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Sample records for ph ruminais em

  1. Cryo-EM study of slow bee paralysis virus at low pH reveals iflavirus genome release mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Kalynych, Sergei; Füzik, Tibor; Přidal, Antonín; de Miranda, Joachim; Plevka, Pavel

    2017-01-01

    Viruses from the family Iflaviridae are insect pathogens. Many of them, including slow bee paralysis virus (SBPV), cause lethal diseases in honeybees and bumblebees, resulting in agricultural losses. Iflaviruses have nonenveloped icosahedral virions containing single-stranded RNA genomes. However, their genome release mechanism is unknown. Here, we show that low pH promotes SBPV genome release, indicating that the virus may use endosomes to enter host cells. We used cryo-EM to study a heterogeneous population of SBPV virions at pH 5.5. We determined the structures of SBPV particles before and after genome release to resolutions of 3.3 and 3.4 Å, respectively. The capsids of SBPV virions in low pH are not expanded. Thus, SBPV does not appear to form “altered” particles with pores in their capsids before genome release, as is the case in many related picornaviruses. The egress of the genome from SBPV virions is associated with a loss of interpentamer contacts mediated by N-terminal arms of VP2 capsid proteins, which result in the expansion of the capsid. Pores that are 7 Å in diameter form around icosahedral threefold symmetry axes. We speculate that they serve as channels for the genome release. Our findings provide an atomic-level characterization of the genome release mechanism of iflaviruses. PMID:28053231

  2. Cryo-EM study of slow bee paralysis virus at low pH reveals iflavirus genome release mechanism.

    PubMed

    Kalynych, Sergei; Füzik, Tibor; Přidal, Antonín; de Miranda, Joachim; Plevka, Pavel

    2017-01-17

    Viruses from the family Iflaviridae are insect pathogens. Many of them, including slow bee paralysis virus (SBPV), cause lethal diseases in honeybees and bumblebees, resulting in agricultural losses. Iflaviruses have nonenveloped icosahedral virions containing single-stranded RNA genomes. However, their genome release mechanism is unknown. Here, we show that low pH promotes SBPV genome release, indicating that the virus may use endosomes to enter host cells. We used cryo-EM to study a heterogeneous population of SBPV virions at pH 5.5. We determined the structures of SBPV particles before and after genome release to resolutions of 3.3 and 3.4 Å, respectively. The capsids of SBPV virions in low pH are not expanded. Thus, SBPV does not appear to form "altered" particles with pores in their capsids before genome release, as is the case in many related picornaviruses. The egress of the genome from SBPV virions is associated with a loss of interpentamer contacts mediated by N-terminal arms of VP2 capsid proteins, which result in the expansion of the capsid. Pores that are 7 Å in diameter form around icosahedral threefold symmetry axes. We speculate that they serve as channels for the genome release. Our findings provide an atomic-level characterization of the genome release mechanism of iflaviruses.

  3. Dissociation energies of PH and PH+.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, R. R.; Nazeer Ahammed, Y.; Srinivasa Rao, A.; Rao, T. V. R.

    1995-12-01

    Dissociation energies for the ground electronic states of diatomic PH and PH+ are determined by fitting empirical potential functions to the respective RKRV curves using correlation coefficients. The estimated ground state dissociation energies of PH and PH+ are 3.10 and 3.20 eV respectively by the curve fitting procedure using the Lippincott potential function. The computed values are in good agreement with experimental values.

  4. Plant Habitat (PH)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Onate, Bryan

    2016-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) will soon have a platform for conducting fundamental research of Large Plants. Plant Habitat (PH) is designed to be a fully controllable environment for high-quality plant physiological research. PH will control light quality, level, and timing, temperature, CO2, relative humidity, and irrigation, while scrubbing ethylene. Additional capabilities include leaf temperature and root zone moisture and oxygen sensing. The light cap will have red (630 nm), blue (450 nm), green (525 nm), far red (730 nm) and broad spectrum white LEDs. There will be several internal cameras (visible and IR) to monitor and record plant growth and operations.

  5. pH Basics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lunelli, Bruno; Scagnolari, Francesco

    2009-01-01

    The exposition of the pervasive concept of pH, of its foundations and implementation as a meaningful quantitative measurement, in nonspecialist university texts is often not easy to follow because too many of its theoretical and operative underpinnings are neglected. To help the inquiring student we provide a concise introduction to the depth just…

  6. pH optrode

    DOEpatents

    Northrup, M. Allen; Langry, Kevin C.

    1993-01-01

    A process is provided for forming a long-lasting, stable, pH-sensitive dye-acrylamide copolymer useful as a pH-sensitive material for use in an optrode or other device sensitive to pH. An optrode may be made by mechanically attaching the copolymer to a sensing device such as an optical fiber.

  7. pH Basics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lunelli, Bruno; Scagnolari, Francesco

    2009-01-01

    The exposition of the pervasive concept of pH, of its foundations and implementation as a meaningful quantitative measurement, in nonspecialist university texts is often not easy to follow because too many of its theoretical and operative underpinnings are neglected. To help the inquiring student we provide a concise introduction to the depth just…

  8. Ph.D. shortage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The late 1990s will see a shortage of Ph.D. graduates, according to the Association of American Universities, Washington, D.C. AAU's new comprehensive study, “The Ph.D. Shortage: The Federal Role,” reports that competition for new Ph.D.s is already intense and can only intensify because demand is greater than supply in both academic and nonacademic markets.Doctoral education plays an increasingly important role in U.S. research and development programs. Students have a pivotal part in doing research and enriching it with new ideas. The AAU report says that graduate students are “major determinants of the creativity and productivity of U.S. academic research, the source of more than 50% of the nation's basic research.’ The market for doctoral education extends beyond the university. In 1985, about 43% of all Ph.D.s employed in this country were working outside higher education; the demand for doctorate recipients in nonacademic sectors continues to grow.

  9. 17-4 PH and 15-5 PH

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Howard T.

    1995-01-01

    17-4 PH and 15-5 PH are extremely useful and versatile precipitation-hardening stainless steels. Armco 17-4 PH is well suited for the magnetic particle inspection requirements of Aerospace Material Specification. Armco 15-5 PH and 17-4 PH are produced in billet, plate, bar, and wire. Also, 15-5 PH is able to meet the stringent mechanical properties required in the aerospace and nuclear industries. Both products are easy to heat treat and machine, making them very useful in many applications.

  10. Urine pH test

    MedlinePlus

    A urine pH test measures the level of acid in urine. ... pH - urine ... meat products, or cheese can decrease your urine pH. ... to check for changes in your urine acid levels. It may be done to ... more effective when urine is acidic or non-acidic (alkaline).

  11. Energy separations for the electronic states of PH -2,PH 2 and PH +2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasubramanian, K.

    1993-03-01

    All-electron complete-active space multi-configuration self-consistent field (CASSCF) followed by second-order configuration interaction (SOCI) calculations in conjunction with large P(13s10p3d2flg/7s6p3d2flg) and H (10s5p1d/8s5p1d) basis sets are made on the electronic states of PH -2, PH 2 and PH +2. We compute the adiabatic electron affinities of PH 2 and PH. The 3B 1-X 1A 1, 1B 1-X 1A 1 energy separations of PH +2 and the 2A 1-X 2B 1 energy separation of PH 2 are computed.

  12. The pH Game.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chemecology, 1996

    1996-01-01

    Describes a game that can be used to teach students about the acidity of liquids and substances around their school and enable them to understand what pH levels tell us about the environment. Students collect samples and measure the pH of water, soil, plants, and other natural material. (DDR)

  13. The pH Game.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chemecology, 1996

    1996-01-01

    Describes a game that can be used to teach students about the acidity of liquids and substances around their school and enable them to understand what pH levels tell us about the environment. Students collect samples and measure the pH of water, soil, plants, and other natural material. (DDR)

  14. Esophageal pH monitoring

    MedlinePlus

    ... test can also be done during upper GI endoscopy by clipping a pH monitor to the lining of the esophagus. ... esophagitis : Barium swallow Esophagogastroduodenoscopy (also called upper GI endoscopy)

  15. Exercise and Pulmonary Hypertension (PH)

    MedlinePlus

    ... with their PH specialist prior to starting any exercise program. Current members: first time on our new PHPN/PHCR or Support Group ... Pulmonary Hypertension Association 801 Roeder Road, Ste. 1000 Silver Spring, ...

  16. Programmable pH buffers

    DOEpatents

    Gough, Dara Van; Huber, Dale L.; Bunker, Bruce C.; Roberts, Mark E.

    2017-01-24

    A programmable pH buffer comprises a copolymer that changes pK.sub.a at a lower critical solution temperature (LCST) in water. The copolymer comprises a thermally programmable polymer that undergoes a hydrophobic-to-hydrophilic phase change at the LCST and an electrolytic polymer that exhibits acid-base properties that are responsive to the phase change. The programmable pH buffer can be used to sequester CO.sub.2 into water.

  17. PhEDEx Data Service

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egeland, Ricky; Wildish, Tony; Huang, Chih-Hao

    2010-04-01

    The PhEDEx Data Service provides access to information from the central PhEDEx database, as well as certificate-authenticated managerial operations such as requesting the transfer or deletion of data. The Data Service is integrated with the "SiteDB" service for fine-grained access control, providing a safe and secure environment for operations. A plug-in architecture allows server-side modules to be developed rapidly and easily by anyone familiar with the schema, and can automatically return the data in a variety of formats for use by different client technologies. Using HTTP access via the Data Service instead of direct database connections makes it possible to build monitoring web-pages with complex drill-down operations, suitable for debugging or presentation from many aspects. This will form the basis of the new PhEDEx website in the near future, as well as providing access to PhEDEx information and certificate-authenticated services for other CMS dataflow and workflow management tools such as CRAB, WMCore, DBS and the dashboard. A PhEDEx command-line client tool provides one-stop access to all the functions of the PhEDEx Data Service interactively, for use in simple scripts that do not access the service directly. The client tool provides certificate-authenticated access to managerial functions, so all the functions of the PhEDEx Data Service are available to it. The tool can be expanded by plug-ins which can combine or extend the client-side manipulation of data from the Data Service, providing a powerful environment for manipulating data within PhEDEx.

  18. pH Optrode Instrumentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tabacco, Mary Beth; Zhou, Quan

    1995-01-01

    pH-sensitive chromophoric reagents immobilized in porous optical fibers. Optoelectronic instrumentation system measures acidity or alkalinity of aqueous nutrient solution. Includes one or more optrodes, which are optical-fiber chemical sensors, in sense, analogous to electrodes but not subject to some of spurious effects distorting readings taken by pH electrodes. Concept of optrodes also described in "Ethylene-Vapor Optrodes" (KSC-11579). pH optrode sensor head, with lead-in and lead-out optical fibers, convenient for monitoring solutions located away from supporting electronic equipment.

  19. Making pH Tangible.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McIntosh, Elizabeth; Moss, Robert

    1995-01-01

    Presents a laboratory exercise in which students test the pH of different substances, study the effect of a buffer on acidic solutions by comparing the behavior of buffered and unbuffered solutions upon the addition of acid, and compare common over-the-counter antacid remedies. (MKR)

  20. Intragastric pH Monitoring,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-10-01

    disposable sensor.. hnt Care 13. Peterson WL. GI bleeding. In: Sleisenger MH, Fordtran IS, Med 1988;14:232-5. ,. eds. Gastrointestinal disease: pathophysiology ... diagnosis and 27. Fimmel CL, Etienne A, Cilluffo T, et al. Long-term ambu- management, Vol I. 4th ed. Philadelphia: WB Saunders, latory gastric pH

  1. Making pH Tangible.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McIntosh, Elizabeth; Moss, Robert

    1995-01-01

    Presents a laboratory exercise in which students test the pH of different substances, study the effect of a buffer on acidic solutions by comparing the behavior of buffered and unbuffered solutions upon the addition of acid, and compare common over-the-counter antacid remedies. (MKR)

  2. The Methods Behind PH WINS

    PubMed Central

    Leider, Jonathon P.; Bharthapudi, Kiran; Pineau, Vicki; Liu, Lin; Harper, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    The Public Health Workforce Interests and Needs Survey (PH WINS) has yielded the first-ever nationally representative sample of state health agency central office employees. The survey represents a step forward in rigorous, systematic data collection to inform the public health workforce development agenda in the United States. PH WINS is a Web-based survey and was developed with guidance from a panel of public health workforce experts including practitioners and researchers. It draws heavily from existing and validated items and focuses on 4 main areas: workforce perceptions about training needs, workplace environment and job satisfaction, perceptions about national trends, and demographics. This article outlines the conceptualization, development, and implementation of PH WINS, as well as considerations and limitations. It also describes the creation of 2 new data sets that will be available in public use for public health officials and researchers—a nationally representative data set for permanently employed state health agency central office employees comprising over 10 000 responses, and a pilot data set with approximately 12 000 local and regional health department staff responses. PMID:26422490

  3. Alkaline pH sensor molecules.

    PubMed

    Murayama, Takashi; Maruyama, Ichiro N

    2015-11-01

    Animals can survive only within a narrow pH range. This requires continual monitoring of environmental and body-fluid pH. Although a variety of acidic pH sensor molecules have been reported, alkaline pH sensor function is not well understood. This Review describes neuronal alkaline pH sensors, grouped according to whether they monitor extracellular or intracellular alkaline pH. Extracellular sensors include the receptor-type guanylyl cyclase, the insulin receptor-related receptor, ligand-gated Cl- channels, connexin hemichannels, two-pore-domain K+ channels, and transient receptor potential (TRP) channels. Intracellular sensors include TRP channels and gap junction channels. Identification of molecular mechanisms underlying alkaline pH sensing is crucial for understanding how animals respond to environmental alkaline pH and how body-fluid pH is maintained within a narrow range.

  4. The fluorescence properties of the phenylated fullerenes C 70Ph 4, C 70Ph 6, C 70Ph 8, and C 70Ph 10 in room temperature solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwell, Martin; Gustavsson, Thomas; Marguet, Sylvie; Vaissière, Benoı̂t de La; Wachter, Norbert K.; Birkett, Paul R.; Mialocq, Jean-Claude; Leach, Sydney

    2001-12-01

    The emission and excitation spectra of four phenylated [70] fullerenes, C 70Ph 4, C 70Ph 6, C 70Ph 8, and C 70Ph 10 in cyclohexane and toluene solutions have been measured. The fluorescence spectra and related excited state properties are found to depend strongly on the number of attached phenyl groups, but with no systematic trends. Quantum yields and fluorescence lifetimes were measured for C 70Ph 6, C 70Ph 8, and C 70Ph 10, allowing the determination of S1 → S0 radiative transition rates kR. It is found that kR for C 70Ph 10 is about six times larger than for the other compounds. This is consistent with measured absorbtivities for these compounds. The particular character of C 70Ph 10 is also manifested by its higher intersystem crossing rate kISC.

  5. The pH of antiseptic cleansers

    PubMed Central

    Kulthanan, Kanokvalai; Varothai, Supenya; Nuchkull, Piyavadee

    2014-01-01

    Background Daily bathing with antiseptic cleansers are proposed by some physicians as an adjunctive management of atopic dermatitis (AD). As atopic skin is sensitive, selection of cleansing products becomes a topic of concern. Objective Our purpose is to evaluate the pH of various antiseptic body cleansers to give an overview for recommendation to patients with AD. Methods Commonly bar and liquid cleansers consisted of antiseptic agents were measured for pH using pH meter and pH-indicator strips. For comparison, mild cleansers and general body cleansers were also measured. Results All cleansing bars had pH 9.8-11.3 except syndet bar that had neutral pH. For liquid cleansers, three cleansing agents had pH close to pH of normal skin, one of antiseptic cleansers, one of mild cleansers and another one of general cleansers. The rest of antiseptic cleansers had pH 8.9-9.6 while mild cleansers had pH 6.9-7.5. Syndet liquid had pH 7 and general liquid cleansers had pH 9.6. Conclusion The pH of cleanser depends on composition of that cleanser. Adding antiseptic agents are not the only factor determining variation of pH. Moreover, benefit of antiseptic properties should be considered especially in cases of infected skin lesions in the selection of proper cleansers for patients with AD. PMID:24527408

  6. Acid loading test (pH)

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003615.htm Acid loading test (pH) To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The acid loading test (pH) measures the ability of the ...

  7. Coping with PH over the Long Term

    MedlinePlus

    ... Newly Diagnosed Parents of Pediatric Patients PH Plus Social Media Specialty Pharmacy suPer Heroes Support Group Leaders Transplant ... Newly Diagnosed Parents of Pediatric Patients PH Plus Social Media Specialty Pharmacy suPer Heroes Support Group Leaders Transplant ...

  8. Media composition: pH and buffers.

    PubMed

    Swain, Jason E

    2012-01-01

    The proper pH of media is a crucial parameter for optimizing efficacy of gamete and embryo culture. Selecting the right media pH and stabilizing this pH are important variables in minimizing intracellular stress and optimizing development. Regulation of intracellular (pHi) and extracellular pH (pHe) is discussed, as well as methods to prevent harmful pHe oscillations. Furthermore, proper approaches to ensure accurate measurement of media pHe are described.

  9. EMS Student Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ogle, Patrick

    This student guide is one of a series of self-contained materials for students enrolled in an emergency medical services (EMS) training program. Discussed in the individual sections of the guide are the following topics: the purpose and history of EMS professionals; EMS training, certification and examinations (national and state certification and…

  10. Yes, we need PhD immunologists!

    PubMed

    Bishop, Gail A

    2015-05-01

    Constrained research funding prompts some to advocate training fewer PhDs. However, PhD immunologists are critically needed for future health challenges. Rather than discouraging promising young scientists from pursuing doctorates, we should ensure that such training is relevant to many different career possibilities to which PhD immunologists can make valuable contributions. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. EM International. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-07-01

    It is the intent of EM International to describe the Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management`s (EM`s) various roles and responsibilities within the international community. Cooperative agreements and programs, descriptions of projects and technologies, and synopses of visits to international sites are all highlighted in this semiannual journal. Focus on EM programs in this issue is on international collaboration in vitrification projects. Technology highlights covers: in situ sealing for contaminated sites; and remote sensors for toxic pollutants. Section on profiles of countries includes: Arctic contamination by the former Soviet Union, and EM activities with Germany--cooperative arrangements.

  12. Functional photoacoustic microscopy of pH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatni, M. Rameez; Yao, Junjie; Danielli, Amos; Favazza, Christopher P.; Maslov, Konstantin I.; Wang, Lihong V.

    2012-02-01

    pH is a tightly regulated indicator of metabolic activity. In mammalian systems, imbalance of pH regulation may result from or result in serious illness. Even though the regulation system of pH is very robust, tissue pH can be altered in many diseases such as cancer, osteoporosis and diabetes mellitus. Traditional high-resolution optical imaging techniques, such as confocal microscopy, routinely image pH in cells and tissues using pH sensitive fluorescent dyes, which change their fluorescence properties with the surrounding pH. Since strong optical scattering in biological tissue blurs images at greater depths, high-resolution pH imaging is limited to penetration depths of 1mm. Here, we report photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) of commercially available pH-sensitive fluorescent dye in tissue phantoms. Using both opticalresolution photoacoustic microscopy (OR-PAM), and acoustic resolution photoacoustic microscopy (AR-PAM), we explored the possibility of recovering the pH values in tissue phantoms. In this paper, we demonstrate that PAM was capable of recovering pH values up to a depth of 2 mm, greater than possible with other forms of optical microscopy.

  13. pH Meter probe assembly

    DOEpatents

    Hale, Charles J.

    1983-01-01

    An assembly for mounting a pH probe in a flowing solution, such as a sanitary sewer line, which prevents the sensitive glass portion of the probe from becoming coated with grease, oil, and other contaminants, whereby the probe gives reliable pH indication over an extended period of time. The pH probe assembly utilizes a special filter media and a timed back-rinse feature for flushing clear surface contaminants of the filter. The flushing liquid is of a known pH and is utilized to check performance of the probe.

  14. pH Meter probe assembly

    DOEpatents

    Hale, C.J.

    1983-11-15

    An assembly for mounting a pH probe in a flowing solution, such as a sanitary sewer line, which prevents the sensitive glass portion of the probe from becoming coated with grease, oil, and other contaminants, whereby the probe gives reliable pH indication over an extended period of time. The pH probe assembly utilizes a special filter media and a timed back-rinse feature for flushing clear surface contaminants of the filter. The flushing liquid is of a known pH and is utilized to check performance of the probe. 1 fig.

  15. Improved reliability of pH measurements.

    PubMed

    Spitzer, Petra; Werner, Barbara

    2002-11-01

    Measurements of pH are performed on a large scale at laboratory level, and in industry. To meet the quality-control requirements and other technical specifications there is a need for traceability in measurement results. The prerequisite for the international acceptance of analytical data is reliability. To measure means to compare. Comparability entails use of recognised references to which the standard buffer solutions used for calibration of pH meter-electrode assemblies can be traced. The new recommendation on the measurement of pH recently published as a provisional document by the International Union on Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) enables traceability for measured pH values to a conventional reference frame which is recognised world-wide. The primary method for pH will be described. If analytical data are to be accepted internationally it is necessary to demonstrate the equivalence of the national traceability structures, including national measurement standards. For the first time key comparisons for pH have been performed by the Consultative Committee for Amount of Substance (CCQM, set up by the International Bureau of Weights and Measures, BIPM) to assess the equivalence of the national measurement procedures used to determine the pH of primary standard buffer solutions. The results of the first key comparison on pH CCQM-K9, and other international initiatives to improve the consistency of the results of measurement for pH, are reported.

  16. Leveraging EMS and VPP

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-05-01

    Elements of EMS  International Standards Organization ( ISO ) 14001 , Environmental Management Systems  The Key Elements of EMS: - Policy - Planning...wingman-- ON and OFF duty Fully Conforming vs. Fully Implemented  “Fully Conforming”  Meets standards established in ISO 14001  ESOH council...e n c e Every airman looking out for his wingman-- ON and OFF duty EMS & VPP Commonalities Environmental Management System ISO 14001 : 2004 Voluntary

  17. Middle School and pH?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herricks, Susan

    2007-01-01

    A local middle school requested that the Water Center of Advanced Materials for Purification of Water With Systems (WaterCAMPWS), a National Science Foundation Science and Technology Center, provide an introduction to pH for their seventh-grade water-based service learning class. After sorting through a multitude of information about pH, a…

  18. pH. Agricultural Lesson Plans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southern Illinois Univ., Carbondale. Dept. of Agricultural Education and Mechanization.

    This lesson plan is intended for use in conducting classes on the effect of pH on plant growth. Presented first are an attention step/problem statement and a series of questions and answers designed to convey general information about soil pH and its effect on plants. The following topics are among those discussed: acidity and alkalinity; the…

  19. PER PhDs & Bachelor's Degrees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Susan C.

    2017-01-01

    Recently, the editor remarked to me that physics departments that offered a PhD with a specialization in Physics Education Research (PER) seemed to graduate more bachelor's degree recipients than those physics PhD departments that did not have the specialization. I was not convinced. That led to quite a bit of discussion between us. He compiled a…

  20. The PH.D. and the Profession.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beringause, Arthur

    The present status of the Ph.D. in English is briefly discussed. Don Cameron Allen's "The Ph.D. in English and American Literature" is praised as a much-needed study which can help the English profession revitalize graduate programs. Several of Allen's conclusions are briefly summarized. (BN)

  1. pH [Measure of Acidity].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, Paula

    This autoinstructional program deals with the study of the pH of given substances by using litmus and hydrion papers. It is a learning activity directed toward low achievers involved in the study of biology at the secondary school level. The time suggested for the unit is 25-30 minutes (plus additional time for further pH testing). The equipment…

  2. Middle School and pH?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herricks, Susan

    2007-01-01

    A local middle school requested that the Water Center of Advanced Materials for Purification of Water With Systems (WaterCAMPWS), a National Science Foundation Science and Technology Center, provide an introduction to pH for their seventh-grade water-based service learning class. After sorting through a multitude of information about pH, a…

  3. Inexpensive and Disposable pH Electrodes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldcamp, Michael J.; Conklin, Alfred; Nelson, Kimberly; Marchetti, Jessica; Brashear, Ryan; Epure, Emily

    2010-01-01

    Inexpensive electrodes for the measurement of pH have been constructed using the ionophore tribenzylamine for sensing H[superscript +] concentrations. Both traditional liquid-membrane electrodes and coated-wire electrodes have been constructed and studied, and both exhibit linear, nearly Nernstian responses to changes in pH. Measurements of pH…

  4. Response to the "Responsive PhD"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huyssen, David

    2007-01-01

    In June 2005, 50 graduate school deans gathered at Princeton to address the fact that the number of new PhDs conferred each year far exceeds the number of tenure-track academic jobs on offer. Under the auspices of the Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation's Responsive PhD Project, these deans spoke passionately about how American…

  5. Inexpensive and Disposable pH Electrodes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldcamp, Michael J.; Conklin, Alfred; Nelson, Kimberly; Marchetti, Jessica; Brashear, Ryan; Epure, Emily

    2010-01-01

    Inexpensive electrodes for the measurement of pH have been constructed using the ionophore tribenzylamine for sensing H[superscript +] concentrations. Both traditional liquid-membrane electrodes and coated-wire electrodes have been constructed and studied, and both exhibit linear, nearly Nernstian responses to changes in pH. Measurements of pH…

  6. Endoscopic sensing of alveolar pH

    PubMed Central

    Choudhury, D.; Tanner, M. G.; McAughtrie, S.; Yu, F.; Mills, B.; Choudhary, T. R.; Seth, S.; Craven, T. H.; Stone, J. M.; Mati, I. K.; Campbell, C. J.; Bradley, M.; Williams, C. K. I.; Dhaliwal, K.; Birks, T. A.; Thomson, R. R.

    2016-01-01

    Previously unobtainable measurements of alveolar pH were obtained using an endoscope-deployable optrode. The pH sensing was achieved using functionalized gold nanoshell sensors and surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). The optrode consisted of an asymmetric dual-core optical fiber designed for spatially separating the optical pump delivery and signal collection, in order to circumvent the unwanted Raman signal generated within the fiber. Using this approach, we demonstrate a ~100-fold increase in SERS signal-to-fiber background ratio, and demonstrate multiple site pH sensing with a measurement accuracy of ± 0.07 pH units in the respiratory acini of an ex vivo ovine lung model. We also demonstrate that alveolar pH changes in response to ventilation. PMID:28101415

  7. Endoscopic sensing of alveolar pH.

    PubMed

    Choudhury, D; Tanner, M G; McAughtrie, S; Yu, F; Mills, B; Choudhary, T R; Seth, S; Craven, T H; Stone, J M; Mati, I K; Campbell, C J; Bradley, M; Williams, C K I; Dhaliwal, K; Birks, T A; Thomson, R R

    2017-01-01

    Previously unobtainable measurements of alveolar pH were obtained using an endoscope-deployable optrode. The pH sensing was achieved using functionalized gold nanoshell sensors and surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). The optrode consisted of an asymmetric dual-core optical fiber designed for spatially separating the optical pump delivery and signal collection, in order to circumvent the unwanted Raman signal generated within the fiber. Using this approach, we demonstrate a ~100-fold increase in SERS signal-to-fiber background ratio, and demonstrate multiple site pH sensing with a measurement accuracy of ± 0.07 pH units in the respiratory acini of an ex vivo ovine lung model. We also demonstrate that alveolar pH changes in response to ventilation.

  8. Determination Of Ph Including Hemoglobin Correction

    DOEpatents

    Maynard, John D.; Hendee, Shonn P.; Rohrscheib, Mark R.; Nunez, David; Alam, M. Kathleen; Franke, James E.; Kemeny, Gabor J.

    2005-09-13

    Methods and apparatuses of determining the pH of a sample. A method can comprise determining an infrared spectrum of the sample, and determining the hemoglobin concentration of the sample. The hemoglobin concentration and the infrared spectrum can then be used to determine the pH of the sample. In some embodiments, the hemoglobin concentration can be used to select an model relating infrared spectra to pH that is applicable at the determined hemoglobin concentration. In other embodiments, a model relating hemoglobin concentration and infrared spectra to pH can be used. An apparatus according to the present invention can comprise an illumination system, adapted to supply radiation to a sample; a collection system, adapted to collect radiation expressed from the sample responsive to the incident radiation; and an analysis system, adapted to relate information about the incident radiation, the expressed radiation, and the hemoglobin concentration of the sample to pH.

  9. Development of Hybrid pH sensor for long-term seawater pH monitoring.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakano, Y.; Egashira, T.; Miwa, T.; Kimoto, H.

    2016-02-01

    We have been developing the in situ pH sensor (Hybrid pH sensor: HpHS) for the long-term seawater pH monitoring. We are planning to provide the HpHS for researchers and environmental consultants for observation of the CCS (Carbon dioxide Capture and Storage) monitoring system, the coastal environment monitoring system (e.g. Blue Carbon) and ocean acidification. The HpHS has two types of pH sensors (i.e. potentiometric pH sensor and spectrophotometric pH sensor). The spectrophotometric pH sensor can measure pH correctly and stably, however it needs large power consumption and a lot of reagents in a long period of observation. The pH sensor used m-cresol purple (mCP) as an indicator of pH (Clayton and Byrne, 1993 and Liu et al., 2011). We can choose both coefficients before deployment. On the other hand, although the potentiometric pH sensor is low power consumption and high-speed response (within 10 seconds), drifts in the pH of the potentiometric measurements may possibly occur for a long-term observation. The HpHS can measure in situ pH correctly and stably combining advantage of both pH sensors. The HpHS consists of an aluminum pressure housing with optical cell (main unit) and an aluminum silicon-oil filled, pressure-compensated vessel containing pumps and valves (diaphragm pump and valve unit) and pressure-compensated reagents bags (pH indicator, pure water and Tris buffer or certified reference material: CRM) with an ability to resist water pressure to 3000m depth. The main unit holds system control boards, pump drivers, data storage (micro SD card), LED right source, photodiode, optical cell and pressure proof windows. The HpHS also has an aluminum pressure housing that holds a rechargeable lithium-ion battery or a lithium battery for the power supply (DC 24 V). The HpHS is correcting the value of the potentiometric pH sensor (measuring frequently) by the value of the spectrophotometric pH sensor (measuring less frequently). It is possible to calibrate in

  10. Composting of rice straw with effective microorganisms (EM) and its influence on compost quality

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    This study aims to assess the effect of EM application on the composting process of rice straw with goat manure and green waste and to evaluate the quality of both compost treatments. There are two treatment piles in this study, in which one pile was applied with EM and another pile without EM. Each treatment was replicated three times with 90 days of composting duration. The parameters for the temperature, pH, TOC and C/N ratio, show that decomposition of organic matter occurs during the 90-day period. The t-test conducted shows that there is a significant difference between compost with EM and compost without EM. The application of EM in compost increases the macro and micronutrient content. The following parameters support this conclusion: compost applied with EM has more N, P and K content (P < 0.05) compared to compost without EM. Although the Fe in compost with EM is much higher (P < 0.05) than in the compost without EM, for Zn and Cu, there is no significant difference between treatments. This study suggests that the application of EM is suitable to increase the mineralization in the composting process. The final resultant compost indicated that it was in the range of the matured level and can be used without any restriction. PMID:23390930

  11. Comparison of two pH meters used for skin surface pH measurement: the pH meter 'pH900' from Courage & Khazaka versus the pH meter '1140' from Mettler Toledo.

    PubMed

    Ehlers, C; Ivens, U I; Møller, M L; Senderovitz, T; Serup, J

    2001-05-01

    Measurement of skin surface pH is used in clinical research to evaluate hazardous shifts in pH following external exposures and to evaluate the state of diseased skin with acute or chronic changes. It is therefore important to measure skin surface pH as precisely as possible. The aim of this study was to compare two commercially available pH meters used for skin surface pH measurement, to reveal differences between them in measured skin pH on the forearm. The first pH meter (pH900) had a pointed electrode and a stabilisation period of 3 s. The second pH meter (pH meter 1140) had a circular electrode and no fixed stabilisation period. Twelve healthy subjects (6 male and 6 female Caucasians) entered the study. The pH measurements were performed once an hour from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. on both forearms in five areas from the elbow to the "wristwatch" zone. In each area, three measurements were performed next to each other with both pH meters (15 measurements per arm per hour per pH meter). The pH900 has a higher measuring level and a higher variation than the pH meter 1140. A skin surface pH meter with a circular electrode and with no fixed stabilisation period is preferable. It is recommended that the pH meter be allowed to stabilise for at least 7 s before the result is read.

  12. Exhaled breath condensate pH assays.

    PubMed

    Davis, Michael D; Hunt, John

    2012-08-01

    Airway pH is central to the physiologic function and cellular biology of the airway. The causes of airway acidification include (1) hypopharyngeal gastric acid reflux with or without aspiration through the vocal cords, (2) inhalation of acid fog or gas (such as chlorine), and (3) intrinsic airway acidification caused by altered airway pH homeostasis in infectious and inflammatory disease processes. The recognition that relevant airway pH deviations occur in lung diseases is opening doors to new simple and inexpensive therapies. This recognition has resulted partly from the ability to use exhaled breath condensate as a window on airway acid-base balance.

  13. EMS in the pueblos.

    PubMed

    Vigil, M A

    1994-02-01

    Imagine creating a movie by excerpting scenes from "Dances With Wolves," splicing it with footage from "Code 3" or "Emergency Response" and then flavoring the script with the mystery of a Tony Hillerman novel. A film producer would probably find it quite difficult to choreograph a finished product from such a compilation of material. To hundreds of Native American EMS providers, however, such a movie is played out every day in Indian country. And with this movie come some real-life problems, including trauma, which is the number-one cause of premature death among Native Americans. But a high trauma rate is just one of the challenges facing tribal EMS responders. There's also prolonged response and transport, the problems involved in maintaining the unique culture and standard of care, the challenges of tribal EMS administration and EMS education of Native American students, and the unsure future of Native American EMS. Beyond that, there's the fact that EMS is a s unique to each Indian reservation as are the cultures of the native peoples who reside on these lands. Yet while no two systems are alike, most tribal EMS providers face similar challenges.

  14. Continuous direct measurement of intracellular chloride and pH in frog skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Bolton, T. B.; Vaughan-Jones, R. D.

    1977-01-01

    1. Ion-sensitive electrodes (made with a chloride-sensitive ion-exchange resin) were used to measure the internal chloride activity (aiCl) of frog sartorius fibres at 25° C. 2. The internal pH (pHi) of other sartorius fibres was measured with a recessed tip pH-sensitive electrode (made with pH-sensitive glass). 3. In normal bicarbonate-free solution (containing 2·5 mM potassium), the average chloride equilibrium potential, ECl (calculated from aiCl and the measured chloride activity of the external solution (aoCl) was 87·7 ± 1·7 mV (mean ± S.E.; n = 16) in fibres where the average membrane potential, Em, was 88·3 ± 1·5 mV (mean ± S.E.; n = 16). In experiments where aiCl was varied between about 1 and 10 mM (which corresponds to values of Em between about -105 and -50 mV) ECl was within 1-3 mV of Em at equilibrium. These measurements of aiCl were obtained from the potential difference between the chloride-sensitive electrode and an intracellular indifferent micro-electrode filled with potassium chloride. If a potassium sulphate-filled indifferent micro-electrode was used, then values of aiCl below about 5 mM were erroneously high, probably due to interference from other sarcoplasmic ions at the indifferent electrode. 4. In solutions containing 15 mM bicarbonate and gassed with 5% CO2, pHi was 6·9, corresponding to an internal bicarbonate concentration of 7·6 mM. ECl measured in this solution was some 4 mV positive to Em. Most of the difference between ECl and Em could be ascribed to interference by sarcoplasmic bicarbonate on the basis of selectivity measurements of chloride against bicarbonate made on the ion-exchange resin in the relevant range of aCl. 5. If bicarbonate/CO2 in the external solution was replaced by HEPES/pure O2 at constant pH, then pHi rose from 6·88 ± 0·02 (mean ± S.E.) to 7·05 ± 0·02. A change in external pH of 1 unit caused pHi to change by about 0·02 unit and the intracellular buffering power was calculated to be about 35

  15. Colorimetric Determination of pH.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tucker, Sheryl; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Presented is an activity in which the pH of a solution can be quantitatively measured using a spectrophotometer. The theory, experimental details, sample preparation and selection, instrumentation, and results are discussed. (CW)

  16. Effect of two mouthwashes on salivary ph.

    PubMed

    Belardinelli, Paola A; Morelatto, Rosana A; Benavidez, Tomás E; Baruzzi, Ana M; López de Blanc, Silvia A

    2014-01-01

    To analyze the effect of two mouthwashes on salivary pH and correlate it with age, buffer capacity and saliva flow rate in healthy volunteers, a crossover phase IV clinical study involving three age-based groups was designed. Two commercial mouthwashes (MW), Cool Mint ListerineR (MWa) and Periobacter R (MWb) were used. The unstimulated saliva of each individual was first characterized by measuring flow rate, pH, and buffer capacity. Salivary pH was evaluated before rinsing with a given MW, immediately after rinsing, 5 minutes later, and then every 10 min (at 15, 25, 35 min) until the baseline pH was recovered. Paired t-test, ANOVA with a randomized block design, and Pearson correlation tests were used. Averages were 0.63 mL/min, 7.06, and 0.87 for flow rate, pH, and buffer capacity, respectively. An immediate significant increase in salivary pH was observed after rinsing, reaching average values of 7.24 (MWb) and 7.30 (MWa), which declined to an almost stable value 15 minutes. The great increase in salivary pH, after MW use shows that saliva is a dynamic system, and that the organism is capable of responding to a stimulus with changes in its composition. It is thus evident that pH of the external agent alone is not a good indicator for its erosive potential because biological systems tend to neutralize it. The results of this study enhance the importance of in vivo measurements and reinforce the concept of the protective action of saliva.

  17. [Power in the PhD programme].

    PubMed

    Tijdink, J K

    2016-01-01

    This article describes the role of power in the world of biomedical research. On the basis of some examples, I intend to demonstrate the influence of power, or its misuse, on PhD students and supervisors, and how this may have a negative effect on the research of PhD students. I will then outline how the biomedical research field can prevent these practices, and how it can create a better and more inspiring atmosphere for young, enthusiastic and talented researchers.

  18. Clinical utility of pH paper versus pH meter in the measurement of critical gastric pH in stress ulcer prophylaxis.

    PubMed

    Bradley, J S; Phillips, J O; Cavanaugh, J E; Metzler, M H

    1998-11-01

    To evaluate the clinical utility of measuring gastric pH with a pH meter vs. pH paper in critical care patients. Prospective comparison of gastric pH measurements, using both pH meter and pH paper. Surgical intensive care unit (ICU) at a rural Midwestern university medical center. Fifty-one patients who received therapy for prophylaxis of stress ulcers in the surgical ICU. Therapy for stress ulcer prophylaxis was monitored. The pH of 985 gastric samples, taken from 51 patients, was measured with both pH meter and pH paper. The pH meter and pH paper measures demonstrated a concordance correlation coefficient of .896. The mean difference between the two measures (pH paper - pH meter) was estimated to be between -0.4 and 1.4, suggesting a positive bias for the paper. The prevalence of events representing clinically relevant differences between the pH meter and pH paper in the measurement of the same gastric sample was calculated. The frequency with which each of the events occurred consecutively (or, in one case, two nearly consecutive events on the same day) was also calculated. Bias in a clinically relevant range was estimated. A set of "probability profiles" was constructed. A hand-held pH meter and pH paper are not interchangeable measures of gastric pH. The pH paper exhibits an appreciable positive bias compared with a hand-held pH meter in the clinically relevant range of 2 to 6. More research is needed to determine if that bias affects treatment outcomes. We recommend the use of a pH meter for patients who demonstrate pH readings of < or = 4, consecutive with readings of < or = 5.

  19. Eukaryotic diversity at pH extremes

    PubMed Central

    Amaral-Zettler, Linda A.

    2013-01-01

    Extremely acidic (pH < 3) and extremely alkaline (pH > 9) environments support a diversity of single-cell and to a lesser extent, multicellular eukaryotic life. This study compared alpha and beta diversity in eukaryotic communities from seven diverse aquatic environments with pH values ranging from 2 to 11 using massively-parallel pyrotag sequencing targeting the V9 hypervariable region of the 18S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene. A total of 946 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) were recovered at a 6% cut-off level (94% similarity) across the sampled environments. Hierarchical clustering of the samples segregated the communities into acidic and alkaline groups. Similarity percentage (SIMPER) analysis followed by indicator OTU analysis (IOA) and non-metric multidimensional scaling (NMDS) were used to determine which characteristic groups of eukaryotic taxa typify acidic or alkaline extremes and the extent to which pH explains eukaryotic community structure in these environments. Spain's Rio Tinto yielded the fewest observed OTUs while Nebraska Sandhills alkaline lakes yielded the most. Distinct OTUs, including metazoan OTUs, numerically dominated pH extreme sites. Indicator OTUs included the diatom Pinnularia and unidentified opisthokonts (Fungi and Filasterea) in the extremely acidic environments, and the ciliate Frontonia across the extremely alkaline sites. Inferred from NMDS, pH explained only a modest fraction of the variation across the datasets, indicating that other factors influence the underlying community structure in these environments. The findings from this study suggest that the ability for eukaryotes to adapt to pH extremes over a broad range of values may be rare, but further study of taxa that can broadly adapt across diverse acidic and alkaline environments, respectively present good models for understanding adaptation and should be targeted for future investigations. PMID:23335919

  20. Eukaryotic diversity at pH extremes.

    PubMed

    Amaral-Zettler, Linda A

    2012-01-01

    Extremely acidic (pH < 3) and extremely alkaline (pH > 9) environments support a diversity of single-cell and to a lesser extent, multicellular eukaryotic life. This study compared alpha and beta diversity in eukaryotic communities from seven diverse aquatic environments with pH values ranging from 2 to 11 using massively-parallel pyrotag sequencing targeting the V9 hypervariable region of the 18S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene. A total of 946 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) were recovered at a 6% cut-off level (94% similarity) across the sampled environments. Hierarchical clustering of the samples segregated the communities into acidic and alkaline groups. Similarity percentage (SIMPER) analysis followed by indicator OTU analysis (IOA) and non-metric multidimensional scaling (NMDS) were used to determine which characteristic groups of eukaryotic taxa typify acidic or alkaline extremes and the extent to which pH explains eukaryotic community structure in these environments. Spain's Rio Tinto yielded the fewest observed OTUs while Nebraska Sandhills alkaline lakes yielded the most. Distinct OTUs, including metazoan OTUs, numerically dominated pH extreme sites. Indicator OTUs included the diatom Pinnularia and unidentified opisthokonts (Fungi and Filasterea) in the extremely acidic environments, and the ciliate Frontonia across the extremely alkaline sites. Inferred from NMDS, pH explained only a modest fraction of the variation across the datasets, indicating that other factors influence the underlying community structure in these environments. The findings from this study suggest that the ability for eukaryotes to adapt to pH extremes over a broad range of values may be rare, but further study of taxa that can broadly adapt across diverse acidic and alkaline environments, respectively present good models for understanding adaptation and should be targeted for future investigations.

  1. MRF with adjustable pH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, Stephen D.

    2011-10-01

    Deterministic final polishing of high precision optics using sub-aperture processing with magnetorheological finishing (MRF) is an accepted practice throughout the world. A wide variety of materials can be successfully worked with aqueous (pH 10), magnetorheological (MR) fluids, using magnetic carbonyl iron (CI) and either ceria or nanodiamond nonmagnetic abrasives. Polycrystalline materials like zinc sulfide (ZnS) and zinc selenide (ZnSe) are difficult to polish at pH 10 with MRF, due to their grain size and the relatively low stiffness of the MR fluid lap. If microns of material are removed, the grain structure of the material begins to appear. In 2005, Kozhinova et al. (Appl. Opt. 44 4671-4677) demonstrated that lowering pH could improve MRF of ZnS. However, magnetic CI particle corrosion rendered their low pH approach unstable and unsuitable for commercial implementation. In 2009, Shafrir et al. described a sol-gel coating process for manufacturing a zirconia-coated CI particle that protects the magnetic core from aqueous corrosion (Appl. Opt .48 6797-6810). The coating process produces free nanozirconia polishing abrasives during the coating procedure, thereby creating an MR polishing powder that is "self-charged" with the polishing abrasive. By simply adding water, it was possible to polish optical glasses and ceramics with good stability at pH 8 for three weeks. The development of a corrosion resistant, MR polishing powder, opens up the possibility for polishing additional materials, wherein the pH may be adjusted to optimize effectiveness. In this paper we describe the CI coating process, the characterization of the coated powder, and procedures for making stable MR fluids with adjustable pH, giving polishing results for a variety of optical glasses and crystalline ceramics.

  2. pH. Training Module 5.305.2.77.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirkwood Community Coll., Cedar Rapids, IA.

    This document is an instructional module package prepared in objective form for use by an instructor familiar with pH, measurement of pH with a pH meter and maintenance of pH meter electrodes. Included are objectives, instructor guides, student handouts and transparency masters. This module considers the definition of pH, types of electrodes and…

  3. A Nanocrystal-based Ratiometric pH Sensor for Natural pH Ranges

    PubMed Central

    Somers, Rebecca C.; Lanning, Ryan M.; Snee, Preston T.; Greytak, Andrew B.; Jain, Rakesh K.

    2014-01-01

    Summary A ratiometric fluorescent pH sensor based on CdSe/CdZnS nanocrystal quantum dots (NCs) has been designed for biological pH ranges. The construct is formed from the conjugation of a pH dye (SNARF) to NCs coated with a poly(amido amine) (PAMAM) dendrimer. The sensor exhibits a well–resolved ratio response at pH values between 6 and 8 under linear or two–photon excitation, and in the presence of a 4% bovine serum albumin (BSA) solution. PMID:26413260

  4. A Nanocrystal-based Ratiometric pH Sensor for Natural pH Ranges.

    PubMed

    Somers, Rebecca C; Lanning, Ryan M; Snee, Preston T; Greytak, Andrew B; Jain, Rakesh K; Bawendi, Moungi G; Nocera, Daniel G

    A ratiometric fluorescent pH sensor based on CdSe/CdZnS nanocrystal quantum dots (NCs) has been designed for biological pH ranges. The construct is formed from the conjugation of a pH dye (SNARF) to NCs coated with a poly(amido amine) (PAMAM) dendrimer. The sensor exhibits a well-resolved ratio response at pH values between 6 and 8 under linear or two-photon excitation, and in the presence of a 4% bovine serum albumin (BSA) solution.

  5. MD-PhDs in dermatology.

    PubMed

    Prystowsky, J H

    1992-05-01

    A national survey was conducted to explore ways in which MD-PhDs in dermatology balance their research and clinical interests and the factors that influenced their career decisions. A questionnaire was mailed to all MD-PhDs who were affiliated with dermatology training programs as determined by a preliminary study. The survey consisted of a questionnaire about research background, career pathway, attitudes about personal and professional issues, and influence of residency training program on career decision making. From 60 MD-PhD dermatologists surveyed, 43 (72%) completed questionnaires. Eighty percent of the respondents (34 of 43) held positions in academic medicine; 76% entered dermatology with the intent to pursue academic medicine. Almost all (93%) held academic positions immediately after residency; 50% held positions with the title of assistant professor or higher as their first postresidency employment. Only 26% of the respondents received funding for their MD-PhD through the federally funded Medical Scientist Training Program. Fifty percent of the respondents completed their training with loans. Despite the long period of training and expense required for the dual career, a high percentage (80%) stayed in academic dermatology suggesting that they are an important source for supplying physician-scientists to the field of dermatology. The ability to limit patient care responsibilities and maintain protected time for research may be a factor responsible for the high percentage of MD-PhDs that stay in academic dermatology.

  6. Imaging pH and Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Hashim, Arig Ibrahim; Zhang, Xiaomeng; Wojtkowiakk, Jonathan W.; Gillies, Robert J.

    2013-01-01

    Metastasis is a multistep process that culminates in the spread of cells from a primary tumor to a distant site or organs. For tumor cells to be able to metastasize, they have to locally invade through basement membrane into the lymphatic and the blood vasculatures. Eventually they extravasate from the blood and colonize in the secondary organ. This process involves multiple interactions between the tumor cells and their microenvironments. The microenvironment surrounding tumors has a significant impact on tumor development and progression. A key factor in the microenvironment is an acidic pH. The extracellular pH of solid tumors is more acidic in comparison to normal tissue as a consequence of high glycolysis and poor perfusion. It plays an important role in almost all steps of metastasis. The past decades have seen development of technologies to non-invasively measure intra- and/or extracellular pH. Most successful measurements are MR-based, and sensitivity and accuracy have dramatically improved. Quantitatively imaging the distribution of acidity helps us understand the role of the tumor microenvironment in cancer progression. This review discusses different MR methods in measuring tumor pH along with emphasizing the importance of extracelluar tumor low pH on different steps of metastasis; more specifically focusing on Epithelial to Mesenchymal transition (EMT), and anti cancer immunity. PMID:21387439

  7. Thermally programmable pH buffers.

    PubMed

    Van Gough, Dara; Bunker, Bruce C; Roberts, Mark E; Huber, Dale L; Zarick, Holly F; Austin, Mariah J; Wheeler, Jill S; Moore, Diana; Spoerke, Erik D

    2012-11-01

    Many reactions in both chemistry and biology rely on the ability to precisely control and fix the solution concentrations of either protons or hydroxide ions. In this report, we describe the behavior of thermally programmable pH buffer systems based on the copolymerization of varying amounts of acrylic acid (AA) groups into N-isopropylacrylamide polymers. Because the copolymers undergo phase transitions upon heating and cooling, the local environment around the AA groups can be reversibly switched between hydrophobic and hydrophilic states affecting the ionization behavior of the acids. Results show that moderate temperature variations can be used to change the solution pH by two units. However, results also indicate that the nature of the transition and its impact on the pH values are highly dependent on the AA content and the degree of neutralization.

  8. Fiber-Optic pH Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganesh, A. Balaji; Radhakrishnan, T. K.

    The new enhancement in the determination of pH using optical fiber system is described here. This work uses the membrane made of cellulose acetate membrane for reagent immobilization and congo red (pKa 3.7) and neutral red (pKa 7.2) as pH indicators. An effective covalent chemical binding procedure is used to immobilize the indicatorsE The response time, reversibility, linear range, reproducibility, and long-term stability of fiber optic sensor with congo red as well as neutral red have been determined. The linear range measured for the sensor based on the congo red and neutral red is 4.2-6.3 and 4.1-9.0, respectively. The response time of sensor membrane is measured by varying the substance pH values between 11.0 and 2.0.

  9. pH and Titratable Acidity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadler, George D.; Murphy, Patricia A.

    There are two interrelated concepts in food analysis that deal with acidity: pH and titratable acidity. Each of these quantities is analytically determined in separate ways and each has its own particular impact on food quality. Titratable acidity deals with measurement of the total acid concentration contained within a food (also called total acidity). This quantity is determined by exhaustive titration of intrinsic acids with a standard base. Titratable acidity is a better predictor of acid's impact on flavor than pH.

  10. Differential genotoxicity of diphenyl diselenide (PhSe)2 and diphenyl ditelluride (PhTe)2.

    PubMed

    Meinerz, Daiane Francine; Allebrandt, Josiane; Mariano, Douglas O C; Waczuk, Emily P; Soares, Felix Antunes; Hassan, Waseem; Rocha, João Batista T

    2014-01-01

    Organoselenium compounds have been pointed out as therapeutic agents. In contrast, the potential therapeutic aspects of tellurides have not yet been demonstrated. The present study evaluated the comparative toxicological effects of diphenyl diselenide (PhSe)2 and diphenyl ditelluride (PhTe)2 in mice after in vivo administration. Genotoxicity (as determined by comet assay) and mutagenicicity were used as end-points of toxicity. Subcutaneous administration of high doses of (PhSe)2 or (PhTe)2 (500 µmol/kg) caused distinct genotoxicity in mice. (PhSe)2 significantly decreased the DNA damage index after 48 and 96 h of its injection (p < 0.05). In contrast, (PhTe) caused a significant increase in DNA damage (p < 0.05) after 48 and 96 h of intoxication. (PhSe)2 did not cause mutagenicity but (PhTe)2 increased the micronuclei frequency, indicating its mutagenic potential. The present study demonstrated that acute in vivo exposure to ditelluride caused genotoxicity in mice, which may be associated with pro-oxidant effects of diphenyl ditelluride. In addition, the use of this compound and possibly other related tellurides must be carefully controlled.

  11. Evaluation of fluorimetric pH sensors for bioprocess monitoring at low pH.

    PubMed

    Janzen, Nils H; Schmidt, Michael; Krause, Christian; Weuster-Botz, Dirk

    2015-09-01

    Optical chemical sensors are the standard for pH monitoring in small-scale bioreactors such as microtiter plates, shaking flasks or other single-use bioreactors. The dynamic pH range of the so far commercially available fluorescent pH sensors applied in small-scale bioreactors is restricted to pH monitoring around neutral pH, although many fermentation processes are performed at pH < 6 on industrial scale. Thus, two new prototype acidic fluorescence pH sensors immobilized in single-use stirred-tank bioreactors, one with excitation at 470 nm and emission at 550 nm (sensor 470/550) and the other with excitation at 505 nm and emission at 600 nm (sensor 505/600), were characterized with respect to dynamic ranges and operational stability in representative fermentation media. Best resolution and dynamic range was observed with pH sensor 505/600 in mineral medium (dynamic range of 3.9 < pH < 7.2). Applying the same pH sensors to complex medium results in a drastic reduction of resolution and dynamic ranges. Yeast extract in complex medium was found to cause background fluorescence at the sensors' operating wavelength combinations. Optical isolation of the sensor by adding a black colored polymer layer above the sensor spot and fixing an aperture made of adhesive photoresistant foil between the fluorescence reader and the transparent bottom of the polystyrene reactors enabled full re-establishment of the sensor's characteristics. Reliability and operational stability of sensor 505/600 was shown by online pH monitoring (4.5 < pH < 5.8) of parallel anaerobic batch fermentations of Clostridium acetobutylicum for the production of acetone, butanol and ethanol (ABE) with offline pH measurements with a standard glass electrode as reference.

  12. Optoelectronic pH Meter: Further Details

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeevarajan, Antony S.; Anderson, Mejody M.; Macatangay, Ariel V.

    2009-01-01

    A collection of documents provides further detailed information about an optoelectronic instrument that measures the pH of an aqueous cell-culture medium to within 0.1 unit in the range from 6.5 to 7.5. The instrument at an earlier stage of development was reported in Optoelectronic Instrument Monitors pH in a Culture Medium (MSC-23107), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 28, No. 9 (September 2004), page 4a. To recapitulate: The instrument includes a quartz cuvette through which the medium flows as it is circulated through a bioreactor. The medium contains some phenol red, which is an organic pH-indicator dye. The cuvette sits between a light source and a photodetector. [The light source in the earlier version comprised red (625 nm) and green (558 nm) light-emitting diodes (LEDs); the light source in the present version comprises a single green- (560 nm)-or-red (623 nm) LED.] The red and green are repeatedly flashed in alternation. The responses of the photodiode to the green and red are processed electronically to obtain the ratio between the amounts of green and red light transmitted through the medium. The optical absorbance of the phenol red in the green light varies as a known function of pH. Hence, the pH of the medium can be calculated from the aforesaid ratio.

  13. Ph.D.'s and the Marketplace.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harvey, James

    Throughout the last decade, Ph.D. recipients were accustomed to a job market in which demand for their services far exceeded supply. During the same period, manpower experts predicted this situation would continue in the foreseeable future. However, when the 60's ended, the employment illusion had been rudely dispelled by frantic reports of a…

  14. The Economic Contribution of PhDs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casey, Bernard H.

    2009-01-01

    This paper looks at what the value of a doctorate is, both to employers in particular and to society and the economy at large. Given the emphasis many universities and funding agencies/governments are putting upon the development of PhD programmes, this is an issue deserving attention. The paper tries to show how two separate but interrelated…

  15. New Directions for the Ph.D.?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deener, David R.

    The award rate of doctorates has tripled since 1960 and the projections indicate that by 1980 the rate will be somewhere between 60 and 70,000. In recent years every facet of the PhD has come under attack. The degree will probably be reshaped from a standard of achievement and accomplishment to a standard of potential, from a demonstration of the…

  16. pH & Rate of Enzymatic Reactions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clariana, Roy B.

    1991-01-01

    A quantitative and inexpensive way to measure the rate of enzymatic reaction is provided. The effects of different pH levels on the reaction rate of an enzyme from yeast are investigated and the results graphed. Background information, a list of needed materials, directions for preparing solutions, procedure, and results and discussion are…

  17. The closed eye environement: pH.

    PubMed

    Hill, R M; Carney, L G

    1976-11-01

    Earlier observations showed that unbuffered bathing media held by a closed chamber against the eye would become progressively more acid over a few minutes. Such shifts, however, when examined for the naturally closed eye, even for prolonged periods, were found to be within 1 pH unit of the open-eye measured average.

  18. Teaching Physics Using PhET Simulations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wieman, C. E.; Adams, W. K.; Loeblein, P.; Perkins, K. K.

    2010-01-01

    PhET Interactive Simulations (sims) are now being widely used in teaching physics and chemistry. Sims can be used in many different educational settings, including lecture, individual or small group inquiry activities, homework, and lab. Here we will highlight a few ways to use them in teaching, based on our research and experiences using them in…

  19. First-Principles pH Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yong-Hyun; Zhang, S. B.

    2006-03-01

    Despite being one of the most important macroscopic measures and a long history even before the quantum mechanics, the concept of pH has rarely been mentioned in microscopic theories, nor being incorporated computationally into first-principles theory of aqueous solutions. Here, we formulate a theory for the pH dependence of solution formation energy by introducing the proton chemical potential as the microscopic counterpart of pH in atomistic solution models. Within the theory, the general acid-base chemistry can be cast in a simple pictorial representation. We adopt density-functional molecular dynamics to demonstrate the usefulness of the method by studying a number of solution systems including water, small solute molecules such as NH3 and HCOOH, and more complex amino acids with several functional groups. For pure water, we calculated the auto- ionization constant to be 13.2 with a 95 % accuracy. For other solutes, the calculated dissociation constants, i.e., the so- called pKa, are also in reasonable agreement with experiments. Our first-principles pH theory can be readily applied to broad solution chemistry problems such as redox reactions.

  20. The Economic Contribution of PhDs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casey, Bernard H.

    2009-01-01

    This paper looks at what the value of a doctorate is, both to employers in particular and to society and the economy at large. Given the emphasis many universities and funding agencies/governments are putting upon the development of PhD programmes, this is an issue deserving attention. The paper tries to show how two separate but interrelated…

  1. The Ph.D. Value Proposition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Kenneth J.

    2012-01-01

    Atlanta University launched its doctor of arts in humanities (DAH) programs almost 40 years ago, and, since the 1988 merger with Clark College, Clark Atlanta University has continued to award the degrees. This fall, for the first time, its students will be able to earn Ph.D.s in humanities instead. In DAH programs around the country, there's been…

  2. Monitoring fetal pH by telemetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blum, A.; Donahoe, T.; Jhabvala, M. D.; Ryan, W.

    1980-01-01

    Telemetry unit has been developed for possible use in measuring scalp-tissue pH and heart rate of unborn infant. Unit radius data to receiver as much as 50 ft. away. Application exists during hours just prior to childbirth to give warning of problems that might require cesarean delivery.

  3. Profile of Ph.Ds in Canada.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    von Zur-Muehlen, Max

    A profile of the socio-economic characteristics of the permanent residents of Canada holding an earned doctorate is presented. In 1973, there were 27,410 Canadian residents who had obtained an earned doctorate. (Holders of such professional doctoral degrees as Doctor of Medicine are excluded from this study.) Only 9 percent of the Ph.Ds were…

  4. What My Ph.D. Taught Me

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levenstein, Jessica

    2013-01-01

    The author started in the Ph.D. program in comparative literature at Princeton in 1992, a year after she graduated from college. She fell in love with mythology and the classical traditions and find herself teaching literature. In the remainder of her time at Princeton, she precepted for four or five more classes, got the chance to join the…

  5. What My Ph.D. Taught Me

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levenstein, Jessica

    2013-01-01

    The author started in the Ph.D. program in comparative literature at Princeton in 1992, a year after she graduated from college. She fell in love with mythology and the classical traditions and find herself teaching literature. In the remainder of her time at Princeton, she precepted for four or five more classes, got the chance to join the…

  6. Teaching Physics Using PhET Simulations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wieman, C. E.; Adams, W. K.; Loeblein, P.; Perkins, K. K.

    2010-01-01

    PhET Interactive Simulations (sims) are now being widely used in teaching physics and chemistry. Sims can be used in many different educational settings, including lecture, individual or small group inquiry activities, homework, and lab. Here we will highlight a few ways to use them in teaching, based on our research and experiences using them in…

  7. The Ph.D. Value Proposition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Kenneth J.

    2012-01-01

    Atlanta University launched its doctor of arts in humanities (DAH) programs almost 40 years ago, and, since the 1988 merger with Clark College, Clark Atlanta University has continued to award the degrees. This fall, for the first time, its students will be able to earn Ph.D.s in humanities instead. In DAH programs around the country, there's been…

  8. Development of sulfonamide AKT PH domain inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Ahad, Ali Md; Zuohe, Song; Du-Cuny, Lei; Moses, Sylvestor A; Zhou, Li Li; Zhang, Shuxing; Powis, Garth; Meuillet, Emmanuelle J; Mash, Eugene A

    2011-03-15

    Disruption of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/AKT signaling pathway can lead to apoptosis in cancer cells. Previously we identified a lead sulfonamide that selectively bound to the pleckstrin homology (PH) domain of AKT and induced apoptosis when present at low micromolar concentrations. To examine the effects of structural modification, a set of sulfonamides related to the lead compound was designed, synthesized, and tested for binding to the expressed PH domain of AKT using a surface plasmon resonance-based competitive binding assay. Cellular activity was determined by means of an assay for pAKT production and a cell killing assay using BxPC-3 cells. The most active compounds in the set are lipophilic and possess an aliphatic chain of the proper length. Results were interpreted with the aid of computational modeling. This paper represents the first structure-activity relationship (SAR) study of a large family of AKT PH domain inhibitors. Information obtained will be used in the design of the next generation of inhibitors of AKT PH domain function.

  9. pH & Rate of Enzymatic Reactions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clariana, Roy B.

    1991-01-01

    A quantitative and inexpensive way to measure the rate of enzymatic reaction is provided. The effects of different pH levels on the reaction rate of an enzyme from yeast are investigated and the results graphed. Background information, a list of needed materials, directions for preparing solutions, procedure, and results and discussion are…

  10. Monitoring fetal pH by telemetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blum, A.; Donahoe, T.; Jhabvala, M. D.; Ryan, W.

    1980-01-01

    Telemetry unit has been developed for possible use in measuring scalp-tissue pH and heart rate of unborn infant. Unit radius data to receiver as much as 50 ft. away. Application exists during hours just prior to childbirth to give warning of problems that might require cesarean delivery.

  11. EMS in Mauritius.

    PubMed

    Ramalanjaona, Georges; Brogan, Gerald X

    2009-02-01

    Mauritius lies in the southwest Indian Ocean about 1250 miles from the African coast and 500 miles from Madagascar. Mauritius (estimated population 1,230,602) became independent from the United Kingdom in 1968 and has one of the highest GDP per capita in Africa. Within Mauritius there is a well established EMS system with a single 999 national dispatch system. Ambulances are either publicly or privately owned. Public ambulances are run by the Government (SAMU). Megacare is a private subscriber only ambulance service. The Government has recently invested in new technology such as telemedicine to further enhance the role of EMS on the island. This article describes the current state of EMS in Mauritius and depicts its development in the context of Government effort to decentralise and modernise the healthcare system.

  12. EMS -- Error Message Service

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rees, P. C. T.; Chipperfield, A. J.; Draper, P. W.

    This document describes the Error Message Service, EMS, and its use in system software. The purpose of EMS is to provide facilities for constructing and storing error messages for future delivery to the user -- usually via the Starlink Error Reporting System, ERR (see SUN/104). EMS can be regarded as a simplified version of ERR without the binding to any software environment (e.g., for message output or access to the parameter and data systems). The routines in this library conform to the error reporting conventions described in SUN/104. A knowledge of these conventions, and of the ADAM system (see SG/4), is assumed in what follows. This document is intended for Starlink systems programmers and can safely be ignored by applications programmers and users.

  13. [A comparison of pH<4 and pH<5 as thresholds for 24-hour pH monitoring in the diagnosis of laryngopharyngeal reflux].

    PubMed

    Wang, J S; Li, J R

    2016-09-07

    Objective: To evaluate the consistency between 24-hour pH monitoring, reflux symptom index(RSI) and reflux finding score(RFS) when using pH<4 or pH<5 as threshold for 24-hour pH monitoring in the diagnosis of laryngopharyngeal reflux. Methods: Patients who presented with suspicious laryngopharyngeal reflux between February 2014 and December 2015 were included in this study. pH<4 and pH<5 reflux episodes, RSI and RFS were collected. The consistency between 24-hour pH monitoring and scale results were analyzed when pH<4 or pH<5 as threshold respectively. The sensitivity and specificity of 24-hour pH monitoring were calculated separately. Results: Median number(M[P25, P75, P95]) of reflux events were 0 [0, 3.0, 5.5] when using pH<4 as pathological threshold and 0 [0, 4.0, and 8.5] using pH<5 as pathological threshold. Laryngopharyngeal reflux was determined in 34.5% patients depending on 24-hour pH monitoring when pH<4 was used as threshold, chi-square revealed medium consistency (κ=0.483) between pH monitoring and scale result. If pH<5 was used as threshold, 41.8% patients were detected with laryngopharyngeal reflux, and the consistency of pH monitoring and scale result was medium(κ=0.540). With RSI and RFS for reference, the sensitivity and specificity of 24-hour pH monitoring were 54.7% and 93.4% respectively when pH<4 was used as threshold. If pH<5 was used as threshold, the sensitivity and specificity of 24-hour pH monitoring were 65.6% and 91.3% respectively. Conclusions: Compared with pH<4 as pathological threshold, the consistency of pH monitoring and scale results was a little better using pH<5 as pathological threshold.

  14. National EMS Research Agenda.

    PubMed

    Sayre, M R; White, L J; Brown, L H; McHenry, S D

    2002-01-01

    Now, more than ever before, the spirit of the emergency services professional is recognized by people everywhere. Individuals from every walk of life comprehend the reality of the job these professionals do each day. Placing the safety of others above their own is their acknowledged responsibility. Rescue and treatment of ill and injured patients are their purpose as well as their gratification. The men and women who provide prehospital care are well aware of the unpredictable nature of emergency medical services (EMS). Prehospital care is given when and where it is needed: in urban settings with vertical challenges and gridlock; in rural settings with limited access; in confined spaces; within entrapments; or simply in the street, exposed to the elements. Despite the challenges, EMS professionals rise to the occasion to do their best with the resources available. Despite more than 30 years of dedicated service by thousands of EMS professionals, academic researchers, and public policy makers, the nation's EMS system is treating victims of illness and injury with little or no evidence that the care they provide is optimal. A national investment in the EMS research infrastructure is necessary to overcome obstacles currently impeding the accumulation of essential evidence of the effectiveness of EMS practice. Funding is required to train new researchers and to help them establish their careers. Financial backing is needed to support the development of effective prehospital treatments for the diseases that drive the design of the EMS system, including injury and sudden cardiac arrest. Innovative strategies to make EMS research easier to accomplish in emergency situations must be implemented. Researchers must have access to patient outcome information in order to evaluate and improve prehospital care. New biomedical and technical advances must be evaluated using scientific methodology. Research is the key to maintaining focus on improving the overall health of the

  15. Relation between pH in the Trunk and Face: Truncal pH Can Be Easily Predicted from Facial pH.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung Ae; Kim, Bo Ri; Chun, Mi Young; Youn, Sang Woong

    2016-04-01

    The clinical symptoms of facial and truncal acne differ. Skin surface acidity (pH), which is affected by sebum secretions, reflects the different clinical characteristics of the face and trunk. However, no studies have been conducted on truncal sebum production and skin pH. We evaluated the differences and relationship between pH values of the face and trunk. We also evaluated the relationship between pH and the quantity of sebum produced in the trunk. A total of 35 female patients clinically diagnosed with truncal acne were included. We measured pH on the face and truncal area using the Skin-pH-Meter PH 905®. We measured truncal sebum secretions using the Sebumeter SM 815®. Statistical analysis was performed to evaluate the correlations and differences between pH and sebum. Facial pH was significantly higher than chest and back pH values. The correlation between pH on the trunk and the face was significant. We used linear regression equations to estimate truncal pH using only measured pH from the chin. There was no significant relationship between truncal sebum secretion and pH. This was the first study that evaluated the differences and correlations between facial and truncal pH. We found that facial pH can predict truncal pH. In addition, we conclude that differences in pH and sebum secretion between the face and trunk are one of the reasons for differences in acne symptom at those sites.

  16. The pH of Enceladus' ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glein, Christopher R.; Baross, John A.; Waite, J. Hunter

    2015-08-01

    Saturn's moon, Enceladus, is a geologically active waterworld. The prevailing paradigm is that there is a subsurface ocean that erupts to the surface, which leads to the formation of a plume of vapor and ice above the south polar region. The chemistry of the ocean is just beginning to be understood, but is of profound geochemical and astrobiological interest. Here, we determine the pH of the ocean using a thermodynamic model of carbonate speciation. Observational data from the Cassini spacecraft are used to make a chemical model of ocean water on Enceladus. The model suggests that Enceladus' ocean is a Na-Cl-CO3 solution with an alkaline pH of ∼11-12. The dominance of aqueous NaCl is a feature that Enceladus' ocean shares with terrestrial seawater, but the ubiquity of dissolved Na2CO3 suggests that soda lakes are more analogous to the Enceladus ocean. The high pH implies that the hydroxide ion should be relatively abundant, while divalent metals should be present at low concentrations owing to buffering by carbonates and phyllosilicates on the ocean floor. Carboxyl groups in dissolved organic species would be negatively charged, while amino groups would exist predominately in the neutral form. Knowledge of the pH improves our understanding of geochemical processes in Enceladus' ocean. The high pH is interpreted to be a key consequence of serpentinization of chondritic rock, as predicted by prior geochemical reaction path models; although degassing of CO2 from the ocean may also play a role depending on the efficiency of mixing processes in the ocean. Serpentinization leads to the generation of H2, a geochemical fuel that can support both abiotic and biological synthesis of organic molecules such as those that have been detected in Enceladus' plume. Serpentinization and H2 generation should have occurred on Enceladus, like on the parent bodies of aqueously altered meteorites; but it is unknown whether these critical processes are still taking place, or if

  17. 21 CFR 876.1400 - Stomach pH electrode.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Stomach pH electrode. 876.1400 Section 876.1400...) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 876.1400 Stomach pH electrode. (a) Identification. A stomach pH electrode is a device used to measure intragastric and intraesophageal pH...

  18. What Is a pH Probe Study?

    MedlinePlus

    What is a pH Probe Study ? What is pH a probe study? M easuring the pH in the esophagus helps determine whether or not acid is coming up from the stomach. A pH probe study is usually done in patients where ...

  19. 21 CFR 876.1400 - Stomach pH electrode.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Stomach pH electrode. 876.1400 Section 876.1400...) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 876.1400 Stomach pH electrode. (a) Identification. A stomach pH electrode is a device used to measure intragastric and intraesophageal pH...

  20. 21 CFR 876.1400 - Stomach pH electrode.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Stomach pH electrode. 876.1400 Section 876.1400...) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 876.1400 Stomach pH electrode. (a) Identification. A stomach pH electrode is a device used to measure intragastric and intraesophageal pH (hydrogen...

  1. 21 CFR 876.1400 - Stomach pH electrode.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Stomach pH electrode. 876.1400 Section 876.1400...) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 876.1400 Stomach pH electrode. (a) Identification. A stomach pH electrode is a device used to measure intragastric and intraesophageal pH (hydrogen...

  2. 21 CFR 876.1400 - Stomach pH electrode.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Stomach pH electrode. 876.1400 Section 876.1400...) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 876.1400 Stomach pH electrode. (a) Identification. A stomach pH electrode is a device used to measure intragastric and intraesophageal pH (hydrogen...

  3. PH DEPENDENT TOXICITY OF FIVE METALS TO THREE MARINE ORGANISMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The pH of natural marine systems is relatively stable; this may explain why metal toxicity changes with pH have not been well documented. However, changes in metal toxicity with pH in marine waters are of concern in toxicity testing. During porewater toxicity testing pH can chang...

  4. [Measurement of intracellular pH].

    PubMed

    Hanaoka, K; Imai, M; Yoshitomi, K

    1992-09-01

    Since various cellular processes depend on changes in pH, the regulation of intracellular pH (pHi) is important both for the individual cell and for the organism. The mechanisms of the regulation of pHi can be investigated by monitoring pHi. In this report, we discuss the four major techniques available for measuring pHi, which are 1) Distribution of weak acids and bases, 2) pH-sensitive microelectrodes, 3) pH-sensitive dyes, and 4) Nuclear magnetic resonance. Among four techniques, the advantage of the microelectrode approach is that it can monitor membrane potential at the same time and be applied to a single cell. The dye technique is a relative new developing technique, which has lots of advantages. It is easy to use, and is capable of monitoring rapid pHi changes, and being applied to a smaller cell, or a single cell.

  5. Not Your Father's Ph.D.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Withrow, Brandon G.

    2008-01-01

    This article describes how the author, a devoted blogger, confronts his fear that his virtual life is damaging his career prospects in academe. As a new Ph.D. in religious studies, the author has every reason to believe he will find a tenure-track job. He has read the numbers and know that, on average, job candidates spend two to five years in…

  6. Complexation Key to a pH Locked Redox Reaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rizvi, Masood Ahmad; Dangat, Yuvraj; Shams, Tahir; Khan, Khaliquz Zaman

    2016-01-01

    An unfavorable pH can block a feasible electron transfer for a pH dependent redox reaction. In this experiment, a series of potentiometric titrations demonstrate the sequential loss in feasibility of iron(II) dichromate redox reaction over a pH range of 0-4. The pH at which this reaction failed to occur was termed as a pH locked reaction. The…

  7. Complexation Key to a pH Locked Redox Reaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rizvi, Masood Ahmad; Dangat, Yuvraj; Shams, Tahir; Khan, Khaliquz Zaman

    2016-01-01

    An unfavorable pH can block a feasible electron transfer for a pH dependent redox reaction. In this experiment, a series of potentiometric titrations demonstrate the sequential loss in feasibility of iron(II) dichromate redox reaction over a pH range of 0-4. The pH at which this reaction failed to occur was termed as a pH locked reaction. The…

  8. Proteorhodopsin Photocycle Kinetics Between pH 5 and pH 9.

    PubMed

    Köhler, Thomas; Weber, Ingrid; Glaubitz, Clemens; Wachtveitl, Josef

    2017-05-01

    The retinal protein proteorhodopsin is a homolog of the well-characterized light-driven proton pump bacteriorhodopsin. Basic mechanisms of proton transport seem to be conserved, but there are noticeable differences in the pH ranges of proton transport. Proton transport and protonation state of a carboxylic acid side chain, the primary proton acceptor, are correlated. In case of proteorhodopsin, the pKa of the primary proton acceptor Asp-97 (pKa  ≈ 7.5) is unexpectedly close to environmental pH (pH ≈ 8). A significant fraction of proteorhodopsin is possibly inactive at natural pH, in contrast to bacteriorhodopsin. We investigated photoinduced kinetics of proteorhodopsin between pH 5 and pH 9 by time resolved UV/vis absorption spectroscopy. Kinetics is inhomogeneous within that pH region and can be considered as a superposition of two fractions. These fractions are correlated with the Asp-97 titration curve. Beside Asp-97, protonation equilibria of other groups influence kinetics, but the observations do not point toward major differences of primary proton acceptor function in proteorhodopsin and bacteriorhodopsin. The pKa of proteorhodopsin and some of its variants is suspected to be an example of molecular adaptation to the physiology of the original organisms. © 2017 The American Society of Photobiology.

  9. The Added Value of a PhD in Medicine--PhD Students' Perceptions of Acquired Competences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anttila, Henrika; Lindblom-Ylänne, Sari; Lonka, Kristi; Pyhältö, Kirsi

    2015-01-01

    PhD in the field of medicine is more common than in any other domain. Many medical doctors are driven towards PhD, but also students with other backgrounds (usually MSc) are conducting a PhD in medical schools. Higher education has invested a lot in developing generic and research competences. Still little is known about how PhD students…

  10. Structural changes induced by acidic pH in human apolipoprotein B-100

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Higuero, José A.; Benito-Vicente, Asier; Etxebarria, Aitor; Milicua, José Carlos G.; Ostolaza, Helena; Arrondo, José L. R.; Martín, Cesar

    2016-01-01

    Acidification in the endosome causes lipoprotein release by promoting a conformational change in the LDLR allowing its recycling and degradation of LDL. Notwithstanding conformational changes occurring in the LDLR have expanded considerably, structural changes occurring in LDL particles have not been fully explored yet. The objectives of the present work were to study structural changes occurring in apoB100 by infrared spectroscopy (IR) and also LDL size and morphology by dynamic light scattering (DLS) and electron microscopy (EM) at both pH 7.4 and 5.0. We determined by IR that pH acidification from 7.4 to 5.0, resembling that occurring within endosomal environment, induces a huge reversible structural rearrangement of apoB100 that is characterized by a reduction of beta-sheet content in favor of alpha-helix structures. Data obtained from DLS and EM showed no appreciable differences in size and morphology of LDL. These structural changes observed in apoB100, which are likely implied in particle release from lipoprotein receptor, also compromise the apoprotein stability what would facilitate LDL degradation. In conclusion, the obtained results reveal a more dynamic picture of the LDL/LDLR dissociation process than previously perceived and provide new structural insights into LDL/LDLR interactions than can occur at endosomal low-pH milieu. PMID:27824107

  11. The EM Earthquake Precursor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, K. B., II; Saxton, P. T.

    2013-12-01

    Many attempts have been made to determine a sound forecasting method regarding earthquakes and warn the public in turn. Presently, the animal kingdom leads the precursor list alluding to a transmission related source. By applying the animal-based model to an electromagnetic (EM) wave model, various hypotheses were formed, but the most interesting one required the use of a magnetometer with a differing design and geometry. To date, numerous, high-end magnetometers have been in use in close proximity to fault zones for potential earthquake forecasting; however, something is still amiss. The problem still resides with what exactly is forecastable and the investigating direction of EM. After the 1989 Loma Prieta Earthquake, American earthquake investigators predetermined magnetometer use and a minimum earthquake magnitude necessary for EM detection. This action was set in motion, due to the extensive damage incurred and public outrage concerning earthquake forecasting; however, the magnetometers employed, grounded or buried, are completely subject to static and electric fields and have yet to correlate to an identifiable precursor. Secondly, there is neither a networked array for finding any epicentral locations, nor have there been any attempts to find even one. This methodology needs dismissal, because it is overly complicated, subject to continuous change, and provides no response time. As for the minimum magnitude threshold, which was set at M5, this is simply higher than what modern technological advances have gained. Detection can now be achieved at approximately M1, which greatly improves forecasting chances. A propagating precursor has now been detected in both the field and laboratory. Field antenna testing conducted outside the NE Texas town of Timpson in February, 2013, detected three strong EM sources along with numerous weaker signals. The antenna had mobility, and observations were noted for recurrence, duration, and frequency response. Next, two

  12. The panacea toolbox of a PhD biomedical student.

    PubMed

    Skaik, Younis

    2014-01-01

    Doing a PhD (doctor of philosophy) for the sake of contribution to knowledge should give the student an immense enthusiasm through the PhD period. It is the time in one's life that one spends to "hit the nail on the head" in a specific area and topic of interest. A PhD consists mostly of hard work and tenacity; however, luck and genius might also play a little role. You can pass all PhD phases without having both luck and genius. The PhD student should have pre-PhD and PhD toolboxes, which are "sine quibus non" for getting successfully a PhD degree. In this manuscript, the toolboxes of the PhD student are discussed.

  13. Six-Channel Spectrophotometers (PH) Onboard JEM-GLIMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Mitsuteru; Takahashi, Yukihiro; Suzuki, Makoto; Yamazaki, Atsushi; Ushio, Tomoo

    Six-channel spectrophotometers (PH) are the science instruments of JEM-GLIMS to measure absolute intensity of the emission originated from lightning discharges and upper atmospheric transient luminous events (TLEs). PH unit-1 (PH-U1) consists of four spectrophotometer channels named from PH1 to PH4, while PH unit-2 (PH-U2) two spectrophotometer channels named PH5 and PH6. Optical filters of these spectrophotometers are selected to detect TLE emission lines of N2 1PG, N2 2PG, N2+ 1NG, and N2 LBH. Since the bandwidth of the optical filter of PH2, 3, 5, and 6 is 10 nm and since PH1 measures NUV emission, photomultiplier tubes with high-voltage converters are used as a photon detector. To the contrary, PH4 uses a photodiode as a photon detector because the pass-band of the optical filter is enough wide to detect transient optical emission. Though PH does not equip spatial resolution, it can acquire light curve data with a high time resolution of 50 μs with a 12-bit resolution. Thus, the combinational analysis of PH data and Lightning and Sprite Imager (LSI) data, it is possible to clarify the relationship between TLEs and their parent lightning discharges, the occurrence condition of TLEs, and the energy of the electrons which excite TLE emission.

  14. EMS & the DEA.

    PubMed

    Beeson, Jeff; Ayres, Chris

    2010-01-01

    It's clear that EMS medical directors and management staff must be vigilant in their oversight of implementation, administration and monitoring of controlled substances within their agencies to best serve the public and avoid running afoul of investigation and incurring significant penalties. Those potentially affected by the need for individual registrations of both emergency vehicles and central inventory systems should carefully monitor upcoming developments in the interpretation od DEA regulations.

  15. Intracellular pH in sperm physiology.

    PubMed

    Nishigaki, Takuya; José, Omar; González-Cota, Ana Laura; Romero, Francisco; Treviño, Claudia L; Darszon, Alberto

    2014-08-01

    Intracellular pH (pHi) regulation is essential for cell function. Notably, several unique sperm ion transporters and enzymes whose elimination causes infertility are either pHi dependent or somehow related to pHi regulation. Amongst them are: CatSper, a Ca(2+) channel; Slo3, a K(+) channel; the sperm-specific Na(+)/H(+) exchanger and the soluble adenylyl cyclase. It is thus clear that pHi regulation is of the utmost importance for sperm physiology. This review briefly summarizes the key components involved in pHi regulation, their characteristics and participation in fundamental sperm functions such as motility, maturation and the acrosome reaction.

  16. Recent Ph.D.s; Honors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-04-01

    Recent Ph.D.s. Atmospheric Sciences. A study of atmospheric ammonia in coastal ecosystems utilizing relaxed eddy accumulation techniques and ion mobility spectrometry, LaToya Myles, Florida A&M University, December 2004, Advisor: Larry Robinson. Honors. Rana A. Fine has been awarded the 2005 Provost Award for Scholarly Activity, presented by the University of Miami. The award ``recognizes faculty for extraordinary research and scholarly pursuits.'' Charles David Keeling and Lonnie G. Thompson will receive the 2005 Tyler Prize for Environmental Achievement. The prize is given to individuals whose accomplishments in environmental science, policy, energy, and medicine confer great benefit upon mankind.

  17. Confirming nasogastric tube position with electromagnetic tracking versus pH or X-ray and tube radio-opacity.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Stephen; Allan, Kaylee; McWilliam, Helen; Manara, Alex; Brown, Jules; Toher, Deirdre; Rayner, Wendy

    Recent evidence suggests official statistics greatly underestimate the occurrence of complications from misplaced nasogastric (NG) tubes, even when detected. Current methods of confirming tube position do not provide adequate protection from misplacement. In addition, some tubes are inadequately radio-opaque. We prospectively audited placement of Cortrak polyurethane tubes (PUTs) to determine: accuracy of the electromagnetic (EM) trace in confirming tube position, radio-opacity of PUTs compared with previously placed polyvinylchloride (PVC) Ryles tubes and whether 12 French PUTs can be used to aspirate gastric residual volumes (GRVs). A total of 127 PUTs were placed in 113 patients. EM traces accurately confirmed tube position compared with X-ray (100% agreement). A 'gastric' EM trace has been defined for future use by other operators. PUTs were adequately radio-opaque with good agreement between interpreters (>98%) whereas PVC Ryles tubes were insufficiently radio-opaque (57-73%), invisible in 23% of cases and with poor agreement between interpreters leaving risk of error. The alternative of using pH confirmation was not possible in 44%. In these cases subsequent X-ray incurred a 2-hour delay to feed and medicines. In addition, neither post-placement pH testing nor X-ray warn of lung placement and potential trauma, whereas the EM trace warned of lung placement prior to damage in 7% of placements. 12 French, single-port PUTs appear adequate to aspirate large GRVs. EM tracing may be considered a standalone method of confirming NG tube position. Corflo (Cortrak) PUTs are adequately radio-opaque. Use of PVC Ryles and other inadequately radio-opaque tubes should stop.

  18. The pH of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plumb, R. C.; Bishop, J. L.; Edwards, J. O.

    1993-01-01

    The Viking labeled release (LR) experiments provided data that can be used to determine the acid-base characteristics of the regolith. Constraints on the acid-base properties and redox potentials of the Martian surface material would provide additional information for determining what reactions are possible and defining formation conditions for the regolith. Calculations devised to determine the pH of Mars must include the amount of soluble acid species or base species present in the LR regolith sample and the solubility product of the carbonate with the limiting solubility. This analysis shows that CaCO3, either as calcite or aragonite, has the correct K(sub sp) to have produced the Viking LR successive injection reabsorption effects. Thus CaCO3 or another MeCO3 with very similar solubility characteristics must have been present on Mars. A small amount of soluble acid, but no more than 4 micro-mol per sample, could also have been present. It is concluded that the pH of the regolith is 7.2 +/- 0.1.

  19. Nanomechanical DNA Origami pH Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Kuzuya, Akinori; Watanabe, Ryosuke; Yamanaka, Yusei; Tamaki, Takuya; Kaino, Masafumi; Ohya, Yuichi

    2014-01-01

    Single-molecule pH sensors have been developed by utilizing molecular imaging of pH-responsive shape transition of nanomechanical DNA origami devices with atomic force microscopy (AFM). Short DNA fragments that can form i-motifs were introduced to nanomechanical DNA origami devices with pliers-like shape (DNA Origami Pliers), which consist of two levers of 170-nm long and 20-nm wide connected at a Holliday-junction fulcrum. DNA Origami Pliers can be observed as in three distinct forms; cross, antiparallel and parallel forms, and cross form is the dominant species when no additional interaction is introduced to DNA Origami Pliers. Introduction of nine pairs of 12-mer sequence (5′-AACCCCAACCCC-3′), which dimerize into i-motif quadruplexes upon protonation of cytosine, drives transition of DNA Origami Pliers from open cross form into closed parallel form under acidic conditions. Such pH-dependent transition was clearly imaged on mica in molecular resolution by AFM, showing potential application of the system to single-molecular pH sensors. PMID:25325338

  20. Nanomechanical DNA origami pH sensors.

    PubMed

    Kuzuya, Akinori; Watanabe, Ryosuke; Yamanaka, Yusei; Tamaki, Takuya; Kaino, Masafumi; Ohya, Yuichi

    2014-10-16

    Single-molecule pH sensors have been developed by utilizing molecular imaging of pH-responsive shape transition of nanomechanical DNA origami devices with atomic force microscopy (AFM). Short DNA fragments that can form i-motifs were introduced to nanomechanical DNA origami devices with pliers-like shape (DNA Origami Pliers), which consist of two levers of 170-nm long and 20-nm wide connected at a Holliday-junction fulcrum. DNA Origami Pliers can be observed as in three distinct forms; cross, antiparallel and parallel forms, and cross form is the dominant species when no additional interaction is introduced to DNA Origami Pliers. Introduction of nine pairs of 12-mer sequence (5'-AACCCCAACCCC-3'), which dimerize into i-motif quadruplexes upon protonation of cytosine, drives transition of DNA Origami Pliers from open cross form into closed parallel form under acidic conditions. Such pH-dependent transition was clearly imaged on mica in molecular resolution by AFM, showing potential application of the system to single-molecular pH sensors.

  1. Discordance between urine pH measured by dipstick and pH meter: implications for methotrexate administration protocols.

    PubMed

    Wockenfus, Amy M; Koch, Christopher D; Conlon, Patricia M; Sorensen, Linda D; Cambern, Kari L; Chihak, Amy J; Zmolek, Julie A; Petersen, Amy E; Burns, Bradley E; Lieske, John C; Karon, Brad S

    2013-01-01

    To minimize toxicity of high-dose methotrexate (MTX) therapy, urinary alkalinization with frequent monitoring of urine pH is required. Urine pH is usually assessed by fast and convenient dipstick methods. When urine color interferes with dipstick measurement, as occurs in patients receiving MTX, alternative methods such as pH meters are used. Nursing staff caring for patients on high-dose MTX reported that urine pH results from dipstick and pH analyzers were often clinically discordant. As a result urine pH by dipstick and pH meter were compared in patients on high-dose MTX therapy and patients with normal-colored urine samples. We measured urine pH by dipstick and pH meter in 116 urine samples from 4 patients receiving high-dose MTX therapy, and in 50 normal-colored urine samples from 50 patients not on MTX therapy. In patients on MTX therapy the mean (±standard deviation) bias between dipstick and pH meter urine pH was 0.7±0.4, compared to 0.4±0.3 in patients not on MTX. For patients on MTX clinical concordance between dipstick and pH meter urine results was poor around a clinical cut-off of pH 8.0. Of the 92 samples with a meter urine pH≤8.0, 72 had a discordant value by dipstick (pH>8). Urine pH readings by dipstick and pH meter are not equivalent, and the bias between them is exacerbated in patients on MTX. Institutions with high-dose MTX therapy protocols should not alternate between dipstick and pH meter urine pH monitoring. Copyright © 2012 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Constant pH simulations of pH responsive polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Arjun; Smith, J. D.; Walters, Keisha B.; Rick, Steven W.

    2016-12-01

    Polyacidic polymers can change structure over a narrow range of pH in a competition between the hydrophobic effect, which favors a compact state, and electrostatic repulsion, which favors an extended state. Constant pH molecular dynamics computer simulations of poly(methacrylic acid) reveal that there are two types of structural changes, one local and one global, which make up the overall response. The local structural response depends on the tacticity of the polymer and leads to different cooperative effects for polymers with different stereochemistries, demonstrating both positive and negative cooperativities.

  3. Catalytic Decomposition of PH3 on Heated Tungsten Wire Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umemoto, Hironobu; Nishihara, Yushin; Ishikawa, Takuma; Yamamoto, Shingo

    2012-08-01

    The catalytic decomposition processes of PH3 on heated tungsten surfaces were studied to clarify the mechanisms governing phosphorus doping into silicon substrates. Mass spectrometric measurements show that PH3 can be decomposed by more than 50% over 2000 K. H, P, PH, and PH2 radicals were identified by laser spectroscopic techniques. Absolute density measurements of these radical species, as well as their PH3 flow rate dependence, show that the major products on the catalyst surfaces are P and H atoms, while PH and PH2 are produced in secondary processes in the gas phase. In other words, catalytic decomposition, unlike plasma decomposition processes, can be a clean source of P atoms, which can be the only major dopant precursors. In the presence of an excess amount of H2, the apparent decomposition efficiency is small. This can be explained by rapid cyclic reactions including decomposition, deposition, and etching to reproduce PH3.

  4. Organelle pH in the Arabidopsis endomembrane system.

    PubMed

    Shen, Jinbo; Zeng, Yonglun; Zhuang, Xiaohong; Sun, Lei; Yao, Xiaoqiang; Pimpl, Peter; Jiang, Liwen

    2013-09-01

    The pH of intracellular compartments is essential for the viability of cells. Despite its relevance, little is known about the pH of these compartments. To measure pH in vivo, we have first generated two pH sensors by combining the improved-solubility feature of solubility-modified green fluorescent protein (GFP) (smGFP) with the pH-sensing capability of the pHluorins and codon optimized for expression in Arabidopsis. PEpHluorin (plant-solubility-modified ecliptic pHluorin) gradually loses fluorescence as pH is lowered with fluorescence vanishing at pH 6.2 and PRpHluorin (plant-solubility-modified ratiomatric pHluorin), a dual-excitation sensor, allowing for precise measurements. Compartment-specific sensors were generated by further fusing specific sorting signals to PEpHluorin and PRpHluorin. Our results show that the pH of cytosol and nucleus is similar (pH 7.3 and 7.2), while peroxisomes, mitochondrial matrix, and plastidial stroma have alkaline pH. Compartments of the secretory pathway reveal a gradual acidification, spanning from pH 7.1 in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to pH 5.2 in the vacuole. Surprisingly, pH in the trans-Golgi network (TGN) and multivesicular body (MVB) is, with pH 6.3 and 6.2, quite similar. The inhibition of vacuolar-type H(+)-ATPase (V-ATPase) with concanamycin A (ConcA) caused drastic increase in pH in TGN and vacuole. Overall, the PEpHluorin and PRpHluorin are excellent pH sensors for visualization and quantification of pH in vivo, respectively.

  5. Why do Emergency Medical Services (EMS) Professionals Leave EMS?

    PubMed

    Blau, Gary; Chapman, Susan A

    2016-12-01

    The objective was to determine why Emergency Medical Technician (EMT)-Basics and Paramedics leave the Emergency Medical Services (EMS) workforce. Data were collected through annual surveys of nationally registered EMT-Basics and Paramedics from 1999 to 2008. Survey items dealing with satisfaction with the EMS profession, likelihood of leaving the profession, and likelihood of leaving their EMS job were assessed for both EMT-Basics and Paramedics, along with reasons for leaving the profession. Individuals whose responses indicated that they were not working in EMS were mailed a special exit survey to determine the reasons for leaving EMS. The likelihood of leaving the profession in the next year was low for both EMT-Basics and Paramedics. Although overall satisfaction levels with the profession were high, EMT-Basics were significantly more satisfied than Paramedics. The most important reasons for leaving the profession were choosing to pursue further education and moving to a new location. A desire for better pay and benefits was a significantly more important reason for EMT-Paramedics' exit decisions than for EMT-Basics. Given the anticipated increased demand for EMS professionals in the next decade, continued study of issues associated with retention is strongly recommended. Some specific recommendations and suggestions for promoting retention are provided. Blau G , Chapman SA . Why do Emergency Medical Services (EMS) professionals leave EMS? Prehosp Disaster Med. 2016;31(Suppl. 1):s105-s111.

  6. Steel slag raises pH of greenhouse substrates

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Dolomitic lime (DL) is the primary liming agent used for increasing pH in peatmoss-based substrates. Steel slag (SS) is a byproduct of the steel manufacturing industry that has been used to elevate field soil pH. The objective of this research was to determine the pH response of a peatmoss-based g...

  7. Acid Rain, pH & Acidity: A Common Misinterpretation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, David B.; Thompson, Ronald E.

    1989-01-01

    Illustrates the basis for misleading statements about the relationship between pH and acid content in acid rain. Explains why pH cannot be used as a measure of acidity for rain or any other solution. Suggests that teachers present acidity and pH as two separate and distinct concepts. (RT)

  8. Acid Rain, pH & Acidity: A Common Misinterpretation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, David B.; Thompson, Ronald E.

    1989-01-01

    Illustrates the basis for misleading statements about the relationship between pH and acid content in acid rain. Explains why pH cannot be used as a measure of acidity for rain or any other solution. Suggests that teachers present acidity and pH as two separate and distinct concepts. (RT)

  9. INFLUENCE OF PH AND REDOX CONDITIONS ON COPPER LEACHING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Leaching behavior of metals from a mineral processing waste at varying pH and redox conditions was studies. Effect of combinations of pH and Eh on leaching of copper is described. Leaching of copper was found to be dependent on both pH and Eh. Higher concentrations of Cu were ...

  10. A Multiattributes Approach for Ranking PhD Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Urbancic, Frank R.

    2008-01-01

    In its plan to combat the PhD shortage crisis, the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business International (AACSB; 2003) has called for the development of PhD program rankings to serve as incentives for academic institutions to invest more in PhD programs, thereby counterbalancing the disproportionate influence of master of business…

  11. Intracellular pH in Sperm Physiology

    PubMed Central

    Nishigaki, Takuya; José, Omar; González-Cota, Ana Laura; Romero, Francisco; Treviño, Claudia L.; Darszon, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Intracellular pH (pHi) regulation is essential for cell function. Notably, several unique sperm ion transporters and enzymes whose elimination causes infertility are either pHi dependent or somehow related to pHi regulation. Amongst them are: CatSper, a Ca2+ channel; Slo3, a K+ channel; the sperm-specific Na+/H+ exchanger and the soluble adenylyl cyclase. It is thus clear that pHi regulation is of the utmost importance for sperm physiology. This review briefly summarizes the key components involved in pHi regulation, their characteristics and participation in fundamental sperm functions such as motility, maturation and the acrosome reaction. PMID:24887564

  12. Ian Douglass Coulter, PhD

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Douglas M

    2004-01-01

    This paper focuses on Dr. Ian Coulter’s accomplishments from the time he became Executive Vice-President of CMCC in 1981, until he ended his presidency with a year’s administrative leave in 1990. Annual planning initiatives, pedagogy, scholarship, conflicts, and the quest for university affiliation are discussed as well as his legacy to the College and the chiropractic profession. The term “adventurous” was first attributed to Coulter by Oswald Hall, PhD, Professor Emeritus, University of Toronto who had worked closely with Coulter in a major investigation of the chiropractic profession from 1976 to 1979. Throughout this article the author tries to capture the spirit of daring, innovation and intellect that permeated Coulter’s presidency, enthralling his advocates and confounding his detractors. PMID:17549218

  13. Barrett's oesophagus: pH profile.

    PubMed

    Gillen, P; Keeling, P; Byrne, P J; Hennessy, T P

    1987-09-01

    Twenty-four patients with a columnar-lined (Barrett's) oesophagus underwent oesophageal manometry and 24 h ambulatory oesophageal pH monitoring. The results were compared with 25 patients with oesophagitis studied in the same fashion. No significant difference in lower oesophageal sphincter pressure was demonstrated between the two groups. The Barrett's patients demonstrated significantly greater acid exposure in the distal oesophagus than oesophagitis patients. Clearance or refluxed acid was poorer in Barrett's patients than oesophagitis patients. Twelve of the Barrett's patients presented with complications of the condition, i.e. ulceration or stricture. No significant difference in acid exposure was demonstrated between Barrett's patients with or without complications. These results suggest that patients with columnar-lined (Barrett's) oesophagus have greater acid exposure than patients with oesophagitis. The development of complications of a Barrett's oesophagus may not be dependent on acid reflux alone.

  14. Understanding Non-Traditional PhD Students Habitus--Implications for PhD Programmes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naidoo, Devika

    2015-01-01

    Against the background of vast changes in doctoral education and the emergence of non-traditional doctoral programmes, this paper investigates the habitus of non-traditional PhD students at a South African university. Bourdieu's conceptual tool of habitus informed the study. In-depth and open-ended interviews were conducted with 10 non-traditional…

  15. High temperature pH measurements using novel pH electrodes. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Macdonald, D.D.; Song, H.; Hettiarachchi, S.

    1995-12-01

    Researchers used three pH sensors: (1) a yttria-stabilized zirconia, (2) tungsten/tungsten oxide, and (3) platinum hydrogen electrodes to measure the pH in concentrated solutions heated to temperatures from 125-300 C in autoclaves. The studies indicated measurements of pH for solutions containing sodium hydroxide, sodium sulfate, sodium chloride, boric acid, ferrous sulfate, nickel sulfate, and chromous sulfate in various compositions. The solution composition and pH was then calculated by MULTEQ at the experimental conditions. These calculations compared well with the experimental measurements for binary and quaternary systems at temperatures to 300 C and concentrations to 1 molal. The agreement was also excellent for the metal sulfate systems but was poor for chromous sulfate. The agreement for boric acid solutions was adequate for low concentrations of boric acid but was poor for concentrated borate solutions where polyborate ions likely exist. It is not known whether the lack of agreement under these conditions is due to deficiencies in MULTEQ or the experimental measurements.

  16. Understanding Non-Traditional PhD Students Habitus--Implications for PhD Programmes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naidoo, Devika

    2015-01-01

    Against the background of vast changes in doctoral education and the emergence of non-traditional doctoral programmes, this paper investigates the habitus of non-traditional PhD students at a South African university. Bourdieu's conceptual tool of habitus informed the study. In-depth and open-ended interviews were conducted with 10 non-traditional…

  17. Comparison of rumen fluid pH by continuous telemetry system and bench pH meter in sheep with different ranges of ruminal pH.

    PubMed

    Reis, Leonardo F; Minervino, Antonio H H; Araújo, Carolina A S C; Sousa, Rejane S; Oliveira, Francisco L C; Rodrigues, Frederico A M L; Meira-Júnior, Enoch B S; Barrêto-Júnior, Raimundo A; Mori, Clara S; Ortolani, Enrico L

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to compare the measurements of sheep ruminal pH using a continuous telemetry system or a bench pH meter using sheep with different degrees of ruminal pH. Ruminal lactic acidosis was induced in nine adult crossbred Santa Ines sheep by the administration of 15 g of sucrose per kg/BW. Samples of rumen fluid were collected at the baseline, before the induction of acidosis (T 0) and at six, 12, 18, 24, 48, and 72 hours after the induction for pH measurement using a bench pH meter. During this 72-hour period, all animals had electrodes for the continuous measurement of pH. The results were compared using the Bland-Altman analysis of agreement, Pearson coefficients of correlation and determination, and paired analysis of variance with Student's t-test. The measurement methods presented a strong correlation (r = 0.94, P < 0.05) but the rumen pH that was measured continuously using a telemetry system resulted in lower values than the bench pH meter (overall mean of 5.38 and 5.48, resp., P = 0.0001). The telemetry system was able to detect smaller changes in rumen fluid pH and was more accurate in diagnosing both subacute ruminal lactic acidosis and acute ruminal lactic acidosis in sheep.

  18. Comparison of Rumen Fluid pH by Continuous Telemetry System and Bench pH Meter in Sheep with Different Ranges of Ruminal pH

    PubMed Central

    Reis, Leonardo F.; Minervino, Antonio H. H.; Araújo, Carolina A. S. C.; Sousa, Rejane S.; Oliveira, Francisco L. C.; Rodrigues, Frederico A. M. L.; Meira-Júnior, Enoch B. S.; Barrêto-Júnior, Raimundo A.; Mori, Clara S.; Ortolani, Enrico L.

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to compare the measurements of sheep ruminal pH using a continuous telemetry system or a bench pH meter using sheep with different degrees of ruminal pH. Ruminal lactic acidosis was induced in nine adult crossbred Santa Ines sheep by the administration of 15 g of sucrose per kg/BW. Samples of rumen fluid were collected at the baseline, before the induction of acidosis (T0) and at six, 12, 18, 24, 48, and 72 hours after the induction for pH measurement using a bench pH meter. During this 72-hour period, all animals had electrodes for the continuous measurement of pH. The results were compared using the Bland-Altman analysis of agreement, Pearson coefficients of correlation and determination, and paired analysis of variance with Student's t-test. The measurement methods presented a strong correlation (r = 0.94, P < 0.05) but the rumen pH that was measured continuously using a telemetry system resulted in lower values than the bench pH meter (overall mean of 5.38 and 5.48, resp., P = 0.0001). The telemetry system was able to detect smaller changes in rumen fluid pH and was more accurate in diagnosing both subacute ruminal lactic acidosis and acute ruminal lactic acidosis in sheep. PMID:24967422

  19. PhD Students' Work Conditions and Study Environment in University- and Industry-Based PhD Programmes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kolmos, A.; Kofoed, L. B.; Du, X. Y.

    2008-01-01

    During the last 10 years, new models of funding and training PhD students have been established in Denmark in order to integrate industry into the entire PhD education. Several programmes have been conducted where it is possible to co-finance PhD scholarships or to become an employee as an industrial PhD in a company. An important question is what…

  20. pH distributions in spontaneous and isotransplanted rat tumours.

    PubMed Central

    Kallinowski, F.; Vaupel, P.

    1988-01-01

    Spontaneous mammary tumours of the rat with various degrees of malignancy exhibit similar tissue pH distributions. The mean pH (+/- s.d.) of dysplasia is 7.05 +/- 0.20. In benign tumours the mean pH is 6.95 +/- 0.19 and in malignant tumours it is 6.94 +/- 0.19. In contrast, tumours with the same degree of malignancy but different histologies show different pH distributions. Benign tumours with a higher percentage of fibrous tissue exhibit less acidic pH values than those with larger portions of epithelial cells (delta pH = 0.38 pH units). The pH distribution in the benign tumours is independent of the tumour wet weight up to stages of very advanced growth. In the malignant tumours, a trend towards more acidic pH values is observed as the tumour mass enlarges. However, in tissue areas within a malignant tumour with gross, long-established necrosis the pH distribution is shifted towards more alkaline pH values. The pH distributions in spontaneous rat tumours are not significantly different from those obtained in isotransplanted Yoshida sarcomas (6.87 +/- 0.21). In the Yoshida sarcomas, mean pH values do not correlate with tumour size. However, a pH gradient from the rim to the centre of the tumours is found which coincides with the development of small, disseminated necroses in the tumour centre. It is concluded that pathology-related variations of tumour pH may be more important than the mode of tumour origin or the degree of malignancy. PMID:3179183

  1. Proton Transport and pH Control in Fungi.

    PubMed

    Kane, Patricia M

    2016-01-01

    Despite diverse and changing extracellular environments, fungi maintain a relatively constant cytosolic pH and numerous organelles of distinct lumenal pH. Key players in fungal pH control are V-ATPases and the P-type proton pump Pma1. These two proton pumps act in concert with a large array of other transporters and are highly regulated. The activities of Pma1 and the V-ATPase are coordinated under some conditions, suggesting that pH in the cytosol and organelles is not controlled independently. Genomic studies, particularly in the highly tractable S. cerevisiae, are beginning to provide a systems-level view of pH control, including transcriptional responses to acid or alkaline ambient pH and definition of the full set of regulators required to maintain pH homeostasis. Genetically encoded pH sensors have provided new insights into localized mechanisms of pH control, as well as highlighting the dynamic nature of pH responses to the extracellular environment. Recent studies indicate that cellular pH plays a genuine signaling role that connects nutrient availability and growth rate through a number of mechanisms. Many of the pH control mechanisms found in S. cerevisiae are shared with other fungi, with adaptations for their individual physiological contexts. Fungi deploy certain proton transport and pH control mechanisms not shared with other eukaryotes; these regulators of cellular pH are potential antifungal targets. This review describes current and emerging knowledge proton transport and pH control mechanisms in S. cerevisiae and briefly discusses how these mechanisms vary among fungi.

  2. The Role of pH Regulation in Cancer Progression.

    PubMed

    McIntyre, Alan; Harris, Adrian L

    Frequently observed phenotypes of tumours include high metabolic activity, hypoxia and poor perfusion; these act to produce an acidic microenvironment. Cellular function depends on pH homoeostasis, and thus, tumours become dependent on pH regulatory mechanisms. Many of the proteins involved in pH regulation are highly expressed in tumours, and their expression is often of prognostic significance. The more acidic tumour microenvironment also has important implications with regard to chemotherapeutic and radiotherapeutic interventions. In addition, we review pH-sensing mechanisms, the role of pH regulation in tumour phenotype and the use of pH regulatory mechanisms as therapeutic targets.

  3. PH-sensitive dispersion of carbon nanotubes by myoglobin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, Haiyu; Shen, Ganni; Sun, Junlin; Zhang, Tao

    2017-03-01

    A facile and effective method of dispersion of double-walled carbon nanotubes (DWNTs) was developed. At appropriate pH value and sonication, myoglobin helps the solubilization of DWNTs. The product is a pH-sensitive dispersion, which remains in a highly dispersed state at pH<3.0 and pH>10.0. This approach can be used to disperse DWNTs in scale. A reversible conversion of the highly dispersed state to the aggregated state could be observed by changing the pH value. This feature holds great promise for the development of pH sensors.

  4. pH in atomic scale simulations of electrochemical interfaces.

    PubMed

    Rossmeisl, Jan; Chan, Karen; Ahmed, Rizwan; Tripković, Vladimir; Björketun, Mårten E

    2013-07-07

    Electrochemical reaction rates can strongly depend on pH, and there is increasing interest in electrocatalysis in alkaline solution. To date, no method has been devised to address pH in atomic scale simulations. We present a simple method to determine the atomic structure of the metal|solution interface at a given pH and electrode potential. Using Pt(111)|water as an example, we show the effect of pH on the interfacial structure, and discuss its impact on reaction energies and barriers. This method paves the way for ab initio studies of pH effects on the structure and electrocatalytic activity of electrochemical interfaces.

  5. Continuous intra-arterial pH measurement.

    PubMed

    Oeseburg, B; Kwant, G; Schut, J K; Veenstra, J

    1980-07-01

    A flexible glass electrode catheter with a diameter of 3 mm has been developed for pH measurement in the arterial system of dogs. In combination with a galvanically isolated amplifier, an undisturbed pH signal could be obtained from the aorta. The system was fast enough to truly record pH changes synchronous with respiration and was shown to be insensitive to variations in blood flow velocity. Good agreement was found between pH catheter readings nd pH values of simultaneously taken arterial samples as measured with a conventional capillary glass electrode.

