya, Ismet

    2015-01-01

    Various PET studies, such as measurements of glucose, serotonin and oxygen metabolism, cerebral blood flow and receptor bindings are availabe for epilepsy. 18Fluoro-2-deoxyglucose (18F-FDG) PET imaging of brain glucose metabolism is a well established and widely available technique. Studies have demonstrated that the sensitivity of interictal FDG-PET is higher than interictal SPECT and similar to ictal SPECT for the lateralization and localization of epileptogenic foci in presurgical patients refractory to medical treatments who have noncontributory EEG and MRI. In addition to localizing epileptogenic focus, FDG-PET provide additional important information on the functional status of the rest of the brain. The main limitation of interictal FDG-PET is that it cannot precisely define the surgical margin as the area of hypometabolism usually extends beyond the epileptogenic zone. Various neurotransmitters (GABA, glutamate, opiates, serotonin, dopamine, acethylcholine, and adenosine) and receptor subtypes are involved in epilepsy. PET receptor imaging studies performed in limited centers help to understand the role of neurotransmitters in epileptogenesis, identify epileptic foci and investigate new treatment approaches. PET receptor imaging studies have demonstrated reduced 11C-flumazenil (GABAA-cBDZ) and 18F-MPPF (5-HT1A serotonin) and increased 11C-cerfentanil (mu opiate) and 11C-MeNTI (delta opiate) bindings in the area of seizure. 11C-flumazenil has been reported to be more sensitive than FDG-PET for identifying epileptic foci. The area of abnormality on GABAAcBDZ and opiate receptor images is usually smaller and more circumscribed than the area of hypometabolism on FDG images. Studies have demonstrated that 11C-alpha-methyl-L-tryptophan PET (to study synthesis of serotonin) can detect the epileptic focus within malformations of cortical development and helps in differentiating epileptogenic from non-epileptogenic tubers in patients with tuberous sclerosis complex

  4. Camera placement in integer lattices (extended abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pocchiola, Michel; Kranakis, Evangelos

    1990-09-01

    Techniques for studying an art gallery problem (the camera placement problem) in the infinite lattice (L sup d) of d tuples of integers are considered. A lattice point A is visible from a camera C positioned at a vertex of (L sup d) if A does not equal C and if the line segment joining A and C crosses no other lattice vertex. By using a combination of probabilistic, combinatorial optimization and algorithmic techniques the position they must occupy in the lattice (L sup d) in the order to maximize their visibility can be determined in polynomial time, for any given number s less than or equal to (5 sup d) of cameras. This improves previous results for s less than or equal to (3 sup d).

  5. PET/CT artifacts.

    PubMed

    Blodgett, Todd M; Mehta, Ajeet S; Mehta, Amar S; Laymon, Charles M; Carney, Jonathan; Townsend, David W

    2011-01-01

    There are several artifacts encountered in positron emission tomography/computed tomographic (PET/CT) imaging, including attenuation correction (AC) artifacts associated with using CT for AC. Several artifacts can mimic a 2-deoxy-2-[18F] fluoro-d-glucose (FDG) avid malignant lesions and therefore recognition of these artifacts is clinically relevant. Our goal was to identify and characterize these artifacts and also discuss some protocol variables that may affect image quality in PET/CT.

  6. Modification of a medical PET scanner for PEPT studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadrmomtaz, Alireza; Parker, D. J.; Byars, L. G.

    2007-04-01

    Over the last 20 years, positron emission tomography (PET) has developed as the most powerful functional imaging modality in medicine. Over the same period the University of Birmingham Positron Imaging Centre has applied PET to study engineering processes and developed the alternative technique of positron emission particle tracking (PEPT) in which a single radioactively labelled tracer particle is tracked by detecting simultaneously the pairs of back-to-back photons arising from positron/electron annihilation. Originally PEPT was performed using a pair of multiwire detectors, and more recently using a pair of digital gamma camera heads. In 2002 the Positron Imaging Centre acquired a medical PET scanner, an ECAT 931/08, previously used at Hammersmith Hospital. This scanner has been rebuilt in a flexible geometry for use in PEPT studies. This paper presents initial results from this system. Fast moving tracer particles can be rapidly and accurately located.

  7. Gesture recognition on smart cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dziri, Aziz; Chevobbe, Stephane; Darouich, Mehdi

    2013-02-01

    Gesture recognition is a feature in human-machine interaction that allows more natural interaction without the use of complex devices. For this reason, several methods of gesture recognition have been developed in recent years. However, most real time methods are designed to operate on a Personal Computer with high computing resources and memory. In this paper, we analyze relevant methods found in the literature in order to investigate the ability of smart camera to execute gesture recognition algorithms. We elaborate two hand gesture recognition pipelines. The first method is based on invariant moments extraction and the second on finger tips detection. The hand detection method used for both pipeline is based on skin color segmentation. The results obtained show that the un-optimized versions of invariant moments method and finger tips detection method can reach 10 fps on embedded processor and use about 200 kB of memory.

  8. Illumination box and camera system

    DOEpatents

    Haas, Jeffrey S.; Kelly, Fredrick R.; Bushman, John F.; Wiefel, Michael H.; Jensen, Wayne A.; Klunder, Gregory L.

    2002-01-01

    A hand portable, field-deployable thin-layer chromatography (TLC) unit and a hand portable, battery-operated unit for development, illumination, and data acquisition of the TLC plates contain many miniaturized features that permit a large number of samples to be processed efficiently. The TLC unit includes a solvent tank, a holder for TLC plates, and a variety of tool chambers for storing TLC plates, solvent, and pipettes. After processing in the TLC unit, a TLC plate is positioned in a collapsible illumination box, where the box and a CCD camera are optically aligned for optimal pixel resolution of the CCD images of the TLC plate. The TLC system includes an improved development chamber for chemical development of TLC plates that prevents solvent overflow.

  9. Camera settings for UAV image acquisition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connor, James; Smith, Mike J.; James, Mike R.

    2016-04-01

    The acquisition of aerial imagery has become more ubiquitous than ever in the geosciences due to the advent of consumer-grade UAVs capable of carrying imaging devices. These allow the collection of high spatial resolution data in a timely manner with little expertise. Conversely, the cameras/lenses used to acquire this imagery are often given less thought, and can be unfit for purpose. Given weight constraints which are frequently an issue with UAV flights, low-payload UAVs (<1 kg) limit the types of cameras/lenses which could potentially be used for specific surveys, and therefore the quality of imagery which can be acquired. This contribution discusses these constraints, which need to be considered when selecting a camera/lens for conducting a UAV survey and how they can best be optimized. These include balancing of the camera exposure triangle (ISO, Shutter speed, Aperture) to ensure sharp, well exposed imagery, and its interactions with other camera parameters (Sensor size, Focal length, Pixel pitch) as well as UAV flight parameters (height, velocity).

  10. Snapshot polarimeter fundus camera.

    PubMed

    DeHoog, Edward; Luo, Haitao; Oka, Kazuhiko; Dereniak, Eustace; Schwiegerling, James

    2009-03-20

    A snapshot imaging polarimeter utilizing Savart plates is integrated into a fundus camera for retinal imaging. Acquired retinal images can be processed to reconstruct Stokes vector images, giving insight into the polarization properties of the retina. Results for images from a normal healthy retina and retinas with pathology are examined and compared. PMID:19305463

  11. Spas color camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toffales, C.

    1983-01-01

    The procedures to be followed in assessing the performance of the MOS color camera are defined. Aspects considered include: horizontal and vertical resolution; value of the video signal; gray scale rendition; environmental (vibration and temperature) tests; signal to noise ratios; and white balance correction.

  12. The LSST Camera Overview

    SciTech Connect

    Gilmore, Kirk; Kahn, Steven A.; Nordby, Martin; Burke, David; O'Connor, Paul; Oliver, John; Radeka, Veljko; Schalk, Terry; Schindler, Rafe; /SLAC

    2007-01-10

    The LSST camera is a wide-field optical (0.35-1um) imager designed to provide a 3.5 degree FOV with better than 0.2 arcsecond sampling. The detector format will be a circular mosaic providing approximately 3.2 Gigapixels per image. The camera includes a filter mechanism and, shuttering capability. It is positioned in the middle of the telescope where cross-sectional area is constrained by optical vignetting and heat dissipation must be controlled to limit thermal gradients in the optical beam. The fast, f/1.2 beam will require tight tolerances on the focal plane mechanical assembly. The focal plane array operates at a temperature of approximately -100 C to achieve desired detector performance. The focal plane array is contained within an evacuated cryostat, which incorporates detector front-end electronics and thermal control. The cryostat lens serves as an entrance window and vacuum seal for the cryostat. Similarly, the camera body lens serves as an entrance window and gas seal for the camera housing, which is filled with a suitable gas to provide the operating environment for the shutter and filter change mechanisms. The filter carousel can accommodate 5 filters, each 75 cm in diameter, for rapid exchange without external intervention.

  13. Jack & the Video Camera

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charlan, Nathan

    2010-01-01

    This article narrates how the use of video camera has transformed the life of Jack Williams, a 10-year-old boy from Colorado Springs, Colorado, who has autism. The way autism affected Jack was unique. For the first nine years of his life, Jack remained in his world, alone. Functionally non-verbal and with motor skill problems that affected his…

  14. Photogrammetric camera calibration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tayman, W.P.; Ziemann, H.

    1984-01-01

    Section 2 (Calibration) of the document "Recommended Procedures for Calibrating Photogrammetric Cameras and Related Optical Tests" from the International Archives of Photogrammetry, Vol. XIII, Part 4, is reviewed in the light of recent practical work, and suggestions for changes are made. These suggestions are intended as a basis for a further discussion. ?? 1984.

  15. Communities, Cameras, and Conservation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patterson, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    Communities, Cameras, and Conservation (CCC) is the most exciting and valuable program the author has seen in her 30 years of teaching field science courses. In this citizen science project, students and community volunteers collect data on mountain lions ("Puma concolor") at four natural areas and public parks along the Front Range of Colorado.…

  16. Anger Camera Firmware

    2010-11-19

    The firmware is responsible for the operation of Anger Camera Electronics, calculation of position, time of flight and digital communications. It provides a first stage analysis of 48 signals from 48 analog signals that have been converted to digital values using A/D convertors.

  17. Make a Pinhole Camera

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Diane K.; Novati, Alexander

    2009-01-01

    On Earth, using ordinary visible light, one can create a single image of light recorded over time. Of course a movie or video is light recorded over time, but it is a series of instantaneous snapshots, rather than light and time both recorded on the same medium. A pinhole camera, which is simple to make out of ordinary materials and using ordinary…

  18. Advanced Virgo phase cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Schaaf, L.; Agatsuma, K.; van Beuzekom, M.; Gebyehu, M.; van den Brand, J.

    2016-05-01

    A century after the prediction of gravitational waves, detectors have reached the sensitivity needed to proof their existence. One of them, the Virgo interferometer in Pisa, is presently being upgraded to Advanced Virgo (AdV) and will come into operation in 2016. The power stored in the interferometer arms raises from 20 to 700 kW. This increase is expected to introduce higher order modes in the beam, which could reduce the circulating power in the interferometer, limiting the sensitivity of the instrument. To suppress these higher-order modes, the core optics of Advanced Virgo is equipped with a thermal compensation system. Phase cameras, monitoring the real-time status of the beam constitute a critical component of this compensation system. These cameras measure the phases and amplitudes of the laser-light fields at the frequencies selected to control the interferometer. The measurement combines heterodyne detection with a scan of the wave front over a photodetector with pin-hole aperture. Three cameras observe the phase front of these laser sidebands. Two of them monitor the in-and output of the interferometer arms and the third one is used in the control of the aberrations introduced by the power recycling cavity. In this paper the working principle of the phase cameras is explained and some characteristic parameters are described.

  19. Imaging phoswich anger camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manchanda, R. K.; Sood, R. K.

    1991-08-01

    High angular resolution and low background are the primary requisites for detectors for future astronomy experiments in the low energy gamma-ray region. Scintillation counters are still the only available large area detector for studies in this energy range. Preliminary details of a large area phoswich anger camera designed for coded aperture imaging is described and its background and position characteristics are discussed.

  20. Millisecond readout CCD camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prokop, Mark; McCurnin, Thomas W.; Stradling, Gary L.

    1993-01-01

    We have developed a prototype of a fast-scanning CCD readout system to record a 1024 X 256 pixel image and transport the image to a recording station within 1 ms of the experimental event. The system is designed to have a dynamic range of greater than 1000 with adequate sensitivity to read single-electron excitations of a CRT phosphor when amplified by a microchannel plate image intensifier. This readout camera is intended for recording images from oscilloscopes, streak, and framing cameras. The sensor is a custom CCD chip, designed by LORAL Aeroneutronics. This CCD chip is designed with 16 parallel output ports to supply the necessary image transfer speed. The CCD is designed as an interline structure to allow fast clearing of the image and on-chip fast sputtering. Special antiblooming provisions are also included. The camera is designed to be modular and to allow CCD chips of other sizes to be used with minimal reengineering of the camera head.

  1. Millisecond readout CCD camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prokop, M.; McCurnin, T. W.; Stradling, G.

    We have developed a prototype of a fast-scanning CCD readout system to record a 1024 x 256 pixel image and transport the image to a recording station within 1 ms of the experimental event. The system is designed to have a dynamic range of greater than 1000 with adequate sensitivity to read single-electron excitations of a CRT phosphor when amplified by a microchannel plate image intensifier. This readout camera is intended for recording images from oscilloscopes, streak, and framing cameras. The sensor is a custom CCD chip, designed by LORAL Aeroneutronics. This CCD chip is designed with 16 parallel output ports to supply the necessary image transfer speed. The CCD is designed as an interline structure to allow fast clearing of the image and on-chip fast shuttering. Special antiblooming provisions are also included. The camera is designed to be modular and to allow CCD chips of other sizes to be used with minimal reengineering of the camera head.

  2. Image Sensors Enhance Camera Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    In the 1990s, a Jet Propulsion Laboratory team led by Eric Fossum researched ways of improving complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) image sensors in order to miniaturize cameras on spacecraft while maintaining scientific image quality. Fossum s team founded a company to commercialize the resulting CMOS active pixel sensor. Now called the Aptina Imaging Corporation, based in San Jose, California, the company has shipped over 1 billion sensors for use in applications such as digital cameras, camera phones, Web cameras, and automotive cameras. Today, one of every three cell phone cameras on the planet feature Aptina s sensor technology.

  3. Simultaneous {sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC-PET/MRI for IMRT Treatment Planning for Meningioma: First Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Thorwarth, Daniela; Henke, Guido; Mueller, Arndt-Christian; Reimold, Matthias; Beyer, Thomas; Boss, Andreas; Kolb, Armin; Pichler, Bernd; Pfannenberg, Christina

    2011-09-01

    Purpose: To evaluate intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) treatment planning based on simultaneous positron-emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging (PET/MRI) of meningioma. Methods and Materials: A meningioma patient was examined prior to radiotherapy with dedicated planning computed tomography (CT), MRI, PET/CT with gallium-68-labeled DOTATOC ({sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC), and simultaneous {sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC-PET/MRI. The first gross target volume (GTV) was defined based on a combination of separate MR and {sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC-PET/CT imaging (GTV{sub PET/CT+MR}). Then, the simultaneous PET/MR images were used to delineate a second GTV (GTV{sub PET/MR}) by following exactly the same delineation strategy. After an isotropic expansion of those volumes by a 4-mm safety margin, the resulting planning target volumes (PTVs) were compared by calculating the intersection volume and the relative complements. A cross-evaluation of IMRT plans was performed, where the treatment plan created for the PTV{sub PET/CT+MR} was applied to the PET/MR-based PTV{sub PET/MR}. Results: Generally, target volumes for IMRT treatment planning did not differ between MRI plus {sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC-PET/CT and simultaneous PET/MR imaging. Only in certain regions of the GTV were differences observed. The overall volume of the PET/MR-based PTV was approximately the same as that obtained from PET/CT data. A small region of infiltrative tumor growth next to the main tumor mass was better visualized with combined PET/MR due to smaller PET voxel sizes and improved recovery. An IMRT treatment plan was optimized for the PTV{sub PET/CT+MR}. The evaluation of this plan with respect to the PTV{sub PET/MR} showed parts of the target volume that would not have received the full radiation dose after delineation of the tumor, based on simultaneous PET/MR. Conclusion: This case showed that differences in target volumes delineated on the basis of separate MR and PET/CT and simultaneous PET/MR may be observed that

  4. Dual cameras acquisition and display system of retina-like sensor camera and rectangular sensor camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Nan; Cao, Fengmei; Lin, Yabin; Bai, Tingzhu; Song, Shengyu

    2015-04-01

    For a new kind of retina-like senor camera and a traditional rectangular sensor camera, dual cameras acquisition and display system need to be built. We introduce the principle and the development of retina-like senor. Image coordinates transformation and interpolation based on sub-pixel interpolation need to be realized for our retina-like sensor's special pixels distribution. The hardware platform is composed of retina-like senor camera, rectangular sensor camera, image grabber and PC. Combined the MIL and OpenCV library, the software program is composed in VC++ on VS 2010. Experience results show that the system can realizes two cameras' acquisition and display.

  5. Pet Loss: Implications for Counselors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharkin, Bruce S.; Bahrick, Audrey S.

    1990-01-01

    Attempts to increase awareness of counselors about topic of pet loss. Discusses how counselors can be actively involved through practice, consultation, and research to help people deal with emotional impact of pet loss. (Author/NB)

  6. The ADNI PET Core: 2015

    PubMed Central

    Jagust, William J.; Landau, Susan M.; Koeppe, Robert A.; Reiman, Eric M.; Chen, Kewei; Mathis, Chester A.; Price, Julie C.; Foster, Norman L.; Wang, Angela Y.

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION This paper reviews the work done in the ADNI PET core over the past 5 years, largely concerning techniques, methods, and results related to amyloid imaging in ADNI. METHODS The PET Core has utilized [18F]florbetapir routinely on ADNI participants, with over 1600 scans available for download. Four different laboratories are involved in data analysis, and have examined factors such as longitudinal florbetapir analysis, use of FDG-PET in clinical trials, and relationships between different biomarkers and cognition. RESULTS Converging evidence from the PET Core has indicated that cross-sectional and longitudinal florbetapir analyses require different reference regions. Studies have also examined the relationship between florbetapir data obtained immediately after injection, which reflects perfusion, and FDG-PET results. Finally, standardization has included the translation of florbetapir PET data to a centiloid scale. CONCLUSION The PET Core has demonstrated a variety of methods for standardization of biomarkers such as florbetapir PET in a multicenter setting. PMID:26194311

  7. Streak camera receiver definition study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, C. B.; Hunkler, L. T., Sr.; Letzring, S. A.; Jaanimagi, P.

    1990-01-01

    Detailed streak camera definition studies were made as a first step toward full flight qualification of a dual channel picosecond resolution streak camera receiver for the Geoscience Laser Altimeter and Ranging System (GLRS). The streak camera receiver requirements are discussed as they pertain specifically to the GLRS system, and estimates of the characteristics of the streak camera are given, based upon existing and near-term technological capabilities. Important problem areas are highlighted, and possible corresponding solutions are discussed.

  8. Automated Camera Array Fine Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clouse, Daniel; Padgett, Curtis; Ansar, Adnan; Cheng, Yang

    2008-01-01

    Using aerial imagery, the JPL FineCalibration (JPL FineCal) software automatically tunes a set of existing CAHVOR camera models for an array of cameras. The software finds matching features in the overlap region between images from adjacent cameras, and uses these features to refine the camera models. It is not necessary to take special imagery of a known target and no surveying is required. JPL FineCal was developed for use with an aerial, persistent surveillance platform.

  9. Combustion pinhole camera system

    DOEpatents

    Witte, A.B.

    1984-02-21

    A pinhole camera system is described utilizing a sealed optical-purge assembly which provides optical access into a coal combustor or other energy conversion reactors. The camera system basically consists of a focused-purge pinhole optical port assembly, a conventional TV vidicon receiver, an external, variable density light filter which is coupled electronically to the vidicon automatic gain control (agc). The key component of this system is the focused-purge pinhole optical port assembly which utilizes a purging inert gas to keep debris from entering the port and a lens arrangement which transfers the pinhole to the outside of the port assembly. One additional feature of the port assembly is that it is not flush with the interior of the combustor. 2 figs.

  10. Combustion pinhole camera system

    DOEpatents

    Witte, Arvel B.

    1984-02-21

    A pinhole camera system utilizing a sealed optical-purge assembly which provides optical access into a coal combustor or other energy conversion reactors. The camera system basically consists of a focused-purge pinhole optical port assembly, a conventional TV vidicon receiver, an external, variable density light filter which is coupled electronically to the vidicon automatic gain control (agc). The key component of this system is the focused-purge pinhole optical port assembly which utilizes a purging inert gas to keep debris from entering the port and a lens arrangement which transfers the pinhole to the outside of the port assembly. One additional feature of the port assembly is that it is not flush with the interior of the combustor.

  11. LSST Camera Optics

    SciTech Connect

    Olivier, S S; Seppala, L; Gilmore, K; Hale, L; Whistler, W

    2006-06-05

    The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) is a unique, three-mirror, modified Paul-Baker design with an 8.4m primary, a 3.4m secondary, and a 5.0m tertiary feeding a camera system that includes corrector optics to produce a 3.5 degree field of view with excellent image quality (<0.3 arcsecond 80% encircled diffracted energy) over the entire field from blue to near infra-red wavelengths. We describe the design of the LSST camera optics, consisting of three refractive lenses with diameters of 1.6m, 1.0m and 0.7m, along with a set of interchangeable, broad-band, interference filters with diameters of 0.75m. We also describe current plans for fabricating, coating, mounting and testing these lenses and filters.

  12. NSTX Tangential Divertor Camera

    SciTech Connect

    A.L. Roquemore; Ted Biewer; D. Johnson; S.J. Zweben; Nobuhiro Nishino; V.A. Soukhanovskii

    2004-07-16

    Strong magnetic field shear around the divertor x-point is numerically predicted to lead to strong spatial asymmetries in turbulence driven particle fluxes. To visualize the turbulence and associated impurity line emission near the lower x-point region, a new tangential observation port has been recently installed on NSTX. A reentrant sapphire window with a moveable in-vessel mirror images the divertor region from the center stack out to R 80 cm and views the x-point for most plasma configurations. A coherent fiber optic bundle transmits the image through a remotely selected filter to a fast camera, for example a 40500 frames/sec Photron CCD camera. A gas puffer located in the lower inboard divertor will localize the turbulence in the region near the x-point. Edge fluid and turbulent codes UEDGE and BOUT will be used to interpret impurity and deuterium emission fluctuation measurements in the divertor.

  13. Hemispherical Laue camera

    DOEpatents

    Li, James C. M.; Chu, Sungnee G.

    1980-01-01

    A hemispherical Laue camera comprises a crystal sample mount for positioning a sample to be analyzed at the center of sphere of a hemispherical, X-radiation sensitive film cassette, a collimator, a stationary or rotating sample mount and a set of standard spherical projection spheres. X-radiation generated from an external source is directed through the collimator to impinge onto the single crystal sample on the stationary mount. The diffracted beam is recorded on the hemispherical X-radiation sensitive film mounted inside the hemispherical film cassette in either transmission or back-reflection geometry. The distances travelled by X-radiation diffracted from the crystal to the hemispherical film are the same for all crystal planes which satisfy Bragg's Law. The recorded diffraction spots or Laue spots on the film thereby preserve both the symmetry information of the crystal structure and the relative intensities which are directly related to the relative structure factors of the crystal orientations. The diffraction pattern on the exposed film is compared with the known diffraction pattern on one of the standard spherical projection spheres for a specific crystal structure to determine the orientation of the crystal sample. By replacing the stationary sample support with a rotating sample mount, the hemispherical Laue camera can be used for crystal structure determination in a manner previously provided in conventional Debye-Scherrer cameras.

  14. Gamma ray camera

    DOEpatents

    Perez-Mendez, V.

    1997-01-21

    A gamma ray camera is disclosed for detecting rays emanating from a radiation source such as an isotope. The gamma ray camera includes a sensor array formed of a visible light crystal for converting incident gamma rays to a plurality of corresponding visible light photons, and a photosensor array responsive to the visible light photons in order to form an electronic image of the radiation therefrom. The photosensor array is adapted to record an integrated amount of charge proportional to the incident gamma rays closest to it, and includes a transparent metallic layer, photodiode consisting of a p-i-n structure formed on one side of the transparent metallic layer, and comprising an upper p-type layer, an intermediate layer and a lower n-type layer. In the preferred mode, the scintillator crystal is composed essentially of a cesium iodide (CsI) crystal preferably doped with a predetermined amount impurity, and the p-type upper intermediate layers and said n-type layer are essentially composed of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H). The gamma ray camera further includes a collimator interposed between the radiation source and the sensor array, and a readout circuit formed on one side of the photosensor array. 6 figs.

  15. Gamma ray camera

    DOEpatents

    Perez-Mendez, Victor

    1997-01-01

    A gamma ray camera for detecting rays emanating from a radiation source such as an isotope. The gamma ray camera includes a sensor array formed of a visible light crystal for converting incident gamma rays to a plurality of corresponding visible light photons, and a photosensor array responsive to the visible light photons in order to form an electronic image of the radiation therefrom. The photosensor array is adapted to record an integrated amount of charge proportional to the incident gamma rays closest to it, and includes a transparent metallic layer, photodiode consisting of a p-i-n structure formed on one side of the transparent metallic layer, and comprising an upper p-type layer, an intermediate layer and a lower n-type layer. In the preferred mode, the scintillator crystal is composed essentially of a cesium iodide (CsI) crystal preferably doped with a predetermined amount impurity, and the p-type upper intermediate layers and said n-type layer are essentially composed of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H). The gamma ray camera further includes a collimator interposed between the radiation source and the sensor array, and a readout circuit formed on one side of the photosensor array.

  16. Orbiter Camera Payload System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Components for an orbiting camera payload system (OCPS) include the large format camera (LFC), a gas supply assembly, and ground test, handling, and calibration hardware. The LFC, a high resolution large format photogrammetric camera for use in the cargo bay of the space transport system, is also adaptable to use on an RB-57 aircraft or on a free flyer satellite. Carrying 4000 feet of film, the LFC is usable over the visible to near IR, at V/h rates of from 11 to 41 milliradians per second, overlap of 10, 60, 70 or 80 percent and exposure times of from 4 to 32 milliseconds. With a 12 inch focal length it produces a 9 by 18 inch format (long dimension in line of flight) with full format low contrast resolution of 88 lines per millimeter (AWAR), full format distortion of less than 14 microns and a complement of 45 Reseau marks and 12 fiducial marks. Weight of the OCPS as supplied, fully loaded is 944 pounds and power dissipation is 273 watts average when in operation, 95 watts in standby. The LFC contains an internal exposure sensor, or will respond to external command. It is able to photograph starfields for inflight calibration upon command.

  17. Lightweight, Compact, Long Range Camera Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shafer, Donald V.

    1983-08-01

    The model 700 camera is the latest in a 30-year series of LOROP cameras developed by McDonnell Douglas Astronautics Company (MDAC) and their predecessor companies. The design achieves minimum size and weight and is optimized for low-contrast performance. The optical system includes a 66-inch focal length, f/5.6, apochromatic lens and three folding mirrors imaging on a 4.5-inch square format. A three-axis active stabilization system provides the capability for long exposure time and, hence, fine grain films can be used. The optical path forms a figure "4" behind the lens. In front of the lens is a 45° pointing mirror. This folded configuration contributed greatly to the lightweight and compact design. This sequential autocycle frame camera has three modes of operation with one, two, and three step positions to provide a choice of swath widths within the range of lateral coverage. The magazine/shutter assembly rotates in relationship with the pointing mirror and aircraft drift angle to maintain film format alignment with the flight path. The entire camera is angular rate stabilized in roll, pitch, and yaw. It also employs a lightweight, electro-magnetically damped, low-natural-frequency spring suspension for passive isolation from aircraft vibration inputs. The combined film transport and forward motion compensation (FMC) mechanism, which is operated by a single motor, is contained in a magazine that can, depending on accessibility which is installation dependent, be changed in flight. The design also stresses thermal control, focus control, structural stiffness, and maintainability. The camera is operated from a remote control panel. This paper describes the leading particulars and features of the camera as related to weight and configuration.

  18. Maximizing the Performance of Automated Low Cost All-sky Cameras

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bettonvil, F.

    2011-01-01

    Thanks to the wide spread of digital camera technology in the consumer market, a steady increase in the number of active All-sky camera has be noticed European wide. In this paper I look into the details of such All-sky systems and try to optimize the performance in terms of accuracy of the astrometry, the velocity determination and photometry. Having autonomous operation in mind, suggestions are done for the optimal low cost All-sky camera.

  19. Predictive and prognostic value of FDG-PET

    PubMed Central

    Oyen, Wim J.G.

    2008-01-01

    Abstract The predictive and prognostic value of fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-positron emission tomography (PET) in non-small-cell lung carcinoma, colorectal carcinoma and lymphoma is discussed. The degree of FDG uptake is of prognostic value at initial presentation, after induction treatment prior to resection and in the case of relapse of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In locally advanced and advanced stages of NSCLC, FDG-PET has been shown to be predictive for clinical outcome at an early stage of treatment. In colorectal carcinoma, limited studies are available on the prognostic value of FDG-PET, however, the technique appears to have great potential in monitoring the success of local ablative therapies soon after intervention and in the prediction and evaluation of response to radiotherapy, systemic therapy, and combinations thereof. The prognostic value of end-of treatment FDG-PET for FDG-avid lymphomas has been established, and the next step is to define how to use this information to optimize patient outcome. In Hodgkin's lymphoma, FDG-PET has a high negative predictive value, however, histological confirmation of positive findings should be sought where possible. For non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, the opposite applies. The newly published standardized guidelines for interpretation formulates specific criteria for visual interpretation and for defining PET positivity in the liver, spleen, lung, bone marrow and small residual lesions. The introduction of these guidelines should reduce variability among studies. Interim PET offers a reliable method for early prediction of long-term remission, however it should only be performed in prospective randomized controlled trials. Many of the diagnostic and management questions considered in this review are relevant to other tumour types. Further research in this field is of great importance, since it may lead to a change in the therapeutic concept of cancer. The preliminary findings call for systematic inclusion of FDG-PET

  20. Novel computer-based endoscopic camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabinovitz, R.; Hai, N.; Abraham, Martin D.; Adler, Doron; Nissani, M.; Fridental, Ron; Vitsnudel, Ilia

    1995-05-01

    We have introduced a computer-based endoscopic camera which includes (a) unique real-time digital image processing to optimize image visualization by reducing over exposed glared areas and brightening dark areas, and by accentuating sharpness and fine structures, and (b) patient data documentation and management. The image processing is based on i Sight's iSP1000TM digital video processor chip and Adaptive SensitivityTM patented scheme for capturing and displaying images with wide dynamic range of light, taking into account local neighborhood image conditions and global image statistics. It provides the medical user with the ability to view images under difficult lighting conditions, without losing details `in the dark' or in completely saturated areas. The patient data documentation and management allows storage of images (approximately 1 MB per image for a full 24 bit color image) to any storage device installed into the camera, or to an external host media via network. The patient data which is included with every image described essential information on the patient and procedure. The operator can assign custom data descriptors, and can search for the stored image/data by typing any image descriptor. The camera optics has extended zoom range of f equals 20 - 45 mm allowing control of the diameter of the field which is displayed on the monitor such that the complete field of view of the endoscope can be displayed on all the area of the screen. All these features provide versatile endoscopic camera with excellent image quality and documentation capabilities.

