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Sample records for pet imaging modality

  1. Dual-Modality PET/Ultrasound imaging of the Prostate

    SciTech Connect

    Huber, Jennifer S.; Moses, William W.; Pouliot, Jean; Hsu, I.C.

    2005-11-11

    Functional imaging with positron emission tomography (PET)will detect malignant tumors in the prostate and/or prostate bed, as well as possibly help determine tumor ''aggressiveness''. However, the relative uptake in a prostate tumor can be so great that few other anatomical landmarks are visible in a PET image. Ultrasound imaging with a transrectal probe provides anatomical detail in the prostate region that can be co-registered with the sensitive functional information from the PET imaging. Imaging the prostate with both PET and transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) will help determine the location of any cancer within the prostate region. This dual-modality imaging should help provide better detection and treatment of prostate cancer. LBNL has built a high performance positron emission tomograph optimized to image the prostate.Compared to a standard whole-body PET camera, our prostate-optimized PET camera has the same sensitivity and resolution, less backgrounds and lower cost. We plan to develop the hardware and software tools needed for a validated dual PET/TRUS prostate imaging system. We also plan to develop dual prostate imaging with PET and external transabdominal ultrasound, in case the TRUS system is too uncomfortable for some patients. We present the design and intended clinical uses for these dual imaging systems.

  2. Dual-Modality Prostate Imaging with PET and Transrectal Ultrasound

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    as a high-scatter ultrasound TMM, using 4% agarose mixed with deionized water and heated to 62 (in a hot water bath on a hot plate and mixed...prostate” was prepared as a low-scatter ultrasound TMM, using 8% gelatin mixed with deionized water and heated until the gelatin dissolved. The PET-US...Emission Tomography–Transrectal Ultrasound (PET-TRUS) imaging of the prostate and validate the technology with phantom and “proof of principle” human

  3. Carbon-11 radiolabeling of iron-oxide nanoparticles for dual-modality PET/MR imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Ramesh; Xu, Youwen; Kim, Sung Won; Schueller, Michael J.; Alexoff, David; Smith, S. David; Wang, Wei; Schlyer, David

    2013-07-01

    Dual-modality imaging, using Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and Positron Emission Tomography (PET) simultaneously, is a powerful tool to gain valuable information correlating structure with function in biomedicine. The advantage of this dual approach is that the strengths of one modality can balance the weaknesses of the other. However, success of this technique requires developing imaging probes suitable for both. Here, we report on the development of a nanoparticle labeling procedure via covalent bonding with carbon-11 PET isotope. Carbon-11 in the form of [11C]methyl iodide was used as a methylation agent to react with carboxylic acid (-COOH) and amine (-NH2) functional groups of ligands bound to the nanoparticles (NPs). The surface coating ligands present on superparamagnetic iron-oxide nanoparticles (SPIO NPs) were radiolabeled to achieve dual-modality PET/MR imaging capabilities. The proof-of-concept dual-modality PET/MR imaging using the radiolabeled SPIO NPs was demonstrated in an in vivo experiment.Dual-modality imaging, using Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and Positron Emission Tomography (PET) simultaneously, is a powerful tool to gain valuable information correlating structure with function in biomedicine. The advantage of this dual approach is that the strengths of one modality can balance the weaknesses of the other. However, success of this technique requires developing imaging probes suitable for both. Here, we report on the development of a nanoparticle labeling procedure via covalent bonding with carbon-11 PET isotope. Carbon-11 in the form of [11C]methyl iodide was used as a methylation agent to react with carboxylic acid (-COOH) and amine (-NH2) functional groups of ligands bound to the nanoparticles (NPs). The surface coating ligands present on superparamagnetic iron-oxide nanoparticles (SPIO NPs) were radiolabeled to achieve dual-modality PET/MR imaging capabilities. The proof-of-concept dual-modality PET/MR imaging using the radiolabeled

  4. Dual-modality brain PET-CT image segmentation based on adaptive use of functional and anatomical information.

    PubMed

    Xia, Yong; Eberl, Stefan; Wen, Lingfeng; Fulham, Michael; Feng, David Dagan

    2012-01-01

    Dual medical imaging modalities, such as PET-CT, are now a routine component of clinical practice. Medical image segmentation methods, however, have generally only been applied to single modality images. In this paper, we propose the dual-modality image segmentation model to segment brain PET-CT images into gray matter, white matter and cerebrospinal fluid. This model converts PET-CT image segmentation into an optimization process controlled simultaneously by PET and CT voxel values and spatial constraints. It is innovative in the creation and application of the modality discriminatory power (MDP) coefficient as a weighting scheme to adaptively combine the functional (PET) and anatomical (CT) information on a voxel-by-voxel basis. Our approach relies upon allowing the modality with higher discriminatory power to play a more important role in the segmentation process. We compared the proposed approach to three other image segmentation strategies, including PET-only based segmentation, combination of the results of independent PET image segmentation and CT image segmentation, and simultaneous segmentation of joint PET and CT images without an adaptive weighting scheme. Our results in 21 clinical studies showed that our approach provides the most accurate and reliable segmentation for brain PET-CT images.

  5. TU-AB-BRA-06: Texture Feature Reproducibility Between PET/CT and PET/MR Imaging Modalities

    SciTech Connect

    Galavis, P; Friedman, K; Chandarana, H; Jackson, K

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Radiomics involves the extraction of texture features from different imaging modalities with the purpose of developing models to predict patient treatment outcomes. The purpose of this study is to investigate texture feature reproducibility across [18F]FDG PET/CT and [18F]FDG PET/MR imaging in patients with primary malignancies. Methods: Twenty five prospective patients with solid tumors underwent clinical [18F]FDG PET/CT scan followed by [18F]FDG PET/MR scans. In all patients the lesions were identified using nuclear medicine reports. The images were co-registered and segmented using an in-house auto-segmentation method. Fifty features, based on the intensity histogram, second and high order matrices, were extracted from the segmented regions from both image data sets. One-way random-effects ANOVA model of the intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) was used to establish texture feature correlations between both data sets. Results: Fifty features were classified based on their ICC values, which were found in the range from 0.1 to 0.86, in three categories: high, intermediate, and low. Ten features extracted from second and high-order matrices showed large ICC ≥ 0.70. Seventeen features presented intermediate 0.5 ≤ ICC ≤ 0.65 and the remaining twenty three presented low ICC ≤ 0.45. Conclusion: Features with large ICC values could be reliable candidates for quantification as they lead to similar results from both imaging modalities. Features with small ICC indicates a lack of correlation. Therefore, the use of these features as a quantitative measure will lead to different assessments of the same lesion depending on the imaging modality from where they are extracted. This study shows the importance of the need for further investigation and standardization of features across multiple imaging modalities.

  6. Cross-modality PET/CT and contrast-enhanced CT imaging for pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jian; Zuo, Chang-Jing; Jia, Ning-Yang; Wang, Jian-Hua; Hu, Sheng-Ping; Yu, Zhong-Fei; Zheng, Yuan; Zhang, An-Yu; Feng, Xiao-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To explore the diagnostic value of the cross-modality fusion images provided by positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) and contrast-enhanced CT (CECT) for pancreatic cancer (PC). METHODS: Data from 70 patients with pancreatic lesions who underwent CECT and PET/CT examinations at our hospital from August 2010 to October 2012 were analyzed. PET/CECT for the cross-modality image fusion was obtained using TureD software. The diagnostic efficiencies of PET/CT, CECT and PET/CECT were calculated and compared with each other using a χ2 test. P < 0.05 was considered to indicate statistical significance. RESULTS: Of the total 70 patients, 50 had PC and 20 had benign lesions. The differences in the sensitivity, negative predictive value (NPV), and accuracy between CECT and PET/CECT in detecting PC were statistically significant (P < 0.05 for each). In 15 of the 31 patients with PC who underwent a surgical operation, peripancreatic vessel invasion was verified. The differences in the sensitivity, positive predictive value, NPV, and accuracy of CECT vs PET/CT and PET/CECT vs PET/CT in diagnosing peripancreatic vessel invasion were statistically significant (P < 0.05 for each). In 19 of the 31 patients with PC who underwent a surgical operation, regional lymph node metastasis was verified by postsurgical histology. There was no statistically significant difference among the three methods in detecting regional lymph node metastasis (P > 0.05 for each). In 17 of the 50 patients with PC confirmed by histology or clinical follow-up, distant metastasis was confirmed. The differences in the sensitivity and NPV between CECT and PET/CECT in detecting distant metastasis were statistically significant (P < 0.05 for each). CONCLUSION: Cross-modality image fusion of PET/CT and CECT is a convenient and effective method that can be used to diagnose and stage PC, compensating for the defects of PET/CT and CECT when they are conducted individually. PMID:25780297

  7. Dual-Modality Prostate Imaging with PET and Transrectal Ultrasound

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-04-01

    concentrations than the “pelvis.” Both TMMs were hardened at room temperature. These PET- TRUS-CT-MRI phantoms are stored with a thin layer of safflower ...hardened at room temperature. Theses phantoms are stored with a thin layer of safflower oil on top to minimize dehydration and shrinkage. Fig. 2

  8. Novel Strategy for Preparing Dual-Modality Optical/PET Imaging Probes via Photo-Click Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Sun, Lingyi; Ding, Jiule; Xing, Wei; Gai, Yongkang; Sheng, Jing; Zeng, Dexing

    2016-05-18

    Preparation of small molecule based dual-modality probes remains a challenging task due to the complicated synthetic procedure. In this study, a novel concise and generic strategy for preparing dual-modality optical/PET imaging probes via photo-click chemistry was developed, in which the diazole photo-click linker functioned not only as a bridge between the targeting-ligand and the PET imaging moiety, but also as the fluorophore for optical imaging. A dual-modality AE105 peptidic probe was successfully generated via this strategy and subsequently applied in the fluorescent staining of U87MG cells and the (68)Ga based PET imaging of mice bearing U87MG xenograft. In addition, dual-modality monoclonal antibody cetuximab has also been generated via this strategy and labeled with (64)Cu for PET imaging studies, broadening the application of this strategy to include the preparation of macromolecule based imaging probes.

  9. Cerenkov Luminescence Imaging as a Modality to Evaluate Antibody-Based PET Radiotracers.

    PubMed

    D'Souza, Jimson W; Hensley, Harvey; Doss, Mohan; Beigarten, Charles; Torgov, Michael; Olafsen, Tove; Yu, Jian Q; Robinson, Matthew K

    2017-01-01

    Antibodies, and engineered antibody fragments, labeled with radioisotopes are being developed as radiotracers for the detection and phenotyping of diseases such as cancer. The development of antibody-based radiotracers requires extensive characterization of their in vitro and in vivo properties, including their ability to target tumors in an antigen-selective manner. In this study, we investigated the use of Cerenkov luminescence imaging (CLI) as compared with PET as a modality for evaluating the in vivo behavior of antibody-based radiotracers.

  10. Cerenkov Luminescence Imaging as a Modality to Evaluate Antibody-Based PET Radiotracers

    PubMed Central

    D’Souza, Jimson W.; Hensley, Harvey; Doss, Mohan; Beigarten, Charles; Torgov, Michael; Olafsen, Tove; Yu, Jian Q.

    2017-01-01

    Antibodies, and engineered antibody fragments, labeled with radioisotopes are being developed as radiotracers for the detection and phenotyping of diseases such as cancer. The development of antibody-based radiotracers requires extensive characterization of their in vitro and in vivo properties, including their ability to target tumors in an antigen-selective manner. In this study, we investigated the use of Cerenkov luminescence imaging (CLI) as compared with PET as a modality for evaluating the in vivo behavior of antibody-based radiotracers. Methods: The anti–prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) huJ591 antibody (IgG; 150 kDa) and its minibody (Mb; 80 kDa) format were functionalized with the chelator 1,4,7-triazacyclononane-1-glutaric acid-4,7-diacetic acid (NODAGA) and radiolabeled with the positron-emitting radionuclide 64Cu (half-life, 12.7 h). Immunoreactive preparations of the radiolabeled antibodies were injected into NCr nu/nu mice harboring PSMA-positive CWR22Rv1 and PSMA-negative PC-3 tumor xenografts. Tumor targeting was evaluated by both PET and CLI. Results: 64Cu-NODAGA-PSMA-IgG and 64Cu-NODAGA-PSMA-Mb retained the ability to bind cell surface PSMA, and both radiotracers exhibited selective uptake into PSMA-positive tumors. Under the experimental conditions used, PSMA-selective uptake of 64Cu-NODAGA-PSMA-IgG and 64Cu-NODAGA-PSMA-Mb was observed by CLI as early as 3 h after injection, with tumor-to-background ratios peaking at 24 (IgG) and 16 (Mb) h after injection. Targeting data generated by CLI correlated with that generated by PET and necropsy. Conclusion: CLI provided a rapid and simple assessment of the targeting specificity and pharmacokinetics of the antibody-based PET radiotracers that correlated well with the behavior observed by standard PET imaging. Moreover, CLI provided clear discrimination between uptake kinetics of an intact IgG and its small-molecular-weight derivative Mb. These data support the use of CLI for the evaluation of

  11. Crossed Cerebellar Diaschisis: Three Case Reports Imaging Using a Tri-Modality PET/CT-MR System.

    PubMed

    Han, Shuguang; Wang, Xiaopeng; Xu, Kai; Hu, Chunfeng

    2016-01-01

    Crossed cerebellar diaschisis (CCD) describes a depression of oxidative metabolism glucose and blood flow in the cerebellum secondary to a supratentorial lesion in the contralateral cerebral hemisphere. PET/MR has the potential to become a powerful tool for demonstrating and imaging intracranial lesions .We herein report 3 cases of CCD imaging using a tri-modality PET/CT-MR set-up for investigating the value of adding MRI rather than CT to PET in clinical routine.We describe 3 patients with CCD and neurological symptoms in conjunction with abnormal cerebral fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography-magnetic resonance imaging (PET/CT-MR) manifestations including arterial spin-labeling (ASL) and T2-weighted images. In all, 18FDG-PET/CT detected positive FDG uptake in supratentorial lesions, and hypometabolism with atrophy in the contralateral cerebellum. More than that, hybrid PET/MRI provided a more accurate anatomic localization and ASL indicated disruption of the cortico-ponto-cerebellar pathway.Using pathology or long-term clinical follow-up to confirm the PET and ASL findings, the supratentorial lesions of the 3 patients were respectively diagnosed with cerebral infarction, recurrent glioma, and metastasis.The reports emphasize the significance of multimodality radiological examinations. Multimodality imaging contributes to proper diagnosis, management, and follow-up of supratentorial lesions with CCD.

  12. Trends in PET imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Moses, William W.

    2000-11-01

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) imaging is a well established method for obtaining information on the status of certain organs within the human body or in animals. This paper presents an overview of recent trends PET instrumentation. Significant effort is being expended to develop new PET detector modules, especially those capable of measuring depth of interaction. This is aided by recent advances in scintillator and pixellated photodetector technology. The other significant area of effort is development of special purpose PET cameras (such as for imaging breast cancer or small animals) or cameras that have the ability to image in more than one modality (such as PET / SPECT or PET / X-Ray CT).

  13. Performance evaluation of a compact PET/SPECT/CT tri-modality system for small animal imaging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Qingyang; Wang, Shi; Ma, Tianyu; Wu, Jing; Liu, Hui; Xu, Tianpeng; Xia, Yan; Fan, Peng; Lyu, Zhenlei; Liu, Yaqiang

    2015-06-01

    PET, SPECT and CT imaging techniques are widely used in preclinical small animal imaging applications. In this paper, we present a compact small animal PET/SPECT/CT tri-modality system. A dual-functional, shared detector design is implemented which enables PET and SPECT imaging with a same LYSO ring detector. A multi-pinhole collimator is mounted on the system and inserted into the detector ring in SPECT imaging mode. A cone-beam CT consisting of a micro focus X-ray tube and a CMOS detector is implemented. The detailed design and the performance evaluations are reported in this paper. In PET imaging mode, the measured NEMA based spatial resolution is 2.12 mm (FWHM), and the sensitivity at the central field of view (CFOV) is 3.2%. The FOV size is 50 mm (∅)×100 mm (L). The SPECT has a spatial resolution of 1.32 mm (FWHM) and an average sensitivity of 0.031% at the center axial, and a 30 mm (∅)×90 mm (L) FOV. The CT spatial resolution is 8.32 lp/mm @10%MTF, and the contrast discrimination function value is 2.06% with 1.5 mm size cubic box object. In conclusion, a compact, tri-modality PET/SPECT/CT system was successfully built with low cost and high performance.

  14. Intrinsically germanium-69-labeled iron oxide nanoparticles: synthesis and in-vivo dual-modality PET/MR imaging.

    PubMed

    Chakravarty, Rubel; Valdovinos, Hector F; Chen, Feng; Lewis, Christina M; Ellison, Paul A; Luo, Haiming; Meyerand, M Elizabeth; Nickles, Robert J; Cai, Weibo

    2014-08-13

    Intrinsically germanium-69-labeled super-paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles are synthesized via a newly developed, fast and highly specific chelator-free approach. The biodistribution pattern and the feasibility of (69) Ge-SPION@PEG for in vivo dual-modality positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance (PET/MR) imaging and lymph-node mapping are investigated, which represents the first example of the successful utilization of a (69) Ge-based agent for PET/MR imaging. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Real-time volume rendering visualization of dual-modality PET/CT images with interactive fuzzy thresholding segmentation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jinman; Cai, Weidong; Eberl, Stefan; Feng, Dagan

    2007-03-01

    Three-dimensional (3-D) visualization has become an essential part for imaging applications, including image-guided surgery, radiotherapy planning, and computer-aided diagnosis. In the visualization of dual-modality positron emission tomography and computed tomography (PET/CT), 3-D volume rendering is often limited to rendering of a single image volume and by high computational demand. Furthermore, incorporation of segmentation in volume rendering is usually restricted to visualizing the presegmented volumes of interest. In this paper, we investigated the integration of interactive segmentation into real-time volume rendering of dual-modality PET/CT images. We present and validate a fuzzy thresholding segmentation technique based on fuzzy cluster analysis, which allows interactive and real-time optimization of the segmentation results. This technique is then incorporated into a real-time multi-volume rendering of PET/CT images. Our method allows a real-time fusion and interchangeability of segmentation volume with PET or CT volumes, as well as the usual fusion of PET/CT volumes. Volume manipulations such as window level adjustments and lookup table can be applied to individual volumes, which are then fused together in real time as adjustments are made. We demonstrate the benefit of our method in integrating segmentation with volume rendering in its application to PET/CT images. Responsive frame rates are achieved by utilizing a texture-based volume rendering algorithm and the rapid transfer capability of the high-memory bandwidth available in low-cost graphic hardware.

  16. Broad-spectrum multi-modality image registration: from PET, CT, and MRI to autoradiography, microscopy, and beyond.

    PubMed

    Zanzonico, P B

    2006-01-01

    Image registration and fusion are increasingly important components of both clinical and small-animal imaging and have lead to the development of a variety of pertinent hardware and software tools, including multi-modality, e.g. PET-CT, devices. At the same time, advances in microscopic imaging, including phosphor-plate digital autoradiography and immunohistochemistry, now allow ultra-high (sub-100 microm)-resolution molecular characterization of tissue sections. To date, however, in vivo imaging of intact subjects and ex vivo imaging of harvested tissues sections have remained separate and distinct, making it difficult to reliably inter-compare the former and the latter. The Department of Medical Physics and the Radiation Biophysics Laboratory at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, under the direction of Dr. Clifton Ling, has now designed, fabricated, and tested a stereotactic imaging system for so-called "broad-spectrum" image registration, from coarser-resolution in vivo imaging modalities such as PET, CT, and MRI to ultra-high-resolution ex vivo imaging techniques such as histology, autoradiography, and immunohistochemistry.

  17. FDG-PET and other imaging modalities for the evaluation of breast cancer recurrence and metastases: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Pan, LingLing; Han, Yuan; Sun, XiaoGuang; Liu, JianJun; Gang, Huang

    2010-07-01

    Breast carcinoma is the most common cancer in female patients with a propensity for recurrence and metastases. The accuracy of ultrasound (US), computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), scintimammography (SMM) and positron emission tomography (PET) in diagnosing the recurrent and/or breast cancer has never been systematically assessed, and present systematic review was aimed at this issue. MEDLINE and EMBASE were searched for articles dealt with detection of recurrent and/or metastatic breast cancer by US, CT, MRI, SMM or PET whether interpreted with or without the use of CT. Histopathologic analysis and/or close clinical and imaging follow-up for at least 6 months were used as golden reference. We extracted data to calculate sensitivity, specificity, summary receiver operating characteristic curves and area under the curve and to test for heterogeneity. In 42 included studies, US and MRI had highest pooled specificity (0.962 and 0.929, respectively); MRI and PET had highest pooled sensitivity (0.9500 and 0.9530, respectively). The AUC of US, CT, MRI, SMM and PET was 0.9251, 0.8596, 0.9718, 0.9386 and 0.9604, respectively. Results of pairwise comparison between each modality demonstrated that AUC of MRI and PET was higher than that of US or CT, p < 0.05. No statistical significance was found between MRI and PET. There was heterogeneity among studies and evidence of publication bias. In conclusion, MRI seemed to be a more useful supplement to current surveillance techniques to assess patients with suspected recurrent and/or metastatic breast cancer. If MRI shows an indeterminate or benign lesion or MRI was not applicable, FDG-PET could be performed in addition.

  18. Principles of nuclear medicine imaging: planar, SPECT, PET, multi-modality, and autoradiography systems.

    PubMed

    Zanzonico, Pat

    2012-04-01

    The underlying principles of nuclear medicine imaging involve the use of unsealed sources of radioactivity in the form of radiopharmaceuticals. The ionizing radiations that accompany the decay of the administered radioactivity can be quantitatively detected, measured, and imaged in vivo with instruments such as gamma cameras. This paper reviews the design and operating principles, as well as the capabilities and limitations, of instruments used clinically and preclinically for in vivo radionuclide imaging. These include gamma cameras, single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) scanners, and positron emission tomography (PET) scanners. The technical basis of autoradiography is reviewed as well.

  19. DEVELOPMENT OF A DUAL MODALITY TOMOGRAPHIC IMAGING SYSTEM FOR BIOLUMINESCENCE AND PET

    SciTech Connect

    CHATZIIOANNOU, ARION

    2011-12-21

    The goal of this proposal was to develop a new hybrid imaging modality capable to simultaneously image optical bioluminescence signals, as well as radionuclide emissions from the annihilation of positrons originating from molecular imaging probes in preclinical mouse models. This new technology enables the simultaneous in-vivo measurements of both emissions that could be produced from a single or a combination of two different biomarkers. It also facilitates establishing the physical limitations of bioluminescence imaging, its tomographic and spectral image reconstruction potential and the quantification of bioluminescence signals.

  20. Multi-modality PET-CT imaging of breast cancer in an animal model using nanoparticle x-ray contrast agent and 18F-FDG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badea, C. T.; Ghaghada, K.; Espinosa, G.; Strong, L.; Annapragada, A.

    2011-03-01

    Multi-modality PET-CT imaging is playing an important role in the field of oncology. While PET imaging facilitates functional interrogation of tumor status, the use of CT imaging is primarily limited to anatomical reference. In an attempt to extract comprehensive information about tumor cells and its microenvironment, we used a nanoparticle xray contrast agent to image tumor vasculature and vessel 'leakiness' and 18F-FDG to investigate the metabolic status of tumor cells. In vivo PET/CT studies were performed in mice implanted with 4T1 mammary breast cancer cells.Early-phase micro-CT imaging enabled visualization 3D vascular architecture of the tumors whereas delayedphase micro-CT demonstrated highly permeable vessels as evident by nanoparticle accumulation within the tumor. Both imaging modalities demonstrated the presence of a necrotic core as indicated by a hypo-enhanced region in the center of the tumor. At early time-points, the CT-derived fractional blood volume did not correlate with 18F-FDG uptake. At delayed time-points, the tumor enhancement in 18F-FDG micro-PET images correlated with the delayed signal enhanced due to nanoparticle extravasation seen in CT images. The proposed hybrid imaging approach could be used to better understand tumor angiogenesis and to be the basis for monitoring and evaluating anti-angiogenic and nano-chemotherapies.

  1. PET in oncology: will it replace the other modalities?

    PubMed

    Hoh, C K; Schiepers, C; Seltzer, M A; Gambhir, S S; Silverman, D H; Czernin, J; Maddahi, J; Phelps, M E

    1997-04-01

    Medical imaging technology is rapidly expanding and the role of each modality is being redefined constantly. PET has been around since the early sixties and gained clinical acceptance in oncology only after an extreme number of scientific publications. Although PET has the unique ability to image biochemical processes in vivo, this ability is not fully used as a clinical imaging tool. In this overview, the role of PET in relation to other tumor imaging modalities will be discussed and the reported results in the literature will be reviewed. In predicting the future of PET, technical improvements of other imaging modalities need to be dealt with. The fundamental physical principles for image formation with computed tomography (CT), ultrasound (US), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), photon-emission tomography (PET), and single photon emission CT (SPECT) will not change. The potential variety of radiopharmaceuticals which may be developed is unlimited, however, and this provides nuclear imaging techniques with a significant advantage and adaptive features for future biologic imaging. The current applications of PET in oncology have been in characterizing tumor lesions, differentiating recurrent disease from treatment effects, staging tumors, evaluating the extent of disease, and monitoring therapy. The future developments in medicine may use the unique capabilities of PET not only in diagnostic imaging but also in molecular medicine and genetics. The articles discussed in this review were selected from a literature search covering the last 3 years, and in which comparisons of PET with conventional imaging were addressed specifically. PET studies with the glucose analogue fluorine-18-labeled deoxyglucose (FDG) have shown the ability of detecting tumor foci in a variety of histological neoplasms such as thyroid cancer, breast cancer, lymphoma, lung cancer, head and neck carcinoma, colorectal cancer, ovarian carcinoma, and musculoskeletal tumors. Also, the contribution

  2. Prospective comparison of 18F-FDG PET with conventional imaging modalities (CT, MRI, US) in lymph node staging of head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Adams, S; Baum, R P; Stuckensen, T; Bitter, K; Hör, G

    1998-09-01

    The aims of this study were to investigate the detection of cervical lymph node metastases of head and neck cancer by positron emission tomographic (PET) imaging with fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) and to perform a prospective comparison with computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), sonographic and histopathological findings. Sixty patients with histologically proven squamous cell carcinoma were studied by PET imaging before surgery. Preoperative endoscopy (including biopsy), CT, MRI and sonography of the cervical region were performed in all patients within 2 weeks preceding 18F-FDG whole-body PET. FDG PET images were analysed visually and quantitatively for objective assessment of regional tracer uptake. Histopathology of the resected neck specimens revealed a total of 1284 lymph nodes, 117 of which showed metastatic involvement. Based on histopathological findings, FDG PET correctly identified lymph node metastases with a sensitivity of 90% and a specificity of 94% (P<10(-6)). CT and MRI visualized histologically proven lymph node metastases with a sensitivity of 82% (specificity 85%) and 80% (specificity 79%), respectively (P<10(-6)). Sonography revealed a sensitivity of 72% (P<10(-6)). The comparison of 18F-FDG PET with conventional imaging modalities demonstrated statistically significant correlations (PET vs CT, P = 0.017; PET vs MRI, P = 0.012; PET vs sonography, P = 0.0001). Quantitative analysis of FDG uptake in lymph node metastases using body weight-based standardized uptake values (SUVBW) showed no significant correlation between FDG uptake (3.7+/-2.0) and histological grading of tumour-involved lymph nodes (P = 0.9). Interestingly, benign lymph nodes had increased FDG uptake as a result of inflammatory reactions (SUVBW-range: 2-15.8). This prospective, histopathologically controlled study confirms FDG PET as the procedure with the highest sensitivity and specificity for detecting lymph node metastases of head and neck cancer

  3. 68Ga-labeled superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) for multi-modality PET/MR/Cherenkov luminescence imaging of sentinel lymph nodes

    PubMed Central

    Madru, Renata; Tran, Thuy A; Axelsson, Johan; Ingvar, Christian; Bibic, Adnan; Ståhlberg, Freddy; Knutsson, Linda; Strand, Sven-Erik

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop 68Ga-SPIONs for use as a single contrast agent for dynamic, quantitative and high resolution PET/MR imaging of Sentinel Lymph Node (SLN). In addition 68Ga enables Cherenkov light emission which can be used for optical guidance during resection of SLN. SPIONs were labeled with 68Ga in ammonium acetate buffer, pH 5.5. The labeling yield and stability in human serum were determined using instant thin layer chromatography. An amount of 0.07-0.1 mL (~5-10 MBq, 0.13 mg Fe) of 68Ga-SPIONs was subcutaneously injected in the hind paw of rats. The animals were imaged at 0-3 h and 25 h post injection with PET/CT, 9.4 T MR and CCDbased Cherenkov optical systems. A biodistribution study was performed by dissecting and measuring the radioactivity in lymph nodes, kidneys, spleen, liver and the injection site. The labeling yield was 97.3 ± 0.05% after 15 min and the 68Ga-SPIONs were stable in human serum. PET, MR and Cherenkov luminescence imaging clearly visualized the SLN. Biodistribution confirmed a high uptake of the 68Ga-SPIONs within the SLN. We conclude that generator produced 68Ga can be labeled to SPIONs. Subcutaneously injected 68Ga-SPIONs can enhance the identification of the SLNs by combining sensitive PET and high resolution MR imaging. Clinically, hybrid PET/MR cameras are already in use and 68Ga-SPIONs have a great potential as a single-dose, tri-modality agent for diagnostic imaging and potential Cherenkov luminescent guided resection of SLN. PMID:24380046

  4. PET/MR Imaging in Gynecologic Oncology.

    PubMed

    Ohliger, Michael A; Hope, Thomas A; Chapman, Jocelyn S; Chen, Lee-May; Behr, Spencer C; Poder, Liina

    2017-08-01

    MR imaging and PET using 2-Deoxy-2-[(18)F]fluoroglucose (FDG) are both useful in the evaluation of gynecologic malignancies. MR imaging is superior for local staging of disease whereas fludeoxyglucose FDG PET is superior for detecting distant metastases. Integrated PET/MR imaging scanners have great promise for gynecologic malignancies by combining the advantages of each modality into a single scan. This article reviews the technology behind PET/MR imaging acquisitions and technical challenges relevant to imaging the pelvis. A dedicated PET/MR imaging protocol; the roles of PET and MR imaging in cervical, endometrial, and ovarian cancers; and future directions for PET/MR imaging are discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Dual-modality PET/CT instrumentation-today and tomorrow.

    PubMed

    Lonsdale, Markus Nowak; Beyer, Thomas

    2010-03-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) has proven to be a clinically valuable imaging modality, particularly for oncology staging and therapy follow-up. The introduction of combined PET/CT imaging has helped address challenging imaging situations when anatomical information on PET-only was inadequate for accurate lesion localization. After a decade of PET/CT these combined systems have matured technically. Today, whole-body oncology staging is available with PET/CT in 15 min, or less. This review details recent developments in combined PET/CT instrumentation and points to implications for major applications in clinical oncology. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Aluminium hydroxide stabilised MnFe2O4 and Fe3O4 nanoparticles as dual-modality contrasts agent for MRI and PET imaging

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Xianjin; Belo, Salome; Krüger, Dirk; Yan, Yong; de Rosales, Rafael T.M.; Jauregui-Osoro, Maite; Ye, Haitao; Su, Shi; Mathe, Domokos; Kovács, Noémi; Horváth, Ildikó; Semjeni, Mariann; Sunassee, Kavitha; Szigeti, Krisztian; Green, Mark A.; Blower, Philip J.

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles (NPs) MnFe2O4 and Fe3O4 were stabilised by depositing an Al(OH)3 layer via a hydrolysis process. The particles displayed excellent colloidal stability in water and a high affinity to [18F]-fluoride and bisphosphonate groups. A high radiolabeling efficiency, 97% for 18F-fluoride and 100% for 64Cu-bisphosphonate conjugate, was achieved by simply incubating NPs with radioactivity solution at room temperature for 5 min. The properties of particles were strongly dependant on the thickness and hardness of the Al(OH)3 layer which could in turn be controlled by the hydrolysis method. The application of these Al(OH)3 coated magnetic NPs in molecular imaging has been further explored. The results demonstrated that these NPs are potential candidates as dual modal probes for MR and PET. In vivo PET imaging showed a slow release of 18F from NPs, but no sign of efflux of 64Cu. PMID:24768194

  7. Aluminium hydroxide stabilised MnFe2O4 and Fe3O4 nanoparticles as dual-modality contrasts agent for MRI and PET imaging.

    PubMed

    Cui, Xianjin; Belo, Salome; Krüger, Dirk; Yan, Yong; de Rosales, Rafael T M; Jauregui-Osoro, Maite; Ye, Haitao; Su, Shi; Mathe, Domokos; Kovács, Noémi; Horváth, Ildikó; Semjeni, Mariann; Sunassee, Kavitha; Szigeti, Krisztian; Green, Mark A; Blower, Philip J

    2014-07-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles (NPs) MnFe2O4 and Fe3O4 were stabilised by depositing an Al(OH)3 layer via a hydrolysis process. The particles displayed excellent colloidal stability in water and a high affinity to [(18)F]-fluoride and bisphosphonate groups. A high radiolabeling efficiency, 97% for (18)F-fluoride and 100% for (64)Cu-bisphosphonate conjugate, was achieved by simply incubating NPs with radioactivity solution at room temperature for 5 min. The properties of particles were strongly dependant on the thickness and hardness of the Al(OH)3 layer which could in turn be controlled by the hydrolysis method. The application of these Al(OH)3 coated magnetic NPs in molecular imaging has been further explored. The results demonstrated that these NPs are potential candidates as dual modal probes for MR and PET. In vivo PET imaging showed a slow release of (18)F from NPs, but no sign of efflux of (64)Cu.

  8. Integrated whole-body PET/MR imaging with 18F-FDG, 18F-FDOPA, and 18F-fluorodopamine in paragangliomas, in comparison to PET/CT: NIH first clinical experience with a single-injection, dual-modality imaging protocol

    PubMed Central

    Blanchet, Elise M.; Millo, Corina; Martucci, Victoria; Maass-Moreno, Roberto; Bluemke, David A.; Pacak, Karel

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Paragangliomas (PGLs) are tumors that can metastasize and recur; therefore, lifelong imaging follow-up is required. Hybrid positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (/CT) is an essential tool to image PGLs. Novel hybrid PET/magnetic resonance (/MR) scanners are currently being studied in clinical oncology. We studied the feasibility of simultaneous whole-body PET/MR imaging to evaluate patients with PGLs. Methods Fifty-three PGLs or PGL-related lesions from eight patients were evaluated. All patients underwent a single-injection, dual-modality imaging protocol consisting of a PET/CT and subsequent PET/MR scan. Four patients were evaluated with 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG), two with 18F-fluorodihydroxyphenylalanine (18F-FDOPA), and two with 18F-fluorodopamine (18F-FDA). PET/MR data were acquired using a hybrid whole-body 3-Tesla integrated PET/MR scanner. PET and MR data (DIXON images for attenuation correction and T2-weighted sequences for anatomic allocation) were acquired simultaneously. Imaging workflow and imaging times were documented. PET/MR and PET/CT data were visually assessed (blindly) in regards to image quality, lesion detection, and anatomic allocation and delineation of the PET findings. Results With hybrid PET/MR, we obtained high quality images in an acceptable acquisition time (median: 31 min, range: 25–40 min) with good patient compliance. A total of 53 lesions, located in the head-and-neck area (6), mediastinum (2), abdomen and pelvis (13), lungs (2), liver (4), and bone (26) were evaluated. 51 lesions were detected with PET/MR and confirmed by PET/CT. Two bone lesions (L4 body (8 mm) and sacrum (6 mm)) were not detectable on an 18F-FDA scan PET/MR, likely due to washout of the 18F-FDA. Co-registered MR tended to be superior to co-registered CT for head-and-neck, abdomen, pelvis, and liver lesions for anatomic allocation and delineation. Conclusions Clinical PGL evaluation with hybrid PET/MR is feasible with high image

  9. PET Imaging of Breast Cancer: Role in Patient Management.

    PubMed

    Lebron, Lizza; Greenspan, Daniel; Pandit-Taskar, Neeta

    2015-04-01

    Breast cancer is the most common malignancy in females. Imaging plays a critical role in diagnosis, staging and surveillance, and management of disease. Fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET the imaging is indicated in specific clinical setting. Sensitivity of detection depends on tumor histology and size. Whole body FDG PET can change staging and management. In recurrent disease, distant metastasis can be detected. FDG PET imaging has prognostic and predictive value. PET/MR is evolving rapidly and may play a role management, assessment of metastatic lesions, and treatment monitoring. This review discusses current PET modalities, focusing on of FDG PET imaging and novel tracers. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. FDG-PET/CT is a pivotal imaging modality to diagnose rare intravascular large B-cell lymphoma: case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Colavolpe, Cecile; Ebbo, Mikael; Trousse, Delphine; Khibri, Hajar; Franques, Jerome; Chetaille, Bruno; Coso, Diane; Ouvrier, Matthieu John; Gastaud, Lauris; Guedj, Eric; Schleinitz, Nicolas

    2015-06-01

    Intravascular large B-cell lymphoma (IVLBCL) remains a diagnostic challenge, because of non-specific findings on clinical, laboratory, and imaging studies. We present a case in which 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography was particularly useful to suspect the diagnosis, to detect unexpected locations, to guide contributive biopsy, and to assess the response to treatment. In case of initial negative results, FDG-PET should be repeated in the course of clinical evolution. In the presence of neurological or hormonal symptoms without brain magnetic resonance imaging abnormality, FDG-PET brain slices could depict additional pituitary and/or brain hypermetabolisms. We discuss the potential interests of FDG-PET in IVLBCL by a literature review. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Simultaneous trimodal PET-MR-EEG imaging: Do EEG caps generate artefacts in PET images?

    PubMed Central

    Rota Kops, Elena; Mauler, Jörg; Tellmann, Lutz; Lerche, Christoph; Herzog, Hans; Shah, N. Jon; Neuner, Irene

    2017-01-01

    Trimodal simultaneous acquisition of positron emission tomography (PET), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and electroencephalography (EEG) has become feasible due to the development of hybrid PET-MR scanners. To capture the temporal dynamics of neuronal activation on a millisecond-by-millisecond basis, an EEG system is appended to the quantitative high resolution PET-MR imaging modality already established in our institute. One of the major difficulties associated with the development of simultaneous trimodal acquisition is that the components traditionally used in each modality can cause interferences in its counterpart. The mutual interferences of MRI components and PET components on PET and MR images, and the influence of EEG electrodes on functional MRI images have been studied and reported on. Building on this, this study aims to investigate the influence of the EEG cap on the quality and quantification of PET images acquired during simultaneous PET-MR measurements. A preliminary transmission scan study on the ECAT HR+ scanner, using an Iida phantom, showed visible attenuation effect due to the EEG cap. The BrainPET-MR emission images of the Iida phantom with [18F]Fluordeoxyglucose, as well as of human subjects with the EEG cap, did not show significant effects of the EEG cap, even though the applied attenuation correction did not take into account the attenuation of the EEG cap itself. PMID:28902890

  12. Qualitative and quantitative comparison of PET/CT and PET/MR imaging in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Al-Nabhani, Khalsa Z; Syed, Rizwan; Michopoulou, Sofia; Alkalbani, Jokha; Afaq, Asim; Panagiotidis, Emmanouil; O'Meara, Celia; Groves, Ashley; Ell, Peter; Bomanji, Jamshed

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to prospectively compare whole-body PET/MR imaging and PET/CT, qualitatively and quantitatively, in oncologic patients and assess the confidence and degree of inter- and intraobserver agreement in anatomic lesion localization. Fifty patients referred for staging with known cancers underwent PET/CT with low-dose CT for attenuation correction immediately followed by PET/MR imaging with 2-point Dixon attenuation correction. PET/CT scans were obtained according to standard protocols (56 ± 20 min after injection of an average 367 MBq of (18)F-FDG, 150 MBq of (68)Ga-DOTATATE, or 333.8 MBq of (18)F-fluoro-ethyl-choline; 2.5 min/bed position). PET/MR was performed with 5 min/bed position. Three dual-accredited nuclear medicine physicians/radiologists identified the lesions and assigned each to an exact anatomic location. The image quality, alignment, and confidence in anatomic localization of lesions were scored on a scale of 1-3 for PET/CT and PET/MR imaging. Quantitative analysis was performed by comparing the standardized uptake values. Intraclass correlation coefficients and the Wilcoxon signed-rank test were used to assess intra- and interobserver agreement in image quality, alignment, and confidence in lesion localization for the 2 modalities. Two hundred twenty-seven tracer-avid lesions were identified in 50 patients. Of these, 225 were correctly identified on PET/CT and 227 on PET/MR imaging by all 3 observers. The confidence in anatomic localization improved by 5.1% when using PET/MR imaging, compared with PET/CT. The mean percentage interobserver agreement was 96% for PET/CT and 99% for PET/MR imaging, and intraobserver agreement in lesion localization across the 2 modalities was 93%. There was 10% (5/50 patients) improvement in local staging with PET/MR imaging, compared with PET/CT. In this first study, we show the effectiveness of whole-body PET/MR imaging in oncology. There is no statistically significant difference between PET

  13. MULTIMODALITY IMAGING: BEYOND PET/CT AND SPECT/CT

    PubMed Central

    Cherry, Simon R.

    2009-01-01

    Multimodality imaging with PET/CT and SPECT/CT has become commonplace in clinical practice and in preclinical and basic medical research. Do other combinations of imaging modalities have a similar potential to impact medical science and clinical medicine? The combination of PET or SPECT with MRI is an area of active research at the present time, while other, perhaps less obvious combinations, including CT/MR and PET/optical also are being studied. In addition to the integration of the instrumentation, there are parallel developments in synthesizing imaging agents that can be viewed by multiple imaging modalities. Is the fusion of PET and SPECT with CT the ultimate answer in multimodality imaging, or is it just the first example of a more general trend towards harnessing the complementary nature of the different modalities on integrated imaging platforms? PMID:19646559

  14. Hybrid PET/MR imaging: physics and technical considerations.

    PubMed

    Shah, Shetal N; Huang, Steve S

    2015-08-01

    In just over a decade, hybrid imaging with FDG PET/CT has become a standard bearer in the management of cancer patients. An exquisitely sensitive whole-body imaging modality, it combines the ability to detect subtle biologic changes with FDG PET and the anatomic information offered by CT scans. With advances in MR technology and advent of novel targeted PET radiotracers, hybrid PET/MRI is an evolutionary technique that is poised to revolutionize hybrid imaging. It offers unparalleled spatial resolution and functional multi-parametric data combined with biologic information in the non-invasive detection and characterization of diseases, without the deleterious effects of ionizing radiation. This article reviews the basic principles of FDG PET and MR imaging, discusses the salient technical developments of hybrid PET/MR systems, and provides an introduction to FDG PET/MR image acquisition.

  15. PET Imaging of Angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Gang; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2009-01-01

    Synopsis Angiogenesis is a highly-controlled process that is dependent on the intricate balance of both promoting and inhibiting factors, involved in various physiological and pathological processes. A comprehensive understanding of the molecular mechanisms that regulate angiogenesis has resulted in the design of new and more effective therapeutic strategies. Due to insufficient sensitivity to detect therapeutic effects by using standard clinical endpoints or by looking for physiological improvement, a multitude of imaging techniques have been developed to assess tissue vasculature on the structural, functional and molecular level. Imaging is expected to provide a novel approach to noninvasively monitor angiogenesis, to optimize the dose of new antiangiogenic agents and to assess the efficacy of therapies directed at modulation of the angiogenic process. All these methods have been successfully used preclinically and will hopefully aid in antiangiogenic drug development in animal studies. In this review article, the application of PET in angiogenesis imaging at both functional and molecular level will be discussed. For PET imaging of angiogenesis related molecular markers, we emphasize integrin αvβ3, VEGF/VEGFR, and MMPs. PMID:20046926

  16. 18F-FDG PET/CT is an ideal imaging modality for the early diagnosis of relapsing polychondritis: A case report.

    PubMed

    Wang, JianJie; Liu, XiaoFei; Pu, Chaoyu; Chen, Yan

    2017-07-01

    Relapsing polychondritis (RP) is a rare autoimmune disease of unknown etiology that may affect multiple cartilage throughout the body. We report on a middle-aged man presented with cough, chest tightness, and fever of unknown origin, 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (F-FDG PET/CT) was performed. And the imaging shows multiple increased FDG accumulation in tracheobronchial tree and all intercostal cartilages, as well as in nasal, right auricule, laryngeal cartilage. Based on the findings, the diagnosis of RP was made. Our case demonstrates that FDG PET/CT is an useful diagnostic tool to accurately determine the extent of inflammation throughout the body and to guiding the selection of a biopsy site.

  17. Small-Animal PET Imaging of Amyloid-Beta Plaques with [11C]PiB and Its Multi-Modal Validation in an APP/PS1 Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Manook, André; Yousefi, Behrooz H.; Willuweit, Antje; Platzer, Stefan; Reder, Sybille; Voss, Andreas; Huisman, Marc; Settles, Markus; Neff, Frauke; Velden, Joachim; Schoor, Michael; von der Kammer, Heinz; Wester, Hans-Jürgen; Schwaiger, Markus

    2012-01-01

    In vivo imaging and quantification of amyloid-β plaque (Aβ) burden in small-animal models of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a valuable tool for translational research such as developing specific imaging markers and monitoring new therapy approaches. Methodological constraints such as image resolution of positron emission tomography (PET) and lack of suitable AD models have limited the feasibility of PET in mice. In this study, we evaluated a feasible protocol for PET imaging of Aβ in mouse brain with [11C]PiB and specific activities commonly used in human studies. In vivo mouse brain MRI for anatomical reference was acquired with a clinical 1.5 T system. A recently characterized APP/PS1 mouse was employed to measure Aβ at different disease stages in homozygous and hemizygous animals. We performed multi-modal cross-validations for the PET results with ex vivo and in vitro methodologies, including regional brain biodistribution, multi-label digital autoradiography, protein quantification with ELISA, fluorescence microscopy, semi-automated histological quantification and radioligand binding assays. Specific [11C]PiB uptake in individual brain regions with Aβ deposition was demonstrated and validated in all animals of the study cohort including homozygous AD animals as young as nine months. Corresponding to the extent of Aβ pathology, old homozygous AD animals (21 months) showed the highest uptake followed by old hemizygous (23 months) and young homozygous mice (9 months). In all AD age groups the cerebellum was shown to be suitable as an intracerebral reference region. PET results were cross-validated and consistent with all applied ex vivo and in vitro methodologies. The results confirm that the experimental setup for non-invasive [11C]PiB imaging of Aβ in the APP/PS1 mice provides a feasible, reproducible and robust protocol for small-animal Aβ imaging. It allows longitudinal imaging studies with follow-up periods of approximately one and a half years and

  18. PET Imaging - from Physics to Clinical Molecular Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majewski, Stan

    2008-03-01

    From the beginnings many years ago in a few physics laboratories and first applications as a research brain function imager, PET became lately a leading molecular imaging modality used in diagnosis, staging and therapy monitoring of cancer, as well as has increased use in assessment of brain function (early diagnosis of Alzheimer's, etc) and in cardiac function. To assist with anatomic structure map and with absorption correction CT is often used with PET in a duo system. Growing interest in the last 5-10 years in dedicated organ specific PET imagers (breast, prostate, brain, etc) presents again an opportunity to the particle physics instrumentation community to contribute to the important field of medical imaging. In addition to the bulky standard ring structures, compact, economical and high performance mobile imagers are being proposed and build. The latest development in standard PET imaging is introduction of the well known TOF concept enabling clearer tomographic pictures of the patient organs. Development and availability of novel photodetectors such as Silicon PMT immune to magnetic fields offers an exciting opportunity to use PET in conjunction with MRI and fMRI. As before with avalanche photodiodes, particle physics community plays a leading role in developing these devices. The presentation will mostly focus on present and future opportunities for better PET designs based on new technologies and methods: new scintillators, photodetectors, readout, software.

  19. Motion correction using anatomical information in PET/CT and PET/MR hybrid imaging.

    PubMed

    Fayad, Hadi; Lamare, Frederic; Merlin, Thibaut; Visvikis, Dimitris

    2016-03-01

    Respiratory and cardiac motion causes qualitative and quantitative inaccuracies in whole body multi-modality imaging such as positron emission tomography coupled with computed tomography (PET/CT) and positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance imaging (PET/MRI). Solutions presented to date include motion synchronized PET and corresponding anatomical acquisitions (four dimensional [4D] PET/CT, 4D PET/MR), frequently referred to as the gating approach. This method is based on the acquisition of an external surrogate using an external device (pressure belt, optical monitoring system, spirometer etc.), subsequently used to bin PET and CT or MR anatomical data into a number of gates. A first limitation of this method is the low signal to noise ratio (SNR) of the resulting motion synchronized PET frames, given that every reconstructed frame contains only part of the count statistics available throughout a motion average PET acquisition. Another limitation is that the complex motion of internal organs cannot be fully estimated, characterized and modelled using a mono-dimensional motion signal. In order to resolve such issues, many advanced techniques have been proposed which include three consecutive major steps. These are based on firstly acquiring an external or internal motion surrogate, estimating or modelling the internal motion using anatomical information extracted from 4D anatomical images (CT and/or MR) and finally correcting for motion either in the PET raw data space, the image space or incorporate it within the PET image reconstruction which is the most optimal based motion correction method in PET/CT and in PET/MR imaging. Current research efforts are concentrating on combining the last two steps within a joint motion estimation/motion correction approach, the exploitation of MRI specific motion characterization sequences and the combination of both respiratory and cardiac motion corrections. The goal of this review is to present and discuss the different

  20. Imaging modalities in spinal disorders

    SciTech Connect

    Kricun, M.E.

    1986-01-01

    This book provides an approach to the various imaging modalities used to view the spine. It discusses the indications, limitations and practical use of each in the diagnosis, work-up and staging of various spinal disorders, and compares each of them in various clinical settings. Topics covered include low back pain syndrome, disk disease, spinal cord lesions, congenital abnormalities, and trauma.

  1. Development of PET/MRI with insertable PET for simultaneous PET and MR imaging of human brain

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, Jin Ho; Choi, Yong Jung, Jiwoong; Kim, Sangsu; Lim, Hyun Keong; Im, Ki Chun; Oh, Chang Hyun; Park, Hyun-wook; Kim, Kyung Min; Kim, Jong Guk

    2015-05-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to develop a dual-modality positron emission tomography (PET)/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with insertable PET for simultaneous PET and MR imaging of the human brain. Methods: The PET detector block was composed of a 4 × 4 matrix of detector modules, each consisting of a 4 × 4 array LYSO coupled to a 4 × 4 Geiger-mode avalanche photodiode (GAPD) array. The PET insert consisted of 18 detector blocks, circularly mounted on a custom-made plastic base to form a ring with an inner diameter of 390 mm and axial length of 60 mm. The PET gantry was shielded with gold-plated conductive fabric tapes with a thickness of 0.1 mm. The charge signals of PET detector transferred via 4 m long flat cables were fed into the position decoder circuit. The flat cables were shielded with a mesh-type aluminum sheet with a thickness of 0.24 mm. The position decoder circuit and field programmable gate array-embedded DAQ modules were enclosed in an aluminum box with a thickness of 10 mm and located at the rear of the MR bore inside the MRI room. A 3-T human MRI system with a Larmor frequency of 123.7 MHz and inner bore diameter of 60 cm was used as the PET/MRI hybrid system. A custom-made radio frequency (RF) coil with an inner diameter of 25 cm was fabricated. The PET was positioned between gradient and the RF coils. PET performance was measured outside and inside the MRI scanner using echo planar imaging, spin echo, turbo spin echo, and gradient echo sequences. MRI performance was also evaluated with and without the PET insert. The stability of the newly developed PET insert was evaluated and simultaneous PET and MR images of a brain phantom were acquired. Results: No significant degradation of the PET performance caused by MR was observed when the PET was operated using various MR imaging sequences. The signal-to-noise ratio of MR images was slightly degraded due to the PET insert installed inside the MR bore while the homogeneity was

  2. Development of PET/MRI with insertable PET for simultaneous PET and MR imaging of human brain.

    PubMed

    Jung, Jin Ho; Choi, Yong; Jung, Jiwoong; Kim, Sangsu; Lim, Hyun Keong; Im, Ki Chun; Oh, Chang Hyun; Park, Hyun-wook; Kim, Kyung Min; Kim, Jong Guk

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a dual-modality positron emission tomography (PET)/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with insertable PET for simultaneous PET and MR imaging of the human brain. The PET detector block was composed of a 4 × 4 matrix of detector modules, each consisting of a 4 × 4 array LYSO coupled to a 4 × 4 Geiger-mode avalanche photodiode (GAPD) array. The PET insert consisted of 18 detector blocks, circularly mounted on a custom-made plastic base to form a ring with an inner diameter of 390 mm and axial length of 60 mm. The PET gantry was shielded with gold-plated conductive fabric tapes with a thickness of 0.1 mm. The charge signals of PET detector transferred via 4 m long flat cables were fed into the position decoder circuit. The flat cables were shielded with a mesh-type aluminum sheet with a thickness of 0.24 mm. The position decoder circuit and field programmable gate array-embedded DAQ modules were enclosed in an aluminum box with a thickness of 10 mm and located at the rear of the MR bore inside the MRI room. A 3-T human MRI system with a Larmor frequency of 123.7 MHz and inner bore diameter of 60 cm was used as the PET/MRI hybrid system. A custom-made radio frequency (RF) coil with an inner diameter of 25 cm was fabricated. The PET was positioned between gradient and the RF coils. PET performance was measured outside and inside the MRI scanner using echo planar imaging, spin echo, turbo spin echo, and gradient echo sequences. MRI performance was also evaluated with and without the PET insert. The stability of the newly developed PET insert was evaluated and simultaneous PET and MR images of a brain phantom were acquired. No significant degradation of the PET performance caused by MR was observed when the PET was operated using various MR imaging sequences. The signal-to-noise ratio of MR images was slightly degraded due to the PET insert installed inside the MR bore while the homogeneity was maintained. The change of gain of

  3. Exercises in PET Image Reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nix, Oliver

    These exercises are complementary to the theoretical lectures about positron emission tomography (PET) image reconstruction. They aim at providing some hands on experience in PET image reconstruction and focus on demonstrating the different data preprocessing steps and reconstruction algorithms needed to obtain high quality PET images. Normalisation, geometric-, attenuation- and scatter correction are introduced. To explain the necessity of those some basics about PET scanner hardware, data acquisition and organisation are reviewed. During the course the students use a software application based on the STIR (software for tomographic image reconstruction) library 1,2 which allows them to dynamically select or deselect corrections and reconstruction methods as well as to modify their most important parameters. Following the guided tutorial, the students get an impression on the effect the individual data precorrections have on image quality and what happens if they are forgotten. Several data sets in sinogram format are provided, such as line source data, Jaszczak phantom data sets with high and low statistics and NEMA whole body phantom data. The two most frequently used reconstruction algorithms in PET image reconstruction, filtered back projection (FBP) and the iterative OSEM (ordered subset expectation maximation) approach are used to reconstruct images. The exercise should help the students gaining an understanding what the reasons for inferior image quality and artefacts are and how to improve quality by a clever choice of reconstruction parameters.

  4. Denoising PET Images Using Singular Value Thresholding and Stein's Unbiased Risk Estimate*

    PubMed Central

    Bagci, Ulas; Mollura, Daniel J.

    2014-01-01

    Image denoising is an important pre-processing step for accurately quantifying functional morphology and measuring activities of the tissues using PET images. Unlike structural imaging modalities, PET images have two difficulties: (1) the Gaussian noise model does not necessarily fit into PET imaging because the exact nature of noise propagation in PET imaging is not well known, and (2) PET images are low resolution; therefore, it is challenging to denoise them while preserving structural information. To address these two difficulties, we introduce a novel methodology for denoising PET images. The proposed method uses the singular value thresholding concept and Stein's unbiased risk estimate to optimize a soft thresholding rule. Results, obtained from 40 MRI-PET images, demonstrate that the proposed algorithm is able to denoise PET images successfully, while still maintaining the quantitative information. PMID:24505751

  5. PET Imaging of Inflammation Biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chenxi; Li, Fang; Niu, Gang; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2013-01-01

    Inflammation plays a significant role in many disease processes. Development in molecular imaging in recent years provides new insight into the diagnosis and treatment evaluation of various inflammatory diseases and diseases involving inflammatory process. Positron emission tomography using 18F-FDG has been successfully applied in clinical oncology and neurology and in the inflammation realm. In addition to glucose metabolism, a variety of targets for inflammation imaging are being discovered and utilized, some of which are considered superior to FDG for imaging inflammation. This review summarizes the potential inflammation imaging targets and corresponding PET tracers, and the applications of PET in major inflammatory diseases and tumor associated inflammation. Also, the current attempt in differentiating inflammation from tumor using PET is also discussed. PMID:23843893

  6. Simultaneous whole-body PET/MR imaging in comparison to PET/CT in pediatric oncology: initial results.

    PubMed

    Schäfer, Jürgen F; Gatidis, Sergios; Schmidt, Holger; Gückel, Brigitte; Bezrukov, Ilja; Pfannenberg, Christina A; Reimold, Matthias; Ebinger, Martin; Fuchs, Jörg; Claussen, Claus D; Schwenzer, Nina F

    2014-10-01

    To compare positron emission tomography (PET)/magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and PET/computed tomography (CT) for lesion detection and interpretation, quantification of fluorine 18 ((18)F) fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake, and accuracy of MR-based PET attenuation correction in pediatric patients with solid tumors. Materials and Methods This prospective study had local ethics committee and German Federal Institute for Drugs and Medical Devices approval. Written informed consent was obtained from all patients and legal guardians. Twenty whole-body (18)F-FDG PET/CT and (18)F-FDG PET/MR examinations were performed in 18 pediatric patients (median age, 14 years; range, 11-17 years). (18)F-FDG PET/CT and (18)F-FDG PET/MR data were acquired sequentially on the same day for all patients. PET standardized uptake values (SUVs) were quantified with volume of interest measurements in lesions and healthy tissues. MR-based PET attenuation correction was compared with CT-derived attenuation maps (µ-maps). Lesion detection was assessed with separate reading of PET/CT and PET/MR data. Estimates of radiation dose were derived from the applied doses of (18)F-FDG and CT protocol parameters. Descriptive statistical analyses were performed to report correlation coefficients and relative deviations for comparison of SUVs, rates of lesion detection, and percentage reductions in radiation dose. PET SUVs showed strong correlations between PET of PET/CT (PETCT) and PET of PET/MR (PETMR) (r > 0.85 for most tissues). Apart from drawbacks of MR-based PET attenuation correction in osseous structures and lungs, similar SUVs were found on PET images corrected with CT-based µ-maps (13.1% deviation of SUVs for bone marrow and <5% deviation for other tissues). Lesion detection rate with PET/MR imaging was equivalent to that with PET/CT (61 areas of focal uptake on PETMR images vs 62 areas on PETCT images). Advantages of PET/MR were observed especially in soft-tissue regions. Furthermore, PET

  7. Development of a PET Scanner for Simultaneously Imaging Small Animals with MRI and PET

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Christopher J; Goertzen, Andrew L; Thiessen, Jonathan D; Bishop, Daryl; Stortz, Greg; Kozlowski, Piotr; Retière, Fabrice; Zhang, Xuezhu; Sossi, Vesna

    2014-01-01

    Recently, positron emission tomography (PET) is playing an increasingly important role in the diagnosis and staging of cancer. Combined PET and X-ray computed tomography (PET-CT) scanners are now the modality of choice in cancer treatment planning. More recently, the combination of PET and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is being explored in many sites. Combining PET and MRI has presented many challenges since the photo-multiplier tubes (PMT) in PET do not function in high magnetic fields, and conventional PET detectors distort MRI images. Solid state light sensors like avalanche photo-diodes (APDs) and more recently silicon photo-multipliers (SiPMs) are much less sensitive to magnetic fields thus easing the compatibility issues. This paper presents the results of a group of Canadian scientists who are developing a PET detector ring which fits inside a high field small animal MRI scanner with the goal of providing simultaneous PET and MRI images of small rodents used in pre-clinical medical research. We discuss the evolution of both the crystal blocks (which detect annihilation photons from positron decay) and the SiPM array performance in the last four years which together combine to deliver significant system performance in terms of speed, energy and timing resolution. PMID:25120157

  8. Automated cardiac motion compensation in PET/CT for accurate reconstruction of PET myocardial perfusion images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khurshid, Khawar; McGough, Robert J.; Berger, Kevin

    2008-10-01

    Error-free reconstruction of PET data with a registered CT attenuation map is essential for accurate quantification and interpretation of cardiac perfusion. Misalignment of the CT and PET data can produce an erroneous attenuation map that projects lung attenuation parameters onto the heart wall, thereby underestimating the attenuation and creating artifactual areas of hypoperfusion that can be misinterpreted as myocardial ischemia or infarction. The major causes of misregistration between CT and PET images are the respiratory motion, cardiac motion and gross physical motion of the patient. The misalignment artifact problem is overcome with automated cardiac registration software that minimizes the alignment error between the two modalities. Results show that the automated registration process works equally well for any respiratory phase in which the CT scan is acquired. Further evaluation of this procedure on 50 patients demonstrates that the automated registration software consistently aligns the two modalities, eliminating artifactual hypoperfusion in reconstructed PET images due to PET/CT misregistration. With this registration software, only one CT scan is required for PET/CT imaging, which reduces the radiation dose required for CT-based attenuation correction and improves the clinical workflow for PET/CT.

  9. Contrast Media in PET/Computed Tomography Imaging.

    PubMed

    Dhull, Varun Singh; Rana, Neelima; Nazar, Aftab Hasan

    2016-01-01

    Is there a need for the contrast-enhanced PET/computed tomography (CT) scan or is the low-dose, non-contrast-enhanced PET/CT scan sufficient? The topic has been debated time and again. Although low-dose noncontrast CT serves the purpose of simple anatomic correlation and attenuation correction of PET images, many times patients have to undergo additional contrast-enhanced diagnostic imaging modalities, which may lead to a delay in decision-making. In this review, the authors have addressed various such issues related to the use of contrast agents and special techniques of clinical interest based on their utility in dual-modality PET/CT.

  10. PET Imaging in Huntington's Disease.

    PubMed

    Roussakis, Andreas-Antonios; Piccini, Paola

    2015-01-01

    To date, little is known about how neurodegeneration and neuroinflammation propagate in Huntington's disease (HD). Unfortunately, no treatment is available to cure or reverse the progressive decline of function caused by the disease, thus considering HD a fatal disease. Mutation gene carriers typically remain asymptomatic for many years although alterations in the basal ganglia and cortex occur early on in mutant HD gene-carriers. Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is a functional imaging technique of nuclear medicine which enables in vivo visualization of numerous biological molecules expressed in several human tissues. Brain PET is most powerful to study in vivo neuronal and glial cells function as well as cerebral blood flow in a plethora of neurodegenerative disorders including Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's and HD. In absence of HD-specific biomarkers for monitoring disease progression, previous PET studies in HD were merely focused on the study of dopaminergic terminals, cerebral blood flow and glucose metabolism in manifest and premanifest HD-gene carriers. More recently, research interest has been exploring novel PET targets in HD including the state of phosphodiesterse expression and the role of activated microglia. Hence, a better understanding of the HD pathogenesis mechanisms may lead to the development of targeted therapies. PET imaging follow-up studies with novel selective PET radiotracers such as 11C-IMA-107 and 11C-PBR28 may provide insight on disease progression and identify prognostic biomarkers, elucidate the underlying HD pathology and assess novel pharmaceutical agents and over time.

  11. PET/MR imaging of atherosclerosis: initial experience and outlook

    PubMed Central

    Rischpler, Christoph; Nekolla, Stephan G; Beer, Ambros J

    2013-01-01

    Hybrid scanners such as PET/CT have in the past emerged as a valuable modality in clinical routine as well as an important research tool. Recently, the newly developed fully integrated PET/MR scanners were introduced to the market, raising high expectations especially due to the excellent soft tissue contrast and functional imaging capabilities of MRI. In this issue of the American Journal of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, initial experiences using a hybrid PET/MR scanner for carotid artery imaging in a group of patients with increased risk for atherosclerosis are described. This represents a proof-of-principle study, which could stimulate future applications of this powerful modality in atherosclerotic plaque imaging. PMID:24116347

  12. PET/MR imaging of atherosclerosis: initial experience and outlook.

    PubMed

    Rischpler, Christoph; Nekolla, Stephan G; Beer, Ambros J

    2013-01-01

    Hybrid scanners such as PET/CT have in the past emerged as a valuable modality in clinical routine as well as an important research tool. Recently, the newly developed fully integrated PET/MR scanners were introduced to the market, raising high expectations especially due to the excellent soft tissue contrast and functional imaging capabilities of MRI. In this issue of the American Journal of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, initial experiences using a hybrid PET/MR scanner for carotid artery imaging in a group of patients with increased risk for atherosclerosis are described. This represents a proof-of-principle study, which could stimulate future applications of this powerful modality in atherosclerotic plaque imaging.

  13. Diagnosis of bone metastasis: recent comparative studies of imaging modalities.

    PubMed

    Talbot, J N; Paycha, F; Balogova, S

    2011-08-01

    Various imaging modalities are currently available to diagnose bone metastasis. The two main anatomical modalities are computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), with many variants proposed for the MRI procedure, including diffusion-weighted imaging. The two main functional modalities are scintigraphy and PET, also with many variants in the radiopharmaceutical, from the "all purpose" 99mTc labelled bisphosphonates to very selective radiopharmaceuticals for rare neoplasia. The diagnostic strategy will become more and more individually tailored according to the patient's clinical and biological data (primary cancer type, phase of the evolution, markers of aggressiveness, serum levels of biological tracers of bone metabolism, circulating or disseminating tumour cells …). If imaging is indicated, the diagnostic strategy will also depend on the availability and the diagnostic performance of the imaging modalities. Assessment of diagnostic performance requires comparative studies, performed with an adequate methodology. The main methodological weaknesses encountered in studies intending to compare imaging modalities for diagnosing bone metastasis are summarised. Comparative studies have been reviewed, which address the initial diagnosis of skeletal metastases in solid tumours except primary bone cancers. The results of more than 140 such comparative studies are then summarised and briefly commented, according to the type of the primary cancer, and according to the compared imaging modalities.

  14. Image reconstruction for PET/CT scanners: past achievements and future challenges

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Shan; Alessio, Adam M; Kinahan, Paul E

    2011-01-01

    PET is a medical imaging modality with proven clinical value for disease diagnosis and treatment monitoring. The integration of PET and CT on modern scanners provides a synergy of the two imaging modalities. Through different mathematical algorithms, PET data can be reconstructed into the spatial distribution of the injected radiotracer. With dynamic imaging, kinetic parameters of specific biological processes can also be determined. Numerous efforts have been devoted to the development of PET image reconstruction methods over the last four decades, encompassing analytic and iterative reconstruction methods. This article provides an overview of the commonly used methods. Current challenges in PET image reconstruction include more accurate quantitation, TOF imaging, system modeling, motion correction and dynamic reconstruction. Advances in these aspects could enhance the use of PET/CT imaging in patient care and in clinical research studies of pathophysiology and therapeutic interventions. PMID:21339831

  15. MR Guided PET Image Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Bing; Li, Quanzheng; Leahy, Richard M.

    2013-01-01

    The resolution of PET images is limited by the physics of positron-electron annihilation and instrumentation for photon coincidence detection. Model based methods that incorporate accurate physical and statistical models have produced significant improvements in reconstructed image quality when compared to filtered backprojection reconstruction methods. However, it has often been suggested that by incorporating anatomical information, the resolution and noise properties of PET images could be improved, leading to better quantitation or lesion detection. With the recent development of combined MR-PET scanners, it is possible to collect intrinsically co-registered MR images. It is therefore now possible to routinely make use of anatomical information in PET reconstruction, provided appropriate methods are available. In this paper we review research efforts over the past 20 years to develop these methods. We discuss approaches based on the use of both Markov random field priors and joint information or entropy measures. The general framework for these methods is described and their performance and longer term potential and limitations discussed. PMID:23178087

  16. On the accuracy of a mutual information algorithm for PET-MR image registration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karaiskos, P.; Malamitsi, J.; Andreou, J.; Prassopoulos, V.; Valotassiou, V.; Laspas, F.; Sandilos, P.; Torrens, M.

    2009-07-01

    Image registration has been increasingly used in radiation diagnosis and treatment planning as a means of information integration from different imaging modalities (e.g. MRI, PET, CT). Especially for brain lesions, accurate 3D registration and fusion of MR and PET images can provide comprehensive information about the patient under study by relating functional information from PET images to the detailed anatomical information available in MR images. However, direct PET-MR image fusion in soft tissue is complicated mainly due to the lack of conspicuous anatomical features in PET images. This study describes the implementation and validation of a mutual information registration algorithm for this purpose. Ten patients with brain lesions underwent MR and PET/CT scanning. MR-PET registration was performed a) based on the well validated MR-CT registration technique and copying the transformation to the PET images derived from the PET/CT scan (MR/PET/CT registration method) and b) directly from the MR and PET images without taking into account the CT images (MR/PET registration method). In order to check the registration accuracy of the MR/PET method, the lesion (target) was contoured in the PET images and it was transferred to the MR images using both the above methods. The MR/PET/CT method served as the gold standard for target contouring. Target contours derived by the MR/PET method were compared with the gold standard target contours for each patient and the deviation between the two contours was used to estimate the accuracy of the PET-MR registration method. This deviation was less than 3 mm (i.e. comparable to the imaging voxel of the PET/CT scanning) for 9/10 of the cases studied. Results show that the mutual information algorithm used is able to perform the PET-MR registration reliably and accurately.

  17. Designing Image Operators for MRI-PET Image Fusion of the Brain

    SciTech Connect

    Marquez, Jorge; Gastelum, Alfonso; Padilla, Miguel A.

    2006-09-08

    Our goal is to obtain images combining in a useful and precise way the information from 3D volumes of medical imaging sets. We address two modalities combining anatomy (Magnetic Resonance Imaging or MRI) and functional information (Positron Emission Tomography or PET). Commercial imaging software offers image fusion tools based on fixed blending or color-channel combination of two modalities, and color Look-Up Tables (LUTs), without considering the anatomical and functional character of the image features. We used a sensible approach for image fusion taking advantage mainly from the HSL (Hue, Saturation and Luminosity) color space, in order to enhance the fusion results. We further tested operators for gradient and contour extraction to enhance anatomical details, plus other spatial-domain filters for functional features corresponding to wide point-spread-function responses in PET images. A set of image-fusion operators was formulated and tested on PET and MRI acquisitions.

  18. (18) F-FDG-PET/CT as adjunctive diagnostic modalities in canine fever of unknown origin.

    PubMed

    Grobman, Megan; Cohn, Leah; Knapp, Stephanie; Bryan, Jeffrey N; Reinero, Carol

    2017-09-18

    Fever of unknown origin (FUO) is a persistent or recurrent fever for which the underlying source has not been identified despite diagnostic investigation. In people, (18) F-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography ((18) F-FDG-PET) alone or in combination with computed tomography (CT) is often beneficial in detecting the source of fever when other diagnostics have failed. Veterinary reports describing use of these modalities in animals with fever of unknown origin are currently lacking. Aims of this retrospective case series were to describe (18) F-FDG-PET or (18) F-FDG-PET/CT findings in a group of dogs with fever of unknown origin. Dogs presenting to a single center between April 2012 and August 2015 were included. A total of four dogs met inclusion criteria and underwent either positron emission tomography (n = 2) or positron emission tomography/CT (n = 2) as a part of their diagnostic investigation. All subjects underwent extensive diagnostic testing prior to (18) F-FDG-PET/CT. Initial diagnostic evaluation failed to identify either a cause of fever or an anatomic location of disease in these four dogs. In each dog, positron emission tomography or positron emission tomography/CT was either able to localize or rule out the presence of focal lesion thereby allowing for directed sampling and/or informed disease treatment. Follow up (18) F-FDG-PET/CT scans performed in two patients showed improvement of observed abnormalities (n = 1) or detected recurrence of disease allowing for repeated treatment before clinical signs recurred (n = 1). Fever resolved after specific treatment in each dog. Findings from the current study supported the use of positron emission tomography or positron emission tomography/CT as adjunctive imaging modalities for diagnosis and gauging response to therapy in dogs with fever of unknown origin. © 2017 American College of Veterinary Radiology.

  19. New functional imaging modalities for chromaffin tumors, neuroblastomas and ganglioneuromas.

    PubMed

    Ilias, Ioannis; Shulkin, Barry; Pacak, Karel

    2005-03-01

    Nuclear medicine modalities use radiolabeled ligands that either follow metabolic pathways or act on cellular receptors. Thus, they permit functional imaging of physiological processes and help to localize sites such as tumors that harbor pathological events. The application of positron emission tomography (PET) ligands to the specific pathways of synthesis, metabolism and inactivation of catecholamines found in chromaffin tumors, neuroblastomas and ganglioneuromas can be used to provide a more thorough localization of these types of tumor. Recent advances have been made in functional imaging to localize pheochromocytomas, paragangliomas, neuroblastomas and ganglioneuromas, including approaches based on PET with [(18)F]fluorodopamine, [(18)F]fluorohydroxyphenylalanine, [(11)C]epinephrine or [(11)C]hydroxyephedrine. Such functional imaging can complement computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging and other scintigraphic techniques to localize these tumors before surgical or medical therapeutic approaches are considered.

  20. Morphology supporting function: attenuation correction for SPECT/CT, PET/CT, and PET/MR imaging

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Tzu C.; Alessio, Adam M.; Miyaoka, Robert M.; Kinahan, Paul E.

    2017-01-01

    Both SPECT, and in particular PET, are unique in medical imaging for their high sensitivity and direct link to a physical quantity, i.e. radiotracer concentration. This gives PET and SPECT imaging unique capabilities for accurately monitoring disease activity for the purposes of clinical management or therapy development. However, to achieve a direct quantitative connection between the underlying radiotracer concentration and the reconstructed image values several confounding physical effects have to be estimated, notably photon attenuation and scatter. With the advent of dual-modality SPECT/CT, PET/CT, and PET/MR scanners, the complementary CT or MR image data can enable these corrections, although there are unique challenges for each combination. This review covers the basic physics underlying photon attenuation and scatter and summarizes technical considerations for multimodal imaging with regard to PET and SPECT quantification and methods to address the challenges for each multimodal combination. PMID:26576737

  1. Dual-modal whole eye photoacoustic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ning; Ren, Qiushi; Li, Changhui

    2014-09-01

    We developed a prototype dual-modal ocular imaging system integrating optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy and high-frequency ultrasound imaging modalities. This system can perform high-resolution ocular imaging from the anterior region down to the fundus area. The novel system successfully imaged the murine eyes in vivo, including iris, lens, retina, and retinal pigment epithelium. Our results demonstrated that this system has a great potential in the diagnosis of ophthalmic diseases.

  2. Joint MR-PET Reconstruction Using a Multi-Channel Image Regularizer.

    PubMed

    Knoll, Florian; Holler, Martin; Koesters, Thomas; Otazo, Ricardo; Bredies, Kristian; Sodickson, Daniel K

    2017-01-01

    While current state of the art MR-PET scanners enable simultaneous MR and PET measurements, the acquired data sets are still usually reconstructed separately. We propose a new multi-modality reconstruction framework using second order Total Generalized Variation (TGV) as a dedicated multi-channel regularization functional that jointly reconstructs images from both modalities. In this way, information about the underlying anatomy is shared during the image reconstruction process while unique differences are preserved. Results from numerical simulations and in-vivo experiments using a range of accelerated MR acquisitions and different MR image contrasts demonstrate improved PET image quality, resolution, and quantitative accuracy.

  3. Simultaneous acquisition of magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) data and positron emission tomography (PET) images with a prototype MR-compatible, small animal PET imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raylman, Raymond R.; Majewski, Stan; Velan, S. Sendhil; Lemieux, Susan; Kross, Brian; Popov, Vladimir; Smith, Mark F.; Weisenberger, Andrew G.

    2007-06-01

    Multi-modality imaging (such as PET-CT) is rapidly becoming a valuable tool in the diagnosis of disease and in the development of new drugs. Functional images produced with PET, fused with anatomical images created by MRI, allow the correlation of form with function. Perhaps more exciting than the combination of anatomical MRI with PET, is the melding of PET with MR spectroscopy (MRS). Thus, two aspects of physiology could be combined in novel ways to produce new insights into the physiology of normal and pathological processes. Our team is developing a system to acquire MRI images and MRS spectra, and PET images contemporaneously. The prototype MR-compatible PET system consists of two opposed detector heads (appropriate in size for small animal imaging), operating in coincidence mode with an active field-of-view of ˜14 cm in diameter. Each detector consists of an array of LSO detector elements coupled through a 2-m long fiber optic light guide to a single position-sensitive photomultiplier tube. The use of light guides allows these magnetic field-sensitive elements of the PET imager to be positioned outside the strong magnetic field of our 3T MRI scanner. The PET scanner imager was integrated with a 12-cm diameter, 12-leg custom, birdcage coil. Simultaneous MRS spectra and PET images were successfully acquired from a multi-modality phantom consisting of a sphere filled with 17 brain relevant substances and a positron-emitting radionuclide. There were no significant changes in MRI or PET scanner performance when both were present in the MRI magnet bore. This successful initial test demonstrates the potential for using such a multi-modality to obtain complementary MRS and PET data.

  4. Simultaneous Multiparametric PET/MRI with Silicon Photomultiplier PET and Ultra-High-Field MRI for Small-Animal Imaging.

    PubMed

    Ko, Guen Bae; Yoon, Hyun Suk; Kim, Kyeong Yun; Lee, Min Sun; Yang, Bo Yeun; Jeong, Jae Min; Lee, Dong Soo; Song, In Chan; Kim, Seok-Ki; Kim, Daehong; Lee, Jae Sung

    2016-08-01

    Visualization of biologic processes at molecular and cellular levels has revolutionized the understanding and treatment of human diseases. However, no single biomedical imaging modality provides complete information, resulting in the emergence of multimodal approaches. Combining state-of-the-art PET and MRI technologies without loss of system performance and overall image quality can provide opportunities for new scientific and clinical innovations. Here, we present a multiparametric PET/MR imager based on a small-animal dedicated, high-performance, silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) PET system and a 7-T MR scanner. A SiPM-based PET insert that has the peak sensitivity of 3.4% and center volumetric resolution of 1.92/0.53 mm(3) (filtered backprojection/ordered-subset expectation maximization) was developed. The SiPM PET insert was placed between the mouse body transceiver coil and gradient coil of a 7-T small-animal MRI scanner for simultaneous PET/MRI. Mutual interference between the MRI and SiPM PET systems was evaluated using various MR pulse sequences. A cylindric corn oil phantom was scanned to assess the effects of the SiPM PET on the MR image acquisition. To assess the influence of MRI on the PET imaging functions, several PET performance indicators including scintillation pulse shape, flood image quality, energy spectrum, counting rate, and phantom image quality were evaluated with and without the application of MR pulse sequences. Simultaneous mouse PET/MRI studies were also performed to demonstrate the potential and usefulness of the multiparametric PET/MRI in preclinical applications. Excellent performance and stability of the PET system were demonstrated, and the PET/MRI combination did not result in significant image quality degradation of either modality. Finally, simultaneous PET/MRI studies in mice demonstrated the feasibility of the developed system for evaluating the biochemical and cellular changes in a brain tumor model and facilitating the

  5. PET imaging in endocrine tumours.

    PubMed

    Khan, S; Lloyd, C; Szyszko, T; Win, Z; Rubello, D; Al-Nahhas, A

    2008-06-01

    The role of PET in the assessment of endocrine tumours has been, until recently, restricted to the use of (18)F-fluoro-deoxy-D-glucose ((18)F-FDG). Being a marker of metabolically active lesions that show high grading and low differentiation, FDG is not ideal for this purpose since the majority of endocrine tumours are slow growing and highly differentiated. It is however useful when dedifferentiation takes place and provides excellent prognostic information. A number of hormone precursors and amino acids are labelled with (11)C and used successfully in the management of parathyroid, adrenal and pituitary tumours. However, the short half-life of (11)C radiopharmaceuticals restricts their use to centres with access to an on-site cyclotron, while the high cost of production may limit their use to research purposes. A promising new positron-emission tomography (PET) tracer is Gallium-68 obtained by elution from a long shelf-life generator that makes it economic and cyclotron-independent. Its short half-life and flexible labelling ability to a wide range of peptides and antibodies makes it ideal for PET imaging. In addition to imaging GEP-NETs and phaeochromocytoma, it has the potential to be used in a wider range of endocrine tumours.

  6. Simultaneous MRI and PET imaging of a rat brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raylman, Raymond R.; Majewski, Stan; Lemieux, Susan K.; Sendhil Velan, S.; Kross, Brian; Popov, Vladimir; Smith, Mark F.; Weisenberger, Andrew G.; Zorn, Carl; Marano, Gary D.

    2006-12-01

    Multi-modality imaging is rapidly becoming a valuable tool in the diagnosis of disease and in the development of new drugs. Functional images produced with PET fused with anatomical structure images created by MRI will allow the correlation of form with function. Our group is developing a system to acquire MRI and PET images contemporaneously. The prototype device consists of two opposed detector heads, operating in coincidence mode. Each MRI-PET detector module consists of an array of LSO detector elements coupled through a long fibre optic light guide to a single Hamamatsu flat panel position-sensitive photomultiplier tube (PSPMT). The use of light guides allows the PSPMTs to be positioned outside the bore of a 3T MRI scanner where the magnetic field is relatively small. To test the device, simultaneous MRI and PET images of the brain of a male Sprague Dawley rat injected with FDG were successfully obtained. The images revealed no noticeable artefacts in either image set. Future work includes the construction of a full ring PET scanner, improved light guides and construction of a specialized MRI coil to permit higher quality MRI imaging.

  7. Development of a PET/Cerenkov-light hybrid imaging system

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Seiichi Hamamura, Fuka; Kato, Katsuhiko; Ogata, Yoshimune; Watabe, Tadashi; Ikeda, Hayato; Kanai, Yasukazu; Hatazawa, Jun; Watabe, Hiroshi

    2014-09-15

    Purpose: Cerenkov-light imaging is a new molecular imaging technology that detects visible photons from high-speed electrons using a high sensitivity optical camera. However, the merit of Cerenkov-light imaging remains unclear. If a PET/Cerenkov-light hybrid imaging system were developed, the merit of Cerenkov-light imaging would be clarified by directly comparing these two imaging modalities. Methods: The authors developed and tested a PET/Cerenkov-light hybrid imaging system that consists of a dual-head PET system, a reflection mirror located above the subject, and a high sensitivity charge coupled device (CCD) camera. The authors installed these systems inside a black box for imaging the Cerenkov-light. The dual-head PET system employed a 1.2 × 1.2 × 10 mm{sup 3} GSO arranged in a 33 × 33 matrix that was optically coupled to a position sensitive photomultiplier tube to form a GSO block detector. The authors arranged two GSO block detectors 10 cm apart and positioned the subject between them. The Cerenkov-light above the subject is reflected by the mirror and changes its direction to the side of the PET system and is imaged by the high sensitivity CCD camera. Results: The dual-head PET system had a spatial resolution of ∼1.2 mm FWHM and sensitivity of ∼0.31% at the center of the FOV. The Cerenkov-light imaging system's spatial resolution was ∼275μm for a {sup 22}Na point source. Using the combined PET/Cerenkov-light hybrid imaging system, the authors successfully obtained fused images from simultaneously acquired images. The image distributions are sometimes different due to the light transmission and absorption in the body of the subject in the Cerenkov-light images. In simultaneous imaging of rat, the authors found that {sup 18}F-FDG accumulation was observed mainly in the Harderian gland on the PET image, while the distribution of Cerenkov-light was observed in the eyes. Conclusions: The authors conclude that their developed PET/Cerenkov-light hybrid

  8. Registration of parametric dynamic F-18-FDG PET/CT breast images with parametric dynamic Gd-DTPA breast images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magri, Alphonso; Krol, Andrzej; Lipson, Edward; Mandel, James; McGraw, Wendy; Lee, Wei; Tillapaugh-Fay, Gwen; Feiglin, David

    2009-02-01

    This study was undertaken to register 3D parametric breast images derived from Gd-DTPA MR and F-18-FDG PET/CT dynamic image series. Nonlinear curve fitting (Levenburg-Marquardt algorithm) based on realistic two-compartment models was performed voxel-by-voxel separately for MR (Brix) and PET (Patlak). PET dynamic series consists of 50 frames of 1-minute duration. Each consecutive PET image was nonrigidly registered to the first frame using a finite element method and fiducial skin markers. The 12 post-contrast MR images were nonrigidly registered to the precontrast frame using a free-form deformation (FFD) method. Parametric MR images were registered to parametric PET images via CT using FFD because the first PET time frame was acquired immediately after the CT image on a PET/CT scanner and is considered registered to the CT image. We conclude that nonrigid registration of PET and MR parametric images using CT data acquired during PET/CT scan and the FFD method resulted in their improved spatial coregistration. The success of this procedure was limited due to relatively large target registration error, TRE = 15.1+/-7.7 mm, as compared to spatial resolution of PET (6-7 mm), and swirling image artifacts created in MR parametric images by the FFD. Further refinement of nonrigid registration of PET and MR parametric images is necessary to enhance visualization and integration of complex diagnostic information provided by both modalities that will lead to improved diagnostic performance.

  9. Clinical Utility of Positron Emission Tomography Magnetic Resonance Imaging (PET-MRI) in Gastrointestinal Cancers.

    PubMed

    Matthews, Robert; Choi, Minsig

    2016-09-09

    Anatomic imaging utilizing both CT (computed tomography) and MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) limits the assessment of cancer metastases in lymph nodes and distant organs while functional imaging like PET (positron emission tomography) scan has its limitation in spatial resolution capacity. Hybrid imaging utilizing PET-CT and PET-MRI are novel imaging modalities that are changing the current landscape in cancer diagnosis, staging, and treatment response. MRI has shown to have higher sensitivity in soft tissue, head and neck pathology, and pelvic disease, as well as, detecting small metastases in the liver and bone compared to CT. Combining MRI with PET allows for detection of metastases that may have been missed with current imaging modalities. In this review, we will examine the clinical utility of FDG PET-MRI in the diagnosis and staging of gastrointestinal cancers with focus on esophageal, stomach, colorectal, and pancreatic cancers. We will also explore its role in treatment response and future directions associated with it.

  10. Multivariate Chemical Image Fusion of Vibrational Spectroscopic Imaging Modalities.

    PubMed

    Gowen, Aoife A; Dorrepaal, Ronan M

    2016-07-02

    Chemical image fusion refers to the combination of chemical images from different modalities for improved characterisation of a sample. Challenges associated with existing approaches include: difficulties with imaging the same sample area or having identical pixels across microscopic modalities, lack of prior knowledge of sample composition and lack of knowledge regarding correlation between modalities for a given sample. In addition, the multivariate structure of chemical images is often overlooked when fusion is carried out. We address these challenges by proposing a framework for multivariate chemical image fusion of vibrational spectroscopic imaging modalities, demonstrating the approach for image registration, fusion and resolution enhancement of chemical images obtained with IR and Raman microscopy.

  11. Development of a PET-Transrectal Ultrasound Prostate Imaging System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, Jennifer S.; Peng, Qiyu.; Moses, William W.; Reutter, Bryan W.; Pouliot, Jean; Hsu, I. Chow

    2011-06-01

    Multimodality imaging has an increasing role in the management of a large number of diseases, particularly if both functional and structural information are acquired and accurately registered. Transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) imaging is currently an integral part of prostate cancer diagnosis and treatment procedures, providing high-resolution anatomical detail of the prostate region. Positron Emission Tomography (PET) imaging with 11C-choline is a sensitive functional imaging technique that can identify biochemical states associated with prostate cancer. We believe that merging these prostate imaging technologies will help identify the location and aggressiveness of prostate cancer. We envision using dual PET-TRUS prostate imaging to guide biopsy, guide treatment procedures, and detect local recurrence earlier than is currently possible. Hence, we have developed a dual PET-TRUS prostate imaging system and protocol designed to allow accurate 3-D image registration. We have evaluated this PET-TRUS system by performing dual PET-TRUS imaging of custom phantoms. We describe here our dual-modality imaging system, custom phantoms and phantom study results. We also discuss our investigation of the PET-TRUS registration accuracy. We measure an average PET-TRUS registration error for our phantom studies of 2.1 ±1.7 mm in the x direction, 1.9 ±1.6 mm in the y direction, and 0.6 ±0.2 mm in the z direction. This registration accuracy is sufficient for some clinical applications such as biopsy guidance and early detection of recurrence.

  12. Principles of PET/MR Imaging.

    PubMed

    Disselhorst, Jonathan A; Bezrukov, Ilja; Kolb, Armin; Parl, Christoph; Pichler, Bernd J

    2014-06-01

    Hybrid PET/MR systems have rapidly progressed from the prototype stage to systems that are increasingly being used in the clinics. This review provides an overview of developments in hybrid PET/MR systems and summarizes the current state of the art in PET/MR instrumentation, correction techniques, and data analysis. The strong magnetic field requires considerable changes in the manner by which PET images are acquired and has led, among others, to the development of new PET detectors, such as silicon photomultipliers. During more than a decade of active PET/MR development, several system designs have been described. The technical background of combined PET/MR systems is explained and related challenges are discussed. The necessity for PET attenuation correction required new methods based on MR data. Therefore, an overview of recent developments in this field is provided. Furthermore, MR-based motion correction techniques for PET are discussed, as integrated PET/MR systems provide a platform for measuring motion with high temporal resolution without additional instrumentation. The MR component in PET/MR systems can provide functional information about disease processes or brain function alongside anatomic images. Against this background, we point out new opportunities for data analysis in this new field of multimodal molecular imaging. © 2014 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Inc.

  13. PSMA-Targeted Nano-Conjugates as Dual-Modality (MRI/PET) Imaging Probes for the Non-Invasive Detection of Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-10-01

    include, bare AuNPs, polymer-coated AuNPs, gadolinium -coated AuNPs and polymer-coated Bi2S3. Molecular CT imaging of cancer using targeted AuNPs in cell...magnetically labeled cells with either gadolinium or iron oxide nanoparticle based agents.1–7 With the much larger ∗Author to whom correspondence...T2) than traditional gadolinium - based contrast agents (T1). However iron oxide based T2 agents also exhibit the inherent weakness of MRI contrast

  14. Monitoring proton radiation therapy with in-room PET imaging.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xuping; España, Samuel; Daartz, Juliane; Liebsch, Norbert; Ouyang, Jinsong; Paganetti, Harald; Bortfeld, Thomas R; El Fakhri, Georges

    2011-07-07

    We used a mobile positron emission tomography (PET) scanner positioned within the proton therapy treatment room to study the feasibility of proton range verification with an in-room, stand-alone PET system, and compared with off-line equivalent studies. Two subjects with adenoid cystic carcinoma were enrolled into a pilot study in which in-room PET scans were acquired in list-mode after a routine fractionated treatment session. The list-mode PET data were reconstructed with different time schemes to generate in-room short, in-room long and off-line equivalent (by skipping coincidences from the first 15 min during the list-mode reconstruction) PET images for comparison in activity distribution patterns. A phantom study was followed to evaluate the accuracy of range verification for different reconstruction time schemes quantitatively. The in-room PET has a higher sensitivity compared to the off-line modality so that the PET acquisition time can be greatly reduced from 30 to <5 min. Features in deep-site, soft-tissue regions were better retained with in-room short PET acquisitions because of the collection of (15)O component and lower biological washout. For soft tissue-equivalent material, the distal fall-off edge of an in-room short acquisition is deeper compared to an off-line equivalent scan, indicating a better coverage of the high-dose end of the beam. In-room PET is a promising low cost, high sensitivity modality for the in vivo verification of proton therapy. Better accuracy in Monte Carlo predictions, especially for biological decay modeling, is necessary.

  15. TU-C-BRD-01: Image Guided SBRT I: Multi-Modality 4D Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, J; Mageras, G; Pan, T

    2014-06-15

    Motion management is one of the critical technical challenges for radiation therapy. 4D imaging has been rapidly adopted as essential tool to assess organ motion associated with respiratory breathing. A variety of 4D imaging techniques have been developed and are currently under development based on different imaging modalities such as CT, MRI, PET, and CBCT. Each modality provides specific and complementary information about organ and tumor respiratory motion. Effective use of each different technique or combined use of different techniques can introduce a comprehensive management of tumor motion. Specifically, these techniques have afforded tremendous opportunities to better define and delineate tumor volumes, more accurately perform patient positioning, and effectively apply highly conformal therapy techniques such as IMRT and SBRT. Successful implementation requires good understanding of not only each technique, including unique features, limitations, artifacts, imaging acquisition and process, but also how to systematically apply the information obtained from different imaging modalities using proper tools such as deformable image registration. Furthermore, it is important to understand the differences in the effects of breathing variation between different imaging modalities. A comprehensive motion management strategy using multi-modality 4D imaging has shown promise in improving patient care, but at the same time faces significant challenges. This session will focuses on the current status and advances in imaging respiration-induced organ motion with different imaging modalities: 4D-CT, 4D-MRI, 4D-PET, and 4D-CBCT/DTS. Learning Objectives: Understand the need and role of multimodality 4D imaging in radiation therapy. Understand the underlying physics behind each 4D imaging technique. Recognize the advantages and limitations of each 4D imaging technique.

  16. Quantitative simultaneous PET-MR imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouyang, Jinsong; Petibon, Yoann; Huang, Chuan; Reese, Timothy G.; Kolnick, Aleksandra L.; El Fakhri, Georges

    2014-06-01

    Whole-body PET is currently limited by the degradation due to patient motion. Respiratory motion degrades imaging studies of the abdomen. Similarly, both respiratory and cardiac motions significantly hamper the assessment of myocardial ischemia and/or metabolism in perfusion and viability cardiac PET studies. Based on simultaneous PET-MR, we have developed robust and accurate MRI methods allowing the tracking and measurement of both respiratory and cardiac motions during abdominal or cardiac studies. Our list-mode iterative PET reconstruction framework incorporates the measured motion fields into PET emission system matrix as well as the time-dependent PET attenuation map and the position dependent point spread function. Our method significantly enhances the PET image quality as compared to conventional methods.

  17. Optimal Co-segmentation of Tumor in PET-CT Images with Context Information

    PubMed Central

    Song, Qi; Bai, Junjie; Han, Dongfeng; Bhatia, Sudershan; Sun, Wenqing; Rockey, William; Bayouth, John E.; Buatti, John M.

    2014-01-01

    PET-CT images have been widely used in clinical practice for radiotherapy treatment planning of the radiotherapy. Many existing segmentation approaches only work for a single imaging modality, which suffer from the low spatial resolution in PET or low contrast in CT. In this work we propose a novel method for the co-segmentation of the tumor in both PET and CT images, which makes use of advantages from each modality: the functionality information from PET and the anatomical structure information from CT. The approach formulates the segmentation problem as a minimization problem of a Markov Random Field (MRF) model, which encodes the information from both modalities. The optimization is solved using a graph-cut based method. Two sub-graphs are constructed for the segmentation of the PET and the CT images, respectively. To achieve consistent results in two modalities, an adaptive context cost is enforced by adding context arcs between the two subgraphs. An optimal solution can be obtained by solving a single maximum flow problem, which leads to simultaneous segmentation of the tumor volumes in both modalities. The proposed algorithm was validated in robust delineation of lung tumors on 23 PET-CT datasets and two head-and-neck cancer subjects. Both qualitative and quantitative results show significant improvement compared to the graph cut methods solely using PET or CT. PMID:23693127

  18. Simultaneous PET/MRI with (13)C magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (hyperPET): phantom-based evaluation of PET quantification.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Adam E; Andersen, Flemming L; Henriksen, Sarah T; Vignaud, Alexandre; Ardenkjaer-Larsen, Jan H; Højgaard, Liselotte; Kjaer, Andreas; Klausen, Thomas L

    2016-12-01

    Integrated PET/MRI with hyperpolarized (13)C magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging ((13)C-MRSI) offers simultaneous, dual-modality metabolic imaging. A prerequisite for the use of simultaneous imaging is the absence of interference between the two modalities. This has been documented for a clinical whole-body system using simultaneous (1)H-MRI and PET but never for (13)C-MRSI and PET. Here, the feasibility of simultaneous PET and (13)C-MRSI as well as hyperpolarized (13)C-MRSI in an integrated whole-body PET/MRI hybrid scanner is evaluated using phantom experiments. Combined PET and (13)C-MRSI phantoms including a NEMA [(18)F]-FDG phantom, (13)C-acetate and (13)C-urea sources, and hyperpolarized (13)C-pyruvate were imaged repeatedly with PET and/or (13)C-MRSI. Measurements evaluated for interference effects included PET activity values in the largest sphere and a background region; total number of PET trues; and (13)C-MRSI signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) for urea and acetate phantoms. Differences between measurement conditions were evaluated using t tests. PET and (13)C-MRSI data acquisition could be performed simultaneously without any discernible artifacts. The average difference in PET activity between acquisitions with and without simultaneous (13)C-MRSI was 0.83 (largest sphere) and -0.76 % (background). The average difference in net trues was -0.01 %. The average difference in (13)C-MRSI SNR between acquisitions with and without simultaneous PET ranged from -2.28 to 1.21 % for all phantoms and measurement conditions. No differences were significant. The system was capable of (13)C-MRSI of hyperpolarized (13)C-pyruvate. Simultaneous PET and (13)C-MRSI in an integrated whole-body PET/MRI hybrid scanner is feasible. Phantom experiments showed that possible interference effects introduced by acquiring data from the two modalities simultaneously are small and non-significant. Further experiments can now investigate the benefits of simultaneous PET and

  19. PET/CT imaging in lung cancer: indications and findings*

    PubMed Central

    Hochhegger, Bruno; Alves, Giordano Rafael Tronco; Irion, Klaus Loureiro; Fritscher, Carlos Cezar; Fritscher, Leandro Genehr; Concatto, Natália Henz; Marchiori, Edson

    2015-01-01

    The use of PET/CT imaging in the work-up and management of patients with lung cancer has greatly increased in recent decades. The ability to combine functional and anatomical information has equipped PET/CT to look into various aspects of lung cancer, allowing more precise disease staging and providing useful data during the characterization of indeterminate pulmonary nodules. In addition, the accuracy of PET/CT has been shown to be greater than is that of conventional modalities in some scenarios, making PET/CT a valuable noninvasive method for the investigation of lung cancer. However, the interpretation of PET/CT findings presents numerous pitfalls and potential confounders. Therefore, it is imperative for pulmonologists and radiologists to familiarize themselves with the most relevant indications for and limitations of PET/CT, seeking to protect their patients from unnecessary radiation exposure and inappropriate treatment. This review article aimed to summarize the basic principles, indications, cancer staging considerations, and future applications related to the use of PET/CT in lung cancer. PMID:26176525

  20. Magnetic Resonance-based Motion Correction for Quantitative PET in Simultaneous PET-MR Imaging.

    PubMed

    Rakvongthai, Yothin; El Fakhri, Georges

    2017-07-01

    Motion degrades image quality and quantitation of PET images, and is an obstacle to quantitative PET imaging. Simultaneous PET-MR offers a tool that can be used for correcting the motion in PET images by using anatomic information from MR imaging acquired concurrently. Motion correction can be performed by transforming a set of reconstructed PET images into the same frame or by incorporating the transformation into the system model and reconstructing the motion-corrected image. Several phantom and patient studies have validated that MR-based motion correction strategies have great promise for quantitative PET imaging in simultaneous PET-MR. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Proton Therapy Verification with PET Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xuping; Fakhri, Georges El

    2013-01-01

    Proton therapy is very sensitive to uncertainties introduced during treatment planning and dose delivery. PET imaging of proton induced positron emitter distributions is the only practical approach for in vivo, in situ verification of proton therapy. This article reviews the current status of proton therapy verification with PET imaging. The different data detecting systems (in-beam, in-room and off-line PET), calculation methods for the prediction of proton induced PET activity distributions, and approaches for data evaluation are discussed. PMID:24312147

  2. PET/CT imaging and radioimmunotherapy of prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bouchelouche, Kirsten; Tagawa, Scott T.; Goldsmith, Stanley J.; Turkbey, Baris; Capala, Jacek; Choyke, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Prostate cancer is a common cancer in men and continues to be a major health problem. Imaging plays an important role in the clinical management of patients with prostate cancer. An important goal for prostate cancer imaging is more accurate disease characterization through the synthesis of anatomic, functional, and molecular imaging information. Positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) in oncology is emerging as an important imaging tool. The most common radiotracer for PET/CT in oncology, 18F- fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG), is not very useful in prostate cancer. However, in recent years other PET tracers have improved the accuracy of PET/CT imaging of prostate cancer. Among these, choline, labelled with 18F or 11C, 11C-acetate and 18F- fluoride have demonstrated promising results, and other new radiopharmaceuticals are currently under development and evaluation in pre-clinical and clinical studies. Large prospective clinical PET/CT trials are needed to establish the role of PET/CT in prostate cancer patients. Because there are only limited available therapeutic options for advanced metastatic prostate cancer, there is an urgent need for the development of more effective treatment modalities that could improve outcome. Prostate cancer represents an attractive target for radioimmunotherapy (RIT) for several reasons, including pattern of metastatic spread (lymph nodes and bone marrow, sites with good access to circulating antibodies), and small volume disease (ideal for antigen access and antibody delivery). Furthermore, prostate cancer is also radiation sensitive. Prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is expressed by virtually all prostate cancers, and represents an attractive target for RIT. Anti PSMA RIT demonstrates antitumor activity and is well tolerated. Clinical trials are underway to further improve upon treatment efficacy and patient selection. This review focuses on the recent advances of clinical PET/CT imaging and RIT of prostate

  3. Multi-modality imaging of small animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kastis, Georgios Anthony

    Over the last few years there has been a great demand for noninvasive, dedicated, small-animal imaging systems for biomedical research applications. In this dissertation we will discuss the development and performance of two gamma-ray systems and a dual modality CT/SPECT system. Initially we introduce FASTSPECT, a stationary, scintillator-based, single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) system that was originally built as a brain imager. We discuss its transformation into a small-animal imaging system and validate its performance by presenting high-resolution images of phantoms and animals. Furthermore, we discuss the development of an in vivo imaging protocol for rat myocardial models using FASTSPECT. The infarct size obtained from the images is quantified and compared with the myocardial infarct size measured from histology. Semiconductor detectors can exhibit good spatial and energy resolution, and therefore offer a promising alternative to scintillation technology. We discuss the performance of a semiconductor detector system, previously developed in our group, for planar and tomographic imaging of small animals. The same gamma-ray detector is used in a dual modality system for imaging mice. The system combines an anatomical imaging modality, x-ray CT, with a functional modality, SPECT. We present the development of the CT/SPECT system and illustrate its performance by presenting high-resolution images of phantoms and mice. Finally, we introduce a procedure for evaluating estimation methods without the use of a gold standard.

  4. Segmentation of brain PET-CT images based on adaptive use of complementary information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Yong; Wen, Lingfeng; Eberl, Stefan; Fulham, Michael; Feng, Dagan

    2009-02-01

    Dual modality PET-CT imaging provides aligned anatomical (CT) and functional (PET) images in a single scanning session, which can potentially be used to improve image segmentation of PET-CT data. The ability to distinguish structures for segmentation is a function of structure and modality and varies across voxels. Thus optimal contribution of a particular modality to segmentation is spatially variant. Existing segmentation algorithms, however, seldom account for this characteristic of PET-CT data and the results using these algorithms are not optimal. In this study, we propose a relative discrimination index (RDI) to characterize the relative abilities of PET and CT to correctly classify each voxel into the correct structure for segmentation. The definition of RDI is based on the information entropy of the probability distribution of the voxel's class label. If the class label derived from CT data for a particular voxel has more certainty than that derived from PET data, the corresponding RDI will have a higher value. We applied the RDI matrix to balance adaptively the contributions of PET and CT data to segmentation of brain PET-CT images on a voxel-by-voxel basis, with the aim to give the modality with higher discriminatory power a larger weight. The resultant segmentation approach is distinguished from traditional approaches by its innovative and adaptive use of the dual-modality information. We compared our approach to the non-RDI version and two commonly used PET-only based segmentation algorithms for simulation and clinical data. Our results show that the RDI matrix markedly improved PET-CT image segmentation.

  5. New SPECT and PET Radiopharmaceuticals for Imaging Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sogbein, Oyebola O.; Pelletier-Galarneau, Matthieu; Schindler, Thomas H.; Wei, Lihui; Wells, R. Glenn; Ruddy, Terrence D.

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear cardiology has experienced exponential growth within the past four decades with converging capacity to diagnose and influence management of a variety of cardiovascular diseases. Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) with technetium-99m radiotracers or thallium-201 has dominated the field; however new hardware and software designs that optimize image quality with reduced radiation exposure are fuelling a resurgence of interest at the preclinical and clinical levels to expand beyond MPI. Other imaging modalities including positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) continue to emerge as powerful players with an expanded capacity to diagnose a variety of cardiac conditions. At the forefront of this resurgence is the development of novel target vectors based on an enhanced understanding of the underlying pathophysiological process in the subcellular domain. Molecular imaging with novel radiopharmaceuticals engineered to target a specific subcellular process has the capacity to improve diagnostic accuracy and deliver enhanced prognostic information to alter management. This paper, while not comprehensive, will review the recent advancements in radiotracer development for SPECT and PET MPI, autonomic dysfunction, apoptosis, atherosclerotic plaques, metabolism, and viability. The relevant radiochemistry and preclinical and clinical development in addition to molecular imaging with emerging modalities such as cardiac MRI and PET-MR will be discussed. PMID:24901002

  6. Assessment of Cardiac Sarcoidosis with Advanced Imaging Modalities

    PubMed Central

    Akasaka, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is a chronic systemic disease of unknown etiology that is characterized by the presence of noncaseating epithelioid granulomas, usually in multiple organs. Several studies have shown that sarcoidosis might be the result of an exaggerated granulomatous reaction after exposure to unidentified antigens in genetically susceptible individuals. Cardiac involvement may occur and lead to an adverse outcome: the heart mechanics will be affected and that causes ventricular failure, and the cardiac electrical system will be disrupted and lead to third degree atrioventricular block, malignant ventricular tachycardia, and sudden cardiac death. Thus, early diagnosis and treatment of this potentially devastating disease is critically important. However, sensitive and accurate imaging modalities have not been established. Recent studies have demonstrated the promising potential of cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and 18F-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography (18F-FDG PET) in the diagnosis and assessment of cardiac sarcoidosis (CS). In this review, we discuss the epidemiology, etiology, histological findings, and clinical features of sarcoidosis. We also introduce advanced imaging including 18F-FDG PET and cardiac MRI as more reliable diagnostic modalities for CS. PMID:25250336

  7. Instrumentation challenges in multi-modality imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brasse, D.; Boisson, F.

    2016-02-01

    Based on different physical principles, imaging procedures currently used in both clinical and preclinical applications present different performance that allow researchers to achieve a large number of studies. However, the relevance of obtaining a maximum of information relating to the same subject is undeniable. The last two decades have thus seen the advent of a full-fledged research axis, the multimodal in vivo imaging. Whether from an instrumentation point of view, for medical research or the development of new probes, all these research works illustrate the growing interest of the scientific community for multimodal imaging, which can be approached with different backgrounds and perspectives from engineers to end-users point of views. In the present review, we discuss the multimodal imaging concept, which focuses not only on PET/CT and PET/MRI instrumentation but also on recent investigations of what could become a possible future in the field.

  8. MO-FG-207-00: Technological Advances in PET/MR Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    2015-06-15

    The use of integrated PET/MRI systems in clinical applications can best benefit from understanding their technological advances and limitations. The currently available clinical PET/MRI systems have their own characteristics. Thorough analyses of existing technical data and evaluation of necessary performance metrics for quality assurances could be conducted to optimize application-specific PET/MRI protocols. This Symposium will focus on technical advances and limitations of clinical PET/MRI systems, and how this exciting imaging modality can be utilized in applications that can benefit from both PET and MRI. Learning Objectives: To understand the technological advances of clinical PET/MRI systems To correctly identify clinical applications that can benefit from PET/MRI To understand ongoing work to further improve the current PET/MRI technology Floris Jansen is a GE Healthcare employee.

  9. PSMA Ligands for PET Imaging of Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Schwarzenboeck, Sarah M; Rauscher, Isabel; Bluemel, Christina; Fendler, Wolfgang P; Rowe, Steven P; Pomper, Martin G; Asfhar-Oromieh, Ali; Herrmann, Ken; Eiber, Matthias

    2017-10-01

    Targeting the prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) with (68)Ga-labeled and (18)F-labeled PET agents has become increasingly important in recent years. Imaging of biochemically recurrent prostate cancer has been established as a widely accepted clinical indication for PSMA ligand PET/CT in many parts of the world because of the results of multiple, primarily retrospective, studies that indicate superior detection efficacy compared with standard-of-care imaging. For high-risk primary prostate cancer, evidence is growing that this modality significantly aids in the detection of otherwise occult nodal and bone metastases. For both clinical indications in recurrent as well as in primary prostate cancer, preliminary data demonstrate a substantial impact on clinical management. Emerging data imply that intraprostatic tumor localization, therapy stratification, and treatment monitoring of advanced disease in specific clinical situations might become future indications. Current criteria for image reporting of PSMA ligand PET are evolving given the expanding body of literature on physiologic and pathologic uptake patterns and pitfalls. This article intends to give an educational overview on the current status of PSMA ligand PET imaging, including imaging procedure and interpretation, clinical indications, diagnostic potential, and impact on treatment planning. © 2017 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging.

  10. Engineering of Radiolabeled Iron Oxide Nanoparticles for Dual-Modality Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Ai, Fanrong; Ferreira, Carolina A.

    2015-01-01

    Over the last decade, radiolabeled iron oxide nanoparticles have been developed as promising contrast agents for dual-modality positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance imaging (PET/MRI) or single-photon emission computed tomography/magnetic resonance imaging (SPECT/MRI). The combination of PET (or SPECT) with MRI can offer synergistic advantages for non-invasive, sensitive, high-resolution, and quantitative imaging, which is suitable for early detection of various diseases such as cancer. Here, we summarize the recent advances on radiolabeled iron oxide nanoparticles for dual-modality imaging, through the use of a variety of PET (and SPECT) isotopes by using both chelator-based and chelator-free radiolabeling techniques. PMID:26692551

  11. Quantitative PET imaging with the 3T MR-BrainPET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weirich, C.; Scheins, J.; Lohmann, P.; Tellmann, L.; Byars, L.; Michel, C.; Rota Kops, E.; Brenner, D.; Herzog, H.; Shah, N. J.

    2013-02-01

    The new hybrid imaging technology of MR-PET allows for simultaneous acquisition of versatile MRI contrasts and the quantitative metabolic imaging with PET. In order to achieve the quantification of PET images with minimal residual error the application of several corrections is crucial. In this work we present our results on quantification with the 3T MR BrainPET scanner.

  12. Nonlinear PET parametric image reconstruction with MRI information using kernel method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Kuang; Wang, Guobao; Chen, Kevin T.; Catana, Ciprian; Qi, Jinyi

    2017-03-01

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is a functional imaging modality widely used in oncology, cardiology, and neurology. It is highly sensitive, but suffers from relatively poor spatial resolution, as compared with anatomical imaging modalities, such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). With the recent development of combined PET/MR systems, we can improve the PET image quality by incorporating MR information. Previously we have used kernel learning to embed MR information in static PET reconstruction and direct Patlak reconstruction. Here we extend this method to direct reconstruction of nonlinear parameters in a compartment model by using the alternating direction of multiplier method (ADMM) algorithm. Simulation studies show that the proposed method can produce superior parametric images compared with existing methods.

  13. PET Imaging of Skeletal Metastases and Its Role in Personalizing Further Management.

    PubMed

    Mahajan, Abhishek; Azad, Gurdip Kaur; Cook, Gary J

    2016-07-01

    In oncology, the skeleton is one of the most frequently encountered sites for metastatic disease and thus early detection not only has an impact on an individual patient's management but also on the overall outcome. Multiparametric and multimodal hybrid PET/computed tomography and PET/MR imaging have revolutionized imaging for bone metastases, but irrespective of tumor biology or morphology of the bone lesion it remains unclear which imaging modality is the most clinically relevant to guide individualized cancer care. In this review, we highlight the current clinical challenges of PET imaging in evaluation and quantification of skeletal tumor burden and its impact on personalized cancer management.

  14. Integrated PET/CT in lung cancer imaging: history and technical aspects.

    PubMed

    De Wever, W; Stroobants, S; Verschakelen, J A

    2007-01-01

    Integrated PET/CT is a new anatomo-metabolic imaging modality combining two different techniques: Computed Tomography (CT) that provides very detailed anatomic information and Positron Emission Tomography (PET) that provides metabolic information. Integrated PET/CT has several advantages. One of the advantages is the use of CT data for attenuation correction that is significantly faster compared to that in conventional PET systems. Due to the use of CT data for attenuation correction, artefacts can be generated on PET images related to the use of intravenous or oral CT contrast agents, CT beam-hardening artefacts due to metallic implants and motion artefacts (respiratory motion, physical bowel motion, cardiac motion). The purpose of this review is to discuss some technical considerations concerning the CT protocol that can be used for PET/CT in lung cancer imaging and to give a short overview of the initial results of staging of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).

  15. Gallium-68 EDTA PET/CT for Renal Imaging.

    PubMed

    Hofman, Michael S; Hicks, Rodney J

    2016-09-01

    Nuclear medicine renal imaging provides important functional data to assist in the diagnosis and management of patients with a variety of renal disorders. Physiologically stable metal chelates like ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) and diethylenetriamine penta-acetate (DTPA) are excreted by glomerular filtration and have been radiolabelled with a variety of isotopes for imaging glomerular filtration and quantitative assessment of glomerular filtration rate. Gallium-68 ((68)Ga) EDTA PET usage predates Technetium-99m ((99m)Tc) renal imaging, but virtually disappeared with the widespread adoption of gamma camera technology that was not optimal for imaging positron decay. There is now a reemergence of interest in (68)Ga owing to the greater availability of PET technology and use of (68)Ga to label other radiotracers. (68)Ga EDTA can be used a substitute for (99m)Tc DTPA for wide variety of clinical indications. A key advantage of PET for renal imaging over conventional scintigraphy is 3-dimensional dynamic imaging, which is particularly helpful in patients with complex anatomy in whom planar imaging may be nondiagnostic or difficult to interpret owing to overlying structures containing radioactive urine that cannot be differentiated. Other advantages include accurate and absolute (rather than relative) camera-based quantification, superior spatial and temporal resolution and integrated multislice CT providing anatomical correlation. Furthermore, the (68)Ga generator enables on-demand production at low cost, with no additional patient radiation exposure compared with conventional scintigraphy. Over the past decade, we have employed (68)Ga EDTA PET/CT primarily to answer difficult clinical questions in patients in whom other modalities have failed, particularly when it was envisaged that dynamic 3D imaging would be of assistance. We have also used it as a substitute for (99m)Tc DTPA if unavailable owing to supply issues, and have additionally examined the role of

  16. Results from the commissioning of a multi-modal endoscope for ultrasound and time of flight PET

    SciTech Connect

    Bugalho, Ricardo

    2015-07-01

    The EndoTOFPET-US collaboration has developed a multi-modal imaging system combining Ultrasound with Time-of-Flight Positron Emission Tomography into an endoscopic imaging device. The objective of the project is to obtain a coincidence time resolution of about 200 ps FWHM and to achieve about 1 mm spatial resolution of the PET system, while integrating all the components in a very compact detector suitable for endoscopic use. This scanner aims to be exploited for diagnostic and surgical oncology, as well as being instrumental in the clinical test of new biomarkers especially targeted for prostate and pancreatic cancer. (authors)

  17. (18)F-NaF PET/CT: EANM procedure guidelines for bone imaging.

    PubMed

    Beheshti, M; Mottaghy, F M; Payche, F; Behrendt, F F F; Van den Wyngaert, T; Fogelman, I; Strobel, K; Celli, M; Fanti, S; Giammarile, F; Krause, B; Langsteger, W

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this guideline is to provide minimum standards for the performance and interpretation of (18)F-NaF PET/CT scans. Standard acquisition and interpretation of nuclear imaging modalities will help to provide consistent data acquisition and numeric values between different platforms and institutes and to promote the use of PET/CT modality as an established diagnostic modality in routine clinical practice. This will also improve the value of scientific work and its contribution to evidence-based medicine.

  18. Kinetic modeling in PET imaging of hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Li, Fan; Joergensen, Jesper T; Hansen, Anders E; Kjaer, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Tumor hypoxia is associated with increased therapeutic resistance leading to poor treatment outcome. Therefore the ability to detect and quantify intratumoral oxygenation could play an important role in future individual personalized treatment strategies. Positron Emission Tomography (PET) can be used for non-invasive mapping of tissue oxygenation in vivo and several hypoxia specific PET tracers have been developed. Evaluation of PET data in the clinic is commonly based on visual assessment together with semiquantitative measurements e.g. standard uptake value (SUV). However, dynamic PET contains additional valuable information on the temporal changes in tracer distribution. Kinetic modeling can be used to extract relevant pharmacokinetic parameters of tracer behavior in vivo that reflects relevant physiological processes. In this paper, we review the potential contribution of kinetic analysis for PET imaging of hypoxia. PMID:25250200

  19. PET and SPECT imaging in veterinary medicine.

    PubMed

    LeBlanc, Amy K; Peremans, Kathelijne

    2014-01-01

    Veterinarians have gained increasing access to positron emission tomography (PET and PET/CT) imaging facilities, allowing them to use this powerful molecular imaging technique for clinical and research applications. SPECT is currently being used more in Europe than in the United States and has been shown to be useful in veterinary oncology and in the evaluation of orthopedic diseases. SPECT brain perfusion and receptor imaging is used to investigate behavioral disorders in animals that have interesting similarities to human psychiatric disorders. This article provides an overview of the potential applications of PET and SPECT. The use of commercially available and investigational PET radiopharmaceuticals in the management of veterinary disease has been discussed. To date, most of the work in this field has utilized the commercially available PET tracer, (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose for oncologic imaging. Normal biodistribution studies in several companion animal species (cats, dogs, and birds) have been published to assist in lesion detection and interpretation for veterinary radiologists and clinicians. Studies evaluating other (18)F-labeled tracers for research applications are underway at several institutions and companion animal models of human diseases are being increasingly recognized for their value in biomarker and therapy development. Although PET and SPECT technologies are in their infancy for clinical veterinary medicine, increasing access to and interest in these applications and other molecular imaging techniques has led to a greater knowledge and collective body of expertise for veterinarians worldwide. Initiation and fostering of physician-veterinarian collaborations are key components to the forward movement of this field.

  20. Feasibility of using respiration-averaged MR images for attenuation correction of cardiac PET/MR imaging.

    PubMed

    Ai, Hua; Pan, Tinsu

    2015-07-08

    Cardiac imaging is a promising application for combined PET/MR imaging. However, current MR imaging protocols for whole-body attenuation correction can produce spatial mismatch between PET and MR-derived attenuation data owing to a disparity between the two modalities' imaging speeds. We assessed the feasibility of using a respiration-averaged MR (AMR) method for attenuation correction of cardiac PET data in PET/MR images. First, to demonstrate the feasibility of motion imaging with MR, we used a 3T MR system and a two-dimensional fast spoiled gradient-recalled echo (SPGR) sequence to obtain AMR images ofa moving phantom. Then, we used the same sequence to obtain AMR images of a patient's thorax under free-breathing conditions. MR images were converted into PET attenuation maps using a three-class tissue segmentation method with two sets of predetermined CT numbers, one calculated from the patient-specific (PS) CT images and the other from a reference group (RG) containing 54 patient CT datasets. The MR-derived attenuation images were then used for attenuation correction of the cardiac PET data, which were compared to the PET data corrected with average CT (ACT) images. In the myocardium, the voxel-by-voxel differences and the differences in mean slice activity between the AMR-corrected PET data and the ACT-corrected PET data were found to be small (less than 7%). The use of AMR-derived attenuation images in place of ACT images for attenuation correction did not affect the summed stress score. These results demonstrate the feasibility of using the proposed SPGR-based MR imaging protocol to obtain patient AMR images and using those images for cardiac PET attenuation correction. Additional studies with more clinical data are warranted to further evaluate the method.

  1. Initial tests of a prototype MRI-compatible PET imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raylman, Raymond R.; Majewski, Stan; Lemieux, Susan; Velan, S. Sendhil; Kross, Brain; Popov, Vladimir; Smith, Mark F.; Weisenberger, Andrew G.; Wojcik, Randy

    2006-12-01

    Multi-modality imaging is rapidly becoming a valuable tool in the diagnosis of disease and in the development of new drugs. Functional images produced with PET fused with anatomical structure images created by MRI, will allow the correlation of form with function. Our group (a collaboration of West Virginia University and Jefferson Lab) is developing a system to acquire MRI and PET images contemporaneously. The prototype device consists of two opposed detector heads, operating in coincidence mode with an active FOV of 5×5×4 cm 3. Each MRI-PET detector module consists of an array of LSO detector elements (2.5×2.5×15 mm 3) coupled through a long fiber optic light guide to a single Hamamatsu flat panel PSPMT. The fiber optic light guide is made of a glued assembly of 2 mm diameter acrylic fibers with a total length of 2.5 m. The use of a light guides allows the PSPMTs to be positioned outside the bore of the 3 T General Electric MRI scanner used in the tests. Photon attenuation in the light guides resulted in an energy resolution of ˜60% FWHM, interaction of the magnetic field with PSPMT further reduced energy resolution to ˜85% FWHM. Despite this effect, excellent multi-plane PET and MRI images of a simple disk phantom were acquired simultaneously. Future work includes improved light guides, optimized magnetic shielding for the PSPMTs, construction of specialized coils to permit high-resolution MRI imaging, and use of the system to perform simultaneous PET and MRI or MR-spectroscopy .

  2. Towards automatic determination of total tumor burden from PET images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renisch, Steffen; Opfer, Roland; Wiemker, Rafael

    2010-03-01

    Quantification of potentially cancerous lesions from imaging modalities, most prominently from CT or PET images, plays a crucial role both in diagnosing and staging of cancer as well as in the assessment of the response of a cancer to a therapy, e.g. for lymphoma or lung cancer. For PET imaging, several quantifications which might bear great discriminating potential (e.g. total tumor burden or total tumor glycolysis) involve the segmentation of the entirety of all of the cancerous lesions. However, this particular task of segmenting the entirety of all cancerous lesions might be very tedious if it has to be done manually, in particular if the disease is scattered or metastasized and thus consists of numerous foci; this is one of the reasons why only few clinical studies on those quantifications are available. In this work, we investigate a way to aid the easy determination of the entirety of cancerous lesions in a PET image of a human. The approach is designed to detect all hot spots within a PET image and rank their probability of being a cancerous lesion. The basis of this component is a modified watershed algorithm; the ranking is performed on a combination of several, primarily morphological measures derived from the individual basins. This component is embedded in a software suite to assess response to a therapy based on PET images. As a preprocessing step, potential lesions are segmented and indicated to the user, who can select the foci which constitute the tumor and discard the false positives. This procedure substantially simplifies the segmentation of the entire tumor burden of a patient. This approach of semi-automatic hot spot detection is evaluated on 17 clinical datasets.

  3. LOR-interleaving image reconstruction for PET imaging with fractional-crystal collimation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yusheng; Matej, Samuel; Karp, Joel S.; Metzler, Scott D.

    2015-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) has become an important modality in medical and molecular imaging. However, in most PET applications, the resolution is still mainly limited by the physical crystal sizes or the detector’s intrinsic spatial resolution. To achieve images with better spatial resolution in a central region of interest (ROI), we have previously proposed using collimation in PET scanner. The collimator is designed to partially mask detector crystals to detect lines of response (LORs) within fractional crystals. A sequence of collimator-encoded LORs is measured with different collimation configurations. This novel collimated scanner geometry makes the reconstruction problem challenging, as both detector and collimator effects need to be modeled to reconstruct high-resolution images from collimated LORs. In this paper, we present an LOR-interleaving (LORI) algorithm, which incorporates these effects and has the advantage of reusing existing reconstruction software, to reconstruct high-resolution images for PET with fractional-crystal collimation. We also develop a 3-D ray-tracing model incorporating both the collimator and crystal penetration for simulations and reconstructions of the collimated PET. By registering the collimator-encoded LORs with the collimator configurations, high-resolution LORs are restored based on the modeled transfer matrices using the nonnegative least-squares method and EM algorithm. The resolution-enhanced images are then reconstructed from the high-resolution LORs using the MLEM or OSEM algorithm. For validation, we applied the LORI method to a small-animal PET scanner, A-PET, with a specially designed collimator. We demonstrate through simulated reconstructions with a hot-rod phantom and MOBY phantom that the LORI reconstructions can substantially improve spatial resolution and quantification compared to the uncollimated reconstructions. The LORI algorithm is crucial to improve overall image quality of collimated PET, which

  4. LOR-interleaving image reconstruction for PET imaging with fractional-crystal collimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yusheng; Matej, Samuel; Karp, Joel S.; Metzler, Scott D.

    2015-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) has become an important modality in medical and molecular imaging. However, in most PET applications, the resolution is still mainly limited by the physical crystal sizes or the detector’s intrinsic spatial resolution. To achieve images with better spatial resolution in a central region of interest (ROI), we have previously proposed using collimation in PET scanners. The collimator is designed to partially mask detector crystals to detect lines of response (LORs) within fractional crystals. A sequence of collimator-encoded LORs is measured with different collimation configurations. This novel collimated scanner geometry makes the reconstruction problem challenging, as both detector and collimator effects need to be modeled to reconstruct high-resolution images from collimated LORs. In this paper, we present a LOR-interleaving (LORI) algorithm, which incorporates these effects and has the advantage of reusing existing reconstruction software, to reconstruct high-resolution images for PET with fractional-crystal collimation. We also develop a 3D ray-tracing model incorporating both the collimator and crystal penetration for simulations and reconstructions of the collimated PET. By registering the collimator-encoded LORs with the collimator configurations, high-resolution LORs are restored based on the modeled transfer matrices using the non-negative least-squares method and EM algorithm. The resolution-enhanced images are then reconstructed from the high-resolution LORs using the MLEM or OSEM algorithm. For validation, we applied the LORI method to a small-animal PET scanner, A-PET, with a specially designed collimator. We demonstrate through simulated reconstructions with a hot-rod phantom and MOBY phantom that the LORI reconstructions can substantially improve spatial resolution and quantification compared to the uncollimated reconstructions. The LORI algorithm is crucial to improve overall image quality of collimated PET, which

  5. Novel Developments in Instrumentation for PET Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karp, Joel

    2013-04-01

    Advances in medical imaging, in particular positron emission tomography (PET), have been based on technical developments in physics and instrumentation that have common foundations with detection systems used in other fields of physics. New detector materials are used in PET systems that maximize efficiency, timing characteristics and robustness, and which lead to improved image quality and quantitative accuracy for clinical imaging. Time of flight (TOF) techniques are now routinely used in commercial PET scanners that combine physiological imaging with anatomical imaging provided by x-ray computed tomography. Using new solid-state photo-sensors instead of traditional photo-multiplier tubes makes it possible to combine PET with magnetic resonance imaging which is a significant technical challenge, but one that is creating new opportunities for both research and clinical applications. An overview of recent advances in instrumentation, such as TOF and PET/MR will be presented, along with examples of imaging studies to demonstrate the impact on patient care and basic research of diseases.

  6. Nanogels as imaging agents for modalities spanning the electromagnetic spectrum.

    PubMed

    Chan, Minnie; Almutairi, Adah

    2016-01-21

    In the past few decades, advances in imaging equipment and protocols have expanded the role of imaging in in vivo diagnosis and disease management, especially in cancer. Traditional imaging agents have rapid clearance and low specificity for disease detection. To improve accuracy in disease identification, localization and assessment, novel nanomaterials are frequently explored as imaging agents to achieve high detection specificity and sensitivity. A promising material for this purpose are hydrogel nanoparticles, whose high hydrophilicity, biocompatibility, and tunable size in the nanometer range make them ideal for imaging. These nanogels (10 to 200 nm) can circumvent uptake by the reticuloendothelial system, allowing longer circulation times than small molecules. In addition, their size/surface properties can be further tailored to optimize their pharmacokinetics for imaging of a particular disease. Herein, we provide a comprehensive review of nanogels as imaging agents in various modalities with sources of signal spanning the electromagnetic spectrum, including MRI, NIR, UV-vis, and PET. Many materials and formulation methods will be reviewed to highlight the versatility of nanogels as imaging agents.

  7. Nanogels as imaging agents for modalities spanning the electromagnetic spectrum

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Minnie

    2016-01-01

    In the past few decades, advances in imaging equipment and protocols have expanded the role of imaging in in vivo diagnosis and disease management, especially in cancer. Traditional imaging agents have rapid clearance and low specificity for disease detection. To improve accuracy in disease identification, localization and assessment, novel nanomaterials are frequently explored as imaging agents to achieve high detection specificity and sensitivity. A promising material for this purpose are hydrogel nanoparticles, whose high hydrophilicity, biocompatibility, and tunable size in the nanometer range make them ideal for imaging. These nanogels (10 to 200 nm) can circumvent uptake by the reticuloendothelial system, allowing longer circulation times than small molecules. In addition, their size/surface properties can be further tailored to optimize their pharmacokinetics for imaging of a particular disease. Herein, we provide a comprehensive review of nanogels as imaging agents in various modalities with sources of signal spanning the electromagnetic spectrum, including MRI, NIR, UV-vis, and PET. Many materials and formulation methods will be reviewed to highlight the versatility of nanogels as imaging agents. PMID:27398218

  8. PET Imaging of Skull Base Neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Mittra, Erik S; Iagaru, Andrei; Quon, Andrew; Fischbein, Nancy

    2007-10-01

    The utility of 18-F-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (PET) and PET/CT for the evaluation of skull base tumors is incompletely investigated, as a limited number of studies specifically focus on this region with regard to PET imaging. Several patterns can be ascertained, however, by synthesizing the data from various published reports and cases of primary skull base malignancies, as well as head and neck malignancies that extend secondarily to the skull base, including nasopharyngeal carcinoma, nasal cavity and paranasal sinus tumors, parotid cancers, and orbital tumors.

  9. Imaging modalities in Focal Therapy: Multiparametric Ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Wildeboer, R R; Panfilova, A P; Mischi, M; Wijkstra, H

    2016-07-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is the most common form of cancer among men in the US and the second most common cause of death. It has been observed that an increasing number of newly diagnosed patients exhibit low-risk features and that over-treatment with radical prostatectomy is a growing problem. The feasibility of focal therapy as an organsparing alternative, however, depends on the reliability of imaging techniques to identify, localize and monitor clinically relevant PCa lesions. The aim of this review is to investigate the potential of multiparametric ultrasound (mpUS) for focal therapy. We briefly introduce the most common focal therapies and thoroughly discuss the ability of available ultrasound modalities to localize PCa and reflect tissue properties. The imaging requirements of the focal therapies are studied to put the performance of the US techniques into perspective. We found that transrectal greyscale echography, Doppler sonography, elastography, contrast-enhanced ultrasonography and computerized ultrasound have been studied for the purpose of prostate imaging. Several of these modalities are already frequently used in current clinical practice; to add to the diagnostic process of PCa, to guide and monitor the application of focal therapy or to perform follow-up after treatment. Despite their capability to detect a large fraction of the PCa lesions, none of these modalities is currently considered sufficiently accurate for stand-alone tumour detection and localization. However, although there are only few studies reporting on a combined use of different ultrasound modalities, the results of an mpUS approach seem promising. Several US modalities have been successfully applied as a viable alternative to monitor tissue destruction during and after treatment. In view of the advantages of US and the promising results of a multiparametric approach in PCa detection and localization, researchers are urged to further investigate mpUS for therapeutic purposes.

  10. A tri-modality image fusion method for target delineation of brain tumors in radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Guo, Lu; Shen, Shuming; Harris, Eleanor; Wang, Zheng; Jiang, Wei; Guo, Yu; Feng, Yuanming

    2014-01-01

    To develop a tri-modality image fusion method for better target delineation in image-guided radiotherapy for patients with brain tumors. A new method of tri-modality image fusion was developed, which can fuse and display all image sets in one panel and one operation. And a feasibility study in gross tumor volume (GTV) delineation using data from three patients with brain tumors was conducted, which included images of simulation CT, MRI, and 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (18F-FDG PET) examinations before radiotherapy. Tri-modality image fusion was implemented after image registrations of CT+PET and CT+MRI, and the transparency weight of each modality could be adjusted and set by users. Three radiation oncologists delineated GTVs for all patients using dual-modality (MRI/CT) and tri-modality (MRI/CT/PET) image fusion respectively. Inter-observer variation was assessed by the coefficient of variation (COV), the average distance between surface and centroid (ADSC), and the local standard deviation (SDlocal). Analysis of COV was also performed to evaluate intra-observer volume variation. The inter-observer variation analysis showed that, the mean COV was 0.14(± 0.09) and 0.07(± 0.01) for dual-modality and tri-modality respectively; the standard deviation of ADSC was significantly reduced (p<0.05) with tri-modality; SDlocal averaged over median GTV surface was reduced in patient 2 (from 0.57 cm to 0.39 cm) and patient 3 (from 0.42 cm to 0.36 cm) with the new method. The intra-observer volume variation was also significantly reduced (p = 0.00) with the tri-modality method as compared with using the dual-modality method. With the new tri-modality image fusion method smaller inter- and intra-observer variation in GTV definition for the brain tumors can be achieved, which improves the consistency and accuracy for target delineation in individualized radiotherapy.

  11. Tri-modality small animal imaging system

    SciTech Connect

    Kundu, B.K.; Stolin, A.V.; Pole, J.; Baumgart, L.; Fontaine, M.; Wojcik, R.; Kross, B.; Zorn, C.; Majewski, S.; Williams, M.B.

    2006-02-01

    Our group is developing a scanner that combines x-ray, single gamma, and optical imaging on the same rotating gantry. Two functional modalities (SPECT and optical) are included because they have different strengths and weaknesses in terms of spatial and temporal decay lengths in the context of in vivo imaging, and because of the recent advent of multiple reporter gene constructs. The effect of attenuation by biological tissue on the detected intensity of the emitted signal was measured for both gamma and optical imaging. Attenuation by biological tissue was quantified for both the bioluminescent emission of luciferace and for the emission light of the near infrared fluorophore cyanine 5.5, using a fixed excitation light intensity. Experiments were performed to test the feasibility of using either single gamma or x-ray imaging to make depth-dependent corrections to the measured optical signal. Our results suggest that significant improvements in quantitation of optical emission are possible using straightforward correction techniques based on information from other modalities. Development of an integrated scanner in which data from each modality are obtained with the animal in a common configuration will greatly simplify this process.

  12. Modular Strategies for PET Imaging Agents

    PubMed Central

    Hooker, Jacob M

    2009-01-01

    Summary of Recent Advances In recent years, modular and simplified chemical and biological strategies have been developed for the synthesis and implementation of positron emission tomography (PET) radiotracers. New developments in bioconjugation and synthetic methodologies, in combination with advances in macromolecular delivery systems and gene-expression imaging, reflect a need to reduce radiosynthesis burden in order to accelerate imaging agent development. These new approaches, which are often mindful of existing infrastructure and available resources, are anticipated to provide a more approachable entry point for researchers interested in using PET to translate in vitro research to in vivo imaging. PMID:19880343

  13. A combined micro-PET/CT scanner for small animal imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jan, Meei-Ling; Ni, Yu-Ching; Chen, Kuo-Wei; Liang, Hsing-Ching; Chuang, Keh-Shih; Fu, Ying-Kai

    2006-12-01

    A micro-PET/CT system was developed by combination of an in-house micro-CT and a microPET ® R4 scanner. The cone-beam micro-CT consists of a rotational gantry that fits an X-ray tube, a CCD-based X-ray detector, and motor-driven linear stages. The gantry was designed to be coaxial with the scanner of microPET ® R4. It can be moved for the convenience of mounting the Ge-68 point-source holder for PET's calibration. The image volumes obtained from two modalities is registered by a pre-determined, inherent spatial transformation function. This hardware-approach fusion, which provides accurate and no labor-intensive alignment, is suitable for mass scanning. The micro-PET/CT system has been operated successfully. Merging the anatomical and functional images benefit studies of the small animal imaging.

  14. Modeling decision-making in single- and multi-modal medical images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canosa, R. L.; Baum, K. G.

    2009-02-01

    This research introduces a mode-specific model of visual saliency that can be used to highlight likely lesion locations and potential errors (false positives and false negatives) in single-mode PET and MRI images and multi-modal fused PET/MRI images. Fused-modality digital images are a relatively recent technological improvement in medical imaging; therefore, a novel component of this research is to characterize the perceptual response to these fused images. Three different fusion techniques were compared to single-mode displays in terms of observer error rates using synthetic human brain images generated from an anthropomorphic phantom. An eye-tracking experiment was performed with naÃve (non-radiologist) observers who viewed the single- and multi-modal images. The eye-tracking data allowed the errors to be classified into four categories: false positives, search errors (false negatives never fixated), recognition errors (false negatives fixated less than 350 milliseconds), and decision errors (false negatives fixated greater than 350 milliseconds). A saliency model consisting of a set of differentially weighted low-level feature maps is derived from the known error and ground truth locations extracted from a subset of the test images for each modality. The saliency model shows that lesion and error locations attract visual attention according to low-level image features such as color, luminance, and texture.

  15. PET imaging of primary mediastinal tumours.

    PubMed Central

    Kubota, K.; Yamada, S.; Kondo, T.; Yamada, K.; Fukuda, H.; Fujiwara, T.; Ito, M.; Ido, T.

    1996-01-01

    Mediastinal masses include a wide variety of tumours and remain an interesting diagnostic challenge for radiologist. We performed positron emission tomography (PET) studies of primary mediastinal tumours in order to predict the malignancy of these tumours preoperatively. Twenty-two patients with primary mediastinal tumours were studied with PET using 2-deoxy-2-[18F]fluoro-D-glucose (FDG). The histological findings of surgical pathology or biopsy, or mediastinoscopy were compared with those of computerised tomography (CT) and PET. PET images were evaluated semiquantitatively using the differential uptake ratio (DUR). Increased FDG uptake was observed in nine of ten patients with malignant tumours, including thymic carcinomas, lymphomas, invasive thymomas and a case of sarcoidosis. A moderate level of FDG uptake was found in a myeloma, non-invasive thymomas, and a schwannoma, whereas a low uptake was observed in a teratoma and various benign cysts. The mean FDG uptake of malignant tumours was significantly higher than that of benign tumours. Both thymic cancer and invasive thymoma showed a high FDG uptake. CT examination resulted in three false-negative and two false-positive cases when used in predicting tumour invasion, while PET was associated with a false-positive and a false-negative case. In conclusion, the use of FDG with PET is clinically helpful in evaluating the malignant nature of primary mediastinal tumours. Our results also suggest that a high FDG uptake reflects the invasiveness of malignant nature of thymic tumours. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:8611400

  16. Hybrid PET/MR Imaging and Brain Connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Aiello, Marco; Cavaliere, Carlo; Salvatore, Marco

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, brain connectivity is gaining ever-increasing interest from the interdisciplinary research community. The study of brain connectivity is characterized by a multifaceted approach providing both structural and functional evidence of the relationship between cerebral regions at different scales. Although magnetic resonance (MR) is the most established imaging modality for investigating connectivity in vivo, the recent advent of hybrid positron emission tomography (PET)/MR scanners paved the way for more comprehensive investigation of brain organization and physiology. Due to the high sensitivity and biochemical specificity of radiotracers, combining MR with PET imaging may enrich our ability to investigate connectivity by introducing the concept of metabolic connectivity and cometomics and promoting new insights on the physiological and molecular bases underlying high-level neural organization. This review aims to describe and summarize the main methods of analysis of brain connectivity employed in MR imaging and nuclear medicine. Moreover, it will discuss practical aspects and state-of-the-art techniques for exploiting hybrid PET/MR imaging to investigate the relationship of physiological processes and brain connectivity. PMID:26973446

  17. Monte Carlo simulations of medical imaging modalities

    SciTech Connect

    Estes, G.P.

    1998-09-01

    Because continuous-energy Monte Carlo radiation transport calculations can be nearly exact simulations of physical reality (within data limitations, geometric approximations, transport algorithms, etc.), it follows that one should be able to closely approximate the results of many experiments from first-principles computations. This line of reasoning has led to various MCNP studies that involve simulations of medical imaging modalities and other visualization methods such as radiography, Anger camera, computerized tomography (CT) scans, and SABRINA particle track visualization. It is the intent of this paper to summarize some of these imaging simulations in the hope of stimulating further work, especially as computer power increases. Improved interpretation and prediction of medical images should ultimately lead to enhanced medical treatments. It is also reasonable to assume that such computations could be used to design new or more effective imaging instruments.

  18. Diagnosing cardiac disease during pregnancy: imaging modalities.

    PubMed

    Ntusi, Ntobeko A; Samuels, Petronella; Moosa, Sulaiman; Mocumbi, Ana O

    2016-01-01

    Pregnant women with known or suspected cardiovascular disease (CVD) often require cardiovascular imaging during pregnancy. The accepted maximum limit of ionising radiation exposure to the foetus during pregnancy is a cumulative dose of 5 rad. Concerns related to imaging modalities that involve ionising radiation include teratogenesis, mutagenesis and childhood malignancy. Importantly, no single imaging study approaches this cautionary dose of 5 rad (50 mSv or 50 mGy). Diagnostic imaging procedures that may be used in pregnancy include chest radiography, fluoroscopy, echocardiography, invasive angiography, cardiovascular computed tomography, computed tomographic pulmonary angiography, cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) and nuclear techniques. Echocardiography and CMR appear to be completely safe in pregnancy and are not associated with any adverse foetal effects, provided there are no general contra-indications to MR imaging. Concerns related to safety of imaging tests must be balanced against the importance of accurate diagnosis and thorough assessment of the pathological condition. Decisions about imaging in pregnancy are premised on understanding the physiology of pregnancy, understanding basic concepts of ionising radiation, the clinical manifestations of existent CVD in pregnancy and features of new CVD. The cardiologist/physician must understand the indications for and limitations of, and the potential harmful effects of each test during pregnancy. Current evidence suggests that a single cardiovascular radiological study during pregnancy is safe and should be undertaken at all times when clinically justified. In this article, the different imaging modalities are reviewed in terms of how they work, how safe they are and what their clinical utility in pregnancy is. Furthermore, the safety of contrast agents in pregnancy is also reviewed.

  19. Respiration-Averaged CT for Attenuation Correction of PET Images – Impact on PET Texture Features in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Nai-Ming; Fang, Yu-Hua Dean; Tsan, Din-Li

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We compared attenuation correction of PET images with helical CT (PET/HCT) and respiration-averaged CT (PET/ACT) in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with the goal of investigating the impact of respiration-averaged CT on 18F FDG PET texture parameters. Materials and Methods A total of 56 patients were enrolled. Tumors were segmented on pretreatment PET images using the adaptive threshold. Twelve different texture parameters were computed: standard uptake value (SUV) entropy, uniformity, entropy, dissimilarity, homogeneity, coarseness, busyness, contrast, complexity, grey-level nonuniformity, zone-size nonuniformity, and high grey-level large zone emphasis. Comparisons of PET/HCT and PET/ACT were performed using Wilcoxon signed-rank tests, intraclass correlation coefficients, and Bland-Altman analysis. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves as well as univariate and multivariate Cox regression analyses were used to identify the parameters significantly associated with disease-specific survival (DSS). A fixed threshold at 45% of the maximum SUV (T45) was used for validation. Results SUV maximum and total lesion glycolysis (TLG) were significantly higher in PET/ACT. However, texture parameters obtained with PET/ACT and PET/HCT showed a high degree of agreement. The lowest levels of variation between the two modalities were observed for SUV entropy (9.7%) and entropy (9.8%). SUV entropy, entropy, and coarseness from both PET/ACT and PET/HCT were significantly associated with DSS. Validation analyses using T45 confirmed the usefulness of SUV entropy and entropy in both PET/HCT and PET/ACT for the prediction of DSS, but only coarseness from PET/ACT achieved the statistical significance threshold. Conclusions Our results indicate that 1) texture parameters from PET/ACT are clinically useful in the prediction of survival in NSCLC patients and 2) SUV entropy and entropy are robust to attenuation correction methods. PMID:26930211

  20. Advanced Imaging Modalities in the Detection of Cerebral Vasospasm

    PubMed Central

    Mills, Jena N.; Mehta, Vivek; Russin, Jonathan; Amar, Arun P.; Rajamohan, Anandh; Mack, William J.

    2013-01-01

    The pathophysiology of cerebral vasospasm following aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is complex and is not entirely understood. Mechanistic insights have been gained through advances in the capabilities of diagnostic imaging. Core techniques have focused on the assessment of vessel caliber, tissue metabolism, and/or regional perfusion parameters. Advances in imaging have provided clinicians with a multifaceted approach to assist in the detection of cerebral vasospasm and the diagnosis of delayed ischemic neurologic deficits (DIND). However, a single test or algorithm with broad efficacy remains elusive. This paper examines both anatomical and physiological imaging modalities applicable to post-SAH vasospasm and offers a historical background. We consider cerebral blood flow velocities measured by Transcranial Doppler Ultrasonography (TCD). Structural imaging techniques, including catheter-based Digital Subtraction Angiography (DSA), CT Angiography (CTA), and MR Angiography (MRA), are reviewed. We examine physiologic assessment by PET, HMPAO SPECT, 133Xe Clearance, Xenon-Enhanced CT (Xe/CT), Perfusion CT (PCT), and Diffusion-Weighted/MR Perfusion Imaging. Comparative advantages and limitations are discussed. PMID:23476766

  1. Molecular Imaging of Prostate Cancer: PET Radiotracers

    PubMed Central

    Jadvar, Hossein

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Recent advances in the fundamental understanding of the complex biology of prostate cancer have provided an increasing number of potential targets for imaging and treatment. The imaging evaluation of prostate cancer needs to be tailored to the various phases of this remarkably heterogeneous disease. CONCLUSION In this article, I review the current state of affairs on a range of PET radiotracers for potential use in the imaging evaluation of men with prostate cancer. PMID:22826388

  2. PET-based molecular imaging in neuroscience.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, A H; Li, H; Winkeler, A; Hilker, R; Knoess, C; Rüger, A; Galldiks, N; Schaller, B; Sobesky, J; Kracht, L; Monfared, P; Klein, M; Vollmar, S; Bauer, B; Wagner, R; Graf, R; Wienhard, K; Herholz, K; Heiss, W D

    2003-07-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) allows non-invasive assessment of physiological, metabolic and molecular processes in humans and animals in vivo. Advances in detector technology have led to a considerable improvement in the spatial resolution of PET (1-2 mm), enabling for the first time investigations in small experimental animals such as mice. With the developments in radiochemistry and tracer technology, a variety of endogenously expressed and exogenously introduced genes can be analysed by PET. This opens up the exciting and rapidly evolving field of molecular imaging, aiming at the non-invasive localisation of a biological process of interest in normal and diseased cells in animal models and humans in vivo. The main and most intriguing advantage of molecular imaging is the kinetic analysis of a given molecular event in the same experimental subject over time. This will allow non-invasive characterisation and "phenotyping" of animal models of human disease at various disease stages, under certain pathophysiological stimuli and after therapeutic intervention. The potential broad applications of imaging molecular events in vivo lie in the study of cell biology, biochemistry, gene/protein function and regulation, signal transduction, transcriptional regulation and characterisation of transgenic animals. Most importantly, molecular imaging will have great implications for the identification of potential molecular therapeutic targets, in the development of new treatment strategies, and in their successful implementation into clinical application. Here, the potential impact of molecular imaging by PET in applications in neuroscience research with a special focus on neurodegeneration and neuro-oncology is reviewed.

  3. Imaging with hypertelescopes: a simple modal approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aime, C.

    2008-05-01

    Aims: We give a simple analysis of imaging with hypertelescopes, a technique proposed by Labeyrie to produce snapshot images using arrays of telescopes. The approach is modal: we describe the transformations induced by the densification onto a sinusoidal decomposition of the focal image instead of the usual point spread function approach. Methods: We first express the image formed at the focus of a diluted array of apertures as the product R_0(α) X_F(α) of the diffraction pattern of the elementary apertures R_0(α) by the object-dependent interference term X_F(α) between all apertures. The interference term, which can be written in the form of a Fourier Series for an extremely diluted array, produces replications of the object, which makes observing the image difficult. We express the focal image after the densification using the approach of Tallon and Tallon-Bosc. Results: The result is very simple for an extremely diluted array. We show that the focal image in a periscopic densification of the array can be written as R_0(α) X_F(α/γ), where γ is the factor of densification. There is a dilatation of the interference term while the diffraction term is unchanged. After de-zooming, the image can be written as γ2 X_F(α)R_0(γ α), an expression which clearly indicates that the final image corresponds to the center of the Fizeau image intensified by γ2. The imaging limitations of hypertelescopes are therefore those of the original configuration. The effect of the suppression of image replications is illustrated in a numerical simulation for a fully redundant configuration and a non-redundant one.

  4. Modality-Invariant Image Classification Based on Modality Uniqueness and Dictionary Learning.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seungryong; Cai, Rui; Park, Kihong; Kim, Sunok; Sohn, Kwanghoon

    2016-12-02

    We present a unified framework for image classification of image sets taken under varying modality conditions. Our method is motivated by a key observation that the image feature distribution is simultaneously influenced by the semantic-class and the modality category label, which limits the performance of conventional methods for that task. With this insight, we introduce modality uniqueness as a discriminative weight that divides each modality cluster from all other clusters. By leveraging the modality uniqueness, our framework is formulated as unsupervised modality clustering and classifier learning based on modality-invariant similarity kernel. Specifically, in the assignment step, each training image is first assigned to the most similar cluster according to its modality. In the update step, based on the current cluster hypothesis, the modality uniqueness and the sparse dictionary are updated. These two steps are formulated in an iterative manner. Based on the final clusters, a modalityinvariant marginalized kernel is then computed, where the similarities between the reconstructed features of each modality are aggregated across all clusters. Our framework enables the reliable inference of semantic-class category for an image, even across large photometric variations. Experimental results show that our method outperforms conventional methods on various benchmarks, such as landmark identification under severely varying weather conditions, domain-adapting image classification, and RGB and near-infrared (NIR) image classification.

  5. Evaluation of registration strategies for multi-modality images of rat brain slices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palm, Christoph; Vieten, Andrea; Salber, Dagmar; Pietrzyk, Uwe

    2009-05-01

    In neuroscience, small-animal studies frequently involve dealing with series of images from multiple modalities such as histology and autoradiography. The consistent and bias-free restacking of multi-modality image series is obligatory as a starting point for subsequent non-rigid registration procedures and for quantitative comparisons with positron emission tomography (PET) and other in vivo data. Up to now, consistency between 2D slices without cross validation using an inherent 3D modality is frequently presumed to be close to the true morphology due to the smooth appearance of the contours of anatomical structures. However, in multi-modality stacks consistency is difficult to assess. In this work, consistency is defined in terms of smoothness of neighboring slices within a single modality and between different modalities. Registration bias denotes the distortion of the registered stack in comparison to the true 3D morphology and shape. Based on these metrics, different restacking strategies of multi-modality rat brain slices are experimentally evaluated. Experiments based on MRI-simulated and real dual-tracer autoradiograms reveal a clear bias of the restacked volume despite quantitatively high consistency and qualitatively smooth brain structures. However, different registration strategies yield different inter-consistency metrics. If no genuine 3D modality is available, the use of the so-called SOP (slice-order preferred) or MOSOP (modality-and-slice-order preferred) strategy is recommended.

  6. Multi-modality molecular imaging for gastric cancer research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Jimin; Chen, Xueli; Liu, Junting; Hu, Hao; Qu, Xiaochao; Wang, Fu; Nie, Yongzhan

    2011-12-01

    Because of the ability of integrating the strengths of different modalities and providing fully integrated information, multi-modality molecular imaging techniques provide an excellent solution to detecting and diagnosing earlier cancer, which remains difficult to achieve by using the existing techniques. In this paper, we present an overview of our research efforts on the development of the optical imaging-centric multi-modality molecular imaging platform, including the development of the imaging system, reconstruction algorithms and preclinical biomedical applications. Primary biomedical results show that the developed optical imaging-centric multi-modality molecular imaging platform may provide great potential in the preclinical biomedical applications and future clinical translation.

  7. Radiolabeling of Nanoparticles and Polymers for PET Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Stockhofe, Katharina; Postema, Johannes M.; Schieferstein, Hanno; Ross, Tobias L.

    2014-01-01

    Nanomedicine has become an emerging field in imaging and therapy of malignancies. Nanodimensional drug delivery systems have already been used in the clinic, as carriers for sensitive chemotherapeutics or highly toxic substances. In addition, those nanodimensional structures are further able to carry and deliver radionuclides. In the development process, non-invasive imaging by means of positron emission tomography (PET) represents an ideal tool for investigations of pharmacological profiles and to find the optimal nanodimensional architecture of the aimed-at drug delivery system. Furthermore, in a personalized therapy approach, molecular imaging modalities are essential for patient screening/selection and monitoring. Hence, labeling methods for potential drug delivery systems are an indispensable need to provide the radiolabeled analog. In this review, we describe and discuss various approaches and methods for the labeling of potential drug delivery systems using positron emitters. PMID:24699244

  8. PET Imaging in Huntington’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Roussakis, Andreas-Antonios; Piccini, Paola

    2015-01-01

    To date, little is known about how neurodegeneration and neuroinflammation propagate in Huntington’s disease (HD). Unfortunately, no treatment is available to cure or reverse the progressive decline of function caused by the disease, thus considering HD a fatal disease. Mutation gene carriers typically remain asymptomatic for many years although alterations in the basal ganglia and cortex occur early on in mutant HD gene–carriers. Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is a functional imaging technique of nuclear medicine which enables in vivo visualization of numerous biological molecules expressed in several human tissues. Brain PET is most powerful to study in vivo neuronal and glial cells function as well as cerebral blood flow in a plethora of neurodegenerative disorders including Parkinson’s disease, Alzheimer’s and HD. In absence of HD–specific biomarkers for monitoring disease progression, previous PET studies in HD were merely focused on the study of dopaminergic terminals, cerebral blood flow and glucose metabolism in manifest and premanifest HD–gene carriers. More recently, research interest has been exploring novel PET targets in HD including the state of phosphodiesterse expression and the role of activated microglia. Hence, a better understanding of the HD pathogenesis mechanisms may lead to the development of targeted therapies. PET imaging follow–up studies with novel selective PET radiotracers such as 11C-IMA–107 and 11C-PBR28 may provide insight on disease progression and identify prognostic biomarkers, elucidate the underlying HD pathology and assess novel pharmaceutical agents and over time. PMID:26683130

  9. Optimized PET imaging for 4D treatment planning in radiotherapy: the virtual 4D PET strategy.

    PubMed

    Gianoli, Chiara; Riboldi, Marco; Fontana, Giulia; Giri, Maria G; Grigolato, Daniela; Ferdeghini, Marco; Cavedon, Carlo; Baroni, Guido

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of the study is to evaluate the performance of a novel strategy, referred to as "virtual 4D PET", aiming at the optimization of hybrid 4D CT-PET scan for radiotherapy treatment planning. The virtual 4D PET strategy applies 4D CT motion modeling to avoid time-resolved PET image acquisition. This leads to a reduction of radioactive tracer administered to the patient and to a total acquisition time comparable to free-breathing PET studies. The proposed method exploits a motion model derived from 4D CT, which is applied to the free-breathing PET to recover respiratory motion and motion blur. The free-breathing PET is warped according to the motion model, in order to generate the virtual 4D PET. The virtual 4D PET strategy was tested on images obtained from a 4D computational anthropomorphic phantom. The performance was compared to conventional motion compensated 4D PET. Tests were also carried out on clinical 4D CT-PET scans coming from seven lung and liver cancer patients. The virtual 4D PET strategy was able to recover lesion motion, with comparable performance with respect to the motion compensated 4D PET. The compensation of the activity blurring due to motion was successfully achieved in terms of spill out removal. Specific limitations were highlighted in terms of partial volume compensation. Results on clinical 4D CT-PET scans confirmed the efficacy in 4D PET count statistics optimization, as equal to the free-breathing PET, and recovery of lesion motion. Compared to conventional motion compensation strategies that explicitly require 4D PET imaging, the virtual 4D PET strategy reduces clinical workload and computational costs, resulting in significant advantages for radiotherapy treatment planning.

  10. PET/CT imaging of abdominal aorta with intramural hematomas, penetrating ulcer, and saccular pseudoaneurysm.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Vien X; Nguyen, Ba D

    2014-05-01

    Acute aortic syndromes, encompassing intramural hematoma, penetrating ulcer, and pseudoaneurysm, are best demonstrated by angiographic CT and magnetic resonance imaging. These imaging modalities provide an accurate evaluation and allow timely therapies of these frequently symptomatic lesions, thus reducing their morbidity and mortality. The inflammatory pathogenesis of these acute aortic syndromes may exhibit positive PET findings predictive of prognosis and outcomes of these vascular events. The authors present a case of PET/CT imaging showing asymptomatic intramural hematomas with penetrating ulcer and saccular pseudoaneurysm of the proximal abdominal aorta.

  11. Clinical Utility of Positron Emission Tomography Magnetic Resonance Imaging (PET-MRI) in Gastrointestinal Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, Robert; Choi, Minsig

    2016-01-01

    Anatomic imaging utilizing both CT (computed tomography) and MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) limits the assessment of cancer metastases in lymph nodes and distant organs while functional imaging like PET (positron emission tomography) scan has its limitation in spatial resolution capacity. Hybrid imaging utilizing PET-CT and PET-MRI are novel imaging modalities that are changing the current landscape in cancer diagnosis, staging, and treatment response. MRI has shown to have higher sensitivity in soft tissue, head and neck pathology, and pelvic disease, as well as, detecting small metastases in the liver and bone compared to CT. Combining MRI with PET allows for detection of metastases that may have been missed with current imaging modalities. In this review, we will examine the clinical utility of FDG PET-MRI in the diagnosis and staging of gastrointestinal cancers with focus on esophageal, stomach, colorectal, and pancreatic cancers. We will also explore its role in treatment response and future directions associated with it. PMID:27618106

  12. Simultaneous PET/MR imaging with a radio frequency-penetrable PET insert.

    PubMed

    Grant, Alexander M; Lee, Brian J; Chang, Chen-Ming; Levin, Craig S

    2017-01-01

    A brain sized radio frequency (RF)-penetrable PET insert has been designed for simultaneous operation with MRI systems. This system takes advantage of electro-optical coupling and battery power to electrically float the PET insert relative to the MRI ground, permitting RF signals to be transmitted through small gaps between the modules that form the PET ring. This design facilitates the use of the built-in body coil for RF transmission and thus could be inserted into any existing MR site wishing to achieve simultaneous PET/MR imaging. The PET detectors employ nonmagnetic silicon photomultipliers in conjunction with a compressed sensing signal multiplexing scheme, and optical fibers to transmit analog PET detector signals out of the MRI room for decoding, processing, and image reconstruction. The PET insert was first constructed and tested in a laboratory benchtop setting, where tomographic images of a custom resolution phantom were successfully acquired. The PET insert was then placed within a 3T body MRI system, and tomographic resolution/contrast phantom images were acquired both with only the B0 field present, and under continuous pulsing from different MR imaging sequences. The resulting PET images have comparable contrast-to-noise ratios (CNR) under all MR pulsing conditions: The maximum percent CNR relative difference for each rod type among all four PET images acquired in the MRI system has a mean of 14.0 ± 7.7%. MR images were successfully acquired through the RF-penetrable PET shielding using only the built-in MR body coil, suggesting that simultaneous imaging is possible without significant mutual interference. These results show promise for this technology as an alternative to costly integrated PET/MR scanners; a PET insert that is compatible with any existing clinical MRI system could greatly increase the availability, accessibility, and dissemination of PET/MR. © 2016 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  13. Current Status of Hybrid PET/MRI in Oncologic Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Rosenkrantz, Andrew B.; Friedman, Kent; Chandarana, Hersh; Melsaether, Amy; Moy, Linda; Ding, Yu-Shin; Jhaveri, Komal; Beltran, Luis; Jain, Rajan

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE This review article explores recent advancements in PET/MRI for clinical oncologic imaging. CONCLUSION Radiologists should understand the technical considerations that have made PET/MRI feasible within clinical workflows, the role of PET tracers for imaging various molecular targets in oncology, and advantages of hybrid PET/MRI compared with PET/CT. To facilitate this understanding, we discuss clinical examples (including gliomas, breast cancer, bone metastases, prostate cancer, bladder cancer, gynecologic malignancy, and lymphoma) as well as future directions, challenges, and areas for continued technical optimization for PET/MRI. PMID:26491894

  14. Combined Modality Treatment for PET-Positive Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma: Favorable Outcomes of Combined Modality Treatment for Patients With Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma and Positive Interim or Postchemotherapy FDG-PET

    SciTech Connect

    Halasz, Lia M.; Jacene, Heather A.; Catalano, Paul J.; Van den Abbeele, Annick D.; LaCasce, Ann; Mauch, Peter M.; Ng, Andrea K.

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: To evaluate outcomes of patients treated for aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) with combined modality therapy based on [{sup 18}F]fluoro-2-deoxy-2-D-glucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) response. Methods and Materials: We studied 59 patients with aggressive NHL, who received chemotherapy and radiation therapy (RT) from 2001 to 2008. Among them, 83% of patients had stage I/II disease. Patients with B-cell lymphoma received R-CHOP (rituximab, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone)-based chemotherapy, and 1 patient with anaplastic lymphoma kinase-negative anaplastic T-cell lymphoma received CHOP therapy. Interim and postchemotherapy FDG-PET or FDG-PET/computed tomography (CT) scans were performed for restaging. All patients received consolidated involved-field RT. Median RT dose was 36 Gy (range, 28.8-50 Gy). Progression-free survival (PFS) and local control (LC) rates were calculated with and without a negative interim or postchemotherapy FDG-PET scan. Results: Median follow-up was 46.5 months. Thirty-nine patients had negative FDG-PET results by the end of chemotherapy, including 12 patients who had a negative interim FDG-PET scan and no postchemotherapy PET. Twenty patients were FDG-PET-positive, including 7 patients with positive interim FDG-PET and no postchemotherapy FDG-PET scans. The 3-year actuarial PFS rates for patients with negative versus positive FDG-PET scans were 97% and 90%, respectively. The 3-year actuarial LC rates for patients with negative versus positive FDG-PET scans were 100% and 90%, respectively. Conclusions: Patients who had a positive interim or postchemotherapy FDG-PET had a PFS rate of 90% at 3 years after combined modality treatment, suggesting that a large proportion of these patients can be cured with consolidated RT.

  15. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and Positron Emission Tomography (PET)/MRI for Lung Cancer Staging.

    PubMed

    Ohno, Yoshiharu; Koyama, Hisanobu; Lee, Ho Yun; Yoshikawa, Takeshi; Sugimura, Kazuro

    2016-07-01

    Tumor, lymph node, and metastasis (TNM) classification of lung cancer is typically performed with the TNM staging system, as recommended by the Union Internationale Contre le Cancer (UICC), the American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC), and the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer (IASLC). Radiologic examinations for TNM staging of lung cancer patients include computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), positron emission tomography with 2-[fluorine-18] fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG-PET), and FDG-PET combined with CT (FDG-PET/CT) and are used for pretherapeutic assessments. Recent technical advances in MR systems, application of fast and parallel imaging and/or introduction of new MR techniques, and utilization of contrast media have markedly improved the diagnostic utility of MRI in this setting. In addition, FDG-PET can be combined or fused with MRI (PET/MRI) for clinical practice. This review article will focus on these recent advances in MRI as well as on PET/MRI for lung cancer staging, in addition to a discussion of their potential and limitations for routine clinical practice in comparison with other modalities such as CT, FDG-PET, and PET/CT.

  16. [¹⁸F]-fluorodeoxyglucose PET imaging of atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Blomberg, Björn A; Høilund-Carlsen, Poul Flemming

    2015-01-01

    [(18)F]-fluorodeoxyglucose PET ((18)FDG PET) imaging has emerged as a promising tool for assessment of atherosclerosis. By targeting atherosclerotic plaque glycolysis, a marker for plaque inflammation and hypoxia, (18)FDG PET can assess plaque vulnerability and potentially predict risk of atherosclerosis-related disease, such as stroke and myocardial infarction. With excellent reproducibility, (18)FDG PET can be a surrogate end point in clinical drug trials, improving trial efficiency. This article summarizes key findings in the literature, discusses limitations of (18)FDG PET imaging of atherosclerosis, and reports recommendations to optimize imaging protocols. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Joint Segmentation of Anatomical and Functional Images: Applications in Quantification of Lesions from PET, PET-CT, MRI-PET, and MRI-PET-CT Images

    PubMed Central

    Bagci, Ulas; Udupa, Jayaram K.; Mendhiratta, Neil; Foster, Brent; Xu, Ziyue; Yao, Jianhua; Chen, Xinjian; Mollura, Daniel J.

    2013-01-01

    We present a novel method for the joint segmentation of anatomical and functional images. Our proposed methodology unifies the domains of anatomical and functional images, represents them in a product lattice, and performs simultaneous delineation of regions based on random walk image segmentation. Furthermore, we also propose a simple yet effective object/background seed localization method to make the proposed segmentation process fully automatic. Our study uses PET, PET-CT, MRI-PET, and fused MRI-PET-CT scans (77 studies in all) from 56 patients who had various lesions in different body regions. We validated the effectiveness of the proposed method on different PET phantoms as well as on clinical images with respect to the ground truth segmentation provided by clinicians. Experimental results indicate that the presented method is superior to threshold and Bayesian methods commonly used in PET image segmentation, is more accurate and robust compared to the other PET-CT segmentation methods recently published in the literature, and also it is general in the sense of simultaneously segmenting multiple scans in real-time with high accuracy needed in routine clinical use. PMID:23837967

  18. [A non-local means approach for PET image denoising].

    PubMed

    Yin, Yong; Sun, Weifeng; Lu, Jie; Liu, Tonghai

    2010-04-01

    Denoising is an important issue for medical image processing. Based on the analysis of the Non-local means algorithm recently reported by Buades A, et al. in international journals we herein propose adapting it for PET image denoising. Experimental de-noising results for real clinical PET images show that Non-local means method is superior to median filtering and wiener filtering methods and it can suppress noise in PET images effectively and preserve important details of structure for diagnosis.

  19. SPECT and PET Imaging of Meningiomas

    PubMed Central

    Valotassiou, Varvara; Leondi, Anastasia; Angelidis, George; Psimadas, Dimitrios; Georgoulias, Panagiotis

    2012-01-01

    Meningiomas arise from the meningothelial cells of the arachnoid membranes. They are the most common primary intracranial neoplasms and represent about 20% of all intracranial tumors. They are usually diagnosed after the third decade of life and they are more frequent in women than in men. According to the World Health Organization (WHO) criteria, meningiomas can be classified into grade I meningiomas, which are benign, grade II (atypical) and grade III (anaplastic) meningiomas, which have a much more aggressive clinical behaviour. Computed Tomography (CT) and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) are routinely used in the diagnostic workup of patients with meningiomas. Molecular Nuclear Medicine Imaging with Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) and Positron Emission Tomography (PET) could provide complementary information to CT and MRI. Various SPECT and PET tracers may provide information about cellular processes and biological characteristics of meningiomas. Therefore, SPECT and PET imaging could be used for the preoperative noninvasive diagnosis and differential diagnosis of meningiomas, prediction of tumor grade and tumor recurrence, response to treatment, target volume delineation for radiation therapy planning, and distinction between residual or recurrent tumour from scar tissue. PMID:22623896

  20. SPECT and PET imaging of meningiomas.

    PubMed

    Valotassiou, Varvara; Leondi, Anastasia; Angelidis, George; Psimadas, Dimitrios; Georgoulias, Panagiotis

    2012-01-01

    Meningiomas arise from the meningothelial cells of the arachnoid membranes. They are the most common primary intracranial neoplasms and represent about 20% of all intracranial tumors. They are usually diagnosed after the third decade of life and they are more frequent in women than in men. According to the World Health Organization (WHO) criteria, meningiomas can be classified into grade I meningiomas, which are benign, grade II (atypical) and grade III (anaplastic) meningiomas, which have a much more aggressive clinical behaviour. Computed Tomography (CT) and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) are routinely used in the diagnostic workup of patients with meningiomas. Molecular Nuclear Medicine Imaging with Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) and Positron Emission Tomography (PET) could provide complementary information to CT and MRI. Various SPECT and PET tracers may provide information about cellular processes and biological characteristics of meningiomas. Therefore, SPECT and PET imaging could be used for the preoperative noninvasive diagnosis and differential diagnosis of meningiomas, prediction of tumor grade and tumor recurrence, response to treatment, target volume delineation for radiation therapy planning, and distinction between residual or recurrent tumour from scar tissue.

  1. LIDAR image recovery by incorporating heterogeneous imaging modalities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cloninger, Alexander; Czaja, Wojciech

    2014-05-01

    As new imaging modalities arise, the problem of inpainting becomes increasing important. Typical techniques for inpainting are completely determined by the penalization term used in the optimization scheme. These methods range from minimizing over total variation to finding a sparsest solution in a given basis to minimizing the Ginzburg-Landau energy. In this paper, we propose a novel approach to inpainting of remote sensing images, which uses previous measurements taken from heterogeneous image soures in conjunction with these well studied penalization methods. These previous measurements could be images with different illumination or weather conditions, images with spatio-temporal changes, or even all together different imaging modalities. Our approach utilizes manifold learning techniques such as diffusion maps or Laplacian eigenmaps that are applied to each image. This is followed by learning a rotation between the two feature spaces in an effort to place data points from both images in a common feature space. Then, we apply a novel preimage algorithm to the fused data in conjunction with an inpainting penalization method to recreate the missing pixels.

  2. Comparative effectiveness of imaging modalities to determine metastatic breast cancer treatment response.

    PubMed

    Lee, Christoph I; Gold, Laura S; Nelson, Heidi D; Chou, Roger; Ramsey, Scott D; Sullivan, Sean D

    2015-02-01

    We performed a systematic review to address the comparative effectiveness of different imaging modalities in evaluating treatment response among metastatic breast cancer patients. We searched seven multidisciplinary electronic databases for relevant publications (January 2003-December 2013) and performed dual abstraction of details and results for all clinical studies that involved stage IV breast cancer patients and evaluated imaging for detecting treatment response. Among 159 citations reviewed, 17 single-institution, non-randomized, observational studies met our inclusion criteria. Several studies demonstrate that changes in PET/CT standard uptake values are associated with changes in tumor volume as determined by bone scan, MRI, and/or CT. However, no studies evaluated comparative test performance between modalities or determined relationships between imaging findings and subsequent clinical decisions. Evidence for imaging's effectiveness in determining treatment response among metastatic breast cancer patients is limited. More rigorous research is needed to address imaging's value in this patient population.

  3. Graph cut based co-segmentation of lung tumor in PET-CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ju, Wei; Xiang, Dehui; Zhang, Bin; Chen, Xinjian

    2015-03-01

    Accurate segmentation of pulmonary tumor is important for clinicians to make appropriate diagnosis and treatment. Positron Emission Tomography (PET) and Computed Tomography (CT) are two commonly used imaging technologies for image-guided radiation therapy. In this study, we present a graph-based method to integrate the two modalities to segment the tumor simultaneously on PET and CT images. The co-segmentation problem is formulated as an energy minimization problem. Two weighted sub-graphs are constructed for PET and CT. The characteristic information of the two modalities is encoded on the edges of the graph. A context cost is enforced by adding context arcs to achieve consistent results between the two modalities. An optimal solution can be achieved by solving a maximum flow problem. The proposed segmentation method was validated on 18 sets of PET-CT images from different patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The quantitative results show significant improvement of our method with a mean DSC value 0.82.

  4. Positron emitting magnetic nanoconstructs for PET/MR imaging.

    PubMed

    Aryal, Santosh; Key, Jaehong; Stigliano, Cinzia; Landis, Melissa D; Lee, Daniel Y; Decuzzi, Paolo

    2014-07-09

    Hybrid PET/MRI scanners have the potential to provide fundamental molecular, cellular, and anatomic information essential for optimizing therapeutic and surgical interventions. However, their full utilization is currently limited by the lack of truly multi-modal contrast agents capable of exploiting the strengths of each modality. Here, we report on the development of long-circulating positron-emitting magnetic nanoconstructs (PEM) designed to image solid tumors for combined PET/MRI. PEMs are synthesized by a modified nano-precipitation method mixing poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA), lipids, and polyethylene glycol (PEG) chains with 5 nm iron oxide nanoparticles (USPIOs). PEM lipids are coupled with 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA) and subsequently chelated to (64)Cu. PEMs show a diameter of 140 ± 7 nm and a transversal relaxivity r2 of 265.0 ± 10.0 (mM × s)(-1), with a r2/r1 ratio of 123. Using a murine xenograft model bearing human breast cancer cell line (MDA-MB-231), intravenously administered PEMs progressively accumulate in tumors reaching a maximum of 3.5 ± 0.25% ID/g tumor at 20 h post-injection. Correlation of PET and MRI signals revealed non-uniform intratumoral distribution of PEMs with focal areas of accumulation at the tumor periphery. These long-circulating PEMs with high transversal relaxivity and tumor accumulation may allow for detailed interrogation over multiple scales in a clinically relevant setting.

  5. The Role of 18F-FDG PET/CT Integrated Imaging in Distinguishing Malignant from Benign Pleural Effusion

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yajuan; Yu, Hongjuan; Ma, Jingquan

    2016-01-01

    18F-FDG PET/CT integrated imaging compared with 18F-FDG PET imaging (Kappa = 0.881 and Kappa = 0.240, respectively). Conclusion 18F-FDG PET/CT integrated imaging is a more reliable modality in distinguishing malignant from benign pleural effusion than 18F-FDG PET imaging and CT imaging alone. For image interpretation of 18F-FDG PET/CT integrated imaging, the PET and CT portions play a major diagnostic role in identifying metastatic effusion and benign effusion, respectively. PMID:27560933

  6. Impact of medical therapy on atheroma volume measured by different cardiovascular imaging modalities.

    PubMed

    Sinno, Mohamad C N; Al-Mallah, Mouaz

    2010-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a systemic disease that affects most vascular beds. The gold standard of atherosclerosis imaging has been invasive intravascular ultrasound (IVUS). Newer noninvasive imaging modalities like B-mode ultrasound, cardiac computed tomography (CT), positron emission tomography (PET), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have been used to assess these vascular territories with high accuracy and reproducibility. These imaging modalities have lately been used for the assessment of the atherosclerotic plaque and the response of its volume to several medical therapies used in the treatment of patients with cardiovascular disease. To study the impact of these medications on atheroma volume progression or regression, imaging modalities have been used on a serial basis providing a unique opportunity to monitor the effect these antiatherosclerotic strategies exert on plaque burden. As a result, studies incorporating serial IVUS imaging, quantitative coronary angiography (QCA), B-mode ultrasound, electron beam computed tomography (EBCT), and dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging have all been used to evaluate the impact of therapeutic strategies that modify cholesterol and blood pressure on the progression/regression of atherosclerotic plaque. In this review, we intend to summarize the impact of different therapies aimed at halting the progression or even result in regression of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease evaluated by different imaging modalities.

  7. 18F-fluorothymidine-pet imaging of glioblastoma multiforme: effects of radiation therapy on radiotracer uptake and molecular biomarker patterns.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekaran, Sanjay; Hollander, Andrew; Xu, Xiangsheng; Benci, Joseph L; Davis, James J; Dorsey, Jay F; Kao, Gary

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. PET imaging is a useful clinical tool for studying tumor progression and treatment effects. Conventional (18)F-FDG-PET imaging is of limited usefulness for imaging Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM) due to high levels of glucose uptake by normal brain and the resultant signal-to-noise intensity. (18)F-Fluorothymidine (FLT) in contrast has shown promise for imaging GBM, as thymidine is taken up preferentially by proliferating cells. These studies were undertaken to investigate the effectiveness of (18)F-FLT-PET in a GBM mouse model, especially after radiation therapy (RT), and its correlation with useful biomarkers, including proliferation and DNA damage. Methods. Nude/athymic mice with human GBM orthografts were assessed by microPET imaging with (18)F-FDG and (18)F-FLT. Patterns of tumor PET imaging were then compared to immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence for markers of proliferation (Ki-67), DNA damage and repair (γH2AX), hypoxia (HIF-1α), and angiogenesis (VEGF). Results. We confirmed that (18)F-FLT-PET uptake is limited in healthy mice but enhanced in the intracranial tumors. Our data further demonstrate that (18)F-FLT-PET imaging usefully reflects the inhibition of tumor by RT and correlates with changes in biomarker expression. Conclusions. (18)F-FLT-PET imaging is a promising tumor imaging modality for GBM, including assessing RT effects and biologically relevant biomarkers.

  8. Current and future imaging modalities for multiple myeloma and its precursor states

    PubMed Central

    TAN, ESTHER; WEISS, BRENDAN M.; MENA, ESTHER; KORDE, NEHA; CHOYKE, PETER L.; LANDGREN, OLA

    2012-01-01

    Traditionally, the skeletal survey has been the standard modality for the detection of osteolytic bone disease in multiple myeloma. In addition to its poor sensitivity for the detection of osteolytic lesions, this modality is not able to identify extramedullary lesions and focal bone marrow involvement, nor measure response to therapy. The application of novel imaging techniques such as computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and molecular imaging such as fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography CT (18F-FDG PET/CT) and fluorine-18 sodium fluoride positron emission tomography CT (18F-NaF PET/CT) has the potential to overcome these limitations as well as provide prognostic information in precursor states and multiple myeloma. Also promising is the use of dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE MRI) to measure vascular permeability, an important feature of myelomagenesis. This review summarizes the current status and possible future role of novel imaging modalities in multiple myeloma and its precursor states. PMID:21649546

  9. Impact of motion and partial volume effects correction on PET myocardial perfusion imaging using simultaneous PET-MR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petibon, Yoann; Guehl, Nicolas J.; Reese, Timothy G.; Ebrahimi, Behzad; Normandin, Marc D.; Shoup, Timothy M.; Alpert, Nathaniel M.; El Fakhri, Georges; Ouyang, Jinsong

    2017-01-01

    PET is an established modality for myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) which enables quantification of absolute myocardial blood flow (MBF) using dynamic imaging and kinetic modeling. However, heart motion and partial volume effects (PVE) significantly limit the spatial resolution and quantitative accuracy of PET MPI. Simultaneous PET-MR offers a solution to the motion problem in PET by enabling MR-based motion correction of PET data. The aim of this study was to develop a motion and PVE correction methodology for PET MPI using simultaneous PET-MR, and to assess its impact on both static and dynamic PET MPI using 18F-Flurpiridaz, a novel 18F-labeled perfusion tracer. Two dynamic 18F-Flurpiridaz MPI scans were performed on healthy pigs using a PET-MR scanner. Cardiac motion was tracked using a dedicated tagged-MRI (tMR) sequence. Motion fields were estimated using non-rigid registration of tMR images and used to calculate motion-dependent attenuation maps. Motion correction of PET data was achieved by incorporating tMR-based motion fields and motion-dependent attenuation coefficients into image reconstruction. Dynamic and static PET datasets were created for each scan. Each dataset was reconstructed as (i) Ungated, (ii) Gated (end-diastolic phase), and (iii) Motion-Corrected (MoCo), each without and with point spread function (PSF) modeling for PVE correction. Myocardium-to-blood concentration ratios (MBR) and apparent wall thickness were calculated to assess image quality for static MPI. For dynamic MPI, segment- and voxel-wise MBF values were estimated by non-linear fitting of a 2-tissue compartment model to tissue time-activity-curves. MoCo and Gating respectively decreased mean apparent wall thickness by 15.1% and 14.4% and increased MBR by 20.3% and 13.6% compared to Ungated images (P  <  0.01). Combined motion and PSF correction (MoCo-PSF) yielded 30.9% (15.7%) lower wall thickness and 82.2% (20.5%) higher MBR compared to Ungated data reconstructed

  10. Impact of motion and partial volume effects correction on PET myocardial perfusion imaging using simultaneous PET-MR

    PubMed Central

    Petibon, Yoann; Guehl, Nicolas J.; Reese, Timothy G.; Ebrahimi, Behzad; Normandin, Marc D.; Shoup, Timothy M.; Alpert, Nathaniel M.; El Fakhri, Georges; Ouyang, Jinsong

    2017-01-01

    PET is an established modality for myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) which enables quantification of absolute myocardial blood flow (MBF) using dynamic imaging and kinetic modeling. However, heart motion and Partial Volume Effects (PVE) significantly limit the spatial resolution and quantitative accuracy of PET MPI. Simultaneous PET-MR offers a solution to the motion problem in PET by enabling MR-based motion correction of PET data. The aim of this study was to develop a motion and PVE correction methodology for PET MPI using simultaneous PET-MR, and to assess its impact on both static and dynamic PET MPI using 18F-Flurpiridaz, a novel 18F-labeled perfusion tracer. Two dynamic 18F-Flurpiridaz MPI scans were performed on healthy pigs using a PET-MR scanner. Cardiac motion was tracked using a dedicated tagged-MRI (tMR) sequence. Motion fields were estimated using non-rigid registration of tMR images and used to calculate motion-dependent attenuation maps. Motion correction of PET data was achieved by incorporating tMR-based motion fields and motion-dependent attenuation coefficients into image reconstruction. Dynamic and static PET datasets were created for each scan. Each dataset was reconstructed as (i) Ungated, (ii) Gated (end-diastolic phase), and (iii) Motion-Corrected (MoCo), each without and with point spread function (PSF) modeling for PVE correction. Myocardium-to-blood concentration ratios (MBR) and apparent wall thickness were calculated to assess image quality for static MPI. For dynamic MPI, segment- and voxel-wise myocardial blood flow (MBF) values were estimated by non-linear fitting of a 2-tissue compartment model to tissue time-activity-curves. MoCo and Gating respectively decreased mean apparent wall thickness by 15.1% and 14.4% and increased MBR by 20.3% and 13.6% compared to Ungated images (P<0.01). Combined motion and PSF correction (MoCo-PSF) yielded 30.9% (15.7%) lower wall thickness and 82.2% (20.5%) higher MBR compared to Ungated data

  11. A CT-, PET- and MR-imaging-compatible hyperbaric pressure chamber for baromedical research.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Kasper; Hansen, Esben Ss; Tolbod, Lars P; Kristensen, Martin C; Ringgaard, Steffen; Brubakk, Alf O; Pedersen, Michael

    2015-12-01

    We describe the development of a novel preclinical rodent-sized pressure chamber system compatible with computed tomography (CT), positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) that allows continuous uncompromised and minimally invasive data acquisition throughout hyperbaric exposures. The effect of various pressures on the acquired image intensity obtained with different CT, PET and MRI phantoms are characterised. Tissue-representative phantom models were examined with CT, PET or MRI at normobaric pressure and hyperbaric pressures up to 1.013 mPa. The relationships between the acquired image signals and pressure were evaluated by linear regression analysis for each phantom. CT and PET showed no effect of pressure per se, except for CT of air, demonstrating an increase in Hounsfield units in proportion to the pressure. For MRI, pressurisation induced no effect on the longitudinal relaxation rate (R₁), whereas the transversal relaxation rate (R₂) changed slightly. The R₂ data further revealed an association between pressure and the concentration of the paramagnetic nuclei gadolinium, the contrast agent used to mimic different tissues in the MRI phantoms. This study demonstrates a pressure chamber system compatible with CT, PET and MRI. We found that no correction in image intensity was required with pressurisation up to 1.013 mPa for any imaging modality. CT, PET or MRI can be used to obtain anatomical and physiological information from pressurised model animals in this chamber.

  12. Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging with 18F-based radiotracers

    PubMed Central

    Alauddin, Mian M

    2012-01-01

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is a nuclear medicine imaging technique that is widely used in early detection and treatment follow up of many diseases, including cancer. This modality requires positron-emitting isotope labeled biomolecules, which are synthesized prior to perform imaging studies. Fluorine-18 is one of the several isotopes of fluorine that is routinely used in radiolabeling of biomolecules for PET; because of its positron emitting property and favorable half-life of 109.8 min. The biologically active molecule most commonly used for PET is 2-deoxy-2-18F-fluoro-β-D-glucose (18F-FDG), an analogue of glucose, for early detection of tumors. The concentrations of tracer accumulation (PET image) demonstrate the metabolic activity of tissues in terms of regional glucose metabolism and accumulation. Other tracers are also used in PET to image the tissue concentration. In this review, information on fluorination and radiofluorination reactions, radiofluorinating agents, and radiolabeling of various compounds and their application in PET imaging is presented. PMID:23133802

  13. Molecular Imaging in Atherosclerosis: FDG PET

    PubMed Central

    Millon, Antoine

    2013-01-01

    18F-FDG PET is a new noninvasive tool for inflammation functional imaging. Low spatial resolution is now compensated by coregistration with CT or MRI. New mechanistic insights have emerged from animal and histology to explain the obtained signals by hypoxia, macrophage infiltration, and differentiation. Mixed results have been found in biomarkers studies. Interesting data have come recently linking plaque anatomy and function in carotids and in aortic aneurysms as well as inflammation and events. In coronary arteries, plaque assessment is still hampered by myocardium uptake but developments are being made. 18-FDG PET has been able to monitor inflammation before and after several therapies in animals and humans but to date the lack of standardization and the absence of prospective event-driven studies prevent this promising technique to be used in clinical practice. PMID:22872371

  14. Development of a Hybrid Nanoprobe for Triple-Modality MR/SPECT/Optical Fluorescence Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Madru, Renata; Svenmarker, Pontus; Ingvar, Christian; Ståhlberg, Freddy; Engels, Stefan-Andersson; Knutsson, Linda; Strand, Sven-Erik

    2014-01-01

    Hybrid clinical imaging is an emerging technology, which improves disease diagnosis by combining already existing technologies. With the combination of high-resolution morphological imaging, i.e., MRI/CT, and high-sensitive molecular detection offered by SPECT/PET/Optical, physicians can detect disease progression at an early stage and design patient-specific treatments. To fully exploit the possibilities of hybrid imaging a hybrid probe compatible with each imaging technology is required. Here, we present a hybrid nanoprobe for triple modality MR/SPECT/Fluorescence imaging. Our imaging agent is comprised of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs), labeled with 99mTc and an Alexa fluorophore (AF), together forming 99mTc-AF-SPIONs. The agent was stable in human serum, and, after subcutaneous injection in the hind paw of Wistar rats, showed to be highly specific by accumulating in the sentinel lymph node. All three modalities clearly visualized the imaging agent. Our results show that a single imaging agent can be used for hybrid imaging. The use of a single hybrid contrast agent permits simultaneous hybrid imaging and, more conventionally, allow for single modality imaging at different time points. For example, a hybrid contrast agent enables pre-operative planning, intra-operative guidance, and post-operative evaluation with the same contrast agent. PMID:26852675

  15. The application of PET imaging in psychoneuroimmunology research.

    PubMed

    Hannestad, Jonas

    2012-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging is a research tool that allows in vivo measurements of brain metabolism and specific target molecules. PET imaging can be used to measure these brain variables in a variety of species, including human and non-human primates, and rodents. PET imaging can therefore be combined with various experimental and clinical model systems that are commonly used in psychoneuroimmunology research.

  16. Intraoperative Imaging-Guided Cancer Surgery: From Current Fluorescence Molecular Imaging Methods to Future Multi-Modality Imaging Technology

    PubMed Central

    Chi, Chongwei; Du, Yang; Ye, Jinzuo; Kou, Deqiang; Qiu, Jingdan; Wang, Jiandong; Tian, Jie; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2014-01-01

    Cancer is a major threat to human health. Diagnosis and treatment using precision medicine is expected to be an effective method for preventing the initiation and progression of cancer. Although anatomical and functional imaging techniques such as radiography, computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography (PET) have played an important role for accurate preoperative diagnostics, for the most part these techniques cannot be applied intraoperatively. Optical molecular imaging is a promising technique that provides a high degree of sensitivity and specificity in tumor margin detection. Furthermore, existing clinical applications have proven that optical molecular imaging is a powerful intraoperative tool for guiding surgeons performing precision procedures, thus enabling radical resection and improved survival rates. However, detection depth limitation exists in optical molecular imaging methods and further breakthroughs from optical to multi-modality intraoperative imaging methods are needed to develop more extensive and comprehensive intraoperative applications. Here, we review the current intraoperative optical molecular imaging technologies, focusing on contrast agents and surgical navigation systems, and then discuss the future prospects of multi-modality imaging technology for intraoperative imaging-guided cancer surgery. PMID:25250092

  17. Multi-modal image registration using structural features.

    PubMed

    Kasiri, Keyvan; Clausi, David A; Fieguth, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Multi-modal image registration has been a challenging task in medical images because of the complex intensity relationship between images to be aligned. Registration methods often rely on the statistical intensity relationship between the images which suffers from problems such as statistical insufficiency. The proposed registration method works based on extracting structural features by utilizing the complex phase and gradient-based information. By employing structural relationships between different modalities instead of complex similarity measures, the multi-modal registration problem is converted into a mono-modal one. Therefore, conventional mono-modal similarity measures can be utilized to evaluate the registration results. This new registration paradigm has been tested on magnetic resonance (MR) brain images of different modes. The method has been evaluated based on target registration error (TRE) to determine alignment accuracy. Quantitative results demonstrate that the proposed method is capable of achieving comparable registration accuracy compared to the conventional mutual information.

  18. PET/SPECT molecular imaging in clinical neuroscience: recent advances in the investigation of CNS diseases

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Feng-Mei

    2015-01-01

    Molecular imaging is an attractive technology widely used in clinical practice that greatly enhances our understanding of the pathophysiology and treatment in central nervous system (CNS) diseases. It is a novel multidisciplinary technique that can be defined as real-time visualization, in vivo characterization and qualification of biological processes at the molecular and cellular level. It involves the imaging modalities and the corresponding imaging agents. Nowadays, molecular imaging in neuroscience has provided tremendous insights into disturbed human brain function. Among all of the molecular imaging modalities, positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) have occupied a particular position that visualize and measure the physiological processes using high-affinity and high-specificity molecular radioactive tracers as imaging probes in intact living brain. In this review, we will put emphasis on the PET/SPECT applications in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and Parkinson’s disease (PD) as major CNS disorders. We will first give an overview of the main classical molecular neuroimaging modalities. Then, the major clinical applications of PET and SPECT along with molecular probes in the fields of psychiatry and neurology will be discussed. PMID:26029646

  19. Multi-modality image registration using the decomposition model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibrahim, Mazlinda; Chen, Ke

    2017-04-01

    In medical image analysis, image registration is one of the crucial steps required to facilitate automatic segmentation, treatment planning and other application involving imaging machines. Image registration, also known as image matching, aims to align two or more images so that information obtained can be compared and combined. Different imaging modalities and their characteristics make the task more challenging. We propose a decomposition model combining parametric and non-parametric deformation for multi-modality image registration. Numerical results show that the normalised gradient field perform better than the mutual information with the decomposition model.

  20. Dedicated PET scanners for breast imaging.

    PubMed

    Freifelder, R; Karp, J S

    1997-12-01

    We have used computer simulations to compare two designs for a PET scanner dedicated to breast imaging with a whole-body PET scanner. The new designs combine high spatial resolution, high sensitivity, and good energy resolution to detect small, low-contrast masses. The detectors are position sensitive NaI(Tl) scintillators. The first design is a ring scanner surrounding the breast and the second consists of two planar detectors placed on opposite sides of the breast. We have employed standard performance measures to compare the different designs: contrast, percentage standard deviation of the background, and signal-to-noise ratios of reconstructed images. The results of the simulations show that both of the proposed designs have better lesion detectability than a whole-body scanner. The results also show that contrast is higher in the ring breast system but that the noise is lower in the planar breast system. Overall, the ring system yields images with the best signal-to-noise ratios, although the planar system offers practical advantages for imaging the breast and axilla.

  1. Dedicated PET scanners for breast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freifelder, Richard; Karp, Joel S.

    1997-12-01

    We have used computer simulations to compare two designs for a PET scanner dedicated to breast imaging with a whole-body PET scanner. The new designs combine high spatial resolution, high sensitivity, and good energy resolution to detect small, low-contrast masses. The detectors are position sensitive NaI(Tl) scintillators. The first design is a ring scanner surrounding the breast and the second consists of two planar detectors placed on opposite sides of the breast. We have employed standard performance measures to compare the different designs: contrast, percentage standard deviation of the background, and signal-to-noise ratios of reconstructed images. The results of the simulations show that both of the proposed designs have better lesion detectability than a whole-body scanner. The results also show that contrast is higher in the ring breast system but that the noise is lower in the planar breast system. Overall, the ring system yields images with the best signal-to-noise ratios, although the planar system offers practical advantages for imaging the breast and axilla.

  2. Molecular platform for design and synthesis of targeted dual-modality imaging probes.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Amit; Zhang, Shanrong; Hao, Guiyang; Hassan, Gedaa; Ramezani, Saleh; Sagiyama, Koji; Lo, Su-Tang; Takahashi, Masaya; Sherry, A Dean; Öz, Orhan K; Kovacs, Zoltan; Sun, Xiankai

    2015-03-18

    We report a versatile dendritic structure based platform for construction of targeted dual-modality imaging probes. The platform contains multiple copies of 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA) branching out from a 1,4,7-triazacyclononane-N,N',N″-triacetic acid (NOTA) core. The specific coordination chemistries of the NOTA and DOTA moieties offer specific loading of (68/67)Ga(3+) and Gd(3+), respectively, into a common molecular scaffold. The platform also contains three amino groups which can potentiate targeted dual-modality imaging of PET/MRI or SPECT/MRI (PET: positron emission tomography; SPECT: single photon emission computed tomography; MRI: magnetic resonance imaging) when further functionalized by targeting vectors of interest. To validate this design concept, a bimetallic complex was synthesized with six peripheral Gd-DOTA units and one Ga-NOTA core at the center, whose ion T1 relaxivity per gadolinium atom was measured to be 15.99 mM(-1) s(-1) at 20 MHz. Further, the bimetallic agent demonstrated its anticipated in vivo stability, tissue distribution, and pharmacokinetic profile when labeled with (67)Ga. When conjugated with a model targeting peptide sequence, the trivalent construct was able to visualize tumors in a mouse xenograft model by both PET and MRI via a single dose injection.

  3. Molecular Platform for Design and Synthesis of Targeted Dual-Modality Imaging Probes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We report a versatile dendritic structure based platform for construction of targeted dual-modality imaging probes. The platform contains multiple copies of 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA) branching out from a 1,4,7-triazacyclononane-N,N′,N″-triacetic acid (NOTA) core. The specific coordination chemistries of the NOTA and DOTA moieties offer specific loading of 68/67Ga3+ and Gd3+, respectively, into a common molecular scaffold. The platform also contains three amino groups which can potentiate targeted dual-modality imaging of PET/MRI or SPECT/MRI (PET: positron emission tomography; SPECT: single photon emission computed tomography; MRI: magnetic resonance imaging) when further functionalized by targeting vectors of interest. To validate this design concept, a bimetallic complex was synthesized with six peripheral Gd-DOTA units and one Ga-NOTA core at the center, whose ion T1 relaxivity per gadolinium atom was measured to be 15.99 mM–1 s–1 at 20 MHz. Further, the bimetallic agent demonstrated its anticipated in vivo stability, tissue distribution, and pharmacokinetic profile when labeled with 67Ga. When conjugated with a model targeting peptide sequence, the trivalent construct was able to visualize tumors in a mouse xenograft model by both PET and MRI via a single dose injection. PMID:25615011

  4. Multiscale Texture Analysis: From 18F-FDG PET Images to Histologic Images.

    PubMed

    Orlhac, Fanny; Thézé, Benoit; Soussan, Michaël; Boisgard, Raphaël; Buvat, Irène

    2016-11-01

    Characterizing tumor heterogeneity using texture indices derived from PET images has shown promise in predicting treatment response and patient survival in some types of cancer. Yet, the relationship between PET-derived texture indices, precise tracer distribution, and biologic heterogeneity needs to be clarified. We investigated this relationship using PET images, autoradiographic images, and histologic images.

  5. MR-guided PET motion correction in LOR space using generic projection data for image reconstruction with PRESTO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheins, J.; Ullisch, M.; Tellmann, L.; Weirich, C.; Rota Kops, E.; Herzog, H.; Shah, N. J.

    2013-02-01

    The BrainPET scanner from Siemens, designed as hybrid MR/PET system for simultaneous acquisition of both modalities, provides high-resolution PET images with an optimum resolution of 3 mm. However, significant head motion often compromises the achievable image quality, e.g. in neuroreceptor studies of human brain. This limitation can be omitted when tracking the head motion and accurately correcting measured Lines-of-Response (LORs). For this purpose, we present a novel method, which advantageously combines MR-guided motion tracking with the capabilities of the reconstruction software PRESTO (PET Reconstruction Software Toolkit) to convert motion-corrected LORs into highly accurate generic projection data. In this way, the high-resolution PET images achievable with PRESTO can also be obtained in presence of severe head motion.

  6. Automatic anatomy recognition in whole-body PET/CT images

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Huiqian; Udupa, Jayaram K. Odhner, Dewey; Tong, Yubing; Torigian, Drew A.; Zhao, Liming

    2016-01-15

    Purpose: Whole-body positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) has become a standard method of imaging patients with various disease conditions, especially cancer. Body-wide accurate quantification of disease burden in PET/CT images is important for characterizing lesions, staging disease, prognosticating patient outcome, planning treatment, and evaluating disease response to therapeutic interventions. However, body-wide anatomy recognition in PET/CT is a critical first step for accurately and automatically quantifying disease body-wide, body-region-wise, and organwise. This latter process, however, has remained a challenge due to the lower quality of the anatomic information portrayed in the CT component of this imaging modality and the paucity of anatomic details in the PET component. In this paper, the authors demonstrate the adaptation of a recently developed automatic anatomy recognition (AAR) methodology [Udupa et al., “Body-wide hierarchical fuzzy modeling, recognition, and delineation of anatomy in medical images,” Med. Image Anal. 18, 752–771 (2014)] to PET/CT images. Their goal was to test what level of object localization accuracy can be achieved on PET/CT compared to that achieved on diagnostic CT images. Methods: The authors advance the AAR approach in this work in three fronts: (i) from body-region-wise treatment in the work of Udupa et al. to whole body; (ii) from the use of image intensity in optimal object recognition in the work of Udupa et al. to intensity plus object-specific texture properties, and (iii) from the intramodality model-building-recognition strategy to the intermodality approach. The whole-body approach allows consideration of relationships among objects in different body regions, which was previously not possible. Consideration of object texture allows generalizing the previous optimal threshold-based fuzzy model recognition method from intensity images to any derived fuzzy membership image, and in the process

  7. PET image reconstruction with anatomical edge guided level set prior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng-Liao, Jinxiu; Qi, Jinyi

    2011-11-01

    Acquiring both anatomical and functional images during one scan, PET/CT systems improve the ability to detect and localize abnormal uptakes. In addition, CT images provide anatomical boundary information that can be used to regularize positron emission tomography (PET) images. Here we propose a new approach to maximum a posteriori reconstruction of PET images with a level set prior guided by anatomical edges. The image prior models both the smoothness of PET images and the similarity between functional boundaries in PET and anatomical boundaries in CT. Level set functions (LSFs) are used to represent smooth and closed functional boundaries. The proposed method does not assume an exact match between PET and CT boundaries. Instead, it encourages similarity between the two boundaries, while allowing different region definition in PET images to accommodate possible signal and position mismatch between functional and anatomical images. While the functional boundaries are guaranteed to be closed by the LSFs, the proposed method does not require closed anatomical boundaries and can utilize incomplete edges obtained from an automatic edge detection algorithm. We conducted computer simulations to evaluate the performance of the proposed method. Two digital phantoms were constructed based on the Digimouse data and a human CT image, respectively. Anatomical edges were extracted automatically from the CT images. Tumors were simulated in the PET phantoms with different mismatched anatomical boundaries. Compared with existing methods, the new method achieved better bias-variance performance. The proposed method was also applied to real mouse data and achieved higher contrast than other methods.

  8. SiPM-PET with a short optical fiber bundle for simultaneous PET-MR imaging.

    PubMed

    Hong, Seong Jong; Kang, Han Gyoo; Ko, Guen Bae; Song, In Chan; Rhee, June-Tak; Lee, Jae Sung

    2012-06-21

    For positron emission tomography (PET) inserts to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) applications, optical fibers have been used for some time to transfer scintillation photons to photomultiplier tubes positioned outside the fringe magnetic field. We previously proposed a novel utilization of an optical fiber for good radio frequency (RF) transmission from body coils to an imaging object. Optical fiber bundles between silicon photomultipliers (SiPM) and scintillation crystals provide an increased spacing between RF-shielded electronics boxes, facilitating RF passage from the body RF coils to imaging objects. In this paper, we present test results of a SiPM-PET system with a short optical fiber bundle for simultaneous PET-MR imaging. We built the SiPM-PET system which consisted of 12 SiPM-PET modules; each module was assembled with a lutetium yttrium oxyorthosilicatecrystal block, a 31 mm optical fiber bundle, a Hamamatsu multi-pixel photon counter S11064-050P and a signal processing box shielded with copper. The SiPM-PET system, with a face-to-face distance of 71 mm, was placed inside a 3 T MRI. A small surface coil placed inside the SiPM-PET system was used to receive the signal from phantoms while the body RF coil transmitted the RF pulses. The SiPM-PET system showed little performance degradation during the simultaneous PET-MR imaging and it caused no significant degradation of MR images with turbo spin echo (TSE), gradient echo or 3D spoiled gradient recalled sequences. Echo planar imaging MR images with and without the SiPM-PET inside the MR scanner were significantly worse than the images obtained with the TSE sequence.

  9. A graph-based approach for the retrieval of multi-modality medical images.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ashnil; Kim, Jinman; Wen, Lingfeng; Fulham, Michael; Feng, Dagan

    2014-02-01

    In this paper, we address the retrieval of multi-modality medical volumes, which consist of two different imaging modalities, acquired sequentially, from the same scanner. One such example, positron emission tomography and computed tomography (PET-CT), provides physicians with complementary functional and anatomical features as well as spatial relationships and has led to improved cancer diagnosis, localisation, and staging. The challenge of multi-modality volume retrieval for cancer patients lies in representing the complementary geometric and topologic attributes between tumours and organs. These attributes and relationships, which are used for tumour staging and classification, can be formulated as a graph. It has been demonstrated that graph-based methods have high accuracy for retrieval by spatial similarity. However, naïvely representing all relationships on a complete graph obscures the structure of the tumour-anatomy relationships. We propose a new graph structure derived from complete graphs that structurally constrains the edges connected to tumour vertices based upon the spatial proximity of tumours and organs. This enables retrieval on the basis of tumour localisation. We also present a similarity matching algorithm that accounts for different feature sets for graph elements from different imaging modalities. Our method emphasises the relationships between a tumour and related organs, while still modelling patient-specific anatomical variations. Constraining tumours to related anatomical structures improves the discrimination potential of graphs, making it easier to retrieve similar images based on tumour location. We evaluated our retrieval methodology on a dataset of clinical PET-CT volumes. Our results showed that our method enabled the retrieval of multi-modality images using spatial features. Our graph-based retrieval algorithm achieved a higher precision than several other retrieval techniques: gray-level histograms as well as state

  10. Advanced Tracers in PET Imaging of Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei; Wu, Hua; Liu, Gang

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death worldwide. Molecular imaging with targeted tracers by positron emission tomography (PET) allows for the noninvasive detection and characterization of biological changes at the molecular level, leading to earlier disease detection, objective monitoring of therapies, and better prognostication of cardiovascular diseases progression. Here we review, the current role of PET in cardiovascular disease, with emphasize on tracers developed for PET imaging of cardiovascular diseases. PMID:25389529

  11. Automated image registration for FDOPA PET studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Kang-Ping; Huang, Sung-Cheng; Yu, Dan-Chu; Melega, William; Barrio, Jorge R.; Phelps, Michael E.

    1996-12-01

    In this study, various image registration methods are investigated for their suitability for registration of L-6-[18F]-fluoro-DOPA (FDOPA) PET images. Five different optimization criteria including sum of absolute difference (SAD), mean square difference (MSD), cross-correlation coefficient (CC), standard deviation of pixel ratio (SDPR), and stochastic sign change (SSC) were implemented and Powell's algorithm was used to optimize the criteria. The optimization criteria were calculated either unidirectionally (i.e. only evaluating the criteria for comparing the resliced image 1 with the original image 2) or bidirectionally (i.e. averaging the criteria for comparing the resliced image 1 with the original image 2 and those for the sliced image 2 with the original image 1). Monkey FDOPA images taken at various known orientations were used to evaluate the accuracy of different methods. A set of human FDOPA dynamic images was used to investigate the ability of the methods for correcting subject movement. It was found that a large improvement in performance resulted when bidirectional rather than unidirectional criteria were used. Overall, the SAD, MSD and SDPR methods were found to be comparable in performance and were suitable for registering FDOPA images. The MSD method gave more adequate results for frame-to-frame image registration for correcting subject movement during a dynamic FDOPA study. The utility of the registration method is further demonstrated by registering FDOPA images in monkeys before and after amphetamine injection to reveal more clearly the changes in spatial distribution of FDOPA due to the drug intervention.

  12. PET imaging of adoptive progenitor cell therapies.

    SciTech Connect

    Gelovani, Juri G.

    2008-05-13

    Objectives. The overall objective of this application is to develop novel technologies for non-invasive imaging of adoptive stem cell-based therapies with positron emission tomography (PET) that would be applicable to human patients. To achieve this objective, stem cells will be genetically labeled with a PET-reporter gene and repetitively imaged to assess their distribution, migration, differentiation, and persistence using a radiolabeled reporter probe. This new imaging technology will be tested in adoptive progenitor cell-based therapy models in animals, including: delivery pro-apoptotic genes to tumors, and T-cell reconstitution for immunostimulatory therapy during allogeneic bone marrow progenitor cell transplantation. Technical and Scientific Merits. Non-invasive whole body imaging would significantly aid in the development and clinical implementation of various adoptive progenitor cell-based therapies by providing the means for non-invasive monitoring of the fate of injected progenitor cells over a long period of observation. The proposed imaging approaches could help to address several questions related to stem cell migration and homing, their long-term viability, and their subsequent differentiation. The ability to image these processes non-invasively in 3D and repetitively over a long period of time is very important and will help the development and clinical application of various strategies to control and direct stem cell migration and differentiation. Approach to accomplish the work. Stem cells will be genetically with a reporter gene which will allow for repetitive non-invasive “tracking” of the migration and localization of genetically labeled stem cells and their progeny. This is a radically new approach that is being developed for future human applications and should allow for a long term (many years) repetitive imaging of the fate of tissues that develop from the transplanted stem cells. Why the approach is appropriate. The novel approach to

  13. (68)Ga-PSMA PET/CT: Joint EANM and SNMMI procedure guideline for prostate cancer imaging: version 1.0.

    PubMed

    Fendler, Wolfgang P; Eiber, Matthias; Beheshti, Mohsen; Bomanji, Jamshed; Ceci, Francesco; Cho, Steven; Giesel, Frederik; Haberkorn, Uwe; Hope, Thomas A; Kopka, Klaus; Krause, Bernd J; Mottaghy, Felix M; Schöder, Heiko; Sunderland, John; Wan, Simon; Wester, Hans-Jürgen; Fanti, Stefano; Herrmann, Ken

    2017-03-10

    The aim of this guideline is to provide standards for the recommendation, performance, interpretation and reporting of (68)Ga-PSMA PET/CT for prostate cancer imaging. These recommendations will help to improve accuracy, precision, and repeatability of (68)Ga-PSMA PET/CT for prostate cancer essentially needed for implementation of this modality in science and routine clinical practice.

  14. Review: comparison of PET rubidium-82 with conventional SPECT myocardial perfusion imaging

    PubMed Central

    Ghotbi, Adam A; Kjær, Andreas; Hasbak, Philip

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear cardiology has for many years been focused on gamma camera technology. With ever improving cameras and software applications, this modality has developed into an important assessment tool for ischaemic heart disease. However, the development of new perfusion tracers has been scarce. While cardiac positron emission tomography (PET) so far largely has been limited to centres with on-site cyclotron, recent developments with generator produced perfusion tracers such as rubidium-82, as well as an increasing number of PET scanners installed, may enable a larger patient flow that may supersede that of gamma camera myocardial perfusion imaging. PMID:24028171

  15. Random Walk and Graph Cut for Co-Segmentation of Lung Tumor on PET-CT Images.

    PubMed

    Ju, Wei; Xiang, Dehui; Xiang, Deihui; Zhang, Bin; Wang, Lirong; Kopriva, Ivica; Chen, Xinjian

    2015-12-01

    Accurate lung tumor delineation plays an important role in radiotherapy treatment planning. Since the lung tumor has poor boundary in positron emission tomography (PET) images and low contrast in computed tomography (CT) images, segmentation of tumor in the PET and CT images is a challenging task. In this paper, we effectively integrate the two modalities by making fully use of the superior contrast of PET images and superior spatial resolution of CT images. Random walk and graph cut method is integrated to solve the segmentation problem, in which random walk is utilized as an initialization tool to provide object seeds for graph cut segmentation on the PET and CT images. The co-segmentation problem is formulated as an energy minimization problem which is solved by max-flow/min-cut method. A graph, including two sub-graphs and a special link, is constructed, in which one sub-graph is for the PET and another is for CT, and the special link encodes a context term which penalizes the difference of the tumor segmentation on the two modalities. To fully utilize the characteristics of PET and CT images, a novel energy representation is devised. For the PET, a downhill cost and a 3D derivative cost are proposed. For the CT, a shape penalty cost is integrated into the energy function which helps to constrain the tumor region during the segmentation. We validate our algorithm on a data set which consists of 18 PET-CT images. The experimental results indicate that the proposed method is superior to the graph cut method solely using the PET or CT is more accurate compared with the random walk method, random walk co-segmentation method, and non-improved graph cut method.

  16. SU-E-J-222: Evaluation of Deformable Registration of PET/CT Images for Cervical Cancer Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Liao, Y; Turian, J; Templeton, A; Kiel, K; Chu, J; Kadir, T

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: PET/CT provides important functional information for radiotherapy targeting of cervical cancer. However, repeated PET/CT procedures for external beam and subsequent brachytherapy expose patients to additional radiation and are not cost effective. Our goal is to investigate the possibility of propagating PET-active volumes for brachytherapy procedures through deformable image registration (DIR) of earlier PET/CT and ultimately to minimize the number of PET/CT image sessions required. Methods: Nine cervical cancer patients each received their brachytherapy preplanning PET/CT at the end of EBRT with a Syed template in place. The planning PET/CT was acquired on the day of brachytherapy treatment with the actual applicator (Syed or Tandem and Ring) and rigidly registered. The PET/CT images were then deformably registered creating a third (deformed) image set for target prediction. Regions of interest with standardized uptake values (SUV) greater than 65% of maximum SUV were contoured as target volumes in all three sets of PET images. The predictive value of the registered images was evaluated by comparing the preplanning and deformed PET volumes with the planning PET volume using Dice's coefficient (DC) and center-of-mass (COM) displacement. Results: The average DCs were 0.12±0.14 and 0.19±0.16 for rigid and deformable predicted target volumes, respectively. The average COM displacements were 1.9±0.9 cm and 1.7±0.7 cm for rigid and deformable registration, respectively. The DCs were improved by deformable registration, however, both were lower than published data for DIR in other modalities and clinical sites. Anatomical changes caused by different brachytherapy applicators could have posed a challenge to the DIR algorithm. The physiological change from interstitial needle placement may also contribute to lower DC. Conclusion: The clinical use of DIR in PET/CT for cervical cancer brachytherapy appears to be limited by applicator choice and requires further

  17. Tumor Lysing Genetically Engineered T Cells Loaded with Multi-Modal Imaging Agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatnagar, Parijat; Alauddin, Mian; Bankson, James A.; Kirui, Dickson; Seifi, Payam; Huls, Helen; Lee, Dean A.; Babakhani, Aydin; Ferrari, Mauro; Li, King C.; Cooper, Laurence J. N.

    2014-03-01

    Genetically-modified T cells expressing chimeric antigen receptors (CAR) exert anti-tumor effect by identifying tumor-associated antigen (TAA), independent of major histocompatibility complex. For maximal efficacy and safety of adoptively transferred cells, imaging their biodistribution is critical. This will determine if cells home to the tumor and assist in moderating cell dose. Here, T cells are modified to express CAR. An efficient, non-toxic process with potential for cGMP compliance is developed for loading high cell number with multi-modal (PET-MRI) contrast agents (Super Paramagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles - Copper-64; SPION-64Cu). This can now be potentially used for 64Cu-based whole-body PET to detect T cell accumulation region with high-sensitivity, followed by SPION-based MRI of these regions for high-resolution anatomically correlated images of T cells. CD19-specific-CAR+SPIONpos T cells effectively target in vitro CD19+ lymphoma.

  18. Imaging corn plants with PhytoPET, a modular PET system for plant biology

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.; Kross, B.; McKisson, J.; McKisson, J. E.; Weisenberger, A. G.; Xi, W.; Zorn, C.; Bonito, G.; Howell, C. R.; Reid, C. D.; Crowell, A.; Cumberbatch, L. C.; Topp, C.; Smith, M. F.

    2013-11-01

    PhytoPET is a modular positron emission tomography (PET) system designed specifically for plant imaging. The PhytoPET design allows flexible arrangements of PET detectors based on individual standalone detector modules built from single Hamamatsu H8500 position sensitive photomultiplier tubes and pixelated LYSO arrays. We have used the PhytoPET system to perform preliminary corn plant imaging studies at the Duke University Biology Department Phytotron. Initial evaluation of the PhytoPET system to image the biodistribution of the positron emitting tracer {sup 11}C in corn plants is presented. {sup 11}CO{sub 2} is loaded into corn seedlings by a leaf-labeling cuvette and translocation of {sup 11}C-sugars is imaged by a flexible arrangement of PhytoPET modules on each side. The PhytoPET system successfully images {sup 11}C within corn plants and allows for the dynamic measurement of {sup 11}C-sugar translocation from the leaf to the roots.

  19. A method for accurate spatial registration of PET images and histopathology slices.

    PubMed

    Puri, Tanuj; Chalkidou, Anastasia; Henley-Smith, Rhonda; Roy, Arunabha; Barber, Paul R; Guerrero-Urbano, Teresa; Oakley, Richard; Simo, Ricard; Jeannon, Jean-Pierre; McGurk, Mark; Odell, Edward W; O'Doherty, Michael J; Marsden, Paul K

    2015-12-01

    Accurate alignment between histopathology slices and positron emission tomography (PET) images is important for radiopharmaceutical validation studies. Limited data is available on the registration accuracy that can be achieved between PET and histopathology slices acquired under routine pathology conditions where slices may be non-parallel, non-contiguously cut and of standard block size. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate a method for aligning PET images and histopathology slices acquired from patients with laryngeal cancer and to assess the registration accuracy obtained under these conditions. Six subjects with laryngeal cancer underwent a (64)Cu-copper-II-diacetyl-bis(N4-methylthiosemicarbazone) ((64)Cu-ATSM) PET computed tomography (CT) scan prior to total laryngectomy. Sea urchin spines were inserted into the pathology specimen to act as fiducial markers. The specimen was fixed in formalin, as per standard histopathology operating procedures, and was then CT scanned and cut into millimetre-thick tissue slices. A subset of the tissue slices that included both tumour and fiducial markers was taken and embedded in paraffin blocks. Subsequently, microtome sectioning and haematoxylin and eosin staining were performed to produce 5-μm-thick tissue sections for microscopic digitisation. A series of rigid registration procedures was performed between the different imaging modalities (PET; in vivo CT-i.e. the CT component of the PET-CT; ex vivo CT; histology slices) with the ex vivo CT serving as the reference image. In vivo and ex vivo CTs were registered using landmark-based registration. Histopathology and ex vivo CT images were aligned using the sea urchin spines with additional anatomical landmarks where available. Registration errors were estimated using a leave-one-out strategy for in vivo to ex vivo CT and were estimated from the RMS landmark accuracy for histopathology to ex vivo CT. The mean ± SD accuracy for registration of the in vivo to ex

  20. Potential of PET-MRI for imaging of non-oncologic musculoskeletal disease

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Audrey P.; Gold, Garry E.

    2016-01-01

    Early detection of musculoskeletal disease leads to improved therapies and patient outcomes, and would benefit greatly from imaging at the cellular and molecular level. As it becomes clear that assessment of multiple tissues and functional processes are often necessary to study the complex pathogenesis of musculoskeletal disorders, the role of multi-modality molecular imaging becomes increasingly important. New positron emission tomography-magnetic resonance imaging (PET-MRI) systems offer to combine high-resolution MRI with simultaneous molecular information from PET to study the multifaceted processes involved in numerous musculoskeletal disorders. In this article, we aim to outline the potential clinical utility of hybrid PET-MRI to these non-oncologic musculoskeletal diseases. We summarize current applications of PET molecular imaging in osteoarthritis (OA), rheumatoid arthritis (RA), metabolic bone diseases and neuropathic peripheral pain. Advanced MRI approaches that reveal biochemical and functional information offer complementary assessment in soft tissues. Additionally, we discuss technical considerations for hybrid PET-MR imaging including MR attenuation correction, workflow, radiation dose, and quantification. PMID:28090451

  1. Anomaly Detection and Artifact Recovery in PET Attenuation-Correction Images Using the Likelihood Function.

    PubMed

    Laymon, Charles M; Bowsher, James E

    2013-02-01

    In dual modality PET/CT, CT data are used to generate the attenuation correction applied in the reconstruction of the PET emission image. This requires converting the CT image into a 511-keV attenuation map. Algorithms for making this transformation require assumptions about the makeup of material within the patient. Anomalous material such as contrast agent administered to enhance the CT scan confounds conversion algorithms and has been observed to result in inaccuracies, i.e., inconsistencies with the true 511-keV attenuation present at the time of the PET emission scan. These attenuation artifacts carry through to the final attenuation-corrected PET emission image and can resemble diseased tissue. We propose an approach to correcting this problem that employs the attenuation information carried by the PET emission data. A likelihood-based algorithm for identifying and correcting of contrast is presented and tested. The algorithm exploits the fact that contrast artifacts manifest as too-high attenuation values in an otherwise high quality attenuation image. In a separate study, the performance of the loglikelihood as an objective-function component of a detection/correction algorithm, independent of any particular algorithm was mapped out for several imaging scenarios as a function of statistical noise. Both the full algorithm and the loglikelihood performed well in studies with simulated data. Additional studies including those with patient data are required to fully understand their capabilities.

  2. PET/MR Imaging in Cancers of the Gastrointestinal Tract.

    PubMed

    Paspulati, Raj Mohan; Gupta, Amit

    2016-10-01

    PET/computed tomography (PET/CT) is an established hybrid imaging technique for staging and follow-up of gastrointestinal (GI) tract malignancies, especially for colorectal carcinoma. Dedicated hybrid PET/MR imaging scanners are currently available for clinical use. Although they will not replace regular use of PET/CT, they may have utility in selected cases of GI tract malignancies. The superior soft tissue contrast resolution and depiction of anatomy and the functional information obtained from diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) provided by MR imaging in PET/MR imaging are advantages over CT of PET/CT for T staging and follow-up of rectal carcinoma and for better characterization of liver lesions. Functional information from DWI and use of liver-specific MR imaging contrast agents are an added advantage in follow-up of liver metastases after systemic and locoregional treatment. New radiotracers will improve the utility of PET/MR imaging in staging and follow-up of tumors, which may not be [18F]-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose avid, such as hepatocellular carcinoma and neuroendocrine tumors. PET/MR imaging also has application in selected cases of cholangiocarcinoma, gallbladder cancer, and pancreatic carcinoma for initial staging and follow-up assessment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. State of the art imaging of multiple myeloma: comparative review of FDG PET/CT imaging in various clinical settings.

    PubMed

    Mesguich, Charles; Fardanesh, Reza; Tanenbaum, Lawrence; Chari, Ajai; Jagannath, Sundar; Kostakoglu, Lale

    2014-12-01

    18-Flurodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography with computed tomography (FDG PET/CT) and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) have higher sensitivity and specificity than whole-body X-ray (WBXR) survey in evaluating disease extent in patients with multiple myeloma (MM). Both modalities are now recommended by the Durie-Salmon Plus classification although the emphasis is more on MRI than PET/CT. The presence of extra-medullary disease (EMD) as evaluated by PET/CT imaging, initial SUVmax and number of focal lesions (FL) are deemed to be strong prognostic parameters at staging. MRI remains the most sensitive technique for the detection of diffuse bone marrow involvement in both the pre and post-therapy setting. Compression fractures are best characterized with MRI signal changes, for determining vertebroplasty candidates. While PET/CT allows for earlier and more specific evaluation of therapeutic efficacy compared to MRI, when signal abnormalities persist years after treatment. PET/CT interpretation, however, can be challenging in the vertebral column and pelvis as well as in cases with post-therapy changes. Hence, a reading approach combining the high sensitivity of MRI and superior specificity of FDG PET/CT would be preferred to increase the diagnostic accuracy. In summary, the established management methods in MM, mainly relying on biological tumor parameters should be complemented with functional imaging data, both at staging and restaging for optimal management of MM.

  4. SU-E-J-86: Lobar Lung Function Quantification by PET Galligas and CT Ventilation Imaging in Lung Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Eslick, E; Kipritidis, J; Keall, P; Bailey, D; Bailey, E

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to quantify the lobar lung function using the novel PET Galligas ([68Ga]-carbon nanoparticle) ventilation imaging and the investigational CT ventilation imaging in lung cancer patients pre-treatment. Methods: We present results on our first three lung cancer patients (2 male, mean age 78 years) as part of an ongoing ethics approved study. For each patient a PET Galligas ventilation (PET-V) image and a pair of breath hold CT images (end-exhale and end-inhale tidal volumes) were acquired using a Siemens Biograph PET CT. CT-ventilation (CT-V) images were created from the pair of CT images using deformable image registration (DIR) algorithms and the Hounsfield Unit (HU) ventilation metric. A comparison of ventilation quantification from each modality was done on the lobar level and the voxel level. A Bland-Altman plot was used to assess the difference in mean percentage contribution of each lobe to the total lung function between the two modalities. For each patient, a voxel-wise Spearmans correlation was calculated for the whole lungs between the two modalities. Results: The Bland-Altman plot demonstrated strong agreement between PET-V and CT-V for assessment of lobar function (r=0.99, p<0.001; range mean difference: −5.5 to 3.0). The correlation between PET-V and CT-V at the voxel level was moderate(r=0.60, p<0.001). Conclusion: This preliminary study on the three patients data sets demonstrated strong agreement between PET and CT ventilation imaging for the assessment of pre-treatment lung function at the lobar level. Agreement was only moderate at the level of voxel correlations. These results indicate that CT ventilation imaging has potential for assessing pre-treatment lobar lung function in lung cancer patients.

  5. Multi-modal registration for correlative microscopy using image analogies.

    PubMed

    Cao, Tian; Zach, Christopher; Modla, Shannon; Powell, Debbie; Czymmek, Kirk; Niethammer, Marc

    2014-08-01

    Correlative microscopy is a methodology combining the functionality of light microscopy with the high resolution of electron microscopy and other microscopy technologies for the same biological specimen. In this paper, we propose an image registration method for correlative microscopy, which is challenging due to the distinct appearance of biological structures when imaged with different modalities. Our method is based on image analogies and allows to transform images of a given modality into the appearance-space of another modality. Hence, the registration between two different types of microscopy images can be transformed to a mono-modality image registration. We use a sparse representation model to obtain image analogies. The method makes use of corresponding image training patches of two different imaging modalities to learn a dictionary capturing appearance relations. We test our approach on backscattered electron (BSE) scanning electron microscopy (SEM)/confocal and transmission electron microscopy (TEM)/confocal images. We perform rigid, affine, and deformable registration via B-splines and show improvements over direct registration using both mutual information and sum of squared differences similarity measures to account for differences in image appearance. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Multi-modal Registration for Correlative Microscopy using Image Analogies

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Tian; Zach, Christopher; Modla, Shannon; Powell, Debbie; Czymmek, Kirk; Niethammer, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Correlative microscopy is a methodology combining the functionality of light microscopy with the high resolution of electron microscopy and other microscopy technologies for the same biological specimen. In this paper, we propose an image registration method for correlative microscopy, which is challenging due to the distinct appearance of biological structures when imaged with different modalities. Our method is based on image analogies and allows to transform images of a given modality into the appearance-space of another modality. Hence, the registration between two different types of microscopy images can be transformed to a mono-modality image registration. We use a sparse representation model to obtain image analogies. The method makes use of corresponding image training patches of two different imaging modalities to learn a dictionary capturing appearance relations. We test our approach on backscattered electron (BSE) scanning electron microscopy (SEM)/confocal and transmission electron microscopy (TEM)/confocal images. We perform rigid, affine, and deformable registration via B-splines and show improvements over direct registration using both mutual information and sum of squared differences similarity measures to account for differences in image appearance. PMID:24387943

  7. A nonlinear, image domain filtering method for cardiac PET images

    SciTech Connect

    Farquhar, T.H.; Chinn, G.; Hoh, C.K.; Huang, S.C.; Hoffman, E.J.

    1998-08-01

    An adaptive, nonlinear image domain filtering strategy is described which improves positron emission tomography (PET) images. The method was formulated to improve on the linear, low-pass filtering typically applied to each projection in the filtered back-projection (FBP) reconstruction algorithm. The algorithm is a potential alternative to linear smoothing which reduces noise but degrades resolution; this method uses the FBP algorithm for reconstruction, but aims to incorporate some of the statistical information and nonlinear smoothing utilized in iterative reconstruction algorithms. The approach uses sinogram segmentation to separate the sinogram elements with higher and lower signal-to-noise ratios, and then reconstruct each with FBP using a more appropriate choice of filter and cut-off frequency. Also, this algorithm addresses the radial streak artifacts introduced by FBP. The algorithm was evaluated using simulations and clinical data of cardiac PET studies on an ECAT 931 PET scanner. The initial results suggest that this technique has advantages over the current clinical protocol. Images processed with the method show generally improved visual image quality and reduced radial streaks without the introduction of artifacts. In simulations, increased contrast recovery and resolution are realized without an increase in the background noise of the reconstructed images.

  8. Effects of imaging modalities, brain atlases and feature selection on prediction of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Ota, Kenichi; Oishi, Naoya; Ito, Kengo; Fukuyama, Hidenao

    2015-12-30

    The choice of biomarkers for early detection of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is important for improving the accuracy of imaging-based prediction of conversion from mild cognitive impairment (MCI) to AD. The primary goal of this study was to assess the effects of imaging modalities and brain atlases on prediction. We also investigated the influence of support vector machine recursive feature elimination (SVM-RFE) on predictive performance. Eighty individuals with amnestic MCI [40 developed AD within 3 years] underwent structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) scans at baseline. Using Automated Anatomical Labeling (AAL) and LONI Probabilistic Brain Atlas (LPBA40), we extracted features representing gray matter density and relative cerebral metabolic rate for glucose in each region of interest from the baseline MRI and FDG-PET data, respectively. We used linear SVM ensemble with bagging and computed the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) as a measure of classification performance. We performed multiple SVM-RFE to compute feature ranking. We performed analysis of variance on the mean AUCs for eight feature sets. The interactions between atlas and modality choices were significant. The main effect of SVM-RFE was significant, but the interactions with the other factors were not significant. Multimodal features were found to be better than unimodal features to predict AD. FDG-PET was found to be better than MRI. Imaging modalities and brain atlases interact with each other and affect prediction. SVM-RFE can improve the predictive accuracy when using atlas-based features. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Fusion of multi-tracer PET images for dose painting.

    PubMed

    Lelandais, Benoît; Ruan, Su; Denœux, Thierry; Vera, Pierre; Gardin, Isabelle

    2014-10-01

    PET imaging with FluoroDesoxyGlucose (FDG) tracer is clinically used for the definition of Biological Target Volumes (BTVs) for radiotherapy. Recently, new tracers, such as FLuoroThymidine (FLT) or FluoroMisonidazol (FMiso), have been proposed. They provide complementary information for the definition of BTVs. Our work is to fuse multi-tracer PET images to obtain a good BTV definition and to help the radiation oncologist in dose painting. Due to the noise and the partial volume effect leading, respectively, to the presence of uncertainty and imprecision in PET images, the segmentation and the fusion of PET images is difficult. In this paper, a framework based on Belief Function Theory (BFT) is proposed for the segmentation of BTV from multi-tracer PET images. The first step is based on an extension of the Evidential C-Means (ECM) algorithm, taking advantage of neighboring voxels for dealing with uncertainty and imprecision in each mono-tracer PET image. Then, imprecision and uncertainty are, respectively, reduced using prior knowledge related to defects in the acquisition system and neighborhood information. Finally, a multi-tracer PET image fusion is performed. The results are represented by a set of parametric maps that provide important information for dose painting. The performances are evaluated on PET phantoms and patient data with lung cancer. Quantitative results show good performance of our method compared with other methods. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Quantitative evaluation of PET image using event information bootstrap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Hankyeol; Kwak, Shin Hye; Kim, Kyeong Min; Kang, Joo Hyun; Chung, Yong Hyun; Woo, Sang-Keun

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to enhance the effect in the PET image quality according to event bootstrap of small animal PET data. In order to investigate the time difference condition, realigned sinograms were generated from randomly sampled data set using bootstrap. List-mode data was obtained from small animal PET scanner for Ge-68 30 sec, Y-90 20 min and Y-90 60 min. PET image was reconstructed by Ordered Subset Expectation Maximization(OSEM) 2D with the list-mode format. Image analysis was investigated by Signal to Noise Ratio(SNR) of Ge-68 and Y-90 image. Non-parametric resampled PET image SNR percent change for the Ge-68 30 sec, Y-90 60 min, and Y-90 20 min was 1.69 %, 7.03 %, and 4.78 %, respectively. SNR percent change of non-parametric resampled PET image with time difference condition was 1.08 % for the Ge-68 30 sec, 6.74 % for the Y-90 60 min and 10.94 % for the Y-90 29 min. The result indicated that the bootstrap with time difference condition had a potential to improve a noisy Y-90 PET image quality. This method should be expected to reduce Y-90 PET measurement time and to enhance its accuracy.

  11. An Evaluation of the Benefits of Simultaneous Acquisition on PET/MR Coregistration in Head/Neck Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Covello, Mario; Nicolai, Emanuele; Salvatore, Marco; Aiello, Marco

    2017-01-01

    Coregistration of multimodal diagnostic images is crucial for qualitative and quantitative multiparametric analysis. While retrospective coregistration is computationally intense and could be inaccurate, hybrid PET/MR scanners allow acquiring implicitly coregistered images. Aim of this study is to assess the performance of state-of-the-art coregistration methods applied to PET and MR acquired as single modalities, comparing the results with the implicitly coregistration of a hybrid PET/MR, in complex anatomical regions such as head/neck (HN). A dataset consisting of PET/CT and PET/MR subsequently acquired in twenty-three patients was considered: performance of rigid (RR) and deformable (DR) registration obtained by a commercial software and an open-source registration package was evaluated. Registration accuracy was qualitatively assessed in terms of visual alignment of anatomical structures and qualitatively measured by the Dice scores computed on segmented tumors in PET and MRI. The resulting scores highlighted that hybrid PET/MR showed higher registration accuracy than retrospectively coregistered images, because of an overall misalignment after RR, unrealistic deformations and volume variations after DR. DR revealed superior performance compared to RR due to complex nonrigid movements of HN district. Moreover, simultaneous PET/MR offers unique datasets serving as ground truth for the improvement and validation of coregistration algorithms, if acquired with PET/CT.

  12. PET/MRI: a novel hybrid imaging technique. Major clinical indications and preliminary experience in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Vitor, Taise; Martins, Karine Minaif; Ionescu, Tudor Mihai; Cunha, Marcelo Livorsi da; Baroni, Ronaldo Hueb; Garcia, Marcio Ricardo Taveira; Wagner, Jairo; Campos, Guilherme de Carvalho; Nogueira, Solange Amorim; Guerra, Elaine Gonçalves; Amaro, Edson

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, medical imaging with hybrid techniques has widely accepted and employed in clinical routine. PET/MRI offers significant advantages, including excellent contrast and resolution and reduced ionizing radiation, as compared to well-established PET/CT. Therefore, PET/MRI is a promising modality for oncologic imaging of some regions, such as brain, head and neck, liver and pelvis. This article set out to analyze clinical conditions that could benefit from PET/MRI imaging based on our caseload. The potential of PET/MRI to become the imaging modality of choice for assessment of neurologic and oncologic conditions associated with soft tissues is highlighted. Clinical aspects of PET/MRI and its application to clinical cases are illustrated with examples extracted from the authors' preliminary experience. RESUMO Nos últimos anos, imagens médicas com tecnologias híbridas tornaram-se amplamente aceitas e utilizadas na prática clínica. O PET/RM possui vantagens importantes, incluindo excelentes contrastes e resolução, e menor radiação ionizante, em comparação ao PET/TC. Por isto, é uma modalidade promissora para exames de imagem de pacientes oncológicos, para avaliar o cérebro, cabeça e pescoço, o fígado e a pelve. O objetivo deste artigo foi analisar as situações clínicas que se beneficiariam de exames de PET/RM a partir de uma casuística. Destacamos o potencial desta técnica se tornar o método de imagem de escolha para doenças neurológicas e oncológicas que envolvam partes moles. Os aspectos clínicos de PET/RM e sua aplicação aos casos clínicos são ilustrados com exemplos da experiência inicial dos autores.

  13. Advances in PET imaging of P-glycoprotein function at the blood-brain barrier.

    PubMed

    Syvänen, Stina; Eriksson, Jonas

    2013-02-20

    Efflux transporter P-glycoprotein (P-gp) at the blood-brain barrier (BBB) restricts substrate compounds from entering the brain and may thus contribute to pharmacoresistance observed in patient groups with refractory epilepsy and HIV. Altered P-gp function has also been implicated in neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease. Positron emission tomography (PET), a molecular imaging modality, has become a promising method to study the role of P-gp at the BBB. The first PET study of P-gp function was conducted in 1998, and during the past 15 years two main categories of P-gp PET tracers have been investigated: tracers that are substrates of P-gp efflux and tracers that are inhibitors of P-gp function. PET, as a noninvasive imaging technique, allows translational research. Examples of this are preclinical investigations of P-gp function before and after administering P-gp modulating drugs, investigations in various animal and disease models, and clinical investigations regarding disease and aging. The objective of the present review is to give an overview of available PET radiotracers for studies of P-gp and to discuss how such studies can be designed. Further, the review summarizes results from PET studies of P-gp function in different central nervous system disorders.

  14. Current and Future Lymphatic Imaging Modalities for Tumor Staging

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Kuo; Liu, Tiegang; Tariq, Imran; Sajjad, Ashif; Niu, Meiying; Liu, Guokai; Mehmood, Zahid; Tian, Guihua

    2014-01-01

    Tumor progression is supported by the lymphatic system which should be scanned efficiently for tumor staging as well as the enhanced therapeutic outcomes. Poor resolution and low sensitivity is a limitation of traditional lymphatic imaging modalities; thus new noninvasive approaches like nanocarriers, magnetic resonance imaging, positron-emission tomography, and quantum dots are advantageous. Some newer modalities, which are under development, and their potential uses will also be discussed in this review. PMID:24757671

  15. (89)Zr-labeled paramagnetic octreotide-liposomes for PET-MR imaging of cancer.

    PubMed

    Abou, Diane S; Thorek, Daniel L J; Ramos, Nicholas N; Pinkse, Martijn W H; Wolterbeek, Hubert T; Carlin, Sean D; Beattie, Bradley J; Lewis, Jason S

    2013-03-01

    Dual-modality PET/MR platforms add a new dimension to patient diagnosis with high resolution, functional, and anatomical imaging. The full potential of this emerging hybrid modality could be realized by using a corresponding dual-modality probe. Here, we report pegylated liposome (LP) formulations, housing a MR T(1) contrast agent (Gd) and the positron-emitting (89)Zr (half-life: 3.27 days), for simultaneous PET and MR tumor imaging capabilities. (89)Zr oxophilicity was unexpectedly found advantageous for direct radiolabeling of preformed paramagnetic LPs. LPs were conjugated with octreotide to selectively target neuroendocrine tumors via human somatostatin receptor subtype 2 (SSTr2). (89)Zr-Gd-LPs and octreotide-conjugated homolog were physically, chemically and biologically characterized. (89)Zr-LPs showed reasonable stability over serum proteins and chelator challenges for proof-of-concept in vitro and in vivo investigations. Nuclear and paramagnetic tracking quantified superior SSTr2-recognition of octreotide-LP compared to controls. This study demonstrated SSTr2-targeting specificity along with direct chelator-free (89)Zr-labeling of LPs and dual PET/MR imaging properties.

  16. 89Zr-Labeled Paramagnetic Octreotide-Liposomes for PET-MR Imaging of Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Abou, Diane S.; Thorek, Daniel L. J.; Ramos, Nicholas N.; Pinkse, Martijn W. H.; Wolterbeek, Hubert T.; Carlin, Sean D.; Beattie, Bradley J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Dual-modality PET/MR platforms add a new dimension to patient diagnosis with high resolution, functional, and anatomical imaging. The full potential of this emerging hybrid modality could be realized by using a corresponding dual-modality probe. Here, we report pegylated liposome (LP) formulations, housing a MR T1 contrast agent (Gd) and the positron-emitting 89Zr (half-life: 3.27 days), for simultaneous PET and MR tumor imaging capabilities. Methods 89Zr oxophilicity was unexpectedly found advantageous for direct radiolabeling of preformed paramagnetic LPs. LPs were conjugated with octreotide to selectively target neuroendocrine tumors via human somatostatin receptor subtype 2 (SSTr2). 89Zr-Gd-LPs and octreotide-conjugated homolog were physically, chemically and biologically characterized. Results 89Zr-LPs showed reasonable stability over serum proteins and chelator challenges for proof-of-concept in vitro and in vivo investigations. Nuclear and paramagnetic tracking quantified superior SSTr2-recognition of octreotide-LP compared to controls. Conclusions This study demonstrated SSTr2-targeting specificity along with direct chelator-free 89Zr-labeling of LPs and dual PET/MR imaging properties. PMID:23224977

  17. CYBPET: a cylindrical PET system for breast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karimian, A.; Thompson, C. J.; Sarkar, S.; Raisali, G.; Pani, R.; Davilu, H.; Sardari, D.

    2005-06-01

    We propose a Cylindrical Breast PET (CYBPET) system for breast imaging with patients in the prone position. An individual pendulous breast is covered by thin plastic to provide reduced pressure fixation and surrounded by the crystals inside the CYBPET ring. Each breast is imaged separately. The rest of the body is shielded properly to minimize the contribution of scattered photons from the other breast and the rest of the body. To compare the CYBPET with whole-body PET (WB-PET) the simulations of CYBPET and a WB-PET (GE-Advance) for a 10 mm tumor inside the breast with a lesion to background (breast) activity concentration of 6 to 1 were made. The noise effective count rate (NECR) of CYBPET is about twice that of WB-PET at activity concentrations less than 3.1 μCi/cc. The spatial resolution of CYBPET is better by 25% than the WB-PET.

  18. Body-wide anatomy recognition in PET/CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Huiqian; Udupa, Jayaram K.; Odhner, Dewey; Tong, Yubing; Zhao, Liming; Torigian, Drew A.

    2015-03-01

    With the rapid growth of positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT)-based medical applications, body-wide anatomy recognition on whole-body PET/CT images becomes crucial for quantifying body-wide disease burden. This, however, is a challenging problem and seldom studied due to unclear anatomy reference frame and low spatial resolution of PET images as well as low contrast and spatial resolution of the associated low-dose CT images. We previously developed an automatic anatomy recognition (AAR) system [15] whose applicability was demonstrated on diagnostic computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) images in different body regions on 35 objects. The aim of the present work is to investigate strategies for adapting the previous AAR system to low-dose CT and PET images toward automated body-wide disease quantification. Our adaptation of the previous AAR methodology to PET/CT images in this paper focuses on 16 objects in three body regions - thorax, abdomen, and pelvis - and consists of the following steps: collecting whole-body PET/CT images from existing patient image databases, delineating all objects in these images, modifying the previous hierarchical models built from diagnostic CT images to account for differences in appearance in low-dose CT and PET images, automatically locating objects in these images following object hierarchy, and evaluating performance. Our preliminary evaluations indicate that the performance of the AAR approach on low-dose CT images achieves object localization accuracy within about 2 voxels, which is comparable to the accuracies achieved on diagnostic contrast-enhanced CT images. Object recognition on low-dose CT images from PET/CT examinations without requiring diagnostic contrast-enhanced CT seems feasible.

  19. Image quality of Zr-89 PET imaging in the Siemens microPET Focus 220 preclinical scanner.

    PubMed

    Bradshaw, Tyler J; Voorbach, Martin J; Reuter, David R; Giamis, Anthony M; Mudd, Sarah R; Beaver, John D

    2016-06-01

    Zr-89 positron emission tomography (PET) is a valuable tool for understanding the biodistribution and pharmacokinetics of antibody-based therapeutics. We compared the image quality of Zr-89 PET and F-18 PET in the Siemens microPET Focus 220 preclinical scanner using different reconstruction methods. Image quality metrics were measured in various Zr-89 and F-18 PET phantoms, including the NEMA NU 4-2008 image quality phantom. Images were reconstructed using various algorithms. Zr-89 PET had greater image noise, inferior spatial resolution, and greater spillover than F-18 PET, but comparable recovery coefficients for cylinders of various diameters. Of the reconstruction methods, OSEM3D resulted in the lowest noise, highest recovery coefficients, best spatial resolution, but also the greatest spillover. Scatter correction results were found to be sensitive to varying object sizes. Zr-89 PET image quality was inferior to that of F-18, and no single reconstruction method was superior in all aspects of image quality.

  20. A novel 3D graph cut based co-segmentation of lung tumor on PET-CT images with Gaussian mixture models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Kai; Chen, Xinjian; Shi, Fei; Zhu, Weifang; Zhang, Bin; Xiang, Dehui

    2016-03-01

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) and Computed Tomography (CT) have been widely used in clinical practice for radiation therapy. Most existing methods only used one image modality, either PET or CT, which suffers from the low spatial resolution in PET or low contrast in CT. In this paper, a novel 3D graph cut method is proposed, which integrated Gaussian Mixture Models (GMMs) into the graph cut method. We also employed the random walk method as an initialization step to provide object seeds for the improvement of the graph cut based segmentation on PET and CT images. The constructed graph consists of two sub-graphs and a special link between the sub-graphs which penalize the difference segmentation between the two modalities. Finally, the segmentation problem is solved by the max-flow/min-cut method. The proposed method was tested on 20 patients' PET-CT images, and the experimental results demonstrated the accuracy and efficiency of the proposed algorithm.

  1. Dual-modality imaging of function and physiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasegawa, Bruce H.; Iwata, Koji; Wong, Kenneth H.; Wu, Max C.; Da Silva, Angela; Tang, Hamilton R.; Barber, William C.; Hwang, Andrew B.; Sakdinawat, Anne E.

    2002-04-01

    Dual-modality imaging is a technique where computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging is combined with positron emission tomography or single-photon computed tomography to acquire structural and functional images with an integrated system. The data are acquired during a single procedure with the patient on a table viewed by both detectors to facilitate correlation between the structural and function images. The resulting data can be useful for localization for more specific diagnosis of disease. In addition, the anatomical information can be used to compensate the correlated radionuclide data for physical perturbations such as photon attenuation, scatter radiation, and partial volume errors. Thus, dual-modality imaging provides a priori information that can be used to improve both the visual quality and the quantitative accuracy of the radionuclide images. Dual-modality imaging systems also are being developed for biological research that involves small animals. The small-animal dual-modality systems offer advantages for measurements that currently are performed invasively using autoradiography and tissue sampling. By acquiring the required data noninvasively, dual-modality imaging has the potential to allow serial studies in a single animal, to perform measurements with fewer animals, and to improve the statistical quality of the data.

  2. Site-specifically labeled CA19.9-targeted immunoconjugates for the PET, NIRF, and multimodal PET/NIRF imaging of pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Houghton, Jacob L.; Zeglis, Brian M.; Abdel-Atti, Dalya; Aggeler, Robert; Sawada, Ritsuko; Agnew, Brian J.; Scholz, Wolfgang W.; Lewis, Jason S.

    2015-01-01

    Molecular imaging agents for preoperative positron emission tomography (PET) and near-infrared fluorescent (NIRF)-guided delineation of surgical margins could greatly enhance the diagnosis, staging, and resection of pancreatic cancer. PET and NIRF optical imaging offer complementary clinical applications, enabling the noninvasive whole-body imaging to localize disease and identification of tumor margins during surgery, respectively. We report the development of PET, NIRF, and dual-modal (PET/NIRF) imaging agents, using 5B1, a fully human monoclonal antibody that targets CA19.9, a well-established pancreatic cancer biomarker. Desferrioxamine (DFO) and/or a NIRF dye (FL) were conjugated to the heavy-chain glycans of 5B1, using a robust and reproducible site-specific (ss) labeling methodology to generate three constructs (ssDFO-5B1, ssFL-5B1, and ssdual-5B1) in which the immunoreactivity was not affected by the conjugation of either label. Each construct was evaluated in a s.c. xenograft model, using CA19.9-positive (BxPC3) and -negative (MIAPaCa-2) human pancreatic cancer cell lines. Each construct showed exceptional uptake and contrast in antigen-positive tumors with negligible nonspecific uptake in antigen-negative tumors. Additionally, the dual-modal construct was evaluated in an orthotopic murine pancreatic cancer model, using the human pancreatic cancer cell line, Suit-2. The ssdual-5B1 demonstrated a remarkable capacity to delineate metastases and to map the sentinel lymph nodes via tandem PET-computed tomography (PET/CT) and NIRF imaging. Fluorescence microscopy, histopathology, and autoradiography were performed on representative sections of excised tumors to visualize the distribution of the constructs within the tumors. These imaging tools have tremendous potential for further preclinical research and for clinical translation. PMID:26668398

  3. Multi-Modal Imaging with a Toolbox of Influenza A Reporter Viruses.

    PubMed

    Tran, Vy; Poole, Daniel S; Jeffery, Justin J; Sheahan, Timothy P; Creech, Donald; Yevtodiyenko, Aleksey; Peat, Andrew J; Francis, Kevin P; You, Shihyun; Mehle, Andrew

    2015-10-13

    Reporter viruses are useful probes for studying multiple stages of the viral life cycle. Here we describe an expanded toolbox of fluorescent and bioluminescent influenza A reporter viruses. The enhanced utility of these tools enabled kinetic studies of viral attachment, infection, and co-infection. Multi-modal bioluminescence and positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET/CT) imaging of infected animals revealed that antiviral treatment reduced viral load, dissemination, and inflammation. These new technologies and applications will dramatically accelerate in vitro and in vivo influenza virus studies.

  4. Motion based X-ray imaging modality.

    PubMed

    Szigeti, Krisztián; Máthé, Domokos; Osváth, Szabolcs

    2014-10-01

    A new X-ray imaging method (patent pending) was developed to visualize function-related motion information. We modify existing X-ray imaging methods to provide four images without increasing the necessary measurement time or radiation dose. The most important of these images is a new "kinetic" image that represents motions inside the object or living body. The motion-based contrast of the kinetic image can help visualize details that were not accessible before. The broad range of the movements and high sensitivity of the method are illustrated by imaging the mechanics of a working clock and the chest of a living African clawed frog (Xenopus laevis). The heart, valves, aorta, and lungs of the frog are clearly visualized in spite of the low soft tissue contrast of the animal. The new technology also reconstructs a "static" image similar to the existing conventional X-ray image. The static image shows practically the same information as the conventional image. The new technology presents two more images which show the point-wise errors of the static and kinetic images. This technique gives a better estimation of errors than present methods because it is based entirely on measured data. The new technology could be used in imaging cardiopulmonary movements, nondestructive testing, or port security screening.

  5. (68)Ga PET Ventilation and Perfusion Lung Imaging-Current Status and Future Challenges.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Dale L; Eslick, Enid M; Schembri, Geoffrey P; Roach, Paul J

    2016-09-01

    Gallium-68 ((68)Ga) is a positron-emitting radionuclide suitable for positron emission tomography (PET) imaging that has a number of convenient features-it has a physical half life of 68 minutes, it is generator produced at the PET facility and needs no local cyclotron, and being a radiometal is able to be chelated to a number of useful molecules for diagnostic imaging with PET. (68)Ga has recently been investigated as a radiotracer for ventilation and perfusion (V/Q) lung imaging. It is relatively easy to produce both V/Q radiopharmaceuticals labeled with (68)Ga for PET studies, it offers higher spatial resolution than equivalent SPECT studies, the short half life allows for multiple (repeated) scans on the same day, and low amounts of radiotracer can be used thus limiting the radiation dose to the subject. In the usual clinical setting requiring a V/Q scan, that of suspected pulmonary embolism, the role of (68)Ga V/Q PET may be limited from a logistical perspective, however, in nonacute applications such as lung function evaluation, radiotherapy treatment planning, and respiratory physiology investigations it would appear to be an ideal modality to employ. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Sparsity-constrained PET image reconstruction with learned dictionaries.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jing; Yang, Bao; Wang, Yanhua; Ying, Leslie

    2016-09-07

    PET imaging plays an important role in scientific and clinical measurement of biochemical and physiological processes. Model-based PET image reconstruction such as the iterative expectation maximization algorithm seeking the maximum likelihood solution leads to increased noise. The maximum a posteriori (MAP) estimate removes divergence at higher iterations. However, a conventional smoothing prior or a total-variation (TV) prior in a MAP reconstruction algorithm causes over smoothing or blocky artifacts in the reconstructed images. We propose to use dictionary learning (DL) based sparse signal representation in the formation of the prior for MAP PET image reconstruction. The dictionary to sparsify the PET images in the reconstruction process is learned from various training images including the corresponding MR structural image and a self-created hollow sphere. Using simulated and patient brain PET data with corresponding MR images, we study the performance of the DL-MAP algorithm and compare it quantitatively with a conventional MAP algorithm, a TV-MAP algorithm, and a patch-based algorithm. The DL-MAP algorithm achieves improved bias and contrast (or regional mean values) at comparable noise to what the other MAP algorithms acquire. The dictionary learned from the hollow sphere leads to similar results as the dictionary learned from the corresponding MR image. Achieving robust performance in various noise-level simulation and patient studies, the DL-MAP algorithm with a general dictionary demonstrates its potential in quantitative PET imaging.

  7. Sparsity-constrained PET image reconstruction with learned dictionaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Jing; Yang, Bao; Wang, Yanhua; Ying, Leslie

    2016-09-01

    PET imaging plays an important role in scientific and clinical measurement of biochemical and physiological processes. Model-based PET image reconstruction such as the iterative expectation maximization algorithm seeking the maximum likelihood solution leads to increased noise. The maximum a posteriori (MAP) estimate removes divergence at higher iterations. However, a conventional smoothing prior or a total-variation (TV) prior in a MAP reconstruction algorithm causes over smoothing or blocky artifacts in the reconstructed images. We propose to use dictionary learning (DL) based sparse signal representation in the formation of the prior for MAP PET image reconstruction. The dictionary to sparsify the PET images in the reconstruction process is learned from various training images including the corresponding MR structural image and a self-created hollow sphere. Using simulated and patient brain PET data with corresponding MR images, we study the performance of the DL-MAP algorithm and compare it quantitatively with a conventional MAP algorithm, a TV-MAP algorithm, and a patch-based algorithm. The DL-MAP algorithm achieves improved bias and contrast (or regional mean values) at comparable noise to what the other MAP algorithms acquire. The dictionary learned from the hollow sphere leads to similar results as the dictionary learned from the corresponding MR image. Achieving robust performance in various noise-level simulation and patient studies, the DL-MAP algorithm with a general dictionary demonstrates its potential in quantitative PET imaging.

  8. PET/MRI in Oncological Imaging: State of the Art

    PubMed Central

    Bashir, Usman; Mallia, Andrew; Stirling, James; Joemon, John; MacKewn, Jane; Charles-Edwards, Geoff; Goh, Vicky; Cook, Gary J.

    2015-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) combined with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a hybrid technology which has recently gained interest as a potential cancer imaging tool. Compared with CT, MRI is advantageous due to its lack of ionizing radiation, superior soft-tissue contrast resolution, and wider range of acquisition sequences. Several studies have shown PET/MRI to be equivalent to PET/CT in most oncological applications, possibly superior in certain body parts, e.g., head and neck, pelvis, and in certain situations, e.g., cancer recurrence. This review will update the readers on recent advances in PET/MRI technology and review key literature, while highlighting the strengths and weaknesses of PET/MRI in cancer imaging. PMID:26854157

  9. Performance of a PET Insert for High Resolution Small Animal PET/MR Imaging at 7T.

    PubMed

    Stortz, Greg; Thiessen, Jonathan D; Bishop, Daryl; Khan, Muhammad S; Kozlowski, Piotr; Retière, Fabrice; Schellenberg, Graham; Shams, Ehsan; Zhang, Xuezhu; Thompson, Christopher J; Goertzen, Andrew; Sossi, Vesna

    2017-09-14

    We present the characterization of a compact magnetic resonance (MR) compatible positron emission tomography (PET) insert for simultaneous pre-clinical PET/MR imaging. While specifically designed with the strict size constraint to fit inside the 114 mm inner diameter of the BGA-12S gradient coil used in the Bruker 70/20 and 94/20 series of small animal MR imaging (MRI) systems, the insert can be easily installed in any appropriate MRI scanner or used as a stand-alone PET system. Methods: The insert is made from a ring of 16 detector-blocks each made from depth-of-interaction capable dual-layer-offset arrays of cerium-doped lutetium-yttrium oxyorthosilicate crystals read out by silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) arrays. Scintillator crystal arrays are made from 22×10 / 21×9 crystals in the bottom/top layers with 6/4 mm layer thicknesses, arranged with a 1.27 mm pitch, resulting in a useable field of view (FOV) 28 mm long and ~55 mm wide. Results: Spatial resolution ranges from 1.17 to 1.86 mm full-width-at-half-maximum (FWHM) in the radial direction from a radial offset of 0 to 15 mm. With a 300-800 keV energy window, peak sensitivity is 2.2% and noise-equivalent count rate (NECR) from a mouse-sized phantom at 3.7 MBq is 11.1 kcps and peaks at 20.8 kcps at 14.5 MBq. Phantom imaging shows that feature sizes as low as 0.7 mm can be resolved. (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG) PET/MR images of mouse and rat brains show no signs of inter-modality interference, and can excellently resolve substructures within the brains. Conclusion: Due to excellent spatial resolvability and lack of intermodality interference, this PET insert will serve as a useful tool for pre-clinical PET/MR. Copyright © 2017 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Inc.

  10. The sweet spot: FDG and other 2-carbon glucose analogs for multi-modal metabolic imaging of tumor metabolism.

    PubMed

    Cox, Benjamin L; Mackie, Thomas R; Eliceiri, Kevin W

    2015-01-01

    Multi-modal imaging approaches of tumor metabolism that provide improved specificity, physiological relevance and spatial resolution would improve diagnosing of tumors and evaluation of tumor progression. Currently, the molecular probe FDG, glucose fluorinated with (18)F at the 2-carbon, is the primary metabolic approach for clinical diagnostics with PET imaging. However, PET lacks the resolution necessary to yield intratumoral distributions of deoxyglucose, on the cellular level. Multi-modal imaging could elucidate this problem, but requires the development of new glucose analogs that are better suited for other imaging modalities. Several such analogs have been created and are reviewed here. Also reviewed are several multi-modal imaging studies that have been performed that attempt to shed light on the cellular distribution of glucose analogs within tumors. Some of these studies are performed in vitro, while others are performed in vivo, in an animal model. The results from these studies introduce a visualization gap between the in vitro and in vivo studies that, if solved, could enable the early detection of tumors, the high resolution monitoring of tumors during treatment, and the greater accuracy in assessment of different imaging agents.

  11. MR-Based Cardiac and Respiratory Motion-Compensation Techniques for PET-MR Imaging.

    PubMed

    Munoz, Camila; Kolbitsch, Christoph; Reader, Andrew J; Marsden, Paul; Schaeffter, Tobias; Prieto, Claudia

    2016-04-01

    Cardiac and respiratory motion cause image quality degradation in PET imaging, affecting diagnostic accuracy of the images. Whole-body simultaneous PET-MR scanners allow for using motion information estimated from MR images to correct PET data and produce motion-compensated PET images. This article reviews methods that have been proposed to estimate motion from MR images and different techniques to include this information in PET reconstruction, in order to overcome the problem of cardiac and respiratory motion in PET-MR imaging. MR-based motion correction techniques significantly increase lesion detectability and contrast, and also improve accuracy of uptake values in PET images.

  12. Update on time-of-flight PET imaging

    PubMed Central

    Surti, Suleman

    2015-01-01

    Time-of-flight (TOF) PET was initially introduced in the early days of PET. TOF PET scanners developed in the 1980s had limited sensitivity and spatial resolution, operated in 2D mode with septa, and used analytic image reconstruction methods. Current generation of TOF PET scanners have the highest sensitivity and spatial resolution ever achieved in commercial whole-body PET, operate in fully-3D mode, and use iterative reconstruction with full system modeling. Previously, it was shown that TOF provides a gain in image signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR) that is proportional to the square root of the object size divided by the system timing resolution. With oncologic studies being the primary application of PET, more recent work has shown that in modern TOF PET scanners there is an improved trade-off between lesion contrast, image noise, and total imaging time, leading to a combination of improved lesion detectability, reduced scan time or injected dose, and more accurate and precise lesion uptake measurement. The benefit of TOF PET is also higher for heavier patients, which leads to a more uniform clinical performance over all patient sizes. PMID:25525181

  13. Improving PET imaging for breast cancer using Virtual Pinhole PET half ring insert

    PubMed Central

    Mathews, Aswin John; Komarov, Sergey; Wu, Heyu; O’Sullivan, Joseph A.; Tai, Yuan-Chuan

    2013-01-01

    A PET insert with detector having smaller crystals and placed near a region of interest in a conventional PET scanner can improve image resolution locally due to the Virtual-Pinhole PET (VP-PET) effect. This improvement is from the higher spatial sampling of the imaging area near the detector. We have built a prototype half-ring PET insert for head-and-neck cancer imaging applications. In this paper, we extend the use of the insert to breast imaging and show that such a system provides high resolution images of breast and axillary lymph nodes while maintaining the full imaging field of view capability of a clinical PET scanner. We characterize the resolution and contrast recovery for tumors across the imaging field of view. First, we model the system using Monte Carlo methods to determine its theoretical limit of improvement. Simulations were conducted with hot spherical tumors embedded in background activity at tumor-to-background contrast ranging from 3:1 to 12:1. Tumors are arranged in a Derenzo-like pattern with their diameters ranging from 2 to 12 mm. Experimental studies were performed using a chest phantom with cylindrical breast attachment. Tumors of different sizes arranged in a Derenzo-like pattern with tumor-to- background ratio of 6:1 are inserted into the breast phantom. Imaging capability of mediastinum and axillary lymph nodes is explored. Both Monte Carlo simulations and experiment show clear improvement in image resolution and contrast recovery with VP-PET half ring insert. The degree of improvement in resolution and contrast recovery depends on location of the tumor. The full field of view imaging capability is shown to be maintained. Minor artifacts are introduced in certain regions. PMID:23999026

  14. Whole-body FDG-PET imaging for staging of Hodgkin`s disease and lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    Hoh, C.K.; Glaspy, J.; Rosen, P.

    1997-03-01

    Accurate staging of Hodgkin`s disease (HD) and non-Hodgkin`s lymphoma (NHL) is important for treatment management. In this study, the utility of 2-[{sup 18}F]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) wholebody PET was evaluated as an imaging modality for initial staging or restaging of 7 HD and 11 NHL patients. Whole-body PET-based staging results were compared to the patient`s clinical stage based on conventional staging studies, which included combinations of CT of the chest, abdomen and pelvis, MRI scans, gallium scans, lymphangiograms, staging laparatomies and bone scans. Accurate staging was performed in 17 of 18 patients using a whole-body PET-based staging algorithm compared to the conventional staging algorithm in 15 of 18 patients. In 5 of 18 patients, whole-body PET-based staging showed additional lesions not detected by conventional staging modalities, whereas conventional staging demonstrated additional lesions in 4 of 18 patients not detected by whole-body PET. The total cost of conventional staging was $66,292 for 16 CT chest scans, 16 CT abdominal/pelvis scans, three limited MRI scans, four bone scans, give gallium scans, two laparotomies and one lymphangiogram. In contrast, scans cost $36,250 for 18 whole-body PET studies and additional selected correlative studies: one plain film radiograph, one limited CT, one bone marrow san, one upper GI and one endoscopy. A whole-body FDG-PET-based staging algorithm may be an accurate and cost-effective method for staging or restaging HD and NHL. 10 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Development of a PET/OMRI combined system for simultaneous imaging of positron and free radical probes for small animals.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Seiichi; Watabe, Tadashi; Ikeda, Hayato; Kanai, Yasukazu; Ichikawa, Kazuhiro; Nakao, Motonao; Kato, Katsuhiko; Hatazawa, Jun

    2016-10-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) has high sensitivity for imaging radioactive tracer distributions in subjects. However, it is not possible to image free radical distribution in a subject by PET. Since free radicals are quite reactive, they are related to many diseases, including but not limited to cancer, inflammation, strokes, and heart disease. The Overhauser enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (OMRI) is so far the only method that images free radical distribution in vivo. By combining PET and OMRI, a new hybrid imaging modality might be developed that can simultaneously image the radioactive tracer and free radical distributions. For this purpose, the authors developed a PET/OMRI combined system for small animals. The developed PET/OMRI system used an optical fiber-based PET system combined with a permanent magnet-based OMRI system. The optical fiber-based PET system uses flexible optical fiber bundles. Eight optical fiber-based block detectors were arranged in a 56 mm diameter ring to form a PET system. The LGSO blocks were located inside the field-of-view (FOV) of the OMRI, and the position sensitive photomultiplier tubes were positioned behind the OMRI to minimize the interference between the PET and the OMRI. The OMRI system used a 0.0165 T permanent magnet. The system has an electron spin resonance coil to enhance the MRI signal using the Overhauser effect to image the free radical in the FOV of the PET/OMRI system. The spatial resolution and sensitivity of the optical fiber-based PET system were 1.2 mm FWHM and 1.2% at the central FOV, respectively. The OMRI system imaged the distribution of a nitroxyl radical (NXR) solution. The interference between PET and OMRI was small. Simultaneous imaging of the positron radiotracer and the NXR solution was successfully conducted with the developed PET/OMRI system for phantom and small animal studies. The authors developed a PET/OMRI combined system with the potential to provide interesting new results in

  16. Coronary Artery PET/MR Imaging: Feasibility, Limitations, and Solutions.

    PubMed

    Robson, Philip M; Dweck, Marc R; Trivieri, Maria Giovanna; Abgral, Ronan; Karakatsanis, Nicolas A; Contreras, Johanna; Gidwani, Umesh; Narula, Jagat P; Fuster, Valentin; Kovacic, Jason C; Fayad, Zahi A

    2017-10-01

    The aims of this study were to describe the authors' initial experience with combined coronary artery positron emission tomographic (PET) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging using (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG) and (18)F-sodium fluoride ((18)F-NaF) radiotracers, describe common problems and their solutions, and demonstrate the feasibility of coronary PET/MR imaging in appropriate patients. Recently, PET imaging has been applied to the aortic valve and regions of atherosclerosis. (18)F-FDG PET imaging has become established for imaging inflammation in atherosclerosis in the aorta and carotid arteries. Moreover, (18)F-NaF has emerged as a novel tracer of active microcalcification in the aortic valve and coronary arteries. Coronary PET imaging remains challenging because of the small caliber of the vessels and their complex motion. Currently, most coronary imaging uses combined PET and computed tomographic imaging, but there is increasing enthusiasm for PET/MR imaging because of its reduced radiation, potential to correct for motion, and the complementary information available from cardiac MR in a single scan. Twenty-three patients with diagnosed or documented risk factors for coronary artery disease underwent either (18)F-FDG or (18)F-NaF PET/MR imaging. Standard breath-held MR-based attenuation correction was compared with a novel free-breathing approach. The impact on PET image artifacts and the interpretation of vascular uptake were evaluated semiquantitatively by expert readers. Moreover, PET reconstructions with more algorithm iterations were compared visually and by target-to-background ratio. Image quality was significantly improved by novel free-breathing attenuation correction. Moreover, conspicuity of coronary uptake was improved by increasing the number of algorithm iterations from 3 to 6. Elevated radiotracer uptake could be localized to individual coronary lesions using both (18)F-FDG (n = 1, maximal target-to-background ratio = 1.61) and (18

  17. A Promising Future: Comparable Imaging Capability of MRI-Compatible Silicon Photomultiplier and Conventional Photosensor Preclinical PET Systems.

    PubMed

    Krizsan, Aron K; Lajtos, Imre; Dahlbom, Magnus; Daver, Freddie; Emri, Miklos; Kis, Sandor A; Opposits, Gabor; Pohubi, Laszlo; Potari, Norbert; Hegyesi, Gyula; Kalinka, Gabor; Gal, Janos; Imrek, Jozsef; Nagy, Ferenc; Valastyan, Ivan; Kiraly, Beata; Molnar, Jozsef; Sanfilippo, Delfo; Balkay, Laszlo

    2015-12-01

    We recently completed construction of a small-animal PET system-the MiniPET-3-that uses state-of-the-art silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) photosensors, making possible dual-modality imaging with MRI. In this article, we compare the MiniPET-3 with the MiniPET-2, a system with the same crystal geometry but conventional photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). The standard measurements proposed by the National Electrical Manufacturers Association NU 4 protocols were performed on both systems. These measurements included spatial resolution, system sensitivity, energy resolution, counting rate performance, scatter fraction, spillover ratio for air and water, recovery coefficient, and image uniformity. The energy windows were set to 350-650 keV on the MiniPET-2 and 360-662 keV on the MiniPET-3. Spatial resolution was approximately 17% better on average for the MiniPET-3 than the MiniPET-2. The systems performed similarly in terms of peak absolute sensitivity (∼1.37%), spillover ratio for air (∼0.15), spillover ratio for water (∼0.25), and recovery coefficient (∼0.33, 0.59, 0.81, 0.89, and 0.94). Uniformity was 5.59% for the MiniPET-2 and 6.49% for the MiniPET-3. Minor differences were found in scatter fraction. With the ratlike phantom, the peak noise-equivalent counting rate was 14 kcps on the MiniPET-2 but 24 kcps on the MiniPET-3. However, with the mouselike phantom, these values were 55 and 91 kcps, respectively. The optimal coincidence time window was 6 ns for the MiniPET-2 and 8 ns for the MiniPET-3. Images obtained with the SiPM-based MiniPET-3 small-animal PET system are similar in quality to those obtained with the conventional PMT-based MiniPET-2. © 2015 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Inc.

  18. Thoracic cancer imaging with PET/CT in radiation oncology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chi, Pai-Chun Melinda

    Significance. Respiratory motion has been shown to cause artifacts in PET/CT imaging. This breathing artifact can have a significant impact on PET quantification and it can lead to large uncertainties when using PET for radiation therapy planning. We have demonstrated a promising solution to resolve the breathing artifact by acquiring respiration-averaged CT (ACT) for PET/CT. The purpose of this work was to optimize the ACT acquisition for clinical implementation and to evaluate the impact of ACT on PET/CT quantification. The hypothesis was that ACT is an effective method in removing the breathing artifact when compared to our current clinical protocol. Methods. Phase and cine approaches for acquiring ACT were investigated and the results of these two approaches were compared to the ACT generated from clinical 4DCT data sets (abbreviated as ACT10phs ). In the phase approach, ACT was generated based on combinations of selected respiratory phases; in the cine approach, ACT was generated based on cine images acquired over a fixed cine duration. The phase combination and cine duration that best approximated the ACT10phs were determined to be the optimized scanning parameters. 216 thoracic PET/CT patients were scanned with both current clinical and the ACT protocols. The effects of ACT on PET/CT quantification were assessed by comparing clinical PET/CT and ACT PET/CT using 3 metrics: PET/CT image alignment, maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax), and threshold segmented gross tumor volume (GTV). Results. ACT10phs can be best approximated to within 2% of SUV variation by phase averaging based on 4 representative phases, and to within 3% by cine image averaging based on >3s of cine duration. We implemented the cine approach on the PET/CT scanners and acquired 216 patient data sets. 68% of patients had breathing artifacts in their clinical PET/CT and the artifacts were removed/reduced in all corresponding ACT PET/CT. PET/CT quantification for lesions <50 cm3 and

  19. PET IMAGING STUDIES IN DRUG ABUSE RESEARCH.

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, J.S.; Volkow, N.D.; Ding, Y.S.; Logan, J.; Wang, G.J.

    2001-01-29

    There is overwhelming evidence that addiction is a disease of the brain (Leshner, 1997). Yet public perception that addiction is a reflection of moral weakness or a lack of willpower persists. The insidious consequence of this perception is that we lose sight of the fact that there are enormous medical consequences of addiction including the fact that a large fraction of the total deaths from cancer and heart disease are caused by smoking addiction. Ironically the medical school that educates physicians in addiction medicine and the cancer hospital that has a smoking cessation clinic are vanishingly rare and efforts at harm reduction are frequently met with a public indignation. Meanwhile the number of people addicted to substances is enormous and increasing particularly the addictions to cigarettes and alcohol. It is particularly tragic that addiction usually begins in adolescence and becomes a chronic relapsing problem and there are basically no completely effective treatments. Clearly we need to understand how drugs of abuse affect the brain and we need to be creative in using this information to develop effective treatments. Imaging technologies have played a major role in the conceptualization of addiction as a disease of the brain (Fowler et al., 1998a; Fowler et al., 1999a). New knowledge has been driven by advances in radiotracer design and chemistry and positron emission tomography (PET) instrumentation and the integration of these scientific tools with the tools of biochemistry, pharmacology and medicine. This topic cuts across the medical specialties of neurology, psychiatry, cancer and heart disease because of the high medical, social and economic toll that drugs of abuse, including and especially the legal drugs, cigarettes and alcohol, take on society. In this chapter we will begin by highlighting the important role that chemistry has played in making it possible to quantitatively image the movement of drugs as well as their effects on the human brain

  20. A single-ring OpenPET enabling PET imaging during radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Tashima, Hideaki; Yamaya, Taiga; Yoshida, Eiji; Kinouchi, Shoko; Watanabe, Mitsuo; Tanaka, Eiichi

    2012-07-21

    We develop an OpenPET system which can provide an accessible open space to the patient during PET scanning. Our first-generation OpenPET geometry which we called dual-ring OpenPET consisted of two separated detector rings and it could extend its axial field of view (FOV) therefore enabling imaging the gap region in addition to the in-ring region. However, applications such as dose verification by in-beam PET measurement during particle therapy and real-time tumor tracking by PET require sensitivity focused onto the gap rather than on the wide FOV. In this paper, we propose a second-generation OpenPET geometry, single-ring OpenPET, which can provide an accessible and observable open space with higher sensitivity and a reduced number of detectors than the earlier one. The proposed geometry has a cylinder shape cut at a slant angle, in which the shape of each cut end becomes an ellipse. We provided a theoretical analysis for sensitivity of the proposed geometry, compared with the dual-ring OpenPET and a geometry where the conventional PET was positioned at a slant angle against the patient bed to form an accessible open space, which we called a slant PET. The central sensitivity depends on the solid angle of these geometries. As a result, we found that the single-ring OpenPET has a sensitivity 1.2 times higher than the dual-ring OpenPET and 1.3 times higher than the slant PET when designed for a 600 mm bed width with 300 mm accessible open space and about 200 detector blocks, each with a front area of 2500 mm². In addition, numerical simulation was carried out to show the imaging property of the proposed geometry realized with the ellipsoidal rings and these results indicate that the depth-of-interaction detector can provide uniform resolution even when the detectors are arranged in an ellipsoidal ring.

  1. A single-ring OpenPET enabling PET imaging during radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tashima, Hideaki; Yamaya, Taiga; Yoshida, Eiji; Kinouchi, Shoko; Watanabe, Mitsuo; Tanaka, Eiichi

    2012-07-01

    We develop an OpenPET system which can provide an accessible open space to the patient during PET scanning. Our first-generation OpenPET geometry which we called dual-ring OpenPET consisted of two separated detector rings and it could extend its axial field of view (FOV) therefore enabling imaging the gap region in addition to the in-ring region. However, applications such as dose verification by in-beam PET measurement during particle therapy and real-time tumor tracking by PET require sensitivity focused onto the gap rather than on the wide FOV. In this paper, we propose a second-generation OpenPET geometry, single-ring OpenPET, which can provide an accessible and observable open space with higher sensitivity and a reduced number of detectors than the earlier one. The proposed geometry has a cylinder shape cut at a slant angle, in which the shape of each cut end becomes an ellipse. We provided a theoretical analysis for sensitivity of the proposed geometry, compared with the dual-ring OpenPET and a geometry where the conventional PET was positioned at a slant angle against the patient bed to form an accessible open space, which we called a slant PET. The central sensitivity depends on the solid angle of these geometries. As a result, we found that the single-ring OpenPET has a sensitivity 1.2 times higher than the dual-ring OpenPET and 1.3 times higher than the slant PET when designed for a 600 mm bed width with 300 mm accessible open space and about 200 detector blocks, each with a front area of 2500 mm2. In addition, numerical simulation was carried out to show the imaging property of the proposed geometry realized with the ellipsoidal rings and these results indicate that the depth-of-interaction detector can provide uniform resolution even when the detectors are arranged in an ellipsoidal ring.

  2. A statistical method for lung tumor segmentation uncertainty in PET images based on user inference.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Chaojie; Wang, Xiuying; Feng, Dagan

    2015-01-01

    PET has been widely accepted as an effective imaging modality for lung tumor diagnosis and treatment. However, standard criteria for delineating tumor boundary from PET are yet to develop largely due to relatively low quality of PET images, uncertain tumor boundary definition, and variety of tumor characteristics. In this paper, we propose a statistical solution to segmentation uncertainty on the basis of user inference. We firstly define the uncertainty segmentation band on the basis of segmentation probability map constructed from Random Walks (RW) algorithm; and then based on the extracted features of the user inference, we use Principle Component Analysis (PCA) to formulate the statistical model for labeling the uncertainty band. We validated our method on 10 lung PET-CT phantom studies from the public RIDER collections [1] and 16 clinical PET studies where tumors were manually delineated by two experienced radiologists. The methods were validated using Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) to measure the spatial volume overlap. Our method achieved an average DSC of 0.878 ± 0.078 on phantom studies and 0.835 ± 0.039 on clinical studies.

  3. Denoising of PET images by context modelling using local neighbourhood correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huerga, Carlos; Castro, Pablo; Corredoira, Eva; Coronado, Monica; Delgado, Victor; Guibelalde, Eduardo

    2017-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) images are characterised by low signal-to-noise ratio and blurred edges when compared with other image modalities. It is therefore advisable to use noise reduction methods for qualitative and quantitative analyses. Given the importance of the maximum and mean uptake values, it is necessary to avoid signal loss, which could modify the clinical significance. This paper proposes a method of non-linear image denoising for PET. It is based on spatially adaptive wavelet-shrinkage and uses context modelling, which explicitly considers the correlation between neighbouring pixels. This context modelling is able to maintain the uptake values and preserve the edges in significant regions. The algorithm is proposed as an alternative to the usual filtering that is performed after reconstruction.

  4. A study of artefacts in simultaneous PET and MR imaging using a prototype MR compatible PET scanner.

    PubMed

    Slates, R B; Farahani, K; Shao, Y; Marsden, P K; Taylor, J; Summers, P E; Williams, S; Beech, J; Cherry, S R

    1999-08-01

    We have assessed the possibility of artefacts that can arise in attempting to perform simultaneous positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using a small prototype MR compatible PET scanner (McPET). In these experiments, we examine MR images for any major artefacts or loss in image quality due to inhomogeneities in the magnetic field, radiofrequency interference or susceptibility effects caused by operation of the PET system inside the MR scanner. In addition, possible artefacts in the PET images caused by the static and time-varying magnetic fields or radiofrequency interference from the MR system were investigated. Biological tissue and a T2-weighted spin echo sequence were used to examine susceptibility artefacts due to components of the McPET scanner (scintillator, optical fibres) situated in the MR field of view. A range of commonly used MR pulse sequences was studied while acquiring PET data to look for possible artefacts in either the PET or MR images. Other than a small loss in signal-to-noise using gradient echo sequences, there was no significant interaction between the two imaging systems. Simultaneous PET and MR imaging of simple phantoms was also carried out in different MR systems with field strengths ranging from 0.2 to 4.7 T. The results of these studies demonstrate that it is possible to acquire PET and MR images simultaneously, without any significant artefacts or loss in image quality, using our prototype MR compatible PET scanner.

  5. Feature-based Alignment of Volumetric Multi-modal Images

    PubMed Central

    Toews, Matthew; Zöllei, Lilla; Wells, William M.

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes a method for aligning image volumes acquired from different imaging modalities (e.g. MR, CT) based on 3D scale-invariant image features. A novel method for encoding invariant feature geometry and appearance is developed, based on the assumption of locally linear intensity relationships, providing a solution to poor repeatability of feature detection in different image modalities. The encoding method is incorporated into a probabilistic feature-based model for multi-modal image alignment. The model parameters are estimated via a group-wise alignment algorithm, that iteratively alternates between estimating a feature-based model from feature data, then realigning feature data to the model, converging to a stable alignment solution with few pre-processing or pre-alignment requirements. The resulting model can be used to align multi-modal image data with the benefits of invariant feature correspondence: globally optimal solutions, high efficiency and low memory usage. The method is tested on the difficult RIRE data set of CT, T1, T2, PD and MP-RAGE brain images of subjects exhibiting significant inter-subject variability due to pathology. PMID:24683955

  6. Advances in image-guided radiation therapy-the role of PET-CT

    SciTech Connect

    Heron, Dwight E. . E-mail: heronD2@upmc.edu; Smith, Ryan P.; Andrade, Regiane S.

    2006-04-01

    In the era of image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT), the greatest challenge remains target delineation, as the opportunity to maximize cures while simultaneously decreasing radiation dose to the surrounding normal tissues is to be realized. Over the last 2 decades, technological advances in radiographic imaging, biochemistry, and molecular biology have played an increasing role in radiation treatment planning, delivery, and evaluation of response. Previously, fluoroscopy formed the basis of radiation treatment planning. Beginning in the late 1980s, computed tomography (CT) has become the basis for modern radiation treatment planning and delivery, coincident with the rise of 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT). Additionally, multi-modality anatomic imaging registration was the solution pursued to augment delineation of tumors and surrounding structures on CT-based treatment planning. Although these imaging modalities provide the customary anatomic details necessary for radiation treatment planning, they have limitations, including difficulty with identification of small tumor deposits, tumor extension, and distinction from scar tissues. To overcome these limitations, PET and, more recently, PET-CT have been innovative regarding the extent of disease appraisal, target delineation in the treatment planning, and assessment of therapy response. We review the role of functional imaging in IGRT as it reassures transformations on the field of radiation oncology. As we move toward the era of IGRT, the use of multi-modality imaging fusion, and the introduction of more sensitive and specific PET-CT tracers may further assist target definition. Furthermore, the potential to predict early outcome or even detect early recurrence of tumor, may allow for the tailoring of intervention in cancer patients. The convergence of a biological target volume, and perhaps multi-tracer tumor, molecular, and genetic profile tumors will probably be vital in cancer treatment

  7. Application of Metabolic PET imaging in radiation oncology

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Aizhi; Marcus, David M.; Shu, Hui-Kuo G.; Shim, Hyunsuk

    2014-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a noninvasive imaging technique that provides functional or metabolic assessment of normal tissue or disease conditions and is playing an increasing role in cancer radiotherapy planning. 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose PET imaging (FDG-PET) is widely used in the clinic for tumor imaging due to increased glucose metabolism in most type of tumors; its role in radiotherapy management of various cancers is reviewed. In addition, other metabolic PET imaging agents at various stages of preclinical and clinical development are reviewed. These agents include radiolabeled amino acids such as methionine for detecting increased protein synthesis, radiolabeled choline for detecting increased membrane lipid synthesis, and radiolabeled acetate for detecting increased cytoplasmic lipid synthesis. The amino acid analogs choline and acetate are often more specific to tumor cells than FDG, so they may play an important role in differentiating cancers from benign conditions and in the diagnosis of cancers with either low FDG uptake or high background FDG uptake. PET imaging with FDG and other metabolic PET imaging agents is playing an increasing role in complementary radiotherapy planning. PMID:22339451

  8. Three-dimensional imaging modalities in endodontics.

    PubMed

    Mao, Teresa; Neelakantan, Prasanna

    2014-09-01

    Recent research in endodontics has highlighted the need for three-dimensional imaging in the clinical arena as well as in research. Three-dimensional imaging using computed tomography (CT) has been used in endodontics over the past decade. Three types of CT scans have been studied in endodontics, namely cone-beam CT, spiral CT, and peripheral quantitative CT. Contemporary endodontics places an emphasis on the use of cone-beam CT for an accurate diagnosis of parameters that cannot be visualized on a two-dimensional image. This review discusses the role of CT in endodontics, pertaining to its importance in the diagnosis of root canal anatomy, detection of peri-radicular lesions, diagnosis of trauma and resorption, presurgical assessment, and evaluation of the treatment outcome.

  9. Three-dimensional imaging modalities in endodontics

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Teresa

    2014-01-01

    Recent research in endodontics has highlighted the need for three-dimensional imaging in the clinical arena as well as in research. Three-dimensional imaging using computed tomography (CT) has been used in endodontics over the past decade. Three types of CT scans have been studied in endodontics, namely cone-beam CT, spiral CT, and peripheral quantitative CT. Contemporary endodontics places an emphasis on the use of cone-beam CT for an accurate diagnosis of parameters that cannot be visualized on a two-dimensional image. This review discusses the role of CT in endodontics, pertaining to its importance in the diagnosis of root canal anatomy, detection of peri-radicular lesions, diagnosis of trauma and resorption, presurgical assessment, and evaluation of the treatment outcome. PMID:25279337

  10. Clinical significance of creative 3D-image fusion across multimodalities [PET+CT+MR] based on characteristic coregistration.

    PubMed

    Peng, Matthew Jian-qiao; Ju, Xiangyang; Khambay, Balvinder S; Ayoub, Ashraf F; Chen, Chin-Tu; Bai, Bo

    2012-03-01

    To investigate a registration approach for 2-dimension (2D) based on characteristic localization to achieve 3-dimension (3D) fusion from images of PET, CT and MR one by one. A cubic oriented scheme of"9-point & 3-plane" for co-registration design was verified to be geometrically practical. After acquisiting DICOM data of PET/CT/MR (directed by radiotracer 18F-FDG etc.), through 3D reconstruction and virtual dissection, human internal feature points were sorted to combine with preselected external feature points for matching process. By following the procedure of feature extraction and image mapping, "picking points to form planes" and "picking planes for segmentation" were executed. Eventually, image fusion was implemented at real-time workstation mimics based on auto-fuse techniques so called "information exchange" and "signal overlay". The 2D and 3D images fused across modalities of [CT+MR], [PET+MR], [PET+CT] and [PET+CT+MR] were tested on data of patients suffered from tumors. Complementary 2D/3D images simultaneously presenting metabolic activities and anatomic structures were created with detectable-rate of 70%, 56%, 54% (or 98%) and 44% with no significant difference for each in statistics. Currently, based on the condition that there is no complete hybrid detector integrated of triple-module [PET+CT+MR] internationally, this sort of multiple modality fusion is doubtlessly an essential complement for the existing function of single modality imaging. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Translocator Protein-18 kDa (TSPO) Positron Emission Tomography (PET) Imaging and Its Clinical Impact in Neurodegenerative Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Dupont, Anne-Claire; Largeau, Bérenger; Santiago Ribeiro, Maria Joao; Guilloteau, Denis; Tronel, Claire; Arlicot, Nicolas

    2017-01-01

    In vivo exploration of activated microglia in neurodegenerative diseases is achievable by Positron Emission Tomography (PET) imaging, using dedicated radiopharmaceuticals targeting the translocator protein-18 kDa (TSPO). In this review, we emphasized the major advances made over the last 20 years, thanks to TSPO PET imaging, to define the pathophysiological implication of microglia activation and neuroinflammation in neurodegenerative diseases, including Parkinson’s disease, Huntington’s disease, dementia, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, multiple sclerosis, and also in psychiatric disorders. The extent and upregulation of TSPO as a molecular biomarker of activated microglia in the human brain is now widely documented in these pathologies, but its significance, and especially its protective or deleterious action regarding the disease’s stage, remains under debate. Thus, we exposed new and plausible suggestions to enhance the contribution of TSPO PET imaging for biomedical research by exploring microglia’s role and interactions with other cells in brain parenchyma. Multiplex approaches, associating TSPO PET radiopharmaceuticals with other biomarkers (PET imaging of cellular metabolism, neurotransmission or abnormal protein aggregates, but also other imaging modalities, and peripheral cytokine levels measurement and/or metabolomics analysis) was considered. Finally, the actual clinical impact of TSPO PET imaging as a routine biomarker of neuroinflammation was put into perspective regarding the current development of diagnostic and therapeutic strategies for neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:28387722

  12. Translocator Protein-18 kDa (TSPO) Positron Emission Tomography (PET) Imaging and Its Clinical Impact in Neurodegenerative Diseases.

    PubMed

    Dupont, Anne-Claire; Largeau, Bérenger; Santiago Ribeiro, Maria Joao; Guilloteau, Denis; Tronel, Claire; Arlicot, Nicolas

    2017-04-07

    In vivo exploration of activated microglia in neurodegenerative diseases is achievable by Positron Emission Tomography (PET) imaging, using dedicated radiopharmaceuticals targeting the translocator protein-18 kDa (TSPO). In this review, we emphasized the major advances made over the last 20 years, thanks to TSPO PET imaging, to define the pathophysiological implication of microglia activation and neuroinflammation in neurodegenerative diseases, including Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, dementia, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, multiple sclerosis, and also in psychiatric disorders. The extent and upregulation of TSPO as a molecular biomarker of activated microglia in the human brain is now widely documented in these pathologies, but its significance, and especially its protective or deleterious action regarding the disease's stage, remains under debate. Thus, we exposed new and plausible suggestions to enhance the contribution of TSPO PET imaging for biomedical research by exploring microglia's role and interactions with other cells in brain parenchyma. Multiplex approaches, associating TSPO PET radiopharmaceuticals with other biomarkers (PET imaging of cellular metabolism, neurotransmission or abnormal protein aggregates, but also other imaging modalities, and peripheral cytokine levels measurement and/or metabolomics analysis) was considered. Finally, the actual clinical impact of TSPO PET imaging as a routine biomarker of neuroinflammation was put into perspective regarding the current development of diagnostic and therapeutic strategies for neurodegenerative diseases.

  13. A web-based image viewer for multiple PET-CT follow-up studies.

    PubMed

    Haraguchi, Daiki; Kim, Jinman; Kumar, Ashnil; Constantinescu, Liviu; Wen, Lingfeng; Feng, David Dagan

    2011-01-01

    There exist many viewers for single-modal medical images that are efficient and are equipped with powerful analysis tools. However, there is a distinct lack of efficient image viewers for multi-modality images, particularly for displaying multiple follow-up studies that depict a patient's response to treatment over time. Such viewers would be required to display large amounts of image data. In this study, we present the TAGIGEN viewer--a web-based image viewer designed specifically for the visualisation of multi-modality follow-up studies. We innovate by defining a series of dynamically generated image grid layouts that display sets of related images together in order to improve the ability to compare and assimilate the myriad images. We adopted a web-based client-server image streaming technology, thus enabling interactive navigation of the images in a computationally efficient manner. Furthermore, our web-based approach is interoperable and requires no software installation. We evaluated the ability of our viewer in displaying and understanding a patient's follow-up images in a case study with combined positron emission tomography and computed tomography (PET-CT) follow-up scans. We conducted a usability survey on 10 participants to measure the usefulness of our viewer, used as an outpatient viewer e.g. viewer designed for use by the patients, in tracking a patient's disease state across four PET-CT studies. Our initial results suggest that our viewer was able to efficiently visualise the patient data over time, and that the web-based implementation was fast (loading on average within 5.6 seconds with real-time navigation) and easy to use (overall survey score higher than 4 / 5).

  14. SU-E-J-275: Review - Computerized PET/CT Image Analysis in the Evaluation of Tumor Response to Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, W; Wang, J; Zhang, H

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To review the literature in using computerized PET/CT image analysis for the evaluation of tumor response to therapy. Methods: We reviewed and summarized more than 100 papers that used computerized image analysis techniques for the evaluation of tumor response with PET/CT. This review mainly covered four aspects: image registration, tumor segmentation, image feature extraction, and response evaluation. Results: Although rigid image registration is straightforward, it has been shown to achieve good alignment between baseline and evaluation scans. Deformable image registration has been shown to improve the alignment when complex deformable distortions occur due to tumor shrinkage, weight loss or gain, and motion. Many semi-automatic tumor segmentation methods have been developed on PET. A comparative study revealed benefits of high levels of user interaction with simultaneous visualization of CT images and PET gradients. On CT, semi-automatic methods have been developed for only tumors that show marked difference in CT attenuation between the tumor and the surrounding normal tissues. Quite a few multi-modality segmentation methods have been shown to improve accuracy compared to single-modality algorithms. Advanced PET image features considering spatial information, such as tumor volume, tumor shape, total glycolytic volume, histogram distance, and texture features have been found more informative than the traditional SUVmax for the prediction of tumor response. Advanced CT features, including volumetric, attenuation, morphologic, structure, and texture descriptors, have also been found advantage over the traditional RECIST and WHO criteria in certain tumor types. Predictive models based on machine learning technique have been constructed for correlating selected image features to response. These models showed improved performance compared to current methods using cutoff value of a single measurement for tumor response. Conclusion: This review showed that

  15. Quantifying hypoxia in human cancers using static PET imaging.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Edward; Yeung, Ivan; Keller, Harald; Wouters, Bradley G; Milosevic, Michael; Hedley, David W; Jaffray, David A

    2016-11-21

    Compared to FDG, the signal of (18)F-labelled hypoxia-sensitive tracers in tumours is low. This means that in addition to the presence of hypoxic cells, transport properties contribute significantly to the uptake signal in static PET images. This sensitivity to transport must be minimized in order for static PET to provide a reliable standard for hypoxia quantification. A dynamic compartmental model based on a reaction-diffusion formalism was developed to interpret tracer pharmacokinetics and applied to static images of FAZA in twenty patients with pancreatic cancer. We use our model to identify tumour properties-well-perfused without substantial necrosis or partitioning-for which static PET images can reliably quantify hypoxia. Normalizing the measured activity in a tumour voxel by the value in blood leads to a reduction in the sensitivity to variations in 'inter-corporal' transport properties-blood volume and clearance rate-as well as imaging study protocols. Normalization thus enhances the correlation between static PET images and the FAZA binding rate K 3, a quantity which quantifies hypoxia in a biologically significant way. The ratio of FAZA uptake in spinal muscle and blood can vary substantially across patients due to long muscle equilibration times. Normalized static PET images of hypoxia-sensitive tracers can reliably quantify hypoxia for homogeneously well-perfused tumours with minimal tissue partitioning. The ideal normalizing reference tissue is blood, either drawn from the patient before PET scanning or imaged using PET. If blood is not available, uniform, homogeneously well-perfused muscle can be used. For tumours that are not homogeneously well-perfused or for which partitioning is significant, only an analysis of dynamic PET scans can reliably quantify hypoxia.

  16. Quantifying hypoxia in human cancers using static PET imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Edward; Yeung, Ivan; Keller, Harald; Wouters, Bradley G.; Milosevic, Michael; Hedley, David W.; Jaffray, David A.

    2016-11-01

    Compared to FDG, the signal of 18F-labelled hypoxia-sensitive tracers in tumours is low. This means that in addition to the presence of hypoxic cells, transport properties contribute significantly to the uptake signal in static PET images. This sensitivity to transport must be minimized in order for static PET to provide a reliable standard for hypoxia quantification. A dynamic compartmental model based on a reaction-diffusion formalism was developed to interpret tracer pharmacokinetics and applied to static images of FAZA in twenty patients with pancreatic cancer. We use our model to identify tumour properties—well-perfused without substantial necrosis or partitioning—for which static PET images can reliably quantify hypoxia. Normalizing the measured activity in a tumour voxel by the value in blood leads to a reduction in the sensitivity to variations in ‘inter-corporal’ transport properties—blood volume and clearance rate—as well as imaging study protocols. Normalization thus enhances the correlation between static PET images and the FAZA binding rate K 3, a quantity which quantifies hypoxia in a biologically significant way. The ratio of FAZA uptake in spinal muscle and blood can vary substantially across patients due to long muscle equilibration times. Normalized static PET images of hypoxia-sensitive tracers can reliably quantify hypoxia for homogeneously well-perfused tumours with minimal tissue partitioning. The ideal normalizing reference tissue is blood, either drawn from the patient before PET scanning or imaged using PET. If blood is not available, uniform, homogeneously well-perfused muscle can be used. For tumours that are not homogeneously well-perfused or for which partitioning is significant, only an analysis of dynamic PET scans can reliably quantify hypoxia.

  17. Quantitative imaging of (124)I with PET/ CT in pretherapy lesion dosimetry. Effects impairing image quantification and their corrections.

    PubMed

    Jentzen, W; Freudenberg, L; Bockisch, A

    2011-02-01

    Iodine-131-labelled agents are successfully used in cancer treatment. In the pretherapy dosimetry approach, positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) using (124)I provides a modality to estimate absorbed dose to tumours and can be considered as the preferred imaging method for this purpose in (131)I radiopharmaceutical therapies. For accurate dosimetry, serial measurements of activity concentrations (ACs) over an appropriate time period are necessary. Consequently, accurate AC determination is of paramount importance in PET/CT-based lesion dosimetry using (124)I-labelled agents. After presenting an historical overview of (124)I clinical application, this review focuses on factors impairing PET image quantification accuracy and on methods of correcting for these effects. Specifically, the emission of prompt gamma photons in the (124)I decay process that are detected in coincidence with each other and with the annihilation photon, and the low (124)I positron branching ration of only 23% raise concerns regarding image quantification accuracy. This review discusses this prompt gamma effect, its impact and approaches to correct for this phenomenon. In (124)I lesion dosimetry, recovery coefficients (RCs) are commonly used to compensate primarily for partial-volume effect but also, in a simplistic way, for prompt gamma coincidence effect; the main methodological factors affecting the RC-corrected (124)I AC are described. Finally, special issues in image (124)I quantification are reviewed, including coadministration of high therapeutic activities of 131I, shine-through artefact, and transmission-contamination effect occurring in stand-alone PET systems.

  18. Counting Rate Characteristics and Image Distortion in Preclinical PET Imaging During Radiopharmaceutical Therapy.

    PubMed

    Mellhammar, Emma; Dahlbom, Magnus; Axelsson, Johan; Strand, Sven-Erik

    2016-12-01

    PET may provide important information on the response during radiopharmaceutical therapy (RPT). Emission of radiation from the RPT radionuclide may disturb coincidence detection and impair image resolution. In this study, we tested the feasibility of performing intratherapeutic PET on 3 preclinical PET systems.

  19. PET/CT for radiotherapy: image acquisition and data processing.

    PubMed

    Bettinardi, V; Picchio, M; Di Muzio, N; Gianolli, L; Messa, C; Gilardi, M C

    2010-10-01

    This paper focuses on acquisition and processing methods in positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) for radiotherapy (RT) applications. The recent technological evolutions of PET/CT systems are described. Particular emphasis is dedicated to the tools needed for the patient positioning and immobilization, to be used in PET/CT studies as well as during RT treatment sessions. The effect of organ and lesion motion due to patient's respiration on PET/CT imaging is discussed. Breathing protocols proposed to minimize PET/CT spatial mismatches in relation to respiratory movements are illustrated. The respiratory gated (RG) 4D-PET/CT techniques, developed to measure and compensate for organ and lesion motion, are then introduced. Finally a description is provided of different acquisition and data processing techniques, implemented with the aim at improving: i) image quality and quantitative accuracy of PET images, and ii) target volume definition and treatment planning in RT, by using specific and personalised motion information.

  20. Towards optimal imaging with PET: an in silico feasibility study.

    PubMed

    McNamara, A L; Toghyani, M; Gillam, J E; Wu, K; Kuncic, Z

    2014-12-21

    The efficacy of Positron Emission Tomography (PET) imaging relies fundamentally on the ability of the system to accurately identify true coincidence events. With existing systems, this is currently accomplished with an energy acceptance criterion followed by correction techniques to remove suspected false coincidence events. These corrections generally result in signal and contrast loss and thus limit the PET system's ability to achieve optimum image quality. A key property of annihilation radiation is that the photons are polarised with respect to each other. This polarisation correlation offers a potentially powerful discriminator, independent of energy, to accurately identify true events. In this proof of concept study, we investigate how photon polarisation information can be exploited in PET imaging by developing a method to discriminate true coincidences using the polarisation correlation of annihilation pairs. We implement this method using a Geant4 PET simulation of a GE Advance/Discovery LS system and demonstrate the potential advantages of the polarisation coincidence selection method over a standard energy criterion method. Current PET ring detectors are not capable of exploiting the polarisation correlation of the photon pairs. Compton PET systems, however are promising candidates for this application. We demonstrate the feasibility of a two-component Compton camera system in identifying true coincidences with Monte Carlo simulations. Our study demonstrates the potential of improving signal gain using polarisation, particularly for high photon emission rates. We also demonstrate the ability of the Compton camera at exploiting this polarisation correlation in PET.

  1. Towards optimal imaging with PET: an in silico feasibility study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNamara, A. L.; Toghyani, M.; Gillam, J. E.; Wu, K.; Kuncic, Z.

    2014-12-01

    The efficacy of Positron Emission Tomography (PET) imaging relies fundamentally on the ability of the system to accurately identify true coincidence events. With existing systems, this is currently accomplished with an energy acceptance criterion followed by correction techniques to remove suspected false coincidence events. These corrections generally result in signal and contrast loss and thus limit the PET system’s ability to achieve optimum image quality. A key property of annihilation radiation is that the photons are polarised with respect to each other. This polarisation correlation offers a potentially powerful discriminator, independent of energy, to accurately identify true events. In this proof of concept study, we investigate how photon polarisation information can be exploited in PET imaging by developing a method to discriminate true coincidences using the polarisation correlation of annihilation pairs. We implement this method using a Geant4 PET simulation of a GE Advance/Discovery LS system and demonstrate the potential advantages of the polarisation coincidence selection method over a standard energy criterion method. Current PET ring detectors are not capable of exploiting the polarisation correlation of the photon pairs. Compton PET systems, however are promising candidates for this application. We demonstrate the feasibility of a two-component Compton camera system in identifying true coincidences with Monte Carlo simulations. Our study demonstrates the potential of improving signal gain using polarisation, particularly for high photon emission rates. We also demonstrate the ability of the Compton camera at exploiting this polarisation correlation in PET.

  2. Implementation and applications of dual-modality imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasegawa, Bruce H.; Barber, William C.; Funk, Tobias; Hwang, Andrew B.; Taylor, Carmen; Sun, Mingshan; Seo, Youngho

    2004-06-01

    In medical diagnosis, functional or physiological data can be acquired using radionuclide imaging with positron emission tomography or with single-photon emission computed tomography. However, anatomical or structural data can be acquired using X-ray computed tomography. In dual-modality imaging, both radionuclide and X-ray detectors are incorporated in an imaging system to allow both functional and structural data to be acquired in a single procedure without removing the patient from the imaging system. In a clinical setting, dual-modality imaging systems commonly are used to localize radiopharmaceutical uptake with respect to the patient's anatomy. This helps the clinician to differentiate disease from regions of normal radiopharmaceutical accumulation, to improve diagnosis or cancer staging, or to facilitate planning for radiation therapy or surgery. While initial applications of dual-modality imaging were developed for clinical imaging on humans, it now is recognized that these systems have potentially important applications for imaging small animals involved in experimental studies including basic investigations of mammalian biology and development of new pharmaceuticals for diagnosis or treatment of disease.

  3. Evaluation of delineation of image details in semiconductor PET utilizing the normalized mutual information technique.

    PubMed

    Kubo, Naoki; Hirata, Kenji; Matsuzaki, Kazuki; Morimoto, Yuichi; Takeuchi, Wataru; Hattori, Naoya; Shiga, Tohru; Kuge, Yuji; Tamaki, Nagara

    2014-06-01

    PET using semiconductor detectors provides high-quality images of the human brain because of its high spatial resolution. To quantitatively evaluate the delineation of image details in clinical PET images, we used normalized mutual information (NMI) to quantify the similarity with images obtained through MRI. NMI is used to evaluate image quality by determining similarity with a reference image. The aim of this study was to evaluate quantitatively the delineation of image details provided by semiconductor PET. To quantitatively evaluate anatomical delineation in clinical PET images, MRI scans of patients were used as T1-weighted images. [(18)F]-fluorodeoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG) PET brain images were obtained from six patients using (a) a Hitachi semiconductor PET scanner and (b) a ECAT HR+ scintillator PET scanner. The NMI calculated from the semiconductor PET and MRI was denoted by NMIsemic, whereas the NMI calculated from conventional scintillator PET and MRI was denoted by NMIconve. The higher the value of NMI, the greater the similarity to MRI. NMIsemic ranged from 1.22 to 1.29, whereas NMIconve ranged from 1.13 to 1.18 (P<0.05). Furthermore, all the NMI values of the semiconductor PET were higher than those of the conventional scintillator PET. Utilizing NMI, we quantitatively evaluated the delineation of image details in clinical PET images. The results reveal that semiconductor PET has superior anatomical delineation and physical performance compared with conventional scintillator PET. This improved delineation of image details makes semiconductor PET promising for clinical applications.

  4. FDG PET Imaging in Pneumocystis Pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Kono, Masanori; Yamashita, Hiroyuki; Kubota, Kazuo; Kano, Toshikazu; Mimori, Akio

    2015-08-01

    A 69-year-old woman with rheumatoid arthritis and pleuritis presented with dyspnea. On admission, she was afebrile and had an oxygen saturation of 97% on ambient air. Chest radiography and CT revealed only subtle ground-glass opacities. However, FDG PET revealed pathological uptake in both lungs. A diagnosis of Pneumocystis pneumonia was made based on a positive β-D-glucan assay and polymerase chain reaction amplification of Pneumocystis jirovecii from the sputum. Posttreatment FDG PET revealed resolution of the previously noted uptake. This case illustrates that FDG PET can be used to diagnose Pneumocystis pneumonia when the CT findings are equivocal.

  5. Fusion Imaging: A Novel Staging Modality in Testis Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    conducted. Patients underwent con- ventional imaging evaluation to include CT abdo - men/pelvis, CXR, as well as a full clinical evaluation to include...positron emission tomography (PET) has been utilized in con- junction with computed tomography ( CT ) and chest radiographs (CXR) to survey patients for...metastatic or recurrent disease. While CT is the standard of care for locating the presence of lymphadenopathy or retro- peritoneal masses, its

  6. Positron emission tomography (PET) for cholangiocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Breitenstein, S.; Apestegui, C.

    2008-01-01

    The combination of positron emission tomography (PET) with computed tomography (PET-CT) provides simultaneous metabolic and anatomic information on tumors in the same imaging session. Sensitivity of PET/PET-CT is higher for intrahepatic (>90%) than for extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) (about 60%). The detection rate of distant metastasis is 100%. PET, and particularly PET-CT, improves the results and impacts on the oncological management in CCA compared with other imaging modalities. Therefore, PET-CT is recommended in the preoperative staging of intrahepatic (strength of recommendation: moderate) and extrahepatic (strength of recommendation: low) CCA. PMID:18773069

  7. Accelerating Image Reconstruction in Dual-Head PET System by GPU and Symmetry Properties

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Cheng-Ying; Kao, Yu-Jiun; Wang, Weichung; Kao, Chien-Min; Chen, Chin-Tu

    2012-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is an important imaging modality in both clinical usage and research studies. We have developed a compact high-sensitivity PET system that consisted of two large-area panel PET detector heads, which produce more than 224 million lines of response and thus request dramatic computational demands. In this work, we employed a state-of-the-art graphics processing unit (GPU), NVIDIA Tesla C2070, to yield an efficient reconstruction process. Our approaches ingeniously integrate the distinguished features of the symmetry properties of the imaging system and GPU architectures, including block/warp/thread assignments and effective memory usage, to accelerate the computations for ordered subset expectation maximization (OSEM) image reconstruction. The OSEM reconstruction algorithms were implemented employing both CPU-based and GPU-based codes, and their computational performance was quantitatively analyzed and compared. The results showed that the GPU-accelerated scheme can drastically reduce the reconstruction time and thus can largely expand the applicability of the dual-head PET system. PMID:23300527

  8. PET radiopharmaceuticals for imaging of tumor hypoxia: a review of the evidence

    PubMed Central

    Lopci, Egesta; Grassi, Ilaria; Chiti, Arturo; Nanni, Cristina; Cicoria, Gianfranco; Toschi, Luca; Fonti, Cristina; Lodi, Filippo; Mattioli, Sandro; Fanti, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    Hypoxia is a pathological condition arising in living tissues when oxygen supply does not adequately cover the cellular metabolic demand. Detection of this phenomenon in tumors is of the utmost clinical relevance because tumor aggressiveness, metastatic spread, failure to achieve tumor control, increased rate of recurrence, and ultimate poor outcome are all associated with hypoxia. Consequently, in recent decades there has been increasing interest in developing methods for measurement of oxygen levels in tumors. Among the image-based modalities for hypoxia assessment, positron emission tomography (PET) is one of the most extensively investigated based on the various advantages it offers, i.e., broad range of radiopharmaceuticals, good intrinsic resolution, three-dimensional tumor representation, possibility of semiquantification/quantification of the amount of hypoxic tumor burden, overall patient friendliness, and ease of repetition. Compared with the other non-invasive techniques, the biggest advantage of PET imaging is that it offers the highest specificity for detection of hypoxic tissue. Starting with the 2-nitroimidazole family of compounds in the early 1980s, a great number of PET tracers have been developed for the identification of hypoxia in living tissue and solid tumors. This paper provides an overview of the principal PET tracers applied in cancer imaging of hypoxia and discusses in detail their advantages and pitfalls. PMID:24982822

  9. Dual PET and Near-Infrared Fluorescence Imaging Probes as Tools for Imaging in Oncology

    PubMed Central

    An, Fei-Fei; Chan, Mark; Kommidi, Harikrishna; Ting, Richard

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The purpose of this article is to summarize advances in PET fluorescence resolution, agent design, and preclinical imaging that make a growing case for clinical PET fluorescence imaging. CONCLUSION Existing SPECT, PET, fluorescence, and MRI contrast imaging techniques are already deeply integrated into the management of cancer, from initial diagnosis to the observation and management of metastases. Combined positron-emitting fluorescent contrast agents can convey new or substantial benefits that improve on these proven clinical contrast agents. PMID:27223168

  10. [Knee imaging: what is the best modality].

    PubMed

    Tavernier, T; Dejour, D

    2001-03-01

    A wide range of exams are available for imaging the knee: standard radiography, ultrasound, bone scintigraphy, CT scan, arthroscan, MRI, arthro-MRI. The radiologist must be aware of the performance capacities of each technique in order to orient the clinician's choice towards the most appropriate exam in a given clinical situation. In the first part of this paper, we examine the performances, advantages and disadvantages of each technique: exam conditions (patient position, incidence, slice thickness, sequence.) are detailed as required. The second part is a practical guide for some typical clinical situations with decision trees for ordering necessary and sufficient explorations.

  11. Evaluation of a silicon photomultiplier PET insert for simultaneous PET and MR imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Ko, Guen Bae; Kim, Kyeong Yun; Yoon, Hyun Suk; Son, Jeong-Whan; Lee, Min Sun; Im, Hyung-Jun; Lee, Jae Sung

    2016-01-15

    Purpose: In this study, the authors present a silicon photomultiplier (SiPM)-based positron emission tomography (PET) insert dedicated to small animal imaging with high system performance and robustness to temperature change. Methods: The insert consists of 64 LYSO-SiPM detector blocks arranged in 4 rings of 16 detector blocks to yield a ring diameter of 64 mm and axial field of view of 55 mm. Each detector block consists of a 9 × 9 array of LYSO crystals (1.2 × 1.2 × 10 mm{sup 3}) and a monolithic 4 × 4 SiPM array. The temperature of each monolithic SiPM is monitored, and the proper bias voltage is applied according to the temperature reading in real time to maintain uniform performance. The performance of this PET insert was characterized using National Electrical Manufacturers Association NU 4-2008 standards, and its feasibility was evaluated through in vivo mouse imaging studies. Results: The PET insert had a peak sensitivity of 3.4% and volumetric spatial resolutions of 1.92 (filtered back projection) and 0.53 (ordered subset expectation maximization) mm{sup 3} at center. The peak noise equivalent count rate and scatter fraction were 42.4 kcps at 15.08 MBq and 16.5%, respectively. By applying the real-time bias voltage adjustment, an energy resolution of 14.2% ± 0.3% was maintained and the count rate varied ≤1.2%, despite severe temperature changes (10–30 °C). The mouse imaging studies demonstrate that this PET insert can produce high-quality images useful for imaging studies on the small animals. Conclusions: The developed MR-compatible PET insert is designed for insertion into a narrow-bore magnetic resonance imaging scanner, and it provides excellent imaging performance for PET/MR preclinical studies.

  12. Evaluation of a silicon photomultiplier PET insert for simultaneous PET and MR imaging.

    PubMed

    Ko, Guen Bae; Kim, Kyeong Yun; Yoon, Hyun Suk; Lee, Min Sun; Son, Jeong-Whan; Im, Hyung-Jun; Lee, Jae Sung

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the authors present a silicon photomultiplier (SiPM)-based positron emission tomography (PET) insert dedicated to small animal imaging with high system performance and robustness to temperature change. The insert consists of 64 LYSO-SiPM detector blocks arranged in 4 rings of 16 detector blocks to yield a ring diameter of 64 mm and axial field of view of 55 mm. Each detector block consists of a 9 × 9 array of LYSO crystals (1.2 × 1.2 × 10 mm(3)) and a monolithic 4 × 4 SiPM array. The temperature of each monolithic SiPM is monitored, and the proper bias voltage is applied according to the temperature reading in real time to maintain uniform performance. The performance of this PET insert was characterized using National Electrical Manufacturers Association NU 4-2008 standards, and its feasibility was evaluated through in vivo mouse imaging studies. The PET insert had a peak sensitivity of 3.4% and volumetric spatial resolutions of 1.92 (filtered back projection) and 0.53 (ordered subset expectation maximization) mm(3) at center. The peak noise equivalent count rate and scatter fraction were 42.4 kcps at 15.08 MBq and 16.5%, respectively. By applying the real-time bias voltage adjustment, an energy resolution of 14.2% ± 0.3% was maintained and the count rate varied ≤1.2%, despite severe temperature changes (10-30 °C). The mouse imaging studies demonstrate that this PET insert can produce high-quality images useful for imaging studies on the small animals. The developed MR-compatible PET insert is designed for insertion into a narrow-bore magnetic resonance imaging scanner, and it provides excellent imaging performance for PET/MR preclinical studies.

  13. Quantitative [18F]-FMISO- PET imaging shows reduction of hypoxia following trastuzumab in a murine model of HER2+ breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sorace, Anna G.; Syed, Anum K.; Barnes, Stephanie L.; Quarles, C. Chad; Sanchez, Violeta; Kang, Hakmook; Yankeelov, Thomas E.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Evaluation of [18F]-FMISO-PET imaging as a metric for evaluating early response to trastuzumab therapy with histological validation in a murine model of HER2+ breast cancer. Procedures Mice with BT474, HER2+ tumors, were imaged with [18F]-FMISO-PET during trastuzumab therapy. Pimonidazole staining was used to confirm hypoxia from imaging. Results [18F]-FMISO-PET indicated significant decreases in hypoxia beginning on day 3 (P < 0.01) prior to changes in tumor size. These results were confirmed with pimonidazole staining on day 7 (P < 0.01); additionally, there was a significant positive linear correlation between histology and PET imaging (r2=0.85). Conclusions [18F]-FMISO-PET is a clinically relevant modality which provides the opportunity to 1) predict response to HER2+ therapy before changes in tumor size, and 2) identify decreases hypoxia which has the potential to guide subsequent therapy. PMID:27506906

  14. Thresholding in PET images of static and moving targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaremko, Brian; Riauka, Terence; Robinson, Don; Murray, Brad; Alexander, Abraham; McEwan, Alexander; Roa, Wilson

    2005-12-01

    Continued therapeutic gain in the treatment of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) will depend upon our ability to escalate the dose to the primary tumour while minimizing normal tissue toxicity. Both these objectives are facilitated by the accurate definition of a target volume that is as small as possible. To this end, both tumour immobilizations via deep inspiratory breath-hold, along with positron emission tomography (PET), have emerged as two promising approaches. Though PET is an excellent means of defining the general location of a tumour focus, its ability to define exactly the geometric extent of such a focus strongly depends upon selection of an appropriate image threshold. However, in clinical practice, the image threshold is typically not chosen according to consistent, well-established criteria. This study explores the relationship between image threshold and the resultant PET-defined volume using a series of F-18 radiotracer-filled hollow spheres of known internal volumes, both static and under oscillatory motion. The effects of both image threshold and tumour motion on the resultant PET image are examined. Imaging data are further collected from a series of simulated gated PET acquisitions in order to test the feasibility of a patient-controlled gating mechanism during deep inspiratory breath-hold. This study illustrates quantitatively considerable variability in resultant PET-defined tumour volumes depending upon numerous factors, including image threshold, size of the lesion, the presence of tumour motion and the scanning protocol. In this regard, when using PET in treatment planning for NSCLC, the radiation oncologist must select the image threshold very carefully to avoid either under-dosing the tumour or overdosing normal tissues.

  15. Modality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barbe, Walter B.; Milone, Michael N., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    This article explains to teachers how they can identify their personal modality strength (auditory, visual, or kinesthetic) and how this orientation affects their classroom style. Techniques are also suggested for providing reading help to auditory, visual, and kinesthetic learners. (SJL)

  16. Review: comparison of PET rubidium-82 with conventional SPECT myocardial perfusion imaging.

    PubMed

    Ghotbi, Adam A; Kjaer, Andreas; Hasbak, Philip

    2014-05-01

    Nuclear cardiology has for many years been focused on gamma camera technology. With ever improving cameras and software applications, this modality has developed into an important assessment tool for ischaemic heart disease. However, the development of new perfusion tracers has been scarce. While cardiac positron emission tomography (PET) so far largely has been limited to centres with on-site cyclotron, recent developments with generator produced perfusion tracers such as rubidium-82, as well as an increasing number of PET scanners installed, may enable a larger patient flow that may supersede that of gamma camera myocardial perfusion imaging. © 2013 The Authors. Clinical Physiology and Functional Imaging published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of the Scandinavian Society of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine.

  17. Imaging of prostate cancer with PET/CT using 18F-Fluorocholine

    PubMed Central

    Vali, Reza; Loidl, Wolfgang; Pirich, Christian; Langesteger, Werner; Beheshti, Mohsen

    2015-01-01

    While 18F-Fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) Positron-Emission Tomography (PET) has limited value in prostate cancer (PCa), it may be useful for specific subgroups of PCa patients with hormone-resistant poorly differentiated cell types. 18F-Fluorocholine (18F-FCH) PET/CT has been increasingly used in primary and recurrent PCa and has been shown to add valuable information. Although there is a correlation between the foci of activity and the areas of malignancy in the prostate gland, the clinical value of 18F-FCH is still controversial for detection of the malignant focus in the prostate. For the T-staging of PCa at diagnosis the value of 18F-FCH is limited. This is probably due to limited resolution of PET system and positive findings in benign prostate diseases. Conversely, 18F-FCH PET/CT is a promising imaging modality for the delineation of local and distant nodal recurrence and bone metastases and is poised to have an impact on therapy management. In this review, recent studies of 18F-FCH PET/CT in PCa are summarized. PMID:25973332

  18. 68Ga-PSMA PET/CT imaging in recurrent prostate cancer: Where are we now?

    PubMed Central

    Mazurek, Andrzej; Dziuk, Mirosław

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Prostate cancer (PCa) is a major health concern worldwide with up to 60% of patients experiencing biochemical relapse after radical treatment. Early diagnosis of PCa recurrence is of high importance for successful salvage therapy. The need for accurate imaging has prompted the introduction of prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA)-based radiotracers for positron emission tomography (PET). Material and methods In this review we summarized and discussed the results of the studies analyzing the utility of 68Ga-PSMA PET/CT in patients who experienced a biochemical relapse of prostate cancer. Results PSMA-based PET scans have been proved to provide a superior diagnostic performance over other modalities for localization of the site of early PCa recurrence. 68Ga-PSMA has been also shown to have a higher sensitivity and specificity than other established PET radiotracers such as radiocholines. Conclusions The early studies show promising results and support the use of 68Ga-PSMA for PCa restaging. However, the number of studies concerning the utility of 68Ga-PSMA PET in the context of secondary PCa staging is limited and there is still a considerable scope for further research in this field. PMID:28461986

  19. Prediction of standard-dose brain PET image by using MRI and low-dose brain [{sup 18}F]FDG PET images

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Jiayin; Gao, Yaozong; Shi, Feng; Lalush, David S.; Lin, Weili; Shen, Dinggang

    2015-09-15

    Purpose: Positron emission tomography (PET) is a nuclear medical imaging technology that produces 3D images reflecting tissue metabolic activity in human body. PET has been widely used in various clinical applications, such as in diagnosis of brain disorders. High-quality PET images play an essential role in diagnosing brain diseases/disorders. In practice, in order to obtain high-quality PET images, a standard-dose radionuclide (tracer) needs to be used and injected into a living body. As a result, it will inevitably increase the patient’s exposure to radiation. One solution to solve this problem is predicting standard-dose PET images using low-dose PET images. As yet, no previous studies with this approach have been reported. Accordingly, in this paper, the authors propose a regression forest based framework for predicting a standard-dose brain [{sup 18}F]FDG PET image by using a low-dose brain [{sup 18}F]FDG PET image and its corresponding magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) image. Methods: The authors employ a regression forest for predicting the standard-dose brain [{sup 18}F]FDG PET image by low-dose brain [{sup 18}F]FDG PET and MRI images. Specifically, the proposed method consists of two main steps. First, based on the segmented brain tissues (i.e., cerebrospinal fluid, gray matter, and white matter) in the MRI image, the authors extract features for each patch in the brain image from both low-dose PET and MRI images to build tissue-specific models that can be used to initially predict standard-dose brain [{sup 18}F]FDG PET images. Second, an iterative refinement strategy, via estimating the predicted image difference, is used to further improve the prediction accuracy. Results: The authors evaluated their algorithm on a brain dataset, consisting of 11 subjects with MRI, low-dose PET, and standard-dose PET images, using leave-one-out cross-validations. The proposed algorithm gives promising results with well-estimated standard-dose brain [{sup 18}F]FDG PET

  20. PET Imaging of Integrin αVβ3 Expression

    PubMed Central

    Beer, Ambros J.; Kessler, Horst; Wester, Hans-Jürgen; Schwaiger, Markus

    2011-01-01

    PET imaging of integrin αvβ3 expression has been studied intensely by the academia and recently also by the industry. Imaging of integrin αvβ3 expression is of great potential value, as the integrin αvβ3 is a key player in tumor metastasis and angiogenesis. Therefore PET imaging of this target might be a suitable in-vivo biomarker of angiogenesis and metastatic potential of tumors. In this manuscript, the various strategies for PET imaging of the integrin αvβ3 will be summarized, including monomeric and multimeric radiolabelled RGD peptides and nanoparticles. While most experiments have been performed using preclinical tumor models, more and more clinical results on PET imaging of αvβ3 expression are available and will be discussed in detail. However, while a multitude of radiotracer strategies have been successfully evaluated for PET imaging of αvβ3, the ultimate clinical value of this new imaging biomarker still has to be evaluated in large clinical trials. PMID:21547152

  1. Novel detector technology for clinical PET.

    PubMed

    Lecomte, Roger

    2009-03-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is the most sensitive of all medical imaging modalities for quantitatively probing biologic processes at the molecular level. However, spatial resolution in PET is significantly inferior to that of other imaging modalities that can provide exquisite images of the anatomy, such as X-ray computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. It has been one of the outstanding challenges of the last decade to combine PET with these complementary imaging modalities in order to synergistically exploit the benefits of each modality and to enhance the role of PET in pre-clinical research as well as in clinical routine and research. The simple juxtaposition of tomographs around a common axial bed, such as with current PET/CT technology, is very successful in allowing sequential acquisition of PET and anatomical data. However, novel imaging combinations are being considered that would enable simultaneous, or at least concurrent, dual-modality imaging through combined PET/MR or PET/CT. The development of these new integrated instruments creates new bewildering challenges for PET detection systems, which, in addition to the ability to measure annihilation radiation in PET, must satisfy several other critical requirements.

  2. Contrast-enhanced [18F] fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography-computed tomography as an initial imaging modality in patients presenting with metastatic malignancy of undefined primary origin.

    PubMed

    Jain, Avani; Srivastava, Madhur Kumar; Pawaskar, Alok Suresh; Shelley, Simon; Elangovan, Indirani; Jain, Hasmukh; Pandey, Somnath; Kalal, Shilpa; Amalachandran, Jaykanth

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the advantages of contrast enhanced F-18-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-contrast enhanced CT [CECT]) when used as an initial imaging modality in patients presenting with metastatic malignancy of undefined primary origin (MUO). A total of 243 patients with fine needle aspiration cytology/biopsy proven MUO were included in this prospective study. Patients who were thoroughly evaluated for primary or primary tumor was detected by any other investigation were excluded from the analysis. Totally, 163 patients with pathological diagnosis of malignancy but no apparent sites of the primary tumor were finally selected for analysis. The site of probable primary malignancy suggested by PET-CECT was confirmed by biopsy/follow-up. PET-CECT suggested probable site of primary in 128/163 (78.52%) patients. In 30/35 remaining patients, primary tumor was not detected even after extensive work-up. In 5 patients, where PET-CECT was negative, primary was found on further extensive investigations or follow-up. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of the study were 95.76%, 66.67%, 88.28% and 85.71% respectively. F-18 FDG PET-CECT aptly serves the purpose of initial imaging modality owing to high sensitivity, negative and positive predictive value. PET-CECT not only surveys the whole body for the primary malignancy but also stages the disease accurately. Use of contrast improves the diagnostic utility of modality as well as help in staging of the primary tumor. Although benefits of using PET-CECT as initial diagnostic modality are obvious from this study, there is a need for a larger study comparing conventional methods for diagnosing primary in patients with MUO versus PET-CECT.

  3. Recent developments of imaging modalities of carotid artery stenting.

    PubMed

    Umemoto, Tomoyuki; Pacchioni, Andrea; Nikas, Dimitrios; Reimers, Bernhard

    2017-02-01

    Compared with conventional angiogram-guided procedure, intravascular imaging modalities give us a lot of useful information to make the procedure better. Intravascular imaging modalities give us the information about lesion characters, reference vessel diameter and the interaction between the stent strut and the plaque such as stent strut malapposition or plaque prolapse in real time during the procedure. We can change our strategy according to this information. Intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) is a most common intravascular imaging modality during carotid artery stenting (CAS) in these days. Its advantage is easy to use compared with optical coherence tomograpy (OCT) which has been reported recently in some case reports or case series. However, due to its high resolution, OCT provides more detailed information especially about plaque prolapse and strut malapposition. IVUS and OCT have a potential to improve acute result and reduce the procedural complication by providing the data of lesion character, reference vessel diameter and the interaction of stent strut and vessel wall. Interventionalists who perform CAS procedure should acquire proficiency in imaging modalities during CAS procedure.

  4. Role of imaging modalities in diagnosis and management of pyomyositis

    SciTech Connect

    Yousefzadeh, D.K.; Mulligan, G.M.; Young, C.S.; Schumann, E.M.; Bosworth, D.E.; Pringle, K.C.

    1982-08-01

    A case of tropical pyomyositis in a temperate climate is reported and 29 more cases are reviewed from the literature. Because of its rarity and deceiving clinical presentation, the disorder may go unrecognized for weeks in nontropical regions. The role of various imaging modalities in timely and accurate diagnosis and nonsurgical management of this disorder is discussed.

  5. Laser Illumination Modality of Photoacoustic Imaging Technique for Prostate Cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Dong-qing; Peng, Yuan-yuan; Guo, Jian; Li, Hui

    2016-02-01

    Photoacoustic imaging (PAI) has recently emerged as a promising imaging technique for prostate cancer. But there was still a lot of challenge in the PAI for prostate cancer detection, such as laser illumination modality. Knowledge of absorbed light distribution in prostate tissue was essential since the distribution characteristic of absorbed light energy would influence the imaging depth and range of PAI. In order to make a comparison of different laser illumination modality of photoacoustic imaging technique for prostate cancer, optical model of human prostate was established and combined with Monte Carlo simulation method to calculate the light absorption distribution in the prostate tissue. Characteristic of light absorption distribution of transurethral and trans-rectal illumination case, and of tumor at different location was compared with each other.The relevant conclusions would be significant for optimizing the light illumination in a PAI system for prostate cancer detection.

  6. Optical tomography: Development of a new medical imaging modality

    SciTech Connect

    Hebden, Jeremy C.

    1998-08-28

    The demonstrated success of near-infrared spectroscopy as a diagnostic tool in medicine has encouraged physicists to pursue the development of an imaging technique based on the transmittance of optical wavelengths through tissue. Potential clinical applications include a means of detecting breast disease, and a cerebral imaging modality for mapping oxygenation and haemodynamics in the brain of newborn infants. Imaging of tissues with light is severely restricted by the overwhelming scatter which occurs when optical radiation propagates through tissue. However, recent innovations in technology and the development of new tomographic reconstruction procedures suggest that a clinically viable imaging modality is achievable. In this paper the recent progress in this field of research is reviewed, and the prospects for ultimate success are discussed.

  7. Current status of PET imaging of differentiated thyroid cancer with second generation radiopharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Lauri, C; Di Traglia, S; Galli, F; Pizzichini, P; Signore, A

    2015-03-01

    Although the prognosis of differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) is favorable, some histotypes show worst clinical outcome and higher risk of recurrence. Serum thyroglobulin (Tg) levels and 131I-whole-body-scan (WBS), together with neck ultrasound (US), represent the golden standard for DTC follow-up. Nevertheless, the relatively high frequency of patients with high Tg levels and negative WBS requires further investigations by using new imaging modalities. The availability of whole body positron emission tomography (PET) methods, in parallel with the advances in radiochemistry, offer a wide substrate for many solutions. To this day ¹⁸F-fluoro-deoxy-glucose (¹⁸F-FDG) PET/CT still represents the imaging of choice in follow-up of patients with high serum Tg and negative ¹³¹I-WBS but in the last decades the research has focused on finding "second generation" radiopharmaceuticals for PET imaging, with both diagnostic and prognostic purposes, aiming to change the way to image thyroid cancer. Moreover, the use of various PET radiopharmaceuticals, that offer the possibility to explore different pathways involved in thyroid cancer, could find important applications in the near future for clinical decision making in order to program tailored treatments and follow-up. It would be desirable to use the same radiopharmaceutical for both imaging and dosimetric purpose to achieve a tailored therapy. Many efforts are focused in this direction and ¹²⁴I-PET/CT is now emerging as a valid tool in restaging and therapy management of DTC with promising results. Although the preliminary data available in literature require a confirmation in larger studies with longer follow-up, we think that in next future ¹²⁴I-PET/CT could gain an important role for management of DTC. The aim of this review was to perform a systematic analysis of literature describing the state of art of "second generation" PET-radiopharmaceuticals for imaging DTC. Discussion is focused on the utility of ¹²⁴I-PET

  8. Pearls and pitfalls in clinical interpretation of prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA)-targeted PET imaging.

    PubMed

    Sheikhbahaei, Sara; Afshar-Oromieh, Ali; Eiber, Matthias; Solnes, Lilja B; Javadi, Mehrbod S; Ross, Ashley E; Pienta, Kenneth J; Allaf, Mohamad E; Haberkorn, Uwe; Pomper, Martin G; Gorin, Michael A; Rowe, Steven P

    2017-08-01

    The rapidly expanding clinical adaptation of prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA)-targeted PET imaging in the evaluation of patients with prostate cancer has placed an increasing onus on understanding both the potential pearls of interpretation as well as limitations of this new technique. As with any new molecular imaging modality, accurate characterization of abnormalities on PSMA-targeted PET imaging can be accomplished only if one is aware of the normal distribution pattern, physiological variants of radiotracer uptake, and potential sources of false-positive and false-negative imaging findings. In recent years, a growing number of reports have come to light describing incidental non-prostatic benign or malignant pathologies with high uptake on PSMA-targeted PET imaging. In this review, we have summarized the published literature regarding the potential pearls and technical and interpretive pitfalls of this imaging modality. Knowledge of these limitations can increase the confidence of interpreting physicians and thus improve patient care. As PSMA-targeted PET is expected to be evaluated in larger prospective trials, the dissemination of potential diagnostic pitfalls and the biologic underpinning of those findings will be of increased importance.

  9. Tau Positron Emission Tomography (PET) Imaging: Past, Present, and Future.

    PubMed

    Ariza, Manuela; Kolb, Hartmuth C; Moechars, Dieder; Rombouts, Frederik; Andrés, José Ignacio

    2015-06-11

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a chronic neurodegenerative disorder and the most common cause of dementia among the elderly population. The good correlation of the density and neocortical spread of neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs) with clinical AD disease progression offers an opportunity for the early diagnosis and staging using a noninvasive imaging technique such as positron emission tomography (PET). Thus, PET imaging of NFTs not only holds promise as a diagnostic tool but also may enable the development of disease modifying therapeutics for AD. In this review, we focus on the structural diversity of tau PET tracers, the challenges related to the identification of high affinity and highly selective NFT ligands, and recent progress in the clinical development of tau PET radioligands.

  10. Advances in PET/MR instrumentation and image reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Cabello, Jorge; Ziegler, Sibylle I

    2016-07-22

    The combination of positron emission tomography (PET) and MRI has attracted the attention of researchers in the past approximately 20 years in small-animal imaging and more recently in clinical research. The combination of PET/MRI allows researchers to explore clinical and research questions in a wide number of fields, some of which are briefly mentioned here. An important number of groups have developed different concepts to tackle the problems that PET instrumentation poses to the exposition of electromagnetic fields. We have described most of these research developments in preclinical and clinical experiments, including the few commercial scanners available. From the software perspective, an important number of algorithms have been developed to address the attenuation correction issue and to exploit the possibility that MRI provides for motion correction and quantitative image reconstruction, especially parametric modelling of radiopharmaceutical kinetics. In this work, we give an overview of some exemplar applications of simultaneous PET/MRI, together with technological hardware and software developments.

  11. PET and PET-CT imaging findings of peritoneal and omental involvement in patients with lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Karaosmanoglu, Ali D; Butros, Selim R; Scott, James; Blake, Michael A

    2013-01-01

    A retrospective institutional-review-board-approved study was performed evaluating positron emission tomography (PET)-computed tomography (CT) imaging findings of peritoneal and omental involvement of lymphoma. Twelve patients were identified with a wide spectrum of imaging findings on PET-CT including but not limited to peritoneal thickening, ascites, and serosal involvement. Lymphoma is among the rare causes of malignant peritoneal or omental involvement. The most common manifestations of peritoneal lymphomatosis are peritoneal 2-[fluorine 18] fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose uptake with corresponding peritoneal thickening and nonobstructive serosal masses on CT. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Sorted self-similarity for multi-modal image registration.

    PubMed

    Kasiri, Keyvan; Fieguth, Paul; Clausi, David A

    2016-08-01

    In medical image analysis, registration of multimodal images has been challenging due to the complex intensity relationship between images. Classical multi-modal registration approaches evaluate the degree of the alignment by measuring the statistical dependency of the intensity values between images to be aligned. Employing statistical similarity measures, such as mutual information, is not promising in those cases with complex and spatially dependent intensity relations. A new similarity measure is proposed based on the assessing the similarity of pixels within an image, based on the idea that similar structures in an image are more probable to undergo similar intensity transformations. The most significant pixel similarity values are considered to transmit the most significant self-similarity information. The proposed method is employed in a framework to register different modalities of real brain scans and the performance of the method is compared to the conventional multi-modal registration approach. Quantitative evaluation of the method demonstrates the better registration accuracy in both rigid and non-rigid deformations.

  13. Imaging of congenital heart disease in adults: choice of modalities.

    PubMed

    Orwat, Stefan; Diller, Gerhard-Paul; Baumgartner, Helmut

    2014-01-01

    Major advances in noninvasive imaging of adult congenital heart disease have been accomplished. These tools play now a key role in comprehensive diagnostic work-up, decision for intervention, evaluation for the suitability of specific therapeutic options, monitoring of interventions and regular follow-up. Besides echocardiography, magnetic resonance (CMR) and computed tomography (CT) have gained particular importance. The choice of imaging modality has thus become a critical issue. This review summarizes strengths and limitations of the different imaging modalities and how they may be used in a complementary fashion. Echocardiography obviously remains the workhorse of imaging routinely used in all patients. However, in complex disease and after surgery echocardiography alone frequently remains insufficient. CMR is particularly useful in this setting and allows reproducible and accurate quantification of ventricular function and comprehensive assessment of cardiac anatomy, aorta, pulmonary arteries and venous return including complex flow measurements. CT is preferred when CMR is contraindicated, when superior spatial resolution is required or when "metallic" artefacts limit CMR imaging. In conclusion, the use of currently available imaging modalities in adult congenital heart disease needs to be complementary. Echocardiography remains the basis tool, CMR and CT should be added considering specific open questions and the ability to answer them, availability and economic issues.

  14. 4D PET iterative deconvolution with spatiotemporal regularization for quantitative dynamic PET imaging.

    PubMed

    Reilhac, Anthonin; Charil, Arnaud; Wimberley, Catriona; Angelis, Georgios; Hamze, Hasar; Callaghan, Paul; Garcia, Marie-Paule; Boisson, Frederic; Ryder, Will; Meikle, Steven R; Gregoire, Marie-Claude

    2015-09-01

    Quantitative measurements in dynamic PET imaging are usually limited by the poor counting statistics particularly in short dynamic frames and by the low spatial resolution of the detection system, resulting in partial volume effects (PVEs). In this work, we present a fast and easy to implement method for the restoration of dynamic PET images that have suffered from both PVE and noise degradation. It is based on a weighted least squares iterative deconvolution approach of the dynamic PET image with spatial and temporal regularization. Using simulated dynamic [(11)C] Raclopride PET data with controlled biological variations in the striata between scans, we showed that the restoration method provides images which exhibit less noise and better contrast between emitting structures than the original images. In addition, the method is able to recover the true time activity curve in the striata region with an error below 3% while it was underestimated by more than 20% without correction. As a result, the method improves the accuracy and reduces the variability of the kinetic parameter estimates calculated from the corrected images. More importantly it increases the accuracy (from less than 66% to more than 95%) of measured biological variations as well as their statistical detectivity.

  15. Development of a triple modality small animal planar imaging system

    SciTech Connect

    A. G. Weisenberger, Z. Lee, S. Majewski, B. Kross, V. Popov, B. Welch, R. Wojcik, C. Zorn

    2006-02-01

    Recently small animal research utilizing nuclear medicine based imaging has been combined with structural anatomical imaging from x-ray radiography providing a powerful tool for animal researchers. The addition of a third modality is the goal of our instrumentation development. Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility and Case Western Reserve University have been collaborating on the development of a planar imaging system which in addition to radiopharmaceutical based functional imaging and x-ray radiography structural imaging also allows for the in vivo bioluminescence imaging thus providing another functional imaging modality. For the gamma camera we use is a Hamamatsu position sensitive photomultiplier tube coupled to a pixellated NaI(TI) scintillator array with individual crystal elements 1 mm × 1 mm × 5 mm in size and a 0.25 mm septum between each element. The gamma camera has a 10 cm diameter active area and can be used for 125I, 99mT and 111In radionuclide imaging. To acquire anatomical information we are using a Rad-Icon Shad-o-Box X-ray detector that provides a field of view of 5 cm × 10 cm. The x-ray source is a Source-Ray compact x-ray generator. We are using a Princeton Instruments cooled CCD based detector for the imaging of the bio-distribution of bioluminescence. All three imaging instruments will be integrated into a single light tight / x-ray tight enclosure.

  16. Multi-modal Ultrasound Imaging for Breast Cancer Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medina-Valdés, L.; Pérez-Liva, M.; Camacho, J.; Udías, J. M.; Herraiz, J. L.; González-Salido, N.

    This work describes preliminary results of a two-modality imaging system aimed at the early detection of breast cancer. The first technique is based on compounding conventional echographic images taken at regular angular intervals around the imaged breast. The other modality obtains tomographic images of propagation velocity using the same circular geometry. For this study, a low-cost prototype has been built. It is based on a pair of opposed 128-element, 3.2 MHz array transducers that are mechanically moved around tissue mimicking phantoms. Compounded images around 360° provide improved resolution, clutter reduction, artifact suppression and reinforce the visualization of internal structures. However, refraction at the skin interface must be corrected for an accurate image compounding process. This is achieved by estimation of the interface geometry followed by computing the internal ray paths. On the other hand, sound velocity tomographic images from time of flight projections have been also obtained. Two reconstruction methods, Filtered Back Projection (FBP) and 2D Ordered Subset Expectation Maximization (2D OSEM), were used as a first attempt towards tomographic reconstruction. These methods yield useable images in short computational times that can be considered as initial estimates in subsequent more complex methods of ultrasound image reconstruction. These images may be effective to differentiate malignant and benign masses and are very promising for breast cancer screening.

  17. PET/CT (and CT) instrumentation, image reconstruction and data transfer for radiotherapy planning.

    PubMed

    Sattler, Bernhard; Lee, John A; Lonsdale, Markus; Coche, Emmanuel

    2010-09-01

    The positron emission tomography in combination with CT in hybrid, cross-modality imaging systems (PET/CT) gains more and more importance as a part of the treatment-planning procedure in radiotherapy. Positron emission tomography (PET), as a integral part of nuclear medicine imaging and non-invasive imaging technique, offers the visualization and quantification of pre-selected tracer metabolism. In combination with the structural information from CT, this molecular imaging technique has great potential to support and improve the outcome of the treatment-planning procedure prior to radiotherapy. By the choice of the PET-Tracer, a variety of different metabolic processes can be visualized. First and foremost, this is the glucose metabolism of a tissue as well as for instance hypoxia or cell proliferation. This paper comprises the system characteristics of hybrid PET/CT systems. Acquisition and processing protocols are described in general and modifications to cope with the special needs in radiooncology. This starts with the different position of the patient on a special table top, continues with the use of the same fixation material as used for positioning of the patient in radiooncology while simulation and irradiation and leads to special processing protocols that include the delineation of the volumes that are subject to treatment planning and irradiation (PTV, GTV, CTV, etc.). General CT acquisition and processing parameters as well as the use of contrast enhancement of the CT are described. The possible risks and pitfalls the investigator could face during the hybrid-imaging procedure are explained and listed. The interdisciplinary use of different imaging modalities implies a increase of the volume of data created. These data need to be stored and communicated fast, safe and correct. Therefore, the DICOM-Standard provides objects and classes for this purpose (DICOM RT). Furthermore, the standard DICOM objects and classes for nuclear medicine (NM, PT) and

  18. Compact and mobile high resolution PET brain imager

    DOEpatents

    Majewski, Stanislaw [Yorktown, VA; Proffitt, James [Newport News, VA

    2011-02-08

    A brain imager includes a compact ring-like static PET imager mounted in a helmet-like structure. When attached to a patient's head, the helmet-like brain imager maintains the relative head-to-imager geometry fixed through the whole imaging procedure. The brain imaging helmet contains radiation sensors and minimal front-end electronics. A flexible mechanical suspension/harness system supports the weight of the helmet thereby allowing for patient to have limited movements of the head during imaging scans. The compact ring-like PET imager enables very high resolution imaging of neurological brain functions, cancer, and effects of trauma using a rather simple mobile scanner with limited space needs for use and storage.

  19. A fully automatic approach for multimodal PET and MR image segmentation in gamma knife treatment planning.

    PubMed

    Rundo, Leonardo; Stefano, Alessandro; Militello, Carmelo; Russo, Giorgio; Sabini, Maria Gabriella; D'Arrigo, Corrado; Marletta, Francesco; Ippolito, Massimo; Mauri, Giancarlo; Vitabile, Salvatore; Gilardi, Maria Carla

    2017-06-01

    Nowadays, clinical practice in Gamma Knife treatments is generally based on MRI anatomical information alone. However, the joint use of MRI and PET images can be useful for considering both anatomical and metabolic information about the lesion to be treated. In this paper we present a co-segmentation method to integrate the segmented Biological Target Volume (BTV), using [(11)C]-Methionine-PET (MET-PET) images, and the segmented Gross Target Volume (GTV), on the respective co-registered MR images. The resulting volume gives enhanced brain tumor information to be used in stereotactic neuro-radiosurgery treatment planning. GTV often does not match entirely with BTV, which provides metabolic information about brain lesions. For this reason, PET imaging is valuable and it could be used to provide complementary information useful for treatment planning. In this way, BTV can be used to modify GTV, enhancing Clinical Target Volume (CTV) delineation. A novel fully automatic multimodal PET/MRI segmentation method for Leksell Gamma Knife(®) treatments is proposed. This approach improves and combines two computer-assisted and operator-independent single modality methods, previously developed and validated, to segment BTV and GTV from PET and MR images, respectively. In addition, the GTV is utilized to combine the superior contrast of PET images with the higher spatial resolution of MRI, obtaining a new BTV, called BTVMRI. A total of 19 brain metastatic tumors, undergone stereotactic neuro-radiosurgery, were retrospectively analyzed. A framework for the evaluation of multimodal PET/MRI segmentation is also presented. Overlap-based and spatial distance-based metrics were considered to quantify similarity concerning PET and MRI segmentation approaches. Statistics was also included to measure correlation among the different segmentation processes. Since it is not possible to define a gold-standard CTV according to both MRI and PET images without treatment response assessment

  20. Model-based image reconstruction for four-dimensional PET

    SciTech Connect

    Li Tianfang; Thorndyke, Brian; Schreibmann, Eduard; Yang Yong; Xing Lei

    2006-05-15

    Positron emission tonography (PET) is useful in diagnosis and radiation treatment planning for a variety of cancers. For patients with cancers in thoracic or upper abdominal region, the respiratory motion produces large distortions in the tumor shape and size, affecting the accuracy in both diagnosis and treatment. Four-dimensional (4D) (gated) PET aims to reduce the motion artifacts and to provide accurate measurement of the tumor volume and the tracer concentration. A major issue in 4D PET is the lack of statistics. Since the collected photons are divided into several frames in the 4D PET scan, the quality of each reconstructed frame degrades as the number of frames increases. The increased noise in each frame heavily degrades the quantitative accuracy of the PET imaging. In this work, we propose a method to enhance the performance of 4D PET by developing a new technique of 4D PET reconstruction with incorporation of an organ motion model derived from 4D-CT images. The method is based on the well-known maximum-likelihood expectation-maximization (ML-EM) algorithm. During the processes of forward- and backward-projection in the ML-EM iterations, all projection data acquired at different phases are combined together to update the emission map with the aid of deformable model, the statistics is therefore greatly improved. The proposed algorithm was first evaluated with computer simulations using a mathematical dynamic phantom. Experiment with a moving physical phantom was then carried out to demonstrate the accuracy of the proposed method and the increase of signal-to-noise ratio over three-dimensional PET. Finally, the 4D PET reconstruction was applied to a patient case.

  1. Fusion of PET and MRI for Hybrid Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Zang-Hee; Son, Young-Don; Kim, Young-Bo; Yoo, Seung-Schik

    Recently, the development of the fusion PET-MRI system has been actively studied to meet the increasing demand for integrated molecular and anatomical imaging. MRI can provide detailed anatomical information on the brain, such as the locations of gray and white matter, blood vessels, axonal tracts with high resolution, while PET can measure molecular and genetic information, such as glucose metabolism, neurotransmitter-neuroreceptor binding and affinity, protein-protein interactions, and gene trafficking among biological tissues. State-of-the-art MRI systems, such as the 7.0 T whole-body MRI, now can visualize super-fine structures including neuronal bundles in the pons, fine blood vessels (such as lenticulostriate arteries) without invasive contrast agents, in vivo hippocampal substructures, and substantia nigra with excellent image contrast. High-resolution PET, known as High-Resolution Research Tomograph (HRRT), is a brain-dedicated system capable of imaging minute changes of chemicals, such as neurotransmitters and -receptors, with high spatial resolution and sensitivity. The synergistic power of the two, i.e., ultra high-resolution anatomical information offered by a 7.0 T MRI system combined with the high-sensitivity molecular information offered by HRRT-PET, will significantly elevate the level of our current understanding of the human brain, one of the most delicate, complex, and mysterious biological organs. This chapter introduces MRI, PET, and PET-MRI fusion system, and its algorithms are discussed in detail.

  2. Pixel-feature hybrid fusion for PET/CT images.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yang-Ming; Nortmann, Charles A

    2011-02-01

    Color blending is a popular display method for functional and anatomic image fusion. The underlay image is typically displayed in grayscale, and the overlay image is displayed in pseudo colors. This pixel-level fusion provides too much information for reviewers to analyze quickly and effectively and clutters the display. To improve the fusion image reviewing speed and reduce the information clutter, a pixel-feature hybrid fusion method is proposed and tested for PET/CT images. Segments of the colormap are selectively masked to have a few discrete colors, and pixels displayed in the masked colors are made transparent. The colormap thus creates a false contouring effect on overlay images and allows the underlay to show through to give contours an anatomic context. The PET standardized uptake value (SUV) is used to control where colormap segments are masked. Examples show that SUV features can be extracted and blended with CT image instantaneously for viewing and diagnosis, and the non-feature part of the PET image is transparent. The proposed pixel-feature hybrid fusion highlights PET SUV features on CT images and reduces display clutters. It is easy to implement and can be used as complementarily to existing pixel-level fusion methods.

  3. Intraobserver and Interobserver Variability in GTV Delineation on FDG-PET-CT Images of Head and Neck Cancers

    SciTech Connect

    Breen, Stephen L. |. E-mail: Stephen.Breen@rmp.uhn.on.ca; Publicover, Julia; De Silva, Shiroma; Pond, Greg; Brock, Kristy |; O'Sullivan, Brian |; Cummings, Bernard; Dawson, Laura; Kim, John; Ringash, Jolie; Waldron, John |; Keller, Anne |; Yu, Eugene; Hendler, Aaron |

    2007-07-01

    Purpose: To determine if the addition of fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) data changes primary site gross tumor volumes (GTVs) in head and neck cancers. Methods and Materials: Computed tomography (CT), contrast-enhanced CT, and FDG-PET-CT scans were obtained in 10 patients with head and neck cancers. Eight experienced observers (6 head and neck oncologists and 2 neuro-radiologists) with access to clinical and radiologic reports outlined primary site GTVs on each modality. Three cases were recontoured twice to assess intraobserver variability. The magnitudes of the GTVs were compared. Intra- and interobserver variability was assessed by a two-way repeated measures analysis of variance. Inter- and intraobserver reliability were calculated. Results: There were no significant differences in the GTVs across the image modalities when compared as ensemble averages; the Wilcoxon matched-pairs signed-rank test showed that CT volumes were larger than PET-CT. Observers demonstrated the greatest consistency and were most interchangeable on contrast-enhanced CT; they performed less reliably on PET-CT. Conclusions: The addition of PET-CT to primary site GTV delineation of head and neck cancers does not change the volume of the GTV defined by this group of expert observers in this patient sample. An FDG-PET may demonstrate differences in neck node delineation and in other disease sites.

  4. Preliminary assessment of the imaging capability of the YAP (S)PET small animal scanner in neuroscience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartoli, Antonietta; Belcari, Nicola; Stark, Daniela; Höhnemann, Sabine; Piel, Markus; Jennewein, Marc; Schmitt, Ulrich; Tillmanns, Julia; Thews, Oliver; Hiemke, Christoph; Roesch, Frank; Del Guerra, Alberto

    2006-12-01

    The new and fully engineered version of the YAP-(S)PET small animal scanner has been tested at the University of Mainz for preliminary assessment of its imaging capability for studies related to neuropharmacology and psychiatry. The main feature of the scanner is the capability to combine PET and SPECT techniques. It allows the development of new and interesting protocols for the investigation of many biological phenomena, more effectively than with PET or SPECT modalities alone. The scanner is made up of four detector heads, each one composed of a 4×4 cm 2 of YAlO 3:Ce (or YAP:Ce) matrix, and has a field of view (FOV) of 4 cm axially×4 cm ∅ transaxially. In PET mode, the volume resolution is less than 8 mm 3 and is nearly constant over the whole FOV, while the sensitivity is about 2%. The SPECT performance is not so good, due to the presence of the multi-hole lead collimator in front of each head. Nevertheless, the YAP-PET scanner offers excellent resolution and sensitivity for performing on the availability of D2-like dopamine receptors on mice and rats in both PET and SPECT modalities.

  5. Imaging carotid body chemodectomas with 68Ga-DOTA-NOC PET-CT

    PubMed Central

    Naswa, N; Kumar, A; Sharma, P; Bal, C; Malhotra, A; Kumar, R

    2012-01-01

    Objective The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the role of 68-gallium-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid-1-Nal3-octreotide (68Ga-DOTA-NOC) positron emission tomography CT (PET-CT) in carotid body chemodectomas (CBCs). Methods : 5 patients with known CBCs (conventional imaging and angiography) were evaluated retrospectively (3 males, 2 females; mean age 36.6 years). All underwent PET-CT after injection of 148 MBq (4 mCi) of 68Ga-DOTA-NOC. Results : At baseline there were four bilateral CBCs and one unilateral CBC with an additional glomus tympanicum and bilateral glomus jugulare tumour in these five patients. All these lesions showed intense uptake on 68Ga-DOTA-NOC PET-CT. Apart from these known lesions, additional tumours were detected in three patients; glomus jugulare in one, aortic body tumour and multiple abdominal paragangliomas in another and unsuspected vertebral metastasis in the last. Overall it led to a change in management in 3 of the 5 patients (60%). Conclusion : 68Ga-DOTA-NOC PET-CT is a promising non-invasive imaging modality in the detection and characterisation of CBCs. PMID:22096221

  6. Gallium-68 PET: A Powerful Generator-based Alternative to Infection and Inflammation Imaging.

    PubMed

    Vorster, Mariza; Maes, Alex; Wiele, Christophe van de; Sathekge, Mike

    2016-09-01

    The process of inflammation (with or without infection) forms part of essentially every major debilitating disease. Early detection and accurate distinction of inflammation from infection are important to optimize and individualize therapy. Nuclear medicine is ideally suited for the detection of pathologic changes early on and is able to target a magnitude of role players involved in the aforementioned processes. Hybrid modalities such as PET/CT and PET/MRI offer high spatial resolution that combines morphologic and pathophysiological changes and add various quantification possibilities that are preferable in these settings. It follows then that the development of PET radiopharmaceuticals is imperative to make use of these latest advances. Gallium-68 (Ga-68)-based tracers are exceptionally well suited to these indications, considering the year-round availability from a single generator, the relative cost-effectiveness, and relative ease of labeling. Over the past few years, the development of Ga-68-based tracers has understandably exploded with a recent growing interest in infection and inflammation imaging. This review aims to highlight some of the most important and interesting advances made with Ga-68-based PET/CT in the field of infection and inflammation imaging. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Innovations in Small-Animal PET/MR Imaging Instrumentation.

    PubMed

    Tsoumpas, Charalampos; Visvikis, Dimitris; Loudos, George

    2016-04-01

    Multimodal imaging has led to a more detailed exploration of different physiologic processes with integrated PET/MR imaging being the most recent entry. Although the clinical need is still questioned, it is well recognized that it represents one of the most active and promising fields of medical imaging research in terms of software and hardware. The hardware developments have moved from small detector components to high-performance PET inserts and new concepts in full systems. Conversely, the software focuses on the efficient performance of necessary corrections without the use of CT data. The most recent developments in both directions are reviewed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. The Basic Principles of FDG-PET/CT Imaging.

    PubMed

    Basu, Sandip; Hess, Søren; Nielsen Braad, Poul-Erik; Olsen, Birgitte Brinkmann; Inglev, Signe; Høilund-Carlsen, Poul Flemming

    2014-10-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging with 2-[(18)F]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) forms the basis of molecular imaging. FDG-PET imaging is a multidisciplinary undertaking that requires close interdisciplinary collaboration in a broad team comprising physicians, technologists, secretaries, radio-chemists, hospital physicists, molecular biologists, engineers, and cyclotron technicians. The aim of this review is to provide a brief overview of important basic issues and considerations pivotal to successful patient examinations, including basic physics, instrumentation, radiochemistry, molecular and cell biology, patient preparation, normal distribution of tracer, and potential interpretive pitfalls. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Vision 20/20: Magnetic resonance imaging-guided attenuation correction in PET/MRI: Challenges, solutions, and opportunities

    SciTech Connect

    Mehranian, Abolfazl; Arabi, Hossein; Zaidi, Habib

    2016-03-15

    Attenuation correction is an essential component of the long chain of data correction techniques required to achieve the full potential of quantitative positron emission tomography (PET) imaging. The development of combined PET/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems mandated the widespread interest in developing novel strategies for deriving accurate attenuation maps with the aim to improve the quantitative accuracy of these emerging hybrid imaging systems. The attenuation map in PET/MRI should ideally be derived from anatomical MR images; however, MRI intensities reflect proton density and relaxation time properties of biological tissues rather than their electron density and photon attenuation properties. Therefore, in contrast to PET/computed tomography, there is a lack of standardized global mapping between the intensities of MRI signal and linear attenuation coefficients at 511 keV. Moreover, in standard MRI sequences, bones and lung tissues do not produce measurable signals owing to their low proton density and short transverse relaxation times. MR images are also inevitably subject to artifacts that degrade their quality, thus compromising their applicability for the task of attenuation correction in PET/MRI. MRI-guided attenuation correction strategies can be classified in three broad categories: (i) segmentation-based approaches, (ii) atlas-registration and machine learning methods, and (iii) emission/transmission-based approaches. This paper summarizes past and current state-of-the-art developments and latest advances in PET/MRI attenuation correction. The advantages and drawbacks of each approach for addressing the challenges of MR-based attenuation correction are comprehensively described. The opportunities brought by both MRI and PET imaging modalities for deriving accurate attenuation maps and improving PET quantification will be elaborated. Future prospects and potential clinical applications of these techniques and their integration in commercial

  10. Vision 20/20: Magnetic resonance imaging-guided attenuation correction in PET/MRI: Challenges, solutions, and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Mehranian, Abolfazl; Arabi, Hossein; Zaidi, Habib

    2016-03-01

    Attenuation correction is an essential component of the long chain of data correction techniques required to achieve the full potential of quantitative positron emission tomography (PET) imaging. The development of combined PET/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems mandated the widespread interest in developing novel strategies for deriving accurate attenuation maps with the aim to improve the quantitative accuracy of these emerging hybrid imaging systems. The attenuation map in PET/MRI should ideally be derived from anatomical MR images; however, MRI intensities reflect proton density and relaxation time properties of biological tissues rather than their electron density and photon attenuation properties. Therefore, in contrast to PET/computed tomography, there is a lack of standardized global mapping between the intensities of MRI signal and linear attenuation coefficients at 511 keV. Moreover, in standard MRI sequences, bones and lung tissues do not produce measurable signals owing to their low proton density and short transverse relaxation times. MR images are also inevitably subject to artifacts that degrade their quality, thus compromising their applicability for the task of attenuation correction in PET/MRI. MRI-guided attenuation correction strategies can be classified in three broad categories: (i) segmentation-based approaches, (ii) atlas-registration and machine learning methods, and (iii) emission/transmission-based approaches. This paper summarizes past and current state-of-the-art developments and latest advances in PET/MRI attenuation correction. The advantages and drawbacks of each approach for addressing the challenges of MR-based attenuation correction are comprehensively described. The opportunities brought by both MRI and PET imaging modalities for deriving accurate attenuation maps and improving PET quantification will be elaborated. Future prospects and potential clinical applications of these techniques and their integration in commercial

  11. Characterization of coronary atherosclerosis by intravascular imaging modalities

    PubMed Central

    Honda, Satoshi; Kanaya, Tomoaki; Noguchi, Teruo; Ogawa, Hisao; Yasuda, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is highly prevalent in Western countries and is associated with morbidity, mortality, and a significant economic burden. Despite the development of anti-atherosclerotic medical therapies, many patients still continue to suffer from coronary events. This residual risk indicates the need for better risk stratification and additional therapies to achieve more reductions in cardiovascular risk. Recent advances in imaging modalities have contributed to visualizing atherosclerotic plaques and defining lesion characteristics in vivo. This innovation has been applied to refining revascularization procedure, assessment of anti-atherosclerotic drug efficacy and the detection of high-risk plaques. As such, intravascular imaging plays an important role in further improvement of cardiovascular outcomes in patients with CAD. The current article reviews available intravascular imaging modalities with regard to its method, advantage and disadvantage. PMID:27500094

  12. Diagnosing, planning and evaluating osteochondral ankle defects with imaging modalities

    PubMed Central

    van Bergen, Christiaan JA; Gerards, Rogier M; Opdam, Kim TM; Terra, Maaike P; Kerkhoffs, Gino MMJ

    2015-01-01

    This current concepts review outlines the role of different imaging modalities in the diagnosis, preoperative planning, and follow-up of osteochondral ankle defects. An osteochondral ankle defect involves the articular cartilage and subchondral bone (usually of the talus) and is mostly caused by an ankle supination trauma. Conventional radiographs are useful as an initial imaging tool in the diagnostic process, but have only moderate sensitivity for the detection of osteochondral defects. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are more accurate imaging modalities. Recently, ultrasonography and single photon emission CT have been described for the evaluation of osteochondral talar defects. CT is the most valuable modality for assessing the exact location and size of bony lesions. Cartilage and subchondral bone damage can be visualized using MRI, but the defect size tends to be overestimated due to bone edema. CT with the ankle in full plantar flexion has been shown a reliable tool for preoperative planning of the surgical approach. Postoperative imaging is useful for objective assessment of repair tissue or degenerative changes of the ankle joint. Plain radiography, CT and MRI have been used in outcome studies, and different scoring systems are available. PMID:26716090

  13. The integration of quantitative multi-modality imaging data into mathematical models of tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atuegwu, Nkiruka C.; Gore, John C.; Yankeelov, Thomas E.

    2010-05-01

    Quantitative imaging data obtained from multiple modalities may be integrated into mathematical models of tumor growth and treatment response to achieve additional insights of practical predictive value. We show how this approach can describe the development of tumors that appear realistic in terms of producing proliferating tumor rims and necrotic cores. Two established models (the logistic model with and without the effects of treatment) and one novel model built a priori from available imaging data have been studied. We modify the logistic model to predict the spatial expansion of a tumor driven by tumor cell migration after a voxel's carrying capacity has been reached. Depending on the efficacy of a simulated cytoxic treatment, we show that the tumor may either continue to expand, or contract. The novel model includes hypoxia as a driver of tumor cell movement. The starting conditions for these models are based on imaging data related to the tumor cell number (as estimated from diffusion-weighted MRI), apoptosis (from 99mTc-Annexin-V SPECT), cell proliferation and hypoxia (from PET). We conclude that integrating multi-modality imaging data into mathematical models of tumor growth is a promising combination that can capture the salient features of tumor growth and treatment response and this indicates the direction for additional research.

  14. A practical salient region feature based 3D multi-modality registration method for medical images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, Dieter A.; Wolz, Gabriele; Sun, Yiyong; Hornegger, Joachim; Sauer, Frank; Kuwert, Torsten; Xu, Chenyang

    2006-03-01

    We present a novel representation of 3D salient region features and its integration into a hybrid rigid-body registration framework. We adopt scale, translation and rotation invariance properties of those intrinsic 3D features to estimate a transform between underlying mono- or multi-modal 3D medical images. Our method combines advantageous aspects of both feature- and intensity-based approaches and consists of three steps: an automatic extraction of a set of 3D salient region features on each image, a robust estimation of correspondences and their sub-pixel accurate refinement with outliers elimination. We propose a region-growing based approach for the extraction of 3D salient region features, a solution to the problem of feature clustering and a reduction of the correspondence search space complexity. Results of the developed algorithm are presented for both mono- and multi-modal intra-patient 3D image pairs (CT, PET and SPECT) that have been acquired for change detection, tumor localization, and time based intra-person studies. The accuracy of the method is clinically evaluated by a medical expert with an approach that measures the distance between a set of selected corresponding points consisting of both anatomical and functional structures or lesion sites. This demonstrates the robustness of the proposed method to image overlap, missing information and artefacts. We conclude by discussing potential medical applications and possibilities for integration into a non-rigid registration framework.

  15. Feasibility of stress only rubidium-82 PET myocardial perfusion imaging.

    PubMed

    McMahon, Sean R; Kikut, Janusz; Pinckney, Richard G; Keating, Friederike K

    2013-12-01

    Stress only SPECT myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) is a validated strategy to streamline cardiac diagnostic imaging. The potential use of Rb82 PET stress only MPI has not been investigated. Stress images from 200 Rb82 PET-MPI were reviewed by two blinded readers and categorized as not requiring additional rest images (normal) or requiring additional images (abnormal or equivocal). No additional images were deemed necessary for 95 (48%) and 99 (50%) by the two blinded readers. The stress only interpretation was compared to the previous read of the complete rest-stress study. The rate of detecting a normal result with stress only reading was 76%-79% with a negative predictive value of 94%-95%. Clinical predictors of a normal stress only PET-MPI included lower age, the absence of CAD, and female gender, but not body mass index. Blinded reads of 50 additional consecutive PET-MPI from patients with selected clinical predictors (age <65 years, no known CAD) were then performed. Of these, 40 (80%) were normal by previous rest-stress reading, and 34 (68%) were categorized as not requiring additional images after stress only reading. PET stress only imaging would have resulted in a mean reduction of radiation exposure of 2.4 mSv per study according to a published radiation estimate. Stress only Rb82 PET-MPI is a feasible strategy to reduce resource utilization and radiation exposure associated with MPI. This strategy would be most applicable to patients with a lower pretest likelihood.

  16. Non-Local Means Denoising of Dynamic PET Images

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Joyita; Leahy, Richard M.; Li, Quanzheng

    2013-01-01

    Objective Dynamic positron emission tomography (PET), which reveals information about both the spatial distribution and temporal kinetics of a radiotracer, enables quantitative interpretation of PET data. Model-based interpretation of dynamic PET images by means of parametric fitting, however, is often a challenging task due to high levels of noise, thus necessitating a denoising step. The objective of this paper is to develop and characterize a denoising framework for dynamic PET based on non-local means (NLM). Theory NLM denoising computes weighted averages of voxel intensities assigning larger weights to voxels that are similar to a given voxel in terms of their local neighborhoods or patches. We introduce three key modifications to tailor the original NLM framework to dynamic PET. Firstly, we derive similarities from less noisy later time points in a typical PET acquisition to denoise the entire time series. Secondly, we use spatiotemporal patches for robust similarity computation. Finally, we use a spatially varying smoothing parameter based on a local variance approximation over each spatiotemporal patch. Methods To assess the performance of our denoising technique, we performed a realistic simulation on a dynamic digital phantom based on the Digimouse atlas. For experimental validation, we denoised PET images from a mouse study and a hepatocellular carcinoma patient study. We compared the performance of NLM denoising with four other denoising approaches – Gaussian filtering, PCA, HYPR, and conventional NLM based on spatial patches. Results The simulation study revealed significant improvement in bias-variance performance achieved using our NLM technique relative to all the other methods. The experimental data analysis revealed that our technique leads to clear improvement in contrast-to-noise ratio in Patlak parametric images generated from denoised preclinical and clinical dynamic images, indicating its ability to preserve image contrast and high

  17. Computer-assisted quantitative evaluation of therapeutic responses for lymphoma using serial PET/CT imaging.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xin; Xue, Zhong; Xing, Jiong; Lee, Daniel Y; Gottschalk, Stephen M; Heslop, Helen E; Bollard, Catherine M; Wong, Stephen T C

    2010-04-01

    Molecular imaging modalities such as positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) have emerged as an essential diagnostic tool for monitoring treatment response in lymphoma patients. However, quantitative assessment of treatment outcomes from serial scans is often difficult, laborious, and time consuming. Automatic quantization of longitudinal PET/CT scans provides more efficient and comprehensive quantitative evaluation of cancer therapeutic responses. This study develops and validates a Longitudinal Image Navigation and Analysis (LINA) system for this quantitative imaging application. LINA is designed to automatically construct longitudinal correspondence along serial images of individual patients for changes in tumor volume and metabolic activity via regions of interest (ROI) segmented from a given time point image and propagated into the space of all follow-up PET/CT images. We applied LINA retrospectively to nine lymphoma patients enrolled in an immunotherapy clinical trial conducted at the Center for Cell and Gene Therapy, Baylor College of Medicine. This methodology was compared to the readout by a diagnostic radiologist, who manually measured the ROI metabolic activity as defined by the maximal standardized uptake value (SUVmax). Quantitative results showed that the measured SUVs obtained from automatic mapping are as accurate as semiautomatic segmentation and consistent with clinical examination findings. The average of relative squared differences of SUVmax between automatic and semiautomatic segmentation was found to be 0.02. These data support a role for LINA in facilitating quantitative analysis of serial PET/CT images to efficiently assess cancer treatment responses in a comprehensive and intuitive software platform. Copyright 2010 AUR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Combination of pet imaging with viral vectors for identification of cancer metastases.

    PubMed

    Brader, Peter; Wong, Richard J; Horowitz, Gilad; Gil, Ziv

    2012-06-01

    There are three main ways for dissemination of solid tumors: direct invasion, lymphatic spread and hematogenic spread. The presence of metastases is the most significant factor in predicting prognosis and therefore evidence of metastases will influence decision-making regarding treatment. Conventional imaging techniques are limited in the evaluation and localization of metastases due to their restricted ability to identify subcentimeter neoplastic disease. Hence, there is a need for an effective noninvasive modality that can accurately identify occult metastases in cancer patients. One such method is the combination of positron emission tomography (PET) with vectors designed for delivery of reporter genes into target cells. Vectors expressing the herpes simplex virus-1 thymidine kinase (HSV1-tk) reporter system have recently been shown to allow localization of micrometastases in animal models of cancer using non invasive imaging. Combination of HSV1-tk and PET imaging is based on the virtues of vectors which can carry and selectively express the HSV1-tk reporter gene in a variety of cancer cells but not in normal tissue. A radioactive tracer which is applied systemically is phosphorylated by the HSV1-tk enzyme, and as a consequence, the tracer accumulates in proportion to the level of HSV1-tk expression which can be imaged by PET. In this paper we review the recent developments in molecular imaging of micrometastases using replication-competent viral or nonviral vectors carrying the HSV1-tk gene using PET imaging. These diagnostic paradigms introduce an advantageous new concept in noninvasive molecular imaging with the potential benefits for improving patient care by providing guidance for therapy to patients with risk for metastases.

  19. Nonrigid PET motion compensation in the lower abdomen using simultaneous tagged-MRI and PET imaging

    PubMed Central

    Guérin, B.; Cho, S.; Chun, S. Y.; Zhu, X.; Alpert, N. M.; El Fakhri, G.; Reese, T.; Catana, C.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: We propose a novel approach for PET respiratory motion correction using tagged-MRI and simultaneous PET-MRI acquisitions.Methods: We use a tagged-MRI acquisition followed by motion tracking in the phase domain to estimate the nonrigid deformation of biological tissues during breathing. In order to accurately estimate motion even in the presence of noise and susceptibility artifacts, we regularize the traditional HARP tracking strategy using a quadratic roughness penalty on neighboring displacement vectors (R-HARP). We then incorporate the motion fields estimated with R-HARP in the system matrix of an MLEM PET reconstruction algorithm formulated both for sinogram and list-mode data representations. This approach allows reconstruction of all detected coincidences in a single image while modeling the effect of motion both in the emission and the attenuation maps. At present, tagged-MRI does not allow estimation of motion in the lungs and our approach is therefore limited to motion correction in soft tissues. Since it is difficult to assess the accuracy of motion correction approaches in vivo, we evaluated the proposed approach in numerical simulations of simultaneous PET-MRI acquisitions using the NCAT phantom. We also assessed its practical feasibility in PET-MRI acquisitions of a small deformable phantom that mimics the complex deformation pattern of a lung that we imaged on a combined PET-MRI brain scanner.Results: Simulations showed that the R-HARP tracking strategy accurately estimated realistic respiratory motion fields for different levels of noise in the tagged-MRI simulation. In simulations of tumors exhibiting increased uptake, contrast estimation was 20% more accurate with motion correction than without. Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) was more than 100% greater when performing motion-corrected reconstruction which included all counts, compared to when reconstructing only coincidences detected in the first of eight gated frames. These results were

  20. Pigmented villonodular synovitis: dedicated PET imaging findings

    PubMed Central

    Amber, Ian Blake; Clark, Brian J; Greene, Gary Stuart

    2013-01-01

    Pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS) is an uncommon entity, which has the potential to cause severe pain. The gold standard for evaluation is MRI, and previous PET findings associated with PVNS have only been documented in the setting of concurrent malignancy. In the setting of recurrent disease, PET is being used to evaluate prebiological and postbiological treatment responses. Recurrent PVNS demonstrates greater hypermetabolic activity than previously documented, supporting the case as a potential mimic of malignant/metastatic disease. Post-treatment evaluations demonstrate decreased metabolic activity, which suggests response to treatment. This behaviour further supports the contention that there is a neoplastic origin to PVNS. PMID:23598941

  1. Adaptive conductance filtering for spatially varying noise in PET images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padfield, Dirk R.; Manjeshwar, Ravindra

    2006-03-01

    PET images that have been reconstructed with unregularized algorithms are commonly smoothed with linear Gaussian filters to control noise. Since these filters are spatially invariant, they degrade feature contrast in the image, compromising lesion detectability. Edge-preserving smoothing filters can differentially preserve edges and features while smoothing noise. These filters assume spatially uniform noise models. However, the noise in PET images is spatially variant, approximately following a Poisson behavior. Therefore, different regions of a PET image need smoothing by different amounts. In this work, we introduce an adaptive filter, based on anisotropic diffusion, designed specifically to overcome this problem. In this algorithm, the diffusion is varied according to a local estimate of the noise using either the local median or the grayscale image opening to weight the conductance parameter. The algorithm is thus tailored to the task of smoothing PET images, or any image with Poisson-like noise characteristics, by adapting itself to varying noise while preserving significant features in the image. This filter was compared with Gaussian smoothing and a representative anisotropic diffusion method using three quantitative task-relevant metrics calculated on simulated PET images with lesions in the lung and liver. The contrast gain and noise ratio metrics were used to measure the ability to do accurate quantitation; the Channelized Hotelling Observer lesion detectability index was used to quantify lesion detectability. The adaptive filter improved the signal-to-noise ratio by more than 45% and lesion detectability by more than 55% over the Gaussian filter while producing "natural" looking images and consistent image quality across different anatomical regions.

  2. Molecular imaging of brain tumors with 18F-DOPA PET and PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Calabria, Ferdinando; Chiaravalloti, Agostino; Di Pietro, Barbara; Grasso, Cristina; Schillaci, Orazio

    2012-06-01

    The objective of this study was to give an overview of the potential clinical utility of [18F]-L-dihydroxyphenylalanine (18F-DOPA) PET and PET/CT for imaging of brain tumors. Review articles and reference lists were used to supplement the search findings. 18F-DOPA has been investigated as a PET tracer for primary brain tumors, metastases of somatic cancer, and evaluation of relapse of pathology in patients with brain tumor after surgery and/or radiotherapy on the basis of enhanced cell proliferation. Available studies have provided encouraging preliminary results for diagnosis of brain tumors and relapse after surgery/radiotherapy. In the brain, excellent discrimination between tumor and normal tissue can be achieved because of the low physiological uptake of 18F-DOPA and the high ratio between tumor and normal hemispheric tissue. Information on evaluation of brain metastases is limited but encouraging. PET and PET/CT with 18F-DOPA are useful in diagnosing primary brain tumors and should be recommended in the diagnosis of relapse of disease after surgical treatment and/or radiotherapy. Semiquantitative analysis could improve diagnosis while correlative imaging with MRI is essential. Limits are due to low knowledge of potential pitfalls.

  3. Cerenkov luminescence imaging guided selective-reconstruction for a flexible dual-head PET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, D.; Chen, X.; Zhang, C.; Wan, L.; Meng, F.; Xie, Q.; Liang, J.

    2017-04-01

    Dual-head PET can simply and flexibilly adjust its architecture to fit the size of the imaging object, making it great potential for simultaneous multi-modality molecular imaging. In this paper, we proposed conceptally dual-modality imaging system of distance-adjustable dual-head PET and Cerenkov luminescence imaging (CLI), and implemented a CLI guided selective-reconstruction method. In the selective-reconstruction, we reconstructed the information inside a predefined region of interest using a fine voxel, whereas reconstructed other regions using a coarse voxel. We used CLI data as a priori information to outline the predefined region of interest. Simultaneously, for reducing the computaion burden, an attenuation map with a coarse voxel size was used for the attenuation correction. We demonstrated the feasibility and effectiveness of our proposed method with Monte Carlo based simulations by reconstructing phantom consisted of two hot rods. Experiment results show that an most improved efficiency over 70 times speedup with an MSE of 5.2235.

  4. A Comparison of Techniques for (90)Y PET/CT Image-Based Dosimetry Following Radioembolization with Resin Microspheres.

    PubMed

    Pasciak, Alexander S; Bourgeois, Austin C; Bradley, Yong C

    2014-01-01

    (90)Y PET/CT following radioembolization has recently been established as a viable diagnostic tool, capable of producing images that are both quantitative and have superior image quality than alternative (90)Y imaging modalities. Because radioembolization is assumed to be a permanent implant, it is possible to convert quantitative (90)Y PET image sets into data representative of spatial committed absorbed-dose. Multiple authors have performed this transformation using dose-point kernel (DPK) convolution to account for the transport of the high-energy (90)Y β-particles. This article explores a technique called the Local Deposition Method (LDM), an alternative to DPK convolution for (90)Y image-based dosimetry. The LDM assumes that the kinetic energy from each (90)Y β-particle is deposited locally, within the voxel where the decay occurred. Using the combined analysis of phantoms scanned using (90)Y PET/CT and ideal mathematical phantoms, an accuracy comparison of DPK convolution and the LDM has been performed. Based on the presented analysis, DPK convolution provides no detectible accuracy benefit over the LDM for (90)Y PET-based dosimetry. For PET systems with (90)Y resolution poorer than 3.25 mm at full-width and half-max using a small voxel size, the LDM may produce a dosimetric solution that is more accurate than DPK convolution under ideal conditions; however, image noise can obscure some of the perceived benefit. As voxel size increases and resolution decreases, differences between the LDM and DPK convolution are reduced. The LDM method of post-radioembolization dosimetry has the advantage of not requiring additional post-processing. The provided conversion factors can be used to determine committed absorbed-dose using conventional PET image analysis tools. The LDM is a recommended option for routine post-radioembolization (90)Y dosimetry based on PET/CT imaging.

  5. A Comparison of Techniques for 90Y PET/CT Image-Based Dosimetry Following Radioembolization with Resin Microspheres

    PubMed Central

    Pasciak, Alexander S.; Bourgeois, Austin C.; Bradley, Yong C.

    2014-01-01

    90Y PET/CT following radioembolization has recently been established as a viable diagnostic tool, capable of producing images that are both quantitative and have superior image quality than alternative 90Y imaging modalities. Because radioembolization is assumed to be a permanent implant, it is possible to convert quantitative 90Y PET image sets into data representative of spatial committed absorbed-dose. Multiple authors have performed this transformation using dose-point kernel (DPK) convolution to account for the transport of the high-energy 90Y β-particles. This article explores a technique called the Local Deposition Method (LDM), an alternative to DPK convolution for 90Y image-based dosimetry. The LDM assumes that the kinetic energy from each 90Y β-particle is deposited locally, within the voxel where the decay occurred. Using the combined analysis of phantoms scanned using 90Y PET/CT and ideal mathematical phantoms, an accuracy comparison of DPK convolution and the LDM has been performed. Based on the presented analysis, DPK convolution provides no detectible accuracy benefit over the LDM for 90Y PET-based dosimetry. For PET systems with 90Y resolution poorer than 3.25 mm at full-width and half-max using a small voxel size, the LDM may produce a dosimetric solution that is more accurate than DPK convolution under ideal conditions; however, image noise can obscure some of the perceived benefit. As voxel size increases and resolution decreases, differences between the LDM and DPK convolution are reduced. The LDM method of post-radioembolization dosimetry has the advantage of not requiring additional post-processing. The provided conversion factors can be used to determine committed absorbed-dose using conventional PET image analysis tools. The LDM is a recommended option for routine post-radioembolization 90Y dosimetry based on PET/CT imaging. PMID:24904832

  6. (⁹⁹m)Tc-bisphosphonate-iron oxide nanoparticle conjugates for dual-modality biomedical imaging.

    PubMed

    Torres Martin de Rosales, Rafael; Tavaré, Richard; Glaria, Arnaud; Varma, Gopal; Protti, Andrea; Blower, Philip J

    2011-03-16

    The combination of radionuclide-based imaging modalities such as single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and positron emission tomography (PET) with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is likely to become the next generation of clinical scanners. Hence, there is a growing interest in the development of SPECT- and PET-MRI agents. To this end, we report a new class of dual-modality imaging agents based on the conjugation of radiolabeled bisphosphonates (BP) directly to the surface of superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticles. We demonstrate the high potential of BP-iron oxide conjugation using (⁹⁹m)Tc-dipicolylamine(DPA)-alendronate, a BP-SPECT agent, and Endorem/Feridex, a liver MRI contrast agent based on SPIO. The labeling of SPIOs with (⁹⁹m)Tc-DPA-alendronate can be performed in one step at room temperature if the SPIO is not coated with an organic polymer. Heating is needed if the nanoparticles are coated, as long as the coating is weakly bound as in the case of dextran in Endorem. The size of the radiolabeled Endorem (⁹⁹m)Tc-DPA-ale-Endorem) was characterized by TEM (5 nm, Fe₃O₄ core) and DLS (106 ± 60 nm, Fe₃O₄ core + dextran). EDX, Dittmer-Lester, and radiolabeling studies demonstrate that the BP is bound to the nanoparticles and that it binds to the Fe₃O₄ cores of Endorem, and not its dextran coating. The bimodal imaging capabilities and excellent stability of these nanoparticles were confirmed using MRI and nanoSPECT-CT imaging, showing that (⁹⁹m)Tc and Endorem co-localize in the liver and spleen In Vivo, as expected for particles of the composition and size of (⁹⁹m)Tc-DPA-ale-Endorem. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first example of radiolabeling SPIOs with BP conjugates and the first example of radiolabeling SPIO nanoparticles directly onto the surface of the iron oxide core, and not its coating. This work lays down the basis for a new generation of SPECT/PET-MR imaging agents in which the BP

  7. Motion correction of PET brain images through deconvolution: II. Practical implementation and algorithm optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raghunath, N.; Faber, T. L.; Suryanarayanan, S.; Votaw, J. R.

    2009-02-01

    Image quality is significantly degraded even by small amounts of patient motion in very high-resolution PET scanners. When patient motion is known, deconvolution methods can be used to correct the reconstructed image and reduce motion blur. This paper describes the implementation and optimization of an iterative deconvolution method that uses an ordered subset approach to make it practical and clinically viable. We performed ten separate FDG PET scans using the Hoffman brain phantom and simultaneously measured its motion using the Polaris Vicra tracking system (Northern Digital Inc., Ontario, Canada). The feasibility and effectiveness of the technique was studied by performing scans with different motion and deconvolution parameters. Deconvolution resulted in visually better images and significant improvement as quantified by the Universal Quality Index (UQI) and contrast measures. Finally, the technique was applied to human studies to demonstrate marked improvement. Thus, the deconvolution technique presented here appears promising as a valid alternative to existing motion correction methods for PET. It has the potential for deblurring an image from any modality if the causative motion is known and its effect can be represented in a system matrix.

  8. Imaging Breast Density: Established and Emerging Modalities1

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jeon-Hor; Gulsen, Gultekin; Su, Min-Ying

    2015-01-01

    Mammographic density has been proven as an independent risk factor for breast cancer. Women with dense breast tissue visible on a mammogram have a much higher cancer risk than women with little density. A great research effort has been devoted to incorporate breast density into risk prediction models to better estimate each individual’s cancer risk. In recent years, the passage of breast density notification legislation in many states in USA requires that every mammography report should provide information regarding the patient’s breast density. Accurate definition and measurement of breast density are thus important, which may allow all the potential clinical applications of breast density to be implemented. Because the two-dimensional mammography-based measurement is subject to tissue overlapping and thus not able to provide volumetric information, there is an urgent need to develop reliable quantitative measurements of breast density. Various new imaging technologies are being developed. Among these new modalities, volumetric mammographic density methods and three-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging are the most well studied. Besides, emerging modalities, including different x-ray–based, optical imaging, and ultrasound-based methods, have also been investigated. All these modalities may either overcome some fundamental problems related to mammographic density or provide additional density and/or compositional information. The present review article aimed to summarize the current established and emerging imaging techniques for the measurement of breast density and the evidence of the clinical use of these density methods from the literature. PMID:26692524

  9. Optimally stabilized PET image denoising using trilateral filtering.

    PubMed

    Mansoor, Awais; Bagci, Ulas; Mollura, Daniel J

    2014-01-01

    Low-resolution and signal-dependent noise distribution in positron emission tomography (PET) images makes denoising process an inevitable step prior to qualitative and quantitative image analysis tasks. Conventional PET denoising methods either over-smooth small-sized structures due to resolution limitation or make incorrect assumptions about the noise characteristics. Therefore, clinically important quantitative information may be corrupted. To address these challenges, we introduced a novel approach to remove signal-dependent noise in the PET images where the noise distribution was considered as Poisson-Gaussian mixed. Meanwhile, the generalized Anscombe's transformation (GAT) was used to stabilize varying nature of the PET noise. Other than noise stabilization, it is also desirable for the noise removal filter to preserve the boundaries of the structures while smoothing the noisy regions. Indeed, it is important to avoid significant loss of quantitative information such as standard uptake value (SUV)-based metrics as well as metabolic lesion volume. To satisfy all these properties, we extended bilateral filtering method into trilateral filtering through multiscaling and optimal Gaussianization process. The proposed method was tested on more than 50 PET-CT images from various patients having different cancers and achieved the superior performance compared to the widely used denoising techniques in the literature.

  10. PET imaging in ectopic Cushing syndrome: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Santhanam, Prasanna; Taieb, David; Giovanella, Luca; Treglia, Giorgio

    2015-11-01

    Cushing syndrome due to endogenous hypercortisolism may cause significant morbidity and mortality. The source of excess cortisol may be adrenal, pituitary, or ectopic. Ectopic Cushing syndrome is sometimes difficult to localize on conventional imaging like CT and MRI. After performing a multilevel thoracoabdominal imaging with CT, the evidence regarding the use of radiotracers for PET imaging is unclear due to significant molecular and etiological heterogeneity of potential causes of ectopic Cushing's syndrome. In our systematic review of literature, it appears that GalLium-based (Ga68) somatostatin receptor analogs have better sensitivity in diagnosis of bronchial carcinoids causing Cushing syndrome and FDG PET appears superior for small-cell lung cancers and other aggressive tumors. Further large-scale studies are needed to identify the best PET tracer for this condition.

  11. PET and NIR optical imaging using self-illuminating (64)Cu-doped chelator-free gold nanoclusters.

    PubMed

    Hu, Hao; Huang, Peng; Weiss, Orit Jacobson; Yan, Xuefeng; Yue, Xuyi; Zhang, Molly Gu; Tang, Yuxia; Nie, Liming; Ma, Ying; Niu, Gang; Wu, Kaichun; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2014-12-01

    Self-illuminating fluorescence imaging without autofluorescence background interference has recently aroused more research interests in molecular imaging. Currently, only a few self-illuminating probes were developed, based mainly on toxic quantum dots such as CdSe, CdTe. Herein, we report a novel design of nontoxic self-illuminating gold nanocluster ((64)Cu-doped AuNCs) for dual-modality positron emission tomography (PET) and near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence imaging based on Cerenkov resonance energy transfer (CRET). PET radionuclide (64)Cu was introduced by a chelator-free doping method, which played dual roles as the energy donor and the PET imaging source. Meanwhile, AuNCs acted as the energy acceptor for NIR fluorescence imaging. (64)Cu-doped AuNCs exhibited efficient CRET-NIR and PET imaging both in vitro and in vivo. In a U87MG glioblastoma xenograft model, (64)Cu-doped AuNCs showed high tumor uptake (14.9 %ID/g at 18 h) and produced satisfactory tumor self-illuminating NIR images in the absence of external excitation. This self-illuminating nanocluster with non-toxicity and good biocompatibility can be employed as a novel imaging contrast agent for biomedical applications, especially for molecular imaging.

  12. PET and NIR Optical Imaging Using Self-Illuminating 64Cu-Doped Chelator-Free Gold Nanoclusters

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Hao; Huang, Peng; Weiss, Orit Jacobson; Yan, Xuefeng; Yue, Xuyi; Zhang, Molly Gu; Tang, Yuxia; Nie, Liming; Ma, Ying; Niu, Gang; Wu, Kaichun; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2014-01-01

    Self-illuminating fluorescence imaging without autofluorescence background interference has recently aroused more research interests in molecular imaging. Currently, only a few self-illuminating probes were developed, based mainly on toxic quantum dots such as CdSe, CdTe. Herein, we report a novel design of nontoxic self-illuminating gold nanocluster (64Cu-doped AuNCs) for dual-modality positron emission tomography (PET) and near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence imaging based on Cerenkov resonance energy transfer (CRET). PET radionuclide 64Cu was introduced by a chelator-free doping method, which played dual roles as the energy donor and the PET imaging source. Meanwhile, AuNCs acted as the energy acceptor for NIR fluorescence imaging. 64Cu-doped AuNCs exhibited efficient CRET-NIR and PET imaging both in vitro and in vivo. In a U87MG glioblastoma xenograft model, 64Cu-doped AuNCs showed high tumor uptake (14.9%ID/g at 18 h) and produced satisfactory tumor self-illuminating NIR images in the absence of external excitation. This self-illuminating nanocluster with non-toxicity and good biocompatibility can be employed as a novel imaging contrast agent for biomedical applications, especially for molecular imaging. PMID:25224367

  13. Image and Dose Simulation in Support of New Mammography Modalities

    SciTech Connect

    Kuruvilla Verghese

    2002-04-05

    This report summarizes the highlights of the research performed under the 2-year NEER grant from the Department of Energy. The primary outcome of the work was a new Monte Carlo code, MCMIS-DS, for Monte Carlo for Mammography Image Simulation including Differential Sampling. The code was written to generate simulated images and dose distributions from two different new digital x-ray imaging modalities, namely, synchrotron imaging (SI) and a slot geometry digital mammography system called Fisher Senoscan. A differential sampling scheme was added to the code to generate multiple images that included variations in the parameters of the measurement system and the object in a single execution of the code. The code is to serve multiple purposes; (1) to answer questions regarding the contribution of scattered photons to images, (2) for use in design optimization studies, and (3) to do up to second-order perturbation studies to assess the effects of design parameter variations and/or physical parameters of the object (the breast) without having to re-run the code for each set of varied parameters. The accuracy and fidelity of the code were validated by a large variety of benchmark studies using published data and also using experimental results from mammography phantoms on both imaging modalities.

  14. Simultaneous maximum a posteriori longitudinal PET image reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, Sam; Reader, Andrew J.

    2017-09-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is frequently used to monitor functional changes that occur over extended time scales, for example in longitudinal oncology PET protocols that include routine clinical follow-up scans to assess the efficacy of a course of treatment. In these contexts PET datasets are currently reconstructed into images using single-dataset reconstruction methods. Inspired by recently proposed joint PET-MR reconstruction methods, we propose to reconstruct longitudinal datasets simultaneously by using a joint penalty term in order to exploit the high degree of similarity between longitudinal images. We achieved this by penalising voxel-wise differences between pairs of longitudinal PET images in a one-step-late maximum a posteriori (MAP) fashion, resulting in the MAP simultaneous longitudinal reconstruction (SLR) method. The proposed method reduced reconstruction errors and visually improved images relative to standard maximum likelihood expectation-maximisation (ML-EM) in simulated 2D longitudinal brain tumour scans. In reconstructions of split real 3D data with inserted simulated tumours, noise across images reconstructed with MAP-SLR was reduced to levels equivalent to doubling the number of detected counts when using ML-EM. Furthermore, quantification of tumour activities was largely preserved over a variety of longitudinal tumour changes, including changes in size and activity, with larger changes inducing larger biases relative to standard ML-EM reconstructions. Similar improvements were observed for a range of counts levels, demonstrating the robustness of the method when used with a single penalty strength. The results suggest that longitudinal regularisation is a simple but effective method of improving reconstructed PET images without using resolution degrading priors.

  15. Current Imaging Modalities for assessing Ocular Blood Flow in Glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Mohindroo, Chirayu; Kumar, Suresh

    2016-01-01

    Glaucoma may be caused by an interplay of elevated intraocular pressure (IOP), vascular, genetic, anatomical, brain, and immune factors. The direct assessment of ocular hemodynam-ics offers promise for glaucoma detection, differentiation, and possibly new treatment modalities. All the methods currently in use to measure ocular blood flow have inherent limitations and measure different aspects of ocular blood flow. This review article attempts to provide detailed information on ocular perfu-sion pressure as well as an overview of the newly developed imaging technologies used to investigate ocular blood flow in glaucoma patients. How to cite this article Mohindroo C, Ichhpujani P, Kumar S. Current Imaging Modalities for assessing Ocular Blood Flow in Glaucoma. J Curr Glaucoma Pract 2016;10(3):104-112. PMID:27857490

  16. Simultaneous imaging using Si-PM-based PET and MRI for development of an integrated PET/MRI system.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Seiichi; Watabe, Tadashi; Watabe, Hiroshi; Aoki, Masaaki; Sugiyama, Eiji; Imaizumi, Masao; Kanai, Yasukazu; Shimosegawa, Eku; Hatazawa, Jun

    2012-01-21

    The silicon photomultiplier (Si-PM) is a promising photo-detector for PET for use in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems because it has high gain and is insensitive to static magnetic fields. Recently we developed a Si-PM-based depth-of-interaction PET system for small animals and performed simultaneous measurements by combining the Si-PM-based PET and the 0.15 T permanent MRI to test the interferences between the Si-PM-based PET and an MRI. When the Si-PM was inside the MRI and installed around the radio frequency (RF) coil of the MRI, significant noise from the RF sequence of the MRI was observed in the analog signals of the PET detectors. However, we did not observe any artifacts in the PET images; fluctuation increased in the count rate of the Si-PM-based PET system. On the MRI side, there was significant degradation of the signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) in the MRI images compared with those without PET. By applying noise reduction procedures, the degradation of the S/N was reduced. With this condition, simultaneous measurements of a rat brain using a Si-PM-based PET and an MRI were made with some degradation in the MRI images. We conclude that simultaneous measurements are possible using Si-PM-based PET and MRI.

  17. Precision Medicine in Multiple Sclerosis: Future of PET Imaging of Inflammation and Reactive Astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Poutiainen, Pekka; Jaronen, Merja; Quintana, Francisco J.; Brownell, Anna-Liisa

    2016-01-01

    Non-invasive molecular imaging techniques can enhance diagnosis to achieve successful treatment, as well as reveal underlying pathogenic mechanisms in disorders such as multiple sclerosis (MS). The cooperation of advanced multimodal imaging techniques and increased knowledge of the MS disease mechanism allows both monitoring of neuronal network and therapeutic outcome as well as the tools to discover novel therapeutic targets. Diverse imaging modalities provide reliable diagnostic and prognostic platforms to better achieve precision medicine. Traditionally, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been considered the golden standard in MS research and diagnosis. However, positron emission tomography (PET) imaging can provide functional information of molecular biology in detail even prior to anatomic changes, allowing close follow up of disease progression and treatment response. The recent findings support three major neuroinflammation components in MS: astrogliosis, cytokine elevation, and significant changes in specific proteins, which offer a great variety of specific targets for imaging purposes. Regardless of the fact that imaging of astrocyte function is still a young field and in need for development of suitable imaging ligands, recent studies have shown that inflammation and astrocyte activation are related to progression of MS. MS is a complex disease, which requires understanding of disease mechanisms for successful treatment. PET is a precise non-invasive imaging method for biochemical functions and has potential to enhance early and accurate diagnosis for precision therapy of MS. In this review we focus on modulation of different receptor systems and inflammatory aspect of MS, especially on activation of glial cells, and summarize the recent findings of PET imaging in MS and present the most potent targets for new biomarkers with the main focus on experimental MS research. PMID:27695400

  18. Differential diagnosis of adrenal mass using imaging modality: special emphasis on f-18 fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hong Je; Lee, Jaetae

    2014-03-01

    Adrenal incidentalomas are adrenal masses serendipitously detected during an imaging study performed for reasons unrelated to suspicion of adrenal disease. The incidence of adrenal incidentalomas has increased because of the widespread use of various imaging modalities. In oncology patients with adrenal incidentalomas, the characterization of the adrenal masses is challenging because nearly 50% of incidental adrenal masses are metastatic lesions that need special medical attention. Although unenhanced computed tomography (CT) densitometry, chemical shift magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), delayed contrast-enhanced CT and CT histogram analysis have been used as sensitive and specific modalities for differentiating benign from malignant adrenal masses, F-18 fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography (F-18 FDG PET)/CT is a highly accurate imaging modality compared to CT or MRI, especially when these two imaging modalities are combined. In addition, a semiquantitative analysis using standardized uptake value ratio further improves the diagnostic accuracy of F-18 FDG PET/CT in differentiating benign from malignant adrenal masses. Thus, F-18 FDG PET/CT is very helpful for determining the best therapeutic management, especially for assessing the need for surgery.

  19. Multi-modal inter-subject registration of mouse brain images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xia; Yankeelov, Thomas E.; Rosen, Glenn; Gore, John C.; Dawant, Benoit M.

    2006-03-01

    The importance of small animal imaging in fundamental and clinical research is growing rapidly. These studies typically involve micro PET, micro MR, and micro CT images as well as optical or fluorescence images. Histological images are also often used to complement and/or validate the in vivo data. As is the case for human studies, automatic registration of these imaging modalities is a critical component of the overall analysis process, but, the small size of the animals and thus the limited spatial resolution of the in vivo images present specific challenges. In this paper, we propose a series of methods and techniques that permit the inter-subject registration of micro MR and histological images. We then compare results obtained by registering directly MR volumes to each other using a non-rigid registration algorithm we have developed at our institution with results obtained by registering first the MR volumes to their corresponding histological volume, which we reconstruct from 2D cross-sections, and then registering histological volumes to each other. We show that the second approach is preferable.

  20. Influence of Iterative Reconstruction Algorithms on PET Image Resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpetas, G. E.; Michail, C. M.; Fountos, G. P.; Valais, I. G.; Nikolopoulos, D.; Kandarakis, I. S.; Panayiotakis, G. S.

    2015-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess image quality of PET scanners through a thin layer chromatography (TLC) plane source. The source was simulated using a previously validated Monte Carlo model. The model was developed by using the GATE MC package and reconstructed images obtained with the STIR software for tomographic image reconstruction. The simulated PET scanner was the GE DiscoveryST. A plane source consisted of a TLC plate, was simulated by a layer of silica gel on aluminum (Al) foil substrates, immersed in 18F-FDG bath solution (1MBq). Image quality was assessed in terms of the modulation transfer function (MTF). MTF curves were estimated from transverse reconstructed images of the plane source. Images were reconstructed by the maximum likelihood estimation (MLE)-OSMAPOSL, the ordered subsets separable paraboloidal surrogate (OSSPS), the median root prior (MRP) and OSMAPOSL with quadratic prior, algorithms. OSMAPOSL reconstruction was assessed by using fixed subsets and various iterations, as well as by using various beta (hyper) parameter values. MTF values were found to increase with increasing iterations. MTF also improves by using lower beta values. The simulated PET evaluation method, based on the TLC plane source, can be useful in the resolution assessment of PET scanners.

  1. HIGH-CONTRAST IMAGING VIA MODAL CONVERGENCE OF DEFORMABLE MIRROR

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Feiling

    2012-06-01

    For extremely high contrast imaging, such as direct observation of faint stellar companions, an adaptive optics system is required to produce low-halo and low-speckle regions in the focal plane. A method for deformable mirror control is proposed to achieve this goal. The method relies on a modal convergence of the deformable mirror driven by a focal-plane metric. The modal sets are derived from the Walsh functions. The Walsh-function modes serve two purposes: the expansion of the actuator displacements and the expansion of the phase functions. Taking advantage of the unique properties of the modal functions, a universal control algorithm is devised for the realization of high-contrast focal planes with and without the help of conventional coronagraphy. Numerical modeling is conducted to simulate complete imaging systems under various scenarios. It is shown that the proposed method reliably produces high-contrast focal planes using either a segmented or a membrane mirror. In the presence of random aberration the method is shown to be able to maintain high-contrast focal planes. Requiring neither retrieval of electric fields nor detailed knowledge of the deformable mirrors, this technique may allow high-contrast imaging in real time.

  2. Radiological Evaluation of Ambiguous Genitalia with Various Imaging Modalities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravi, N.; Bindushree, Kadakola

    2012-07-01

    Disorders of sex development (DSDs) are congenital conditions in which the development of chromosomal, gonadal, or anatomic sex is atypical. These can be classified broadly into four categories on the basis of gonadal histologic features: female pseudohermaphroditism (46,XX with two ovaries); male pseudohermaphroditism (46,XY with two testes); true hermaphroditism (ovotesticular DSD) (both ovarian and testicular tissues); and gonadal dysgenesis, either mixed (a testis and a streak gonad) or pure (bilateral streak gonads). Imaging plays an important role in demonstrating the anatomy and associated anomalies. Ultrasonography is the primary modality for demonstrating internal organs and magnetic resonance imaging is used as an adjunct modality to assess for internal gonads and genitalia. Early and appropriate gender assignment is necessary for healthy physical and psychologic development of children with ambiguous genitalia. Gender assignment can be facilitated with a team approach that involves a pediatric endocrinologist, geneticist, urologist, psychiatrist, social worker, neonatologist, nurse, and radiologist, allowing timely diagnosis and proper management. We describe case series on ambiguous genitalia presented to our department who were evaluated with multiple imaging modalities.

  3. The left bundle branch block revised with novel imaging modalities

    PubMed Central

    van Dijk, J.; Mannaerts, H.F.J.; Germans, T.; Hauer, H.A.; Knaapen, P.; Visser, C.A.; Kamp, O.

    2006-01-01

    Left bundle branch block (LBBB) is related to abnormal cardiac conduction and mechanical asynchrony and is associated with hypertension and coronary artery disease. Improved evaluation of left ventricular (LV) mechanical asynchrony is needed, because of the increasing number of patients with LBBB and heart failure. In this paper, we describe tissue Doppler imaging (TDI), strain (rate) imaging and tissue tracking in LBBB patients. A variety of patterns of mechanical activation can be observed in LBBB patients. A recent development, referred to as tissue synchronisation imaging, colour codes TDI time-to-peak systolic velocities of segments and displays mechanical asynchrony. Furthermore, real-time 3D echocardiography provides new regional information about mechanical asynchrony. Contained in an LV model and projected on a bull's eye plot, this modality helps to display the spatial distribution of mechanical asynchrony. Finally, segmental time-to-peak circumferential strain curves, produced by cardiac magnetic resonance imaging, provide additional quantification of LV mechanical asynchrony. Effects of LBBB on regional and global cardiac function are impressive, myocardial involvement seems to play a role and with the help of these novel imaging modalities, new insights continue to develop. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6Figure 7 PMID:25696572

  4. Direct Estimation of Kinetic Parametric Images for Dynamic PET

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guobao; Qi, Jinyi

    2013-01-01

    Dynamic positron emission tomography (PET) can monitor spatiotemporal distribution of radiotracer in vivo. The spatiotemporal information can be used to estimate parametric images of radiotracer kinetics that are of physiological and biochemical interests. Direct estimation of parametric images from raw projection data allows accurate noise modeling and has been shown to offer better image quality than conventional indirect methods, which reconstruct a sequence of PET images first and then perform tracer kinetic modeling pixel-by-pixel. Direct reconstruction of parametric images has gained increasing interests with the advances in computing hardware. Many direct reconstruction algorithms have been developed for different kinetic models. In this paper we review the recent progress in the development of direct reconstruction algorithms for parametric image estimation. Algorithms for linear and nonlinear kinetic models are described and their properties are discussed. PMID:24396500

  5. Differential Receptor Tyrosine Kinase PET Imaging for Therapeutic Guidance

    PubMed Central

    Wehrenberg-Klee, Eric; Turker, N. Selcan; Heidari, Pedram; Larimer, Benjamin; Juric, Dejan; Baselga, José; Scaltriti, Maurizio

    2016-01-01

    Inhibitors of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/protein kinase B/mammalian target of rapamycin (PI3K/AKT/mTOR) pathway hold promise for the treatment of breast cancer, but resistance to these treatments can arise via feedback loops that increase surface expression of the receptor tyrosine kinases (RTK) epidermal growth factor receptor 1 (EGFR) and human epidermal growth factor receptor 3 (HER3), leading to persistent growth pathway signaling. We developed PET probes that provide a method of imaging this response in vivo, determining which tumors may use this escape pathway while avoiding the need for repeated biopsies. Methods: Anti-EGFR-F(ab′)2 and anti-HER3-F(ab′)2 were generated from monoclonal antibodies by enzymatic digestion, conjugated to DOTA, and labeled with 64Cu. A panel of breast cancer cell lines was treated with increasing concentrations of the AKT inhibitor GDC-0068 or the PI3K inhibitor GDC-0941. Pre- and posttreatment expression of EGFR and HER3 was compared using Western blot and correlated to probe accumulation with binding studies. Nude mice xenografts of HCC-70 or MDA-MB-468 were treated with either AKT inhibitor or PI3K inhibitor and imaged with either EGFR or HER3 PET probe. Results: Changes in HER3 and EGFR PET probe accumulation correlate to RTK expression change as assessed by Western blot (R2 of 0.85–0.98). EGFR PET probe PET/CT imaging of HCC70 tumors shows an SUV of 0.32 ± 0.03 for vehicle-, 0.50 ± 0.01 for GDC-0941–, and 0.62 ± 0.01 for GDC-0068–treated tumors, respectively (P < 0.01 for both comparisons to vehicle). HER3 PET probe PET/CT imaging of MDAMB468 tumors shows an SUV of 0.35 ± 0.02 for vehicle- and 0.73 ± 0.05 for GDC-0068–treated tumors (P < 0.01). Conclusion: Our imaging studies, using PET probes specific to EGFR and HER3, show that changes in RTK expression indicative of resistance to PI3K and AKT inhibitors can be seen within days of therapy initiation and are of sufficient magnitude as to allow reliable

  6. A dual-modal retinal imaging system with adaptive optics

    PubMed Central

    Meadway, Alexander; Girkin, Christopher A.; Zhang, Yuhua

    2013-01-01

    An adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope (AO-SLO) is adapted to provide optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging. The AO-SLO function is unchanged. The system uses the same light source, scanning optics, and adaptive optics in both imaging modes. The result is a dual-modal system that can acquire retinal images in both en face and cross-section planes at the single cell level. A new spectral shaping method is developed to reduce the large sidelobes in the coherence profile of the OCT imaging when a non-ideal source is used with a minimal introduction of noise. The technique uses a combination of two existing digital techniques. The thickness and position of the traditionally named inner segment/outer segment junction are measured from individual photoreceptors. In-vivo images of healthy and diseased human retinas are demonstrated. PMID:24514529

  7. Contemporary Diagnostic Imaging Modalities for the Staging and Surveillance of Melanoma Patients: a Meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Yan; Bronstein, Yulia; Ross, Merrick I.; Askew, Robert L.; Lee, Jeffrey E.; Gershenwald, Jeffrey E.; Royal, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Background Meta-analyses were performed to examine the utility of ultrasonography, computed tomography (CT), positron emission tomography (PET), and a combination of both (PET-CT) for the staging and surveillance of melanoma patients. Method Patient-level data from 74 studies containing 10 528 patients (between January 1, 1990, and June, 30, 2009) were used to derive characteristics of the diagnostic tests used. Meta-analyses were conducted by use of Bayesian bivariate binomial models to estimate sensitivity and specificity. Diagnostic odds ratios [ie, true-positive results/false-negative results)/(false-positive results/true-negative results)] and their 95% credible intervals (CrIs) and positive predictive values were used as indicators of test performance. Results Among the four imaging methods examined for the staging of regional lymph nodes, ultrasonography had the highest sensitivity (60%, 95% CrI = 33% to 83%), specificity (97%, 95% CrI = 88% to 99%), and diagnostic odds ratio (42, 95% CrI = 8.08 to 249.8). For staging of distant metastases, PET-CT had the highest sensitivity (80%, 95% CrI = 53% to 93%), specificity (87%, 95% CrI = 54% to 97%), and diagnostic odds ratio (25, 95% CrI = 3.58 to 198.7). Similar trends were observed for melanoma surveillance of lymph node involvement, with ultrasonography having the highest sensitivity (96%, 95% CrI = 85% to 99%), specificity (99%, 95% CrI = 95% to 100%), and diagnostic odds ratio (1675, 95% CrI = 226.6 to 15,920). For distant metastases, PET-CT had the highest sensitivity (86%, 95% CrI = 76% to 93%), specificity (91%, 95% CrI = 79% to 97%), and diagnostic odds ratio (67, 95% CrI = 20.42 to 229.7). Positive predictive values were likewise highest for ultrasonography in lymph node staging and for PET-CT in detecting distant metastases. Conclusion Among the compared modalities, ultrasonography was superior for detecting lymph node metastases, and PET-CT was superior for the detection of distant metastases in both

  8. Pulmonary imaging using respiratory motion compensated simultaneous PET/MR

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Joyita; Huang, Chuan; Li, Quanzheng; El Fakhri, Georges

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Pulmonary positron emission tomography (PET) imaging is confounded by blurring artifacts caused by respiratory motion. These artifacts degrade both image quality and quantitative accuracy. In this paper, the authors present a complete data acquisition and processing framework for respiratory motion compensated image reconstruction (MCIR) using simultaneous whole body PET/magnetic resonance (MR) and validate it through simulation and clinical patient studies. Methods: The authors have developed an MCIR framework based on maximum a posteriori or MAP estimation. For fast acquisition of high quality 4D MR images, the authors developed a novel Golden-angle RAdial Navigated Gradient Echo (GRANGE) pulse sequence and used it in conjunction with sparsity-enforcing k-t FOCUSS reconstruction. The authors use a 1D slice-projection navigator signal encapsulated within this pulse sequence along with a histogram-based gate assignment technique to retrospectively sort the MR and PET data into individual gates. The authors compute deformation fields for each gate via nonrigid registration. The deformation fields are incorporated into the PET data model as well as utilized for generating dynamic attenuation maps. The framework was validated using simulation studies on the 4D XCAT phantom and three clinical patient studies that were performed on the Biograph mMR, a simultaneous whole body PET/MR scanner. Results: The authors compared MCIR (MC) results with ungated (UG) and one-gate (OG) reconstruction results. The XCAT study revealed contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) improvements for MC relative to UG in the range of 21%–107% for 14 mm diameter lung lesions and 39%–120% for 10 mm diameter lung lesions. A strategy for regularization parameter selection was proposed, validated using XCAT simulations, and applied to the clinical studies. The authors’ results show that the MC image yields 19%–190% increase in the CNR of high-intensity features of interest affected by

  9. Assessment of bone fragility with clinical imaging modalities

    PubMed Central

    Dong, XN; Wang, X

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Osteoporotic fractures are a vital public health concern and have created a great economic burden to our society. Therefore, early diagnosis of patients with high risk of osteoporotic fractures is essential. The current gold standard for assessment of fracture risk is the measurement of bone mineral density using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. However, such techniques are not very effective in the diagnosis of patients with osteopaenia. Doctors are usually unable to make an informed decision regarding the treatment plan of these patients. In addition to bone mineral density, advanced imaging modalities have been explored in recent years to assess bone quality in other contributing factors, such as microarchitecture of trabecular bone, mineralisation, microdamage and bone remodelling rates. Currently, the microarchitecture of trabecular bone can be evaluated in vivo by high-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography techniques, which have a resolution of 80 µm. However, such imaging techniques still remain a high-end research tool rather than a diagnostic tool for clinical applications. Thus, the limited accessibility and affordability of high-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography have become major concerns for the general public. Alternatively, combining bone mineral density measurements with stochastic assessments of spatial bone mineral density distribution from dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry images may offer an economic and efficient approach to non-invasively evaluate skeletal integrity and identify the at-risk population for osteoporotic fractures. The aim of this critical review is to assess bone fragility with clinical imaging modalities. Conclusion High-resolution quantitative computed tomography imaging technique may provide direct measurements of microarchitectures of trabecular bone in vivo. However, it is an expensive method of imaging modality. PMID:24294491

  10. MRI and PET image fusion using fuzzy logic and image local features.

    PubMed

    Javed, Umer; Riaz, Muhammad Mohsin; Ghafoor, Abdul; Ali, Syed Sohaib; Cheema, Tanveer Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    An image fusion technique for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography (PET) using local features and fuzzy logic is presented. The aim of proposed technique is to maximally combine useful information present in MRI and PET images. Image local features are extracted and combined with fuzzy logic to compute weights for each pixel. Simulation results show that the proposed scheme produces significantly better results compared to state-of-art schemes.

  11. Molecular PET imaging for biology-guided adaptive radiotherapy of head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Hoeben, Bianca A W; Bussink, Johan; Troost, Esther G C; Oyen, Wim J G; Kaanders, Johannes H A M

    2013-10-01

    Integration of molecular imaging PET techniques into therapy selection strategies and radiation treatment planning for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) can serve several purposes. First, pre-treatment assessments can steer decisions about radiotherapy modifications or combinations with other modalities. Second, biology-based objective functions can be introduced to the radiation treatment planning process by co-registration of molecular imaging with planning computed tomography (CT) scans. Thus, customized heterogeneous dose distributions can be generated with escalated doses to tumor areas where radiotherapy resistance mechanisms are most prevalent. Third, monitoring of temporal and spatial variations in these radiotherapy resistance mechanisms early during the course of treatment can discriminate responders from non-responders. With such information available shortly after the start of treatment, modifications can be implemented or the radiation treatment plan can be adapted tailing the biological response pattern. Currently, these strategies are in various phases of clinical testing, mostly in single-center studies. Further validation in multicenter set-up is needed. Ultimately, this should result in availability for routine clinical practice requiring stable production and accessibility of tracers, reproducibility and standardization of imaging and analysis methods, as well as general availability of knowledge and expertise. Small studies employing adaptive radiotherapy based on functional dynamics and early response mechanisms demonstrate promising results. In this context, we focus this review on the widely used PET tracer (18)F-FDG and PET tracers depicting hypoxia and proliferation; two well-known radiation resistance mechanisms.

  12. Localized Prostate Cancer Detection with 18F FACBC PET/CT: Comparison with MR Imaging and Histopathologic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Mena, Esther; Shih, Joanna; Pinto, Peter A.; Merino, Maria J.; Lindenberg, Maria L.; Bernardo, Marcelino; McKinney, Yolanda L.; Adler, Stephen; Owenius, Rikard; Choyke, Peter L.; Kurdziel, Karen A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To characterize uptake of 1-amino-3-fluorine 18-fluorocyclobutane-1-carboxylic acid (18F FACBC) in patients with localized prostate cancer, benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), and normal prostate tissue and to evaluate its potential utility in delineation of intraprostatic cancers in histopathologically confirmed localized prostate cancer in comparison with magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Materials and Methods Institutional review board approval and written informed consent were obtained for this HIPAA-compliant prospective study. Twenty-one men underwent dynamic and static abdominopelvic 18F FACBC combined positron emission tomography (PET) and computed tomography (CT) and multiparametric (MP) 3-T endorectal MR imaging before robotic-assisted prostatectomy. PET/CT and MR images were coregistered by using pelvic bones as fiducial markers; this was followed by manual adjustments. Whole-mount histopathologic specimens were sliced with an MR-based patient-specific mold. 18F FACBC PET standardized uptake values (SUVs) were compared with those at MR imaging and histopathologic analysis for lesion- and sector-based (20 sectors per patient) analysis. Positive and negative predictive values for each modality were estimated by using generalized estimating equations with logit link function and working independence correlation structure. Results 18F FACBC tumor uptake was rapid but reversible. It peaked 3.6 minutes after injection and reached a relative plateau at 15–20 minutes (SUVmax[15–20min]). Mean prostate tumor SUVmax(15–20min) was significantly higher than that of the normal prostate (4.5 ± 0.5 vs 2.7 ± 0.5) (P < .001); however, it was not significantly different from that of BPH (4.3 ± 0.6) (P = .27). Sector-based comparison with histopathologic analysis, including all tumors, revealed sensitivity and specificity of 67% and 66%, respectively, for 18F FACBC PET/CT and 73% and 79%, respectively, for T2-weighted MR imaging. 18F FACBC PET/CT and MP MR

  13. PET image reconstruction: a robust state space approach.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huafeng; Tian, Yi; Shi, Pengcheng

    2005-01-01

    Statistical iterative reconstruction algorithms have shown improved image quality over conventional nonstatistical methods in PET by using accurate system response models and measurement noise models. Strictly speaking, however, PET measurements, pre-corrected for accidental coincidences, are neither Poisson nor Gaussian distributed and thus do not meet basic assumptions of these algorithms. In addition, the difficulty in determining the proper system response model also greatly affects the quality of the reconstructed images. In this paper, we explore the usage of state space principles for the estimation of activity map in tomographic PET imaging. The proposed strategy formulates the organ activity distribution through tracer kinetics models, and the photon-counting measurements through observation equations, thus makes it possible to unify the dynamic reconstruction problem and static reconstruction problem into a general framework. Further, it coherently treats the uncertainties of the statistical model of the imaging system and the noisy nature of measurement data. Since H(infinity) filter seeks minimummaximum-error estimates without any assumptions on the system and data noise statistics, it is particular suited for PET image reconstruction where the statistical properties of measurement data and the system model are very complicated. The performance of the proposed framework is evaluated using Shepp-Logan simulated phantom data and real phantom data with favorable results.

  14. QIN: Quantitative Assessment of Dynamic PET Imaging Data in Cancer Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Muzi, Mark; O’Sullivan, Finbarr; Mankoff, David; Doot, Robert; Pierce, Larry; Kurland, Brenda; Linden, Hannah; Kinahan, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Clinical imaging in PET is often performed using single time point estimates of tracer uptake or static imaging that provides a spatial map of regional tracer concentration. However, dynamic tracer imaging can provide considerably more information about in vivo biology by delineating both the temporal and spatial pattern of tracer uptake. In addition several potential sources of error that occur in static imaging can be mitigated. This review focuses of the application of dynamic PET imaging to measuring regional cancer biologic features and especially in using dynamic PET imaging for quantitative therapeutic response monitoring in cancer clinical trials. Dynamic PET imaging output parameters, particularly transport (flow) and overall metabolic rate, have provided imaging endpoints for clinical trials at single center institutions for years. However dynamic imaging poses many challenges for multi-center clinical trial implementations from cross-center calibration to the inadequacy of a common informatics infrastructure. Underlying principles and methodology of PET dynamic imaging are first reviewed, followed by an examination of current approaches to dynamic PET image analysis with a specific case example of dynamic FLT imaging to illustrate the approach. PMID:22819579

  15. Disease quantification on PET/CT images without object delineation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Yubing; Udupa, Jayaram K.; Odhner, Dewey; Wu, Caiyun; Fitzpatrick, Danielle; Winchell, Nicole; Schuster, Stephen J.; Torigian, Drew A.

    2017-03-01

    The derivation of quantitative information from images to make quantitative radiology (QR) clinically practical continues to face a major image analysis hurdle because of image segmentation challenges. This paper presents a novel approach to disease quantification (DQ) via positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) images that explores how to decouple DQ methods from explicit dependence on object segmentation through the use of only object recognition results to quantify disease burden. The concept of an object-dependent disease map is introduced to express disease severity without performing explicit delineation and partial volume correction of either objects or lesions. The parameters of the disease map are estimated from a set of training image data sets. The idea is illustrated on 20 lung lesions and 20 liver lesions derived from 18F-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG)-PET/CT scans of patients with various types of cancers and also on 20 NEMA PET/CT phantom data sets. Our preliminary results show that, on phantom data sets, "disease burden" can be estimated to within 2% of known absolute true activity. Notwithstanding the difficulty in establishing true quantification on patient PET images, our results achieve 8% deviation from "true" estimates, with slightly larger deviations for small and diffuse lesions where establishing ground truth becomes really questionable, and smaller deviations for larger lesions where ground truth set up becomes more reliable. We are currently exploring extensions of the approach to include fully automated body-wide DQ, extensions to just CT or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) alone, to PET/CT performed with radiotracers other than FDG, and other functional forms of disease maps.

  16. Inert fluorinated gas MRI: a new pulmonary imaging modality.

    PubMed

    Couch, Marcus J; Ball, Iain K; Li, Tao; Fox, Matthew S; Ouriadov, Alexei V; Biman, Birubi; Albert, Mitchell S

    2014-12-01

    Fluorine-19 ((19)F) MRI of the lungs using inhaled inert fluorinated gases can potentially provide high quality images of the lungs that are similar in quality to those from hyperpolarized (HP) noble gas MRI. Inert fluorinated gases have the advantages of being nontoxic, abundant, and inexpensive compared with HP gases. Due to the high gyromagnetic ratio of (19)F, there is sufficient thermally polarized signal for imaging, and averaging within a single breath-hold is possible due to short longitudinal relaxation times. Therefore, the gases do not need to be hyperpolarized prior to their use in MRI. This eliminates the need for an expensive polarizer and expensive isotopes. Inert fluorinated gas MRI of the lungs has been previously demonstrated in animals, and more recently in healthy volunteers and patients with lung diseases. The ongoing improvements in image quality demonstrate the potential of (19)F MRI for visualizing the distribution of ventilation in human lungs and detecting functional biomarkers. In this brief review, the development of inert fluorinated gas MRI, current progress, and future prospects are discussed. The current state of HP noble gas MRI is also briefly discussed in order to provide context to the development of this new imaging modality. Overall, this may be a viable clinical imaging modality that can provide useful information for the diagnosis and management of chronic respiratory diseases.

  17. Development of single-channel stereoscopic video imaging modality for real-time retinal imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radfar, Edalat; Park, Jihoon; Lee, Sangyeob; Ha, Myungjin; Yu, Sungkon; Jang, Seulki; Jung, Byungjo

    2016-03-01

    Stereoscopic retinal image can effectively help doctors. Most of stereo imaging surgical microscopes are based on dual optical channels and benefit from dual cameras in which left and right cameras capture corresponding left and right eye views. This study developed a single-channel stereoscopic retinal imaging modality based on a transparent rotating deflector (TRD). Two different viewing angles are generated by imaging through the TRD which is mounted on a motor synchronized with a camera and is placed in single optical channel. Because of the function of objective lens in the imaging modality which generate stereo-image from an object at its focal point, and according to eye structure, the optical set up of the imaging modality can compatible for retinal imaging when the cornea and eye lens are engaged in objective lens.

  18. Impact of FDG-PET/CT Imaging on Nodal Staging for Head-And-Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Murakami, Ryuji . E-mail: murakami@kaiju.medic.kumamoto-u.ac.jp; Uozumi, Hideaki; Hirai, Toshinori; Nishimura, Ryuichi; Shiraishi, Shinya; Ota, Kazutoshi D.D.S.; Murakami, Daizo; Tomiguchi, Seiji; Oya, Natsuo; Katsuragawa, Shigehiko; Yamashita, Yasuyuki

    2007-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the impact of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) imaging on nodal staging for head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Methods and Materials: The study population consisted of 23 patients with head-and-neck SCC who were evaluated with FDG-PET/CT and went on to neck dissection. Two observers consensually determined the lesion size and maximum standardized uptake value (SUV{sub max}) and compared the results with pathologic findings on nodal-level involvement. Two different observers (A and B) independently performed three protocols for clinical nodal staging. Methods 1, 2, and 3 were based on conventional modalities, additional visual information from FDG-PET/CT images, and FDG-PET/CT imaging alone with SUV data, respectively. Results: All primary tumors were visualized with FDG-PET/CT. Pathologically, 19 positive and 93 negative nodal levels were identified. The SUV{sub max} overlapped in negative and positive nodes <15 mm in diameter. According to receiver operating characteristics analysis, the size-based SUV{sub max} cutoff values were 1.9, 2.5, and 3.0 for lymph nodes <10 mm, 10-15 mm, and >15 mm, respectively. These cutoff values yielded 79% sensitivity and 99% specificity for nodal-level staging. For Observer A, the sensitivity and specificity in Methods 1, 2, and 3 were 68% and 94%, 68% and 99%, and 84% and 99%, respectively, and Method 3 yielded significantly higher accuracy than Method 1 (p = 0.0269). For Observer B, Method 3 yielded the highest sensitivity (84%) and specificity (99%); however, the difference among the three protocols was not statistically significant. Conclusion: Imaging with FDG-PET/CT with size-based SUV{sub max} cutoff values is an important modality for radiation therapy planning.

  19. Optical imaging modalities: From design to diagnosis of skin cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korde, Vrushali Raj

    This study investigates three high resolution optical imaging modalities to better detect and diagnose skin cancer. The ideal high resolution optical imaging system can visualize pre-malignant tissue growth non-invasively with resolution comparable to histology. I examined 3 modalities which approached this goal. The first method examined was high magnification microscopy of thin stained tissue sections, together with a statistical analysis of nuclear chromatin patterns termed Karyometry. This method has subcellular resolution, but it necessitates taking a biopsy at the desired tissue site and imaging the tissue ex-vivo. My part of this study was to develop an automated nuclear segmentation algorithm to segment cell nuclei in skin histology images for karyometric analysis. The results of this algorithm were compared to hand segmented cell nuclei in the same images, and it was concluded that the automated segmentations can be used for karyometric analysis. The second optical imaging modality I investigated was Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT). OCT is analogous to ultrasound, in which sound waves are delivered into the body and the echo time and reflected signal magnitude are measured. Due to the fast speed of light and detector temporal integration times, low coherence interferometry is needed to gate the backscattered light. OCT acquires cross sectional images, and has an axial resolution of 1-15 mum (depending on the source bandwidth) and a lateral resolution of 10-20 mum (depending on the sample arm optics). While it is not capable of achieving subcellular resolution, it is a non-invasive imaging modality. OCT was used in this study to evaluate skin along a continuum from normal to sun damaged to precancer. I developed algorithms to detect statistically significant differences between images of sun protected and sun damaged skin, as well as between undiseased and precancerous skin. An Optical Coherence Microscopy (OCM) endoscope was developed in the third

  20. Software-based PET-MR image coregistration: combined PET-MRI for the rest of us!

    PubMed

    Robertson, Matthew S; Liu, Xinyang; Plishker, William; Zaki, George F; Vyas, Pranav K; Safdar, Nabile M; Shekhar, Raj

    2016-10-01

    With the introduction of hybrid positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance imaging (PET/MRI), a new imaging option to acquire multimodality images with complementary anatomical and functional information has become available. Compared with hybrid PET/computed tomography (CT), hybrid PET/MRI is capable of providing superior anatomical detail while removing the radiation exposure associated with CT. The early adoption of hybrid PET/MRI, however, has been limited. To provide a viable alternative to the hybrid PET/MRI hardware by validating a software-based solution for PET-MR image coregistration. A fully automated, graphics processing unit-accelerated 3-D deformable image registration technique was used to align PET (acquired as PET/CT) and MR image pairs of 17 patients (age range: 10 months-21 years, mean: 10 years) who underwent PET/CT and body MRI (chest, abdomen or pelvis), which were performed within a 28-day (mean: 10.5 days) interval. MRI data for most of these cases included single-station post-contrast axial T1-weighted images. Following registration, maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) values observed in coregistered PET (cPET) and the original PET were compared for 82 volumes of interest. In addition, we calculated the target registration error as a measure of the quality of image coregistration, and evaluated the algorithm's performance in the context of interexpert variability. The coregistration execution time averaged 97±45 s. The overall relative SUVmax difference was 7% between cPET-MRI and PET/CT. The average target registration error was 10.7±6.6 mm, which compared favorably with the typical voxel size (diagonal distance) of 8.0 mm (typical resolution: 0.66 mm × 0.66 mm × 8 mm) for MRI and 6.1 mm (typical resolution: 3.65 mm × 3.65 mm × 3.27 mm) for PET. The variability in landmark identification did not show statistically significant differences between the algorithm and a typical expert. We have

  1. Multi-Modality Phantom Development

    SciTech Connect

    Huber, Jennifer S.; Peng, Qiyu; Moses, William W.

    2009-03-20

    Multi-modality imaging has an increasing role in the diagnosis and treatment of a large number of diseases, particularly if both functional and anatomical information are acquired and accurately co-registered. Hence, there is a resulting need for multi modality phantoms in order to validate image co-registration and calibrate the imaging systems. We present our PET-ultrasound phantom development, including PET and ultrasound images of a simple prostate phantom. We use agar and gelatin mixed with a radioactive solution. We also present our development of custom multi-modality phantoms that are compatible with PET, transrectal ultrasound (TRUS), MRI and CT imaging. We describe both our selection of tissue mimicking materials and phantom construction procedures. These custom PET-TRUS-CT-MRI prostate phantoms use agargelatin radioactive mixtures with additional contrast agents and preservatives. We show multi-modality images of these custom prostate phantoms, as well as discuss phantom construction alternatives. Although we are currently focused on prostate imaging, this phantom development is applicable to many multi-modality imaging applications.

  2. Improving PET spatial resolution and detectability for prostate cancer imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bal, H.; Guerin, L.; Casey, M. E.; Conti, M.; Eriksson, L.; Michel, C.; Fanti, S.; Pettinato, C.; Adler, S.; Choyke, P.

    2014-08-01

    Prostate cancer, one of the most common forms of cancer among men, can benefit from recent improvements in positron emission tomography (PET) technology. In particular, better spatial resolution, lower noise and higher detectability of small lesions could be greatly beneficial for early diagnosis and could provide a strong support for guiding biopsy and surgery. In this article, the impact of improved PET instrumentation with superior spatial resolution and high sensitivity are discussed, together with the latest development in PET technology: resolution recovery and time-of-flight reconstruction. Using simulated cancer lesions, inserted in clinical PET images obtained with conventional protocols, we show that visual identification of the lesions and detectability via numerical observers can already be improved using state of the art PET reconstruction methods. This was achieved using both resolution recovery and time-of-flight reconstruction, and a high resolution image with 2 mm pixel size. Channelized Hotelling numerical observers showed an increase in the area under the LROC curve from 0.52 to 0.58. In addition, a relationship between the simulated input activity and the area under the LROC curve showed that the minimum detectable activity was reduced by more than 23%.

  3. SU-E-QI-20: A Review of Advanced PET and CT Image Features for the Evaluation of Tumor Response

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, W

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To review the literature in using quantitative PET and CT image features for the evaluation of tumor response. Methods: We reviewed and summarized more than fifty papers that use advanced, quantitative PET/CT image features for the evaluation of tumor response. We also discussed future works on extracting disease-specific features, combining multiple and complementary features in response modeling, delineating tumor in multimodality images, and exploring biological explanations of these advanced features. Results: Advanced PET image features considering spatial information, such as tumor volume, tumor shape, total glycolytic volume, histogram distance, and texture features (characterizing spatial distribution of FDG uptake) have been found more informative than the traditional SUVmax for the prediction of tumor response. Advanced CT features, including volumetric, attenuation, morphologic, structure, and texture descriptors, have also been found advantage over the traditional RECIST and WHO criteria in certain tumor types. Conclusions: Advanced, quantitative FDG PET/CT image features have been shown promising for the evaluation of tumor response. With the emerging multi-modality imaging performed at multiple time points for each patient, it becomes more important to analyze the serial images quantitatively, select and combine both complementary and contradictory information from various sources, for accurate and personalized evaluation of tumor response to therapy.

  4. Utility of noninvasive imaging modalities in a retina practice

    PubMed Central

    Jayadev, Chaitra; Jain, Nimesh; Sachdev, Sonia; Mohan, Ashwin; Yadav, Naresh Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescein angiography (FFA) has been the gold standard to understand, diagnose and treat retinal disorders. However, being an invasive procedure it has several limitations including adverse drug reactions. Hence, noninvasive tests that can be repeated during the course of the disease are the need of the hour. The aim of our study was to compare images of patients with retinal microvasculature pathology taken from three different imaging modalities (invasive vs. noninvasive). Lesions were detected more easily and with a greater resolution of morphology on retinal function imaging (RFI) and optical coherence tomography angiography (angio-OCT). Functional integrity of the vessels was better delineated on FFA. RFI and angio-OCT are noninvasive rapid and efficient methods to image vascular conditions with easy repeatability and negligible adverse effects. PMID:28112141

  5. Imaging modalities in mild traumatic brain injury and sports concussion.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Peter G; Walker, Matthew T

    2011-10-01

    Mild traumatic brain injury is a significant public health issue that has been gaining considerable attention over the past few years. After injury, a large percentage of patients experience postconcussive symptoms that affect work and school performance and that carry significant medicolegal implications. Conventional imaging modalities (computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging) are insensitive to microstructural changes and underestimate the degree of diffuse axonal injury and metabolic changes. Newer imaging techniques have attempted to better diagnose and characterize diffuse axonal injury and the metabolic and functional aspects of traumatic brain injury. The following review article summarizes the currently available imaging studies and describes the novel and more investigational techniques available for mild traumatic brain injury. A suggested algorithm is offered.

  6. Multi-modality functional image guided dose escalation in the presence of uncertainties.

    PubMed

    Alber, Markus; Thorwarth, Daniela

    2014-06-01

    In order to increase local tumour control by radiotherapy without increasing toxicity, it appears promising to harness functional imaging (FI) to guide dose to sub-volumes of the target with a high tumour load and perhaps de-escalate dose to low risk volumes, in order to maximise the efficiency of the deposited radiation dose. A number of problems have to be solved to make focal dose escalation (FDE) efficient and safe: (1) how to combine ambiguous information from multiple imaging modalities; (2) how to take into account uncertainties of FI based tissue classification; (3) how to account for geometric uncertainties in treatment delivery; (4) how to add complementary FI modalities to an existing scheme. A generic optimisation concept addresses these points and is explicitly designed for clinical efficacy and for lowering the implementation threshold to FI-guided FDE. It combines classic tumour control probability modelling with a multi-variate logistic regression model of FI accuracy and an uncomplicated robust optimisation method. Its key elements are (1) that dose is deposited optimally when it achieves equivalent expected effect everywhere in the target volume and (2) that one needs to cap the certainty about the absence of tumour anywhere in the target region. For illustration, an example of a PET/MR-guided FDE in prostate cancer is given. FDE can be safeguarded against FI uncertainties, at the price of a limit on the sensible dose escalation. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  7. Conspicuity of Malignant Lesions on PET/CT and Simultaneous Time-Of-Flight PET/MRI

    PubMed Central

    Minamimoto, Ryogo; Iagaru, Andrei; Jamali, Mehran; Holley, Dawn; Barkhodari, Amir; Vasanawala, Shreyas; Zaharchuk, Greg

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To compare the conspicuity of malignant lesions between FDG PET/CT and a new simultaneous, time-of-flight (TOF) enabled PET/MRI scanner. Methods All patients underwent a single-injection of FDG, followed by a dual imaging protocol consisting of PET/CT followed by TOF PET/MRI. PET/CT and PET/MRI images were evaluated by two readers independently for areas of FDG uptake compatible with malignancy, and then categorized into 5 groups (1: PET/MRI and PET/CT positive; 2: PET/MRI positive, PET/CT positive in retrospect; 3: PET/CT positive, PET/MRI positive in retrospect; 4: PET/MRI positive, PET/CT negative; 5: PET/MRI negative, PET/CT positive) by consensus. Patients with no lesions on either study or greater than 10 lesions based on either modality were excluded from the study. Results Fifty-two patients (mean±SD age: 58±14 years) underwent the dual imaging protocol; of these, 29 patients with a total of 93 FDG-avid lesions met the inclusion criteria. The majority of lesions (56%) were recorded prospectively in the same location on PET/CT and PET/MRI. About an equal small fraction of lesions were seen on PET/CT but only retrospectively on PET/MRI (9%) and vice versa (12%). More lesions were identified only on PET/MRI but not on PET/CT, even in retrospect (96% vs. 81%, respectively; p = 0.003). Discrepant lesions had lower maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) than concordant lesions on both modalities (p<0.001). Conclusions While most lesions were identified prospectively on both modalities, significantly more lesions were identified with PET/MRI than with PET/CT. PMID:28103230

  8. Multi-modal automatic montaging of adaptive optics retinal images.

    PubMed

    Chen, Min; Cooper, Robert F; Han, Grace K; Gee, James; Brainard, David H; Morgan, Jessica I W

    2016-12-01

    We present a fully automated adaptive optics (AO) retinal image montaging algorithm using classic scale invariant feature transform with random sample consensus for outlier removal. Our approach is capable of using information from multiple AO modalities (confocal, split detection, and dark field) and can accurately detect discontinuities in the montage. The algorithm output is compared to manual montaging by evaluating the similarity of the overlapping regions after montaging, and calculating the detection rate of discontinuities in the montage. Our results show that the proposed algorithm has high alignment accuracy and a discontinuity detection rate that is comparable (and often superior) to manual montaging. In addition, we analyze and show the benefits of using multiple modalities in the montaging process. We provide the algorithm presented in this paper as open-source and freely available to download.

  9. Multi-modal automatic montaging of adaptive optics retinal images

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Min; Cooper, Robert F.; Han, Grace K.; Gee, James; Brainard, David H.; Morgan, Jessica I. W.

    2016-01-01

    We present a fully automated adaptive optics (AO) retinal image montaging algorithm using classic scale invariant feature transform with random sample consensus for outlier removal. Our approach is capable of using information from multiple AO modalities (confocal, split detection, and dark field) and can accurately detect discontinuities in the montage. The algorithm output is compared to manual montaging by evaluating the similarity of the overlapping regions after montaging, and calculating the detection rate of discontinuities in the montage. Our results show that the proposed algorithm has high alignment accuracy and a discontinuity detection rate that is comparable (and often superior) to manual montaging. In addition, we analyze and show the benefits of using multiple modalities in the montaging process. We provide the algorithm presented in this paper as open-source and freely available to download. PMID:28018714

  10. Polyaspartic acid coated iron oxide nanoprobes for PET/MRI imaging.

    PubMed

    Cowger, Taku; Xie, Jin

    2013-01-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles, due to their exceptional magnetic property, biocompatibility, and biodegradability, have long been studied as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (Xie et al., Curr Med Chem 16(10):1278-1294, 2009; Xie et al., Adv Drug deliv Rev 62(11):1064-1079, 2010). While previous applications mostly target reticuloendothelial system (RES) organs such as liver and lymph nodes, recent efforts have been made to impart targeting peptides or antibodies onto particle surface to enable site-specific targeting after systemic administration (Xie et al., Adv Drug Deliv Rev 62(11):1064-1079, 2010; Cai and Chen, Small 3(11):1840-1854, 2007; Corot et al., Adv Drug Deliv Rev 58 (14):1471-1504, 2006; Xie et al., Acc Chem Res 44(10):883-892). Moreover, other imaging functionalities can be loaded onto nanoparticles to achieve multimodality imaging probes (Cai and Chen, Small 3(11):1840-1854, 2007; Lee et al., J Nucl Med Soc Nucl Med 49(8):1371-1379, 2008). In this protocol, we describe the procedure of constructing an iron oxide nanoparticle (IONP)-based probe with high affinity towards integrin αvβ3 for positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) dual modality imaging. The related characterizations and validation experiments, including particle concentration determination, Prussian blue staining, animal model preparation, and in vivo PET/MRI imaging will also be discussed.

  11. Metabolic PET Imaging in Cancer Detection and Therapy Response

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Aizhi; Lee, Daniel; Shim, Hyunsuk

    2010-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a noninvasive imaging technique that provides a functional or metabolic assessment of normal tissue or disease conditions. 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose PET imaging (FDG-PET) is widely used clinically for tumor imaging due to increased glucose metabolism in most types of tumors, and has been shown to improve the diagnosis and subsequent treatment of cancers. In this chapter, we review its use in cancer diagnosis, staging, restaging, and assessment of response to treatment. In addition, other metabolic PET imaging agents in research or clinical trial stages are discussed, including amino acid analogs based on increased protein synthesis, and choline, which is based on increased membrane lipid synthesis. Amino acid analogs and choline are more specific to tumor cells than FDG, so they play an important role in differentiating cancers from benign conditions and in the diagnosis of cancers with low FDG uptake or high background FDG uptake. For decades, researchers have shown that tumors have altered metabolic profiles and display elevated uptake of glucose, amino acids, and lipids, which can be used for cancer diagnosis and monitoring of the therapeutic response with excellent signal-to-noise ratios. PMID:21362516

  12. Early Recognition of Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy through FDDNP PET Imaging

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    head injuries sustained in battle have been associated with the development of chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). Pathological series have...Keywords:Traumatic Brain Injury, Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy ,PET imaging, Tau Overall Project Summary:Preparation for enrollment...AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-13-1-0486 TITLE: Early Recognition of Chronic Traumatic

  13. PET with radiolabeled aminoacid.

    PubMed

    Crippa, F; Alessi, A; Serafini, G L

    2012-04-01

    Since the clinical introduction of FDG, neuroimaging has been the first area of PET application in oncology. Later, while FDG-PET became progressively a key imaging modality in the management of the majority of malignancies outside the brain, its neuro-oncologic indications faced some limitations because of the unfavourable characteristics of FDG as brain tumor-seeking agent. PET applications in neuro-oncology have received new effectiveness by the advent of positron-emission labelled amino acids, so that it has been coined the term "Amino acid PET" to differentiate this imaging tool from FDG-PET. Radiolabeled amino acids are a very interesting class of PET tracers with great diagnostic potential in neuro-oncology because of their low uptake in normal brain and, conversely, high uptake in most brain tumors including low-grade gliomas. The present article surveys the results obtained using L-[methyl-11C]Methionine (MET), that has been the ancestor of PET amino acid tracers and is still the most popular amino acid imaging modality in oncology, and stresses the important role that this diagnostic modality can play in the evaluation of brain tumors. However, the use of MET is restricted to PET centers with an in-house cyclotron and radiochemistry facility, because of the short half-life (20 min) of 11C. The promising results of MET have stimulated the development of 18F-labelled aminoacid tracers, particularly O-(2-18F-fluoeoethyl1)-L-tyrosine (FET), that has the same properties of MET and, thanks to the longer half-life of 18F (about 110 min), allows a distribution strategy from a production tracer site to user satellite PET centers. Considering a more widespread use of Amino acid PET, together with the recent development of integrated PET-MRI imaging systems, and the oncoming clinical validation of other interesting PET tracers, i.e. FMISO or 18F-FAZA for hypoxia imaging and FLT for tumor proliferation imaging, it can be reasonably expected that metabolic imaging

  14. Imaging chemokine receptor CXCR4 in chronic infection of the bone with (68)Ga-Pentixafor-PET/CT - first insights.

    PubMed

    Bouter, Caroline; Meller, Birgit; Sahlmann, Carsten Oliver; Staab, Wieland; Wester, Hans Jürgen; Kropf, Saskia; Meller, Johannes

    2017-07-20

    Due to its role in infection and inflammatory processes the chemokine receptor CXCR4 might be a potent target in imaging of infectious and inflammatory diseases. The aim of this pilot study was to determine whether the CXCR4 ligand (68)Ga-Pentixafor is suitable for imaging chronic infection of the bone. Methods: The study comprises 14 patients with suspected infection of the skeleton that underwent (68)Ga-Pentixafor-(68)Ga-Pentixafor-Positron emission tomography/computed tomography(PET/CT) between 04/2015 and 02/2017 in our facility. (68)Ga-Pentixafor-PET/CT results were retrospectively evaluated against a histological, bacteriological and clinical standard. Results were also compared to available bone scintigraphy, white blood cell scintigraphy and (18)F-FDG-PET/CT. Results:(68)Ga-Pentixafor-PET/CT was positive in 9/14 patients. Diagnoses included osteitis/osteomyelitis of peripheral bone, osteomyelitis of the maxilla and infected endoprostheses. Target-background ratios were 5,1 to 15 (mean 8,7). 8/9 cases were true positive confirmed by pathology, bacteriology or clinical observation. All negative cases were confirmed true negative by other imaging modalities and follow up. Conclusion: Imaging of CXCR4 expression with (68)Ga-Pentixafor-PET/CT appears suitable for diagnosing chronic infection of the skeleton. Findings of this study reveal a possible diagnostic gain in suspected chronic infections that are difficult to diagnose by other imaging modalities. Copyright © 2017 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Inc.

  15. Enhancing image classification models with multi-modal biomarkers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caban, Jesus J.; Liao, David; Yao, Jianhua; Mollura, Daniel J.; Gochuico, Bernadette; Yoo, Terry

    2011-03-01

    Currently, most computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) systems rely on image analysis and statistical models to diagnose, quantify, and monitor the progression of a particular disease. In general, CAD systems have proven to be effective at providing quantitative measurements and assisting physicians during the decision-making process. As the need for more flexible and effective CADs continues to grow, questions about how to enhance their accuracy have surged. In this paper, we show how statistical image models can be augmented with multi-modal physiological values to create more robust, stable, and accurate CAD systems. In particular, this paper demonstrates how highly correlated blood and EKG features can be treated as biomarkers and used to enhance image classification models designed to automatically score subjects with pulmonary fibrosis. In our results, a 3-5% improvement was observed when comparing the accuracy of CADs that use multi-modal biomarkers with those that only used image features. Our results show that lab values such as Erythrocyte Sedimentation Rate and Fibrinogen, as well as EKG measurements such as QRS and I:40, are statistically significant and can provide valuable insights about the severity of the pulmonary fibrosis disease.

  16. PDE based scheme for multi-modal medical image watermarking.

    PubMed

    Aherrahrou, N; Tairi, H

    2015-11-25

    This work deals with copyright protection of digital images, an issue that needs protection of intellectual property rights. It is an important issue with a large number of medical images interchanged on the Internet every day. So, it is a challenging task to ensure the integrity of received images as well as authenticity. Digital watermarking techniques have been proposed as valid solution for this problem. It is worth mentioning that the Region Of Interest (ROI)/Region Of Non Interest (RONI) selection can be seen as a significant limitation from which suffers most of ROI/RONI based watermarking schemes and that in turn affects and limit their applicability in an effective way. Generally, the ROI/RONI is defined by a radiologist or a computer-aided selection tool. And thus, this will not be efficient for an institute or health care system, where one has to process a large number of images. Therefore, developing an automatic ROI/RONI selection is a challenge task. The major aim of this work is to develop an automatic selection algorithm of embedding region based on the so called Partial Differential Equation (PDE) method. Thus avoiding ROI/RONI selection problems including: (1) computational overhead, (2) time consuming, and (3) modality dependent selection. The algorithm is evaluated in terms of imperceptibility, robustness, tamper localization and recovery using MRI, Ultrasound, CT and X-ray grey scale medical images. From experimental results that we have conducted on a database of 100 medical images of four modalities, it can be inferred that our method can achieve high imperceptibility, while showing good robustness against attacks. Furthermore, the experiment results confirm the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm in detecting and recovering the various types of tampering. The highest PSNR value reached over the 100 images is 94,746 dB, while the lowest PSNR value is 60,1272 dB, which demonstrates the higher imperceptibility nature of the proposed

  17. PET Image Reconstruction Using Information Theoretic Anatomical Priors

    PubMed Central

    Somayajula, Sangeetha; Panagiotou, Christos; Rangarajan, Anand; Li, Quanzheng; Arridge, Simon R.

    2011-01-01

    We describe a nonparametric framework for incorporating information from co-registered anatomical images into positron emission tomographic (PET) image reconstruction through priors based on information theoretic similarity measures. We compare and evaluate the use of mutual information (MI) and joint entropy (JE) between feature vectors extracted from the anatomical and PET images as priors in PET reconstruction. Scale-space theory provides a framework for the analysis of images at different levels of detail, and we use this approach to define feature vectors that emphasize prominent boundaries in the anatomical and functional images, and attach less importance to detail and noise that is less likely to be correlated in the two images. Through simulations that model the best case scenario of perfect agreement between the anatomical and functional images, and a more realistic situation with a real magnetic resonance image and a PET phantom that has partial volumes and a smooth variation of intensities, we evaluate the performance of MI and JE based priors in comparison to a Gaussian quadratic prior, which does not use any anatomical information. We also apply this method to clinical brain scan data using F18 Fallypride, a tracer that binds to dopamine receptors and therefore localizes mainly in the striatum. We present an efficient method of computing these priors and their derivatives based on fast Fourier transforms that reduce the complexity of their convolution-like expressions. Our results indicate that while sensitive to initialization and choice of hyperparameters, information theoretic priors can reconstruct images with higher contrast and superior quantitation than quadratic priors. PMID:20851790

  18. PET image reconstruction using information theoretic anatomical priors.

    PubMed

    Somayajula, Sangeetha; Panagiotou, Christos; Rangarajan, Anand; Li, Quanzheng; Arridge, Simon R; Leahy, Richard M

    2011-03-01

    We describe a nonparametric framework for incorporating information from co-registered anatomical images into positron emission tomographic (PET) image reconstruction through priors based on information theoretic similarity measures. We compare and evaluate the use of mutual information (MI) and joint entropy (JE) between feature vectors extracted from the anatomical and PET images as priors in PET reconstruction. Scale-space theory provides a framework for the analysis of images at different levels of detail, and we use this approach to define feature vectors that emphasize prominent boundaries in the anatomical and functional images, and attach less importance to detail and noise that is less likely to be correlated in the two images. Through simulations that model the best case scenario of perfect agreement between the anatomical and functional images, and a more realistic situation with a real magnetic resonance image and a PET phantom that has partial volumes and a smooth variation of intensities, we evaluate the performance of MI and JE based priors in comparison to a Gaussian quadratic prior, which does not use any anatomical information. We also apply this method to clinical brain scan data using F(18) Fallypride, a tracer that binds to dopamine receptors and therefore localizes mainly in the striatum. We present an efficient method of computing these priors and their derivatives based on fast Fourier transforms that reduce the complexity of their convolution-like expressions. Our results indicate that while sensitive to initialization and choice of hyperparameters, information theoretic priors can reconstruct images with higher contrast and superior quantitation than quadratic priors.

  19. Innovative LuYAP:Ce array for PET imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cinti, M. N.; Scafe, R.; Bennati, P.; Lo Meo, S.; Frantellizzi, V.; Pellegrini, R.; De Vincentis, G.; Sacco, D.; Fabbri, A.; Pani, R.

    2017-03-01

    We present an imaging characterization of a 10 × 10 LuYAP array (2 × 2 × 10 mm3 pixels) with an innovative dielectric coating insulation (0.015 mm thick), in view of its possible use in a gamma camera for imaging positron emission tomography (PET) or in similar applications, e.g. as γ -prompt detector in hadron therapy. The particular assembly of this array was realized in order to obtain a packing fraction of 98%, improving detection efficiency and light collection. For imaging purpose, the array has been coupled with a selected Hamamatsu H10966-100 Multi Anode Photomultiplier read out by a customized 64 independent channels electronics. This tube presents a superbialkali photocathode with 38% of quantum efficiency, permitting to enhance energy resolution and consequently image quality. A pixel identification of about 0.5 mm at 662 keV was obtained, highlighting the potentiality of this detector in PET applications.

  20. Analysis of FET-PET imaging for target volume definition in patients with gliomas treated with conformal radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Rieken, Stefan; Habermehl, Daniel; Giesel, Frederik L; Hoffmann, Christoph; Burger, Ute; Rief, Harald; Welzel, Thomas; Haberkorn, Uwe; Debus, Jürgen; Combs, Stephanie E

    2013-12-01

    Modern radiotherapy (RT) techniques such as stereotactic RT, intensity-modulated RT, or particle irradiation allow local dose escalation with simultaneous sparing of critical organs. Several trials are currently investigating their benefit in glioma reirradiation and boost irradiation. Target volume definition is of critical importance especially when steep dose gradient techniques are employed. In this manuscript we investigate the impact of O-(2-(F-18)fluoroethyl)-l-tyrosine-positron emission tomography/computer tomography (FET-PET/CT) on target volume definition in low and high grade glioma patients undergoing either first or re-irradiation with particles. We investigated volumetric size and uniformity of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)- vs. FET-PET/CT-derived gross tumor volumes (GTVs) and planning target volumes (PTVs) of 41 glioma patients. Clinical cases are presented to demonstrate potential benefits of integrating FET-PET/CT-planning into daily routine. Integrating FET-uptake into the delineation of GTVs yields larger volumes. Combined modality-derived PTVs are significantly enlarged in high grade glioma patients and in case of primary RT. The congruence of MRI and FET signals for the identification of glioma GTVs is poor with mean uniformity indices of 0.39. MRI-based PTVs miss 17% of FET-PET/CT-based GTVs. Non significant alterations were detected in low grade glioma patients and in those undergoing reirradiation. Target volume definition for malignant gliomas during initial RT may yield significantly differing results depending upon the imaging modality, which the contouring process is based upon. The integration of both MRI and FET-PET/CT may help to improve GTV coverage by avoiding larger incongruences between physical and biological imaging techniques. In low grade gliomas and in cases of reirradiation, more studies are needed in order to investigate a potential benefit of FET-PET/CT for planning of RT. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All

  1. Reproducibility of Quantitative Brain Imaging Using a PET-Only and a Combined PET/MR System

    PubMed Central

    Lassen, Martin L.; Muzik, Otto; Beyer, Thomas; Hacker, Marcus; Ladefoged, Claes Nøhr; Cal-González, Jacobo; Wadsak, Wolfgang; Rausch, Ivo; Langer, Oliver; Bauer, Martin

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the feasibility of migrating a quantitative brain imaging protocol from a positron emission tomography (PET)-only system to an integrated PET/MR system. Potential differences in both absolute radiotracer concentration as well as in the derived kinetic parameters as a function of PET system choice have been investigated. Five healthy volunteers underwent dynamic (R)-[11C]verapamil imaging on the same day using a GE-Advance (PET-only) and a Siemens Biograph mMR system (PET/MR). PET-emission data were reconstructed using a transmission-based attenuation correction (AC) map (PET-only), whereas a standard MR-DIXON as well as a low-dose CT AC map was applied to PET/MR emission data. Kinetic modeling based on arterial blood sampling was performed using a 1-tissue-2-rate constant compartment model, yielding kinetic parameters (K1 and k2) and distribution volume (VT). Differences for parametric values obtained in the PET-only and the PET/MR systems were analyzed using a 2-way Analysis of Variance (ANOVA). Comparison of DIXON-based AC (PET/MR) with emission data derived from the PET-only system revealed average inter-system differences of −33 ± 14% (p < 0.05) for the K1 parameter and −19 ± 9% (p < 0.05) for k2. Using a CT-based AC for PET/MR resulted in slightly lower systematic differences of −16 ± 18% for K1 and −9 ± 10% for k2. The average differences in VT were −18 ± 10% (p < 0.05) for DIXON- and −8 ± 13% for CT-based AC. Significant systematic differences were observed for kinetic parameters derived from emission data obtained from PET/MR and PET-only imaging due to different standard AC methods employed. Therefore, a transfer of imaging protocols from PET-only to PET/MR systems is not straightforward without application of proper correction methods. Clinical Trial Registration: www.clinicaltrialsregister.eu, identifier 2013-001724-19 PMID:28769742

  2. PET Imaging for Initial Staging and Therapy Assessment in Multiple Myeloma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Bailly, Clément; Leforestier, Rodolphe; Jamet, Bastien; Carlier, Thomas; Bourgeois, Mickael; Guérard, François; Touzeau, Cyrille; Moreau, Philippe; Chérel, Michel; Kraeber-Bodéré, Françoise; Bodet-Milin, Caroline

    2017-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a hematological neoplasm characterized by the clonal proliferation of malignant plasma cells in the bone marrow. MM results in diffuse or focal bone infiltration and extramedullary lesions. Over the past two decades, advances have been made with regard to the diagnosis, staging, treatment, and imaging of MM. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are currently recommended as the most effective imaging modalities at diagnostic. Yet, recent data from the literature suggest that positron emission tomography combined with computed tomography (PET/CT) using 18F-deoxyglucose (FDG) is a promising technique for initial staging and therapeutic monitoring in this pathology. This paper reviews the recent advances as well as the potential place of a more specific radiopharmaceutical in MM. PMID:28218709

  3. TU-G-303-02: Robust Radiomics Methods for PET and CT Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Aerts, H.

    2015-06-15

    ‘Radiomics’ refers to studies that extract a large amount of quantitative information from medical imaging studies as a basis for characterizing a specific aspect of patient health. Radiomics models can be built to address a wide range of outcome predictions, clinical decisions, basic cancer biology, etc. For example, radiomics models can be built to predict the aggressiveness of an imaged cancer, cancer gene expression characteristics (radiogenomics), radiation therapy treatment response, etc. Technically, radiomics brings together quantitative imaging, computer vision/image processing, and machine learning. In this symposium, speakers will discuss approaches to radiomics investigations, including: longitudinal radiomics, radiomics combined with other biomarkers (‘pan-omics’), radiomics for various imaging modalities (CT, MRI, and PET), and the use of registered multi-modality imaging datasets as a basis for radiomics. There are many challenges to the eventual use of radiomics-derived methods in clinical practice, including: standardization and robustness of selected metrics, accruing the data required, building and validating the resulting models, registering longitudinal data that often involve significant patient changes, reliable automated cancer segmentation tools, etc. Despite the hurdles, results achieved so far indicate the tremendous potential of this general approach to quantifying and using data from medical images. Specific applications of radiomics to be presented in this symposium will include: the longitudinal analysis of patients with low-grade gliomas; automatic detection and assessment of patients with metastatic bone lesions; image-based monitoring of patients with growing lymph nodes; predicting radiotherapy outcomes using multi-modality radiomics; and studies relating radiomics with genomics in lung cancer and glioblastoma. Learning Objectives: Understanding the basic image features that are often used in radiomic models. Understanding

  4. Predicting standard-dose PET image from low-dose PET and multimodal MR images using mapping-based sparse representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yan; Zhang, Pei; An, Le; Ma, Guangkai; Kang, Jiayin; Shi, Feng; Wu, Xi; Zhou, Jiliu; Lalush, David S.; Lin, Weili; Shen, Dinggang

    2016-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) has been widely used in clinical diagnosis for diseases and disorders. To obtain high-quality PET images requires a standard-dose radionuclide (tracer) injection into the human body, which inevitably increases risk of radiation exposure. One possible solution to this problem is to predict the standard-dose PET image from its low-dose counterpart and its corresponding multimodal magnetic resonance (MR) images. Inspired by the success of patch-based sparse representation (SR) in super-resolution image reconstruction, we propose a mapping-based SR (m-SR) framework for standard-dose PET image prediction. Compared with the conventional patch-based SR, our method uses a mapping strategy to ensure that the sparse coefficients, estimated from the multimodal MR images and low-dose PET image, can be applied directly to the prediction of standard-dose PET image. As the mapping between multimodal MR images (or low-dose PET image) and standard-dose PET images can be particularly complex, one step of mapping is often insufficient. To this end, an incremental refinement framework is therefore proposed. Specifically, the predicted standard-dose PET image is further mapped to the target standard-dose PET image, and then the SR is performed again to predict a new standard-dose PET image. This procedure can be repeated for prediction refinement of the iterations. Also, a patch selection based dictionary construction method is further used to speed up the prediction process. The proposed method is validated on a human brain dataset. The experimental results show that our method can outperform benchmark methods in both qualitative and quantitative measures.

  5. Diagnosis of pulmonary embolism with various imaging modalities.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Sunita D; Eagleton, Matthew J; Greenfield, Lazar J

    2004-06-01

    Pulmonary embolism (PE) is a major health concern that affects approximately 600,000 new patients annually. The diagnosis of PE can be difficult to make, and several imaging studies have been developed to aid in this process. Initial evaluation involves the acquisition of a chest radiograph. Findings on radiography, however, are often non-specific. The gold-standard study historically has been pulmonary angiography, with increasing diagnostic yield since the implementation of digital subtraction technology. This is an invasive procedure, however, but the incidence of major complications is low. Less invasive modalities have been developed and include ventilation-perfusion lung scans. These are used as one of the initial screening tests in evaluation of patients with suspected PE. The presence of a high-probability scan usually indicates the presence of a PE, although few patients have high probability scans. The test is significantly affected by underlying pulmonary disease or previous PE. Given this, ventilation-perfusion lung scans are limited as a primary diagnostic tool in the evaluation of suspected PE. Helical computed tomography (CT) is currently under much scrutiny as a diagnostic tool for PE. Currently a prospective, multicenter trial evaluating its efficacy (PIOPED II) has been initiated, but the results are pending. Preliminary reports suggest the helical CT and venous phase CT may become a first line study in patient evaluation. The diagnosis of PE is challenging and several imaging modalities are currently used to assist the clinician. Currently, multiple modalities are often required to make the diagnosis. With the advent of new technology and improved imaging techniques, the diagnosis of PE will become easier.

  6. Parametric myocardial perfusion PET imaging using physiological clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohy-ud-Din, Hassan; Karakatsanis, Nikolaos A.; Lodge, Martin A.; Tang, Jing; Rahmim, Arman

    2014-03-01

    We propose a novel framework of robust kinetic parameter estimation applied to absolute ow quanti cation in dynamic PET imaging. Kinetic parameter estimation is formulated as a nonlinear least squares with spatial constraints problem (NLLS-SC) where the spatial constraints are computed from a physiologically driven clustering of dynamic images, and used to reduce noise contamination. An ideal clustering of dynamic images depends on the underlying physiology of functional regions, and in turn, physiological processes are quanti ed by kinetic parameter estimation. Physiologically driven clustering of dynamic images is performed using a clustering algorithm (e.g. K-means, Spectral Clustering etc) with Kinetic modeling in an iterative handshaking fashion. This gives a map of labels where each functionally homogenous cluster is represented by mean kinetics (cluster centroid). Parametric images are acquired by solving the NLLS-SC problem for each voxel which penalizes spatial variations from its mean kinetics. This substantially reduces noise in the estimation process for each voxel by utilizing kinetic information from physiologically similar voxels (cluster members). Resolution degradation is also substantially minimized as no spatial smoothing between heterogeneous functional regions is performed. The proposed framework is shown to improve the quantitative accuracy of Myocardial Perfusion (MP) PET imaging, and in turn, has the long-term potential to enhance capabilities of MP PET in the detection, staging and management of coronary artery disease.

  7. Improving cross-modal face recognition using polarimetric imaging.

    PubMed

    Short, Nathaniel; Hu, Shuowen; Gurram, Prudhvi; Gurton, Kristan; Chan, Alex

    2015-03-15

    We investigate the performance of polarimetric imaging in the long-wave infrared (LWIR) spectrum for cross-modal face recognition. For this work, polarimetric imagery is generated as stacks of three components: the conventional thermal intensity image (referred to as S0), and the two Stokes images, S1 and S2, which contain combinations of different polarizations. The proposed face recognition algorithm extracts and combines local gradient magnitude and orientation information from S0, S1, and S2 to generate a robust feature set that is well-suited for cross-modal face recognition. Initial results show that polarimetric LWIR-to-visible face recognition achieves an 18% increase in Rank-1 identification rate compared to conventional LWIR-to-visible face recognition. We conclude that a substantial improvement in automatic face recognition performance can be achieved by exploiting the polarization-state of radiance, as compared to using conventional thermal imagery.

  8. Lung tumor segmentation in PET images using graph cuts.

    PubMed

    Ballangan, Cherry; Wang, Xiuying; Fulham, Michael; Eberl, Stefan; Feng, David Dagan

    2013-03-01

    The aim of segmentation of tumor regions in positron emission tomography (PET) is to provide more accurate measurements of tumor size and extension into adjacent structures, than is possible with visual assessment alone and hence improve patient management decisions. We propose a segmentation energy function for the graph cuts technique to improve lung tumor segmentation with PET. Our segmentation energy is based on an analysis of the tumor voxels in PET images combined with a standardized uptake value (SUV) cost function and a monotonic downhill SUV feature. The monotonic downhill feature avoids segmentation leakage into surrounding tissues with similar or higher PET tracer uptake than the tumor and the SUV cost function improves the boundary definition and also addresses situations where the lung tumor is heterogeneous. We evaluated the method in 42 clinical PET volumes from patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Our method improves segmentation and performs better than region growing approaches, the watershed technique, fuzzy-c-means, region-based active contour and tumor customized downhill.

  9. Current status of PET imaging in Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Pagano, Gennaro; Niccolini, Flavia; Politis, Marios

    2016-06-01

    To review the developments of recent decades and the current status of PET molecular imaging in Huntington's disease (HD). A systematic review of PET studies in HD was performed. The MEDLINE, Web of Science, Cochrane and Scopus databases were searched for articles in all languages published up to 19 August 2015 using the major medical subject heading "Huntington Disease" combined with text and key words "Huntington Disease", "Neuroimaging" and "PET". Only peer-reviewed, primary research studies in HD patients and premanifest HD carriers, and studies in which clinical features were described in association with PET neuroimaging results, were included in this review. Reviews, case reports and nonhuman studies were excluded. A total of 54 PET studies were identified and analysed in this review. Brain metabolism ([(18)F]FDG and [(15)O]H2O), presynaptic ([(18)F]fluorodopa, [(11)C]β-CIT and [(11)C]DTBZ) and postsynaptic ([(11)C]SCH22390, [(11)C]FLB457 and [(11)C]raclopride) dopaminergic function, phosphodiesterases ([(18)F]JNJ42259152, [(18)F]MNI-659 and [(11)C]IMA107), and adenosine ([(18)F]CPFPX), cannabinoid ([(18)F]MK-9470), opioid ([(11)C]diprenorphine) and GABA ([(11)C]flumazenil) receptors were evaluated as potential biomarkers for monitoring disease progression and for assessing the development and efficacy of novel disease-modifying drugs in premanifest HD carriers and HD patients. PET studies evaluating brain restoration and neuroprotection were also identified and described in detail. Brain metabolism, postsynaptic dopaminergic function and phosphodiesterase 10A levels were proven to be powerful in assessing disease progression. However, no single technique may be currently considered an optimal biomarker and an integrative multimodal imaging approach combining different techniques should be developed for monitoring potential neuroprotective and preventive treatment in HD.

  10. Current Imaging Modalities for assessing Ocular Blood Flow in Glaucoma.

    PubMed

    Mohindroo, Chirayu; Ichhpujani, Parul; Kumar, Suresh

    2016-01-01

    Glaucoma may be caused by an interplay of elevated intraocular pressure (IOP), vascular, genetic, anatomical, brain, and immune factors. The direct assessment of ocular hemodynam-ics offers promise for glaucoma detection, differentiation, and possibly new treatment modalities. All the methods currently in use to measure ocular blood flow have inherent limitations and measure different aspects of ocular blood flow. This review article attempts to provide detailed information on ocular perfu-sion pressure as well as an overview of the newly developed imaging technologies used to investigate ocular blood flow in glaucoma patients.

  11. Photoacoustic and ultrasound dual-modality imaging for inflammatory arthritis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Guan; Chamberland, David; Girish, Gandikota; Wang, Xueding

    2014-03-01

    Arthritis is a leading cause of disability, affecting 46 million of the population in the U.S. Rendering new optical contrast in articular tissues at high spatial and temporal resolution, emerging photoacoustic imaging (PAI) combined with more established ultrasound (US) imaging technologies provides unique opportunities for diagnosis and treatment monitoring of inflammatory arthritis. In addition to capturing peripheral bone and soft tissue images, PAI has the capability to quantify hemodynamic properties including regional blood oxygenation and blood volume, both abnormal in synovial tissues affected by arthritis. Therefore, PAI, especially when performed together with US, should be of considerable help for further understanding the pathophysiology of arthritis as well as assisting in therapeutic decisions, including assessing the efficacy of new pharmacological therapies. In this paper, we will review our recent work on the development of PAI for application to the diagnostic imaging and therapeutic monitoring of inflammatory arthritis. We will present the imaging results from a home-built imaging system and another one based on a commercial US. The performance of PAI in evaluating pharmacological therapy on animal model of arthritis will be shown. Moreover, our resent work on PAI and US dual-modality imaging of human peripheral joints in vivo will also be presented.

  12. Dual Modality Noncontact Photoacoustic and Spectral Domain OCT Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Leiss-Holzinger, Elisabeth; Bauer-Marschallinger, Johannes; Hochreiner, Armin; Hollinger, Philipp; Berer, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    We developed a multimodal imaging system, combining noncontact photoacoustic imaging and optical coherence tomography (OCT). Photoacoustic signals are recorded without contact to the specimens’ surface by using an interferometric technique. The interferometer is realized within a fiber-optic network using a fiber laser at 1550 nm as source. The fiber-optic network allows the integration of a fiber-based OCT system operating at a wavelength region around 1310 nm. Light from the fiber laser and the OCT source are multiplexed into one fiber using wavelength-division multiplexing. The same focusing optics is used for both modalities. Back-reflected light from the sample is demultiplexed and guided to the respective imaging systems. As the same optical components are used for OCT and photoacoustic imaging, the obtained images are co-registered intrinsically in lateral direction. Three-dimensional imaging is implemented by hybrid galvanometer and mechanical scanning. To allow fast B-scan measurements, scanning of the interrogation beam along one dimension is executed by a galvanometer scanner. Slow-axis scanning, perpendicular to the fast axis, is performed utilizing a linear translational stage. We demonstrate two-dimensional and three-dimensional imaging on agarose phantoms. PMID:25900968

  13. Dual Modality Noncontact Photoacoustic and Spectral Domain OCT Imaging.

    PubMed

    Leiss-Holzinger, Elisabeth; Bauer-Marschallinger, Johannes; Hochreiner, Armin; Hollinger, Philipp; Berer, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    We developed a multimodal imaging system, combining noncontact photoacoustic imaging and optical coherence tomography (OCT). Photoacoustic signals are recorded without contact to the specimens' surface by using an interferometric technique. The interferometer is realized within a fiber-optic network using a fiber laser at 1550 nm as source. The fiber-optic network allows the integration of a fiber-based OCT system operating at a wavelength region around 1310 nm. Light from the fiber laser and the OCT source are multiplexed into one fiber using wavelength-division multiplexing. The same focusing optics is used for both modalities. Back-reflected light from the sample is demultiplexed and guided to the respective imaging systems. As the same optical components are used for OCT and photoacoustic imaging, the obtained images are co-registered intrinsically in lateral direction. Three-dimensional imaging is implemented by hybrid galvanometer and mechanical scanning. To allow fast B-scan measurements, scanning of the interrogation beam along one dimension is executed by a galvanometer scanner. Slow-axis scanning, perpendicular to the fast axis, is performed utilizing a linear translational stage. We demonstrate two-dimensional and three-dimensional imaging on agarose phantoms. © The Author(s) 2015.

  14. Automated movement correction for dynamic PET/CT images: evaluation with phantom and patient data.

    PubMed

    Ye, Hu; Wong, Koon-Pong; Wardak, Mirwais; Dahlbom, Magnus; Kepe, Vladimir; Barrio, Jorge R; Nelson, Linda D; Small, Gary W; Huang, Sung-Cheng

    2014-01-01

    Head movement during a dynamic brain PET/CT imaging results in mismatch between CT and dynamic PET images. It can cause artifacts in CT-based attenuation corrected PET images, thus affecting both the qualitative and quantitative aspects of the dynamic PET images and the derived parametric images. In this study, we developed an automated retrospective image-based movement correction (MC) procedure. The MC method first registered the CT image to each dynamic PET frames, then re-reconstructed the PET frames with CT-based attenuation correction, and finally re-aligned all the PET frames to the same position. We evaluated the MC method's performance on the Hoffman phantom and dynamic FDDNP and FDG PET/CT images of patients with neurodegenerative disease or with poor compliance. Dynamic FDDNP PET/CT images (65 min) were obtained from 12 patients and dynamic FDG PET/CT images (60 min) were obtained from 6 patients. Logan analysis with cerebellum as the reference region was used to generate regional distribution volume ratio (DVR) for FDDNP scan before and after MC. For FDG studies, the image derived input function was used to generate parametric image of FDG uptake constant (Ki) before and after MC. Phantom study showed high accuracy of registration between PET and CT and improved PET images after MC. In patient study, head movement was observed in all subjects, especially in late PET frames with an average displacement of 6.92 mm. The z-direction translation (average maximum = 5.32 mm) and x-axis rotation (average maximum = 5.19 degrees) occurred most frequently. Image artifacts were significantly diminished after MC. There were significant differences (P<0.05) in the FDDNP DVR and FDG Ki values in the parietal and temporal regions after MC. In conclusion, MC applied to dynamic brain FDDNP and FDG PET/CT scans could improve the qualitative and quantitative aspects of images of both tracers.

  15. Automated Movement Correction for Dynamic PET/CT Images: Evaluation with Phantom and Patient Data

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Hu; Wong, Koon-Pong; Wardak, Mirwais; Dahlbom, Magnus; Kepe, Vladimir; Barrio, Jorge R.; Nelson, Linda D.; Small, Gary W.; Huang, Sung-Cheng

    2014-01-01

    Head movement during a dynamic brain PET/CT imaging results in mismatch between CT and dynamic PET images. It can cause artifacts in CT-based attenuation corrected PET images, thus affecting both the qualitative and quantitative aspects of the dynamic PET images and the derived parametric images. In this study, we developed an automated retrospective image-based movement correction (MC) procedure. The MC method first registered the CT image to each dynamic PET frames, then re-reconstructed the PET frames with CT-based attenuation correction, and finally re-aligned all the PET frames to the same position. We evaluated the MC method's performance on the Hoffman phantom and dynamic FDDNP and FDG PET/CT images of patients with neurodegenerative disease or with poor compliance. Dynamic FDDNP PET/CT images (65 min) were obtained from 12 patients and dynamic FDG PET/CT images (60 min) were obtained from 6 patients. Logan analysis with cerebellum as the reference region was used to generate regional distribution volume ratio (DVR) for FDDNP scan before and after MC. For FDG studies, the image derived input function was used to generate parametric image of FDG uptake constant (Ki) before and after MC. Phantom study showed high accuracy of registration between PET and CT and improved PET images after MC. In patient study, head movement was observed in all subjects, especially in late PET frames with an average displacement of 6.92 mm. The z-direction translation (average maximum = 5.32 mm) and x-axis rotation (average maximum = 5.19 degrees) occurred most frequently. Image artifacts were significantly diminished after MC. There were significant differences (P<0.05) in the FDDNP DVR and FDG Ki values in the parietal and temporal regions after MC. In conclusion, MC applied to dynamic brain FDDNP and FDG PET/CT scans could improve the qualitative and quantitative aspects of images of both tracers. PMID:25111700

  16. Dynamic PET Image reconstruction for parametric imaging using the HYPR kernel method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spencer, Benjamin; Qi, Jinyi; Badawi, Ramsey D.; Wang, Guobao

    2017-03-01

    Dynamic PET image reconstruction is a challenging problem because of the ill-conditioned nature of PET and the lowcounting statistics resulted from short time-frames in dynamic imaging. The kernel method for image reconstruction has been developed to improve image reconstruction of low-count PET data by incorporating prior information derived from high-count composite data. In contrast to most of the existing regularization-based methods, the kernel method embeds image prior information in the forward projection model and does not require an explicit regularization term in the reconstruction formula. Inspired by the existing highly constrained back-projection (HYPR) algorithm for dynamic PET image denoising, we propose in this work a new type of kernel that is simpler to implement and further improves the kernel-based dynamic PET image reconstruction. Our evaluation study using a physical phantom scan with synthetic FDG tracer kinetics has demonstrated that the new HYPR kernel-based reconstruction can achieve a better region-of-interest (ROI) bias versus standard deviation trade-off for dynamic PET parametric imaging than the post-reconstruction HYPR denoising method and the previously used nonlocal-means kernel.

  17. Data Acquisition and Image Reconstruction Systems from the miniPET Scanners to the CARDIOTOM Camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valastván, I.; Imrek, J.; Hegyesi, G.; Molnár, J.; Novák, D.; Bone, D.; Kerek, A.

    2007-11-01

    Nuclear imaging devices play an important role in medical diagnosis as well as drug research. The first and second generation data acquisition systems and the image reconstruction library developed provide a unified hardware and software platform for the miniPET-I, miniPET-II small animal PET scanners and for the CARDIOTOM™.

  18. A small animal PET based on GAPDs and charge signal transmission approach for hybrid PET-MR imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Jihoon; Choi, Yong; Hong, Key Jo; Hu, Wei; Jung, Jin Ho; Huh, Yoonsuk; Kim, Byung-Tae

    2011-08-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) employing Geiger-mode avalanche photodiodes (GAPDs) and charge signal transmission approach was developed for small animal imaging. Animal PET contained 16 LYSO and GAPD detector modules that were arranged in a 70 mm diameter ring with an axial field of view of 13 mm. The GAPDs charge output signals were transmitted to a preamplifier located remotely using 300 cm flexible flat cables. The position decoder circuits (PDCs) were used to multiplex the PET signals from 256 to 4 channels. The outputs of the PDCs were digitized and further-processed in the data acquisition unit. The cross-compatibilities of the PET detectors and MRI were assessed outside and inside the MRI. Experimental studies of the developed full ring PET were performed to examine the spatial resolution and sensitivity. Phantom and mouse images were acquired to examine the imaging performance. The mean energy and time resolution of the PET detector were 17.6% and 1.5 ns, respectively. No obvious degradation on PET and MRI was observed during simultaneous PET-MRI data acquisition. The measured spatial resolution and sensitivity at the CFOV were 2.8 mm and 0.7%, respectively. In addition, a 3 mm diameter line source was clearly resolved in the hot-sphere phantom images. The reconstructed transaxial PET images of the mouse brain and tumor displaying the glucose metabolism patterns were imaged well. These results demonstrate GAPD and the charge signal transmission approach can allow the development of high performance small animal PET with improved MR compatibility.

  19. Radiolabeled Sugars Used for PET and SPECT Imaging.

    PubMed

    Barrios-Lopez, Brianda; Bergstrom, Kim

    2016-01-01

    There are new efforts to develop "sugar" probes for molecular imaging focusing on human clinical studies. Radiolabeled carbohydrates are used as substrate probes for studying specific processes in tissues and organisms. The best application case is 2-Deoxy-2-[18F]fluoro-D-glucose (18F-FDG), which is incorporated by cancer cells. The introduction of ltF-FDG has advanced enormously human Positron Emission Tomography (PET). This review focuses on the importance of 18FFDG and other sugars as imaging probes in PET and Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) imaging. In conclusion, new radiolabeled molecules that can be used as radiopharmaceuticals also would possibly help in the treatment of cancer cells in human patients. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  20. Gallium-68 Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen PET Imaging.

    PubMed

    Hofman, Michael S; Iravani, Amir

    2017-04-01

    The role of gallium-68 ((68)Ga) prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) PET imaging is evolving and finding its place in the imaging armamentarium for prostate cancer (PCa). Despite the progress of conventional imaging strategies, significant limitations remain, including identification of small-volume disease and assessment of bone. Clinical studies have demonstrated that (68)Ga-PSMA is a promising tracer for detection of PCa metastases, even in patients with low prostate-specific antigen. To provide an accurate interpretation of (68)Ga-PSMA PET/computed tomography, nuclear medicine specialists and radiologists should be familiar with physiologic (68)Ga-PSMA uptake, common variants, patterns of locoregional and distant spread of PCa, and inherent pitfalls.

  1. Multi-modality imaging of tumor phenotype and response to therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyflot, Matthew J.

    2011-12-01

    Imaging and radiation oncology have historically been closely linked. However, the vast majority of techniques used in the clinic involve anatomical imaging. Biological imaging offers the potential for innovation in the areas of cancer diagnosis and staging, radiotherapy target definition, and treatment response assessment. Some relevant imaging techniques are FDG PET (for imaging cellular metabolism), FLT PET (proliferation), CuATSM PET (hypoxia), and contrast-enhanced CT (vasculature and perfusion). Here, a technique for quantitative spatial correlation of tumor phenotype is presented for FDG PET, FLT PET, and CuATSM PET images. Additionally, multimodality imaging of treatment response with FLT PET, CuATSM, and dynamic contrast-enhanced CT is presented, in a trial of patients receiving an antiangiogenic agent (Avastin) combined with cisplatin and radiotherapy. Results are also presented for translational applications in animal models, including quantitative assessment of proliferative response to cetuximab with FLT PET and quantification of vascular volume with a blood-pool contrast agent (Fenestra). These techniques have clear applications to radiobiological research and optimized treatment strategies, and may eventually be used for personalized therapy for patients.

  2. Energy dependence of scatter components in multispectral PET imaging.

    PubMed

    Bentourkia, M; Msaki, P; Cadorette, J; Lecomte, R

    1995-01-01

    High resolution images in PET based on small individual detectors are obtained at the cost of low sensitivity and increased detector scatter. These limitations can be partially overcome by enlarging discrimination windows to include more low-energy events and by developing more efficient energy-dependent methods to correct for scatter radiation from all sources. The feasibility of multispectral scatter correction was assessed by decomposing response functions acquired in multiple energy windows into four basic components: object, collimator and detector scatter, and trues. The shape and intensity of these components are different and energy-dependent. They are shown to contribute to image formation in three ways: useful (true), potentially useful (detector scatter), and undesirable (object and collimator scatter) information to the image over the entire energy range. With the Sherbrooke animal PET system, restoration of detector scatter in every energy window would allow nearly 90% of all detected events to participate in image formation. These observations suggest that multispectral acquisition is a promising solution for increasing sensitivity in high resolution PET. This can be achieved without loss of image quality if energy-dependent methods are made available to preserve useful events as potentially useful events are restored and undesirable events removed.

  3. Parametric dynamic F-18-FDG PET/CT breast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magri, Alphonso; Feiglin, David; Lipson, Edward; Mandel, James; McGraw, Wendy; Lee, Wei; Krol, Andrzej

    2008-03-01

    This study was undertaken to estimate metabolic tissue properties from dynamic breast F-18-FDG PET/CT image series and to display them as 3D parametric images. Each temporal PET series was obtained immediately after injection of 10 mCi of F-18-FDG and consisted of fifty 1- minute frames. Each consecutive frame was nonrigidly registered to the first frame using a finite element method (FEM) based model and fiducial skin markers. Nonlinear curve fitting of activity vs. time based on a realistic two-compartment model was performed for each voxel of the volume. Curve fitting was accomplished by application of the Levenburg-Marquardt algorithm (LMA) that minimized X2. We evaluated which parameters are most suitable to determine the spatial extent and malignancy in suspicious lesions. In addition, Patlak modeling was applied to the data. A mixture model was constructed and provided a classification system for the breast tissue. It produced unbiased estimation of the spatial extent of the lesions. We conclude that nonrigid registration followed by voxel-by-voxel based nonlinear fitting to a realistic two-compartment model yields better quality parametric images, as compared to unprocessed dynamic breast PET time series. By comparison with the mixture model, we established that the total cumulated activity and maximum activity parametric images provide the best delineation of suspicious breast tissue lesions and hyperactive subregions within the lesion that cannot be discerned in unprocessed images.

  4. PET image reconstruction: mean, variance, and optimal minimax criterion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Huafeng; Gao, Fei; Guo, Min; Xue, Liying; Nie, Jing; Shi, Pengcheng

    2015-04-01

    Given the noise nature of positron emission tomography (PET) measurements, it is critical to know the image quality and reliability as well as expected radioactivity map (mean image) for both qualitative interpretation and quantitative analysis. While existing efforts have often been devoted to providing only the reconstructed mean image, we present a unified framework for joint estimation of the mean and corresponding variance of the radioactivity map based on an efficient optimal min-max criterion. The proposed framework formulates the PET image reconstruction problem to be a transformation from system uncertainties to estimation errors, where the minimax criterion is adopted to minimize the estimation errors with possibly maximized system uncertainties. The estimation errors, in the form of a covariance matrix, express the measurement uncertainties in a complete way. The framework is then optimized by ∞-norm optimization and solved with the corresponding H∞ filter. Unlike conventional statistical reconstruction algorithms, that rely on the statistical modeling methods of the measurement data or noise, the proposed joint estimation stands from the point of view of signal energies and can handle from imperfect statistical assumptions to even no a priori statistical assumptions. The performance and accuracy of reconstructed mean and variance images are validated using Monte Carlo simulations. Experiments on phantom scans with a small animal PET scanner and real patient scans are also conducted for assessment of clinical potential.

  5. PET imaging stability measurements during simultaneous pulsing of aggressive MR sequences on the GE SIGNA PET/MR.

    PubMed

    Deller, Timothy W; Khalighi, Mohammad Mehdi; Jansen, Floris P; Glover, Gary H

    2017-07-26

    The recent introduction of simultaneous whole-body PET/MR scanners has enabled new research taking advantage of the complementary information obtainable with PET and MR imaging. One such application is kinetic modeling, which requires high levels of PET quantitative stability. This challenges the task of isolating the two imaging subsystems from mutual interference. Performance measurements have previously been published demonstrating sufficient PET stability in the presence of MR pulsing for typical clinical use; however, PET stability during radiofrequency (RF)-intensive and gradient-intensive sequences has not previously been evaluated for a clinical whole-body scanner. In this work, PET stability of the SIGNA PET/MR was examined during simultaneous scanning of aggressive MR pulse sequences. Methods: PET performance tests were acquired with MR idle and also during simultaneous MR pulsing. Recent system improvements mitigating RF interference and gain variation were employed. A fast recovery fast spin echo (FRFSE) MR sequence was selected for high RF power, and an echo planar imaging (EPI) sequence was selected for its high heat-inducing gradients. Measurements were performed to determine PET stability under varying MR conditions using the following metrics: sensitivity, scatter fraction, contrast recovery, uniformity, count rate performance, and image quantitation. A final PET quantitative stability assessment for simultaneous PET scanning during functional-MRI (fMRI) studies was performed with a spiral in-and-out gradient echo sequence. Results: Quantitation stability of a (68)Ge flood phantom was demonstrated within 0.34%. Normalized sensitivity was stable during simultaneous scanning within 0.3%. Scatter fraction measured with a (68)Ge line source in the scatter phantom was stable within the range of 40.4% to 40.6%. Contrast recovery and uniformity were comparable for PET images acquired simultaneously with multiple MR conditions. Peak noise equivalent count

  6. Comparison of quantitative Y-90 SPECT and non-time-of-flight PET imaging in post-therapy radioembolization of liver cancer.

    PubMed

    Yue, Jianting; Mauxion, Thibault; Reyes, Diane K; Lodge, Martin A; Hobbs, Robert F; Rong, Xing; Dong, Yinfeng; Herman, Joseph M; Wahl, Richard L; Geschwind, Jean-François H; Frey, Eric C

    2016-10-01

    Radioembolization with yttrium-90 microspheres may be optimized with patient-specific pretherapy treatment planning. Dose verification and validation of treatment planning methods require quantitative imaging of the post-therapy distribution of yttrium-90 (Y-90). Methods for quantitative imaging of Y-90 using both bremsstrahlung SPECT and PET have previously been described. The purpose of this study was to compare the two modalities quantitatively in humans. Calibration correction factors for both quantitative Y-90 bremsstrahlung SPECT and a non-time-of-flight PET system without compensation for prompt coincidences were developed by imaging three phantoms. The consistency of these calibration correction factors for the different phantoms was evaluated. Post-therapy images from both modalities were obtained from 15 patients with hepatocellular carcinoma who underwent hepatic radioembolization using Y-90 glass microspheres. Quantitative SPECT and PET images were rigidly registered and the total liver activities and activity distributions estimated for each modality were compared. The activity distributions were compared using profiles, voxel-by-voxel correlation and Bland-Altman analyses, and activity-volume histograms. The mean ± standard deviation of difference in the total activity in the liver between the two modalities was 0% ± 9% (range -21%-18%). Voxel-by-voxel comparisons showed a good agreement in regions corresponding roughly to treated tumor and treated normal liver; the agreement was poorer in regions with low or no expected activity, where PET appeared to overestimate the activity. The correlation coefficients between intrahepatic voxel pairs for the two modalities ranged from 0.86 to 0.94. Cumulative activity volume histograms were in good agreement. These data indicate that, with appropriate reconstruction methods and measured calibration correction factors, either Y-90 SPECT/CT or Y-90 PET/CT can be used for quantitative post-therapy monitoring of Y

  7. IMAGE FUSION USING CT, MRI AND PET FOR TREATMENT PLANNING, NAVIGATION AND FOLLOW UP IN PERCUTANEOUS RFA

    PubMed Central

    Giesel, F.L.; Mehndiratta, A.; Locklin, J.; McAuliffe, M.J.; White, S.; Choyke, P.L.; Knopp, M.V.; Wood, B.J.; Haberkorn, U.; von Tengg-Kobligk, H.

    2010-01-01

    Aim To evaluate the feasibility of fusion of morphologic and functional imaging modalities to facilitate treatment planning, probe placement, probe re-positioning, and early detection of residual disease following radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of cancer. Methods Multi-modality datasets were separately acquired that included functional (FDG-PET and DCE-MRI) and standard morphologic studies (CT and MRI). Different combinations of imaging modalities were registered and fused prior to, during, and following percutaneous image-guided tumor ablation with radiofrequency. Different algorithms and visualization tools were evaluated for both intra-modality and inter-modality image registration using the software MIPAV (Medical Image Processing, Analysis and Visualization). Semi-automated and automated registration algorithms were used on a standard PC workstation: 1) landmark-based least-squares rigid registration, 2) landmark-based thin-plate spline elastic registration, and 3) automatic voxel-similarity, affine registration. Results Intra- and inter-modality image fusion were successfully performed prior to, during and after RFA procedures. Fusion of morphologic and functional images provided a useful view of the spatial relationship of lesion structure and functional significance. Fused axial images and segmented three-dimensional surface models were used for treatment planning and post-RFA evaluation, to assess potential for optimizing needle placement during procedures. Conclusion Fusion of morphologic and functional images is feasible before, during and after radiofrequency ablation of tumors in abdominal organs. For routine use, the semi-automated registration algorithms may be most practical. Image fusion may facilitate interventional procedures like RFA and should be further evaluated. PMID:19550401

  8. Translocator Protein PET Imaging in a Preclinical Prostate Cancer Model.

    PubMed

    Tantawy, Mohammed N; Charles Manning, H; Peterson, Todd E; Colvin, Daniel C; Gore, John C; Lu, Wenfu; Chen, Zhenbang; Chad Quarles, C

    2017-08-18

    The identification and targeting of biomarkers specific to prostate cancer (PCa) could improve its detection. Given the high expression of translocator protein (TSPO) in PCa, we investigated the use of [(18)F]VUIIS1008 (a novel TSPO-targeting radioligand) coupled with positron emission tomography (PET) to identify PCa in mice and to characterize their TSPO uptake. Pten(pc-/-), Trp53(pc-/-) prostate cancer-bearing mice (n = 9, 4-6 months old) were imaged in a 7T MRI scanner for lesion localization. Within 24 h, the mice were imaged using a microPET scanner for 60 min in dynamic mode following a retro-orbital injection of ~ 18 MBq [(18)F]VUIIS1008. Following imaging, tumors were harvested and stained with a TSPO antibody. Regions of interest (ROIs) were drawn around the tumor and muscle (hind limb) in the PET images. Time-activity curves (TACs) were recorded over the duration of the scan for each ROI. The mean activity concentrations between 40 and 60 min post radiotracer administration between tumor and muscle were compared. Tumor presence was confirmed by visual inspection of the MR images. The uptake of [(18)F]VUIIS1008 in the tumors was significantly higher (p < 0.05) than that in the muscle, where the percent injected dose per unit volume for tumor was 7.1 ± 1.6 % ID/ml and that of muscle was < 1 % ID/ml. In addition, positive TSPO expression was observed in tumor tissue analysis. The foregoing preliminary data suggest that TSPO may be a useful biomarker of PCa. Therefore, using TSPO-targeting PET ligands, such as [(18)F]VUIIS1008, may improve PCa detectability and characterization.

  9. Silicon detectors for combined MR-PET and MR-SPECT imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Studen, A.; Brzezinski, K.; Chesi, E.; Cindro, V.; Clinthorne, N. H.; Cochran, E.; Grošičar, B.; Grkovski, M.; Honscheid, K.; Kagan, H.; Lacasta, C.; Llosa, G.; Mikuž, M.; Stankova, V.; Weilhammer, P.; Žontar, D.

    2013-02-01

    Silicon based devices can extend PET-MR and SPECT-MR imaging to applications, where their advantages in performance outweigh benefits of high statistical counts. Silicon is in many ways an excellent detector material with numerous advantages, among others: excellent energy and spatial resolution, mature processing technology, large signal to noise ratio, relatively low price, availability, versatility and malleability. The signal in silicon is also immune to effects of magnetic field at the level normally used in MR devices. Tests in fields up to 7 T were performed in a study to determine effects of magnetic field on positron range in a silicon PET device. The curvature of positron tracks in direction perpendicular to the field's orientation shortens the distance between emission and annihilation point of the positron. The effect can be fully appreciated for a rotation of the sample for a fixed field direction, compressing range in all dimensions. A popular Ga-68 source was used showing a factor of 2 improvement in image noise compared to zero field operation. There was also a little increase in noise as the reconstructed resolution varied between 2.5 and 1.5 mm. A speculative applications can be recognized in both emission modalities, SPECT and PET. Compton camera is a subspecies of SPECT, where a silicon based scatter as a MR compatible part could inserted into the MR bore and the secondary detector could operate in less constrained environment away from the magnet. Introducing a Compton camera also relaxes requirements of the radiotracers used, extending the range of conceivable photon energies beyond 140.5 keV of the Tc-99m. In PET, one could exploit the compressed sub-millimeter range of positrons in the magnetic field. To exploit the advantage, detectors with spatial resolution commensurate to the effect must be used with silicon being an excellent candidate. Measurements performed outside of the MR achieving spatial resolution below 1 mm are reported.

  10. Novel Preparation Methods of 52Mn for ImmunoPET Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Graves, Stephen A.; Hernandez, Reinier; Fonslet, Jesper; England, Christopher G.; Valdovinos, Hector F.; Ellison, Paul A.; Barnhart, Todd E.; Elema, Dennis R.; Theuer, Charles P.; Cai, Weibo; Nickles, Robert J.; Severin, Gregory W.

    2015-01-01

    52Mn (t1/2 = 5.59 d, β+ = 29.6%, Eβave = 0.24 MeV) shows promise in positron emission tomography (PET) and in dual-modality manganese-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MEMRI) applications including neural tractography, stem cell tracking, and biological toxicity studies. The extension to bioconjugate application requires high-specific-activity 52Mn in a state suitable for macromolecule labeling. To that end a 52Mn production, purification, and labeling system is presented, and its applicability in preclinical, macromolecule PET is shown using the conjugate 52Mn-DOTA-TRC105. 52Mn is produced by 60 μA, 16 MeV proton irradiation of natural chromium metal pressed into a silver disc support. Radiochemical separation proceeds by strong anion exchange chromatography of the dissolved Cr target, employing a semiorganic mobile phase, 97:3 (v:v) ethanol:HCl (11 M, aqueous). The method is 62 ± 14% efficient (n = 7) in 52Mn recovery, leading to a separation factor from Cr of (1.6 ± 1.0) × 106 (n = 4), and an average effective specific activity of 0.8 GBq/μmol (n = 4) in titration against DOTA. 52Mn-DOTA-TRC105 conjugation and labeling demonstrate the potential for chelation applications. In vivo images acquired using PET/CT in mice bearing 4T1 xenograft tumors are presented. Peak tumor uptake is 18.7 ± 2.7%ID/g at 24 h post injection and ex vivo 52Mn biodistribution validates the in vivo PET data. Free 52Mn2+ (as chloride or acetate) is used as a control in additional mice to evaluate the nontargeted biodistribution in the tumor model. PMID:26317429

  11. Improved proton computed tomography by dual modality image reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, David C. Bassler, Niels; Petersen, Jørgen Breede Baltzer; Sørensen, Thomas Sangild

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: Proton computed tomography (CT) is a promising image modality for improving the stopping power estimates and dose calculations for particle therapy. However, the finite range of about 33 cm of water of most commercial proton therapy systems limits the sites that can be scanned from a full 360° rotation. In this paper the authors propose a method to overcome the problem using a dual modality reconstruction (DMR) combining the proton data with a cone-beam x-ray prior. Methods: A Catphan 600 phantom was scanned using a cone beam x-ray CT scanner. A digital replica of the phantom was created in the Monte Carlo code Geant4 and a 360° proton CT scan was simulated, storing the entrance and exit position and momentum vector of every proton. Proton CT images were reconstructed using a varying number of angles from the scan. The proton CT images were reconstructed using a constrained nonlinear conjugate gradient algorithm, minimizing total variation and the x-ray CT prior while remaining consistent with the proton projection data. The proton histories were reconstructed along curved cubic-spline paths. Results: The spatial resolution of the cone beam CT prior was retained for the fully sampled case and the 90° interval case, with the MTF = 0.5 (modulation transfer function) ranging from 5.22 to 5.65 linepairs/cm. In the 45° interval case, the MTF = 0.5 dropped to 3.91 linepairs/cm For the fully sampled DMR, the maximal root mean square (RMS) error was 0.006 in units of relative stopping power. For the limited angle cases the maximal RMS error was 0.18, an almost five-fold improvement over the cone beam CT estimate. Conclusions: Dual modality reconstruction yields the high spatial resolution of cone beam x-ray CT while maintaining the improved stopping power estimation of proton CT. In the case of limited angles, the use of prior image proton CT greatly improves the resolution and stopping power estimate, but does not fully achieve the quality of a 360

  12. Multimodal facial color imaging modality for objective analysis of skin lesions

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Youngwoo; Nelson, J. Stuart; Jung, Byungjo

    2009-01-01

    We introduce a multimodal facial color imaging modality that provides a conventional color image, parallel and cross-polarization color images, and a fluorescent color image. We characterize the imaging modality and describe the image analysis methods for objective evaluation of skin lesions. The parallel and cross-polarization color images are useful for the analysis of skin texture, pigmentation, and vascularity. The polarization image, which is derived from parallel and cross-polarization color images, provides morphological information of superficial skin lesions. The fluorescent color image is useful for the evaluation of skin chromophores excited by UV-A radiation. In order to demonstrate the validity of the new imaging modality in dermatology, sample images were obtained from subjects with various skin disorders and image analysis methods were applied for objective evaluation of those lesions. In conclusion, we are confident that the imaging modality and analysis methods should be useful tools to simultaneously evaluate various skin lesions in dermatology. PMID:19123654

  13. Quantitative myocardial blood flow imaging with integrated time-of-flight PET-MR.

    PubMed

    Kero, Tanja; Nordström, Jonny; Harms, Hendrik J; Sörensen, Jens; Ahlström, Håkan; Lubberink, Mark

    2017-12-01

    The use of integrated PET-MR offers new opportunities for comprehensive assessment of cardiac morphology and function. However, little is known on the quantitative accuracy of cardiac PET imaging with integrated time-of-flight PET-MR. The aim of the present work was to validate the GE Signa PET-MR scanner for quantitative cardiac PET perfusion imaging. Eleven patients (nine male; mean age 59 years; range 46-74 years) with known or suspected coronary artery disease underwent (15)O-water PET scans at rest and during adenosine-induced hyperaemia on a GE Discovery ST PET-CT and a GE Signa PET-MR scanner. PET-MR images were reconstructed using settings recommended by the manufacturer, including time-of-flight (TOF). Data were analysed semi-automatically using Cardiac VUer software, resulting in both parametric myocardial blood flow (MBF) images and segment-based MBF values. Correlation and agreement between PET-CT-based and PET-MR-based MBF values for all three coronary artery territories were assessed using regression analysis and intra-class correlation coefficients (ICC). In addition to the cardiac PET-MR reconstruction protocol as recommended by the manufacturer, comparisons were made using a PET-CT resolution-matched reconstruction protocol both without and with TOF to assess the effect of time-of-flight and reconstruction parameters on quantitative MBF values. Stress MBF data from one patient was excluded due to movement during the PET-CT scanning. Mean MBF values at rest and stress were (0.92 ± 0.12) and (2.74 ± 1.37) mL/g/min for PET-CT and (0.90 ± 0.23) and (2.65 ± 1.15) mL/g/min for PET-MR (p = 0.33 and p = 0.74). ICC between PET-CT-based and PET-MR-based regional MBF was 0.98. Image quality was improved with PET-MR as compared to PET-CT. ICC between PET-MR-based regional MBF with and without TOF and using different filter and reconstruction settings was 1.00. PET-MR-based MBF values correlated well with PET-CT-based MBF values

  14. High resolution PET breast imager with improved detection efficiency

    DOEpatents

    Majewski, Stanislaw

    2010-06-08

    A highly efficient PET breast imager for detecting lesions in the entire breast including those located close to the patient's chest wall. The breast imager includes a ring of imaging modules surrounding the imaged breast. Each imaging module includes a slant imaging light guide inserted between a gamma radiation sensor and a photodetector. The slant light guide permits the gamma radiation sensors to be placed in close proximity to the skin of the chest wall thereby extending the sensitive region of the imager to the base of the breast. Several types of photodetectors are proposed for use in the detector modules, with compact silicon photomultipliers as the preferred choice, due to its high compactness. The geometry of the detector heads and the arrangement of the detector ring significantly reduce dead regions thereby improving detection efficiency for lesions located close to the chest wall.

  15. PET-Computed Tomography in Veterinary Medicine.

    PubMed

    Randall, Elissa K

    2016-05-01

    PET/CT is an advanced imaging modality that is becoming more commonly used in veterinary medicine. It is most commonly used to image patients with cancer, and the most frequently used radiopharmaceutical is F-18 FDG. F-18 FDG is a glucose analog that highlights areas of increased glucose metabolism on the PET images. CT images provide excellent anatomic depiction and aid in interpretation of the PET data. Many types of cancer are hypermetabolic on PET/CT scans, but normal structures and areas of inflammation are also hypermetabolic, so knowledge of normal imaging and cytologic or histopathologic evaluation of lesions is essential. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. MR-DTI and PET multimodal imaging of dopamine release within subdivisions of basal ganglia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tziortzi, A.; Searle, G.; Tsoumpas, C.; Long, C.; Shotbolt, P.; Rabiner, E.; Jenkinson, M.; Gunn, R. N.

    2011-09-01

    The basal ganglia is a group of anatomical nuclei, functionally organised into limbic, associative and sensorimotor regions, which plays a central role in dopamine related neurological and psychiatric disorders. In this study, we combine two imaging modalities to enable the measurement of dopamine release in functionally related subdivisions of the basal ganglia. [11C]-(+)-PHNO Positron Emission Tomography (PET) measurements in the living human brain pre- and post-administration of amphetamine allow for the estimation of regional dopamine release. Combined Magnetic Resonance Diffusion Tensor Imaging (MR-DTI) data allows for the definition of functional territories of the basal ganglia from connectivity information. The results suggest that there is a difference in dopamine release among the connectivity derived functional subdivisions. Dopamine release is highest in the limbic area followed by the sensorimotor and then the associative area with this pattern reflected in both striatum and pallidum.

  17. Resolution modeling in PET imaging: Theory, practice, benefits, and pitfalls

    PubMed Central

    Rahmim, Arman; Qi, Jinyi; Sossi, Vesna

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, the authors review the field of resolution modeling in positron emission tomography (PET) image reconstruction, also referred to as point-spread-function modeling. The review includes theoretical analysis of the resolution modeling framework as well as an overview of various approaches in the literature. It also discusses potential advantages gained via this approach, as discussed with reference to various metrics and tasks, including lesion detection observer studies. Furthermore, attention is paid to issues arising from this approach including the pervasive problem of edge artifacts, as well as explanation and potential remedies for this phenomenon. Furthermore, the authors emphasize limitations encountered in the context of quantitative PET imaging, wherein increased intervoxel correlations due to resolution modeling can lead to significant loss of precision (reproducibility) for small regions of interest, which can be a considerable pitfall depending on the task of interest. PMID:23718620

  18. Molecular Imaging of Hydrolytic Enzymes Using PET and SPECT

    PubMed Central

    Rempel, Brian P.; Price, Eric W.

    2017-01-01

    Hydrolytic enzymes are a large class of biological catalysts that play a vital role in a plethora of critical biochemical processes required to maintain human health. However, the expression and/or activity of these important enzymes can change in many different diseases and therefore represent exciting targets for the development of positron emission tomography (PET) and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) radiotracers. This review focuses on recently reported radiolabeled substrates, reversible inhibitors, and irreversible inhibitors investigated as PET and SPECT tracers for imaging hydrolytic enzymes. By learning from the most successful examples of tracer development for hydrolytic enzymes, it appears that an early focus on careful enzyme kinetics and cell-based studies are key factors for identifying potentially useful new molecular imaging agents. PMID:28927325

  19. Phosphoramidate-based Peptidomimetic Prostate Cancer PET Imaging Agents

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-07-01

    develop a PET imaging agent based on modifying the peptidomimetic PSMA inhibitor which will result in improved tumor uptake and clearance mechanism...Different fluorination approaches were attempted with PSMA module compounds such as direct labeling, cupper free chemistry and the use of...labeling approaches are established, and then the labeling of the modified PSMA inhibitor analogues will be investigated in vitro as well as in vivo. 15

  20. Phosphoramidate-based Peptidomimetic Prostate Cancer PET Imaging Agents

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-11-01

    goal is to develop a PET imaging agent based on modifying the peptidomimetic PSMA inhibitor which will result in improved tumor uptake and clearance...mechanism. Different fluorination approaches were attempted with PSMA module compounds such as direct labeling, cupper free chemistry and the use of...the labeling approaches are established, and then the labeling of the modified PSMA inhibitor analogues will be investigated in vitro as well as in

  1. Cumulative phase delay imaging - A new contrast enhanced ultrasound modality

    SciTech Connect

    Demi, Libertario Sloun, Ruud J. G. van; Mischi, Massimo; Wijkstra, Hessel

    2015-10-28

    Recently, a new acoustic marker for ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) has been introduced. A cumulative phase delay (CPD) between the second harmonic and fundamental pressure wave field components is in fact observable for ultrasound propagating through UCAs. This phenomenon is absent in the case of tissue nonlinearity and is dependent on insonating pressure and frequency, UCA concentration, and propagation path length through UCAs. In this paper, ultrasound images based on this marker are presented. The ULA-OP research platform, in combination with a LA332 linear array probe (Esaote, Firenze Italy), were used to image a gelatin phantom containing a PVC plate (used as a reflector) and a cylindrical cavity measuring 7 mm in diameter (placed in between the observation point and the PVC plate). The cavity contained a 240 µL/L SonoVueO{sup ®} UCA concentration. Two insonating frequencies (3 MHz and 2.5 MHz) were used to scan the gelatine phantom. A mechanical index MI = 0.07, measured in water at the cavity location with a HGL-0400 hydrophone (Onda, Sunnyvale, CA), was utilized. Processing the ultrasound signals backscattered from the plate, ultrasound images were generated in a tomographic fashion using the filtered back-projection method. As already observed in previous studies, significantly higher CPD values are measured when imaging at a frequency of 2.5 MHz, as compared to imaging at 3 MHz. In conclusion, these results confirm the applicability of the discussed CPD as a marker for contrast imaging. Comparison with standard contrast-enhanced ultrasound imaging modalities will be the focus of future work.

  2. Cumulative phase delay imaging - A new contrast enhanced ultrasound modality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demi, Libertario; van Sloun, Ruud J. G.; Wijkstra, Hessel; Mischi, Massimo

    2015-10-01

    Recently, a new acoustic marker for ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) has been introduced. A cumulative phase delay (CPD) between the second harmonic and fundamental pressure wave field components is in fact observable for ultrasound propagating through UCAs. This phenomenon is absent in the case of tissue nonlinearity and is dependent on insonating pressure and frequency, UCA concentration, and propagation path length through UCAs. In this paper, ultrasound images based on this marker are presented. The ULA-OP research platform, in combination with a LA332 linear array probe (Esaote, Firenze Italy), were used to image a gelatin phantom containing a PVC plate (used as a reflector) and a cylindrical cavity measuring 7 mm in diameter (placed in between the observation point and the PVC plate). The cavity contained a 240 µL/L SonoVueO® UCA concentration. Two insonating frequencies (3 MHz and 2.5 MHz) were used to scan the gelatine phantom. A mechanical index MI = 0.07, measured in water at the cavity location with a HGL-0400 hydrophone (Onda, Sunnyvale, CA), was utilized. Processing the ultrasound signals backscattered from the plate, ultrasound images were generated in a tomographic fashion using the filtered back-projection method. As already observed in previous studies, significantly higher CPD values are measured when imaging at a frequency of 2.5 MHz, as compared to imaging at 3 MHz. In conclusion, these results confirm the applicability of the discussed CPD as a marker for contrast imaging. Comparison with standard contrast-enhanced ultrasound imaging modalities will be the focus of future work.

  3. Imaging quality of (44)Sc in comparison with five other PET radionuclides using Derenzo phantoms and preclinical PET.

    PubMed

    Bunka, Maruta; Müller, Cristina; Vermeulen, Christiaan; Haller, Stephanie; Türler, Andreas; Schibli, Roger; van der Meulen, Nicholas P

    2016-04-01

    PET is the favored nuclear imaging technique because of the high sensitivity and resolution it provides, as well as the possibility for quantification of accumulated radioactivity. (44)Sc (T1/2=3.97h, Eβ(+)=632keV) was recently proposed as a potentially interesting radionuclide for PET. The aim of this study was to investigate the image quality, which can be obtained with (44)Sc, and compare it with five other, frequently employed PET nuclides using Derenzo phantoms and a small-animal PET scanner. The radionuclides were produced at the medical cyclotron at CRS, ETH Zurich ((11)C, (18)F), at the Injector II research cyclotron at CRS, PSI ((64)Cu, (89)Zr, (44)Sc), as well as via a generator system ((68)Ga). Derenzo phantoms, containing solutions of each of these radionuclides, were scanned using a GE Healthcare eXplore VISTA small-animal PET scanner. The image resolution was determined for each nuclide by analysis of the intensity signal using the reconstructed PET data of a hole diameter of 1.3mm. The image quality of (44)Sc was compared to five frequently-used PET radionuclides. In agreement with the positron range, an increasing relative resolution was determined in the sequence of (68)Ga<(44)Sc<(89)Zr<(11)C<(64)Cu<(18)F. The performance of (44)Sc was in agreement with the theoretical expectations based on the energy of the emitted positrons. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. PET Imaging with 89Zr: From Radiochemistry to the Clinic

    PubMed Central

    Deri, Melissa A.; Zeglis, Brian M.; Francesconi, Lynn C.; Lewis, Jason S.

    2012-01-01

    The advent of antibody-based cancer therapeutics has led to the concomitant rise in the development of companion diagnostics for these therapies, particularly nuclear imaging agents. A number of radioisotopes have been employed for antibody-based PET and SPECT imaging, notably 64Cu, 124I, 111In, and 99mTc; in recent years, however, the field has increasingly focused on 89Zr, a radiometal with near ideal physical and chemical properties for immunoPET imaging. In the review at hand, we seek to provide a comprehensive portrait of the current state of 89Zr radiochemical and imaging research, including work into the production and purification of the isotope, the synthesis of new chelators, the development of new bioconjugation strategies, the creation of novel 89Zr-based agents for preclinical imaging studies, and the translation of 89Zr-labeled radiopharmaceuticals to the clinic. Particular attention will also be dedicated to emerging trends in the field, 89Zr-based imaging applications using vectors other than antibodies, the comparative advantages and limitations of 89Zr-based imaging compared to that with other isotopes, and areas that would benefit from more extensive investigation. At bottom, it is hoped that this review will provide both the experienced investigator and new scientist with a full and critical overview of this exciting and fast-developing field. PMID:22998840

  5. Quantification of Lung PET Images: Challenges and Opportunities.

    PubMed

    Chen, Delphine L; Cheriyan, Joseph; Chilvers, Edwin R; Choudhury, Gourab; Coello, Christopher; Connell, Martin; Fisk, Marie; Groves, Ashley M; Gunn, Roger N; Holman, Beverley F; Hutton, Brian F; Lee, Sarah; MacNee, William; Mohan, Divya; Parr, David; Subramanian, Deepak; Tal-Singer, Ruth; Thielemans, Kris; van Beek, Edwin J R; Vass, Laurence; Wellen, Jeremy W; Wilkinson, Ian; Wilson, Frederick J

    2017-02-01

    Millions of people are affected by respiratory diseases, leading to a significant health burden globally. Because of the current insufficient knowledge of the underlying mechanisms that lead to the development and progression of respiratory diseases, treatment options remain limited. To overcome this limitation and understand the associated molecular changes, noninvasive imaging techniques such as PET and SPECT have been explored for biomarker development, with (18)F-FDG PET imaging being the most studied. The quantification of pulmonary molecular imaging data remains challenging because of variations in tissue, air, blood, and water fractions within the lungs. The proportions of these components further differ depending on the lung disease. Therefore, different quantification approaches have been proposed to address these variabilities. However, no standardized approach has been developed to date. This article reviews the data evaluating (18)F-FDG PET quantification approaches in lung diseases, focusing on methods to account for variations in lung components and the interpretation of the derived parameters. The diseases reviewed include acute respiratory distress syndrome, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and interstitial lung diseases such as idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Based on review of prior literature, ongoing research, and discussions among the authors, suggested considerations are presented to assist with the interpretation of the derived parameters from these approaches and the design of future studies.

  6. Molecular imaging for prostate cancer: Performance analysis of (68)Ga-PSMA PET/CT versus choline PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Michaud, L; Touijer, K A

    2017-06-01

    There is a need for a precise and reliable imaging to improve the management of prostate cancer. In recent years the PET/CT with choline has changed the handling of prostate cancer in Europe, and it is commonly used for initial stratification or for the diagnosis of a biochemical recurrence, although it does not lack limitations. Other markers are being tested, including the ligand of prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA), that seems to offer encouraging prospects. The goal of this piece of work was to critically review the role of choline and PSMA PET/CT in prostate cancer. A systematic literature review of databases PUBMED/MEDLINE and EMBASE was conducted searching for articles fully published in English on the PET marker in prostate cancer and its clinical application. It seems as 68Ga-PSMA PET/CT is better than PET/CT in prostate cancer to detect primary prostate lesions, initial metastases in the lymph nodes and recurrence. However, further research is required to obtain high-level tests. Also, other PET markers are studied. Moreover, the emergence of a new PET/MR camera could change the performance of PET imaging. Copyright © 2016 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. Multimodality imaging with CT, MR and FDG-PET for radiotherapy target volume delineation in oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Bird, David; Scarsbrook, Andrew F; Sykes, Jonathan; Ramasamy, Satiavani; Subesinghe, Manil; Carey, Brendan; Wilson, Daniel J; Roberts, Neil; McDermott, Gary; Karakaya, Ebru; Bayman, Evrim; Sen, Mehmet; Speight, Richard; Prestwich, Robin J D

    2015-11-04

    This study aimed to quantify the variation in oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma gross tumour volume (GTV) delineation between CT, MR and FDG PET-CT imaging. A prospective, single centre, pilot study was undertaken where 11 patients with locally advanced oropharyngeal cancers (2 tonsil, 9 base of tongue primaries) underwent pre-treatment, contrast enhanced, FDG PET-CT and MR imaging, all performed in a radiotherapy treatment mask. CT, MR and CT-MR GTVs were contoured by 5 clinicians (2 radiologists and 3 radiation oncologists). A semi-automated segmentation algorithm was used to contour PET GTVs. Volume and positional analyses were undertaken, accounting for inter-observer variation, using linear mixed effects models and contour comparison metrics respectively. Significant differences in mean GTV volume were found between CT (11.9 cm(3)) and CT-MR (14.1 cm(3)), p < 0.006, CT-MR and PET (9.5 cm(3)), p < 0.0009, and MR (12.7 cm(3)) and PET, p < 0.016. Substantial differences in GTV position were found between all modalities with the exception of CT-MR and MR GTVs. A mean of 64 %, 74 % and 77 % of the PET GTVs were included within the CT, MR and CT-MR GTVs respectively. A mean of 57 % of the MR GTVs were included within the CT GTV; conversely a mean of 63 % of the CT GTVs were included within the MR GTV. CT inter-observer variability was found to be significantly higher in terms of position and/or volume than both MR and CT-MR (p < 0.05). Significant differences in GTV volume were found between GTV volumes delineated by radiologists (9.7 cm(3)) and oncologists (14.6 cm(3)) for all modalities (p = 0.001). The use of different imaging modalities produced significantly different GTVs, with no single imaging technique encompassing all potential GTV regions. The use of MR reduced inter-observer variability. These data suggest delineation based on multimodality imaging has the potential to improve accuracy of GTV definition. ISRCTN Registry: ISRCTN

  8. Simultaneous ECG-gated PET Imaging of Multiple Mice

    PubMed Central

    Seidel, Jurgen; Bernardo, Marcelino L.; Wong, Karen J.; Xu, Biying; Williams, Mark R.; Kuo, Frank; Jagoda, Elaine M.; Basuli, Falguni; Li, Changhui; Griffiths, Gary L.; Green, Michael V.; Choyke, Peter L.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction We describe and illustrate a method for creating ECG-gated PET images of the heart for each of several mice imaged at the same time. The method is intended to increase “throughput” in PET research studies of cardiac dynamics or to obtain information derived from such studies, e.g. tracer concentration in end diastolic left ventricular blood. Methods An imaging bed with provisions for warming, anesthetic delivery, etc., was fabricated by 3D printing to allow simultaneous PET imaging of two side-by-side mice. After electrode attachment, tracer injection and placement of the animals in the scanner field-of-view, ECG signals from each animal were continuously analyzed and independent trigger markers generated whenever an R-wave was detected in each signal. PET image data were acquired in “list” mode and these trigger markers were inserted into this list along with the image data. Since each mouse is in a different spatial location in the FOV, sorting of these data using trigger markers first from one animal and then the other yields two independent and correctly formed ECG-gated image sequences that reflect the dynamical properties of the heart during an “average” cardiac cycle. Results The described method yields two independent ECG-gated image sequences that exhibit the expected properties in each animal, e.g. variation of the ventricular cavity volumes from maximum to minimum and back during the cardiac cycle in the processed animal with little or no variation in these volumes during the cardiac cycle in the unprocessed animal. Conclusion ECG-gated image sequences for each of several animals can be created from a single list mode data collection using the described method. In principle, this method can be extended to more than two mice (or other animals) and to other forms of physiological gating, e.g. respiratory gating, when several subjects are imaged at the same time. Animal Care Animal care was provided in accordance with the procedures

  9. A computational pipeline for quantification of pulmonary infections in small animal models using serial PET-CT imaging.

    PubMed

    Bagci, Ulas; Foster, Brent; Miller-Jaster, Kirsten; Luna, Brian; Dey, Bappaditya; Bishai, William R; Jonsson, Colleen B; Jain, Sanjay; Mollura, Daniel J

    2013-07-23

    Infectious diseases are the second leading cause of death worldwide. In order to better understand and treat them, an accurate evaluation using multi-modal imaging techniques for anatomical and functional characterizations is needed. For non-invasive imaging techniques such as computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and positron emission tomography (PET), there have been many engineering improvements that have significantly enhanced the resolution and contrast of the images, but there are still insufficient computational algorithms available for researchers to use when accurately quantifying imaging data from anatomical structures and functional biological processes. Since the development of such tools may potentially translate basic research into the clinic, this study focuses on the development of a quantitative and qualitative image analysis platform that provides a computational radiology perspective for pulmonary infections in small animal models. Specifically, we designed (a) a fast and robust automated and semi-automated image analysis platform and a quantification tool that can facilitate accurate diagnostic measurements of pulmonary lesions as well as volumetric measurements of anatomical structures, and incorporated (b) an image registration pipeline to our proposed framework for volumetric comparison of serial scans. This is an important investigational tool for small animal infectious disease models that can help advance researchers' understanding of infectious diseases. We tested the utility of our proposed methodology by using sequentially acquired CT and PET images of rabbit, ferret, and mouse models with respiratory infections of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (TB), H1N1 flu virus, and an aerosolized respiratory pathogen (necrotic TB) for a total of 92, 44, and 24 scans for the respective studies with half of the scans from CT and the other half from PET. Institutional Administrative Panel on Laboratory Animal Care approvals were

  10. A computational pipeline for quantification of pulmonary infections in small animal models using serial PET-CT imaging

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Infectious diseases are the second leading cause of death worldwide. In order to better understand and treat them, an accurate evaluation using multi-modal imaging techniques for anatomical and functional characterizations is needed. For non-invasive imaging techniques such as computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and positron emission tomography (PET), there have been many engineering improvements that have significantly enhanced the resolution and contrast of the images, but there are still insufficient computational algorithms available for researchers to use when accurately quantifying imaging data from anatomical structures and functional biological processes. Since the development of such tools may potentially translate basic research into the clinic, this study focuses on the development of a quantitative and qualitative image analysis platform that provides a computational radiology perspective for pulmonary infections in small animal models. Specifically, we designed (a) a fast and robust automated and semi-automated image analysis platform and a quantification tool that can facilitate accurate diagnostic measurements of pulmonary lesions as well as volumetric measurements of anatomical structures, and incorporated (b) an image registration pipeline to our proposed framework for volumetric comparison of serial scans. This is an important investigational tool for small animal infectious disease models that can help advance researchers’ understanding of infectious diseases. Methods We tested the utility of our proposed methodology by using sequentially acquired CT and PET images of rabbit, ferret, and mouse models with respiratory infections of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (TB), H1N1 flu virus, and an aerosolized respiratory pathogen (necrotic TB) for a total of 92, 44, and 24 scans for the respective studies with half of the scans from CT and the other half from PET. Institutional Administrative Panel on Laboratory Animal

  11. Motion compensation for PET image reconstruction using deformable tetrahedral meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manescu, P.; Ladjal, H.; Azencot, J.; Beuve, M.; Shariat, B.

    2015-12-01

    Respiratory-induced organ motion is a technical challenge to PET imaging. This motion induces displacements and deformation of the organs tissues, which need to be taken into account when reconstructing the spatial radiation activity. Classical image-based methods that describe motion using deformable image registration (DIR) algorithms cannot fully take into account the non-reproducibility of the respiratory internal organ motion nor the tissue volume variations that occur during breathing. In order to overcome these limitations, various biomechanical models of the respiratory system have been developed in the past decade as an alternative to DIR approaches. In this paper, we describe a new method of correcting motion artefacts in PET image reconstruction adapted to motion estimation models such as those based on the finite element method. In contrast with the DIR-based approaches, the radiation activity was reconstructed on deforming tetrahedral meshes. For this, we have re-formulated the tomographic reconstruction problem by introducing a time-dependent system matrix based calculated using tetrahedral meshes instead of voxelized images. The MLEM algorithm was chosen as the reconstruction method. The simulations performed in this study show that the motion compensated reconstruction based on tetrahedral deformable meshes has the capability to correct motion artefacts. Results demonstrate that, in the case of complex deformations, when large volume variations occur, the developed tetrahedral based method is more appropriate than the classical DIR-based one. This method can be used, together with biomechanical models controlled by external surrogates, to correct motion artefacts in PET images and thus reducing the need for additional internal imaging during the acquisition.

  12. Generalized PSF modeling for optimized quantitation in PET imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashrafinia, Saeed; Mohy-ud-Din, Hassan; Karakatsanis, Nicolas A.; Jha, Abhinav K.; Casey, Michael E.; Kadrmas, Dan J.; Rahmim, Arman

    2017-06-01

    Point-spread function (PSF) modeling offers the ability to account for resolution degrading phenomena within the PET image generation framework. PSF modeling improves resolution and enhances contrast, but at the same time significantly alters image noise properties and induces edge overshoot effect. Thus, studying the effect of PSF modeling on quantitation task performance can be very important. Frameworks explored in the past involved a dichotomy of PSF versus no-PSF modeling. By contrast, the present work focuses on quantitative performance evaluation of standard uptake value (SUV) PET images, while incorporating a wide spectrum of PSF models, including those that under- and over-estimate the true PSF, for the potential of enhanced quantitation of SUVs. The developed framework first analytically models the true PSF, considering a range of resolution degradation phenomena (including photon non-collinearity, inter-crystal penetration and scattering) as present in data acquisitions with modern commercial PET systems. In the context of oncologic liver FDG PET imaging, we generated 200 noisy datasets per image-set (with clinically realistic noise levels) using an XCAT anthropomorphic phantom with liver tumours of varying sizes. These were subsequently reconstructed using the OS-EM algorithm with varying PSF modelled kernels. We focused on quantitation of both SUVmean and SUVmax, including assessment of contrast recovery coefficients, as well as noise-bias characteristics (including both image roughness and coefficient of-variability), for different tumours/iterations/PSF kernels. It was observed that overestimated PSF yielded more accurate contrast recovery for a range of tumours, and typically improved quantitative performance. For a clinically reasonable number of iterations, edge enhancement due to PSF modeling (especially due to over-estimated PSF) was in fact seen to lower SUVmean bias in small tumours. Overall, the results indicate that exactly matched PSF

  13. Generalized PSF modeling for optimized quantitation in PET imaging.

    PubMed

    Ashrafinia, Saeed; Mohy-Ud-Din, Hassan; Karakatsanis, Nicolas A; Jha, Abhinav K; Casey, Michael E; Kadrmas, Dan J; Rahmim, Arman

    2017-06-21

    Point-spread function (PSF) modeling offers the ability to account for resolution degrading phenomena within the PET image generation framework. PSF modeling improves resolution and enhances contrast, but at the same time significantly alters image noise properties and induces edge overshoot effect. Thus, studying the effect of PSF modeling on quantitation task performance can be very important. Frameworks explored in the past involved a dichotomy of PSF versus no-PSF modeling. By contrast, the present work focuses on quantitative performance evaluation of standard uptake value (SUV) PET images, while incorporating a wide spectrum of PSF models, including those that under- and over-estimate the true PSF, for the potential of enhanced quantitation of SUVs. The developed framework first analytically models the true PSF, considering a range of resolution degradation phenomena (including photon non-collinearity, inter-crystal penetration and scattering) as present in data acquisitions with modern commercial PET systems. In the context of oncologic liver FDG PET imaging, we generated 200 noisy datasets per image-set (with clinically realistic noise levels) using an XCAT anthropomorphic phantom with liver tumours of varying sizes. These were subsequently reconstructed using the OS-EM algorithm with varying PSF modelled kernels. We focused on quantitation of both SUVmean and SUVmax, including assessment of contrast recovery coefficients, as well as noise-bias characteristics (including both image roughness and coefficient of-variability), for different tumours/iterations/PSF kernels. It was observed that overestimated PSF yielded more accurate contrast recovery for a range of tumours, and typically improved quantitative performance. For a clinically reasonable number of iterations, edge enhancement due to PSF modeling (especially due to over-estimated PSF) was in fact seen to lower SUVmean bias in small tumours. Overall, the results indicate that exactly matched PSF

  14. Qualitative and quantitative image analysis of CT and MR imaging in patients with neuroendocrine liver metastases in comparison to (68)Ga-DOTATOC PET.

    PubMed

    Flechsig, Paul; Zechmann, Christian M; Schreiweis, Julian; Kratochwil, Clemens; Rath, Daniel; Schwartz, Lawrence H; Schlemmer, Heinz-Peter; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich; Haberkorn, Uwe; Giesel, Frederik L

    2015-08-01

    To compare lesion conspicuity in patients with liver metastases arising from gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (GEP-NETs) using MRI, PET and CT. 16 patients with GEP-NETs were evaluated using non-contrast MRI, contrast-enhanced (CE) MRI using Gd-EOB-DTPA and CE-(68)Ga-DOTATOC PET. Quantitative analyses were performed by two blinded readers using ROI-analyses quantifying contrast ratios (CR) between normal liver-tissue and GEP-NET-metastases. Qualitative analyses were performed evaluating primary visibility and spatial detectability of all lesions. 103 of the same liver metastases were detected on all modalities. Qualitatively, lesion conspicuity was superior on CE-MRI imaging compared to non-contrast MR-sequences (T2, DWI, fl2D, fl3D), as well as arterial- and portal-venous phase CT. Concerning detectability of lesions, CE-MRI was superior to all other modalities. The quantitative ROI-analysis demonstrated improved CR for DWI compared to all other non-contrast MR-sequences (p<0.001). CE-MRI presented with higher CR-values compared to CE-(68)Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT (p<0.001). Anatomic imaging using non contrast MRI with fl2D-and fl3D-sequences in combination with the molecular imaging modality (68)Ga-DOTATOC PET is optimal for the assessment of liver lesions in GEP-NET-patients. Even though CE-MRI was superior to non-contrast MRI, non-contrast MRI is sufficient to detect and quantify liver metastases in daily routine, especially in combination with DW-Imaging. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  15. Evaluation of attenuation and scatter correction requirements in small animal PET and SPECT imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konik, Arda Bekir

    Positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission tomography (SPECT) are two nuclear emission-imaging modalities that rely on the detection of high-energy photons emitted from radiotracers administered to the subject. The majority of these photons are attenuated (absorbed or scattered) in the body, resulting in count losses or deviations from true detection, which in turn degrades the accuracy of images. In clinical emission tomography, sophisticated correction methods are often required employing additional x-ray CT or radionuclide transmission scans. Having proven their potential in both clinical and research areas, both PET and SPECT are being adapted for small animal imaging. However, despite the growing interest in small animal emission tomography, little scientific information exists about the accuracy of these correction methods on smaller size objects, and what level of correction is required. The purpose of this work is to determine the role of attenuation and scatter corrections as a function of object size through simulations. The simulations were performed using Interactive Data Language (IDL) and a Monte Carlo based package, Geant4 application for emission tomography (GATE). In IDL simulations, PET and SPECT data acquisition were modeled in the presence of attenuation. A mathematical emission and attenuation phantom approximating a thorax slice and slices from real PET/CT data were scaled to 5 different sizes (i.e., human, dog, rabbit, rat and mouse). The simulated emission data collected from these objects were reconstructed. The reconstructed images, with and without attenuation correction, were compared to the ideal (i.e., non-attenuated) reconstruction. Next, using GATE, scatter fraction values (the ratio of the scatter counts to the total counts) of PET and SPECT scanners were measured for various sizes of NEMA (cylindrical phantoms representing small animals and human), MOBY (realistic mouse/rat model) and XCAT (realistic human model

  16. A 16-channel MR coil for simultaneous PET/MR imaging in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Dregely, Isabel; Lanz, Titus; Metz, Stephan; Mueller, Matthias F; Kuschan, Marika; Nimbalkar, Manoj; Bundschuh, Ralph A; Ziegler, Sibylle I; Haase, Axel; Nekolla, Stephan G; Schwaiger, Markus

    2015-04-01

    To implement and evaluate a dedicated receiver array coil for simultaneous positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance (PET/MR) imaging in breast cancer. A 16-channel receiver coil design was optimized for simultaneous PET/MR imaging. To assess MR performance, the signal-to-noise ratio, parallel imaging capability and image quality was evaluated in phantoms, volunteers and patients and compared to clinical standard protocols. For PET evaluation, quantitative (18) F-FDG PET images of phantoms and seven patients (14 lesions) were compared to images without the coil. In PET image reconstruction, a CT-based template of the coil was combined with the MR-acquired attenuation correction (AC) map of the phantom/patient. MR image quality was comparable to clinical MR-only examinations. PET evaluation in phantoms showed regionally varying underestimation of the standardised uptake value (SUV; mean 22 %) due to attenuation caused by the coil. This was improved by implementing the CT-based coil template in the AC (<2 % SUV underestimation). Patient data indicated that including the coil in the AC increased the SUV values in the lesions (21 ± 9 %). Using a dedicated PET/MR breast coil, state-of-the-art MRI was possible. In PET, accurate quantification and image homogeneity could be achieved if a CT-template of this coil was included in the AC for PET image reconstruction. • State-of-the-art breast MRI using a dedicated PET/MR breast coil is feasible. • A multi-channel design facilitates shorter MR acquisition times via parallel imaging. • An MR coil inside a simultaneous PET/MR system causes PET photon attenuation. • Including a coil CT-template in PET image reconstruction results in recovering accurate quantification.

  17. Use of multiple imaging modalities to detect ovarian cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanter, Elizabeth; Walker, Ross; Marion, Sam; Hoyer, Patricia; Barton, Jennifer K.

    2005-04-01

    Ovarian cancer is not a common cancer-approximately 25,000 new cases in 2004-but it is the fifth leading cause of death from cancer in women (over 16,000 in 2004). Little is known about the precursors and early stages of ovarian cancer partially due to the lack of human samples at the early stages. A cohesive model that incorporates ovarian cancer induction into a menopausal rodent would be well suited for comprehensive studies of ovarian cancer. Non-destructive imaging would allow carcinogenesis to be followed. Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT), Optical Coherence Microscopy (OCM) and Light-Induced Fluorescence (LIF) are minimally invasive optical modalities that allow both structural and biochemical changes to be noted. Rat ovaries were exposed to 4-vinylcyclohexene diepoxide (VCD) for 20 days in order to destroy the primordial follicles. Plain sutures and sutures coated with 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA) were implanted in the right ovary, in order to produce epithelial based ovarian cancers (a plain suture was inserted in the control). Rats were sacrificed at 4 weeks and ovaries were harvested and imaged with a combined OCT/LIF system and with the OCM. Histology was preformed on the harvested ovaries and any pathology determined. Two of the ovaries were visually abnormal; the OCT/LIF imaging confirmed these abnormalities. The normal ovary OCM and OCT images show the organized structure of the ovary, the follicles, bursa and corpus lutea are visible. The OCM images show the disorganized structure of one of the abnormal ovaries. Overall this pilot study demonstrated the feasibility of both the animal model and optical imaging.

  18. Framework for the construction of a Monte Carlo simulated brain PET-MR image database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, B. A.; Erlandsson, K.; Drobnjak, I.; Pedemonte, S.; Vunckx, K.; Bousse, A.; Reilhac-Laborde, A.; Ourselin, S.; Hutton, B. F.

    2014-01-01

    Simultaneous PET-MR acquisition reduces the possibility of registration mismatch between the two modalities. This facilitates the application of techniques, either during reconstruction or post-reconstruction, that aim to improve the PET resolution by utilising structural information provided by MR. However, in order to validate such methods for brain PET-MR studies it is desirable to evaluate the performance using data where the ground truth is known. In this work, we present a framework for the production of datasets where simulations of both the PET and MR, based on real data, are generated such that reconstruction and post-reconstruction approaches can be fairly compared.

  19. Imaging Modalities to Identity Inflammation in an Atherosclerotic Plaque

    PubMed Central

    Goel, Sunny; Miller, Avraham; Agarwal, Chirag; Zakin, Elina; Acholonu, Michael; Gidwani, Umesh; Sharma, Abhishek; Kulbak, Guy; Shani, Jacob; Chen, On

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic, progressive, multifocal arterial wall disease caused by local and systemic inflammation responsible for major cardiovascular complications such as myocardial infarction and stroke. With the recent understanding that vulnerable plaque erosion and rupture, with subsequent thrombosis, rather than luminal stenosis, is the underlying cause of acute ischemic events, there has been a shift of focus to understand the mechanisms that make an atherosclerotic plaque unstable or vulnerable to rupture. The presence of inflammation in the atherosclerotic plaque has been considered as one of the initial events which convert a stable plaque into an unstable and vulnerable plaque. This paper systemically reviews the noninvasive and invasive imaging modalities that are currently available to detect this inflammatory process, at least in the intermediate stages, and discusses the ongoing studies that will help us to better understand and identify it at the molecular level. PMID:26798515

  20. Multi-modality image registration for effective thermographic fever screening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dwith, C. Y. N.; Ghassemi, Pejhman; Pfefer, Joshua; Casamento, Jon; Wang, Quanzeng

    2017-02-01

    Fever screening based on infrared thermographs (IRTs) is a viable mass screening approach during infectious disease pandemics, such as Ebola and Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS), for temperature monitoring in public places like hospitals and airports. IRTs have been found to be powerful, quick and non-invasive methods for detecting elevated temperatures. Moreover, regions medially adjacent to the inner canthi (called the canthi regions in this paper) are preferred sites for fever screening. Accurate localization of the canthi regions can be achieved through multi-modality registration of infrared (IR) and white-light images. Here we propose a registration method through a coarse-fine registration strategy using different registration models based on landmarks and edge detection on eye contours. We have evaluated the registration accuracy to be within +/- 2.7 mm, which enables accurate localization of the canthi regions.

  1. Competitive advantage of PET/MRI.

    PubMed

    Jadvar, Hossein; Colletti, Patrick M

    2014-01-01

    Multimodality imaging has made great strides in the imaging evaluation of patients with a variety of diseases. Positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) is now established as the imaging modality of choice in many clinical conditions, particularly in oncology. While the initial development of combined PET/magnetic resonance imaging (PET/MRI) was in the preclinical arena, hybrid PET/MR scanners are now available for clinical use. PET/MRI combines the unique features of MRI including excellent soft tissue contrast, diffusion-weighted imaging, dynamic contrast-enhanced imaging, fMRI and other specialized sequences as well as MR spectroscopy with the quantitative physiologic information that is provided by PET. Most evidence for the potential clinical utility of PET/MRI is based on studies performed with side-by-side comparison or software-fused MRI and PET images. Data on distinctive utility of hybrid PET/MRI are rapidly emerging. There are potential competitive advantages of PET/MRI over PET/CT. In general, PET/MRI may be preferred over PET/CT where the unique features of MRI provide more robust imaging evaluation in certain clinical settings. The exact role and potential utility of simultaneous data acquisition in specific research and clinical settings will need to be defined. It may be that simultaneous PET/MRI will be best suited for clinical situations that are disease-specific, organ-specific, related to diseases of the children or in those patients undergoing repeated imaging for whom cumulative radiation dose must be kept as low as reasonably achievable. PET/MRI also offers interesting opportunities for use of dual modality probes. Upon clear definition of clinical utility, other important and practical issues related to business operational model, clinical workflow and reimbursement will also be resolved. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. A Pretargeted PET Imaging Strategy Based on Bioorthogonal Diels–Alder Click Chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Zeglis, Brian M.; Sevak, Kuntal K.; Reiner, Thomas; Mohindra, Priya; Carlin, Sean D.; Zanzonico, Pat; Weissleder, Ralph; Lewis, Jason S.

    2014-01-01

    The specificity of antibodies have made immunoconjugates promising vectors for the delivery of radioisotopes to cancer cells; however, their long pharmacologic half-lives necessitate the use of radioisotopes with long physical halsives, a combination that leads to high radiation doses to patients. Therefore, the development of targeting modalities that harness the advantages of antibodies without their pharmacokinetic limitations is desirable. To this end, we report the development of a methodology for pretargeted PET imaging based on the bioorthogonal Diels–Alder click reaction between tetrazine and transcyclooctene. Methods A proof-of-concept system based on the A33 antibody, SW1222 colorectal cancer cells, and 64Cu was used. The huA33 antibody was covalently modified with transcyclooctene, and a NOTA-modified tetrazine was synthesized and radiolabeled with 64Cu. Pretargeted in vivo biodistribution and PET imaging experiments were performed with athymic nude mice bearing A33 antigen–expressing, SW1222 colorectal cancer xenografts. Results The huA33 antibody was modified with transcyclooctene to produce a conjugate with high immunoreactivity, and the 64Cu-NOTA–labeled tetrazine ligand was synthesized with greater than 99% purity and a specific activity of 9–10 MBq/μg. For in vivo experiments, mice bearing SW1222 xenografts were injected with transcyclooctene-modified A33; after allowing 24 h for accumulation of the antibody in the tumor, the mice were injected with 64Cu-NOTA–labeled tetrazine for PET imaging and biodistribution experiments. At 12 h after injection, the retention of uptake in the tumor (4.1 ± 0.3 percent injected dose per gram), coupled with the fecal excretion of excess radioligand, produced images with high tumor-to-background ratios. PET imaging and biodistribution experiments performed using A33 directly labeled with either 64Cu or 89Zr revealed that although absolute tumor uptake was higher with the directly radiolabeled antibodies

  3. Performance evaluation of the microPET P4: a PET system dedicated to animal imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tai, Y. C.; Chatziioannou, A.; Siegel, S.; Young, J.; Newport, D.; Goble, R. N.; Nutt, R. E.; Cherry, S. R.

    2001-07-01

    The microPET Primate 4-ring system (P4) is an animal PET tomograph with a 7.8 cm axial extent, a 19 cm diameter transaxial field of view (FOV) and a 22 cm animal port. The system is composed of 168 detector modules, each with an 8×8 array of 2.2×2.2×10 mm3 lutetium oxyorthosilicate crystals, arranged as 32 crystal rings 26 cm in diameter. The detector crystals are coupled to a Hamamatsu R5900-C8 PS-PMT via a 10 cm long optical fibre bundle. The detectors have a timing resolution of 3.2 ns, an average energy resolution of 26%, and an average intrinsic spatial resolution of 1.75 mm. The system operates in 3D mode without inter-plane septa, acquiring data in list mode. The reconstructed image spatial resolution ranges from 1.8 mm at the centre to 3 mm at 4 cm radial offset. The tomograph has a peak system sensitivity of 2.25% at the centre of the FOV with a 250-750 keV energy window. The noise equivalent count rate peaks at 100-290 kcps for representative object sizes. Images from two phantoms and three different types of laboratory animal demonstrate the advantage of the P4 system over the original prototype microPET, including its threefold improvement in sensitivity and a large axial FOV sufficient to image an entire mouse in a single bed position.

  4. Early Detection of Bone Metastasis in Small Cell Neuroendocrine Carcinoma of the Cervix by 68Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT Imaging.

    PubMed

    Damian, Andres; Lago, Graciela; Rossi, Susana; Alonso, Omar; Engler, Henry

    2017-03-01

    The neuroendocrine small cell carcinoma of the cervix is a rare malignancy that has a poor prognosis due to early lymphatic and hematogenous spread. We herein report a case of a 27- year-old woman who was referred for initial staging of a neuroendocrine small cell carcinoma with previous unremarkable structural imaging. Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT revealed focal uptake at the primary tumor and in a solitary pelvic bone lesion suggestive of metastases that was further confirmed by CT-guided biopsy. Somatostatin receptor PET/CT may be a useful image modality for early detection of metastases to guide treatment in these patients.

  5. Optimizing modelling in iterative image reconstruction for preclinical pinhole PET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goorden, Marlies C.; van Roosmalen, Jarno; van der Have, Frans; Beekman, Freek J.

    2016-05-01

    The recently developed versatile emission computed tomography (VECTor) technology enables high-energy SPECT and simultaneous SPECT and PET of small animals at sub-mm resolutions. VECTor uses dedicated clustered pinhole collimators mounted in a scanner with three stationary large-area NaI(Tl) gamma detectors. Here, we develop and validate dedicated image reconstruction methods that compensate for image degradation by incorporating accurate models for the transport of high-energy annihilation gamma photons. Ray tracing software was used to calculate photon transport through the collimator structures and into the gamma detector. Input to this code are several geometric parameters estimated from system calibration with a scanning 99mTc point source. Effects on reconstructed images of (i) modelling variable depth-of-interaction (DOI) in the detector, (ii) incorporating photon paths that go through multiple pinholes (‘multiple-pinhole paths’ (MPP)), and (iii) including various amounts of point spread function (PSF) tail were evaluated. Imaging 18F in resolution and uniformity phantoms showed that including large parts of PSFs is essential to obtain good contrast-noise characteristics and that DOI modelling is highly effective in removing deformations of small structures, together leading to 0.75 mm resolution PET images of a hot-rod Derenzo phantom. Moreover, MPP modelling reduced the level of background noise. These improvements were also clearly visible in mouse images. Performance of VECTor can thus be significantly improved by accurately modelling annihilation gamma photon transport.

  6. Simultaneous water activation and glucose metabolic rate imaging with PET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verhaeghe, Jeroen; Reader, Andrew J.

    2013-02-01

    A novel imaging and signal separation strategy is proposed to be able to separate [18F]FDG and multiple [15O]H2O signals from a simultaneously acquired dynamic PET acquisition of the two tracers. The technique is based on the fact that the dynamics of the two tracers are very distinct. By adopting an appropriate bolus injection strategy and by defining tailored sets of basis functions that model either the FDG or water component, it is possible to separate the FDG and water signal. The basis functions are inspired from the spectral analysis description of dynamic PET studies and are defined as the convolution of estimated generating functions (GFs) with a set of decaying exponential functions. The GFs are estimated from the overall measured head curve, while the decaying exponential functions are pre-determined. In this work, the time activity curves (TACs) are modelled post-reconstruction but the model can be incorporated in a global 4D reconstruction strategy. Extensive PET simulation studies are performed considering single [18F]FDG and 6 [15O]H2O bolus injections for a total acquisition time of 75 min. The proposed method is evaluated at multiple noise levels and different parameters were estimated such as [18F]FDG uptake and blood flow estimated from the [15O]H2O component, requiring a full dynamic analysis of the two components, static images of [18F]FDG and the water components as well as [15O]H2O activation. It is shown that the resulting images and parametric values in ROIs are comparable to images obtained from separate imaging, illustrating the feasibility of simultaneous imaging of [18F]FDG and [15O]H2O components. For more information on this article, see medicalphysicsweb.org

  7. Molecular imaging to guide systemic cancer therapy: Illustrative examples of PET imaging cancer biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Pantel, Austin R; Mankoff, David A

    2017-02-28

    Molecular imaging agents have the ability to non-invasively visualize, characterize, and quantify the molecular biology of disease. Recent advances in nuclear probe development, particularly in PET radiotracers, have generated many new imaging agents with precise molecular targets. With such specificity, PET probes may be utilized as biomarkers to objectively interrogate and evaluate pathology. Whereas the current indications for PET imaging are predominately confined to staging and restaging of malignancy, the utility of PET greatly expands when utilized as a biomarker, the topic of this review. As an imaging biomarker, PET may be used to (1) measure target expression to select subsets of patients who would most benefit from targeted therapy; (2) measure early treatment response to predict therapeutic efficacy; and (3) relate tumor response to survival. This review will discuss the application of radiotracers to targeted cancer therapy. Particular attention is given to new radiotracers evaluated in recently completed clinical trials and those with current or potential clinical utility. The diverse roles of PET in clinical trails for drug development are also examined. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Using