  6. Time course of pH change in plant epidermis using microscopic pH imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dan, Risako; Shimizu, Megumi; Kazama, Haruko; Sakaue, Hirotaka

    2010-11-01

    We established a microscopic pH imaging system to track the time course of pH change in plant epidermis in vivo. In the previous research, we have found out that anthocyanin containing cells have higher pH. However, it was not clear whether the anthocyanin increased the pH or anthocyanin was synthesized result from the higher pH. Therefore, we further investigated the relationship between anthocyanin and pH change. To track the time course of pH change in plant epidermis, we established a system using luminescent imaging technique. We used HPTS (8-Hydroxypyrene-1,3,6-Trisulfonate) as pH indicator and applied excitation ratio imaging method. Luminescent image was converted to a pH distribution by obtained in vitro calibration using known pH solution. Cellular level observation was enabled by merging microscopic color picture of the same region to the pH change image. The established system was applied to epidermal cells of red-tip leaf lettuce, Lactuca Sativa L. and the time course was tracked in the growth process. We would discuss about the relationship between anthocyanin and pH change in plant epidermis.

  7. [Vulvovaginitis: vaginal pH changes and associated microflora].

    PubMed

    Saturnino, Ana Conceiçáo Ribeiro Dantas; Sisenando, Herbert Ary Arzabe Anteza Costa Nóbrega; Pereira, Alessandra Ramalho; Vale, Ana Patrícia Medeiros; Pires, Leila Monte; de Araújo, Jarine Torres; Ramos, Eleni Souto Nóbrega

    2005-01-01

    To establish a correlation between pH vaginal and the microflora associated in carriers of vulvovaginites. In the present study, the cytopathological examination and the vaginal flow in a group of 65 sexually active women had been carried through, 20 and 72 years, taken care of in the Laboratório de Citologia Clínica do Departamento de Análises Clínicas e Toxicológicas da Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, for determination of microorganisms in cervicovaginal sample and of pH in the vaginal flow. Associating pH vaginal with the presence of vulvovaginitis, it was evidenced that the Candida sp. occurred more frequently in pH 4.0, Trichomonas vaginalis in pH 6.0, Gardnerella vaginalis in pH 5.0, coconuts in pH 5.0, bacilli in pH 4.0 and cocos/bacilos in pH 6.0. It was observed that all the patients had presented at least one type of ethiological agent of vulvovaginiti and an associated microflora. The joint accomplishment of the cytological examinations and the determination of pH revealed important for directing the microflora associated with the vulvovaginiti, suggesting, of this form, that pH vaginal plays preponderant role how much to the presence of the infectious agents in the vaginal ecosystem.

  8. Identified EM Earthquake Precursors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Kenneth, II; Saxton, Patrick

    2014-05-01

    Many attempts have been made to determine a sound forecasting method regarding earthquakes and warn the public in turn. Presently, the animal kingdom leads the precursor list alluding to a transmission related source. By applying the animal-based model to an electromagnetic (EM) wave model, various hypotheses were formed, but the most interesting one required the use of a magnetometer with a differing design and geometry. To date, numerous, high-end magnetometers have been in use in close proximity to fault zones for potential earthquake forecasting; however, something is still amiss. The problem still resides with what exactly is forecastable and the investigating direction of EM. After a number of custom rock experiments, two hypotheses were formed which could answer the EM wave model. The first hypothesis concerned a sufficient and continuous electron movement either by surface or penetrative flow, and the second regarded a novel approach to radio transmission. Electron flow along fracture surfaces was determined to be inadequate in creating strong EM fields, because rock has a very high electrical resistance making it a high quality insulator. Penetrative flow could not be corroborated as well, because it was discovered that rock was absorbing and confining electrons to a very thin skin depth. Radio wave transmission and detection worked with every single test administered. This hypothesis was reviewed for propagating, long-wave generation with sufficient amplitude, and the capability of penetrating solid rock. Additionally, fracture spaces, either air or ion-filled, can facilitate this concept from great depths and allow for surficial detection. A few propagating precursor signals have been detected in the field occurring with associated phases using custom-built loop antennae. Field testing was conducted in Southern California from 2006-2011, and outside the NE Texas town of Timpson in February, 2013. The antennae have mobility and observations were noted for

  9. Monitoring Survivability and Infectivity of Porcine Epidemic Diarrhea Virus (PEDv) in the Infected On-Farm Earthen Manure Storages (EMS).

    PubMed

    Tun, Hein M; Cai, Zhangbin; Khafipour, Ehsan

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDv) has caused major epidemics, which has been a burden to North America's swine industry. Low infectious dose and high viability in the environment are major challenges in eradication of this virus. To further understand the viability of PEDv in the infected manure, we longitudinally monitored survivability and infectivity of PEDv in two open earthen manure storages (EMS; previously referred to as lagoon) from two different infected swine farms identified in the province of Manitoba, Canada. Our study revealed that PEDv could survive up to 9 months in the infected EMS after the initial outbreak in the farm. The viral load varied among different layers of the EMS with an average of 1.1 × 10(5) copies/ml of EMS, independent of EMS temperature and pH. In both studied EMS, the evidence of viral replication was observed through increased viral load in the later weeks of the samplings while there was no new influx of infected manure into the EMS, which was suggestive of presence of potential alternative hosts for PEDv within the EMS. Decreasing infectivity of virus over time irrespective of increased viral load suggested the possibility of PEDv evolution within the EMS and perhaps in the new host that negatively impacted virus infectivity. Viral load in the top layer of the EMS was low and mostly non-infective suggesting that environmental factors, such as UV and sunlight, could diminish the replicability and infectivity of the virus. Thus, frequent agitation of the EMS that could expose virus to UV and sunlight might be a potential strategy for reduction of PEDv load and infectivity in the infected EMS.

  10. Monitoring Survivability and Infectivity of Porcine Epidemic Diarrhea Virus (PEDv) in the Infected On-Farm Earthen Manure Storages (EMS)

    PubMed Central

    Tun, Hein M.; Cai, Zhangbin; Khafipour, Ehsan

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDv) has caused major epidemics, which has been a burden to North America’s swine industry. Low infectious dose and high viability in the environment are major challenges in eradication of this virus. To further understand the viability of PEDv in the infected manure, we longitudinally monitored survivability and infectivity of PEDv in two open earthen manure storages (EMS; previously referred to as lagoon) from two different infected swine farms identified in the province of Manitoba, Canada. Our study revealed that PEDv could survive up to 9 months in the infected EMS after the initial outbreak in the farm. The viral load varied among different layers of the EMS with an average of 1.1 × 105 copies/ml of EMS, independent of EMS temperature and pH. In both studied EMS, the evidence of viral replication was observed through increased viral load in the later weeks of the samplings while there was no new influx of infected manure into the EMS, which was suggestive of presence of potential alternative hosts for PEDv within the EMS. Decreasing infectivity of virus over time irrespective of increased viral load suggested the possibility of PEDv evolution within the EMS and perhaps in the new host that negatively impacted virus infectivity. Viral load in the top layer of the EMS was low and mostly non-infective suggesting that environmental factors, such as UV and sunlight, could diminish the replicability and infectivity of the virus. Thus, frequent agitation of the EMS that could expose virus to UV and sunlight might be a potential strategy for reduction of PEDv load and infectivity in the infected EMS. PMID:27014197

  11. The F/Ph rearrangement reaction of [(Ph3P)3RhF], the fluoride congener of Wilkinson's catalyst.

    PubMed

    Macgregor, Stuart A; Roe, D Christopher; Marshall, William J; Bloch, Karen M; Bakhmutov, Vladimir I; Grushin, Vladimir V

    2005-11-02

    The fluoride congener of Wilkinson's catalyst, [(Ph(3)P)(3)RhF] (1), has been synthesized and fully characterized. Unlike Wilkinson's catalyst, 1 easily activates the inert C-Cl bond of ArCl (Ar = Ph, p-tolyl) under mild conditions (3 h at 80 degrees C) to produce trans-[(Ph(3)P)(2)Rh(Ph(2)PF)(Cl)] (2) and ArPh as a result of C-Cl, Rh-F, and P-C bond cleavage and C-C, Rh-Cl, and P-F bond formation. In benzene (2-3 h at 80 degrees C), 1 decomposes to a 1:1 mixture of trans-[(Ph(3)P)(2)Rh(Ph(2)PF)(F)] (3) and the cyclometalated complex [(Ph(3)P)(2)Rh(Ph(2)PC(6)H(4))] (4). Both the chloroarene activation and the thermal decomposition reactions have been shown to occur via the facile and reversible F/Ph rearrangement reaction of 1 to cis-[(Ph(3)P)(2)Rh(Ph)(Ph(2)PF)] (5), which has been isolated and fully characterized. Kinetic studies of the F/Ph rearrangement, an intramolecular process not influenced by extra phosphine, have led to the determination of E(a) = 22.7 +/- 1.2 kcal mol(-)(1), DeltaH(++) = 22.0 +/- 1.2 kcal mol(-)(1), and DeltaS(++) = -10.0 +/- 3.7 eu. Theoretical studies of F/Ph exchange with the [(PH(3))(2)(PH(2)Ph)RhF] model system pointed to two possible mechanisms: (i) Ph transfer to Rh followed by F transfer to P (formally oxidative addition followed by reductive elimination, pathway 1) and (ii) F transfer to produce a metallophosphorane with subsequent Ph transfer to Rh (pathway 2). Although pathway 1 cannot be ruled out completely, the metallophosphorane mechanism finds more support from both our own and previously reported observations. Possible involvement of metallophosphorane intermediates in various P-F, P-O, and P-C bond-forming reactions at a metal center is discussed.

  12. To PhET or Not To PhET: That Is the Question

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casao, Robert

    2008-10-01

    The investigation examined use of a Physics Education Technology (PhET) simulation versus a hands-on lab activity on student's conceptual understanding of physics content. Topics of study included vectors, projectile motion, direct current (DC) circuits, and the photoelectric effect. Participants consisted of high school juniors and seniors enrolled in a physics course. Assessment instruments consisted of questions taken from the Vector Evaluation Test, the Electric Circuits Concept Evaluation test, textbook test banks, or written to address concepts under evaluation. Data collection consisted of a pre-test score, a post-test score, and a gain score. The conceptual understanding of the experimental and the control groups did not significantly differ for vectors and DC circuits. The conceptual understanding of the experimental and control groups did significantly differ for projectile motion. The results indicated a conceptual gain for students using the photoelectric effect simulation. Student attitudes towards the PhET simulations were positive.

  13. Accurate transport properties for O(3P)-H and O(3P)-H2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dagdigian, Paul J.; Kłos, Jacek; Warehime, Mick; Alexander, Millard H.

    2016-10-01

    Transport properties for collisions of oxygen atoms with hydrogen atoms and hydrogen molecules have been computed by means of time-independent quantum scattering calculations. For the O(3P)-H(2S) interaction, potential energy curves for the four OH electronic states emanating from this asymptote were computed by the internally-contracted multi-reference configuration interaction method, and the R-dependent spin-orbit matrix elements were taken from Parlant and Yarkony [J. Chem. Phys. 110, 363 (1999)]. For the O(3P)-H2 interaction, diabatic potential energy surfaces were derived from internally contracted multi-reference configuration interaction calculations. Transport properties were computed for these two collision pairs and compared with those obtained with the conventional approach that employs isotropic Lennard-Jones (12-6) potentials.

  14. Low pH alkaline chemical formulations

    SciTech Connect

    French, T.R.; Peru, D.A.; Thornton, S.D.

    1989-01-01

    This report describes the development of a surfactant-enhanced alkaline flooding system that is applicable to specific reservoir conditions in Wilmington (California) field. The cost of the chemicals for an ASP (alkali/surfactant/polymer) flood is calculated to be $3.90/bbl of oil produced, with 78% of that cost attributable to polymer. This research included phase behavior tests, oil displacement tests, mineral dissolution tests, and adsorption measurements. It was discovered that consumption of low pH alkalis is low enough in the Wilmington field to be acceptable. In addition, alkali dramatically reduced surfactant adsorption and precipitation. A mixture of NaHCO3 and Na2CO3 was recommended for use as a preflush and in the ASP formulation. Research was also conducted on the synergistic effect that occurs when a mixture of alkali and synthetic surfactant contacts crude oil. It appears that very low IFT is predominantly a result of the activation of the natural surfactants present in the Wilmington oil, and the sustained low IFT is primarily the result of the synthetic surfactant. It also appears that removal of acids from the crude oil by the alkali renders the oil more interfacially reactive to synthetic surfactant. These phenomena help to explain the synergism that results from combining alkali and synthetic surfactant into a single oil recovery formulation. 19 refs., 24 figs., 10 tabs.

  15. Combined M.D./Ph.D. and Ph.D. Training Program in Breast Cancer Prevention

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-07-01

    of trainees, and the development of courses for the program. In the sixth year, we recruited Ms. Anne Miermont and Mr. Mark Markowski . Ms. Miermont...Baltimore County. Mr. Markowski , an MD/PhD student received his BS in Biochemistry and Mathematics from Georgetown University. Ms. Miermont is...currently working in the lab of her Thesis Mentor, Dr. Priscilla Furth. Mr. Markowski is currently working in the lab of Thesis Mentor Dr. Edward Gelmann

  16. Italia-Netherland PhD Program: the I.O. PhD Research Program.

    PubMed

    Bellissima, Valentina; Borghesi, Alessandro; Bozzetti, Valentina; Dessì, Angelica; Fabiano, Adele; Risso, Francesco M; Salvo, Vincenzo; Satriano, Angela; Silvagni, Davide; Varrica, Alessandro; van Bel, Frank; Visser, Gerard H A; Vles, Hans Js; Zimmermann, Luc J I; Gavilanes, Antonio D W; Gazzolo, Diego

    2011-10-01

    In the framework of long-term scientific collaboration among the founder members coming from Holland and Italy there was a growing consensus to activate a philosophical doctorate (PhD) program, involving young Italian researchers in the field of perinatal medicine, neonatology and pediatrics. The aims were to promote excellence in research, offering to young Italian physicians the opportunity to maturate an International research experience leading to PhD degree, and to promote human and technological improvement energies in perinatal, neonatal and pediatrics research. Thus, an official collaboration among the Dutch Universities from Maastricht and Utrecht and the Italian Children's Hospital from Alessandria, has been activated on March 1st 2010, finalized to the PhD program. The experimental phase included the selection of projects and relative candidates after an interview-selection focusing on their scientific attitudes and the availability on their research projects. Candidates' selection started on May 2010 and on September 29th ten projects and candidates have been approved by the scientific commission. Research topics included: perinatal asphyxia, aging and the origin of adulthood neurodegenerative disease, neuroprotective strategies, biochemical pulmonology, intrauterine growth retardation and perinatal teratology. To date, all projects have been approved by local Ethics Committee from the University/Hospital of origin of the candidates. Five manuscripts have been published and/or submitted to international Journals regarding pneumology, perinatal asphyxia and teratology, whilst about 60-70% of data regarding clinical studies have already been collected.

  17. Dipstick Spot urine pH does not accurately represent 24 hour urine PH measured by an electrode

    PubMed Central

    Omar, Mohamed; Sarkissian, Carl; Jianbo, Li; Calle, Juan; Monga, Manoj

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives To determine whether spot urine pH measured by dipstick is an accurate representation of 24 hours urine pH measured by an electrode. Materials and Methods We retrospectively reviewed urine pH results of patients who presented to the urology stone clinic. For each patient we recorded the most recent pH result measured by dipstick from a spot urine sample that preceded the result of a 24-hour urine pH measured by the use of a pH electrode. Patients were excluded if there was a change in medications or dietary recommendations or if the two samples were more than 4 months apart. A difference of more than 0.5 pH was considered an inaccurate result. Results A total 600 patients were retrospectively reviewed for the pH results. The mean difference in pH between spot urine value and the 24 hours collection values was 0.52±0.45 pH. Higher pH was associated with lower accuracy (p<0.001). The accuracy of spot urine samples to predict 24-hour pH values of <5.5 was 68.9%, 68.2% for 5.5 to 6.5 and 35% for >6.5. Samples taken more than 75 days apart had only 49% the accuracy of more recent samples (p<0.002). The overall accuracy is lower than 80% (p<0.001). Influence of diurnal variation was not significant (p=0.588). Conclusions Spot urine pH by dipstick is not an accurate method for evaluation of the patients with urolithiasis. Patients with alkaline urine are more prone to error with reliance on spot urine pH. PMID:27286119

  18. Dipstick Spot urine pH does not accurately represent 24 hour urine PH measured by an electrode.

    PubMed

    Omar, Mohamed; Sarkissian, Carl; Jianbo, Li; Calle, Juan; Monga, Manoj

    2016-01-01

    To determine whether spot urine pH measured by dipstick is an accurate representation of 24 hours urine pH measured by an electrode. We retrospectively reviewed urine pH results of patients who presented to the urology stone clinic. For each patient we recorded the most recente pH result measured by dipstick from a spot urine sample that preceded the result of a 24-hour urine pH measured by the use of a pH electrode. Patients were excluded if there was a change in medications or dietary recommendations or if the two samples were more than 4 months apart. A difference of more than 0.5 pH was considered na inaccurate result. A total 600 patients were retrospectively reviewed for the pH results. The mean difference in pH between spot urine value and the 24 hours collection values was 0.52±0.45 pH. Higher pH was associated with lower accuracy (p<0.001). The accuracy of spot urine samples to predict 24-hour pH values of <5.5 was 68.9%, 68.2% for 5.5 to 6.5 and 35% for >6.5. Samples taken more than 75 days apart had only 49% the accuracy of more recent samples (p<0.002). The overall accuracy is lower than 80% (p<0.001). Influence of diurnal variation was not significant (p=0.588). Spot urine pH by dipstick is not an accurate method for evaluation of the patients with urolithiasis. Patients with alkaline urine are more prone to error with reliance on spot urine pH.

  19. In vitro synthesis and purification of PhIP-deoxyguanosine and PhIP-DNA oligomer covalent complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman, J.

    1994-12-01

    2-Amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP) is a heterocyclic amine compound formed when meats are cooked at high temperatures. PhIP damages DNA by forming covalent complexes with DNA carcinogen. In an effort to understand how the binding of PhIP to DNA may cause cancer, it is important to characterize the structures of PhIP-damaged DNA molecules. Our HPLC data support fluorescence and {sup 32}P Post-labeling studies which indicate the formation of several species of 2{prime}deoxyguanosine-(dG) or oligodeoxynucleotide-PhIP adducts. The reaction of PhIP with dG resulted in a reddish precipitate that was likely the major adduct, N-(deoxyguanosin-8-yl)-PhIP (dG-C8-PhIP) adduct, with a more polar adduct fraction remaining in the supernatant. Reversed-phase HPLC analysis of the adducts in the supernatant revealed the existence of species of much shorter retention times than the dG-C8-PhIP adduct, confirming that these species are more polar than dG-C8-PhIP. At least four adducts were formed in the reaction of PhIP with DNA oligomer. HPLC analysis of the PhIP-DNA oligomer supernatant after butanol extractions revealed four unresolved peaks which spectra had maximum wavelengths between 340 and 360 nm. Though adduct peaks were not completely resolved, there was {approximately}3 minutes interval between the DNA oligomer peak and the adduct peaks. Furthermore, fluorescence emission data of the DNA oligomer-PhIP adduct solution show heterogeneous binding. The more polar PhIP adducts were fraction-collected and their structures will be solved by nuclear magnetic resonance or x-ray crystallography.

  20. Lung lamellar bodies maintain an acidic internal pH

    SciTech Connect

    Chander, A.; Johnson, R.G.; Reicherter, J.; Fisher, A.B.

    1986-05-05

    The internal pH of lung lamellar bodies was investigated with membrane permeable basic amines. Isolated granular pneumocytes and isolated lung lamellar bodies exhibited fluorescence when exposed to 8 microM quinacrine, suggesting accumulation of this dye due to an acidic internal pH. Uptake of (/sup 14/C)methylamine by isolated lung lamellar bodies was measured to quantitate the intralamellar body pH. In KCl-ATP (10 mM) medium (pH 7.0), the accumulation ratio of methylamine (inside/outside) during 2-min incubation was 8.1 +/- 0.47 (mean +/- S.E., n = 8) indicating an internal pH of 6.1. Lamellar bodies accumulated methylamine almost 30-fold in K+-free mannitol medium indicating an internal pH of 5.6. The pH gradient across the lamellar body membrane decreased when external pH was decreased or when ATP was omitted. The pH gradient was also decreased by the addition of 10 mM NH/sub 4/Cl, 2 micrograms/ml nigericin, 0.02 mM N,N'-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide, or 1 mM N'-ethylmaleimide. These observations indicate that lamellar bodies maintain an acidic interior (pH 6.1 or below) which is generated by an energy-dependent process.

  1. Osmolytes contribute to pH homeostasis of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Kitko, Ryan D; Wilks, Jessica C; Garduque, Gian M; Slonczewski, Joan L

    2010-04-08

    Cytoplasmic pH homeostasis in Escherichia coli includes numerous mechanisms involving pH-dependent catabolism and ion fluxes. An important contributor is transmembrane K+ flux, but the actual basis of K+ compensation for pH stress remains unclear. Osmoprotection could mediate the pH protection afforded by K+ and other osmolytes. The cytoplasmic pH of E. coli K-12 strains was measured by GFPmut3 fluorimetry. The wild-type strain Frag1 was exposed to rapid external acidification by HCl addition. Recovery of cytoplasmic pH was enhanced equally by supplementation with NaCl, KCl, proline, or sucrose. A triple mutant strain TK2420 defective for the Kdp, Trk and Kup K+ uptake systems requires exogenous K+ for steady-state pH homeostasis and for recovery from sudden acid shift. The K+ requirement however was partly compensated by supplementation with NaCl, choline chloride, proline, or sucrose. Thus, the K+ requirement was mediated in part by osmolarity, possibly by relieving osmotic stress which interacts with pH stress. The rapid addition of KCl to strain TK2420 suspended at external pH 5.6 caused a transient decrease in cytoplasmic pH, followed by slow recovery to an elevated steady-state pH. In the presence of 150 mM KCl, however, rapid addition of another 150 mM KCl caused a transient increase in cytoplasmic pH. These transient effects may arise from secondary K+ fluxes occurring through other transport processes in the TK2420 strain. Diverse osmolytes including NaCl, KCl, proline, or sucrose contribute to cytoplasmic pH homeostasis in E. coli, and increase the recovery from rapid acid shift. Osmolytes other than K+ restore partial pH homeostasis in a strain deleted for K+ transport.

  2. Uses of pH electrodes in nuclear chemistry.

    PubMed

    Ekberg, C; Andersson, S; Olsson, M

    2002-11-01

    The determination and definition of pH is a controversial subject in many areas in chemistry. For these reasons the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) has developed recommendations for pH measurement. These recommendations are currently (winter 2001) under revision - there will be increased emphasis on traceability of uncertainties in pH measurement. Here we describe how glass electrodes designed for measurement of pH are used in nuclear chemistry. The use of pH electrodes is then related to the IUPAC recommendations. In applied chemistry, e.g. nuclear chemistry, a pH is not sought as often as a hydrogen ion concentration or a simple equilibrium point during a titration. Ionic strengths are, moreover, often above the range in which the IUPAC recommendations apply. In these instances uncertainties must be assessed individually.

  3. pH measurement of low-conductivity waters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Busenberg, Eurybiades; Plummer, L.N.

    1987-01-01

    pH is an important and commonly measured parameter of precipitation and other natural waters. The various sources of errors in pH measurement were analyzed and procedures for improving the accuracy and precision of pH measurements in natural waters with conductivities of < 100 uS/cm at 25 C are suggested. Detailed procedures are given for the preparation of dilute sulfuric acid standards to evaluate the performance of pH electrodes in low conductivity waters. A daily check of the pH of dilute sulfuric acid standards and deionized water saturated with a gas mixture of low carbon dioxide at partial pressure (air) prior to the measurement of the pH of low conductivity waters is suggested. (Author 's abstract)

  4. Cell wall pH and auxin transport velocity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasenstein, K. H.; Rayle, D.

    1984-01-01

    According to the chemiosmotic polar diffusion hypothesis, auxin pulse velocity and basal secretion should increase with decreasing cell wall pH. Experiments were designed to test this prediction. Avena coleoptile sections were preincubated in either fusicoccin (FC), cycloheximide, pH 4.0, or pH 8.0 buffer and subsequently their polar transport capacities were determined. Relative to controls, FC enhanced auxin (IAA) uptake while CHI and pH 8.0 buffer reduced IAA uptake. Nevertheless, FC reduced IAA pulse velocity while cycloheximide increased velocity. Additional experiments showed that delivery of auxin to receivers is enhanced by increased receiver pH. This phenomenon was overcome by a pretreatment of the tissue with IAA. Our data suggest that while acidic wall pH values facilitate cellular IAA uptake, they do not enhance pulse velocity or basal secretion. These findings are inconsistent with the chemiosmotic hypothesis for auxin transport.

  5. Soil ph Control in the Mobile Corrosion Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radenkov, T. A.; Romanenko, S. V.; Kolpakov, V. A.; E Merzlyakov, O.; Kabanov, V. A.; Kagirov, A. G.

    2017-04-01

    Corrosion monitoring methods and pH measuring devices are studied. Considering the heterogeneity of the soil pH, depending on depth and sampling points, it is advisable to use solid-state potentiometric sensors that are capable of pH measuring with an error not exceeding 0.2 pH units. In the process of the pipeline installation necessary to control the soil pH value. While it is impossible to predict what kind of horizon will be in contact with the pipe material at different points. This problem requires future development of technique for the correct pH measuring for the purpose of mobile pipeline corrosion monitoring. When using cathodic protection has been required find the balance between the parameters which prevent the corrosion reactions and also take into account the hydrogen absorption on surface of the pipes material.

  6. Cell wall pH and auxin transport velocity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasenstein, K. H.; Rayle, D.

    1984-01-01

    According to the chemiosmotic polar diffusion hypothesis, auxin pulse velocity and basal secretion should increase with decreasing cell wall pH. Experiments were designed to test this prediction. Avena coleoptile sections were preincubated in either fusicoccin (FC), cycloheximide, pH 4.0, or pH 8.0 buffer and subsequently their polar transport capacities were determined. Relative to controls, FC enhanced auxin (IAA) uptake while CHI and pH 8.0 buffer reduced IAA uptake. Nevertheless, FC reduced IAA pulse velocity while cycloheximide increased velocity. Additional experiments showed that delivery of auxin to receivers is enhanced by increased receiver pH. This phenomenon was overcome by a pretreatment of the tissue with IAA. Our data suggest that while acidic wall pH values facilitate cellular IAA uptake, they do not enhance pulse velocity or basal secretion. These findings are inconsistent with the chemiosmotic hypothesis for auxin transport.

  7. Computer model of unstirred layer and intracellular pH changes. Determinants of unstirred layer pH.

    PubMed

    Marrannes, Roger

    2013-06-01

    Transmembrane acid-base fluxes affect the intracellular pH and unstirred layer pH around a superfused biological preparation. In this paper the factors influencing the unstirred layer pH and its gradient are studied. An analytical expression of the unstirred layer pH gradient in steady state is derived as a function of simultaneous transmembrane fluxes of (weak) acids and bases with the dehydration reaction of carbonic acid in equilibrium. Also a multicompartment computer model is described consisting of the extracellular bulk compartment, different unstirred layer compartments and the intracellular compartment. With this model also transient changes and the influence of carbonic anhydrase (CA) can be studied. The analytical expression and simulations with the multicompartment model demonstrate that in steady state the unstirred layer pH and its gradient are influenced by the size and type of transmembrane flux of acids and bases, their dissociation constant and diffusion coefficient, the concentration, diffusion coefficient and type of mobile buffers and the activity and location of CA. Similar principles contribute to the amplitude of the unstirred layer pH transients. According to these models an immobile buffer does not influence the steady-state pH, but reduces the amplitude of pH transients especially when these are fast. The unstirred layer pH provides useful information about transmembrane acid-base fluxes. This paper gives more insight how the unstirred layer pH and its transients can be interpreted. Methodological issues are discussed.

  8. Optrodes of photonic fiber to pH sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rendón-Romero, A.; Peña-Gomar, M.; Alvarado-Méndez, E.

    2012-10-01

    In this paper, design of optrodes of photonic optical fiber to a pH sensor with a pH dye is described. The sensor is prepared by immobilizing blue bromophenol, as a pH dye, using sol-gel technique with a photonic optical fiber. The physical principle is based in the absorption of the optrodes of the light from a laser diode as an emitter, and as transducer we use a photoresist for electronic conditioning of the signal.

  9. Ratiometric Imaging of Extracellular pH in Dental Biofilms.

    PubMed

    Schlafer, Sebastian; Dige, Irene

    2016-03-09

    The pH in bacterial biofilms on teeth is of central importance for dental caries, a disease with a high worldwide prevalence. Nutrients and metabolites are not distributed evenly in dental biofilms. A complex interplay of sorption to and reaction with organic matter in the biofilm reduces the diffusion paths of solutes and creates steep gradients of reactive molecules, including organic acids, across the biofilm. Quantitative fluorescent microscopic methods, such as fluorescence life time imaging or pH ratiometry, can be employed to visualize pH in different microenvironments of dental biofilms. pH ratiometry exploits a pH-dependent shift in the fluorescent emission of pH-sensitive dyes. Calculation of the emission ratio at two different wavelengths allows determining local pH in microscopic images, irrespective of the concentration of the dye. Contrary to microelectrodes the technique allows monitoring both vertical and horizontal pH gradients in real-time without mechanically disturbing the biofilm. However, care must be taken to differentiate accurately between extra- and intracellular compartments of the biofilm. Here, the ratiometric dye, seminaphthorhodafluor-4F 5-(and-6) carboxylic acid (C-SNARF-4) is employed to monitor extracellular pH in in vivo grown dental biofilms of unknown species composition. Upon exposure to glucose the dye is up-concentrated inside all bacterial cells in the biofilms; it is thus used both as a universal bacterial stain and as a marker of extracellular pH. After confocal microscopic image acquisition, the bacterial biomass is removed from all pictures using digital image analysis software, which permits to exclusively calculate extracellular pH. pH ratiometry with the ratiometric dye is well-suited to study extracellular pH in thin biofilms of up to 75 µm thickness, but is limited to the pH range between 4.5 and 7.0.

  10. Time dependence of the pH of rain

    Treesearch

    John A. Kadlecek; Volkar A. Mohnen

    1976-01-01

    Standard procedures for determining the pH of rain samples usually involve substantial delays from the time of rainfall to the time of analysis. This assumes that no change in pH occurs during the storage period. We have found that this is not always true. We have determined that individual rain water samples possess a time dependent pH which can be correlated with the...

  11. Design of PH sensor signal acquisition and display system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Huifa; Zhang, Quanzhu; Deng, Yonghong

    2017-06-01

    With the continuous development of sensor manufacturing technology, how to better deal with the signal is particularly important. PH value of the sensor voltage generated by the signal as a signal, through the MCU acquisition A / D conversion, and ultimately through the digital display of its PH value. The system uses hardware and software to achieve the results obtained with the high-precision PH meter to strive to improve the accuracy and reduce error.

  12. Chapter A6. Section 6.4. pH

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilde, Franceska D.; Busenberg, Eurybiades; Radtke, Dean B.

    2006-01-01

    Measurement of pH is critical to the understanding of the viability and vulnerability of environmental waters and is considered a master variable in determining the aqueous geochemistry of an aqueous system. pH is a measure that represents the hydrogen-ion concentration (activity) of a solution. This section of the National Field Manual (NFM) describes U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) guidance and protocols for measurement of pH in ground and surface waters.

  13. Quantum dot photoluminescence lifetime-based pH nanosensor.

    PubMed

    Ruedas-Rama, Maria J; Orte, Angel; Hall, Elizabeth A H; Alvarez-Pez, Jose M; Talavera, Eva M

    2011-03-14

    The first CdSe/ZnS quantum dot photoluminescence lifetime-based pH nanosensor has been developed. The average lifetime of mercaptopropionic acid-capped QD nanosensors showed a linear response in the pH range of 5.2-6.9. These nanosensors have been satisfactorily applied for pH estimation in simulated intracellular media, with high sensitivity and high selectivity toward most of the intracellular components.

  14. Update to Millstone 3 elevated pH tests

    SciTech Connect

    Bergmann, C.A.; Perock, J.D.; Hudson, M.J.B.; King, R.W.; Macklin, S.

    1995-03-01

    In view of the potential radiological benefits of elevated coolant pH operation, Northwest Utilities (NU), in support of an EPRI-Westinghouse program, agreed to operate the Millstone 3 plant at the start of its second fuel cycle as a demonstration of the effect of elevated coolant pH on out-of-core radiation fields. Operating with an elevated pH is defined as operating with an average lithium concentration of 3.35 ppm, until reaching an end of cycle pH of 7.2 or 7.4. The plant operated during its second and third cycles with an elevated coolant pH. The end of cycle pH during the second cycle was 7.4, and 7.2 during the third cycle. (During the first cycle, operation was with a coordinated pH of 7.0). Evaluation of the dose rate trends in Millstone 3 after two cycles of elevated coolant pH operation concluded that an elevated coolant pH resulted in a 15 percent lower component dose rate compared to other plants that operated with coordinated pH 6.9. However, due to a possible increase in fuel clad corrosion, operation during cycle 4 was restricted to pH 6.9 coordinated chemistry, with the exception of the last two months during which the pH increased to 7.35. At the end of cycle 4 (EOC4), there was a greater increase in component and crud trap dose rates than expected. This paper reviews the radiological trends in the plant and discusses the potential causes for the increase in the dose rates at EOC4.

  15. Determining pH of strip-mine spoils

    Treesearch

    W. A. Berg

    1969-01-01

    Results with the LaMotte-Morgan method for determining soil pH-or the solution modification of this method-usually agreed fairly well with the results from using a pH meter, the recognized standard. Results obtained with the Soiltex and Hellige-Truog methods often deviated somewhat from the pH meter readings; and the Hydrion papers and the Kelway pH tester often gave...

  16. PH Dependent Interactions between Aqueous Iodide Ion and Selected Oxidizers.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-12-06

    between the oxidizers oeroxydisultte, peroxide. percarbonate, and perborate ions and aqueous iodide have been measured at pH 1. 4. 7, 9. Reactions were... Perborate and percarbonate are salts with "hydrogen peroxide of crystallization" (see formulae listed in Table i). These salts appear to release this...between hydrogen peroxide and iodide are highly pH dependent. These materials react very slowly, or not at all, at pH 49. 2). Perborate and percarbonate are

  17. Field measurement of alkalinity and pH

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barnes, Ivan

    1964-01-01

    The behavior of electrometric pH equipment under field conditions departs from the behavior predicted from Nernst's law. The response is a linear function of pH, and hence measured pH values may be corrected to true pH if the instrument is calibrated with two reference solutions for each measurement. Alkalinity titrations may also be made in terms of true pH. Standard methods, such as colorimetric titrations, were rejected as unreliable or too cumbersome for rapid field use. The true pH of the end point of the alkalinity titration as a function of temperature, ionic strength, and total alkalinity has been calculated. Total alkalinity in potable waters is the most important factor influencing the end point pH, which varies from 5.38 (0 ? C, 5 ppm (parts per million) HC0a-) to 4.32 (300 ppm HC0a-,35 ? C), for the ranges of variables considered. With proper precautions, the pH may be determined to =i:0.02 pH and the alkalinity to =i:0.6 ppm HCO3- for many naturally occurring bodies of fresh water.

  18. pH inactivation of phosphofructokinase arrests postmortem glycolysis.

    PubMed

    England, Eric M; Matarneh, Sulaiman K; Scheffler, Tracy L; Wachet, Céline; Gerrard, David E

    2014-12-01

    Fresh meat quality development is influenced by pH decline that results from muscle glycolyzing energy substrates postmortem. The exact reason why glycolysis stops in the presence of residual glycogen remains unclear. We hypothesized that a critical glycolytic enzyme loses activity near the ultimate pH of meat. Porcine longissimus muscle samples were subjected to an in vitro system that mimics postmortem anaerobic metabolism at buffered pH values (7.0, 6.5, 6.0, 5.5 or 5.0). At pH7.0, 6.5, and 6.0, glycogenolysis and glycolysis proceeded normally while pH5.5 stopped lactate formation. Additional experimentation indicated that phosphofructokinase lost activity at pH5.5 while all other glycolytic enzymes remained active. A similar inactivation of phosphofructokinase was observed when using chicken and beef muscle. Elevated temperature hastened pH decline and phosphofructokinase activity loss. Thus, pH inactivates phosphofructokinase and arrests postmortem glycolysis, which may explain the similar ultimate pH across meat of different species.

  19. Nanosensor aided photoacoustic measurement of pH in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, Aniruddha; Yoon, Hyung Ki; Kopelman, Raoul; Wang, Xueding

    2013-03-01

    pH plays a critical role in many aspects of cell and tissues physiology. Lower pH is also a typical characteristic of arthritic joints and tumor tissues. These pH anomalies are also exploited in different drug delivery mechanisms. Here we present, a new method of pH sensing in vivo using spectroscopic photoacoustic measurements facilitated by pH sensitive nanosensors. The nanosensors consist of Seminaphtharhodafluor (SNARF), a pH sensitive dye, encapsulated in a specially designed polyacrylamide hydrogel matrix with a hydrophobic core. The photoacoustic intensity ratio between the excitation wavelengths of 585nm and 565nm increases in the pH range from 6.0 to 8.0 and is used to determine the pH of the local environment. These nanosensors are biodegradable, biocompatible, have a long plasma lifetime and can be targeted to any type of cells or tissues by surface modification using proper targeting moieties. The encapsulation of the dye prevents the interaction of the dye with proteins in plasma and also reduces the dye degradation. The SNARF dye in its free form loses 90% of its absorbance in presence of albumin, a protein found in abundance in plasma, and this has severely limited its adaptation to in vivo environments. In comparison, the SNARF nanosensors lose only 16% of their absorbance in the same environment. We employ these nanosensors to demonstrate the feasibility of pH sensing in vivo through photoacoustic measurements on a rat joint model.

  20. Molecular aspects of bacterial pH sensing and homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Krulwich, Terry A.; Sachs, George; Padan, Etana

    2011-01-01

    Diverse mechanisms for pH-sensing and cytoplasmic pH homeostasis enable most bacteria to tolerate or grow at external pH values that are outside the cytoplasmic pH range they must maintain for growth. The most extreme cases are exemplified by the extremophiles that inhabit environments whose pH is below 3 or above 11. Here we describe how recent insights into the structure and function of key molecules and their regulators reveal novel strategies of bacterial pH-homeostasis. These insights may help us better target certain pathogens and better harness the capacities of environmental bacteria. PMID:21464825

  1. Fiber Bragg Grating Based pH Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yulianti, Ian; Sahmah, Abu; Supa'at, M.; Idrus, M.; Kassim, Norazan M.; Al-hetar, Abdulaziz M.

    2011-05-01

    This paper demonstrates the modeling of pH sensor based on pH sensitive hydrogel coated FBG. The modeling was done by simulating the hydrogel swelling behavior, then calculating the strain induced by hydrogel expansion. Meshless numerical method was adopted to solve the Poison Nernst Planck equation coupled to mechanical equation to simulate the hydrogel swelling. The strain induced in the FBG due to mechanical expansion of hydrogel was calculated analytically. Strain of more than 10 μɛ was obtained at pH> 5. At pH of 5, λB shift of more than 10 pm was achieved.

  2. Cytoplasmic pH and human erythrocyte shape.

    PubMed Central

    Gedde, M M; Davis, D K; Huestis, W H

    1997-01-01

    Altered external pH transforms human erythrocytes from discocytes to stomatocytes (low pH) or echinocytes (high pH). The mechanism of this transformation is unknown. The preceding companion study (Gedde and Huestis) demonstrated that these shape changes are not mediated by changes in membrane potential, as has been reported. The aim of this study was to identify the physiological properties that mediate this shape change. Red cells were placed in a wide range of physiological states by manipulation of buffer pH, chloride concentration, and osmolality. Morphology and four potential predictor properties (cell pH, membrane potential, cell water, and cell chloride concentration) were assayed. Analysis of the data set by stratification and nonlinear multivariate modeling showed that change in neither cell water nor cell chloride altered the morphology of normal pH cells. In contrast, change in cell pH caused shape change in normal-range membrane potential and cell water cells. The results show that change in cytoplasmic pH is both necessary and sufficient for the shape changes of human erythrocytes equilibrated in altered pH environments. PMID:9138569

  3. Temporal and spatial variability of rainfall pH

    Treesearch

    Richard G. Semonin

    1977-01-01

    The distribution of average rainwater pH over an area of 1,800 km² containing 81 collectors was determined from 25 storm events. The areal average of the data was pH 4.9, with a range of values from 4.3 to 6.8. A single storm event was studied to determine the change of pH as a function of time. The initial rain was pH 7.1, decreasing to 4.1. An excellent...

  4. EPA LABORATORIES IMPLEMENT EMS PROGRAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper highlights the breadth and magnitude of carrying out an effective Environmental Management System (EMS) program at the U.S. EPA's research and development laboratories. Federal research laboratories have unique operating challenges compared to more centralized industr...

  5. Quantitative pH assessment of small-volume samples using a universal pH indicator.

    PubMed

    Brown, Jeffrey D; Bell, Nathaniel; Li, Victoria; Cantrell, Kevin

    2014-10-01

    We developed a hue-based pH determination method to analyze digital images of samples in a 384-well plate after the addition of a universal pH indicator. The standard error of calibration for 69 pH standards was 0.078 pH units, and no sample gave an error greater than 0.23 units. We then used in-solution isoelectric focusing to determine the isoelectric point of Wnt3A protein in conditioned medium and after purification and applied the described method to assess the pH of these small-volume samples. End users may access our standard to assay the pH of their own samples with no additional calibration. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Red-emitting dyes with photophysical and photochemical properties controlled by pH.

    PubMed

    Novakova, Veronika; Miletin, Miroslav; Kopecky, Kamil; Zimcik, Petr

    2011-12-09

    New unsymmetrical zinc azaphthalocyanines, bearing one substituted aniline as a peripheral substituent, were prepared by using a statistical condensation approach. Both fluorescence and singlet oxygen quantum yields were extremely low in DMF (Φ(F)<0.01, Φ(Δ)<0.02, respectively), but increased after the addition of sulfuric acid, reaching values comparable to controls without aniline substituents (Φ(F)=0.22-0.29, Φ(Δ)=0.40-0.59, respectively). This behavior was attributed to the deactivation of excited states by intramolecular charge transfer from a donor site (aniline), which was blocked after protonation in acidic media. In the protonated form, all of the compounds efficiently emitted light with λ(em) in the region of 662-675 nm. The investigated compounds were anchored to dioleoylphosphatidylcholine (DOPC) unilamellar vesicles and showed response to buffer pH. They were highly fluorescent at low pH values and almost nonfluorescent in neutral solutions. The pK(a) values were determined in DOPC vesicles and ranged between 2.2 and 4.2.

  7. Extracellular pH modulates GABAergic neurotransmission in rat hypothalamus.

    PubMed

    Chen, Z L; Huang, R Q

    2014-06-20

    Changes in extracellular pH have a modulatory effect on GABAA receptor function. It has been reported that pH sensitivity of the GABA receptor is dependent on subunit composition and GABA concentration. Most of previous investigations focused on GABA-evoked currents, which only reflect the postsynaptic receptors. The physiological relevance of pH modulation of GABAergic neurotransmission is not fully elucidated. In the present studies, we examined the influence of extracellular pH on the GABAA receptor-mediated inhibitory neurotransmission in rat hypothalamic neurons. The inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs), tonic currents, and the GABA-evoked currents were recorded with whole-cell patch techniques on the hypothalamic slices from Sprague-Dawley rats at 15-26 postnatal days. The amplitude and frequency of spontaneous GABA IPSCs were significantly increased while the external pH was changed from 7.3 to 8.4. In the acidic pH (6.4), the spontaneous GABA IPSCs were reduced in amplitude and frequency. The pH induced changes in miniature GABA IPSCs (mIPSCs) similar to that in spontaneous IPSCs. The pH effect on the postsynaptic GABA receptors was assessed with exogenously applied varying concentrations of GABA. The tonic currents and the currents evoked by sub-saturating concentration of GABA ([GABA]) (10 μM) were inhibited by acidic pH and potentiated by alkaline pH. In contrast, the currents evoked by saturating [GABA] (1mM) were not affected by pH changes. We also investigated the influence of pH buffers and buffering capacity on pH sensitivity of GABAA receptors on human recombinant α1β2γ2 GABAA receptors stably expressed in HEK 293 cells. The pH influence on GABAA receptors was similar in HEPES- and MES-buffered media, and not dependent on protonated buffers, suggesting that the observed pH effect on GABA response is a specific consequence of changes in extracellular protons. Our data suggest that the hydrogen ions suppress the GABAergic neurotransmission

  8. The Semen pH Affects Sperm Motility and Capacitation.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ji; Chen, Li; Li, Jie; Li, Hongjun; Hong, Zhiwei; Xie, Min; Chen, Shengrong; Yao, Bing

    2015-01-01

    As the chemical environment of semen can have a profound effect on sperm quality, we examined the effect of pH on the motility, viability and capacitation of human sperm. The sperm in this study was collected from healthy males to avoid interference from other factors. The spermatozoa cultured in sperm nutrition solution at pH 5.2, 6.2, 7.2 and 8.2 were analyzed for sperm total motility, progressive motility (PR), hypo-osmotic swelling (HOS) rate, and sperm penetration. Our results showed that these parameters were similar in pH 7.2 and 8.2 sperm nutrition solutions, but decreased in pH 5.2 and 6.2 solutions. The HOS rate exhibited positive correlation with the sperm total motility and PR. In addition, the sperm Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase activity at different pHs was measured, and the enzyme activity was significantly lower in pH 5.2 and 6.2 media, comparing with that in pH 8.2 and pH 7.2 solutions. Using flow cytometry (FCM) and laser confocal scanning microscopy (LCSM) analysis, the intracellular Ca2(+ )concentrations of sperm cultured in sperm capacitation solution at pH 5.2, 6.2, 7.2 and 8.2 were determined. Compared with that at pH 7.2, the mean fluorescence intensity of sperm in pH 5.2 and 6.2 media decreased significantly, while that of pH 8.2 group showed no difference. Our results suggested that the declined Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase activity at acidic pHs result in decreased sperm movement and capacitation, which could be one of the mechanisms of male infertility.

  9. The pH of beverages in the United States.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Avanija; Norris, Don F; Momeni, Stephanie S; Waldo, Belinda; Ruby, John D

    2016-04-01

    Dental erosion is the chemical dissolution of tooth structure in the absence of bacteria when the environment is acidic (pH < 4.0). Research indicates that low pH is the primary determinant of a beverage's erosive potential. In addition, citrate chelation of calcium ions may contribute to erosion at higher pH. The authors of this study determined the erosive potential measured by the pH of commercially available beverages in the United States. The authors purchased 379 beverages from stores in Birmingham, Alabama, and categorized them (for example, juices, sodas, flavored waters, teas, and energy drinks) and assessed their pH. They used a pH meter to measure the pH of each beverage in triplicate immediately after it was opened at a temperature of 25°C. The authors recorded the pH data as mean (standard deviation). Most (93%, 354 of 379) beverages had a pH of less than 4.0, and 7% (25 of 379) had a pH of 4.0 or more. Relative beverage erosivity zones based on studies of apatite solubility in acid indicated that 39% (149 of 379) of the beverages tested in this study were considered extremely erosive (pH < 3.0), 54% (205 of 379) were considered erosive (pH 3.0 to 3.99), and 7% (25 of 379) were considered minimally erosive (pH ≥ 4.0). This comprehensive pH assessment of commercially available beverages in the United States found that most are potentially erosive to the dentition. This study's findings provide dental clinicians and auxiliaries with information regarding the erosive potential of commercially available beverages. Specific dietary recommendations for the prevention of dental erosion may now be developed based on the patient's history of beverage consumption. Copyright © 2016 American Dental Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Notes on the Measurement of pH Values

    SciTech Connect

    Carranza, R M; Rebak, R B

    2005-05-05

    The original definition of pH is: pH = -log a{sub H}. Where a{sub H} is the (relative) hydrogen ion activity. However, a single ion activity cannot be measured. Activities of individual ionic species are necessarily conventional. The pH number, of course, has in itself little absolute significance. As the negative of the logarithm of a product of a concentration (c or m) and an activity coefficient (y or {gamma}), it acquires its magnitude from the numerical scale adopted for the latter. Experimental pH measurements are nonetheless widely applied to the determination of thermodynamic equilibrium data such as pK values, on the assumption that they represent -log a{sub H} (or paH). The single ion activity coefficient approaches unity as the ionic strength goes to zero, so that activity becomes m or c and paH becomes pmH or pcH. pH is therefore defined operationally in terms of the operation or method used to measure it, that is, by means of a cell called an operational cell. The cell is standardized by solutions of assigned pH value (Reference Value pH Standard, Primary pH Standards and Operational Standards). Such standard reference solutions are buffer solutions whose pH values are assigned from measurements on cells with or without liquid junction. It must be emphasized that the definition of pH scale is quite different from the measurement of pH with glass-reference electrode-pH meter assemblies, where several standards are used in order to take into account possible deficiencies in the electrode and meter performance.

  11. Mapping Soil pH Buffering Capacity of Selected Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weaver, A. R.; Kissel, D. E.; Chen, F.; West, L. T.; Adkins, W.; Rickman, D.; Luvall, J. C.

    2003-01-01

    Soil pH buffering capacity, since it varies spatially within crop production fields, may be used to define sampling zones to assess lime requirement, or for modeling changes in soil pH when acid forming fertilizers or manures are added to a field. Our objective was to develop a procedure to map this soil property. One hundred thirty six soil samples (0 to 15 cm depth) from three Georgia Coastal Plain fields were titrated with calcium hydroxide to characterize differences in pH buffering capacity of the soils. Since the relationship between soil pH and added calcium hydroxide was approximately linear for all samples up to pH 6.5, the slope values of these linear relationships for all soils were regressed on the organic C and clay contents of the 136 soil samples using multiple linear regression. The equation that fit the data best was b (slope of pH vs. lime added) = 0.00029 - 0.00003 * % clay + 0.00135 * % O/C, r(exp 2) = 0.68. This equation was applied within geographic information system (GIS) software to create maps of soil pH buffering capacity for the three fields. When the mapped values of the pH buffering capacity were compared with measured values for a total of 18 locations in the three fields, there was good general agreement. A regression of directly measured pH buffering capacities on mapped pH buffering capacities at the field locations for these samples gave an r(exp 2) of 0.88 with a slope of 1.04 for a group of soils that varied approximately tenfold in their pH buffering capacities.

  12. Biomedical PhD education--an international perspective.

    PubMed

    Mulvany, Michael J

    2013-05-01

    The PhD, otherwise known as the doctor of philosophy or Dr. Phil., is an internationally recognized degree, indicating that the PhD graduate has received training in research under supervision. Traditionally, the PhD was the route to an academic career, with most successful PhD graduates receiving tenured university positions. However, over the past 20-30 years, and particularly the past 10 years, the situation has changed dramatically. Governments in many countries have invested massively in PhD education, believing that trained researchers will contribute to the 'knowledge society', and thus increase the competitiveness of their countries in the future economies of the world. Thus, only a small fraction of PhD graduates now end up in academic research. Yet, the PhD remains a research degree, and indeed, institutions have become heavily dependent on PhD students for their research output. The situation has thus created a paradox. On the one hand, it has become essential for institutions to have many PhD students and for the research performed to be of the highest level. On the other hand, the careers of PhD students are not necessarily going to be directly related to the research performed during their PhD studies. The purpose of this article is to explore how this seeming paradox is being addressed in biomedicine and to show that far from being inconsistent that the two aspects are in fact complementary. The article is based on the author's experience as Head of Aarhus Graduate School of Health Sciences 2002-2011 and his work with graduate schools across Europe and internationally through the organization ORPHEUS.

  13. Mapping Soil pH Buffering Capacity of Selected Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weaver, A. R.; Kissel, D. E.; Chen, F.; West, L. T.; Adkins, W.; Rickman, D.; Luvall, J. C.

    2003-01-01

    Soil pH buffering capacity, since it varies spatially within crop production fields, may be used to define sampling zones to assess lime requirement, or for modeling changes in soil pH when acid forming fertilizers or manures are added to a field. Our objective was to develop a procedure to map this soil property. One hundred thirty six soil samples (0 to 15 cm depth) from three Georgia Coastal Plain fields were titrated with calcium hydroxide to characterize differences in pH buffering capacity of the soils. Since the relationship between soil pH and added calcium hydroxide was approximately linear for all samples up to pH 6.5, the slope values of these linear relationships for all soils were regressed on the organic C and clay contents of the 136 soil samples using multiple linear regression. The equation that fit the data best was b (slope of pH vs. lime added) = 0.00029 - 0.00003 * % clay + 0.00135 * % O/C, r(exp 2) = 0.68. This equation was applied within geographic information system (GIS) software to create maps of soil pH buffering capacity for the three fields. When the mapped values of the pH buffering capacity were compared with measured values for a total of 18 locations in the three fields, there was good general agreement. A regression of directly measured pH buffering capacities on mapped pH buffering capacities at the field locations for these samples gave an r(exp 2) of 0.88 with a slope of 1.04 for a group of soils that varied approximately tenfold in their pH buffering capacities.

  14. High-Resolution FTIR Study of the PH Stretching Bands ν 1 and ν 5 of PH 2F and PH 2Cl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckers, H.; Burger, H.; Paplewski, M.

    1995-06-01

    The FTIR spectra in the ν1 and ν5 (PH stretching) regions of the short-lived molecules PH2F and PH2Cl have been recorded with a resolution of 5.5 × 10-3 cm-1. The rovibrational analysis of the A/C- and B-type bands yielded excited state parameters, and relative transition moments of the ν1 and ν5 bands as well as the μA:μC ratio of ν1 were estimated by band contour simulations. The band centers were determined: PH2F, ν1 2283.11950(4), ν5 2286.97185(4); and PH235CI, ν1 2203.43762(4), ν5 2309.67696(4) cm-1. In PH2F, weak c-type Coriolis resonance effects with ζc1,5 = 0.0120 were found to affect the Ka = 1 and Ka = 0 levels of ν1 and ν5, respectively. The experimental results are in good agreement with previously reported predictions from ab initio harmonic and anharmonic force fields.

  15. Microscale pH Titrations Using an Automatic Pipet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flint, Edward B.; Kortz, Carrie L.; Taylor, Max A.

    2002-01-01

    Presents a microscale pH titration technique that utilizes an automatic pipet. A small aliquot (1-5 mL) of the analyte solution is titrated with repeated additions of titrant, and the pH is determined after each delivery. The equivalence point is determined graphically by either the second derivative method or a Gran plot. The pipet can be…

  16. Sugar sensing based on induced pH changes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Youngmi; Hilderbrand, Scott A; Weissleder, Ralph; Tung, Ching-Hsuan

    2007-06-14

    A sensory assembly consisting of a pH sensitive NIR dye and an arylboronic acid shows ratiometric absorption changes with increased fluorescence intensity upon addition of sugar in aqueous media; this demonstrates a new signal transduction mechanism for the detection of sugar based on pH changes induced in the microenvironment of the sensory assembly.