  1. Camera calibration using a genetic algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hui, Nirmal Baran; Pratihar, Dilip Kumar

    2008-12-01

    An autonomous robot will have to detect moving obstacles online before it can plan its collision-free path, while navigating in a dynamic environment. The robot collects information about the environment with the help of a camera and determines the inputs for its motion planner through image analysis. The present article deals with issues related to camera calibration and online image processing. The problem of camera calibration is treated as an optimization problem and solved using a genetic algorithm so as to achieve minimum distorted image plane error. The calibrated vision system is then utilized for the detection and identification of the objects by analysing the images collected at regular intervals. For image processing, five different operations, such as median filtering, thresholding, perimeter estimation, labelling and size filtering, have been carried out. To show the effectiveness of the developed camera-based vision system, inputs of the motion planner of a navigating robot are calculated for two different cases. It is observed that online detection of the shapes and configurations of the obstacles is possible by using the vision system developed.

  2. Optical Design of the LSST Camera

    SciTech Connect

    Olivier, S S; Seppala, L; Gilmore, K

    2008-07-16

    The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) uses a novel, three-mirror, modified Paul-Baker design, with an 8.4-meter primary mirror, a 3.4-m secondary, and a 5.0-m tertiary feeding a camera system that includes a set of broad-band filters and refractive corrector lenses to produce a flat focal plane with a field of view of 9.6 square degrees. Optical design of the camera lenses and filters is integrated with optical design of telescope mirrors to optimize performance, resulting in excellent image quality over the entire field from ultra-violet to near infra-red wavelengths. The LSST camera optics design consists of three refractive lenses with clear aperture diameters of 1.55 m, 1.10 m and 0.69 m and six interchangeable, broad-band, filters with clear aperture diameters of 0.75 m. We describe the methodology for fabricating, coating, mounting and testing these lenses and filters, and we present the results of detailed tolerance analyses, demonstrating that the camera optics will perform to the specifications required to meet their performance goals.

  3. Digital Camera Control for Faster Inspection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Katharine; Siekierski, James D.; Mangieri, Mark L.; Dekome, Kent; Cobarruvias, John; Piplani, Perry J.; Busa, Joel

    2009-01-01

    Digital Camera Control Software (DCCS) is a computer program for controlling a boom and a boom-mounted camera used to inspect the external surface of a space shuttle in orbit around the Earth. Running in a laptop computer in the space-shuttle crew cabin, DCCS commands integrated displays and controls. By means of a simple one-button command, a crewmember can view low- resolution images to quickly spot problem areas and can then cause a rapid transition to high- resolution images. The crewmember can command that camera settings apply to a specific small area of interest within the field of view of the camera so as to maximize image quality within that area. DCCS also provides critical high-resolution images to a ground screening team, which analyzes the images to assess damage (if any); in so doing, DCCS enables the team to clear initially suspect areas more quickly than would otherwise be possible and further saves time by minimizing the probability of re-imaging of areas already inspected. On the basis of experience with a previous version (2.0) of the software, the present version (3.0) incorporates a number of advanced imaging features that optimize crewmember capability and efficiency.

  4. Polarisation-based coincidence event discrimination: an in silico study towards a feasible scheme for Compton-PET.

    PubMed

    Toghyani, M; Gillam, J E; McNamara, A L; Kuncic, Z

    2016-08-01

    Current positron emission tomography (PET) systems use temporally localised coincidence events discriminated by energy and time-of-flight information. The two annihilation photons are in an entangled polarisation state and, in principle, additional information from the polarisation correlation of photon pairs could be used to improve the accuracy of coincidence classification. In a previous study, we demonstrated that in principle, the polarisation correlation information could be transferred to an angular correlation in the distribution of scattered photon pairs in a planar Compton camera system. In the present study, we model a source-phantom-detector system using Geant4 and we develop a coincidence classification scheme that exploits the angular correlation of scattered annihilation quanta to improve the accuracy of coincidence detection. We find a [Formula: see text] image quality improvement in terms of the peak signal-to-noise ratio when scattered coincidence events are discriminated solely by their angular correlation, thus demonstrating the feasibility of this novel classification scheme. By integrating scatter events (both single-single and single-only) with unscattered coincidence events discriminated using conventional methods, our results suggest that Compton-PET may be a promising candidate for optimal emission tomographic imaging. PMID:27405797

  5. Polarisation-based coincidence event discrimination: an in silico study towards a feasible scheme for Compton-PET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toghyani, M.; Gillam, J. E.; McNamara, A. L.; Kuncic, Z.

    2016-08-01

    Current positron emission tomography (PET) systems use temporally localised coincidence events discriminated by energy and time-of-flight information. The two annihilation photons are in an entangled polarisation state and, in principle, additional information from the polarisation correlation of photon pairs could be used to improve the accuracy of coincidence classification. In a previous study, we demonstrated that in principle, the polarisation correlation information could be transferred to an angular correlation in the distribution of scattered photon pairs in a planar Compton camera system. In the present study, we model a source-phantom-detector system using Geant4 and we develop a coincidence classification scheme that exploits the angular correlation of scattered annihilation quanta to improve the accuracy of coincidence detection. We find a 22% image quality improvement in terms of the peak signal-to-noise ratio when scattered coincidence events are discriminated solely by their angular correlation, thus demonstrating the feasibility of this novel classification scheme. By integrating scatter events (both single-single and single-only) with unscattered coincidence events discriminated using conventional methods, our results suggest that Compton-PET may be a promising candidate for optimal emission tomographic imaging.

  6. DEVICE CONTROLLER, CAMERA CONTROL

    1998-07-20

    This is a C++ application that is the server for the cameral control system. Devserv drives serial devices, such as cameras and videoswitchers used in a videoconference, upon request from a client such as the camxfgbfbx ccint program. cc Deverv listens on UPD ports for clients to make network contractions. After a client connects and sends a request to control a device (such as to pan,tilt, or zooma camera or do picture-in-picture with a videoswitcher),more » devserv formats the request into an RS232 message appropriate for the device and sends this message over the serial port to which the device is connected. Devserv then reads the reply from the device from the serial port to which the device is connected. Devserv then reads the reply from the device from the serial port and then formats and sends via multicast a status message. In addition, devserv periodically multicasts status or description messages so that all clients connected to the multicast channel know what devices are supported and their ranges of motion and the current position. The software design employs a class hierarchy such that an abstract base class for devices can be subclassed into classes for various device categories(e.g. sonyevid30, cononvco4, panasonicwjmx50, etc.). which are further subclassed into classes for various device categories. The devices currently supported are the Sony evi-D30, Canon, VCC1, Canon VCC3, and Canon VCC4 cameras and the Panasonic WJ-MX50 videoswitcher. However, developers can extend the class hierarchy to support other devices.« less

  7. Adaptive compressive sensing camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Charles; Hsu, Ming K.; Cha, Jae; Iwamura, Tomo; Landa, Joseph; Nguyen, Charles; Szu, Harold

    2013-05-01

    We have embedded Adaptive Compressive Sensing (ACS) algorithm on Charge-Coupled-Device (CCD) camera based on the simplest concept that each pixel is a charge bucket, and the charges comes from Einstein photoelectric conversion effect. Applying the manufactory design principle, we only allow altering each working component at a minimum one step. We then simulated what would be such a camera can do for real world persistent surveillance taking into account of diurnal, all weather, and seasonal variations. The data storage has saved immensely, and the order of magnitude of saving is inversely proportional to target angular speed. We did design two new components of CCD camera. Due to the matured CMOS (Complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor) technology, the on-chip Sample and Hold (SAH) circuitry can be designed for a dual Photon Detector (PD) analog circuitry for changedetection that predicts skipping or going forward at a sufficient sampling frame rate. For an admitted frame, there is a purely random sparse matrix [Φ] which is implemented at each bucket pixel level the charge transport bias voltage toward its neighborhood buckets or not, and if not, it goes to the ground drainage. Since the snapshot image is not a video, we could not apply the usual MPEG video compression and Hoffman entropy codec as well as powerful WaveNet Wrapper on sensor level. We shall compare (i) Pre-Processing FFT and a threshold of significant Fourier mode components and inverse FFT to check PSNR; (ii) Post-Processing image recovery will be selectively done by CDT&D adaptive version of linear programming at L1 minimization and L2 similarity. For (ii) we need to determine in new frames selection by SAH circuitry (i) the degree of information (d.o.i) K(t) dictates the purely random linear sparse combination of measurement data a la [Φ]M,N M(t) = K(t) Log N(t).

  8. DEVICE CONTROLLER, CAMERA CONTROL

    SciTech Connect

    Perry, Marcia

    1998-07-20

    This is a C++ application that is the server for the cameral control system. Devserv drives serial devices, such as cameras and videoswitchers used in a videoconference, upon request from a client such as the camxfgbfbx ccint program. cc Deverv listens on UPD ports for clients to make network contractions. After a client connects and sends a request to control a device (such as to pan,tilt, or zooma camera or do picture-in-picture with a videoswitcher), devserv formats the request into an RS232 message appropriate for the device and sends this message over the serial port to which the device is connected. Devserv then reads the reply from the device from the serial port to which the device is connected. Devserv then reads the reply from the device from the serial port and then formats and sends via multicast a status message. In addition, devserv periodically multicasts status or description messages so that all clients connected to the multicast channel know what devices are supported and their ranges of motion and the current position. The software design employs a class hierarchy such that an abstract base class for devices can be subclassed into classes for various device categories(e.g. sonyevid30, cononvco4, panasonicwjmx50, etc.). which are further subclassed into classes for various device categories. The devices currently supported are the Sony evi-D30, Canon, VCC1, Canon VCC3, and Canon VCC4 cameras and the Panasonic WJ-MX50 videoswitcher. However, developers can extend the class hierarchy to support other devices.

  9. Pets and the Elderly.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frazier, Billie H.

    This document contains a brief bibliography of peer-reviewed literature, with abstracts, on pets and the elderly. It is one of 12 bibliographies on aging prepared by the National Agricultural Library for its "Pathfinders" series of publications. Topics covered by the other 11 bibliographies include aging parents, adult children, dementia and…

  10. Neutron imaging camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunter, S. D.; de Nolfo, G. A.; Barbier, L. M.; Link, J. T.; Son, S.; Floyd, S. R.; Guardala, N.; Skopec, M.; Stark, B.

    2008-04-01

    The Neutron Imaging Camera (NIC) is based on the Three-dimensional Track Imager (3_DTI) technology developed at GSFC for gamma-ray astrophysics applications. The 3-DTI, a large volume time-projection chamber, provides accurate, ~0.4 mm resolution, 3-D tracking of charged particles. The incident direction of fast neutrons, En > 0.5 MeV, are reconstructed from the momenta and energies of the proton and triton fragments resulting from 3He(n,p)3H interactions in the 3-DTI volume. The performance of the NIC from laboratory is presented.

  11. Neutron Imaging Camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Stanley; deNolfo, G. A.; Barbier, L. M.; Link, J. T.; Son, S.; Floyd, S. R.; Guardala, N.; Skopec, M.; Stark, B.

    2008-01-01

    The Neutron Imaging Camera (NIC) is based on the Three-dimensional Track Imager (3DTI) technology developed at GSFC for gamma-ray astrophysics applications. The 3-DTI, a large volume time-projection chamber, provides accurate, approximately 0.4 mm resolution, 3-D tracking of charged particles. The incident direction of fast neutrons, En > 0.5 MeV, are reconstructed from the momenta and energies of the proton and triton fragments resulting from (sup 3)He(n,p) (sup 3)H interactions in the 3-DTI volume. The performance of the NIC from laboratory and accelerator tests is presented.

  12. MR/PET or PET/MRI: does it matter?

    PubMed

    Beyer, Thomas; Moser, Ewald

    2013-02-01

    After the very successful clinical introduction of combined PET/CT imaging a decade ago, a hardware combination of PET and MR is following suit. Today, three different approaches towards integrated PET/MR have been proposed: (1) a triple-modality system with a 3T MRI and a time-of-flight PET/CT installed in adjacent rooms, (2) a tandem system with a 3T MRI and a time-of-flight PET/CT in a co-planar installation with a joint patient handling system, and (3) a fully-integrated system with a whole-body PET system mounted inside a 3T MRI system. This special issue of MAGMA brings together contributions from key experts in the field of PET/MR, PET/CT and CT. The various papers share the author's perspectives on the state-of-the-art PET/MR imaging with any of the three approaches mentioned above. In addition to several reviews discussing advantages and challenges of combining PET and MRI for clinical diagnostics, first clinical data are also presented. We expect this special issue to nurture future improvements in hardware, clinical protocols, and efficient post-processing strategies to further assess the diagnostic value of combined PET/MR imaging. It remains to be seen whether a so-called "killer application" for PET/MRI will surface. In that case PET/MR is likely to excel in pre-clinical and selected research applications for now. This special issue helps the readers to stay on track of this exciting development. PMID:23385880

  13. Mars Science Laboratory Engineering Cameras

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maki, Justin N.; Thiessen, David L.; Pourangi, Ali M.; Kobzeff, Peter A.; Lee, Steven W.; Dingizian, Arsham; Schwochert, Mark A.

    2012-01-01

    NASA's Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Rover, which launched to Mars in 2011, is equipped with a set of 12 engineering cameras. These cameras are build-to-print copies of the Mars Exploration Rover (MER) cameras, which were sent to Mars in 2003. The engineering cameras weigh less than 300 grams each and use less than 3 W of power. Images returned from the engineering cameras are used to navigate the rover on the Martian surface, deploy the rover robotic arm, and ingest samples into the rover sample processing system. The navigation cameras (Navcams) are mounted to a pan/tilt mast and have a 45-degree square field of view (FOV) with a pixel scale of 0.82 mrad/pixel. The hazard avoidance cameras (Haz - cams) are body-mounted to the rover chassis in the front and rear of the vehicle and have a 124-degree square FOV with a pixel scale of 2.1 mrad/pixel. All of the cameras utilize a frame-transfer CCD (charge-coupled device) with a 1024x1024 imaging region and red/near IR bandpass filters centered at 650 nm. The MSL engineering cameras are grouped into two sets of six: one set of cameras is connected to rover computer A and the other set is connected to rover computer B. The MSL rover carries 8 Hazcams and 4 Navcams.

  14. HONEY -- The Honeywell Camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clayton, C. A.; Wilkins, T. N.

    The Honeywell model 3000 colour graphic recorder system (hereafter referred to simply as Honeywell) has been bought by Starlink for producing publishable quality photographic hardcopy from the IKON image displays. Full colour and black & white images can be recorded on positive or negative 35mm film. The Honeywell consists of a built-in high resolution flat-faced monochrome video monitor, a red/green/blue colour filter mechanism and a 35mm camera. The device works on the direct video signals from the IKON. This means that changing the brightness or contrast on the IKON monitor will not affect any photographs that you take. The video signals from the IKON consist of separate red, green and blue signals. When you take a picture, the Honeywell takes the red, green and blue signals in turn and displays three pictures consecutively on its internal monitor. It takes an exposure through each of three filters (red, green and blue) onto the film in the camera. This builds up the complete colour picture on the film. Honeywell systems are installed at nine Starlink sites, namely Belfast (locally funded), Birmingham, Cambridge, Durham, Leicester, Manchester, Rutherford, ROE and UCL.

  15. WFOV star tracker camera

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, I.T. ); Ledebuhr, A.G.; Axelrod, T.S.; Kordas, J.F.; Hills, R.F. )

    1991-04-01

    A prototype wide-field-of-view (WFOV) star tracker camera has been fabricated and tested for use in spacecraft navigation. The most unique feature of this device is its 28{degrees} {times} 44{degrees} FOV, which views a large enough sector of the sky to ensure the existence of at least 5 stars of m{sub v} = 4.5 or brighter in all viewing directions. The WFOV requirement and the need to maximize both collection aperture (F/1.28) and spectral input band (0.4 to 1.1 {mu}m) to meet the light gathering needs for the dimmest star have dictated the use of a novel concentric optical design, which employs a fiber optic faceplate field flattener. The main advantage of the WFOV configuration is the smaller star map required for position processing, which results in less processing power and faster matching. Additionally, a size and mass benefit is seen with a larger FOV/smaller effective focal length (efl) sensor. Prototype hardware versions have included both image intensified and un-intensified CCD cameras. Integration times of {le} 50 msec have been demonstrated with both the intensified and un-intensified versions. 3 refs., 16 figs.

  16. NFC - Narrow Field Camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koukal, J.; Srba, J.; Gorková, S.

    2015-01-01

    We have been introducing a low-cost CCTV video system for faint meteor monitoring and here we describe the first results from 5 months of two-station operations. Our system called NFC (Narrow Field Camera) with a meteor limiting magnitude around +6.5mag allows research on trajectories of less massive meteoroids within individual parent meteor showers and the sporadic background. At present 4 stations (2 pairs with coordinated fields of view) of NFC system are operated in the frame of CEMeNt (Central European Meteor Network). The heart of each NFC station is a sensitive CCTV camera Watec 902 H2 and a fast cinematographic lens Meopta Meostigmat 1/50 - 52.5 mm (50 mm focal length and fixed aperture f/1.0). In this paper we present the first results based on 1595 individual meteors, 368 of which were recorded from two stations simultaneously. This data set allows the first empirical verification of theoretical assumptions for NFC system capabilities (stellar and meteor magnitude limit, meteor apparent brightness distribution and accuracy of single station measurements) and the first low mass meteoroid trajectory calculations. Our experimental data clearly showed the capabilities of the proposed system for low mass meteor registration and for calculations based on NFC data to lead to a significant refinement in the orbital elements for low mass meteoroids.

  17. MEMS digital camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutierrez, R. C.; Tang, T. K.; Calvet, R.; Fossum, E. R.

    2007-02-01

    MEMS technology uses photolithography and etching of silicon wafers to enable mechanical structures with less than 1 μm tolerance, important for the miniaturization of imaging systems. In this paper, we present the first silicon MEMS digital auto-focus camera for use in cell phones with a focus range of 10 cm to infinity. At the heart of the new silicon MEMS digital camera, a simple and low-cost electromagnetic actuator impels a silicon MEMS motion control stage on which a lens is mounted. The silicon stage ensures precise alignment of the lens with respect to the imager, and enables precision motion of the lens over a range of 300 μm with < 5 μm hysteresis and < 2 μm repeatability. Settling time is < 15 ms for 200 μm step, and < 5ms for 20 μm step enabling AF within 0.36 sec at 30 fps. The precise motion allows COTS optics to maintain MTF > 0.8 at 20 cy/mm up to 80% field over the full range of motion. Accelerated lifetime testing has shown that the alignment and precision of motion is maintained after 8,000 g shocks, thermal cycling from - 40 C to 85 C, and operation over 20 million cycles.

  18. Stereoscopic camera design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montgomery, David J.; Jones, Christopher K.; Stewart, James N.; Smith, Alan

    2002-05-01

    It is clear from the literature that the majority of work in stereoscopic imaging is directed towards the development of modern stereoscopic displays. As costs come down, wider public interest in this technology is expected to increase. This new technology would require new methods of image formation. Advances in stereo computer graphics will of course lead to the creation of new stereo computer games, graphics in films etc. However, the consumer would also like to see real-world stereoscopic images, pictures of family, holiday snaps etc. Such scenery would have wide ranges of depth to accommodate and would need also to cope with moving objects, such as cars, and in particular other people. Thus, the consumer acceptance of auto/stereoscopic displays and 3D in general would be greatly enhanced by the existence of a quality stereoscopic camera. This paper will cover an analysis of existing stereoscopic camera designs and show that they can be categorized into four different types, with inherent advantages and disadvantages. A recommendation is then made with regard to 3D consumer still and video photography. The paper will go on to discuss this recommendation and describe its advantages and how it can be realized in practice.

  19. The YAP camera: An accurate gamma camera particularly suitable for new radiopharmaceuticals research

    SciTech Connect

    Vittori, F.; Notaristefani, F. de; Malatesta, T.

    1997-02-01

    The YAP Camera represents a refined research instrument in nuclear medicine and pharmacology because of its overall detection efficiency comparable to an Anger Camera and its submillimeter intrinsic spatial resolution. The YAP Camera consists of a YAP : Ce multicrystal matrix, whose pillars dimensions are 0.6 mm x 0.6 mm x 10 mm, optically coupled with a position sensitive PMT Hamamatsu R2486 and furnished with a parallel hole lead collimator 20 mm thick with holes diameter of 0.5 mm and septa of 0.15 mm. At this stage it is a miniature camera, with a field of view (FOV) of 40 mm x 40 mm and a total spatial resolution of 1.0--1.2 mm, currently used for radiotracers studies on small biological specimens. A detailed analysis of the detector position linearity and energy responses are presented in this work. The intrinsic spatial resolution is studied with three different single hole collimators (1.0, 0.3, and 0.2 mm), and a theoretical equation is presented. Three different parallel hole collimators are tested to evaluate the optimal hole and septa dimensions. Finally, it is demonstrated that two correction procedures are capable of recovering the image spatial homogeneity and of removing the statistical noise. Some phantom images show the importance of the small-field YAP Camera in the radiopharmacological research.

  20. 24 CFR 960.707 - Pet ownership.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Pet ownership. 960.707 Section 960... ADMISSION TO, AND OCCUPANCY OF, PUBLIC HOUSING Pet Ownership in Public Housing § 960.707 Pet ownership. (a..., may own one or more common household pets or have one or more common household pets present in...

  1. 24 CFR 960.707 - Pet ownership.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Pet ownership. 960.707 Section 960... ADMISSION TO, AND OCCUPANCY OF, PUBLIC HOUSING Pet Ownership in Public Housing § 960.707 Pet ownership. (a..., may own one or more common household pets or have one or more common household pets present in...

  2. Talking with Children about Furry Classroom Pets.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Child Care, 1994

    1994-01-01

    Notes that rodents and rabbits share many characteristics that make them suitable classroom pets and gives background information on rabbits, guinea pigs, hamsters, and gerbils. Offers advice on buying a classroom pet, the pet's home, feeding, helping the children handle the pet, and pet health and family planning. (TJQ)

  3. [The PET, Past and Future].

    PubMed

    Fujii, Hirofumi

    2015-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a unique nuclear medicine test using positron emitters such as 18F and 11C. In PET tests, various kinds of functional aspects of human bodies can be evaluated by using compounds labeled by these positron emitters. Recently, combined scanners of PET and anatomical imaging modalities such as CT and MRI have been developed and functional information with anatomical location can be easily obtained, increasing the usefulness of PET tests. PET tests are now essential imaging tools to diagnose various kinds of disease with functional abnormalities. In the field of oncology, 18F-fluorodeoxy glucose PET tests are routinely used in clinical practice under health insurance. In the field of neurology, PET tests are actively used to investigate cerebral function by labeled neurotransmitters and so on. Currently, brain PET tests to detect beta-amyloid are applied to the diagnosis of dementia. In the field of cardiology, cardiac perfusion and myocardial metabolism are quantitatively measured by using PET and obtained results have successfully revealed the pathogenesis of intractable cardiac diseases. Future technical advances will enhance the usefulness of PET tests more and more. PMID:26753390

  4. Cloud Computing with Context Cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pickles, A. J.; Rosing, W. E.

    2016-05-01

    We summarize methods and plans to monitor and calibrate photometric observations with our autonomous, robotic network of 2m, 1m and 40cm telescopes. These are sited globally to optimize our ability to observe time-variable sources. Wide field "context" cameras are aligned with our network telescopes and cycle every ˜2 minutes through BVr'i'z' filters, spanning our optical range. We measure instantaneous zero-point offsets and transparency (throughput) against calibrators in the 5-12m range from the all-sky Tycho2 catalog, and periodically against primary standards. Similar measurements are made for all our science images, with typical fields of view of ˜0.5 degrees. These are matched against Landolt, Stetson and Sloan standards, and against calibrators in the 10-17m range from the all-sky APASS catalog. Such measurements provide pretty good instantaneous flux calibration, often to better than 5%, even in cloudy conditions. Zero-point and transparency measurements can be used to characterize, monitor and inter-compare sites and equipment. When accurate calibrations of Target against Standard fields are required, monitoring measurements can be used to select truly photometric periods when accurate calibrations can be automatically scheduled and performed.

  5. FDG-PET Contributions to the Pathophysiology of Memory Impairment.

    PubMed

    Segobin, Shailendra; La Joie, Renaud; Ritz, Ludivine; Beaunieux, Hélène; Desgranges, Béatrice; Chételat, Gaël; Pitel, Anne Lise; Eustache, Francis

    2015-09-01

    Measurement of synaptic activity by Positron Emission Tomography (PET) and its relation to cognitive functions such as episodic memory, working memory and executive functions in healthy humans and patients with neurocognitive disorders have been well documented. In this review, we introduce the concept of PET imaging that allows the observation of a particular biological process in vivo through the use of radio-labelled compounds, its general use to the medical world and its contributions to the understanding of memory systems. We then focus on [(18)F]-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG-PET), the radiotracer that is used to measure local cerebral metabolic rate of glucose that is indicative of synaptic activity in the brain. FDG-PET at rest has been at the forefront of functional neuroimaging over the past 3 decades, contributing to the understanding of cognitive functions in healthy humans and how these functional patterns change with cognitive alterations. We discuss methodological considerations that are important for optimizing FDG-PET imaging data prior to analysis. We then highlight the contribution of FDG-PET to the understanding of the patterns of functional differences in non-degenerative pathologies, normal ageing, and age-related neurodegenerative disorders. Through reasonable temporal and spatial resolution, its ability to measure synaptic activity in the whole brain, independently of any specific network and disease, makes it ideal to observe regional functional changes associated with memory impairment. PMID:26319237

  6. FDG-PET Contributions to the Pathophysiology of Memory Impairment.

    PubMed

    Segobin, Shailendra; La Joie, Renaud; Ritz, Ludivine; Beaunieux, Hélène; Desgranges, Béatrice; Chételat, Gaël; Pitel, Anne Lise; Eustache, Francis

    2015-09-01

    Measurement of synaptic activity by Positron Emission Tomography (PET) and its relation to cognitive functions such as episodic memory, working memory and executive functions in healthy humans and patients with neurocognitive disorders have been well documented. In this review, we introduce the concept of PET imaging that allows the observation of a particular biological process in vivo through the use of radio-labelled compounds, its general use to the medical world and its contributions to the understanding of memory systems. We then focus on [(18)F]-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG-PET), the radiotracer that is used to measure local cerebral metabolic rate of glucose that is indicative of synaptic activity in the brain. FDG-PET at rest has been at the forefront of functional neuroimaging over the past 3 decades, contributing to the understanding of cognitive functions in healthy humans and how these functional patterns change with cognitive alterations. We discuss methodological considerations that are important for optimizing FDG-PET imaging data prior to analysis. We then highlight the contribution of FDG-PET to the understanding of the patterns of functional differences in non-degenerative pathologies, normal ageing, and age-related neurodegenerative disorders. Through reasonable temporal and spatial resolution, its ability to measure synaptic activity in the whole brain, independently of any specific network and disease, makes it ideal to observe regional functional changes associated with memory impairment.

  7. Simulation for CZT Compton PET (Maximization of the efficiency for PET using Compton event)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Changyeon; Lee, Wonho; Lee, Taewoong

    2011-10-01

    utilized. On the other hand, since the angular resolution is strongly dependent on the pixelization effect, a finer pixel size and proper distance between the 1st and 2nd interaction position were needed to optimize the performance of CZT Compton PET. The total number of effective events detected by CZT Compton PET was 2.75 times higher than that by the same system using the photoelectric effect only.

  8. Neutron Imaging Camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Stanley D.; DeNolfo, Georgia; Floyd, Sam; Krizmanic, John; Link, Jason; Son, Seunghee; Guardala, Noel; Skopec, Marlene; Stark, Robert

    2008-01-01

    We describe the Neutron Imaging Camera (NIC) being developed for DTRA applications by NASA/GSFC and NSWC/Carderock. The NIC is based on the Three-dimensional Track Imager (3-DTI) technology developed at GSFC for gamma-ray astrophysics applications. The 3-DTI, a large volume time-projection chamber, provides accurate, approximately 0.4 mm resolution. 3-D tracking of charged particles. The incident direction of fast neutrons, E(sub N) > 0.5 MeV. arc reconstructed from the momenta and energies of the proton and triton fragments resulting from 3He(n,p)3H interactions in the 3-DTI volume. We present angular and energy resolution performance of the NIC derived from accelerator tests.

  9. A Motionless Camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Omniview, a motionless, noiseless, exceptionally versatile camera was developed for NASA as a receiving device for guiding space robots. The system can see in one direction and provide as many as four views simultaneously. Developed by Omniview, Inc. (formerly TRI) under a NASA Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) grant, the system's image transformation electronics produce a real-time image from anywhere within a hemispherical field. Lens distortion is removed, and a corrected "flat" view appears on a monitor. Key elements are a high resolution charge coupled device (CCD), image correction circuitry and a microcomputer for image processing. The system can be adapted to existing installations. Applications include security and surveillance, teleconferencing, imaging, virtual reality, broadcast video and military operations. Omniview technology is now called IPIX. The company was founded in 1986 as TeleRobotics International, became Omniview in 1995, and changed its name to Interactive Pictures Corporation in 1997.

