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Sample records for ph range 2-11

  1. A Nanocrystal-based Ratiometric pH Sensor for Natural pH Ranges.

    PubMed

    Somers, Rebecca C; Lanning, Ryan M; Snee, Preston T; Greytak, Andrew B; Jain, Rakesh K; Bawendi, Moungi G; Nocera, Daniel G

    A ratiometric fluorescent pH sensor based on CdSe/CdZnS nanocrystal quantum dots (NCs) has been designed for biological pH ranges. The construct is formed from the conjugation of a pH dye (SNARF) to NCs coated with a poly(amido amine) (PAMAM) dendrimer. The sensor exhibits a well-resolved ratio response at pH values between 6 and 8 under linear or two-photon excitation, and in the presence of a 4% bovine serum albumin (BSA) solution.

  2. A Nanocrystal-based Ratiometric pH Sensor for Natural pH Ranges

    PubMed Central

    Somers, Rebecca C.; Lanning, Ryan M.; Snee, Preston T.; Greytak, Andrew B.; Jain, Rakesh K.

    2014-01-01

    Summary A ratiometric fluorescent pH sensor based on CdSe/CdZnS nanocrystal quantum dots (NCs) has been designed for biological pH ranges. The construct is formed from the conjugation of a pH dye (SNARF) to NCs coated with a poly(amido amine) (PAMAM) dendrimer. The sensor exhibits a well–resolved ratio response at pH values between 6 and 8 under linear or two–photon excitation, and in the presence of a 4% bovine serum albumin (BSA) solution. PMID:26413260

  3. pH optrode for the complete working range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vishnoi, Gargi; Goel, Tara C.; Pillai, P. K. C.

    1999-01-01

    We report a fast response and inexpensive optical sensor capable of measuring pH in the range of 0.5 to 13.5 units with good resolution. Three indicator dyes viz. Bromocresol Green, Bromothymol Blue and Nile Blue were used to fabricate the sensor head. ion-exchange resin, Amberlite IRA 400, was powdered and immobilized by these dye solutions. In order to prepare sensing membranes, Polyvinyl chloride was dissolved in Tetrahydrofuran and the solution was poured on to a glass plate. Before the membrane was completely dry, the immobilized resin powder was uniformly sprinkled so that the granules are properly glued to it. A bundle of fibers was attached to the membrane mechanically to carry the light from the source to the membrane and collect the reflected optical signal. He-He laser was used as a light source. The experimental results show a linear dependence of pH value on reflected optical signal for the pH range of 0.5 to 13.5 with the resolution of 0.02 unit. The optrode was also characterized by studying the effect of ionic strength and temperature of the solution on the probe response.

  4. Triple-oxygen-isotope determination of molecular oxygen incorporation in sulfate produced during abiotic pyrite oxidation (pH = 2-11)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohl, Issaku; Bao, Huiming

    2011-04-01

    Aqueous oxidation of sulfide minerals to sulfate is an integral part of the global sulfur and oxygen cycles. The current model for pyrite oxidation emphasizes the role of Fe 2+-Fe 3+ electron shuttling and repeated nucleophilic attack by water molecules on sulfur. Previous δ 18O-labeled experiments show that a variable fraction (0-60%) of the oxygen in product sulfate is derived from dissolved O 2, the other potential oxidant. This indicates that nucleophilic attack cannot continue all the way to sulfate and that a sulfoxyanion of intermediate oxidation state is released into solution. The observed variability in O 2% may be due to the presence of competing oxidation pathways, variable experimental conditions (e.g. abiotic, biotic, or changing pH value), or uncertainties related to the multiple experiments needed to effectively use the δ 18O label to differentiate sulfate-oxygen sources. To examine the role of O 2 and Fe 3+ in determining the final incorporation of O 2 oxygen in sulfate produced during pyrite oxidation, we designed a set of aerated, abiotic, pH-buffered (pH = 2, 7, 9, 10, and 11), and triple-oxygen-isotope labeled solutions with and without Fe 3+ addition. While abiotic and pH-buffered conditions help to eliminate variables, triple oxygen isotope labeling and Fe 3+ addition help to determine the oxygen sources in sulfate and examine the role of Fe 2+-Fe 3+ electron shuttling during sulfide oxidation, respectively. Our results show that sulfate concentration increased linearly with time and the maximum concentration was achieved at pH 11. At pH 2, 7, and 9, sulfate production was slow but increased by 4× with the addition of Fe 3+. Significant amounts of sulfite and thiosulfate were detected in pH ⩾ 9 reactors, while concentrations were low or undetectable at pH 2 and 7. The triple oxygen isotope data show that at pH ⩾ 9, product sulfate contained 21-24% air O 2 signal, similar to pH 2 with Fe 3+ addition. Sulfate from the pH 2 reactor

  5. Extended-range spectroscopic pH measurement using optimized mixtures of dyes.

    PubMed

    Raghuraman, B; Gustavson, G; Van Hal, R E G; Dressaire, E; Zhdaneev, O

    2006-12-01

    The spectroscopic technique for pH measurement is a well-established laboratory technique that can give high-accuracy pH values. Recent studies have shown the advantage of this technique over standard potentiometric methods for pH measurements in fresh water and seawater and also at high temperatures and pressures. However, a limitation of the spectroscopic technique is that a single pH dye is sensitive only over a narrow pH range. We have developed optimized dye mixtures that are both sensitive and accurate over a broad pH range. The measurement is robust and simple, requires a minimum of two wavelengths, and is independent of the volume of the dye mixture added. Optimization of the dye mixture formulation to maximize accuracy in a broad range of pH involves varying both the dye type and its mole fraction and also accounting for spectral noise. This technique has been successfully applied for in situ pH measurements of oilfield formation waters.

  6. Characterizing and quantilying controls on arsenic solubility over a pH range of 1-11 in a uranium mill-scale experiment.

    PubMed

    Moldovan, Brett I; Hendry, M Jim

    2005-07-01

    A mill-scale hydrometallurgical experiment (2700 m3 of effluent treated/day) was conducted for three months at the Rabbit Lake uranium mine site located in northern Saskatchewan, Canada, to determine the controls on the solubility of dissolved arsenic over a pH range of 1-11 and to develop a thermodynamic database for the dominant mineralogical controls on arsenic in the mill and the resulting mill tailings. The arsenic concentrations in the mill ranged from 526 mg/L at pH 1.0 (initial) to 1.34 mg/L at pH 10.8 (final discharge). Geochemical modeling of the chemistry data shows that arsenic solubility is controlled by the formation of scorodite (FeAsO4-2H2O) from pH 2.4 to pH 3.1, with 99.8% of dissolved arsenic precipitated as scorodite. Model results show that scorodite is unstable (releasing arsenic back in to solution) above pH 3.1 and arsenic adsorption to the surface of 2-line ferrihydrite is the dominant controlling factor in the solubility of arsenic from pH 3.2 to pH 11.0, with 99.8% of dissolved arsenic removed from solution via this mechanism. Finally, model results show -0.2% of the total dissolved arsenic adsorbs to the surface of amorphous aluminum hydroxide from pH 5.0 to pH 8.0. Minor alterations to the thermodynamic properties of arsenite and arsenate adsorption to 2-line ferrihydrite allowed the fit between measured mill-scale and modeled concentrations for the pH range of 3.2-11.0 to be optimized.

  7. Wide pH range tolerance in extremophiles: towards understanding an important phenomenon for future biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Dhakar, Kusum; Pandey, Anita

    2016-03-01

    Microorganisms that inhabit the extreme pH environments are classified as acidophiles and alkaliphiles. A number of studies emerged from extreme high (hot springs, hydrothermal vents) as well as low temperature (arctic and antarctic regions, sea water, ice shelf, marine sediments, cold deserts, glaciers, temperate forests, and plantations) environments have highlighted the occurrence of microorganisms (thermophiles/psychrophiles) with the ability to tolerate wide pH range, from acidic to alkaline (1.5-14.0 in some cases), under laboratory conditions. However, the sampling source (soil/sediment) of these microorganisms showed the pH to be neutral or slightly acidic/alkaline. The aim of the present review is to discuss the phenomenon of wide pH range tolerance possessed by these microorganisms as a hidden character in perspective of their habitats, possible mechanisms, phylogeny, ecological and biotechnological relevance, and future perspectives. It is believed that the genome is a probable reservoir of the hidden variations. The extremophiles have the ability to adapt against the environmental change that is probably through the expression/regulation of the specific genes that were already present in the genome. The phenomenon is likely to have broad implications in biotechnology, including both environmental (such as bioremediation, biodegradation, and biocontrol), and industrial applications (as a source of novel extremozymes and many other useful bioactive compounds with wide pH range tolerance).

  8. The feasibility of measuring ocean pH by long-range acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worcester, Peter F.

    1989-04-01

    Low frequency (<1000 Hz) sound absorption in the ocean depends exponentially on ocean pH. While the absolute amplitudes measured in long-range (order of 1000 km) acoustic transmission experiments depend in a complex manner on ocean structure and are difficult to interpret without ambiguity, measurements of differential absorption as a function of frequency contain significant information. For surface-reflected rays (RSR) there is the additional factor of frequency-dependent reflectivity. In principle, a comparison of transmitted and received acoustic spectra can be inverted to obtain ocean pH and surface roughness. Calculations performed with preliminary data from a 750-km path in the North Pacific give qualitative agreement with theory (higher frequencies are attenuated more than lower frequencies) but are inadequate for quantitative comparisons (the experiment was not optimized for differential attenuation measurements). Our conclusion is that it is possible, but not easy, to obtain quantitative information on ocean pH and surface roughness from measurements of differential attenuation with frequency along resolved ray paths. To obtain an accuracy of 0.05 in pH with a 750-km transmission at 550+/-100 Hz would require about 100 independent samples for the North Pacific (pH~7.7) and 60 independent samples for the Atlantic (pH~8.0) in order to achieve adequate averaging of amplitude fluctuations induced by internal waves and ambient acoustic noise.

  9. Exploration of a Basin and Range-Type Geothermal System Using Soil pH Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owens, L.; Hill, G.; Norman, D. I.

    2005-12-01

    The Socorro Peak, NM Known Geothermal Reservoir Area (KGRA) is a Basin and Range-type extentional-fault geothermal system boasting thermal gradients upwards of 420 mW/m3 in an uplift Precambrian fault block. Structural and geophysical evidence suggests that a low-to-mid temperature (60-100C) geothermal aquifer may reside within the fault-bounded alluvial basin, capped and insulated by over 1000meters of Tertiary mudstone aquitard strata and Quaternary flanglomerates. Select Ion Leach Analysis Geochemistry (SILG) and pH analysis of soils were employed to investigate the location and extent of the Socorro KGRA. The SILG geothermal exploration method is commonly used for mineral and oil exploration; the soil pH is method is a new method being developed. Soil samples for SILG were collected at 100m intervals over the alluvial basin and range bounding fault. Oxide Suite elements (As, V, I, Hg) and alkali elements (Rb, Sr) were observed in a series of nested halos of anomalously high concentrations surrounding a central core of anomalously low concentrations. The center of this 3 km-wide anomaly is located just in to the east of the range bounding fault. This pattern is interpreted as an oxidizing environment surrounding a reduction chimney created by the geothermal waters. Field pH analyses were also performed on a 25 meter interval grid over the same exploration area. A 25 g soil sample screened to 18 mesh is mixed with 10 cc water, stirred and pH measured. Two dimensional plots indicate a central region of 7.0 to 7.5 pH values surrounded by a 1.5 km radius semi-halo of 5.0 to 6.5 pH values . This pattern corresponds with those observed by SILG. If a geothermal reservoir is responsible for the oxidizing/reduction environment causing the volatilization of select ions through the substrate, then we would also expect to see a decrease in pH caused by the release of free hydrogen ions. Spikes of acidic pH values (5.0-6.0) were also observed along sub alluvium faults

  10. Comparison of Rumen Fluid pH by Continuous Telemetry System and Bench pH Meter in Sheep with Different Ranges of Ruminal pH

    PubMed Central

    Reis, Leonardo F.; Minervino, Antonio H. H.; Araújo, Carolina A. S. C.; Sousa, Rejane S.; Oliveira, Francisco L. C.; Rodrigues, Frederico A. M. L.; Meira-Júnior, Enoch B. S.; Barrêto-Júnior, Raimundo A.; Mori, Clara S.; Ortolani, Enrico L.

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to compare the measurements of sheep ruminal pH using a continuous telemetry system or a bench pH meter using sheep with different degrees of ruminal pH. Ruminal lactic acidosis was induced in nine adult crossbred Santa Ines sheep by the administration of 15 g of sucrose per kg/BW. Samples of rumen fluid were collected at the baseline, before the induction of acidosis (T0) and at six, 12, 18, 24, 48, and 72 hours after the induction for pH measurement using a bench pH meter. During this 72-hour period, all animals had electrodes for the continuous measurement of pH. The results were compared using the Bland-Altman analysis of agreement, Pearson coefficients of correlation and determination, and paired analysis of variance with Student's t-test. The measurement methods presented a strong correlation (r = 0.94, P < 0.05) but the rumen pH that was measured continuously using a telemetry system resulted in lower values than the bench pH meter (overall mean of 5.38 and 5.48, resp., P = 0.0001). The telemetry system was able to detect smaller changes in rumen fluid pH and was more accurate in diagnosing both subacute ruminal lactic acidosis and acute ruminal lactic acidosis in sheep. PMID:24967422

  11. A broad pH range and processive chitinase from a metagenome library

    PubMed Central

    Thimoteo, S.S.; Glogauer, A.; Faoro, H.; de Souza, E.M.; Huergo, L.F.; Moerschbacher, B.M.; Pedrosa, F.O.

    2017-01-01

    Chitinases are hydrolases that degrade chitin, a polymer of N-acetylglucosamine linked β(1-4) present in the exoskeleton of crustaceans, insects, nematodes and fungal cell walls. A metagenome fosmid library from a wastewater-contaminated soil was functionally screened for chitinase activity leading to the isolation and identification of a chitinase gene named metachi18A. The metachi18A gene was subcloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli BL21 and the MetaChi18A chitinase was purified by affinity chromatography as a 6xHis-tagged fusion protein. The MetaChi18A enzyme is a 92-kDa protein with a conserved active site domain of glycosyl hydrolases family 18. It hydrolyses colloidal chitin with an optimum pH of 5 and temperature of 50°C. Moreover, the enzyme retained at least 80% of its activity in the pH range from 4 to 9 and 98% at 600 mM NaCl. Thin layer chromatography analyses identified chitobiose as the main product of MetaChi18A on chitin polymers as substrate. Kinetic analysis showed inhibition of MetaChi18A activity at high concentrations of colloidal chitin and 4-methylumbelliferyl N,N′-diacetylchitobiose and sigmoid kinetics at low concentrations of colloidal chitin, indicating a possible conformational change to lead the chitin chain from the chitin-binding to the catalytic domain. The observed stability and activity of MetaChi18A over a wide range of conditions suggest that this chitinase, now characterized, may be suitable for application in the industrial processing of chitin. PMID:28076454

  12. A broad pH range and processive chitinase from a metagenome library.

    PubMed

    Thimoteo, S S; Glogauer, A; Faoro, H; de Souza, E M; Huergo, L F; Moerschbacher, B M; Pedrosa, F O

    2017-01-05

    Chitinases are hydrolases that degrade chitin, a polymer of N-acetylglucosamine linked β(1-4) present in the exoskeleton of crustaceans, insects, nematodes and fungal cell walls. A metagenome fosmid library from a wastewater-contaminated soil was functionally screened for chitinase activity leading to the isolation and identification of a chitinase gene named metachi18A. The metachi18A gene was subcloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli BL21 and the MetaChi18A chitinase was purified by affinity chromatography as a 6xHis-tagged fusion protein. The MetaChi18A enzyme is a 92-kDa protein with a conserved active site domain of glycosyl hydrolases family 18. It hydrolyses colloidal chitin with an optimum pH of 5 and temperature of 50°C. Moreover, the enzyme retained at least 80% of its activity in the pH range from 4 to 9 and 98% at 600 mM NaCl. Thin layer chromatography analyses identified chitobiose as the main product of MetaChi18A on chitin polymers as substrate. Kinetic analysis showed inhibition of MetaChi18A activity at high concentrations of colloidal chitin and 4-methylumbelliferyl N,N'-diacetylchitobiose and sigmoid kinetics at low concentrations of colloidal chitin, indicating a possible conformational change to lead the chitin chain from the chitin-binding to the catalytic domain. The observed stability and activity of MetaChi18A over a wide range of conditions suggest that this chitinase, now characterized, may be suitable for application in the industrial processing of chitin.

  13. Highly Sensitive and Wide-Dynamic-Range Multichannel Optical-Fiber pH Sensor Based on PWM Technique.

    PubMed

    Khan, Md Rajibur Rahaman; Kang, Shin-Won

    2016-11-09

    In this study, we propose a highly sensitive multichannel pH sensor that is based on an optical-fiber pulse width modulation (PWM) technique. According to the optical-fiber PWM method, the received sensing signal's pulse width changes when the optical-fiber pH sensing-element of the array comes into contact with pH buffer solutions. The proposed optical-fiber PWM pH-sensing system offers a linear sensing response over a wide range of pH values from 2 to 12, with a high pH-sensing ability. The sensitivity of the proposed pH sensor is 0.46 µs/pH, and the correlation coefficient R² is approximately 0.997. Additional advantages of the proposed optical-fiber PWM pH sensor include a short/fast response-time of about 8 s, good reproducibility properties with a relative standard deviation (RSD) of about 0.019, easy fabrication, low cost, small size, reusability of the optical-fiber sensing-element, and the capability of remote sensing. Finally, the performance of the proposed PWM pH sensor was compared with that of potentiometric, optical-fiber modal interferometer, and optical-fiber Fabry-Perot interferometer pH sensors with respect to dynamic range width, linearity as well as response and recovery times. We observed that the proposed sensing systems have better sensing abilities than the above-mentioned pH sensors.

  14. Influence of pH-dependent aquatic toxicity of ionizable pharmaceuticals on risk assessments over environmental pH ranges.

    PubMed

    Boström, Marja Lena; Berglund, Olof

    2015-04-01

    Due to variation in pH, ionizable pharmaceuticals entering aquatic environments experience different degrees of ionization, which may affect toxicity. Using data from toxicity testing at only neutral pH may potentially under- or overestimate actual toxicity at pH ranges found in natural aquatic environments. Here we show relative pH-dependent acute toxicity to Daphnia magna for the pharmaceutical weak bases fluoxetine and sertraline, as well as the weak acids naproxen, diclofenac, ibuprofen and ketoprofen. A probabilistic modelling approach using the pH-dependent toxicity data for D. magna and an environmental pH distribution based on over 4000 European running waters from 21 countries predicted that environmental toxicity for the weak bases may be underestimated if pH 7 was assumed. The model predicted median underestimation by a factor of 3, with 90% of the model results ranging from 1 to 6. Consequently, due to the slightly basic nature of the European running waters, weak acid toxicity may be overestimated by a factor of 2. Predicted median toxicity was 0.5 of that assuming pH 7 with 90% of the results ranging from 0.03 to 5. Because aquatic pH exhibits large variation both within and between countries, we advise the use of site-specific risk assessments for ionizable pharmaceuticals in making informed water management decisions.

  15. Highly Sensitive and Wide-Dynamic-Range Multichannel Optical-Fiber pH Sensor Based on PWM Technique

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Md. Rajibur Rahaman; Kang, Shin-Won

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we propose a highly sensitive multichannel pH sensor that is based on an optical-fiber pulse width modulation (PWM) technique. According to the optical-fiber PWM method, the received sensing signal’s pulse width changes when the optical-fiber pH sensing-element of the array comes into contact with pH buffer solutions. The proposed optical-fiber PWM pH-sensing system offers a linear sensing response over a wide range of pH values from 2 to 12, with a high pH-sensing ability. The sensitivity of the proposed pH sensor is 0.46 µs/pH, and the correlation coefficient R2 is approximately 0.997. Additional advantages of the proposed optical-fiber PWM pH sensor include a short/fast response-time of about 8 s, good reproducibility properties with a relative standard deviation (RSD) of about 0.019, easy fabrication, low cost, small size, reusability of the optical-fiber sensing-element, and the capability of remote sensing. Finally, the performance of the proposed PWM pH sensor was compared with that of potentiometric, optical-fiber modal interferometer, and optical-fiber Fabry–Perot interferometer pH sensors with respect to dynamic range width, linearity as well as response and recovery times. We observed that the proposed sensing systems have better sensing abilities than the above-mentioned pH sensors. PMID:27834865

  16. The characteristic AgcoreAushell nanoparticles as SERS substrates in detecting dopamine molecules at various pH ranges

    PubMed Central

    Bu, Yanru; Lee, Sang-Wha

    2015-01-01

    AgcoreAushell nanoparticles (NPs) are a promising surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrate, which can offer a high enhancement factor through the combined effect of the high SERS activity of the Ag core and the biocompatibility of the Au shell. In this study, AgcoreAushell NPs were examined as SERS substrates for the sensitive detection of dopamine (DA) molecules in an aqueous solution. The SERS activity of the AgcoreAushell NPs was strongly dependent on the pH of the solution. When the pH of the solution was acidic (pH <5) or basic (pH >9), the AgcoreAushell NPs exhibited negligible SERS activity toward the DA molecules, due to the weakened interactions (or repulsive forces) between the DA molecules and the core–shell NPs. On the other hand, the AgcoreAushell NPs exhibited a high SERS activity in the intermediate pH ranges (pH 7–9), due to the molecular bridging effect of DA molecules, which allows probe molecules to be located at the interstitial junctions (so-called hot spots) between the core–shell NPs. The results of this study highlight the importance of probe-induced clustering of core–shell NPs in the SERS measurements at physiological pH. PMID:26345418

  17. Expanding the active pH range of Escherichia coli glutamate decarboxylase by breaking the cooperativeness.

    PubMed

    Thu Ho, Ngoc Anh; Hou, Chen Yuan; Kim, Woo Hyun; Kang, Taek Jin

    2013-02-01

    Bacterial glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) transforms glutamate into γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) with the consumption of a proton. The enzyme is active under acidic environments only and sharply loses its activity as pH approaches neutrality with concomitant structural deformation. In an attempt to understand better the role of this cooperative loss of activity upon pH shifts, we prepared and studied a series of GAD site-specific mutants. In this report, we show that the cooperativeness was kept intact by at least two residues, Glu89 and His465, of which Glu89 is newly identified to be involved in the cooperativity system of GAD. Double mutation on these residues not only broke the cooperativity in the activity change but also yielded a mutant GAD that retained the activity at neutral pH. The resulting mutant GAD that was active at neutral pH inhibited the cell growth in a glycerol medium by converting intracellular Glu into GABA in an uncontrolled manner, which explains in part why the cooperativeness of GAD has to be kept by several layers of safety keepers. This unexpected result might be utilized to convert a low-valued by-product of biodiesel production, glycerol, into value-added product, GABA.

  18. Separation and determination of chiral composition in penicillamine tablets by capillary electrophoresis in a broad pH range.

    PubMed

    Song, Lijuan; Guo, Zhenpeng; Chen, Yi

    2012-07-01

    A chiral capillary electrophoretic method with nearly full pH window was explored for the separation and determination of dl-penicillamine. A facile one-pot labeling technique was coupled in the method for introduction of chromophore and charge groups onto the analytes to facilitate the electromigration and sensitive detection. By using simply a cost-effective neutral β-cyclodextrin as chiral selector, baseline separation of the dl-penicillamine was achieved from pH 2.0 to over pH 10. Quantification of standard d- and l-penicillamines was demonstrated by taking pH 4.5, 7.4, and 9.7 as the representatives of acidic, neutral, and basic conditions. The working curves were constructed between peak area and concentration, having linear ranges of 8.56-8.56 × 10(2) μg/mL for pH 4.5 and 8.56-1.71 × 10(3) μg/mL for pH 7.4 and 9.7, with correlation coefficients all better than 0.999. The limit of detection (S/N = 3) was 2.58 μg/mL in acidic and neutral conditions or 1.41 μg/mL in basic condition. The method was further validated by assaying the commercial penicillamine tablets, applicable to quantification of the effective enantiomer and the trace impurity of l-penicillamine at a content of down to 0.2, 0.6, and 2.0% for pH 9.7, 4.5, and 7.4, respectively. The recovery determined by spiking technique was in a range from 93.1 to 105 %. The method is easily extendable to the analysis of other chiral amines or amino acids.

  19. Pulsed multiwavelength laser ranging system. Ph.D. Thesis - Maryland Univ.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abshire, J. B.

    1982-01-01

    A pulsed multiwavelength laser ranging system for measuring atmospheric delay was built and tested, and its theoretical performance limits were calculated. The system uses a dye modelocked ND:YAG laser, which transmits 70 psec wide pulses simultaneously at 1064, 532, and 355 nm. The differential delay of the 1064 and 355 nm pulses is measured by a specially calibrated waveform digitizer to estimate the dry atmospheric delay. The delay time of the 532 nm pulse is used to measure the target distance. Static crossed field photomultipliers are used as detectors for all wavelengths. Theoretical analysis shows that path curvature and atmospheric turbulence are fundamental limits to the ranging accuracy of both single and multicolor systems operating over horizontal paths. For two color systems, an additional error is caused by the uncertainty in the path averaged water vapor. The standard deviation of the multicolor instrument's timing measurements is directly proportional to the laser pulse width plus photomultiplier jitter divided by the square root of the received photoelectron number. The prototype system's maximum range is km, which is limited by atmospheric and system transmission losses at 355 nm. System signal detection and false alarm calculations are also presented.

  20. A single design strategy for dual sensitive pH probe with a suitable range to map pH in living cells

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Kang-Kang; Hou, Ji-Ting; Li, Kun; Yao, Qian; Yang, Jin; Wu, Ming-Yu; Xie, Yong-Mei; Yu, Xiao-Qi

    2015-01-01

    Due to the lack of a proper imaging approach, a veracious pH map of normal and abnormal cell is still rare. In this work, we presented a rhodamine-salicylaldehyde combination (Rh-SA2) as a novel pH probe, which has dual sensitive units for both acidic and basic environment. This dual sensitive probe acts like a chameleon in living cells and offers the doubling guarantees for endocellular pH mapping. Moreover, a quantitative measurement of cellular pH changes was allowed and the endocellular pH values under drug-associated stimuli were also investigated. PMID:26486180

  1. Semimetallic MoP2: an active and stable hydrogen evolution electrocatalyst over the whole pH range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pu, Zonghua; Saana Amiinu, Ibrahim; Wang, Min; Yang, Yushi; Mu, Shichun

    2016-04-01

    Developing efficient non-precious metal hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) electrocatalysts is a great challenge for sustainable hydrogen production from water. In this communication, for the first time, semimetallic MoP2 nanoparticle films on a metal Mo plate (MoP2 NPs/Mo) are fabricated through a facile two-step strategy. When used as a binder-free hydrogen evolution cathode, the as-prepared MoP2 NPs/Mo electrode exhibits superior HER catalytic activity at all pH values. At a current density of 10 mA cm-2, the catalyst displays overpotentials of 143, 211 and 194 mV in 0.5 M H2SO4, 1.0 M phosphate buffer solution and 1.0 M KOH, respectively. Furthermore, it exhibits excellent stability over a wide pH range. Thus, this in situ route opens up a new avenue for the fabrication of highly efficient, cost-effective and binder-free non-precious catalysts for water splitting and other electrochemical devices.Developing efficient non-precious metal hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) electrocatalysts is a great challenge for sustainable hydrogen production from water. In this communication, for the first time, semimetallic MoP2 nanoparticle films on a metal Mo plate (MoP2 NPs/Mo) are fabricated through a facile two-step strategy. When used as a binder-free hydrogen evolution cathode, the as-prepared MoP2 NPs/Mo electrode exhibits superior HER catalytic activity at all pH values. At a current density of 10 mA cm-2, the catalyst displays overpotentials of 143, 211 and 194 mV in 0.5 M H2SO4, 1.0 M phosphate buffer solution and 1.0 M KOH, respectively. Furthermore, it exhibits excellent stability over a wide pH range. Thus, this in situ route opens up a new avenue for the fabrication of highly efficient, cost-effective and binder-free non-precious catalysts for water splitting and other electrochemical devices. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental section and figures. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr00820h

  2. 36 CFR 2.11 - Picnicking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Picnicking. 2.11 Section 2.11 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR RESOURCE PROTECTION, PUBLIC USE AND RECREATION § 2.11 Picnicking. Picnicking is allowed, except in designated...

  3. The potential of selected macroalgal species for treatment of AMD at different pH ranges in temperate regions.

    PubMed

    Oberholster, Paul J; Cheng, Po-Hsun; Botha, Anna-Maria; Genthe, Bettina

    2014-09-01

    The metal bioaccumulation potential of selected macroalgae species at different pH ranges was study for usage as part of a possible secondary passive acid mine drainage (AMD) treatment technology in algae ponds. Two separate studies were conducted to determine the suitability of macroalgae for passive treatment when metabolic processes in macrophytes and microorganisms in constructed wetlands decrease during winter months. In the field study, the bioconcentration of metals (mg/kg dry weight) measured in the benthic macroalgae mats was in the following order: site 1. Oedogonium crassum Al > Fe > Mn > Zn; site 2. Klebsormidium klebsii, Al > Fe > Mn > Zn; site 3. Microspora tumidula, Fe > Al > Mn > Zn and site 4. M. tumidula, Fe > Mn > Al > Zn. In the laboratory study, cultured macroalgae K. klebsii, O. crassum and M. tumidula isolated from the field sampling sites were exposed to three different pH values (3, 5 and 7), while bioaccumulation of the metals, Al, Fe, Mn and Zn and glutathione S-transferase (GST) activity were measured in the different selected algae species at a constant water temperature of 14 °C. Bioaccumulation of Al was the highest for O. crassum followed by K. klebsii and M. tumidula (p < 0.0001). From the study it was evident that the highest metal bioaccumulation occurred in the macroalgae O. crassum at all three tested pH values under constant low water temperature.

  4. Semimetallic MoP2: an active and stable hydrogen evolution electrocatalyst over the whole pH range.

    PubMed

    Pu, Zonghua; Saana Amiinu, Ibrahim; Wang, Min; Yang, Yushi; Mu, Shichun

    2016-04-28

    Developing efficient non-precious metal hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) electrocatalysts is a great challenge for sustainable hydrogen production from water. In this communication, for the first time, semimetallic MoP2 nanoparticle films on a metal Mo plate (MoP2 NPs/Mo) are fabricated through a facile two-step strategy. When used as a binder-free hydrogen evolution cathode, the as-prepared MoP2 NPs/Mo electrode exhibits superior HER catalytic activity at all pH values. At a current density of 10 mA cm(-2), the catalyst displays overpotentials of 143, 211 and 194 mV in 0.5 M H2SO4, 1.0 M phosphate buffer solution and 1.0 M KOH, respectively. Furthermore, it exhibits excellent stability over a wide pH range. Thus, this in situ route opens up a new avenue for the fabrication of highly efficient, cost-effective and binder-free non-precious catalysts for water splitting and other electrochemical devices.

  5. A fluorescent sensing of nerve agent simulant with dual emissions at wide pH range in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Kim, Youngsam; Jang, Yoon Jeong; Mulay, Sandip V; Nguyen, Thuy-Tien T; Churchill, David G

    2017-03-23

    A new 1,8-naphthalimide-based fluorescent probe for the detection of diethyl cyanophosphonate, a very common nerve agent simulant, was designed, synthesized and characterized fully. The probe showed around 50-fold enhancement of fluorescence intensity over other nerve agent simulants. Importantly, the probe is able to work under aqueous conditions at wide pH range. Two reactive groups, the oxime and phenol, allowed a dual emission with different kinetic reaction. The reaction of diethyl cyanophosphonate with the oxime group occurred in advance; the resulting time-response of fluorescence enhancement was observed within ~30 s. After the oxime underwent reaction, then phenol also underwent substitution reaction with diethyl cyanophosphate resulting blue emission. To show real application of this new probe, silica plate assays for the detection of diethyl cyanophosphonate in gas and liquid phase through dual emissions channel were carried out.

  6. 42 CFR 2.11 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Definitions. 2.11 Section 2.11 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL PROVISIONS CONFIDENTIALITY OF ALCOHOL AND...: Alcohol abuse means the use of an alcoholic beverage which impairs the physical, mental, emotional,...

  7. 42 CFR 2.11 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Definitions. 2.11 Section 2.11 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL PROVISIONS CONFIDENTIALITY OF ALCOHOL AND...: Alcohol abuse means the use of an alcoholic beverage which impairs the physical, mental, emotional,...

  8. 42 CFR 2.11 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Definitions. 2.11 Section 2.11 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL PROVISIONS CONFIDENTIALITY OF ALCOHOL AND...: Alcohol abuse means the use of an alcoholic beverage which impairs the physical, mental, emotional,...

  9. 42 CFR 2.11 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Definitions. 2.11 Section 2.11 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL PROVISIONS CONFIDENTIALITY OF ALCOHOL AND...: Alcohol abuse means the use of an alcoholic beverage which impairs the physical, mental, emotional,...

  10. Peroxidase-like activity of gold nanoparticles stabilized by hyperbranched polyglycidol derivatives over a wide pH range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drozd, Marcin; Pietrzak, Mariusz; Parzuchowski, Paweł; Mazurkiewicz-Pawlicka, Marta; Malinowska, Elżbieta

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this work was to carry out comparative studies on the peroxidase-like activity of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) stabilized with low molecular weight hyperbranched polyglycidol (HBPG-OH) and its derivative modified with maleic acid residues (HBPG-COOH). The influence of the stabilizer to gold precursor ratio on the size and morphology of nanoparticles obtained was checked, and prepared nanoparticles were characterized by means of transmission electron microscopy and UV-Vis spectroscopy. The results indicated the divergent effect of increasing the concentration of stabilizers (HBPG-OH or HBPG-COOH) on the size of the nanostructures obtained. The gold nanoparticles obtained were characterized as having intrinsic peroxidase-like activity and the mechanism of catalysis in acidic and alkaline mediums was consistent with the standard Michaelis-Menten kinetics, revealing a strong affinity of AuNPs with 2, 2‧-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS) and 3, 3‧, 5, 5‧-tetramethylbenzidine (TMB), and significantly lower affinity towards phenol. By comparing the kinetic parameters, a negligible effect of polymeric ligand charge on activity against various types of substrates (anionic or cationic) was indicated. The superiority of steric stabilization via the application of tested low-weight hyperbranched polymers over typical stabilizers in preventing salt-induced aggregation and maintaining high catalytic activity in time was proved. The applied hyperbranched stabilizers provide a good tool for manufacturing gold-based nanozymes, which are highly stable and active over a wide pH range.

  11. Oxidation of iodide and iodine on birnessite (delta-MnO2) in the pH range 4-8.

    PubMed

    Allard, Sébastien; von Gunten, Urs; Sahli, Elisabeth; Nicolau, Rudy; Gallard, Hervé

    2009-08-01

    The oxidation of iodide by synthetic birnessite (delta-MnO(2)) was studied in perchlorate media in the pH range 4-8. Iodine (I(2)) was detected as an oxidation product that was subsequently further oxidized to iodate (IO(3)(-)). The third order rate constants, second order on iodide and first order on manganese oxide, determined by extraction of iodine in benzene decreased with increasing pH (6.3-7.5) from 1790 to 3.1M(-2) s(-1). Both iodine and iodate were found to adsorb significantly on birnessite with an adsorption capacity of 12.7 microM/g for iodate at pH 5.7. The rate of iodine oxidation by birnessite decreased with increasing ionic strength, which resulted in a lower rate of iodate formation. The production of iodine in iodide-containing waters in contact with manganese oxides may result in the formation of undesired iodinated organic compounds (taste and odor, toxicity) in natural and technical systems. The probability of the formation of such compounds is highest in the pH range 5-7.5. For pH <5 iodine is quickly oxidized to iodate, a non-toxic and stable sink for iodine. At pH >7.5, iodide is not oxidized to a significant extent.

  12. Graft copolymers that exhibit temperature-induced phase transitions over a wide range of pH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Guohua; Hoffman, Allan S.

    1995-01-01

    THERE are many potential applications of 'intelligent' aqueous polymer systems1-8 in medicine, biotechnology, industry and in environmental problems9-13. Many of these polymer systems undergo reversible phase transitions-for example, abrupt changes in volume-in response to external stimuli such as temperature, pH or the nature of the solvent. Most of the polymers studied previously are responsive to only one kind of stimulus. But for some applications, independent responsiveness to several factors, such as temperature and pH, may be required. Here we describe a polymer that undergoes marked solubility changes in water in response to temperature and/or pH changes. The polymer is prepared by grafting temperature-sensitive side chains onto a pH-sensitive backbone. We also find that block copolymers, in which the temperature- and pH-sensitive units alternate along the chain, show similar behaviour.

  13. Analysis of Chameleonic Change of Red Cabbage Depending on Broad pH Range for Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Kyung Hee; Kim, Tae Young; Ko, Hyun Seok; Han, Eun Mi; Lee, Suk-Ho; Kim, Jung-Hun; Lee, Jae Wook

    2015-08-01

    Dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) were assembled using natural dyes extracted from red cabbage as a sensitizer. In this work, we investigated the adsorption characteristics and the electrochemical behavior for harvesting sunlight and electron transfer in red cabbage DSSCs under different solvents and pH. For the red cabbage dye-sensitized electrode adsorbed at pH 3.5, the solar cell yields a short-circuit current density (Jsc) of 1.60 mA/cm2, a photovoltage (Vcc) of 0.46 V, and a fill factor of 0.55, corresponding to an energy conversion efficiency (η) of 0.41%.

  14. Two-step counterdiffusion protocol for the crystallization of haemoglobin II from Lucina pectinata in the pH range 4–9

    PubMed Central

    Nieves-Marrero, Carlos A.; Ruiz-Martínez, Carlos R.; Estremera-Andújar, Rafael A.; González-Ramírez, Luis A.; López-Garriga, Juan; Gavira, José A.

    2010-01-01

    Lucina pectinata haemoglobin II (HbII) transports oxygen in the presence of H2S to the symbiotic system in this bivalve mollusc. The composition of the haem pocket at the distal site includes TyrB10 and GlnE7, which are very common in other haem proteins. Obtaining crystals of oxyHbII at various pH values is required in order to elucidate the changes in the conformations of TyrB10 and GlnE7 and structural scenarios induced by changes in pH. Here, the growth of crystals of oxyHbII using the capillary counterdiffusion (CCD) technique at various pH values using a two-step protocol is reported. In the first step, a mini-screen was used to validate sodium formate as the best precipitating reagent for the growth of oxyHbII crystals. The second step, a pH screen typically used for optimization, was used to produce crystals in the pH range 4–­9. Very well faceted prismatic ruby-red crystals were obtained at all pH values. X-ray data sets were acquired using synchrotron radiation of wavelength 0.886 Å (for the crystals obtained at pH 5) and 0.908 Å (for those obtained at pH 4, 8 and 9) to maximum resolutions of 3.30, 1.95, 1.85 and 2.00 Å for the crystals obtained at pH 4, 5, 8 and 9, respectively. All of the crystals were isomorphous and belonged to space group P42212. PMID:20208156

  15. A broad pH range indicator-based spectrophotometric assay for true lipases using tributyrin and tricaprylin[S

    PubMed Central

    Camacho-Ruiz, María de los Angeles; Mateos-Díaz, Juan Carlos; Carrière, Frédéric; Rodriguez, Jorge A.

    2015-01-01

    A continuous assay is proposed for the screening of acidic, neutral, or alkaline lipases using microtiter plates, emulsified short- and medium-chain TGs, and a pH indicator. The lipase activity measurement is based on the decrease of the pH indicator optical density due to protonation which is caused by the release of FFAs during the hydrolysis of TGs and thus acidification. Purified lipases with distinct pH optima and an esterase were used to validate the method. The rate of lipolysis was found to be linear with time and proportional to the amount of enzyme added in each case. Specific activities measured with this microplate assay method were lower than those obtained by the pH-stat technique. Nevertheless, the pH-dependent profiles of enzymatic activity were similar with both assays. In addition, the substrate preference of each enzyme tested was not modified and this allowed discriminating lipase and esterase activities using tributyrin (low water solubility) and tricaprylin (not water soluble) as substrates. This continuous lipase assay is compatible with a high sample throughput and can be applied for the screening of lipases and lipase inhibitors from biological samples. PMID:25748441

  16. 42 CFR 2.11 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... individual who, after arrest on a criminal charge, is identified as an alcohol or drug abuser in order to... DRUG ABUSE PATIENT RECORDS General Provisions § 2.11 Definitions. For purposes of these regulations... social well-being of the user. Drug abuse means the use of a psychoactive substance for other...

  17. Modeling of formation and prevention of a pure water zone in capillary isoelectric focusing with narrow pH range carrier ampholytes.

    PubMed

    Takácsi-Nagy, Anna; Kilár, Ferenc; Thormann, Wolfgang

    2017-03-01

    This paper comprises a continuation of computer simulation studies dealing with carrier ampholyte based CIEF in presence of narrow pH gradients. With this technique, amphoteric sample components with pI values outside the pH gradient are migrating isotachophoretically toward the cathode or anode whereas components with pI values within the gradient become focused. In order to understand the processes occurring in presence of the electric field, the behavior of both carrier ampholytes and amphoteric sample components is investigated by computer modeling. Characteristics of two pH unit gradients with end components having pI values at or around 7.00 and conditions that lead to the formation of a water zone at neutrality were investigated. Data obtained reveal that a zone of water is formed in focusing with carrier ampholytes when the applied pH range does not cover the neutral region, ends at pH 7.00 or begins at pH 7.00. The presence of additional amphoteric components that cover the neutrality region prevent water zone formation under current flow. This situation is met in experiments with narrow pH gradients that end or begin around neutrality. Simulation data reveal that no water zone evolves when atmospheric carbon dioxide dissolved in the catholyte causes the migration of carbonic acid (in the form of carbonate and/or hydrogen carbonate ions) from the catholyte through the focusing structure. An electrolyte change in the electrode solution does not have an impact on the focusing part but does change the isotachophoretic pattern migrating behind the leading ion.

  18. Fever-range hyperthermia improves the anti-apoptotic effect induced by low pH on human neutrophils promoting a proangiogenic profile

    PubMed Central

    Díaz, Fernando Erra; Dantas, Ezequiel; Cabrera, Maia; Benítez, Constanza A; Delpino, María V; Duette, Gabriel; Rubione, Julia; Sanjuan, Norberto; Trevani, Analía S; Geffner, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophils have the shortest lifespan among leukocytes and usually die via apoptosis, limiting their deleterious potential. However, this tightly regulated cell death program can be modulated by pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs), danger-associated molecular pattern (DAMPs), and inflammatory cytokines. We have previously reported that low pH, a hallmark of inflammatory processes and solid tumors, moderately delays neutrophil apoptosis. Here we show that fever-range hyperthermia accelerates the rate of neutrophil apoptosis at neutral pH but markedly increases neutrophil survival induced by low pH. Interestingly, an opposite effect was observed in lymphocytes; hyperthermia plus low pH prevents lymphocyte activation and promotes the death of lymphocytes and lymphoid cell lines. Analysis of the mechanisms through which hyperthermia plus low pH increased neutrophil survival revealed that hyperthermia further decreases cytosolic pH induced by extracellular acidosis. The fact that two Na+/H+ exchanger inhibitors, 5-(N-ethyl-N-isopropyl) amiloride (EIPA) and amiloride, reproduced the effects induced by hyperthermia suggested that it prolongs neutrophil survival by inhibiting the Na+/H+ antiporter. The neutrophil anti-apoptotic effect induced by PAMPs, DAMPs, and inflammatory cytokines usually leads to the preservation of the major neutrophil effector functions such as phagocytosis and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. In contrast, our data revealed that the anti-apoptotic effect induced by low pH and hyperthermia induced a functional profile characterized by a low phagocytic activity, an impairment in ROS production and a high ability to suppress T-cell activation and to produce the angiogenic factors VEGF, IL-8, and the matrix metallopeptidase 9 (MMP-9). These results suggest that acting together fever and local acidosis might drive the differentiation of neutrophils into a profile able to promote both cancer progression and tissue repair during the

  19. Fever-range hyperthermia improves the anti-apoptotic effect induced by low pH on human neutrophils promoting a proangiogenic profile.

    PubMed

    Díaz, Fernando Erra; Dantas, Ezequiel; Cabrera, Maia; Benítez, Constanza A; Delpino, María V; Duette, Gabriel; Rubione, Julia; Sanjuan, Norberto; Trevani, Analía S; Geffner, Jorge

    2016-10-27

    Neutrophils have the shortest lifespan among leukocytes and usually die via apoptosis, limiting their deleterious potential. However, this tightly regulated cell death program can be modulated by pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs), danger-associated molecular pattern (DAMPs), and inflammatory cytokines. We have previously reported that low pH, a hallmark of inflammatory processes and solid tumors, moderately delays neutrophil apoptosis. Here we show that fever-range hyperthermia accelerates the rate of neutrophil apoptosis at neutral pH but markedly increases neutrophil survival induced by low pH. Interestingly, an opposite effect was observed in lymphocytes; hyperthermia plus low pH prevents lymphocyte activation and promotes the death of lymphocytes and lymphoid cell lines. Analysis of the mechanisms through which hyperthermia plus low pH increased neutrophil survival revealed that hyperthermia further decreases cytosolic pH induced by extracellular acidosis. The fact that two Na(+)/H(+) exchanger inhibitors, 5-(N-ethyl-N-isopropyl) amiloride (EIPA) and amiloride, reproduced the effects induced by hyperthermia suggested that it prolongs neutrophil survival by inhibiting the Na(+)/H(+) antiporter. The neutrophil anti-apoptotic effect induced by PAMPs, DAMPs, and inflammatory cytokines usually leads to the preservation of the major neutrophil effector functions such as phagocytosis and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. In contrast, our data revealed that the anti-apoptotic effect induced by low pH and hyperthermia induced a functional profile characterized by a low phagocytic activity, an impairment in ROS production and a high ability to suppress T-cell activation and to produce the angiogenic factors VEGF, IL-8, and the matrix metallopeptidase 9 (MMP-9). These results suggest that acting together fever and local acidosis might drive the differentiation of neutrophils into a profile able to promote both cancer progression and tissue repair

  20. Template-free synthesis of ZnWO{sub 4} powders via hydrothermal process in a wide pH range

    SciTech Connect

    Hojamberdiev, Mirabbos; Zhu, Gangqiang; Xu, Yunhua

    2010-12-15

    ZnWO{sub 4} powders with different morphologies were fabricated through a template-free hydrothermal method at 180 {sup o}C for 8 h in a wide pH range. X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), UV-visible and luminescence spectrophotometers were applied to study the effects of pH values on crystallinity, morphology, optical and luminescence properties. The XRD results showed that the WO{sub 3} + ZnWO{sub 4}, ZnWO{sub 4}, and ZnO phases could form after hydrothermal processing at 180 {sup o}C for 8 h with the pH values of 1, 3-11, and 13, respectively. The SEM and TEM observation revealed that the morphological transformation of ZnWO{sub 4} powders occurred with an increase in pH values as follows: star anise-, peony-, and desert rose-like microstructures and soya bean- and rod-like nanostructures. The highest luminescence intensity was found to be in sample consisting of star anise-like crystallites among all the samples due to the presence of larger particles with high crystallinity resulted from the favorable pH under the current hydrothermal conditions.

  1. Wide pH range for fluoride removal from water by MHS-MgO/MgCO₃ adsorbent: kinetic, thermodynamic and mechanism studies.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kaisheng; Wu, Shibiao; Wang, Xuelong; He, Junyong; Sun, Bai; Jia, Yong; Luo, Tao; Meng, Fanli; Jin, Zhen; Lin, Dongyue; Shen, Wei; Kong, Lingtao; Liu, Jinhuai

    2015-05-15

    A novel environment friendly adsorbent, micro-nano hierarchical structured flower-like MgO/MgCO3 (MHS-MgO/MgCO3), was developed for fluoride removal from water. The adsorbent was characterized and its defluoridation properties were investigated. Adsorption kinetics fitted well the pseudo-second-order model. Kinetic data revealed that the fluoride adsorption was rapid, more than 83-90% of fluoride could be removed within 30 min, and the adsorption equilibrium was achieved in the following 4 h. The fluoride adsorption isotherm was well described by Freundlich model. The maximum adsorption capacity was about 300 mg/g at pH=7. Moreover, this adsorbent possessed a very wide available pH range of 5-11, and the fluoride removal efficiencies even reached up to 86.2%, 83.2% and 76.5% at pH=11 for initial fluoride concentrations of 10, 20 and 30 mg/L, respectively. The effects of co-existing anions indicated that the anions had less effect on adsorption of fluoride except phosphate. In addition, the adsorption mechanism analysis revealed that the wide available pH range toward fluoride was mainly resulted from the exchange of the carbonate and hydroxyl groups on the surface of the MHS-MgO/MgCO3 with fluoride anions.

  2. Bovine β-lactoglobulin is dimeric under imitative physiological conditions: dissociation equilibrium and rate constants over the pH range of 2.5-7.5.

    PubMed

    Mercadante, Davide; Melton, Laurence D; Norris, Gillian E; Loo, Trevor S; Williams, Martin A K; Dobson, Renwick C J; Jameson, Geoffrey B

    2012-07-18

    The oligomerization of β-lactoglobulin (βLg) has been studied extensively, but with somewhat contradictory results. Using analytical ultracentrifugation in both sedimentation equilibrium and sedimentation velocity modes, we studied the oligomerization of βLg variants A and B over a pH range of 2.5-7.5 in 100 mM NaCl at 25°C. For the first time, to our knowledge, we were able to estimate rate constants (k(off)) for βLg dimer dissociation. At pH 2.5 k(off) is low (0.008 and 0.009 s(-1)), but at higher pH (6.5 and 7.5) k(off) is considerably greater (>0.1 s(-1)). We analyzed the sedimentation velocity data using the van Holde-Weischet method, and the results were consistent with a monomer-dimer reversible self-association at pH 2.5, 3.5, 6.5, and 7.5. Dimer dissociation constants K(D)(2-1) fell close to or within the protein concentration range of ∼5 to ∼45 μM, and at ∼45 μM the dimer predominated. No species larger than the dimer could be detected. The K(D)(2-1) increased as |pH-pI| increased, indicating that the hydrophobic effect is the major factor stabilizing the dimer, and suggesting that, especially at low pH, electrostatic repulsion destabilizes the dimer. Therefore, through Poisson-Boltzmann calculations, we determined the electrostatic dimerization energy and the ionic charge distribution as a function of ionic strength at pH above (pH 7.5) and below (pH 2.5) the isoelectric point (pI∼5.3). We propose a mechanism for dimer stabilization whereby the added ionic species screen and neutralize charges in the vicinity of the dimer interface. The electrostatic forces of the ion cloud surrounding βLg play a key role in the thermodynamics and kinetics of dimer association/dissociation.

  3. Directed evolution and mutagenesis of glutamate decarboxylase from Lactobacillus brevis Lb85 to broaden the range of its activity toward a near-neutral pH.

    PubMed

    Shi, Feng; Xie, Yilong; Jiang, Junjun; Wang, Nannan; Li, Yongfu; Wang, Xiaoyuan

    2014-01-01

    Glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) transforms l-glutamate into γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) with the consumption of a proton. GAD derived from lactic acid bacteria exhibits optimum activity at pH 4.0-5.0 and significantly loses activity at near-neutral pH. To broaden the active range of the GAD GadB1 from Lactobacillus brevis Lb85 toward a near-neutral pH, irrational design using directed evolution and rational design using site-specific mutagenesis were performed. For directed evolution of GadB1, a sensitive high-throughput screening strategy based on a pH indicator was established. One improved mutant, GadB1(T17I/D294G/Q346H), was selected from 800 variants after one round of EP-PCR. It exhibited 3.9- and 25.0-fold increase in activity and catalytic efficiency, respectively at pH 6.0. Through site-specific mutagenesis, several improved mutants were obtained, with GadB1(E312S) being the best one. The combined mutant GadB1(T17I/D294G/E312S/Q346H) showed even higher catalytic efficiency, 13.1- and 43.2-fold that of wild-type GadB1 at pH 4.6 and 6.0, respectively. The amount of GABA produced in gadB1(T17I/D294G/Q346H)-, gadB1(E312S)- and gadB1(T17I/D294G/E312S/Q346H)-expressing Corynebacterium glutamicum ATCC 13032 from endogenous l-glutamate increased by 9.6%, 20.3% and 63.9%, respectively. These results indicate that these mutations have beneficial effects on expanding the active pH range and on GABA biosynthesis, suggesting these GadB1 variants as potent candidates for GABA production.

  4. Electrostatic Assemblies of Well-Dispersed AgNPs on the Surface of Electrospun Nanofibers as Highly Active SERS Substrates for Wide-Range pH Sensing.

    PubMed

    Yang, Tong; Ma, Jun; Zhen, Shu Jun; Huang, Cheng Zhi

    2016-06-15

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) has shown high promise in analysis and bioanalysis, wherein noble metal nanoparticles (NMNPs) such as silver nanoparticles were employed as substrates because of their strong localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) properties. However, SERS-based pH sensing was restricted because of the aggregation of NMNPs in acidic medium or biosamples with high ionic strength. Herein, by using the electrostatic interaction as a driving force, AgNPs are assembled on the surface of ethylene imine polymer (PEI)/poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) electrospun nanofibers, which are then applied as highly sensitive and reproducible SERS substrate with an enhancement factor (EF) of 10(7)-10(8). When p-aminothiophenol (p-ATP) is used as an indicator with its b2 mode, a good and wide linear response to pH ranging from 2.56 to 11.20 could be available, and the as-prepared nanocomposite fibers then could be fabricated as excellent pH sensors in complicated biological samples such as urine, considering that the pH of urine could reflect the acid-base status of a person. This work not only emerges a cost-effective, direct, and convenient approach to homogeneously decorate AgNPs on the surface of polymer nanofibers but also supplies a route for preparing other noble metal nanofibrous sensing membranes.

  5. Capillary isoelectric focusing of microorganisms in the pH range 2-5 in a dynamically modified FS capillary with UV detection.

    PubMed

    Horká, Marie; Růzicka, Filip; Holá, Veronika; Slais, Karel

    2006-07-01

    The isoelectric points of many microbial cells lie within the pH range spanning from 1.5 to 4.5. In this work, we suggest a CIEF method for the separation of cells according to their isoelectric points in the pH range of 2-5. It includes the segmental injection of the sample pulse composed of the segment of the selected simple ampholytes, the segment of the bioanalytes and the segment of carrier ampholytes into fused silica capillaries dynamically modified by poly(ethylene glycole). This polymer dissolved in the catholyte, in the anolyte and in the injected sample pulse was used for a prevention of the bioanalyte adsorption on the capillary surface and for the reduction of the electroosmotic flow. Between each focusing run, the capillaries were washed with the mixture of acetone/ethanol to achieve the reproducible and efficient CIEF. In order to trace of pH gradients, low-molecular-mass pI markers were used. The mixed cultures of microorganisms, Escherichia coli CCM 3954, Candida albicans CCM 8180, Candida parapsilosis, Candida krusei, Candida glabrata, Candida tropicalis, CCM 8223, Proteus vulgaris, Klebsiela pneumoniae, Staphylococcus aureus CCM 3953, Streptococcus agalactiae CCM 6187, Enterococcus faecalis CCM 4224 and Staphylococcus epidermidis CCM 4418, were focused and separated by the CIEF method suggested here. This CIEF method enables the separation and detection of the microbes from the mixed cultures within several minutes. The minimum detectable number of microbial cells was less than 10(3).

  6. Nutrient leaching, soil pH and changes in microbial community increase with time in lead-contaminated boreal forest soil at a shooting range area.

    PubMed

    Selonen, Salla; Setälä, Heikki

    2017-02-01

    Despite the known toxicity of lead (Pb), Pb pellets are widely used at shotgun shooting ranges over the world. However, the impacts of Pb on soil nutrients and soil microbes, playing a crucial role in nutrient cycling, are poorly understood. Furthermore, it is unknown whether these impacts change with time after the cessation of shooting. To shed light on these issues, three study sites in the same coniferous forest in a shooting range area were studied: an uncontaminated control site and an active and an abandoned shooting range, both sharing a similar Pb pellet load in the soil, but the latter with a 20-year longer contamination history. Soil pH and nitrate concentration increased, whilst soil phosphate concentration and fungal phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) decreased due to Pb contamination. Our results imply that shooting-derived Pb can influence soil nutrients and microbes not only directly but also indirectly by increasing soil pH. However, these mechanisms cannot be differentiated here. Many of the Pb-induced changes were most pronounced at the abandoned range, and nutrient leaching was increased only at that site. These results suggest that Pb disturbs the structure and functions of the soil system and impairs a crucial ecosystem service, the ability to retain nutrients. Furthermore, the risks of shooting-derived Pb to the environment increase with time.

  7. Hydrolytically stable, diaminocarboxylic acid-based membranes buffering in the pH range from 6 to 8.5 for isoelectric trapping separations.

    PubMed

    Fleisher, Helen C; Vigh, Gyula

    2005-06-01

    Diaminocarboxylic acid carrier ampholytes, such as L-histidine, 2,3-diaminopropionic acid, L-ornithine, and L-lysine, were reacted with glycerol-1,3-diglycidyl ether (GDGE) and poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) in the presence of sodium hydroxide to produce hydrolytically and mechanically stable hydrogels, supported on a PVA substrate, for use as buffering membranes in isoelectric trapping (IET) separations. The pH values of the DACAPVA membranes were determined with the help of small-molecule pI markers and proteins and were found to be in the 6 < pH < 8.5 range. The membranes were successfully used to isoelectrically trap small ampholytes, desalt ampholyte solutions in IET mode, and effect the binary separation of chicken egg white proteins.

  8. Rate constant for the reaction of NO sub 2 with sulfur(IV) over the pH range 5. 3-13

    SciTech Connect

    Clifton, C.L.; Altstein, N.; Hule, R.E. )

    1988-05-01

    Rate constants have been determined for the reactions of NO{sub 2} with SO{sub 3}{sup 2{minus}} and HSO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} in aqueous solutions. A pulse radiolysis apparatus with signal averaging, which has allowed us to monitor the decay of NO{sub 2} directly and to measure rate constants for the reaction of NO{sub 2} with SO{sub 3}{sup 2{minus}} and HSO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} over the pH range 5.3-13. The rate constant increases from about 1.2 {times} 10{sup 7} M{sup {minus}1} s{sup {minus}1} near pH 5 to 2.9 {times} 10{sup 7} M{sup {minus}1} s{sup {minus}1} at pH 13. The reaction appears to involve the formation of an intermediate complex that may undergo subsequent reaction with NO{sub 2} to yield the ultimate products or may react with other substrates present. The formation of a long-lived intermediate would have implications on the chemistry of flue gas scrubbers and on luminol-based NO{sub 2} detectors.

  9. Solubility of lead and copper in biochar-amended small arms range soils: influence of soil organic carbon and pH.

    PubMed

    Uchimiya, Minori; Bannon, Desmond I

    2013-08-14

    Biochar is often considered a strong heavy metal stabilizing agent. However, biochar in some cases had no effects on, or increased the soluble concentrations of, heavy metals in soil. The objective of this study was to determine the factors causing some biochars to stabilize and others to dissolve heavy metals in soil. Seven small arms range soils with known total organic carbon (TOC), cation exchange capacity, pH, and total Pb and Cu contents were first screened for soluble Pb and Cu concentrations. Over 2 weeks successive equilibrations using weak acid (pH 4.5 sulfuric acid) and acetate buffer (0.1 M at pH 4.9), Alaska soil containing disproportionately high (31.6%) TOC had nearly 100% residual (insoluble) Pb and Cu. This soil was then compared with sandy soils from Maryland containing significantly lower (0.5-2.0%) TOC in the presence of 10 wt % (i) plant biochar activated to increase the surface-bound carboxyl and phosphate ligands (PS450A), (ii) manure biochar enriched with soluble P (BL700), and (iii) unactivated plant biochars produced at 350 °C (CH350) and 700 °C (CH500) and by flash carbonization (corn). In weak acid, the pH was set by soil and biochar, and the biochars increasingly stabilized Pb with repeated extractions. In pH 4.9 acetate buffer, PS450A and BL700 stabilized Pb, and only PS450A stabilized Cu. Surface ligands of PS450A likely complexed and stabilized Pb and Cu even under acidic pH in the presence of competing acetate ligand. Oppositely, unactivated plant biochars (CH350, CH500, and corn) mobilized Pb and Cu in sandy soils; the putative mechanism is the formation of soluble complexes with biochar-borne dissolved organic carbon. In summary, unactivated plant biochars can inadvertently increase dissolved Pb and Cu concentrations of sandy, low TOC soils when used to stabilize other contaminants.

  10. Plasma membrane of Beta vulgaris storage root shows high water channel activity regulated by cytoplasmic pH and a dual range of calcium concentrations.

    PubMed

    Alleva, Karina; Niemietz, Christa M; Sutka, Moira; Maurel, Christophe; Parisi, Mario; Tyerman, Stephen D; Amodeo, Gabriela

    2006-01-01

    Plasma membrane vesicles isolated by two-phase partitioning from the storage root of Beta vulgaris show atypically high water permeability that is equivalent only to those reported for active aquaporins in tonoplast or animal red cells (Pf=542 microm s(-1)). The values were determined from the shrinking kinetics measured by stopped-flow light scattering. This high Pf was only partially inhibited by mercury (HgCl2) but showed low activation energy (Ea) consistent with water permeation through water channels. To study short-term regulation of water transport that could be the result of channel gating, the effects of pH, divalent cations, and protection against dephosphorylation were tested. The high Pf observed at pH 8.3 was dramatically reduced by medium acidification. Moreover, intra-vesicular acidification (corresponding to the cytoplasmic face of the membrane) shut down the aquaporins. De-phosphorylation was discounted as a regulatory mechanism in this preparation. On the other hand, among divalent cations, only calcium showed a clear effect on aquaporin activity, with two distinct ranges of sensitivity to free Ca2+ concentration (pCa 8 and pCa 4). Since the normal cytoplasmic free Ca2+ sits between these ranges it allows for the possibility of changes in Ca2+ to finely up- or down-regulate water channel activity. The calcium effect is predominantly on the cytoplasmic face, and inhibition corresponds to an increase in the activation energy for water transport. In conclusion, these findings establish both cytoplasmic pH and Ca2+ as important regulatory factors involved in aquaporin gating.

  11. Charge-leveling and proper treatment of long-range electrostatics in all-atom molecular dynamics at constant pH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, Jason A.; Shen, Jana K.

    2012-11-01

    Recent development of constant pH molecular dynamics (CpHMD) methods has offered promise for adding pH-stat in molecular dynamics simulations. However, until now the working pH molecular dynamics (pHMD) implementations are dependent in part or whole on implicit-solvent models. Here we show that proper treatment of long-range electrostatics and maintaining charge neutrality of the system are critical for extending the continuous pHMD framework to the all-atom representation. The former is achieved here by adding forces to titration coordinates due to long-range electrostatics based on the generalized reaction field method, while the latter is made possible by a charge-leveling technique that couples proton titration with simultaneous ionization or neutralization of a co-ion in solution. We test the new method using the pH-replica-exchange CpHMD simulations of a series of aliphatic dicarboxylic acids with varying carbon chain length. The average absolute deviation from the experimental pKa values is merely 0.18 units. The results show that accounting for the forces due to extended electrostatics removes the large random noise in propagating titration coordinates, while maintaining charge neutrality of the system improves the accuracy in the calculated electrostatic interaction between ionizable sites. Thus, we believe that the way is paved for realizing pH-controlled all-atom molecular dynamics in the near future.

  12. Hierarchical MoS2@MoP core-shell heterojunction electrocatalysts for efficient hydrogen evolution reaction over a broad pH range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Aiping; Tian, Chungui; Yan, Haijing; Jiao, Yanqing; Yan, Qing; Yang, Guoyu; Fu, Honggang

    2016-05-01

    A low-cost catalyst for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) over a broad pH range is highly desired to meet the practical needs in different areas. In this study, hierarchical flower-like MoS2@MoP core-shell heterojunctions (HF-MoSP) are designed as a promising catalyst for HER over a broad pH range. The materials are obtained by the controllable phosphidation of the hierarchical MoS2 flower (HF-MoS2) composed of thin silk belt-like sheets. The phosphidation degree, P/S ratio and work function (WF) of HF-MoSP can be tuned easily over broad range by changing the phosphidation temperature. Under optimized condition, HF-MoSP exhibits excellent electrocatalytic activity for HER with a low onset overpotential of 29 mV and η of 108 mV at 10 mA cm-2 in 0.5 M H2SO4 and retains its good activity for 30 h. In addition, the catalyst shows excellent activity in 1 M KOH with an onset overpotential of 42 mV and η of 119 mV at 10 mA cm-2. The catalysts also exhibit obvious activity in neutral, weak acid and weak alkaline conditions. The good performance is relative to the synergy of the MoP shell and MoS2 core and the high WF of HF-MoSP close to Pt, and the large SBET of HF-MoSP benefited from the hierarchical structure. This study represents the construction of the core-shell heterojunction and provides a new way to provide the low-cost and high-performance catalyst for HER.A low-cost catalyst for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) over a broad pH range is highly desired to meet the practical needs in different areas. In this study, hierarchical flower-like MoS2@MoP core-shell heterojunctions (HF-MoSP) are designed as a promising catalyst for HER over a broad pH range. The materials are obtained by the controllable phosphidation of the hierarchical MoS2 flower (HF-MoS2) composed of thin silk belt-like sheets. The phosphidation degree, P/S ratio and work function (WF) of HF-MoSP can be tuned easily over broad range by changing the phosphidation temperature. Under optimized

  13. Climate and pH Predict the Potential Range of the Invasive Apple Snail (Pomacea insularum) in the Southeastern United States

    PubMed Central

    Byers, James E.; McDowell, William G.; Dodd, Shelley R.; Haynie, Rebecca S.; Pintor, Lauren M.; Wilde, Susan B.

    2013-01-01

    Predicting the potential range of invasive species is essential for risk assessment, monitoring, and management, and it can also inform us about a species’ overall potential invasiveness. However, modeling the distribution of invasive species that have not reached their equilibrium distribution can be problematic for many predictive approaches. We apply the modeling approach of maximum entropy (MaxEnt) that is effective with incomplete, presence-only datasets to predict the distribution of the invasive island apple snail, Pomacea insularum. This freshwater snail is native to South America and has been spreading in the USA over the last decade from its initial introductions in Texas and Florida. It has now been documented throughout eight southeastern states. The snail’s extensive consumption of aquatic vegetation and ability to accumulate and transmit algal toxins through the food web heighten concerns about its spread. Our model shows that under current climate conditions the snail should remain mostly confined to the coastal plain of the southeastern USA where it is limited by minimum temperature in the coldest month and precipitation in the warmest quarter. Furthermore, low pH waters (pH <5.5) are detrimental to the snail’s survival and persistence. Of particular note are low-pH blackwater swamps, especially Okefenokee Swamp in southern Georgia (with a pH below 4 in many areas), which are predicted to preclude the snail’s establishment even though many of these areas are well matched climatically. Our results elucidate the factors that affect the regional distribution of P. insularum, while simultaneously presenting a spatial basis for the prediction of its future spread. Furthermore, the model for this species exemplifies that combining climatic and habitat variables is a powerful way to model distributions of invasive species. PMID:23451090

  14. Cyclase-associated protein (CAP) acts directly on F-actin to accelerate cofilin-mediated actin severing across the range of physiological pH.

    PubMed

    Normoyle, Kieran P M; Brieher, William M

    2012-10-12

    Fast actin depolymerization is necessary for cells to rapidly reorganize actin filament networks. Utilizing a Listeria fluorescent actin comet tail assay to monitor actin disassembly rates, we observed that although a mixture of actin disassembly factors (cofilin, coronin, and actin-interacting protein 1 is sufficient to disassemble actin comet tails in the presence of physiological G-actin concentrations this mixture was insufficient to disassemble actin comet tails in the presence of physiological F-actin concentrations. Using biochemical complementation, we purified cyclase-associated protein (CAP) from thymus extracts as a factor that protects against the inhibition of excess F-actin. CAP has been shown to participate in actin dynamics but has been thought to act by liberating cofilin from ADP·G-actin monomers to restore cofilin activity. However, we found that CAP augments cofilin-mediated disassembly by accelerating the rate of cofilin-mediated severing. We also demonstrated that CAP acts directly on F-actin and severs actin filaments at acidic, but not neutral, pH. At the neutral pH characteristic of cytosol in most mammalian cells, we demonstrated that neither CAP nor cofilin are capable of severing actin filaments. However, the combination of CAP and cofilin rapidly severed actin at all pH values across the physiological range. Therefore, our results reveal a new function for CAP in accelerating cofilin-mediated actin filament severing and provide a mechanism through which cells can maintain high actin turnover rates without having to alkalinize cytosol, which would affect many biochemical reactions beyond actin depolymerization.