  17. The Early Development of Electronic pH Meters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hines, Wallis G.; de Levie, Robert

    2010-01-01

    A 19-year-old undergraduate at the University of Chicago, Kenneth Goode, in 1921 came up with the idea of an electronic pH meter, worked out some of its initial problems, and set in motion an international scientific effort that culminated in the current, wide availability of electronic pH meters. Except for the replacement of vacuum tubes by…

  18. A Renaissance in Engineering PhD Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akay, Adnan

    2008-01-01

    This paper addresses the role of engineering PhD education and its relationship to innovation and technology, and the need to reconsider how we educate PhD engineers. Much of the effort on engineering education in the last two decades focused on undergraduate education with a few exceptions that relate to master degree programs. Doctoral education…

  19. Traceable Reference Standards for Seawater pH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waters, J. F.; Easley, R. A.; Pratt, K. W.

    2016-02-01

    Ocean acidification is primarily driven by increased anthropogenic atmospheric CO2. Our present understanding of the effects of an increasingly acidic ocean is largely founded on metrologically unlinked collections of diverse environmental observations and laboratory studies with vast temporal and geographic extents. To understand these complex implications better, it is critical to establish rigorous metrological traceability in seawater carbon-system measurements and to develop a comprehensive evaluation of the measurement uncertainty. This poster communicates the development of a NIST reference material to extend metrological traceability to measurements of seawater pH. Traceability of seawater pH to the International System of Units (SI) is achieved through a multi-standard suite of synthetic seawater buffers certified using primary pH metrology (Harned cell measurements). The primary measurements of these buffer materials extend to lower salinities and pH values than those from previous investigations. The lifetime of these liquid buffers (months) is too short for use as a reference material (years). To leverage the measurement to a stable calibrator, a purified batch of colorimetric pH indicator is characterized spectrophotometrically using these same primary buffers. Use of a multi-standard suite of primary buffers traceably links the solid reference material to the primary pH measurements in a manner compliant with current practice for calibration of secondary pH measurements. An uncertainty analysis compliant with presently accepted metrological guidelines for pH determined with the reference material is presented.

  20. Evanescent-wave spectroscopic fiber optic pH sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egami, C.; Takeda, K.; Isai, M.; Ogita, M.

    1996-02-01

    We demonstrate a new type of fiber optic pH sensor, which is the application of evanescent-wave spectroscopic technique. A methyl red (MR)-doped-poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) film that coated as part of cladding does function as a pH sensor probe. In this system MR doped in PMMA is used as indicator dye for pH measurement. The absorption spectrum shift in wavelength of indicator dye enables us to get the pH value. The sensor probe is immersed in water solution containing a small proportion of acetic acid over the wide pH range of 5.0 to 7.0. The chemical interaction between MR in sensor probe and hydrogen ion in the water solution causes a change in the dipole moment of MR, that is, the absorption spectrum macroscopically. The evanescent-wave spectroscopic technique provides the measurement of the absorption spectrum shift over a broad range of visible wavelength. The result of experiment was that MR absorption spectrum shifted by 40 nm every increase of 1.0 in pH. The small change in the pH value can be sensed as a large wavelength shift of pH indicator absorption spectrum.

  1. Research Collaboration and Commercialization: The PhD Candidate Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dooley, Lawrence; Kenny, Breda

    2015-01-01

    This paper explores PhD students' perceptions of their entrepreneurial and commercial capabilities, their attitude towards university supports and the extent to which they engage in external collaboration. The study concentrated on current PhD researchers at one university in Ireland as a unit of analysis and provides encouraging evidence from the…

  2. Frequently Asked Questions for Parents of Children with PH

    MedlinePlus

    ... symptoms and treatment. How will PH affect my child’s growth and development? Most children with idiopathic pulmonary hypertension have normal growth and development; however, when it is associated with another medical ... the PH get worse as my child gets older? There is no known cure for ...

  3. The Undergraduate Origins of PhD Economists Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stock, Wendy A.; Siegfried, John J.

    2015-01-01

    The authors update prior analyses of the undergraduate origins of individuals who earn a PhD in economics in the United States. They include the list of the top institutions worldwide graduating the largest number of undergraduates who subsequently earn an economics PhD from a U.S. university and lists of American institutions with the largest…

  4. Earth & Space Science PhDs, Class of 2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Claudy, Nicholas; Henly, Megan; Migdalski, Chet

    This study documents the employment patterns and demographic characteristics of recent PhDs in earth and space science. It summarizes the latest annual survey of recent earth and space science PhDs conducted by the American Geological Institute, the American Geophysical Union, and the Statistical Research Center of the American Institute of…

  5. The PhD Viva: A Space for Academic Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Share, Michelle

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the viva experiences of 87 social science PhD graduates from three Irish higher education institutions through a questionnaire that assessed outcome, preparation, conduct and post-viva. The majority were awarded their PhD with minor corrections, considered their viva as a summative assessment, and emphasised its purpose as…

  6. International Mobility of French Ph.D.s

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonnard, Claire; Calmand, Julien; Giret, Jean-François

    2017-01-01

    This research investigates the determinants of international mobility of Ph.D.s upon graduation. It is based on a survey of 400 young Ph.D.s who graduated in France between 2003 and 2008, half of whom were still abroad more than six years after graduating. The impacts of personal, occupational and scientific characteristics on the successive…

  7. Mapping bark pH to better understand the cortisphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levia, D. F., Jr.; Köhler, S.; Jungkunst, H. F.; Gerold, G.

    2016-12-01

    The biogeochemistry of the cortisphere is poorly understood, despite the fact that a large variety of microbes, epiphytes, and insects live on, within, and just beneath corticular surfaces. Bark pH is a critical parameter that partially controls the chemodynamics of the cortisphere and its habitability by bark dwelling organisms as well as the chemistry of throughfall and stemflow. This presentation articulates, tests, and validates a method to accurately determine bark pH in situ. We employed agar-agar panels, embedded with a pH marker, to determine the spatiality of bark pH on cacao trees in Indonesia. In contrast to existing ex situ methods, we were able to record spatial differences in bark pH. In particular, bark pH was observed to fluctuate in relation to both morphological features on the bark, possibly corresponding to preferential flowpaths of stemflow, and epiphytic coverage. Due to its simplicity and economical nature, our method may be attractive to a variety of researchers interested in bark pH, its spatial variability, influence on stemflow chemistry, and its effect on organisms dwelling in the cortipshere. Publication note: This presentation is based on the following article: Köhler, S., Levia, D.F., Jungkunst, H.F. and Gerold, G. 2015. An in situ method to measure and map bark pH. Journal of Wood Chemistry and Technology 35(6): 438-449. [DOI: 10.1080/02773813.2015.1025285

  8. PhDs in Australia, from the Beginning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dobson, Ian R.

    2012-01-01

    The Australian PhD is a relatively recent phenomenon, the first three being awarded in 1948. Before that, most Australian scholars typically went to Britain (predominantly) or the USA to undertake their doctoral studies. The aim of this research note is to provide a brief statistical history of the Australian PhD, noting changes over time between…

  9. Tracking the PhD Students' Daily Computer Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sim, Kwong Nui; van der Meer, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated PhD students' computer activities in their daily research practice. Software that tracks computer usage (Manic Time) was installed on the computers of nine PhD students, who were at their early, mid and final stage in doing their doctoral research in four different discipline areas (Commerce, Humanities, Health Sciences and…

  10. Consideration of Factors Affecting Strip Effluent PH and Sodium Content

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, T.

    2015-07-29

    A number of factors were investigated to determine possible reasons for why the Strip Effluent (SE) can sometimes have higher than expected pH values and/or sodium content, both of which have prescribed limits. All of the factors likely have some impact on the pH values and Na content.

  11. Variation of ocean pH in the Indonesia waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Putri, Mutiara Rachmat; Setiawan, Agus; Safitri, Mediana

    2015-09-01

    The variation of ocean acidity (pH) in the Indonesia waters is strongly influenced by monsoon. Since the climate change tends to potentially change monsoonal variation over the Indonesian region, it will give also implication to the ocean pH variation. Moreover, changes of ocean pH will give effects to the marine lifes and their environment. In order to investigate this issue, we tried to calculate monthly variation of sea surface pH in the Indonesia waters based on monthly average temperature and salinity over past 18 years data. Temperature and salinity data used in this study were taken from the hydrodynamic model of Hamburg Shelf Ocean Model (HAMSOM), while alkalinity and dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) were from World Ocean Atlas 2009 (WOA 2009). Algorithm from Ocean Carbon Model Intercomparison Project-version.3 (OCMIP-3) was used to calculate the pH. The estimation results indicate that pH variation in the Indonesia waters changes insignificantly over 18 years. El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and Indian Ocean Dipole (IOD) contribute to physical changes of seawater, but did not affect the pH significantly. The average pH of seawater is higher during northwest monsoon than during southeast monsoon.

  12. Can Community Colleges Survive the PhD Glut?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Anita

    The impact of the current employment situation on hiring faculty for community college teaching is examined. It is concluded that prospects for improving the quality of learning in community colleges are not particularly enhanced by the apparently growing surplus of new PhDs in our field. On the contrary, it is suggested that hiring PhDs for…

  13. The Importance of Having a Ph.D., Career Advice

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A presentation on the importance of having a PhD to motivate Initiative to Maximize Student Diversity Program (IMSD) undergrads towards conducting research, pursuing careers in the biomedical field, applying to grad school, and getting a Ph.D., based upon ARS scientist's experiences as a student, a ...

  14. The Early Development of Electronic pH Meters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hines, Wallis G.; de Levie, Robert

    2010-01-01

    A 19-year-old undergraduate at the University of Chicago, Kenneth Goode, in 1921 came up with the idea of an electronic pH meter, worked out some of its initial problems, and set in motion an international scientific effort that culminated in the current, wide availability of electronic pH meters. Except for the replacement of vacuum tubes by…

  15. International Mobility of French Ph.D.s

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonnard, Claire; Calmand, Julien; Giret, Jean-François

    2017-01-01

    This research investigates the determinants of international mobility of Ph.D.s upon graduation. It is based on a survey of 400 young Ph.D.s who graduated in France between 2003 and 2008, half of whom were still abroad more than six years after graduating. The impacts of personal, occupational and scientific characteristics on the successive…

  16. The PhD Viva: A Space for Academic Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Share, Michelle

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the viva experiences of 87 social science PhD graduates from three Irish higher education institutions through a questionnaire that assessed outcome, preparation, conduct and post-viva. The majority were awarded their PhD with minor corrections, considered their viva as a summative assessment, and emphasised its purpose as…

  17. The Undergraduate Origins of PhD Economists Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stock, Wendy A.; Siegfried, John J.

    2015-01-01

    The authors update prior analyses of the undergraduate origins of individuals who earn a PhD in economics in the United States. They include the list of the top institutions worldwide graduating the largest number of undergraduates who subsequently earn an economics PhD from a U.S. university and lists of American institutions with the largest…

  18. Effect of pH on biological phosphorus uptake.

    PubMed

    Serralta, J; Ferrer, J; Borrás, L; Seco, A

    2006-12-05

    An anaerobic aerobic laboratory scale sequencing batch reactor (SBR) was operated to study the effect of pH on enhanced biological phosphorus removal. Seven steady states were achieved under different operating conditions. In all of them, a slight variation in the pH value was observed during anaerobic phase. However, pH rose significantly during aerobic phase. The increase observed was due to phosphorus uptake and carbon dioxide stripping. When pH was higher than 8.2-8.25 the phosphorus uptake rate clearly decreased. The capability of Activated Sludge Model No. 2d (ASM2d) and Biological Nutrient Removal Model No. 1 (BNRM1) to simulate experimental results was evaluated. Both models successfully characterized the enhanced biological phosphorus removal performance of the SBR. Furthermore, BNRM1 also reproduced the pH variations observed and the decrease in the phosphorus uptake rate. This model includes a switch function in the kinetic expressions to represent the pH inhibition in biological processes. The pH inhibition constants related to polyphosphate storage process were obtained by adjusting model predictions to measured phosphorus concentrations. On the other hand, pH inhibition should be included in ASM2d to accurately simulate experimental phosphorus evolution observed in an A/O SBR.

  19. Research Collaboration and Commercialization: The PhD Candidate Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dooley, Lawrence; Kenny, Breda

    2015-01-01

    This paper explores PhD students' perceptions of their entrepreneurial and commercial capabilities, their attitude towards university supports and the extent to which they engage in external collaboration. The study concentrated on current PhD researchers at one university in Ireland as a unit of analysis and provides encouraging evidence from the…

  20. Factors associated with ruminal pH at herd level.

    PubMed

    Geishauser, T; Linhart, N; Neidl, A; Reimann, A

    2012-08-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate factors associated with ruminal pH at herd level. Four hundred and thirty-two cows of a Thuringian dairy herd were sampled before claw trimming using a rumen fluid scoop. Volume and pH of the rumen sample were measured, and lactation number, percentage of concentrates in the ration, days in milk (DIM), time of day, and daily milk yield were recorded. Rumen sampling was successful in 99.8% of the cows. The average sample volume was 25 mL. Rumen sample pH decreased with increasing percentage of concentrates in the ration. Ruminal pH decreased from calving to 77 DIM, and grew subsequently to 330 DIM. During the day, rumen pH followed a sinus curve, with maxima in the morning (0915 h) and afternoon (1533 h), and a minimum around noon (1227 h). Ruminal pH decreased with increasing daily milk yield. Lactation number interacted with daily milk yield on rumen pH. The percentage of concentrates in the ration, DIM, time of day, and daily milk yield were significant factors affecting ruminal pH at the herd level.

  1. Rethinking PhD Learning Incorporating Communities of Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shacham, Miri; Od-Cohen, Yehudit

    2009-01-01

    This paper grows from research which focuses on the learning characteristics of PhD students, incorporating communities of practice both during their studies and beyond completion of their PhD, and drawing on theories of adult learning and lifelong learning. It shows how professional discourse enhances academic discourse through student engagement…

  2. Busca de estruturas em grandes escalas em altos redshifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boris, N. V.; Sodrã©, L., Jr.; Cypriano, E.

    2003-08-01

    A busca por estruturas em grandes escalas (aglomerados de galáxias, por exemplo) é um ativo tópico de pesquisas hoje em dia, pois a detecção de um único aglomerado em altos redshifts pode por vínculos fortes sobre os modelos cosmológicos. Neste projeto estamos fazendo uma busca de estruturas distantes em campos contendo pares de quasares próximos entre si em z Â3 0.9. Os pares de quasares foram extraídos do catálogo de Véron-Cetty & Véron (2001) e estão sendo observados com os telescópios: 2,2m da University of Hawaii (UH), 2,5m do Observatório de Las Campanas e com o GEMINI. Apresentamos aqui a análise preliminar de um par de quasares observado nos filtros i'(7800 Å) e z'(9500 Å) com o GEMINI. A cor (i'-z') mostrou-se útil para detectar objetos "early-type" em redshifts menores que 1.1. No estudo do par 131046+0006/J131055+0008, com redshift ~ 0.9, o uso deste método possibilitou a detecção de sete objetos candidatos a galáxias "early-type". Num mapa da distribuição projetada dos objetos para 22 < i' < 25 observou-se que estas galáxias estão localizadas próximas a um dos quasares e há indícios de que estejam aglomeradas dentro de um área de ~ 6 arcmin2. Se esse for o caso, estes objetos seriam membros de uma estrutura em grande escala. Um outro argumento em favor dessa hipótese é que eles obedecem uma relação do tipo Kormendy (raio equivalente X brilho superficial dentro desse raio), como a apresentada pelas galáxias elípticas em z = 0.

  3. Ambulatory pH Monitoring: New Advances and Indications

    PubMed Central

    Lutsi, Brant

    2006-01-01

    Ambulatory pH monitoring is currently used to objectively demonstrate abnormal degrees of esophageal acid exposure in patients with suspected gastroesophageal reflux disease. The development of wireless pH capsule recording has improved the tolerability and increased the duration of pH recording. Use of symptom-reflux correlation measures and pH testing, combining periods off and on PPI therapy, serves to optimize the performance of conventional pH testing. On the other hand, devices that measure bile reflux as well as nonacid reflux (esophageal impedance testing) have broadened the definition of gastroesophageal reflux and present potential explanations for patients with continued symptoms despite high-dose PPI therapy. These advances and their current and future clinical applications are reviewed

  4. ['Sandwich PhD': considerations for a successful experience abroad].

    PubMed

    Salvetti, Marina de Goes; Bueno, Mariana; Gastaldo, Denise; Kimura, Amélia Fumiko; Pimenta, Cibele Andrucioli de Mattos

    2013-03-01

    International PhD internship, named "Sandwich PhD" in Brazil is an opportunity to improve research abilities, to become known in academic area and to establish and/or increase work opportunities in an international context. In this article, we describe key factors regarding the planning and development of the "Sandwich PhD" as experienced by professors and students involved in the collaboration between the School of Nursing, University of São Paulo and Lawrence S. Bloomberg Faculty of Nursing, University of Toronto, Canada. We also present the participation of PhD students' network as an alternative to the "Sandwich PhD". An international experience, when well-planned and developed correctly, promotes students' personal and professional development and favors the internationalization of Brazilian graduate programs and research groups.

  5. Tight Coupling of Astrocyte pH Dynamics to Epileptiform Activity Revealed by Genetically Encoded pH Sensors.

    PubMed

    Raimondo, Joseph V; Tomes, Hayley; Irkle, Agnese; Kay, Louise; Kellaway, Lauriston; Markram, Henry; Millar, Robert P; Akerman, Colin J

    2016-06-29

    Astrocytes can both sense and shape the evolution of neuronal network activity and are known to possess unique ion regulatory mechanisms. Here we explore the relationship between astrocytic intracellular pH dynamics and the synchronous network activity that occurs during seizure-like activity. By combining confocal and two-photon imaging of genetically encoded pH reporters with simultaneous electrophysiological recordings, we perform pH measurements in defined cell populations and relate these to ongoing network activity. This approach reveals marked differences in the intracellular pH dynamics between hippocampal astrocytes and neighboring pyramidal neurons in rodent in vitro models of epilepsy. With three different genetically encoded pH reporters, astrocytes are observed to alkalinize during epileptiform activity, whereas neurons are observed to acidify. In addition to the direction of pH change, the kinetics of epileptiform-associated intracellular pH transients are found to differ between the two cell types, with astrocytes displaying significantly more rapid changes in pH. The astrocytic alkalinization is shown to be highly correlated with astrocytic membrane potential changes during seizure-like events and mediated by an electrogenic Na(+)/HCO3 (-) cotransporter. Finally, comparisons across different cell-pair combinations reveal that astrocytic pH dynamics are more closely related to network activity than are neuronal pH dynamics. This work demonstrates that astrocytes exhibit distinct pH dynamics during periods of epileptiform activity, which has relevance to multiple processes including neurometabolic coupling and the control of network excitability. Dynamic changes in intracellular ion concentrations are central to the initiation and progression of epileptic seizures. However, it is not known how changes in intracellular H(+) concentration (ie, pH) differ between different cell types during seizures. Using recently developed pH-sensitive proteins, we

  6. Plant based dietary supplement increases urinary pH

    PubMed Central

    Berardi, John M; Logan, Alan C; Rao, A Venket

    2008-01-01

    Background Research has demonstrated that the net acid load of the typical Western diet has the potential to influence many aspects of human health, including osteoporosis risk/progression; obesity; cardiovascular disease risk/progression; and overall well-being. As urinary pH provides a reliable surrogate measure for dietary acid load, this study examined whether a plant-based dietary supplement, one marketed to increase alkalinity, impacts urinary pH as advertised. Methods Using pH test strips, the urinary pH of 34 healthy men and women (33.9 +/- 1.57 y, 79.3 +/- 3.1 kg) was measured for seven days to establish a baseline urinary pH without supplementation. After this initial baseline period, urinary pH was measured for an additional 14 days while participants ingested the plant-based nutritional supplement. At the end of the investigation, pH values at baseline and during the treatment period were compared to determine the efficacy of the supplement. Results Mean urinary pH statistically increased (p = 0.03) with the plant-based dietary supplement. Mean urinary pH was 6.07 +/- 0.04 during the baseline period and increased to 6.21 +/- 0.03 during the first week of treatment and to 6.27 +/- 0.06 during the second week of treatment. Conclusion Supplementation with a plant-based dietary product for at least seven days increases urinary pH, potentially increasing the alkalinity of the body. PMID:18990209

  7. Anti-Leukemia Activity of In Vitro-Expanded Human Gamma Delta T Cells in a Xenogeneic Ph+ Leukemia Model

    PubMed Central

    Siegers, Gabrielle M.; Felizardo, Tania C.; Mathieson, A. Mark; Kosaka, Yoko; Wang, Xing-Hua; Medin, Jeffrey A.; Keating, Armand

    2011-01-01

    Gamma delta T cells (GDTc) lyse a variety of hematological and solid tumour cells in vitro and in vivo, and are thus promising candidates for cellular immunotherapy. We have developed a protocol to expand human GDTc in vitro, yielding highly cytotoxic Vgamma9/Vdelta2 CD27/CD45RA double negative effector memory cells. These cells express CD16, CD45RO, CD56, CD95 and NKG2D. Flow cytometric, clonogenic, and chromium release assays confirmed their specific cytotoxicity against Ph+ cell lines in vitro. We have generated a fluorescent and bioluminescent Ph+ cell line, EM-2eGFPluc, and established a novel xenogeneic leukemia model. Intravenous injection of EM-2eGFPluc into NOD.Cg-Prkdcscid Il2rgtm1Wjl/SzJ (NSG) mice resulted in significant dose-dependent bone marrow engraftment; lower levels engrafted in blood, lung, liver and spleen. In vitro-expanded human GDTc injected intraperitoneally were found at higher levels in blood and organs compared to those injected intravenously; GDTc survived at least 33 days post-injection. In therapy experiments, we documented decreased bone marrow leukemia burden in mice treated with GDTc. Live GDTc were found in spleen and bone marrow at endpoint, suggesting the potential usefulness of this therapy. PMID:21304898

  8. Continuous pH monitoring in a perfused bioreactor system using an optical pH sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeevarajan, Antony S.; Vani, Sundeep; Taylor, Thomas D.; Anderson, Melody M.

    2002-01-01

    Monitoring and regulating the pH of the solution in a bioprocess is one of the key steps in the success of bioreactor operation. An in-line optical pH sensor, based on the optical absorption properties of phenol red present in the medium, was developed and tested in this work for use in NASA space bioreactors based on a rotating wall-perfused vessel system supporting a baby hamster kidney (BHK-21) cell culture. The sensor was tested over three 30-day and one 124-day cell runs. The pH sensor initially was calibrated and then used during the entire cell culture interval. The pH reported by the sensor was compared to that measured by a fiber optically coupled Shimadzu spectrophotometer and a blood gas analyzer. The maximum standard error of prediction for all the four cell runs for development pH sensor against BGA was +/-0.06 pH unit and for the fiber optically coupled Shimadzu spectrophotometer against the blood gas analyzer was +/-0.05 pH unit. The pH sensor system performed well without need of recalibration for 124 days. Copyright 2002 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Thermal processing of acidified foods with pH 4.1 to pH 4.6

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Shelf-stable acidified foods with a pH at or below 4.6 must be processed to achieve a 5-log reduction for vegetative bacterial pathogens. Published research does not exist to adequately support the Food and Drug Administration process filings for products with pH 4.1–4.6 or to define critical limits...

  10. Continuous pH monitoring in a perfused bioreactor system using an optical pH sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeevarajan, Antony S.; Vani, Sundeep; Taylor, Thomas D.; Anderson, Melody M.

    2002-01-01

    Monitoring and regulating the pH of the solution in a bioprocess is one of the key steps in the success of bioreactor operation. An in-line optical pH sensor, based on the optical absorption properties of phenol red present in the medium, was developed and tested in this work for use in NASA space bioreactors based on a rotating wall-perfused vessel system supporting a baby hamster kidney (BHK-21) cell culture. The sensor was tested over three 30-day and one 124-day cell runs. The pH sensor initially was calibrated and then used during the entire cell culture interval. The pH reported by the sensor was compared to that measured by a fiber optically coupled Shimadzu spectrophotometer and a blood gas analyzer. The maximum standard error of prediction for all the four cell runs for development pH sensor against BGA was +/-0.06 pH unit and for the fiber optically coupled Shimadzu spectrophotometer against the blood gas analyzer was +/-0.05 pH unit. The pH sensor system performed well without need of recalibration for 124 days. Copyright 2002 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. High-Resolution pH Imaging of Living Bacterial Cells To Detect Local pH Differences

    PubMed Central

    Morimoto, Yusuke V.; Kami-ike, Nobunori; Miyata, Tomoko; Kawamoto, Akihiro; Kato, Takayuki

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Protons are utilized for various biological activities such as energy transduction and cell signaling. For construction of the bacterial flagellum, a type III export apparatus utilizes ATP and proton motive force to drive flagellar protein export, but the energy transduction mechanism remains unclear. Here, we have developed a high-resolution pH imaging system to measure local pH differences within living Salmonella enterica cells, especially in close proximity to the cytoplasmic membrane and the export apparatus. The local pH near the membrane was ca. 0.2 pH unit higher than the bulk cytoplasmic pH. However, the local pH near the export apparatus was ca. 0.1 pH unit lower than that near the membrane. This drop of local pH depended on the activities of both transmembrane export components and FliI ATPase. We propose that the export apparatus acts as an H+/protein antiporter to couple ATP hydrolysis with H+ flow to drive protein export. PMID:27923921

  12. Physiological pH. Effects on posthypoxic proximal tubular injury.

    PubMed

    Zager, R A; Schimpf, B A; Gmur, D J

    1993-04-01

    After O2 deprivation, tissue acidosis rapidly self-corrects. This study assessed the effect of this pH correction on the induction, and pathways, of posthypoxic proximal tubular injury. In addition, ways to prevent the resultant injury were explored. Isolated rat proximal tubular segments (PTSs) were subjected to hypoxia/reoxygenation (50/30 or 30/50 minutes) under the following incubation conditions: 1) continuous pH 7.4, 2) continuous pH 6.8, or 3) hypoxia at pH 6.8 and reoxygenation at pH 7.4 (NaHCO3 or Tris base addition). Continuously oxygenated PTSs maintained under these same pH conditions served as controls. Lethal cell injury was assessed by lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release. pH effects on several purported pathways of hypoxia/reoxygenation injury were also assessed (ATP depletion, lipid peroxidation, and membrane deacylation). Acidosis blocked hypoxic LDH release (pH 7.4, 50 +/- 2%; pH 6.8, 6 +/- 1%) without mitigating membrane deacylation or ATP depletion. During reoxygenation, minimal LDH was released (3-5%) if pH was held constant. However, if posthypoxic pH was corrected, immediate (< or = 5 minutes) and marked cell death (e.g., 55 +/- 3% with Tris) occurred. This was dissociated from lipid peroxidation or new deacylation, and it was preceded by a depressed ATP/ADP ratio (suggesting an acidosis-associated defect in hypoxic/posthypoxic cell energetics). Realkalinization injury was not inevitable, since it could be substantially blocked by 1) posthypoxic glycine addition, 2) transient posthypoxic hypothermia, or 3) allowing a 10-minute reoxygenation (cell recovery) period before base addition. Neither mannitol nor graded buffer Ca2+ deletion conferred protection. Acute pH correction caused no injury to continuously oxygenated PTSs. Conclusions are as follows: 1) Posthypoxic "pH shock" causes virtually immediate cell death, not by causing de novo injury but, rather, by removing the cytoprotective effect of acidosis. 2) This injury can be prevented by a

  13. Proximal esophageal pH monitoring: improved definition of normal values and determination of a composite pH score.

    PubMed

    Ayazi, Shahin; Hagen, Jeffrey A; Zehetner, Joerg; Oezcelik, Arzu; Abate, Emmanuele; Kohn, Geoffrey P; Sohn, Helen J; Lipham, John C; Demeester, Steven R; Demeester, Tom R

    2010-03-01

    Patients with respiratory and laryngeal symptoms are commonly referred for evaluation of reflux disease as a potential cause. Dual-probe pH monitoring is often performed, although data on normal acid exposure in the proximal esophagus are limited because of the small number of normal subjects and inconsistent placement of the proximal pH sensor in relation to the upper esophageal sphincter. We measured proximal esophageal acid exposure using dual-probe pH and calculated a composite pH score in a large number of asymptomatic volunteers to better define normal values. Eighty-one normal subjects free of reflux, laryngeal, or respiratory symptoms were recruited. All had video esophagraphy to exclude hiatal hernia. Esophageal pH monitoring was performed using 1 of 3 different dual-probe catheters with sensors spaced 10, 15, or 18 cm apart. The standard components of esophageal acid exposure were measured, excluding meal periods. A composite pH score for the proximal esophagus was calculated using these components. The final study population consisted of 59 (49% male) subjects, with a median age of 27 years. All had normal distal esophageal acid exposure and no hiatal hernia. The 95(th) percentile values for the percent time the pH was < 4 for the total, upright, and supine periods were 0.9%, 1.2%, and 0.4%, respectively. The 95(th) percentile for the number of reflux episodes was 24 and for the calculated proximal esophageal composite pH score was 16.4. In a large population of normal subjects, we have defined the normal values and calculated a composite pH score for proximal esophageal acid exposure. The total percent time pH < 4 was similar to previously published normal values, but the number of reflux episodes was greater. Copyright 2010 American College of Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Improved granular activated carbon for the stabilization of wastewater PH

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, R.W.; Dussert, B.W.; Kovacic, S.L.

    1996-12-31

    Laboratory studies have identified the cause of the pH rise, which occurs during water treatment with activated carbon, as an interaction between the naturally occurring anions and protons in the water and the carbon surface. The interaction can be described as an ion exchange type of phenomenon, in which the carbon surface sorbs the anions and corresponding hydronium ions from the water. These studies have shown that the anion sorption and resulting pH increase is independent of the raw material used for the activated carbon production, e.g. bituminous or subbituminous coal, peat, wood or coconut. Also, the pH excursions occur with virgin, reactivated, and acid washed granular carbons. Current pH control technologies focus on adjustment of the wastewater pH prior to discharge or recycle of the initial effluent water until the pH increase abates. However, improved water pH control options have been realized by altering the carbon surface through controlled oxidation rather than the water chemistry or extended preprocessing at the treatment site.

  15. Oral pH in gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Sujatha, S; Jalihal, Umesh; Devi, Yashoda; Rakesh, N; Chauhan, Pallavi; Sharma, Shivani

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study is to compare surface pH in various parts of the oral cavity between patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and healthy controls. Using a flat pH meter sensor, fixed electrode pen type digital pH meter, oral pH levels were assessed at different mucosal sites among 34 GERD patients and 32 healthy controls. Salivary flow rates and buffering capacity were also assessed in them. A thorough oral examination was performed to screen for any oral and dental changes. A significantly lower pH of 6.65 ± 0.13 (mean ± SD) was found in the GERD group compared to control group 7.23 ± 0.12 (p < 0.05). Least pH was found in the floor of the mouth 6.594 ± 0.17 and highest in the lower labial mucosa among the GERD patients. Salivary flow rate and buffering capacity were low in these patients. Significant changes were noticed in the hard and soft tissues of the oral cavity among the GERD group. Oral mucosal pH is altered in GERD patients and may contribute to effects on the oral cavity.

  16. A ph sensor based on a flexible substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Wen-Ding

    pH sensor is an essential component used in many chemical, food, and bio-material industries. Conventional glass electrodes have been used to construct pH sensors, however, have some disadvantages. Glass electrodes are easily affected by alkaline or HF solution, they require a high input impedance pH meter, they often exhibit a sluggish response. In some specific applications, it is also difficult to use glass electrodes for in vivo biomedical or food monitoring applications due to the difficulty of size miniaturization, planarization and polymerization based on current manufacturing technologies. In this work, we have demonstrated a novel flexible pH sensor based on low-cost sol-gel fabrication process of iridium oxide (IrOx) sensing film (IROF). A pair of flexible miniature IrOx/AgCl electrode generated the action potential from the solution by electrochemical mechanism to obtain the pH level of the reagent. The fabrication process including sol-gel, thermal oxidation, and the electro-plating process of the silver chloride (AgCl) reference electrode were reported in the work. The IrOx film was verified and characterized using electron dispersive analysis (EDAX), scanning electron microscope (SEM), and x-ray diffraction (XRD). The flexible pH sensor's performance and characterization have been investigated with different testing parameters such as sensitivity, response time, stability, reversibility, repeatability, selectivity and temperature dependence. The flexible IrOx pH sensors exhibited promising sensing performance with a near-Nernstian response of sensitivity which is between --51.1mV/pH and --51.7mV/pH in different pH levels ranging from 1.5 to 12 at 25°C. Two applications including gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) diagnosis and food freshness wireless monitoring using our micro-flexible IrOx pH sensors were demonstrated. For the GERD diagnosing system, we embedded the micro flexible pH sensor on a 1.2cmx3.8cm of the capsule size of wireless sensor

  17. Optical fibre PH sensor based on immobilized indicator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Defu; Cao, Qiang; Han, JingHong; Cai, Jine; Li, YaTing; Zhu, ZeMin; Fan, Jie; Gao, Ning

    1991-08-01

    An optical fiber pH sensor which has the immobilized pH sensitive indicator dye reagents on the tip of the optical fiber has been studied. The probe is made by covalently immobilizing the phenol red, bromine phenol blue, or bromothymol blue on the polyacrylamide microsphere fixed by polyterafluoroethylene (PTFE) film. A gap between the dye and optical fiber was used to make the diffusion of the hydrogen ions easier. The parameters of the optical fiber pH sensor have been given completely. The ranges of measurement are 3.0 - 5.0 pH, 7.0 - 8.5 pH, and 8.0 - 10.0 pH for bromine phenol blue, phenol red, and bromothymol blue, respectively. The sensitivity is 66.6 mV/pH. The probe has a precision of better than 0.55 pH. The linear correlation coefficient is 0.999. The response time is 1 - 2 min. The hysteresis is 0.52%. The repeatability is 0.013 mV, while the stability is 0.015 pH/h.

  18. Innovation in Learning: PhD and DNP Student Collaborations.

    PubMed

    Eaton, Linda H; Gordon, Debra B; Doorenbos, Ardith Z

    2017-09-01

    Working together, PhD and Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) students can advance knowledge creation and the translation of knowledge into practice. Although different in purpose and education, PhD and DNP programs should prepare students to collaborate throughout their careers. This article describes an innovative pilot project that partnered PhD and DNP students during their graduate programs. Group meetings were used to facilitate collaboration among 12 PhD and DNP students interested in pain management. Using a five-stage collaboration process model, students worked together on dissertation and capstone projects. PhD and DNP students collaborated on the completion of dissertation and capstone projects, as well as on publications and presentations. A case example of an effective partnership is included. Partnering of PhD and DNP students can further the development of new nursing knowledge and evidence-based practice. Successful collaboration can be facilitated by PhD and DNP faculty. [J Nurs Educ. 2017;56(9):556-559.]. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  19. Nanochannel pH gradient electrofocusing of proteins.

    PubMed

    Startsev, Michael A; Inglis, David W; Baker, Mark S; Goldys, Ewa M

    2013-08-06

    We demonstrate matrix-free pH gradient electrofocusing of proteins within an 85 nm deep nanochannel. In contrast to conventional isoelectric focusing where the fluid does not move, this pH gradient method traps protein molecules flowing through a channel by balancing electric forces due to pH-dependent protein charge and viscous drag forces caused by electro-osmosis. The nanoscale depth of the device and the low voltage used limit convection relative to diffusion, thus producing a stable focused band of protein. R-Phycoerythrin (RPE) and Dylight labeled streptavidin (Dyl-Strep) were focused within a nanochannel using applied voltages between 0.4 and 1.6 V. Concentration enhancement factors of over 380 have been achieved within 5 min. Varying the buffer pH (between 2.7 and 7.2) at the boundaries of the nanochannel affected the shape of the focused bands. For RPE, a pH span of 4.5 (pH 2.7 to 7.2) yielded the narrowest peak while a span of 2.4 (pH 2.7 to 5.1) produced a significantly wider peak. Such matrix-free nanofluidic devices with pH gradient electrofocusing may enable on-chip integration of orthogonal separation techniques with mass spectrometry offering labor savings and enhanced performance.

  20. Critical assessment of the pH of children's soap.

    PubMed

    Mendes, Bruna Rafaela; Shimabukuro, Danielle Midori; Uber, Marjorie; Abagge, Kerstin Taniguchi

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the pH value of children's antibacterial soaps and syndets used in children's baths and verify whether there is information regarding pH on the product label. Quantitative, cross-sectional, analytical observational study that included ninety soap samples, both in bar and liquid presentations, as follows: 67 children's soap (group 1), 17 antibacterial soaps (group 2), and 6 syndets (group 3). Each sample had its pH measured after 1% dilution. In addition to descriptive statistics, the Pearson-Yates chi-squared test and Student's t-tests were applied, considering the minimal significance level of 5%. The Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney test, Fisher's exact test, and the Kruskal-Wallis test were used for inferential statistics. The pH levels varied considerably between liquid and bar presentations, with lower levels (4.4-7.9) found for the liquids (p<0.05). Syndets showed pH levels close to the ideal (slightly acid) and the antibacterial soaps showed the highest pH levels (up to 11.34) (p<0.05). Only two of the soaps included in the study had information about their pH levels on the product packaging. Knowledge of the pH of children's soap by doctors and users is important, considering the great pH variability found in this study. Moreover, liquid soaps, and especially syndets, are the most recommended for the sensitive skin of neonates and infants, in order to guarantee skin barrier efficacy. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  1. Umbilical Cord Blood pH in Intrapartum Hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Perveen, Fouzia; Khan, Ayesha; Ali, Tahmina; Rabia, Syeda

    2015-09-01

    To determine the association of cord arterial blood pH with neonatal outcome in cases of intrapartum fetal hypoxia. Descriptive analytical study. Gynaecology Unit-II, Civil Hospital, Karachi, from September 2011 to November 2012. All singleton cephalic fetuses at term gestation were included in the study. Those with any anomaly, malpresentation, medical disorders, maternal age < 18 years, multiple gestation and ruptured membranes were excluded. Patients with abnormal cardiotocography and/or meconium stained liquor were enrolled as index case and immediate next delivery with no such signs as a control. Demographic characteristics, pH level < or > 7.25, neonatal outcome measures (healthy, NICU admission or neonatal death), color of liquor and mode of delivery recorded on predesigned proforma. Statistical analysis performed by SPSS 16 by using independent-t test or chi-square test and ANOVA test as needed. A total of 204 newborns were evaluated. The mean pH level was found to be significantly different (p=0.007) in two groups. The pH value 7.25 had significant association (p < 0.001) with the neonatal outcome. However, the association of neonatal outcome with severity of acidemia was not found to be significant. Grading of Meconium Stained Liquor (MSL) also did not relate positively with pH levels as 85.7% of grade I, 68.9% of grade II and 59.4% of grade III MSLhad pH > 7.25. Majority (63.6%) cases needed caesarean section as compared to 31.4% controls. There is a significant association of cord arterial blood pH at birth with neonatal outcome at pH < or > 7.25; but below the level of pH 7.25 it is still inconclusive.

  2. pH Responsiveness of hydrogels formed by telechelic polyampholytes.

    PubMed

    Dyakonova, Margarita A; Gotzamanis, George; Niebuur, Bart-Jan; Vishnevetskaya, Natalya S; Raftopoulos, Konstantinos N; Di, Zhenyu; Filippov, Sergey K; Tsitsilianis, Constantinos; Papadakis, Christine M

    2017-05-21

    We investigate the influence of pH on the rheological and structural properties of hydrogels formed by hydrophobic association of the sticky ends of the triblock terpolymer poly(methyl methacrylate)-b-poly(2-(diethylamino)ethyl methacrylate-co-methacrylic acid)-b-poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA-b-P(DEA-co-MAA)-b-PMMA). The middle block is a weak polyampholyte having a pH dependent charge density and sign, which enables tuning of the rheological and structural properties by pH variation. Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) studies of solutions in D2O at 0.05 wt% and pH 3.0 reveal clusters of interconnected spherical micelles having PMMA cores, stabilized by repulsive ionic interactions in the middle polyampholyte block. With increasing pH, the degree of ionization of the DEA units decreases, whereas the one of the MAA units increases, resulting in a complete loss of the correlation between these micelles. At a concentration of 3 wt% at low pH values, the system forms a gel with charged fuzzy spheres from PMMA interacting via a screened Coulomb potential. With increasing pH, the gel disintegrates due to the decrease in the effective charge on the micelles. At both concentrations, the hydrophobic aggregation of micelles is observed near the isoelectric point. At pH 3.0-7.4, the autocorrelation functions measured by rotational dynamic light scattering at 3 wt% exhibit a decay steeper than single exponential, which confirms that the gels are frozen, presumably due to the glassy PMMA cores and hydrophobic interpolyelectrolyte complexes. At pH 11, the diffusion of single micelles is observed in addition to the frozen dynamics.

  3. Axillary pH and influence of deodorants.

    PubMed

    Stenzaly-Achtert, S.; Schölermann, A.; Schreiber, J.; Diec, K. H.; Rippke, F.; Bielfeldt, S.

    2000-05-01

    BACKGROUND/AIMS: In moist intertriginous regions, such as the armpit, the pH value is physiologically higher than in other skin regions. The regulation of the axillary pH-value was examined in an open study with 48 subjects in three groups with n=16 each. METHODS: In the first 10 days (run-in) the subjects received a standard treatment in the axilla with shaving, cleansing and application of a pH-neutral deodorant. This was followed by a 5 day treatment period with the three test products (pH5 Eucerin(R) Deodorant Roll-on, Deodorant Balsam Spray, Deodorant Cream). The study was concluded by a wash-out period with procedures identical to the run-in phase. The pH was measured with a calibrated pH-meter. RESULTS: A significant pH reduction was shown during the treatment period when compared to the run-in phase. The Deodorant Roll-on induced a reduction of the mean pH values from 6.1 to 5.3, the Deodorant Balsam Spray from 6.5 to 5.7 and the Deodorant Cream from 6.2 to 5.3. During the wash-out period all pH values returned to baseline. CONCLUSION: All of the deodorants tested demonstrated a significant reduction in axillary pH. There is evidence that a high skin pH promotes the growth of several microorganisms that produce malodor. Therefore, the regulation of pH may contribute to the deodorant efficacy of the test products.

  4. pH recovery from intracellular alkalinization in Retzius neurones of the leech central nervous system.

    PubMed Central

    Frey, G; Schlue, W R

    1993-01-01

    1. Neutral-carrier pH-sensitive microelectrodes were used to investigate intracellular pH (pHi) recovery from alkalinization in leech Retzius neurones in Hepes- and in CO2-HCO3(-)-buffered solution. The Retzius neurones were alkaline loaded by the addition and subsequent removal of 16 mM acetate, by changing from 5% CO2-27 mM HCO3- to 2% CO2-11 mM HCO3- or by changing from CO2-HCO3(-)- to Hepes-buffered solution. 2. In Hepes-buffered solution (pH 7.4) the mean pHi was 7.29 +/- 0.11 and the mean membrane potential -44.7 +/- 5.9 mV (mean +/- S.D.; n = 83). 3. The rate of pHi recovery from alkalinization increased with decreasing pH of the bathing medium (pHb). pHi changed about 0.30 pH units for a pHb unit change. 4. A decrease of extracellular buffer concentration (Hepes concentration lowered from 20 to 5 mM) caused an acidification of extracellular and intracellular pH and an acceleration of pHi recovery from alkalinization. 5. A depolarization of the Retzius cell membrane-induced by increasing the K+ concentration of the bathing medium from 4 to 20 mM (delta Em = 16.5 +/- 5.5 mV) or from 4 to 40 mM (delta Em = 24.8 +/- 3.5 mV)--evoked a decrease of pHi and an acceleration of pHi recovery from alkalinization. 6. The H+ current blocker Zn2+ (0.5 mM) inhibited pHi recovery from alkalinization at resting membrane potential as well as during depolarization. The inhibition was more pronounced during depolarization. 7. In Cl(-)-free, CO2-HCO3(-)-buffered solution pHi recovery from an alkaline load by changing from 5% CO2-27 mM HCO3- to 2% CO2-11 mM HCO3- was slowed by 48-71%. The rate of pHi recovery from an alkaline load induced by changing from CO2-HCO3- to Hepes buffer was reduced by 33-56% in Cl(-)-free solution. The removal of external Cl- did not affect pHi recovery in Hepes-buffered solution. 8. The pHi recovery from alkalinization was DIDS-insensitive in CO2-HCO3(-)- as in Hepes-buffered solutions and was not slowed in the absence of external Na+. 9. It is

  5. Method for producing rapid pH changes

    DOEpatents

    Clark, John H.; Campillo, Anthony J.; Shapiro, Stanley L.; Winn, Kenneth R.

    1981-01-01

    A method of initiating a rapid pH change in a solution by irradiating the solution with an intense flux of electromagnetic radiation of a frequency which produces a substantial pK change to a compound in solution. To optimize the resulting pH change, the compound being irradiated in solution should have an excited state lifetime substantially longer than the time required to establish an excited state acid-base equilibrium in the solution. Desired pH changes can be accomplished in nanoseconds or less by means of picosecond pulses of laser radiation.

  6. Method for producing rapid pH changes

    DOEpatents

    Clark, J.H.; Campillo, A.J.; Shapiro, S.L.; Winn, K.R.

    A method of initiating a rapid pH change in a solution comprises irradiating the solution with an intense flux of electromagnetic radiation of a frequency which produces a substantial pK change to a compound in solution. To optimize the resulting pH change, the compound being irradiated in solution should have an excited state lifetime substantially longer than the time required to establish an excited state acid-base equilibrium in the solution. Desired pH changes can be accomplished in nanoseconds or less by means of picosecond pulses of laser radiation.

  7. Imaging pH with hyperpolarized 13C.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, Ferdia A; Kettunen, Mikko I; Brindle, Kevin M

    2011-10-01

    pH is a fundamental physiological parameter that is tightly controlled by endogenous buffers. The acid-base balance is altered in many disease states, such as inflammation, ischemia and cancer. Despite the importance of pH, there are currently no routine methods for imaging the spatial distribution of pH in humans. The enormous gain in sensitivity afforded by dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) has provided a novel way in which to image tissue pH using MR, which has the potential to be translated into the clinic. This review explores the advantages and disadvantages of current pH imaging techniques and how they compare with DNP-based approaches for the measurement and imaging of pH with hyperpolarized (13)C. Intravenous injection of hyperpolarized (13)C-labeled bicarbonate results in the rapid production of hyperpolarized (13)CO(2) in the reaction catalyzed by carbonic anhydrase. As this reaction is close to equilibrium in the body and is pH dependent, the ratio of the (13)C signal intensities from H(13)CO(3)(-) and (13)CO(2), measured using MRS, can be used to calculate pH in vivo. The application of this technique to a murine tumor model demonstrated that it measured predominantly extracellular pH and could be mapped in the animal using spectroscopic imaging techniques. A second approach has been to use the production of hyperpolarized (13)CO(2) from hyperpolarized [1-(13)C]pyruvate to measure predominantly intracellular pH. In tissues with a high aerobic capacity, such as the heart, the hyperpolarized [1-(13)C]pyruvate undergoes rapid oxidative decarboxylation, catalyzed by intramitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase. Provided that there is sufficient carbonic anhydrase present to catalyze the rapid equilibration of the hyperpolarized (13)C label between CO(2) and bicarbonate, the ratio of their resonance intensities may again be used to estimate pH, which, in this case, is predominantly intracellular. As both pyruvate and bicarbonate are endogenous molecules they

  8. Effect of pH on Human Mycoplasma Strains

    PubMed Central

    Shepard, Maurice C.; Lunceford, Carl D.

    1965-01-01

    Shepard, Maurice C. (U.S. Naval Medical Field Research Laboratory, Camp Lejeune, N.C.), and Carl D. Lunceford. Effect of pH on human Mycoplasma strains. J. Bacteriol. 89:265–270. 1965.—The optimal reaction of culture media for the cultivation of T-strain Mycoplasma of human origin was investigated. By use of a recently modified tryptic digest medium, the optimal reaction in either agar or fluid medium was found to be pH 6.0. In contrast, human classic (large-colony) Mycoplasma could be cultivated in agar or fluid medium over a rather broad pH range, and the influence of the reaction of the medium appeared to be primarily species-dependent. M. salivarium, for example, grew best in agar from pH 5.5 through 6.5. M. pneumoniae (Easton's agent) yielded largest colony numbers in agar and highest titers in broth at pH 8.0. In the case of T-strain Mycoplasma, both maximal colony numbers in agar and highest titers in fluid media were achieved at a reaction of pH 6.0. In addition, largest colony size of T-strain Mycoplasma was also achieved in agar at pH 6.0, and averaged 50 to 100% larger than that obtained by cultivation at pH 8.0 with the same medium. Although T-strains will develop in agar media over a pH range of from 5.0 through 10.0, the extremely small colony size and poor staining properties resulting from growth in an alkaline medium make their recognition in agar cultures difficult. Aerobic cultivation of T-strains was first achieved in agar adjusted to pH 5.5 to 6.0. In fluid medium, multiplication of T-strains occurred only within the limits of pH 5.0 through 8.0, with highest titers being reached at pH 6.0. Greater attention to the reaction of complete Mycoplasma media is stressed. PMID:14255688

  9. Near Infrared Spectral Determination of Human Tissue pH.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-10-01

    Continuous Tissue pH Monitory in the Human Fetus During Labor", Obstet . Gynecol ., 55:523, 1980. 23. [Lemer 82] Lemer, H., et al., "Measurement of Glucose...Umbilical Blood pH", Am. J. Obstet . Gynecol ., 128: 901-903, 1977. 38. [Weyer 85] Weyer, L G., "Near Infrared Spectroscopy of Organic Substances," Applied...Patterns and Tissue pH in the Human Fetus", Am. J. Obstet . Gynecol ., 134:685-690, 1979. 24 Appendix I An Estimation Extension of the FKNN Algorithm In

  10. pH sensor based on boron nitride nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Q.; Bando, Y.; Zhao, L.; Zhi, C. Y.; Golberg, D.

    2009-10-01

    A submicrometer-sized pH sensor based on biotin-fluorescein-functionalized multiwalled BN nanotubes with anchored Ag nanoparticles is designed. Intrinsic pH-dependent photoluminescence and Raman signals in attached fluorescein molecules enhanced by Ag nanoparticles allow this novel nanohybrid to perform as a practical pH sensor. It is able to work in a submicrometer-sized space. For example, the sensor may determine the environmental pH of sub-units in living cells where a traditional optical fiber sensor fails because of spatial limitations.

  11. Growth and functional responses of different cultivars of Lotus corniculatus to aluminum and low pH stress.

    PubMed

    Pavlovkin, Ján; Pal'ove-Balang, Peter; Kolarovic, Lukás; Zelinová, Veronika

    2009-09-15

    Aluminum toxicity is an important stress factor in acid soils. Growth, respiration and permeability properties of root cells were studied in five cultivars of Lotus corniculatus subjected to aluminum (Al) or low pH stress. The cultivars showed significant differences in root elongation under stress conditions, which correlated with changes in membrane potential (E(M)) of root cortical cells. A pH drop from 5.5 to 4.0 resulted in significant membrane depolarization and root growth inhibition. The strongest inhibition was observed in cv. São Gabriel (33.6%) and least in cv. UFRGS (25.8%). Application of an extremely high Al concentration (2mM) stopped the root growth in cv. INIA Draco, while inhibition in cv. UFRGS reached only 75%. The E(M) values of cortical cells of Lotus roots varied between -115 and -144mV. Treatment with 250microM of AlCl(3) (pH 4) resulted in rapid membrane depolarization. The extent of the membrane depolarization ranged between 51mV (cv. UFGRS) and 16mV (cv. INIA Draco). The membrane depolarization was followed by a loss of K(+) from Al-treated roots (2mM Al) and resulted in a decrease of the diffusion potential (E(D)). The total amount of K(+) in Al-treated roots dropped from 31.4 to 16.8micromolg(-1) FW in sensitive cv. INIA Draco, or from 26.1 to 22.7micromolg(-1) FW in tolerant cv. UFGRS. The rate of root respiration under control conditions as well as under Al treatment was higher in cv. INIA Draco than in cv. UFRGS. Al-induced inhibition of root respiration was 21-34% of the control.

  12. EM-21 ALTERNATIVE ENHANCED CHEMICAL CLEANING PROGRAM FOR SLUDGE HEEL REMOVAL

    SciTech Connect

    Hay, M; King, W; Martino, C

    2009-12-18

    Preliminary studies in the EM-21 Alternative Chemical Cleaning Program have focused on understanding the dissolution of Hematite (a primary sludge heel phase) in oxalic acid, with a focus on minimizing oxalic acid usage. Literature reviews, thermodynamic modeling, and experimental results have all confirmed that pH control, preferably using a supplemental proton source, is critical to oxalate minimization. With pH control, iron concentrations as high as 0.103 M have been obtained in 0.11 M oxalic acid. This is consistent with the formation of a 1:1 (iron:oxalate) complex. The solubility of Hematite in oxalic acid has been confirmed to increase by a factor of 3 when the final solution pH decreases from 5 to below 1. This is consistent with literature predictions of a shift in speciation from a 1:3 to 1:1 as the pH is lowered. Above a solution pH of 6, little Hematite dissolves. These results emphasize the importance of pH control in optimizing Hematite dissolution in oxalic acid.

  13. Preparing MD-PhD students for clinical rotations: navigating the interface between PhD and MD training.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, Charles; Insel, Paul A

    2013-06-01

    Many aspects of MD-PhD training are not optimally designed to prepare students for their future roles as translational clinician-scientists. The transition between PhD research efforts and clinical rotations is one hurdle that must be overcome. MD-PhD students have deficits in clinical skills compared with those of their MD-only colleagues at the time of this transition. Reimmersion programs (RPs) targeted to MD-PhD students have the potential to help them navigate this transition.The authors draw on their experience creating and implementing an RP that incorporates multiple types of activities (clinical exam review, objective structured clinical examination, and supervised practice in patient care settings) designed to enhance the participants' skills and readiness for clinical efforts. On the basis of this experience, they note that MD-PhD students' time away from the clinical environment negatively affects their clinical skills, causing them to feel underprepared for clinical rotations. The authors argue that participation in an RP can help students feel more comfortable speaking with and examining patients and decrease their anxiety regarding clinical encounters. The authors propose that RPs can have positive outcomes for improving the transition from PhD to clinical MD training in dual-degree programs. Identifying and addressing this and other transitions need to be considered to improve the educational experience of MD-PhD students.

  14. emPHasis-10: development of a health-related quality of life measure in pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Yorke, Janelle; Corris, Paul; Gaine, Sean; Gibbs, J. Simon R.; Kiely, David G.; Harries, Carl; Pollock, Val; Armstrong, Iain

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a measure of the impact of pulmonary hypertension (PH) on health-related quality of life (HRQoL) as there is a need for a short, validated instrument that can be used in routine clinical practice. Interviews were conducted with 30 PH patients to derive 32 statements, which were presented as a semantic differential six-point scale (0–5), with contrasting adjectives at each end. This item list was completed by patients attending PH clinics across the UK and Ireland. Rasch analysis was applied to identify items fitting a uni-dimensional model. 226 patients (mean age 55.6±14 years; 70% female) with PH (82% had pulmonary arterial hypertension) completed the study questionnaires. 10 of the 32 items demonstrated fit to the Rasch model (Chi-squared 16; p>0.05) and generated the emPHasis-10 questionnaire. Test–retest (intraclass correlation coefficient 0.95, n=33) and internal consistency (Chronbach’s α=0.9) were strong. emPHasis-10 scores correlated consistently with other relevant measures and discriminated subgroups of patients stratified by World Health Organization functional class (ANOVA F=1.73; p<0.001). The emPHasis-10 is a short questionnaire for assessing HRQoL in pulmonary arterial hypertension. It has excellent measurement properties and is sensitive to differences in relevant clinical parameters. It is freely available for clinical and academic use. PMID:24232702

  15. Meet EPA Engineer Shawn Ryan, Ph.D.

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Shawn Ryan, Ph.D. is a chemical engineer at EPA's National Homeland Security Research Center. He has worked at EPA for 12 years, nine of which have been devoted to leading research to support decontamination and consequence management.

  16. Meet EPA Scientist Heriberto Cabezas, Ph.D.

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Heriberto Cabezas, Ph.D. is currently the Senior Science Advisor to the Sustainable Technology Division in EPA's National Risk Management Research Lab, where he works to advance the application of science and technologies to address sustainability.

  17. Meet EPA Environmental Engineer Terra Haxton, Ph.D.

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA Environmental Engineer Terra Haxton, Ph.D., uses computer simulation models to protect drinking water. She investigates approaches to help water utilities be better prepared to respond to contamination incidents in their distribution systems.

  18. Meet EPA Scientist Tim Shafer, Ph.D.

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Tim Shafer earned his bachelor’s degree in biology and chemistry from Hope College in Holland, MI, in 1986 and his Ph.D. in pharmacology and environmental toxicology from Michigan State University in 1991.

  19. Meet EPA Biologist Laura Jackson, Ph.D.

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Research Biologist Laura Jackson, Ph.D., has worked for the EPA for 22 years, leading research initiatives in a diversity of disciplines, including environmental monitoring, land use planning, and the impacts that urbanization has on an area's ecology

  20. Meet EPA Scientist Susan Yee, Ph.D.

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Susan Yee, Ph.D., is an ecologist at EPA's Gulf Ecology Division. She is working on the Puerto Rico Sustainable Communities program, developing decision support tools to evaluate how alternative decisions impact coastal ecosystem goods and services

  1. Meet EPA Scientist Michael Nye, Ph.D.

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Michael Nye, Ph.D., is a social scientist who studies natural risk, socio-demographic change and sustainable behavior. Prior to joining EPA, he worked for the UK Environment Agency in flood risk management and emergency preparedness

  2. Commentary: PhDs in biochemistry education-5 years later.

    PubMed

    Offerdahl, Erika G; Momsen, Jennifer L; Osgood, Marcy

    2014-01-01

    In this commentary, the discussion of PhDs in biochemistry education research is expanded to explore a number of diverse pathways leading to a competitive research program in biochemistry education research.

  3. Commentary: PhDs in Biochemistry Education--5 Years Later

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Offerdahl, Erika G.; Momsen, Jennifer L.; Osgood, Marcy

    2014-01-01

    In this commentary, the discussion of PhDs in biochemistry education research is expanded to explore a number of diverse pathways leading to a competitive research program in biochemistry education research.

  4. Meet EPA Microbiologist Eric Villegas, Ph.D.

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Eric Villegas, Ph.D. is a research microbiologist in EPA's Office of Research and Development. His recent work focuses on next generation sequencing technology to better understand risks associated with waterborne parasites.

  5. Ashley Felix, Ph.D., M.P.H.

    Cancer.gov

    NCI Cancer Prevention Fellowship Program (CPFP) alumna, Ashley Felix, Ph.D., M.P.H., details her transition from pre-med student to an epidemiologist who focuses on studying the causes and prevention of disease.

  6. Meet EPA Scientist Dermont Bouchard, Ph.D.

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA Scientist Dermont Bouchard, Ph.D., is working to better understand how tiny nanomaterials might be released into the environment. His research helps regulators and other decision-makers lower risks and better protect human health and the environment

  7. Colorimetric pH measurement of animal cell culture media.

    PubMed

    Jang, Juno; Moon, Soo-Jin; Hong, Sung-Hwan; Kim, Ik-Hwan

    2010-11-01

    Most animal cell culture media can be buffered using bicarbonate and high pressure CO(2) in a closed system. However, in an open system, the pH of the culture media increases continuously due to the marked difference in CO(2) pressure between the culture media and the atmosphere. Therefore, it is important to measure the exact pH of the culture media in an intact closed system. In this study, a pH measurement method was developed using visible light. The pH was calculated from light absorbance by the cells and by the culture media. This method was successfully applied to both suspension and anchorage-dependent cell cultures.

  8. Meet EPA Scientist Valerie Zartarian, Ph.D.

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Senior exposure scientist and research environmental engineer Valerie Zartarian, Ph.D. helps build computer models and other tools that advance our understanding of how people interact with chemicals.

  9. Brenda K. Edwards, PhD | DCCPS/NCI/NIH

    Cancer.gov

    Brenda K. Edwards, PhD, has been with the Surveillance Research Program (SRP) and its predecessor organizations at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) since 1989, serving as SRP’s Associate Director from 1990-2011.

  10. pH Effects on Electrospray Ionization Efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liigand, Jaanus; Laaniste, Asko; Kruve, Anneli

    2017-03-01

    Electrospray ionization efficiency is known to be affected by mobile phase composition. In this paper, a detailed study of analyte ionization efficiency dependence on mobile phase pH is presented. The pH effect was studied on 28 compounds with different chemical properties. Neither p K a nor solution phase ionization degree by itself was observed to be sufficient at describing how aqueous phase pH affects the ionization efficiency of the analyte. Therefore, the analyte behavior was related to various physicochemical properties via linear discriminant analyses. Distinction between pH-dependent and pH-independent compounds was achieved using two parameters: number of potential charge centers and hydrogen bonding acceptor capacity (in the case of 80% acetonitrile) or polarity of neutral form of analyte and p K a (in the case of 20% acetonitrile). It was also observed that decreasing pH may increase ionization efficiency of a compound by more than two orders of magnitude.

  11. Meet EPA Chemist Linda Sheldon, Ph.D.

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Environmental chemist Linda Sheldon, Ph.D, is the Associate Director for Human Heath in the National Exposure Research Laboratory. She studies environmental exposure, particularly focusing on children's environments and their contact with chemicals.

  12. Meet EPA Natural Resource Economist Marisa Mazzotta, Ph.D.

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Marisa Mazzotta, Ph.D. currently works as an Economist at EPA's Atlantic Ecology Division. Her research focuses on the public's valuation and prioritization of natural resources, and the relationship between ecological changes and economic benefits.

  13. Meet EPA Scientist Jody Shoemaker, Ph.D.

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA research chemist Jody Shoemaker, Ph.D., works to support Agency efforts to protect drinking water. She helps develop methods for analyzing organic chemicals on the Drinking Water Contaminant Candidate List (CCL).

  14. Meet EPA Scientist Blake Schaeffer, Ph.D.

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA research ecologist Blake Schaeffer, Ph.D. focuses on ways to use satellite remote sensing technology to monitor water quality. His research interests broadly include deriving water quality parameters in coasts, estuaries, and lakes using satellites

  15. The Training and Work of Ph.D. Physical Scientists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, S. J.; Schweitzer, A. E.

    2003-05-01

    Doctoral education has often been viewed as the pinnacle of the formal education system. How useful is doctoral training in one's later career? In an NSF-funded project, we set out to perform a study of the training, careers, and work activities of Ph.D. physical scientists. The study included both in-depth interviews and a survey sent out to a sample of Ph.D. holders 4-8 years after graduation. Come and find out the results of this study: What skills are most Ph.D. physical scientists using? What should graduate programs be teaching? Are Ph.D.'s who are working in their specific field of training happier than their counterparts working different jobs? What skills and preparation lead to future job satisfaction, perhaps the most important indicator of the "success" of graduate education? A preprint and further details can be found at the project web site at: spot.colorado.edu/ phdcarer.

  16. Meet EPA Chemist Quincy Teng, Ph.D.

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA research chemist Quincy Teng, Ph.D., focuses on the application of metabolomics—a relatively new, specialized field of biochemistry focused on studying small molecules known as metabolites—on environmental and life sciences.

  17. Commentary: PhDs in Biochemistry Education--5 Years Later

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Offerdahl, Erika G.; Momsen, Jennifer L.; Osgood, Marcy

    2014-01-01

    In this commentary, the discussion of PhDs in biochemistry education research is expanded to explore a number of diverse pathways leading to a competitive research program in biochemistry education research.

  18. Meet EPA Biologist Mitch Kostich, Ph.D.

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA biologist, Mitch Kostich, Ph.D., conducts research to identify risks from exposures to chemical contaminants in water. His research uses technologies to prioritize contaminants in the environment based on the potential risks they pose to life

  19. The geologic history of seawater pH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halevy, I.; Bachan, A.

    2017-03-01

    Although pH is a fundamental property of Earth’s oceans, critical to our understanding of seawater biogeochemistry, its long-timescale geologic history is poorly constrained. We constrain seawater pH through time by accounting for the cycles of the major components of seawater. We infer an increase from early Archean pH values between ~6.5 and 7.0 and Phanerozoic values between ~7.5 and 9.0, which was caused by a gradual decrease in atmospheric pCO2 in response to solar brightening, alongside a decrease in hydrothermal exchange between seawater and the ocean crust. A lower pH in Earth’s early oceans likely affected the kinetics of chemical reactions associated with the origin of life, the energetics of early metabolisms, and climate through the partitioning of CO2 between the oceans and atmosphere.

  20. Thermodynamic, Kinetic, Structural, and Computational Studies of the Ph3Sn-H, Ph3Sn-SnPh3, and Ph3Sn-Cr(CO)3C5Me5 Bond Dissociation Enthalpies.

    PubMed

    Cai, Xiaochen; Majumdar, Subhojit; Fortman, George C; Koppaka, Anjaneyulu; Serafim, Leonardo; Captain, Burjor; Temprado, Manuel; Hoff, Carl D

    2016-10-05

    The kinetics of the reaction of Ph3SnH with excess •Cr(CO)3C5Me5 = •Cr, producing HCr and Ph3Sn-Cr, was studied in toluene solution under 2-3 atm CO pressure in the temperature range of 17-43.5 °C. It was found to obey the rate equation d[Ph3Sn-Cr]/dt = k[Ph3SnH][•Cr] and exhibit a normal kinetic isotope effect (kH/kD = 1.12 ± 0.04). Variable-temperature studies yielded ΔH(‡) = 15.7 ± 1.5 kcal/mol and ΔS(‡) = -11 ± 5 cal/(mol·K) for the reaction. These data are interpreted in terms of a two-step mechanism involving a thermodynamically uphill hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) producing Ph3Sn• and HCr, followed by rapid trapping of Ph3Sn• by excess •Cr to produce Ph3Sn-Cr. Assuming an overbarrier of 2 ± 1 kcal/mol in the HAT step leads to a derived value of 76.0 ± 3.0 kcal/mol for the Ph3Sn-H bond dissociation enthalpy (BDE) in toluene solution. The reaction enthalpy of Ph3SnH with excess •Cr was measured by reaction calorimetry in toluene solution, and a value of the Sn-Cr BDE in Ph3Sn-Cr of 50.4 ± 3.5 kcal/mol was derived. Qualitative studies of the reactions of other R3SnH compounds with •Cr are described for R = (n)Bu, (t)Bu, and Cy. The dehydrogenation reaction of 2Ph3SnH → H2 + Ph3SnSnPh3 was found to be rapid and quantitative in the presence of catalytic amounts of the complex Pd(IPr)(P(p-tolyl)3). The thermochemistry of this process was also studied in toluene solution using varying amounts of the Pd(0) catalyst. The value of ΔH = -15.8 ± 2.2 kcal/mol yields a value of the Sn-Sn BDE in Ph3SnSnPh3 of 63.8 ± 3.7 kcal/mol. Computational studies of the Sn-H, Sn-Sn, and Sn-Cr BDEs are in good agreement with experimental data and provide additional insight into factors controlling reactivity in these systems. The structures of Ph3Sn-Cr and Cy3Sn-Cr were determined by X-ray crystallography and are reported. Mechanistic aspects of oxidative addition reactions in this system are discussed.

  1. Allosteric properties of PH domains in Arf regulatory proteins.

    PubMed

    Roy, Neeladri Sekhar; Yohe, Marielle E; Randazzo, Paul A; Gruschus, James M

    2016-01-01

    Pleckstrin Homology (PH) domains bind phospholipids and proteins. They are critical regulatory elements of a number enzymes including guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) and GTPase-activating proteins (GAPs) for Ras-superfamily guanine nucleotide binding proteins such as ADP-ribosylation factors (Arfs). Recent studies have indicated that many PH domains may bind more than one ligand cooperatively. Here we discuss the molecular basis of PH domain-dependent allosteric behavior of 2 ADP-ribosylation factor exchange factors, Grp1 and Brag2, cooperative binding of ligands to the PH domains of Grp1 and the Arf GTPase-activating protein, ASAP1, and the consequences for activity of the associated catalytic domains.

  2. Stress-Corrosion Cracking in Martensitic PH Stainless Steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphries, T.; Nelson, E.

    1984-01-01

    Precipitation-hardening alloys evaluated in marine environment tests. Report describes marine-environment stress-corrosion cracking (SCC) tests of three martensitic precipitation hardening (PH) stainless-steel alloys.

  3. Meet EPA Scientist Jeff Szabo, Ph.D.

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA scientist Jeff Szabo, Ph.D., has worked for the EPA’s National Homeland Security Research Center since 2005. He conducts and manages water security research projects at EPA’s Test and Evaluation facility.

  4. Meet EPA Ecologist Paul Mayer, Ph.D.

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA ecologist Paul Mayer, Ph.D. works in EPA's Groundwater and Ecosystem Restoration division where he studies riparian zones (the area along rivers and streams where the habitats are influenced by both the land and water) and stream restoration

  5. Meet EPA Scientist Jordan West, Ph.D.

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Jordan West, Ph.D. is an aquatic ecologist at EPA. Her areas of expertise include freshwater & marine ecology, climate change impacts and adaptation, resilience and threshold theory, environmental risk assessment, expert elicitation & stakeholder processes

  6. Swiss national MD-PhD-program: an outcome analysis.

    PubMed

    Kuehnle, Katrin; Winkler, David T; Meier-Abt, Peter J

    2009-09-19

    This study aims at a first evaluation of the outcome of the Swiss national MD-PhD program during the last 16 years. One hundred and twenty six former and current students in the Swiss national MD-PhD program were surveyed via a Web-based questionnaire in September 2007. Twenty-four questions assessed information regarding participant demographics, information on the PhD thesis and publication activity, current positions and research activity, as well as participant's opinions, attitudes and career goals. Eighty questionnaires were received from 126 MD-PhD students and graduates (63.5% response rate). The responders consisted of present students (36%), former graduates (56%), and dropouts (8%). The percentage of women in the program was 23%, and the average duration of the program was 4.2 +/- 1.4 years. Research interests were predominantly in the fields of neuroscience, immunology, molecular biology and cancer research. A considerable portion of the MD-PhD graduates had an excellent publication record stemming from their PhD research work, and 89% were planning to continue a research-orientated career. Over 50% of those MD-PhD graduates completing their thesis before 2002 had already reached an assistant or full professor position at the time of the survey. Nearly all participants considered the MD-PhD training helpful to their career and high quality standards were assigned to the acquired practical and intellectual skills. However, criticism was expressed concerning the general mentoring and the career related mentoring. Moreover, general mentoring and career related mentoring were significantly less well perceived in research groups employing more than seven PhD students at the same time. The MD-PhD students and graduates surveyed were satisfied with their education and most of them continued a research-orientated career. Regarding the overall positive evaluation, this study supports the view that MD-PhD graduates are well qualified for a successful career in

  7. [Photohemolysis sensitized by psoralen: dependence on pH].

    PubMed

    Potapenko, A Ia; Belichenko, I V; Mamedov, I S; Zhuravel', N N; Kiagova, A A; Beijersbergen van Henegouwen, G M J; De Vries, Ch

    2007-01-01

    The effect of pH on the hemolysis of erythrocytes photosensitized (366 nm, 23 Wt/m2) by psoralen has been studied. The dependence of the photohemolysis rate (V) on irradiation dose (D) was described by the equation V = Vo + kD, where Vo is the rate of hemolysis without irradiation (dark), and k is the constant. The index of the power at dose x was approximately equal to 2, and its value did not change as the pH of the erythrocyte suspension was changed. It was found that changes in pH led to a sharp change in the value of coefficient k and correspondingly V. The lowest rate of photohemolysis was observed in the pH range from 8.0 to 8.4. As pH was changed from 3.4 to 9.0 or from 8.0 to 7.4, the V value increased approximately twofold. At pH below 7.4, an abrupt increase (approximately fourfold) in V was observed, with the pK value being equal to 7.3. The psoralen molecule lacks titratable acidic and basic groups; therefore, the effects of pH can hardly be assigned to changes in the photophysical properties of the sensitizer. The increase in V in the alkaline region is prohably related to the acceleration of photooxidation of reduced glutathione, whereas the jump of V at pH of about 7.3 may be due to the titration of the product of psoralen photooxidation. The latter assumption is confirmed by the data of hign performance liquid chromatography. In these experiments, psoralen was oxidized in ethanol and mixed with the phosphate buffer at different pH values followed by a qualitative and quantitative analysis by high performance liquid chromatography of photoproducts. Several photoproducts of psoralen have been identified whose content depended on pH. The curve of titration of one photoproduct was similar in shape to the pH dependence of psoralen-photosensitized hemolysis.

  8. Comparison of pH Data Measured with a pH Sensor Array Using Different Data Fusion Methods

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Yi-Hung; Chou, Jung-Chuan

    2012-01-01

    This paper introduces different data fusion methods which are used for an electrochemical measurement using a sensor array. In this study, we used ruthenium dioxide sensing membrane pH electrodes to form a sensor array. The sensor array was used for detecting the pH values of grape wine, generic cola drink and bottled base water. The measured pH data were used for data fusion methods to increase the reliability of the measured results, and we also compared the fusion results with other different data fusion methods.

  9. Teaching Human Digestion and pH Using Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Hanna

    2008-01-01

    Testing the pH of various liquids is one of the most popular activities in 5th- through 8th-grade classrooms. The author presents an extensive pH-testing lesson based on a 5E (engagement, exploration, explanation, extension, and evaluation) teaching model. The activity provides students with the opportunity to learn about pH and how it relates to…

  10. Jennifer Sargent, PhD | Center for Cancer Research

    Cancer.gov

    Jennifer Sargent, PhDMay 3, 2016 Senior Editor, The Lancet London, UK Jennifer Sargent, Ph.D., is currently a Senior Editor at The Lancet.  Previously, she was an Associate Editor at Nature Reviews Endocrinology.  Dr. Sargent is also a former NIH Research Fellow, and served as an editor on the NIH Fellows Editorial Board, as well as completing a NIH Catalyst editorial internship. Topics to be covered:

  11. Teaching Human Digestion and pH Using Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Hanna

    2008-01-01

    Testing the pH of various liquids is one of the most popular activities in 5th- through 8th-grade classrooms. The author presents an extensive pH-testing lesson based on a 5E (engagement, exploration, explanation, extension, and evaluation) teaching model. The activity provides students with the opportunity to learn about pH and how it relates to…

  12. Shumard Oaks Successfully Planted on High pH Soils

    Treesearch

    Harvey E. Kennedy; Roger M. Krinard

    1985-01-01

    Shumard oak was successfully planted on high pH (7.8-8.0) Mississippi River alluvium soils where some other planted red oaks had failed. Survival and growth have been good through ages 10, 11, and 25 years in three separate plantings. Shumard oak on high pH soils, in addition to producing timber, would allow a consistent mast-producing tree on sites normally void of...

  13. Mouthguard and sports drinks on tooth surface pH.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Y; Yang, T-C; Miyanaga, H; Tanaka, Y; Ikebe, K; Akimoto, N

    2014-09-01

    The influence of sports drinks and mouthguards on the pH level of tooth surface was examined. A custom-made mouthguard was fabricated for each subject. The pH level was measured by electric pH meter with sensitivity of 0.01 up to 30 min. Sports drinks (pH=3.75) containing 9.4% sugar were used in this study. Measurements were performed on a cohort of 23 female subjects without a mouthguard (control), wearing a mouthguard only (MG), wearing a mouthguard after 30 ml sports drink intake (SD+MG), wearing a mouthguard during a 5-min jogging exercise (MG+EX) and wearing a mouthguard during jogging after sports drink intake (SD+MG+EX). For 7 male subjects, the same measurements were performed while a sports drink was taken over the mouthguard (MG+SD, MD+EX+SD). MG showed statistically higher pH level than control (p<0.05). SD+MG exhibited a significant decrease in pH level, and SD+MG+EX exhibited even below the critical level of pH 5.5 in some subjects. When sports drinks were taken over the mouthguard, no significant differences in pH level were observed among the different conditions.Within the limitations of this study, it was suggested that wearing a mouthguard during exercise is in itself not a possible risk factor for dental caries, while wearing a mouthguard after consuming sports drinks is.

  14. The PhD in Writing Accompanied by an Exegesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnold, Josie

    2005-01-01

    The position of this paper is to further the discussion on what constitutes academic assessment in the PhD by artefact and exegesis. In doing so, it explores some of the ideas that arose in setting up the PhD in creative writing at Swinburne University of Technology. Thus, I: (1) survey some of the questions that arise about the journeys made by…

  15. MD-PhD training: looking back and looking forward.

    PubMed

    Bonham, Ann C

    2014-01-01

    MD-PhD programs provide rigorous, integrated training for physician-scientists, enabling them to frame scientific questions in unique ways and to apply clinical insight to fundamental science. Few would question the influential contributions of MD-PhD physician-scientists in advancing medical science. In this issue of Academic Medicine, Jeffe et al affirm high levels of excellence in educational outcomes from MD-PhD training programs at U.S. MD-granting medical schools, especially programs that receive funding from the NIH Medical Scientist Training Program (MSTP). The author of this commentary observes that, in the face of current economic pressures, comprehensive, longitudinal national outcomes data from MSTP- and non-MSTP-funded MD-PhD programs will help verify the value provided by MD-PhD physician-scientists. She proposes that MD-PhD programs should better prepare the next generation of physician-scientists for future research environments, which will provide new technologies, venues, and modalities. These research environments will be more closely integrated within health care delivery systems, extend into diverse communities and regions, and employ complex technologies. MD-PhD physician-scientists also will train and gain expertise in broadening areas of research, such as health policy, health economics, clinical epidemiology, and medical informatics. Program leaders are ideally situated to foster innovative learning environments and methodologies. By sharing their innovations, they can help ensure production of a diverse MD-PhD physician-scientist workforce, prepared to engage in myriad research opportunities to meet patient and population needs in a new environment.

  16. PH-Sensitive Ni(OH)2-Based Microelectrochemical Transistors.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-11-24

    basic solution is increased, VG for device turn on moves negative, in accord with the known pH dependence of the redox chemistry of Ni(OH)2 " Detection...transistor behavicr i 3 illustrated under dynamic and steady state conditions; as the pH of a basic solution is increased, VG for device turn on moves...important battery electrode, Ni(OH)2 is an electrochromic material, becoming colored upon electrochemical oxidation.6 Like other electrochromic transition

  17. Glutamate transport into synaptic vesicles. Roles of membrane potential, pH gradient, and intravesicular pH.

    PubMed

    Tabb, J S; Kish, P E; Van Dyke, R; Ueda, T

    1992-08-05

    Glutamate, the major excitatory neurotransmitter in the mammalian central nervous system, is transported into bovine synaptic vesicles in a manner that is ATP dependent and requires a vesicular electrochemical proton gradient. We studied the electrical and chemical elements of this driving force and evaluated the effects of chloride on transport. Increasing concentrations of Cl- were found to increase the steady-state ATP-dependent vesicular pH gradient (delta pH) and were found to concomitantly decrease the vesicular membrane potential (delta psi). Low millimolar chloride concentrations, which cause 3-6-fold stimulation of vesicular glutamate uptake, caused small but measurable increases in delta pH and decreases in delta psi, when compared to control vesicles in the absence of chloride. Nigericin in potassium buffers was used to alter the relative proportions of delta pH and delta psi. Compared to controls, at all chloride concentrations tested, nigericin virtually abolished delta pH and increased the vesicle interior positive delta psi. Concomitantly, nigericin increased ATP-dependent glutamate uptake in 0-1 mM chloride but decreased glutamate uptake in 4 mM (45%), 20 mM (80%), and 140 mM (75%) Cl- (where delta pH in the absence of nigericin was large). These findings suggest that either delta psi, delta pH, or a combination can drive glutamate uptake, but to different degrees. In the presence of 4 mM Cl-, where uptake is optimal, both delta psi and delta pH contribute to the driving force for uptake. When the extravesicular pH was increased from 7.4 to 8.0, more Cl- was required to stimulate vesicular glutamate uptake. In the absence of Cl-, as extravesicular pH was lowered to 6.8, uptake was over 3-fold greater than it was at pH 7.4. As extravesicular pH was reduced from 8.0 toward 6.8, less Cl- was required for maximal stimulation. Decreasing the extravesicular pH from 8.0 to 6.8 in the absence of Cl- significantly increased glutamate uptake activity, even

  18. Data collection and analysis strategies for phMRI.

    PubMed

    Mandeville, Joseph B; Liu, Christina H; Vanduffel, Wim; Marota, John J A; Jenkins, Bruce G

    2014-09-01

    Although functional MRI traditionally has been applied mainly to study changes in task-induced brain function, evolving acquisition methodologies and improved knowledge of signal mechanisms have increased the utility of this method for studying responses to pharmacological stimuli, a technique often dubbed "phMRI". The proliferation of higher magnetic field strengths and the use of exogenous contrast agent have boosted detection power, a critical factor for successful phMRI due to the restricted ability to average multiple stimuli within subjects. Receptor-based models of neurovascular coupling, including explicit pharmacological models incorporating receptor densities and affinities and data-driven models that incorporate weak biophysical constraints, have demonstrated compelling descriptions of phMRI signal induced by dopaminergic stimuli. This report describes phMRI acquisition and analysis methodologies, with an emphasis on data-driven analyses. As an example application, statistically efficient data-driven regressors were used to describe the biphasic response to the mu-opioid agonist remifentanil, and antagonism using dopaminergic and GABAergic ligands revealed modulation of the mesolimbic pathway. Results illustrate the power of phMRI as well as our incomplete understanding of mechanisms underlying the signal. Future directions are discussed for phMRI acquisitions in human studies, for evolving analysis methodologies, and for interpretative studies using the new generation of simultaneous PET/MRI scanners. This article is part of the Special Issue Section entitled 'Neuroimaging in Neuropharmacology'.

  19. Data Collection and Analysis Strategies for phMRI

    PubMed Central

    Mandeville, Joseph B.; Liu, Christina H.; Vanduffel, Wim; Marota, John J.A.; Jenkins, Bruce G.

    2014-01-01

    Although functional MRI traditionally has been applied mainly to study changes in task-induced brain function, evolving acquisition methodologies and improved knowledge of signal mechanisms have increased the utility of this method for studying responses to pharmacological stimuli, a technique often dubbed “phMRI”. The proliferation of higher magnetic field strengths and the use of exogenous contrast agent have boosted detection power, a critical factor for successful phMRI due to the restricted ability to average multiple stimuli within subjects. Receptor-based models of neurovascular coupling, including explicit pharmacological models incorporating receptor densities and affinities and data-driven models that incorporate weak biophysical constraints, have demonstrated compelling descriptions of phMRI signal induced by dopaminergic stimuli. This report describes phMRI acquisition and analysis methodologies, with an emphasis on data-driven analyses. As an example application, statistically efficient data-driven regressors were used to describe the biphasic response to the mu-opioid agonist remifentanil, and antagonism using dopaminergic and GABAergic ligands revealed modulation of the mesolimbic pathway. Results illustrate the power of phMRI as well as our incomplete understanding of mechanisms underlying the signal. Future directions are discussed for phMRI acquisitions in human studies, for evolving analysis methodologies, and for interpretative studies using the new generation of simultaneous PET/MRI scanners. PMID:24613447

  20. Monitoring pH and ORP in a SHARON reactor.

    PubMed

    Claros, J; Serralta, J; Seco, A; Ferrer, J; Aguado, D

    2011-01-01

    This paper analyses the valuable information provided by the on-line measurements of pH and oxidation reduction potential (ORP) in a continuous single high ammonia removal over nitrite (SHARON) reactor. A laboratory-scale SHARON reactor equipped with pH, ORP, electric conductivity and dissolved oxygen (DO) probes has been operated for more than one year. Nitrogen removal over nitrite has been achieved by adding methanol at the beginning of anoxic stages. Time evolution of pH and ORP along each cycle allows identifying the decrease in nitritation rate when ammonia is consumed during the aerobic phase and the end of the denitrification process during the anoxic phase. Therefore, monitoring pH and ORP can be used to develop a real-time control system aimed at optimizing the length of both aerobic and anoxic stages. Real-time control of methanol addition can be carried out by using the information provided by these probes: excessive methanol addition in the anoxic stage is clearly detected in the ORP profile of the following aerobic phase, while a deficit of methanol is detected in both pH and ORP profiles of that anoxic phase. Moreover, other valuable information such as the amount of ammonia nitrified, failures in DO measurements, excessive stirring during the anoxic stage and methanol dosage in the aerobic phase was also provided by the pH and ORP profiles.

  1. Automated high precision secondary pH measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastkowski, F.; Jakobsen, P. T.; Stefan, F.; Kristensen, H. B.; Jensen, H. D.; Kawiecki, R.; Wied, C. E.; Kauert, A.; Seidl, B.; Spitzer, P.; Eberhardt, R.; Adel, B.

    2013-04-01

    A new setup for high precision, automated secondary pH measurements together with a reference measurement procedure has been developed and tested in interlaboratory comparisons using buffers pH 4.005, pH 7.000, and pH 10.012 at 25 °C and 37 °C. Using primary buffers as standards, a standard uncertainty in pH better than 0.005 can be reached. The central measuring device is a one piece, thermostatted cell of PFA (perfluoroalkoxy) with a built-in Hamilton® Single Pore™ Glass electrode. Due to its flow-through principle this device allows pH measurements with low consumption of measurement solutions. The very hydrophobic and smooth PFA as construction material facilitates complete emptying of the cell. Furthermore, the tempering unit affords very precise temperature control and hence contributes to the low target uncertainty of the produced secondary buffer solutions. Use of a symmetric measurement sequence and the two point calibration was sufficient to reach high precision and accuracy.

  2. Structure of human saposin A at lysosomal pH

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, Chris H.; Read, Randy J.; Deane, Janet E.

    2015-06-27

    A 1.8 Å resolution structure of the sphingolipid activator protein saposin A has been determined at pH 4.8, the physiologically relevant lysosomal pH for hydrolase enzyme activation and lipid-transfer activity. The saposins are essential cofactors for the normal lysosomal degradation of complex glycosphingolipids by acid hydrolase enzymes; defects in either saposin or hydrolase function lead to severe metabolic diseases. Saposin A (SapA) activates the enzyme β-galactocerebrosidase (GALC), which catalyzes the breakdown of β-d-galactocerebroside, the principal lipid component of myelin. SapA is known to bind lipids and detergents in a pH-dependent manner; this is accompanied by a striking transition from a ‘closed’ to an ‘open’ conformation. However, previous structures were determined at non-lysosomal pH. This work describes a 1.8 Å resolution X-ray crystal structure determined at the physiologically relevant lysosomal pH 4.8. In the absence of lipid or detergent at pH 4.8, SapA is observeed to adopt a conformation closely resembling the previously determined ‘closed’ conformation, showing that pH alone is not sufficient for the transition to the ‘open’ conformation. Structural alignments reveal small conformational changes, highlighting regions of flexibility.

  3. Salivary pH changes during 10% carbamide peroxide bleaching.

    PubMed

    Leonard, R H; Bentley, C D; Haywood, V B

    1994-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect on salivary pH of a 10% carbamide peroxide solution when used with a custom-fitted guard for bleaching teeth. Baseline pH values were established for unstimulated saliva and on saliva produced while wearing an empty guard. After insertion of a guard half filled with Proxigel, salivary pH measurements were made at 5-minute intervals until the values returned to baseline levels. Mean salivary pH values were 6.81 +/- 0.11 for unstimulated samples and 6.91 +/- 0.18 after insertion of the empty guard. After insertion of the filled guard, there was a statistically insignificant decrease in salivary pH during the first 5 minutes, followed by an increase above baseline at 10 minutes, to a mean peak value of 7.32 +/- 0.27 at 15 minutes. The difference between the baseline values and the mean peak value at 15 minutes was statistically significant. The results of the study indicated that the pH of saliva increased significantly during the first 15 minutes of nightguard vital bleaching and did not significantly drop below baseline in the first 2 hours after insertion with a moderately low-pH solution.

  4. pH sensing using boron doped diamond electrodes.

    PubMed

    Fierro, Stéphane; Mitani, Naoko; Comninellis, Christos; Einaga, Yasuaki

    2011-10-06

    The boron doped diamond (BDD) electrode is presented as an appropriate candidate for next generation glass-free, highly stable and accurate pH sensors. The method used in this study is based on the potential change related to the hydrogen evolution reaction following a current step, which is pH dependent. Alkali cations in the solution have no influence on the accuracy of the pH calibration curve, which provides an advantage with respect to the conventional pH glass electrode. The unwanted influence of electrochemically active compounds in solution can be avoided by adjusting the current density applied during chronopotentiometric measurements. The accuracy of the pH measurements is due to the excellent stability as well as the wide potential window and low background current of BDD electrodes. This faculty was not observed when using conventional electrode materials. The efficacy of this new type of pH sensor has been tested using tap water as a typical real sample.

  5. The European Mobile System (EMS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jongejans, A.; Rogard, R.; Mistretta, I.; Ananasso, F.

    1993-01-01

    The European Space Agency is presently procuring an L band payload in order to promote a regional European L band system coping with the specific needs of the European market. The payload, and the two communications systems to be supported, are described below. The potential market for EMS in Europe is discussed.

  6. Comparing Metal Leaching and Toxicity from High pH, Low pH, and High Ammonia Fly Ash

    SciTech Connect

    Palumbo, Anthony Vito; Phillips, Jana Randolph; Fagan, Lisa Anne; Drake, Meghan M; Ruther, Rose Emily; Fisher, L. Suzanne; Amonette, J. E.

    2007-01-01

    Previous work with both class F and class C fly ash indicated minimal leaching from most fly ashes tested. However, the addition of NOx removal equipment might result in higher levels of ammonia in the fly ash. We have recently been testing fly ash with a wide range of pH (3.7-12.4) originating from systems with NOx removal equipment. Leaching experiments were done using dilute CaCl2 solutions in batch and columns and a batch nitric acid method. All methods indicated that the leaching of heavy metals was different in the highest ammonia sample tested and the high pH sample. However, toxicity testing with the Microtox system has indicated little potential toxicity in leachates except for the fly ash at the highest pH (12.4). When the leachate from the high pH fly ash was neutralized, toxicity was eliminated.

  7. Comparing metal leaching and toxicity from high pH, low pH, and high ammonia fly ash

    SciTech Connect

    Palumbo, Anthony V.; Tarver, Jana R.; Fagan, Lisa A.; McNeilly, Meghan S.; Ruther, Rose; Fisher, L. S.; Amonette, James E.

    2007-07-01

    Previous work with both class F and class C fly ash indicated minimal leaching from most fly ashes tested. However, the addition of NOx removal equipment might result in higher levels of ammonia in the fly ash. We have recently been testing fly ash with a wide range of pH (3.7–12.4) originating from systems with NOx removal equipment. Leaching experiments were done using dilute CaCl2 solutions in batch and columns and a batch nitric acid method. All methods indicated that the leaching of heavy metals was different in the highest ammonia sample tested and the high pH sample. However, toxicity testing with the Microtox* system has indicated little potential toxicity in leachates except for the fly ash at the highest pH (12.4). When the leachate from the high pH fly ash was neutralized, toxicity was eliminated.

  8. Characterisation and deployment of an immobilised pH sensor spot towards surface ocean pH measurements.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Jennifer S; Achterberg, Eric P; Rérolle, Victoire M C; Abi Kaed Bey, Samer; Floquet, Cedric F A; Mowlem, Matthew C

    2015-10-15

    The oceans are a major sink for anthropogenic atmospheric carbon dioxide, and the uptake causes changes to the marine carbonate system and has wide ranging effects on flora and fauna. It is crucial to develop analytical systems that allow us to follow the increase in oceanic pCO2 and corresponding reduction in pH. Miniaturised sensor systems using immobilised fluorescence indicator spots are attractive for this purpose because of their simple design and low power requirements. The technology is increasingly used for oceanic dissolved oxygen measurements. We present a detailed method on the use of immobilised fluorescence indicator spots to determine pH in ocean waters across the pH range 7.6-8.2. We characterised temperature (-0.046 pH/°C from 5 to 25 °C) and salinity dependences (-0.01 pH/psu over 5-35), and performed a preliminary investigation into the influence of chlorophyll on the pH measurement. The apparent pKa of the sensor spots was 6.93 at 20 °C. A drift of 0.00014 R (ca. 0.0004 pH, at 25 °C, salinity 35) was observed over a 3 day period in a laboratory based drift experiment. We achieved a precision of 0.0074 pH units, and observed a drift of 0.06 pH units during a test deployment of 5 week duration in the Southern Ocean as an underway surface ocean sensor, which was corrected for using certified reference materials. The temperature and salinity dependences were accounted for with the algorithm, R=0.00034-0.17·pH+0.15·S(2)+0.0067·T-0.0084·S·1.075. This study provides a first step towards a pH optode system suitable for autonomous deployment. The use of a short duration low power illumination (LED current 0.2 mA, 5 μs illumination time) improved the lifetime and precision of the spot. Further improvements to the pH indicator spot operations include regular application of certified reference materials for drift correction and cross-calibration against a spectrophotometric pH system. Desirable future developments should involve novel

  9. pH measurement and a rational and practical pH control strategy for high throughput cell culture system.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Haiying; Purdie, Jennifer; Wang, Tongtong; Ouyang, Anli

    2010-01-01

    The number of therapeutic proteins produced by cell culture in the pharmaceutical industry continues to increase. During the early stages of manufacturing process development, hundreds of clones and various cell culture conditions are evaluated to develop a robust process to identify and select cell lines with high productivity. It is highly desirable to establish a high throughput system to accelerate process development and reduce cost. Multiwell plates and shake flasks are widely used in the industry as the scale down model for large-scale bioreactors. However, one of the limitations of these two systems is the inability to measure and control pH in a high throughput manner. As pH is an important process parameter for cell culture, this could limit the applications of these scale down model vessels. An economical, rapid, and robust pH measurement method was developed at Eli Lilly and Company by employing SNARF-4F 5-(-and 6)-carboxylic acid. The method demonstrated the ability to measure the pH values of cell culture samples in a high throughput manner. Based upon the chemical equilibrium of CO(2), HCO(3)(-), and the buffer system, i.e., HEPES, we established a mathematical model to regulate pH in multiwell plates and shake flasks. The model calculates the required %CO(2) from the incubator and the amount of sodium bicarbonate to be added to adjust pH to a preset value. The model was validated by experimental data, and pH was accurately regulated by this method. The feasibility of studying the pH effect on cell culture in 96-well plates and shake flasks was also demonstrated in this study. This work shed light on mini-bioreactor scale down model construction and paved the way for cell culture process development to improve productivity or product quality using high throughput systems.

  10. A computer program for correlating dental plaque pH values, cH+, plaque titration, critical pH, resting pH and the solubility of enamel apatite.

    PubMed

    Larsen, M J; Pearce, E I

    1997-07-01

    A computer program was written in Visual Basic (Microsoft) to calculate (a) the area between a plaque pH curve (as seen after a sucrose rinse) and either a resting pH (around pH 7) or a critical pH value (around 5.5) above at least parts of the pH curve; (b) the solubility of apatite at the pH values in plaque; (c) the area between the plaque pH solubility curve and the apatite solubility at the resting pH/critical pH; (d) the area between plaque cH+ curve and the cH+ value at resting pH/ critical pH; and (e) the area between a plaque pH curve and a cut-off pH value below the curve, e.g. pH 3. It was found that because both the cH+ and the solubility of apatite increased logarithmically with a pH drop, the two latter area functions (d, e) were basically different from those based directly on pH curves. Thus, pH changes around the resting pH value had little effect on areas calculated from concentrations of H+ and solubility. In contrast, a small pH change around pH 4 had a strong impact on both demineralization potential and areas based on cH+. Also, because of the logarithmic nature, demineralization potentials were generally large in comparison to remineralization potentials, a point that has hitherto received little attention.

  11. Coral calcifying fluid pH is modulated by seawater carbonate chemistry not solely seawater pH.

    PubMed

    Comeau, S; Tambutté, E; Carpenter, R C; Edmunds, P J; Evensen, N R; Allemand, D; Ferrier-Pagès, C; Tambutté, S; Venn, A A

    2017-01-25

    Reef coral calcification depends on regulation of pH in the internal calcifying fluid (CF) in which the coral skeleton forms. However, little is known about calcifying fluid pH (pHCF) regulation, despite its importance in determining the response of corals to ocean acidification. Here, we investigate pHCF in the coral Stylophora pistillata in seawater maintained at constant pH with manipulated carbonate chemistry to alter dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) concentration, and therefore total alkalinity (AT). We also investigate the intracellular pH of calcifying cells, photosynthesis, respiration and calcification rates under the same conditions. Our results show that despite constant pH in the surrounding seawater, pHCF is sensitive to shifts in carbonate chemistry associated with changes in [DIC] and [AT], revealing that seawater pH is not the sole driver of pHCF Notably, when we synthesize our results with published data, we identify linear relationships of pHCF with the seawater [DIC]/[H(+)] ratio, [AT]/ [H(+)] ratio and [[Formula: see text

  12. Ligand accessibility and bioactivity of a hormone–dendrimer conjugate depend on pH and pH history

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Sung Hoon; Madak-Erdogan, Zeynep; Bae, Sung Chul; Carlson, Kathryn E.; Mayne, Christopher G.; Granick, Steve; Katzenellenbogen, Benita S.; Katzenellenbogen, John A.

    2015-07-17

    Estrogen conjugates with a polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimer have shown remarkably selective regulation of the nongenomic actions of estrogens in target cells in this paper. In response to pH changes, however, these estrogen–dendrimer conjugates (EDCs) display a major morphological transition that alters the accessibility of the estrogen ligands that compromises the bioactivity of the EDC. A sharp break in dynamic behavior near pH 7 occurs for three different ligands on the surface of a PAMAM-G6 dendrimer: a fluorophore (tetramethylrhodamine [TMR]) and two estrogens (17α-ethynylestradiol and diphenolic acid). Collisional quenching and time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy experiments with TMR–PAMAM revealed high ligand shielding above pH 7 and low shielding below pH 7. Furthermore, when the pH was cycled from 8.5 (conditions of ligand–PAMAM conjugation) to 4.5 (e.g., endosome/lysosome) and through 6.5 (e.g., hypoxic environment) back to pH 8.5, the 17α-ethynylestradiol– and diphenolic acid–PAMAM conjugates experienced a dramatic, irreversible loss in cell stimulatory activity; dynamic NMR studies indicated that the hormonal ligands had become occluded within the more hydrophobic core of the PAMAM dendrimer. Thus, the active state of these estrogen–dendrimer conjugates appears to be metastable. Finally, this pH-dependent irreversible masking of activity is of considerable relevance to the design of drug conjugates with amine-bearing PAMAM dendrimers.

  13. Effect of systemic pH on pH sub i and lactic acid generation in exhaustive forearm exercise

    SciTech Connect

    Hood, V.L.; Schubert, C.; Keller, U.; Mueller, S. Univ. of Vermont College of Medicine, Burlington )

    1988-09-01

    To investigate whether changes in systemic pH affect intracellular pH (pH{sub i}), energy-rich phosphates, and lactic acid generation in muscle, eight normal volunteers performed exhaustive forearm exercise with arterial blood flow occluded for 2 min on three occasions. Subjects ingested 4 mmol/kg NH{sub 4}Cl (acidosis; A) or NaHCO{sub 3} (alkalosis; B) or nothing (control; C) 3 h before the exercise. Muscle pH{sub i} and phosphocreatine (PCr) content were measured with {sup 31}P-nuclear magnetic resonance ({sup 31}P-NMR) spectroscopy during exercise and recovery. Lactate output during 0.5-7 min of recovery was calculated as deep venous-arterial concentration differences times forearm blood flow. Before exercise, blood pH and bicarbonate were lower in acidosis than alkalosis and intermediate in control. Lactic acid output during recovery was less with A than B and intermediate in C. PCr utilization and resynthesis were not affected by extracellular pH changes. pH{sub i} did not differ before exercise or at its end. Hence systemic acidosis inhibited and alkalosis stimulated lactic acid output. These findings suggest that systemic pH regulates cellular acid production, protecting muscle pH, at the expense of energy availability.

  14. pH influences the biocompatibility of methylene blue solutions.

    PubMed

    Gusman, David Jonathan Rodrigues; Cintra, Luciano Tavares Angelo; Novaes, Vivian Cristina Noronha; Matheus, Henrique Rinaldi; de Araujo, Nathália Januario; de Almeida, Juliano Milanezi

    2017-05-23

    The aim of this study was to investigate the biocompatibility of methylene blue at different pH levels through the method of implantation in subcutaneous tissue. Eighty-four sterilized polyethylene tubes were allocated in the subcutaneous tissue of 28 rats, each one receiving four tubes, set into four groups: group tube (G-T)-empty tube, fibrin group (G-F)-tube filled with fibrin sponge, group methylene blue pH 7 (G-MB/pH 7)-tube filled with fibrin sponge soaked by methylene blue (100 μg/ml) at pH 7.0, and group methylene blue pH 1 (G-MB/pH 1)-tube filled with fibrin sponge and soaked by methylene blue (100 μg/ml) at pH 1.0. After 7, 15, and 30 days, seven animals from each group were euthanized, and the tubes involved by the surrounding tissue were removed and fixed with 4% buffered formaldehyde solution. The collected pieces were processed and histological sections (4 μm) were stained with hematoxylin and eosin and analyzed by light microscopy. Scores were assigned to analysis of histopathologic parameters. The results were statistically analyzed by the Kruskal-Wallis test (p ≤ 0.05). At 7 and 30 days, the G-MB/pH 1 group showed no significant difference in the G-T control group, while G-MB/pH 7 had a significant increase on tissue reaction, also when compared to G-T. At 15 days, there was no statistical difference between the groups. Within the limits of this study, it is concluded that methylene blue at pH 1.0 provides better biocompatibility than at pH 7.0.

  15. DIGESTION PRODUCTS OF THE PH20 HYALURONIDASE INHIBIT REMYELINATION

    PubMed Central

    Preston, Marnie; Gong, Xi; Su, Weiping; Matsumoto, Steven G.; Banine, Fatima; Winkler, Clayton; Foster, Scott; Xing, Rubing; Struve, Jaime; Dean, Justin; Baggenstoss, Bruce; Weigel, Paul H.; Montine, Thomas J.; Back, Stephen A.; Sherman, Larry S.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs) recruited to demyelinating lesions often fail to mature into oligodendrocytes (OLs) that remyelinate spared axons. The glycosaminoglycan hyaluronan (HA) accumulates in demyelinating lesions and has been implicated in the failure of OPC maturation and remyelination. We tested the hypothesis that OPCs in demyelinating lesions express a specific hyaluronidase, and that digestion products of this enzyme inhibit OPC maturation. METHODS Mouse OPCs grown in vitro were analyzed for hyaluronidase expression and activity. Gain of function studies were used to define the hyaluronidases that blocked OPC maturation. Mouse and human demyelinating lesions were assessed for hyaluronidase expression. Digestion products from different hyaluronidases and a hyaluronidase inhibitor were tested for their effects on OPC maturation and functional remyelination in vivo. RESULTS OPCs demonstrated hyaluronidase activity in vitro and expressed multiple hyaluronidases including HYAL1, HYAL2, and PH20. HA digestion by PH20 but not other hyaluronidases inhibited OPC maturation into OLs. In contrast, inhibiting HA synthesis did not influence OPC maturation. PH20 expression was elevated in OPCs and reactive astrocytes in both rodent and human demyelinating lesions. HA-digestion products generated by the PH20 hyaluronidase but not another hyaluronidase inhibited remyelination following lysolecithin-induced demyelination. Inhibition of hyaluronidase activity lead to increased OPC maturation and promoted increased conduction velocities through lesions. INTERPRETATION We determined that PH20 is elevated in demyelinating lesions and that increased PH20 expression is sufficient to inhibit OPC maturation and remyelination. Pharmacological inhibition of PH20 may therefore be an effective way to promote remyelination in multiple sclerosis and related conditions. PMID:23463525

  16. Cosmic muon induced EM showers in NO$\

    SciTech Connect

    Yadav, Nitin; Duyang, Hongyue; Shanahan, Peter; Mishra, Sanjib; Bhuyan, Bipul

    2016-11-15

    Here, the NuMI Off-Axis ve Appearance (NOvA) experiment is a ne appearance neutrino oscillation experiment at Fermilab. It identifies the ne signal from the electromagnetic (EM) showers induced by the electrons in the final state of neutrino interactions. Cosmic muon induced EM showers, dominated by bremsstrahlung, are abundant in NOvA far detector. We use the Cosmic Muon- Removal technique to get pure EM shower sample from bremsstrahlung muons in data. We also use Cosmic muon decay in flight EM showers which are highly pure EM showers.The large Cosmic-EM sample can be used, as data driven method, to characterize the EM shower signature and provides valuable checks of the simulation, reconstruction, particle identification algorithm, and calibration across the NOvA detector.

  17. PH5 for integrating and archiving different data types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azevedo, Steve; Hess, Derick; Beaudoin, Bruce

    2016-04-01

    PH5 is IRIS PASSCAL's file organization of HDF5 used for seismic data. The extensibility and portability of HDF5 allows the PH5 format to evolve and operate on a variety of platforms and interfaces. To make PH5 even more flexible, the seismic metadata is separated from the time series data in order to achieve gains in performance as well as ease of use and to simplify user interaction. This separation affords easy updates to metadata after the data are archived without having to access waveform data. To date, PH5 is currently used for integrating and archiving active source, passive source, and onshore-offshore seismic data sets with the IRIS Data Management Center (DMC). Active development to make PH5 fully compatible with FDSN web services and deliver StationXML is near completion. We are also exploring the feasibility of utilizing QuakeML for active seismic source representation. The PH5 software suite, PIC KITCHEN, comprises in-field tools that include data ingestion (e.g. RefTek format, SEG-Y, and SEG-D), meta-data management tools including QC, and a waveform review tool. These tools enable building archive ready data in-field during active source experiments greatly decreasing the time to produce research ready data sets. Once archived, our online request page generates a unique web form and pre-populates much of it based on the metadata provided to it from the PH5 file. The data requester then can intuitively select the extraction parameters as well as data subsets they wish to receive (current output formats include SEG-Y, SAC, mseed). The web interface then passes this on to the PH5 processing tools to generate the requested seismic data, and e-mail the requester a link to the data set automatically as soon as the data are ready. PH5 file organization was originally designed to hold seismic time series data and meta-data from controlled source experiments using RefTek data loggers. The flexibility of HDF5 has enabled us to extend the use of PH5 in several

  18. Monitoring the Productivity of Coastal Systems Using PH ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The impact of nutrient inputs to the eutrophication of coastal ecosystems has been one of the great themes of coastal ecology. There have been countless studies devoted to quantifying how human sources of nutrients, in particular nitrogen (N), effect coastal water bodies. These studies, which often measure in situ concentrations of nutrients, chlorophyll, and dissolved oxygen, are often spatially and/or temporally intensive and expensive. We provide evidence from experimental mesocosms, coupled with data from the water column of a well-mixed estuary, that pH can be a quick, inexpensive, and integrative measure of net ecosystem metabolism. In some cases, this approach is a more sensitive tracer of production than direct measurements of chlorophyll and carbon-14. Taken together, our data suggest that pH is a sensitive, but often overlooked, tool for monitoring estuarine production. This presentation will explore the potential utility of pH as an indicator of ecosystem productivity. Our data suggest that pH is a sensitive and potentially integrator of net ecosystem production. It should not be overlooked, that measuring pH is quick, easy, and inexpensive, further increasing its value as an analytical tool.

  19. Interfacial pH during mussel adhesive plaque formation

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Nadine R. Martinez; Das, Saurabh; Kaufman, Yair; Israelachvili, Jacob N.; Waite, J. Herbert

    2015-01-01

    Mussel (Mytilus californianus) adhesion to marine surfaces involves an intricate and adaptive synergy of molecules and spatio-temporal processes. Although the molecules, such as mussel foot proteins (mfps), are well characterized, deposition details remain vague and speculative. Developing methods for the precise surveillance of conditions that apply during mfp deposition would aid both in understanding mussel adhesion and translating this adhesion into useful technologies. To probe the interfacial pH at which mussels buffer the local environment during mfp deposition, a lipid bilayer with tethered pH-sensitive fluorochromes was assembled on mica. The interfacial pH during foot contact with modified mica ranged from 2.2−3.3, which is well below the seawater pH of ~8. The acidic pH serves multiple functions: it limits mfp-Dopa oxidation, thereby enabling the catecholic functionalities to adsorb to surface oxides by H-bonding and metal ion coordination, and provides a solubility switch for mfps, most of which aggregate at pH ≥ 7-8. PMID:25875963

  20. pH responsive graft copolymers of chitosan.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Elvan; Yalinca, Zulal; Yahya, Kovan; Sirotina, Uliana

    2016-09-01

    Grafting suitable polymers onto chitosan can produce cationic or polyampholyte polymers or hydrogels that are potential smart biomedical materials. Chitosan-graft-[poly(diethylamino)ethyl methacrylate] has been prepared in three different physical forms as linear free chains in solution, chemical gels crosslinked with glutaraldehyde, and poly(diethylamino)ethyl methacrylate] grafted onto chitosan tripolyphosphate gel beads. In addition to chemical structure, the graft copolymers were characterized with respect to their dissolution and swelling behavior in aqueous solution. It has been established that solubility of the products is controlled by the grafting yield. While pH sensitive polymers, which collapse at a given pH value are obtained at lower grafting yields, hydrogels form at higher grafting yields with pH responsive swelling behavior. Glutaraldehyde crosslinked chitosan-graft-[poly(diethylamino)ethyl methacrylate] gels and chitosan tripolyphosphate gel beads grafted with poly[(diethylamino)ethyl methacrylate] exhibit pH sensitive swelling with highest equilibrium swelling capacity at pH=1.2.

  1. Near-infrared noninvasive spectroscopic determination of pH

    DOEpatents

    Alam, Mary K.; Robinson, Mark R.

    1998-08-11

    Methods and apparatus for, preferably, determining noninvasively and in vitro pH in a human. The non-invasive method includes the steps of: generating light at three or more different wavelengths in the range of 1000 nm to 2500 nm; irradiating blood containing tissue; measuring the intensities of the wavelengths emerging from the blood containing tissue to obtain a set of at least three spectral intensities v. wavelengths; and determining the unknown values of pH. The determination of pH is made by using measured intensities at wavelengths that exhibit change in absorbance due to histidine titration. Histidine absorbance changes are due to titration by hydrogen ions. The determination of the unknown pH values is performed by at least one multivariate algorithm using two or more variables and at least one calibration model. The determined pH values are within the physiological ranges observed in blood containing tissue. The apparatus includes a tissue positioning device, a source, at least one detector, electronics, a microprocessor, memory, and apparatus for indicating the determined values.

  2. Interfacial pH during mussel adhesive plaque formation.

    PubMed

    Martinez Rodriguez, Nadine R; Das, Saurabh; Kaufman, Yair; Israelachvili, Jacob N; Waite, J Herbert

    2015-01-01

    Mussel (Mytilus californianus) adhesion to marine surfaces involves an intricate and adaptive synergy of molecules and spatio-temporal processes. Although the molecules, such as mussel foot proteins (mfps), are well characterized, deposition details remain vague and speculative. Developing methods for the precise surveillance of conditions that apply during mfp deposition would aid both in understanding mussel adhesion and translating this adhesion into useful technologies. To probe the interfacial pH at which mussels buffer the local environment during mfp deposition, a lipid bilayer with tethered pH-sensitive fluorochromes was assembled on mica. The interfacial pH during foot contact with modified mica ranged from 2.2 to 3.3, which is well below the seawater pH of ~ 8. The acidic pH serves multiple functions: it limits mfp-Dopa oxidation, thereby enabling the catecholic functionalities to adsorb to surface oxides by H-bonding and metal ion coordination, and provides a solubility switch for mfps, most of which aggregate at pH ≥ 7-8.

  3. Photoreactions of bacteriorhodopsin at acid pH

    SciTech Connect

    Varo, G.; Lanyi, J.K. )

    1989-12-01

    It has been known that bacteriorhodopsin, the retinal protein in purple membrane which functions as a light-driven proton pump, undergoes reversible spectroscopic changes at acid pH. The absorption spectra of various bacteriorhodopsin species were estimated from measured spectra of the mixtures that form at low pH, in the presence of sulfate and chloride. The dependency of these on pH and the concentration of Cl- fit a model in which progressive protonation of purple membrane produces blue membrane, which will bind, with increasing affinity as the pH is lowered, chloride ions to produce acid purple membrane. Transient spectroscopy with a multichannel analyzer identified the intermediates of the photocycles of these altered pigments, and described their kinetics. Blue membrane produced red-shifted KL-like and L-like products, but no other photointermediates, consistent with earlier suggestions. Unlike others, however, we found that acid purple membrane exhibited a very different photocycle: its first detected intermediate was not like KL in that it was much more red-shifted, and the only other intermediate detectable resembled the O species of the bacteriorhodopsin photocycle. An M-like intermediate, with a deprotonated Schiff base, was not found in either of these photocycles. There are remarkable similarities between the photoreactions of the acid forms of bacteriorhodopsin and the chloride transport system halorhodopsin, where the Schiff base deprotonation seems to be prevented by lack of suitable aspartate residues, rather than by low pH.

  4. Noninvasive Ph-telemetric Measurement of Gastrointestinal Function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tietze, Karen J.

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to gain experience with and validate the Heidelberg pH-telemetric methodology in order to determine if the pH-telemetric methodology would be a useful noninvasive measure of gastrointestinal transit time for future ground-based and in-flight drug evaluation studies. The Heidelberg pH metering system is a noninvasive, nonradioactive telemetric system that, following oral ingestion, continuously measures intraluminal pH of the stomach, duodenum, small bowel, ileocecal junction, and large bowel. Gastrointestinal motility profiles were obtained in normal volunteers using the lactulose breath-hydrogen and Heidelberg pH metering techniques. All profiles were obtained in the morning after an overnight fast. Heidelberg pH profiles were obtained in the fasting and fed states; lactulose breath-hydrogen profiles were obtained after a standard breakfast. Mouth-to-cecum transit time was measured as the interval from administration of lactulose (30 ml; 20 g) to a sustained increase in breath-hydrogen of 10 ppm or more. Gastric emptying time was measured as the interval from the administration of the Heidelberg capsule to a sustained increase in pH of three units or more.

  5. The Role of Ph Fronts in Tissue Electroporation Based Treatments

    PubMed Central

    Maglietti, Felipe; Michinski, Sebastian; Olaiz, Nahuel; Castro, Marcelo; Suárez, Cecilia; Marshall, Guillermo

    2013-01-01

    Treatments based on electroporation (EP) induce the formation of pores in cell membranes due to the application of pulsed electric fields. We present experimental evidence of the existence of pH fronts emerging from both electrodes during treatments based on tissue EP, for conditions found in many studies, and that these fronts are immediate and substantial. pH fronts are indirectly measured through the evanescence time (ET), defined as the time required for the tissue buffer to neutralize them. The ET was measured through a pH indicator imaged at a series of time intervals using a four-cluster hard fuzzy-c-means algorithm to segment pixels corresponding to the pH indicator at every frame. The ET was calculated as the time during which the number of pixels was 10% of those in the initial frame. While in EP-based treatments such as reversible (ECT) and irreversible electroporation (IRE) the ET is very short (though enough to cause minor injuries) due to electric pulse characteristics and biological buffers present in the tissue, in gene electrotransfer (GET), ET is much longer, enough to denaturate plasmids and produce cell damage. When any of the electric pulse parameters is doubled or tripled the ET grows and, remarkably, when any of the pulse parameters in GET is halved, the ET drops significantly. Reducing pH fronts has relevant implications for GET treatment efficiency, due to a substantial reduction of plasmid damage and cell loss. PMID:24278257

  6. Ocean Acidification: Euphausia Pacifica's Response to Decreasing pH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, H. N.; Cooper, H.

    2014-12-01

    The increasing rate of CO2 accumulating in Earth's oceans creates a threat to organisms that can lead to disturbances in their reproduction, survival and growth. Euphausia pacifica is the dominant species of krill in Monterey Bay, CA, and a keystone species in the bay's food web. Previous work on the effects of ocean acidification on the survival, growth and molting of E. pacifica have shown they are fairly tolerant to increased CO2 concentrations. However, less is known about energy costs associated with maintaining their internal pH levels which could affect food consumption, swimming behavior or growth activity. We hypothesized that krill exposed to high CO2 will increase their feeding rate on local species of phytoplankton to account for increased energy costs of pH buffering activity. We exposed experimental E. pacifica to waters of pH 7.6 (the expected pH surface waters in year 2100), and pH 8.0 (control) periods.test for acclimation or longer term stress. Feeding rates were calculated as changes in phytoplankton counts over 24 hours of feeding using Frost's equations (Frost 1972). Understanding the way E. pacifica is affected by ocean acidification is important because of the role they play as the primary food source for a variety of predators necessary to maintain the Pacific's ecology.

  7. Data on soil P(H) of Barddhaman district, India.

    PubMed

    Bid, Sumanta

    2017-06-01

    P(H) (Puissance de Hydrogen) is an essential ingredient of soil that effects on fertility and productivity of dirt. Barddhaman district is a part of Lower Gangetic Plain fully covered by alluvial soil and popularly known as 'rice bowl of West Bengal' owing to its lofty production. This data article provides a block level data on soil P(H) that is essential for further investigation of the relationship among soil ph, plant growth, plant health and productivity. This data is valuable in the field of soil geography and soil science. Soil P(H) data is more relevant in the ground of plant biology, agricultural geography and agricultural science. It helps to explain the acidic and alkaline nature of alluvial soil. The data consist of 195 samples (n=195) taken from the entire district. Samples have been collected from March, 2014 to March, 2015 and experimented in the laboratory. Theoretically P(H) value is limited within 0-14. Experiment result exemplifies the highest value 8.5 found in Khandaghosh block whereas lowest value is 4.5 and the samples which result in lowest value are gathered from 4 different blocks like Manteswar, Burdwan - II, Barabani and Salanpur.

  8. Kinetics of biological perchlorate reduction and pH effect.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao; Lippincott, Lee; Meng, Xiaoguang

    2008-05-01

    Batch experiments were conducted to investigate the kinetics of perchlorate reduction by heterotrophic and mixed perchlorate-reducing bacteria. Substrate-utilizing and cellular maintenance models were employed to fit the experimental data for microbial perchlorate reduction. The half saturation constant, K(s), obtained in this study was below 0.1mg/L, which indicated that perchlorate-reducing bacteria are effective at utilizing low concentrations of perchlorate. The effect of pH on the kinetics of microbial perchlorate reduction was also studied. Perchlorate reduction occurred throughout the pH range from 5.0 to 9.0. Nevertheless, the rates of perchlorate removal by a unit mass of bacteria were significantly different at various pHs with a maximum rate at pH 7.0. The variation of q(max) with pH was described well with a Gaussian peak equation. This equation is expected to be applicable for practical purposes when pH effects need to be considered.

  9. PhIN: A Protein Pharmacology Interaction Network Database

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Z; Li, J; Dang, R; Liang, L; Lin, J

    2015-01-01

    Network pharmacology is a new and hot concept in drug discovery for its ability to investigate the complexity of polypharmacology, and becomes more and more important in drug development. Here we report a protein pharmacology interaction network database (PhIN), aiming to assist multitarget drug discovery by providing comprehensive and flexible network pharmacology analysis. Overall, PhIN contains 1,126,060 target–target interaction pairs in terms of shared compounds and 3,428,020 pairs in terms of shared scaffolds, which involve 12,419,700 activity data, 9,414 targets, 314 viral targets, 652 pathways, 1,359,400 compounds, and 309,556 scaffolds. Using PhIN, users can obtain interacting target networks within or across human pathways, between human and virus, by defining the number of shared compounds or scaffolds under an activity cutoff. We expect PhIN to be a useful tool for multitarget drug development. PhIN is freely available at http://cadd.pharmacy.nankai.edu.cn/phin/. PMID:26225242

  10. [Molecular genetics in chronic myeloid leukemia with variant Ph translocation].

    PubMed

    Wu, Wei; Li, Jian-yong; Zhu, Yu; Qiu, Hai-rong; Pan, Jin-lan; Xu, Wei; Chen, Li-juan; Shen, Yun-feng; Xue, Yong-quan

    2007-08-01

    To explore the value of fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and multiplex fluorescence in situ hybridization (M-FISH) techniques in the detection of genetic changes in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) with variant Philadelphia translocation (vPh). Cytogenetic preparations from 10 CML patients with vPh confirmed by R banding were assayed with dual color dual fusion FISH technique. If only one fusion signal was detected in interphase cells, metaphase cells were observed to determine if there were derivative chromosome 9[der (9)] deletions. Meanwhile, the same cytogenetic preparations were assayed with M-FISH technique. Of the 10 CML patients with vPh, 5 were detected with der (9) deletions by FISH technique. M-FISH technique revealed that besides the chromosome 22, chromosomes 1, 3, 5, 6, 8, 10, 11 and 17 were also involved in the vPh. M-FISH technique also detected the abnormalities which were not found with conventional cytogenetics (CC), including two never reported abnormalities. The combination of CC, FISH and M-FISH technique could refine the genetic diagnosis of CML with vPh.

  11. Reduction of dehydroascorbic acid at low pH.

    PubMed

    Wechtersbach, Luka; Cigić, Blaz

    2007-08-01

    Ascorbic acid and dehydroascorbic acid are unstable in aqueous solution in the presence of copper and iron ions, causing problems in the routine analysis of vitamin C. Their stability can be improved by lowering the pH below 2, preferably with metaphosphoric acid. Dehydroascorbic acid, an oxidised form of vitamin C, gives a relatively low response on the majority of chromatographic detectors, and is therefore routinely determined as the increase of ascorbic acid formed after reduction. The reduction step is routinely performed at a pH that is suboptimal for the stability of both forms. In this paper, the reduction of dehydroascorbic acid with tris-[2-carboxyethyl] phosphine (TCEP) at pH below 2 is evaluated. Dehydroascorbic acid is fully reduced with TCEP in metaphosphoric acid in less than 20 min, and yields of ascorbic acid are the same as at higher pH. TCEP and ascorbic acid formed by reduction, are more stable in metaphosphoric acid than in acetate or citrate buffers at pH 5, in the presence of redox active copper ions. The simple experimental procedure and low probability of artefacts are major benefits of this method, over those currently applied in a routine assay of vitamin C, performed on large number of samples.

  12. The Production Rate and Employment of Ph.D. Astronomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metcalfe, Travis S.

    2008-02-01

    In an effort to encourage self-regulation of the astronomy job market, I examine the supply of, and demand for, astronomers over time. On the supply side, I document the production rate of Ph.D. astronomers from 1970 to 2006 using the UMI Dissertation Abstracts database, along with data from other independent sources. I compare the long-term trends in Ph.D. production with federal astronomy research funding over the same time period, and I demonstrate that additional funding is correlated with higher subsequent Ph.D. production. On the demand side, I monitor the changing patterns of employment using statistics about the number and types of jobs advertised in the AAS Job Register from 1984 to 2006. Finally, I assess the sustainability of the job market by normalizing this demand by the annual Ph.D. production. The most recent data suggest that there are now annual advertisements for about one postdoctoral job, half a faculty job, and half a research/support position for every new domestic Ph.D. recipient in astronomy and astrophysics. The average new astronomer might expect to hold up to 3 jobs before finding a steady position.

  13. pH variations during diafiltration due to buffer nonidealities.

    PubMed

    Baek, Youngbin; Yang, Deyu; Singh, Nripen; Arunkumar, Abhiram; Ghose, Sanchayita; Li, Zheng Jian; Zydney, Andrew L

    2017-08-25

    Diafiltration is used for final formulation of essentially all biotherapeutics. Several studies have demonstrated that buffer/excipient concentrations in the final diafiltered product can be different than that in the diafiltration buffer due to interactions between buffer species and the protein product. However, recent work in our lab has shown variations in solution pH that are largely independent of the protein concentration during the first few diavolumes. Our hypothesis is that these pH variations are due to nonidealities in the acid-base equilibrium coefficient. A model was developed for the diafiltration process accounting for the ionic strength dependence of the pKa . Experimental results obtained using phosphate and histidine buffers were in excellent agreement with model predictions. A decrease in ionic strength leads to an increase in the pKa for the phosphate buffer, causing a shift in the solution pH, even under conditions where the initial feed and the diafiltration buffer are at the same pH. This effect could be eliminated by matching the ionic strength of the feed and diafiltration buffer. The experimental data and model provide new insights into the factors controlling the pH profile during diafiltration processes. © 2017 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 2017. © 2017 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  14. Low pH increases the yield of exosome isolation.

    PubMed

    Ban, Jae-Jun; Lee, Mijung; Im, Wooseok; Kim, Manho

    2015-05-22

    Exosomes are the extracellular vesicles secreted by various cells. Exosomes mediate intercellular communication by delivering a variety of molecules between cells. Cancer cell derived exosomes seem to be related with tumor progression and metastasis. Tumor microenvironment is thought to be acidic and this low pH controls exosome physiology, leading to tumor progression. Despite the importance of microenvironmental pH on exosome, most of exosome studies have been performed without regard to pH. Therefore, the difference of exosome stability and yield of isolation by different pH need to be studied. In this research, we investigated the yield of total exosomal protein and RNA after incubation in acidic, neutral and alkaline conditioned medium. Representative exosome markers were investigated by western blot after incubation of exosomes in different pH. As a result, the concentrations of exosomal protein and nucleic acid were significantly increased after incubation in the acidic medium compared with neutral medium. The higher levels of exosome markers including CD9, CD63 and HSP70 were observed after incubation in an acidic environment. On the other hand, no exosomal protein, exosomal RNA and exosome markers have been detected after incubation in an alkaline condition. In summary, our results indicate that the acidic condition is the favorable environment for existence and isolation of exosomes.

  15. Reorientations in the bacteriorhodopsin photoscycle are pH dependent.

    PubMed Central

    Harms, G S; Song, Q; Johnson, C K

    1996-01-01

    Chromophore reorientations during the bacteriorhodopsin photocycle in the purple membrane of Halobacterium salinarium have been detected by time-resolved linear dichroism measurements of the optical anisotropy over the pH range from 4 to 10 and at ionic strengths from 10 mM to 1 M. The results show that reorientations in the L and M states of bacteriorhodopsin are pH dependent, reaching their largest amplitude when the membrane is at pH 6-8. Reorientations on the millisecond time scale of unexcited spectator proteins in the native purple membrane also depend on pH, consistent with the suggestion that spectator reorientations are triggered by reorientation of the photoexcited protein. The results imply that a group with a PK(a) of 5 to 6 enables reorientations, and that the deprotonation of a site at pH values above 9 restricts reorientational motion. This suggests that reorientations in M may be correlated with proton release. PMID:9172759

  16. Intracellular pH and the Control of Multidrug Resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Sanford; Roy, Deborshi; Schindler, Melvin

    1994-02-01

    Many anticancer drugs are classified as either weak bases or molecules whose binding to cellular structures is pH dependent. Accumulation of these drugs within tumor cells should be affected by transmembrane pH gradients. Indeed, development of multidrug resistance (MDR) in tumor cells has been correlated with an alkaline shift of cytosolic pH. To examine the role of pH in drug partitioning, the distribution of two drugs, doxorubicin and daunomycin, was monitored in fibroblasts and myeloma cells. In both cell types the drugs rapidly accumulated within the cells. The highest concentrations were measured in the most acidic compartments-e.g., lysosomes. Modifying the cellular pH in drug-sensitive cells to mimic reported shifts in MDR caused an immediate change in the cellular drug concentration. Drug accumulation was enhanced by acidic shifts and reversed by alkaline shifts. All of these effects were rapid and reversible. These results demonstrate that the alkaline shift observed in MDR is sufficient to prevent the accumulation of chemotherapeutic drugs independent of active drug efflux.

  17. Intracellular pH and the control of multidrug resistance.

    PubMed Central

    Simon, S; Roy, D; Schindler, M

    1994-01-01

    Many anticancer drugs are classified as either weak bases or molecules whose binding to cellular structures is pH dependent. Accumulation of these drugs within tumor cells should be affected by transmembrane pH gradients. Indeed, development of multidrug resistance (MDR) in tumor cells has been correlated with an alkaline shift of cytosolic pH. To examine the role of pH in drug partitioning, the distribution of two drugs, doxorubicin and daunomycin, was monitored in fibroblasts and myeloma cells. In both cell types the drugs rapidly accumulated within the cells. The highest concentrations were measured in the most acidic compartments--e.g., lysosomes. Modifying the cellular pH in drug-sensitive cells to mimic reported shifts in MDR caused an immediate change in the cellular drug concentration. Drug accumulation was enhanced by acidic shifts and reversed by alkaline shifts. All of these effects were rapid and reversible. These results demonstrate that the alkaline shift observed in MDR is sufficient to prevent the accumulation of chemotherapeutic drugs independent of active drug efflux. Images PMID:8302842

  18. Correlation of the NBME advanced clinical examination in EM and the national EM M4 exams.

    PubMed

    Hiller, Katherine; Miller, Emily S; Lawson, Luan; Wald, David; Beeson, Michael; Heitz, Corey; Morrissey, Thomas; House, Joseph; Poznanski, Stacey

    2015-01-01

    Since 2011 two online, validated exams for fourth-year emergency medicine (EM) students have been available (National EM M4 Exams). In 2013 the National Board of Medical Examiners offered the Advanced Clinical Examination in Emergency Medicine (EM-ACE). All of these exams are now in widespread use; however, there are no data on how they correlate. This study evaluated the correlation between the EM-ACE exam and the National EM M4 Exams. From May 2013 to April 2014 the EM-ACE and one version of the EM M4 exam were administered sequentially to fourth-year EM students at five U.S. medical schools. Data collected included institution, gross and scaled scores and version of the EM M4 exam. We performed Pearson's correlation and random effects linear regression. 305 students took the EM-ACE and versions 1 (V1) or 2 (V2) of the EM M4 exams (281 and 24, respectively) [corrected].The mean percent correct for the exams were as follows: EM-ACE 74.9 (SD-9.82), V1 83.0 (SD-6.39), V2 78.5 (SD-7.70) [corrected]. Pearson's correlation coefficient for the V1/EM-ACE was 0.53 (0.43 scaled) and for the V2/EM-ACE was 0.58 (0.41 scaled) [corrected]. The coefficient of determination for V1/ EM-ACE was 0.73 and for V2/EM-ACE 0.71 (0.65 and .49 for scaled scores) [ERRATUM]. The R-squared values were 0.28 and 0.30 (0.18 and 0.13 scaled), respectively [corrected]. There was significant cluster effect by institution. There was moderate positive correlation of student scores on the EM-ACE exam and the National EM M4 Exams.

  19. Controllable dissociations of PH3 molecules on Si(001)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qin; Lei, Yanhua; Shao, Xiji; Ming, Fangfei; Xu, Hu; Wang, Kedong; Xiao, Xudong

    2016-04-01

    We demonstrate for the first time to our knowledge that controllable dissociation of PH3 adsorption products PH x (x = 2, 1) can be realized by STM (scanning tunneling microscope) manipulation techniques at room temperature. Five dissociative products and their geometric structures are identified via combining STM experiments and first-principle calculations and simulations. In total we realize nine kinds of controllable dissociations by applying a voltage pulse among the PH3-related structures on Si(001). The dissociation rates of the five most common reactions are measured by the I-t spectrum method as a function of voltage. The suddenly increased dissociation rate at 3.3 V indicates a transition from multivibrational excitation to single-step excitation induced by inelastic tunneling electrons. Our studies prove that selectively breaking the chemical bonds of a single molecule on semiconductor surface by STM manipulation technique is feasible.

  20. Nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite prepared under various pH conditions.

    PubMed

    Palanivelu, R; Mary Saral, A; Ruban Kumar, A

    2014-10-15

    Hydroxyapatite (HAP) has sovereign biomedical application due to its excellent biocompatibility, chemical and crystallographic similitude with natural human bone. In this present work, we discussed about the role of pH in the synthesis of calcium phosphate compound using calcium nitrate tetrahydrate and di-ammonium hydrogen phosphate as starting materials by chemical precipitation method assisted with ultrasonic irradiation technique. 5% polyethylene glycol (PEG600) is added along with the precursors under various pH condition of 7, 9 and 11 respectively. The functional group analysis, crystallized size and fraction of crystallized size are confirmed using Fourier Transformation Infra-Red spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction pattern. Morphological observations are done by scanning electron microscope. The results revealed the presence of nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite at pH above 9.

  1. PH and Electrochemical Responsive Materials for Corrosion Smart Coating Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Wenyan; Calle, Luz M.

    2008-01-01

    Corrosion is a costly issue for military operations and civil industries. While most corrosion initiates from localized corrosion form, such as pitting, failure directly caused by localized corrosion is the most dangerous kind, because it is difficult to anticipate and prevent, occurs very suddenly and can be catastrophic. One way of preventing these failures is with a coating that can detect and heal localized corrosion. pH and other electrochemical changes are often associated with localized corrosion, so it is expected that materials that are pH or otherwise electrochemical responsive can be used to detect and control corrosion. This paper will review various pH and electrochemical responsive materials and their potential applications in corrosion smart coatings. Current research results in this field will also be reported.

  2. Designing pH induced fold switch in proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baruah, Anupaul; Biswas, Parbati

    2015-05-01

    This work investigates the computational design of a pH induced protein fold switch based on a self-consistent mean-field approach by identifying the ensemble averaged characteristics of sequences that encode a fold switch. The primary challenge to balance the alternative sets of interactions present in both target structures is overcome by simultaneously optimizing two foldability criteria corresponding to two target structures. The change in pH is modeled by altering the residual charge on the amino acids. The energy landscape of the fold switch protein is found to be double funneled. The fold switch sequences stabilize the interactions of the sites with similar relative surface accessibility in both target structures. Fold switch sequences have low sequence complexity and hence lower sequence entropy. The pH induced fold switch is mediated by attractive electrostatic interactions rather than hydrophobic-hydrophobic contacts. This study may provide valuable insights to the design of fold switch proteins.

  3. The pH dependent Raman spectroscopic study of caffeine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Jian; Gu, Huaimin; Zhong, Liang; Hu, Yongjun; Liu, Fang

    2011-02-01

    First of all the surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) and normal Raman spectra of caffeine aqueous solution were obtained at different pH values. In order to obtain the detailed vibrational assignments of the Raman spectroscopy, the geometry of caffeine molecule was optimized by density functional theory (DFT) calculation. By comparing the SERS of caffeine with its normal spectra at different pH values; it is concluded that pH value can dramatically affect the SERS of caffeine, but barely affect the normal Raman spectrum of caffeine aqueous solution. It can essentially affect the reorientation of caffeine molecule to the Ag colloid surface, but cannot impact the vibration of functional groups and chemical bonds in caffeine molecule.

  4. Photonic porous silicon as a pH sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pace, Stephanie; Vasani, Roshan B.; Zhao, Wei; Perrier, Sébastien; Voelcker, Nicolas H.

    2014-08-01

    Chronic wounds do not heal within 3 months, and during the lengthy healing process, the wound is invariably exposed to bacteria, which can colonize the wound bed and form biofilms. This alters the wound metabolism and brings about a change of pH. In this work, porous silicon photonic films were coated with the pH-responsive polymer poly(2-diethylaminoethyl acrylate). We demonstrated that the pH-responsive polymer deposited on the surface of the photonic film acts as a barrier to prevent water from penetrating inside the porous matrix at neutral pH. Moreover, the device demonstrated optical pH sensing capability visible by the unaided eye.

  5. Earth and Space Science PhD Employment Trends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giesler, J. L.

    2001-05-01

    A recent report by the American Geophysical Union and the American Geological Institute, "Earth and Space Science PhDs, Class of 1999" looked at employment trends of recent graduates. Demographically, our graduates are, as a population, older than those who graduated in any other physical science. While almost one-third of graduates are employed in a different subfield than that of their degree, more than 80% of Earth and space science PhDs secure initial employment in the geosciences. Graduates are finding employment in less than 6 months and the unemployment rate has dropped significantly below that of two years ago. The PhD classes of 1996, 1997, and 1998 had ~ 50% of their graduates taking postdoctoral appointments. In 1999, this declined to only 38% postdocs with an increase in permanent employment in both the education and government sectors. Perception of the job market is improving as well. Respondents are considerably happier than they were in 1996.

  6. Photonic porous silicon as a pH sensor.

    PubMed

    Pace, Stephanie; Vasani, Roshan B; Zhao, Wei; Perrier, Sébastien; Voelcker, Nicolas H

    2014-01-01

    Chronic wounds do not heal within 3 months, and during the lengthy healing process, the wound is invariably exposed to bacteria, which can colonize the wound bed and form biofilms. This alters the wound metabolism and brings about a change of pH. In this work, porous silicon photonic films were coated with the pH-responsive polymer poly(2-diethylaminoethyl acrylate). We demonstrated that the pH-responsive polymer deposited on the surface of the photonic film acts as a barrier to prevent water from penetrating inside the porous matrix at neutral pH. Moreover, the device demonstrated optical pH sensing capability visible by the unaided eye.

  7. IMPACT OF WATER PH ON ZEBRA MUSSEL MORTALITY

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel P. Molloy

    2002-10-15

    The experiments conducted this past quarter have suggested that the bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens strain CL0145A is effective at killing zebra mussels throughout the entire range of pH values tested (7.2 to 8.6). Highest mortality was achieved at pH values characteristic of preferred zebra mussel waterbodies, i.e., hard waters with a range of 7.8 to 8.6. In all water types tested, however, ranging from very soft to very hard, considerable mussel kill was achieved (83 to 99% mean mortality), suggesting that regardless of the pH or hardness of the treated water, significant mussel kill can be achieved upon treatment with P. fluorescens strain CL0145A. These results further support the concept that this bacterium has significant potential for use as a zebra mussel control agent in power plant pipes receiving waters with a wide range of physical and chemical characteristics.

  8. Designing pH induced fold switch in proteins.

    PubMed

    Baruah, Anupaul; Biswas, Parbati

    2015-05-14

    This work investigates the computational design of a pH induced protein fold switch based on a self-consistent mean-field approach by identifying the ensemble averaged characteristics of sequences that encode a fold switch. The primary challenge to balance the alternative sets of interactions present in both target structures is overcome by simultaneously optimizing two foldability criteria corresponding to two target structures. The change in pH is modeled by altering the residual charge on the amino acids. The energy landscape of the fold switch protein is found to be double funneled. The fold switch sequences stabilize the interactions of the sites with similar relative surface accessibility in both target structures. Fold switch sequences have low sequence complexity and hence lower sequence entropy. The pH induced fold switch is mediated by attractive electrostatic interactions rather than hydrophobic-hydrophobic contacts. This study may provide valuable insights to the design of fold switch proteins.

  9. Stabilization of Mercury in High pH Tank Sludges

    SciTech Connect

    Spence, R.; Barton, J.

    2003-02-24

    DOE complex contains many tank sludges contaminated with mercury. The high pH of these tank sludges typically fails to stabilize the mercury, resulting in these radioactive wastes also being characteristically hazardous or mixed waste. The traditional treatment for soluble inorganic mercury species is precipitation as insoluble mercuric sulfide. Sulfide treatment and a commercial mercury-stabilizing product were tested on surrogate sludges at various alkaline pH values. Neither the sulfide nor the commercial product stabilized the mercury sufficiently at the high pH of the tank sludges to pass the Toxicity Characteristic Leach Procedure (TCLP) treatment standards of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). The commercial product also failed to stabilize the mercury in samples of the actual tank sludges.

  10. An analysis of Ph.D. examiners' reports in engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prieto, Elena; Holbrook, Allyson; Bourke, Sid

    2016-03-01

    In recent years, there have been increasing calls for an overall transformation of the nature of engineering Ph.D. programs and the way theses are assessed. There exists a need to understand the examination process to ensure the best quality outcome for candidates in engineering. The work we present in this paper uses data collected between 2003 and 2010 for a total of 1220 Australian Ph.D. theses by analysing examiner reports. Our analysis indicates that Ph.D. theses in engineering, N = 106, differ considerably from those in other fields in areas such as gender of candidates and examiners and the examiners' geographical location. We also found that assessment areas such as significance and contribution of the thesis, publications arising from the thesis, breadth, depth and recency of the literature review and communication and editorial correctness are areas in which the proportion of text of engineering examiners' comments differs significantly from other fields.

  11. Mid-Career PhD Physicists: Academia & Beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Susan

    2017-01-01

    What jobs do mid-career PhD physicists hold? In a first-ever study, we collected data in 2011 from over 1,500 physics PhD recipients from the classes of 1996, 1997, 2000, and 2001. About 45% of the physics PhD recipients in these classes immediately took jobs that were not temporary, and over 40% accepted postdocs. How does taking a postdoc affect mid-career employment? What is the relationship between first job (after any postdocs) and mid-career employment? How do physicists' actual jobs compare with what they thought they would be doing when they graduated? Using our initial employment and mid-career data, I will answer these questions and more.

  12. Critical issues in PhD training for biomedical scientists.

    PubMed

    Juliano, R L; Oxford, G S

    2001-10-01

    The rapidly changing world of modern biomedical research is raising important new issues for traditional PhD training programs and is creating concern among young PhD scientists about their futures. Specifically, the United States is producing substantially more biomedical PhDs than can be accommodated in professional positions that truly require the PhD as a credential. The "surplus" PhD population is being relegated to poorly paid, unstable, and increasingly unsatisfying jobs. In addition, many current graduate and postdoctoral training programs may not be adequately preparing young scientists for the more complex, more quantitative biological science of the future. Finally, many current graduate training programs are not attracting a sufficient portion of the most talented young people in the nation. To ameliorate these problems in the training and early career paths of basic biomedical scientists, the authors make specific recommendations, such as urging (1) that graduate trainees should be supported exclusively by competitive individual fellowships, training grants, or institutional funds and not by RO1s or similar research awards; (2) that graduate and postdoctoral stipends be increased so that they provide a reasonable living wage; and (3) that research-intensive academic institutions create a career path for biomedical PhDs other than that designed for the traditional tenure-track, grant-funded principal investigator and faculty member. They conclude that it is in the interest of faculty and institutions to make these and other drastic changes because the current system is both inherently unfair and self-destructive.

  13. Saliva pH affects the sweetness sense.

    PubMed

    Aoyama, Ken-Ichi; Okino, Yuichiro; Yamazaki, Hiroshi; Kojima, Rena; Uchibori, Masahiro; Nakanishi, Yaushiro; Ota, Yoshihide

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to establish a prediction system for taste sense according to the biochemical data of saliva. The present study included 100 participants ages ≥20 y without physical, mental, or dental disabilities. Saliva samples were collected from the participants and subjected to biochemical analyses. Taste examination (sweetness, saltiness, sourness, and bitterness) was performed using the dropped disk method. Correlation analysis and multiple regression analysis were performed between the taste sense properties and biochemical data of saliva. Multiple regression analysis demonstrated that sweetness sensitivity (in which a higher score indicates lower sensitivity) was significantly affected by various biochemical properties, with the strongest influence being pH. The following prediction equation was determined: Sweetness sensitivity = 1.38 + (-0.12 × low pH [1: If pH <6.7, 0: otherwise]) + (0.80 × high pH [1: If pH >7.3, 0: otherwise]) + (0.04 × Fe [μg/dL]). Analysis of variance showed an overall significant effect of these variables on sweetness sensitivity (R(2) = 0.74; P < 0.01). Saliva pH most strongly affects the sweetness sensitivity. This prediction can be used for evaluations of variations in dietary choices and to help individuals make healthy food choices to maintain health. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. pH sensitive quantum dot-anthraquinone nanoconjugates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruedas-Rama, Maria Jose; Hall, Elizabeth A. H.

    2014-05-01

    Semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) have been shown to be highly sensitive to electron or charge transfer processes, which may alter their optical properties. This feature can be exploited for different sensing applications. Here, we demonstrate that QD-anthraquinone conjugates can function as electron transfer-based pH nanosensors. The attachment of the anthraquinones on the surface of QDs results in the reduction of electron hole recombination, and therefore a quenching of the photoluminescence intensity. For some anthraquinone derivatives tested, the quenching mechanism is simply caused by an electron transfer process from QDs to the anthraquinone, functioning as an electron acceptor. For others, electron transfer and energy transfer (FRET) processes were found. A detailed analysis of the quenching processes for CdSe/ZnS QD of two different sizes is presented. The photoluminescence quenching phenomenon of QDs is consistent with the pH sensitive anthraquinone redox chemistry. The resultant family of pH nanosensors shows pKa ranging ˜5-8, being ideal for applications of pH determination in physiological samples like blood or serum, for intracellular pH determination, and for more acidic cellular compartments such as endosomes and lysosomes. The nanosensors showed high selectivity towards many metal cations, including the most physiologically important cations which exist at high concentration in living cells. The reversibility of the proposed systems was also demonstrated. The nanosensors were applied in the determination of pH in samples mimicking the intracellular environment. Finally, the possibility of incorporating a reference QD to achieve quantitative ratiometric measurements was investigated.

  15. Harvard College Observatory: Shapley's Factory for PhD Degrees?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welther, B. L.

    2000-12-01

    When Harlow Shapley assumed the Directorship of Harvard College Observatory in 1921, there was no program in place there to train the next generation of astronomers. In 1923, using the Pickering Fund for women assistants, Shapley hired a young English woman, Cecilia Payne, to work on stellar spectra. Just two short years later, Payne completed her research and wrote a celebrated thesis on stellar atmospheres. Because Harvard University was not prepared to confer a PhD degree on a woman at that time, Payne presented her thesis to Radcliffe College. Thus, in 1925 she became the first person to receive a PhD in astronomy for a research project at HCO. By 1933, a PhD in Astronomy had been conferred on eight graduate students who had undertaken research projects at HCO: four men who received their degree from Harvard, and four women, from Radcliffe. In subsequent years, however, the equal distribution of degrees for men and women quickly changed. When the 30th degree was bestowed in 1943, only 10 of the candidates were women. By 1955, when the 60th degree was conferred, only 14 women had received a PhD. In just two decades, then, the ratio of women astronomers had steadily dropped from a solid 50% at the height of the Shapley era to slightly less than 25% at his retirement. Also, until the mid-1960s, the women astronomers still had to apply to Radcliffe for their PhD degrees. This paper will briefly examine the funding and research topics of some of the HCO PhD candidates in the Shapley Era (1921-1955). It will also highlight some of their subsequent contributions to 20th-century American Astronomy.

  16. Bicarbonate increases tumor pH and inhibits spontaneous metastases.

    PubMed

    Robey, Ian F; Baggett, Brenda K; Kirkpatrick, Nathaniel D; Roe, Denise J; Dosescu, Julie; Sloane, Bonnie F; Hashim, Arig Ibrahim; Morse, David L; Raghunand, Natarajan; Gatenby, Robert A; Gillies, Robert J

    2009-03-15

    The external pH of solid tumors is acidic as a consequence of increased metabolism of glucose and poor perfusion. Acid pH has been shown to stimulate tumor cell invasion and metastasis in vitro and in cells before tail vein injection in vivo. The present study investigates whether inhibition of this tumor acidity will reduce the incidence of in vivo metastases. Here, we show that oral NaHCO(3) selectively increased the pH of tumors and reduced the formation of spontaneous metastases in mouse models of metastatic breast cancer. This treatment regimen was shown to significantly increase the extracellular pH, but not the intracellular pH, of tumors by (31)P magnetic resonance spectroscopy and the export of acid from growing tumors by fluorescence microscopy of tumors grown in window chambers. NaHCO(3) therapy also reduced the rate of lymph node involvement, yet did not affect the levels of circulating tumor cells, suggesting that reduced organ metastases were not due to increased intravasation. In contrast, NaHCO(3) therapy significantly reduced the formation of hepatic metastases following intrasplenic injection, suggesting that it did inhibit extravasation and colonization. In tail vein injections of alternative cancer models, bicarbonate had mixed results, inhibiting the formation of metastases from PC3M prostate cancer cells, but not those of B16 melanoma. Although the mechanism of this therapy is not known with certainty, low pH was shown to increase the release of active cathepsin B, an important matrix remodeling protease.

  17. Manganese toxicity to fungi: influence of pH

    SciTech Connect

    Babich, H.; Stotzky, G.

    1981-10-01

    The effects of Mn on mycelial proliferation of fungi and the effect of pH on Mn toxicity were evaluated. Results indicated that the fungi exhibited wide differences in their sensitivities to Mn. Incipient inhibition (i.e., the level of Mn at which growth inhibition was noted initially, P < 0.05) for Scopulariopsis brevicaulis and Aspergillus giganteus occurred at 100 ppM Mn; for Rhizopus stolonifer, Arthrobotrys conoides, Aspergillus niger, Aspergillus flavus, Trichoderma viride, and Penicillium vermiculatum at 500 ppM Mn; for Cephalosporium sp. at 1000 ppM Mn; and for Gliocladium sp. at 1000 to 1500 ppM Mn; growth of Aspergillus clavatus was not inhibited even at 2000 ppM Mn. No growth of S. brevicaulis occurred at 500 ppM Mn and of R. stolonifer at 1500 ppM Mn. The levels of Mn causing incipient and/or total inhibition of mycelial growth of the fungi studied were comparable to the levels reported to inhibit mycelial proliferation of some phylloplane fungi. Only A. conoides showed significant (P < 0.5) stimulation of mycelial growth by Mn; 10, 50, and 100 ppM Mn increased growth rates over control (0 ppM Mn) values. There was no consistent trend in the effect of pH on Mn toxicity to the fungi. However, each fungus showed a definitive response to Mn at the different pH levels. Thus, increasing the pH from 5.5 to 8.5 did not significantly affect the toxicity of Mn to Gliocladium sp., P. vermiculatum, or A. niger. The toxicity of Mn to R. stolonifer and T. viride was not different at pH 5.5 and 6.5, but increasing the pH to 7.5 or 8.5 significantly enhanced the toxicity.

  18. Bicarbonate Increases Tumor pH and Inhibits Spontaneous Metastases

    PubMed Central

    Robey, Ian F.; Baggett, Brenda K.; Kirkpatrick, Nathaniel D.; Roe, Denise J.; Dosescu, Julie; Sloane, Bonnie F.; Hashim, Arig Ibrahim; Morse, David L.; Raghunand, Natarajan; Gatenby, Robert A.; Gillies, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    The external pH of solid tumors is acidic as a consequence of increased metabolism of glucose and poor perfusion. Acid pH has been shown to stimulate tumor cell invasion and metastasis in vitro and in cells before tail vein injection in vivo. The present study investigates whether inhibition of this tumor acidity will reduce the incidence of in vivo metastases. Here, we show that oral NaHCO3 selectively increased the pH of tumors and reduced the formation of spontaneous metastases in mouse models of metastatic breast cancer. This treatment regimen was shown to significantly increase the extracellular pH, but not the intracellular pH, of tumors by 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy and the export of acid from growing tumors by fluorescence microscopy of tumors grown in window chambers. NaHCO3 therapy also reduced the rate of lymph node involvement, yet did not affect the levels of circulating tumor cells, suggesting that reduced organ metastases were not due to increased intravasation. In contrast, NaHCO3 therapy significantly reduced the formation of hepatic metastases following intrasplenic injection, suggesting that it did inhibit extravasation and colonization. In tail vein injections of alternative cancer models, bicarbonate had mixed results, inhibiting the formation of metastases from PC3M prostate cancer cells, but not those of B16 melanoma. Although the mechanism of this therapy is not known with certainty, low pH was shown to increase the release of active cathepsin B, an important matrix remodeling protease. PMID:19276390

  19. Cytoplasmic pH mediates pH taxis and weak-acid repellent taxis of bacteria.

    PubMed

    Kihara, M; Macnab, R M

    1981-03-01

    Bacteria migrate away from an acid pH and from a number of chemicals, including organic acids such as acetate; the basis for detection of these environmental cues has not been demonstrated. Membrane-permeant weak acids caused prolonged tumbling when added to Salmonella sp. or Escherichia coli cells at pH 5.5. Tethered Salmonella cells went from a prestimulus behavior of 14% clockwise rotation to 80% clockwise rotation when 40 mM acetate was added and remained this way for more than 30 min. A low external pH in the absence of weak acid did not markedly affect steady-state tumbling frequency. Among the weak acids tested, the rank for acidity (salicylate greater than benzoate greater than acetate greater than 5,5-dimethyl-2,4-oxazolidinedione) was the same as the rank for the ability to collapse the transmembrane pH gradient and to cause tumbling. At pH 7.0, the tumbling responses caused by the weak acids were much briefer. Indole, a non-weak-acid repellent, did not cause prolonged tumbling at low pH. Two chemotaxis mutants (a Salmonella mutant defective in the chemotaxis methylesterase and an E. coli mutant defective in the methyl-accepting protein in MCP I) showed inverse responses of enhanced counterclockwise rotation in the first 1 min after acetate addition. The latter mutant had been found previously to be defective in the sensing of gradients of extracellular pH and (at neutral pH) of acetate. We conclude (i) that taxes away from acid pH and membrane-permeant weak acids are both mediated by a pH-sensitive component located either in the cytoplasm or on the cytoplasmic side of the membrane, rather than by an external receptor (as in the case of the attractants), and (ii) that both of these taxes involve components of the chemotaxis methylation system, at least in the early phase of the response.

  20. Metal/Metal Oxide Differential Electrode pH Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    West, William; Buehler, Martin; Keymeulen, Didier

    2007-01-01

    Solid-state electrochemical sensors for measuring the degrees of acidity or alkalinity (in terms of pH values) of liquid solutions are being developed. These sensors are intended to supplant older electrochemical pH sensors that include glass electrode structures and reference solutions. The older sensors are fragile and subject to drift. The present developmental solid-state sensors are more rugged and are expected to be usable in harsh environments. The present sensors are based on a differential-electrode measurement principle. Each sensor includes two electrodes, made of different materials, in equilibrium with the solution of interest.

  1. Measurement and control of pH in hydrothermal solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Wesolowski, D.J.; Palmer, D.A.; Mesmer, R.E.

    1995-12-31

    Hydrogen-electrode concentration cells with liquid junction are routinely used to measure the pH of aqueous solutions from 0 to 300 C. Results include the dissociation constants of common acids and bases and the hydrolysis and complexation of metal ions in aqueous electrolytes over a wide range of salinities. Recently, we have utilized these cells to examine the sorption of H{sup +} on mineral surfaces, the solubility of minerals with continuous in situ pH measurement, and the thermal decompositon rates of organic acids.

  2. Plastic optical fiber sensor for gastric ph detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldini, Francesco; Bracci, Susanna; Cosi, Franco

    1994-02-01

    An optical fiber sensor for gastric pH detection is described, making use of plastic fibers as light carriers and a proper electronic system for both source driving and signal processing. The use of a suitable microprocessor and an internal buffer allows the realization of a portable and reliable device, fed by batteries. The indicators, bromophenol blue (BPB) or thymol blue (TB), are immobilized on controlled pore glass (CPG) fixed at the end of plastic optical fibers following a proprietary process. The realized optrode, satisfying clinical requirements, was tested `in vitro.' A precision of pH units and a response time of (

  3. Measuring Phagosomal pH by Fluorescence Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Canton, Johnathan; Grinstein, Sergio

    2017-01-01

    Dual wavelength ratiometric imaging has become a powerful tool for the study of pH in intracellular compartments. It allows for the dynamic imaging of live cells while accounting for changes in the focal plane, differential loading of the fluorescent probe, and photobleaching caused by repeated image acquisitions. Ratiometric microscopic imaging has the added advantage over whole population methods of being able to resolve individual cells and even individual organelles. In this chapter we provide a detailed discussion of the basic principles of ratiometric imaging and its application to the measurement of phagosomal pH, including probe selection, the necessary instrumentation, and calibration methods.

  4. All-optical nanoscale pH meter.

    PubMed

    Bishnoi, Sandra W; Rozell, Christopher J; Levin, Carly S; Gheith, Muhammed K; Johnson, Bruce R; Johnson, Don H; Halas, Naomi J

    2006-08-01

    We show that an Au nanoshell with a pH-sensitive molecular adsorbate functions as a standalone, all-optical nanoscale pH meter that monitors its local environment through the pH-dependent surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectra of the adsorbate molecules. Moreover, we also show how the performance of such a functional nanodevice can be assessed quantitatively. The complex spectral output is reduced to a simple device characteristic by application of a locally linear manifold approximation algorithm. The average accuracy of the nano-"meter" was found to be +/-0.10 pH units across its operating range.

  5. pH control in biological systems using calcium carbonate.

    PubMed

    Salek, S S; van Turnhout, A G; Kleerebezem, R; van Loosdrecht, M C M

    2015-05-01

    Due to its abundance, calcium carbonate (CaCO3) has high potentials as a source of alkalinity for biotechnological applications. The application of CaCO3 in biological systems as neutralizing agent is, however, limited due to potential difficulties in controlling the pH. The objective of the present study was to determine the dominant processes that control the pH in an acid-forming microbial process in the presence of CaCO3. To achieve that, a mathematical model was made with a minimum set of kinetically controlled and equilibrium reactions that was able to reproduce the experimental data of a batch fermentation experiment using finely powdered CaCO3. In the model, thermodynamic equilibrium was assumed for all speciation, complexation and precipitation reactions whereas, rate limited reactions were included for the biological fatty acid production, the mass transfer of CO2 from the liquid phase to the gas phase and the convective transport of CO2 out of the gas phase. The estimated pH-pattern strongly resembled the measured pH, suggesting that the chosen set of kinetically controlled and equilibrium reactions were establishing the experimental pH. A detailed analysis of the reaction system with the aid of the model revealed that the pH establishment was most sensitive to four factors: the mass transfer rate of CO2 to the gas phase, the biological acid production rate, the partial pressure of CO2 and the Ca(+2) concentration in the solution. Individual influences of these factors on the pH were investigated by extrapolating the model to a continuously stirred-tank reactor (CSTR) case. This case study indicates how the pH of a commonly used continuous biotechnological process could be manipulated and adjusted by altering these four factors. Achieving a better insight of the processes controlling the pH of a biological system using CaCO3 as its neutralizing agent can result in broader applications of CaCO3 in biotechnological industries.

  6. Physiological carbon dioxide, bicarbonate, and pH sensing.

    PubMed

    Tresguerres, Martin; Buck, Jochen; Levin, Lonny R

    2010-11-01

    In biological systems, carbon dioxide exists in equilibrium with bicarbonate and protons. The individual components of this equilibrium (i.e., CO₂, HCO₃⁻, and H(+)), which must be sensed to be able to maintain cellular and organismal pH, also function as signals to modulate multiple physiological functions. Yet, the molecular sensors for CO₂/HCO₃⁻/pH remained unknown until recently. Here, we review recent progress in delineating molecular and cellular mechanisms for sensing CO₂, HCO₃⁻, and pH.

  7. Physiological carbon dioxide, bicarbonate, and pH sensing

    PubMed Central

    Tresguerres, Martin; Buck, Jochen

    2010-01-01

    In biological systems, carbon dioxide exists in equilibrium with bicarbonate and protons. The individual components of this equilibrium (i.e., CO2, HCO3−, and H+), which must be sensed to be able to maintain cellular and organismal pH, also function as signals to modulate multiple physiological functions. Yet, the molecular sensors for CO2/HCO3−/pH remained unknown until recently. Here, we review recent progress in delineating molecular and cellular mechanisms for sensing CO2, HCO3−, and pH. PMID:20683624

  8. Developing imidazoles as CEST MRI pH sensors

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xing; Song, Xiaolei; Banerjee, Sangeeta Ray; Li, Yuguo; Byun, Youngjoo; Liu, Guanshu; Bhujwalla, Zaver M.; Pomper, Martin G.; McMahon, Michael T.

    2016-01-01

    A series of intra-molecular hydrogen bonded imidazoles and related heterocyclic compounds were screened for their N–H chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast properties. Of the compounds, imidazole-4,5-dicarboxamides (I45DCs) were found to provide the strongest contrast, with the contrast produced at a large chemical shift from water (7.8 ppm) and strongly dependent on pH. We have tested several probes based on this scaffold, and demonstrated that these probes could be applied for in vivo detection of kidney pH after intravenous administration. PMID:27071959

  9. Haematic pH sensor for extracorporeal circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrari, Luca; Fabbri, Paola; Rovati, Luigi; Pilati, Francesco

    2012-03-01

    The design and realization of an optical sensor for measuring haematic pH during extracorporeal circulation is presented. It consists of a chemical sensing element in contact with the blood, an interrogation optical head to externally probe the sensing element and the front-end electronics to acquire and process the information of interest. The fluorescein O-methacrylate 97% is used as the indicator. The developed system has been tested in-vitro and on an in-vivo animal model. It showed a linear behavior in the haematic range of interest with a mean error lower than 0.01 units of pH.

  10. Doping of germanium nanowires grown in presence of PH3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tutuc, E.; Chu, J. O.; Ott, J. A.; Guha, S.

    2006-12-01

    The authors study the Au-catalyzed chemical vapor growth of germanium (Ge) nanowires in the presence of phosphine (PH3), used as a dopant precursor. The device characteristics of the ensuing nanowire field effect transistors (FETs) indicate n-type, highly doped nanowires. Using a combination of different nanowire growth sequences and their FET characteristics, the authors determine that phosphorus incorporates predominately via the conformal growth, which accompanies the acicular, nanowire growth. As such, the Ge nanowires grown in the presence of PH3 contain a phosphorus doped shell and an undoped core. The authors determine the doping level in the shell to be ≃(1-4)×1019cm-3.

  11. Alkaline pH Homeostasis in Bacteria: New Insights

    PubMed Central

    Padan, Etana; Bibi, Eitan; Ito, Masahiro; Krulwich, Terry A.

    2011-01-01

    The capacity of bacteria to survive and grow at alkaline pH values is of widespread importance in the epidemiology of pathogenic bacteria, in remediation and industrial settings, as well as in marine, plant-associated and extremely alkaline ecological niches. Alkali-tolerance and alkaliphily, in turn, strongly depend upon mechanisms for alkaline pH homeostasis, as shown in pH shift experiments and growth experiments in chemostats at different external pH values. Transcriptome and proteome analyses have recently complemented physiological and genetic studies, revealing numerous adaptations that contribute to alkaline pH homeostasis. These include elevated levels of transporters and enzymes that promote proton capture and retention (e.g. the ATP synthase and monovalent cation/proton antiporters), metabolic changes that lead to increased acid production, and changes in the cell surface layers that contribute to cytoplasmic proton retention. Targeted studies over the past decade have followed up the long-recognized importance of monovalent cations in active pH homeostasis. These studies show the centrality of monovalent cation/proton antiporters in this process while microbial genomics provides information about the constellation of such antiporters in individual strains. A comprehensive phylogenetic analysis of both eukaryotic and prokaryotic genome databases has identified orthologes from bacteria to humans that allow better understanding of the specific functions and physiological roles of the antiporters. Detailed information about the properties of multiple antiporters in individual strains is starting to explain how specific monovalent cation/proton antiporters play dominant roles in alkaline pH homeostasis in cells that have several additional antiporters catalyzing ostensibly similar reactions. New insights into the pH-dependent Na+/H+ antiporter NhaA that plays an important role in Escherichia coli have recently emerged from the determination of the structure

  12. Stress corrosion cracking properties of 15-5PH steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosa, Ferdinand

    1993-01-01

    Unexpected occurrence of failures, due to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of structural components, indicate a need for improved characterization of materials and more advanced analytical procedures for reliably predicting structures performance. Accordingly, the purpose of this study was to determine the stress corrosion susceptibility of 15-5PH steel over a wide range of applied strain rates in a highly corrosive environment. The selected environment for this investigation was a highly acidified sodium chloride (NaCl) aqueous solution. The selected alloy for the study was a 15-5PH steel in the H900 condition. The slow strain rate technique was selected to test the metals specimens.

  13. pH sensitivity of ammonium transport by Rhbg

    PubMed Central

    Abdulnour-Nakhoul, Solange M.; Schmidt, Eric; Doetjes, Rienk; Rabon, Edd; Hamm, L. Lee

    2010-01-01

    Rhbg is a membrane glycoprotein that is involved in NH3/NH4+ transport. Several models have been proposed to describe Rhbg, including an electroneutral NH4+/H+ exchanger, a uniporter, an NH4+ channel, or even a gas channel. In this study, we characterized the pH sensitivity of Rhbg expressed in Xenopus oocytes. We used two-electrode voltage clamp and ion-selective microelectrodes to measure NH4+-induced [and methyl ammonium (MA+)] currents and changes in intracellular pH (pHi), respectively. In oocytes expressing Rhbg, 5 mM NH4Cl (NH3/NH4+) at extracellular pH (pHo) of 7.5 induced an inward current, decreased pHi, and depolarized the cell. Raising pHo to 8.2 significantly enhanced the NH4+-induced current and pHi changes, whereas decreasing bath pH to 6.5 inhibited these changes. Lowering pHi (decreased by butyrate) also inhibited the NH4+-induced current and pHi decrease. In oocytes expressing Rhbg, 5 mM methyl amine hydrochloride (MA/MA+), often used as an NH4Cl substitute, induced an inward current, a pHi increase (not a decrease), and depolarization of the cell. Exposing the oocyte to MA/MA+ at alkaline bath pH (8.2) enhanced the MA+-induced current, whereas lowering bath pH to 6.5 inhibited the MA+ current completely. Exposing the oocyte to MA/MA+ at low pHi abolished the MA+-induced current and depolarization; however, pHi still increased. These data indicate that 1) transport of NH4+ and MA/MA+ by Rhbg is pH sensitive; 2) electrogenic NH4+ and MA+ transport are stimulated by alkaline pHo but inhibited by acidic pHi or pHo; and 3) electroneutral transport of MA by Rhbg is likely but is less sensitive to pH changes. PMID:20810915

  14. pH sensitivity of ammonium transport by Rhbg.

    PubMed

    Nakhoul, Nazih L; Abdulnour-Nakhoul, Solange M; Schmidt, Eric; Doetjes, Rienk; Rabon, Edd; Hamm, L Lee

    2010-12-01

    Rhbg is a membrane glycoprotein that is involved in NH(3)/NH(4)(+) transport. Several models have been proposed to describe Rhbg, including an electroneutral NH(4)(+)/H(+) exchanger, a uniporter, an NH(4)(+) channel, or even a gas channel. In this study, we characterized the pH sensitivity of Rhbg expressed in Xenopus oocytes. We used two-electrode voltage clamp and ion-selective microelectrodes to measure NH(4)(+)-induced [and methyl ammonium (MA(+))] currents and changes in intracellular pH (pH(i)), respectively. In oocytes expressing Rhbg, 5 mM NH(4)Cl (NH(3)/NH(4)(+)) at extracellular pH (pH(o)) of 7.5 induced an inward current, decreased pH(i), and depolarized the cell. Raising pH(o) to 8.2 significantly enhanced the NH(4)(+)-induced current and pH(i) changes, whereas decreasing bath pH to 6.5 inhibited these changes. Lowering pH(i) (decreased by butyrate) also inhibited the NH(4)(+)-induced current and pH(i) decrease. In oocytes expressing Rhbg, 5 mM methyl amine hydrochloride (MA/MA(+)), often used as an NH(4)Cl substitute, induced an inward current, a pH(i) increase (not a decrease), and depolarization of the cell. Exposing the oocyte to MA/MA(+) at alkaline bath pH (8.2) enhanced the MA(+)-induced current, whereas lowering bath pH to 6.5 inhibited the MA(+) current completely. Exposing the oocyte to MA/MA(+) at low pH(i) abolished the MA(+)-induced current and depolarization; however, pH(i) still increased. These data indicate that 1) transport of NH(4)(+) and MA/MA(+) by Rhbg is pH sensitive; 2) electrogenic NH(4)(+) and MA(+) transport are stimulated by alkaline pH(o) but inhibited by acidic pH(i) or pH(o); and 3) electroneutral transport of MA by Rhbg is likely but is less sensitive to pH changes.

  15. Complaints against an EMS system.

    PubMed

    Colwell, Christopher B; Pons, Peter T; Pi, Randy

    2003-11-01

    Complaints against Emergency Medical Services (EMS) agencies represent a concerning and potentially time-consuming problem for all involved in the delivery of prehospital emergency medical care. The objective of this study was to identify the source of complaints against an EMS system to help focus quality and performance improvement and customer service efforts. We conducted a retrospective review of complaints filed against a busy urban EMS agency over a 6-year period. All complaints were included, totaled by season and by year, and categorized by originator and nature of the complaint. A total of 286 complaints were registered during the 6-year period, with an average of 48 per year and 9.3 per 10,000 responses. The most common originators of complaints were patients (53%) followed by medical personnel (19%) and family members or friends (12%). Rude behavior accounted for 23% of the complaints registered, followed by technical skills (20%), transport problems (18%), and loss of belongings (13%). The identification of areas of dissatisfaction will allow focused quality and performance improvement programs directed at customer service and risk management.

  16. Crystallogenesis of bacteriophage P22 tail accessory factor gp26 at acidic and neutral pH

    SciTech Connect

    Cingolani, Gino Andrews, Dewan; Casjens, Sherwood

    2006-05-01

    The crystallogenesis of bacteriophage P22 tail-fiber gp26 is described. To study possible pH-induced conformational changes in gp26 structure, native trimeric gp26 has been crystallized at acidic pH (4.6) and a chimera of gp26 fused to maltose-binding protein (MBP-gp26) has been crystallized at neutral and alkaline pH (7-10). Gp26 is one of three phage P22-encoded tail accessory factors essential for stabilization of viral DNA within the mature capsid. In solution, gp26 exists as an extended triple-stranded coiled-coil protein which shares profound structural similarities with class I viral membrane-fusion protein. In the cryo-EM reconstruction of P22 tail extracted from mature virions, gp26 forms an ∼220 Å extended needle structure emanating from the neck of the tail, which is likely to be brought into contact with the cell’s outer membrane when the viral DNA-injection process is initiated. To shed light on the potential role of gp26 in cell-wall penetration and DNA injection, gp26 has been crystallized at acidic, neutral and alkaline pH. Crystals of native gp26 grown at pH 4.6 diffract X-rays to 2.0 Å resolution and belong to space group P2{sub 1}, with a dimer of trimeric gp26 molecules in the asymmetric unit. To study potential pH-induced conformational changes in the gp26 structure, a chimera of gp26 fused to maltose-binding protein (MBP-gp26) was generated. Hexagonal crystals of MBP-gp26 were obtained at neutral and alkaline pH using the high-throughput crystallization robot at the Hauptman–Woodward Medical Research Institute, Buffalo, NY, USA. These crystals diffract X-rays to beyond 2.0 Å resolution. Structural analysis of gp26 crystallized at acidic, neutral and alkaline pH is in progress.

  17. Structural basis of dual Ca(2+)/pH regulation of the endolysosomal TRPML1 channel.

    PubMed

    Li, Minghui; Zhang, Wei K; Benvin, Nicole M; Zhou, Xiaoyuan; Su, Deyuan; Li, Huan; Wang, Shu; Michailidis, Ioannis E; Tong, Liang; Li, Xueming; Yang, Jian

    2017-01-23

    The activities of organellar ion channels are often regulated by Ca(2+) and H(+), which are present in high concentrations in many organelles. Here we report a structural element critical for dual Ca(2+)/pH regulation of TRPML1, a Ca(2+)-release channel crucial for endolysosomal function. TRPML1 mutations cause mucolipidosis type IV (MLIV), a severe lysosomal storage disorder characterized by neurodegeneration, mental retardation and blindness. We obtained crystal structures of the 213-residue luminal domain of human TRPML1 containing three missense MLIV-causing mutations. This domain forms a tetramer with a highly electronegative central pore formed by a novel luminal pore loop. Cysteine cross-linking and cryo-EM analyses confirmed that this architecture occurs in the full-length channel. Structure-function studies demonstrated that Ca(2+) and H(+) interact with the luminal pore and exert physiologically important regulation. The MLIV-causing mutations disrupt the luminal-domain structure and cause TRPML1 mislocalization. Our study reveals the structural underpinnings of TRPML1's regulation, assembly and pathogenesis.

  18. The formation of RCCCO and CCC(O)R (R = Me, Ph) neutral radicals from ionic precursors in the gas phase: the rearrangement of CCC(O)Ph.

    PubMed

    Peppe, Salvatore; McAnoy, Andrew M; Dua, Suresh; Bowie, John H

    2004-01-01

    Neutrals MeCCCO, CCC(O)Me, PhCCCO and CCC(O)Ph have been made by neutralisation of [MeCCCO](+), [CCC(O)Me](-), [PhCCCO](+) and [CC(CO)Ph](-). Neutrals MeCCCO, CCC(O)Me and PhCCCO are stable for the microsecond duration of the neutralisation experiment. A joint experimental and theoretical study (energies calculated at the B3LYP/aug-cc-pVDZ//B3LYP/6-31G(d) level of theory) suggests that the neutral radical CCC(O)Ph rearranges via a four-centred ipso radical cyclisation/ring opening to form the isomer PhCCCO in an exothermic reaction. (13)C labelling confirms that the rearrangement does not involve O migration. Some of the PhCCCO radicals formed in this reaction are sufficiently energised to effect decomposition to give PhCC and CO. Copyright 2004 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Molecular Details of the PH Domain of ACAP1(BAR-PH) Protein Binding to PIP-Containing Membrane.

    PubMed

    Chan, Kevin Chun; Lu, Lanyuan; Sun, Fei; Fan, Jun

    2017-02-03

    ACAP1 proteins were previously reported to specifically bind PIP2-containing cell membranes and form well-structured protein lattices in order to conduct membrane tubulation. We carried out molecular dynamics simulations to characterize orientation of the PH domains with respect to the BAR domains inside the protein dimer. Followed by molecular dynamics simulations, we present a comprehensive orientation analysis of PH domain under different states including unbound and bound with lipids. We have examined two binding pockets on the PH domain and present PMF profiles of the two pockets to account for their preference to PIP2 lipids. Combining orientation analysis and studies of binding pockets, our simulations results reveal valuable molecular basis for protein-lipid interactions of ACAP1 proteins during membrane remodeling process.

  20. Ligand accessibility and bioactivity of a hormone–dendrimer conjugate depend on pH and pH history

    DOE PAGES

    Kim, Sung Hoon; Madak-Erdogan, Zeynep; Bae, Sung Chul; ...

    2015-07-17

    Estrogen conjugates with a polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimer have shown remarkably selective regulation of the nongenomic actions of estrogens in target cells in this paper. In response to pH changes, however, these estrogen–dendrimer conjugates (EDCs) display a major morphological transition that alters the accessibility of the estrogen ligands that compromises the bioactivity of the EDC. A sharp break in dynamic behavior near pH 7 occurs for three different ligands on the surface of a PAMAM-G6 dendrimer: a fluorophore (tetramethylrhodamine [TMR]) and two estrogens (17α-ethynylestradiol and diphenolic acid). Collisional quenching and time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy experiments with TMR–PAMAM revealed high ligand shielding abovemore » pH 7 and low shielding below pH 7. Furthermore, when the pH was cycled from 8.5 (conditions of ligand–PAMAM conjugation) to 4.5 (e.g., endosome/lysosome) and through 6.5 (e.g., hypoxic environment) back to pH 8.5, the 17α-ethynylestradiol– and diphenolic acid–PAMAM conjugates experienced a dramatic, irreversible loss in cell stimulatory activity; dynamic NMR studies indicated that the hormonal ligands had become occluded within the more hydrophobic core of the PAMAM dendrimer. Thus, the active state of these estrogen–dendrimer conjugates appears to be metastable. Finally, this pH-dependent irreversible masking of activity is of considerable relevance to the design of drug conjugates with amine-bearing PAMAM dendrimers.« less

  1. Cosmic muon induced EM showers in NO$$\

    DOE PAGES

    Yadav, Nitin; Duyang, Hongyue; Shanahan, Peter; ...

    2016-11-15

    Here, the NuMI Off-Axis ve Appearance (NOvA) experiment is a ne appearance neutrino oscillation experiment at Fermilab. It identifies the ne signal from the electromagnetic (EM) showers induced by the electrons in the final state of neutrino interactions. Cosmic muon induced EM showers, dominated by bremsstrahlung, are abundant in NOvA far detector. We use the Cosmic Muon- Removal technique to get pure EM shower sample from bremsstrahlung muons in data. We also use Cosmic muon decay in flight EM showers which are highly pure EM showers.The large Cosmic-EM sample can be used, as data driven method, to characterize the EMmore » shower signature and provides valuable checks of the simulation, reconstruction, particle identification algorithm, and calibration across the NOvA detector.« less

  2. The variability of pH in convective storms

    Treesearch

    Richard G. Semonin

    1976-01-01

    The rainwater pH was measured in a total of 22 storms which occurred in 1972 and 1974 in the METROMEX (METROpolitan Meteorological EXperiment) rainwater sampling network. The network consists of 81 collectors in an area of 1800 km² over and east of St. Louis, Missouri. The data set is composed of dry...

  3. Conditions Influencing the Career Accomplishments of Ph.D.s.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Mary Jo; Centra John A.

    The influence of academic ability, training, and personal characteristics on postdegree careers and attainments of recent Ph.D.s were analyzed in two studies. Publication rates and income were used as indicators of attainments. The path model employed viewed the employment setting as well as the kind of employment activity as influences on the…

  4. Interview Scheduling Strategies of New Ph.D. Economists.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    List, John A.

    2000-01-01

    Investigates the factors that affect procuring job interviews for new Ph.D. economists. Used a data set from the personal surveys of a cohort of first-time job seekers who attended the 1997 American Economic Association (AEA) meeting in New Orleans (Louisiana). States that estimation results suggest a heterogeneity in the interview decision across…

  5. An Analysis of Ph.D. Examiners' Reports in Engineering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prieto, Elena; Holbrook, Allyson; Bourke, Sid

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, there have been increasing calls for an overall transformation of the nature of engineering Ph.D. programs and the way theses are assessed. There exists a need to understand the examination process to ensure the best quality outcome for candidates in engineering. The work we present in this paper uses data collected between 2003…

  6. Asad Umar, DVM, PhD | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    Dr. Asad Umar received his PhD in Biochemistry and Immunology at the Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, MD, in 1993. He conducted his postdoctoral training in the laboratories of Patricia Gearhart in Baltimore, MD and Thomas Kunkel at the National Institutes of Environmental Health Sciences in Research Triangle Park, NC. Dr. |

  7. Richard Mazurchuk, PhD | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    Dr. Richard Mazurchuk received a BS in Physics and MS and PhD in Biophysics from SUNY Buffalo. His research focused on developing novel multi-modality imaging techniques, contrast (enhancing) agents and methods to assess the efficacy of experimental therapeutics. |

  8. Robert Shoemaker, PhD | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    Dr. Robert Shoemaker obtained his PhD in human genetics from the Graduate School of Public Health of the University of Pittsburgh in 1975. Following postdoctoral experience at the Armed Forces Institute of Pathology he moved to the Children's Hospital Medical Center of Akron. His research on pediatric tumors led to an interest in the genetics of drug resistance and new drug discovery. |

  9. Engineering a pH responsive pore forming protein

    PubMed Central

    Kisovec, Matic; Rezelj, Saša; Knap, Primož; Cajnko, Miša Mojca; Caserman, Simon; Flašker, Ajda; Žnidaršič, Nada; Repič, Matej; Mavri, Janez; Ruan, Yi; Scheuring, Simon; Podobnik, Marjetka; Anderluh, Gregor

    2017-01-01

    Listeriolysin O (LLO) is a cytolysin capable of forming pores in cholesterol-rich lipid membranes of host cells. It is conveniently suited for engineering a pH-governed responsiveness, due to a pH sensor identified in its structure that was shown before to affect its stability. Here we introduced a new level of control of its hemolytic activity by making a variant with hemolytic activity that was pH-dependent. Based on detailed structural analysis coupled with molecular dynamics and mutational analysis, we found that the bulky side chain of Tyr406 allosterically affects the pH sensor. Molecular dynamics simulation further suggested which other amino acid residues may also allosterically influence the pH-sensor. LLO was engineered to the point where it can, in a pH-regulated manner, perforate artificial and cellular membranes. The single mutant Tyr406Ala bound to membranes and oligomerized similarly to the wild-type LLO, however, the final membrane insertion step was pH-affected by the introduced mutation. We show that the mutant toxin can be activated at the surface of artificial membranes or living cells by a single wash with slightly acidic pH buffer. Y406A mutant has a high potential in development of novel nanobiotechnological applications such as controlled release of substances or as a sensor of environmental pH. PMID:28176876

  10. PhDs by Publications: An "Easy Way Out"?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Niven, Penelope; Grant, Carolyn

    2012-01-01

    PhDs by publications are a relatively new model for doctoral research, especially in the context of the Humanities or Education. This paper describes two writers' experiences of conducting doctoral studies in this genre and in these faculties. Each discover alternative ways of employing a body of published research papers in development of an…

  11. PhOLKS Lore: Learning from Photographs, Families, and Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, JoBeth; Fabregas, Vinette; Hankins, Karen Hale; Hull, Gregory; Labbo, Linda; Lawson, Hattie Spruill; Michalove, Barabara; Piazza, Steve; Piha, Cyndy; Sprague, Linda; Townsend, Sybil; Urdanivia-English, Carmen

    2002-01-01

    Considers how children can develop personal, social, and cultural connections through photography and narratives in order to envision other possibilities for their lives. Concludes that they found a "web of complex and engaging social relationships" that provided a solid foundation for learning with children and families. Describes the PhOLKS…

  12. Peer Mentorship and Transformational Learning: PhD Student Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Preston, Jane P.; Ogenchuk, Marcella J.; Nsiah, Joseph K.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the paper is to describe our peer mentorship experiences and explain how these experiences fostered transformational learning during our PhD graduate program in educational administration. As a literature backdrop, we discuss characteristics of traditional forms of mentorship and depict how our experiences of peer mentorship was…

  13. Gender Differences in Research Patterns among PhD Economists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barbezat, Debra A.

    2006-01-01

    This study is based on a 1996 survey of PhD economists working in the academic and nonacademic sectors since 1989. Despite a raw gender difference in all types of research output, the male dummy variable proves statistically significant in predicting only one publication measure. In a full sample and faculty subsample, number of years since…

  14. [Regulation effects of tourmaline on seawater pH value].

    PubMed

    Xia, Meisheng; Zhang, Hongmei; Hu, Caihong; Xu, Zirong

    2005-10-01

    In this paper, chemical analysis, X-ray diffraction and atomic force microscopy were employed to examine the characteristics of tourmaline produced in east Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region, and batch experiments were conducted to study its regulation effects on seawater pH value. The factors affecting the regulation, such as the dosage of tourmaline and the salinity and initial pH value of seawater, were also studied. The results showed that tourmaline could regulate the seawater pH value from its initial 3 and 10 to 7.1 and 8.9, respectively, and the regulation effect was greater in the seawater with lower salinity, e.g., after 120 minutes treatment, the initial pH value (5.0) of the seawater with a salinity of 5, 10, 15, 20 and 35 was increased by 3.24, 3.16, 3.06, 2.99 and 2.85 unit, respectively. Tourmaline had little effect on seawater conductivity. This study would provide an experimental base for the application of tourmaline in aquaculture.

  15. Vance Berger, PhD | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    Dr. Vance Berger completed his PhD in statistics at Rutgers University in 1995, and then began working at the FDA. This is where he developed his research focus on biases and threats to the validity of medical studies, especially clinical trials. In 1999, Dr. Berger joined the NCI, and has remained ever since. |

  16. PhDs by Publications: An "Easy Way Out"?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Niven, Penelope; Grant, Carolyn

    2012-01-01

    PhDs by publications are a relatively new model for doctoral research, especially in the context of the Humanities or Education. This paper describes two writers' experiences of conducting doctoral studies in this genre and in these faculties. Each discover alternative ways of employing a body of published research papers in development of an…

  17. Christos Patriotis, PhD | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    Dr. Christos Patriotis obtained his MSc in Biochemistry from the University of Sofia, Bulgaria in 1985 and his PhD in Molecular Biology from the Bulgarian Academy of Sciences in 1990. Postdoctoral training focused on signal transduction and tumor cell biology. |

  18. Biochemical Stabilization of Glucagon at Alkaline pH

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Melanie A.; Castle, Jessica R.; El Youssef, Joseph; Bakhtiani, Parkash A.; Bergstrom, Colin P.; Carroll, Julie M.; Breen, Matthew E.; Leonard, Gerald L.; David, Larry L.; Roberts, Charles T.; Ward, W. Kenneth

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background: For patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus, a bihormonal artificial endocrine pancreas system utilizing glucagon and insulin has been found to stabilize glycemic control. However, commercially available formulations of glucagon cannot currently be used in such systems because of physical instability characterized by aggregation and chemical degradation. Storing glucagon at pH 10 blocks protein aggregation but results in chemical degradation. Reductions in pH minimize chemical degradation, but even small reductions increase protein aggregation. We hypothesized that common pharmaceutical excipients accompanied by a new excipient would inhibit glucagon aggregation at an alkaline pH. Methods and Results: As measured by tryptophan intrinsic fluorescence shift and optical density at 630 nm, protein aggregation was indeed minimized when glucagon was formulated with curcumin and albumin. This formulation also reduced chemical degradation, measured by liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry. Biological activity was retained after aging for 7 days in an in vitro cell-based bioassay and also in Yorkshire swine. Conclusions: Based on these findings, a formulation of glucagon stabilized with curcumin, polysorbate-80, l-methionine, and albumin at alkaline pH in glycine buffer may be suitable for extended use in a portable pump in the setting of a bihormonal artificial endocrine pancreas. PMID:24968220

  19. Miniaturized metal oxide pH sensors for bacteria detection.

    PubMed

    Uria, Naroa; Abramova, Natalia; Bratov, Andrey; Muñoz-Pascual, Francesc-Xavier; Baldrich, Eva

    2016-01-15

    It is well known that the metabolic activity of some microorganisms results in changes of pH of the culture medium, a phenomenon that can be used for detection and quantification of bacteria. However, conventional glass electrodes that are commonly used for pH measurements are bulky, fragile and expensive, which hinders their application in miniaturized systems and encouraged to the search for alternatives. In this work, two types of metal oxide pH sensors have been tested to detect the metabolic activity of the bacterium Escherichia coli (E. coli). These pH sensors were produced on silicon chips with platinum metal contacts, onto which thin layers of IrOx or Ta2O5 were incorporated by two different methods (electrodeposition and e-beam sputtering, respectively). In order to facilitate measurement in small sample volumes, an Ag/AgCl pseudo-reference was also screen-printed in the chip and was assayed in parallel to an external Ag/AgCl reference electrode. As it is shown, the developed sensors generated results indistinguishable from those provided by a conventional glass pH-electrode but could be operated in significantly smaller sample volumes. After optimization of the detection conditions, the metal oxide sensors are successfully applied for detection of increasing concentrations of viable E. coli, with detection of less than 10(3)cfu mL(-1) in undiluted culture medium in just 5h.

  20. Measures for Ph.D. Evaluation: The Recruitment Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    D'Agostino, Antonella; Fruzzetti, Stefania; Ghellini, Giulio; Neri, Laura

    2011-01-01

    In the last years the quality of Higher Education (HE) system and its evaluation have been key issues of the political and scientific debate on education policies all over Europe. In the wide landscape that involves the entire HE system we draw attention on the third level of its organization, i.e. the Ph.D. In particular, this paper discusses the…

  1. pH- and Thermal-Responsive Multishape Memory Hydrogel.

    PubMed

    Gong, Xiao-Lei; Xiao, Yao-Yu; Pan, Min; Kang, Yang; Li, Bang-Jing; Zhang, Sheng

    2016-10-10

    A multistimuli sensitive shape memory hydrogel with dual and triple shape memory properties was prepared by grafting dansyl groups into the network of polyacrylamide (PAAM). The hydrophobic aggregation of dansyl groups acted as molecular switches, which showed reversible aggregation-disaggregation transition in aqueous solution in response to the pH or temperature change.

  2. Modulation of autophagic activity by extracellular pH.

    PubMed

    Xu, Teng; Su, Hang; Ganapathy, Suthakar; Yuan, Zhi-Min

    2011-11-01

    Reprogramming energy metabolism from oxidative phosphorylation to aerobic glycolysis, a common feature of human cancer, is associated with a relative acidic tumor microenvironment which can sometimes be further accentuated by hypoxia operating within most solid tumors. We found that alteration of extracellular pH induces marked and rapid changes of autophagic activity. Interestingly, acidic and basic conditions induced completely opposite effect on autophagy, with its activity suppressed at lower pH whereas stimulated at higher pH. Gene knockdown experiments indicated that pH induced-autophagy requires Beclin 1, Vps34 and Atg5, key components of the autophagy pathway. Of note, an acidic condition not only inhibits the basal but also blocks the starvation-induced autophagy activity. Significantly, examination of different areas of tumor mass revealed a lower autophagic activity within the inner region than the outer region. These findings have important implications on the connections between autophagy and cancer as well as a wide range of other physiological and pathological processes.

  3. Annotation of Fusarium graminearum (PH-1) Version 5.0

    PubMed Central

    Hammond-Kosack, Kim E.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Fusarium graminearum floral infections are a major risk to the global supply of safe cereal grains. We report updates to the PH-1 reference genome and significant improvements to the annotation. Changes include introduction of legacy annotation identifiers, new gene models, secretome and effectorP predictions, and inclusion of extensive untranslated region (UTR) annotations. PMID:28082505

  4. Meet EPA Ecologist Michael Murrell, Ph.D.

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Michael Murrel, Ph.D., is a EPA research ecologist working on the Gulf of Mexico Hypoxia Project, helping develop models of the northern Gulf to quantify the links between freshwater flowing into the Gulf from the land, nutrients, and hypoxia—“dead zones”

  5. An Analysis of Ph.D. Examiners' Reports in Engineering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prieto, Elena; Holbrook, Allyson; Bourke, Sid

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, there have been increasing calls for an overall transformation of the nature of engineering Ph.D. programs and the way theses are assessed. There exists a need to understand the examination process to ensure the best quality outcome for candidates in engineering. The work we present in this paper uses data collected between 2003…

  6. Catalytic gold nanoparticle driven pH specific chemical locomotion.

    PubMed

    Dey, Krishna Kanti; Panda, Biswa Ranjan; Paul, Anumita; Basu, Saurabh; Chattopadhyay, Arun

    2010-08-15

    Gold nanoparticle (Au NP) catalyzed decomposition of alkaline hydrogen peroxide has been utilized in driving chemical locomotives in a liquid. Au NPs deposited on spherical micron sized polymer resin beads catalyzed the decomposition of H(2)O(2) in the pH range 9.1-10.8. The O(2) gas bubbles produced in the decomposition moved the beads upward with average velocities that depended on the pH of the solution. The measured average velocity of the bead increased with the increase in pH in the range 9.1-10.8. Above this pH, the self-decomposition of H(2)O(2) produced sufficient bubbles in the medium that made the motion haphazard and thus prevented a clear measurement of the velocity. The observed accelerated motion of the locomotive has been explained by considering the time-dependent growth of O(2) gas bubbles on the polymer, while taking into consideration desorption and other factors.

  7. Promoting Creativity in PhD Supervision: Tensions and Dilemmas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitelock, Denise; Faulkner, Dorothy; Miell, Dorothy

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we argue that the processes of collaborative creativity are just as important within the sociocultural context of PhD supervisory practice, as they are in other organizational and educational settings. In order to test this claim a series of interviews with supervisors and students were undertaken to uncover the pedagogic processes…

  8. Carbon Nanotube Chemiresistor for Wireless pH Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gou, Pingping; Kraut, Nadine D.; Feigel, Ian M.; Bai, Hao; Morgan, Gregory J.; Chen, Yanan; Tang, Yifan; Bocan, Kara; Stachel, Joshua; Berger, Lee; Mickle, Marlin; Sejdić, Ervin; Star, Alexander

    2014-03-01

    The ability to accurately measure real-time pH fluctuations in-vivo could be highly advantageous. Early detection and potential prevention of bacteria colonization of surgical implants can be accomplished by monitoring associated acidosis. However, conventional glass membrane or ion-selective field-effect transistor (ISFET) pH sensing technologies both require a reference electrode which may suffer from leakage of electrolytes and potential contamination. Herein, we describe a solid-state sensor based on oxidized single-walled carbon nanotubes (ox-SWNTs) functionalized with the conductive polymer poly(1-aminoanthracene) (PAA). This device had a Nernstian response over a wide pH range (2-12) and retained sensitivity over 120 days. The sensor was also attached to a passively-powered radio-frequency identification (RFID) tag which transmits pH data through simulated skin. This battery-less, reference electrode free, wirelessly transmitting sensor platform shows potential for biomedical applications as an implantable sensor, adjacent to surgical implants detecting for infection.

  9. pH Switchable Emulsions Based on Dynamic Covalent Surfactants.

    PubMed

    Ren, Gaihuan; Wang, Lei; Chen, Qianqian; Xu, Zhenghe; Xu, Jian; Sun, Dejun

    2017-03-28

    Dynamic covalent surfactants were designed to prepare pH switchable emulsions. A dynamic covalent bond between nonamphiphilic building blocks (polyethylenimine (PEI) and benzaldehyde (B)) was introduced to form the dynamic covalent surfactant PEI-B. The dynamic nature of covalent bond in PEI-B was confirmed by (1)H NMR and fluorescence probe analysis. Stable emulsions were successfully prepared with interfacial active PEI-B at pH 7.8 with various water/paraffin oil ratios under sonication. When lowering the pH to 3.5, a complete phase separation was observed as a result of breaking dynamic covalent bond in the interfacial active PEI-B. After tuning the pH back to 7.8, stable emulsion was obtained again due to the reformation of the dynamic covalent bond and hence interfacial active PEI-B. The emulsification and demulsification were dependent on the formation and breaking of dynamic covalent bond in PEI-B. Such pH-triggered emulsification and demulsification can be switched at least three times. Application of dynamic covalent surfactants will open up a novel route for preparing responsive emulsions.

  10. Application of SERS Nanoparticles for Intracellular pH Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Laurence, T; Talley, C; Colvin, M; Huser, T

    2004-10-21

    We present an alternative approach to optical probes that will ultimately allow us to measure chemical concentrations in microenvironments within cells and tissues. This approach is based on monitoring the surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) response of functionalized metal nanoparticles (50-100 nm in diameter). SERS allows for the sensitive detection of changes in the state of chemical groups attached to individual nanoparticles and small clusters. Here, we present the development of a nanoscale pH meter. The pH response of these nanoprobes is tested in a cell-free medium, measuring the pH of the solution immediately surrounding the nanoparticles. Heterogeneities in the SERS signal, which can result from the formation of small nanoparticle clusters, are characterized using SERS correlation spectroscopy and single particle/cluster SERS spectroscopy. The response of the nanoscale pH meters is tested under a wide range of conditions to approach the complex environment encountered inside living cells and to optimize probe performance.

  11. The Production Rate and Employment of Ph.D. Astronomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metcalfe, Travis S.

    2007-05-01

    As in many sciences, the production rate of new Ph.D. astronomers is decoupled from the global demand for trained scientists. As noted by Thronson (1991, PASP, 103, 90), overproduction appears to be built into the system, making the mathematical formulation of surplus astronomer production similar to that for industrial pollution models -- an unintended side effect of the process. Following Harris (1994, ASP Conf., 57, 12), I document the production of Ph.D. astronomers from 1990 to 2005 using the online Dissertation Abstracts database. To monitor the changing patterns of employment, I examine the number of postdoctoral, tenure-track, and other jobs advertised in the AAS Job Register during this same period. Although the current situation is clearly unsustainable, it was much worse a decade ago with nearly 7 new Ph.D. astronomers in 1995 for every new tenure-track job. While the number of new permanent positions steadily increased throughout the late 1990's, the number of new Ph.D. recipients gradually declined. After the turn of the century, the production of new astronomers leveled off, but new postdoctoral positions grew dramatically. There has also been recent growth in the number of non-tenure-track lecturer, research, and support positions. This is just one example of a larger cultural shift to temporary employment that is happening throughout society -- it is not unique to astronomy.

  12. Foraminifera promote calcification by elevating their intracellular pH

    PubMed Central

    de Nooijer, Lennart Jan; Toyofuku, Takashi; Kitazato, Hiroshi

    2009-01-01

    Surface seawaters are supersaturated with respect to calcite, but high concentrations of magnesium prevent spontaneous nucleation and growth of crystals. Foraminifera are the most widespread group of calcifying organisms and generally produce calcite with a low Mg content, indicating that they actively remove Mg2+ from vacuolized seawater before calcite precipitation. However, one order of foraminifera has evolved a calcification pathway, by which it produces calcite with a very high Mg content, suggesting that these species do not alter the Mg/Ca ratio of vacuolized seawater considerably. The cellular mechanism that makes it possible to precipitate calcite at high Mg concentrations, however, has remained unknown. Here we demonstrate that they are able to elevate the pH at the site of calcification by at least one unit above seawater pH and, thereby, overcome precipitation-inhibition at ambient Mg concentrations. A similar result was obtained for species that precipitate calcite with a low Mg concentration, suggesting that elevating the pH at the site of calcification is a widespread strategy among foraminifera to promote calcite precipitation. Since the common ancestor of these two groups dates back to the Cambrian, our results would imply that this physiological mechanism has evolved over half a billion years ago. Since foraminifera rely on elevating the intracellular pH for their calcification, our results show that ongoing ocean acidification can result in a decrease of calcite production by these abundant calcifyers. PMID:19706891

  13. Supervising the PhD: A Guide to Success.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delamont, Sara; Atkinson, Paul; Parry, Odette

    This handbook is a practical guide for the novice and experienced supervisor of Ph.D. students focusing on the British system. The book is organized to follow the progress of a student from starting out to a career after the viva voce examination. The chapters are: (1) "A Most Persuasive Piece of Argument"; (2) "Caught and Held by a…

  14. DISSOLVED ORGANIC MATTER AND METALS: EFFECTS OF PH ON PARTITIONING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Eighteen Dutch soils were extracted in aqueous solutions at varying pH. Extracts were analyzed for Cd, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn by ICP-AES. Extract dissolved organic carbon (DOC) was fractionated into three operationally defined fractions: hydrophilic acids (Hyd), fulvic acids (FA), an...

  15. Online Ph.D. Program Delivery Models and Student Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jorissen, Shari L.; Keen, James P.; Riedel, Eric S.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to provide information to an online university that offers Ph.D. programs in three formats: knowledge area modules (or KAM, a type of faculty-led, self-directed doctoral study), course-based model, and mixed model (a combination of the KAM and course-based models). The investigators sought to determine why students…

  16. Structure of human saposin A at lysosomal pH.

    PubMed

    Hill, Chris H; Read, Randy J; Deane, Janet E

    2015-07-01

    The saposins are essential cofactors for the normal lysosomal degradation of complex glycosphingolipids by acid hydrolase enzymes; defects in either saposin or hydrolase function lead to severe metabolic diseases. Saposin A (SapA) activates the enzyme β-galactocerebrosidase (GALC), which catalyzes the breakdown of β-D-galactocerebroside, the principal lipid component of myelin. SapA is known to bind lipids and detergents in a pH-dependent manner; this is accompanied by a striking transition from a `closed' to an `open' conformation. However, previous structures were determined at non-lysosomal pH. This work describes a 1.8 Å resolution X-ray crystal structure determined at the physiologically relevant lysosomal pH 4.8. In the absence of lipid or detergent at pH 4.8, SapA is observeed to adopt a conformation closely resembling the previously determined `closed' conformation, showing that pH alone is not sufficient for the transition to the `open' conformation. Structural alignments reveal small conformational changes, highlighting regions of flexibility.

  17. The PhD Project: How Successful Is It?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartz, Bill N.; Williams, Satina V.; Walden, W. Darrell

    2011-01-01

    The PhD Project's mission to diversify the work force by increasing the diversity of business school faculty is quite admirable, but is the Project successful? To gather insights toward responding to that question and to offer suggestions, we reviewed three of the Project's objectives that relate most closely to minority doctoral students and…

  18. Gender Differences in Research Patterns among PhD Economists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barbezat, Debra A.

    2006-01-01

    This study is based on a 1996 survey of PhD economists working in the academic and nonacademic sectors since 1989. Despite a raw gender difference in all types of research output, the male dummy variable proves statistically significant in predicting only one publication measure. In a full sample and faculty subsample, number of years since…

  19. Earth and Space Science PhDs: Class of 2000

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giesler, J.

    2001-12-01

    The American Geophysical Union (AGU) and the American Geological Institute (AGI) have been collecting data on recent PhDs in the geosciences for 5 years (1996-2000). Over these years continual improvement has been recorded in the job market through indicators such as time to find employment and starting salaries. As these indicators continue to improve, so too does the perception of the job market in general. There are several characteristics that are unique to PhDs in the geosciences. Unlike physical science graduates, there is a significant number who have been working full-time at least one year prior to earning their PhD. Recent graduates employed prior to graduation are heavily concentrated in Solid Earth Geology (41%) followed by Atmospheric Sciences (19%) and Oceanography (12%). A second distinguishable feature of Earth & space science PhDs is their age. Each year there is a higher percentage of recent graduates over the age of 40: 16% in 1998, 20% in 1999, and 23% in 2000. In 2000, the average time between earning a B.S. and starting a graduate program was 4.6 years. Both 1999 and 2000 show a drop in the overall numbers of postdoctoral appointments. This suggests that greater than 50% of the recent graduates are finding full-time permanent employment. Of the geoscience subfields, oceanography has greatest number of people obtaining employment outside the field.

  20. Engineering a pH responsive pore forming protein.

    PubMed

    Kisovec, Matic; Rezelj, Saša; Knap, Primož; Cajnko, Miša Mojca; Caserman, Simon; Flašker, Ajda; Žnidaršič, Nada; Repič, Matej; Mavri, Janez; Ruan, Yi; Scheuring, Simon; Podobnik, Marjetka; Anderluh, Gregor

    2017-02-08

    Listeriolysin O (LLO) is a cytolysin capable of forming pores in cholesterol-rich lipid membranes of host cells. It is conveniently suited for engineering a pH-governed responsiveness, due to a pH sensor identified in its structure that was shown before to affect its stability. Here we introduced a new level of control of its hemolytic activity by making a variant with hemolytic activity that was pH-dependent. Based on detailed structural analysis coupled with molecular dynamics and mutational analysis, we found that the bulky side chain of Tyr406 allosterically affects the pH sensor. Molecular dynamics simulation further suggested which other amino acid residues may also allosterically influence the pH-sensor. LLO was engineered to the point where it can, in a pH-regulated manner, perforate artificial and cellular membranes. The single mutant Tyr406Ala bound to membranes and oligomerized similarly to the wild-type LLO, however, the final membrane insertion step was pH-affected by the introduced mutation. We show that the mutant toxin can be activated at the surface of artificial membranes or living cells by a single wash with slightly acidic pH buffer. Y406A mutant has a high potential in development of novel nanobiotechnological applications such as controlled release of substances or as a sensor of environmental pH.

  1. Do We Need Incentives for PhD Supervisors?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sadowski, Dieter; Schneider, Peter; Thaller, Nicole

    2008-01-01

    This article presents empirical results of explorative case studies that examine whether the New Public Management mechanisms have improved the academic performance of PhD education in selected German and European economics departments. Our data rely on document analyses of organisational variables and in-depth semi-structured interviews with…

  2. Karl Krueger, PhD | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    Dr. Karl Krueger received a PhD in biochemistry from Vanderbilt University and continued his research training at NIH as a postdoctoral fellow before joining the faculty at Georgetown University School of Medicine. His research throughout this period focused on different aspects of drug receptors and their role in the nervous system. |

  3. DISSOLVED ORGANIC MATTER AND METALS: EFFECTS OF PH ON PARTITIONING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Eighteen Dutch soils were extracted in aqueous solutions at varying pH. Extracts were analyzed for Cd, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn by ICP-AES. Extract dissolved organic carbon (DOC) was fractionated into three operationally defined fractions: hydrophilic acids (Hyd), fulvic acids (FA), an...

  4. Foraminifera promote calcification by elevating their intracellular pH.

    PubMed

    de Nooijer, Lennart Jan; Toyofuku, Takashi; Kitazato, Hiroshi

    2009-09-08

    Surface seawaters are supersaturated with respect to calcite, but high concentrations of magnesium prevent spontaneous nucleation and growth of crystals. Foraminifera are the most widespread group of calcifying organisms and generally produce calcite with a low Mg content, indicating that they actively remove Mg(2+) from vacuolized seawater before calcite precipitation. However, one order of foraminifera has evolved a calcification pathway, by which it produces calcite with a very high Mg content, suggesting that these species do not alter the Mg/Ca ratio of vacuolized seawater considerably. The cellular mechanism that makes it possible to precipitate calcite at high Mg concentrations, however, has remained unknown. Here we demonstrate that they are able to elevate the pH at the site of calcification by at least one unit above seawater pH and, thereby, overcome precipitation-inhibition at ambient Mg concentrations. A similar result was obtained for species that precipitate calcite with a low Mg concentration, suggesting that elevating the pH at the site of calcification is a widespread strategy among foraminifera to promote calcite precipitation. Since the common ancestor of these two groups dates back to the Cambrian, our results would imply that this physiological mechanism has evolved over half a billion years ago. Since foraminifera rely on elevating the intracellular pH for their calcification, our results show that ongoing ocean acidification can result in a decrease of calcite production by these abundant calcifyers.

  5. Improved pH buffering agent for sodium hypochlorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nash, J. R.; Veeder, L. N.

    1969-01-01

    Sodium citrate/citric acid was found to be an effective buffer for pH control when used with sodium hypochlorite. The mixture does not corrode aluminum. The buffer appears to form a type of conversion coating that may provide corrosion-resistant properties to aluminum in other applications.

  6. pH Effects on Electrospray Ionization Efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liigand, Jaanus; Laaniste, Asko; Kruve, Anneli

    2016-12-01

    Electrospray ionization efficiency is known to be affected by mobile phase composition. In this paper, a detailed study of analyte ionization efficiency dependence on mobile phase pH is presented. The pH effect was studied on 28 compounds with different chemical properties. Neither pK a nor solution phase ionization degree by itself was observed to be sufficient at describing how aqueous phase pH affects the ionization efficiency of the analyte. Therefore, the analyte behavior was related to various physicochemical properties via linear discriminant analyses. Distinction between pH-dependent and pH-independent compounds was achieved using two parameters: number of potential charge centers and hydrogen bonding acceptor capacity (in the case of 80% acetonitrile) or polarity of neutral form of analyte and pK a (in the case of 20% acetonitrile). It was also observed that decreasing pH may increase ionization efficiency of a compound by more than two orders of magnitude.

  7. Supervising the PhD: A Guide to Success.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delamont, Sara; Atkinson, Paul; Parry, Odette

    This handbook is a practical guide for the novice and experienced supervisor of Ph.D. students focusing on the British system. The book is organized to follow the progress of a student from starting out to a career after the viva voce examination. The chapters are: (1) "A Most Persuasive Piece of Argument"; (2) "Caught and Held by a…

  8. PhD Students, Interculturality, Reflexivity, Community and Internationalisation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holliday, Adrian

    2017-01-01

    Interviews with a small group of doctoral students at a British university indicate that the students feel that the programme provides an environment within which they develop interculturality through reflexive engagement with the PhD community and in some cases with the participants in their research. Significant here is that they are…

  9. Engineering a pH responsive pore forming protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kisovec, Matic; Rezelj, Saša; Knap, Primož; Cajnko, Miša Mojca; Caserman, Simon; Flašker, Ajda; Žnidaršič, Nada; Repič, Matej; Mavri, Janez; Ruan, Yi; Scheuring, Simon; Podobnik, Marjetka; Anderluh, Gregor

    2017-02-01

    Listeriolysin O (LLO) is a cytolysin capable of forming pores in cholesterol-rich lipid membranes of host cells. It is conveniently suited for engineering a pH-governed responsiveness, due to a pH sensor identified in its structure that was shown before to affect its stability. Here we introduced a new level of control of its hemolytic activity by making a variant with hemolytic activity that was pH-dependent. Based on detailed structural analysis coupled with molecular dynamics and mutational analysis, we found that the bulky side chain of Tyr406 allosterically affects the pH sensor. Molecular dynamics simulation further suggested which other amino acid residues may also allosterically influence the pH-sensor. LLO was engineered to the point where it can, in a pH-regulated manner, perforate artificial and cellular membranes. The single mutant Tyr406Ala bound to membranes and oligomerized similarly to the wild-type LLO, however, the final membrane insertion step was pH-affected by the introduced mutation. We show that the mutant toxin can be activated at the surface of artificial membranes or living cells by a single wash with slightly acidic pH buffer. Y406A mutant has a high potential in development of novel nanobiotechnological applications such as controlled release of substances or as a sensor of environmental pH.

  10. The Empathic Operating System (emOS)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-15

    The Empathic Operating System ( emOS ) Physiological measurements have typically been limited to expensive and cumbersome clinical research equipment...Report: The Empathic Operating System ( emOS ) Report Title Physiological measurements have typically been limited to expensive and cumbersome clinical...C-0043 Proposal number: 62850-LS-DRP Project title: “The Empathic Operating System ( emOS )” Contract performance period: January 1, 2016 – April 7

  11. Drugs, bugs, and esophageal pH profiles.

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, M.

    1999-01-01

    Until relatively recently, gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) was thought to be a relatively trivial problem, and pharmaceutical companies initially had remarkably little interest in clinical trials for GERD. Over the last ten years, GERD therapy has become the subject of intense interest, since reflux disease is now recognized as a major market for antisecretory and prokinetic drugs. Even low-technology antacids are now known to effectively neutralize esophageal acid prevent acid reflux for up to 90 minutes. Esophageal pH profiling is known to be an excellent surrogate for clinical efficacy of GERD drugs, particularly in erosive esophagitis. Years ago, famotidine normalized esophageal mucosal exposure to pH < 4.0 only when administered in doses of 40 mg twice a day. Subsequent studies confirmed that multiple daily dosing of histamine-2 receptor antagonists (H2RAs) was mandatory for GERD treatment, with clear dose-response relationships for each agent. Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) have each been carefully assessed in terms esophageal and gastric pH profiles. Omeprazole has a particularly flat dose response curve, making it difficult to differentiate pH or clinical effects of 20 vs. 40 mg doses. Improved rapidity of onset and/or enhanced potency is demonstrable in pH data obtained with lansoprazole, rabeprazole and pantoprazole. Such differences will translate to improved clinical efficacy, based on the meta-analyses of Richard Hunt and his group in Canada that correlate pH effects and symptom relief/healing. PPI's have dependably surpassed H2RAs and prokinetic drugs in management of the more severe grades of esophagitis. Helicobacter pylori has a peculiar relationship to GERD. There has been some concern that PPIs given to patients with H. pylori might accelerate development of severe atrophic gastritis. It is also now known that eradication of H. pylori may increase symptomatic GERD (possibly as a result of increased gastric acid secretion once the bacteria

  12. Drugs, bugs, and esophageal pH profiles.

    PubMed

    Robinson, M

    1999-01-01

    Until relatively recently, gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) was thought to be a relatively trivial problem, and pharmaceutical companies initially had remarkably little interest in clinical trials for GERD. Over the last ten years, GERD therapy has become the subject of intense interest, since reflux disease is now recognized as a major market for antisecretory and prokinetic drugs. Even low-technology antacids are now known to effectively neutralize esophageal acid prevent acid reflux for up to 90 minutes. Esophageal pH profiling is known to be an excellent surrogate for clinical efficacy of GERD drugs, particularly in erosive esophagitis. Years ago, famotidine normalized esophageal mucosal exposure to pH < 4.0 only when administered in doses of 40 mg twice a day. Subsequent studies confirmed that multiple daily dosing of histamine-2 receptor antagonists (H2RAs) was mandatory for GERD treatment, with clear dose-response relationships for each agent. Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) have each been carefully assessed in terms esophageal and gastric pH profiles. Omeprazole has a particularly flat dose response curve, making it difficult to differentiate pH or clinical effects of 20 vs. 40 mg doses. Improved rapidity of onset and/or enhanced potency is demonstrable in pH data obtained with lansoprazole, rabeprazole and pantoprazole. Such differences will translate to improved clinical efficacy, based on the meta-analyses of Richard Hunt and his group in Canada that correlate pH effects and symptom relief/healing. PPI's have dependably surpassed H2RAs and prokinetic drugs in management of the more severe grades of esophagitis. Helicobacter pylori has a peculiar relationship to GERD. There has been some concern that PPIs given to patients with H. pylori might accelerate development of severe atrophic gastritis. It is also now known that eradication of H. pylori may increase symptomatic GERD (possibly as a result of increased gastric acid secretion once the bacteria

  13. Ambulatory long-term pH monitoring in pigs.

    PubMed

    Gawad, K A; Wachowiak, R; Rempf, C; Tiefenbacher, W J; Strate, T; Achilles, E G; Blöchle, C; Izbicki, J R

    2003-10-01

    pH monitoring has been established as the "gold standard" in the diagnosis of gastroesophageal reflux. Evaluation of experimental antireflux therapy should therefore also include this technique, but a suitable technique in an experimental model did not exist so far. The aim of our study was to establish a reliable method for the evaluation of an experimental reflux model in pigs. A total of 33 German Landrace pigs with an average body weight of 56 (50.2-67.2) kg were included. pH monitoring was performed before and after open cardiomyotomy in each animal. All manipulations were performed under general anesthesia. After manometric localization of the gastroesophageal high-pressure zone, a standard pH probe was inserted into the pharynx through a small needle-punctured canal on the side of the animal's snout and placed under endoscopic guidance with the proximal sensor 3 cm above the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) and the distal sensor in the stomach for reference. The harness to carry the pH recorder on the animal's back consisted of a modified belly strap that enabled the animal to move around without limitation. For analysis the same threshold levels were defined as in humans. Gastroesophageal reflux was induced by cardiomyotomy. The placement of the standard pH probe was possible in all cases. Inserting the probe on the side of the snout left the animals free to nuzzle, which complies with the normal habits of pigs, without breaking the probes and without being compromised in their natural behavior. Repeated punctures for multiple measurements were easily feasible. We performed up to three examinations in each individual animal. Recording was performed for 48 h. A mean number of 67.3 (+/-9.7) acidic refluxes were registered. The mean number of long acidic refluxes was 3.2 (+/-0.75). For an average total time of 75.5 (+/-14.3) min the pH was below 4 accounting for a fraction time pH below 4 of 3.5% (+/-0.68%). Following cardiomyotomy the number of acidic

  14. Nitric oxide and pH modulation in gynaecological cancer.

    PubMed

    Sanhueza, Carlos; Araos, Joaquín; Naranjo, Luciano; Barros, Eric; Subiabre, Mario; Toledo, Fernando; Gutiérrez, Jaime; Chiarello, Delia I; Pardo, Fabián; Leiva, Andrea; Sobrevia, Luis

    2016-12-01

    Nitric oxide plays several roles in cellular physiology, including control of the vascular tone and defence against pathogen infection. Neuronal, inducible and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (NOS) isoforms synthesize nitric oxide. Cells generate acid and base equivalents, whose physiological intracellular concentrations are kept due to membrane transport systems, including Na(+) /H(+) exchangers and Na(+) /HCO3(-) transporters, thus maintaining a physiological pH at the intracellular (~7.0) and extracellular (~7.4) medium. In several pathologies, including cancer, cells are exposed to an extracellular acidic microenvironment, and the role for these membrane transport mechanisms in this phenomenon is likely. As altered NOS expression and activity is seen in cancer cells and because this gas promotes a glycolytic phenotype leading to extracellular acidosis in gynaecological cancer cells, a pro-inflammatory microenvironment increasing inducible NOS expression in this cell type is feasible. However, whether abnormal control of intracellular and extracellular pH by cancer cells regards with their ability to synthesize or respond to nitric oxide is unknown. We, here, discuss a potential link between pH alterations, pH controlling membrane transport systems and NOS function. We propose a potential association between inducible NOS induction and Na(+) /H(+) exchanger expression and activity in human ovary cancer. A potentiation between nitric oxide generation and the maintenance of a low extracellular pH (i.e. acidic) is proposed to establish a sequence of events in ovarian cancer cells, thus preserving a pro-proliferative acidic tumour extracellular microenvironment. We suggest that pharmacological therapeutic targeting of Na(+) /H(+) exchangers and inducible NOS may have benefits in human epithelial ovarian cancer.

  15. Antimalarials increase vesicle pH in Plasmodium falciparum

    PubMed Central

    1985-01-01

    The asexual erythrocytic stage of the malarial parasite ingests and degrades the hemoglobin of its host red cell. To study this process, we labeled the cytoplasm of uninfected red cells with fluorescein-dextran, infected those cells with trophozoite- and schizont-rich cultures of Plasmodium falciparum, and harvested them 110-120 h later in the trophozoite stage. After lysis of the red cell cytoplasm with digitonin, the only fluorescence remaining was in small (0.5-0.9 micron) vesicles similar to the parasite's food vacuole. As measured by spectrofluorimetry, the pH of these vesicles was acid (initial pH 5.2- 5.4), and they responded to MgATP with acidification and to weak bases such as NH4Cl with alkalinization. These three properties are similar to those obtained with human fibroblasts and suggest that the endocytic vesicles of plasmodia are similar to those of mammalian cells. Each of the antimalarials tested (chloroquine, quinine, and mefloquine) as well as NH4Cl inhibited parasite growth at concentrations virtually identical to those that increased parasite vesicle pH. These results suggest two conclusions: (a) The increases in vesicle pH that we have observed in our digitonin-treated parasite preparation occur at similar concentrations of weak bases and antimalarials in cultures of parasitized erythrocytes, and (b) P. falciparum parasites are exquisitely dependent on vesicle pH during their asexual erythrocytic cycle, perhaps for processes analogous to endocytosis and proteolysis in mammalian cells, and that antimalarials and NH4Cl may act by interfering with these events. PMID:3905824

  16. Regulation of Vacuolar pH in Citrus limon

    SciTech Connect

    Lincoln Taiz

    2005-06-22

    The primary objective of this grant was to characterize the vacuolar V-ATPase of lemon fruits. Lemon fruit vacuoles have an internal pH of about 2.5. Since a typical plant vacuole has a luminal pH of around 5.5, the lemon fruit V-APTase must have special properties which allow it to acidify the lumen to such a low pH: (1) it might have a different structure; (2) it might have a different H{sup +}/ATP stoichiometry; and (3) it might be regulated differently. During the course of the investigations (which began in 1996) they characterized these aspects of the V-ATPases of both lemon fruits and lime fruits. They examined lime fruits because of the availability of both acidic limes with a low vacuolar pH and sweet limes, which have a much higher vacuolar pH. The existence of two types of lime fruits allowed a comparison of the V-ATPases of the two varieties. In this report they are including two publications from 1996 and 1997 as background for the later publications. A review article with Heven Sze on V-ATPase nomenclature was also generated during the funding period. In addition to the studies on citrus fruit vacuoles, they also initiated studies in two new areas: polar auxin transport and the regulation of stomatal opening by UV-B irradiation. These studies were intended to serve as a basis of future separate grants, but the proposals they submitted on these topics were not funded.

  17. Extracellular pH regulates bone cell function.

    PubMed

    Arnett, Timothy R

    2008-02-01

    The skeletons of land vertebrates contain a massive reserve of alkaline mineral (hydroxyapatite), which is ultimately available to buffer metabolic H+ if acid-base balance is not maintained within narrow limits. The negative impact of acidosis on the skeleton has long been known but was thought to result from passive, physicochemical dissolution of bone mineral. This brief, selective review summarizes what is now known of the direct functional responses of bone cells to extracellular pH. We discovered that bone resorption by cultured osteoclasts is stimulated directly by acid. The stimulatory effect is near-maximal at pH 7.0, whereas above pH 7.4, resorption is switched off. In bone organ cultures, H+-stimulated bone mineral release is almost entirely osteoclast-mediated, with a negligible physicochemical component. Acidification is the key requirement for osteoclasts to excavate resorption pits in all species studied to date, and extracellular H+ may thus be regarded as the long-sought osteoclast activation factor. Acid-activated osteoclasts can be stimulated further by agents such as parathyroid hormone, 1,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol, and receptor activator of nuclear factor kappaB ligand. Osteoclasts may respond to pH changes via H+-sensing ion channels such as transient receptor potential vanilloid 1, a nociceptor that is also activated by capsaicin. Acidosis also exerts a powerful, reciprocal inhibitory effect on the mineralization of bone matrix by cultured osteoblasts. This is caused by increased hydroxyapatite solubility at low pH, together with selective inhibition of alkaline phosphatase, which is required for mineralization. Diets or drugs that shift acid-base balance in the alkaline direction may provide useful treatments for bone loss disorders.

  18. Exhaled breath condensate pH in mechanically ventilated patients.

    PubMed

    Nannini, L J; Quintana, R; Bagilet, D H; Druetta, M; Ramírez, M; Nieto, R; Guelman Greta, G

    2013-12-01

    In this prospective clinical trial we aimed to answer if spontaneous exhaled breath condensate (EBC) in the trap of the expiratory arm of the ventilator could replace EBC collected by coolant chamber standardized with Argon as an inert gas. Second, if EBC pH could predict ventilator associated pneumonia (VAP) and mortality. We included 34 critically ill patients (males = 26), aged = 54.85 ± 19.86 (mean ± SD) yrs, that required mechanical ventilation due to non-pulmonary direct cause (APACHE II score = 23.58 ± 14.7; PaO(2)/FiO(2) = 240.00 ± 98.29). ICU with 9 beds from a regional teaching hospital. The patients were followed up until development of VAP, successful weaning or death. There were significant differences between mean EBC pH from the 4 procedures with the exception of spontaneous EBC de-aerated with Argon (n = 79; 6.74 ± 0.28) and coolant chamber deaerated with Argon (n = 79; 6.70 ± 0.36; p = NS by Tukey's Multiple Comparison Test). However, none of the procedures were extrapolated between each other according to Bland & Altman method. The mean EBC pH from the trap without Argon was 6.50 ± 0.28. From the total of 34 patients, 22 survived and were discharged and 12 patients died in the ICU. Spontaneous EBC pH could not be extrapolated to EBC pH from coolant chamber and it did not change in subjects who dead, neither subject with VAP in comparison with baseline data. The lack of other biomarker in EBC and the lack of a control group determinate the need for further studies in this setting. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. and SEMICYUC. All rights reserved.

  19. Carbonic Anhydrases Function in Anther Cell Differentiation Downstream of the Receptor-Like Kinase EMS1.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jian; Li, Zhiyong; Biener, Gabriel; Xiong, Erhui; Malik, Shikha; Eaton, Nathan; Zhao, Catherine Z; Raicu, Valerica; Kong, Hongzhi; Zhao, Dazhong

    2017-06-01

    Plants extensively employ leucine-rich repeat receptor-like kinases (LRR-RLKs), the largest family of RLKs, to control a wide range of growth and developmental processes as well as defense responses. To date, only a few direct downstream effectors for LRR-RLKs have been identified. We previously showed that the LRR-RLK EMS1 (EXCESS MICROSPOROCYTES1) and its ligand TPD1 (TAPETUM DETERMINANT1) are required for the differentiation of somatic tapetal cells and reproductive microsporocytes during early anther development in Arabidopsis thaliana Here, we report the identification of β-carbonic anhydrases (βCAs) as the direct downstream targets of EMS1. EMS1 biochemically interacts with βCA proteins. Loss of function of βCA genes caused defective tapetal cell differentiation, while overexpression of βCA1 led to the formation of extra tapetal cells. EMS1 phosphorylates βCA1 at four sites, resulting in increased βCA1 activity. Furthermore, phosphorylation-blocking mutations impaired the function of βCA1 in tapetal cell differentiation; however, a phosphorylation mimic mutation promoted the formation of tapetal cells. βCAs are also involved in pH regulation in tapetal cells. Our findings highlight the role of βCA in controlling cell differentiation and provide insights into the posttranslational modification of carbonic anhydrases via receptor-like kinase-mediated phosphorylation. © 2017 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.

  20. In vivo monitoring the changes of interstitial pH and FAD/NADH ratio by fluorescence spectroscopy in healing skin wounds.

    PubMed

    Mokrý, Michal; Gál, Peter; Vidinský, Boris; Kusnír, Jaroslav; Dubayová, Katarína; Mozes, Stefan; Sabo, Ján

    2006-01-01

    The aim of our study was to evaluate the changes of interstitial pH and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD)/reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) ratio in healing skin wounds using fluorescence spectroscopy in Sprague Dawley rats. In the experiment, excisional and incisional models of wound healing were used. The florescein as the pH-sensitive probe using excitation spectra (lambda(Em) = 535 nm) was used for the measurement of pH changes, and synchronous fluorescence spectra (Deltalambda = 60 nm) for the monitoring of FAD/NADH ratio changes were measured from the surfaces of healing wounds. Increase of interstitial pH and FAD/NADH ratio was recorded during the time interval from the 15th to the 65th minute after surgery. The decrease of pH between the 48th and the 72nd hour after surgery as well as the increase of FAD/NADH ratio between the 72nd and the 96th hour of wound healing were recorded. The results indicate that the use of fluorescence spectroscopy may be considered as a valuable tool for noninvasive in vivo monitoring of selected redox parameters in the early phases of wound healing.

  1. DOE/EM Criticality Safety Needs Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Westfall, Robert Michael; Hopper, Calvin Mitchell

    2011-02-01

    The issue of nuclear criticality safety (NCS) in Department of Energy Environmental Management (DOE/EM) fissionable material operations presents challenges because of the large quantities of material present in the facilities and equipment that are committed to storage and/or material conditioning and dispositioning processes. Given the uncertainty associated with the material and conditions for many DOE/EM fissionable material operations, ensuring safety while maintaining operational efficiency requires the application of the most-effective criticality safety practices. In turn, more-efficient implementation of these practices can be achieved if the best NCS technologies are utilized. In 2002, DOE/EM-1 commissioned a survey of criticality safety technical needs at the major EM sites. These needs were documented in the report Analysis of Nuclear Criticality Safety Technology Supporting the Environmental Management Program, issued May 2002. Subsequent to this study, EM safety management personnel made a commitment to applying the best and latest criticality safety technology, as described by the DOE Nuclear Criticality Safety Program (NCSP). Over the past 7 years, this commitment has enabled the transfer of several new technologies to EM operations. In 2008, it was decided to broaden the basis of the EM NCS needs assessment to include not only current needs for technologies but also NCS operational areas with potential for improvements in controls, analysis, and regulations. A series of NCS workshops has been conducted over the past years, and needs have been identified and addressed by EM staff and contractor personnel. These workshops were organized and conducted by the EM Criticality Safety Program Manager with administrative and technical support by staff at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). This report records the progress made in identifying the needs, determining the approaches for addressing these needs, and assimilating new NCS technologies into EM

  2. The PhEDEx next-gen website

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egeland, R.; Huang, C.-H.; Rossman, P.; Sundarrajan, P.; Wildish, T.

    2012-12-01

    PhEDEx is the data-transfer management solution written by CMS. It consists of agents running at each site, a website for presentation of information, and a web-based data-service for scripted access to information. The website allows users to monitor the progress of data-transfers, the status of site agents and links between sites, and the overall status and behaviour of everything about PhEDEx. It also allows users to make and approve requests for data-transfers and for deletion of data. It is the main point-of-entry for all users wishing to interact with PhEDEx. For several years, the website has consisted of a single perl program with about 10K SLOC. This program has limited capabilities for exploring the data, with only coarse filtering capabilities and no context-sensitive awareness. Graphical information is presented as static images, generated on the server, with no interactivity. It is also not well connected to the rest of the PhEDEx codebase, since much of it was written before the data-service was developed. All this makes it hard to maintain and extend. We are re-implementing the website to address these issues. The UI is being rewritten in Javascript, replacing most of the server-side code. We are using the YUI toolkit to provide advanced features and context-sensitive interaction, and will adopt a Javascript charting library for generating graphical representations client-side. This relieves the server of much of its load, and automatically improves server-side security. The Javascript components can be re-used in many ways, allowing custom pages to be developed for specific uses. In particular, standalone test-cases using small numbers of components make it easier to debug the Javascript than it is to debug a large server program. Information about PhEDEx is accessed through the PhEDEx data-service, since direct SQL is not available from the clients’ browser. This provides consistent semantics with other, externally written monitoring tools, which

  3. 21 CFR 868.1170 - Indwelling blood hydrogen ion concentration (pH) analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Indwelling blood hydrogen ion concentration (pH... Indwelling blood hydrogen ion concentration (pH) analyzer. (a) Identification. An indwelling blood hydrogen ion concentration (pH) analyzer is a device that consists of a catheter-tip pH electrode and that...

  4. 21 CFR 868.1170 - Indwelling blood hydrogen ion concentration (pH) analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Indwelling blood hydrogen ion concentration (pH... Indwelling blood hydrogen ion concentration (pH) analyzer. (a) Identification. An indwelling blood hydrogen ion concentration (pH) analyzer is a device that consists of a catheter-tip pH electrode and that...

  5. 21 CFR 868.1170 - Indwelling blood hydrogen ion concentration (pH) analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Indwelling blood hydrogen ion concentration (pH... Indwelling blood hydrogen ion concentration (pH) analyzer. (a) Identification. An indwelling blood hydrogen ion concentration (pH) analyzer is a device that consists of a catheter-tip pH electrode and that...

  6. 21 CFR 868.1170 - Indwelling blood hydrogen ion concentration (pH) analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Indwelling blood hydrogen ion concentration (pH... Indwelling blood hydrogen ion concentration (pH) analyzer. (a) Identification. An indwelling blood hydrogen ion concentration (pH) analyzer is a device that consists of a catheter-tip pH electrode and that...

  7. 21 CFR 868.1170 - Indwelling blood hydrogen ion concentration (pH) analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Indwelling blood hydrogen ion concentration (pH... Indwelling blood hydrogen ion concentration (pH) analyzer. (a) Identification. An indwelling blood hydrogen ion concentration (pH) analyzer is a device that consists of a catheter-tip pH electrode and that...

  8. A comparison of pH determination methods in food animal practice.

    PubMed Central

    Nappert, G; Naylor, J M

    2001-01-01

    The accuracy of a portable pH meter in measuring blood pH in neonatal calves, urine pH, and ruminal fluid pH in cows has been assessed. Thirty-five diarrheic and 15 healthy beef calves were used for blood gas analysis; 57 healthy dairy cows provided voided urine samples; and ruminal fluid samples were obtained from 10 dairy cows with ruminal fistulas on 4 separate days. Measurements of blood pH were obtained from an automated blood gas analyzer and the portable pH meter. Measurements of urine and ruminal fluid pH were determined with the benchtop pH meter, urinalysis strips, narrow range pH paper, and the portable pH meter. The portable pH meter was more accurate in measuring urine pH and ruminal fluid pH in cows than blood pH in neonatal calves. The urinalysis strips and the narrow range pH paper were found adequate to evaluate urine and ruminal pH. Images Figure 1. PMID:11360858

  9. FATIGUE PROPERTIES OF 17-4 PH AND 15-5 PH STEEL IN THE H-900 AND H-1050 CONDITION

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The rotating beam fatigue properties of 17-4 PH and 15-5 PH steels were evaluated for the H-900 and H- 1050 conditions. In addition, the effect of...shot peening on 15-5 PH was investigated. The results indicate that the two alloys behave similarly. Over aging to the H- 1050 results in a 5% decrease in

  10. Carbon Dioxide Addition to Microbial Fuel Cell Cathodes Maintains Sustainable Catholyte pH and Improves Anolyte pH, Alkalinity, and Conductivity

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Bioelectrochemical system (BES) pH imbalances develop due to anodic proton-generating oxidation reactions and cathodic hydroxide-ion-generating reduction reactions. Until now, workers added unsustainable buffers to reduce the pH difference between the anode and cathode because the pH imbalance cont...

  11. EMS provider determinations of necessity for transport and reimbursement for EMS response, medical care, and transport: combined resource document for the National Association of EMS Physicians position statements.

    PubMed

    Millin, Michael G; Brown, Lawrence H; Schwartz, Brian

    2011-01-01

    With increasing demands for emergency medical services (EMS), many EMS jurisdictions are utilizing EMS provider-initiated nontransport policies as a method to offload potentially nonemergent patients from the EMS system. EMS provider determination of medical necessity, resulting in nontransport of patients, has the potential to avert unnecessary emergency department visits. However, EMS systems that utilize these policies must have additional education for the providers, a quality improvement process, and active physician oversight. In addition, EMS provider determination of nontransport for a specific situation should be supported by evidence in the peer-reviewed literature that the practice is safe. Further, EMS systems that do not utilize these programs should not be financially penalized. Payment for EMS services should be based on the prudent layperson standard. EMS systems that do utilize nontransport policies should be appropriately reimbursed, as this represents potential cost savings to the health care system.

  12. Hot Ductility of the 17-4 PH Stainless Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrera Lara, V.; Guerra Fuentes, L.; Covarrubias Alvarado, O.; Salinas Rodriguez, A.; Garcia Sanchez, E.

    2016-03-01

    The mechanisms of loss of hot ductility and the mechanical behavior of 17-4 PH alloys were investigated using hot tensile testing at temperatures between 700 and 1100 °C and strain rates of 10-4, 10-2, and 10-1 s-1. Scanning electron microscopy was used in conjunction with the results of the tensile tests to find the temperature region of loss of ductility and correlate it with cracking observed during processing by hot upsetting prior to ring rolling. It is reported that 17-4 PH alloys lose ductility in a temperature range around 900 °C near to the duplex austenite + ferrite phase field. Furthermore, it is found that niobium carbides precipitated at austenite/ferrite interfaces and grain boundaries have a pronounced effect on the mechanical behavior of the alloy during high-temperature deformation.

  13. Flexible high-temperature pH probe

    DOEpatents

    Bielawski, John C.; Outwater, John O.; Halbfinger, George P.

    2003-04-22

    A flexible pH probe device is provided for use in hot water and other high temperature environments up to about 590.degree. F. The pH probe includes a flexible, inert tubular probe member, an oxygen anion conducting, solid state electrolyte plug located at the distal end of the tubular member, oxide powder disposed at the distal end of the tubular member; a metal wire extending along the tubular member and having a distal end in contact with the oxide powder so as to form therewith an internal reference electrode; and a compression fitting forming a pressure boundary seal around a portion of the tubular member remote from the distal end thereof. Preferably, the tubular member is made of polytetrafluoroethylene, and the solid state electrolyte plug is made of stabilized zirconia. The flexibility of the probe member enables placement of the electrode into the area of interest, including around corners, into confined areas and the like.

  14. SAMPLING DEVICE FOR pH MEASUREMENT IN PROCESS STREAMS

    DOEpatents

    Michelson, C.E.; Carson, W.N. Jr.

    1958-11-01

    A pH cell is presented for monitoring the hydrogen ion concentration of a fluid in a process stream. The cell is made of glass with a side entry arm just above a reservoir in which the ends of a glass electrode and a reference electrode are situated. The glass electrode contains the usual internal solution which is connected to a lead. The reference electrode is formed of saturated calomel having a salt bridge in its bottom portion fabricated of a porous glass to insure low electrolyte flow. A flush tube leads into the cell through which buffer and flush solutions are introduced. A ground wire twists about both electrode ends to insure constant electrical grounding of the sample. The electrode leads are electrically connected to a pH meter of aay standard type.

  15. Aminoglycoside toxicity: pH dependent inhibition of ADH response.

    PubMed

    Goodman, D B; Souliere, C R; Forrest, J N

    1986-05-01

    The effect of aminoglycoside antibiotics on the response of the isolated toad urinary bladder to antidiuretic hormone (ADH) was investigated. Gentamicin and neomycin both acidify the serosal bathing solution and cause a dose-dependent inhibition of the hydroosmotic response to ADH, while streptomycin has minimal effect on media pH and causes no inhibition of the response to ADH. Detailed studies employing gentamicin indicate that acidification stimulates production of PGE2, a known inhibitor of the hydroosmotic response of the toad bladder to ADH. When media pH is rigidly controlled or PGE2 production is inhibited by indomethacin, the inhibitory effect of gentamicin on the response to ADH is ameliorated. These studies suggest that the defect in renal concentrating ability seen as part of aminoglycoside nephrotoxicity could be due, in part, to an acidification-induced, prostaglandin-mediated resistance to the action of ADH.

  16. Miniature Chemical Optical Fiber Sensors For Ph Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boisde, G.; Perez, J. J.

    1987-10-01

    A miniature optode (diameter about 1 mm) was built with 200/280 all-silica fibers usable over long distances. The immobilized indicator is fixed on a cross-linked styrene/divinyl-benzene copolymer (XADZI). The sensors are constructed so that measurements can be taken either by absorption at many different points in the single optical fiber, or by reflection from the end of the fiber. A wide range of pH values are encountered with radioactive wastes, and experiments are performed either with bromophenol blue (3.0 to 6.0) or a double-indicator (thymol blue) between 0.8 and 3.2, and 9 and 13 pH, as well as other indicators. Lifetimes, reversibility and kinetics are considered. A new low-cost device is proposed for chemical process control and medical applications.

  17. Biochar contribution to soil pH buffer capacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tonutare, Tonu; Krebstein, Kadri; Utso, Maarius; Rodima, Ako; Kolli, Raimo; Shanskiy, Merrit

    2014-05-01

    Biochar as ecologically clean and stable form of carbon has complex of physical and chemical properties which make it a potentially powerful soil amendment (Mutezo, 2013). Therefore during the last decade the biochar application as soil amendment has been a matter for a great number of investigations. For the ecological viewpoint the trend of decreasing of soil organic matter in European agricultural land is a major problem. Society is faced with the task to find possibilities to stabilize or increase soil organic matter content in soil and quality. The availability of different functional groups (e.g. carboxylic, phenolic, acidic, alcoholic, amine, amide) allows soil organic matter to buffer over a wide range of soil pH values (Krull et al. 2004). Therefore the loss of soil organic matter also reduces cation exchange capacity resulting in lower nutrient retention (Kimetu et al. 2008). Biochar can retain elements in soil directly through the negative charge that develops on its surfaces, and this negative charge can buffer acidity in the soil. There are lack of investigations about the effect of biochar to soil pH buffering properties, The aim of our investigation was to investigate the changes in soil pH buffer capacity in a result of addition of carbonizated material to temperate region soils. In the experiment different kind of softwood biochars, activated carbon and different soil types with various organic matter and pH were used. The study soils were Albeluvisols, Leptosols, Cambisols, Regosols and Histosols . In the experiment the series of the soil: biochar mixtures with the biochar content 0 to 100% were used. The times of equiliberation between solid and liquid phase were from 1 to 168 hours. The suspension of soil: biochar mixtures was titrated with HCl solution. The titration curves were established and pH buffer capacities were calculated for the pH interval from 3.0 to 10.0. The results demonstrate the dependence of pH buffer capacity from soil type

  18. Adsorption of polyetheramines on montmorillonite at high pH.

    PubMed

    Cui, Yannan; van Duijneveldt, Jeroen S

    2010-11-16

    Adsorption of a series of polyetheramines on montmorillonite in aqueous suspension was investigated by a range of methods: elemental analysis, atomic absorption spectroscopy, measurement of pH, conductivity and electrophoretic mobility, and small-angle X-ray scattering. Adsorption proceeds through an ion exchange mechanism. The maximum surface coverage attained is equivalent to about 40% of the cationic exchange capacity of the clay. Adsorption of the poly(oxypropylene) block adjacent to the amine group onto the clay surface may contribute to this. Surprisingly the adsorption takes place at pH conditions well above the pK(a) of the amine surfactants, where they are not protonated in the bulk solution. The surface coverage as a function of molar mass broadly agrees with predictions assuming adsorbed polymers adopt a densely packed mushroom configuration at the clay surface.

  19. Postgraduate research training: the PhD and MD thesis.

    PubMed

    Higginson, I; Corner, J

    1996-04-01

    Higher research degrees, such as the PhD, MPhil and MD, have existed within universities for 80 years or more, although the differences between the MD and PhD remain confused. A higher research degree training provides individuals with greater research knowledge and skills, and benefits the specialty. Concern exists about the levels of supervision sometimes provided, failure to complete degrees, and the variable levels of research knowledge and skills attained. We propose that higher research degrees in palliative care have four functions: extending personal scholarship, generating knowledge, training for the individual and contributing to the growth of the specialty. Such an approach may include: a formalised first year with taught components such as in research MSc programmes, formal supervision and progress assessment. In palliative care, clinical and academic approaches need greater integration. Multiprofessional learning is essential. To allow individuals to undertake higher research degree programmes, fellowships or specific funding are needed.

  20. pH adjustment schedule for the amide local anesthetics.

    PubMed

    Ikuta, P T; Raza, S M; Durrani, Z; Vasireddy, A R; Winnie, A P; Masters, R W

    1989-01-01

    Several studies have indicated that the addition of sodium bicarbonate to solutions of local anesthetics to raise the pH closer to the pKa shortens the latency, increases the intensity, and prolongs the duration of the resultant neural blockade. However, the addition of too much bicarbonate will cause precipitation, and this may result in the injection of particulate free base along with the solution. The present study was carried out to determine the maximal amount of sodium bicarbonate that can be added to each of the amide local anesthetics without the formation of a precipitate, and, thus, to construct a pH adjustment schedule to simplify the alkalinization of local anesthetics in clinical practice.

  1. [Lipid metabolism of caddisfly larvae at low pH].

    PubMed

    Regerand, T I; Nefedova, Z A; Toĭvonen, L T; Dubrovina, L V; Vuory, K-M; Markova, L V; Ruokolaĭnen, T R

    2002-01-01

    The influence of low pH (5.0 and 4.0) on lipid metabolism of caddisworms Hydropsyche contubernalis L. (Trichoptera) was studied in 48 h toxicity experiments. The results were correlated with lipid composition of caddisworms directly isolated from natural water. Phospholipids, cholesterol, mono-, di-, triacylglycerols, and fatty acids were detected by thin-layer and liquid chromatography. Minimal environmental changes were shown to initiate the biochemical adaptation mechanisms strengthening the cellular membranes through their condensation due to additional phospholipid and cholesterol synthesis. In the natural medium the adaptation processes are more active than in the artificial medium. More serious changes, such as pH decrease to 4.0, suppress the adaptation processes in the first medium and terminated them in the second one.

  2. Biona-C Cell Culture pH Monitoring System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedericks, C.

    1999-01-01

    Sensors 2000! is developing a system to demonstrate the ability to perform accurate, real-time measurements of pH and CO2 in a cell culture media in Space. The BIONA-C Cell Culture pH Monitoring System consists of S2K! developed ion selective sensors and control electronics integrated with the fluidics of a cell culture system. The integrated system comprises a "rail" in the Cell Culture Module (CCM) of WRAIR (Space Biosciences of Walter Read Army Institute of Research). The CCM is a Space Shuttle mid-deck locker experiment payload. The BIONA-C is displayed along with associated graphics and text explanations. The presentation will stimulate interest in development of sensor technology for real-time cell culture measurements. The transfer of this technology to other applications will also be of interest. Additional information is contained in the original document.

  3. Sex differentials in the earnings of Ph.D.s.

    PubMed

    Ferber, M A; Kordick, B

    1978-01-01

    Using a survey of two cohorts of men and women who received Ph.D.s in the years 1958-63 and 1967-72, the authors test two hypotheses: (1) that the relatively lower earnings of highly educated women can be explained largely by their career interruptions and by their lesser willingness to accumulate human capital in anticipation of such interruptions, and (2) that the differential in earnings between men and women increases with age because of career interruptions and that the gap narrows once women reenter the labor force on a permanent basis The findings do not lend support to either of these hypotheses, leading the authors to reject the proposition that the lower rewards of women Ph.D.s are primarily caused by their own voluntary decisions.

  4. Chromatographic hydrophobicity index: pH profile for polyprotic compounds.

    PubMed

    Fuguet, Elisabet; Ràfols, Clara; Bosch, Elisabeth; Rosés, Martí

    2009-11-06

    The Chromatographic Hydrophobicity Index (CHI) has been measured for several diprotic compounds. In order to model the variation of CHI with pH, a general equation for polyprotic compounds which allows the calculation of CHI for each one of the species has been proposed. Different types of diprotic solutes have been selected: neutral acids, neutral bases, and amphiprotic compounds (non-zwitterionic and zwitterionic). The applicability of the model to these complex polyprotic compounds, its advantages and limitations, as well as the information provided by the fits is discussed. In general, the model fits the experimental behaviour of all kind of solutes very well, obtaining the higher hydrophobicity values for the neutral form of the compounds, except for the zwitterionic phenylalanine. The equation and parameters obtained allow an easy calculation of CHI of the compound at any pH value.

  5. Reconstructing Ocean pH with Boron Isotopes in Foraminifera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, Gavin L.; Rae, James W. B.

    2016-06-01

    In order to better understand the effect of CO2 on the Earth system in the future, geologists may look to CO2-induced environmental change in Earth's past. Here we describe how CO2 can be reconstructed using the boron isotopic composition (δ11B) of marine calcium carbonate. We review the chemical principles that underlie the proxy, summarize the available calibration data, and detail how boron isotopes can be used to estimate ocean pH and ultimately atmospheric CO2 in the past. δ11B in a variety of marine carbonates shows a coherent relationship with seawater pH, in broad agreement with simple models for this proxy. Offsets between measured and predicted δ11B may in part be explained by physiological influences, though the exact mechanisms of boron incorporation into carbonate remain unknown. Despite these uncertainties, we demonstrate that δ11B may provide crucial constraints on past ocean acidification and atmospheric CO2.

  6. Biona-C Cell Culture pH Monitoring System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedericks, C.

    1999-01-01

    Sensors 2000! is developing a system to demonstrate the ability to perform accurate, real-time measurements of pH and CO2 in a cell culture media in Space. The BIONA-C Cell Culture pH Monitoring System consists of S2K! developed ion selective sensors and control electronics integrated with the fluidics of a cell culture system. The integrated system comprises a "rail" in the Cell Culture Module (CCM) of WRAIR (Space Biosciences of Walter Read Army Institute of Research). The CCM is a Space Shuttle mid-deck locker experiment payload. The BIONA-C is displayed along with associated graphics and text explanations. The presentation will stimulate interest in development of sensor technology for real-time cell culture measurements. The transfer of this technology to other applications will also be of interest. Additional information is contained in the original document.

  7. A high-throughput colourimetric method for the determination of pH in crystallization screens.

    PubMed

    Kirkwood, Jobie; Wilson, Julie; O'Keefe, Simon; Hargreaves, David

    2014-09-01

    The crystallization of proteins is dependent on the careful control of numerous parameters, one of these being pH. The pH of crystallization is generally reported as that of the buffer; however, the true pH has been found to be as many as four pH units away. Measurement of pH with a meter is time-consuming and requires the reformatting of the crystallization solution. To overcome this, a high-throughput method for pH determination of buffered solutions has been developed with results comparable to those of a pH meter.

  8. School Budget Hold'em Facilitator's Guide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Education Resource Strategies, 2012

    2012-01-01

    "School Budget Hold'em" is a game designed to help school districts rethink their budgeting process. It evolved out of Education Resource Strategies' (ERS) experience working with large urban districts around the country. "School Budget Hold'em" offers a completely new approach--one that can turn the budgeting process into a long-term visioning…

  9. Hala Azzam, PhD, MPH | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    Dr. Hala Azzam is a Cancer Epidemiologist in the Cancer Prevention Fellowship Program (CPFP) in the Division of Cancer Prevention within the National Cancer Institute. She received her Bachelor's degree in molecular biology from Kings College London University, her PhD in anatomy and cell biology from Georgetown University Lombardi Cancer Center, and her MPH in epidemiology from Johns Hopkins University. She is also a CPFP alumna. |

  10. Altaf Mohammed, PhD | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    Dr. Altaf Mohammed serves as a Program Director and COR for the Chemopreventive Agent Development Research Group (CADRG), Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP), National Cancer Institute (NCI). Dr. Mohammed obtained his Ph.D. in Microbiology from India before moving to the Department of Medicine at University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center (OUHSC) in Oklahoma City for a post-doctoral fellowship in carcinogenesis and cancer chemoprevention.  Dr. |

  11. Micellar Enzymology for Thermal, pH, and Solvent Stability.

    PubMed

    Minteer, Shelley D

    2017-01-01

    This chapter describes methods for enzyme stabilization using micellar solutions. Micellar solutions have been shown to increase the thermal stability, as well as the pH and solvent tolerance of enzymes. This field is traditionally referred to as micellar enzymology. This chapter details the use of ionic and nonionic micelles for the stabilization of polyphenol oxidase, lipase, and catalase, although this method could be used with any enzymatic system or enzyme cascade system.

  12. Urinary pH, cigarette smoking and bladder cancer risk

    PubMed Central

    Alguacil, Juan; Kogevinas, Manolis; Silverman, Debra T.; Malats, Núria; Real, Francisco X.; García-Closas, Montserrat; Tardón, Adonina; Rivas, Manuel; Torà, Montserrat; García-Closas, Reina; Serra, Consol; Carrato, Alfredo; Pfeiffer, Ruth M.; Fortuny, Joan; Samanic, Claudine; Rothman, Nathaniel

    2011-01-01

    Glucuronide conjugates of 4-aminobiphenyl and its N-hydroxy metabolite can be rapidly hydrolyzed in acidic urine to undergo further metabolic activation and form DNA adducts in the urothelium. We conducted a large multicenter case–control study in Spain to explore the etiology of bladder cancer and evaluated the association between urine pH and bladder cancer risk, alone and in combination with cigarette smoking. In total, 712 incident urothelial cell carcinoma cases and 611 hospital controls directly measured their urine pH with dipsticks twice a day (first void in the morning and early in the evening) during four consecutive days 2 weeks after hospital discharge. We found that a consistently acidic urine pH ≤6.0 was associated with an increased risk of bladder cancer [odds ratio (OR) = 1.5, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.2–1.9] compared with all other subjects. Furthermore, risk estimates for smoking intensity and risk of bladder cancer among current smokers tended to be higher for those with a consistently acidic urine (OR = 8.8, 11.5 and 23.8) compared with those without (OR = 4.3, 7.7 and 5.8, respectively, for 1–19, 20–29 and 30+ cigarettes per day; Pinteraction for 30+ cigarettes per day = 0.024). These results suggest that urine pH, which is determined primarily by diet and body surface area, may be an important modifier of smoking and risk of bladder cancer. PMID:21402590

  13. Young Kim, PhD | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    Young S Kim, PhD, joined the Division of Cancer Prevention at the National Cancer Institute in 1998 as a Program Director who oversees and monitors NCI grants in the area of Nutrition and Cancer. She serves as an expert in nutrition, molecular biology, and genomics as they relate to cancer prevention. Dr. Kim assists with research initiatives that will advance nutritional science and lead to human health benefits. |

  14. The Research Doctorate in Nursing: The PhD.

    PubMed

    Rice, David

    2016-03-01

    When nurses are considering an advanced degree beyond the master's level of educational preparation, a number of considerations may direct the decision-making process. The doctorate of philosophy (PhD) in nursing is a research degree that will well serve nurses who have the desire to apply theory and develop formal programs of research, become faculty of nursing, combine clinical practice with formal research, and advance through professional leadership in the ranks of hospitals and health systems organizations. 
.

  15. Lynn Sorbara, PhD | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    Dr. Lynn Sorbara earned her PhD from Albert Einstein College of Medicine in 1986. Her thesis research was in the areas of the mechanism of action of the drug, Taxol, and of multidrug resistance. After postdoctoral fellowships at the Rockefeller University and the Mount Sinai College of Medicine in Manhattan, she came to the NIH as a Senior Staff Fellow in the Diabetes Branch of NIDDK. |

  16. Iranian PhD student wins human-rights prize

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cartwright, Jon

    2013-11-01

    A physicist imprisoned in Iran while on a break from his PhD studies in the US has been awarded a human-rights prize. Omid Kokabee, who had been based at the University of Texas in Austin, has been given the Andrei Sakharov Prize from the American Physical Society (APS) for "his courage in refusing to use his physics knowledge to work on projects that he deemed harmful to humanity, in the face of extreme physical and psychological pressure".

  17. Testing the pH of Soft Drinks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christmann, Edwin P.; Holy, Adam J.

    2005-01-01

    In this article, the authors describe how to use a TI-73/83/84 graphing calculator and Vernier's LabPro/CBL2 probe system to take pH readings. This is not an endorsement of these products, but simply the authors' attempt to give readers an idea of what is involved in using this technology in the classroom. This activity can be accomplished using a…

  18. Vernon Steele, PhD, MPH | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    Dr. Vernon Steele is a Program Director and Group Leader for the Chemoprevention Agent Development Research Group in the NCI Division of Cancer Prevention. He earned his MS and PhD degrees in Radiation Biology at the University of Rochester in 1975 studying radiation effects on cell differentiation. He recently received his Masters of Public Health degree from Johns Hopkins University focusing on environmental toxicology. |

  19. Boost in minorities doing PhDs in the US

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banks, Michael

    2009-05-01

    The number of people from underrepresented minorities doing PhDs in the physical sciences in the US has increased "dramatically" since 2000, according to a new report by the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). While there was little difference in the number of African, Hispanic and Native American students studying subjects such as economics and sociology, the numbers doing physical sciences increased by almost 50%.

  20. Timing of binary and millisecond PKSMB/PH pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eatough, Ralph; Possenti, Andrea; Manchester, Dick; Kramer, Michael; Lyne, Andrew; Hobbs, George; Burgay, Marta; Camilo, Fernando; Stairs, Ingrid; Keith, Michael; Lorimer, Duncan Ross; Jaroenjittichai, Phrudth

    2010-04-01

    This proposal concentrates the timing observations of binary and millisecond pulsars discovered by us in the Parkes Multibeam (PKSMB) and high-latitude (PH) surveys. In order to fully exploit the scientific promises of our discoveries it is essential to perform continued timing observations. It is crucial that the observing sessions be spaced at three-to-five week intervals. The pulsars will be visible during LST 10:00-19:00 and the project should be scheduled within this interval.

  1. Timing of binary and millisecond PKSMB/PH pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eatough, Ralph; Possenti, Andrea; Manchester, Dick; Kramer, Michael; Lyne, Andrew; Hobbs, George; Burgay, Marta; Camilo, Fernando; Stairs, Ingrid; Keith, Michael; Lorimer, Duncan Ross; Jaroenjittichai, Phrudth

    2009-10-01

    This proposal concentrates the timing observations of binary and millisecond pulsars discovered by us in the Parkes Multibeam (PKSMB) and high-latitude (PH) surveys. In order to fully exploit the scientific promises of our discoveries it is essential to perform continued timing observations. It is crucial that the observing sessions be spaced at three-to-five week intervals. The pulsars will be visible during LST 10:00-19:00 and the project should be scheduled within this interval.

  2. Timing of binary and millisecond PKSMB/PH pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eatough, Ralph; Possenti, Andrea; Manchester, Dick; Verbiest, Joris P. W.; Kramer, Michael; Lyne, Andrew; Hobbs, George; Burgay, Marta; Camilo, Fernando; Stairs, Ingrid; Keith, Michael; Lorimer, Duncan Ross

    2010-10-01

    This proposal concentrates the timing observations of binary and millisecond pulsars discovered by us in the Parkes Multibeam (PKSMB) and high-latitude (PH) surveys. In order to fully exploit the scientific promises of our discoveries it is essential to perform continued timing observations. It is crucial that the observing sessions be spaced at three-to-five week intervals. The pulsars will be visible during LST 10:00-19:00 and the project should be scheduled within this interval.

  3. Timing of binary and millisecond PKSMB/PH pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramer, Michael; Possenti, Andrea; Manchester, Dick; Lyne, Andrew; Hobbs, George; McLaughlin, Maura; Burgay, Marta; D'Amico, Nichi; Camilo, Fernando; Stairs, Ingrid; Faulkner, Andrew; Lorimer, Duncan Ross

    2007-04-01

    This proposal concentrates the timing observations of binary and millisecond pulsars discovered by us in the Parkes Multibeam (PKSMB) and high-latitude (PH) surveys. In order to fully exploit the scientific promises of our discoveries it is essential to perform continued timing observations. It is crucial that the observing sessions be spaced at three-to-five week intervals. The pulsars will be visible during LST 10:00-19:00 and the project should be scheduled within this interval.

  4. Timing of binary and millisecond PKSMB/PH pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramer, Michael; Possenti, Andrea; Manchester, Dick; Lyne, Andrew; Hobbs, George; McLaughlin, Maura; Burgay, Marta; D'Amico, Nichi; Stairs, Ingrid; Faulkner, Andrew; Eatough, Ralph; Lorimer, Duncan Ross

    2008-04-01

    This proposal concentrates the timing observations of binary and millisecond pulsars discovered by us in the Parkes Multibeam (PKSMB) and high-latitude (PH) surveys. In order to fully exploit the scientific promises of our discoveries it is essential to perform continued timing observations. It is crucial that the observing sessions be spaced at three-to-five week intervals. The pulsars will be visible during LST 10:00-19:00 and the project should be scheduled within this interval.

  5. Timing of binary and millisecond PKSMB/PH pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramer, Michael; Possenti, Andrea; Manchester, Dick; Lyne, Andrew; Hobbs, George; McLaughlin, Maura; Burgay, Marta; D'Amico, Nichi; Stairs, Ingrid; Faulkner, Andrew; Eatough, Ralph; Lorimer, Duncan Ross

    2007-10-01

    This proposal concentrates the timing observations of binary and millisecond pulsars discovered by us in the Parkes Multibeam (PKSMB) and high-latitude (PH) surveys. In order to fully exploit the scientific promises of our discoveries it is essential to perform continued timing observations. It is crucial that the observing sessions be spaced at three-to-five week intervals. The pulsars will be visible during LST 10:00-19:00 and the project should be scheduled within this interval.

  6. Timing of binary and millisecond PKSMB/PH pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramer, Michael; Possenti, Andrea; Manchester, Dick; Lyne, Andrew; Hobbs, George; McLaughlin, Maura; Burgay, Marta; D'Amico, Nichi; Camilo, Fernando; Stairs, Ingrid; Faulkner, Andrew; Lorimer, Duncan Ross

    2006-10-01

    This proposal concentrates the timing observations of binary and millisecond pulsars discovered by us in the Parkes Multibeam (PKSMB) and high-latitude (PH) surveys. In order to fully exploit the scientific promises of our discoveries it is essential to perform continued timing observations. It is crucial that the observing sessions be spaced at three-to-five week intervals. The pulsars will be visible during LST 10:00-19:00 and the project should be scheduled within this interval.

  7. Timing of binary and millisecond PKSMB/PH pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eatough, Ralph; Possenti, Andrea; Manchester, Dick; Kramer, Michael; Lyne, Andrew; Hobbs, George; McLaughlin, Maura; Burgay, Marta; D'Amico, Nichi; Stairs, Ingrid; Faulkner, Andrew; Lorimer, Duncan Ross

    2009-04-01

    This proposal concentrates the timing observations of binary and millisecond pulsars discovered by us in the Parkes Multibeam (PKSMB) and high-latitude (PH) surveys. In order to fully exploit the scientific promises of our discoveries it is essential to perform continued timing observations. It is crucial that the observing sessions be spaced at three-to-five week intervals. The pulsars will be visible during LST 10:00-19:00 and the project should be scheduled within this interval.

  8. Modeling of glucose pH enzyme electrode

    SciTech Connect

    Sarbolouki, M.N.; Ghoorchian, H.; Mozaffari, S. )

    1990-08-01

    Fabrication of a modified glucose pH enzyme electrode, using cellulose acetate instead of cellophane, and its performance are described. A physico-mathematical model that considers glucose transport across the membrane from the bulk into the enzyme solution layer, subsequent proton generation as a consequence of glucose oxidation by the enzyme glucose oxidase, and proton transport back through the membrane into the bulk solution is developed. Proper rate equations are simultaneously solved. Experimental and theoretical results are compared.

  9. Can anthocyanins improve maintenance therapy of Ph(+) acute lymphoblastic leukaemia?

    PubMed

    Köchling, Joachim; Schmidt, Manuel; Rott, Yvonne; Sagner, Michael; Ungefroren, Hendrik; Wittig, Burghard; Henze, Günter

    2013-04-01

    Chemotherapy and tyrosine kinase inhibitors provide high remission rates. However, prognosis of adult patients with Philadelphia chromosome-positive acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (Ph(+) ALL) still remains poor. Because most adults eventually relapse without allogeneic stem cell transplantation, which is not available for all patients, novel strategies are required for relapse prevention. As the integrity of the immune system is essential for the control of remaining leukaemia cells, we compared the efficacy of anthocyanins, imatinib and a DNA-based vaccine as non-immunosuppressant components with 6-mercaptopurine (6-MP) to control minimal residual disease in vitro and in vivo using different leukaemia cell lines and syngeneic mice. Proliferation of Ph(+) ALL was significantly better inhibited by anthocyanin-rich berry extract or imatinib compared with 6-MP. Although anthocyanins induced apoptosis in some leukaemia cell lines, the level of caspase-3, caspase-8 and caspase-9 was significantly lower compared with imatinib and 6-MP. When used as single components, anthocyanins and imatinib mesylate failed to eradicate pre-existing Ph(+) ALL in syngeneic mice, while 6-MP led to 10% and DNA vaccination to 56% survival. Intriguingly, only the combination of DNA vaccination with berry extract but not with the isolated anthocyanin, cyanidin-3-rutinoside or imatinib further increased leukaemia-free and overall survival, and 90% of lethally challenged mice survived. We suggest that induction and enhancement of a leukaemia-specific immunity by DNA vaccination and anthocyanin-rich berry extract can also decrease the relapse rate in patients with Ph(+) ALL. Furthermore, this approach may serve as strategy for maintenance therapy of other malignancies.

  10. Hydrogen Embrittlement in 17-4PH Stainless Steel

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-08-01

    is observed to exhibit microplastic tearing mixed with some quasi- cleavage. When exposed to longer hydrogen charging times, specimens in the higher...Hours, (a) Central Region Illustrating Dimpled Rupture, (b) and 0-) Shell Region Near Edge Exhibiting Microplastic Tearing. 20 NTAC TP 6 3 43 (a) (b) (c...Shell Region Near Edge Exhibiting Microplastic Tearing. 21 ’JWC TP 6343 FIGURE 15. SEM Fractographv Showing Intergranular Fracture (if 17-4PH- in

  11. EM Cep: The Be Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochiashvili, N.; Kochiashvili, I.; Natsvlishvili, R.; Vardosanidze, M.; Beradze, S.

    2017-07-01

    On the basis of UBVR photometric data, obtained in the Abastumani Observatory during 1991-1999, very interesting and unusual flare of EM Cep has been revealed. Duration of the flare was over two hours. We estimated the percentage of brightness increase during the flare and brightness decrease of the corresponding anti- flare and the minimum amount of the lost mass during this event. We have solved the light curves of the star using the Wilson-Devinney code. But the resulting fraction of calculated brightness of the companion star was not in accordance with spectral data. Then we decided to check the idea of a pulsating single star using new spectral data. Together with our Buyrakan colleagues we obtained and analyzed spectra of the star. We could not find spectral lines of a companion star or any traces of the radial velocities using this data. Hence, we concluded that we need the higher resolution spectra for final resolution of the matter. On the basis of the latest spectral data of Bulgarian astronomers they concluded that EM Cep is a single star. This makes it possible to suggest, that the question of stellar pulsation could be solved using additional photometric observations.

  12. Modeling pH variation in reverse osmosis.

    PubMed

    Nir, Oded; Bishop, Noga Fridman; Lahav, Ori; Freger, Viatcheslav

    2015-12-15

    The transport of hydronium and hydroxide ions through reverse osmosis membranes constitutes a unique case of ionic species characterized by uncommonly high permeabilities. Combined with electromigration, this leads to complex behavior of permeate pH, e.g., negative rejection, as often observed for monovalent ions in nanofiltration of salt mixtures. In this work we employed a rigorous phenomenological approach combined with chemical equilibrium to describe the trans-membrane transport of hydronium and hydroxide ions along with salt transport and calculate the resulting permeate pH. Starting from the Nernst-Planck equation, a full non-linear transport equation was derived, for which an approximate solution was proposed based on the analytical solution previously developed for trace ions in a dominant salt. Using the developed approximate equation, transport coefficients were deduced from experimental results obtained using a spiral wound reverse osmosis module operated under varying permeate flux (2-11 μm/s), NaCl feed concentrations (0.04-0.18 M) and feed pH values (5.5-9.0). The approximate equation agreed well with the experimental results, corroborating the finding that diffusion and electromigration, rather than a priori neglected convection, were the major contributors to the transport of hydronium and hydroxide. The approach presented here has the potential to improve the predictive capacity of reverse osmosis transport models for acid-base species, thereby improving process design/control. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Advanced Biotelemetry Systems for Space Life Sciences: PH Telemetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hines, John W.; Somps, Chris; Ricks, Robert; Kim, Lynn; Connolly, John P. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    The SENSORS 2000! (S2K!) program at NASA's Ames Research Center is currently developing a biotelemetry system for monitoring pH and temperature in unrestrained subjects. This activity is part of a broader scope effort to provide an Advanced Biotelemetry System (ABTS) for use in future space life sciences research. Many anticipated research endeavors will require biomedical and biochemical sensors and related instrumentation to make continuous inflight measurements in a variable-gravity environment. Since crew time is limited, automated data acquisition, data processing, data storage, and subject health monitoring are required. An automated biochemical and physiological data acquisition system based on non invasive or implantable biotelemetry technology will meet these requirements. The ABTS will ultimately acquire a variety of physiological measurands including temperature, biopotentials (e.g. ECG, EEG, EMG, EOG), blood pressure, flow and dimensions, as well as chemical and biological parameters including pH. Development activities are planned in evolutionary, leveraged steps. Near-term activities include 1) development of a dual channel pH/temperature telemetry system, and 2) development of a low bandwidth, 4-channel telemetry system, that measures temperature, heart rate, pressure, and pH. This abstract describes the pH/temperature telemeter.

  14. Advanced Biotelemetry Systems for Space Life Sciences: PH Telemetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hines, John W.; Somps, Chris; Ricks, Robert; Kim, Lynn; Connolly, John P. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    The SENSORS 2000! (S2K!) program at NASA's Ames Research Center is currently developing a biotelemetry system for monitoring pH and temperature in unrestrained subjects. This activity is part of a broader scope effort to provide an Advanced Biotelemetry System (ABTS) for use in future space life sciences research. Many anticipated research endeavors will require biomedical and biochemical sensors and related instrumentation to make continuous inflight measurements in a variable-gravity environment. Since crew time is limited, automated data acquisition, data processing, data storage, and subject health monitoring are required. An automated biochemical and physiological data acquisition system based on non invasive or implantable biotelemetry technology will meet these requirements. The ABTS will ultimately acquire a variety of physiological measurands including temperature, biopotentials (e.g. ECG, EEG, EMG, EOG), blood pressure, flow and dimensions, as well as chemical and biological parameters including pH. Development activities are planned in evolutionary, leveraged steps. Near-term activities include 1) development of a dual channel pH/temperature telemetry system, and 2) development of a low bandwidth, 4-channel telemetry system, that measures temperature, heart rate, pressure, and pH. This abstract describes the pH/temperature telemeter.

  15. Acidic pH environment induces autophagy in osteoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhichao; Lai, Qingguo; Li, Yanan; Xu, Chao; Tang, Xiaopeng; Ci, Jiangbo; Sun, Shaolong; Xu, Bingbing; Li, Yan

    2017-01-01

    Osteoblasts (OBs) play an important role in bone fracture healing, yet the extreme adverse microenvironment in fracture sites has a negative impact on the survival of OBs. Therefore, it is important to study how OBs behave in the complex fracture microenvironment. Studies have shown that autophagy plays a pivotal role in maintaining cellular homeostasis and defending the cell against adverse microenvironments. In this study we found the induction of autophagy in OBs at femoral bone fracture sites, which may be a result of ischemia, oxidative stress and hypoxia within the local area. At fracture sites a low pH environment also developed. Until now it has been unclear whether the induction of autophagy in osteoblasts is triggered by the acidic pH environment. Therefore, we cultured OBs in vitro in media of different pH values, and found both autophagy and apoptosis increased in OBs in acidic conditions. However, when autophagy inhibitor chloroquine (CQ) was used, apoptosis increased significantly compared with that without CQ. Thus indicating that inhibition of autophagy may promote apoptosis in OBs in an acidic environment, which may provide a new therapeutic strategy to decrease cell apoptosis in OBs through the use of drugs that modulate the autophagic state. PMID:28382973

  16. Optoelectronic Instrument Monitors pH in a Culture Medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Melody M.; Pellis, Neal; Jeevarajan, Anthony S.; Taylor, Thomas D.

    2004-01-01

    An optoelectronic instrument monitors the pH of an aqueous cell-culture medium in a perfused rotating-wall-vessel bioreactor. The instrument is designed to satisfy the following requirements: It should be able to measure the pH of the medium continuously with an accuracy of 0.1 in the range from 6.5 to 7.5. It should be noninvasive. Any material in contact with the culture medium should be sterilizable as well as nontoxic to the cells to be grown in the medium. The biofilm that inevitably grows on any surface in contact with the medium should not affect the accuracy of the pH measurement. It should be possible to obtain accurate measurements after only one calibration performed prior to a bioreactor cell run. The instrument should be small and lightweight. The instrument includes a quartz cuvette through which the culture medium flows as it is circulated through the bioreactor. The cuvette is sandwiched between light source on one side and a photodetector on the other side. The light source comprises a red and a green light-emitting diode (LED) that are repeatedly flashed in alternation with a cycle time of 5 s. The responses of the photodiode to the green and red LEDs are processed electronically to obtain a quantity proportional to the ratio between the amounts of green and red light transmitted through the medium.

  17. pH optrode for the complete working range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vishnoi, Gargi; Goel, Tara C.; Pillai, P. K. C.

    1999-01-01

    We report a fast response and inexpensive optical sensor capable of measuring pH in the range of 0.5 to 13.5 units with good resolution. Three indicator dyes viz. Bromocresol Green, Bromothymol Blue and Nile Blue were used to fabricate the sensor head. ion-exchange resin, Amberlite IRA 400, was powdered and immobilized by these dye solutions. In order to prepare sensing membranes, Polyvinyl chloride was dissolved in Tetrahydrofuran and the solution was poured on to a glass plate. Before the membrane was completely dry, the immobilized resin powder was uniformly sprinkled so that the granules are properly glued to it. A bundle of fibers was attached to the membrane mechanically to carry the light from the source to the membrane and collect the reflected optical signal. He-He laser was used as a light source. The experimental results show a linear dependence of pH value on reflected optical signal for the pH range of 0.5 to 13.5 with the resolution of 0.02 unit. The optrode was also characterized by studying the effect of ionic strength and temperature of the solution on the probe response.

  18. No nitrification in lakes below pH 3.

    PubMed

    Jeschke, Christina; Falagán, Carmen; Knöller, Kay; Schultze, Martin; Koschorreck, Matthias

    2013-12-17

    Lakes affected by acid mine drainage (AMD) or acid rain often contain elevated concentrations of ammonium, which threatens water quality. It is commonly assumed that this is due to the inhibition of microbial nitrification in acidic water, but nitrification was never directly measured in mine pit lakes. For the first time, we measured nitrification by (15)NH4Cl isotope tracer addition in acidic as well as neutral mine pit lakes in Spain and Germany. Nitrification activity was only detected in neutral lakes. In acidic lakes no conversion of (15)NH4(+) to (15)NO3(-) was observed. This was true both for the water column as well as for biofilms on the surface of macrophytes or dead wood and the oxic surface layer of the sediment. Stable isotope analysis of nitrate showed (18)O values typical for nitrification only in neutral lakes. In a comparison of NH4(+) concentrations in 297 surface waters with different pH, ammonium concentrations higher 10 mg NH4-N L(-1) were only observed in lakes below pH 3. On the basis of the results from stable isotope investigations and the examination of a metadata set we conclude that the lower limit for nitrification in lakes is around pH 3.

  19. The EM algorithm in medical imaging.

    PubMed

    Kay, J

    1997-03-01

    This article outlines the statistical developments that have taken place in the use of the EM algorithm in emission and transmission tomography during the past decade or so. We discuss the statistical aspects of the modelling of the projection data for both the emission and transmission cases and define the relevant probability models. This leads to the use of the method of maximum likelihood as a means of estimating the relevant unknown parameters within a given region of a patient's body and to the use of the EM algorithm to compute the reconstruction. Various different types of EM algorithm are discussed, including the SAGE algorithms of Fessler and Hero. The limitations of the EM algorithm, per se, are covered and the need for regularization is stressed. A number of different methods for penalizing the likelihood are described and a number of algorithms for the computation of the penalized EM reconstruction are discussed.

  20. Side mounted EMS for aluminium scrap melters

    SciTech Connect

    Eidem, M.; Tallbaeck, G.; Hanley, P.J.

    1996-10-01

    Normally the electromagnetic stirrer (EMS) is placed below the furnace. However it has recently been found that the EMS can also be placed at the side of the furnace, still giving good stirring. This makes it possible to install EMS on most existing furnaces. The side-mounted EMS is compared with the standard bottom-mounted stirrer with respect to installation, melting time and flow pattern in the melt. The major conclusion is that a side-mounted EMS is practical and will give about as good a performance as the bottom-mounted. Melting time estimates are based upon 3-D fluid flow and heat transfer predictions in combination with a simplified scrap melting theory. Predicted melting times are in fair agreement with operational data for mechanically stirred and electromagnetically bottom stirred furnaces.