  10. Newer PET application with an old tracer: role of 18F-NaF skeletal PET/CT in oncologic practice.

    PubMed

    Bastawrous, Sarah; Bhargava, Puneet; Behnia, Fatemeh; Djang, David S W; Haseley, David R

    2014-01-01

    The skeleton is one of the most common sites for metastatic disease, particularly from breast and prostate cancer. Bone metastases are associated with considerable morbidity, and accurate imaging of the skeleton is important in determining the appropriate therapeutic plan. Sodium fluoride labeled with fluorine 18 (sodium fluoride F 18 [(18)F-NaF]) is a positron-emitting radiopharmaceutical first introduced several decades ago for skeletal imaging. (18)F-NaF was approved for clinical use as a positron emission tomographic (PET) agent by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration in 1972. The early use of this agent was limited, given the difficulties of imaging its high-energy photons on the available gamma cameras. For skeletal imaging, it was eventually replaced by technetium 99m ((99m)Tc)-labeled agents because of the technical limitations of (18)F-NaF. During the past several years, the widespread availability and implementation of hybrid PET and computed tomographic (CT) dual-modality systems (PET/CT) have encouraged a renewed interest in (18)F-NaF PET/CT for routine clinical use in bone imaging. Because current PET/CT systems offer high sensitivity and spatial resolution, the use of (18)F-NaF has been reevaluated for the detection of malignant and nonmalignant osseous disease. Growing evidence suggests that (18)F-NaF PET/CT provides increased sensitivity and specificity in the detection of bone metastases. Furthermore, the favorable pharmacokinetics of (18)F-NaF, combined with the superior imaging characteristics of PET/CT, supports the routine clinical use of (18)F-NaF PET/CT for oncologic imaging for skeletal metastases. In this article, a review of the indications, imaging appearances, and utility of (18)F-NaF PET/CT in the evaluation of skeletal disease is provided, with an emphasis on oncologic imaging.

  11. Progress reported in PET recycling

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-06-01

    The Goodyear Polyester Division has demonstrated its ability to break down polyethylene terephthalate (PET) from recycled plastic soft drink bottles and remanufacture the material into PET suitable for containers. Most people are familiar with PET in the form of lightweight, shatter resistant beverage bottles. About 20 percent of these beverage containers currently are being recycled. The recycled PET is currently used in many applications such as carpeting, pillow stuffing, sleeping bag filling, insulation for water heaters and non-food containers. This is the first step of Goodyear's increased efforts to recycle PET from containers into a material suitable for food packing. The project is extremely complex, involving sophisticated understanding of the chemical reactions involved, PET production and the technology testing protocols necessary to design a process that addresses all the technical, safety, and regulatory concerns. The research conducted so far indicated that additional processing beyond simply cleaning the shredded material, called flake, will be required to assure a quality polymer.

  12. Ingredients: where pet food starts.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Angele

    2008-08-01

    Every clinician is asked "What should I feed my pet?" Understanding the ingredients in pet food is an important part of making the best recommendation. Pet food can be as simple as one ingredient or as complicated as containing more than 60 ingredients. Pet food and its ingredients are regulated by the Food and Drug Administration and state feed officials. Part of that regulation is the review and definition of ingredients. Existing ingredients change and new ingredients become available so the need for ingredient definitions grows. Ingredients for product formulations are chosen based on their nutrient content, digestibility, palatability, functionality, availability, and cost. As an example, a typical, nutritionally complete dry dog food with 42 ingredients is examined and the ingredients are discussed here. Safe, healthy pet food starts with safe ingredients sourced from well-monitored suppliers. The ultimate goal of both veterinarians and pet food manufacturers is the same--long healthy lives for dogs and cats.

  13. PET/CT scanners: a hardware approach to image fusion.

    PubMed

    Townsend, David W; Beyer, Thomas; Blodgett, Todd M

    2003-07-01

    New technology that combines positron tomography with x-ray computed tomography (PET/CT) is available from all major vendors of PET imaging equipment: CTI, Siemens, GE, Philips. Although not all vendors have made the same design choices as those described in this review all have in common that their high performance design places a commercial CT scanner in tandem with a commercial PET scanner. The level of physical integration is actually less than that of the original prototype design where the CT and PET components were mounted on the same rotating support. There will undoubtedly be a demand for PET/CT technology with a greater level of integration, and at a reduced cost. This may be achieved through the design of a scanner specifically for combined anatomical and functional imaging, rather than a design combining separate CT and PET scanners, as in the current approaches. By avoiding the duplication of data acquisition and image reconstruction functions, for example, a more integrated design should also allow cost savings over current commercial PET/CT scanners. The goal is then to design and build a device specifically for imaging the function and anatomy of cancer in the most optimal and effective way, without conceptualizing it as combined PET and CT. The development of devices specifically for imaging a particular disease (eg, cancer) differs from the conventional approach of, for example, an all-purpose anatomical imaging device such as a CT scanner. This new concept targets more of a disease management approach rather than the usual division into the medical specialties of radiology (anatomical imaging) and nuclear medicine (functional imaging). PMID:12931321

  14. Camera Calibration for Uav Application Using Sensor of Mobile Camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Y.; Chikatsu, H.

    2015-05-01

    Recently, 3D measurements using small unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) have increased in Japan, because small type UAVs is easily available at low cost and the analysis software can be created the easily 3D models. However, small type UAVs have a problem: they have very short flight times and a small payload. In particular, as the payload of a small type UAV increases, its flight time decreases. Therefore, it is advantageous to use lightweight sensors in small type UAVs. A mobile camera is lightweight and has many sensors such as an accelerometer, a magnetic field, and a gyroscope. Moreover, these sensors can be used simultaneously. Therefore, the authors think that the problems of small UAVs can be solved using the mobile camera. The authors executed camera calibration using a test target for evaluating sensor values measured using a mobile camera. Consequently, the authors confirmed the same accuracy with normal camera calibration.

  15. Client services for geriatric pets.

    PubMed

    Hancock, G; Yates, J

    1989-01-01

    Some veterinarians have been reluctant to discuss the prospect of the death of a pet because of a sense of discomfort and a lack of understanding about how to respond to the client's grief reaction. It is essential to take the time for this important communication and help clients deal with fears about the process, any feelings of guilt and helplessness, and judgments about the medical aspects of a case. Clients must be encouraged to express grief over the loss of a pet, particularly a geriatric pet that has lived with them many years and to which they are deeply bonded. Veterinarians need to counsel clients about obtaining additional pets or another pet. The phrase "replacement pet" must be stricken from the veterinarian's vocabulary. One does not "replace" a deceased spouse, mother, father, or child. It is possible to have another child or find another spouse, but it is not possible to replace a person. Neither can a pet be "replaced," because each pet is a unique living being. It is disrespectful to the memory of deceased pets to belittle their uniqueness by suggesting that they can be replaced. Instead, the veterinarian has the capability and responsibility to help pet owners maintain fond and happy memories of an irreplacable pet, while finding room in their hearts for another new pet to create happiness for the future. Once the grief is resolved, clients will be thankful for having had the privilege of sharing their life with an animal and experiencing the joy of the bond between two unique individuals. PMID:2646816

  16. Client services for geriatric pets.

    PubMed

    Hancock, G; Yates, J

    1989-01-01

    Some veterinarians have been reluctant to discuss the prospect of the death of a pet because of a sense of discomfort and a lack of understanding about how to respond to the client's grief reaction. It is essential to take the time for this important communication and help clients deal with fears about the process, any feelings of guilt and helplessness, and judgments about the medical aspects of a case. Clients must be encouraged to express grief over the loss of a pet, particularly a geriatric pet that has lived with them many years and to which they are deeply bonded. Veterinarians need to counsel clients about obtaining additional pets or another pet. The phrase "replacement pet" must be stricken from the veterinarian's vocabulary. One does not "replace" a deceased spouse, mother, father, or child. It is possible to have another child or find another spouse, but it is not possible to replace a person. Neither can a pet be "replaced," because each pet is a unique living being. It is disrespectful to the memory of deceased pets to belittle their uniqueness by suggesting that they can be replaced. Instead, the veterinarian has the capability and responsibility to help pet owners maintain fond and happy memories of an irreplacable pet, while finding room in their hearts for another new pet to create happiness for the future. Once the grief is resolved, clients will be thankful for having had the privilege of sharing their life with an animal and experiencing the joy of the bond between two unique individuals.

  17. Multimodality tomographic scintimammography with PET, PECI, and SPECT: initial evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krol, Andrzej; Feiglin, David H.; Thomas, Frank D.; Hellwig, Bradford J.; Gagne, George M.

    2002-04-01

    We compared tomographic scintimammography performed using single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), positron emission coincidence imaging (PECI) and positron emission tomography (PET). A female thorax phantom was used. Activities of the myocardium, thorax and breasts were adjusted to emulate the count rate observed with patients. Hollow plastic spheres, imitating hot lesions (1.5-20ml), filled with radioactive saline were inserted in the center of each breast. Specific activities of internal organs were adjusted to emulate the count rate observed with patients. SPECT data were acquired with Tc-99m using gamma cameras with NaI(Tl) detectors. A modified FBP (CODE) reconstruction algorithm was used to render SPECT tomographic images. PECI (Siemens E.CAM with NaI(Tl)) and PET (GE Advance with BGO) data were acquired using F-18 FDG. Vendor supplied reconstruction algorithms were used. The reconstructed hot lesions contrast and resolution were investigated. Image quality obtained can be ranked as follows: (1) PET(BGO), (2) PECI(NaI), (3) SPECT(NaI) In conclusion, assuming comparable uptake values of Tc-99m-sestamibi and F-18 FDG, PET seems to be a superior methodology in visualization of breast lesion as compared to SPECT and PECI. All these tomographic methods appear to be promising adjunct to x-ray mammography in difficult to interpret cases.

  18. Evaluation of a video-based head motion tracking system for dedicated brain PET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anishchenko, S.; Beylin, D.; Stepanov, P.; Stepanov, A.; Weinberg, I. N.; Schaeffer, S.; Zavarzin, V.; Shaposhnikov, D.; Smith, M. F.

    2015-03-01

    Unintentional head motion during Positron Emission Tomography (PET) data acquisition can degrade PET image quality and lead to artifacts. Poor patient compliance, head tremor, and coughing are examples of movement sources. Head motion due to patient non-compliance can be an issue with the rise of amyloid brain PET in dementia patients. To preserve PET image resolution and quantitative accuracy, head motion can be tracked and corrected in the image reconstruction algorithm. While fiducial markers can be used, a contactless approach is preferable. A video-based head motion tracking system for a dedicated portable brain PET scanner was developed. Four wide-angle cameras organized in two stereo pairs are used for capturing video of the patient's head during the PET data acquisition. Facial points are automatically tracked and used to determine the six degree of freedom head pose as a function of time. The presented work evaluated the newly designed tracking system using a head phantom and a moving American College of Radiology (ACR) phantom. The mean video-tracking error was 0.99±0.90 mm relative to the magnetic tracking device used as ground truth. Qualitative evaluation with the ACR phantom shows the advantage of the motion tracking application. The developed system is able to perform tracking with accuracy close to millimeter and can help to preserve resolution of brain PET images in presence of movements.

  19. Extended suicide with a pet.

    PubMed

    Cooke, Brian K

    2013-01-01

    The combination of the killing of a pet and a suicide is a perplexing scenario that is largely unexplored in the literature. Many forensic psychiatrists and psychologists may be unaccustomed to considering the significance of the killing of a pet. The subject is important, however, because many people regard their pets as members of their family. A case is presented of a woman who killed her pet dog and herself by carbon monoxide poisoning. The purpose of this article is to provide an initial exploration of the topic of extended suicide with a pet. Forensic mental health evaluations may have a role in understanding the etiology of this event and in opining as to the culpability of individuals who attempt to or successfully kill a pet and then commit suicide. Because the scientific literature is lacking, there is a need to understand this act from a variety of perspectives. First, a social and anthropological perspective will be presented that summarizes the history of the practice of killing of one's pet, with a focus on the ancient Egyptians. A clinical context will examine what relationship animals have to mental illness. A vast body of existing scientific data showing the relevance of human attachment to pets suggests that conclusions from the phenomena of homicide-suicide and filicide-suicide are applicable to extended suicide with a pet. Finally, recommendations will be proposed for both clinical and forensic psychiatrists faced with similar cases. PMID:24051598

  20. FDG PET imaging in sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Sobic-Saranovic, Dragana; Artiko, Vera; Obradovic, Vladimir

    2013-11-01

    The objective of this review is to highlight the clinical utility of FDG-PET/CT for evaluation of patients with chronic sarcoidosis. The emphasis was on the potential advantages and disadvantages of this technique in these patients based on which recommendations were made. The advantage of FDG-PET/CT technique is that it can visualize FDG accumulation in activated inflammatory cells and simultaneously provide PET and CT images. Of particular interest is the use of FDG-PET/CT for the staging and identification of occult sites and sites suitable for biopsy and for the assessment of inflammatory active sarcoidosis in patients with prolonged symptoms, especially when other markers of the disease are within normal values. FDG-PET/CT also provides a better visualization of extrathoracic sites of active sarcoidosis, such as in the bones, liver, spleen, and retroperitoneal lymph nodes. The use of FDG-PET/CT is of special interest in cardiac sarcoidosis because this potentially life-threatening disease is sometimes present in asymptomatic patients. FDG-PET/CT also has a role in the clinical management of patients with chronic persistent sarcoidosis, such as for planning treatment, monitoring response, and long-term follow-up. The limitations of FDG-PET/CT in patients with sarcoidosis are discussed in the context of a "sarcoidosis-lymphoma syndrome" and potentially excessive radiation exposure. Further prospective multicentre studies are needed to refine the clinical applications of FDG-PET/CT in patients with sarcoidosis and drive the field forward.

  1. Whole blood glucose analysis based on smartphone camera module.

    PubMed

    Devadhasan, Jasmine Pramila; Oh, Hyunhee; Choi, Cheol Soo; Kim, Sanghyo

    2015-11-01

    Complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) image sensors have received great attention for their high efficiency in biological applications. The present work describes a CMOS image sensor-based whole blood glucose monitoring system through a point-of-care (POC) approach. A simple poly-ethylene terephthalate (PET) chip was developed to carry out the enzyme kinetic reaction at various concentrations (110–586 mg∕dL) of mouse blood glucose. In this technique, assay reagent is immobilized onto amine functionalized silica (AFSiO2) nanoparticles as an electrostatic attraction in order to achieve glucose oxidation on the chip. The assay reagent immobilized AFSiO2 nanoparticles develop a semi-transparent reaction platform, which is technically a suitable chip to analyze by a camera module. The oxidized glucose then produces a green color according to the glucose concentration and is analyzed by the camera module as a photon detection technique; the photon number decreases when the glucose concentration increases. The combination of these components, the CMOS image sensor and enzyme immobilized PET film chip, constitute a compact, accurate, inexpensive, precise, digital, highly sensitive, specific, and optical glucose-sensing approach for POC diagnosis. PMID:26524683

  2. Whole blood glucose analysis based on smartphone camera module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devadhasan, Jasmine Pramila; Oh, Hyunhee; Choi, Cheol Soo; Kim, Sanghyo

    2015-11-01

    Complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) image sensors have received great attention for their high efficiency in biological applications. The present work describes a CMOS image sensor-based whole blood glucose monitoring system through a point-of-care (POC) approach. A simple poly-ethylene terephthalate (PET) chip was developed to carry out the enzyme kinetic reaction at various concentrations (110-586 mg/dL) of mouse blood glucose. In this technique, assay reagent is immobilized onto amine functionalized silica (AFSiO2) nanoparticles as an electrostatic attraction in order to achieve glucose oxidation on the chip. The assay reagent immobilized AFSiO2 nanoparticles develop a semi-transparent reaction platform, which is technically a suitable chip to analyze by a camera module. The oxidized glucose then produces a green color according to the glucose concentration and is analyzed by the camera module as a photon detection technique; the photon number decreases when the glucose concentration increases. The combination of these components, the CMOS image sensor and enzyme immobilized PET film chip, constitute a compact, accurate, inexpensive, precise, digital, highly sensitive, specific, and optical glucose-sensing approach for POC diagnosis.

  3. A generalized reconstruction framework for unconventional PET systems

    PubMed Central

    Mathews, Aswin John; Li, Ke; Komarov, Sergey; Wang, Qiang; Ravindranath, Bosky; O’Sullivan, Joseph A.; Tai, Yuan-Chuan

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Quantitative estimation of the radionuclide activity concentration in positron emission tomography (PET) requires precise modeling of PET physics. The authors are focused on designing unconventional PET geometries for specific applications. This work reports the creation of a generalized reconstruction framework, capable of reconstructing tomographic PET data for systems that use right cuboidal detector elements positioned at arbitrary geometry using a regular Cartesian grid of image voxels. Methods: The authors report on a variety of design choices and optimization for the creation of the generalized framework. The image reconstruction algorithm is maximum likelihood-expectation–maximization. System geometry can be specified using a simple script. Given the geometry, a symmetry seeking algorithm finds existing symmetry in the geometry with respect to the image grid to improve the memory usage/speed. Normalization is approached from a geometry independent perspective. The system matrix is computed using the Siddon’s algorithm and subcrystal approach. The program is parallelized through open multiprocessing and message passing interface libraries. A wide variety of systems can be modeled using the framework. This is made possible by modeling the underlying physics and data correction, while generalizing the geometry dependent features. Results: Application of the framework for three novel PET systems, each designed for a specific application, is presented to demonstrate the robustness of the framework in modeling PET systems of unconventional geometry. Three PET systems of unconventional geometry are studied. (1) Virtual-pinhole half-ring insert integrated into Biograph-40: although the insert device improves image quality over conventional whole-body scanner, the image quality varies depending on the position of the insert and the object. (2) Virtual-pinhole flat-panel insert integrated into Biograph-40: preliminary results from an investigation into a

  4. Molecular imaging using PET for breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Kurihara, Hiroaki; Shimizu, Chikako; Miyakita, Yasuji; Yoshida, Masayuki; Hamada, Akinobu; Kanayama, Yousuke; Yonemori, Kan; Hashimoto, Jun; Tani, Hitomi; Kodaira, Makoto; Yunokawa, Mayu; Yamamoto, Harukaze; Watanabe, Yasuyoshi; Fujiwara, Yasuhiro; Tamura, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    Molecular imaging can visualize the biological processes at the molecular and cellular levels in vivo using certain tracers for specific molecular targets. Molecular imaging of breast cancer can be performed with various imaging modalities, however, positron emission tomography (PET) is a sensitive and non-invasive molecular imaging technology and this review will focus on PET molecular imaging of breast cancer, such as FDG-PET, FLT-PET, hormone receptor PET, and anti-HER2 PET.

  5. A detector head design for small-animal PET with silicon photomultipliers (SiPM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moehrs, Sascha; DelGuerra, Alberto; Herbert, Deborah J.; Mandelkern, Mark A.

    2006-03-01

    Small-animal PET systems are now striving for sub-millimetre resolution. Current systems based upon PSPMTs and finely pixellated scintillators can be pushed to higher resolution, but at the expense of other performance parameters and a rapidly escalating cost. Moreover, depth of interaction (DOI) information is usually difficult to assess in such systems, even though this information is highly desirable to reduce the parallax error, which is often the dominant error for such high-resolution systems. In this study we propose a high-resolution detector head for a small-animal PET imaging system with intrinsic DOI information. Instead of a pixellated scintillator, our design is based upon the classic Anger camera principle, i.e. the head is constructed of modular layers each consisting of a continuous slab of scintillator, viewed by a new type of compact silicon photodetector. The photodetector is the recently developed silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) that as well as being very compact has many other attractive properties: high gain at low bias voltage, excellent single-photoelectron resolution and fast timing. A detector head of about 4 × 4 cm2 in area is proposed, constructed from three modular layers of the type described above. We perform a simulation study, using the Monte Carlo simulation package Geant4. The simulation results are used to optimize the geometry of the detector head and characterize its performance. Additionally, hit estimation algorithms are studied to determine the interaction position of annihilation photons correctly over the whole detector surface. The resulting detector has a nearly uniform efficiency for 511 keV photons of ~70% and an intrinsic spatial resolution of less than ~0.4 mm full width at half maximum (fwhm).

  6. A cooperative control algorithm for camera based observational systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Young, Joseph G.

    2012-01-01

    Over the last several years, there has been considerable growth in camera based observation systems for a variety of safety, scientific, and recreational applications. In order to improve the effectiveness of these systems, we frequently desire the ability to increase the number of observed objects, but solving this problem is not as simple as adding more cameras. Quite often, there are economic or physical restrictions that prevent us from adding additional cameras to the system. As a result, we require methods that coordinate the tracking of objects between multiple cameras in an optimal way. In order to accomplish this goal, we present a new cooperative control algorithm for a camera based observational system. Specifically, we present a receding horizon control where we model the underlying optimal control problem as a mixed integer linear program. The benefit of this design is that we can coordinate the actions between each camera while simultaneously respecting its kinematics. In addition, we further improve the quality of our solution by coupling our algorithm with a Kalman filter. Through this integration, we not only add a predictive component to our control, but we use the uncertainty estimates provided by the filter to encourage the system to periodically observe any outliers in the observed area. This combined approach allows us to intelligently observe the entire region of interest in an effective and thorough manner.

  7. Radiation camera motion correction system

    DOEpatents

    Hoffer, P.B.

    1973-12-18

    The device determines the ratio of the intensity of radiation received by a radiation camera from two separate portions of the object. A correction signal is developed to maintain this ratio at a substantially constant value and this correction signal is combined with the camera signal to correct for object motion. (Official Gazette)

  8. Airborne ballistic camera tracking systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redish, W. L.

    1976-01-01

    An operational airborne ballistic camera tracking system was tested for operational and data reduction feasibility. The acquisition and data processing requirements of the system are discussed. Suggestions for future improvements are also noted. A description of the data reduction mathematics is outlined. Results from a successful reentry test mission are tabulated. The test mission indicated that airborne ballistic camera tracking systems are feasible.

  9. Camera artifacts in IUE spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruegman, O. W.; Crenshaw, D. M.

    1994-01-01

    This study of emission line mimicking features in the IUE cameras has produced an atlas of artifiacts in high-dispersion images with an accompanying table of prominent artifacts and a table of prominent artifacts in the raw images along with a medium image of the sky background for each IUE camera.

  10. Multi-PSPMT scintillation camera

    SciTech Connect

    Pani, R.; Pellegrini, R.; Trotta, G.; Scopinaro, F.; Soluri, A.; Vincentis, G. de; Scafe, R.; Pergola, A.

    1999-06-01

    Gamma ray imaging is usually accomplished by the use of a relatively large scintillating crystal coupled to either a number of photomultipliers (PMTs) (Anger Camera) or to a single large Position Sensitive PMT (PSPMT). Recently the development of new diagnostic techniques, such as scintimammography and radio-guided surgery, have highlighted a number of significant limitations of the Anger camera in such imaging procedures. In this paper a dedicated gamma camera is proposed for clinical applications with the aim of improving image quality by utilizing detectors with an appropriate size and shape for the part of the body under examination. This novel scintillation camera is based upon an array of PSPMTs (Hamamatsu R5900-C8). The basic concept of this camera is identical to the Anger Camera with the exception of the substitution of PSPMTs for the PMTs. In this configuration it is possible to use the high resolution of the PSPMTs and still correctly position events lying between PSPMTs. In this work the test configuration is a 2 by 2 array of PSPMTs. Some advantages of this camera are: spatial resolution less than 2 mm FWHM, good linearity, thickness less than 3 cm, light weight, lower cost than equivalent area PSPMT, large detection area when coupled to scintillating arrays, small dead boundary zone (< 3 mm) and flexibility in the shape of the camera.

  11. Mars Exploration Rover engineering cameras

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Maki, J.N.; Bell, J.F.; Herkenhoff, K. E.; Squyres, S. W.; Kiely, A.; Klimesh, M.; Schwochert, M.; Litwin, T.; Willson, R.; Johnson, Aaron H.; Maimone, M.; Baumgartner, E.; Collins, A.; Wadsworth, M.; Elliot, S.T.; Dingizian, A.; Brown, D.; Hagerott, E.C.; Scherr, L.; Deen, R.; Alexander, D.; Lorre, J.

    2003-01-01

    NASA's Mars Exploration Rover (MER) Mission will place a total of 20 cameras (10 per rover) onto the surface of Mars in early 2004. Fourteen of the 20 cameras are designated as engineering cameras and will support the operation of the vehicles on the Martian surface. Images returned from the engineering cameras will also be of significant importance to the scientific community for investigative studies of rock and soil morphology. The Navigation cameras (Navcams, two per rover) are a mast-mounted stereo pair each with a 45?? square field of view (FOV) and an angular resolution of 0.82 milliradians per pixel (mrad/pixel). The Hazard Avoidance cameras (Hazcams, four per rover) are a body-mounted, front- and rear-facing set of stereo pairs, each with a 124?? square FOV and an angular resolution of 2.1 mrad/pixel. The Descent camera (one per rover), mounted to the lander, has a 45?? square FOV and will return images with spatial resolutions of ???4 m/pixel. All of the engineering cameras utilize broadband visible filters and 1024 x 1024 pixel detectors. Copyright 2003 by the American Geophysical Union.

  12. The "All Sky Camera Network"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caldwell, Andy

    2005-01-01

    In 2001, the "All Sky Camera Network" came to life as an outreach program to connect the Denver Museum of Nature and Science (DMNS) exhibit "Space Odyssey" with Colorado schools. The network is comprised of cameras placed strategically at schools throughout Colorado to capture fireballs--rare events that produce meteorites. Meteorites have great…

  13. Next-generation digital camera integration and software development issues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkataraman, Shyam; Peters, Ken; Hecht, Richard

    1998-04-01

    This paper investigates the complexities associated with the development of next generation digital cameras due to requirements in connectivity and interoperability. Each successive generation of digital camera improves drastically in cost, performance, resolution, image quality and interoperability features. This is being accomplished by advancements in a number of areas: research, silicon, standards, etc. As the capabilities of these cameras increase, so do the requirements for both hardware and software. Today, there are two single chip camera solutions in the market including the Motorola MPC 823 and LSI DCAM- 101. Real time constraints for a digital camera may be defined by the maximum time allowable between capture of images. Constraints in the design of an embedded digital camera include processor architecture, memory, processing speed and the real-time operating systems. This paper will present the LSI DCAM-101, a single-chip digital camera solution. It will present an overview of the architecture and the challenges in hardware and software for supporting streaming video in such a complex device. Issues presented include the development of the data flow software architecture, testing and integration on this complex silicon device. The strategy for optimizing performance on the architecture will also be presented.

  14. IMAX camera (12-IML-1)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The IMAX camera system is used to record on-orbit activities of interest to the public. Because of the extremely high resolution of the IMAX camera, projector, and audio systems, the audience is afforded a motion picture experience unlike any other. IMAX and OMNIMAX motion picture systems were designed to create motion picture images of superior quality and audience impact. The IMAX camera is a 65 mm, single lens, reflex viewing design with a 15 perforation per frame horizontal pull across. The frame size is 2.06 x 2.77 inches. Film travels through the camera at a rate of 336 feet per minute when the camera is running at the standard 24 frames/sec.

  15. A modular scintillation camera for use in nuclear medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Milster, T.D.; Arendt, J.; Barrett, H.H.; Easton, R.L.; Rossi, G.R.; Selberg, L.A.; Simpson, R.G.

    1984-02-01

    A ''modular'' scintillation camera is discussed as an alternative to using Anger cameras for gamma-ray imaging in nuclear medicine. Each module is an independent gamma camera and consists of a scintillation crystal, light pipe and mask plane, PMT's, and processing electronics. Groups of modules efficiently image radionuclide distributions by effectively utilizing crystal area. Performance of each module is maximized by using Monte-Carlo computer simulations to determine the optical design of the camera, optimizing the signal processing of the PMT signals using maximum-likelihood (ML) estimators, and incorporating digital lookup tables. Each event is completely processed in 2 ..mu..sec, and FWHM of the PSF over the crystal area is expected to be 3 mm. Both one-dimensional and two-dimensional prototypes are tested for spatial and energy resolution

  16. A Pinhole Camera for SPEAR 2

    SciTech Connect

    Safranek, James

    2002-08-23

    A new pinhole camera system has been installed on Spear 2 to measure its vertical emittance. The hard X-rays from a bending magnet source point are imaged on a phosphor screen through a 30 um x 25 um pinhole aperture. The resolution of the system for 8 keV photons is limited to 31.2 um by Fraunhoffer diffraction and is much smaller than the 340 um FWHM vertical beam size corresponding to 0.9% vertical coupling. Measurements are presented. Optimal pinhole location and hole size are discussed.

  17. Lights, Camera, Courtroom? Should Trials Be Televised?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirtley, Jane E.; Brothers, Thomas W.; Veal, Harlan K.

    1999-01-01

    Presents three differing perspectives from American Bar Association members on whether television cameras should be allowed in the courtroom. Contends that cameras should be allowed with differing degrees of certainty: cameras truly open the courts to the public; cameras must be strategically placed; and cameras should be used only with the…

  18. How long is enough to detect terrestrial animals? Estimating the minimum trapping effort on camera traps.

    PubMed

    Si, Xingfeng; Kays, Roland; Ding, Ping

    2014-01-01

    Camera traps is an important wildlife inventory tool for estimating species diversity at a site. Knowing what minimum trapping effort is needed to detect target species is also important to designing efficient studies, considering both the number of camera locations, and survey length. Here, we take advantage of a two-year camera trapping dataset from a small (24-ha) study plot in Gutianshan National Nature Reserve, eastern China to estimate the minimum trapping effort actually needed to sample the wildlife community. We also evaluated the relative value of adding new camera sites or running cameras for a longer period at one site. The full dataset includes 1727 independent photographs captured during 13,824 camera days, documenting 10 resident terrestrial species of birds and mammals. Our rarefaction analysis shows that a minimum of 931 camera days would be needed to detect the resident species sufficiently in the plot, and c. 8700 camera days to detect all 10 resident species. In terms of detecting a diversity of species, the optimal sampling period for one camera site was c. 40, or long enough to record about 20 independent photographs. Our analysis of evaluating the increasing number of additional camera sites shows that rotating cameras to new sites would be more efficient for measuring species richness than leaving cameras at fewer sites for a longer period.

  19. How long is enough to detect terrestrial animals? Estimating the minimum trapping effort on camera traps

    PubMed Central

    Si, Xingfeng; Kays, Roland

    2014-01-01

    Camera traps is an important wildlife inventory tool for estimating species diversity at a site. Knowing what minimum trapping effort is needed to detect target species is also important to designing efficient studies, considering both the number of camera locations, and survey length. Here, we take advantage of a two-year camera trapping dataset from a small (24-ha) study plot in Gutianshan National Nature Reserve, eastern China to estimate the minimum trapping effort actually needed to sample the wildlife community. We also evaluated the relative value of adding new camera sites or running cameras for a longer period at one site. The full dataset includes 1727 independent photographs captured during 13,824 camera days, documenting 10 resident terrestrial species of birds and mammals. Our rarefaction analysis shows that a minimum of 931 camera days would be needed to detect the resident species sufficiently in the plot, and c. 8700 camera days to detect all 10 resident species. In terms of detecting a diversity of species, the optimal sampling period for one camera site was c. 40, or long enough to record about 20 independent photographs. Our analysis of evaluating the increasing number of additional camera sites shows that rotating cameras to new sites would be more efficient for measuring species richness than leaving cameras at fewer sites for a longer period. PMID:24868493

  20. How long is enough to detect terrestrial animals? Estimating the minimum trapping effort on camera traps.

    PubMed

    Si, Xingfeng; Kays, Roland; Ding, Ping

    2014-01-01

    Camera traps is an important wildlife inventory tool for estimating species diversity at a site. Knowing what minimum trapping effort is needed to detect target species is also important to designing efficient studies, considering both the number of camera locations, and survey length. Here, we take advantage of a two-year camera trapping dataset from a small (24-ha) study plot in Gutianshan National Nature Reserve, eastern China to estimate the minimum trapping effort actually needed to sample the wildlife community. We also evaluated the relative value of adding new camera sites or running cameras for a longer period at one site. The full dataset includes 1727 independent photographs captured during 13,824 camera days, documenting 10 resident terrestrial species of birds and mammals. Our rarefaction analysis shows that a minimum of 931 camera days would be needed to detect the resident species sufficiently in the plot, and c. 8700 camera days to detect all 10 resident species. In terms of detecting a diversity of species, the optimal sampling period for one camera site was c. 40, or long enough to record about 20 independent photographs. Our analysis of evaluating the increasing number of additional camera sites shows that rotating cameras to new sites would be more efficient for measuring species richness than leaving cameras at fewer sites for a longer period. PMID:24868493

  1. Proportional counter radiation camera

    DOEpatents

    Borkowski, C.J.; Kopp, M.K.

    1974-01-15

    A gas-filled proportional counter camera that images photon emitting sources is described. A two-dimensional, positionsensitive proportional multiwire counter is provided as the detector. The counter consists of a high- voltage anode screen sandwiched between orthogonally disposed planar arrays of multiple parallel strung, resistively coupled cathode wires. Two terminals from each of the cathode arrays are connected to separate timing circuitry to obtain separate X and Y coordinate signal values from pulse shape measurements to define the position of an event within the counter arrays which may be recorded by various means for data display. The counter is further provided with a linear drift field which effectively enlarges the active gas volume of the counter and constrains the recoil electrons produced from ionizing radiation entering the counter to drift perpendicularly toward the planar detection arrays. A collimator is interposed between a subject to be imaged and the counter to transmit only the radiation from the subject which has a perpendicular trajectory with respect to the planar cathode arrays of the detector. (Official Gazette)

  2. Camera sensitivity study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlueter, Jonathan; Murphey, Yi L.; Miller, John W. V.; Shridhar, Malayappan; Luo, Yun; Khairallah, Farid

    2004-12-01

    As the cost/performance Ratio of vision systems improves with time, new classes of applications become feasible. One such area, automotive applications, is currently being investigated. Applications include occupant detection, collision avoidance and lane tracking. Interest in occupant detection has been spurred by federal automotive safety rules in response to injuries and fatalities caused by deployment of occupant-side air bags. In principle, a vision system could control airbag deployment to prevent this type of mishap. Employing vision technology here, however, presents a variety of challenges, which include controlling costs, inability to control illumination, developing and training a reliable classification system and loss of performance due to production variations due to manufacturing tolerances and customer options. This paper describes the measures that have been developed to evaluate the sensitivity of an occupant detection system to these types of variations. Two procedures are described for evaluating how sensitive the classifier is to camera variations. The first procedure is based on classification accuracy while the second evaluates feature differences.

  3. Optimum color filters for CCD digital cameras.

    PubMed

    Engelhardt, K; Seitz, P

    1993-06-01

    A procedure for the definition of optimum spectral transmission curves for any solid-state (especially silicon-based CCD) color camera is presented. The design of the target curves is based on computer simulation of the camera system and on the use of test colors with known spectral reflectances. Color errors are measured in a uniform color space (CIELUV) and by application of the Commission Internationale de l'Eclairage color difference formula. Dielectric filter stacks were designed by simulated thermal annealing, and a stripe filter pattern was fabricated with transmission properties close to the specifications. Optimization of the color transformation minimizes the residual average color error and an average color error of ~1 just noticeable difference should be feasible. This means that color differences on a side-to-side comparison of original and reproduced color are practically imperceptible. In addition, electrical cross talk within the solid-state imager can be compensated by adapting the color matrixing coefficients. The theoretical findings of this work were employed for the design and fabrication of a high-resolution digital CCD color camera with high calorimetric accuracy. PMID:20829908

  4. Performing 18F-FDG PET studies following injections of 99mTc-sestamibi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, R. J.; Karp, J. S.

    1999-06-01

    When SPECT studies are followed by PET studies on the same day, substantial 99mTc activity may be present in patients during the PET scans. Degraded PET camera performance results unless the low-energy gamma rays are absorbed by lead shields. Spatial resolution, camera count rates, energy spectra, image contrast and noise, and image quality have been measured for phantoms with varying levels of 99mTc activity, and both with and without thin lead shields placed in front of the detectors. In addition examples of the results of twelve 18F-FDG PET cardiac studies performed within 6 h of 99mTc-sestamibi injections are reported. The presence of 99mTc (140 keV gamma rays) causes light pile-up with 511 keV photons resulting in distorted energy spectra, degraded spatial resolution, increased Compton background and reduced count-rate capability. These effects are avoided using thin lead shields. Studies performed with 99mTc activity in patients but using lead shields are of comparable quality to studies performed without 99mTc or shields. Thin lead shields effectively filter low-energy gamma rays during PET studies leading to improved count-rate capability, contrast and image quality.

  5. Cardiac PET/Computed Tomography Applications and Cardiovascular Outcome.

    PubMed

    Schindler, Thomas Hellmut

    2015-07-01

    Cardiac PET/computed tomography (CT) in conjunction with different blood flow tracers is increasingly applied for the assessment of myocardial perfusion and myocardial flow reserve (MFR) in the detection of coronary artery disease (CAD). The ability of PET/CT to noninvasively determine regional myocardial blood flow at rest and during vasomotor stress allows the calculation of the MFR, which carries important prognostic information in patients with subclinical forms of cardiomyopathy. The measured MFR optimizes the identification and characterization of the extent and severity of CAD burden, and contributes to the flow-limiting effect of single lesions in multivessel CAD. PMID:26099678

  6. Auto-converging stereo cameras for 3D robotic tele-operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edmondson, Richard; Aycock, Todd; Chenault, David

    2012-06-01

    Polaris Sensor Technologies has developed a Stereovision Upgrade Kit for TALON robot to provide enhanced depth perception to the operator. This kit previously required the TALON Operator Control Unit to be equipped with the optional touchscreen interface to allow for operator control of the camera convergence angle adjustment. This adjustment allowed for optimal camera convergence independent of the distance from the camera to the object being viewed. Polaris has recently improved the performance of the stereo camera by implementing an Automatic Convergence algorithm in a field programmable gate array in the camera assembly. This algorithm uses scene content to automatically adjust the camera convergence angle, freeing the operator to focus on the task rather than adjustment of the vision system. The autoconvergence capability has been demonstrated on both visible zoom cameras and longwave infrared microbolometer stereo pairs.

  7. Get Set for a Pet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeRosa, Bill

    1987-01-01

    Describes a game in which students deal with some of the factors involved in being a responsible pet owner. Includes a list of the materials needed for the game and provides the game board and the game pieces, along with a fold-out poster about neutering and spaying pets. (TW)

  8. Meet the Alpha-Pets.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zitlaw, Jo Ann Bruce; Frank, Cheryl Standish

    1985-01-01

    "Alpha-Pets" are the focal point of an integrated, multidisciplinary curriculum. Each pet is featured for a week in a vocabulary-rich story and introduces related activities beginning with the featured letter, such as the four food groups during Freddie Fish's week or universe during Ulysses Unicorn's week. (MT)

  9. Vision Sensors and Cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoefflinger, Bernd

    Silicon charge-coupled-device (CCD) imagers have been and are a specialty market ruled by a few companies for decades. Based on CMOS technologies, active-pixel sensors (APS) began to appear in 1990 at the 1 μm technology node. These pixels allow random access, global shutters, and they are compatible with focal-plane imaging systems combining sensing and first-level image processing. The progress towards smaller features and towards ultra-low leakage currents has provided reduced dark currents and μm-size pixels. All chips offer Mega-pixel resolution, and many have very high sensitivities equivalent to ASA 12.800. As a result, HDTV video cameras will become a commodity. Because charge-integration sensors suffer from a limited dynamic range, significant processing effort is spent on multiple exposure and piece-wise analog-digital conversion to reach ranges >10,000:1. The fundamental alternative is log-converting pixels with an eye-like response. This offers a range of almost a million to 1, constant contrast sensitivity and constant colors, important features in professional, technical and medical applications. 3D retino-morphic stacking of sensing and processing on top of each other is being revisited with sub-100 nm CMOS circuits and with TSV technology. With sensor outputs directly on top of neurons, neural focal-plane processing will regain momentum, and new levels of intelligent vision will be achieved. The industry push towards thinned wafers and TSV enables backside-illuminated and other pixels with a 100% fill-factor. 3D vision, which relies on stereo or on time-of-flight, high-speed circuitry, will also benefit from scaled-down CMOS technologies both because of their size as well as their higher speed.

  10. Recent Developments in PET Instrumentation

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Hao; Levin, Craig S.

    2013-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is used in the clinic and in vivo small animal research to study molecular processes associated with diseases such as cancer, heart disease, and neurological disorders, and to guide the discovery and development of new treatments. This paper reviews current challenges of advancing PET technology and some of newly developed PET detectors and systems. The paper focuses on four aspects of PET instrumentation: high photon detection sensitivity; improved spatial resolution; depth-of-interaction (DOI) resolution and time-of-flight (TOF). Improved system geometry, novel non-scintillator based detectors, and tapered scintillation crystal arrays are able to enhance the photon detection sensitivity of a PET system. Several challenges for achieving high resolution with standard scintillator-based PET detectors are discussed. Novel detectors with 3-D positioning capability have great potential to be deployed in PET for achieving spatial resolution better than 1 mm, such as cadmium-zinc-telluride (CZT) and position-sensitive avalanche photodiodes (PSAPDs). DOI capability enables a PET system to mitigate parallax error and achieve uniform spatial resolution across the field-of-view (FOV). Six common DOI designs, as well as advantages and limitations of each design, are discussed. The availability of fast scintillation crystals such as LaBr3, and the silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) greatly advances TOF-PET development. Recent instrumentation and initial results of clinical trials are briefly presented. If successful, these technology advances, together with new probe molecules, will substantially enhance the molecular sensitivity of PET and thus increase its role in preclinical and clinical research as well as evaluating and managing disease in the clinic. PMID:20497121

  11. An Inexpensive Digital Infrared Camera

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mills, Allan

    2012-01-01

    Details are given for the conversion of an inexpensive webcam to a camera specifically sensitive to the near infrared (700-1000 nm). Some experiments and practical applications are suggested and illustrated. (Contains 9 figures.)

  12. 36 CFR 1002.15 - Pets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Pets. 1002.15 Section 1002.15....15 Pets. (a) The following are prohibited: (1) Possessing a pet in a public building, public... possession of pets by the Board. This paragraph shall not apply to guide dogs accompanying visually...

  13. 36 CFR 1002.15 - Pets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Pets. 1002.15 Section 1002.15....15 Pets. (a) The following are prohibited: (1) Possessing a pet in a public building, public... possession of pets by the Board. This paragraph shall not apply to guide dogs accompanying visually...

  14. 7 CFR 502.11 - Pets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Pets. 502.11 Section 502.11 Agriculture Regulations of... CONDUCT ON BELTSVILLE AGRICULTURE RESEARCH CENTER PROPERTY, BELTSVILLE, MARYLAND § 502.11 Pets. Pets... vaccinations. Pets that are the property of employees residing on BARC must be up to date on their...

  15. Solid State Television Camera (CID)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steele, D. W.; Green, W. T.

    1976-01-01

    The design, development and test are described of a charge injection device (CID) camera using a 244x248 element array. A number of video signal processing functions are included which maximize the output video dynamic range while retaining the inherently good resolution response of the CID. Some of the unique features of the camera are: low light level performance, high S/N ratio, antiblooming, geometric distortion, sequential scanning and AGC.

  16. The future of consumer cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battiato, Sebastiano; Moltisanti, Marco

    2015-03-01

    In the last two decades multimedia, and in particular imaging devices (camcorders, tablets, mobile phones, etc.) have been dramatically diffused. Moreover the increasing of their computational performances, combined with an higher storage capability, allows them to process large amount of data. In this paper an overview of the current trends of consumer cameras market and technology will be given, providing also some details about the recent past (from Digital Still Camera up today) and forthcoming key issues.

  17. Astronomy and the camera obscura

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feist, M.

    2000-02-01

    The camera obscura (from Latin meaning darkened chamber) is a simple optical device with a long history. In the form considered here, it can be traced back to 1550. It had its heyday during the Victorian era when it was to be found at the seaside as a tourist attraction or sideshow. It was also used as an artist's drawing aid and, in 1620, the famous astronomer-mathematician, Johannes Kepler used a small tent camera obscura to trace the scenery.

  18. Picosecond (picoframe) framing camera evaluations.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y; Sibbett, W; Walker, D R

    1992-03-01

    Detailed theoretical evaluations of picoframe-I- and II-type framing cameras are presented, and predicted performance characteristics are compared with experimental results. The methods of theoretical simulations are described, and a suite of computer programs was developed. The theoretical analyses indicate that the existence of fringe fields in the vicinity of the deflectors is the main factor that limits the dynamic spatial resolutions and frame times of these particular designs of framing camera, and possible refinements are outlined. PMID:20720702

  19. Microfluidics: a groundbreaking technology for PET tracer production?

    PubMed

    Rensch, Christian; Jackson, Alexander; Lindner, Simon; Salvamoser, Ruben; Samper, Victor; Riese, Stefan; Bartenstein, Peter; Wängler, Carmen; Wängler, Björn

    2013-07-05

    Application of microfluidics to Positron Emission Tomography (PET) tracer synthesis has attracted increasing interest within the last decade. The technical advantages of microfluidics, in particular the high surface to volume ratio and resulting fast thermal heating and cooling rates of reagents can lead to reduced reaction times, increased synthesis yields and reduced by-products. In addition automated reaction optimization, reduced consumption of expensive reagents and a path towards a reduced system footprint have been successfully demonstrated. The processing of radioactivity levels required for routine production, use of microfluidic-produced PET tracer doses in preclinical and clinical imaging as well as feasibility studies on autoradiolytic decomposition have all given promising results. However, the number of microfluidic synthesizers utilized for commercial routine production of PET tracers is very limited. This study reviews the state of the art in microfluidic PET tracer synthesis, highlighting critical design aspects, strengths, weaknesses and presenting several characteristics of the diverse PET market space which are thought to have a significant impact on research, development and engineering of microfluidic devices in this field. Furthermore, the topics of batch- and single-dose production, cyclotron to quality control integration as well as centralized versus de-centralized market distribution models are addressed.

  20. PET-Based Thoracic Radiation Oncology.

    PubMed

    Simone, Charles B; Houshmand, Sina; Kalbasi, Anusha; Salavati, Ali; Alavi, Abass

    2016-07-01

    Fluorodeoxyglucose-PET is increasingly being integrated into multiple aspects of oncology. PET/computed tomography (PET/CT) has become especially important in radiation oncology. With the increasing use of advanced techniques like intensity-modulated radiation therapy and proton therapy, PET/CT scans have played critical roles in the target delineation of tumors for radiation oncologists delivering conformal treatment techniques. Use of PET/CT is well established in lung cancer and several other thoracic malignancies. This article details the current uses of PET/CT in thoracic radiation oncology with a focus on lung cancer and describes expected future roles of PET/CT for thoracic tumors.

  1. Science, conservation, and camera traps

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nichols, James D.; Karanth, K. Ullas; O'Connel, Allan F.; O'Connell, Allan F.; Nichols, James D.; Karanth, K. Ullas

    2011-01-01

    Biologists commonly perceive camera traps as a new tool that enables them to enter the hitherto secret world of wild animals. Camera traps are being used in a wide range of studies dealing with animal ecology, behavior, and conservation. Our intention in this volume is not to simply present the various uses of camera traps, but to focus on their use in the conduct of science and conservation. In this chapter, we provide an overview of these two broad classes of endeavor and sketch the manner in which camera traps are likely to be able to contribute to them. Our main point here is that neither photographs of individual animals, nor detection history data, nor parameter estimates generated from detection histories are the ultimate objective of a camera trap study directed at either science or management. Instead, the ultimate objectives are best viewed as either gaining an understanding of how ecological systems work (science) or trying to make wise decisions that move systems from less desirable to more desirable states (conservation, management). Therefore, we briefly describe here basic approaches to science and management, emphasizing the role of field data and associated analyses in these processes. We provide examples of ways in which camera trap data can inform science and management.

  2. Diagnostic accuracy of CSF Ab42 and florbetapir PET for Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Mattsson, Niklas; Insel, Philip S; Landau, Susan; Jagust, William; Donohue, Michael; Shaw, Leslie M; Trojanowski, John Q; Zetterberg, Henrik; Blennow, Kaj; Weiner, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Background Reduced cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) β-amyloid42 (Aβ42) and increased florbetapir positron emission tomography (PET) uptake reflects brain Aβ accumulation. These biomarkers are correlated with each other and altered in Alzheimer's disease (AD), but no study has directly compared their diagnostic performance. Methods We examined healthy controls (CN, N = 169) versus AD dementia patients (N = 118), and stable (sMCI; no dementia, followed up for at least 2 years, N = 165) versus progressive MCI (pMCI; conversion to AD dementia, N = 59). All subjects had florbetapir PET (global and regional; temporal, frontal, parietal, and cingulate) and CSF Aβ42 measurements at baseline. We compared area under the curve (AUC), sensitivity, and specificity (testing a priori and optimized cutoffs). Clinical diagnosis was the reference standard. Results CSF Aβ42 and (global or regional) PET florbetapir did not differ in AUC (CN vs. AD, CSF 84.4%; global PET 86.9%; difference [95% confidence interval] −6.7 to 1.5). CSF Aβ42 and global PET florbetapir did not differ in sensitivity, but PET had greater specificity than CSF in most comparisons. Sixteen CN progressed to MCI and AD (six Aβ negative, seven Aβ positive, and three PET positive but CSF negative). Interpretation The overall diagnostic accuracies of CSF Aβ42 and PET florbetapir were similar, but PET had greater specificity. This was because some CN and sMCI subjects appear pathological using CSF but not using PET, suggesting that low CSF Aβ42 not always translates to cognitive decline or brain Aβ accumulation. Other factors, including costs and side effects, may also be considered when determining the optimal modality for different applications. PMID:25356425

  3. Segmentation of brain PET-CT images based on adaptive use of complementary information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Yong; Wen, Lingfeng; Eberl, Stefan; Fulham, Michael; Feng, Dagan

    2009-02-01

    Dual modality PET-CT imaging provides aligned anatomical (CT) and functional (PET) images in a single scanning session, which can potentially be used to improve image segmentation of PET-CT data. The ability to distinguish structures for segmentation is a function of structure and modality and varies across voxels. Thus optimal contribution of a particular modality to segmentation is spatially variant. Existing segmentation algorithms, however, seldom account for this characteristic of PET-CT data and the results using these algorithms are not optimal. In this study, we propose a relative discrimination index (RDI) to characterize the relative abilities of PET and CT to correctly classify each voxel into the correct structure for segmentation. The definition of RDI is based on the information entropy of the probability distribution of the voxel's class label. If the class label derived from CT data for a particular voxel has more certainty than that derived from PET data, the corresponding RDI will have a higher value. We applied the RDI matrix to balance adaptively the contributions of PET and CT data to segmentation of brain PET-CT images on a voxel-by-voxel basis, with the aim to give the modality with higher discriminatory power a larger weight. The resultant segmentation approach is distinguished from traditional approaches by its innovative and adaptive use of the dual-modality information. We compared our approach to the non-RDI version and two commonly used PET-only based segmentation algorithms for simulation and clinical data. Our results show that the RDI matrix markedly improved PET-CT image segmentation.

  4. FDG PET with contrast-enhanced CT: a critical imaging tool for laryngeal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Chu, Mae Mae A Y; Kositwattanarerk, Arpakorn; Lee, David J; Makkar, Jasnit S; Genden, Eric M; Kao, Johnny; Packer, Stuart H; Som, Peter M; Kostakoglu, Lale

    2010-09-01

    Fluorine 18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) has evolved to be an essential imaging modality in the evaluation of laryngeal carcinoma. Although the modality has limited utility in assessing the extent of the primary tumor, FDG PET has proved to be superior to anatomic modalities in the detection of lymph node and distant metastases. The role of FDG PET in the evaluation of patients with laryngeal tumors that are clinically classified as N0 has not shown consistent usefulness because of the innate resolution limitations of the camera. In the posttherapy setting, however, FDG PET has consistently demonstrated a high negative predictive value in the identification of recurrent disease, both during the course of therapy and during long-term follow-up. In addition, contrast material-enhanced computed tomography (CT) in conjunction with FDG PET has demonstrated a complementary role by allowing for superior anatomic coregistration and therefore more definitive diagnosis. There is sufficient evidence that with further advances in PET technology, this modality will likely become more useful in the detection of small lesions and occult nodal disease, as well as in guiding the management of laryngeal carcinoma. PMID:20833855

  5. Role for 11C-choline PET in active surveillance of prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Boychak, Oleksandr; Vos, Larissa; Makis, William; Buteau, Francois-Alexandre; Pervez, Nadeem; Parliament, Matthew; McEwan, Alexander J.B.; Usmani, Nawaid

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Active surveillance (AS) is an increasingly popular management strategy for men diagnosed with low-risk indolent prostate cancer. Current tests (prostate-specific antigen [PSA], clinical staging, and prostate biopsies) to monitor indolent disease lack accuracy. 11C-choline positron emission tomography (PET) has excellent detection rates in local and distant recurrence of prostate cancer. We examine 11C-choline PET for identifying aggressive prostate cancer warranting treatment in the AS setting. Methods: In total, 24 patients on AS had clinical assessment and PSA testing every 6 months and 11C-choline PET and prostate biopsies annually. The sensitivity and specificity to identify prostate cancer and progressive disease (PD) were calculated for each 11C-choline PET scan. Results: In total, 62 biopsy-paired, serial 11C-choline PET scans were analyzed using a series of standard uptake value-maximum (SUVmax) cut-off thresholds. During follow-up (mean 25.3 months), 11 of the 24 low-risk prostate cancer patients developed PD and received definitive treatment. The prostate cancer detection rate with 11C-choline PET had moderate sensitivity (72.1%), but low specificity (45.0%). PD prediction from baseline 11C-choline PET had satisfactory sensitivity (81.8%), but low specificity (38.5%). The addition of clinical parameters to the baseline 11C-choline PET improved specificity (69.2%), with a slight reduction in sensitivity (72.7%) for PD prediction. Conclusions: Addition of 11C-choline PET imaging during AS may help to identify aggressive disease earlier than traditional methods. However, 11C-choline PET alone has low specificity due to overlap of SUV values with benign pathologies. Triaging low-risk prostate cancer patients into AS versus therapy will require further optimization of PET protocols or consideration of alternative strategies (i.e., magnetic resonance imaging, biomarkers). PMID:25844108

  6. NEMA NU 4-2008 validation and applications of the PET-SORTEO Monte Carlo simulations platform for the geometry of the Inveon PET preclinical scanner.

    PubMed

    Boisson, F; Wimberley, C J; Lehnert, W; Zahra, D; Pham, T; Perkins, G; Hamze, H; Gregoire, M-C; Reilhac, A

    2013-10-01

    Monte Carlo-based simulation of positron emission tomography (PET) data plays a key role in the design and optimization of data correction and processing methods. Our first aim was to adapt and configure the PET-SORTEO Monte Carlo simulation program for the geometry of the widely distributed Inveon PET preclinical scanner manufactured by Siemens Preclinical Solutions. The validation was carried out against actual measurements performed on the Inveon PET scanner at the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation in Australia and at the Brain & Mind Research Institute and by strictly following the NEMA NU 4-2008 standard. The comparison of simulated and experimental performance measurements included spatial resolution, sensitivity, scatter fraction and count rates, image quality and Derenzo phantom studies. Results showed that PET-SORTEO reliably reproduces the performances of this Inveon preclinical system. In addition, imaging studies showed that the PET-SORTEO simulation program provides raw data for the Inveon scanner that can be fully corrected and reconstructed using the same programs as for the actual data. All correction techniques (attenuation, scatter, randoms, dead-time, and normalization) can be applied on the simulated data leading to fully quantitative reconstructed images. In the second part of the study, we demonstrated its ability to generate fast and realistic biological studies. PET-SORTEO is a workable and reliable tool that can be used, in a classical way, to validate and/or optimize a single PET data processing step such as a reconstruction method. However, we demonstrated that by combining a realistic simulated biological study ([(11)C]Raclopride here) involving different condition groups, simulation allows one also to assess and optimize the data correction, reconstruction and data processing line flow as a whole, specifically for each biological study, which is our ultimate intent. PMID:24018840

  7. Specific recommendations for accurate and direct use of PET-CT in PET guided radiotherapy for head and neck sites

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, C. M. Convery, D. J.; Greener, A. G.; Pike, L. C.; Baker, S.; Woods, E.; Hartill, C. E.

    2014-04-15

    techniques, laser positioning may affect setup accuracy and couch deflection may be greater than scanners dedicated to radiotherapy. The full set of departmental commissioning and routine quality assurance tests applied to radiotherapy CT simulators must be carried out on the PET-CT scanner. CT image quality must be optimized for radiotherapy planning whilst understanding that the appearance will differ between scanners and may affect delineation. PET-CT quality assurance schedules will need to be added to and modified to incorporate radiotherapy quality assurance. Methods of working for radiotherapy and PET staff will change to take into account considerations of both parties. PET to CT alignment must be subject to quality control on a loaded and unloaded couch preferably using a suitable emission phantom, and tested throughout the whole data pathway. Data integrity must be tested throughout the whole pathway and a system included to verify that delineated structures are transferred correctly. Excellent multidisciplinary team communication and working is vital, and key staff members on both sides should be specifically dedicated to the project. Patient pathway should be clearly devised to optimize patient care and the resources of all departments. Recruitment of a cohort of patients into a methodology study is valuable to test the quality assurance methods and pathway.

  8. Sub-Camera Calibration of a Penta-Camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobsen, K.; Gerke, M.

    2016-03-01

    Penta cameras consisting of a nadir and four inclined cameras are becoming more and more popular, having the advantage of imaging also facades in built up areas from four directions. Such system cameras require a boresight calibration of the geometric relation of the cameras to each other, but also a calibration of the sub-cameras. Based on data sets of the ISPRS/EuroSDR benchmark for multi platform photogrammetry the inner orientation of the used IGI Penta DigiCAM has been analyzed. The required image coordinates of the blocks Dortmund and Zeche Zollern have been determined by Pix4Dmapper and have been independently adjusted and analyzed by program system BLUH. With 4.1 million image points in 314 images respectively 3.9 million image points in 248 images a dense matching was provided by Pix4Dmapper. With up to 19 respectively 29 images per object point the images are well connected, nevertheless the high number of images per object point are concentrated to the block centres while the inclined images outside the block centre are satisfying but not very strongly connected. This leads to very high values for the Student test (T-test) of the finally used additional parameters or in other words, additional parameters are highly significant. The estimated radial symmetric distortion of the nadir sub-camera corresponds to the laboratory calibration of IGI, but there are still radial symmetric distortions also for the inclined cameras with a size exceeding 5μm even if mentioned as negligible based on the laboratory calibration. Radial and tangential effects of the image corners are limited but still available. Remarkable angular affine systematic image errors can be seen especially in the block Zeche Zollern. Such deformations are unusual for digital matrix cameras, but it can be caused by the correlation between inner and exterior orientation if only parallel flight lines are used. With exception of the angular affinity the systematic image errors for corresponding

  9. Preliminary Design of Pinhole camera for NSLS-II Project.

    SciTech Connect

    Pinayev,I.; Kosciuk, B.; Singh, O.

    2009-05-04

    The NSLS-II Light Source being built at Brookhaven National Laboratory is expected to provide very small emittances and electron beam sizes. High resolution imaging systems are required in order to provide robust measurements. The pinhole camera will utilize 6-fold magnification with a pinhole placed inside a crotch absorber. The pinhole is protected from high power synchrotron radiation with a filter made of refractory metal. In this paper we provide resolution analyses, heat load calculations, and optimization details for the NSLS-II pinhole camera, including beamline design.

  10. PET and SPECT studies in children with hemispheric low-grade gliomas.

    PubMed

    Juhász, Csaba; Bosnyák, Edit

    2016-10-01

    Molecular imaging is playing an increasing role in the pretreatment evaluation of low-grade gliomas. While glucose positron emission tomography (PET) can be helpful to differentiate low-grade from high-grade tumors, PET imaging with amino acid radiotracers has several advantages, such as better differentiation between tumors and non-tumorous lesions, optimized biopsy targeting, and improved detection of tumor recurrence. This review provides a brief overview of single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) studies followed by a more detailed review of the clinical applications of glucose and amino acid PET imaging in low-grade hemispheric gliomas. We discuss key differences in the performance of the most commonly utilized PET radiotracers and highlight the advantage of PET/MRI fusion to obtain optimal information about tumor extent, heterogeneity, and metabolism. Recent data also suggest that simultaneous acquisition of PET/MR images and the combination of advanced MRI techniques with quantitative PET can further improve the pretreatment and post-treatment evaluation of pediatric brain tumors. PMID:27659825

  11. PET/CT in radiation oncology

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Tinsu; Mawlawi, Osama

    2008-11-15

    PET/CT is an effective tool for the diagnosis, staging and restaging of cancer patients. It combines the complementary information of functional PET images and anatomical CT images in one imaging session. Conventional stand-alone PET has been replaced by PET/CT for improved patient comfort, patient throughput, and most importantly the proven clinical outcome of PET/CT over that of PET and that of separate PET and CT. There are over two thousand PET/CT scanners installed worldwide since 2001. Oncology is the main application for PET/CT. Fluorine-18 deoxyglucose is the choice of radiopharmaceutical in PET for imaging the glucose uptake in tissues, correlated with an increased rate of glycolysis in many tumor cells. New molecular targeted agents are being developed to improve the accuracy of targeting different disease states and assessing therapeutic response. Over 50% of cancer patients receive radiation therapy (RT) in the course of their disease treatment. Clinical data have demonstrated that the information provided by PET/CT often changes patient management of the patient and/or modifies the RT plan from conventional CT simulation. The application of PET/CT in RT is growing and will become increasingly important. Continuing improvement of PET/CT instrumentation will also make it easier for radiation oncologists to integrate PET/CT in RT. The purpose of this article is to provide a review of the current PET/CT technology, to project the future development of PET and CT for PET/CT, and to discuss some issues in adopting PET/CT in RT and potential improvements in PET/CT simulation of the thorax in radiation therapy.

  12. Pets and the immunocompromised person

    MedlinePlus

    ... their pets to avoid getting diseases from the animals. Persons in this category include those who take ... risk of diseases that can be passed from animals to humans. Here are some tips: Ask your ...

  13. 10 "Poison Pills" for Pets

    MedlinePlus

    ... left on the bedside table. Zolpidem may make cats wobbly and sleepy, but most pets become very ... very common pain killer found in most households. Cats are extremely sensitive to acetaminophen, but dogs can ...

  14. Take Care with Pet Reptiles

    MedlinePlus

    ... pets in households with young children. [775 KB] Animals and Health Check out two CDC websites with helpful resources. Gastrointestinal (Enteric) Diseases from Animals : Information about zoonotic outbreaks, prevention messages, and helpful ...

  15. Influence of temperature and bias voltage on the performance of a high resolution PET detector built with position sensitive avalanche photodiodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandenbroucke, A.; McLaughlin, T. J.; Levin, C. S.

    2012-08-01

    We evaluate the performance of an 8 × 8 array of 0.9 × 0.9 × 1 mm3 cerium doped lutetium oxyothosilicate (LSO) crystals coupled to a position sensitive avalanche photodiode (PSAPD) as a function of bias voltage and temperature. We use this detector to develop a general methodology to optimize bias voltage, temperature, and gain for PET detectors using semiconductor photodetectors. This detector module will be used in a novel high resolution positron emission tomography (PET) camera dedicated to breast imaging under construction in our lab. Due to the tight packing of many PSAPDs in the system a thermal gradient is expected across the imaging heads. Data were collected for 11 PSAPD temperatures between 5°C and 40°C using a thermo-electric (Peltier) device. At each temperature the bias voltage was varied in steps of 5 V over a 50 V range. We present three methods to predict the optimal bias voltage at every temperature: one based on optimizing the coincidence time resolution, the others based on the relative change in PSAPD gain and leakage current due to the onset of hole multiplication. Optimal gain could also be predicted based on the quality of the flood histogram. At optimal bias voltage, the energy resolution degrades as (10.5±0.1)+((0.038±0.006)/ °C·T)%. Time resolution stays constant at 2.37±0.02 ns below 15°C. Above this temperature, time resolution deteriorates as (1.67±0.06)+((0.042±0.002)/°C·T)ns. Even at high temperatures, all 64 crystal position peaks in the flood histogram are still clearly visible. The width of the peaks in the flood histogram show a quadratic degradation with temperature: (2.6±0.1)·10-2+(1.6±0.2)·10-5/(°C)2·T2. We conclude that both the quality of the flood histogram as well as the coincidence time resolution are better parameters to estimate the optimal bias voltage, than energy resolution. Optimal bias voltage is found to be dependent on the value of k, the ratio between hole and electron multiplication. We

  16. The Clementine longwave infrared camera

    SciTech Connect

    Priest, R.E.; Lewis, I.T.; Sewall, N.R.; Park, H.S.; Shannon, M.J.; Ledebuhr, A.G.; Pleasance, L.D.; Massie, M.A.; Metschuleit, K.

    1995-04-01

    The Clementine mission provided the first ever complete, systematic surface mapping of the moon from the ultra-violet to the near-infrared regions. More than 1.7 million images of the moon, earth and space were returned from this mission. The longwave-infrared (LWIR) camera supplemented the UV/Visible and near-infrared mapping cameras providing limited strip coverage of the moon, giving insight to the thermal properties of the soils. This camera provided {approximately}100 m spatial resolution at 400 km periselene, and a 7 km across-track swath. This 2.1 kg camera using a 128 x 128 Mercury-Cadmium-Telluride (MCT) FPA viewed thermal emission of the lunar surface and lunar horizon in the 8.0 to 9.5 {micro}m wavelength region. A description of this light-weight, low power LWIR camera along with a summary of lessons learned is presented. Design goals and preliminary on-orbit performance estimates are addressed in terms of meeting the mission`s primary objective for flight qualifying the sensors for future Department of Defense flights.

  17. Nutritional sustainability of pet foods.

    PubMed

    Swanson, Kelly S; Carter, Rebecca A; Yount, Tracy P; Aretz, Jan; Buff, Preston R

    2013-03-01

    Sustainable practices meet the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their needs. Applying these concepts to food and feed production, nutritional sustainability is the ability of a food system to provide sufficient energy and essential nutrients required to maintain good health in a population without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their nutritional needs. Ecological, social, and economic aspects must be balanced to support the sustainability of the overall food system. The nutritional sustainability of a food system can be influenced by several factors, including the ingredient selection, nutrient composition, digestibility, and consumption rates of a diet. Carbon and water footprints vary greatly among plant- and animal-based ingredients, production strategy, and geographical location. Because the pet food industry is based largely on by-products and is tightly interlinked with livestock production and the human food system, however, it is quite unique with regard to sustainability. Often based on consumer demand rather than nutritional requirements, many commercial pet foods are formulated to provide nutrients in excess of current minimum recommendations, use ingredients that compete directly with the human food system, or are overconsumed by pets, resulting in food wastage and obesity. Pet food professionals have the opportunity to address these challenges and influence the sustainability of pet ownership through product design, manufacturing processes, public education, and policy change. A coordinated effort across the industry that includes ingredient buyers, formulators, and nutritionists may result in a more sustainable pet food system. PMID:23493530

  18. Medium format cameras used by NASA astronauts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amsbury, David; Bremer, Jeff

    1989-01-01

    The medium format cameras and other hardware used for photographing the earth from the Space Shuttle are discussed. Illustrations and descriptions are given for the two types of cameras used for most earth photography, the NASA-modified Hasselblad 500 EL/M 70-mm cameras and the Linhof AeroTechnika 45 camera. Also, the data recording modules used on Space Shuttle missions and a mounting device to produce simultaneous photography using two cameras are examined.

  19. Energy and coincidence time resolution measurements of CdTe detectors for PET.

    PubMed

    Ariño, G; Chmeissani, M; De Lorenzo, G; Puigdengoles, C; Cabruja, E; Calderón, Y; Kolstein, M; Macias-Montero, J G; Martinez, R; Mikhaylova, E; Uzun, D

    2013-02-01

    We report on the characterization of 2 mm thick CdTe diode detector with Schottky contacts to be employed in a novel conceptual design of PET scanner. Results at -8°C with an applied bias voltage of -1000 V/mm show a 1.2% FWHM energy resolution at 511 keV. Coincidence time resolution has been measured by triggering on the preamplifier output signal to improve the timing resolution of the detector. Results at the same bias and temperature conditions show a FWHM of 6 ns with a minimum acceptance energy of 500 keV. These results show that pixelated CdTe Schottky diode is an excellent candidate for the development of next generation nuclear medical imaging devices such as PET, Compton gamma cameras, and especially PET-MRI hybrid systems when used in a magnetic field immune configuration.

  20. Towards the Implementation of an Autonomous Camera Algorithm on the da Vinci Platform.

    PubMed

    Eslamian, Shahab; Reisner, Luke A; King, Brady W; Pandya, Abhilash K

    2016-01-01

    Camera positioning is critical for all telerobotic surgical systems. Inadequate visualization of the remote site can lead to serious errors that can jeopardize the patient. An autonomous camera algorithm has been developed on a medical robot (da Vinci) simulator. It is found to be robust in key scenarios of operation. This system behaves with predictable and expected actions for the camera arm with respect to the tool positions. The implementation of this system is described herein. The simulation closely models the methodology needed to implement autonomous camera control in a real hardware system. The camera control algorithm follows three rules: (1) keep the view centered on the tools, (2) keep the zoom level optimized such that the tools never leave the field of view, and (3) avoid unnecessary movement of the camera that may distract/disorient the surgeon. Our future work will apply this algorithm to the real da Vinci hardware.

  1. Towards the Implementation of an Autonomous Camera Algorithm on the da Vinci Platform.

    PubMed

    Eslamian, Shahab; Reisner, Luke A; King, Brady W; Pandya, Abhilash K

    2016-01-01

    Camera positioning is critical for all telerobotic surgical systems. Inadequate visualization of the remote site can lead to serious errors that can jeopardize the patient. An autonomous camera algorithm has been developed on a medical robot (da Vinci) simulator. It is found to be robust in key scenarios of operation. This system behaves with predictable and expected actions for the camera arm with respect to the tool positions. The implementation of this system is described herein. The simulation closely models the methodology needed to implement autonomous camera control in a real hardware system. The camera control algorithm follows three rules: (1) keep the view centered on the tools, (2) keep the zoom level optimized such that the tools never leave the field of view, and (3) avoid unnecessary movement of the camera that may distract/disorient the surgeon. Our future work will apply this algorithm to the real da Vinci hardware. PMID:27046563

  2. The GISMO-2 Bolometer Camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Staguhn, Johannes G.; Benford, Dominic J.; Fixsen, Dale J.; Hilton, Gene; Irwin, Kent D.; Jhabvala, Christine A.; Kovacs, Attila; Leclercq, Samuel; Maher, Stephen F.; Miller, Timothy M.; Moseley, Samuel H.; Sharp, Elemer H.; Wollack, Edward J.

    2012-01-01

    We present the concept for the GISMO-2 bolometer camera) which we build for background-limited operation at the IRAM 30 m telescope on Pico Veleta, Spain. GISM0-2 will operate Simultaneously in the 1 mm and 2 mm atmospherical windows. The 1 mm channel uses a 32 x 40 TES-based Backshort Under Grid (BUG) bolometer array, the 2 mm channel operates with a 16 x 16 BUG array. The camera utilizes almost the entire full field of view provided by the telescope. The optical design of GISM0-2 was strongly influenced by our experience with the GISMO 2 mm bolometer camera which is successfully operating at the 30m telescope. GISMO is accessible to the astronomical community through the regular IRAM call for proposals.

  3. Dark Energy Camera for Blanco

    SciTech Connect

    Binder, Gary A.; /Caltech /SLAC

    2010-08-25

    In order to make accurate measurements of dark energy, a system is needed to monitor the focus and alignment of the Dark Energy Camera (DECam) to be located on the Blanco 4m Telescope for the upcoming Dark Energy Survey. One new approach under development is to fit out-of-focus star images to a point spread function from which information about the focus and tilt of the camera can be obtained. As a first test of a new algorithm using this idea, simulated star images produced from a model of DECam in the optics software Zemax were fitted. Then, real images from the Mosaic II imager currently installed on the Blanco telescope were used to investigate the algorithm's capabilities. A number of problems with the algorithm were found, and more work is needed to understand its limitations and improve its capabilities so it can reliably predict camera alignment and focus.

  4. Camera-on-a-Chip

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Jet Propulsion Laboratory's research on a second generation, solid-state image sensor technology has resulted in the Complementary Metal- Oxide Semiconductor Active Pixel Sensor (CMOS), establishing an alternative to the Charged Coupled Device (CCD). Photobit Corporation, the leading supplier of CMOS image sensors, has commercialized two products of their own based on this technology: the PB-100 and PB-300. These devices are cameras on a chip, combining all camera functions. CMOS "active-pixel" digital image sensors offer several advantages over CCDs, a technology used in video and still-camera applications for 30 years. The CMOS sensors draw less energy, they use the same manufacturing platform as most microprocessors and memory chips, and they allow on-chip programming of frame size, exposure, and other parameters.

  5. A high count rate position decoding and energy measuring method for nuclear cameras using Anger logic detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, W.H.; Li, H.; Uribe, J.

    1998-06-01

    A new method for processing signals from Anger position-sensitive detectors used in gamma cameras and PET is proposed for very high count-rate imaging where multiple-event pileups are the norm. This method is designed to sort out and recover every impinging event from multiple-event pileups while maximizing the collection of scintillation signal for every event to achieve optimal accuracy in the measurement of energy and position. For every detected event, this method cancels the remnant signals from previous events, and excludes the pileup of signals from following events. The remnant subtraction is exact even for multiple pileup events. A prototype circuit for energy recovery demonstrated that the maximum count rates can be increased by more than 10 times comparing to the pulse-shaping method, and the energy resolution is as good as pulse shaping (or fixed integration) at low count rates. At 2 {times} 10{sup 6} events/sec on NaI(Tl), the true counts acquired with this method is 3.3 times more than the delay-line clipping method (256 ns clipping) due to events recovered from pileups. Pulse-height spectra up to 3.5 {times} 10{sup 6} events/sec have been studied. Monte Carlo simulation studies have been performed for image-quality comparisons between different processing methods.

  6. Development of the LBNL positron emission mammography camera

    SciTech Connect

    Huber, Jennifer S.; Choong, Woon-Seng; Wang, Jimmy; Maltz, Jonathon S.; Qi, Jinyi; Mandelli, Emanuele; Moses, William W.

    2002-12-19

    We present the construction status of the LBNL Positron Emission Mammography (PEM) camera, which utilizes a PET detector module with depth of interaction measurement consisting of 64 LSO crystals (3x3x30 mm3) coupled on one end to a single photomultiplier tube (PMT) and on the opposite end to a 64 pixel array of silicon photodiodes (PDs). The PMT provides an accurate timing pulse, the PDs identify the crystal of interaction, the sum provides a total energy signal, and the PD/(PD+PMT) ratio determines the depth of interaction. We have completed construction of all 42 PEM detector modules. All data acquisition electronics have been completed, fully tested and loaded onto the gantry. We have demonstrated that all functions of the custom IC work using the production rigid-flex boards and data acquisition system. Preliminary detector module characterization and coincidence data have been taken using the production system, including initial images.

  7. SU-C-9A-06: The Impact of CT Image Used for Attenuation Correction in 4D-PET

    SciTech Connect

    Cui, Y; Bowsher, J; Yan, S; Cai, J; Das, S; Yin, F

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the appropriateness of using 3D non-gated CT image for attenuation correction (AC) in a 4D-PET (gated PET) imaging protocol used in radiotherapy treatment planning simulation. Methods: The 4D-PET imaging protocol in a Siemens PET/CT simulator (Biograph mCT, Siemens Medical Solutions, Hoffman Estates, IL) was evaluated. CIRS Dynamic Thorax Phantom (CIRS Inc., Norfolk, VA) with a moving glass sphere (8 mL) in the middle of its thorax portion was used in the experiments. The glass was filled with {sup 18}F-FDG and was in a longitudinal motion derived from a real patient breathing pattern. Varian RPM system (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA) was used for respiratory gating. Both phase-gating and amplitude-gating methods were tested. The clinical imaging protocol was modified to use three different CT images for AC in 4D-PET reconstruction: first is to use a single-phase CT image to mimic actual clinical protocol (single-CT-PET); second is to use the average intensity projection CT (AveIP-CT) derived from 4D-CT scanning (AveIP-CT-PET); third is to use 4D-CT image to do the phase-matched AC (phase-matching- PET). Maximum SUV (SUVmax) and volume of the moving target (glass sphere) with threshold of 40% SUVmax were calculated for comparison between 4D-PET images derived with different AC methods. Results: The SUVmax varied 7.3%±6.9% over the breathing cycle in single-CT-PET, compared to 2.5%±2.8% in AveIP-CT-PET and 1.3%±1.2% in phasematching PET. The SUVmax in single-CT-PET differed by up to 15% from those in phase-matching-PET. The target volumes measured from single- CT-PET images also presented variations up to 10% among different phases of 4D PET in both phase-gating and amplitude-gating experiments. Conclusion: Attenuation correction using non-gated CT in 4D-PET imaging is not optimal process for quantitative analysis. Clinical 4D-PET imaging protocols should consider phase-matched 4D-CT image if available to achieve better accuracy.

  8. Radiometric performance of the Viking Mars lander cameras

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huck, F. O.; Burcher, E. E.; Taylor, E. J.; Wall, S. D.

    1975-01-01

    The Viking lander cameras feature an array of 12 silicon photodiodes for electronic focus selection and multispectral imaging. Comparisons of absolute radiometric calibrations of the four cameras selected for the mission to Mars with performance predictions based on their design data revealed minor discrepancies. These discrepancies were caused primarily by the method used to calibrate the photosensor array and apparently also from light reflections internal to the array. The sensitivity and dynamic range of all camera channels are found to be sufficient for high quality pictures, providing that the commandable gains and offsets can be optimized for the scene radiance; otherwise, the quantization noise may be too high or the dynamic range too low for an adequate characterization of the scene.

  9. SFDT-1 Camera Pointing and Sun-Exposure Analysis and Flight Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Joseph; Dutta, Soumyo; Striepe, Scott

    2015-01-01

    The Supersonic Flight Dynamics Test (SFDT) vehicle was developed to advance and test technologies of NASA's Low Density Supersonic Decelerator (LDSD) Technology Demonstration Mission. The first flight test (SFDT-1) occurred on June 28, 2014. In order to optimize the usefulness of the camera data, analysis was performed to optimize parachute visibility in the camera field of view during deployment and inflation and to determine the probability of sun-exposure issues with the cameras given the vehicle heading and launch time. This paper documents the analysis, results and comparison with flight video of SFDT-1.

  10. Demonstration of an Axial PET concept for brain and small animal imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beltrame, P.; Bolle, E.; Braem, A.; Casella, C.; Chesi, E.; Clinthorne, N.; De Leo, R.; Dissertori, G.; Djambazov, L.; Fanti, V.; Joram, C.; Kagan, H.; Lustermann, W.; Meddi, F.; Nappi, E.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Oliver, J. F.; Pauss, F.; Rafecas, M.; Renker, D.; Rudge, A.; Schinzel, D.; Schneider, T.; Séguinot, J.; Solevi, P.; Stapnes, S.; Weilhammer, P.

    2011-02-01

    Standard Positron Emission Tomography (PET) cameras need to reach a compromise between spatial resolution and sensitivity. To overcome this limitation we developed a novel concept of PET. Our AX-PET demonstrator is made of LYSO crystals aligned along the z coordinate (patient's axis) and WLS strips orthogonally placed with respect to the crystals. This concept offers full 3D localization of the photon interaction inside the camera. Thus the spatial resolution and the sensitivity can be simultaneously improved and the reconstruction of Compton interactions inside the detector is also possible. Moreover, by means of G-APDs for reading out the photons, both from LYSO and WLS, the detector is insensitive to magnetic fields and it is then suitable to be used in a combined PET/MRI apparatus. A complete Monte Carlo simulation and dedicated reconstruction software have been developed. The two final modules, each composed of 48 crystals and 156 WLS strips, have been built and fully characterized in a dedicated test set-up. The results, obtained with a 22Na point source (0.25 mm diameter), of the single module performances and a first estimation of the performances with the two module system are reported.

  11. Astronomical observations with an infrared array camera

    SciTech Connect

    Tresch-Fienberg, R.M.

    1985-01-01

    Astronomical observations with an infrared array camera demonstrate that arrays are excellent for high spatial resolution photometric mapping of celestial objects. The author describes a a 16 x 16 pixel array camera system based on a bismuth-doped silicon charge injection device optimized for use in the 8-13 micron atmospheric window. Observing techniques and image processing algorithms that are unique to the use of an array detector are also discussed. Multi-wavelength, 1-2 arcsec resolution images of three different celestial objects are presented. For the galactic center, maps of the infrared color temperature and emission optical depth are derived. The results are consistent with a model in which a low density region with a massive luminosity source at its center is encircled by a ring of gas and dust from which material may be infalling toward the nucleus. Multiple luminosity sources are not required to explain the infrared appearance of the galactic center. Images of Seyfert galaxy NGC 1068 are the first to resolve the infrared structure of the nucleus and show that it is similar to that at optical and radio wavelengths. Infrared emission extended northeast of the nucleus is identified with the radio jet. Combined with optical spectra and charge coupled device images, the new data imply a causal relationship between the Seyfert activity in the nucleus and the starburst in the disk.

  12. Derivation of the scan time requirement for maintaining a consistent PET image quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jin Su; Lee, Jae Sung; Kim, Seok-Ki

    2015-05-01

    Objectives: the image quality of PET for larger patients is relatively poor, even though the injection dose is optimized considering the NECR characteristics of the PET scanner. This poor image quality is due to the lower level of maximum NECR that can be achieved in these large patients. The aim of this study was to optimize the PET scan time to obtain a consistent PET image quality regardless of the body size, based on the relationship between the patient specific NECR (pNECR) and body weight. Methods: eighty patients (M/F=53/27, body weight: 059 ± 1 kg) underwent whole-body FDG PET scans using a Philips GEMINI GS PET/CT scanner after an injection of 0.14 mCi/kg FDG. The relationship between the scatter fraction (SF) and body weight was determined by repeated Monte Carlo simulations using a NEMA scatter phantom, the size of which varied according to the relationship between the abdominal circumference and body weight. Using this information, the pNECR was calculated from the prompt and delayed PET sinograms to obtain the prediction equation of NECR vs. body weight. The time scaling factor (FTS) for the scan duration was finally derived to make PET images with equivalent SNR levels. Results: the SF and NECR had the following nonlinear relationships with the body weight: SF=0.15 ṡ body weight0.3 and NECR = 421.36 (body weight)-0.84. The equation derived for FTS was 0.01ṡ body weight + 0.2, which means that, for example, a 120-kg person should be scanned 1.8 times longer than a 70 kg person, or the scan time for a 40-kg person can be reduced by 30%. Conclusion: the equation of the relative time demand derived in this study will be useful for maintaining consistent PET image quality in clinics.

  13. Parasites in pet reptiles

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Exotic reptiles originating from the wild can be carriers of many different pathogens and some of them can infect humans. Reptiles imported into Slovenia from 2000 to 2005, specimens of native species taken from the wild and captive bred species were investigated. A total of 949 reptiles (55 snakes, 331 lizards and 563 turtles), belonging to 68 different species, were examined for the presence of endoparasites and ectoparasites. Twelve different groups (Nematoda (5), Trematoda (1), Acanthocephala (1), Pentastomida (1) and Protozoa (4)) of endoparasites were determined in 26 (47.3%) of 55 examined snakes. In snakes two different species of ectoparasites were also found. Among the tested lizards eighteen different groups (Nematoda (8), Cestoda (1), Trematoda (1), Acanthocephala (1), Pentastomida (1) and Protozoa (6)) of endoparasites in 252 (76.1%) of 331 examined animals were found. One Trombiculid ectoparasite was determined. In 563 of examined turtles eight different groups (Nematoda (4), Cestoda (1), Trematoda (1) and Protozoa (2)) of endoparasites were determined in 498 (88.5%) animals. In examined turtles three different species of ectoparasites were seen. The established prevalence of various parasites in reptiles used as pet animals indicates the need for examination on specific pathogens prior to introduction to owners. PMID:21624124

  14. Retinal oximetry with a multiaperture camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemaillet, Paul; Lompado, Art; Ibrahim, Mohamed; Nguyen, Quan Dong; Ramella-Roman, Jessica C.

    2010-02-01

    Oxygen saturation measurements in the retina is an essential measurement in monitoring eye health of diabetic patient. In this paper, preliminary result of oxygen saturation measurements for a healthy patient retina is presented. The retinal oximeter used is based on a regular fundus camera to which was added an optimized optical train designed to perform aperture division whereas a filter array help select the requested wavelengths. Hence, nine equivalent wavelength-dependent sub-images are taken in a snapshot which helps minimizing the effects of eye movements. The setup is calibrated by using a set of reflectance calibration phantoms and a lookuptable (LUT) is computed. An inverse model based on the LUT is presented to extract the optical properties of a patient fundus and further estimate the oxygen saturation in a retina vessel.

  15. Visible camera imaging of plasmas in Proto-MPEX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosby, R.; Skeen, C.; Biewer, T. M.; Renfro, R.; Ray, H.; Shaw, G. C.

    2015-11-01

    The prototype Material Plasma Exposure eXperiment (Proto-MPEX) is a linear plasma device being developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). This machine plans to study plasma-material interaction (PMI) physics relevant to future fusion reactors. Measurements of plasma light emission will be made on Proto-MPEX using fast, visible framing cameras. The cameras utilize a global shutter, which allows a full frame image of the plasma to be captured and compared at multiple times during the plasma discharge. Typical exposure times are ~10-100 microseconds. The cameras are capable of capturing images at up to 18,000 frames per second (fps). However, the frame rate is strongly dependent on the size of the ``region of interest'' that is sampled. The maximum ROI corresponds to the full detector area, of ~1000x1000 pixels. The cameras have an internal gain, which controls the sensitivity of the 10-bit detector. The detector includes a Bayer filter, for ``true-color'' imaging of the plasma emission. This presentation will exmine the optimized camera settings for use on Proto-MPEX. This work was supported by the US. D.O.E. contract DE-AC05-00OR22725.

  16. Design, calibration and operation of Mars lander cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bos, Brent Jon

    2002-09-01

    In the 45 years since the dawn of the space age, there have only been two Mars lander camera designs to successfully operate on the Martian surface. Therefore information on Mars imager design and operation issues is limited. In addition, good examples of Mars lander imager calibration work are almost non-existent. This work presents instrument calibration results for a Mars lander camera originally designed to fly as an instrument onboard the 2001 Mars Surveyor lander as a robotic arm camera (RAC). Test procedures and results are described as well as techniques for improving the accuracy of the calibration data. In addition we describe camera algorithms and operations research results for optimizing imager operations on the Martian surface. Finally, the lessons learned from the 2001 RAC are applied to the preliminary design of a new Mars camera for the Artemis Mars Scout mission. The design utilizes a Bayer color mosaic filter, white light LED's and includes an optical system operating at f/13 with a maximum resolution of 0.11 mrad/pixel. It is capable of imaging in several modes including: stereo, microscopic and panoramic at a mass of 0.3 kg. It will provide planetary geologists with an unprecedented view of the Martian surface.

  17. Stratoscope 2 integrating television camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The development, construction, test and delivery of an integrating television camera for use as the primary data sensor on Flight 9 of Stratoscope 2 is described. The system block diagrams are presented along with the performance data, and definition of the interface of the telescope with the power, telemetry, and communication system.

  18. Making Films without a Camera.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cox, Carole

    1980-01-01

    Describes draw-on filmmaking as an exciting way to introduce children to the plastic, fluid nature of the film medium, to develop their appreciation and understanding of divergent cinematic techniques and themes, and to invite them into the dream world of filmmaking without the need for a camera. (AEA)

  19. High speed multiwire photon camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lacy, Jeffrey L. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    An improved multiwire proportional counter camera having particular utility in the field of clinical nuclear medicine imaging. The detector utilizes direct coupled, low impedance, high speed delay lines, the segments of which are capacitor-inductor networks. A pile-up rejection test is provided to reject confused events otherwise caused by multiple ionization events occurring during the readout window.

  20. High speed multiwire photon camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lacy, Jeffrey L. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    An improved multiwire proportional counter camera having particular utility in the field of clinical nuclear medicine imaging. The detector utilizes direct coupled, low impedance, high speed delay lines, the segments of which are capacitor-inductor networks. A pile-up rejection test is provided to reject confused events otherwise caused by multiple ionization events occuring during the readout window.

  1. Measuring Distances Using Digital Cameras

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kendal, Dave

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a generic method of calculating accurate horizontal and vertical object distances from digital images taken with any digital camera and lens combination, where the object plane is parallel to the image plane or tilted in the vertical plane. This method was developed for a project investigating the size, density and spatial…

  2. Camera assisted multimodal user interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hannuksela, Jari; Silvén, Olli; Ronkainen, Sami; Alenius, Sakari; Vehviläinen, Markku

    2010-01-01

    Since more processing power, new sensing and display technologies are already available in mobile devices, there has been increased interest in building systems to communicate via different modalities such as speech, gesture, expression, and touch. In context identification based user interfaces, these independent modalities are combined to create new ways how the users interact with hand-helds. While these are unlikely to completely replace traditional interfaces, they will considerably enrich and improve the user experience and task performance. We demonstrate a set of novel user interface concepts that rely on built-in multiple sensors of modern mobile devices for recognizing the context and sequences of actions. In particular, we use the camera to detect whether the user is watching the device, for instance, to make the decision to turn on the display backlight. In our approach the motion sensors are first employed for detecting the handling of the device. Then, based on ambient illumination information provided by a light sensor, the cameras are turned on. The frontal camera is used for face detection, while the back camera provides for supplemental contextual information. The subsequent applications triggered by the context can be, for example, image capturing, or bar code reading.

  3. Gamma-ray camera flyby

    SciTech Connect

    2010-01-01

    Animation based on an actual classroom demonstration of the prototype CCI-2 gamma-ray camera's ability to image a hidden radioactive source, a cesium-137 line source, in three dimensions. For more information see http://newscenter.lbl.gov/feature-stories/2010/06/02/applied-nuclear-physics/.

  4. The Camera Comes to Court.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Floren, Leola

    After the Lindbergh kidnapping trial in 1935, the American Bar Association sought to eliminate electronic equipment from courtroom proceedings. Eventually, all but two states adopted regulations applying that ban to some extent, and a 1965 Supreme Court decision encouraged the banning of television cameras at trials as well. Currently, some states…

  5. High-speed pulse camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawson, J. R.

    1968-01-01

    Miniaturized, 16 mm high speed pulse camera takes spectral photometric photographs upon instantaneous command. The design includes a low-friction, low-inertia film transport, a very thin beryllium shutter driven by a low-inertia stepper motor for minimum actuation time after a pulse command, and a binary encoder.

  6. Recent advances in digital camera optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishiguro, Keizo

    2012-10-01

    The digital camera market has extremely expanded in the last ten years. The zoom lens for digital camera is especially the key determining factor of the camera body size and image quality. Its technologies have been based on several analog technological progresses including the method of aspherical lens manufacturing and the mechanism of image stabilization. Panasonic is one of the pioneers of both technologies. I will introduce the previous trend in optics of zoom lens as well as original optical technologies of Panasonic digital camera "LUMIX", and in addition optics in 3D camera system. Besides, I would like to suppose the future trend in digital cameras.

  7. Dual-modality brain PET-CT image segmentation based on adaptive use of functional and anatomical information.

    PubMed

    Xia, Yong; Eberl, Stefan; Wen, Lingfeng; Fulham, Michael; Feng, David Dagan

    2012-01-01

    Dual medical imaging modalities, such as PET-CT, are now a routine component of clinical practice. Medical image segmentation methods, however, have generally only been applied to single modality images. In this paper, we propose the dual-modality image segmentation model to segment brain PET-CT images into gray matter, white matter and cerebrospinal fluid. This model converts PET-CT image segmentation into an optimization process controlled simultaneously by PET and CT voxel values and spatial constraints. It is innovative in the creation and application of the modality discriminatory power (MDP) coefficient as a weighting scheme to adaptively combine the functional (PET) and anatomical (CT) information on a voxel-by-voxel basis. Our approach relies upon allowing the modality with higher discriminatory power to play a more important role in the segmentation process. We compared the proposed approach to three other image segmentation strategies, including PET-only based segmentation, combination of the results of independent PET image segmentation and CT image segmentation, and simultaneous segmentation of joint PET and CT images without an adaptive weighting scheme. Our results in 21 clinical studies showed that our approach provides the most accurate and reliable segmentation for brain PET-CT images. PMID:21719257

  8. Dual-modality brain PET-CT image segmentation based on adaptive use of functional and anatomical information.

    PubMed

    Xia, Yong; Eberl, Stefan; Wen, Lingfeng; Fulham, Michael; Feng, David Dagan

    2012-01-01

    Dual medical imaging modalities, such as PET-CT, are now a routine component of clinical practice. Medical image segmentation methods, however, have generally only been applied to single modality images. In this paper, we propose the dual-modality image segmentation model to segment brain PET-CT images into gray matter, white matter and cerebrospinal fluid. This model converts PET-CT image segmentation into an optimization process controlled simultaneously by PET and CT voxel values and spatial constraints. It is innovative in the creation and application of the modality discriminatory power (MDP) coefficient as a weighting scheme to adaptively combine the functional (PET) and anatomical (CT) information on a voxel-by-voxel basis. Our approach relies upon allowing the modality with higher discriminatory power to play a more important role in the segmentation process. We compared the proposed approach to three other image segmentation strategies, including PET-only based segmentation, combination of the results of independent PET image segmentation and CT image segmentation, and simultaneous segmentation of joint PET and CT images without an adaptive weighting scheme. Our results in 21 clinical studies showed that our approach provides the most accurate and reliable segmentation for brain PET-CT images.

  9. Exercises in PET Image Reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nix, Oliver

    These exercises are complementary to the theoretical lectures about positron emission tomography (PET) image reconstruction. They aim at providing some hands on experience in PET image reconstruction and focus on demonstrating the different data preprocessing steps and reconstruction algorithms needed to obtain high quality PET images. Normalisation, geometric-, attenuation- and scatter correction are introduced. To explain the necessity of those some basics about PET scanner hardware, data acquisition and organisation are reviewed. During the course the students use a software application based on the STIR (software for tomographic image reconstruction) library 1,2 which allows them to dynamically select or deselect corrections and reconstruction methods as well as to modify their most important parameters. Following the guided tutorial, the students get an impression on the effect the individual data precorrections have on image quality and what happens if they are forgotten. Several data sets in sinogram format are provided, such as line source data, Jaszczak phantom data sets with high and low statistics and NEMA whole body phantom data. The two most frequently used reconstruction algorithms in PET image reconstruction, filtered back projection (FBP) and the iterative OSEM (ordered subset expectation maximation) approach are used to reconstruct images. The exercise should help the students gaining an understanding what the reasons for inferior image quality and artefacts are and how to improve quality by a clever choice of reconstruction parameters.

  10. Recent Understandings of Pet Allergies

    PubMed Central

    Ownby, Dennis; Johnson, Christine Cole

    2016-01-01

    Allergic reactions to pets have been recognized for at least a hundred years. Yet our understanding of the effects of all of the interactions between pet exposures and human immune responses continues to grow. Allergists, epidemiologists, and immunologists have spent years trying to better understand how exposures to pet allergens lead to allergic sensitization (the production of allergen-specific immunoglobulin class E [IgE] antibodies) and subsequent allergic disease. A major new development in this understanding is the recognition that pet exposures consist of not only allergen exposures but also changes in microbial exposures. Exposures to certain pet-associated microbes, especially in the neonatal period, appear to be able to dramatically alter how a child’s immune system develops and this in turn reduces the risk of allergic sensitization and disease. An exciting challenge in the next few years will be to see whether these changes can be developed into a realistic preventative strategy with the expectation of significantly reducing allergic disease, especially asthma. PMID:26918180

  11. Children's drawings and attachment to pets.

    PubMed

    Kidd, A H; Kidd, R M

    1995-08-01

    To help confirm the concept that distances placed between the self and other figures in children's drawings represent emotional distances, 242 pet-owning and 35 nonpet-owning kindergartners through eighth graders drew pictures of themselves, a pet, and/or a family member. Owners drew pets significantly closer than family-figures although the younger the child, the greater the distance between self and pet. Older children drew themselves holding pets significantly more often, but younger children placed the family-figure between the self and the pet significantly more often. There were no significant gender differences in self-figure/pet-figure distances, but cats, dogs, caged animals, and farm animals were placed significantly closer to self-figures than were fish. Over-all, owners were clearly emotionally closer to pets than to family members, but nonowners were as close emotionally to family members as were owners. PMID:7501763

  12. [Interest of FDG-PET for lung cancer radiotherapy].

    PubMed

    Thureau, S; Mezzani-Saillard, S; Modzelewski, R; Edet-Sanson, A; Dubray, B; Vera, P

    2011-10-01

    The recent advances in medical imaging have profoundly altered the radiotherapy of non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC). A meta-analysis has confirmed the superiority of FDG PET-CT over CT for initial staging. FDG PET-CT improves the reproducibility of target volume delineation, especially close to the mediastinum or in the presence of atelectasia. Although not formally validated by a randomized trial, the reduction of the mediastinal target volume, by restricting the irradiation to FDG-avid nodes, is widely accepted. The optimal method of delineation still remains to be defined. The role of FDG PET-CT in monitoring tumor response during radiotherapy is under investigation, potentially opening the way to adapting the treatment modalities to tumor radiation sensitivity. Other tracers, such as F-miso (hypoxia), are also under clinical investigation. To avoid excessive delays, the integration of PET-CT in routine practice requires quick access to the imaging equipment, technical support (fusion and image processing) and multidisciplinary delineation of target volumes. PMID:21880535

  13. Surveillance of a 2D plane area with 3D deployed cameras.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yi-Ge; Zhou, Jie; Deng, Lei

    2014-01-01

    As the use of camera networks has expanded, camera placement to satisfy some quality assurance parameters (such as a good coverage ratio, an acceptable resolution constraints, an acceptable cost as low as possible, etc.) has become an important problem. The discrete camera deployment problem is NP-hard and many heuristic methods have been proposed to solve it, most of which make very simple assumptions. In this paper, we propose a probability inspired binary Particle Swarm Optimization (PI-BPSO) algorithm to solve a homogeneous camera network placement problem. We model the problem under some more realistic assumptions: (1) deploy the cameras in the 3D space while the surveillance area is restricted to a 2D ground plane; (2) deploy the minimal number of cameras to get a maximum visual coverage under more constraints, such as field of view (FOV) of the cameras and the minimum resolution constraints. We can simultaneously optimize the number and the configuration of the cameras through the introduction of a regulation item in the cost function. The simulation results showed the effectiveness of the proposed PI-BPSO algorithm.

  14. Developments in particle tracking using the Birmingham Positron Camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, D. J.; Allen, D. A.; Benton, D. M.; Fowles, P.; McNeil, P. A.; Tan, Min; Beynon, T. D.

    1997-02-01

    The RAL/Birmingham Positron Camera consists of a pair of MWPCs for detecting the pairs of back-to-back 511 keV photons arising from positron-electron annihilation. It was constructed in 1984 for the purpose of applying PET to engineering situations, and has been widely used for the non-invasive imaging of flow, including extensive studies on geological samples. The technique of Positron Emission Particle Tracking (PEPT), whereby a single positron-emitting tracer particle can be tracked at high speed, was developed at Birmingham and has proved a very powerful tool for studying the behaviour of granular materials in systems such as mixers and fluidised beds. In order to extend its effective field of view, the camera has recently been mounted on a motorised translation stage under computer control so that the motion of a tracer particle can be followed over a length of up to 1.5 m. A preliminary investigation into the feasibility of enhancing the PEPT technique using the singles count rates in the two detectors has also been undertaken.

  15. PET Metabolic Biomarkers for Cancer.

    PubMed

    Croteau, Etienne; Renaud, Jennifer M; Richard, Marie Anne; Ruddy, Terrence D; Bénard, François; deKemp, Robert A

    2016-01-01

    The body's main fuel sources are fats, carbohydrates (glucose), proteins, and ketone bodies. It is well known that an important hallmark of cancer cells is the overconsumption of glucose. Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging using the glucose analog (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG) has been a powerful cancer diagnostic tool for many decades. Apart from surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy represent the two main domains for cancer therapy, targeting tumor proliferation, cell division, and DNA replication-all processes that require a large amount of energy. Currently, in vivo clinical imaging of metabolism is performed almost exclusively using PET radiotracers that assess oxygen consumption and mechanisms of energy substrate consumption. This paper reviews the utility of PET imaging biomarkers for the detection of cancer proliferation, vascularization, metabolism, treatment response, and follow-up after radiation therapy, chemotherapy, and chemotherapy-related side effects. PMID:27679534

  16. PET Metabolic Biomarkers for Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Croteau, Etienne; Renaud, Jennifer M.; Richard, Marie Anne; Ruddy, Terrence D.; Bénard, François; deKemp, Robert A.

    2016-01-01

    The body’s main fuel sources are fats, carbohydrates (glucose), proteins, and ketone bodies. It is well known that an important hallmark of cancer cells is the overconsumption of glucose. Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging using the glucose analog 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) has been a powerful cancer diagnostic tool for many decades. Apart from surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy represent the two main domains for cancer therapy, targeting tumor proliferation, cell division, and DNA replication—all processes that require a large amount of energy. Currently, in vivo clinical imaging of metabolism is performed almost exclusively using PET radiotracers that assess oxygen consumption and mechanisms of energy substrate consumption. This paper reviews the utility of PET imaging biomarkers for the detection of cancer proliferation, vascularization, metabolism, treatment response, and follow-up after radiation therapy, chemotherapy, and chemotherapy-related side effects. PMID:27679534

  17. PET Metabolic Biomarkers for Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Croteau, Etienne; Renaud, Jennifer M.; Richard, Marie Anne; Ruddy, Terrence D.; Bénard, François; deKemp, Robert A.

    2016-01-01

    The body’s main fuel sources are fats, carbohydrates (glucose), proteins, and ketone bodies. It is well known that an important hallmark of cancer cells is the overconsumption of glucose. Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging using the glucose analog 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) has been a powerful cancer diagnostic tool for many decades. Apart from surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy represent the two main domains for cancer therapy, targeting tumor proliferation, cell division, and DNA replication—all processes that require a large amount of energy. Currently, in vivo clinical imaging of metabolism is performed almost exclusively using PET radiotracers that assess oxygen consumption and mechanisms of energy substrate consumption. This paper reviews the utility of PET imaging biomarkers for the detection of cancer proliferation, vascularization, metabolism, treatment response, and follow-up after radiation therapy, chemotherapy, and chemotherapy-related side effects.

  18. Latest achievements in PET techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Guerra, Alberto; Belcari, Nicola; Motta, Alfonso; Di Domenico, Giovanni; Sabba, Nicola; Zavattini, Guido

    2003-11-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) has moved from a distinguished research tool in physiology, cardiology and neurology to become a major tool for clinical investigation in oncology, in cardiac applications and in neurological disorders. Much of the PET accomplishments is due to the remarkable improvements in the last 10 years both in hardware and software aspects. Nowadays a similar effort is made by many research groups towards the construction of dedicated PET apparatus in new emerging fields such as molecular medicine, gene therapy, breast cancer imaging and combined modalities. This paper reports on some recent results we have obtained in small animal imaging and positron emission mammography, based on the use of advanced technology in the field of scintillators and photodetectors, such as Position-Sensitive Detectors coupled to crystal matrices, combined use of scintillating fibers and Hybrid-Photo-Diodes readout, and Hamamatsu flat panels. New ideas and future developments are discussed.

  19. Understanding advertising in pet nutrition.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, R G

    1994-01-01

    Advertising is part of the effort to attract attention of consumers to products, in this case, pet foods. It is generally benign in its effect, but it can be misleading, although rarely deliberately so. It uses a specialized vocabulary, which must be mastered if one is to understand what is intended. For all of the expense and effort, advertising figures directly in relatively few decisions to purchase. Its main intention is to call our attention to a particular pet food and to give that product an image. If the pet food does not perform in the consumer's hands, then all of the advertising on earth will not be persuasive. On the other hand, if a product performs well, the word-of-mouth will be positive and that mode of advertising is one of the most effective. PMID:8076285

  20. 36 CFR 13.1234 - Pets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Pets. 13.1234 Section 13.1234 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NATIONAL PARK... § 13.1234 Pets. Possessing a pet in the BCDA is prohibited....

  1. Pet therapy: dogs de-stress students.

    PubMed

    Young, Judith S

    2012-01-01

    Research supports the efficacy of the human-animal bond and pet therapy in a variety of settings. At nursing students' request at one school, the author began offering pet therapy prior to examinations. Anecdotal evidence of a study with the author's Golden Retriever, Goldilocks, demonstrates that pet therapy can reduce test anxiety and improve nursing student performance. PMID:23082615

  2. 7 CFR 503.11 - Pets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Pets. 503.11 Section 503.11 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CONDUCT ON PLUM ISLAND ANIMAL DISEASE CENTER § 503.11 Pets. No pets or animals of any kind may be...

  3. 7 CFR 503.11 - Pets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Pets. 503.11 Section 503.11 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CONDUCT ON PLUM ISLAND ANIMAL DISEASE CENTER § 503.11 Pets. No pets or animals of any kind may be...

  4. 7 CFR 503.11 - Pets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Pets. 503.11 Section 503.11 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CONDUCT ON PLUM ISLAND ANIMAL DISEASE CENTER § 503.11 Pets. No pets or animals of any kind may be...

  5. 7 CFR 503.11 - Pets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Pets. 503.11 Section 503.11 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CONDUCT ON PLUM ISLAND ANIMAL DISEASE CENTER § 503.11 Pets. No pets or animals of any kind may be...

  6. 7 CFR 503.11 - Pets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Pets. 503.11 Section 503.11 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CONDUCT ON PLUM ISLAND ANIMAL DISEASE CENTER § 503.11 Pets. No pets or animals of any kind may be...

  7. A Guide to Managing Your Classroom Pets.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caras, Robert

    1980-01-01

    The author suggests eight ideal classroom pets: hamsters; turtles; snakes; spiders; frogs and toads; fish; and birds. For each he gives suggestions on selecting the pet and housing and feeding it in the classroom. Desert terrariums and home pet care training are also discussed. (SJL)

  8. 7 CFR 500.10 - Pets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Pets. 500.10 Section 500.10 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE NATIONAL ARBORETUM Conduct on U.S. National Arboreturm Property § 500.10 Pets. Pets brought upon...

  9. Saying Goodbye: Pet Loss and Its Implications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duffey, Thelma

    2005-01-01

    Pets can be loyal, loving, and entertaining members of a family. Their deaths are generally experienced as painful losses by the people who love them, even though the grief experience is often culturally disenfranchised. In this manuscript, we discuss the role that pets can play in a person's life; the effects that pet loss can have on the people…

  10. 36 CFR 13.1234 - Pets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Pets. 13.1234 Section 13.1234 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NATIONAL PARK... § 13.1234 Pets. Possessing a pet in the BCDA is prohibited....

  11. Fast 3D-EM reconstruction using Planograms for stationary planar positron emission mammography camera.

    PubMed

    Motta, A; Guerra, A Del; Belcari, N; Moehrs, S; Panetta, D; Righi, S; Valentini, D

    2005-12-01

    At the University of Pisa we are building a PEM prototype, the YAP-PEM camera, consisting of two opposite 6 x 6 x 3 cm3 detector heads of 30 x 30 YAP:Ce finger crystals, 2 x 2 x 30 mm3 each. The camera will be equipped with breast compressors. The acquisition will be stationary. Compared with a whole body PET scanner, a planar Positron Emission Mammography (PEM) camera allows a better, easier and more flexible positioning around the breast in the vicinity of the tumor: this increases the sensitivity and solid angle coverage, and reduces cost. To avoid software rejection of data during the reconstruction, resulting in a reduced sensitivity, we adopted a 3D-EM reconstruction which uses all of the collected Lines Of Response (LORs). This skips the PSF distortion given by data rebinning procedures and/or Fourier methods. The traditional 3D-EM reconstruction requires several times the computation of the LOR-voxel correlation matrix, or probability matrix {p(ij)}; therefore is highly time-consuming. We use the sparse and symmetry properties of the matrix {p(ij)} to perform fast 3D-EM reconstruction. Geometrically, a 3D grid of cubic voxels (FOV) is crossed by several divergent 3D line sets (LORs). The symmetries occur when tracing different LORs produces the same p(ij) value. Parallel LORs of different sets cross the FOV in the same way, and the repetition of p(ij) values depends on the ratio between the tube and voxel sizes. By optimizing this ratio, the occurrence of symmetries is increased. We identify a nucleus of symmetry of LORs: for each set of symmetrical LORs we choose just one LOR to be put in the nucleus, while the others lie outside. All of the possible p(ij) values are obtainable by tracking only the LORs of this nucleus. The coordinates of the voxels of all of the other LORs are given by means of simple translation rules. Before making the reconstruction, we trace the LORs of the nucleus to find the intersecting voxels, whose p(ij) values are computed and

  12. Combustion pinhole-camera system

    DOEpatents

    Witte, A.B.

    1982-05-19

    A pinhole camera system is described utilizing a sealed optical-purge assembly which provides optical access into a coal combustor or other energy conversion reactors. The camera system basically consists of a focused-purge pinhole optical port assembly, a conventional TV vidicon receiver, an external, variable density light filter which is coupled electronically to the vidicon automatic gain control (agc). The key component of this system is the focused-purge pinhole optical port assembly which utilizes a purging inert gas to keep debris from entering the port and a lens arrangement which transfers the pinhole to the outside of the port assembly. One additional feature of the port assembly is that it is not flush with the interior of the combustor.

  13. A 10-microm infrared camera.

    PubMed

    Arens, J F; Jernigan, J G; Peck, M C; Dobson, C A; Kilk, E; Lacy, J; Gaalema, S

    1987-09-15

    An IR camera has been built at the University of California at Berkeley for astronomical observations. The camera has been used primarily for high angular resolution imaging at mid-IR wavelengths. It has been tested at the University of Arizona 61- and 90-in. telescopes near Tucson and the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility on Mauna Kea, HI. In the observations the system has been used as an imager with interference coated and Fabry-Perot filters. These measurements have demonstrated a sensitivity consistent with photon shot noise, showing that the system is limited by the radiation from the telescope and atmosphere. Measurements of read noise, crosstalk, and hysteresis have been made in our laboratory. PMID:20490151

  14. Electronographic cameras for space astronomy.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carruthers, G. R.; Opal, C. B.

    1972-01-01

    Magnetically-focused electronographic cameras have been under development at the Naval Research Laboratory for use in far-ultraviolet imagery and spectrography, primarily in astronomical and optical-geophysical observations from sounding rockets and space vehicles. Most of this work has been with cameras incorporating internal optics of the Schmidt or wide-field all-reflecting types. More recently, we have begun development of electronographic spectrographs incorporating an internal concave grating, operating at normal or grazing incidence. We also are developing electronographic image tubes of the conventional end-window-photo-cathode type, for far-ultraviolet imagery at the focus of a large space telescope, with image formats up to 120 mm in diameter.

  15. PET/CT and Bremsstrahlung Imaging After 90Y DOTANOC Therapy for Rectal Net With Liver Metastases.

    PubMed

    Abdülrezzak, Ümmühan; Kula, Mustafa; Tutuş, Ahmet; Buyukkaya, Fikret; Karaca, Halit

    2015-10-01

    Peptide receptor radionuclide therapy with Lu or Y is promising with successful results in somatostatin receptor-positive tumors. In all radiation therapies, knowledge of the radiation dose received by the target, and other organs in the body is essential to evaluate the risks and benefits of any procedure. We report a case of liver metastases from a rectal neuroendocrine tumor, which was treated with Y DOTANOC. Posttreatment whole-body planar images were acquired through Bremsstrahlung radiations of Y on a γ-camera, and thoracolumbar PET/CT images were acquired on PET. PMID:26204211

  16. Optimisation of a dual head semiconductor Compton camera using Geant4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harkness, L. J.; Boston, A. J.; Boston, H. C.; Cooper, R. J.; Cresswell, J. R.; Grint, A. N.; Nolan, P. J.; Oxley, D. C.; Scraggs, D. P.; Beveridge, T.; Gillam, J.; Lazarus, I.

    2009-06-01

    Conventional medical gamma-ray camera systems utilise mechanical collimation to provide information on the position of an incident gamma-ray photon. Systems that use electronic collimation utilising Compton image reconstruction techniques have the potential to offer huge improvements in sensitivity. Position sensitive high purity germanium (HPGe) detector systems are being evaluated as part of a single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) Compton camera system. Data have been acquired from the orthogonally segmented planar SmartPET detectors, operated in Compton camera mode. The minimum gamma-ray energy which can be imaged by the current system in Compton camera configuration is 244 keV due to the 20 mm thickness of the first scatter detector which causes large gamma-ray absorption. A simulation package for the optimisation of a new semiconductor Compton camera has been developed using the Geant4 toolkit. This paper will show results of preliminary analysis of the validated Geant4 simulation for gamma-ray energies of SPECT, 141 keV.

  17. ISO camera array development status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sibille, F.; Cesarsky, C.; Agnese, P.; Rouan, D.

    1989-01-01

    A short outline is given of the Infrared Space Observatory Camera (ISOCAM), one of the 4 instruments onboard the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO), with the current status of its two 32x32 arrays, an InSb charge injection device (CID) and a Si:Ga direct read-out (DRO), and the results of the in orbit radiation simulation with gamma ray sources. A tentative technique for the evaluation of the flat fielding accuracy is also proposed.

  18. SPEIR: A Ge Compton Camera

    SciTech Connect

    Mihailescu, L; Vetter, K M; Burks, M T; Hull, E L; Craig, W W

    2004-02-11

    The SPEctroscopic Imager for {gamma}-Rays (SPEIR) is a new concept of a compact {gamma}-ray imaging system of high efficiency and spectroscopic resolution with a 4-{pi} field-of-view. The system behind this concept employs double-sided segmented planar Ge detectors accompanied by the use of list-mode photon reconstruction methods to create a sensitive, compact Compton scatter camera.

  19. Overt vs. covert speed cameras in combination with delayed vs. immediate feedback to the offender.

    PubMed

    Marciano, Hadas; Setter, Pe'erly; Norman, Joel

    2015-06-01

    Speeding is a major problem in road safety because it increases both the probability of accidents and the severity of injuries if an accident occurs. Speed cameras are one of the most common speed enforcement tools. Most of the speed cameras around the world are overt, but there is evidence that this can cause a "kangaroo effect" in driving patterns. One suggested alternative to prevent this kangaroo effect is the use of covert cameras. Another issue relevant to the effect of enforcement countermeasures on speeding is the timing of the fine. There is general agreement on the importance of the immediacy of the punishment, however, in the context of speed limit enforcement, implementing such immediate punishment is difficult. An immediate feedback that mediates the delay between the speed violation and getting a ticket is one possible solution. This study examines combinations of concealment and the timing of the fine in operating speed cameras in order to evaluate the most effective one in terms of enforcing speed limits. Using a driving simulator, the driving performance of the following four experimental groups was tested: (1) overt cameras with delayed feedback, (2) overt cameras with immediate feedback, (3) covert cameras with delayed feedback, and (4) covert cameras with immediate feedback. Each of the 58 participants drove in the same scenario on three different days. The results showed that both median speed and speed variance were higher with overt than with covert cameras. Moreover, implementing a covert camera system along with immediate feedback was more conducive to drivers maintaining steady speeds at the permitted levels from the very beginning. Finally, both 'overt cameras' groups exhibit a kangaroo effect throughout the entire experiment. It can be concluded that an implementation strategy consisting of covert speed cameras combined with immediate feedback to the offender is potentially an optimal way to motivate drivers to maintain speeds at the

  20. Competitive advantage of PET/MRI.

    PubMed

    Jadvar, Hossein; Colletti, Patrick M

    2014-01-01

    Multimodality imaging has made great strides in the imaging evaluation of patients with a variety of diseases. Positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) is now established as the imaging modality of choice in many clinical conditions, particularly in oncology. While the initial development of combined PET/magnetic resonance imaging (PET/MRI) was in the preclinical arena, hybrid PET/MR scanners are now available for clinical use. PET/MRI combines the unique features of MRI including excellent soft tissue contrast, diffusion-weighted imaging, dynamic contrast-enhanced imaging, fMRI and other specialized sequences as well as MR spectroscopy with the quantitative physiologic information that is provided by PET. Most evidence for the potential clinical utility of PET/MRI is based on studies performed with side-by-side comparison or software-fused MRI and PET images. Data on distinctive utility of hybrid PET/MRI are rapidly emerging. There are potential competitive advantages of PET/MRI over PET/CT. In general, PET/MRI may be preferred over PET/CT where the unique features of MRI provide more robust imaging evaluation in certain clinical settings. The exact role and potential utility of simultaneous data acquisition in specific research and clinical settings will need to be defined. It may be that simultaneous PET/MRI will be best suited for clinical situations that are disease-specific, organ-specific, related to diseases of the children or in those patients undergoing repeated imaging for whom cumulative radiation dose must be kept as low as reasonably achievable. PET/MRI also offers interesting opportunities for use of dual modality probes. Upon clear definition of clinical utility, other important and practical issues related to business operational model, clinical workflow and reimbursement will also be resolved.

  1. 21 CFR 886.1120 - Opthalmic camera.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Opthalmic camera. 886.1120 Section 886.1120 Food... DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 886.1120 Opthalmic camera. (a) Identification. An ophthalmic camera is an AC-powered device intended to take photographs of the eye and the surrounding...

  2. 21 CFR 892.1110 - Positron camera.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Positron camera. 892.1110 Section 892.1110 Food... DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1110 Positron camera. (a) Identification. A positron camera is a device intended to image the distribution of positron-emitting radionuclides in the...

  3. 16 CFR 501.1 - Camera film.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Camera film. 501.1 Section 501.1 Commercial... 500 § 501.1 Camera film. Camera film packaged and labeled for retail sale is exempt from the net... should be expressed, provided: (a) The net quantity of contents on packages of movie film and bulk...

  4. 16 CFR 501.1 - Camera film.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Camera film. 501.1 Section 501.1 Commercial... 500 § 501.1 Camera film. Camera film packaged and labeled for retail sale is exempt from the net... should be expressed, provided: (a) The net quantity of contents on packages of movie film and bulk...

  5. 16 CFR 501.1 - Camera film.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Camera film. 501.1 Section 501.1 Commercial... 500 § 501.1 Camera film. Camera film packaged and labeled for retail sale is exempt from the net... should be expressed, provided: (a) The net quantity of contents on packages of movie film and bulk...

  6. 16 CFR 501.1 - Camera film.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... should be expressed, provided: (a) The net quantity of contents on packages of movie film and bulk still... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Camera film. 501.1 Section 501.1 Commercial... 500 § 501.1 Camera film. Camera film packaged and labeled for retail sale is exempt from the...

  7. 16 CFR 501.1 - Camera film.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Camera film. 501.1 Section 501.1 Commercial... 500 § 501.1 Camera film. Camera film packaged and labeled for retail sale is exempt from the net... should be expressed, provided: (a) The net quantity of contents on packages of movie film and bulk...

  8. Unassisted 3D camera calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atanassov, Kalin; Ramachandra, Vikas; Nash, James; Goma, Sergio R.

    2012-03-01

    With the rapid growth of 3D technology, 3D image capture has become a critical part of the 3D feature set on mobile phones. 3D image quality is affected by the scene geometry as well as on-the-device processing. An automatic 3D system usually assumes known camera poses accomplished by factory calibration using a special chart. In real life settings, pose parameters estimated by factory calibration can be negatively impacted by movements of the lens barrel due to shaking, focusing, or camera drop. If any of these factors displaces the optical axes of either or both cameras, vertical disparity might exceed the maximum tolerable margin and the 3D user may experience eye strain or headaches. To make 3D capture more practical, one needs to consider unassisted (on arbitrary scenes) calibration. In this paper, we propose an algorithm that relies on detection and matching of keypoints between left and right images. Frames containing erroneous matches, along with frames with insufficiently rich keypoint constellations, are detected and discarded. Roll, pitch yaw , and scale differences between left and right frames are then estimated. The algorithm performance is evaluated in terms of the remaining vertical disparity as compared to the maximum tolerable vertical disparity.

  9. Coaxial fundus camera for opthalmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Matos, Luciana; Castro, Guilherme; Castro Neto, Jarbas C.

    2015-09-01

    A Fundus Camera for ophthalmology is a high definition device which needs to meet low light illumination of the human retina, high resolution in the retina and reflection free image1. Those constraints make its optical design very sophisticated, but the most difficult to comply with is the reflection free illumination and the final alignment due to the high number of non coaxial optical components in the system. Reflection of the illumination, both in the objective and at the cornea, mask image quality, and a poor alignment make the sophisticated optical design useless. In this work we developed a totally axial optical system for a non-midriatic Fundus Camera. The illumination is performed by a LED ring, coaxial with the optical system and composed of IR of visible LEDs. The illumination ring is projected by the objective lens in the cornea. The Objective, LED illuminator, CCD lens are coaxial making the final alignment easily to perform. The CCD + capture lens module is a CCTV camera with autofocus and Zoom built in, added to a 175 mm focal length doublet corrected for infinity, making the system easily operated and very compact.

  10. Realistic camera noise modeling with application to improved HDR synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goossens, Bart; Luong, Hiêp; Aelterman, Jan; Pižurica, Aleksandra; Philips, Wilfried

    2012-12-01

    Due to the ongoing miniaturization of digital camera sensors and the steady increase of the "number of megapixels", individual sensor elements of the camera become more sensitive to noise, even deteriorating the final image quality. To go around this problem, sophisticated processing algorithms in the devices, can help to maximally exploit the knowledge on the sensor characteristics (e.g., in terms of noise), and offer a better image reconstruction. Although a lot of research focuses on rather simplistic noise models, such as stationary additive white Gaussian noise, only limited attention has gone to more realistic digital camera noise models. In this article, we first present a digital camera noise model that takes several processing steps in the camera into account, such as sensor signal amplification, clipping, post-processing,.. We then apply this noise model to the reconstruction problem of high dynamic range (HDR) images from a small set of low dynamic range (LDR) exposures of a static scene. In literature, HDR reconstruction is mostly performed by computing a weighted average, in which the weights are directly related to the observer pixel intensities of the LDR image. In this work, we derive a Bayesian probabilistic formulation of a weighting function that is near-optimal in the MSE sense (or SNR sense) of the reconstructed HDR image, by assuming exponentially distributed irradiance values. We define the weighting function as the probability that the observed pixel intensity is approximately unbiased. The weighting function can be directly computed based on the noise model parameters, which gives rise to different symmetric and asymmetric shapes when electronic noise or photon noise is dominant. We also explain how to deal with the case that some of the noise model parameters are unknown and explain how the camera response function can be estimated using the presented noise model. Finally, experimental results are provided to support our findings.

  11. PET-Based Percutaneous Needle Biopsy.

    PubMed

    El-Haddad, Ghassan

    2016-07-01

    PET can be used to guide percutaneous needle biopsy to the most metabolic lesion, improving diagnostic yield. PET biopsy guidance can be performed using visual or software coregistration, electromagnetic needle tracking, cone-beam computed tomography (CT), and intraprocedural PET/CT guidance. PET/CT-guided biopsies allow the sampling of lesions that may not be clearly visible on anatomic imaging, or of lesions that are morphologically normal. PET can identify suspicious locations within complex tumors that are most likely to contain important diagnostic and prognostic information. PMID:27321036

  12. The MiniPET: a didactic PET system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedro, R.; Silva, J.; Gurriana, L.; Silva, J. M.; Maio, A.; Soares Augusto, J.

    2013-03-01

    The MiniPET project aims to design and build a small PET system. It consists of two 4 × 4 matrices of 16 LYSO scintillator crystals and two PMTs with 16 channels resulting in a low cost system with the essential functionality of a clinical PET instrument. It is designed to illustrate the physics of the PET technique and to provide a didactic platform for the training of students and nuclear imaging professionals as well as for scientific outreach. The PET modules can be configured to test for the coincidence of 511 keV gamma rays. The model has a flexible mechanical setup [1] and can simulate 14 diferent ring geometries, from a configuration with as few as 18 detectors per ring (ring radius phi=51 mm), up to a geometry with 70 detectors per ring (phi=200 mm). A second version of the electronic system [2] allowed measurement and recording of the energy deposited in 4 detector channels by photons from a 137Cs radioactive source and by photons resulting of the annihilation of positrons from a 22Na radioactive source. These energy spectra are used for detector performance studies, as well as angular dependency studies. In this paper, the mechanical setup, the front-end high-speed analog electronics, the digital acquisition and control electronics implemented in a FPGA, as well as the data-transfer interface between the FPGA board and a host PC are described. Recent preliminary results obtained with the 4 active channels in the prototype are also presented.

  13. Development of PET/MRI with insertable PET for simultaneous PET and MR imaging of human brain

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, Jin Ho; Choi, Yong Jung, Jiwoong; Kim, Sangsu; Lim, Hyun Keong; Im, Ki Chun; Oh, Chang Hyun; Park, Hyun-wook; Kim, Kyung Min; Kim, Jong Guk

    2015-05-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to develop a dual-modality positron emission tomography (PET)/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with insertable PET for simultaneous PET and MR imaging of the human brain. Methods: The PET detector block was composed of a 4 × 4 matrix of detector modules, each consisting of a 4 × 4 array LYSO coupled to a 4 × 4 Geiger-mode avalanche photodiode (GAPD) array. The PET insert consisted of 18 detector blocks, circularly mounted on a custom-made plastic base to form a ring with an inner diameter of 390 mm and axial length of 60 mm. The PET gantry was shielded with gold-plated conductive fabric tapes with a thickness of 0.1 mm. The charge signals of PET detector transferred via 4 m long flat cables were fed into the position decoder circuit. The flat cables were shielded with a mesh-type aluminum sheet with a thickness of 0.24 mm. The position decoder circuit and field programmable gate array-embedded DAQ modules were enclosed in an aluminum box with a thickness of 10 mm and located at the rear of the MR bore inside the MRI room. A 3-T human MRI system with a Larmor frequency of 123.7 MHz and inner bore diameter of 60 cm was used as the PET/MRI hybrid system. A custom-made radio frequency (RF) coil with an inner diameter of 25 cm was fabricated. The PET was positioned between gradient and the RF coils. PET performance was measured outside and inside the MRI scanner using echo planar imaging, spin echo, turbo spin echo, and gradient echo sequences. MRI performance was also evaluated with and without the PET insert. The stability of the newly developed PET insert was evaluated and simultaneous PET and MR images of a brain phantom were acquired. Results: No significant degradation of the PET performance caused by MR was observed when the PET was operated using various MR imaging sequences. The signal-to-noise ratio of MR images was slightly degraded due to the PET insert installed inside the MR bore while the homogeneity was

  14. High-performance electronics for time-of-flight PET systems.

    PubMed

    Choong, W-S; Peng, Q; Vu, C Q; Turko, B T; Moses, W W

    2013-01-01

    We have designed and built a high-performance readout electronics system for time-of-flight positron emission tomography (TOF PET) cameras. The electronics architecture is based on the electronics for a commercial whole-body PET camera (Siemens/CPS Cardinal electronics), modified to improve the timing performance. The fundamental contributions in the electronics that can limit the timing resolution include the constant fraction discriminator (CFD), which converts the analog electrical signal from the photo-detector to a digital signal whose leading edge is time-correlated with the input signal, and the time-to-digital converter (TDC), which provides a time stamp for the CFD output. Coincident events are identified by digitally comparing the values of the time stamps. In the Cardinal electronics, the front-end processing electronics are performed by an Analog subsection board, which has two application-specific integrated circuits (ASICs), each servicing a PET block detector module. The ASIC has a built-in CFD and TDC. We found that a significant degradation in the timing resolution comes from the ASIC's CFD and TDC. Therefore, we have designed and built an improved Analog subsection board that replaces the ASIC's CFD and TDC with a high-performance CFD (made with discrete components) and TDC (using the CERN high-performance TDC ASIC). The improved Analog subsection board is used in a custom single-ring LSO-based TOF PET camera. The electronics system achieves a timing resolution of 60 ps FWHM. Prototype TOF detector modules are read out with the electronics system and give coincidence timing resolutions of 259 ps FWHM and 156 ps FWHM for detector modules coupled to LSO and LaBr3 crystals respectively. PMID:24575149

  15. High-performance electronics for time-of-flight PET systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choong, W.-S.; Peng, Q.; Vu, C. Q.; Turko, B. T.; Moses, W. W.

    2013-01-01

    We have designed and built a high-performance readout electronics system for time-of-flight positron emission tomography (TOF PET) cameras. The electronics architecture is based on the electronics for a commercial whole-body PET camera (Siemens/CPS Cardinal electronics), modified to improve the timing performance. The fundamental contributions in the electronics that can limit the timing resolution include the constant fraction discriminator (CFD), which converts the analog electrical signal from the photo-detector to a digital signal whose leading edge is time-correlated with the input signal, and the time-to-digital converter (TDC), which provides a time stamp for the CFD output. Coincident events are identified by digitally comparing the values of the time stamps. In the Cardinal electronics, the front-end processing electronics are performed by an Analog subsection board, which has two application-specific integrated circuits (ASICs), each servicing a PET block detector module. The ASIC has a built-in CFD and TDC. We found that a significant degradation in the timing resolution comes from the ASIC's CFD and TDC. Therefore, we have designed and built an improved Analog subsection board that replaces the ASIC's CFD and TDC with a high-performance CFD (made with discrete components) and TDC (using the CERN high-performance TDC ASIC). The improved Analog subsection board is used in a custom single-ring LSO-based TOF PET camera. The electronics system achieves a timing resolution of 60 ps FWHM. Prototype TOF detector modules are read out with the electronics system and give coincidence timing resolutions of 259 ps FWHM and 156 ps FWHM for detector modules coupled to LSO and LaBr3 crystals respectively.

  16. High-performance electronics for time-of-flight PET systems.

    PubMed

    Choong, W-S; Peng, Q; Vu, C Q; Turko, B T; Moses, W W

    2013-01-01

    We have designed and built a high-performance readout electronics system for time-of-flight positron emission tomography (TOF PET) cameras. The electronics architecture is based on the electronics for a commercial whole-body PET camera (Siemens/CPS Cardinal electronics), modified to improve the timing performance. The fundamental contributions in the electronics that can limit the timing resolution include the constant fraction discriminator (CFD), which converts the analog electrical signal from the photo-detector to a digital signal whose leading edge is time-correlated with the input signal, and the time-to-digital converter (TDC), which provides a time stamp for the CFD output. Coincident events are identified by digitally comparing the values of the time stamps. In the Cardinal electronics, the front-end processing electronics are performed by an Analog subsection board, which has two application-specific integrated circuits (ASICs), each servicing a PET block detector module. The ASIC has a built-in CFD and TDC. We found that a significant degradation in the timing resolution comes from the ASIC's CFD and TDC. Therefore, we have designed and built an improved Analog subsection board that replaces the ASIC's CFD and TDC with a high-performance CFD (made with discrete components) and TDC (using the CERN high-performance TDC ASIC). The improved Analog subsection board is used in a custom single-ring LSO-based TOF PET camera. The electronics system achieves a timing resolution of 60 ps FWHM. Prototype TOF detector modules are read out with the electronics system and give coincidence timing resolutions of 259 ps FWHM and 156 ps FWHM for detector modules coupled to LSO and LaBr3 crystals respectively.

  17. Respiratory motion correction in 4D-PET by simultaneous motion estimation and image reconstruction (SMEIR).

    PubMed

    Kalantari, Faraz; Li, Tianfang; Jin, Mingwu; Wang, Jing

    2016-08-01

    In conventional 4D positron emission tomography (4D-PET), images from different frames are reconstructed individually and aligned by registration methods. Two issues that arise with this approach are as follows: (1) the reconstruction algorithms do not make full use of projection statistics; and (2) the registration between noisy images can result in poor alignment. In this study, we investigated the use of simultaneous motion estimation and image reconstruction (SMEIR) methods for motion estimation/correction in 4D-PET. A modified ordered-subset expectation maximization algorithm coupled with total variation minimization (OSEM-TV) was used to obtain a primary motion-compensated PET (pmc-PET) from all projection data, using Demons derived deformation vector fields (DVFs) as initial motion vectors. A motion model update was performed to obtain an optimal set of DVFs in the pmc-PET and other phases, by matching the forward projection of the deformed pmc-PET with measured projections from other phases. The OSEM-TV image reconstruction was repeated using updated DVFs, and new DVFs were estimated based on updated images. A 4D-XCAT phantom with typical FDG biodistribution was generated to evaluate the performance of the SMEIR algorithm in lung and liver tumors with different contrasts and different diameters (10-40 mm). The image quality of the 4D-PET was greatly improved by the SMEIR algorithm. When all projections were used to reconstruct 3D-PET without motion compensation, motion blurring artifacts were present, leading up to 150% tumor size overestimation and significant quantitative errors, including 50% underestimation of tumor contrast and 59% underestimation of tumor uptake. Errors were reduced to less than 10% in most images by using the SMEIR algorithm, showing its potential in motion estimation/correction in 4D-PET. PMID:27385378

  18. Ultra-low dose CT attenuation correction for PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Xia, Ting; Alessio, Adam M; De Man, Bruno; Manjeshwar, Ravindra; Asma, Evren; Kinahan, Paul E

    2012-01-21

    A challenge for positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) quantitation is patient respiratory motion, which can cause an underestimation of lesion activity uptake and an overestimation of lesion volume. Several respiratory motion correction methods benefit from longer duration CT scans that are phase matched with PET scans. However, even with the currently available, lowest dose CT techniques, extended duration cine CT scans impart a substantially high radiation dose. This study evaluates methods designed to reduce CT radiation dose in PET/CT scanning. We investigated selected combinations of dose reduced acquisition and noise suppression methods that take advantage of the reduced requirement of CT for PET attenuation correction (AC). These include reducing CT tube current, optimizing CT tube voltage, adding filtration, CT sinogram smoothing and clipping. We explored the impact of these methods on PET quantitation via simulations on different digital phantoms. CT tube current can be reduced much lower for AC than that in low dose CT protocols. Spectra that are higher energy and narrower are generally more dose efficient with respect to PET image quality. Sinogram smoothing could be used to compensate for the increased noise and artifacts at radiation dose reduced CT images, which allows for a further reduction of CT dose with no penalty for PET image quantitation. When CT is not used for diagnostic and anatomical localization purposes, we showed that ultra-low dose CT for PET/CT is feasible. The significant dose reduction strategies proposed here could enable respiratory motion compensation methods that require extended duration CT scans and reduce radiation exposure in general for all PET/CT imaging. PMID:22156174

  19. A Investigation of Deadtime and Count Rate Limitations for High Resolution, Multiplane PET Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Germano, Guido

    1991-02-01

    The goal of this dissertation was to measure and characterize the data loss and the inaccuracies/artifacts caused by high count rates in the latest generations of PET scanners based on two-dimensional matrix detectors, and then, to develop and evaluate methods for compensating for these sources of error. It is important to have a quantitative knowledge of the count rate characteristics for accurate quantitation in PET studies, and it is useful for planning qualitative studies in such a manner that high data rates will not cause inordinate data loss or loss of resolution due to pileup in the detector system. Our approach has been to analyze the PET system as a series of sections or components in a pipeline, independent of one another except for the fact that they are receiving data from the previous section. We have found that all losses of true coincidence events in a PET study, for any PET system, can be seen as occurring in three separate system sections: (1) the front end, comprising the detector assembly and some pre-processing electronics, (2) the coincidence processing stage and (3) the transfer stage, where coincidence data must travel before being sorted into a sinogram. We postulated a model for the loss mechanisms in those three sections, applied it to data collected on neuroPET, total body and animal PET systems, and demonstrated that data loss can be estimated and compensated with excellent precision over a wide range of activity levels. With the advent of matrix detectors, cost and other practical considerations have imposed the multiplexing of all individual detector elements in the matrix through a single channel. This has in turn led to the front end of current PET systems becoming the section that suffers the most, under high count rate conditions. Future PET systems' optimization with respect to count rate and data loss shall concentrate on hardware and firmware modifications of the system's front end.

  20. Respiratory motion correction in 4D-PET by simultaneous motion estimation and image reconstruction (SMEIR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalantari, Faraz; Li, Tianfang; Jin, Mingwu; Wang, Jing

    2016-08-01

    In conventional 4D positron emission tomography (4D-PET), images from different frames are reconstructed individually and aligned by registration methods. Two issues that arise with this approach are as follows: (1) the reconstruction algorithms do not make full use of projection statistics; and (2) the registration between noisy images can result in poor alignment. In this study, we investigated the use of simultaneous motion estimation and image reconstruction (SMEIR) methods for motion estimation/correction in 4D-PET. A modified ordered-subset expectation maximization algorithm coupled with total variation minimization (OSEM-TV) was used to obtain a primary motion-compensated PET (pmc-PET) from all projection data, using Demons derived deformation vector fields (DVFs) as initial motion vectors. A motion model update was performed to obtain an optimal set of DVFs in the pmc-PET and other phases, by matching the forward projection of the deformed pmc-PET with measured projections from other phases. The OSEM-TV image reconstruction was repeated using updated DVFs, and new DVFs were estimated based on updated images. A 4D-XCAT phantom with typical FDG biodistribution was generated to evaluate the performance of the SMEIR algorithm in lung and liver tumors with different contrasts and different diameters (10-40 mm). The image quality of the 4D-PET was greatly improved by the SMEIR algorithm. When all projections were used to reconstruct 3D-PET without motion compensation, motion blurring artifacts were present, leading up to 150% tumor size overestimation and significant quantitative errors, including 50% underestimation of tumor contrast and 59% underestimation of tumor uptake. Errors were reduced to less than 10% in most images by using the SMEIR algorithm, showing its potential in motion estimation/correction in 4D-PET.

  1. Respiratory motion correction in 4D-PET by simultaneous motion estimation and image reconstruction (SMEIR).

    PubMed

    Kalantari, Faraz; Li, Tianfang; Jin, Mingwu; Wang, Jing

    2016-08-01

    In conventional 4D positron emission tomography (4D-PET), images from different frames are reconstructed individually and aligned by registration methods. Two issues that arise with this approach are as follows: (1) the reconstruction algorithms do not make full use of projection statistics; and (2) the registration between noisy images can result in poor alignment. In this study, we investigated the use of simultaneous motion estimation and image reconstruction (SMEIR) methods for motion estimation/correction in 4D-PET. A modified ordered-subset expectation maximization algorithm coupled with total variation minimization (OSEM-TV) was used to obtain a primary motion-compensated PET (pmc-PET) from all projection data, using Demons derived deformation vector fields (DVFs) as initial motion vectors. A motion model update was performed to obtain an optimal set of DVFs in the pmc-PET and other phases, by matching the forward projection of the deformed pmc-PET with measured projections from other phases. The OSEM-TV image reconstruction was repeated using updated DVFs, and new DVFs were estimated based on updated images. A 4D-XCAT phantom with typical FDG biodistribution was generated to evaluate the performance of the SMEIR algorithm in lung and liver tumors with different contrasts and different diameters (10-40 mm). The image quality of the 4D-PET was greatly improved by the SMEIR algorithm. When all projections were used to reconstruct 3D-PET without motion compensation, motion blurring artifacts were present, leading up to 150% tumor size overestimation and significant quantitative errors, including 50% underestimation of tumor contrast and 59% underestimation of tumor uptake. Errors were reduced to less than 10% in most images by using the SMEIR algorithm, showing its potential in motion estimation/correction in 4D-PET.

  2. Ultra-low dose CT attenuation correction for PET/CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Ting; Alessio, Adam M.; De Man, Bruno; Manjeshwar, Ravindra; Asma, Evren; Kinahan, Paul E.

    2012-01-01

    A challenge for positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) quantitation is patient respiratory motion, which can cause an underestimation of lesion activity uptake and an overestimation of lesion volume. Several respiratory motion correction methods benefit from longer duration CT scans that are phase matched with PET scans. However, even with the currently available, lowest dose CT techniques, extended duration cine CT scans impart a substantially high radiation dose. This study evaluates methods designed to reduce CT radiation dose in PET/CT scanning. We investigated selected combinations of dose reduced acquisition and noise suppression methods that take advantage of the reduced requirement of CT for PET attenuation correction (AC). These include reducing CT tube current, optimizing CT tube voltage, adding filtration, CT sinogram smoothing and clipping. We explored the impact of these methods on PET quantitation via simulations on different digital phantoms. CT tube current can be reduced much lower for AC than that in low dose CT protocols. Spectra that are higher energy and narrower are generally more dose efficient with respect to PET image quality. Sinogram smoothing could be used to compensate for the increased noise and artifacts at radiation dose reduced CT images, which allows for a further reduction of CT dose with no penalty for PET image quantitation. When CT is not used for diagnostic and anatomical localization purposes, we showed that ultra-low dose CT for PET/CT is feasible. The significant dose reduction strategies proposed here could enable respiratory motion compensation methods that require extended duration CT scans and reduce radiation exposure in general for all PET/CT imaging.

  3. Respiratory motion correction in 4D-PET by simultaneous motion estimation and image reconstruction (SMEIR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalantari, Faraz; Li, Tianfang; Jin, Mingwu; Wang, Jing

    2016-08-01

    In conventional 4D positron emission tomography (4D-PET), images from different frames are reconstructed individually and aligned by registration methods. Two issues that arise with this approach are as follows: (1) the reconstruction algorithms do not make full use of projection statistics; and (2) the registration between noisy images can result in poor alignment. In this study, we investigated the use of simultaneous motion estimation and image reconstruction (SMEIR) methods for motion estimation/correction in 4D-PET. A modified ordered-subset expectation maximization algorithm coupled with total variation minimization (OSEM-TV) was used to obtain a primary motion-compensated PET (pmc-PET) from all projection data, using Demons derived deformation vector fields (DVFs) as initial motion vectors. A motion model update was performed to obtain an optimal set of DVFs in the pmc-PET and other phases, by matching the forward projection of the deformed pmc-PET with measured projections from other phases. The OSEM-TV image reconstruction was repeated using updated DVFs, and new DVFs were estimated based on updated images. A 4D-XCAT phantom with typical FDG biodistribution was generated to evaluate the performance of the SMEIR algorithm in lung and liver tumors with different contrasts and different diameters (10–40 mm). The image quality of the 4D-PET was greatly improved by the SMEIR algorithm. When all projections were used to reconstruct 3D-PET without motion compensation, motion blurring artifacts were present, leading up to 150% tumor size overestimation and significant quantitative errors, including 50% underestimation of tumor contrast and 59% underestimation of tumor uptake. Errors were reduced to less than 10% in most images by using the SMEIR algorithm, showing its potential in motion estimation/correction in 4D-PET.

  4. Principles of PET/MR Imaging.

    PubMed

    Disselhorst, Jonathan A; Bezrukov, Ilja; Kolb, Armin; Parl, Christoph; Pichler, Bernd J

    2014-05-12

    Hybrid PET/MR systems have rapidly progressed from the prototype stage to systems that are increasingly being used in the clinics. This review provides an overview of developments in hybrid PET/MR systems and summarizes the current state of the art in PET/MR instrumentation, correction techniques, and data analysis. The strong magnetic field requires considerable changes in the manner by which PET images are acquired and has led, among others, to the development of new PET detectors, such as silicon photomultipliers. During more than a decade of active PET/MR development, several system designs have been described. The technical background of combined PET/MR systems is explained and related challenges are discussed. The necessity for PET attenuation correction required new methods based on MR data. Therefore, an overview of recent developments in this field is provided. Furthermore, MR-based motion correction techniques for PET are discussed, as integrated PET/MR systems provide a platform for measuring motion with high temporal resolution without additional instrumentation. The MR component in PET/MR systems can provide functional information about disease processes or brain function alongside anatomic images. Against this background, we point out new opportunities for data analysis in this new field of multimodal molecular imaging. PMID:24819419

  5. Silicon photomultiplier modules for MRI-compatible PET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sul, Woo-Suk; Kim, Hyoungtaek; Cho, Gyuseong

    2015-04-01

    Silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) modules were developed for use in positron emission tomography-magnetic resonance imaging (PET-MRI), which is a hybrid medical imaging technology. A PET-MRI is very efficient in the early diagnosis of representative senile diseases, including cancer, Alzheimer's disease, and Parkinson's disease. SiPMs comprise the core image sensor for MR-compatible PET applications since they have a low operational voltage, high gain, good timing resolution, ruggedness, insensitivity to magnetic fields, compactness, and low cost. In PET systems, SiPM microcells can be optimized by making a trade-off between photon detection efficiency (PDE) and dynamic range. The SiPM modules used in this study were fabricated at the National NanoFab Center (NNFC) of South Korea by using a customized CMOS processes. The SiPM modules were evaluated by first packaging them with a cost-effective PCB package instead of with a conventional ceramic package. Measurements on 1,400 SiPMs indicated a uniform breakdown voltage of 20.54 V with a standard deviation of 0.07 V. Moreover, the SiPM modules present a high and uniform energy resolution of 13.6% with a standard deviation of 0.5% at 511 keV with 3 × 3 × 20 mm3 cerium-doped lutetium-yttrium oxyorthosilicate (Lu2(1-x)Y2xSiO5:Ce, LYSO) crystal coupling. These results indicated that the proposed devices offer adequate performance to form the foundation of an image sensor technology for MRI-compatible PET.

  6. Robust identification of polyethylene terephthalate (PET) plastics through Bayesian decision.

    PubMed

    Zulkifley, Mohd Asyraf; Mustafa, Mohd Marzuki; Hussain, Aini; Mustapha, Aouache; Ramli, Suzaimah

    2014-01-01

    Recycling is one of the most efficient methods for environmental friendly waste management. Among municipal wastes, plastics are the most common material that can be easily recycled and polyethylene terephthalate (PET) is one of its major types. PET material is used in consumer goods packaging such as drinking bottles, toiletry containers, food packaging and many more. Usually, a recycling process is tailored to a specific material for optimal purification and decontamination to obtain high grade recyclable material. The quantity and quality of the sorting process are limited by the capacity of human workers that suffer from fatigue and boredom. Several automated sorting systems have been proposed in the literature that include using chemical, proximity and vision sensors. The main advantages of vision based sensors are its environmentally friendly approach, non-intrusive detection and capability of high throughput. However, the existing methods rely heavily on deterministic approaches that make them less accurate as the variations in PET plastic waste appearance are too high. We proposed a probabilistic approach of modeling the PET material by analyzing the reflection region and its surrounding. Three parameters are modeled by Gaussian and exponential distributions: color, size and distance of the reflection region. The final classification is made through a supervised training method of likelihood ratio test. The main novelty of the proposed method is the probabilistic approach in integrating various PET material signatures that are contaminated by stains under constant lighting changes. The system is evaluated by using four performance metrics: precision, recall, accuracy and error. Our system performed the best in all evaluation metrics compared to the benchmark methods. The system can be further improved by fusing all neighborhood information in decision making and by implementing the system in a graphics processing unit for faster processing speed.

  7. Robust Identification of Polyethylene Terephthalate (PET) Plastics through Bayesian Decision

    PubMed Central

    Zulkifley, Mohd Asyraf; Mustafa, Mohd Marzuki; Hussain, Aini; Mustapha, Aouache; Ramli, Suzaimah

    2014-01-01

    Recycling is one of the most efficient methods for environmental friendly waste management. Among municipal wastes, plastics are the most common material that can be easily recycled and polyethylene terephthalate (PET) is one of its major types. PET material is used in consumer goods packaging such as drinking bottles, toiletry containers, food packaging and many more. Usually, a recycling process is tailored to a specific material for optimal purification and decontamination to obtain high grade recyclable material. The quantity and quality of the sorting process are limited by the capacity of human workers that suffer from fatigue and boredom. Several automated sorting systems have been proposed in the literature that include using chemical, proximity and vision sensors. The main advantages of vision based sensors are its environmentally friendly approach, non-intrusive detection and capability of high throughput. However, the existing methods rely heavily on deterministic approaches that make them less accurate as the variations in PET plastic waste appearance are too high. We proposed a probabilistic approach of modeling the PET material by analyzing the reflection region and its surrounding. Three parameters are modeled by Gaussian and exponential distributions: color, size and distance of the reflection region. The final classification is made through a supervised training method of likelihood ratio test. The main novelty of the proposed method is the probabilistic approach in integrating various PET material signatures that are contaminated by stains under constant lighting changes. The system is evaluated by using four performance metrics: precision, recall, accuracy and error. Our system performed the best in all evaluation metrics compared to the benchmark methods. The system can be further improved by fusing all neighborhood information in decision making and by implementing the system in a graphics processing unit for faster processing speed. PMID

  8. High performance polyester concrete using recycled PET

    SciTech Connect

    Rebeiz, K.S.

    1995-10-01

    Recycled polyethylene terephthalate (PET) plastic wastes could be used in production of unsaturated polyester resins. In turn, these resins could be mixed with inorganic aggregates to produce polymer concrete (PC). Unsaturated polyesters based on recycled PET might be a potentially lower source cost of resins for producing useful PC based-products. The advantage of recycling PET in PC is that the PET materials do not have to be purified, including removal of colors, to the same extent as other PET recycling applications, which should facilitate the recycling operation and minimize its cost. The recycling of PET in PC could also help save energy and allow the long term disposal of the PET waste, an important advantage in recycling applications.

  9. Quantitative simultaneous PET-MR imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouyang, Jinsong; Petibon, Yoann; Huang, Chuan; Reese, Timothy G.; Kolnick, Aleksandra L.; El Fakhri, Georges

    2014-06-01

    Whole-body PET is currently limited by the degradation due to patient motion. Respiratory motion degrades imaging studies of the abdomen. Similarly, both respiratory and cardiac motions significantly hamper the assessment of myocardial ischemia and/or metabolism in perfusion and viability cardiac PET studies. Based on simultaneous PET-MR, we have developed robust and accurate MRI methods allowing the tracking and measurement of both respiratory and cardiac motions during abdominal or cardiac studies. Our list-mode iterative PET reconstruction framework incorporates the measured motion fields into PET emission system matrix as well as the time-dependent PET attenuation map and the position dependent point spread function. Our method significantly enhances the PET image quality as compared to conventional methods.

  10. Diseases Transmitted by Less Common House Pets.

    PubMed

    Chomel, Bruno B

    2015-12-01

    Beside dogs and cats, the most common pets worldwide, an increasing number of pocket pets and exotic pets are making their way to more and more households, especially in North America and Europe. Although many of these animals make appropriate pets, they also can be a source of many zoonotic diseases, especially in young children and immunocompromised individuals. Some of these diseases can be life threatening, such as rabies, rat bite fever, and plague. Some others are quite common, because of the frequency of the pathogens harbored by these species, such as salmonellosis in reptiles and amphibians. Appropriate knowledge of the zoonotic agents carried by these "new" pet species is strongly recommended prior to acquiring pocket or exotic pets. Furthermore, adopting wildlife as pets is strongly discouraged, because it is always a risky action that can lead to major health issues. PMID:27337276

  11. Passive Millimeter Wave Camera (PMMWC) at TRW

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Engineers at TRW, Redondo Beach, California, inspect the Passive Millimeter Wave Camera, a weather-piercing camera designed to see through fog, clouds, smoke and dust. Operating in the millimeter wave portion of the electromagnetic spectrum, the camera creates visual-like video images of objects, people, runways, obstacles and the horizon. A demonstration camera (shown in photo) has been completed and is scheduled for checkout tests and flight demonstration. Engineer (left) holds a compact, lightweight circuit board containing 40 complete radiometers, including antenna, monolithic millimeter wave integrated circuit (MMIC) receivers and signal processing and readout electronics that forms the basis for the camera's 1040-element focal plane array.

  12. Passive Millimeter Wave Camera (PMMWC) at TRW

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Engineers at TRW, Redondo Beach, California, inspect the Passive Millimeter Wave Camera, a weather-piercing camera designed to 'see' through fog, clouds, smoke and dust. Operating in the millimeter wave portion of the electromagnetic spectrum, the camera creates visual-like video images of objects, people, runways, obstacles and the horizon. A demonstration camera (shown in photo) has been completed and is scheduled for checkout tests and flight demonstration. Engineer (left) holds a compact, lightweight circuit board containing 40 complete radiometers, including antenna, monolithic millimeter wave integrated circuit (MMIC) receivers and signal processing and readout electronics that forms the basis for the camera's 1040-element focal plane array.

  13. HHEBBES! All sky camera system: status update

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bettonvil, F.

    2015-01-01

    A status update is given of the HHEBBES! All sky camera system. HHEBBES!, an automatic camera for capturing bright meteor trails, is based on a DSLR camera and a Liquid Crystal chopper for measuring the angular velocity. Purpose of the system is to a) recover meteorites; b) identify origin/parental bodies. In 2015, two new cameras were rolled out: BINGO! -alike HHEBBES! also in The Netherlands-, and POgLED, in Serbia. BINGO! is a first camera equipped with a longer focal length fisheye lens, to further increase the accuracy. Several minor improvements have been done and the data reduction pipeline was used for processing two prominent Dutch fireballs.

  14. CCD video camera and airborne applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sturz, Richard A.

    2000-11-01

    The human need to see for ones self and to do so remotely, has given rise to video camera applications never before imagined and growing constantly. The instant understanding and verification offered by video lends its applications to every facet of life. Once an entertainment media, video is now ever present in out daily life. The application to the aircraft platform is one aspect of the video camera versatility. Integrating the video camera into the aircraft platform is yet another story. The typical video camera when applied to more standard scene imaging poses less demanding parameters and considerations. This paper explores the video camera as applied to the more complicated airborne environment.

  15. Spectrometry with consumer-quality CMOS cameras.

    PubMed

    Scheeline, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Many modern spectrometric instruments use diode arrays, charge-coupled arrays, or CMOS cameras for detection and measurement. As portable or point-of-use instruments are desirable, one would expect that instruments using the cameras in cellular telephones and tablet computers would be the basis of numerous instruments. However, no mass market for such devices has yet developed. The difficulties in using megapixel CMOS cameras for scientific measurements are discussed, and promising avenues for instrument development reviewed. Inexpensive alternatives to use of the built-in camera are also mentioned, as the long-term question is whether it is better to overcome the constraints of CMOS cameras or to bypass them.

  16. Mini gamma camera, camera system and method of use

    DOEpatents

    Majewski, Stanislaw; Weisenberger, Andrew G.; Wojcik, Randolph F.

    2001-01-01

    A gamma camera comprising essentially and in order from the front outer or gamma ray impinging surface: 1) a collimator, 2) a scintillator layer, 3) a light guide, 4) an array of position sensitive, high resolution photomultiplier tubes, and 5) printed circuitry for receipt of the output of the photomultipliers. There is also described, a system wherein the output supplied by the high resolution, position sensitive photomultipiler tubes is communicated to: a) a digitizer and b) a computer where it is processed using advanced image processing techniques and a specific algorithm to calculate the center of gravity of any abnormality observed during imaging, and c) optional image display and telecommunications ports.

  17. Lane detection algorithm for an onboard camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellino, Mario; Lopez de Meneses, Yuri; Ryser, Peter; Jacot, Jacques

    2005-02-01

    After analysing the major causes of injuries and death on roads, it is understandable that one of the main goals in the automotive industry is to increase vehicle safety. The European project SPARC (Secure Propulsion using Advanced Redundant Control) is developing the next generation of trucks that will fulfil these aims. The main technologies that will be used in the SPARC project to achieve the desiderated level of safety will be presented. In order to avoid accidents in critical situations, it is necessary to have a representation of the environment of the vehicle. Thus, several solutions using different sensors will be described and analysed. Particularly, a division of this project aims to integrate cameras in automotive vehicles to increase security and prevent driver's mistakes. Indeed, with this vision platform it would be possible to extract the position of the lane with respect to the vehicle, and thus, help the driver to follow the optimal trajectory. A definition of lane is proposed, and a lane detection algorithm is presented. In order to improve the detection, several criteria are explained and detailed. Regrettably, such an embedded camera is subject to the vibration of the truck, and the resulting sequence of images is difficult to analyse. Thus, we present different solutions to stabilize the images and particularly a new approach developed by the "Laboratoire de Production Microtechnique". Indeed, it was demonstrated in previous works that the presence of noise can be used, through a phenomenon called Stochastic Resonance. Thus, instead of decreasing the influence of noise in industrial applications, which has non negligible costs, it is perhaps interesting to use this phenomenon to reveal some useful information, such as for example the contour of the objects and lanes.

  18. Initial laboratory evaluation of color video cameras

    SciTech Connect

    Terry, P L

    1991-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has considerable experience with monochrome video cameras used in alarm assessment video systems. Most of these systems, used for perimeter protection, were designed to classify rather than identify an intruder. Monochrome cameras are adequate for that application and were selected over color cameras because of their greater sensitivity and resolution. There is a growing interest in the identification function of security video systems for both access control and insider protection. Color information is useful for identification purposes, and color camera technology is rapidly changing. Thus, Sandia National Laboratories established an ongoing program to evaluate color solid-state cameras. Phase one resulted in the publishing of a report titled, Initial Laboratory Evaluation of Color Video Cameras (SAND--91-2579).'' It gave a brief discussion of imager chips and color cameras and monitors, described the camera selection, detailed traditional test parameters and procedures, and gave the results of the evaluation of twelve cameras. In phase two six additional cameras were tested by the traditional methods and all eighteen cameras were tested by newly developed methods. This report details both the traditional and newly developed test parameters and procedures, and gives the results of both evaluations.

  19. Phenology cameras observing boreal ecosystems of Finland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peltoniemi, Mikko; Böttcher, Kristin; Aurela, Mika; Kolari, Pasi; Tanis, Cemal Melih; Linkosalmi, Maiju; Loehr, John; Metsämäki, Sari; Nadir Arslan, Ali

    2016-04-01

    Cameras have become useful tools for monitoring seasonality of ecosystems. Low-cost cameras facilitate validation of other measurements and allow extracting some key ecological features and moments from image time series. We installed a network of phenology cameras at selected ecosystem research sites in Finland. Cameras were installed above, on the level, or/and below the canopies. Current network hosts cameras taking time lapse images in coniferous and deciduous forests as well as at open wetlands offering thus possibilities to monitor various phenological and time-associated events and elements. In this poster, we present our camera network and give examples of image series use for research. We will show results about the stability of camera derived color signals, and based on that discuss about the applicability of cameras in monitoring time-dependent phenomena. We will also present results from comparisons between camera-derived color signal time series and daily satellite-derived time series (NVDI, NDWI, and fractional snow cover) from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) at selected spruce and pine forests and in a wetland. We will discuss the applicability of cameras in supporting phenological observations derived from satellites, by considering the possibility of cameras to monitor both above and below canopy phenology and snow.

  20. Enhanced PET resolution by combining pinhole collimation and coincidence detection.

    PubMed

    DiFilippo, Frank P

    2015-10-21

    algorithm. Hot rods of 1.4 mm diameter were resolved easily in a simulated phantom. System sensitivity was 0.09% for a simulated 70-mm line source corresponding to the NEMA NU-4 mouse phantom. Higher resolution is expected with further optimization of pinhole design, and higher sensitivity is expected with a focused and denser pinhole configuration. The simulations demonstrate high spatial resolution and feasibility of small animal imaging with an add-on multi-pinhole collimator for a clinical PET scanner. Further work is needed to develop geometric calibration and quantitative data corrections and, eventually, to construct a prototype device and produce images with physical phantoms.

  1. Characterization of the Series 1000 Camera System

    SciTech Connect

    Kimbrough, J; Moody, J; Bell, P; Landen, O

    2004-04-07

    The National Ignition Facility requires a compact network addressable scientific grade CCD camera for use in diagnostics ranging from streak cameras to gated x-ray imaging cameras. Due to the limited space inside the diagnostic, an analog and digital input/output option in the camera controller permits control of both the camera and the diagnostic by a single Ethernet link. The system consists of a Spectral Instruments Series 1000 camera, a PC104+ controller, and power supply. The 4k by 4k CCD camera has a dynamic range of 70 dB with less than 14 electron read noise at a 1MHz readout rate. The PC104+ controller includes 16 analog inputs, 4 analog outputs and 16 digital input/output lines for interfacing to diagnostic instrumentation. A description of the system and performance characterization is reported.

  2. Pet insurance--essential option?

    PubMed

    Stowe, J D

    2000-08-01

    As Hawn (2) says, "insurance is about risk and peace of mind." She reports that the American Humane Society supports pet insurance because companion animals are able to be treated for disease or accidents that are life-threatening where, otherwise, they would have been euthanized. For veterinarians, she suggests that pet insurance allows them to practice veterinary medicine "as if it were free." It is inevitable that pet insurance will grow as a recourse for veterinary fees. This may be a savior to some families whose budget is stretched to the limit at a critical moment in the health care of their cherished pet. We in the veterinary profession have an advantage over other professions. We have seen the good, the bad, and the ugly of insurance, as it applies to human health and dental care. If we work hand-in-hand with our own industries, collectively we may be able to develop a system that wins for everyone, with fees that allow practice to thrive and growth strategies that accommodate new treatment and diagnostic modalities, as well as consistent and exemplary customer service. The path ahead is always fraught with bumps and potholes. We can be a passive passenger and become a victim of the times or an active driver to steer the profession to a clearer route. Pet insurance is but one of the solutions for the profession; the others are a careful assessment of our fees--charging what we are worth, not what we think the client will pay; business management; customer service; leadership of our health care team; lifelong learning; and more efficient delivery systems. Let us stop being a victim, stop shooting ourselves in the professional foot, and seize the day! PMID:10945132

  3. Pet insurance--essential option?

    PubMed Central

    Stowe, J D

    2000-01-01

    As Hawn (2) says, "insurance is about risk and peace of mind." She reports that the American Humane Society supports pet insurance because companion animals are able to be treated for disease or accidents that are life-threatening where, otherwise, they would have been euthanized. For veterinarians, she suggests that pet insurance allows them to practice veterinary medicine "as if it were free." It is inevitable that pet insurance will grow as a recourse for veterinary fees. This may be a savior to some families whose budget is stretched to the limit at a critical moment in the health care of their cherished pet. We in the veterinary profession have an advantage over other professions. We have seen the good, the bad, and the ugly of insurance, as it applies to human health and dental care. If we work hand-in-hand with our own industries, collectively we may be able to develop a system that wins for everyone, with fees that allow practice to thrive and growth strategies that accommodate new treatment and diagnostic modalities, as well as consistent and exemplary customer service. The path ahead is always fraught with bumps and potholes. We can be a passive passenger and become a victim of the times or an active driver to steer the profession to a clearer route. Pet insurance is but one of the solutions for the profession; the others are a careful assessment of our fees--charging what we are worth, not what we think the client will pay; business management; customer service; leadership of our health care team; lifelong learning; and more efficient delivery systems. Let us stop being a victim, stop shooting ourselves in the professional foot, and seize the day! Images p639-a PMID:10945132

  4. Extrinsic Calibration of Camera Networks Using a Sphere

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Junzhi; Deboeverie, Francis; Slembrouck, Maarten; van Haerenborgh, Dirk; van Cauwelaert, Dimitri; Veelaert, Peter; Philips, Wilfried

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a novel extrinsic calibration method for camera networks using a sphere as the calibration object. First of all, we propose an easy and accurate method to estimate the 3D positions of the sphere center w.r.t. the local camera coordinate system. Then, we propose to use orthogonal procrustes analysis to pairwise estimate the initial camera relative extrinsic parameters based on the aforementioned estimation of 3D positions. Finally, an optimization routine is applied to jointly refine the extrinsic parameters for all cameras. Compared to existing sphere-based 3D position estimators which need to trace and analyse the outline of the sphere projection in the image, the proposed method requires only very simple image processing: estimating the area and the center of mass of the sphere projection. Our results demonstrate that we can get a more accurate estimate of the extrinsic parameters compared to other sphere-based methods. While existing state-of-the-art calibration methods use point like features and epipolar geometry, the proposed method uses the sphere-based 3D position estimate. This results in simpler computations and a more flexible and accurate calibration method. Experimental results show that the proposed approach is accurate, robust, flexible and easy to use. PMID:26247950

  5. A Robust Camera-Based Interface for Mobile Entertainment

    PubMed Central

    Roig-Maimó, Maria Francesca; Manresa-Yee, Cristina; Varona, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Camera-based interfaces in mobile devices are starting to be used in games and apps, but few works have evaluated them in terms of usability or user perception. Due to the changing nature of mobile contexts, this evaluation requires extensive studies to consider the full spectrum of potential users and contexts. However, previous works usually evaluate these interfaces in controlled environments such as laboratory conditions, therefore, the findings cannot be generalized to real users and real contexts. In this work, we present a robust camera-based interface for mobile entertainment. The interface detects and tracks the user’s head by processing the frames provided by the mobile device’s front camera, and its position is then used to interact with the mobile apps. First, we evaluate the interface as a pointing device to study its accuracy, and different factors to configure such as the gain or the device’s orientation, as well as the optimal target size for the interface. Second, we present an in the wild study to evaluate the usage and the user’s perception when playing a game controlled by head motion. Finally, the game is published in an application store to make it available to a large number of potential users and contexts and we register usage data. Results show the feasibility of using this robust camera-based interface for mobile entertainment in different contexts and by different people. PMID:26907288

  6. Portable gamma camera for clinical use in nuclear medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Pani, R.; Pellegrini, R.; Scopinaro, F.

    1996-12-31

    Up today Hamamatsu R3292 is the Position Sensitive Photo Multiplier Tube (PSPMT) with the largest sensitive area (10 cm of diameter). At the same time it has the minimum size for clinical application in Nuclear Medicine. A portable gamma camera was realized, based on 5 inches PSPMT coupled to a scintillating array. The head has a light weight (15 Kg.) spatial resolution resulted better than that of Anger Camera with good linearity response, good energy resolution and FOV coincident with intrinsic one of PSPMT. To optimize gamma camera response two different scintillating arrays were tested: YAP:Ce and CsI (Tl). Their overall size cover all photochatode active area, and crystal pixel size was 2 mm x 2 mm. The detection efficiency resulted comparable to that of Anger Camera. The best result was obtained by CsI (Tl) scintillating: an intrinsic spatial resolution of 1.6 mm FWHM and a relative energy resolution of 17% FWHM. With a standard general purpose collimator a spatial resolution of about 2 mm resulted. Some preliminary results were also obtained in breast scintigraphy.

  7. A Robust Camera-Based Interface for Mobile Entertainment.

    PubMed

    Roig-Maimó, Maria Francesca; Manresa-Yee, Cristina; Varona, Javier

    2016-02-19

    Camera-based interfaces in mobile devices are starting to be used in games and apps, but few works have evaluated them in terms of usability or user perception. Due to the changing nature of mobile contexts, this evaluation requires extensive studies to consider the full spectrum of potential users and contexts. However, previous works usually evaluate these interfaces in controlled environments such as laboratory conditions, therefore, the findings cannot be generalized to real users and real contexts. In this work, we present a robust camera-based interface for mobile entertainment. The interface detects and tracks the user's head by processing the frames provided by the mobile device's front camera, and its position is then used to interact with the mobile apps. First, we evaluate the interface as a pointing device to study its accuracy, and different factors to configure such as the gain or the device's orientation, as well as the optimal target size for the interface. Second, we present an in the wild study to evaluate the usage and the user's perception when playing a game controlled by head motion. Finally, the game is published in an application store to make it available to a large number of potential users and contexts and we register usage data. Results show the feasibility of using this robust camera-based interface for mobile entertainment in different contexts and by different people.

  8. Extrinsic Calibration of Camera Networks Using a Sphere.

    PubMed

    Guan, Junzhi; Deboeverie, Francis; Slembrouck, Maarten; van Haerenborgh, Dirk; van Cauwelaert, Dimitri; Veelaert, Peter; Philips, Wilfried

    2015-08-04

    In this paper, we propose a novel extrinsic calibration method for camera networks using a sphere as the calibration object. First of all, we propose an easy and accurate method to estimate the 3D positions of the sphere center w.r.t. the local camera coordinate system. Then, we propose to use orthogonal procrustes analysis to pairwise estimate the initial camera relative extrinsic parameters based on the aforementioned estimation of 3D positions. Finally, an optimization routine is applied to jointly refine the extrinsic parameters for all cameras. Compared to existing sphere-based 3D position estimators which need to trace and analyse the outline of the sphere projection in the image, the proposed method requires only very simple image processing: estimating the area and the center of mass of the sphere projection. Our results demonstrate that we can get a more accurate estimate of the extrinsic parameters compared to other sphere-based methods. While existing state-of-the-art calibration methods use point like features and epipolar geometry, the proposed method uses the sphere-based 3D position estimate. This results in simpler computations and a more flexible and accurate calibration method. Experimental results show that the proposed approach is accurate, robust, flexible and easy to use.

  9. Real-Time Camera Guidance for 3d Scene Reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schindler, F.; Förstner, W.

    2012-07-01

    We propose a framework for operator guidance during the image acquisition process for reliable multi-view stereo reconstruction. Goal is to achieve full coverage of the object and sufficient overlap. Multi-view stereo is a commonly used method to reconstruct both camera trajectory and 3D object shape. After determining an initial solution, a globally optimal reconstruction is usually obtained by executing a bundle adjustment involving all images. Acquiring suitable images, however, still requires an experienced operator to ensure accuracy and completeness of the final solution. We propose an interactive framework for guiding unexperienced users or possibly an autonomous robot. Using approximate camera orientations and object points we estimate point uncertainties within a sliding bundle adjustment and suggest appropriate camera movements. A visual feedback system communicates the decisions to the user in an intuitive way. We demonstrate the suitability of our system with a virtual image acquisition simulation as well as in real-world scenarios. We show that when following the camera movements suggested by our system, the proposed framework is able to generate good approximate values for the bundle adjustment, leading to accurate results compared to ground truth after few iterations. Possible applications are non-professional 3D acquisition systems on low-cost platforms like mobile phones, autonomously navigating robots as well as online flight planning of unmanned aerial vehicles.

  10. Reliability improvement of low-cost camera for microsatellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jiankang; Chen, Xinhua; Chen, Yuheng; Zhou, Wang; Shen, Weimin

    2009-07-01

    Remote sensing is one of the most defective means for environment monitor, resource management, national security and so on, but existing conventional satellites are too expensive for common users to afford. Microsatellites can reduce their cost and optimize their image products for specific applications. Space camera is one of their important payloads. The trade-off faced in a cost driven camera design is how to reduce cost while still have the required reliability. This paper introduces our path to develop reliable and low-cost space camera. The space camera has two main parts: optical system and camera circuits. Commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) lenses are difficult to maintain their imaging performance under space environment. Our designed optical system adopts catadioptric layout, so that its temperature sensitivity is low. The material and structure of camera lens can bear the vibration and shock during its launch. Its mechanical reliability is approved through mechanical test. A window made of synthetic fused silica is used to protect the lens and CCD sensor from space radiation. Optical system is completed with compact structure, wide temperature range, large relative aperture, high imaging quality and pass through the mechanical test, thermal cycling and vacuum thermal test. Modular concept is developed within the space camera circuit, which is composed of seven modules which are power supply unit, microcontroller unit, waveform generator unit, CCD unit, CCD signal processor unit, LVDS unit, and current surge restrain unit. Module concept and the use of plastic-encapsulated microcircuits (PEMs) components can simplify the design and the maintainability and can minimize size, mass, and power consumption. Through the destructive physical analysis (DPA), screening, and board level burn-in select the PEMs than can replace the hermetically sealed microcircuits(HSMs). Derating, redundancy, thermal dissipation, software error detection and so on are adopted in the

  11. PDX infrared TV camera system

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobsen, R.A.

    1981-08-01

    An infrared TV camera system has been developed for use on PDX. This system is capable of measuring the temporal and spatial energy deposition on the limiters and divertor neutralizer plates; time resolutions of 1 ms are achievable. The system has been used to measure the energy deposition on the PDX neutralizer plates and the temperature jump of limiter surfaces during a pulse. The energy scrapeoff layer is found to have characteristic dimensions of the order of a cm. The measurement of profiles is very sensitive to variations in the thermal emissivity of the surfaces.

  12. Cryogenic mechanism for ISO camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luciano, G.

    1987-12-01

    The Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) camera configuration, architecture, materials, tribology, motorization, and development status are outlined. The operating temperature is 2 to 3 K, at 2.5 to 18 microns. Selected material is a titanium alloy, with MoS2/TiC lubrication. A stepping motor drives the ball-bearing mounted wheels to which the optical elements are fixed. Model test results are satisfactory, and also confirm the validity of the test facilities, particularly for vibration tests at 4K.

  13. PET and PET/CT imaging of skeletal metastases

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Bone scintigraphy augmented with radiographs or cross-sectional imaging, such as computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), has remained the commonest method to diagnose and follow up skeletal metastases. However, bone scintigraphy is associated with relatively poor spatial resolution, limited diagnostic specificity and reduced sensitivity for bone marrow disease. It also shows limited diagnostic accuracy in assessing response to therapy in a clinically useful time period. With the advent of hybrid positron emission tomography (PET)/CT scanners there has been an increasing interest in using various PET tracers to evaluate skeletal disease including [18F]fluoride (NaF) as a bone-specific tracer and [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose and [18F]choline as tumour-specific tracers. There is also early work exploring the receptor status of skeletal metastases with somatostatin receptor analogues. This review describes the potential utility of these tracers in the assessment of skeletal metastases. PMID:20663736

  14. Compact large FoV gamma camera for breast molecular imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pani, R.; Cinti, M. N.; Pellegrini, R.; Betti, M.; Devincentis, G.; Bennati, P.; Ridolfi, S.; Iurlaro, G.; Montani, L.; Scafè, R.; Marini, M.; Porfiri, L. M.; Giachetti, G.; Baglini, F.; Salvadori, G.; Madesani, M.; Pieracci, M.; Catarsi, F.; Bigongiari, A.

    2006-12-01

    The very low sensitivity of scintimammography for tumours under 1 cm in diameter, with current nuclear medicine cameras, is the major limitation in recommending this test modality for screening purposes. To improve this diagnostic technique,a new concept of scintillation gamma camera, which fits the best requirements for functional breast imaging has been developed under "Integrated Mammographic Imaging" (IMI) project. This camera consists of a large detection head (6″×7″),very compact sized and with light weight to be easily positioned in the same X-ray geometry. The detection head consists of matrix of 42 photodetector Hamamatsu 1 in 2 square H8520-C12 PSPMTs, which are closely packed and coupled to a NaI(Tl) scintillating array, with individual crystal pixel 2×2×6 mm 3 size. Large FoV camera shows a very good pixel identification in the detection dead zones between tubes allowing an accurate LUT correction of the final image reconstruction. Electronic read-out was especially designed to optimize the intrinsic spatial resolution and camera compactness. With respect to Anger camera, the overall spatial resolution is improved up to 40% while the overall energy resolution values is ˜16% at 140 keV. Large FoV dedicated camera was characterized and tested by phantom studies; and clinical trials are currently performed. For all patients, compression views have been acquiring for both breasts in craniocaudal projections, and are compared with standard gamma camera images.

  15. A versatile photogrammetric camera automatic calibration suite for multispectral fusion and optical helmet tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Villiers, Jason; Jermy, Robert; Nicolls, Fred

    2014-06-01

    This paper presents a system to determine the photogrammetric parameters of a camera. The lens distortion, focal length and camera six degree of freedom (DOF) position are calculated. The system caters for cameras of different sensitivity spectra and fields of view without any mechanical modifications. The distortion characterization, a variant of Brown's classic plumb line method, allows many radial and tangential distortion coefficients and finds the optimal principal point. Typical values are 5 radial and 3 tangential coefficients. These parameters are determined stably and demonstrably produce superior results to low order models despite popular and prevalent misconceptions to the contrary. The system produces coefficients to model both the distorted to undistorted pixel coordinate transformation (e.g. for target designation) and the inverse transformation (e.g. for image stitching and fusion) allowing deterministic rates far exceeding real time. The focal length is determined to minimise the error in absolute photogrammetric positional measurement for both multi camera systems or monocular (e.g. helmet tracker) systems. The system determines the 6 DOF position of the camera in a chosen coordinate system. It can also determine the 6 DOF offset of the camera relative to its mechanical mount. This allows faulty cameras to be replaced without requiring a recalibration of the entire system (such as an aircraft cockpit). Results from two simple applications of the calibration results are presented: stitching and fusion of the images from a dual-band visual/ LWIR camera array, and a simple laboratory optical helmet tracker.

  16. a Method for Self-Calibration in Satellite with High Precision of Space Linear Array Camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wei; Qian, Fangming; Miao, Yuzhe; Wang, Rongjian

    2016-06-01

    At present, the on-orbit calibration of the geometric parameters of a space surveying camera is usually processed by data from a ground calibration field after capturing the images. The entire process is very complicated and lengthy and cannot monitor and calibrate the geometric parameters in real time. On the basis of a large number of on-orbit calibrations, we found that owing to the influence of many factors, e.g., weather, it is often difficult to capture images of the ground calibration field. Thus, regular calibration using field data cannot be ensured. This article proposes a real time self-calibration method for a space linear array camera on a satellite using the optical auto collimation principle. A collimating light source and small matrix array CCD devices are installed inside the load system of the satellite; these use the same light path as the linear array camera. We can extract the location changes of the cross marks in the matrix array CCD to determine the real-time variations in the focal length and angle parameters of the linear array camera. The on-orbit status of the camera is rapidly obtained using this method. On one hand, the camera's change regulation can be mastered accurately and the camera's attitude can be adjusted in a timely manner to ensure optimal photography; in contrast, self-calibration of the camera aboard the satellite can be realized quickly, which improves the efficiency and reliability of photogrammetric processing.

  17. Comparison of dosimetry between PET/CT and PET alone using (11)C-ITMM.

    PubMed

    Ito, Kimiteru; Sakata, Muneyuki; Oda, Keiichi; Wagatsuma, Kei; Toyohara, Jun; Ishibashi, Kenji; Ishii, Kenji; Ishiwata, Kiichi

    2016-03-01

    We used a new tracer, N-[4-[6-(isopropylamino) pyrimidin-4-yl]-1,3-thiazol-2-yl]-4-(11)C-methoxy-N-methylbenzamide ((11)C-ITMM), to compare radiation doses from positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) with previously published doses from PET alone. Twelve healthy volunteers [six males (mean age ± SD, 27.7 ± 6.7 years) and six females (31.8 ± 14.5 years)] in 12 examinations were recruited. Dose estimations from PET/CT were compared with those from PET alone. Regions of interest (ROIs) in PET/CT were delineated on the basis of low-dose CT (LD-CT) images acquired during PET/CT. Internal and external radiation doses were estimated using OLINDA/EXM 1.0 and CT-Expo software. The effective dose (ED) for (11)C-ITMM calculated from PET/CT was estimated to be 4.7 ± 0.5 μSv/MBq for the male subjects and 4.1 ± 0.7 μSv/MBq for the female subjects. The mean ED for (11)C-ITMM calculated from PET alone in a previous report was estimated to be 4.6 ± 0.3 μSv/MBq (males, n = 3). The ED values for (11)C-ITMM calculated from PET/CT in the male subjects were almost identical to those from PET alone. The absorbed doses (ADs) of the gallbladder, stomach, red bone marrow, and spleen calculated from PET/CT were significantly different from those calculated from PET alone. The EDs of (11)C-ITMM calculated from PET/CT were almost identical to those calculated from PET alone. The ADs in several organs calculated from PET/CT differed from those from PET alone. LD-CT images acquired during PET/CT may facilitate organ identification.

  18. PET measurements of cerebral metabolism corrected for CSF contributions

    SciTech Connect

    Chawluk, J.; Alavi, A.; Dann, R.; Kushner, M.J.; Hurtig, H.; Zimmerman, R.A.; Reivich, M.

    1984-01-01

    Thirty-three subjects have been studied with PET and anatomic imaging (proton-NMR and/or CT) in order to determine the effect of cerebral atrophy on calculations of metabolic rates. Subgroups of neurologic disease investigated include stroke, brain tumor, epilepsy, psychosis, and dementia. Anatomic images were digitized through a Vidicon camera and analyzed volumetrically. Relative areas for ventricles, sulci, and brain tissue were calculated. Preliminary analysis suggests that ventricular volumes as determined by NMR and CT are similar, while sulcal volumes are larger on NMR scans. Metabolic rates (18F-FDG) were calculated before and after correction for CSF spaces, with initial focus upon dementia and normal aging. Correction for atrophy led to a greater increase (%) in global metabolic rates in demented individuals (18.2 +- 5.3) compared to elderly controls (8.3 +- 3.0,p < .05). A trend towards significantly lower glucose metabolism in demented subjects before CSF correction was not seen following correction for atrophy. These data suggest that volumetric analysis of NMR images may more accurately reflect the degree of cerebral atrophy, since NMR does not suffer from beam hardening artifact due to bone-parenchyma juxtapositions. Furthermore, appropriate correction for CSF spaces should be employed if current resolution PET scanners are to accurately measure residual brain tissue metabolism in various pathological states.

  19. System Synchronizes Recordings from Separated Video Cameras

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nail, William; Nail, William L.; Nail, Jasper M.; Le, Doung T.

    2009-01-01

    A system of electronic hardware and software for synchronizing recordings from multiple, physically separated video cameras is being developed, primarily for use in multiple-look-angle video production. The system, the time code used in the system, and the underlying method of synchronization upon which the design of the system is based are denoted generally by the term "Geo-TimeCode(TradeMark)." The system is embodied mostly in compact, lightweight, portable units (see figure) denoted video time-code units (VTUs) - one VTU for each video camera. The system is scalable in that any number of camera recordings can be synchronized. The estimated retail price per unit would be about $350 (in 2006 dollars). The need for this or another synchronization system external to video cameras arises because most video cameras do not include internal means for maintaining synchronization with other video cameras. Unlike prior video-camera-synchronization systems, this system does not depend on continuous cable or radio links between cameras (however, it does depend on occasional cable links lasting a few seconds). Also, whereas the time codes used in prior video-camera-synchronization systems typically repeat after 24 hours, the time code used in this system does not repeat for slightly more than 136 years; hence, this system is much better suited for long-term deployment of multiple cameras.

  20. Empirical Study on Designing of Gaze Tracking Camera Based on the Information of User's Head Movement.

    PubMed

    Pan, Weiyuan; Jung, Dongwook; Yoon, Hyo Sik; Lee, Dong Eun; Naqvi, Rizwan Ali; Lee, Kwan Woo; Park, Kang Ryoung

    2016-08-31

    Gaze tracking is the technology that identifies a region in space that a user is looking at. Most previous non-wearable gaze tracking systems use a near-infrared (NIR) light camera with an NIR illuminator. Based on the kind of camera lens used, the viewing angle and depth-of-field (DOF) of a gaze tracking camera can be different, which affects the performance of the gaze tracking system. Nevertheless, to our best knowledge, most previous researches implemented gaze tracking cameras without ground truth information for determining the optimal viewing angle and DOF of the camera lens. Eye-tracker manufacturers might also use ground truth information, but they do not provide this in public. Therefore, researchers and developers of gaze tracking systems cannot refer to such information for implementing gaze tracking system. We address this problem providing an empirical study in which we design an optimal gaze tracking camera based on experimental measurements of the amount and velocity of user's head movements. Based on our results and analyses, researchers and developers might be able to more easily implement an optimal gaze tracking system. Experimental results show that our gaze tracking system shows high performance in terms of accuracy, user convenience and interest.