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Sample records for phage display derived

  1. Drugs derived from phage display

    PubMed Central

    Nixon, Andrew E; Sexton, Daniel J; Ladner, Robert C

    2014-01-01

    Phage display, one of today’s fundamental drug discovery technologies, allows identification of a broad range of biological drugs, including peptides, antibodies and other proteins, with the ability to tailor critical characteristics such as potency, specificity and cross-species binding. Further, unlike in vivo technologies, generating phage display-derived antibodies is not restricted by immunological tolerance. Although more than 20 phage display-derived antibody and peptides are currently in late-stage clinical trials or approved, there is little literature addressing the specific challenges and successes in the clinical development of phage-derived drugs. This review uses case studies, from candidate identification through clinical development, to illustrate the utility of phage display as a drug discovery tool, and offers a perspective for future developments of phage display technology. PMID:24262785

  2. Phage display-derived human antibodies in clinical development and therapy

    PubMed Central

    Frenzel, André; Schirrmann, Thomas; Hust, Michael

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Over the last 3 decades, monoclonal antibodies have become the most important class of therapeutic biologicals on the market. Development of therapeutic antibodies was accelerated by recombinant DNA technologies, which allowed the humanization of murine monoclonal antibodies to make them more similar to those of the human body and suitable for a broad range of chronic diseases like cancer and autoimmune diseases. In the early 1990s in vitro antibody selection technologies were developed that enabled the discovery of “fully” human antibodies with potentially superior clinical efficacy and lowest immunogenicity. Antibody phage display is the first and most widely used of the in vitro selection technologies. It has proven to be a robust, versatile platform technology for the discovery of human antibodies and a powerful engineering tool to improve antibody properties. As of the beginning of 2016, 6 human antibodies discovered or further developed by phage display were approved for therapy. In 2002, adalimumab (Humira®) became the first phage display-derived antibody granted a marketing approval. Humira® was also the first approved human antibody, and it is currently the best-selling antibody drug on the market. Numerous phage display-derived antibodies are currently under advanced clinical investigation, and, despite the availability of other technologies such as human antibody-producing transgenic mice, phage display has not lost its importance for the discovery and engineering of therapeutic antibodies. Here, we provide a comprehensive overview about phage display-derived antibodies that are approved for therapy or in clinical development. A selection of these antibodies is described in more detail to demonstrate different aspects of the phage display technology and its development over the last 25 years. PMID:27416017

  3. A Phage Display Screening Derived Peptide with Affinity for the Adeninyl Moiety

    PubMed Central

    Elmlund, Louise; Söderberg, Pernilla; Suriyanarayanan, Subramanian; Nicholls, Ian A.

    2014-01-01

    Phage display screening of a surface-immobilized adenine derivative led to the identification of a heptameric peptide with selectivity for adenine as demonstrated through quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) studies. The peptide demonstrated a concentration dependent affinity for an adeninyl moiety decorated surface (KD of 968 ± 53.3 μM), which highlights the power of piezoelectric sensing in the study of weak interactions. PMID:25587414

  4. Phage display-derived binders able to distinguish Listeria monocytogenes from other Listeria species.

    PubMed

    Morton, Josephine; Karoonuthaisiri, Nitsara; Charlermroj, Ratthaphol; Stewart, Linda D; Elliott, Christopher T; Grant, Irene R

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to produce phage display-derived binders with the ability to distinguish Listeria monocytogenes from other Listeria spp., which may have potential utility to enhance detection of Listeria monocytogenes. To obtain binders with the desired binding specificity a series of surface and solution phage-display biopannings were performed. Initially, three rounds of surface biopanning against gamma-irradiated L. monocytogenes serovar 4b cells were performed followed by an additional surface biopanning round against L. monocytogenes 4b which included prior subtraction biopanning against gamma-irradiated L. innocua cells. In an attempt to further enhance binder specificity for L. monocytogenes 4b two rounds of solution biopanning were performed, both rounds included initial subtraction solution biopanning against L. innocua. Subsequent evaluations were performed on the phage clones by phage binding ELISA. All phage clones tested from the second round of solution biopanning had higher specificity for L. monocytogenes 4b than for L. innocua and three other foodborne pathogens (Salmonella spp., Escherichia coli and Campylobacter jejuni). Further evaluation with five other Listeria spp. revealed that one phage clone in particular, expressing peptide GRIADLPPLKPN, was highly specific for L. monocytogenes with at least 43-fold more binding capability to L. monocytogenes 4b than to any other Listeria sp. This proof-of-principle study demonstrates how a combination of surface, solution and subtractive biopanning was used to maximise binder specificity. L. monocytogenes-specific binders were obtained which could have potential application in novel detection tests for L. monocytogenes, benefiting both the food and medical industries. PMID:24040227

  5. Phage display-derived binders able to distinguish Listeria monocytogenes from other Listeria species.

    PubMed

    Morton, Josephine; Karoonuthaisiri, Nitsara; Charlermroj, Ratthaphol; Stewart, Linda D; Elliott, Christopher T; Grant, Irene R

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to produce phage display-derived binders with the ability to distinguish Listeria monocytogenes from other Listeria spp., which may have potential utility to enhance detection of Listeria monocytogenes. To obtain binders with the desired binding specificity a series of surface and solution phage-display biopannings were performed. Initially, three rounds of surface biopanning against gamma-irradiated L. monocytogenes serovar 4b cells were performed followed by an additional surface biopanning round against L. monocytogenes 4b which included prior subtraction biopanning against gamma-irradiated L. innocua cells. In an attempt to further enhance binder specificity for L. monocytogenes 4b two rounds of solution biopanning were performed, both rounds included initial subtraction solution biopanning against L. innocua. Subsequent evaluations were performed on the phage clones by phage binding ELISA. All phage clones tested from the second round of solution biopanning had higher specificity for L. monocytogenes 4b than for L. innocua and three other foodborne pathogens (Salmonella spp., Escherichia coli and Campylobacter jejuni). Further evaluation with five other Listeria spp. revealed that one phage clone in particular, expressing peptide GRIADLPPLKPN, was highly specific for L. monocytogenes with at least 43-fold more binding capability to L. monocytogenes 4b than to any other Listeria sp. This proof-of-principle study demonstrates how a combination of surface, solution and subtractive biopanning was used to maximise binder specificity. L. monocytogenes-specific binders were obtained which could have potential application in novel detection tests for L. monocytogenes, benefiting both the food and medical industries.

  6. High-level expression of a phage display-derived scFv in Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Damasceno, Leonardo M; Lee, Frank; Ritter, Gerd; Old, Lloyd; Batt, Carl

    2009-01-01

    Numerous techniques are available for investigating protein-ligand interactions. The phage display technique is one such method routinely used to identify antibody-antigen interactions and has the benefit of being easily adaptable to high-throughput screening platforms. Once identified, antigen-binding domains on fragment antibodies or single-chain fragment antibodies (scFv) can be expressed and purified for further studies. In this chapter, we describe a method for high-level expression of a phage display-derived scFv in Pichia pastoris. The phage display-derived antibody A33scFv recognizes a cell surface glycoprotein (designated A33) expressed in colon cancer that serves as a target antigen for radioimmunoimaging and/or immunotherapy of human colon cancer. The expression and purification of A33scFv was optimized for the methylotrophic yeast P. pastoris. P. pastoris with a Mut(S) phenotype was selected to express A33scFv under regulation of the methanol-inducible AOX1 promoter. Here we describe a large-scale fed-batch fermentation process with an efficient online closed-loop methanol control for the production of the recombinant protein. Purification of A33scFv from clarified culture medium was done using a two-step chromatographic procedure using anion exchange and hydrophobic interaction chromatography, resulting in a final product with more than 90% purity. This chapter provides protocols that can be used as a base for process development of recombinant protein expression in P. pastoris and purification of these proteins for use in further functionality studies and in diagnostic and therapeutic applications.

  7. Phage and Yeast Display.

    PubMed

    Sheehan, Jared; Marasco, Wayne A

    2015-02-01

    Despite the availability of antimicrobial drugs, the continued development of microbial resistance--established through escape mutations and the emergence of resistant strains--limits their clinical utility. The discovery of novel, therapeutic, monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) offers viable clinical alternatives in the treatment and prophylaxis of infectious diseases. Human mAb-based therapies are typically nontoxic in patients and demonstrate high specificity for the intended microbial target. This specificity prevents negative impacts on the patient microbiome and avoids driving the resistance of nontarget species. The in vitro selection of human antibody fragment libraries displayed on phage or yeast surfaces represents a group of well-established technologies capable of generating human mAbs. The advantage of these forms of microbial display is the large repertoire of human antibody fragments present during a single selection campaign. Furthermore, the in vitro selection environments of microbial surface display allow for the rapid isolation of antibodies--and their encoding genes--against infectious pathogens and their toxins that are impractical within in vivo systems, such as murine hybridomas. This article focuses on the technologies of phage display and yeast display, as these strategies relate to the discovery of human mAbs for the treatment and vaccine development of infectious diseases. PMID:26104550

  8. MimoDB: a new repository for mimotope data derived from phage display technology.

    PubMed

    Ru, Beibei; Huang, Jian; Dai, Ping; Li, Shiyong; Xia, Zhongkui; Ding, Hui; Lin, Hao; Guo, Fengbiao; Wang, Xianlong

    2010-11-01

    Peptides selected from phage-displayed random peptide libraries are valuable in two aspects. On one hand, these peptides are candidates for new diagnostics, therapeutics and vaccines. On the other hand, they can be used to predict the networks or sites of protein-protein interactions. MimoDB, a new repository for these peptides, was developed, in which 10,716 peptides collected from 571 publications were grouped into 1,229 sets. Besides peptide sequences, other important information, such as the target, template, library and complex structure, was also included. MimoDB can be browsed and searched through a user-friendly web interface. For computational biologists, MimoDB can be used to derive customized data sets and benchmarks, which are useful for new algorithm development and tool evaluation. For experimental biologists, their results can be searched against the MimoDB database to exclude possible target-unrelated peptides. The MimoDB database is freely accessible at http://immunet.cn/mimodb/. PMID:21079566

  9. Discovery and Characterization of Phage Display-Derived Human Monoclonal Antibodies against RSV F Glycoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Aimin; Callahan, Cheryl; Pristatsky, Pavlo; Swoyer, Ryan; Cejas, Pedro; Nahas, Debbie; Galli, Jennifer; Cosmi, Scott; DiStefano, Daniel; Hoang, Van M.; Bett, Andrew; Casimiro, Danilo

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a leading cause of lower respiratory tract infection in infants, the elderly and in immunosuppressed populations. The vast majority of neutralizing antibodies isolated from human subjects target the RSV fusion (F) glycoprotein, making it an attractive target for the development of vaccines and therapeutic antibodies. Currently, Synagis® (palivizumab) is the only FDA approved antibody drug for the prevention of RSV infection, and there is a great need for more effective vaccines and therapeutics. Phage display is a powerful tool in antibody discovery with the advantage that it does not require samples from immunized subjects. In this study, Morphosys HuCAL GOLD® phage libraries were used for panning against RSV prefusion and postfusion F proteins. Panels of human monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against RSV F protein were discovered following phage library panning and characterized. Antibodies binding specifically to prefusion or postfusion F proteins and those binding both conformations were identified. 3B1 is a prototypic postfusion F specific antibody while 2E1 is a prototypic prefusion F specific antibody. 2E1 is a potent broadly neutralizing antibody against both RSV A and B strains. Epitope mapping experiments identified a conformational epitope spanning across three discontinuous sections of the RSV F protein, as well as critical residues for antibody interaction. PMID:27258388

  10. Discovery and Characterization of Phage Display-Derived Human Monoclonal Antibodies against RSV F Glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhifeng; Zhang, Lan; Tang, Aimin; Callahan, Cheryl; Pristatsky, Pavlo; Swoyer, Ryan; Cejas, Pedro; Nahas, Debbie; Galli, Jennifer; Cosmi, Scott; DiStefano, Daniel; Hoang, Van M; Bett, Andrew; Casimiro, Danilo; Vora, Kalpit A

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a leading cause of lower respiratory tract infection in infants, the elderly and in immunosuppressed populations. The vast majority of neutralizing antibodies isolated from human subjects target the RSV fusion (F) glycoprotein, making it an attractive target for the development of vaccines and therapeutic antibodies. Currently, Synagis® (palivizumab) is the only FDA approved antibody drug for the prevention of RSV infection, and there is a great need for more effective vaccines and therapeutics. Phage display is a powerful tool in antibody discovery with the advantage that it does not require samples from immunized subjects. In this study, Morphosys HuCAL GOLD® phage libraries were used for panning against RSV prefusion and postfusion F proteins. Panels of human monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against RSV F protein were discovered following phage library panning and characterized. Antibodies binding specifically to prefusion or postfusion F proteins and those binding both conformations were identified. 3B1 is a prototypic postfusion F specific antibody while 2E1 is a prototypic prefusion F specific antibody. 2E1 is a potent broadly neutralizing antibody against both RSV A and B strains. Epitope mapping experiments identified a conformational epitope spanning across three discontinuous sections of the RSV F protein, as well as critical residues for antibody interaction. PMID:27258388

  11. Competitive Mirror Image Phage Display Derived Peptide Modulates Amyloid Beta Aggregation and Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Rudolph, Stephan; Klein, Antonia Nicole; Tusche, Markus; Schlosser, Christine; Elfgen, Anne; Brener, Oleksandr; Teunissen, Charlotte; Gremer, Lothar; Funke, Susanne Aileen; Kutzsche, Janine; Willbold, Dieter

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer´s disease is the most prominent type of dementia and currently no causative treatment is available. According to recent studies, oligomeric species of the amyloid beta (Aβ) peptide appear to be the most toxic Aβ assemblies. Aβ monomers, however, may be not toxic per se and may even have a neuroprotective role. Here we describe a competitive mirror image phage display procedure that allowed us to identify preferentially Aβ1–42 monomer binding and thereby stabilizing peptides, which destabilize and thereby eliminate toxic oligomer species. One of the peptides, called Mosd1 (monomer specific d-peptide 1), was characterized in more detail. Mosd1 abolished oligomers from a mixture of Aβ1–42 species, reduced Aβ1–42 toxicity in cell culture, and restored the physiological phenotype in neuronal cells stably transfected with the gene coding for human amyloid precursor protein. PMID:26840229

  12. Antibody Phage Display Libraries: Contributions to Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Dantas-Barbosa, Carmela; de Macedo Brigido, Marcelo; Maranhao, Andrea Queiroz

    2012-01-01

    Since the advent of phage display technology, dating back to 1985, antibody libraries displayed on filamentous phage surfaces have been used to identify specific binders for many different purposes, including the recognition of tumors. Phage display represents a high-throughput technique for screening billions of random fusion antibodies against virtually any target on the surface or inside cancer cells, or even soluble markers found in patient serum. Many phage display derived binders targeting important tumor markers have been identified. Selection directed to tumoral cells’ surfaces lead to the identification of unknown tumoral markers. Also the improvement of methods that require smaller amounts of cells has opened the possibility to use this approach on patient samples. Robust techniques combining an antibody library displayed on the phage surface and protein microarray allowed the identification of auto antibodies recognized by patient sera. Many Ab molecules directly or indirectly targeting angiogenesis have been identified, and one of them, ramucirumab, has been tested in 27 phase I–III clinical trials in a broad array of cancers. Examples of such antibodies will be discussed here with emphasis on those used as probes for molecular imaging and other clinical trials. PMID:22754305

  13. Protein and Antibody Engineering by Phage Display.

    PubMed

    Frei, J C; Lai, J R

    2016-01-01

    Phage display is an in vitro selection technique that allows for the rapid isolation of proteins with desired properties including increased affinity, specificity, stability, and new enzymatic activity. The power of phage display relies on the phenotype-to-genotype linkage of the protein of interest displayed on the phage surface with the encoding DNA packaged within the phage particle, which allows for selective enrichment of library pools and high-throughput screening of resulting clones. As an in vitro method, the conditions of the binding selection can be tightly controlled. Due to the high-throughput nature, rapidity, and ease of use, phage display is an excellent technological platform for engineering antibody or proteins with enhanced properties. Here, we describe methods for synthesis, selection, and screening of phage libraries with particular emphasis on designing humanizing antibody libraries and combinatorial scanning mutagenesis libraries. We conclude with a brief section on troubleshooting for all stages of the phage display process. PMID:27586328

  14. Targeting Leishmania major parasite with peptides derived from a combinatorial phage display library.

    PubMed

    Rhaiem, Rafik Ben; Houimel, Mehdi

    2016-07-01

    Cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) is a global problem caused by intracellular protozoan pathogens of the genus Leishmania for which there are no suitable vaccine or chemotherapy options. Thus, de novo identification of small molecules binding to the Leishmania parasites by direct screening is a promising and appropriate alternative strategy for the development of new drugs. In this study, we used a random linear hexapeptide library fused to the gene III protein of M13 filamentous bacteriophage to select binding peptides to metacyclic promastigotes from a highly virulent strain of Leishmania major (Zymodeme MON-25; MHOM/TN/94/GLC94). After four rounds of stringent selection and amplification, polyclonal and monoclonal phage-peptides directed against L. major metacyclic promastigotes were assessed by ELISA, and the optimal phage-peptides were grown individually and characterized for binding to L. major by monoclonal phage ELISA. The DNA of 42 phage-peptides clones was amplified by PCR, sequenced, and their amino acid sequences deduced. Six different peptide sequences were obtained with frequencies of occurrence ranging from 2.3% to 85.7%. The biological effect of the peptides was assessed in vitro on human monocytes infected with L. major metacyclic promastigotes, and in vivo on susceptible parasite-infected BALB/c mice. The development of cutaneous lesions in the right hind footpads of infected mice after 13 weeks post-infection showed a protection rate of 81.94% with the injected peptide P2. Moreover, Western blots revealed that the P2 peptide interacted with the major surface protease gp63, a protein of 63kDa molecular weight. Moreover, bioinformatics were used to predict the interaction between peptides and the major surface molecule of the L. major. The molecular docking showed that the P2 peptide has the minimum interaction energy and maximum shape complimentarity with the L. major gp63 active site. Our study demonstrated that the P2 peptide occurs at high frequency

  15. Chemical Synthesis and In Vitro Evaluation of a Phage Display-Derived Peptide Active against Infectious Salmon Anemia Virus

    PubMed Central

    Ojeda, Nicolás; Cárdenas, Constanza; Guzmán, Fanny

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Infectious salmon anemia virus (ISAV) is the etiological agent of the disease by the same name and causes major losses in the salmon industry worldwide. Epizootic ISAV outbreaks have occurred in Norway and, to a lesser degree, in Canada. In 2007, an ISAV outbreak in Chile destroyed most of the seasonal production and endangered the entire Chilean salmon industry. None of the existing prophylactic approaches have demonstrated efficacy in providing absolute protection from or even a palliative effect on ISAV proliferation. Sanitary control measures for ISAV, based on molecular epidemiology data, have proven insufficient, mainly due to high salmon culture densities and a constant presence of a nonpathogenic strain of the virus. This report describes an alternative treatment approach based on interfering peptides selected from a phage display library. The screening of a phage display heptapeptide library resulted in the selection of a novel peptide with significant in vitro antiviral activity against ISAV. This peptide specifically interacted with the viral hemagglutinin-esterase protein, thereby impairing virus binding, with plaque reduction assays showing a significant reduction in viral yields. The identified peptide acts at micromolar concentrations against at least two different pathogenic strains of the virus, without detectable cytotoxic effects on the tested fish cells. Therefore, antiviral peptides represent a novel alternative for controlling ISAV and, potentially, other fish pathogens. IMPORTANCE Identifying novel methods for the efficient control of infectious diseases is imperative for the future of global aquaculture. The present study used a phage display heptapeptide library to identify a peptide with interfering activity against a key protein of the infectious salmon anemia virus (ISAV). A piscine orthomyxovirus, ISAV is a continuous threat to the commercial sustainability of cultured salmon production worldwide. The complex epidemiological

  16. Phage display of engineered binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Levisson, Mark; Spruijt, Ruud B; Winkel, Ingrid Nolla; Kengen, Servé W M; van der Oost, John

    2014-01-01

    In current purification processes optimization of the capture step generally has a large impact on cost reduction. At present, valuable biomolecules are often produced in relatively low concentrations and, consequently, the eventual selective separation from complex mixtures can be rather inefficient. A separation technology based on a very selective high-affinity binding may overcome these problems. Proteins in their natural environment manifest functionality by interacting specifically and often with relatively high affinity with other molecules, such as substrates, inhibitors, activators, or other proteins. At present, antibodies are the most commonly used binding proteins in numerous applications. However, antibodies do have limitations, such as high production costs, low stability, and a complex patent landscape. A novel approach is therefore to use non-immunoglobulin engineered binding proteins in affinity purification. In order to obtain engineered binders with a desired specificity, a large mutant library of the new to-be-developed binding protein has to be created and screened for potential binders. A powerful technique to screen and select for proteins with desired properties from a large pool of variants is phage display. Here, we indicate several criteria for potential binding protein scaffolds and explain the principle of M13 phage display. In addition, we describe experimental protocols for the initial steps in setting up a M13 phage display system based on the pComb3X vector, including construction of the phagemid vector, production of phages displaying the protein of interest, and confirmation of display on the M13 phage.

  17. Hydroxyapatite chromatography of phage-display virions.

    PubMed

    Smith, George P; Gingrich, Todd R

    2005-12-01

    Hydroxyapatite column chromatography can be used to purify filamentous bacteriophage--the phage most commonly used for phage display. Virions that have been partially purified from culture supernatant by two cycles of precipitation in 2% polyethylene glycol are adsorbed onto the matrix at a density of at least 7.6 x 10(13) virions (about 3 mg) per milliliter of packed bed volume in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS; 0.15 M NaCl, 5 mM NaH2PO4, pH-adjusted to 7.0 with NaOH). The matrix is washed successively with wash buffer I(150 mM NaCl, 125 mM phosphate, pH 7.0), wash buffer II (2.55 M NaCl, 125 mM phosphate, pH 7.0), and wash buffer I; after which virions are desorbed in desorption buffer (150 mM NaCl, 200 mM phosphate, pH 7.0), and the matrix is stripped with stripping buffer (150 mM NaCl, 1 Mphosphate, pH 7.0). About half of the applied virions are recovered in desorption buffer. Western blot analysis shows that they have undetectable levels of host-derived protein contaminants that are present in the input virions and in virions purified by CsCl equilibrium density gradient centrifugation--the method most commonly used to prepare virions in high purity. Hydroxyapatite chromatography is thus an attractive alternative method for purifying filamentous virions, particularly when the scale is too large for ultracentrifugation to be practical. PMID:16382907

  18. Nanoscale bacteriophage biosensors beyond phage display.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jong-Wook; Song, Jangwon; Hwang, Mintai P; Lee, Kwan Hyi

    2013-01-01

    Bacteriophages are traditionally used for the development of phage display technology. Recently, their nanosized dimensions and ease with which genetic modifications can be made to their structure and function have put them in the spotlight towards their use in a variety of biosensors. In particular, the expression of any protein or peptide on the extraluminal surface of bacteriophages is possible by genetically engineering the genome. In addition, the relatively short replication time of bacteriophages offers researchers the ability to generate mass quantities of any given bacteriophage-based biosensor. Coupled with the emergence of various biomarkers in the clinic as a means to determine pathophysiological states, the development of current and novel technologies for their detection and quantification is imperative. In this review, we categorize bacteriophages by their morphology into M13-based filamentous bacteriophages and T4- or T7-based icosahedral bacteriophages, and examine how such advantages are utilized across a variety of biosensors. In essence, we take a comprehensive approach towards recent trends in bacteriophage-based biosensor applications and discuss their outlook with regards to the field of biotechnology.

  19. Nanoscale bacteriophage biosensors beyond phage display

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jong-Wook; Song, Jangwon; Hwang, Mintai P; Lee, Kwan Hyi

    2013-01-01

    Bacteriophages are traditionally used for the development of phage display technology. Recently, their nanosized dimensions and ease with which genetic modifications can be made to their structure and function have put them in the spotlight towards their use in a variety of biosensors. In particular, the expression of any protein or peptide on the extraluminal surface of bacteriophages is possible by genetically engineering the genome. In addition, the relatively short replication time of bacteriophages offers researchers the ability to generate mass quantities of any given bacteriophage-based biosensor. Coupled with the emergence of various biomarkers in the clinic as a means to determine pathophysiological states, the development of current and novel technologies for their detection and quantification is imperative. In this review, we categorize bacteriophages by their morphology into M13-based filamentous bacteriophages and T4- or T7-based icosahedral bacteriophages, and examine how such advantages are utilized across a variety of biosensors. In essence, we take a comprehensive approach towards recent trends in bacteriophage-based biosensor applications and discuss their outlook with regards to the field of biotechnology. PMID:24143096

  20. Identification of Chondrocyte-Binding Peptides by Phage Display

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Crystal S.F.; Lui, Julian C.; Baron, Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    As an initial step toward targeting cartilage tissue for potential therapeutic applications, we sought cartilage-binding peptides using phage display, a powerful technology for selection of peptides that bind to molecules of interest. A library of phage displaying random 12-amino acid peptides was iteratively incubated with cultured chondrocytes to select phage that bind cartilage. The resulting phage clones demonstrated increased affinity to chondrocytes by ELISA, when compared to a wild-type, insertless phage. Furthermore, the selected phage showed little preferential binding to other cell types, including primary skin fibroblast, myocyte and hepatocyte cultures, suggesting a tissue-specific interaction. Immunohistochemical staining revealed that the selected phage bound chondrocytes themselves and the surrounding extracellular matrix. FITC-tagged peptides were synthesized based on the sequence of cartilage-binding phage clones. These peptides, but not a random peptide, bound cultured chondrocytes, and extracelluar matrix. In conclusion, using phage display, we identified peptide sequences that specifically target chondrocytes. We anticipate that such peptides may be coupled to therapeutic molecules to provide targeted treatment for cartilage disorders. PMID:23440926

  1. Chemical and Genetic Wrappers for Improved Phage and RNA Display

    PubMed Central

    Lamboy, Jorge A.; Tam, Phillip Y.; Lee, Lucie S.; Jackson, Pilgrim J.; Avrantinis, Sara K.; Lee, Hye Jin; Corn, Robert M.

    2009-01-01

    An Achilles heel inherent to all molecular display formats, background binding between target and display system introduces false positives into screens and selections. For example, the negatively charged surfaces of phage, mRNA, and ribosome display systems bind with unacceptably high non-specificity to positively charged target molecules, which represent an estimated 35% of proteins in the human proteome. We report the first systematic attempt to understand why a broad class of molecular display selections fail, and then solve the underlying problem for both phage and RNA display. First, a genetic strategy introduced a short charge neutralizing peptide into the solvent-exposed, negatively charged phage coat. The modified phage (KO7+) reduced or eliminated non-specific binding to the problematic high pI proteins. In the second, chemical approach, oligolysine wrappers for phage and total RNA blocked non-specific interactions. For phage display applications, the peptides Lysn (where n = 16 to 24) emerged as optimal for wrapping the phage. Lys8, however, provided effective wrappers for RNA binding in assays against the RNA binding protein HIV-1 Vif. The oligolysine peptides blocked non-specific binding to allow successful selections, screens, and assays with five previously unworkable protein targets. PMID:18973165

  2. Phage display creates innovative applications to combat hepatitis B virus

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Wen Siang; Ho, Kok Lian

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) has killed countless lives in human history. The invention of HBV vaccines in the 20th century has reduced significantly the rate of the viral infection. However, currently there is no effective treatment for chronic HBV carriers. Newly emerging vaccine escape mutants and drug resistant strains have complicated the viral eradication program. The entire world is now facing a new threat of HBV and human immunodeficiency virus co-infection. Could phage display provide solutions to these life-threatening problems? This article reviews critically and comprehensively the innovative and potential applications of phage display in the development of vaccines, therapeutic agents, diagnostic reagents, as well as gene and drug delivery systems to combat HBV. The application of phage display in epitope mapping of HBV antigens is also discussed in detail. Although this review mainly focuses on HBV, the innovative applications of phage display could also be extended to other infectious diseases. PMID:25206271

  3. Detection of TNT-derivatives with recombinant phages

    PubMed Central

    Simonovicá, Mladen; Simonovicá, Branislav

    2012-01-01

    New immunoreagents for detection of TNT-derivatives TNP and TNP-Tris were developed using phage display technique. The monovalent and pentavalent recombinant phages carrying scFv specific for TNT were constructed and compared with each other to define the impact of valency and molecule dimension on antibody binding in immunoassay. Also, the bifunctional phages were generated, which carried TNT-specific scFvs as well as enzyme β-lactamase as a model marker on its surface. The most sensitive recombinant phages were selected and used for detection of TNP-Tris in a competitive ELISA based on immobilized antigen. Preincubation and partial phages saturation with a sample containing antigen allowed competition with immobilized hapten and displacement of free antigen. The phages exposing enzyme were used as immunoreagents for single step detection. The other phages were detected with specific marked antibodies. To date, the results presented in this paper are the first ever published regarding the recombinant phages for the detection of TNT. PMID:23050216

  4. Tumor cell-targeting by phage-displayed peptides.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, Ulla B; Schreiber, Valerie; Schultz, Huguette; Mischler, Fabienne; Schughart, Klaus

    2002-07-01

    We isolated cancer cell-specific phages by subtracting and selecting complex peptide display phage libraries on cultured human cancer cells. The best candidate was selected by performing three rounds of subtraction before each of five selections on the human colorectal WiDr cell line. The phage showed more than 1000-fold higher binding efficiency for WiDr cells when compared to five other human cancer cell lines, including two of colorectal origin, and when compared to wild-type M13 phage. Fifty-fold higher binding efficiency was also seen for a human breast cancer cell line. We show that the WiDr cell binding of the selected phage was efficiently competed by the synthetic peptide HEWSYLAPYPWF, predicted from the phage sequence. This confirms that the specificity of the peptide is independent of the display by the phage coat proteins. The identified peptide may target biomarkers linked to colorectal cancer, and thus be useful for designing gene transfer vectors as well as diagnostic and prognostic tools for this disease. PMID:12082461

  5. Selective posttranslational modification of phage-displayed polypeptides

    DOEpatents

    Tsao, Meng-Lin; Tian, Feng; Schultz, Peter

    2013-02-05

    The invention relates to posttranslational modification of phage-displayed polypeptides. These displayed polypeptides comprise at least one unnatural amino acid, e.g., an aryl-azide amino acid such as p-azido-L-phenylalanine, or an alkynyl-amino acid such as para-propargyloxyphenylalanine, which are incorporated into the phage-displayed fusion polypeptide at a selected position by using an in vivo orthogonal translation system comprising a suitable orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase and a suitable orthogonal tRNA species. These unnatural amino acids advantageously provide targets for posttranslational modifications such as azide-alkyne [3+2]cycloaddition reactions and Staudinger modifications.

  6. Selective posttranslational modification of phage-displayed polypeptides

    DOEpatents

    Tsao, Meng-Lin; Tian, Feng; Schultz, Peter

    2013-11-19

    The invention relates to posttranslational modification of phage-displayed polypeptides. These displayed polypeptides comprise at least one unnatural amino acid, e.g., an aryl-azide amino acid such as p-azido-L-phenylalanine, or an alkynyl-amino acid such as para-propargyloxyphenylalanine, which are incorporated into the phage-displayed fusion polypeptide at a selected position by using an in vivo orthogonal translation system comprising a suitable orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase and a suitable orthogonal tRNA species. These unnatural amino acids advantageously provide targets for posttranslational modifications such as azide-alkyne [3+2] cycloaddition reactions and Staudinger modifications.

  7. Biochemical functionalization of peptide nanotubes with phage displayed peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swaminathan, Swathi; Cui, Yue

    2016-09-01

    The development of a general approach for the biochemical functionalization of peptide nanotubes (PNTs) could open up existing opportunities in both fundamental studies as well as a variety of applications. PNTs are spontaneously assembled organic nanostructures made from peptides. Phage display has emerged as a powerful approach for identifying selective peptide binding motifs. Here, we demonstrate for the first time the biochemical functionalization of PNTs via peptides identified from a phage display peptide library. The phage-displayed peptides are shown to recognize PNTs. These advances further allow for the development of bifunctional peptides for the capture of bacteria and the self-assembly of silver particles onto PNTs. We anticipate that these results could provide significant opportunities for using PNTs in both fundamental studies and practical applications, including sensors and biosensors nanoelectronics, energy storage devices, drug delivery, and tissue engineering.

  8. Biochemical functionalization of peptide nanotubes with phage displayed peptides.

    PubMed

    Swaminathan, Swathi; Cui, Yue

    2016-09-01

    The development of a general approach for the biochemical functionalization of peptide nanotubes (PNTs) could open up existing opportunities in both fundamental studies as well as a variety of applications. PNTs are spontaneously assembled organic nanostructures made from peptides. Phage display has emerged as a powerful approach for identifying selective peptide binding motifs. Here, we demonstrate for the first time the biochemical functionalization of PNTs via peptides identified from a phage display peptide library. The phage-displayed peptides are shown to recognize PNTs. These advances further allow for the development of bifunctional peptides for the capture of bacteria and the self-assembly of silver particles onto PNTs. We anticipate that these results could provide significant opportunities for using PNTs in both fundamental studies and practical applications, including sensors and biosensors nanoelectronics, energy storage devices, drug delivery, and tissue engineering. PMID:27479451

  9. Plasmids and packaging cell lines for use in phage display

    DOEpatents

    Bradbury, Andrew M.

    2012-07-24

    The invention relates to a novel phagemid display system for packaging phagemid DNA into phagemid particles which completely avoids the use of helper phage. The system of the invention incorporates the use of bacterial packaging cell lines which have been transformed with helper plasmids containing all required phage proteins but not the packaging signals. The absence of packaging signals in these helper plasmids prevents their DNA from being packaged in the bacterial cell, which provides a number of significant advantages over the use of both standard and modified helper phage. Packaged phagemids expressing a protein or peptide of interest, in fusion with a phage coat protein such as g3p, are generated simply by transfecting phagemid into the packaging cell line.

  10. Identification of Soft Matter Binding Peptide Ligands Using Phage Display.

    PubMed

    Günay, Kemal Arda; Klok, Harm-Anton

    2015-10-21

    Phage display is a powerful tool for the selection of highly affine, short peptide ligands. While originally primarily used for the identification of ligands to proteins, the scope of this technique has significantly expanded over the past two decades. Phage display nowadays is also increasingly applied to identify ligands that selectively bind with high affinity to a broad range of other substrates including natural and biological polymers as well as a variety of low-molecular-weight organic molecules. Such peptides are of interest for various reasons. The ability to selectively and with high affinity bind to the substrate of interest allows the conjugation or immobilization of, e.g., nanoparticles or biomolecules, or generally, facilitates interactions at materials interfaces. On the other hand, presentation of peptide ligands that selectively bind to low-molecular-weight organic materials is of interest for the development of sensor surfaces. The aim of this article is to highlight the opportunities provided by phage display for the identification of peptide ligands that bind to synthetic or natural polymer substrates or to small organic molecules. The article will first provide an overview of the different peptide ligands that have been identified by phage display that bind to these "soft matter" targets. The second part of the article will discuss the different characterization techniques that allow the determination of the affinity of the identified ligands to the respective substrates. PMID:26275106

  11. Development of Anti-Infectives Using Phage Display: Biological Agents against Bacteria, Viruses, and Parasites

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Johnny X.; Bishop-Hurley, Sharon L.

    2012-01-01

    The vast majority of anti-infective therapeutics on the market or in development are small molecules; however, there is now a nascent pipeline of biological agents in development. Until recently, phage display technologies were used mainly to produce monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) targeted against cancer or inflammatory disease targets. Patent disputes impeded broad use of these methods and contributed to the dearth of candidates in the clinic during the 1990s. Today, however, phage display is recognized as a powerful tool for selecting novel peptides and antibodies that can bind to a wide range of antigens, ranging from whole cells to proteins and lipid targets. In this review, we highlight research that exploits phage display technology as a means of discovering novel therapeutics against infectious diseases, with a focus on antimicrobial peptides and antibodies in clinical or preclinical development. We discuss the different strategies and methods used to derive, select, and develop anti-infectives from phage display libraries and then highlight case studies of drug candidates in the process of development and commercialization. Advances in screening, manufacturing, and humanization technologies now mean that phage display can make a significant contribution in the fight against clinically important pathogens. PMID:22664969

  12. Paradoxical effects of the phage display-derived peptide antagonist IGF-F1-1 on insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor signaling.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Stephanie A; Rosenzweig, Steven A

    2006-06-28

    The insulin-like growth factor binding proteins (IGFBPs) represent a unique class of IGF antagonists regulating the bioavailability of the IGFs extracellularly. Accordingly, they represent an important class of proteins for cancer therapeutics and chemoprevention. IGF-F1-1 is a cyclic hexadecapeptide identified by high throughput phage display that binds to the IGFBP-binding domain on IGF-1. It acts as an IGFBP-mimetic, capable of inhibiting IGF-1 binding to the IGFBPs. To further examine the utility of IGF-F1-1 as an IGF-1 antagonist we tested its ability to inhibit IGFBP-2 and IGFBP-3 binding to IGF-1, (125)I-IGF-1 binding to IGF-1Rs and to block IGF-1 induced Akt activation, cell cycle changes and [(3)H]thymidine incorporation in MCF-7 cells. These biological activities were inhibited by treatment with IGFBP-2, wortmannin or the IGF-1R tyrosine kinase inhibitor, NVP-AEW541, but not by IGF-F1-1. Our findings confirm previous studies indicating that IGF-F1-1 is a weak antagonist of IGF-1 binding to the IGFBPs and the IGF-1R and suggest that it does not effectively inhibit downstream events stimulated by IGF-1. We further demonstrated that IGF-F1-1 treatment of MCF-7 cells results in the paradoxical activation of Akt, S-phase transition and [(3)H]thymidine incorporation. These results suggest that IGF-F1-1 is a weak agonist, exhibiting mitogenic actions. IGF-F1-1 may act in conjunction with IGF-1 at the IGF-1R or independently of IGF-1 at the IGF-1R or another receptor.

  13. Prospective identification of parasitic sequences in phage display screens

    PubMed Central

    Matochko, Wadim L.; Cory Li, S.; Tang, Sindy K.Y.; Derda, Ratmir

    2014-01-01

    Phage display empowered the development of proteins with new function and ligands for clinically relevant targets. In this report, we use next-generation sequencing to analyze phage-displayed libraries and uncover a strong bias induced by amplification preferences of phage in bacteria. This bias favors fast-growing sequences that collectively constitute <0.01% of the available diversity. Specifically, a library of 109 random 7-mer peptides (Ph.D.-7) includes a few thousand sequences that grow quickly (the ‘parasites’), which are the sequences that are typically identified in phage display screens published to date. A similar collapse was observed in other libraries. Using Illumina and Ion Torrent sequencing and multiple biological replicates of amplification of Ph.D.-7 library, we identified a focused population of 770 ‘parasites’. In all, 197 sequences from this population have been identified in literature reports that used Ph.D.-7 library. Many of these enriched sequences have confirmed function (e.g. target binding capacity). The bias in the literature, thus, can be viewed as a selection with two different selection pressures: (i) target-binding selection, and (ii) amplification-induced selection. Enrichment of parasitic sequences could be minimized if amplification bias is removed. Here, we demonstrate that emulsion amplification in libraries of ∼106 diverse clones prevents the biased selection of parasitic clones. PMID:24217917

  14. T4 bacteriophage as a phage display platform.

    PubMed

    Gamkrelidze, Mariam; Dąbrowska, Krystyna

    2014-07-01

    Analysis of molecular events in T4-infected Escherichia coli has revealed some of the most important principles of biology, including relationships between structures of genes and their products, virus-induced acquisition of metabolic function, and morphogenesis of complex structures through sequential gene product interaction rather than sequential gene activation. T4 bacteriophages and related strains were applied in the first formulations of many fundamental biological concepts. These include the unambiguous recognition of nucleic acids as the genetic material, the definition of the gene by fine-structure mutation, recombinational and functional analyses, the demonstration that the genetic code is triplet, the discovery of mRNA, the importance of recombination and DNA replications, light-dependent and light-independent DNA repair mechanisms, restriction and modification of DNA, self-splicing of intron/exon arrangement in prokaryotes, translation bypassing and others. Bacteriophage T4 possesses unique features that make it a good tool for a multicomponent vaccine platform. Hoc/Soc-fused antigens can be assembled on the T4 capsid in vitro and in vivo. T4-based phage display combined with affinity chromatography can be applied as a new method for bacteriophage purification. The T4 phage display system can also be used as an attractive approach for cancer therapy. The data show the efficient display of both single and multiple HIV antigens on the phage T4 capsid and offer insights for designing novel particulate HIV or other vaccines that have not been demonstrated by other vector systems.

  15. T4 bacteriophage as a phage display platform.

    PubMed

    Gamkrelidze, Mariam; Dąbrowska, Krystyna

    2014-07-01

    Analysis of molecular events in T4-infected Escherichia coli has revealed some of the most important principles of biology, including relationships between structures of genes and their products, virus-induced acquisition of metabolic function, and morphogenesis of complex structures through sequential gene product interaction rather than sequential gene activation. T4 bacteriophages and related strains were applied in the first formulations of many fundamental biological concepts. These include the unambiguous recognition of nucleic acids as the genetic material, the definition of the gene by fine-structure mutation, recombinational and functional analyses, the demonstration that the genetic code is triplet, the discovery of mRNA, the importance of recombination and DNA replications, light-dependent and light-independent DNA repair mechanisms, restriction and modification of DNA, self-splicing of intron/exon arrangement in prokaryotes, translation bypassing and others. Bacteriophage T4 possesses unique features that make it a good tool for a multicomponent vaccine platform. Hoc/Soc-fused antigens can be assembled on the T4 capsid in vitro and in vivo. T4-based phage display combined with affinity chromatography can be applied as a new method for bacteriophage purification. The T4 phage display system can also be used as an attractive approach for cancer therapy. The data show the efficient display of both single and multiple HIV antigens on the phage T4 capsid and offer insights for designing novel particulate HIV or other vaccines that have not been demonstrated by other vector systems. PMID:24828789

  16. Probing ADAMTS13 Substrate Specificity using Phage Display

    PubMed Central

    Desch, Karl C.; Kretz, Colin; Yee, Andrew; Gildersleeve, Robert; Metzger, Kristin; Agrawal, Nidhi; Cheng, Jane; Ginsburg, David

    2015-01-01

    Von Willebrand factor (VWF) is a large, multimeric protein that regulates hemostasis by tethering platelets to the subendothelial matrix at sites of vascular damage. The procoagulant activity of plasma VWF correlates with the length of VWF multimers, which is proteolytically controlled by the metalloprotease ADAMTS13. To probe ADAMTS13 substrate specificity, we created phage display libraries containing randomly mutated residues of a minimal ADAMTS13 substrate fragment of VWF, termed VWF73. The libraries were screened for phage particles displaying VWF73 mutant peptides that were resistant to proteolysis by ADAMTS13. These peptides exhibited the greatest mutation frequency near the ADAMTS13 scissile residues. Kinetic assays using mutant and wild-type substrates demonstrated excellent agreement between rates of cleavage for mutant phage particles and the corresponding mutant peptides. Cleavage resistance of selected mutations was tested in vivo using hydrodynamic injection of corresponding full-length expression plasmids into VWF-deficient mice. These studies confirmed the resistance to cleavage resulting from select amino acid substitutions and uncovered evidence of alternate cleavage sites and recognition by other proteases in the circulation of ADAMTS13 deficient mice. Taken together, these studies demonstrate the key role of specific amino acids residues including P3-P2’ and P11’, for substrate specificity and emphasize the importance in flowing blood of other ADAMTS13–VWF exosite interactions outside of VWF73. PMID:25849793

  17. Targeting membrane proteins for antibody discovery using phage display.

    PubMed

    Jones, Martina L; Alfaleh, Mohamed A; Kumble, Sumukh; Zhang, Shuo; Osborne, Geoffrey W; Yeh, Michael; Arora, Neetika; Hou, Jeff Jia Cheng; Howard, Christopher B; Chin, David Y; Mahler, Stephen M

    2016-01-01

    A critical factor in the successful isolation of new antibodies by phage display is the presentation of a correctly folded antigen. While this is relatively simple for soluble proteins which can be purified and immobilized onto a plastic surface, membrane proteins offer significant challenges for antibody discovery. Whole cell panning allows presentation of the membrane protein in its native conformation, but is complicated by a low target antigen density, high background of irrelevant antigens and non-specific binding of phage particles to cell surfaces. The method described here uses transient transfection of alternating host cell lines and stringent washing steps to address each of these limitations. The successful isolation of antibodies from a naive scFv library is described for three membrane bound proteins; human CD83, canine CD117 and bat CD11b. PMID:27189586

  18. Targeting membrane proteins for antibody discovery using phage display

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Martina L.; Alfaleh, Mohamed A.; Kumble, Sumukh; Zhang, Shuo; Osborne, Geoffrey W.; Yeh, Michael; Arora, Neetika; Hou, Jeff Jia Cheng; Howard, Christopher B.; Chin, David Y.; Mahler, Stephen M.

    2016-01-01

    A critical factor in the successful isolation of new antibodies by phage display is the presentation of a correctly folded antigen. While this is relatively simple for soluble proteins which can be purified and immobilized onto a plastic surface, membrane proteins offer significant challenges for antibody discovery. Whole cell panning allows presentation of the membrane protein in its native conformation, but is complicated by a low target antigen density, high background of irrelevant antigens and non-specific binding of phage particles to cell surfaces. The method described here uses transient transfection of alternating host cell lines and stringent washing steps to address each of these limitations. The successful isolation of antibodies from a naive scFv library is described for three membrane bound proteins; human CD83, canine CD117 and bat CD11b. PMID:27189586

  19. Advancement and applications of peptide phage display technology in biomedical science.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chien-Hsun; Liu, I-Ju; Lu, Ruei-Min; Wu, Han-Chung

    2016-01-01

    Combinatorial phage library is a powerful research tool for high-throughput screening of protein interactions. Of all available molecular display techniques, phage display has proven to be the most popular approach. Screening phage-displayed random peptide libraries is an effective means of identifying peptides that can bind target molecules and regulate their function. Phage-displayed peptide libraries can be used for (i) B-cell and T-cell epitope mapping, (ii) selection of bioactive peptides bound to receptors or proteins, disease-specific antigen mimics, peptides bound to non-protein targets, cell-specific peptides, or organ-specific peptides, and (iii) development of peptide-mediated drug delivery systems and other applications. Targeting peptides identified using phage display technology may be useful for basic research and translational medicine. In this review article, we summarize the latest technological advancements in the application of phage-displayed peptide libraries to applied biomedical sciences.

  20. Biopanning of endotoxin-specific phage displayed peptides.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Celestine J; Sharma, Shilpi; Kumar, Gyanendra; Visweswariah, Sandhya S; Surolia, Avadhesha

    2003-07-18

    Systemic bacterial infections frequently lead to a plethora of symptoms termed "endotoxic shock" or "sepsis." Characterized by hypotension, coagulation abnormalities, and multiple organ failure, treatment of sepsis still remains mostly supportive. Of the various experimental therapeutic interventional strategies, neutralization of endotoxin by peptides or proteins is becoming popular recently. Hence, design of endotoxin binding peptides is gaining currency as their structural complexity and mode of recognition of endotoxin precludes mounting of resistance against them by the susceptible bacteria by genetic recombination, mutation, etc. Earlier work from our laboratory had shown that the amphiphilic cationic peptides are good ligands for endotoxin binding. In this study, we report the results of studies with the 12 selected lipid A binding phage displayed peptides by biopanning of a repertoire of a random pentadecapeptide library displayed on the filamentous M-13 phage. A comparison of the sequences revealed no consensus sequence between the 12 selected peptides suggesting that the lipid A binding motif is not sequence specific which is in accord with the sequence variation seen with the naturally occurring anti-microbial and/or endotoxin binding peptides. Thus, the flexibility of the peptides coupled with their plasticity in recognizing the lipid A moiety, explains their tight binding to endotoxin. At a structural level, asymmetric distribution of the charged polar residues on one face of the helix and non-polar residues on the opposite face appears to correlate with their activity.

  1. Intravenous Infusion of Phage-displayed Antibody Library in Human Cancer Patients: Enrichment and Cancer-Specificity of Tumor-Homing Phage-Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Shukla, Girja S.; Krag, David N.; Peletskaya, Elena N.; Pero, Stephanie C.; Sun, Yu-Jing; Carman, Chelsea L.; McCahill, Laurence E.; Roland, Thomas A.

    2013-01-01

    Phage display is a powerful method for target discovery and selection of ligands for cancer treatment and diagnosis. Our goal was to select tumor-binding antibodies in cancer patients. Eligibility criteria included absence of preexisting anti-phage antibodies and a Stage IV cancer status. All patients were intravenously administered 1×1011 TUs/kg of an scFv library 1 to 4 hours before surgical resection of their tumors. No significant adverse events related to the phage library infusion were observed. Phage were successfully recovered from all tumors. Individual clones from each patient were assessed for binding to the tumor from which clones were recovered. Multiple tumor-binding phage-antibodies were identified. Soluble scFv antibodies were produced from the phage clones showing higher tumor binding. The tumor-homing phage-antibodies and derived soluble scFvs were found to bind varying numbers (0 to 5) of 8 tested normal human tissues (breast, cervix, colon, kidney, liver, spleen, skin, and uterus). The clones that showed high tumor specificity were found to bind corresponding tumors from other patients also. Clone enrichment was observed based on tumor binding and DNA sequence data. Clone sequences of multiple variable regions showed significant matches to certain cancer-related antibodies. One of the clones (07-2355) that was found to share a 12-amino acid long motif with a reported IL-17A antibody was further studied for competitive binding for possible antigen target identification. We conclude that these outcomes support the safety and utility of phage display library panning in cancer patients for ligand selection and target discovery for cancer treatment and diagnosis. PMID:23736951

  2. Characterization and Selection of 3-(1-Naphthoyl)-Indole Derivative-Specific Alpaca VHH Antibodies Using a Phage Display Library.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Hiroshi; Murakami, Akikazu; Yoshida, Maiko; Muraoka, Jin; Wakai, Junko; Kenjyou, Noriko; Ito, Yuji

    2016-08-01

    A new alpaca VHH antibody library against 3-(1-naphthoyl)-indole derivatives was developed from alpaca immunized with 7-(3-(1-naphthoyl)-1H-indol-1-yl)-heptanoic acid-keyhole limpet hemocyanin (Hep-KLH) protein conjugates as the immunogen. From this library, two 3-(1-naphthoyl)-indole derivative-specific clones, named NN01 and NN02, were isolated using biopanning technology. The binding specificity of these clones was confirmed using a competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (c-ELISA). Based on the results of c-ELISA, a median inhibitory concentration (IC50) of these two VHH antibodies, NN01 and NN02, in the case of 7-(3-(1-naphthoyl)-1H-indol-1-yl)-heptanoic acid (Hep; one of 3-(1-naphthoyl)-indole derivatives) as an inhibitor exhibited an approximate 3 × 10(-7) M and 6 × 10(-7) M, respectively. Thus, VHH antibodies produced in this study could be considered a useful tool for the detection of 3-(1-naphthoyl)-indole derivatives. PMID:27556911

  3. Intra-domain phage display (ID-PhD) of peptides and protein mini-domains censored from canonical pIII phage display

    PubMed Central

    Tjhung, Katrina F.; Deiss, Frédérique; Tran, Jessica; Chou, Ying; Derda, Ratmir

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we describe multivalent display of peptide and protein sequences typically censored from traditional N-terminal display on protein pIII of filamentous bacteriophage M13. Using site-directed mutagenesis of commercially available M13KE phage cloning vector, we introduced sites that permit efficient cloning using restriction enzymes between domains N1 and N2 of the pIII protein. As infectivity of phage is directly linked to the integrity of the connection between N1 and N2 domains, intra-domain phage display (ID-PhD) allows for simple quality control of the display and the natural variations in the displayed sequences. Additionally, direct linkage to phage propagation allows efficient monitoring of sequence cleavage, providing a convenient system for selection and evolution of protease-susceptible or protease-resistant sequences. As an example of the benefits of such an ID-PhD system, we displayed a negatively charged FLAG sequence, which is known to be post-translationally excised from pIII when displayed on the N-terminus, as well as positively charged sequences which suppress production of phage when displayed on the N-terminus. ID-PhD of FLAG exhibited sub-nanomolar apparent Kd suggesting multivalent nature of the display. A TEV-protease recognition sequence (TEVrs) co-expressed in tandem with FLAG, allowed us to demonstrate that 99.9997% of the phage displayed the FLAG-TEVrs tandem and can be recognized and cleaved by TEV-protease. The residual 0.0003% consisted of phage clones that have excised the insert from their genome. ID-PhD is also amenable to display of protein mini-domains, such as the 33-residue minimized Z-domain of protein A. We show that it is thus possible to use ID-PhD for multivalent display and selection of mini-domain proteins (Affibodies, scFv, etc.). PMID:25972845

  4. Intra-domain phage display (ID-PhD) of peptides and protein mini-domains censored from canonical pIII phage display.

    PubMed

    Tjhung, Katrina F; Deiss, Frédérique; Tran, Jessica; Chou, Ying; Derda, Ratmir

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we describe multivalent display of peptide and protein sequences typically censored from traditional N-terminal display on protein pIII of filamentous bacteriophage M13. Using site-directed mutagenesis of commercially available M13KE phage cloning vector, we introduced sites that permit efficient cloning using restriction enzymes between domains N1 and N2 of the pIII protein. As infectivity of phage is directly linked to the integrity of the connection between N1 and N2 domains, intra-domain phage display (ID-PhD) allows for simple quality control of the display and the natural variations in the displayed sequences. Additionally, direct linkage to phage propagation allows efficient monitoring of sequence cleavage, providing a convenient system for selection and evolution of protease-susceptible or protease-resistant sequences. As an example of the benefits of such an ID-PhD system, we displayed a negatively charged FLAG sequence, which is known to be post-translationally excised from pIII when displayed on the N-terminus, as well as positively charged sequences which suppress production of phage when displayed on the N-terminus. ID-PhD of FLAG exhibited sub-nanomolar apparent Kd suggesting multivalent nature of the display. A TEV-protease recognition sequence (TEVrs) co-expressed in tandem with FLAG, allowed us to demonstrate that 99.9997% of the phage displayed the FLAG-TEVrs tandem and can be recognized and cleaved by TEV-protease. The residual 0.0003% consisted of phage clones that have excised the insert from their genome. ID-PhD is also amenable to display of protein mini-domains, such as the 33-residue minimized Z-domain of protein A. We show that it is thus possible to use ID-PhD for multivalent display and selection of mini-domain proteins (Affibodies, scFv, etc.). PMID:25972845

  5. A polystyrene binding target-unrelated peptide isolated in the screening of phage display library.

    PubMed

    Bakhshinejad, Babak; Sadeghizadeh, Majid

    2016-11-01

    Phage display is a powerful methodology for the identification of peptide ligands binding to any desired target. However, the selection of target-unrelated peptides (TUPs) appears as a huge problem in the screening of phage display libraries through biopanning. The phage-displayed peptide TLHPAAD has been isolated both in our laboratory and by another reserach group on completely different screening targets prompting us to hypothesize that it may be a potential TUP. In the current study, we analyzed the binding characteristics and propagation rate of phage clone displaying TLHPAAD peptide (SW-TUP clone). The results of ELISA experiment and phage recovery assay provided strong support for the notion that SW-TUP phage binds to polystyrene with a significantly higher affinity than control phage clones. Furthermore, this polystyrene binding was demonstrated to occur in a concentration- and pH-dependent mode. Characterization of the propagation profile of phage clones within a specified time course revealed no statistically significant difference between the amplification rate of SW-TUP and control phages. Our findings lead us to the conclusion that SW-TUP phage clone with the displayed peptide TLHPAAD is not a true target binder and its selection in biopanning experiments results from its bidning affinity to the polystyrene surface of the solid phase.

  6. A polystyrene binding target-unrelated peptide isolated in the screening of phage display library.

    PubMed

    Bakhshinejad, Babak; Sadeghizadeh, Majid

    2016-11-01

    Phage display is a powerful methodology for the identification of peptide ligands binding to any desired target. However, the selection of target-unrelated peptides (TUPs) appears as a huge problem in the screening of phage display libraries through biopanning. The phage-displayed peptide TLHPAAD has been isolated both in our laboratory and by another reserach group on completely different screening targets prompting us to hypothesize that it may be a potential TUP. In the current study, we analyzed the binding characteristics and propagation rate of phage clone displaying TLHPAAD peptide (SW-TUP clone). The results of ELISA experiment and phage recovery assay provided strong support for the notion that SW-TUP phage binds to polystyrene with a significantly higher affinity than control phage clones. Furthermore, this polystyrene binding was demonstrated to occur in a concentration- and pH-dependent mode. Characterization of the propagation profile of phage clones within a specified time course revealed no statistically significant difference between the amplification rate of SW-TUP and control phages. Our findings lead us to the conclusion that SW-TUP phage clone with the displayed peptide TLHPAAD is not a true target binder and its selection in biopanning experiments results from its bidning affinity to the polystyrene surface of the solid phase. PMID:27555439

  7. Generation of TCR-Like Antibodies Using Phage Display.

    PubMed

    Santich, Brian H; Liu, Hong; Liu, Cheng; Cheung, Nai-Kong V

    2015-01-01

    The adaptive immune response against cancer consists of two arms: the humoral response from B cells, and the cell-mediated response from T cells. The humoral response has the advantage of diversity, theoretically recognizing antigens of any type (sugar, protein, lipid, etc.), but is generally limited to surface-expressed targets. T cells on the other hand, can recognize intracellular targets, but only if they are proteins, and presented as small peptide fragments on major histocompatibility complex (MHC) cell surface antigens. However, with advances in protein engineering and phage display, it has become feasible to quickly identify and generate antibodies or single-chain variable fragments against peptide-MHC, thus bridging the two arms, and allowing for recognition, identification, and effector responses against cells expressing intracellular targets. PMID:26424273

  8. A novel approach for separating bacteriophages from other bacteriophages using affinity chromatography and phage display

    PubMed Central

    Ceglarek, Izabela; Piotrowicz, Agnieszka; Lecion, Dorota; Miernikiewicz, Paulina; Owczarek, Barbara; Hodyra, Katarzyna; Harhala, Marek; Górski, Andrzej; Dąbrowska, Krystyna

    2013-01-01

    Practical applications of bacteriophages in medicine and biotechnology induce a great need for technologies of phage purification. None of the popular methods offer solutions for separation of a phage from another similar phage. We used affinity chromatography combined with competitive phage display (i) to purify T4 bacteriophage from bacterial debris and (ii) to separate T4 from other contaminating bacteriophages. In ‘competitive phage display’ bacterial cells produced both wild types of the proteins (expression from the phage genome) and the protein fusions with affinity tags (expression from the expression vectors). Fusion proteins were competitively incorporated into the phage capsid. It allowed effective separation of T4 from a contaminating phage on standard affinity resins. PMID:24225840

  9. Purification of phage display-modified bacteriophage T4 by affinity chromatography

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Affinity chromatography is one of the most efficient protein purification strategies. This technique comprises a one-step procedure with a purification level in the order of several thousand-fold, adaptable for various proteins, differentiated in their size, shape, charge, and other properties. The aim of this work was to verify the possibility of applying affinity chromatography in bacteriophage purification, with the perspective of therapeutic purposes. T4 is a large, icosahedral phage that may serve as an efficient display platform for foreign peptides or proteins. Here we propose a new method of T4 phage purification by affinity chromatography after its modification with affinity tags (GST and Histag) by in vivo phage display. As any permanent introduction of extraneous DNA into a phage genome is strongly unfavourable for medical purposes, integration of foreign motifs with the phage genome was not applied. The phage was propagated in bacteria expressing fusions of the phage protein Hoc with affinity tags from bacterial plasmids, independently from the phage expression system. Results Elution profiles of phages modified with the specific affinity motifs (compared to non-specific phages) document their binding to the affinity resins and effective elution with standard competitive agents. Non-specific binding was also observed, but was 102-105 times weaker than the specific one. GST-modified bacteriophages were also effectively released from glutathione Sepharose by proteolytic cleavage. The possibility of proteolytic release was designed at the stage of expression vector construction. Decrease in LPS content in phage preparations was dependent on the washing intensity; intensive washing resulted in preparations of 11-40 EU/ml. Conclusions Affinity tags can be successfully incorporated into the T4 phage capsid by the in vivo phage display technique and they strongly elevate bacteriophage affinity to a specific resin. Affinity chromatography can be

  10. Bacteriophages and phage-derived proteins--application approaches.

    PubMed

    Drulis-Kawa, Zuzanna; Majkowska-Skrobek, Grazyna; Maciejewska, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Currently, the bacterial resistance, especially to most commonly used antibiotics has proved to be a severe therapeutic problem. Nosocomial and community-acquired infections are usually caused by multidrug resistant strains. Therefore, we are forced to develop an alternative or supportive treatment for successful cure of life-threatening infections. The idea of using natural bacterial pathogens such as bacteriophages is already well known. Many papers have been published proving the high antibacterial efficacy of lytic phages tested in animal models as well as in the clinic. Researchers have also investigated the application of non-lytic phages and temperate phages, with promising results. Moreover, the development of molecular biology and novel generation methods of sequencing has opened up new possibilities in the design of engineered phages and recombinant phage-derived proteins. Encouraging performances were noted especially for phage enzymes involved in the first step of viral infection responsible for bacterial envelope degradation, named depolymerases. There are at least five major groups of such enzymes - peptidoglycan hydrolases, endosialidases, endorhamnosidases, alginate lyases and hyaluronate lyases - that have application potential. There is also much interest in proteins encoded by lysis cassette genes (holins, endolysins, spanins) responsible for progeny release during the phage lytic cycle. In this review, we discuss several issues of phage and phage-derived protein application approaches in therapy, diagnostics and biotechnology in general. PMID:25666799

  11. Bacteriophages and Phage-Derived Proteins – Application Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Drulis-Kawa, Zuzanna; Majkowska-Skrobek, Grazyna; Maciejewska, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Currently, the bacterial resistance, especially to most commonly used antibiotics has proved to be a severe therapeutic problem. Nosocomial and community-acquired infections are usually caused by multidrug resistant strains. Therefore, we are forced to develop an alternative or supportive treatment for successful cure of life-threatening infections. The idea of using natural bacterial pathogens such as bacteriophages is already well known. Many papers have been published proving the high antibacterial efficacy of lytic phages tested in animal models as well as in the clinic. Researchers have also investigated the application of non-lytic phages and temperate phages, with promising results. Moreover, the development of molecular biology and novel generation methods of sequencing has opened up new possibilities in the design of engineered phages and recombinant phage-derived proteins. Encouraging performances were noted especially for phage enzymes involved in the first step of viral infection responsible for bacterial envelope degradation, named depolymerases. There are at least five major groups of such enzymes – peptidoglycan hydrolases, endosialidases, endorhamnosidases, alginate lyases and hyaluronate lyases – that have application potential. There is also much interest in proteins encoded by lysis cassette genes (holins, endolysins, spanins) responsible for progeny release during the phage lytic cycle. In this review, we discuss several issues of phage and phage-derived protein application approaches in therapy, diagnostics and biotechnology in general. PMID:25666799

  12. The use of phage display peptide libraries for basic and translational research.

    PubMed

    Brissette, Renee; Goldstein, Neil I

    2007-01-01

    Phage display is a molecular technique, whereby genes are displayed in a functional form on the outer surfaces of bacteriophages by fusion to viral coat proteins. The gene product is encoded by a plasmid contained within the virus, which can be recovered and sequenced, linking the genetic information to the function of the protein. Phage display offers a powerful tool for the identification of short peptides or single chain antibodies that can bind and regulate the function of target proteins. One major advantage of phage display lies in its ability to rapidly identify target-specific peptides with pharmacological activity as agonists or antagonists. PMID:18217687

  13. Selection dynamic of Escherichia coli host in M13 combinatorial peptide phage display libraries.

    PubMed

    Zanconato, Stefano; Minervini, Giovanni; Poli, Irene; De Lucrezia, Davide

    2011-01-01

    Phage display relies on an iterative cycle of selection and amplification of random combinatorial libraries to enrich the initial population of those peptides that satisfy a priori chosen criteria. The effectiveness of any phage display protocol depends directly on library amino acid sequence diversity and the strength of the selection procedure. In this study we monitored the dynamics of the selective pressure exerted by the host organism on a random peptide library in the absence of any additional selection pressure. The results indicate that sequence censorship exerted by Escherichia coli dramatically reduces library diversity and can significantly impair phage display effectiveness. PMID:21512219

  14. Nanodiscs allow phage display selection for ligands to non-linear epitopes on membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Pavlidou, Marina; Hänel, Karen; Möckel, Luis; Willbold, Dieter

    2013-01-01

    In this work, we exploited a method that uses polytopic membrane proteins as targets for phage display selections. Membrane proteins represent the largest class of drug targets and drug discovery is mostly based on the identification of ligands binding to target molecules. The screening of a phage display library for ligands against membrane proteins is typically hindered by the requirement of these proteins for a membrane environment, which is necessary to retain correct folding and epitope formation. Especially in proteins with multiple transmembrane domains, epitopes often are non-linear and consist of a combination of loops between transmembrane stretches of the proteins. Here, we have used bacteriorhodopsin (bR) as a model of polytopic membrane protein, assembled into nanoscale phospholipid bilayers, so called nanodiscs, to screen a phage display library for potential ligands. Nanodiscs provide a native-like environment to membrane proteins and thus selection of ligands can take place in a near physiological state. Screening a 12-mer phage display peptide library against bR nanodiscs led to the isolation of phage clones binding specifically to bR. We were further able to identify the binding site of selected phage clones proving that the clones bind to extramembranous, non-linear epitopes of bR. Thus, nanodiscs provide a suitable and general tool that allows screening of a phage display library against membrane proteins in a near native environment.

  15. Potential of phage-displayed peptide library technology to identify functional targeting peptides

    PubMed Central

    Krumpe, Lauren RH; Mori, Toshiyuki

    2010-01-01

    Combinatorial peptide library technology is a valuable resource for drug discovery and development. Several peptide drugs developed through phage-displayed peptide library technology are presently in clinical trials and the authors envision that phage-displayed peptide library technology will assist in the discovery and development of many more. This review attempts to compile and summarize recent literature on targeting peptides developed through peptide library technology, with special emphasis on novel peptides with targeting capacity evaluated in vivo. PMID:20150977

  16. Phage Displayed Peptides/Antibodies Recognizing Growth Factors and Their Tyrosine Kinase Receptors as Tools for Anti-Cancer Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Ronca, Roberto; Benzoni, Patrizia; De Luca, Angela; Crescini, Elisabetta; Dell’Era, Patrizia

    2012-01-01

    The basic idea of displaying peptides on a phage, introduced by George P. Smith in 1985, was greatly developed and improved by McCafferty and colleagues at the MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology and, later, by Barbas and colleagues at the Scripps Research Institute. Their approach was dedicated to building a system for the production of antibodies, similar to a naïve B cell repertoire, in order to by-pass the standard hybridoma technology that requires animal immunization. Both groups merged the phage display technology with an antibody library to obtain a huge number of phage variants, each of them carrying a specific antibody ready to bind its target molecule, allowing, later on, rare phage (one in a million) to be isolated by affinity chromatography. Here, we will briefly review the basis of the technology and the therapeutic application of phage-derived bioactive molecules when addressed against key players in tumor development and progression: growth factors and their tyrosine kinase receptors. PMID:22606042

  17. Efficient identification of tubby-binding proteins by an improved system of T7 phage display.

    PubMed

    Caberoy, Nora B; Zhou, Yixiong; Jiang, Xiaoyu; Alvarado, Gabriela; Li, Wei

    2010-01-01

    Mutation in the tubby gene causes adult-onset obesity, progressive retinal, and cochlear degeneration with unknown mechanism. In contrast, mutations in tubby-like protein 1 (Tulp1), whose C-terminus is highly homologous to tubby, only lead to retinal degeneration. We speculate that their diverse N-terminus may define their distinct disease profile. To elucidate the binding partners of tubby, we used tubby N-terminus (tubby-N) as bait to identify unknown binding proteins with open-reading-frame (ORF) phage display. T7 phage display was engineered with three improvements: high-quality ORF phage display cDNA library, specific phage elution by protease cleavage, and dual phage display for sensitive high throughput screening. The new system is capable of identifying unknown bait-binding proteins in as fast as approximately 4-7 days. While phage display with conventional cDNA libraries identifies high percentage of out-of-frame unnatural short peptides, all 28 tubby-N-binding clones identified by ORF phage display were ORFs. They encode 16 proteins, including 8 nuclear proteins. Fourteen proteins were analyzed by yeast two-hybrid assay and protein pull-down assay with ten of them independently verified. Comparative binding analyses revealed several proteins binding to both tubby and Tulp1 as well as one tubby-specific binding protein. These data suggest that tubby-N is capable of interacting with multiple nuclear and cytoplasmic protein binding partners. These results demonstrated that the newly-engineered ORF phage display is a powerful technology to identify unknown protein-protein interactions.

  18. Phage Display Selection of Cyclic Peptides That Inhibit Andes Virus Infection▿

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Pamela R.; Hjelle, Brian; Njus, Hadya; Ye, Chunyan; Bondu-Hawkins, Virginie; Brown, David C.; Kilpatrick, Kathleen A.; Larson, Richard S.

    2009-01-01

    Specific therapy is not available for hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome caused by Andes virus (ANDV). Peptides capable of blocking ANDV infection in vitro were identified using antibodies against ANDV surface glycoproteins Gn and Gc to competitively elute a cyclic nonapeptide-bearing phage display library from purified ANDV particles. Phage was examined for ANDV infection inhibition in vitro, and nonapeptides were synthesized based on the most-potent phage sequences. Three peptides showed levels of viral inhibition which were significantly increased by combination treatment with anti-Gn- and anti-Gc-targeting peptides. These peptides will be valuable tools for further development of both peptide and nonpeptide therapeutic agents. PMID:19515773

  19. Antibody VH and VL recombination using phage and ribosome display technologies reveals distinct structural routes to affinity improvements with VH-VL interface residues providing important structural diversity.

    PubMed

    Groves, Maria A T; Amanuel, Lily; Campbell, Jamie I; Rees, D Gareth; Sridharan, Sudharsan; Finch, Donna K; Lowe, David C; Vaughan, Tristan J

    2014-01-01

    In vitro selection technologies are an important means of affinity maturing antibodies to generate the optimal therapeutic profile for a particular disease target. Here, we describe the isolation of a parent antibody, KENB061 using phage display and solution phase selections with soluble biotinylated human IL-1R1. KENB061 was affinity matured using phage display and targeted mutagenesis of VH and VL CDR3 using NNS randomization. Affinity matured VHCDR3 and VLCDR3 library blocks were recombined and selected using phage and ribosome display protocol. A direct comparison of the phage and ribosome display antibodies generated was made to determine their functional characteristics.In our analyses, we observed distinct differences in the pattern of beneficial mutations in antibodies derived from phage and ribosome display selections, and discovered the lead antibody Jedi067 had a ~3700-fold improvement in KD over the parent KENB061. We constructed a homology model of the Fv region of Jedi067 to map the specific positions where mutations occurred in the CDR3 loops. For VL CDR3, positions 94 to 97 carry greater diversity in the ribosome display variants compared with the phage display. The positions 95a, 95b and 96 of VLCDR3 form part of the interface with VH in this model. The model shows that positions 96, 98, 100e, 100f, 100 g, 100h, 100i and 101 of the VHCDR3 include residues at the VH and VL interface. Importantly, Leu96 and Tyr98 are conserved at the interface positions in both phage and ribosome display indicating their importance in maintaining the VH-VL interface. For antibodies derived from ribosome display, there is significant diversity at residues 100a to 100f of the VH CDR3 compared with phage display. A unique deletion of isoleucine at position 102 of the lead candidate, Jedi067, also occurs in the VHCDR3.As anticipated, recombining the mutations via ribosome display led to a greater structural diversity, particularly in the heavy chain CDR3, which in turn

  20. Uptake and processing of modified bacteriophage M13 in mice: implications for phage display.

    PubMed

    Molenaar, Tom J M; Michon, Ingrid; de Haas, Sonja A M; van Berkel, Theo J C; Kuiper, Johan; Biessen, Erik A L

    2002-02-01

    Internalization and degradation of filamentous bacteriophage M13 by a specific target cell may have major consequences for the recovery of phage in in vivo biopanning of phage libraries. Therefore, we investigated the pharmacokinetics and processing of native and receptor-targeted phage in mice. (35)S-radiolabeled M13 was chemically modified by conjugation of either galactose (lacM13) or succinic acid groups (sucM13) to the coat protein of the phage to stimulate uptake by galactose recognizing hepatic receptors and scavenger receptors, respectively. Receptor-mediated endocytosis of modified phage reduced the plasma half-life of native M13 (t(1/2) = 4.5 h) to 18 min for lactosylated and 1.5 min for succinylated bacterophage. Internalization of sucM13 was complete within 30 min after injection and resulted in up to 5000-fold reduction of bioactive phage within 90 min. In conclusion, these data provide information on the in vivo behavior of wild-type and receptor-targeted M13, which has important implications for future in vivo phage display experiments and for the potential use of M13 as a viral gene delivery vehicle. PMID:11853411

  1. Phage display and hybridoma generation of antibodies to human CXCR2 yields antibodies with distinct mechanisms and epitopes.

    PubMed

    Rossant, Christine J; Carroll, Danielle; Huang, Ling; Elvin, John; Neal, Frances; Walker, Edward; Benschop, Joris J; Kim, Eldar E; Barry, Simon T; Vaughan, Tristan J

    2014-01-01

    Generation of functional antibodies against integral membrane proteins such as the G-protein coupled receptor CXCR2 is technically challenging for several reasons, including limited epitope accessibility, the requirement for a lipid environment to maintain structure and their existence in dynamic conformational states. Antibodies to human CXCR2 were generated by immunization in vivo and by in vitro selection methods. Whole cell immunization of transgenic mice and screening of phage display libraries using CXCR2 magnetic proteoliposomes resulted in the isolation of antibodies with distinct modes of action. The hybridoma-derived antibody fully inhibited IL-8 and Gro-α responses in calcium flux and β-arrestin recruitment assays. The phage-display derived antibodies were allosteric antagonists that showed ligand dependent differences in functional assays. The hybridoma and phage display antibodies did not cross-compete in epitope competition assays and mapping using linear and CLIPS peptides confirmed that they recognized distinct epitopes of human CXCR2. This illustrates the benefits of using parallel antibody isolation approaches with different antigen presentation methods to successfully generate functionally and mechanistically diverse antagonistic antibodies to human CXCR2. The method is likely to be broadly applicable to other complex membrane proteins.

  2. The isolation and characterisation of human monoclonal HLA-A2 antibodies from an immune V gene phage display library.

    PubMed

    Watkins, N A; Brown, C; Hurd, C; Navarrete, C; Ouwehand, W H

    2000-03-01

    Molecular cloning techniques and V gene phage display have revolutionised the production of human monoclonal antibodies. Antibodies of a defined specificity can be obtained by selecting phage display libraries on antigen in a process known as panning. We have applied these techniques to the isolation of three HLA-A2-specific single chain variable domain fragments (scFv) from a patient alloimmunised by blood transfusion. Analysis of specificity with cells of HLA genotyped donors revealed the following: i) in addition to the major reactivity with HLA-A2, cross-reactivity with the HLA-A28 epitope; and ii) inhibition of scFv binding to the antigen by the patients' antibodies. The heavy chain variable genes of all three were derived from the germline gene Cos-3, carry the hallmarks of somatic hypermutation, and are most likely derived from clonally related B cells. The light chain variable domains were encoded by DPK1 and DPK8 from the VkappaI family. These data show that phage display can be used to clone HLA-specific alloantibodies that recognise the native antigen from alloimmunised patients. PMID:10777097

  3. Exploring the Secretomes of Microbes and Microbial Communities Using Filamentous Phage Display.

    PubMed

    Gagic, Dragana; Ciric, Milica; Wen, Wesley X; Ng, Filomena; Rakonjac, Jasna

    2016-01-01

    Microbial surface and secreted proteins (the secretome) contain a large number of proteins that interact with other microbes, host and/or environment. These proteins are exported by the coordinated activities of the protein secretion machinery present in the cell. A group of bacteriophage, called filamentous phage, have the ability to hijack bacterial protein secretion machinery in order to amplify and assemble via a secretion-like process. This ability has been harnessed in the use of filamentous phage of Escherichia coli in biotechnology applications, including screening large libraries of variants for binding to "bait" of interest, from tissues in vivo to pure proteins or even inorganic substrates. In this review we discuss the roles of secretome proteins in pathogenic and non-pathogenic bacteria and corresponding secretion pathways. We describe the basics of phage display technology and its variants applied to discovery of bacterial proteins that are implicated in colonization of host tissues and pathogenesis, as well as vaccine candidates through filamentous phage display library screening. Secretome selection aided by next-generation sequence analysis was successfully applied for selective display of the secretome at a microbial community scale, the latter revealing the richness of secretome functions of interest and surprising versatility in filamentous phage display of secretome proteins from large number of Gram-negative as well as Gram-positive bacteria and archaea. PMID:27092113

  4. Exploring the Secretomes of Microbes and Microbial Communities Using Filamentous Phage Display

    PubMed Central

    Gagic, Dragana; Ciric, Milica; Wen, Wesley X.; Ng, Filomena; Rakonjac, Jasna

    2016-01-01

    Microbial surface and secreted proteins (the secretome) contain a large number of proteins that interact with other microbes, host and/or environment. These proteins are exported by the coordinated activities of the protein secretion machinery present in the cell. A group of bacteriophage, called filamentous phage, have the ability to hijack bacterial protein secretion machinery in order to amplify and assemble via a secretion-like process. This ability has been harnessed in the use of filamentous phage of Escherichia coli in biotechnology applications, including screening large libraries of variants for binding to “bait” of interest, from tissues in vivo to pure proteins or even inorganic substrates. In this review we discuss the roles of secretome proteins in pathogenic and non-pathogenic bacteria and corresponding secretion pathways. We describe the basics of phage display technology and its variants applied to discovery of bacterial proteins that are implicated in colonization of host tissues and pathogenesis, as well as vaccine candidates through filamentous phage display library screening. Secretome selection aided by next-generation sequence analysis was successfully applied for selective display of the secretome at a microbial community scale, the latter revealing the richness of secretome functions of interest and surprising versatility in filamentous phage display of secretome proteins from large number of Gram-negative as well as Gram-positive bacteria and archaea. PMID:27092113

  5. Phage display selects for amylases with improved low pH starch-binding.

    PubMed

    Verhaert, Raymond M D; Beekwilder, Jules; Olsthoorn, René; van Duin, Jan; Quax, Wim J

    2002-06-13

    Directed evolution of secreted industrial enzymes is hampered by the lack of powerful selection techniques. We have explored surface display to select for enzyme variants with improved binding performance on complex polymeric substrates. By a combination of saturation mutagenesis and phage display we selected alpha-amylase variants, which have the ability to bind starch substrate at industrially preferred low pH conditions. First we displayed active alpha-amylase on the surface of phage fd. Secondly we developed a selection system that is based on the ability of alpha-amylase displaying phages to bind to cross-linked starch. This system was used to probe the involvement of specific beta-strands in substrate interaction. Finally, a saturated library of alpha-amylase mutants with one or more amino acid residues changed in their Cbeta4 starch-binding domain was subjected to phage display selection. Mutant molecules with good starch-binding and hydrolytic capacity could be isolated from the phage library by repeated binding and elution of phage particles at lowered pH value. Apart from the wild type alpha-amylase a specific subset of variants, with only changes in three out of the seven possible positions, was selected. All selected variants could hydrolyse starch and heptamaltose at low pH. Interestingly, variants were found with a starch hydrolysis ratio at pH 4.5/7.5 that is improved relative to the wild type alpha-amylase. These data demonstrate that useful alpha-amylase mutants can be selected via surface display on the basis of their binding properties to starch at lowered pH values.

  6. Corruption of phage display libraries by target-unrelated clones: diagnosis and countermeasures.

    PubMed

    Thomas, William D; Golomb, Miriam; Smith, George P

    2010-12-15

    Phage display is used to discover peptides or proteins with a desired target property-most often, affinity for a target selector molecule. Libraries of phage clones displaying diverse surface peptides are subject to a selection process designed to enrich for the target behavior and subsequently propagated to restore phage numbers. A recurrent problem is enrichment of clones, called target-unrelated phages or peptides (TUPs), that lack the target behavior. Many TUPs are propagation related; they have mutations conferring a growth advantage and are enriched during the propagations accompanying selection. Unlike other filamentous phage libraries, fd-tet-based libraries are relatively resistant to propagation-related TUP corruption. Their minus-strand origin is disrupted by a large cassette that simultaneously confers resistance to tetracycline and imposes a rate-limiting growth defect that cannot be bypassed with simple mutations. Nonetheless, a new type of propagation-related TUP emerged in the output of in vivo selections from an fd-tet library. The founding clone had a complex rearrangement that restored the minus-strand origin while retaining tetracycline resistance. The rearrangement involved two recombination events, one with a contaminant having a wild-type minus-strand origin. The founder's infectivity advantage spread by simple recombination to clones displaying different peptides. We propose measures for minimizing TUP corruption.

  7. Targeting pancreatic islets with phage display assisted by laser pressure catapult microdissection.

    PubMed

    Yao, Virginia J; Ozawa, Michael G; Trepel, Martin; Arap, Wadih; McDonald, Donald M; Pasqualini, Renata

    2005-02-01

    Heterogeneity of the microvasculature in different organs has been well documented by multiple methods including in vivo phage display. However, less is known about the diversity of blood vessels within functionally distinct regions of organs. Here, we combined in vivo phage display with laser pressure catapult microdissection to identify peptide ligands for vascular receptors in the islets of Langerhans in the murine pancreas. Protein database analyses of the peptides, CVSNPRWKC and CHVLWSTRC, showed sequence identity to two ephrin A-type ligand homologues, A2 and A4. Confocal microscopy confirmed that most immunoreactivity of CVSNPRWKC and CHVLWSTRC phage was associated with blood vessels in pancreatic islets. Antibodies recognizing EphA4, a receptor for ephrin-A ligands, were similarly associated with islet blood vessels. Importantly, binding of both islet-homing phage and anti-EphA4 antibody was strikingly increased in blood vessels of pancreatic islet tumors in RIP-Tag2 transgenic mice. These results indicate that endothelial cells of blood vessels in pancreatic islets preferentially express EphA4 receptors, and this expression is increased in tumors. Our findings show in vivo phage display and laser pressure catapult microdissection can be combined to reveal endothelial cell specialization within focal regions of the microvasculature.

  8. An Electrochemiluminescence Immunosensor Based on Gold-Magnetic Nanoparticles and Phage Displayed Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Mu, Xihui; Tong, Zhaoyang; Huang, Qibin; Liu, Bing; Liu, Zhiwei; Hao, Lanqun; Dong, Hua; Zhang, Jinping; Gao, Chuan

    2016-01-01

    Using the multiple advantages of the ultra-highly sensitive electrochemiluminescence (ECL) technique, Staphylococcus protein A (SPA) functionalized gold-magnetic nanoparticles and phage displayed antibodies, and using gold-magnetic nanoparticles coated with SPA and coupled with a polyclonal antibody (pcAb) as magnetic capturing probes, and Ru(bpy)32+-labeled phage displayed antibody as a specific luminescence probe, this study reports a new way to detect ricin with a highly sensitive and specific ECL immunosensor and amplify specific detection signals. The linear detection range of the sensor was 0.0001~200 µg/L, and the limit of detection (LOD) was 0.0001 µg/L, which is 2500-fold lower than that of the conventional ELISA technique. The gold-magnetic nanoparticles, SPA and Ru(bpy)32+-labeled phage displayed antibody displayed different amplifying effects in the ECL immunosensor and can decrease LOD 3-fold, 3-fold and 20-fold, respectively, compared with the ECL immunosensors without one of the three effects. The integrated amplifying effect can decrease the LOD 180-fold. The immunosensor integrates the unique advantages of SPA-coated gold-magnetic nanoparticles that improve the activity of the functionalized capturing probe, and the amplifying effect of the Ru(bpy)32+-labeled phage displayed antibodies, so it increases specificity, interference-resistance and decreases LOD. It is proven to be well suited for the analysis of trace amounts of ricin in various environmental samples with high recovery ratios and reproducibility. PMID:26927130

  9. Immunodiagnosis of Canine Visceral Leishmaniasis Using Mimotope Peptides Selected from Phage Displayed Combinatorial Libraries

    PubMed Central

    Toledo-Machado, Christina Monerat; Machado de Avila, Ricardo Andrez; NGuyen, Christophe; Granier, Claude; Bueno, Lilian Lacerda; Carneiro, Claudia Martins; Menezes-Souza, Daniel; Carneiro, Rubens Antonio; Chávez-Olórtegui, Carlos; Fujiwara, Ricardo Toshio

    2015-01-01

    ELISA and RIFI are currently used for serodiagnosis of canine visceral leishmaniasis (CVL). The accuracy of these tests is controversial in endemic areas where canine infections by Trypanosoma cruzi may occur. We evaluated the usefulness of synthetic peptides that were selected through phage display technique in the serodiagnosis of CVL. Peptides were chosen based on their ability to bind to IgGs purified from infected dogs pooled sera. We selected three phage clones that reacted only with those IgGs. Peptides were synthesized, polymerized with glutaraldehyde, and used as antigens in ELISA assays. Each individual peptide or a mix of them was reactive with infected dogs serum. The assay was highly sensitive and specific when compared to soluble Leishmania antigen that showed cross-reactivity with anti-T. cruzi IgGs. Our results demonstrate that phage display technique is useful for selection of peptides that may represent valuable synthetic antigens for an improved serodiagnosis of CVL. PMID:25710003

  10. Engineering phage materials with desired peptide display: rational design sustained through natural selection.

    PubMed

    Merzlyak, Anna; Lee, Seung-Wuk

    2009-12-01

    Genetic engineering of phage provides novel opportunities to build various nanomaterials by displaying functional peptide motifs on its surface coat protein. However, any genetic modifications of phage coat proteins must be able to accommodate their many biological roles in the phage replication process. To express functional but inherently unfavorable peptide motifs on major coat protein pVIII, we devised a novel genetic conjugation method to circumvent bacterial biological censorship. Constraining the designed peptides among the degenerate flanking residues, we obtained a pVIII library of phage that retained the desired sequences yet could navigate through the phage replication process due to the naturally selected flanking residues. Further, we systematically analyzed the biochemical and size-related compensation mechanisms of the pVIII expressed peptides by constructing four chemically diverse (His, Trp, Glu, Lys) partial library series. Described genetic conjugation methodology can serve to improve the design of engineered phage and allow further exploitation of these particles as functional nanobiomaterials for various applications. PMID:19842621

  11. Real-time analysis of dual-display phage immobilization and autoantibody screening using quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring.

    PubMed

    Rajaram, Kaushik; Losada-Pérez, Patricia; Vermeeren, Veronique; Hosseinkhani, Baharak; Wagner, Patrick; Somers, Veerle; Michiels, Luc

    2015-01-01

    Over the last three decades, phage display technology has been used for the display of target-specific biomarkers, peptides, antibodies, etc. Phage display-based assays are mostly limited to the phage ELISA, which is notorious for its high background signal and laborious methodology. These problems have been recently overcome by designing a dual-display phage with two different end functionalities, namely, streptavidin (STV)-binding protein at one end and a rheumatoid arthritis-specific autoantigenic target at the other end. Using this dual-display phage, a much higher sensitivity in screening specificities of autoantibodies in complex serum sample has been detected compared to single-display phage system on phage ELISA. Herein, we aimed to develop a novel, rapid, and sensitive dual-display phage to detect autoantibodies presence in serum samples using quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring as a sensing platform. The vertical functionalization of the phage over the STV-modified surfaces resulted in clear frequency and dissipation shifts revealing a well-defined viscoelastic signature. Screening for autoantibodies using antihuman IgG-modified surfaces and the dual-display phage with STV magnetic bead complexes allowed to isolate the target entities from complex mixtures and to achieve a large response as compared to negative control samples. This novel dual-display strategy can be a potential alternative to the time consuming phage ELISA protocols for the qualitative analysis of serum autoantibodies and can be taken as a departure point to ultimately achieve a point of care diagnostic system.

  12. Real-time analysis of dual-display phage immobilization and autoantibody screening using quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Rajaram, Kaushik; Losada-Pérez, Patricia; Vermeeren, Veronique; Hosseinkhani, Baharak; Wagner, Patrick; Somers, Veerle; Michiels, Luc

    2015-01-01

    Over the last three decades, phage display technology has been used for the display of target-specific biomarkers, peptides, antibodies, etc. Phage display-based assays are mostly limited to the phage ELISA, which is notorious for its high background signal and laborious methodology. These problems have been recently overcome by designing a dual-display phage with two different end functionalities, namely, streptavidin (STV)-binding protein at one end and a rheumatoid arthritis-specific autoantigenic target at the other end. Using this dual-display phage, a much higher sensitivity in screening specificities of autoantibodies in complex serum sample has been detected compared to single-display phage system on phage ELISA. Herein, we aimed to develop a novel, rapid, and sensitive dual-display phage to detect autoantibodies presence in serum samples using quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring as a sensing platform. The vertical functionalization of the phage over the STV-modified surfaces resulted in clear frequency and dissipation shifts revealing a well-defined viscoelastic signature. Screening for autoantibodies using antihuman IgG-modified surfaces and the dual-display phage with STV magnetic bead complexes allowed to isolate the target entities from complex mixtures and to achieve a large response as compared to negative control samples. This novel dual-display strategy can be a potential alternative to the time consuming phage ELISA protocols for the qualitative analysis of serum autoantibodies and can be taken as a departure point to ultimately achieve a point of care diagnostic system. PMID:26316752

  13. Direct selection and phage display of a Gram-positive secretome

    PubMed Central

    Jankovic, Dragana; Collett, Michael A; Lubbers, Mark W; Rakonjac, Jasna

    2007-01-01

    Surface, secreted and transmembrane protein-encoding open reading frames, collectively the secretome, can be identified in bacterial genome sequences using bioinformatics. However, functional analysis of translated secretomes is possible only if many secretome proteins are expressed and purified individually. We have now developed and applied a phage display system for direct selection, identification, expression and purification of bacterial secretome proteins. PMID:18078523

  14. Phage displayed peptide recognizing porcine aminopeptidase N is a potent small molecule inhibitor of PEDV entry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Three phage-displayed peptides designated H, S and F that recognize porcine aminopeptidase N (pAPN), the cellular receptor of porcine transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV) were able to inhibit cell infection by TGEV. These same peptides had no inhibitory effects on infection of Vero cells by po...

  15. Identification of Novel Single Chain Fragment Variable Antibodies Against TNF-α Using Phage Display Technology

    PubMed Central

    Alizadeh, Ali Akbar; Hamzeh-Mivehroud, Maryam; Dastmalchi, Siavoush

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) is an inflammatory cytokine, involved in both physiological and pathological pathways. Because of central role of TNF-α in pathogenesis of inflammatory diseases, in the current study, we aimed to identify novel scFv antibodies against TNF-α using phage display technology. Methods: Using libraries composed of phagemid displaying scFv antibodies, four rounds of biopanning against TNF-α were carried out, which led to identification of scFvs capable of binding to TNF-α. The scFv antibody with appropriate binding affinity towards TNF-α, was amplified and used in ELISA experiment. Results: Titration of phage achieved from different rounds of biopanning showed an enrichment of specific anti-TNF-α phages during biopanning process. Using ELISA experiment, a binding constant (Kd) of 1.11 ± 0.32 nM was determined for the phage displaying J48 scFv antibody. Conclusion: The findings in the current work revealed that the identified novel scFv antibody displayed at the N-terminal of minor coat proteins of phagemid binds TNF-α with suitable affinity. However, the soluble form of the antibody is needed to be produced and evaluated in more details regarding its binding properties to TNF-α. PMID:26793613

  16. Improvement and efficient display of Bacillus thuringiensis toxins on M13 phages and ribosomes.

    PubMed

    Pacheco, Sabino; Cantón, Emiliano; Zuñiga-Navarrete, Fernando; Pecorari, Frédéric; Bravo, Alejandra; Soberón, Mario

    2015-12-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) produces insecticidal proteins that have been used worldwide in the control of insect-pests in crops and vectors of human diseases. However, different insect species are poorly controlled by the available Bt toxins or have evolved resistance to these toxins. Evolution of Bt toxicity could provide novel toxins to control insect pests. To this aim, efficient display systems to select toxins with increased binding to insect membranes or midgut proteins involved in toxicity are likely to be helpful. Here we describe two display systems, phage display and ribosome display, that allow the efficient display of two non-structurally related Bt toxins, Cry1Ac and Cyt1Aa. Improved display of Cry1Ac and Cyt1Aa on M13 phages was achieved by changing the commonly used peptide leader sequence of the coat pIII-fusion protein, that relies on the Sec translocation pathway, for a peptide leader sequence that relies on the signal recognition particle pathway (SRP) and by using a modified M13 helper phage (Phaberge) that has an amber mutation in its pIII genomic sequence and preferentially assembles using the pIII-fusion protein. Also, both Cry1Ac and Cyt1Aa were efficiently displayed on ribosomes, which could allow the construction of large libraries of variants. Furthermore, Cry1Ac or Cyt1Aa displayed on M13 phages or ribosomes were specifically selected from a mixture of both toxins depending on which antigen was immobilized for binding selection. These improved systems may allow the selection of Cry toxin variants with improved insecticidal activities that could counter insect resistances. PMID:26606918

  17. Molecular specialization of breast vasculature: A breast-homing phage-displayed peptide binds to aminopeptidase P in breast vasculature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Essler, Markus; Ruoslahti, Erkki

    2002-02-01

    In vivo phage display identifies peptides that selectively home to the vasculature of individual organs, tissues, and tumors. Here we report the identification of a cyclic nonapeptide, CPGPEGAGC, which homes to normal breast tissue with a 100-fold selectivity over nontargeted phage. The homing of the phage is inhibited by its cognate synthetic peptide. Phage localization in tissue sections showed that the breast-homing phage binds to the blood vessels in the breast, but not in other tissues. The phage also bound to the vasculature of hyperplastic and malignant lesions in transgenic breast cancer mice. Expression cloning with a phage-displayed cDNA library yielded a phage that specifically bound to the breast-homing peptide. The cDNA insert was homologous to a fragment of aminopeptidase P. The homing peptide bound aminopeptidase P from malignant breast tissue in affinity chromatography. Antibodies against aminopeptidase P inhibited the in vitro binding of the phage-displayed cDNA to the peptide and the in vivo homing of phage carrying the peptide. These results indicate that aminopeptidase P is the receptor for the breast-homing peptide. This peptide may be useful in designing drugs for the prevention and treatment of breast cancer.

  18. Phage antibody display libraries: a powerful antibody discovery platform for immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Aizhi; Tohidkia, Mohammad R; Siegel, Donald L; Coukos, George; Omidi, Yadollah

    2016-01-01

    Phage display technology (PDT), a combinatorial screening approach, provides a molecular diversity tool for creating libraries of peptides/proteins and discovery of new recombinant therapeutics. Expression of proteins such as monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) on the surface of filamentous phage can permit the selection of high affinity and specificity therapeutic mAbs against virtually any target antigen. Using a number of diverse selection platforms (e.g. solid phase, solution phase, whole cell and in vivo biopannings), phage antibody libraries (PALs) from the start point provides great potential for the isolation of functional mAb fragments with diagnostic and/or therapeutic purposes. Given the pivotal role of PDT in the discovery of novel therapeutic/diagnostic mAbs, in the current review, we provide an overview on PALs and discuss their impact in the advancement of engineered mAbs.

  19. Identification of peptides that selectively bind to myoglobin by biopanning of phage displayed-peptide library.

    PubMed

    Padmanaban, Guruprasath; Park, Hyekyung; Choi, Ji Suk; Cho, Yong-Woo; Kang, Woong Chol; Moon, Chan-Il; Kim, In-San; Lee, Byung-Heon

    2014-10-10

    Biopanning of phage displayed-peptide library was performed against myoglobin, a marker for the early assessment of acute myocardial infarction (AMI), to identify peptides that selectively bind to myoglobin. Using myoglobin-conjugated magnetic beads, phages that bound to myoglobin were collected and amplified for the next round of screening. A 148-fold enrichment of phage titer was observed after five rounds of screening relative to the first round. After phage binding ELISA, three phage clones were selected (3R1, 3R7 and 3R10) and the inserted peptides were chemically synthesized. The analysis of binding affinity showed that the 3R7 (CPSTLGASC) peptide had higher binding affinity (Kd=57 nM) than did the 3R1 (CNLSSSWIC) and 3R10 (CVPRLSAPC) peptide (Kd=125 nM and 293 nM, respectively). Cross binding activity to other proteins, such as bovine serum albumin, troponin I, and creatine kinase-MB, was minimal. In a peptide-antibody sandwich ELISA, the selected peptides efficiently captured myoglobin. Moreover, the concentrations of myoglobin in serum samples measured by a peptide-peptide sandwich assay were comparable to those measured by a commercial antibody-based kit. These results indicate that the identified peptides can be used for the detection of myoglobin and may be a cost effective alternative to antibodies.

  20. Fingerprint-like Analysis of “Nanoantibody” Selection by Phage Display Using Two Helper Phage Variants

    PubMed Central

    Tillib, S.V.; Ivanova, T.I.; Vasilev, L.A.

    2010-01-01

    This paper discusses the selection of mini-antibody (nanoantibody, nanobody® or single domain antibody) sequences of desired specificity by phage display-based method using a generated library of antigen-binding domains of special heavy-chain only antibodies (single-stranded antibodies) of immunized camel. A comprehensive comparison of the efficiency of parallel selection procedures was performed by using the traditional (M13KO7) and modified (with N-terminal deletion in the surface gIII protein) helper phages. These two methods are partly complementary, and by using them in parallel one can significantly improve the selection efficiency. Parallel restriction analysis (fingerprinting) of PCR-amplified cloned sequences coding for mini-antibodies (HMR-analysis) is proposed for identifying individual clones, as a replacement to sequencing (to a certain extent). Using this method, unique data were collected on the selection of mini-antibody variants with the required specificity at various stages of a multi-stage selection procedure. It has been shown that different sequences coding for mini-antibodies are selected in different ways, and that, if this feature is not taken into account, some mini-antibody variants may be lost. PMID:22649655

  1. Combining Phage and Yeast Cell Surface Antibody Display to Identify Novel Cell Type-Selective Internalizing Human Monoclonal Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Bidlingmaier, Scott; Su, Yang; Liu, Bin

    2015-01-01

    Using phage antibody display, large libraries can be generated and screened to identify monoclonal antibodies with affinity for target antigens. However, while library size and diversity is an advantage of the phage display method, there is limited ability to quantitatively enrich for specific binding properties such as affinity. One way of overcoming this limitation is to combine the scale of phage display selections with the flexibility and quantitativeness of FACS-based yeast surface display selections. In this chapter we describe protocols for generating yeast surface antibody display libraries using phage antibody display selection outputs as starting material and FACS-based enrichment of target antigen-binding clones from these libraries. These methods should be widely applicable for the identification of monoclonal antibodies with specific binding properties. PMID:26060069

  2. Novel strategy for the selection of human recombinant Fab fragments to membrane proteins from a phage-display library.

    PubMed

    Labrijn, Aran F; Koppelman, Marco H G M; Verhagen, Janneke; Brouwer, Mieke C; Schuitemaker, Hanneke; Hack, C Erik; Huisman, Han G

    2002-03-01

    Traditionally, the selection of phage-display libraries is performed on purified antigens (Ags), immobilized to a solid substrate. However, this approach may not be applicable for some Ags, such as membrane proteins, which for structural integrity strongly rely on their native environment. Here we describe an approach for the selection of phage-libraries against membrane proteins. The envelope glycoproteins (Env) of the Human Immunodeficiency Virus type-1 (HIV-1) were used as a model for a type-1 integral membrane protein. HIV-1IHI Env, expressed on the surface of Rabbit Kidney cells (RK13) with a recombinant vaccinia virus (rVV), was solubilized using the non-ionic detergent n-Octyl beta-D-glucopyranoside (OG). Membrane associated Env was reconstituted into vesicles by the simultaneous removal of detergent and free monomeric Env subunits by gel-filtration. The resulting antigen preparation, termed OG-P1IHI, was captured on microtiter plates coated with Galanthus nivalis agglutinin (GNA) and used for rounds of selection (panning) of a well-characterized phage-display library derived from an HIV-1 seropositive donor. Simultaneously, an identical experiment was performed with OG-P1IHI vesicles disrupted by Nonidet P-40 (NP-P1IHI). Both membrane-associated and soluble Ags were selected for vaccinia-specific clones (OG-P1IHI: 59/75 and NP-P1IHI: 1/75) and HIV-1-specific clones (OG-P1IHI: 11/75 and NP-P1IHI: 65/75) using our approach. Hence, the novel panning strategy described here may be applicable for selection of phage-libraries against membrane proteins.

  3. Selection of ceramic fluorapatite-binding peptides from a phage display combinatorial peptide library: optimum affinity tags for fluorapatite chromatography.

    PubMed

    Islam, Tuhidul; Bibi, Noor Shad; Vennapusa, Rami Reddy; Fernandez-Lahore, Marcelo

    2013-08-01

    Peptide affinity tags have become efficient tools for the purification of recombinant proteins from biological mixtures. The most commonly used ligands in this type of affinity chromatography are immobilized metal ions, proteins, antibodies, and complementary peptides. However, the major bottlenecks of this technique are still related to the ligands, including their low stability, difficulties in immobilization, and leakage into the final products. A model approach is presented here to overcome these bottlenecks by utilizing macroporous ceramic fluorapatite (CFA) as the stationary phase in chromatography and the CFA-specific short peptides as tags. The CFA chromatographic materials act as both the support matrix and the ligand. Peptides that bind with affinity to CFA were identified from a randomized phage display heptapeptide library. A total of five rounds of phage selection were performed. A common N-terminal sequence was found in two selected peptides: F4-2 (KPRSMLH) and F5-4 (KPRSVSG). The peptide F5-4, displayed by more than 40% of the phages analyzed in the fifth round of selection, was subjected to further studies. Selectivity of the peptide for the chemical composition and morphology of CFA was assured by the adsorption studies. The dissociation constant, obtained from the F5-4/CFA adsorption isotherm, was in the micromolar range, and the maximum capacity was 39.4 nmol/mg. The chromatographic behavior of the peptides was characterized on a CFA stationary phase with different buffers. Preferential affinity and specific retention properties suggest the possible application of the phage-derived peptides as a tag in CFA affinity chromatography for enhancing the selective recovery of proteins.

  4. Nanoparticles and phage display selected peptides for imaging and therapy of cancer.

    PubMed

    Cutler, Cathy S; Chanda, Nripen; Shukla, Ravi; Sisay, Nebiat; Cantorias, Melchor; Zambre, Ajit; McLaughlin, Mark; Kelsey, James; Upenandran, Anandhi; Robertson, Dave; Deutscher, Susan; Kannan, Raghuraman; Katti, Kattesh

    2013-01-01

    Molecular imaging probes are a special class of pharmaceuticals that target specific biochemical signatures associated with disease and allow for noninvasive imaging on the molecular level. Because changes in biochemistry occur before diseases reach an advanced stage, molecular imaging probes make it possible to locate and stage disease, track the effectiveness of drugs, treat disease, monitor response, and select patients to allow for more personalized diagnosis and treatment of disease. Targeting agents radiolabeled with positron emitters are of interest due to their ability to quantitatively measure biodistribution and receptor expression to allow for optimal dose determinations. (68)Ga is a positron emitter, which allows for quantitative imaging through positron emission chromatography (PET). The availability of (68)Ga from a generator and its ability to form stable complexes with a variety of chelates hold promise for expanding PET utilization to facilities unable to afford their own cyclotron. Nanoparticles conjugated with various proteins and peptides derived from phage display that can be selectively targeted are being developed and evaluated for guided imaging and therapy. Herein we highlight some initial efforts in combining the enhanced selectivity of nanoparticles and peptides with (68)Ga for use as molecular imaging probes. PMID:22918758

  5. Dense display of HIV-1 envelope spikes on the lambda phage scaffold does not result in the generation of improved antibody responses to HIV-1 Env

    PubMed Central

    Mattiacio, Jonelle; Walter, Scott; Brewer, Matt; Domm, William; Friedman, Alan E.; Dewhurst, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    The generation of strong, virus-neutralizing antibody responses to the HIV-1 envelope spike (Env) is a major goal in HIV-1 vaccine research. To try to enhance the Env-specific response, we displayed oligomeric gp140 on a virus-like scaffold provided by the lambda phage capsid. To do this, an in vitro complementation system was used to “decorate” phage particles with glycosylated, mammalian cell-derived envelope oligomers. We compared the immune response to lambda phage particles displaying HIV-1 Env to that elicited by soluble oligomeric gp140 in rabbits. Env-binding antibody titers were higher in animals that received oligomeric gp140 as compared to Env decorated phage particles, as were virus neutralizing antibody responses. The Env decorated phage particles were, however, able to efficiently boost a protein-primed humoral response to levels equivalent to those elicited by high-dose adjuvanted Env oligomers. These results show that display of HIV-1 envelope spikes on the bacteriophage lambda capsid does not result in an improved, Env-specific humoral immune response. PMID:21310193

  6. Automated panning and screening procedure on microplates for antibody generation from phage display libraries.

    PubMed

    Turunen, Laura; Takkinen, Kristiina; Söderlund, Hans; Pulli, Timo

    2009-03-01

    Antibody phage display technology is well established and widely used for selecting specific antibodies against desired targets. Using conventional manual methods, it is laborious to perform multiple selections with different antigens simultaneously. Furthermore, manual screening of the positive clones requires much effort. The authors describe optimized and automated procedures of these processes using a magnetic bead processor for the selection and a robotic station for the screening step. Both steps are performed in a 96-well microplate format. In addition, adopting the antibody phage display technology to automated platform polyethylene glycol precipitation of the enriched phage pool was unnecessary. For screening, an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay protocol suitable for a robotic station was developed. This system was set up using human gamma-globulin as a model antigen to select antibodies from a VTT naive human single-chain antibody (scFv) library. In total, 161 gamma-globulin-selected clones were screened, and according to fingerprinting analysis, 9 of the 13 analyzed clones were different. The system was further tested using testosterone bovine serum albumin (BSA) and beta-estradiol-BSA as antigens with the same library. In total, 1536 clones were screened from 4 rounds of selection with both antigens, and 29 different testosterone-BSA and 23 beta-estradiol-BSA binding clones were found and verified by sequencing. This automated antibody phage display procedure increases the throughput of generating wide panels of target-binding antibody candidates and allows the selection and screening of antibodies against several different targets in parallel with high efficiency.

  7. Inorganic binding peptides designed by phage display techniques for biotechnology applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Chih-Wei

    Biomacromolecules play an important role in the control of hard tissue structure and function via specific molecular recognition interactions between proteins of the matrix and inorganic species of the biomineral phase. During the construction of the tissue, biomacromolecules are usually folded into a certain comformation, analogous to a "lock" for fitting with other proteins or smaller molecules as a "key". Currently, the rational design of molecular recognition in biomacro-molecules is still hard to accomplish because the protein conformation is too complex to precisely predict based on the existing conformational information of proteins found in biological systems. In the past two decades, the combinatorial approach (e.g. phage display techniques) has been used to select short binding peptides with molecular recognition to an inorganic target material without a prior knowledge of the amino acid sequence required for the specific binding. The technique has been referred to as "biopanning" because bacteriophages are used to "screen" for peptides that exhibit strong binding to a target material of interest. In this study, two diverse applications were chosen to demonstrate the utility of the biopanning approach. In one project, phage display techniques were used to pan for Indium Zinc Oxide (InZnO) binding peptides to serve as linkers between transducer devices and biosensing elements for demonstration of the feasibility of reversibly electro-activated biosensors. The amorphous InZnO, with its homogeneous surface, led to three consensus peptide sequences, AGFPNSTHSSNL, SHAPDSTWFALF, and TNSSSQFVVAIP. In addition, it was demonstrated that some selected phage clones of the InZnO binding peptides were able to be released from the InZnO surface after applying a voltage of 1400 mV on an electro-activated releasing device. In the second project, phage display techniques were used to select phage clones that bind specifically to francolite mineral in order to achieve

  8. Development of a peptide by phage display for SPECT imaging of resistance-susceptible breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Larimer, Benjamin M; Deutscher, Susan L

    2014-01-01

    Personalized medicine is at the forefront of cancer diagnosis and therapy. Molecularly targeted therapies such as trastuzumab and tamoxifen have enhanced prognosis of patients with cancers expressing ERBB2 and the estrogen receptor, respectively. One obstacle to targeted therapy is the development of resistance. A targeted peptide that could distinguish resistance-susceptible cancer would aid in treatment. BT-474 human breast cancer cells can be resistant to both tamoxifen and trastuzumab, and may serve as a model for malignancies in which targeted therapy may not work. Bacteriophage (phage) display is a combinatorial technology that has been used to isolate peptides that target a specific cancer subtype. It was hypothesized that in vivo phage display could be used to select a peptide for SPECT imaging of BT-474 human breast cancer xenografts. A phage library displaying random 15 amino acid peptides was subjected to four rounds of selection, after which 14 clones were analyzed for BT-474 binding and specificity. One phage clone, 51, demonstrated superior binding and specificity, and the displayed peptide was synthesized for in vitro characterization. Peptide 51 bound specifically to BT-474 cells with an EC50 = 2.33 µM and was synthesized as a DOTA-conjugated peptide and radiolabeled with 111In for in vitro and in vivo analysis. The radiolabeled peptide exhibited an IC50 = 16.1 nM to BT-474 cells and its biodistribution and SPECT imaging in BT-474 xenografted mice was analyzed. Although tumor uptake was moderate at 0.11% ID/g, SPECT imaging revealed a distinct tumor vasculature binding pattern. It was discovered that peptide 51 had an identical 5 amino acid N-terminal sequence to a peptide, V1, which bound to Nrp1, a tumor vasculature protein. Peptide 51 and V1 were examined for binding to target cells, and 51 bound both target and endothelial cells, while V1 only bound endothelial cells. Truncated versions of 51 did not bind BT-474 cells, demonstrating that the

  9. PEGylation enables the specific tumor accumulation of a peptide identified by phage display.

    PubMed

    Mier, Walter; Krämer, Susanne; Zitzmann, Sabine; Altmann, Annette; Leotta, Karin; Schierbaum, Ursula; Schnölzer, Martina; Eisenhut, Michael; Haberkorn, Uwe

    2013-04-28

    Peptides are excellent alternatives to small molecules and proteinaceous drugs. Their high medicinal potential for diagnostic and therapeutic applications has prompted the development of tumor targeting peptides. Despite its excellent tumor binding capacity, FROP-DOTA (H-Glu-Asn-Tyr-Glu-Leu-Met-Asp-Leu-Leu-Ala-Tyr-Leu-Lys(DOTA)-NH2), a peptide that we had identified in phage display libraries, revealed slow binding kinetics. Consequently, biodistribution studies showed that its excretion forestalled a significant tumor accumulation. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the conjugation of PEG to FROP-DOTA resulted in a derivative with a prolonged residence time in the blood. A synthetic method for the PEGylation of the tumor specific peptide FROP-DOTA was developed. Thereafter, binding studies were done in vitro and a biodistribution was performed in tumor bearing animals. These were compared to the data obtained with FROP-DOTA. The binding kinetics of the PEGylated FROP-DOTA was even slower than that of FROP-DOTA. Biodistribution studies of the labeled conjugate in mice bearing human FRO82-2 tumors showed a time dependent increased uptake of the PEGylated peptide with a high retention (at 24 h p.i. 76% of the maximal activity concentration persisted in the tumor). The highest uptake values were determined at 120 min p.i. reaching 2.3%ID/g tumor as compared to 0.06%ID/g observed for the non-PEGylated derivative at 135 min p.i. Apparently, PEGylation provides a substantially improved stabilization in the circulation which allowed a stable tumor accumulation. PMID:23474823

  10. Phage Display Based Cloning of Proteins Interacting with the Cytoplasmic Tail of Membrane Immunoglobulins

    PubMed Central

    Geisberger, Roland; Prlic, Martin; Achatz-Straussberger, Gertrude; Oberndorfer, Iris; Luger, Elke; Lamers, Marinus; Crameri, Reto; Appenzeller, Ulrich; Wienands, Jürgen; Breitenbach, Michael; Ferreira, Fatima; Achatz, Gernot

    2002-01-01

    The reduced quantity and quality of serum immunoglobulins (sIgs) in mutant mice expressing truncated cytoplasmic tails of IgE and IgG1 indicate an active role for the cytoplasmic domains of mIgG1 and mIgE. We used phage display technology to identify candidate proteins able to interact with the cytoplasmic tail of mIgE. Using a murine cDNA B cell library displayed on the surface of phage as prey and the 28 amino acid long cytoplasmic tail of IgE as bait, we isolated phage encoding the murine hematopoietic progenitor kinase 1 (HPK1). Surface plasmon resonance analysis measurements confirmed affinity of HPK1 to the mIgE cytoplasmic tail and revealed association to other immunoglobulin isotypes as well. Immunoprecipitation experiments, using lysates from two B cell lines expressing nitrophenyl (NP) specific mIgE molecules showed co-precipitation of IgE and HPK1. The interaction of HPK1 with the cytoplasmic domains of membrane immunoglobulins indicate an active role of the tails as part of an isotype specific signal transduction, independent from the Igα/Igβ heterodimers, and may represent a missing link to upstream regulatory elements of HPK1 activation. PMID:12885153

  11. Protection against Influenza A Virus Challenge with M2e-Displaying Filamentous Escherichia coli Phages

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Lei; Ibañez, Lorena Itatí; Van den Bossche, Veronique; Roose, Kenny; Youssef, Sameh A.; de Bruin, Alain; Fiers, Walter; Saelens, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    Human influenza viruses are responsible for annual epidemics and occasional pandemics that cause severe illness and mortality in all age groups worldwide. Matrix protein 2 (M2) of influenza A virus is a tetrameric type III membrane protein that functions as a proton-selective channel. The extracellular domain of M2 (M2e) is conserved in human and avian influenza A viruses and is being pursued as a component for a universal influenza A vaccine. To develop a M2e vaccine that is economical and easy to purify, we genetically fused M2e amino acids 2–16 to the N-terminus of pVIII, the major coat protein of filamentous bacteriophage f88. We show that the resulting recombinant f88−M2e2-16 phages are replication competent and display the introduced part of M2e on the phage surface. Immunization of mice with purified f88−M2e2-16 phages in the presence of incomplete Freund’s adjuvant, induced robust M2e-specific serum IgG and protected BALB/c mice against challenge with human and avian influenza A viruses. Thus, replication competent filamentous bacteriophages can be used as efficient and economical carriers to display conserved B cell epitopes of influenza A. PMID:25973787

  12. Shotgun phage display of Lactobacillus casei BL23 against collagen and fibronectin.

    PubMed

    Munoz-Provencio, Diego; Monedero, Vicente

    2011-02-01

    Lactobacilli are normal constituents of the intestinal microbiota, and some strains show the capacity to bind to extracellular matrix proteins and components of the mucosal layer, which represents an adaptation to persist in this niche. A shotgun phage-display library of Lactobacillus casei BL23 was constructed and screened for peptides able to bind to fibronectin and collagen. Clones showing binding to these proteins were isolated, which encoded overlapping fragments of a putative transcriptional regulator (LCABL_29260), a hypothetical protein exclusively found in the L. casei/rhamnosus group (LCABL_01820), and a putative phage-related endolysin (LCABL_13470). The construction of different glutathione S-transferase (GST) fusions confirmed the binding activity and demonstrated that the three identified proteins could interact with fibronectin, fibrinogen, and collagen. The results illustrate the utility of phage display for the isolation of putative adhesins in lactobacilli. However, it remains to be determined whether the primary function of these proteins actually is adhesion to mucosal surfaces.

  13. Shotgun phage display of Lactobacillus casei BL23 against collagen and fibronectin.

    PubMed

    Munoz-Provencio, Diego; Monedero, Vicente

    2011-02-01

    Lactobacilli are normal constituents of the intestinal microbiota, and some strains show the capacity to bind to extracellular matrix proteins and components of the mucosal layer, which represents an adaptation to persist in this niche. A shotgun phage-display library of Lactobacillus casei BL23 was constructed and screened for peptides able to bind to fibronectin and collagen. Clones showing binding to these proteins were isolated, which encoded overlapping fragments of a putative transcriptional regulator (LCABL_29260), a hypothetical protein exclusively found in the L. casei/rhamnosus group (LCABL_01820), and a putative phage-related endolysin (LCABL_13470). The construction of different glutathione S-transferase (GST) fusions confirmed the binding activity and demonstrated that the three identified proteins could interact with fibronectin, fibrinogen, and collagen. The results illustrate the utility of phage display for the isolation of putative adhesins in lactobacilli. However, it remains to be determined whether the primary function of these proteins actually is adhesion to mucosal surfaces. PMID:21364304

  14. Panning of a phage display library against a synthetic capsule for peptide ligands that bind to the native capsule of Bacillus anthracis.

    PubMed

    Beer, Michael; Liu, Chun-Qiang

    2012-01-01

    Bacillus anthracis is the causative agent of anthrax with the ability to not only produce a tripartite toxin, but also an enveloping capsule comprised primarily of γ-D-glutamic acid residues. The purpose of this study was to isolate peptide ligands capable of binding to the native capsule of B. anthracis from a commercial phage display peptide library using a synthetic form of the capsule consisting of 12 γ-D-glutamic acid residues. Following four rounds of selection, 80 clones were selected randomly and analysed by DNA sequencing. Four clones, each containing a unique consensus sequence, were identified by sequence alignment analysis. Phage particles were prepared and their derived 12-mer peptides were also chemically synthesized and conjugated to BSA. Both the phage particles and free peptide-BSA conjugates were evaluated by ELISA for binding to encapsulated cells of B. anthracis as well as a B. anthracis capsule extract. All the phage particles tested except one were able to bind to both the encapsulated cells and the capsule extract. However, the peptide-BSA conjugates could only bind to the encapsulated cells. One of the peptide-BSA conjugates, with the sequence DSSRIPMQWHPQ (termed G1), was fluorescently labelled and its binding to the encapsulated cells was further confirmed by confocal microscopy. The results demonstrated that the synthetic capsule was effective in isolating phage-displayed peptides with binding affinity for the native capsule of B. anthracis.

  15. Engineering RNA phage MS2 virus-like particles for peptide display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, Sheldon Keith

    Phage display is a powerful and versatile technology that enables the selection of novel binding functions from large populations of randomly generated peptide sequences. Random sequences are genetically fused to a viral structural protein to produce complex peptide libraries. From a sufficiently complex library, phage bearing peptides with practically any desired binding activity can be physically isolated by affinity selection, and, since each particle carries in its genome the genetic information for its own replication, the selectants can be amplified by infection of bacteria. For certain applications however, existing phage display platforms have limitations. One such area is in the field of vaccine development, where the goal is to identify relevant epitopes by affinity-selection against an antibody target, and then to utilize them as immunogens to elicit a desired antibody response. Today, affinity selection is usually conducted using display on filamentous phages like M13. This technology provides an efficient means for epitope identification, but, because filamentous phages do not display peptides in the high-density, multivalent arrays the immune system prefers to recognize, they generally make poor immunogens and are typically useless as vaccines. This makes it necessary to confer immunogenicity by conjugating synthetic versions of the peptides to more immunogenic carriers. Unfortunately, when introduced into these new structural environments, the epitopes often fail to elicit relevant antibody responses. Thus, it would be advantageous to combine the epitope selection and immunogen functions into a single platform where the structural constraints present during affinity selection can be preserved during immunization. This dissertation describes efforts to develop a peptide display system based on the virus-like particles (VLPs) of bacteriophage MS2. Phage display technologies rely on (1) the identification of a site in a viral structural protein that is

  16. Blocking peptides against HBV: PreS1 protein selected from a phage display library

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Wei; Liu, Yang; Zu, Xiangyang; Jin, Rui; Xiao, Gengfu

    2011-09-09

    Highlights: {yields} Successfully selected specific PreS1-interacting peptides by using phage displayed library. {yields} Alignment of the positive phage clones revealed a consensus PreS1 binding motif. {yields} A highly enriched peptide named P7 had a strong binding ability for PreS1. {yields} P7 could block PreS1 attachment. -- Abstract: The PreS1 protein is present on the outermost part of the hepatitis B virus (HBV) surface and has been shown to have a pivotal function in viral infectivity and assembly. The development of reagents with high affinity and specificity for PreS1 is of great significance for early diagnosis and treatment of HBV infection. A phage display library of dodecapeptide was screened for interactions with purified PreS1 protein. Alignment of the positive phage clones revealed a putative consensus PreS1 binding motif of HX{sub n}HX{sub m}HP/R. Moreover, a peptide named P7 (KHMHWHPPALNT) was highly enriched and occurred with a surprisingly high frequency of 72%. A thermodynamic study revealed that P7 has a higher binding affinity to PreS1 than the other peptides. Furthermore, P7 was able to abrogate the binding of HBV virions to the PreS1 antibody, suggesting that P7 covers key functional sites on the native PreS1 protein. This newly isolated peptide may, therefore, be a new therapeutic candidate for the treatment of HBV. The consensus motif could be modified to deliver imaging, diagnostic, and therapeutic agents to tissues affected by HBV.

  17. A compact phage display human scFv library for selection of antibodies to a wide variety of antigens

    PubMed Central

    Pansri, Potjamas; Jaruseranee, Nanthnit; Rangnoi, Kuntalee; Kristensen, Peter; Yamabhai, Montarop

    2009-01-01

    Background Phage display technology is a powerful new tool for making antibodies outside the immune system, thus avoiding the use of experimental animals. In the early days, it was postulated that this technique would eventually replace hybridoma technology and animal immunisations. However, since this technology emerged more than 20 years ago, there have only been a handful reports on the construction and application of phage display antibody libraries world-wide. Results Here we report the simplest and highly efficient method for the construction of a highly useful human single chain variable fragment (scFv) library. The least number of oligonucleotide primers, electroporations and ligation reactions were used to generate a library of 1.5 × 108 individual clones, without generation of sub-libraries. All possible combinations of heavy and light chains, among all immunoglobulin isotypes, were included by using a mixture of primers and overlapping extension PCR. The key difference from other similar libraries was the highest diversity of variable gene repertoires, which was derived from 140 non-immunized human donors. A wide variety of antigens were successfully used to affinity select specific binders. These included pure recombinant proteins, a hapten and complex antigens such as viral coat proteins, crude snake venom and cancer cell surface antigens. In particular, we were able to use standard bio-panning method to isolate antibody that can bind to soluble Aflatoxin B1, when using BSA-conjugated toxin as a target, as demonstrated by inhibition ELISA. Conclusion These results suggested that by using an optimized protocol and very high repertoire diversity, a compact and efficient phage antibody library can be generated. This advanced method could be adopted by any molecular biology laboratory to generate both naïve or immunized libraries for particular targets as well as for high-throughput applications. PMID:19175944

  18. Phage-displayed peptides selected for binding to Campylobacter jejuni are antimicrobial.

    PubMed

    Bishop-Hurley, Sharon L; Rea, Philippa J; McSweeney, Christopher S

    2010-10-01

    In developed countries, Campylobacter jejuni is a leading cause of zoonotic bacterial gastroenteritis in humans with chicken meat implicated as a source of infection. Campylobacter jejuni colonises the lower gastrointestinal tract of poultry and during processing is spread from the gastrointestinal tract onto the surface of dressed carcasses. Controlling or eliminating C.jejuni on-farm is considered to be one of the best strategies for reducing human infection. Molecules on the cell surface of C.jejuni interact with the host to facilitate its colonisation and persistence in the gastrointestinal tract of poultry. We used a subtractive phage-display protocol to affinity select for peptides binding to the cell surface of a poultry isolate of C.jejuni with the aim of finding peptides that could be used to control this microorganism in chickens. In total, 27 phage peptides, representing 11 unique clones, were found to inhibit the growth of C.jejuni by up to 99.9% in vitro. One clone was bactericidal, reducing the viability of C.jejuni by 87% in vitro. The phage peptides were highly specific. They completely inhibited the growth of two of the four poultry isolates of C.jejuni tested with no activity detected towards other Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria.

  19. Identification of small molecule binding sites within proteins using phage display technology.

    SciTech Connect

    Rodi, D. J.; Agoston, G. E.; Manon, R.; Lapcevich, R.; Green, S. J.; Makowski, L.; Biosciences Division; EntreMed Inc.; Florida State Univ.

    2001-11-01

    Affinity selection of peptides displayed on phage particles was used as the basis for mapping molecular contacts between small molecule ligands and their protein targets. Analysis of the crystal structures of complexes between proteins and small molecule ligands revealed that virtually all ligands of molecular weight 300 Da or greater have a continuous binding epitope of 5 residues or more. This observation led to the development of a technique for binding site identification which involves statistical analysis of an affinity-selected set of peptides obtained by screening of libraries of random, phage-displayed peptides against small molecules attached to solid surfaces. A random sample of the selected peptides is sequenced and used as input for a similarity scanning program which calculates cumulative similarity scores along the length of the putative receptor. Regions of the protein sequence exhibiting the highest similarity with the selected peptides proved to have a high probability of being involved in ligand binding. This technique has been employed successfully to map the contact residues in multiple known targets of the anticancer drugs paclitaxel (Taxol), docetaxel (Taxotere) and 2-methoxyestradiol and the glycosaminoglycan hyaluronan, and to identify a novel paclitaxel receptor [1]. These data corroborate the observation that the binding properties of peptides displayed on the surface of phage particles can mimic the binding properties of peptides in naturally occurring proteins. It follows directly that structural context is relatively unimportant for determining the binding properties of these disordered peptides. This technique represents a novel, rapid, high resolution method for identifying potential ligand binding sites in the absence of three-dimensional information and has the potential to greatly enhance the speed of development of novel small molecule pharmaceuticals.

  20. Silent Encoding of Chemical Post-Translational Modifications in Phage-Displayed Libraries.

    PubMed

    Tjhung, Katrina F; Kitov, Pavel I; Ng, Simon; Kitova, Elena N; Deng, Lu; Klassen, John S; Derda, Ratmir

    2016-01-13

    In vitro selection of chemically modified peptide libraries presented on phage, while a powerful technology, is limited to one chemical post-translational modification (cPTM) per library. We use unique combinations of redundant codons to encode cPTMs with "silent barcodes" to trace multiple modifications within a mixed modified library. As a proof of concept, we produced phage-displayed peptide libraries Ser-[X]4-Gly-Gly-Gly, with Gly and Ser encoded using unique combinations of codons (TCA-[X]4-GGAGGAGGA, AGT-[X]4-GGTGGTGGT, etc., where [X]4 denotes a random NNK library). After separate chemical modification and pooling, mixed-modified libraries can be panned and deep-sequenced to identify the enriched peptide sequence and the accompanying cPTM simultaneously. We panned libraries bearing combinations of modifications (sulfonamide, biotin, mannose) against matched targets (carbonic anhydrase, streptavidin, concanavalin A) to identify desired ligands. Synthesis and validation of sequences identified by deep sequencing revealed that specific cPTMs are significantly enriched in panning against the specific targets. Panning on carbonic anhydrase yielded a potent ligand, sulfonamide-WIVP, with Kd = 6.7 ± 2.1 nM, a 20-fold improvement compared with the control ligand sulfonamide-GGGG. Silent encoding of multiple cPTMs can be readily incorporated into other in vitro display technologies such as bacteriophage T7 or mRNA display.

  1. Selection of peptides binding to metallic borides by screening M13 phage display libraries

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Metal borides are a class of inorganic solids that is much less known and investigated than for example metal oxides or intermetallics. At the same time it is a highly versatile and interesting class of compounds in terms of physical and chemical properties, like semiconductivity, ferromagnetism, or catalytic activity. This makes these substances attractive for the generation of new materials. Very little is known about the interaction between organic materials and borides. To generate nanostructured and composite materials which consist of metal borides and organic modifiers it is necessary to develop new synthetic strategies. Phage peptide display libraries are commonly used to select peptides that bind specifically to metals, metal oxides, and semiconductors. Further, these binding peptides can serve as templates to control the nucleation and growth of inorganic nanoparticles. Additionally, the combination of two different binding motifs into a single bifunctional phage could be useful for the generation of new composite materials. Results In this study, we have identified a unique set of sequences that bind to amorphous and crystalline nickel boride (Ni3B) nanoparticles, from a random peptide library using the phage display technique. Using this technique, strong binders were identified that are selective for nickel boride. Sequence analysis of the peptides revealed that the sequences exhibit similar, yet subtle different patterns of amino acid usage. Although a predominant binding motif was not observed, certain charged amino acids emerged as essential in specific binding to both substrates. The 7-mer peptide sequence LGFREKE, isolated on amorphous Ni3B emerged as the best binder for both substrates. Fluorescence microscopy and atomic force microscopy confirmed the specific binding affinity of LGFREKE expressing phage to amorphous and crystalline Ni3B nanoparticles. Conclusions This study is, to our knowledge, the first to identify peptides that

  2. Phage display: development of nanocarriers for targeted drug delivery to the brain

    PubMed Central

    Bakhshinejad, Babak; Karimi, Marzieh; Khalaj-Kondori, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    The blood brain barrier represents a formidable obstacle for the transport of most systematically administered neurodiagnostics and neurotherapeutics to the brain. Phage display is a high throughput screening strategy that can be used for the construction of nanomaterial peptide libraries. These libraries can be screened for finding brain targeting peptide ligands. Surface functionalization of a variety of nanocarriers with these brain homing peptides is a sophisticated way to develop nanobiotechnology-based drug delivery platforms that are able to cross the blood brain barrier. These efficient drug delivery systems raise our hopes for the diagnosis and treatment of various brain disorders in the future. PMID:26199590

  3. Mapping protein-protein interactions with phage-displayed combinatorial peptide libraries.

    SciTech Connect

    Kay, B. K.; Castagnoli, L.; Biosciences Division; Univ. of Rome

    2003-01-01

    This unit describes the process and analysis of affinity selecting bacteriophage M13 from libraries displaying combinatorial peptides fused to either a minor or major capsid protein. Direct affinity selection uses target protein bound to a microtiter plate followed by purification of selected phage by ELISA. Alternatively, there is a bead-based affinity selection method. These methods allow one to readily isolate peptide ligands that bind to a protein target of interest and use the consensus sequence to search proteomic databases for putative interacting proteins.

  4. Screening and Antiviral Analysis of Phages That Display Peptides with an Affinity to Subunit C of Porcine Aminopeptidase

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Donghua; Zhu, Qinghe; Feng, Li

    2013-01-01

    The purified C subunit of the recombinant porcine aminopeptidase N (rpAPN-C) protein was used as an immobilized target to screen potential ligands against rpAPN-C from a 12-mer phage display random peptide library. After five rounds of biopanning, five phage clones showed specific binding affinities to rpAPN-C. In 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assays, the phage clone PM1, which contained the HDAISWTHYHPW peptide sequence, had a protective effect against TGEV infection in swine testis cells. Therefore, the HDAISWTHYHPW peptide sequence has a potential use as a small molecular therapeutic agent against TGEV infection. PMID:24111863

  5. Identification of D-peptide ligands through mirror-image phage display.

    PubMed

    Schumacher, T N; Mayr, L M; Minor, D L; Milhollen, M A; Burgess, M W; Kim, P S

    1996-03-29

    Genetically encoded libraries of peptides and oligonucleotides are well suited for the identification of ligands for many macromolecules. A major drawback of these techniques is that the resultant ligands are subject to degradation by naturally occurring enzymes. Here, a method is described that uses a biologically encoded library for the identification of D-peptide ligands, which should be resistant to proteolytic degradation. In this approach, a protein is synthesized in the D-amino acid configuration and used to select peptides from a phage display library expressing random L-amino acid peptides. For reasons of symmetry, the mirror images of these phage-displayed peptides interact with the target protein of the natural handedness. The value of this approach was demonstrated by the identification of a cyclic D-peptide that interacts with the Src homology 3 domain of c- SRC. Nuclear magnetic resonance studies indicate that the binding site for this D-peptide partially overlaps the site for the physiological ligands of this domain.

  6. Isolation of Llama Antibody Fragments for Prevention of Dandruff by Phage Display in Shampoo

    PubMed Central

    Dolk, Edward; van der Vaart, Marcel; Lutje Hulsik, David; Vriend, Gert; de Haard, Hans; Spinelli, Silvia; Cambillau, Christian; Frenken, Leon; Verrips, Theo

    2005-01-01

    As part of research exploring the feasibility of using antibody fragments to inhibit the growth of organisms implicated in dandruff, we isolated antibody fragments that bind to a cell surface protein of Malassezia furfur in the presence of shampoo. We found that phage display of llama single-domain antibody fragments (VHHs) can be extended to very harsh conditions, such as the presence of shampoo containing nonionic and anionic surfactants. We selected several VHHs that bind to the cell wall protein Malf1 of M. furfur, a fungus implicated in causing dandruff. In addition to high stability in the presence of shampoo, these VHHs are also stable under other denaturing conditions, such as high urea concentrations. Many of the stable VHHs were found to contain arginine at position 44. Replacement of the native amino acid at position 44 with arginine in the most stable VHH that lacked this arginine resulted in a dramatic further increase in the stability. The combination of the unique properties of VHHs together with applied phage display and protein engineering is a powerful method for obtaining highly stable VHHs that can be used in a wide range of applications. PMID:15640220

  7. Accelerating phage-display library selection by reversible and site-specific biotinylation.

    PubMed

    Koide, Akiko; Wojcik, John; Gilbreth, Ryan N; Reichel, Annett; Piehler, Jacob; Koide, Shohei

    2009-11-01

    Immobilization of a target molecule to a solid support is an indispensable step in phage display library sorting. Here we describe an immobilization method that addresses shortcomings of existing strategies. Our method is based on the use of a polyhistidine-tagged (His-tagged) target molecule and (BT)tris-NTA, a high-affinity capture reagent for His-tags that also contains a biotin moiety. (BT)tris-NTA provides a stable and reversible linkage between a His-tag and a streptavidin-coated solid support. Because His-tags are the de facto standard for recombinant protein purification, this method dramatically simplifies target preparation for phage display library sorting. Here, we demonstrate the utility of this method by selecting high-affinity binding proteins based on the fibronectin type III (FN3) scaffold to two His-tagged protein targets, yeast small ubiquitin-like modifier and maltose-binding protein. Notably, a significant number of FN3 clones binding either targets selected using the new immobilization method exhibited only very weak binding when the same target was immobilized by coating on a polystyrene surface. This suggests that the His-tag-mediated immobilization exposes epitopes that are masked by commonly used passive adsorption methods. Together, these results establish a method with the potential to streamline and enhance many binding-protein engineering experiments. PMID:19737805

  8. Selection of recombinant anti-SH3 domain antibodies by high-throughput phage display.

    PubMed

    Huang, Haiming; Economopoulos, Nicolas O; Liu, Bernard A; Uetrecht, Andrea; Gu, Jun; Jarvik, Nick; Nadeem, Vincent; Pawson, Tony; Moffat, Jason; Miersch, Shane; Sidhu, Sachdev S

    2015-11-01

    Antibodies are indispensable tools in biochemical research and play an expanding role as therapeutics. While hybridoma technology is the dominant method for antibody production, phage display is an emerging technology. Here, we developed and employed a high-throughput pipeline that enables selection of antibodies against hundreds of antigens in parallel. Binding selections using a phage-displayed synthetic antigen-binding fragment (Fab) library against 110 human SH3 domains yielded hundreds of Fabs targeting 58 antigens. Affinity assays demonstrated that representative Fabs bind tightly and specifically to their targets. Furthermore, we developed an efficient affinity maturation strategy adaptable to high-throughput, which increased affinity dramatically but did not compromise specificity. Finally, we tested Fabs in common cell biology applications and confirmed recognition of the full-length antigen in immunoprecipitation, immunoblotting and immunofluorescence assays. In summary, we have established a rapid and robust high-throughput methodology that can be applied to generate highly functional and renewable antibodies targeting protein domains on a proteome-wide scale.

  9. A novel peptide specifically targeting ovarian cancer identified by in vivo phage display.

    PubMed

    Ma, Chuying; Yin, Guangfu; Yan, Danhong; He, Xueling; Zhang, Li; Wei, Yan; Huang, Zhongbing

    2013-12-01

    Discovery of peptide ligands that can target human ovarian cancer and deliver chemotherapeutics offers new opportunity for cancer therapy. The advent of phage-displayed peptide library facilitated the screening of such peptides. In vivo screening that set in a microanatomic and functional context was applied in our study, and a novel peptide WSGPGVWGASVK targeting ovarian cancer was isolated. The phage clone PC3-1 displaying peptide WSGPGVWGASVK can gain effective access to accumulate in the tumor sites after intravenous injection while reducing its accumulation in normal organs. Positive immunostaining of PC3-1 was located in both sites of tumor cells and tumor blood vessels, which resulted in a diffuse binding pattern through the tumor. In vitro study results confirmed the capability of peptide WSGPGVWGASVK binding to and being internalized by both tumor cells and angiogenic endothelial cells. Flow cytometry analysis revealed that the peptide bound to SKOV3 cells with Kd value of 5.43 ± 0.4 μM. Taken together, it suggested that peptide WSGPGVWGASVK is a lead candidate for delivering therapeutics to penetrate into tumors. PMID:24105738

  10. Identification of a Novel Lysosomal Trafficking Peptide using Phage Display Biopanning Coupled with Endocytic Selection Pressure

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Methods to select ligands that accumulate specifically in cancer cells and traffic through a defined endocytic pathway may facilitate rapid pairing of ligands with linkers suitable for drug conjugate therapies. We performed phage display biopanning on cancer cells that are treated with selective inhibitors of a given mechanism of endocytosis. Using chlorpromazine to inhibit clathrin-mediated endocytosis in H1299 nonsmall cell lung cancer cells, we identified two clones, ATEPRKQYATPRVFWTDAPG (15.1) and a novel peptide LQWRRDDNVHNFGVWARYRL (H1299.3). The peptides segregate by mechanism of endocytosis and subsequent location of subcellular accumulation. The H1299.3 peptide primarily utilizes clathrin-mediated endocytosis and colocalizes with Lamp1, a lysosomal marker. Conversely, the 15.1 peptide is clathrin-independent and localizes to a perinuclear region. Thus, this novel phage display scheme allows for selection of peptides that selectively internalize into cells via a known mechanism of endocytosis. These types of selections may allow for better matching of linker with targeting ligand by selecting ligands that internalize and traffic to known subcellular locations. PMID:25188559

  11. Wide Screening of Phage-Displayed Libraries Identifies Immune Targets in Planta

    PubMed Central

    Rioja, Cristina; Van Wees, Saskia C.; Charlton, Keith A.; Pieterse, Corné M. J.; Lorenzo, Oscar; García-Sánchez, Susana

    2013-01-01

    Microbe-Associated Molecular Patterns and virulence effectors are recognized by plants as a first step to mount a defence response against potential pathogens. This recognition involves a large family of extracellular membrane receptors and other immune proteins located in different sub-cellular compartments. We have used phage-display technology to express and select for Arabidopsis proteins able to bind bacterial pathogens. To rapidly identify microbe-bound phage, we developed a monitoring method based on microarrays. This combined strategy allowed for a genome-wide screening of plant proteins involved in pathogen perception. Two phage libraries for high-throughput selection were constructed from cDNA of plants infected with Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA14, or from combined samples of the virulent isolate DC3000 of Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato and its avirulent variant avrRpt2. These three pathosystems represent different degrees in the specificity of plant-microbe interactions. Libraries cover up to 2×107 different plant transcripts that can be displayed as functional proteins on the surface of T7 bacteriophage. A number of these were selected in a bio-panning assay for binding to Pseudomonas cells. Among the selected clones we isolated the ethylene response factor ATERF-1, which was able to bind the three bacterial strains in competition assays. ATERF-1 was rapidly exported from the nucleus upon infiltration of either alive or heat-killed Pseudomonas. Moreover, aterf-1 mutants exhibited enhanced susceptibility to infection. These findings suggest that ATERF-1 contains a microbe-recognition domain with a role in plant defence. To identify other putative pathogen-binding proteins on a genome-wide scale, the copy number of selected-vs.-total clones was compared by hybridizing phage cDNAs with Arabidopsis microarrays. Microarray analysis revealed a set of 472 candidates with significant fold change. Within this set defence-related genes, including well

  12. Profiling lethal factor interacting proteins from human stomach using T7 phage display screening.

    PubMed

    Cardona-Correa, Albin; Rios-Velazquez, Carlos

    2016-05-01

    The anthrax lethal factor (LF) is a zinc dependent metalloproteinase that cleaves the majority of mitogen-activated protein kinase kinases and a member of NOD-like receptor proteins, inducing cell apoptosis. Despite efforts to fully understand the Bacillus anthracis toxin components, the gastrointestinal (GI) anthrax mechanisms have not been fully elucidated. Previous studies demonstrated gastric ulceration, and a substantial bacterial growth rate in Peyer's patches. However, the complete molecular pathways of the disease that results in tissue damage by LF proteolytic activity remains unclear. In the present study, to identify the profile of the proteins potentially involved in GI anthrax, protein‑protein interactions were investigated using human stomach T7 phage display (T7PD) cDNA libraries. T7PD is a high throughput technique that allows the expression of cloned DNA sequences as peptides on the phage surface, enabling the selection and identification of protein ligands. A wild type and mutant LF (E687A) were used to differentiate interaction sites. A total of 124 clones were identified from 194 interacting‑phages, at both the DNA and protein level, by in silico analysis. Databases revealed that the selected candidates were proteins from different families including lipase, peptidase‑A1 and cation transport families, among others. Furthermore, individual T7PD candidates were tested against LF in order to detect their specificity to the target molecule, resulting in 10 LF‑interacting peptides. With a minimum concentration of LF for interaction at 1 µg/ml, the T7PD isolated pepsin A3 pre‑protein (PAP) demonstrated affinity to both types of LF. In addition, PAP was isolated in various lengths for the same protein, exhibiting common regions following PRALINE alignment. These findings will help elucidate and improve the understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of GI anthrax, and aid in the development of potential therapeutic agents. PMID

  13. Phage Display and Peptide Mapping of an Immunoglobulin Light Chain Fibril-Related Conformational Epitope†

    PubMed Central

    O’Nuallain, Brian; Allen, Amy; Ataman, Demet; Weiss, Deborah T.; Solomon, Alan; Wall, Jonathan S.

    2008-01-01

    Amyloid fibrils and partially unfolded intermediates can be distinguished serologically from native amyloidogenic precursor proteins or peptides. In this regard, we previously had reported that mAb 11-1F4, generated by immunizing mice with a thermally denatured variable domain (VL) fragment of the human κ4 Bence Jones protein Len, bound to a non-native conformational epitope located within the N-terminal 18 residues of fibrillar, as well as partially denatured, Ig light chains (O’Nuallain B. et al. (2006) Biochemistry 46, 1240–247). To define further the antibody binding site, we used random peptide phage display and epitope mapping of VL Len using wild-type and alanine-mutated Len peptides where it was shown that the antibody epitope was reliant on up to 10 of the first 15 residues of protein Len. Comparison of Vκ and Vλ N-terminal germline consensus sequences with protein Len and 11-1F4-binding phages indicated that this antibody’s cross-reactivity with light chains was related to an invariant proline at position(s) 7 and/or 8, bulky hydrophobic residues at positions 11 and 13, and additionally, to the ability to accommodate amino acid diversity at positions 1–4. Sequence alignments of the phage peptides revealed a central proline, often flanked by aromatic residues. Taken together, these results have provided evidence for the structural basis of the specificity of 11-1F4 for both κ and λ light chain fibrils. We posit that the associated binding site involves a rare type VI β-turn or touch-turn that is anchored by a cis-proline residue. The identification of an 11-1F4-related mimotope should facilitate development of pan-light chain fibril-reactive antibodies that could be used in the diagnosis and treatment of patients with AL amyloidosis. PMID:17944486

  14. Identification of Late Embryogenesis Abundant (LEA) Protein Putative Interactors Using Phage Display

    PubMed Central

    Kushwaha, Rekha; Lloyd, Taylor D.; Schäfermeyer, Kim R.; Kumar, Santosh; Downie, Allan Bruce

    2012-01-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana seeds without functional SEED MATURATION PROTEIN1 (SMP1), a boiling soluble protein predicted to be of intrinsic disorder, presumed to be a LATE EMBRYOGENESIS ABUNDANT (LEA) family protein based on sequence homology, do not enter secondary dormancy after 3 days at 40 °C. We hypothesized that SMP1 may protect a heat labile protein involved in the promotion of secondary dormancy. Recombinant SMP1 and GmPM28, its soybean (Glycine max), LEA4 homologue, protected the labile GLUCOSE-6-PHOSPHATE DEHYROGENASE enzyme from heat stress, as did a known protectant, Bovine Serum Albumin, whether the LEA protein was in solution or attached to the bottom of microtiter plates. Maintenance of a biological function for both recombinant LEA proteins when immobilized encouraged a biopanning approach to screen for potential protein interactors. Phage display with two Arabidopsis seed, T7 phage, cDNA libraries, normalized for transcripts present in the mature, dehydrated, 12-, 24-, or 36-h imbibed seeds, were used in biopans against recombinant SMP1 and GmPM28. Phage titer increased considerably over four rounds of biopanning for both LEA proteins, but not for BSA, at both 25 and at 41 °C, regardless of the library used. The prevalence of multiple, independent clones encoding portions of specific proteins repeatedly retrieved from different libraries, temperatures and baits, provides evidence suggesting these LEA proteins are discriminating which proteins they protect, a novel finding. The identification of putative LEA-interacting proteins provides targets for reverse genetic approaches to further dissect the induction of secondary dormancy in seeds in response to heat stress. PMID:22837651

  15. Injected phage-displayed-VP28 vaccine reduces shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei mortality by white spot syndrome virus infection.

    PubMed

    Solís-Lucero, G; Manoutcharian, K; Hernández-López, J; Ascencio, F

    2016-08-01

    White spot syndrome virus (WSSV) is the most important viral pathogen for the global shrimp industry causing mass mortalities with huge economic losses. Recombinant phages are capable of expressing foreign peptides on viral coat surface and act as antigenic peptide carriers bearing a phage-displayed vaccine. In this study, the full-length VP28 protein of WSSV, widely known as potential vaccine against infection in shrimp, was successfully cloned and expressed on M13 filamentous phage. The functionality and efficacy of this vaccine immunogen was demonstrated through immunoassay and in vivo challenge studies. In ELISA assay phage-displayed VP28 was bind to Litopenaeus vannamei immobilized hemocyte in contrast to wild-type M13 phage. Shrimps were injected with 2 × 10(10) cfu animal(-1) single dose of VP28-M13 and M13 once and 48 h later intramuscularly challenged with WSSV to test the efficacy of the vaccine against the infection. All dead challenged shrimps were PCR WSSV-positive. The accumulative mortality of the vaccinated and challenged shrimp groups was significantly lower (36.67%) than the unvaccinated group (66.67%). Individual phenoloxidase and superoxide dismutase activity was assayed on 8 and 48 h post-vaccination. No significant difference was found in those immunological parameters among groups at any sampled time evaluated. For the first time, phage display technology was used to express a recombinant vaccine for shrimp. The highest percentage of relative survival in vaccinated shrimp (RPS = 44.99%) suggest that the recombinant phage can be used successfully to display and deliver VP28 for farmed marine crustaceans.

  16. Mimotopes of the Vi Antigen of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhi Identified from Phage Display Peptide Library

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Swee-Seong; Tan, Wen-Siang; Devi, Shamala; Wang, Lin-Fa; Pang, Tikki; Thong, Kwai-Lin

    2003-01-01

    The capsular polysaccharide Vi antigen (ViCPS) is an essential virulence factor and also a protective antigen of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi. A random 12-mer phage-displayed peptide library was used to identify mimotopes (epitope analogues) of this antigen by panning against a ViCPS-specific monoclonal antibody (MAb) ATVi. Approximately 75% of the phage clones selected in the fourth round carried the peptide sequence TSHHDSHGLHRV, and the rest of the clones harbored ENHSPVNIAHKL and other related sequences. These two sequences were also obtained in a similar panning process by using pooled sera from patients with a confirmed diagnosis of typhoid fever, suggesting they mimic immunodominant epitopes of ViCPS antigens. Binding of MAb ATVi to the mimotopes was specifically blocked by ViCPS, indicating that they interact with the same binding site (paratope) of the MAb. Data and reagents generated in this study have important implications for the development of peptide-base diagnostic tests and peptide vaccines and may also provide a better understanding of the pathogenesis of typhoid fever. PMID:14607870

  17. Contribution of phage-derived genomic islands to the virulence of facultative bacterial pathogens.

    PubMed

    Busby, Ben; Kristensen, David M; Koonin, Eugene V

    2013-02-01

    Facultative pathogens have extremely dynamic pan-genomes, to a large extent derived from bacteriophages and other mobile elements. We developed a simple approach to identify phage-derived genomic islands and apply it to show that pathogens from diverse bacterial genera are significantly enriched in clustered phage-derived genes compared with related benign strains. These findings show that genome expansion by integration of prophages containing virulence factors is a major route of evolution of facultative bacterial pathogens.

  18. Selection of a CXCR4 antagonist from a human heavy chain CDR3-derived phage library.

    PubMed

    Chevigné, Andy; Fischer, Aurélie; Mathu, Julie; Counson, Manuel; Beaupain, Nadia; Plesséria, Jean-Marc; Schmit, Jean-Claude; Deroo, Sabrina

    2011-08-01

    Phage display technology is a powerful selection approach to identify strong and specific binders to a large variety of targets. In this study, we compared the efficacy of a phage library displaying human heavy chain complementarity determining region 3 (HCDR3) repertoires with a set of conventional random peptide libraries for the identification of CXCR4 antagonists using a peptide corresponding to the second extracellular loop of the receptor CXCR4 as target. A total of 11 selection campaigns on this target did not result in any specific ligand from the random peptide libraries. In contrast, a single selection campaign with an HCDR3 library derived from the IgM repertoire of a nonimmunized donor resulted in nine specific peptides with lengths ranging from 10 to 19 residues. Four of these HCDR3 sequences interacted with native receptor and the most frequently isolated peptide displayed an affinity of 5.6 μm and acted as a CXCR4 antagonist (IC(50) = 23 μm). To comprehend the basis of the highly efficient HCDR3 library selection, its biochemical properties were investigated. The HCDR3 length varied from 3 to 21 residues and displayed a biased amino acid content with a predominant proportion of Tyr, Gly, Ser and Asp. Repetitive and conserved motifs were observed in the majority of the HCDR3 sequences. The strength and efficacy of the HCDR3 libraries reside in the combination of multiple size peptides and a naturally biased sequence variation. Therefore, HCDR3 libraries represent a powerful and versatile alternative to fully randomized peptide libraries, in particular for difficult targets.

  19. High-throughput sequencing enhanced phage display enables the identification of patient-specific epitope motifs in serum

    PubMed Central

    Christiansen, Anders; Kringelum, Jens V.; Hansen, Christian S.; Bøgh, Katrine L.; Sullivan, Eric; Patel, Jigar; Rigby, Neil M.; Eiwegger, Thomas; Szépfalusi, Zsolt; Masi, Federico de; Nielsen, Morten; Lund, Ole; Dufva, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Phage display is a prominent screening technique with a multitude of applications including therapeutic antibody development and mapping of antigen epitopes. In this study, phages were selected based on their interaction with patient serum and exhaustively characterised by high-throughput sequencing. A bioinformatics approach was developed in order to identify peptide motifs of interest based on clustering and contrasting to control samples. Comparison of patient and control samples confirmed a major issue in phage display, namely the selection of unspecific peptides. The potential of the bioinformatic approach was demonstrated by identifying epitopes of a prominent peanut allergen, Ara h 1, in sera from patients with severe peanut allergy. The identified epitopes were confirmed by high-density peptide micro-arrays. The present study demonstrates that high-throughput sequencing can empower phage display by (i) enabling the analysis of complex biological samples, (ii) circumventing the traditional laborious picking and functional testing of individual phage clones and (iii) reducing the number of selection rounds. PMID:26246327

  20. Identification of Novel Immunogenic Proteins of Neisseria gonorrhoeae by Phage Display

    PubMed Central

    Connor, Daniel O.; Zantow, Jonas; Hust, Michael; Bier, Frank F.; von Nickisch-Rosenegk, Markus

    2016-01-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae is one of the most prevalent sexually transmitted diseases worldwide with more than 100 million new infections per year. A lack of intense research over the last decades and increasing resistances to the recommended antibiotics call for a better understanding of gonococcal infection, fast diagnostics and therapeutic measures against N. gonorrhoeae. Therefore, the aim of this work was to identify novel immunogenic proteins as a first step to advance those unresolved problems. For the identification of immunogenic proteins, pHORF oligopeptide phage display libraries of the entire N. gonorrhoeae genome were constructed. Several immunogenic oligopeptides were identified using polyclonal rabbit antibodies against N. gonorrhoeae. Corresponding full-length proteins of the identified oligopeptides were expressed and their immunogenic character was verified by ELISA. The immunogenic character of six proteins was identified for the first time. Additional 13 proteins were verified as immunogenic proteins in N. gonorrhoeae. PMID:26859666

  1. Epitope identification and discovery using phage display libraries: applications in vaccine development and diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lin-Fa; Yu, Meng

    2004-01-01

    Antigenic epitopes are the part (contact points) of an antigen involved in specific interaction with the antigen-binding site (the paratope) of an antibody or a T-cell receptor. Detailed analysis of epitopes is important both for the understanding of immunological events and for the development of more effective vaccine and diagnostic tools for various diseases. Identification and characterization of epitopes is a complex process. Although various methods have been developed in this area, there still lacks a simple common approach which can be applied to all epitopes. Since its first introduction more than a decade ago, phage display technology has made a major impact in this area of research. With the exponential growth in this area, it is impractical to review the entire literature detailing all possible applications. Instead, this review aims to focus on specific applications related to the discovery and identification of epitopes which have potential as vaccine candidates or can be used in disease diagnosis.

  2. Isolation of Osteosarcoma-Associated Human Antibodies from a Combinatorial Fab Phage Display Library

    PubMed Central

    Dantas-Barbosa, Carmela; Faria, Fabrícia P.; Brigido, Marcelo M.; Maranhão, Andrea Q.

    2009-01-01

    Osteosarcoma, a highly malignant disease, is the most common primary bone tumor and is frequently found in children and adolescents. In order to isolate antibodies against osteosarcoma antigens, a combinatorial osteosarcoma Fab library displayed on the surface of phages was used. After three rounds of selection on the surface of tumor cells, several osteosarcoma-reactive Fabs were detected. From these Fabs, five were better characterized, and despite having differences in their VH (heavy chain variable domain) and Vκ (kappa chain variable domain) regions, they all bound to a protein with the same molecular mass. Further analysis by cell ELISA and immunocytochemistry suggested that the Fabs recognize a membrane-associated tumor antigen expressed in higher amounts in neoplasic cells than in normal tissue. These results suggest that the human Fabs selected in this work are a valuable tool for the study of this neoplasia. PMID:20037728

  3. Identification of Novel Immunogenic Proteins of Neisseria gonorrhoeae by Phage Display.

    PubMed

    Connor, Daniel O; Zantow, Jonas; Hust, Michael; Bier, Frank F; von Nickisch-Rosenegk, Markus

    2016-01-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae is one of the most prevalent sexually transmitted diseases worldwide with more than 100 million new infections per year. A lack of intense research over the last decades and increasing resistances to the recommended antibiotics call for a better understanding of gonococcal infection, fast diagnostics and therapeutic measures against N. gonorrhoeae. Therefore, the aim of this work was to identify novel immunogenic proteins as a first step to advance those unresolved problems. For the identification of immunogenic proteins, pHORF oligopeptide phage display libraries of the entire N. gonorrhoeae genome were constructed. Several immunogenic oligopeptides were identified using polyclonal rabbit antibodies against N. gonorrhoeae. Corresponding full-length proteins of the identified oligopeptides were expressed and their immunogenic character was verified by ELISA. The immunogenic character of six proteins was identified for the first time. Additional 13 proteins were verified as immunogenic proteins in N. gonorrhoeae.

  4. Identification of Novel Immunogenic Proteins of Neisseria gonorrhoeae by Phage Display.

    PubMed

    Connor, Daniel O; Zantow, Jonas; Hust, Michael; Bier, Frank F; von Nickisch-Rosenegk, Markus

    2016-01-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae is one of the most prevalent sexually transmitted diseases worldwide with more than 100 million new infections per year. A lack of intense research over the last decades and increasing resistances to the recommended antibiotics call for a better understanding of gonococcal infection, fast diagnostics and therapeutic measures against N. gonorrhoeae. Therefore, the aim of this work was to identify novel immunogenic proteins as a first step to advance those unresolved problems. For the identification of immunogenic proteins, pHORF oligopeptide phage display libraries of the entire N. gonorrhoeae genome were constructed. Several immunogenic oligopeptides were identified using polyclonal rabbit antibodies against N. gonorrhoeae. Corresponding full-length proteins of the identified oligopeptides were expressed and their immunogenic character was verified by ELISA. The immunogenic character of six proteins was identified for the first time. Additional 13 proteins were verified as immunogenic proteins in N. gonorrhoeae. PMID:26859666

  5. Selection of Ceratitis capitata (Diptera: Tephritidae) Specific Recombinant Monoclonal Phage Display Antibodies for Prey Detection Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Monzó, César; Urbaneja, Alberto; Ximénez-Embún, Miguel; García-Fernández, Julia; García, José Luis; Castañera, Pedro

    2012-01-01

    Several recombinant antibodies against the Mediterranean fruit fly, Ceratitis capitata (Wiedemann) (Diptera: Tephritidae), one of the most important pests in agriculture worldwide, were selected for the first time from a commercial phage display library of human scFv antibodies. The specificity and sensitivity of the selected recombinant antibodies were compared with that of a rabbit polyclonal serum raised in parallel using a wide range of arthropod species as controls. The selected recombinant monoclonal antibodies had a similar or greater specificity when compared with classical monoclonal antibodies. The selected recombinant antibodies were successfully used to detect the target antigen in the gut of predators and the scFv antibodies were sequenced and compared. These results demonstrate the potential for recombinant scFv antibodies to be used as an alternative to the classical monoclonal antibodies or even molecular probes in the post-mortem analysis studies of generalist predators. PMID:23272105

  6. Selection of specific interactors from phage display library based on sea lamprey variable lymphocyte receptor sequences.

    PubMed

    Wezner-Ptasinska, Magdalena; Otlewski, Jacek

    2015-12-01

    Variable lymphocyte receptors (VLRs) are non-immunoglobulin components of adaptive immunity in jawless vertebrates. These proteins composed of leucine-rich repeat modules offer some advantages over antibodies in target binding and therefore are attractive candidates for biotechnological applications. In this paper we report the design and characterization of a phage display library based on a previously proposed dVLR scaffold containing six LRR modules [Wezner-Ptasinska et al., 2011]. Our library was designed based on a consensus approach in which the randomization scheme reflects the frequencies of amino acids naturally occurring in respective positions responsible for antigen recognition. We demonstrate general applicability of the scaffold by selecting dVLRs specific for lysozyme and S100A7 protein with KD values in the micromolar range. The dVLR library could be used as a convenient alternative to antibodies for effective isolation of high affinity binders.

  7. Application of phage display to high throughput antibody generation and characterization

    PubMed Central

    Schofield, Darren J; Pope, Anthony R; Clementel, Veronica; Buckell, Jenny; Chapple, Susan DJ; Clarke, Kay F; Conquer, Jennie S; Crofts, Anna M; Crowther, Sandra RE; Dyson, Michael R; Flack, Gillian; Griffin, Gareth J; Hooks, Yvette; Howat, William J; Kolb-Kokocinski, Anja; Kunze, Susan; Martin, Cecile D; Maslen, Gareth L; Mitchell, Joanne N; O'Sullivan, Maureen; Perera, Rajika L; Roake, Wendy; Shadbolt, S Paul; Vincent, Karen J; Warford, Anthony; Wilson, Wendy E; Xie, Jane; Young, Joyce L; McCafferty, John

    2007-01-01

    We have created a high quality phage display library containing over 1010 human antibodies and describe its use in the generation of antibodies on an unprecedented scale. We have selected, screened and sequenced over 38,000 recombinant antibodies to 292 antigens, yielding over 7,200 unique clones. 4,400 antibodies were characterized by specificity testing and detailed sequence analysis and the data/clones are available online. Sensitive detection was demonstrated in a bead based flow cytometry assay. Furthermore, positive staining by immunohistochemistry on tissue microarrays was found for 37% (143/381) of antibodies. Thus, we have demonstrated the potential of and illuminated the issues associated with genome-wide monoclonal antibody generation. PMID:18047641

  8. Potential of Peptides as Inhibitors and Mimotopes: Selection of Carbohydrate-Mimetic Peptides from Phage Display Libraries

    PubMed Central

    Matsubara, Teruhiko

    2012-01-01

    Glycoconjugates play various roles in biological processes. In particular, oligosaccharides on the surface of animal cells are involved in virus infection and cell-cell communication. Inhibitors of carbohydrate-protein interactions are potential antiviral drugs. Several anti-influenza drugs such as oseltamivir and zanamivir are derivatives of sialic acid, which inhibits neuraminidase. However, it is very difficult to prepare a diverse range of sugar derivatives by chemical synthesis or by the isolation of natural products. In addition, the pathogenic capsular polysaccharides of bacteria are carbohydrate antigens, for which a safe and efficacious method of vaccination is required. Phage-display technology has been improved to enable the identification of peptides that bind to carbohydrate-binding proteins, such as lectins and antibodies, from a large repertoire of peptide sequences. These peptides are known as “carbohydrate-mimetic peptides (CMPs)” because they mimic carbohydrate structures. Compared to carbohydrate derivatives, it is easy to prepare mono- and multivalent peptides and then to modify them to create various derivatives. Such mimetic peptides are available as peptide inhibitors of carbohydrate-protein interactions and peptide mimotopes that are conjugated with adjuvant for vaccination. PMID:23094142

  9. Selective inhibitors of digestive enzymes from Aedes aegypti larvae identified by phage display.

    PubMed

    Soares, Tatiane Sanches; Soares Torquato, Ricardo Jose; Alves Lemos, Francisco Jose; Tanaka, Aparecida Sadae

    2013-01-01

    Dengue is a serious disease transmitted by the mosquito Aedes aegypti during blood meal feeding. It is estimated that the dengue virus is transmitted to millions of individuals each year in tropical and subtropical areas. Dengue control strategies have been based on controlling the vector, Ae. aegypti, using insecticide, but the emergence of resistance poses new challenges. The aim of this study was the identification of specific protease inhibitors of the digestive enzymes from Ae. aegypti larvae, which may serve as a prospective alternative biocontrol method. High affinity protein inhibitors were selected by all of the digestive serine proteases of the 4th instar larval midgut, and the specificity of these inhibitors was characterized. These inhibitors were obtained from a phage library displaying variants of HiTI, a trypsin inhibitor from Haematobia irritans, that are mutated in the reactive loop (P1-P4'). Based on the selected amino acid sequence pattern, seven HiTI inhibitor variants were cloned, expressed and purified. The results indicate that the HiTI variants named T6 (RGGAV) and T128 (WNEGL) were selected by larval trypsin-like (IC(50) of 1.1 nM) and chymotrypsin-like enzymes (IC(50) of 11.6 nM), respectively. The variants T23 (LLGGL) and T149 (GGVWR) inhibited both larval chymotrypsin-like (IC(50) of 4.2 nM and 29.0 nM, respectively) and elastase-like enzymes (IC(50) of 1.2 nM for both). Specific inhibitors were successfully obtained for the digestive enzymes of Ae. aegypti larvae by phage display. Our data also strongly suggest the presence of elastase-like enzymes in Ae. aegypti larvae. The HiTI variants T6 and T23 are good candidates for the development as a larvicide to control the vector.

  10. Directed Selection of Recombinant Human Monoclonal Antibodies to Herpes Simplex Virus Glycoproteins from Phage Display Libraries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanna, Pietro Paolo; Williamson, R. Anthony; de Logu, Alessandro; Bloom, Floyd E.; Burton, Dennis R.

    1995-07-01

    Human monoclonal antibodies have considerable potential in the prophylaxis and treatment of viral disease. However, only a few such antibodies suitable for clinical use have been produced to date. We have previously shown that large panels of human recombinant monoclonal antibodies against a plethora of infectious agents, including herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2, can be established from phage display libraries. Here we demonstrate that facile cloning of recombinant Fab fragments against specific viral proteins in their native conformation can be accomplished by panning phage display libraries against viral glycoproteins "captured" from infected cell extracts by specific monoclonal antibodies immobilized on ELISA plates. We have tested this strategy by isolating six neutralizing recombinant antibodies specific for herpes simplex glycoprotein gD or gB, some of which are against conformationally sensitive epitopes. By using defined monoclonal antibodies for the antigen-capture step, this method can be used for the isolation of antibodies to specific regions and epitopes within the target viral protein. For instance, monoclonal antibodies to a nonneutralizing epitope can be used in the capture step to clone antibodies to neutralizing epitopes, or antibodies to a neutralizing epitope can be used to clone antibodies to a different neutralizing epitope. Furthermore, by using capturing antibodies to more immunodominant epitopes, one can direct the cloning to less immunogenic ones. This method should be of value in generating antibodies to be used both in the prophylaxis and treatment of viral infections and in the characterization of the mechanisms of antibody protective actions at the molecular level.

  11. Combining phage display with de novo protein sequencing for reverse engineering of monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Rickert, Keith W; Grinberg, Luba; Woods, Robert M; Wilson, Susan; Bowen, Michael A; Baca, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    The enormous diversity created by gene recombination and somatic hypermutation makes de novo protein sequencing of monoclonal antibodies a uniquely challenging problem. Modern mass spectrometry-based sequencing will rarely, if ever, provide a single unambiguous sequence for the variable domains. A more likely outcome is computation of an ensemble of highly similar sequences that can satisfy the experimental data. This outcome can result in the need for empirical testing of many candidate sequences, sometimes iteratively, to identity one which can replicate the activity of the parental antibody. Here we describe an improved approach to antibody protein sequencing by using phage display technology to generate a combinatorial library of sequences that satisfy the mass spectrometry data, and selecting for functional candidates that bind antigen. This approach was used to reverse engineer 2 commercially-obtained monoclonal antibodies against murine CD137. Proteomic data enabled us to assign the majority of the variable domain sequences, with the exception of 3-5% of the sequence located within or adjacent to complementarity-determining regions. To efficiently resolve the sequence in these regions, small phage-displayed libraries were generated and subjected to antigen binding selection. Following enrichment of antigen-binding clones, 2 clones were selected for each antibody and recombinantly expressed as antigen-binding fragments (Fabs). In both cases, the reverse-engineered Fabs exhibited identical antigen binding affinity, within error, as Fabs produced from the commercial IgGs. This combination of proteomic and protein engineering techniques provides a useful approach to simplifying the technically challenging process of reverse engineering monoclonal antibodies from protein material.

  12. A highly functional synthetic phage display library containing over 40 billion human antibody clones.

    PubMed

    Weber, Marcel; Bujak, Emil; Putelli, Alessia; Villa, Alessandra; Matasci, Mattia; Gualandi, Laura; Hemmerle, Teresa; Wulhfard, Sarah; Neri, Dario

    2014-01-01

    Several synthetic antibody phage display libraries have been created and used for the isolation of human monoclonal antibodies. The performance of antibody libraries, which is usually measured in terms of their ability to yield high-affinity binding specificities against target proteins of interest, depends both on technical aspects (such as library size and quality of cloning) and on design features (which influence the percentage of functional clones in the library and their ability to be used for practical applications). Here, we describe the design, construction and characterization of a combinatorial phage display library, comprising over 40 billion human antibody clones in single-chain fragment variable (scFv) format. The library was designed with the aim to obtain highly stable antibody clones, which can be affinity-purified on protein A supports, even when used in scFv format. The library was found to be highly functional, as >90% of randomly selected clones expressed the corresponding antibody. When selected against more than 15 antigens from various sources, the library always yielded specific and potent binders, at a higher frequency compared to previous antibody libraries. To demonstrate library performance in practical biomedical research projects, we isolated the human antibody G5, which reacts both against human and murine forms of the alternatively spliced BCD segment of tenascin-C, an extracellular matrix component frequently over-expressed in cancer and in chronic inflammation. The new library represents a useful source of binding specificities, both for academic research and for the development of antibody-based therapeutics.

  13. A New Peptide Ligand for Targeting Human Carbonic Anhydrase IX, Identified through the Phage Display Technology

    PubMed Central

    Askoxylakis, Vasileios; Garcia-Boy, Regine; Rana, Shoaib; Krämer, Susanne; Hebling, Ulrike; Mier, Walter; Altmann, Annette; Markert, Annette; Debus, Jürgen; Haberkorn, Uwe

    2010-01-01

    Carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX) is a transmembrane enzyme found to be overexpressed in various tumors and associated with tumor hypoxia. Ligands binding this target may be used to visualize hypoxia, tumor manifestation or treat tumors by endoradiotherapy. Methods Phage display was performed with a 12 amino acid phage display library by panning against a recombinant extracellular domain of human carbonic anhydrase IX. The identified peptide CaIX-P1 was chemically synthesized and tested in vitro on various cell lines and in vivo in Balb/c nu/nu mice carrying subcutaneously transplanted tumors. Binding, kinetic and competition studies were performed on the CAIX positive human renal cell carcinoma cell line SKRC 52, the CAIX negative human renal cell carcinoma cell line CaKi 2, the human colorectal carcinoma cell line HCT 116 and on human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). Organ distribution studies were carried out in mice, carrying SKRC 52 tumors. RNA expression of CAIX in HCT 116 and HUVEC cells was investigated by quantitative real time PCR. Results In vitro binding experiments of 125I-labeled-CaIX-P1 revealed an increased uptake of the radioligand in the CAIX positive renal cell carcinoma cell line SKRC 52. Binding of the radioligand in the colorectal carcinoma cell line HCT 116 increased with increasing cell density and correlated with the mRNA expression of CAIX. Radioligand uptake was inhibited up to 90% by the unlabeled CaIX-P1 peptide, but not by the negative control peptide octreotide at the same concentration. No binding was demonstrated in CAIX negative CaKi 2 and HUVEC cells. Organ distribution studies revealed a higher accumulation in SKRC 52 tumors than in heart, spleen, liver, muscle, intestinum and brain, but a lower uptake compared to blood and kidney. Conclusions These data indicate that CaIX-P1 is a promising candidate for the development of new ligands targeting human carbonic anhydrase IX. PMID:21209841

  14. A Highly Functional Synthetic Phage Display Library Containing over 40 Billion Human Antibody Clones

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Marcel; Bujak, Emil; Putelli, Alessia; Villa, Alessandra; Matasci, Mattia; Gualandi, Laura; Hemmerle, Teresa; Wulhfard, Sarah; Neri, Dario

    2014-01-01

    Several synthetic antibody phage display libraries have been created and used for the isolation of human monoclonal antibodies. The performance of antibody libraries, which is usually measured in terms of their ability to yield high-affinity binding specificities against target proteins of interest, depends both on technical aspects (such as library size and quality of cloning) and on design features (which influence the percentage of functional clones in the library and their ability to be used for practical applications). Here, we describe the design, construction and characterization of a combinatorial phage display library, comprising over 40 billion human antibody clones in single-chain fragment variable (scFv) format. The library was designed with the aim to obtain highly stable antibody clones, which can be affinity-purified on protein A supports, even when used in scFv format. The library was found to be highly functional, as >90% of randomly selected clones expressed the corresponding antibody. When selected against more than 15 antigens from various sources, the library always yielded specific and potent binders, at a higher frequency compared to previous antibody libraries. To demonstrate library performance in practical biomedical research projects, we isolated the human antibody G5, which reacts both against human and murine forms of the alternatively spliced BCD segment of tenascin-C, an extracellular matrix component frequently over-expressed in cancer and in chronic inflammation. The new library represents a useful source of binding specificities, both for academic research and for the development of antibody-based therapeutics. PMID:24950200

  15. Neutralisation of factor VIII inhibitors by anti-idiotypes isolated from phage-displayed libraries.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Anja; Brettschneider, Kerstin; Kahle, Jörg; Orlowski, Aleksander; Becker-Peters, Karin; Stichel, Diana; Schulze, Jörg; Braner, Markus; Tampé, Robert; Schwabe, Dirk; Königs, Christoph

    2016-07-01

    Following replacement therapy with coagulation factor VIII (FVIII), up to 30 % of haemophilia A patients develop FVIII-specific inhibitory antibodies (FVIII inhibitors). Immune tolerance induction (ITI) is not always successful, resulting in a need for alternative treatments for FVIII inhibitor-positive patients. As tolerance induction in the course of ITI appears to involve the formation of anti-idiotypes specific for anti-FVIII antibodies, such anti-idiotypes might be used to restore haemostasis in haemophilia A patients with FVIII inhibitors. We isolated anti-idiotypic antibody fragments (scFvs) binding to murine FVIII inhibitors 2-76 and 2-77 from phage-displayed libraries. FVIII inhibitor/anti-idiotype interactions were very specific as no cross-reactivity with other FVIII inhibitors or isotype controls was observed. ScFvs blocked binding of FVIII inhibitors to FVIII and neutralised their cognate inhibitors in vitro and a monoclonal mouse model. In addition, scFv JkH5 specific for FVIII inhibitor 2-76 stained 2-76-producing hybridoma cells. JkH5 residues R52 and Y226, located in complementary determining regions, were identified as crucial for the JkH5/2-76 interaction using JkH5 alanine mutants. SPR spectroscopy revealed that JkH5 interacts with FVIII inhibitor 2-76 with nanomolar affinity. Thus, FVIII inhibitor-specific, high-affinity anti-idiotypes can be isolated from phage-displayed libraries and neutralise their respective inhibitors. Furthermore, we show that anti-idiotypic scFvs might be utilised to specifically target inhibitor-specific B cells. Hence, a pool of anti-idiotypes could enable the reestablishment of haemostasis in the presence of FVIII inhibitors in patients or even allow the depletion of inhibitors by targeting inhibitor-specific B cell populations. PMID:27009573

  16. Rapid development of new protein biosensors utilizing peptides obtained via phage display.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jun; Park, Jong Pil; Dooley, Kevin; Cropek, Donald M; West, Alan C; Banta, Scott

    2011-01-01

    There is a consistent demand for new biosensors for the detection of protein targets, and a systematic method for the rapid development of new sensors is needed. Here we present a platform where short unstructured peptides that bind to a desired target are selected using M13 phage display. The selected peptides are then chemically synthesized and immobilized on gold, allowing for detection of the target using electrochemical techniques such as electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). A quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) is also used as a diagnostic tool during biosensor development. We demonstrate the utility of this approach by creating a novel peptide-based electrochemical biosensor for the enzyme alanine aminotransferase (ALT), a well-known biomarker of hepatotoxicity. Biopanning of the M13 phage display library over immobilized ALT, led to the rapid identification of a new peptide (ALT5-8) with an amino acid sequence of WHWRNPDFWYLK. Phage particles expressing this peptide exhibited nanomolar affinity for immobilized ALT (K(d,app) = 85±20 nM). The newly identified ALT5-8 peptide was then chemically synthesized with a C-terminal cysteine for gold immobilization. The performance of the gold-immobilized peptides was studied with cyclic voltammetry (CV), QCM, and EIS. Using QCM, the sensitivity for ALT detection was 8.9±0.9 Hz/(µg/mL) and the limit of detection (LOD) was 60 ng/mL. Using EIS measurements, the sensitivity was 142±12 impedance percentage change %/(µg/mL) and the LOD was 92 ng/mL. In both cases, the LOD was below the typical concentration of ALT in human blood. Although both QCM and EIS produced similar LODs, EIS is preferable due to a larger linear dynamic range. Using QCM, the immobilized peptide exhibited a nanomolar dissociation constant for ALT (K(d) = 20.1±0.6 nM). These results demonstrate a simple and rapid platform for developing and assessing the performance of sensitive, peptide-based biosensors for new protein targets

  17. Cellular Internalization Mechanism and Intracellular Trafficking of Filamentous M13 Phages Displaying a Cell-Penetrating Transbody and TAT Peptide

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Seung-Min; Pham, Chuong D.; Choi, Dong-Ki; Kwon, Myung-Hee; Kim, Yong-Sung

    2012-01-01

    Cellular internalization of bacteriophage by surface-displayed cell penetrating peptides has been reported, though the underlying mechanism remains elusive. Here we describe in detail the internalization mechanism and intracellular trafficking and stability of filamentous M13 phages, the cellular entry of which is mediated by surface-displayed cell-penetrating light chain variable domain 3D8 VL transbody (3D8 VL-M13) or TAT peptide (TAT-M13). Recombinant 3D8 VL-M13 and TAT-M13 phages were efficiently internalized into living mammalian cells via physiologically relevant, energy-dependent endocytosis and were recovered from the cells in their infective form with the yield of 3D8 VL-M13 being higher (0.005∼0.01%) than that of TAT-M13 (0.001∼0.005%). Biochemical and genetic studies revealed that 3D8 VL-M13 was internalized principally by caveolae-mediated endocytosis via interaction with heparan sulfate proteoglycans as cell surface receptors, whereas TAT-M13 was internalized by clathrin- and caveolae-mediated endocytosis utilizing chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans as cell surface receptors, suggesting that phage internalization occurs by physiological endocytotic mechanism through specific cell surface receptors rather than non-specific transcytotic pathways. Internalized 3D8 VL-M13 phages routed to the cytosol and remained stable for more than 18 h without further trafficking to other subcellular compartments, whereas TAT-M13 phages routed to several subcellular compartments before being degraded in lysosomes even after 2 h of internalization. Our results suggest that the internalizing mechanism and intracellular trafficking of filamentous M13 bacteriophages largely follow the attributes of the displayed cell-penetrating moiety. Efficient internalization and cytosolic localization of 3D8 VL transbody-displayed phages will provide a useful tool for intracellular delivery of polar macromolecules such as proteins, peptides, and siRNAs. PMID:23251631

  18. Subtractive Phage Display Selection from Canine Visceral Leishmaniasis Identifies Novel Epitopes That Mimic Leishmania infantum Antigens with Potential Serodiagnosis Applications

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Lourena E.; Lima, Mayara I. S.; Chávez-Fumagalli, Miguel A.; Menezes-Souza, Daniel; Martins, Vivian T.; Duarte, Mariana C.; Lage, Paula S.; Lopes, Eliane G. P.; Lage, Daniela P.; Ribeiro, Tatiana G.; Andrade, Pedro H. R.; de Magalhães-Soares, Danielle F.; Soto, Manuel; Tavares, Carlos A. P.; Goulart, Luiz R.

    2014-01-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) is a zoonotic disease that is endemic to Brazil, where dogs are the main domestic parasite reservoirs, and the percentages of infected dogs living in regions where canine VL (CVL) is endemic have ranged from 10% to 62%. Despite technological advances, some problems have been reported with CVL serodiagnosis. The present study describes a sequential subtractive selection through phage display technology from polyclonal antibodies of negative and positive sera that resulted in the identification of potential bacteriophage-fused peptides that were highly sensitive and specific to antibodies of CVL. A negative selection was performed in which phage clones were adhered to purified IgGs from healthy and Trypanosoma cruzi-infected dogs to eliminate cross-reactive phages. The remaining supernatant nonadhered phages were submitted to positive selection against IgG from the blood serum of dogs that were infected with Leishmania infantum. Phage clones that adhered to purified IgGs from the CVL-infected serum samples were selected. Eighteen clones were identified and their reactivities tested by a phage enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (phage-ELISA) against the serum samples from infected dogs (n = 31) compared to those from vaccinated dogs (n = 21), experimentally infected dogs with cross-reactive parasites (n = 23), and healthy controls (n = 17). Eight clones presented sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of 100%, and they showed no cross-reactivity with T. cruzi- or Ehrlichia canis-infected dogs or with dogs vaccinated with two different commercial CVL vaccines in Brazil. Our study identified eight mimotopes of L. infantum antigens with 100% accuracy for CVL serodiagnosis. The use of these mimotopes by phage-ELISA proved to be an excellent assay that was reproducible, simple, fast, and inexpensive, and it can be applied in CVL-monitoring programs. PMID:24256622

  19. Development of an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for thiacloprid in soil and agro-products with phage-displayed peptide.

    PubMed

    Yin, Wei; Hua, Xiude; Liu, Xiaofeng; Shi, Haiyan; Gee, Shirley J; Wang, Minghua; Hammock, Bruce D

    2015-07-15

    A monoclonal antibody (3A5) that can recognize thiacloprid was produced, and a linear 8-residue peptide phage library was constructed. Six phage-displayed peptides were isolated from the linear 8-residue peptide phage library and a cyclic 8-residue peptide phage library. A phage enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was developed to detect thiacloprid using a phage-displayed peptide. Under the optimal conditions, the half-maximal inhibition concentration (IC50) and the limit of detection (IC10) of the developed phage ELISA were 8.3 and 0.7 μg/L, respectively. Compared with the conventional ELISA, the sensitivity was improved more than 3-fold. The cross-reactivity (CR) was less than 0.08% for the tested structural analogues and was regarded as negligible. The recoveries of thiacloprid ranged from 80.3% to 116.3% in environmental and agricultural samples, which conformed to the requirements for residue detection. The amount of thiacloprid detected by phage ELISA in the samples was significantly correlated with that detected by high-performance liquid chromatography. The current study indicates that isolating phage-displayed peptides from phage display libraries is an alternative method for the development of a sensitive immunoassay and that the developed assay is a potentially useful tool for detecting thiacloprid in environmental and agricultural samples. PMID:25908560

  20. Bispecific monoclonal antibodies against a viral and an enzyme: utilities in ultrasensitive virus ELISA and phage display technology.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fei; Guttikonda, S; Suresh, M R

    2003-03-01

    A quadroma (hybrid-hybridoma) secreting bispecific antibodies with one paratope specific for M13 bacteriophage coat protein and another paratope specific for alkaline phosphatase (AP) was developed by electro-fusion of the two parental hybridomas and selected by a fluorescence activated cell sorter (FACS). The anti-phage M13/anti-AP bsMAbs were purified from anti-phage M13 monospecific MAb by a novel affinity method using Mimetic Blue A6XL as immune complexes with AP. The purified bsMAbs with potentially every molecule uniformly bound with AP generated an immuno-probe with the theoretical highest specificity. An ultrasensitive sandwich ELISA for detecting viruses was developed by using this bsMAb coupled with an amplified ELISA procedure. The sensitivity of the assay was increased 1000 times compared with conventional ELISA to achieve detection of 100 phage particles which is approximately 2.3 fg of phage coat protein. This type of bsMAb probe and ELISA format can be used to design new body fluid assays for viral load of HIV, hepatitis and other human pathogens as rapid and inexpensive alternatives to the PCR based method. This unique bispecific probe also allowed rapid and sensitive detection of bound M13/fd phage clones while panning for specific phages displaying peptide mimics against an antigen from a phage display peptide library. Furthermore, we demonstrate the principle virus purification using bsMAb as affinity ligand with a mild phosphate buffer elution. The results indicate that bsMAb could be used to develop affinity chromatography for purifying highly contagious and pathogenic viruses avoiding procedures employing prolonged high-speed centrifugation. PMID:12609538

  1. Beyond phage display: non-traditional applications of the filamentous bacteriophage as a vaccine carrier, therapeutic biologic, and bioconjugation scaffold

    PubMed Central

    Henry, Kevin A.; Arbabi-Ghahroudi, Mehdi; Scott, Jamie K.

    2015-01-01

    For the past 25 years, phage display technology has been an invaluable tool for studies of protein–protein interactions. However, the inherent biological, biochemical, and biophysical properties of filamentous bacteriophage, as well as the ease of its genetic manipulation, also make it an attractive platform outside the traditional phage display canon. This review will focus on the unique properties of the filamentous bacteriophage and highlight its diverse applications in current research. Particular emphases are placed on: (i) the advantages of the phage as a vaccine carrier, including its high immunogenicity, relative antigenic simplicity and ability to activate a range of immune responses, (ii) the phage’s potential as a prophylactic and therapeutic agent for infectious and chronic diseases, (iii) the regularity of the virion major coat protein lattice, which enables a variety of bioconjugation and surface chemistry applications, particularly in nanomaterials, and (iv) the phage’s large population sizes and fast generation times, which make it an excellent model system for directed protein evolution. Despite their ubiquity in the biosphere, metagenomics work is just beginning to explore the ecology of filamentous and non-filamentous phage, and their role in the evolution of bacterial populations. Thus, the filamentous phage represents a robust, inexpensive, and versatile microorganism whose bioengineering applications continue to expand in new directions, although its limitations in some spheres impose obstacles to its widespread adoption and use. PMID:26300850

  2. Putative phage-display epitopes of the porcine epidemic diarrhea virus S1 protein and their anti-viral activity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) is a pathogen of swine that causes severe diarrhea and dehydration resulting in substantial morbidity and mortality in newborn piglets. Phage display is a technique with wide application, in particular, the identification of key antigen epitopes for the develop...

  3. Viral morphogenesis is the dominant source of sequence censorship in M13 combinatorial peptide phage display.

    SciTech Connect

    Rodi, D. J.; Soares, A. S.; Makowski, L.; Biosciences Division; BNL

    2002-01-01

    Novel statistical methods have been developed and used to quantitate and annotate the sequence diversity within combinatorial peptide libraries on the basis of small numbers (1-200) of sequences selected at random from commercially available M13 p3-based phage display libraries. These libraries behave statistically as though they correspond to populations containing roughly 4.0{+-}1.6% of the random dodecapeptides and 7.9{+-}2.6% of the random constrained heptapeptides that are theoretically possible within the phage populations. Analysis of amino acid residue occurrence patterns shows no demonstrable influence on sequence censorship by Escherichia coli tRNA isoacceptor profiles or either overall codon or Class II codon usage patterns, suggesting no metabolic constraints on recombinant p3 synthesis. There is an overall depression in the occurrence of cysteine, arginine and glycine residues and an overabundance of proline, threonine and histidine residues. The majority of position-dependent amino acid sequence bias is clustered at three positions within the inserted peptides of the dodecapeptide library, +1, +3 and +12 downstream from the signal peptidase cleavage site. Conformational tendency measures of the peptides indicate a significant preference for inserts favoring a {beta}-turn conformation. The observed protein sequence limitations can primarily be attributed to genetic codon degeneracy and signal peptidase cleavage preferences. These data suggest that for applications in which maximal sequence diversity is essential, such as epitope mapping or novel receptor identification, combinatorial peptide libraries should be constructed using codon-corrected trinucleotide cassettes within vector-host systems designed to minimize morphogenesis-related censorship.

  4. Mapping protein-protein interactions with phage-displayed combinatorial peptide libraries and alanine scanning.

    PubMed

    Kokoszka, Malgorzata E; Kay, Brian K

    2015-01-01

    One avenue for inferring the function of a protein is to learn what proteins it may bind to in the cell. Among the various methodologies, one way for doing so is to affinity select peptide ligands from a phage-displayed combinatorial peptide library and then to examine if the proteins that carry such peptide sequences interact with the target protein in the cell. With the protocols described in this chapter, a laboratory with skills in microbiology, molecular biology, and protein biochemistry can readily identify peptides in the library that bind selectively, and with micromolar affinity, to a given target protein on the time scale of 2 months. To illustrate this approach, we use a library of bacteriophage M13 particles, which display 12-mer combinatorial peptides, to affinity select different peptide ligands for two different targets, the SH3 domain of the human Lyn protein tyrosine kinase and a segment of the yeast serine/threonine protein kinase Cbk1. The binding properties of the selected peptide ligands are then dissected by sequence alignment, Kunkel mutagenesis, and alanine scanning. Finally, the peptide ligands can be used to predict cellular interacting proteins and serve as the starting point for drug discovery. PMID:25616333

  5. Protein ligand design: from phage display to synthetic protein epitope mimetics in human antibody Fc-binding peptidomimetics.

    PubMed

    Dias, Ricardo L A; Fasan, Rudi; Moehle, Kerstin; Renard, Annabelle; Obrecht, Daniel; Robinson, John A

    2006-03-01

    Phage display is a powerful method for selecting peptides with novel binding functions. Synthetic peptidomimetic chemistry is a powerful tool for creating structural diversity in ligands as a means to establish structure-activity relationships. Here we illustrate a method of bridging these two methodologies, by starting with a disulfide bridged phage display peptide which binds a human antibody Fc fragment (Delano et al. Science 2000, 287, 1279) and creating a backbone cyclic beta-hairpin peptidomimetic with 80-fold higher affinity for the Fc domain. The peptidomimetic is shown to adopt a well-defined beta-hairpin conformation in aqueous solution, with a bulge in one beta-strand, as seen in the crystal structure of the phage peptide bound to the Fc domain. The higher binding affinity of the peptidomimetic presumably reflects the effect of constraining the free ligand into the conformation required for binding, thus highlighting in this example the influence that ligand flexibility has on the binding energy. Since phage display peptides against a wide variety of different proteins are now accessible, this approach to synthetic ligand design might be applied to many other medicinally and biotechnologically interesting target proteins.

  6. Characterization of Seven New Polystyrene Plates Binding Peptides from a Phage-Displayed Random 12-Peptide Library.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yun-Fei; Gao, Xiao-Chen; Xu, Tian-Qi; Dun, Zhao; Yu, Xing-Long

    2016-01-01

    A random 12-peptide library was screened against Erysipelothrix rhusiopthiae and porcine circovirus 2 recombinant Cap protein and the selected peptides were used for detecting the corresponding pathogens quickly and effectively. To our surprise, seven peptides, P1 (WHWNAP WWNGVY), P2 (FHWTWQFPYTST), P3 (GAMHLPWHMGTL), P4 (HWNIWWQHHPSP), P5 (HFFKWHTRTNDQ), P6 (HFFRWHPSAHLG) and P7 (HFAYWWNGVRGP) with the characteristics of polystyrene plate (PS) binding target-unrelated peptides (TUPs), were selected from the library. It has been found that P2 and P4 shared common motif of plastic binding peptide, moreover, P2, P3, P5 and P7 have been isolated repeatedly in other research groups using different targets. Then, the seven peptide phage clones were identified as the PS binding TUP phages by phage-ELISA and elution titration, particularly, P1 and P2 showed strong PS binding affinity which can not be inhibited by usual blocking buffers. In addition, all of the phages were not propagation-related TUP, but P3 showed the similar propagation rate with M13KE (vector phage). We also found that the seven PS-TUPs are rich in W, H, F, P and G, particularly, both W and H are contained in all PS-TUPs. It deduced that they may play a potential role in peptide binding to plastic. Although it is difficult to eliminate the TUP phages in phage display completely, these PS-TUPs can be used to exclude the false positive peptides rapidly and effectively and help us to obtain truly interesting peptides more accurately. PMID:26980286

  7. Selection of novel peptide mimics of the GD2 ganglioside from a constrained phage-displayed peptide library.

    PubMed

    Horwacik, Irena; Czaplicki, Dominik; Talarek, Katarzyna; Kowalczyk, Aleksandra; Bolesta, Elzbieta; Kozbor, Danuta; Rokita, Hanna

    2007-05-01

    Aberrant glycosylation is a universal feature of cancer cells. There are quantitative and qualitative changes in expression of gangliosides observed in tumors of a neuroectodermal origin such as neuroblastoma, melanoma and astrocytoma. The presence of large amounts of GD2 ganglioside on neuroblastoma cells, as compared to normal cells, opens the possibilities to use the tumor-associated carbohydrate antigen in diagnosis and immunotherapeutic approaches. In the quest for immunogens potentially capable of eliciting anti-GD2 ganglioside immune responses, we performed affinity purification of phage-displayed peptides from the LX-8 library (12-mer containing disulphide bridge). The library was screened with the biotinylated anti-GD2 ganglioside 14G2a mAb monoclonal antibody. Our goal was to isolate and characterize peptide mimics of GD2 ganglioside. Numerous individual phage clones that bound 14G2a mAb were identified with the application of immunoblotting technique in the phage pools yielded from the pannings. The phage-borne peptides were tested for their anti-GD2 ganglioside antibody binding ability using ELISA. Among these clones five different phage-displayed peptide sequences were identified. Moreover, we showed that the secondary structure of the peptides, stabilized by the disulfide bridging between cysteine residues at positions 2 and 11, was crucial for the binding of the peptides to 14G2a mAb. In a separate set of experiments, we observed a competition of the peptides, expressed on phages as well as in their synthetic form, with the nominal antigen GD2 ganglioside expressed on IMR-32 neuroblastoma cells for binding to 14G2a mAb. Based on the obtained results we concluded that all of these 5 peptides were mimics of the GD2 ganglioside. PMID:17390090

  8. Identification of a peptide specifically targeting ovarian cancer by the screening of a phage display peptide library

    PubMed Central

    WANG, LEDAN; HU, YUE; LI, WENJU; WANG, FAN; LU, XIAOSHENG; HAN, XUEYING; LV, JIEQIANG; CHEN, JIE

    2016-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is the most common cause of cancer-associated mortality in terms of gynecological malignancies, and is difficult to diagnose due to the absence of reliable biomarkers. To identify ovarian cancer-specific biomarkers, the present study used a Ph.D.-7™ Phage Display Peptide Library to screen for ligands that selectively target HO-8910 ovarian cancer cells. Following 5 rounds of biopanning, the phage clone P2 was selected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and DNA sequencing, and its characteristics were additionally validated by immunofluorescence and immunohistochemical assays. The results revealed the positive phage were enriched 92-fold following 5 rounds of biopanning, and the DNA sequence AAC CCG ATG ATT CGC CGC CAG (amino acid sequence, NPMIRRQ) was repeated most frequently (phage clones, P2, P3, P15, P30 and P54). Immunofluorescence and immunohistochemical assays revealed that the phage clone P2 was able to bind to ovarian cancer cells and tissues, and not those of cervical cancer. In conclusion, the peptide NPMIRRQ may be a potential agent for the diagnosis of ovarian cancer. PMID:27313733

  9. Triosephosphate isomerase of Taenia solium (TTPI): phage display and antibodies as tools for finding target regions to inhibit catalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Sanabria-Ayala, Víctor; Belmont, Iaraset; Abraham, Landa

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies demonstrated that antibodies against triosephosphate isomerase of Taenia solium (TTPI) can alter its enzymatic catalysis. In the present study, we used antibodies produced against the NH2-terminal region of TTPI (1/3NH2TTPI) and the phage display technology to find target regions to inhibit TTPI activity. As a first step, we obtained polyclonal antibodies against non-conserved regions from the 1/3NH2TTPI, which had an inhibitory effect of about 74 % on catalytic activity. Afterward, they were used to screen a library of phage-displayed dodecapeptides; as a result, 41 phage mimotope clones were isolated and grouped according to their amino acid sequence, finding the consensus A1 (VPTXPI), A2 (VPTXXI), B (LTPGQ), and D (DPLPR). Antibodies against selected phage mimotope clones were obtained by rabbit's immunization; these ones clearly recognized TTPI by both Western blot and ELISA. However, only the mimotope PDTS16 (DSVTPTSVMAVA) clone, which belongs to the VPTXXI consensus, raised antibodies capable of inhibiting the TTPI catalytic activity in 45 %. Anti-PDTS16 antibodies were confronted to several synthetic peptides that encompass the 1/3NH2TTPI, and they only recognized three, which share the motif FDTLQK belonging to the helix-α1 in TTPI. This suggests that this motif is the main part of the epitope recognized by anti-PDTS16 antibodies and revealed its importance for TTPI catalysis.

  10. Phage-displayed peptides as capture antigens in an innovative assay for Taenia saginata-infected cattle.

    PubMed

    Fogaça, Rafaela L; Capelli-Peixoto, Janaína; Yamanaka, Isabel B; de Almeida, Rodrigo P M; Muzzi, João Carlos D; Borges, Mariangela; Costa, Alvimar J; Chávez-Olortegui, Carlos; Thomaz-Soccol, Vanete; Alvarenga, Larissa M; de Moura, Juliana

    2014-11-01

    Bovine cysticercosis is detected during the routine post mortem examination of carcasses by visual inspection (knife and eye method). However, the sensitivity of this procedure is several times lower than immunoassays, even when it is performed by qualified professionals. In the present study, a new generation capture antigens were screened from a phage display peptide library using antibodies from Taenia saginata-infected animals. Eight phage clones were selected, and one, Tsag 3 (VHTSIRPRCQPRAITPR), produced similar results to the T. saginata metacestode crude antigen (TsCa) when used as a capture antigen in an ELISA. The phage-displayed peptides competed with TsCa for binding sites, reducing the reactivity by approximately 30 %. Alanine scanning indicated that proline, arginine, and serine are important residues for antibody binding. Tsag 1 (HFYQITWLPNTFPAR), the most frequent affinity-selected clone, and Tsag 6 (YRWPSTPSASRQATL) shared similarity with highly conserved proteins from the Taeniidae family with known immunogenicity. Due to their epitopic or mimotopic properties, these affinity-selected phages could contribute to the rational design of an ante mortem immunodiagnosis method for bovine cysticercosis, as well as an epitope-based vaccine to interrupt the taeniosis/cysticercosis complex. PMID:25081558

  11. A phage display-selected peptide inhibitor of Agrobacterium vitis polygalacturonase.

    PubMed

    Warren, Jeremy G; Kasun, George W; Leonard, Takara; Kirkpatrick, Bruce C

    2016-05-01

    Agrobacterium vitis, the causal agent of crown gall of grapevine, is a threat to viticulture worldwide. A major virulence factor of this pathogen is polygalacturonase, an enzyme that degrades pectin components of the xylem cell wall. A single gene encodes for the polygalacturonase gene. Disruption of the polygalacturonase gene results in a mutant that is less pathogenic and produces significantly fewer root lesions on grapevines. Thus, the identification of peptides or proteins that could inhibit the activity of polygalacturonase could be part of a strategy for the protection of plants against this pathogen. A phage-displayed combinatorial peptide library was used to isolate peptides with a high binding affinity to A. vitis polygalacturonase. These peptides showed sequence similarity to regions of Oryza sativa (EMS66324, Japonica) and Triticum urartu (NP_001054402, wild wheat) polygalacturonase-inhibiting proteins (PGIPs). Furthermore, these panning experiments identified a peptide, SVTIHHLGGGS, which was able to reduce A. vitis polygalacturonase activity by 35% in vitro. Truncation studies showed that the IHHL motif alone is sufficient to inhibit A. vitis polygalacturonase activity. PMID:26177065

  12. Selective and Sensitive Sensing of Flame Retardant Chemicals Through Phage Display Discovered Recognition Peptide.

    PubMed

    Jin, Hyo-Eon; Zueger, Chris; Chung, Woo-Jae; Wong, Winnie; Lee, Byung Yang; Lee, Seung-Wuk

    2015-11-11

    We report a highly selective and sensitive biosensor for the detection of an environmentally toxic molecule, decabrominated diphenyl ether (DBDE), one of the most common congeners of the polybrominated frame retardants (polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE)), using newly discovered DBDE peptide receptors integrated with carbon nanotube field-effect transistors (CNT-FET). The specific DBDE peptide receptor was identified using a high-throughput screening process of phage library display. The resulting binding peptide carries an interesting consensus binding pocket with two Trp-His/Asn-Trp repeats, which binds to the DBDE in a multivalent manner. We integrated the novel DBDE binding peptide onto the CNT-FET using polydiacetylene coating materials linked through cysteine-maleimide click chemistry. The resulting biosensor could detect the desired DBDE selectively with a 1 fM detection limit. Our combined approaches of selective receptor discovery, material nanocoating through click chemistry, and integration onto a sensitive CNT-FET electronic sensor for desired target chemicals will pave the way toward the rapid development of portable and easy-to-use biosensors for desired chemicals to protect our health and environment. PMID:26455834

  13. Identification of calreticulin as a ligand of GABARAP by phage display screening of a peptide library.

    PubMed

    Mohrlüder, Jeannine; Stangler, Thomas; Hoffmann, Yvonne; Wiesehan, Katja; Mataruga, Anja; Willbold, Dieter

    2007-11-01

    4-Aminobutyrate type A (GABA(A)) receptor-associated protein (GABARAP) is a ubiquitin-like modifier implicated in the intracellular trafficking of GABA(A) receptors, and belongs to a family of proteins involved in intracellular vesicular transport processes, such as autophagy and intra-Golgi transport. In this article, it is demonstrated that calreticulin is a high affinity ligand of GABARAP. Calreticulin, although best known for its functions as a Ca(2+) -dependent chaperone and a Ca(2+) -buffering protein in the endoplasmic reticulum, is also localized to the cytosol and exerts a variety of extra-endoplasmic reticulum functions. By phage display screening of a randomized peptide library, peptides that specifically bind GABARAP were identified. Their amino acid sequences allowed us to identify calreticulin as a potential GABARAP binding protein. GABARAP binding to calreticulin was confirmed by pull-down experiments with brain lysate and colocalization studies in N2a cells. Calreticulin and GABARAP interact with a dissociation constant K(d) = 64 nm and a mean lifetime of the complex of 20 min. Thus, the interaction between GABARAP and calreticulin is the strongest so far reported for each protein. PMID:17916189

  14. Immunodiagnosis of human neurocysticercosis using a synthetic peptide selected by phage-display.

    PubMed

    Hell, R C R; Amim, P; de Andrade, H M; de Avila, R A M; Felicori, L; Oliveira, A G; Oliveira, C A; Nascimento, E; Tavares, C A P; Granier, C; Chávez-Olórtegui, C

    2009-04-01

    The usefulness of a synthetic peptide in the serodiagnosis of Taenia solium human neurocysticercosis (NC) has been evaluated. Phage-displayed peptides were screened with human antibodies to scolex protein antigen from cysticercus cellulosae (SPACc). One clone was found to interact specifically with anti-SPACc IgGs. The corresponding synthetic peptide was found to be recognized in ELISA by NC patient's sera. The study was carried out with sera from 28 confirmed NC patients, 13 control sera and 73 sera from patients suffering from other infectious diseases. A 93% sensibility and a 94.3% specificity was achieved. Figures of 89% and 31.4% of sensibility and specificity were obtained in a SPACc-based ELISA. Immunoblotting of SPACc with anti-peptide antibodies revealed a single band of approximately 45 kDa in 1D and four 45 kDa isoforms in 2D-gel electrophoresis. A strong and specific immunostaining in the fibers beneath the suckers, at the base of the rostellum, and in the tissue surrounding the scolex of cysticerci was observed by immunomicroscopy. Our results show that a peptide-based immunodiagnostic of neurocisticercosis can be envisioned.

  15. Selective and Sensitive Sensing of Flame Retardant Chemicals Through Phage Display Discovered Recognition Peptide.

    PubMed

    Jin, Hyo-Eon; Zueger, Chris; Chung, Woo-Jae; Wong, Winnie; Lee, Byung Yang; Lee, Seung-Wuk

    2015-11-11

    We report a highly selective and sensitive biosensor for the detection of an environmentally toxic molecule, decabrominated diphenyl ether (DBDE), one of the most common congeners of the polybrominated frame retardants (polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE)), using newly discovered DBDE peptide receptors integrated with carbon nanotube field-effect transistors (CNT-FET). The specific DBDE peptide receptor was identified using a high-throughput screening process of phage library display. The resulting binding peptide carries an interesting consensus binding pocket with two Trp-His/Asn-Trp repeats, which binds to the DBDE in a multivalent manner. We integrated the novel DBDE binding peptide onto the CNT-FET using polydiacetylene coating materials linked through cysteine-maleimide click chemistry. The resulting biosensor could detect the desired DBDE selectively with a 1 fM detection limit. Our combined approaches of selective receptor discovery, material nanocoating through click chemistry, and integration onto a sensitive CNT-FET electronic sensor for desired target chemicals will pave the way toward the rapid development of portable and easy-to-use biosensors for desired chemicals to protect our health and environment.

  16. Isolation of soluble scFv antibody fragments specific for small biomarker molecule, L-Carnitine, using phage display.

    PubMed

    Abou El-Magd, Rabab M; Vozza, Nicolas F; Tuszynski, Jack A; Wishart, David S

    2016-01-01

    Isolation of single chain antibody fragment (scFv) clones from naïve Tomlinson I+J phage display libraries that specifically bind a small biomarker molecule, L-Carnitine, was performed using iterative affinity selection procedures. L-Carnitine has been described as a conditionally essential nutrient for humans. Abnormally high concentrations of L-Carnitine in urine are related to many health disorders including diabetes mellitus type 2 and lung cancer. ELISA-based affinity characterization results indicate that selectants preferentially bind to L-Carnitine in the presence of key bioselecting component materials and closely related L-Carnitine derivatives. In addition, the affinity results were confirmed using biophysical fluorescence quenching for tyrosine residues in the V segment. Small-scale production of the soluble fragment yielded 1.3mg/L using immunopure-immobilized protein A affinity column. Circular Dichroism data revealed that the antibody fragment (Ab) represents a folded protein that mainly consists of β-sheets. These novel antibody fragments may find utility as molecular affinity interface receptors in various electrochemical biosensor platforms to provide specific L-Carnitine binding capability with potential applications in metabolomic devices for companion diagnostics and personalized medicine applications. It may also be used in any other biomedical application where detection of the L-Carnitine level is important. PMID:26608419

  17. Phage display selection of Affibody molecules with specific binding to the extracellular domain of the epidermal growth factor receptor.

    PubMed

    Friedman, M; Nordberg, E; Höidén-Guthenberg, I; Brismar, H; Adams, G P; Nilsson, F Y; Carlsson, J; Ståhl, S

    2007-04-01

    Affibody molecules specific for the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) have been selected by phage display technology from a combinatorial protein library based on the 58-residue, protein A-derived Z domain. EGFR is overexpressed in various malignancies and is frequently associated with poor patient prognosis, and the information provided by targeting this receptor could facilitate both patient diagnostics and treatment. Three selected Affibody variants were shown to selectively bind to the extracellular domain of EGFR (EGFR-ECD). Kinetic biosensor analysis revealed that the three monomeric Affibody molecules bound with similar affinity, ranging from 130 to 185 nM. Head-to-tail dimers of the Affibody molecules were compared for their binding to recombinant EGFR-ECD in biosensor analysis and in human epithelial cancer A431 cells. Although the dimeric Affibody variants were found to bind in a range of 25-50 nM affinities in biosensor analysis, they were found to be low nanomolar binders in the cellular assays. Competition assays using radiolabeled Affibody dimers confirmed specific EGFR-binding and demonstrated that the three Affibody molecules competed for the same epitope. Immunofluorescence microscopy demonstrated that the selected Affibody dimers were initially binding to EGFR at the cell surface of A431, and confocal microscopy analysis showed that the Affibody dimers could thereafter be internalized. The potential use of the described Affibody molecules as targeting agents for radionuclide based imaging applications in various carcinomas is discussed. PMID:17452435

  18. Anti-idiotypic VHH phage display-mediated immuno-PCR for ultrasensitive determination of mycotoxin zearalenone in cereals.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xianxian; He, Qinghua; Xu, Yang; Liu, Xing; Shu, Mei; Tu, Zhui; Li, Yanping; Wang, Wei; Cao, Dongmei

    2016-01-15

    Immunoassay is frequently used to analyze mycotoxin contamination. However, the introduction of mycotoxins or their conjugates in conventional immunoassay threatens the safety of individuals and the environment. The variable domain of heavy-chain antibodies (VHHs) can be used as alternative compounds to produce anti-idiotypic antibodies, which work as non-toxic surrogate reagents in immunoassay. In this work, anti-zearalenone (ZEN) monoclonal antibody (mAb) was used as the target for biopanning anti-idiotypic VHH from a naïve alpaca VHH phage display library. After four panning cycles, one anti-idiotypic VHH phage clone (Z1) was isolated and the Z1 based phage ELISA for ZEN showed a half inhibitory concentration (IC50) of 0.25±0.02ng/mL, a linear range of 0.11-0.55ng/mL, and a limit of detection (LOD) of 0.08ng/mL. Furthermore, the phage particles of Z1 were also applied to immuno-polymerase chain reaction (PD-IPCR), which supplied both the detection antigens and deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) templates. Compared with that of phage ELISA, the LOD of Z1 based PD-IPCR was 12-fold improved, with a detection limit of 6.5pg/mL and a linear range of 0.01-100ng/mL. The proposed method was then validated with liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Results showed the reliability of PD-IPCR for the determination of ZEN in cereal samples. The use of anti-idiotypic VHH phage as non-toxic surrogate and signal-amplification function of PCR make it a promising method for actual ZEN analysis in cereals. PMID:26592626

  19. [Production of miniantibodies to Agrobacterium tumefaciens VirE2 virulence protein by the method of phage display].

    PubMed

    Velikov, V A; Ermoshina, O S; Volokhina, I V; Chumakov, M I

    2006-01-01

    The scFv miniantibodies to the recombinant protein VirE2 from Agrobacterium tumefaciens were obtained by the method of phage display. The miniantibodies were purified and tested using timmunodot method for binding to a recombinant protein from Escherichia coli and to the native protein VirE2 from A. tumefaciens. The functional activity of the miniantibodies was comparable to the activity of mouse polyclonal antibodies against the VirE2 protein. PMID:16512606

  20. Next-Generation Sequencing of a Single Domain Antibody Repertoire Reveals Quality of Phage Display Selected Candidates.

    PubMed

    Turner, Kendrick B; Naciri, Jennifer; Liu, Jinny L; Anderson, George P; Goldman, Ellen R; Zabetakis, Dan

    2016-01-01

    Next-Generation Sequencing and bioinformatics are powerful tools for analyzing the large number of DNA sequences present in an immune library. In this work, we constructed a cDNA library of single domain antibodies from a llama immunized with staphylococcal enterotoxin B. The resulting library was sequenced, resulting in approximately 8.5 million sequences with 5.4 million representing intact, useful sequences. The sequenced library was interrogated using sequences of known SEB-binding single domain antibodies from the library obtained through phage display panning methods in a previous study. New antibodies were identified, produced, and characterized, and were shown to have affinities and melting temperatures comparable to those obtained by traditional panning methods. This demonstrates the utility of using NGS as a complementary tool to phage-displayed biopanning as a means for rapidly obtaining additional antibodies from an immune library. It also shows that phage display, using a library of high diversity, is able to select high quality antibodies even when they are low in frequency. PMID:26895405

  1. Next-Generation Sequencing of a Single Domain Antibody Repertoire Reveals Quality of Phage Display Selected Candidates

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Kendrick B.; Naciri, Jennifer; Liu, Jinny L.; Anderson, George P.; Goldman, Ellen R.; Zabetakis, Dan

    2016-01-01

    Next-Generation Sequencing and bioinformatics are powerful tools for analyzing the large number of DNA sequences present in an immune library. In this work, we constructed a cDNA library of single domain antibodies from a llama immunized with staphylococcal enterotoxin B. The resulting library was sequenced, resulting in approximately 8.5 million sequences with 5.4 million representing intact, useful sequences. The sequenced library was interrogated using sequences of known SEB-binding single domain antibodies from the library obtained through phage display panning methods in a previous study. New antibodies were identified, produced, and characterized, and were shown to have affinities and melting temperatures comparable to those obtained by traditional panning methods. This demonstrates the utility of using NGS as a complementary tool to phage-displayed biopanning as a means for rapidly obtaining additional antibodies from an immune library. It also shows that phage display, using a library of high diversity, is able to select high quality antibodies even when they are low in frequency. PMID:26895405

  2. Tetanus Neurotoxin Neutralizing Antibodies Screened from a Human Immune scFv Antibody Phage Display Library.

    PubMed

    Wang, Han; Yu, Rui; Fang, Ting; Yu, Ting; Chi, Xiangyang; Zhang, Xiaopeng; Liu, Shuling; Fu, Ling; Yu, Changming; Chen, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Tetanus neurotoxin (TeNT) produced by Clostridium tetani is one of the most poisonous protein substances. Neutralizing antibodies against TeNT can effectively prevent and cure toxicosis. Using purified Hc fragments of TeNT (TeNT-Hc) as an antigen, three specific neutralizing antibody clones recognizing different epitopes were selected from a human immune scFv antibody phage display library. The three antibodies (2-7G, 2-2D, and S-4-7H) can effectively inhibit the binding between TeNT-Hc and differentiated PC-12 cells in vitro. Moreover, 2-7G inhibited TeNT-Hc binding to the receptor via carbohydrate-binding sites of the W pocket while 2-2D and S-4-7H inhibited binding of the R pocket. Although no single mAb completely protected mice from the toxin, they could both prolong survival when challenged with 20 LD50s (50% of the lethal dose) of TeNT. When used together, the mAbs completely neutralized 1000 LD50s/mg Ab, indicating their high neutralizing potency in vivo. Antibodies recognizing different carbohydrate-binding pockets could have higher synergistic toxin neutralization activities than those that recognize the same pockets. These results could lead to further production of neutralizing antibody drugs against TeNT and indicate that using TeNT-Hc as an antigen for screening human antibodies for TeNT intoxication therapy from human immune antibody library was convenient and effective. PMID:27626445

  3. Tetanus Neurotoxin Neutralizing Antibodies Screened from a Human Immune scFv Antibody Phage Display Library

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Han; Yu, Rui; Fang, Ting; Yu, Ting; Chi, Xiangyang; Zhang, Xiaopeng; Liu, Shuling; Fu, Ling; Yu, Changming; Chen, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Tetanus neurotoxin (TeNT) produced by Clostridium tetani is one of the most poisonous protein substances. Neutralizing antibodies against TeNT can effectively prevent and cure toxicosis. Using purified Hc fragments of TeNT (TeNT-Hc) as an antigen, three specific neutralizing antibody clones recognizing different epitopes were selected from a human immune scFv antibody phage display library. The three antibodies (2-7G, 2-2D, and S-4-7H) can effectively inhibit the binding between TeNT-Hc and differentiated PC-12 cells in vitro. Moreover, 2-7G inhibited TeNT-Hc binding to the receptor via carbohydrate-binding sites of the W pocket while 2-2D and S-4-7H inhibited binding of the R pocket. Although no single mAb completely protected mice from the toxin, they could both prolong survival when challenged with 20 LD50s (50% of the lethal dose) of TeNT. When used together, the mAbs completely neutralized 1000 LD50s/mg Ab, indicating their high neutralizing potency in vivo. Antibodies recognizing different carbohydrate-binding pockets could have higher synergistic toxin neutralization activities than those that recognize the same pockets. These results could lead to further production of neutralizing antibody drugs against TeNT and indicate that using TeNT-Hc as an antigen for screening human antibodies for TeNT intoxication therapy from human immune antibody library was convenient and effective. PMID:27626445

  4. Selection of cell-type specific antibodies on tissue-sections using phage display.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Simon Asbjørn; Meldgaard, Theresa; Lykkemark, Simon; Mandrup, Ole Aalund; Kristensen, Peter

    2015-08-01

    With the advent of modern technologies enabling single cell analysis, it has become clear that small sub-populations of cells or even single cells can drive the phenotypic appearance of tissue, both diseased and normal. Nucleic acid based technologies allowing single cell analysis has been faster to mature, while technologies aimed at analysing the proteome at a single cell level is still lacking behind, especially technologies which allow single cell analysis in tissue. Introducing methods, that allows such analysis, will pave the way for discovering new biomarkers with more clinical relevance, as these may be unique for microenvironments only present in tissue and will avoid artifacts introduced by in vitro studies. Here, we introduce a technology enabling biomarker identification on small sub-populations of cells within a tissue section. Phage antibody libraries are applied to the tissue sections, followed by washing to remove non-bound phage particles. To eliminate phage antibodies binding to antigens ubiquitously expressed and retrieve phage antibodies binding specifically to antigens expressed by the sub-population of cells, the area of interest is protected by a 'shadow stick'. The phage antibodies on the remaining areas on the slide are exposed to UV light, which introduces cross-links in the phage genome, thus rendering them non-replicable. In this work we applied the technology, guided by CD31 expressing endothelial cells, to isolate recombinant antibodies specifically binding biomarkers expressed either by the cell or in the microenvironment surrounding the endothelial cell.

  5. Selection of cell-type specific antibodies on tissue-sections using phage display

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, Simon Asbjørn; Meldgaard, Theresa; Lykkemark, Simon; Mandrup, Ole Aalund; Kristensen, Peter

    2015-01-01

    With the advent of modern technologies enabling single cell analysis, it has become clear that small sub-populations of cells or even single cells can drive the phenotypic appearance of tissue, both diseased and normal. Nucleic acid based technologies allowing single cell analysis has been faster to mature, while technologies aimed at analysing the proteome at a single cell level is still lacking behind, especially technologies which allow single cell analysis in tissue. Introducing methods, that allows such analysis, will pave the way for discovering new biomarkers with more clinical relevance, as these may be unique for microenvironments only present in tissue and will avoid artifacts introduced by in vitro studies. Here, we introduce a technology enabling biomarker identification on small sub-populations of cells within a tissue section. Phage antibody libraries are applied to the tissue sections, followed by washing to remove non-bound phage particles. To eliminate phage antibodies binding to antigens ubiquitously expressed and retrieve phage antibodies binding specifically to antigens expressed by the sub-population of cells, the area of interest is protected by a ‘shadow stick’. The phage antibodies on the remaining areas on the slide are exposed to UV light, which introduces cross-links in the phage genome, thus rendering them non-replicable. In this work we applied the technology, guided by CD31 expressing endothelial cells, to isolate recombinant antibodies specifically binding biomarkers expressed either by the cell or in the microenvironment surrounding the endothelial cell. PMID:25808085

  6. Phage display selection of tight specific binding variants from a hyperthermostable Sso7d scaffold protein library.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ning; Schmitt, Margaret A; Fisk, John D

    2016-04-01

    Antibodies, the quintessential biological recognition molecules, are not ideal for many applications because of their large size, complex modifications, and thermal and chemical instability. Identifying alternative scaffolds that may be evolved into tight, specific binding molecules with improved physical properties is of increasing interest, particularly for biomedical applications in resource-limited environments. Hyperthermophilic organisms, such as Sulfolobus solfataricus, are an attractive source of highly stable proteins that may serve as starting points for alternative molecular recognition scaffolds. We describe the first application of phage display to identify binding proteins based on the S. solfataricus protein Sso7d scaffold. Sso7d is a small cysteine-free DNA-binding protein (approximately 7 kDa, 63 amino acids), with a melting temperature of nearly 100 °C. Tight-binding Sso7d variants were selected for a diverse set of protein targets from a 10(10) member library, demonstrating the versatility of the scaffold. These Sso7d variants are able to discriminate among closely related human, bovine and rabbit serum albumins. Equilibrium dissociation constants in the nanomolar to low micromolar range were measured via competitive ELISA. Importantly, the Sso7d variants continue to bind their targets in the absence of the phage context. Furthermore, phage-displayed Sso7d variants retain their binding affinity after exposure to temperatures up to 70 °C. Taken together, our results suggest that the Sso7d scaffold will be a complementary addition to the range of non-antibody scaffold proteins that may be utilized in phage display. Variants of hyperthermostable binding proteins have potential applications in diagnostics and therapeutics for environments with extreme conditions of storage and deployment. PMID:26835881

  7. Phage display selection of tight specific binding variants from a hyperthermostable Sso7d scaffold protein library.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ning; Schmitt, Margaret A; Fisk, John D

    2016-04-01

    Antibodies, the quintessential biological recognition molecules, are not ideal for many applications because of their large size, complex modifications, and thermal and chemical instability. Identifying alternative scaffolds that may be evolved into tight, specific binding molecules with improved physical properties is of increasing interest, particularly for biomedical applications in resource-limited environments. Hyperthermophilic organisms, such as Sulfolobus solfataricus, are an attractive source of highly stable proteins that may serve as starting points for alternative molecular recognition scaffolds. We describe the first application of phage display to identify binding proteins based on the S. solfataricus protein Sso7d scaffold. Sso7d is a small cysteine-free DNA-binding protein (approximately 7 kDa, 63 amino acids), with a melting temperature of nearly 100 °C. Tight-binding Sso7d variants were selected for a diverse set of protein targets from a 10(10) member library, demonstrating the versatility of the scaffold. These Sso7d variants are able to discriminate among closely related human, bovine and rabbit serum albumins. Equilibrium dissociation constants in the nanomolar to low micromolar range were measured via competitive ELISA. Importantly, the Sso7d variants continue to bind their targets in the absence of the phage context. Furthermore, phage-displayed Sso7d variants retain their binding affinity after exposure to temperatures up to 70 °C. Taken together, our results suggest that the Sso7d scaffold will be a complementary addition to the range of non-antibody scaffold proteins that may be utilized in phage display. Variants of hyperthermostable binding proteins have potential applications in diagnostics and therapeutics for environments with extreme conditions of storage and deployment.

  8. Selection of binding targets in parasites using phage-display and aptamer libraries in vivo and in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Tonelli, R. R.; Colli, W.; Alves, M. J. M.

    2012-01-01

    Parasite infections are largely dependent on interactions between pathogen and different host cell populations to guarantee a successful infectious process. This is particularly true for obligatory intracellular parasites as Plasmodium, Toxoplasma, and Leishmania, to name a few. Adhesion to and entry into the cell are essential steps requiring specific parasite and host cell molecules. The large amount of possible involved molecules poses additional difficulties for their identification by the classical biochemical approaches. In this respect, the search for alternative techniques should be pursued. Among them two powerful methodologies can be employed, both relying upon the construction of highly diverse combinatorial libraries of peptides or oligonucleotides that randomly bind with high affinity to targets on the cell surface and are selectively displaced by putative ligands. These are, respectively, the peptide-based phage display and the oligonucleotide-based aptamer techniques. The phage display technique has been extensively employed for the identification of novel ligands in vitro and in vivo in different areas such as cancer, vaccine development, and epitope mapping. Particularly, phage display has been employed in the investigation of pathogen–host interactions. Although this methodology has been used for some parasites with encouraging results, in trypanosomatids its use is, as yet, scanty. RNA and DNA aptamers, developed by the SELEX process (Systematic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential Enrichment), were described over two decades ago and since then contributed to a large number of structured nucleic acids for diagnostic or therapeutic purposes or for the understanding of the cell biology. Similarly to the phage display technique scarce use of the SELEX process has been used in the probing of parasite–host interaction. In this review, an overall survey on the use of both phage display and aptamer technologies in different pathogenic organisms will

  9. Generation of a mouse scFv library specific for porcine aminopeptidase N using the T7 phage display system.

    PubMed

    Sun, Dongbo; Shi, Hongyan; Chen, Jianfei; Shi, Da; Zhu, Qinghe; Zhang, Hong; Liu, Shengwang; Wang, Yunfeng; Qiu, Huaji; Feng, Li

    2012-06-01

    Porcine aminopeptidase N (pAPN) is a common cellular receptor for swine transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV) and porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV). To investigate single-chain fragment variable (scFv) repertoire against pAPN, the genes encoding the immunoglobulin light chain variable region (VL) and heavy chain variable region (VH) were amplified by reverse transcript polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) using a series of degenerate primers from the spleen of BABL/c mice immunized with native pAPN. The VL and VH amplicons were combined randomly by a 12 amino acid flexible linker by splicing by overlap extension PCR (SOE-PCR), which produced the scFv gene repertoire. After ligation of the scFv gene repertoire into the T7Select10-3b vector, a mouse scFv phage library specific for pAPN was produced through in vitro packaging. The primary scFv library against pAPN contained 2.0×10(7) recombinant phage clones, and the titer of the amplified library was 3.6×10(9)pfu/mL. BstNI restriction analysis and DNA sequencing revealed that 28 phage clones from the primary pAPN scFv library showed excellent diversity. The effectiveness of the scFv library against pAPN was verified further by phage ELISA using the recombinant protein of the pAPN C subunit as coating antigen. The construction and evaluation of a murine scFv library against the common receptor pAPN of porcine coronaviruses TGEV and PEDV using the T7 phage display system are described.

  10. An antibody Fab selected from a recombinant phage display library detects deesterified pectic polysaccharide rhamnogalacturonan II in plant cells.

    PubMed Central

    Williams, M N; Freshour, G; Darvill, A G; Albersheim, P; Hahn, M G

    1996-01-01

    Rhamnogalacturonan II (RG-II) is a structurally complex, low molecular weight pectic polysaccharide that is released from primary cell walls of higher plants by treatment with endopolygalacturonase and is chromatographically purified after alkaline deesterification. A recombinant monovalent antibody fragment (Fab) that specifically recognizes RG-II has been obtained by selection from a phage display library of mouse immunoglobulin genes. By itself, RG-II is not immunogenic. Therefore, mice were immunized with a neoglycoprotein prepared by covalent attachment of RG-II to modified BSA. A cDNA library of the mouse IgG1/kappa antibody repertoire was constructed in the phage display vector pComb3. Selection of antigen-binding phage particles resulted in the isolation of an antibody Fab, CCRC-R1, that binds alkali-treated RG-II with high specificity. CCRC-R1 binds an epitope found primarily at sites proximal to the plasma membrane of suspension-cultured sycamore maple cells. In cells deesterified by alkali, CCRC-R1 labels the entire wall, suggesting that the RG-II epitope recognized by CCRC-R1 is masked by esterification in most of the wall and tha such RG-II esterification is absent near the plasma membrane. PMID:8624441

  11. Identification of a NEP1-35 recognizing peptide that neutralizes CNS myelin inhibition using phage display library.

    PubMed

    Deng, Qiyue; Cai, Wenqin; Li, Shurong; Su, Bingyin

    2013-03-01

    Nogo-A has been identified as an inhibitory molecule to neurite outgrowth after injury in adult mammalian central nervous system (CNS). The C-terminal fragment of Nogo-A, Nogo-66, inhibits axonal regrowth through NgR1 signaling. Residues 1-32 of Nogo-66 cover two regions that contribute most affinity of Nogo-66 to NgR1. It is unclear whether blocking the two regions with specific small ligands could neutralize the inhibition of Nogo-66. Therefore in this study we explored two phage display peptide libraries to screen small peptides that might bind Nogo-66. NEP1-35 containing 1-33 residues of Nogo-66 was taken as the target for panning. We found that phage-borne peptides with stronger affinity to NEP1-35 contained a relatively conserved motif, RRXXXXXXXRRX. Afterwards one identified peptide, NH(2)-RRQTLSHQMRRP-COOH was synthesized and tested in neurite outgrowth assay, in which this small molecule showed moderate ability to neutralize CNS myelin inhibition in vitro. Our results demonstrated that short peptides could act as adaptors to Nogo-66 and neutralize CNS myelin inhibition in vitro. Additionally, the results also suggested that phage display could help to discover novel small molecules with high affinity to CNS regrowth inhibitors, which might be able to promote CNS regeneration with fewer side effects since they could block only the corresponding regions of inhibitors.

  12. Cell adhesion and invasion inhibitory effect of an ovarian cancer targeting peptide selected via phage display in vivo.

    PubMed

    Pu, Ximing; Ma, Chuying; Yin, Guangfu; You, Fei; Wei, Yan

    2014-01-17

    Organ-specific metastasis is of great importance since most of the cancer deaths are caused by spread of the primary cancer to distant sites. Therefore, targeted anti-metastases therapies are needed to prevent cancer cells from metastasizing to different organs. The phage clone pc3-1 displaying peptide WSGPGVWGASVK selected by phage display had been identified which have high binding efficiency and remarkable cell specificity to SK-OV-3 cells. In the present work, the effects of selected cell-binding phage and cognate peptide on the cell adhesion and invasion of targeted cells were investigated. Results showed that the adhesive ability of SK-OV-3 to extracellular matrix was inhibited by pc3-1 and peptide WSGPGVWGASVK, and pc3-1 blocked SK-OV-3 cells attachment more effective than the cognate peptide. The peptide WSGPGVWGASVK suppressed the cell number of SK-OV-3 that attached to HUVECs monolayer up to 24% and could block the spreading of the attaching cells. Forthermore, the cognate peptide could inhibit the invasion of SK-OV-3 significantly. The number of invaded SK-OV-3 cells and invaded SK-OV-3-activated HUVECs pretreated with peptide WSGPGVWGASVK was decreased by 24.3% and 36.6%, respectively. All these results suggested that peptide WSGPGVWGASVK might possess anti-metastasis against SK-OV-3 cells. PMID:24342617

  13. Phage display revisited: Epitope mapping of a monoclonal antibody directed against Neisseria meningitidis adhesin A using the PROFILER technology.

    PubMed

    Cariccio, Veronica Lanza; Domina, Maria; Benfatto, Salvatore; Venza, Mario; Venza, Isabella; Faleri, Agnese; Bruttini, Marco; Bartolini, Erika; Giuliani, Marzia Monica; Santini, Laura; Brunelli, Brunella; Norais, Nathalie; Borgogni, Erica; Midiri, Angelina; Galbo, Roberta; Romeo, Letizia; Biondo, Carmelo; Masignani, Vega; Teti, Giuseppe; Felici, Franco; Beninati, Concetta

    2016-01-01

    There is a strong need for rapid and reliable epitope mapping methods that can keep pace with the isolation of increasingly larger numbers of mAbs. We describe here the identification of a conformational epitope using Phage-based Representation OF ImmunoLigand Epitope Repertoire (PROFILER), a recently developed high-throughput method based on deep sequencing of antigen-specific lambda phage-displayed libraries. A novel bactericidal monoclonal antibody (mAb 9F11) raised against Neisseria meningitidis adhesin A (NadA), an important component of the Bexsero(®) anti-meningococcal vaccine, was used to evaluate the technique in comparison with other epitope mapping methods. The PROFILER technology readily identified NadA fragments that were capable of fully recapitulating the reactivity of the entire antigen against mAb 9F11. Further analysis of these fragments using mutagenesis and hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass-spectrometry allowed us to identify the binding site of mAb 9F11 (A250-D274) and an adjoining sequence (V275-H312) that was also required for the full functional reconstitution of the epitope. These data suggest that, by virtue of its ability to detect a great variety of immunoreactive antigen fragments in phage-displayed libraries, the PROFILER technology can rapidly and reliably identify epitope-containing regions and provide, in addition, useful clues for the functional characterization of conformational mAb epitopes. PMID:26963435

  14. Uses of Phage Display in Agriculture: A Review of Food-Related Protein-Protein Interactions Discovered by Biopanning over Diverse Baits

    PubMed Central

    Kushwaha, Rekha; Payne, Christina M.; Downie, A. Bruce

    2013-01-01

    This review highlights discoveries made using phage display that impact the use of agricultural products. The contribution phage display made to our fundamental understanding of how various protective molecules serve to safeguard plants and seeds from herbivores and microbes is discussed. The utility of phage display for directed evolution of enzymes with enhanced capacities to degrade the complex polymers of the cell wall into molecules useful for biofuel production is surveyed. Food allergies are often directed against components of seeds; this review emphasizes how phage display has been employed to determine the seed component(s) contributing most to the allergenic reaction and how it has played a central role in novel approaches to mitigate patient response. Finally, an overview of the use of phage display in identifying the mature seed proteome protection and repair mechanisms is provided. The identification of specific classes of proteins preferentially bound by such protection and repair proteins leads to hypotheses concerning the importance of safeguarding the translational apparatus from damage during seed quiescence and environmental perturbations during germination. These examples, it is hoped, will spur the use of phage display in future plant science examining protein-ligand interactions. PMID:23710253

  15. Uses of phage display in agriculture: a review of food-related protein-protein interactions discovered by biopanning over diverse baits.

    PubMed

    Kushwaha, Rekha; Payne, Christina M; Downie, A Bruce

    2013-01-01

    This review highlights discoveries made using phage display that impact the use of agricultural products. The contribution phage display made to our fundamental understanding of how various protective molecules serve to safeguard plants and seeds from herbivores and microbes is discussed. The utility of phage display for directed evolution of enzymes with enhanced capacities to degrade the complex polymers of the cell wall into molecules useful for biofuel production is surveyed. Food allergies are often directed against components of seeds; this review emphasizes how phage display has been employed to determine the seed component(s) contributing most to the allergenic reaction and how it has played a central role in novel approaches to mitigate patient response. Finally, an overview of the use of phage display in identifying the mature seed proteome protection and repair mechanisms is provided. The identification of specific classes of proteins preferentially bound by such protection and repair proteins leads to hypotheses concerning the importance of safeguarding the translational apparatus from damage during seed quiescence and environmental perturbations during germination. These examples, it is hoped, will spur the use of phage display in future plant science examining protein-ligand interactions.

  16. PHASTpep: Analysis Software for Discovery of Cell-Selective Peptides via Phage Display and Next-Generation Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Dasa, Siva Sai Krishna; Kelly, Kimberly A.

    2016-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing has enhanced the phage display process, allowing for the quantification of millions of sequences resulting from the biopanning process. In response, many valuable analysis programs focused on specificity and finding targeted motifs or consensus sequences were developed. For targeted drug delivery and molecular imaging, it is also necessary to find peptides that are selective—targeting only the cell type or tissue of interest. We present a new analysis strategy and accompanying software, PHage Analysis for Selective Targeted PEPtides (PHASTpep), which identifies highly specific and selective peptides. Using this process, we discovered and validated, both in vitro and in vivo in mice, two sequences (HTTIPKV and APPIMSV) targeted to pancreatic cancer-associated fibroblasts that escaped identification using previously existing software. Our selectivity analysis makes it possible to discover peptides that target a specific cell type and avoid other cell types, enhancing clinical translatability by circumventing complications with systemic use. PMID:27186887

  17. A new non-muscle-invasive bladder tumor-homing peptide identified by phage display in vivo

    PubMed Central

    YANG, XIAOFENG; ZHANG, FAN; LUO, JUNQIAN; PANG, JIANZHI; YAN, SANHUA; LUO, FANG; LIU, JIEHAO; WANG, WEI; CUI, YONGPING; SU, XIXI

    2016-01-01

    Bladder cancer is common and widespread, and its incidence is increasing. Many new diagnostic methods combined with state-of-the-art technology have been introduced in cystoscopy to collect real-time images of the bladder mucosa for diagnosis, but often miss inconspicuous early-stage tumors. Fluorophore-labeled peptides with high sensitivity and specificity for cancer would be a desirable tool for the detection and treatment of tiny or residual bladder tumors. Phage display and the human non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer cell line BIU-87 were used to identify a peptide. The isolated phage display peptide (CSSPIGRHC, named NYZL1) was tested in vitro for its binding specificity and affinity. Accumulation into xenograft tumors in a nude mouse model was analyzed with FITC-labeled NYZL1. NYZL1, with strong tumor-homing ability, was identified by in vivo phage library selection in the bladder cancer model. The NYZL1 phage and synthetic FITC-labeled NYZL1 peptides bound to tumor tissues and cells, but were hardly detected in normal control organs. Notably, accumulation of FITC-NYZL1 in bladder tumor cells was time-dependent. Biodistribution studies of xenografts of BIU-87 cells showed accumulation of injected FITC-NYZL1 in the tumors, and the bound peptide could not be removed by perfusion after 24 h. The mouse model of bladder tumor showed increased fluorescence intensity in the tumor-bearing bladder in comparison with normal bladder tissues after 4–6 h. In conclusion, NYZL1 may represent a lead peptide structure applicable in the development of optical molecular imaging. PMID:27221614

  18. Two-stage selection of sequences from a random phage display library delineates both core residues and permitted structural range within an epitope.

    PubMed

    Miceli, R M; DeGraaf, M E; Fischer, H D

    1994-01-01

    Libraries of random peptides can be screened to identify species which interact with antibodies or receptors. Similarly, maps of native molecular interactions can frequently be deduced by screening a limited set of peptide fragments derived from sequences within a native antigen or ligand. However, the existence of cross-reactive sequences that mimic original epitopes and the limited replaceability of amino acid residues suggest that the sequence space accessible by a receptor can be much broader. Definition of this space is of particular importance where structural information is required for peptidomimetic or drug design. We have used a two-stage selection scheme to expand the sequence space accessible by a phage display library and to define peptide epitopes of the anti-FLAG octapeptide monoclonal M2 antibody. Affinity selection of a primary library of 2 x 10(6) random decapeptides identified a non-contiguous core of three residues in the binding motif Tyr-Lys-Xaa-Xaa-Asp. A second stage library with 2 x 10(7) individual clones bearing the core motif but with the remaining flanking and internal residues re-randomized permitted access to a broader sequence space represented in a library equivalent to several orders of magnitude larger. Data here demonstrate that extended access to binding sequence space permitted by multi-stage screening of phage display libraries can reveal not only essential residues required for ligand binding, but also the ligand structural range permitted within the receptor binding pocket.

  19. Monoclonal antibody proteomics: use of antibody mimotope displaying phages and the relevant synthetic peptides for mAb scouting.

    PubMed

    Hajdú, István; Flachner, Beáta; Bognár, Melinda; Végh, Barbara M; Dobi, Krisztina; Lőrincz, Zsolt; Lázár, József; Cseh, Sándor; Takács, László; Kurucz, István

    2014-08-01

    Monoclonal antibody proteomics uses nascent libraries or cloned (Plasmascan™, QuantiPlasma™) libraries of mAbs that react with individual epitopes of proteins in the human plasma. At the initial phase of library creation, cognate protein antigen and the epitope interacting with the antibodies are not known. Scouting for monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) with the best binding characteristics is of high importance for mAb based biomarker assay development. However, in the absence of the identity of the cognate antigen the task represents a challenge. We combined phage display, and surface plasmon resonance (Biacore) experiments to test whether specific phages and the respective mimotope peptides obtained from large scale studies are applicable to determine key features of antibodies for scouting. We show here that mAb captured phage-mimotope heterogeneity that is the diversity of the selected peptide sequences, is inversely correlated with an important binding descriptor; the off-rate of the antibodies and that represents clues for driving the selection of useful mAbs for biomarker assay development. Carefully chosen synthetic mimotope peptides are suitable for specificity testing in competitive assays using the target proteome, in our case the human plasma.

  20. Identification of the Pharmacophore of the CC Chemokine-binding Proteins Evasin-1 and -4 Using Phage Display*

    PubMed Central

    Bonvin, Pauline; Dunn, Steven M.; Rousseau, François; Dyer, Douglas P.; Shaw, Jeffrey; Power, Christine A.; Handel, Tracy M.; Proudfoot, Amanda E. I.

    2014-01-01

    To elucidate the ligand-binding surface of the CC chemokine-binding proteins Evasin-1 and Evasin-4, produced by the tick Rhipicephalus sanguineus, we sought to identify the key determinants responsible for their different chemokine selectivities by expressing Evasin mutants using phage display. We first designed alanine mutants based on the Evasin-1·CCL3 complex structure and an in silico model of Evasin-4 bound to CCL3. The mutants were displayed on M13 phage particles, and binding to chemokine was assessed by ELISA. Selected variants were then produced as purified proteins and characterized by surface plasmon resonance analysis and inhibition of chemotaxis. The method was validated by confirming the importance of Phe-14 and Trp-89 to the inhibitory properties of Evasin-1 and led to the identification of a third crucial residue, Asn-88. Two amino acids, Glu-16 and Tyr-19, were identified as key residues for binding and inhibition of Evasin-4. In a parallel approach, we identified one clone (Y28Q/N60D) that showed a clear reduction in binding to CCL3, CCL5, and CCL8. It therefore appears that Evasin-1 and -4 use different pharmacophores to bind CC chemokines, with the principal binding occurring through the C terminus of Evasin-1, but through the N-terminal region of Evasin-4. However, both proteins appear to target chemokine N termini, presumably because these domains are key to receptor signaling. The results also suggest that phage display may offer a useful approach for rapid investigation of the pharmacophores of small inhibitory binding proteins. PMID:25266725

  1. Development of single chain variable fragment (scFv) antibodies against Xylella fastidiosa subsp. pauca by phage display.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Qing; Jordan, Ramon; Brlansky, Ronald H; Istomina, Olga; Hartung, John

    2015-10-01

    Xylella fastidiosa is a member of the gamma proteobacteria. It is fastidious, insect-vectored and xylem-limited and causes a variety of diseases, some severe, on a wide range of economically important perennial crops, including grape and citrus. Antibody based detection assays are commercially available for X. fastidiosa, and are effective at the species, but not at the subspecies level. We have made a library of scFv antibody fragments directed against X. fastidiosa subsp. pauca strain 9a5c (citrus) by using phage display technology. Antibody gene repertoires were PCR-amplified using 23 primers for the heavy chain variable region (V(H)) and 21 primers for the light chain variable region (V(L)). The V(H) and V(L) were joined by overlap extension PCR, and then the genes of the scFv library were ligated into the phage vector pKM19. The library contained 1.2×10(7) independent clones with full-length scFv inserts. In each of 3cycles of affinity-selection with 9a5c, about 1.0×10(12) phage were used for panning with 4.1×10(6), 7.1×10(6), 2.1×10(7) phage recovered after the first, second and third cycles, respectively. Sixty-six percent of clones from the final library bound X. fastidiosa 9a5c in an ELISA. Some of these scFv antibodies recognized strain 9a5c and did not recognize X. fastidiosa strains that cause Pierce's disease of grapevine.

  2. Identification of high-affinity VEGFR3-binding peptides through a phage-displayed random peptide library

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yan; Li, Cai-Yun

    2015-01-01

    Objective Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) interaction with its receptor, VEGFR-3/Flt-4, regulates lymphangiogenesis. VEGFR-3/Flt-4 expression in cancer cells has been correlated with clinical stage, lymph node metastasis, and lymphatic invasion. The objective of this study is to identify a VEGFR-3/Flt-4-interacting peptide that could be used to inhibit VEGFR-3 for ovarian cancer therapy. Methods The extracellular fragment of recombinant human VEGFR-3/Flt-4 (rhVEGFR-3/Flt-4) fused with coat protein pIII was screened against a phage-displayed random peptide library. Using affinity enrichment and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) screening, positive clones of phages were amplified. Three phage clones were selected after four rounds of biopanning, and the specific binding of the peptides to rhVEGFR-3 was detected by ELISA and compared with that of VEGF-D. Immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence analyses of ovarian cancer tissue sections was undertaken to demonstrate the specificity of the peptides. Results After four rounds of biopanning, ELISA confirmed the specificity of the enriched bound phage clones for rhVEGFR-3. Sequencing and translation identified three different peptides. Non-competitive ELISA revealed that peptides I, II, and III had binding affinities for VEGFR-3 with Kaff (affinity constant) of 16.4±8.6 µg/mL (n=3), 9.2±2.1 µg/mL (n=3), and 174.8±31.1 µg/mL (n=3), respectively. In ovarian carcinoma tissue sections, peptide III (WHWLPNLRHYAS), which had the greatest binding affinity, also co-localized with VEGFR-3 in endothelial cells lining lymphatic vessels; its labeling of ovarian tumors in vivo was also confirmed. Conclusion These finding showed that peptide III has high specificity and activity and, therefore, may represent a potential therapeutic approach to target VEGF-VEGFR-3 signaling for the treatment or diagnosis of ovarian cancer. PMID:26197772

  3. Development of single chain variable fragment (scFv) antibodies against Xylella fastidiosa subsp. pauca by phage display.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Qing; Jordan, Ramon; Brlansky, Ronald H; Istomina, Olga; Hartung, John

    2015-10-01

    Xylella fastidiosa is a member of the gamma proteobacteria. It is fastidious, insect-vectored and xylem-limited and causes a variety of diseases, some severe, on a wide range of economically important perennial crops, including grape and citrus. Antibody based detection assays are commercially available for X. fastidiosa, and are effective at the species, but not at the subspecies level. We have made a library of scFv antibody fragments directed against X. fastidiosa subsp. pauca strain 9a5c (citrus) by using phage display technology. Antibody gene repertoires were PCR-amplified using 23 primers for the heavy chain variable region (V(H)) and 21 primers for the light chain variable region (V(L)). The V(H) and V(L) were joined by overlap extension PCR, and then the genes of the scFv library were ligated into the phage vector pKM19. The library contained 1.2×10(7) independent clones with full-length scFv inserts. In each of 3cycles of affinity-selection with 9a5c, about 1.0×10(12) phage were used for panning with 4.1×10(6), 7.1×10(6), 2.1×10(7) phage recovered after the first, second and third cycles, respectively. Sixty-six percent of clones from the final library bound X. fastidiosa 9a5c in an ELISA. Some of these scFv antibodies recognized strain 9a5c and did not recognize X. fastidiosa strains that cause Pierce's disease of grapevine. PMID:26232710

  4. Construction, exploitation and evolution of a new peptide library displayed at high density by fusion to the major coat protein of filamentous phage.

    PubMed

    Iannolo, G; Minenkova, O; Gonfloni, S; Castagnoli, L; Cesareni, G

    1997-06-01

    The amino-terminus of the major coat protein (PVIII) of filamentous phage can be extended, up to 6-7 residues, without interfering with the phage life cycle. We have constructed a library of approximately ten millions different phage each displaying a different octapeptide joined to the amino-terminus of the 2700 copies of PVIII. Most of the resulting clones are able to produce infective particles. This molecular repertoire constituted by the periodic regular decoration of the phage filament surface, can be utilized to search elements that bind proteins or relatively small organic molecules like the textile dye Cibacron blue. By sequential growth cycles we have performed a library evolution experiment to select phage clones that have a growth advantage in the absence of any requirement for binding a specific target. The consensus of the best growers reveals a Pro rich sequence with large hydrophobic residues at position 7 and Asn at position 1 of the random peptide insert. We propose that the assembly secretion process is favoured in phages displaying this family of peptides since they fit the groove between two adjacent PVIII subunits by making advantageous molecular contacts on the phage surface. PMID:9224932

  5. An efficient method for variable region assembly in the construction of scFv phage display libraries using independent strand amplification.

    PubMed

    Sotelo, Pablo; Collazo, Noberto; Zuñiga, Roberto; Gutiérrez-González, Matías; Catalán, Diego; Ribeiro, Carolina Hager; Aguillón, Juan Carlos; Molina, María Carmen

    2012-01-01

    Phage display library technology is a common method to produce human antibodies. In this technique, the immunoglobulin variable regions are displayed in a bacteriophage in a way that each filamentous virus displays the product of a single antibody gene on its surface. From the collection of different phages, it is possible to isolate the virus that recognizes specific targets. The most common form in which to display antibody variable regions in the phage is the single chain variable fragment format (scFv), which requires assembly of the heavy and light immunoglobulin variable regions in a single gene. In this work, we describe a simple and efficient method for the assembly of immunoglobulin heavy and light chain variable regions in a scFv format. This procedure involves a two-step reaction: (1) DNA amplification to produce the single strand form of the heavy or light chain gene required for the fusion; and (2) mixture of both single strand products followed by an assembly reaction to construct a complete scFv gene. Using this method, we produced 6-fold more scFv encoding DNA than the commonly used splicing by overlap extension PCR (SOE-PCR) approach. The scFv gene produced by this method also proved to be efficient in generating a diverse scFv phage display library. From this scFv library, we obtained phages that bound several non-related antigens, including recombinant proteins and rotavirus particles.

  6. Membrane dipeptidase is the receptor for a lung-targeting peptide identified by in vivo phage display.

    PubMed

    Rajotte, D; Ruoslahti, E

    1999-04-23

    In vivo phage display is a powerful method to study organ- and tissue-specific vascular addresses. Using this approach, peptides capable of tissue-specific homing can be identified by performing a selection for that trait in vivo. We recently showed that the CGFECVRQCPERC (termed GFE-1) peptide can selectively bind to mouse lung vasculature after an intravenous injection. Our aim in the present study was to identify the receptor for this lung-homing peptide. By using affinity chromatography, we isolated a 55-kDa lung cell-surface protein that selectively binds to the GFE-1 peptide. Protein sequencing established the identity of the receptor as membrane dipeptidase (MDP), a cell-surface zinc metalloprotease involved in the metabolism of glutathione, leukotriene D4, and certain beta-lactam antibiotics. Phage particles displaying the GFE-1 peptide selectively bind to COS-1 cells transfected with the murine MDP cDNA. Moreover, the synthetic GFE-1 peptide could inhibit MDP activity. By establishing MDP as the receptor for the GFE-1 peptide, our results suggest potential applications for both MDP and the GFE-1 peptide in delivery of compounds to the lungs. This work also demonstrates that cell-surface proteases can be involved in tissue-specific homing.

  7. Specific phage-displayed peptides discriminate different forms of neurocysticercosis by antibody detection in the serum samples.

    PubMed

    Manhani, M N; Ribeiro, V S; Cardoso, R; Ueira-Vieira, C; Goulart, L R; Costa-Cruz, J M

    2011-06-01

    Neurocysticercosis (NC), caused by Taenia solium metacestode, infects the central nervous system and is a devastating parasitic infection. Diagnosis is based on symptoms, imaging, serology and epidemiology. Current markers present variable sensitivity and specificity, frequent cross-reactions and are not able to discriminate NC clinical forms. The aim of this study was to select mimotopes of T. solium metacestode antigens that may be used in NC immunodiagnosis, specifically to discriminate between active and inactive forms. A random peptide phage display library was screened against IgY from chickens immunized with total saline extract from T. solium metacestodes and validated against 110 serum samples, classified into active NC (18), inactive NC (22), cross-reactive parasitic diseases (40) and healthy controls (30). We have successfully selected seven peptides with significant immunoreactivity to IgG of NC patients, with sensitivity ranging from 95.5% to 100% to detect the inactive form and specificity varied from 85.7% to 94.3%. One phage-displayed peptide (Cc48) can be directly used as biomarker to distinguish inactive from active forms with an accuracy of 95.7%, and this novel mimotope may also be used as an auxiliary tool to neuroimaging tests and treatment follow-up.

  8. Generation of Potent Anti-Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Neutralizing Antibodies from Mouse Phage Display Library for Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Yan-Da; Wu, Yen-Yu; Tsai, Yi-Jiue; Tsai, Yi-San; Lin, Yu-Ying; Lai, Szu-Liang; Huang, Chao-Yang; Lok, Ying-Yung; Hu, Chih-Yung; Lai, Jiann-Shiun

    2016-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is an important stimulator for angiogenesis in solid tumors. Blocking VEGF activity is an effective therapeutic strategy to inhibit tumor growth and metastasis. Avastin, a humanized monoclonal antibody recognizes VEGF, has been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration. To generate potential VEGF-recognizing antibodies with better tumor regression ability than that of Avastin, we have designed a systematic antibody selection plan. From mice immunized with recombinant human VEGF, we generated three phage display libraries, scFv-M13KO7, Fab-M13KO7, and scFv-Hyperphage, in single-chain Fv (scFv) or Fab format, displayed using either M13KO7 helper phage or Hyperphage. Solid-phase and solution-phase selection strategies were then applied to each library, generating six panning combinations. A total of sixty-four antibodies recognizing VEGF were obtained. Based on the results of epitope mapping, binding affinity, and biological functions in tumor inhibition, eight antibodies were chosen to examine their abilities in tumor regression in a mouse xenograft model using human COLO 205 cancer cells. Three of them showed improvement in the inhibition of tumor growth (328%–347% tumor growth ratio (% of Day 0 tumor volume) on Day 21 vs. 435% with Avastin). This finding suggests a potential use of these three antibodies for VEGF-targeted therapy. PMID:26861297

  9. Specific probe selection from landscape phage display library and its application in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay of free prostate-specific antigen.

    PubMed

    Lang, Qiaolin; Wang, Fei; Yin, Long; Liu, Mingjun; Petrenko, Valery A; Liu, Aihua

    2014-03-01

    Probes against targets can be selected from the landscape phage library f8/8, displaying random octapeptides on the pVIII coat protein of the phage fd-tet and demonstrating many excellent features including multivalency, stability, and high structural homogeneity. Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) is usually determined by immunoassay, by which antibodies are frequently used as the specific probes. Herein we found that more advanced probes against free prostate-specific antigen (f-PSA) can be screened from the landscape phage library. Four phage monoclones were selected and identified by the specificity array. One phage clone displaying the fusion peptide ERNSVSPS showed good specificity and affinity to f-PSA and was used as a PSA capture probe in a sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) array. An anti-human PSA monoclonal antibody (anti-PSA mAb) was used to recognize the captured antigen, followed by horseradish peroxidase-conjugated antibody (HRP-IgG) and o-phenylenediamine, which were successively added to develop plate color. The ELISA conditions such as effect of blocking agent, coating buffer pH, phage concentration, antigen incubation time, and anti-PSA mAb dilution for phage ELISA were optimized. On the basis of the optimal phage ELISA conditions, the absorbance taken at 492 nm on a microplate reader was linear with f-PSA concentration within 0.825-165 ng/mL with a low limit of detection of 0.16 ng/mL. Thus, the landscape phage is an attractive biomolecular probe in bioanalysis.

  10. Human antibody fragments specific for the epidermal growth factor receptor selected from large non-immunised phage display libraries.

    PubMed

    Souriau, Christelle; Rothacker, Julie; Hoogenboom, Hennie R; Nice, Edouard

    2004-09-01

    Antibodies to EGFR have been shown to display anti-tumour effects mediated in part by inhibition of cellular proliferation and angiogenesis, and by enhancement of apoptosis. Humanised antibodies are preferred for clinical use to reduce complications with HAMA and HAHA responses frequently seen with murine and chimaeric antibodies. We have used depletion and subtractive selection strategies on cells expressing the EGFR to sample two large antibody fragment phage display libraries for the presence of human antibodies which are specific for the EGFR. Four Fab fragments and six scFv fragments were identified, with affinities of up to 2.2nM as determined by BIAcore analysis using global fitting of the binding curves to obtain the individual rate constants (ka and kd). This overall approach offers a generic screening method for the identification of growth factor specific antibodies and antibody fragments from large expression libraries and has potential for the rapid development of new therapeutic and diagnostic reagents.

  11. Selection of phage-displayed human antibody fragments on Dengue virus particles captured by a monoclonal antibody: application to the four serotypes.

    PubMed

    Cabezas, Sheila; Rojas, Gertrudis; Pavon, Alequis; Alvarez, Mayling; Pupo, Maritza; Guillen, Gerardo; Guzman, Maria G

    2008-02-01

    Antibody fragments to the four Dengue virus serotypes were isolated from a human universal naïve library using phage display technology. Phage-displayed antibody fragments were selected on Dengue virus particles directly captured from infected Vero cells supernatant by an anti-dengue monoclonal antibody, in order to avoid laborious virus concentration/purification procedures. A total of nine phage-displayed antibody fragments were obtained. Seven of them were highly specific for three of the selector serotypes (two for Dengue 1, four for Dengue 3 and one for Dengue 4). One clone (Dengue 3-selected) cross-reacted with Dengue 1, whereas another (selected with Dengue 2) cross-reacted with the three remaining serotypes. The soluble variants of six antibody fragments recognized their target viruses when used at nanomolar and even subnanomolar concentrations. All phage-displayed antibody fragments were cross-reactive against several strains of distinct genotypes within the corresponding serotype(s). These antibody fragments are potentially useful for the future development of tools for viral diagnosis and serotype identification. The simple phage selection method on captured virus could be applied in a high throughput way to obtain larger panels of antibody fragments to Dengue virus for multiple applications.

  12. Phage-displayed antibody fragments recognizing dengue 3 and dengue 4 viruses as tools for viral serotyping in sera from infected individuals.

    PubMed

    Cabezas, Sheila; Rojas, Gertrudis; Pavon, Alequis; Bernardo, Lidice; Castellanos, Yinet; Alvarez, Mayling; Pupo, Maritza; Guillen, Gerardo; Guzman, Maria G

    2009-01-01

    The current study shows the usefulness of dengue-3- and dengue-4-specific phage-displayed antibody fragments as tools for viral detection and serotyping in sera from infected individuals. C6/36 HT cells were inoculated with acute-phase sera from patients, and supernatants were collected daily and analyzed by ELISA using phage-displayed antibody fragments as serotype-specific detector reagents. Serotyping of most samples was possible as early as two to three days postinoculation. Results were comparable with those obtained by indirect immunofluorescence assay but were obtained in a shorter period of time (<1 week). Phage-displayed antibody fragments were better tools for diagnosis and serotyping than their soluble counterparts. Our approach combines the advantages of viral isolation and ELISA techniques. These results could be the basis for the development of a high-throughput method for identifying dengue virus serotypes, which is crucial for the management and control of the disease.

  13. Mapping polyclonal antibody responses to bacterial infection using next generation phage display.

    PubMed

    Naqid, Ibrahim A; Owen, Jonathan P; Maddison, Ben C; Spiliotopoulos, Anastasios; Emes, Richard D; Warry, Andrew; Tchórzewska, Monika A; Martelli, Francesca; Gosling, Rebecca J; Davies, Robert H; La Ragione, Roberto M; Gough, Kevin C

    2016-01-01

    Mapping polyclonal antibody responses to infectious diseases to identify individual epitopes has the potential to underpin the development of novel serological assays and vaccines. Here, phage-peptide library panning coupled with screening using next generation sequencing was used to map antibody responses to bacterial infections. In the first instance, pigs experimentally infected with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium was investigated. IgG samples from twelve infected pigs were probed in parallel and phage binding compared to that with equivalent IgG from pre-infected animals. Seventy-seven peptide mimotopes were enriched specifically against sera from multiple infected animals. Twenty-seven of these peptides were tested in ELISA and twenty-two were highly discriminatory for sera taken from pigs post-infection (P < 0.05) indicating that these peptides are mimicking epitopes from the bacteria. In order to further test this methodology, it was applied to differentiate antibody responses in poultry to infections with distinct serovars of Salmonella enterica. Twenty-seven peptides were identified as being enriched specifically against IgY from multiple animals infected with S. Enteritidis compared to those infected with S. Hadar. Nine of fifteen peptides tested in ELISA were highly discriminatory for IgY following S. Enteritidis infection (p < 0.05) compared to infections with S. Hadar or S. Typhimurium. PMID:27072017

  14. Functional characterization of a monoclonal antibody epitope using a lambda phage display-deep sequencing platform

    PubMed Central

    Domina, Maria; Lanza Cariccio, Veronica; Benfatto, Salvatore; Venza, Mario; Venza, Isabella; Borgogni, Erica; Castellino, Flora; Midiri, Angelina; Galbo, Roberta; Romeo, Letizia; Biondo, Carmelo; Masignani, Vega; Teti, Giuseppe; Felici, Franco; Beninati, Concetta

    2016-01-01

    We have recently described a method, named PROFILER, for the identification of antigenic regions preferentially targeted by polyclonal antibody responses after vaccination. To test the ability of the technique to provide insights into the functional properties of monoclonal antibody (mAb) epitopes, we used here a well-characterized epitope of meningococcal factor H binding protein (fHbp), which is recognized by mAb 12C1. An fHbp library, engineered on a lambda phage vector enabling surface expression of polypeptides of widely different length, was subjected to massive parallel sequencing of the phage inserts after affinity selection with the 12C1 mAb. We detected dozens of unique antibody-selected sequences, the most enriched of which (designated as FrC) could largely recapitulate the ability of fHbp to bind mAb 12C1. Computational analysis of the cumulative enrichment of single amino acids in the antibody-selected fragments identified two overrepresented stretches of residues (H248-K254 and S140-G154), whose presence was subsequently found to be required for binding of FrC to mAb 12C1. Collectively, these results suggest that the PROFILER technology can rapidly and reliably identify, in the context of complex conformational epitopes, discrete “hot spots” with a crucial role in antigen-antibody interactions, thereby providing useful clues for the functional characterization of the epitope. PMID:27530334

  15. Mapping polyclonal antibody responses to bacterial infection using next generation phage display

    PubMed Central

    Naqid, Ibrahim A.; Owen, Jonathan P.; Maddison, Ben C.; Spiliotopoulos, Anastasios; Emes, Richard D.; Warry, Andrew; Tchórzewska, Monika A.; Martelli, Francesca; Gosling, Rebecca J.; Davies, Robert H.; La Ragione, Roberto M.; Gough, Kevin C.

    2016-01-01

    Mapping polyclonal antibody responses to infectious diseases to identify individual epitopes has the potential to underpin the development of novel serological assays and vaccines. Here, phage-peptide library panning coupled with screening using next generation sequencing was used to map antibody responses to bacterial infections. In the first instance, pigs experimentally infected with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium was investigated. IgG samples from twelve infected pigs were probed in parallel and phage binding compared to that with equivalent IgG from pre-infected animals. Seventy-seven peptide mimotopes were enriched specifically against sera from multiple infected animals. Twenty-seven of these peptides were tested in ELISA and twenty-two were highly discriminatory for sera taken from pigs post-infection (P < 0.05) indicating that these peptides are mimicking epitopes from the bacteria. In order to further test this methodology, it was applied to differentiate antibody responses in poultry to infections with distinct serovars of Salmonella enterica. Twenty-seven peptides were identified as being enriched specifically against IgY from multiple animals infected with S. Enteritidis compared to those infected with S. Hadar. Nine of fifteen peptides tested in ELISA were highly discriminatory for IgY following S. Enteritidis infection (p < 0.05) compared to infections with S. Hadar or S. Typhimurium. PMID:27072017

  16. Identification of a novel peptide ligand targeting visceral adipose tissue via transdermal route by in vivo phage display.

    PubMed

    Lee, Nam Kyung; Kim, Hong Shin; Kim, Kyung Hyun; Kim, Eun-Bae; Cho, Chong Su; Kang, Sang Kee; Choi, Yun Jaie

    2011-11-01

    To find novel peptide ligands targeting visceral adipose tissue (visceral fat) via transdermal route, in vivo phage display screening was conducted by dermal administration of a phage-peptide library to rats and a peptide sequence, CGLHPAFQC (designated as TDA1), was identified as a targeting ligand to visceral adipose tissue through the consecutive transdermal biopannings. Adipocyte-specific affinity and transdermal activity of the TDA1 were validated in vitro and targeting ability of the dermally administered TDA1 to visceral adipose tissue was also confirmed in vivo. TDA1 was effectively translocated into systemic circulation after dermal administration and selectively targeted visceral adipose tissue without any preference to other organs tested. Fluorescent microscopic analysis revealed that the TDA1 could be specifically localized in the hair follicles of the skin, as well as in the visceral adipose tissue. Thus, we inferred that dermally administered TDA1 would first access systemic circulation via hair follicles as its transdermal route and then could target visceral fat effectively. The overall results suggest that the TDA1 peptide could be potentially applied as a homing moiety for delivery of anti-obesity therapeutics to visceral fat through the convenient transdermal pathway. PMID:21999821

  17. Generation and Validation of a Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 Clone Set for Protein Expression and Phage Display

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaohu; Petrosino, Joseph; Hemphill, Lisa; Wan, Xiufeng; Leaphart, Adam B.; Weinstock, George M.; Palzkill, Timothy; Zhou, Jizhong

    2008-01-01

    A comprehensive gene collection for S. oneidensis was constructed using the lambda recombinase (Gateway) cloning system. A total of 3584 individual ORFs (85%) have been successfully cloned into the entry plasmids. To validate the use of the clone set, three sets of ORFs were examined within three different destination vectors constructed in this study. Success rates for heterologous protein expression of S. oneidensis His- or His/GST- tagged proteins in E. coli were approximately 70%. The ArcA and NarP transcription factor proteins were tested in an in vitro binding assay to demonstrate that functional proteins can be successfully produced using the clone set. Further functional validation of the clone set was obtained from phage display experiments in which a phage encoding thioredoxin was successfully isolated from a pool of 80 different clones after three rounds of biopanning using immobilized anti-thioredoxin antibody as a target. This clone set complements existing genomic (e.g., whole-genome microarray) and other proteomic tools (e.g., mass spectrometry-based proteomic analysis), and facilitates a wide variety of integrated studies, including protein expression, purification, and functional analyses of proteins both in vivo and in vitro. PMID:18714347

  18. Identification of a novel peptide ligand targeting visceral adipose tissue via transdermal route by in vivo phage display.

    PubMed

    Lee, Nam Kyung; Kim, Hong Shin; Kim, Kyung Hyun; Kim, Eun-Bae; Cho, Chong Su; Kang, Sang Kee; Choi, Yun Jaie

    2011-11-01

    To find novel peptide ligands targeting visceral adipose tissue (visceral fat) via transdermal route, in vivo phage display screening was conducted by dermal administration of a phage-peptide library to rats and a peptide sequence, CGLHPAFQC (designated as TDA1), was identified as a targeting ligand to visceral adipose tissue through the consecutive transdermal biopannings. Adipocyte-specific affinity and transdermal activity of the TDA1 were validated in vitro and targeting ability of the dermally administered TDA1 to visceral adipose tissue was also confirmed in vivo. TDA1 was effectively translocated into systemic circulation after dermal administration and selectively targeted visceral adipose tissue without any preference to other organs tested. Fluorescent microscopic analysis revealed that the TDA1 could be specifically localized in the hair follicles of the skin, as well as in the visceral adipose tissue. Thus, we inferred that dermally administered TDA1 would first access systemic circulation via hair follicles as its transdermal route and then could target visceral fat effectively. The overall results suggest that the TDA1 peptide could be potentially applied as a homing moiety for delivery of anti-obesity therapeutics to visceral fat through the convenient transdermal pathway.

  19. Small regulatory RNAs in lambdoid bacteriophages and phage-derived plasmids: Not only antisense.

    PubMed

    Nejman-Faleńczyk, Bożena; Bloch, Sylwia; Licznerska, Katarzyna; Felczykowska, Agnieszka; Dydecka, Aleksandra; Węgrzyn, Alicja; Węgrzyn, Grzegorz

    2015-03-01

    Until recently, only two small regulatory RNAs encoded by lambdoid bacteriophages were known. These transcripts are derived from paQ and pO promoters. The former one is supposed to act as an antisense RNA for expression of the Q gene, encoding a transcription antitermination protein. The latter transcript, called oop RNA, was initially proposed to have a double role, in establishing expression of the cI gene and in providing a primer for DNA replication. Although the initially proposed mechanisms by which oop RNA could influence the choice between two alternative developmental pathways of the phage and the initiation of phage DNA replication were found not true, the pO promoter has been demonstrated to be important for both regulation of phage development and control of DNA replication. Namely, the pO-derived transcript is an antisense RNA for expression of the cII gene, and pO is a part of a dual promoter system responsible for regulation of initiation of DNA synthesis from the oriλ region. Very recent studies identified a battery of small RNAs encoded by lambdoid bacteriophages existing as prophages in chromosomes of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli strains. Some of them have very interesting functions, like anti-small RNAs.

  20. Novel β-lactamase-random peptide fusion libraries for phage display selection of cancer cell-targeting agents suitable for enzyme prodrug therapy

    PubMed Central

    Shukla, Girja S.; Krag, David N.

    2010-01-01

    Novel phage-displayed random linear dodecapeptide (X12) and cysteine-constrained decapeptide (CX10C) libraries constructed in fusion to the amino-terminus of P99 β-lactamase molecules were used for identifying β-lactamase-linked cancer cell-specific ligands. The size and quality of both libraries were comparable to the standards of other reported phage display systems. Using the single-round panning method based on phage DNA recovery, we identified severalβ-lactamase fusion peptides that specifically bind to live human breast cancer MDA-MB-361 cells. The β-lactamase fusion to the peptides helped in conducting the enzyme activity-based clone normalization and cell-binding screening in a very time- and cost-efficient manner. The methods were suitable for 96-well readout as well as microscopic imaging. The success of the biopanning was indicated by the presence of ~40% cancer cell-specific clones among recovered phages. One of the binding clones appeared multiple times. The cancer cell-binding fusion peptides also shared several significant motifs. This opens a new way of preparing and selecting phage display libraries. The cancer cell-specific β-lactamase-linked affinity reagents selected from these libraries can be used for any application that requires a reporter for tracking the ligand molecules. Furthermore, these affinity reagents have also a potential for their direct use in the targeted enzyme prodrug therapy of cancer. PMID:19751096

  1. Epitope Analysis of Cerebrospinal Fluid IgG in Japanese Multiple Sclerosis Patients Using Phage Display Method

    PubMed Central

    Fujimori, Juichi; Nakashima, Ichiro; Fujihara, Kazuo; Misu, Tatsuro; Sato, Shigeru; Itoyama, Yasuto

    2011-01-01

    To investigate the antigen recognized by cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) high affinity IgG in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS), the phage display method was applied to the CSF from 15 MS and 10 control patients. Peptide sequences recognized by MS and control CSF IgG were individual specific, and no common motif was found. Peptide sequences frequently showed homology to various kinds of amino acid sequences of ubiquitous viruses such as epstein barr virus (EBV) and herpes simplex virus (HSV), although the frequency was not specific to MS patients. MS CSF IgG may recognize various types of ubiquitous viral antigen and may be increased by a bystander response. PMID:22132333

  2. P7, a novel antagonist of corticotropin releasing factor receptor type 1 (CRFR1) screened from phage display library.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jinmei; Zhuo, Rengong; Peng, Peng; Liu, Xiaoyan; Yan, Haitao; Zhang, Shuzhuo; Zheng, Jianquan; Wei, Xiaoli; Ma, Xiaoyun

    2015-07-31

    The corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) plays a central role in regulating the activities of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis in the presence of a variety of stressful stimuli via binding to its type 1 receptors (CRFR1). Despite that many peptidic or non-peptidic antagonists of CRFR1 have been developed to serve as therapeutic tools to CRF-related pathologies, none of them have been utilized clinically. Targeting the extracellular domain 1 (EC1) of CRFR1, the CRF-binding site, represents a new strategy to inhibit the function of the receptor. However, no such agents have been identified up to now. Herein, by using an 87-amino acid fragment corresponding to the EC1 region as the bait, we screened the binding polypeptides from a phage display (Ph.D.-12) peptide library. After 3-round biopanning, positive clones were selected and the polypeptides carried by them were identified. 5 polypeptides were found to bind with the target specifically. Among them, the P7 exhibited the highest affinity. By evaluating the cAMP accumulation in the CRFR1 or CRFR2-expressing HEK293 cells, we demonstrated that P7 blocking the function of CRFR1, but not CRFR2. In addition, we also found that P7 and CRF act on CRFR1 competitively. Taken together, we reveal that P7, a novel polypeptide identified from phage display library, inhibits the function of CRFR1 effectively and specifically by binding at its EC1 domain. The new polypeptide might provide a promising agent for diagnostic or therapeutic utilities in CRF-related disorders.

  3. DARPins recognizing the tumor-associated antigen EpCAM selected by phage and ribosome display and engineered for multivalency.

    PubMed

    Stefan, Nikolas; Martin-Killias, Patricia; Wyss-Stoeckle, Sascha; Honegger, Annemarie; Zangemeister-Wittke, Uwe; Plückthun, Andreas

    2011-11-01

    Designed Ankyrin Repeat Proteins (DARPins) represent a novel class of binding molecules. Their favorable biophysical properties such as high affinity, stability and expression yields make them ideal candidates for tumor targeting. Here, we describe the selection of DARPins specific for the tumor-associated antigen epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM), an approved therapeutic target on solid tumors. We selected DARPins from combinatorial libraries by both phage display and ribosome display and compared their binding on tumor cells. By further rounds of random mutagenesis and ribosome display selection, binders with picomolar affinity were obtained that were entirely monomeric and could be expressed at high yields in the cytoplasm of Escherichia coli. One of the binders, denoted Ec1, bound to EpCAM with picomolar affinity (K(d)=68 pM), and another selected DARPin (Ac2) recognized a different epitope on EpCAM. Through the use of a variety of bivalent and tetravalent arrangements with these DARPins, the off-rate on cells was further improved by up to 47-fold. All EpCAM-specific DARPins were efficiently internalized by receptor-mediated endocytosis, which is essential for intracellular delivery of anticancer agents to tumor cells. Thus, using EpCAM as a target, we provide evidence that DARPins can be conveniently selected and rationally engineered to high-affinity binders of various formats for tumor targeting.

  4. A novel in vivo method for isolating antibodies from a phage display library by neuronal retrograde transport selectively yields antibodies against p75(NTR.).

    PubMed

    Tani, Hiroaki; Osbourn, Jane K; Walker, Edward H; Rush, Robert A; Ferguson, Ian A

    2013-01-01

    The neurotrophin receptor p75(NTR) is utilized by a variety of pathogens to gain entry into the central nervous system (CNS). We tested if this entry portal might be exploited using a phage display library to isolate internalizing antibodies that target the CNS in vivo. By applying a phage library that expressed human single chain variable fragment (scFv) antibodies on their surface to a transected sciatic nerve, we showed that (1) phage conjugated to anti-p75(NTR) antibody or phage scFv library pre-panned against p75(NTR) are internalized by neurons expressing p75(NTR); (2) subsequent retrograde axonal transport separates internalized phage from the applied phage; and, (3) internalized phage can be recovered from a proximal ligature made on a nerve. This approach resulted in 13-fold increase in the number of phage isolated from the injured nerve compared with the starting population, and isolation of 18 unique internalizing p75(NTR) antibodies that were transported from the peripheral nerve into the spinal cord, through the blood-brain barrier. In addition, antibodies recognizing other potentially internalized antigens were identified through in vivo selection using a fully diverse library. Because p75(NTR) expression is upregulated in motor neurons in response to injury and in disease, the p75(NTR) antibodies may have substantial potential for cell-targeted drug/gene delivery. In addition, this novel selection method provides the potential to generate panels of antibodies that could be used to identify further internalization targets, which could aid drug delivery across the blood-brain barrier.

  5. Fast and Sequence-Specific Palladium-Mediated Cross-Coupling Reaction Identified from Phage Display

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Fast and specific bioorthogonal reactions are highly desirable because they provide efficient tracking of biomolecules that are present in low abundance and/or involved in fast dynamic process in living systems. Toward this end, classic strategy involves the optimization of substrate structures and reaction conditions in test tubes, testing their compatibility with biological systems, devising synthetic biology schemes to introduce the modified substrates into living cells or organisms, and finally validating the superior kinetics for enhanced capacity in tracking biomolecules in vivo—a lengthy process often mired by unexpected results. Here, we report a streamlined approach in which the “microenvironment” of a bioorthogonal chemical reporter is exploited directly in biological systems via phage-assisted interrogation of reactivity (PAIR) to optimize not only reaction kinetics but also specificity. Using the PAIR strategy, we identified a short alkyne-containing peptide sequence showing fast kinetics (k2 = 13 000 ± 2000 M–1 s–1) in a palladium-mediated cross-coupling reaction. Site-directed mutagenesis studies suggested that the residues surrounding the alkyne moiety facilitate the assembly of a key palladium–alkyne intermediate along the reaction pathway. When this peptide sequence was inserted into the extracellular domain of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), this reactive sequence directed the specific labeling of EGFR in live mammalian cells. PMID:25025771

  6. Fast and sequence-specific palladium-mediated cross-coupling reaction identified from phage display.

    PubMed

    Lim, Reyna K V; Li, Nan; Ramil, Carlo P; Lin, Qing

    2014-09-19

    Fast and specific bioorthogonal reactions are highly desirable because they provide efficient tracking of biomolecules that are present in low abundance and/or involved in fast dynamic process in living systems. Toward this end, classic strategy involves the optimization of substrate structures and reaction conditions in test tubes, testing their compatibility with biological systems, devising synthetic biology schemes to introduce the modified substrates into living cells or organisms, and finally validating the superior kinetics for enhanced capacity in tracking biomolecules in vivo--a lengthy process often mired by unexpected results. Here, we report a streamlined approach in which the "microenvironment" of a bioorthogonal chemical reporter is exploited directly in biological systems via phage-assisted interrogation of reactivity (PAIR) to optimize not only reaction kinetics but also specificity. Using the PAIR strategy, we identified a short alkyne-containing peptide sequence showing fast kinetics (k2=13,000±2000 M(-1) s(-1)) in a palladium-mediated cross-coupling reaction. Site-directed mutagenesis studies suggested that the residues surrounding the alkyne moiety facilitate the assembly of a key palladium-alkyne intermediate along the reaction pathway. When this peptide sequence was inserted into the extracellular domain of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), this reactive sequence directed the specific labeling of EGFR in live mammalian cells. PMID:25025771

  7. Use of periplasmic target protein capture for phage display engineering of tight-binding protein–protein interactions

    PubMed Central

    Fryszczyn, Bartlomiej G.; Brown, Nicholas G.; Huang, Wanzhi; Balderas, Miriam A.; Palzkill, Timothy

    2011-01-01

    Phage display is a powerful tool to study and engineer protein and peptide interactions. It is not without its limitations, however, such as the requirement for target protein purification and immobilization in a correctly folded state. A protein capture method is described here that allows enrichment of tight-binding protein variants in vivo thereby eliminating the need for target protein purification and immobilization. The linkage of genotype to phenotype is achieved by placing both receptor and ligand encoding genes on the same plasmid. This allows the isolation of the tight-binding ligand–receptor pair complexes after their association in the bacterial periplasm. The interaction between the TEM-1-β-lactamase fused to the gene 3 coat protein displayed on the surface of M13 bacteriophage and the β-lactamse inhibitory protein (BLIP) expressed in soluble form with a signal sequence to export it to the periplasm was used as a model system to test the method. The system was experimentally validated using a previously characterized collection of BLIP alanine mutants with a range of binding affinities for TEM-1 β-lactamase and by isolating tight-binding variants from a library of mutants randomized at residue position Tyr50 in BLIP which contacts β-lactamase. PMID:21900304

  8. Screening and identification of human ZnT8-specific single-chain variable fragment (scFv) from type 1 diabetes phage display library.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qian; Wang, Xiaodong; Gu, Yong; Zhang, Xiao; Qin, Yao; Chen, Heng; Xu, Xinyu; Yang, Tao; Zhang, Mei

    2016-07-01

    Zinc transporter 8 (ZnT8) is a major autoantigen and a predictive marker in type 1 diabetes (T1D). To investigate ZnT8-specific antibodies, a phage display library from T1D was constructed and single-chain antibodies against ZnT8 were screened and identified. Human T1D single-chain variable fragment (scFv) phage display library consists of approximately 1×10(8) clones. After four rounds of bio-panning, seven unique clones were positive by phage ELISA. Among them, C27 and C22, which demonstrated the highest affinity to ZnT8, were expressed in Escherichia coli Top10F' and then purified by affinity chromatography. C27 and C22 specifically bound ZnT8 N/C fusion protein and ZnT8 C terminal dimer with one Arg325Trp mutation. The specificity to human islet cells of these scFvs were further confirmed by immunohistochemistry. In conclusion, we have successfully constructed a T1D phage display antibody library and identified two ZnT8-specific scFv clones, C27 and C22. These ZnT8-specific scFvs are potential agents in immunodiagnostic and immunotherapy of T1D. PMID:27270580

  9. Phage therapy pharmacology: calculating phage dosing.

    PubMed

    Abedon, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    Phage therapy, which can be described as a phage-mediated biocontrol of bacteria (or, simply, biocontrol), is the application of bacterial viruses-also bacteriophages or phages-to reduce densities of nuisance or pathogenic bacteria. Predictive calculations for phage therapy dosing should be useful toward rational development of therapeutic as well as biocontrol products. Here, I consider the theoretical basis of a number of concepts relevant to phage dosing for phage therapy including minimum inhibitory concentration (but also "inundation threshold"), minimum bactericidal concentration (but also "clearance threshold"), decimal reduction time (D value), time until bacterial eradication, threshold bacterial density necessary to support phage population growth ("proliferation threshold"), and bacterial density supporting half-maximal phage population growth rates (K(B)). I also address the concepts of phage killing titers, multiplicity of infection, and phage peak densities. Though many of the presented ideas are not unique to this chapter, I nonetheless provide variations on derivations and resulting formulae, plus as appropriate discuss relative importance. The overriding goal is to present a variety of calculations that are useful toward phage therapy dosing so that they may be found in one location and presented in a manner that allows facile appreciation, comparison, and implementation. The importance of phage density as a key determinant of the phage potential to eradicate bacterial targets is stressed throughout the chapter. PMID:22050820

  10. Prokaryotic expression and refolding of EGFR extracellular domain and generation of phage display human scFv against EGFR.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yaqiong; Zhang, Juan; Jin, Haizhen; Chen, Zhiguo; Wu, Qinhang; Li, Weiguang; Yue, Ming; Luo, Chen; Wang, Min

    2013-10-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), overexpressed in many epithelial tumors, is emerging as an attractive target for cancer therapy. Antibodies to the extracellular region of EGFR play a key role in the development of a mechanistic understanding and cancer therapy. In the present study, we demonstrated for the first time that EGFR-truncated extracellular domain (EGFR-tED), which was expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) cells in the form of inclusion bodies, could be purified and renatured. The EGFR-tED protein was purified by gel filtration and Ni-NTA affinity chromatography with high purity (>90%) and refolded by a urea gradient size-exclusion chromatography, which could bind its ligand EGF in a concentration-dependent manner. The renatured EGFR was used for biopanning anti-EGFR scFvs from a human synthetic antibody phage display library. Combined with an additional cell-based ELISA screen, a novel scFv, E10, was obtained with two-fold more potent on the binding to EGFR-bearing tumor cells (the epidermoid carcinoma cell line A431) and the inhibition of A431 cells proliferation than scFv 11F8, suggesting that the E10 has the potential to be developed as therapeutic agents to solid tumors associated with EGFR overexpression.

  11. Isolation of peptides from phage-displayed random peptide libraries that interact with the talin-binding domain of vinculin.

    PubMed Central

    Adey, N B; Kay, B K

    1997-01-01

    Peptides isolated from combinatorial libraries typically interact with, and thus help to characterize, biologically relevant binding domains of target proteins. To characterize the binding domains of the focal adhesion protein vinculin, vinculin-binding peptides were isolated from two phage-displayed random peptide libraries. Altogether, five non-similar vinculin-binding peptides were identified. Despite the lack of obvious sequence similarity between the peptides, binding and competition studies indicated that all five interact with the talin-binding domain of vinculin and do not disrupt the binding of alpha-actinin or paxillin to vinculin. The identified peptides and talin bind to vinculin in a comparable manner; both bind to immobilized vinculin, but neither binds to soluble vinculin unless the C-terminus of vinculin has been deleted. An analysis of amino acid variants of one of the peptides has revealed three non-contiguous motifs that also occur in the region of talin previously demonstrated to bind vinculin. Amino acid substitutions within a 127-residue segment of talin capable of binding vinculin confirmed the importance of two of the motifs and suggest that residues critical for binding are within a 16-residue region. This study demonstrates that the vinculin-binding peptides interact with vinculin in a biologically relevant manner and represent an excellent tool for further study of the biochemistry of vinculin. PMID:9182713

  12. Deoxynivalenol-mimic nanobody isolated from a naïve phage display nanobody library and its application in immunoassay.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Yu-Lou; He, Qing-Hua; Xu, Yang; Bhunia, Arun K; Tu, Zhui; Chen, Bo; Liu, Yuan-Yuan

    2015-08-01

    In this study, using mycotoxin deoxynivalenol (DON) as a model hapten, we developed a nanobody-based environmental friendly immunoassay for sensitive detection of DON. Two nanobodies (N-28 and N-31) which bind to anti-DON monoclonal antibody (MAb) were isolated from a naive phage display library. These nanobodies are clonable, thermally stable and mycotoxin-free products and can be served as coating antigen mimetics in heterologous immunoassay. The half inhibition concentration (IC50) of the immunoassay developed with N-28 and N-31 was 8.77 ± 0.41 ng mL(-1) and 19.97 ± 0.84 ng mL(-1), respectively, which were 18- and 8-fold more sensitive than the conventional coating antigen (DON-BSA) based immunoassay. In order to better understand the molecular mechanism of antigen mimicry by nanobody, the 3D structure of "nanobody (N-28) - anti-DON MAb" complex was presented and verified by molecular modeling and alanine-scanning mutagenesis. The results showed that hydrogen bond and hydrophobic interaction formed between Thr 102 - Ser 106 of N-28 and CDR H3 residues of anti-DON antibody may contribute to their binding. This novel concept of enhancing sensitivity of immunoassay for DON based on nanobody may provide potential applications in a general method for immunoassay of various food chemical contaminants.

  13. Manipulation of unfolding-induced protein aggregation by peptides selected for aggregate-binding ability through phage display library screening.

    PubMed

    Kundu, Bishwajit; Shukla, Anshuman; Guptasarma, Purnananda

    2002-03-01

    A phage-displayed library of peptides (12-mer) was screened for the ability to bind to thermally aggregated bovine carbonic anhydrase (BCA), with a view toward examining whether peptides possessing this ability might bind to partially structured intermediates on the protein's unfolding pathway and, therefore, constitute useful tools for manipulation of the kinetic partitioning of molecules between the unfolded and aggregated states. Two peptides [N-HPSTMGLRTMHP-C and N-TPSAWKTALVKA-C] were identified and tested. While neither showed thermal aggregation autonomously, both peptides individually elicited remarkable increases in the levels of thermal aggregation of BCA. A possible explanation is that both peptides bind to surfaces on molten BCA that are not directly involved in aggregation. Such binding could slow down interconversions between folded and unfolded states and stabilize aggregation-prone intermediate(s) to make them more prone to aggregation, while failing to achieve any steric prevention of aggregation. The approach has the potential of yielding useful aggregation-aiding/inhibiting agents, and may provide clues to whether amorphous aggregates are "immobilized" forms of folding intermediates. PMID:11866450

  14. The Phage Lytic Proteins from the Staphylococcus aureus Bacteriophage vB_SauS-phiIPLA88 Display Multiple Active Catalytic Domains and Do Not Trigger Staphylococcal Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Rubio, Lorena; Martínez, Beatriz; Rodríguez, Ana; Donovan, David M.; Götz, Friedrich; García, Pilar

    2013-01-01

    The increase in antibiotic resistance world-wide revitalized the interest in the use of phage lysins to combat pathogenic bacteria. In this work, we analyzed the specific cleavage sites on the staphylococcal peptidoglycan produced by three phage lytic proteins. The investigated cell wall lytic enzymes were the endolysin LysH5 derived from the S. aureus bacteriophage vB_SauS-phi-IPLA88 (phi-IPLA88) and two fusion proteins between lysostaphin and the virion-associated peptidoglycan hydrolase HydH5 (HydH5SH3b and HydH5Lyso). We determined that all catalytic domains present in these proteins were active. Additionally, we tested for the emergence of resistant Staphylococcus aureus to any of the three phage lytic proteins constructs. Resistant S. aureus could not be identified after 10 cycles of bacterial exposure to phage lytic proteins either in liquid or plate cultures. However, a quick increase in lysostaphin resistance (up to 1000-fold in liquid culture) was observed. The lack of resistant development supports the use of phage lytic proteins as future therapeutics to treat staphylococcal infections. PMID:23724076

  15. Application of a recombinant Fab fragment from a phage display library for sensitive detection of a target antigen by an inhibition ELISA system.

    PubMed

    Itoh, K; Suzuki, K; Ishiwata, S; Tezuka, T; Mizugaki, M; Suzuki, T

    1999-02-01

    We have found that the recombinant Fab (rFab) produced by phage display system was detectable for a target antigen more sensitive than the parental monoclonal antibody (MoAb). The Fab phage display library was constructed from hybridoma cells producing APU-6 MoAb specific for a modified nucleoside, pseudouridine that have been studied as a urinary marker for malignancy. Fab-displayed phage clones were screened by a direct ELISA, and the single positive clone was finally obtained. Although the reaction pattern of rFab against pseudouridine and uridine was almost identical to that of MoAb, detection sensitivity of rFab was approximately 30 times higher than that of MoAb. Since the sensitivity of rFab was almost identical to that of Fab fragment prepared by papain digestion of MoAb, the increased sensitivity is considered to be the nature of Fab fragment. The sensitivity of established assay system was sufficient for quantitative determination of serum pseudouridine levels in healthy individuals and cancer patients. This procedure may be applicable for improvement of detection sensitivity of a MoAb-based inhibition ELISA system for drugs or low molecular weight compounds.

  16. Uses of phage display in agriculture: sequence analysis and comparative modeling of late embryogenesis abundant client proteins suggest protein-nucleic acid binding functionality.

    PubMed

    Kushwaha, Rekha; Downie, A Bruce; Payne, Christina M

    2013-01-01

    A group of intrinsically disordered, hydrophilic proteins-Late Embryogenesis Abundant (LEA) proteins-has been linked to survival in plants and animals in periods of stress, putatively through safeguarding enzymatic function and prevention of aggregation in times of dehydration/heat. Yet despite decades of effort, the molecular-level mechanisms defining this protective function remain unknown. A recent effort to understand LEA functionality began with the unique application of phage display, wherein phage display and biopanning over recombinant Seed Maturation Protein homologs from Arabidopsis thaliana and Glycine max were used to retrieve client proteins at two different temperatures, with one intended to represent heat stress. From this previous study, we identified 21 client proteins for which clones were recovered, sometimes repeatedly. Here, we use sequence analysis and homology modeling of the client proteins to ascertain common sequence and structural properties that may contribute to binding affinity with the protective LEA protein. Our methods uncover what appears to be a predilection for protein-nucleic acid interactions among LEA client proteins, which is suggestive of subcellular residence. The results from this initial computational study will guide future efforts to uncover the protein protective mechanisms during heat stress, potentially leading to phage-display-directed evolution of synthetic LEA molecules.

  17. Selection of recombinant antibodies by phage display technology and application for detection of allergenic Brazil nut (Bertholletia excelsa) in processed foods.

    PubMed

    de la Cruz, Silvia; López-Calleja, Inés María; Alcocer, Marcos; González, Isabel; Martín, Rosario; García, Teresa

    2013-10-30

    Current immunological methods for detection of Brazil nut allergens in foods are based on polyclonal antibodies raised in animals. Phage display technology allows the procurement of high-affinity antibodies avoiding animal immunization steps and therefore attaining the principle of replacement supported by animal welfare guidelines. In this study, we screened Tomlinson I and J libraries for specific binders against Brazil nut by employing a Brazil nut protein extract and a purified Brazil nut 2S globulin, and we successfully isolated a phage single chain variable fragment (named BE95) that specifically recognizes Brazil nut proteins. The selected phage scFv was further used as affinity probe to develop an indirect phage-ELISA for detection of Brazil nut in experimental binary mixtures and in commercial food products, with a limit of detection of 5 mg g(-1). This study describes for the first time the isolation of recombinant antibody fragments specific for an allergenic tree nut protein from a naïve library and paves the way to develop new immunoassays for food analysis based on probes that can be produced in vitro when required and do not rely on animal immunization.

  18. Phage display of human antibodies from a patient suffering from coeliac disease and selection of isotype-specific scFv against gliadin

    PubMed Central

    Rhyner, Claudio; Weichel, Michael; Hübner, Philipp; Achatz, Gernot; Blaser, Kurt; Crameri, Reto

    2003-01-01

    Coeliac disease (CD), a gastrointestinal illness characterized by intestinal malabsorption, results from gluten intolerance accompanied with immunological responses towards gliadin, an ethanol-soluble protein fraction of wheat and other cereals. The role of gliadin in eliciting immune responses in CD is still partly unclear; however, the occurrence of anti-gliadin in the sera of patients suffering from CD correlates well with clinical symptoms. In this work we report the construction of isotype-specific, phage-displayed scFv libraries from peripheral blood lymphocytes of a patient with CD and from a healthy control individual. VH and VL chains were amplified by reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction (RT–PCR) using a set of oligonucleotides recognizing all human variable gene families. The three scFv libraries (IgA, IgG and IgM) were selectively enriched for gliadin-binding phage. After four rounds of affinity selection, polyclonal enrichment of gliadin-binding phage was observed in all libraries from the CD patient but in none from the healthy donor. Phagemid particles generated from single clones were demonstrated to be gliadin-specific, as shown by strongly positive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and BiaCore signals. The VH and VL chains from samples of these monoclonal isotype-specific phage were sequenced to identify the most common variable regions used by the immune system to elicit antibody responses against gliadin. PMID:14511241

  19. Designer and natural peptide toxin blockers of the KcsA potassium channel identified by phage display.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ruiming; Dai, Hui; Mendelman, Netanel; Cuello, Luis G; Chill, Jordan H; Goldstein, Steve A N

    2015-12-15

    Peptide neurotoxins are powerful tools for research, diagnosis, and treatment of disease. Limiting broader use, most receptors lack an identified toxin that binds with high affinity and specificity. This paper describes isolation of toxins for one such orphan target, KcsA, a potassium channel that has been fundamental to delineating the structural basis for ion channel function. A phage-display strategy is presented whereby ∼1.5 million novel and natural peptides are fabricated on the scaffold present in ShK, a sea anemone type I (SAK1) toxin stabilized by three disulfide bonds. We describe two toxins selected by sorting on purified KcsA, one novel (Hui1, 34 residues) and one natural (HmK, 35 residues). Hui1 is potent, blocking single KcsA channels in planar lipid bilayers half-maximally (Ki) at 1 nM. Hui1 is also specific, inhibiting KcsA-Shaker channels in Xenopus oocytes with a Ki of 0.5 nM whereas Shaker, Kv1.2, and Kv1.3 channels are blocked over 200-fold less well. HmK is potent but promiscuous, blocking KcsA-Shaker, Shaker, Kv1.2, and Kv1.3 channels with Ki of 1-4 nM. As anticipated, one Hui1 blocks the KcsA pore and two conserved toxin residues, Lys21 and Tyr22, are essential for high-affinity binding. Unexpectedly, potassium ions traversing the channel from the inside confer voltage sensitivity to the Hui1 off-rate via Arg23, indicating that Lys21 is not in the pore. The 3D structure of Hui1 reveals a SAK1 fold, rationalizes KcsA inhibition, and validates the scaffold-based approach for isolation of high-affinity toxins for orphan receptors. PMID:26627718

  20. Designer and natural peptide toxin blockers of the KcsA potassium channel identified by phage display

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Ruiming; Dai, Hui; Mendelman, Netanel; Cuello, Luis G.; Chill, Jordan H.; Goldstein, Steve A. N.

    2015-01-01

    Peptide neurotoxins are powerful tools for research, diagnosis, and treatment of disease. Limiting broader use, most receptors lack an identified toxin that binds with high affinity and specificity. This paper describes isolation of toxins for one such orphan target, KcsA, a potassium channel that has been fundamental to delineating the structural basis for ion channel function. A phage-display strategy is presented whereby ∼1.5 million novel and natural peptides are fabricated on the scaffold present in ShK, a sea anemone type I (SAK1) toxin stabilized by three disulfide bonds. We describe two toxins selected by sorting on purified KcsA, one novel (Hui1, 34 residues) and one natural (HmK, 35 residues). Hui1 is potent, blocking single KcsA channels in planar lipid bilayers half-maximally (Ki) at 1 nM. Hui1 is also specific, inhibiting KcsA-Shaker channels in Xenopus oocytes with a Ki of 0.5 nM whereas Shaker, Kv1.2, and Kv1.3 channels are blocked over 200-fold less well. HmK is potent but promiscuous, blocking KcsA-Shaker, Shaker, Kv1.2, and Kv1.3 channels with Ki of 1–4 nM. As anticipated, one Hui1 blocks the KcsA pore and two conserved toxin residues, Lys21 and Tyr22, are essential for high-affinity binding. Unexpectedly, potassium ions traversing the channel from the inside confer voltage sensitivity to the Hui1 off-rate via Arg23, indicating that Lys21 is not in the pore. The 3D structure of Hui1 reveals a SAK1 fold, rationalizes KcsA inhibition, and validates the scaffold-based approach for isolation of high-affinity toxins for orphan receptors. PMID:26627718

  1. Unique Biological Properties of Catalytic Domain Directed Human Anti-CAIX Antibodies Discovered through Phage-Display Technology

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Chen; Lo, Agnes; Yammanuru, Anuradha; Tallarico, Aimee St. Clair; Brady, Kristen; Murakami, Akikazu; Barteneva, Natasha; Zhu, Quan; Marasco, Wayne A.

    2010-01-01

    Carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX, gene G250/MN-encoded transmembrane protein) is highly expressed in various human epithelial tumors such as renal clear cell carcinoma (RCC), but absent from the corresponding normal tissues. Besides the CA signal transduction activity, CAIX may serve as a biomarker in early stages of oncogenesis and also as a reliable marker of hypoxia, which is associated with tumor resistance to chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Although results from preclinical and clinical studies have shown CAIX as a promising target for detection and therapy for RCC, only a limited number of murine monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) and one humanized mAb are available for clinical testing and development. In this study, paramagnetic proteoliposomes of CAIX (CAIX-PMPLs) were constructed and used for anti-CAIX antibody selection from our 27 billion human single-chain antibody (scFv) phage display libraries. A panel of thirteen human scFvs that specifically recognize CAIX expressed on cell surface was identified, epitope mapped primarily to the CA domain, and affinity-binding constants (KD) determined. These human anti-CAIX mAbs are diverse in their functions including induction of surface CAIX internalization into endosomes and inhibition of the carbonic anhydrase activity, the latter being a unique feature that has not been previously reported for anti-CAIX antibodies. These human anti-CAIX antibodies are important reagents for development of new immunotherapies and diagnostic tools for RCC treatment as well as extending our knowledge on the basic structure-function relationships of the CAIX molecule. PMID:20224781

  2. Identification of calmodulin isoform-specific binding peptides from a phage-displayed random 22-mer peptide library.

    PubMed

    Choi, Ji Young; Lee, Sang Hyoung; Park, Chan Young; Heo, Won Do; Kim, Jong Cheol; Kim, Min Chul; Chung, Woo Sik; Moon, Byeong Cheol; Cheong, Yong Hwa; Kim, Cha Young; Yoo, Jae Hyuk; Koo, Ja Choon; Ok, Hyun Mi; Chi, Seung-Wook; Ryu, Seong-Eon; Lee, Sang Yeol; Lim, Chae Oh; Cho, Moo Je

    2002-06-14

    Plants express numerous calmodulin (CaM) isoforms that exhibit differential activation or inhibition of CaM-dependent enzymes in vitro; however, their specificities toward target enzyme/protein binding are uncertain. A random peptide library displaying a 22-mer peptide on a bacteriophage surface was constructed to screen peptides that specifically bind to plant CaM isoforms (soybean calmodulin (ScaM)-1 and SCaM-4 were used in this study) in a Ca2+-dependent manner. The deduced amino acid sequence analyses of the respective 80 phage clones that were independently isolated via affinity panning revealed that SCaM isoforms require distinct amino acid sequences for optimal binding. SCaM-1-binding peptides conform to a 1-5-10 ((FILVW)XXX(FILV) XXXX(FILVW)) motif (where X denotes any amino acid), whereas SCaM-4-binding peptide sequences conform to a 1-8-14 ((FILVW)XXXXXX(FAILVW)XXXXX(FILVW)) motif. These motifs are classified based on the positions of conserved hydrophobic residues. To examine their binding properties further, two representative peptides from each of the SCaM isoform-binding sequences were synthesized and analyzed via gel mobility shift assays, Trp fluorescent spectra analyses, and phosphodiesterase competitive inhibition experiments. The results of these studies suggest that SCaM isoforms possess different binding sequences for optimal target interaction, which therefore may provide a molecular basis for CaM isoform-specific function in plants. Furthermore, the isolated peptide sequences may serve not only as useful CaM-binding sequence references but also as potential reagents for studying CaM isoform-specific function in vivo.

  3. Phage p1-derived artificial chromosomes facilitate heterologous expression of the FK506 gene cluster.

    PubMed

    Jones, Adam C; Gust, Bertolt; Kulik, Andreas; Heide, Lutz; Buttner, Mark J; Bibb, Mervyn J

    2013-01-01

    We describe a procedure for the conjugative transfer of phage P1-derived Artificial Chromosome (PAC) library clones containing large natural product gene clusters (≥70 kilobases) to Streptomyces coelicolor strains that have been engineered for improved heterologous production of natural products. This approach is demonstrated using the gene cluster for FK506 (tacrolimus), a clinically important immunosuppressant of high commercial value. The entire 83.5 kb FK506 gene cluster from Streptomyces tsukubaensis NRRL 18488 present in one 130 kb PAC clone was introduced into four different S. coelicolor derivatives and all produced FK506 and smaller amounts of the related compound FK520. FK506 yields were increased by approximately five-fold (from 1.2 mg L(-1) to 5.5 mg L(-1)) in S. coelicolor M1146 containing the FK506 PAC upon over-expression of the FK506 LuxR regulatory gene fkbN. The PAC-based gene cluster conjugation methodology described here provides a tractable means to evaluate and manipulate FK506 biosynthesis and is readily applicable to other large gene clusters encoding natural products of interest to medicine, agriculture and biotechnology.

  4. Mapping the epitope in cadherin-like receptors involved in Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1A toxin interaction using phage display.

    PubMed

    Gómez, I; Oltean, D I; Gill, S S; Bravo, A; Soberón, M

    2001-08-01

    In susceptible lepidopteran insects, aminopeptidase N and cadherin-like proteins are the putative receptors for Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) toxins. Using phage display, we identified a key epitope that is involved in toxin-receptor interaction. Three different scFv molecules that bind Cry1Ab toxin were obtained, and these scFv proteins have different amino acid sequences in the complementary determinant region 3 (CDR3). Binding analysis of these scFv molecules to different members of the Cry1A toxin family and to Escherichia coli clones expressing different Cry1A toxin domains showed that the three selected scFv molecules recognized only domain II. Heterologous binding competition of Cry1Ab toxin to midgut membrane vesicles from susceptible Manduca sexta larvae using the selected scFv molecules showed that scFv73 competed with Cry1Ab binding to the receptor. The calculated binding affinities (K(d)) of scFv73 to Cry1Aa, Cry1Ab, and Cry1Ac toxins are in the range of 20-51 nm. Sequence analysis showed this scFv73 molecule has a CDR3 significantly homologous to a region present in the cadherin-like protein from M. sexta (Bt-R(1)), Bombyx mori (Bt-R(175)), and Lymantria dispar. We demonstrated that peptides of 8 amino acids corresponding to the CDR3 from scFv73 or to the corresponding regions of Bt-R(1) or Bt-R(175) are also able to compete with the binding of Cry1Ab and Cry1Aa toxins to the Bt-R(1) or Bt-R(175) receptors. Finally, we showed that synthetic peptides homologous to Bt-R(1) and scFv73 CDR3 and the scFv73 antibody decreased the in vivo toxicity of Cry1Ab to M. sexta larvae. These results show that we have identified the amino acid region of Bt-R(1) and Bt-R(175) involved in Cry1A toxin interaction.

  5. A conformational epitope mapped in the bovine herpesvirus type 1 envelope glycoprotein B by phage display and the HSV-1 3D structure.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Greyciele R; Goulart, Luiz Ricardo; Cunha-Junior, Jair P; Bataus, Luiz A M; Japolla, Greice; Brito, Wilia M E D; Campos, Ivan T N; Ribeiro, Cristina; Souza, Guilherme R L

    2015-08-01

    The selected dodecapeptide (1)DRALYGPTVIDH(12) from a phage-displayed peptide library and the crystal structure of the envelope glycoprotein B (Env gB) from Herpes Simplex Virus type 1 (HSV-1) led us to the identification of a new discontinuous epitope on the Bovine herpesvirus type 1 (BoHV-1) Env gB. In silico analysis revealed a short BoHV-1 gB motif ((338)YKRD(341)) within a epitope region, with a high similarity to the motifs shared by the dodecapeptide N-terminal region ((5)YxARD(1)) and HSV-1 Env gB ((326)YARD(329)), in which the (328)Arg residue is described to be a neutralizing antibody target. Besides the characterization of an antibody-binding site of the BoHV-1 Env gB, we have demonstrated that the phage-fused peptide has the potential to be used as a reagent for virus diagnosis by phage-ELISA assay, which discriminated BoHV-1 infected serum samples from negative ones. PMID:26267086

  6. Effects of an amyloid-beta 1-42 oligomers antibody screened from a phage display library in APP/PS1 transgenic mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jianping; Li, Nan; Ma, Jun; Gu, Zhiqiang; Yu, Lie; Fu, Xiaojie; Liu, Xi; Wang, Jian

    2016-01-01

    We screened anti-Aβ1-42 antibodies from a human Alzheimer’s disease (AD) specific single chain variable fragment (scFv) phage display library and assessed their effects in APP/PS1 transgenic mice. Reverse transcription-PCR was used to construct the scFv phage display library, and screening identified 11A5 as an anti-Aβ1-42 antibody. We mixed 11A5 and the monoclonal antibody 6E10 with Aβ1-42 and administered the mixture to Sprague-Dawley rats via intracerebroventricular injection. After 30 days, rats injected with the antibody/ Aβ1-42 mixture and those injected with Aβ1-42 alone were tested on the Morris water maze. We also injected 11A5 and 6E10 into APP/PS1 transgenic mice and assessed the concentrations of Aβ in brain and peripheral blood by ELISA at 1-month intervals for 3 months. Finally we evaluated behavior changes in the Morris water maze. Rats injected with Aβ1-42 and mixed antibodies showed better performance in the Morris water maze than did rats injected with Aβ1-42 alone. In APP/PS1 transgenic mice, Aβ concentration was lower in the brains of the antibody-treated group than in the control group, but higher in the peripheral blood. The antibody-treated mice also exhibited improved behavioral performance in the Morris water maze. In conclusion, anti-Aβ1-42 antibodies (11A5) screened from the human scFv antibody phage display library promoted the efflux or clearance of Aβ1-42 and effectively decreased the cerebral Aβ burden in an AD mouse model. PMID:26820640

  7. Identification of Borrelia burgdorferi Ribosomal Protein L25 by the Phage Surface Display Method and Evaluation of the Protein's Value for Serodiagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Mueller, Markus; Bunk, Sebastian; Diterich, Isabel; Weichel, Michael; Rauter, Carolin; Hassler, Dieter; Hermann, Corinna; Crameri, Reto; Hartung, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    The phage surface display technique was used to identify Borrelia burgdorferi antigens. By affinity selection with immunoglobulin G from pooled sera of six Lyme borreliosis (LB) patients, the ribosomal protein L25 was identified. The diagnostic value of L25 was investigated by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, using sera from 80 LB patients and 75 controls, and the use of the protein resulted in a specificity of 99% and a 23% sensitivity, which qualify L25 as a useful antigen when combined with others. PMID:17021109

  8. Peptide sequences identified by phage display are immunodominant functional motifs of Pet and Pic serine proteases secreted by Escherichia coli and Shigella flexneri.

    PubMed

    Ulises, Hernández-Chiñas; Tatiana, Gazarian; Karlen, Gazarian; Guillermo, Mendoza-Hernández; Juan, Xicohtencatl-Cortes; Carlos, Eslava

    2009-12-01

    Plasmid-encoded toxin (Pet) and protein involved in colonization (Pic), are serine protease autotransporters of Enterobacteriaceae (SPATEs) secreted by enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAEC), which display the GDSGSG sequence or the serine motif. Our research was directed to localize functional sites in both proteins using the phage display method. From a 12mer linear and a 7mer cysteine-constrained (C7C) libraries displayed on the M13 phage pIII protein we selected different mimotopes using IgG purified from sera of children naturally infected with EAEC producing Pet and Pic proteins, and anti-Pet and anti-Pic IgG purified from rabbits immunized with each one of these proteins. Children IgG selected a homologous group of sequences forming the consensus sequence, motif, PQPxK, and the motifs PGxI/LN and CxPDDSSxC were selected by the rabbit anti-Pet and anti-Pic IgGs, respectively. Analysis of the amino terminal region of a panel of SPATEs showed the presence in all of them of sequences matching the PGxI/LN or CxPDDSSxC motifs, and in a three-dimensional model (Modeller 9v2) designed for Pet, both these motifs were found in the globular portion of the protein, close to the protease active site GDSGSG. Antibodies induced in mice by mimotopes carrying the three aforementioned motifs were reactive with Pet, Pic, and with synthetic peptides carrying the immunogenic mimotope sequences TYPGYINHSKA and LLPQPPKLLLP, thus confirming that the peptide moiety of the selected phages induced the antibodies specific for the toxins. The antibodies induced in mice to the PGxI/LN and CxPDDSSxC mimotopes inhibited fodrin proteolysis and macrophage chemotaxis biological activities of Pet. Our results showed that we were able to generate, by a phage display procedure, mimotopes with sequence motifs PGxI/LN and CxPDDSSxC, and to identify them as functional motifs of the Pet, Pic and other SPATEs involved in their biological activities.

  9. Selection of scFv Antibody Fragments Binding to Human Blood versus Lymphatic Endothelial Surface Antigens by Direct Cell Phage Display

    PubMed Central

    Keller, Thomas; Kalt, Romana; Raab, Ingrid; Schachner, Helga; Mayrhofer, Corina; Kerjaschki, Dontscho; Hantusch, Brigitte

    2015-01-01

    The identification of marker molecules specific for blood and lymphatic endothelium may provide new diagnostic tools and identify new targets for therapy of immune, microvascular and cancerous diseases. Here, we used a phage display library expressing human randomized single-chain Fv (scFv) antibodies for direct panning against live cultures of blood (BECs) and lymphatic (LECs) endothelial cells in solution. After six panning rounds, out of 944 sequenced antibody clones, we retrieved 166 unique/diverse scFv fragments, as indicated by the V-region sequences. Specificities of these phage clone antibodies for respective compartments were individually tested by direct cell ELISA, indicating that mainly pan-endothelial cell (EC) binders had been selected, but also revealing a subset of BEC-specific scFv antibodies. The specific staining pattern was recapitulated by twelve phage-independently expressed scFv antibodies. Binding capacity to BECs and LECs and differential staining of BEC versus LEC by a subset of eight scFv antibodies was confirmed by immunofluorescence staining. As one antigen, CD146 was identified by immunoprecipitation with phage-independent scFv fragment. This antibody, B6-11, specifically bound to recombinant CD146, and to native CD146 expressed by BECs, melanoma cells and blood vessels. Further, binding capacity of B6-11 to CD146 was fully retained after fusion to a mouse Fc portion, which enabled eukaryotic cell expression. Beyond visualization and diagnosis, this antibody might be used as a functional tool. Overall, our approach provided a method to select antibodies specific for endothelial surface determinants in their native configuration. We successfully selected antibodies that bind to antigens expressed on the human endothelial cell surfaces in situ, showing that BECs and LECs share a majority of surface antigens, which is complemented by cell-type specific, unique markers. PMID:25993332

  10. PLANET: a phage library analysis expert tool.

    PubMed

    Leplae, R; Tramontano, A

    1995-01-01

    In recent years random peptide libraries displayed on filamentous phage have been widely used and new ideas and techniques are continuously developing in the field (1-5). Notwithstanding this growing interest in the technique and in its promising results, and the enormous increase in usage and scope, very little effort has been devoted to the implementation of software able to handle and analyze the growing number of phage library-derived sequences. In our laboratory, phage libraries are extensively used and peptide sequences are continuously produced, so that the need arose of creating a database (6) to collect all the experimental results in a format compatible with GCG sequence analysis packages (7). We present here the description of an XWindow-based software package named PLANET (Phage Library ANalysis Expert Tool) devoted to the maintenance and statistical analysis of the database.

  11. Identification of a novel aFGF-binding peptide with anti-tumor effect on breast cancer from phage display library

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Xiaoyong; Cai, Cuizan; Xiao, Fei; Xiong, Yaoling; Huang, Yadong; Zhang, Qihao; Xiang, Qi; Lou, Guofeng; Lian, Mengyang; Su, Zhijian; Zheng, Qing

    2014-03-21

    Highlights: • A specific aFGF-binding peptide AP8 was identified from a phage display library. • AP8 could inhibit aFGF-stimulated cell proliferation in a dose-dependent manner. • AP8 arrested the cell cycle at the G0/G1 phase by suppressing Cyclin D1. • AP8 could block the activation of Erk1/2 and Akt kinase. • AP8 counteracted proliferation and cell cycle via influencing PA2G4 and PCNA. - Abstract: It has been reported that acidic fibroblast growth factor (aFGF) is expressed in breast cancer and via interactions with fibroblast growth factor receptors (FGFRs) to promote the stage and grade of the disease. Thus, aFGF/FGFRs have been considered essential targets in breast cancer therapy. We identified a specific aFGF-binding peptide (AGNWTPI, named AP8) from a phage display heptapeptide library with aFGF after four rounds of biopanning. The peptide AP8 contained two (TP) amino acids identical and showed high homology to the peptides of the 182–188 (GTPNPTL) site of high-affinity aFGF receptor FGFR1. Functional analyses indicated that AP8 specifically competed with the corresponding phage clone A8 for binding to aFGF. In addition, AP8 could inhibit aFGF-stimulated cell proliferation, arrested the cell cycle at the G0/G1 phase by increasing PA2G4 and suppressing Cyclin D1 and PCNA, and blocked the aFGF-induced activation of Erk1/2 and Akt kinase in both breast cancer cells and vascular endothelial cells. Therefore, these results indicate that peptide AP8, acting as an aFGF antagonist, is a promising therapeutic agent for the treatment of breast cancer.

  12. Engineering a genetically encoded competitive inhibitor of the KEAP1-NRF2 interaction via structure-based design and phage display.

    PubMed

    Guntas, Gurkan; Lewis, Steven M; Mulvaney, Kathleen M; Cloer, Erica W; Tripathy, Ashutosh; Lane, Thomas R; Major, Michael B; Kuhlman, Brian

    2016-01-01

    In its basal state, KEAP1 binds the transcription factor NRF2 (Kd = 5 nM) and promotes its degradation by ubiquitylation. Changes in the redox environment lead to modification of key cysteines within KEAP1, resulting in NRF2 protein accumulation and the transcription of genes important for restoring the cellular redox state. Using phage display and a computational loop grafting protocol, we engineered a monobody (R1) that is a potent competitive inhibitor of the KEAP1-NRF2 interaction. R1 bound to KEAP1 with a Kd of 300 pM and in human cells freed NRF2 from KEAP1 resulting in activation of the NRF2 promoter. Unlike cysteine-reactive small molecules that lack protein specificity, R1 is a genetically encoded, reversible inhibitor designed specifically for KEAP1. R1 should prove useful for studying the role of the KEAP1-NRF2 interaction in several disease states. The structure-based phage display strategy employed here is a general approach for engineering high-affinity binders that compete with naturally occurring interactions.

  13. Phage-displayed T-cell epitope grafted into immunoglobulin heavy-chain complementarity-determining regions: an effective vaccine design tested in murine cysticercosis.

    PubMed

    Manoutcharian, K; Terrazas, L I; Gevorkian, G; Acero, G; Petrossian, P; Rodriguez, M; Govezensky, T

    1999-09-01

    A new type of immunogenic molecule was engineered by replacing all three complementarity-determining-region (CDR) loops of the human immunoglobulin (Ig) heavy-chain variable (V(H)) domain with the Taenia crassiceps epitope PT1 (PPPVDYLYQT) and by displaying this construct on the surfaces of M13 bacteriophage. When BALB/c mice were immunized with such phage particles (PIgphage), a strong protection against challenge infection in very susceptible female hosts was obtained. When specifically stimulated, the in vivo-primed CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells isolated from mice immunized with PT1, both as a free peptide and as the PIgphage construct, proliferated in vitro, indicating efficient epitope presentation by both major histocompatibility complex class II and class I molecules in the specifically antigen-pulsed macrophages used as antigen-presenting cells. These data demonstrate the immunogenic potential of recombinant phage particles displaying CDR epitope-grafted Ig V(H) domains and establish an alternative approach to the design of an effective subunit vaccine for prevention of cysticercosis. The key advantage of this type of immunogen is that no adjuvant is required for its application. The proposed strategy for immunogen construction is potentially suitable for use in any host-pathogen interaction.

  14. Phage-Displayed T-Cell Epitope Grafted into Immunoglobulin Heavy-Chain Complementarity-Determining Regions: an Effective Vaccine Design Tested in Murine Cysticercosis

    PubMed Central

    Manoutcharian, Karen; Terrazas, Luis Ignacio; Gevorkian, Goar; Acero, Gonzalo; Petrossian, Pavel; Rodriguez, Miriam; Govezensky, Tzipe

    1999-01-01

    A new type of immunogenic molecule was engineered by replacing all three complementarity-determining-region (CDR) loops of the human immunoglobulin (Ig) heavy-chain variable (VH) domain with the Taenia crassiceps epitope PT1 (PPPVDYLYQT) and by displaying this construct on the surfaces of M13 bacteriophage. When BALB/c mice were immunized with such phage particles (PIgphage), a strong protection against challenge infection in very susceptible female hosts was obtained. When specifically stimulated, the in vivo-primed CD4+ and CD8+ T cells isolated from mice immunized with PT1, both as a free peptide and as the PIgphage construct, proliferated in vitro, indicating efficient epitope presentation by both major histocompatibility complex class II and class I molecules in the specifically antigen-pulsed macrophages used as antigen-presenting cells. These data demonstrate the immunogenic potential of recombinant phage particles displaying CDR epitope-grafted Ig VH domains and establish an alternative approach to the design of an effective subunit vaccine for prevention of cysticercosis. The key advantage of this type of immunogen is that no adjuvant is required for its application. The proposed strategy for immunogen construction is potentially suitable for use in any host-pathogen interaction. PMID:10456929

  15. Masked selection: a straightforward and flexible approach for the selection of binders against specific epitopes and differentially expressed proteins by phage display.

    PubMed

    Even-Desrumeaux, Klervi; Nevoltris, Damien; Lavaut, Marie Noelle; Alim, Karima; Borg, Jean-Paul; Audebert, Stéphane; Kerfelec, Brigitte; Baty, Daniel; Chames, Patrick

    2014-02-01

    Phage display is a well-established procedure to isolate binders against a wide variety of antigens that can be performed on purified antigens, but also on intact cells. As selection steps are performed in vitro, it is possible to focus the outcome of the selection on relevant epitopes by performing some additional steps, such as depletion or competitive elutions. However in practice, the efficiency of these steps is often limited and can lead to inconsistent results. We have designed a new selection method named masked selection, based on the blockade of unwanted epitopes to favor the targeting of relevant ones. We demonstrate the efficiency and flexibility of this method by selecting single-domain antibodies against a specific portion of a fusion protein, by selecting binders against several members of the seven transmembrane receptor family using transfected HEK cells, or by selecting binders against unknown breast cancer markers not expressed on normal samples. The relevance of this approach for antibody-based therapies was further validated by the identification of four of these markers, Epithelial cell adhesion molecule, Transferrin receptor 1, Metastasis cell adhesion molecule, and Sushi containing domain 2, using immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry. This new phage display strategy can be applied to any type of antibody fragments or alternative scaffolds, and is especially suited for the rapid discovery and identification of cell surface markers. PMID:24361863

  16. Masked Selection: A Straightforward and Flexible Approach for the Selection of Binders Against Specific Epitopes and Differentially Expressed Proteins by Phage Display*

    PubMed Central

    Even-Desrumeaux, Klervi; Nevoltris, Damien; Lavaut, Marie Noelle; Alim, Karima; Borg, Jean-Paul; Audebert, Stéphane; Kerfelec, Brigitte; Baty, Daniel; Chames, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Phage display is a well-established procedure to isolate binders against a wide variety of antigens that can be performed on purified antigens, but also on intact cells. As selection steps are performed in vitro, it is possible to focus the outcome of the selection on relevant epitopes by performing some additional steps, such as depletion or competitive elutions. However in practice, the efficiency of these steps is often limited and can lead to inconsistent results. We have designed a new selection method named masked selection, based on the blockade of unwanted epitopes to favor the targeting of relevant ones. We demonstrate the efficiency and flexibility of this method by selecting single-domain antibodies against a specific portion of a fusion protein, by selecting binders against several members of the seven transmembrane receptor family using transfected HEK cells, or by selecting binders against unknown breast cancer markers not expressed on normal samples. The relevance of this approach for antibody-based therapies was further validated by the identification of four of these markers, Epithelial cell adhesion molecule, Transferrin receptor 1, Metastasis cell adhesion molecule, and Sushi containing domain 2, using immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry. This new phage display strategy can be applied to any type of antibody fragments or alternative scaffolds, and is especially suited for the rapid discovery and identification of cell surface markers. PMID:24361863

  17. Biomagnetic separation of Salmonella Typhimurium with high affine and specific ligand peptides isolated by phage display technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steingroewer, Juliane; Bley, Thomas; Bergemann, Christian; Boschke, Elke

    2007-04-01

    Analyses of food-borne pathogens are of great importance in order to minimize the health risk for customers. Thus, very sensitive and rapid detection methods are required. Current conventional culture techniques are very time consuming. Modern immunoassays and biochemical analysis also require pre-enrichment steps resulting in a turnaround time of at least 24 h. Biomagnetic separation (BMS) is a promising more rapid method. In this study we describe the isolation of high affine and specific peptides from a phage-peptide library, which combined with BMS allows the detection of Salmonella spp. with a similar sensitivity as that of immunomagnetic separation using antibodies.

  18. Identification of a Conserved Linear B-Cell Epitope of Streptococcus dysgalactiae GapC Protein by Screening Phage-Displayed Random Peptide Library

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Ziyao; Zhou, Xue; Yu, Liquan; Sun, Hunan; Wu, Zhijun; Yu, Yongzhong; Song, Baifen; Ma, Jinzhu; Tong, Chunyu; Wang, Xintong; Zhu, Zhanbo; Cui, Yudong

    2015-01-01

    The GapC of Streptococcus dysgalactiae (S. dysgalactiae) is a highly conserved surface protein that can induce protective humoral immune response in animals. However, B-cell epitopes on the S. dysgalactiae GapC have not been well identified. In this study, a monoclonal antibody (mAb5B7) against the GapC1-150 protein was prepared. After passive transfer, mAb5B7 could partially protect mice against S. dysgalactiae infection. Eleven positive phage clones recognized by mAb5B7 were identified by screening phage-displayed random 12-peptide library, most of which matched the consensus motif DTTQGRFD. The motif sequence exactly matches amino acids 48-55 of the S. dysgalactiae GapC protein. In addition, the motif 48DTTQGRFD55 shows high homology among various streptococcus species. Site-directed mutagenic analysis further confirmed that residues D48, T50, Q51, G52 and F54 formed the core motif of 48DTTQGRFD55. This motif was the minimal determinant of the B-cell epitope recognized by the mAb5B7. As expected, epitope-peptide evoked protective immune response against S. dysgalactiae infection in immunized mice. Taken together, this identified conserved B-cell epitope within S. dysgalactiae GapC could provide very valuable insights for vaccine design against S. dysgalactiae infection. PMID:26121648

  19. Development of human antibody fragments using antibody phage display for the detection and diagnosis of Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV)

    PubMed Central

    Kirsch, Martina Inga; Hülseweh, Birgit; Nacke, Christoph; Rülker, Torsten; Schirrmann, Thomas; Marschall, Hans-Jürgen; Hust, Michael; Dübel, Stefan

    2008-01-01

    Background Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV) belongs to the Alphavirus group. Several species of this family are also pathogenic to humans and are recognized as potential agents of biological warfare and terrorism. The objective of this work was the generation of recombinant antibodies for the detection of VEEV after a potential bioterrorism assault or an natural outbreak of VEEV. Results In this work, human anti-VEEV single chain Fragments variable (scFv) were isolated for the first time from a human naïve antibody gene library using optimized selection processes. In total eleven different scFvs were identified and their immunological specificity was assessed. The specific detection of the VEEV strains TC83, H12/93 and 230 by the selected antibody fragments was proved. Active as well as formalin inactivated virus particles were recognized by the selected antibody fragments which could be also used for Western blot analysis of VEEV proteins and immunohistochemistry of VEEV infected cells. The anti-VEEV scFv phage clones did not show any cross-reactivity with Alphavirus species of the Western equine encephalitis virus (WEEV) and Eastern equine encephalitis virus (EEEV) antigenic complex, nor did they react with Chikungunya virus (CHIKV), if they were used as detection reagent. Conclusion For the first time, this study describes the selection of antibodies against a human pathogenic virus from a human naïve scFv antibody gene library using complete, active virus particles as antigen. The broad and sensitive applicability of scFv-presenting phage for the immunological detection and diagnosis of Alphavirus species was demonstrated. The selected antibody fragments will improve the fast identification of VEEV in case of a biological warfare or terroristic attack or a natural outbreak. PMID:18764933

  20. Synergetic Targeted Delivery of Sleeping-Beauty Transposon System to Mesenchymal Stem Cells Using LPD Nanoparticles Modified with a Phage-Displayed Targeting Peptide.

    PubMed

    Ma, Kun; Wang, Dong-Dong; Lin, Yiyang; Wang, Jianglin; Petrenko, Valery; Mao, Chuanbin

    2013-03-01

    An important criterion for effective gene therapy is sufficient chromosomal integration activity. The Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon system is a plasmid system allowing efficient insertion of transgenes into the host genome. However, such efficient insertion occurs only after the system is delivered to nuclei. Since transposons do not have the transducing abilities of viral vectors, efficient delivery of this system first into cells and then into cell nuclei is still a challenge. Here, a phage display technique using a major coat displayed phage library is employed to identify a peptide (VTAMEPGQ) that can home to rat mesenchymal stem cells (rMSCs). A nanoparticle, called liposome protamine/DNA lipoplex (LPD), is electrostatically assembled from cationic liposomes and an anionic complex of protamine, DNA and targeting peptides. Various peptides are enveloped inside the LPD to improve its targeting capability for rMSCs and nuclei. The rMSC-targeting peptide and nuclear localization signal (NLS) peptide can execute the synergetic effect to promote transfection action of LPD. The homing peptide directs the LPD to target the MSCs, whereas the NLS peptide directs transposon to accumulate into nuclei once LPD is internalized inside the cells, leading to increased gene expression. This suggests that rMSC-targeting peptide and NLS peptide within LPD can target to rMSCs and then guide transposon into nuclei. After entering the nuclei, SB transposon increase the insertion rates into cellular chromosomes. The targeting LPD does not show obvious cell toxicity and influence on the differentiation potential of rMSCs. Therefore, the integration of SB transposon and LPD system is a promising nonviral gene delivery vector in stem cell therapy. PMID:23885226

  1. A Conserved Epitope Mapped with a Monoclonal Antibody against the VP3 Protein of Goose Parvovirus by Using Peptide Screening and Phage Display Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chenxi; Liu, Hongyu; Li, Jinzhe; Liu, Dafei; Meng, Runze; Zhang, Qingshan; Shaozhou, Wulin; Bai, Xiaofei; Zhang, Tingting; Liu, Ming; Zhang, Yun

    2016-01-01

    Background Waterfowl parvovirus (WPV) infection causes high mortality and morbidity in both geese (Anser anser) and Muscovy ducks (Cairina moschata), resulting in significant losses to the waterfowl industries. The VP3 protein of WPV is a major structural protein that induces neutralizing antibodies in the waterfowl. However, B-cell epitopes on the VP3 protein of WPV have not been characterized. Methods and Results To understand the antigenic determinants of the VP3 protein, we used the monoclonal antibody (mAb) 4A6 to screen a set of eight partially expressed overlapping peptides spanning VP3. Using western blotting and an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), we localized the VP3 epitope between amino acids (aa) 57 and 112. To identify the essential epitope residues, a phage library displaying 12-mer random peptides was screened with mAb 4A6. Phage clone peptides displayed a consensus sequence of YxRFHxH that mimicked the sequence 82Y/FNRFHCH88, which corresponded to amino acid residues 82 to 88 of VP3 protein of WPVs. mAb 4A6 binding to biotinylated fragments corresponding to amino acid residues 82 to 88 of the VP3 protein verified that the 82FxRFHxH88 was the VP3 epitope and that amino acids 82F is necessary to retain maximal binding to mAb 4A6. Parvovirus-positive goose and duck sera reacted with the epitope peptide by dot blotting assay, revealing the importance of these amino acids of the epitope in antibody-epitope binding reactivity. Conclusions and Significance We identified the motif FxRFHxH as a VP3-specific B-cell epitope that is recognized by the neutralizing mAb 4A6. This finding might be valuable in understanding of the antigenic topology of VP3 of WPV. PMID:27191594

  2. Screening a phage display library for a novel FGF8b-binding peptide with anti-tumor effect on prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Wenhui; Chen, Xilei; Li, Tao; Li, Yanmei; Wang, Ruixue; He, Dan; Luo, Wu; Li, Xiaokun; Wu, Xiaoping

    2013-05-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 8b (FGF8b) is the major isoform of FGF8 expressed in prostate cancer and it correlates with the stage and grade of the disease. FGF8b has been considered as a potential target for prostate cancer therapy. Here we isolated 12 specific FGF8b-binding phage clones by screening a phage display heptapeptide library with FGF8b. The peptide (HSQAAVP, named as P12) corresponding to one of these clones showed high homology to the immunoglobulin-like (Ig-like) domain II(D2) of high-affinity FGF8b receptor (FGFR3c), contained 3 identical amino acids (AVP) to the authentic FGFR3 D2 sequence aa 163–169 (LLAVPAA) directly participating in ligand binding, carried the same charges as its corresponding motif (aa163–169) in FGFR3c, suggesting that P12 may have a greater potential to interrupt FGF8b binding to its receptors than other identified heptapeptides do. Functional analysis indicated that synthetic P12 peptides mediate significant inhibition of FGF8b-induced cell proliferation, arrest cell cycle at the G0/G1 phase via suppression of Cyclin D1 and PCNA, and blockade of the activations of Erk1/2 and Akt cascades in both prostate cancer cells and vascular endothelial cells. The results demonstrated that the P12 peptide acting as an FGF8b antagonist may have therapeutic potential in prostate cancer. - Highlights: ► A novel FGF8b-binding peptide P12 was isolated from a phage display library. ► The mechanisms for P12 peptide inhibiting cell proliferation were proposed. ► P12 caused cell cycle arrest at G0/G1 phase via suppression of Cyclin D1 and PCNA. ► P12 suppressed FGF8b-induced activations of Akt and MAP kinases. ► P12 acting as an FGF8b antagonist may have therapeutic potential in prostate cancer.

  3. Mimotope peptides selected from phage display combinatorial library by serum antibodies of pigs experimentally infected with Taenia solium as leads to developing diagnostic antigens for human neurocysticercosis.

    PubMed

    Gazarian, Karlen; Rowlay, Merril; Gazarian, Tatiana; Vazquez Buchelli, Jorge Enrique; Hernández Gonzáles, Marisela

    2012-12-01

    Neurocysticercosis is caused by penetration of the tapeworm Taenia solium larvae into the central nervous system resulting in a diverse range of neurologic complications including epilepsy in endemic areas that globalization spreads worldwide. Sensitive and specific immunodiagnosis is needed for the early detection and elimination of the parasite, but the lack of standardized, readily obtainable antigens is a challenge. Here, we used the phage display for resolving the problem. The rationale of the strategy rests on the concept that the screening of combinatorial libraries with polyclonal serum to pathogens reveals families of peptides mimicking the pathogen most immunodominant epitopes indispensable for the successful diagnosis. The screening of a 7mer library with serum IgG of four pigs experimentally infected with parasite followed by computer aided segregation of the selected sequences resulted in the discovery of four clusters of homologous sequences of which one presented a family of ten mimotopes selected by three infected pig serum IgGs; the common motif sequence LSPF carried by the family was considered to be the core of an immunodominant epitope of the parasite critical for the binding with the antibody that selected the mimotopes. The immunoassay testing permitted to select a mimotope whose synthetic peptide free of the phage with the amino acid sequence Leu-Ser-Fen-Pro-Ser-Val-Val that distinguished well a panel of 21 cerebrospinal fluids of neurocysticercosis patients from the fluids of individuals with neurological complications of other etiology. This peptide is proposed as a lead for developing a novel molecularly defined diagnostic antigen(s) for the neurocysticercosis.

  4. OVCAR-3 Spheroid-Derived Cells Display Distinct Metabolic Profiles

    PubMed Central

    Vermeersch, Kathleen A.; Wang, Lijuan; Mezencev, Roman; McDonald, John F.; Styczynski, Mark P.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Recently, multicellular spheroids were isolated from a well-established epithelial ovarian cancer cell line, OVCAR-3, and were propagated in vitro. These spheroid-derived cells displayed numerous hallmarks of cancer stem cells, which are chemo- and radioresistant cells thought to be a significant cause of cancer recurrence and resultant mortality. Gene set enrichment analysis of expression data from the OVCAR-3 cells and the spheroid-derived putative cancer stem cells identified several metabolic pathways enriched in differentially expressed genes. Before this, there had been little previous knowledge or investigation of systems-scale metabolic differences between cancer cells and cancer stem cells, and no knowledge of such differences in ovarian cancer stem cells. Methods To determine if there were substantial metabolic changes corresponding with these transcriptional differences, we used two-dimensional gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry to measure the metabolite profiles of the two cell lines. Results These two cell lines exhibited significant metabolic differences in both intracellular and extracellular metabolite measurements. Principal components analysis, an unsupervised dimensional reduction technique, showed complete separation between the two cell types based on their metabolite profiles. Pathway analysis of intracellular metabolomics data revealed close overlap with metabolic pathways identified from gene expression data, with four out of six pathways found enriched in gene-level analysis also enriched in metabolite-level analysis. Some of those pathways contained multiple metabolites that were individually statistically significantly different between the two cell lines, with one of the most broadly and consistently different pathways, arginine and proline metabolism, suggesting an interesting hypothesis about cancerous and stem-like metabolic phenotypes in this pair of cell lines. Conclusions Overall, we demonstrate for the

  5. A Phage Tail-Derived Element with Wide Distribution among Both Prokaryotic Domains: A Comparative Genomic and Phylogenetic Study

    PubMed Central

    Sarris, Panagiotis F.; Ladoukakis, Emmanuel D.; Panopoulos, Nickolas J.; Scoulica, Effie V.

    2014-01-01

    Prophage sequences became an integral part of bacterial genomes as a consequence of coevolution, encoding fitness or virulence factors. Such roles have been attributed to phage-derived elements identified in several Gram-negative species: The type VI secretion system (T6SS), the R- and F-type pyocins, and the newly discovered Serratia entomophila antifeeding prophage (Afp), and the Photorhabdus luminescens virulence cassette (PVC). In this study, we provide evidence that remarkably conserved gene clusters, homologous to Afp/PVC, are not restricted to Gram-negative bacteria but are widespread throughout all prokaryotes including the Archaea. Even though they are phylogenetically closer to pyocins, they share key characteristics in common with the T6SS, such as the use of a chaperon-type AAA+ ATPase and the lack of a host cell lysis mechanism. We thus suggest that Afp/PVC-like elements could be classified as phage-like-protein-translocation structures (PLTSs) rather than as pyocins. The reconstruction of phylogeny and the conserved gene content suggest that the diversification of prophage sequences to PLTS occurred in bacteria early in evolution and only once, but PLTS clusters have been horizontally transferred to some of the bacterial lineages and to the Archaea. The adaptation of this element in such a wide host range is suggestive of its versatile use in prokaryotes. PMID:25015235

  6. The comparison of BLyS-binding peptides from phage display library and computer-aided design on BLyS-TACI interaction.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yacong; Hao, Xiafei; Feng, Jiannan; Shen, Beifen; Wei, Jing; Sun, Jian

    2015-02-01

    BLyS antagonists have become the therapeutic reagents in the treatment of autoimmune disorders. BLyS binding peptides and their Fc fusion proteins may be alternative BLyS antagonists in such application. In this study, the activity of BLyS binding peptide 814 obtained from phage display library and peptide TA designed by computer-aided modeling on the interaction of BLyS-TACI was compared. In addition, to maintain the spatial conformation and stability of the peptides, human IgG1 Fc fragment was fused to peptides 814 and TA to form peptide-Fc fusion proteins, steady and innovative peptibodies. The prokaryotic expression plasmids pET30a-814-Fc and pET30a-TA-Fc for these peptibodies were acquired by genetic engineering, and confirmed by DNA sequencing. After the right plasmids were transformed into Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3), the fusion proteins were expressed and purified by protein A affinity column. As a result of competitive ELISA, peptides 814 and TA at 100μg/ml displayed 52.2% and 28.6% inhibition on the interaction of TACI-Fc with BLyS respectively. Moreover, 814-Fc and TA-Fc fusion proteins could bind to BLyS in a dosage-dependent manner as TACI-Fc did, and displayed 54.7% and 26.1% inhibition on the interaction of TACI-Fc-Myc with BLyS at 100μg/ml respectively. So 814-Fc and TA-Fc proteins had the similar bioactivity as the peptides did. Furthermore, compared with TA-Fc, 814-Fc showed two-fold inhibition effect on BLyS binding to TACI, suggesting that 814-Fc could inhibit BLyS bioactivity significantly and might serve as a potential antagonist to treat autoimmune diseases associated with BLyS overexpression.

  7. Recognition of Vipera ammodytes meridionalis neurotoxin vipoxin and its components using phage-displayed scFv and polyclonal antivenom sera.

    PubMed

    Stoyanova, Vishnya; Aleksandrov, Radoslav; Lukarska, Maria; Duhalov, Deyan; Atanasov, Vasil; Petrova, Svetla

    2012-10-01

    Vipoxin is a potent postsynaptic heterodimeric neurotoxin isolated from the venom of the Bulgarian snake Vipera ammodytes meridionalis, whose snakebites cause different and strongly manifested pathophysiological effects (neurotoxic, hemolytic, anticoagulant, convulsant, hypotensive, hyperglycemic etc.). The neutralization of snake toxins calls for extensive research through the application of different approaches: antibodies, non-immunologic inhibitors, natural products derived from plants and animals, as well as synthetic drugs. In this study, we applied naive Tomlinson I + J (Cambridge, UK) libraries to obtain recombinant human scFv antibodies against the vipoxin's two subunits--basic and toxic phospholipase A₂ (PLA₂) and acidic, non-toxic component. We found that 33 of more than hundred tested clones were positive and recognized vipoxin and its subunits. Enriched scFv-phage samples (1.2 × 10⁹ pfu/ml) were analyzed for their binding (ELISA) and enzyme-inhibiting abilities. Single chain Fv-phage clones--D₁₂, E₃, F₆, D₁₀ and G₅ exhihest binding affinity for the toxic component. Clones A₁, D₁₂ and C₁₂ recognized preferentially vipoxin's acidic component. Clones E₃, G₅ and H₄ inhibited the enzymatic activity of both vipoxin and its purified and separated toxic subunit to the highest extent. Six of the selected clones (E₃, G₅, H₄, C₁₂, D₁₀ and A₁₁) inhibited direct hemolytic activity of vipoxin and its pure PLA₂ subunit. The obtained specific scFv antibodies will be used for epitope mapping studies required to shed light on the role of the phospholipase A₂ activity for the vipoxin toxicity and its effective neutralization.

  8. Toward a Code for the Interactions of Zinc Fingers with DNA: Selection of Randomized Fingers Displayed on Phage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choo, Yen; Klug, Aaron

    1994-11-01

    We have used two selection techniques to study sequence-specific DNA recognition by the zinc finger, a small, modular DNA-binding minidomain. We have chosen zinc fingers because they bind as independent modules and so can be linked together in a peptide designed to bind a predetermined DNA site. In this paper, we describe how a library of zinc fingers displayed on the surface of bacteriophage enables selection of fingers capable of binding to given DNA triplets. The amino acid sequences of selected fingers which bind the same triplet are compared to examine how sequence-specific DNA recognition occurs. Our results can be rationalized in terms of coded interactions between zinc fingers and DNA, involving base contacts from a few α-helical positions. In the paper following this one, we describe a complementary technique which confirms the identity of amino acids capable of DNA sequence discrimination from these positions.

  9. High throughput cytotoxicity screening of anti-HER2 immunotoxins conjugated with antibody fragments from phage-displayed synthetic antibody libraries

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Shin-Chen; Chen, Hong-Sen; Lin, Hung-Wei; Chao, Wei-Ting; Chen, Yao-Sheng; Fu, Chi-Yu; Yu, Chung-Ming; Huang, Kai-Fa; Wang, Andrew H.-J.; Yang, An-Suei

    2016-01-01

    Immunotoxins are an important class of antibody-based therapeutics. The potency of the immunotoxins depends on the antibody fragments as the guiding modules targeting designated molecules on cell surfaces. Phage-displayed synthetic antibody scFv libraries provide abundant antibody fragment candidates as targeting modules for the immunoconjugates, but the discovery of optimally functional immunoconjugates is limited by the scFv-payload conjugation procedure. In this work, cytotoxicity screening of non-covalently assembled immunotoxins was developed in high throughput format to discover highly functional synthetic antibody fragments for delivering toxin payloads. The principles governing the efficiency of the antibodies as targeting modules have been elucidated from large volume of cytotoxicity data: (a) epitope and paratope of the antibody-based targeting module are major determinants for the potency of the immunotoxins; (b) immunotoxins with bivalent antibody-based targeting modules are generally superior in cytotoxic potency to those with corresponding monovalent targeting module; and (c) the potency of the immunotoxins is positively correlated with the densities of the cell surface antigen. These findings suggest that screening against the target cells with a large pool of antibodies from synthetic antibody libraries without the limitations of natural antibody responses can lead to optimal potency and minimal off-target toxicity of the immunoconjugates. PMID:27550798

  10. High throughput cytotoxicity screening of anti-HER2 immunotoxins conjugated with antibody fragments from phage-displayed synthetic antibody libraries.

    PubMed

    Hou, Shin-Chen; Chen, Hong-Sen; Lin, Hung-Wei; Chao, Wei-Ting; Chen, Yao-Sheng; Fu, Chi-Yu; Yu, Chung-Ming; Huang, Kai-Fa; Wang, Andrew H-J; Yang, An-Suei

    2016-01-01

    Immunotoxins are an important class of antibody-based therapeutics. The potency of the immunotoxins depends on the antibody fragments as the guiding modules targeting designated molecules on cell surfaces. Phage-displayed synthetic antibody scFv libraries provide abundant antibody fragment candidates as targeting modules for the immunoconjugates, but the discovery of optimally functional immunoconjugates is limited by the scFv-payload conjugation procedure. In this work, cytotoxicity screening of non-covalently assembled immunotoxins was developed in high throughput format to discover highly functional synthetic antibody fragments for delivering toxin payloads. The principles governing the efficiency of the antibodies as targeting modules have been elucidated from large volume of cytotoxicity data: (a) epitope and paratope of the antibody-based targeting module are major determinants for the potency of the immunotoxins; (b) immunotoxins with bivalent antibody-based targeting modules are generally superior in cytotoxic potency to those with corresponding monovalent targeting module; and (c) the potency of the immunotoxins is positively correlated with the densities of the cell surface antigen. These findings suggest that screening against the target cells with a large pool of antibodies from synthetic antibody libraries without the limitations of natural antibody responses can lead to optimal potency and minimal off-target toxicity of the immunoconjugates. PMID:27550798

  11. Identification of peptides that bind hepatitis C virus envelope protein E2 and inhibit viral cellular entry from a phage-display peptide library.

    PubMed

    Lü, Xin; Yao, Min; Zhang, Jian-Min; Yang, Jing; Lei, Ying-Feng; Huang, Xiao-Jun; Jia, Zhan-Sheng; Ma, Li; Lan, Hai-Yun; Xu, Zhi-Kai; Yin, Wen

    2014-05-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) envelope protein E2 is required for the entry of HCV into cells. Viral envelope proteins interact with cell receptors in a multistep process, which may be a promising target for the development of novel antiviral agents. In this study, a heptapeptide M13 phage-display library was screened for peptides that bind specifically to prokaryotically expressed, purified truncated HCV envelope protein E2. ELISA assay was used to quantify the binding of the peptides to HCV E2 protein. Flow cytometry, quantitative reverse-transcription PCR and western blotting were used to investigate the inhibition effect of one peptide on HCV infection in hepatoma cells (Huh7.5) in vitro. Four peptides capable of binding specifically to HCV E2 protein were obtained after three rounds of biopanning. Peptide C18 (WPWHNHR), with the highest affinity for binding HCV E2 protein, was synthesized. The results showed that peptide C18 inhibited the viral infectivity of both HCV pseudotype particles (HCVpp) harboring HCV envelope glycoproteins and cell-culture produced HCV (HCVcc). Thus, this study demonstrated that peptide C18 is a potential candidate for anti-HCV therapy as a novel viral entry inhibitor.

  12. Dissecting the Binding Mode of Low Affinity Phage Display Peptide Ligands to Protein Targets by Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange Coupled to Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Phage display (PD) is frequently used to discover peptides capable of binding to biological protein targets. The structural characterization of peptide–protein complexes is often challenging due to their low binding affinities and high structural flexibility. Here, we investigate the use of hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) to characterize interactions of low affinity peptides with their cognate protein targets. The HDX-MS workflow was optimized to accurately detect low-affinity peptide–protein interactions by use of ion mobility, electron transfer dissociation, nonbinding control peptides, and statistical analysis of replicate data. We show that HDX-MS can identify regions in the two epigenetic regulator proteins KDM4C and KDM1A that are perturbed through weak interactions with PD-identified peptides. Two peptides cause reduced HDX on opposite sides of the active site of KDM4C, indicating distinct binding modes. In contrast, the perturbation site of another PD-selected peptide inhibiting the function of KDM1A maps to a GST-tag. Our results demonstrate that HDX-MS can validate and map weak peptide–protein interactions and pave the way for understanding and optimizing the binding of peptide scaffolds identified through PD and similar ligand discovery approaches. PMID:25325890

  13. A phage display selected 7-mer peptide inhibitor of the Tannerella forsythia metalloprotease-like enzyme Karilysin can be truncated to Ser-Trp-Phe-Pro.

    PubMed

    Skottrup, Peter Durand; Sørensen, Grete; Ksiazek, Miroslaw; Potempa, Jan; Riise, Erik

    2012-01-01

    Tannerella forsythia is a gram-negative bacteria, which is strongly associated with the development of periodontal disease. Karilysin is a newly identified metalloprotease-like enzyme, that is secreted from T. forsythia. Karilysin modulates the host immune response and is therefore considered a likely drug target. In this study peptides were selected towards the catalytic domain from Karilysin (Kly18) by phage display. The peptides were linear with low micromolar binding affinities. The two best binders (peptide14 and peptide15), shared the consensus sequence XWFPXXXGGG. A peptide15 fusion with Maltose Binding protein (MBP) was produced with peptide15 fused to the N-terminus of MBP. The peptide15-MBP was expressed in E. coli and the purified fusion-protein was used to verify Kly18 specific binding. Chemically synthesised peptide15 (SWFPLRSGGG) could inhibit the enzymatic activity of both Kly18 and intact Karilysin (Kly48). Furthermore, peptide15 could slow down the autoprocessing of intact Kly48 to Kly18. The WFP motif was important for inhibition and a truncation study further demonstrated that the N-terminal serine was also essential for Kly18 inhibition. The SWFP peptide had a Ki value in the low micromolar range, which was similar to the intact peptide15. In conclusion SWFP is the first reported inhibitor of Karilysin and can be used as a valuable tool in structure-function studies of Karilysin.

  14. Discovering neutralizing antibodies targeting the stem epitope of H1N1 influenza hemagglutinin with synthetic phage-displayed antibody libraries.

    PubMed

    Tung, Chao-Ping; Chen, Ing-Chien; Yu, Chung-Ming; Peng, Hung-Pin; Jian, Jhih-Wei; Ma, Shiou-Hwa; Lee, Yu-Ching; Jan, Jia-Tsrong; Yang, An-Suei

    2015-10-12

    Broadly neutralizing antibodies developed from the IGHV1-69 germline gene are known to bind to the stem region of hemagglutinin in diverse influenza viruses but the sequence determinants for the antigen recognition, including neutralization potency and binding affinity, are not clearly understood. Such understanding could inform designs of synthetic antibody libraries targeting the stem epitope on hemagglutinin, leading to artificially designed antibodies that are functionally advantageous over antibodies from natural antibody repertoires. In this work, the sequence space of the complementarity determining regions of a broadly neutralizing antibody (F10) targeting the stem epitope on the hemagglutinin of a strain of H1N1 influenza virus was systematically explored; the elucidated antibody-hemagglutinin recognition principles were used to design a phage-displayed antibody library, which was then used to discover neutralizing antibodies against another strain of H1N1 virus. More than 1000 functional antibody candidates were selected from the antibody library and were shown to neutralize the corresponding strain of influenza virus with up to 7 folds higher potency comparing with the parent F10 antibody. The antibody library could be used to discover functionally effective antibodies against other H1N1 influenza viruses, supporting the notion that target-specific antibody libraries can be designed and constructed with systematic sequence-function information.

  15. Comprehensive mapping of functional epitopes on dengue virus glycoprotein E DIII for binding to broadly neutralizing antibodies 4E11 and 4E5A by phage display.

    PubMed

    Frei, Julia C; Kielian, Margaret; Lai, Jonathan R

    2015-11-01

    Here we investigated the binding of Dengue virus envelope glycoprotein domain III (DIII) by two broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs), 4E11 and 4E5A. There are four serotypes of Dengue virus (DENV-1 to -4), whose DIII sequences vary by up to 49%. We used combinatorial alanine scanning mutagenesis, a phage display approach, to map functional epitopes (those residues that contribute most significantly to the energetics of antibody-antigen interaction) on these four serotypes. Our results showed that 4E11, which binds strongly to DENV-1, -2, and -3, and moderately to DENV-4, recognized a common conserved core functional epitope involving DIII residues K310, L/I387, L389, and W391. There were also unique recognition features for each serotype, suggesting that 4E11 has flexible recognition requirements. Similar scanning studies for the related bNAb 4E5A, which binds more tightly to DENV-4, identified broader functional epitopes on DENV-1. These results provide useful information for immunogen and therapeutic antibody design. PMID:26339794

  16. Novel amyloid-beta specific scFv and VH antibody fragments from human and mouse phage display antibody libraries.

    PubMed

    Medecigo, M; Manoutcharian, K; Vasilevko, V; Govezensky, T; Munguia, M E; Becerril, B; Luz-Madrigal, A; Vaca, L; Cribbs, D H; Gevorkian, G

    2010-06-01

    Anti-amyloid immunotherapy has been proposed as an appropriate therapeutic approach for Alzheimer's disease (AD). Significant efforts have been made towards the generation and assessment of antibody-based reagents capable of preventing and clearing amyloid aggregates as well as preventing their synaptotoxic effects. In this study, we selected a novel set of human anti-amyloid-beta peptide 1-42 (Abeta1-42) recombinant monoclonal antibodies in a single chain fragment variable (scFv) and a single-domain (VH) format. We demonstrated that these antibody fragments recognize in a specific manner amyloid-beta deposits in APP/Tg mouse brains, inhibit toxicity of oligomeric Abeta1-42 in neuroblastoma cell cultures in a concentration-dependent manner and reduced amyloid deposits in APP/Tg2576 mice after intracranial administration. These antibody fragments recognize epitopes in the middle/C-terminus region of Abeta, which makes them strong therapeutic candidates due to the fact that most of the Abeta species found in the brains of AD patients display extensive N-terminus truncations/modifications.

  17. NOVEL AMYLOID-BETA SPECIFIC scFv and VH ANTIBODY FRAGMENTS FROM HUMAN AND MOUSE PHAGE DISPLAY ANTIBODY LIBRARIES

    PubMed Central

    Medecigo, M.; Manoutcharian, K.; Vasilevko, V.; Govezensky, T.; Munguia, M. E.; Becerril, B.; Luz-Madrigal, A.; Vaca, L.; Cribbs, D. H.; Gevorkian, G.

    2010-01-01

    Anti-amyloid immunotherapy has been proposed as an appropriate therapeutic approach for Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Significant efforts have been made towards the generation and assessment of antibody-based reagents capable of preventing and clearing amyloid aggregates as well as preventing their synaptotoxic effects. In this study, we selected a novel set of human anti-amyloid-beta peptide 1-42 (Aβ1-42) recombinant monoclonal antibodies in a single chain fragment variable (scFv) and a single domain (VH) formats. We demonstrated that these antibody fragments recognize in a specific manner amyloid beta deposits in APP/Tg mouse brains, inhibit toxicity of oligomeric Aβ1-42 in neuroblastoma cell cultures in a concentration-dependently manner and reduced amyloid deposits in APP/Tg2576 mice after intracranial administration. These antibody fragments recognize epitopes in the middle/C-terminus region of Aβ, which makes them strong therapeutic candidates due to the fact that most of the Aβ species found in the brains of AD patients display extensive N-terminus truncations/modifications. PMID:20451261

  18. Phage Transduction.

    PubMed

    Goh, Shan

    2016-01-01

    Bacteriophages mediate horizontal gene transfer through a mechanism known as transduction. Phage transduction carried out in the laboratory involves a bacterial donor and a recipient, both of which are susceptible to infection by the phage of interest. Phage is propagated in the donor, concentrated, and exposed transiently to recipient at different multiplicity of infection ratios. Transductants are selected for the desired phenotype by culture on selective medium. Here we describe transduction of ermB conferring resistance to erythromycin by the C. difficile phage ϕC2. PMID:27507341

  19. Phage display-mediated discovery of novel tyrosinase-targeting tetrapeptide inhibitors reveals the significance of N-terminal preference of cysteine residues and their functional sulfur atom.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yu-Ching; Hsiao, Nai-Wan; Tseng, Tien-Sheng; Chen, Wang-Chuan; Lin, Hui-Hsiung; Leu, Sy-Jye; Yang, Ei-Wen; Tsai, Keng-Chang

    2015-02-01

    Tyrosinase, a key copper-containing enzyme involved in melanin biosynthesis, is closely associated with hyperpigmentation disorders, cancer, and neurodegenerative diseases, and as such, it is an essential target in medicine and cosmetics. Known tyrosinase inhibitors possess adverse side effects, and there are no safety regulations; therefore, it is necessary to develop new inhibitors with fewer side effects and less toxicity. Peptides are exquisitely specific to their in vivo targets, with high potencies and relatively few off-target side effects. Thus, we systematically and comprehensively investigated the tyrosinase-inhibitory abilities of N- and C-terminal cysteine/tyrosine-containing tetrapeptides by constructing a phage-display random tetrapeptide library and conducting computational molecular docking studies on novel tyrosinase tetrapeptide inhibitors. We found that N-terminal cysteine-containing tetrapeptides exhibited the most potent tyrosinase-inhibitory abilities. The positional preference of cysteine residues at the N terminus in the tetrapeptides significantly contributed to their tyrosinase-inhibitory function. The sulfur atom in cysteine moieties of N- and C-terminal cysteine-containing tetrapeptides coordinated with copper ions, which then tightly blocked substrate-binding sites. N- and C-terminal tyrosine-containing tetrapeptides functioned as competitive inhibitors against mushroom tyrosinase by using the phenol ring of tyrosine to stack with the imidazole ring of His263, thus competing for the substrate-binding site. The N-terminal cysteine-containing tetrapeptide CRVI exhibited the strongest tyrosinase-inhibitory potency (with an IC50 of 2.7 ± 0.5 μM), which was superior to those of the known tyrosinase inhibitors (arbutin and kojic acid) and outperformed kojic acid-tripeptides, mimosine-FFY, and short-sequence oligopeptides at inhibiting mushroom tyrosinase.

  20. A potent human anti-eotaxin1 antibody, CAT-213: isolation by phage display and in vitro and in vivo efficacy.

    PubMed

    Main, Sarah; Handy, Rachel; Wilton, Jane; Smith, Stephen; Williams, Liz; Fou, Leila Du; Andrews, John; Conroy, Louise A; May, Richard; Anderson, Ian; Vaughan, Tristan J

    2006-12-01

    The CC chemokine, eotaxin1 (CCL11) is an important regulator of eosinophil function. A marked accumulation of eosinophils in tissues has been correlated with the up-regulation of eotaxin1 expression in several diseases. The potential therapeutic value of neutralizing the effects of eotaxin1 in inflammatory conditions (including asthma) is under investigation. A human single-chain fragment variable antibody that neutralizes human eotaxin1 (CAT-212) was produced using antibody phage display and converted to whole antibody IgG4 format (CAT-213). A novel approach to lead optimization in which the length of the variable heavy chain complementarity-determining region 3 was reduced by one amino acid resulted in an increase in potency of >1000-fold compared with the parent anti-eotaxin1 antibody. The optimized antibody binds eotaxin1 with high affinity (80.4 pM) and specificity. CAT-213 and CAT-212 do not bind or neutralize a range of other human proteins including human monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, a structurally similar chemokine. CAT-213 neutralizes the ability of eotaxin1 to cause an increase in intracellular calcium signaling (with an IC(50) value of 2.86 nM), migration of CCR3-expressing L1.2 cells (with an IC(50) value of 0.48 nM), and inhibition of the eotaxin1-evoked shape change of human eosinophils in vitro (with an IC(50) of 0.71 nM). Local administration of CAT-213 to mice (1-100 microg kg(-1)) attenuates dermal eosinophilia induced by human eotaxin1, achieving >90% inhibition of eosinophil influx. CAT-213 may therefore be of therapeutic value in inhibiting diseases in which eotaxin1 and eosinophils play a major role, for example, severe asthma.

  1. PEGylated poly(2-(dimethylamino) ethyl methacrylate)/DNA polyplex micelles decorated with phage-displayed TGN peptide for brain-targeted gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Qian, Yong; Zha, Yuan; Feng, Bing; Pang, Zhiqing; Zhang, Bo; Sun, Xiyang; Ren, Jinfeng; Zhang, Chi; Shao, Xiayan; Zhang, Qizhi; Jiang, Xinguo

    2013-03-01

    Phage-displayed TGN peptide-decorated polymeric micelle-like polyplexes based on pegylated poly(2-(dimethylamino) ethyl methacrylate) (PEG-PDMAEMA) were prepared for efficient brain-targeted gene delivery. The diblock copolymers Methoxy-PEG-PDMAEMA and Maleimide-PEG-PDMAEMA were synthesized by the atom transfer radical polymerization method. The TGN ligand, a 12-amino acid peptide that could facilitate blood-brain barrier (BBB) targeting, was conjugated to the PEG terminus of the copolymer via a maleimide-mediated covalent binding procedure. TGN-PEG-PDMAEMA was complexed with plasmid DNA to yield polyplexes. The physiochemical properties of the polyplexes, such as morphology, particle size, zeta potential, cytotoxicity and DNA complex formation ability, were studied prior to the successful in vitro and in vivo transfection. The TGN-PEG-PDMAEMA/DNA polyplexes maintained their stable nano-size, were characterized by good condensation capacity and low toxicity and even provided higher cellular uptake than the unmodified polyplexes (PEG-PDMAEMA/DNA polyplexes). Confocal microscopy studies showed that the DNA of TGN-PEG-PDMAEMA/DNA polyplexes entered into the nuclei through the endosome/lysosome pathway. The transfection efficiency of TGN-modified polyplexes was higher than that of unmodified polyplexes both in vitro and in vivo. The results obtained from frozen sections indicated the widespread expression of an exogenous gene in the mouse brain after intravenous injection. Therefore, the results demonstrate that the TGN-decorated PEG-PDMAEMA developed in this study could be utilized as a potential vehicle for gene delivery to the brain. PMID:23245924

  2. Selection of single chain variable fragment (scFv) antibodies from a hyperimmunized phage display library for the detection of the antibiotic monensin.

    PubMed

    Makvandi-Nejad, Shokouh; Sheedy, Claudia; Veldhuis, Linda; Richard, Gabrielle; Hall, J Christopher

    2010-08-31

    Concerns over the occurrence of the veterinary antibiotic monensin (MW 671Da) in animal food products and water have given rise to the need for a sensitive and rapid detection method. In this study, four monensin-specific single chain variable fragments (scFvs) were isolated from a hyperimmunized phage-displayed library originating from splenocytes of a mouse immunized with monensin conjugated to bovine serum albumin (BSA). The coding sequences of the scFvs were engineered in the order 5'-V(L)-linker-V(H)-3', where the linker encodes for Gly(10)Ser(7)Arg. Three rounds of selection were performed against monensin conjugated to chicken ovalbumin (OVA) and keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH), alternately. In the third round of selection, two different strategies, which differed in the number of washes and the concentration of the coating conjugates, were used to select for specific binders to monensin. A total of 376 clones from round two and three were screened for their specific binding to monensin conjugates and positive clones were sequenced. It was found that 80% of clones from round three contained a stop codon. After removing the stop codon by site-directed mutagenesis, ten binders with different amino acid sequences were subcloned into the vector pMED2 for soluble expression in Escherichia coli HB2151. Four of these scFvs bound to free monensin as determined using competitive fluorescence polarization assays (C-FPs). IC(50) values ranged from 0.031 and 231 microM. A cross-reactivity assay against salinomycin, lasalocid A, kanamycin and ampicillin revealed that the two best binders were highly specific to monensin.

  3. Genome Sequences of Pseudomonas oryzihabitans Phage POR1 and Pseudomonas aeruginosa Phage PAE1

    PubMed Central

    Dyson, Zoe A.; Seviour, Robert J.; Tucci, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    We report the genome sequences of two double-stranded DNA siphoviruses, POR1 infective for Pseudomonas oryzihabitans and PAE1 infective for Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The phage POR1 genome showed no nucleotide sequence homology to any other DNA phage sequence in the GenBank database, while phage PAE1 displayed synteny to P. aeruginosa phages M6, MP1412, and YuA. PMID:27313312

  4. Genome Sequences of Pseudomonas oryzihabitans Phage POR1 and Pseudomonas aeruginosa Phage PAE1.

    PubMed

    Dyson, Zoe A; Seviour, Robert J; Tucci, Joseph; Petrovski, Steve

    2016-06-16

    We report the genome sequences of two double-stranded DNA siphoviruses, POR1 infective for Pseudomonas oryzihabitans and PAE1 infective for Pseudomonas aeruginosa The phage POR1 genome showed no nucleotide sequence homology to any other DNA phage sequence in the GenBank database, while phage PAE1 displayed synteny to P. aeruginosa phages M6, MP1412, and YuA.

  5. Genome Sequences of Pseudomonas oryzihabitans Phage POR1 and Pseudomonas aeruginosa Phage PAE1.

    PubMed

    Dyson, Zoe A; Seviour, Robert J; Tucci, Joseph; Petrovski, Steve

    2016-01-01

    We report the genome sequences of two double-stranded DNA siphoviruses, POR1 infective for Pseudomonas oryzihabitans and PAE1 infective for Pseudomonas aeruginosa The phage POR1 genome showed no nucleotide sequence homology to any other DNA phage sequence in the GenBank database, while phage PAE1 displayed synteny to P. aeruginosa phages M6, MP1412, and YuA. PMID:27313312

  6. On the mechanism of targeting of phage fusion protein-modified nanocarriers: only the binding peptide sequence matters.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tao; Kulkarni, Nikita; D'Souza, Gerard G M; Petrenko, Valery A; Torchilin, Vladimir P

    2011-10-01

    The integration of pharmaceutical nanocarriers with phage display techniques is emerging as a new paradigm for targeted cancer nanomedicines. We explored the direct use of landscape phage fusion proteins for the self-assembly of phage-derived binding peptides to liposomes for cancer cell targeting. The primary purpose of this study was to elucidate the targeting mechanism with a particular emphasis on the relative contributions of the two motifs that make up the landscape phage fusion protein (a binding peptide and the phage pVIII coat protein) to the targeting efficiency. Using transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering, we confirmed the formation of phage-liposomes. Using FACS analysis, fluorescence microscopy, and fluorescence photospectrometry, we found that liposomes modified with MCF-7-specific phage fusion proteins (MCF-7 binding peptide, DMPGTVLP, fused to the phage PVIII coat protein) provided a strong and specific association with target MCF-7 cancer cells but not with cocultured, nontarget cells including C166-GFP and NIH3T3. The substitution for the binding peptide fused to phage pVIII coat protein abolished the targeting specificity. The addition of free binding peptide, DMPGTVLP, competitively inhibited the interaction of MCF-7-specific phage-liposomes with target MCF-7 cells but showed no reduction of MCF-7-associated plain liposomes. The proteolysis of the binding peptide reduced MCF-7 cell-associated phage-liposomes in a proteinase K (PK) concentration-dependent manner with no effect on the binding of plain liposomes to MCF-7 cells. Overall, only the binding peptide motif was involved in the targeting specificity of phage-liposomes. The presence of phage pVIII coat protein did not interfere with the targeting efficiency. PMID:21675738

  7. On the mechanism of targeting of phage fusion protein-modified nanocarriers: only the binding peptide sequence matters

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tao; Kulkarni, Nikita; D’Souza, Gerard G.M.; Petrenko, Valery A.; Torchilin, Vladimir P.

    2011-01-01

    The integration of pharmaceutical nanocarriers with phage display techniques is emerging as a new paradigm for targeted cancer nanomedicines. We explored the direct use of landscape phage fusion proteins for the self-assembly of phage-derived binding peptides to liposomes for cancer cell targeting. The primary purpose of this study was to elucidate the targeting mechanism with a particular emphasis on the relative contributions of the two motifs that make up the landscape phage fusion protein (a binding peptide and the phage pVIII coat protein) to the targeting efficiency. Using transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering, we confirmed the formation of phage-liposomes. Using FACS analysis, fluorescence microscopy, and fluorescence photospectrometry, we found that liposomes modified with MCF-7-specific phage fusion proteins (MCF-7 binding peptide, DMPGTVLP, fused to the phage PVIII coat protein) provided a strong and specific association with target MCF-7 cancer cells but not with co-cultured, non-target cells including C166-GFP and NIH3T3. The substitution for the binding peptide fused to phage pVIII coat protein abolished the targeting specificity. The addition of free binding peptide, DMPGTVLP, competitively inhibited the interaction of MCF-7-specific phage-liposomes with target MCF-7 cells but showed no reduction of MCF-7-associated plain liposomes. The proteolysis of the binding peptide reduced MCF-7 cell-associated phage-liposomes in a proteinase K (PK) concentration-dependent manner with no effect on the binding of plain liposomes to MCF-7 cells. Overall, only the binding peptide motif was involved in the targeting specificity of phage-liposomes. The presence of phage pVIII coat protein did not interfere with the targeting efficiency. PMID:21675738

  8. Novel anti-Tn single-chain Fv-Fc fusion proteins derived from immunized phage library and antibody Fc domain.

    PubMed

    Kubota, Tsuguo; Matsushita, Takefumi; Niwa, Rinpei; Kumagai, Izumi; Nakamura, Kazuyasu

    2010-09-01

    Tn[GalNAc(α1-3)-Ser/Thr] antigen, a tumor-associated carbohydrate antigen, is highly expressed in various tumors and an attractive candidate for cancer immunotherapy. The generation of an anti-Tn antibody is a first step toward the construction of new anticancer molecules. However, because of the simple and small conformation of the Tn molecule, it is difficult to generate an anti-Tn antibody for therapeutic use by conventional hybridoma technology. The purpose of this study was to isolate anti-Tn single-chain antibody fragments (scFv) by phage display technology from a novel immunised library, to attach an antibody constant region (Fc) and to convert them to scFv-Fc fusion proteins. The scFv-Fcs obtained here showed strict specificity against the Tn antigen and also showed antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity. These results suggest a potential use of this antibody generating method by phage display and indicate the potential of Fc-fusion proteins as therapeutic candidates.

  9. Generation and characterization of a novel recombinant antibody against LMP1-TES1 of Epstein-Barr virus isolated by phage display.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dawei; Mao, Yuan; Cao, Qing; Xiong, Lin; Wen, Juan; Chen, Renjie; Zhu, Jin

    2013-04-22

    Latent Membrane Protein 1 (LMP1) is a primary target for controlling tumorigenesis in Epstein-Barr virus related malignancies; in this study, we aimed to develop a specific antibody against the TES1 domain of the oncogenic LMP1. We screened a full human naïve Fab phage library against TES1 peptide, which consisted of C terminal-activating regions proximal 44 amino acids. After three rounds of panning, enrichment and testing by phage ELISA and further analyzed by DNA sequencing, we selected a phage clone with the highest affinity to LMP1-TES1 and designated it as htesFab. The positive clone was expressed in Escherichia coli and the purified htesFab was characterized for its binding specificity and affinity to LMP1. ELISA, immunofluorescence and FACS analysis confirmed that htesFab could recognize LMP1 TES1 both in vitro and in LMP1 expressing HNE2-LMP1 cells. Furthermore, MTT assay showed that htesFab inhibited the proliferation of HNE2-LMP1 cells in a dose-dependent manner. In summary, this study reported the isolation and characterization of human Fab, which specifically targets the C terminal region/TES1 of LMP1, and has potential to be developed as novel tool for the diagnosis and therapy of Epstein-Barr virus related carcinoma.

  10. A novel Omp25-binding peptide screened by phage display can inhibit Brucella abortus 2308 infection in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Junbo; Guo, Fei; Huang, Xiaoqiang; Zhang, Hui; Wang, Yuanzhi; Yin, Shuanghong; Li, Zhiqiang

    2014-01-01

    Brucellosis is a globally distributed zoonotic disease affecting animals and humans, and current antibiotic and vaccine strategies are not optimal. The surface-exposed protein Omp25 is involved in Brucella virulence and plays an important role in Brucella pathogenesis during infection, suggesting that Omp25 could be a useful target for selecting potential therapeutic molecules to inhibit Brucella pathogenesis. In this study, we identified, we believe for the first time, peptides that bind specifically to the Omp25 protein of pathogens, using a phage panning technique, After four rounds of panning, 42 plaques of eluted phages were subjected to pyrosequencing. Four phage clones that bound better than the other clones were selected following confirmation by ELISA and affinity constant determination. The peptides selected could significantly inhibit Brucella abortus 2308 (S2308) internalization and intracellular growth in RAW264.7 macrophages, and significantly induce secretion of TNF-α and IL-12 in peptide- and S2308-treated cells. Any observed peptide (OP11, OP27, OP35 or OP40) could significantly inhibit S2308 infection in BALB/c mice. Moreover, the peptide OP11 was the best candidate peptide for inhibiting S2308 infection in vitro and in vivo. These results suggest that peptide OP11 has potential for exploitation as a peptide drug in resisting S2308 infection. PMID:24722798

  11. Recombinant phage probes for Listeria monocytogenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carnazza, S.; Gioffrè, G.; Felici, F.; Guglielmino, S.

    2007-10-01

    Monitoring of food and environmental samples for biological threats, such as Listeria monocytogenes, requires probes that specifically bind biological agents and ensure their immediate and efficient detection. There is a need for robust and inexpensive affinity probes as an alternative to antibodies. These probes may be recruited from random peptide libraries displayed on filamentous phage. In this study, we selected from two phage peptide libraries phage clones displaying peptides capable of specific and strong binding to the L. monocytogenes cell surface. The ability of isolated phage clones to interact specifically with L. monocytogenes was demonstrated using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and confirmed by co-precipitation assay. We also assessed the sensitivity of phage-bacteria binding by PCR on phage-captured Listeria cells, which could be detected at a concentration of 104 cells ml-1. In addition, as proof-of-concept, we tested the possibility of immobilizing the affinity-selected phages to a putative biosensor surface. The quality of phage deposition was monitored by ELISA and fluorescent microscopy. Phage-bacterial binding was confirmed by high power optical phase contrast microscopy. Overall, the results of this work validate the concept of affinity-selected recombinant filamentous phages as probes for detecting and monitoring bacterial agents under any conditions that warrant their recognition, including in food products.

  12. The habits of highly effective phages: population dynamics as a framework for identifying therapeutic phages.

    PubMed

    Bull, James J; Gill, Jason J

    2014-01-01

    The use of bacteriophages as antibacterial agents is being actively researched on a global scale. Typically, the phages used are isolated from the wild by plating on the bacteria of interest, and a far larger set of candidate phages is often available than can be used in any application. When an excess of phages is available, how should the best phages be identified? Here we consider phage-bacterial population dynamics as a basis for evaluating and predicting phage success. A central question is whether the innate dynamical properties of phages are the determinants of success, or instead, whether extrinsic, indirect effects can be responsible. We address the dynamical perspective, motivated in part by the absence of dynamics in previously suggested principles of phage therapy. Current mathematical models of bacterial-phage dynamics do not capture the realities of in vivo dynamics, nor is this likely to change, but they do give insight to qualitative properties that may be generalizable. In particular, phage adsorption rate may be critical to treatment success, so understanding the effects of the in vivo environment on host availability may allow prediction of useful phages prior to in vivo experimentation. Principles for predicting efficacy may be derived by developing a greater understanding of the in vivo system, or such principles could be determined empirically by comparing phages with known differences in their dynamic properties. The comparative approach promises to be a powerful method of discovering the key to phage success. We offer five recommendations for future study: (i) compare phages differing in treatment efficacy to identify the phage properties associated with success, (ii) assay dynamics in vivo, (iii) understand mechanisms of bacterial escape from phages, (iv) test phages in model infections that are relevant to the intended clinical applications, and (v) develop new classes of models for phage growth in spatially heterogeneous environments

  13. Production and Purification of Recombinant Filamentous Bacteriophages Displaying Immunogenic Heterologous Epitopes.

    PubMed

    Deng, Lei; Linero, Florencia; Saelens, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    Viruslike particles often combine high physical stability with robust immunogenicity. Furthermore, when such particles are based on bacteriophages, they can be produced in high amounts at minimal cost and typically will require only standard biologically contained facilities. We provide protocols for the characterization and purification of recombinant viruslike particles derived from filamentous bacteriophages. As an example, we focus on filamentous Escherichia coli fd phage displaying a conserved influenza A virus epitope that is fused genetically to the N-terminus of the major coat protein of this phage. A step-by-step procedure to obtain a high-titer, pure recombinant phage preparation is provided. We also describe a quality control experiment based on a biological readout of the purified fd phage preparation. These protocols together with the highlighted critical steps may facilitate generic implementation of the provided procedures for the display of other epitopes by recombinant fd phages.

  14. Synthetic Phage for Tissue Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Merzlyak, Anna; Lee, Seung-Wuk

    2014-01-01

    Controlling structural organization and signaling motif display is of great importance to design the functional tissue regenerating materials. Synthetic phage, genetically engineered M13 bacteriophage has been recently introduced as novel tissue regeneration materials to display a high density of cell-signaling peptides on their major coat proteins for tissue regeneration purposes. Structural advantages of their long-rod shape and monodispersity can be taken together to construct nanofibrous scaffolds which support cell proliferation and differentiation as well as direct orientation of their growth in two or three dimensions. This review demonstrated how functional synthetic phage is designed and subsequently utilized for tissue regeneration that offers potential cell therapy. PMID:24991085

  15. Gold nanoprobe functionalized with specific fusion protein selection from phage display and its application in rapid, selective and sensitive colorimetric biosensing of Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Liu, Pei; Han, Lei; Wang, Fei; Petrenko, Valery A; Liu, Aihua

    2016-08-15

    Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) is one of the most ubiquitous pathogens in public healthcare worldwide. It holds great insterest in establishing robust analytical method for S. aureus. Herein, we report a S. aureus-specific recognition element, isolated from phage monoclone GQTTLTTS, which was selected from f8/8 landscape phage library against S. aureus in a high-throughput way. By functionalizing cysteamine (CS)-stabilized gold nanoparticles (CS-AuNPs) with S. aureus-specific pVIII fusion protein (fusion-pVIII), a bifunctional nanoprobe (CS-AuNPs@fusion-pVIII) for S. aureus was developed. In this strategy, the CS-AuNPs@fusion-pVIII could be induced to aggregate quickly in the presence of target S. aureus, resulting in a rapid colorimetric response of gold nanoparticles. More importantly, the as-designed probe exhibited excellent selectivity over other bacteria. Thus, the CS-AuNPs@fusion-pVIII could be used as the indicator of target S. aureus. This assay can detect as low as 19CFUmL(-1)S. aureus within 30min. Further, this approach can be applicable to detect S. aureus in real water samples. Due to its sensitivity, specificity and rapidness, this proposed method is promising for on-site testing of S. aureus without using any costly instruments.

  16. Generation of a phage-display library of single-domain camelid VH H antibodies directed against Chlamydomonas reinhardtii antigens, and characterization of VH Hs binding cell-surface antigens.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Wenzhi; Rosenberg, Julian N; Wauchope, Akelia D; Tremblay, Jacqueline M; Shoemaker, Charles B; Weeks, Donald P; Oyler, George A

    2013-11-01

    Single-domain antibodies (sdAbs) are powerful tools for the detection, quantification, purification and subcellular localization of proteins of interest in biological research. We have generated camelid (Lama pacos) heavy chain-only variable VH domain (VH H) libraries against antigens in total cell lysates from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. The sdAbs in the sera from immunized animals and VH H antibody domains isolated from the library show specificity to C. reinhardtii and lack of reactivity to antigens from four other algae: Chlorella variabilis, Coccomyxa subellipsoidea, Nannochloropsis oceanica and Thalassiosira pseudonana. Antibodies were produced against a diverse representation of antigens as evidenced by sera ELISA and protein-blot analyses. A phage-display library consisting of the VH H region contained at least 10(6) individual transformants, and thus should represent a wide range of C. reinhardtii antigens. The utility of the phage library was demonstrated by using live C. reinhardtii cells to pan for VH H clones with specific recognition of cell-surface epitopes. The lead candidate VH H clones (designated B11 and H10) bound to C. reinhardtii with EC50 values ≤ 0.5 nm. Treatment of cells with VH H B11 fused to the mCherry or green fluorescent proteins allowed brilliant and specific staining of the C. reinhardtii cell wall and analysis of cell-wall genesis during cell division. Such high-complexity VH H antibody libraries for algae will be valuable tools for algal researchers and biotechnologists.

  17. Ecofriendly antiglare film derived from biomass using ultraviolet curing nanoimprint lithography for high-definition display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takei, Satoshi; Murakami, Gaku; Mori, Yuto; Ichikawa, Takumi; Sekiguchi, Atsushi; Obata, Tsutomu; Yokoyama, Yoshiyuki; Mizuno, Wataru; Sumioka, Junji; Horita, Yuji

    2013-07-01

    Nanopatterning of an ecofriendly antiglare film derived from biomass using an ultraviolet curing nanoimprint lithography is reported. Developed sugar-related organic compounds with liquid glucose and trehalose derivatives derived from biomass produced high-quality imprint images of pillar patterns with a 230-nm diameter. Ecofriendly antiglare film with liquid glucose and trehalose derivatives derived from biomass was indicated to achieve the real refraction index of 1.45 to 1.53 at 350 to 800 nm, low imaginary refractive index of <0.005 and low volumetric shrinkage of 4.8% during ultraviolet irradiation. A distinctive bulky glucose structure in glucose and trehalose derivatives was considered to be effective for minimizing the volumetric shrinkage of resist film during ultraviolet irradiation, in addition to suitable optical properties for high-definition display.

  18. Established a new double antibodies sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for detecting Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) Cry1Ab toxin based single-chain variable fragments from a naïve mouse phage displayed library.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao; Xu, Chongxin; Zhang, Cunzheng; Liu, Yuan; Xie, Yajing; Liu, Xianjin

    2014-04-01

    ScFvs are composed of the variable regions of the heavy and light chains via a short linker that maintain the specific antigen binding abilities of antibodies. In this study, we constructed a naïve mouse phage displayed library to generate scFvs against Cry1Ab toxin. After affinity panning, positive phage-scFvs were isolated, sequenced and characterized by ELISA. The best binding ability scFv-G9 was expressed and purified. SDS-PAGE indicated that the relative molecular mass of scFv was estimated at 28 kDa. The purified scFv-G9 was used to develop a new DAS-ELISA for detecting Cry1Ab toxin, within minimum detection limit of 0.008 μg mL(-1), a working range 0.018-6.23 μg mL(-1), and the linear curve displayed an acceptable correlation coefficient of 0.98. The cross-reactivity showed that scFv-G9 had strongly binding ability to Cry1Ac toxin, but not to Cry1B, Cry1C and Cry1F toxin. The average recoveries of Cry1Ab toxin from spiked leaf and rice samples were in the range 92.1-94.8%, and 91.6-98.6%, respectively, with a coefficient of variation (C.V) less than 5.0%. These results showed promising applications of scfv-G9 for detecting Cry1Ab toxin with new DAS-ELISA.

  19. Diversity and censoring of landscape phage libraries

    PubMed Central

    Kuzmicheva, G.A.; Jayanna, P.K.; Sorokulova, I.B.; Petrenko, V.A.

    2009-01-01

    Libraries of random peptides displayed on the surface of filamentous phages are a valuable source for biospecific ligands. However, their successful use can be hindered by a disproportionate representation of different phage clones and fluctuation of their composition that arises during phage reproduction, which have potential to affect efficiency of selection of clones with an optimal binding. Therefore, there is a need to develop phage display libraries with extended and varied repertoires of displayed peptides. In this work, we compared the complexity, evolution and representation of two phage display libraries displaying foreign octamers and nonamers in 4000 copies as the N-terminal part of the major coat protein pVIII of phage fd–tet (landscape libraries). They were obtained by replacement of amino acids 2–4 and 2–5 of pVIII with random octa- and nonamers, respectively. Statistical analysis of the libraries revealed their dramatic censoring and evolution during amplification. Further, a survey of both libraries for clones that bind common selectors revealed the presence of different non-overlapping families of target-specific clones in each library justifying the concept that different landscape libraries cover different areas of a sequence space. PMID:18988692

  20. Flagellar display of bone protein-derived peptides for studying peptide-mediated biomineralization

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dong; Newton, Salete M. C.; Klebba, Philip E.; Mao, Chuanbin

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial flagellum is self-assembled primarily from thousands of a protein subunit called flagellin (FliC). A foreign peptide can be fully displayed on the surface of the flagellum through inserting it into every constituent protein subunit. To shed light into the role of bone proteins during nucleation of hydroxyapatite (HAP), representative domains from type I collagen, including a part of N-, C-terminal, N-, C-zone around hole zone and a 8 repetitive Gly-Pro-Pro (GPP8) sequence similar to central sequence of type I collagen, were separately displayed on the surface of the flagella. Moreover, eight negatively charged, contiguous glutamic acid residues (E8) and two other characteristic sequences, derived from a representative non-collagenous protein called bone sialoprotein (BSP), were also displayed on flagella. After being incubated in a HAP supersaturated precursor solution, flagella displaying E8 or GPP8 sequences were found to be coated with a layer of HAP nanocrystals. Very weak or no nucleation are observed on flagella displaying other peptides being tested. We also found that calcium ions can induce the assembly of the negatively charged E8 flagella into bundles mimicking collagen fibers, followed by the formation of HAP nanocrystals with the crystallographic c-axis preferentially aligned with long axes of flagella which is similar to that along the collagen fibrils in bone. This work demonstrates that due to the ease of peptide display on flagella and self-assembly of flagella, flagella can serve as a platform for studying biomineralization and as a building block to generate bone-like biomaterials. PMID:23148645

  1. Femtomolar Fab binding affinities to a protein target by alternative CDR residue co-optimization strategies without phage or cell surface display

    PubMed Central

    Plittersdorf, Hanna; Hesse, Oliver; Scheidig, Andreas; Strerath, Michael; Gritzan, Uwe; Pellengahr, Klaus; Scholz, Peter; Eicker, Andrea; Myszka, David; Haupts, Ulrich

    2012-01-01

    In therapeutic or diagnostic antibody discovery, affinity maturation is frequently required to optimize binding properties. In some cases, achieving very high affinity is challenging using the display-based optimization technologies. Here we present an approach that begins with the creation and clonal, quantitative analysis of soluble Fab libraries with complete diversification in adjacent residue pairs encompassing every complementarity-determining region position. This was followed by alternative recombination approaches and high throughput screening to co-optimize large sets of the found improving mutations. We applied this approach to the affinity maturation of the anti-tumor necrosis factor antibody adalimumab and achieved ~500-fold affinity improvement, resulting in femtomolar binding. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the in vitro engineering of a femtomolar affinity antibody against a protein target without display screening. We compare our findings to a previous report that employed extensive mutagenesis and recombination libraries with yeast display screening. The present approach is widely applicable to the most challenging of affinity maturation efforts. PMID:22531438

  2. Pro-region engineering for improved yeast display and secretion of brain derived neurotrophic factor.

    PubMed

    Burns, Michael L; Malott, Thomas M; Metcalf, Kevin J; Puguh, Arthya; Chan, Jonah R; Shusta, Eric V

    2016-03-01

    Brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a promising therapeutic candidate for a variety of neurological diseases. However, it is difficult to produce as a recombinant protein. In its native mammalian context, BDNF is first produced as a pro-protein with subsequent proteolytic removal of the pro-region to yield mature BDNF protein. Therefore, in an attempt to improve yeast as a host for heterologous BDNF production, the BDNF pro-region was first evaluated for its effects on BDNF surface display and secretion. Addition of the wild-type pro-region to yeast BDNF production constructs improved BDNF folding both as a surface-displayed and secreted protein in terms of binding its natural receptors TrkB and p75, but titers remained low. Looking to further enhance the chaperone-like functions provided by the pro-region, two rounds of directed evolution were performed, yielding mutated pro-regions that further improved the display and secretion properties of BDNF. Subsequent optimization of the protease recognition site was used to control whether the produced protein was in pro- or mature BDNF forms. Taken together, we have demonstrated an effective strategy for improving BDNF compatibility with yeast protein engineering and secretion platforms. PMID:26580314

  3. Ligand-directed profiling of organelles with internalizing phage libraries

    PubMed Central

    Dobroff, Andrey S.; Rangel, Roberto; Guzman-Roja, Liliana; Salmeron, Carolina C.; Gelovani, Juri G.; Sidman, Richard L.; Bologa, Cristian G.; Oprea, Tudor I.; Brinker, C. Jeffrey; Pasqualini, Renata; Arap, Wadih

    2015-01-01

    Phage display is a resourceful tool to, in an unbiased manner, discover and characterize functional protein-protein interactions, to create vaccines, and to engineer peptides, antibodies, and other proteins as targeted diagnostic and/or therapeutic agents. Recently, our group has developed a new class of internalizing phage (iPhage) for ligand-directed targeting of organelles and/or to identify molecular pathways within live cells. This unique technology is suitable for applications ranging from fundamental cell biology to drug development. Here we describe the method for generating and screening the iPhage display system, and explain how to select and validate candidate internalizing homing peptide. PMID:25640897

  4. Development of a workflow for screening and identification of α-amylase inhibitory peptides from food source using an integrated Bioinformatics-phage display approach: Case study - Cumin seed.

    PubMed

    Siow, Hwee-Leng; Lim, Theam Soon; Gan, Chee-Yuen

    2017-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to develop an efficient workflow to discover α-amylase inhibitory peptides from cumin seed. A total of 56 unknown peptides was initially found in the cumin seed protein hydrolysate. They were subjected to 2 different in silico screenings and 6 peptides were shortlisted. The peptides were then subjected to in vitro selection using phage display technique and 3 clones (CSP3, CSP4 and CSP6) showed high affinity in binding α-amylase. These clones were subjected to the inhibitory test and only CSP4 and CSP6 exhibited high inhibitory activity. Therefore, these peptides were chemically synthesized for validation purposes. CSP4 exhibited inhibition of bacterial and human salivary α-amylases with IC50 values of 0.11 and 0.04μmol, respectively, whereas CSP6 was about 0.10 and 0.15μmol, respectively. Results showed that the strength of each protocol has been successfully combined as deemed fit to enhance the α-amylase inhibitor peptide discovery.

  5. Development of a workflow for screening and identification of α-amylase inhibitory peptides from food source using an integrated Bioinformatics-phage display approach: Case study - Cumin seed.

    PubMed

    Siow, Hwee-Leng; Lim, Theam Soon; Gan, Chee-Yuen

    2017-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to develop an efficient workflow to discover α-amylase inhibitory peptides from cumin seed. A total of 56 unknown peptides was initially found in the cumin seed protein hydrolysate. They were subjected to 2 different in silico screenings and 6 peptides were shortlisted. The peptides were then subjected to in vitro selection using phage display technique and 3 clones (CSP3, CSP4 and CSP6) showed high affinity in binding α-amylase. These clones were subjected to the inhibitory test and only CSP4 and CSP6 exhibited high inhibitory activity. Therefore, these peptides were chemically synthesized for validation purposes. CSP4 exhibited inhibition of bacterial and human salivary α-amylases with IC50 values of 0.11 and 0.04μmol, respectively, whereas CSP6 was about 0.10 and 0.15μmol, respectively. Results showed that the strength of each protocol has been successfully combined as deemed fit to enhance the α-amylase inhibitor peptide discovery. PMID:27507449

  6. Two novel neutralizing antigenic epitopes of the s1 subunit protein of a QX-like avian infectious bronchitis virus strain Sczy3 as revealed using a phage display peptide library.

    PubMed

    Zou, Nianli; Xia, Jing; Wang, Fuyan; Duan, Zhenzhen; Miao, Dan; Yan, Qigui; Cao, Sanjie; Wen, Xintian; Liu, Ping; Huang, Yong

    2015-11-15

    The spike (S) protein of the infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) plays a central role in the pathogenicity, the immune antibody production, serotype and the tissue tropism. In this study, we generate 11 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against S1 subunit of IBV Sczy3 strain, and two mAbs 1D5 and 6A12 were positive in indirect ELISA against both His-S1 protein and the purified whole viral antigen. MAb 6A12 and 1D5 could recognized by other 10 IBV strains (IBVs) from five different genotypes, except that 1D5 had a relatively low reaction with two of the 10 tested IBVs. End-point neutralizing assay performed in chicken embro kidney (CEK) cells revealed that the neutralization titer of 6A12 and 1D5 against Sczy3 reached 1:44.7 and 1:40.6, respectively. After screening a phage display peptide library and peptide scanning, we identified two linear B-cell epitopes that were recognized by the mAbs 1D5 and 6A12, which corresponded to the amino acid sequences (87)PPQGMAW(93) and (412)IQTRTEP(418), respectively, in the IBV S1 subunit. Sequences comparison revealed that epitope (412)IQTRTEP(418) was conserved among IBVs, while the epitope (87)PPQGMAW(93) was relatively variable among IBVs. The novel mAbs and the epitopes identified will be useful for developing diagnostic assays for IBV infections.

  7. Engineered phages for electronics.

    PubMed

    Cui, Yue

    2016-11-15

    Phages are traditionally widely studied in biology and chemistry. In recent years, engineered phages have attracted significant attentions for functionalization or construction of electronic devices, due to their specific binding, catalytic, nucleating or electronic properties. To apply the engineered phages in electronics, these are a number of interesting questions: how to engineer phages for electronics? How are the engineered phages characterized? How to assemble materials with engineered phages? How are the engineered phages micro or nanopatterned? What are the strategies to construct electronics devices with engineered phages? This review will highlight the early attempts to address these questions and explore the fundamental and practical aspects of engineered phages in electronics, including the approaches for selection or expression of specific peptides on phage coat proteins, characterization of engineered phages in electronics, assembly of electronic materials, patterning of engineered phages, and construction of electronic devices. It provides the methodologies and opens up ex-cit-ing op-por-tu-ni-ties for the development of a variety of new electronic materials and devices based on engineered phages for future applications.

  8. Intention Perception in High Functioning People with Autism Spectrum Disorders Using Animacy Displays Derived from Human Actions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAleer, Phil; Kay, Jim W.; Pollick, Frank E.; Rutherford, M. D.

    2011-01-01

    The perception of intent in Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) often relies on synthetic animacy displays. This study tests intention perception in ASD via animacy stimuli derived from human motion. Using a forced choice task, 28 participants (14 ASDs; 14 age and verbal-I.Q. matched controls) categorized displays of Chasing, Fighting, Flirting,…

  9. A Monoclonal Fab Derived from a Human Nonimmune Phage Library Reveals a New Epitope on gp41 and Neutralizes Diverse Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Strains▿

    PubMed Central

    Gustchina, Elena; Louis, John M.; Lam, Son N.; Bewley, Carole A.; Clore, G. Marius

    2007-01-01

    A monoclonal Fab (Fab 3674) selected from a human nonimmune phage library by panning against the chimeric construct NCCG-gp41 (which comprises an exposed coiled-coil trimer of gp41 N helices fused in the helical phase onto the minimal thermostable ectodomain of gp41) is described. Fab 3674 is shown to neutralize diverse laboratory-adapted B strains of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and primary isolates of subtypes A, B, and C in an Env-pseudotyped-virus neutralization assay, albeit with reduced potency (approximately 25-fold) compared to that of 2F5 and 4E10. Alanine scanning mutagenesis maps a novel epitope to a shallow groove on the N helices of gp41 that is exposed between two C helices in the fusogenic six-helix bundle conformation of gp41. Bivalent Fab 3674 and the C34 peptide (a potent fusion inhibitor derived from the C helix of gp41) are shown to act at similar stages of the fusion reaction and to neutralize HIV-1 synergistically, providing additional evidence that the epitope of Fab 3674 is new and distinct from the binding site of C34. PMID:17898046

  10. Chemical strategies for the covalent modification of filamentous phage

    PubMed Central

    Bernard, Jenna M. L.; Francis, Matthew B.

    2014-01-01

    Historically filamentous bacteriophage have been known to be the workhorse of phage display due to their ability to link genotype to phenotype. More recently, the filamentous phage scaffold has proven to be powerful outside the realm of phage display technology in fields such as molecular imaging, cancer research and materials, and vaccine development. The ability of the virion to serve as a platform for a variety of applications heavily relies on the functionalization of the phage coat proteins with a wide variety of functionalities. Genetic modification of the coat proteins has been the most widely used strategy for functionalizing the virion; however, complementary chemical modification strategies can help to diversify the range of materials that can be developed. This review emphasizes the recent advances that have been made in the chemical modification of filamentous phage as well as some of the challenges that are involved in functionalizing the virion. PMID:25566240

  11. VHH phage-based competitive real-time immuno-polymerase chain reaction for ultrasensitive detection of ochratoxin A in cereal.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xing; Xu, Yang; Xiong, Yong-hua; Tu, Zhui; Li, Yan-ping; He, Zhen-yun; Qiu, Yu-lou; Fu, Jin-heng; Gee, Shirley J; Hammock, Bruce D

    2014-08-01

    Phage display-mediated immuno-polymerase chain reaction (PD-IPCR) is an ultrasensitive detection technology that combines the advantages of immuno-PCR and phage display. The phage particle, which displayed antibody fragments including single-chain fragment variable (scFv), variable domain of heavy-chain antibodies (VHH), and antigen-binding fragment (Fab) on the surface can be directly used in IPCR, supplying both the detection antibody and deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) template. In this work, we used ochratoxin A (OTA) as a model system to study the capacity of PD-IPCR in the detection of toxic small molecular weight compounds, especially mycotoxins. An alpaca-derived VHH library was constructed and subjected to four cycles of panning. In total, 16 clones with four unique sequences were selected by competitive binding with OTA. The clone VHH-28 resulted in the lowest 50% inhibitory concentration of 0.31 ng/mL in the phage enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and was selected to develop the VHH phage-based real-time immuno-PCR (RT-IPCR). The detection limit of the VHH phage-based RT-IPCR was 3.7 pg/L, with a linear range of 0.01-1000 pg/mL. This method was compared with conventional ELISA, and validation results indicated the reliability of VHH phage-based RT-IPCR in the detection of OTA in cereal samples. This study provides a new idea for the ultrasensitive detection of mycotoxins and other toxic small molecular weight compounds.

  12. Molecular imaging of T4 phage in mammalian tissues and cells

    PubMed Central

    Kaźmierczak, Zuzanna; Piotrowicz, Agnieszka; Owczarek, Barbara; Hodyra, Katarzyna; Miernikiewicz, Paulina; Lecion, Dorota; Harhala, Marek; Górski, Andrzej; Dąbrowska, Krystyna

    2014-01-01

    Advances in phage therapy encourage scientific interest in interactions of phages with human and animal organisms. This has created a need for developing tools that facilitate studies of phage circulation and deposition in tissues and cells. Here we propose a new green fluorescent protein (GFP)-based method for T4 phage molecular imaging in living systems. The method employs decoration of a phage capsid with GFP fused to the N-terminus of Hoc protein by in vivo phage display. Fluorescent phages were positively assessed as regards their applicability for detection inside living mammalian cells (by phagocytosis) and tissues (filtering and retention by lymph nodes and spleen). Molecular imaging provides innovative techniques that have brought substantial progress in life sciences. We propose it as a useful tool for studies of phage biology. PMID:24653943

  13. High frequency generalized transduction by miniMu plasmid phage.

    PubMed

    Wang, B M; Liu, L; Groisman, E A; Casadaban, M J; Berg, C M

    1987-06-01

    Deletion derivatives of phage Mu which replicate as multicopy plasmids, and also transpose and package like Mu, have been developed for the in vivo cloning of bacterial genes. We show here that these miniMu plasmid phage are also efficient at generalized transduction and that both in vivo cloning and generalized transduction of a given gene can be accomplished in a single experiment.

  14. Estimating richness from phage metagenomes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bacteriophages are important drivers of ecosystem functions, yet little is known about the vast majority of phages. Phage metagenomics, or the study of the collective genome of an assemblage of phages, enables the investigation of broad ecological questions in phage communities. One ecological cha...

  15. Genomic Characterization of the Novel Aeromonas hydrophila Phage Ahp1 Suggests the Derivation of a New Subgroup from phiKMV-Like Family.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian-Bin; Lin, Nien-Tsung; Tseng, Yi-Hsiung; Weng, Shu-Fen

    2016-01-01

    Aeromonas hydrophila is an opportunistic pathogenic bacterium causing diseases in human and fish. The emergence of multidrug-resistant A. hydrophila isolates has been increasing in recent years. In this study, we have isolated a novel virulent podophage of A. hydrophila, designated as Ahp1, from waste water. Ahp1 has a rapid adsorption (96% adsorbed in 2 min), a latent period of 15 min, and a burst size of 112 PFU per infected cell. At least eighteen Ahp1 virion proteins were visualized in SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, with a 36-kDa protein being the predicted major capsid protein. Genome analysis of Ahp1 revealed a linear doubled-stranded DNA genome of 42,167 bp with a G + C content of 58.8%. The genome encodes 46 putative open reading frames, 5 putative phage promoters, and 3 transcriptional terminators. Based on high degrees of similarity in overall genome organization and among most of the corresponding ORFs, as well as phylogenetic relatedness among their DNAP, RNAP and major capsid proteins, we propose a new subgroup, designated Ahp1-like subgroup. This subgroup contains Ahp1 and members previously belonging to phiKMV-like subgroup, phiAS7, phi80-18, GAP227, phiR8-01, and ISAO8. Since Ahp1 has a narrow host range, for effective phage therapy, different phages are needed for preparation of cocktails that are capable of killing the heterogeneous A. hydrophila strains. PMID:27603936

  16. Genomic Characterization of the Novel Aeromonas hydrophila Phage Ahp1 Suggests the Derivation of a New Subgroup from phiKMV-Like Family

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jian-Bin; Lin, Nien-Tsung; Tseng, Yi-Hsiung; Weng, Shu-Fen

    2016-01-01

    Aeromonas hydrophila is an opportunistic pathogenic bacterium causing diseases in human and fish. The emergence of multidrug-resistant A. hydrophila isolates has been increasing in recent years. In this study, we have isolated a novel virulent podophage of A. hydrophila, designated as Ahp1, from waste water. Ahp1 has a rapid adsorption (96% adsorbed in 2 min), a latent period of 15 min, and a burst size of 112 PFU per infected cell. At least eighteen Ahp1 virion proteins were visualized in SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, with a 36-kDa protein being the predicted major capsid protein. Genome analysis of Ahp1 revealed a linear doubled-stranded DNA genome of 42,167 bp with a G + C content of 58.8%. The genome encodes 46 putative open reading frames, 5 putative phage promoters, and 3 transcriptional terminators. Based on high degrees of similarity in overall genome organization and among most of the corresponding ORFs, as well as phylogenetic relatedness among their DNAP, RNAP and major capsid proteins, we propose a new subgroup, designated Ahp1-like subgroup. This subgroup contains Ahp1 and members previously belonging to phiKMV-like subgroup, phiAS7, phi80-18, GAP227, phiR8-01, and ISAO8. Since Ahp1 has a narrow host range, for effective phage therapy, different phages are needed for preparation of cocktails that are capable of killing the heterogeneous A. hydrophila strains. PMID:27603936

  17. Phage treatment of human infections

    PubMed Central

    Abedon, Stephen T; Kuhl, Sarah J; Blasdel, Bob G

    2011-01-01

    Phages as bactericidal agents have been employed for 90 years as a means of treating bacterial infections in humans as well as other species, a process known as phage therapy. In this review we explore both the early historical and more modern use of phages to treat human infections. We discuss in particular the little-reviewed French early work, along with the Polish, US, Georgian and Russian historical experiences. We also cover other, more modern examples of phage therapy of humans as differentiated in terms of disease. In addition, we provide discussions of phage safety, other aspects of phage therapy pharmacology, and the idea of phage use as probiotics. PMID:22334863

  18. Phage therapy in the food industry.

    PubMed

    Endersen, Lorraine; O'Mahony, Jim; Hill, Colin; Ross, R Paul; McAuliffe, Olivia; Coffey, Aidan

    2014-01-01

    Despite advances in modern technologies, the food industry is continuously challenged with the threat of microbial contamination. The overuse of antibiotics has further escalated this problem, resulting in the increasing emergence of antibiotic-resistant foodborne pathogens. Efforts to develop new methods for controlling microbial contamination in food and the food processing environment are extremely important. Accordingly, bacteriophages (phages) and their derivatives have emerged as novel, viable, and safe options for the prevention, treatment, and/or eradication of these contaminants in a range of foods and food processing environments. Whole phages, modified phages, and their derivatives are discussed in terms of current uses and future potential as antimicrobials in the traditional farm-to-fork context, encompassing areas such as primary production, postharvest processing, biosanitation, and biodetection. The review also presents some safety concerns to ensure safe and effective exploitation of bacteriophages in the future.

  19. Using Videos Derived from Simulations to Support the Analysis of Spatial Awareness in Synthetic Vision Displays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boton, Matthew L.; Bass, Ellen J.; Comstock, James R., Jr.

    2006-01-01

    The evaluation of human-centered systems can be performed using a variety of different methodologies. This paper describes a human-centered systems evaluation methodology where participants watch 5-second non-interactive videos of a system in operation before supplying judgments and subjective measures based on the information conveyed in the videos. This methodology was used to evaluate the ability of different textures and fields of view to convey spatial awareness in synthetic vision systems (SVS) displays. It produced significant results for both judgment based and subjective measures. This method is compared to other methods commonly used to evaluate SVS displays based on cost, the amount of experimental time required, experimental flexibility, and the type of data provided.

  20. Deep sequencing analysis of phage libraries using Illumina platform.

    PubMed

    Matochko, Wadim L; Chu, Kiki; Jin, Bingjie; Lee, Sam W; Whitesides, George M; Derda, Ratmir

    2012-09-01

    This paper presents an analysis of phage-displayed libraries of peptides using Illumina. We describe steps for the preparation of short DNA fragments for deep sequencing and MatLab software for the analysis of the results. Screening of peptide libraries displayed on the surface of bacteriophage (phage display) can be used to discover peptides that bind to any target. The key step in this discovery is the analysis of peptide sequences present in the library. This analysis is usually performed by Sanger sequencing, which is labor intensive and limited to examination of a few hundred phage clones. On the other hand, Illumina deep-sequencing technology can characterize over 10(7) reads in a single run. We applied Illumina sequencing to analyze phage libraries. Using PCR, we isolated the variable regions from M13KE phage vectors from a phage display library. The PCR primers contained (i) sequences flanking the variable region, (ii) barcodes, and (iii) variable 5'-terminal region. We used this approach to examine how diversity of peptides in phage display libraries changes as a result of amplification of libraries in bacteria. Using HiSeq single-end Illumina sequencing of these fragments, we acquired over 2×10(7) reads, 57 base pairs (bp) in length. Each read contained information about the barcode (6bp), one complimentary region (12bp) and a variable region (36bp). We applied this sequencing to a model library of 10(6) unique clones and observed that amplification enriches ∼150 clones, which dominate ∼20% of the library. Deep sequencing, for the first time, characterized the collapse of diversity in phage libraries. The results suggest that screens based on repeated amplification and small-scale sequencing identify a few binding clones and miss thousands of useful clones. The deep sequencing approach described here could identify under-represented clones in phage screens. It could also be instrumental in developing new screening strategies, which can preserve

  1. Temperate phages both mediate and drive adaptive evolution in pathogen biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Emily V.; James, Chloe E.; Williams, David; O’Brien, Siobhan; Fothergill, Joanne L.; Haldenby, Sam; Paterson, Steve; Winstanley, Craig

    2016-01-01

    Temperate phages drive genomic diversification in bacterial pathogens. Phage-derived sequences are more common in pathogenic than nonpathogenic taxa and are associated with changes in pathogen virulence. High abundance and mobilization of temperate phages within hosts suggests that temperate phages could promote within-host evolution of bacterial pathogens. However, their role in pathogen evolution has not been experimentally tested. We experimentally evolved replicate populations of Pseudomonas aeruginosa with or without a community of three temperate phages active in cystic fibrosis (CF) lung infections, including the transposable phage, ɸ4, which is closely related to phage D3112. Populations grew as free-floating biofilms in artificial sputum medium, mimicking sputum of CF lungs where P. aeruginosa is an important pathogen and undergoes evolutionary adaptation and diversification during chronic infection. Although bacterial populations adapted to the biofilm environment in both treatments, population genomic analysis revealed that phages altered both the trajectory and mode of evolution. Populations evolving with phages exhibited a greater degree of parallel evolution and faster selective sweeps than populations without phages. Phage ɸ4 integrated randomly into the bacterial chromosome, but integrations into motility-associated genes and regulators of quorum sensing systems essential for virulence were selected in parallel, strongly suggesting that these insertional inactivation mutations were adaptive. Temperate phages, and in particular transposable phages, are therefore likely to facilitate adaptive evolution of bacterial pathogens within hosts. PMID:27382184

  2. Abortive infection mechanisms and prophage sequences significantly influence the genetic makeup of emerging lytic lactococcal phages.

    PubMed

    Labrie, Simon J; Moineau, Sylvain

    2007-02-01

    In this study, we demonstrated the remarkable genome plasticity of lytic lactococcal phages that allows them to rapidly adapt to the dynamic dairy environment. The lytic double-stranded DNA phage ul36 was used to sequentially infect a wild-type strain of Lactococcus lactis and two isogenic derivatives with genes encoding two phage resistance mechanisms, AbiK and AbiT. Four phage mutants resistant to one or both Abi mechanisms were isolated. Comparative analysis of their complete genomes, as well as morphological observations, revealed that phage ul36 extensively evolved by large-scale homologous and nonhomologous recombination events with the inducible prophage present in the host strain. One phage mutant exchanged as much as 79% of its genome compared to the core genome of ul36. Thus, natural phage defense mechanisms and prophage elements found in bacterial chromosomes contribute significantly to the evolution of the lytic phage population.

  3. A comparative study and phage typing of silage-making Lactobacillus bacteriophages.

    PubMed

    Doi, Katsumi; Zhang, Ye; Nishizaki, Yousuke; Umeda, Akiko; Ohmomo, Sadahiro; Ogata, Seiya

    2003-01-01

    To investigate basic characteristics of 10 virulent phages active on silage-making lactobacilli, morphological properties, host ranges, protein composition and genome characterization were separated into five groups based on host ranges and basic properties. The seven phages of groups I, II and V were active on Lactobacillus plantarum and Lactobacillus pentosus. Phage phiPY4 (group III) infected both L. casei and Lactobacillus rhamnosus. Phage phiPY5 (group IV) specifically infected Lactobacillus casei. Morphologically, three phages of groups I belonged to the Myoviridae family, while seven other phages of groups II, III and V belonged to the Siphoviridae family. SDS-PAGE profiles, restriction analysis, G + C contents of DNA and Dot blot hybridization revealed a high degree of homology in each group. Clustering derived from host range analysis was closely related to results of DNA and protein analyses. These phages may be applicable to phage typing for silage-making lactobacilli. PMID:16233449

  4. A unique human blood-derived cell population displays high potential for producing insulin.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yong; Huang, Zhihua; Lazzarini, Ping; Wang, Yong; Di, Anke; Chen, Meiling

    2007-08-17

    Blood can provide a valuable source for the generation of stem cells. Herein we identified a novel cell population from adult human blood, designated peripheral blood insulin-producing cells (PB-IPC). Phenotypic analysis demonstrated that PB-IPC displayed the embryonic stem (ES) cell-associated transcription factors including Oct-4 and Nanog, along with the hematopoietic markers CD9, CD45, and CD117; but lacked expression of the hematopoietic stem cell marker CD34 as well as lymphocyte and monocyte/macrophage markers. Notably, in vitro and in vivo characterization revealed that PB-IPC demonstrated characteristics of islet beta cell progenitors including the expression of beta cell-specific insulin gene transcription factors and prohormone convertases, production of insulin, formation of insulin granules, and the ability to reduce hyperglycemia and migrate into pancreatic islets after transplantation into the diabetic mice. These findings may open up new avenues for autologous blood stem cell-based therapies for diabetes.

  5. Large Displacement in Relaxor Ferroelectric Terpolymer Blend Derived Actuators Using Al Electrode for Braille Displays

    PubMed Central

    Lu, S. G.; Chen, X.; Levard, T.; Diglio, P. J.; Gorny, L. J.; Rahn, C. D.; Zhang, Q. M.

    2015-01-01

    Poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) based polymers are attractive for applications for artificial muscles, high energy density storage devices etc. Recently these polymers have been found great potential for being used as actuators for refreshable full-page Braille displays for visually impaired people in terms of light weight, miniaturized size, and larger displacement, compared with currently used lead zirconate titanate ceramic actuators. The applied voltages of published polymer actuators, however, cannot be reduced to meet the requirements of using city power. Here, we report the polymer actuator generating quite large displacement and blocking force at a voltage close to the city power. Our embodiments also show good self-healing performance and disuse of lead-containing material, which makes the Braille device safer, more reliable and more environment-friendly. PMID:26079628

  6. Large Displacement in Relaxor Ferroelectric Terpolymer Blend Derived Actuators Using Al Electrode for Braille Displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, S. G.; Chen, X.; Levard, T.; Diglio, P. J.; Gorny, L. J.; Rahn, C. D.; Zhang, Q. M.

    2015-06-01

    Poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) based polymers are attractive for applications for artificial muscles, high energy density storage devices etc. Recently these polymers have been found great potential for being used as actuators for refreshable full-page Braille displays for visually impaired people in terms of light weight, miniaturized size, and larger displacement, compared with currently used lead zirconate titanate ceramic actuators. The applied voltages of published polymer actuators, however, cannot be reduced to meet the requirements of using city power. Here, we report the polymer actuator generating quite large displacement and blocking force at a voltage close to the city power. Our embodiments also show good self-healing performance and disuse of lead-containing material, which makes the Braille device safer, more reliable and more environment-friendly.

  7. Large Displacement in Relaxor Ferroelectric Terpolymer Blend Derived Actuators Using Al Electrode for Braille Displays.

    PubMed

    Lu, S G; Chen, X; Levard, T; Diglio, P J; Gorny, L J; Rahn, C D; Zhang, Q M

    2015-06-16

    Poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) based polymers are attractive for applications for artificial muscles, high energy density storage devices etc. Recently these polymers have been found great potential for being used as actuators for refreshable full-page Braille displays for visually impaired people in terms of light weight, miniaturized size, and larger displacement, compared with currently used lead zirconate titanate ceramic actuators. The applied voltages of published polymer actuators, however, cannot be reduced to meet the requirements of using city power. Here, we report the polymer actuator generating quite large displacement and blocking force at a voltage close to the city power. Our embodiments also show good self-healing performance and disuse of lead-containing material, which makes the Braille device safer, more reliable and more environment-friendly.

  8. Phage on the stage

    PubMed Central

    Temple, Louise; Lewis, Lynn

    2015-01-01

    The resurgence of interest in bacteriophages for use in combating antibiotic resistant bacteria is coincident with an urgent call for more effective science education practices, including hands-on learning opportunities. To address this issue, a number of solutions have been proposed, including a large educational experiment, begun in 2007 by the Howard Hughes Medical Institute and currently involving over 85 colleges and universities, which has students discovering unique phages, obtaining images, and purifying phage DNA. A subset of these phage genomes is sequenced and analyzed using bioinformatics tools. Papers describing individual phage discoveries and comparative genomic studies are being published regularly. The vast majority of students in the program are in their first year of college, a critical time in capturing their interest and retaining them as science majors. This viral discovery model is being adopted and modified by a wide variety of educational institutions using a number of different bacterial hosts. In the opinion of the authors, this program and others like it represent a model accessible to virtually any undergraduate setting. And because of these programs, bacteriophage enthusiasts (academics, health professionals, biotechnology companies) can look forward to more well prepared students entering their ranks and should anticipate many more potentially useful phages discovered and characterized. PMID:26442195

  9. Janus Suprabead Displays Derived from the Modified Photonic Crystals toward Temperature Magnetism and Optics Multiple Responses.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huanhuan; Yang, Shengyang; Yin, Su-Na; Chen, Li; Chen, Su

    2015-04-29

    The design and development of Janus suprabeads (JSs) with multiple responses are highly desirable in the fabrication of functional nanomaterials. In this work, we report a triphase microfluidic strategy for the construction of JSs with temperature-magnetism-optics triple responses. Initially, macromonomer poly(methacrylic acid) (PMAA) obtained via catalytic chain transfer polymerization (CCTP) was grafted onto the polystyrene (PS) colloidal photonic crystals (CPCs) surface. Because abundant carboxylic acid groups in PMAA could coordinate cadmium ions for in situ production of fluorescent CdS quantum dots (QDs) after introducing sulfur ions, the as-prepared JSs were endowed with favorable optical properties. Meanwhile, the as-prepared Cd(2+)/PS CPCs were employed as a template to build JSs with temperature-magnetism sensitivity via the introduction of magnetic Fe3O4 and hydrogels. Finally, the fluorescence pattern was easily performed by using chalcogenides as "ink" to write on the pad, in which in situ reaction mechanism was involved in the response. The multiple responsive JSs show promising applications in sensor, display, and anticounterfeit fields.

  10. New Non-Toxic Semi-Synthetic Derivatives from Natural Diterpenes Displaying Anti-Tuberculosis Activity.

    PubMed

    Matos, Priscilla M; Mahoney, Brian; Chan, Yohan; Day, David P; Cabral, Mirela M W; Martins, Carlos H G; Santos, Raquel A; Bastos, Jairo K; Page, Philip C Bulman; Heleno, Vladimir C G

    2015-10-07

    We report herein the synthesis of six diterpene derivatives, three of which are new, generated through known organic chemistry reactions that allowed structural modification of the existing natural products kaurenoic acid (1) and copalic acid (2). The new compounds were fully characterized using high resolution mass spectrometry, infrared spectroscopy, ¹H- and (13)C-NMR experiments. We also report the evaluation of the anti-tuberculosis potential for all compounds, which showed some promising results for Micobacterium tuberculosis inhibition. Moreover, the toxicity for each of the most active compounds was also assessed.

  11. Semisynthetic Lipopeptides Derived from Nisin Display Antibacterial Activity and Lipid II Binding on Par with That of the Parent Compound.

    PubMed

    Koopmans, Timo; Wood, Thomas M; 't Hart, Peter; Kleijn, Laurens H J; Hendrickx, Antoni P A; Willems, Rob J L; Breukink, Eefjan; Martin, Nathaniel I

    2015-07-29

    The lipid II-binding N-terminus of nisin, comprising the so-called A/B ring system, was synthetically modified to provide antibacterially active and proteolytically stable derivatives. A variety of lipids were coupled to the C-terminus of the nisin A/B ring system to generate semisynthetic constructs that display potent inhibition of bacterial growth, with activities approaching that of nisin itself. Most notable was the activity observed against clinically relevant bacterial strains including MRSA and VRE. Experiments with membrane models indicate that these constructs operate via a lipid II-mediated mode of action without causing pore formation. A lipid II-dependent mechanism of action is further supported by antagonization assays wherein the addition of lipid II was found to effectively block the antibacterial activity of the nisin-derived lipopeptides. PMID:26122963

  12. Semisynthetic Lipopeptides Derived from Nisin Display Antibacterial Activity and Lipid II Binding on Par with That of the Parent Compound.

    PubMed

    Koopmans, Timo; Wood, Thomas M; 't Hart, Peter; Kleijn, Laurens H J; Hendrickx, Antoni P A; Willems, Rob J L; Breukink, Eefjan; Martin, Nathaniel I

    2015-07-29

    The lipid II-binding N-terminus of nisin, comprising the so-called A/B ring system, was synthetically modified to provide antibacterially active and proteolytically stable derivatives. A variety of lipids were coupled to the C-terminus of the nisin A/B ring system to generate semisynthetic constructs that display potent inhibition of bacterial growth, with activities approaching that of nisin itself. Most notable was the activity observed against clinically relevant bacterial strains including MRSA and VRE. Experiments with membrane models indicate that these constructs operate via a lipid II-mediated mode of action without causing pore formation. A lipid II-dependent mechanism of action is further supported by antagonization assays wherein the addition of lipid II was found to effectively block the antibacterial activity of the nisin-derived lipopeptides.

  13. Xanthine Oxidase-Derived ROS Display a Biphasic Effect on Endothelial Cells Adhesion and FAK Phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Ben-Mahdi, Meriem H; Dang, Pham My-Chan; Gougerot-Pocidalo, Marie-Anne; O'Dowd, Yvonne; El-Benna, Jamel; Pasquier, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    In pathological situations such as ischemia-reperfusion and acute respiratory distress syndrome, reactive oxygen species (ROS) are produced by different systems which are involved in endothelial cells injury, ultimately leading to severe organ dysfunctions. The aim of this work was to study the effect of ROS produced by hypoxanthine-xanthine oxidase (Hx-XO) on the adhesion of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) and on the signaling pathways involved. Results show that Hx-XO-derived ROS induced an increase in HUVEC adhesion in the early stages of the process (less than 30 min), followed by a decrease in adhesion in the later stages of the process. Interestingly, Hx-XO-derived ROS induced the same biphasic effect on the phosphorylation of the focal adhesion kinase (FAK), a nonreceptor tyrosine kinase critical for cell adhesion, but not on ERK1/2 phosphorylation. The biphasic effect was not seen with ERK1/2 where a decrease in phosphorylation only was observed. Wortmannin, a PI3-kinase inhibitor, inhibited ROS-induced cell adhesion and FAK phosphorylation. Orthovanadate, a protein tyrosine phosphatase inhibitor, and Resveratrol (Resv), an antioxidant agent, protected FAK and ERK1/2 from dephosphorylation and HUVEC from ROS-induced loss of adhesion. This study shows that ROS could have both stimulatory and inhibitory effects on HUVEC adhesion and FAK phosphorylation and suggests that PI3-kinase and tyrosine phosphatase control these effects. PMID:27528888

  14. Xanthine Oxidase-Derived ROS Display a Biphasic Effect on Endothelial Cells Adhesion and FAK Phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Dang, Pham My-Chan; Gougerot-Pocidalo, Marie-Anne; Pasquier, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    In pathological situations such as ischemia-reperfusion and acute respiratory distress syndrome, reactive oxygen species (ROS) are produced by different systems which are involved in endothelial cells injury, ultimately leading to severe organ dysfunctions. The aim of this work was to study the effect of ROS produced by hypoxanthine-xanthine oxidase (Hx-XO) on the adhesion of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) and on the signaling pathways involved. Results show that Hx-XO-derived ROS induced an increase in HUVEC adhesion in the early stages of the process (less than 30 min), followed by a decrease in adhesion in the later stages of the process. Interestingly, Hx-XO-derived ROS induced the same biphasic effect on the phosphorylation of the focal adhesion kinase (FAK), a nonreceptor tyrosine kinase critical for cell adhesion, but not on ERK1/2 phosphorylation. The biphasic effect was not seen with ERK1/2 where a decrease in phosphorylation only was observed. Wortmannin, a PI3-kinase inhibitor, inhibited ROS-induced cell adhesion and FAK phosphorylation. Orthovanadate, a protein tyrosine phosphatase inhibitor, and Resveratrol (Resv), an antioxidant agent, protected FAK and ERK1/2 from dephosphorylation and HUVEC from ROS-induced loss of adhesion. This study shows that ROS could have both stimulatory and inhibitory effects on HUVEC adhesion and FAK phosphorylation and suggests that PI3-kinase and tyrosine phosphatase control these effects. PMID:27528888

  15. Adaptive evolution of a derived radius morphology in manakins (Aves, Pipridae) to support acrobatic display behavior.

    PubMed

    Friscia, Anthony; Sanin, Gloria D; Lindsay, Willow R; Day, Lainy B; Schlinger, Barney A; Tan, Josh; Fuxjager, Matthew J

    2016-06-01

    The morphology of the avian skeleton is often studied in the context of adaptations for powered flight. The effects of other evolutionary forces, such as sexual selection, on avian skeletal design are unclear, even though birds produce diverse behaviors that undoubtedly require a variety of osteological modifications. Here, we investigate this issue in a family of passerine birds called manakins (Pipridae), which have evolved physically unusual and elaborate courtship displays. We report that, in species within the genus Manacus, the shaft of the radius is heavily flattened and shows substantial solidification. Past work anecdotally notes this morphology and attributes it to the species' ability to hit their wings together above their heads to produce loud mechanical sonations. Our results show that this feature is unique to Manacus compared to the other species in our study, including a variety of taxa that produce other sonations through alternate wing mechanisms. At the same time, our data reveal striking similarities across species in total radius volume and solidification. Together, this suggests that supposedly adaptive alterations in radial morphology occur within a conserved framework of a set radius volume and solidness, which in turn is likely determined by natural selection. Further allometric analyses imply that the radius is less constrained by body size and the structural demands that underlie powered flight, compared to other forelimb bones that are mostly unmodified across taxa. These results are consistent with the idea that the radius is more susceptible to selective modification by sexual selection. Overall, this study provides some of the first insight into the osteological evolution of passerine birds, as well as the way in which opposing selective forces can shape skeletal design in these species. J. Morphol. 277:766-775, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27027525

  16. Strategies to Query and Display Allergy-Derived Epitope Data from the Immune Epitope Database

    PubMed Central

    Vaughan, Kerrie; Peters, Bjoern; Larche, Mark; Pomes, Anna; Broide, David; Sette, Alessandro

    2013-01-01

    The recognition of specific epitopes on allergens by antibodies and T cells is a key element in allergic processes. Analysis of epitope data may be of interest for basic immunopathology or for potential application in diagnostics or immunotherapy. The Immune Epitope Database (IEDB) is a freely available repository of epitope data from infectious disease agents, as well as epitopes defined for allergy, autoimmunity, and transplantation. The IEDB curates the experiments associated with each epitope and thus provides a variety of different ways to search the data. This review aims to demonstrate the utility of the IEDB and its query strategies, including searching by epitope structure (peptidic/nonpeptidic), by assay methodology, by host, by the allergen itself, or by the organism from which the allergen was derived. Links to tools for visualization of 3-D structures, epitope prediction, and analyses of B and T cell reactivity by host response frequency score are also highlighted. PMID:23172234

  17. HCMV Displays a Unique Transcriptome of Immunomodulatory Genes in Primary Monocyte-Derived Cell Types

    PubMed Central

    Van Damme, Ellen; Thys, Kim; Tuefferd, Marianne; Van Hove, Carl; Aerssens, Jeroen; Van Loock, Marnix

    2016-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is a betaherpesvirus which rarely presents problems in healthy individuals, yet may result in severe morbidity in immunocompromised patients and in immune-naïve neonates. HCMV has a large 235 kb genome with a coding capacity of at least 165 open reading frames (ORFs). This large genome allows complex gene regulation resulting in different sets of transcripts during lytic and latent infection. While latent virus mainly resides within monocytes and CD34+ progenitor cells, reactivation to lytic infection is driven by differentiation towards terminally differentiated myeloid dendritic cells and macrophages. Consequently, it has been suggested that macrophages and dendritic cells contribute to viral spread in vivo. Thus far only limited knowledge is available on the expression of HCMV genes in terminally differentiated myeloid primary cells and whether or not the virus exhibits a different set of lytic genes in primary cells compared with lytic infection in NHDF fibroblasts. To address these questions, we used Illumina next generation sequencing to determine the HCMV transcriptome in macrophages and dendritic cells during lytic infection and compared it to the transcriptome in NHDF fibroblasts. Here, we demonstrate unique expression profiles in macrophages and dendritic cells which significantly differ from the transcriptome in fibroblasts mainly by modulating the expression of viral transcripts involved in immune modulation, cell tropism and viral spread. In a head to head comparison between macrophages and dendritic cells, we observed that factors involved in viral spread and virion composition are differentially regulated suggesting that the plasticity of the virion facilitates the infection of surrounding cells. Taken together, this study provides the full transcript expression analysis of lytic HCMV genes in monocyte-derived type 1 and type 2 macrophages as well as in monocyte-derived dendritic cells. Thereby underlining the potential

  18. Phage mutations in response to CRISPR diversification in a bacterial population.

    PubMed

    Sun, Christine L; Barrangou, Rodolphe; Thomas, Brian C; Horvath, Philippe; Fremaux, Christophe; Banfield, Jillian F

    2013-02-01

    Interactions between bacteria and their coexisting phage populations impact evolution and can strongly influence biogeochemical processes in natural ecosystems. Periodically, mutation or migration results in exposure of a host to a phage to which it has no immunity; alternatively, a phage may be exposed to a host it cannot infect. To explore the processes by which coexisting, co-evolving hosts and phage populations establish, we cultured Streptococcus thermophilus DGCC7710 with phage 2972 and tracked CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats) diversification and host-phage co-evolution in a population derived from a colony that acquired initial CRISPR-encoded immunity. After 1 week of co-culturing, the coexisting host-phage populations were metagenomically characterized using 454 FLX Titanium sequencing. The evolved genomes were compared with reference genomes to identify newly incorporated spacers in S. thermophilus DGCC7710 and recently acquired single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in phage 2972. Following phage exposure, acquisition of immune elements (spacers) led to a genetically diverse population with multiple subdominant strain lineages. Phage mutations that circumvented three early immunization events were localized in the proto-spacer adjacent motif (PAM) or near the PAM end of the proto-spacer, suggesting a strong selective advantage for the phage that mutated in this region. The sequential fixation or near fixation of these single mutations indicates selection events so severe that single phage genotypes ultimately gave rise to all surviving lineages and potentially carried traits unrelated to immunity to fixation.

  19. Phage mutations in response to CRISPR diversification in a bacterial population.

    PubMed

    Sun, Christine L; Barrangou, Rodolphe; Thomas, Brian C; Horvath, Philippe; Fremaux, Christophe; Banfield, Jillian F

    2013-02-01

    Interactions between bacteria and their coexisting phage populations impact evolution and can strongly influence biogeochemical processes in natural ecosystems. Periodically, mutation or migration results in exposure of a host to a phage to which it has no immunity; alternatively, a phage may be exposed to a host it cannot infect. To explore the processes by which coexisting, co-evolving hosts and phage populations establish, we cultured Streptococcus thermophilus DGCC7710 with phage 2972 and tracked CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats) diversification and host-phage co-evolution in a population derived from a colony that acquired initial CRISPR-encoded immunity. After 1 week of co-culturing, the coexisting host-phage populations were metagenomically characterized using 454 FLX Titanium sequencing. The evolved genomes were compared with reference genomes to identify newly incorporated spacers in S. thermophilus DGCC7710 and recently acquired single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in phage 2972. Following phage exposure, acquisition of immune elements (spacers) led to a genetically diverse population with multiple subdominant strain lineages. Phage mutations that circumvented three early immunization events were localized in the proto-spacer adjacent motif (PAM) or near the PAM end of the proto-spacer, suggesting a strong selective advantage for the phage that mutated in this region. The sequential fixation or near fixation of these single mutations indicates selection events so severe that single phage genotypes ultimately gave rise to all surviving lineages and potentially carried traits unrelated to immunity to fixation. PMID:23057534

  20. Diversity of phage infection types and associated terminology: the problem with 'Lytic or lysogenic'.

    PubMed

    Hobbs, Zack; Abedon, Stephen T

    2016-04-01

    Bacteriophages, or phages, are viruses of members of domain Bacteria. These viruses play numerous roles in shaping the diversity of microbial communities, with impact differing depending on what infection strategies specific phages employ. From an applied perspective, these especially are communities containing undesired or pathogenic bacteria that can be modified through phage-mediated bacterial biocontrol, that is, through phage therapy. Here we seek to categorize phages in terms of their infection strategies as well as review or suggest more descriptive, accurate or distinguishing terminology. Categories can be differentiated in terms of (1) whether or not virion release occurs (productive infections versus lysogeny, pseudolysogeny and/or the phage carrier state), (2) the means of virion release (lytic versus chronic release) and (3) the degree to which phages are genetically equipped to display lysogenic cycles (temperate versus non-temperate phages). We address in particular the use or overuse of what can be a somewhat equivocal phrase, 'Lytic or lysogenic', especially when employed as a means of distinguishing among phages types. We suggest that the implied dichotomy is inconsistent with both modern as well as historical understanding of phage biology. We consider, therefore, less ambiguous terminology for distinguishing between 'Lytic' versus 'Lysogenic' phage types. PMID:26925588

  1. Diversity of phage infection types and associated terminology: the problem with 'Lytic or lysogenic'.

    PubMed

    Hobbs, Zack; Abedon, Stephen T

    2016-04-01

    Bacteriophages, or phages, are viruses of members of domain Bacteria. These viruses play numerous roles in shaping the diversity of microbial communities, with impact differing depending on what infection strategies specific phages employ. From an applied perspective, these especially are communities containing undesired or pathogenic bacteria that can be modified through phage-mediated bacterial biocontrol, that is, through phage therapy. Here we seek to categorize phages in terms of their infection strategies as well as review or suggest more descriptive, accurate or distinguishing terminology. Categories can be differentiated in terms of (1) whether or not virion release occurs (productive infections versus lysogeny, pseudolysogeny and/or the phage carrier state), (2) the means of virion release (lytic versus chronic release) and (3) the degree to which phages are genetically equipped to display lysogenic cycles (temperate versus non-temperate phages). We address in particular the use or overuse of what can be a somewhat equivocal phrase, 'Lytic or lysogenic', especially when employed as a means of distinguishing among phages types. We suggest that the implied dichotomy is inconsistent with both modern as well as historical understanding of phage biology. We consider, therefore, less ambiguous terminology for distinguishing between 'Lytic' versus 'Lysogenic' phage types.

  2. Mice Lacking Platelet-Derived Growth Factor D Display a Mild Vascular Phenotype.

    PubMed

    Gladh, Hanna; Folestad, Erika Bergsten; Muhl, Lars; Ehnman, Monika; Tannenberg, Philip; Lawrence, Anna-Lisa; Betsholtz, Christer; Eriksson, Ulf

    2016-01-01

    Platelet-derived growth factor D (PDGF-D) is the most recently discovered member of the PDGF family. PDGF-D signals through PDGF receptor β, but its biological role remains largely unknown. In contrast to other members of the PDGF family of growth factors, which have been extensively investigated using different knockout approaches in mice, PDGF-D has until now not been characterized by gene inactivation in mice. Here, we present the phenotype of a constitutive Pdgfd knockout mouse model (Pdgfd-/-), carrying a LacZ reporter used to visualize Pdgfd promoter activity. Inactivation of the Pdgfd gene resulted in a mild phenotype in C57BL/6 mice, and the offspring was viable, fertile and generally in good health. We show that Pdgfd reporter gene activity was consistently localized to vascular structures in both postnatal and adult tissues. The expression was predominantly arterial, often localizing to vascular bifurcations. Endothelial cells appeared to be the dominating source for Pdgfd, but reporter gene activity was occasionally also found in subpopulations of mural cells. Tissue-specific analyses of vascular structures revealed that NG2-expressing pericytes of the cardiac vasculature were disorganized in Pdgfd-/- mice. Furthermore, Pdgfd-/- mice also had a slightly elevated blood pressure. In summary, the vascular expression pattern together with morphological changes in NG2-expressing cells, and the increase in blood pressure, support a function for PDGF-D in regulating systemic arterial blood pressure, and suggests a role in maintaining vascular homeostasis. PMID:27032083

  3. Mice Lacking Platelet-Derived Growth Factor D Display a Mild Vascular Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Muhl, Lars; Ehnman, Monika; Tannenberg, Philip; Lawrence, Anna-Lisa; Betsholtz, Christer; Eriksson, Ulf

    2016-01-01

    Platelet-derived growth factor D (PDGF-D) is the most recently discovered member of the PDGF family. PDGF-D signals through PDGF receptor β, but its biological role remains largely unknown. In contrast to other members of the PDGF family of growth factors, which have been extensively investigated using different knockout approaches in mice, PDGF-D has until now not been characterized by gene inactivation in mice. Here, we present the phenotype of a constitutive Pdgfd knockout mouse model (Pdgfd-/-), carrying a LacZ reporter used to visualize Pdgfd promoter activity. Inactivation of the Pdgfd gene resulted in a mild phenotype in C57BL/6 mice, and the offspring was viable, fertile and generally in good health. We show that Pdgfd reporter gene activity was consistently localized to vascular structures in both postnatal and adult tissues. The expression was predominantly arterial, often localizing to vascular bifurcations. Endothelial cells appeared to be the dominating source for Pdgfd, but reporter gene activity was occasionally also found in subpopulations of mural cells. Tissue-specific analyses of vascular structures revealed that NG2-expressing pericytes of the cardiac vasculature were disorganized in Pdgfd-/- mice. Furthermore, Pdgfd-/- mice also had a slightly elevated blood pressure. In summary, the vascular expression pattern together with morphological changes in NG2-expressing cells, and the increase in blood pressure, support a function for PDGF-D in regulating systemic arterial blood pressure, and suggests a role in maintaining vascular homeostasis. PMID:27032083

  4. A mimotope peptide of Aβ42 fibril-specific antibodies with Aβ42 fibrillation inhibitory activity induces anti-Aβ42 conformer antibody response by a displayed form on an M13 phage in mice.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Koichi; Nishimura, Masaaki; Yamaguchi, Yuya; Hashiguchi, Shuhei; Takiguchi, Sho; Yamaguchi, Makoto; Tahara, Haruna; Gotanda, Takuma; Abe, Risa; Ito, Yuji; Sugimura, Kazuhisa

    2011-07-01

    In Alzheimer's disease (AD), amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides accumulate in the brain in different forms, including fibrils and oligomers. Recently, we established three distinct conformation-dependent human single-chain Fv (scFv) antibodies, including B6 scFv, which bound to Aβ42 fibril but not to soluble-form Aβ, inhibiting Aβ42 fibril formation. In this study, we determined the mimotopes of these antibodies and found a common mimotope sequence, B6-C15, using the Ph.D.-C7C phage library. The B6-C15 showed weak homology to the C-terminus of Aβ42 containing GXXXG dimerization motifs. We synthesized the peptide of B6-C15 fused with biotinylated TAT at the N-terminus (TAT-B6-C15) and characterized its biochemical features on an Aβ42-fibrillation reaction in vitro. We demonstrated that, first, TAT-B6-C15 inhibited Aβ42 fibril formation; secondly, TAT-B6-C15 bound to prefibril Aβ42 oligomers but not to monomers, trimers, tetramers, fibrils, or ultrasonicated fragments; thirdly, TAT-B6-C15 inhibited Aβ42-induced cytotoxicity against human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells; and, fourthly, when mice were administered B6-C15-phages dissolved in phosphate-buffered saline, the anti-Aβ42 conformer IgG antibody response was induced. These results suggested that the B6-C15 peptide might provide unique opportunities to analyze the Aβ42 fibrillation pathway and develop a vaccine vehicle for Alzheimer's disease. PMID:21641049

  5. The first phage electron micrographs

    PubMed Central

    Ackermann, Hans-W.

    2011-01-01

    The first phage electron micrographs were published in 1940 in Germany and proved the particulate nature of bacteriophages. Phages and infected bacteria were first examined raw and unstained. US American scientists introduced shadowing and freeze-drying. Phages appeared to be tailed and morphologically heterogeneous. Phage types identified by early electron microscopy include enterobacteriophages T4, T1, T7, T5, 7–11, ViI and Pseudomonas phage PB1. This paper retraces the development of early virus electron microscopy till the introduction of negative staining. PMID:23050215

  6. Improved Fab presentation on phage surface with the use of molecular chaperone coplasmid system.

    PubMed

    Loh, Qiuting; Leong, Siew Wen; Tye, Gee Jun; Choong, Yee Siew; Lim, Theam Soon

    2015-05-15

    The low presentation efficiency of Fab (fragment antigen binding) fragments during phage display is largely due to the complexity of disulphide bond formation. This can result in the presentation of Fab fragments devoid of a light chain during phage display. Here we propose the use of a coplasmid system encoding several molecular chaperones (DsbA, DsbC, FkpA, and SurA) to improve Fab packaging. A comparison was done using the Fab fragment from IgG and IgD. We found that the use of the coplasmid during phage packaging was able to improve the presentation efficiency of the Fab fragment on phage surfaces. A modified version of panning using the coplasmid system was evaluated and was successful at enriching Fab binders. Therefore, the coplasmid system would be an attractive alternative for improved Fab presentation for phage display.

  7. Phage-based platforms for the clinical detection of human bacterial pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Schofield, David A.; Sharp, Natasha J.; Westwater, Caroline

    2012-01-01

    Bacteriophages (phages) have been utilized for decades as a means for uniquely identifying their target bacteria. Due to their inherent natural specificity, ease of use, and straightforward production, phage possess a number of desirable attributes which makes them particularly suited as bacterial detectors. As a result, extensive research has been conducted into the development of phage, or phage-derived products to expedite the detection of human pathogens. However, very few phage-based diagnostics have transitioned from the research lab into a clinical diagnostic tool. Herein we review the phage-based platforms that are currently used for the detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Yersinia pestis, Bacillus anthracis and Staphylococcus aureus in the clinical field. We briefly describe the disease, the current diagnostic options, and the role phage diagnostics play in identifying the cause of infection, and determining antibiotic susceptibility. PMID:23050221

  8. In vitro display technologies - new tools for drug discovery.

    PubMed

    FitzGerald

    2000-06-01

    Over the past decade, several ligand discovery techniques have been developed that mimic the process of natural evolution. Phage display technology is the most established of these methods and has been applied to numerous technological problems including the discovery of novel drugs. More recently, some new display technologies have emerged which, unlike phage display, operate entirely in vitro and have concomitant advantages. This review describes this new generation of display technologies and indicates how they might fit into the modern drug discovery process.

  9. Phage fitness may help predict phage therapy efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Lindberg, Heather M; McKean, Kurt A; Wang, Ing-Nang

    2014-01-01

    We isolated 6 phages from 2 environmental water sources and assessed their ability to treat Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection of Drosophila melanogaster. We found all 6 phages were able to significantly increase mean survival time (MST) of infected D. melanogaster. Although phage traits, such as adsorption rate, burst size, and lysis time, varied significantly among these phages, none of the traits correlated significantly with MST. Phage growth rate determined in vitro, however, was found to be significantly correlated with MST. Overall, our study shows that infected D. melanogaster can be used as a model system to test the therapeutic efficacy of phages. In addition, a more comprehensive characteristic, like the in vitro growth rate, seems to be a better indicator in predicting therapeutic success than constituent traits like the adsorption rate, burst size, or lysis time. PMID:26713221

  10. Phage as a Genetically Modifiable Supramacromolecule in Chemistry, Materials and Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Binrui; Yang, Mingying; Mao, Chuanbin

    2016-01-01

    CONSPECTUS Filamentous bacteriophage (phage) is a genetically modifiable supramacromolecule. It can be pictured as a semiflexible nanofiber (~900 nm long and ~8 nm wide) made of a DNA core and a protein shell with the former genetically encoding the latter. Although phage bioengineering and phage display techniques were developed before the 1990s, these techniques have not been widely used for chemistry, materials, and biomedical research from the perspective of supramolecular chemistry until recently. Powered by our expertise in displaying a foreign peptide on its surface through engineering phage DNA, we have employed phage to identify target-specific peptides, construct novel organic–inorganic nanohybrids, develop biomaterials for disease treatment, and generate bioanalytical methods for disease diagnosis. Compared with conventional biomimetic chemistry, phage-based supramolecular chemistry represents a new frontier in chemistry, materials science, and medicine. In this Account, we introduce our recent successful efforts in phage-based supramolecular chemistry, by integrating the unique nanofiber-like phage structure and powerful peptide display techniques into the fields of chemistry, materials science, and medicine: (1) successfully synthesized and assembled silica, hydroxyapatite, and gold nanoparticles using phage templates to form novel functional materials; (2) chemically introduced azo units onto the phage to form photoresponsive functional azo-phage nanofibers via a diazotization reaction between aromatic amino groups and the tyrosine residues genetically displayed on phage surfaces; (3) assembled phage into 2D films for studying the effects of both biochemical (the peptide sequences displayed on the phages) and biophysical (the topographies of the phage films) cues on the proliferation and differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and identified peptides and topographies that can induce their

  11. Bacteriophage module reshuffling results in adaptive host range as exemplified by the baseplate model of listerial phage A118.

    PubMed

    Cambillau, Christian

    2015-10-01

    Each phage infects its specific bacterial host strain through highly specific interactions between the baseplate-associated receptor binding protein (RBP) at the tip of the phage tail and the receptor at the host surface. Baseplates incorporate structural core modules, Dit and Tal, largely conserved among phages, and peripheral modules anchoring the RBPs. Exploiting structural information from the HHpred program and EM data from the Bielmann et al. (2015) paper, a molecular model of the A118 phage baseplate was generated from different building blocks. This model implies the occurrence of baseplate module reshuffling and suggests that listerial phage A118 may have been derived from lactococcal phage TP901-1 through host species exchange. With the increase of available viral module structures, modelling phage baseplates will become easier and more reliant, and will provide insightful information on the nature of the phage host receptor and its mode of recognition.

  12. Bacteriophage module reshuffling results in adaptive host range as exemplified by the baseplate model of listerial phage A118.

    PubMed

    Cambillau, Christian

    2015-10-01

    Each phage infects its specific bacterial host strain through highly specific interactions between the baseplate-associated receptor binding protein (RBP) at the tip of the phage tail and the receptor at the host surface. Baseplates incorporate structural core modules, Dit and Tal, largely conserved among phages, and peripheral modules anchoring the RBPs. Exploiting structural information from the HHpred program and EM data from the Bielmann et al. (2015) paper, a molecular model of the A118 phage baseplate was generated from different building blocks. This model implies the occurrence of baseplate module reshuffling and suggests that listerial phage A118 may have been derived from lactococcal phage TP901-1 through host species exchange. With the increase of available viral module structures, modelling phage baseplates will become easier and more reliant, and will provide insightful information on the nature of the phage host receptor and its mode of recognition. PMID:26074066

  13. Increased androgenic sensitivity in the hind limb muscular system marks the evolution of a derived gestural display

    PubMed Central

    Mangiamele, Lisa A.; Fuxjager, Matthew J.; Schuppe, Eric R.; Taylor, Rebecca S.; Hödl, Walter; Preininger, Doris

    2016-01-01

    Physical gestures are prominent features of many species’ multimodal displays, yet how evolution incorporates body and leg movements into animal signaling repertoires is unclear. Androgenic hormones modulate the production of reproductive signals and sexual motor skills in many vertebrates; therefore, one possibility is that selection for physical signals drives the evolution of androgenic sensitivity in select neuromotor pathways. We examined this issue in the Bornean rock frog (Staurois parvus, family: Ranidae). Males court females and compete with rivals by performing both vocalizations and hind limb gestural signals, called “foot flags.” Foot flagging is a derived display that emerged in the ranids after vocal signaling. Here, we show that administration of testosterone (T) increases foot flagging behavior under seminatural conditions. Moreover, using quantitative PCR, we also find that adult male S. parvus maintain a unique androgenic phenotype, in which androgen receptor (AR) in the hind limb musculature is expressed at levels ∼10× greater than in two other anuran species, which do not produce foot flags (Rana pipiens and Xenopus laevis). Finally, because males of all three of these species solicit mates with calls, we accordingly detect no differences in AR expression in the vocal apparatus (larynx) among taxa. The results show that foot flagging is an androgen-dependent gestural signal, and its emergence is associated with increased androgenic sensitivity within the hind limb musculature. Selection for this novel gestural signal may therefore drive the evolution of increased AR expression in key muscles that control signal production to support adaptive motor performance. PMID:27143723

  14. Lytic and inhibition responses to bacteriophages among marine bacteria, with special reference to the origin of phage-host systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moebus, K.

    1983-12-01

    The results of phage-host cross-reaction tests reported by Moebus & Nattkemper (1981) were re-examined using serially diluted bacteriophage suspensions to elicit the actual type of reaction between the bacteria and phage lysates tested. More than 1450 phage-host systems were studied at 25 °C incubation temperature. Among the nearly 300 phage strains used, 29 were identified as temperate ones. In about 65 % of the phage-host systems bacteriophage propagation was indicated by plaque formation. The remaining systems were characterized by the “inhibition” reaction of bacteria to phage lysates indicated by homogenously reduced bacterial growth within the test area without production of progeny phages. Since crude phage lysates had to be used, it remains obscure whether agents other than infective phage particles (defective ones or bacteriocins) caused this reaction. Among 269 systems of the inhibition type which were also tested at 5° and 15 °C, 54 were observed to propagate phages at one of or both the lower temperatures. Plaques produced at 15 °C with several phage-host systems were found to yield only few progeny phages which generally could not be propagated to produce high-titer phage stocks. With one system temperature-sensitive phage mutants were isolated. The probability of inhibition reactions occurring was found to be higher with phage-host systems isolated east of the Azores than with systems derived from the western Atlantic. With systems from the last mentioned area the proportion of inhibition versus lytic responses of bacteria to phages was observed to increase with the distance between the stations where both parts of the systems were derived. The latter findings are discussed in view of the assumption that bacterial and bacteriophage populations undergo genetic changes while being transported from west to east.

  15. Chromium(III) Binding Phage Screening for the Selective Adsorption of Cr(III) and Chromium Speciation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ting; Zhang, Xiao-Yu; Zhang, Xiao-Xiao; Chen, Ming-Li; Wang, Jian-Hua

    2015-09-30

    The screening of suitable sorption medium is the key for highly selective solid phase extraction (SPE) of heavy metals. Herein, we demonstrate a universal protocol for producing selective SPE adsorbent through an evolutional approach based on phage display peptide library. By choosing chromium(III) as the model target, immobilized Cr(III) resins are first prepared using Ni-NTA affinity resins for the interaction with NEB heptapeptide phage library. After three rounds of positive biopanning against target Cr(III) and negative biopanning against foreign metal species, Cr(III) binding phages with high selectivity are obtained. The binding affinity and selectivity are further assessed with ELISA. The phages bearing peptide (YKASLIT) is finally chosen and immobilized on cytopore beads for Cr(III) preconcentration. The retained Cr(III) is efficiently recovered by 0.10 mol L(-1) HNO3 and quantified with ICP-MS. By loading 4000 μL of sample solution at pH 7.0 for 2 h and stripping with 400 μL of 0.10 mol L(-1) HNO3, a linear range of 0.05-0.50 μg L(-1) is achieved along with an enrichment factor of 7.1. The limit of detection is derived to be 15 ng L(-1) (3σ, n = 7) with a RSD of 3.6% (0.25 μg L(-1), n = 7). The procedure is validated by analyzing chromium content in a certified reference material GBW08608 (simulate water). In addition, chromium speciation in real water samples is demonstrated. Cr(VI) is first converted into Cr(III), and the latter subjected to the sorption onto the Cr(III) binding phage, followed by elution and quantification of the total chromium amount, and finally speciation is achieved by difference.

  16. Chromium(III) Binding Phage Screening for the Selective Adsorption of Cr(III) and Chromium Speciation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ting; Zhang, Xiao-Yu; Zhang, Xiao-Xiao; Chen, Ming-Li; Wang, Jian-Hua

    2015-09-30

    The screening of suitable sorption medium is the key for highly selective solid phase extraction (SPE) of heavy metals. Herein, we demonstrate a universal protocol for producing selective SPE adsorbent through an evolutional approach based on phage display peptide library. By choosing chromium(III) as the model target, immobilized Cr(III) resins are first prepared using Ni-NTA affinity resins for the interaction with NEB heptapeptide phage library. After three rounds of positive biopanning against target Cr(III) and negative biopanning against foreign metal species, Cr(III) binding phages with high selectivity are obtained. The binding affinity and selectivity are further assessed with ELISA. The phages bearing peptide (YKASLIT) is finally chosen and immobilized on cytopore beads for Cr(III) preconcentration. The retained Cr(III) is efficiently recovered by 0.10 mol L(-1) HNO3 and quantified with ICP-MS. By loading 4000 μL of sample solution at pH 7.0 for 2 h and stripping with 400 μL of 0.10 mol L(-1) HNO3, a linear range of 0.05-0.50 μg L(-1) is achieved along with an enrichment factor of 7.1. The limit of detection is derived to be 15 ng L(-1) (3σ, n = 7) with a RSD of 3.6% (0.25 μg L(-1), n = 7). The procedure is validated by analyzing chromium content in a certified reference material GBW08608 (simulate water). In addition, chromium speciation in real water samples is demonstrated. Cr(VI) is first converted into Cr(III), and the latter subjected to the sorption onto the Cr(III) binding phage, followed by elution and quantification of the total chromium amount, and finally speciation is achieved by difference. PMID:26346061

  17. Clostridium difficile phages: still difficult?

    PubMed Central

    Hargreaves, Katherine R.; Clokie, Martha R. J.

    2014-01-01

    Phages that infect Clostridium difficile were first isolated for typing purposes in the 1980s, but their use was short lived. However, the rise of C. difficile epidemics over the last decade has triggered a resurgence of interest in using phages to combat this pathogen. Phage therapy is an attractive treatment option for C. difficile infection, however, developing suitable phages is challenging. In this review we summarize the difficulties faced by researchers in this field, and we discuss the solutions and strategies used for the development of C. difficile phages for use as novel therapeutics. Epidemiological data has highlighted the diversity and distribution of C. difficile, and shown that novel strains continue to emerge in clinical settings. In parallel with epidemiological studies, advances in molecular biology have bolstered our understanding of C. difficile biology, and our knowledge of phage–host interactions in other bacterial species. These three fields of biology have therefore paved the way for future work on C. difficile phages to progress and develop. Benefits of using C. difficile phages as therapeutic agents include the fact that they have highly specific interactions with their bacterial hosts. Studies also show that they can reduce bacterial numbers in both in vitro and in vivo systems. Genetic analysis has revealed the genomic diversity among these phages and provided an insight into their taxonomy and evolution. No strictly virulent C. difficile phages have been reported and this contributes to the difficulties with their therapeutic exploitation. Although treatment approaches using the phage-encoded endolysin protein have been explored, the benefits of using “whole-phages” are such that they remain a major research focus. Whilst we don’t envisage working with C. difficile phages will be problem-free, sufficient study should inform future strategies to facilitate their development to combat this problematic pathogen. PMID:24808893

  18. Beyond Helper Phage: Using "Helper Cells" to Select Peptide Affinity Ligands.

    PubMed

    Phipps, M Lisa; Lillo, Antoinetta M; Shou, Yulin; Schmidt, Emily N; Paavola, Chad D; Naranjo, Leslie; Bemdich, Sara; Swanson, Basil I; Bradbury, Andrew R M; Martinez, Jennifer S

    2016-01-01

    Peptides are important affinity ligands for microscopy, biosensing, and targeted delivery. However, because they can have low affinity for their targets, their selection from large naïve libraries can be challenging. When selecting peptidic ligands from display libraries, it is important to: 1) ensure efficient display; 2) maximize the ability to select high affinity ligands; and 3) minimize the effect of the display context on binding. The "helper cell" packaging system has been described as a tool to produce filamentous phage particles based on phagemid constructs with varying display levels, while remaining free of helper phage contamination. Here we report on the first use of this system for peptide display, including the systematic characterization and optimization of helper cells, their inefficient use in antibody display and their use in creating and selecting from a set of phage display peptide libraries. Our libraries were analyzed with unprecedented precision by standard or deep sequencing, and shown to be superior in quality than commercial gold standards. Using our helper cell libraries, we have obtained ligands recognizing Yersinia pestis surface antigen F1V and L-glutamine-binding periplasmic protein QBP. In the latter case, unlike any of the peptide library selections described so far, we used a combination of phage and yeast display to select intriguing peptide ligands. Based on the success of our selections we believe that peptide libraries obtained with helper cells are not only suitable, but preferable to traditional phage display libraries for selection of peptidic ligands. PMID:27626637

  19. Beyond Helper Phage: Using "Helper Cells" to Select Peptide Affinity Ligands

    PubMed Central

    Shou, Yulin; Schmidt, Emily N.; Paavola, Chad D.; Naranjo, Leslie; Bemdich, Sara; Swanson, Basil I.; Bradbury, Andrew R. M.; Martinez, Jennifer S.

    2016-01-01

    Peptides are important affinity ligands for microscopy, biosensing, and targeted delivery. However, because they can have low affinity for their targets, their selection from large naïve libraries can be challenging. When selecting peptidic ligands from display libraries, it is important to: 1) ensure efficient display; 2) maximize the ability to select high affinity ligands; and 3) minimize the effect of the display context on binding. The “helper cell” packaging system has been described as a tool to produce filamentous phage particles based on phagemid constructs with varying display levels, while remaining free of helper phage contamination. Here we report on the first use of this system for peptide display, including the systematic characterization and optimization of helper cells, their inefficient use in antibody display and their use in creating and selecting from a set of phage display peptide libraries. Our libraries were analyzed with unprecedented precision by standard or deep sequencing, and shown to be superior in quality than commercial gold standards. Using our helper cell libraries, we have obtained ligands recognizing Yersinia pestis surface antigen F1V and L-glutamine-binding periplasmic protein QBP. In the latter case, unlike any of the peptide library selections described so far, we used a combination of phage and yeast display to select intriguing peptide ligands. Based on the success of our selections we believe that peptide libraries obtained with helper cells are not only suitable, but preferable to traditional phage display libraries for selection of peptidic ligands. PMID:27626637

  20. Beyond Helper Phage: Using "Helper Cells" to Select Peptide Affinity Ligands.

    PubMed

    Phipps, M Lisa; Lillo, Antoinetta M; Shou, Yulin; Schmidt, Emily N; Paavola, Chad D; Naranjo, Leslie; Bemdich, Sara; Swanson, Basil I; Bradbury, Andrew R M; Martinez, Jennifer S

    2016-01-01

    Peptides are important affinity ligands for microscopy, biosensing, and targeted delivery. However, because they can have low affinity for their targets, their selection from large naïve libraries can be challenging. When selecting peptidic ligands from display libraries, it is important to: 1) ensure efficient display; 2) maximize the ability to select high affinity ligands; and 3) minimize the effect of the display context on binding. The "helper cell" packaging system has been described as a tool to produce filamentous phage particles based on phagemid constructs with varying display levels, while remaining free of helper phage contamination. Here we report on the first use of this system for peptide display, including the systematic characterization and optimization of helper cells, their inefficient use in antibody display and their use in creating and selecting from a set of phage display peptide libraries. Our libraries were analyzed with unprecedented precision by standard or deep sequencing, and shown to be superior in quality than commercial gold standards. Using our helper cell libraries, we have obtained ligands recognizing Yersinia pestis surface antigen F1V and L-glutamine-binding periplasmic protein QBP. In the latter case, unlike any of the peptide library selections described so far, we used a combination of phage and yeast display to select intriguing peptide ligands. Based on the success of our selections we believe that peptide libraries obtained with helper cells are not only suitable, but preferable to traditional phage display libraries for selection of peptidic ligands.

  1. Induction of Protective Anti-CTL Epitope Responses against HER-2-Positive Breast Cancer Based on Multivalent T7 Phage Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Pouyanfard, Somayeh; Bamdad, Taravat; Hashemi, Hamidreza; Bandehpour, Mojgan; Kazemi, Bahram

    2012-01-01

    We report here the development of multivalent T7 bacteriophage nanoparticles displaying an immunodominant H-2kd-restricted CTL epitope derived from the rat HER2/neu oncoprotein. The immunotherapeutic potential of the chimeric T7 nanoparticles as anti-cancer vaccine was investigated in BALB/c mice in an implantable breast tumor model. The results showed that T7 phage nanoparticles confer a high immunogenicity to the HER-2-derived minimal CTL epitope, as shown by inducing robust CTL responses. Furthermore, the chimeric nanoparticles protected mice against HER-2-positive tumor challenge in both prophylactic and therapeutic setting. In conclusion, these results suggest that CTL epitope-carrying T7 phage nanoparticles might be a promising approach for development of T cell epitope-based cancer vaccines. PMID:23166703

  2. Ecogenomics and genome landscapes of marine Pseudoalteromonas phage H105/1.

    PubMed

    Duhaime, Melissa Beth; Wichels, Antje; Waldmann, Jost; Teeling, Hanno; Glöckner, Frank Oliver

    2011-01-01

    Marine phages have an astounding global abundance and ecological impact. However, little knowledge is derived from phage genomes, as most of the open reading frames in their small genomes are unknown, novel proteins. To infer potential functional and ecological relevance of sequenced marine Pseudoalteromonas phage H105/1, two strategies were used. First, similarity searches were extended to include six viral and bacterial metagenomes paired with their respective environmental contextual data. This approach revealed 'ecogenomic' patterns of Pseudoalteromonas phage H105/1, such as its estuarine origin. Second, intrinsic genome signatures (phylogenetic, codon adaptation and tetranucleotide (tetra) frequencies) were evaluated on a resolved intra-genomic level to shed light on the evolution of phage functional modules. On the basis of differential codon adaptation of Phage H105/1 proteins to the sequenced Pseudoalteromonas spp., regions of the phage genome with the most 'host'-adapted proteins also have the strongest bacterial tetra signature, whereas the least 'host'-adapted proteins have the strongest phage tetra signature. Such a pattern may reflect the evolutionary history of the respective phage proteins and functional modules. Finally, analysis of the structural proteome identified seven proteins that make up the mature virion, four of which were previously unknown. This integrated approach combines both novel and classical strategies and serves as a model to elucidate ecological inferences and evolutionary relationships from phage genomes that typically abound with unknown gene content.

  3. Prevalence of Stx phages in environments of a pig farm and lysogenic infection of the field E. coli O157 isolates with a recombinant converting Phage.

    PubMed

    Yan, Yaxian; Shi, Yibo; Cao, Dongmei; Meng, Xiangpeng; Xia, Luming; Sun, Jianhe

    2011-02-01

    The prevalence and nature of Shiga toxin (Stx)-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) and Stx phage were investigated in 720 swine fecal samples randomly collected from a commercial breeding pig farm in China over a 1-year surveillance period. Eight STEC O157 (1.1%), 33 STEC non-O157 (4.6%), and two stx-negative O157 (0.3%) isolates were identified. Fecal filtrates were screened directly for Stx phages using E. coli K-12 derivative strains MC1061 as indicator, yielding 15 Stx1 and 57 Stx2 phages. One Stx1 and eight Stx2 phages were obtained following norfloxacin induction of the eight field STEC O157 isolates. All Stx1 phages had hexagonal heads with long tails, while Stx2 phages had three different morphologies. Notably, most of field STEC O157 isolates released more free phages and Stx toxin after induction with ciprofloxacin. Furthermore, upon infection with the recombinant phage ΦMin27(Δstx::cat), E. coli laboratory strains produced both lysogenic and lytic phage, whereas two of the eight O157 STEC isolates produced only lysogens. The lysogens from laboratory strains produced infectious particles similar to ΦMin27. Similarly, the lysogens from the STEC O157 isolates released Stx phage too, although free ΦMin27(Δstx::cat) particles were not detected. Collectively, our results reveal that breeding pig farms could be important reservoirs for Stx phages and that residual antibacterial agents may enhance the release of Stx phages and the expression of Stx. PMID:20697714

  4. Prevalence of Stx phages in environments of a pig farm and lysogenic infection of the field E. coli O157 isolates with a recombinant converting Phage.

    PubMed

    Yan, Yaxian; Shi, Yibo; Cao, Dongmei; Meng, Xiangpeng; Xia, Luming; Sun, Jianhe

    2011-02-01

    The prevalence and nature of Shiga toxin (Stx)-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) and Stx phage were investigated in 720 swine fecal samples randomly collected from a commercial breeding pig farm in China over a 1-year surveillance period. Eight STEC O157 (1.1%), 33 STEC non-O157 (4.6%), and two stx-negative O157 (0.3%) isolates were identified. Fecal filtrates were screened directly for Stx phages using E. coli K-12 derivative strains MC1061 as indicator, yielding 15 Stx1 and 57 Stx2 phages. One Stx1 and eight Stx2 phages were obtained following norfloxacin induction of the eight field STEC O157 isolates. All Stx1 phages had hexagonal heads with long tails, while Stx2 phages had three different morphologies. Notably, most of field STEC O157 isolates released more free phages and Stx toxin after induction with ciprofloxacin. Furthermore, upon infection with the recombinant phage ΦMin27(Δstx::cat), E. coli laboratory strains produced both lysogenic and lytic phage, whereas two of the eight O157 STEC isolates produced only lysogens. The lysogens from laboratory strains produced infectious particles similar to ΦMin27. Similarly, the lysogens from the STEC O157 isolates released Stx phage too, although free ΦMin27(Δstx::cat) particles were not detected. Collectively, our results reveal that breeding pig farms could be important reservoirs for Stx phages and that residual antibacterial agents may enhance the release of Stx phages and the expression of Stx.

  5. Directed synthesis of bio-inorganic vanadium oxide composites using genetically modified filamentous phage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Michael; Baik, Seungyun; Jeon, Hojeong; Kim, Yuchan; Kim, Jungtae; Kim, Young Jun

    2015-05-01

    The growth of crystalline vanadium oxide using a filamentous bacteriophage template was investigated using sequential incubation in a V2O5 precursor. Using the genetic modification of the bacteriophage, we displayed two cysteines that constrained the RSTB-1 peptide on the major coat protein P8, resulting in vanadium oxide crystallization. The phage-driven vanadium oxide crystals with different topologies, microstructures, photodegradation and vanadium oxide composites were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), quartz microbalance and dissipation (QCM-D) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Non-specific electrostatic attraction between a wild-type phage (wt-phage) and vanadium cations in the V2O5 precursor caused phage agglomeration and fiber formation along the length of the viral scaffold. As a result, the addition of recombinant phage (re-phage) in V2O5 precursors formed heterogeneous structures, which led to efficient condensation of vanadium oxide crystal formation in lines, shown by QCM-D analysis. Furthermore, re-phage/VxOx composites showed significantly enhanced photodegradation activities compared with the synthesized wt-phage-V2O5 composite under illumination. This study demonstrates that peptide-mediated vanadium oxide mineralization is governed by a complicated interplay of peptide sequence, local structure, kinetics and the presence of a mineralizing aid, such as the two cysteine-constrained peptides on the phage surface, and has potential for use in nanotechnology applications.

  6. N-Terminal Labeling Of Filamentous Phage To Create Cancer Marker Imaging Agents

    PubMed Central

    Carrico, Zachary M.; Farkas, Michelle E.; Zhou, Yu; Hsiao, Sonny C.; Marks, James D.; Chokhawala, Harshal; Clark, Douglas S.; Francis, Matthew B.

    2012-01-01

    We report a convenient new technique for the labeling of filamentous phage capsid proteins. Previous reports have shown that phage coat protein residues can be modified, but the lack of chemically distinct amino acids in the coat protein sequences makes it difficult to attach high levels of synthetic molecules without altering the binding capabilities of the phage. To modify the phage with polymer chains, imaging groups, and other molecules, we have developed chemistry to convert the N-terminal amines of the ~4,200 coat proteins into ketone groups. These sites can then serve as chemospecific handles for the attachment of alkoxyamine groups through oxime formation. Specifically, we demonstrate the attachment of fluorophores and up to 3,000 molecules of 2 kD poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG2k) to each of the phage capsids without significantly affecting the binding of phage-displayed antibody fragments to EGFR and HER2 (two important epidermal growth factor receptors). We also demonstrate the utility of the modified phage for the characterization of breast cancer cells using multicolor fluorescence microscopy. Due to the widespread use of filamentous phage as display platforms for peptide and protein evolution, we envision that the ability to attach large numbers of synthetic functional groups to their coat proteins will be of significant value to the biological and materials communities. PMID:22830952

  7. Intragenus generalized transduction in Staphylococcus spp. by a novel giant phage.

    PubMed

    Uchiyama, Jumpei; Takemura-Uchiyama, Iyo; Sakaguchi, Yoshihiko; Gamoh, Keiji; Kato, Shin-ichiro; Daibata, Masanori; Ujihara, Takako; Misawa, Naoaki; Matsuzaki, Shigenobu

    2014-09-01

    Bacteriophage (phage)-mediated generalized transduction is expected to contribute to the emergence of drug-resistant staphylococcal clones in various environments. In this study, novel phage S6 was isolated from sewage and used to test generalized transduction in human- and animal-derived staphylococci. Phage S6 was a novel type of giant myophage, which possessed a DNA genome that contained uracil instead of thymine, and it could infect all of the tested staphylococcal species. The phage S6 appeared to be similar to the transducing phage PBS1, which infects Bacillus spp. Moreover, phage S6 facilitated the transduction of a plasmid in Staphylococcus aureus and from S. aureus to non-aureus staphylococcal species, as well as vice versa. Transduction of methicillin resistance also occurred in S. aureus. This is the first report of successful intragenus generalized transduction among staphylococci.

  8. Conserved termini and adjacent variable region of Twortlikevirus Staphylococcus phages.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xianglilan; Kang, Huaixing; Li, Yuyuan; Liu, Xiaodong; Yang, Yu; Li, Shasha; Pei, Guangqian; Sun, Qiang; Shu, Peng; Mi, Zhiqiang; Huang, Yong; Zhang, Zhiyi; Liu, Yannan; An, Xiaoping; Xu, Xiaolu; Tong, Yigang

    2015-12-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is an increasing cause of serious infection, both in the community and hospital settings. Despite sophisticated strategies and efforts, the antibiotic options for treating MRSA infection are narrowing because of the limited number of newly developed antimicrobials. Here, four newly-isolated MRSA-virulent phages, IME-SA1, IMESA2, IME-SA118 and IME-SA119, were sequenced and analyzed. Their genome termini were identified using our previously proposed "termini analysis theory". We provide evidence that remarkable conserved terminus sequences are found in IME-SA1/2/118/119, and, moreover, are widespread throughout Twortlikevirus Staphylococcus phage G1 and K species. Results also suggested that each phage of the two species has conserved 5' terminus while the 3' terminus is variable. More importantly, a variable region with a specific pattern was found to be present near the conserved terminus of Twortlikevirus S. phage G1 species. The clone with the longest variable region had variable terminus lengths in successive generations, while the clones with the shortest variable region and with the average length variable region maintained the same terminal length as themselves during successive generations. IME-SA1 bacterial infection experiments showed that the variation is not derived from adaptation of the phage to different host strains. This is the first study of the conserved terminus and variable region of Twortlikevirus S. phages.

  9. A transposon-derived DNA polymerase from Entamoeba histolytica displays intrinsic strand displacement, processivity and lesion bypass.

    PubMed

    Pastor-Palacios, Guillermo; López-Ramírez, Varinia; Cardona-Felix, Cesar S; Brieba, Luis G

    2012-01-01

    Entamoeba histolytica encodes four family B2 DNA polymerases that vary in amino acid length from 813 to 1279. These DNA polymerases contain a N-terminal domain with no homology to other proteins and a C-terminal domain with high amino acid identity to archetypical family B2 DNA polymerases. A phylogenetic analysis indicates that these family B2 DNA polymerases are grouped with DNA polymerases from transposable elements dubbed Polintons or Mavericks. In this work, we report the cloning and biochemical characterization of the smallest family B2 DNA polymerase from E. histolytica. To facilitate its characterization we subcloned its 660 amino acids C-terminal region that comprises the complete exonuclease and DNA polymerization domains, dubbed throughout this work as EhDNApolB2. We found that EhDNApolB2 displays remarkable strand displacement, processivity and efficiently bypasses the DNA lesions: 8-oxo guanosine and abasic site.Family B2 DNA polymerases from T. vaginalis, G. lambia and E. histolytica contain a Terminal Region Protein 2 (TPR2) motif twice the length of the TPR2 from φ29 DNA polymerase. Deletion studies demonstrate that as in φ29 DNA polymerase, the TPR2 motif of EhDNApolB2 is solely responsible of strand displacement and processivity. Interestingly the TPR2 of EhDNApolB2 is also responsible for efficient abasic site bypass. These data suggests that the 21 extra amino acids of the TPR2 motif may shape the active site of EhDNApolB2 to efficiently incorporate and extended opposite an abasic site. Herein we demonstrate that an open reading frame derived from Politons-Mavericks in parasitic protozoa encode a functional enzyme and our findings support the notion that the introduction of novel motifs in DNA polymerases can confer specialized properties to a conserved scaffold. PMID:23226232

  10. Complete Genome Sequence of Bacillus subtilis Strain CU1050, Which Is Sensitive to Phage SPβ

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus subtilis is used as a model organism to study cellular and molecular processes. Here, we announce the complete genomic sequence of B. subtilis strain CU1050, derived from B. subtilis strain 168. CU1050 has historically been used to study suppressor mutations and phage biology, especially the lysogenic phage SPβ. PMID:27056236

  11. A Label-Free Electrochemical Impedance Cytosensor Based on Specific Peptide-Fused Phage Selected from Landscape Phage Library.

    PubMed

    Han, Lei; Liu, Pei; Petrenko, Valery A; Liu, Aihua

    2016-02-24

    One of the major challenges in the design of biosensors for cancer diagnosis is to introduce a low-cost and selective probe that can recognize cancer cells. In this paper, we combined the phage display technology and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) to develop a label-free cytosensor for the detection of cancer cells, without complicated purification of recognition elements. Fabrication steps of the cytosensing interface were monitored by EIS. Due to the high specificity of the displayed octapeptides and avidity effect of their multicopy display on the phage scaffold, good biocompatibility of recombinant phage, the fibrous nanostructure of phage, and the inherent merits of EIS technology, the proposed cytosensor demonstrated a wide linear range (2.0 × 10(2) - 2.0 × 10(8) cells mL(-1)), a low limit of detection (79 cells mL(-1), S/N = 3), high specificity, good inter-and intra-assay reproducibility and satisfactory storage stability. This novel cytosensor designing strategy will open a new prospect for rapid and label-free electrochemical platform for tumor diagnosis.

  12. A Label-Free Electrochemical Impedance Cytosensor Based on Specific Peptide-Fused Phage Selected from Landscape Phage Library

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Lei; Liu, Pei; Petrenko, Valery A.; Liu, Aihua

    2016-02-01

    One of the major challenges in the design of biosensors for cancer diagnosis is to introduce a low-cost and selective probe that can recognize cancer cells. In this paper, we combined the phage display technology and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) to develop a label-free cytosensor for the detection of cancer cells, without complicated purification of recognition elements. Fabrication steps of the cytosensing interface were monitored by EIS. Due to the high specificity of the displayed octapeptides and avidity effect of their multicopy display on the phage scaffold, good biocompatibility of recombinant phage, the fibrous nanostructure of phage, and the inherent merits of EIS technology, the proposed cytosensor demonstrated a wide linear range (2.0 × 102 ‑ 2.0 × 108 cells mL‑1), a low limit of detection (79 cells mL‑1, S/N = 3), high specificity, good inter-and intra-assay reproducibility and satisfactory storage stability. This novel cytosensor designing strategy will open a new prospect for rapid and label-free electrochemical platform for tumor diagnosis.

  13. A Label-Free Electrochemical Impedance Cytosensor Based on Specific Peptide-Fused Phage Selected from Landscape Phage Library

    PubMed Central

    Han, Lei; Liu, Pei; Petrenko, Valery A.; Liu, Aihua

    2016-01-01

    One of the major challenges in the design of biosensors for cancer diagnosis is to introduce a low-cost and selective probe that can recognize cancer cells. In this paper, we combined the phage display technology and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) to develop a label-free cytosensor for the detection of cancer cells, without complicated purification of recognition elements. Fabrication steps of the cytosensing interface were monitored by EIS. Due to the high specificity of the displayed octapeptides and avidity effect of their multicopy display on the phage scaffold, good biocompatibility of recombinant phage, the fibrous nanostructure of phage, and the inherent merits of EIS technology, the proposed cytosensor demonstrated a wide linear range (2.0 × 102 − 2.0 × 108 cells mL−1), a low limit of detection (79 cells mL−1, S/N = 3), high specificity, good inter-and intra-assay reproducibility and satisfactory storage stability. This novel cytosensor designing strategy will open a new prospect for rapid and label-free electrochemical platform for tumor diagnosis. PMID:26908277

  14. A Label-Free Electrochemical Impedance Cytosensor Based on Specific Peptide-Fused Phage Selected from Landscape Phage Library.

    PubMed

    Han, Lei; Liu, Pei; Petrenko, Valery A; Liu, Aihua

    2016-01-01

    One of the major challenges in the design of biosensors for cancer diagnosis is to introduce a low-cost and selective probe that can recognize cancer cells. In this paper, we combined the phage display technology and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) to develop a label-free cytosensor for the detection of cancer cells, without complicated purification of recognition elements. Fabrication steps of the cytosensing interface were monitored by EIS. Due to the high specificity of the displayed octapeptides and avidity effect of their multicopy display on the phage scaffold, good biocompatibility of recombinant phage, the fibrous nanostructure of phage, and the inherent merits of EIS technology, the proposed cytosensor demonstrated a wide linear range (2.0 × 10(2) - 2.0 × 10(8) cells mL(-1)), a low limit of detection (79 cells mL(-1), S/N = 3), high specificity, good inter-and intra-assay reproducibility and satisfactory storage stability. This novel cytosensor designing strategy will open a new prospect for rapid and label-free electrochemical platform for tumor diagnosis. PMID:26908277

  15. Phage therapy of pulmonary infections

    PubMed Central

    Abedon, Stephen T

    2015-01-01

    It is generally agreed that a bacteriophage-associated phenomenon was first unambiguously observed one-hundred years ago with the findings of Twort in 1915. This was independently followed by complementary observations by d'Hérelle in 1917. D'Hérelle's appreciation of the bacteriophage phenomenon appears to have directly led to the development of phages as antibacterial agents within a variety of contexts, including medical and agricultural. Phage use to combat nuisance bacteria appears to be especially useful where targets are sufficiently problematic, suitably bactericidal phages exist, and alternative approaches are lacking in effectiveness, availability, safety, or cost effectiveness, etc. Phage development as antibacterial agents has been strongest particularly when antibiotics have been less available or useful, e.g., such as in the treatment of chronic infections by antibiotic-resistant bacteria. One relatively under-explored or at least not highly reported use of phages as therapeutic agents has been to combat bacterial infections of the lungs and associated tissues. These infections are diverse in terms of their etiologies, manifestations, and also in terms of potential strategies of phage delivery. Here I review the literature considering the phage therapy of pulmonary and pulmonary-related infections, with emphasis on reports of clinical treatment along with experimental treatment of pulmonary infections using animal models. PMID:26442188

  16. Discovery of internalizing antibodies to tumor antigens from phage libraries

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yu; Marks, James D

    2014-01-01

    Phage antibody technology can be used to generate human antibodies to essentially any antigen. Many therapeutic target antigens are cell surface receptors, which can be challenging targets for antibody generation. In addition, for many therapeutic applications, one needs antibodies that not only bind the cell surface receptor but that also are internalized into the cell upon binding. This allows use of the antibody to deliver a range of payloads into the cell to achieve a therapeutic effect. In this chapter we describe how human phage antibody libraries can be selected directly on tumor cell lines to generate antibodies that bind cell surface receptors and which upon binding are rapidly internalized into the cell. Specific protocols show how to: 1) directly select cell binding and internalizing antibodies from human phage antibody libraries; 2) screen the phage antibodies in a high throughput flow cytometry assay for binding to the tumor cell line used for selection; 3) identify the antigen bound by the phage antibody using immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry; and 4) direct cell binding and internalizing selections to a specific tumor antigen by sequential selection on a tumor cell line followed by selection on yeast displaying the target tumor antigen on the yeast surface. PMID:22208981

  17. Improving the safety of Staphylococcus aureus polyvalent phages by their production on a Staphylococcus xylosus strain.

    PubMed

    El Haddad, Lynn; Ben Abdallah, Nour; Plante, Pier-Luc; Dumaresq, Jeannot; Katsarava, Ramaz; Labrie, Steve; Corbeil, Jacques; St-Gelais, Daniel; Moineau, Sylvain

    2014-01-01

    Team1 (vB_SauM_Team1) is a polyvalent staphylococcal phage belonging to the Myoviridae family. Phage Team1 was propagated on a Staphylococcus aureus strain and a non-pathogenic Staphylococcus xylosus strain used in industrial meat fermentation. The two Team1 preparations were compared with respect to their microbiological and genomic properties. The burst sizes, latent periods, and host ranges of the two derivatives were identical as were their genome sequences. Phage Team1 has 140,903 bp of double stranded DNA encoding for 217 open reading frames and 4 tRNAs. Comparative genomic analysis revealed similarities to staphylococcal phages ISP (97%) and G1 (97%). The host range of Team1 was compared to the well-known polyvalent staphylococcal phages phi812 and K using a panel of 57 S. aureus strains collected from various sources. These bacterial strains were found to represent 18 sequence types (MLST) and 14 clonal complexes (eBURST). Altogether, the three phages propagated on S. xylosus lysed 52 out of 57 distinct strains of S. aureus. The identification of phage-insensitive strains underlines the importance of designing phage cocktails with broadly varying and overlapping host ranges. Taken altogether, our study suggests that some staphylococcal phages can be propagated on food-grade bacteria for biocontrol and safety purposes. PMID:25061757

  18. Improving the Safety of Staphylococcus aureus Polyvalent Phages by Their Production on a Staphylococcus xylosus Strain

    PubMed Central

    El Haddad, Lynn; Ben Abdallah, Nour; Plante, Pier-Luc; Dumaresq, Jeannot; Katsarava, Ramaz; Labrie, Steve; Corbeil, Jacques; St-Gelais, Daniel; Moineau, Sylvain

    2014-01-01

    Team1 (vB_SauM_Team1) is a polyvalent staphylococcal phage belonging to the Myoviridae family. Phage Team1 was propagated on a Staphylococcus aureus strain and a non-pathogenic Staphylococcus xylosus strain used in industrial meat fermentation. The two Team1 preparations were compared with respect to their microbiological and genomic properties. The burst sizes, latent periods, and host ranges of the two derivatives were identical as were their genome sequences. Phage Team1 has 140,903 bp of double stranded DNA encoding for 217 open reading frames and 4 tRNAs. Comparative genomic analysis revealed similarities to staphylococcal phages ISP (97%) and G1 (97%). The host range of Team1 was compared to the well-known polyvalent staphylococcal phages phi812 and K using a panel of 57 S. aureus strains collected from various sources. These bacterial strains were found to represent 18 sequence types (MLST) and 14 clonal complexes (eBURST). Altogether, the three phages propagated on S. xylosus lysed 52 out of 57 distinct strains of S. aureus. The identification of phage-insensitive strains underlines the importance of designing phage cocktails with broadly varying and overlapping host ranges. Taken altogether, our study suggests that some staphylococcal phages can be propagated on food-grade bacteria for biocontrol and safety purposes. PMID:25061757

  19. Bacteria-phage interactions in natural environments.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Muñoz, Samuel L; Koskella, Britt

    2014-01-01

    Phages are considered the most abundant and diverse biological entities on Earth and are notable not only for their sheer abundance, but also for their influence on bacterial hosts. In nature, bacteria-phage relationships are complex and have far-reaching consequences beyond particular pairwise interactions, influencing everything from bacterial virulence to eukaryotic fitness to the carbon cycle. In this review, we examine bacteria and phage distributions in nature first by highlighting biogeographic patterns and nonhost environmental influences on phage distribution, then by considering the ways in which phages and bacteria interact, emphasizing phage life cycles, bacterial responses to phage infection, and the complex patterns of phage host specificity. Finally, we discuss phage impacts on bacterial abundance, genetics, and physiology, and further aim to clarify distinctions between current theoretical models and point out areas in need of future research. PMID:25131402

  20. The present position in Brucella phage research

    PubMed Central

    Droževkina, M. S.

    1963-01-01

    It is only comparatively recently that efforts to isolate and purify stable Brucella phages have met with success. This success has important implications for the epidemiology and possibly the control of brucellosis, and the author has therefore thought it opportune to summarize and review the present state of research on Brucella phages. After giving an outline of the history of Brucella phage isolation, she goes into the methodology of phage isolation from numerous sources, of phage reinforcement, and of determination of the lytic activity of phage. This is followed by a discussion of the biological properties, morphology and typing of Brucella phage, and of lysogeny in Brucella. Finally, she reviews the promising research that is being done on Brucella typing with specific phage and on the use of antiphage serum in diagnosis, and discusses the possible use of phage in the treatment and prevention of brucellosis. PMID:14043752

  1. Phage nanofibers induce vascularized osteogenesis in 3D printed bone scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianglin; Yang, Mingying; Zhu, Ye; Wang, Lin; Tomsia, Antoni P; Mao, Chuanbin

    2014-08-01

    A virus-activated matrix is developed to overcome the challenge of forming vascularized bone tissue. It is generated by filling a 3D printed bioceramic scaffold with phage nanofibers displaying high-density RGD peptide. After it is seeded with mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and implanted into a bone defect, the phage nanofibers induce osteogenesis and angiogenesis by activating endothelialization and osteogenic differentiation of MSCs.

  2. Development of phoH as a novel signature gene for assessing marine phage diversity.

    PubMed

    Goldsmith, Dawn B; Crosti, Giuseppe; Dwivedi, Bhakti; McDaniel, Lauren D; Varsani, Arvind; Suttle, Curtis A; Weinbauer, Markus G; Sandaa, Ruth-Anne; Breitbart, Mya

    2011-11-01

    Phages play a key role in the marine environment by regulating the transfer of energy between trophic levels and influencing global carbon and nutrient cycles. The diversity of marine phage communities remains difficult to characterize because of the lack of a signature gene common to all phages. Recent studies have demonstrated the presence of host-derived auxiliary metabolic genes in phage genomes, such as those belonging to the Pho regulon, which regulates phosphate uptake and metabolism under low-phosphate conditions. Among the completely sequenced phage genomes in GenBank, this study identified Pho regulon genes in nearly 40% of the marine phage genomes, while only 4% of nonmarine phage genomes contained these genes. While several Pho regulon genes were identified, phoH was the most prevalent, appearing in 42 out of 602 completely sequenced phage genomes. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that phage phoH sequences formed a cluster distinct from those of their bacterial hosts. PCR primers designed to amplify a region of the phoH gene were used to determine the diversity of phage phoH sequences throughout a depth profile in the Sargasso Sea and at six locations worldwide. phoH was present at all sites examined, and a high diversity of phoH sequences was recovered. Most phoH sequences belonged to clusters without any cultured representatives. Each depth and geographic location had a distinct phoH composition, although most phoH clusters were recovered from multiple sites. Overall, phoH is an effective signature gene for examining phage diversity in the marine environment. PMID:21926220

  3. Membrane fusion during phage lysis

    PubMed Central

    Berry, Joel; Kongari, Rohit; Cahill, Jesse; Young, Ry

    2015-01-01

    In general, phages cause lysis of the bacterial host to effect release of the progeny virions. Until recently, it was thought that degradation of the peptidoglycan (PG) was necessary and sufficient for osmotic bursting of the cell. Recently, we have shown that in Gram-negative hosts, phage lysis also requires the disruption of the outer membrane (OM). This is accomplished by spanins, which are phage-encoded proteins that connect the cytoplasmic membrane (inner membrane, IM) and the OM. The mechanism by which the spanins destroy the OM is unknown. Here we show that the spanins of the paradigm coliphage lambda mediate efficient membrane fusion. This supports the notion that the last step of lysis is the fusion of the IM and OM. Moreover, data are provided indicating that spanin-mediated fusion is regulated by the meshwork of the PG, thus coupling fusion to murein degradation by the phage endolysin. Because endolysin function requires the formation of μm-scale holes by the phage holin, the lysis pathway is seen to require dramatic dynamics on the part of the OM and IM, as well as destruction of the PG. PMID:25870259

  4. Phage Specificity of the Freshwater Fish Pathogen Flavobacterium columnare▿

    PubMed Central

    Laanto, Elina; Sundberg, Lotta-Riina; Bamford, Jaana K. H.

    2011-01-01

    Flavobacteria and their phages were isolated from Finnish freshwaters and fish farms. Emphasis was placed on finding phages infecting the fish pathogen Flavobacterium columnare for use as phage therapy agents. The host ranges of the flavobacterial phages varied, phages infecting F. columnare being more host specific than the other phages. PMID:21890667

  5. Transposable Phage Mu.

    PubMed

    Harshey, Rasika M

    2014-10-01

    Transposable phage Mu has played a major role in elucidating the mechanism of movement of mobile DNA elements. The high efficiency of Mu transposition has facilitated a detailed biochemical dissection of the reaction mechanism, as well as of protein and DNA elements that regulate transpososome assembly and function. The deduced phosphotransfer mechanism involves in-line orientation of metal ion-activated hydroxyl groups for nucleophilic attack on reactive diester bonds, a mechanism that appears to be used by all transposable elements examined to date. A crystal structure of the Mu transpososome is available. Mu differs from all other transposable elements in encoding unique adaptations that promote its viral lifestyle. These adaptations include multiple DNA (enhancer, SGS) and protein (MuB, HU, IHF) elements that enable efficient Mu end synapsis, efficient target capture, low target specificity, immunity to transposition near or into itself, and efficient mechanisms for recruiting host repair and replication machineries to resolve transposition intermediates. MuB has multiple functions, including target capture and immunity. The SGS element promotes gyrase-mediated Mu end synapsis, and the enhancer, aided by HU and IHF, participates in directing a unique topological architecture of the Mu synapse. The function of these DNA and protein elements is important during both lysogenic and lytic phases. Enhancer properties have been exploited in the design of mini-Mu vectors for genetic engineering. Mu ends assembled into active transpososomes have been delivered directly into bacterial, yeast, and human genomes, where they integrate efficiently, and may prove useful for gene therapy. PMID:26104374

  6. Complete Genome Sequence of Vibrio anguillarum Phage CHOED Successfully Used for Phage Therapy in Aquaculture

    PubMed Central

    Higuera, Gastón; Gajardo, Felipe; Castillo, Daniel; Middleboe, Mathias; García, Katherine; Ramírez, Carolina; Espejo, Romilio T.

    2014-01-01

    Vibrio anguillarum phage CHOED was isolated from Chilean mussels. It is a virulent phage showing effective inhibition of V. anguillarum. CHOED has potential in phage therapy, because it can protect fish from vibriosis in fish farms. Here, we announce the completely sequenced genome of V. anguillarum phage CHOED. PMID:25013148

  7. Phage Community Dynamics in Hot Springs

    PubMed Central

    Breitbart, Mya; Wegley, Linda; Leeds, Steven; Schoenfeld, Tom; Rohwer, Forest

    2004-01-01

    In extreme thermal environments such as hot springs, phages are the only known microbial predators. Here we present the first study of prokaryotic and phage community dynamics in these environments. Phages were abundant in hot springs, reaching concentrations of a million viruses per milliliter. Hot spring phage particles were resistant to shifts to lower temperatures, possibly facilitating DNA transfer out of these extreme environments. The phages were actively produced, with a population turnover time of 1 to 2 days. Phage-mediated microbial mortality was significant, making phage lysis an important component of hot spring microbial food webs. Together, these results show that phages exert an important influence on microbial community structure and energy flow in extreme thermal environments. PMID:15006788

  8. Mast cell- and dendritic cell-derived exosomes display a specific lipid composition and an unusual membrane organization.

    PubMed Central

    Laulagnier, Karine; Motta, Claude; Hamdi, Safouane; Roy, Sébastien; Fauvelle, Florence; Pageaux, Jean-François; Kobayashi, Toshihide; Salles, Jean-Pierre; Perret, Bertrand; Bonnerot, Christian; Record, Michel

    2004-01-01

    Exosomes are small vesicles secreted from multivesicular bodies, which are able to stimulate the immune system leading to tumour cell eradication. We have analysed lipids of exosomes secreted either upon stimulation from rat mast cells (RBL-2H3 cells), or constitutively from human dendritic cells. As compared with parent cells, exosomes displayed an enrichment in sphingomyelin, but not in cholesterol. Phosphatidylcholine content was decreased, but an enrichment was noted in disaturated molecular species as in phosphatidylethanolamines. Lyso(bis)phosphatidic acid was not enriched in exosomes as compared with cells. Fluorescence anisotropy demonstrated an increase in exosome-membrane rigidity from pH 5 to 7, suggesting their membrane reorganization between the acidic multivesicular body compartment and the neutral outer cell medium. NMR analysis established a bilayer organization of exosome membrane, and ESR studies using 16-doxyl stearic acid demonstrated a higher flip-flop of lipids between the two leaflets as compared with plasma membrane. In addition, the exosome membrane exhibited no asymmetrical distribution of phosphatidylethanolamines. Therefore exosome membrane displays a similar content of the major phospholipids and cholesterol, and is organized as a lipid bilayer with a random distribution of phosphatidylethanolamines. In addition, we observed tight lipid packing at neutral pH and a rapid flip-flop between the two leaflets of exosome membranes. These parameters could be used as a hallmark of exosomes. PMID:14965343

  9. Phage-encoded Serine Integrases and Other Large Serine Recombinases.

    PubMed

    Smith, Margaret C M

    2015-08-01

    The large serine recombinases (LSRs) are a family of enzymes, encoded in temperate phage genomes or on mobile elements, that precisely cut and recombine DNA in a highly controllable and predictable way. In phage integration, the LSRs act at specific sites, the attP site in the phage and the attB site in the host chromosome, where cleavage and strand exchange leads to the integrated prophage flanked by the recombinant sites attL and attR. The prophage can excise by recombination between attL and attR but this requires a phage-encoded accessory protein, the recombination directionality factor (RDF). Although the LSRs can bind specifically to all the recombination sites, only specific integrase-bound sites can pair in a synaptic complex prior to strand exchange. Recent structural information has led to a breakthrough in our understanding of the mechanism of the LSRs, notably how the LSRs bind to their substrates and how LSRs display this site-selectivity. We also understand that the RDFs exercise control over the LSRs by protein-protein interactions. Other recent work with the LSRs have contributed to our understanding of how all serine recombinases undergo strand exchange subunit rotation, facilitated by surfaces that resemble a molecular bearing.

  10. Who went into phage research?

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    A total of 30,000 phage papers, books, or book chapters, published between 1965 and 2010, were analyzed for the ethnic origins of 14,429 first authors. Their names represent 40 linguistic domains or geographic areas and at least 70 languages. British and German names predominate. Results broadly concur with statistics on the frequency of publications by country and show the growing role of Third-World countries in phage research. Irish and Jewish scientists are prominent. Historical and societal factors appear to be very important elements in the advancement of science. PMID:22666657

  11. Photochemistry of chalcone and the application of chalcone-derivatives in photo-alignment layer of liquid crystal display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Dong-mee; Jung, Kyoung-hoon; Moon, Ji-hye; Shin, Dong-myung

    2003-01-01

    We synthesized chalcone derivatives and introduced them as a side chain unit in the backbone of polyimide for photo-alignment layers. The rate of photoreaction was followed by the disappearance of the CCCO bond in the chalcone moiety using UV-visible spectroscopy. The absorption peak at around 340 nm decreased significantly in less than a few minutes at room temperature. We studied the effect of the length of alkyl chain in chalcone derivatives and found that the alignment properties are very much dependent on the chain length.

  12. Isolation and characterization of the Shiga toxin gene (stx)-bearing Escherichia coli O157 and non-O157 from retail meats in Shandong Province, China, and characterization of the O157-derived stx2 phages.

    PubMed

    Koitabashi, Tsutomu; Cui, Shan; Kamruzzaman, Muhammad; Nishibuchi, Mitsuaki

    2008-04-01

    Infection by Shiga toxin (Stx)-producing Escherichia coli of non-O157 and O157 serotypes are rare in China, but infection by O157 serotype was found in Shandong Province and three other provinces in China. To understand the reason for these rare infections and to determine the safety of retail meats in Shandong Province, we examined the distribution of Shiga toxin gene (stx)-bearing E. coli in retail meats and characterized the isolated stx-bearing strains. We used hybridization with DNA probes and isolated stx1- and/or stx2-positive E. coli from 31 (58%) of 53 retail meat samples, with beef showing the highest frequency (68%). Of 42 stx-positive isolates, none belonged to O157. Using the O157-specific immunomagnetic bead technique, we isolated E. coli O157 carrying the eae and stx2 genes from eight beef samples (26%). These strains produced little or no Stx2 and carried a unique q gene. Replication of the stx2 phages was detected in these strains, whereas stx2 phage replication was not detected in our previous study in which we examined similar stx2-bearing E. coli O157 strains from other Asian countries. Analysis of E. coli C600 lysogenized with the stx2 phages found in this study suggests that the lack of Stx2 production is due to changes in non-q gene region(s) of the phage genome or chromosomal mutation(s) in the host. Our data and reports by other workers suggest it is necessary to determine if various stx2-bearing E. coli O157 strains producing Stx2 to varying degrees are distributed in meats in various locations in China.

  13. Characterization of phi HAU3, a broad-host-range temperate streptomyces phage, and development of phasmids.

    PubMed

    Zhou, X; Deng, Z; Hopwood, D A; Kieser, T

    1994-04-01

    phi HAU3 is a temperate Streptomyces phage with cohesive ends and a broad host range that includes Streptomyces hygroscopicus 10-22, a producer of antifungal compounds, but it fails to grow on Streptomyces lividans 66. Two phasmid derivatives were constructed that function as lambda cosmid vectors in Escherichia coli and as phages in Streptomyces spp.

  14. Revenge of the phages: defeating bacterial defences.

    PubMed

    Samson, Julie E; Magadán, Alfonso H; Sabri, Mourad; Moineau, Sylvain

    2013-10-01

    Bacteria and their viral predators (bacteriophages) are locked in a constant battle. In order to proliferate in phage-rich environments, bacteria have an impressive arsenal of defence mechanisms, and in response, phages have evolved counter-strategies to evade these antiviral systems. In this Review, we describe the various tactics that are used by phages to overcome bacterial resistance mechanisms, including adsorption inhibition, restriction-modification, CRISPR-Cas (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats-CRISPR-associated proteins) systems and abortive infection. Furthermore, we consider how these observations have enhanced our knowledge of phage biology, evolution and phage-host interactions. PMID:23979432

  15. Beyond helper phage: Using "helper cells" to select peptide affinity ligands

    DOE PAGES

    Phipps, Mary Lisa; Lillo, Antoinetta M.; Shou, Yulin; Schmidt, Emily N.; Paavola, Chad D.; Naranjo, Leslie A.; Bemdich, Sara; Swanson, Basil I.; Bradbury, Andrew R. M.; Martinez, Jennifer S.; et al

    2016-09-14

    Peptides are important affinity ligands for microscopy, biosensing, and targeted delivery. However, because they can have low affinity for their targets, their selection from large naïve libraries can be challenging. When selecting peptidic ligands from display libraries, it is important to: 1) ensure efficient display; 2) maximize the ability to select high affinity ligands; and 3) minimize the effect of the display context on binding. The “helper cell” packaging system has been described as a tool to produce filamentous phage particles based on phagemid constructs with varying display levels, while remaining free of helper phage contamination. Here we report onmore » the first use of this system for peptide display, including the systematic characterization and optimization of helper cells, their inefficient use in antibody display and their use in creating and selecting from a set of phage display peptide libraries. Our libraries were analyzed with unprecedented precision by standard or deep sequencing, and shown to be superior in quality than commercial gold standards. Using our helper cell libraries, we have obtained ligands recognizing Yersinia pestis surface antigen F1V and L-glutamine-binding periplasmic protein QBP. In the latter case, unlike any of the peptide library selections described so far, we used a combination of phage and yeast display to select intriguing peptide ligands. Here, based on the success of our selections we believe that peptide libraries obtained with helper cells are not only suitable, but preferable to traditional phage display libraries for selection of peptidic ligands.« less

  16. Phage typing of Staphylococcus saprophyticus.

    PubMed Central

    Torres Pereira, A.; Melo Cristino, J. A.

    1991-01-01

    This study included 502 staphylococcus strains; Staphylococcus saprophyticus (297 strains) S. cohnii (47), S. xylosus (10), S. epidermidis (67) and S. aureus (81). Mitomycin C induction was performed on 100 isolates of S. saprophyticus and all induced strains were reacted with each other. Twenty-six strains proved to be lysogenic. Phages were propagated and titrated. With 12 of the phages there were three frequent associations, named lytic groups A, B and C, which included 75% of all typable strains. Typability of the system was 45% and reproducibility was between 94.2% and 100%. Phages did not lyse S. aureus and S. epidermidis strains, but they lysed S. saprophyticus and only rare strains of other novobiocin resistant species. Effective S. saprophyticus typing serves ecological purposes and tracing the origin of urinary strains from the skin or mucous membranes. Phage typing in association with plasmid profiling previously described, are anticipated as complementary methods with strong discriminatory power for differentiating among S. saprophyticus strains. PMID:1752305

  17. A novel binuclear copper complex incorporating a nalidixic acid derivative displaying a one-dimensional coordination polymeric structure.

    PubMed

    Bergamini, F R G; Ribeiro, M A; Miranda, P C M L; Formiga, A L B; Corbi, P P

    2016-07-01

    The identification of the antibacterial action of nalidixic acid (nx) was central to the development of the quinolone antibacterial compounds. The ability of the nx naphthyridyl ring to interact with and inhibit some proteins has encouraged the investigation of similar structures in the search for more active compounds with less adverse effects. The possibility of structural modification by attachment of other biologically active moieties to the naphthyridyl ring of nx allowed the development of new active antimicrobial molecules. Hydrazone derivatives of nx can be synthesized easily based on the condensation of the hydrazide derivative of nx with the desired aldehyde or ketone. Only a few complexes with nx hydrazone derivatives have been described but for none were the crystal structures elucidated. The synthesis of a new one-dimensional Cu(II) coordination polymer, namely catena-poly[[copper(II)-di-μ-chlorido-copper(II)-{μ-1-ethyl-N'-[(1H-imidazol-4-yl)methylidene]-7-methyl-4-oxo-1,4-dihydro-1,8-naphthyridine-3-carbohydrazidato}-[dimethanolcopper(II)]-{μ-1-ethyl-N'-[(1H-imidazol-3-yl)methylidene]-7-methyl-4-oxo-1,4-dihydro-1,8-naphthyridine-3-carbohydrazidato}] dichloride methanol tetrasolvate], {[Cu3(C16H15N6O2)2Cl2(CH3OH)2]Cl2·4CH3OH}n, with the (1H-imidazol-4-yl)methylidene carbohydrazide derivative of nalidixic acid (denoted h4imi), is presented and its structure is compared to the density functional theory (DFT) optimized structure of free h4imi. The title structure presents an octahedral Cu(II) ion on an inversion centre alternating along a polymer chain with a square-pyramidal Cu(II) ion, with the two Cu(II) centres bridged by two chloride ligands. Hydrogen bonds involving chloride counter-ions and methanol solvent molecules mediate the three-dimensional packing of the polymer. Comparison of the geometrical results from the structure analysis with those derived from a DFT study of the free ligand reveal the differences that arise upon coordination

  18. A novel binuclear copper complex incorporating a nalidixic acid derivative displaying a one-dimensional coordination polymeric structure.

    PubMed

    Bergamini, F R G; Ribeiro, M A; Miranda, P C M L; Formiga, A L B; Corbi, P P

    2016-07-01

    The identification of the antibacterial action of nalidixic acid (nx) was central to the development of the quinolone antibacterial compounds. The ability of the nx naphthyridyl ring to interact with and inhibit some proteins has encouraged the investigation of similar structures in the search for more active compounds with less adverse effects. The possibility of structural modification by attachment of other biologically active moieties to the naphthyridyl ring of nx allowed the development of new active antimicrobial molecules. Hydrazone derivatives of nx can be synthesized easily based on the condensation of the hydrazide derivative of nx with the desired aldehyde or ketone. Only a few complexes with nx hydrazone derivatives have been described but for none were the crystal structures elucidated. The synthesis of a new one-dimensional Cu(II) coordination polymer, namely catena-poly[[copper(II)-di-μ-chlorido-copper(II)-{μ-1-ethyl-N'-[(1H-imidazol-4-yl)methylidene]-7-methyl-4-oxo-1,4-dihydro-1,8-naphthyridine-3-carbohydrazidato}-[dimethanolcopper(II)]-{μ-1-ethyl-N'-[(1H-imidazol-3-yl)methylidene]-7-methyl-4-oxo-1,4-dihydro-1,8-naphthyridine-3-carbohydrazidato}] dichloride methanol tetrasolvate], {[Cu3(C16H15N6O2)2Cl2(CH3OH)2]Cl2·4CH3OH}n, with the (1H-imidazol-4-yl)methylidene carbohydrazide derivative of nalidixic acid (denoted h4imi), is presented and its structure is compared to the density functional theory (DFT) optimized structure of free h4imi. The title structure presents an octahedral Cu(II) ion on an inversion centre alternating along a polymer chain with a square-pyramidal Cu(II) ion, with the two Cu(II) centres bridged by two chloride ligands. Hydrogen bonds involving chloride counter-ions and methanol solvent molecules mediate the three-dimensional packing of the polymer. Comparison of the geometrical results from the structure analysis with those derived from a DFT study of the free ligand reveal the differences that arise upon coordination.

  19. Transfer of antibiotic-resistance genes via phage-related mobile elements.

    PubMed

    Brown-Jaque, Maryury; Calero-Cáceres, William; Muniesa, Maite

    2015-05-01

    Antibiotic resistance is a major concern for society because it threatens the effective prevention of infectious diseases. While some bacterial strains display intrinsic resistance, others achieve antibiotic resistance by mutation, by the recombination of foreign DNA into the chromosome or by horizontal gene acquisition. In many cases, these three mechanisms operate together. Several mobile genetic elements (MGEs) have been reported to mobilize different types of resistance genes and despite sharing common features, they are often considered and studied separately. Bacteriophages and phage-related particles have recently been highlighted as MGEs that transfer antibiotic resistance. This review focuses on phages, phage-related elements and on composite MGEs (phages-MGEs) involved in antibiotic resistance mobility. We review common features of these elements, rather than differences, and provide a broad overview of the antibiotic resistance transfer mechanisms observed in nature, which is a necessary first step to controlling them.

  20. Self-made phage libraries with heterologous inserts in the Mtd of Bordetella bronchiseptica.

    PubMed

    Overstreet, Cathie M; Yuan, Tom Z; Levin, Aron M; Kong, Calvin; Coroneus, John G; Weiss, Gregory A

    2012-04-01

    Phage display libraries are widely used as tools for identifying, dissecting and optimizing ligands. Development of a simple method to access greater library diversities could expedite and expand the technique. This paper reports progress toward harnessing the naturally occurring diversity generating retroelement used by Bordetella bronchiseptica bacteriophage to alter its tail-fiber protein. Mutagenesis and testing identified four sites amenable to the insertion of <19-residue heterologous peptides within the variable region. Such sites allow auto-generation of peptide libraries surrounded by a scaffold with additional variations. The resultant self-made phage libraries were used successfully for selections targeting anti-FLAG antibody, immobilized metal affinity chromatography microtiter plates and HIV-1 gp41. The reported experiments demonstrate the utility of the major tropism determinant protein of B.bronchiseptica as a natural scaffold for diverse, phage-constructed libraries with heterologous self-made phage libraries.

  1. Human umbilical cord blood-derived mesenchymal stromal cells display a novel interaction between P-selectin and galectin-1.

    PubMed

    Suila, H; Hirvonen, T; Kotovuori, A; Ritamo, I; Kerkelä, E; Anderson, H; Natunen, S; Tuimala, J; Laitinen, S; Nystedt, J; Räbinä, J; Valmu, L

    2014-07-01

    Human multipotent mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (MSCs) have been shown to exert immunomodulatory properties that have great potential in therapies for various inflammatory and autoimmune disorders. However, intravenous delivery of these cells is followed by massive cell entrapment in the lungs and insufficient homing to target tissues or organs. In targeting to tissues, MSCs and other therapeutic cells employ similar mechanisms as leucocytes, including a cascade of rolling and adhesion steps mediated by selectins, integrins and their ligands. However, the mechanisms of MSCs homing are not well understood. We discovered that P-selectin (CD62P) binds to umbilical cord blood (UCB)-derived MSCs independently of the previously known sialyl Lewis x (sLex)-containing ligands such as P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1, CD162). By biochemical assays, we identified galectin-1 as a novel ligand for P-selectin. Galectin-1 has previously been shown to be a key mediator of the immunosuppressive effects of human MSCs. We conclude that this novel interaction is likely to play a major role in the immunomodulatory targeting of human UCB-derived MSCs.

  2. Maize death acids, 9-lipoxygenase-derived cyclopente(a)nones, display activity as cytotoxic phytoalexins and transcriptional mediators.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Shawn A; Huffaker, Alisa; Kaplan, Fatma; Sims, James; Ziemann, Sebastian; Doehlemann, Gunther; Ji, Lexiang; Schmitz, Robert J; Kolomiets, Michael V; Alborn, Hans T; Mori, Naoki; Jander, Georg; Ni, Xinzhi; Sartor, Ryan C; Byers, Sara; Abdo, Zaid; Schmelz, Eric A

    2015-09-01

    Plant damage promotes the interaction of lipoxygenases (LOXs) with fatty acids yielding 9-hydroperoxides, 13-hydroperoxides, and complex arrays of oxylipins. The action of 13-LOX on linolenic acid enables production of 12-oxo-phytodienoic acid (12-OPDA) and its downstream products, termed "jasmonates." As signals, jasmonates have related yet distinct roles in the regulation of plant resistance against insect and pathogen attack. A similar pathway involving 9-LOX activity on linolenic and linoleic acid leads to the 12-OPDA positional isomer, 10-oxo-11-phytodienoic acid (10-OPDA) and 10-oxo-11-phytoenoic acid (10-OPEA), respectively; however, physiological roles for 9-LOX cyclopentenones have remained unclear. In developing maize (Zea mays) leaves, southern leaf blight (Cochliobolus heterostrophus) infection results in dying necrotic tissue and the localized accumulation of 10-OPEA, 10-OPDA, and a series of related 14- and 12-carbon metabolites, collectively termed "death acids." 10-OPEA accumulation becomes wound inducible within fungal-infected tissues and at physiologically relevant concentrations acts as a phytoalexin by suppressing the growth of fungi and herbivores including Aspergillus flavus, Fusarium verticillioides, and Helicoverpa zea. Unlike previously established maize phytoalexins, 10-OPEA and 10-OPDA display significant phytotoxicity. Both 12-OPDA and 10-OPEA promote the transcription of defense genes encoding glutathione S transferases, cytochrome P450s, and pathogenesis-related proteins. In contrast, 10-OPEA only weakly promotes the accumulation of multiple protease inhibitor transcripts. Consistent with a role in dying tissue, 10-OPEA application promotes cysteine protease activation and cell death, which is inhibited by overexpression of the cysteine protease inhibitor maize cystatin-9. Unlike jasmonates, functions for 10-OPEA and associated death acids are consistent with specialized roles in local defense reactions. PMID:26305953

  3. Maize death acids, 9-lipoxygenase–derived cyclopente(a)nones, display activity as cytotoxic phytoalexins and transcriptional mediators

    PubMed Central

    Christensen, Shawn A.; Huffaker, Alisa; Kaplan, Fatma; Sims, James; Ziemann, Sebastian; Doehlemann, Gunther; Ji, Lexiang; Schmitz, Robert J.; Kolomiets, Michael V.; Alborn, Hans T.; Mori, Naoki; Jander, Georg; Ni, Xinzhi; Sartor, Ryan C.; Byers, Sara; Abdo, Zaid; Schmelz, Eric A.

    2015-01-01

    Plant damage promotes the interaction of lipoxygenases (LOXs) with fatty acids yielding 9-hydroperoxides, 13-hydroperoxides, and complex arrays of oxylipins. The action of 13-LOX on linolenic acid enables production of 12-oxo-phytodienoic acid (12-OPDA) and its downstream products, termed “jasmonates.” As signals, jasmonates have related yet distinct roles in the regulation of plant resistance against insect and pathogen attack. A similar pathway involving 9-LOX activity on linolenic and linoleic acid leads to the 12-OPDA positional isomer, 10-oxo-11-phytodienoic acid (10-OPDA) and 10-oxo-11-phytoenoic acid (10-OPEA), respectively; however, physiological roles for 9-LOX cyclopentenones have remained unclear. In developing maize (Zea mays) leaves, southern leaf blight (Cochliobolus heterostrophus) infection results in dying necrotic tissue and the localized accumulation of 10-OPEA, 10-OPDA, and a series of related 14- and 12-carbon metabolites, collectively termed “death acids.” 10-OPEA accumulation becomes wound inducible within fungal-infected tissues and at physiologically relevant concentrations acts as a phytoalexin by suppressing the growth of fungi and herbivores including Aspergillus flavus, Fusarium verticillioides, and Helicoverpa zea. Unlike previously established maize phytoalexins, 10-OPEA and 10-OPDA display significant phytotoxicity. Both 12-OPDA and 10-OPEA promote the transcription of defense genes encoding glutathione S transferases, cytochrome P450s, and pathogenesis-related proteins. In contrast, 10-OPEA only weakly promotes the accumulation of multiple protease inhibitor transcripts. Consistent with a role in dying tissue, 10-OPEA application promotes cysteine protease activation and cell death, which is inhibited by overexpression of the cysteine protease inhibitor maize cystatin-9. Unlike jasmonates, functions for 10-OPEA and associated death acids are consistent with specialized roles in local defense reactions. PMID:26305953

  4. Triploid human embryonic stem cells derived from tripronuclear zygotes displayed pluripotency and trophoblast differentiation ability similar to the diploid human embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Rungsiwiwut, Ruttachuk; Numchaisrika, Pranee; Ahnonkitpanit, Vichuda; Virutamasen, Pramuan; Pruksananonda, Kamthorn

    2016-04-22

    Because the diploid human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) can be successfully derived from tripronuclear zygotes thus, they can serve as an alternative source of derivation of normal karyotype hESC lines. The aim of the present study was to compare the pluripotency and trophoblast differentiation ability of hESCs derived from tripronuclear zygotes and diploid hESCs. In the present study, a total of 20 tripronuclear zygotes were cultured; 8 zygotes developed to the blastocyst stage and 1 hESC line was generated. Unlike the previous studies, chromosomal correction of tripronuclear zygotes during derivation of hESCs did not occur. The established line carries 3 sets of chromosomes and showed a numerical aberration. Although the cell line displayed an abnormal chromosome number, it was found the cell line has been shown to be pluripotent with the ability to differentiate into 3 embryonic germ layers both in vitro and in vivo. The expression of X inactive specific transcript (XIST) in mid-passage (passage 42) of undifferentiated triploid hESCs was detected, indicating X chromosome inactivation of the cell line. Moreover, when this cell line was induced to differentiate toward the trophoblast lineage, morphological and functional trophoblast cells were observed, similar to the diploid hESC line. PMID:26821869

  5. Genetic Diversity and Evolution of Salmonella enterica Serovar Enteritidis Strains with Different Phage Types

    PubMed Central

    Pettengill, James; Strain, Errol; Allard, Marc W.; Ahmed, Rafiq; Zhao, Shaohua; Brown, Eric W.

    2014-01-01

    Phage typing has been used for the epidemiological surveillance of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis for over 2 decades. However, knowledge of the genetic and evolutionary relationships between phage types is very limited, making differences difficult to interpret. Here, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) identified from whole-genome comparisons were used to determine the relationships between some S. Enteritidis phage types (PTs) commonly associated with food-borne outbreaks in the United States. Emphasis was placed on the predominant phage types PT8, PT13a, and PT13 in North America. With >89,400 bp surveyed across 98 S. Enteritidis isolates representing 14 distinct phage types, 55 informative SNPs were discovered within 23 chromosomally anchored loci. To maximize the discriminatory and evolutionary partitioning of these highly homogeneous strains, sequences comprising informative SNPs were concatenated into a single combined data matrix and subjected to phylogenetic analysis. The resultant phylogeny allocated most S. Enteritidis isolates into two distinct clades (clades I and II) and four subclades. Synapomorphic (shared and derived) sets of SNPs capable of distinguishing individual clades/subclades were identified. However, individual phage types appeared to be evolutionarily disjunct when mapped to this phylogeny, suggesting that phage typing may not be valid for making phylogenetic inferences. Furthermore, the set of SNPs identified here represents useful genetic markers for strain differentiation of more clonal S. Enteritidis strains and provides core genotypic markers for future development of a SNP typing scheme with S. Enteritidis. PMID:24574287

  6. The use of specialised transducing phages in the amplification of enzyme production.

    PubMed

    Moir, A; Brammar, W J

    1976-11-24

    Two types of lambdatrp phages have been used as model systems to investigate ways of optimising the expression of bacterial genes from transducing phage genomes. Excellent yields of trp enzymes were achieved by infecting a trpR- host with Q- or Q-S- derivatives of lambdatrpAM1, which expresses its trp genese exclusively from the trp promoter. The five trp geneproducts constituted more than 50% of the total soluble protein of infected cells under these conditions, and an even higher proportion of the protein synthesized after infection. In a trpR+ host, phage DNA replication was easily able to override tryptophan-mediated repression by titration of the trp promoter were equally productive, while having the advantage of being much simpler to construct and propagate. lambdatrp phages lacking the trp promoter were used to investigate ways of optimising gene expression initiated at the phage promoter, PL. Though very powerful, the latter promoter is more difficult to harness then the trp promoter. Derepression of transcription from PL by the use of cro- mutations is accompanied by poor replication of transducing phage DNA. Attempts to circumvent this difficulty using virulent of cro,cII double mutants have not been successful. Nevertheless, cells infected with a lambdatrp phage expressing its trp genes exclusively from PL made up to 16 per cent of their protein as trp gene-products.

  7. The Diterpenoid 7-Keto-Sempervirol, Derived from Lycium chinense, Displays Anthelmintic Activity against both Schistosoma mansoni and Fasciola hepatica

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Jennifer; Brown, Martha; Peak, Emily; Bartholomew, Barbara; Nash, Robert J.; Hoffmann, Karl F.

    2015-01-01

    spine loss. Conclusions/ Significance 7-keto-sempervirol negatively affects the viability and phenotype of two related pathogenic trematodes responsible for significant human and animal infectious diseases. This plant-derived, natural product is also active against both larval and adult developmental forms. As such, the data collectively indicate that 7-keto-sempervirol is an important starting point for anthelmintic drug development. Medicinal chemistry optimisation of more potent 7-keto-sempervirol analogues could lead to the identification of novel chemical entities useful for future combinatorial or replacement anthelmintic control. PMID:25768432

  8. Landscape Phage Fusion Protein-mediated Targeting of Nanomedicines Enhances their Prostate Tumor Cell Association and Cytotoxic Efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Jayanna, P.K.; Bedi, D; Gillespie, J.W.; DeInnocentes, P.; Wang, T; Torchilin, V.P; Bird, R.C.; Petrenko, V.A.

    2010-01-01

    Tumor-specific cytotoxicity of drugs can be enhanced by targeting them to tumor receptors using tumor-specific ligands. Phage display offers a high-throughput approach to screen for the targeting ligands. We have successfully isolated phage fusion peptides selective and specific for PC3 prostate cancer cells. Also, we have demonstrated a novel approach of targeting liposomes through tumor-specific phage fusion coat proteins, exploiting the intrinsic properties of the phage coat protein as an integral membrane protein. Here we describe the production of Rhodamine-labeled liposomes as well as doxorubicin-loaded long circulating liposomes targeted to PC3 prostate tumor cells via PC-specific phage peptides, as an extension of our previous studies. Targeting of labeled liposomes was demonstrated using fluorescence microscopy as well as flow cytometry. Targeting of doxorubicin-loaded liposomes enhanced their cytotoxic effect against PC3 cells in vitro indicating a possible therapeutic advantage. The simplicity of the approach for generating targeted liposomes coupled with the ability to rapidly obtain tumor-specific phage fusion proteins via phage display may contribute to a combinatorial system for the production of targeted liposomal therapeutics for advanced stages of prostate tumor. PMID:20138246

  9. Control of Pierce's Disease by Phage

    PubMed Central

    Das, Mayukh; Bhowmick, Tushar Suvra; Ahern, Stephen J.; Young, Ry; Gonzalez, Carlos F.

    2015-01-01

    Pierce’s Disease (PD) of grapevines, caused by Xylella fastidiosa subsp. fastidiosa (Xf), is a limiting factor in the cultivation of grapevines in the US. There are presently no effective control methods to prevent or treat PD. The therapeutic and prophylactic efficacy of a phage cocktail composed of four virulent (lytic) phages was evaluated for control of PD. Xf levels in grapevines were significantly reduced in therapeutically or prophylactically treated grapevines. PD symptoms ceased to progress one week post-therapeutic treatment and symptoms were not observed in prophylactically treated grapevines. Cocktail phage levels increased in grapevines in the presence of the host. No in planta phage-resistant Xf isolates were obtained. Moreover, Xf mutants selected for phage resistance in vitro did not cause PD symptoms. Our results indicate that phages have great potential for biocontrol of PD and other economically important diseases caused by Xylella. PMID:26107261

  10. Control of Pierce's Disease by Phage.

    PubMed

    Das, Mayukh; Bhowmick, Tushar Suvra; Ahern, Stephen J; Young, Ry; Gonzalez, Carlos F

    2015-01-01

    Pierce's Disease (PD) of grapevines, caused by Xylella fastidiosa subsp. fastidiosa (Xf), is a limiting factor in the cultivation of grapevines in the US. There are presently no effective control methods to prevent or treat PD. The therapeutic and prophylactic efficacy of a phage cocktail composed of four virulent (lytic) phages was evaluated for control of PD. Xf levels in grapevines were significantly reduced in therapeutically or prophylactically treated grapevines. PD symptoms ceased to progress one week post-therapeutic treatment and symptoms were not observed in prophylactically treated grapevines. Cocktail phage levels increased in grapevines in the presence of the host. No in planta phage-resistant Xf isolates were obtained. Moreover, Xf mutants selected for phage resistance in vitro did not cause PD symptoms. Our results indicate that phages have great potential for biocontrol of PD and other economically important diseases caused by Xylella. PMID:26107261

  11. Bacteriophages with potential to inactivate Salmonella Typhimurium: Use of single phage suspensions and phage cocktails.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Carla; Moreirinha, Catarina; Lewicka, Magdalena; Almeida, Paulo; Clemente, Carla; Cunha, Ângela; Delgadillo, Ivonne; Romalde, Jésus L; Nunes, Maria L; Almeida, Adelaide

    2016-07-15

    The aim of this study was to compare the dynamics of three previously isolated bacteriophages (or phages) individually (phSE-1, phSE-2 and phSE-5) or combined in cocktails of two or three phages (phSE-1/phSE-2, phSE-1/phSE-5, phSE-2/phSE-5 and phSE-1/phSE-2/phSE-5) to control Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (Salmonella Typhimurium) in order to evaluate their potential application during depuration. Phages were assigned to the family Siphoviridae and revealed identical restriction digest profiles, although they showed a different phage adsorption, host range, burst size, explosion time and survival in seawater. The three phages were effective against S. Typhimurium (reduction of ∼2.0 log CFU/mL after 4h treatment). The use of cocktails was not significantly more effective than the use of single phages. A big fraction of the remained bacteria are phage-resistant mutants (frequency of phage-resistant mutants 9.19×10(-5)-5.11×10(-4)) but phage- resistant bacterial mutants was lower for the cocktail phages than for the single phage suspensions and the phage phSE-1 presented the highest rate of resistance and phage phSE-5 the lowest one. The spectral changes of S. Typhimurium resistant and phage-sensitive cells were compared and revealed relevant differences for peaks associated to amide I (1620cm(-1)) and amide II (1515cm(-1)) from proteins and from carbohydrates and phosphates region (1080-1000cm(-1)). Despite the similar efficiency of individual phages, the development of lower resistance indicates that phage cocktails might be the most promising choice to be used during the bivalve depuration to control the transmission of salmonellosis.

  12. Phage idiotype vaccination: first phase I/II clinical trial in patients with multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Multiple myeloma is characterized by clonal expansion of B cells producing monoclonal immunoglobulins or fragments thereof, which can be detected in the serum and/or urine and are ideal target antigens for patient-specific immunotherapies. Methods Using phage particles as immunological carriers, we employed a novel chemically linked idiotype vaccine in a clinical phase I/II trial including 15 patients with advanced multiple myeloma. Vaccines composed of purified paraproteins linked to phage were manufactured successfully for each patient. Patients received six intradermal immunizations with phage idiotype vaccines in three different dose groups. Results Phage idiotype was well tolerated by all study participants. A subset of patients (80% in the middle dose group) displayed a clinical response indicated by decrease or stabilization of paraprotein levels. Patients exhibiting a clinical response to phage vaccines also raised idiotype-specific immunoglobulins. Induction of a cellular immune response was demonstrated by a cytotoxicity assay and delayed type hypersensitivity tests. Conclusion We present a simple, time- and cost-efficient phage idiotype vaccination strategy, which represents a safe and feasible patient-specific therapy for patients with advanced multiple myeloma and produced promising anti-tumor activity in a subset of patients. PMID:24885819

  13. Enhancing and initiating phage-based therapies

    PubMed Central

    Serwer, Philip; Wright, Elena T; Chang, Juan T; Liu, Xiangan

    2014-01-01

    Drug development has typically been a primary foundation of strategy for systematic, long-range management of pathogenic cells. However, drug development is limited in speed and flexibility when response is needed to changes in pathogenic cells, especially changes that produce drug-resistance. The high replication speed and high diversity of phages are potentially useful for increasing both response speed and response flexibility when changes occur in either drug resistance or other aspects of pathogenic cells. We present strategy, with some empirical details, for (1) using modern molecular biology and biophysics to access these advantages during the phage therapy of bacterial infections, and (2) initiating use of phage capsid-based drug delivery vehicles (DDVs) with procedures that potentially overcome both drug resistance and other present limitations in the use of DDVs for the therapy of neoplasms. The discussion of phage therapy includes (a) historical considerations, (b) changes that appear to be needed in clinical tests if use of phage therapy is to be expanded, (c) recent work on novel phages and its potential use for expanding the capabilities of phage therapy and (d) an outline for a strategy that encompasses both theory and practice for expanding the applications of phage therapy. The discussion of DDVs starts by reviewing current work on DDVs, including work on both liposomal and viral DDVs. The discussion concludes with some details of the potential use of permeability constrained phage capsids as DDVs. PMID:26713220

  14. Experimental Phage Therapy for Burkholderia pseudomallei Infection

    PubMed Central

    Leang-Chung, Choh; Vellasamy, Kumutha Malar; Mariappan, Vanitha; Li-Yen, Chang; Vadivelu, Jamuna

    2016-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei is an intracellular Gram-negative bacterial pathogen intrinsically resistant to a variety of antibiotics. Phages have been developed for use as an alternative treatment therapy, particularly for bacterial infections that do not respond to conventional antibiotics. In this study, we investigated the use of phages to treat cells infected with B. pseudomallei. Phage C34 isolated from seawater was purified and characterised on the basis of its host range and morphology using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Phage C34 was able to lyse 39.5% of B. pseudomallei clinical strains. Due to the presence of contractile tail, phage C34 is classified as a member of the family Myoviridae, a tailed double-stranded DNA virus. When 2 × 105 A549 cells were exposed to 2 × 107 PFU of phage C34, 24 hours prior to infection with 2 × 106 CFU of B. pseudomallei, it was found that the survivability of the cells increased to 41.6 ± 6.8% as compared to 22.8 ± 6.0% in untreated control. Additionally, application of phage successfully rescued 33.3% of mice infected with B. pseudomallei and significantly reduced the bacterial load in the spleen of the phage-treated mice. These findings indicate that phage can be a potential antimicrobial agent for B. pseudomallei infections. PMID:27387381

  15. Experimental Phage Therapy for Burkholderia pseudomallei Infection.

    PubMed

    Guang-Han, Ong; Leang-Chung, Choh; Vellasamy, Kumutha Malar; Mariappan, Vanitha; Li-Yen, Chang; Vadivelu, Jamuna

    2016-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei is an intracellular Gram-negative bacterial pathogen intrinsically resistant to a variety of antibiotics. Phages have been developed for use as an alternative treatment therapy, particularly for bacterial infections that do not respond to conventional antibiotics. In this study, we investigated the use of phages to treat cells infected with B. pseudomallei. Phage C34 isolated from seawater was purified and characterised on the basis of its host range and morphology using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Phage C34 was able to lyse 39.5% of B. pseudomallei clinical strains. Due to the presence of contractile tail, phage C34 is classified as a member of the family Myoviridae, a tailed double-stranded DNA virus. When 2 × 105 A549 cells were exposed to 2 × 107 PFU of phage C34, 24 hours prior to infection with 2 × 106 CFU of B. pseudomallei, it was found that the survivability of the cells increased to 41.6 ± 6.8% as compared to 22.8 ± 6.0% in untreated control. Additionally, application of phage successfully rescued 33.3% of mice infected with B. pseudomallei and significantly reduced the bacterial load in the spleen of the phage-treated mice. These findings indicate that phage can be a potential antimicrobial agent for B. pseudomallei infections. PMID:27387381

  16. Use of phages to control Campylobacter spp.

    PubMed

    Janež, Nika; Loc-Carrillo, Catherine

    2013-10-01

    The use of phages to control pathogenic bacteria has been investigated since they were first discovered in the beginning of the 1900s. Over the last century we have slowly gained an in-depth understanding of phage biology including which phage properties are desirable when considering phage as biocontrol agents and which phage characteristics to potentially avoid. Campylobacter infections are amongst the most frequently encountered foodborne bacterial infections around the world. Handling and consumption of raw or undercooked poultry products have been determined to be the main route of transmission. The ability to use phages to target these bacteria has been studied for more than a decade and although we have made progress towards deciphering how best to use phages to control Campylobacter associated with poultry production, there is still much work to be done. This review outlines methods to improve the isolation of these elusive phages, as well as methods to identify desirable characteristics needed for a successful outcome. It also highlights the body of research undertaken so far and what criteria to consider when doing in-vivo studies, especially because some in-vitro studies have not been found to translate into to phage efficacy in-vivo.

  17. The human insulin gene displays transcriptionally active epigenetic marks in islet-derived mesenchymal precursor cells in the absence of insulin expression.

    PubMed

    Mutskov, Vesco; Raaka, Bruce M; Felsenfeld, Gary; Gershengorn, Marvin C

    2007-12-01

    Human islet-derived precursor cells (hIPCs), mesenchymal cells derived in vitro from adult pancreas, proliferate freely and do not express insulin but can be differentiated to epithelial cells that express insulin. hIPCs have been studied with the goal of obtaining large quantities of insulin-producing cells suitable for transplantation into patients suffering from type 1 diabetes. It appeared that undifferentiated hIPCs are "committed" to a pancreatic endocrine phenotype through multiple cell divisions, suggesting that epigenetic modifications at the insulin locus could be responsible. We determined patterns of histone modifications over the insulin gene in human islets and hIPCs and compared them with HeLa and human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hBM-MSCs), neither of which expresses insulin. The insulin gene in islets displays high levels of histone modifications (H4 hyperacetylation and dimethylation of H3 lysine 4) typical of active genes. These are not present in HeLa and hBM-MSCs, which instead have elevated levels of H3 lysine 9 dimethylation, a mark of inactive genes. hIPCs, in contrast, show significant levels of active chromatin modifications, as much as half those seen in islets, and show no measurable H3 K9 methylation. Cells expanded from a minor population of mesenchymal stromal cells found in islets exhibit the same histone modifications as established hIPCs. We conclude that hIPCs, which do not express the insulin gene, nonetheless uniquely exhibit epigenetic marks that could poise them for activation of insulin expression. This epigenetic signature may be a general mechanism whereby tissue-derived precursor cells are committed to a distinct specification. Disclosure of potential conflicts of interest is found at the end of this article.

  18. Oligopeptidase A is required for normal phage P22 development.

    PubMed Central

    Conlin, C A; Vimr, E R; Miller, C G

    1992-01-01

    The opdA gene of Salmonella typhimurium encodes an endoprotease, oligopeptidase A (OpdA). Strains carrying opdA mutations were deficient as hosts for phage P22. P22 and the closely related phages L and A3 formed tiny plaques on an opdA host. Salmonella phages 9NA, KB1, and ES18.h1 were not affected by opdA mutations. Although opdA strains displayed normal doubling times and were infected by P22 as efficiently as opdA+ strains, the burst size of infectious particles from an opdA host was less than 1/10 of that from an opdA+ host. This decrease resulted from a reduced efficiency of plating of particles from an opdA infection. In the absence of a functional opdA gene, most of the P22 particles are defective. To identify the target of OpdA action, P22 mutants which formed plaques larger than wild-type plaques on an opdA mutant lawn were isolated. Marker rescue experiments using cloned fragments of P22 DNA localized these mutations to a 1-kb fragment. The nucleotide sequence of this fragment and a contiguous region (including all of both P22 gene 7 and gene 14) was determined. The mutations leading to opdA independence affected the region of gene 7 coding for the amino terminus of gp7, a protein required for DNA injection by the phage. Comparison of the nucleotide sequence with the N-terminal amino acid sequence of gp7 suggested that a 20-amino-acid peptide is removed from gp7 during phage development. Further experiments showed that this processing was opdA dependent and rapid (half-life, less than 2 min) and occurred in the absence of other phage proteins. The opdA-independent mutations lead to mutant forms of gp7 which function without processing. Images PMID:1522065

  19. Peptide microarray with ligands at high density based on symmetrical carrier landscape phage for detection of cellulase.

    PubMed

    Qi, Huan; Wang, Fei; Petrenko, Valery A; Liu, Aihua

    2014-06-17

    Peptide microarrays evolved recently as a routine analytical implementation in various research areas due to their unique characteristics. However, the immobilization of peptides with high density in each spot during the fabricating process remains a problem, which will affect the performance of the resultant microarray greatly. To respond to this challenge, a novel peptide immobilization method using symmetrical phage carrier was developed in this work. The cellulytic enzyme endoglucanase I (EG I) was used as a model for selection of its specific peptide ligands from the f8/8 landscape library. Three phage monoclones were selected and identified by the specificity array, of which one phage monoclone displaying the fusion peptide EGSDPRMV (phage EGSDPRMV) could bind EG I specifically with highest affinity. Subsequently, the phage EGSDPRMV was used directly to construct peptide microarray. For comparison, major coat protein pVIII fused EG I specific peptide EGSDPRMV (pVIII-fused EGSDPRMV) which was isolated from phage EGSDPRMV was also immobilized by traditional method to fabricate peptide microarray. The fluorescent signal of the phage EGSDPRMV-mediated peptide microarray was more reproducible and about four times higher than the value for pVIII-fused EGSDPRMV-based microarray, suggesting the high efficiency of the proposed phage EGSDPRMV-mediated peptide immobilization method. Further, the phage EGSDPRMV based microarray not only simplified the procedure of microarray construction but also exhibited significantly enhanced sensitivity due to the symmetrical carrier landscape phage, which dramatically increased the density and sterical regularity of immobilized peptides in each spot. Thus, the proposed strategy has the advantages that the immobilizing peptide ligands were not disturbed by their composition and the immobilized peptides were highly regular with free amino-terminal.

  20. Lectin mapping reveals stage-specific display of surface carbohydrates in in vitro and haemolymph-derived cells of the entomopathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana.

    PubMed

    Wanchoo, Arun; Lewis, Michael W; Keyhani, Nemat O

    2009-09-01

    The entomopathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana and its insect host target represent a model system with which to examine host-pathogen interactions. Carbohydrate epitopes on the surfaces of fungal cells play diverse roles in processes that include adhesion, non-self recognition and immune invasion with respect to invertebrate hosts. B. bassiana produces a number of distinct cell types that include aerial conidia, submerged conidia, blastospores and haemolymph-derived cells termed in vivo blastospores or hyphal bodies. In order to characterize variations in the surface carbohydrate epitopes among these cells, a series of fluorescently labelled lectins, combined with confocal microscopy and flow cytometry to quantify the response, was used. Aerial conidia displayed the most diverse lectin binding characteristics, showing reactivity against concanavalin A (ConA), Galanthus nivalis (GNL), Griffonia simplicifolia (GSII), Helix pomatia (HPA), Griffonia simplicifolia isolectin (GSI), peanut agglutinin (PNA), Ulex europaeus agglutinin I (UEAI) and wheatgerm agglutinin (WGA), and weak reactivity against Ricinus communis I (RCA), Sambucus nigra (SNA), Limax flavus (LFA) and Sophora japonica (SJA) lectins. Lectin binding to submerged conidia was similar to that to aerial conidia, except that no reactivity against UEAI, HPA and SJA was noted, and WGA appeared to bind strongly at specific polar spots. In contrast, the majority of in vitro blastospores were not bound by ConA, GNL, GSII, GSI, SNA, UEAI, LFA or SJA, with PNA binding in large patches, and some polarity in WGA binding noted. Significant changes in lectin binding also occurred after aerial conidial germination and in cells grown on either lactose or trehalose. For germinated conidia, differential lectin binding was noted between the conidial base, the germ tube and the hyphal tip. Fungal cells isolated from the haemolymph of the infected insect hosts Manduca sexta and Heliothis virescens appeared to shed most

  1. Phage Peptide Libraries As a Source of Targeted Ligands

    PubMed Central

    Nemudraya, A. A.; Richter, V. A.; Kuligina, E. V.

    2016-01-01

    One of the dominant trends in modern pharmacology is the creation of drugs that act directly on the lesion focus and have minimal toxicity on healthy tissues and organs. This problem is particularly acute in relation to oncologic diseases. Short tissue- and organ-specific peptides capable of delivering drugs to the affected organ or tissue are considered promising targeted agents that can be used in the diagnosis and therapy of diseases, including cancer. The review discusses in detail the technology of phage display as a method for obtaining specific targeted peptide agents and offers examples of their use in diagnostic and clinical practice. PMID:27099784

  2. A Virulent Phage Infecting Lactococcus garvieae, with Homology to Lactococcus lactis Phages

    PubMed Central

    Eraclio, Giovanni; Tremblay, Denise M.; Lacelle-Côté, Alexia; Labrie, Simon J.; Fortina, Maria Grazia

    2015-01-01

    A new virulent phage belonging to the Siphoviridae family and able to infect Lactococcus garvieae strains was isolated from compost soil. Phage GE1 has a prolate capsid (56 by 38 nm) and a long noncontractile tail (123 nm). It had a burst size of 139 and a latent period of 31 min. Its host range was limited to only two L. garvieae strains out of 73 tested. Phage GE1 has a double-stranded DNA genome of 24,847 bp containing 48 predicted open reading frames (ORFs). Putative functions could be assigned to only 14 ORFs, and significant matches in public databases were found for only 17 ORFs, indicating that GE1 is a novel phage and its genome contains several new viral genes and encodes several new viral proteins. Of these 17 ORFs, 16 were homologous to deduced proteins of virulent phages infecting the dairy bacterium Lactococcus lactis, including previously characterized prolate-headed phages. Comparative genome analysis confirmed the relatedness of L. garvieae phage GE1 to L. lactis phages c2 (22,172 bp) and Q54 (26,537 bp), although its genome organization was closer to that of phage c2. Phage GE1 did not infect any of the 58 L. lactis strains tested. This study suggests that phages infecting different lactococcal species may have a common ancestor. PMID:26407890

  3. Clear Plaque Mutants of Lactococcal Phage TP901-1

    PubMed Central

    Kot, Witold; Kilstrup, Mogens; Vogensen, Finn K.; Hammer, Karin

    2016-01-01

    We report a method for obtaining turbid plaques of the lactococcal bacteriophage TP901-1 and its derivative TP901-BC1034. We have further used the method to isolate clear plaque mutants of this phage. Analysis of 8 such mutants that were unable to lysogenize the host included whole genome resequencing. Four of the mutants had different mutations in structural genes with no relation to the genetic switch. However all 8 mutants had a mutation in the cI repressor gene region. Three of these were located in the promoter and Shine-Dalgarno sequences and five in the N-terminal part of the encoded CI protein involved in the DNA binding. The conclusion is that cI is the only gene involved in clear plaque formation i.e. the CI protein is the determining factor for the lysogenic pathway and its maintenance in the lactococcal phage TP901-1. PMID:27258092

  4. Mammalian Host-Versus-Phage immune response determines phage fate in vivo.

    PubMed

    Hodyra-Stefaniak, Katarzyna; Miernikiewicz, Paulina; Drapała, Jarosław; Drab, Marek; Jończyk-Matysiak, Ewa; Lecion, Dorota; Kaźmierczak, Zuzanna; Beta, Weronika; Majewska, Joanna; Harhala, Marek; Bubak, Barbara; Kłopot, Anna; Górski, Andrzej; Dąbrowska, Krystyna

    2015-01-01

    Emerging bacterial antibiotic resistance draws attention to bacteriophages as a therapeutic alternative to treat bacterial infection. Examples of phage that combat bacteria abound. However, despite careful testing of antibacterial activity in vitro, failures nevertheless commonly occur. We investigated immunological response of phage antibacterial potency in vivo. Anti-phage activity of phagocytes, antibodies, and serum complement were identified by direct testing and by high-resolution fluorescent microscopy. We accommodated the experimental data into a mathematical model. We propose a universal schema of innate and adaptive immunity impact on phage pharmacokinetics, based on the results of our numerical simulations. We found that the mammalian-host response to infecting bacteria causes the concomitant removal of phage from the system. We propose the notion that this effect as an indirect pathway of phage inhibition by bacteria with significant relevance for the clinical outcome of phage therapy. PMID:26440922

  5. Mammalian Host-Versus-Phage immune response determines phage fate in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Hodyra-Stefaniak, Katarzyna; Miernikiewicz, Paulina; Drapała, Jarosław; Drab, Marek; Jończyk-Matysiak, Ewa; Lecion, Dorota; Kaźmierczak, Zuzanna; Beta, Weronika; Majewska, Joanna; Harhala, Marek; Bubak, Barbara; Kłopot, Anna; Górski, Andrzej; Dąbrowska, Krystyna

    2015-01-01

    Emerging bacterial antibiotic resistance draws attention to bacteriophages as a therapeutic alternative to treat bacterial infection. Examples of phage that combat bacteria abound. However, despite careful testing of antibacterial activity in vitro, failures nevertheless commonly occur. We investigated immunological response of phage antibacterial potency in vivo. Anti-phage activity of phagocytes, antibodies, and serum complement were identified by direct testing and by high-resolution fluorescent microscopy. We accommodated the experimental data into a mathematical model. We propose a universal schema of innate and adaptive immunity impact on phage pharmacokinetics, based on the results of our numerical simulations. We found that the mammalian-host response to infecting bacteria causes the concomitant removal of phage from the system. We propose the notion that this effect as an indirect pathway of phage inhibition by bacteria with significant relevance for the clinical outcome of phage therapy. PMID:26440922

  6. [Phage therapy for bacterial infection of burn].

    PubMed

    Peng, Y Z; Huang, G T

    2016-09-20

    With the long-term and widespread use of antibiotics, drug resistance of bacteria has become a major problem in the treatment of burn infection. For treating multidrug resistant bacteria, phage therapy has become the focus of attention. Development of phage therapy to fill the blank of this field in China is extremely urgent. PMID:27647065

  7. Development of Phage-Based Single Chain Fv Antibody Reagents for Detection of Yersinia pestis

    PubMed Central

    Shou, Yulin; Graves, Steven W.; Bradbury, Andrew R. M.

    2011-01-01

    Background Most Yersinia pestis strains are known to express a capsule-like antigen, fraction 1 (F1). F1 is encoded by the caf1 gene located on the large 100-kb pFra plasmid, which is found in Y. pestis but not in closely related species such as Yersinia enterocolytica and Yersinia pseudotuberculosis. In order to find antibodies specifically binding to Y. pestis we screened a large single chain Fv antibody fragment (scFv) phage display library using purified F1 antigen as a selection target. Different forms of the selected antibodies were used to establish assays for recombinant F1 antigen and Y. pestis detection. Methods Phage antibody panning was performed against F1 in an automated fashion using the Kingfisher magnetic bead system. Selected scFvs were screened for F1-binding specificity by one-step alkaline phosphatase enzyme linked immunosorbant assay (ELISA), and assayed for binding to recombinant antigen and/or Y. pestis by flow cytometry and whole-cell ELISA. Results Seven of the eight selected scFvs were shown to specifically bind both recombinant F1 and a panel of F1-positive Yersinia cells. The majority of the soluble scFvs were found to be difficult to purify, unstable and prone to cross-reactivity with F1-negative Yersinia strains, whereas phage displayed scFvs were found to be easy to purify/label and remarkably stable. Furthermore direct fluorescent labeling of phage displaying scFv allowed for an easy one-step flow cytometry assay. Slight cross-reactivity was observed when fixed cells were used in ELISA. Conclusions Our high throughput methods of selection and screening allowed for time and cost effective discovery of seven scFvs specifically binding Y. pestis F1 antigen. We describe implementation of different methods for phage-based immunoassay. Based on the success of these methods and the proven stability of phage, we indicate that the use of phage-displayed, rather than phage-free proteins, might generally overcome the shortcomings of sc

  8. Preparation and assay of phage lambda.

    PubMed

    Dale, J W; Greenaway, P J

    1985-01-01

    Lambda, a temperate bacteriophage of E. coli, has two alternative modes of replication in sensitive cells, known as the lytic and lysogenic cycles. In the lytic cycle, after the lambda DNA enters the cells, various phage functions are expressed that result in the production of a large number of mature phage particles and cell lysis. In the lysogenic mode, which normally occurs in only a small proportion of the infected cells, the phage forms a more or less stable relationship with the host bacterium; this stable state is known as lysogeny. In a lysogenic cell, phage DNA is normally incorporated into the chromosomal DNA via specific attachment sites on both the phage DNA and the host chromosome. Replication of lambda DNA then occurs only during replication of the host chromosome, and the phage genome is inherited by each daughter cell at cell division. The phage is maintained in this prophage state through the action of a repressor protein, coded for by the phage gene cl. This repressor protein turns off the expression of virtually the whole of the lambda genome. If the repressor is inactivated, the expression of phage genes is initiated. This leads to the excision of lambda DNA from the host chromosome and entry into the lytic cycle. The balance between the lytic and lysogenic modes of replication is a delicate and complex one in which a key factor is the concentration of the cl gene product. Some of the many sources of further information about the basic biology of lambda phage are listed in the references to this chapter.

  9. Enhanced Tumor Delivery and Antitumor Activity in Vivo of Liposomal Doxorubicin Modified with MCF-7-Specific Phage Fusion Protein

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tao; Hartner, William C.; Gillespie, James W.; Praveen, Kulkarni P.; Yang, Shenghong; Mei, Leslie A.; Petrenko, Valery A.; Torchilin, Vladimir P.

    2013-01-01

    A novel strategy to improve the therapeutic index of chemotherapy has been developed by the integration of nanotechnology with phage technique. The objective of this study was to combine phage display, identifying tumor-targeting ligands, with a liposomal nanocarrier for targeted delivery of doxorubicin. Following the proof of concept in cell-based experiments, this study focused on in vivo assessment of antitumor activity and potential side-effects of phage fusion protein-modified liposomal doxorubicin. MCF-7-targeted phage-Doxil treatments led to greater tumor remission and faster onset of antitumor activity than the treatments with non-targeted formulations. The enhanced anticancer effect induced by the targeted phage-Doxil correlated with an improved tumor accumulation of doxorubicin. Tumor sections consistently revealed enhanced apoptosis, reduced proliferation activity and extensive necrosis. Phage-Doxil-treated mice did not show any sign of hepatotoxicity and maintained overall health. Therefore, MCF-7-targeted phage-Doxil seems to be an active and tolerable chemotherapy for breast cancer treatment. PMID:24028893

  10. Aberrant immunity behaviour of hybrid lambda imm21 phages containing the DNA of ColE1-type plasmids.

    PubMed

    Windass, J D; Brammar, W J

    1979-01-01

    Hybrid lambda and lambda imm21 bacteriophages carrying various ColE1-type plasmids have been constructed in vitro. The lambda imm21/plasmid recombinants display aberrant immunity behaviour, giving clear plaques under conditions where the parental phages give turbid ones and being able to grow on homoimmune lysogens. lambda imm lambda/plasmid recombinants show no such unusual behaviour. Studies with hybrids of a lambda imm21 cITS phage carrying pMB9 DNA showed the operation of the plasmid's replication system to be the basic cause of the aberrant immunity behaviour. The plasmid replication system could act as a complete alternative to the phage system during vegetative phage growth. The probable reason that lambda imm21 phages show such altered phenotypes when carrying a functional plasmid replication origin, whereas lambda imm lambda and lambda imm434 (Mukai et al., 1978) phages do not, is the relative ease of titration of the phage 21 repressor to allow transcription from pR21. Various uses are considered for the altered phenotypic behaviour of lambda imm21/ColE1-type plasmid hybrids.

  11. A Flagellar Glycan-Specific Protein Encoded by Campylobacter Phages Inhibits Host Cell Growth.

    PubMed

    Javed, Muhammad Afzal; Sacher, Jessica C; van Alphen, Lieke B; Patry, Robert T; Szymanski, Christine M

    2015-12-01

    We previously characterized a carbohydrate binding protein, Gp047, derived from lytic Campylobacter phage NCTC 12673, as a promising diagnostic tool for the identification of Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli. We also demonstrated that this protein binds specifically to acetamidino-modified pseudaminic acid residues on host flagella, but the role of this protein in the phage lifecycle remains unknown. Here, we report that Gp047 is capable of inhibiting C. jejuni growth both on solid and liquid media, an activity, which we found to be bacteriostatic. The Gp047 domain responsible for bacterial growth inhibition is localized to the C-terminal quarter of the protein, and this activity is both contact- and dose-dependent. Gp047 gene homologues are present in all Campylobacter phages sequenced to date, and the resulting protein is not part of the phage particle. Therefore, these results suggest that either phages of this pathogen have evolved an effector protein capable of host-specific growth inhibition, or that Campylobacter cells have developed a mechanism of regulating their growth upon sensing an impending phage threat. PMID:26694450

  12. Evidence for horizontal gene transfer between Chlamydophila pneumoniae and Chlamydia phage

    PubMed Central

    Rosenwald, Anne G; Murray, Bradley; Toth, Theodore; Madupu, Ramana; Kyrillos, Alexandra; Arora, Gaurav

    2014-01-01

    Chlamydia-infecting bacteriophages, members of the Microviridae family, specifically the Gokushovirinae subfamily, are small (4.5–5 kb) single-stranded circles with 8–10 open-reading frames similar to E. coli phage ϕX174. Using sequence information found in GenBank, we examined related genes in Chlamydophila pneumoniae and Chlamydia-infecting bacteriophages. The 5 completely sequenced C. pneumoniae strains contain a gene orthologous to a phage gene annotated as the putative replication initiation protein (PRIP, also called VP4), which is not found in any other members of the Chlamydiaceae family sequenced to date. The C. pneumoniae strain infecting koalas, LPCoLN, in addition contains another region orthologous to phage sequences derived from the minor capsid protein gene, VP3. Phylogenetically, the phage PRIP sequences are more diverse than the bacterial PRIP sequences; nevertheless, the bacterial sequences and the phage sequences each cluster together in their own clade. Finally, we found evidence for another Microviridae phage-related gene, the major capsid protein gene, VP1 in a number of other bacterial species and 2 eukaryotes, the woodland strawberry and a nematode. Thus, we find considerable evidence for DNA sequences related to genes found in bacteriophages of the Microviridae family not only in a variety of prokaryotic but also eukaryotic species. PMID:26713222

  13. A Flagellar Glycan-Specific Protein Encoded by Campylobacter Phages Inhibits Host Cell Growth

    PubMed Central

    Javed, Muhammad Afzal; Sacher, Jessica C.; van Alphen, Lieke B.; Patry, Robert T.; Szymanski, Christine M.

    2015-01-01

    We previously characterized a carbohydrate binding protein, Gp047, derived from lytic Campylobacter phage NCTC 12673, as a promising diagnostic tool for the identification of Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli. We also demonstrated that this protein binds specifically to acetamidino-modified pseudaminic acid residues on host flagella, but the role of this protein in the phage lifecycle remains unknown. Here, we report that Gp047 is capable of inhibiting C. jejuni growth both on solid and liquid media, an activity, which we found to be bacteriostatic. The Gp047 domain responsible for bacterial growth inhibition is localized to the C-terminal quarter of the protein, and this activity is both contact- and dose-dependent. Gp047 gene homologues are present in all Campylobacter phages sequenced to date, and the resulting protein is not part of the phage particle. Therefore, these results suggest that either phages of this pathogen have evolved an effector protein capable of host-specific growth inhibition, or that Campylobacter cells have developed a mechanism of regulating their growth upon sensing an impending phage threat. PMID:26694450

  14. Phage-resistance linked to cell heterogeneity in the commercial strain Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. lactis Ab1.

    PubMed

    Suárez, Viviana B; Maciel, Natalia; Guglielmotti, Daniela; Zago, Miriam; Giraffa, Giorgio; Reinheimer, Jorge

    2008-12-10

    The aim of this work was to study the relationship between the cell morphological heterogeneity and the phage-resistance in the commercial strain Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. lactis Ab1. Two morphological variants (named C and T) were isolated from this strain. Phage-resistant derivatives were isolated from them and the percentage of occurrence of confirmed phage-resistant cells was 0.001% of the total cellular population. Within these phage-resistant cell derivatives there were T (3 out of 4 total isolates) and C (1 out of 4 total isolates) variants. The study of some technological properties (e.g. proteolytic and acidifying activities) demonstrated that most of phage-resistant derivatives were not as good as the parental strain. However, for one derivative (a T variant), the technological properties were better than those of the parental strain. On the other hand, it was possible to determinate that the system of phage-resistance in the T variants was interference in adsorption step, with adsorption rates <15%. For the C variant derivative it was possible to demonstrate the presence of a restriction/modification system and, moreover, to determinate that this system could be Type I R/M. PMID:18976830

  15. Correlation of conversion of Salmonella enterica serovar enteritidis phage type 1, 4, or 6 to phage type 7 with loss of lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed Central

    Baggesen, D L; Wegener, H C; Madsen, M

    1997-01-01

    Studies of pairs of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis isolates from different poultry flocks showed that phage type (PT) 7 may be derived from PT 1, 4, and 6. The conversion appeared to be associated with loss of lipopolysaccharide. It is concluded that PT 7 may be of little value as an epidemiological marker of S. enterica serovar Enteritidis. PMID:8968942

  16. Genomic characterization provides new insight into Salmonella phage diversity

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Salmonella is a widely distributed foodborne pathogen that causes tens of millions of salmonellosis cases globally every year. While the genomic diversity of Salmonella is increasingly well studied, our knowledge of Salmonella phage genomic diversity is still rather limited, despite the contributions of both lysogenic and lytic phages to Salmonella virulence, diversity and ecology (e.g., through horizontal gene transfer and Salmonella lysis). To gain a better understanding of phage diversity in a specific ecological niche, we sequenced 22 Salmonella phages isolated from a number of dairy farms from New York State (United States) and analyzed them using a comparative genomics approach. Results Classification of the 22 phages according to the presence/absence of orthologous genes allowed for classification into 8 well supported clusters. In addition to two phage clusters that represent novel virulent Salmonella phages, we also identified four phage clusters that each contained previously characterized phages from multiple continents. Our analyses also identified two clusters of phages that carry putative virulence (e.g., adhesins) and antimicrobial resistance (tellurite and bicyclomycin) genes as well as virulent and temperate transducing phages. Insights into phage evolution from our analyses include (i) identification of DNA metabolism genes that may facilitate nucleotide synthesis in phages with a G+C % distinct from Salmonella, and (ii) evidence of Salmonella phage tailspike and fiber diversity due to both single nucleotide polymorphisms and major re-arrangements, which may affect the host specificity of Salmonella phages. Conclusions Genomics-based characterization of 22 Salmonella phages isolated from dairy farms allowed for identification of a number of novel Salmonella phages. While the comparative genomics analyses of these phages provide a number of new insights in the evolution and diversity of Salmonella phages, they only represent a first

  17. Therapeutic use of chimeric bacteriophage (phage) lysins in staphylococcal endophthalmitis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Purpose: Phage endolysins are peptidoglycan hydrolases that are produced at the end of the phage lytic cycle to digest the host bacterial cell wall, facilitating the release of mature phage progeny. The aim of this study is to determine the antimicrobial activity of chimeric phage lysins against cli...

  18. Phage anti-immune complex assay: general strategy for noncompetitive immunodetection of small molecules.

    PubMed

    González-Techera, A; Vanrell, L; Last, J A; Hammock, B D; González-Sapienza, G

    2007-10-15

    Due to their size, small molecules cannot be simultaneously bound by two antibodies, precluding their detection by noncompetitive two-site immunoassays, which are superior to competitive ones in terms of sensitivity, kinetics, and working range. This has prompted the development of anti-immune complex antibodies, but these are difficult to produce, and often exhibit high cross-reactivity with the unliganded primary antibody. This work demonstrates that anti-immune complex antibodies can be substituted by phage particles isolated from phage display peptide libraries. Phages bearing specific small peptide loops allowed to focus the recognition to changes in the binding area of the immune complex. The concept was tested using environmental and drug analytes; with improved sensitivity and ready adaptation into on-site formats. Peptides specific for different immune complexes can be isolated from different peptide libraries in a simple and systematic fashion allowing the rapid development of noncompetitive assays for small molecules.

  19. Inactivation and reactivation of B. megatherium phage.

    PubMed

    NORTHROP, J H

    1955-11-20

    Preparation of Reversibly Inactivated (R.I.) Phage.- If B. megatherium phage (of any type, or in any stage of purification) is suspended in dilute salt solutions at pH 5-6, it is completely inactivated; i.e., it does not form plaques, or give rise to more phage when mixed with a sensitive organism (Northrop, 1954). The inactivation occurs when the phage is added to the dilute salt solution. If a suspension of the inactive phage in pH 7 peptone is titrated to pH 5 and allowed to stand, the activity gradually returns. The inactivation is therefore reversible. Properties of R.I. Phage.- The R.I. phage is adsorbed by sensitive cells at about the same rate as the active phage. It kills the cells, but no active phage is produced. The R.I. phage therefore has the properties of phage "ghosts" (Herriott, 1951) or of colicines (Gratia, 1925), or phage inactivated by ultraviolet light (Luria, 1947). The R.I. phage is sedimented in the centrifuge at the same rate as active phage. It is therefore about the same size as the active phage. The R.I. phage is most stable in pH 7, 5 per cent peptone, and may be kept in this solution for weeks at 0 degrees C. The rate of digestion of R.I. phage by trypsin, chymotrypsin, or desoxyribonuclease is about the same as that of active phage (Northrop, 1955 a). Effect of Various Substances on the Formation of R.I. Phage.- There is an equilibrium between R.I. phage and active phage. The R.I. form is the stable one in dilute salt solution, pH 5 to 6.5 and at low temperature (<20 degrees C.). At pH >6.5, in dilute salt solution, the R.I. phage changes to the active form. The cycle, active right harpoon over left harpoon inactive phage, may be repeated many times at 0 degrees C. by changing the pH of the solution back and forth between pH 7 and pH 6. Irreversible inactivation is caused by distilled water, some heavy metals, concentrated urea or quanidine solutions, and by l-arginine. Reversible inactivation is prevented by all salts tested (except

  20. Rapid enumeration of phage in monodisperse emulsions.

    PubMed

    Tjhung, Katrina F; Burnham, Sean; Anany, Hany; Griffiths, Mansel W; Derda, Ratmir

    2014-06-17

    Phage-based detection assays have been developed for the detection of viable bacteria for applications in clinical diagnosis, monitoring of water quality, and food safety. The majority of these assays deliver a positive readout in the form of newly generated progeny phages by the bacterial host of interest. Progeny phages are often visualized as plaques, or holes, in a lawn of bacteria on an agar-filled Petri dish; however, this rate-limiting step requires up to 12 h of incubation time. We have previously described an amplification of bacteriophages M13 inside droplets of media suspended in perfluorinated oil; a single phage M13 in a droplet yields 10(7) copies in 3-4 h. Here, we describe that encapsulation of reporter phages, both lytic T4-LacZ and nonlytic M13, in monodisperse droplets can also be used for rapid enumeration of phage. Compartmentalization in droplets accelerated the development of the signal from the reporter enzyme; counting of "positive" droplets yields accurate enumeration of phage particles ranging from 10(2) to 10(6) pfu/mL. For enumeration of T4-LacZ phage, the fluorescent signal appeared in as little as 90 min. Unlike bulk assays, quantification in emulsion is robust and insensitive to fluctuations in environmental conditions (e.g., temperature). Power-free emulsification using gravity-driven flow in the absence of syringe pumps and portable fluorescence imaging solutions makes this technology promising for use at the point of care in low-resource environments. This droplet-based phage enumeration method could accelerate and simplify point-of-care detection of the pathogens for which reporter bacteriophages have been developed.

  1. Rapid enumeration of phage in monodisperse emulsions.

    PubMed

    Tjhung, Katrina F; Burnham, Sean; Anany, Hany; Griffiths, Mansel W; Derda, Ratmir

    2014-06-17

    Phage-based detection assays have been developed for the detection of viable bacteria for applications in clinical diagnosis, monitoring of water quality, and food safety. The majority of these assays deliver a positive readout in the form of newly generated progeny phages by the bacterial host of interest. Progeny phages are often visualized as plaques, or holes, in a lawn of bacteria on an agar-filled Petri dish; however, this rate-limiting step requires up to 12 h of incubation time. We have previously described an amplification of bacteriophages M13 inside droplets of media suspended in perfluorinated oil; a single phage M13 in a droplet yields 10(7) copies in 3-4 h. Here, we describe that encapsulation of reporter phages, both lytic T4-LacZ and nonlytic M13, in monodisperse droplets can also be used for rapid enumeration of phage. Compartmentalization in droplets accelerated the development of the signal from the reporter enzyme; counting of "positive" droplets yields accurate enumeration of phage particles ranging from 10(2) to 10(6) pfu/mL. For enumeration of T4-LacZ phage, the fluorescent signal appeared in as little as 90 min. Unlike bulk assays, quantification in emulsion is robust and insensitive to fluctuations in environmental conditions (e.g., temperature). Power-free emulsification using gravity-driven flow in the absence of syringe pumps and portable fluorescence imaging solutions makes this technology promising for use at the point of care in low-resource environments. This droplet-based phage enumeration method could accelerate and simplify point-of-care detection of the pathogens for which reporter bacteriophages have been developed. PMID:24892245

  2. N15: the linear phage-plasmid.

    PubMed

    Ravin, Nikolai V

    2011-03-01

    The lambdoid phage N15 of Escherichia coli is very unusual among temperate phages in that its prophage is not integrated into chromosome but is a linear plasmid molecule with covalently closed ends. Upon infection the phage DNA circularises via cohesive ends, then phage-encoded enzyme, protelomerase, cuts at an inverted repeat site and forms hairpin ends (telomeres) of the linear plasmid prophage. Replication of the N15 prophage is initiated at an internally located ori site and proceeds bidirectionally resulting in formation of duplicated telomeres. Then the N15 protelomerase cuts duplicated telomeres generating two linear plasmid molecules with hairpin telomeres. Stable inheritance of the plasmid prophage is ensured by partitioning operon similar to the F factor sop operon. Unlike F sop, the N15 centromere consists of four inverted repeats dispersed in the genome. The multiplicity and dispersion of centromeres are required for efficient partitioning of a linear plasmid. The centromeres are located in N15 genome regions involved in phage replication and control of lysogeny, and binding of partition proteins at these sites regulates these processes. Two N15-related lambdoid Siphoviridae phages, φKO2 in Klebsiella oxytoca and pY54 in Yersinia enterocolitica, also lysogenize their hosts as linear plasmids, as well as Myoviridae marine phages VP882 and VP58.5 in Vibrio parahaemolyticus and ΦHAP-1 in Halomonas aquamarina. The genomes of all these phages contain similar protelomerase genes, lysogeny modules and replication genes, as well as plasmid-partitioning genes, suggesting that these phages may belong to a group diverged from a common ancestor.

  3. Site-specific integration of the temperate bacteriophage phi adh into the Lactobacillus gasseri chromosome and molecular characterization of the phage (attP) and bacterial (attB) attachment sites.

    PubMed Central

    Raya, R R; Fremaux, C; De Antoni, G L; Klaenhammer, T R

    1992-01-01

    The temperate bacteriophage phi adh integrates its genome into the chromosomal DNA of Lactobacillus gasseri ADH by a site-specific recombination process. Southern hybridization analysis of BclI-digested genomic DNA from six relysogenized derivatives of the prophage-cured strain NCK102 displayed phage-chromosomal junction fragments identical to those of the lysogenic parent. The phi adh attachment site sequence, attP, was located within a 365-bp EcoRI-HindIII fragment of phage phi adh. This fragment was cloned and sequenced. DNA sequence analysis revealed striking features common to the attachment sites of other site-specific recombination systems: five direct repeats of the sequence TGTCCCTTTT(C/T) and a 14-bp inverted repeat. Oligonucleotides derived from the sequence of the attP-containing fragment enabled us to amplify predicted junction fragment sequences and thus to identify attL, attR, and attB. The core region was defined as the 16-bp sequence TACACTTCTTAGGAGG. Phage-encoded functions essential for site-specific insertion of phage phi adh were located in a 4.5-kb BclI fragment. This fragment was cloned in plasmid pSA34 to generate the insertional vector pTRK182. Plasmid pTRK182 was introduced into L. gasseri NCK102 by electroporation. Hybridization analysis showed that a single copy of pTRK182 had integrated at the attB site of the NCK102 erythromycin-resistant transformants. This is the first site-specific recombination system described in lactobacilli, as well as the first attP-based site-specific integration vector constructed for L. gasseri ADH. Images PMID:1512192

  4. Three New Escherichia coli Phages from the Human Gut Show Promising Potential for Phage Therapy.

    PubMed

    Dalmasso, Marion; Strain, Ronan; Neve, Horst; Franz, Charles M A P; Cousin, Fabien J; Ross, R Paul; Hill, Colin

    2016-01-01

    With the emergence of multi-drug resistant bacteria the use of bacteriophages (phages) is gaining renewed interest as promising anti-microbial agents. The aim of this study was to isolate and characterize phages from human fecal samples. Three new coliphages, ɸAPCEc01, ɸAPCEc02 and ɸAPCEc03, were isolated. Their phenotypic and genomic characteristics, and lytic activity against biofilm, and in combination with ciprofloxacin, were investigated. All three phages reduced the growth of E. coli strain DPC6051 at multiplicity of infection (MOI) between 10-3 and 105. A cocktail of all three phages completely inhibited the growth of E. coli. The phage cocktail also reduced biofilm formation and prevented the emergence of phage-resistant mutants which occurred with single phage. When combined with ciprofloxacin, phage alone or in cocktail inhibited the growth of E. coli and prevented the emergence of resistant mutants. These three new phages are promising biocontrol agents for E. coli infections. PMID:27280590

  5. Three New Escherichia coli Phages from the Human Gut Show Promising Potential for Phage Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Dalmasso, Marion; Strain, Ronan; Neve, Horst; Franz, Charles M. A. P.; Cousin, Fabien J.; Ross, R. Paul; Hill, Colin

    2016-01-01

    With the emergence of multi-drug resistant bacteria the use of bacteriophages (phages) is gaining renewed interest as promising anti-microbial agents. The aim of this study was to isolate and characterize phages from human fecal samples. Three new coliphages, ɸAPCEc01, ɸAPCEc02 and ɸAPCEc03, were isolated. Their phenotypic and genomic characteristics, and lytic activity against biofilm, and in combination with ciprofloxacin, were investigated. All three phages reduced the growth of E. coli strain DPC6051 at multiplicity of infection (MOI) between 10−3 and 105. A cocktail of all three phages completely inhibited the growth of E. coli. The phage cocktail also reduced biofilm formation and prevented the emergence of phage-resistant mutants which occurred with single phage. When combined with ciprofloxacin, phage alone or in cocktail inhibited the growth of E. coli and prevented the emergence of resistant mutants. These three new phages are promising biocontrol agents for E. coli infections. PMID:27280590

  6. Tales from a thousand and one phages

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Valera, Francisco; Mizuno, Carolina Megumi; Ghai, Rohit

    2014-01-01

    The sequencing of marine metagenomic fosmids led to the discovery of several new complete phage genomes. Among the 21 major sequence groups, 10 totally novel groups of marine phages could be identified. Some of these represent the first phages infecting large marine prokaryotic phyla, such as the Verrucomicrobia and the recently described Ca. Actinomarinales. Coming from a single deep photic zone sample the diversity of phages found is astonishing, and the comparison with a metavirome from the same location indicates that only 2% of the real diversity was recovered. In addition to this large macro-diversity, rich micro-diversity was also found, affecting host-recognition modules, mirroring the variation of cell surface components in their host marine microbes. PMID:24616837

  7. Human Pluripotent Stem Cells and Derived Neuroprogenitors Display Differential Degrees of Susceptibility to BH3 Mimetics ABT-263, WEHI-539 and ABT-199

    PubMed Central

    Dimopoulos, Nicolás Alexis; Fernandez Espinosa, Damián Darío; Miriuka, Santiago Gabriel; Sevlever, Gustavo Emilio; Romorini, Leonardo; Scassa, María Elida

    2016-01-01

    Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) are hypersensitive to genotoxic stress and display lower survival ability relative to their differentiated progeny. Herein, we attempted to investigate the source of this difference by comparing the DNA damage responses triggered by the topoisomerase I inhibitor camptothecin, in hESCs, human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) and hESCs-derived neuroprogenitors (NP). We observed that upon camptothecin exposure pluripotent stem cells underwent apoptosis more swiftly and at a higher rate than differentiated cells. However, the cellular response encompassing ataxia-telangiectasia mutated kinase activation and p53 phosphorylation both on serine 15 as well as on serine 46 resulted very similar among the aforementioned cell types. Importantly, we observed that hESCs and hiPSCs express lower levels of the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 than NP. To assess whether Bcl-2 abundance could account for this differential response we treated cells with ABT-263, WEHI-539 and ABT-199, small molecules that preferentially target the BH3-binding pocket of Bcl-xL and/or Bcl-2 and reduce their ability to sequester pro-apoptotic factors. We found that in the absence of stress stimuli, NP exhibited a higher sensitivity to ABT- 263 and WEHI-539 than hESCs and hiPSCs. Conversely, all tested cell types appeared to be highly resistant to the Bcl-2 specific inhibitor, ABT-199. However, in all cases we determined that ABT-263 or WEHI-539 treatment exacerbated camptothecin-induced apoptosis. Importantly, similar responses were observed after siRNA-mediated down-regulation of Bcl-xL or Bcl-2. Taken together, our results suggest that Bcl-xL contrary to Bcl-2 contributes to ensure cell survival and also functions as a primary suppressor of DNA double-strand brake induced apoptosis both in pluripotent and derived NP cells. The emerging knowledge of the relative dependence of pluripotent and progenitor cells on Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL activities may help to predict

  8. Supersize me: Cronobacter sakazakii phage GAP32

    SciTech Connect

    Abbasifar, Reza; Griffiths, Mansel W.; Sabour, Parviz M.; Ackermann, Hans-Wolfgang; Vandersteegen, Katrien; Lavigne, Rob; Noben, Jean-Paul; Alanis Villa, Argentina; Abbasifar, Arash; Nash, John H.E.; Kropinski, Andrew M.

    2014-07-15

    Cronobacter sakazakii is a Gram-negative pathogen found in milk-based formulae that causes infant meningitis. Bacteriophages have been proposed to control bacterial pathogens; however, comprehensive knowledge about a phage is required to ensure its safety before clinical application. We have characterized C. sakazakii phage vB{sub C}saM{sub G}AP32 (GAP32), which possesses the second largest sequenced phage genome (358,663 bp). A total of 571 genes including 545 protein coding sequences and 26 tRNAs were identified, thus more genes than in the smallest bacterium, Mycoplasma genitalium G37. BLASTP and HHpred searches, together with proteomic analyses reveal that only 23.9% of the putative proteins have defined functions. Some of the unique features of this phage include: a chromosome condensation protein, two copies of the large subunit terminase, a predicted signal-arrest-release lysin; and an RpoD-like protein, which is possibly involved in the switch from immediate early to delayed early transcription. Its closest relatives are all extremely large myoviruses, namely coliphage PBECO4 and Klebsiella phage vB{sub K}leM-RaK2, with whom it shares approximately 44% homologous proteins. Since the homologs are not evenly distributed, we propose that these three phages belong to a new subfamily. - Highlights: • Cronobacter sakazakii phage vB{sub C}saM{sub G}AP32 has a genome of 358,663 bp. • It encodes 545 proteins which is more than Mycoplasma genitalium G37. • It is a member of the Myoviridae. • It is peripherally related to coliphage PBECO4 and Klebsiella phage vB{sub K}leM-RaK2. • GAP32 encodes a chromosome condensation protein.

  9. The Staphylococci Phages Family: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Deghorain, Marie; Van Melderen, Laurence

    2012-01-01

    Due to their crucial role in pathogenesis and virulence, phages of Staphylococcus aureus have been extensively studied. Most of them encode and disseminate potent staphylococcal virulence factors. In addition, their movements contribute to the extraordinary versatility and adaptability of this prominent pathogen by improving genome plasticity. In addition to S. aureus, phages from coagulase-negative Staphylococci (CoNS) are gaining increasing interest. Some of these species, such as S. epidermidis, cause nosocomial infections and are therefore problematic for public health. This review provides an overview of the staphylococcal phages family extended to CoNS phages. At the morphological level, all these phages characterized so far belong to the Caudovirales order and are mainly temperate Siphoviridae. At the molecular level, comparative genomics revealed an extensive mosaicism, with genes organized into functional modules that are frequently exchanged between phages. Evolutionary relationships within this family, as well as with other families, have been highlighted. All these aspects are of crucial importance for our understanding of evolution and emergence of pathogens among bacterial species such as Staphylococci. PMID:23342361

  10. Characterisation data of simple sequence repeats of phages closely related to T7M.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tiao-Yin

    2016-09-01

    Coliphages T7M and T3, Yersinia phage ϕYeO3-12, and Salmonella phage ϕSG-JL2 share high homology in genomic sequences. Simple sequence repeats (SSRs) are found in their genomes and variations of SSRs among these phages are observed. Analyses on regions of sequences in T7M and T3 genomes that are likely derived from phage recombination, as well as the counterparts in ϕYeO3-12 and ϕSG-JL2, have been discussed by Lin in "Simple sequence repeat variations expedite phage divergence: mechanisms of indels and gene mutations" [1]. These regions are referred to as recombinant regions. The focus here is on SSRs in the whole genome and regions of sequences outside the recombinant regions, referred to as non-recombinant regions. This article provides SSR counts, relative abundance, relative density, and GC contents in the complete genome and non-recombinant regions of these phages. SSR period sizes and motifs in the non-recombinant regions of phage genomes are plotted. Genomic sequence changes between T7M and T3 due to insertions, deletions, and substitutions are also illustrated. SSRs and nearby sequences of T7M in the non-recombinant regions are compared to the sequences of ϕYeO3-12 and ϕSG-JL2 in the corresponding positions. The sequence variations of SSRs due to vertical evolution are classified into four categories and tabulated: (1) insertion/deletion of SSR units, (2) expansion/contraction of SSRs without alteration of genome length, (3) changes of repeat motifs, and (4) generation/loss of repeats.

  11. Characterisation data of simple sequence repeats of phages closely related to T7M.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tiao-Yin

    2016-09-01

    Coliphages T7M and T3, Yersinia phage ϕYeO3-12, and Salmonella phage ϕSG-JL2 share high homology in genomic sequences. Simple sequence repeats (SSRs) are found in their genomes and variations of SSRs among these phages are observed. Analyses on regions of sequences in T7M and T3 genomes that are likely derived from phage recombination, as well as the counterparts in ϕYeO3-12 and ϕSG-JL2, have been discussed by Lin in "Simple sequence repeat variations expedite phage divergence: mechanisms of indels and gene mutations" [1]. These regions are referred to as recombinant regions. The focus here is on SSRs in the whole genome and regions of sequences outside the recombinant regions, referred to as non-recombinant regions. This article provides SSR counts, relative abundance, relative density, and GC contents in the complete genome and non-recombinant regions of these phages. SSR period sizes and motifs in the non-recombinant regions of phage genomes are plotted. Genomic sequence changes between T7M and T3 due to insertions, deletions, and substitutions are also illustrated. SSRs and nearby sequences of T7M in the non-recombinant regions are compared to the sequences of ϕYeO3-12 and ϕSG-JL2 in the corresponding positions. The sequence variations of SSRs due to vertical evolution are classified into four categories and tabulated: (1) insertion/deletion of SSR units, (2) expansion/contraction of SSRs without alteration of genome length, (3) changes of repeat motifs, and (4) generation/loss of repeats. PMID:27500195

  12. Complete genome sequences of three Erwinia amylovora phages isolated in north america and a bacteriophage induced from an Erwinia tasmaniensis strain.

    PubMed

    Müller, I; Kube, M; Reinhardt, R; Jelkmann, W; Geider, K

    2011-02-01

    Fire blight, a plant disease of economic importance caused by Erwinia amylovora, may be controlled by the application of bacteriophages. Here, we provide the complete genome sequences and the annotation of three E. amylovora-specific phages isolated in North America and genomic information about a bacteriophage induced by mitomycin C treatment of an Erwinia tasmaniensis strain that is antagonistic for E. amylovora. The American phages resemble two already-described viral genomes, whereas the E. tasmaniensis phage displays a singular genomic sequence in BLAST searches.

  13. Heterogeneity in Induction Level, Infection Ability, and Morphology of Shiga Toxin-Encoding Phages (Stx Phages) from Dairy and Human Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli O26:H11 Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Bonanno, Ludivine; Petit, Marie-Agnès; Loukiadis, Estelle; Michel, Valérie

    2016-01-01

    Shiga toxin (Stx)-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) bacteria are foodborne pathogens responsible for diarrhea and hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS). Shiga toxin, the main STEC virulence factor, is encoded by the stx gene located in the genome of a bacteriophage inserted into the bacterial chromosome. The O26:H11 serotype is considered to be the second-most-significant HUS-causing serotype worldwide after O157:H7. STEC O26:H11 bacteria and their stx-negative counterparts have been detected in dairy products. They may convert from the one form to the other by loss or acquisition of Stx phages, potentially confounding food microbiological diagnostic methods based on stx gene detection. Here we investigated the diversity and mobility of Stx phages from human and dairy STEC O26:H11 strains. Evaluation of their rate of in vitro induction, occurring either spontaneously or in the presence of mitomycin C, showed that the Stx2 phages were more inducible overall than Stx1 phages. However, no correlation was found between the Stx phage levels produced and the origin of the strains tested or the phage insertion sites. Morphological analysis by electron microscopy showed that Stx phages from STEC O26:H11 displayed various shapes that were unrelated to Stx1 or Stx2 types. Finally, the levels of sensitivity of stx-negative E. coli O26:H11 to six Stx phages differed among the 17 strains tested and our attempts to convert them into STEC were unsuccessful, indicating that their lysogenization was a rare event. PMID:26826235

  14. Heterogeneity in Induction Level, Infection Ability, and Morphology of Shiga Toxin-Encoding Phages (Stx Phages) from Dairy and Human Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli O26:H11 Isolates.

    PubMed

    Bonanno, Ludivine; Petit, Marie-Agnès; Loukiadis, Estelle; Michel, Valérie; Auvray, Frédéric

    2016-01-29

    Shiga toxin (Stx)-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) bacteria are foodborne pathogens responsible for diarrhea and hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS). Shiga toxin, the main STEC virulence factor, is encoded by the stx gene located in the genome of a bacteriophage inserted into the bacterial chromosome. The O26:H11 serotype is considered to be the second-most-significant HUS-causing serotype worldwide after O157:H7. STEC O26:H11 bacteria and their stx-negative counterparts have been detected in dairy products. They may convert from the one form to the other by loss or acquisition of Stx phages, potentially confounding food microbiological diagnostic methods based on stx gene detection. Here we investigated the diversity and mobility of Stx phages from human and dairy STEC O26:H11 strains. Evaluation of their rate of in vitro induction, occurring either spontaneously or in the presence of mitomycin C, showed that the Stx2 phages were more inducible overall than Stx1 phages. However, no correlation was found between the Stx phage levels produced and the origin of the strains tested or the phage insertion sites. Morphological analysis by electron microscopy showed that Stx phages from STEC O26:H11 displayed various shapes that were unrelated to Stx1 or Stx2 types. Finally, the levels of sensitivity of stx-negative E. coli O26:H11 to six Stx phages differed among the 17 strains tested and our attempts to convert them into STEC were unsuccessful, indicating that their lysogenization was a rare event.

  15. Structural and Functional Studies of gpX of Escherichia coli Phage P2 Reveal a Widespread Role for LysM Domains in the Baseplates of Contractile-Tailed Phages

    PubMed Central

    Fatehi Hassanabad, Mostafa; Chang, Tom; Pirani, Nawaz; Bona, Diane; Edwards, Aled M.

    2013-01-01

    A variety of bacterial pathogenicity determinants, including the type VI secretion system and the virulence cassettes from Photorhabdus and Serratia, share an evolutionary origin with contractile-tailed myophages. The well-characterized Escherichia coli phage P2 provides an excellent system for studies related to these systems, as its protein composition appears to represent the “minimal” myophage tail. In this study, we used nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to determine the solution structure of gpX, a 68-residue tail baseplate protein. Although the sequence and structure of gpX are similar to those of LysM domains, which are a large family associated with peptidoglycan binding, we did not detect a peptidoglycan-binding activity for gpX. However, bioinformatic analysis revealed that half of all myophages, including all that possess phage T4-like baseplates, encode a tail protein with a LysM-like domain, emphasizing a widespread role for this domain in baseplate function. While phage P2 gpX comprises only a single LysM domain, many myophages display LysM domain fusions with other tail proteins, such as the DNA circulation protein found in Mu-like phages and gp53 of T4-like phages. Electron microscopy of P2 phage particles with an incorporated gpX-maltose binding protein fusion revealed that gpX is located at the top of the baseplate, near the junction of the baseplate and tail tube. gpW, the orthologue of phage T4 gp25, was also found to localize to this region. A general colocalization of LysM-like domains and gpW homologues in diverse phages is supported by our bioinformatic analysis. PMID:24097944

  16. [Lytic phages and prophages of Streptococcus suis--a review].

    PubMed

    Tang, Fang; Lu, Chengping

    2015-04-01

    Streptococcus suis (S. suis) is an important zoonosis and pathogen that can carry prophages. In this review, we focus on the recent advances in our understanding of lytic phage and lysogenic phage of S. suis, including the morphology of S. suis lytic phage, the functions of lysin and terminase large subunit encoded by S. suis lytic phage, comparative genomics of S. suis prophages, lysogenic. conversion between S. suis lytic phage and prophage. Furthermore, prospective evolution of interactions between phage and host was discussed. PMID:26211312

  17. Rapid Detection of Viable Bacillus anthracis Spores in Environmental Samples by Using Engineered Reporter Phages.

    PubMed

    Sharp, Natasha J; Molineux, Ian J; Page, Martin A; Schofield, David A

    2016-04-01

    Bacillus anthracis, the causative agent of anthrax, was utilized as a bioterrorism agent in 2001 when spores were distributed via the U.S. postal system. In responding to this event, the Federal Bureau of Investigation used traditional bacterial culture viability assays to ascertain the extent of contamination of the postal facilities within 24 to 48 h of environmental sample acquisition. Here, we describe a low-complexity, second-generation reporter phage assay for the rapid detection of viableB. anthracis spores in environmental samples. The assay uses an engineered B. anthracis reporter phage (Wβ::luxAB-2) which transduces bioluminescence to infected cells. To facilitate low-level environmental detection and maximize the signal response, expression of luxABin an earlier version of the reporter phage (Wβ::luxAB-1) was optimized. These alterations prolonged signal kinetics, increased light output, and improved assay sensitivity. Using Wβ::luxAB-2, detection of B. anthracis spores was 1 CFU in 8 h from pure cultures and as low as 10 CFU/g in sterile soil but increased to 10(5)CFU/g in unprocessed soil due to an unstable signal and the presence of competing bacteria. Inclusion of semiselective medium, mediated by a phage-expressed antibiotic resistance gene, maintained signal stability and enabled the detection of 10(4)CFU/g in 6 h. The assay does not require spore extraction and relies on the phage infecting germinating cells directly in the soil sample. This reporter phage displays promise for the rapid detection of low levels of spores on clean surfaces and also in grossly contaminated environmental samples from complex matrices such as soils. PMID:26873316

  18. Rapid Detection of Viable Bacillus anthracis Spores in Environmental Samples by Using Engineered Reporter Phages

    PubMed Central

    Sharp, Natasha J.; Molineux, Ian J.; Page, Martin A.

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus anthracis, the causative agent of anthrax, was utilized as a bioterrorism agent in 2001 when spores were distributed via the U.S. postal system. In responding to this event, the Federal Bureau of Investigation used traditional bacterial culture viability assays to ascertain the extent of contamination of the postal facilities within 24 to 48 h of environmental sample acquisition. Here, we describe a low-complexity, second-generation reporter phage assay for the rapid detection of viable B. anthracis spores in environmental samples. The assay uses an engineered B. anthracis reporter phage (Wβ::luxAB-2) which transduces bioluminescence to infected cells. To facilitate low-level environmental detection and maximize the signal response, expression of luxAB in an earlier version of the reporter phage (Wβ::luxAB-1) was optimized. These alterations prolonged signal kinetics, increased light output, and improved assay sensitivity. Using Wβ::luxAB-2, detection of B. anthracis spores was 1 CFU in 8 h from pure cultures and as low as 10 CFU/g in sterile soil but increased to 105 CFU/g in unprocessed soil due to an unstable signal and the presence of competing bacteria. Inclusion of semiselective medium, mediated by a phage-expressed antibiotic resistance gene, maintained signal stability and enabled the detection of 104 CFU/g in 6 h. The assay does not require spore extraction and relies on the phage infecting germinating cells directly in the soil sample. This reporter phage displays promise for the rapid detection of low levels of spores on clean surfaces and also in grossly contaminated environmental samples from complex matrices such as soils. PMID:26873316

  19. Tolerance of a phage element by Streptococcus pneumoniae leads to a fitness defect during colonization.

    PubMed

    DeBardeleben, Hilary K; Lysenko, Elena S; Dalia, Ankur B; Weiser, Jeffrey N

    2014-07-01

    The pathogenesis of the disease caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae begins with colonization of the upper respiratory tract. Temperate phages have been identified in the genomes of up to 70% of clinical isolates. How these phages affect the bacterial host during colonization is unknown. Here, we examined a clinical isolate that carries a novel prophage element, designated Spn1, which was detected in both integrated and episomal forms. Surprisingly, both lytic and lysogenic Spn1 genes were expressed under routine growth conditions. Using a mouse model of asymptomatic colonization, we demonstrate that the Spn1(-) strain outcompeted the Spn1(+) strain >70-fold. To determine if Spn1 causes a fitness defect through a trans-acting factor, we constructed an Spn1(+) mutant that does not become an episome or express phage genes. This mutant competed equally with the Spn1(-) strain, indicating that expression of phage genes or phage lytic activity is required to confer this fitness defect. In vitro, we demonstrate that the presence of Spn1 correlated with a defect in LytA-mediated autolysis. Furthermore, the Spn1(+) strain displayed increased chain length and resistance to lysis by penicillin compared to the Spn(-) strain, indicating that Spn1 alters the cell wall physiology of its host strain. We posit that these changes in cell wall physiology allow for tolerance of phage gene products and are responsible for the relative defect of the Spn1(+) strain during colonization. This study provides new insight into how bacteria and prophages interact and affect bacterial fitness in vivo. PMID:24816604

  20. Tolerance of a Phage Element by Streptococcus pneumoniae Leads to a Fitness Defect during Colonization

    PubMed Central

    DeBardeleben, Hilary K.; Lysenko, Elena S.; Dalia, Ankur B.

    2014-01-01

    The pathogenesis of the disease caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae begins with colonization of the upper respiratory tract. Temperate phages have been identified in the genomes of up to 70% of clinical isolates. How these phages affect the bacterial host during colonization is unknown. Here, we examined a clinical isolate that carries a novel prophage element, designated Spn1, which was detected in both integrated and episomal forms. Surprisingly, both lytic and lysogenic Spn1 genes were expressed under routine growth conditions. Using a mouse model of asymptomatic colonization, we demonstrate that the Spn1− strain outcompeted the Spn1+ strain >70-fold. To determine if Spn1 causes a fitness defect through a trans-acting factor, we constructed an Spn1+ mutant that does not become an episome or express phage genes. This mutant competed equally with the Spn1− strain, indicating that expression of phage genes or phage lytic activity is required to confer this fitness defect. In vitro, we demonstrate that the presence of Spn1 correlated with a defect in LytA-mediated autolysis. Furthermore, the Spn1+ strain displayed increased chain length and resistance to lysis by penicillin compared to the Spn− strain, indicating that Spn1 alters the cell wall physiology of its host strain. We posit that these changes in cell wall physiology allow for tolerance of phage gene products and are responsible for the relative defect of the Spn1+ strain during colonization. This study provides new insight into how bacteria and prophages interact and affect bacterial fitness in vivo. PMID:24816604

  1. Diversity-generating Retroelements in Phage and Bacterial Genomes.

    PubMed

    Guo, Huatao; Arambula, Diego; Ghosh, Partho; Miller, Jeff F

    2014-12-01

    Diversity-generating retroelements (DGRs) are DNA diversification machines found in diverse bacterial and bacteriophage genomes that accelerate the evolution of ligand-receptor interactions. Diversification results from a unidirectional transfer of sequence information from an invariant template repeat (TR) to a variable repeat (VR) located in a protein-encoding gene. Information transfer is coupled to site-specific mutagenesis in a process called mutagenic homing, which occurs through an RNA intermediate and is catalyzed by a unique, DGR-encoded reverse transcriptase that converts adenine residues in the TR into random nucleotides in the VR. In the prototype DGR found in the Bordetella bacteriophage BPP-1, the variable protein Mtd is responsible for phage receptor recognition. VR diversification enables progeny phage to switch tropism, accelerating their adaptation to changes in sequence or availability of host cell-surface molecules for infection. Since their discovery, hundreds of DGRs have been identified, and their functions are just beginning to be understood. VR-encoded residues of many DGR-diversified proteins are displayed in the context of a C-type lectin fold, although other scaffolds, including the immunoglobulin fold, may also be used. DGR homing is postulated to occur through a specialized target DNA-primed reverse transcription mechanism that allows repeated rounds of diversification and selection, and the ability to engineer DGRs to target heterologous genes suggests applications for bioengineering. This chapter provides a comprehensive review of our current understanding of this newly discovered family of beneficial retroelements.

  2. Targeting Enterococcus faecalis biofilms with phage therapy.

    PubMed

    Khalifa, Leron; Brosh, Yair; Gelman, Daniel; Coppenhagen-Glazer, Shunit; Beyth, Shaul; Poradosu-Cohen, Ronit; Que, Yok-Ai; Beyth, Nurit; Hazan, Ronen

    2015-04-01

    Phage therapy has been proven to be more effective, in some cases, than conventional antibiotics, especially regarding multidrug-resistant biofilm infections. The objective here was to isolate an anti-Enterococcus faecalis bacteriophage and to evaluate its efficacy against planktonic and biofilm cultures. E. faecalis is an important pathogen found in many infections, including endocarditis and persistent infections associated with root canal treatment failure. The difficulty in E. faecalis treatment has been attributed to the lack of anti-infective strategies to eradicate its biofilm and to the frequent emergence of multidrug-resistant strains. To this end, an anti-E. faecalis and E. faecium phage, termed EFDG1, was isolated from sewage effluents. The phage was visualized by electron microscopy. EFDG1 coding sequences and phylogeny were determined by whole genome sequencing (GenBank accession number KP339049), revealing it belongs to the Spounavirinae subfamily of the Myoviridae phages, which includes promising candidates for therapy against Gram-positive pathogens. This analysis also showed that the EFDG1 genome does not contain apparent harmful genes. EFDG1 antibacterial efficacy was evaluated in vitro against planktonic and biofilm cultures, showing effective lytic activity against various E. faecalis and E. faecium isolates, regardless of their antibiotic resistance profile. In addition, EFDG1 efficiently prevented ex vivo E. faecalis root canal infection. These findings suggest that phage therapy using EFDG1 might be efficacious to prevent E. faecalis infection after root canal treatment.

  3. Network models of phage-bacteria coevolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosvall, Martin; Dodd, Ian B.; Krishna, Sandeep; Sneppen, Kim

    2006-12-01

    Bacteria and their bacteriophages are the most abundant, widespread, and diverse groups of biological entities on the planet. In an attempt to understand how the interactions between bacteria, virulent phages, and temperate phages might affect the diversity of these groups, we developed a stochastic network model for examining the coevolution of these ecologies. In our approach, nodes represent whole species or strains of bacteria or phages, rather than individuals, with “speciation” and extinction modeled by duplication and removal of nodes. Phage-bacteria links represent host-parasite relationships and temperate-virulent phage links denote prophage-encoded resistance. The effect of horizontal transfer of genetic information between strains was also included in the dynamical rules. The observed networks evolved in a highly dynamic fashion but the ecosystems were prone to collapse (one or more entire groups going extinct). Diversity could be stably maintained in the model only if the probability of speciation was independent of the diversity. Such an effect could be achieved in real ecosystems if the speciation rate is primarily set by the availability of ecological niches.

  4. Enhanced binding and killing of target tumor cells by drug-loaded liposomes modified with tumor-specific phage fusion coat protein

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tao; D’Souza, Gerard GM; Bedi, Deepa; Fagbohun, Olusegun A; Potturi, L Prasanna; Papahadjopoulos-Sternberg, Brigitte; Petrenko, Valery A; Torchilin, Vladimir P

    2010-01-01

    Aim To explore cancer cell-specific phage fusion pVIII coat protein, identified using phage display, for targeted delivery of drug-loaded liposomes to MCF-7 breast cancer cells. Material & methods An 8-mer landscape library f8/8 and a biopanning protocol against MCF-7 cells were used to select a landscape phage protein bearing MCF-7-specific peptide. Size and morphology of doxorubicin-loaded liposomes modified with the tumor-specific phage fusion coat protein (phage–Doxil) were determined by dynamic light scattering and freeze-fraction electron microscopy. Topology of the phage protein in liposomes was examined by western blot. Association of phage–Doxil with MCF-7 cells was evaluated by fluorescence microscopy and fluorescence spectrometry. Selective targeting to MCF-7 was shown by FACS using a coculture model with target and nontarget cells. Phage–Doxil-induced tumor cell killing and apoptosis were confirmed by CellTiter-Blue® Assay and caspase-3/CPP32 fluorometric assay. Results A chimeric phage fusion coat protein specific towards MCF-7 cells, identified from a phage landscape library, was directly incorporated into the liposomal bilayer of doxorubicin-loaded PEGylated liposomes (Doxil®) without additional conjugation with lipophilic moieties. Western blotting confirmed the presence of both targeting peptide and pVIII coat protein in the phage–Doxil, which maintained the liposomal morphology and retained a substantial part of the incorporated drug after phage protein incorporation. The binding activity of the phage fusion pVIII coat protein was retained after incorporation into liposomes, and phage–Doxil strongly and specifically targeted MCF-7 cells, demonstrating significantly increased cytotoxicity towards target cells in vitro. Conclusion We present a novel and straightforward method for making tumor-targeted nanomedicines by anchoring specific phage proteins (substitute antibodies) on their surface. PMID:20528452

  5. The gastrointestinal phage communities of the cultivated freshwater fishes.

    PubMed

    He, Yang; Yang, Hongjiang

    2015-03-01

    The phage communities in the gut of 62 cultivated freshwater fish were investigated by culture-based methods. Using three selective media, 445 pathogenic bacilli strains were isolated and used as indicators for subsequent phage isolations. Totally, 63 phages were detected and the respective host strains were identified with the comparative sequence analysis of 16S rRNA gene, including Aeromonas (29), Vibrio (1), Citrobacter (16), Serratia (4), Enterobacter (2), Proteus (3), Buttiauxella (2), Plesiomonas (2), Kluyvera (1), Morgenella (2) and Providencia (1). The diversity of Aeromonas phages was assessed by discrimination of their host strains with random amplified polymorphic DNA method. Furthermore, the isolated Aeromonas phages were characterized by host range and growth inhibition assay. The results demonstrated that there were abundant and diverse phage populations in the gut environment of the cultivated freshwater fishes. The phages could contribute to the microbiota balance in the gut ecosystem of fishes and provide reliable phage sources for future applications.

  6. Phages of Listeria offer novel tools for diagnostics and biocontrol

    PubMed Central

    Hagens, Steven; Loessner, Martin J.

    2014-01-01

    Historically, bacteriophages infecting their hosts have perhaps been best known and even notorious for being a nuisance in dairy-fermentation processes. However, with the rapid progress in molecular microbiology and microbial ecology, a new dawn has risen for phages. This review will provide an overview on possible uses and applications of Listeria phages, including phage-typing, reporter phage for bacterial diagnostics, and use of phage as biocontrol agents for food safety. The use of phage-encoded enzymes such as endolysins for the detection and as antimicrobial agent will also be addressed. Desirable properties of candidate phages for biocontrol will be discussed. While emphasizing the enormous future potential for applications, we will also consider some of the intrinsic limitations dictated by both phage and bacterial ecology. PMID:24782847

  7. Aerosol Phage Therapy Efficacy in Burkholderia cepacia Complex Respiratory Infections

    PubMed Central

    Semler, Diana D.; Goudie, Amanda D.; Finlay, Warren H.

    2014-01-01

    Phage therapy has been suggested as a potential treatment for highly antibiotic-resistant bacteria, such as the species of the Burkholderia cepacia complex (BCC). To address this hypothesis, experimental B. cenocepacia respiratory infections were established in mice using a nebulizer and a nose-only inhalation device. Following infection, the mice were treated with one of five B. cenocepacia-specific phages delivered as either an aerosol or intraperitoneal injection. The bacterial and phage titers within the lungs were assayed 2 days after treatment, and mice that received the aerosolized phage therapy demonstrated significant decreases in bacterial loads. Differences in phage activity were observed in vivo. Mice that received phage treatment by intraperitoneal injection did not demonstrate significantly reduced bacterial loads, although phage particles were isolated from their lung tissue. Based on these data, aerosol phage therapy appears to be an effective method for treating highly antibiotic-resistant bacterial respiratory infections, including those caused by BCC bacteria. PMID:24798268

  8. The gastrointestinal phage communities of the cultivated freshwater fishes.

    PubMed

    He, Yang; Yang, Hongjiang

    2015-03-01

    The phage communities in the gut of 62 cultivated freshwater fish were investigated by culture-based methods. Using three selective media, 445 pathogenic bacilli strains were isolated and used as indicators for subsequent phage isolations. Totally, 63 phages were detected and the respective host strains were identified with the comparative sequence analysis of 16S rRNA gene, including Aeromonas (29), Vibrio (1), Citrobacter (16), Serratia (4), Enterobacter (2), Proteus (3), Buttiauxella (2), Plesiomonas (2), Kluyvera (1), Morgenella (2) and Providencia (1). The diversity of Aeromonas phages was assessed by discrimination of their host strains with random amplified polymorphic DNA method. Furthermore, the isolated Aeromonas phages were characterized by host range and growth inhibition assay. The results demonstrated that there were abundant and diverse phage populations in the gut environment of the cultivated freshwater fishes. The phages could contribute to the microbiota balance in the gut ecosystem of fishes and provide reliable phage sources for future applications. PMID:25743067

  9. Current taxonomy of phages infecting lactic acid bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Mahony, Jennifer; van Sinderen, Douwe

    2013-01-01

    Phages infecting lactic acid bacteria have been the focus of significant research attention over the past three decades. Through the isolation and characterization of hundreds of phage isolates, it has been possible to classify phages of the dairy starter and adjunct bacteria Lactococus lactis, Streptococcus thermophilus, Leuconostoc spp., and Lactobacillus spp. Among these, phages of L. lactis have been most thoroughly scrutinized and serve as an excellent model system to address issues that arise when attempting taxonomic classification of phages infecting other LAB species. Here, we present an overview of the current taxonomy of phages infecting LAB genera of industrial significance, the methods employed in these taxonomic efforts and how these may be employed for the taxonomy of phages of currently underrepresented and emerging phage species. PMID:24478767

  10. Mapping protease substrates using a biotinylated phage substrate library.

    SciTech Connect

    Scholle, M. D.; Kriplani, U.; Pabon, A.; Sishtla, K.; Glucksman, M. J.; Kay, B. K.; Biosciences Division; Chicago Medical School

    2005-05-05

    We describe a bacteriophage M13 substrate library encoding the AviTag (BirA substrate) and combinatorial heptamer peptides displayed at the N terminus of the mature form of capsid protein III. Phages are biotinylated efficiently (> or = 50%) when grown in E. coli cells coexpressing BirA, and such viral particles can be immobilized on a streptavidin-coated support and released by protease cleavage within the combinatorial peptide. We have used this library to map the specificity of human Factor Xa and a neuropeptidase, neurolysin (EC3.4.24.16). Validation by analysis of isolated peptide substrates has revealed that neurolysin recognizes the motif hydrophobic-X-Pro-Arg-hydrophobic, where Arg-hydrophobic is the scissile bond.

  11. Genomic Diversity of Phages Infecting Probiotic Strains of Lactobacillus paracasei.

    PubMed

    Mercanti, Diego J; Rousseau, Geneviève M; Capra, María L; Quiberoni, Andrea; Tremblay, Denise M; Labrie, Simon J; Moineau, Sylvain

    2016-01-01

    Strains of the Lactobacillus casei group have been extensively studied because some are used as probiotics in foods. Conversely, their phages have received much less attention. We analyzed the complete genome sequences of five L. paracasei temperate phages: CL1, CL2, iLp84, iLp1308, and iA2. Only phage iA2 could not replicate in an indicator strain. The genome lengths ranged from 34,155 bp (iA2) to 39,474 bp (CL1). Phages iA2 and iLp1308 (34,176 bp) possess the smallest genomes reported, thus far, for phages of the L. casei group. The GC contents of the five phage genomes ranged from 44.8 to 45.6%. As observed with many other phages, their genomes were organized as follows: genes coding for DNA packaging, morphogenesis, lysis, lysogeny, and replication. Phages CL1, CL2, and iLp1308 are highly related to each other. Phage iLp84 was also related to these three phages, but the similarities were limited to gene products involved in DNA packaging and structural proteins. Genomic fragments of phages CL1, CL2, iLp1308, and iLp84 were found in several genomes of L. casei strains. Prophage iA2 is unrelated to these four phages, but almost all of its genome was found in at least four L. casei strains. Overall, these phages are distinct from previously characterized Lactobacillus phages. Our results highlight the diversity of L. casei phages and indicate frequent DNA exchanges between phages and their hosts. PMID:26475105

  12. Genomic Diversity of Phages Infecting Probiotic Strains of Lactobacillus paracasei

    PubMed Central

    Rousseau, Geneviève M.; Capra, María L.; Quiberoni, Andrea; Tremblay, Denise M.; Labrie, Simon J.

    2015-01-01

    Strains of the Lactobacillus casei group have been extensively studied because some are used as probiotics in foods. Conversely, their phages have received much less attention. We analyzed the complete genome sequences of five L. paracasei temperate phages: CL1, CL2, iLp84, iLp1308, and iA2. Only phage iA2 could not replicate in an indicator strain. The genome lengths ranged from 34,155 bp (iA2) to 39,474 bp (CL1). Phages iA2 and iLp1308 (34,176 bp) possess the smallest genomes reported, thus far, for phages of the L. casei group. The GC contents of the five phage genomes ranged from 44.8 to 45.6%. As observed with many other phages, their genomes were organized as follows: genes coding for DNA packaging, morphogenesis, lysis, lysogeny, and replication. Phages CL1, CL2, and iLp1308 are highly related to each other. Phage iLp84 was also related to these three phages, but the similarities were limited to gene products involved in DNA packaging and structural proteins. Genomic fragments of phages CL1, CL2, iLp1308, and iLp84 were found in several genomes of L. casei strains. Prophage iA2 is unrelated to these four phages, but almost all of its genome was found in at least four L. casei strains. Overall, these phages are distinct from previously characterized Lactobacillus phages. Our results highlight the diversity of L. casei phages and indicate frequent DNA exchanges between phages and their hosts. PMID:26475105

  13. Library-based display technologies: where do we stand?

    PubMed

    Galán, Asier; Comor, Lubos; Horvatić, Anita; Kuleš, Josipa; Guillemin, Nicolas; Mrljak, Vladimir; Bhide, Mangesh

    2016-07-19

    Over the past two decades, library-based display technologies have been staggeringly optimized since their appearance in order to mimic the process of natural molecular evolution. Display technologies are essential for the isolation of specific high-affinity binding molecules (proteins, polypeptides, nucleic acids and others) for diagnostic and therapeutic applications in cancer, infectious diseases, autoimmune, neurodegenerative, inflammatory pathologies etc. Applications extend to other fields such as antibody and enzyme engineering, cell-free protein synthesis and the discovery of protein-protein interactions. Phage display technology is the most established of these methods but more recent fully in vitro alternatives, such as ribosome display, mRNA display, cis-activity based (CIS) display and covalent antibody display (CAD), as well as aptamer display and in vitro compartmentalization, offer advantages over phage in library size, speed and the display of unnatural amino acids and nucleotides. Altogether, they have produced several molecules currently approved or in diverse stages of clinical or preclinical testing and have provided researchers with tools to address some of the disadvantages of peptides and nucleotides such as their low affinity, low stability, high immunogenicity and difficulty to cross membranes. In this review we assess the fundamental technological features and point out some recent advances and applications of display technologies.

  14. The Caulobacter crescentus phage phiCbK: genomics of a canonical phage

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The bacterium Caulobacter crescentus is a popular model for the study of cell cycle regulation and senescence. The large prolate siphophage phiCbK has been an important tool in C. crescentus biology, and has been studied in its own right as a model for viral morphogenesis. Although a system of some interest, to date little genomic information is available on phiCbK or its relatives. Results Five novel phiCbK-like C. crescentus bacteriophages, CcrMagneto, CcrSwift, CcrKarma, CcrRogue and CcrColossus, were isolated from the environment. The genomes of phage phiCbK and these five environmental phage isolates were obtained by 454 pyrosequencing. The phiCbK-like phage genomes range in size from 205 kb encoding 318 proteins (phiCbK) to 280 kb encoding 448 proteins (CcrColossus), and were found to contain nonpermuted terminal redundancies of 10 to 17 kb. A novel method of terminal ligation was developed to map genomic termini, which confirmed termini predicted by coverage analysis. This suggests that sequence coverage discontinuities may be useable as predictors of genomic termini in phage genomes. Genomic modules encoding virion morphogenesis, lysis and DNA replication proteins were identified. The phiCbK-like phages were also found to encode a number of intriguing proteins; all contain a clearly T7-like DNA polymerase, and five of the six encode a possible homolog of the C. crescentus cell cycle regulator GcrA, which may allow the phage to alter the host cell’s replicative state. The structural proteome of phage phiCbK was determined, identifying the portal, major and minor capsid proteins, the tail tape measure and possible tail fiber proteins. All six phage genomes are clearly related; phiCbK, CcrMagneto, CcrSwift, CcrKarma and CcrRogue form a group related at the DNA level, while CcrColossus is more diverged but retains significant similarity at the protein level. Conclusions Due to their lack of any apparent relationship to other described phages, this

  15. DELIVERY OF siRNA INTO BREAST CANCER CELLS VIA PHAGE FUSION PROTEIN-TARGETED LIPOSOMES

    PubMed Central

    Bedi, Deepa; Musacchio, Tiziana; Fagbohun, Olusegun A.; Gillespie, James W.; Deinnocentes, Patricia; Bird, R. Curtis; Bookbinder, Lonnie; Torchilin, Vladimir P.; Petrenko, Valery A.

    2011-01-01

    Efficacy of siRNAs as potential anticancer therapeutics can be increased by their targeted delivery into cancer cells via tumor-specific ligands. Phage display offers an unique approach to identify highly specific and selective ligands that can deliver nanocarriers to the site of disease. In this study, we proved a novel approach for intracellular delivery of siRNAs into breast cancer cells through their encapsulation into liposomes targeted to the tumor cells with preselected intact phage proteins. The targeted siRNA liposomes were obtained by a fusion of two parental liposomes containing spontaneously inserted siRNA and fusion phage proteins. The presence of pVIII coat protein fused to a MCF-7 cell-targeting peptide DMPGTVLP in the liposomes was confirmed by Western blotting. The novel phage-targeted siRNA-nanopharmaceuticals demonstrate significant down-regulation of PRDM14 gene expression and PRDM14 protein synthesis in the target MCF- 7 cells. This approach offers the potential for development of new anticancer siRNA-based targeted nanomedicines. PMID:21050894

  16. Molecular characterization of a phage-encoded resistance system in Lactococcus lactis.

    PubMed

    McGrath, S; Seegers, J F; Fitzgerald, G F; van Sinderen, D

    1999-05-01

    A specific fragment of the genome of Tuc2009, a temperate lactococcal bacteriophage, was shown to contain several open reading frames, whose deduced protein products exhibited similarities to proteins known to be involved in DNA replication and modification. In this way, a putative single-stranded binding protein, replisome organizer protein, topoisomerase I, and a methylase were identified. When the genetic information coding for the putative replisome organizer protein of Tuc2009, Rep2009, was supplied on a high-copy-number plasmid vector, it was shown to confer a phage-encoded resistance (Per) phenotype on its lactococcal host UC509.9. The presence of this recombinant plasmid was shown to cause a marked reduction in Tuc2009 DNA replication, suggesting that the observed phage resistance was due to titration of a factor, or factors, required for Tuc2009 DNA replication. Further experiments delineated the phage resistance-conferring region to a 160-bp fragment rich in direct repeats. Gel retardation experiments, which indicated a protein-DNA interaction between this 160-bp fragment and the Rep2009 protein, were performed. UC509.9 strains harboring plasmids with randomly mutated versions of this fragment were shown to display a variable phage resistance phenotype, depending on the position of the mutations.

  17. Identification and characterization of major cat allergen Fel d 1 mimotopes on filamentous phage carriers.

    PubMed

    Luzar, Jernej; Molek, Peter; Šilar, Mira; Korošec, Peter; Košnik, Mitja; Štrukelj, Borut; Lunder, Mojca

    2016-03-01

    Cat allergy is one of the most prevalent allergies worldwide and can lead to the development of rhinitis and asthma. Thus far, only allergen extracts from natural sources have been used for allergen-specific immunotherapy. However, extracts and whole allergens in immunotherapy present an anaphylaxis risk. Identification of allergen epitopes or mimotopes has an important role in development of safe and effective allergen-specific immunotherapy. Moreover, with a suitable immunogenic carrier, the absence of sufficient immune response elicited by short peptides could be surmounted. In this study, we identified five structural mimotopes of the major cat allergen Fel d 1 by immunoscreening with random peptide phage libraries. The mimotopes were computationally mapped to the allergen surface, and their IgE reactivity was confirmed using sera from cat-allergic patients. Importantly, the mimotopes showed no basophil activation of the corresponding cat-allergic patients, which makes them good candidates for the development of hypoallergenic vaccine. As bacteriophage particles are becoming increasingly recognized as immunogenic carriers, we constructed bacteriophage particles displaying multiple copies of each selected mimotope on major phage coat protein. These constructed phages elicited T cell-mediated immune response, which was predominated by the type 1 T cell response. Mimotopes alone contributed to the type 1 T cell response by promoting IL-2 production. Fel d 1 mimotopes, as well as their filamentous phage immunogenic carriers, represent promising candidates in the development of hypoallergenic vaccine against cat allergy.

  18. Identification and characterization of major cat allergen Fel d 1 mimotopes on filamentous phage carriers.

    PubMed

    Luzar, Jernej; Molek, Peter; Šilar, Mira; Korošec, Peter; Košnik, Mitja; Štrukelj, Borut; Lunder, Mojca

    2016-03-01

    Cat allergy is one of the most prevalent allergies worldwide and can lead to the development of rhinitis and asthma. Thus far, only allergen extracts from natural sources have been used for allergen-specific immunotherapy. However, extracts and whole allergens in immunotherapy present an anaphylaxis risk. Identification of allergen epitopes or mimotopes has an important role in development of safe and effective allergen-specific immunotherapy. Moreover, with a suitable immunogenic carrier, the absence of sufficient immune response elicited by short peptides could be surmounted. In this study, we identified five structural mimotopes of the major cat allergen Fel d 1 by immunoscreening with random peptide phage libraries. The mimotopes were computationally mapped to the allergen surface, and their IgE reactivity was confirmed using sera from cat-allergic patients. Importantly, the mimotopes showed no basophil activation of the corresponding cat-allergic patients, which makes them good candidates for the development of hypoallergenic vaccine. As bacteriophage particles are becoming increasingly recognized as immunogenic carriers, we constructed bacteriophage particles displaying multiple copies of each selected mimotope on major phage coat protein. These constructed phages elicited T cell-mediated immune response, which was predominated by the type 1 T cell response. Mimotopes alone contributed to the type 1 T cell response by promoting IL-2 production. Fel d 1 mimotopes, as well as their filamentous phage immunogenic carriers, represent promising candidates in the development of hypoallergenic vaccine against cat allergy. PMID:26908079

  19. HostPhinder: A Phage Host Prediction Tool.

    PubMed

    Villarroel, Julia; Kleinheinz, Kortine Annina; Jurtz, Vanessa Isabell; Zschach, Henrike; Lund, Ole; Nielsen, Morten; Larsen, Mette Voldby

    2016-05-04

    The current dramatic increase of antibiotic resistant bacteria has revitalised the interest in bacteriophages as alternative antibacterial treatment. Meanwhile, the development of bioinformatics methods for analysing genomic data places high-throughput approaches for phage characterization within reach. Here, we present HostPhinder, a tool aimed at predicting the bacterial host of phages by examining the phage genome sequence. Using a reference database of 2196 phages with known hosts, HostPhinder predicts the host species of a query phage as the host of the most genomically similar reference phages. As a measure of genomic similarity the number of co-occurring k-mers (DNA sequences of length k) is used. Using an independent evaluation set, HostPhinder was able to correctly predict host genus and species for 81% and 74% of the phages respectively, giving predictions for more phages than BLAST and significantly outperforming BLAST on phages for which both had predictions. HostPhinder predictions on phage draft genomes from the INTESTI phage cocktail corresponded well with the advertised targets of the cocktail. Our study indicates that for most phages genomic similarity correlates well with related bacterial hosts. HostPhinder is available as an interactive web service [1] and as a stand alone download from the Docker registry [2].

  20. Genome Sequences of Gordonia Phages Bowser and Schwabeltier

    PubMed Central

    Montgomery, Matthew T.; Arnold, Zachary M.; Basina, Aleksandra; Iyer, Ankitha M.; Stoner, Ty H.; Kasturiarachi, Naomi S.; Pressimone, Catherine A.; Schiebel, Johnathon G.; Furbee, Emily C.; Grubb, Sarah R.; Warner, Marcie H.; Garlena, Rebecca A.; Russell, Daniel A.; Jacobs-Sera, Deborah; Hatfull, Graham F.

    2016-01-01

    Gordonia phages Bowser and Schwabeltier are newly isolated phages infecting Gordonia terrae 3612. Bowser and Schwabeltier have similar siphoviral morphologies and their genomes are related to each other, but not to other phages. Their lysis cassettes are atypically situated among virion tail genes, and Bowser encodes two tyrosine integrases. PMID:27516498

  1. HostPhinder: A Phage Host Prediction Tool.

    PubMed

    Villarroel, Julia; Kleinheinz, Kortine Annina; Jurtz, Vanessa Isabell; Zschach, Henrike; Lund, Ole; Nielsen, Morten; Larsen, Mette Voldby

    2016-01-01

    The current dramatic increase of antibiotic resistant bacteria has revitalised the interest in bacteriophages as alternative antibacterial treatment. Meanwhile, the development of bioinformatics methods for analysing genomic data places high-throughput approaches for phage characterization within reach. Here, we present HostPhinder, a tool aimed at predicting the bacterial host of phages by examining the phage genome sequence. Using a reference database of 2196 phages with known hosts, HostPhinder predicts the host species of a query phage as the host of the most genomically similar reference phages. As a measure of genomic similarity the number of co-occurring k-mers (DNA sequences of length k) is used. Using an independent evaluation set, HostPhinder was able to correctly predict host genus and species for 81% and 74% of the phages respectively, giving predictions for more phages than BLAST and significantly outperforming BLAST on phages for which both had predictions. HostPhinder predictions on phage draft genomes from the INTESTI phage cocktail corresponded well with the advertised targets of the cocktail. Our study indicates that for most phages genomic similarity correlates well with related bacterial hosts. HostPhinder is available as an interactive web service [1] and as a stand alone download from the Docker registry [2]. PMID:27153081

  2. Genome Sequences of Gordonia Phages Bowser and Schwabeltier.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, Matthew T; Pope, Welkin H; Arnold, Zachary M; Basina, Aleksandra; Iyer, Ankitha M; Stoner, Ty H; Kasturiarachi, Naomi S; Pressimone, Catherine A; Schiebel, Johnathon G; Furbee, Emily C; Grubb, Sarah R; Warner, Marcie H; Garlena, Rebecca A; Russell, Daniel A; Jacobs-Sera, Deborah; Hatfull, Graham F

    2016-01-01

    Gordonia phages Bowser and Schwabeltier are newly isolated phages infecting Gordonia terrae 3612. Bowser and Schwabeltier have similar siphoviral morphologies and their genomes are related to each other, but not to other phages. Their lysis cassettes are atypically situated among virion tail genes, and Bowser encodes two tyrosine integrases. PMID:27516498

  3. Complete Genome Sequence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Phage AAT-1

    PubMed Central

    Andrade-Domínguez, Andrés

    2016-01-01

    Aspects of the interaction between phages and animals are of interest and importance for medical applications. Here, we report the genome sequence of the lytic Pseudomonas phage AAT-1, isolated from mammalian serum. AAT-1 is a double-stranded DNA phage, with a genome of 57,599 bp, containing 76 predicted open reading frames. PMID:27563032

  4. Complete Genome Sequence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Phage AAT-1.

    PubMed

    Andrade-Domínguez, Andrés; Kolter, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Aspects of the interaction between phages and animals are of interest and importance for medical applications. Here, we report the genome sequence of the lytic Pseudomonas phage AAT-1, isolated from mammalian serum. AAT-1 is a double-stranded DNA phage, with a genome of 57,599 bp, containing 76 predicted open reading frames. PMID:27563032

  5. Vi I typing phage for generalized transduction of Salmonella typhi.

    PubMed

    Cerquetti, M C; Hooke, A M

    1993-08-01

    Salmonella typhi Vi typing phages were used to transduce temperature-sensitive (Ts) mutants of Salmonella typhi. Antibiotic resistance and Ts+ markers were transduced at high frequency (> 10(-4) per virulent phage). Several markers were cotransduced by phage Vi I, suggesting that it may be useful for mapping studies of the S. typhi genome.

  6. HostPhinder: A Phage Host Prediction Tool

    PubMed Central

    Villarroel, Julia; Kleinheinz, Kortine Annina; Jurtz, Vanessa Isabell; Zschach, Henrike; Lund, Ole; Nielsen, Morten; Larsen, Mette Voldby

    2016-01-01

    The current dramatic increase of antibiotic resistant bacteria has revitalised the interest in bacteriophages as alternative antibacterial treatment. Meanwhile, the development of bioinformatics methods for analysing genomic data places high-throughput approaches for phage characterization within reach. Here, we present HostPhinder, a tool aimed at predicting the bacterial host of phages by examining the phage genome sequence. Using a reference database of 2196 phages with known hosts, HostPhinder predicts the host species of a query phage as the host of the most genomically similar reference phages. As a measure of genomic similarity the number of co-occurring k-mers (DNA sequences of length k) is used. Using an independent evaluation set, HostPhinder was able to correctly predict host genus and species for 81% and 74% of the phages respectively, giving predictions for more phages than BLAST and significantly outperforming BLAST on phages for which both had predictions. HostPhinder predictions on phage draft genomes from the INTESTI phage cocktail corresponded well with the advertised targets of the cocktail. Our study indicates that for most phages genomic similarity correlates well with related bacterial hosts. HostPhinder is available as an interactive web service [1] and as a stand alone download from the Docker registry [2]. PMID:27153081

  7. Cell biology perspectives in phage biology.

    PubMed

    Ansaldi, Mireille

    2012-01-01

    Cellular biology has long been restricted to large cellular organisms. However, as the resolution of microscopic methods increased, it became possible to study smaller cells, in particular bacterial cells. Bacteriophage biology is one aspect of bacterial cell biology that has recently gained insight from cell biology. Despite their small size, bacteriophages could be successfully labeled and their cycle studied in the host cells. This review aims to put together, although non-extensively, several cell biology studies that recently pushed the elucidation of key mechanisms in phage biology, such as the lysis-lysogeny decision in temperate phages or genome replication and transcription, one step further.

  8. RE12 derivatives displaying Vaccinia H1-related phosphatase (VHR) inhibition in the presence of detergent and their anti-proliferative activity against HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    Thuaud, Frédéric; Kojima, Shuntaro; Hirai, Go; Oonuma, Kana; Tsuchiya, Ayako; Uchida, Takako; Tsuchimoto, Teruhisa; Sodeoka, Mikiko

    2014-05-01

    New derivatives of Vaccinia H1-related phosphatase (VHR) inhibitor RE12 (5) were designed by replacing the long straight alkyl chain with other hydrophobic functionalities containing two aromatic rings, with the aim of obtaining potent, cell-active inhibitors. We established a direct coupling reaction between tetronic acid derivative and thioimidate to prepare the RE derivatives 6a-6i efficiently. These compounds all showed VHR-inhibitory activity in the presence of 0.001% NP-40, whereas RE12 (5) was inactive under this condition, even at 100 μM. Further structure-activity studies focused on terminal substitution afforded trifluoromethyl derivative 6k (RE176) and nitro derivative 6l (RE177). The IC50 value of 6l in the presence of NP-40 was almost equivalent to that of RE12 (5) in its absence. Compound 6k (RE176) potently inhibited proliferation of HeLa cells.

  9. lambda altSF: a phage variant that acquired the ability to substitute specific sets of genes at high frequency.

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, D; Tomich, P; Parsons, C; Olson, E; Deans, R; Flamm, E

    1981-01-01

    We report the isolation of lambda altSF, a variant of Escherichia coli phage lambda that substitutes sets of genes at high frequency. Two forms of the variant phage have been studied: lambda altSF lambda, which exhibits the immunity (repressor recognition) of phage lambda, and lambda altSF22, which exhibits the immunity of Salmonella phage P22. Lysates made from single plaques of lambda altSF lambda contain 10-30% phage of the P22 form. Similarly, lysates from single plaques of lambda altSF22 contain as much as 1% phage of the lambda form. Heteroduplex analyses reveal the following features of the lambda altSF chromosomes: (i) each form has the immunity genes appropriate to its immune phenotype, (ii) the substituted segments include genes involved in regulation and replication, and (iii) the alt phages have unusual additions and substitutions of DNA not normally found associated with either immunity region. In the case of lambda altSF lambda, there is a small insertion in the region of the cI gene. Because revertants that lose this inserted DNA concomitantly lose the ability to substitute, we conclude that the insertion plays a role in the substitution process. In the case of change from lambda altSF lambda to lambda altSF22, the substituting P22 genes are derived from the E. coli host. We have identified a set of Salmonella phage P22 genes in a standard nonlysogenic strain of E. coli K-12 that is apparently carried in a silent form. The reason for this lack of expression is not obvious, because this P22 material includes structural genes and associated promoters and is potentially active. When this set of genes substitutes for the analogous set of genetic material on the genome of lambda altSF lambda, the P22 genes are expressed in a normal manner. Images PMID:6454136

  10. Vibrio cholerae phage K139: complete genome sequence and comparative genomics of related phages.

    PubMed

    Kapfhammer, Dagmar; Blass, Julia; Evers, Stefan; Reidl, Joachim

    2002-12-01

    In this report, we characterize the complete genome sequence of the temperate phage K139, which morphologically belongs to the Myoviridae phage family (P2 and 186). The prophage genome consists of 33,106 bp, and the overall GC content is 48.9%. Forty-four open reading frames were identified. Homology analysis and motif search were used to assign possible functions for the genes, revealing a close relationship to P2-like phages. By Southern blot screening of a Vibrio cholerae strain collection, two highly K139-related phage sequences were detected in non-O1, non-O139 strains. Combinatorial PCR analysis revealed almost identical genome organizations. One region of variable gene content was identified and sequenced. