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Sample records for petroleum refinery workers

  1. Cytogenetic biomonitoring on a group of petroleum refinery workers.

    PubMed

    Basso, Emiliano; Cevoli, Chiara; Papacchini, Maddalena; Tranfo, Giovanna; Mansi, Antonella; Testa, Antonella

    2011-07-01

    Workers employed in petroleum refineries are exposed to a wide range of toxic compounds (benzene, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, heavy metals, etc.) with known mutagenic and carcinogenic potential. In this study, we investigated by using the cytokinesis block micronucleus (CBMN) assay on human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) whether general occupational exposure in petroleum refineries resulted in early biological effects, which would be indicative of adverse health effects in the long term. In this study, out of more 500 workers enrolled in the study, 79 male subjects (46 nonsmokers and 33 smokers), employed in two different Italian petroleum refineries, and a total of 50 male control subjects (34 nonsmokers and 16 smokers) were selected by using very strict selection criteria. The comparison of chromosome damage in PBL between exposed and control populations pointed out a significant increase of micronuclei in the exposed group, correlated with the length of employment. Results confirm that smoking is the principal confounding factor for the responses. In conclusion, our results are indicative of a potential genotoxic risk related to the complex occupational exposure in petroleum refineries, despite the measures adopted in the plants, and corroborate the need to increase safety measures to avoid exposure to chemical agents.

  2. Kidney cancer and hydrocarbon exposures among petroleum refinery workers.

    PubMed Central

    Poole, C; Dreyer, N A; Satterfield, M H; Levin, L; Rothman, K J

    1993-01-01

    To evaluate the hypothesis of increased kidney cancer risk after exposure to hydrocarbons, especially those present in gasoline, we conducted a case-control study in a cohort of approximately 100,000 male refinery workers from five petroleum companies. A review of 18,323 death certificates identified 102 kidney cancer cases, to each of whom four controls were matched by refinery location and decade of birth. Work histories, containing an average of 15.7 job assignments per subject, were found for 98% of the cases and 94% of the controls. To each job, industrial hygienists assigned semiquantitative ratings for the intensity and frequency of exposures to three hydrocarbon categories: nonaromatic liquid gasoline distillates, aromatic hydrocarbons, and the more volatile hydrocarbons. Ratings of "present" or "absent" were assigned for seven additional exposures: higher boiling hydrocarbons, polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons, asbestos, chlorinated solvents, ionizing radiation, and lead. Each exposure had either no association or a weak association with kidney cancer. For the hydrocarbon category of principal a priori interest, the nonaromatic liquid gasoline distillates, the estimated relative risk (RR) for any exposure above refinery background was 1.0 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.5-1.9). Analyses of cumulative exposures and of exposures in varying time periods before kidney cancer occurrence also produced null or near-null results. In an analysis of the longest job held by each subject (average duration 9.2 years or 40% of the refinery work history), three groups appeared to be at increased risk: laborers (RR = 1.9, 95% CI 1.0-3.9); workers in receipt, storage, and movements (RR = 2.5, 95% CI 0.9-6.6); and unit cleaners (RR = 2.3, 95% CI 0.5-9.9). PMID:8020449

  3. Mortality of United Kingdom oil refinery and petroleum distribution workers, 1951-1998.

    PubMed

    Sorahan, T; Nichols, L; Harrington, J M

    2002-09-01

    The mortality experienced by cohorts of 28 630 oil refinery workers and 16 480 petroleum distribution workers has been investigated. Study subjects were all those male employees first employed in the period 1946-1974 at one of eight UK oil refineries or at one of 476 UK petroleum distribution centres; all subjects had a minimum of 12 months employment with some employment after 1 January 1951. The observed numbers of cause-specific deaths were compared with expectations based on national mortality rates. The resultant standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) were significantly below 100 for all causes, in both oil refinery workers (observed, 9341; expected, 10 649.7; SMR = 88) and petroleum distribution workers (observed, 6083; expected, 6460.3; SMR = 94). Significantly elevated SMRs were shown in oil refinery workers for cancer of the gall bladder (observed, 24; expected, 14.0; SMR = 172), cancer of the pleura (observed, 38; expected, 15.0; SMR = 254) and melanoma (observed, 36; expected, 22.2; SMR = 162). Significantly elevated SMRs were not found in petroleum distribution workers for any site of cancer. SMRs for selected causes of death were calculated by period from commencing employment, by year of hire and by job type. The only findings that suggested the presence of an occupational cancer hazard were an excess of mesothelioma in oil refinery workers and an excess of leukaemia in petroleum distribution workers, both excesses occurring in long-term follow-up for workers first employed >30 years ago.

  4. Asbestos-related cancers in refinery workers in the Australian petroleum industry.

    PubMed

    Gun, Richard; Pratt, Nicole L; Roder, David M; Ryan, Philip

    2006-01-01

    In this study of the incidence of asbestos-related cancer in the Australian petroleum industry, the authors traced a cohort of 16,543 petroleum industry workers for a total of 226,989 person-years. There were 18 cases of pleural mesothelioma; 12 occurred in refinery nonoffice workers, for whom the Standardized Incidence Ratio was 3.77 (95% confidence interval = 1.95-6.59). The incidence of lung cancer was significantly lower than that in the general male population. Lung cancer incidence was higher in maintenance workers than in nonmaintenance workers, but the excess was not statistically significant, as it was based on small numbers with wide confidence intervals. Lung cancer rates in refinery workers did not increase with duration of employment; however, they did tend to be higher in workers hired in earlier decades. Excess mesothelioma incidence in refinery workers is confirmed, but it is likely that there are few if any asbestos-related lung cancers.

  5. Incidence of Myelodysplastic Syndrome in UK Petroleum Distribution and Oil Refinery Workers, 1995-2011.

    PubMed

    Sorahan, Tom; Mohammed, Nuredin

    2016-05-06

    The incidence of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) experienced by cohorts of 16,467 petroleum distribution workers and 28,554 oil refinery workers has been investigated. Study subjects were all those male employees first employed at one of 476 UK petroleum distribution centres or eight UK oil refineries in the period 1946-1974; all subjects had a minimum of twelve months employment with some employment after 1st January, 1951. Observed numbers (Obs) of MDS cases were compared with expectations based on national incidence rates for the period 1995-2011. The overall standardised registration ratio (SRR) was 73 (Obs = 17) in petroleum distribution workers for the age-range 15-84 years, and 77 (Obs = 21) for the age-range 15-99 years. The overall SRR was 81 (Obs = 29) in oil refinery workers for the age-range 15-84 years, and 83 (Obs = 36) for the age-range 15-99 years. More detailed analyses were carried out in terms of year of registration, period from hire, decade of hire, and duration of employment. The overall SRR findings did not provide clear evidence for the presence of an occupational cancer hazard, and provide no support for the hypothesis that low-level benzene exposure has an important effect on the risks of MDS.

  6. An updated mortality study of workers at a petroleum refinery in Beaumont, Texas.

    PubMed

    Raabe, G K; Collingwood, K W; Wong, O

    1998-01-01

    The mortality experience of 7,119 workers who were employed at a Beaumont, Texas, refinery for at least 1 year between 1945 and 1987 was investigated. Mortality analyses based on standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) showed overall mortality was significantly lower than expected compared with the U.S. general population (SMR = 82, 95% CI = 79-86). Total cancer mortality was also lower than expected (SMR = 92, 95% CI = 84-100). Significant mortality deficits from several malignant and nonmalignant diseases were reported. A significant mortality increase in the broad category of lymphatic and hematopoietic cancers was found (SMR = 133, 95% CI = 103-170). This increase was attributed to a nonsignificant elevation in leukemia of all cell types combined (SMR = 139, 95% CI = 92-201) and a borderline significant increase in other lymphatic tissue cancer (SMR = 158, 95% CI = 101-235). The elevation in leukemia was confined to workers hired before 1950. Furthermore, the leukemia excess was shown to have peaked during the 1960s, with mortality no longer elevated post-1980. Analyses of cell type-specific leukemias showed a similar temporal pattern for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) which was not significantly elevated (SMR = 136, 95% CI = 59-268). Mortality from other leukemia cell types was similar to or lower than expected. Mortality from non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) (SMR = 140, 95% CI = 88-211) and multiple myeloma (MM) (SMR = 121, 95% CI = 55-230) were increased, but neither was statistically significant nor likely to be related to refinery employment. No death from asbestosis was reported, and mortality from mesothelioma and pulmonary fibrosis was lower than expected. Lung cancer mortality for the overall cohort was similar to expected. For the overall cohort, analyses by duration of employment and time since first employment showed no evidence of any trends for increasing cause-specific mortality. Separate analyses of male workers

  7. Environmental and occupational health risks among agricultural workers living in a rural community near petroleum refinery and motorway in Skopje region.

    PubMed

    Karadžinska-Bislimovska, Jovanka; Minov, Jordan; Stoleski, Sašo; Mijakoski, Dragan; Risteska-Kuc, Snežana; Milkovska, Snežana

    2010-12-01

    To assess health risks in agricultural workers associated with environmental exposure to pollutants released from a petroleum refinery and from traffic, we performed a cross-sectional study that included 119 randomly selected subjects divided in two groups. Group 1 included 60 agricultural workers living in a rural community near the petroleum refinery and a motorway overpass, whereas Group 2 consisted of 59 agricultural workers performing similar activities and living in a rural community with no exposure to industrial and traffic pollutants. Risk assessment included a questionnaire, blood pressure measurement, spirometry, laboratory tests, and toxicological analysis. The groups showed a similar prevalence of health problems, with exception of muscle pain in the extremities, headache, and fatigue, which were significantly more common in Group 1. Diastolic blood pressure was higher in Group 1, but not significantly (p=0.057). The same is true for blood carbon monoxide. Significantly higher in Group 1 were blood haemoglobin (p=0.001) and blood lead (p<0.001). Serum cholinesterase activity was similar in both groups. Our findings indicate the need of regular medical exams, ambient monitoring and environmental impact assessment in agricultural population in order to detect individuals at risk and to institute adequate preventive measures.

  8. Health Risk Assessment for Exposure to Benzene in Petroleum Refinery Environments

    PubMed Central

    Edokpolo, Benjamin; Yu, Qiming Jimmy; Connell, Des

    2015-01-01

    The health risk resulting from benzene exposure in petroleum refineries was calculated using data from the scientific literature from various countries throughout the world. The exposure data was collated into four scenarios from petroleum refinery environments and plotted as cumulative probability distributions (CPD) plots. Health risk was evaluated for each scenario using the Hazard Quotient (HQ) at 50% (CEXP50) and 95% (CEXP95) exposure levels. Benzene levels were estimated to pose a significant risk with HQ50 > 1 and HQ95 > 1 for workers exposed to benzene as base estimates for petroleum refinery workers (Scenario 1), petroleum refinery workers evaluated with personal samplers in Bulgarian refineries (Scenario 2B) and evaluated using air inside petroleum refineries in Bulgarian refineries (Scenario 3B). HQ50 < 1 were calculated for petroleum refinery workers with personal samplers in Italian refineries (Scenario 2A), air inside petroleum refineries (Scenario 3A) and air outside petroleum refineries (Scenario 4) in India and Taiwan indicating little possible adverse health effects. Also, HQ95 was < 1 for Scenario 4 however potential risk was evaluated for Scenarios 2A and 3A with HQ95 > 1. The excess Cancer risk (CR) for lifetime exposure to benzene for all the scenarios was evaluated using the Slope Factor and Overall Risk Probability (ORP) methods. The result suggests a potential cancer risk for exposure to benzene in all the scenarios. However, there is a higher cancer risk at 95% (CEXP95) for petroleum refinery workers (2B) with a CR of 48,000 per 106 and exposure to benzene in air inside petroleum refineries (3B) with a CR of 28,000 per 106. PMID:25588154

  9. Health risk assessment for exposure to benzene in petroleum refinery environments.

    PubMed

    Edokpolo, Benjamin; Yu, Qiming Jimmy; Connell, Des

    2015-01-12

    The health risk resulting from benzene exposure in petroleum refineries was calculated using data from the scientific literature from various countries throughout the world. The exposure data was collated into four scenarios from petroleum refinery environments and plotted as cumulative probability distributions (CPD) plots. Health risk was evaluated for each scenario using the Hazard Quotient (HQ) at 50% (CEXP50) and 95% (CEXP95) exposure levels. Benzene levels were estimated to pose a significant risk with HQ50 > 1 and HQ95 > 1 for workers exposed to benzene as base estimates for petroleum refinery workers (Scenario 1), petroleum refinery workers evaluated with personal samplers in Bulgarian refineries (Scenario 2B) and evaluated using air inside petroleum refineries in Bulgarian refineries (Scenario 3B). HQ50 < 1 were calculated for petroleum refinery workers with personal samplers in Italian refineries (Scenario 2A), air inside petroleum refineries (Scenario 3A) and air outside petroleum refineries (Scenario 4) in India and Taiwan indicating little possible adverse health effects. Also, HQ95 was < 1 for Scenario 4 however potential risk was evaluated for Scenarios 2A and 3A with HQ95 > 1. The excess Cancer risk (CR) for lifetime exposure to benzene for all the scenarios was evaluated using the Slope Factor and Overall Risk Probability (ORP) methods. The result suggests a potential cancer risk for exposure to benzene in all the scenarios. However, there is a higher cancer risk at 95% (CEXP95) for petroleum refinery workers (2B) with a CR of 48,000 per 106 and exposure to benzene in air inside petroleum refineries (3B) with a CR of 28,000 per 106.

  10. Energy Efficiency Roadmap for Petroleum Refineries in California

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2004-04-01

    Through the California State IOF initiative, the California Energy Commission PIER Program developed a petroleum refining roadmap to identify energy issues and priorities unique to the refining industry in California and create a plan for future R&D that could help California refineries implement energy efficient technologies.

  11. Mortality patterns among workers in three Texas oil refineries

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, T.L.; Waxweiler, R.J.; Moure-Eraso, R.; Itaya, S.; Fraumeni, J.F.

    1982-02-01

    The cause-specific mortality experience of 2,509 active and retired members of the Oil, Chemical, and Atomic Workers International Union (OCAW) who worked at three oil refineries in the Beaumont/Port Arthur area of Texas was examined to determine whether there might be unusual patterns of fatal disease related to workplace exposures. Deaths that occurred between 1943 and 1979 were identified from membership records of the OCAW headquarters in Denver and from the records of union locals in Texas which represent workers at the three refineries. Death certificates were obtained from state vital records offices for the decedents. Cause-specific Proportionate Mortality Ratios (PMRs) were calculated using the mortality experience of the U.S. general population as a standard. Excess mortality from stomach cancer occurred among active union members who worked at Refinery A and among active and retired members who worked at Refineries B and C. PMRs for leukemia, multiple myeloma, and other lymphomas were elevated, especially among retired workers. Relative frequencies of brain tumor deaths were significantly elevated among active members at all three refineries and slightly elevated among retirees at Refineries A and C. Findings suggest that oil refinery workers may have elevated risks of these cancers and indicate that more definitive studies are necessary.

  12. Updated estimation of energy efficiencies of U.S. petroleum refineries.

    SciTech Connect

    Palou-Rivera, I.; Wang, M. Q.

    2010-12-08

    Evaluation of life-cycle (or well-to-wheels, WTW) energy and emission impacts of vehicle/fuel systems requires energy use (or energy efficiencies) of energy processing or conversion activities. In most such studies, petroleum fuels are included. Thus, determination of energy efficiencies of petroleum refineries becomes a necessary step for life-cycle analyses of vehicle/fuel systems. Petroleum refinery energy efficiencies can then be used to determine the total amount of process energy use for refinery operation. Furthermore, since refineries produce multiple products, allocation of energy use and emissions associated with petroleum refineries to various petroleum products is needed for WTW analysis of individual fuels such as gasoline and diesel. In particular, GREET, the life-cycle model developed at Argonne National Laboratory with DOE sponsorship, compares energy use and emissions of various transportation fuels including gasoline and diesel. Energy use in petroleum refineries is key components of well-to-pump (WTP) energy use and emissions of gasoline and diesel. In GREET, petroleum refinery overall energy efficiencies are used to determine petroleum product specific energy efficiencies. Argonne has developed petroleum refining efficiencies from LP simulations of petroleum refineries and EIA survey data of petroleum refineries up to 2006 (see Wang, 2008). This memo documents Argonne's most recent update of petroleum refining efficiencies.

  13. Microbial enhanced separation of oil from a petroleum refinery sludge.

    PubMed

    Joseph, P J; Joseph, Ammini

    2009-01-15

    Petroleum refineries around the world have adopted different technological options to manage the solid wastes generated during the refining process and stocking of crude oil. These include physical, chemical and biological treatment methods. In this investigation bacterial mediated oil separation is effected. Two strains of Bacillus were isolated from petroleum-contaminated soils, and inoculated into slurry of sludge, and sludge-sand combinations. The bacteria could effect the separation of oil so as to form a floating scum within 48h with an efficiency of 97% at < or =5% level of sludge in the sludge-sand mixture. The activity was traced to the production of biosurfactants by bacteria.

  14. Advanced purification of petroleum refinery wastewater by catalytic vacuum distillation.

    PubMed

    Yan, Long; Ma, Hongzhu; Wang, Bo; Mao, Wei; Chen, Yashao

    2010-06-15

    In our work, a new process, catalytic vacuum distillation (CVD) was utilized for purification of petroleum refinery wastewater that was characteristic of high chemical oxygen demand (COD) and salinity. Moreover, various common promoters, like FeCl(3), kaolin, H(2)SO(4) and NaOH were investigated to improve the purification efficiency of CVD. Here, the purification efficiency was estimated by COD testing, electrolytic conductivity, UV-vis spectrum, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and pH value. The results showed that NaOH promoted CVD displayed higher efficiency in purification of refinery wastewater than other systems, where the pellucid effluents with low salinity and high COD removal efficiency (99%) were obtained after treatment, and the corresponding pH values of effluents varied from 7 to 9. Furthermore, environment estimation was also tested and the results showed that the effluent had no influence on plant growth. Thus, based on satisfied removal efficiency of COD and salinity achieved simultaneously, NaOH promoted CVD process is an effective approach to purify petroleum refinery wastewater.

  15. 77 FR 63320 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Petroleum Refineries in Foreign Trade Sub-zones

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-16

    ... collection was previously published in the Federal Register (77 FR 47429) on August 8, 2012, allowing for a... SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Agency Information Collection Activities: Petroleum Refineries... review and approval in accordance with the Paperwork Reduction Act: Petroleum Refineries in Foreign...

  16. 77 FR 47429 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Petroleum Refineries in Foreign Trade Sub-zones

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-08

    ... SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Agency Information Collection Activities; Petroleum Refineries... concerning the Petroleum Refineries in Foreign Trade Sub-zones. This request for comment is being made... CBP is soliciting comments concerning the following information collection: Title:...

  17. Potential Impacts of Reductions in Refinery Activity on Northeast Petroleum Product Markets

    EIA Publications

    2012-01-01

    Potential Impacts of Reductions in Refinery Activity on Northeast Petroleum Product Markets is an update to a previous Energy Information Administration (EIA) report, Reductions in Northeast Refining Activity: Potential Implications for Petroleum Product Markets, released in December 2011. This update analyzes possible market responses and impacts in the event Sunoco's Philadelphia refinery closes this summer, in addition to the recently idled refineries on the East Coast and in the U.S. Virgin Islands.

  18. [Working conditions and occupational pathology in electrolytic nickel refinery workers].

    PubMed

    Siurin, S A; Burakova, O A

    2012-01-01

    The working conditions during electrolytic nickel refinery correspond to Class 3, Grade 3-4, which may give rise to health problems in workers of all occupations employed in this production. Their risk and prevalence are significantly higher in the most exposed occupational group, such as electrolysis workers (40.1% of all cases). The structure of occupational diseases is dominated by respiratory diseases (68.8%), mainly due to exposure to aerosols of nickel compounds. It is concluded that working conditions and medical prevention interventions should be improved for this group of workers. PMID:22834262

  19. Aerobic degradation of petroleum refinery wastewater in sequential batch reactor.

    PubMed

    Thakur, Chandrakant; Srivastava, Vimal C; Mall, Indra D

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present work was to study the effect of various parameters affecting the treatment of raw petroleum refinery wastewater (PRW) having chemical oxygen demand (COD) of 350 mg L(-1) and total organic carbon (TOC) of 70 mg L(-1) in sequential batch reactor (SBR). Effect of hydraulic retention time (HRT) was studied in instantaneous fill condition. Maximum COD and TOC removal efficiencies were found to be 80% and 84%, respectively, for fill phase of 2 h and react phase of 2 h with fraction of SBR being filled with raw PRW in each cycle being 0.4. Effect of parameters was studied in terms of settling characteristic of treated slurry. Kinetics of treatment process has been studied. FTIR and UV-visible analysis of PRW before and after treatment have been performed so as to understand the degradation mechanism.

  20. BTEX biodegradation by bacteria from effluents of petroleum refinery.

    PubMed

    Mazzeo, Dânia Elisa Christofoletti; Levy, Carlos Emílio; de Angelis, Dejanira de Franceschi; Marin-Morales, Maria Aparecida

    2010-09-15

    Groundwater contamination with benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylene (BTEX) has been increasing, thus requiring an urgent development of methodologies that are able to remove or minimize the damages these compounds can cause to the environment. The biodegradation process using microorganisms has been regarded as an efficient technology to treat places contaminated with hydrocarbons, since they are able to biotransform and/or biodegrade target pollutants. To prove the efficiency of this process, besides chemical analysis, the use of biological assessments has been indicated. This work identified and selected BTEX-biodegrading microorganisms present in effluents from petroleum refinery, and evaluated the efficiency of microorganism biodegradation process for reducing genotoxic and mutagenic BTEX damage through two test-systems: Allium cepa and hepatoma tissue culture (HTC) cells. Five different non-biodegraded BTEX concentrations were evaluated in relation to biodegraded concentrations. The biodegradation process was performed in a BOD Trak Apparatus (HACH) for 20 days, using microorganisms pre-selected through enrichment. Although the biodegradation usually occurs by a consortium of different microorganisms, the consortium in this study was composed exclusively of five bacteria species and the bacteria Pseudomonas putida was held responsible for the BTEX biodegradation. The chemical analyses showed that BTEX was reduced in the biodegraded concentrations. The results obtained with genotoxicity assays, carried out with both A. cepa and HTC cells, showed that the biodegradation process was able to decrease the genotoxic damages of BTEX. By mutagenic tests, we observed a decrease in damage only to the A. cepa organism. Although no decrease in mutagenicity was observed for HTC cells, no increase of this effect after the biodegradation process was observed either. The application of pre-selected bacteria in biodegradation processes can represent a reliable and

  1. BTEX biodegradation by bacteria from effluents of petroleum refinery.

    PubMed

    Mazzeo, Dânia Elisa Christofoletti; Levy, Carlos Emílio; de Angelis, Dejanira de Franceschi; Marin-Morales, Maria Aparecida

    2010-09-15

    Groundwater contamination with benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylene (BTEX) has been increasing, thus requiring an urgent development of methodologies that are able to remove or minimize the damages these compounds can cause to the environment. The biodegradation process using microorganisms has been regarded as an efficient technology to treat places contaminated with hydrocarbons, since they are able to biotransform and/or biodegrade target pollutants. To prove the efficiency of this process, besides chemical analysis, the use of biological assessments has been indicated. This work identified and selected BTEX-biodegrading microorganisms present in effluents from petroleum refinery, and evaluated the efficiency of microorganism biodegradation process for reducing genotoxic and mutagenic BTEX damage through two test-systems: Allium cepa and hepatoma tissue culture (HTC) cells. Five different non-biodegraded BTEX concentrations were evaluated in relation to biodegraded concentrations. The biodegradation process was performed in a BOD Trak Apparatus (HACH) for 20 days, using microorganisms pre-selected through enrichment. Although the biodegradation usually occurs by a consortium of different microorganisms, the consortium in this study was composed exclusively of five bacteria species and the bacteria Pseudomonas putida was held responsible for the BTEX biodegradation. The chemical analyses showed that BTEX was reduced in the biodegraded concentrations. The results obtained with genotoxicity assays, carried out with both A. cepa and HTC cells, showed that the biodegradation process was able to decrease the genotoxic damages of BTEX. By mutagenic tests, we observed a decrease in damage only to the A. cepa organism. Although no decrease in mutagenicity was observed for HTC cells, no increase of this effect after the biodegradation process was observed either. The application of pre-selected bacteria in biodegradation processes can represent a reliable and

  2. The Implementation and Maintenance of a Behavioral Safety Process in a Petroleum Refinery

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myers, Wanda V.; McSween, Terry E.; Medina, Rixio E.; Rost, Kristen; Alvero, Alicia M.

    2010-01-01

    A values-centered and team-based behavioral safety process was implemented in a petroleum oil refinery. Employee teams defined the refinery's safety values and related practices, which were used to guide the process design and implementation. The process included (a) a safety assessment; (b) the clarification of safety-related values and related…

  3. [Arterial hypertension and alcoholism among workers in an oil refinery].

    PubMed

    Lima, C T; Carvalho, F M; Quadros, C de A; Gonçalves, H R; Silva Júnior, J A; Peres, M F; Bonfim, M S

    1999-09-01

    The role of alcohol ingestion in the incidence of arterial hypertension has not been completely established. In addition, there are few studies addressing this point in relation to populations of workers. The objective of this study was to evaluate the association between alcoholism and arterial hypertension among workers in an oil refinery in Mataripe, Bahia, Brazil, from 1986 to 1993. We designed a retrospective cohort study with a 7-year follow-up in a stratified systematic sample of 335 workers from the refinery. Arterial hypertension was diagnosed based on blood pressure measurements done during routine medical examinations. At the beginning of follow-up, three groups were defined using the CAGE test of alcohol dependency: nondrinkers (n = 121), CAGE-negative workers (n = 116), and CAGE-positive workers (n = 98). In comparison with the CAGE-negative group, the CAGE-positive group had both greater relative risk and greater attributable risk for developing arterial hypertension (RR = 2.58; AR = 24.95 per 1,000 person-years). The CAGE-positive group also had greater risks compared to nondrinkers (RR = 2.06; AR = 20.97 per 1,000 person-years). The attributable fractions for the same two comparisons of groups were 61% and 51%, respectively. Rate standardization by age or smoking habit did not substantially change the results. Alcoholism is an important risk factor for arterial hypertension. PMID:10517096

  4. 78 FR 37133 - National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants From Petroleum Refineries

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-20

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... Petroleum Refineries AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: This action... of environmental protection provided under those standards. The final amendments do not add any...

  5. Smoking and occupational allergy in workers in a platinum refinery.

    PubMed Central

    Venables, K. M.; Dally, M. B.; Nunn, A. J.; Stevens, J. F.; Stephens, R.; Farrer, N.; Hunter, J. V.; Stewart, M.; Hughes, E. G.; Newman Taylor, A. J.

    1989-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To test the hypothesis that smoking increases the risk of sensitisation by occupational allergens. DESIGN--Historical prospective cohort study. SETTING--Platinum refinery. SUBJECTS--91 Workers (86 men) who started work between 1 January 1973 and 31 December 1974 and whose smoking habit and atopic state (on skin prick testing with common allergens) had been noted at joining. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Results of skin prick tests with platinum salts carried out routinely every three to six months and records of any respiratory symptoms noted by the refinery's occupational health service. Follow up was until 1980 or until leaving refinery work, whichever was earlier. RESULTS--57 Workers smoked and 29 were atopic; 22 developed a positive result on skin testing with platinum salts and 49 developed symptoms, including all 22 whose skin test result was positive. Smoking was the only significant predictor of a positive result on skin testing with platinum salts and its effect was greater than that of atopy; the estimated relative risks (95% confidence interval) when both were included in the regression model were: smokers versus non-smokers 5.05 (1.68 to 15.2) and atopic versus non-atopic 2.29 (0.88 to 5.99). Number of cigarettes smoked per day was the only significant predictor of respiratory symptoms. CONCLUSION--Smokers are at increased risk of sensitisation by platinum salts. PMID:2508944

  6. Treatment of petroleum refinery sourwater by advanced oxidation processes.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Alessandra; Castro, Antonio V; Dezotti, Márcia; Sant'Anna, G L

    2006-09-01

    The performance of several oxidation processes to remove organic pollutants from sourwater was investigated. Sourwater is a specific stream of petroleum refineries, which contains slowly biodegradable compounds and toxic substances that impair the industrial biological wastewater treatment system. Preliminary experiments were conducted, using the following processes: H2O2, H2O2/UV, UV, photocatalysis, ozonation, Fenton and photo-Fenton. All processes, except Fenton and photo-Fenton, did not lead to satisfactory results, reducing at most 35% of the sourwater dissolved organic carbon (DOC). Thus, further experiments were performed with these two techniques to evaluate process conditions and organic matter removal kinetics. Batch experiments revealed that the Fenton reaction is very fast and reaches, in a few minutes, an ultimate DOC removal of 13-27%, due to the formation of iron complexes. Radiation for an additional period of 60 min can increase DOC removal up to 87%. Experiments were also conducted in a continuous mode, operating one 0.4L Fenton stirred reactor and one 1.6L photo-Fenton reactor in series. DOC removals above 75% were reached, when the reaction system was operated with hydraulic retention times (HRT) higher than 85 min. An empirical mathematical model was proposed to represent the DOC removal kinetics, allowing predicting process performance quite satisfactorily.

  7. Purification and detoxification of petroleum refinery wastewater by electrocoagulation process.

    PubMed

    Gousmi, N; Sahmi, A; Li, H Z; Poncin, S; Djebbar, R; Bensadok, K

    2016-09-01

    The treatment of synthetic oily wastewater having the characteristics of a typical petroleum refinery wastewater (PRW) by electrocoagulation (EC) using iron and aluminum electrodes was conducted in an electrolytic reactor equipped with fluid recirculation. During the treatment, the emulsion stability was followed by the measurement of Zeta potential and particle sizes. Effects of some operating conditions such as electrodes material, current density and electrolysis time on removal efficiencies of turbidity, and chemical oxygen demand (COD) were investigated in detail. The PRW purification by the EC process was found to be the most effective using aluminum as the anode and cathode, current density of 60 A/m(2) and 30 min of electrolysis time. Under these conditions, the process efficiencies were 83.52% and 99.94%, respectively, for COD and turbidity removals which correspond to final values of 96 mg O2/L and 0.5 NTU. A moderate energy consumption (0.341 kWh) was needed to treat 1 m(3) of PRW. Besides, the ecotoxicity test proved that toxic substances presented in the PRW, and those inhibiting the germination growth of whet, were eliminated by the EC technique.

  8. Characterisation of workers' exposure in a Russian nickel refinery.

    PubMed

    Thomassen, Y; Nieboer, E; Ellingsen, D; Hetland, S; Norseth, T; Odland, J Ø; Romanova, N; Chernova, S; Tchachtchine, V P

    1999-02-01

    In support of a feasibility study of reproductive and developmental health among females employed in the Monchegorsk (Russia) nickel refinery, personal exposure and biological monitoring assessments were conducted. The inhalable aerosol fraction was measured and characterised by chemical speciation and particle-size distribution measurements. Unexpected findings were that: (i), pyrometallurgical working environments had significant levels of water-soluble nickel; (ii), significant exposure to cobalt occurred for the nickel workers; (iii), particles of size corresponding to the thoracic and respirable fractions appeared to be virtually absent in most of the areas surveyed. The water-soluble fraction is judged to be primarily responsible for the observed urinary nickel and cobalt concentrations. It is concluded relative to current international occupational-exposure limits for nickel in air, and because of the high nickel concentrations observed in urine, that the Monchegorsk nickel workers are heavily exposed. The implication of this finding for follow-up epidemiological work is alluded to. PMID:11529072

  9. Airborne concentrations of metals and total dust during solid catalyst loading and unloading operations at a petroleum refinery.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Ryan C; Gaffney, Shannon H; Le, Matthew H; Unice, Ken M; Paustenbach, Dennis J

    2012-09-01

    Workers handle catalysts extensively at petroleum refineries throughout the world each year; however, little information is available regarding the airborne concentrations and plausible exposures during this type of work. In this paper, we evaluated the airborne concentrations of 15 metals and total dust generated during solid catalyst loading and unloading operations at one of the largest petroleum refineries in the world using historical industrial hygiene samples collected between 1989 and 2006. The total dust and metals, which included aluminum, cadmium, chromium, cobalt, copper, iron, lead, manganese, molybdenum, nickel, platinum, silicon, silver, vanadium, and zinc, were evaluated in relation to the handling of four different types of solid catalysts associated with three major types of catalytic processes. Consideration was given to the known components of the solid catalysts and any metals that were likely deposited onto them during use. A total of 180 analytical results were included in this analysis, representing 13 personal and 54 area samples. Of the long-term personal samples, airborne concentrations of metals ranged from <0.001 to 2.9mg/m(3), and, in all but one case, resulted in concentrations below the current U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration's Permissible Exposure Limits and the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists' Threshold Limit Values. The arithmetic mean total dust concentration resulting from long-term personal samples was 0.31mg/m(3). The data presented here are the most complete set of its kind in the open literature, and are useful for understanding the potential exposures during solid catalyst handling activities at this petroleum refinery and perhaps other modern refineries during the timeframe examined. PMID:22177528

  10. Airborne concentrations of metals and total dust during solid catalyst loading and unloading operations at a petroleum refinery.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Ryan C; Gaffney, Shannon H; Le, Matthew H; Unice, Ken M; Paustenbach, Dennis J

    2012-09-01

    Workers handle catalysts extensively at petroleum refineries throughout the world each year; however, little information is available regarding the airborne concentrations and plausible exposures during this type of work. In this paper, we evaluated the airborne concentrations of 15 metals and total dust generated during solid catalyst loading and unloading operations at one of the largest petroleum refineries in the world using historical industrial hygiene samples collected between 1989 and 2006. The total dust and metals, which included aluminum, cadmium, chromium, cobalt, copper, iron, lead, manganese, molybdenum, nickel, platinum, silicon, silver, vanadium, and zinc, were evaluated in relation to the handling of four different types of solid catalysts associated with three major types of catalytic processes. Consideration was given to the known components of the solid catalysts and any metals that were likely deposited onto them during use. A total of 180 analytical results were included in this analysis, representing 13 personal and 54 area samples. Of the long-term personal samples, airborne concentrations of metals ranged from <0.001 to 2.9mg/m(3), and, in all but one case, resulted in concentrations below the current U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration's Permissible Exposure Limits and the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists' Threshold Limit Values. The arithmetic mean total dust concentration resulting from long-term personal samples was 0.31mg/m(3). The data presented here are the most complete set of its kind in the open literature, and are useful for understanding the potential exposures during solid catalyst handling activities at this petroleum refinery and perhaps other modern refineries during the timeframe examined.

  11. Petroleum Refinery Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) Model User Reference Guide

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, M.

    2013-12-31

    The Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) models, developed through the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), are user-friendly tools utilized to estimate the economic impacts at the local level of constructing and operating fuel and power generation projects for a range of conventional and renewable energy technologies. The JEDI Petroleum Refinery Model User Reference Guide was developed to assist users in employing and understanding the model. This guide provides information on the model's underlying methodology, as well as the parameters and references used to develop the cost data utilized in the model. This guide also provides basic instruction on model add-in features, operation of the model, and a discussion of how the results should be interpreted. Based on project-specific inputs from the user, the model estimates job creation, earning and output (total economic activity) for a given petroleum refinery. This includes the direct, indirect and induced economic impacts to the local economy associated with the refinery's construction and operation phases. Project cost and job data used in the model are derived from the most current cost estimations available. Local direct and indirect economic impacts are estimated using economic multipliers derived from IMPLAN software. By determining the regional economic impacts and job creation for a proposed refinery, the JEDI Petroleum Refinery model can be used to field questions about the added value refineries may bring to the local community.

  12. Treatment of petroleum refinery wastewater by ultrasound-dispersed nanoscale zero-valent iron particles.

    PubMed

    Rasheed, Qusay Jaffer; Pandian, Kannaiyan; Muthukumar, Karuppan

    2011-09-01

    Petroleum refineries release wastewater, which is rich in organic pollutants and cannot be treated easily. This study presents the treatment of petroleum refinery wastewater using nanoscale zero valent iron (NZVI) in the presence of ultrasonication. NZVI characteristics were analyzed using SEM and XRD. The influence of NZVI dosage and initial pH on % chemical oxygen demand (COD) reduction was studied. From the results, it can be inferred that a dosage of 0.15 g/l and an initial pH are optimum for the effective degradation of effluents. The degradation data were found to follow first order kinetics. The results indicate that using NZVI in combination with ultrasonication is an efficient method for the treatment of petroleum refinery wastewater.

  13. Allocation of energy use in petroleum refineries to petroleum products : implications for life-cycle energy use and emission inventory of petroleum transportation fuels.

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, M.; Lee, H.; Molburg, J.

    2004-01-01

    Studies to evaluate the energy and emission impacts of vehicle/fuel systems have to address allocation of the energy use and emissions associated with petroleum refineries to various petroleum products because refineries produce multiple products. The allocation is needed in evaluating energy and emission effects of individual transportation fuels. Allocation methods used so far for petroleum-based fuels (e.g., gasoline, diesel, and liquefied petroleum gas [LPG]) are based primarily on mass, energy content, or market value shares of individual fuels from a given refinery. The aggregate approach at the refinery level is unable to account for the energy use and emission differences associated with producing individual fuels at the next sub-level: individual refining processes within a refinery. The approach ignores the fact that different refinery products go through different processes within a refinery. Allocation at the subprocess level (i.e., the refining process level) instead of at the aggregate process level (i.e., the refinery level) is advocated by the International Standard Organization. In this study, we seek a means of allocating total refinery energy use among various refinery products at the level of individual refinery processes. We present a petroleum refinery-process-based approach to allocating energy use in a petroleum refinery to petroleum refinery products according to mass, energy content, and market value share of final and intermediate petroleum products as they flow through refining processes within a refinery. The results from this study reveal that product-specific energy use based on the refinery process-level allocation differs considerably from that based on the refinery-level allocation. We calculated well-to-pump total energy use and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions for gasoline, diesel, LPG, and naphtha with the refinery process-based allocation approach. For gasoline, the efficiency estimated from the refinery-level allocation

  14. Petroleum Technology: From Refinery To Home, Business, and Industry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shewell, John A.

    1997-01-01

    Discusses the application of petroleum technology and presents activities designed to raise students' awareness of the importance of petroleum-based products in their lives. Includes a handout designed to help students understand the refining processes in which the crude oil from the drill site is transformed into nearly 6,000 petroleum-based…

  15. More evidence of unpublished industry studies of lead smelter/refinery workers

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Lead smelter/refinery workers in the US have had significant exposure to lead and are an important occupational group to study to understand the health effects of chronic lead exposure in adults. Recent research found evidence that studies of lead smelter/refinery workers have been conducted but not published. This paper presents further evidence for this contention. Objectives To present further evidence of industry conducted, unpublished epidemiologic studies of lead smelter/refinery workers and health outcomes. Methods Historical research relying on primary sources such as internal industry documents and published studies. Results ASARCO smelter/refinery workers were studied in the early 1980s and found to have increased risk of lung cancer and stroke in one study, but not in another. Conclusions Because occupational lead exposure is an on-going concern for US and overseas workers, all epidemiologic studies should be made available to evaluate and update occupational health and safety standards. PMID:26070220

  16. Energy efficiency and greenhouse gas emission intensity of petroleum products at U.S. refineries.

    PubMed

    Elgowainy, Amgad; Han, Jeongwoo; Cai, Hao; Wang, Michael; Forman, Grant S; DiVita, Vincent B

    2014-07-01

    This paper describes the development of (1) a formula correlating the variation in overall refinery energy efficiency with crude quality, refinery complexity, and product slate; and (2) a methodology for calculating energy and greenhouse gas (GHG) emission intensities and processing fuel shares of major U.S. refinery products. Overall refinery energy efficiency is the ratio of the energy present in all product streams divided by the energy in all input streams. Using linear programming (LP) modeling of the various refinery processing units, we analyzed 43 refineries that process 70% of total crude input to U.S. refineries and cover the largest four Petroleum Administration for Defense District (PADD) regions (I, II, III, V). Based on the allocation of process energy among products at the process unit level, the weighted-average product-specific energy efficiencies (and ranges) are estimated to be 88.6% (86.2%-91.2%) for gasoline, 90.9% (84.8%-94.5%) for diesel, 95.3% (93.0%-97.5%) for jet fuel, 94.5% (91.6%-96.2%) for residual fuel oil (RFO), and 90.8% (88.0%-94.3%) for liquefied petroleum gas (LPG). The corresponding weighted-average, production GHG emission intensities (and ranges) (in grams of carbon dioxide-equivalent (CO2e) per megajoule (MJ)) are estimated to be 7.8 (6.2-9.8) for gasoline, 4.9 (2.7-9.9) for diesel, 2.3 (0.9-4.4) for jet fuel, 3.4 (1.5-6.9) for RFO, and 6.6 (4.3-9.2) for LPG. The findings of this study are key components of the life-cycle assessment of GHG emissions associated with various petroleum fuels; such assessment is the centerpiece of legislation developed and promulgated by government agencies in the United States and abroad to reduce GHG emissions and abate global warming.

  17. 75 FR 37730 - National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants From Petroleum Refineries

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-30

    ... systems at petroleum refineries. 74 FR 55670 (40 CFR part 63, subpart CC). In this action, we are... Executive Order Reviews Under Executive Order 12866, Regulatory Planning and Review (58 FR 51735, October 4..., Federalism (64 FR 43255, August 10, 1999). This action does not significantly or uniquely affect...

  18. 78 FR 76788 - Standards of Performance for Petroleum Refineries for Which Construction, Reconstruction, or...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-19

    ...The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is proposing to amend the Standards of Performance for Petroleum Refineries for Which Construction, Reconstruction, or Modification Commenced After May 14, 2007. In the ``Rules and Regulations'' section of this Federal Register, we are amending the definition of ``delayed coking unit'' as a direct final rule without a prior proposed rule. If we receive......

  19. 77 FR 959 - National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants From Petroleum Refineries; National...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-06

    ... automatically captured and included as part of the comment that is placed in the public docket and made... entities Industry 325 Manufacturing industries, particularly petrochemical, chemical, polymers, plastics... final MACT standards for petroleum refineries (40 CFR part 63, subpart CC) on August 18, 1995 (60...

  20. Refinery Outages: Description and Potential Impact on Petroleum Product Prices

    EIA Publications

    2007-01-01

    This report responds to a July 13, 2006 request from Chairman Jeff Bingaman of the Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resources requested that the Energy Information Administration conduct a study of the impact that refinery shutdowns have had on the price of oil and gasoline.

  1. Improvement of processes for treating saline wastewater in petroleum refineries

    SciTech Connect

    Sorochenko, V.F.

    1994-11-01

    The saline waste water produced in desalting crude oil in electric desalting units is usually dumped into the sewer system of the refinery. This work was aimed at developing methods of treatment with reagents to prevent and remove salt deposits in the process of freshening saline wastes, by means of aluminium chloride waste materials that have been recovered for utilization.

  2. Spontaneous abortions among nickel-exposed female refinery workers.

    PubMed

    Vaktskjold, Arild; Talykova, Ljudmila V; Chashchin, Valerij P; Odland, Jon Ø; Nieboer, Evert

    2008-04-01

    A case-control study to investigate whether women employed in nickel-exposed work areas in early pregnancy are at elevated risk of spontaneous abortion (SA). Data about pregnancy outcome and maternal factors were obtained about each delivery and SA from women in selected work places. Each pregnancy record was assigned a categorical nickel (Ni) exposure rating according to the women's occupations at pregnancy onset. The guidelines were the water-soluble Ni subfraction of the inhalable aerosol fraction obtained by personal monitoring for nickel- and copper-refinery workers or/and measured urinary-Ni concentrations. The unadjusted odds ratio for the association between the maternal exposure to Ni and an SA for Ni-exposed women was 1.38 (95% confidence interval: 1.04-1.84), and the adjusted was 1.14 (0.95-1.37). In conclusion, there was no statistical association between maternal occupational exposure to water-soluble Ni in early pregnancy and the risk of self-reported SA. The findings do not exclude the possibility of a weak excess risk, or a risk in the first weeks of pregnancy. PMID:18365800

  3. Probabilistic ecological risk assessment of selected PAH`s in sediments near a petroleum refinery

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold, W.R.; Biddinger, G.R.

    1995-12-31

    Sediment samples were collected and analyzed for a number of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) along a gradient from a petroleum refinery`s wastewater diffuser. These data were used to calculate the potential risk to aquatic organisms using probabilistic modeling and Monte Carlo sampling procedures. Sediment chemistry data were used in conjunction with estimates of Biota-Sediment Accumulation Factors and Non-Polar Narcosis Theory to predict potential risk to bivalves. Bivalves were the receptors of choice because of their lack of a well-developed enzymatic system for metabolizing PAHs. Thus, they represent a species of higher inherent risk of adverse impact. PAHs considered in this paper span a broad range of octanol-water partition coefficients. Results indicate negligible risk of narcotic effects from PAHs existing near the refinery wastewater discharge.

  4. Leukemia mortality by cell type in petroleum workers with potential exposure to benzene.

    PubMed Central

    Raabe, G K; Wong, O

    1996-01-01

    Workers in the petroleum industry are potentially exposed to a variety of petrochemicals, including benzene or benzene-containing liquids. Although a large number of studies of petroleum workers have been conducted to examine leukemia and other cancer risks, few existing studies have investigated cell-type-specific leukemias. One of the major reasons for the lack of cell-type-specific analysis was the small number of deaths by cell type in individual studies. In the present investigation, all cohort studies of petroleum workers in the United States and the United Kingdom were combined into a single database for cell-type-specific leukemia analysis. The majority of these workers were petroleum refinery employees, but production, pipeline, and distribution workers in the petroleum industry were also included. The combined cohort consisted of more than 208,000 petroleum workers, who contributed more than 4.6 million person-years of observation. Based on a meta-analysis of the combined data, cell-type-specific leukemia risks were expressed in terms of standardized mortality ratios (meta-SMRs). The meta-SMR for acute myeloid leukemia was 0.96. The lack of an increase of acute myeloid leukemia was attributed to the low levels of benzene exposure in the petroleum industry, particularly in comparison to benzene exposure levels in some previous studies of workers in other industries, who had been found to experience an increased risk of acute myeloid leukemia. Similarly, no increase in chronic myeloid, acute lymphocytic, or chronic lymphocytic leukemias was found in petroleum workers (meta-SMRs of 0.89, 1.16, and 0.84, respectively). Stratified meta-analyses restricted to refinery studies or to studies with at least 15 years of follow-up yielded similar results. The findings of the present investigation are consistent with those from several recent case-control studies of cell-type-specific leukemia. Patterns and levels of benzene exposure in the petroleum industry are

  5. Review of petroleum transport network models and their applicability to a national refinery model

    SciTech Connect

    Hooker, J. N.

    1982-04-01

    This report examines four petroleum transport network models to determine whether parts of them can be incorporated into the transportation component of a national refinery model. Two questions in particular are addressed. (a) How do the models under examination represent the oil transport network, estimate link capacities, and calculate transport costs. (b) Are any of these network representations, capacity estimates, or cost functions suitable for inclusion in a linear programming model of oil refinery and primary distribution in the US. Only pipeline and waterway transport is discussed. The models examined are the Department of Energy's OILNET model, the Department of Transportation's Freight Energy Model, the Federal Energy Administration Petroleum Transportation Network Model, and an Oak Ridge National Laboratory oil pipeline energy model. Link capacity and cost functions are recommended for each transport mode. The coefficients of the recommended pipeline cost functions remain to be estimated.

  6. Petroleum refinery stripped sour water treatment using the activated sludge process.

    PubMed

    Merlo, Rion; Gerhardt, Matthew B; Burlingham, Fran; De Las Casas, Carla; Gill, Everett; Flippin, T Houston

    2011-11-01

    A pilot study was performed over 91 days to determine if the activated sludge process could treat a segregated stripped sour water (SSW) stream from a petroleum refinery. The study was performed in two periods. The first period was terminated after 19 days, as a result of excessive sludge bulking. The elimination of sludge bulking during the 70-day second period is attributed to operational changes, which included aerating the influent to oxidize reduced sulfur, adjusting the influent pH, and adding micronutrients to satisfy biological requirements. The pilot plant provided a chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal of up to 93%. Nitrification was achieved, with effluent ammonia values < 1 mg-N/L. These results indicate that direct treatment of SSW with the activated sludge process is possible and has direct application to full-scale petroleum refinery wastewater plant upgrades.

  7. FEASIBILITY STUDY FOR A PETROLEUM REFINERY FOR THE JICARILLA APACHE TRIBE

    SciTech Connect

    John D. Jones

    2004-10-01

    A feasibility study for a proposed petroleum refinery for the Jicarilla Apache Indian Reservation was performed. The available crude oil production was identified and characterized. There is 6,000 barrels per day of crude oil production available for processing in the proposed refinery. The proposed refinery will utilize a lower temperature, smaller crude fractionation unit. It will have a Naphtha Hydrodesulfurizer and Reformer to produce high octane gasoline. The surplus hydrogen from the reformer will be used in a specialized hydrocracker to convert the heavier crude oil fractions to ultra low sulfur gasoline and diesel fuel products. The proposed refinery will produce gasoline, jet fuel, diesel fuel, and a minimal amount of lube oil. The refinery will require about $86,700,000 to construct. It will have net annual pre-tax profit of about $17,000,000. The estimated return on investment is 20%. The feasibility is positive subject to confirmation of long term crude supply. The study also identified procedures for evaluating processing options as a means for American Indian Tribes and Native American Corporations to maximize the value of their crude oil production.

  8. A historical prospective mortality study of workers in copper and zinc refineries

    SciTech Connect

    Logue, J.N.; Koontz, M.D.; Hattwick, M.A.W.

    1982-05-01

    Earlier health studies of workers in electrolytic refinery operations have raised concern that workers may experience excess morbidity and premature death as a result of hazardous occupational exposures. This study was designed to determine if the refinery operation is associated with any excess mortality patterns. A cohort of 4,802 male workers exposed for at least one year during 1964-1975 was assembled from nine U.S. zinc and copper refineries. Vital status was ascertained for 4,241 (88%) of the cohort. Death certificates were obtained for 84% (355/423) of the deceased. Overall standard mortality ratios (SMRs) were calculated to be 92 for the cohort, 97 for the subgroup of copper refinery workers, and 83 for the subgroup of zinc refinery workers. Significantly high cause-specific SMRs were as follows: (1) cerebrovacular disease (CBVD) for the cohort: (2) all cancers, cancer of the digestive tract, and CBVD for the copper subgroup; (3) all cancers, cancer of the respiratory tract, and CBVD for one plant that demonstrated a significantly high overall SMR (133). The significant excess of cancer deaths among the study cohort is largely due to the plant that exhibited the significantly high overall mortality rate, but lack of smoking data qualifies this finding. The significant excess of CBVD seems to be consistent across plants and further research seems warranted to verify the finding.

  9. Characteristics of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted from a petroleum refinery in Beijing, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Wei; Cheng, Shuiyuan; Li, Guohao; Wang, Gang; Wang, Haiyan

    2014-06-01

    This study made a field VOCs (volatile organic compounds) measurement for a petroleum refinery in Beijing by determining 56 PAMS VOCs, which are demanded for photochemical assessment in US, and obtained the characteristics of VOCs emitted from the whole refinery and from its inner main devices. During the monitoring period, this refinery brought about an average increase of 61 ppbv in the ambient TVOCs (sum of the PAMS VOCs) at the refinery surrounding area, while the background of TVOCs there was only 10-30 ppbv. In chemical profile, the VOCs emitted from the whole refinery was characteristic by isobutane (8.7%), n-butane (7.9%), isopentane (6.3%), n-pentane (4.9%%), n-hexane (7.6%), C6 branched alkanes (6.0%), propene (12.7%), 1-butene (4.1%), benzene (7.8%), and toluene (5.9%). On the other hand, the measurement for the inner 5 devices, catalytic cracking units (CCU2 and CCU3), catalytic reforming unit (CRU), tank farm (TF), and wastewater treatment(WT), revealed the higher level of VOCs pollutions (about several hundred ppbv of TVOCs), and the individual differences in VOCs chemical profiles. Based on the measured speciated VOCs data at the surrounding downwind area, PMF receptor model was applied to identify the VOCs sources in the refinery. Then, coupling with the VOCs chemical profiles measured at the device areas, we concluded that CCU1/3 contributes to 25.9% of the TVOCs at the surrounding downwind area by volume, followed by CCU2 (24.7%), CRU (18.9%), TF (18.3%) and WT (12.0%), which was accordant with the research of US EPA (2008). Finally, ozone formation potentials of the 5 devices were also calculated by MIR technique, which showed that catalytic cracking units, accounting for about 55.6% to photochemical ozone formation, should be given the consideration of VOCs control firstly.

  10. 77 FR 44685 - ConocoPhillips Company, Trainer Refinery, Including On-Site Leased Workers From Shrack, Young...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-30

    ... Employment and Training Administration ConocoPhillips Company, Trainer Refinery, Including On-Site Leased Workers From Shrack, Young, and Associates, Inc., and Project Control Associates, Trainer, PA; Notice of...Phillips Company, Trainer Refinery, including on-site leased workers from Shrack, Young, and...

  11. Peroxidase-catalyzed removal of phenols from a petroleum refinery wastewater.

    PubMed

    Wagner, M; Nicell, J A

    2001-01-01

    The phenol content of a petroleum refinery wastewater was reduced below the discharge limit following treatment with horseradish peroxidase and H2O2. Approximately 58% of COD, 78% of BOD5, and 95% of toxicity were removed along with the phenols. As a result of treatment, phenols were transformed into less biodegradable compounds which could be removed by subsequent coagulation and precipitation. Optimization of the peroxide concentration led to 20% enzyme savings. The use of PEG and chitosan as protective additives resulted in 4 and 25-fold reductions in enzyme requirements, respectively. Phenol removal did not appear to be adversely affected by the presence of other hydrocarbons that are frequently present in refinery wastewaters.

  12. Characteristics of ozone and ozone precursors (VOCs and NOx) around a petroleum refinery in Beijing, China.

    PubMed

    Wei, Wei; Cheng, Shuiyuan; Li, Guohao; Wang, Gang; Wang, Haiyang

    2014-02-01

    A field measurement campaign for ozone and ozone precursors (VOCs and NOx) was conducted in summer 2011 around a petroleum refinery in the Beijing rural region. Three observation sites were arranged, one at southwest of the refinery as the background, and two at northeast of the refinery as the downwind receptors. Monitoring data revealed the presence of serious surface O3 pollution with the characteristics of high average daily mean and maximum concentrations (64.0 and 145.4 ppbV in no-rain days, respectively) and multi-peak diurnal variation. For NOx, the average hourly concentrations of NO2 and NO were in the range of 20.5-46.1 and 1.8-6.4 ppbV, respectively. For VOC measurement, a total of 51 compounds were detected. Normally, TVOCs at the background site was only dozens of ppbC, while TVOCs at the downwind sites reached several hundreds of ppbC. By subtracting the VOC concentrations at background, chemical profiles of VOC emission from the refinery were obtained, mainly including alkanes (60.0% +/- 4.3%), alkenes (21.1% +/- 5.5%) and aromatics (18.9% +/- 3.9%). Moreover, some differences in chemical profiles for the same measurement hours were observed between the downwind sites; the volume ratios of alkanes with low reactivity and those of alkenes with high reactivity respectively showed an increasing trend and a decreasing trend. Finally, based on temporal and spatial variations of VOC mixing ratios, their photochemical degradations and dispersion degradations were estimated to be 0.15-0.27 and 0.42-0.62, respectively, by the photochemical age calculation method, indicating stronger photochemical reactions around the refinery.

  13. Program development to identify and characterize potential emergency situations at a petroleum refinery and determination of industrial hygiene emergency responses

    SciTech Connect

    Oransky, J.J.; Delp, S.N.; Deppen, E.A.; Barrett, D.

    1995-12-31

    In the modern world the field of industrial hygiene continues to grow beyond the traditional definition of the profession. This case study documents the problem solving approach used to identify potential exposures and evaluate industrial hygiene preparedness to handle emergencies due to fire or major spill at a complex multi-process petroleum refinery. In the recent past an environmental engineer and industrial hygiene consulting firm was retained by a mature, multi-process petroleum refinery to assist in the program development to identify and characterize potential emergency situations due to a fire, major release, or spill. This study would assist the refinery in compliance with the process safety and emergency response standards and to protect refinery operations and fire fighting personnel by minimizing potential exposures and risk when responding to such a major incident.

  14. Long-term follow-up mortality study of petroleum refinery and chemical plant employees.

    PubMed

    Tsai, S P; Gilstrap, E L; Cowles, S R; Snyder, P J; Ross, C E

    1996-01-01

    A previous report presented the 1948-1983 mortality patterns of the Shell Deer Park Manufacturing Complex employees who were employed for at least 3 months from 1948 through 1972. The present study updates the earlier investigation by extending the vital status follow-up through 1989 and by expanding the cohort to include employees hired after 1972. As in the previous study, the overall mortality and cancer mortality for both refinery and chemical employees were quite favorable compared to residents in the local population. Among refinery workers, cancers for which a suspicion of work-relatedness was raised in the previous study, i.e. leukemia and cancers of the central nervous system and biliary passage/liver, no supportive evidence was found in this update. For both refinery and chemical plant employees, the mortality rate due to cancers of all lymphopoietic tissue increased with increasing duration of employment; this finding was also noted by the original study. This was also evident for lymphoreticulosarcoma in refinery employees and for leukemia in chemical plant employees. However, elevations of cancers of all lymphatic and hematopoietic tissue are primarily confined to employees who started work at the complex before 1946. By contrast, deaths from cancer of all lymphatic and hematopoietic tissue for employees hired after 1945 were 22% lower than the comparison population. Seven deaths with mesothelioma mentioned on the death certificates were identified, with 3.2 deaths expected, resulting in a statistically nonsignificant SMR of 219.

  15. Health status of copper refinery workers with specific reference to selenium exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Holness, D.L.; Taraschuk, I.G.; Nethercott, J.R. )

    1989-09-01

    Copper refinery workers exposed to selenium were studied before, during, and after a shutdown period. Urine selenium levels were 83 {plus minus} 30 mumol/mol creatinine and 69 {plus minus} 27 mumol/mol creatinine when measured on two occasions during exposure compared with 56 {plus minus} 17 mumol/mol creatinine when the workers had been free of exposure for 10 wk during a shutdown. The refinery workers reported more nose and eye irritation, indigestion, stomach pain, and fatigue than controls. Garlic-like breath odor was reported to be personally and socially offensive by many of the workers. Reporting of symptoms, pulmonary function indices, and laboratory test results did not change with exposure except for hemoglobin level, which rose during the shutdown. Hemoglobin levels were found to be inversely correlated with the urine selenium level, and there was a positive correlation noted for the interactive effect of urine selenium and urine arsenic levels on hemoglobin.49 references.

  16. Measurement of particulate phase polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAHs) around a petroleum refinery.

    PubMed

    Rao, Padma S; Ansari, M Faiyaz; Pipalatkar, P; Kumar, A; Nema, P; Devotta, S

    2008-02-01

    A study on concentrations of ambient particulates viz. total suspended particulate matters (TSP), respirable suspended particulate matter (RSPM) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) were carried out at six sites around the Asia's largest, 12 MMTPA, petroleum refinery in west coast of India. PAH concentrations are correlated with each other in these sites, suggesting that they have related sources and sinks. The present article discusses the monitoring aspects such as sample collection, pretreatment and analytical methods and compares the monitored levels for assessing the source receptor distribution pattern. The main sources of RSPM and PAHs in urban air are automobile exhaust (CPCB, Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in air and their effects on human health. " http://www.cpcb.nic.in/ph/ch21103.htm ", 2003; Manuel et al., Environmental Science and Technology, 13: 227-231, 2004) and industrial emissions like petroleum refinery (Vo-Dinh, Chemical analysis of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, Wiley: New York, 1989; Wagrowaski and Hites, Environmental Science and Technology, 31: 279-282, 1997). Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) are ubiquitous constituents of urban airborne particulate mostly generated by anthropogenic activities (Li et al., Environmental Science and Technology, 37:1958-2965, 2003; Thorsen et al., Environmental Science and Technology, 38: 2029-2037, 2004; Ohura et al., Environmental Science and Technology, 32: 450-455, 2004) and some of them are of major health concern mainly due to their well-known carcinogenic and mutagenic properties (Soclo et al., Marine Pollution Bulletin, 40: 387-396, 2000; Chen et al., Environment International, 28: 659-668, 2003; Larsen and Baker, Environmental Science and Technology, 32: 450-455, 2003). Limited information is available on PAHs contributions from refineries to ambient air. Hence this study would not only create a database but also provide necessary inputs towards dose-response relationship for

  17. Catalytic ozonation of petroleum refinery wastewater utilizing Mn-Fe-Cu/Al2O 3 catalyst.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chunmao; Yoza, Brandon A; Wang, Yandan; Wang, Ping; Li, Qing X; Guo, Shaohui; Yan, Guangxu

    2015-04-01

    There is of great interest to develop an economic and high-efficient catalytic ozonation system (COS) for the treatment of biologically refractory wastewaters. Applications of COS require options of commercially feasible catalysts. Experiments in the present study were designed to prepare and investigate a novel manganese-iron-copper oxide-supported alumina-assisted COS (Mn-Fe-Cu/Al2O3-COS) for the pretreatment of petroleum refinery wastewater. The highly dispersed composite metal oxides on the catalyst surface greatly promoted the performance of catalytic ozonation. Hydroxyl radical mediated oxidation is a dominant reaction in Mn-Fe-Cu/Al2O3-COS. Mn-Fe-Cu/Al2O3-COS enhanced COD removal by 32.7% compared with a single ozonation system and by 8-16% compared with Mn-Fe/Al2O3-COS, Mn-Cu/Al2O3-COS, and Fe-Cu/Al2O3-COS. The O/C and H/C ratios of oxygen-containing polar compounds significantly increased after catalytic ozonation, and the biodegradability of petroleum refinery wastewater was significantly improved. This study illustrates potential applications of Mn-Fe-Cu/Al2O3-COS for pretreatment of biologically refractory wastewaters.

  18. Catalytic ozonation of petroleum refinery wastewater utilizing Mn-Fe-Cu/Al2O 3 catalyst.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chunmao; Yoza, Brandon A; Wang, Yandan; Wang, Ping; Li, Qing X; Guo, Shaohui; Yan, Guangxu

    2015-04-01

    There is of great interest to develop an economic and high-efficient catalytic ozonation system (COS) for the treatment of biologically refractory wastewaters. Applications of COS require options of commercially feasible catalysts. Experiments in the present study were designed to prepare and investigate a novel manganese-iron-copper oxide-supported alumina-assisted COS (Mn-Fe-Cu/Al2O3-COS) for the pretreatment of petroleum refinery wastewater. The highly dispersed composite metal oxides on the catalyst surface greatly promoted the performance of catalytic ozonation. Hydroxyl radical mediated oxidation is a dominant reaction in Mn-Fe-Cu/Al2O3-COS. Mn-Fe-Cu/Al2O3-COS enhanced COD removal by 32.7% compared with a single ozonation system and by 8-16% compared with Mn-Fe/Al2O3-COS, Mn-Cu/Al2O3-COS, and Fe-Cu/Al2O3-COS. The O/C and H/C ratios of oxygen-containing polar compounds significantly increased after catalytic ozonation, and the biodegradability of petroleum refinery wastewater was significantly improved. This study illustrates potential applications of Mn-Fe-Cu/Al2O3-COS for pretreatment of biologically refractory wastewaters. PMID:25649390

  19. Tracking Petroleum Refinery Emission Events Using Lanthanum and Lanthanides as Elemental Markers for Fine Particulate Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, P.; Chellam, S.; Fraser, M. P.

    2007-12-01

    This presentation reports the development and application of an analytical method to quantify the rare earth elements (REEs) in atmospheric particulate matter and emissions of catalyst material from the petroleum refining industry. Inductively coupled plasma - mass spectrometry following high temperature/high pressure microwave digestion has been used to study the REE composition of several fresh and spent catalysts used in fluidized-bed catalytic cracking (FCC) units in petroleum refineries as well as in ambient atmospheric fine particulate matter collected in Houston, TX. The results show that the routine emissions from local FCC units in Houston contribute a constant and low amount to ambient PM2.5 of ~0.1 micrograms per cubic meter. However, a significant (33 - 106 fold) increase in the contributions of FCC emissions to PM2.5 is quantified during an upset emission event compared with background levels associated with routine operation. The impact of emissions from the local refinery that reported the emission event was tracked to a site approximately 50 km downwind from the source, illustrating the potential exposure of humans over a large geographical area through the long-range transport of atmospheric fine particles as well as the power of elemental signatures to understand the sources of fine particles.

  20. Models for respiratory cancer in nickel refinery workers

    SciTech Connect

    Kaldor, J.; Peto, J.; Easton, D.; Doll, R.; Hermon, C.; Morgan, L.

    1986-10-01

    Lung and nasal sinus cancer death rates among employees of a nickel refinery in South Wales were examined from the standpoint of quantifying the relationship between exposure and the risk of these two cancers. Areas in the refinery associated with high risk were identified by using a matched case-control approach, and a simple index of exposure for each man was constructed accordingly based on the duration of time spent in these areas. The dependence of relative risk and absolute excess risk for lung and nasal sinus cancers on age at first employment, calendar period of first employment, time since first employment, and duration of exposure in high-risk areas was then analyzed. The relative risk for nasal sinus cancer increased sharply with increasing age at first exposure but remained roughly constant throughout the period of follow-up, while that for lung cancer was independent of age at first exposure and dropped sharply with increasing time since first employment. The implications and limitations of these analyses are discussed in relation to the multistage theory of carcinogenesis and occupational risk assessment.

  1. Mortality due to haematological cancer in cities close to petroleum refineries in Spain.

    PubMed

    Cirera, Lluís; Cirarda, Francisco; Palència, Laia; Estarlich, Marisa; Montes-Martínez, Agustín; Lorenzo, Pedro; Daponte-Codina, Antonio; López-Abente, Gonzalo

    2013-01-01

    Controversy exists as to whether working or living in the vicinity of a petroleum refinery (RF) increases the risk of haematological cancer (HC). The European Pollutant Release and Transfer Register obliges petroleum refineries to notify their emissions of toxic substances which include carcinogenic substances. Our objective is to determine if living in the proximity of an RF is associated with a greater risk of mortality due to HC in the census tracts (CTs) of the Spanish cities of Bilbao, Cartagena, Castellón, La Coruña, Huelva, and Santa Cruz de Tenerife. This is an ecological study of mortality in the years 1996-2007 which includes 968 CTs with 1,263,371 inhabitants. Exposure has been measured as the distance from the centroid of each CT to the RF. The Besag-York-Mollié autoregressive spatial model has been fitted by R-INLA to estimate the relative risk (RR) and 95 % credible intervals (95 % CrI) for distance in quintiles. The most distant quintile has been taken as the reference. A total of 2,574 persons died of HC. The distances from the CTs to RFs ranged from 0.5 to 22.5 km (median = 7.6 km). All of the RRs for the quintiles of distances in Huelva were greater than 1. Statistically significant excess risk was shown in Cartagena in the nearest CT (1.8 to 6.8 km; RR = 1.43, 95 % CrI 1.02 to 2.02). Radial effects have not been detected between the CT of residence and the petroleum RF in mortality due to HC in any of the cities.

  2. ESTE: Verification of Portable Optical and Thermal Imaging Devices for Leak Detection at Petroleum Refineries and Chemical Plants

    EPA Science Inventory

    This is an ESTE project summary brief. EPA’s Environmental Technology Verification Program (ETV) is verifying the performance of portable optical and thermal imaging devices for leak detection at petroleum refineries and chemical plans. Industrial facilities, such as chemical p...

  3. Effects of work-related stress on work ability index among refinery workers

    PubMed Central

    Habibi, Ehsanollah; Dehghan, Habibollah; Safari, Shahram; Mahaki, Behzad; Hassanzadeh, Akbar

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Work-related stress is one of the basic problems in industrial also top 10 work-related health problems and it is increasingly implicated in the development a number of problems such as cardiovascular disease, musculoskeletal diseases, early retirement to employees. On the other hand, early retirement to employees from the workplace has increased on the problems of today's industries. Hereof, improving work ability is one of the most effective ways to enhance the ability and preventing disability and early retirement. The aim of This study is determine the relationship between job stress score and work ability index (WAI) at the refinery workers. Materials and Methods: This is a cross-sectional study in which 171 workers from a refinery in isfahan in 2012 who were working in different occupational groups participated. Based on appropriate assignment sampling, 33 office workers, 69 operational workers, and 69 maintenance workers, respectively, were invited to participate in this study. Two questionnaires including work related-stress and WAI were filled in. Finally, the information was analyzed using the SPSS-20 and statistic tests namely, analysis of covariance Kruskal-Wallis test. Pearson correlation coefficient, ANOVA and t-test. Results: Data analysis revealed that 86% and 14% of participants had moderate and severe stress respectively. Average score of stress and standard deviation was 158.7 ± 17.3 that was in extreme stress range. Average score and standard deviation of WAI questionnaire were 37.18 and 3.86 respectively. That placed in a good range. Pearson correlation coefficient showed that WAI score had significant reversed relationship with a score of stress. Conclusion: According to the results, mean stress score among refinery worker was high and one fator that affect work abiity was high stress, hence training on communication skills and safe working environment in order to decreses stress, enhance the work ability of workers. PMID

  4. Measurements of radiation level in petroleum products and wastes in Riyadh City Refinery.

    PubMed

    Al-Saleh, F S; Al-Harshan, G A

    2008-07-01

    Recent concern has been devoted to the hazard arising from naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM) in oil and gas facilities. Twenty-seven petroleum samples were collected from Riyadh Refinery. Fourteen samples were products and 13 were waste samples; three of them were scale samples and 10 were sludge samples. The specific radioactivities of (238)U, (232)Th, (226)Ra, (224)Ra, (40)K, and (235)U for all samples were determined using high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometry. The radium equivalent activity, radiation hazard indices and absorbed dose rate in air for all waste samples were estimated. The radon emanation coefficient of the waste samples was estimated. It ranged between 0.574 and 0.154. The age of two scale samples was determined and found to be 2.39 and 3.66 years. The chemical structure of the waste samples was investigated using X-ray florescence analysis (XRF) and Mg, Al, Si, S, Cl, Ca and Fe were found in all samples. From this study, it was noticed that the concentrations of the natural radionuclides in the petroleum wastes were higher than that of the petroleum products.

  5. Biostimulation of Indigenous Microbial Community for Bioremediation of Petroleum Refinery Sludge

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Jayeeta; Kazy, Sufia K.; Gupta, Abhishek; Dutta, Avishek; Mohapatra, Balaram; Roy, Ajoy; Bera, Paramita; Mitra, Adinpunya; Sar, Pinaki

    2016-01-01

    Nutrient deficiency severely impairs the catabolic activity of indigenous microorganisms in hydrocarbon rich environments (HREs) and limits the rate of intrinsic bioremediation. The present study aimed to characterize the microbial community in refinery waste and evaluate the scope for biostimulation based in situ bioremediation. Samples recovered from the wastewater lagoon of Guwahati refinery revealed a hydrocarbon enriched [high total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH)], oxygen-, moisture-limited, reducing environment. Intrinsic biodegradation ability of the indigenous microorganisms was enhanced significantly (>80% reduction in TPH by 90 days) with nitrate amendment. Preferred utilization of both higher- (>C30) and middle- chain (C20-30) length hydrocarbons were evident from GC-MS analysis. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and community level physiological profiling analyses indicated distinct shift in community’s composition and metabolic abilities following nitrogen (N) amendment. High throughput deep sequencing of 16S rRNA gene showed that the native community was mainly composed of hydrocarbon degrading, syntrophic, methanogenic, nitrate/iron/sulfur reducing facultative anaerobic bacteria and archaebacteria, affiliated to γ- and δ-Proteobacteria and Euryarchaeota respectively. Genes for aerobic and anaerobic alkane metabolism (alkB and bssA), methanogenesis (mcrA), denitrification (nirS and narG) and N2 fixation (nifH) were detected. Concomitant to hydrocarbon degradation, lowering of dissolve O2 and increase in oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) marked with an enrichment of N2 fixing, nitrate reducing aerobic/facultative anaerobic members [e.g., Azovibrio, Pseudoxanthomonas and Comamonadaceae members] was evident in N amended microcosm. This study highlighted that indigenous community of refinery sludge was intrinsically diverse, yet appreciable rate of in situ bioremediation could be achieved by supplying adequate N sources. PMID:27708623

  6. Large scale and long term application of bioslurping: the case of a Greek petroleum refinery site.

    PubMed

    Gidarakos, E; Aivalioti, M

    2007-11-19

    This paper presents the course and the remediation results of a 4-year application of bioslurping technology on the subsurface of a Greek petroleum refinery, which is still under full operation and has important and complicated subsurface contamination problems, mainly due to the presence of light non-aqueous phase liquids (LNAPL). About 55 wells are connected to the central bioslurping unit, while a mobile bioslurping unit is also used whenever and wherever is necessary. Moreover, there are about 120 additional wells for the monitoring of the subsurface of the facilities that cover a total area of 1,000,000 m(2). An integrated monitoring program has also been developed and applied on the site, including frequent LNAPL layer depth and thickness measurements, conduction of bail-down and recovery tests, sampling and chemical analysis of the free oil phase, etc., so as to evaluate the remediation technique's efficiency and ensure a prompt tracing of any new potential leak. Despite the occurrence of new leaks within the last 4 years and the observed entrapment of LNAPL in the vadoze zone, bioslurping has managed to greatly restrict the original plume within certain and relatively small parts of the refinery facilities.

  7. Ambient volatile organic compound (VOC) concentrations around a petrochemical complex and a petroleum refinery.

    PubMed

    Cetin, Eylem; Odabasi, Mustafa; Seyfioglu, Remzi

    2003-08-01

    Air samples were collected between September 2000 and September 2001 in Izmir, Turkey at three sampling sites located around a petrochemical complex and an oil refinery to measure ambient volatile organic compound (VOC) concentrations. VOC concentrations were 4-20-fold higher than those measured at a suburban site in Izmir, Turkey. Ethylene dichloride, a leaded gasoline additive used in petroleum refining and an intermediate product of the vinyl chloride process in the petrochemical complex, was the most abundant volatile organic compound, followed by ethyl alcohol and acetone. Evaluations based on wind direction clearly indicated that ambient VOC concentrations measured were affected by the refinery and petrochemical complex emissions. VOC concentrations showed seasonal variations at all sampling sites. Concentrations were highest in summer, followed by autumn, probably due to increased evaporation of VOCs from fugitive sources as a result of higher temperatures. VOC concentrations generally increased with temperature and wind speed. Temperature and wind speed together explained 1-60% of the variability in VOC concentrations. The variability in ambient VOC concentrations that could not be explained by temperature and wind speed can be attributed to the effect of other factors (i.e. wind direction, other VOC sources).

  8. Electrical CT image reconstruction technique for powder flow in petroleum refinery process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takei, Masahiro; Doh, Deog-Hee; Ochi, Mitsuaki

    2008-03-01

    A new reconstruction method called sampled pattern matching (SPM) was applied to the image reconstruction of an electrical capacitance computed tomography in powder flow in a vertical pipe for petroleum refinery process. This new method is able to achieve stable convergence without the use of an empirical value. Experiments were carried out using fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) catalysts as powder with two air volume flow rates and four powder volume flow rates to measure the capacitance of a pipe cross section. The SPM method is compared with conventional methods in terms of volume fraction, residual capacitance, and correlation capacitance. Overall, the SPM method proved superior to conventional methods without any empirical value because SPM achieves accurate reconstruction by using an objective function that is calculated as the inner product calculation between the experimental capacitance and the reconstructed image capacitance.

  9. Petroleum refinery secondary effluent polishing using freezing processes--toxicity and organic contaminant removal.

    PubMed

    Gao, W; Smith, D W; Habib, M

    2008-06-01

    A petroleum refinery secondary effluent was treated using two freezing techniques--spray freezing and unidirectional downward freezing (UDF). The freezing processes were effective to remove toxicity and total organic carbon (TOC)- and chemical oxygen demand (COD)-causing materials in the effluent. Agitation of the liquid during UDF significantly improved the impurity separation efficiency; 85 to 96% removal of TOC and COD was achieved without any pretreatment and freezing only 70% of the feed water. The treatment efficiency of the spray freezing was at the same level as that of UDF without mixing. The spray ice with longer storage time released more contaminants with early meltwater. The initial contaminant concentration of the feed water and the freezing temperatures (-10 degrees C and -25 degrees C) had no significant influence on the treatment efficiency. A small fluctuation in effluent TOC concentration caused a dramatic change in effluent toxicity (Microtox). The effective concentration (EC20) (Microtox) was effective in detecting effluent toxicity. PMID:18686927

  10. Cancer risk among workers at a copper/nickel smelter and nickel refinery in Finland.

    PubMed

    Karjalainen, S; Kerttula, R; Pukkala, E

    1992-01-01

    A total of 1,388 workers employed for at least 3 months at a copper/nickel smelter and nickel refinery were followed up for cancer from 1953 to 1987 through the Finnish Cancer Registry. There were 1,339 male and 49 female workers, making a total of 27,130 and 706 person-years, respectively. All of the women worked in the refinery, which opened in 1960, the same year the smelting of nickel began. A total of 67 cancers were diagnosed among the men, the standardized incidence ratio for all cancers being 1.0. No cancer was found among the women (1.8 expected). The risk of cancer among men was analysed according to primary site, exposure to nickel, type of work, years since first exposure and age at diagnosis. In the subcohort of nickel refinery workers, one case of sinonasal cancer was observed, against 0.02 expected, but otherwise no significantly increased risks of cancer were found. In addition to the small size of the cohort, the non-positive finding concerning lung cancer might be related to the relatively low arsenic exposure and, perhaps, to the late commencement of nickel production. PMID:1587630

  11. Cancer risk among workers at a copper/nickel smelter and nickel refinery in Finland.

    PubMed

    Karjalainen, S; Kerttula, R; Pukkala, E

    1992-01-01

    A total of 1,388 workers employed for at least 3 months at a copper/nickel smelter and nickel refinery were followed up for cancer from 1953 to 1987 through the Finnish Cancer Registry. There were 1,339 male and 49 female workers, making a total of 27,130 and 706 person-years, respectively. All of the women worked in the refinery, which opened in 1960, the same year the smelting of nickel began. A total of 67 cancers were diagnosed among the men, the standardized incidence ratio for all cancers being 1.0. No cancer was found among the women (1.8 expected). The risk of cancer among men was analysed according to primary site, exposure to nickel, type of work, years since first exposure and age at diagnosis. In the subcohort of nickel refinery workers, one case of sinonasal cancer was observed, against 0.02 expected, but otherwise no significantly increased risks of cancer were found. In addition to the small size of the cohort, the non-positive finding concerning lung cancer might be related to the relatively low arsenic exposure and, perhaps, to the late commencement of nickel production.

  12. Model to investigate energy and greenhouse gas emissions implications of refining petroleum: impacts of crude quality and refinery configuration.

    PubMed

    Abella, Jessica P; Bergerson, Joule A

    2012-12-18

    A petroleum refinery model, Petroleum Refinery Life-cycle Inventory Model (PRELIM), which quantifies energy use and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions with the detail and transparency sufficient to inform policy analysis is developed. PRELIM improves on prior models by representing a more comprehensive range of crude oil quality and refinery configuration, using publicly available information, and supported by refinery operating data and experts' input. The potential use of PRELIM is demonstrated through a scenario analysis to explore the implications of processing crudes of different qualities, with a focus on oil sands products, in different refinery configurations. The variability in GHG emissions estimates resulting from all cases considered in the model application shows differences of up to 14 g CO₂eq/MJ of crude, or up to 11 g CO₂eq/MJ of gasoline and 19 g CO₂eq/MJ of diesel (the margin of deviation in the emissions estimates is roughly 10%). This variability is comparable to the magnitude of upstream emissions and therefore has implications for both policy and mitigation of GHG emissions.

  13. A cohort study on mortality from cancer and other causes among workers at a metal refinery.

    PubMed

    Tokudome, S; Kuratsune, M

    1976-03-15

    A non-concurrent prospective study was made on deaths from cancer and other causes occurring among 2,675 male workers at a metal refinery from 1949 to 1971. The expected number of deaths computed by applying age- and cause-specific death rates of Japanese males to these workers was compared with the observed number of deaths. Among 839 copper smelters, significantly increased mortalities were noted for lung cancer (SMR = 1,189) and colon cancer, but nor for cancer of the stomach, liver (primary) and biliary passages, pancreas and skin or for leukemia, tuberculosis, cerebrovascular diseases, heart diseases and liver cirrhosis. A dose-response relationship was demonstrated between the mortality from lung cancer and the degree of exposure. A very high excess mortality from lung cancer (SMR = 2,500) was seen among copper smelters who were considered to have been most heavily exposed to arsenic or workers who had engaged in sintering and blast furnace operations for 15 years of more before 1949. The latent period of lung cancer was 37.6 years on average, and not related to level of exposure. Twenty-six of 29 deaths from lung cancer among copper smelters occurred after they had left the refinery. Other production workers and clerical workers showed no significant excess mortality from any kind of cancer. PMID:1254355

  14. Assessment of micronuclei and sister chromatid exchange frequency in the petroleum industry workers in province of Vojvodina, Republic of Serbia.

    PubMed

    Mrdjanović, Jasminka; Šolajić, Slavica; Dimitrijević, Sladjana; Đan, Igor; Nikolić, Ivan; Jurišić, Vladimir

    2014-07-01

    Persons who work with petroleum and petroleum derivatives (PPD) are potentially at risk of developing cancer mostly due to the carcinogenity of benzene. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine in which degree occupational exposure of workers to PPD causes damage to DNA by analysis of micronuclei (MN), sister chromatid exchanges (SCE) and proliferation index (PI). 30 workers of refinery in Novi Sad, participated in the study as exposed and 30 volunteers as control group. Workers exposed to PPD had significantly higher values of MN and SCE in comparison to controls. Exposition time to PPD and type of working place have also significantly effects to DNA damage. The influence of confounding factor such as smoking and age were also evaluated.

  15. Cracking of simulated oil refinery off-gas over a coal char, petroleum coke, and quartz

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan Zhang; Jin-hu Wu; Dong-ke Zhang

    2008-03-15

    The cracking of oil refinery off-gas, simulated with a gas mixture containing methane (51%), ethylene (21.4%), ethane (21.1%), and propane (6.5%), over a coal char, petroleum coke, and quartz, respectively, has been studied in a fixed bed reactor. The experiments were performed at temperatures between 850 and 1000{sup o}C and at atmospheric pressure. The results show that the conversions of all species considered increased with increasing temperature. Ethane and propane completely decomposed over all three bed materials in the temperature range investigated. However, the higher initial conversion rates of methane and ethylene cracking at all temperatures were observed only over the coal char and not on the petroleum coke and quartz, indicating a significant catalytic effect of the coal char on methane and ethylene cracking. Methane and ethylene conversions decreased with reaction time due to deactivation of the coal char by carbon deposition on the char surface and, in the later stage of a cracking experiment, became negative, suggesting that methane and ethylene had been formed during the cracking of ethane and propane. 16 refs., 13 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Refinery Outages

    EIA Publications

    2015-01-01

    Semiannual reporting on refinery outages and their potential implications for available refinery capacity, petroleum product markets, and supply of gasoline, diesel fuel, and heating oil. Dissemination of such analyses can be beneficial to market participants who may otherwise be unable to access such information.

  17. Identification of Genes and Pathways Related to Phenol Degradation in Metagenomic Libraries from Petroleum Refinery Wastewater

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Cynthia C.; Hayden, Helen; Sawbridge, Tim; Mele, Pauline; De Paula, Sérgio O.; Silva, Lívia C. F.; Vidigal, Pedro M. P.; Vicentini, Renato; Sousa, Maíra P.; Torres, Ana Paula R.; Santiago, Vânia M. J.; Oliveira, Valéria M.

    2013-01-01

    Two fosmid libraries, totaling 13,200 clones, were obtained from bioreactor sludge of petroleum refinery wastewater treatment system. The library screening based on PCR and biological activity assays revealed more than 400 positive clones for phenol degradation. From these, 100 clones were randomly selected for pyrosequencing in order to evaluate the genetic potential of the microorganisms present in wastewater treatment plant for biodegradation, focusing mainly on novel genes and pathways of phenol and aromatic compound degradation. The sequence analysis of selected clones yielded 129,635 reads at an estimated 17-fold coverage. The phylogenetic analysis showed Burkholderiales and Rhodocyclales as the most abundant orders among the selected fosmid clones. The MG-RAST analysis revealed a broad metabolic profile with important functions for wastewater treatment, including metabolism of aromatic compounds, nitrogen, sulphur and phosphorus. The predicted 2,276 proteins included phenol hydroxylases and cathecol 2,3- dioxygenases, involved in the catabolism of aromatic compounds, such as phenol, byphenol, benzoate and phenylpropanoid. The sequencing of one fosmid insert of 33 kb unraveled the gene that permitted the host, Escherichia coli EPI300, to grow in the presence of aromatic compounds. Additionally, the comparison of the whole fosmid sequence against bacterial genomes deposited in GenBank showed that about 90% of sequence showed no identity to known sequences of Proteobacteria deposited in the NCBI database. This study surveyed the functional potential of fosmid clones for aromatic compound degradation and contributed to our knowledge of the biodegradative capacity and pathways of microbial assemblages present in refinery wastewater treatment system. PMID:23637911

  18. Identification of genes and pathways related to phenol degradation in metagenomic libraries from petroleum refinery wastewater.

    PubMed

    Silva, Cynthia C; Hayden, Helen; Sawbridge, Tim; Mele, Pauline; De Paula, Sérgio O; Silva, Lívia C F; Vidigal, Pedro M P; Vicentini, Renato; Sousa, Maíra P; Torres, Ana Paula R; Santiago, Vânia M J; Oliveira, Valéria M

    2013-01-01

    Two fosmid libraries, totaling 13,200 clones, were obtained from bioreactor sludge of petroleum refinery wastewater treatment system. The library screening based on PCR and biological activity assays revealed more than 400 positive clones for phenol degradation. From these, 100 clones were randomly selected for pyrosequencing in order to evaluate the genetic potential of the microorganisms present in wastewater treatment plant for biodegradation, focusing mainly on novel genes and pathways of phenol and aromatic compound degradation. The sequence analysis of selected clones yielded 129,635 reads at an estimated 17-fold coverage. The phylogenetic analysis showed Burkholderiales and Rhodocyclales as the most abundant orders among the selected fosmid clones. The MG-RAST analysis revealed a broad metabolic profile with important functions for wastewater treatment, including metabolism of aromatic compounds, nitrogen, sulphur and phosphorus. The predicted 2,276 proteins included phenol hydroxylases and cathecol 2,3- dioxygenases, involved in the catabolism of aromatic compounds, such as phenol, byphenol, benzoate and phenylpropanoid. The sequencing of one fosmid insert of 33 kb unraveled the gene that permitted the host, Escherichia coli EPI300, to grow in the presence of aromatic compounds. Additionally, the comparison of the whole fosmid sequence against bacterial genomes deposited in GenBank showed that about 90% of sequence showed no identity to known sequences of Proteobacteria deposited in the NCBI database. This study surveyed the functional potential of fosmid clones for aromatic compound degradation and contributed to our knowledge of the biodegradative capacity and pathways of microbial assemblages present in refinery wastewater treatment system.

  19. Micronucleus and chromosome aberrations induced in onion (Allium cepa) by a petroleum refinery effluent and by river water that receives this effluent.

    PubMed

    Hoshina, Márcia M; Marin-Morales, Maria A

    2009-11-01

    In this study, micronucleus (MN) and chromosome aberration (CA) tests in Allium cepa (onion) were carried out in order to make a preliminary characterization of the water quality of the Atibaia River in an area that is under the influence of petroleum refinery and also to evaluate the effectiveness of the treatments used by the refinery. For these evaluations, seeds of A. cepa were germinated in waters collected in five different sites related with the refinery in ultra-pure water (negative control) and in methyl methanesulfonate solution (positive control). According to our results, we can suggest that even after the treatments (physicochemical, biological and stabilization pond) the final refinery effluent could induce chromosome aberrations and micronucleus in meristematic cells of A. cepa and that the discharge of the petroleum refinery effluents in the Atibaia River can interfere in the quality of this river. PMID:19647317

  20. Occurrences and behaviors of naphthenic acids in a petroleum refinery wastewater treatment plant.

    PubMed

    Wang, Beili; Wan, Yi; Gao, Yingxin; Zheng, Guomao; Yang, Min; Wu, Song; Hu, Jianying

    2015-05-01

    Naphthenic acids (NAs) are one class of compounds in wastewaters from petroleum industries that are known to cause toxic effects, and their removal from oilfield wastewater is an important challenge for remediation of large volumes of petrochemical effluents. The present study investigated occurrences and behaviors of total NAs and aromatic NAs in a refinery wastewater treatment plant, located in north China, which combined physicochemical and biological processes. Concentrations of total NAs were semiquantified to be 113-392 μg/L in wastewater from all the treatment units, and the percentages of aromatic NAs in total NAs was estimated to be 2.1-8.8%. The mass reduction for total NAs and aromatic NAs was 15±16% and 7.5±24% after the physicochemical treatment, respectively. Great mass reduction (total NAs: 65±11%, aromatic NAs: 86±5%) was observed in the biological treatment units, and antiestrogenic activities observed in wastewater from physicochemical treatment units disappeared in the effluent of the activated sludge system. The distributions of mass fractions of NAs demonstrated that biodegradation via activated sludge was the major mechanism for removing alicyclic NAs, aromatic NAs, and related toxicities in the plant, and the polycyclic NA congener classes were relatively recalcitrant to biodegradation, which is a complete contrast to the preferential adsorption of NAs with higher cyclicity (low Z value). Removal efficiencies of total NAs were 73±17% in summer, which were higher than those in winter (53±15%), and the seasonal variation was possibly due to the relatively high microbial biotransformation activities in the activated sludge system in summer (indexed by O3-NAs/NAs). The results of the investigations indicated that biotransformation of NA mixtures by the activated sludge system were largely affected by temperature, and employing an efficient adsorbent together with biodegradation processes would help cost-effectively remove NAs in petroleum

  1. Volatile organic compound concentrations in ambient air of Kaohsiung petroleum refinery in Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Tsai-Yin; Sree, Usha; Tseng, Sen-Hong; Chiu, Kong Hwa; Wu, Chien-Hou; Lo, Jiunn-Guang

    The air quality assessment for volatile organic compounds (VOC) was conducted in and around Chinese petroleum corporation (CPC) refinery at Kaohsiung, located in southern Taiwan, during 2001 by collecting air samples at 26 sites. Benzene and toluene were detected as the most abundant VOC by both gas chromatography and ultra-violet differential optical absorption spectroscopy (UV-DOAS) techniques. BTXE concentrations showed day and night variations at some of the sampling site. The highest among the 26 sites for total concentration of VOC at CPC was 2506 ppbv near waste burning stack. High concentrations of VOC were also detected at the wastewater management area and the east gate of the plant. The values were 10-18 times higher than those probed in Kaohsiung city. The meteorological parameters such as wind speed and direction played vital roles in the distribution of ambient air VOC concentrations and affected the petrochemical complex emissions. The application of UV-DOAS for online monitoring of criteria pollutants appears feasible though the accuracy of the technique is not fully controlled.

  2. Optimization of ferric hydroxide coprecipitation process for selenium removal from petroleum refinery stripped four water

    SciTech Connect

    Gerhardt, M.B.; Marrs, D.R.; Roehl, R.

    1996-12-31

    Iron coprecipitation was used in bench-scale tests to remove selenium from stripped sour water generated by two petroleum refineries. Chlorine dioxide and hydrogen peroxide were found to convert selenocyanate in the stripped sour water to selenite, which can be removed by iron coprecipitation. An iodometric titration procedure was developed to determine the required oxidant dose. Iron coprecipitation reduced selenium concentrations by 40 to 99 percent in stripped sour water after chlorine dioxide pretreatment Removal was less effective with hydrogen peroxide as the oxidant: total selenium concentrations were reduced by 28 to 92 percent in stripped sour water after hydrogen peroxide pretreatment. Highest removals were obtained at the highest oxidant and iron doses. Sludges produced in coprecipitation tests were hazardous under California regulations. Ozone oxidized selenocyanate but prevented ferric hydroxide precipitation or coagulation. Air was ineffective at selenocyanate oxidation. Repeatedly contacting iron hydroxide with stripped sour water pretreated with hydrogen peroxide, in a simulation of a countercurrent adsorption process, increased the selenium adsorbed on the solids from 32 to 147 pg selenium per mg of iron, but some of the adsorbed selenite was oxidized to selenate and desorbed back into solution.

  3. Mortality among workers employed in petroleum refining and petrochemical plants

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, T.L.; Decoufle, P.; Moure-Eraso, R.

    1980-02-01

    The cause-specific mortality experience of 3,105 members of the Oil, Chemical and Atomic Workers International Union was examined to determine if there were unusual patterns of fatal disease that may be indicative of hazardous agents in the work environment. Deaths among active Union members that were reported by locals in Texas between 1947 and 1977 were identified through membership records, and proportionate mortality was analyzed in several broad industrial categories. PMRs for cancers of the liver and biliary passages, pancreas, lung and skin were elevated among refinery and petrochemical plant workers; however risks did not increase with length of membership. Increased relative frequencies of stomach cancer, cancer of the brain, leukemia and multiple myeloma were confined to white males in the same category who had been Union members for 10 or more years. Excess deaths from stomach cancer and brain cancer were found among white male members employed at one specific oil refinery and petrochemical plant. Observed numbers of deaths from cancer of the stomach were greater than expected among whites and nonwhites, and an elevated PMR for lung cancer among nonwhites was found at an additional plant. Findings suggest that workers in this industry may be at increased risk of certain cancers and indicate areas for further investigation.

  4. Mortality among workers employed in petroleum refining and petrochemical plants.

    PubMed

    Thomas, T L; Decoufle, P; Moure-Eraso, R

    1980-02-01

    The cause-specific mortality experience of 3,105 members of the Oil, Chemical and Atomic Workers International Union was examined to determine if there were unusual patterns of fatal disease that may be indicative of hazardous agents in the work environment. Deaths among active Union members that were reported by locals in Texas between 1947 and 1977 were identified through membership records, and proportionate mortality was analyzed in several broad industrial categories. PMRs for cancers of the liver and biliary passages, pancreas, lung and skin were elevated among refinery and petrochemical plant workers; however, risks did not increase with length of membership. Increased relative frequencies of stomach cancer, cancer of the brain, leukemia and multiple myeloma were confined to white males in the same category who had been Union members for 10 or more years. Excess deaths from stomach cancer and brain cancer were found among white male members employed at one specific oil refinery and petrochemical plant. Observed numbers of deaths from cancer of the stomach were greater than expected among whites and nonwhites, and an elevated PMR for lung cancer among nonwhites was found at an additional plant. Findings suggest that workers in this industry may be at increased risk of certain cancers and indicate areas for further investigation.

  5. Mortality of workers at a nickel carbonyl refinery, 1958–2000

    PubMed Central

    Sorahan, T; Williams, S

    2005-01-01

    Background: Excess risks of respiratory cancer have been shown in some groups of nickel exposed workers. It is clear, however, that not all forms of nickel exposure are implicated in these excess risks. Aim: To determine whether occupational exposures received in a modern nickel carbonyl refinery lead to increased risks of cancer, in particular nasal cancer and lung cancer. Methods: The mortality experienced by a cohort of 812 workers employed at a nickel refinery was investigated. Study subjects were all male workforce employees first employed in the period 1953–92 who had at least five years' employment with the company. Observed numbers of cause specific deaths were compared with expectations based on national mortality rates; SMRs were also calculated by period from commencing employment, year of commencing employment, and type of work. Results: Overall, standardised mortality ratios (SMRs) were close to 100 for all causes (Obs 191, SMR 96, 95% CI 83 to 111), all neoplasms (Obs 63, SMR 104, 95% CI 80 to 133), non-malignant diseases of the respiratory system (Obs 18, SMR 97, 95% CI 57 to 153), and diseases of the circulatory system (Obs 85, SMR 94, 95% CI 75 to 116). There were no significantly increased SMRs for any site of cancer. There was a non-significant excess for lung cancer (Obs 28, Exp 20.17, SMR 139, 95% CI 92 to 201), and in subgroup analyses a significantly increased SMR of 231 (Obs 9) was found for those 142 workers with at least five years' employment in the feed handling and nickel extraction departments. In the total cohort there was a single death from nasal cancer (Exp 0.10). Conclusions: The non-significant excess of lung cancer deaths may well be a chance finding, but in light of previous studies some role for nickel exposures cannot be excluded. PMID:15657188

  6. Chronic and Initiation/Promotion Skin Bioassays of Petroleum Refinery Streams.

    PubMed Central

    Skisak, C; Furedi-Machacek, EM; Schmitt, SS; Swanson, MS; Vernot, EH

    1994-01-01

    Nine refinery streams were tested in both chronic and initiation/promotion (I/P) skin bioassays. In the chronic bioassay, groups of 50 C3H/HeJ mice received twice weekly applications of 50 microl of test article for at least 2 years. In the initiation phase of the I/P bioassay, groups of CD-1 mice received an initiating dose of 50 microl of test article for 5 consecutive days, followed by promotion with 50 microl of phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (0.01% w/v in acetone) for 25 weeks. In the promotion phase of the I/P bioassay, CD-1 mice were initiated with 50 microl of 7,12-dimethylbenzanthracene (0.1% w/v in acetone) or acetone, followed by promotion with 50 microl of test article twice weekly for 25 weeks. The most volatile of the streams, sweetened naphtha, and the least volatile, vacuum residuum, were noncarcinogenic in both assays. Middle distillates, with a boiling range of 150 degrees-370 degreesC, demonstrated carcinogenic activity in the chronic bioassay and acted as promoters but not initiators in the I/P bioassay. Untreated mineral oil streams displayed initiating activity and were carcinogenic in the chronic bioassay, presumably due to the presence of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons of requisite size and structure. A highly solvent-refined mineral oil stream lacked initiating activity. These results indicate that the I/P bioassay, which takes 6 months to complete, may be a good qualitative predictor of the results of a chronic bioassay, at least for petroleum streams. Furthermore, the I/P bioassay can provide insight into possible mechanisms of tumor development. Images p82-a PMID:9719673

  7. Correlation of urinary nickel excretion with observed 'total' and inhalable aerosol exposures of nickel refinery workers.

    PubMed

    Werner, M A; Thomassen, Y; Hetland, S; Norseth, T; Berge, S R; Vincent, J H

    1999-12-01

    An investigation of the relationship between observed nickel aerosol exposures and urinary nickel excretion was undertaken at a Scandinavian nickel refinery. The goal of the study was to assess the impact of nickel aerosol speciation, the use of particle size-selective sampling instrumentation and adjustment of urinary levels for creatinine excretion on the usefulness of urinary nickel excretion as a marker for exposure. Urinary nickel measurements and paired 'total' and inhalable aerosol exposure measurements were collected each day for one week from refinery workers in four process areas. The mean observed urinary nickel concentration was 12 micrograms L-1 (11 micrograms of Ni per g of creatinine). The strongest relationships between urinary excretion and aerosol exposure were found when urinary nickel levels were adjusted for creatinine excretion and when exposure to only soluble forms of nickel aerosol was considered. No significant difference was observed between measures of 'total' and inhalable aerosol in the ability to predict urinary excretion patterns. In the light of these results, it is recommended that consideration be given to the chemical species distribution of nickel aerosol in the use of urinary nickel measurements as a screening tool for cancer risk in occupationally-exposed populations. PMID:11529189

  8. Mortality from cancer and other causes among workers at a metal refinery.

    PubMed

    Tokudome, S; Kuratsune, M

    1983-03-20

    Hidden cases of occupational lung cancer among males were revealed by a case-control study in a town. The findings were confirmed by a prospective study on mortality among the employees of a metal refinery. It demonstrated not only a significantly increased mortality from lung cancer among copper smelters but also definite dose-response relationships between mortality from lung cancer and the degree of exposure. A very high excess mortality from lung cancer (0/E = 25.00) was observed among copper smelters who were considered to have been most heavily exposed to arsenic and/or other carcinogenic substances or workers who had been engaged in sintering and blast furnace operations for 15 years or more before 1949. The average latency period of lung cancer was 37.6 years, and unrelated to the level of exposure. Twenty-six of 29 deaths from lung cancer among copper smelters occurred after they had left the company. Other production workers and clerical workers showed no significant excess mortality from any kind of cancer. PMID:6679660

  9. Lung cancer incidence among Norwegian nickel-refinery workers 1953-2000.

    PubMed

    Grimsrud, Tom K; Berge, Steinar R; Martinsen, Jan Ivar; Andersen, Aage

    2003-04-01

    Among workers employed at a nickel refinery in Norway between 1910 and 1977 an elevated risk of lung cancer has been demonstrated. A dose-related effect from nickel exposure has been identified, with the strongest gradient for water-soluble nickel. This pattern was recently confirmed in a nested case-control study with adjustment for smoking and potential occupational confounders. In the present study, updated cancer data were used to explore the risk by duration of work at the refinery and by exposure to different forms of nickel. Comparisons were made with the national male population (standardised incidence ratios) as well as internal reference groups (Poisson regression) under adjustment for age and smoking. The results confirmed earlier findings of a strong dose-related risk dependent on duration of work in production departments and cumulative exposure to nickel, most clearly seen for water-soluble nickel. Only slightly elevated risks were found among the unexposed and in the group with no experience from production or maintenance work. The risk associated with exposure to nickel chloride was similar to that for nickel sulfate. Analyses restricted to men exposed after 1967, with estimates based on personal monitoring of nickel in the breathing zone, showed the same risk pattern as for earlier years. Elevated lung cancer incidence was even suggested for workers with their first employment after 1978 when a lot of high exposure jobs were abandoned. The combined effect of exposure to nickel and smoking seemed to be in agreement with a multiplicative risk pattern. PMID:12729252

  10. A critical review of cancer epidemiology in the petroleum industry, with a meta-analysis of a combined database of more than 350,000 workers.

    PubMed

    Wong, O; Raabe, G K

    2000-08-01

    In 1989 we published a critical review of cancer epidemiology in petroleum workers, which included as a component of the review a meta-analysis by cancer site. Subsequently we have completed three additional reviews and meta-analyses on cell-type-specific leukemias (1995), multiple myeloma (1997), and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (2000). The objective of the present investigation was to update our 1989 review and meta-analysis of nonlymphohematopoietic cancers in cohort studies of petroleum workers. Included in the present investigation were cohort studies of petroleum workers from the United States, the United Kingdom, Canada, Australia, Finland, Sweden, and Italy. Individual studies were reviewed with regard to specific cancer sites. For each cancer of interest, risk ratios from the individual studies were presented. In some studies, subcohort analyses stratified by exposure parameters such as length of employment, job category, and hire year were also reported. These subcohort or stratified analyses were reviewed and the results of these analyses were taken into consideration in our interpretation. In addition to the qualitative review of individual studies, a meta-analysis was performed to combine data from individual cohort studies of petroleum workers. The primary purpose of the meta-analysis was to provide a summary measure of risk for each cancer site. Based on a review and meta-analyses of cohort studies of more than 350,000 petroleum workers in the United States, the United Kingdom, Canada, Australia, Finland, Sweden, and Italy, we concluded that there was no increased mortality from digestive cancers (stomach, large intestine, liver, or pancreas), lung cancer, bladder cancer, kidney cancer, or brain cancer. The summary standardized mortality ratios for these cancer sites were all below unity. Significant increases of melanoma mortality were reported in some small groups of refinery workers in the United Kingdom and upstream operation workers in Canada, but no

  11. [INFLUENCE OF ENVIRONMENT FACTORS ON THE MORBIDITY RATE WITH TEMPORARY DISABILITY OF WORKING IN OIL REFINERY WORKERS].

    PubMed

    Kharlashova, N V; Chebotarev, P A

    2015-01-01

    There was performed a comprehensive assessment of working conditions of refinery workers on the results of the carrying out of certification of workplaces on working conditions. An analysis of the sample materials laboratory control over the content of harmful substances in the working area of industrial premises refinery. The prolonged exposure to harmful factors on the health ofworkers of the main production throughout the length of service was established to be a major riskfactor for the development of somatic and malignant diseases, to the gain in the morbidity rate and can become a cause of the emergency of malignancies.

  12. The sublethal effects of petroleum refinery effluents: Mixed function oxygenase (MFO) induction in rainbow trout

    SciTech Connect

    Sherry, J.; Scott, B.; Parrott, J.; Hodson, P.; Rao, S.

    1995-12-31

    Canada uses a single biological parameter which is based on the ability of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) to survive a 24 hour exposure to assess and regulate the toxicity of refinery effluents. The acute toxicity of Canadian refinery effluents is generally well controlled. Long term exposures to sublethal toxicants, which are not covered by the current regulations, could have adverse ecological effects. Since PAHs, such as benzo(a)pyrene, can occur in refinery effluents, the authors tested the hypothesis that refinery effluents can induce mixed-function oxygenase measured as ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase activity (EROD) activity in fish. Two end of pipe effluent samples were collected from each of four Ontario refineries. All effluents induced EROD activity in young trout in a dose dependent manner. The EROD parameter has potential as a bioindicator of exposure to refinery effluents. The samples were also tested for toxicity to fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) larvae and to a fish cell line (Ictalurus nebulosus). Fathead minnow growth was significantly reduced by six out of eight samples, and larval survival was affected by one sample. The in vitro data were less consistent: weak toxicity was detected in some samples but the dose response relationship was poor. Direct acting mutagens were detected in two effluents using the Ames Fluctuation assay.

  13. All cause mortality and incidence of cancer in workers in bauxite mines and alumina refineries.

    PubMed

    Fritschi, Lin; Hoving, Jan Lucas; Sim, Malcolm R; Del Monaco, Anthony; MacFarlane, Ewan; McKenzie, Dean; Benke, Geza; de Klerk, Nicholas

    2008-08-15

    Bauxite is a reddish clay that is refined to produce alumina, which is then reduced to aluminium. There have been studies examining the health of workers in aluminium smelters, but not workers in bauxite mining and alumina refining. A cohort of employees of 1 large aluminium company since 1983 was assembled (n = 6,485, 5,828 men). Deaths and incident cancers to 2002 were ascertained by linkage to national and state cancer and death registries. SIRs and SMRs were calculated compared to national rates standardizing for calendar year, sex and 5-year age group. The mortality from all causes (SMR 0.68, 95% CI: 0.60-0.77), and from circulatory and respiratory diseases, all cancers combined and injury in the male cohort were lower than in the Australian male population and were similar across work groups and with duration of employment. The only significant increased mortality risk was from pleural mesothelioma. The incidence of all cancers combined was similar to the Australian rate. The cohort had a lower risk of incident lymphohaematopoietic cancer (SIR 0.50, 95% CI: 0.31-0.88) and a higher risk of melanoma (SIR 1.30, 95% CI: 1.00-1.69) although no dose-responses were seen. There was also an increased risk of mesothelioma (SIR 3.49, 95% CI: 1.82-6.71), which was associated with exposures outside the aluminium industry. This study is the first to examine cancer and mortality amongst workers in bauxite mines and alumina refineries and found little evidence for increased cancer incidence or mortality in these workers.

  14. Optimization of Fenton-based treatment of petroleum refinery wastewater with scrap iron using response surface methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saber, Ali; Hasheminejad, Hasti; Taebi, Amir; Ghaffari, Ghasem

    2014-09-01

    The ever-increasing number and production capacity of petroleum refineries in recent years have intensified the need for developing an effective and practical method for treating their wastewaters. In this study, the application of Fenton process with scrap iron powder was investigated for the treatment of a bio-refractory petroleum refinery effluent. Response surface methodology was employed with a cubic IV optimal design to optimize the process using chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal as the target response. H2O2/COD, and H2O2/Fe mass ratios as well as pH were considered as the relevant parameters. A COD removal of more than 83 % was achieved under optimal conditions (H2O2/COD 10.03, H2O2/Fe 2.66 and pH 3.0) within 90 min. Kinetics studies were conducted to investigate the effect of reaction time on COD removal. In addition, the role of post-coagulation on COD removal under optimal conditions was investigated and it was found that 37 % of COD removal occurred due to coagulation, indicating its high potential in the Fenton process.

  15. Using PM(2.5) lanthanoid elements and nonparametric wind regression to track petroleum refinery FCC emissions.

    PubMed

    Du, Li; Turner, Jay

    2015-10-01

    A long term air quality study is being conducted in Roxana, Illinois, USA, at the fenceline of a petroleum refinery. Measurements include 1-in-6 day 24-hour integrated ambient fine particulate matter (PM2.5) speciation following the Chemical Speciation Network (CSN) sampling and analysis protocols. Lanthanoid elements, some of which are tracers of fluidized-bed catalytic cracker (FCC) emissions, are also measured by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) after extraction from PM2.5 using hot block-assisted acid digestion. Lanthanoid recoveries of 80-90% were obtained for two ambient particulate matter standard reference materials (NIST SRM 1648a and 2783). Ambient PM2.5 La patterns could be explained by a two-source model representing resuspended soil and FCC emissions with enhanced La/Ce ratios when impacted by the refinery. Nonparametric wind regression demonstrates that when the monitoring station was upwind of the refinery the mean La/Ce ratio is consistent with soil and when the monitoring station is downwind of the refinery the mean ratio is more than four times higher for bearings that corresponds to maximum impacts. Source apportionment modeling using EPA UNMIX and EPA PMF could not reliably apportion PM2.5 mass to the FCC emissions. However, the weight of evidence is that such contributions are small with no large episodes observed for the 164 samples analyzed. This study demonstrates the applicability of a hot block-assisted digestion protocol for the extraction of lanthanoid elements as well as insights obtained from long-term monitoring data including wind direction-based analyses.

  16. Mortality among three refinery/petrochemical plant cohorts. I. 1970 to 1982 active/terminated workers.

    PubMed

    Lewis, R J; Gamble, J F; Jorgensen, G

    2000-07-01

    This study updates mortality rates for 19,075 active and terminated workers at three refinery/petrochemical plants. Mortality rates of the workers were compared with both national and state rates. The results indicated deficits of deaths for all causes, all malignant neoplasms, and respiratory and prostate cancer. The noteworthy finding was a statistically significant increase in leukemia among Louisiana male subjects (standardized mortality ratio [SMR], 181; 95% confidence interval [CI], 122 to 259), which showed suggestive trends of increasing SMRs with increasing tenure. This excess was largely due to increased chronic lymphocytic leukemia (SMR, 351; 95% CI, 168 to 645). The rate of kidney cancer remained elevated among Louisiana male subjects, but this finding was no longer significant, and there were no patterns in SMRs by tenure and latency. Mesothelioma was increased at the Louisiana (SMR, 198; 95% CI, 72 to 430) and Texas (SMR, 246; 95% CI, 99 to 507) locations. The leukemia findings have prompted a study of leukemia incidence at the Louisiana location.

  17. Multi-component assessment of worker exposures in a copper refinery. Part 1. Environmental monitoring.

    PubMed

    Thomassen, Yngvar; Nieboer, Evert; Romanova, Natalya; Nikanov, Alexander; Hetland, Siri; VanSpronsen, Eric P; Odland, Jon Øyvind; Chashchin, Valery

    2004-12-01

    The exposure characterisation described in this paper for 135 copper refinery workers (45 females, 90 males) focuses on the concentrations of copper, nickel and other trace elements in the inhalable aerosol fractions, as well as in the water-soluble and water-insoluble subfractions. Some information is also provided on the thoracic and respirable aerosol fractions. Further, results are presented for volatile hydrides of arsenic and selenium released in the copper purification steps of the electrorefining process. For the pyrometallurgical operations, a comparison of the geometric means for the inhalable aerosol fraction indicated that water-soluble copper levels were on average 19-fold higher compared to nickel (p < 0.001) and a significant association was evident between them (r = 0.87, p < 0.001); for the insoluble subfraction, the copper : nickel ratio was 12.5 (p < 0.001) and the inter-element correlation had r = 0.98 and p < 0.001. Although for the electrorefinery workers the relative inhalable concentrations of copper and nickel were not significantly different (p > 0.05), the corresponding inter-element associations were: slope of 7.7, r= 0.54, p < or =0.001 for the water-soluble subfraction and slope of 1.3, r = 0.71 and p < or =0.001 for the water-insoluble subfraction. On average, a good proportion of the inhalable copper and nickel were found in the thoracic (40%) and respirable (20%) aerosol fractions. Cobalt air concentrations were generally low with geometric means and 95% confidence intervals of 3.1 (2.4-4.2)microg m(-3) (pyrometallurgical workers) and 0.3 (0.4-0.5) microg m(-3)(electrorefinery workers). Similarly, the maximum concentrations of cadmium and lead were low, respectively 4 and 25 microg m(-3). Of the hydrides, tellurium and antimony could not be detected, but for the arsenic (arsine) and selenium hydrides measurable exposure occurred for almost all electrorefinery workers, although the levels were generally low at 0.2 microg m(-3). PMID

  18. A case-control study of lung cancer among refinery workers.

    PubMed

    Rosamilia, K; Wong, O; Raabe, G K

    1999-12-01

    This case-control study examined the relationship between lung cancer and the work histories of male employees at a large Texas refinery. The study included 112 lung cancer deaths observed between 1946 and 1987 and 490 matched controls. Employment histories were obtained from personnel records, and smoking information was available from medical records. Both stratification methods and conditional logistic regression were used in data analyses. Overall employment in four general job categories (administrative, engineering/laboratory, process, maintenance/mechanical) was not associated with lung cancer mortality. Results by hire period (< 1940, 1940+) showed that workers hired into process jobs before 1940 had a nonsignificantly elevated odds ratio (OR) of 1.71 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.85-3.45) compared with nonprocess workers hired before 1940. Among process workers hired before 1940, there was a significant trend toward increasing OR with increasing duration of employment in process jobs, and the association with lung cancer was strongest among smokers in the highest duration category of 30+ years (OR = 2.98, 95% CI = 1.07-8.31). Latency analyses of process workers hired before 1940 indicated that their lung cancer risk had peaked between 30 and 50 years since first employment. Definitive statements about causal factors are limited because results among process workers were based on small numbers of subjects in some exposure categories, and there was no information on specific workplace exposures. The OR for maintenance/mechanical jobs after adjustment for smoking was 1.00 (95% CI = 0.55-1.82). Furthermore, there was no pattern in relation to duration of employment in maintenance/mechanical jobs. The results from this study do not support the hypothesis that work in maintenance/mechanical jobs increases lung cancer risk. On the basis of analyses in this study, it is unlikely that asbestos exposure contributed to excess lung cancer mortality. Additional

  19. PORTABLE IMAGING DEVICES FOR INDUSTRIAL LEAK DETECTION AT PETROLEUM REFINERIES AND CHEMICAL PLANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Undiscovered gas leaks, or fugitive emissions, in chemical plants and refinery operations can impact regional air quality as well as being a public health problem. Surveying a facility for potential gas leaks can be a daunting task. Industrial Leak Detection and Repair (LDAR) pro...

  20. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs): a possible cause of lung cancer mortality among nickel/copper smelter and refinery workers

    SciTech Connect

    Verma, D.K.; Julian, J.A.; Roberts, R.S.; Muir, D.C.; Jadon, N.; Shaw, D.S. )

    1992-05-01

    A retrospective industrial hygiene investigation was undertaken to explain the cause of a statistically significant excess lung cancer mortality observed in a subset of a large cohort of nickel workers involved in mining, smelting, and refining of nickel and copper in Ontario. The focus of this paper is to demonstrate how an industrial hygiene follow-up assessment of an epidemiologic finding can help to identify a likely cause. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) alone or in association with particulate and gaseous contaminants (e.g., SO2) were likely the causative agents of the excess lung cancer observed among the lead welders, cranemen, and arc furnace workers of the copper refinery.

  1. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs): a possible cause of lung cancer mortality among nickel/copper smelter and refinery workers.

    PubMed

    Verma, D K; Julian, J A; Roberts, R S; Muir, D C; Jadon, N; Shaw, D S

    1992-05-01

    A retrospective industrial hygiene investigation was undertaken to explain the cause of a statistically significant excess lung cancer mortality observed in a subset of a large cohort of nickel workers involved in mining, smelting, and refining of nickel and copper in Ontario. The focus of this paper is to demonstrate how an industrial hygiene follow-up assessment of an epidemiologic finding can help to identify a likely cause. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) alone or in association with particulate and gaseous contaminants (e.g., SO2) were likely the causative agents of the excess lung cancer observed among the lead welders, cranemen, and arc furnace workers of the copper refinery.

  2. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs): a possible cause of lung cancer mortality among nickel/copper smelter and refinery workers.

    PubMed

    Verma, D K; Julian, J A; Roberts, R S; Muir, D C; Jadon, N; Shaw, D S

    1992-05-01

    A retrospective industrial hygiene investigation was undertaken to explain the cause of a statistically significant excess lung cancer mortality observed in a subset of a large cohort of nickel workers involved in mining, smelting, and refining of nickel and copper in Ontario. The focus of this paper is to demonstrate how an industrial hygiene follow-up assessment of an epidemiologic finding can help to identify a likely cause. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) alone or in association with particulate and gaseous contaminants (e.g., SO2) were likely the causative agents of the excess lung cancer observed among the lead welders, cranemen, and arc furnace workers of the copper refinery. PMID:1609742

  3. A nested case-control study of kidney cancer among refinery/petrochemical workers

    SciTech Connect

    Gamble, J.F.; Pearlman, E.D.; Nicolich, M.J.

    1996-06-01

    A nested case-control study was designed to evaluate whether a nearly twofold excess of kidney cancer among workers at a refinery/petrochemical plant was associated with cumulative exposure to C{sub 2}-C{sub 5} saturated, C{sub 2}-C{sub 5} unsaturated, C{sub 6}-C{sub 10} aliphatic saturated, C{sub 6}-C{sub 10} aliphatic unsaturated, and C{sub 6}-C{sub 10} aromatic process streams. Nonoccupational risk factors were body mass index association with cumulative exposure or tenure as estimated by conditional logistic regression and adjusted for nonoccupational risk factors. Categorical analysis showed increased odds ratios only in the second (low) and fourth (high) quartiles compared to the first quartile reference group of lowest exposed workers, and a three-quarter-fold increased odds ratio for >32 years` tenure compared to the <25-year reference group. The number of cases was small with wide confidence intervals around estimate of risk, so the possibility of an exposure-response trend cannot be ruled out. Multivariate analysis identified overweight (high BMI; p<0.01) as the most important risk factor in this data set, followed by tenure and increased blood pressure. There was a weak association with current smoking, but not with pack-years smoked. The risk of kidney cancer for a nonsmoker with normal blood pressure but 25% overweight was increased about 2.6-fold (95% CI = 1.2-5.4). The risk of kidney cancer for a nonsmoker of normal weight with high blood pressure (e.g., 150/110), was increased about 4.5 (95% CI, 0.8-26). 49 refs., 3 figs., 8 tabs.

  4. A nested case-control study of kidney cancer among refinery/petrochemical workers.

    PubMed Central

    Gamble, J F; Pearlman, E D; Nicolich, M J

    1996-01-01

    A nested case-control study was designed to evaluate whether a nearly twofold excess of kidney cancer among workers at a refinery/petrochemical plant was associated with cumulative exposure to C2-C5 saturated, C2-C5 unsaturated, C6-C10 aliphatic saturated, C6-C10 aliphatic unsaturated, and C6-C10 aromatic process streams. Nonoccupational risk factors were body mass index (BMI), blood pressure (both measured at about age 28), and smoking. There was no significant association with cumulative exposure or tenure as estimated by conditional logistic regression and adjusted for nonoccupational risk factors. Categorical analysis showed increased odds ratios only in the second (low) and fourth (high) quartiles compared to the first quartile reference group of lowest exposed workers, and a three-quarter-fold increased odds ratio for > 32 years' tenure compared to the < 25-year reference group. The number of cases was small with wide confidence intervals around estimate of risk, so the possibility of an exposure-response trend cannot be ruled out. Multivariate analysis identified overweight (high BMI; p < 0.01) as the most important risk factor in this data set, followed by tenure and increased blood pressure. There was a weak association with current smoking, but not with pack-years smoked. The risk of kidney cancer for a nonsmoker with normal blood pressure but 25% overweight was increased about 2.6-fold (95% CI = 1.2-5.4). The risk of kidney cancer for a nonsmoker of normal weight with high blood pressure (e.g., 150/110), was increased about 4.5 (95% CI, 0.8-26). Images Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3. PMID:8793353

  5. Treatment of petroleum refinery wastewater containing heavily polluting substances in an aerobic submerged fixed-bed reactor.

    PubMed

    Vendramel, S; Bassin, J P; Dezotti, M; Sant'Anna, G L

    2015-01-01

    Petroleum refineries produce large amount of wastewaters, which often contain a wide range of different compounds. Some of these constituents may be recalcitrant and therefore difficult to be treated biologically. This study evaluated the capability of an aerobic submerged fixed-bed reactor (ASFBR) containing a corrugated PVC support material for biofilm attachment to treat a complex and high-strength organic wastewater coming from a petroleum refinery. The reactor operation was divided into five experimental runs which lasted more than 250 days. During the reactor operation, the applied volumetric organic load was varied within the range of 0.5-2.4 kgCOD.m(-3).d(-1). Despite the inherent fluctuations on the characteristics of the complex wastewater and the slight decrease in the reactor performance when the influent organic load was increased, the ASFBR showed good stability and allowed to reach chemical oxygen demand, dissolved organic carbon and total suspended solids removals up to 91%, 90% and 92%, respectively. Appreciable ammonium removal was obtained (around 90%). Some challenging aspects of reactor operation such as biofilm quantification and important biofilm constituents (e.g. polysaccharides (PS) and proteins (PT)) were also addressed in this work. Average PS/volatile attached solids (VAS) and PT/VAS ratios were around 6% and 50%, respectively. The support material promoted biofilm attachment without appreciable loss of solids and allowed long-term operation without clogging. Microscopic observations of the microbial community revealed great diversity of higher organisms, such as protozoa and rotifers, suggesting that toxic compounds found in the wastewater were possibly removed in the biofilm.

  6. A combination of solvent extraction and freeze thaw for oil recovery from petroleum refinery wastewater treatment pond sludge.

    PubMed

    Hu, Guangji; Li, Jianbing; Hou, Haobo

    2015-01-01

    A combination of solvent extraction and freeze thaw was examined for recovering oil from the high-moisture petroleum refinery wastewater treatment pond sludge. Five solvents including cyclohexane (CHX), dichloromethane (DCM), methyl ethyl ketone (MEK), ethyl acetate (EA), and 2-propanol (2-Pro) were examined. It was found that these solvents except 2-Pro showed a promising oil recovery rate of about 40%, but the recycling of DCM solvent after oil extraction was quite low. Three solvents (CHX, MEK and EA) were then selected for examining the effect of freeze/thaw treatment on improving the quality of recovered oil. This treatment increased the total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) content in recovered oil from about 40% to 60% for both MEK and EA extractions, but little effect was observed for CHX extraction. Although the solid residue after oil recovery had a significantly decreased TPH content, a high concentration of heavy metals was observed, indicating that this residue may require proper management. In general, the combination of solvent extraction with freeze/thaw is effective for high-moisture oily hazardous waste treatment.

  7. Accumulation of metals and histopathology in Oreochromis niloticus exposed to treated NNPC Kaduna (Nigeria) petroleum refinery effluent

    SciTech Connect

    Onwumere, B.G.; Oladimeji, A.A. )

    1990-04-01

    Accumulation of heavy metals and histopathology were observed in Oreochromis niloticus exposed to treated petroleum refinery effluent from the Nigerian National Petroleum Corporation, Kaduna. Analysis of fish metal burden showed that the fish concentrated trace metals a thousand times above the levels existing in the exposure medium. Some metals were preferentially accumulated more than others and the accumulation was, in decreasing order, Pb, Fe, Zn, Cu, Mn, Cr, Ni, and Cd. Whole fish metal burden was lower in fish from which the gill, liver, and kidney had been removed, suggesting that these organs accumulated the metals more than other tissues. Hemorrhaging of fins was observed in all treatment concentrations except that of the control, and fish exposed to 40 and 50% effluent were most affected. Erosion of the caudal fin was also observed in fish exposed to 40 and 50% effluent. Examination of the organs for histopathology revealed damages to the gills. Gills with edematous fused lamellae congested with blood were observed. No histopathological damage was observed in the liver and kidney. The extent of metal accumulation and histopathological damage were directly related to the effluent concentrations.

  8. A combination of solvent extraction and freeze thaw for oil recovery from petroleum refinery wastewater treatment pond sludge.

    PubMed

    Hu, Guangji; Li, Jianbing; Hou, Haobo

    2015-01-01

    A combination of solvent extraction and freeze thaw was examined for recovering oil from the high-moisture petroleum refinery wastewater treatment pond sludge. Five solvents including cyclohexane (CHX), dichloromethane (DCM), methyl ethyl ketone (MEK), ethyl acetate (EA), and 2-propanol (2-Pro) were examined. It was found that these solvents except 2-Pro showed a promising oil recovery rate of about 40%, but the recycling of DCM solvent after oil extraction was quite low. Three solvents (CHX, MEK and EA) were then selected for examining the effect of freeze/thaw treatment on improving the quality of recovered oil. This treatment increased the total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) content in recovered oil from about 40% to 60% for both MEK and EA extractions, but little effect was observed for CHX extraction. Although the solid residue after oil recovery had a significantly decreased TPH content, a high concentration of heavy metals was observed, indicating that this residue may require proper management. In general, the combination of solvent extraction with freeze/thaw is effective for high-moisture oily hazardous waste treatment. PMID:25464326

  9. Electron microscopy of particles deposited in the lungs of nickel refinery workers.

    PubMed

    Küpper, Miriam; Weinbruch, Stephan; Skaug, Vidar; Skogstad, Asbjørn; Thornér, Elín Einarsdóttir; Benker, Nathalie; Ebert, Martin; Chashchin, Valery; Odland, Jon Øyvind; Thomassen, Yngvar

    2015-08-01

    The size, morphology, and chemical composition of particles deposited in the lungs of two nickel refinery workers were studied by scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The particles were extracted from the lung tissue by low-temperature ashing or by dissolution in tetramethylammonium hydroxide. The suitability of both sample preparation techniques was checked with reference materials. Both approaches lead to Fe-rich artifact particles. Low-temperature ashing leads to oxidation of small (diameter < 2 μm) metallic Ni and Ni sulfide particles, dissolution in tetramethylammonium hydroxide to removal of sulfate surface layers. Silicates and alumosilicates are the most abundant particle groups in the lungs of both subjects. From the various metal-dominated particle groups, Ni-rich particles are most abundant followed by Fe-rich and Ti-rich particles. Ni appears to be present predominantly as an oxide. Pure Ni metal and Ni sulfides were not observed. The presence of soluble Ni phases was not investigated as they will not be preserved during sample preparation. Based on their spherical morphology, it is estimated that a large fraction of Ni-rich particles (50-60 % by number) as well as Fe-rich and Cu-rich particles (27-45 %) originate from high-temperature processes (smelting, welding). This fraction is much lower for silicates (3-5 %), alumosilicates (1-2 %), and Ti-rich particles (9-11 %). The absence of metallic Ni particles most likely results from low exposure to this species. The absence of Ni sulfides may be either ascribed to low exposure or to fast clearance.

  10. Electron microscopy of particles deposited in the lungs of nickel refinery workers.

    PubMed

    Küpper, Miriam; Weinbruch, Stephan; Skaug, Vidar; Skogstad, Asbjørn; Thornér, Elín Einarsdóttir; Benker, Nathalie; Ebert, Martin; Chashchin, Valery; Odland, Jon Øyvind; Thomassen, Yngvar

    2015-08-01

    The size, morphology, and chemical composition of particles deposited in the lungs of two nickel refinery workers were studied by scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The particles were extracted from the lung tissue by low-temperature ashing or by dissolution in tetramethylammonium hydroxide. The suitability of both sample preparation techniques was checked with reference materials. Both approaches lead to Fe-rich artifact particles. Low-temperature ashing leads to oxidation of small (diameter < 2 μm) metallic Ni and Ni sulfide particles, dissolution in tetramethylammonium hydroxide to removal of sulfate surface layers. Silicates and alumosilicates are the most abundant particle groups in the lungs of both subjects. From the various metal-dominated particle groups, Ni-rich particles are most abundant followed by Fe-rich and Ti-rich particles. Ni appears to be present predominantly as an oxide. Pure Ni metal and Ni sulfides were not observed. The presence of soluble Ni phases was not investigated as they will not be preserved during sample preparation. Based on their spherical morphology, it is estimated that a large fraction of Ni-rich particles (50-60 % by number) as well as Fe-rich and Cu-rich particles (27-45 %) originate from high-temperature processes (smelting, welding). This fraction is much lower for silicates (3-5 %), alumosilicates (1-2 %), and Ti-rich particles (9-11 %). The absence of metallic Ni particles most likely results from low exposure to this species. The absence of Ni sulfides may be either ascribed to low exposure or to fast clearance. PMID:26077746

  11. A retrospective mortality study of workers exposed to arsenic in a gold mine and refinery in France.

    PubMed

    Simonato, L; Moulin, J J; Javelaud, B; Ferro, G; Wild, P; Winkelmann, R; Saracci, R

    1994-05-01

    A historical mortality study of a cohort of employees of a gold mining and refining company was carried out in Salsigne, France. A major goal of the study was to investigate the relationship between lung cancer mortality and exposure to arsenic, radon, silica, and other contaminants of the working environment. A twofold excess of lung cancer was found both among miners and smelters, mainly concentrated among workers who had experienced exposure to past levels of arsenic, radon, and silica. The consistency of the results in the mine and the refinery are suggestive of a carcinogenic risk from both soluble and insoluble arsenic, although the potential role of other factors cannot be dismissed.

  12. [The effect of occupational factors on immunologic indices in workers in the petroleum-refining industry].

    PubMed

    Guseĭn-zade, K M; Torosian, A Ts; Agakishiev, D D; Kerimov, S G; Akhmedova, L M

    1989-01-01

    Examinations of 518 refinery workers have helped define the dermatologic morbidity structure. Immunologic examinations have been carried out in 82 workers. 70 of these have developed skin abnormalities (toxicoderma, eczema, itching, hyperkeratosis, vascular spots, abnormal pigmentation, etc.). The studies have revealed reduced levels of the cell-mediated immunity parameters: T-lymphocytes, T-theophylline-sensitive lymphocytes, and decreased functional activities thereof); this has been parallelled by activation of the humoral immunity.

  13. The effects of Fenton process on the removal of petroleum hydrocarbons from oily sludge in Shiraz oil refinery, Iran

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Due to the high concentrations of total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) in oily sludge and their environmental hazards, the concern regarding their effects on health and the environment has increased. The main objective of this research was focused on evaluating the feasibility of using Fenton process in removing TPH in oily sludge from Shiraz oil refinery, Southern Iran. Results To determine optimum conditions, four different parameters were assessed at four different levels using Taguchi method. According to data, the optimum conditions were as follows: the reaction time of 1 hour, H2O2 to sample mass ratio of 15, H2O2 to Fe (II) molar ratio of 10 and pH of 5. The maximum TPH reduction rate was 36.47%. Because of the semi-solid nature of the sample and the hydroxyl radicals mainly generated in the aqueous solution, TPH reduction rate greatly improved by adding water. Ultimately, by adding 40 ml water per gram of the oily sludge under optimized conditions, the reduction rate of 73.07% was achieved. Conclusions The results demonstrated that this method can be used as a pre-treatment method for the oily sludge. Moreover, a complementary treatment is necessary to reach the standard limit. PMID:24422994

  14. Diversity of nitrifying bacteria in a full-scale petroleum refinery wastewater treatment plant experiencing unstable nitrification.

    PubMed

    Figuerola, Eva L M; Erijman, Leonardo

    2010-09-15

    We have investigated bacterial populations relevant to nitrification in a full-scale activated sludge plant receiving wastewater from a petroleum refinery showing unstable nitrification. Inhibition of ammonia oxidation was related to phenol concentration according to a model of non-competitive inhibition. While the number of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) did not correlate with nitrification performance, the total number of nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB) dropped considerably during periods of nitrite accumulation or no nitrification. Diversity of nitrifiers in the sludge of the full-scale facility was examined at a time of full nitrification with the construction of clone libraries of ammonia monooxygenase (amoA) gene and of the 16S rRNA gene of NOB. Nucleotide sequences of amoA gene belonged to one dominant population, associated with Nitrosomonas europaea, and to a minor population related to the Nitrosomonas nitrosa lineage. The majority of sequences retrieved in the NOB-like clone library also clustered within a single operational taxonomic unit. The high dominance of Nitrobacter over Nitrospira and the low diversity of nitrifying bacteria observed in this wastewater treatment plant might account for the increased risk of failure in the presence of disturbances.

  15. Adverse Health Effects of Benzene Exposure Among Children Following a Flaring Incident at the British Petroleum Refinery in Texas City.

    PubMed

    D'Andrea, Mark A; Reddy, G Kesava

    2016-03-01

    This study examined the health effects of benzene exposure among children from a flaring incident at the British Petroleum (BP) refinery in Texas City, Texas. A total of 899 children (benzene exposed, n = 641 and unexposed, n = 258), aged <17 years, were included. Hematological analysis showed that white blood cell (×10(3)/µL) counts were significantly decreased in the exposed children compared with the unexposed children (7.1 ± 2.2 versus 7.6 ± 2.1, P = .001). Similarly, the hemoglobin (g/dL) levels were decreased significantly in the exposed group compared with the unexposed group (12.7 ± 1.3 vs 13.1 ± 1.5, P = .001). Conversely, platelet (×10(3)/µL) counts were increased significantly in the exposed group compared with the unexposed group (318.6 ± 79.8 versus 266.9 ± 58.8, P = .001). Hepatic enzymes were also significantly elevated among exposed children compared with the unexposed children. These findings suggest that children exposed to benzene are at a higher risk of developing both hepatic and bone marrow-related disorders. PMID:26269465

  16. Adverse Health Effects of Benzene Exposure Among Children Following a Flaring Incident at the British Petroleum Refinery in Texas City.

    PubMed

    D'Andrea, Mark A; Reddy, G Kesava

    2016-03-01

    This study examined the health effects of benzene exposure among children from a flaring incident at the British Petroleum (BP) refinery in Texas City, Texas. A total of 899 children (benzene exposed, n = 641 and unexposed, n = 258), aged <17 years, were included. Hematological analysis showed that white blood cell (×10(3)/µL) counts were significantly decreased in the exposed children compared with the unexposed children (7.1 ± 2.2 versus 7.6 ± 2.1, P = .001). Similarly, the hemoglobin (g/dL) levels were decreased significantly in the exposed group compared with the unexposed group (12.7 ± 1.3 vs 13.1 ± 1.5, P = .001). Conversely, platelet (×10(3)/µL) counts were increased significantly in the exposed group compared with the unexposed group (318.6 ± 79.8 versus 266.9 ± 58.8, P = .001). Hepatic enzymes were also significantly elevated among exposed children compared with the unexposed children. These findings suggest that children exposed to benzene are at a higher risk of developing both hepatic and bone marrow-related disorders.

  17. Individual and combined effects of organic, toxic, and hydraulic shocks on sequencing batch reactor in treating petroleum refinery wastewater.

    PubMed

    Mizzouri, Nashwan Sh; Shaaban, Md Ghazaly

    2013-04-15

    This study analyzes the effects of toxic, hydraulic, and organic shocks on the performance of a lab-scale sequencing batch reactor (SBR) with a capacity of 5L. Petroleum refinery wastewater (PRWW) was treated with an organic loading rate (OLR) of approximately 0.3 kg chemical oxygen demand (COD)/kg MLSSd at 12.8h hydraulic retention time (HRT). A considerable variation in the COD was observed for organic, toxic, hydraulic, and combined shocks, and the worst values observed were 68.9, 77.1, 70.2, and 57.8%, respectively. Improved control of toxic shock loads of 10 and 20mg/L of chromium (VI) was identified. The system was adversely affected by the organic shock when a shock load thrice the normal value was used, and this behavior was repeated when the hydraulic shock was 4.8h HRT. The empirical recovery period was greater than the theoretical period because of the inhibitory effects of phenols, sulfides, high oil, and grease in the PRWW. The system recovery rates from the shocks were in the following order: toxic, organic, hydraulic, and combined shocks. System failure occurred when the combined shocks of organic and hydraulic were applied. The system was resumed by replacing the PRWW with glucose, and the OLR was reduced to half its initial value.

  18. Refinery Capacity Report

    EIA Publications

    2016-01-01

    Data series include fuel, electricity, and steam purchased for consumption at the refinery; refinery receipts of crude oil by method of transportation; and current and projected atmospheric crude oil distillation, downstream charge, and production capacities. Respondents are operators of all operating and idle petroleum refineries (including new refineries under construction) and refineries shut down during the previous year, located in the 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands, Guam, and other U.S. possessions. The Refinery Capacity Report does not contain working and shell storage capacity data. This data is now being collected twice a year as of March 31 and September 30 on the Form EIA-810, "Monthly Refinery Report", and is now released as a separate report Working and Net Available Shell Storage Capacity.

  19. Sensitivity of screening-level toxicity tests using soils from a former petroleum refinery

    SciTech Connect

    Pauwels, S.; Bureau, J.; Roy, Y.; Allen, B.; Robidoux, P.Y.; Soucy, M.

    1995-12-31

    The authors tested five composite soil samples from a former refinery. The samples included a reference soil (Mineral Oil and Grease, MO and G < 40 ppm), thermally-treated soil, biotreated soil, and two untreated soils. They evaluated toxicity using the earthworm E. foetida, lettuce, cress, barley, Microtox, green algae, fathead minnow, and D. magna. The endpoints measured were lethality, seed germination, root elongation, growth, and bioluminescence. Toxicity, as measured by the number of positive responses, increased as follows: biotreated soil < untreated soil No. 1 < reference soil < thermally-treated soil and untreated soil No. 2. The biotreated soil generated only one positive response, whereas the thermally-treated soil and untreated soil No. 2 generated five positive responses. The most sensitive and discriminant terrestrial endpoint was lettuce root elongation which responded to untreated soil No. 1, thermally-treated soil, and reference soil. The least sensitive was barley seed germination for which no toxicity was detected. The most sensitive and discriminant aquatic endpoint was green algae growth which responded to untreated soil No. 1, thermally-treated soil, and reference soil. The least sensitive was D. magna for which no toxicity was detected. Overall, soil and aqueous extract toxicity was spotty and no consistent patterns emerged to differentiate the five soils. Biotreatment significantly reduced the effects of the contamination. Aqueous toxicity was measured in the reference soil, probably because of the presence of unknown dissolved compounds in the aqueous extract. Finally, clear differences in sensitivity existed among the test species.

  20. Control of occupational exposure to phenol in industrial wastewater treatment plant of a petroleum refinery in Alexandria, Egypt: An intervention application case study.

    PubMed

    Zaki, Gehan R; El-Marakby, Fadia A; Ramadan, Alaa El-Din K; Issa, Ahmed I; Nofal, Faten H

    2016-11-01

    Phenol exposure is one of the hazards in the industrial wastewater treatment basin of any refinery. It additively interacts with hydrogen sulfide emitted from the wastewater basin. Consequently, its concentration should be greatly lower than its threshold limit value. The present study aimed at controlling occupational exposure to phenol in the work environment of wastewater treatment plant in a refinery by reducing phenolic compounds in the industrial wastewater basin. This study was conducted on both laboratory and refinery scales. The first was completed by dividing each wastewater sample from the outlets of different refinery units into three portions; the first was analyzed for phenolic compounds. The second and third were for laboratory scale charcoal and bacterial treatments. The two methods were compared regarding their simplicities, design, and removal efficiencies. Accordingly, bacterial treatment by continuous flow of sewage water containing Pseudomonas Aeruginosa was used for refinery scale treatment. Laboratory scale treatment of phenolic compounds revealed higher removal efficiency of charcoal [100.0(0.0) %] than of bacteria [99.9(0.013) %]. The refinery scale bacterial treatment was [99.8(0.013) %] efficient. Consequently, level of phenol in the work environment after refinery-scale treatment [0.069(0.802) mg/m(3)] was much lower than that before [5.700(26.050) mg/m(3)], with removal efficiency of [99.125(2.335) %]. From the present study, we can conclude that bacterial treatment of phenolic compounds in industrial wastewater of the wastewater treatment plant using continuous flow of sewage water containing Pseudomonas Aeruginosa reduces the workers' exposure to phenol.

  1. Control of occupational exposure to phenol in industrial wastewater treatment plant of a petroleum refinery in Alexandria, Egypt: An intervention application case study.

    PubMed

    Zaki, Gehan R; El-Marakby, Fadia A; Ramadan, Alaa El-Din K; Issa, Ahmed I; Nofal, Faten H

    2016-11-01

    Phenol exposure is one of the hazards in the industrial wastewater treatment basin of any refinery. It additively interacts with hydrogen sulfide emitted from the wastewater basin. Consequently, its concentration should be greatly lower than its threshold limit value. The present study aimed at controlling occupational exposure to phenol in the work environment of wastewater treatment plant in a refinery by reducing phenolic compounds in the industrial wastewater basin. This study was conducted on both laboratory and refinery scales. The first was completed by dividing each wastewater sample from the outlets of different refinery units into three portions; the first was analyzed for phenolic compounds. The second and third were for laboratory scale charcoal and bacterial treatments. The two methods were compared regarding their simplicities, design, and removal efficiencies. Accordingly, bacterial treatment by continuous flow of sewage water containing Pseudomonas Aeruginosa was used for refinery scale treatment. Laboratory scale treatment of phenolic compounds revealed higher removal efficiency of charcoal [100.0(0.0) %] than of bacteria [99.9(0.013) %]. The refinery scale bacterial treatment was [99.8(0.013) %] efficient. Consequently, level of phenol in the work environment after refinery-scale treatment [0.069(0.802) mg/m(3)] was much lower than that before [5.700(26.050) mg/m(3)], with removal efficiency of [99.125(2.335) %]. From the present study, we can conclude that bacterial treatment of phenolic compounds in industrial wastewater of the wastewater treatment plant using continuous flow of sewage water containing Pseudomonas Aeruginosa reduces the workers' exposure to phenol. PMID:27310430

  2. Biodegradation of oil spill by petroleum refineries using consortia of novel bacterial strains.

    PubMed

    Singh, Bina; Bhattacharya, Amit; Channashettar, Veeranna A; Jeyaseelan, C Paul; Gupta, Sachin; Sarma, Priyangshu M; Mandal, Ajoy K; Lal, Banwari

    2012-08-01

    Feasibility study carried out at the site prior to the full scale study showed that the introduced bacterial consortium effectively adapted to the local environment of the soil at bioremediation site. The soil samples were collected from the contaminated fields after treatment with bacterial consortium at different time intervals and analyzed by gas chromatography after extraction with hexane and toluene. At time zero (just before initiation of bioremediation), the concentration of total petroleum hydrocarbons in the soil (25-cm horizon) of plot A, B, C and D was 30.90 %, 18.80 %, 25.90 % and 29.90 % respectively, after 360 days of treatment with microbial consortia was reduced to 0.97 %, 1.0 %, 1.0 %, and 1.1 % respectively. Whereas, only 5 % degradation was observed in the control plot after 365 days (microbial consortium not applied).

  3. An evaluation of the environmental implications of petroleum refinery emissions by multielemental neutron activation analysis of rumen fluid ash of buffaloes.

    PubMed

    Garg, A N; Chutke, N L; Ambulkar, M N; Dogra, R K

    1996-01-01

    In order to study environmental pollution in and around a petroleum refinery complex, a multielemental instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) method was used to assay concentrations of As, Ba, Br, Cl, Co, Cr, Cs, Cu, Fe, Hg, La, Mn, Mo, K, Na, P, Sc, Rb, Se, Sr, W and Zn in the rumen fluid ash samples of buffaloes from the vicinity of the refinery. Corresponding samples from a control area 300 km away from the refinery were analysed. Standard Reference Materials, Bovine liver (SRM 1577a), Oyster tissue (SRM 1566a) and Animal bone (CRM H-5) were also analysed for quality control. Samples were irradiated with thermal neutrons at 10(12)-10(13) n cm-2 s-1 and counted by high-resolution gamma spectrometry. Mean elemental concentrations of As, Ba, Br, Cr, Hg and Fe were found to be enhanced, whereas those of Na, K, Cl, Cu, Mn and P were depleted in samples from the vicinity of the refinery complex compared to controls. The environmental implications of anomalous elemental concentrations are discussed.

  4. Production of coal-based fuels and value-added products: coal to liquids using petroleum refinery streams

    SciTech Connect

    Clifford, C.E.B.; Schobert, H.H.

    2008-07-01

    We are studying several processes that utilize coal, coal-derived materials, or biomass in existing refining facilities. A major emphasis is the production of a coal-based replacement for JP-8 jet fuel. This fuel is very similar to Jet A and jet A-1 in commercial variation, so this work has significant carry-over into the private sector. We have been focusing on three processes that would be retrofitted into a refinery: (1) coal tar/refinery stream blending and hydro-treatment; (2) coal extraction using refinery streams followed by hydro-treatment; and (3) co-coking of coal blended with refinery streams. 4 figs., 5 tabs.

  5. Bioleaching of metals from spent refinery petroleum catalyst using moderately thermophilic bacteria: effect of particle size.

    PubMed

    Srichandan, Haragobinda; Singh, Sradhanjali; Pathak, Ashish; Kim, Dong-Jin; Lee, Seoung-Won; Heyes, Graeme

    2014-01-01

    The present work investigated the leaching potential of moderately thermophilic bacteria in the recovery of metals from spent petroleum catalyst of varying particle sizes. The batch bioleaching experiments were conducted by employing a mixed consortium of moderate thermophilic bacteria at 45°C and by using five different particle sizes (from 45 to >2000 μm) of acetone-washed spent catalyst. The elemental mapping by FESEM confirmed the presence of Al, Ni, V and Mo along with sulfur in the spent catalyst. During bioleaching, Ni (92-97%) and V (81-91%) were leached in higher concentrations, whereas leaching yields of Al (23-38%) were found to be lowest in all particle sizes investigated. Decreasing the particle size from >2000 μm to 45-106 μm caused an increase in leaching yields of metals during initial hours. However, the final metals leaching yields were almost independent of particle sizes of catalyst. Leaching kinetics was observed to follow the diffusion-controlled model showing the linearity more close than the chemical control. The results of the present study suggested that bioleaching using moderate thermophilic bacteria was highly effective in removing the metals from spent catalyst. Moreover, bioleaching can be conducted using spent catalyst of higher particle size (>2000 μm), thus saving the grinding cost and making process attractive for larger scale application.

  6. A review of the technological solutions for the treatment of oily sludges from petroleum refineries.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Leonardo Jordão; Alves, Flávia Chaves; de França, Francisca Pessôa

    2012-10-01

    The activities of the oil industry have several impacts on the environment due to the large amounts of oily wastes that are generated. The oily sludges are a semi-solid material composed by a mixture of clay, silica and iron oxides contaminated with oil, produced water and the chemicals used in the production of oil. Nowadays both the treatment and management of these waste materials is essential to promote sustainable management of exploration and exploitation of natural resources. Biological, physical and chemical processes can be used to reduce environmental contamination by petroleum hydrocarbons to acceptable levels. The choice of treatment method depends on the physical and chemical properties of the waste as well as the availability of facilities to process these wastes. Literature provides some operations for treatment of oily sludges, such as landfilling, incineration, co-processing in clinkerization furnaces, microwave liquefaction, centrifugation, destructive distillation, thermal plasma, low-temperature conversion, incorporation in ceramic materials, development of impermeable materials, encapsulation and biodegradation in land farming, biopiles and bioreactors. The management of the technology to be applied for the treatment of oily wastes is essential to promote proper environmental management, and provide alternative methods to reduce, reuse and recycle the wastes.

  7. Insights into PM10 sources in Houston, Texas: Role of petroleum refineries in enriching lanthanoid metals during episodic emission events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozlaker, Ayşe; Buzcu-Güven, Birnur; Fraser, Matthew P.; Chellam, Shankararaman

    2013-04-01

    Petroleum refineries may emit large quantities of pollutants during non-routine operations that include start-ups and shutdowns, planned maintenance, and unplanned equipment failures. The Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ) tracks such events by requiring industries to self-report estimates of these emissions because they often have a detrimental impact on local air quality and potentially, public health. An inventory of non-routine episodic emission events is available via TCEQ's website. However, there is on-going concern that such episodic emissions are sometimes under-reported or even not cataloged. Herein, we present concentrations of 42 main group, transition, and lanthanoid elements in 114 time-resolved (3 or 6 h) samples collected over a 1-month period. We also develop strategies to identify aerosol sources using elemental tracers and compare source apportionment (performed by positive matrix factorization) based on ambient measurements to inventoried non-routine emission events. Through interpretation of key marker elements, five sources impacting concentrations of metals in PM10 were identified and calculated to contribute 73% of the measured PM10 mass. On average, primary emissions from fluidized-bed catalytic cracking (FCC) units negligibly contributed to apportioned PM10 mass. However, 35 samples were identified as impacted by transient PM10 emissions from FCC units because of elevated levels of lanthanoid metals and their ratios. Only 31 of these 35 samples coincided with self-reported non-routine emission events. Further, roughly half of the emission event self-reports detailed only emissions of gaseous pollutants. Based on this, we posit that not all PM10 emission events are reported and even self-reported emission events are incomplete - those that only catalog gaseous pollutants may also include unreported PM emissions.

  8. Health effects of benzene exposure among children following a flaring incident at the British Petroleum Refinery in Texas City.

    PubMed

    D'Andrea, Mark A; Reddy, G Kesava

    2014-02-01

    Human exposure to benzene is associated with multiple adverse health effects leading to hematological malignancies. The objective of this retrospective study was to evaluate the health consequences of benzene exposure in children following a flaring incident at the British petroleum (BP) refinery in Texas City, Texas. The study included children aged <17 years who had been exposed and unexposed to benzene. Using medical charts, clinical data including white blood cell (WBC) counts, platelets counts, hemoglobin, hematocrit, blood urea nitrogen (BUN), creatinine, alkaline phosphatase (ALP), aspartate amino transferase (AST), alanine amino transferase (ALT), and somatic symptom complaints by the children exposed to benzene were reviewed and analyzed. A total of 312 subjects (benzene exposed, n = 157 and unexposed, n = 155) were included. Hematologic analysis showed that WBC counts were significantly decreased in benzene-exposed children compared with the unexposed children (6.8 ± 2.1 versus 7.3 ± 1.7, P = .022). Conversely, platelet (X 10(3) per μL) counts were increased significantly in the benzene-exposed group compared with the unexposed group (278.4 ± 59.9 versus 261.6 ± 51.7, P = .005). Similarly, benzene-exposed children had significantly higher levels of ALP (183.7± 95.6 versus 165 ± 70.3 IU/L, P = .04), AST (23.6 ± 15.3 versus 20.5 ± 5.5 IU/L, P = .015), and ALT (19.2 ± 7.8 versus 16.9 ± 6.9 IU/L, P = .005) compared with the unexposed children. Together, the results of the study reveal that children exposed to benzene experienced significantly altered blood profiles, liver enzymes, and somatic symptoms indicating that children exposed to benzene are at a higher risk of developing hepatic or blood related disorders.

  9. Hepatic function in previously exposed thorium refinery workers as compared to normal controls from the health and nutrition survey.

    PubMed

    Farid, I; Conibear, S A

    1983-01-01

    The effect of thorium exposure on hepatic function was investigated in 275 former workers of a thorium refinery. Body burden of radioactivity from the decay chain of thorium was measured as 212Bi and 220Rn in the exhaled breath. Asparate aminotransferase, globulin and total bilirubin in sera were found to be associated with body burden of radioactivity at high levels of significance. Thorium-exposed workers were also compared with a population of white males from the Health and Nutrition Survey conducted by the National Center for Health Statistics from 1971 to 1975. The results showed the means of aspartate aminotransferase alkaline phosphatase to be significantly higher (P = 0.0001) in the thorium-exposed workers when corrected for age, alcohol use and weight. The changes observed in liver function may be compatible with a toxic effect of thorium or daughter products on hepatocytes. The correlation of some hepatic function tests with body burden of radioactivity suggests a radiation effect of thorium although a chemical toxic effect cannot be ruled out and further investigation of chemical toxicity of rare earths are indicated.

  10. Active and uncontrolled asthma among children exposed to air stack emissions of sulphur dioxide from petroleum refineries in Montreal, Quebec: A cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Deger, Leylâ; Plante, Céline; Jacques, Louis; Goudreau, Sophie; Perron, Stéphane; Hicks, John; Kosatsky, Tom; Smargiassi, Audrey

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Little attention has been devoted to the effects on children’s respiratory health of exposure to sulphur dioxide (SO2) in ambient air from local industrial emissions. Most studies on the effects of SO2 have assessed its impact as part of the regional ambient air pollutant mix. OBJECTIVE: To examine the association between exposure to stack emissions of SO2 from petroleum refineries located in Montreal’s (Quebec) east-end industrial complex and the prevalence of active asthma and poor asthma control among children living nearby. METHODS: The present cross-sectional study used data from a respiratory health survey of Montreal children six months to 12 years of age conducted in 2006. Of 7964 eligible households that completed the survey, 842 children between six months and 12 years of age lived in an area impacted by refinery emissions. Ambient SO2 exposure levels were estimated using dispersion modelling. Log-binomial regression models were used to estimate crude and adjusted prevalence ratios (PRs) and 95% CIs for the association between yearly school and residential SO2 exposure estimates and asthma outcomes. Adjustments were made for child’s age, sex, parental history of atopy and tobacco smoke exposure at home. RESULTS: The adjusted PR for the association between active asthma and SO2 levels was 1.14 (95% CI 0.94 to 1.39) per interquartile range increase in modelled annual SO2. The effect on poor asthma control was greater (PR=1.39 per interquartile range increase in modelled SO2 [95% CI 1.00 to 1.94]). CONCLUSIONS: Results of the present study suggest a relationship between exposure to refinery stack emissions of SO2 and the prevalence of active and poor asthma control in children who live and attend school in proximity to refineries. PMID:22536578

  11. X-ray diffraction spectrometric analysis of nickel refinery aerosols, process materials and particulates isolated from worker lung tissues.

    PubMed

    Andersen, I; Svenes, Knut

    2003-04-01

    Results are reported of X-ray diffraction analysis of extracts derived from lungs of two nickel refinery workers and of three stationary air samples collected inside a nickel refinery. Since environmental samples from the 1950s and 1960s do not exist, two archived production control samples from that period were also analyzed. Because nickel has been found in respiratory tissue of workers retired for more than twenty years, it was likely that the residual nickel compounds must be rather insoluble. Preliminary surveys showed that sulfur was not present in the lung tissue deposits and thus water-soluble and sulfidic nickel were therefore extracted from the ten process samples before the X-ray analysis. A common compound that was found in all 10 samples was trevorite. This is a spinel-type mineral, much like magnetite where the divalent iron is replaced by nickel. It may be formed when trivalent iron reacts with nickel at 1100 degrees C. It has magnetic properties and is very insoluble. Samples from the lungs were obtained by burning off the organic tissue at 630 degrees C. Due to a relatively high detection limit for the X-ray diffraction technique, we were initially not able to detect any mineral nickel compound. But when particles extracted with a magnet were analyzed, a very clear diffraction pattern of trevorite was identified. The main residue after the magnetic separation had a low concentration of nickel (4 microg g(-1)), which suggests that trevorite was the dominating, if not the only, nickel compound present. In addition, chemical analyses were performed on 13 tissue samples from one single lung; one from each main bronchus, two from each lobe, and an additional one from the lower right lobe. Statistical testing showed a highly significant correlation between the five elements determined: Ni, Co, Cu, Fe and Cr. This suggests that these metals are isomorphous and substitute for each other in the mineral structure. These results may indicate that the nickel

  12. Congenital defects, abortion and other health effects in nickel refinery workers.

    PubMed

    Chashschin, V P; Artunina, G P; Norseth, T

    1994-06-01

    Health impairment was investigated by a thorough clinical investigation in a cross-sectional study of 821 male and 758 female workers in a nickel hydrometallurgy refining plant. The average nickel exposure levels were found to be around 0.2 mg/m3 in the electrolysis department and 0.13 mg/m3 in the electrolyte purification department. Corresponding average urinary values for nickel were 16 micrograms/l and 10 micrograms/l, respectively. The most common types of health impairment found were respiratory, skin and cardiovascular diseases. Health impairments, except for respiratory diseases, were found more often in females than in males. The design of the study does not allow comparison with a non-exposed population. Even if there are serious limitations in the statistical and sampling details of the pregnancies and new-born babies, the results suggest adverse health effects at usually accepted exposure levels to nickel. Normal pregnancies were reported in 29% of 356 pregnant nickel workers compared with 39% in 342 local construction workers. Spontaneous and threatening abortions were reported in 16% and 17% of all pregnancies in nickel-exposed workers, compared with 9% and 8%, respectively in the construction workers. Structural malformations were found in about 17% of alive-born infants with nickel-exposed mothers, compared with about 6% in the reference group. Significant increased risks of 2.9, 6.1 and 1.9 for total defects, cardiovascular defects and defects of the musculoskeletal system, respectively, were demonstrated. PMID:8029704

  13. Upper respiratory cancer among refinery and chemical plant workers: a case-control study in Baton Rouge, Louisiana

    SciTech Connect

    Soskolne, C.L.

    1982-01-01

    Upper respiratory cancer (URC) specific to workers employed on an ethanol unit at a large southern United States refinery and chemical plant was associated with exposure to strong concentrations of sulfuric acid used as a reactant in this process. The carcinogen implicated by indirect evidence was diethyl sulfate. However, additional URC cases were subsequently found that could not be associated with employment on the former ethanol unit. This fact, together with the continued use of sulfuric acid in strong, intermediate, and weak concentrations in the same industrial complex, motivated the present investigation. In particular, hypotheses concerning an association between laryngeal cancer and industrial exposure to the three concentrations of sulfuric acid present in the complex have been tested. The study is a multiple-matched case-control design with a minimum of three controls individually matched to each case on race, sex, date of birth, date of initial employment and duration of employment. Results indicate significant associations between sulfuric acid exposure and URC with odds ratio exceeding four. Strong collinearity among the three acid concentrations has rendered any separation of independent acid strength effects impossible. None of the other exposures examined in this study, including asbestos, nickel or wood dust, revealed significant associations. There is a strong possibility that the association is specific for laryngeal cancer.

  14. Optimization of two-step bioleaching of spent petroleum refinery catalyst by Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans using response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Srichandan, Haragobinda; Pathak, Ashish; Kim, Dong Jin; Lee, Seoung-Won

    2014-01-01

    A central composite design (CCD) combined with response surface methodology (RSM) was employed for maximizing bioleaching yields of metals (Al, Mo, Ni, and V) from as-received spent refinery catalyst using Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans. Three independent variables, namely initial pH, sulfur concentration, and pulp density were investigated. The pH was found to be the most influential parameter with leaching yields of metals varying inversely with pH. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) of the quadratic model indicated that the predicted values were in good agreement with experimental data. Under optimized conditions of 1.0% pulp density, 1.5% sulfur and pH 1.5, about 93% Ni, 44% Al, 34% Mo, and 94% V was leached from the spent refinery catalyst. Among all the metals, V had the highest maximum rate of leaching (Vmax) according to the Michaelis-Menten equation. The results of the study suggested that two-step bioleaching is efficient in leaching of metals from spent refinery catalyst. Moreover, the process can be conducted with as received spent refinery catalyst, thus making the process cost effective for large-scale applications.

  15. Refinery, petrochemical plant injuries decline

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-07-25

    The National Petroleum Refiners Association (NPRA) reports a 7% reduction in workplace injury and illness incidence rates for refineries in 1993, and a 21% decrease for petrochemical plants. The report summarizes data from 135 of the 162 US member refineries, and 117 of the 172 US member petrochemical plants. This paper summarizes the report findings.

  16. Multi-component assessment of worker exposures in a copper refinery. Part 2. Biological exposure indices for copper, nickel and cobalt.

    PubMed

    Nieboer, Evert; Thomassen, Yngvar; Romanova, Natalya; Nikonov, Alexander; Odland, Jon Øyvind; Chaschin, Valery

    2007-07-01

    Urinary copper (Cu), nickel (Ni) and cobalt (Co) concentrations were determined for 127 Cu refinery workers (40 females, 87 males), with values of the 95% upper confidence interval of the geometric mean in nmol per mmol creatinine of 89 (Ni), 42 (Cu) and 3.4 (Co) for electrorefinery workers. In the pyrometallurgical departments, the corresponding concentrations were 37 (Ni), 99 (Cu) and 11 (Co). Female workers had higher Co urinary concentrations than males (p< or = 0.05) while no gender difference was observed for Cu and Ni. Inter-elemental correlations were moderate to weak. Based on the inhalable aerosol levels reported previously for the same workers, the observed urinary Cu concentrations were considerably lower than expected, relative to Co and Ni. This is interpreted in terms of the current understanding of Cu homeostasis. PMID:17607390

  17. Role of natural attenuation, phytoremediation and hybrid technologies in the remediation of a refinery soil with old/recent petroleum hydrocarbons contamination.

    PubMed

    Couto, Maria Nazaré P F S; Pinto, Dorabela; Basto, M Clara P; Vasconcelos, Teresa S D

    2012-09-01

    Within a search for a biological remediation technology to remove petroleum hydrocarbons (PHC) from a contaminated soil from a refinery, the potential of monitored natural attenuation (MNA) was compared with the use of transplants of Cortaderia selloana both in the absence and in the presence of soil amendments. After 31 months of experiments, MNA was effective in removing most of the recent PHC contamination (50% of the initial total contamination) at 5-20 cm depth. The presence of weathered contamination explains the existence of an established community of PHC degraders, as can be inferred by the most probable number technique. C. selloana, in its turn, showed capacity to mobilize the most recalcitrant fraction of PHC to its roots, nevertheless masking its remediation capacity. The use of a hybrid technology (C. selloana together with treatments with a surfactant and a bioaugmentation product) improved the removal of PHC at 15-20 cm depth, the presence of C. selloana facilitating the migration of additives into the deeper layers of soil, which can be considered a secondary but positive role of the plant. In the surface soil layer, which was exposed to both microorganisms and the atmosphere, a further 20% of weathered PHC contamination disappeared (70% total removal) as a result of photo- and chemical degradation. Periodic revolving of the soil, like tillage, to expose all the contaminated soil to the atmosphere will therefore be a reliable option for reducing the contamination of the refinery soil if conditions (space and equipment) permit this operation.

  18. Determination of chromosome aberrations in workers in a petroleum refining factory.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yang Jee; Cho, Yoon Hee; Paek, Domyung; Chung, Hai Won

    2004-12-01

    Human exposure to benzene is derived occupationally from the petrochemical and petroleum refining industries. This study was performed to determine whether the frequencies of chromosome aberrations in workers exposed to low levels of benzene in a petroleum refining factory were elevated compared to an unexposed control group. The study population was comprised of 178 exposed workers and 36 unexposed workers. The frequencies of chromatid deletions and total chromosome aberrations in workers exposed to benzene were significantly higher compared to the unexposed control group. The frequency of total chromosome aberration was 4.20 per 500 metaphase cells in the exposed workers, whereas the frequency was 2.24 per 500 metaphase cells in the unexposed control group. The frequencies of total chromosome aberrations were significantly associated with benzene concentration after adjusting for confounding variables such as age, smoking status, and alcohol intake. The frequencies of chromosome aberrations were significantly increased in workers with low white blood cell counts (below 4000 cells/mm3) compared to those with high white blood cell counts (above 4000 cells/mm3). A reduced white blood cell count (below 4000/mm3) is suggestive of chronic exposure to benzene. In conclusion chronic benzene exposure and preclinical signs, such as reduced white blood cell counts, may be monitored by chromosome aberrations analysis.

  19. Organic constituents in sour condensates from shale-oil and petroleum-crude runs at Sohio's Toledo refinery: identification and wastewater-control-technology considerations

    SciTech Connect

    Wingender, R J; Harrison, W; Raphaelian, L A

    1981-02-01

    Samples of sour condensate generated from the continuous processing of both crude shale oil and petroleum crude were collected and extracted with methylene chloride. The extracts were analyzed using capillary-column gas chromatography/mass spectrometry at Argonne National Laboratory and Radian Corporation. Qualitatively, the predominant types of organic compounds present in the shale-oil sour condensate were pyridines and anilines; semiquantitatively, these compounds were present at a concentration of 5.7 ppM, or about 78% of the total concentration of components detected. In contrast, straight-chain alkanes were the predominant types of compounds found in the sour condensate produced during isocracking of conventional crude oil. The approximate concentration of straight-chain alkanes, 8.3 ppM, and of other branched and/or unsaturated hydrocarbons, 6.8 ppM, amounted to 88% of the total concentration of components detected in the sour condensate from the petroleum-crude run. Nitrogen compounds in the shale-oil sour condensate may necessitate alterations of the sour water and refinery wastewater-treatment facilities to provide for organics degradation and to accommodate the potentially greater ammonia loadings. This would include use of larger amounts of caustic to enhance ammonia removal by steam stripping. Possible problems associated with biological removal of organic-nitrogen compounds should be investigated in future experimental shale-oil refining runs.

  20. Gene expression profiles in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of Chinese nickel refinery workers with high exposures to nickel and control subjects

    PubMed Central

    Arita, Adriana; Muñoz, Alexandra; Chervona, Yana; Niu, Jingping; Qu, Qingshan; Zhao, Najuan; Ruan, Ye; Kiok, Kathrin; Kluz, Thomas; Sun, Hong; Clancy, Hailey A.; Shamy, Magdy; Costa, Max

    2012-01-01

    Background Occupational exposure to nickel (Ni) is associated with an increased risk of lung and nasal cancers. Ni compounds exhibit weak mutagenic activity, alter the cell’s epigenetic homeostasis, and activate signaling pathways. However, changes in gene expression associated with Ni exposure have only been investigated in vitro. This study was conducted in a Chinese population to determine whether occupational exposure to Ni was associated with differential gene expression profiles in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of Ni-refinery workers when compared to referents. Methods Eight Ni-refinery workers and ten referents were selected. PBMC RNA was extracted and gene expression profiling was performed using Affymetrix exon arrays. Differentially expressed genes between both groups were identified in a global analysis. Results There were a total of 2756 differentially expressed genes (DEG) in the Ni-refinery workers relative to the control subjects (FDR adjusted p<0.05) with 770 up-regulated genes and 1986 down-regulated genes. DNA repair and epigenetic genes were significantly overrepresented (p< 0.0002) among the DEG. Of 31 DNA repair genes, 29 were repressed in the high exposure group and two were overexpressed. Of the 16 epigenetic genes 12 were repressed in the high exposure group and 4 were overexpressed. Conclusions The results of this study indicate that occupational exposure to Ni is associated with alterations in gene expression profiles in PBMCs of subjects. Impact Gene expression may be useful in identifying patterns of deregulation that precede clinical identification of Ni-induced cancers. PMID:23195993

  1. Phylogenetic and functional diversity of metagenomic libraries of phenol degrading sludge from petroleum refinery wastewater treatment system

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    In petrochemical refinery wastewater treatment plants (WWTP), different concentrations of pollutant compounds are received daily in the influent stream, including significant amounts of phenolic compounds, creating propitious conditions for the development of particular microorganisms that can rapidly adapt to such environment. In the present work, the microbial sludge from a refinery WWTP was enriched for phenol, cloned into fosmid vectors and pyrosequenced. The fosmid libraries yielded 13,200 clones and a comprehensive bioinformatic analysis of the sequence data set revealed a complex and diverse bacterial community in the phenol degrading sludge. The phylogenetic analyses using MEGAN in combination with RDP classifier showed a massive predominance of Proteobacteria, represented mostly by the genera Diaphorobacter, Pseudomonas, Thauera and Comamonas. The functional classification of phenol degrading sludge sequence data set generated by MG-RAST showed the wide metabolic diversity of the microbial sludge, with a high percentage of genes involved in the aerobic and anaerobic degradation of phenol and derivatives. In addition, genes related to the metabolism of many other organic and xenobiotic compounds, such as toluene, biphenyl, naphthalene and benzoate, were found. Results gathered herein demonstrated that the phenol degrading sludge has complex phylogenetic and functional diversities, showing the potential of such community to degrade several pollutant compounds. This microbiota is likely to represent a rich resource of versatile and unknown enzymes which may be exploited for biotechnological processes such as bioremediation. PMID:22452812

  2. Injuries to international petroleum drilling workers, 1988 to 1990.

    PubMed

    McNabb, S J; Ratard, R C; Horan, J M; Farley, T A

    1994-06-01

    Nonfatal work-related injury (NFI) rates are 49% higher among oil and gas field workers than among workers in all US industries combined, and these injuries are more severe (the rate of lost workdays in the oil and gas field services industry is 2.8 times that of all US industries combined). We analyzed the 1988 to 1990 incident reports submitted by drilling companies to the International Association of Drilling Contractors, an industry-wide international trade association representing 95% of the world's oil and gas drilling companies. We determined geographic and occupation-specific incidence rates by full-time equivalents, calculated per job category and year. Of the 5,251 reports, 5,218 (99.4%) were of NFI and 33 (0.6%) of fatal work-related injuries (FI). The overall NFI rate was 1.2/100 full-time equivalents and the overall FI rate was 7.5/100,000 full-time equivalents. Reported NFI in US territory was 4 times more common than in non-US territory. Reported FI in US and non-US waters were 4 and 5 times more common than on land, respectively. Three job categories--floormen, roustabouts, and derrickmen--accounted for 74% of the NFI and 64% of FI, with a rate ratio, compared with rates for all other occupations, of 10.5, 8.5, and 7.0 for NFI and 5.0, 9.4, and 4.0 for FI. Among all occupations, the body part most frequently injured was the upper extremity (1,631/5,218 [31%]). The four key NFI types and circumstances identified included the upper extremities "caught in" (857/5,218 [16%]),the back "strained" (592/5,218[11%]), the lower extremities "struck by" (538/5,218 [10%]), and the lower extremities injured while "slipping" (402/5,218 [8%]). Results of these analyses revealed several high-risk occupations in this industry and identified high-risk activities that can be targeted for further study. PMID:8071724

  3. Injuries to international petroleum drilling workers, 1988 to 1990.

    PubMed

    McNabb, S J; Ratard, R C; Horan, J M; Farley, T A

    1994-06-01

    Nonfatal work-related injury (NFI) rates are 49% higher among oil and gas field workers than among workers in all US industries combined, and these injuries are more severe (the rate of lost workdays in the oil and gas field services industry is 2.8 times that of all US industries combined). We analyzed the 1988 to 1990 incident reports submitted by drilling companies to the International Association of Drilling Contractors, an industry-wide international trade association representing 95% of the world's oil and gas drilling companies. We determined geographic and occupation-specific incidence rates by full-time equivalents, calculated per job category and year. Of the 5,251 reports, 5,218 (99.4%) were of NFI and 33 (0.6%) of fatal work-related injuries (FI). The overall NFI rate was 1.2/100 full-time equivalents and the overall FI rate was 7.5/100,000 full-time equivalents. Reported NFI in US territory was 4 times more common than in non-US territory. Reported FI in US and non-US waters were 4 and 5 times more common than on land, respectively. Three job categories--floormen, roustabouts, and derrickmen--accounted for 74% of the NFI and 64% of FI, with a rate ratio, compared with rates for all other occupations, of 10.5, 8.5, and 7.0 for NFI and 5.0, 9.4, and 4.0 for FI. Among all occupations, the body part most frequently injured was the upper extremity (1,631/5,218 [31%]). The four key NFI types and circumstances identified included the upper extremities "caught in" (857/5,218 [16%]),the back "strained" (592/5,218[11%]), the lower extremities "struck by" (538/5,218 [10%]), and the lower extremities injured while "slipping" (402/5,218 [8%]). Results of these analyses revealed several high-risk occupations in this industry and identified high-risk activities that can be targeted for further study.

  4. Ability of fractionated petroleum refinery effluent to elicit cyto- and photocytotoxic responses and to induce 7-ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase activity in fish cell lines.

    PubMed

    Schirmer, K; Tom, D J; Bols, N C; Sherry, J P

    2001-04-23

    The ability of fractionated petroleum refinery effluent to cause cellular responses in fish cell lines was evaluated. The cellular responses, which included direct and indirect cytotoxicity, photocytotoxicity and induction of 7-ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD) activity, may potentially be linked to sublethal effects observed in effluent-exposed fish and fish larvae. In order to be able to quantify cellular responses rapidly, microtitre plates were used along with fluorescent probes. For the quantification of cyto- and photocytotoxicity, the fluorescent probes were alamar Blue and carboxyfluorescein diacetate acetoxymethyl ester (CFDA-AM), which monitor metabolic activity and cell membrane integrity, respectively. EROD activity was measured as the rate of conversion by EROD of the substrate 7-ethoxyresorufin to its fluorescent product, resorufin. Effluent from an Ontario refinery was fractionated into aqueous and particulate phase. As well, a solid phase extract (SPE) was used to prepare concentrated effluent for testing in the cell lines. The effluent was able to elicit all of the responses of interest although significant cyto- and photocytotoxicity required effluent equivalent concentrations above 100% effluent and could only be revealed upon exposure of cells to the SPE concentrated effluent. Based on their retention on C18, the cytotoxicants are likely to be non-polar to moderately polar chemicals. The presence of polar compounds affecting cellular metabolism was indicated by the responses of exposed cells to a 90% aqueous phase effluent. In contrast to cyto- and photocytotoxicity, EROD induction occurred at effluent equivalent concentrations well below 100% effluent and was elicited by the SPE and the particulate fraction thereby suggesting that most EROD-inducers were particle-bound. Among other applications, the described techniques could help to determine the source of causative agents of sublethal effects in the refining process.

  5. Treatment of petroleum refinery wastewater by distillation-assisted catalytic oxidation under low temperature and low pressure.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xiaoming; Li, Wenhong; Fu, Feng; Li, Dong; Cao, Zhenheng; Wang, Jiwu

    2011-01-01

    A distillation-assisted catalytic oxidation (DACO) process under low temperature (100 degrees C) and atmospheric pressure was investigated to treat heavily contaminated wastewater from oil refining industry. The DACO experiments were carried out in a distillation batch reactor, using CuO/gamma-A1(2)O3 as catalyst. The experimental temperature was kept at 100 degrees C and H2O2 oxidant was supplied into the reactive system with 200 mL/L. The results demonstrated that more than 92.2% of chemical oxygen demand removal was obtained and the absorbance of the refinery wastewater after treatment was zero, indicating significant decolorization efficiency for the solution. The research of life and stability showed that the catalyst had a good stability. The present study indicates that this DACO approach may have a significant application potential for industrial wastewater treatment.

  6. Treatment of petroleum refinery wastewater by distillation-assisted catalytic oxidation under low temperature and low pressure.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xiaoming; Li, Wenhong; Fu, Feng; Li, Dong; Cao, Zhenheng; Wang, Jiwu

    2011-01-01

    A distillation-assisted catalytic oxidation (DACO) process under low temperature (100 degrees C) and atmospheric pressure was investigated to treat heavily contaminated wastewater from oil refining industry. The DACO experiments were carried out in a distillation batch reactor, using CuO/gamma-A1(2)O3 as catalyst. The experimental temperature was kept at 100 degrees C and H2O2 oxidant was supplied into the reactive system with 200 mL/L. The results demonstrated that more than 92.2% of chemical oxygen demand removal was obtained and the absorbance of the refinery wastewater after treatment was zero, indicating significant decolorization efficiency for the solution. The research of life and stability showed that the catalyst had a good stability. The present study indicates that this DACO approach may have a significant application potential for industrial wastewater treatment. PMID:22049769

  7. Mortality and cancer morbidity in a cohort of Canadian petroleum workers

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, R; Schnatter, A; Drummond, I; Murray, N; Thompson, F; Katz, A; Jorgensen, G; Nicolich, M; Dahlman, D; Theriault, G

    2003-01-01

    Aims: To assess mortality and cancer morbidity in Canadian petroleum workers and explore exposure-response relations for specific petroleum agents. Methods: A total of 25 292 employees hired between 1964 and 1994 were linked to the Canadian tumour registry and national mortality database. Exposure-response trends were assessed for hydrocarbon solvents/fuels, hydrocarbon lubricants, petroleum coke/spent catalyst, and hydrogen sulphide (H2S). Results: External comparison analyses (mortality and incidence) showed deficits for all causes and all malignant neoplasms combined and were consistent with expectation for most malignant and non-malignant sites analysed. Gall bladder cancer mortality was increased among males based on four deaths, but cases had no common job assignments and the increase was focused in workers employed <10 years. Mesothelioma incidence was increased. Most exposure-specific analyses were compromised by small numbers. Statistically significant increases were observed for H2S exposure and a subgroup of accidental deaths as well as for petroleum coke/spent catalyst exposure and lung cancer. While both findings have a degree of biologic plausibility, the H2S association, which exhibited a clearer exposure-response pattern, could be subject to unmeasured confounders. Additionally, interpretation was complicated by the high correlation between hydrocarbon and H2S exposures. With regard to lung cancer, the analysis could not adequately control for smoking, was based on small numbers, and exhibited a tenuous exposure-response pattern. Conclusion: The findings for mesothelioma suggest the need for continued attention to asbestos in the petroleum industry. The relation between accidental deaths and H2S exposure deserves closer scrutiny in similarly exposed populations. Further analyses of lung cancer are underway and will be reported separately. PMID:14634182

  8. Treatment of petroleum refinery wastewater using a sequential anaerobic-aerobic moving-bed biofilm reactor system based on suspended ceramsite.

    PubMed

    Lu, Mang; Gu, Li-Peng; Xu, Wen-Hao

    2013-01-01

    In this study, a novel suspended ceramsite was prepared, which has high strength, optimum density (close to water), and high porosity. The ceramsite was used to feed a moving-bed biofilm reactor (MBBR) system with an anaerobic-aerobic (A/O) arrangement to treat petroleum refinery wastewater for simultaneous removal of chemical oxygen demand (COD) and ammonium. The hydraulic retention time (HRT) of the anaerobic-aerobic MBBR system was varied from 72 to 18 h. The anaerobic-aerobic system had a strong tolerance to shock loading. Compared with the professional emission standard of China, the effluent concentrations of COD and NH3-N in the system could satisfy grade I at HRTs of 72 and 36 h, and grade II at HRT of 18 h. The average sludge yield of the anaerobic reactor was estimated to be 0.0575 g suspended solid/g CODremoved. This work demonstrated that the anaerobic-aerobic MBBR system using the suspended ceramsite as bio-carrier could be applied to achieving high wastewater treatment efficiency. PMID:23656940

  9. Treatment of petroleum refinery wastewater using a sequential anaerobic-aerobic moving-bed biofilm reactor system based on suspended ceramsite.

    PubMed

    Lu, Mang; Gu, Li-Peng; Xu, Wen-Hao

    2013-01-01

    In this study, a novel suspended ceramsite was prepared, which has high strength, optimum density (close to water), and high porosity. The ceramsite was used to feed a moving-bed biofilm reactor (MBBR) system with an anaerobic-aerobic (A/O) arrangement to treat petroleum refinery wastewater for simultaneous removal of chemical oxygen demand (COD) and ammonium. The hydraulic retention time (HRT) of the anaerobic-aerobic MBBR system was varied from 72 to 18 h. The anaerobic-aerobic system had a strong tolerance to shock loading. Compared with the professional emission standard of China, the effluent concentrations of COD and NH3-N in the system could satisfy grade I at HRTs of 72 and 36 h, and grade II at HRT of 18 h. The average sludge yield of the anaerobic reactor was estimated to be 0.0575 g suspended solid/g CODremoved. This work demonstrated that the anaerobic-aerobic MBBR system using the suspended ceramsite as bio-carrier could be applied to achieving high wastewater treatment efficiency.

  10. Possible health effects of liquefied petroleum gas on workers at filling and distribution stations of Gaza governorates.

    PubMed

    Sirdah, M M; Al Laham, N A; El Madhoun, R A

    2013-03-01

    Liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) is widely used in the Gaza Strip for domestic purposes, in agriculture and industry and, illegally, in cars. This study aimed to identify possible health effects on workers exposed to LPG in Gaza governorates. Data were collected by a questionnaire interview, and haematological and biochemical analyses of venous blood samples were made from 30 workers at filling and distribution stations and 30 apparently healthy controls. Statistically significant differences were found in all self-reported health-related complaints among LPG workers versus controls. LPG workers had significantly higher values of red blood cell counts, haemoglobin, haematocrit mean corpuscular haemoglobin and platelet counts. They also had significantly higher values of kidney function tests (urea, creatinine and uric acid) and liver function enzyme activities (aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase). LPG workers at Gaza Strip petroleum stations are at higher risk for health-related symptoms and clinical abnormalities.

  11. Possible health effects of liquefied petroleum gas on workers at filling and distribution stations of Gaza governorates.

    PubMed

    Sirdah, M M; Al Laham, N A; El Madhoun, R A

    2013-03-01

    Liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) is widely used in the Gaza Strip for domestic purposes, in agriculture and industry and, illegally, in cars. This study aimed to identify possible health effects on workers exposed to LPG in Gaza governorates. Data were collected by a questionnaire interview, and haematological and biochemical analyses of venous blood samples were made from 30 workers at filling and distribution stations and 30 apparently healthy controls. Statistically significant differences were found in all self-reported health-related complaints among LPG workers versus controls. LPG workers had significantly higher values of red blood cell counts, haemoglobin, haematocrit mean corpuscular haemoglobin and platelet counts. They also had significantly higher values of kidney function tests (urea, creatinine and uric acid) and liver function enzyme activities (aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase). LPG workers at Gaza Strip petroleum stations are at higher risk for health-related symptoms and clinical abnormalities. PMID:23879082

  12. An updated study of mortality among workers at a petroleum manufacturing plant.

    PubMed

    Honda, Y; Delzell, E; Cole, P

    1995-02-01

    This study evaluated mortality among 9796 white male workers at a petroleum-manufacturing plant. The main purpose was to examine recent patterns in leukemia mortality, for which an increase had been reported in an earlier investigation. Compared to U.S. white men, the cohort had an excess of leukemia in 1940-1979 (38 observed/23 expected; standardized mortality ratio = 168; 95% confidence interval = 119-230). In the 1980s, there was a deficit of leukemia (8 observed/14 expected; standardized mortality ratio = 55; 95% confidence interval = 24-108). However, this was balanced by an excess of myelofibrosis and myelodysplasia (4 observed, < 1 expected). These results indicate that any occupational leukemogenic exposures at the plant have been reduced to a point at which they are insufficient to cause leukemia. Hourly workers also had an excess of deaths from mesothelioma in the 1980s (8 observed, about 2.5 expected), possibly because of exposure to asbestos in the past.

  13. Petroleum contamination impact on macrobenthic communities under the influence of an oil refinery: Integrating chemical and biological multivariate data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venturini, Natalia; Muniz, Pablo; Bícego, Márcia C.; Martins, César C.; Tommasi, Luiz Roberto

    2008-07-01

    Petroleum contamination impact on macrobenthic communities in the northeast portion of Todos os Santos Bay was assessed combining in multivariate analyses, chemical parameters such as aliphatic and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon indices and concentration ratios with benthic ecological parameters. Sediment samples were taken in August 2000 with a 0.05 m 2 van Veen grab at 28 sampling locations. The predominance of n-alkanes with more than 24 carbons, together with CPI values close to one, and the fact that most of the stations showed UCM/resolved aliphatic hydrocarbons ratios (UCM:R) higher than two, indicated a high degree of anthropogenic contribution, the presence of terrestrial plant detritus, petroleum products and evidence of chronic oil pollution. The indices used to determine the origin of PAH indicated the occurrence of a petrogenic contribution. A pyrolytic contribution constituted mainly by fossil fuel combustion derived PAH was also observed. The results of the stepwise multiple regression analysis performed with chemical data and benthic ecological descriptors demonstrated that not only total PAH concentrations but also specific concentration ratios or indices such as ≥C24:petroleum related variables seemed to have a main influence on macrofauna community structure. The PCA ordination performed with the chemical data resulted in the formation of three groups of stations. The decrease in macrofauna density, number of species and diversity from groups III to I seemed to be related to the occurrence of high aliphatic hydrocarbon and PAH concentrations associated with fine sediments. Our results showed that macrobenthic communities in the northeast portion of Todos os Santos Bay are subjected to the impact of chronic oil pollution as was reflected by the reduction in the number of species and diversity. These results

  14. Myelodysplastic Syndrome and Benzene Exposure Among Petroleum Workers: An International Pooled Analysis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Benzene at high concentrations is known to cause acute myeloid leukemia (AML), but its relationship with other lymphohematopoietic (LH) cancers remains uncertain, particularly at low concentrations. In this pooled analysis, we examined the risk of five LH cancers relative to lower levels of benzene exposure in petroleum workers. Methods We updated three nested case–control studies from Australia, Canada, and the United Kingdom with new incident LH cancers among petroleum distribution workers through December 31, 2006, and pooled 370 potential case subjects and 1587 matched LH cancer-free control subjects. Quantitative benzene exposure in parts per million (ppm) was blindly reconstructed using historical monitoring data, and exposure certainty was scored as high, medium, or low. Two hematopathologists assigned diagnoses and scored the certainty of diagnosis as high, medium, or low. Dose–response relationships were examined for five LH cancers, including the three most common leukemia cell-types (AML, chronic myeloid leukemia [CML], and chronic lymphoid leukemia [CLL]) and two myeloid tumors (myelodysplastic syndrome [MDS] and myeloproliferative disease [MPD]). Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using conditional logistic regression, controlling for age, sex, and time period. Results Cumulative benzene exposure showed a monotonic dose–response relationship with MDS (highest vs lowest tertile, >2.93 vs ≤0.348 ppm-years, OR = 4.33, 95% CI = 1.31 to 14.3). For peak benezene exposures (>3 ppm), the risk of MDS was increased in high and medium certainty diagnoses (peak exposure vs no peak exposure, OR = 6.32, 95% CI = 1.32 to 30.2) and in workers having the highest exposure certainty (peak exposure vs no peak exposure, OR = 5.74, 95% CI = 1.05 to 31.2). There was little evidence of dose–response relationships for AML, CLL, CML, or MPD. Conclusions Relatively low-level exposure to benzene experienced by petroleum

  15. Perceived mastery of work among shift workers in the Norwegian offshore petroleum industry.

    PubMed

    Ljoså, Cathrine Haugene; Tyssen, Reidar; Lau, Bjørn

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated associations between individual and work-related factors and perceived mastery of work among offshore shift workers. 2,406 employees of a Norwegian petroleum company were invited to participate. A web-based survey was used and 1336 completed questionnaires were returned (56%). Mastery of work was assessed using QPS Nordic Mastery Scale and the results were compared with a sample from the QPS Nordic study. Individual factors adjusted for were age, gender, marital status and personality. The following work-related factors were included: demands, control, support, night work and shift work home interference. Female offshore shift workers reported higher levels of perceived mastery of work compared with women in the comparison sample. The following variables were independently associated with perceived mastery of work: female gender (β=0.10, p=0.008), decisional demands (β=0.13, p<0.001), control (β=0.05, p=0.009), social support (β=0.07, p<0.001), shift-work locus of control (β=0.04, p=0.005) and neuroticism (β=-0.29, p<0.001). Post hoc analyses showed no sex differences in perceived mastery in two separate work positions on the platforms. Work-related variables and personality explained 55% and 45% respectively of the total variance (R(2)=0.22) explained by the final model. Female petroleum offshore workers reported somewhat higher levels of mastery of work than their male colleagues, however, this may be due to different work positions. Work-related factors accounted for about half of the explained variance and decisional demands, control and support remained statistically significant after controlling for personality.

  16. Perceived mastery of work among shift workers in the Norwegian offshore petroleum industry.

    PubMed

    Ljoså, Cathrine Haugene; Tyssen, Reidar; Lau, Bjørn

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated associations between individual and work-related factors and perceived mastery of work among offshore shift workers. 2,406 employees of a Norwegian petroleum company were invited to participate. A web-based survey was used and 1336 completed questionnaires were returned (56%). Mastery of work was assessed using QPS Nordic Mastery Scale and the results were compared with a sample from the QPS Nordic study. Individual factors adjusted for were age, gender, marital status and personality. The following work-related factors were included: demands, control, support, night work and shift work home interference. Female offshore shift workers reported higher levels of perceived mastery of work compared with women in the comparison sample. The following variables were independently associated with perceived mastery of work: female gender (β=0.10, p=0.008), decisional demands (β=0.13, p<0.001), control (β=0.05, p=0.009), social support (β=0.07, p<0.001), shift-work locus of control (β=0.04, p=0.005) and neuroticism (β=-0.29, p<0.001). Post hoc analyses showed no sex differences in perceived mastery in two separate work positions on the platforms. Work-related variables and personality explained 55% and 45% respectively of the total variance (R(2)=0.22) explained by the final model. Female petroleum offshore workers reported somewhat higher levels of mastery of work than their male colleagues, however, this may be due to different work positions. Work-related factors accounted for about half of the explained variance and decisional demands, control and support remained statistically significant after controlling for personality. PMID:23095327

  17. Pulmonary fibrosis in cable plant workers exposed to mist and vapor of petroleum distillates

    SciTech Connect

    Skyberg, K.; Roenneberg, A.; Kamoey, J.I.; Dale, K.; Borgersen, A.

    1986-08-01

    Twenty-five cable plant workers exposed to mists and vapors of mineral oils and kerosene for 5-35 years have investigated in a cross-sectional, matched pairs study. The exposed cohort and the referents were examined by radiology, pulmonary function measurements, and a questionnaire for symptoms of respiratory disease. Lung tissue from a deceased worker with 35 years of exposure was investigated by histopathologic methods and by scanning electron microscopy. Exposure measurements were performed by personal sampling. Previous employment and smoking habits were recorded for all subjects. An increased prevalence of slight basal lung fibrosis was found in chest films of the exposed workers. Pulmonary fibrosis was confirmed histopathologically. A moderately decreased vital capacity (VC) and forced expiratory volume (FEV/sub 1/) was found. Oil mist was measured to time-weighted average levels of 0.15-0.30 mg/m/sup 3/ with short-term vapor exposure of up to 4000 mg/m/sup 3/. It is concluded that mists and vapors from petroleum distillates are the most probable caused of the findings.

  18. [Evaluation of the senses of taste and smell in petroleum chemistry workers based on 3-year observations].

    PubMed

    Latkowski, B; Zalewski, P; Najwer, K; Zbrzezny, K; Czyzewski, I

    1981-01-01

    The authors have presented results of examinations of the smell and taste senses in 547 petrochemistry, workers, and 100 cotton industry workers composing a control group. In both groups, those aged 26 -- 35, with long duration of employment, predominated. In the primary group i.e. petroleum chemistry workers, dysgeusia has been found in 319 (58.3%) subjects with no reaction at all in 102 (18.6%) persons. Hyposmia has been found in 238 (43.5%) and anosmia in 50 (9.2%) subjects. In the control group, dysgeusia has been found in 69%, whereas anosmia in 24% of subjects. PMID:7289861

  19. Identification of awkward postures that cause discomfort to Liquid Petroleum Gas workers in Mumbai, India

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, Salian Shivani; Boricha, Jinal; Yardi, Sujata

    2012-01-01

    Background: Awkward, extreme and repetitive postures have been associated with work related musculoskeletal discomfort and injury to the lower back. Liquid Petroleum Gas (LPG) workers in India; that is the delivery men carry heavy cylinders on their shoulders and back. The cylinders come in commercial and residential form which range in weight from 14.2kgs, 16.2kgs, 19.2kgs, 32kgs, 40 kgs etc. They have a tedious schedule of 8 h/day and mostly associated with loading and unloading of the cylinders. Their job demands a high intensity of strength and power. They are exposed to high level of physical demands and relatively lesser amount of rest which makes them vulnerable to various injuries over a period of time. Materials and Methods: 100 LPG workers (delivery men) were interviewed using the Ovako work assessment system OWAS posture code and action category system developed by ISMAIL et al.[10] was used. A battery of questions with specific stress was constructed and validated in the Department of Physiotherapy, Padmashree Dr D.Y Patil University, Nerul, Navi Mumbai, India. Results: This study presented an ergonomic assessment of LPG workers. The results show that the workers work in awkward postures. They transfer the cylinders in poor postures with high velocity and motion repetitiveness thus subjecting their spine to greater amounts of compressive forces. Regarding to work discomfort survey questionnaire, the postures cause ill effects on their various body segments. Among them 90% fall in category 4 while loading the cylinder, that is the load by those postures have a very harmful effect on musculoskeletal, system-corrective action for improvement required immediately. And while unloading 70% fall in category 3, which are postures that have harmful effect on musculoskeletal system. Corrective actions should be done as soon as possible. Majority of workers also complained of severe injury to back-34%, shoulder-20%, knee-20%, neck-16%, and toes-10%. Conclusion

  20. Petroleum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McManus, T. R.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    This review of petroleum covers: crude oil; fuels, gaseous and liquid; lubricants, oils, and greases; asphalts, bitumens, tars, and pitches; hydrocarbons; physical properties; metals in oil; nonmetallic elements and heterocompounds; and analytical methods and apparatus. (MVL)

  1. Preparation, characterization and photocatalytic application of TiO2/Fe-ZSM-5 nanocomposite for the treatment of petroleum refinery wastewater: Optimization of process parameters by response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Ghasemi, Zahra; Younesi, Habibollah; Zinatizadeh, Ali Akbar

    2016-09-01

    Photocatalytic degradation of organic contaminants from petroleum refinery wastewater under UV and sunlight was investigated by immobilizing nanosized TiO2 photocatalyst into the structure of as-synthesized Fe-ZSM-5 zeolite via sol-gel method. Pure phase of TiO2/Fe-ZSM-5 photocatalyst with specific surface area of 304.6 m(2) g(-1) and loaded TiO2 of 29.28% was successfully synthesized. Effects of various operational parameters on treatment process were investigated by use of Response Surface Methodology (RSM). Maximum reduction of 80% COD was achieved at pH of 4, a photocatalyst concentration of 2.1 g l(-1), temperature of 45 °C and UV exposure time of 240 min. Gas chromatography-mass demonstrated an apparent shift in molecular weight from a higher fraction to a lower fraction even under sunlight. It is expected that the prepared photocatalyst is able to use ultraviolet and visible light energy. Results indicated that removal of COD degradation did not decrease as the reuse cycle of photocatalyst increased. Moreover, the potential to use sunlight energy and the simplicity of operation make photocatalysis an attractive prospect in terms of petroleum refinery wastewater treatment. PMID:27341159

  2. Preparation, characterization and photocatalytic application of TiO2/Fe-ZSM-5 nanocomposite for the treatment of petroleum refinery wastewater: Optimization of process parameters by response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Ghasemi, Zahra; Younesi, Habibollah; Zinatizadeh, Ali Akbar

    2016-09-01

    Photocatalytic degradation of organic contaminants from petroleum refinery wastewater under UV and sunlight was investigated by immobilizing nanosized TiO2 photocatalyst into the structure of as-synthesized Fe-ZSM-5 zeolite via sol-gel method. Pure phase of TiO2/Fe-ZSM-5 photocatalyst with specific surface area of 304.6 m(2) g(-1) and loaded TiO2 of 29.28% was successfully synthesized. Effects of various operational parameters on treatment process were investigated by use of Response Surface Methodology (RSM). Maximum reduction of 80% COD was achieved at pH of 4, a photocatalyst concentration of 2.1 g l(-1), temperature of 45 °C and UV exposure time of 240 min. Gas chromatography-mass demonstrated an apparent shift in molecular weight from a higher fraction to a lower fraction even under sunlight. It is expected that the prepared photocatalyst is able to use ultraviolet and visible light energy. Results indicated that removal of COD degradation did not decrease as the reuse cycle of photocatalyst increased. Moreover, the potential to use sunlight energy and the simplicity of operation make photocatalysis an attractive prospect in terms of petroleum refinery wastewater treatment.

  3. The relationship between low-level benzene exposure and leukemia in Canadian petroleum distribution workers.

    PubMed Central

    Schnatter, A R; Armstrong, T W; Thompson, L S; Nicolich, M J; Katz, A M; Huebner, W W; Pearlman, E D

    1996-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the relationship between leukemia occurrence and long-term, low-level benzene exposures in petroleum distribution workers. Fourteen cases were identified among a previously studied cohort [Schnatter et al., Environ Health Perspect 101 (Suppl 6):85-89 (1993)]. Four controls per case were selected from the same cohort, controlling for birth year and time at risk. Industrial hygienists estimated workplace exposures for benzene, without knowledge of case-control status. Average benzene concentrations ranged from 0.01 to 6.2 ppm. Company medical records were used to abstract information on other potential confounders such as cigarette smoking. Odds ratios were calculated for several exposure metrics. Conditional logistic regression modeling was used to control for potential confounders. The risk of leukemia was not associated with increasing cumulative exposure to benzene for these exposure levels. Duration of benzene exposure was more closely associated with leukemia risk than other exposure metrics, although results were not statistically significant. A family history of cancer and cigarette smoking were the two strongest risk factors for leukemia, with cumulative benzene exposure showing no additional risk when considered in the same models. This study is consistent with other data in that it was unable to demonstrate a relationship between leukemia and long-term, low-level benzene exposures. The power of the study was limited. Thus, further study on benzene exposures in this concentration range are warranted. PMID:9118923

  4. Lymphohaematopoietic malignancies and quantitative estimates of exposure to benzene in Canadian petroleum distribution workers.

    PubMed Central

    Schnatter, A R; Armstrong, T W; Nicolich, M J; Thompson, F S; Katz, A M; Huebner, W W; Pearlman, E D

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the relation between mortality from lymphohaematopoietic cancer and long term, low level exposures to benzene among male petroleum distribution workers. METHODS: This nested case control study identified all fatal cases of lymphohaematopoietic cancer among a previously studied cohort. Of the 29 cases, 14 had leukaemia, seven multiple myeloma, and eight non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. A four to one matching ratio was used to select a stratified sample of controls from the same cohort, controlling for year of birth and time at risk. Industrial hygienists estimated workplace exposures for benzene and total hydrocarbons, without knowledge of case or control status, for combinations of job, location, and era represented in all work histories. Average daily benzene concentrations ranged from 0.01 to 6.2 parts per million (ppm) for all jobs. Company medical records were used to abstract information on other potential confounders such as cigarette smoking, although the data were incomplete. Odds ratios (ORs) were calculated with conditional logistic regression techniques for several exposure variables. RESULTS: Risks of leukaemia, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, and multiple myeloma were not associated with increasing cumulative exposure to benzene or total hydrocarbons. For leukaemia, the logistic regression model predicted an OR of 1.002 (P < 0.77) for each ppm-y of exposure to benzene. Duration of exposure to benzene was more closely associated with risk of leukaemia than other exposure variables. It was not possible to completely control for other risk factors, although there was suggestive evidence that smoking and a family history of cancer may have played a part in the risk of leukaemia. CONCLUSION: This study did not show a relation between lymphohaematopoietic cancer and long term, low level exposures to benzene. The power of the study to detect low-such as twofold-risks was limited. Thus, further study on exposures to benzene in this concentration range

  5. A case-control study to investigate the association between exposure to benzene and deaths from leukaemia in oil refinery workers.

    PubMed Central

    Rushton, L.; Alderson, M. R.

    1981-01-01

    All deaths with a mention of leukaemia on the death certificate, in men employed over a period of 25 years of 8 oil refineries in the U.K. were identified. The potential benzene exposure of these cases was compared with that of two sets of controls selected from the total refinery population. One set of controls was matched for refinery and year of birth, the other set was matched for refinery, year of birth nd length of service. No information was available on measurement of benzene in the work environment but a job history was obtained from refinery personnel records for all cases and controls. This was used to allocate each man to a benzene exposure level of "low", "medium", or "high". There was no overall excess of deaths from leukaemia when compared with the expectation from national rates. There was also no excess of cytological types of leukaemia which have been shown to be particularly associated with benzene exposure. However, the risk for those men with medium or high exposure relative to the risk for those with low benzene exposure approached a significance (P=0.05) when length of service was taken into account. If there were an increased risk of leukaemia due to benzene exposure, it could have only been one that affected a very small proportion of men within the refinery workforce. PMID:7459242

  6. 77 FR 29362 - Conocophillips Company, Trainer Refinery, Trainer, PA; Notice of Affirmative Determination...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-17

    ... Employment and Training Administration Conocophillips Company, Trainer Refinery, Trainer, PA; Notice of... former workers of ConocoPhillips Company, Trainer Refinery, Trainer, Pennsylvania (subject firm). The... on February 28, 2012 (77 FR 12084). The initial investigation resulted in a negative...

  7. Short-Term Energy Outlook Model Documentation: Petroleum Products Supply Module

    EIA Publications

    2013-01-01

    The Petroleum Products Supply Module of the Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO) model provides forecasts of petroleum refinery inputs (crude oil, unfinished oils, pentanes plus, liquefied petroleum gas, motor gasoline blending components, and aviation gasoline blending components) and refinery outputs (motor gasoline, jet fuel, distillate fuel, residual fuel, liquefied petroleum gas, and other petroleum products).

  8. Simultaneous speciation of arsenic (As(III), MMA, DMA, and As(V)) and selenium (Se(IV), Se(VI), and SeCN-) in petroleum refinery aqueous streams.

    PubMed

    Tonietto, Gisele B; Godoy, José M; Oliveira, Ana Cristina; de Souza, Marcia V

    2010-07-01

    High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) coupled to an ICP-MS with an octapole reaction system (ORS) has been used to carry out quantitative speciation of selenium (Se) and arsenic (As) in the stream waters of a refining process. The argon dimers interfering with the (78)Se and (80)Se isotopes were suppressed by pressurizing the octapole chamber with 3.1 mL min(-1) H(2) and 0.5 mL min(-1) He. Four arsenic species arsenite--As(III), arsenate (As(V)), monomethylarsonic acid (MMA), and dimethylarsinic acid (DMA)--and three inorganic Se species--selenite Se(IV), selenate Se(VI), and selenocyanate (SeCN(-))--were separated in a single run by ion chromatography (IC) using gradient elution with 100 mmol L(-1) NH(4)NO(3), pH 8.5, adjusted by addition of NH(3), as eluent. Repeatabilities of peak position and of peak area evaluation were better than 1% and about 3%, respectively. Detection limits (as 3sigma of the baseline noise) were 81, 56, and 75 ng L(-1) for Se(IV), Se(VI), and SeCN(-), respectively, and 22, 19, 25, and 16 ng L(-1) for As(III), As(V), MMA, and DMA, respectively. Calibration curve R (2) values ranged between 0.996 and 0.999 for the arsenic and selenium species. Column recovery for ion chromatography was calculated to be 97 +/- 6% for combined arsenic species and 98 +/- 3% for combined selenium species. Because certified reference materials for As and Se speciation studies are still not commercially available, in order to check accuracy and precision the method was applied to certified reference materials, BCR 714, BCR 1714, and BCR 715 and to two different refinery samples--inlet and outlet wastewater. The method was successfully used to study the quantitative speciation of selenium and arsenic in petroleum refinery wastewaters.

  9. Genotoxicity of samples of nickel refinery dust.

    PubMed

    Clemens, Farrah; Landolph, Joseph R

    2003-05-01

    At the International Nickel Company (INCO) nickel refinery in Clydach, Wales, U.K., which has operated since 1901, 365 respiratory cancers, including 85 nasal cancers and 280 lung cancers, have occurred in workers since the 1920s. From 1901 to 1923, incidences of these cancers were high. In 1923, the refining process was changed, eliminating a nickel arsenide, Ni5As2, called orcelite, from the refinery. Incidences of respiratory cancers decreased substantially from 1925 to 1930. Refinery dust samples were obtained in 1920 and in 1929; both of these samples contain primarily nickel oxide (NiO), but the 1920 sample also contains orcelite. The orcelite content of the 1920 sample is approximately 10%, while that of the 1929 sample is approximately 1%. We hypothesized that orcelite in the 1920 sample was partially responsible for inducing nasal and lung cancers in the refinery workers, and we tested this hypothesis. The 1920 and 1929 samples and orcelite were phagocytosed by cultured C3H/10T1/2 Cl 8 (10T1/2) mouse embryo cells to similar extents and were similarly cytotoxic to 10T1/2 cells. The 1920 sample and orcelite induced dose-dependent morphological transformation of 10T1/2 cells; the 1929 sample did not. The cell transforming ability of the 1920 sample, and therefore its probable carcinogenicity, correlates with induction of respiratory cancers in refinery workers exposed to orcelite-containing nickel refinery dust before 1923. Inability of the 1929 sample to induce morphological transformation correlates with decreased human respiratory tumor incidence at this plant after 1923. This data supports our hypothesis that orcelite in the 1920 refinery sample contributed to its carcinogenicity to nickel refinery workers. PMID:12657748

  10. Mortality among three refinery/petrochemical plant cohorts. II. Retirees.

    PubMed

    Gamble, J F; Lewis, R J; Jorgensen, G

    2000-07-01

    This study updates mortality data for 6238 retirees from three refinery/petrochemical plants. Almost 90% of the cohort was deceased. Deaths from all causes (standardized mortality ratio, 104; 95% confidence interval, 102 to 107) and all cancers (standardized mortality ratio, 109; 95% confidence interval, 102 to 116) were elevated. Increased deaths due to kidney cancer, mesothelioma, and the category of other lymphohemopoietic cancers also were observed. The rate of leukemia was not increased. There was little internal or external consistency to support an occupational relationship for kidney cancer, but findings for mesothelioma and other lymphohemopoietic cancers are consistent with reports for other petroleum cohorts. Analyses by age indicated significantly higher all-cause mortality rates among persons retiring before age 65. The results suggest that continued surveillance of mesothelioma and lymphohemopoietic cancer malignancies in younger workers with more contemporary exposures may be warranted. Furthermore, age at retirement should be considered when analyzing occupational cohorts.

  11. Refinery siting workbook: appendices C to O

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-07-01

    Applicable laws and permits available for the selection and building of petroleum refineries are enclosed. A glossary of pertinent terms is also included. References related to the National Environmental Policy Act, the Clean Air Act, the Federal Water Pollution Control Act, Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, Toxic Substance Control Act, and Wetlands and Coastal Zone are included. Permit information is also presented. (DC)

  12. Cancer mortality patterns by work category in three Texas oil refineries.

    PubMed

    Thomas, T L; Waxweiler, R J; Crandall, M S; White, D W; Moure-Eraso, R; Fraumeni, J F

    1984-01-01

    A previous proportionate mortality ratio analysis revealed elevated mortality from brain tumors, stomach cancer, leukemia, and other cancers among OCAW members employed in three Texas oil refineries. In order to evaluate these findings, complete work histories of cases and a matched set of controls who died from other causes of death were obtained from company personnel records. Work histories were summarized by classifying each job title and department entry into one of several broad work categories of refinery unit operations. A worker was considered "exposed" to a work category if he was known to have worked at least 1 day in the category 15 or more years prior to his death. Maximum likelihood estimates of the relative risk for brain tumor, stomach cancer, and leukemia were calculated by work category using a procedure for matched case-control data. No strong associations for brain tumor risk were seen with any work categories. A slight association for leukemia was seen among workers in the Treating category, which included unit operations that reduce the level of aromatic and sulfur constituents of petroleum products and combine them with additives to improve their quality. Stomach cancer risk was elevated among maintenance workers and workers exposed to lubricating oils and paraffin wax processing. PMID:6741944

  13. Kyrgyzstan starts up its first refinery

    SciTech Connect

    McLeod, G.

    1997-05-05

    The Central Asian republic of Kyrgyzstan started up its first oil refinery in October 1996. The 10,000 b/d plant is designed to produce gasoline, diesel, and mazut (heavy fuel oil) from local Kyrgyz crude. Before construction of the Jalalabad refinery, all finished petroleum products were imported from neighboring countries. Kyrgyzstan`s demand for finished products is about 40,000 b/d. The new refinery was designed and constructed by Petrofac of Tyler, Texas, on behalf of Kyrgoil Corp., Calgary. Kyrgoil is a partner with the Kyrgyz state oil company, Kyrgyzsneft, in a venture called Kyrzgyz Petroleum Co. (KPC). KPC has undertaken restoration and continued development of the oil fields in Kyrgyzstan`s Fergana basin, in addition to the refinery project. The company also has marketing rights for finished products within Kyrgyzstan. The refinery comprises: a hydroskimming (atmospheric distillation) section, diesel steam stripping, gasoline blending, and utilities and off-sites, including steam generation, power generation, tank farm, truck and rail tank-car loading and unloading facilities, crude inlet pipeline, high-voltage power line, substation, air compression, laboratory, and maintenance facilities.

  14. [Epidemiological data on precancerous conditions and neoplasms among workers in the petroleum-refining industry].

    PubMed

    Saprykina, A G

    1990-01-01

    A prospective cohort research revealed an increased morbidity level among oil-processing workers with chronic pretumour diseases (chronic bronchitis, anacid gastritis, ailments of the larynx and skin, diseases of cervix uteri, benign tumour of the uterus and pretumour mammary gland diseases). Statistically reliable data have been received with regard to lung cancer mortality of males in the sample cohort, and lung and cervix uteri cancer mortality of females, as well as the risk factors of lung, larynx and skin cancer in males, and lung and large intestine cancer in females,--all in comprison with workers who have no contact with oil-processing products.

  15. The effect of hydraulic retention time on the performance and fouling characteristics of membrane sequencing batch reactors used for the treatment of synthetic petroleum refinery wastewater.

    PubMed

    Shariati, Seyed Ramin Pajoum; Bonakdarpour, Babak; Zare, Nasim; Ashtiani, Farzin Zokaee

    2011-09-01

    The use of membrane sequencing batch reactors, operated at HRT of 8, 16 and 24h, was considered for the treatment of a synthetic petroleum wastewater. Increase in HRT resulted in statistically significant decrease in MLSS. Removal efficiencies higher than 97% were found for the three model hydrocarbon pollutants at all HRTs, with air stripping making a small contribution to overall removal. Particle size distribution (PSD) and microscopic analysis showed reduction in the protozoan populations in the activated sludge with decreasing HRT. PSD analysis also showed a higher proportion of larger and smaller sized particles at the lowest HRT. The rate of membrane fouling was found to increase with decreasing HRT; SMP, especially carbohydrate SMP, and mixed liquor apparent viscosity also showed a pronounced increase with decreasing HRT, whereas the concentration of EPS and its components decreased. FTIR analysis identified organic compounds as the main component of membrane pore fouling.

  16. 76 FR 50214 - Mandan, Hidatsa and Arikara (MHA) Nation's Refinery, Notice of Availability of the Record of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-12

    ...,000 barrels-per-day petroleum refinery on the Fort Berthold Indian Reservation near Makoti in North Dakota. The refinery will produce diesel fuel, gasoline and propane. The NPDES permit will be for surface... AGENCY Mandan, Hidatsa and Arikara (MHA) Nation's Refinery, Notice of Availability of the Record...

  17. [The level of mercapturic acids in the urine of workers in the petroleum refining industry].

    PubMed

    Benchev, I; Khristeva, V; Mukhtarova, M

    1991-01-01

    Examination are carried out on 236 workers from three productions of oil-processing industry, who are exposed to the effect of hydrocarbons--saturated from the ethylene order, saturated (benzine), aromatic and sulphuric compounds--sulphur-containing organic, hydrogen sulphide, sulphur dioxide. The purpose of the study is to establish the risk of exposure to alkylating agents, which are potentially cancerogenic and mutagenic. Leading noxa in the production of high-octane aviation benzine (production "sulfur acidic alkylation", are the sulphur containing organic compounds, hydrogen sulphide, and in some working places--hydrocarbons (benzine and aromatic); in the production of "Ethylene" and "Polypropylene" leading noxae are the saturated hydrocarbons, and the sulphur-containing organic compounds as well as the unsaturated hydrocarbons (ethylene and propylene). The mercapturic acids in urine are determined after the method of Malonova and Bardoday (1983), and the creatinine by the Böringer test. Tobacco smoking and taking of drugs is also considered when data processing. A control group of 30 persons is also examined. In the workers from the 3 enterprises the average values of mercapturic acids in smokers and non-smokers are higher than that of the control group. The differences are statistically significant in the group of non-smokers. The highest per cent of workers with increased content of mercapturic acids (above 8 mumol/mmol creatinine) is established in the production of "Polypropylene".

  18. Petroleum supply annual 1996: Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    1997-06-01

    The Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA) contains information on the supply and disposition of crude oil and petroleum products. The publication reflects data that were collected from the petroleum industry during 1996 through annual and monthly surveys. The PSA is divided into two volumes. This first volume contains three sections: Summary Statistics, Detailed Statistics, and Refinery Capacity; each with final annual data. The summary statistics section show 16 years of data depicting the balance between supply, disposition and ending stocks for various commodities including crude oil, motor gasoline, distillate fuel oil, residual fuel oil, jet fuel propane/propylene, and liquefied petroleum gases. The detailed statistics section provide 1996 detailed statistics on supply and disposition, refinery operations, imports and exports, stocks, and transportation of crude oil and petroleum products. The refinery capacity contain listings of refineries and associated crude oil distillation and downstream capacities by State, as of January 1, 1997, as well as summaries of corporate refinery capacities and refinery storage capacities. In addition, refinery receipts of crude oil by method of transportation for 1996 are provided. Also included are fuels consumed at refineries, and lists of shutdowns, sales, reactivations, and mergers during 1995 and 1996. 16 figs., 59 tabs.

  19. Petroleum: An energy profile, 1999

    SciTech Connect

    1999-07-01

    This report prepared by the Energy Information Administration covers the following topics: petroleum production and end-use sectors; resources and reserves; exploration and production; LPG sources and processing; motor gasoline octane enhancement; constructing pipelines; the strategic petroleum reserve; imports and exports; marketing; district descriptions and maps; and refinery processes and facilities. 33 figs., 7 tabs.

  20. Partial oxidation of heavy refinery fractions

    SciTech Connect

    Dille, R.M.; Rhodes, H.A.; Wallon, S.B.

    1984-07-31

    This is a partial oxidation process in which heavy hydrocarbonaceous fractions from a petroleum refinery and light liquid paraffinic hydrocarbon extractants are used in the production of synthesis gas, reducing gas, or fuel gas i.e., gaseous mixtures comprising H/sub 2/ and CO. In the process, substantially all of the particulate carbon and soot that are simultaneously produced are recovered and recycled to the reaction zone. A dispersion of carbon-soot-light paraffinic hydrocarbon extractant from the decanting zone is combined with a heavy refinery fraction in admixture with a liquid aromatic-rich hydrocarbon to produce a pumpable single liquid phase mixture which is introduced into a fractionation zone where the following streams are separated from each other: (a) a stream of light paraffinic hydrocarbon extractant which is recycled to the decanting zone, (b) a stream comprising at least a portion of the aromatic-rich hydrocarbon which is recycled for mixing with the heavy refinery fraction, and (c) a stream of pumpable dispersion of carbon-soot heavy refinery fraction and any remaining aromatic-rich hydrocarbon which may be used as fuel in the system or exported. Troublesome asphaltene precipitation that causes operational problems and increased viscosity is avoided by the subject process. Comparatively low cost heavy refinery fractions which ordinarily are difficult to handle may be now used along with light liquid paraffinic hydrocarbon extractants.

  1. Atmospheric concentrations of saturated and aromatic hydrocarbons around a Greek oil refinery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalabokas, P. D.; Hatzianestis, J.; Bartzis, J. G.; Papagiannakopoulos, P.

    Petroleum refineries are large industrial installations that are responsible for the emission of several pollutants into the atmosphere. Hydrocarbons are among the most important air pollutants that are emitted by petroleum refineries, since they are involved in almost every refinery process. The ambient air concentrations of many saturated and aromatic hydrocarbons were measured in several sites around an oil refinery, near the city of Corinth in Greece, during 1997. At the same time several meteorological parameters were also recorded. The seasonal, diurnal and spatial variations of the ambient air concentrations of these hydrocarbons were investigated and analyzed. An estimation of the contribution of the refinery to the measured atmospheric levels of hydrocarbons was also performed. The ambient air mixing ratios of the saturated and aromatic hydrocarbons in a large area outside the refinery were generally low, in ppbv range, much lower than the ambient air quality standards or the ambient air concentrations in the two largest urban centers in Greece, Athens and Thessaloniki.

  2. Optimal Design of Air Quality Monitoring Network and its Application in an Oil Refinery Plant: An Approach to Keep Health Status of Workers

    PubMed Central

    ZoroufchiBenis, Khaled; Fatehifar, Esmaeil; Ahmadi, Javad; Rouhi, Alireza

    2015-01-01

    Background: Industrial air pollution is a growing challenge to humane health, especially in developing countries, where there is no systematic monitoring of air pollution. Given the importance of the availability of valid information on population exposure to air pollutants, it is important to design an optimal Air Quality Monitoring Network (AQMN) for assessing population exposure to air pollution and predicting the magnitude of the health risks to the population. Methods: A multi-pollutant method (implemented as a MATLAB program) was explored for configur­ing an AQMN to detect the highest level of pollution around an oil refinery plant. The method ranks potential monitoring sites (grids) according to their ability to represent the ambient concentration. The term of cluster of contiguous grids that exceed a threshold value was used to calculate the Station Dosage. Selection of the best configuration of AQMN was done based on the ratio of a sta­tion’s dosage to the total dosage in the network. Results: Six monitoring stations were needed to detect the pollutants concentrations around the study area for estimating the level and distribution of exposure in the population with total network efficiency of about 99%. An analysis of the design procedure showed that wind regimes have greatest effect on the location of monitoring stations. Conclusion: The optimal AQMN enables authorities to implement an effective program of air quality management for protecting human health. PMID:26933646

  3. Petroleum supply annual 1995: Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    1996-05-01

    The {ital Petroleum Supply Annual} contains information on supply and disposition of crude oil and petroleum products. It reflects data collected from the petroleum industry during 1995 through monthly surveys, and it is divided into 2 volumes. This volume contains three sections: summary statistics, detailed statistics, and selected refinery statistics, each with final annual data. (The other volume contains final statistics for each month and replaces data previously published in the {ital Petroleum Supply Monthly}).

  4. Energy efficiency improvement and cost saving opportunities forpetroleum refineries

    SciTech Connect

    Worrell, Ernst; Galitsky, Christina

    2005-02-15

    The petroleum refining industry in the United States is the largest in the world, providing inputs to virtually any economic sector,including the transport sector and the chemical industry. The industry operates 146 refineries (as of January 2004) around the country,employing over 65,000 employees. The refining industry produces a mix of products with a total value exceeding $151 billion. Refineries spend typically 50 percent of cash operating costs (i.e., excluding capital costs and depreciation) on energy, making energy a major cost factor and also an important opportunity for cost reduction. Energy use is also a major source of emissions in the refinery industry making energy efficiency improvement an attractive opportunity to reduce emissions and operating costs. Voluntary government programs aim to assist industry to improve competitiveness through increased energy efficiency and reduced environmental impact. ENERGY STAR (R), a voluntary program managed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, stresses the need for strong and strategic corporate energy management programs. ENERGY STAR provides energy management tools and strategies for successful corporate energy management programs. This Energy Guide describes research conducted to support ENERGY STAR and its work with the petroleum refining industry.This research provides information on potential energy efficiency opportunities for petroleum refineries. This Energy Guide introduces energy efficiency opportunities available for petroleum refineries. It begins with descriptions of the trends, structure, and production of the refining industry and the energy used in the refining and conversion processes. Specific energy savings for each energy efficiency measure based on case studies of plants and references to technical literature are provided. If available, typical payback periods are also listed. The Energy Guide draws upon the experiences with energy efficiency measures of petroleum refineries worldwide

  5. Seminal plasma trace metal levels in industrial workers.

    PubMed

    Dawson, E B; Evans, D R; Harris, W A; Powell, L C

    2000-05-01

    This study compares the seminal plasma trace metal levels of hospital workers with groups of industrial workers in a petroleum refinery, smelter, and chemical plant. The metals measured were the essential metals (copper, zinc, nickel, cobalt, and manganese) and the toxic metals (lead, cadmium, and aluminum). The group mean +/- SE metal level for each group (50 subjects per group) was calculated, and the statistical significance of the group mean differences of the industrial groups with the hospital group (control) was determined by the Student's t-test. The differences observed in the smelter group were increased copper and zinc (p < or = 0.001) and decreased nickel, cobalt, and manganese (p < or = 0.001, < or = 0.01). The refinery group differences were increased copper, zinc, and nickel (p < or = 0.001) but decreased cobalt and manganese (p < or = 0.001). The chemical group differences were increased zinc (p < or = 0.001) and decreased cobalt (p < or = 0.001). The seminal plasma levels of the toxic metals lead and aluminum were increased in each of the industrial groups (p < or = 0.001). Concurrent differences were (1) decreased accumulation of nickel, cobalt, and manganese in the smelter group, (2) decreased cobalt and manganese in the refinery group, and (3) only decreased cobalt in the chemical group. PMID:11051584

  6. Measurement and removal of bioconcentratable compounds in refinery effluents

    SciTech Connect

    Gala, W.R.; Dorn, P.B.; Means, J.C.; Jenkins, K.D.; Folwarkow, S.

    1994-12-31

    Public concern regarding the presence of persistent, bioconcentratable compounds in fish and shellfish has led the petroleum industry to investigate methods for the measurement of bioconcentratable compounds in refinery effluents. Research has focused on developing methods to measure polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and other hydrocarbons directly in the effluent and in bivalves exposed to refinery effluents in the field and in the laboratory. Results from a multi-refinery study in the San Francisco Bay Area using selective ion monitoring GC/MS-MS indicated that alkylated and non-substituted 2--3 ring PAHs are rarely present in refinery effluents at concentrations greater than 100 ng/L. Higher MW PAHs were rarely detected. PAHs did not substantially bioconcentrate in bivalves exposed in the laboratory to refinery effluent and reference sea water. Total PAHs were generally less than 50 {mu}g/g in the effluent-exposed bivalves. A comparison of the waste water treatment facilities at each refinery suggest that biological treatment already required by existing regulations is sufficient to reduce PAH concentrations to these low levels.

  7. Nickel refinery dust

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Nickel refinery dust ; no CASRN Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Effect

  8. [Health effects in petrochemical workers: cohort mortality studies in Italian plants].

    PubMed

    Pesatori, Angela Cecilia

    2013-01-01

    The issue of carcinogenicty of petroleum chemicals has been extensively addressed in the scientific literature. The International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), in 1989, classified working in petroleum refineries in Group 2A (probable carcinogen) mainly due to increased risks for skin cancer and leukemia. Subsequent studies highlighted increased mortality from pleural mesothelioma. We present and discuss the findings of the mortality studies in four Italian petrochemical plants. The study population includes: 676 subjects employed in a plant near Rome, 1583 workers of a plant located in the Milan area, 903 workers employed in another northern petrochemical plant (Cremona area) and over 2000 subjects who had worked in a similar plant in Sardinia (Cagliari area). Age-gender-and calendar period adjusted Standardized Mortality Ratios (SMRs) and 95% Confidence Intervals (CI) were calculated using regional rates. Analyses by duration of employment and time since first employment were also performed.

  9. Nested case-control study of leukaemia, multiple myeloma, and kidney cancer in a cohort of petroleum workers exposed to gasoline

    PubMed Central

    Wong, O.; Trent, L.; Harris, F.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This nested case-control study was based on data in a cohort study of more than 18,000 petroleum distribution workers exposed to gasoline, which contains about 2%-3% benzene. Risks of leukaemia, acute myeloid leukaemia, multiple myeloma, and kidney cancer were examined relative to exposure to gasoline. METHODS: For each case, up to five individually matched controls were selected. Analyses based on the Mantel-Haenszel procedure as well as univariate and multivariate conditional logistic regression were performed for each disease category. Jobs with similar exposures were grouped into homogeneous categories for analysis. Several quantitative indices of exposure to gasoline were used in the analyses: duration of exposure, cumulative exposure, frequency of peak exposure, and time of first exposure. RESULTS: No increased risks for the four cancers were found for any job category. Analyses with logistic regression models based on duration of exposure, cumulative exposure, and frequency of peak exposure did not show any increased risk or exposure-effect relation. Time of first exposure to gasoline was also found to be unrelated to the four diseases under investigation. CONCLUSION: Exposure to gasoline or benzene at the concentrations experienced by this cohort of distribution workers is not a risk factor for leukaemia (all cell types), acute myeloid leukaemia, multiple myeloma, or kidney cancer.   PMID:10450237

  10. Storage tracking refinery trends

    SciTech Connect

    Saunders, J.

    1996-05-01

    Regulatory and marketplace shakeups have made the refining and petrochemical industries highly competitive. The fight to survive has forced refinery consolidations, upgrades and companywide restructurings. Bulk liquid storage terminals are following suit. This should generate a flurry of engineering and construction by the latter part of 1997. A growing petrochemical industry translates into rising storage needs. Industry followers forecasted flat petrochemical growth in 1996 due to excessive expansion in 1994 and 1995. But expansion is expected to continue throughout this year on the strength of several products.

  11. Petroleum supply annual, 1997. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    1998-06-01

    The Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA) contains information on the supply and disposition of crude oil and petroleum products. The publication reflects data that were collected from the petroleum industry during 1997 through annual and monthly surveys. The PSA is divided into two volumes. This first volume contains three sections: Summary Statistics, Detailed Statistics, and Refinery Statistics; each with final annual data. The second volume contains final statistics for each month of 1997, and replaces data previously published in the Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM). The tables in Volumes 1 and 2 are similarly numbered to facilitate comparison between them. 16 figs., 48 tabs.

  12. Petroleum supply annual 1993. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    The Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA) contains information on the supply and disposition of crude oil and petroleum products. The publication reflects data that were collected from the petroleum industry during 1993 through annual and monthly surveys. The PSA is divided into two volumes. This first volume contains four sections: Summary Statistics, Detailed Statistics, Refinery Capacity, and Oxygenate Capacity each with final annual data. The second volume contains final statistics for each month of 1993, and replaces data previously published in the Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM). The tables in Volumes 1 and 2 are similarly numbered to facilitate comparison between them. Below is a description of each section in Volume 1 of the PSA.

  13. Petroleum supply annual 1994. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    1995-05-22

    The Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA) contains information on the supply and disposition of crude oil and petroleum products. The publication reflects data that were collected from the petroleum industry during 1994 through annual and monthly surveys. The PSA is divided into two volumes. This first volume contains four sections: Summary Statistics, Detailed Statistics, Refinery Capacity, and Oxygenate Capacity each with final annual data. The second volume contains final statistics for each month of 1994, and replaces data previously published in the Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM). The tables in Volumes 1 and 2 are similarly numbered to facilitate comparison between them. Below is a description of each section in Volume 1 of the PSA.

  14. Petroleum supply monthly, with data from June 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1996-08-01

    The Petroleum Supply Division (PSD) of the Energy Information Administration (EIA) collects and published information on petroleum supply and disposition in the United States. The information is collected through a series of surveys that make up the Petroleum Supply Reporting System (PSRS). The PSRS data are published in the Weekly Petroleum Status Report (WPSR), Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM), and Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA). This report presents information on crude oil production, crude oil imports and exports, refinery operations, natural gas processing, transportation, and oxygenate data.

  15. Petroleum-solvent mortality study of Oklahoma dry cleaners. Volume 1. Final report, 1 January 1986-31 March 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Asal, N.R.; Coleman, R.L.; Petrone, R.L.; Owen, W.; Walsworth, S.

    1988-06-30

    The records of the Board of the Oklahoma State Dry Cleaners were used in a study on the effects of chronic, occupational exposures to petroleum dry-cleaning solvents. The historical licensure records maintained by the Board made it possible to study a well defined cohort of dry cleaners for which there is information on solvent exposure and duration of exposure. Volume 1 consisted of a review of the literature with information provided concerning the history of dry cleaning, description of the industry, legislation affecting the industry, a description of the process, equipment used, emission sources, levels of solvent exposure, exposure limits, the chemistry of petroleum hydrocarbons, animal toxicology, mutagenicity, teratogenicity, tumor production, human effects, and cancer mortality among oil-refinery workers. Volume 2 is also available.

  16. Computer model for refinery operations with emphasis on jet fuel production. Volume 1: Program description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunbar, D. N.; Tunnah, B. G.

    1978-01-01

    A FORTRAN computer program is described for predicting the flow streams and material, energy, and economic balances of a typical petroleum refinery, with particular emphasis on production of aviation turbine fuel of varying end point and hydrogen content specifications. The program has provision for shale oil and coal oil in addition to petroleum crudes. A case study feature permits dependent cases to be run for parametric or optimization studies by input of only the variables which are changed from the base case.

  17. Short-Term Energy Outlook Model Documentation: Other Petroleum Products Consumption Model

    EIA Publications

    2011-01-01

    The other petroleum product consumption module of the Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO) model is designed to provide U.S. consumption forecasts for 6 petroleum product categories: asphalt and road oil, petrochemical feedstocks, petroleum coke, refinery still gas, unfinished oils, and other miscvellaneous products

  18. Retrospective estimation of exposure to benzene in a leukaemia case-control study of petroleum marketing and distribution workers in the United Kingdom.

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, S J; Bell, G M; Cordingley, N; Pearlman, E D; Rushton, L

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To provide quantitative estimates of exposure to benzene for cases and controls in an epidemiology study to investigate the risk of leukaemia in petroleum distribution workers. METHODS: Work histories were obtained for cases and controls together with detailed information on the distribution sites. For each job in the work history, an estimate of exposure (parts per million (ppm)) was obtained by multiplying a measure derived from exposure data by modifying factors to reflect the differences between the conditions that existed at the time of measurement and those at the time of interest. The modifying factors used related to job activity, the number of road tankers loaded, the benzene content of the gasoline, the mixture of products handled, temperature, and loading technology. Cumulative exposures for each case and control were obtained by multiplying the exposure estimates for each job by the duration of time in the respective jobs, and summing these over all jobs in the work history. Peak exposure and exposure through dermal contact were quantitatively classified for each job. RESULTS: Measured exposures were obtained for 30 job categories, and ranged from 0.003 to 8.20 ppm. 40% of work histories were assigned background exposures, with a further 34% assigned the exposure estimate for a driver carrying out top submerged loading of motor fuel into road tankers. Cumulative exposures ranged from < 1 to > 200 ppm-years, although 81% were < 5 ppm-years. Comparison of the exposure estimates for selected jobs with data from sources not used in the study showed similar results. CONCLUSION: The estimates of exposure to benzene in this study provide a sound basis for the epidemiological analyses. PMID:9155777

  19. Energy Bandwidth for Petroleum Refining Processes

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2006-10-01

    The petroleum refining energy bandwidth report analyzes the most energy-intensive unit operations used in U.S. refineries: crude oil distillation, fluid catalytic cracking, catalytic hydrotreating, catalytic reforming, and alkylation. The "bandwidth" provides a snapshot of the energy losses that can potentially be recovered through best practices and technology R&D.

  20. Nutrient-stimulated biodegradation of aged refinery hydrocarbons in soil

    SciTech Connect

    Drake, E.N.; Stokley, K.E.; Calcavecchio, P.; Bare, R.E.; Rothenburger, S.J.; Prince, R.C.; Douglas, G.S.

    1995-12-31

    Aged hydrocarbon-contaminated refinery soil was amended with water and nutrients and tilled weekly for 1 year to stimulate biodegradation. Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) analysis of polycyclic aromatic compounds (PAHs) and triterpane biomarkers, and Freon IR analysis of total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH), were used to determine the extent of biodegradation. There was significant degradation of extractable hydrocarbon (up to 60%), but neither hopane, oleanane, nor the amount of polars decreased during this period of bioremediation, allowing them to be used as conserved internal markers for estimating biodegradation. Significant degradation of the more alkylated two- and three-ring compounds, and of the four-ring species pyrene and chrysene and their alkylated congeners, was seen. Substantial degradation (> 40%) of benzo(b)fluoranthene, benzo(k)fluoranthene, and benzo(a)pyrene also was seen. The results show that bioremediation can be a useful treatment in the cleanup of contaminated refinery sites.

  1. Assessment of coal liquids as refinery feedstocks

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, P.

    1992-02-01

    The R D of direct coal liquefaction has reached such a stage that current two-stage processes can produce coal liquids with high yields and improved quality at a reasonable cost. To fully realize the potential value, these coal liquids should be refined into high-value liquid transportation fuels. The purpose of this study is to assess coal liquids as feedstocks to be processed by modern petroleum refining technologies. After the introduction, Section 2.0 summarizes ASTM specifications for major transportation fuels: gasoline, jet fuel, and diesel fuel, which serve as a target for coal-liquid refining. A concise description of modern refining processes follows with an emphasis on the requirements for the raw materials. These provide criteria to judge the quality of coal liquids as a refinery feedstock for the production of marketable liquid fuels. Section 3.0 surveys the properties of coal liquids produced by various liquefaction processes. Compared with typical petroleum oils, the current two-stage coal liquids are: Light in boiling range and free of resids and metals; very low in sulfur but relatively high in oxygen; relatively low in hydrogen and high in cyclics content; and essentially toxicologically inactive when end point is lower than 650[degrees]F, particularly after hydroprocessing. Despite these characteristics, the coal liquids are basically similar to petroleum. The modern refining technology is capable of processing coal liquids into transportation fuels meeting all specifications, and hydroprocessinq is obviously the major tool. The important point is the determination of a reasonable product slate and an appropriate refining scheme.

  2. Assessment of coal liquids as refinery feedstocks

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, P.

    1992-02-01

    The R&D of direct coal liquefaction has reached such a stage that current two-stage processes can produce coal liquids with high yields and improved quality at a reasonable cost. To fully realize the potential value, these coal liquids should be refined into high-value liquid transportation fuels. The purpose of this study is to assess coal liquids as feedstocks to be processed by modern petroleum refining technologies. After the introduction, Section 2.0 summarizes ASTM specifications for major transportation fuels: gasoline, jet fuel, and diesel fuel, which serve as a target for coal-liquid refining. A concise description of modern refining processes follows with an emphasis on the requirements for the raw materials. These provide criteria to judge the quality of coal liquids as a refinery feedstock for the production of marketable liquid fuels. Section 3.0 surveys the properties of coal liquids produced by various liquefaction processes. Compared with typical petroleum oils, the current two-stage coal liquids are: Light in boiling range and free of resids and metals; very low in sulfur but relatively high in oxygen; relatively low in hydrogen and high in cyclics content; and essentially toxicologically inactive when end point is lower than 650{degrees}F, particularly after hydroprocessing. Despite these characteristics, the coal liquids are basically similar to petroleum. The modern refining technology is capable of processing coal liquids into transportation fuels meeting all specifications, and hydroprocessinq is obviously the major tool. The important point is the determination of a reasonable product slate and an appropriate refining scheme.

  3. Oil refinery experience with the assessment of refinery effluents and receiving waters using biologically based methods.

    PubMed

    Comber, Michael H I; Girling, Andrew; den Haan, Klaas H; Whale, Graham

    2015-10-01

    The trend in discharges of petroleum-related substances from refineries in Europe shows a consistent picture of declining emissions, since first measured in 1969. This decline coincides with enhanced internal capture or recycling procedures and increasing use of physical and biological treatments. At the same time, and partly in response to legislative drivers, there has been an increase in the use of chronic (long-term) toxicity tests and alternative methods for assessing the quality of effluent discharges. The Whole Effluent Assessment (WEA) approach has also driven the increased conduct of studies addressing the fate of effluent constituents. Such studies have included the use of biodegradation and solid-phase micro-extraction-biomimetic extraction (SPME-BE) methods to address potentially bioaccumulative substances (PBS). In this way, it is then possible to address the persistence and toxicity of these PBS constituents of an effluent. The data collected in various case studies highlights the advantages and pitfalls of using biologically-based methods to assess the potential for refinery effluents to cause environmental impacts.

  4. Petroleum supply annual 1998: Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    1999-06-01

    The ``Petroleum Supply Annual`` (PSA) contains information on the supply and disposition of crude oil and petroleum products. The publication reflects data that were collected from the petroleum industry during 1998 through annual and monthly surveys. The PSA is divided into two volumes. This first volume contains three sections: Summary Statistics, Detailed Statistics, and Refinery Statistics; each with final annual data. The second volume contains final statistics for each month of 1998, and replaces data previously published in the PSA. The tables in Volumes 1 and 2 are similarly numbered to facilitate comparison between them. 16 figs., 59 tabs.

  5. Refinery suppliers face tough times

    SciTech Connect

    Rotman, D.; Walsh, K.

    1997-03-12

    Despite a handful of bright spots in hydroprocessing and petrochemical sectors, economic woes plague much of the refinery and petrochemical catalysts business, as suppliers are feeling the impact of mature markets and refiners` ongoing cost cutting. Industry experts say the doldrums could spur further restructuring in the catalyst business, with suppliers scrambling for market share and jockeying for position in growing sectors. Expect further consolidation over the next several years, says Pierre Bonnifay, president of IFP Enterprises (New York). {open_quotes}There are still too many players for the mature [refinery catalyst] markets.{close_quotes} Others agree. {open_quotes}Only about seven [or] eight major suppliers will survive,{close_quotes} says Robert Allsmiller, v.p./refinery and petrochemical catalysts at United Catalysts Inc. (UCI; Louisville, KY). {open_quotes}Who they [will be] is still up in the air.{close_quotes}

  6. Multi objective multi refinery optimization with environmental and catastrophic failure effects objectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khogeer, Ahmed Sirag

    2005-11-01

    Petroleum refining is a capital-intensive business. With stringent environmental regulations on the processing industry and declining refining margins, political instability, increased risk of war and terrorist attacks in which refineries and fuel transportation grids may be targeted, higher pressures are exerted on refiners to optimize performance and find the best combination of feed and processes to produce salable products that meet stricter product specifications, while at the same time meeting refinery supply commitments and of course making profit. This is done through multi objective optimization. For corporate refining companies and at the national level, Intea-Refinery and Inter-Refinery optimization is the second step in optimizing the operation of the whole refining chain as a single system. Most refinery-wide optimization methods do not cover multiple objectives such as minimizing environmental impact, avoiding catastrophic failures, or enhancing product spec upgrade effects. This work starts by carrying out a refinery-wide, single objective optimization, and then moves to multi objective-single refinery optimization. The last step is multi objective-multi refinery optimization, the objectives of which are analysis of the effects of economic, environmental, product spec, strategic, and catastrophic failure. Simulation runs were carried out using both MATLAB and ASPEN PIMS utilizing nonlinear techniques to solve the optimization problem. The results addressed the need to debottleneck some refineries or transportation media in order to meet the demand for essential products under partial or total failure scenarios. They also addressed how importing some high spec products can help recover some of the losses and what is needed in order to accomplish this. In addition, the results showed nonlinear relations among local and global objectives for some refineries. The results demonstrate that refineries can have a local multi objective optimum that does not

  7. Air sampling of nickel in a refinery.

    PubMed

    Harmse, Johannes L; Engelbrecht, Jacobus C

    2007-08-01

    Air monitoring was conducted in a nickel base metal refinery to determine compliance with occupational exposure limits. The hypothesis stated that levels of airborne dust may pose a risk to worker health if compared to the relevant exposure limits. Exposure limits for nickel species are set for the inhalable nickel dust fraction. Personal air samples, representative of three selected areas were collected in the workers' breathing zones, using the Institute of Occupational Medicine (IOM) samplers. Real-time personal samples were collected randomly over a two-month period in three nickel production areas. Filter papers were treated gravimetrically and were analysed for soluble and insoluble nickel through inductive coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Measured concentrations were expressed as time weighted average exposure concentrations. Results were compared to South African occupational exposure limits (OELs) and to the threshold limit values (TLVs) set by the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH) to determine compliance. Statistical compliance was also determined using the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health procedure as prescribed by South Africa's Hazardous Chemical Substances Regulations in 1995. In two of the areas it was found that exposure concentrations complied with the OELs. Some exposures exceeded the OEL values and most exposures exceeded the TLV values in the other area concerned. A comprehensive health risk assessment needs to be conducted to determine the cause of non-compliance. PMID:17613095

  8. Aged refinery hydrocarbon biodegradation in soil

    SciTech Connect

    Drake, E.N.; Stokley, K.E.; Calcavecchio, P.

    1995-12-31

    Aged hydrocarbon biodegradation was investigated as a potential cleanup technology for refinery soil. Well-mixed field soil was amended with water and nutrients and tilled weekly for one year in laboratory mesocosms to stimulate biodegradation. Freon infrared analysis of total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH), and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) analysis of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and triterpane biomarkers were used to determine the extent of biodegradation. Significant reductions in TPH (up to 68%) and methylene chloride extractable material (up to 55%) were observed. The combined trimethylated phenanthrene/anthracenes (C3P/A) were even more highly depleted than TPH. Nutrient amendment increased TPH, methylene chloride, and C3P/A removal, but not biomarker concentrations. Significant reduction of two to five ring PAHs occurred. Expected depletion patterns for PAHs were observed except in the case of naphthalene and derivatives, phenanthrene/anthracene and derivatives, and chrysene. A possible explanation is that the more readily degradable PAHs were already highly biodegraded before the study and the remaining portions were less available for biodegradation. These results are consistent with reports on the effects of aging on PAH biodegradation in soil. Biodegradation was influenced by PAH structure and molecular weight.

  9. Asbestos-associated cancers in the Ontario refinery and petrochemical sector.

    PubMed

    Finkelstein, M M

    1996-11-01

    Asbestos has been widely used in the refinery and petrochemical sector. Mesothelioma has occurred among maintenance employees, and it was hypothesized that mesothelioma is a marker for exposures which might increase lung cancer risk. A death certificate-based case-control study of mesothelioma and lung cancer from 1980 to 1992 was conducted in an Ontario county with a substantial presence of these industries. Each of the 17 men who died of mesothelioma and 424 with lung cancer were matched with controls who died of other causes. The Job and Industry fields on the death certificates were abstracted. Employment as a maintenance worker in the refinery and petrochemical sector was associated with an increased risk of mesothelioma (odds ratio: 24.5; 90% confidence interval 3.1-102). The risk of lung cancer among petrochemical workers, in comparison with all other workers in the county, was 0.88. In an internal comparison of maintenance employees with other blue-collar workers in the refinery and petrochemical sector, the odds ratio for lung cancer was 1.73 (90% confidence interval 0.83-3.6). This finding is consistent with no difference in risk between maintenance and other employees, but it is also compatible with study power being too low to achieve statistical significance. The hypothesis of increased lung cancer risk could be examined more fully with nested case-control studies in existing cohorts. Meanwhile, it would be prudent to reinforce adherence to asbestos control measures in the refinery and petrochemical sector.

  10. Computer model for refinery operations with emphasis on jet fuel production. Volume 3: Detailed systems and programming documentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunbar, D. N.; Tunnah, B. G.

    1978-01-01

    The FORTRAN computing program predicts flow streams and material, energy, and economic balances of a typical petroleum refinery, with particular emphasis on production of aviation turbine fuels of varying end point and hydrogen content specifications. The program has a provision for shale oil and coal oil in addition to petroleum crudes. A case study feature permits dependent cases to be run for parametric or optimization studies by input of only the variables which are changed from the base case.

  11. Petroleum Market Model of the National Energy Modeling System. Part 1

    SciTech Connect

    1997-12-18

    The purpose of this report is to define the objectives of the Petroleum Market Model (PMM), describe its basic approach, and provide detail on how it works. This report is intended as a reference document for model analysts, users, and the public. The PMM models petroleum refining activities, the marketing of petroleum products to consumption regions, the production of natural gas liquids in gas processing plants, and domestic methanol production. The PMM projects petroleum product prices and sources of supply for meeting petroleum product demand. The sources of supply include crude oil, both domestic and imported; other inputs including alcohols and ethers; natural gas plant liquids production; petroleum product imports; and refinery processing gain. In addition, the PMM estimates domestic refinery capacity expansion and fuel consumption. Product prices are estimated at the Census division level and much of the refining activity information is at the Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District level.

  12. Cross-sectional survey of kidney function in refinery employees

    SciTech Connect

    Viau, C.; Bernard, A.; Lauwerys, R.; Buchet, J.P.; Quaeghebeur, L.; Cornu, M.E.; Phillips, S.C.; Mutti, A.; Lucertini, S.; Franchini, I.

    1987-01-01

    We examined sensitive biochemical and immunological markers of kidney function and damage in 53 male oil refinery workers exposed to hydrocarbons and compared their results with those of a control group of 61 age-matched nonexposed males. The mean duration of employment of exposed males was 11 years. The current levels of exposure to a variety of aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons, as determined by personal monitoring, were well below the current threshold limit values. No difference was found in the urinary tubular parameters beta-N-acetyl-D-glucosaminidase, beta 2-microglobulin (beta 2-m) and retinol-binding protein. Similar serum beta 2-m levels indicated no impairment of the glomerular filtration rate in the exposed workers. The levels of circulating immune complexes were also identical in both groups. The mean albuminuria was slightly higher (p less than .005) in the exposed group in a quantitative assay but was not dipstick-detectable. The mean urinary excretion of a renal antigen was also higher (p less than .05) in the exposed group and correlated with the excretion of albumin. Finally, slightly higher titers of anti-laminin antibodies were found in five exposed employees, but this was not accompanied by an increased albuminuria. We conclude that chronic low-level hydrocarbon exposure in these refinery workers does not lead to clinically significant renal abnormalities. Nevertheless, some findings are consistent with the possible role of hydrocarbon exposure in the induction of renal disturbances.

  13. Idled refineries require safety measures

    SciTech Connect

    Garrison, W.G.

    1981-12-07

    After an entire reinery has been shut down, there are some security, fire, and other risks that can be identified and greatly reduced. In the past, shutting down and mothballing a single refinery process unit was not an uncommon occurrence. During such shutdowns, the refinery's basic firefighting and fire protection facilities and security continued to be maintained with no appreciable change in protection to the shutdown unit. The expected duration of the shutdown, climatic conditions during the four seasons, and other considerations will dictate the type and degree of mothballing. This discussion focuses on maintaining adequate security and fire defenses. Because cold weather and snow will present unique problems to some plants, special emphasis is given to this exposure.

  14. Petroleum products

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-01-01

    This book is the first of three volumes devoted to petroleum products and lubricants. This volume begins with standard D 56 and contains all petroleum standards up to D 1947. It contains specifications and test methods for fuels, solvents, burner fuel oils, lubricating oils, cutting oils, lubricating greases, fluids measurement and sampling, liquified petroleum gases, light hydrocarbons, plant spray oils, sulfonates, crude petroleum, petrolatam, and wax.

  15. REFINERY INTEGRATION OF BY-PRODUCTS FROM COAL-DERIVED JET FUELS

    SciTech Connect

    Leslie R. Rudnick; Andre Boehman; Chunshan Song; Bruce Miller; Gareth Mitchell

    2005-05-18

    This report summarizes the accomplishments toward project goals during the first six months of the second year of the project to assess the properties and performance of coal based products. These products are in the gasoline, diesel and fuel oil range and result from coal based jet fuel production from an Air Force funded program. Specific areas of progress include generation of coal based material that has been fractionated into the desired refinery cuts, acquisition and installation of a research gasoline engine, and modification of diesel engines for use in evaluating diesel produced in the project. The desulfurization of sulfur containing components of coal and petroleum is being studied so that effective conversion of blended coal and petroleum streams can be efficiently converted to useful refinery products. Equipment is now in place to begin fuel oil evaluations to assess the quality of coal based fuel oil. Coal samples have procured and are being assessed for cleaning prior to use in coking studies.

  16. Refinery Integration of By-Products from Coal-Derived Jet Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Leslie R. Rudnick; Andre Boehman; Chunshan Song; Bruce Miller; Gareth Mitchell

    2005-11-17

    This report summarizes the accomplishments toward project goals during the first six months of the second year of the project to assess the properties and performance of coal based products. These products are in the gasoline, diesel and fuel oil range and result from coal based jet fuel production from an Air Force funded program. Specific areas of progress include generation of coal based material that has been fractionated into the desired refinery cuts, acquisition and installation of a research gasoline engine, and modification of diesel engines for use in evaluating diesel produced in the project. The desulfurization of sulfur containing components of coal and petroleum is being studied so that effective conversion of blended coal and petroleum streams can be efficiently converted to useful refinery products. Evaluations to assess the quality of coal based fuel oil are reported. Coal samples have procured and are being assessed for cleaning prior to use in coking studies.

  17. Refinery Integration of By-Products from Coal-Derived Jet Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Leslie R. Rudnick; Andre Boehman; Chunshan Song; Bruce Miller; John Andresen

    2004-09-17

    This report summarizes the accomplishments toward project goals during the first twelve months of the project to assess the properties and performance of coal based products. These products are in the gasoline, diesel and fuel oil range and result from coal based jet fuel production from an Air Force funded program. Specific areas of progress include generation of coal based material that has been fractionated into the desired refinery cuts, acquisition and installation of a research gasoline engine, and modification of diesel engines for use in evaluating diesel produced in the project. The desulfurization of sulfur containing components of coal and petroleum is being studied so that effective conversion of blended coal and petroleum streams can be efficiently converted to useful refinery products. Equipment is now in place to begin fuel oil evaluations to assess the quality of coal based fuel oil. Coal samples have procured and are being assessed for cleaning prior to use in coking studies.

  18. REFINERY INTEGRATION OF BY-PRODUCTS FROM COAL-DERIVED JET FUELS

    SciTech Connect

    Leslie R. Rudnick; Andre Boehman; Chunshan Song; Bruce Miller; John Andresen

    2004-04-23

    This report summarizes the accomplishments toward project goals during the first six months of the project to assess the properties and performance of coal based products. These products are in the gasoline, diesel and fuel oil range and result from coal based jet fuel production from an Air Force funded program. Specific areas of progress include generation of coal based material that has been fractionated into the desired refinery cuts, acquisition and installation of a research gasoline engine, and modification of diesel engines for use in evaluating diesel produced in the project. The desulfurization of sulfur containing components of coal and petroleum is being studied so that effective conversion of blended coal and petroleum streams can be efficiently converted to useful refinery products. Equipment is now in place to begin fuel oil evaluations to assess the quality of coal based fuel oil. Coal samples have procured and are being assessed for cleaning prior to use in coking studies.

  19. 3. FOURTH FLOOR OF LARD REFINERY (NOTICE ORIGINAL WOODEN BEAMS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. FOURTH FLOOR OF LARD REFINERY (NOTICE ORIGINAL WOODEN BEAMS AND UNDATED LARD PRESS AND VATS ON RIGHT SIDE) - Wilson's Oil House, Lard Refinery, & Edible Fats Factory, Lard Refinery, 2801 Southwest Fifteenth Street, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma County, OK

  20. 2. NORTHEAST CORNER OF LARD REFINERY (CONNECTING BUILDING ON THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. NORTHEAST CORNER OF LARD REFINERY (CONNECTING BUILDING ON THE RIGHT) - Wilson's Oil House, Lard Refinery, & Edible Fats Factory, Lard Refinery, 2801 Southwest Fifteenth Street, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma County, OK

  1. Effect of petroleum hydrocarbons on algae

    SciTech Connect

    Bhadauria, S. ); Sengar, R.M.S. ); Mittal, S.; Bhattacharjee, S. )

    1992-01-01

    Algal species (65) were isolated from oil refinery effluent. Twenty-five of these species were cultured in Benecke's medium in a growth chamber, along with controls. Retardation in algal growth, inhibition in algal photosynthesis, and discoloration was observed in petroleum enriched medium. Few forms, viz. Cyclotella sp., Cosmarium sp., and Merismopedia sp. could not survive. The lag phase lengthened by several days and slope of exponential phase was also depressed. Chlamydomonas sp., Scenedesmus sp., Ankistrodesmus sp., Nitzschia sp. and Navicula sp. were comparatively susceptible to petroleum. Depression in carbon fixation, cell numbers, and total dry algal mass was noticeable, showing toxicity to both diatoms and green algae.

  2. Petroleum supply annual 1998: Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    1999-06-01

    The Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA) contains information on the supply and disposition of crude oil and petroleum products. The publication reflects data that were collected from the petroleum industry during 1998 through monthly surveys. The PSA is divided into two volumes. The first volume contains three sections: Summary Statistics, Detailed Statistics, and Refinery Statistics; each with final annual data. This second volume contains final statistics for each month of 1998, and replaces data previously published in the Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM). The tables in Volumes 1 and 2 are similarly numbered to facilitate comparison between them. Explanatory Notes, located at the end of this publication, present information describing data collection, sources, estimation methodology, data quality control procedures, modifications to reporting requirements and interpretation of tables. Industry terminology and product definitions are listed alphabetically in the Glossary. 35 tabs.

  3. Petroleum supply annual, 1997. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    1998-06-01

    The Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA) contains information on the supply and disposition of crude oil and petroleum products. The publication reflects data that were collected from the petroleum industry during 1997 through monthly surveys. The PSA is divided into two volumes. The first volume contains three sections: Summary Statistics, Detailed Statistics, and Refinery Statistics; each with final annual data. The second volume contains final statistics for each month of 1997, and replaces data previously published in the Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM). The tables in Volumes 1 and 2 are similarly numbered to facilitate comparison between them. Explanatory Notes, located at the end of this publication, present information describing data collection, sources, estimation methodology, data quality control procedures, modifications to reporting requirements and interpretation of tables. Industry terminology and product definitions are listed alphabetically in the Glossary. 35 tabs.

  4. Petroleum supply annual 1995: Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    1996-06-01

    The Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA) contains information on the supply and disposition of crude oil and petroleum products. The publication reflects data that were collected from the petroleum industry during 1995 through monthly surveys. The PSA is divided into two volumes. This first volume contains three sections: Summary Statistics, Detailed Statistics, and selected Refinery Statistics each with final annual data. The second volume contains final statistics for each month of 1995, and replaces data previously published in the Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM). The tables in Volumes 1 and 2 are similarly numbered to facilitate comparison between them. Explanatory Notes, located at the end of this publication, present information describing data collection, sources, estimation methodology, data quality control procedures, modifications to reporting requirements and interpretation of tables. Industry terminology and product definitions are listed alphabetically in the Glossary.

  5. Petroleum supply annual 1996: Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    1997-06-01

    The Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA) contains information on the supply and disposition of crude oil and petroleum products. The publication reflects data that were collected from the petroleum industry during 1996 through monthly surveys. The PSA is divided into two volumes. The first volume contains three sections: Summary Statistics, Detailed Statistics, and Refinery Capacity; each with final annual data. The second volume contains final statistics for each month of 1996, and replaces data previously published in the Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM). The tables in Volumes 1 and 2 are similarly numbered to facilitate comparison between them. Explanatory Notes, located at the end of this publication, present information describing data collection, sources, estimation methodology, data quality control procedures, modifications to reporting requirements and interpretation of tables. Industry terminology and product definitions are listed alphabetically in the Glossary. 35 tabs.

  6. Petroleum supply annual 1994, Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    1995-06-01

    The Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA) contains information on the supply and disposition of crude oil and petroleum products. The publication reflects data that were collected from the petroleum industry during 1994 through annual and monthly surveys. The PSA is divided into two volumes. This first volume contains four sections: Summary Statistics, Detailed Statistics, Refinery Capacity, and Oxygenate Capacity each with final annual data. The second volume contains final statistics for each month of 1994, and replaces data previously published in the Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM). The tables in Volumes 1 and 2 are similarly numbered to facilitate comparison between them. Explanatory Notes, located at the end of this publication, present information describing data collection, sources, estimation methodology, data quality control procedures, modifications to reporting requirements and interpretation of tables. Industry terminology and product definitions are listed alphabetically in the Glossary.

  7. Refinery burner simulation design architecture summary.

    SciTech Connect

    Pollock, Guylaine M.; McDonald, Michael James; Halbgewachs, Ronald D.

    2011-10-01

    This report describes the architectural design for a high fidelity simulation of a refinery and refinery burner, including demonstrations of impacts to the refinery if errors occur during the refinery process. The refinery burner model and simulation are a part of the capabilities within the Sandia National Laboratories Virtual Control System Environment (VCSE). Three components comprise the simulation: HMIs developed with commercial SCADA software, a PLC controller, and visualization software. All of these components run on different machines. This design, documented after the simulation development, incorporates aspects not traditionally seen in an architectural design, but that were utilized in this particular demonstration development. Key to the success of this model development and presented in this report are the concepts of the multiple aspects of model design and development that must be considered to capture the necessary model representation fidelity of the physical systems.

  8. Heat Recovery and Energy Conservation in Petroleum Refining.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, William Gale

    1990-01-01

    The focus of the analysis presented here is improved recovery (and use) of waste heat at existing petroleum refineries. The major energy-conservation opportunities associated with waste heat are systematically examined both physically and in terms of cost. The opportunities at the Study Refinery are systematically examined in detail. The presentation begins with an overview of the processes carried out in contemporary petroleum refineries including discussion of typical energy use. There follows a brief thermodynamic description of refinery energy flows with an emphasis on heat and on energy-efficiency analysis. The heart of the thesis is Chapters 3-5 describing heat recovery opportunities involving, respectively: extraction and use of heat from combustion gases being discharged through stacks, the exchange of heat between product streams, and uses for low-temperature waste heat. In Chapter 6, a unifying economic concept is introduced (with details in the Appendix): a "supply curve" for saved energy. This describes the potential rate of energy savings in barrels of oil-equivalent per year (in analogy with production capacity of oil or gas fields), as a function of the cost of saved energy in dollars per barrel (in analogy with the production cost of energy). The nature of the distribution is, of course, for the cost of saved energy to increase with increasing energy savings. In this chapter, estimates are presented for the energy conservation opportunities other than waste heat at the Study Refinery. All the opportunities are then summarized in a single supply curve. The extraordinary result in a cost-effective opportunity to reduce refinery energy use by some 26% at 1984 prices. This translates into roughly a 1 energy-cost reduction per 42-gallon barrel of petroleum input. Of course, investments are required; the net benefit would be about 1.5 cents per gallon of product. This would be a major benefit in relation to typical refinery earnings. The concluding

  9. Refinery Integration of By-Products from Coal-Derived Jet Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Caroline E. Burgess Clifford; Andre Boehman; Chunshan Song; Bruce Miller; Gareth Mitchell

    2006-05-17

    This report summarizes the accomplishments toward project goals during the first six months of the third year of the project to assess the properties and performance of coal based products. These products are in the gasoline, diesel and fuel oil range and result from coal based jet fuel production from an Air Force funded program. Specific areas of progress include generation of coal based material that has been fractionated into the desired refinery cuts, acquisition and installation of a research gasoline engine, and modification of diesel engines for use in evaluating diesel produced in the project. Characterization of the gasoline fuel indicates a dominance of single ring alkylcycloalkanes that have a low octane rating; however, blends containing these compounds do not have a negative effect upon gasoline when blended in refinery gasoline streams. Characterization of the diesel fuel indicates a dominance of 3-ring aromatics that have a low cetane value; however, these compounds do not have a negative effect upon diesel when blended in refinery diesel streams. The desulfurization of sulfur containing components of coal and petroleum is being studied so that effective conversion of blended coal and petroleum streams can be efficiently converted to useful refinery products. Equipment is now in place to begin fuel oil evaluations to assess the quality of coal based fuel oil. Combustion and characterization of fuel oil indicates that the fuel is somewhere in between a No. 4 and a No. 6 fuel oil. Emission testing indicates the fuel burns similarly to these two fuels, but trace metals for the coal-based material are different than petroleum-based fuel oils. Co-coking studies using cleaned coal are highly reproducible in the pilot-scale delayed coker. Evaluation of the coke by Alcoa, Inc. indicated that while the coke produced is of very good quality, the metals content of the carbon is still high in iron and silica. Coke is being evaluated for other possible uses

  10. Texas facility treats, recycles refinery, petrochemical wastes

    SciTech Connect

    1996-09-16

    A US Gulf Coast environmental services company is treating refinery and petrochemical plant wastes to universal treatment standards (UTS). DuraTherm Inc.`s recycling center uses thermal desorption to treat a variety of refinery wastes and other hazardous materials. The plant is located in San Leon, Tex., near the major Houston/Texas City refining and petrochemical center. DuraTherm`s customers include major US refining companies, plus petrochemical, terminal, pipeline, transportation, and remediation companies. Examples of typical contaminant concentrations and treatment levels for refinery wastes are shown. The paper discusses thermal desorption, the process description and testing.

  11. Petroleum Market Model of the National Energy Modeling System

    SciTech Connect

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to define the objectives of the Petroleum Market Model (PMM), describe its basic approach, and provide detail on how it works. This report is intended as a reference document for model analysts, users, and the public. The PMM models petroleum refining activities, the marketing of petroleum products to consumption regions. The production of natural gas liquids in gas processing plants, and domestic methanol production. The PMM projects petroleum product prices and sources of supply for meeting petroleum product demand. The sources of supply include crude oil, both domestic and imported; other inputs including alcohols and ethers; natural gas plant liquids production; petroleum product imports; and refinery processing gain. In addition, the PMM estimates domestic refinery capacity expansion and fuel consumption. Product prices are estimated at the Census division level and much of the refining activity information is at the Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District level. This report is organized as follows: Chapter 2, Model Purpose; Chapter 3, Model Overview and Rationale; Chapter 4, Model Structure; Appendix A, Inventory of Input Data, Parameter Estimates, and Model Outputs; Appendix B, Detailed Mathematical Description of the Model; Appendix C, Bibliography; Appendix D, Model Abstract; Appendix E, Data Quality; Appendix F, Estimation methodologies; Appendix G, Matrix Generator documentation; Appendix H, Historical Data Processing; and Appendix I, Biofuels Supply Submodule.

  12. U.S. refinery efficiency: impacts analysis and implications for fuel carbon policy implementation.

    PubMed

    Forman, Grant S; Divita, Vincent B; Han, Jeongwoo; Cai, Hao; Elgowainy, Amgad; Wang, Michael

    2014-07-01

    In the next two decades, the U.S. refining industry will face significant changes resulting from a rapidly evolving domestic petroleum energy landscape. The rapid influx of domestically sourced tight light oil and relative demand shifts for gasoline and diesel will impose challenges on the ability of the U.S. refining industry to satisfy both demand and quality requirements. This study uses results from Linear Programming (LP) modeling data to examine the potential impacts of these changes on refinery, process unit, and product-specific efficiencies, focusing on current baseline efficiency values across 43 existing large U.S. refineries that are operating today. These results suggest that refinery and product-specific efficiency values are sensitive to crude quality, seasonal and regional factors, and refinery configuration and complexity, which are determined by final fuel specification requirements. Additional processing of domestically sourced tight light oil could marginally increase refinery efficiency, but these benefits could be offset by crude rebalancing. The dynamic relationship between efficiency and key parameters such as crude API gravity, sulfur content, heavy products, residual upgrading, and complexity are key to understanding possible future changes in refinery efficiency. Relative to gasoline, the efficiency of diesel production is highly variable, and is influenced by the number and severity of units required to produce diesel. To respond to future demand requirements, refiners will need to reduce the gasoline/diesel (G/D) production ratio, which will likely result in greater volumes of diesel being produced through less efficient pathways resulting in reduced efficiency, particularly on the marginal barrel of diesel. This decline in diesel efficiency could be offset by blending of Gas to Liquids (GTL) diesel, which could allow refiners to uplift intermediate fuel streams into more efficient diesel production pathways, thereby allowing for the

  13. Recovering selenium from copper refinery slimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyvärinen, Olli; Lindroos, Leo; Yllö, Erkki

    1989-07-01

    The selenium contained within copper refinery slimes may be recovered advantageously by roasting at about 600°C. While roasting in air is inefficient, roasting in a sulfating atmosphere enables practically complete selenium recovery. Based on laboratory tests, a new selenium recovery process was adopted at Outokumpu Copper Refinery. In this process, sulfation is achieved by feeding sulfur dioxide and oxygen into the roasting furnace.

  14. Refinery siting workbook: appendices A and B

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-07-01

    The objective of this effort is to develop and provide basic refinery-related information for use by state and local government officials as a basis for establishing responsible refinery siting requirements and policies consistent with the federal clean air and water standards and socio-economic concerns. The report will be organized into two volumes. The main text comprises the basic topics of physical concerns, regulatory requirements, and permitting activities, while the second volume includes the detailed appendix materials such as the applicable laws, and the necessary permits, as available and a glossary of pertinent terms. As a means to this objective, three refinery sizes, 200,000, 100,000 and 30,000 barrels per day crude charge will be discussed in technical terms. Process unit configuration will be presented which will maximize either gasoline or heating oil production with either sweet or sour crude oil feedstocks. The major issues affecting the socio-economic impact of siting the refinery in a given locale will be presented. These data will review the factors affecting the human environment and the issues that must be addressed to assess the impact that a refinery will have on a community. The key federal registrations which impact upon a refinery siting decision shall be reviewed. Summaries of these regulations and a simplified decision diagram for the air and water acts shall be presented to assist both government and refinery officials in understanding the scope of regulatory impact. All pertinent procedures required for refinery permitting shall be reviewed under the generalized headings of air, water, health and safety, land use, and miscellaneous permits. This categorization at the federal, state and local levels of government shall be used as a basis for establishing degrees of emphasis.

  15. Materials of construction for refinery applications

    SciTech Connect

    Farraro, T.; Stellina, R.M. Jr.

    1996-08-01

    In today`s modern highly complex oil refineries proper material selection has become one of the most important factors in the design and repair of refinery processing equipment. Proper material selection will ensure that the expectations of the designers for safety, reliability and economy are actually realized. On the other hand, improper materials selection can result in unexpected equipment failures which can lead to significant losses.

  16. Current situation of oil refinery in Bulgaria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vershkova, Elena; Petkova, Petinka; Grinkevich, Anastasia

    2016-09-01

    This article deals with the classification approach for oil refineries in international practices. Criteria of refinery estimation group, including its financial status estimation, have been investigated. The analysis object is “Lukoil Neftochim Bourgas” AD (LNCHB) activity. This company is a leading enterprise in Bulgaria. The analysis of LNCHB operating: energy intensity index; index of operating costs and return on investment index have been performed.

  17. The potential for low petroleum gasoline

    SciTech Connect

    Hadder, G.R.; Webb, G.M.; Clauson, M.

    1996-06-01

    The Energy Policy Act requires the Secretary of Energy to determine the feasibility of producing sufficient replacement fuels to replace at least 30 percent of the projected consumption of motor fuels by light duty vehicles in the year 2010. The Act also requires the Secretary to determine the greenhouse gas implications of the use of replacement fuels. A replacement fuel is a non-petroleum portion of gasoline, including certain alcohols, ethers, and other components. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory Refinery Yield Model has been used to study the cost and refinery impacts for production of {open_quotes}low petroleum{close_quotes} gasolines, which contain replacement fuels. The analysis suggests that high oxygenation is the key to meeting the replacement fuel target, and a major contributor to cost increase is investment in processes to produce and etherify light olefins. High oxygenation can also increase the costs of control of vapor pressure, distillation properties, and pollutant emissions of gasolines. Year-round low petroleum gasoline with near-30 percent non-petroleum components might be produced with cost increases of 23 to 37 cents per gallon of gasoline, and with greenhouse gas emissions changes between a 3 percent increase and a 16 percent decrease. Crude oil reduction, with decreased dependence on foreign sources, is a major objective of the low petroleum gasoline program. For year-round gasoline with near-30 percent non-petroleum components, crude oil use is reduced by 10 to 12 percent, at a cost $48 to $89 per barrel. Depending upon resolution of uncertainties about extrapolation of the Environmental Protection Agency Complex Model for pollutant emissions, availability of raw materials and other issues, costs could be lower or higher.

  18. A Comparative Assessment of Resource Efficiency in Petroleum Refining

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Jeongwoo; Forman, G; Elgowainy, Amgad; Cai, Hao; Wang, Michael; Divita, V

    2015-10-01

    Because of increasing environmental and energy security concerns, a detailed understanding of energy efficiency and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in the petroleum refining industry is critical for fair and equitable energy and environmental policies. To date, this has proved challenging due in part to the complex nature and variability within refineries. In an effort to simplify energy and emissions refinery analysis, we delineated LP modeling results from 60 large refineries from the US and EU into broad categories based on crude density (API gravity) and heavy product (HP) yields. Product-specific efficiencies and process fuel shares derived from this study were incorporated in Argonne National Laboratory's GREET life-cycle model, along with regional upstream GHG intensities of crude, natural gas and electricity specific to the US and EU regions. The modeling results suggest that refineries that process relatively heavier crude inputs and have lower yields of HPs generally have lower energy efficiencies and higher GHG emissions than refineries that run lighter crudes with lower yields of HPs. The former types of refineries tend to utilize energy-intensive units which are significant consumers of utilities (heat and electricity) and hydrogen. Among the three groups of refineries studied, the major difference in the energy intensities is due to the amount of purchased natural gas for utilities and hydrogen, while the sum of refinery feed inputs are generally constant. These results highlight the GHG emissions cost a refiner pays to process deep into the barrel to produce more of the desirable fuels with low carbon to hydrogen ratio. (c) 2015 Argonne National Laboratory. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  19. Refinery IGCC plants are exceeding 90% capacity factor after 3 years

    SciTech Connect

    Jaeger, H.

    2006-01-15

    Steep learning curves for commercial IGCC plants in Italy show annual capacity factors of 55-60% in the first year of service and improvement to over 90% after the third year. The article reviews the success of three IGCC projects in Italy - those of ISAB Energy, Sarlux Saras and Api Energy. EniPower is commissioning a 250 MW IGCC plant that will burn syngas produced by gasification of residues at an adjacent Eni Sannazzaro refinery in north central Italy. The article lists 14 commercially operating IGCC plants worldwide that together provide close to 3900 MW of generating capacity. These use a variety of feedstock-coals, petroleum coke and refinery residues and biomass. Experience with commercial scale plants in Europe demonstrates that IGCC plants can operate at capacity factors comparable to if not better than conventional coal plants. 2 figs., 1 photo.

  20. 77 FR 56421 - Standards of Performance for Petroleum Refineries; Standards of Performance for Petroleum...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-12

    ... heaters on June 24, 2008. This action also lifts the stay that was granted on September 26, 2008 (73 FR 55751) and extended until further notice on December 22, 2008 (73 FR 78552) on the provisions at issue... affected sources, these final amendments include concentration-based nitrogen oxide (NO X )...

  1. The effects of refineries on proximate housing: A hedonic study of St. Bernard Parish, Louisiana, 1979-1991

    SciTech Connect

    Flower, P.C.

    1993-01-01

    Recent legal litigation and market activity implies that petroleum refineries negatively impact the values of proximate residential properties. This study empirically investigates whether a negative impact is detectable and whether the magnitude of the impact has been affected by environmental events. Offensive sensory factors, health risks, higher maintenance, and the risk of explosions are attributes of a refinery which may be perceived negatively. Several conditions are necessary for such attributes to be fully capitalized into property values: there must be a significant difference in the impact over the area considered; and individual preferences must be homogeneous to prevent locational sorting. The detection of the capitalization requires that the negative factor's net effect is stronger than any offsetting influences. This study uses hedonic regression techniques with distance from the refinery as a proxy for the environmental effect. Two refineries in St. Bernard Parish are denoted by their owners; Mobil and Murphy. The Mobil refinery has residential neighbors on one side, and these neighbors are separated from the processing equipment by an internal buffer zone, a wide street right-of-way, and a strip of commercial properties. The Murphy refinery has neighbors on the west and east sides with negligible buffer zones. Negative publicity regarding Cancer Alley in 1982 and an explosion in 1983 are environmental events. The study uses transaction data on single-family residences between 1979 and 1991. Three models are used to search for a significant proximity effect and determine if the environmental events changed the level of impact. A short-term negative impact is detected for the Mobil area in the 1982-83 period, but there is no significant negative effect in any of the other time segments. A significant and persistent negative effect is detected on the western side of the Murphy refinery after 1983.

  2. Analysis of nickel refinery dusts.

    PubMed

    Draper, M H; Duffus, J H; John, P; Metcalfe, L; Morgan, L; Park, M V; Weitzner, M I

    1994-06-01

    After characterization of bulk samples by inductively coupled plasma emission spectroscopic (ICP-ES) quantitative analysis and X-ray powder diffraction studies, single particle techniques using quantitative image analysis, scanning electron microscopy--energy dispersive analysis by X-ray, and finally laser beam ionization mass spectrometry analysis (LIMA) for surface analysis have been applied to historical nickel refinery dust samples from the nickel refining plant at Clydach in Wales. There were two historical samples of processed material from 1920 and 1929. These samples had a remarkably small particle size range, mean 3 microns and range, 0.75-24 microns. The most significant difference in elemental composition was the presence of 10% arsenic in the 1920 sample compared with 1% in the 1929 sample. The X-ray spectra revealed the presence of NiO in both. However, surprisingly, CuO was identified only in the 1929 sample. Of particular interest was the presence of a component, in the 1920 sample only, identified as the mineral orcelite, a copper-iron-nickel-arsenide-sulphide mineral, predominantly, Ni5-XAs2. Using the LIMA technique, it was found that in both samples, arsenic and arsenic derivative peaks are prominent, indicating the surface availability of arsenic compounds. PMID:8029701

  3. Test plan, the Czechowice Oil Refinery bioremediation demonstration of a process waste lagoon. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Altman, D.J.; Hazen, T.C.; Tien, A.J.; Worsztynowicz, A.; Ulfig, K.

    1997-05-10

    The overall objective of the bioremediation project is to provide a cost effective bioremediation demonstration of petroleum contaminated soil at the Czechowice Oil Refinery. Additional objectives include training of personnel, and transfer of this technology by example to Poland, and the Risk Abatement Center for Central and Eastern Europe (RACE). The goal of the remediation is to reduce the risk of PAH compounds in soil and provide a green zone (grassy area) adjacent to the site boundary. Initial project discussions with the Czechowice Oil Refinery resulted in helping the refinery find an immediate cost effective solution for the dense organic sludge in the lagoons. They found that when mixed with other waste materials, the sludge could be sold as a fuel source to local cement kilns. Thus the waste was incinerated and provided a revenue stream for the refinery to cleanup the lagoon. This allowed the bioremediation project to focus on remediation of contaminated soil that unusable as fuel, less recalcitrant and easier to handle and remediate. The assessment identified 19 compounds at the refinery that represented significant risk and would require remediation. These compounds consisted of metals, PAH`s, and BTEX. The contaminated soil to be remediated in the bioremediation demonstration contains only PAH (BTEX and metals are not significantly above background concentrations). The final biopile design consists of (1) dewatering and clearing lagoon A to clean clay, (2) adding a 20 cm layer of dolomite with pipes for drainage, leachate collection, air injection, and pH adjustment, (3) adding a 1.1 m layer of contaminated soil mixed with wood chips to improve permeability, and (4) completing the surface with 20 cm of top soil planted with grass.

  4. Computer model for refinery operations with emphasis on jet fuel production. Volume 2: Data and technical bases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunbar, D. N.; Tunnah, B. G.

    1978-01-01

    The FORTRAN computing program predicts the flow streams and material, energy, and economic balances of a typical petroleum refinery, with particular emphasis on production of aviation turbine fuel of varying end point and hydrogen content specifications. The program has provision for shale oil and coal oil in addition to petroleum crudes. A case study feature permits dependent cases to be run for parametric or optimization studies by input of only the variables which are changed from the base case. The report has sufficient detail for the information of most readers.

  5. Mesotheliomas following exposure to asbestos used in sugar refineries: report of 12 Italian cases.

    PubMed

    Maltoni, C; Pinto, C; Valenti, D; Carnuccio, R; Amaducci, E; Minardi, F

    1995-01-01

    Twelve Italian cases of mesothelioma (all the cases but one from the Emilia Romagna Region), following exposure to asbestos used in sugar refinery plants, are reported. Eleven cases arose in workers occupationally exposed, and one in the daughter of an exposed worker, following family contact. Eleven of the cases were pleural and one peritoneal. In the 11 cases following occupational exposure the average latency time was 36.0 (range 23-48) years, and the average age at onset was 63.4 years. In the case which followed family contact, the latency time and the age of the onset were 37 years. This represents the largest series of cases of mesothelioma due to the asbestos present in sugar refinery plants reported to date in the scientific literature. While these cases demonstrate the risk of asbestos mesothelioma in the sugar refinery industry, they in no way give the dimension of the pathological effects of asbestos (and man-made mineral fibres) used in this industry. To assess this risk further research is suggested.

  6. Measuring, managing and maximizing refinery performance

    SciTech Connect

    Bascur, O.A.; Kennedy, J.P.

    1996-01-01

    Implementing continuous quality improvement is a confluence of total quality management, people empowerment, performance indicators and information engineering. Supporting information technologies allow a refiner to narrow the gap between management objectives and the process control level. Dynamic performance monitoring benefits come from production cost savings, improved communications and enhanced decision making. A refinery workgroup information flow model helps automate continuous improvement of processes, performance and the organization. The paper discusses the rethinking of refinery operations, dynamic performance monitoring, continuous process improvement, the knowledge coordinator and repository manager, an integrated plant operations workflow, and successful implementation.

  7. Risk of Asthmatic Episodes in Children Exposed to Sulfur Dioxide Stack Emissions from a Refinery Point Source in Montreal, Canada

    PubMed Central

    Smargiassi, Audrey; Kosatsky, Tom; Hicks, John; Plante, Céline; Armstrong, Ben; Villeneuve, Paul J.; Goudreau, Sophie

    2009-01-01

    Background Little is known about the respiratory effects of short-term exposures to petroleum refinery emissions in young children. This study is an extension of an ecologic study that found an increased rate of hospitalizations for respiratory conditions among children living near petroleum refineries in Montreal (Canada). Methods We used a time-stratified case–crossover design to assess the risk of asthma episodes in relation to short-term variations in sulfur dioxide levels among children 2–4 years of age living within 0.5–7.5 km of the refinery stacks. Health data used to measure asthma episodes included emergency department (ED) visits and hospital admissions from 1996 to 2004. We estimated daily levels of SO2 at the residence of children using a) two fixed-site SO2 monitors located near the refineries and b) the AERMOD (American Meteorological Society/Environmental Protection Agency Regulatory Model) atmospheric dispersion model. We used conditional logistic regression to estimate odds ratios associated with an increase in the interquartile range of daily SO2 mean and peak exposures (31.2 ppb for AERMOD peaks). We adjusted for temperature, relative humidity, and regional/urban background air pollutant levels. Results The risks of asthma ED visits and hospitalizations were more pronounced for same-day (lag 0) SO2 peak levels than for mean levels on the same day, or for other lags: the adjusted odds ratios estimated for same-day SO2 peak levels from AERMOD were 1.10 [95% confidence interval (CI), 1.00–1.22] and 1.42 (95% CI, 1.10–1.82), over the interquartile range, for ED visits and hospital admissions, respectively. Conclusions Short-term episodes of increased SO2 exposures from refinery stack emissions were associated with a higher number of asthma episodes in nearby children. PMID:19440507

  8. The US petroleum refining industry in the 1980's

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-10-11

    As part of the EIA program on petroleum, The US Petroleum Refining Industry in the 1980's, presents a historical analysis of the changes that took place in the US petroleum refining industry during the 1980's. It is intended to be of interest to analysts in the petroleum industry, state and federal government officials, Congress, and the general public. The report consists of six chapters and four appendices. Included is a detailed description of the major events and factors that affected the domestic refining industry during this period. Some of the changes that took place in the 1980's are the result of events that started in the 1970's. The impact of these events on US refinery configuration, operations, economics, and company ownership are examined. 23 figs., 11 tabs.

  9. Use of absorption spectroscopy for refined petroleum product discrimination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Short, Michael

    1991-07-01

    On-line discrimination between arbitrary petroleum products is necessary for optimal control of petroleum refinery and pipeline operation and process control involving petroleum distillates. There are a number of techniques by which petroleum products can be distinguished from one another. Among these, optical measurements offer fast, non-intrusive, real-time characterization. The application examined here involves optically monitoring the interface between dissimilar batches of fluids in a gasoline pipeline. After examination of near- infrared and mid-infrared absorption spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy, Fourier transform mid-infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy was chosen as the best candidate for implementation. On- line FTIR data is presented, verifying the applicability of the technique for batch interface detection.

  10. Using constructed wetlands to treat biochemical oxygen demand and ammonia associated with a refinery effluent.

    PubMed

    Huddleston, G M; Gillespie, W B; Rodgers, J H

    2000-02-01

    This study evaluated the effectiveness of constructed wetlands for tertiary treatment of a petroleum refinery effluent. Specific performance objectives were to decrease 5-day biochemical oxygen demand (BOD(5)) and ammonia by at least 50% and to reduce toxicity associated with this effluent. Two bench-scale wetlands (replicates) were constructed in a greenhouse to provide tertiary treatment of effluent samples shipped from the refinery to the study site. Integrated wetland features included Typha latifolia Linnaeus planted in low organic (0.2%), sandy sediment, 48-h nominal hydraulic retention time, and 15-cm overlying water depth. Targeted constituents and aqueous toxicity were monitored in wetland inflows and outflows for 3 months. Following a 2 to 3-week stabilization period, effective and consistent removal of BOD(5) and ammonia (as NH(3)-N) from the effluent was observed. Average BOD(5) removal was 80%, while NH(3)-N decreased by an average of 95%. Survival of Pimephales promelas Rafinesque and Ceriodaphnia dubia Richard (7-day, static, renewal exposures) increased by more than 50% and 20%, respectively. Reproduction of C. dubia increased from zero in undiluted wetland inflow to 50% of controls in undiluted wetland outflow. This study demonstrated the potential for constructed wetlands to decrease BOD(5), ammonia, and toxicity in this refinery effluent.

  11. TPH-contaminated Mexican refinery soil: health risk assessment and the first year of changes.

    PubMed

    Iturbe, Rosario; Flores, Rosa M; Flores, Carlos R; Torres, Luis G

    2004-02-01

    The soil of a coastal Mexican refinery is quite contaminated, especially by hydrocarbons, with detected concentrations up to 130000 mg kg(-1) as TPHs (total petroleum hydrocarbons). The main sources of contamination are pipelines, valves, and old storage tanks, besides the land disposal of untreated hydrocarbon sediments derived from the cleaning of storage tanks. A health risk assessment (HRA) was carried out in order to measure the risk hazard indexes and clean-up standards for the refinery soil. HRA suggested the following actions to be taken: benzene concentrations must be reduced in eight of the 16 studied refinery zones to 0.0074-0.0078 mg kg(-1). Also, vanadium concentration must be reduced in two zones up to a concentration of 100 mg kg(-1). In only one of all of the studied zones, benzo(a)pyrene concentration must be reduced to 0.1 mg kg(-1). After 1 yr, TPHs showed a diminution of about 52%. Even though TPHs concentrations were variable, during 1999 the average concentrations were as much as 15.5 times the goal concentration. For year 2000, TPHs concentrations were only 7.4-fold the proposed value. For the 1999-2000 period, PAHs (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons) concentrations decreased by 82%. Some PAHs with 2, 3, 4, and 5 aromatic rings were removed up to 100% values.

  12. The Use of Oil Refinery Wastes as a Dust Suppression Surfactant for Use in Mining

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon-Hardy, D.W.; Beyhan, S.; Ediz, I.G.; Erarslan, K.

    2008-10-15

    In this research, the suitability of a selection of petroleum refinery wastes as a dust suppressant were examined. Dust is a significant problem in surface and underground mining mainly because of its adverse effects on human health and machinery. Hence, dust control and suppression is a vital part of mine planning for mining engineers. Water is the oldest and the cheapest suppressant in dealing with the mine dusts. However, surfactant use has recently been used for a wider range of applications in the mining industry. In order to carry out laboratory experiments, a dust chamber was designed and manufactured. The chamber has an inlet for coal dust entrance and a nozzle for spraying water and the oil refinery wastes. Water and the surfactants were mixed at various ratios and then sprayed onto the coal dusts within the cell. Dust concentration was measured systematically to determine the effects of surfactant containing solution on the coal dust and the data obtained by the measurements were analyzed. The results showed that the oil refinery wastes could be used as a dust suppressant, which may create an economical utilization for the wastes concerned.

  13. Production of ethanol from refinery waste gases. Phase 2, technology development, annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Arora, D.; Basu, R.; Phillips, J.R.; Wikstrom, C.V.; Clausen, E.C.; Gaddy, J.L.

    1995-07-01

    Oil refineries discharge large volumes of H{sub 2}, CO, and CO{sub 2} from cracking, coking, and hydrotreating operations. This program seeks to develop a biological process for converting these waste gases into ethanol, which can be blended with gasoline to reduce emissions. Production of ethanol from all 194 US refineries would save 450 billion BTU annually, would reduce crude oil imports by 110 million barrels/year and emissions by 19 million tons/year. Phase II efforts has yielded at least 3 cultures (Clostridium ljungdahlii, Isolate O-52, Isolate C-01) which are able to produce commercially viable concentrations of ethanol from CO, CO{sub 2}, and H{sub 2} in petroleum waste gas. Single continuous stirred tank reactor studies have shown that 15-20 g/L of ethanol can be produced, with less than 5 g/L acetic acid byproduct. Culture and reactor optimization in Phase III should yield even higher ethanol concentrations and minimal acetic acid. Product recovery studies showed that ethanol is best recovered in a multi-step process involving solvent extraction/distillation to azeotrope/azeotropic distillation or pervaporation, or direct distillation to the azeotrope/azeotropic distillation or pervaporation. Projections show that the ethanol facility for a typical refinery would require an investment of about $30 million, which would be returned in less than 2 years.

  14. TPH-contaminated Mexican refinery soil: health risk assessment and the first year of changes.

    PubMed

    Iturbe, Rosario; Flores, Rosa M; Flores, Carlos R; Torres, Luis G

    2004-02-01

    The soil of a coastal Mexican refinery is quite contaminated, especially by hydrocarbons, with detected concentrations up to 130000 mg kg(-1) as TPHs (total petroleum hydrocarbons). The main sources of contamination are pipelines, valves, and old storage tanks, besides the land disposal of untreated hydrocarbon sediments derived from the cleaning of storage tanks. A health risk assessment (HRA) was carried out in order to measure the risk hazard indexes and clean-up standards for the refinery soil. HRA suggested the following actions to be taken: benzene concentrations must be reduced in eight of the 16 studied refinery zones to 0.0074-0.0078 mg kg(-1). Also, vanadium concentration must be reduced in two zones up to a concentration of 100 mg kg(-1). In only one of all of the studied zones, benzo(a)pyrene concentration must be reduced to 0.1 mg kg(-1). After 1 yr, TPHs showed a diminution of about 52%. Even though TPHs concentrations were variable, during 1999 the average concentrations were as much as 15.5 times the goal concentration. For year 2000, TPHs concentrations were only 7.4-fold the proposed value. For the 1999-2000 period, PAHs (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons) concentrations decreased by 82%. Some PAHs with 2, 3, 4, and 5 aromatic rings were removed up to 100% values. PMID:14969447

  15. Rocky Mountain area petroleum product availability with reduced PADD IV refining capacity

    SciTech Connect

    Hadder, G.R.; Chin, S.M.

    1994-02-01

    Studies of Rocky Mountain area petroleum product availability with reduced refining capacity in Petroleum Administration for Defense IV (PADD IV, part of the Rocky Mountain area) have been performed with the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Refinery Yield Model, a linear program which has been updated to blend gasolines to satisfy constraints on emissions of nitrogen oxides and winter toxic air pollutants. The studies do not predict refinery closures in PADD IV. Rather, the reduced refining capacities provide an analytical framework for probing the flexibility of petroleum refining and distribution for winter demand conditions in the year 2000. Industry analysts have estimated that, for worst case scenarios, 20 to 35 percent of PADD IV refining capacity could be shut-down as a result of clean air and energy tax legislation. Given these industry projections, the study scenarios provide the following conclusions: The Rocky Mountain area petroleum system would have the capability to satisfy winter product demand with PADD IV refinery capacity shut-downs in the middle of the range of industry projections, but not in the high end of the range of projections. PADD IV crude oil production can be maintained by re-routing crude released from PADD IV refinery demands to satisfy increased crude oil demands in PADDs II (Midwest), III (Gulf Coast), and Washington. Clean Air Act product quality regulations generally do not increase the difficulty of satisfying emissions reduction constraints in the scenarios.

  16. Occupational exposure to benzene at the ExxonMobil refinery in Baytown, TX (1978-2006).

    PubMed

    Gaffney, Shannon H; Panko, Julie M; Unice, Ken M; Burns, Amanda M; Kreider, Marisa L; Gelatt, Richard H; Booher, Lindsay E; Paustenbach, Dennis J

    2011-01-01

    Although occupational benzene exposure of refinery workers has been studied for decades, no extensive analysis of historical industrial hygiene data has been performed focusing on airborne concentrations at specific refineries and tasks. This study characterizes benzene exposures at the ExxonMobil Baytown, TX, refinery from 1978 to 2006 to understand the variability in workers' exposures over time and during different job tasks. Exposures were grouped by operational status, job title, and tasks. More than 9000 industrial hygiene air samples were evaluated; approximately 4000 non-task (> 3 h) and 1000 task-related (< 3 h) personal samples were considered. Each sample was assigned to one of 27 job titles, 29 work areas, and 16 task bins (when applicable). Process technicians were sampled most frequently, resulting in the following mean benzene concentrations by area: hydrofiner (n=245, mean=1.3 p.p.m.), oil movements (n=286, mean=0.23 p.p.m.), reformer (n=575, mean=0.10 p.p.m.), tank farm (n=9, mean=0.65 p.p.m.), waste treatment (n=446, mean=0.13 p.p.m.), and other areas (n=460, mean=0.062 p.p.m.). The most frequently sampled task was sample collection (n=218, mean=0.40 p.p.m.). Job title and area did not significantly impact task-related exposures. Airborne concentrations were significantly lower after 1990 than before 1990. Results of this task-focused study may be useful when analyzing benzene exposures at other refineries.

  17. Use of refinery computer model to predict fuel production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flores, F. J.

    1979-01-01

    Several factors (crudes, refinery operation and specifications) that affect yields and properties of broad specification jet fuel were parameterized using the refinery simulation model which can simulate different types of refineries were used to make the calculations. Results obtained from the program are used to correlate yield as a function of final boiling point, hydrogen content and freezing point for jet fuels produced in two refinery configurations, each one processing a different crude mix. Refinery performances are also compared in terms of energy consumption.

  18. Integrated Corn-Based Bio-Refinery

    SciTech Connect

    2006-04-01

    The Integrated Corn-Based Bio-Refinery (ICBR) process will use new technology to convert corn grain and stover into fermentable sugars for the parallel production of value-added chemicals such as 1,3-propanediol (PDO) and fuel ethanol.

  19. [Sumac (Rhus chinensis Mill) biomass refinery engineering].

    PubMed

    Wang, Lan; Wang, Ning; Li, Tan; Chen, Hongzhang

    2014-05-01

    Sumac (Rhus chinensis Mill) is an abundant and widely distributed Chinese native plant. Sumac fruit contains low content of vegetable oil, as an atypical oil plants hardly being processed through traditional vegetable oil production technologies. Based on our own studies on the characteristics of sumac fruit and branches, we established a novel model of sumac biomass refinery, and constructed the sumac biomass refinery technology system and eco-industrial chain integration. Steam explosion was the key technology, and several components fractionation technologies were integrated in the sumac biomass refinery system. The fractionated components were converted into different products depending on their functional features. Eight products including sumac fruit oil, biodiesel, protein feed, flavonoids, unbleached facial tissue, phenolic resin, biomass briquette and biogas were produced in the refinery. The extracted sumac fruit oil by steam explosion pretreatment was applied for the new food resource of Ministry of Health, and the permit was approved. This research provides a new model for the development of atypical wild plant resources.

  20. Refinery Upgrading of Hydropyrolysis Oil From Biomass

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, Michael; Marker, Terry; Ortiz-Toral, Pedro; Linck, Martin; Felix, Larry; Wangerow, Jim; Swanson, Dan; McLeod, Celeste; Del Paggio, Alan; Urade, Vikrant; Rao, Madhusudhan; Narasimhan, Laxmi; Gephart, John; Starr, Jack; Hahn, John; Stover, Daniel; Parrish, Martin; Maxey, Carl; Shonnard, David; Handler, Robert; Fan, Jiquig

    2015-08-31

    Cellulosic and woody biomass can be converted to bio-oils containing less than 10% oxygen by a hydropyrolysis process. Hydropyrolysis is the first step in Gas Technology Institute’s (GTI) integrated Hydropyrolysis and Hydroconversion IH2®. These intermediate bio-oils can then be converted to drop-in hydrocarbon fuels using existing refinery hydrotreating equipment to make hydrocarbon blending components, which are fully compatible with existing fuels. Alternatively, cellulosic or woody biomass can directly be converted into drop-in hydrocarbon fuels containing less than 0.4% oxygen using the IH2 process located adjacent to a refinery or ethanol production facility. Many US oil refineries are actually located near biomass resources and are a logical location for a biomass to transportation fuel conversion process. The goal of this project was to work directly with an oil refinery partner, to determine the most attractive route and location for conversion of biorenewables to drop in fuels in their refinery and ethanol production network. Valero Energy Company, through its subsidiaries, has 12 US oil refineries and 11 ethanol production facilities, making them an ideal partner for this analysis. Valero is also part of a 50- 50 joint venture with Darling Ingredients called Diamond Green Diesel. Diamond Green Diesel’s production capacity is approximately 11,000 barrels per day of renewable diesel. The plant is located adjacent to Valero’s St Charles, Louisiana Refinery and converts recycled animal fats, used cooking oil, and waste corn oil into renewable diesel. This is the largest renewable diesel plant in the U.S. and has successfully operated for over 2 years For this project, 25 liters of hydropyrolysis oil from wood and 25 liters of hydropyrolysis oils from corn stover were produced. The hydropyrolysis oil produced had 4-10% oxygen. Metallurgical testing of hydropyrolysis liquids was completed by Oak Ridge National Laboratories (Oak Ridge) and showed the

  1. Prebiotic petroleum.

    PubMed

    Ali, Mekki-Berrada

    2014-12-01

    This short communication summarizes a global and continuous reflection on the origins of life. "Prebiotic Petroleum" assumes that "the class of most complex molecules of life that may have geochemical and abiotic origin is the class of fatty acids with long aliphatic chains" and proposes a physical process for the formation of liposomes. Developments following the workshop start from the idea that the liposomes also acquire ion exchange channels physically during their forming process. PMID:25743765

  2. [Preface for special issue on biomass refinery (2014)].

    PubMed

    Chen, Hongzhang; Qiu, Weihua

    2014-05-01

    Biomass is the most abundant organic macromolecules in nature, which is expected to achieve the brilliant of biorefinery equivalent to petroleum refining. However, it is considered as the future industry to human due to the complicated composition and transformation processes. The traditional lignocellulose bio-refining thoughts ignored the functional requirements of products, but spent a lot of energies to destruct macromolecule into small molecules, and then converted the small molecules into different products, which was high energy consumption and low atom economy. How to realize the biorefinery of lignocellulose is the key point and difficulty to achieve the biomass industry. An ideal biorefinery of lignocellulose should as far as possibly to obtain the maximum yield of each component, to maintain the integrity of the molecule, to optimize the utilization of raw materials and finally to realize the maximum value. Therefore, it requires the raw materials refining of lignocellosic biomass should be based on the relationship of structure, process transformation and related product characteristics. This special issue reports the latest advances in the fields of raw material refinery, refining technologies, conversion technologies of component.

  3. Fate and effect of naphthenic acids on oil refinery activated sludge wastewater treatment systems.

    PubMed

    Misiti, Teresa; Tezel, Ulas; Pavlostathis, Spyros G

    2013-01-01

    Naphthenic acids (NAs) are a complex group of alkyl-substituted acyclic, monocyclic and polycyclic carboxylic acids present in oil sands process waters, crude oil, refinery wastewater and petroleum products. Crude oil, desalter brine, influent, activated sludge mixed liquor and effluent refinery samples were received from six United States refineries. The total acid number (TAN) of the six crudes tested ranged from 0.12 to 1.5 mg KOH/g crude oil and correlated to the total NA concentration in the crudes. The total NA concentration in the desalter brine, influent, activated sludge mixed liquor and effluent samples ranged from 4.2 to 40.4, 4.5 to 16.6, 9.6 to 140.3 and 2.8 to 11.6 mg NA/L, respectively. The NAs in all wastewater streams accounted for less than 16% of the total COD, indicating that many other organic compounds are present and that NAs are a minor component in refinery wastewaters. Susceptibility tests showed that none of the activated sludge heterotrophic microcosms was completely inhibited by NAs up to 400 mg/L. Growth inhibition ranging from 10 to 59% was observed in all microcosms at and above 100 mg NA/L. NAs chronically-sorbed to activated sludge mixed liquor biomass and powdered activated carbon (PAC) were recalcitrant and persistent. More than 80% of the total NAs remained in the solid phase at the end of the 10-day desorption period (five successive desorption steps). Throughout a 90-day incubation period, the total NA concentration decreased by 33 and 51% in PAC-free and PAC-containing mixed liquor microcosms, respectively. The lower molecular weight fraction of NAs was preferentially degraded in both mixed liquors. The persistence of the residual, higher molecular weight NAs is likely a combination of molecular recalcitrance and decreased bioavailability when chronically-sorbed to the biomass and/or PAC. PMID:23141768

  4. Fate and effect of naphthenic acids on oil refinery activated sludge wastewater treatment systems.

    PubMed

    Misiti, Teresa; Tezel, Ulas; Pavlostathis, Spyros G

    2013-01-01

    Naphthenic acids (NAs) are a complex group of alkyl-substituted acyclic, monocyclic and polycyclic carboxylic acids present in oil sands process waters, crude oil, refinery wastewater and petroleum products. Crude oil, desalter brine, influent, activated sludge mixed liquor and effluent refinery samples were received from six United States refineries. The total acid number (TAN) of the six crudes tested ranged from 0.12 to 1.5 mg KOH/g crude oil and correlated to the total NA concentration in the crudes. The total NA concentration in the desalter brine, influent, activated sludge mixed liquor and effluent samples ranged from 4.2 to 40.4, 4.5 to 16.6, 9.6 to 140.3 and 2.8 to 11.6 mg NA/L, respectively. The NAs in all wastewater streams accounted for less than 16% of the total COD, indicating that many other organic compounds are present and that NAs are a minor component in refinery wastewaters. Susceptibility tests showed that none of the activated sludge heterotrophic microcosms was completely inhibited by NAs up to 400 mg/L. Growth inhibition ranging from 10 to 59% was observed in all microcosms at and above 100 mg NA/L. NAs chronically-sorbed to activated sludge mixed liquor biomass and powdered activated carbon (PAC) were recalcitrant and persistent. More than 80% of the total NAs remained in the solid phase at the end of the 10-day desorption period (five successive desorption steps). Throughout a 90-day incubation period, the total NA concentration decreased by 33 and 51% in PAC-free and PAC-containing mixed liquor microcosms, respectively. The lower molecular weight fraction of NAs was preferentially degraded in both mixed liquors. The persistence of the residual, higher molecular weight NAs is likely a combination of molecular recalcitrance and decreased bioavailability when chronically-sorbed to the biomass and/or PAC.

  5. Petroleum coke in the urban environment: a review of potential health effects.

    PubMed

    Caruso, Joseph A; Zhang, Kezhong; Schroeck, Nicholas J; McCoy, Benjamin; McElmurry, Shawn P

    2015-05-29

    Petroleum coke, or petcoke, is a granular coal-like industrial by-product that is separated during the refinement of heavy crude oil. Recently, the processing of material from Canadian oil sands in U.S. refineries has led to the appearance of large petcoke piles adjacent to urban communities in Detroit and Chicago. The purpose of this literature review is to assess what is known about the effects of petcoke exposure on human health. Toxicological studies in animals indicate that dermal or inhalation petcoke exposure does not lead to a significant risk for cancer development or reproductive and developmental effects. However, pulmonary inflammation was observed in long-term inhalation exposure studies. Epidemiological studies in coke oven workers have shown increased risk for cancer and chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases, but these studies are confounded by multiple industrial exposures, most notably to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons that are generated during petcoke production. The main threat to urban populations in the vicinity of petcoke piles is most likely fugitive dust emissions in the form of fine particulate matter. More research is required to determine whether petcoke fine particulate matter causes or exacerbates disease, either alone or in conjunction with other environmental contaminants.

  6. Petroleum Coke in the Urban Environment: A Review of Potential Health Effects

    PubMed Central

    Caruso, Joseph A.; Zhang, Kezhong; Schroeck, Nicholas J.; McCoy, Benjamin; McElmurry, Shawn P.

    2015-01-01

    Petroleum coke, or petcoke, is a granular coal-like industrial by-product that is separated during the refinement of heavy crude oil. Recently, the processing of material from Canadian oil sands in U.S. refineries has led to the appearance of large petcoke piles adjacent to urban communities in Detroit and Chicago. The purpose of this literature review is to assess what is known about the effects of petcoke exposure on human health. Toxicological studies in animals indicate that dermal or inhalation petcoke exposure does not lead to a significant risk for cancer development or reproductive and developmental effects. However, pulmonary inflammation was observed in long-term inhalation exposure studies. Epidemiological studies in coke oven workers have shown increased risk for cancer and chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases, but these studies are confounded by multiple industrial exposures, most notably to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons that are generated during petcoke production. The main threat to urban populations in the vicinity of petcoke piles is most likely fugitive dust emissions in the form of fine particulate matter. More research is required to determine whether petcoke fine particulate matter causes or exacerbates disease, either alone or in conjunction with other environmental contaminants. PMID:26035666

  7. Impact of software and hardware technologies on occupational health and safety policies in Saudi Arabian oil refineries.

    PubMed

    Idreis, Hany M; Siqueira, Carlos E; Levenstein, Charles C

    2006-01-01

    This article seeks to examine the impact of technology importation on occupational health and safety in both Saudi Arabian and U.S. oil refining industries. Technologies imported to the Saudi oil industry take two forms: hardware (sophisticated equipment to run oil facilities) and software (policies and regulations pertaining to workers' health and safety, and employment rights installed by Aramco's founding multinational companies). This study utilizes qualitative, historically oriented, cross-national case studies to compare and assess workers' health, safety, and rights in Saudi Aramco with its U.S. counterpart, Motiva Enterprises. Two facilities were chosen to conduct field research: the Saudi Aramco oil refinery at Jeddah and Motiva's refinery at Port Arthur, Texas. The Jeddah refinery is fully owned by Saudi Aramco, thus, representing Aramco's health and safety policies and regulations. The Port Arthur refinery serves as a reference case study for U.S. oil refining facilities. The aspects of occupational health and safety in Saudi Aramco--ExxonMobil's joint ventures SAMREF and LUBREF--also are discussed to examine workers' health policies in both companies. The American oil industry made a significant contribution in establishing the Saudi oil industry, with the cooperation of the Saudi government. Despite having outstanding employment benefits schemes in Saudi Aramco, the presence of an organized work force better serves employee participation in Motiva than in Aramco. Safety systems such as Process Safety Management (PSM)--applied in Motiva--partially exist in Aramco to operate hardware technologies safely. Motiva training systems are better through PACE's Triangle of Prevention (TOP). Both companies follow the same pattern of handling occupational injuries and diseases; however, Saudi government agencies (GOSI) are responsible for compensating and treating injured workers. Saudi workers expressed conditional support for the worker committee program

  8. Impact of software and hardware technologies on occupational health and safety policies in Saudi Arabian oil refineries.

    PubMed

    Idreis, Hany M; Siqueira, Carlos E; Levenstein, Charles C

    2006-01-01

    This article seeks to examine the impact of technology importation on occupational health and safety in both Saudi Arabian and U.S. oil refining industries. Technologies imported to the Saudi oil industry take two forms: hardware (sophisticated equipment to run oil facilities) and software (policies and regulations pertaining to workers' health and safety, and employment rights installed by Aramco's founding multinational companies). This study utilizes qualitative, historically oriented, cross-national case studies to compare and assess workers' health, safety, and rights in Saudi Aramco with its U.S. counterpart, Motiva Enterprises. Two facilities were chosen to conduct field research: the Saudi Aramco oil refinery at Jeddah and Motiva's refinery at Port Arthur, Texas. The Jeddah refinery is fully owned by Saudi Aramco, thus, representing Aramco's health and safety policies and regulations. The Port Arthur refinery serves as a reference case study for U.S. oil refining facilities. The aspects of occupational health and safety in Saudi Aramco--ExxonMobil's joint ventures SAMREF and LUBREF--also are discussed to examine workers' health policies in both companies. The American oil industry made a significant contribution in establishing the Saudi oil industry, with the cooperation of the Saudi government. Despite having outstanding employment benefits schemes in Saudi Aramco, the presence of an organized work force better serves employee participation in Motiva than in Aramco. Safety systems such as Process Safety Management (PSM)--applied in Motiva--partially exist in Aramco to operate hardware technologies safely. Motiva training systems are better through PACE's Triangle of Prevention (TOP). Both companies follow the same pattern of handling occupational injuries and diseases; however, Saudi government agencies (GOSI) are responsible for compensating and treating injured workers. Saudi workers expressed conditional support for the worker committee program

  9. Reconstruction of historical exposures at a Welsh nickel refinery (1953-2000).

    PubMed

    Sivulka, Donna J; Seilkop, Steven K; Lascelles, Keith; Conard, Bruce R; Jones, Sian F; Collinson, Eric C

    2014-07-01

    Past epidemiological studies of workers in a nickel refinery in Clydach, Wales, have shown evidence of large excess respiratory cancer mortality risks [lung cancer relative risk (RR) ≈ 3; nasal cancer RR ≈ 140] in those employed prior to 1930, with risks dropping dramatically in workers hired subsequently. The pre-1930 risks have generally been attributed to high exposures to mixtures of nickel compounds. More recent studies of this refinery's workers have focused on those first hired in 1953, when many of the operations that presumably gave rise to the high exposures were no longer in operation. While these studies have shown greatly decreased lung cancer risks overall (RR ≈ 1.4), and no substantive evidence of increased nasal cancer risk, the absence of reliable exposure estimates have made it difficult to ascertain whether the increased lung cancer risks are nickel related or due to other factors. This study uses nickel measurements from the 1970s to the present, documentation of process changes, and dust measurements taken around the 1950s to construct an exposure matrix for the recent cohort. It provides evidence of at least 30-fold decreases in levels of nickel exposure from the 1950s to the present, with estimated inhalable nickel concentrations in the 1950s in excess of 5mg Ni m(-3).

  10. Reconstruction of historical exposures at a Welsh nickel refinery (1953-2000).

    PubMed

    Sivulka, Donna J; Seilkop, Steven K; Lascelles, Keith; Conard, Bruce R; Jones, Sian F; Collinson, Eric C

    2014-07-01

    Past epidemiological studies of workers in a nickel refinery in Clydach, Wales, have shown evidence of large excess respiratory cancer mortality risks [lung cancer relative risk (RR) ≈ 3; nasal cancer RR ≈ 140] in those employed prior to 1930, with risks dropping dramatically in workers hired subsequently. The pre-1930 risks have generally been attributed to high exposures to mixtures of nickel compounds. More recent studies of this refinery's workers have focused on those first hired in 1953, when many of the operations that presumably gave rise to the high exposures were no longer in operation. While these studies have shown greatly decreased lung cancer risks overall (RR ≈ 1.4), and no substantive evidence of increased nasal cancer risk, the absence of reliable exposure estimates have made it difficult to ascertain whether the increased lung cancer risks are nickel related or due to other factors. This study uses nickel measurements from the 1970s to the present, documentation of process changes, and dust measurements taken around the 1950s to construct an exposure matrix for the recent cohort. It provides evidence of at least 30-fold decreases in levels of nickel exposure from the 1950s to the present, with estimated inhalable nickel concentrations in the 1950s in excess of 5mg Ni m(-3). PMID:24759375

  11. 31 CFR 576.308 - Iraqi petroleum and petroleum products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Iraqi petroleum and petroleum products... SANCTIONS REGULATIONS General Definitions § 576.308 Iraqi petroleum and petroleum products. The term Iraqi petroleum and petroleum products means any petroleum, petroleum products, or natural gas originating in...

  12. 31 CFR 576.308 - Iraqi petroleum and petroleum products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Iraqi petroleum and petroleum products... SANCTIONS REGULATIONS General Definitions § 576.308 Iraqi petroleum and petroleum products. The term Iraqi petroleum and petroleum products means any petroleum, petroleum products, or natural gas originating in...

  13. 31 CFR 576.308 - Iraqi petroleum and petroleum products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Iraqi petroleum and petroleum products... SANCTIONS REGULATIONS General Definitions § 576.308 Iraqi petroleum and petroleum products. The term Iraqi petroleum and petroleum products means any petroleum, petroleum products, or natural gas originating in...

  14. 31 CFR 576.308 - Iraqi petroleum and petroleum products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Iraqi petroleum and petroleum products... SANCTIONS REGULATIONS General Definitions § 576.308 Iraqi petroleum and petroleum products. The term Iraqi petroleum and petroleum products means any petroleum, petroleum products, or natural gas originating in...

  15. Expanded Mongstad refinery has major export role

    SciTech Connect

    Aalund, L.R

    1990-03-12

    Lost in the controversy over project cost overruns during the late 1980s was the fact that Statoil, Norway's state-owned oil company, was turning its Mongstad plant into one of Europe's most modern refiners. The expansion and revamp project was completed and put on stream during the last half of 1989. The author reports how the modernized refinery's output of top quality products has implications for markets not only throughout Scandinavia but also in northwestern Europe and the United States.

  16. Opportunities for Biorenewables in Oil Refineries

    SciTech Connect

    Marker, T.L.

    2005-12-19

    Abstract: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the potential for using biorenewable feedstocks in oil refineries. Economic analyses were conducted, with support from process modeling and proof of principle experiments, to assess a variety of potential processes and configurations. The study considered two primary alternatives: the production of biodiesel and green diesel from vegetable oils and greases and opportunities for utilization of pyrolysis oil. The study identified a number of promising opportunities for biorenewables in existing or new refining operations.

  17. Naphthenic acid corrosion in the refinery

    SciTech Connect

    Craig, H.L. Jr.

    1995-11-01

    Field tests and laboratory studies of refinery process streams are presented. The effects of temperature, velocity and physical state were studied with respect to alloy selection for corrosion resistant service. The amount of molybdenum in the austenitic stainless steel alloys is the dominant factor in conferring corrosion resistance. The Naphthenic Acid Corrosion Index (NACI) is useful in assessing the severity of corrosion under a variety of circumstances.

  18. Energy Efficiency Improvement in the Petroleum RefiningIndustry

    SciTech Connect

    Worrell, Ernst; Galitsky, Christina

    2005-05-01

    Information has proven to be an important barrier inindustrial energy efficiency improvement. Voluntary government programsaim to assist industry to improve energy efficiency by supplyinginformation on opportunities. ENERGY STAR(R) supports the development ofstrong strategic corporate energy management programs, by providingenergy management information tools and strategies. This paper summarizesENERGY STAR research conducted to develop an Energy Guide for thePetroleum Refining industry. Petroleum refining in the United States isthe largest in the world, providing inputs to virtually every economicsector, including the transport sector and the chemical industry.Refineries spend typically 50 percent of the cash operating costs (e.g.,excluding capital costs and depreciation) on energy, making energy amajor cost factor and also an important opportunity for cost reduction.The petroleum refining industry consumes about 3.1 Quads of primaryenergy, making it the single largest industrial energy user in the UnitedStates. Typically, refineries can economically improve energy efficiencyby 20 percent. The findings suggest that given available resources andtechnology, there are substantial opportunities to reduce energyconsumption cost-effectively in the petroleum refining industry whilemaintaining the quality of the products manufactured.

  19. The Kennecott Utah Copper Refinery modernization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutliff, K. E.; Probert, T. I.; Unger, C. T.; Hoffmann, J. E.; Wells, B. A.; George, D. B.

    1996-08-01

    In early 1992, Kennecott announced plans to modernize and expand the smelter and refinery located near Salt Lake City, Utah. The project increased the smelter capacity from 150,000 tonnes per year to 280,000 tonnes per year and also increased the refinery capacity from 200,000 tonnes per year to meet smelter output. Total cost of the modernization was 882 million. Part I of this paper outlines the scope of the refinery modernization program and describes the implementation of the new technology used there. The technology is based on polymer concrete cells, thoroughly prepared anodes, stainless steel plating blanks, and highly automated materials handling. In Part II, the hydrometallurgical process chemistry employed at the new Kennecott slimes treatment facility is described. The processing philosophy incorporates three major objectives: very-high firstpass recovery of the valuable metals from the slimes with minimal in-process inventory; minimization of the return of impurity metals (e.g., Pb, Sb, As, and Bi) to the smelter circuit; and complete elimination of pyrometallurgical processing with its potential for environmental abuse and precious metals recycle. In both parts, the unit start-ups and initial operating results are presented.

  20. Polyvinyl chloride work boots in the management of shoe dermatitis in industrial workers.

    PubMed

    Mathias, C G; Maibach, H I

    1979-07-01

    A sugar refinery worker developed allergic contact dermatitis of his feet secondary to rubber accelerators in his work boots. The dermatitis resolved when polyvinyl chloride work boots were substituted. The importance of controlling hyperhidrosis in the management of foot dermatitis in workers is discussed. PMID:498770

  1. EIA model documentation: Petroleum market model of the national energy modeling system

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-28

    The purpose of this report is to define the objectives of the Petroleum Market Model (PMM), describe its basic approach, and provide detail on how it works. This report is intended as a reference document for model analysts, users, and the public. Documentation of the model is in accordance with EIA`s legal obligation to provide adequate documentation in support of its models. The PMM models petroleum refining activities, the marketing of petroleum products to consumption regions, the production of natural gas liquids in gas processing plants, and domestic methanol production. The PMM projects petroleum product prices and sources of supply for meeting petroleum product demand. The sources of supply include crude oil, both domestic and imported; other inputs including alcohols and ethers; natural gas plant liquids production; petroleum product imports; and refinery processing gain. In addition, the PMM estimates domestic refinery capacity expansion and fuel consumption. Product prices are estimated at the Census division level and much of the refining activity information is at the Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District level.

  2. Petroleum Market Model of the National Energy Modeling System. Part 2

    SciTech Connect

    1997-12-18

    This report contains the following: Bibliography; Petroleum Market Model abstract; Data quality; Estimation methodologies (includes refinery investment recovery thresholds, gas plant models, chemical industry demand for methanol, estimation of refinery fixed costs, estimation of distribution costs, estimation of taxes gasoline specifications, estimation of gasoline market shares, estimation of low-sulfur diesel market shares, low-sulfur diesel specifications, estimation of regional conversion coefficients, estimation of SO{sub 2} allowance equations, unfinished oil imports methodology, product pipeline capacities and tariffs, cogeneration methodology, natural gas plant fuel consumption, and Alaskan crude oil exports); Matrix generator documentation; Historical data processing; and Biofuels supply submodule.

  3. Occupational exposure to benzene at the ExxonMobil refinery at Baton Rouge, Louisiana (1977-2005).

    PubMed

    Panko, Julie M; Gaffney, Shannon H; Burns, Amanda M; Unice, Ken M; Kreider, Marisa L; Booher, Lindsay E; Gelatt, Richard H; Marshall, J Ralph; Paustenbach, Dennis J

    2009-09-01

    Because crude oil contains up to 3% benzene and there is an association between high chronic exposure to appreciable concentrations of benzene and acute myelogenous leukemia, exposure of refinery workers has been studied for many years. To date, no extensive industrial hygiene exposure analyses for historical benzene exposure have been performed, and none have focused on the airborne concentrations in the workplace at specific refineries or for specific tasks. In this study, the authors evaluated the airborne concentrations of benzene and their variability over time at the ExxonMobil refinery in Baton Rouge between 1977 and 2005. Refinery workers were categorized into 117 worker groups using company job descriptions. These 117 groups were further collapsed into 25 job categories based on similarity of measured exposure results. Results of 5289 personal air samples are included in this analysis; 3403 were considered nontask (>or= 180 min) personal samples, and 830 were considered task-related (< 180 min) personal samples; the remainder did not fit in either category. In general, nontask personal air samples indicated that exposures of the past 30 years were generally below the occupational exposure limit of 1 ppm, but there was only a small, decreasing temporal trend in the concentrations. The job sampled most frequently during routine operations was process technician and, as broken down by area, resulted in the following mean benzene concentrations: analyzers (mean = 0.12 ppm), coker (mean = 0.013 ppm), hydrofiner (mean = 0.0054 ppm), lube blending and storage (mean = 0.010 ppm), waste treatment (mean = 0.092 ppm), and all other areas (mean = 0.055 ppm). Task-based samples indicated that the highest exposures resulted from the sampling tasks, specifically from those performed on process materials; in general, though, even these tasks had concentrations well below the STEL of 5 ppm. The most frequently sampled task was gauging (mean = 0.12 ppm). Task

  4. 78 FR 10128 - Expansion/Reorganization of Foreign-Trade Subzone 70T; Marathon Petroleum Company LP; Detroit, MI

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-13

    ... Marathon Petroleum Company LP refinery in Detroit, Michigan. (B-42-2012, docketed 6/1/2012); Whereas, notice inviting public comment has been given in the Federal Register (77 FR 33716-33717) and the... Foreign-Trade Zones Board Expansion/Reorganization of Foreign-Trade Subzone 70T; Marathon...

  5. Further follow up of mortality in a United Kingdom oil refinery cohort.

    PubMed Central

    Rushton, L

    1993-01-01

    The results of an extension of follow up (1976 to 1989) of a cohort of workers employed for at least one year between 1 January 1950 and 31 December 1975 at eight oil refineries in Britain are reported. Over 99% of the workers were successfully traced to determine their vital status at 31 December 1989. The mortality observed was compared with that expected from the death rates of all the male population of England and Wales and Scotland. The mortality from all causes of death for the total study population was lower than that of the comparison population, and reduced mortality was also found for many of the major non-malignant causes of death. Raised mortality patterns were found for diseases of the arteries, in particular aortic aneurysm, and accidental fire and explosion, for the total study population, and across several refineries and other subgroups. Mortality from all neoplasms was lower than expected overall, largely due to a deficit of deaths from malignant neoplasm of the lung. Raised mortality from all neoplasms was found for labourers and in particular for malignant neoplasms of the oesophagus, stomach, and lung, although the mortality was also high for all men in this social class in the national population. Regional variations may have accounted for some of the high mortality. There were other raised mortality patterns in malignant neoplasms of the intestine, rectum, larynx, and prostate but these tended to be isolated and not consistent across refineries and other subgroups. As in the earlier follow up there was raised mortality from melanoma in several job groups. PMID:8329321

  6. [Analisys of work-related accidents and incidents in an oil refinery in Rio de Janeiro].

    PubMed

    de Souza, Carlos Augusto Vaz; de Freitas, Carlos Machado

    2003-01-01

    Accidents in the chemical industry can have serious consequences for workers, communities, and the environment and are thus highly relevant to public health. This article is the result of an occupational surveillance project involving several public institutions. We analyze 800 work-related accidents that resulted in injuries, environmental damage, or loss of production in 1997 in an oil refinery located in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The methodology was based on managerial and organizational approaches to accident investigation, with the European Union reporting system as the reference. The results highlight various limitations in the process of reporting and investigating accidents, as well as a certain hierarchy of accidents, with more attention given to accidents involving loss of production and less to those resulting in injuries, particularly among outsourced workers. PMID:14666211

  7. [Low temperature plasma technology for biomass refinery].

    PubMed

    Fu, Xiaoguo; Chen, Hongzhang

    2014-05-01

    Biorefinery that utilizes renewable biomass for production of fuels, chemicals and bio-materials has become more and more important in chemical industry. Recently, steam explosion technology, acid and alkali treatment are the main biorefinery treatment technologies. Meanwhile, low temperature plasma technology has attracted extensive attention in biomass refining process due to its unique chemical activity and high energy. We systemically summarize the research progress of low temperature plasma technology for pretreatment, sugar platflow, selective modification, liquefaction and gasification in biomass refinery. Moreover, the mechanism of low temperature plasma in biorefinery and its further development were also discussed.

  8. Multi-Criteria Optimization of Refinery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livshits, Mikhail Yu.; Sizikov, Aleksandr P.

    2016-02-01

    Vector optimization of refinery is discussed. As the target function, a multi-level hierarchy criterion convolution is used. This convolution is formed following the recurrent procedure based on a scalar invariant representing a linear combination of Hölder norms: the first order norm and the sup-norm. The issue of matrix representation of the suggested invariant has been analyzed; the procedure of building the respective matrix structure has been developed. The approach has been implemented in a respective package of application software programs.

  9. Biodegradation of petroleum sludge and petroleum polluted soil by a bacterial consortium: a laboratory study.

    PubMed

    Gojgic-Cvijovic, G D; Milic, J S; Solevic, T M; Beskoski, V P; Ilic, M V; Djokic, L S; Narancic, T M; Vrvic, M M

    2012-02-01

    This article presents a study of the efficiency and degradation pattern of samples of petroleum sludge and polluted sandy soil from an oil refinery. A bacterial consortium, consisting of strains from the genera Pseudomonas, Achromobacter, Bacillus and Micromonospora, was isolated from a petroleum sludge sample and characterized. The addition of nitrogen and phosphorus nutrients and a chemical surfactant to both the samples and bioaugmentation to the soil sample were applied under laboratory conditions. The extent of biodegradation was monitored by the gravimetric method and analysis of the residual oil by gas chromatography. Over a 12-week experiment, the achieved degree of TPH (total petroleum hydrocarbon) degradation amounted to 82-88% in the petroleum sludge and 86-91% in the polluted soil. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry was utilized to determine the biodegradability and degradation rates of n-alkanes, isoprenoids, steranes, diasteranes and terpanes. Complete degradation of the n-alkanes and isoprenoids fractions occurred in both the samples. In addition, the intensities of the peaks corresponding to tricyclic terpenes and homohopanes were decreased, while significant changes were also observed in the distribution of diasteranes and steranes.

  10. [Indian workers in Oman].

    PubMed

    Longuenesse, E

    1985-01-01

    Until recently Oman was a country of emigration, but by 1980 an estimated 200,000 foreign workers were in the country due to the petroleum boom. Almost 1/3 of the estimated 300,000 Indian workers in the Gulf states were in Oman, a country whose colonial heritage was closely tied to that of India and many of whose inhabitants still speak Urdu. The number of work permits granted to Indians working in the private sector in Oman increased from 47,928 in 1976 to 80,787 in 1980. An estimated 110,000 Indians were working in Oman in 1982, the great majority in the construction and public works sector. A few hundred Indian women were employed by the government of Oman, as domestics, or in other capacities. No accurate data is available on the qualifications of Indian workers in Oman, but a 1979 survey suggested a relatively low illiteracy rate among them. 60-75% of Indians in Oman are from the state of Kerala, followed by workers from the Punjab and the southern states of Tamil Nadu and Andhra Pradesh and Bombay. Indian workers are recruited by specialized agencies or by friends or relatives already employed in Oman. Employers in Oman prefer to recruit through agencies because the preselection process minimizes hiring of workers unqualified for their posts. Officially, expenses of transportation, visas, and other needs are shared by the worker and the employer, but the demand for jobs is so strong that the workers are obliged to pay commissions which amount to considerable sums for stable and well paying jobs. Wages in Oman are however 2 to 5 times the level in India. Numerous abuses have been reported in recruitment practices and in failure of employers in Oman to pay the promised wages, but Indian workers have little recourse. At the same level of qualifications, Indians are paid less then non-Omani Arabs, who in turn receive less than Oman nationals. Indians who remain in Oman long enough nevertheless are able to support families at home and to accumulate considerable

  11. 40 CFR 80.1621 - Small volume refinery definition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... whether the reduction in crude oil capacity is due to operational changes at the refinery or a company....1622: (1) Produces gasoline by processing crude oil through refinery processing units. (2) The average aggregate daily crude oil throughput, including feedstocks derived from crude oil, for the calendar...

  12. Fundamentals of petroleum. Third edition

    SciTech Connect

    Gerding, M.

    1986-01-01

    This book contains the following nine chapters: Petroleum Geology; Petroleum Exploration; Aspects of Leasing; Drilling Operations; Production; Transportation; Refining and Processing; Petroleum Marketing; and Economics of the Industry.

  13. [Analysis of fluorescence spectrum of petroleum-polluted water].

    PubMed

    Huang, Miao-Fen; Song, Qing-Jun; Xing, Xu-Feng; Jian, Wei-Jun; Liu, Yuan; Zhao, Zu-Long

    2014-09-01

    In four ratio experiments, natural waters, sampled from the mountain reservoir and the sea water around Dalian city, were mixed with the sewage from petroleum refinery and petroleum exploitation plants. The fluorescence spectra of water samples containing only chromophoric dissolved organic matters(CDOM), samples containing only petroleum, and samples containing a mixture of petroleum and CDOM were analyzed, respectively. The purpose of this analysis is to provide a basis for determining the contribution of petroleum substances and CDOM to the total absorption coefficient of the petroleum-contaminated water by using fluorescence technique. The results showed that firstly, CDOM in seawater had three main fluorescence peaks at Ex: 225-230 nm/Em: 320-330 nm, Ex: 280 nm/Em: 340 nm and Ex: 225-240 nm/Em: 430-470 nm, respectively, and these may arise from the oceanic chlorophyll. CDOM in natural reservoir water had two main fluorescence peaks at EX: 240- 260 nm/Em: 420-450 nm and Ex: 310~350 nm/Em: 420--440 nm, respectively, and these may arise from the terrestrial sources; secondly, the water samples containing only petroleum extracted with n-hexane had one to three fluorescence spectral peaksat Ex: 220-240 nm/Em: 320-340 nm, Ex: 270-290 nm/Em: 310-340 nm and Ex: 220-235 nm/Em: 280-310 nm, respectively, caused by their hydrocarbon component; finally, the water samples containing both petroleum and CDOM showed a very strong fluorescence peak at Ex: 230-250 nm/Em: 320-370 nm, caused by the combined effect of CDOM and petroleum hydrocarbons.

  14. [Analysis of fluorescence spectrum of petroleum-polluted water].

    PubMed

    Huang, Miao-Fen; Song, Qing-Jun; Xing, Xu-Feng; Jian, Wei-Jun; Liu, Yuan; Zhao, Zu-Long

    2014-09-01

    In four ratio experiments, natural waters, sampled from the mountain reservoir and the sea water around Dalian city, were mixed with the sewage from petroleum refinery and petroleum exploitation plants. The fluorescence spectra of water samples containing only chromophoric dissolved organic matters(CDOM), samples containing only petroleum, and samples containing a mixture of petroleum and CDOM were analyzed, respectively. The purpose of this analysis is to provide a basis for determining the contribution of petroleum substances and CDOM to the total absorption coefficient of the petroleum-contaminated water by using fluorescence technique. The results showed that firstly, CDOM in seawater had three main fluorescence peaks at Ex: 225-230 nm/Em: 320-330 nm, Ex: 280 nm/Em: 340 nm and Ex: 225-240 nm/Em: 430-470 nm, respectively, and these may arise from the oceanic chlorophyll. CDOM in natural reservoir water had two main fluorescence peaks at EX: 240- 260 nm/Em: 420-450 nm and Ex: 310~350 nm/Em: 420--440 nm, respectively, and these may arise from the terrestrial sources; secondly, the water samples containing only petroleum extracted with n-hexane had one to three fluorescence spectral peaksat Ex: 220-240 nm/Em: 320-340 nm, Ex: 270-290 nm/Em: 310-340 nm and Ex: 220-235 nm/Em: 280-310 nm, respectively, caused by their hydrocarbon component; finally, the water samples containing both petroleum and CDOM showed a very strong fluorescence peak at Ex: 230-250 nm/Em: 320-370 nm, caused by the combined effect of CDOM and petroleum hydrocarbons. PMID:25532346

  15. Heavy oil project pushed at complex refinery

    SciTech Connect

    Zandona, O.J.; Busch, L.E.; Hettinger, W.P. Jr.; Krock, R.P.

    1982-03-22

    A process description is given of a reduced crude conversion (RCC) refinery with a 40,000 b/d capacity. The process design basis is to process 40,000 b/d 650/sup +//sup 0/ F. untreated atmospheric reduced crude oil comparable to that from Arabian light crude oil. Specific feedstock qualities are: 18.6/sup 0/ APl, 2.7 wt% sulfur, 5.8 wt% Ramsbottom carbon, and 35 ppm nickel plus vanadium metals. Design conversion is 78%. Design RCC gasoline yield of 51% in addition to propylene and butylene yields of 21% as alkylation unit feedstock give a total gasoline potential of 69% of the feed to the RCC Unit after netting out additional isobutane feedstock for the alkylation process. This process will be applied to a wide range of crude oils, extending the flexibility of the refinery with regard to crude oil supply operations. The RCC technology has been demonstrated to be technically feasible for crude oils containing 70 ppm Ni +V and 5.8% Ramsbottom carbon in the atmospheric reduced crude oil. 8 refs.

  16. Reformulated gasoline: Costs and refinery impacts

    SciTech Connect

    Hadder, G.R.

    1994-02-01

    Studies of reformulated gasoline (RFG) costs and refinery impacts have been performed with the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Refinery Yield Model (ORNL-RYM), a linear program which has been updated to blend gasolines to satisfy emissions constraints defined by preliminary complex emissions models. Policy makers may use the reformulation cost knee (the point at which costs start to rise sharply for incremental emissions control) to set emissions reduction targets, giving due consideration to the differences between model representations and actual refining operations. ORNL-RYM estimates that the reformulation cost knee for the US East Coast (PADD I) is about 15.2 cents per gallon with a 30 percent reduction of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The estimated cost knee for the US Gulf Coast (PADD III) is about 5.5 cents per gallon with a VOC reduction of 35 percent. Reid vapor pressure (RVP) reduction is the dominant VOC reduction mechanism. Even with anti-dumping constraints, conventional gasoline appears to be an important sink which permits RFG to be blended with lower aromatics and sulfur contents in PADD III. In addition to the potentially large sensitivity of RFG production to different emissions models, RFG production is sensitive to the non-exhaust VOC share assumption for a particular VOC model. ORNL-RYM has also been used to estimate the sensitivity of RFG production to the cost of capital; to the RVP requirements for conventional gasoline; and to the percentage of RFG produced in a refining region.

  17. Reduction of COD in refinery wastewater through adsorption on date-pit activated carbon.

    PubMed

    El-Naas, Muftah H; Al-Zuhair, Sulaiman; Abu Alhaija, Manal

    2010-01-15

    Experiments were carried out to evaluate the batch adsorption of COD from petroleum refinery wastewater on a locally prepared date-pit activated carbon (DP-AC), and its adsorption effectiveness was compared to that of commercially available BDH activated carbon (BDH-AC). Adsorption equilibrium and kinetic data were determined for both adsorbents and fitted to several adsorption isotherm and kinetics models, respectively. The Langmuir monolayer isotherm fitted well the equilibrium data of COD on both adsorbents; whereas, the kinetics data were best fitted by the pseudo-second order model. Modeling of the controlling mechanisms indicated that both intrinsic kinetics and mass transfer contributed to controlling the adsorption process. Mass transfer seemed to be the dominant mechanism at low COD content, while intrinsic kinetics dominates at high concentrations. In general, the adsorption effectiveness of locally prepared DP-AC was proven to be comparable to that of BDH-AC. Therefore, DP-AC can be utilized as an effective and less expensive adsorbent for the reduction of COD in refinery wastewater.

  18. Aquatic toxicity variability for fresh- and saltwater species in refinery wastewater effluent

    SciTech Connect

    Bleckmann, C.A.; Rabe, B.; Edgmon, S.J.; Fillingame, D.

    1995-07-01

    The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has established test requirements for toxicity reduction or toxicity identification evaluations (TR/TIE) of wastewater effluents. Interpretations of test results are complicated by factors other than toxicity when essentially freshwater wastewaters flow into estuaries and the effluent permit requires marine organisms for testing. This paper reports the results of an investigation of potential freshwater surrogate species, and Microtox{reg_sign}, for use in such a TIE. Of the five species tested, mysid shrimp were found to be most sensitive to unidentified toxicants in petroleum refinery wastewater. No strong correlations of this sensitivity to that of other organisms, or to several wastewater constitutents, were identified. The two marine species specified in the effluent permit were more sensitive to the toxicants that were the freshwater species.

  19. Effect of oil refinery sludges on the growth and antioxidant system of alfalfa plants.

    PubMed

    Martí, M Carmen; Camejo, Daymi; Fernández-García, Nieves; Rellán-Alvarez, Rubén; Marques, Silvia; Sevilla, Francisca; Jiménez, Ana

    2009-11-15

    The refining process in the petrochemical industry generates oil refinery sludges, a potentially contaminating waste product, with a high content of hydrocarbons and heavy metals. Faster degradation of hydrocarbons has been reported in vegetated soils than in non-vegetated soils, but the impact of these contaminants on the plants physiology and on their antioxidant system is not well known. In this study, the effect of the addition of petroleum sludge to soil on the physiological parameters, nutrient contents, and oxidative and antioxidant status in alfalfa was investigated. An inhibition of alfalfa growth and an induction of oxidative stress, as indicated by an increase in protein oxidation, were found. Also, the superoxide dismutase isoenzymes, peroxidase, and those enzymes involved in the ascorbate-glutathione cycle showed significant activity increases, parallel to an enhancement of total homoglutathione, allowing plants being tolerant to this situation. This information is necessary to establish successful and sustainable plant-based remediation strategies.

  20. Classification of diesel pool refinery streams through near infrared spectroscopy and support vector machines using C-SVC and ν-SVC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves, Julio Cesar L.; Henriques, Claudete B.; Poppi, Ronei J.

    2014-01-01

    The use of near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy combined with chemometric methods have been widely used in petroleum and petrochemical industry and provides suitable methods for process control and quality control. The algorithm support vector machines (SVM) has demonstrated to be a powerful chemometric tool for development of classification models due to its ability to nonlinear modeling and with high generalization capability and these characteristics can be especially important for treating near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy data of complex mixtures such as petroleum refinery streams. In this work, a study on the performance of the support vector machines algorithm for classification was carried out, using C-SVC and ν-SVC, applied to near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy data of different types of streams that make up the diesel pool in a petroleum refinery: light gas oil, heavy gas oil, hydrotreated diesel, kerosene, heavy naphtha and external diesel. In addition to these six streams, the diesel final blend produced in the refinery was added to complete the data set. C-SVC and ν-SVC classification models with 2, 4, 6 and 7 classes were developed for comparison between its results and also for comparison with the soft independent modeling of class analogy (SIMCA) models results. It is demonstrated the superior performance of SVC models especially using ν-SVC for development of classification models for 6 and 7 classes leading to an improvement of sensitivity on validation sample sets of 24% and 15%, respectively, when compared to SIMCA models, providing better identification of chemical compositions of different diesel pool refinery streams.

  1. Classification of diesel pool refinery streams through near infrared spectroscopy and support vector machines using C-SVC and ν-SVC.

    PubMed

    Alves, Julio Cesar L; Henriques, Claudete B; Poppi, Ronei J

    2014-01-01

    The use of near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy combined with chemometric methods have been widely used in petroleum and petrochemical industry and provides suitable methods for process control and quality control. The algorithm support vector machines (SVM) has demonstrated to be a powerful chemometric tool for development of classification models due to its ability to nonlinear modeling and with high generalization capability and these characteristics can be especially important for treating near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy data of complex mixtures such as petroleum refinery streams. In this work, a study on the performance of the support vector machines algorithm for classification was carried out, using C-SVC and ν-SVC, applied to near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy data of different types of streams that make up the diesel pool in a petroleum refinery: light gas oil, heavy gas oil, hydrotreated diesel, kerosene, heavy naphtha and external diesel. In addition to these six streams, the diesel final blend produced in the refinery was added to complete the data set. C-SVC and ν-SVC classification models with 2, 4, 6 and 7 classes were developed for comparison between its results and also for comparison with the soft independent modeling of class analogy (SIMCA) models results. It is demonstrated the superior performance of SVC models especially using ν-SVC for development of classification models for 6 and 7 classes leading to an improvement of sensitivity on validation sample sets of 24% and 15%, respectively, when compared to SIMCA models, providing better identification of chemical compositions of different diesel pool refinery streams.

  2. Petroleum Processing Wastes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, D. A.

    1978-01-01

    Presents a literature review of the petroleum processing wastes, covering publications of 1977. This review covers studies such as the use of activated carbon in petroleum and petrochemical waste treatment. A list of 15 references is also presented. (HM)

  3. Refinery catalysts: Coping with performance anxiety

    SciTech Connect

    Shelley, S.

    1994-04-01

    Petroleum refiners worldwide are struggling to comply with environmental mandates that tightly dictate the composition of gasoline and diesel fuel. At the same time, many are trying to capitalize on cost advantages offered by heavy, dirty feedstocks. This is stimulating development in catalysts for resid cracking, isomerization, alkylation and hydrotreating. The paper briefly describes development efforts.

  4. Practical petroleum geology

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-01-01

    This book presents the scope and content of the field of petroleum geology from the standpoint of the practicing petroleum geologist. Includes chapters on basic geological concepts, the sedimentation process, accumulation of hydrocarbons, exploration, economic examination, drilling of exploratory wells, recovering oil and gas (reservoir geology), and the relationship of geology to the petroleum industry as a whole.

  5. Conversion of high carbon refinery by-products. Quarterly report, July 1--September 30, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Katta, S.; Henningsen, G.; Lin, Y.Y.; Agrawal, R.

    1996-10-18

    The overall objective of the project is to demonstrate that a partial oxidation system, which utilizes a transport reactor, is a viable means of converting refinery wastes, byproducts, and other low value materials into valuable products. The primary product would be a high quality fuel gas, which could also be used as a source of hydrogen. The concept involves subjecting the hydrocarbon feed to pyrolysis and steam gasification in a circulating bed of solids. Carbon residue formed during pyrolysis, as well as metals in the feed, are captured by the circulating solids which are returned to the bottom of the transport reactor. Air or oxygen is introduced in this lower zone and sufficient carbon is burned, sub-stoichiometrically, to provide the necessary heat for the endothermic pyrolysis and gasification reactions. The hot solids and gases leaving this zone pass upward to contact the feed material and continue the gasification process. Tests were conducted in the Transport Reactor Test Unit (TRTU) to study gasification and combustion of Rose Bottoms solids using the spent FCC (Fluid Catalytic Cracker) catalyst as the circulating medium and petroleum coke at temperature of 1,750 F. The Rose (Residuum Oil Supercritical Extraction) bottoms was produced in the Kellogg`s Rose unit. A dry solid feed system developed previously was used to feed petroleum coke and Rose Bottoms. Studies were also done in the Bench Scale Reactor Unit (BRU) to investigate partial oxidation and gasification of petroleum coke over temperature range of 1,800 F to 2,100 F. Results obtained in the BRU and TRTU on petroleum coke formed the basis to develop a flowsheet to process this material in a transport reactor. Results from these studies are presented in this report.

  6. Applications of T-ray spectroscopy in the petroleum field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Douseri, Fatemah M.

    2005-11-01

    Because of heavy usage of petroleum products, which are the main source of energy in daily life and industry, a fast, reliable, and portable analysis system is needed to complement traditional techniques. Terahertz (THz) radiation, or T-rays, is electromagnetic radiation in the 0.1 to 10 THz frequency range. One unique attribute of T-rays is their ability to sensitively measure the induced molecular dipole moments in non-polar liquids such as aromatics, which make up the majority of the contents of many petroleum products. This information can lead to several applications in petroleum analysis. The application of T-rays to petroleum product analysis has the potential to make a significant impact in the petroleum field. In this dissertation, I show the first use of T-ray time-domain spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy techniques for petroleum product analysis. I report on the feasibility of analyzing selected petroleum products, including gasoline, diesel, lubricating oil, and selected compounds of toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene (BTEX). With the use of a T-ray time-domain spectrometer. I demonstrate that gasolines with different octane numbers and diesel all show specific absorption coefficients and refractive indexes in the spectral range from 0.5 to 2.0 THz. Furthermore, I report the qualitative and quantitative analysis of selected BTEX components in gasoline and diesel using FTIR spectroscopy in the 50 to 650 cm-1 region. I distinguish gasolines with different octane numbers from diesel and lubricating oil according to their different spectral features. I also determine the concentration of (o, m, p) xylene isomers in gasoline according to their specific absorption bands. The experimental results in this thesis, imply that linking between the knowledge of petroleum products and the development of T-ray spectrometer with the cooperation of industry might translate the T-ray spectroscopic system into a real world application in

  7. Characterizing exposures to airborne metals and nanoparticle emissions in a refinery.

    PubMed

    Miller, Arthur; Drake, Pamela L; Hintz, Patrick; Habjan, Matt

    2010-07-01

    An air quality survey was conducted at a precious metals refinery in order to evaluate worker exposures to airborne metals and to provide detailed characterization of the aerosols. Two areas within the refinery were characterized: a furnace room and an electro-refining area. In line with standard survey practices, both personal and area air filter samples were collected on 37-mm filters and analyzed for metals by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy. In addition to the standard sampling, measurements were conducted using other tools, designed to provide enhanced characterization of the workplace aerosols. The number concentration and number-weighted particle size distribution of airborne particles were measured with a fast mobility particle sizer (FMPS). Custom-designed software was used to correlate particle concentration data with spatial location data to generate contour maps of particle number concentrations in the work areas. Short-term samples were collected in areas of localized high concentrations and analyzed using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) to determine particle morphology and elemental chemistry. Analysis of filter samples indicated that all of the workers were exposed to levels of silver above the Occupational Safety and Health Administration permissible exposure limit of 0.01 mg m(-3) even though the localized ventilation was functioning. Measurements with the FMPS indicated that particle number concentrations near the furnace increased up to 1000-fold above the baseline during the pouring of molten metal. Spatial mapping revealed localized elevated particle concentrations near the furnaces and plumes of particles rising into the stairwells and traveling to the upper work areas. Results of TEM/EDS analyses confirmed the high number of nanoparticles measured by the FMPS and indicated the aerosols were rich in metals including silver, lead, antimony, selenium, and zinc. Results of

  8. New oil era prompts unique resid refinery

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, T.E.; Sliger, A.G.; Kain, G.E.

    1982-03-22

    Flowsheets and a process description are given for a refinery that will employ resid desulfurization and the Heavy Oil Cracking (HOC) process to upgrade the bottom of the crude barrel. The key processing concept in the new Saber facility is the combination of HOC, a proven process, that has been employed since the early 1960's, with resid hydrodesulfurization (HDS) a newer process but one that is well proven and that has found widespread application. Design feedstock for the complex is heavy Arabian 650+/degree/ F. atmospheric resid, but flexibility to run light Arabian atmospheric resid or any intermediate resid also has been incorporated into the design. Rated Capacity is 46,100 b/sd. 9 refs.

  9. RCC complex now cornerstone of Ashland refinery

    SciTech Connect

    Busch, L.E.; Hettinger, W.P.; Krock, R.P.

    1984-12-10

    Performance of the first grassroots RCC process unit during its initial 1 1/2 years of operation at Ashland's principal refinery at Catlettsburg, Ky., has confirmed the commercial viability and process advantages of this new technology for heavy oil conversion. The unit has successfully processed untreated atmospheric residuum having Ramsbottom carbon content as high as 7.1 wt%, and metals contamination up to 70 ppm nickel plus vanadium into high yields of transportation and distillate fuels and other light products. The startup of this 40,000 b/d facility in March 1983 brought to fruition nearly 8 years of diligent process development and a 3-year accelerated engineering and construction program. The commercial unit was expressly designed and built to exploit process, hardware, and catalyst innovations flowing from the development effort and demonstrated to be especially applicable to converting long resids. The unit has generally met and exceeded technical expectations.

  10. Reengineering refinery systems: The next generation desktop

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, J.P.

    1996-09-01

    As refiners reengineer, flatten, or downsize, they remove entire levels of people, leaving in a state of flux the legacy systems and procedures that were designed to support the old organization. The remaining people have new, expanded positions as they absorb roles of the flattened organization. Reengineering will thus drive a new type of structural obsolescence. In addition to normal departmental software aging, many roles must be supported throughout the corporation instead of within a dedicated group. The net result is that reengineering provides an opportunity and mandate to rethink what roles are needed to support refining and what software is needed to support those roles. This article provides both a component architecture technology background and a plan of action for implementing a new manufacturing system that includes the software required to support refinery operations. The emphasis on infrastructure is key to success; these projects are too big to implement immediately. A solid infrastructure and good support feed the continuous improvement process.

  11. Production of ethanol from refinery waste gases. Phase 3. Engineering development. Annual report, April 1, 1995--May 15, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Arora, D.; Basu, R.; Phillips, J.R.; Wikstrom, C.V.; Clausen, E.C; Gaddy, J.L.

    1996-11-01

    Refineries discharge large volumes of H2, CO, and CO 2 from cracking, coking, and hydrotreating operations. This R&D program seeks to develop, demonstrate, and commercialize a biological process for converting these waste gases into ethanol for blending with gasoline. A 200,000 BPD refinery could produce up to 38 million gallons ethanol per year. The program is being conducted in 3 phases: II, technology development; III, engineering development; and IV, demonstration. Phase I, exploratory development, has been completed. The research effort has yielded two strains (Isolates O-52 and C-01) which are to be used in the pilot studies to produce ethanol from CO, CO2, and H2 in petroleum waste gas. Results from single continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) laboratory tests have shown that 20-25 g/L ethanol can be produced with < 5 g/L acetic acid byproduct. Laboratory studies with two CSTRs in series have yielded ethanol concentrations of 30-35 g/L with 2-4 g/L acetic acid byproduct. Water recycle from distillation back to the fermenter shows that filtration of the water before distillation eliminates the recycle of toxic materials back to the fermenter. Product recovery in the process will use direct distillation to the azeotrope, followed by adsorption to produce neat ethanol. This is less energy intensive than e.g. solvent extraction, azeotropic distillation, or pervaporation. Economic projections are quite attractive; the economics are refinery stream dependent and thus vary depending on refinery location and operation.

  12. Petroleum marketing monthly

    SciTech Connect

    1995-11-01

    The Petroleum Marketing Monthly (PMM) provides information and statistical data on a variety of crude oils and refined petroleum products. The publication presents statistics on crude oil costs and refined petroleum products sales for use by industry, government, private sector analysts, educational institutions, and consumers. Data on crude oil include the domestic first purchase price, the f.o.b. and landed cost of imported crude oil, and the refiners` acquisition cost of crude oil. Refined petroleum product sales data include motor gasoline, distillates, residuals, aviation fuels, kerosene, and propane. The Petroleum Marketing Division, Office of Oil and Gas, Energy Information Administration ensures the accuracy, quality, and confidentiality of the published data.

  13. Petroleum supply monthly

    SciTech Connect

    1995-10-01

    The Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM) is one of a family of four publications produced by the Petroleum Supply Division within the Energy Information Administration (EIA) reflecting different levels of data timeliness and completeness. The other publications are the Weekly Petroleum Status Report (WPSR), the Winter Fuels Report, and the Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA). Data presented in the PSM describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major US geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the United States (50 States and the District of Columbia). The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in primary supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blends, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregated, the data reported by these sectors approximately represent the consumption of petroleum products in the United States.

  14. Petroleum Supply Monthly

    SciTech Connect

    1996-02-01

    The Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM) is one of a family of four publications produced by the Petroleum Supply Division within the Energy Information Administration (EIA) reflecting different levels of data timeliness and completeness. The other publications are the Weekly Petroleum Status Report (WPSR), the Winter Fuels Report, and the Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA). Data presented in the PSM describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major U.S. geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the United States (50 States and the District of Columbia). The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in primary supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregated, the data reported by these sectors approximately represent the consumption of petroleum products in the United States. Data presented in the PSM are divided into two sections: Summary Statistics and Detailed Statistics.

  15. Petroleum marketing annual 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1995-08-24

    The Petroleum Marketing Annual (PMA) provides information and statistical data on a variety of crude oils and refined petroleum products. The publication presents statistics on crude oil costs and refined petroleum products sales for use by industry, government, private sector analysis, educational institutions, and consumers. Data on crude oil include the domestic first purchase price, the fob and landed cost of imported crude oil, and the refiners` acquisition cost of crude oil. Refined petroleum product sales data include motor gasoline, distillates, residuals, aviation fuels, kerosene, and propane. The Petroleum Marketing Division, Office of Oil and Gas, Energy Information Administration ensures the accuracy, quality, and confidentiality of the published data in the Petroleum Marketing Annual. For this production, all estimates have been recalculated since their earlier publication in the Petroleum Marketing Monthly (PMM). These calculations made use of additional data and corrections that were received after the PMM publication date.

  16. Refinery Integration of By-Products from Coal-Derived Jet Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Caroline E. Burgess Clifford; Andre Boehman; Chunshan Song; Bruce Miller; Gareth Mitchell

    2007-03-17

    This report summarizes the accomplishments toward project goals during the no cost extension period of the third year of the project to assess the properties and performance of coal based products. These products are in the gasoline, diesel and fuel oil range and result from coal based jet fuel production from an Air Force funded program. Specific areas of progress include generation of coal based material that has been fractionated into the desired refinery cuts for a third round of testing, the use of a research gasoline engine to test coal-based gasoline, and modification of diesel engines for use in evaluating diesel produced in the project. At the pilot scale, the hydrotreating process was modified to separate the heavy components from the LCO and RCO fractions before hydrotreating in order to improve the performance of the catalysts in further processing. Hydrotreating and hydrogenation of the product has been completed, and due to removal of material before processing, yield of the jet fuel fraction has decreased relative to an increase in the gasoline fraction. Characterization of the gasoline fuel indicates a dominance of single ring alkylcycloalkanes that have a low octane rating; however, blends containing these compounds do not have a negative effect upon gasoline when blended in refinery gasoline streams. Characterization of the diesel fuel indicates a dominance of 3-ring aromatics that have a low cetane value; however, these compounds do not have a negative effect upon diesel when blended in refinery diesel streams. Both gasoline and diesel continue to be tested for combustion performance. The desulfurization of sulfur containing components of coal and petroleum is being studied so that effective conversion of blended coal and petroleum streams can be efficiently converted to useful refinery products. Activated carbons have proven useful to remove the heavy sulfur components, and unsupported Ni/Mo and Ni/Co catalysts have been very effective for

  17. 40 CFR 80.1141 - Small refinery exemption.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... his/her knowledge, and that the refinery was small as of December 31, 2004. (iii) Name, address, phone... paragraph (h) of this section. (c) If EPA finds that a refiner provided false or inaccurate...

  18. 40 CFR 80.1141 - Small refinery exemption.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... his/her knowledge, and that the refinery was small as of December 31, 2004. (iii) Name, address, phone... paragraph (h) of this section. (c) If EPA finds that a refiner provided false or inaccurate...

  19. World Energy Projection System Plus Model Documentation: Refinery Model

    EIA Publications

    2016-01-01

    This report documents the objectives, analytical approach and development of the World Energy Projection System Plus (WEPS ) Refinery Model. It also catalogues and describes critical assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and model source code.

  20. Mortality studies of smelter workers.

    PubMed

    Enterline, P E; Marsh, G M

    1980-01-01

    In view of the historic importance of smelter workers in the field of occupational medicine, it is surprising that until very recently little data was available on the mortality experience of these workers. The problem in most studies lies in identifying the smelter workers, because smelting, strictly speaking, refers to the melting of ores for the purposes of recovering metals, whereas smelters sometimes perform the operations of roasting, calcining, sintering, converting, and refining. These distinctions are not made in most mortality studies. Most mortality studies of smelter workers conducted to date have shown some excess in lung cancer. For lead, copper, cadmium, and nickel smelters a different etiologic agent has been proposed for each. These different explanations arise partly from different initial perspectives in conducting the studies. In this paper, data are presented on a current historical-prospective study of males who worked a year or more during the period January 1, 1940 to December 31, 1964 at a copper smelter in Tacoma, Washington. This smelter (and refinery) handled a copper ore with a relatively high arsenic content and produced arsenic trioxide as a by-product. Overall 97.2% of the original study population was traced through 1976. Of the 1,061 who were found to have died, death certificates were obtained for 1,018, or 96%. For all causes of death, the mortality rates in this cohort, expressed as a Standardized Mortality Ratio (SMR), were 3.5% higher than that expected based on the United States white male mortality experience. A total of 104 respiratory system cancers were observed compared to 54.6 expected (SMR = 190.5, p less than .05). Respiratory cancer rates were found to be elevated in both smokers and nonsmokers. Overall, a gradual rise in SMR's for respiratory cancer was observed with increasing duration of exposure but not with an increasing interval from onset of exposure. This observation is consistent with the notion that the

  1. Mortality studies of smelter workers.

    PubMed

    Enterline, P E; Marsh, G M

    1980-01-01

    In view of the historic importance of smelter workers in the field of occupational medicine, it is surprising that until very recently little data was available on the mortality experience of these workers. The problem in most studies lies in identifying the smelter workers, because smelting, strictly speaking, refers to the melting of ores for the purposes of recovering metals, whereas smelters sometimes perform the operations of roasting, calcining, sintering, converting, and refining. These distinctions are not made in most mortality studies. Most mortality studies of smelter workers conducted to date have shown some excess in lung cancer. For lead, copper, cadmium, and nickel smelters a different etiologic agent has been proposed for each. These different explanations arise partly from different initial perspectives in conducting the studies. In this paper, data are presented on a current historical-prospective study of males who worked a year or more during the period January 1, 1940 to December 31, 1964 at a copper smelter in Tacoma, Washington. This smelter (and refinery) handled a copper ore with a relatively high arsenic content and produced arsenic trioxide as a by-product. Overall 97.2% of the original study population was traced through 1976. Of the 1,061 who were found to have died, death certificates were obtained for 1,018, or 96%. For all causes of death, the mortality rates in this cohort, expressed as a Standardized Mortality Ratio (SMR), were 3.5% higher than that expected based on the United States white male mortality experience. A total of 104 respiratory system cancers were observed compared to 54.6 expected (SMR = 190.5, p less than .05). Respiratory cancer rates were found to be elevated in both smokers and nonsmokers. Overall, a gradual rise in SMR's for respiratory cancer was observed with increasing duration of exposure but not with an increasing interval from onset of exposure. This observation is consistent with the notion that the

  2. Petroleum and diesel sulfur degradation under gamma radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrade, Luana dos Santos; Calvo, Wilson Aparecido Parejo; Sato, Ivone Mulako; Duarte, Celina Lopes

    2015-10-01

    Hydrodesulfurization (HDS) is currently the most common method used by refineries to remove sulfur compounds from petroleum fractions. However, it is not highly effective for removing thiophene compounds such as benzothiophene. Additionally, this process generates high costs for the oil industry. In the present work, ionizing radiation was used in order to study the effect on the degradation of petroleum and diesel sulfur compounds. Crude oil and diesel fuel samples were studied, without any pretreatment, and irradiated using a cobalt-60 gamma cell in a batch system at absorbed doses of 30 kGy and 50 kGy. The sulfur compounds were extracted and then analyzed by gas chromatography associated with mass spectrometry (GCMS). A high efficiency of ionizing radiation was observed regarding the degradation of sulfur compounds such as benzothiophene and benzenethiol and the formation of fragments, for example 1.2-dimethylbenzene and toluene.

  3. Implementation results for automated gas-pulsed cleaning systems of TsKTI on petroleum-heating furnaces, heat-recovery boilers, and hot-water boilers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pogrebnyak, A. P.; Kokorev, V. L.; Kokorev, A. L.; Moiseenko, I. O.; Gul'Tyaev, A. V.; Efimova, N. N.

    2012-03-01

    A description is given on the long-term positive experience of implementation of gas-pulsed cleaning (GPC) systems of TsKTI, development for heating surfaces of heat-exchange apparatuses for various purposes (steam and hot-water boilers, processing furnaces of petroleum refineries, etc.) against external soot-dust, ash, and condensed deposits formed during solid and fluid combustion.

  4. Device and method for upgrading petroleum feedstocks and petroleum refinery streams using an alkali metal conductive membrane

    DOEpatents

    Gordon, John Howard; Alvare, Javier

    2016-09-13

    A reactor has two chambers, namely an oil feedstock chamber and a source chamber. An ion separator separates the oil feedstock chamber from the source chamber, wherein the ion separator allows alkali metal ions to pass from the source chamber, through the ion separator, and into the oil feedstock chamber. A cathode is at least partially housed within the oil feedstock chamber and an anode is at least partially housed within the source chamber. A quantity of an oil feedstock is within the oil feedstock chamber, the oil feedstock comprising at least one carbon atom and a heteroatom and/or one or more heavy metals, the oil feedstock further comprising naphthenic acid. When the alkali metal ion enters the oil feedstock chamber, the alkali metal reacts with the heteroatom, the heavy metals and/or the naphthenic acid, wherein the reaction with the alkali metal forms inorganic products.

  5. Petroleum marketing monthly

    SciTech Connect

    1996-02-01

    The Petroleum Marketing Monthly (PMM) provides information and statistical data on a variety of crude oils and refined petroleum products. The publication presents statistics on crude oil costs and refined petroleum products sales for use by industry, government, private sector analysts, educational institutions, and consumers. Data on crude oil include the domestic first purchase price, the f.o.b. and landed cost of imported crude oil, and the refiners acquisition cost of crude oil. Refined petroleum product sales data include motor gasoline, distillates, residuals, aviation fuels, kerosene, and propane. The Petroleum Marketing Division, Office of Oil and Gas, Energy Information Administration ensures the accuracy, quality, and confidentiality of the published data in the Petroleum Marketing Monthly.

  6. Petroleum marketing monthly

    SciTech Connect

    1995-08-01

    The Petroleum Marketing Monthly (PMM) provides information and statistical data on a variety of crude oils and refined petroleum products. The publication presents statistics on crude oil costs and refined petroleum products sales for use by industry, government, private sector analysts, educational institutions, and consumers. Data on crude oil include the domestic first purchase price, the f.o.b. and landed cost of imported crude oil, and the refiners` acquisition cost of crude oil. Refined petroleum product sales data include motor gasoline, distillates, residuals, aviation fuels, kerosene, and propane. The Petroleum Marketing Division, Office of Oil and Gas, Energy Information Administration ensures the accuracy, quality, and confidentiality of the published data in the Petroleum Marketing Monthly.

  7. Petroleum marketing monthly

    SciTech Connect

    1996-07-01

    Petroleum Marketing Monthly (PPM) provides information and statistical data on a variety of crude oils and refined petroleum products. The publication presents statistics on crude oil costs and refined petroleum products sales for use by industry, government, private sector analysts, educational institutions, and consumers. Data on crude oil include the domestic first purchase price, the f.o. b. and landed cost of imported crude oil, and the refiners` acquisition cost of crude oil. Refined petroleum product sales data include motor gasoline, distillates, residuals, aviation fuels, kerosene, and propane. The Petroleum Marketing Division, Office of Oil and Gas, Energy Information Administration ensures the accuracy, quality, and confidentiality of the published data in the Petroleum Marketing Monthly.

  8. Future petroleum geologist: discussion

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, G.D.

    1987-07-01

    Robert R. Berg's (1986) article, ''The Future Petroleum Geologist,'' summarizes the findings of the 13-member AAPG Select Committee on The Future Petroleum Geologist appointed by President William L. Fisher in July 1985. While this undertaking is laudable, particularly considering present circumstance in the petroleum industry, the committee has apparently overlooked a vital aspect concerning the future knowledge requirements of the petroleum geologist. Specifically, the Select Committee makes no mention of the need for computer literacy in its list of educational training categories. Obviously, AAPG is well aware of both the interest in computers by its membership and the increasing need for training and familiarity in this discipline. The Select Committee on The Future Petroleum Geologist, while undertaking a difficult and potentially controversial task, has omitted an important aspect of the background requirements for generations of future petroleum geologists; the committee should consider an amendment to their recommendations to reflect this increasingly important field study.

  9. Exposures and symptoms among workers after an offsite train derailment and vinyl chloride release

    PubMed Central

    Wilken, Jason A.; Graziano, Leah; Vaouli, Elena; Markiewicz, Karl; Helverson, Robert; Brinker, Kimberly; Shumate, Alice M.; Duncan, Mary Anne

    2015-01-01

    Objective In 2012 in New Jersey, a train derailment resulted in the puncture of a tanker car carrying liquid vinyl chloride under pressure, and a resulting airborne vinyl chloride plume drifted onto the grounds of a nearby refinery. This report details the investigation of exposures and symptoms among refinery workers. Design and setting The investigation team met with refinery workers to discuss their experience after the derailment and provided workers a self-administered survey to document symptoms and worker responses during the incident. Associations among categorical variables and experiencing symptoms were evaluated using Fisher’s exact test. Participants Twenty-six of 155 (17 percent) workers present at the refinery or driving on the access road the date the spill occurred completed the survey. Main outcome measure(s) Any self-reported symptom following exposure from the vinyl chloride release. Results Fifteen workers (58 percent) reported ≥1 symptom, most commonly headache (12, 46 percent). Three (12 percent) reported using respiratory protection. No differences in reporting symptoms were observed by location during the incident or by the building in which workers sheltered. Workers who moved from one shelter to another during the incident (ie, broke shelter) were more likely to report symptoms (Fisher’s exact test, p = 0.03); however, there are only limited data regarding vinyl chloride concentrations in shelters versus outside. Conclusions Breaking shelter might result in greater exposures and managers and health and safety officers of vulnerable facilities with limited physical access should consider developing robust shelter-in-place plans and alternate emergency egress plans. Workers should consider using respiratory protection if exiting a shelter is necessary during a chemical incident. PMID:26312496

  10. Method for recovering petroleum

    SciTech Connect

    Coenen, H.; Kriegel, E.

    1985-08-06

    A process for recovering petroleum from deposits which have already been worked by primary extraction or are not suited for primary extraction. A gas in its supercritical state is introduced into the deposit. The supercritical gas charges itself with the petroleum while flowing through the deposit. The charged supercritical gas leaves the deposit and the petroleum is separated in a plurality of fractions from the charged supercritical gas.

  11. Petroleum: An Energy Profile 1999

    EIA Publications

    1999-01-01

    Explains in layman's terms the major components and operations of the U.S. petroleum industry that include: petroleum products, resources and reserves, drilling and exploration, refining, storage and transportation, imports, exports, and petroleum marketing.

  12. Petroleum 1996: Issues and Trends

    EIA Publications

    1997-01-01

    Examines historical trends and focuses on major petroleum issues and the events they represent. It analyzes different dimensions of the petroleum industry and related markets in terms of how they relate to the volatility in petroleum markets.

  13. Refinery Integration of By-Products from Coal-Derived Jet Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Caroline E. Burgess Clifford; Andre' Boehman; Chunshan Song; Bruce Miller; Gareth Mitchell

    2006-09-17

    This report summarizes the accomplishments toward project goals during the second six months of the third year of the project to assess the properties and performance of coal based products. These products are in the gasoline, diesel and fuel oil range and result from coal based jet fuel production from an Air Force funded program. Specific areas of progress include generation of coal based material that has been fractionated into the desired refinery cuts and examination of carbon material, the use of a research gasoline engine to test coal-based gasoline, and modification of diesel engines for use in evaluating diesel produced in the project. At the pilot scale, the hydrotreating process was modified to separate the heavy components from the LCO and RCO fractions before hydrotreating in order to improve the performance of the catalysts in further processing. Characterization of the gasoline fuel indicates a dominance of single ring alkylcycloalkanes that have a low octane rating; however, blends containing these compounds do not have a negative effect upon gasoline when blended in refinery gasoline streams. Characterization of the diesel fuel indicates a dominance of 3-ring aromatics that have a low cetane value; however, these compounds do not have a negative effect upon diesel when blended in refinery diesel streams. Both gasoline and diesel continue to be tested for combustion performance. The desulfurization of sulfur containing components of coal and petroleum is being studied so that effective conversion of blended coal and petroleum streams can be efficiently converted to useful refinery products. Activated carbons have proven useful to remove the heavy sulfur components, and unsupported Ni/Mo and Ni/Co catalysts have been very effective for hydrodesulfurization. Equipment is now in place to begin fuel oil evaluations to assess the quality of coal based fuel oil. Combustion and characterization of the latest fuel oil (the high temperature fraction of RCO

  14. The US petroleum industry: Past as prologue 1970--1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-10-01

    This report focuses on the developments that shaped the domestic petroleum industry, and US supply and demand patterns between 1970 and 1992. It also highlights foreign demand and refinery trends. These events are presented in statistical terms in Chapter 2, and are described in detail in Chapter 3. Some similarity, in information noted in Chapters 2 and 3 allows each chapter to stand independently, to facilitate the report`s use. The report is intended to provide background information on the petroleum industry, and its history, and to act as a reference for those more familiar with the industry. Chapter 2 describes the patterns of change for each component of supply and demand, and briefly touches on the events (fully described in Chapter 3) that induced significant change or fluctuation. Supplemental data are contained in the Appendix section. Chapter 3 presents a chronology of the major petroleum-related events and their consequences. The Chapter also describes the actions or reactions of the petroleum industry to the event, and the impact of the events and actions taken on domestic and/or foreign economies.

  15. Assessment of genotoxic activity of petroleum hydrocarbon-bioremediated soil.

    PubMed

    Płaza, Grazyna; Nałecz-Jawecki, Grzegorz; Ulfig, Krzysztof; Brigmon, Robin L

    2005-11-01

    The relationship between toxicity and soil contamination must be understood to develop reliable indicators of environmental restoration for bioremediation. Two bacterial rapid bioassays, SOS chromotest and the umu test with and without metabolic activation (S-9 mixture), were used to evaluate the genotoxicity of petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated soil following bioremediation treatment. The soil was taken from an engineered biopile at the Czechowice-Dziedzice Polish oil refinery (CZOR). The bioremediation process in the biopile lasted 4 years, and the toxicity measurements were done after this treatment. Carcinogens detected in the soil, polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), were reduced to low concentrations (2mg/kg dry wt) by the bioremediation process. Genotoxicity was not observed for soils tested with and without metabolic activation by a liver homogenate (S-9 mixture). However, the umu test was more sensitive than the SOS chromotest in the analysis of petroleum hydrocarbon-bioremediated soil. Analytical results of soil used in the bioassays confirmed that the bioremediation process reduced 81% of the petroleum hydrocarbons including PAHs. We conclude that the combined test systems employed in this study are useful tools for the genotoxic examination of remediated petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated soil.

  16. ASSESSMENT OF GENOTOXIC ACTIVITY OF PETROLEUM HYDROCARBON-BIOREMEDIATED SOIL

    SciTech Connect

    BRIGMON, ROBIN

    2004-10-20

    The relationship between toxicity and soil contamination must be understood to develop reliable indicators of environmental restoration for bioremediation. Two bacterial rapid bioassays: SOS chromotest and umu-test with and without metabolic activation (S-9 mixture) were used to evaluate genotoxicity of petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated soil following bioremediation treatment. The soil was taken from an engineered biopile at the Czor Polish oil refinery. The bioremediation process in the biopile lasted 4 years, and the toxicity measurements were done after this treatment. Carcinogens detected in the soil, polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), were reduced to low concentrations (2 mg/kg dry wt) by the bioremediation process. Genotoxicity was not observed for soils tested with and without metabolic activation by a liver homogenate (S-9 mixture). However, umu-test was more sensitive than SOS-chromotest in the analysis of petroleum hydrocarbon-bioremediated soil. Analytical results of soil used in the bioassays confirmed that the bioremediation process reduced 81 percent of the petroleum hydrocarbons including PAHs. We conclude that the combined test systems employed in this study are useful tools for the genotoxic examination of remediated petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated soil.

  17. Overview of infrared in the petroleum industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohliger, Albert A.

    2003-04-01

    Infrared Thermography has been found to be a very valuable tool in the petroleum industry. It has had focus in surveying all the types of equipment in its asset base. This includes electrical distribution systems, pumping systems, piping systems, exchangers, flares, process fired heaters and many other types of equipment. The petroleum industry is divided into three basic operating areas; Upstream, Midstream and Downstream. Upstream operation covers the exploration, drilling and production of natural gas and crude oil. Midstream operation in the petroleum industry is the distribution and storage system between the Upstream to the Downstream systems. Downstream operations make the finished energy product and are the refineries and chemical plants. As in other industries, the petroleum industry has mechanical equipment, electrical equipment, pressure-containing equipment, and fixed structures. In addition to this equipment, there is some specialty equipment which includes items such as fired heaters and specialty process vessels. The industry has put in place infrared programs as a predictive maintenance tool in many of their operating areas. Using infrared to monitor the operating integrity on equipment is one of the synergies now being better developed. The opportunity is to define measurable thermal patterns that can be used to define defects and predict failures. Infrared technology is a mature reliability work process and been around for many years. The first commercial infrared camera was available in the '70's. These radiometric cameras and the support equipment have had many improvements since then. The use of the technology has also been improved with synergies incorporated from many type of industries, including the military. Infrared is a technology that has been added to the predictive & preventative maintenance toolbox of the petroleum industry reliability focus. An important part of any reliability work process is to have predictive tools to define

  18. Worker Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yiziang, Zeng; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Describes worker education in China as an important part of the national educational plan and an indispensible foundation for the work of developing enterprisers. Basic tasks are the development of the mind, preparation of specialists, improving workers, and modernization of socialist enterprises. (JOW)

  19. 76 FR 42052 - National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants From Petroleum Refineries

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-18

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Parts 9 and 63 RIN 2060-AO55 National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants From... portions of the final rule amending the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants From...) establishes a two-stage regulatory process to address emissions of hazardous air pollutants (HAP)...

  20. 78 FR 76753 - Standards of Performance for Petroleum Refineries for Which Construction, Reconstruction, or...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-19

    ... an ``anonymous access'' system, which means the EPA will not know your ] identity or contact information unless you provide it in the body of your comment. If you send an email comment directly to the... contact information in the body of your comment and with any disk or CD-ROM you submit. If the EPA...

  1. Shakedown operation of group of units for aromatic hydrocarbon production at the Novopolotsk petroleum refinery

    SciTech Connect

    Rudkovskii, A.D.; Chesnovitskii, K.G.; Koroleva, M.I.; Sulimov, A.D.; Teteruk, V.G.

    1983-03-01

    This article describes how technical xylene and C/sub 9/ aromatic hydrocarbons are produced in catalytic reformers operated in conjunction with diethylene glycol extraction units. In the operation of the unit, the greatest difficulties were encountered in purification of the p-xylene, owing to frequent mechanical failures of the equipment of the pulsed columns due to hydraulic shock and unstable operation under the process conditions required to obtain a product with a purity above 99%. As a result of the successful shakedown operations of individual aromatic hydrocarbons, the yields of commercial products (ethylbenzene, p-xylene, o-xylene, pseudocumene) have amounted to 76.9% of the technical xylene feed.

  2. Diversity of birds at Panipat refinery, Haryana (India).

    PubMed

    Dhadse, Sharda; Kotangale, J P; Chaudhari, P R; Wate, S R

    2009-11-01

    Avifaunal study was carried out in Panipat refinery area before and after commissioning. A total of 63 birds were observed during the study, of which 39 and 49 birds were present during 1992 and 2001 respectively. Of these, 25 birds were common during both the study period. Blue rock pigeon was most dominant during 1992 whereas house sparrow was dominant during 2001. Species diversity index was found to be 5.26 and 6.64 in respective years. Jaccard's and Sorenson similarity indices were 0.40 and 0.57 respectively. Majority of birds were insectivorous in habits followed by granivorous birds in 1992 and piscivorous birds in 2001. The study reveals that less diversity was observed in 1992 when Panipat refinery was commissioned, but more birds especially aquatic ones were observed after the commissioning of the refinery. This has been attributed to increase in birds habitats due to developments of wetlands in and outside refinery, development of green belt around refinery and increase in green cover of area due to boosting of agroforestry and social forestry. PMID:18850287

  3. Diversity of birds at Panipat refinery, Haryana (India).

    PubMed

    Dhadse, Sharda; Kotangale, J P; Chaudhari, P R; Wate, S R

    2009-11-01

    Avifaunal study was carried out in Panipat refinery area before and after commissioning. A total of 63 birds were observed during the study, of which 39 and 49 birds were present during 1992 and 2001 respectively. Of these, 25 birds were common during both the study period. Blue rock pigeon was most dominant during 1992 whereas house sparrow was dominant during 2001. Species diversity index was found to be 5.26 and 6.64 in respective years. Jaccard's and Sorenson similarity indices were 0.40 and 0.57 respectively. Majority of birds were insectivorous in habits followed by granivorous birds in 1992 and piscivorous birds in 2001. The study reveals that less diversity was observed in 1992 when Panipat refinery was commissioned, but more birds especially aquatic ones were observed after the commissioning of the refinery. This has been attributed to increase in birds habitats due to developments of wetlands in and outside refinery, development of green belt around refinery and increase in green cover of area due to boosting of agroforestry and social forestry.

  4. Oil refinery wastewater treatment using coupled electrocoagulation and fixed film biological processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez, Laura S.; Rodriguez, Oscar M.; Reyna, Silvia; Sánchez-Salas, José Luis; Lozada, J. Daniel; Quiroz, Marco A.; Bandala, Erick R.

    2016-02-01

    Oil refinery wastewater was treated using a coupled treatment process including electrocoagulation (EC) and a fixed film aerobic bioreactor. Different variables were tested to identify the best conditions using this procedure. After EC, the effluent was treated in an aerobic biofilter. EC was capable to remove over 88% of the overall chemical oxygen demand (COD) in the wastewater under the best working conditions (6.5 V, 0.1 M NaCl, 4 electrodes without initial pH adjustment) with total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) removal slightly higher than 80%. Aluminum release from the electrodes to the wastewater was found an important factor for the EC efficiency and closely related with several operational factors. Application of EC allowed to increase the biodegradability of the sample from 0.015, rated as non-biodegradable, up to 0.5 widely considered as biodegradable. The effluent was further treated using an aerobic biofilter inoculated with a bacterial consortium including gram positive and gram negative strains and tested for COD and TPH removal from the EC treated effluent during 30 days. Cell count showed the typical bacteria growth starting at day three and increasing up to a maximum after eight days. After day eight, cell growth showed a plateau which agreed with the highest decrease on contaminant concentration. Final TPHs concentration was found about 600 mgL-1 after 30 days whereas COD concentration after biological treatment was as low as 933 mgL-1. The coupled EC-aerobic biofilter was capable to remove up to 98% of the total TPH amount and over 95% of the COD load in the oil refinery wastewater.

  5. Oil refinery wastewater treatment using coupled electrocoagulation and fixed film biological processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez, Laura S.; Rodriguez, Oscar M.; Reyna, Silvia; Sánchez-Salas, José Luis; Lozada, J. Daniel; Quiroz, Marco A.; Bandala, Erick R.

    2016-02-01

    Oil refinery wastewater was treated using a coupled treatment process including electrocoagulation (EC) and a fixed film aerobic bioreactor. Different variables were tested to identify the best conditions using this procedure. After EC, the effluent was treated in an aerobic biofilter. EC was capable to remove over 88% of the overall chemical oxygen demand (COD) in the wastewater under the best working conditions (6.5 V, 0.1 M NaCl, 4 electrodes without initial pH adjustment) with total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) removal slightly higher than 80%. Aluminum release from the electrodes to the wastewater was found an important factor for the EC efficiency and closely related with several operational factors. Application of EC allowed to increase the biodegradability of the sample from 0.015, rated as non-biodegradable, up to 0.5 widely considered as biodegradable. The effluent was further treated using an aerobic biofilter inoculated with a bacterial consortium including gram positive and gram negative strains and tested for COD and TPH removal from the EC treated effluent during 30 days. Cell count showed the typical bacteria growth starting at day three and increasing up to a maximum after eight days. After day eight, cell growth showed a plateau which agreed with the highest decrease on contaminant concentration. Final TPHs concentration was found about 600 mgL-1 after 30 days whereas COD concentration after biological treatment was as low as 933 mgL-1. The coupled EC-aerobic biofilter was capable to remove up to 98% of the total TPH amount and over 95% of the COD load in the oil refinery wastewater.

  6. Revise refinery/distribution models to a regional basis. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, H.F.; Capers, J.D.; Webster, L.D. Jr.; Wise, J.R.

    1980-12-30

    This project was conducted to demonstrate that DOE Regions are feasible geographical subdivisions of a domestic petroleum industry aggregating model that simulates the industry's entire operation from raw materials production to the satisfaction of products demands. The modeling system, developed for DOE on a different geographical basis in prior studies, has been successfully modified, validated and used to satisfy the requirements of this project. Basic project efforts were divided into eight different tasks. A summary of each task, including its description, completion date and reporting method, is included. Task 1 consisted of developing an appropriate data base and redesigning the modeling system to accommodate small groupings of states (Aggregator Model Areas) which could be combined in final reports to produce results on the basis of DOE Regions. Task 2 involved restructuring and validating a set of refinery linear programming (LP) models, and the same effort was required for the industry aggregator model under Task 3. Under Task 4, we determined that utilizing the 1985-normal supply and demand balances developed earlier in the project would be appropriate for efforts under this contract modification. Task 5 supported development of extreme yields for refinery operations within each modeled AMA. Task 6, an analysis of potential supply interruption scenarios, combined with DOE response strategies, was conducted along the lines of scenario/response strategies developed earlier under this contract. Results for Task 7 showed that it would not be necessary to divert remaining imported crude supplies away from the Gulf Coast during an emergency. Task 8 results provided DOE with the capability to estimate the impact on world crude markets of potential DOE strategies for acquiring crude supplies to be stored in SPR sites along the Gulf Coast.

  7. Fundamentals of Petroleum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Naval Personnel, Washington, DC.

    Basic information on petroleum is presented in this book prepared for naval logistics officers. Petroleum in national defense is discussed in connection with consumption statistics, productive capacity, world's resources, and steps in logistics. Chemical and geological analyses are made in efforts to familiarize methods of refining, measuring,…

  8. Petroleum production operations

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    This book is a study of petroleum production written for those with technical expertise between novice and professional. Covers petroleum reservoirs and drive mechanisms, well completion, well performance evaluation, primary cementing, perforating, squeeze cementing, packer and tubing forces, problem well analysis, workover methods, workover planning, and beam pumping.

  9. Petroleum supply monthly, April 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-04-01

    Data presented in the Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM) describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major US geographical regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the US. The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in primary supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregated, the data reported by these sectors approximately represent the consumption of petroleum products in the US.

  10. Update of a prospective study of mortality and cancer incidence in the Australian petroleum industry

    PubMed Central

    Gun, R; Pratt, N; Griffith, E; Adams, G; Bisby, J; Robinson, K

    2004-01-01

    Aims: To update the analysis of the cohort mortality and cancer incidence study of employees in the Australian petroleum industry. Methods: Employees from 1981 to 1996 were traced through the Australian National Death Index and the National Cancer Statistics Clearing House. Cause specific mortality and cancer incidence were compared with those of the Australian population by means of standardised mortality ratios (SMRs) and standardised incidence ratios (SIRs). Associations between increased incidence of specific cancers and employment in the petroleum industry were tested by trends according to period of first employment, duration of employment, latency, and hydrocarbon exposure, adjusting for personal smoking history where appropriate. Total follow up time was 176 598 person-years for males and 10 253 person-years for females. Results: A total of 692 of the 15 957 male subjects, and 16 of the 1206 female subjects had died by the cut off date, 31 December 1996. In males, the all-cause SMR and the SMRs for all major disease categories were significantly below unity. There was a non-significant increase of the all-cancer SIR (1.04, 95% CI 0.97 to 1.11). There was a significant increase of the incidence of melanoma (SIR 1.54, 95% CI 1.30 to 1.81), bladder cancer (SIR 1.37, 95% CI 1.00 to 1.83), and prostate cancer (SIR 1.19, 95% CI 1.00 to 1.40), and a marginally significant excess of pleural mesothelioma (SIR 1.80, 95% CI 0.90 to 3.22), leukaemia (SIR 1.39, 95%CI 0.91 to 2.02), and multiple myeloma (SIR 1.72, 95% CI 0.96 to 2.84). Conclusions: Most cases of mesothelioma are probably related to past exposure to asbestos in refineries. The melanoma excess may be the result of early diagnosis. The excess bladder cancer has not been observed previously in this industry and is not readily explained. The divergence between cancer incidence and cancer mortality suggests that the "healthy worker effect" may be related to early reporting of curable cancers, leading to

  11. World petroleum supplies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Peter M.

    A number of conclusions by political conservatives about the fate of world petroleum supplies have been emerging lately. Among the most recent of them arose from discussions, held at the 1983 spring meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), which focused on the environment and resource study entitled “The Global 2000 Report” (New Scientist, June 9, 1983). Fred Singer, representing the Heritage Foundation of Washington, D.C., criticized the report, which predicted shortages in the near future, saying that the current world-wide oil glut will continue beyond the year 2000. Alternatives to the use of petroleum are a part of the cause. Singer argued that conservation, nuclear energy, and other petroleum substitutes will continue to suppress the demand for petroleum. In addition, according to other evaluations, exploration for petroleum and natural gas has not really begun.

  12. [Evaluation of the efficiency of Angara River water protection measures against pollution by petroleum products].

    PubMed

    Zabuga, G A; Katul'skiĭ, Iu N; Gorbunova, O V; Storozheva, L N

    2011-01-01

    The process installations and storage reservoirs of a petroleum refinery have leaks of petroleum products (PP) that pollute soil, underground waters, and eventually nearest water objects, by worsening their hygienic state. Environmental and economic assessments of the Angara River water protection system that is in operation at the petroleum refinery OAO "Angara Petroleum Company", which comprises well clusters, a gravel-filled trench, and a drainage system, have shown the high values of preventable relative natural and economic damages and other economic indicators. At the same time, comparison of the amount of PPs accumulated at the industrial site with their annual withdrawal has demonstrated a need for further development of a river protection system. Therefore the environmental protection system efficacy evaluated by the quality of goal attainment and by means of a matrix of algorithmized statements was 60% or 5 of 20 scores, which shows the necessity of special measures to protect Angara River waters. The elaboration and implementation of these measures associated with considerable expenditures make it possible not only to increase the environmental efficiency of water protection of the Angara River, but also to do the hygienic quality of water use in its related localities.

  13. Mortality experience among employees at a hydrometallurgical nickel refinery and fertiliser complex in Fort Saskatchewan, Alberta (1954-95)

    PubMed Central

    Egedahl, R; Carpenter, M; Lundell, D

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To study the mortality experience of workers at a hydrometallurgical nickel refinery and fertiliser complex in Fort Saskatchewan, Alberta, Canada.
METHODS—A total of 1649 male employees of Sherritt International who worked for at least 12 continuous months during the years 1954 to 1978 at the Fort Saskatchewan, Alberta hydrometallurgical nickel refinery and fertiliser complex were followed up for an additional 17 years. Mortality was ascertained from the Canadian mortality data base maintained by Statistics Canada and covered the years 1954-95. Statistics were analysed with Monson's computer program.
RESULTS—Total mortality, when compared with the Canadian population, was significantly below expectation. Fewer deaths were found for circulatory disease, ischaemic heart disease, respiratory disease, neoplasms, digestive cancer, and accidents, poisonings, and violence. Among the 718 men in the group exposed to nickel, there were no deaths due to nasal cavity or paranasal sinus cancer. Fewer deaths were found for all causes, circulatory disease, ischaemic heart disease, neoplasms and digestive cancer. Lower death rates were observed than expected for respiratory malignancies and cancer of the bronchus and lung.
CONCLUSION—No association was found in this study between exposure to nickel concentrate or metallic nickel in the hydrometallurgical refining process and the subsequent development of respiratory cancer.


Keywords: epidemiology; nickel workers; mortality PMID:11600726

  14. Refinery/additive technologies and low temperature pumpability

    SciTech Connect

    Rossi, A

    1988-01-01

    A key element in low temperature engine oil pumpability is wax, and in particular its composition and behavior. The wax composition is determined by the basestocks used in the formulation and its impediment to oil flow is reduced by additives (wax crystal modifiers). Basestocks are desirable mixtures of hydrocarbons in which the undesirable components are weeded out by refinery separation and conversion sciences. The refinery unit operations take into account the chemical and physical properties of the hydrocarbons that are present in the crude oil. The refinery unit operations can be combined to manufacture basestocks by four pathways. The basestocks produced by these divergent pathways must have the same physical properties - i.e., viscosity at 40/sup 0/C, viscosity index, and pour point - and yet be different mixtures of desirable hydrocarbons.

  15. Application of high-temperature simulated distillation to the residuum oil supercritical extraction process in petroleum refining

    PubMed

    Raia; Villalanti; Subramanian; Williams

    2000-01-01

    The gas chromatographic method of high-temperature simulated distillation (HTSD) is described, and the results are presented for the application of HTSD to the characterization of petroleum refinery feed and products from solvent deasphalting operations. Results are presented for refinery residual feed, deasphalted oil, and asphaltene fractions from the residual oil supercritical extraction process. Asphaltene removal from petroleum residuum using solvent deasphalting results in the improved quality and high recovery of deasphalted oil product for use as lube oil, fluid catalytic cracking, or hydrocracker feedstocks. The HTSD procedure presented here proves valuable for characterizing the fractions from the deasphalting process to obtain the percentage yield with boiling point data over the range from approximately 36 degrees C (97 degrees F) to 733 degrees C (1352 degrees F), which covers the boiling range of n-paraffins of carbon number C5 to C108.

  16. Role of heavy oil cracking in refinery processing

    SciTech Connect

    Rush, J.B.

    1981-01-01

    Heavy oil cracking was developed by Borger Refinery to dispose of the residual portion of the crude. The use of catalysts of higher activity, riser cracking, and the passivation of metals resulted in operations that are comparable with the good gas oil operations. The experience with heavy oil cracking has revealed three problem areas unique to heavy oil cracking. These are: high coke yields; metal contamination and high gas yields; and high sulfur content of the regenerator flue gas. Some discussion is given on: methods of sulfur removal; the effect of hydrotreated heavy-oil cracker charge; and the role of heavy oil cracking in a modern refinery. 7 refs.

  17. Benefits of modern refinery information systems for manufacturing cleaner fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Latour, P.R.

    1995-12-31

    Revolutionary changes in quality specifications (number, complexity, uncertainty, economic sensitivity) for reformulated gasolines (RFG) and low-sulfur diesels (LSD) are being addressed by powerful, new, computer integrated manufacturing technology for Refinery Information Systems and Advanced Process Control (RIS/APC). This paper shows how the five active RIS/APC functions -- performance measurement, optimization, scheduling, control and integration -- are used to manufacture new, clean fuels competitively. With current industry spending for this field averaging 2 to 3 cents/bbl crude, many refineries can capture 50 to 100 cents/bbl if the technology is properly employed and sustained throughout refining operations, organizations, and businesses.

  18. Amine corrosion inhibitor successful in tests at Mobil's Paulsboro refinery

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-11-03

    Mobil Oil Corp. has successfully completed a test of an amine unit corrosion inhibition system at its 100,000-b/d refinery in Paulsboro, NJ. The system, the Amine Guard ST system is used to inhibit corrosion of diethanolamine (DEA) sweetening units that treat process streams from the fluid catalytic cracker (FCC), a hydrodesulfurization unit (HDU), and lube oil dewaxing (LDW) units at the refinery. Use of the corrosion-inhibition system has allowed an increase in the DEA concentration to 55 wt %, a reduction of the DEA circulation rate by 40%, and a reduction in regeneration steam of 35%.

  19. 40 CFR 80.1622 - Approval for small refiner and small volume refinery status.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... includes all government employees. (2)(i) The total corporate crude oil capacity of each refinery as... applying for approval under this section must send the total corporate crude oil capacity of each refinery...) The total crude throughput of each small volume refinery, defined as the total crude oil...

  20. 40 CFR 80.1280 - How are refinery benzene baselines calculated?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false How are refinery benzene baselines... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Benzene Averaging, Banking and Trading (abt) Program § 80.1280 How are refinery benzene baselines calculated? (a) A refinery's...

  1. 40 CFR 80.1280 - How are refinery benzene baselines calculated?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false How are refinery benzene baselines... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Benzene Averaging, Banking and Trading (abt) Program § 80.1280 How are refinery benzene baselines calculated? (a) A refinery's...

  2. 40 CFR 80.1280 - How are refinery benzene baselines calculated?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false How are refinery benzene baselines... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Benzene Averaging, Banking and Trading (abt) Program § 80.1280 How are refinery benzene baselines calculated? (a) A refinery's...

  3. 40 CFR 80.1280 - How are refinery benzene baselines calculated?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false How are refinery benzene baselines... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Benzene Averaging, Banking and Trading (abt) Program § 80.1280 How are refinery benzene baselines calculated? (a) A refinery's...

  4. 40 CFR 80.1280 - How are refinery benzene baselines calculated?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false How are refinery benzene baselines... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Benzene Averaging, Banking and Trading (abt) Program § 80.1280 How are refinery benzene baselines calculated? (a) A refinery's...

  5. 40 CFR 80.295 - How is a refinery sulfur baseline determined?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false How is a refinery sulfur baseline... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Abt Program-Baseline Determination § 80.295 How is a refinery sulfur baseline determined? (a) A refinery's gasoline sulfur...

  6. 40 CFR 80.295 - How is a refinery sulfur baseline determined?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false How is a refinery sulfur baseline... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Abt Program-Baseline Determination § 80.295 How is a refinery sulfur baseline determined? (a) A refinery's gasoline sulfur...

  7. 40 CFR 80.295 - How is a refinery sulfur baseline determined?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false How is a refinery sulfur baseline... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Abt Program-Baseline Determination § 80.295 How is a refinery sulfur baseline determined? (a) A refinery's gasoline sulfur...

  8. 40 CFR 80.295 - How is a refinery sulfur baseline determined?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false How is a refinery sulfur baseline... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Abt Program-Baseline Determination § 80.295 How is a refinery sulfur baseline determined? (a) A refinery's gasoline sulfur...

  9. 40 CFR 80.295 - How is a refinery sulfur baseline determined?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false How is a refinery sulfur baseline... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Abt Program-Baseline Determination § 80.295 How is a refinery sulfur baseline determined? (a) A refinery's gasoline sulfur...

  10. 40 CFR 80.94 - Requirements for gasoline produced at foreign refineries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... CFR part 80, subparts D, E and F. (ii) If the foreign refinery baseline is assigned, or a foreign... used to determine the identity of the refinery at which the gasoline was produced, that the gasoline... foreign refinery under 40 CFR part 80, subpart F. (1) Include in the inventory reconciliation...

  11. 40 CFR 80.596 - How is a refinery motor vehicle diesel fuel volume baseline calculated?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... vehicle diesel fuel produced during the most recent calendar year the refinery was in operation after... the U.S. during the most recent calendar year the refinery was in operation after being reactivated... most recent calendar year the refinery was in operation after being reactivated pursuant to §...

  12. 26 CFR 1.179C-1T - Election to expense certain refineries (temporary).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... under section 179C(a) for the cost of any qualified refinery property. The provisions of this section... section) of the property. (iv) Throughput is a volumetric rate measuring the flow of crude oil or... 7701(a)(9). (b) Qualified refinery property—(1) In general. Qualified refinery property is any...

  13. How big is big? How often is often? Characterizing Texas petroleum refining upset air emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCoy, Britney J.; Fischbeck, Paul S.; Gerard, David

    2010-11-01

    This work examines the magnitude and frequency of Texas petroleum refineries upset air emissions over a 44-month period. Upset emissions occur during plant start-ups, shut-downs, maintenance, malfunctions and flaring incidents, and these emissions are typically exempt from regulation. These emissions contain a variety of chemicals, including benzene, nitrogen oxides, sulfur dioxide, and butadiene. Unlike other states, Texas has detailed reporting requirements, regulations in place, and an extensive upset emissions database. A key scientific and public policy question is whether upset emissions have significant impacts on local air quality and public health. However, it is not possible to address this question without first understanding the magnitude and properties of upsets. We merge related databases to examine over 3,900 upset emission events and find that upset emissions are significant in both size and occurrence when compared to routine operation emissions. It is determined that these events are not random, being more likely to occur during the summer, in the morning, and early in the workweek. A regional analysis of Port Arthur suggests that upset emissions from co-located refineries are equivalent to having an additional refinery within the region. Because of uncertainties within the reporting process and an obvious underestimation by some refineries, there is a need for better tracking of upset emissions.

  14. EIA model documentation: Petroleum Market Model of the National Energy Modeling System

    SciTech Connect

    1994-12-30

    The purpose of this report is to define the objectives of the Petroleum Market Model (PMM), describe its basic approach, and provide detail on how it works. This report is intended as a reference document for model analysts, users, and the public. Documentation of the model is in accordance with EIA`s legal obligation to provide adequate documentation in support of its models (Public Law 94-385, section 57.b.2). The PMM models petroleum refining activities, the marketing of products, the production of natural gas liquids and domestic methanol, projects petroleum provides and sources of supplies for meeting demand. In addition, the PMM estimates domestic refinery capacity expansion and fuel consumption.

  15. Biological Treatment of Petroleum in Radiologically Contaminated Soil

    SciTech Connect

    BERRY, CHRISTOPHER

    2005-11-14

    This chapter describes ex situ bioremediation of the petroleum portion of radiologically co-contaminated soils using microorganisms isolated from a waste site and innovative bioreactor technology. Microorganisms first isolated and screened in the laboratory for bioremediation of petroleum were eventually used to treat soils in a bioreactor. The bioreactor treated soils contaminated with over 20,000 mg/kg total petroleum hydrocarbon and reduced the levels to less than 100 mg/kg in 22 months. After treatment, the soils were permanently disposed as low-level radiological waste. The petroleum and radiologically contaminated soil (PRCS) bioreactor operated using bioventing to control the supply of oxygen (air) to the soil being treated. The system treated 3.67 tons of PCRS amended with weathered compost, ammonium nitrate, fertilizer, and water. In addition, a consortium of microbes (patent pending) isolated at the Savannah River National Laboratory from a petroleum-contaminated site was added to the PRCS system. During operation, degradation of petroleum waste was accounted for through monitoring of carbon dioxide levels in the system effluent. The project demonstrated that co-contaminated soils could be successfully treated through bioventing and bioaugmentation to remove petroleum contamination to levels below 100 mg/kg while protecting workers and the environment from radiological contamination.

  16. Cancer incidence at a hydrometallurgical nickel refinery.

    PubMed

    Egedahl, R; Rice, E

    1984-01-01

    Sherritt Gordon Mines Limited established hydrometallurgical nickel refining operations at Fort Saskatchewan, Alberta, in 1954. Records of workers with a minimum of one year's employment with Sherritt Gordon Mines were obtained and identification information as well as details of work history were collected and placed on computer. Cancer cases were identified by matching the study records with the computer listings of the Alberta Cancer Registry. Cancer deaths were verified utilizing record-linkage with death registrations of the Alberta Vital Statistics Division. The files of the Alberta Health Care Insurance Commission were used to ascertain the vital status of past employees of Sherritt Gordon Mines Limited. Among the 993 employees in the nickel refining and maintenance groups at Sherritt Gordon Mines, 30 cases of cancer were identified occurring at 13 diagnostic sites. No neoplasms of the nasal cavities or paranasal sinuses were found in the study population. Two cases of lung cancer were detected among maintenance workers. A single case of renal-cell cancer was diagnosed in the nickel-exposure category as well as in the maintenance group. None of the observed-to-expected cancer incidence ratios at the various diagnostic sites were statistically significant at the p less than 0.05 level. PMID:6535579

  17. Petroleum supply monthly, January 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-01-01

    Data presented describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major US geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the United States. The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in primary supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregated, the data reported by these sectors approximately represent the consumption of petroleum products in the United States.

  18. Petroleum supply monthly, February 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-03-01

    The Petroleum Supply Monthly presents data describing the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major US geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the US. The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in primary supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders; operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. Data are divided into two sections: Summary statistics and Detailed statistics.

  19. Petroleum supply monthly, August 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    This publication the Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM) is one of a family of four publications produced by the Petroleum Supply Division within the Energy Information Administration (EIA) reflecting different levels of data timeliness and completeness. The other publications are the Weekly Petroleum Status Report, (WPSR), the Winter Fuels Report, and the Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA). Data presented describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major US geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the United States (50 States and the District of Columbia). The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in primary supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. Data presented are divided into Summary Statistics and Detailed Statistics.

  20. Carbonate petroleum reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Roehl, P.O.; Choquette, P.W.

    1985-01-01

    This book presents papers on the geology of petroleum deposits. Topics considered include diagenesis, porosity, dolomite reservoirs, deposition, reservoir rock, reefs, morphology, fracture-controlled production, Cenozoic reservoirs, Mesozoic reservoirs, and Paleozoic reservoirs.

  1. Battle of the starches: Insoluble versus soluble at the refinery

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A study using the USDA starch research method has been conducted to evaluate the effects of total, insoluble, and soluble starch on raw sugar filterability and viscosity in international carbonatation refineries. Raw sugar qualities, i.e., pol, color, % invert, ash, and dextran, were also studied in...

  2. Texas refinery air pollution emissions are being severely underestimated

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, Colin

    2014-06-01

    The Houston-Galveston-Brazoria region of southeastern Texas is home to heavy industrial investment in oil refining and petrochemical production. Pollutants emanating from the factories and refineries have repeatedly caused the region to fail national and state-level tests for air quality and ground-level ozone.

  3. 40 CFR 80.1441 - Small refinery exemption.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) of this section. (6) Refiners who own refineries that qualified as small under 40 CFR 80.1141 do not... December 31, 2006. (iii) Name, address, phone number, facsimile number, and e-mail address of a corporate... letters under this subpart M. (c) If EPA finds that a refiner provided false or inaccurate...

  4. 40 CFR 80.1441 - Small refinery exemption.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) of this section. (6) Refiners who own refineries that qualified as small under 40 CFR 80.1141 do not... December 31, 2006. (iii) Name, address, phone number, facsimile number, and e-mail address of a corporate... letters under this subpart M. (c) If EPA finds that a refiner provided false or inaccurate...

  5. Performance of high nickel alloys in refinery and petrochemical environments

    SciTech Connect

    Crum, J.R.; Adkins, M.E.; Lipscomb, W.G.

    1986-07-01

    In certain intermediate temperature refinery and petrochemical applications, both resistance to polythionic acid and chloride stress corrosion cracking (SCC) and high temperature strength and stability are required. The effect of simulated operating temperatures in the 900 to 1500/sup 0/F (482 to 816/sup 0/C) range on the corrosion and mechanical properties of several nickel alloys is examined.

  6. Treatment and disposal of refinery sludges: Indian scenario.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharyya, J K; Shekdar, A V

    2003-06-01

    Crude oil is a major source of energy and feedstock for petrochemicals. Oily sludge, bio-sludge and chemical sludge are the major sludges generated from the processes and effluent treatment plants of the refineries engaged in crude oil refining operations. Refineries in India generate about 28,220 tons of sludge per annum. Various types of pollutants like phenols, heavy metals, etc. are present in the sludges and they are treated as hazardous waste. Oily sludge, which is generated in much higher amount compared to other sludges, contains phenol (90-100 mg/kg), nickel (17-25 mg/kg), chromium (27-80 mg/kg), zinc (7-80 mg/kg), manganese (19-24 mg/kg), cadmium (0.8-2 mg/kg), copper (32-120 mg/kg) and lead (0.001-0.12 mg/ kg). Uncontrolled disposal practices of sludges in India cause degradation of environmental and depreciation of aesthetic quality. Environmental impact due to improper sludge management has also been identified. Salient features of various treatment and disposal practices have been discussed. Findings of a case study undertaken by the authors for Numaligarh Refinery in India have been presented. Various system alternatives have been identified for waste management in Numaligarh Refinery. A ranking exercise has been carried out to evaluate the alternatives and select the appropriate one. A detailed design of the selected waste management system has been presented. PMID:12870645

  7. Romania's petroleum systems

    SciTech Connect

    Stefanescu, M.O. ); Popescu, B.M. )

    1993-09-01

    In Romania, nine onshore petroleum systems and one offshore petroleum system have recently been identified. Of the onshore systems, three are related to the compressional folded basins: Teleajen-Sita (early Middle Cretaceous marine source rocks), and Puciossa-Fusaru and Alunis-Kliwa (Oligocene-early Miocene marine source rocks). In the same category, we have included the recently discovered Deleni petroleum system with source rocks of not yet identified origin but whose reservoirs certainly belong to a folded basin. In the foreland platform basins, two systems can be distinguished: Rimesti-Fauresti (Middle Jurassic marine source rocks) and Infra-Anhydrite (with presumed Middle Jurassic or middle Miocene marine source rocks). The areas corresponding to the posttectonic basins include three onshore petroleum systems and one offshore system: the Pannonian (Badenian marine and Sarmatian brackish water source rocks), the Valea Caselor-Borsa (oligocene marine source rocks) and the Transylvanian (Badenian marine shales source and Sarmatian brackish water source rocks). Offshore, there is only one petroleum system consisting of Oligocene-Miocene marine source rock and Cretaceous or Eocene reservoirs. The majority of the mentioned petroleum systems reservoirs are Paleozoic to Pliocene clastics, but in the platform areas, carbonate reservoirs are found in the Paleozoic and Mesozoic. In all the petroleum systems, despite the different ages of the source rocks, most of the hydrocarbons have been expelled relatively recently during the Late Sarmatian-Pliocene interval. This face is substantiated by examples from two petroleum systems: the Rimesti-Fauresti (duration time 173 m.y., preservation 2 m.y.) and the Alunis-Kliwa (duration time 29-30 m.y., preservation 4 m.y.). The hydrocarbons were first expelled and migrated into described systems reservoirs after Late Styrian and Moldavian overthrusting, i.e. not earlier than 12-14 m.y.

  8. Sedimentology and petroleum geology

    SciTech Connect

    Bjorlykke, K.O. )

    1989-01-01

    This book presents an introduction to sedimentology as well as petroleum geology. It integrates both subjects, which are closely related but mostly treated separately. The author covers the basic aspects of sedimentology, sedimentary geochemistry and diagenesis. Principles of stratigraphy, seismic stratigraphy and basin modelling forms the base for the part on petroleum geology. Subjects discussed include the composition of kerogen and hydrocarbons, theories of migration and trapping of hydrocarbons and properties of reservoir rocks. Introductions to well logging and production geology are given.

  9. Petroleum basin studies

    SciTech Connect

    Shannon, P.M. ); Naylor, D. )

    1989-01-01

    This book reviews the tectonic setting, basin development and history of exploration of a number of selected petroleum provinces located in a variety of settings in the Middle East, North Sea, Nigeria, the Rocky Mountains, Gabon and China. This book illustrates how ideas and models developed in one area may be applied to other regions. Regional reviews and the reassessment of petroleum provinces are presented.

  10. Refinery Integration of By-Products from Coal-Derived Jet Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Caroline Clifford; Andre Boehman; Chunshan Song; Bruce Miller; Gareth Mitchell

    2008-03-31

    fuels ({approx}60 ON for coal-based gasoline and {approx}20 CN for coal-based diesel fuel). Therefore, the allowable range of blending levels was studied where the blend would achieve acceptable performance. However, in both cases of the coal-based fuels, their ignition characteristics may make them ideal fuels for advanced combustion strategies where lower ON and CN are desirable. Task 3 was designed to develop new approaches for producing ultra clean fuels and value-added chemicals from refinery streams involving coal as a part of the feedstock. It consisted of the following three parts: (1) desulfurization and denitrogenation which involves both new adsorption approach for selective removal of nitrogen and sulfur and new catalysts for more effective hydrotreating and the combination of adsorption denitrogenation with hydrodesulfurization; (2) saturation of two-ring aromatics that included new design of sulfur resistant noble-metal catalysts for hydrogenation of naphthalene and tetralin in middle distillate fuels, and (3) value-added chemicals from naphthalene and biphenyl, which aimed at developing value-added organic chemicals from refinery streams such as 2,6-dimethylnaphthalene and 4,4{prime}-dimethylbiphenyl as precursors to advanced polymer materials. Major advances were achieved in this project in designing the catalysts and sorbent materials, and in developing fundamental understanding. The objective of Task 4 was to evaluate the effect of introducing coal into an existing petroleum refinery on the fuel oil product, specifically trace element emissions. Activities performed to accomplish this objective included analyzing two petroleum-based commercial heavy fuel oils (i.e., No. 6 fuel oils) as baseline fuels and three co-processed fuel oils, characterizing the atomization performance of a No. 6 fuel oil, measuring the combustion performance and emissions of the five fuels, specifically major, minor, and trace elements when fired in a watertube boiler designed

  11. Bioremediation of Petroleum and Radiological Contaminated Soils at the Savannah River Site: Laboratory to Field Scale Applications

    SciTech Connect

    BRIGMON, ROBINL.

    2004-06-07

    In the process of Savannah River Site (SRS) operations limited amounts of waste are generated containing petroleum, and radiological contaminated soils. Currently, this combination of radiological and petroleum contaminated waste does not have an immediate disposal route and is being stored in low activity vaults. SRS developed and implemented a successful plan for clean up of the petroleum portion of the soils in situ using simple, inexpensive, bioreactor technology. Treatment in a bioreactor removes the petroleum contamination from the soil without spreading radiological contamination to the environment. This bioreactor uses the bioventing process and bioaugmentation or the addition of the select hydrocarbon degrading bacteria. Oxygen is usually the initial rate-limiting factor in the biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons. Using the bioventing process allowed control of the supply of nutrients and moisture based on petroleum contamination concentrations and soil type. The results of this work have proven to be a safe and cost-effective means of cleaning up low level radiological and petroleum-contaminated soil. Many of the other elements of the bioreactor design were developed or enhanced during the demonstration of a ''biopile'' to treat the soils beneath a Polish oil refinery's waste disposal lagoons. Aerobic microorganisms were isolated from the aged refinery's acidic sludge contaminated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Twelve hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria were isolated from the sludge. The predominant PAH degraders were tentatively identified as Achromobacter, Pseudomonas Burkholderia, and Sphingomonas spp. Several Ralstonia spp were also isolated that produce biosurfactants. Biosurfactants can enhance bioremediation by increasing the bioavailability of hydrophobic contaminants including hydrocarbons. The results indicated that the diversity of acid-tolerant PAH-degrading microorganisms in acidic oil wastes may be much greater than previously

  12. Radiographic evidence of pulmonary fibrosis and possible etiologic factors at a nickel refinery in Norway.

    PubMed

    Berge, Steinar R; Skyberg, Knut

    2003-08-01

    Animal studies have shown that nickel compounds may induce pulmonary fibrosis, but so far only limited documentation in humans has been available. Radiographs of 1046 workers in a nickel refinery in Norway were read blindly and independently by three NIOSH certified B-readers, according to the ILO standards. Pulmonary fibrosis (PF) was defined as a median reading of ILO score > or = 1/0 and following this criterion, 47 cases (4.5%) were identified. In logistic regression models, controlling for age and smoking, there was evidence of increased risk of PF with cumulative exposure to soluble nickel or sulfidic nickel (p = 0.04 for both). For metallic nickel a p-value of 0.07 was found. For soluble nickel there was a dose-response trend for 4 categories of cumulated exposure. In the group with the highest cumulative exposure to soluble nickel (low exposure as reference), the crude odds ratio for PF was 4.34 (95% CI 1.75-10.77). The risk adjusted for age, smoking, asbestos and sulfidic nickel was 2.24 (0.82-6.16), with a dose-response trend. The corresponding figures for sulfidic nickel were 5.06 (1.70-15.09, crude) and 2.04 (0.54-7.70, adjusted for age, smoking, asbestos and soluble nickel). However, the dose-response trend was less clear for sulfidic nickel. Controlling for estimated asbestos exposure at the refinery tended to increase the odds ratios of soluble and sulfidic nickel. This study indicates that in addition to age and smoking exposure to soluble and sulfidic nickel compounds are risk factors of PF in humans. Since the number of cases identified in this study is small and undetected confounders may have been present, further studies in other cohorts are appropriate. PMID:12948249

  13. Phillips Petroleum`s Seastar Project

    SciTech Connect

    Upchurch, J.L.; Money, R.P.

    1997-02-01

    On May 1, 1995 Phillips Petroleum`s Seastar Project began production as the first cluster-type subsea development in the Gulf of Mexico. Seastar production reached approximately 60 million cubic feet of gas per day (mmscfd) in November 1995 with the completion of a second {open_quotes}sales{close_quotes} line (a pipeline that transports the petroleum to shore) at the Vermilion Block 386-B host platform. Currently, the field is producing 40 to 50 mmscfd and plans are on schedule for the addition of a third producing well during the first quarter of 1997. All of the subsea equipment was installed using a drilling vessel and onboard ROV support. The Seastar project began in 1987 when Phillips and its partners leased Garden Banks Blocks 70 and 71, located 110 miles south of Cameron Louisiana. The partnership drilled two wells in 1990 that discovered noncommercial hydrocarbon reserves. Following a reevaluation of the seismic data, Phillips assumed 100 percent ownership in the leases and drilled Garden Banks 71 No. 2, which discovered 350 feet of {open_quotes}pay{close_quotes} sand (oil resource) in March 1993. The initial phase of the project consisted of two satellite subsea trees tied back to a four-slot retrievable subsea manifold in 760 feet of water. Commingled gas production is delivered via dual subsea pipelines to a host platform processing facility in 300 feet of water 13 miles away in Vermilion Block 386-B, thence via sales lines to shore.

  14. Base Oils from Petroleum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prince, R. J.

    The source, composition and suitability of crude oils for base oil production are reviewed. The physical and chemical properties of alkanes, naphthenes and aromatics and their characteristics for lubricant applications are examined. Properties and applications of various base oils are defined and specified. Production of conventional mineral oils is described, including the various processes to remove wax and other deleterious substances, followed by increasingly severe hydrogenation to produce base oils of increased quality and performance. The API categorization of mineral base oils, either direct from the refinery or after hydrotreatment of increasing severity, is described, together with sub-categories.

  15. 31 CFR 542.314 - Petroleum or petroleum products of Syrian origin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Petroleum or petroleum products of... REGULATIONS General Definitions § 542.314 Petroleum or petroleum products of Syrian origin. The term petroleum or petroleum products of Syrian origin means petroleum or petroleum products of Syrian...

  16. Shale worker's pneumoconiosis, associated respiratory ailments and skin tumors - plus ancillary documentation of mining and retorting processes and oil shale characterization (ex-shale workers in Scotland). Mid-project progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Seaton, A.

    1983-11-01

    Progress is reported on a study of survivors of Scottish oil shale mines, retorts, and refineries. The prevalence of pneumoconiosis and skin tumors is being determined by occupational histories, dermatology and smoking questionnaires, and x-ray surveys. A control study of workers of a colliery population in northeast England and mineralogical characterization of Scottish and Colorado shales are also being conducted. (ACR)

  17. Petroleum engineering manpower supply

    SciTech Connect

    Dorfman, M.

    1982-09-01

    The supply of Petroleum Engineers within the U.S. has shown an exponential growth during the last decade due to increases in the price of petroleum and concommitant demand for engineers in the petroleum industry at all levels of activity. Schools currently have very large enrollments; many lack sufficient faculty and facilities to adequately handle the large loads. Recent uncertainty in long range forecasting of petroleum demand, coupled with uncertainty in the price of oil due to turmoil in the Middle East and the discovery of additional large reserves of petroleum as a result of increased drilling, has led to a decline of approximately 25% in the price of crude oil on the spot market and subsequent reductions in drilling in 1982 from a high of 4,500 rigs in the U.S. to 2528 rigs by August 31, 1982; a reduction of 44% this year. This reduction in activity will be reflected in reduced job opportunities for many new graduates in December 1982 and in 1983, and the ''pipelines'' within the schools are filled with students in expectation of good jobs in the private sector of the economy. Since Petroleum Engineering departments maintain a close tie with industry, it is essential that some balance be maintained between supply and demand, so as to try to prevent a glut of engineers descending upon the market. Steps are underway at many schools. to reduce enrollments by a variety of methods at the present time. An upturn in demand in petroleum prices may serve to mitigate the problem within the next two years, but a long-range interchange between industrial hiring forecasts and universities is essential in planning for the future.

  18. A retrospective mortality study within operating segments of a petroleum company

    SciTech Connect

    Schnatter, A.R.; Theriault, G.; Katz, A.M.; Thompson, F.S.; Donaleski, D.; Murray, N. )

    1992-01-01

    This retrospective mortality study was conducted among 34,597 oil industry workers in diverse operating segments. Employees were traced through Statistics Canada, and overall mortality (SMR = 0.85) was lower than general population rates and similar to other petrochemical cohorts. The most notable finding was a significant excess of malignant melanoma [observed deaths (N) = 16, SMR = 1.87, 95% CI = 1.07, 3.04], which concentrated among upstream workers (N = 6, SMR = 6.00, 95% CI = 2.19, 13.06), and was directly related to employment duration and latency. Specific substances or hydrocarbon (HC) streams could not be implicated, although possible explanations include dermal HC exposure, ultraviolet light exposure, or a synergistic effect between these two factors. Marketing/transportation workers showed a non-significant excess of multiple myeloma (SMR = 1.81), which was also related to employment duration, latency, and commencement of employment before 1950. Lymphatic cancer, skin cancer, and kidney cancer mortality was not elevated in refinery workers, a finding at odds with some previous refinery worker studies. Although the malignant melanoma and possibly the multiple myeloma mortality patterns are consistent with an occupational link, further studies are needed to investigate the relationship of these diseases with particular exposures.

  19. Biodegradation of petroleum-based oil wastes through composting.

    PubMed

    Kirchmann, H; Ewnetu, W

    1998-01-01

    Composting of horse manure was used as a means of degradation of two oil wastes, oil sludge from petrol stations and petroleum residues from a refinery. Paraffin oil was chosen as a reference. Oil wastes decomposed to 78-93% during 4.5 months of composting. The degradation of the waste oils was higher than that of the reference paraffin oil and no difference was found between the two types of oil wastes concerning their decomposition. At the end of the experiment, most of the polyaromatic hydrocarbons had been degraded except pyrene, chrysene and dibenz(ah)anthracene. Gaseous losses of oil compounds through volatilisation from composts were found not to be significant.

  20. Petroleum storage tank cleaning using commercial microbial culture products

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, D.R.; Entzeroth, L.C.; Timmis, A.; Whiteside, A.; Hoskins, B.C.

    1995-12-31

    The removal of paraffinic bottom accumulations from refinery storage tanks represents an increasingly costly area of petroleum storage management. Microorganisms can be used to reduce paraffinic bottoms by increasing the solubility of bottom material and by increasing the wax-carrying capacity of carrier oil used in the cleaning process. The economic savings of such treatments are considerable. The process is also intrinsically safer than alternative methods, as it reduces and even eliminates the need for personnel to enter the tank during the cleaning process. Both laboratory and field sample analyses can be used to document changes in tank material during the treatment process. These changes include increases in volatile content and changes in wax distribution. Several case histories illustrating these physical and chemical changes are presented along with the economics of treatment.

  1. Pilot-scale constructed wetlands for petroleum-contaminated groundwater.

    PubMed

    Bedessem, Marjorie E; Ferro, Ari M; Hiegel, Trevor

    2007-06-01

    A pilot study was conducted to determine the feasibility of using constructed treatment wetlands to remediate recovered groundwater from the subsurface of a former refinery site. The pilot system consisted of four subsurface flow treatment cells operated in an upward vertical flow mode and equipped with subsurface aeration lines. The treatment system showed minimal capability for methyl-tert-butyl ether removal, but did effectively remove total petroleum hydrocarbons-deisel range organics and total benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and o-, m-, and p-xylenes (total BTEX). Effluent benzene concentrations were less than 0.05 mg/L in 70% of the samples from a treatment cell using subsurface aeration and a wetland sod amendment. Based on 1 year of operating data, cumulative mass removal approached 80% for benzene and 88% for total BTEX.

  2. Predicting petroleum phototoxicity.

    PubMed

    Wernersson, Ann-Sofie

    2003-03-01

    Phototoxicity to Daphnia magna was studied on 14 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and 22 petroleum products (ranging from diesel to crude oil). The phototoxicity ranking of pure PAHs was about the same as found in another study on fish gill cells in vitro (Toxicology 127 (1998) 143), suggesting that the relative acute phototoxicity does not differ significantly between different species. Most petroleum products were found to be phototoxic, although the results differ somewhat between test methods (preparation of water-accommodated fractions or petroleum ether dissolved oil slurries). The degree of phototoxicity of a sample is related to both the source and the refining process of the crude oil. The best chemical predictors found were the concentrations of eight phototoxic parent PAHs. An even simpler analytical technique suggested for initial screening would be direct measurements of "total PAH," where samples having more than 3% PAH should be studied further.

  3. Aplastic anemia in a petrochemical factory worker.

    PubMed Central

    Baak, Y M; Ahn, B Y; Chang, H S; Kim, J H; Kim, K A; Lim, Y

    1999-01-01

    A petrochemical worker with aplastic anemia was referred to our hospital. He worked in a petroleum resin-producing factory and had been exposed to low-level benzene while packaging the powder resin and pouring lime into a deactivation tank. According to the yearly environmental survey of the working area, the airborne benzene level was approximately 0.28 ppm. Exposure to benzene, a common chemical used widely in industry, may progressively lead to pancytopenia, aplastic anemia, and leukemia. The hematotoxicity of benzene is related to the amount and duration of exposure. Most risk predictions for benzene exposures have been based on rubber workers who were exposed to high concentrations. In the petroleum industry, the concentration of benzene is relatively low, and there are disputes over the toxicity of low-level benzene because of a lack of evidence. In this paper we report the case of aplastic anemia induced by low-level benzene exposure. Images Figure 1 PMID:10504154

  4. Petroleum marketing annual, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-07-01

    This publication contains statistical data on a variety of crude oils and refined petroleum products. The publication provides statistics on crude oil costs and refined petroleum products sales for use by industry, government, private sector analysts, educational institutions, and consumers. Data on crude oil include the domestic first purchase price, the free-on-board (f.o.b.) and landed cost of imported crude oil, and the refiners` acquisition cost of crude oil. Sales data for motor gasoline, distillates, residuals, aviation fuels, kerosene, and propane are presented.

  5. Petroleum Marketing Annual, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-12-18

    This report contains statistical data on a variety of crude oils and refined petroleum products. The publication provides statistics on crude oil costs and refined petroleum products sales for us by industry, government, private sector analysts, educational institutions, and consumers. Data on crude oil include the domestic first purchase price, the free-on-board (f.o.b.) and landed cost of imported crude oil, and the refiners' acquisition cost of crude oil. Sales data for motor gasoline, distillates, residuals, aviation fuels, kerosene, and propane are presented. 13 figs., 51 tabs.

  6. Characterization and assessment of Al Ruwais refinery wastewater.

    PubMed

    Al Zarooni, Mohamed; Elshorbagy, Walid

    2006-08-25

    An extensive bulk parameters and component-based analysis was carried out for Al Ruwais refinery wastewater during the period of June 2002-June 2003. The program included identification of major process and utilities wastewater streams and quantification of these streams relative to the total wastewater generated from all refinery processes. In addition to the high biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) and chemical oxygen demand (COD) reported levels, the analysis showed high concentrations of polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and phenolic compounds in the major wastewater streams. Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) were also detected in few streams. The caustic water was found to have the highest levels of the pollutants mentioned above. Dilution of the wastewater with process cooling water serves as the main treatment approach applied to the effluent wastewater before disposal into the sea. Primary as well as secondary treatment units are thought to be essential and strongly recommended to reduce the pollutants to levels below the United Arab Emirates (UAE) standards for marine discharge.

  7. Petroleum marketing monthly, June 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    The Petroleum Marketing Monthly (PMM) provides information and statistical data on a variety of crude oils and refined petroleum products. The publication presents statistics on crude oil costs and refined petroleum products sales for use by industry, government, private sector analysts, educational institutions, and consumers. Data on crude oil include the domestic first purchase price, the f.o.b. and landed cost of imported crude oil, and the refiners` acquisition cost of crude oil. Refined petroleum product sales data include motor gasoline, distillates, residuals, aviation fuels, kerosene, and propane. Monthly statistics on purchases of crude oil and sales of petroleum products are presented in five sections: Summary Statistics; Crude Oil Prices; Prices of Petroleum Products; Volumes of Petroleum Products; and Prime Supplier Sales Volumes of Petroleum Products for Local Consumption. The feature article is entitled ``The Second Oxygenated Gasoline Season.`` 7 figs., 50 tabs.

  8. Petroleum supply monthly, August 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-08-26

    Data presented in the Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM) describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major US geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the United States (50 States and the District of Columbia). The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in primary supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregated, the data reported by these sectors approximately represent the consumption of petroleum products in the United States. Data presented in the PSM are divided into two sections: Summary Statistics and Detailed Statistics.

  9. Petroleum supply monthly, July 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-07-29

    Data presented in the Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM) describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major US geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the United States (50 States and the District of Columbia). The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in primary supply. Included are: Petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregated, the data reported by these sectors approximately represent the consumption of petroleum products in the United States.

  10. Martinez Refinery Completes Plant-Wide Energy Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    2002-11-01

    This OIT BestPractices Case Study describes how the Equilon Enterprises oil refinery in Martinez, California undertook a plant-wide energy assessment that focused on three key areas: waste minimization, process debottlenecking, and operations optimization. The assessment yielded recommendations, which, if implemented, can save more than 6,000,000 MMBtu per year and an estimated $52,000,000 per year, plus improve process control and reduce waste.

  11. Recommissioned German refinery ready to meet tough fuels, emissions specs

    SciTech Connect

    Rhodes, A.K.

    1993-08-09

    In November and December 1991, Beta Raffinerie-gesellschaft Wilhelmshaven MBH restarted the mothballed refinery at Wilhelmshaven, Germany. The refurbished refinery is sophisticated enough to produce high-grade, low-sulfur fuels and meet stringent emissions specifications, even when processing high-sulfur crudes. Located on Jade Bay in northern Germany near Wilhelmshaven, the Beta facility is the only refinery in Germany on a deep-water port. Refurbishment and recommissioning took only about 1 year. The primary steps were: detailed visual/ultrasonic inspection; reassembly or replacement of all pumps; replacement of much of the piping and installment of new piping to improve tank farm flexibility; disassembly and reassembly of all jetty booms and dredging of the jetty; sandblasting and relining of all tanks, installation of double seals, and replacement of various tank bottoms; conversion or upgrading of several tanks to other uses; strengthening of LPG spheres and covering them with concrete casements; reactivating the Foxboro control system for startup (the system is now being replaced with another system); complete overhauling of all process units, replacement of drawers in towers, rotors, and other equipment, and debottlenecking of process units to achieve higher throughputs; upgrading of al furnaces and heaters, as required, and re-equipping; them with low-NO[sub x] burners; installation of a stack-emissions measurement control system; removal of all asbestos gaskets and replacing them with non asbestos gaskets, and renewal of rail and truck-loading automation and installation of bottom-loading and vapor-recovery systems.

  12. University of Maine Integrated Forest Product Refinery (IFPR) Technology Research

    SciTech Connect

    Pendse, Hemant P.

    2010-11-23

    This project supported research on science and technology that forms a basis for integrated forest product refinery for co-production of chemicals, fuels and materials using existing forest products industry infrastructure. Clear systems view of an Integrated Forest Product Refinery (IFPR) allowed development of a compelling business case for a small scale technology demonstration in Old Town ME for co-production of biofuels using cellulosic sugars along with pulp for the new owners of the facility resulting in an active project on Integrated Bio-Refinery (IBR) at the Old Town Fuel & Fiber. Work on production of advanced materials from woody biomass has led to active projects in bioplastics and carbon nanofibers. A lease for 40,000 sq. ft. high-bay space has been obtained to establish a Technology Research Center for IFPR technology validation on industrially relevant scale. UMaine forest bioproducts research initiative that began in April 2006 has led to establishment of a formal research institute beginning in March 2010.

  13. Evaluation of oil removal efficiency and enzymatic activity in some fungal strains for bioremediation of petroleum-polluted soils

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Petroleum pollution is a global disaster and there are several soil cleaning methods including bioremediation. Methods In a field study, fugal strains were isolated from oil-contaminated sites of Arak refinery (Iran) and their growth ability was checked in potato dextrose agar (PDA) media containing 0-10% v/v crude oil, the activity of three enzymes (Catalase, Peroxidase and Phenol Oxidase) was evaluated in the fungal colonies and bioremediation ability of the fungi was checked in the experimental pots containing 3 kg sterilized soil and different concentrations of petroleum (0-10% w/w). Results Four fungal strains, Acromonium sp., Alternaria sp., Aspergillus terreus and Penicillium sp., were selected as the most resistant ones. They were able to growth in the subjected concentrations and Alternaria sp. showed the highest growth ability in the petroleum containing media. The enzyme assay showed that the enzymatic activity was increased in the oil-contaminated media. Bioremediation results showed that the studied fungi were able to decrease petroleum pollution. The highest petroleum removing efficiency of Aspergillus terreus, Penicillium sp., Alternaria sp. and Acromonium sp. was evaluated in the 10%, 8%, 8% and 2% petroleum pollution respectively. Conclusions Fungi are important microorganisms in decreasing of petroleum pollution. They have bioremediation potency that is related to their enzymatic activities. PMID:23369665

  14. Chemical Principles Revisited: Petroleum Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kolb, Doris; Kolb, Kenneth E.

    1979-01-01

    Presents an historical review of the role of petroleum in world history and information on the chemistry of petroleum. It is suggested that petroleum chemistry be discussed since within the next two decades oil and gas will provide the major portion of U.S. energy. (Author/SA)

  15. Petroleum supply monthly, April 1990

    SciTech Connect

    1990-06-26

    The Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM) is one of a family of three publications produced by the Petroleum Supply Division within the Energy Information Administration (EIA) reflecting different levels of data timeliness and completeness. The other two publications are the Weekly Petroleum Status Report (WPSR) and the Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA). Data presented in the Petroleum Supply Monthly describe (PSM) the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major US geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the United States (50 States and the District of Columbia). The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in Primary Supply.'' Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregated, the data reported by these sectors approximately represent the consumption of petroleum products in the United States. Data presented in the PSM are divided into two sections: (1) the Summary Statistics and (2) the Detailed Statistics.

  16. Petroleum Vapor - Field Technical

    EPA Science Inventory

    The screening approach being developed by EPA OUST to evaluate petroleum vapor intrusion (PVI) requires information that has not be routinely collected in the past at vapor intrusion sites. What is the best way to collect this data? What are the relevant data quality issues and ...

  17. Fundamentals of petroleum

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    This book presents basic information about the petroleum industry. Nine fully illustrated chapters cover geology, exploration, leasing, drilling, production, transportation, refining and processing, marketing, and economics of the industry, with the extensive use of high tech in every phase of the industry described. A detailed index facilitates the book's use as a reference.

  18. Petroleum Processing Efficiency Improvement

    SciTech Connect

    John Schabron; Joseph Rovani; Mark Sanderson; Jenny Loveridge

    2012-09-01

    A series of volatile crude oils was characterized using the Asphaltene Determinator oncolumn precipitation and re-dissolution method developed at Western Research Institute (WRI). Gravimetric asphaltenes and polars fractions from silica gel chromatography separation of the oils were characterized also. A study to define the differences in composition of asphaltenes in refinery desalter rag layer emulsions and the corresponding feed and desalter oils was conducted. Results indicate that the most polar and pericondensed aromatic material in the asphaltenes is enriched in the emulsions. The wax types and carbon number distributions in the two heptaneeluting fractions from the Waxphaltene Determinator separation were characterized by repetitive collection of the fractions followed by high temperature gas chromatography (GC) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). High resolution Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICRMS) was conducted by researchers at the Florida State University National High Magnetic Field laboratory in a no-cost collaboration with the study.

  19. Integrating hazardous waste management into a multimedia pollution prevention paradigm. A protoype regulatory program for petroleum refinesments

    SciTech Connect

    Elcock, D.; Gasper, J.

    1996-12-31

    An emerging trend in environmental regulatory management promises enhanced environmental protection and more flexibility for regulated entities. This trend reflects three concepts. First, regulations designed to reduce one type of environmental pollution (e.g., air pollution) should not increase other types of pollution (e.g. hazardous waste). Second, pollution prevention is an important alternative to end-of-pipe control requirements. Third, offering polluting entities the flexibility of meeting certain performance criteria may produce better environmental results than prescribing specific technologies or approaches. A significant body of literature supports the need to develop regulatory programs that incorporate these concepts. However, there is little evidence that these concepts have been integrated into actual multimedia regulatory programs. Argonne National Laboratory and the U.S. Department of Energy are developing a prototype regulatory program for petroleum refineries that embraces these concepts. The development approach in this case study comprises several steps: (1) identifying and evaluating existing regulations governing petroleum refineries (if any); (2) characterizing expected future operating conditions of refineries; (3) setting goals for the regulatory program; (4) identifying and evaluating options for the program; (5) developing a prototype based on selected options; (6) identifying and addressing implementation issues; and (7) testing the prototype on a pilot basis. The approach being used in the U.S. effort is flexible and can be used in environmental management efforts throughout the Pacific Basin--in both developing and developed countries.

  20. Health-hazard evaluation report HETA 89-374-2197, Exxon Baytown Refinery, Baytown, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Kinnes, G.M.; Kawamoto, M.M.

    1992-03-01

    In response to a request from The Gulf Coast Industrial Workers Union (GCIWU), an investigation was begun of possible hazardous working conditions at the Exxon Baytown Refinery (SIC-2911), Baytown, Texas. Some process technicians had reported that they experienced heart attack type symptoms while or after they were involved in unloading the diesel fuel cetane improver, 2-ethylhexyl-nitrate (27247967), from tanker trucks. Approximately every 5 days the 2-ethylhexyl-nitrate was delivered to the facility in a 6000 gallon tanker truck, and pumped into a 15,000 gallon storage tank. Nine personal breathing zone and general area air samples were collected during the cetane improver unloading operation. Only three of the nine samples had detectable levels of 2-ethylhexyl-nitrate, ranging from 0.05 to 0.48 parts per million (ppm); however, the validity of the data was questionable due to difficulties in analysis. Of the 11 interviewed employees, six reported symptoms related to cetane improver exposure. Often the symptoms were temporally related to direct skin exposure. Some of the symptoms were headache, lightheadedness or dizziness, chest discomfort or palpitations, and nausea. Personal protective equipment procedures had been implemented, decreasing the occurence of symptomatic episodes. The authors conclude that symptoms were consistent with excessive exposure to nitrated esters. The authors recommend that efforts continue to limit the exposure to the chemical.

  1. Petroleum supply monthly, October 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-10-26

    The Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM) is one of a family of four publications produced by the Petroleum Supply Division within the Energy Information Administration (EIA) reflecting different levels of data timeliness and completeness. The other publications are the Weekly Petroleum Status Report (WPSR), the Winter Fuels Report, and the Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA). Data presented in the PSM describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major US geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the United States (50 States and the District of Columbia). The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in primary supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregated, the data reported by these sectors approximately represent the consumption of petroleum products in the United States. Data presented in the PSM are divided into two sections: Summary Statistics and Detailed Statistics.

  2. Petroleum supply monthly, May 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-05-27

    The Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM) is one of a family of four publications produced by the Petroleum Supply Division within the Energy Information Administration (EIA) reflecting different levels of data timeliness and completeness. The other publications are the Weekly Petroleum Status Report (WPSR), the Winter Fuels Report, and the Petroleum supply annual (PSA). Data presented in the PSM describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major US geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the United States (50 States and the District of columbia). The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in primary supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregated, the data reported by these sectors approximately represent the consumption of petroleum products in the United States. Data presented in the PSM are divided into two sections: Summary Statistics and Detailed Statistics.

  3. Petroleum supply monthly, July 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-07-26

    The Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM) is one of a family of four publications produced by the Petroleum Supply Division within the Energy Information Administration (EIA) reflecting different levels of data timeliness and completeness. The other publications are the Weekly Petroleum Status Report (WPSR), the Winter Fuels Report, and the Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA). Data presented in the PSM describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major US geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the United States (50 States and the District of Columbia). The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in primary supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregated, the data reported by these sectors approximately represent the consumption of petroleum products in the United States. Data presented in the PSM are divided into two sections: Summary Statistics and Detailed Statistics.

  4. Petroleum supply monthly, June 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-06-28

    The Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM) is one of a family of four publications produced by the Petroleum Supply Division within the Energy Information Administration (EIA) reflecting different levels of data timeliness and completeness. The other publications are the Weekly Petroleum Status Report (WPSR), the Winter Fuels Report, and the Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA). Data presented in the PSM describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major US geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the United States (50 States and the District of Columbia). The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in primary supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregated, the data reported by these sectors approximately represent the consumption of petroleum products in the United States. Data presented in the PSM are divided into two sections: Summary Statistics and Detailed Statistics.

  5. Petroleum supply monthly, January 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1996-02-15

    The Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM) is one of a family of four publications produced by the Petroleum Supply Division within the Energy Information Administration (EIA) reflecting different levels of data timeliness and completeness. The other publications are the Weekly Petroleum Status Report (WPSR), the Winter Fuels Report, and the Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA). Data presented in the PSM describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major US geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the United States (50 States and the District of Columbia). The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in primary supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregated, the data reported by these sectors approximately represent the consumption of petroleum products in the United States. Data presented in the PSM are divided into two sections: Summary Statistics and Detailed Statistics.

  6. Petroleum supply monthly, September 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-09-30

    The Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM) is one of a family of three publications produced by the Petroleum Supply Division within the Energy Information Administration (EIA) reflecting different levels of data timeliness and completeness. The other two publications are the Weekly Petroleum Status Report (WPSR) and the Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA). Data presented in PSM describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major US geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administrations for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the United States (50 states and the District of Columbia). The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in Primary Supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregated, the data reported by these sectors approximately represent the consumption of petroleum products in the United States. Data presented in the PSM are divided into two sections (1) the Summary Statistics and (2) the Detailed Statistics. 65 tabs.

  7. Petroleum Supply Monthly, August 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-10-30

    The Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM) is one of a family of three publications produced by the Petroleum Supply Division within the Energy Information administration (EIA) reflecting different levels of data timeliness and completeness. The other two publications are the Weekly Petroleum Status Report (WPSR) and the Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA). Data presented in the PSM describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major US geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) district movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the United States (50 States and the District of Columbia). The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in Primary Supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregated, the data reported by these sectors approximately represent the consumption of petroleum products in the United States. Data presented in the PSM are divided into two sections (1) the Summary Statistics and (2) the Detailed Statistics.

  8. Field trial on removal of petroleum-hydrocarbon pollutants using a microbial consortium for bioremediation and rhizoremediation.

    PubMed

    Pizarro-Tobías, Paloma; Niqui, José L; Roca, Amalia; Solano, Jennifer; Fernández, Matilde; Bastida, Felipe; García, Carlos; Ramos, Juan L

    2015-02-01

    Petroleum waste sludges are toxic and dangerous that is why environmental protection agencies have declared their treatment top priority. Physicochemical treatments are expensive and environmentally unfriendly, while alternative biological treatments are less costly but, in general, work at a slower pace. An in situ bioremediation and rhizoremediation field scale trial was performed in an area contaminated with oil refinery sludge under semiarid climate. The bioremediation and rhizoremediation treatments included the use of an artificial consortium made up of plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria,and the combined use of the mentioned consortium along with pasture plants respectively. Rhizoremediation revealed that the development of vegetation favoured the evolution of indigenous microbiota with potential to remove petroleum wastes. This was inferred as the decline of total petroleum hydrocarbons 7 months after the biological treatment.

  9. Field trial on removal of petroleum-hydrocarbon pollutants using a microbial consortium for bioremediation and rhizoremediation.

    PubMed

    Pizarro-Tobías, Paloma; Niqui, José L; Roca, Amalia; Solano, Jennifer; Fernández, Matilde; Bastida, Felipe; García, Carlos; Ramos, Juan L

    2015-02-01

    Petroleum waste sludges are toxic and dangerous that is why environmental protection agencies have declared their treatment top priority. Physicochemical treatments are expensive and environmentally unfriendly, while alternative biological treatments are less costly but, in general, work at a slower pace. An in situ bioremediation and rhizoremediation field scale trial was performed in an area contaminated with oil refinery sludge under semiarid climate. The bioremediation and rhizoremediation treatments included the use of an artificial consortium made up of plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria,and the combined use of the mentioned consortium along with pasture plants respectively. Rhizoremediation revealed that the development of vegetation favoured the evolution of indigenous microbiota with potential to remove petroleum wastes. This was inferred as the decline of total petroleum hydrocarbons 7 months after the biological treatment. PMID:25870876

  10. Strategic Petroleum Reserve quarterly report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-11-15

    The Strategic Petroleum Reserve was created pursuant to the Energy Policy and Conservation Act of December 22, 1975 (Public Law 94-163). Its purposes are to reduce the impact of disruptions in supplies of petroleum products and to carry out obligations of the United States under the Agreement on an International Energy Program. Section 165(a) of the Act requires the submission of Annual Reports and Section 165(b)(1) requires the submission of Quarterly Reports. This Quarterly Report highlights activities undertaken during the third quarter of calendar year 1995, including: inventory of petroleum products stored in the Reserve; current storage capacity and ullage available; current status of the Strategic Petroleum Reserve storage facilities, major projects and the acquisition of petroleum products; funds obligated by the Secretary from the SPR Petroleum Account and the Strategic Petroleum Reserve Account during the prior calendar quarter and in total; and major environmental actions completed, in progress, or anticipated.

  11. Petroleum Supply Monthly, July 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-28

    Data presented in the PSM describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major US geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the United States (50 states and the District of Columbia). The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in Primary Supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregated, the data reported by these sectors approximately represent the consumption of petroleum products in the United States.

  12. Determination of nickel in lung specimens of thirty-nine autopsied nickel workers.

    PubMed

    Andersen, I; Svenes, K B

    1989-01-01

    Lung specimens from 39 nickel refinery workers autopsied during the period from 1978 to 1984 were analyzed for nickel. Fifteen of the workers were employed in the Roasting and Smelting Department, where exposure to nickel was predominantly in the form of nickel-copper oxides, Ni3S2 and metallic dust. The remaining 24 men worked in the Electrolysis Department. Exposure in this group was considered to be mostly to the water-soluble compounds, NiSO4 and NiCl2, but also to a lesser degree to water-insoluble nickel compounds such as nickel-copper oxides and sulphides. The arithmetic mean +/- SD for nickel concentration in lung tissues expressed in micrograms g-1 dry wt for the 39 workers was 150 +/- 280. In the workers employed in the Roasting and Smelting Department, the average nickel concentration was 330 +/- 380; for those who worked in the Electrolysis Department it was 34 +/- 48. Lung tissue from 16 autopsied persons not connected with the refinery had an average nickel concentration of 0.76 +/- 0.39. Statistical analysis based on log-normal distributions of the measured nickel concentrations allowed three major conclusions to be formulated: (1) nickel refinery workers exhibit elevated nickel levels in lung tissues at autopsy; (2) workers of the Electrolysis Department and the Roasting Smelting Department constitute distinct groups with respect to the accumulation of nickel in lung tissue; (3) workers who were diagnosed to have lung cancer had the same lung nickel concentrations at autopsy as those who died of other causes. PMID:2722252

  13. Determination of nickel in lung specimens of thirty-nine autopsied nickel workers.

    PubMed

    Andersen, I; Svenes, K B

    1989-01-01

    Lung specimens from 39 nickel refinery workers autopsied during the period from 1978 to 1984 were analyzed for nickel. Fifteen of the workers were employed in the Roasting and Smelting Department, where exposure to nickel was predominantly in the form of nickel-copper oxides, Ni3S2 and metallic dust. The remaining 24 men worked in the Electrolysis Department. Exposure in this group was considered to be mostly to the water-soluble compounds, NiSO4 and NiCl2, but also to a lesser degree to water-insoluble nickel compounds such as nickel-copper oxides and sulphides. The arithmetic mean +/- SD for nickel concentration in lung tissues expressed in micrograms g-1 dry wt for the 39 workers was 150 +/- 280. In the workers employed in the Roasting and Smelting Department, the average nickel concentration was 330 +/- 380; for those who worked in the Electrolysis Department it was 34 +/- 48. Lung tissue from 16 autopsied persons not connected with the refinery had an average nickel concentration of 0.76 +/- 0.39. Statistical analysis based on log-normal distributions of the measured nickel concentrations allowed three major conclusions to be formulated: (1) nickel refinery workers exhibit elevated nickel levels in lung tissues at autopsy; (2) workers of the Electrolysis Department and the Roasting Smelting Department constitute distinct groups with respect to the accumulation of nickel in lung tissue; (3) workers who were diagnosed to have lung cancer had the same lung nickel concentrations at autopsy as those who died of other causes.

  14. Ex situ soil VES/bioremediation of petroleum hydrocarbon impacted soil

    SciTech Connect

    Cotton, D.W.; Patras, L.E.; Bayliss, R.

    1994-12-31

    Over 60 years of refining operations resulted in petroleum hydrocarbon contamination of soil and groundwater at the 74-acre former Golden Eagle Refinery in Carson, California, considered to be the largest Superfund site in the state. Successful negotiations with the California Regional Water Quality Control Board, Los Angeles Region, and the California Department of Toxic Substances Control resulted in the use of a phased approach, separating the soil and groundwater remediation activities. This paper discusses the remediation program for the ex situ vapor extraction system (VES) and bioremediation of almost 1.4 million cubic yards of petroleum hydrocarbon-impacted soil. The remediation program included four treatment units encompassing 17 acres which were stacked approximately 30 feet high in 18-inch treatment layers.

  15. Biocide usage in cooling towers in the electric power and petroleum refining industries

    SciTech Connect

    Veil, J.; Rice, J.K.; Raivel, M.E.S.

    1997-11-01

    Cooling towers users frequently apply biocides to the circulating cooling water to control growth of microorganisms, algae, and macroorganisms. Because of the toxic properties of biocides, there is a potential for the regulatory controls on their use and discharge to become increasingly more stringent. This report examines the types of biocides used in cooling towers by companies in the electric power and petroleum refining industries, and the experiences those companies have had in dealing with agencies that regulate cooling tower blowdown discharges. Results from a sample of 67 electric power plants indicate that the use of oxidizing biocides (particularly chlorine) is favored. Quaternary ammonia salts (quats), a type of nonoxidizing biocide, are also used in many power plant cooling towers. The experience of dealing with regulators to obtain approval to discharge biocides differs significantly between the two industries. In the electric power industry, discharges of any new biocide typically must be approved in writing by the regulatory agency. The approval process for refineries is less formal. In most cases, the refinery must notify the regulatory agency that it is planning to use a new biocide, but the refinery does not need to get written approval before using it. The conclusion of the report is that few of the surveyed facilities are having any difficulty in using and discharging the biocides they want to use.

  16. Removal of sulfur compounds from petroleum refinery wastewater through adsorption on modified activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Ben Hariz, Ichrak; Al Ayni, Foued; Monser, Lotfi

    2014-01-01

    The adsorption of sulfur compounds from petroleum refinery wastewater on a chemically modified activated carbon (MAC) was investigated. The modification technique (nitric acid, hydrogen peroxide and thermal modification) enhanced the removal capacity of carbon and therefore decreases cost-effective removal of sulfide from refinery wastewater. Adsorption equilibrium and kinetics data were determined for sulfur removal from real refinery wastewater. The data were evaluated according to several adsorption isotherm and kinetics models. The Freundlich isotherm fitted well with the equilibrium data of sulfur on different adsorbents, whereas the kinetics data were best fitted by the pseudo-second-order model. Insights of sulfide removal mechanisms indicated that the sorption was controlled through the intraparticle diffusion mechanism with a significant contribution of film diffusion. The MAC adsorbent was found to have an effective removal capacity of approximately 2.5 times that of non-modified carbon. Using different MAC, sulfides were eliminated with a removal capacity of 52 mg g(-1). Therefore, MAC can be utilized as an effective and less expensive adsorbent for the reduction of sulfur in refinery wastewater.

  17. MTR BASEMENT. WORKERS (DON ALVORD AND CYRIL VAN ORDEN OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    MTR BASEMENT. WORKERS (DON ALVORD AND CYRIL VAN ORDEN OF PHILLIPS PETROLEUM CO.) POSE FOR GAMMA IRRADIATION EXPERIMENT IN MTR CANAL. CANS OF FOOD WILL BE LOWERED TO CANAL BOTTOM, WHERE SPENT MTR FUEL ELEMENTS EMIT GAMMA RADIATION. INL NEGATIVE NO. 11746. Unknown Photographer, 8/20/1954 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  18. Sedimentology and petroleum geology

    SciTech Connect

    Bjorlykke, K.

    1989-01-01

    In this introduction to sedimentology and petroleum geology the subjects, which are closely related but mostly treated separately, are integrated. The first part covers the basic aspects of sedimentology, sedimentary geochemistry and diagenesis, including brief discussions of flow in rivers and channels, types of sediment transport, lake and river deposits, deltas (river-dominated, tide-dominated, and wave-dominated) and the water budget. Principles of stratigraphy, seismic stratigraphy and basin modeling form the basis for the last part on petroleum geology. Here subjects include the composition of kerogen and hydrocarbons, theories of migration and trapping of hydrocarbons and properties of reservoir rocks. Finally, short introductions to well logging and production geology are given.

  19. The Strategic Petroleum Reserve

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    The Strategic Petroleum Reserve program was set into motion by the 1975 Energy Policy and Conservation Act (EPCA). By 1990, 590 million barrels of oil had been placed in storage. Salt domes along the Gulf Coast offered ideal storage. Both sweet'' and sour'' crude oil have been acquired using various purchase options. Drawdown, sale, and distribution of the oil would proceed according to guidelines set by EPCA in the event of a severe energy supply disruption. (SM)

  20. Norwegian petroleum guide

    SciTech Connect

    Christie, H.B.

    1984-01-01

    This is about the comprehensive guide to Norwegian oil and gas activities, very useful to anyone in the industry. Material includes political guidelines, control institutions, work possibilities and licenses, working environment law, employer and employee organizations, national insurance, taxes, communication, rescue operations and standby. Contents: Oil and the economy; Petroleum technology research; Responsibilities of different authorities; The Labour Inspection Directorate; The Health Directorate Offshore Office; The Coastal Directorate; Helicopter traffic; The Norwegian Petroleum Directorate; The Maritime Directorate; Det norske Veritas; The Norwegian Waterways and Electricity Board; The State Institute for Radiation Hygiene; The State Explosive Inspection; Work possibilities in the North Sea; Working environment legislation on the Continental Shelf; Collective bargaining agreements, labor conflicts and the right to organize; Taxation Rules; National health insurance and the petroleum activity; Occupational injuries on the Norwegian Continental Shelf; Company insurances; The private pension scheme; Other types of insuracne common among oil companies; The rescue service in Norway; Oganizations within the oil industry offshore and onshore; and Law of aliens admission to the Kindgom.

  1. Primary silver extraction with a high sulphur activated petroleum coke.

    PubMed

    Schouwenaars, R; Durán Moreno, A; Ramírez Zamora, R M

    2004-01-01

    An extended study was performed to determine the mechanisms that are responsible for the significant silver extraction capacity of activated carbons prepared from a high-sulphur petroleum coke that is available as a waste material from Mexican petroleum refineries. Earlier studies had shown the feasibility of the production of these adsorbents but indicated that the mechanisms of metal adsorption in the present carbons are significantly different from what is classically accepted for commercial carbons. Therefore, selective titration, IR-spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy of carbons were combined with adsorption experiments and the determination of electrochemical parameters of mixtures of carbon-AgNO3 solution to explain the fundamental reasons for the performance of the obtained carbons. This allowed us to determine the identity of the surface functional groups and to distinguish the effect of different activation processes. The experiments permitted us to explain why these activated carbons, which have a low specific area and lack classical surface functional groups, show such a high silver adsorption capacity.

  2. Respirometry for assessing the biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Plaza, G; Ulfig, K; Worsztynowicz, A; Malina, G; Krzeminska, B; Brigmon, R L

    2005-02-01

    The respiration method using the Micro-Oxymax respirometer was applied to evaluate the bioremediation potential of hydrocarbon-contaminated soils in two biopiles at the oil refinery in Czechowice-Dziedzice, Poland. In biopiles 1 and 2, two different technologies, i.e., enhanced (engineered) bioremediation and monitored natural attenuation (MNA) were used, respectively. In biopiles 1 and 2, the bioremediation process lasted 6 years and 8 months, respectively. The biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons was evaluated on the basis of CO2 production and O2 uptake. The CO2 production and O2 consumption rates during hydrocarbon biodegradation were calculated from the slopes of cumulative curve linear regressions. The results confirmed the hydrocarbon biodegradation process in both biopiles. However, in biopile 2 the process was more effective compared to biopile 1. In biopile 2, the O2 consumption and CO2 production means were 3.37 and 2.4 milliliters per kilogram of soil (dry weight) per minute, respectively. Whereas, in biopile 1, the O2 consumption and CO2 production means were 1.52 and 1.07 milliliters per kilogram of soil (dry weight) per minute, respectively. The mean biodegradation rate for biopile 2 was two times higher--67 mg hydrocarbons kg d.w.(-1)day(-1) compared with biopile 1, where the mean was 30 mg hydrocarbons kg d.w.(-1)day(-l). The results were correlated with petroleum hydrocarbon concentrations and microbial activity measured by dehydrogenase assay.

  3. Beryllium contamination inside vehicles of machine shop workers

    SciTech Connect

    Sanderson, W.T.; Henneberger, P.K.; Martyny, J.; Ellis, K.; Mroz, M.M.; Newman, L.S. |

    1999-04-01

    Inhalation of beryllium particles causes a chronic, debilitating lung disease--chronic beryllium disease (CBD)--in immunologically sensitized workers. Evidence that very low concentrations of beryllium may initiate this chronic disease is provided by incidences of the illness in family members exposed to beryllium dust from workers` clothes and residents in neighborhoods surrounding beryllium refineries. This article describes the results of a cross-sectional survey to evaluate potential take-home beryllium exposures by measuring surface concentrations on the hands and in vehicles of workers at a precision machine shop where cases of CBD had recently been diagnosed. Many workers did not change out of their work clothes and shoes at the end of their shift, increasing the risk of taking beryllium home to their families. Wipe samples collected from workers` hands and vehicle surfaces were analyzed for beryllium content by inductively coupled argon plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES). The results ranged widely, from nondetectable to 40 {micro}g/ft{sup 2} on workers` hands and up to 714 {micro}g/fg{sup 2} inside their vehicles, demonstrating that many workers carried residual beryllium on their hands and contaminated the inside of their vehicles when leaving work. The highest beryllium concentrations inside the workers` vehicles were found on the drivers` floor (GM = 19 {micro}g/ft{sup 2}, GSD = 4.9), indicating that workers were carrying beryllium on their shoes into their vehicles. A safe level of beryllium contamination on surfaces is not known, but it is prudent to reduce the potential for workers to carry beryllium away from the work site.

  4. Chronic beryllium disease in a precious metal refinery. Clinical epidemiologic and immunologic evidence for continuing risk from exposure to low level beryllium fumes

    SciTech Connect

    Cullen, M.R.; Kominsky, J.R.; Rossman, M.D.; Cherniack, M.G.; Rankin, J.A.; Balmes, J.R.; Kern, J.A.; Daniele, R.P.; Palmer, L.; Naegel, G.P.

    1987-01-01

    Five workers at a precious metal refinery developed granulomatous lung disease between 1972 and 1985. The original diagnosis was sarcoidosis, but 4 of the workers were subsequently proved to have hypersensitivity to beryllium by in vitro proliferative responses of lymphocytes obtained by bronchoalveolar lavage. Review of medical records of coworkers and extensive industrial hygiene surveillance of the plant demonstrated that 4 cases occurred in the furnace area where air concentrations of beryllium fume were consistently below the permissible exposure limit of 2 micrograms/M3. A single case has been recognized from parts of the refinery where exposures to cold beryllium dust often exceeded the standard by as much as 20-fold. These data demonstrate that chronic beryllium disease still occurs and confirm the importance of specific immunologic testing in patients suspected of having sarcoidosis but with potential exposure to beryllium. The data raise concern about the adequacy of modern industrial controls, especially in the setting of exposure to highly respirable beryllium fumes.

  5. Conversion of high carbon refinery by-products. Quarterly report, January 1--March 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Katta, S.; Henningsen, G.; Lin, Y.Y.; O`Donnell, J.

    1996-04-26

    The overall objective of the project is to demonstrate that a partial oxidation system, which utilizes a transport reactor, is a viable means of converting refinery wastes, byproducts, and other low value materials into valuable products. The primary product would be a high quality fuel gas, which could also be used as a source of hydrogen. The concept involves subjecting the hydrocarbon feed to pyrolysis and steam gasification in a circulating bed of solids. Carbon residue formed during pyrolysis, as well as metals in the feed, are captured by the circulating solids which are returned to the bottom of the transport reactor. Air or oxygen is introduced in this lower zone and sufficient carbon is burned, sub-stoichiometrically, to provide the necessary heat for the endothermic pyrolysis and gasification reactions. The hot solids and gases leaving this zone pass upward to contact the feed material and continue the gasification process. The Transport Reactor Test Unit (TRTU) was commissioned to conduct studies on pyrolysis of Rose Bottoms using spent FCC (Fluid Catalytic Cracker) catalyst as the circulating medium and gasification of this carbon over a temperature range of 1,600 to 1,700 F. The Rose Bottoms (Residuum Oil Supercritical Extraction) was produced in the Rose unit. Studies were done in the Bench Scale Reactor Unit (BRU) to develop suitable catalyst formulations and to study the steam reforming of methane and propane in support of the experiments to be conducted in the TRTU. Studies were also conducted on gasification of coke breeze, petroleum cokes and carbon deposited on FCC catalyst. The catalytic effect of potassium on gasification of these solids was studied. Studies were conducted in the CFS (cold flow simulator) to investigate flow problems experienced in the TRTU. Results from these studies are presented in this report.

  6. Isolation and characterization of hyper phenol tolerant Bacillus sp. from oil refinery and exploration sites.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Aditi; Ghoshal, Aloke K

    2010-04-15

    Bacillus cereus MTCC 9817 strain AKG1 and B. cereus MTCC 9818 strain AKG2 were isolated from petroleum refinery and oil exploration site, respectively. The 16S rDNA sequence of strain AKG1 showed the closest relation to B. cereus 99.63% and Bacillus coagulans 99.63% followed by 99.34% homology with Bacillus thuringiensis strain 2PR56-10. AKG2 is mostly related to B. thuringiensis strain CMG 861 with 99.37% homology. The similarity search between AKG1 and AKG2 gave the lowest similarity 99.19% among same genus similar sequences. At phenol concentration of 1000 mg/L, the optimum growth conditions for AKG1 were found to be 37 degrees C and pH 7.0 and the same were found to be 37 degrees C and pH 7.5 for AKG2. The growth kinetics of the strains AKG1 and AKG2 are best fitted by Yano model (maximum growth rate, mu(max)=1.024 h(-1) and inhibition constant, K(I)=171,800 mg/L) and Edward model (mu(max)=0.5969 h(-1) and K(I)=1483 mg/L) respectively. Growth kinetics of both the strains are also well fitted by the Haldane model with mu(max)=0.4396 h(-1) and K(I)=637.8 mg/L for AKG1 and mu(max)=0.9332 h(-1) and K(I)=494.4 mg/L for AKG2. PMID:19945784

  7. Random packing debottlenecks refinery de-ethanizing stripper

    SciTech Connect

    Deley, S.J. ); Graf, K. )

    1994-08-01

    BP Oil Co. successfully packed a de-ethanizing stripper at its Lima, Ohio, refinery to improve capacity and ethane removal. Design capacity increased from 76,000 b/d to 92,000 b/d, and ethane in the LPG product decreased from 6--7 LV % to 3.5 LV %. The improved performance has been evident in 2 years of operation since the revamp. Critical project decisions included: feed preheat; liquid distributor design; water decanting capability; weld-free internals supports; materials of constriction; and support-ledge removal. The paper describes the stripper tower, the project scope, design choices, modifications, start-up, and operation.

  8. Clean air amendments put big burden on refinery planners

    SciTech Connect

    Scherr, R.C.; Smalley, G.A. Jr.; Norman, M.E. )

    1991-06-10

    The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 will not only require the production of reformulated gasoline but also have significant impact on other refinery-related construction. This must be considered when developing sound planning strategy. The three titles of the Clean Air Act Amendments that will have the greatest effect on refining are: Title I: Nonattainment; Title III: Air toxics; Title V: Permitting. To understand the ramifications of these amendments, it is necessary to review the interactions of new requirements with the permitting and construction schedule shown.

  9. Feasibility study report for the Imperial Valley Ethanol Refinery: a 14. 9-million-gallon-per-year ethanol synfuel refinery utilizing geothermal energy

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-03-01

    The construction and operation of a 14,980,000 gallon per year fuel ethanol from grain refinery in the Imperial Valley of California is proposed. The Imperial Valley Ethanol Refinery (refinery) will use hot geothermal fluid from geothermal resources at the East Mesa area as the source of process energy. In order to evaluate the economic viability of the proposed Project, exhaustive engineering, cost analysis, and financial studies have been undertaken. This report presents the results of feasibility studies undertaken in geothermal resource, engineering, marketing financing, management, environment, and permits and approvals. The conclusion of these studies is that the Project is economically viable. US Alcohol Fuels is proceeding with its plans to construct and operate the Refinery.

  10. 40 CFR 80.1666 - Additional requirements for foreign small refiners and foreign small volume refineries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... movement and storage of the certified Sulfur-FRGAS from the refinery to the load port, and from this review... description of the gasoline's movement and storage between production at the source refinery and vessel... requirements of this subpart O. (3) The forum for any civil or criminal enforcement action related to...

  11. 40 CFR 80.94 - Requirements for gasoline produced at foreign refineries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... CFR part 80, subparts D, E and F. (ii) If the foreign refinery baseline is assigned, or a foreign... and E300 using the methodologies specified in § 80.46, by: (A) The third party analyzing the sample... foreign refinery under 40 CFR part 80, subpart F. (1) Include in the inventory reconciliation...

  12. 40 CFR 80.94 - Requirements for gasoline produced at foreign refineries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... CFR part 80, subparts D, E and F. (ii) If the foreign refinery baseline is assigned, or a foreign... and E300 using the methodologies specified in § 80.46, by: (A) The third party analyzing the sample... foreign refinery under 40 CFR part 80, subpart F. (1) Include in the inventory reconciliation...

  13. 40 CFR 80.596 - How is a refinery motor vehicle diesel fuel volume baseline calculated?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... fuel volume baseline calculated? 80.596 Section 80.596 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Requirements § 80.596 How is a refinery motor vehicle diesel fuel volume baseline calculated? (a) For purposes of this subpart, a refinery's motor vehicle diesel fuel volume baseline is calculated using...

  14. 40 CFR 80.596 - How is a refinery motor vehicle diesel fuel volume baseline calculated?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... fuel volume baseline calculated? 80.596 Section 80.596 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Requirements § 80.596 How is a refinery motor vehicle diesel fuel volume baseline calculated? (a) For purposes of this subpart, a refinery's motor vehicle diesel fuel volume baseline is calculated using...

  15. 40 CFR 80.825 - How is the refinery or importer annual average toxics value determined?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... average toxics value determined? 80.825 Section 80.825 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... Gasoline Toxics Performance Requirements § 80.825 How is the refinery or importer annual average toxics value determined? (a) The refinery or importer annual average toxics value is calculated as...

  16. 40 CFR 80.1238 - How is a refinery's or importer's average benzene concentration determined?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... average benzene concentration determined? 80.1238 Section 80.1238 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Benzene Gasoline Benzene Requirements § 80.1238 How is a refinery's or importer's average benzene concentration determined? (a) The average benzene concentration of gasoline produced at a refinery or...

  17. 40 CFR 80.1238 - How is a refinery's or importer's average benzene concentration determined?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... average benzene concentration determined? 80.1238 Section 80.1238 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Benzene Gasoline Benzene Requirements § 80.1238 How is a refinery's or importer's average benzene concentration determined? (a) The average benzene concentration of gasoline produced at a refinery or...

  18. 40 CFR 80.1238 - How is a refinery's or importer's average benzene concentration determined?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... average benzene concentration determined? 80.1238 Section 80.1238 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Benzene Gasoline Benzene Requirements § 80.1238 How is a refinery's or importer's average benzene concentration determined? (a) The average benzene concentration of gasoline produced at a refinery or...

  19. 40 CFR 80.1238 - How is a refinery's or importer's average benzene concentration determined?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... average benzene concentration determined? 80.1238 Section 80.1238 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Benzene Gasoline Benzene Requirements § 80.1238 How is a refinery's or importer's average benzene concentration determined? (a) The average benzene concentration of gasoline produced at a refinery or...

  20. 40 CFR 80.1238 - How is a refinery's or importer's average benzene concentration determined?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... average benzene concentration determined? 80.1238 Section 80.1238 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Benzene Gasoline Benzene Requirements § 80.1238 How is a refinery's or importer's average benzene concentration determined? (a) The average benzene concentration of gasoline produced at a refinery or...

  1. 40 CFR 80.94 - Requirements for gasoline produced at foreign refineries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... CFR part 80, subparts D, E and F. (ii) If the foreign refinery baseline is assigned, or a foreign... foreign refinery under 40 CFR part 80, subpart F. (1) Include in the inventory reconciliation analysis... CFR part 80, subparts D, E and F. (3) The forum for any civil or criminal enforcement action...

  2. 40 CFR 80.94 - Requirements for gasoline produced at foreign refineries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... CFR part 80, subparts D, E and F. (ii) If the foreign refinery baseline is assigned, or a foreign... foreign refinery under 40 CFR part 80, subpart F. (1) Include in the inventory reconciliation analysis... CFR part 80, subparts D, E and F. (3) The forum for any civil or criminal enforcement action...

  3. 40 CFR 80.210 - What sulfur standards apply to gasoline downstream from refineries and importers?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... gasoline downstream from refineries and importers? 80.210 Section 80.210 Protection of Environment... Gasoline Sulfur Gasoline Sulfur Standards § 80.210 What sulfur standards apply to gasoline downstream from refineries and importers? The sulfur standard for gasoline at any point in the gasoline distribution...

  4. 40 CFR 80.596 - How is a refinery motor vehicle diesel fuel volume baseline calculated?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... fuel volume baseline calculated? 80.596 Section 80.596 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Requirements § 80.596 How is a refinery motor vehicle diesel fuel volume baseline calculated? (a) For purposes of this subpart, a refinery's motor vehicle diesel fuel volume baseline is calculated using...

  5. Petroleum marketing monthly, August 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-08-15

    The Petroleum Marketing Monthly (PMM) provides information and statistical data on a variety of crude oils and refined petroleum products. The publication presents statistics on crude oil costs and refined petroleum products sales for use by industry, government, private sector analysts, educational institutions, and consumers. Data on crude oil include the domestic first purchase price, the f.o.b. and landed cost of imported crude oil, and the refiners` acquisition cost of crude oil. Refined petroleum product Sales data include motor gasoline, distillates, residuals, aviation fuels, kerosene, and propane. The Petroleum Marketing Division, Office of Oil and Gas, Energy Information Administration ensures the accuracy, quality, and confidentiality of the published data in the Petroleum Marketing Monthly.

  6. Petroleum marketing monthly, September 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-09-01

    The Petroleum Marketing Monthly (PMM) provides information and statistical data on a variety of crude oils and refined petroleum products. The publication presents statistics on crude oil costs and refined petroleum product sales for use by industry, government, private sector analysts, educational institutions, and consumers. Data on crude oil include the domestic first purchase price, the f.o.b. and landed cost of imported crude oil, and the refiners` acquisition cost of crude oil. Refined petroleum product sales data include motor gasoline, distillates, residuals, aviation fuels, kerosene, and propane. The Petroleum Marketing Division, Office of Oil and Gas, Energy Information Administration ensures the accuracy, quality, and confidentiality of the published data in the Petroleum Marketing Monthly.

  7. Reducing workers' compensation costs.

    PubMed

    Killian, M J

    1994-01-01

    Employers can reduce their workers' compensation costs by encouraging internal communication and education before and after injuries occur. Comprehensive workers' compensation programs can be developed by integrating the management of employee benefits and workers' compensation claims. PMID:10133659

  8. Fitness-for-service and decisions for petroleum and chemical equipment. PVP-Volume 315

    SciTech Connect

    Prager, M.; Becht, C. IV; Depadova, T.A.; Okazaki, M.; Onyewuenyi, O.A.; Smith, J.P.; Takezono, S.; Weingart, L.J.; Yagi, K.

    1995-12-31

    This volume is part of a series of publications intended to present the technical foundation for broadly accepted practices to establish the mechanical integrity of equipment in service. A focal point for this activity has been a Materials Properties Council program on fitness-for-service (FSS) reported in earlier PVP volumes. Work reported here covers the full range of equipment of interest to petroleum and chemical companies from LNG to creep service and provides a snapshot of current Codes, methods, concerns, and problems. It encompasses crack-like flaws and local thinning situations, welds, clad vessels, storage tanks, and pressure vessels. The work in progress is only a start, and the papers herein should be viewed as part of the process of validating the techniques used. While most of the applications are to petroleum refineries and natural gas processing plants, some papers deal with fossil-fuel power plants, nuclear power plants, synthetic fuels refineries, and materials for high-temperature applications. Papers have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base.

  9. Petroleum marketing monthly, December 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-05

    This publication provides information and statistical data on a variety of crude oils and refined petroleum products. It presents statistics on crude oil costs and refined petroleum products sales for use by industry, government, private sector analysts, educational institutions, and consumers. Data on crude oil include domestic first purchase price, f.o.b. and landed cost of imported crude, and refiners` acquisition cost of crude. Refined petroleum product sales data include motor gasoline, distillates, residuals, aviation fuels, kerosene, and propane.

  10. Measured and estimated benzene and volatile organic carbon (VOC) emissions at a major U.S. refinery/chemical plant: Comparison and prioritization.

    PubMed

    Hoyt, Daniel; Raun, Loren H

    2015-08-01

    Estimates of emissions for processes and point sources at petroleum refineries and chemical plants provide the foundation for many other environmental evaluations and policy decisions. The most commonly used method, based on emission factors, results in unreliable estimates. More information regarding the actual emissions within a facility is necessary to provide a foundation for improving emission factors and prioritizing which emission factors most need improvement. Identification of which emission factors both perform poorly and introduce the largest error is needed to provide such a prioritization. To address this need, benzene and volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions within a major chemical plant/refinery were measured and compared with emission factor estimates. The results of this study indicate estimated emissions were never higher and commonly lower than the measured emissions. At one source location, VOC emissions were found to be largely representative of those measured (i.e., the catalytic reformer), but more often, emissions were significantly underestimated (e.g., up to 448 times greater than estimated at a floating roof tank). The sources with both the largest relative error between the estimate and the measurement and the largest magnitude of emissions in this study were a wastewater treatment process, an aromatics concentration unit and benzene extraction unit process area, and two sets of tanks (sets 7 and 8). Emission factors for these sources are priorities for further evaluation and improvement in this chemical plant/refinery. This study presents empirical data that demonstrate the need to validate and improve emission factors. Emission factors needing improvement are prioritized by identifying those that are weak models and introduce the largest error in magnitude of emissions. The results can also be used to prioritize evaluations of the emissions sources and controls, and any operational conditions or erroneous assumptions that may be

  11. High-Octane Fuel from Refinery Exhaust Gas: Upgrading Refinery Off-Gas to High-Octane Alkylate

    SciTech Connect

    2009-12-01

    Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: Exelus is developing a method to convert olefins from oil refinery exhaust gas into alkylate, a clean-burning, high-octane component of gasoline. Traditionally, olefins must be separated from exhaust before they can be converted into another source of useful fuel. Exelus’ process uses catalysts that convert the olefin to alkylate without first separating it from the exhaust. The ability to turn up to 50% of exhaust directly into gasoline blends could result in an additional 46 million gallons of gasoline in the U.S. each year.

  12. Petroleum supply monthly: December 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-01

    Data are presented which describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major U.S. geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the United States. Data are presented in two sections: Summary Statistics, presenting a time series of selected petroleum data on a U.S. level, and Detailed Statistics, presenting statistics for the most current month available as well as year to date.

  13. Petroleum industry in Iran

    SciTech Connect

    Farideh, A.

    1981-01-01

    This study examines the oil industry in Iran from the early discovery of oil nearly two hundred years ago in Mazandaran (north part) to the development of a giant modern industry in the twentieth century. Chapter I presents a brief historical setting to introduce the reader to the importance of oil in Iran. It focuses on the economic implications of the early oil concessions in the period 1901 to 1951. Chapter II discusses the nationalization of the Iranian oil industry and creation of NIOC in 1951 and the international political and economic implication of these activities. Chapter III explains the activities of NIOC in Iran. Exploration and drilling, production, exports, refineries, natural gas, petrochemicals and internal distributions are studied. Chapter IV discusses the role of the development planning of Iran. A brief presentation of the First Development Plan through the Fifth Development Plan is given. Sources and uses of funds by plan organization during these Five Plans is studied. The Iran and Iraq War is also studied briefly, but the uncertainty of its resolution prevents any close analysis of its impact on the Iranian oil industry. One conclusion, however, is certain; oil has been a vital resource in Iran's past and it will remain the lifetime of its economic development in the future.

  14. 15 CFR Supplement No. 1 to Part 754 - Petroleum and Petroleum Products

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Petroleum and Petroleum Products No... SUPPLY CONTROLS Pt. 754, Supp. 1 Supplement No. 1 to Part 754—Petroleum and Petroleum Products This... petroleum (including reconstituted crude petroleum), tar sands and crude shale oil. 2710.0710...

  15. 19 CFR 151.47 - Optional entry of net quantity of petroleum or petroleum products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Optional entry of net quantity of petroleum or petroleum products. 151.47 Section 151.47 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF... Petroleum and Petroleum Products § 151.47 Optional entry of net quantity of petroleum or petroleum...

  16. 19 CFR 151.47 - Optional entry of net quantity of petroleum or petroleum products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Optional entry of net quantity of petroleum or petroleum products. 151.47 Section 151.47 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF... Petroleum and Petroleum Products § 151.47 Optional entry of net quantity of petroleum or petroleum...

  17. 31 CFR 542.412 - Transactions relating to Syrian petroleum or petroleum products from third countries...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... petroleum or petroleum products from third countries; transshipments. 542.412 Section 542.412 Money and... Syrian petroleum or petroleum products from third countries; transshipments. (a) Transactions relating to goods containing petroleum or petroleum products of Syrian origin are not prohibited by § 542.208...

  18. 19 CFR 151.47 - Optional entry of net quantity of petroleum or petroleum products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Optional entry of net quantity of petroleum or petroleum products. 151.47 Section 151.47 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF... Petroleum and Petroleum Products § 151.47 Optional entry of net quantity of petroleum or petroleum...

  19. 19 CFR 151.47 - Optional entry of net quantity of petroleum or petroleum products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Optional entry of net quantity of petroleum or petroleum products. 151.47 Section 151.47 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF... Petroleum and Petroleum Products § 151.47 Optional entry of net quantity of petroleum or petroleum...

  20. 19 CFR 151.47 - Optional entry of net quantity of petroleum or petroleum products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Optional entry of net quantity of petroleum or petroleum products. 151.47 Section 151.47 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF... Petroleum and Petroleum Products § 151.47 Optional entry of net quantity of petroleum or petroleum...

  1. Genotoxicity of refinery waste assessed by some DNA damage tests.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Amit Kumar; Ahmad, Irshad; Ahmad, Masood

    2015-04-01

    Refinery waste effluent is well known to contain polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, phenols and heavy metals as potentially genotoxic substances. The aim of the present study was to assess the genotoxic potential of Mathura refinery wastewater (MRWW) by various in vitro tests including the single cell gel electrophoresis, plasmid nicking assay and S1 nuclease assay. Treatment of human lymphocytes to different MRWW concentrations (0.15×, 0.3×, 0.5× and 0.78×) caused the formation of comets of which the mean tail lengths increased proportionately and differed significantly from those of unexposed controls. The toxic effect of MRWW on DNA was also studied by plasmid nicking assay and S1 nuclease assay. Strand breaks formation in the MRWW treated pBR322 plasmid confirmed its genotoxic effect. Moreover, a dose dependent increase in cleavage of calf thymus DNA in S1 nuclease assay was also suggestive of the DNA damaging potential of MRWW. A higher level of ROS generation in the test water sample was recorded which might be contributing to its genotoxicity. Interaction between the constituents of MRWW and calf thymus DNA was also ascertained by UV-visible spectroscopy.

  2. Alkylation of refinery C5 streams to lower gasoline volatility

    SciTech Connect

    Cronkright, W.A.; Ditz, J.M.; Newsome, D.S. ); Lerner, H. ); Schorfheide, J.J. ); Libbers, D.D. )

    1994-01-01

    A pilot plant program was carried out to provide precise information about the sulfuric acid alkylation of refinery C5 streams under conditions found in commercial operation of the Exxon stirred, autorefrigerated alkylation process. The study used isobutane to alkylate the full range of pentenes in a C5 cut from an FCC unit as well as the linear olefin concentrate in the raffinate that would be obtained after processing this cut in a TAME unit. A few experiments were conducted with a mixture of C5 olefins matching the composition of the refinery feed in order to highlight the effect of impurities. The results showed that hydrocarbon impurities are a principal factor causing the high acid consumption values reported for pentene alkylation. The results also demonstrated that operating variables that affect acid consumption and alkylate quality in butene alkylation produce directionally similar effects in pentene alkylation, but of different magnitude. It is concluded that sulfur acid alkylation of pentenes produces an excellent isoparaffinic blending stock for the gasoline pool while eliminating volatile olefins and reducing gasoline RVP. Combined with the TAME process, a scheme for adding oxygen and achieving maximum RVP reduction at the same time is realized.

  3. Genotoxicity of refinery waste assessed by some DNA damage tests.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Amit Kumar; Ahmad, Irshad; Ahmad, Masood

    2015-04-01

    Refinery waste effluent is well known to contain polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, phenols and heavy metals as potentially genotoxic substances. The aim of the present study was to assess the genotoxic potential of Mathura refinery wastewater (MRWW) by various in vitro tests including the single cell gel electrophoresis, plasmid nicking assay and S1 nuclease assay. Treatment of human lymphocytes to different MRWW concentrations (0.15×, 0.3×, 0.5× and 0.78×) caused the formation of comets of which the mean tail lengths increased proportionately and differed significantly from those of unexposed controls. The toxic effect of MRWW on DNA was also studied by plasmid nicking assay and S1 nuclease assay. Strand breaks formation in the MRWW treated pBR322 plasmid confirmed its genotoxic effect. Moreover, a dose dependent increase in cleavage of calf thymus DNA in S1 nuclease assay was also suggestive of the DNA damaging potential of MRWW. A higher level of ROS generation in the test water sample was recorded which might be contributing to its genotoxicity. Interaction between the constituents of MRWW and calf thymus DNA was also ascertained by UV-visible spectroscopy. PMID:24836934

  4. The fouling in the tubular heat exchanger of Algiers refinery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harche, Rima; Mouheb, Abdelkader; Absi, Rafik

    2016-05-01

    Crude oil fouling in refinery preheat exchangers is a chronic operational problem that compromises energy recovery in these systems. Progress is hindered by the lack of quantitative knowledge of the dynamic effects of fouling on heat exchanger transfer and pressure drops. In subject of this work is an experimental determination of the thermal fouling resistance in the tubular heat exchanger of the crude oil preheats trains installed in an Algiers refinery. By measuring the inlet and outlet temperatures and mass flows of the two fluids, the overall heat transfer coefficient has been determined. Determining the overall heat transfer coefficient for the heat exchanger with clean and fouled surfaces, the fouling resistance was calculated. The results obtained from the two cells of exchangers studies, showed that the fouling resistance increased with time presented an exponential evolution in agreement with the model suggested by Kern and Seaton, with the existence of fluctuation caused by the instability of the flow rate and the impact between the particles. The bad cleaning of the heat exchangers involved the absence of the induction period and caused consequently, high values of the fouling resistance in a relatively short period of time.

  5. A database and query system for refinery vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Jenkins, W.

    1994-12-31

    Maintaining pressure vessel integrity has always required accurate and complete record keeping. The presence of OSHA 1910, however, requires record keeping that is even more accurate and -- more importantly -- accessible on demand. All chemical process industries, and especially refineries, are challenged to find better ways to document the inspection and maintenance work they perform. This paper discusses a software program that provides a comprehensive, user-friendly approach to this problem. It provides: (1) A Data Entry and Recovery System for all sections of every pressure vessel in a refinery. In addition to storing U-1 Manufacturers Data Form information, the program also provides space for other important data, including internal environment. (2) A Query System that produces on demand a list of equipment that satisfies any or all of 36 defining criteria. (3) A self-checking data entry system that makes it virtually impossible to enter incorrect data, even for computer novices. (4) Vessel History records for all components, including heat exchanger tubes and bundles. (5) A Windows format that allows the integration of other vendors` thickness, warehouse and maintenance programs.

  6. Biodegradation of oil refinery wastes under OPA and CERCLA

    SciTech Connect

    Gamblin, W.W.; Banipal, B.S.; Myers, J.M.

    1995-12-31

    Land treatment of oil refinery wastes has been used as a disposal method for decades. More recently, numerous laboratory studies have been performed attempting to quantify degradation rates of more toxic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon compounds (PAHs). This paper discusses the results of the fullscale aerobic biodegradation operations using land treatment at the Macmillan Ring-Free Oil refining facility. The tiered feasibility approach of evaluating biodegradation as a treatment method to achieve site-specific cleanup criteria, including pilot biodegradation operations, is discussed in an earlier paper. Analytical results of biodegradation indicate that degradation rates observed in the laboratory can be met and exceeded under field conditions and that site-specific cleanup criteria can be attained within a proposed project time. Also prevented are degradation rates and half-lives for PAHs for which cleanup criteria have been established. PAH degradation rates and half-life values are determined and compared with the laboratory degradation rates and half-life values which used similar oil refinery wastes by other in investigators (API 1987).

  7. International petroleum statistics report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-10-01

    The International Petroleum Statistics Report is a monthly publication that provides current international oil data. This report presents data on international oil production, demand, imports, exports and stocks. The report has four sections. Section 1 contains time series data on world oil production, and on oil demand and stocks in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). Section 2 presents an oil supply/demand balance for the world, in quarterly intervals for the most recent two years. Section 3 presents data on oil imports by OECD countries. Section 4 presents annual time series data on world oil production and oil stocks, demand, and trade in OECD countries.

  8. Underground petroleum tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-07-01

    This book presents the results of a survey of 46 state underground storage tank program officials. The survey covers: Whether petroleum tank insurance (mandated by the EPA) is available in each state and whether category 3 and 4 owners can obtain it; state programs that help owners meet the financial responsibility and/or technical requirements of such insurance; and lending institutions' attitudes towards providing loans to storage tank owners. A survey of the number and terms of insurance policies offered to tank owners is also presented.

  9. Petroleum supply monthly, March 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-03-30

    Data presented in the Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM) describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major US geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the United States (50 States and the District of Columbia). The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in primary supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregated, the data reported by these sectors approximately represent the consumption of petroleum products in the United States. Data presented in the PSM are divided into two sections: Summary Statistics and Detailed Statistics. The tables and figures in the Summary Statistics section of the PSM present a time series of selected petroleum data on a US level. Most time series include preliminary estimates for one month based on the Weekly Petroleum Supply Reporting System; statistics based on the most recent data from the Monthly Petroleum Supply Reporting System (MPSRS); and statistics published in prior issues of the PSM and PSA. The Detailed Statistics tables of the PSM present statistics for the most current month available as well as year-to-date. In most cases, the statistics are presented for several geographic areas -- the United States (50 States and the District of Columbia), five PAD Districts, and 12 Refining Districts. At the US and PAD District level, the total volume and the daily rate of activities are presented. The statistics are developed from monthly survey forms submitted by respondents to the EIA and from data provided from other sources.

  10. Petroleum supply monthly, June 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-06-28

    Data presented in the Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM) describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major US geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the United States (50 States and the District of Columbia). The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in primary supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregated, the data reported by these sectors approximately represent the consumption of petroleum products in the United States. Data presented in the PSM are divided into two sections: Summary Statistics and Detailed Statistics. The tables and figures ih the Summary Statistics section of the PSM present a time series of selected petroleum data on a US level. Most time series include preliminary estimates for one month based on the Weekly Petroleum Supply Reporting System; statistics based on the most recent data from the Monthly Petroleum Supply Reporting System (MPSRS); and statistics published in prior issues of the PSM and PSA. The Detailed Statistics tables of the PSM present statistics for the most current month available as well as year-to-date. In most cases, the statistics are presented for several geographic areas - - the United States (50 States and the District of Columbia), five PAD Districts, and 12 Refining Districts. At the US and PAD District level, the total volume and the daily rate of activities are presented. The statistics are developed from monthly survey forms submitted by respondents to the EIA and from data provided firom other sources.

  11. Ergonomics in designing process: dialogue between designers, executors and users in the maintenance activity of radars in an oil refinery.

    PubMed

    Menegon, Fabrício Augusto; Rodrigues, Daniela da Silva; Fontes, Andréa Regina Martins; Menegon, Nilton Luiz

    2012-01-01

    This paper aims to discuss the role of ergonomics in design process using the dialogue developed by designers, implementers and users in an oil refinery. It was possible to identify the need of minimizing the postural constraints, risk of accidents, mechanical shocks and to enlarge safety perception in the access and permanency of the users at the workspace. It has been determined and validated by workers and managers to implement different deadlines depending on programming, viability and execution time for the improvements proposed. In a long-term: it was proposed the substitution of the ladders with time planning according to the maintenance program of the tanks; in a short-time: it was suggested the expansion of the existing platforms, implementation of a walkway connection provided with guardrails between the upper access of the side ladder and the repositioning of radar set and aerial aiming at the usage by workers at the workstation of the new platform. It was also elaborated eight typologies of intervention, according to the request, type of tank, material stored, and its setting place. The design process arises from ergonomics workplace analysis that presents concepts for solutions which was a mediator tool to be settled between users and implementers.

  12. Indigenous Precambrian petroleum revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, G.E.; Kaczor, M.J.; McArthur, R.E.

    1980-10-01

    Irrefutable evidence of fossil remains from Precambrian sediments and proved petroleum reserves in upper Proterozoic (Riphean-Vendian) strata of the Irkutsk basin, USSR, suggest that unmetamorphosed Precambrian sedimentary rocks should be a focus for hydrocarbon exploration. Since 1965, a dramatic increase in publications which document worldwide occurrences of Precambrian life forms discloses that, by the end of the Proterozoic, organic evolution had produced diversified assemblages of relatively highly developed macroorganisms and microorganisms. Some of these organisms have generated crude oil in the Nonesuch Shale of northern Michigan and kerogen in stromatolitic carbonate rocks in Africa Kerogen has been extracted from approx. 2300-m.y. old Transvaal (Africa) stromatolitic limestone containing coccoid and complex filamentous cyanophytes. Also, aromatic and aliphatic hydrocarbons have been obtained from the approx. 2800-m.y. old Bulawayan stromatolitic limestone of Rhodesia. Additional evidence indicates that commercial reserves of petroleum from Precambrian strata are possible. An oil discovery in Lower Cambrian rocks in 1962, at Markovo in the Irkutsk basin of the Siberian platform area, led to four noncommercial and eight commercial fields producing from Lower Cambrian and Upper Proterozoic strata.

  13. International petroleum statistics report

    SciTech Connect

    1997-05-01

    The International Petroleum Statistics Report is a monthly publication that provides current international oil data. This report is published for the use of Members of Congress, Federal agencies, State agencies, industry, and the general public. Publication of this report is in keeping with responsibilities given the Energy Information Administration in Public Law 95-91. The International Petroleum Statistics Report presents data on international oil production, demand, imports, and stocks. The report has four sections. Section 1 contains time series data on world oil production, and on oil demand and stocks in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). This section contains annual data beginning in 1985, and monthly data for the most recent two years. Section 2 presents an oil supply/demand balance for the world. This balance is presented in quarterly intervals for the most recent two years. Section 3 presents data on oil imports by OECD countries. This section contains annual data for the most recent year, quarterly data for the most recent two quarters, and monthly data for the most recent twelve months. Section 4 presents annual time series data on world oil production and oil stocks, demand, and trade in OECD countries. World oil production and OECD demand data are for the years 1970 through 1995; OECD stocks from 1973 through 1995; and OECD trade from 1985 through 1995.

  14. Job Prospects for Petroleum Engineers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Basta, Nicholas

    1988-01-01

    Describes petroleum engineering as one area in industry where job opportunities are few but where the worst of the declines has been seen. Discusses the causes of the decline. Lists several areas where petroleum engineers have found alternatives including environmental projects, water supply projects, and computer applications. (CW)

  15. Strategic petroleum reserve. Quarterly report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-05-15

    The Strategic Petroleum Reserve serves as one of our most important investments in reducing the Nation`s vulnerability to oil supply disruptions. Its existence provides an effective response mechanism should a disruption occur and a formidable deterrent to the use of oil as a political instrument. The Strategic Petroleum Reserve was created pursuant to the Energy Policy and Conservation Act of December 22, 1975, (Public Law 94-163) as amended, to reduce the impact of disruptions in supplies of petroleum products and to carry out obligations of the United States under the Agreement on an International Energy Program. Section 165(a) of the Act requires the submission of Annual Reports and Section 165(b)(1) requires the submission of Quarterly Reports. This Quarterly Report highlights activities undertaken during the first quarter of calendar year 1994, including: (1) inventory of petroleum products stored in the Reserve, under contract and in transit at the end of the calendar quarter; (2) fill rate for the current quarter and projected fill rate for the next calendar quarter; (3) average price of the petroleum products acquired during the calendar quarter; (4) current and projected storage capacity; (5) analysis of existing or anticipated problems with the acquisition and storage of petroleum products, and future expansion of storage capacity; (6) funds obligated by the Secretary from the SPR Petroleum Account and the Strategic Petroleum Reserve Account during the prior calendar quarter and in total; and (7) major environmental actions completed, in progress, or anticipated.

  16. Fractionation process for petroleum wax

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, R.L.; Mitchael, M.R.; Krenowicz, R.A.; Southard, W.M.

    1991-07-16

    This patent describes a process which comprises separating a petroleum wax into a lower boiling wax fraction of a narrow melting range and a higher boiling wax fraction of wider melting range by subjecting the petroleum wax to distillation in a wiped film evaporator.

  17. Petroleum occurrences and plate tectonics

    SciTech Connect

    Olenin, V.B.; Sokolov, B.A.

    1983-01-01

    This paper analyzes the mechanisms of petroleum formation and petroleum accumulation proposed in recent years by some Russian and foreign investigators from the viewpoint of the new global or plate tectonics. On the basis of discussion and the facts, the authors conclude that the mechanisms proposed are in contradiction to reality and their use in practical application is at least premature.

  18. Petroleum industry assists hurricane relief

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-09-14

    This paper reports that the petroleum industry is aiding victims of last month's Hurricane Andrew with cash, clothing, food, water, and other supplies. Cash contributions announced as of last week totaled more than $2.7 million for distribution in South Florida and South Louisiana. Petroleum industry employees were collecting relief items such as bottled water and diapers for distribution in those areas.

  19. Changes in the mutagenicity of petroleum products undergoing bioremediation

    SciTech Connect

    Houk, V.S.; Claxton, L.D.

    1995-11-01

    As EPA, industry, and others promote the use of bioremediation as a treatment alternative for environmental contamination, the health risks of such cleanup efforts must be assessed. Conversions of toxic constituents to metabolic intermediates and byproducts can result in fluctuations in toxicity over time. We have examined this process by studying the microbial degradation of petroleum products in the field and in the laboratory. For the field study, we evaluated 2 accidental releases (a coastal oil spill and a refinery leak) in which biodegradation was achieved by accelerating the proliferation of indigenous soil microbes through application of nutrient formulations. Soil samples were collected before, during, and after in situ treatment, and organics were extracted from the soils by sonication with dichloromethane (DCM). The extracts were tested for mutagenicity using the spiral Salmonella assay. Results indicated that the mutagenicity of the oil-impacted beaches depended on soil composition, nutrient formulation, and natural removal processes such as wave action. The mutagenicity of the refinery fuel-impacted soils was related to depth of collection, water table location, and levels of BTEX contamination. For the laboratory study, we evaluated the bio-degradation of 3 crude oils by 2 species of fungi combined in flasks of mineral salts. Flasks were incubated at 30{degrees}C for up to one month, and contents were extracted with DCM at 2-day intervals and tested for mutagenic activity. An oil that was highly mutagenic became nonmutagenid in as few as 5-6 days of treatment, while a nonmutagenic oil became mutagenic over time.

  20. A health promotion programme for oil refinery employees: changes of health promotion needs observed at three years.

    PubMed

    Talvi, A I; Järvisalo, J O; Knuts, L R

    1999-02-01

    The main aim of this three-year follow-up study was to evaluate the long-term effects of a workplace health promotion intervention programme offered by the Neste Oyj corporation's occupational health service. Another aim was to study factors associated with changes in health promotion needs. These were assessed using information obtained by means of questionnaires and laboratory measurements. The target areas assessed were physical activity, musculoskeletal problems, dietary habits, obesity, blood pressure, serum lipids, smoking, quality of sleep and mental well-being. Participants from one oil refinery were offered special health promotion counselling, while those from the other oil refinery studied received only their personal results, written information and instructions. Evaluation of the changes in needs was mainly based on comparison of the results of two examinations performed with an interval of three years. Effects of special health promotion counselling were observed in the target area of physical activity. Elimination of certain health promotion needs was seen in both groups in all of the target areas. The most extensive changes were seen in the target areas of musculoskeletal symptoms, dietary habits, blood pressure and mental well-being. Basic education, occupational status and age-group, as well as the value of tending health were frequent variables explaining the reduction in the need for health promotion activities. Worker participation in health promotion counselling activities provided by occupational health services can be high, as in this study in which the participation rate was 90% and the drop-out rate during the three years only 10%. PMID:10436561