  15. A low-temperature-active alkaline pectate lyase from Xanthomonas campestris ACCC 10048 with high activity over a wide pH range.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Peng; Meng, Kun; Wang, Yaru; Luo, Huiying; Shi, Pengjun; Huang, Huoqing; Tu, Tao; Yang, Peilong; Yao, Bin

    2012-11-01

    Alkaline pectate lyases are favorable for the textile industry. Here, we report the gene cloning and expression of a low-temperature-active alkaline pectate lyase (PL D) from Xanthomonas campestris ACCC 10048. Deduced PL D consists of a putative 27-residue signal peptide and a catalytic domain of 320 residues belonging to family PF09492. Recombinant PL D (r-PL D) produced in Escherichia coli was purified to electrophoretic homogeneity with a single step of Ni(2+)-NTA affinity chromatography and showed an apparent molecular weight of ~38 kDa. The pH and temperature optima of r-PL D were found to be 9.0 °C and 30 °C, respectively. Compared with its microbial counterparts, r-PL D had higher activity over a wide pH range (>45 % of the maximum activity at pH 3.0-12.0) and at lower temperatures (>35 % of activity even at 0 °C). The K(m) and V(max) values of r-PL D for polygalacturonic acid were 4.9 gl(-1) and 30.1 μmolmin(-1) mg(-1), respectively. Compared with the commercial compound pectinase from Novozymes, r-PL D showed similar efficacy in reducing the intrinsic viscosity of polygalacturonic acid (35.1 % vs. 36.5 %) and in bioscouring of jute (10.25 % vs. 10.82 %). Thus, r-PL D is a valuable additive candidate for the textile industry.

  16. Non-sticky translocation of bio-molecules through Tween 20-coated solid-state nanopores in a wide pH range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaoqing; Hu, Rui; Li, Ji; Tong, Xin; Diao, J. J.; Yu, Dapeng; Zhao, Qing

    2016-10-01

    Nanopore-based sensing technology is considered high-throughput and low-cost for single molecule detection, but solid-state nanopores have suffered from pore clogging issues. A simple Tween 20 coating method is applied to ensure long-term (several hours) non-sticky translocation of various types of bio-molecules through SiN nanopores in a wide pH range (4.0-13.0). We also emphasize the importance of choosing appropriate concentration of Tween 20 coating buffer for desired effect. By coating nanopores with a Tween 20 layer, we are able to differentiate between single-stranded DNA and double-stranded DNA, to identify drift-dominated domain for single-stranded DNA, to estimate BSA volume and to observe the shape of individual nucleosome translocation event without non-specific adsorption. The wide pH endurance from 4.0 to 13.0 and the broad types of detection analytes including nucleic acids, proteins, and biological complexes highlight the great application potential of Tween 20-coated solid-state nanopores.

  17. Antenna Effect on the Organic Spacer-Modified Eu-Doped Layered Gadolinium Hydroxide for the Detection of Vanadate Ions over a Wide pH Range.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Heejin; Lee, Byung-Il; Byeon, Song-Ho

    2016-05-04

    The excitation of the adsorbed vanadate group led to the red emission arising from the efficient energy transfer to Eu-doped layered gadolinium hydroxide (LGdH:Eu). This light-harvesting antenna effect allowed LGdH:Eu to detect selectively a vanadate in aqueous solution at different pHs. Because vanadate exists in various forms by extensive oligomerization and protonation reactions in aqueous solution depending on pH, it is important to detect a vanadate regardless of its form over a wide pH range. In particular, spacer molecules with long alkyl chains greatly facilitated access of a vanadate antenna into the interlayer surface of LGdH:Eu. The concomitant increase in adsorption capacity of LGdH:Eu achieved a strong antenna effect of vanadate on the red emission from Eu(3+). When a suspension containing LGdH:Eu nanosheets (1.0 g/L) was used, the vanadate concentration down to 1 × 10(-5) M could even be visually monitored, and the detection limit based on the (5)D0 → (7)F2 emission intensity could reach 4.5 × 10(-8) M.

  18. Interconnected Co-Entrapped, N-Doped Carbon Nanotube Film as Active Hydrogen Evolution Cathode over the Whole pH Range.

    PubMed

    Xing, Zhicai; Liu, Qian; Xing, Wei; Asiri, Abdullah M; Sun, Xuping

    2015-06-08

    The use of electrocatalysts with low metal content (metal-deficient) or metal free for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) can prevent or decrease metal ion release, which reduces environmental impact; development of such catalysts with high activity and durability over the whole pH range is thus highly desired but still remains a huge challenge. Herein, we describe the direct growth of a film consisting of interconnected Co-entrapped, N-doped carbon nanotubes on carbon cloth using chemical vapor deposition from dicyanodiamine using a Co3 O4 nanowire array as catalyst. This integrated architecture is used as a flexible 3D electrode for the electrolytic hydrogen evolution with outstanding catalytic activity and durability in acidic media. Moreover, this electrode is also highly efficient under neutral and basic conditions. It offers us an attractive carbon-based metal-deficient HER catalyst outperforming most transition-metal and all metal-free/deficient catalysts.

  19. A Thermostable Glucoamylase from Bispora sp. MEY-1 with Stability over a Broad pH Range and Significant Starch Hydrolysis Capacity

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Yingguo; Wang, Kun; Niu, Canfang; Huang, Huoqing; Shi, Pengjun; Wang, Caihong; Yang, Peilong; Yao, Bin

    2014-01-01

    Background Glucoamylase is an exo-type enzyme that converts starch completely into glucose from the non-reducing ends. To meet the industrial requirements for starch processing, a glucoamylase with excellent thermostability, raw-starch degradation ability and high glucose yield is much needed. In the present study we selected the excellent Carbohydrate-Activity Enzyme (CAZyme) producer, Bispora sp. MEY-1, as the microbial source for glucoamylase gene exploitation. Methodology/Principal Findings A glucoamylase gene (gla15) was cloned from Bispora sp. MEY-1 and successfully expressed in Pichia pastoris with a high yield of 34.1 U/ml. Deduced GLA15 exhibits the highest identity of 64.2% to the glucoamylase from Talaromyces (Rasamsonia) emersonii. Purified recombinant GLA15 was thermophilic and showed the maximum activity at 70°C. The enzyme was stable over a broad pH range (2.2–11.0) and at high temperature up to 70°C. It hydrolyzed the breakages of both α-1,4- and α-1,6-glycosidic linkages in amylopectin, soluble starch, amylose, and maltooligosaccharides, and had capacity to degrade raw starch. TLC and H1-NMR analysis showed that GLA15 is a typical glucoamylase of GH family 15 that releases glucose units from the non-reducing ends of α-glucans. The combination of Bacillus licheniformis amylase and GLA15 hydrolyzed 96.14% of gelatinized maize starch after 6 h incubation, which was about 9% higher than that of the combination with a commercial glucoamylase from Aspergillus niger. Conclusion/Significance GLA15 has a broad pH stability range, high-temperature thermostability, high starch hydrolysis capacity and high expression yield. In comparison with the commercial glucoamylase from A. niger, GLA15 represents a better candidate for application in the food industry including production of glucose, glucose syrups, and high-fructose corn syrups. PMID:25415468

  20. A National Content Analysis of PhD Program Objectives, Structures, and Curricula: Do Programs Address the Full Range of Social Work's Needs?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drisko, James; Hunnicutt, Christie; Berenson, Laura

    2015-01-01

    The Group for the Advancement of Doctoral Education (GADE) promotes excellence in PhD education in Social Work. GADE's 2013 Quality Guidelines for PhD Programs heavily emphasize preparation for research. Little is known, however, about the details of the contemporary social work PhD program structure and curriculum. Several prior surveys have…

  1. 4-(8-Quinolyl)amino-7-nitro-2,1,3-benzoxadiazole as a new selective and sensitive fluorescent and colorimetric pH probe with dual-responsive ranges in aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xutian; Zhang, Min; Liang, Haipeng; Huang, Zhaowei; Tang, Jiang; Chen, Zhi; Yang, Liting; Ma, Li-Jun; Wang, Yuhai; Xu, Baiping

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescent and colorimetric pH probe possess many advantages including rapid response time, nondestructive testing, and excellent pH sensitivity. However, they usually cannot be utilized simultaneously in both acidic and basic pH ranges. In this study, a new selective and sensitive fluorescent and colorimetric pH probe, 4-(8- quinolyl)amino-7-nitro-2,1,3-benzoxadiazole (1), was designated and synthesized. The optical probe exhibited dual-responsive pH ranges to both acidic and basic aqueous solutions. When the solution pH was gradually increased from 8.5 to 13.3, the absorption spectra of 1 showed an obvious hyperchromicity, accompanied with a red shift of the absorption band at 340 nm, a blue shift of the absorption band at 482 nm, and a distinct color change from orange to violet pink to yellow. Within the pH range from 2.2 to 0.2, the fluorescent spectra of 1 showed a "turn-on" response signal to solution pH. In order to understand the response mechanism of the probe to solution pH, the probe molecule was split into two parts, 8-aminoquinoline (2) and 4-amino-7- nitro-benzofurazan (3). UV-vis absorption and fluorescent experiments of 2 and 3 indicated that both are sensitive optical pH probes. Furthermore, the NMR experiment of 1 was explored in basic and acidic conditions. The results indicated that the colorimetric responses of 1 to pH under basic condition should be attributed to the deprotonation of the imino group on the quinolyl ring, and the fluorescent recognition of 1 to pH under acidic condition was probably due to the protonation of the nitrogen atoms from the benzofurazan and quinolyl rings.

  2. Purification, biochemical characterization and antifungal activity of a novel Aspergillus tubingensis glucose oxidase steady on broad range of pH and temperatures.

    PubMed

    Kriaa, Mouna; Hammami, Inès; Sahnoun, Mouna; Azebou, Manel Cheffi; Triki, Mohamed Ali; Kammoun, Radhouane

    2015-11-01

    This study was carried out to evaluate the in vitro and in vivo antifungal efficiency of Aspergillus tubingensis CTM 507 glucose oxidase (GOD) against plant pathogenic fungi. GOD displayed a wide inhibitory spectrum toward different fungi at a concentration of 20 AU. The GOD had a strong inhibitor effect on mycelia growth and spore germination of Pythium ultimum. Interestingly, the GOD exhibited a potent in vivo antifungal effect against P. ultimum responsible for potato plants disease. The antifungal GOD was purified 13-fold with 27 % yield and a specific activity of 3435 U/mg. The relative molecular mass of the GOD was 180 kDa by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). The GOD activity was optimum at pH 4.5 and 60 °C. It was found to be stable over a large pH range (3-9). It also displayed a marked thermostability with a 50-min half-life at 65 °C. The 10 residues of the N-terminal sequence of the purified GOD (S-K-G-S-A-V-T-T-P-D) showed no homology to the other reported GOD, identifying a novel GOD. FTIR spectroscopic analysis revealed the presence of C-O and C=O groups corresponding to a D-glucono-lactone. The findings indicated that GOD is the first A. tubingensis-produced fungicide ever reported to exhibit such promising biological properties. It could become a natural alternative to synthetic fungicides to control certain important plant microbial diseases.

  3. Novel RGO/α-FeOOH supported catalyst for Fenton oxidation of phenol at a wide pH range using solar-light-driven irradiation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Fang, Jiasheng; Crittenden, John C; Shen, Chanchan

    2017-01-23

    A novel solar-light-driven (SLD) Fenton catalyst was developed by reducing the ferrous-ion onto graphene oxide (GO) and forming reduced graphene oxide/α-FeOOH composites (RF) via in-situ induced self-assembly process. The RF was supported on several mesoporous supports (i.e., Al-MCM-41, MCM-41 and γ-Al2O3). The activity, stability and energy use for phenol oxidation were systematically studied for a wide pH range. Furthermore, the catalytic mechanism at acid and alkaline aqueous conditions was also elucidated. The results showed that Fe(II) was reduced onto GO nanosheets and α-FeOOH crystals were formed during the self-assembly process. Compared with Fenton reaction without SLD irradiation, the visible light irradiation not only dramatically accelerated the rate of Fenton-based reactions, but also extended the operating pH for the Fenton reaction (from 4.0 to 8.0). The phenol oxidation on RF supported catalysts was fitting well with the pseudo-first-order kinetics, and needed low initiating energy, insensitive to the reacting temperature changes (273-318K). The Al-MCM-41 supported RF was a more highly energy-efficient catalyst with the prominent catalytic activity at wide operating pHs. During the reaction, OH radicals were generated by the SLD irradiation from H2O2 reduction and H2O oxidation in the Fe(Ⅱ)/Fe(Ⅲ) and Fe(Ⅲ)/Fe(Ⅳ) cycling processes.

  4. The genome of alkaliphilic Bacillus pseudofirmus OF4 reveals adaptations that support the ability to grow in an external pH range from 7.5 to 11.4

    PubMed Central

    Janto, Benjamin; Ahmed, Azad; Ito, Masahiro; Liu, Jun; Hicks, David B.; Pagni, Sarah; Fackelmayer, Oliver J.; Smith, Terry-Ann; Earl, Joshua; Elbourne, Liam D.H.; Hassan, Karl; Paulsen, Ian T.; Kolstø, Anne-Brit; Tourasse, Nicolas J.; Ehrlich, Garth D.; Boissy, Robert; Ivey, D. Mack; Li, Gang; Xue, Yanfen; Ma, Yanhe; Hu, Fen Z.; Krulwich, Terry A.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Bacillus pseudofirmus OF4 is an extreme but facultative alkaliphile that grows non-fermentatively in a pH range from 7.5 to above 11.4 and can withstand large sudden increases in external pH. It is a model organism for studies of bioenergetics at high pH, at which energy demands are higher than at neutral pH because both cytoplasmic pH homeostasis and ATP synthesis require more energy. The alkaliphile also tolerates a cytoplasmic pH > 9.0 at external pH values at which the pH homeostasis capacity is exceeded, and manages other stresses that are exacerbated at alkaline pH, e.g. sodium, oxidative and cell wall stresses. The genome of B. pseudofirmus OF4 includes two plasmids that are lost from some mutants without viability loss. The plasmids may provide a reservoir of mobile elements that promote adaptive chromosomal rearrangements under particular environmental conditions. The genome also reveals a more acidic pI profile for proteins exposed on the outer surface than found in neutralophiles. A large array of transporters and regulatory genes are predicted to protect the alkaliphile from its overlapping stresses. In addition, unanticipated metabolic versatility was observed, which could ensure requisite energy for alkaliphily under diverse conditions. PMID:21951522

  5. 41 CFR 60-2.11 - Organizational profile.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Organizational profile. 60-2.11 Section 60-2.11 Public Contracts and Property Management Other Provisions Relating to Public Contracts OFFICE OF FEDERAL CONTRACT COMPLIANCE PROGRAMS, EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR 2-AFFIRMATIVE ACTION PROGRAMS Purpose...

  6. 9 CFR 2.11 - Denial of initial license application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... have violated any Federal, State, or local laws or regulations pertaining to animal cruelty within 1... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Denial of initial license application. 2.11 Section 2.11 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE,...

  7. 9 CFR 2.11 - Denial of initial license application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... have violated any Federal, State, or local laws or regulations pertaining to animal cruelty within 1... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Denial of initial license application. 2.11 Section 2.11 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE,...

  8. 9 CFR 2.11 - Denial of initial license application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... have violated any Federal, State, or local laws or regulations pertaining to animal cruelty within 1... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Denial of initial license application. 2.11 Section 2.11 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE,...

  9. 9 CFR 2.11 - Denial of initial license application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... have violated any Federal, State, or local laws or regulations pertaining to animal cruelty within 1... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Denial of initial license application. 2.11 Section 2.11 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE,...

  10. 9 CFR 2.11 - Denial of initial license application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... have violated any Federal, State, or local laws or regulations pertaining to animal cruelty within 1... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Denial of initial license application. 2.11 Section 2.11 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE,...

  11. Genome of alkaliphilic Bacillus pseudofirmus OF4 reveals adaptations that support the ability to grow in an external pH range from 7.5 to 11.4.

    PubMed

    Janto, Benjamin; Ahmed, Azad; Ito, Masahiro; Liu, Jun; Hicks, David B; Pagni, Sarah; Fackelmayer, Oliver J; Smith, Terry-Ann; Earl, Joshua; Elbourne, Liam D H; Hassan, Karl; Paulsen, Ian T; Kolstø, Anne-Brit; Tourasse, Nicolas J; Ehrlich, Garth D; Boissy, Robert; Ivey, D Mack; Li, Gang; Xue, Yanfen; Ma, Yanhe; Hu, Fen Z; Krulwich, Terry A

    2011-12-01

    Bacillus pseudofirmus OF4 is an extreme but facultative alkaliphile that grows non-fermentatively in a pH range from 7.5 to above 11.4 and can withstand large sudden increases in external pH. It is a model organism for studies of bioenergetics at high pH, at which energy demands are higher than at neutral pH because both cytoplasmic pH homeostasis and ATP synthesis require more energy. The alkaliphile also tolerates a cytoplasmic pH > 9.0 at external pH values at which the pH homeostasis capacity is exceeded, and manages other stresses that are exacerbated at alkaline pH, e.g. sodium, oxidative and cell wall stresses. The genome of B. pseudofirmus OF4 includes two plasmids that are lost from some mutants without viability loss. The plasmids may provide a reservoir of mobile elements that promote adaptive chromosomal rearrangements under particular environmental conditions. The genome also reveals a more acidic pI profile for proteins exposed on the outer surface than found in neutralophiles. A large array of transporters and regulatory genes are predicted to protect the alkaliphile from its overlapping stresses. In addition, unanticipated metabolic versatility was observed, which could ensure requisite energy for alkaliphily under diverse conditions.

  12. Adjustments of gastric pH, motility and temperature during long-term preservation of stomach contents in free-ranging incubating king penguins.

    PubMed

    Thouzeau, C; Peters, G; Le Bohec, C; Le Maho, Y

    2004-07-01

    Male king penguins are able to store undigested food in their stomach for up to 3 weeks during their incubation fast, which evidently implies some modification of their digestive process. Using small electronic recorders, we studied the change in gastric pH, motility and temperature during the first week of food storage. The pH could be maintained at values as high as 6 throughout the incubation fast, a pH that is unfavourable for avian gastric proteinase activity. Gastric motility was never completely inhibited but could be markedly reduced. Stomach temperature was maintained at around 38 degrees C. The fact that stomach temperature of incubating birds did not show a daily rhythmic fluctuation as seen in non-breeding birds could be due to temperature constraints on embryo development. Thus the present study demonstrates substantial adjustments of pH and gastric motility in incubating king penguins, which may contribute to the inhibition of digestive gastric processes.

  13. Comprehensive study on the structure of the BSA from extended-to aged form in wide (2-12) pH range.

    PubMed

    Varga, N; Hornok, V; Sebők, D; Dékány, I

    2016-07-01

    In this work we studied the structure of the bovine serum albumin (BSA) and the protein-ligand interactions since researchers prefer to use them as carriers in drug delivery systems. Systematic study (between pH 2-12, in double distilled water and physiological salt solution) was carried out to determine the changes in the secondary and the tertiary structures of the BSA, the apparent molecular weight (Mw), the size (dLS) and the electrokinetic potential (ζ). At pH 7, the BSA has higher stability in the absence (ζ=-69mV, dLS=2.2nm, A2=1.4×10(-3)mlmol/g(2)) than in the presence of salt solution (ζ=-2.4mV, dLS=5.3nm, A2=-3.2×10(-4)mlmol/g(2)). The Mw strongly depends on the pH and the ionic strength (at pH 3 in the absence of salt, the Mw is 54.6kDa while in the presence of salt is 114kDa) which determines the geometry of the protein. The protein-ligand interactions were characterized by fluorescence (FL) and isothermal microcalorimetry (ITC) methods; these independent techniques provided similar thermodynamic parameters such as the binding constant (K) and the Gibbs free energy (ΔG).

  14. Influenza HA Subtypes Demonstrate Divergent Phenotypes for Cleavage Activation and pH of Fusion: Implications for Host Range and Adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Galloway, Summer E.; Reed, Mark L.; Russell, Charles J.; Steinhauer, David A.

    2013-01-01

    The influenza A virus (IAV) HA protein must be activated by host cells proteases in order to prime the molecule for fusion. Consequently, the availability of activating proteases and the susceptibility of HA to protease activity represents key factors in facilitating virus infection. As such, understanding the intricacies of HA cleavage by various proteases is necessary to derive insights into the emergence of pandemic viruses. To examine these properties, we generated a panel of HAs that are representative of the 16 HA subtypes that circulate in aquatic birds, as well as HAs representative of the subtypes that have infected the human population over the last century. We examined the susceptibility of the panel of HA proteins to trypsin, as well as human airway trypsin-like protease (HAT) and transmembrane protease, serine 2 (TMPRSS2). Additionally, we examined the pH at which these HAs mediated membrane fusion, as this property is related to the stability of the HA molecule and influences the capacity of influenza viruses to remain infectious in natural environments. Our results show that cleavage efficiency can vary significantly for individual HAs, depending on the protease, and that some HA subtypes display stringent selectivity for specific proteases as activators of fusion function. Additionally, we found that the pH of fusion varies by 0.7 pH units among the subtypes, and notably, we observed that the pH of fusion for most HAs from human isolates was lower than that observed from avian isolates of the same subtype. Overall, these data provide the first broad-spectrum analysis of cleavage-activation and membrane fusion characteristics for all of the IAV HA subtypes, and also show that there are substantial differences between the subtypes that may influence transmission among hosts and establishment in new species. PMID:23459660

  15. Soil classification predicts differences in prokaryotic communities across a range of geographically distant soils once pH is accounted for

    PubMed Central

    Kaminsky, Rachel; Trouche, Blandine; Morales, Sergio E.

    2017-01-01

    Agricultural land is typically managed based on visible plant life at the expense of the belowground majority. However, microorganisms mediate processes sustaining plant life and the soil environment. To understand the role of microbes we first must understand what controls soil microbial community assembly. We assessed the distribution and composition of prokaryotic communities from soils representing four geographic regions on the South Island of New Zealand. These soils are under three different uses (dairy, sheep and beef, and high country farming) and are representative of major soil classification groups (brown, pallic, gley and recent). We hypothesized that pH would account for major community patterns based on 16S profiles, but that land use and location would be secondary modifiers. Community diversity and structure was linked to pH, coinciding with land use. Soil classification correlated with microbial community structure and evenness, but not richness in high country and sheep and beef communities. The impact of land use and pH remained significant at the regional scale, but soil classification provided support for community variability not explained by either of those factors. These results suggest that several edaphic properties must be examined at multiple spatial scales to robustly examine soil prokaryotic communities. PMID:28349950

  16. 16 CFR 2.11 - Orders requiring access.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION ORGANIZATION, PROCEDURES AND RULES OF PRACTICE NONADJUDICATIVE PROCEDURES Inquiries; Investigations; Compulsory Processes § 2.11 Orders requiring access. (a) In investigations other than those conducted under section 20 of the Federal Trade Commission Act, the...

  17. 16 CFR 2.11 - Orders requiring access.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION ORGANIZATION, PROCEDURES AND RULES OF PRACTICE NONADJUDICATIVE PROCEDURES Inquiries; Investigations; Compulsory Processes § 2.11 Orders requiring access. (a) In investigations other than those conducted under section 20 of the Federal Trade Commission Act, the...

  18. Amino acid modified Ni catalyst exhibits reversible H2 oxidation/production over a broad pH range at elevated temperatures

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Arnab; DuBois, Daniel L.; Roberts, John A. S.; Shaw, Wendy J.

    2014-01-01

    Hydrogenases interconvert H2 and protons at high rates and with high energy efficiencies, providing inspiration for the development of molecular catalysts. Studies designed to determine how the protein scaffold can influence a catalytically active site have led to the synthesis of amino acid derivatives of [Ni(P2RN2R′)2]2+ complexes, [Ni(P2CyN2Amino acid)2]2+ (CyAA). It is shown that these CyAA derivatives can catalyze fully reversible H2 production/oxidation at rates approaching those of hydrogenase enzymes. The reversibility is achieved in acidic aqueous solutions (pH = 0–6), 1 atm 25% H2/Ar, and elevated temperatures (tested from 298 to 348 K) for the glycine (CyGly), arginine (CyArg), and arginine methyl ester (CyArgOMe) derivatives. As expected for a reversible process, the catalytic activity is dependent upon H2 and proton concentrations. CyArg is significantly faster in both directions (∼300 s−1 H2 production and 20 s−1 H2 oxidation; pH = 1, 348 K, 1 atm 25% H2/Ar) than the other two derivatives. The slower turnover frequencies for CyArgOMe (35 s−1 production and 7 s−1 oxidation under the same conditions) compared with CyArg suggests an important role for the COOH group during catalysis. That CyArg is faster than CyGly (3 s−1 production and 4 s−1 oxidation) suggests that the additional structural features imparted by the guanidinium groups facilitate fast and reversible H2 addition/release. These observations demonstrate that outer coordination sphere amino acids work in synergy with the active site and can play an important role for synthetic molecular electrocatalysts, as has been observed for the protein scaffold of redox active enzymes. PMID:25368196

  19. Enhanced growth of influenza vaccine seed viruses in vero cells mediated by broadening the optimal pH range for virus membrane fusion.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Shin; Horimoto, Taisuke; Ito, Mutsumi; Takano, Ryo; Katsura, Hiroaki; Shimojima, Masayuki; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro

    2012-02-01

    Vaccination is one of the most effective preventive measures to combat influenza. Prospectively, cell culture-based influenza vaccines play an important role for robust vaccine production in both normal settings and urgent situations, such as during the 2009 pandemic. African green monkey Vero cells are recommended by the World Health Organization as a safe substrate for influenza vaccine production for human use. However, the growth of influenza vaccine seed viruses is occasionally suboptimal in Vero cells, which places limitations on their usefulness for enhanced vaccine production. Here, we present a strategy for the development of vaccine seed viruses with enhanced growth in Vero cells by changing an amino acid residue in the stem region of the HA2 subunit of the hemagglutinin (HA) molecule. This mutation optimized the pH for HA-mediated membrane fusion in Vero cells and enhanced virus growth 100 to 1,000 times in the cell line, providing a promising strategy for cell culture-based influenza vaccines.

  20. Variation of photoautotrophic fatty acid production from a highly CO2 tolerant alga, Chlorococcum littorale, with inorganic carbon over narrow ranges of pH.

    PubMed

    Ota, Masaki; Takenaka, Motohiro; Sato, Yoshiyuki; Smith, Richard L; Inomata, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Photoautotrophic fatty acid production of a highly CO2 -tolerant green alga Chlorococcum littorale in the presence of inorganic carbon at 295 K and light intensity of 170 µmol-photon m(-2) s(-1) was investigated. CO2 concentration in the bubbling gas was adjusted by mixing pure gas components of CO2 and N2 to avoid photorespiration and β-oxidation of fatty acids under O2 surrounding conditions. Maximum content of total fatty acid showed pH-dependence after nitrate depletion of the culture media and increased with the corresponding inorganic carbon ratio. Namely, [HCO3 (-) ]/([CO2 ]+n[ CO32-]) ratio in the culture media was found to be a controlling factor for photoautotrophic fatty acid production after the nitrate limitation. At a CO2 concentration of 5% (vol/vol) and a pH of 6.7, the fatty acid content was 47.8 wt % (dry basis) at its maximum that is comparable with land plant seed oils.

  1. Survey of 2,11-cyclized cembranoids from Caribbean sources.

    PubMed

    Cóbar, Oscar M

    2009-01-01

    This review covers the literature published since the report of the first compound to December 2006, for marine natural 2,11-cyclized cembranoids isolated from Caribbean sources, with 30 citations, most of them from 2000 to 2006, referring to compounds isolated from the Caribbean gorgonian octocorals Briareum asbestinum, Briareum polyanthes, and Erithropodiun caribaeorum. The emphasis is on all of these natural compounds isolated to date, with an overview of their biogenetic pathway and relevant biological activity.

  2. Re-evaluation of cord blood arterial and venous reference ranges for pH, pO(2), pCO(2), according to spontaneous or cesarean delivery.

    PubMed

    Kotaska, K; Urinovska, R; Klapkova, E; Prusa, R; Rob, L; Binder, T

    2010-01-01

    Umbilical cord blood gas analysis (pO(2) and pCO(2)) is now recommended in all high-risk baby deliveries and in some centers it is performed routinely following all deliveries. The aim of this study was to re-evaluate cord blood arterial and venous reference ranges for pH, pO(2), pCO(2) in newborns, delivered by spontaneous vaginal delivery (SVD) and by cesarean section (CS) performed in Faculty Hospital Motol. Two groups of subjects were selected for the study. Group I consisted of 303 newborns with SVD. Group II consisted of 189 newborns delivered by cesarean section. Cord blood samples were analyzed for standard blood gas and pH, using the analytical device Rapid Lab 845 and Rapid Lab 865. We obtained reference values expressed as range (lower and upper reference value expressed as 2.5 and 97.5 percentiles) for cord blood in newborns with SVD: arterial cord blood: pH=7.01-7.39; pCO(2)=4.12-11.45 kPa; pO(2)=1.49-5.06 kPa; venous cord blood: pH=7.06-7.44; pCO(2)=3.33-9.85 kPa; pO(2)=1.80-6.29 kPa. We also obtained reference values for cord blood in newborns delivered by CS: arterial cord blood: pH=7.05-7.39; pCO(2)=5.01-10.60 kPa; pO(2)=1.17-5.94 kPa; venous cord blood: pH=7.10-7.42; pCO(2)=3.88-9.36 kPa; pO(2)=1.98-7.23 kPa. Re-evaluated reference ranges play essential role in monitoring conditions of newborns with spontaneous and caesarean delivery.

  3. Amino acid modified Ni catalyst exhibits reversible H2 oxidation/production over a broad pH range at elevated temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Dutta, Arnab; DuBois, Daniel L.; Roberts, John A.; Shaw, Wendy J.

    2014-11-18

    Hydrogenases interconvert H2 and protons at high rates and with high energy efficiencies, providing inspiration for the development of molecular catalysts. Studies designed to determine how the protein scaffold can influence a catalytically active site has led to the synthesis of amino acid derivatives, [Ni(PCy2NAmino acid2)2]2+ (CyAA), of [Ni(PR2NR'2)2]2+ complexes. It is shown that these CyAA derivatives can catalyze fully reversible H2 production/oxidation, a feature reminiscent of enzymes. The reversibility is achieved in acidic aqueous solutions, 0.25% H2/Ar, and elevated temperatures (tested up to 348 K) for the glycine (CyGly), arginine (CyArg), and arginine methyl ester (CyArgOMe) derivatives. As expected for a reversible process, the activity is dependent upon H2 and proton concentration. CyArg is significantly faster in both directions than the other two derivatives (~300 s-1 H2 production and 20 s-1 H2 oxidation; pH=1, 348 K). The significantly slower rates for CyArgOMe (35 s-1 production and 7 s-1 oxidation) compared to CyArg suggests an important role for the COOH group during catalysis. That CyArg is faster than CyGly (3 s-1 production and 4 s-1 oxidation under the same conditions) suggests that the additional structural features imparted by the guanidinium groups facilitate fast and reversible H2 addition/release. These observations demonstrate that appended, outer coordination sphere amino acids work in synergy with the active site and can play an equally important role for synthetic molecular electrocatalysts as the protein scaffold does for redox active enzymes. This work was funded by the Office of Science Early Career Research Program through the US DOE, BES (AD, WJS), and the Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the US DOE, BES (DLD, JASR). PNNL is operated by Battelle for the US DOE.

  4. Monitoring of crustal movements in the San Andreas fault zone by a satellite-borne ranging system. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, M.

    1976-01-01

    The Close Grid Geodynamic Measurement System is conceived as an orbiting ranging device with a ground base grid of reflectors or transponders (spacing 1.0 to 30 km), which are projected to be of low cost (maintenance free and unattended), and which will permit the saturation of a local area to obtain data useful to monitor crustal movements in the San Andreas fault zone. The system includes a station network of 75 stations covering an area between 36 deg N and 38 deg N latitudes, and 237 deg E and 239 deg E longitudes, with roughly half of the stations on either side of the faults. In addition, the simulation of crustal movements through the introduction of changes in the relative positions between grid stations, weather effect for intervisibility between satellite and station and loss of observations thereof, and comparative evaluation of various observational scheme-patterns have been critically studied.

  5. Miniaturization of cytotoxicity tests for concentration range-finding studies prior to conducting the pH 6.7 Syrian hamster embryo cell-transformation assay.

    PubMed

    Plöttner, Sabine; Käfferlein, Heiko U; Brüning, Thomas

    2013-08-15

    The Syrian hamster embryo (SHE) cell-transformation assay (SHE assay) is a promising alternative method to animal testing for the identification of potential carcinogens in vitro. Prior to conducting the SHE assay the appropriate concentration range for each test chemical must be established, with a maximum concentration causing approximately 50% cytotoxicity. Concentration range-finding is done in separate experiments, which are similar to the final SHE assay but with less replicates and more concentrations. Here we present an alternative for the cytotoxicity testing by miniaturization of the test procedure by use of 24-well plates and surpluses from feeder-cell preparations as target cells. In addition, we integrated the photometry-based neutral red (NR) assay. For validation of the assay, incubations with dimethyl sulf-oxide, p-phenylenediamine-2HCl, aniline, o-toluidine-HCl, 2,4-diaminotoluene, and 2-naphthylamine were carried out in the miniaturized approach and compared with the standard procedure in terms of calculating the relative plating efficiencies (RPEs). To directly compare both methods, concentrations that produced 50% cytotoxicity (IC50) were calculated. Excellent associations were observed between the number of colonies and NR uptake. For all test substances a concentration-dependent, concomitant decrease of NR uptake in the miniaturized approach and RPEs in the standard test was observed after a 7-day incubation. The results from both test setups showed a comparable order of magnitude and the IC50 values differed by a factor <2 (1.4-1.9), depending on the substance in question. Overall, the miniaturized approach should be considered an improved alternative for cytotoxicity testing in the SHE assay, as it saves valuable SHE cells and speeds-up the time, to obtain test results more rapidly.

  6. Last-Century Increases in Intrinsic Water-Use Efficiency of Grassland Communities Have Occurred over a Wide Range of Vegetation Composition, Nutrient Inputs, and Soil pH1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Köhler, Iris H.; Macdonald, Andy J.; Schnyder, Hans

    2016-01-01

    Last-century climate change has led to variable increases of the intrinsic water-use efficiency (Wi; the ratio of net CO2 assimilation to stomatal conductance for water vapor) of trees and C3 grassland ecosystems, but the causes of the variability are not well understood. Here, we address putative drivers underlying variable Wi responses in a wide range of grassland communities. Wi was estimated from carbon isotope discrimination in archived herbage samples from 16 contrasting fertilizer treatments in the Park Grass Experiment, Rothamsted, England, for the 1915 to 1929 and 1995 to 2009 periods. Changes in Wi were analyzed in relation to nitrogen input, soil pH, species richness, and functional group composition. Treatments included liming as well as phosphorus and potassium additions with or without ammonium or nitrate fertilizer applications at three levels. Wi increased between 11% and 25% (P < 0.001) in the different treatments between the two periods. None of the fertilizers had a direct effect on the change of Wi (ΔWi). However, soil pH (P < 0.05), species richness (P < 0.01), and percentage grass content (P < 0.01) were significantly related to ΔWi. Grass-dominated, species-poor plots on acidic soils showed the largest ΔWi (+14.7 μmol mol−1). The ΔWi response of these acidic plots was probably related to drought effects resulting from aluminum toxicity on root growth. Our results from the Park Grass Experiment show that Wi in grassland communities consistently increased over a wide range of nutrient inputs, soil pH, and plant community compositions during the last century. PMID:26620525

  7. Last-Century Increases in Intrinsic Water-Use Efficiency of Grassland Communities Have Occurred over a Wide Range of Vegetation Composition, Nutrient Inputs, and Soil pH.

    PubMed

    Köhler, Iris H; Macdonald, Andy J; Schnyder, Hans

    2016-02-01

    Last-century climate change has led to variable increases of the intrinsic water-use efficiency (Wi; the ratio of net CO2 assimilation to stomatal conductance for water vapor) of trees and C3 grassland ecosystems, but the causes of the variability are not well understood. Here, we address putative drivers underlying variable Wi responses in a wide range of grassland communities. Wi was estimated from carbon isotope discrimination in archived herbage samples from 16 contrasting fertilizer treatments in the Park Grass Experiment, Rothamsted, England, for the 1915 to 1929 and 1995 to 2009 periods. Changes in Wi were analyzed in relation to nitrogen input, soil pH, species richness, and functional group composition. Treatments included liming as well as phosphorus and potassium additions with or without ammonium or nitrate fertilizer applications at three levels. Wi increased between 11% and 25% (P < 0.001) in the different treatments between the two periods. None of the fertilizers had a direct effect on the change of Wi (ΔWi). However, soil pH (P < 0.05), species richness (P < 0.01), and percentage grass content (P < 0.01) were significantly related to ΔWi. Grass-dominated, species-poor plots on acidic soils showed the largest ΔWi (+14.7 μmol mol(-1)). The ΔWi response of these acidic plots was probably related to drought effects resulting from aluminum toxicity on root growth. Our results from the Park Grass Experiment show that Wi in grassland communities consistently increased over a wide range of nutrient inputs, soil pH, and plant community compositions during the last century.

  8. A protein–dye hybrid system as a narrow range tunable intracellular pH sensor† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Figures depicting various photophysical properties, cytotoxicity studies and confocal fluorescence images. See DOI: 10.1039/c6sc02659a Click here for additional data file.

    PubMed Central

    Anees, Palapuravan; Sudheesh, Karivachery V.; Jayamurthy, Purushothaman; Chandrika, Arunkumar R.; Omkumar, Ramakrishnapillai V.

    2016-01-01

    Accurate monitoring of pH variations inside cells is important for the early diagnosis of diseases such as cancer. Even though a variety of different pH sensors are available, construction of a custom-made sensor array for measuring minute variations in a narrow biological pH window, using easily available constituents, is a challenge. Here we report two-component hybrid sensors derived from a protein and organic dye nanoparticles whose sensitivity range can be tuned by choosing different ratios of the components, to monitor the minute pH variations in a given system. The dye interacts noncovalently with the protein at lower pH and covalently at higher pH, triggering two distinguishable fluorescent signals at 700 and 480 nm, respectively. The pH sensitivity region of the probe can be tuned for every unit of the pH window resulting in custom-made pH sensors. These narrow range tunable pH sensors have been used to monitor pH variations in HeLa cells using the fluorescence imaging technique. PMID:28042467

  9. Hybrid of g-C3N4 Assisted Metal-Organic Frameworks and Their Derived High-Efficiency Oxygen Reduction Electrocatalyst in the Whole pH Range.

    PubMed

    Gu, Wenling; Hu, Liuyong; Li, Jing; Wang, Erkang

    2016-12-28

    A highly active electrocatalyst in the whole pH range for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) is produced by employing the g-C3N4 assisted metal-organic frameworks (MOF) of C3N4@NH2-MIL-101 as the precursor. By pyrolyzing the hybrid at 700 °C, the C3N4@NH2-MIL-101 could be easily transformed into an abundant iron and nitrogen codoped porous carbon skeleton. The selective use of g-C3N4 as a support template plays a critical role in facilitating the formation of the architecture with high surface area and rich N content. The obtained catalyst of C3N4@NH2-MIL-101-700 manifested remarkable oxygen reduction activity over the pH 0-14. Noteworthy, the catalyst displayed outstanding ORR activity with more positive half-wave potential than that of the commercial Pt/C catalyst in both alkaline and neutral conditions. Additionally, the optimal C3N4@NH2-MIL-101-700 also exhibited prominent ORR activity which is almost equal to that of commercial Pt/C in acidic electrolyte with high selectivity and very low H2O2 yield. Most importantly, the better methanol tolerance and much higher stability than the commercial Pt/C of C3N4@NH2-MIL-101-700 no matter under alkaline, neutral, or acid conditions further demonstrate the catalyst to be a promising candidate for practical electrocatalytic applications.

  10. Alkaline pH sensor molecules.

    PubMed

    Murayama, Takashi; Maruyama, Ichiro N

    2015-11-01

    Animals can survive only within a narrow pH range. This requires continual monitoring of environmental and body-fluid pH. Although a variety of acidic pH sensor molecules have been reported, alkaline pH sensor function is not well understood. This Review describes neuronal alkaline pH sensors, grouped according to whether they monitor extracellular or intracellular alkaline pH. Extracellular sensors include the receptor-type guanylyl cyclase, the insulin receptor-related receptor, ligand-gated Cl- channels, connexin hemichannels, two-pore-domain K+ channels, and transient receptor potential (TRP) channels. Intracellular sensors include TRP channels and gap junction channels. Identification of molecular mechanisms underlying alkaline pH sensing is crucial for understanding how animals respond to environmental alkaline pH and how body-fluid pH is maintained within a narrow range.

  11. Draft Genome Sequence of Bacillus ginsengihumi Strain M2.11 with Phytase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Suleimanova, Aliya D.; Boulygina, Eugenia A.; Kazakov, Sergey V.; Baranova, Daria S.; Akhmetova, Alina I.; Mardanova, Ayslu M.

    2015-01-01

    This paper announces the genome sequence of Bacillus ginsengihumi strain M2.11, which has been characterized as a strain which produces the enzyme with the ability to degrade phytase. The genome of the strain M2.11 is 3.7 Mb and harbors 3,082 coding sequences. PMID:26272561

  12. Dissociation energies of PH and PH+.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, R. R.; Nazeer Ahammed, Y.; Srinivasa Rao, A.; Rao, T. V. R.

    1995-12-01

    Dissociation energies for the ground electronic states of diatomic PH and PH+ are determined by fitting empirical potential functions to the respective RKRV curves using correlation coefficients. The estimated ground state dissociation energies of PH and PH+ are 3.10 and 3.20 eV respectively by the curve fitting procedure using the Lippincott potential function. The computed values are in good agreement with experimental values.

  13. Half-sandwich o-N,N-dimethylaminobenzyl complexes over the full size range of group 3 and lanthanide metals. synthesis, structural characterization, and catalysis of phosphine P--H bond addition to carbodiimides.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wen-Xiong; Nishiura, Masayoshi; Mashiko, Tomohiro; Hou, Zhaomin

    2008-01-01

    The acid-base reactions between the rare-earth metal (Ln) tris(ortho-N,N-dimethylaminobenzyl) complexes [Ln(CH2C(H4NMe2-o)3] with one equivalent of the silylene-linked cyclopentadiene-amine ligand (C5Me4H)SiMe2NH(C6H2Me3-2,4,6) afforded the corresponding half-sandwich aminobenzyl complexes [{Me2Si(C5Me4)(NC6H2Me3-2,4,6)}Ln(CH2C6H4NMe2-o)(thf)] (2-Ln) (Ln=Y, La, Pr, Nd, Sm, Gd, Lu) in 60-87 % isolated yields. The one-pot reaction between ScCl(3) and [Me2Si(C5Me4)(NC6H2Me3-2,4,6)]Li2 followed by reaction with LiCH2C6H4NMe2-o in THF gave the scandium analogue [{Me2Si(C5Me4)(NC6H2Me3-2,4,6)}Sc(CH2C6H4NMe2-o)] (2-Sc) in 67 % isolated yield. 2-Sc could not be prepared by the acid-base reaction between [Sc(CH2C6H4NMe2-o)3] and (C5Me4H)SiMe2NH(C6H2Me3-2,4,6). These half-sandwich rare-earth metal aminobenzyl complexes can serve as efficient catalyst precursors for the catalytic addition of various phosphine P--H bonds to carbodiimides to form a series of phosphaguanidine derivatives with excellent tolerability to aromatic carbon-halogen bonds. A significant increase in the catalytic activity was observed, as a result of an increase in the metal size with a general trend of La>Pr, Nd>Sm>Gd>Lu>Sc. The reaction of 2-La with 1 equiv of Ph2PH yielded the corresponding phosphide complex [{Me2Si(C5Me4)(NC6H2Me3-2,4,6)}La(PPh2)(thf)2] (4), which, on recrystallization from benzene, gave the dimeric analogue [{Me2Si(C5Me4)(NC6H2Me3-2,4,6)}La(PPh2)]2 (5). Addition of 4 or 5 to iPrN=C=NiPr in THF yielded the phosphaguanidinate complex [{Me2Si(C5Me4)(NC6H2Me3-2,4,6)}La{iPrNC(PPh2)NiPr}(thf)] (6), which, on recrystallization from ether, afforded the ether-coordinated structurally characterizable analogue [{Me2Si(C5Me4)(NC6H2Me3-2,4,6)}La{iPrNC(PPh2)NiPr}(OEt2)] (7). The reaction of 6 or 7 with Ph2PH in THF yielded 4 and the phosphaguanidine iPrN=C(PPh2)NHiPr (3a). These results suggest that the catalytic formation of a phosphaguanidine compound proceeds through the nucleophilic addition

  14. A Narrow pH Range Supports Butanol, Hexanol, and Octanol Production from Syngas in a Continuous Co-culture of Clostridium ljungdahlii and Clostridium kluyveri with In-Line Product Extraction

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Hanno; Molitor, Bastian; Diender, Martijn; Sousa, Diana Z.; Angenent, Largus T.

    2016-01-01

    Carboxydotrophic bacteria (CTB) have received attention due to their ability to synthesize commodity chemicals from producer gas and synthesis gas (syngas). CTB have an important advantage of a high product selectivity compared to chemical catalysts. However, the product spectrum of wild-type CTB is narrow. Our objective was to investigate whether a strategy of combining two wild-type bacterial strains into a single, continuously fed bioprocessing step would be promising to broaden the product spectrum. Here, we have operated a syngas-fermentation process with Clostridium ljungdahlii and Clostridium kluyveri with in-line product extraction through gas stripping and product condensing within the syngas recirculation line. The main products from C. ljungdahlii fermentation at a pH of 6.0 were ethanol and acetate at net volumetric production rates of 65.5 and 431 mmol C·L−1·d−1, respectively. An estimated 2/3 of total ethanol produced was utilized by C. kluyveri to chain elongate with the reverse β-oxidation pathway, resulting in n-butyrate and n-caproate at net rates of 129 and 70 mmol C·L−1·d−1, respectively. C. ljungdahlii likely reduced the produced carboxylates to their corresponding alcohols with the reductive power from syngas. This resulted in the longer-chain alcohols n-butanol, n-hexanol, and n-octanol at net volumetric production rates of 39.2, 31.7, and 0.045 mmol C·L−1·d−1, respectively. The continuous production of the longer-chain alcohols occurred only within a narrow pH spectrum of 5.7–6.4 due to the pH discrepancy between the two strains. Regardless whether other wild-type strains could overcome this pH discrepancy, the specificity (mol carbon in product per mol carbon in all other liquid products) for each longer-chain alcohol may never be high in a single bioprocessing step. This, because two bioprocesses compete for intermediates (i.e., carboxylates): (1) chain elongation; and (2) biological reduction. This innate competition

  15. A Narrow pH Range Supports Butanol, Hexanol, and Octanol Production from Syngas in a Continuous Co-culture of Clostridium ljungdahlii and Clostridium kluyveri with In-Line Product Extraction.

    PubMed

    Richter, Hanno; Molitor, Bastian; Diender, Martijn; Sousa, Diana Z; Angenent, Largus T

    2016-01-01

    Carboxydotrophic bacteria (CTB) have received attention due to their ability to synthesize commodity chemicals from producer gas and synthesis gas (syngas). CTB have an important advantage of a high product selectivity compared to chemical catalysts. However, the product spectrum of wild-type CTB is narrow. Our objective was to investigate whether a strategy of combining two wild-type bacterial strains into a single, continuously fed bioprocessing step would be promising to broaden the product spectrum. Here, we have operated a syngas-fermentation process with Clostridium ljungdahlii and Clostridium kluyveri with in-line product extraction through gas stripping and product condensing within the syngas recirculation line. The main products from C. ljungdahlii fermentation at a pH of 6.0 were ethanol and acetate at net volumetric production rates of 65.5 and 431 mmol C·L(-1)·d(-1), respectively. An estimated 2/3 of total ethanol produced was utilized by C. kluyveri to chain elongate with the reverse β-oxidation pathway, resulting in n-butyrate and n-caproate at net rates of 129 and 70 mmol C·L(-1)·d(-1), respectively. C. ljungdahlii likely reduced the produced carboxylates to their corresponding alcohols with the reductive power from syngas. This resulted in the longer-chain alcohols n-butanol, n-hexanol, and n-octanol at net volumetric production rates of 39.2, 31.7, and 0.045 mmol C·L(-1)·d(-1), respectively. The continuous production of the longer-chain alcohols occurred only within a narrow pH spectrum of 5.7-6.4 due to the pH discrepancy between the two strains. Regardless whether other wild-type strains could overcome this pH discrepancy, the specificity (mol carbon in product per mol carbon in all other liquid products) for each longer-chain alcohol may never be high in a single bioprocessing step. This, because two bioprocesses compete for intermediates (i.e., carboxylates): (1) chain elongation; and (2) biological reduction. This innate competition

  16. A satellite measurement of cosmic-ray abundances and spectra in the charge range 2 less than or equal to 7 less than or equal to 10. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, J. W.

    1973-01-01

    The composition of the nuclear component of the cosmic radiation was studied to yield information concerning the source, propagation, and confinement of cosmic rays within the galaxy. The first comprehensive satellite measurement is presented of cosmic-ray composition and spectra in the charge range 2 equal to or less than Z equal to or less than 10 using the geomagnetic field as a rigidity analyzer through the entire range of vertical cutoffs. The results indicate that the spectra of all the elements in the observed range are similar, and thus that various ratios of elemental abundances are nearly independent of rigidity over the range 2 equal to or less than P equal to or less than 15 GV. Calculations of the propagation of cosmic rays through the interstellar and interplanetary media predict that there should be a variation with rigidity of ratios of various elements, because of the charge-dependent effects of ionization of the interstellar gas by the cosmic rays. The absence of this variation can be explained by assuming a rigidity-dependent confinement of the cosmic rays in the galaxy.

  17. 43 CFR 2.11 - What contact information should your request include?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false What contact information should your... OF INFORMATION ACT; RECORDS AND TESTIMONY How To Make a Request § 2.11 What contact information... number (or the name and telephone number of an appropriate contact), email address, and fax number...

  18. 43 CFR 2.11 - What contact information should your request include?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false What contact information should your... OF INFORMATION ACT; RECORDS AND TESTIMONY How To Make a Request § 2.11 What contact information... number (or the name and telephone number of an appropriate contact), email address, and fax number...

  19. Synthesis and Evaluation of a 2,11-Cembranoid-Inspired Library.

    PubMed

    Welford, Amanda J; Caldwell, John J; Liu, Manjuan; Richards, Meirion; Brown, Nathan; Lomas, Cara; Tizzard, Graham J; Pitak, Mateusz B; Coles, Simon J; Eccles, Suzanne A; Raynaud, Florence I; Collins, Ian

    2016-04-11

    The 2,11-cembranoid family of natural products has been used as inspiration for the synthesis of a structurally simplified, functionally diverse library of octahydroisobenzofuran-based compounds designed to augment a typical medicinal chemistry library screen. Ring-closing metathesis, lactonisation and SmI2 -mediated methods were exemplified and applied to the installation of a third ring to mimic the nine-membered ring of the 2,11-cembranoids. The library was assessed for aqueous solubility and permeability, with a chemical-space analysis performed for comparison to the family of cembranoid natural products and a sample set of a screening library. Preliminary investigations in cancer cells showed that the simpler scaffolds could recapitulate the reported anti-migratory activity of the natural products.

  20. Synthesis and Evaluation of a 2,11‐Cembranoid‐Inspired Library

    PubMed Central

    Welford, Amanda J; Liu, Manjuan; Richards, Meirion; Brown, Nathan; Lomas, Cara; Tizzard, Graham J.; Pitak, Mateusz B.; Coles, Simon J.; Eccles, Suzanne A.; Raynaud, Florence I.; Collins, Ian

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The 2,11‐cembranoid family of natural products has been used as inspiration for the synthesis of a structurally simplified, functionally diverse library of octahydroisobenzofuran‐based compounds designed to augment a typical medicinal chemistry library screen. Ring‐closing metathesis, lactonisation and SmI2‐mediated methods were exemplified and applied to the installation of a third ring to mimic the nine‐membered ring of the 2,11‐cembranoids. The library was assessed for aqueous solubility and permeability, with a chemical‐space analysis performed for comparison to the family of cembranoid natural products and a sample set of a screening library. Preliminary investigations in cancer cells showed that the simpler scaffolds could recapitulate the reported anti‐migratory activity of the natural products. PMID:26929153

  1. The post-common-envelope, binary central star of the planetary nebula Hen 2-11

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, D.; Boffin, H. M. J.; Miszalski, B.; Wesson, R.; Corradi, R. L. M.; Tyndall, A. A.

    2014-02-01

    We present a detailed photometric study of the central star system of the planetary nebula Hen 2-11, selected for study because of its low-ionisation filaments and bipolar morphology - traits which have been strongly linked with central star binarity. Photometric monitoring with NTT-EFOSC2 reveals a highly irradiated, double-eclipsing, post-common-envelope system with a period of 0.609 d. Modelling of the lightcurve indicates that the nebular progenitor is extremely hot, while the secondary in the system is probably a K-type main sequence star. The chemical composition of the nebula is analysed, showing Hen 2-11 to be a medium-excitation non-Type i nebula. A simple photoionisation model is constructed determining abundance ratios of C/O and N/O which would be consistent with the common-envelope cutting short the AGB evolution of the nebular progenitor. The detection of a post-common-envelope binary system at the heart of Hen 2-11 further strengthens the link between binary progeny and the formation of axisymmetric planetary nebulae with patterns of low-ionisation filaments, clearly demonstrating their use as morphological indicators of central star binarity. Extracted 1D spectra, reduced 2D spectra, and table of photometry are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/562/A89

  2. Complexation Key to a pH Locked Redox Reaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rizvi, Masood Ahmad; Dangat, Yuvraj; Shams, Tahir; Khan, Khaliquz Zaman

    2016-01-01

    An unfavorable pH can block a feasible electron transfer for a pH dependent redox reaction. In this experiment, a series of potentiometric titrations demonstrate the sequential loss in feasibility of iron(II) dichromate redox reaction over a pH range of 0-4. The pH at which this reaction failed to occur was termed as a pH locked reaction. The…

  3. 17 CFR 240.15c2-11 - Initiation or resumption of quotations without specific information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... security, or any indication by a broker or dealer that he wishes to advertise his general interest in... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Initiation or resumption of quotations without specific information. 240.15c2-11 Section 240.15c2-11 Commodity and Securities...

  4. Evaluation of fluorimetric pH sensors for bioprocess monitoring at low pH.

    PubMed

    Janzen, Nils H; Schmidt, Michael; Krause, Christian; Weuster-Botz, Dirk

    2015-09-01

    Optical chemical sensors are the standard for pH monitoring in small-scale bioreactors such as microtiter plates, shaking flasks or other single-use bioreactors. The dynamic pH range of the so far commercially available fluorescent pH sensors applied in small-scale bioreactors is restricted to pH monitoring around neutral pH, although many fermentation processes are performed at pH < 6 on industrial scale. Thus, two new prototype acidic fluorescence pH sensors immobilized in single-use stirred-tank bioreactors, one with excitation at 470 nm and emission at 550 nm (sensor 470/550) and the other with excitation at 505 nm and emission at 600 nm (sensor 505/600), were characterized with respect to dynamic ranges and operational stability in representative fermentation media. Best resolution and dynamic range was observed with pH sensor 505/600 in mineral medium (dynamic range of 3.9 < pH < 7.2). Applying the same pH sensors to complex medium results in a drastic reduction of resolution and dynamic ranges. Yeast extract in complex medium was found to cause background fluorescence at the sensors' operating wavelength combinations. Optical isolation of the sensor by adding a black colored polymer layer above the sensor spot and fixing an aperture made of adhesive photoresistant foil between the fluorescence reader and the transparent bottom of the polystyrene reactors enabled full re-establishment of the sensor's characteristics. Reliability and operational stability of sensor 505/600 was shown by online pH monitoring (4.5 < pH < 5.8) of parallel anaerobic batch fermentations of Clostridium acetobutylicum for the production of acetone, butanol and ethanol (ABE) with offline pH measurements with a standard glass electrode as reference.

  5. Plant Habitat (PH)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Onate, Bryan

    2016-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) will soon have a platform for conducting fundamental research of Large Plants. Plant Habitat (PH) is designed to be a fully controllable environment for high-quality plant physiological research. PH will control light quality, level, and timing, temperature, CO2, relative humidity, and irrigation, while scrubbing ethylene. Additional capabilities include leaf temperature and root zone moisture and oxygen sensing. The light cap will have red (630 nm), blue (450 nm), green (525 nm), far red (730 nm) and broad spectrum white LEDs. There will be several internal cameras (visible and IR) to monitor and record plant growth and operations.

  6. Calculation of electron-impact rotationally elastic total cross sections for NH{sub 3}, H{sub 2}S, and PH{sub 3} over the energy range from 0.01 eV to 2 keV

    SciTech Connect

    Limbachiya, Chetan; Vinodkumar, Minaxi; Mason, Nigel

    2011-04-15

    This paper report results of calculation of the total cross section Q{sub T} for electron impact on NH{sub 3}, H{sub 2}S, and PH{sub 3} over a wide range of incident energies from 0.01 eV to 2 keV. Total cross sections Q{sub T} (elastic plus electronic excitation) for incident energies below the ionization threshold of the target were calculated using the UK molecular R-matrix code through the Quantemol-N software package and cross sections at higher energies were derived using the spherical complex optical potential formalism. The two methods are found to give self-consistent values where they overlap. The present results are, in general, found to be in good agreement with previous experimental and theoretical results.

  7. pH Basics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lunelli, Bruno; Scagnolari, Francesco

    2009-01-01

    The exposition of the pervasive concept of pH, of its foundations and implementation as a meaningful quantitative measurement, in nonspecialist university texts is often not easy to follow because too many of its theoretical and operative underpinnings are neglected. To help the inquiring student we provide a concise introduction to the depth just…

  8. pH optrode

    DOEpatents

    Northrup, M. Allen; Langry, Kevin C.

    1993-01-01

    A process is provided for forming a long-lasting, stable, pH-sensitive dye-acrylamide copolymer useful as a pH-sensitive material for use in an optrode or other device sensitive to pH. An optrode may be made by mechanically attaching the copolymer to a sensing device such as an optical fiber.

  9. Ph.D. shortage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The late 1990s will see a shortage of Ph.D. graduates, according to the Association of American Universities, Washington, D.C. AAU's new comprehensive study, “The Ph.D. Shortage: The Federal Role,” reports that competition for new Ph.D.s is already intense and can only intensify because demand is greater than supply in both academic and nonacademic markets.Doctoral education plays an increasingly important role in U.S. research and development programs. Students have a pivotal part in doing research and enriching it with new ideas. The AAU report says that graduate students are “major determinants of the creativity and productivity of U.S. academic research, the source of more than 50% of the nation's basic research.’ The market for doctoral education extends beyond the university. In 1985, about 43% of all Ph.D.s employed in this country were working outside higher education; the demand for doctorate recipients in nonacademic sectors continues to grow.

  10. ART: Surveying the Local Universe at 2-11 keV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Dell, S. L.; Ramsey, B. D.; Adams, M. L.; Brandt, W. N.; Bubarev, M. V.; Hassinger, G.; Pravlinski, M.; Predehl, P.; Romaine, S. E.; Swartz, D. A.; Urry, C. M.; Vikhlinin, A.; Weisskopf, M. C.

    2008-01-01

    The Astronomical Rontgen Telescope (ART) is a medium-energy x-ray telescope system proposed for the Russian-led mission Spectrum Rontgen-Gamma (SRG). Optimized for performance over the 2-11-keV band, ART complements the softer response of the SRG prime instrument-the German eROSITA x-ray telescope system. The anticipated number of ART detections is 50,000-with 1,000 heavily-obscured (N(sub H)> 3x10(exp 23)/sq cm) AGN-in the SRG 4-year all-sky survey, plus a comparable number in deeper wide-field (500 deg(sup 2) total) surveys. ART's surveys will provide a minimally-biased, nearly-complete census of the local Universe in the medium-energy x-ray band (including Fe-K lines), at CCD spectral resolution. During long (approx.100-ks) pointed observations, ART can obtain statistically significant spectral data up to about 15 keY for bright sources and medium-energy x-ray continuum and Fe-K-line spectra of AGN detected with the contemporaneous NuSTAR hard-x-ray mission.

  11. ART: Surveying the Local Universe at 2-11 keV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Dell, Stephen L.; Ramsey, B. D.; Adams, M. L.; Areviev, V.; Brandt, W. N.; Buntov, M.; Elsner, R. F.; Grigorovich, S.; Gubarev, M. V.; Hasinger, G.; Lapshov, I.; Litvin, D.; Meidinger, N.; Pavlinsky, M.; Predehl, P.; Revnivtsev, M.; Romaine, S. E.; Sazonov, S.; Semena, N.; Swartz, D. A.; Tkachenko, A.; Urry, C. M.; Vikhlinin, A.; Weisskopf, M. C.

    2008-03-01

    The Astronomical Röntgen Telescope (ART) is a medium-energy x-ray telescope system proposed for the Russian-led mission Spectrum Röntgen-Gamma (SRG). Optimized for performance over the 2-11-keV band, ART complements the softer response of the SRG prime instrument - the German eROSITA x-ray telescope system. The anticipated number of ART detections is 50,000 - with about 1,000 heavily-obscured (NH > 3×1023 cm-2) active galactic nuclei (AGN) - in the SRG 4-year all-sky survey, plus a comparable number in deeper wide-field (500 deg2 total) surveys. ART's surveys will provide a minimally-biased, nearly-complete census of the local Universe in the medium-energy x-ray band (including Fe-K lines), at CCD spectral resolution. During long (�-ks) pointed observations, ART can obtain statistically significant spectral data up to about 15 keV for bright sources and medium-energy x-ray continuum and Fe-K-line spectra of AGN detected with the contemporaneous NuSTAR hard-x-ray mission.

  12. 17-4 PH and 15-5 PH

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Howard T.

    1995-01-01

    17-4 PH and 15-5 PH are extremely useful and versatile precipitation-hardening stainless steels. Armco 17-4 PH is well suited for the magnetic particle inspection requirements of Aerospace Material Specification. Armco 15-5 PH and 17-4 PH are produced in billet, plate, bar, and wire. Also, 15-5 PH is able to meet the stringent mechanical properties required in the aerospace and nuclear industries. Both products are easy to heat treat and machine, making them very useful in many applications.

  13. Fiber-Optic pH Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganesh, A. Balaji; Radhakrishnan, T. K.

    The new enhancement in the determination of pH using optical fiber system is described here. This work uses the membrane made of cellulose acetate membrane for reagent immobilization and congo red (pKa 3.7) and neutral red (pKa 7.2) as pH indicators. An effective covalent chemical binding procedure is used to immobilize the indicatorsE The response time, reversibility, linear range, reproducibility, and long-term stability of fiber optic sensor with congo red as well as neutral red have been determined. The linear range measured for the sensor based on the congo red and neutral red is 4.2-6.3 and 4.1-9.0, respectively. The response time of sensor membrane is measured by varying the substance pH values between 11.0 and 2.0.

  14. Passive Ranging

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-08-01

    1981). 5. R. Courant and D. Hilbert, Methods of Mathematical Physics , Vol. I, English ed., * Interscience, New York, 1953. 32 32 APPENDIX A CALCULATION...K Courant and D. Hilbert, Methods of Mathematical Physics , Vol. I, English ed., * Interscience, New York, 1953. A-8 APPENDIX B * RANGING ACCURACY IN

  15. Eukaryotic diversity at pH extremes

    PubMed Central

    Amaral-Zettler, Linda A.

    2013-01-01

    Extremely acidic (pH < 3) and extremely alkaline (pH > 9) environments support a diversity of single-cell and to a lesser extent, multicellular eukaryotic life. This study compared alpha and beta diversity in eukaryotic communities from seven diverse aquatic environments with pH values ranging from 2 to 11 using massively-parallel pyrotag sequencing targeting the V9 hypervariable region of the 18S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene. A total of 946 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) were recovered at a 6% cut-off level (94% similarity) across the sampled environments. Hierarchical clustering of the samples segregated the communities into acidic and alkaline groups. Similarity percentage (SIMPER) analysis followed by indicator OTU analysis (IOA) and non-metric multidimensional scaling (NMDS) were used to determine which characteristic groups of eukaryotic taxa typify acidic or alkaline extremes and the extent to which pH explains eukaryotic community structure in these environments. Spain's Rio Tinto yielded the fewest observed OTUs while Nebraska Sandhills alkaline lakes yielded the most. Distinct OTUs, including metazoan OTUs, numerically dominated pH extreme sites. Indicator OTUs included the diatom Pinnularia and unidentified opisthokonts (Fungi and Filasterea) in the extremely acidic environments, and the ciliate Frontonia across the extremely alkaline sites. Inferred from NMDS, pH explained only a modest fraction of the variation across the datasets, indicating that other factors influence the underlying community structure in these environments. The findings from this study suggest that the ability for eukaryotes to adapt to pH extremes over a broad range of values may be rare, but further study of taxa that can broadly adapt across diverse acidic and alkaline environments, respectively present good models for understanding adaptation and should be targeted for future investigations. PMID:23335919

  16. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic study of the kinetics of a first-order phase transition in tridecanoic acid CH3(CH2)11COOH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marikhin, V. A.; Myasnikova, L. P.; Radovanova, E. I.; Volchek, B. Z.; Medvedeva, D. A.

    2017-02-01

    The structural changes in crystalline lamella cores of tridecanoic acid CH3(CH2)11COOH during heating in the range from the temperature T 1 = 13.5°C to T 2 > T m = 41.6°C have been investigated using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The behavior of the bands of rocking (in the region of 720 cm-1) and bending (in the region of 1470 cm-1) vibrations of CH2 groups in tridecanoic acid methylene segments has been analyzed. It has been shown that, in the first-order phase transition region ( T s-s 36°C) within a narrow temperature range (Δ T 1 ≤ 1 K), there is a gradual transformation of the initial triclinic subcell into the hexagonal subcell. The mechanism of this transition has been considered in terms of the theory of diffuse first-order phase transitions.

  17. Immunogenicity and safety of tetravalent dengue vaccine in 2-11 year-olds previously vaccinated against yellow fever: randomized, controlled, phase II study in Piura, Peru.

    PubMed

    Lanata, Claudio F; Andrade, Teresa; Gil, Ana I; Terrones, Cynthia; Valladolid, Omar; Zambrano, Betzana; Saville, Melanie; Crevat, Denis

    2012-09-07

    In a randomized, placebo-controlled, monocenter, observer blinded study conducted in an area where dengue is endemic, we assessed the safety and immunogenicity of a recombinant, live, attenuated, tetravalent dengue vaccine candidate (CYD-TDV) in 2-11 year-olds with varying levels of pre-existing yellow-fever immunity due to vaccination 1-7 years previously. 199 children received 3 injections of CYD-TDV (months 0, 6 and 12) and 99 received placebo (months 0 and 6) or pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (month 12). One month after the third dengue vaccination, serotype specific neutralizing antibody GMTs were in the range of 178-190 (1/dil) (versus 16.7-38.1 in the control group), a 10-20 fold-increase from baseline, and 94% of vaccines were seropositive to all four serotypes (versus 39% in the control group). There were no vaccine-related SAEs. The observed reactogenicity profile was consistent with phase I studies, with severity grade 1-2 injection site pain, headache, malaise and fever most frequently reported and no increase after subsequent vaccinations. Virologically confirmed dengue cases were seen after completion of the 3 doses: 1 in the CYD-TDV group (N=199), and 3 in the control group (N=99). A 3-dose regimen of CYD-TDV had a good safety profile in 2-11 year olds with a history of YF vaccination and elicited robust antibody responses that were balanced against the four serotypes.

  18. Quantum dot photoluminescence lifetime-based pH nanosensor.

    PubMed

    Ruedas-Rama, Maria J; Orte, Angel; Hall, Elizabeth A H; Alvarez-Pez, Jose M; Talavera, Eva M

    2011-03-14

    The first CdSe/ZnS quantum dot photoluminescence lifetime-based pH nanosensor has been developed. The average lifetime of mercaptopropionic acid-capped QD nanosensors showed a linear response in the pH range of 5.2-6.9. These nanosensors have been satisfactorily applied for pH estimation in simulated intracellular media, with high sensitivity and high selectivity toward most of the intracellular components.

  19. Energy separations for the electronic states of PH -2,PH 2 and PH +2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasubramanian, K.

    1993-03-01

    All-electron complete-active space multi-configuration self-consistent field (CASSCF) followed by second-order configuration interaction (SOCI) calculations in conjunction with large P(13s10p3d2flg/7s6p3d2flg) and H (10s5p1d/8s5p1d) basis sets are made on the electronic states of PH -2, PH 2 and PH +2. We compute the adiabatic electron affinities of PH 2 and PH. The 3B 1-X 1A 1, 1B 1-X 1A 1 energy separations of PH +2 and the 2A 1-X 2B 1 energy separation of PH 2 are computed.

  20. An efficient and practical synthesis of [2-11C]indole via superfast nucleophilic [11C]cyanation and RANEY® Nickel catalyzed reductive cyclization

    DOE PAGES

    So Jeong Lee; Fowler, Joanna S.; Alexoff, David; ...

    2015-09-21

    We developed a rapid method for the synthesis of carbon-11 radiolabeled indole using a sub-nanomolar quantity of no-carrier-added [11C]cyanide as radio-precursor. Based upon a reported synthesis of 2-(2-nitrophenyl)acetonitrile (2), a highly reactive substrate 2-nitrobenzyl bromide (1) was evaluated for nucleophilic [11C]cyanation. Additionally, related reaction conditions were explored with the goal of obtaining of highly reactive 2-(2-nitrophenyl)-[1-11C]acetonitrile ([11C]-2) while inhibiting its rapid conversion to 2,3-bis(2-nitrophenyl)-[1-11C]propanenitrile ([11C]-3). Next, a Raney Nickel catalyzed reductive cyclization method was utilized for synthesizing the desired [2-11C]indole with hydrazinium monoformate as the active reducing agent. Extensive and iterative screening of basicity, temperature and stoichiometry was required tomore » overcome the large stoichiometry bias that favored 2-nitrobenzylbromide (1) over [11C]cyanide, which both caused further alkylation of the desired nitrile and poisoned the Raney Nickel catalyst. The result is an efficient two-step, streamlined method to reliably synthesize [2-11C]indole with an entire radiochemical yield of 21 ± 2.2% (n = 5, ranging from 18 – 24%). The radiochemical purity of the final product was > 98% and specific activity was 176 ± 24.8 GBq/μmol (n = 5, ranging from 141 – 204 GBq/μmol). The total radiosynthesis time including product purification by semi-preparative HPLC was 50 – 55 min from end of cyclotron bombardment.« less

  1. Cytoplasmic pH and human erythrocyte shape.

    PubMed Central

    Gedde, M M; Davis, D K; Huestis, W H

    1997-01-01

    Altered external pH transforms human erythrocytes from discocytes to stomatocytes (low pH) or echinocytes (high pH). The mechanism of this transformation is unknown. The preceding companion study (Gedde and Huestis) demonstrated that these shape changes are not mediated by changes in membrane potential, as has been reported. The aim of this study was to identify the physiological properties that mediate this shape change. Red cells were placed in a wide range of physiological states by manipulation of buffer pH, chloride concentration, and osmolality. Morphology and four potential predictor properties (cell pH, membrane potential, cell water, and cell chloride concentration) were assayed. Analysis of the data set by stratification and nonlinear multivariate modeling showed that change in neither cell water nor cell chloride altered the morphology of normal pH cells. In contrast, change in cell pH caused shape change in normal-range membrane potential and cell water cells. The results show that change in cytoplasmic pH is both necessary and sufficient for the shape changes of human erythrocytes equilibrated in altered pH environments. PMID:9138569

  2. Subtask 2.11 - An Investigation into the EERC Staged Electrostatic Precipitator Concept

    SciTech Connect

    Ye Zhuang; Jay Almlie; Stanley Miller

    2008-03-31

    A new concept of electrostatic precipitator (ESP), named a Staged ESP (an Energy & Environmental Research Center proprietary), was conceived in June 2004. The concept is based on a simple design that can be retrofitted on existing coal-fired power plants to provide high particulate matter (PM) collection efficiency without compromising reliability. A prototype of Staged ESP was designed, fabricated, and tested in two different combustion coal flue gases with different fly ash resistivities. Several design parameters of the Staged ESP were evaluated under various operating conditions to optimize PM collection performance. A set of particulate sampling data, including aerodynamic particle sizer, scanning mobility particle sizer, and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Method 5 data, was collected to determine PM emissions of the Staged ESP configurations. These data were compared against data collected with a conventional ESP configuration. Compared to PM capture performance in conventional ESPs, an additional 30% to 70% reductions on total PM emissions were achieved for Staged ESPs in flue gas with medium- to high-resistivity fly ashes. Experimental data proved that the Staged ESP concept is capable of achieving higher PM collection efficiency, especially for particles in the submicrometer size range typically thought difficult to capture in an ESP.

  3. The pH Game.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chemecology, 1996

    1996-01-01

    Describes a game that can be used to teach students about the acidity of liquids and substances around their school and enable them to understand what pH levels tell us about the environment. Students collect samples and measure the pH of water, soil, plants, and other natural material. (DDR)

  4. Optoelectronic pH Meter: Further Details

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeevarajan, Antony S.; Anderson, Mejody M.; Macatangay, Ariel V.

    2009-01-01

    A collection of documents provides further detailed information about an optoelectronic instrument that measures the pH of an aqueous cell-culture medium to within 0.1 unit in the range from 6.5 to 7.5. The instrument at an earlier stage of development was reported in Optoelectronic Instrument Monitors pH in a Culture Medium (MSC-23107), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 28, No. 9 (September 2004), page 4a. To recapitulate: The instrument includes a quartz cuvette through which the medium flows as it is circulated through a bioreactor. The medium contains some phenol red, which is an organic pH-indicator dye. The cuvette sits between a light source and a photodetector. [The light source in the earlier version comprised red (625 nm) and green (558 nm) light-emitting diodes (LEDs); the light source in the present version comprises a single green- (560 nm)-or-red (623 nm) LED.] The red and green are repeatedly flashed in alternation. The responses of the photodiode to the green and red are processed electronically to obtain the ratio between the amounts of green and red light transmitted through the medium. The optical absorbance of the phenol red in the green light varies as a known function of pH. Hence, the pH of the medium can be calculated from the aforesaid ratio.

  5. Constant pH simulations of pH responsive polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Arjun; Smith, J. D.; Walters, Keisha B.; Rick, Steven W.

    2016-12-01

    Polyacidic polymers can change structure over a narrow range of pH in a competition between the hydrophobic effect, which favors a compact state, and electrostatic repulsion, which favors an extended state. Constant pH molecular dynamics computer simulations of poly(methacrylic acid) reveal that there are two types of structural changes, one local and one global, which make up the overall response. The local structural response depends on the tacticity of the polymer and leads to different cooperative effects for polymers with different stereochemistries, demonstrating both positive and negative cooperativities.

  6. A comparison of pH determination methods in food animal practice.

    PubMed Central

    Nappert, G; Naylor, J M

    2001-01-01

    The accuracy of a portable pH meter in measuring blood pH in neonatal calves, urine pH, and ruminal fluid pH in cows has been assessed. Thirty-five diarrheic and 15 healthy beef calves were used for blood gas analysis; 57 healthy dairy cows provided voided urine samples; and ruminal fluid samples were obtained from 10 dairy cows with ruminal fistulas on 4 separate days. Measurements of blood pH were obtained from an automated blood gas analyzer and the portable pH meter. Measurements of urine and ruminal fluid pH were determined with the benchtop pH meter, urinalysis strips, narrow range pH paper, and the portable pH meter. The portable pH meter was more accurate in measuring urine pH and ruminal fluid pH in cows than blood pH in neonatal calves. The urinalysis strips and the narrow range pH paper were found adequate to evaluate urine and ruminal pH. Images Figure 1. PMID:11360858

  7. Evanescent-wave spectroscopic fiber optic pH sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egami, C.; Takeda, K.; Isai, M.; Ogita, M.

    1996-02-01

    We demonstrate a new type of fiber optic pH sensor, which is the application of evanescent-wave spectroscopic technique. A methyl red (MR)-doped-poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) film that coated as part of cladding does function as a pH sensor probe. In this system MR doped in PMMA is used as indicator dye for pH measurement. The absorption spectrum shift in wavelength of indicator dye enables us to get the pH value. The sensor probe is immersed in water solution containing a small proportion of acetic acid over the wide pH range of 5.0 to 7.0. The chemical interaction between MR in sensor probe and hydrogen ion in the water solution causes a change in the dipole moment of MR, that is, the absorption spectrum macroscopically. The evanescent-wave spectroscopic technique provides the measurement of the absorption spectrum shift over a broad range of visible wavelength. The result of experiment was that MR absorption spectrum shifted by 40 nm every increase of 1.0 in pH. The small change in the pH value can be sensed as a large wavelength shift of pH indicator absorption spectrum.

  8. Urine pH test

    MedlinePlus

    ... pubmed/7797810 . Read More Acid loading test (pH) Acute kidney failure Alkalosis Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease Diabetic ketoacidosis Diarrhea - overview Distal renal tubular acidosis Gastric suction Interstitial nephritis Kidney stones ...

  9. Exercise and Pulmonary Hypertension (PH)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Process: Some First Steps Adoption Success Story Watch Classroom Recordings Empowered Patient Online Toolkit Tab 1: Very ... Kathy Groebner Education Programs Patients and Caregivers PHA Classroom PHA on the Road: PH Patients and Families ...

  10. Esophageal pH monitoring

    MedlinePlus

    ... test can also be done during upper GI endoscopy by clipping a pH monitor to the lining of the esophagus. ... esophagitis : Barium swallow Esophagogastroduodenoscopy (also called upper GI endoscopy)

  11. Nanosensor aided photoacoustic measurement of pH in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, Aniruddha; Yoon, Hyung Ki; Kopelman, Raoul; Wang, Xueding

    2013-03-01

    pH plays a critical role in many aspects of cell and tissues physiology. Lower pH is also a typical characteristic of arthritic joints and tumor tissues. These pH anomalies are also exploited in different drug delivery mechanisms. Here we present, a new method of pH sensing in vivo using spectroscopic photoacoustic measurements facilitated by pH sensitive nanosensors. The nanosensors consist of Seminaphtharhodafluor (SNARF), a pH sensitive dye, encapsulated in a specially designed polyacrylamide hydrogel matrix with a hydrophobic core. The photoacoustic intensity ratio between the excitation wavelengths of 585nm and 565nm increases in the pH range from 6.0 to 8.0 and is used to determine the pH of the local environment. These nanosensors are biodegradable, biocompatible, have a long plasma lifetime and can be targeted to any type of cells or tissues by surface modification using proper targeting moieties. The encapsulation of the dye prevents the interaction of the dye with proteins in plasma and also reduces the dye degradation. The SNARF dye in its free form loses 90% of its absorbance in presence of albumin, a protein found in abundance in plasma, and this has severely limited its adaptation to in vivo environments. In comparison, the SNARF nanosensors lose only 16% of their absorbance in the same environment. We employ these nanosensors to demonstrate the feasibility of pH sensing in vivo through photoacoustic measurements on a rat joint model.

  12. Field measurement of alkalinity and pH

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barnes, Ivan

    1964-01-01

    The behavior of electrometric pH equipment under field conditions departs from the behavior predicted from Nernst's law. The response is a linear function of pH, and hence measured pH values may be corrected to true pH if the instrument is calibrated with two reference solutions for each measurement. Alkalinity titrations may also be made in terms of true pH. Standard methods, such as colorimetric titrations, were rejected as unreliable or too cumbersome for rapid field use. The true pH of the end point of the alkalinity titration as a function of temperature, ionic strength, and total alkalinity has been calculated. Total alkalinity in potable waters is the most important factor influencing the end point pH, which varies from 5.38 (0 ? C, 5 ppm (parts per million) HC0a-) to 4.32 (300 ppm HC0a-,35 ? C), for the ranges of variables considered. With proper precautions, the pH may be determined to =i:0.02 pH and the alkalinity to =i:0.6 ppm HCO3- for many naturally occurring bodies of fresh water.

  13. PhEDEx Data Service

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egeland, Ricky; Wildish, Tony; Huang, Chih-Hao

    2010-04-01

    The PhEDEx Data Service provides access to information from the central PhEDEx database, as well as certificate-authenticated managerial operations such as requesting the transfer or deletion of data. The Data Service is integrated with the "SiteDB" service for fine-grained access control, providing a safe and secure environment for operations. A plug-in architecture allows server-side modules to be developed rapidly and easily by anyone familiar with the schema, and can automatically return the data in a variety of formats for use by different client technologies. Using HTTP access via the Data Service instead of direct database connections makes it possible to build monitoring web-pages with complex drill-down operations, suitable for debugging or presentation from many aspects. This will form the basis of the new PhEDEx website in the near future, as well as providing access to PhEDEx information and certificate-authenticated services for other CMS dataflow and workflow management tools such as CRAB, WMCore, DBS and the dashboard. A PhEDEx command-line client tool provides one-stop access to all the functions of the PhEDEx Data Service interactively, for use in simple scripts that do not access the service directly. The client tool provides certificate-authenticated access to managerial functions, so all the functions of the PhEDEx Data Service are available to it. The tool can be expanded by plug-ins which can combine or extend the client-side manipulation of data from the Data Service, providing a powerful environment for manipulating data within PhEDEx.

  14. Programmable pH buffers

    DOEpatents

    Gough, Dara Van; Huber, Dale L.; Bunker, Bruce C.; Roberts, Mark E.

    2017-01-24

    A programmable pH buffer comprises a copolymer that changes pK.sub.a at a lower critical solution temperature (LCST) in water. The copolymer comprises a thermally programmable polymer that undergoes a hydrophobic-to-hydrophilic phase change at the LCST and an electrolytic polymer that exhibits acid-base properties that are responsive to the phase change. The programmable pH buffer can be used to sequester CO.sub.2 into water.

  15. Ratiometric Imaging of Extracellular pH in Dental Biofilms.

    PubMed

    Schlafer, Sebastian; Dige, Irene

    2016-03-09

    The pH in bacterial biofilms on teeth is of central importance for dental caries, a disease with a high worldwide prevalence. Nutrients and metabolites are not distributed evenly in dental biofilms. A complex interplay of sorption to and reaction with organic matter in the biofilm reduces the diffusion paths of solutes and creates steep gradients of reactive molecules, including organic acids, across the biofilm. Quantitative fluorescent microscopic methods, such as fluorescence life time imaging or pH ratiometry, can be employed to visualize pH in different microenvironments of dental biofilms. pH ratiometry exploits a pH-dependent shift in the fluorescent emission of pH-sensitive dyes. Calculation of the emission ratio at two different wavelengths allows determining local pH in microscopic images, irrespective of the concentration of the dye. Contrary to microelectrodes the technique allows monitoring both vertical and horizontal pH gradients in real-time without mechanically disturbing the biofilm. However, care must be taken to differentiate accurately between extra- and intracellular compartments of the biofilm. Here, the ratiometric dye, seminaphthorhodafluor-4F 5-(and-6) carboxylic acid (C-SNARF-4) is employed to monitor extracellular pH in in vivo grown dental biofilms of unknown species composition. Upon exposure to glucose the dye is up-concentrated inside all bacterial cells in the biofilms; it is thus used both as a universal bacterial stain and as a marker of extracellular pH. After confocal microscopic image acquisition, the bacterial biomass is removed from all pictures using digital image analysis software, which permits to exclusively calculate extracellular pH. pH ratiometry with the ratiometric dye is well-suited to study extracellular pH in thin biofilms of up to 75 µm thickness, but is limited to the pH range between 4.5 and 7.0.

  16. An in vitro and in silico study on the flavonoid-mediated modulation of the transport of 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP) through Caco-2 monolayers

    SciTech Connect

    Schutte, Maaike E. . E-mail: maaike.schutte@wur.nl; Freidig, Andreas P.; Sandt, Johannes J.M. van de; Rietjens, Ivonne M.C.M.

    2006-12-01

    The present study describes the effect of different flavonoids on the absorption of the pro-carcinogen PhIP through Caco-2 monolayers and the development of an in silico model describing this process taking into account passive diffusion and active transport of PhIP. Various flavonoids stimulated the apical to basolateral PhIP transport. Using the in silico model for flavone, kaempferol and chrysoeriol, the apparent Ki value for inhibition of the active transport to the apical side was estimated to be below 53 {mu}M and for morin, robinetin and taxifolin between 164 and 268 {mu}M. For myricetin, luteolin, naringenin and quercetin, the apparent Ki values were determined more accurately and amounted to 37.3, 12.2, 11.7 and 5.6 {mu}M respectively. Additional experiments revealed that the apical to basolateral PhIP transport was also increased in the presence of a typical BCRP or MRP inhibitor with apparent Ki values in the same range as those of the flavonoids. This observation together with the fact that flavonoids are known to be inhibitors of MRPs and BCRP, corroborates that inhibition of these apical membrane transporters is involved in the flavonoid-mediated increased apical to basolateral PhIP transport. Based on the apparent Ki values obtained, it is concluded that the flavonols, at the levels present in the regular Western diet, are capable of stimulating the transport of PhIP through Caco-2 monolayers from the apical to the basolateral compartment. This points to flavonoid-mediated stimulation of the bioavailability of PhIP and, thus, a possible adverse effect of these supposed beneficial food ingredients.

  17. IMPACT OF WATER PH ON ZEBRA MUSSEL MORTALITY

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel P. Molloy

    2002-10-15

    The experiments conducted this past quarter have suggested that the bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens strain CL0145A is effective at killing zebra mussels throughout the entire range of pH values tested (7.2 to 8.6). Highest mortality was achieved at pH values characteristic of preferred zebra mussel waterbodies, i.e., hard waters with a range of 7.8 to 8.6. In all water types tested, however, ranging from very soft to very hard, considerable mussel kill was achieved (83 to 99% mean mortality), suggesting that regardless of the pH or hardness of the treated water, significant mussel kill can be achieved upon treatment with P. fluorescens strain CL0145A. These results further support the concept that this bacterium has significant potential for use as a zebra mussel control agent in power plant pipes receiving waters with a wide range of physical and chemical characteristics.

  18. Modeling pH variation in reverse osmosis.

    PubMed

    Nir, Oded; Bishop, Noga Fridman; Lahav, Ori; Freger, Viatcheslav

    2015-12-15

    The transport of hydronium and hydroxide ions through reverse osmosis membranes constitutes a unique case of ionic species characterized by uncommonly high permeabilities. Combined with electromigration, this leads to complex behavior of permeate pH, e.g., negative rejection, as often observed for monovalent ions in nanofiltration of salt mixtures. In this work we employed a rigorous phenomenological approach combined with chemical equilibrium to describe the trans-membrane transport of hydronium and hydroxide ions along with salt transport and calculate the resulting permeate pH. Starting from the Nernst-Planck equation, a full non-linear transport equation was derived, for which an approximate solution was proposed based on the analytical solution previously developed for trace ions in a dominant salt. Using the developed approximate equation, transport coefficients were deduced from experimental results obtained using a spiral wound reverse osmosis module operated under varying permeate flux (2-11 μm/s), NaCl feed concentrations (0.04-0.18 M) and feed pH values (5.5-9.0). The approximate equation agreed well with the experimental results, corroborating the finding that diffusion and electromigration, rather than a priori neglected convection, were the major contributors to the transport of hydronium and hydroxide. The approach presented here has the potential to improve the predictive capacity of reverse osmosis transport models for acid-base species, thereby improving process design/control.

  19. Hyperpolarised organic phosphates as NMR reporters of compartmental pH.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Pernille Rose; Meier, Sebastian

    2016-02-07

    Organic phosphate metabolites contain functional groups with pKa values near the physiologic pH range, yielding pH-dependent (13)C chemical shift changes of adjacent quaternary carbon sites. When formed in defined cellular compartments from exogenous hyperpolarised (13)C substrates, metabolites can thus yield localised pH values and correlations of organelle pH and catalytic activity.

  20. 40 CFR 432.3 - General limitation or standard for pH.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false General limitation or standard for pH... limitation or standard for pH. Any discharge subject to BPT, BCT, or NSPS limitations or standards in this part must remain within the pH range of 6 to 9....

  1. 40 CFR 432.3 - General limitation or standard for pH.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false General limitation or standard for pH... limitation or standard for pH. Any discharge subject to BPT, BCT, or NSPS limitations or standards in this part must remain within the pH range of 6 to 9....

  2. 40 CFR 432.3 - General limitation or standard for pH.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false General limitation or standard for pH... standard for pH. Any discharge subject to BPT, BCT, or NSPS limitations or standards in this part must remain within the pH range of 6 to 9....

  3. 40 CFR 432.3 - General limitation or standard for pH.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false General limitation or standard for pH... limitation or standard for pH. Any discharge subject to BPT, BCT, or NSPS limitations or standards in this part must remain within the pH range of 6 to 9....

  4. 40 CFR 432.3 - General limitation or standard for pH.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false General limitation or standard for pH... standard for pH. Any discharge subject to BPT, BCT, or NSPS limitations or standards in this part must remain within the pH range of 6 to 9....

  5. INFLUENCE OF PH ON RECOVERY OF MYCOPLASMA FROM THE HUMAN OROPHARYNX.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    methylene blue . Positive cultures in the first group were as follows: 78% at pH 5.0, 94% at pH 6.0, 88% at pH 7.0, and 78% at pH 8.0. Highest incidence of M. pharyngis occurred at pH 7.0 and of M. salivarium at pH 5.0 and 6.0. The one M. hominis type 1 isolate grew evenly over the entire range of pH tested. In the second group, a pH of 7.0 and 8.0 was optimal for the recovery of M. pneumoniae. It was concluded that, excepting M. pneumoniae, the human oral mycoplasmas are more frequently isolated on PPLO agar of pH 6.0 and 7.0.

  6. Intragastric pH Monitoring,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-10-01

    disposable sensor.. hnt Care 13. Peterson WL. GI bleeding. In: Sleisenger MH, Fordtran IS, Med 1988;14:232-5. ,. eds. Gastrointestinal disease: pathophysiology ... diagnosis and 27. Fimmel CL, Etienne A, Cilluffo T, et al. Long-term ambu- management, Vol I. 4th ed. Philadelphia: WB Saunders, latory gastric pH

  7. Making pH Tangible.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McIntosh, Elizabeth; Moss, Robert

    1995-01-01

    Presents a laboratory exercise in which students test the pH of different substances, study the effect of a buffer on acidic solutions by comparing the behavior of buffered and unbuffered solutions upon the addition of acid, and compare common over-the-counter antacid remedies. (MKR)

  8. 40 CFR 420.07 - Effluent limitations guidelines and standards for pH.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... standards for pH. 420.07 Section 420.07 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... § 420.07 Effluent limitations guidelines and standards for pH. (a) The pH level in process wastewaters subject to a subpart within this part shall be within the range of 6.0 to 9.0. (b) The pH level shall...

  9. Influence of pH Regulation Mode in Glucose Fermentation on Product Selection and Process Stability

    PubMed Central

    Mohd-Zaki, Zuhaida; Bastidas-Oyanedel, Juan R.; Lu, Yang; Hoelzle, Robert; Pratt, Steven; Slater, Fran R.; Batstone, Damien J.

    2016-01-01

    Mixed culture anaerobic fermentation generates a wide range of products from simple sugars, and is potentially an effective process for producing renewable commodity chemicals. However it is difficult to predict product spectrum, and to control the process. One of the key control handles is pH, but the response is commonly dependent on culture history. In this work, we assess the impact of pH regulation mode on the product spectrum. Two regulation modes were applied: in the first, pH was adjusted from 4.5 to 8.5 in progressive steps of 0.5 and in the second, covered the same pH range, but the pH was reset to 5.5 before each change. Acetate, butyrate, and ethanol were produced throughout all pH ranges, but there was a shift from butyrate at pH < 6.5 to ethanol at pH > 6.5, as well as a strong and consistent shift from hydrogen to formate as pH increased. Microbial analysis indicated that progressive pH resulted in dominance by Klebsiella, while reset pH resulted in a bias towards Clostridium spp., particularly at low pH, with higher variance in community between different pH levels. Reset pH was more responsive to changes in pH, and analysis of Gibbs free energy indicated that the reset pH experiments operated closer to thermodynamic equilibrium, particularly with respect to the formate/hydrogen balance. This may indicate that periodically resetting pH conforms better to thermodynamic expectations. PMID:27681895

  10. Optical fibre PH sensor based on immobilized indicator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Defu; Cao, Qiang; Han, JingHong; Cai, Jine; Li, YaTing; Zhu, ZeMin; Fan, Jie; Gao, Ning

    1991-08-01

    An optical fiber pH sensor which has the immobilized pH sensitive indicator dye reagents on the tip of the optical fiber has been studied. The probe is made by covalently immobilizing the phenol red, bromine phenol blue, or bromothymol blue on the polyacrylamide microsphere fixed by polyterafluoroethylene (PTFE) film. A gap between the dye and optical fiber was used to make the diffusion of the hydrogen ions easier. The parameters of the optical fiber pH sensor have been given completely. The ranges of measurement are 3.0 - 5.0 pH, 7.0 - 8.5 pH, and 8.0 - 10.0 pH for bromine phenol blue, phenol red, and bromothymol blue, respectively. The sensitivity is 66.6 mV/pH. The probe has a precision of better than 0.55 pH. The linear correlation coefficient is 0.999. The response time is 1 - 2 min. The hysteresis is 0.52%. The repeatability is 0.013 mV, while the stability is 0.015 pH/h.

  11. Comparing Metal Leaching and Toxicity from High pH, Low pH, and High Ammonia Fly Ash

    SciTech Connect

    Palumbo, Anthony Vito; Phillips, Jana Randolph; Fagan, Lisa Anne; Drake, Meghan M; Ruther, Rose Emily; Fisher, L. Suzanne; Amonette, J. E.

    2007-01-01

    Previous work with both class F and class C fly ash indicated minimal leaching from most fly ashes tested. However, the addition of NOx removal equipment might result in higher levels of ammonia in the fly ash. We have recently been testing fly ash with a wide range of pH (3.7-12.4) originating from systems with NOx removal equipment. Leaching experiments were done using dilute CaCl2 solutions in batch and columns and a batch nitric acid method. All methods indicated that the leaching of heavy metals was different in the highest ammonia sample tested and the high pH sample. However, toxicity testing with the Microtox system has indicated little potential toxicity in leachates except for the fly ash at the highest pH (12.4). When the leachate from the high pH fly ash was neutralized, toxicity was eliminated.

  12. Comparing metal leaching and toxicity from high pH, low pH, and high ammonia fly ash

    SciTech Connect

    Palumbo, Anthony V.; Tarver, Jana R.; Fagan, Lisa A.; McNeilly, Meghan S.; Ruther, Rose; Fisher, L. S.; Amonette, James E.

    2007-07-01

    Previous work with both class F and class C fly ash indicated minimal leaching from most fly ashes tested. However, the addition of NOx removal equipment might result in higher levels of ammonia in the fly ash. We have recently been testing fly ash with a wide range of pH (3.7–12.4) originating from systems with NOx removal equipment. Leaching experiments were done using dilute CaCl2 solutions in batch and columns and a batch nitric acid method. All methods indicated that the leaching of heavy metals was different in the highest ammonia sample tested and the high pH sample. However, toxicity testing with the Microtox* system has indicated little potential toxicity in leachates except for the fly ash at the highest pH (12.4). When the leachate from the high pH fly ash was neutralized, toxicity was eliminated.

  13. Determination of pH in regions of the midguts of acaridid mites.

    PubMed

    Erban, Tomas; Hubert, Jan

    2010-01-01

    The pH of the guts of mites strongly affects their digestive processes. This study was carried out to determine the pH in the guts of 12 species of stored product and house dust mites. Eighteen pH indicators were chosen and offered to the mites in the feeding biotest. Based on the color changes of the indicators, the gut contents of acaridid mites were determined to be within a pH range of 4 to neutral. The gut contents showed a gradient in pH from the anterior to the posterior part. The anterior midgut (ventriculus and caeca) of most species had a pH ranging from 4.5 to 5, or slightly more alkaline for most of the species, while the middle midgut (intercolon/colon) had a pH of 5 to 6. Finally, the pH of the posterior midgut (postcolon) was between 5.5 and 7. Except for Dermatophagoides spp., no remarkable differences in the pH of the gut were observed among the tested species. Dermatophagoides spp. had a more acidic anterior midgut (a pH of 4 to 5) and colon (a pH of 5) with postcolon (a pH of below 6). The results characterizing in vivo conditions in the mite gut offer useful information to study the activity of mite digestive enzymes including their inhibitors and gut microflora.

  14. Evaluation of pH of Bathing Soaps and Shampoos for Skin and Hair Care

    PubMed Central

    Tarun, Jose; Susan, Jose; Suria, Jacob; Susan, Veronica John; Criton, Sebastian

    2014-01-01

    Background: Normal healthy skin has potential of hydrogen (pH) range of 5.4-5.9 and a normal bacterial flora. Use of soap with high pH causes an increase in skin pH, which in turn causes an increase in dehydrative effect, irritability and alteration in bacterial flora. The majority of soaps and shampoos available in the market do not disclose their pH. Aims and Objectives: The aim of this study was to assess the pH of different brands of bathing soaps and shampoos available in the market. Materials and Methods: The samples of soaps and shampoos were collected from shops in the locality. The samples of different brands are coded before the analysis of the pH. Solution of each sample was made and pH was measured using pH meter. Results: Majority of the soaps have a pH within the range of 9-10. Majority of the shampoos have a pH within the range of 6-7. Conclusions: The soaps and shampoos commonly used by the population at large have a pH outside the range of normal skin and hair pH values. Therefore, it is hoped that before recommending soap to patient especially those who have sensitive and acne prone skin, due consideration is given to the pH factor and also that manufacturers will give a thought to pH of soaps and shampoos manufactured by them, so that their products will be more skin and hair friendly. PMID:25284846

  15. The fluorescence properties of the phenylated fullerenes C 70Ph 4, C 70Ph 6, C 70Ph 8, and C 70Ph 10 in room temperature solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwell, Martin; Gustavsson, Thomas; Marguet, Sylvie; Vaissière, Benoı̂t de La; Wachter, Norbert K.; Birkett, Paul R.; Mialocq, Jean-Claude; Leach, Sydney

    2001-12-01

    The emission and excitation spectra of four phenylated [70] fullerenes, C 70Ph 4, C 70Ph 6, C 70Ph 8, and C 70Ph 10 in cyclohexane and toluene solutions have been measured. The fluorescence spectra and related excited state properties are found to depend strongly on the number of attached phenyl groups, but with no systematic trends. Quantum yields and fluorescence lifetimes were measured for C 70Ph 6, C 70Ph 8, and C 70Ph 10, allowing the determination of S1 → S0 radiative transition rates kR. It is found that kR for C 70Ph 10 is about six times larger than for the other compounds. This is consistent with measured absorbtivities for these compounds. The particular character of C 70Ph 10 is also manifested by its higher intersystem crossing rate kISC.

  16. A novel pH optical sensor using methyl orange based on triacetylcellulose membranes as support.

    PubMed

    Hosseini, Mohammad; Heydari, Rouhollah; Alimoradi, Mohammad

    2014-07-15

    A novel pH optical sensor based on triacetylcellulose membrane as solid support was developed by using immobilization of methyl orange indicator. The prepared optical sensor was fixed into a flow cell for on-line pH monitoring. Variables affecting sensor performance, such as pH of dye bonding to triacetylcellulose membrane and dye concentration have been fully evaluated and optimized. The calibration curve showed good behavior and precision (RSD<0.4%) in the pH range of 4.0-12.0. No significant variation was observed on sensor response with increasing the ionic strength in the range of 0.0-0.5M of sodium chloride. Determination of pH by using the proposed optical sensor is on-line, quick, inexpensive, selective and sensitive in the pH range of 4.0-12.0.

  17. The Influence of pH on Prokaryotic Cell Size and Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundararajan, D.; Gutierrez, F.; Heim, N. A.; Payne, J.

    2015-12-01

    The pH of a habitat is essential to an organism's growth and success in its environment. Although most organisms maintain a neutral internal pH, their environmental pH can vary greatly. However, little research has been done concerning an organism's environmental pH across a wide range of taxa. We studied pH tolerance in prokaryotes and its relationship with biovolume, taxonomic classification, and ideal temperature. We had three hypotheses: pH and temperature are not correlated; pH tolerance is similar within taxonomic groups; and extremophiles have small cell sizes. To test these hypotheses, we used pH, size, and taxonomic data from The Prokaryotes. We found that the mean optimum external pH was neutral for prokaryotes as a whole and when divided by domain, phylum, and class. Using ANOVA to test for pH within and among group variances, we found that variation of pH in domains, phyla, classes, and families was greater than between them. pH and size did not show much of a correlation, except that the largest and smallest sized prokaryotes had nearly neutral pH. This seems significant because extremophiles need to divert more of their energy from growth to maintain a neutral internal pH. Acidophiles showed a larger range of optimum pH values than alkaliphiles. A similar result was seen with the minimum and maximum pH values of acidophiles and alkaliphiles. While acidophiles were spread out and had some alkaline maximum values, alkaliphiles had smaller ranges, and unlike some acidophiles that had pH minimums close to zero, alkaliphile pH maximums did not go beyond a pH of 12. No statistically significant differences were found between sizes of acidophiles and alkaliphiles. However, optimum temperatures of acidophiles and alkaliphiles did have a statistically significant difference. pH and temperature had a negative correlation. Therefore, pH seems to have a correlation with cell size, temperature, and taxonomy to some extent.

  18. Characterisation and deployment of an immobilised pH sensor spot towards surface ocean pH measurements.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Jennifer S; Achterberg, Eric P; Rérolle, Victoire M C; Abi Kaed Bey, Samer; Floquet, Cedric F A; Mowlem, Matthew C

    2015-10-15

    The oceans are a major sink for anthropogenic atmospheric carbon dioxide, and the uptake causes changes to the marine carbonate system and has wide ranging effects on flora and fauna. It is crucial to develop analytical systems that allow us to follow the increase in oceanic pCO2 and corresponding reduction in pH. Miniaturised sensor systems using immobilised fluorescence indicator spots are attractive for this purpose because of their simple design and low power requirements. The technology is increasingly used for oceanic dissolved oxygen measurements. We present a detailed method on the use of immobilised fluorescence indicator spots to determine pH in ocean waters across the pH range 7.6-8.2. We characterised temperature (-0.046 pH/°C from 5 to 25 °C) and salinity dependences (-0.01 pH/psu over 5-35), and performed a preliminary investigation into the influence of chlorophyll on the pH measurement. The apparent pKa of the sensor spots was 6.93 at 20 °C. A drift of 0.00014 R (ca. 0.0004 pH, at 25 °C, salinity 35) was observed over a 3 day period in a laboratory based drift experiment. We achieved a precision of 0.0074 pH units, and observed a drift of 0.06 pH units during a test deployment of 5 week duration in the Southern Ocean as an underway surface ocean sensor, which was corrected for using certified reference materials. The temperature and salinity dependences were accounted for with the algorithm, R=0.00034-0.17·pH+0.15·S(2)+0.0067·T-0.0084·S·1.075. This study provides a first step towards a pH optode system suitable for autonomous deployment. The use of a short duration low power illumination (LED current 0.2 mA, 5 μs illumination time) improved the lifetime and precision of the spot. Further improvements to the pH indicator spot operations include regular application of certified reference materials for drift correction and cross-calibration against a spectrophotometric pH system. Desirable future developments should involve novel

  19. The pH of antiseptic cleansers

    PubMed Central

    Kulthanan, Kanokvalai; Varothai, Supenya; Nuchkull, Piyavadee

    2014-01-01

    Background Daily bathing with antiseptic cleansers are proposed by some physicians as an adjunctive management of atopic dermatitis (AD). As atopic skin is sensitive, selection of cleansing products becomes a topic of concern. Objective Our purpose is to evaluate the pH of various antiseptic body cleansers to give an overview for recommendation to patients with AD. Methods Commonly bar and liquid cleansers consisted of antiseptic agents were measured for pH using pH meter and pH-indicator strips. For comparison, mild cleansers and general body cleansers were also measured. Results All cleansing bars had pH 9.8-11.3 except syndet bar that had neutral pH. For liquid cleansers, three cleansing agents had pH close to pH of normal skin, one of antiseptic cleansers, one of mild cleansers and another one of general cleansers. The rest of antiseptic cleansers had pH 8.9-9.6 while mild cleansers had pH 6.9-7.5. Syndet liquid had pH 7 and general liquid cleansers had pH 9.6. Conclusion The pH of cleanser depends on composition of that cleanser. Adding antiseptic agents are not the only factor determining variation of pH. Moreover, benefit of antiseptic properties should be considered especially in cases of infected skin lesions in the selection of proper cleansers for patients with AD. PMID:24527408

  20. Near-infrared noninvasive spectroscopic determination of pH

    DOEpatents

    Alam, Mary K.; Robinson, Mark R.

    1998-08-11

    Methods and apparatus for, preferably, determining noninvasively and in vitro pH in a human. The non-invasive method includes the steps of: generating light at three or more different wavelengths in the range of 1000 nm to 2500 nm; irradiating blood containing tissue; measuring the intensities of the wavelengths emerging from the blood containing tissue to obtain a set of at least three spectral intensities v. wavelengths; and determining the unknown values of pH. The determination of pH is made by using measured intensities at wavelengths that exhibit change in absorbance due to histidine titration. Histidine absorbance changes are due to titration by hydrogen ions. The determination of the unknown pH values is performed by at least one multivariate algorithm using two or more variables and at least one calibration model. The determined pH values are within the physiological ranges observed in blood containing tissue. The apparatus includes a tissue positioning device, a source, at least one detector, electronics, a microprocessor, memory, and apparatus for indicating the determined values.

  1. Fluorescence pH probe based on microstructured polymer optical fiber.

    PubMed

    Yang, X H; Wang, L L

    2007-12-10

    A kind of optical pH sensor was demonstrated that is based on a pH-sensitive fluorescence dye-doped (eosin) cellulose acetate (CA) thin-film modified microstructured polymer optical fiber (MPOF). It was obtained by directly inhaling an eosin-CA-acetic acid mixed solution into array holes in a MPOF and then removing the solvent (acetic acid). The sensing film showed different fluorescence intensities to different pH solutions in a pH range of 2.5-4.5. Furthermore, the pH response range could be tailored through doping a surfactant, hexadecyl trimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB), in the sensing film.

  2. A ph sensor based on a flexible substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Wen-Ding

    pH sensor is an essential component used in many chemical, food, and bio-material industries. Conventional glass electrodes have been used to construct pH sensors, however, have some disadvantages. Glass electrodes are easily affected by alkaline or HF solution, they require a high input impedance pH meter, they often exhibit a sluggish response. In some specific applications, it is also difficult to use glass electrodes for in vivo biomedical or food monitoring applications due to the difficulty of size miniaturization, planarization and polymerization based on current manufacturing technologies. In this work, we have demonstrated a novel flexible pH sensor based on low-cost sol-gel fabrication process of iridium oxide (IrOx) sensing film (IROF). A pair of flexible miniature IrOx/AgCl electrode generated the action potential from the solution by electrochemical mechanism to obtain the pH level of the reagent. The fabrication process including sol-gel, thermal oxidation, and the electro-plating process of the silver chloride (AgCl) reference electrode were reported in the work. The IrOx film was verified and characterized using electron dispersive analysis (EDAX), scanning electron microscope (SEM), and x-ray diffraction (XRD). The flexible pH sensor's performance and characterization have been investigated with different testing parameters such as sensitivity, response time, stability, reversibility, repeatability, selectivity and temperature dependence. The flexible IrOx pH sensors exhibited promising sensing performance with a near-Nernstian response of sensitivity which is between --51.1mV/pH and --51.7mV/pH in different pH levels ranging from 1.5 to 12 at 25°C. Two applications including gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) diagnosis and food freshness wireless monitoring using our micro-flexible IrOx pH sensors were demonstrated. For the GERD diagnosing system, we embedded the micro flexible pH sensor on a 1.2cmx3.8cm of the capsule size of wireless sensor

  3. Fetal scalp pH testing

    MedlinePlus

    Fetal scalp blood; Scalp pH testing; Fetal blood testing - scalp; Fetal distress - fetal scalp testing; Labor - fetal scalp testing ... a baby. In these cases, testing the scalp pH can help the doctor decide whether the fetus ...

  4. Acid loading test (pH)

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003615.htm Acid loading test (pH) To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The acid loading test (pH) measures the ability of the ...

  5. Soil bacterial and fungal communities across a pH gradient in an arable soil.

    PubMed

    Rousk, Johannes; Bååth, Erland; Brookes, Philip C; Lauber, Christian L; Lozupone, Catherine; Caporaso, J Gregory; Knight, Rob; Fierer, Noah

    2010-10-01

    Soils collected across a long-term liming experiment (pH 4.0-8.3), in which variation in factors other than pH have been minimized, were used to investigate the direct influence of pH on the abundance and composition of the two major soil microbial taxa, fungi and bacteria. We hypothesized that bacterial communities would be more strongly influenced by pH than fungal communities. To determine the relative abundance of bacteria and fungi, we used quantitative PCR (qPCR), and to analyze the composition and diversity of the bacterial and fungal communities, we used a bar-coded pyrosequencing technique. Both the relative abundance and diversity of bacteria were positively related to pH, the latter nearly doubling between pH 4 and 8. In contrast, the relative abundance of fungi was unaffected by pH and fungal diversity was only weakly related with pH. The composition of the bacterial communities was closely defined by soil pH; there was as much variability in bacterial community composition across the 180-m distance of this liming experiment as across soils collected from a wide range of biomes in North and South America, emphasizing the dominance of pH in structuring bacterial communities. The apparent direct influence of pH on bacterial community composition is probably due to the narrow pH ranges for optimal growth of bacteria. Fungal community composition was less strongly affected by pH, which is consistent with pure culture studies, demonstrating that fungi generally exhibit wider pH ranges for optimal growth.

  6. Influence of pH on heat resistance of Bacillus licheniformis in buffer and homogenised foods.

    PubMed

    Palop, A; Raso, J; Pagán, R; Condón, S; Sala, F J

    1996-02-01

    The influence of pH of heating menstruum (McIlvaine buffer) on the heat resistance of Bacillus licheniformis was investigated and compared with the heat resistance in homogenised tomato and asparagus at pH 7 and 4 in a wide range of temperatures. Heat resistance was in all mestrua smaller at acid pH. At 99 degrees C and pH 4, heat resistance was 1/20 lower than at pH 7. However, the magnitude of this effect decreased as heat treatment temperatures were increased almost disappearing at 120 degrees C. z values increased from 6.85 at pH 7, to 10.75 at pH 4. At 99 degrees C the effect of pH on heat resistance was constant along the range of pH's tested. The increase of one pH unit increased D99 by 180%. At pH 7 and 4, heat resistance was the same in buffer as in tomato and asparagus homogenates at all temperatures tested. The diminishing influence of the acidification of some foods on the heat resistance of B. licheniformis sterilisation temperatures should be taken into account when a raise in temperature is considered to shorten the duration of heat processes.

  7. [Photohemolysis sensitized by psoralen: dependence on pH].

    PubMed

    Potapenko, A Ia; Belichenko, I V; Mamedov, I S; Zhuravel', N N; Kiagova, A A; Beijersbergen van Henegouwen, G M J; De Vries, Ch

    2007-01-01

    The effect of pH on the hemolysis of erythrocytes photosensitized (366 nm, 23 Wt/m2) by psoralen has been studied. The dependence of the photohemolysis rate (V) on irradiation dose (D) was described by the equation V = Vo + kD, where Vo is the rate of hemolysis without irradiation (dark), and k is the constant. The index of the power at dose x was approximately equal to 2, and its value did not change as the pH of the erythrocyte suspension was changed. It was found that changes in pH led to a sharp change in the value of coefficient k and correspondingly V. The lowest rate of photohemolysis was observed in the pH range from 8.0 to 8.4. As pH was changed from 3.4 to 9.0 or from 8.0 to 7.4, the V value increased approximately twofold. At pH below 7.4, an abrupt increase (approximately fourfold) in V was observed, with the pK value being equal to 7.3. The psoralen molecule lacks titratable acidic and basic groups; therefore, the effects of pH can hardly be assigned to changes in the photophysical properties of the sensitizer. The increase in V in the alkaline region is prohably related to the acceleration of photooxidation of reduced glutathione, whereas the jump of V at pH of about 7.3 may be due to the titration of the product of psoralen photooxidation. The latter assumption is confirmed by the data of hign performance liquid chromatography. In these experiments, psoralen was oxidized in ethanol and mixed with the phosphate buffer at different pH values followed by a qualitative and quantitative analysis by high performance liquid chromatography of photoproducts. Several photoproducts of psoralen have been identified whose content depended on pH. The curve of titration of one photoproduct was similar in shape to the pH dependence of psoralen-photosensitized hemolysis.

  8. Measurement and control of pH in hydrothermal solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Wesolowski, D.J.; Palmer, D.A.; Mesmer, R.E.

    1995-12-31

    Hydrogen-electrode concentration cells with liquid junction are routinely used to measure the pH of aqueous solutions from 0 to 300 C. Results include the dissociation constants of common acids and bases and the hydrolysis and complexation of metal ions in aqueous electrolytes over a wide range of salinities. Recently, we have utilized these cells to examine the sorption of H{sup +} on mineral surfaces, the solubility of minerals with continuous in situ pH measurement, and the thermal decompositon rates of organic acids.

  9. Stress corrosion cracking properties of 15-5PH steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosa, Ferdinand

    1993-01-01

    Unexpected occurrence of failures, due to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of structural components, indicate a need for improved characterization of materials and more advanced analytical procedures for reliably predicting structures performance. Accordingly, the purpose of this study was to determine the stress corrosion susceptibility of 15-5PH steel over a wide range of applied strain rates in a highly corrosive environment. The selected environment for this investigation was a highly acidified sodium chloride (NaCl) aqueous solution. The selected alloy for the study was a 15-5PH steel in the H900 condition. The slow strain rate technique was selected to test the metals specimens.

  10. Continuous intra-arterial blood pH monitoring by a fiber-optic fluorosensor.

    PubMed

    Jin, Weizhong; Wu, Lingxiang; Song, Yuanlin; Jiang, Jinjun; Zhu, Xiaodan; Yang, Dawei; Bai, Chunxue

    2011-05-01

    Continuous intra-arterial blood pH monitoring is highly desirable in clinical practice. However, devices with appreciable accuracy are still not commercially available to date. In this study, we present a fiber-optic fluorosensor that can be used to continuously and accurately measure blood pH changes. The pH sensor is developed based on a proton-sensitive fluorescence dye, N-allyl-4-(4'-methyl-piperazinyl)-1,8-naphthalimide, which is bonded covalently to an optical fiber through heat polymerization. Fluorescence intensity was recorded after the sensor was exposed to different pH buffer solutions or intra-arterial blood in rabbits. Fluorescence intensity with emission peak at 510 nm decreased immediately as the blood pH increased. Linear and reproducible responses were observed when pH ranges from 6.8 to 8.0 with resolution of 0.03 pH units. The correlation coefficient between the pH sensor and the conventional blood gas analyzer was 0.93 in vivo ( n=75, p<0.001) with a bias and precision of -0.02 ± 0.08 pH units. The pH sensor was stable during measurement for at least 72 h. The pH sensor is not sensitive to fluctuations of various ions' concentrations and plasma osmosis at pathophysiological limits, suggesting that it is useful for the continuous measurement of blood pH at various clinical settings.

  11. Thermodynamic, Kinetic, Structural, and Computational Studies of the Ph3Sn-H, Ph3Sn-SnPh3, and Ph3Sn-Cr(CO)3C5Me5 Bond Dissociation Enthalpies.

    PubMed

    Cai, Xiaochen; Majumdar, Subhojit; Fortman, George C; Koppaka, Anjaneyulu; Serafim, Leonardo; Captain, Burjor; Temprado, Manuel; Hoff, Carl D

    2016-10-05

    The kinetics of the reaction of Ph3SnH with excess •Cr(CO)3C5Me5 = •Cr, producing HCr and Ph3Sn-Cr, was studied in toluene solution under 2-3 atm CO pressure in the temperature range of 17-43.5 °C. It was found to obey the rate equation d[Ph3Sn-Cr]/dt = k[Ph3SnH][•Cr] and exhibit a normal kinetic isotope effect (kH/kD = 1.12 ± 0.04). Variable-temperature studies yielded ΔH(‡) = 15.7 ± 1.5 kcal/mol and ΔS(‡) = -11 ± 5 cal/(mol·K) for the reaction. These data are interpreted in terms of a two-step mechanism involving a thermodynamically uphill hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) producing Ph3Sn• and HCr, followed by rapid trapping of Ph3Sn• by excess •Cr to produce Ph3Sn-Cr. Assuming an overbarrier of 2 ± 1 kcal/mol in the HAT step leads to a derived value of 76.0 ± 3.0 kcal/mol for the Ph3Sn-H bond dissociation enthalpy (BDE) in toluene solution. The reaction enthalpy of Ph3SnH with excess •Cr was measured by reaction calorimetry in toluene solution, and a value of the Sn-Cr BDE in Ph3Sn-Cr of 50.4 ± 3.5 kcal/mol was derived. Qualitative studies of the reactions of other R3SnH compounds with •Cr are described for R = (n)Bu, (t)Bu, and Cy. The dehydrogenation reaction of 2Ph3SnH → H2 + Ph3SnSnPh3 was found to be rapid and quantitative in the presence of catalytic amounts of the complex Pd(IPr)(P(p-tolyl)3). The thermochemistry of this process was also studied in toluene solution using varying amounts of the Pd(0) catalyst. The value of ΔH = -15.8 ± 2.2 kcal/mol yields a value of the Sn-Sn BDE in Ph3SnSnPh3 of 63.8 ± 3.7 kcal/mol. Computational studies of the Sn-H, Sn-Sn, and Sn-Cr BDEs are in good agreement with experimental data and provide additional insight into factors controlling reactivity in these systems. The structures of Ph3Sn-Cr and Cy3Sn-Cr were determined by X-ray crystallography and are reported. Mechanistic aspects of oxidative addition reactions in this system are discussed.

  12. pH Shifting alters solubility characteristics and thermal stability of soy protein isolate and its globulin fractions in different pH, salt concentration, and temperature conditions.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jiang; Xiong, Youling L; Chen, Jie

    2010-07-14

    Soy protein isolate (SPI), beta-conglycinin (7S), and glycinin (11S) were subjected to pH-shifting treatments, that is, unfolding at pH 1.5 or 12.0 followed by refolding at pH 7.0, to induce molten globule structures. Treated samples were analyzed for protein solubility, thermal stability, and aggregation in 0, 0.1, and 0.6 M NaCl solutions at pH 2.0-8.0. The pH(12) shifting resulted in drastic increases (up to 2.5-fold) in SPI solubility in the pH 6.0-7.0 range, especially at 0 M NaCl. The pH(1.5) shifting had a generally lesser effect on solubility. 11S exhibited a solubility pattern similar to that of SPI, but the solubility of 7S was unaffected by pH shifting except at 0.6 M NaCl. The pH shifting, notably at pH 12.0, produced soluble, disulfide-linked polymers from 11S and reduced (P < 0.05) its enthalpy but not its temperature of denaturation. Soy proteins structurally altered by pH shifting had a reduced sensitivity to thermal aggregation.

  13. Growth of water hyacinth in municipal landfill leachate with different pH.

    PubMed

    El-Gendy, A S; Biswas, N; Bewtra, J K

    2004-07-01

    Batch experiments were conducted to investigate the effect of municipal landfill leachate pH on the growth of water hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes). These experiments were carried out in a green house environment on leachate samples collected from Essex-Windsor Regional Landfill, Windsor, Ontario, Canada. It was found that water hyacinth plants survived in a pH range of 4.0 to 8.0. Both alkaline pH (above 8.0) and highly acidic pH (below 4.0) had inhibitory effect on the growth of plants. The pH range, for optimum growth of the water hyacinth plants was found to be 5.8 to 6.0. At optimum growth, water hyacinth had an average mean relative growth rate of 0.043 d-1. It was found that nitrogen compounds underwent different transformations depending on the pH of leachate. Plant uptake, nitrification and volatilization were among these transformations.

  14. Inorganic Carbon Accumulation and Photosynthesis in a Blue-green Alga as a Function of External pH 1

    PubMed Central

    Coleman, John R.; Colman, Brian

    1981-01-01

    The blue-green alga Coccochloris peniocystis photosynthesizes optimally over the pH range of 7.0 to 10.0, but the O2-evolution rate is inhibited below pH 7.0 and ceases below pH 5.25. Measurement of the inorganic carbon pool in this alga in the light, using the silicone-fluid filtration technique demonstrated that the rate of accumulation of dissolved inorganic carbon remained relatively constant over a wide pH range. At external dissolved inorganic carbon concentrations of 0.56 to 0.89 millimolar the internal concentration after 30 seconds illumination was greater than 3.5 millimolar over the entire pH range. Intracellular pH measured in the light using [14C]5,5-dimethyloxazolidine-2,4-dione and [14C]methylamine dropped from pH 7.6 at an external pH of 7.0 to pH 6.6 at an external pH of 5.25. Above an external pH of 7.0 the intracellular pH rose gradually to pH 7.9 at an external pH 10.0. Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase activity of cell-free algal extracts exhibited optimal activity at pH 7.5 to 7.8 but was inactive below pH 6.5. It is suggested that the inability of Coccochloris to maintain its intracellular pH when in an acidic environment restricts its photosynthetic capacity by a direct pH effect on the principal CO2 fixing enzyme. PMID:16661792

  15. pH Tolerance in Freshwater Bacterioplankton: Trait Variation of the Community as Measured by Leucine Incorporation

    PubMed Central

    Kritzberg, Emma

    2015-01-01

    pH is an important factor determining bacterial community composition in soil and water. We have directly determined the community tolerance (trait variation) to pH in communities from 22 lakes and streams ranging in pH from 4 to 9 using a growth-based method not relying on distinguishing between individual populations. The pH in the water samples was altered to up to 16 pH values, covering in situ pH ± 2.5 U, and the tolerance was assessed by measuring bacterial growth (Leu incorporation) instantaneously after pH adjustment. The resulting unimodal response curves, reflecting community tolerance to pH, were well modeled with a double logistic equation (mean R2 = 0.97). The optimal pH for growth (pHopt) among the bacterial communities was closely correlated with in situ pH, with a slope (0.89 ± 0.099) close to unity. The pH interval, in which growth was ≥90% of that at pHopt, was 1.1 to 3 pH units wide (mean 2.0 pH units). Tolerance response curves of communities originating from circum-neutral pH were symmetrical, whereas in high-pH (8.9) and especially in low-pH (<5.5) waters, asymmetric tolerance curves were found. In low-pH waters, decreasing pH was more detrimental for bacterial growth than increasing pH, with a tendency for the opposite for high-pH waters. A pH tolerance index, using the ratio of growth at only two pH values (pH 4 and 8), was closely related to pHopt (R2 = 0.83), allowing for easy determination of pH tolerance during rapid changes in pH. PMID:26276108

  16. Precision of a field method for determination of pH in dilute lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Turk, J.T.

    1986-01-01

    Replicate pH measurements in three dilute lakes made during extreme conditions indicate that pH can be measured in the field with a variance due to measurement error of 0.005 unit. Error of the field technique in measuring the pH of dilute solutions in the laboratory ranges from less than 0.01 unit in dilute strong-acid solutions to about 0.05 unit in air-saturated deionized water.

  17. 40 CFR 439.4 - General limitation or standard for pH.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false General limitation or standard for pH. 439.4 Section 439.4 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT... limitation or standard for pH. The pH must remain within the range 6.0 to 9.0 in any discharge subject to...

  18. 41 CFR 302-2.11 - May the 1-year time limitation for completing all aspects of a relocation be extended?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true May the 1-year time... and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System RELOCATION ALLOWANCES INTRODUCTION 2-EMPLOYEES ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS General Rules Time Limits § 302-2.11 May the 1-year time limitation...

  19. 41 CFR 302-2.11 - May the 1-year time limitation for completing all aspects of a relocation be extended?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false May the 1-year time... and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System RELOCATION ALLOWANCES INTRODUCTION 2-EMPLOYEES ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS General Rules Time Limits § 302-2.11 May the 1-year time limitation...

  20. 41 CFR 302-2.11 - May the 2-year time limitation for completing all aspects of a relocation be extended?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false May the 2-year time... and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System RELOCATION ALLOWANCES INTRODUCTION 2-EMPLOYEES ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS General Rules Time Limits § 302-2.11 May the 2-year time limitation...

  1. 41 CFR 302-2.11 - May the 2-year time limitation for completing all aspects of a relocation be extended?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false May the 2-year time... and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System RELOCATION ALLOWANCES INTRODUCTION 2-EMPLOYEES ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS General Rules Time Limits § 302-2.11 May the 2-year time limitation...

  2. 41 CFR 302-2.11 - May the 1-year time limitation for completing all aspects of a relocation be extended?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false May the 1-year time... and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System RELOCATION ALLOWANCES INTRODUCTION 2-EMPLOYEES ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS General Rules Time Limits § 302-2.11 May the 1-year time limitation...

  3. 43 CFR 3162.2-11 - How soon after I know of the likelihood of drainage must I take protective action?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false How soon after I know of the likelihood of... Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS... § 3162.2-11 How soon after I know of the likelihood of drainage must I take protective action? (a)...

  4. Interfacial pH during mussel adhesive plaque formation

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Nadine R. Martinez; Das, Saurabh; Kaufman, Yair; Israelachvili, Jacob N.; Waite, J. Herbert

    2015-01-01

    Mussel (Mytilus californianus) adhesion to marine surfaces involves an intricate and adaptive synergy of molecules and spatio-temporal processes. Although the molecules, such as mussel foot proteins (mfps), are well characterized, deposition details remain vague and speculative. Developing methods for the precise surveillance of conditions that apply during mfp deposition would aid both in understanding mussel adhesion and translating this adhesion into useful technologies. To probe the interfacial pH at which mussels buffer the local environment during mfp deposition, a lipid bilayer with tethered pH-sensitive fluorochromes was assembled on mica. The interfacial pH during foot contact with modified mica ranged from 2.2−3.3, which is well below the seawater pH of ~8. The acidic pH serves multiple functions: it limits mfp-Dopa oxidation, thereby enabling the catecholic functionalities to adsorb to surface oxides by H-bonding and metal ion coordination, and provides a solubility switch for mfps, most of which aggregate at pH ≥ 7-8. PMID:25875963

  5. Kinetics of biological perchlorate reduction and pH effect.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao; Lippincott, Lee; Meng, Xiaoguang

    2008-05-01

    Batch experiments were conducted to investigate the kinetics of perchlorate reduction by heterotrophic and mixed perchlorate-reducing bacteria. Substrate-utilizing and cellular maintenance models were employed to fit the experimental data for microbial perchlorate reduction. The half saturation constant, K(s), obtained in this study was below 0.1mg/L, which indicated that perchlorate-reducing bacteria are effective at utilizing low concentrations of perchlorate. The effect of pH on the kinetics of microbial perchlorate reduction was also studied. Perchlorate reduction occurred throughout the pH range from 5.0 to 9.0. Nevertheless, the rates of perchlorate removal by a unit mass of bacteria were significantly different at various pHs with a maximum rate at pH 7.0. The variation of q(max) with pH was described well with a Gaussian peak equation. This equation is expected to be applicable for practical purposes when pH effects need to be considered.

  6. Interfacial pH during mussel adhesive plaque formation.

    PubMed

    Martinez Rodriguez, Nadine R; Das, Saurabh; Kaufman, Yair; Israelachvili, Jacob N; Waite, J Herbert

    2015-01-01

    Mussel (Mytilus californianus) adhesion to marine surfaces involves an intricate and adaptive synergy of molecules and spatio-temporal processes. Although the molecules, such as mussel foot proteins (mfps), are well characterized, deposition details remain vague and speculative. Developing methods for the precise surveillance of conditions that apply during mfp deposition would aid both in understanding mussel adhesion and translating this adhesion into useful technologies. To probe the interfacial pH at which mussels buffer the local environment during mfp deposition, a lipid bilayer with tethered pH-sensitive fluorochromes was assembled on mica. The interfacial pH during foot contact with modified mica ranged from 2.2 to 3.3, which is well below the seawater pH of ~ 8. The acidic pH serves multiple functions: it limits mfp-Dopa oxidation, thereby enabling the catecholic functionalities to adsorb to surface oxides by H-bonding and metal ion coordination, and provides a solubility switch for mfps, most of which aggregate at pH ≥ 7-8.

  7. The influence of pH on the specific adhesion of P piliated Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Klinth, Jeanna E; Castelain, Mickaël; Uhlin, Bernt Eric; Axner, Ove

    2012-01-01

    Adhesion to host tissues is an initiating step in a majority of bacterial infections. In the case of Gram-negative bacteria this adhesion is often mediated by a specific interaction between an adhesin, positioned at the distal end of bacterial pili, and its receptor on the surface of the host tissue. Furthermore, the rod of the pilus, and particularly its biomechanical properties, is believed to be crucial for the ability of bacteria to withstand external forces caused by, for example, (in the case of urinary tract infections) urinary rinsing flows by redistributing the force to several pili. In this work, the adhesion properties of P-piliated E. coli and their dependence of pH have been investigated in a broad pH range by both the surface plasmon resonance technique and force measuring optical tweezers. We demonstrate that P piliated bacteria have an adhesion ability throughout the entire physiologically relevant pH range (pH 4.5 - 8). We also show that pH has a higher impact on the binding rate than on the binding stability or the biomechanical properties of pili; the binding rate was found to have a maximum around pH 5 while the binding stability was found to have a broader distribution over pH and be significant over the entire physiologically relevant pH range. Force measurements on a single organelle level show that the biomechanical properties of P pili are not significantly affected by pH.

  8. A novel optical probe for pH sensing in gastro-esophageal apparatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldini, F.; Ghini, G.; Giannetti, A.; Senesi, F.; Trono, C.

    2011-03-01

    Monitoring gastric pH for long periods, usually 24 h, may be essential in analyzing the physiological pattern of acidity, in obtaining information on changes in activity during peptic ulcer disease, and in assessing the effect of antisecretory drugs. Gastro-esophageal reflux, which causes a pH decrease in the esophagus content from pH 7 even down to pH 2, can determine esophagitis with possible strictures and Barrett's esophagus. One of the difficulties of the optical measurement of pH in the gastro-esophageal apparatus lies in the required extended working range from 1 to 8 pH units. The present paper deals with a novel optical pH sensor, using methyl red as optical pH indicator. Contrary to all acidbase indicators characterized by working ranges limited to 2-3 pH units, methyl red, after its covalent immobilization on controlled pore glass (CPG), is characterized by a wide working range which fits with the clinical requirements. The novel probe design here described is suitable for gastro-esophageal applications and allows the optimization of the performances of the CPG with the immobilised indicator. This leads to a very simple configuration characterized by a very fast response time.

  9. Functional photoacoustic microscopy of pH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatni, M. Rameez; Yao, Junjie; Danielli, Amos; Favazza, Christopher P.; Maslov, Konstantin I.; Wang, Lihong V.

    2012-02-01

    pH is a tightly regulated indicator of metabolic activity. In mammalian systems, imbalance of pH regulation may result from or result in serious illness. Even though the regulation system of pH is very robust, tissue pH can be altered in many diseases such as cancer, osteoporosis and diabetes mellitus. Traditional high-resolution optical imaging techniques, such as confocal microscopy, routinely image pH in cells and tissues using pH sensitive fluorescent dyes, which change their fluorescence properties with the surrounding pH. Since strong optical scattering in biological tissue blurs images at greater depths, high-resolution pH imaging is limited to penetration depths of 1mm. Here, we report photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) of commercially available pH-sensitive fluorescent dye in tissue phantoms. Using both opticalresolution photoacoustic microscopy (OR-PAM), and acoustic resolution photoacoustic microscopy (AR-PAM), we explored the possibility of recovering the pH values in tissue phantoms. In this paper, we demonstrate that PAM was capable of recovering pH values up to a depth of 2 mm, greater than possible with other forms of optical microscopy.

  10. Effect of environmental pH on enzyme activity and growth of Bacteroides gingivalis W50.

    PubMed Central

    McDermid, A S; McKee, A S; Marsh, P D

    1988-01-01

    Since the pH of the gingival crevice increases from below neutrality in health to above pH 8 in disease, we decided to investigate the effect of environmental pH on the growth and enzyme activity of Bacteroides gingivalis W50. Cells were grown in a chemostat under hemin-excess conditions over a range of pH values; stable growth was observed only between pH 6.7 and 8.3, with the maximum yields obtained between pH 7.0 and 8.0. The enzyme profile of cells varied markedly with pH. Enzymes with a specificity for gingival connective tissue (collagenase, hyaluronidase) were produced optimally at or below neutral pH, whereas trypsinlike activity increased with the growth pH and was maximal at pH 8.0. Chymotrypsinlike activity was generally low, although its activity was highest at the extremes of growth pH, i.e., at pH 6.7 and 8.3. Inhibitor studies provided evidence that the breakdown of collagen involved the concerted action of both a collagenase and the trypsinlike enzyme. The ratio of trypsin to collagenolytic activity rose from 1:1 during growth at neutral pH and below to almost 7:1 during growth at pH 8.3. Thus B. gingivalis appears to be uniquely adapted as a periodontopathic organism in that under environmental conditions likely to prevail during the initial stages of pocket development it produces maximally those enzymes with a tissue-damaging potential. Then, as the pH of the pocket rises during the host inflammatory response, the activity of the trypsinlike enzyme increases markedly, which may enable cells to inactivate key components of the host defenses such as immunoglobulins and complement. PMID:3281900

  11. Range Reference Notebook

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-10-15

    rifle grenade (inert), tin can lid, 15” tent peg 3 Table FRD-7. Fort Ritchie Sector 3 Representative Examples of Non-MEC Clutter Description 1/2...Appendix B—Indirect Fire Range Examples SITES ( ADI ) Adak Naval Air Facility, AK, Mitt Lake Mortar Range (FRI) Fort Ritchie...example range. B- ADI -1 Indirect-Fire Range,: Adak, AK, Mitt Lake Mortar Range Impact Area Site-Specific References – Adak NAF Foster Wheeler

  12. Effect of extracellular pH on growth and proton motive force of Bacteroides succinogenes, a cellulolytic ruminal bacterium.

    PubMed Central

    Russell, J B

    1987-01-01

    The utilization of cellulose or cellobiose by Bacteroides succinogenes S85 was severely inhibited at pH values of less than 5.7. Since low pH inhibited the utilization of both cellobiose and cellulose, changes in cellulase activity could not explain the effect. At an extracellular pH of 6.9, the pH gradient (delta pH) across the cell membrane was only 0.07 U. As extracellular pH declined from 6.9 to 5.7, intracellular pH decreased to a smaller extent than extracellular pH and delta pH increased. Below pH 5.7, there was a linear and nearly proportional decrease in intracellular pH. B. succinogenes took up the lipophilic cation tetraphenylphosphonium ion (TPP+) in the presence of cellobiose, and uptake was sensitive to the ionophore valinomycin. As pH was decreased with phosphoric acid, the cells lost TPP+ and electrical potential, delta psi, decreased. From extracellular pH 6.9 to 5.7, the decrease in delta psi was compensated for by an increase in delta pH, and the proton motive force ranged from 152 to 158 mV. At a pH of less than 5.7, there was a large decrease in proton motive force, and this decrease corresponded to the inhibition of cellobiose utilization. PMID:2827568

  13. Effect of initial solution pH on photo-induced reductive decomposition of perfluorooctanoic acid.

    PubMed

    Qu, Yan; Zhang, Chao-Jie; Chen, Pei; Zhou, Qi; Zhang, Wei-Xian

    2014-07-01

    The effects of initial solution pH on the decomposition of perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) with hydrated electrons as reductant were investigated. The reductive decomposition of PFOA depends strongly on the solution pH. In the pH range of 5.0-10.0, the decomposition and defluorination rates of PFOA increased with the increase of the initial solution pH. The rate constant was 0.0295 min(-1) at pH 10.0, which was more than 49.0 times higher than that at pH 5.0. Higher pH also inhibits the generation of toxic intermediates during the PFOA decomposition. For example, the short-chain PFCAs reached a lower maximum concentration in shorter reaction time as pH increasing. The peak areas of accumulated fluorinated and iodinated hydrocarbons detected by GC/MS under acidic conditions were nearly 10-100 times more than those under alkaline conditions. In short, alkaline conditions were more favorable for photo-induced reduction of PFOA as high pH promoted the decomposition of PFOA and inhibited the accumulation of intermediate products. The concentration of hydrated electron, detected by laser flash photolysis, increased with the increase of the initial pH. This was the main reason why the decomposition of PFOA in the UV-KI system depended strongly on the initial pH.

  14. A Long-Range Precision Ranging System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Easterling, Mahlon

    1961-01-01

    A technique is presented that may be used for precision real-time continuous range measuring at long ranges. The technique uses a carrier that is phase modulated by a pseudo-random binary sequence. The characteristics of the sequence that make it acquirable are discussed. The general form of a receiver capable of tracking the carrier is given and is shown to be a kind of phase-locked loop. A two-loop system capable of tracking a pseudo-random sequence and its clock is given. The combination of the receiver and the sequence tracking system form a ranging receiver. The power division necessary between the carrier and the sidebands is shown to be determined by the noise bandwidths of the two tracking systems. The bandwidths necessary for tracking space probes and Earth satellites are given and some experiments in radar-tracking Earth satellites are described. Based on these experiments, estimates are made of the useful range of such a system in tracking space probes.

  15. Catalytic gold nanoparticle driven pH specific chemical locomotion.

    PubMed

    Dey, Krishna Kanti; Panda, Biswa Ranjan; Paul, Anumita; Basu, Saurabh; Chattopadhyay, Arun

    2010-08-15

    Gold nanoparticle (Au NP) catalyzed decomposition of alkaline hydrogen peroxide has been utilized in driving chemical locomotives in a liquid. Au NPs deposited on spherical micron sized polymer resin beads catalyzed the decomposition of H(2)O(2) in the pH range 9.1-10.8. The O(2) gas bubbles produced in the decomposition moved the beads upward with average velocities that depended on the pH of the solution. The measured average velocity of the bead increased with the increase in pH in the range 9.1-10.8. Above this pH, the self-decomposition of H(2)O(2) produced sufficient bubbles in the medium that made the motion haphazard and thus prevented a clear measurement of the velocity. The observed accelerated motion of the locomotive has been explained by considering the time-dependent growth of O(2) gas bubbles on the polymer, while taking into consideration desorption and other factors.

  16. Site-specific management of soil pH and nutrients in blueberry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Site-specific management of soil pH and fertilizers is one of the most promising strategies in precision agriculture and is potentially applicable to many horticultural crops, including blueberry. Unlike most fruit crops, blueberry is adapted to low soil pH conditions in the range of 4-5.5 and has ...

  17. Passive infrared ranging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonpacher, N. K.

    1983-12-01

    The range of an infrared source was estimated by analyzing the atmospheric absorption by CO2 in several wavelength intervals of its spectrum. These bandpasses were located at the edge of the CO2 absorption band near 2300 1/cm (4.3 micron). A specific algorithm to predict range was determined based on numerous computer generated spectra. When tested with these spectra, range estimates within 0.8 km were obtained for ranges between 0 and 18 km. Accuracy decreased when actual source spectra were tested. Although actual spectra were available only for ranges to 5 km, 63% of these spectra resulted in range estimates that were within 1.6 km of the actual range. Specific spectral conditions that affected the range predictions were found. Methods to correct the deficiencies were discussed. Errors from atmospheric variations, and the effects of background noise, were also investigated. Limits on accuracy and range resolution were determined.

  18. [Acute lymphoblastic leukemia with T + PH1 monocytosis: a case report].

    PubMed

    Braham Jmili, Nejia; Sendi, Halima; Khelif, Abderrahim

    2011-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia Type T PH1 positive (with t (9.22)) are exceptional. These effects can occur immediately or in the evolution of chronic myeloid leukemia known. We report the case of a patient aged 31 years with acute lymphoblastic leukemia T PH1 + cyologiques with cytological atypia. The overall appearance of blood and marrow: the signs of dysplasia the presence of a monocytic contingent, with blood monocytes evoked a myeloid acute leukemia AL. But the immunophenotype was unequivocally in favor of T- acute lymphoblastic leukemia with one aspect of lymphoid blasts in morphology and myeloperoxidase negative. The karyotype showed the presence of Philadelphia chromosome in all mitoses with additional abnormalities (chromosomes 2, 11.16…).

  19. Molecular Basis of pH and Ca2+ Regulation of Aquaporin Water Permeability

    PubMed Central

    Németh-Cahalan, Karin L.; Kalman, Katalin; Hall, James E.

    2004-01-01

    Aquaporins facilitate the diffusion of water across cell membranes. We previously showed that acid pH or low Ca2+ increase the water permeability of bovine AQP0 expressed in Xenopus oocytes. We now show that external histidines in loops A and C mediate the pH dependence. Furthermore, the position of histidines in different members of the aquaporin family can “tune” the pH sensitivity toward alkaline or acid pH ranges. In bovine AQP0, replacement of His40 in loop A by Cys, while keeping His122 in loop C, shifted the pH sensitivity from acid to alkaline. In the killifish AQP0 homologue, MIPfun, with His at position 39 in loop A, alkaline rather than acid pH increased water permeability. Moving His39 to His40 in MIPfun, to mimic bovine AQP0 loop A, shifted the pH sensitivity back to the acid range. pH regulation was also found in two other members of the aquaporin family. Alkaline pH increased the water permeability of AQP4 that contains His at position 129 in loop C. Acid and alkaline pH sensitivity was induced in AQP1 by adding histidines 48 (in loop A) and 130 (in loop C). We conclude that external histidines in loops A and C that span the outer vestibule contribute to pH sensitivity. In addition, we show that when AQP0 (bovine or killifish) and a crippled calmodulin mutant were coexpressed, Ca2+ sensitivity was lost but pH sensitivity was maintained. These results demonstrate that Ca2+ and pH modulation are separable and arise from processes on opposite sides of the membrane. PMID:15078916

  20. Improved reliability of pH measurements.

    PubMed

    Spitzer, Petra; Werner, Barbara

    2002-11-01

    Measurements of pH are performed on a large scale at laboratory level, and in industry. To meet the quality-control requirements and other technical specifications there is a need for traceability in measurement results. The prerequisite for the international acceptance of analytical data is reliability. To measure means to compare. Comparability entails use of recognised references to which the standard buffer solutions used for calibration of pH meter-electrode assemblies can be traced. The new recommendation on the measurement of pH recently published as a provisional document by the International Union on Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) enables traceability for measured pH values to a conventional reference frame which is recognised world-wide. The primary method for pH will be described. If analytical data are to be accepted internationally it is necessary to demonstrate the equivalence of the national traceability structures, including national measurement standards. For the first time key comparisons for pH have been performed by the Consultative Committee for Amount of Substance (CCQM, set up by the International Bureau of Weights and Measures, BIPM) to assess the equivalence of the national measurement procedures used to determine the pH of primary standard buffer solutions. The results of the first key comparison on pH CCQM-K9, and other international initiatives to improve the consistency of the results of measurement for pH, are reported.

  1. pH Meter probe assembly

    DOEpatents

    Hale, C.J.

    1983-11-15

    An assembly for mounting a pH probe in a flowing solution, such as a sanitary sewer line, which prevents the sensitive glass portion of the probe from becoming coated with grease, oil, and other contaminants, whereby the probe gives reliable pH indication over an extended period of time. The pH probe assembly utilizes a special filter media and a timed back-rinse feature for flushing clear surface contaminants of the filter. The flushing liquid is of a known pH and is utilized to check performance of the probe. 1 fig.

  2. pH Meter probe assembly

    DOEpatents

    Hale, Charles J.

    1983-01-01

    An assembly for mounting a pH probe in a flowing solution, such as a sanitary sewer line, which prevents the sensitive glass portion of the probe from becoming coated with grease, oil, and other contaminants, whereby the probe gives reliable pH indication over an extended period of time. The pH probe assembly utilizes a special filter media and a timed back-rinse feature for flushing clear surface contaminants of the filter. The flushing liquid is of a known pH and is utilized to check performance of the probe.

  3. RADIO RANGING DEVICE

    DOEpatents

    Nieset, R.T.

    1961-05-16

    A radio ranging device is described. It utilizes a super regenerative detector-oscillator in which echoes of transmitted pulses are received in proper phase to reduce noise energy at a selected range and also at multiples of the selected range.

  4. Tau ranging revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tausworthe, R. C.

    1987-01-01

    It is shown that a ranging receiver with a sufficient and reasonable number of correlators is competitive with the current sequential component ranging system by some 1.5 to 2.5 dB. The optimum transmitter code, the optimum receiver, and a near-maximum-lilelihood range-estimation algorithm are presented.

  5. Long Range Technology Planning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ambron, Sueann, Ed.

    1986-01-01

    This summary of a meeting of the Apple Education Advisory Council, on long range technology plans at the state, county, district, and school levels, includes highlights from group discussions on future planning, staff development, and curriculum. Three long range technology plans at the state level are provided: Long Range Educational Technology…

  6. pH sensitive quantum dot-anthraquinone nanoconjugates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruedas-Rama, Maria Jose; Hall, Elizabeth A. H.

    2014-05-01

    Semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) have been shown to be highly sensitive to electron or charge transfer processes, which may alter their optical properties. This feature can be exploited for different sensing applications. Here, we demonstrate that QD-anthraquinone conjugates can function as electron transfer-based pH nanosensors. The attachment of the anthraquinones on the surface of QDs results in the reduction of electron hole recombination, and therefore a quenching of the photoluminescence intensity. For some anthraquinone derivatives tested, the quenching mechanism is simply caused by an electron transfer process from QDs to the anthraquinone, functioning as an electron acceptor. For others, electron transfer and energy transfer (FRET) processes were found. A detailed analysis of the quenching processes for CdSe/ZnS QD of two different sizes is presented. The photoluminescence quenching phenomenon of QDs is consistent with the pH sensitive anthraquinone redox chemistry. The resultant family of pH nanosensors shows pKa ranging ˜5-8, being ideal for applications of pH determination in physiological samples like blood or serum, for intracellular pH determination, and for more acidic cellular compartments such as endosomes and lysosomes. The nanosensors showed high selectivity towards many metal cations, including the most physiologically important cations which exist at high concentration in living cells. The reversibility of the proposed systems was also demonstrated. The nanosensors were applied in the determination of pH in samples mimicking the intracellular environment. Finally, the possibility of incorporating a reference QD to achieve quantitative ratiometric measurements was investigated.

  7. Systematic generation of buffer systems for pH gradient ion exchange chromatography and their application.

    PubMed

    Kröner, Frieder; Hubbuch, Jürgen

    2013-04-12

    pH gradient protein separations are widely used techniques in the field of protein analytics, of which isoelectric focusing is the most well known application. The chromatographic variant, based on the formation of pH gradients in ion exchange columns is only rarely applied due to the difficulties to form controllable, linear pH gradients over a broad pH range. This work describes a method for the systematic generation of buffer compositions with linear titration curves, resulting in well controllable pH gradients. To generate buffer compositions with linear titration curves an in silico method was successfully developed. With this tool, buffer compositions for pH gradient ion exchange chromatography with pH ranges spanning up to 7.5 pH units were established and successfully validated. Subsequently, the buffer systems were used to characterize the elution behavior of 22 different model proteins in cation and anion exchange pH gradient chromatography. The results of both chromatographic modes as well as isoelectric focusing were compared to describe differences in between the methods.

  8. Does soil pH influence swallow-wort distribution in its current range?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The perennial non-native vines, pale swallow-wort (Cynanchum rossicum [Kleopow] Borhidi) and black swallow-wort (Cynanchum louiseae [L.] Kartesz & Gandhi), are established invaders in the northeastern United States and southeastern Canada, and are spreading westward. The swallow-worts typically colo...

  9. Role of pH in metal adsorption from aqueous solutions containing chelating agents on chitosan

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, F.C.; Tseng, R.L.; Juang, R.S.

    1999-01-01

    The role of pH in adsorption of Cu(II) from aqueous solutions containing chelating agents on chitosan was emphasized. Four chelating agents including ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), citric acid, tartaric acid, and sodium gluconate were used. It was shown that the adsorption ability of Cu(II) on chitosan from its chelated solutions varied significantly with pH variations. The competition between coordination of Cu(II) with unprotonated chitosan and electrostatic interaction of the Cu(II) chelates with protonated chitosan took place because of the change in solution pH during adsorption. The maximum adsorption capacity was obtained within each optimal pH range determined from titration curves of the chelated solutions. Coordination of Cu(II) with the unprotonated chitosan was found to dominate at pH below such an optimal pH value.

  10. Telemetry Ranging: Signal Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamkins, J.; Kinman, P.; Xie, H.; Vilnrotter, V.; Dolinar, S.

    2016-02-01

    This article describes the details of the signal processing used in a telemetry ranging system in which timing information is extracted from the downlink telemetry signal in order to compute spacecraft range. A previous article describes telemetry ranging concepts and architecture, which are a slight variation of a scheme published earlier. As in that earlier work, the telemetry ranging concept eliminates the need for a dedicated downlink ranging signal to communicate the necessary timing information. The present article describes the operation and performance of the major receiver functions on the spacecraft and the ground --- many of which are standard tracking loops already in use in JPL's flight and ground radios --- and how they can be used to provide the relevant information for making a range measurement. It also describes the implementation of these functions in software, and performance of an end-to-end software simulation of the telemetry ranging system.

  11. Telemetry-Based Ranging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamkins, Jon; Vilnrotter, Victor A.; Andrews, Kenneth S.; Shambayati, Shervin

    2011-01-01

    A telemetry-based ranging scheme was developed in which the downlink ranging signal is eliminated, and the range is computed directly from the downlink telemetry signal. This is the first Deep Space Network (DSN) ranging technology that does not require the spacecraft to transmit a separate ranging signal. By contrast, the evolutionary ranging techniques used over the years by NASA missions, including sequential ranging (transmission of a sequence of sinusoids) and PN-ranging (transmission of a pseudo-noise sequence) whether regenerative (spacecraft acquires, then regenerates and retransmits a noise-free ranging signal) or transparent (spacecraft feeds the noisy demodulated uplink ranging signal into the downlink phase modulator) relied on spacecraft power and bandwidth to transmit an explicit ranging signal. The state of the art in ranging is described in an emerging CCSDS (Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems) standard, in which a pseudo-noise (PN) sequence is transmitted from the ground to the spacecraft, acquired onboard, and the PN sequence is coherently retransmitted back to the ground, where a delay measurement is made between the uplink and downlink signals. In this work, the telemetry signal is aligned with the uplink PN code epoch. The ground station computes the delay between the uplink signal transmission and the received downlink telemetry. Such a computation is feasible because symbol synchronizability is already an integral part of the telemetry design. Under existing technology, the telemetry signal cannot be used for ranging because its arrival-time information is not coherent with any Earth reference signal. By introducing this coherence, and performing joint telemetry detection and arrival-time estimation on the ground, a high-rate telemetry signal can provide all the precision necessary for spacecraft ranging.

  12. pH. Agricultural Lesson Plans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southern Illinois Univ., Carbondale. Dept. of Agricultural Education and Mechanization.

    This lesson plan is intended for use in conducting classes on the effect of pH on plant growth. Presented first are an attention step/problem statement and a series of questions and answers designed to convey general information about soil pH and its effect on plants. The following topics are among those discussed: acidity and alkalinity; the…

  13. pH [Measure of Acidity].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, Paula

    This autoinstructional program deals with the study of the pH of given substances by using litmus and hydrion papers. It is a learning activity directed toward low achievers involved in the study of biology at the secondary school level. The time suggested for the unit is 25-30 minutes (plus additional time for further pH testing). The equipment…

  14. Middle School and pH?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herricks, Susan

    2007-01-01

    A local middle school requested that the Water Center of Advanced Materials for Purification of Water With Systems (WaterCAMPWS), a National Science Foundation Science and Technology Center, provide an introduction to pH for their seventh-grade water-based service learning class. After sorting through a multitude of information about pH, a…

  15. Inexpensive and Disposable pH Electrodes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldcamp, Michael J.; Conklin, Alfred; Nelson, Kimberly; Marchetti, Jessica; Brashear, Ryan; Epure, Emily

    2010-01-01

    Inexpensive electrodes for the measurement of pH have been constructed using the ionophore tribenzylamine for sensing H[superscript +] concentrations. Both traditional liquid-membrane electrodes and coated-wire electrodes have been constructed and studied, and both exhibit linear, nearly Nernstian responses to changes in pH. Measurements of pH…

  16. A Framework for Developing pH Guidance for Drinking Water Treatment and Distribution - abstract

    EPA Science Inventory

    Worldwide, many agencies have historically limited the range of pH values of distributed water between 6.5 and 8.5. Although this range is not a regulatory limit, many jurisdictions have used it as one. In some cases, the range has been a barrier to optimizing distribution syste...

  17. A Framework for Developing pH Guidance for Drinking Water Treatment and Distribution

    EPA Science Inventory

    Worldwide, many agencies have historically limited the range of pH values of distributed water between 6.5 and 8.5. Although this range is not a regulatory limit, many jurisdictions have used it as one. In some cases, the range has been a barrier to optimizing distribution syste...

  18. Modeling of salt and pH gradient elution in ion-exchange chromatography.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Michael; Hafner, Mathias; Frech, Christian

    2014-01-01

    The separation of proteins by internally and externally generated pH gradients in chromatofocusing on ion-exchange columns is a well-established analytical method with a large number of applications. In this work, a stoichiometric displacement model was used to describe the retention behavior of lysozyme on SP Sepharose FF and a monoclonal antibody on Fractogel SO3 (S) in linear salt and pH gradient elution. The pH dependence of the binding charge B in the linear gradient elution model is introduced using a protein net charge model, while the pH dependence of the equilibrium constant is based on a thermodynamic approach. The model parameter and pH dependences are calculated from linear salt gradient elutions at different pH values as well as from linear pH gradient elutions at different fixed salt concentrations. The application of the model for the well-characterized protein lysozyme resulted in almost identical model parameters based on either linear salt or pH gradient elution data. For the antibody, only the approach based on linear pH gradients is feasible because of the limited pH range useful for salt gradient elution. The application of the model for the separation of an acid variant of the antibody from the major monomeric form is discussed.

  19. Continuous intra-arterial blood pH monitoring in rabbits with acid-base disorders.

    PubMed

    Jin, Weizhong; Jiang, Jinjun; Wang, Xun; Zhu, Xiaodan; Wang, Guifang; Song, Yuanlin; Bai, Chunxue

    2011-07-31

    The acid-base balance of arterial blood is important for the clinical management of seriously ill patients, especially patients with acute lung injury or acute respiratory distress syndrome. We developed a novel fluorosensor for continuous blood pH monitoring and evaluated its performance both in vitro and in vivo in rabbits with acid-base disorders. The pH sensor is made of N-allyl-4-piperazinyl-1, 8-napthalimide and 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate, which were bonded at the distal end of the optical fiber. The fluorescence intensity increased as the pH decreased with good reproducibility, selectivity and linearity in the pH range of 6-8. The pH measurement precision was 0.03 ± 0.03 pH units with a bias of -0.02 ± 0.04 (n = 105) and -0.00 ± 0.05 pH units (n=189) in rabbits with metabolic and respiratory acid-base orders, respectively. The optical pH sensor can accurately measure pH fluctuations with a fast response and is a promising candidate for continuous in-line measurements of blood pH in critical care patients.

  20. Relation of pH to toxicity of lampricide TFM in the laboratory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bills, T.D.; Marking, L.L.; Howe, G.E.; Rach, J.J.

    1988-01-01

    In the control of larval sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus ) with 3-trifluoromethyl-4-nitrophenol (TFM) in tributaries of the Great Lakes, occasional kills of other fishes have caused concern about the effects of the chemical on non-target organisms. Stream treatment rates have been based on previous application rates, alkalinity measurements, results of on-site toxicity tests, or combinations of these. Laboratory studies in 1987 showed that pH is the primary factor that affects the toxicity of TFM (the lower the pH, the greater the toxicity): even small changes in pH alter the toxicity, whereas substantial changes in alkalinity have little effect. In 12-h exposures, the 96-h LC50 for TFM to rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri ) ranged from about 0.9 mg/L at pH 6.5 to > 100 mg/L at pH 9.5, but (at pH 7.5) the LC50's differed little at total alkalinities of about 18 mg/L and 207 mg/L. Decreases in pH as small as 0.5 pH unit caused nontoxic solutions to become toxic to rainbow trout. Some kills of non-target fish during stream treatments were reportedly caused by decreases in pH, and (conversely) that some stream treatments for sea lampreys were ineffective because pH increased.

  1. Role of pH on the stress corrosion cracking of titanium alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khokhar, M. I.; Beck, F. H.; Fontana, M. G.

    1973-01-01

    Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) experiments were conducted on Ti-8-1-1 wire specimens in hydrochloric and sulfuric acids of variable pH in order to determine the effect of pH on the susceptibility to cracking. The alloy exhibited increasing susceptibility with decreasing pH. By varying the applied potential, it was observed that susceptibility zones exist both in the cathodic and the anodic ranges. In the cathodic range, susceptibility also increased with decreasing applied potential. Corrosion potential-time data in hydrochloric acid (pH 1.7) and sulfuric acid (pH 1.7) indicate that chloride ions lower the corrosion potential of the specimen which, in turn, increases the susceptibility.

  2. The effect of pH on phosphorus availability and speciation in an aquaponics nutrient solution.

    PubMed

    Cerozi, Brunno da Silva; Fitzsimmons, Kevin

    2016-11-01

    The interaction between the main ions in aquaponics nutrient solutions affects chemical composition and availability of nutrients, and nutrient uptake by plant roots. This study determined the effect of pH on phosphorus (P) speciation and availability in an aquaponics nutrient solution and used Visual MINTEQ to simulate P species and P activity. In both experimental and simulated results, P availability decreased with increase in pH of aquaponics nutrient solutions. According to simulations, P binds to several cations leaving less free phosphate ions available in solution. High pH values resulted in the formation of insoluble calcium phosphate species. The study also demonstrated the importance of organic matter and alkalinity in keeping free phosphate ions in solution at high pH ranges. It is recommended though that pH in aquaponics systems is maintained at a 5.5-7.2 range for optimal availability and uptake by plants.

  3. Determination Of Ph Including Hemoglobin Correction

    DOEpatents

    Maynard, John D.; Hendee, Shonn P.; Rohrscheib, Mark R.; Nunez, David; Alam, M. Kathleen; Franke, James E.; Kemeny, Gabor J.

    2005-09-13

    Methods and apparatuses of determining the pH of a sample. A method can comprise determining an infrared spectrum of the sample, and determining the hemoglobin concentration of the sample. The hemoglobin concentration and the infrared spectrum can then be used to determine the pH of the sample. In some embodiments, the hemoglobin concentration can be used to select an model relating infrared spectra to pH that is applicable at the determined hemoglobin concentration. In other embodiments, a model relating hemoglobin concentration and infrared spectra to pH can be used. An apparatus according to the present invention can comprise an illumination system, adapted to supply radiation to a sample; a collection system, adapted to collect radiation expressed from the sample responsive to the incident radiation; and an analysis system, adapted to relate information about the incident radiation, the expressed radiation, and the hemoglobin concentration of the sample to pH.

  4. Endoscopic sensing of alveolar pH

    PubMed Central

    Choudhury, D.; Tanner, M. G.; McAughtrie, S.; Yu, F.; Mills, B.; Choudhary, T. R.; Seth, S.; Craven, T. H.; Stone, J. M.; Mati, I. K.; Campbell, C. J.; Bradley, M.; Williams, C. K. I.; Dhaliwal, K.; Birks, T. A.; Thomson, R. R.

    2016-01-01

    Previously unobtainable measurements of alveolar pH were obtained using an endoscope-deployable optrode. The pH sensing was achieved using functionalized gold nanoshell sensors and surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). The optrode consisted of an asymmetric dual-core optical fiber designed for spatially separating the optical pump delivery and signal collection, in order to circumvent the unwanted Raman signal generated within the fiber. Using this approach, we demonstrate a ~100-fold increase in SERS signal-to-fiber background ratio, and demonstrate multiple site pH sensing with a measurement accuracy of ± 0.07 pH units in the respiratory acini of an ex vivo ovine lung model. We also demonstrate that alveolar pH changes in response to ventilation. PMID:28101415

  5. Real-time pH monitoring of industrially relevant enzymatic reactions in a microfluidic side-entry reactor (μSER) shows potential for pH control.

    PubMed

    Gruber, Pia; Marques, Marco P C; Sulzer, Philipp; Wohlgemuth, Roland; Mayr, Torsten; Baganz, Frank; Szita, Nicolas

    2017-01-20

    Monitoring and control of pH is essential for the control of reaction conditions and reaction progress for any biocatalytic or biotechnological process. Microfluidic enzymatic reactors are increasingly proposed for process development, however typically lack instrumentation, such as pH monitoring. We present a microfluidic side-entry reactor (μSER) and demonstrate for the first time real-time pH monitoring of the progression of an enzymatic reaction in a microfluidic reactor as a first step towards achieving pH control. Two different types of optical pH sensors were integrated at several positions in the reactor channel which enabled pH monitoring between pH 3.5 and pH 8.5, thus a broader range than typically reported. The sensors withstood the thermal bonding temperatures typical of microfluidic device fabrication. Additionally, fluidic inputs along the reaction channel were implemented to adjust the pH of the reaction. Time-course profiles of pH were recorded for a transketolase and a penicillin G acylase catalyzed reaction. Without pH adjustment, the former showed a pH increase of 1 pH unit and the latter a pH decrease of about 2.5 pH units. With pH adjustment, the pH drop of the penicillin G acylase catalyzed reaction was significantly attenuated, the reaction condition kept at a pH suitable for the operation of the enzyme, and the product yield increased. This contribution represents a further step towards fully instrumented and controlled microfluidic reactors for biocatalytic process development.

  6. Micron Accurate Absolute Ranging System: Range Extension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smalley, Larry L.; Smith, Kely L.

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to investigate Fresnel diffraction as a means of obtaining absolute distance measurements with micron or greater accuracy. It is believed that such a system would prove useful to the Next Generation Space Telescope (NGST) as a non-intrusive, non-contact measuring system for use with secondary concentrator station-keeping systems. The present research attempts to validate past experiments and develop ways to apply the phenomena of Fresnel diffraction to micron accurate measurement. This report discusses past research on the phenomena, and the basis of the use Fresnel diffraction distance metrology. The apparatus used in the recent investigations, experimental procedures used, preliminary results are discussed in detail. Continued research and equipment requirements on the extension of the effective range of the Fresnel diffraction systems is also described.

  7. Compressive laser ranging.

    PubMed

    Babbitt, Wm Randall; Barber, Zeb W; Renner, Christoffer

    2011-12-15

    Compressive sampling has been previously proposed as a technique for sampling radar returns and determining sparse range profiles with a reduced number of measurements compared to conventional techniques. By employing modulation on both transmission and reception, compressive sensing in ranging is extended to the direct measurement of range profiles without intermediate measurement of the return waveform. This compressive ranging approach enables the use of pseudorandom binary transmit waveforms and return modulation, along with low-bandwidth optical detectors to yield high-resolution ranging information. A proof-of-concept experiment is presented. With currently available compact, off-the-shelf electronics and photonics, such as high data rate binary pattern generators and high-bandwidth digital optical modulators, compressive laser ranging can readily achieve subcentimeter resolution in a compact, lightweight package.

  8. Carbon Nanotube Chemiresistor for Wireless pH Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gou, Pingping; Kraut, Nadine D.; Feigel, Ian M.; Bai, Hao; Morgan, Gregory J.; Chen, Yanan; Tang, Yifan; Bocan, Kara; Stachel, Joshua; Berger, Lee; Mickle, Marlin; Sejdić, Ervin; Star, Alexander

    2014-03-01

    The ability to accurately measure real-time pH fluctuations in-vivo could be highly advantageous. Early detection and potential prevention of bacteria colonization of surgical implants can be accomplished by monitoring associated acidosis. However, conventional glass membrane or ion-selective field-effect transistor (ISFET) pH sensing technologies both require a reference electrode which may suffer from leakage of electrolytes and potential contamination. Herein, we describe a solid-state sensor based on oxidized single-walled carbon nanotubes (ox-SWNTs) functionalized with the conductive polymer poly(1-aminoanthracene) (PAA). This device had a Nernstian response over a wide pH range (2-12) and retained sensitivity over 120 days. The sensor was also attached to a passively-powered radio-frequency identification (RFID) tag which transmits pH data through simulated skin. This battery-less, reference electrode free, wirelessly transmitting sensor platform shows potential for biomedical applications as an implantable sensor, adjacent to surgical implants detecting for infection.

  9. Modulation of autophagic activity by extracellular pH.

    PubMed

    Xu, Teng; Su, Hang; Ganapathy, Suthakar; Yuan, Zhi-Min

    2011-11-01

    Reprogramming energy metabolism from oxidative phosphorylation to aerobic glycolysis, a common feature of human cancer, is associated with a relative acidic tumor microenvironment which can sometimes be further accentuated by hypoxia operating within most solid tumors. We found that alteration of extracellular pH induces marked and rapid changes of autophagic activity. Interestingly, acidic and basic conditions induced completely opposite effect on autophagy, with its activity suppressed at lower pH whereas stimulated at higher pH. Gene knockdown experiments indicated that pH induced-autophagy requires Beclin 1, Vps34 and Atg5, key components of the autophagy pathway. Of note, an acidic condition not only inhibits the basal but also blocks the starvation-induced autophagy activity. Significantly, examination of different areas of tumor mass revealed a lower autophagic activity within the inner region than the outer region. These findings have important implications on the connections between autophagy and cancer as well as a wide range of other physiological and pathological processes.

  10. Improved ranging systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Larry E.

    1989-01-01

    Spacecraft range measurements have provided the most accurate tests, to date, of some relativistic gravitational parameters, even though the measurements were made with ranging systems having error budgets of about 10 meters. Technology is now available to allow an improvement of two orders of magnitude in the accuracy of spacecraft ranging. The largest gains in accuracy result from the replacement of unstable analog components with high speed digital circuits having precisely known delays and phase shifts.

  11. Automatic range selector

    DOEpatents

    McNeilly, Clyde E.

    1977-01-04

    A device is provided for automatically selecting from a plurality of ranges of a scale of values to which a meter may be made responsive, that range which encompasses the value of an unknown parameter. A meter relay indicates whether the unknown is of greater or lesser value than the range to which the meter is then responsive. The rotatable part of a stepping relay is rotated in one direction or the other in response to the indication from the meter relay. Various positions of the rotatable part are associated with particular scales. Switching means are sensitive to the position of the rotatable part to couple the associated range to the meter.

  12. Effects of pH and Carbon Source on Synechococcus PCC 7002 Cultivation: Biomass and Carbohydrate Production with Different Strategies for pH Control.

    PubMed

    De Farias Silva, Carlos Eduardo; Sforza, Eleonora; Bertucco, Alberto

    2017-02-01

    Synechococcus PCC 7002 is an interesting species in view of industrial production of carbohydrates. The cultivation performances of this species are strongly affected by the pH of the medium, which also influences the carbohydrate accumulation. In this work, different methods of pH control were analyzed, in order to obtain a higher production of both Synechococcus biomass and carbohydrates. To better understand the influence of pH on growth and carbohydrate productivity, manual and automatic pH regulation in CO2 and bicarbonate system were applied. The pH value of 8.5 resulted the best to achieve both of these goals. From an industrial point of view, an alternative way to maintain the pH practically constant during the entire period of cultivation is the exploitation of the bicarbonate-CO2 buffer system, with the double aim to maintain the pH in the viability range and also to provide the amount of carbon required by growth. In this condition, a high concentration of biomass (6 g L(-1)) and carbohydrate content (around 60 %) were obtained, which are promising in view of a potential use for bioethanol production. The chemical equilibrium of C-N-P species was also evaluated by applying the ionic balance equations, and a relation between the sodium bicarbonate added in the medium and the equilibrium value of pH was discussed.

  13. High-resolution ocean pH dynamics in four subtropical Atlantic benthic habitats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández, C. A.; Clemente, S.; Sangil, C.; Hernández, J. C.

    2015-12-01

    Oscillations of ocean pH are largely unknown in coastal environments and ocean acidification studies often do not account for natural variability yet most of what is known about marine species and populations is found out via studies conducted in near shore environments. Most experiments designed to make predictions about future climate change scenarios are carried out in coastal environments with no research that takes into account the natural pH variability. In order to fill this knowledge gap and to provide reliable measures of pH oscillation, seawater pH was measured over time using moored pH sensors in four contrasting phytocenoses typical of the north Atlantic subtropical region. Each phytocenosis was characterized by its predominant engineer species: (1) Cystoseira abies-marina, (2) a mix of gelidiales and geniculate corallines, (3) Lobophora variegata, and (4) encrusting corallines. The autonomous pH measuring systems consisted of a pH sensor; a data logger and a battery encased in a waterproof container and allowed the acquisition of high-resolution continuous pH data at each of the study sites. The pH variation observed ranged by between 0.09 and 0.24 pHNBS units. A clear daily variation in seawater pH was detected at all the studied sites (0.04-0.12 pHNBS units). Significant differences in daily pH oscillations were also observed between phytocenoses, which shows that macroalgal communities influence the seawater pH in benthic habitats. Natural oscillations in pH must be taken into account in future ocean acidification studies to put findings in perspective and for any ecological recommendations to be realistic.

  14. Acidification of the North Pacific Ocean: Direct Observations of pH in 1991 and 2006

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byrne, R. H.; Liu, X.; Mecking, S.; Feely, R. A.

    2006-12-01

    Spectrophotometric procedures were first successfully used to obtain seawater pH profiles on a 1991 cruise within the CLIVAR/CO2 Repeat Hydrography Program. During a 2006 reoccupation of the P16N transect along 152 ^{0}W, closely similar methods were used to obtain a fifteen-year spectrophotometrically-based record of ocean pH change. Spectrophotometric procedures are particularly robust as a means of observing changes in seawater pH because sulfonephthalein equilibrium constants, being nearly constant at constant temperature and salinity, are unimportant in pH difference calculations. In such cases, the quality of pH difference measurements is most closely related to measurement precision. Since the precision of spectrophotometric pH measurements (using observations of sulfonephthalein absorbance ratios) is on the order of 0.0004 pH units, pH differences can be measured with a precision somewhat better than +/- 0.001. In the absence of other effects, the atmospheric pCO2 increase between 1991 and 2006 would decrease the pH of the surface ocean, in equilibrium with the atmosphere, by approximately 0.025 pH units. Thus, spectrophotometric pH observations are capable of directly resolving pH perturbations on a scale commensurate with potential atmospherically-induced changes. At depths between 3000 and 5000 meters the directly observed mean fifteen-year pH difference was on the order of 0.000 +/-0.0015. At depths below 1000 meters, pH changes generally ranged between + 0.006 and -0.006. In contrast, in the upper 700 meters, pH was much more variable, with an average fifteen-year pH decrease on the order of 0.025 and including pH differences as large as -0.055. These directly observed pH differences are consistent with expected changes in response to elevated atmospheric CO2, along with changes that can be attributed to differences in respiration and changes in ocean circulation.

  15. Agriculture, Forestry, Range Resources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crea, W. J., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    Significant results obtained from ERTS-1 observations of agriculture, forestry, and range resources are summarized. Four major parts are covered: (1) crop classification and mensuration; (2) timber and range resources survey and classification; (3) soil survey and mapping; and (4) subdiscipline areas.

  16. Laser ranging data analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    Near real-time Lageos laser ranging data are analyzed in terms of range bias, time bias, and internal precision, and estimates for earth orientation parameters X(sub p), Y(sub p), and UT1 are obtained. The results of these analyses are reported in a variety of formats. Copies of monthly summaries from November, 1986 through November, 1987 are included.

  17. Long Range Facilities Planning

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-04-01

    Richard Muther range facilities Many alterna- analysis indi- cated that if NASSCO ever expected to surpass its output of the last several years, current...Marine Engineers (SNAME) SP-1 Panel Meeting. The Maritime Administration had Richard Muther (an authority on long range facility planning) address a

  18. Preparation of a novel pH optical sensor using orange (II) based on agarose membrane as support.

    PubMed

    Heydari, Rouhollah; Hosseini, Mohammad; Amraei, Ahmadreza; Mohammadzadeh, Ali

    2016-04-01

    A novel and cost effective optical pH sensor was prepared using covalent immobilization of orange (II) indicator on the agarose membrane as solid support. The fabricated optical sensor was fixed into a sample holder of a spectrophotometer instrument for pH monitoring. Variables affecting sensor performance including pH of dye bonding to agarose membrane and dye concentration were optimized. The sensor responds to the pH changes in the range of 3.0-10.0 with a response time of 2.0 min and appropriate reproducibility (RSD ≤ 0.9%). No significant variation was observed on sensor response after increasing the ionic strength in the range of 0.0-0.5M of sodium chloride. Determination of pH using the proposed optical sensor is quick, simple, inexpensive, selective and sensitive in the pH range of 3.0-10.0.

  19. Natural skin surface pH is on average below 5, which is beneficial for its resident flora.

    PubMed

    Lambers, H; Piessens, S; Bloem, A; Pronk, H; Finkel, P

    2006-10-01

    Variable skin pH values are being reported in literature, all in the acidic range but with a broad range from pH 4.0 to 7.0. In a multicentre study (N = 330), we have assessed the skin surface pH of the volar forearm before and after refraining from showering and cosmetic product application for 24 h. The average pH dropped from 5.12 +/- 0.56 to 4.93 +/- 0.45. On the basis of this pH drop, it is estimated that the 'natural' skin surface pH is on average 4.7, i.e. below 5. This is in line with existing literature, where a relatively large number of reports (c. 50%) actually describes pH values below 5.0; this is in contrast to the general assumption, that skin surface pH is on average between 5.0 and 6.0. Not only prior use of cosmetic products, especially soaps, have profound influence on skin surface pH, but the use of plain tap water, in Europe with a pH value generally around 8.0, will increase skin pH up to 6 h after application before returning to its 'natural' value of on average below 5.0. It is demonstrated that skin with pH values below 5.0 is in a better condition than skin with pH values above 5.0, as shown by measuring the biophysical parameters of barrier function, moisturization and scaling. The effect of pH on adhesion of resident skin microflora was also assessed; an acid skin pH (4-4.5) keeps the resident bacterial flora attached to the skin, whereas an alkaline pH (8-9) promotes the dispersal from the skin.

  20. Home range and travels

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stickel, L.F.; King, John A.

    1968-01-01

    The concept of home range was expressed by Seton (1909) in the term 'home region,' which Burr (1940, 1943) clarified with a definition of home range and exemplified in a definitive study of Peromyscus in the field. Burt pointed out the ever-changing characteristics of home-range area and the consequent absence of boundaries in the usual sense--a finding verified by investigators thereafter. In the studies summarized in this paper, sizes of home ranges of Peromyscus varied within two magnitudes, approximately from 0.1 acre to ten acres, in 34 studies conducted in a variety of habitats from the seaside dunes of Florida to the Alaskan forests. Variation in sizes of home ranges was correlated with both environmental and physiological factors; with habitat it was conspicuous, both in the same and different regions. Food supply also was related to size of home range, both seasonally and in relation to habitat. Home ranges generally were smallest in winter and largest in spring, at the onset of the breeding season. Activity and size also were affected by changes in weather. Activity was least when temperatures were low and nights were bright. Effects of rainfall were variable. Sizes varied according to sex and age; young mice remained in the parents' range until they approached maturity, when they began to travel more widely. Adult males commonly had larger home ranges than females, although there were a number of exceptions. An inverse relationship between population density and size of home range was shown in several studies and probably is the usual relationship. A basic need for activity and exploration also appeared to influence size of home range. Behavior within the home range was discussed in terms of travel patterns, travels in relation to home sites and refuges, territory, and stability of size of home range. Travels within the home range consisted of repeated use of well-worn trails to sites of food, shelter, and refuge, plus more random exploratory travels

  1. Exhaled breath condensate pH assays.

    PubMed

    Davis, Michael D; Hunt, John

    2012-08-01

    Airway pH is central to the physiologic function and cellular biology of the airway. The causes of airway acidification include (1) hypopharyngeal gastric acid reflux with or without aspiration through the vocal cords, (2) inhalation of acid fog or gas (such as chlorine), and (3) intrinsic airway acidification caused by altered airway pH homeostasis in infectious and inflammatory disease processes. The recognition that relevant airway pH deviations occur in lung diseases is opening doors to new simple and inexpensive therapies. This recognition has resulted partly from the ability to use exhaled breath condensate as a window on airway acid-base balance.

  2. Effects of pH and hardness on chronic toxicity of ammonia to Ceriodaphnia dubia

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, C.G.; Crunkilton, R.L.

    1994-12-31

    Ammonia is one of the most common toxicants encountered in municipal and industrial discharges. There is limited information on how changes in water chemistry affect toxicity of ammonia to invertebrates. This study assessed effects of pH and hardness on chronic toxicity of unionized ammonia to Ceriodaphnia dubia. Three-brood life cycle tests were run at four pH levels in combination with three hardness levels to determine effects on reproduction. Hardness levels ranged from 40 mg/L CaCO{sub 3} to 180 mg/L CaCO{sub 3}, while pH levels ranged from 6.5 to 9.0. Hardness and pH in combination yielded the lowest toxicity at pH 9.0 in hard water, with a LOEC of 1.31 mg/L unionized ammonia-nitrogen (UIA-N). The highest toxicity was at pH 6.5 in medium water, with a LOEC of 0.04 mg/L UIA-N. Toxicity of unionized ammonia (UIA) generally decreased as hardness increased. Average LOECs ranged from 0.33 mg/L UIA-N in soft water to 0.77 mg/L UIA-N in hard water. Unionized ammonia was least toxic in hard water at pH 7.0, 8.0, and 9.0. At pH 6.5 UIA was least toxic in soft water. Toxicity of UIA generally decreased as pH increased. Average LOECs ranged from 0.08 mg/L UIA-N at pH 6.5 to 0.77 mg/L UIA-N at pH 9.0. Unionized ammonia was most toxic at pH 6.5 at all hardness levels. In both soft and hard water UIA was least toxic at pH 9.0, while in medium water it was least toxic at pH 8.0.

  3. A novel acidic pH fluorescent probe based on a benzothiazole derivative.

    PubMed

    Ma, Qiujuan; Li, Xian; Feng, Suxiang; Liang, Beibei; Zhou, Tiqiang; Xu, Min; Ma, Zhuoyi

    2017-04-15

    A novel acidic pH fluorescent probe 1 based on a benzothiazole derivative has been designed, synthesized and developed. The linear response range covers the acidic pH range from 3.44 to 6.46, which is valuable for pH researches in acidic environment. The evaluated pKa value of the probe 1 is 4.23. The fluorescence enhancement of the studied probe 1 with an increase in hydrogen ions concentration is based on the hindering of enhanced photo-induced electron transfer (PET) process. Moreover, the pH sensor possesses a highly selective response to H(+) in the presence of metal ions, anions and other bioactive small molecules which would be interfere with its fluorescent pH response. Furthermore, the probe 1 responds to acidic pH with short response time that was less than 1min. The probe 1 has been successfully applied to confocal fluorescence imaging in live HeLa cells and can selectively stain lysosomes. All of such good properties prove it can be used to monitoring pH fluctuations in acidic environment with high sensitivity, pH dependence and short response time.

  4. Effects of saliva on starch-thickened drinks with acidic and neutral pH.

    PubMed

    Hanson, Ben; Cox, Ben; Kaliviotis, Efstathios; Smith, Christina H

    2012-09-01

    Powdered maize starch thickeners are used to modify drink consistency in the clinical management of dysphagia. Amylase is a digestive enzyme found in saliva which breaks down starch. This action is dependent on pH, which varies in practice depending on the particular drink. This study measured the effects of human saliva on the viscosity of drinks thickened with a widely used starch-based thickener. Experiments simulated a possible clinical scenario whereby saliva enters a cup and contaminates a drink. Citric acid (E330) was added to water to produce a controlled range of pH from 3.0 to 7.0, and several commercially available drinks with naturally low pH were investigated. When saliva was added to thickened water, viscosity was reduced to less than 1% of its original value after 10-15 min. However, lowering pH systematically slowed the reduction in viscosity attributable to saliva. At pH 3.5 and below, saliva was found to have no significant effect on viscosity. The pH of drinks in this study ranged from 2.6 for Coca Cola to 6.2 for black coffee. Again, low pH slowed the effect of saliva. For many popular drinks, having pH of 3.6 or less, viscosity was not significantly affected by the addition of saliva.

  5. A novel acidic pH fluorescent probe based on a benzothiazole derivative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Qiujuan; Li, Xian; Feng, Suxiang; Liang, Beibei; Zhou, Tiqiang; Xu, Min; Ma, Zhuoyi

    2017-04-01

    A novel acidic pH fluorescent probe 1 based on a benzothiazole derivative has been designed, synthesized and developed. The linear response range covers the acidic pH range from 3.44 to 6.46, which is valuable for pH researches in acidic environment. The evaluated pKa value of the probe 1 is 4.23. The fluorescence enhancement of the studied probe 1 with an increase in hydrogen ions concentration is based on the hindering of enhanced photo-induced electron transfer (PET) process. Moreover, the pH sensor possesses a highly selective response to H+ in the presence of metal ions, anions and other bioactive small molecules which would be interfere with its fluorescent pH response. Furthermore, the probe 1 responds to acidic pH with short response time that was less than 1 min. The probe 1 has been successfully applied to confocal fluorescence imaging in live HeLa cells and can selectively stain lysosomes. All of such good properties prove it can be used to monitoring pH fluctuations in acidic environment with high sensitivity, pH dependence and short response time.

  6. Measurement of pH micro-heterogeneity in natural cheese matrices by fluorescence lifetime imaging

    PubMed Central

    Burdikova, Zuzana; Svindrych, Zdenek; Pala, Jan; Hickey, Cian D.; Wilkinson, Martin G.; Panek, Jiri; Auty, Mark A. E.; Periasamy, Ammasi; Sheehan, Jeremiah J.

    2015-01-01

    Cheese, a product of microbial fermentation may be defined as a protein matrix entrapping fat, moisture, minerals and solutes as well as dispersed bacterial colonies. The growth and physiology of bacterial cells in these colonies may be influenced by the microenvironment around the colony, or alternatively the cells within the colony may modify the microenvironment (e.g., pH, redox potential) due to their metabolic activity. While cheese pH may be measured at macro level there remains a significant knowledge gap relating to the degree of micro-heterogeneity of pH within the cheese matrix and its relationship with microbial, enzymatic and physiochemical parameters and ultimately with cheese quality, consistency and ripening patterns. The pH of cheese samples was monitored both at macroscopic scale and at microscopic scale, using a non-destructive microscopic technique employing C-SNARF-4 and Oregon Green 488 fluorescent probes. The objectives of this work were to evaluate the suitability of these dyes for microscale pH measurements in natural cheese matrices and to enhance the sensitivity and extend the useful pH range of these probes using fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM). In particular, fluorescence lifetime of Oregon Green 488 proved to be sensitive probe to map pH micro heterogeneity within cheese matrices. Good agreement was observed between macroscopic scale pH measurement by FLIM and by traditional pH methods, but in addition considerable localized microheterogeneity in pH was evident within the curd matrix with pH range between 4.0 and 5.5. This technique provides significant potential to further investigate the relationship between cheese matrix physico-chemistry and bacterial metabolism during cheese manufacture and ripening. PMID:25798136

  7. Semiautomated pH gradient ion-exchange chromatography of monoclonal antibody charge variants.

    PubMed

    Talebi, Mohammad; Shellie, Robert A; Hilder, Emily F; Lacher, Nathan A; Haddad, Paul R

    2014-10-07

    A new approach using a chromatography system equipped with isocratic pumps and an electrolytic eluent generator (EG) is introduced, replacing external pH gradient delivery using conventional gradient systems, in which bottled buffers with preadjusted pH are mixed using a gradient pump. The EG is capable of generating high purity base or acid required for online preparation of the buffer at the point of use, utilizing deionized water as the only carrier stream. Typically, the buffer was generated from online titration of a reagent composed of low molecular weight amines. The reagent was delivered isocratically into a static mixing tee, where it was titrated to the required pH with electrolytically generated base or acid. The required pH gradient was thus conveniently generated by electrically controlling the concentration of titrant. Also, since the pH was adjusted at the point of use, this approach offered enhanced throughput in terms of eluent preparation time and labor, and with a more reproducible pH profile. The performance of the system was demonstrated by running pH gradients ranging from pH 8.2 to 10.9 on a polymer monolith cation-exchange column for high throughput profiling of charge heterogeneity of intact, basic therapeutic monoclonal antibodies. A high degree of flexibility in modulating the key parameters of the pH gradient, including the buffer concentration, the pH gradient slope and the operating pH range was demonstrated. This enabled fine-tuning of the separation conditions for each individual antibody in order to enhance the chromatographic resolution.

  8. Improved granular activated carbon for the stabilization of wastewater pH

    SciTech Connect

    1996-10-01

    Many times the start up of granular activated carbon adsorption systems for the control of organic contaminants in wastewater cm exhibit unacceptable increases in the adscurber effluent pH. Experience shows that the duration of the pH increase ranges from several hours to several days, during which time several hundred bed volumes of water can be discharged with a pH in excess of 9. Laboratory studies have identified the cause of the pH rise as an interaction between the naturally occurring anions and protons ar the water and the carbon surface. The interaction can be described as an ion exchange type of phenomenon, in which the carbon surface sorbs the anions and corresponding hydronium ions from the water. Capacities of the carbon for the anions range from 2 to 9 mg/g GAC, depending upon the water characteristics, the carbon type, the nature of the anion and its influent concentration. These studies have shown de the anion sorption and resulting pH increase is independent of the raw material used for die activated carbon production, e.g. bituminous or sub-bituminous coal, peat, wood or coconut. Also, the pH excursions occur with virgin, reactivated, and acid washed granular carbons. Current pH control technologies focus on adjustment of wastewater pH prior to discharge or recycle of the initial effluent water until the pH increase abates. However, improved water pH control options have been realized by altering the carbon surface rather than the water chemistry. The change to the carbon surface is accomplished through a controlled oxidation process. This process provides a more acidic carbon surface with a reduced affinity for the anions in the waste water. As a result, the pH excursions above 9 are eliminated and the initial effluent from the adsorption system can be discharged without further treatment.

  9. Measurement of pH micro-heterogeneity in natural cheese matrices by fluorescence lifetime imaging.

    PubMed

    Burdikova, Zuzana; Svindrych, Zdenek; Pala, Jan; Hickey, Cian D; Wilkinson, Martin G; Panek, Jiri; Auty, Mark A E; Periasamy, Ammasi; Sheehan, Jeremiah J

    2015-01-01

    Cheese, a product of microbial fermentation may be defined as a protein matrix entrapping fat, moisture, minerals and solutes as well as dispersed bacterial colonies. The growth and physiology of bacterial cells in these colonies may be influenced by the microenvironment around the colony, or alternatively the cells within the colony may modify the microenvironment (e.g., pH, redox potential) due to their metabolic activity. While cheese pH may be measured at macro level there remains a significant knowledge gap relating to the degree of micro-heterogeneity of pH within the cheese matrix and its relationship with microbial, enzymatic and physiochemical parameters and ultimately with cheese quality, consistency and ripening patterns. The pH of cheese samples was monitored both at macroscopic scale and at microscopic scale, using a non-destructive microscopic technique employing C-SNARF-4 and Oregon Green 488 fluorescent probes. The objectives of this work were to evaluate the suitability of these dyes for microscale pH measurements in natural cheese matrices and to enhance the sensitivity and extend the useful pH range of these probes using fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM). In particular, fluorescence lifetime of Oregon Green 488 proved to be sensitive probe to map pH micro heterogeneity within cheese matrices. Good agreement was observed between macroscopic scale pH measurement by FLIM and by traditional pH methods, but in addition considerable localized microheterogeneity in pH was evident within the curd matrix with pH range between 4.0 and 5.5. This technique provides significant potential to further investigate the relationship between cheese matrix physico-chemistry and bacterial metabolism during cheese manufacture and ripening.

  10. pH gradient and distribution of streptococci, lactobacilli, prevotellae, and fusobacteria in carious dentine

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Ky-Anh T.; Browne, Gina V.; Simonian, Mary; Hunter, Neil

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Caries process comprises acidogenic and aciduric bacteria that are responsible for lowering the pH and subsequent destruction of hydroxyapatite matrix in enamel and dentine. The aim of this study was to identify the correlation between the pH gradient of a carious lesion and proportion and distribution of four bacterial genera; lactobacilli, streptococci, prevotellae, and fusobacteria with regard to total load of bacteria. Materials and methods A total of 25 teeth with extensive dentinal caries were sampled in sequential layers. Using quantitative real-time PCR of 16S rRNA gene, we quantified the total load of bacteria as well as the proportion of the abovementioned genera following pH measurement of each sample with a fine microelectrode. Results We demonstrated the presence of a pH gradient across the lesion with a strong association between the quantity of lactobacilli and the lowest pH range (pH 4.5–5.0; p = 0.003). Streptococci had a tendency to occupy the most superficial aspect of the carious lesion but showed no correlation to any pH value. Prevotellae showed clear preference for the pH range 5.5–6.0 (p = 0.042). The total representation of these four genera did not reach more than one quarter of the total bacterial load in most carious samples. Conclusion We revealed differential colonization behavior of bacteria with respect to pH gradient and a lower than expected abundance of lactobacilli and streptococci in established carious lesions. The data indicate the numerical importance of relatively unexplored taxa within the lesion of dentinal caries. Clinical relevance The gradient nature of pH in the lesion as well as colonization difference of examined bacterial taxa with reference to pH provides a new insight in regard to conservative caries management. PMID:23771212

  11. Range Safety Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schrock, Kenneth W.; Humphries, Ricky H. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The high kinetic and potential energy of a launch vehicle mandates there be a mechanism to minimize possible damage to provide adequate safety for the launch facilities, range, and, most importantly, the general public. The Range Safety System, sometimes called the Flight Termination System or Flight Safety System, provides the required level of safety. The Range Safety System section of the Avionics chapter will attempt to describe how adequate safety is provided, the system's design, operation, and it's interface with the rest of the launch vehicle.

  12. Coping with PH over the Long Term

    MedlinePlus

    ... Process: Some First Steps Adoption Success Story Watch Classroom Recordings Empowered Patient Online Toolkit Tab 1: Very ... Kathy Groebner Education Programs Patients and Caregivers PHA Classroom PHA on the Road: PH Patients and Families ...

  13. A wearable fingernail chemical sensing platform: pH sensing at your fingertips.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jayoung; Cho, Thomas N; Valdés-Ramírez, Gabriela; Wang, Joseph

    2016-04-01

    This article demonstrates an example of a wearable chemical sensor based on a fingernail platform. Fingernails represent an attractive wearable platform, merging beauty products with chemical sensing, to enable monitoring of our surrounding environment. The new colorimetric pH fingernail sensor relies on coating artificial nails with a recognition layer consisted of pH indicators entrapped in a polyvinyl chloride (PVC) matrix. Such color changing fingernails offer fast and reversible response to pH changes, repeated use, and intense color change detected easily with naked eye. The PVC matrix prevents leaching out of the indicator molecules from the fingernail sensor toward such repeated use. The limited narrow working pH range of a single pH indicator has been addressed by multiplexing three different pH indicators: bromothymol blue (pH 6.0-7.6), bromocresol green (pH 3.8-5.4), and cresol red (pH 7.2-8.8), as demonstrated for analyses of real-life samples of acidic, neutral, and basic character. The new concept of an optical wearable chemical sensor on fingernail platforms can be expanded towards diverse analytes for various applications in connection to the judicious design of the recognition layer.

  14. Empirical algorithms to estimate water column pH in the Southern Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, N. L.; Juranek, L. W.; Johnson, K. S.; Feely, R. A.; Riser, S. C.; Talley, L. D.; Russell, J. L.; Sarmiento, J. L.; Wanninkhof, R.

    2016-04-01

    Empirical algorithms are developed using high-quality GO-SHIP hydrographic measurements of commonly measured parameters (temperature, salinity, pressure, nitrate, and oxygen) that estimate pH in the Pacific sector of the Southern Ocean. The coefficients of determination, R2, are 0.98 for pH from nitrate (pHN) and 0.97 for pH from oxygen (pHOx) with RMS errors of 0.010 and 0.008, respectively. These algorithms are applied to Southern Ocean Carbon and Climate Observations and Modeling (SOCCOM) biogeochemical profiling floats, which include novel sensors (pH, nitrate, oxygen, fluorescence, and backscatter). These algorithms are used to estimate pH on floats with no pH sensors and to validate and adjust pH sensor data from floats with pH sensors. The adjusted float data provide, for the first time, seasonal cycles in surface pH on weekly resolution that range from 0.05 to 0.08 on weekly resolution for the Pacific sector of the Southern Ocean.

  15. A structural transition in class II major histocompatibility complex proteins at mildly acidic pH

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Peptide binding by class II major histocompatibility complex proteins is generally enhanced at low pH in the range of hydrogen ion concentrations found in the endosomal compartments of antigen- presenting cells. We and others have proposed that class II molecules undergo a reversible conformational change at low pH that is associated with enhanced peptide loading. However, no one has previously provided direct evidence for a structural change in class II proteins in the mildly acidic pH conditions in which enhanced peptide binding is observed. In this study, susceptibility to denaturation induced by sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) detergent or heat was used to probe the conformation of class II at different hydrogen ion concentrations. Class II molecules became sensitive to denaturation at pH 5.5-6.5 depending on the allele and experimental conditions. The observed structural transition was fully reversible if acidic pH was neutralized before exposure to SDS or heat. Experiments with the environment- sensitive fluorescent probe ANS (8-anilino-1-naphthalene-sulfonic acid) provided further evidence for a reversible structural transition at mildly acidic pH associated with an increase in exposed hydrophobicity in class II molecules. IAd conformation was found to change at a higher pH than IEd, IEk, or IAk, which correlates with the different pH optimal for peptide binding by these molecules. We conclude that pH regulates peptide binding by influencing the structure of class II molecules. PMID:8551215

  16. Effect of pH on Orthophosphate Uptake by Corn Roots 1

    PubMed Central

    Sentenac, Hervé; Grignon, Claude

    1985-01-01

    Orthophosphate (Pi) influx in washed corn roots was studied with experimental conditions allowing a distinction of pH effects on Pi ionization in the medium and on the transport system itself. There appeared to be no relationship between the pH dependencies of membrane potential, H+ secretion, and 32Pi influx. The Pi uptake versus pH curves were compared to the calculated ones describing the concentrations of the different ionized Pi forms in the medium and in the cell walls; the latter were obtained using the theoretical model described by Sentenac and Grignon (1981) Plant Physiol 68: 415-419). The conclusion was that the transported form is H2PO4− and the concentration sensed by the transport system is the local one. The ionic compositions of experimental media were manipulated to ensure constant pH and various H2PO4− concentrations, or constant H2PO4− concentration and various pH values in the walls. The kinetic analysis of the results in the micromolar range showed that the transport system has an intrinsic sensitivity to pH, and is switched from a low activity state at pH > 6 to a high activity one at pH < 4 (pH in the walls). This change could be triggered by the protonation of a group with pK 5.5. PMID:16663996

  17. Adsorption of polyetheramines on montmorillonite at high pH.

    PubMed

    Cui, Yannan; van Duijneveldt, Jeroen S

    2010-11-16

    Adsorption of a series of polyetheramines on montmorillonite in aqueous suspension was investigated by a range of methods: elemental analysis, atomic absorption spectroscopy, measurement of pH, conductivity and electrophoretic mobility, and small-angle X-ray scattering. Adsorption proceeds through an ion exchange mechanism. The maximum surface coverage attained is equivalent to about 40% of the cationic exchange capacity of the clay. Adsorption of the poly(oxypropylene) block adjacent to the amine group onto the clay surface may contribute to this. Surprisingly the adsorption takes place at pH conditions well above the pK(a) of the amine surfactants, where they are not protonated in the bulk solution. The surface coverage as a function of molar mass broadly agrees with predictions assuming adsorbed polymers adopt a densely packed mushroom configuration at the clay surface.

  18. Hot Ductility of the 17-4 PH Stainless Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrera Lara, V.; Guerra Fuentes, L.; Covarrubias Alvarado, O.; Salinas Rodriguez, A.; Garcia Sanchez, E.

    2016-03-01

    The mechanisms of loss of hot ductility and the mechanical behavior of 17-4 PH alloys were investigated using hot tensile testing at temperatures between 700 and 1100 °C and strain rates of 10-4, 10-2, and 10-1 s-1. Scanning electron microscopy was used in conjunction with the results of the tensile tests to find the temperature region of loss of ductility and correlate it with cracking observed during processing by hot upsetting prior to ring rolling. It is reported that 17-4 PH alloys lose ductility in a temperature range around 900 °C near to the duplex austenite + ferrite phase field. Furthermore, it is found that niobium carbides precipitated at austenite/ferrite interfaces and grain boundaries have a pronounced effect on the mechanical behavior of the alloy during high-temperature deformation.

  19. In Situ Determination of the Intracellular pH of Lactococcus lactis and Lactobacillus plantarum during Pressure Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Molina-Gutierrez, Adriana; Stippl, Volker; Delgado, Antonio; Gänzle, Michael G.; Vogel, Rudi F.

    2002-01-01

    Hydrostatic pressure may affect the intracellular pH of microorganisms by (i) enhancing the dissociation of weak organic acids and (ii) increasing the permeability of the cytoplasmic membrane and inactivation of enzymes required for pH homeostasis. The internal pHs of Lactococcus lactis and Lactobacillus plantarum during and after pressure treatment at 200 and 300 MPa and at pH values ranging from 4.0 to 6.5 were determined. Pressure treatment at 200 MPa for up to 20 min did not reduce the viability of either strain at pH 6.5. Pressure treatment at pH 6.5 and 300 MPa reduced viable cell counts of Lactococcus lactis and Lactobacillus plantarum by 5 log after 20 and 120 min, respectively. Pressure inactivation was faster at pH 5 or 4. At ambient pressure, both strains maintained a transmembrane pH gradient of 1 pH unit at neutral pH and about 2 pH units at pH 4.0. During pressure treatment at 200 and 300 MPa, the internal pH of L. lactis was decreased to the value of the extracellular pH during compression. The same result was observed during treatment of Lactobacillus plantarum at 300 MPa. Lactobacillus plantarum was unable to restore the internal pH after a compression-decompression cycle at 300 MPa and pH 6.5. Lactococcus lactis lost the ability to restore its internal pH after 20 and 4 min of pressure treatment at 200 and 300 MPa, respectively. As a consequence, pressure-mediated stress reactions and cell death may be considered secondary effects promoted by pH and other environmental conditions. PMID:12200293

  20. Effect of two mouthwashes on salivary ph.

    PubMed

    Belardinelli, Paola A; Morelatto, Rosana A; Benavidez, Tomás E; Baruzzi, Ana M; López de Blanc, Silvia A

    2014-01-01

    To analyze the effect of two mouthwashes on salivary pH and correlate it with age, buffer capacity and saliva flow rate in healthy volunteers, a crossover phase IV clinical study involving three age-based groups was designed. Two commercial mouthwashes (MW), Cool Mint ListerineR (MWa) and Periobacter R (MWb) were used. The unstimulated saliva of each individual was first characterized by measuring flow rate, pH, and buffer capacity. Salivary pH was evaluated before rinsing with a given MW, immediately after rinsing, 5 minutes later, and then every 10 min (at 15, 25, 35 min) until the baseline pH was recovered. Paired t-test, ANOVA with a randomized block design, and Pearson correlation tests were used. Averages were 0.63 mL/min, 7.06, and 0.87 for flow rate, pH, and buffer capacity, respectively. An immediate significant increase in salivary pH was observed after rinsing, reaching average values of 7.24 (MWb) and 7.30 (MWa), which declined to an almost stable value 15 minutes. The great increase in salivary pH, after MW use shows that saliva is a dynamic system, and that the organism is capable of responding to a stimulus with changes in its composition. It is thus evident that pH of the external agent alone is not a good indicator for its erosive potential because biological systems tend to neutralize it. The results of this study enhance the importance of in vivo measurements and reinforce the concept of the protective action of saliva.

  1. Preliminary error budget for an optical ranging system: Range, range rate, and differenced range observables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Folkner, W. M.; Finger, M. H.

    1990-01-01

    Future missions to the outer solar system or human exploration of Mars may use telemetry systems based on optical rather than radio transmitters. Pulsed laser transmission can be used to deliver telemetry rates of about 100 kbits/sec with an efficiency of several bits for each detected photon. Navigational observables that can be derived from timing pulsed laser signals are discussed. Error budgets are presented based on nominal ground stations and spacecraft-transceiver designs. Assuming a pulsed optical uplink signal, two-way range accuracy may approach the few centimeter level imposed by the troposphere uncertainty. Angular information can be achieved from differenced one-way range using two ground stations with the accuracy limited by the length of the available baseline and by clock synchronization and troposphere errors. A method of synchronizing the ground station clocks using optical ranging measurements is presented. This could allow differenced range accuracy to reach the few centimeter troposphere limit.

  2. Strategy for pH control and pH feedback-controlled substrate feeding for high-level production of L-tryptophan by Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Li-Kun; Wang, Jian; Xu, Qing-Yang; Zhao, Chun-Guang; Shen, Zhi-Qiang; Xie, Xi-Xian; Chen, Ning

    2013-05-01

    Optimum production of L-tryptophan by Escherichia coli depends on pH. Here, we established conditions for optimizing the production of L-tryptophan. The optimum pH range was 6.5-7.2, and pH was controlled using a three-stage strategy [pH 6.5 (0-12 h), pH 6.8 (12-24 h), and pH 7.2 (24-38 h)]. Specifically, ammonium hydroxide was used to adjust pH during the initial 24 h, and potassium hydroxide and ammonium hydroxide (1:2, v/v) were used to adjust pH during 24-38 h. Under these conditions, NH4 (+) and K(+) concentrations were kept below the threshold for inhibiting L-tryptophan production. Optimization was also accomplished using ratios (v/v) of glucose to alkali solutions equal to 4:1 (5-24 h) and 6:1 (24-38 h). The concentration of glucose and the pH were controlled by adjusting the pH automatically. Applying a pH-feedback feeding method, the steady-state concentration of glucose was maintained at approximately 0.2 ± 0.02 g/l, and acetic acid accumulated to a concentration of 1.15 ± 0.03 g/l, and the plasmid stability was 98 ± 0.5 %. The final, optimized concentration of L-tryptophan was 43.65 ± 0.29 g/l from 52.43 ± 0.38 g/l dry cell weight.

  3. Effect of pH on microstructure and characteristics of cream cheese.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, R R; Tavares, D Q; Kindstedt, P S; Gigante, M L

    2009-03-01

    This study evaluated the effect of pH on the microstructure of cream cheese and compared pH-induced changes in its microstructure with concomitant changes in cheese firmness and meltability. On 4 different days, experimental batches of cultured hot pack cream cheese were manufactured and analyzed for initial chemical composition. The cheeses were then sectioned into samples that were randomly assigned to 7 different treatment groups. Three groups were exposed to ammonia vapor for 1, 3, and 5 min to increase the pH; 3 groups were exposed to acetic acid vapor for 30, 60, and 90 min to decrease the pH; and 1 unexposed group served as the control. After equilibration at 4 degrees C, samples were analyzed for pH, firmness, meltability, and microstructure by scanning electron microscopy. The effects of experimental treatments on cheese pH, firmness, and meltability were analyzed by randomized complete block analysis of variance (ANOVA). Relationships between cheese pH and firmness and meltability were evaluated by regression. Experimental treatments significantly affected cheese pH, firmness, and meltability. Cheese firmness decreased and meltability increased with increasing pH from about pH 4.2 to 6.8. Cheese microstructure also changed dramatically over the same approximate pH range. Specifically, the volume of the protein network surrounding the fat droplets increased markedly with increasing pH, presumably due to casein swelling. These data support the hypothesis that protein-to-water interactions increased as the cheese pH increased, which gave rise to progressive swelling of the casein network, softer texture, and increased meltability.

  4. Photochemical Performance of the Acidophilic Red Alga Cyanidium sp. in a pH Gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kvíderová, Jana

    2012-06-01

    The acidophilic red alga Cyanidium sp. is one of the dominant mat-forming species in the highly acidic waters of Río Tinto, Spain. The culture of Cyanidium sp., isolated from a microbial mat sample collected at Río Tinto, was exposed to 9 different pH conditions in a gradient from 0.5 to 5 for 24 h and its physiological status evaluated by variable chlorophyll a fluorescence kinetics measurements. Maximum quantum yield was determined after 30 min, 1 h, 2 h, 4 h, 6 h and 24 h of exposure after 15 min dark adaptation. The effect of pH on photochemical activity of Cyanidium sp. was observable as early as 30 min after exposure and the pattern remained stable or with only minor modifications for 24 h. The optimum pH ranged from 1.5 to 2.5. A steep decrease of the photochemical activity was observed at pH below 1 even after 30 min of exposure. Although the alga had tolerated the exposure to pH = 1 for at least 6 h, longer (24 h) exposure resulted in reduction of the photochemical activity. At pH above 2.5, the decline was more moderate and its negative effect on photochemistry was less severe. According to the fluorescence measurements, the red alga Cyanidium sp. is well-adapted to prevailing pH at its original locality at Río Tinto, i.e. pH of 1 to 3. The short-term survival in pH < 1.5 may be adaptation to rare exposures to such low pH in the field. The tolerance of pH above 3 could be caused by adaptation to the microenvironment of the inner parts of microbial mats in which Cyanidium sp. usually dominates and where higher pH could occur due to photosynthetic oxygen production.

  5. Micro Electrochemical pH Sensor Applicable for Real-Time Ratiometric Monitoring of pH Values in Rat Brains.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jie; Zhang, Limin; Tian, Yang

    2016-02-16

    To develop in vivo monitoring meter for pH measurements is still the bottleneck for understanding the role of pH plays in the brain diseases. In this work, a selective and sensitive electrochemical pH meter was developed for real-time ratiometric monitoring of pH in different regions of rat brains upon ischemia. First, 1,2-naphthoquinone (1,2-NQ) was employed and optimized as a selective pH recognition element to establish a 2H(+)/2e(-) approach over a wide range of pH from 5.8 to 8.0. The pH meter demonstrated remarkable selectivity toward pH detection against metal ions, amino acids, reactive oxygen species, and other biological species in the brain. Meanwhile, an inner reference, 6-(ferrocenyl)hexanethiol (FcHT), was selected as a built-in correction to avoid the environmental effect through coimmobilization with 1,2-NQ. In addition, three-dimensional gold nanoleaves were electrodeposited onto the electrode surface to amplify the signal by ∼4.0-fold and the measurement was achieved down to 0.07 pH. Finally, combined with the microelectrode technique, the microelectrochemical pH meter was directly implanted into brain regions including the striatum, hippocampus, and cortex and successfully applied in real-time monitoring of pH values in these regions of brain followed by global cerebral ischemia. The results demonstrated that pH values were estimated to 7.21 ± 0.05, 7.13 ± 0.09, and 7.27 ± 0.06 in the striatum, hippocampus, and cortex in the rat brains, respectively, in normal conditions. However, pH decreased to 6.75 ± 0.07 and 6.52 ± 0.03 in the striatum and hippocampus, upon global cerebral ischemia, while a negligible pH change was obtained in the cortex.

  6. Laser Ranging Simulation Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piazolla, Sabino; Hemmati, Hamid; Tratt, David

    2003-01-01

    Laser Ranging Simulation Program (LRSP) is a computer program that predicts selected aspects of the performances of a laser altimeter or other laser ranging or remote-sensing systems and is especially applicable to a laser-based system used to map terrain from a distance of several kilometers. Designed to run in a more recent version (5 or higher) of the MATLAB programming language, LRSP exploits the numerical and graphical capabilities of MATLAB. LRSP generates a graphical user interface that includes a pop-up menu that prompts the user for the input of data that determine the performance of a laser ranging system. Examples of input data include duration and energy of the laser pulse, the laser wavelength, the width of the laser beam, and several parameters that characterize the transmitting and receiving optics, the receiving electronic circuitry, and the optical properties of the atmosphere and the terrain. When the input data have been entered, LRSP computes the signal-to-noise ratio as a function of range, signal and noise currents, and ranging and pointing errors.

  7. Immobilized fluorescent dyes for sensitive pH measurements on enamel surfaces with fiber optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rumphorst, A.; Seeger, Stefan; Duschner, H.

    1996-01-01

    Information on the pH directly on surfaces of dental enamel is an important aspect in research on tooth decay. As an alternative to pH-electrodes our approach to the problem is the optical determination of pH by pH sensitive fluorescent dyes immobilized to tooth surfaces. In this study a model for measuring pH either on aminated cellulose substrates or on enamel (in vitro) with a fluorescein type dye is presented. The experimental realization is a fiber optic sensor with a nitrogen-pumped dye laser system and photodiode for the detection of the emitted fluorescence light. The surface pH values in the range between 4 and 7 were derived from the ratios of the excitation bands at 490 nm and 460 nm.

  8. Satellite Laser Ranging operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearlman, Michael R.

    1994-01-01

    Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR) is currently providing precision orbit determination for measurements of: 1) Ocean surface topography from satellite borne radar altimetry, 2) Spatial and temporal variations of the gravity field, 3) Earth and ocean tides, 4) Plate tectonic and regional deformation, 5) Post-glacial uplift and subsidence, 6) Variations in the Earth's center-of-mass, and 7) Variations in Earth rotation. SLR also supports specialized programs in time transfer and classical geodetic positioning, and will soon provide precision ranging to support experiments in relativity.

  9. Broad host range plasmids.

    PubMed

    Jain, Aayushi; Srivastava, Preeti

    2013-11-01

    Plasmids are and will remain important cloning vehicles for biotechnology. They have also been associated with the spread of a number of diseases and therefore are a subject of environmental concern. With the advent of sequencing technologies, the database of plasmids is increasing. It will be of immense importance to identify the various bacterial hosts in which the plasmid can replicate. The present review article describes the features that confer broad host range to the plasmids, the molecular basis of plasmid host range evolution, and applications in recombinant DNA technology and environment.

  10. Western Aeronautical Test Range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakahara, Robert D.

    2008-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the work of the Western Aeronautical Test Range (WATR). NASA's Western Aeronautical Test Range is a network of facilities used to support aeronautical research, science missions, exploration system concepts, and space operations. The WATR resides at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center located at Edwards Air Force Base, California. The WATR is a part of NASA's Corporate Management of Aeronautical Facilities and funded by the Strategic Capability Asset Program (SCAP). Maps show the general location of the WATR area that is used for aeronautical testing and evaluation. The products, services and facilities of WATR are discussed,

  11. pH neutralization and zonation in alkaline-saline tank waste plumes.

    PubMed

    Wan, Jiamin; Larsen, Joern T; Tokunaga, Tetsu K; Zheng, Zuoping

    2004-03-01

    At the Hanford Site in Washington State, the pH values of contaminant plumes resulting from leaking of initially highly alkaline-saline radioactive waste solutions into the subsurface are now found to be substantially neutralized. However, the nature of plume pH neutralization has not previously been understood. As a master geochemical variable, pH needs to be understood in order to predict the fate and transport of contaminants carried by the waste plumes. Through this laboratory study, we found that the plume pH values spanned a broad range from 14 (within the near-source region) down to the value of 7 (lower than the pH value of the initial soil solution) while the plume was still connected to an actively leaking source. We defined two zones within a plume: the silicate dissolution zone (SDZ, pH 14-10) and the neutralized zone (NZ, pH 10-7). Quartz dissolution at elevated temperature and precipitation of secondary silicates (including sodium metasilicate, cancrinite, and zeolites) are the key reactions responsible for the pH neutralization within the SDZ. The rapid and thorough cation exchange of Na+ replacing Ca2+/Mg2+, combined with transport, resulted in a dynamic Ca2+/Mg2+-enriched plume front. Subsequent precipitation of calcite, sodium silicate, and possibly talc led to dramatically reduced pH within the plume front and the neutralized zone. During aging (after the plume source became inactive), continued quartz dissolution and the secondary silicate precipitation drove the pH value lower, toward pH 11 at equilibrium within the SDZ, whereas the pH values in the NZ remained relatively unchanged with time. A pH profile of 11 from the plume source to pH 7 at the plume front is expected for a historical plume. This laboratory-based study provided realistic plume pH profiles (consistent with that measured from borehole samples) and identified underlying mechanisms responsible for pH evolution.

  12. Assessment of pH variability at a coastal CO 2 vent for ocean acidification studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerrison, Philip; Hall-Spencer, Jason M.; Suggett, David J.; Hepburn, Leanne J.; Steinke, Michael

    2011-08-01

    Marine environments with naturally high CO 2 concentrations have become important research sites for studying the impacts of future ocean acidification on biological processes. We conducted high temporal resolution pH and temperature measurements in and around a shallow (2.5-3 m) CO 2 vent site off Ischia, Italy in May and June 2008. Loggers were deployed at five stations to monitor water at both the surface and benthos. Our reference station, 500 m from the CO 2 vent, had no noticeable vent influence. It had a naturally high and stable benthic pH (mean 8.16, inter-quartile range (IQ): 8.14-8.18) fluctuating with diel periodicity, presumably driven by community photosynthesis and respiration. A principal component analysis (PCA) revealed that the pH of this station was well constrained by meteorological parameters. In contrast, a station positioned within the vent zone, had a low and very variable benthic mean pH of 7.11 (IQ: 6.91-7.62) with large pH fluctuations not well constrained by a PCA. Any stations positioned within 20 m of the main vent zone had lowered pH, but suffered from abnormally large pH fluctuations making them unsuitable representatives to predict future changes to a shallow coastal environment. Between these extremes, we identified a benthic area with a lower pH of 7.84 (IQ: 7.83-7.88) that retained many of the characteristics of the reference station such as a natural diel pH periodicity and low variability. Our results indicate that a range of pH environments maybe commonplace near CO 2 vents due to their characteristic acidification of benthic water over a wide area. Such environments could become invaluable natural laboratories for ocean acidification research, closely mimicking future CO 2 conditions in a natural setting.

  13. Rain pH estimation based on the particulate matter pollutants and wet deposition study.

    PubMed

    Singh, Shweta; Elumalai, Suresh Pandian; Pal, Asim Kumar

    2016-09-01

    In forecasting of rain pH, the changes caused by particulate matter (PM) are generally neglected. In regions of high PM concentration like Dhanbad, the role of PM in deciding the rain pH becomes important. Present work takes into account theoretical prediction of rain pH by two methods. First method considers only acid causing gases (ACG) like CO2, SO2 and NOx in pH estimation, whereas, second method additionally accounts for effect of PM (ACG-PM). In order to predict the rain pH, site specific deposited dust that represents local PM was studied experimentally for its impact on pH of neutral water. After incorporation of PM correction factor, it was found that, rain pH values estimated were more representative of the observed ones. Fractional bias (FB) for the ACG-PM method reduced to values of the order of 10(-2) from those with order of 10(-1) for the ACG method. The study confirms neutralization of rain acidity by PM. On account of this, rain pH was found in the slightly acidic to near neutral range, despite of the high sulfate flux found in rain water. Although, the safer range of rain pH blurs the severity of acid rain from the picture, yet huge flux of acidic and other ions get transferred to water bodies, soil and ultimately to the ground water system. Simple use of rain pH for rain water quality fails to address the issues of its increased ionic composition due to the interfering pollutants and thus undermines severity of pollutants transferred from air to rain water and then to water bodies and soil.

  14. Fabrication and characterization of TiO2 coated cone shaped nano-fiber pH sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pathak, A. K.; Bhardwaj, V.; Gangwar, R. K.; De, M.; Singh, V. K.

    2017-03-01

    In the present paper a novel cone shaped nano-fiber (CSNF) pH sensor using multi-mode fiber (MMF) has been fabricated and demonstrated. Three different pH indicators, chlorophenol red, bromothymol blue and cresol red with precursor tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) have been used for fabrication of pH sensing layer. A significant enhancement in sensing properties of pH sensor with TiO2 thin film has been observed. The pH sensor with TiO2 thin film shows the quite high sensitivity (1.16 dBm/pH) as compared to sensor with simple pH coating (0.81 dBm/pH) at 1550 nm with a good linear response. Moreover, the sensor with TiO2 film exhibits fast response time of ∼ 25 s for pH values ranging from 4 to 11 with excellent stability and durability.

  15. High performance flexible pH sensor based on carboxyl-functionalized and DEP aligned SWNTs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lu; Shao, Jinyou; Li, Xiangming; Zhao, Qiang; Nie, Bangbang; Xu, Chuan; Ding, Haitao

    2016-11-01

    The detection and control of the pH is very important in many biomedical and chemical reaction processes. A miniaturized flexible pH sensor that is light weight, robust, and conformable is very important in many applications, such as multifunctional lab-on-a-chip systems or wearable biomedical devices. In this work, we demonstrate a flexible chemiresistive pH sensor based on dielectrophoresis (DEP) aligned carboxyl-functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). Decorated carboxyl groups can react with hydrogen (H+) and hydroxide (OH-) ions, enabling the sensor to be capable of sensing the pH. DEP is used to deposit well-organized and highly aligned SWNTs in desired locations, which improves the metal-nanotube interface and highly rapid detection of the pH, resulting in better overall device performance. When pH buffer solutions are dropped onto such SWNTs, the H+ and OH- ions caninteract with the carboxyl groups and affect the generation of holes and electrons in the SWNTs, leading to resistance variations in the SWNTs. The results shows that the relative resistance variations of the sensor increases linearly with increasing the pH values in the range from 5 to 9 and the response time ranges from 0.2 s to 22.6 s. The pH sensor also shows high performance in mechanical bendability, which benefited from the combination of flexible PET substrates and SWNTs. The SWNT-based flexible pH sensor demonstrates great potential in a wide range of areas due to its simple structure, excellent performance, low power consumption, and compatibility with integrated circuits.

  16. Agriculture, forestry, range resources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crea, W. J.

    1974-01-01

    In the area of crop specie identification, it has been found that temporal data analysis, preliminary stratification, and unequal probability analysis were several of the factors that contributed to high identification accuracies. Single data set accuracies on fields of greater than 80,000 sq m (20 acres) are in the 70- to 90-percent range; however, with the use of temporal data, accuracies of 95 percent have been reported. Identification accuracy drops off significantly on areas of less than 80,000 sq m (20 acres) as does measurement accuracy. Forest stratification into coniferous and deciduous areas has been accomplished to a 90- to 95-percent accuracy level. Using multistage sampling techniques, the timber volume of a national forest district has been estimated to a confidence level and standard deviation acceptable to the Forest Service at a very favorable cost-benefit time ratio. Range specie/plant community vegetation mapping has been accomplished at various levels of success (69- to 90-percent accuracy). However, several investigators have obtained encouraging initial results in range biomass (forage production) estimation and range readiness predictions. Soil association map correction and soil association mapping in new area appear to have been proven feasible on large areas; however, testing in a complex soil area should be undertaken.

  17. Agriculture, forestry, range resources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macdonald, R. B.

    1974-01-01

    The necessary elements to perform global inventories of agriculture, forestry, and range resources are being brought together through the use of satellites, sensors, computers, mathematics, and phenomenology. Results of ERTS-1 applications in these areas, as well as soil mapping, are described.

  18. Front Range Branch Officers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The Front Range Branch of AGU has installed officers for 1990: Ray Noble, National Center for Atmospheric Research, chair; Sherry Oaks, U.S. Geological Survey, chair-elect; Howard Garcia, NOAA, treasurer; Catharine Skokan, Colorado School of Mines, secretary. JoAnn Joselyn of NOAA is past chair. Members at large are Wallace Campbell, NOAA; William Neff, USGS; and Stephen Schneider, NCAR.

  19. Nonscanning confocal ranging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, P. C.; Arons, E.

    1995-03-01

    We demonstrate a nonscanning confocal ranging system based on spatially incoherent interferometry. Such a system has significant advantages over the conventional confocal imaging system and other interferometric systems. We develop the theory in terms of coherence cells and demonstrate the equivalence of our method to the conventional confocal methods. Experimental results are also provided.

  20. Electric vehicles: Driving range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kempton, Willett

    2016-09-01

    For uptake of electric vehicles to increase, consumers' driving-range needs must be fulfilled. Analysis of the driving patterns of personal vehicles in the US now shows that today's electric vehicles can meet all travel needs on almost 90% of days from a single overnight charge.

  1. RADIO RANGING DEVICE

    DOEpatents

    Bogle, R.W.

    1960-11-22

    A description is given of a super-regenerative oscillator ranging device provided with radiating and receiving means and being capable of indicating the occurrence of that distance between itself and a reflecting object which so phases the received echo of energy of a preceding emitted oscillation that the intervals between oscillations become uniform.

  2. Long Range Plan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jefferson Coll., Hillsboro, MO.

    This document presents Jefferson College's "Long Range Plan," which is intended to provide the College's governing board, administration, and faculty and staff with a task-oriented blueprint for maximizing the delivery of higher education services to students and the community in a predictable, programmatic, and fiscally sound manner.…

  3. STDN ranging equipment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, C. E.

    1975-01-01

    Final results of the Spaceflight Tracking and Data Network (STDN) Ranging Equipment program are summarized. Basic design concepts and final design approaches are described. Theoretical analyses which define requirements and support the design approaches are presented. Design verification criteria are delineated and verification test results are specified.

  4. Agriculture, forest, and range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The findings and recommendations of the panel for developing a satellite remote-sensing global information system in the next decade are reported. User requirements were identified in five categories: (1) cultivated crops, (2) land resources, (3)water resources, (4)forest management, and (5) range management. The benefits from the applications of satellite data are discussed.

  5. Fact Sheet: Range Complex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cornelson, C.; Fretter, E.

    2004-01-01

    NASA Ames has a long tradition in leadership with the use of ballistic ranges and shock tubes for the purpose of studying the physics and phenomena associated with hypervelocity flight. Cutting-edge areas of research run the gamut from aerodynamics, to impact physics, to flow-field structure and chemistry. This legacy of testing began in the NACA era of the 1940's with the Supersonic Free Flight Tunnel, and evolved dramatically up through the late 1950s with the pioneering work in the Ames Hypersonic Ballistic Range. The tradition continued in the mid-60s with the commissioning of the three newest facilities: the Ames Vertical Gun Range (AVGR) in 1964, the Hypervelocity Free Flight Facility (HFFF) in 1965 and the Electric Arc Shock Tube (EAST) in 1966. Today the Range Complex continues to provide unique and critical testing in support of the Nation's programs for planetary geology and geophysics; exobiology; solar system origins; earth atmospheric entry, planetary entry, and aerobraking vehicles; and various configurations for supersonic and hypersonic aircraft.

  6. The thermal stability of the Fusarium solani pisi cutinase as a function of pH

    PubMed Central

    2001-01-01

    We have investigated the thermal stability of the Fusarium solani pisi cutinase as a function of pH, in the range from pH 2–12. Its highest enzymatic activity coincides with the pH-range at which it displays its highest thermal stability. The unfolding of the enzyme as a function of pH was investigated by microcalorimetry. The ratio between the calorimetric enthalpy (ΔHcal) and the van't Hoff enthalpy (ΔHv) obtained, is far from unity, indicating that cutinase does not exhibit a simple two state unfolding behaviour. The role of pH on the electrostatic contribution to the thermal stability was assessed using TITRA. We propose a molecular interpretation for the pH-variation in enzymatic activity. PMID:12488611

  7. The effect of pH on chronic aquatic nickel toxicity is dependent on the pH itself: Extending the chronic nickel bioavailability models.

    PubMed

    Nys, Charlotte; Janssen, Colin R; Van Sprang, Patrick; De Schamphelaere, Karel A C

    2016-05-01

    The environmental quality standard for Ni in the European Commission's Water Framework Directive is bioavailability based. Although some of the available chronic Ni bioavailability models are validated only for pH ≤ 8.2, a considerable fraction of European surface waters has a pH > 8.2. Therefore, the authors investigated the effect of a change in pH from 8.2 to 8.7 on chronic Ni toxicity in 3 invertebrate (Daphnia magna, Lymnaea stagnalis, and Brachionus calyciflorus) and 2 plant species (Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata and Lemna minor). Nickel toxicity was almost always significantly higher at pH 8.7 than at pH 8.2. To test whether the existing chronic Ni bioavailability models developed for pH ≤ 8.2 can be used at higher pH levels, Ni toxicity at pH 8.7 was predicted based on Ni toxicity observed at pH 8.2. This resulted in a consistent underestimation of toxicity. The results suggest that the effect of pH on Ni(2+) toxicity is dependent on the pH itself: the slope of the pH effect is steeper above than below pH 8.2 for species for which a species-specific bioavailability model exists. Therefore, the existing chronic Ni bioavailability models were modified to allow predictions of chronic Ni toxicity to invertebrates and plants in the pH range of 8.2 to 8.7 by applying a pH slope (SpH ) dependent on the pH of the target water. These modified Ni bioavailability models resulted in more accurate predictions of Ni toxicity to all 5 species (within 2-fold error), without the bias observed using the bioavailability models developed for pH ≤ 8.2. The results of the present study can decrease the uncertainty in implementing the bioavailability-based environmental quality standard under the Water Framework Directive for high-pH regions in Europe.

  8. Optoelectronic Instrument Monitors pH in a Culture Medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Melody M.; Pellis, Neal; Jeevarajan, Anthony S.; Taylor, Thomas D.

    2004-01-01

    An optoelectronic instrument monitors the pH of an aqueous cell-culture medium in a perfused rotating-wall-vessel bioreactor. The instrument is designed to satisfy the following requirements: It should be able to measure the pH of the medium continuously with an accuracy of 0.1 in the range from 6.5 to 7.5. It should be noninvasive. Any material in contact with the culture medium should be sterilizable as well as nontoxic to the cells to be grown in the medium. The biofilm that inevitably grows on any surface in contact with the medium should not affect the accuracy of the pH measurement. It should be possible to obtain accurate measurements after only one calibration performed prior to a bioreactor cell run. The instrument should be small and lightweight. The instrument includes a quartz cuvette through which the culture medium flows as it is circulated through the bioreactor. The cuvette is sandwiched between light source on one side and a photodetector on the other side. The light source comprises a red and a green light-emitting diode (LED) that are repeatedly flashed in alternation with a cycle time of 5 s. The responses of the photodiode to the green and red LEDs are processed electronically to obtain a quantity proportional to the ratio between the amounts of green and red light transmitted through the medium.

  9. Constitutive expression of recombinant human hyaluronidase PH20 by Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kuan-Jung; Sabrina, Sabrina; El-Safory, Nermeen S; Lee, Guan-Chiun; Lee, Cheng-Kang

    2016-12-01

    PH20 is known as sperm adhesion molecule 1 (SPAM1) and also has hyaluronidase function to preferentially hydrolyze the glycosidic linkage of hyaluronic acid (HA). A DNA fragment containing core domain of human PH20 gene was cloned into a constitutive expression plasmid (pGAPZαC) of Pichia pastoris to produce a fusion protein with α factor signal in the N-terminus and 6 × His as well as c-Myc tags in the C-terminus. The resulting plasmid pGAPZαC-PH20 was integrated into the genome of P. pastoris strain GS115. Functional recombinant human PH20 (rHuPH20) was successfully expressed and secreted by the recombinant P. pastoris transformant. Highest hyaluronidase activity of 2 mU/mL could be obtained at 3 day in an YPD culture. After purified by phenylboronic acid resin adsorption, rHuPH20 with a specific activity of 230 mU/mg was obtained. Via periodic acid-Schiff staining and zymogram analysis, the partially purified rHuPH20 was determined to be highly glycosylated to various extents with molecular mass in the range of 100-300 kDa. The enzyme showed a maximal activity at pH 5.0 but no appreciable activity at pH ≤3 and pH ≥8. The hyaluronidase activity could be stably maintained at 4°C but lost 40% after incubating at 30°C for 4 h. Both N-acetyl cysteine and glutathione showed a half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) of 8 mM against rHuPH20.

  10. The influence of pH on biotite dissolution and alteration kinetics at low temperature

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Acker, James G.; Bricker, O.P.

    1992-01-01

    Biotite dissolution rates in acidic solutions were determined in fluidized-bed reactors and flowthrough columns. Biotite dissolution rates increased inversely as a linear function of pH in the pH range 3-7, where the rate order n = -0.34. Biotite dissolved incongruently over this pH range, with preferential release of magnesium and iron from the octahedral layer. Release of tetrahedral silicon was much greater at pH 3 than at higher pH. Iron release was significantly enhanced by low pH conditions. Solution compositions from a continuous exposure flow-through column of biotite indicated biotite dissolves incongruently at pH 4, consistent with alteration to a vermiculite-type product. Solution compositions from a second intermittent-flow column exhibited elevated cation release rates upon the initiation of each exposure to solution. The presence of strong oxidizing agents, the mineral surface area, and sample preparation methodology also influenced the dissolution or alteration kinetics of biotite. ?? 1992.

  11. Effect of some anionic polymers on pH of triethanolamine aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Musiał, Witold; Kubis, Aleksander

    2004-01-01

    One of the suggested approaches in the management and prophylaxis of acne involves binding of free fatty acids in the form of soap with alcoholamines. Due to a possible irritating effect of alcoholamines associated with a relatively high pH of their aqueous solutions, complexation of alcoholamines with acid polymers is advocated. Triethanolamine is one of the best recognized alcoholamines. It was conventionally neutralized with Carbopols, Eudragits, alginic acid and pectin. During neutralization of polymer dispersions with triethanolamine, variations in the course of the neutralization curve have been observed among individual macromolecular compounds. The pH of 0.1 mol/l triethanolamine solution reaches 10.51, while following a complete neutralization with anionic polymers, such as Carbopols, Eudragits, alginic acid and pectin, pH ranges from 3.88 for systems neutralized with alginic acid to 8.50 for the system neutralized with Eudragit S-100. Complexation of triethanolamine with anionic polymers decreases its pH, and it is possible to find such pH range in which pH of the preparation containing the polymer and triethanolamine will correspond to the physiological pH of the skin.

  12. Thermally programmable pH buffers.

    PubMed

    Van Gough, Dara; Bunker, Bruce C; Roberts, Mark E; Huber, Dale L; Zarick, Holly F; Austin, Mariah J; Wheeler, Jill S; Moore, Diana; Spoerke, Erik D

    2012-11-01

    Many reactions in both chemistry and biology rely on the ability to precisely control and fix the solution concentrations of either protons or hydroxide ions. In this report, we describe the behavior of thermally programmable pH buffer systems based on the copolymerization of varying amounts of acrylic acid (AA) groups into N-isopropylacrylamide polymers. Because the copolymers undergo phase transitions upon heating and cooling, the local environment around the AA groups can be reversibly switched between hydrophobic and hydrophilic states affecting the ionization behavior of the acids. Results show that moderate temperature variations can be used to change the solution pH by two units. However, results also indicate that the nature of the transition and its impact on the pH values are highly dependent on the AA content and the degree of neutralization.

  13. Macroalgae contribute to nested mosaics of pH variability in a subarctic fjord

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krause-Jensen, D.; Duarte, C. M.; Hendriks, I. E.; Meire, L.; Blicher, M. E.; Marbà, N.; Sejr, M. K.

    2015-08-01

    The Arctic Ocean is considered the most vulnerable ecosystem to ocean acidification, and large-scale assessments of pH and the saturation state for aragonite (Ωarag) have led to the notion that the Arctic Ocean is already close to a corrosive state. In high-latitude coastal waters the regulation of pH and Ωarag is, however, far more complex than offshore because increased biological activity and input of glacial meltwater affect pH. Effects of ocean acidification on calcifiers and non-calcifying phototrophs occupying coastal habitats cannot be derived from extrapolation of current and forecasted offshore conditions, but they require an understanding of the regimes of pH and Ωarag in their coastal habitats. To increase knowledge of the natural variability in pH in the Arctic coastal zone and specifically to test the influence of benthic vegetated habitats, we quantified pH variability in a Greenland fjord in a nested-scale approach. A sensor array logging pH, O2, PAR, temperature and salinity was applied on spatial scales ranging from kilometre scale across the horizontal extension of the fjord; to 100 m scale vertically in the fjord, 10-100 m scale between subtidal habitats with and without kelp forests and between vegetated tidal pools and adjacent vegetated shores; and to centimetre to metre scale within kelp forests and millimetre scale across diffusive boundary layers of macrophyte tissue. In addition, we assessed the temporal variability in pH on diurnal and seasonal scales. Based on pH measurements combined with point samples of total alkalinity, dissolved inorganic carbon and relationships to salinity, we also estimated variability in Ωarag. Results show variability in pH and Ωarag of up to 0.2-0.3 units at several scales, i.e. along the horizontal and vertical extension of the fjord, between seasons and on a diel basis in benthic habitats and within 1 m3 of kelp forest. Vegetated intertidal pools exhibited extreme diel pH variability of > 1.5 units and

  14. Analog/digital pH meter system I.C.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vincent, Paul; Park, Jea

    1992-01-01

    The project utilizes design automation software tools to design, simulate, and fabricate a pH meter integrated circuit (IC) system including a successive approximation type seven-bit analog to digital converter circuits using a 1.25 micron N-Well CMOS MOSIS process. The input voltage ranges from 0.5 to 1.0 V derived from a special type pH sensor, and the output is a three-digit decimal number display of pH with one decimal point.

  15. Initiation of lipid autoxidation by ABAP at pH 4-10 in SDS micelles.

    PubMed

    Musialik, Malgorzata; Kita, Marcin; Litwinienko, Grzegorz

    2008-02-21

    The rates of radical generation, R(i), by two water soluble initiators: 2,2'-azobis(2-methylpropionamidine) and 2,2'-azobis[2-methyl-N-(2-hydroxyethyl)propionamide], and the lipid soluble 2,2'-azobisisobutyronitrile were measured in an SDS micellar system over a pH range of 4-10. Enhanced values of R(i) at low pH are attributed to Coulombic repulsion of protonated radicals.

  16. Application of a fluorescence intensity ratio technique for the intrinsic determination of pH using an optical fiber sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thotath, Bhadra; Nguyen, T. Hien; Zhang, Weiwei; Wren, Stephen P.; Baxter, Gregory W.; Sun, Tong; Collins, Stephen F.; Grattan, Kenneth T. V.

    2015-09-01

    An intensity ratio technique has been used for characterizing fluorescence spectra from novel coumarin dyes for pH sensing, in the range of 0.5 - 6, providing results that are independent of possible fluctuations in the intensity of the excitation source, deterioration of the indicator and changes in optical coupling. The arrangement was determined to have a sensitivity of 25% per unit pH change (at a pH of 4).

  17. Effect of pH upon electroreduction of cadmium(II) ions in aqueous solutions containing polyethylenimine

    SciTech Connect

    Turbanov, K.Yu.; Ermakov, S.S.; Krasikov, B.S.

    1994-02-10

    The effect of the pH of the solution upon electroreduction of cadmium(II) complexes with polyethylenimine has been studied by methods of differential impulse and tast polarography and square-wave and cyclic voltammetry in the region of pH from 4 to 12. A scheme is proposed for the electrode process involving the Cd(II) complexes with polyethylenimine in the studied pH range.

  18. Organic Acid Excretion in Penicillium ochrochloron Increases with Ambient pH

    PubMed Central

    Vrabl, Pamela; Fuchs, Viktoria; Pichler, Barbara; Schinagl, Christoph W.; Burgstaller, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    Despite being of high biotechnological relevance, many aspects of organic acid excretion in filamentous fungi like the influence of ambient pH are still insufficiently understood. While the excretion of an individual organic acid may peak at a certain pH value, the few available studies investigating a broader range of organic acids indicate that total organic acid excretion rises with increasing external pH. We hypothesized that this phenomenon might be a general response of filamentous fungi to increased ambient pH. If this is the case, the observation should be widely independent of the organism, growth conditions, or experimental design and might therefore be a crucial key point in understanding the function and mechanisms of organic acid excretion in filamentous fungi. In this study we explored this hypothesis using ammonium-limited chemostat cultivations (pH 2–7), and ammonium or phosphate-limited bioreactor batch cultivations (pH 5 and 7). Two strains of Penicillium ochrochloron were investigated differing in the spectrum of excreted organic acids. Confirming our hypothesis, the main result demonstrated that organic acid excretion in P. ochrochloron was enhanced at high external pH levels compared to low pH levels independent of the tested strain, nutrient limitation, and cultivation method. We discuss these findings against the background of three hypotheses explaining organic acid excretion in filamentous fungi, i.e., overflow metabolism, charge balance, and aggressive acidification hypothesis. PMID:22493592

  19. Phosphoglycolate phosphatase. Effect of cation and pH on activity.

    PubMed

    Christeller, J T; Tolbert, N E

    1978-03-25

    P-glycolate phosphatase requires divalent cations for activity. Activity-pH curves identified 2 active site residues with pK values at pH 5.7 and pH 9.1 in the presence of magnesium and at pH 5.7 and pH 7.5 in the presence of manganese or cobalt. Saturation velocity kinetics enabled the identification of two distinct divalent cation binding sites. The first, nonspecific site has a K0.5 of 2 to 7 x 10(-5) M, depending on the cation and the pH. The second site, which is specific for magnesium, binds this cation in a negatively cooperative fashion. The affinity at pH 8.1 varies approximately 100-fold from the first magnesium bound to the fourth. The negative cooperativity is greatest at high pH. Because the pH range of activity is very broad, both the phosphate monoanion and dianion of P-glycolate must be bound as the substrate. The concentration of these two species at the apparent Km is independent of magnesium concentration. The P-glycolate.magnesium complex is kinetically inactive.

  20. Attributing seasonal pH variability in surface ocean waters to governing factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagens, M.; Middelburg, J. J.

    2016-12-01

    On-going ocean acidification and increasing availability of high-frequency pH data have stimulated interest to understand seasonal pH dynamics in surface waters. Here we show that it is possible to accurately reproduce observed pH values by combining seasonal changes in temperature (T), dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), and total alkalinity (TA) from three time series stations with novel pH sensitivity factors. Moreover, we quantify the separate contributions of T, DIC, and TA changes to winter-to-summertime differences in pH, which are in the ranges of -0.0334 to -0.1237, 0.0178 to 0.1169, and -0.0063 to 0.0234, respectively. The effects of DIC and temperature are therefore largely compensatory, and are slightly tempered by changes in TA. Whereas temperature principally drives pH seasonality in low-latitude to midlatitude systems, winter-to-summer DIC changes are most important at high latitudes. This work highlights the potential of pH sensitivity factors as a tool for quantifying the driving mechanisms behind pH changes.

  1. Influence of pH on the localized corrosion of iron

    SciTech Connect

    Webley, R.; Henry, R.

    1986-06-01

    The influence of pH on the pitting corrosion of iron in chloride and sulfate solutions was determined using two artificial pit apparatuses to obtain the pH near the surface of the pit bottom. A glass membrane electrode and an antimony electrode were used to measure pH in the two apparatuses. Using solutions of NaCl and Na/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ at current densities of 0.5, 5.0, and 10 mA/cm/sup 2/ pH's in the range 5 to 6 were obtained with the first apparatus. The antimony probe did not measure pH accurately in solutions of 1 N NaCl and 1 N Na/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ and had an error of approximately 2 pH units. A one-dimensional transport model was developed to predict pH variations around the pit mouth and inside the pit. The validity of this model was not verified due to the relative lack of precision with pH measurement techniques.

  2. Change of pH during excess sludge fermentation under alkaline, acidic and neutral conditions.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Yue; Peng, Yongzhen; Liu, Ye; Jin, Baodan; Wang, Bo; Wang, Shuying

    2014-12-01

    The change in pH during excess sludge (ES) fermentation of varying sludge concentrations was investigated in a series of reactors at alkaline, acidic, and neutral pHs. The results showed that the changes were significantly affected by fermentative conditions. Under different conditions, pH exhibited changing profiles. When ES was fermented under alkaline conditions, pH decreased in a range of (10±1). At the beginning of alkaline fermentation, pH dropped significantly, at intervals of 4h, 4h, and 5h with sludge concentrations of 8665.6mg/L, 6498.8mg/L, and 4332.5mg/L, then it would become moderate. However, under acidic conditions, pH increased from 4 to 5. Finally, under neutral conditions pH exhibited a decrease then an increase throughout entire fermentation process. Further study showed short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs), ammonia nitrogen and cations contributed to pH change under various fermentation conditions. This study presents a novel strategy based on pH change to predict whether SCFAs reach their stable stage.

  3. Influence of pH on yeast immobilization on polystyrene surfaces modified by energetic ion bombardment.

    PubMed

    Tran, Clara T H; Kondyurin, Alexey; Chrzanowski, Wojciech; Bilek, Marcela M M; McKenzie, David R

    2013-04-01

    Plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) treatment is a novel method for immobilizing yeast on polymer surfaces by covalent linkage. This study of the immobilization of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in both rehydrated and cultured forms showed that the density of cell attachment on PIII treated polystyrene (PS) was strongly dependent on the pH of the incubation medium and was higher for rehydrated yeast. A study of the surface charge was undertaken to explain this result. A high density of cell attachment occurs in acidic conditions (pH 3-5) and a significantly reduced cell density occurs in neutral and alkaline buffers (pH 6-10) for both types of yeast. Force measurements using atomic force microscopy show that a negative charge is present on polystyrene after PIII treatment. The charge is close to zero at pH 3 to pH 5 and increasingly negative from pH 6 to pH 10. Both rehydrated yeast and cultured yeast have negative electrophoretic mobility in the pH range studied. The repulsive forces are weak in acidic buffers and stronger in neutral and alkaline buffers, in good agreement with the cell densities observed. Rehydrated yeast cells are found to be more hydrophobic than cultured yeasts in the same buffer. The higher hydrophobicity explains the higher attachment of rehydrated yeast compared to cultured yeast.

  4. Effect of pH and nitrite concentration on nitrite oxidation rate.

    PubMed

    Jiménez, E; Giménez, J B; Ruano, M V; Ferrer, J; Serralta, J

    2011-10-01

    The effect of pH and nitrite concentration on the activity of the nitrite oxidizing bacteria (NOB) in an activated sludge reactor has been determined by means of laboratory batch experiments based on respirometric techniques. The bacterial activity was measured at different pH and at different total nitrite concentrations (TNO₂). The experimental results showed that the nitrite oxidation rate (NOR) depends on the TNO₂ concentration independently of the free nitrous acid (FNA) concentration, so FNA cannot be considered as the real substrate for NOB. NOB were strongly affected by low pH values (no activity was detected at pH 6.5) but no inhibition was observed at high pH values (activity was nearly the same for the pH range 7.5-9.95). A kinetic expression for nitrite oxidation process including switch functions to model the effect of TNO₂ concentration and pH inhibition is proposed. Substrate half saturation constant and pH inhibition constants have been obtained.

  5. 2D ratiometric fluorescent pH sensor for tracking of cells proliferation and metabolism.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jun; Ding, Changqin; Zhou, Jie; Tian, Yang

    2015-08-15

    Extracellular pH plays a vital role no matter in physiological or pathological studies. In this work, a hydrogel, CD@Nile-FITC@Gel (Gel sensor), entrapping the ratiometric fluorescent probe CD@Nile-FITC was developed. The Gel sensor was successfully used for real-time extracellular pH monitoring. In the case of CD@Nile-FITC, pH-sensitive fluorescent dye fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) was chosen as the response signal for H(+) and Nile blue chloride (Nile) as the reference signal. The developed fluorescent probe exhibited high selectivity for pH over other metal ions and amino acids. Meanwhile, the carbon-dots-based inorganic-organic probe demonstrated excellent photostability against long-term light illumination. In order to study the extracellular pH change in processes of cell proliferation and metabolism, CD@Nile-FITC probe was entrapped in sodium alginate gel and consequently formed CD@Nile-FITC@Gel. The MTT assay showed low cytotoxicity of the Gel and the pH titration indicated that it could monitor the pH fluctuations linearly and rapidly within the pH range of 6.0-9.0, which is valuable for physiological pH determination. As expected, the real-time bioimaging of the probe was successfully achieved.

  6. Range expansion of mutualists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muller, Melanie J. I.; Korolev, Kirill S.; Murray, Andrew W.; Nelson, David R.

    2012-02-01

    The expansion of a species into new territory is often strongly influenced by the presence of other species. This effect is particularly striking for the case of mutualistic species that enhance each other's proliferation. Examples range from major events in evolutionary history, such as the spread and diversification of flowering plants due to their mutualism with pollen-dispersing insects, to modern examples like the surface colonisation of multi-species microbial biofilms. Here, we investigate the spread of cross-feeding strains of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae on an agar surface as a model system for expanding mutualists. Depending on the degree of mutualism, the two strains form distinctive spatial patterns during their range expansion. This change in spatial patterns can be understood as a phase transition within a stepping stone model generalized to two mutualistic species.

  7. Long Range Materials Research

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-12-31

    India, also called bulat steels, are known to have high carbon contents, commonly 1.5 to 2.0% carbon. The high quality of these steels is well...gamma-cementite range, essentially all of the cementite is converted to the spheroidized form. However, during transformation...plus additional cementite In non-spheroldlzed form, typically l>iates. As set forth above, It is Important that essentially

  8. Light beam range finder

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, Thomas E.

    1998-01-01

    A "laser tape measure" for measuring distance which includes a transmitter such as a laser diode which transmits a sequence of electromagnetic pulses in response to a transmit timing signal. A receiver samples reflections from objects within the field of the sequence of visible electromagnetic pulses with controlled timing, in response to a receive timing signal. The receiver generates a sample signal in response to the samples which indicates distance to the object causing the reflections. The timing circuit supplies the transmit timing signal to the transmitter and supplies the receive timing signal to the receiver. The receive timing signal causes the receiver to sample the reflection such that the time between transmission of pulses in the sequence in sampling by the receiver sweeps over a range of delays. The transmit timing signal causes the transmitter to transmit the sequence of electromagnetic pulses at a pulse repetition rate, and the received timing signal sweeps over the range of delays in a sweep cycle such that reflections are sampled at the pulse repetition rate and with different delays in the range of delays, such that the sample signal represents received reflections in equivalent time. The receiver according to one aspect of the invention includes an avalanche photodiode and a sampling gate coupled to the photodiode which is responsive to the received timing signal. The transmitter includes a laser diode which supplies a sequence of visible electromagnetic pulses. A bright spot projected on to the target clearly indicates the point that is being measured, and the user can read the range to that point with precision of better than 0.1%.

  9. Light beam range finder

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, T.E.

    1998-06-16

    A ``laser tape measure`` for measuring distance is disclosed which includes a transmitter such as a laser diode which transmits a sequence of electromagnetic pulses in response to a transmit timing signal. A receiver samples reflections from objects within the field of the sequence of visible electromagnetic pulses with controlled timing, in response to a receive timing signal. The receiver generates a sample signal in response to the samples which indicates distance to the object causing the reflections. The timing circuit supplies the transmit timing signal to the transmitter and supplies the receive timing signal to the receiver. The receive timing signal causes the receiver to sample the reflection such that the time between transmission of pulses in the sequence in sampling by the receiver sweeps over a range of delays. The transmit timing signal causes the transmitter to transmit the sequence of electromagnetic pulses at a pulse repetition rate, and the received timing signal sweeps over the range of delays in a sweep cycle such that reflections are sampled at the pulse repetition rate and with different delays in the range of delays, such that the sample signal represents received reflections in equivalent time. The receiver according to one aspect of the invention includes an avalanche photodiode and a sampling gate coupled to the photodiode which is responsive to the received timing signal. The transmitter includes a laser diode which supplies a sequence of visible electromagnetic pulses. A bright spot projected on to the target clearly indicates the point that is being measured, and the user can read the range to that point with precision of better than 0.1%. 7 figs.

  10. Long range chromatin organization

    PubMed Central

    Acuña, Luciana I Gómez; Kornblihtt, Alberto R

    2014-01-01

    Splicing is a predominantly co-transcriptional process that has been shown to be tightly coupled to transcription. Chromatin structure is a key factor that mediates this functional coupling. In light of recent evidence that shows the importance of higher order chromatin organization in the coordination and regulation of gene expression, we discuss here the possible roles of long-range chromatin organization in splicing and alternative splicing regulation. PMID:25764333

  11. Photometric Passive Range Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Argueta-Diaz, Victor; García-Valenzuela, Augusto

    2008-04-01

    In this paper we present a passive optical ranging method that consists of taking several photometric measurements from the light radiated by an object and deriving the range from these measurements. This passive ranging device uses an iris of radius a, a lens of radius larger than a, and a photodetector of radius p

  12. Front Range Report, Abstracts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spence, William

    The second regional conference of the Front Range Branch, AGU, was attended by more than 80 professionals and some 20 outstanding high school students. The conference included 2 days of interdisciplinary talks, and lots of discussion, that primarily were keyed to geophysical studies of Colorado, Wyoming, and New Mexico. Other talks reported on nonregional, and sometimes global, studies being done by geophypsicists of the Front Range region.Topics included tectonics of the Front Range and the Colorado Plateau, pollution of the Arkansas and Mississippi rivers, and a supreme polluting event that caused the late-Cretaceous extinctions. Other notable talks were on toxic cleanup, microburst (wind shear) detection at U.S. airports, and other meteorological studies. Several talks treated the audience to the excitement of new work and surprise discoveries. The meeting was multimedia, including the playing of two videos through a projection TV and the playing of a fascinating tape between an airport control tower and incoming pilots during a severe microburst event.

  13. Influence of pH on organic acid production by Clostridium sporogenes in test tube and fermentor cultures.

    PubMed Central

    Montville, T J; Parris, N; Conway, L K

    1985-01-01

    The influence of pH on the growth parameters of and the organic acids produced by Clostridium sporogenes 3121 cultured in test tubes and fermentors at 35 degrees C was examined. Specific growth rates in the fermentor maintained at a constant pH ranged from 0.20 h-1 at pH 5.00 to 0.86 h-1 at pH 6.50. Acetic acid was the primary organic acid in supernatants of 24-h cultures; total organic acid levels were 2.0 to 22.0 mumol/ml. Supernatants from pH 5.00 and 5.50 cultures had total organic acid levels less than one-third of those found at pH 6.00 to 7.00. The specific growth rates of the test tube cultures ranged from 0.51 h-1 at pH 5.00 to 0.95 h-1 at pH 6.50. The pH of the medium did not affect the average total organic acid content (51.5 mumol/ml) but did affect the distribution of the organic acids, which included formic, acetic, propionic, butyric, 3-(p-hydroxyphenyl)propionic, and 3-phenylpropionic acids. Butyric acid levels were lower, but formic and propionic acid levels were higher, at pH 5.00 than at other pHs. PMID:4004207

  14. pH dominates variation in tropical soil archaeal diversity and community structure.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Binu M; Kim, Mincheol; Lai-Hoe, Ang; Shukor, Nor A A; Rahim, Raha A; Go, Rusea; Adams, Jonathan M

    2013-11-01

    Little is known of the factors influencing soil archaeal community diversity and composition in the tropics. We sampled soils across a range of forest and nonforest environments in the equatorial tropics of Malaysia, covering a wide range of pH values. DNA was PCR-amplified for the V1-V3 region of the 16S rRNA gene, and 454-pyrosequenced. Soil pH was the best predictor of diversity and community composition of Archaea, being a stronger predictor than land use. Archaeal OTU richness was highest in the most acidic soils. Overall archaeal abundance in tropical soils (determined by qPCR) also decreased at higher pH. This contrasts with the opposite trend previously found in temperate soils. Thaumarcheota group 1.1b was more abundant in alkaline soils, whereas group 1.1c was only detected in acidic soils. These results parallel those found in previous studies in cooler climates, emphasizing niche conservatism among broad archaeal groups. Among the most abundant operational taxonomic units (OTUs), there was clear evidence of niche partitioning by pH. No individual OTU occurred across the entire range of pH values. Overall, the results of this study show that pH plays a major role in structuring tropical soil archaeal communities.

  15. Effect of pH on the heavy metal-clay mineral interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Altyn, O.; Oezbelge, H.O.; Dogu, T.; Oezbelge, T.A.

    1997-12-31

    Adsorption and ion exchange of Pb and Cd on the surface of kaolinite and montmorillonite were studied with a strong emphasis on the pH values of solutions containing heavy metal ions. The pH range studied was 2.5 - 9. For kaolinite at a clay/solution ratio of 1/10 (w/w), Pb removal changes from 20 to 30% for an initial Pb concentration of 1640 ppm, and Cd removal changes from 10 to 20% for an initial Cd concentration of 1809 ppm. Due to its high exchange capacity, montmorillonite can remove more heavy metal than kaolinite. Removal rates for montmorillonite can reach up to 90% for both Pb and Cd. In the pH range of 3-6, there is a plateau for the removal rates. At pH values higher than 6, removal seems to increase artificially due to the precipitation of heavy metals. Under similar conditions for both clays, the rate of removal of Pb is always higher than that of Cd. As the pH value decreases for montmorillonite, there is a strong tendency for decreased surface area and swelling, as indicated by BET surface area measurements, adsorbed layer thickness and pore size distribution data. In the range of pH values studied, X-ray diffraction analysis showed the appearance of a characteristic (001) peak for montmorillonite, indicating that the crystalline structure of the clay was intact during the experiments.

  16. Differential genotoxicity of diphenyl diselenide (PhSe)2 and diphenyl ditelluride (PhTe)2.

    PubMed

    Meinerz, Daiane Francine; Allebrandt, Josiane; Mariano, Douglas O C; Waczuk, Emily P; Soares, Felix Antunes; Hassan, Waseem; Rocha, João Batista T

    2014-01-01

    Organoselenium compounds have been pointed out as therapeutic agents. In contrast, the potential therapeutic aspects of tellurides have not yet been demonstrated. The present study evaluated the comparative toxicological effects of diphenyl diselenide (PhSe)2 and diphenyl ditelluride (PhTe)2 in mice after in vivo administration. Genotoxicity (as determined by comet assay) and mutagenicicity were used as end-points of toxicity. Subcutaneous administration of high doses of (PhSe)2 or (PhTe)2 (500 µmol/kg) caused distinct genotoxicity in mice. (PhSe)2 significantly decreased the DNA damage index after 48 and 96 h of its injection (p < 0.05). In contrast, (PhTe) caused a significant increase in DNA damage (p < 0.05) after 48 and 96 h of intoxication. (PhSe)2 did not cause mutagenicity but (PhTe)2 increased the micronuclei frequency, indicating its mutagenic potential. The present study demonstrated that acute in vivo exposure to ditelluride caused genotoxicity in mice, which may be associated with pro-oxidant effects of diphenyl ditelluride. In addition, the use of this compound and possibly other related tellurides must be carefully controlled.

  17. pH treatment as an effective tool to select the functional and structural properties of yak milk caseins.

    PubMed

    Liu, H N; Zhang, C; Zhang, H; Guo, H Y; Wang, P J; Zhu, Y B; Ren, F Z

    2013-09-01

    Qula is made from yak milk after defatting, acidifying, and drying. Yak milk caseins are purified from Qula by dissolving in alkali solution. The effects of different pH treatments on the functional and structural properties of yak milk caseins were investigated. Over a broad range of pH (from 6.0 to 12.0), functional properties of yak milk caseins, including solubility, emulsifying activities, and thermal characteristics, and the structural properties, including 1-anilino-8-naphthalene-sulfonate fluorescence, turbidity and particle diameter, were evaluated. The results showed that the yak milk casein yield increased as the pH increased from 6.0 to 12.0. The solubility dramatically increased as the pH increased from 6.0 to 8.0, and decreased as the pH increased from 9.0 to 12.0. The changes in emulsifying activity were not significant. Caseins were remarkably heat stable at pH 9.0. The turbidity of the casein solution decreased rapidly as the pH increased from 6.0 to 12.0, and the results suggested that reassembled casein micelles were more compact at low pH than high pH. At pH values higher than 8.0, the yield of yak milk caseins reached more than 80%. The highest solubility was at pH 8.0, the best emulsification was at pH 10.0 and the greatest thermal stability was at pH 9.0. According to the functional characteristics of yak milk caseins, alkali conditions (pH 8.0-10.0) should be selected for optimum production. These results suggested that pH-dependent treatment could be used to modify the properties of yak milk caseins by appropriate selection of the pH level.

  18. pH preference and avoidance responses of adult brook trout Salvelinus fontinalis and brown trout Salmo trutta.

    PubMed

    Fost, B A; Ferreri, C P

    2015-03-01

    The pH preferred and avoided by wild, adult brook trout Salvelinus fontinalis and brown trout Salmo trutta was examined in a series a laboratory tests using gradual and steep-gradient flow-through aquaria. The results were compared with those published for the observed segregation patterns of juvenile S. fontinalis and S. trutta in Pennsylvania streams. The adult S. trutta tested showed a preference for pH 4·0 while adult S. fontinalis did not prefer any pH within the range tested. Salmo trutta are not found in Pennsylvania streams with a base-flow pH < 5·8 which suggests that S. trutta prefer pH well above 4·0. Adult S. trutta displayed a lack of avoidance at pH below 5·0, as also reported earlier for juveniles. The avoidance pH of wild, adult S. fontinalis (between pH 5·5 and 6·0) and S. trutta (between pH 6·5 and 7·0) did not differ appreciably from earlier study results for the avoidance pH of juvenile S. fontinalis and S. trutta. A comparison of c.i. around these avoidance estimates indicates that avoidance pH is similar among adult S. fontinalis and S. trutta in this study. The limited overlap of c.i. for avoidance pH values for the two species, however, suggests that some S. trutta will display avoidance at a higher pH when S. fontinalis will not. The results of this study indicate that segregation patterns of adult S. fontinalis and S. trutta in Pennsylvania streams could be related to pH and that competition with S. trutta could be mediating the occurrence of S. fontinalis at some pH levels.

  19. Hexavalent chromium reduction with scrap iron in continuous-flow system Part 1: effect of feed solution pH.

    PubMed

    Gheju, M; Iovi, A; Balcu, I

    2008-05-01

    The reduction of hexavalent chromium by scrap iron was investigated in continuous system, using long-term column experiments, for aqueous Cr(VI) solutions having low buffering capacities, over the pH range of 2.00-7.30. The results showed that the initial pH of Cr(VI) solution significantly affects the reduction capacity of scrap iron. The highest reduction capacity was determined to be 19.2 mg Cr(VI)/g scrap iron, at pH 2.50, and decreased with increasing the initial pH of Cr(VI) solution. A considerable decrease in scrap iron reduction capacity (25%) was also observed at pH 2.00, as compared to pH 2.50, due to the increased contribution of H(+) ions to the corrosion of scrap iron, which leads to a rapid decrease in time of the scrap iron volume. Over the pH range of 2.50-7.30, hexavalent chromium concentration increases slowly in time after its breakthrough in column effluent, until a steady-state concentration was observed; similarly, over the same pH range, the amount of solubilized Cr(III) in treated column effluent decreases in time, until a steady-state concentration was observed. The steady-state concentration in column effluent decreased for Cr(VI) and increased for Cr(III) with decreasing the initial pH of Cr(VI) solution. No steady-state Cr(VI) or Cr(III) concentrations in column effluent were observed at pH 2.00. Over the entire studied pH range, the amount of Fe(total) in treated solution increases as the initial pH of column influent is decreased; the results show also a continuously decrease in time of Fe(total) concentration, for a constant initial pH, due to a decrease in time of iron corrosion rate. Cr(III) concentration in column effluent also continuously decreased in time, for a constant initial pH, over the pH range of 2.50-7.30. This represents an advantage, because the amount of precipitant agent used to remove Fe(total) and Cr(III) from the column effluent will also decrease in time. The optimum pH for Cr(VI) reduction with scrap iron in

  20. Effect of pH control strategies and substrate concentration on the hydrogen yield from fermentative hydrogen production in large laboratory-scale.

    PubMed

    Mariakakis, I; Krampe, J; Steinmetz, H

    2012-01-01

    A series of batch experiments investigating two different pH control strategies, initial pH adjustment and continuous pH control, have been carried out in large laboratory-scale reactors with working volumes of 30 L. In both cases, pH was varied between 5 and 7.5. Sucrose concentrations were also varied starting from 0 up to 30 g/L. Higher hydrogen production yields can be achieved by batch experiments through continuous pH control than by simple initial pH adjustment. In the case of continuous pH control, maximization of hydrogen yield was acquired for slightly acidic pH of 6.5. Continuous pH control in the neutral pH range of 7.0 and in pH lower than 6.5, induced a reduction in the hydrogen production yield. Sucrose can be completely degraded only for a pH higher than 6. Lower pH values seem to inhibit the hydrogen-producing bacteria. Under the conditions of continuous pH adjustment at pH 6.5 and a sucrose concentration of 25 g/L the maximum hydrogen yield of 1.79 mol H(2)/mol hexose was obtained. These conditions could be applied for the batch start-up of large fermentors.

  1. The effects of pH on the growth of Chlorella vulgaris and its interactions with cadmium toxicity.

    PubMed

    Rachlin, J W; Grosso, A

    1991-05-01

    The effects of pH alone, and in combination with exposure to 0.89 microM cadmium, on the growth response of the green alga Chlorella vulgaris were evaluated. Acidic (3.0-6.2) and alkaline (8.3-9.0) pH values retarded the growth of this alga. Optimal growth occurred when the pH of the medium was adjusted to values of 7.5 and 8.0. When the cells were exposed to pH adjusted medium plus the presence of 0.89 microM Cd, a value known to reduce population growth by 50% at the control pH of 6.9, the affects were additive at the acidic (3.0-5.0) pH ranges. At alkaline pH values of 8.3-9.0 all toxicity responses could be explained by pH adjustment alone, indicating that additional cadmium toxicity was absent. At pH values of 7.5 and 8.0, cadmium toxicity was mitigated against, and resultant growth at pH 8.0 was at the same enhanced rate as this pH without cadmium.

  2. What My Ph.D. Taught Me

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levenstein, Jessica

    2013-01-01

    The author started in the Ph.D. program in comparative literature at Princeton in 1992, a year after she graduated from college. She fell in love with mythology and the classical traditions and find herself teaching literature. In the remainder of her time at Princeton, she precepted for four or five more classes, got the chance to join the…

  3. The Economic Contribution of PhDs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casey, Bernard H.

    2009-01-01

    This paper looks at what the value of a doctorate is, both to employers in particular and to society and the economy at large. Given the emphasis many universities and funding agencies/governments are putting upon the development of PhD programmes, this is an issue deserving attention. The paper tries to show how two separate but interrelated…

  4. PH Sensitive WO3-Based Microelectrochemical Transistors.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-09-22

    a WO3 target. The cyclic voltammetry of these microelectrodes indicates that WO3 connects individual microelectrodes, since the voltammogram of a...transistor that is sensitive to pH. The cyclic voltammetry is pH-dependent and consistent with pH-dependent transistor characteristics, which indicate that the

  5. Development of sulfonamide AKT PH domain inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Ahad, Ali Md; Zuohe, Song; Du-Cuny, Lei; Moses, Sylvestor A; Zhou, Li Li; Zhang, Shuxing; Powis, Garth; Meuillet, Emmanuelle J; Mash, Eugene A

    2011-03-15

    Disruption of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/AKT signaling pathway can lead to apoptosis in cancer cells. Previously we identified a lead sulfonamide that selectively bound to the pleckstrin homology (PH) domain of AKT and induced apoptosis when present at low micromolar concentrations. To examine the effects of structural modification, a set of sulfonamides related to the lead compound was designed, synthesized, and tested for binding to the expressed PH domain of AKT using a surface plasmon resonance-based competitive binding assay. Cellular activity was determined by means of an assay for pAKT production and a cell killing assay using BxPC-3 cells. The most active compounds in the set are lipophilic and possess an aliphatic chain of the proper length. Results were interpreted with the aid of computational modeling. This paper represents the first structure-activity relationship (SAR) study of a large family of AKT PH domain inhibitors. Information obtained will be used in the design of the next generation of inhibitors of AKT PH domain function.

  6. Teaching Physics Using PhET Simulations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wieman, C. E.; Adams, W. K.; Loeblein, P.; Perkins, K. K.

    2010-01-01

    PhET Interactive Simulations (sims) are now being widely used in teaching physics and chemistry. Sims can be used in many different educational settings, including lecture, individual or small group inquiry activities, homework, and lab. Here we will highlight a few ways to use them in teaching, based on our research and experiences using them in…

  7. Ph.D.'s and the Marketplace.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harvey, James

    Throughout the last decade, Ph.D. recipients were accustomed to a job market in which demand for their services far exceeded supply. During the same period, manpower experts predicted this situation would continue in the foreseeable future. However, when the 60's ended, the employment illusion had been rudely dispelled by frantic reports of a…

  8. pH & Rate of Enzymatic Reactions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clariana, Roy B.

    1991-01-01

    A quantitative and inexpensive way to measure the rate of enzymatic reaction is provided. The effects of different pH levels on the reaction rate of an enzyme from yeast are investigated and the results graphed. Background information, a list of needed materials, directions for preparing solutions, procedure, and results and discussion are…

  9. The Ph.D. Value Proposition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Kenneth J.

    2012-01-01

    Atlanta University launched its doctor of arts in humanities (DAH) programs almost 40 years ago, and, since the 1988 merger with Clark College, Clark Atlanta University has continued to award the degrees. This fall, for the first time, its students will be able to earn Ph.D.s in humanities instead. In DAH programs around the country, there's been…

  10. Monitoring fetal pH by telemetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blum, A.; Donahoe, T.; Jhabvala, M. D.; Ryan, W.

    1980-01-01

    Telemetry unit has been developed for possible use in measuring scalp-tissue pH and heart rate of unborn infant. Unit radius data to receiver as much as 50 ft. away. Application exists during hours just prior to childbirth to give warning of problems that might require cesarean delivery.

  11. Laser Range Camera Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Storjohann, K.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes an imaging model that was derived for use with a laser range camera (LRC) developed by the Advanced Intelligent Machines Division of Odetics. However, this model could be applied to any comparable imaging system. Both the derivation of the model and the determination of the LRC's intrinsic parameters are explained. For the purpose of evaluating the LRC's extrinsic parameters, i.e., its external orientation, a transformation of the LRC's imaging model into a standard camera's (SC) pinhole model is derived. By virtue of this transformation, the evaluation of the LRC's external orientation can be found by applying any SC calibration technique.

  12. A series of naphthalimide derivatives as intra- and extra-cellular pH sensors

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Yanqing; Su, Fengyu; Weber, Warner; Nandakumar, Vivek; Shumway, Bradley R.; Jin, Yuguang; Zhou, Xianfeng; Holl, Mark R.; Johnson, Roger H.; Meldrum, Deirdre R.

    2010-01-01

    A series of new naphthalimide derivatives were synthesized and studied. Three of the materials (SM1, SM2, and SM3) possess methacrylate(s) moieties as pH sensor monomers, enabling these compounds to be polymerized with other monomers for thin film preparation for extracellular pH sensing. Herein, poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate)-co-poly(acrylamide) (PHEMA-co-PAM) was chosen as the polymer matrix. Structure influences on pH responses and pKa values were studied. The film P3 composed of the sensing moiety SM3 has a pKa close to the usual biological environmental pH of ~7. It was used as an extracellular pH sensor to monitor pH change during the metabolism of prokaryotic Escherichia coli (E. coil). On the other hand, the three sensor monomers are new intracellular biomarkers to sense lysosomes of eukaryotic cells since (1) their pKa values are in a range of 5.9 to 6.8; (2) their emission intensities at acidic conditions (such as at pH 5) are much stronger than those at a neutral condition of pH 7; (3) lysosomes range in size from 0.1 to 1.2 μm in diameter with pH ranging from 4.5 to 5.0, which is much more acidic than the pH value of the cytoplasm (usually with a pH value of ~7.2); and (4) the acidity of lysosomes enables a protonation of the amino groups of the pH probes making the sensors emit brightly in acidic organelles by inhibiting the photo-induced electron transfer from the amino groups to the fluorophores. Lysosome sensing was demonstrated using live human brain glioblastoma U87MG cell line, human cervical cancer HeLa cell line, and human esophagus premalignant CP-A and CP-D cell lines by observations of small acidic spherical organelles (lysosomes) and significant colocalizations (82 ~ 95%) of the sensors with a commercially available lysosome-selective staining probe LysoTracker Red® under confocal fluorescence microscopy. PMID:20619451

  13. Archaeal abundance across a pH gradient in an arable soil and its relationship to bacterial and fungal growth rates.

    PubMed

    Bengtson, Per; Sterngren, Anna E; Rousk, Johannes

    2012-08-01

    Soil pH is one of the most influential factors for the composition of bacterial and fungal communities, but the influence of soil pH on the distribution and composition of soil archaeal communities has yet to be systematically addressed. The primary aim of this study was to determine how total archaeal abundance (quantitative PCR [qPCR]-based estimates of 16S rRNA gene copy numbers) is related to soil pH across a pH gradient (pH 4.0 to 8.3). Secondarily, we wanted to assess how archaeal abundance related to bacterial and fungal growth rates across the same pH gradient. We identified two distinct and opposite effects of pH on the archaeal abundance. In the lowest pH range (pH 4.0 to 4.7), the abundance of archaea did not seem to correspond to pH. Above this pH range, there was a sharp, almost 4-fold decrease in archaeal abundance, reaching a minimum at pH 5.1 to 5.2. The low abundance of archaeal 16S rRNA gene copy numbers at this pH range then sharply increased almost 150-fold with pH, resulting in an increase in the ratio between archaeal and bacterial copy numbers from a minimum of 0.002 to more than 0.07 at pH 8. The nonuniform archaeal response to pH could reflect variation in the archaeal community composition along the gradient, with some archaea adapted to acidic conditions and others to neutral to slightly alkaline conditions. This suggestion is reinforced by observations of contrasting outcomes of the (competitive) interactions between archaea, bacteria, and fungi toward the lower and higher ends of the examined pH gradient.

  14. Using multiple spectral feature analysis for quantitative pH mapping in a mining environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopačková, Veronika

    2014-05-01

    The pH is one of the major chemical parameters affecting the results of remediation programs carried out at abandoned mines and dumps and one of the major parameters controlling heavy metal mobilization and speciation. This study is concerned with testing the feasibility of estimating surface pH on the basis of airborne hyperspectral (HS) data (HyMap). The work was carried on the Sokolov lignite mine, as it represents a site with extreme material heterogeneity and high pH gradients. First, a geochemical conceptual model of the site was defined. Pyrite, jarosite or lignite were the diagnostic minerals of very low pH (<3.0), jarosite in association with goethite indicated increased pH (3.0-6.5) and goethite alone characterized nearly neutral or higher pH (>6.5). It was found that these minerals have absorption feature parameters which are common for both forms, individual minerals as well as parts of the mixtures, while the shift to longer wavelengths of the absorption maximum centered between 0.90 and 1.00 μm is the main parameter that allows differentiation among the ferric minerals. The multi range spectral feature fitting (MRSFF) technique was employed to map the defined end-members indicating certain pH ranges in the HS image datasets. This technique was found to be sensitive enough to assess differences in the desired spectral parameters (e.g., absorption shape, depth and indirectly maximum absorption wavelength position). Furthermore, the regression model using the fit images, the results of MRSFF, as inputs was constructed (R2 = 0.61, Rv2 = 0.76) to estimate the surface pH. This study represents one of the few approaches employing image spectroscopy for quantitative pH modeling in a mining environment and the achieved results demonstrate the potential application of hyperspectral remote sensing as an efficient method for environmental monitoring.

  15. pH dependent unfolding characteristics of DLC8 dimer: Residue level details from NMR.

    PubMed

    Mohan, P M Krishna; Hosur, Ramakrishna V

    2008-11-01

    Environment dependence of folding and unfolding of a protein is central to its function. In the same vein, knowledge of pH dependence of stability and folding/unfolding is crucial for many biophysical equilibrium and kinetic studies designed to understand protein folding mechanisms. In the present study we investigated the guanidine induced unfolding transition of dynein light chain protein (DLC8), a cargo adaptor of the dynein complex in the pH range 7-10. It is observed that while the protein remains a dimer in the entire pH range, its stability is somewhat reduced at alkaline pH. Global unfolding features monitored using fluorescence spectroscopy revealed that the unfolding transition of DLC8 at pH 7 is best described by a three-state model, whereas, that at pH 10 is best described by a two-state model. Chemical shift perturbations due to pH change provided insights into the corresponding residue level structural perturbations in the DLC8 dimer. Likewise, backbone (15)N relaxation measurements threw light on the corresponding motional changes in the dimeric protein. These observations have been rationalized on the basis of expected changes with increasing pH in the protonation states of the titratable residues on the structure of the protein. These, in turn provide an explanation for the change from three-state to two-state guanidine induced unfolding transition as the pH is increased from 7 to 10. All these results exemplify and highlight the role of environment vis-à-vis the sequence and structure of a given protein in dictating its folding/unfolding characteristics.

  16. Slowing down of 2-11 MeV 12C, 16O, 28Si and 63Cu heavy ions through Si3N4 thin foil by using Time-of-Flight spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guesmia, A.; Msimanga, M.; Pineda-Vargas, C. A.; Ammi, H.; Dib, A.; Ster, M.

    2016-03-01

    The stopping force and the energy-loss straggling of 63Cu, 28Si, 16O and 12C partially stripped heavy ions crossing silicon nitride foil has been determined over a continuous range of energies 2-11 MeV, by using a method based on the Heavy Ion-Elastic Recoil Detection Analysis (HI-ERDA) technique using a Time of Flight (ToF) spectrometer. The obtained energy loss straggling values corrected for non-statistical straggling and the thickness variation using the Besenbacher's method have been analyzed and compared with the corresponding computed values. For computed electronic straggling we have used alternatively the widely used formulations such as, the universal Bohr straggling deduced from the Bohr stopping model, and the Lindhard-Scharff formula including the Bunching effect given by Hvelplund-Firsov formula according to the Besenbacher approach. The aim of such comparison is to check the reliability and accuracy of the existing energy loss straggling formulations, in the light of the present experimental results. The experimental results of energy loss straggling of all ions are found to be greater than those predicted by the Bohr stopping model or Lindhard-Scharff prediction model. The introduction of the bunching effect improves the comparison and gives an estimation of other effects such as charge exchange.

  17. Polypeptide micelles with dual pH activatable dyes for sensing cells and cancer imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Ping; Yang, Yueting; Yi, Huqiang; Fang, Shengtao; Zhang, Pengfei; Sheng, Zonghai; Gao, Guanhui; Gao, Duyang; Cai, Lintao

    2014-04-01

    pH is an important control parameter for maintenance of cell viability and tissue functions. pH monitoring provides valuable information on cell metabolic processes and the living environment. In this study, we prepared dual pH-sensitive, fluorescent dye-loaded polypeptide nanoparticles (DPNs) for ratiometric sensing of pH changes in living cells. DPNs contain two types of dyes: N-(rhodamine B) lactam cystamine (RBLC), an acid activatable fluorescent dye with increased fluorescence in an acidic environment, and fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC), a base activatable fluorescent dye with enhanced fluorescence in an alkaline environment. Hence, DPNs exhibited a dual response signal with strong red fluorescence and weak green fluorescence under acidic conditions; in contrast, they showed strong green fluorescence and almost no red fluorescence under alkaline and neutral conditions. The favorable inverse pH responses of the two fluorescent dyes resulted in ratiometric pH determination for DPNs with an optimized pH-sensitive range of pH 4.5-7.5. Quantitative analysis of the intracellular pH of intact MCF-7 cells has been successfully demonstrated with our nanosensor. Moreover, single acid activatable fluorescent dye doped polypeptide nanoparticles that only contained RBLC can distinguish tumor tissue from normal tissue by monitoring the acidic extracellular environment.pH is an important control parameter for maintenance of cell viability and tissue functions. pH monitoring provides valuable information on cell metabolic processes and the living environment. In this study, we prepared dual pH-sensitive, fluorescent dye-loaded polypeptide nanoparticles (DPNs) for ratiometric sensing of pH changes in living cells. DPNs contain two types of dyes: N-(rhodamine B) lactam cystamine (RBLC), an acid activatable fluorescent dye with increased fluorescence in an acidic environment, and fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC), a base activatable fluorescent dye with enhanced fluorescence

  18. MiniAERCam Ranging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Talley, Tom

    2003-01-01

    Johnson Space Center (JSC) is designing a small, remotely controlled vehicle that will carry two color and one black and white video cameras in space. The device will launch and retrieve from the Space Vehicle and be used for remote viewing. Off the shelf cellular technology is being used as the basis for communication system design. Existing plans include using multiple antennas to make simultaneous estimates of the azimuth of the MiniAERCam from several sites on the Space Station and use triangulation to find the location of the device. Adding range detection capability to each of the nodes on the Space Vehicle would allow an estimate of the location of the MiniAERCam to be made at each Communication And Telemetry Box (CATBox) independent of all the other communication nodes. This project will investigate the techniques used by the Global Positioning System (GPS) to achieve accurate positioning information and adapt those strategies that are appropriate to the design of the CATBox range determination system.

  19. Range Process Simulation Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, Dave; Haas, William; Barth, Tim; Benjamin, Perakath; Graul, Michael; Bagatourova, Olga

    2005-01-01

    Range Process Simulation Tool (RPST) is a computer program that assists managers in rapidly predicting and quantitatively assessing the operational effects of proposed technological additions to, and/or upgrades of, complex facilities and engineering systems such as the Eastern Test Range. Originally designed for application to space transportation systems, RPST is also suitable for assessing effects of proposed changes in industrial facilities and large organizations. RPST follows a model-based approach that includes finite-capacity schedule analysis and discrete-event process simulation. A component-based, scalable, open architecture makes RPST easily and rapidly tailorable for diverse applications. Specific RPST functions include: (1) definition of analysis objectives and performance metrics; (2) selection of process templates from a processtemplate library; (3) configuration of process models for detailed simulation and schedule analysis; (4) design of operations- analysis experiments; (5) schedule and simulation-based process analysis; and (6) optimization of performance by use of genetic algorithms and simulated annealing. The main benefits afforded by RPST are provision of information that can be used to reduce costs of operation and maintenance, and the capability for affordable, accurate, and reliable prediction and exploration of the consequences of many alternative proposed decisions.

  20. Western Aeronautical Test Range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakahara, Robert D.

    2008-01-01

    NASA's Western Aeronautical Test Range (WATR) is a network of facilities used to support aeronautical research, science missions, exploration system concepts, and space operations. The WATR resides at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center located at Edwards Air Force Base, California. The WATR is a part of NASA's Corporate Management of Aeronautical Facilities and funded by the Strategic Capability Asset Program (SCAP). It is managed by the Aeronautics Test Program (ATP) of the Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate (ARMD) to provide the right facility at the right time. NASA is a tenant on Edwards Air Force Base and has an agreement with the Air Force Flight Test Center to use the land and airspace controlled by the Department of Defense (DoD). The topics include: 1) The WATR supports a variety of vehicles; 2) Dryden shares airspace with the AFFTC; 3) Restricted airspace, corridors, and special use areas are available for experimental aircraft; 4) WATR Products and Services; 5) WATR Support Configuration; 6) Telemetry Tracking; 7) Time Space Positioning; 8) Video; 9) Voice Communication; 10) Mobile Operations Facilities; 11) Data Processing; 12) Mission Control Center; 13) Real-Time Data Analysis; and 14) Range Safety.

  1. Effects of ph, carbonate, orthophosphate, and redox potential on cuprosolvency

    SciTech Connect

    Schock, M.R.; Lytle, D.A.; Clement, J.A.

    1995-12-01

    A comprehensive solubility model for copper in drinking water has been developed, that is consistent with available data for copper dissolution and passivation in drinking water systems. Copper solubility (cuprosolvency) is greatly affected by the redox conditions of the systems. The concentration of Cu(I) is dominated by Cu{sub 2}O(s) or CuOH(s) solid phases, plus soluble aqueous ammonia and chloride complexes. In new piping, the concentration of Cu(II) is mainly governed by Cu(OH){sub 2}(s) (cupric hydroxide), rather than CuO(s) (tenorite) or Cu{sub 2}(OH){sub 2}CO{sub 3}(s)(malachite). Complexation of Cu(II) by DIC and hydroxide ion is extremely important. Increases in DIC are predicted to cause significant increases in copper solubility in the pH range of 7.5--10. Utilities may trade off increasing cuprosolvency by DIC addition for ensuring adequate buffering intensity in the finished water. Sufficient dosages of orthophosphate in the pH range of 6.5 to 7.5 may reduce cuprosolvency under oxidizing conditions. Sulfate may decrease cuprosolvency under some conditions, or may interfere with the formation of cupric hydroxide films under mildly alkaline conditions. Dissolved oxygen and chlorine residual play complicated roles in determining copper concentrations after various standing times. Frequently, 48--72 hours are necessary to reach equilibrium levels of copper in disinfected systems.

  2. Simultaneous high-resolution pH and spectrophotometric recordings of oxygen binding in blood microvolumes.

    PubMed

    Oellermann, Michael; Pörtner, Hans-O; Mark, Felix C

    2014-05-01

    Oxygen equilibrium curves have been widely used to understand oxygen transport in numerous organisms. A major challenge has been to monitor oxygen binding characteristics and concomitant pH changes as they occur in vivo, in limited sample volumes. Here we report a technique allowing highly resolved and simultaneous monitoring of pH and blood pigment saturation in minute blood volumes. We equipped a gas diffusion chamber with a broad-range fibre-optic spectrophotometer and a micro-pH optode and recorded changes of pigment oxygenation along oxygen partial pressure (PO2) and pH gradients to test the setup. Oxygen binding parameters derived from measurements in only 15 μl of haemolymph from the cephalopod Octopus vulgaris showed low instrumental error (0.93%) and good agreement with published data. Broad-range spectra, each resolving 2048 data points, provided detailed insight into the complex absorbance characteristics of diverse blood types. After consideration of photobleaching and intrinsic fluorescence, pH optodes yielded accurate recordings and resolved a sigmoidal shift of 0.03 pH units in response to changing PO2 from 0 to 21 kPa. Highly resolved continuous recordings along pH gradients conformed to stepwise measurements at low rates of pH changes. In this study we showed that a diffusion chamber upgraded with a broad-range spectrophotometer and an optical pH sensor accurately characterizes oxygen binding with minimal sample consumption and manipulation. We conclude that the modified diffusion chamber is highly suitable for experimental biologists who demand high flexibility, detailed insight into oxygen binding as well as experimental and biological accuracy combined in a single setup.

  3. A Flexible Optical pH Sensor Based on Polysulfone Membranes Coated with pH-Responsive Polyaniline Nanofibers

    PubMed Central

    Abu-Thabit, Nedal; Umar, Yunusa; Ratemi, Elaref; Ahmad, Ayman; Ahmad Abuilaiwi, Faraj

    2016-01-01

    A new optical pH sensor based on polysulfone (PSU) and polyaniline (PANI) was developed. A transparent and flexible PSU membrane was employed as a support. The electrically conductive and pH-responsive PANI was deposited onto the membrane surface by in situ chemical oxidative polymerization (COP). The absorption spectra of the PANI-coated PSU membranes exhibited sensitivity to pH changes in the range of 4–12, which allowed for designing a dual wavelength pH optical sensor. The performance of the membranes was assessed by measuring their response starting from high pH and going down to low pH, and vice versa. It was found that it is necessary to precondition the sensor layers before each measurement due to the slight hysteresis observed during forward and backward pH titrations. PSU membranes with polyaniline coating thicknesses in the range of ≈100–200 nm exhibited fast response times of <4 s, which are attributed to the porous, rough and nanofibrillar morphology of the polyaniline coating. The fabricated pH sensor was characterized by a sigmoidal response (R2 = 0.997) which allows for pH determination over a wide dynamic range. All membranes were stable for a period of more than six months when stored in 1 M HCl solution. The reproducibility of the fabricated optical pH sensors was found to be <0.02 absorption units after one month storage in 1 M HCl solution. The performance of the optical pH sensor was tested and the obtained pH values were compared with the results obtained using a pH meter device. PMID:27355953

  4. Effects of pH and Temperature on the Stability of Fumonisins in Maize Products

    PubMed Central

    Bryła, Marcin; Waśkiewicz, Agnieszka; Szymczyk, Krystyna; Jędrzejczak, Renata

    2017-01-01

    This paper is a study of the stability of fumonisins in dough based on maize flour prepared in a phosphate buffer with a pH of 3.5, 5.5 or 7.5 and baked at a temperature within the range of 100–250 °C. Buffers with various pH values were tested, since it is well-known that pH may significantly influence interactions of fumonisins with other substances. A standard analytical procedure was used to determine the concentration of free fumonisins. Hydrolysis in an alkaline medium was then applied to reveal the hidden forms, while the total fumonisins concentations was determined in another measurement. The total concentration of fumonisins was statistically higher in pH = 3.5 and pH = 5.5 than the concentration of free fumonisins; no similar difference was found at pH = 7.5. The applied phosphate buffer pH 7.5 may enhance solubility of fumonisins, which would increase extraction efficiency of free analytes, thereby decreasing the difference between concentrations of total and free fumonisins. Hydrolysed B1 fumonisin (HFB1) and partially hydrolysed B1 fumonisin (isomers a and b: PHFB1a and PHFB1b, respectively) were the main investigated substances. For baking temperatures below 220 °C, fumonisins were slightly more stable for pH = 5.5 than for pH = 3.5 and pH = 7.5. In both of these latter cases, the concentration of partially hydrolysed fumonisins grew initially (up to 200 °C) with an increase in the baking temperature, and then dropped. Similar behaviour was observed for free HFB1, which may suggest the following fumonisin degradation mechanism: initially, the tricarballylic acid (TCA) groups are removed from the molecules, and next, the HFB1 molecules disintegrate. PMID:28257053

  5. Biochar contribution to soil pH buffer capacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tonutare, Tonu; Krebstein, Kadri; Utso, Maarius; Rodima, Ako; Kolli, Raimo; Shanskiy, Merrit

    2014-05-01

    Biochar as ecologically clean and stable form of carbon has complex of physical and chemical properties which make it a potentially powerful soil amendment (Mutezo, 2013). Therefore during the last decade the biochar application as soil amendment has been a matter for a great number of investigations. For the ecological viewpoint the trend of decreasing of soil organic matter in European agricultural land is a major problem. Society is faced with the task to find possibilities to stabilize or increase soil organic matter content in soil and quality. The availability of different functional groups (e.g. carboxylic, phenolic, acidic, alcoholic, amine, amide) allows soil organic matter to buffer over a wide range of soil pH values (Krull et al. 2004). Therefore the loss of soil organic matter also reduces cation exchange capacity resulting in lower nutrient retention (Kimetu et al. 2008). Biochar can retain elements in soil directly through the negative charge that develops on its surfaces, and this negative charge can buffer acidity in the soil. There are lack of investigations about the effect of biochar to soil pH buffering properties, The aim of our investigation was to investigate the changes in soil pH buffer capacity in a result of addition of carbonizated material to temperate region soils. In the experiment different kind of softwood biochars, activated carbon and different soil types with various organic matter and pH were used. The study soils were Albeluvisols, Leptosols, Cambisols, Regosols and Histosols . In the experiment the series of the soil: biochar mixtures with the biochar content 0 to 100% were used. The times of equiliberation between solid and liquid phase were from 1 to 168 hours. The suspension of soil: biochar mixtures was titrated with HCl solution. The titration curves were established and pH buffer capacities were calculated for the pH interval from 3.0 to 10.0. The results demonstrate the dependence of pH buffer capacity from soil type

  6. Range imaging laser radar

    DOEpatents

    Scott, M.W.

    1990-06-19

    A laser source is operated continuously and modulated periodically (typically sinusoidally). A receiver imposes another periodic modulation on the received optical signal, the modulated signal being detected by an array of detectors of the integrating type. Range to the target determined by measuring the phase shift of the intensity modulation on the received optical beam relative to a reference. The receiver comprises a photoemitter for converting the reflected, periodically modulated, return beam to an accordingly modulated electron stream. The electron stream is modulated by a local demodulation signal source and subsequently converted back to a photon stream by a detector. A charge coupled device (CCD) array then averages and samples the photon stream to provide an electrical signal in accordance with the photon stream. 2 figs.

  7. Range imaging laser radar

    DOEpatents

    Scott, Marion W.

    1990-01-01

    A laser source is operated continuously and modulated periodically (typicy sinusoidally). A receiver imposes another periodic modulation on the received optical signal, the modulated signal being detected by an array of detectors of the integrating type. Range to the target determined by measuring the phase shift of the intensity modulation on the received optical beam relative to a reference. The receiver comprises a photoemitter for converting the reflected, periodically modulated, return beam to an accordingly modulated electron stream. The electron stream is modulated by a local demodulation signal source and subsequently converted back to a photon stream by a detector. A charge coupled device (CCD) array then averages and samples the photon stream to provide an electrical signal in accordance with the photon stream.

  8. Measurement of individual intracellular pH and membrane potential values in living cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slavik, Jan; Lanz, Edvard; Cimprich, Petr

    1999-07-01

    It was assumed that each cell is a homogeneous suspension may have a slightly different pH and membrane potential. A wide range of pH-sensitive fluorescent dyes BCECF, SNARF, FITC, carboxyfluorescein, fluorescein and pyranine have been carefully tested for the accuracy and reliability of their pH-response inside living cells. The intracellular milieu was simulated by a series of mineral buffers with addition of proteins. The pH values have been determined from the excitation ratios 490/435 nm for BCECF, FITC, carboxyfluorescein and fluorescein, and 450/400 nm for pyranine, emission ratios 518/529 nm for BCECF and 635/590 nm for SNARF. The spectrally determined values were then compared with the pH values of buffers measured by a glass electrode. Using the data from the calibration procedure, we evaluated individual intracellular pH values of a large number of cells within one cell population. The confocal ratio fluorescence microscopy revealed pH maps from which both cytoplasmic and vacuolar pH values could be determine, flow cytometry gave enormous amount of average intracellular pH values of individual cells of a whole cell population. Each cell population exhibited significant differences in both cytoplasmic pH values among individual cells. The pH distribution of a typical cell population appeared to fit a Gaussian curve. In yeast it was a Gaussian curve with half- width values around 0.4 pH unit. The men pH values depended on the growth phase, H-ATPase activity and external pH values. The preliminary result with the new membrane potential dye tetramethylrhodamine methyl ester indicated that similarly to pH values, there is a heterogeneity in membrane potential values among cell sin one cell population. The data presented above suggest that each ell behaves as an individual with an individual set up of its metabolism. This 'fine tuning' of the metabolism result in slightly higher or lower pH or membrane potential values that can be detected by fluorescence

  9. Generation of pH responsive fluorescent nano capsules through simple steps for the oral delivery of low pH susceptible drugs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radhakumary, Changerath; Sreenivasan, Kunnatheeri

    2016-11-01

    pH responsive nano capsules are promising as it can encapsulate low pH susceptible drugs like insulin and guard them from the hostile environments in the intestinal tract. The strong acidity of the gastro-intestinal tract and the presence of proteolytic enzymes are the tumbling blocks for the design of drug delivery vehicles through oral route for drugs like insulin. Nano capsules are normally built over templates which are subsequently removed by further steps. Such processes are complex and often lead into deformed and collapsed capsules. In this study, we choose calcium carbonate (CaCO3) nano particles to serve as template. Over CaCO3 nanoparticles, silica layers were built followed by polymethacrylic acid chains to acquire pH responsiveness. During the polymerization process of the methacrylic acid, the calcium carbonate core particles were dissolved leading to the formation of nano hollow capsules having a size that ranges from 225 to 246 nm and thickness from 19 to 58 nm. The methodology is simple and devoid of additional steps. The nano shells exhibited 80% release of the loaded model drug, insulin at pH 7.4 while at pH 2.0 the capsules nearly stopped the release of the drug. Polymethacrylic acid shows pH responsive swelling behavior that it swells at intestinal pH (7.0-7.5) and shrinks at gastric pH (˜2.0) thus enabling the safe unloading of the drug from the nano capsules.

  10. Functional and rheological properties of proteins in frozen turkey breast meat with different ultimate pH.

    PubMed

    Chan, J T Y; Omana, D A; Betti, M

    2011-05-01

    Functional and rheological properties of proteins from frozen turkey breast meat with different ultimate pH at 24 h postmortem (pH(24)) have been studied. Sixteen breast fillets from Hybrid Tom turkeys were initially selected based on lightness (L*) values for each color group (pale, normal, and dark), with a total of 48 breast fillets. Further selection of 8 breast samples was made within each class of meat according to the pH(24). The average L* and pH values of the samples were within the following range: pale (L* >52; pH ≤5.7), normal (46 < L* < 52; 5.9 < pH <6.1), and dark (L* <46; pH ≥6.3), referred to as low, normal, and high pH meat, respectively. Ultimate pH did not cause major changes in the emulsifying and foaming properties of the extracted sarcoplasmic and myofibrillar proteins. An SDS-PAGE profile of proteins from low and normal pH meat was similar, which revealed that the extent of protein denaturation was the same. Low pH meat had the lowest water-holding capacity compared with normal and high pH meat as shown by the increase in cooking loss, which can be explained by factors other than protein denaturation. Gel strength analysis and folding test revealed that gel-forming ability was better for high pH meat compared with low and normal pH meat.Dynamic viscoelastic behavior showed that myosin denaturation temperature was independent of pH(24). Normal and high pH meat had similar hardness, springiness, and chewiness values as revealed by texture profile analysis. The results from this study indicate that high pH meat had similar or better functional properties than normal pH meat. Therefore, high pH meat is suitable for further processed products, whereas low pH meat may need additional treatment or ingredient formulations to improve its functionality.

  11. The pH of Enceladus' ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glein, Christopher R.; Baross, John A.; Waite, J. Hunter

    2015-08-01

    Saturn's moon, Enceladus, is a geologically active waterworld. The prevailing paradigm is that there is a subsurface ocean that erupts to the surface, which leads to the formation of a plume of vapor and ice above the south polar region. The chemistry of the ocean is just beginning to be understood, but is of profound geochemical and astrobiological interest. Here, we determine the pH of the ocean using a thermodynamic model of carbonate speciation. Observational data from the Cassini spacecraft are used to make a chemical model of ocean water on Enceladus. The model suggests that Enceladus' ocean is a Na-Cl-CO3 solution with an alkaline pH of ∼11-12. The dominance of aqueous NaCl is a feature that Enceladus' ocean shares with terrestrial seawater, but the ubiquity of dissolved Na2CO3 suggests that soda lakes are more analogous to the Enceladus ocean. The high pH implies that the hydroxide ion should be relatively abundant, while divalent metals should be present at low concentrations owing to buffering by carbonates and phyllosilicates on the ocean floor. Carboxyl groups in dissolved organic species would be negatively charged, while amino groups would exist predominately in the neutral form. Knowledge of the pH improves our understanding of geochemical processes in Enceladus' ocean. The high pH is interpreted to be a key consequence of serpentinization of chondritic rock, as predicted by prior geochemical reaction path models; although degassing of CO2 from the ocean may also play a role depending on the efficiency of mixing processes in the ocean. Serpentinization leads to the generation of H2, a geochemical fuel that can support both abiotic and biological synthesis of organic molecules such as those that have been detected in Enceladus' plume. Serpentinization and H2 generation should have occurred on Enceladus, like on the parent bodies of aqueously altered meteorites; but it is unknown whether these critical processes are still taking place, or if

  12. Nestedness in Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungal Communities along Soil pH Gradients in Early Primary Succession: Acid-Tolerant Fungi Are pH Generalists.

    PubMed

    Kawahara, Ai; An, Gi-Hong; Miyakawa, Sachie; Sonoda, Jun; Ezawa, Tatsuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Soil acidity is a major constraint on plant productivity. Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi support plant colonization in acidic soil, but soil acidity also constrains fungal growth and diversity. Fungi in extreme environments generally evolve towards specialists, suggesting that AM fungi in acidic soil are acidic-soil specialists. In our previous surveys, however, some AM fungi detected in strongly acidic soils could also be detected in a soil with moderate pH, which raised a hypothesis that the fungi in acidic soils are pH generalists. To test the hypothesis, we conducted a pH-manipulation experiment and also analyzed AM fungal distribution along a pH gradient in the field using a synthesized dataset of the previous and recent surveys. Rhizosphere soils of the generalist plant Miscanthus sinensis were collected both from a neutral soil and an acidic soil, and M. sinensis seedlings were grown at three different pH. For the analysis of field communities, rhizosphere soils of M. sinensis were collected from six field sites across Japan, which covered a soil pH range of 3.0-7.4, and subjected to soil trap culture. AM fungal community compositions were determined based on LSU rDNA sequences. In the pH-manipulation experiment the acidification of medium had a significant impact on the compositions of the community from the neutral soil, but the neutralization of the medium had no effect on those of the community from the acidic soil. Furthermore, the communities in lower -pH soils were subsets of (nested in) those in higher-pH soils. In the field communities a significant nestedness pattern was observed along the pH gradient. These observations suggest that the fungi in strongly acidic soils are pH generalists that occur not only in acidic soil but also in wide ranges of soil pH. Nestedness in AM fungal community along pH gradients may have important implications for plant community resilience and early primary succession after disturbance in acidic soils.

  13. Nestedness in Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungal Communities along Soil pH Gradients in Early Primary Succession: Acid-Tolerant Fungi Are pH Generalists

    PubMed Central

    Kawahara, Ai; An, Gi-Hong; Miyakawa, Sachie; Sonoda, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Soil acidity is a major constraint on plant productivity. Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi support plant colonization in acidic soil, but soil acidity also constrains fungal growth and diversity. Fungi in extreme environments generally evolve towards specialists, suggesting that AM fungi in acidic soil are acidic-soil specialists. In our previous surveys, however, some AM fungi detected in strongly acidic soils could also be detected in a soil with moderate pH, which raised a hypothesis that the fungi in acidic soils are pH generalists. To test the hypothesis, we conducted a pH-manipulation experiment and also analyzed AM fungal distribution along a pH gradient in the field using a synthesized dataset of the previous and recent surveys. Rhizosphere soils of the generalist plant Miscanthus sinensis were collected both from a neutral soil and an acidic soil, and M. sinensis seedlings were grown at three different pH. For the analysis of field communities, rhizosphere soils of M. sinensis were collected from six field sites across Japan, which covered a soil pH range of 3.0–7.4, and subjected to soil trap culture. AM fungal community compositions were determined based on LSU rDNA sequences. In the pH-manipulation experiment the acidification of medium had a significant impact on the compositions of the community from the neutral soil, but the neutralization of the medium had no effect on those of the community from the acidic soil. Furthermore, the communities in lower -pH soils were subsets of (nested in) those in higher-pH soils. In the field communities a significant nestedness pattern was observed along the pH gradient. These observations suggest that the fungi in strongly acidic soils are pH generalists that occur not only in acidic soil but also in wide ranges of soil pH. Nestedness in AM fungal community along pH gradients may have important implications for plant community resilience and early primary succession after disturbance in acidic soils. PMID

  14. Miniaturised optical fiber pH sensor for gastro-esophageal applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldini, F.; Chiavaioli, F.; Cosi, F.; Giannetti, A.; Tombelli, S.; Trono, C.

    2013-05-01

    Monitoring pH for long periods, usually 24 h, in the stomach and in the esophagus may be essential in the diagnosis of gastro-esophageal diseases. The clinical range of interest is quite extended, between 1 to 8 pH units. Methyl red, after its covalent immobilization on controlled pore glass (CPG), is characterized by a working range which fits well with the clinical one. A novel probe, suitable for gastro-esophageal applications, was designed in order to optimize the performances of the colored CPG. This leads to a very simple probe configuration characterized by a very fast response.

  15. Tropical soil bacterial communities in Malaysia: pH dominates in the equatorial tropics too.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Binu M; Kim, Mincheol; Singh, Dharmesh; Lee-Cruz, Larisa; Lai-Hoe, Ang; Ainuddin, A N; Go, Rusea; Rahim, Raha Abdul; Husni, M H A; Chun, Jongsik; Adams, Jonathan M

    2012-08-01

    The dominant factors controlling soil bacterial community variation within the tropics are poorly known. We sampled soils across a range of land use types--primary (unlogged) and logged forests and crop and pasture lands in Malaysia. PCR-amplified soil DNA for the bacterial 16S rRNA gene targeting the V1-V3 region was pyrosequenced using the 454 Roche machine. We found that land use in itself has a weak but significant effect on the bacterial community composition. However, bacterial community composition and diversity was strongly correlated with soil properties, especially soil pH, total carbon, and C/N ratio. Soil pH was the best predictor of bacterial community composition and diversity across the various land use types, with the highest diversity close to neutral pH values. In addition, variation in phylogenetic structure of dominant lineages (Alphaproteobacteria, Beta/Gammaproteobacteria, Acidobacteria, and Actinobacteria) is also significantly correlated with soil pH. Together, these results confirm the importance of soil pH in structuring soil bacterial communities in Southeast Asia. Our results also suggest that unlike the general diversity pattern found for larger organisms, primary tropical forest is no richer in operational taxonomic units of soil bacteria than logged forest, and agricultural land (crop and pasture) is actually richer than primary forest, partly due to selection of more fertile soils that have higher pH for agriculture and the effects of soil liming raising pH.

  16. Corrosion of glass-bonded sodalite as a function of pH and temperature.

    SciTech Connect

    Morss, L. R.; Stanley, M.; Tatko, C.; Ebert, W. L.

    1999-11-29

    This paper reports the results of corrosion tests with monoliths of sodalite, binder glass, and glass-bonded sodalite, a ceramic waste form (CWF) that is being developed to immobilize radioactive electrorefiner salt used to condition spent sodium-bonded nuclear fuel. These tests were performed with dilute pH-buffered solutions in the pH range of 5-10 at temperatures of 70 and 90 C. The pH dependence of the forward dissolution rates of the CWF and its components have been determined. The pH dependence of the dissolution rates of sodalite, binder glass, and glass-bonded sodalite are similar to the pH dependence of dissolution rate of borosilicate nuclear waste glasses, with a negative pH dependence in the acidic region and a positive pH dependence in the basic region. Our results on the forward dissolution rates and their temperature and pH dependence will be used as components of a waste form degradation model to predict the long-term behavior of the CWF in a nuclear waste repository.

  17. Influence of pH on microbial hydrogen metabolism in diverse sedimentary ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Goodwin, S; Conrad, R; Zeikus, J G

    1988-02-01

    Hydrogen transformation kinetic parameters were measured in sediments from anaerobic systems covering a wide range of environmental pH values to assess the influence of pH on hydrogen metabolism. The concentrations of dissolved hydrogen were measured and hydrogen transformation kinetics of the sediments were monitored in the laboratory by monitoring hydrogen consumption progress curves. The hydrogen turnover rate constants (kt) decreased directly as a function of decreasing sediment pH, and the maximum hydrogen uptake velocities (Vmax) varied as a function of pH within each of the trophic states. Conversely, the half-saturation concentrations (Km) were independent of pH. The steady-state hydrogen concentrations were at least 2 orders of magnitude lower than the half-saturation constants for hydrogen uptake. Dissolved hydrogen concentrations were at least fivefold higher in sediments from eutrophic systems than from oligotrophic and dystrophic systems. The rates of hydrogen production determined from the assumption of steady state decreased with sediment pH. These data indicate that progressively lower pH values inhibit microbial hydrogen-producing and -consuming processes within sedimentary ecosystems.

  18. A cell-surface-anchored ratiometric fluorescent probe for extracellular pH sensing.

    PubMed

    Ke, Guoliang; Zhu, Zhi; Wang, Wei; Zou, Yuan; Guan, Zhichao; Jia, Shasha; Zhang, Huimin; Wu, Xuemeng; Yang, Chaoyong James

    2014-09-10

    Accurate sensing of the extracellular pH is a very important yet challenging task in biological and clinical applications. This paper describes the development of an amphiphilic lipid-DNA molecule as a simple yet useful cell-surface-anchored ratiometric fluorescent probe for extracellular pH sensing. The lipid-DNA probe, which consists of a hydrophobic diacyllipid tail and a hydrophilic DNA strand, is modified with two fluorescent dyes; one is pH-sensitive as pH indicator and the other is pH-insensitive as an internal reference. The lipid-DNA probe showed sensitive and reversible response to pH change in the range of 6.0-8.0, which is suitable for most extracellular studies. In addition, based on simple hydrophobic interactions with the cell membrane, the lipid-DNA probe can be easily anchored on the cell surface with negligible cytotoxicity, excellent stability, and unique ratiometric readout, thus ensuring its accurate sensing of extracellular pH. Finally, this lipid-DNA-based ratiometric pH indicator was successfully used for extracellular pH sensing of cells in 3D culture environment, demonstrating the potential applications of the sensor in biological and medical studies.

  19. Polypeptide micelles with dual pH activatable dyes for sensing cells and cancer imaging.

    PubMed

    Gong, Ping; Yang, Yueting; Yi, Huqiang; Fang, Shengtao; Zhang, Pengfei; Sheng, Zonghai; Gao, Guanhui; Gao, Duyang; Cai, Lintao

    2014-05-21

    pH is an important control parameter for maintenance of cell viability and tissue functions. pH monitoring provides valuable information on cell metabolic processes and the living environment. In this study, we prepared dual pH-sensitive, fluorescent dye-loaded polypeptide nanoparticles (DPNs) for ratiometric sensing of pH changes in living cells. DPNs contain two types of dyes: N-(rhodamine B) lactam cystamine (RBLC), an acid activatable fluorescent dye with increased fluorescence in an acidic environment, and fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC), a base activatable fluorescent dye with enhanced fluorescence in an alkaline environment. Hence, DPNs exhibited a dual response signal with strong red fluorescence and weak green fluorescence under acidic conditions; in contrast, they showed strong green fluorescence and almost no red fluorescence under alkaline and neutral conditions. The favorable inverse pH responses of the two fluorescent dyes resulted in ratiometric pH determination for DPNs with an optimized pH-sensitive range of pH 4.5-7.5. Quantitative analysis of the intracellular pH of intact MCF-7 cells has been successfully demonstrated with our nanosensor. Moreover, single acid activatable fluorescent dye doped polypeptide nanoparticles that only contained RBLC can distinguish tumor tissue from normal tissue by monitoring the acidic extracellular environment.

  20. PhCESA3 silencing inhibits elongation and stimulates radial expansion in petunia

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Weiyuan; Cai, Yuanping; Hu, Li; Wei, Qian; Chen, Guoju; Bai, Mei; Wu, Hong; Liu, Juanxu; Yu, Yixun

    2017-01-01

    Cellulose synthase catalytic subunits (CESAs) play important roles in plant growth, development and disease resistance. Previous studies have shown an essential role of Arabidopsis thaliana CESA3 in plant growth. However, little is known about the role of CESA3 in species other than A. thaliana. To gain a better understanding of CESA3, the petunia (Petunia hybrida) PhCESA3 gene was isolated, and the role of PhCESA3 in plant growth was analyzed in a wide range of plants. PhCESA3 mRNA was present at varying levels in tissues examined. VIGS-mediated PhCESA3 silencing resulted in dwarfing of plant height, which was consistent with the phenotype of the A. thaliana rsw1 mutant (a temperature-sensitive allele of AtCESA1), the A. thaliana cev1 mutant (the AtCESA3 mild mutant), and the antisense AtCESA3 line. However, PhCESA3 silencing led to swollen stems, pedicels, filaments, styles and epidermal hairs as well as thickened leaves and corollas, which were not observed in the A. thaliana cev1 mutant, the rsw1 mutant and the antisense AtCESA3 line. Further micrographs showed that PhCESA3 silencing reduced the length and increased the width of cells, suggesting that PhCESA3 silencing inhibits elongation and stimulates radial expansion in petunia. PMID:28150693

  1. Influence of pH on wound-healing: a new perspective for wound-therapy?

    PubMed

    Schneider, Lars Alexander; Korber, Andreas; Grabbe, Stephan; Dissemond, Joachim

    2007-02-01

    Wound healing is a complex regeneration process, which is characterised by intercalating degradation and re-assembly of connective tissue and epidermal layer. The pH value within the wound-milieu influences indirectly and directly all biochemical reactions taking place in this process of healing. Interestingly it is so far a neglected parameter for the overall outcome. For more than three decades the common assumption amongst physicians was that a low pH value, such as it is found on normal skin, is favourable for wound healing. However, investigations have shown that in fact some healing processes such as the take-rate of skin-grafts require an alkaline milieu. The matter is thus much more complicated than it was assumed. This review article summarises the existing literature dealing with the topic of pH value within the wound-milieu, its influence on wound healing and critically discusses the currently existing data in this field. The conclusion to be drawn at present is that the wound pH indeed proves to be a potent influential factor for the healing process and that different pH ranges are required for certain distinct phases of wound healing. Further systematic data needs to be collected for a better understanding of the pH requirements under specific circumstances. This is important as it will help to develop new pH targeted therapeutic strategies.

  2. Synthesis of a pH dependent covalent imprinted polymer able to recognize organotin species.

    PubMed

    Gallego-Gallegos, Mercedes; Muñoz-Olivas, Riansares; Cámara, C; Mancheño, María J; Sierra, Miguel A

    2006-01-01

    The covalent imprinting approach has for the first time been successfully applied for the synthesis of an imprinted polymer able to recognize organotin species. The synthesis has been accomplished by co-polymerization of the complex Bu(2)SnO-m-vinylbenzoin as the imprinting template plus co-monomer sodium methacrylate, and ethylene glycol dimethacrylate as cross-linker. The imprinting effect has been evidenced within the narrow pH range 2.5< pH< 3.5. At lower pH values, the imprinting effect is prevented by the exclusive existence of non-specific interactions, whereas pH>3.5 provokes a strong rebind of the template in both imprinted and non-imprinted polymers. This pH dependency can be explained as a selective chemical modification which reduces bind diversity following a model based on enolization by protonation of the specific cavities. Characterization of the adsorption isotherms showed good agreement with the Langmuir-Freundlich (LF) model, presenting quite homogeneous binding sites for a bulk material and high capacity in the imprinting pH range. In addition, the affinity spectrum (AS) method has been represented showing the typical profiles of LF isotherm for both sub-saturation and saturation levels, being in general agreement with the encountered values for fitting coefficients. The covalent molecular imprinted polymer has been successfully evaluated in a SPE process for further OTC determination in the certified mussel tissue (CRM 477).

  3. The effect of pH on the survival of leptospires in water*

    PubMed Central

    Smith, C. E. Gordon; Turner, L. H.

    1961-01-01

    One of the factors on which the incidence of leptospirosis is dependent is the survival time of shed leptospires in surface water or soil water, and this time is in turn affected by the acidity or alkalinity of the water. The authors have therefore studied the survival of four leptospiral serotypes in buffered distilled water at pH's ranging from 5.3 to 8.0. All survived longer in alkaline than in acid water, and significant differences between the serotypes were found in response to pH. Survival at pH's under 7.0 ranged from 10 to 117 days and at pH's over 7.0 from 21 to 152 days. Survival was also studied in aqueous extracts of soil samples from different areas in Malaya; no correlation was found between pH and survival time. It was also noted that in a group of Malayan ricefields a low incidence of leptospirosis in man was accompanied by a high infection rate among rodents, and when it was found that this phenomenon could not be explained by pH or salinity, attention was turned to the soil. Bentonite clay, similar to the montmorrillonite clay of the ricefields, was found to adsorb about half the leptospires in suspension. The authors recommend that field study of this laboratory observation be undertaken. PMID:20604084

  4. Near-infrared spectroscopy of lysed blood: pH effects

    SciTech Connect

    Alam, M.K.; Franke, J.E.; Maynard, J.D.; Robinson, M.R.; Niemczyk, T.M.; Rohrschieb, M.; Eaton, R.P.

    1995-12-31

    Recent investigations by our group have demonstrated that near-infrared spectra collected from lysed blood solutions can be used to create clinically useful partial least squares (PSL) models for pH with standard errors of prediction below 0.05 pH units for pH range of 1 (6.8 to 7.8). Further work was performed in order to discern the primary source of pH information in the spectra. Results from these experiments are presented using spectral data acquired over the spectral range of 1300 nm to 2500 nm from plasma, lysed blood and amino acids solutions. Data were analyzed by principal component analysis (PCA) and loading vectors were compared. Experiments were designed to eliminate possible correlation between pH and other components in the system in order to ensure variations in the spectral data were due to hydrogen ion changes only. Results indicate that variations in the spectral characteristics of histidine mimic those seen in lysed blood, but not those seen in plasma, suggesting that histidine residues from hemoglobin are providing the necessary variation for pH modeling in the lysed blood solutions.

  5. Salt effect on the pH profile and kinetic parameters of microbial phytases.

    PubMed

    Ullah, Abul H J; Sethumadhavan, Kandan; Mullaney, Edward J

    2008-05-14

    The pH profiles of two microbial phytases were determined using four different general purpose buffers at different pH values. The roles of calcium chloride, sodium chloride, and sodium fluoride on activity were compared in these buffers. For Aspergillus niger phytase, calcium extended the pH range to 8.0. A high concentration of sodium chloride affected the activity of fungal phytase in the pH 3-4 range and shifted the pH optimum to 2.0 from 5.5 in Escherichia coli phytase. As expected, both of the microbial phytases were inhibited by sodium fluoride at acidic pH values. Because the Km for phytate increased nearly 2-fold for fungal phytase while Vmax increased about 75% in a high concentration of sodium chloride, it is possible that salt enhanced the product to dissociate from the active site due to an altered electrostatic environment. Modeling studies indicate that while the active site octapeptide's orientation is very similar, there are some differences in the arrangements of alpha-helices, beta-sheets, and coils that could account for the observed catalytic and salt effect differences.

  6. 21 CFR 876.1400 - Stomach pH electrode.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Stomach pH electrode. 876.1400 Section 876.1400...) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 876.1400 Stomach pH electrode. (a) Identification. A stomach pH electrode is a device used to measure intragastric and intraesophageal pH...

  7. 21 CFR 876.1400 - Stomach pH electrode.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Stomach pH electrode. 876.1400 Section 876.1400...) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 876.1400 Stomach pH electrode. (a) Identification. A stomach pH electrode is a device used to measure intragastric and intraesophageal pH...

  8. 21 CFR 876.1400 - Stomach pH electrode.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Stomach pH electrode. 876.1400 Section 876.1400...) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 876.1400 Stomach pH electrode. (a) Identification. A stomach pH electrode is a device used to measure intragastric and intraesophageal pH...

  9. 21 CFR 876.1400 - Stomach pH electrode.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Stomach pH electrode. 876.1400 Section 876.1400...) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 876.1400 Stomach pH electrode. (a) Identification. A stomach pH electrode is a device used to measure intragastric and intraesophageal pH...

  10. PH DEPENDENT TOXICITY OF FIVE METALS TO THREE MARINE ORGANISMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The pH of natural marine systems is relatively stable; this may explain why metal toxicity changes with pH have not been well documented. However, changes in metal toxicity with pH in marine waters are of concern in toxicity testing. During porewater toxicity testing pH can chang...

  11. 21 CFR 876.1400 - Stomach pH electrode.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Stomach pH electrode. 876.1400 Section 876.1400...) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 876.1400 Stomach pH electrode. (a) Identification. A stomach pH electrode is a device used to measure intragastric and intraesophageal pH...

  12. What Is a pH Probe Study?

    MedlinePlus

    What is a pH Probe Study ? What is pH a probe study? M easuring the pH in the esophagus helps determine whether or not acid is coming up from the stomach. A pH probe study is usually done in patients where ...

  13. Application of curcumin nanoparticles in a lab-on-paper device as a simple and green pH probe.

    PubMed

    Pourreza, Nahid; Golmohammadi, Hamed

    2015-01-01

    This article describes the design and fabrication of a novel lab-on-paper device for pH sensing using curcumin nanoparticles (CURNs). In order to fabricate the lab-on-paper, the wax dipping method was used. The color of loaded paper with CURNs changed from yellow to orange and red to brown in the pH range of 7-13. The image of the lab-on-paper was taken by a digital camera and the picture was processed and analyzed using Adobe Photoshop software. The change in mean color intensity with pH was recorded and employed as an analytical signal for quantitative sensing of pH. The parameters affecting the pH sensor were optimized to enhance the selectivity and sensitivity of the method. Under optimum conditions, the mean color intensity was linearly proportional to the pH in the range of 8-13. The relative standard deviations of 10 replicate measurements of pH 9 and pH 12 were 2.3% and 1.5%, respectively. The developed sensor was successfully applied to the determination of pH in different water samples with satisfactory results.

  14. Peptide binding to HLA-DP proteins at pH 5.0 and pH 7.0: a quantitative molecular docking study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background HLA-DPs are class II MHC proteins mediating immune responses to many diseases. Peptides bind MHC class II proteins in the acidic environment within endosomes. Acidic pH markedly elevates association rate constants but dissociation rates are almost unchanged in the pH range 5.0 – 7.0. This pH-driven effect can be explained by the protonation/deprotonation states of Histidine, whose imidazole has a pKa of 6.0. At pH 5.0, imidazole ring is protonated, making Histidine positively charged and very hydrophilic, while at pH 7.0 imidazole is unprotonated, making Histidine less hydrophilic. We develop here a method to predict peptide binding to the four most frequent HLA-DP proteins: DP1, DP41, DP42 and DP5, using a molecular docking protocol. Dockings to virtual combinatorial peptide libraries were performed at pH 5.0 and pH 7.0. Results The X-ray structure of the peptide – HLA-DP2 protein complex was used as a starting template to model by homology the structure of the four DP proteins. The resulting models were used to produce virtual combinatorial peptide libraries constructed using the single amino acid substitution (SAAS) principle. Peptides were docked into the DP binding site using AutoDock at pH 5.0 and pH 7.0. The resulting scores were normalized and used to generate Docking Score-based Quantitative Matrices (DS-QMs). The predictive ability of these QMs was tested using an external test set of 484 known DP binders. They were also compared to existing servers for DP binding prediction. The models derived at pH 5.0 predict better than those derived at pH 7.0 and showed significantly improved predictions for three of the four DP proteins, when compared to the existing servers. They are able to recognize 50% of the known binders in the top 5% of predicted peptides. Conclusions The higher predictive ability of DS-QMs derived at pH 5.0 may be rationalised by the additional hydrogen bond formed between the backbone carbonyl oxygen belonging to the peptide

  15. Quantifying the pH ‘vital effect’ in the temperate zooxanthellate coral Cladocora caespitosa: Validation of the boron seawater pH proxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trotter, Julie; Montagna, Paolo; McCulloch, Malcolm; Silenzi, Sergio; Reynaud, Stéphanie; Mortimer, Graham; Martin, Sophie; Ferrier-Pagès, Christine; Gattuso, Jean-Pierre; Rodolfo-Metalpa, Riccardo

    2011-03-01

    Boron isotopic and elemental systematics are used to define the vital effects for the temperate shallow water Mediterranean coral Cladocora caespitosa. The corals are from a range of seawater pH conditions (pHT ~ 7.6 to ~ 8.1) and environmental settings: (1) naturally living colonies harvested from normal pH waters offshore Levanto, (2) colonies transplanted nearby a subsea volcanic vent system, and (3) corals cultured in aquaria exposed to high (700 μatm) and near present day (400 μatm) pCO2 levels. B/Ca compositions measured using laser ablation inductively coupled mass spectrometry (LA-ICPMS) show that boron uptake by C. caespitosa cultured at different pCO2 levels is independent of ambient seawater pH being mainly controlled by temperature-dependent calcification. In contrast, the boron isotope compositions (δ11Bcarb) of the full suite of corals determined by positive thermal ionisation mass spectrometry (PTIMS) shows a clear trend of decreasing δ11Bcarb (from 26.7 to 22.2‰) with decreasing seawater pH, reflecting the strong pH dependence of the boron isotope system. The δ11Bcarb compositions together with measurements of ambient seawater parameters enable calibration of the boron pH proxy for C. caespitosa, by using a new approach that defines the relationship between ambient seawater pH (pHsw) and the internally controlled pH at the site of calcification (pHbiol). C. caespitosa exhibits a linear relationship between pHsw and the shift in pH due to physiological processes (ΔpH = pHbiol - pHsw) giving the regression ΔpHClad = 4.80 - 0.52 × pHsw for this species. We further apply this method (“ΔpH-pHsw”) to calibrate tropical species of Porites, Acropora, and Stylophora reported in the literature. The temperate and tropical species calibrations are all linearly correlated (r2 > 0.9) and the biological fractionation component (ΔpH) between species varies within ~ 0.2 pH units. Our “ΔpH-pHsw” approach provides a robust and accurate tool to

  16. [Measurement of intracellular pH].

    PubMed

    Hanaoka, K; Imai, M; Yoshitomi, K

    1992-09-01

    Since various cellular processes depend on changes in pH, the regulation of intracellular pH (pHi) is important both for the individual cell and for the organism. The mechanisms of the regulation of pHi can be investigated by monitoring pHi. In this report, we discuss the four major techniques available for measuring pHi, which are 1) Distribution of weak acids and bases, 2) pH-sensitive microelectrodes, 3) pH-sensitive dyes, and 4) Nuclear magnetic resonance. Among four techniques, the advantage of the microelectrode approach is that it can monitor membrane potential at the same time and be applied to a single cell. The dye technique is a relative new developing technique, which has lots of advantages. It is easy to use, and is capable of monitoring rapid pHi changes, and being applied to a smaller cell, or a single cell.

  17. Neutron range spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Manglos, Stephen H.

    1989-06-06

    A neutron range spectrometer and method for determining the neutron energy spectrum of a neutron emitting source are disclosed. Neutrons from the source are collimnated along a collimation axis and a position sensitive neutron counter is disposed in the path of the collimated neutron beam. The counter determines positions along the collimation axis of interactions between the neutrons in the neutron beam and a neutron-absorbing material in the counter. From the interaction positions, a computer analyzes the data and determines the neutron energy spectrum of the neutron beam. The counter is preferably shielded and a suitable neutron-absorbing material is He-3. The computer solves the following equation in the analysis: ##EQU1## where: N(x).DELTA.x=the number of neutron interactions measured between a position x and x+.DELTA.x, A.sub.i (E.sub.i).DELTA.E.sub.i =the number of incident neutrons with energy between E.sub.i and E.sub.i +.DELTA.E.sub.i, and C=C(E.sub.i)=N .sigma.(E.sub.i) where N=the number density of absorbing atoms in the position sensitive counter means and .sigma. (E.sub.i)=the average cross section of the absorbing interaction between E.sub.i and E.sub.i +.DELTA.E.sub.i.

  18. Novel CeO₂-based screen-printed potentiometric electrodes for pH monitoring.

    PubMed

    Betelu, S; Polychronopoulou, K; Rebholz, C; Ignatiadis, I

    2011-12-15

    Nuclear waste repositories are being installed in deep excavated rock formations in some places in Europe to isolate and store radioactive waste. In France, the Callovo-Oxfordian formation (COx) is a possible candidate for nuclear waste storage. This work investigates the applicability of CeO(2)-based oxides (CeO(2), Ce(0.8)Sm(0.2)O(2) and Ce(0.8)Zr(0.2)O(2)) for monitoring the pH of the COx pore water (T=25°C). The study is limited to the pH range between 5.5 and 13.2, which includes the pH values that have been encountered or are anticipated in the COx formation during its evolution as radioactive waste repository due mainly to alkalinisation, an increase in salinity, and a decrease in redox potential. Screen-printing was done to assemble electrodes and rapidly generate data sets. The electrochemical behavior of CeO(2)-based screen-printed electrodes (CeO(2)-based SPEs) was determined by cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The use of the electrodes for pH sensing was then evaluated by potentiometric measurements. The feasibility of measuring pH with CeO(2)-based SPEs was first tested in NH(4)Cl/NH(3) buffer solutions, leading to electrode calibration over the widest range of pH, from around neutral to basic pH. Experiments were then conducted in NaHCO(3)/Na(2)CO(3) buffer samples similar to conditions prevailing in the COx formation. Ce(0.8)Zr(0.2)O(2) SPEs exhibit a near-Nernstian behavior (sensitivity -(51±2)mV/pH) in the pH range of 5.5-13.2 at 25°C. Electrode response was slightly affected by the direction of the pH change. Electrode reliability was clearly demonstrated for pH monitoring. Probes based on the same components, but more durably designed, could be considered for pH measurements in radioactive waste repositories.

  19. Seawater pH at the advent of metazoan calcification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ries, Justin; Gonzalez-Roubaud, Cécile; Douville, Eric; Montagna, Paolo

    2016-04-01

    The boron isotopic composition (δ11B) of bulk limestones provides a potentially powerful tool for reconstructing seawater pH deep into the geologic past (Kasemann et al., 2005; Paris et al., 2010; Ohnemueller et al., 2014). Here, we present δ11B of 35 calcitic limestones derived from a ca. 9 m.y. interval of the terminal Proterozoic Nama Group of southern Namibia. These units immediately precede the so-called Cambrian Radiation - the greatest diversification of metazoans in Earth history marked by the near-simultaneous advent of calcification across most animal phyla. The Nama Group represents one of the best preserved (average [Sr] = 1805 ppm; Mn/Sr < 2; δ18O > -10‰) and most continuous terminal Proterozoic limestone sequences known in the world. The carbonate units investigated here were deposited between ca. 552 and 543 Ma in a semi-divided foreland basin of the Kalahari Craton (Grotzinger and Miller, 2008). Depositional environments were shore-associated and ranged from upper shoreline/tidal flats to below-wave-base lower shoreface, and comprise calcisiltites, calcarenites, heterolithic interbeds, grainstones, and microbialites (Saylor et al., 1998; Grotzinger and Miller, 2008). The δ11B of the 35 sampled Nama Group carbonates were obtained via MC-ICP-MS. Samples were screened for contamination of the δ11B signal by clays (using [Al] as a proxy for clay content) (Paris et al., 2010) and by open-system meteoric diagenesis (δ11B-δ18O correlation). The δ11B values of the limestones ranged from 0.5 to 10.8‰ (avg. = 5.3‰), which is consistent with the previously observed increasing trend in carbonate δ11B (Paris et al., 2010) from the -6.2 to 2.7‰ values reported for Neoproterozoic cap carbonate dolostones (Kasemann et al., 2005) to the ca. 25‰ value reported for most modern marine carbonates. B/Ca ratios for the sampled limestones ranged from 3.4 to 24.0 ppm (avg. = 11.0). Assuming a seawater temperature of 25° C, a salinity of 35, a depth of 10

  20. Not Your Father's Ph.D.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Withrow, Brandon G.

    2008-01-01

    This article describes how the author, a devoted blogger, confronts his fear that his virtual life is damaging his career prospects in academe. As a new Ph.D. in religious studies, the author has every reason to believe he will find a tenure-track job. He has read the numbers and know that, on average, job candidates spend two to five years in…

  1. Effects of pH and Trace Minerals on Long-Term Starvation of Leuconostoc mesenteroides

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dong-Shik; Thomas, Steven; Fogler, H. Scott

    2000-01-01

    Laboratory experiments have definitively shown that exopolymer-producing bacteria have the potential to modify the flow of fluids in oil reservoirs to enhance oil production. Once injected into the reservoir, they will be subjected to a wide range of pH values and to starvation resulting from nutrient depletion. For successful field implementation it is necessary to have a fundamental understanding of these effects on the viability of bacteria. This paper addresses the effects of pH and trace minerals on cell viability of Leuconostoc mesenteroides during carbon source depletion. Two different carbon sources were used to grow cells before transferring the cells to starvation conditions: sucrose and a combination of glucose and fructose. These substrates were chosen because L. mesenteroides produces a significant amount of water-insoluble exopolymers (dextran) under sucrose-fed conditions, which may enhance cell survival under harsh conditions. The effects of dextran on the cell viability were tested at different pH values with and without trace minerals. The rate of cell death followed an exponential-decay law for different values of the solution pH. The optimal solution pH for survival was pH 5, whereas cells died rapidly at pH 3 and below and at pH 13 and above. The sucrose-fed cells showed a greater viability than cells fed glucose and fructose for all pH ranges tested. The results indicated that water-insoluble exopolymers help cells survive for longer periods of time under starvation conditions. The effects of trace minerals on cell culturability were tested at two pH values, 4.5 and 7. For both cases, cells showed a greater culturability (smaller decay rate constant) in the presence of trace minerals than without trace minerals. It was also found that the effects of trace minerals on cell culturability were greater for glucose-fructose-fed cells than for sucrose-fed cells. The Michaelis pH function theory was used for comparing the relationships between the

  2. Effects of pH and trace minerals on long-term starvation of Leuconostoc mesenteroides.

    PubMed

    Kim, D S; Thomas, S; Fogler, H S

    2000-03-01

    Laboratory experiments have definitively shown that exopolymer-producing bacteria have the potential to modify the flow of fluids in oil reservoirs to enhance oil production. Once injected into the reservoir, they will be subjected to a wide range of pH values and to starvation resulting from nutrient depletion. For successful field implementation it is necessary to have a fundamental understanding of these effects on the viability of bacteria. This paper addresses the effects of pH and trace minerals on cell viability of Leuconostoc mesenteroides during carbon source depletion. Two different carbon sources were used to grow cells before transferring the cells to starvation conditions: sucrose and a combination of glucose and fructose. These substrates were chosen because L. mesenteroides produces a significant amount of water-insoluble exopolymers (dextran) under sucrose-fed conditions, which may enhance cell survival under harsh conditions. The effects of dextran on the cell viability were tested at different pH values with and without trace minerals. The rate of cell death followed an exponential-decay law for different values of the solution pH. The optimal solution pH for survival was pH 5, whereas cells died rapidly at pH 3 and below and at pH 13 and above. The sucrose-fed cells showed a greater viability than cells fed glucose and fructose for all pH ranges tested. The results indicated that water-insoluble exopolymers help cells survive for longer periods of time under starvation conditions. The effects of trace minerals on cell culturability were tested at two pH values, 4.5 and 7. For both cases, cells showed a greater culturability (smaller decay rate constant) in the presence of trace minerals than without trace minerals. It was also found that the effects of trace minerals on cell culturability were greater for glucose-fructose-fed cells than for sucrose-fed cells. The Michaelis pH function theory was used for comparing the relationships between the

  3. Effect of pH on Structure and Magnetic Properties of Electrodeposited CoNiP Nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngoc, Do Quang; Van Thiem, Luu; Tu, Le Tuan

    2017-03-01

    Ordered CoNiP nanowire arrays with average diameter of 200 nm have been fabricated by electrodeposition into polycarbonate templates at different pH levels. X-ray diffraction analysis and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy confirmed the quality of the fabricated nanowires. Magnetic measurements revealed that the magnetic anisotropy of the nanowires was significantly altered by varying the pH level of the electrolytic bath. With increasing pH level, the coercive field (H c) and the remanent to saturation magnetization ratio (M r/M s) rapidly increased in the pH range of 2.0 to 3.5 and tended to saturate for higher levels of pH. The CoNiP nanowires were found to transform from soft- to hard-magnetic characteristics when the pH level exceeded a critical value of ˜3.5, at which the maximum coercivity of 1430 Oe was achieved.

  4. Effects of sporulation pH on the heat resistance and the sporulation of Bacillus cereus.

    PubMed

    Mazas, M; López, M; González, I; Bernardo, A; Martín, R

    1997-11-01

    Spores of Bacillus cereus ATCC 7004, 4342 and 9818 were obtained in nutrient agar at several pH from 5.9 to 8.3. The optimum pH for sporulation was around 7, but good production of spores was obtained in the range 6.5-8.3. With all three strains, D-values clearly dropped with sporulation pH, decreasing by about 65% per pH unit. z-Values were not significantly modified (P > 0.05) by this factor. Mean z-values of 7.13 degrees C +/- 0.16 for strain 7004, 7.67 degrees C +/- 0.04 for 4342 and 8.80 degrees C +/- 0.64 for 9818 were obtained.

  5. Hydrogel-coated fiber Bragg grating sensor for pH monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pabbisetti, Vayu Nandana Kishore; Madhuvarasu, Sai Shankar

    2016-06-01

    We present a fiber-optic wavelength-modulated sensor for pH applications. Fiber Bragg grating (FBG) is functionalized with a stimulus-responsive hydrogel that induces a strain on FBG due to mechanical expansion of the gel in response to ambient pH changes. The gel is synthesized from the blends of poly (vinyl alcohol)/poly (acrylic acid). The induced strain results in a shift of FBG reflected peak that is monitored by an interrogator. The sensor system shows good linearity in the acidic pH range of 3 to 7 with a sensitivity of 12.16 pm/pH. In addition, it shows good repeatability and oscillator behavior, which proves it to be fit for pH sensing applications.

  6. Optical principle of pH measurement for detection of auxin flow through cellular membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podrazky, Ondrej; Mrazek, Jan; Seidl, Miroslav; Kasik, Ivan; Tobiska, Petr; Matejec, Vlastimil; Martan, Tomas; Aubrecht, Jan

    2007-05-01

    The paper shows an approach to the determination of pH changes of solutions with a fine spatial resolution by means of fiber-optic tapers and fluorescence detection. This approach can be adopted for the determination of auxin flow through celluar membranes. Spectral absorption and fluorescence of pH transducers, namely of fluorescein, carboxyfluorescein, 6,8-dihydroxy-1,3-pyrenedisulfonic acid disodium salt and 2',7'-bis(2-carbonylethyl)-5(6)-carboxyfluorescein, were tested. The approach, based on the determination of a shift of the maxima of their fluorescence peaks, was employed for processing the measured fluorescence data in bulk solutions. Suitable tapered fiber probes were prepared and in vitro demonstrated for pH monitoring in a pH range from 6 to 7.

  7. Acidic pH promotes intervertebral disc degeneration: Acid-sensing ion channel -3 as a potential therapeutic target

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, Hamish T. J.; Hodson, Nathan; Baird, Pauline; Richardson, Stephen M.; Hoyland, Judith A.

    2016-01-01

    The aetiology of intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration remains poorly understood. Painful IVD degeneration is associated with an acidic intradiscal pH but the response of NP cells to this aberrant microenvironmental factor remains to be fully characterised. The aim here was to address the hypothesis that acidic pH, similar to that found in degenerate IVDs, leads to the altered cell/functional phenotype observed during IVD degeneration, and to investigate the involvement of acid-sensing ion channel (ASIC) -3 in the response. Human NP cells were treated with a range of pH, from that of a non-degenerate (pH 7.4 and 7.1) through to mildly degenerate (pH 6.8) and severely degenerate IVD (pH 6.5 and 6.2). Increasing acidity of pH caused a decrease in cell proliferation and viability, a shift towards matrix catabolism and increased expression of proinflammatory cytokines and pain-related factors. Acidic pH resulted in an increase in ASIC-3 expression. Importantly, inhibition of ASIC-3 prevented the acidic pH induced proinflammatory and pain-related phenotype in NP cells. Acidic pH causes a catabolic and degenerate phenotype in NP cells which is inhibited by blocking ASIC-3 activity, suggesting that this may be a useful therapeutic target for treatment of IVD degeneration. PMID:27853274

  8. Design of an optically stable pH sensor based on immobilization of Giemsa on triacetylcellulose membrane.

    PubMed

    Khodadoust, Saeid; Kouri, Narges Cham; Talebiyanpoor, Mohammad Sharif; Deris, Jamile; Pebdani, Arezou Amiri

    2015-12-01

    In this work a simple, inexpensive, and sensitive optical sensor based on triacetylcellulose membrane as solid support was developed by using immobilization of Giemsa indicator for pH measurement. In this method, the influence variables on the membrane performance including pH concentration of indicator, response time, ionic strength, and reversibility were investigated. At optimum values of all variables the response of optical pH sensor is linear in the pH range of 3.0-12.0. This optical sensor was produced through simultaneous binding of the Giemsa on the activated triacetylcellulose membrane which responded to the pH changes in a broader linear range within less than 2.0 min and suitable reproducibility (RSD<5%). Stability results showed that this sensor was stable after 6 months of storage in the water/ethanol (50:50, v/v) solution without any measurable divergence in response properties (less than 5% RSD).

  9. Efficient blue organic light-emitting diodes using N(2) ,N(2) ,N(11) ,N(11) ,5,6,7,8-octaphenyltriphenylene-2,11-diamine derivatives.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young Seok; Jeong, Su Jin; Lee, Hyun Woo; Kim, Jwajin; Lee, Song Eun; Kim, Young Kwan; Yoon, Seung Soo

    2016-06-01

    In this study, we have synthesized phenyl-substituted triphenylene derivatives, using the Diels-Alder reaction and the Buchwald-Hartwig reaction. To investigate electroluminescence properties of these materials, multilayer organic light-emitting diode (OLED) devices were fabricated with a structure of indium-tin-oxide (ITO) (180 nm)/4,4'-bis(N-(1-naphthyl)-N-phenylamino)biphenyl (NPB) (50 nm)/blue-emitting materials (1-3) (30 nm)/bathophenanthroline (Bphen) (35 nm)/lithium quinolate (Liq) (2 nm)/Al (100 nm). A device using N(2) ,N(2) ,N(11) ,N(11) ,5,6,7-heptaphenyltriphenylene-2,11-diamine (2) exhibited efficient blue emission with luminous, power, and external quantum efficiencies of 0.92 cd/A, 0.67 lm/W, and 1.17% at 20 mA/cm(2) , respectively. The Commission International de L'Éclairage coordinates of this device were (x = 0.15, y = 0.09) at 6.0 V. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Bacterial Profile of Dentine Caries and the Impact of pH on Bacterial Population Diversity

    PubMed Central

    Kianoush, Nima; Adler, Christina J.; Nguyen, Ky-Anh T.; Browne, Gina V.; Simonian, Mary; Hunter, Neil

    2014-01-01

    Dental caries is caused by the release of organic acids from fermentative bacteria, which results in the dissolution of hydroxyapatite matrices of enamel and dentine. While low environmental pH is proposed to cause a shift in the consortium of oral bacteria, favouring the development of caries, the impact of this variable has been overlooked in microbial population studies. This study aimed to detail the zonal composition of the microbiota associated with carious dentine lesions with reference to pH. We used 454 sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene (V3–V4 region) to compare microbial communities in layers ranging in pH from 4.5–7.8 from 25 teeth with advanced dentine caries. Pyrosequencing of the amplicons yielded 449,762 sequences. Nine phyla, 97 genera and 409 species were identified from the quality-filtered, de-noised and chimera-free sequences. Among the microbiota associated with dentinal caries, the most abundant taxa included Lactobacillus sp., Prevotella sp., Atopobium sp., Olsenella sp. and Actinomyces sp. We found a disparity between microbial communities localised at acidic versus neutral pH strata. Acidic conditions were associated with low diversity microbial populations, with Lactobacillus species including L. fermentum, L. rhamnosus and L. crispatus, being prominent. In comparison, the distinctive species of a more diverse flora associated with neutral pH regions of carious lesions included Alloprevotella tanerrae, Leptothrix sp., Sphingomonas sp. and Streptococcus anginosus. While certain bacteria were affected by the pH gradient, we also found that ∼60% of the taxa associated with caries were present across the investigated pH range, representing a substantial core. We demonstrated that some bacterial species implicated in caries progression show selective clustering with respect to pH gradient, providing a basis for specific therapeutic strategies. PMID:24675997

  11. Hemoglobin correction for near-infrared pH determination in lysed blood solutions.

    PubMed

    Alam, M Kathleen; Franke, James E; Rohrscheib, Mark R; Nunez, David; Abate, Vincent; Maynard, John D; Kemeny, Gabor J

    2003-09-01

    The near-infrared (NIR) measurement of blood pH relies on the spectral signature of histidine residing on the hemoglobin molecule. If the amount of hemoglobin in solution varies, the size of the histidine signal can vary depending on changes in either the pH or hemoglobin concentration. Multivariate calibration models developed using the NIR spectra collected from blood at a single hemoglobin concentration are shown to predict data from different hemoglobin levels with a bias and slope. A simple, scalar path length correction of the spectral data does not correct this problem. However, global partial least-square (PLS) models built with data encompassing a range of hemoglobin concentration have a cross-validated standard error of prediction (CVSEP) similar to the CVSEP of data obtained from a single hemoglobin level. It will be shown that the prediction of pH of an unknown sample using a global PLS model requires that the unknown have a hemoglobin concentration falling within the range encompassed by the global model. An alternative method for correcting the predicted pH for hemoglobin levels is also presented. The alternative method updates the single-hemoglobin-level models with slope and intercept estimates from the pH predictions of data collected at alternate hemoglobin levels. The slope and intercept correction method gave SEP values averaging to 0.034 pH units. Since both methods require some knowledge of the hemoglobin concentration in order for a pH prediction to be made, a model for hemoglobin concentration is developed using spectral data and is used for pH correction.

  12. Initial pH as a determinant of cellulose digestion rate by mixed ruminal microorganisms in vitro.

    PubMed

    Mouriño, F; Akkarawongsa, R; Weimer, P J

    2001-04-01

    In vitro fermentations of pure cellulose by mixed ruminal microorganisms were conducted under conditions in which pH declined within ranges similar to those observed in the rumen. At low cellulose concentrations (12.5 g/L), the first-order rate constants (k) of cellulose disappearance were successively lower at initial pH values of 6.86, 6.56, and 6.02, but in each case the value of k was maintained over a pH range of 0.3 to 1.2 units, as the fermentation progressed. Plots of k versus initial pH were linear, and k displayed a relative decrease of approximately 7% per 0.1 unit decrease in pH. At high cellulose concentration (50 g/L) and an initial pH of 6.8, cellulose digestion was initially zero order, the absolute rate of digestion declined with pH and digestion essentially ceased at pH 5.3 after only 30% of the added cellulose was digested. Further incubation resulted in a loss of bound N and P, suggesting that at low pH cells lysed or detached from the undigested fibers. Pure cultures of ruminal cellulolytic bacteria also were able to ferment cellulose to a minimum pH of 5.1 to 5.3, but the extent of fermentation was increased by coculture with noncellulolytic bacteria. A model is proposed in which the first-order rate constant of cellulose digestion is determined by the pH at which the fermentation is initiated, and end product ratios reflect greater activity of the noncellulolytic population as pH declines.

  13. Effects of acidic pH on voltage-gated ion channels in rat trigeminal mesencephalic nucleus neurons

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jin-Eon; Cho, Jin-Hwa; Choi, In-Sun; Kim, Do-Yeon

    2017-01-01

    The effects of acidic pH on several voltage-dependent ion channels, such as voltage-dependent K+ and Ca2+ channels, and hyperpolarization-gated and cyclic nucleotide-activated cation (HCN) channels, were examined using a whole-cell patch clamp technique on mechanically isolated rat mesencephalic trigeminal nucleus neurons. The application of a pH 6.5 solution had no effect on the peak amplitude of voltage-dependent K+ currents. A pH 6.0 solution slightly, but significantly inhibited the peak amplitude of voltage-dependent K+ currents. The pH 6.0 also shifted both the current-voltage and conductance-voltage relationships to the depolarization range. The application of a pH 6.5 solution scarcely affected the peak amplitude of membrane currents mediated by HCN channels, which were profoundly inhibited by the general HCN channel blocker Cs+ (1 mM). However, the pH 6.0 solution slightly, but significantly inhibited the peak amplitude of HCN-mediated currents. Although the pH 6.0 solution showed complex modulation of the current-voltage and conductance-voltage relationships, the midpoint voltages for the activation of HCN channels were not changed by acidic pH. On the other hand, voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels were significantly inhibited by an acidic pH. The application of an acidic pH solution significantly shifted the current-voltage and conductance-voltage relationships to the depolarization range. The modulation of several voltage-dependent ion channels by an acidic pH might affect the excitability of mesencephalic trigeminal nucleus neurons, and thus physiological functions mediated by the mesencephalic trigeminal nucleus could be affected in acidic pH conditions. PMID:28280415

  14. The Added Value of a PhD in Medicine--PhD Students' Perceptions of Acquired Competences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anttila, Henrika; Lindblom-Ylänne, Sari; Lonka, Kristi; Pyhältö, Kirsi

    2015-01-01

    PhD in the field of medicine is more common than in any other domain. Many medical doctors are driven towards PhD, but also students with other backgrounds (usually MSc) are conducting a PhD in medical schools. Higher education has invested a lot in developing generic and research competences. Still little is known about how PhD students…

  15. Kinetic study of catechin stability: effects of pH, concentration, and temperature.

    PubMed

    Li, Na; Taylor, Lynne S; Ferruzzi, Mario G; Mauer, Lisa J

    2012-12-26

    The degradation behaviors of catechins in dilute aqueous systems, including tea beverages and catechin solutions, have been documented; however, their reaction kinetics in green tea concentrated solutions, and impacts of pH, concentration, and temperature thereon, have not yet been established. In this study, reactions were conducted at pH levels ranging from 1.5 to 7, concentrations ranging from 1 to 1666.7 mg/mL, and temperatures ranging from 25 to 120 °C. Catechin contents were determined using high-performance liquid chromatography. Catechins were found to be more stable at high concentrations around pH 4. An empirical model for catechin content was established as a function of pH and temperature and showed good correlation between green tea concentrated solutions and previous reports of catechin stability in powder systems. These results provide useful approaches for shelf life calculations and catechin loss predictions at given temperature and pH conditions in green tea concentrates.

  16. A revision of the genus Atelecrinus PH Carpenter (Echinodermata: Crinoidea).

    PubMed

    Messing, Charles G

    2013-01-01

    The unusual bathyal comatulid crinoid genus Atelecrinus is widespread in the Atlantic and tropical Pacific Oceans and currently includes three recognized species. A re-assessment based on examination of new and existing specimens requires establishment of two new genera and five new species, and returns three junior synonyms to species-level status. Paratelecrinus is erected to accommodate Atelecrinus wyvilli PH Carpenter, A. conifer AH Clark, A. cubensis PH Carpenter, P. orthotriremis, new species, P. amenouzume new species, P. laticonulus new species and P. telo new species. Adelatelecrinus is erected to accommodate Atelecrinus sulcatus AH Clark and Adelatelecrinus vallatus new species. Atelecrinus retains A. balanoides PH Carpenter and A. helgae AH Clark, which restricts the genus to the Atlantic. In both Paratelecrinus and Adelatelecrinus, the basals articulate with the centrodorsal via ligament bundles anchored in deep ringlike interradial pits that project into the centrodorsal cavity, whereas in Atelecrinus the centrodorsal rim has shallow interradial concavities and attaches to the basals via a tight junction with no obvious ligament bundles. The spoon-shaped aboral fossa in the basals of Paratelecrinus appears to be unique among articulate crinoids and differs from the smooth fossa found in both Atelecrinus and Adelatelecrinus. New material extends the range of the family to the Indian Ocean. A few species are now known from enough specimens to identify some ontogenetic and distributional variations. Proximal ray morphology varies substantially with size in P. cubensis and P. orthotriremis. A. balanoides generally occurs in deeper water in the Lesser Antilles than in the Bahamas and Strait of Florida, while P. orthotriremis occurs in shallower water in the Lesser Antilles and deeper in the Bahamas.

  17. Influence of pH, particle size and crystal form on dissolution behaviour of engineered nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Avramescu, M-L; Rasmussen, P E; Chénier, M; Gardner, H D

    2017-01-01

    Solubility is a critical component of physicochemical characterisation of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) and an important parameter in their risk assessments. Standard testing methodologies are needed to estimate the dissolution behaviour and biodurability (half-life) of ENMs in biological fluids. The effect of pH, particle size and crystal form on dissolution behaviour of zinc metal, ZnO and TiO2 was investigated using a simple 2 h solubility assay at body temperature (37 °C) and two pH conditions (1.5 and 7) to approximately frame the pH range found in human body fluids. Time series dissolution experiments were then conducted to determine rate constants and half-lives. Dissolution characteristics of investigated ENMs were compared with those of their bulk analogues for both pH conditions. Two crystal forms of TiO2 were considered: anatase and rutile. For all compounds studied, and at both pH conditions, the short solubility assays and the time series experiments consistently showed that biodurability of the bulk analogues was equal to or greater than biodurability of the corresponding nanomaterials. The results showed that particle size and crystal form of inorganic ENMs were important properties that influenced dissolution behaviour and biodurability. All ENMs and bulk analogues displayed significantly higher solubility at low pH than at neutral pH. In the context of classification and read-across approaches, the pH of the dissolution medium was the key parameter. The main implication is that pH and temperature should be specified in solubility testing when evaluating ENM dissolution in human body fluids, even for preliminary (tier 1) screening.

  18. The effect of pH dependence of antibody-antigen interactions on subcellular trafficking dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Devanaboyina, Siva Charan; Lynch, Sandra M; Ober, Raimund J; Ram, Sripad; Kim, Dongyoung; Puig-Canto, Alberto; Breen, Shannon; Kasturirangan, Srinath; Fowler, Susan; Peng, Li; Zhong, Haihong; Jermutus, Lutz; Wu, Herren; Webster, Carl; Ward, E Sally; Gao, Changshou

    2013-01-01

    A drawback of targeting soluble antigens such as cytokines or toxins with long-lived antibodies is that such antibodies can prolong the half-life of the target antigen by a “buffering” effect. This has motivated the design of antibodies that bind to target with higher affinity at near neutral pH relative to acidic endosomal pH (~pH 6.0). Such antibodies are expected to release antigen within endosomes following uptake into cells, whereas antibody will be recycled and exocytosed in FcRn-expressing cells. To understand how the pH dependence of antibody-antigen interactions affects intracellular trafficking, we generated three antibodies that bind IL-6 with different pH dependencies in the range pH 6.0–7.4. The behavior of antigen in the presence of these antibodies has been characterized using a combination of fixed and live cell fluorescence microscopy. As the affinity of the antibody:IL-6 interaction at pH 6.0 decreases, an increasing amount of antigen dissociates from FcRn-bound antibody in early and late endosomes, and then enters lysosomes. Segregation of antibody and FcRn from endosomes in tubulovesicular transport carriers (TCs) into the recycling pathway can also be observed in live cells, and the extent of IL-6 association with TCs correlates with increasing affinity of the antibody:IL-6 interaction at acidic pH. These analyses result in an understanding, in spatiotemporal terms, of the effect of pH dependence of antibody-antigen interactions on subcellular trafficking and inform the design of antibodies with optimized binding properties for antigen elimination. PMID:24492341

  19. Effect on pH heating medium on the thermal resistance of Bacillus stearothermophilus spores.

    PubMed

    López, M; González, I; Condón, S; Bernardo, A

    1996-01-01

    The influence of the pH of heating medium on heat resistance of Bacillus stearothermophilus spores (ATCC 7953, 12980, 15951 and 15952) were studied. The pH values tested were: 4.0, 5.0, 6.0 and 7.0 at temperatures of 115, 120, 125, 130 and 135 degrees C. It was found that at low treatment temperatures (115 degrees C) D-values decreased between 7- and 10-fold with 7953, 12980 and 15951 strains and about 23-fold with 15952 strain when pH dropped from 7.0 to 4.0. At highest treatment temperatures (135 degrees C) D-values obtained with pH 6.0 and 7.0 did not show any significant statistical differences (p > 0.05). z-Values appeared to be higher when the medium was acidified, ranging from 7.58 to 8.20 and 9.43 10.0 for spores suspended in McIlvaine buffer pH 7.0 and pH 4.0, respectively, although the difference was not statistically significant. Heat resistance of strain ATCC 7953 at 120, 128, and 135 degrees C in asparagus purée and tomato purée at pH 5.0 under continuous monitoring of pH was also determined. D-values obtained in asparagus purée were similar to those obtained in buffer at the same pH, whereas those observed in tomato purée were found to be lower.

  20. Influence of pH on extracellular matrix preservation during lung decellularization.

    PubMed

    Tsuchiya, Tomoshi; Balestrini, Jenna L; Mendez, Julio; Calle, Elizabeth A; Zhao, Liping; Niklason, Laura E

    2014-12-01

    The creation of decellularized organs for use in regenerative medicine requires the preservation of the organ extracellular matrix (ECM) as a means to provide critical cues for differentiation and migration of cells that are seeded onto the organ scaffold. The purpose of this study was to assess the influence of varying pH levels on the preservation of key ECM components during the decellularization of rat lungs. Herein, we show that the pH of the 3-[(3-cholamidopropyl)dimethylammonio]-1-propanesulfonate (CHAPS)-based decellularization solution influences ECM retention, cell removal, and also the potential for host response upon implantation of acellular lung tissue. The preservation of ECM components, including elastin, fibronectin, and laminin, were better retained in the lower pH conditions that were tested (pH ranges tested: 8, 10, 12); glycosaminoglycans were preserved to a higher extent in the lower pH groups as well. The DNA content following decellularization of the rat lung was inversely correlated with the pH of the decellularization solution. Despite detectible levels of cyotoskeletal proteins and significant residual DNA, tissues decellularized at pH 8 demonstrated the greatest tissue architecture maintenance and the least induction of host response of all acellular conditions. These results highlight the effect of pH on the results obtained by organ decellularization and suggest that altering the pH of the solutions used for decellularization may influence the ability of cells to properly differentiate and home to appropriate locations within the scaffold, based on the preservation of key ECM components and implantation results.

  1. Fluorescence ratio imaging microscopy: temporal and spatial measurements of cytoplasmic pH

    PubMed Central

    1987-01-01

    Fluorescence ratio imaging microscopy (Tanasugarn, L., P. McNeil, G. Reynolds, and D. L. Taylor, 1984, J. Cell Biol., 98:717-724) has been used to measure the spatial variations in cytoplasmic pH of individual quiescent and nonquiescent Swiss 3T3 cells. Fundamental issues of ratio imaging that permit precise and accurate temporal and spatial measurements have been addressed including: excitation light levels, lamp operation, intracellular probe concentrations, methods of threshold selection, photobleaching, and spatial signal-to-noise ratio measurements. Subcellular measurements can be measured accurately (less than 3% coefficient of variation) in an area of 3.65 microns 2 with the present imaging system. Quiescent Swiss 3T3 cells have a measured cytoplasmic pH of 7.09 (0.01 SEM), whereas nonquiescent cells have a pH of 7.35 (0.01 SEM) in the presence of bicarbonate buffer. A unimodal distribution of mean cytoplasmic pH in both quiescent and nonquiescent cells was identified from populations of cells measured on a cell by cell basis. Therefore, unlike earlier studies based on cell population averages, it can be stated that cells in each population exhibit a narrow range of cytoplasmic pH. However, the mean cytoplasmic pH can change based on the physiological state of the cells. In addition, there appears to be little, if any, spatial variation in cytoplasmic pH in either quiescent or nonquiescent Swiss 3T3 cells. The pH within the nucleus was always the same as the surrounding cytoplasm. These values will serve as a reference point for investigating the role of temporal and spatial variations in cytoplasmic pH in a variety of cellular processes including growth control and cell movement. PMID:3558476

  2. The pH sensitivity of Aqp0 channels in tetraploid and diploid teleosts

    PubMed Central

    Chauvigné, François; Zapater, Cinta; Stavang, Jon Anders; Taranger, Geir Lasse; Cerdà, Joan; Finn, Roderick Nigel

    2015-01-01

    Water homeostasis and the structural integrity of the vertebrate lens is partially mediated by AQP0 channels. Emerging evidence indicates that external pH may be involved in channel gating. Here we show that a tetraploid teleost, the Atlantic salmon, retains 4 aqp0 genes (aqp0a1, -0a2, -0b1, and -0b2), which are highly, but not exclusively, expressed in the lens. Functional characterization reveals that, although each paralog permeates water efficiently, the permeability is respectively shifted to the neutral, alkaline, or acidic pH in Aqp0a1, -0a2, and -0b1, whereas that of Aqp0b2 is not regulated by external pH. Mutagenesis studies demonstrate that Ser38, His39, and His40 residues in the extracellular transmembrane domain of α-helix 2 facing the water pore are critical for the pH modulation of water transport. To validate these findings, we show that both zebrafish Aqp0a and -0b are functional water channels with respective pH sensitivities toward alkaline or acid pH ranges and that an N-terminal allelic variant (Ser19) of Aqp0b exists that abolishes water transport in Xenopus laevis oocytes. The data suggest that the alkaline pH sensitivity is a conserved trait in teleost Aqp0 a-type channels, whereas mammalian AQP0 and some teleost Aqp0 b-type channels display an acidic pH permeation preference.—Chauvigné, F., Zapater, C., Stavang, J. A., Taranger, G. L., Cerdà, J., Finn, R. N. The pH sensitivity of Aqp0 channels in tetraploid and diploid teleosts. PMID:25667219

  3. Novel oral phosphate binder with nanocrystalline maghemite-phosphate binding capacity and pH effect.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, T M-H; Müller, R H; Taupitz, M; Schnorr, J; Hamm, B; Wagner, S

    2015-03-30

    Hyperphosphatemia is one of the main risk factors contributing to morbidity and mortality in patients with end stage renal disease. The demand for a new phosphate binder is continuously increasing since the number of patients suffering under hyperphosphatemia is growing. However, side effects and high pill burden of currently available phosphate binders are the main reasons for low compliance and uncontrolled serum phosphate levels. Therefore, the aim of this study was to develop a novel phosphate binder with a high phosphate binding capacity over the entire gastrointestinal (GI) pH range. This novel phosphate binder C-PAM-10 is based on d-mannose coated nanocrystalline maghemite and belongs to the new class of phosphate binders, called the "iron based agents". It was possible to obtain a phosphate binding product that showed very high phosphate binding capacities with the characteristic of being pH independent at relevant pH ranges. The simulation of a GI passage ranging from pH 1.2 to pH 7.5 showed a 2.5 times higher phosphate binding capacity compared to the commonly used phosphate binder sevelamer carbonate. The simulation of a pH sensitive coating that releases the iron based phosphate binder at pH values ≥4.5 still showed a very high phosphate binding capacity combined with very low iron release which might decrease iron related side effects in vivo. Therefore, C-PAM-10 and its variations may be very promising candidates as a superior phosphate binder.

  4. High-Frequency Dynamics of Ocean pH: A Multi-Ecosystem Comparison

    PubMed Central

    Hofmann, Gretchen E.; Smith, Jennifer E.; Johnson, Kenneth S.; Send, Uwe; Levin, Lisa A.; Micheli, Fiorenza; Paytan, Adina; Price, Nichole N.; Peterson, Brittany; Takeshita, Yuichiro; Matson, Paul G.; Crook, Elizabeth Derse; Kroeker, Kristy J.; Gambi, Maria Cristina; Rivest, Emily B.; Frieder, Christina A.; Yu, Pauline C.; Martz, Todd R.

    2011-01-01

    The effect of Ocean Acidification (OA) on marine biota is quasi-predictable at best. While perturbation studies, in the form of incubations under elevated pCO2, reveal sensitivities and responses of individual species, one missing link in the OA story results from a chronic lack of pH data specific to a given species' natural habitat. Here, we present a compilation of continuous, high-resolution time series of upper ocean pH, collected using autonomous sensors, over a variety of ecosystems ranging from polar to tropical, open-ocean to coastal, kelp forest to coral reef. These observations reveal a continuum of month-long pH variability with standard deviations from 0.004 to 0.277 and ranges spanning 0.024 to 1.430 pH units. The nature of the observed variability was also highly site-dependent, with characteristic diel, semi-diurnal, and stochastic patterns of varying amplitudes. These biome-specific pH signatures disclose current levels of exposure to both high and low dissolved CO2, often demonstrating that resident organisms are already experiencing pH regimes that are not predicted until 2100. Our data provide a first step toward crystallizing the biophysical link between environmental history of pH exposure and physiological resilience of marine organisms to fluctuations in seawater CO2. Knowledge of this spatial and temporal variation in seawater chemistry allows us to improve the design of OA experiments: we can test organisms with a priori expectations of their tolerance guardrails, based on their natural range of exposure. Such hypothesis-testing will provide a deeper understanding of the effects of OA. Both intuitively simple to understand and powerfully informative, these and similar comparative time series can help guide management efforts to identify areas of marine habitat that can serve as refugia to acidification as well as areas that are particularly vulnerable to future ocean change. PMID:22205986

  5. Application of DGT to high pH environments: uptake efficiency of radionuclides of different oxidation states onto Chelex binding gel.

    PubMed

    Stockdale, Anthony; Bryan, Nick D

    2013-05-01

    The DGT Chelex binding phase has not been tested for binding efficiency over the extreme high pH range (i.e., 10 to 13). Here, we examined the uptake efficiency of the gel-encapsulated Chelex cation exchange resin binding phase when in direct contact with solutions of radionuclides of different oxidation states over the circumneutral to high pH range (∼7 to 13). Results show that the Chelex binding gel is suitable for Eu(3+) for circumneutral pH, for UO2(2+) up to at least pH 10.7 and for NpO2(+) up to at least pH 11.7. Application may be appropriate at higher pH values but testing of complete solution deployment units will be required. This work provides the framework to use DGT as a tool for the study of high pH radionuclide systems.

  6. Cytoplasmic pH response to acid stress in individual cells of Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis observed by fluorescence ratio imaging microscopy.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Keith A; Kitko, Ryan D; Mershon, J Patrick; Adcox, Haley E; Malek, Kotiba A; Berkmen, Melanie B; Slonczewski, Joan L

    2012-05-01

    The ability of Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis to regulate their cytoplasmic pH is well studied in cell suspensions but is poorly understood in individual adherent cells and biofilms. We observed the cytoplasmic pH of individual cells using ratiometric pHluorin. A standard curve equating the fluorescence ratio with pH was obtained by perfusion at a range of external pH 5.0 to 9.0, with uncouplers that collapse the transmembrane pH difference. Adherent cells were acid stressed by switching the perfusion medium from pH 7.5 to pH 5.5. The E. coli cytoplasmic pH fell to a value that varied among individual cells (range of pH 6.2 to 6.8), but a majority of cells recovered (to pH 7.0 to 7.5) within 2 min. In an E. coli biofilm, cells shifted from pH 7.5 to pH 5.5 failed to recover cytoplasmic pH. Following a smaller shift (from pH 7.5 to pH 6.0), most biofilm cells recovered fully, although the pH decreased further than that of isolated adherent cells, and recovery took longer (7 min or longer). Some biofilm cells began to recover pH and then failed, a response not seen in isolated cells. B. subtilis cells were acid shifted from pH 7.5 to pH 6.0. In B. subtilis, unlike the case with E. coli, cytoplasmic pH showed no "overshoot" but fell to a level that was maintained. This level of cytoplasmic pH post-acid shift varied among individual B. subtilis cells (range of pH, 7.0 to 7.7). Overall, the cytoplasmic pHs of individual bacteria show important variation in the acid stress response, including novel responses in biofilms.

  7. Sol gel based fiber optic sensor for blook pH measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Grant, S. A.; Glass, R. S.

    1996-12-19

    This paper describes a fiber-optic pH sensor based upon sol-gel encapsulation of a self-referencing dye, seminaphthorhodamine-1 carboxylate (SNARF-1C). The simple sol-gel fabrication procedure and low coating leachability are ideal for encapsulation and immobilization of dye molecules onto the end of an optical fiber. A miniature bench-top fluorimeter system was developed for use with the optical fiber to obtain pH measurements. Linear and reproducible responses were obtained in human blood in the pH range 6.8 to 8.0, which encompasses the clinically-relevant range. Therefore, this sensor can be considered for in vivo use.

  8. Macroalgae contribute to nested mosaics of pH variability in a sub-Arctic fjord

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krause-Jensen, D.; Duarte, C. M.; Hendriks, I. E.; Meire, L.; Blicher, M. E.; Marbà, N.; Sejr, M. K.

    2015-03-01

    The Arctic Ocean is considered the most vulnerable ecosystem to ocean acidification (OA) and large-scale assessments of pH and the saturation state for aragonite (Ωarag) indicate that it is already close to corrosive states (Ωarag < 1). In high-latitude coastal waters the regulation of pH and Ωarag is far more complex than offshore because increased biological activity and input of glacial meltwater affect pH. As most calcifiers occupy coastal habitats, the assessment of risks from OA to these vulnerable organisms cannot be derived from extrapolation of current and forecasted offshore conditions, but requires an understanding of the regimes of pH and Ωarag in their coastal habitats. To increase knowledge of the natural variability of pH in the Arctic coastal zone and specifically to test the influence of benthic vegetated habitats, we quantified pH-variability in a Greenland fjord in a nested scale approach. A sensor array logging pH, O2, PAR, temperature and salinity was applied on spatial scales ranging from km-scale across the horizontal extension of the fjord, over 100 m scale vertically in the fjord, 10-100 m scale between subtidal habitats with and without kelp forests and between vegetated tidal pools and adjacent vegetated shores, to cm-m scale within kelp forests and mm-scale across boundary layers of macrophyte tissue. In addition, we assessed the temporal variability in pH on diurnal and seasonal scales. Based on pH-measurements combined with relationships between salinity, total alkalinity and dissolved inorganic carbon we also estimated variability of Ωarag. Results show variability in pH and Ωarag of up to 0.2-0.3 units at several scales, i.e. along the horizontal and vertical extension of the fjord, between seasons and on a diel basis in benthic habitats and within 1 m3 of kelp forest. Vegetated intertidal pools exhibited extreme diel pH variability of > 1.5 units and macrophyte boundary layers a pH-range of up to 0.8 units. Overall, Ωarag was

  9. The panacea toolbox of a PhD biomedical student.

    PubMed

    Skaik, Younis

    2014-01-01

    Doing a PhD (doctor of philosophy) for the sake of contribution to knowledge should give the student an immense enthusiasm through the PhD period. It is the time in one's life that one spends to "hit the nail on the head" in a specific area and topic of interest. A PhD consists mostly of hard work and tenacity; however, luck and genius might also play a little role. You can pass all PhD phases without having both luck and genius. The PhD student should have pre-PhD and PhD toolboxes, which are "sine quibus non" for getting successfully a PhD degree. In this manuscript, the toolboxes of the PhD student are discussed.

  10. Effects of soil pH on the Vicia-micronucleus genotoxicity assay.

    PubMed

    Dhyèvre, Adrien; Foltête, Anne Sophie; Aran, Delphine; Muller, Serge; Cotelle, Sylvie

    2014-11-01

    In the field of contaminated sites and soil management, chemical analyses only bring typological data about pollution. As far as bioavailability and effects on organisms are concerned, we need ecotoxicology tools. In this domain, among many existing tests, we chose to study genotoxicity because it is a short-term endpoint with long-term consequences. The aim of this study is to assess the effects of soil pH on the results of the Vicia faba root tip micronucleus test for the two following reasons: (i) to define the pH range within which the test can be performed without modifying the soil to be tested, within the framework of the ISO standard of the test and (ii) to provides information about the effects of the pH on the genotoxic potential of soils. In this context, we modified the pH of a standard soil with HCl or NaOH and we spiked the matrix with copper (2, 4 and 8 mmol kg(-1) dry soil) or with maleic hydrazide, an antigerminative chemical (5, 10 and 20 μmol kg(-1) dry soil). We concluded that the pH had no effect on the mitotic index or micronucleus frequency in the root cells of the negative controls: extreme pH values did not induce micronucleus formation in root cells. Moreover, according to our results, the Vicia-micronucleus test can be performed with pH values ranging between 3.2 and 9.0, but in the ISO 29200 "Soil quality--assessment of genotoxic effects on higher plants--V. faba micronucleus test" we recommended to use a control soil with a pH value ranging between 5 and 8 for a more accurate assessment of chemical genotoxicity. We also found that acid pH could increase the genotoxic potential of pollutants, especially heavy metals. With hydrazide maleic spiked soil, plants were placed in a situation of double stress, i.e. toxicity caused by extreme pH values and toxicity induced by the pollutant.

  11. Recent Ph.D.s; Honors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-04-01

    Recent Ph.D.s. Atmospheric Sciences. A study of atmospheric ammonia in coastal ecosystems utilizing relaxed eddy accumulation techniques and ion mobility spectrometry, LaToya Myles, Florida A&M University, December 2004, Advisor: Larry Robinson. Honors. Rana A. Fine has been awarded the 2005 Provost Award for Scholarly Activity, presented by the University of Miami. The award ``recognizes faculty for extraordinary research and scholarly pursuits.'' Charles David Keeling and Lonnie G. Thompson will receive the 2005 Tyler Prize for Environmental Achievement. The prize is given to individuals whose accomplishments in environmental science, policy, energy, and medicine confer great benefit upon mankind.

  12. Intracellular pH in sperm physiology.

    PubMed

    Nishigaki, Takuya; José, Omar; González-Cota, Ana Laura; Romero, Francisco; Treviño, Claudia L; Darszon, Alberto

    2014-08-01

    Intracellular pH (pHi) regulation is essential for cell function. Notably, several unique sperm ion transporters and enzymes whose elimination causes infertility are either pHi dependent or somehow related to pHi regulation. Amongst them are: CatSper, a Ca(2+) channel; Slo3, a K(+) channel; the sperm-specific Na(+)/H(+) exchanger and the soluble adenylyl cyclase. It is thus clear that pHi regulation is of the utmost importance for sperm physiology. This review briefly summarizes the key components involved in pHi regulation, their characteristics and participation in fundamental sperm functions such as motility, maturation and the acrosome reaction.

  13. Environmental Scanning Electron Microscopy characterization of the adhesion of conidia from Penicillium expansum to cedar wood substrata at different pH values.

    PubMed

    El Abed, Soumya; Ibnsouda, Saad Koraichi; Latrache, Hassan; Meftah, Hasna; Tahri, Nezha Joutey; Hamadi, Fatima

    2012-04-01

    Initial microbial adhesion to surfaces is a complicated process that is affected by a number of factors. An important property of a solution that may influence adhesion is pH. The surface properties of the cedar wood were characterized by the sessile drop technique. Moreover, the interfacial free energy of surface adhesion to the cedar wood was determined under pH values (2, 3, 5, 7, 9 and 11). The results showed that cedar wood examined at different pH levels could be considered hydrophobic ranged from Giwi = -13.1 mJ/m(2) to Giwi = -75 mJ/m(2). We noted that the electron-donor character of cedar wood was important at both basic and limit acidic conditions (pH 11 and pH 3) and it decreased at intermediate pH (pH 5). The cedar wood substratum presents a weak electron acceptor under various pH's. In addition, the adhesion of conidia from Penicilllium expansum to the cedar wood surfaces at different pH values (2, 3, 5, 7, 9 and 11) was investigated using Environmental Scanning Electron Microscopy and image analysis was assessed with the Mathlab(®) program. The data analysis showed that the conidia from P. expansum were strongly influenced by the pH. The maximum adhesion occurs in the pH 11 and pH 3 and decreased to 24% at pH 5.

  14. Investigation of pH and Temperature Profiles in the GI Tract of Fasted Human Subjects Using the Intellicap(®) System.

    PubMed

    Koziolek, Mirko; Grimm, Michael; Becker, Dieter; Iordanov, Ventzeslav; Zou, Hans; Shimizu, Jeff; Wanke, Christoph; Garbacz, Grzegorz; Weitschies, Werner

    2015-09-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) pH and temperature profiles under fasted-state conditions were investigated in two studies with each 10 healthy human subjects using the IntelliCap(®) system. This telemetric drug delivery device enabled the determination of gastric emptying time, small bowel transit time, and colon arrival time by significant pH and temperature changes. The study results revealed high variability of GI pH and transit times. The gastric transit of IntelliCap(®) was characterized by high fluctuations of the pH with mean values ranging from pH 1.7 to pH 4.7. Gastric emptying was observed after 7-202 min (median: 30 min). During small bowel transit, which had a duration of 67-532 min (median: 247 min), pH values increased slightly from pH 5.9-6.3 in proximal parts to pH 7.4-7.8 in distal parts. Colonic pH conditions were characterized by values fluctuating mainly between pH 5 and pH 8. The pH profiles and transit times described in this work are highly relevant for the comprehension of drug delivery of solid oral dosage forms comprising ionizable drugs and excipients with pH-dependent solubility.

  15. Deep-sea coral δ13C: A tool to reconstruct the difference between seawater pH and δ11B-derived calcifying fluid pH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Patrick; Goodkin, Nathalie F.; Stewart, Joseph A.; Foster, Gavin L.; Sikes, Elisabeth L.; White, Helen K.; Hennige, Sebastian; Roberts, J. Murray

    2016-01-01

    The boron isotopic composition (δ11B) of coral skeleton is a proxy for seawater pH. However, δ11B-based pH estimates must account for the pH difference between seawater and the coral calcifying fluid, ΔpH. We report that skeletal δ11B and ΔpH are related to the skeletal carbon isotopic composition (δ13C) in four genera of deep-sea corals collected across a natural pH range of 7.89-8.09, with ΔpH related to δ13C by ΔpH = 0.029 × δ13C + 0.929, r2 = 0.717. Seawater pH can be reconstructed by determining ΔpH from δ13C and subtracting it from the δ11B-derived calcifying fluid pH. The uncertainty for reconstructions is ±0.12 pH units (2 standard deviations) if estimated from regression prediction intervals or between ±0.04 and ±0.06 pH units if estimated from confidence intervals. Our new approach quantifies and corrects for vital effects, offering improved accuracy relative to an existing δ11B versus seawater pH calibration with deep-sea scleractinian corals.

  16. Measurement of pH in whole blood by near-infrared spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Alam, M. Kathleen; Maynard, John D.; Robinson, M. Ries Niemczyk, Thomas M. Rohrscheib, Mark R.

    1999-03-01

    Whole blood pH has been determined {ital in vitro} by using near-infrared spectroscopy over the wavelength range of 1500 to 1785 nm with multivariate calibration modeling of the spectral data obtained from two different sample sets. In the first sample set, the pH of whole blood was varied without controlling cell size and oxygen saturation (O{sub 2} Sat) variation. The result was that the red blood cell (RBC) size and O{sub 2} Sat correlated with pH. Although the partial least-squares (PLS) multivariate calibration of these data produced a good pH prediction cross-validation standard error of prediction (CVSEP)=0.046, R{sup 2}=0.982, the spectral data were dominated by scattering changes due to changing RBC size that correlated with the pH changes. A second experiment was carried out where the RBC size and O{sub 2} Sat were varied orthogonally to the pH variation. A PLS calibration of the spectral data obtained from these samples produced a pH prediction with an R{sup 2} of 0.954 and a cross-validated standard error of prediction of 0.064 pH units. The robustness of the PLS calibration models was tested by predicting the data obtained from the other sets. The predicted pH values obtained from both data sets yielded R{sup 2} values greater than 0.9 once the data were corrected for differences in hemoglobin concentration. For example, with the use of the calibration produced from the second sample set, the pH values from the first sample set were predicted with an R{sup 2} of 0.92 after the predictions were corrected for bias and slope. It is shown that spectral information specific to pH-induced chemical changes in the hemoglobin molecule is contained within the PLS loading vectors developed for both the first and second data sets. It is this pH specific information that allows the spectra dominated by pH-correlated scattering changes to provide robust pH predictive ability in the uncorrelated data, and visa versa. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital Society for Applied

  17. Impact of pH and DIC on Lead Mineralology and Solubility in Drinking Water

    EPA Science Inventory

    In order to remain compliant with the U.S. EPA’s Lead and Copper rule, it is pivotal to understand the relationship between factors affecting lead release in drinking water distribution systems. Lead solids were synthesized in cell experiments using a pH range of 6-11 with both...

  18. Regulating Emotions and Aiming for a Ph.D.: Excerpts from "Anthropology Matters"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hovland, Ingie

    2012-01-01

    In this article I will present a range of experiences of graduate socialisation that have been discussed in past articles in the journal "Anthropology Matters". These are the experiences of social anthropology Ph.D. students in the United Kingdom. The overarching theme for the article is "regulating emotions", and the excerpts…

  19. Managing Criticism in Ph.D. Supervision: A Qualitative Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Sarah; Seale, Clive

    2007-01-01

    This article is part of a larger study which presents findings from an in-depth longitudinal case study of a student's Ph.D. journey. It shows how criticism is produced and managed in the supervisory relationship. As well as an overview of types of criticism produced across a range of supervisory interactions, the article presents a micro-analysis…

  20. MICROBIAL SULFATE REDUCTION AND METAL ATTENUATION IN PH 4 ACID MINE WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sediments recovered from the flooded mine workings of the Penn Mine, a Cu-Zn mine abandoned since the early 1960s, were cultured for anaerobic bacteria over a range of pH (4 to 7.5). The molecular biology of sediments and cultures was studied to determine whether sulfate-reducing...

  1. An ultrasensitive method of real time pH monitoring with complementary metal oxide semiconductor image sensor.

    PubMed

    Devadhasan, Jasmine Pramila; Kim, Sanghyo

    2015-02-09

    CMOS sensors are becoming a powerful tool in the biological and chemical field. In this work, we introduce a new approach on quantifying various pH solutions with a CMOS image sensor. The CMOS image sensor based pH measurement produces high-accuracy analysis, making it a truly portable and user friendly system. pH indicator blended hydrogel matrix was fabricated as a thin film to the accurate color development. A distinct color change of red, green and blue (RGB) develops in the hydrogel film by applying various pH solutions (pH 1-14). The semi-quantitative pH evolution was acquired by visual read out. Further, CMOS image sensor absorbs the RGB color intensity of the film and hue value converted into digital numbers with the aid of an analog-to-digital converter (ADC) to determine the pH ranges of solutions. Chromaticity diagram and Euclidean distance represent the RGB color space and differentiation of pH ranges, respectively. This technique is applicable to sense the various toxic chemicals and chemical vapors by situ sensing. Ultimately, the entire approach can be integrated into smartphone and operable with the user friendly manner.

  2. Nanomechanical DNA Origami pH Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Kuzuya, Akinori; Watanabe, Ryosuke; Yamanaka, Yusei; Tamaki, Takuya; Kaino, Masafumi; Ohya, Yuichi

    2014-01-01

    Single-molecule pH sensors have been developed by utilizing molecular imaging of pH-responsive shape transition of nanomechanical DNA origami devices with atomic force microscopy (AFM). Short DNA fragments that can form i-motifs were introduced to nanomechanical DNA origami devices with pliers-like shape (DNA Origami Pliers), which consist of two levers of 170-nm long and 20-nm wide connected at a Holliday-junction fulcrum. DNA Origami Pliers can be observed as in three distinct forms; cross, antiparallel and parallel forms, and cross form is the dominant species when no additional interaction is introduced to DNA Origami Pliers. Introduction of nine pairs of 12-mer sequence (5′-AACCCCAACCCC-3′), which dimerize into i-motif quadruplexes upon protonation of cytosine, drives transition of DNA Origami Pliers from open cross form into closed parallel form under acidic conditions. Such pH-dependent transition was clearly imaged on mica in molecular resolution by AFM, showing potential application of the system to single-molecular pH sensors. PMID:25325338

  3. The pH of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plumb, R. C.; Bishop, J. L.; Edwards, J. O.

    1993-01-01

    The Viking labeled release (LR) experiments provided data that can be used to determine the acid-base characteristics of the regolith. Constraints on the acid-base properties and redox potentials of the Martian surface material would provide additional information for determining what reactions are possible and defining formation conditions for the regolith. Calculations devised to determine the pH of Mars must include the amount of soluble acid species or base species present in the LR regolith sample and the solubility product of the carbonate with the limiting solubility. This analysis shows that CaCO3, either as calcite or aragonite, has the correct K(sub sp) to have produced the Viking LR successive injection reabsorption effects. Thus CaCO3 or another MeCO3 with very similar solubility characteristics must have been present on Mars. A small amount of soluble acid, but no more than 4 micro-mol per sample, could also have been present. It is concluded that the pH of the regolith is 7.2 +/- 0.1.

  4. Variations of thiaminase I activity pH dependencies among typical Great Lakes forage fish and Paenibacillus thiaminolyticus.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zajicek, J.L.; Brown, L.; Brown, S.B.; Honeyfield, D.C.; Fitzsimons, J.D.; Tillitt, D.E.

    2009-01-01

    The source of thiaminase in the Great Lakes food web remains unknown. Biochemical characterization of the thiaminase I activities observed in forage fish was undertaken to provide insights into potential thiaminase sources and to optimize catalytic assay conditions. We measured the thiaminase I activities of crude extracts from five forage fish species and one strain of Paenibacillus thiaminolyticus over a range of pH values. The clupeids, alewife Alosa pseudoharengus and gizzard shad Dorosoma cepedianum, had very similar thiaminase I pH dependencies, with optimal activity ranges (> or = 90% of maximum activity) between pH 4.6 and 5.5. Rainbow smelt Osmerus mordax and spottail shiner Notropis hudsonius had optimal activity ranges between pH 5.5-6.6. The thiaminase I activity pH dependence profile of P. thiaminolyticus had an optimal activity range between pH 5.4 and 6.3, which was similar to the optimal range for rainbow smelt and spottail shiners. Incubation of P. thiaminolyticus extracts with extracts from bloater Coregonus hoyi (normally, bloaters have little or no detectable thiaminase I activity) did not significantly alter the pH dependence profile of P. thiaminolyticus-derived thiaminase I, such that it continued to resemble that of the rainbow smelt and spottail shiner, with an apparent optimal activity range between pH 5.7 and 6.6. These data are consistent with the hypothesis of a bacterial source for thiaminase I in the nonclupeid species of forage fish; however, the data also suggest different sources of thiaminase I enzymes in the clupeid species.

  5. Host origin determines pH tolerance of Tritrichomonas foetus isolates from the feline gastrointestinal and bovine urogenital tracts.

    PubMed

    Morin-Adeline, Victoria; Fraser, Stuart T; Stack, Colin; Šlapeta, Jan

    2015-10-01

    The ability for protozoan parasites to tolerate pH fluctuations within their niche is critical for the establishment of infection and require the parasite to be capable of adapting to a distinct pH range. We used two host adapted Tritrichomonas foetus isolates, capable of infecting either the digestive tract (pH 5.3-6.6) of feline hosts or the reproductive tract (pH 7.4-7.8) of bovine hosts to address their adaptability to changing pH. Using flow cytometry, we investigated the pH tolerance of the bovine and feline T. foetus isolates over a range of physiologically relevant pH in vitro. Following exposure to mild acid stress (pH 6), the bovine T. foetus isolates showed a significant decrease in cell viability and increased cytoplasmic granularity (p-value < 0.003, p-value < 0.0002) compared to pH 7 and 8 (p-value > 0.7). In contrast, the feline genotype displayed an enhanced capacity to maintain cell morphology and viability (p-value > 0.05). Microscopic assessment revealed that following exposure to a weak acidic stress (pH 6), the bovine T. foetus transformed into rounded parasites with extended cell volumes and displays a decrease in viability. The higher tolerance for acidic extracellular environment of the feline isolate compared to the bovine isolate suggests that pH could be a critical factor in regulating T. foetus infections and host-specificity.

  6. Effect of soil pH on as hyperaccumulation capacity in fern species, Pityrogramma calomelanos.

    PubMed

    Anh, B T Kim; Kim, D D; Kuschk, P; Tua, T V; Hue, N T; Minh, N N

    2013-03-01

    Arsenic uptake by hyperaccumulator plant species depends on many different environmental factors. Soil pH is one of the most important factors due to its combined effect on both chemical and biological processes. In greenhouse experiment, the effect of pH (within the pH range 3.6 - 8.9) on As uptake as well as biomass of Pityrogramma calomelanos was evaluated. The plants were grown in mining soil containing 645.6 mg As kg(-1) for 14 weeks. Within this time, the plant biomass growth was 3.78 - 8.64 g d. wt. per plant and the removal amounted 6.3-18.4 mg As per plant. Translocation factor (ratio of As in fronds to roots) of the fern was 3.6 - 9.7, indicating its potential in phytoremediation of As contaminated soil. Influence of pH on As bioavailability was visible as the available As concentration was higher in acidic soil compared to alkaline soil. Furthermore, it was found that As accumulation by Pityrogramma calomelanos was optimum in the soil of pH 3.6. Nevertheless, the results of this study demonstrate that remediation of As-contaminated mining soils, by this fern, can be improved by changing the soil pH from 4.6 to 6.8.

  7. Soil pH determines microbial diversity and composition in the park grass experiment.

    PubMed

    Zhalnina, Kateryna; Dias, Raquel; de Quadros, Patricia Dörr; Davis-Richardson, Austin; Camargo, Flavio A O; Clark, Ian M; McGrath, Steve P; Hirsch, Penny R; Triplett, Eric W

    2015-02-01

    The Park Grass experiment (PGE) in the UK has been ongoing since 1856. Its purpose is to study the response of biological communities to the long-term treatments and associated changes in soil parameters, particularly soil pH. In this study, soil samples were collected across pH gradient (pH 3.6-7) and a range of fertilizers (nitrogen as ammonium sulfate, nitrogen as sodium nitrate, phosphorous) to evaluate the effects nutrients have on soil parameters and microbial community structure. Illumina 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) amplicon sequencing was used to determine the relative abundances and diversity of bacterial and archaeal taxa. Relationships between treatments, measured soil parameters, and microbial communities were evaluated. Clostridium, Bacteroides, Bradyrhizobium, Mycobacterium, Ruminococcus, Paenibacillus, and Rhodoplanes were the most abundant genera found at the PGE. The main soil parameter that determined microbial composition, diversity, and biomass in the PGE soil was pH. The most probable mechanism of the pH impact on microbial community may include mediation of nutrient availability in the soil. Addition of nitrogen to the PGE plots as ammonium sulfate decreases soil pH through increased nitrification, which causes buildup of soil carbon, and hence increases C/N ratio. Plant species richness and plant productivity did not reveal significant relationships with microbial diversity; however, plant species richness was positively correlated with soil microbial biomass. Plants responded to the nitrogen treatments with an increase in productivity and a decrease in the species richness.

  8. Soil pH regulates the abundance and diversity of Group 1.1c Crenarchaeota.

    PubMed

    Lehtovirta, Laura E; Prosser, James I; Nicol, Graeme W

    2009-12-01

    Archaeal communities in many acidic forest soil systems are dominated by a distinct crenarchaeal lineage Group 1.1c. In addition, they are found consistently in other acidic soils including grassland pasture, moorland and alpine soils. To determine whether soil pH is a major factor in determining their presence and abundance, Group 1.1c community size and composition were investigated across a pH gradient from 4.5 to 7.5 that has been maintained for > 40 years. The abundances of Group 1.1c Crenarchaeota, total Crenarchaeota and total bacteria were assessed by quantitative PCR (qPCR) targeting 16S rRNA genes and the diversity of Group 1.1c crenarchaeal community was investigated by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and phylogenetic analysis. The abundance of Group 1.1c Crenarchaeota declined as the pH increased, whereas total Crenarchaeota and Bacteria showed no clear trend. Community diversity of Group 1.1c Crenarchaeota was also influenced with different DGGE bands dominating at different pH. Group 1.1c Crenarchaeota were also quantified in 13 other soils representing a range of habitats, soil types and pH. These results exhibited the same trend as that shown across the pH gradient with Group 1.1c Crenarchaeota representing a greater proportion of total Crenarchaeota in the most acidic soils.

  9. Effect of carbon dioxide and ammonium removal on pH changes in polishing ponds.

    PubMed

    Cavalcanti, P F F; van Haandel, A; Lettinga, G

    2002-01-01

    If nutrient removal is to be obtained in ponds treating sewage, the pH must be raised so that ammonia can desorb and phosphates can precipitate. In this paper it is shown that the pH increase in ponds can be predicted quantitatively from simple stoichiometry, taking into consideration physical and biological carbon dioxide removal, ammonia stripping and calcium carbonate precipitation. Biological CO2 removal by photosynthesis is identified as the main process to effect pH increase in ponds. The rate of pH increase and consequently the required retention time depend on the net rate of CO2 consumption, the extent of ammonium stripping, the characteristics of the influent (alkalinity and pH) as well as factors concerning the environment (temperature) and dimensions (depth) of the pond. A high pH (range 9 to 10) can be obtained in about 5 days if digested sewage is used (low organic material concentration), climate conditions are favourable and the pond is shallow (< 0.5 m deep).

  10. Optical non-contact pH measurement in cell culture with sterilizable, modular parts.

    PubMed

    Kattipparambil Rajan, Dhanesh; Patrikoski, Mimmi; Verho, Jarmo; Sivula, Jyrki; Ihalainen, Heimo; Miettinen, Susanna; Lekkala, Jukka

    2016-12-01

    A non-contact real time pH measurement using fully modular optical parts is described for phenol-red medium cell cultures. The modular parts can be sterilized, and once the measurement is started at the beginning of culture, no recalibration or maintenance is needed till the end of the culture. Measurements can be carried out without any special manual attention. The modular assembly of LED and sensor cassettes is unique, robust, reusable and reproducible. pH is measured in an intact closed flow system, without wasting any culture medium. A special pump encapsulation enables the system to be effortlessly functional in extremely humid incubator environments. This avoids lengthy sample tubings in and out of the incubator, associated large temperature changes and CO2 buffering issues. A new correction model to compensate errors caused e.g. by biolayers in spectrometric pH measurement is put-forward, which improves the accuracy of pH estimation significantly. The method provides resolution down to 0.1 pH unit in physiological pH range with mean absolute error 0.02.

  11. Modeling the Effect of pH and Temperature for Cellulases Immobilized on Enzymogel Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Samaratunga, Ashani; Kudina, Olena; Nahar, Nurun; Zakharchenko, Andrey; Minko, Sergiy; Voronov, Andriy; Pryor, Scott W

    2015-06-01

    Production costs of cellulosic biofuels can be lowered if cellulases are recovered and reused using particulate carriers that can be extracted after biomass hydrolysis. Such enzyme recovery was recently demonstrated using enzymogel nanoparticles with grafted polymer brushes loaded with cellulases. In this work, cellulase (NS50013) and β-glucosidase (Novozyme 188) were immobilized on enzymogels made of poly(acrylic acid) polymer brushes grafted to the surface of silica nanoparticles. Response surface methodology was used to model effects of pH and temperature on hydrolysis and recovery of free and attached enzymes. Hydrolysis yields using both enzymogels and free cellulase and β-glucosidase were highest at the maximum temperature tested, 50 °C. The optimal pH for cellulase enzymogels and free enzyme was 5.0 and 4.4, respectively, while both free β-glucosidase and enzymogels had an optimal pH near 4.4. Highest hydrolysis sugar concentrations with cellulase and β-glucosidase enzymogels were 69 and 53 % of those with free enzymes, respectively. Enzyme recovery using enzymogels decreased with increasing pH, but cellulase recovery remained greater than 88 % throughout the operating range of pH values less than 5.0 and was greater than 95 % at pH values below 4.3. Recovery of β-glucosidase enzymogels was not affected by temperature and had little impact on cellulase recovery.

  12. The kinetic properties producing the perfunctory pH profiles of catalase-peroxidases.

    PubMed

    Moore, Robert L; Powell, Luke J; Goodwin, Douglas C

    2008-06-01

    Many structure-function relationship studies performed on the catalase-peroxidase enzymes are based on limited kinetic data. To provide a more substantive understanding of catalase-peroxidase function, we undertook a more exhaustive evaluation of catalase-peroxidase catalysis as a function of pH. Kinetic parameters across a broad pH range for the catalase and peroxidase activities of E. coli catalase peroxidase (KatG) were obtained, including the separate analysis of the oxidizing and reducing substrates of the peroxidase catalytic cycle. This investigation identified ABTS-dependent inhibition of peroxidase activity, particularly at low pH, unveiling that previously reported pH optima are clearly skewed. We show that turnover and efficiency of peroxidase activity increases with decreasing pH until the protein unfolds. The data also suggest that the catalase pH optimum is more complex than it is often assumed to be. The apparent optimum is in fact the intersection of the optimum for binding (7.00) and the optimum for activity (5.75). We also report the apparent pK(a)s for binding and catalysis of catalase activity as well as approximate values for certain peroxidatic and catalatic steps.

  13. Theory of signal and noise in double-gated nanoscale electronic pH sensors

    PubMed Central

    Go, Jonghyun; Nair, Pradeep R.; Alam, Muhammad A.

    2012-01-01

    The maximum sensitivity of classical nanowire (NW)-based pH sensors is defined by the Nernst limit of 59 mV/pH. For typical noise levels in ultra-small single-gated nanowire sensors, the signal-to-noise ratio is often not sufficient to resolve pH changes necessary for a broad range of applications. Recently, a new class of double-gated devices was demonstrated to offer apparent “super-Nernstian” response (>59 mV/pH) by amplifying the original pH signal through innovative biasing schemes. However, the pH-sensitivity of these nanoscale devices as a function of biasing configurations, number of electrodes, and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) remains poorly understood. Even the basic question such as “Do double-gated sensors actually resolve smaller changes in pH compared to conventional single-gated sensors in the presence of various sources of noise?” remains unanswered. In this article, we provide a comprehensive numerical and analytical theory of signal and noise of double-gated pH sensors to conclude that, while the theoretical lower limit of pH-resolution does not improve for double-gated sensors, this new class of sensors does improve the (instrument-limited) pH resolution. PMID:22991484

  14. Conformal self-assembled thin films for optical pH sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topasna, Daniela M.; Topasna, Gregory A.; Liu, Minghanbo; Tseng, Ching-Hung

    2016-04-01

    Simple, reliable, lightweight, and inexpensive thin films based sensors are still in intense development and high demand in many applications such as biomedical, industrial, environmental, military, and consumer products. One important class of sensors is the optical pH sensor. In addition, conformal thin film based sensors extend the range of application for pH optical sensors. We present the results on the fabrication and characterization of optical pH sensing coatings made through ionic self-assembled technique. These thin films are based on the combination of a polyelectrolyte and water-soluble organic dye molecule Direct Yellow 4. A series of films was fabricated and characterized in order to determine the optimized parameters of the polymer and of the organic dye solutions. The optical pH responses of these films were also studied. The transparent films were immersed in solutions at various temperature and pH values. The films are stable when immersed in solutions with pH below 9.0 and temperatures below 90 °C and they maintain their performance after longer immersion times. We also demonstrate the functionality of these coatings as conformal films.

  15. Effect of pH on the fluorescence characteristics of some flavones probes.

    PubMed

    Voicescu, Mariana; Ionescu, Sorana; Gatea, Florentina

    2014-04-05

    The photophysical properties such as electronic absorption, molar extinction coefficient, emission spectra, fluorescence quantum yield and lifetime of three different hydroxyflavones (a typical model of flavonols) such as: 3-HF, 3,6-diHF and 3,7-diHF, have been studied in the pH range from 2.5 to 9.2. Both electronic absorption and fluorescence spectra are sensitive to pH. The fluorescence quantum yield at pH 7.4 of the mentioned flavones probes have been determined. The fluorescence lifetime of different emissive species (Normal, Tautomer and Anion forms) as pH dependence have been also estimated. The effect of pH on the intramolecular excited state proton transfer process (ESIPT) has been discussed. The normal and tautomeric forms change as a function of pH, the normal one being more sensitive. The position of the -OH group on the second aromatic ring in the flavonol's structure has been also discussed. The results have relevance to compounds which have photoreactions accompanied by dual fluorescence.

  16. Theory of signal and noise in double-gated nanoscale electronic pH sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Go, Jonghyun; Nair, Pradeep R.; Alam, Muhammad A.

    2012-08-01

    The maximum sensitivity of classical nanowire (NW)-based pH sensors is defined by the Nernst limit of 59 mV/pH. For typical noise levels in ultra-small single-gated nanowire sensors, the signal-to-noise ratio is often not sufficient to resolve pH changes necessary for a broad range of applications. Recently, a new class of double-gated devices was demonstrated to offer apparent 'super-Nernstian' response (>59 mV/pH) by amplifying the original pH signal through innovative biasing schemes. However, the pH-sensitivity of these nanoscale devices as a function of biasing configurations, number of electrodes, and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) remains poorly understood. Even the basic question such as 'Do double-gated sensors actually resolve smaller changes in pH compared to conventional single-gated sensors in the presence of various sources of noise?' remains unanswered. In this article, we provide a comprehensive numerical and analytical theory of signal and noise of double-gated pH sensors to conclude that, while the theoretical lower limit of pH-resolution does not improve for double-gated sensors, this new class of sensors does improve the (instrument-limited) pH resolution.

  17. The effect of pH on anaerobic fermentation of primary sludge at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Wu, Haiyan; Yang, Dianhai; Zhou, Qi; Song, Zhoubing

    2009-12-15

    The effect of pH in the range of 3.0-11.0 on anaerobic fermentation of primary sludge (PS) was investigated at room temperature. The experimental results showed that the concentrations of soluble chemical oxygen demands (SCOD), soluble protein and carbohydrate and short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) under alkaline conditions were significantly higher than those under other pHs. At fermentation time of 5 days, the average SCFAs concentration increased from 968 to 3511mg COD/L with the increase of pH from 3.0 to 10.0. However, further increasing pH to 11.0 resulted in the decrease of SCFAs. At pH 10.0, acetic, propionic and iso-valeric acids were the three main products, and the volatile suspended solids (VSS) reduction reached 38%. It was also observed that at any pH value investigated, there were obvious ammonia and phosphorus releases during fermentation. According to this study it is obvious that alkaline pH benefited the soluble organic carbon production from PS.

  18. A neutral ceramidase homologue from Dictyostelium discoideum exhibits an acidic pH optimum.

    PubMed Central

    Monjusho, Hatsumi; Okino, Nozomu; Tani, Motohiro; Maeda, Mineko; Yoshida, Motonobu; Ito, Makoto

    2003-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence reported for the Dictyostelium discoideum ceramidase is available on the DNA Data Bank of Japan (DDBJ). Ceramidases (CDases) are currently classified into three categories (acid, neutral and alkaline) based on their optimal pHs and primary structures. Here, we report the first exception to this rule. We cloned the CDase cDNA, consisting of 2142 nucleotides encoding 714 amino-acid residues, from the slime mould, Dictyostelium discoideum. The putative amino-acid sequence indicates 32-42% identity with various neutral CDases, but does not show any similarity to the acid and alkaline CDases, indicating the enzyme should be classified as a neutral CDase. However, overexpression of the cDNA in D. discoideum resulted in increased CDase activity at an acidic, but not a neutral pH range. Knockout of the gene in slime mould eliminated CDase activity at acidic pH. The recombinant enzyme expressed in the slime mould was purified and then characterized. Consequently, the purified CDase was found to exhibit the maximal activity at approx. pH 3.0. The singular pH dependency of slime mould CDase is not derived from the specific post-translational modification in the slime mould, because the enzyme showed an acidic pH optimum even when expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells, whereas rat neutral-CDase exhibited a neutral pH optimum when expressed in slime mould. PMID:12943537

  19. In situ chemical oxidation of BTEX and MTBE by ferrate: pH dependence and stability.

    PubMed

    Pepino Minetti, Roberto C; Macaño, Héctor R; Britch, Javier; Allende, M Carla

    2017-02-15

    Gasoline spills from underground storage tanks are a worldwide environmental problem. BTEX and MtBE are the compounds of gasoline that present the highest degree of migration due to their chemical properties, and are therefore able to impact groundwater reservoirs. In situ chemical oxidation (ISCO) is an emerging technology for groundwater remediation. Several compounds such as permanganate and hydrogen peroxide among others have been used as oxidants, a strong impact of pH on the relative stabilities and reduction potentials having been in each case determined. This paper presents a study of stability and degradation of BTEX and MtBE at different pH ranges of a novel oxidant for ISCO, potassium ferrate (K2FeO4). To carry out this study, BTEX and MtBE solutions were prepared in different phosphate buffers (pH 5,8; 7; 9; 10 and 11) in concentration ratio of (FeO4(-2))/(BTEX+MtBE)=100:1. Each solution was analyzed at different times by gas chromatography with photoionization and tandem mass spectrometer detector. The results show a higher degree of degradation at pH 7 for Benzene and Toluene, and at pH 9 for Ethyl benzene and Xylenes, while MtBE proved recalcitrant to degradation by ferrate. The most favorable pH for stability of FeO4(-2) solution was confirmed in 9-10.

  20. An optical fiber sensor for remote pH sensing and imaging.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian; Wang, Lili

    2012-03-01

    A fiber-optical probe for pH sensing and real-time imaging is successfully fabricated by connecting a polymer imaging fiber and a gradient index (GRIN) lens rod which was modified with a sensing film. By employing an improved metallographic microscope, an optical system is designed to cooperate with the probe. This novel technique has high-quality imaging capabilities for observing remote samples while measuring pH. The linear range of the probe is pH 1.2-3.5. This technique overcomes the difficulty that high-quality images cannot be obtained when directly using conventional imaging bundles for pH sensing and imaging. As preliminary applications, the corrosion behavior of an iron screw and the reaction process of rust were investigated in buffer solutions of pH 2.0 and 2.9, respectively. The experiment demonstrated that the pH values of the analytes' surface were higher than that of buffer solutions due to the chemical reaction. It provides great potential for applications in optical multifunctional detection, especially in chemical sensing and biosensing.

  1. pH profile of the adsorption of nucleotides onto montmorillonite. I - Selected homoionic clays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawless, J. G.; Church, F. M.; Mazzurco, J.; Banin, A.; Huff, R.; Kao, J.; Cook, A.; Lowe, T.; Orenberg, J. B.; Edelson, E.

    1985-01-01

    The effect of pH and adsorbed ions on the adsorption of purine and pyrimidine nucleotides on montmorillonite clay was studied experimentally. The specific nucleotides examined were: 5 prime-AMP; 3-prime AMP; and 5 prime-CMP. The pH of the clay samples was adjusted to various levels in the 2-12 pH range using microliter volumes of concentrated acid (1N HCl) and base (1NHNaOH). It was found that preferential adsorption among nulceotides was dependent on the pH level and on the characteristics of the substituted metal cation and anion exchange mechanisms. Below pH 4, adsorption was attributed to cation and anion exchange mechanisms. Above pH 4, however, adsorption was attributed to the complexation mechanisms occurring between the metal cations in the clay exchange site and in the biomolecule. The possible role of homoionic clays in the concentration mechanisms of biomonomers in the prebiotic environment is discussed.

  2. Photon upconversion sensitized nanoprobes for sensing and imaging of pH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arppe, Riikka; Näreoja, Tuomas; Nylund, Sami; Mattsson, Leena; Koho, Sami; Rosenholm, Jessica M.; Soukka, Tero; Schäferling, Michael

    2014-05-01

    Acidic pH inside cells indicates cellular dysfunctions such as cancer. Therefore, the development of optical pH sensors for measuring and imaging intracellular pH is a demanding challenge. The available pH-sensitive probes are vulnerable to e.g. photobleaching or autofluorescence background in biological materials. Our approach circumvents these problems due to near infrared excitation and upconversion photoluminescence. We introduce a nanosensor based on upconversion resonance energy transfer (UC-RET) between an upconverting nanoparticle (UCNP) and a fluorogenic pH-dependent dye pHrodo™ Red that was covalently bound to the aminosilane surface of the nanoparticles. The sensitized fluorescence of the pHrodo™ Red dye increases strongly with decreasing pH. By referencing the pH-dependent emission of pHrodo™ Red with the pH-insensitive upconversion photoluminescence of the UCNP, we developed a pH-sensor which exhibits a dynamic range from pH 7.2 to 2.5. The applicability of the introduced pH nanosensor for pH imaging was demonstrated by imaging the two emission wavelengths of the nanoprobe in living HeLa cells with a confocal fluorescence microscope upon 980 nm excitation. This demonstrates that the presented pH-nanoprobe can be used as an intracellular pH-sensor due to the unique features of UCNPs: excitation with deeply penetrating near-infrared light, high photostability, lack of autofluorescence and biocompatibility due to an aminosilane coating.Acidic pH inside cells indicates cellular dysfunctions such as cancer. Therefore, the development of optical pH sensors for measuring and imaging intracellular pH is a demanding challenge. The available pH-sensitive probes are vulnerable to e.g. photobleaching or autofluorescence background in biological materials. Our approach circumvents these problems due to near infrared excitation and upconversion photoluminescence. We introduce a nanosensor based on upconversion resonance energy transfer (UC-RET) between an

  3. Blood pH optrode based on evanescent waves and refractive index change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammarling, Krister; Hilborn, Jöns; Nilsson, Hans-Erik; Manuilskiy, Anatoliy

    2014-02-01

    Sensing pH in blood with an silica multimode optical fiber. This sensor is based on evanescent wave absorption and measures the change of the refractive index and absorption in a cladding made of a biocompatible Polymer. In contrast to many existing fiber optical sensors which are based upon different dyes or florescent material to sense the pH, here presents a solution where a part of the cladding is replaced with a Poly (β-amino ester) made of 1.4-Butanediol diacrylate, Piperazine, and Trimethylolpropane Triacrylate. Piperazine has the feature of changing its volume by swelling or shrinking in response to the pH level. This paper utilizes this dimension effect and measure the refractive index and the absorption of the cladding in respect to different pH-levels. The alteration of refractive index also causes a change in the absorption and therefore the output power changes as a function of the pH level. The sensor is sensitive to pH in a wide spectral range and light absorbency can be observed for wavelengths ranging from UV to far IR.

  4. Effect of organic carbon and pH on soil sorption of sulfamethazine.

    PubMed

    Lertpaitoonpan, Warisara; Ong, Say Kee; Moorman, Thomas B

    2009-07-01

    Batch sorption of sulfamethazine was conducted using five soils with organic carbon (OC) contents ranging from 0.1% to 3.8% and solution pHs ranging from 5.5 to 9. Sorption of sulfamethazine was found to be impacted by OC, soil surface area and soil solution pH, with higher K(d) values for soils with higher OC and lower K(d) values as the pH increased. However, OC was found to be the more dominant parameter. Linear partition coefficients at pH 5.5 were found to be 0.58+/-0.17 Lkg(-1) for soil with 0.1% OC and 3.91+/-0.36 Lkg(-1) for soil with 3.8% OC. At pH 9, the K(d) values were found to decrease by more than 50% to 0.23+/-0.06 Lkg(-1) (soil with 0.1% OC) and 1.16+/-0.05 Lkg(-1) (soil with 3.8% OC). Hydrophobic sorption was probably involved for pH<7.4 (pK(a,2)=7.4 for sulfamethazine) due to the non-ionized form of sulfamethazine while surface sorption was probably involved for pH>7.4 due to the ionized form of sulfamethazine. This was confirmed by regressing the estimated sorption coefficients of cationic, uncharged, and anionic species against the soil properties. A stepwise linear regression model incorporating the anionic fraction of sulfamethazine ionization and soil properties were developed and were found to estimate the K(d) values of other studies using soils of different pH and soil properties.

  5. An Optical Sensor with Polyaniline-Gold Hybrid Nanostructures for Monitoring pH in Saliva.

    PubMed

    Luo, Chongdai; Wang, Yangyang; Li, Xuemeng; Jiang, Xueqin; Gao, Panpan; Sun, Kang; Zhou, Jianhua; Zhang, Zhiguang; Jiang, Qing

    2017-03-17

    Saliva contains important personal physiological information that is related to some diseases, and it is a valuable source of biochemical information that can be collected rapidly, frequently, and without stress. In this article, we reported a new and simple localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) substrate composed of polyaniline (PANI)-gold hybrid nanostructures as an optical sensor for monitoring the pH of saliva samples. The overall appearance and topography of the substrates, the composition, and the wettability of the LSPR surfaces were characterized by optical and scanning electron microscope (SEM) images, infrared spectra, and contact angles measurement, respectively. The PANI-gold hybrid substrate readily responded to the pH. The response time was very short, which was 3.5 s when the pH switched from 2 to 7, and 4.5 s from 7 to 2. The changes of visible-near-infrared (NIR) spectra of this sensor upon varying pH in solution showed that-for the absorption at given wavelengths of 665 nm and 785 nm-the sensitivities were 0.0299 a.u./pH (a.u. = arbitrary unit) with a linear range of pH = 5-8 and 0.0234 a.u./pH with linear range of pH = 2-8, respectively. By using this new sensor, the pH of a real saliva sample was monitored and was consistent with the parallel measurements with a standard laboratory method. The results suggest that this novel LSPR sensor shows great potential in the field of mobile healthcare and home medical devices, and could also be modified by different sensitive materials to detect various molecules or ions in the future.

  6. An Optical Sensor with Polyaniline-Gold Hybrid Nanostructures for Monitoring pH in Saliva

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Chongdai; Wang, Yangyang; Li, Xuemeng; Jiang, Xueqin; Gao, Panpan; Sun, Kang; Zhou, Jianhua; Zhang, Zhiguang; Jiang, Qing

    2017-01-01

    Saliva contains important personal physiological information that is related to some diseases, and it is a valuable source of biochemical information that can be collected rapidly, frequently, and without stress. In this article, we reported a new and simple localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) substrate composed of polyaniline (PANI)-gold hybrid nanostructures as an optical sensor for monitoring the pH of saliva samples. The overall appearance and topography of the substrates, the composition, and the wettability of the LSPR surfaces were characterized by optical and scanning electron microscope (SEM) images, infrared spectra, and contact angles measurement, respectively. The PANI-gold hybrid substrate readily responded to the pH. The response time was very short, which was 3.5 s when the pH switched from 2 to 7, and 4.5 s from 7 to 2. The changes of visible-near-infrared (NIR) spectra of this sensor upon varying pH in solution showed that—for the absorption at given wavelengths of 665 nm and 785 nm—the sensitivities were 0.0299 a.u./pH (a.u. = arbitrary unit) with a linear range of pH = 5–8 and 0.0234 a.u./pH with linear range of pH = 2–8, respectively. By using this new sensor, the pH of a real saliva sample was monitored and was consistent with the parallel measurements with a standard laboratory method. The results suggest that this novel LSPR sensor shows great potential in the field of mobile healthcare and home medical devices, and could also be modified by different sensitive materials to detect various molecules or ions in the future. PMID:28336901

  7. Effect of urine pH on the effectiveness of shock wave lithotripsy: A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Majzoub, Ahmad; Al-Ani, Ammar; Gul, Tawiz; Kamkoum, Hatem; Al-Jalham, Khalid

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Shock wave lithotripsy (SWL) is a well-established modality in the treatment of urolithiasis. Studying the effect of urine pH on SWL success is appealing as pH can be manipulated before SWL to insure a better outcome. Materials and Methods: This is a prospective study performed at a tertiary medical center. Patients presenting to the SWL unit with a single renal stone <2 cm in size were included in this study. In addition to standard laboratory and radiologic investigations, urine pH measurement was performed on all patients before their procedure. The number of sessions performed, and the stone-free rate (SFR) were assessed. Patients were divided into two groups according to stone clearance. Group 1 was stone-free, whereas Group 2 had residual stones after three sessions of SWL. Data was also classified according to different pH ranges. Influential factors were compared among the study groups and pH ranges. Results: A total of 175 patients were included in this study. The SFR was 54.3%. The mean number of sessions performed was 2.2 ± 0.8. Group 1 included 95 patients, whereas Group 2 had eighty patients. Among all studied factors, stone size (P = 0.03) and skin to stone distance (P = 0.04) significantly affected SFR with SWL. Urine pH was not found to have a statistically significant influence on SWL outcome (P = 0.51). Conclusion: Urine pH was not found in this study population to influence the effectiveness of SWL. Further experimental studies are required to help investigate this notion. PMID:27453649

  8. A pH dependent Raman and surface enhanced Raman spectroscopic studies of citrazinic acid aided by theoretical calculations.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Sougata; Chowdhury, Joydeep; Dutta, Soumen; Pal, Tarasankar

    2016-12-05

    A pH dependent normal Raman scattering (NRS) and surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectral patterns of citrazinic acid (CZA), a biologically important molecule, have been investigated. The acid, with different pKa values (~4 and ~11) for the two different functional groups (-COOH and -OH groups), shows interesting range of color changes (yellow at pH~14 and brown at pH~2) with the variation in solution pH. Thus, depending upon the pH of the medium, CZA molecule can exist in various protonated and/or deprotonated forms. Here we have prescribed the existence different possible forms of CZA at different pH (Forms "C", "H" and "Dprot" at pH~14 and Forms "A", "D", and "P" at pH~2 respectively). The NRS spectra of these solutions and their respective SERS spectra over gold nanoparticles were recorded. The spectra clearly differ in their spectral profiles. For example the SERS spectra recorded with the CZA solution at pH~2 shows blue shift for different bands compared to its NRS window e.g. 406 to 450cm(-1), 616 to 632cm(-1), 1332 to 1343cm(-1) etc. Again, the most enhanced peak at ~1548cm(-1) in NRS while in the SERS window this appears at ~1580cm(-1). Similar observation was also made for CZA at pH~14. For example, the 423cm(-1) band in the NRS profile experience a blue shift and appears at ~447cm(-1) in the SERS spectrum as well as other bands at ~850, ~1067 and ~1214cm(-1) in the SERS window are markedly enhanced. It is also worth noting that the SERS spectra at the different pH also differ from each other. These spectral differences indicate the existence of various adsorptive forms of the CZA molecule depending upon the pH of the solution. Therefore based on the experimental findings we propose different possible molecular forms of CZA at different pH (acidic and alkaline) conditions. For example forms 'A', 'D' and 'P' existing in acidic pH (pH~2) and three other deprotonated forms 'C', 'H' and 'Dprot' in alkaline pH (pH~14). The DFT calculations for these

  9. A pH dependent Raman and surface enhanced Raman spectroscopic studies of citrazinic acid aided by theoretical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Sougata; Chowdhury, Joydeep; Dutta, Soumen; Pal, Tarasankar

    2016-12-01

    A pH dependent normal Raman scattering (NRS) and surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectral patterns of citrazinic acid (CZA), a biologically important molecule, have been investigated. The acid, with different pKa values (~ 4 and ~ 11) for the two different functional groups (-COOH and -OH groups), shows interesting range of color changes (yellow at pH ~ 14 and brown at pH ~ 2) with the variation in solution pH. Thus, depending upon the pH of the medium, CZA molecule can exist in various protonated and/or deprotonated forms. Here we have prescribed the existence different possible forms of CZA at different pH (Forms "C", "H" and "Dprot" at pH ~ 14 and Forms "A", "D", and "P" at pH ~ 2 respectively). The NRS spectra of these solutions and their respective SERS spectra over gold nanoparticles were recorded. The spectra clearly differ in their spectral profiles. For example the SERS spectra recorded with the CZA solution at pH ~ 2 shows blue shift for different bands compared to its NRS window e.g. 406 to 450 cm- 1, 616 to 632 cm- 1, 1332 to 1343 cm- 1 etc. Again, the most enhanced peak at ~ 1548 cm- 1 in NRS while in the SERS window this appears at ~ 1580 cm- 1. Similar observation was also made for CZA at pH ~ 14. For example, the 423 cm- 1 band in the NRS profile experience a blue shift and appears at ~ 447 cm- 1 in the SERS spectrum as well as other bands at ~ 850, ~ 1067 and ~ 1214 cm- 1 in the SERS window are markedly enhanced. It is also worth noting that the SERS spectra at the different pH also differ from each other. These spectral differences indicate the existence of various adsorptive forms of the CZA molecule depending upon the pH of the solution. Therefore based on the experimental findings we propose different possible molecular forms of CZA at different pH (acidic and alkaline) conditions. For example forms 'A', 'D' and 'P' existing in acidic pH (pH ~ 2) and three other deprotonated forms 'C', 'H' and 'Dprot' in alkaline pH (pH ~ 14). The DFT

  10. Influence of soil pH in vegetative filter strips for reducing soluble nutrient transport.

    PubMed

    Rahmana, Atikur; Rahmana, Shafiqur; Cihacek, Larry

    2014-08-01

    Low efficacy of vegetative filter strips (VFS) in reducing soluble nutrients has been reported in research articles. Solubility of phosphorus and nitrogen compounds is largely affected by pH of soil. Changing soil pH may result in a decrease in soluble nutrient transportation through VFS. This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of pH levels of VFS soil on soluble nutrient transport reduction from manure-borne runoff. Soil (loamy sand texture; bulk density 1.3 g cm-3) was treated with calcium carbonate to change pH at different pH treatment levels (5.5-6.5, 6.5-7.5, and 7.5-8.5), soil was packed into galvanized metal boxes, and tall fescue grasses were established in the boxes to simulate VFS. Boxes were placed in an open environment, tilted to a 3.0% slope, and 44.0 L manure-amended water was applied through the VFS by a pump at a rate of 1.45 L min-1. Water samples were collected at the inlet and outlet as well as from the leachate. Samples were analysed for ortho-phosphorus, ammonium nitrogen, nitrate nitrogen, and potassium. Highest transport reductions in ortho-phosphorus (42.4%) and potassium (20.5%) were observed at pH range 7.5-8.5. Ammonium nitrogen transport reduction was the highest at pH level of 6.5-7.5 and was 26.1%. Surface transport reduction in nitrate nitrogen was 100%, but leachate had the highest concentration of nitrate nitrogen. Mass transport reduction also suggested that higher pH in the VFS soil are effective in reducing some soluble nutrients transport.

  11. Gastric and pancreatic responses to meals varying in pH

    PubMed Central

    Dembinski, A.; Konturek, S. J.; Thor, P.

    1974-01-01

    1. Gastric acid response to a test meal of 10% peptone was measured in chronic gastric and pancreatic fistula cats using the Fordtran and Walsh method, monitoring the rate at which a solution of 0·5 M sodium bicarbonate had to be added to maintain constant pH of gastric content at pre-selected values ranging from 5·0 to 1·0. Simultaneously, pancreatic secretion was determined by the standard collection technique. In this way the pH profile for the inhibition of gastric secretion and stimulation of pancreatic secretion has been established in cats. 2. A peptone meal adjusted to pH 5·0 produced gastric acid output similar to the maximal response to histamine or pentagastrin. It provoked a negligible stimulation of pancreatic flow rate and bicarbonate output but a large protein output. 3. Graded decrease of the peptone meal pH to below 4·0 resulted in inhibition of gastric acid production and in a concomitant stimulation of pancreatic secretory volume and bicarbonate output. A meal adjusted to pH 1·0 stimulated gastric secretion only about 30% of the response recorded at pH 5·0. Pancreatic secretion with a meal adjusted to pH 3·0 reached the highest level of about 70% of the maximal response to exogenous secretin. 4. Since the observed changes in the secretory activity of the stomach and the pancreas induced by test meals adjusted to pH 3·0 can be fully reproduced by exogenous secretin, it is suggested that in the cat this hormone may be responsible for the gastric inhibitory and pancreatic stimulatory mechanisms activated during normal digestion of food. PMID:4449058

  12. Role of pH on antioxidants production by Spirulina (Arthrospira) platensis.

    PubMed

    Ismaiel, Mostafa Mahmoud Sami; El-Ayouty, Yassin Mahmoud; Piercey-Normore, Michele

    2016-01-01

    Algae can tolerate a broad range of growing conditions but extreme conditions may lead to the generation of highly dangerous reactive oxygen species (ROS), which may cause the deterioration of cell metabolism and damage cellular components. The antioxidants produced by algae alleviate the harmful effects of ROS. While the enhancement of antioxidant production in blue green algae under stress has been reported, the antioxidant response to changes in pH levels requires further investigation. This study presents the effect of pH changes on the antioxidant activity and productivity of the blue green alga Spirulina (Arthrospira) platensis. The algal dry weight (DW) was greatly enhanced at pH 9.0. The highest content of chlorophyll a and carotenoids (10.6 and 2.4mg/g DW, respectively) was recorded at pH 8.5. The highest phenolic content (12.1mg gallic acid equivalent (GAE)/g DW) was recorded at pH 9.5. The maximum production of total phycobiliprotein (159mg/g DW) was obtained at pH 9.0. The antioxidant activities of radical scavenging activity, reducing power and chelating activity were highest at pH 9.0 with an increase of 567, 250 and 206% compared to the positive control, respectively. Variation in the activity of the antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and peroxidase (POD) was also reported. While the high alkaline pH may favor the overproduction of antioxidants, normal cell metabolism and membrane function is unaffected, as shown by growth and chlorophyll content, which suggests that these conditions are suitable for further studies on the harvest of antioxidants from S. platensis.

  13. Effect of initial pH control on biological phosphorus removal induced by the aerobic/extended-idle regime.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dongbo; Zheng, Wei; Liao, Dexiang; Li, Xiaoming; Yang, Qi; Zeng, Guangming

    2013-02-01

    Recently, it has been reported that biological phosphorus removal (BPR) can be induced by an aerobic/extended-idle (AEI) regime. This study further investigated the effect of initial pH ranging from 6.6 to 8.2 on BPR in the AEI process, and compared the BPR performance between the AEI and the anaerobic/oxic (A/O) regimes under their optimal initial pH value. Experimental results firstly showed that phosphorus removal linearly increased with initial pH increasing from 6.6 to 7.8, but slightly decreased when initial pH increased from 7.8 to 8.2. The optimal initial pH should be controlled at 7.8, and the phosphorus removal at initial pH 7.8 was approximately 1.7-time than that at initial pH 6.6. The mechanism studies showed that the biomass cultured at initial pH 7.8 contained more polyphosphate accumulating organisms (PAOs), lower glycogen accumulating organisms (GAOs), and had higher activities of exopolyphosphatase and polyphosphate kinase than that cultured at initial pH 6.6. Cyclic studies revealed that initial pH control affected the transformations of intracellular polyhydroxyalkanoates and glycogen, which might thereby influence microbial competition between PAOs and GAOs. Then, BPR performance between the AEI and the A/O regimes by adjusting initial pH at 7.8 was also compared. The results showed the AEI regime could drive a better BPR than the generally accepted A/O regime (98% vs 88%). Finally, controlling initial pH at 7.8 to promote BPR in the AEI process was confirmed for a municipal wastewater.

  14. Coadsorption of ciprofloxacin and Cu(II) on montmorillonite and kaolinite as affected by solution pH.

    PubMed

    Pei, Zhiguo; Shan, Xiao-Quan; Kong, Jingjing; Wen, Bei; Owens, Gary

    2010-02-01

    The coadsorption of ciprofloxacin (Cip) and Cu(II) on montmorillonite and kaolinite was studied between pH 4.0 and 9.5. At pH < 5.0, Cu(2+), Cip(+) and [Cu(II)(Cip(+/-))](2+) were the main species in solution. Between pH 5.0-7.0 [Cu(II)(Cip(+/-))](2+) was the dominant complex species. Above pH 8.0 [Cu(II)(Cip(-))(2)](0) precipitated. The presence of Cu(II) exerted no effect on the Cip sorption onto montmorillonite at low pH, whereas it increased Cip sorption on montmorillonite at pH > 6.0 due to the stronger affinity of Cip-Cu(II) complexes compared to sole Cip(-) or Cip(+/-), or Cip sorption via a Cu(II) bridge increased. In contrast, Cip increased Cu(II) adsorption on montmorillonite at pH < 7.0, whereas it decreased the adsorption of Cu(II) on kaolinite at pH 6.0-8.0. Cip was sorbed onto the kaolinite surface via interaction of carboxyl groups over the entire pH range. At pH 4.0-4.7, Cip(+) sorption onto kaolinite's positively charged surface was more favorable than sorption of Cip-Cu(II) complexes. Batch experiments and FTIR analyses indicated that the coordination between Cip(+/-), Cip(-) and Cu(II) were most likely present on kaolinite surface at pH 7.0. At pH > 8.0, Cu(OH)(2) (s) and [Cu(II)(Cip(-))(2)](0) precipitated out of solution or on the montmorillonite or kaolinite surface, which was not considered evidence for either the sorption of Cip or the adsorption of Cu(II).

  15. Organelle pH in the Arabidopsis endomembrane system.

    PubMed

    Shen, Jinbo; Zeng, Yonglun; Zhuang, Xiaohong; Sun, Lei; Yao, Xiaoqiang; Pimpl, Peter; Jiang, Liwen

    2013-09-01

    The pH of intracellular compartments is essential for the viability of cells. Despite its relevance, little is known about the pH of these compartments. To measure pH in vivo, we have first generated two pH sensors by combining the improved-solubility feature of solubility-modified green fluorescent protein (GFP) (smGFP) with the pH-sensing capability of the pHluorins and codon optimized for expression in Arabidopsis. PEpHluorin (plant-solubility-modified ecliptic pHluorin) gradually loses fluorescence as pH is lowered with fluorescence vanishing at pH 6.2 and PRpHluorin (plant-solubility-modified ratiomatric pHluorin), a dual-excitation sensor, allowing for precise measurements. Compartment-specific sensors were generated by further fusing specific sorting signals to PEpHluorin and PRpHluorin. Our results show that the pH of cytosol and nucleus is similar (pH 7.3 and 7.2), while peroxisomes, mitochondrial matrix, and plastidial stroma have alkaline pH. Compartments of the secretory pathway reveal a gradual acidification, spanning from pH 7.1 in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to pH 5.2 in the vacuole. Surprisingly, pH in the trans-Golgi network (TGN) and multivesicular body (MVB) is, with pH 6.3 and 6.2, quite similar. The inhibition of vacuolar-type H(+)-ATPase (V-ATPase) with concanamycin A (ConcA) caused drastic increase in pH in TGN and vacuole. Overall, the PEpHluorin and PRpHluorin are excellent pH sensors for visualization and quantification of pH in vivo, respectively.

  16. Ian Douglass Coulter, PhD

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Douglas M

    2004-01-01

    This paper focuses on Dr. Ian Coulter’s accomplishments from the time he became Executive Vice-President of CMCC in 1981, until he ended his presidency with a year’s administrative leave in 1990. Annual planning initiatives, pedagogy, scholarship, conflicts, and the quest for university affiliation are discussed as well as his legacy to the College and the chiropractic profession. The term “adventurous” was first attributed to Coulter by Oswald Hall, PhD, Professor Emeritus, University of Toronto who had worked closely with Coulter in a major investigation of the chiropractic profession from 1976 to 1979. Throughout this article the author tries to capture the spirit of daring, innovation and intellect that permeated Coulter’s presidency, enthralling his advocates and confounding his detractors. PMID:17549218

  17. Intracellular pH in Sperm Physiology

    PubMed Central

    Nishigaki, Takuya; José, Omar; González-Cota, Ana Laura; Romero, Francisco; Treviño, Claudia L.; Darszon, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Intracellular pH (pHi) regulation is essential for cell function. Notably, several unique sperm ion transporters and enzymes whose elimination causes infertility are either pHi dependent or somehow related to pHi regulation. Amongst them are: CatSper, a Ca2+ channel; Slo3, a K+ channel; the sperm-specific Na+/H+ exchanger and the soluble adenylyl cyclase. It is thus clear that pHi regulation is of the utmost importance for sperm physiology. This review briefly summarizes the key components involved in pHi regulation, their characteristics and participation in fundamental sperm functions such as motility, maturation and the acrosome reaction. PMID:24887564

  18. Barrett's oesophagus: pH profile.

    PubMed

    Gillen, P; Keeling, P; Byrne, P J; Hennessy, T P

    1987-09-01

    Twenty-four patients with a columnar-lined (Barrett's) oesophagus underwent oesophageal manometry and 24 h ambulatory oesophageal pH monitoring. The results were compared with 25 patients with oesophagitis studied in the same fashion. No significant difference in lower oesophageal sphincter pressure was demonstrated between the two groups. The Barrett's patients demonstrated significantly greater acid exposure in the distal oesophagus than oesophagitis patients. Clearance or refluxed acid was poorer in Barrett's patients than oesophagitis patients. Twelve of the Barrett's patients presented with complications of the condition, i.e. ulceration or stricture. No significant difference in acid exposure was demonstrated between Barrett's patients with or without complications. These results suggest that patients with columnar-lined (Barrett's) oesophagus have greater acid exposure than patients with oesophagitis. The development of complications of a Barrett's oesophagus may not be dependent on acid reflux alone.

  19. Acid Rain, pH & Acidity: A Common Misinterpretation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, David B.; Thompson, Ronald E.

    1989-01-01

    Illustrates the basis for misleading statements about the relationship between pH and acid content in acid rain. Explains why pH cannot be used as a measure of acidity for rain or any other solution. Suggests that teachers present acidity and pH as two separate and distinct concepts. (RT)

  20. Steel slag raises pH of greenhouse substrates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dolomitic lime (DL) is the primary liming agent used for increasing pH in peatmoss-based substrates. Steel slag (SS) is a byproduct of the steel manufacturing industry that has been used to elevate field soil pH. The objective of this research was to determine the pH response of a peatmoss-based g...

  1. High temperature pH measurements using novel pH electrodes. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Macdonald, D.D.; Song, H.; Hettiarachchi, S.

    1995-12-01

    Researchers used three pH sensors: (1) a yttria-stabilized zirconia, (2) tungsten/tungsten oxide, and (3) platinum hydrogen electrodes to measure the pH in concentrated solutions heated to temperatures from 125-300 C in autoclaves. The studies indicated measurements of pH for solutions containing sodium hydroxide, sodium sulfate, sodium chloride, boric acid, ferrous sulfate, nickel sulfate, and chromous sulfate in various compositions. The solution composition and pH was then calculated by MULTEQ at the experimental conditions. These calculations compared well with the experimental measurements for binary and quaternary systems at temperatures to 300 C and concentrations to 1 molal. The agreement was also excellent for the metal sulfate systems but was poor for chromous sulfate. The agreement for boric acid solutions was adequate for low concentrations of boric acid but was poor for concentrated borate solutions where polyborate ions likely exist. It is not known whether the lack of agreement under these conditions is due to deficiencies in MULTEQ or the experimental measurements.

  2. Understanding Non-Traditional PhD Students Habitus--Implications for PhD Programmes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naidoo, Devika

    2015-01-01

    Against the background of vast changes in doctoral education and the emergence of non-traditional doctoral programmes, this paper investigates the habitus of non-traditional PhD students at a South African university. Bourdieu's conceptual tool of habitus informed the study. In-depth and open-ended interviews were conducted with 10 non-traditional…

  3. Effects of pH and Temperature on Recombinant Manganese Peroxidase Production and Stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Fei; Kongsaeree, Puapong; Schilke, Karl; Lajoie, Curtis; Kelly, Christine

    The enzyme manganese peroxidase (MnP) is produced by numerous white-rot fungi to overcome biomass recalcitrance caused by lignin. MnP acts directly on lignin and increases access of the woody structure to synergistic wood-degrading enzymes such as cellulases and xylanases. Recombinant MnP (rMnP) can be produced in the yeast Pichia pastoris αMnP1-1 in fed-batch fermentations. The effects of pH and temperature on recombinant manganese peroxidase (rMnP) production by P. pastoris αMnP1-1 were investigated in shake flask and fed-batch fermentations. The optimum pH and temperature for a standardized fed-batch fermentation process for rMnP production in P. pastoris ctMnP1-1 were determined to be pH 6 and 30 °C, respectively. P. pastoris αMnP1-1 constitutively expresses the manganese peroxidase (mnp1) complementary DNA from Phanerochaete chrysosporium, and the rMnP has similar kinetic characteristics and pH activity and stability ranges as the wild-type MnP (wtMnP). Cultivation of P. chrysosporium mycelia in stationary flasks for production of heme peroxidases is commonly conducted at low pH (pH 4.2). However, shake flask and fed-batch fermentation experiments with P. pastoris αMnP1-1 demonstrated that rMnP production is highest at pH 6, with rMnP concentrations in the medium declining rapidly at pH less than 5.5, although cell growth rates were similar from pH 4-7. Investigations of the cause of low rMnP production at low pH were consistent with the hypothesis that intracellular proteases are released from dead and lysed yeast cells during the fermentation that are active against rMnP at pH less than 5.5.

  4. Development of Online Spectroscopic pH Monitoring for Nuclear Fuel Reprocessing Plants: Weak Acid Schemes.

    PubMed

    Casella, Amanda J; Ahlers, Laura R H; Campbell, Emily L; Levitskaia, Tatiana G; Peterson, James M; Smith, Frances N; Bryan, Samuel A

    2015-05-19

    In nuclear fuel reprocessing, separating trivalent minor actinides and lanthanide fission products is extremely challenging and often necessitates tight pH control in TALSPEAK (Trivalent Actinide-Lanthanide Separation by Phosphorus reagent Extraction from Aqueous Komplexes) separations. In TALSPEAK and similar advanced processes, aqueous pH is one of the most important factors governing the partitioning of lanthanides and actinides between an aqueous phase containing a polyaminopolycarboxylate complexing agent and a weak carboxylic acid buffer and an organic phase containing an acidic organophosphorus extractant. Real-time pH monitoring would significantly increase confidence in the separation performance. Our research is focused on developing a general method for online determination of the pH of aqueous solutions through chemometric analysis of Raman spectra. Spectroscopic process-monitoring capabilities, incorporated in a counter-current centrifugal contactor bank, provide a pathway for online, real-time measurement of solution pH. The spectroscopic techniques are process-friendly and can be easily configured for online applications, whereas classic potentiometric pH measurements require frequent calibration/maintenance and have poor long-term stability in aggressive chemical and radiation environments. Raman spectroscopy discriminates between the protonated and deprotonated forms of the carboxylic acid buffer, and the chemometric processing of the Raman spectral data with PLS (partial least-squares) regression provides a means to quantify their respective abundances and therefore determine the solution pH. Interpretive quantitative models have been developed and validated under a range of chemical composition and pH conditions using a lactic acid/lactate buffer system. The developed model was applied to new spectra obtained from online spectral measurements during a solvent extraction experiment using a counter-current centrifugal contactor bank. The model

  5. Optical characterization of the new nanocomposite SBMA/Eu(TTA)3(Ph3PO)2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bordian, Olga; Verlan, Victor; Culeac, Ion; Iovu, Mihail; Zubareva, Vera; Nistor, Iurie

    2015-02-01

    We describe a new nanocomposite material based on the copolymer of styrene with butyl methacrylate (1:1) (SBMA), and coordinating compound of Europium(III) Eu(TTA)3(Ph3PO)2. The SBMA/Eu(TTA)3(Ph3PO)2 nanocomposite was prepared by a simple technology and can be obtained in the form of optical fibers, thin films and planar waveguides on various substrates with large area. Experimental results on optical transmission and photoluminescence spectroscopy are presented. The nanocomposite exhibits a strong photoluminescence emission in the range 560-750 nm, with the main photoluminescence band at 613 nm.

  6. Kinetic and thermodynamic study of the behaviour of diphenylcarbazide in aqueous solution with pH.

    PubMed

    Salinas-Hernández, P; Rojas-Hernández, A; Ramírez-Silva, M T

    2003-09-01

    In order to find out about the chemical behaviour of the diphenylcarbazide (DPCI) in water, kinetic and thermodynamic studies were carried out using UV-Vis spectrophotometry within the 0-12 pH range. The kinetic parameters and acidity constant were then determined, and the results show that a pseudo first order reaction rate was observed during hydroxilation, while the reaction rate was also observed to increase with the pH. The acidity constant obtained with the aid of SQUAD was pK(a)=10.718+/-0.027.

  7. Corrosion properties of powder bed fusion additively manufactured 17-4 PH stainless steel

    DOE PAGES

    Schaller, Rebecca; Taylor, Jason; Rodelas, Jeffrey; ...

    2017-02-18

    The corrosion susceptibility of a laser powder bed fusion (LPBF) additively manufactured alloy, UNS S17400 (17-4 PH), was explored compared to conventional wrought material. Microstructural characteristics were characterized and related to corrosion behavior in quiescent, aqueous 0.6 M NaCl solutions. Electrochemical measurements demonstrated that the LPBF 17-4 PH alloy exhibited a reduced passivity range and active corrosion compared to its conventional wrought counterpart. Lastly, a micro-electrochemical cell was employed to further understand the effects of the local scale and attributed the reduced corrosion resistance of the LPBF material to pores with diameters ≥ 50 µm.

  8. Laser range profile of cones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Wenzhen; Gong, Yanjun; Wang, Mingjun; Gong, Lei

    2016-10-01

    technology. Laser one-dimensional range profile can reflect the characteristics of the target shape and surface material. These techniques were motivated by applications of laser radar to target discrimination in ballistic missile defense. The radar equation of pulse laser about cone is given in this paper. This paper demonstrates the analytical model of laser one-dimensional range profile of cone based on the radar equation of the pulse laser. Simulations results of laser one-dimensional range profiles of some cones are given. Laser one-dimensional range profiles of cone, whose surface material with diffuse lambertian reflectance, is given in this paper. Laser one-dimensional range profiles of cone, whose surface mater with diffuse materials whose retroreflectance can be modeled closely with an exponential term that decays with increasing incidence angles, is given in this paper. Laser one-dimensional range profiles of different pulse width of cone is given in this paper. The influences of surface material, pulse width, attitude on the one-dimensional range are analyzed. The laser two-dimensional range profile is two-dimensional scattering imaging of pulse laser of target. The two-dimensional range profile of roughness target can provide range resolved information. An analytical model of two-dimensional laser range profile of cone is proposed. The simulations of two-dimensional laser range profiles of some cones are given. Laser two-dimensional range profiles of cone, whose surface mater with diffuse lambertian reflectance, is given in this paper. Laser two-dimensional range profiles of cone, whose surface mater with diffuse materials whose retroreflectance can be modeled closely with an exponential term that decays with increasing incidence angles, is given in this paper. The influence of pulse width, surface material on laser two-dimensional range profile is analyzed. Laser one-dimensional range profile and laser two-dimensional range profile are called as laser

  9. Estimation of water activity from pH and °Brix values of some food products.

    PubMed

    Gabriel, Alonzo A

    2008-06-01

    In this study, a predictive model for the estimation of water activity (aw(25°C)) as a function of pH (1.00-8.00) and °Brix (0-82.00) values of simulated food solutions (SFS) was developed, through response surface methodology. Response fit analyses resulted in a highly significant (pH<0.0001) square root polynomial model that can predict aw(25°C) of SFS in terms of pH and °Brix values within the defined variable ranges. The linear, quadratic and interactive influences of pH and °Brix on aw(25°C) were all significant (pH<0.0001). Model validations in SFS and in a number of actual food systems showed that the model had acceptable predictive performance, as indicated by the calculated accuracy and bias indices.

  10. Report of key comparison SIM.QM-K91 pH of phthalate buffer (nominal pH ~4.01 at 25 °C)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzaga, F. B.; Dias, J. C.; Pratt, K. W.; Waters, J.; Dimitrova, L.; Delgado, M.; Canaza, G. T.; Cristancho, R. O.; Chavarro, L. A.; Fajardo, S.; Rodruangthum, P.; Tangpaisarnkul, N.; Gavrilkin, V.; Nagibin, S.; Petrenko, A.; Manska, A.

    2015-01-01

    At the SIM meeting in Buenos Aires, from 30 May to 1 June 2012, it was decided a RMO key comparison on pH measurement coordinated by INMETRO would be performed, named SIM.QM-K91, in order to investigate the degrees of equivalence of measurement procedures for the pH determination of a phthalate buffer solution (nominal pH around 4.01 at 25 °C). Phthalate buffer is widely used to calibrate pH electrodes in the acid range. A buffer solution of 0.05 mol kg-1 potassium hydrogen phthalate, KHC8H4O4, is one of the primary pH reference buffer solutions recommended by IUPAC. It was only allowed to participate in this comparison by using a differential cell or a glass electrode, instead of primary cells, if the highest metrological standard in the institute or if the CMCs are based on the type of cell to be used. The results obtained by INMETRO and NIST (who also participated in CCQM-K91 comparison) were used to link the results from the other institutes to the key comparison reference value of CCQM-K91. In this comparison, pH measurements were performed at 25 °C, and optionally also at 15 °C and 37 °C. Nine institutes took part in the comparison and the results are presented in this report. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by CCQM, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  11. Hydroxylated near-infrared BODIPY fluorophores as intracellular pH sensors.

    PubMed

    Salim, Mohamed M; Owens, Eric A; Gao, Tielong; Lee, Jeong Heon; Hyun, Hoon; Choi, Hak Soo; Henary, Maged

    2014-10-07

    In this study, a series of new, highly sensitive BF2-chelated tetraarylazadipyrromethane dyes are synthesized and analyzed to be suitable as on/off photo-induced electron transfer modulated fluorescent sensors for determination of intracellular pH. The ethanolic solutions of the new indicators feature absorption maxima in the range of 696-700 nm and a fluorescence emission maximum at 720 nm. Molar absorptivity and fluorescence quantum yield data were determined for the studied set of aza-BODIPY indicators. These indicators have high molar absorption coefficients of ∼80,000 M(-1) cm(-1) and quantum yields (up to 18%). Corresponding pKa values of indicators are determined from absorbance and fluorescence measurements and range from 9.1 to 10.8, depending on the selective positioning of electron-donating functionalities. The excellent photostability of the aza-BODIPY indicators makes them particularly suitable for long duration measurements. The in vitro cellular staining of living tissues in PC3 cells based on the isosbestic point at pH 7.8 and pH 9.3 has been employed which shows an increase in fluorescence intensity at 800 nm with increase in pH for certain compounds and fluorescence intensity decreases at 700 nm. Therefore, the new indicators are suitable for exploitation and adaptation in a diverse range of analytical applications.

  12. Loss on drying, calcium concentration and pH of fluoride dentifrices

    PubMed Central

    Brito, Arella Cristina Muniz; Dantas, Lívia Rocha; De Brito, André Luiz Fiquene; Muniz, Ana Cristina Silva; Ramos, Ianny Alves; Cardoso, Andreia Medeiros Rodrigues; Xavier, Alidianne Fábia Cabral; Cavalcanti, Alessandro Leite

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Fluoride dentifrices containing calcium carbonate have advantages such as control of dental plaque and progression of dental caries, also contributing to oral hygiene, represent most dentifrices marketed in Brazil. Aim: To evaluate the physicochemical properties of seven fluoride dentifrices containing calcium carbonate in relation to hydrogen potential (pH), loss on drying and calcium concentration. Materials and Methods: Data collection was performed using the potentiometric method for pH ranges, gravimetric analysis for loss on drying and atomic absorption spectrometry for the concentration of calcium ions. All tests were performed in triplicate and the analysis was performed entirely at random according to one-way analysis of variance at 5% significance level. Results: The pH values were alkaline and ranged from 8.67 (Oral-B 123®) to 10.03 (Colgate Máxima Proteção Anticáries®). The results of loss on drying ranged from 33.81% (Oral-B 123®) to 61.13% (Close Up®), with significant differences between brands tested. In relation to the calcium content, the highest and lowest concentrations were found in dentifrices Even® (155.55 g/kg) and Colgate Ultra Branco® (129 g/kg), respectively, with significant difference (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Fluoride dentifrices analyzed showed alkaline pH and high levels of loss on drying and calcium concentration. However, these physicochemical characteristics differed according to the different brands tested. PMID:25821380

  13. Proton Transport and pH Control in Fungi.

    PubMed

    Kane, Patricia M

    2016-01-01

    Despite diverse and changing extracellular environments, fungi maintain a relatively constant cytosolic pH and numerous organelles of distinct lumenal pH. Key players in fungal pH control are V-ATPases and the P-type proton pump Pma1. These two proton pumps act in concert with a large array of other transporters and are highly regulated. The activities of Pma1 and the V-ATPase are coordinated under some conditions, suggesting that pH in the cytosol and organelles is not controlled independently. Genomic studies, particularly in the highly tractable S. cerevisiae, are beginning to provide a systems-level view of pH control, including transcriptional responses to acid or alkaline ambient pH and definition of the full set of regulators required to maintain pH homeostasis. Genetically encoded pH sensors have provided new insights into localized mechanisms of pH control, as well as highlighting the dynamic nature of pH responses to the extracellular environment. Recent studies indicate that cellular pH plays a genuine signaling role that connects nutrient availability and growth rate through a number of mechanisms. Many of the pH control mechanisms found in S. cerevisiae are shared with other fungi, with adaptations for their individual physiological contexts. Fungi deploy certain proton transport and pH control mechanisms not shared with other eukaryotes; these regulators of cellular pH are potential antifungal targets. This review describes current and emerging knowledge proton transport and pH control mechanisms in S. cerevisiae and briefly discusses how these mechanisms vary among fungi.

  14. pH distributions in spontaneous and isotransplanted rat tumours.

    PubMed Central

    Kallinowski, F.; Vaupel, P.

    1988-01-01

    Spontaneous mammary tumours of the rat with various degrees of malignancy exhibit similar tissue pH distributions. The mean pH (+/- s.d.) of dysplasia is 7.05 +/- 0.20. In benign tumours the mean pH is 6.95 +/- 0.19 and in malignant tumours it is 6.94 +/- 0.19. In contrast, tumours with the same degree of malignancy but different histologies show different pH distributions. Benign tumours with a higher percentage of fibrous tissue exhibit less acidic pH values than those with larger portions of epithelial cells (delta pH = 0.38 pH units). The pH distribution in the benign tumours is independent of the tumour wet weight up to stages of very advanced growth. In the malignant tumours, a trend towards more acidic pH values is observed as the tumour mass enlarges. However, in tissue areas within a malignant tumour with gross, long-established necrosis the pH distribution is shifted towards more alkaline pH values. The pH distributions in spontaneous rat tumours are not significantly different from those obtained in isotransplanted Yoshida sarcomas (6.87 +/- 0.21). In the Yoshida sarcomas, mean pH values do not correlate with tumour size. However, a pH gradient from the rim to the centre of the tumours is found which coincides with the development of small, disseminated necroses in the tumour centre. It is concluded that pathology-related variations of tumour pH may be more important than the mode of tumour origin or the degree of malignancy. PMID:3179183

  15. PhD Students' Work Conditions and Study Environment in University- and Industry-Based PhD Programmes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kolmos, A.; Kofoed, L. B.; Du, X. Y.

    2008-01-01

    During the last 10 years, new models of funding and training PhD students have been established in Denmark in order to integrate industry into the entire PhD education. Several programmes have been conducted where it is possible to co-finance PhD scholarships or to become an employee as an industrial PhD in a company. An important question is what…

  16. pH and buffer capacities of apoplastic and cytoplasmic cell compartments in leaves.

    PubMed

    Oja; Savchenko; Jakob; Heber

    1999-08-12

    After opening the stomata in CO(2)-free air, darkened leaves of several plant species were titrated with CO(2) at concentrations between 1 and 16%, in air in order to reversibly decrease cellular pH values and to calculate buffer capacities from pH changes and bicarbonate accumulation using both gas-exchange and fluorescence methods for analysis. After equilibration with CO(2) for times ranging between 4.4 and 300 s, fast CO(2) release from bicarbonate indicated catalysis by highly active carbonic anhydrase. Its time constant was below 2.5 s. Additional CO(2) was released with time constants of about 5, 15 and approximately 300 s. With CO(2) as the acidifying agent, calculated buffer capacities depend on assumptions regarding initial pH in the absence of an acid load. At an initial stroma pH of 7.7, the stromal buffer capacity was about 20 mM pH-unit(-1 )in darkened spinach leaves. At an initial pH of 7.5 it would be only 12 mM pH-unit(-1), i.e. not higher than expected solely on the basis of known stromal concentrations of phosphate and phosphate esters, disregarding the contribution of other solutes. At a concentration of 16%, CO(2) reduced the stromal pH by about 1 pH unit. Buffering of the cytosol was measured by the CO(2)-dependent quenching of the fluorescence of pyranine which was fed to spinach leaves via the petiole. Brief exposures to high CO(2) minimized interference by effective cytosolic pH regulation. Cytosolic buffering appeared to be similar to or only somewhat higher than chloroplast buffering if the initial cytosolic pH was assumed to be 7.25, which is in accord with published cytosolic pH values. The difference from chloroplast pH values indicates the existence of a pH gradient across the chloroplast envelope even in darkened leaves. Apoplastic buffering was weak as measured by the CO(2)-dependent quenching of dextran-conjugated fluorescein isothiocyanate which was infiltrated together with sodium vanadate into potato leaves. In the absence of

  17. pH dependence of the stability of barstar to chemical and thermal denaturation.

    PubMed Central

    Khurana, R.; Hate, A. T.; Nath, U.; Udgaonkar, J. B.

    1995-01-01

    Equilibrium unfolding of barstar with guanidine hydrochloride (GdnHCl) and urea as denaturants as well as thermal unfolding have been carried out as a function of pH using fluorescence, far-UV and near-UV CD, and absorbance as probes. Both GdnHCl-induced and urea-induced denaturation studies at pH 7 show that barstar unfolds through a two-state F<->U mechanism and yields identical values for delta GU, the free energy difference between the fully folded (F) and unfolded (U) forms, of 5.0 +/- 0.5 kcal.mol-1 at 25 degrees C. Thermal denaturation of barstar also follows a two-state F<->U unfolding transition at pH 7, and the value of delta GU at 25 degrees C is similar to that obtained from chemical denaturation. The pH dependence of denaturation by GdnHCl is complex. The Cm value (midpoint of the unfolding transition) has been used as an index for stability in the pH range 2-10, because barstar does not unfold through a two-state transition on denaturation by GdnHCl at all pH values studied. Stability is maximum at pH 2-3, where barstar exists in a molten globule-like form that forms a large soluble oligomer. The stability decreases with an increase in pH to 5, the isoelectric pH of the protein. Above pH 5, the stability increases as the pH is raised to 7. Above pH 8, it again decreases as the pH is raised to 10. The decrease in stability from pH 7 to 5 in wild-type (wt) barstar, which is shown to be characterized by an apparent pKa of 6.2 +/- 0.2, is not observed in H17Q, a His 17-->Gln 17 mutant form of barstar. This decrease in stability has therefore been correlated with the protonation of His 17 in barstar. The decrease in stability beyond pH 8 in wt barstar, which is characterized by an apparent pKa of 9.2 +/- 0.2, is not detected in BSCCAA, the Cys 40 Cys 82-->Ala 40 Ala 82 double mutant form of barstar. Thus, this decrease in stability has been correlated with the deprotonation of at least one of the two cysteines present in wt barstar. The increase in

  18. Fine-particle water and pH in the southeastern United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, H.; Xu, L.; Bougiatioti, A.; Cerully, K. M.; Capps, S. L.; Hite, J. R., Jr.; Carlton, A. G.; Lee, S.-H.; Bergin, M. H.; Ng, N. L.; Nenes, A.; Weber, R. J.

    2015-05-01

    secondary organic aerosol (SOA) chemistry. The mean pH predicted in the Alabama forest (SOAS) was 0.94 ± 0.59 (median 0.93). pH diurnal trends followed liquid water and were driven mainly by variability in RH; during SOAS nighttime pH was near 1.5, while daytime pH was near 0.5. pH ranged from 0.5 to 2 in summer and 1 to 3 in the winter at other sites. The systematically low pH levels in the southeast may have important ramifications, such as significantly influencing acid-catalyzed reactions, gas-aerosol partitioning, and mobilization of redox metals and minerals. Particle ion balances or molar ratios, often used to infer pH, do not consider the dissociation state of individual ions or particle liquid water levels and do not correlate with particle pH.

  19. The Role of pH Regulation in Cancer Progression.

    PubMed

    McIntyre, Alan; Harris, Adrian L

    Frequently observed phenotypes of tumours include high metabolic activity, hypoxia and poor perfusion; these act to produce an acidic microenvironment. Cellular function depends on pH homoeostasis, and thus, tumours become dependent on pH regulatory mechanisms. Many of the proteins involved in pH regulation are highly expressed in tumours, and their expression is often of prognostic significance. The more acidic tumour microenvironment also has important implications with regard to chemotherapeutic and radiotherapeutic interventions. In addition, we review pH-sensing mechanisms, the role of pH regulation in tumour phenotype and the use of pH regulatory mechanisms as therapeutic targets.

  20. Continuous intra-arterial pH measurement.

    PubMed

    Oeseburg, B; Kwant, G; Schut, J K; Veenstra, J

    1980-07-01

    A flexible glass electrode catheter with a diameter of 3 mm has been developed for pH measurement in the arterial system of dogs. In combination with a galvanically isolated amplifier, an undisturbed pH signal could be obtained from the aorta. The system was fast enough to truly record pH changes synchronous with respiration and was shown to be insensitive to variations in blood flow velocity. Good agreement was found between pH catheter readings nd pH values of simultaneously taken arterial samples as measured with a conventional capillary glass electrode.

  1. Time course of pH change in plant epidermis using microscopic pH imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dan, Risako; Shimizu, Megumi; Kazama, Haruko; Sakaue, Hirotaka

    2010-11-01

    We established a microscopic pH imaging system to track the time course of pH change in plant epidermis in vivo. In the previous research, we have found out that anthocyanin containing cells have higher pH. However, it was not clear whether the anthocyanin increased the pH or anthocyanin was synthesized result from the higher pH. Therefore, we further investigated the relationship between anthocyanin and pH change. To track the time course of pH change in plant epidermis, we established a system using luminescent imaging technique. We used HPTS (8-Hydroxypyrene-1,3,6-Trisulfonate) as pH indicator and applied excitation ratio imaging method. Luminescent image was converted to a pH distribution by obtained in vitro calibration using known pH solution. Cellular level observation was enabled by merging microscopic color picture of the same region to the pH change image. The established system was applied to epidermal cells of red-tip leaf lettuce, Lactuca Sativa L. and the time course was tracked in the growth process. We would discuss about the relationship between anthocyanin and pH change in plant epidermis.

  2. Influence of pH on the acute toxicity of ammonia to juvenile freshwater mussels (fatmucket, Lampsilis siliquoidea).

    PubMed

    Wang, Ning; Erickson, Russell J; Ingersoll, Christopher G; Ivey, Christopher D; Brunson, Eric L; Augspurger, Tom; Barnhart, M Christopher

    2008-05-01

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate the influence of pH on the toxicity of ammonia to juvenile freshwater mussels. Acute 96-h ammonia toxicity tests were conducted with 10-d-old juvenile mussels (fatmucket, Lampsilis siliquoidea) at five pH levels ranging from 6.5 to 9.0 in flow-through diluter systems at 20 degrees C. Acute 48-h tests with amphipods (Hyalella azteca) and 96-h tests with oligochaetes (Lumbriculus variegatus) were conducted concurrently under the same test conditions to determine the sensitivity of mussels relative to these two commonly tested benthic invertebrate species. During the exposure, pH levels were maintained within 0.1 of a pH unit and ammonia concentrations were relatively constant through time (coefficient of variation for ammonia concentrations ranged from 2 to 30% with a median value of 7.9%). The median effective concentrations (EC50s) of total ammonia nitrogen (N) for mussels were at least two to six times lower than the EC50s for amphipods and oligochaetes, and the EC50s for mussels decreased with increasing pH and ranged from 88 mg N/L at pH 6.6 to 0.96 mg N/L at pH 9.0. The EC50s for mussels were at or below the final acute values used to derive the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's acute water quality criterion (WQC). However, the quantitative relationship between pH and ammonia toxicity to juvenile mussels was similar to the average relationship for other taxa reported in the WQC. These results indicate that including mussel toxicity data in a revision to the WQC would lower the acute criterion but not change the WQC mathematical representation of the relative effect of pH on ammonia toxicity.

  3. Influence of pH on the acute toxicity of ammonia to juvenile freshwater mussels (fatmucket, Lampsills siliquoidea)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wang, N.; Erickson, R.J.; Ingersoll, C.G.; Ivey, C.D.; Brunson, E.L.; Augspurger, T.; Barnhart, M.C.

    2008-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate the influence of pH on the toxicity of ammonia to juvenile freshwater mussels. Acute 96-h ammonia toxicity tests were conducted with 10-d-old juvenile mussels (fatmucket, Lampsilis siliquoidea) at five pH levels ranging from 6.5 to 9.0 in flow-through diluter systems at 20??C. Acute 48-h tests with amphipods (Hyalella azteca) and 96-h tests with oligochaetes (Lumbriculus variegatus) were conducted concurrently under the same test conditions to determine the sensitivity of mussels relative to these two commonly tested benthic invertebrate species. During the exposure, pH levels were maintained within 0.1 of a pH unit and ammonia concentrations were relatively constant through time (coefficient of variation for ammonia concentrations ranged from 2 to 30% with a median value of 7.9%). The median effective concentrations (EC50s) of total ammonia nitrogen (N) for mussels were at least two to six times lower than the EC50s for amphipods and oligochaetes, and the EC50s for mussels decreased with increasing pH and ranged from 88 mg N/L at pH 6.6 to 0.96 mg N/L at pH 9.0. The EC50s for mussels were at or below the final acute values used to derive the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's acute water quality criterion (WQC). However, the quantitative relationship between pH and ammonia toxicity to juvenile mussels was similar to the average relationship for other taxa reported in the WQC. These results indicate that including mussel toxicity data in a revision to the WQC would lower the acute criterion but not change the WQC mathematical representation of the relative effect of pH on ammonia toxicity. ?? 2008 SETAC.

  4. High Sensitivity pH Sensor Based on Porous Silicon (PSi) Extended Gate Field-Effect Transistor

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hardan, Naif H.; Abdul Hamid, Muhammad Azmi; Ahmed, Naser M.; Jalar, Azman; Shamsudin, Roslinda; Othman, Norinsan Kamil; Kar Keng, Lim; Chiu, Weesiong; Al-Rawi, Hamzah N.

    2016-01-01

    In this study, porous silicon (PSi) was prepared and tested as an extended gate field-effect transistor (EGFET) for pH sensing. The prepared PSi has pore sizes in the range of 500 to 750 nm with a depth of approximately 42 µm. The results of testing PSi for hydrogen ion sensing in different pH buffer solutions reveal that the PSi has a sensitivity value of 66 mV/pH that is considered a super Nernstian value. The sensor considers stability to be in the pH range of 2 to 12. The hysteresis values of the prepared PSi sensor were approximately 8.2 and 10.5 mV in the low and high pH loop, respectively. The result of this study reveals a promising application of PSi in the field for detecting hydrogen ions in different solutions. PMID:27338381

  5. Task 2.0 -- Air quality assessment, control, and analytical methods: Subtask 2.11 -- Lactic acid FGD additives from sugar beet wastewater. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, E.S.

    1998-06-01

    Organic buffers maintain the pH of the scrubber slurry in flue gas desulfurization as the SO{sub 2} dissolves at the air-liquid interface. Inexpensive acids with an appropriate pKa are required for this application. The pKa of lactic acid (3.86) is between that of the interface and the recirculating slurry and will make soluble calcium ions available in large amounts. Currently lactic acid is somewhat expensive for this, but the project work will lead to development of a new source of inexpensive lactate. Microbial action during the storage and processing of sugar beets forms lactic acid in concentrations as high as 14 g/L in the processing water. The concentrations are lower than those occurring in conventional fermentation production of lactic acids, but since a considerable amount of water is involved in the processing of sugar beets in the Red River Valley, a substantial amount of lactic acid or calcium lactate could be recovered as a byproduct for use in flue gas desulfurization (FGD) and other applications. The feasibility of two novel lactate recovery schemes applicable to dilute streams was evaluated in the project.

  6. Task 2.0 - Air Quality Assessment, Control, and Analytical Methods Subtask 2.11 - Lactic Acid FGD Additives From Sugar Beet Wastewater

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, Edwin S

    1998-02-01

    Organic buffers maintain the pH of the scrubber slurry in flue gas desulfurization (FGD) as the SO2 dissolves at the air-liquid interface. Inexpensive acids with an appropriate pKa are required for this application. The pKa of lactic acid (3.86) is between that of the interface and the recirculating slurry and will make soluble calcium ion available in large amounts. Currently lactic acid is somewhat expensive for this use, but this project will develop a new source of inexpensive lactate. Microbial action during the storage and processing of sugar beets forms lactic acid in concentrations as high 14 g/L in the processing water. The concentrations are lower than those occurring in conventional fermentation production of lactic acids, but since a considerable amount of water is involved in the processing of sugar beets in the Red River Valley (1 million gallons/day), a substantial amount of lactic acid or calcium lactate could be recovered as a by- product for use in FGD and other applications.

  7. The influence of soil pH on the diversity, abundance and transcriptional activity of ammonia oxidizing archaea and bacteria.

    PubMed

    Nicol, Graeme W; Leininger, Sven; Schleper, Christa; Prosser, James I

    2008-11-01

    Autotrophic ammonia oxidation occurs in acid soils, even though laboratory cultures of isolated ammonia oxidizing bacteria fail to grow below neutral pH. To investigate whether archaea possessing ammonia monooxygenase genes were responsible for autotrophic nitrification in acid soils, the community structure and phylogeny of ammonia oxidizing bacteria and archaea were determined across a soil pH gradient (4.9-7.5) by amplifying 16S rRNA and amoA genes followed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and sequence analysis. The structure of both communities changed with soil pH, with distinct populations in acid and neutral soils. Phylogenetic reconstructions of crenarchaeal 16S rRNA and amoA genes confirmed selection of distinct lineages within the pH gradient and high similarity in phylogenies indicated a high level of congruence between 16S rRNA and amoA genes. The abundance of archaeal and bacterial amoA gene copies and mRNA transcripts contrasted across the pH gradient. Archaeal amoA gene and transcript abundance decreased with increasing soil pH, while bacterial amoA gene abundance was generally lower and transcripts increased with increasing pH. Short-term activity was investigated by DGGE analysis of gene transcripts in microcosms containing acidic or neutral soil or mixed soil with pH readjusted to that of native soils. Although mixed soil microcosms contained identical archaeal ammonia oxidizer communities, those adapted to acidic or neutral pH ranges showed greater relative activity at their native soil pH. Findings indicate that different bacterial and archaeal ammonia oxidizer phylotypes are selected in soils of different pH and that these differences in community structure and abundances are reflected in different contributions to ammonia oxidizer activity. They also suggest that both groups of ammonia oxidizers have distinct physiological characteristics and ecological niches, with consequences for nitrification in acid soils.

  8. Distribution of dermatophytes and other related fungi in Jaipur city, with particular reference to soil pH.

    PubMed

    Jain, Neetu; Sharma, Meenakshi

    2011-01-01

    Screening of 217 soil samples of different habitats, such as PG study centre, garden, farmhouse, nursery, roadside, hostel, animal habitat, bird habitat, marriage garden, temple, vegetable market and house dust, was carried out for the presence of dermatophytes and related fungi in relation to soil pH. A total of 461 isolates belonging to 26 genera and 34 species were recorded. Soil pH values vary from 3 to 10.5. Trichophyton verrucosum, Microsporum audouinii and M. canis were isolated for the first time in Jaipur from pH range 7.0 to 9.0. Chrysosporium tropicum (46.08%) was the most predominant fungus isolated from pH range 6.5 to 9.5. Trichophyton mentagrophytes (24.88%) was the second most common fungal species isolated from pH 6.5 to 9.5. Most of the keratinophilic fungi were isolated from pH 6.5 to 8.5. Only one isolate of Fusarium moniliforme was reported from a highly acidic site at pH 3. Roadside and garden soils were found to be the most suitable sites for almost all keratinophilic fungi.

  9. [Effects of pH and coexisting cations on ammonia adsorption from aqueous solution by strawberry stem powder].

    PubMed

    Liu, Hai-wei; Liu, Yun; Wang, Hai-yun; Dong, Yuan-hua

    2010-08-01

    Batch equilibrium experiments were carried out to study ammonia adsorptions from aqueous solution by strawberry (Fragaia ananassa Duchesne) stem powder. The effects of pH, coexisting cations, initial ammonia concentration and temperature were investigated as well. The results showed that the equilibrium data fitted well to the Langmuir model and Freundlich model, and the maximum adsorption capacities were 3.05, 4.24 and 4.79 mg x g(-1) at 15, 25 and 35 degrees C respectively. The increase of temperature was favorable to ammonia adsorption. The optimal pH of ammonia adsorption was in the range of 4-8. The NH4+ content decreased at higher pH and the negative charges decreased at lower pH, resulting in the decrease of ammonia adsorption at both higher and lower pH. The pH changes after adsorption buffered both effects. K+, Na+, Ca2+ and Mg2+ had no effect on ammonia adsorption by strawberry stem, but Zn2+ and Al3+ decreased the adsorption for their hydrolyzation. The ammonia adsorption by strawberry stem powder could be applied in a large pH range and could not be affected by usual metal cations in wastewater, therefore the strawberry stem powder not only could be a suitable ammonia adsorbent, but also had advantages comparing with most mineral materials.

  10. Adsorption of fluoride onto crystalline titanium dioxide: effect of pH, ionic strength, and co-existing ions.

    PubMed

    Babaeivelni, Kamel; Khodadoust, Amid P

    2013-03-15

    Adsorption of fluoride from water onto titanium dioxide (TiO(2)) powder was investigated. The sorbent was crystalline TiO(2) composed of mostly anatase with a specific surface area of 56 m(2)/g. Adsorption kinetics and isotherm experiments were performed using an aqueous solution with bicarbonate alkalinity representative of natural waters. Adsorption kinetics data showed that maximum adsorption of fluoride occurred within 3h, following a pseudo-second order kinetics model. Adsorption isotherm data followed the Langmuir equation, indicating favorable adsorption of fluoride onto TiO(2), while results from the Dubinin-Radushkevich model are indicative of physical adsorption of fluoride. Adsorption of fluoride increased with decreasing solution pH. Maximum adsorption of fluoride occurred within the pH range of 2-5, while approximately 75% of maximum adsorption was obtained in the pH range of 7-8 with rapidly declining adsorption above pH 9. The pH(pzc) data for TiO(2) indicated the preferred adsorption of fluoride onto the acidic surface of TiO(2). Higher bicarbonate concentrations in solution increased the solution pH which was conducive to a decrease in adsorption of fluoride onto the surface of TiO(2) at higher pH. Overall, the solution pH was the main factor controlling the uptake of fluoride by TiO(2).

  11. Influence of pH on heavy metal speciation and removal from wastewater using micellar-enhanced ultrafiltration.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jinhui; Yuan, Fang; Zeng, Guangming; Li, Xue; Gu, Yanling; Shi, Lixiu; Liu, Wenchu; Shi, Yahui

    2017-04-01

    pH plays an important role in heavy metal removal during micellar-enhanced ultrafiltration (MEUF). In the present work, the influence of pH on heavy metal speciation and removal from wastewater by MEUF was investigated using an anionic surfactant (sodium dodecyl sulfate, SDS) and a hydrophilic membrane (polyether sulfone). Experiments were performed with pH values in the range of 1-12. Metal ion removal efficiency (R) was used to assess the effects of the MEUF process. Results showed that better removal rate of copper and cadmium was achieved at high pH values (pH > 3) with SDS feed concentration of 8 mM, while the optimal pH range was 3-10 for zinc and lead. The corresponding efficiencies for heavy metal removal decreased with the increasing feed concentration of metal ions under the pH conditions of 1-12. Furthermore, the heavy metal ion removal rate (50 mg/L) followed the order of Pb(2+) > Cd(2+) > Zn(2+) > Cu(2+). These results showed that pH is a key parameter in metal ion speciation and removal during MEUF.

  12. Temperature sensitivity of organic substrate decay varies with pH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, K.; Lehmeier, C.; Ballantyne, F.; Billings, S. A.

    2012-12-01

    Cellulose is the most abundant biopolymer in soils and globally ubiquitous. It serves as a primary carbon source for myriad microbes able to release cellulases which cleave the cellulose into smaller molecules. For example, β-glucosidase, one type of cellulase, breaks down a terminal β-glycosidic bond of cellulose. The carbon of the liberated glucose becomes available for microbial uptake, after which it can then be mineralized and returned to the atmosphere via heterotrophic respiration. Thus, exoenzymes play an important role in the global cycling of carbon. Numerous studies suggest that global warming potentially increases the rate at which β-glucosidase breaks down cellulose, but it is not known how pH of the soil solution influences the effect of temperature on cellulose decomposition rates; this is important given the globally wide range of soil pH. Using fluorescence enzyme assay techniques, we studied the effect of temperature and pH on the reaction rate at which purified β-Glucosidase decays β-D-cellobioside (a compound often employed to simulate cellulose). We evaluated the temperature sensitivity of this reaction at five temperatures (5, 10, 15, 20, and 25°C) and six pH values (3.5, 4.5, 5.5, 6.5, 7.5, and 8.5)encompassing the naturally occurring range in soils, in a full-factorial design. First, we determined Vmax at 25°C and pH 6.5, standard conditions for measuring enzyme activities in many studies. The Vmax was 858.65 μmol h-1mg-1and was achieved at substrate concentration of 270 μM. At all pH values, the reaction rate slowed down at lower temperatures; at a pH of 3.5, no enzymatic activity was detected. The enzyme activity was significantly different between pH 4.5 and higher pHs. For example, enzyme reactivity at pH 4.5 was significantly lower than that at 7.5 at 20 and 25°C (Bonferroni-corrected P =0.0006, 0.0004, respectively), but not at lower temperatures. Similarly, enzyme reactivity at pH 4.5 was lower than that at pH 8.5 at 10, 15

  13. Biocompatibility of 17-4 PH stainless steel foam for implant applications.

    PubMed

    Mutlu, Ilven; Oktay, Enver

    2011-01-01

    In this study, biocompatibility of 17-4 PH stainless steel foam for biomedical implant applications was investigated. 17-4 PH stainless steel foams having porosities in the range of 40-82% with an average pore size of around 600 μm were produced by space holder-sintering technique. Sintered foams were precipitation hardened for times of 1-6 h at temperatures between 450-570 °C. Compressive yield strength and Young's modulus of aged stainless steel foams were observed to vary between 80-130 MPa and 0.73-1.54 GPa, respectively. Pore morphology, pore size and the mechanical properties of the 17-4 PH stainless steel foams were close to cancellous bone. In vitro evaluations of cytotoxicity of the foams were investigated by XTT and MTT assays and showed sufficient biocompatibility. Surface roughness parameters of the stainless steel foams were also determined to characterize the foams.

  14. A fiber optic ammonia sensor using a universal pH indicator.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Adolfo J; Zamarreño, Carlos R; Matías, Ignacio R; Arregui, Francisco J; Cruz, Rene F Domínguez; May-Arrioja, Daniel A

    2014-02-27

    A universal pH indicator is used to fabricate a fiber optic ammonia sensor. The advantage of this pH indicator is that it exhibits sensitivity to ammonia over a broad wavelength range. This provides a differential response, with a valley around 500 nm and a peak around 650 nm, which allows us to perform ratiometric measurements. The ratiometric measurements provide not only an enhanced signal, but can also eliminate any external disturbance due to humidity or temperature fluctuations. In addition, the indicator is embedded in a hydrophobic and gas permeable polyurethane film named Tecoflex®. The film provides additional advantages to the sensor, such as operation in dry environments, efficient transport of the element to be measured to the sensitive area of the sensor, and prevent leakage or detachment of the indicator. The combination of the universal pH indicator and Tecoflex® film provides a reliable and robust fiber optic ammonia sensor.

  15. A Fiber Optic Ammonia Sensor Using a Universal pH Indicator

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez, Adolfo J.; Zamarreño, Carlos R.; Matías, Ignacio R.; Arregui, Francisco. J.; Domínguez Cruz, Rene F.; May-Arrioja, Daniel. A.

    2014-01-01

    A universal pH indicator is used to fabricate a fiber optic ammonia sensor. The advantage of this pH indicator is that it exhibits sensitivity to ammonia over a broad wavelength range. This provides a differential response, with a valley around 500 nm and a peak around 650 nm, which allows us to perform ratiometric measurements. The ratiometric measurements provide not only an enhanced signal, but can also eliminate any external disturbance due to humidity or temperature fluctuations. In addition, the indicator is embedded in a hydrophobic and gas permeable polyurethane film named Tecoflex®. The film provides additional advantages to the sensor, such as operation in dry environments, efficient transport of the element to be measured to the sensitive area of the sensor, and prevent leakage or detachment of the indicator. The combination of the universal pH indicator and Tecoflex® film provides a reliable and robust fiber optic ammonia sensor. PMID:24583969

  16. High pH reversed-phase chromatography with fraction concatenation for 2D proteomic analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Feng; Shen, Yufeng; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.

    2012-04-01

    Orthogonal high-resolution separations are critical for attaining improved analytical dynamic ranges of proteome measurements. Concatenated high pH reversed phase liquid chromatography affords better separations than the strong cation exchange conventionally applied for two-dimensional shotgun proteomic analysis. For example, concatenated high pH reversed phase liquid chromatography increased identification coverage for peptides (e.g., by 1.8-fold) and proteins (e.g., by 1.6-fold) in shotgun proteomics analyses of a digested human protein sample. Additional advantages of concatenated high pH RPLC include improved protein sequence coverage, simplified sample processing, and reduced sample losses, making this an attractive first dimension separation strategy for two-dimensional proteomics analyses.

  17. Tattoo-based potentiometric ion-selective sensors for epidermal pH monitoring.

    PubMed

    Bandodkar, Amay J; Hung, Vinci W S; Jia, Wenzhao; Valdés-Ramírez, Gabriela; Windmiller, Joshua R; Martinez, Alexandra G; Ramírez, Julian; Chan, Garrett; Kerman, Kagan; Wang, Joseph

    2013-01-07

    This article presents the fabrication and characterization of novel tattoo-based solid-contact ion-selective electrodes (ISEs) for non-invasive potentiometric monitoring of epidermal pH levels. The new fabrication approach combines commercially available temporary transfer tattoo paper with conventional screen printing and solid-contact polymer ISE methodologies. The resulting tattoo-based potentiometric sensors exhibit rapid and sensitive response to a wide range of pH changes with no carry-over effects. Furthermore, the tattoo ISE sensors endure repetitive mechanical deformation, which is a key requirement of wearable and epidermal sensors. The flexible and conformal nature of the tattoo sensors enable them to be mounted on nearly any exposed skin surface for real-time pH monitoring of the human perspiration, as illustrated from the response during a strenuous physical activity. The resulting tattoo-based ISE sensors offer considerable promise as wearable potentiometric sensors suitable for diverse applications.

  18. Novel pH-sensitive probes with a ratiometric detection for intracellular pH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ipuy, Martin; Billon, Cyrielle; Micouin, Guillaume; Samarut, Jacques; Andraud, Chantal; Bretonnière, Yann

    2014-08-01

    The development of new pH-sensitive fluorescent probes based on a push-pull architecture is presented with a 2- dicyanomethylene-3-cyano-4,5,5-trimethyl-2,5-dihydrofurane as strong electron acceptor group. With a small structural change, it is possible to obtain a large range of phenolic pKa from 4.8 to 8.6 with some close to neutrality, underlining the role of the electron density modulation on the acidic properties. Remarkable changes in the optical properties (both absorption and fluorescence) were observed as a function of the pH. Ratiometric imaging of intracellular pH was carried out with the most promising probes and highlighted the possibility to distinguish near-neutral minor pH fluctuations in cells.

  19. Nitrification in premise plumbing: role of phosphate, pH and pipe corrosion.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Griffin, Allian; Edwards, Marc

    2008-06-15

    Nitrification in PVC premise plumbing is a weak function of pH over the range 6.5--8.5 and is insensitive to phosphate concentrations 5--1000 ppb. Lead pipe enhanced nitrification relative to PVC, consistent with expectations that nitrifiers could benefit from ammonia recycled from nitrate via lead corrosion. Relatively new copper pipe (< 1.5-years-old) did not allow nitrifiers to establish, but nitrifiers gradually colonized over a period of months in brass pipes when copper concentrations were reduced by pH adjustment or orthophosphate. Nitrifiers were inhibited by trace copper, but not by lead levels up to 8000 ppb. In some systems using chloramines, brass in plastic plumbing systems might be more susceptible to lead/copper leaching, and accelerated dezincification, due to lower pH values resulting from nitrification.

  20. Physiological HEPES buffer proposed as a calibrator for pH measurement in human blood.

    PubMed

    Lang, W; Zander, R

    1999-05-01

    N-(2-hydroxyethyl)-piperazine-N'-2-ethanesulfonic acid, known as HEPES buffer, with pK in the physiological range was studied for use as an alternative to conventional phosphate buffer for the calibration of pH in modern clinical analyzers. In different series of aqueous equimolar HEPES buffer, pH was measured at 37 degrees C with a capillary glass electrode standardized previously using phosphate, and variations due to changes in total HEPES buffer concentration (0.025 to 0.320 mol/l), and NaCl (0 to 0.250 mol/l) were monitored. For 0.05 equimolar HEPES buffer without NaCl, the pH of 7.362+/-0.003 (n = 15) obtained coincided well with the reference pH (7.364) from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). In particular, in the preferred 0.05 equimolar HEPES buffer/0.110 mol/l NaCl, which is isotonic to human plasma (0.160 mol/l), and termed physiological HEPES buffer (PHB), the pH of 7.346+/-0.003 (n = 84) can be related to the calculated corresponding reference pH from NIST without liquid junction (7.374), and is also compatible with the pH measured in normal arterial blood, pH = 7.403+/-0.003 (n = 20). Hence, in the two-point calibration of clinical analyzers, PHB, which is defined operationally with respect to the glass electrode and to phosphate buffer, may be useful as a calibrator in the range of buffer adjustment control to meet the correct values for pH when measuring in blood. Whereas Na-HEPES salt is hygroscopic and does not meet the declared purity grade (> 99%), pure HEPES acid is non-hygroscopic and conforms to the manufacturer's purity grade (> or = 99%). Therefore, for easy preparation of PHB, HEPES acid is the preferred starting material.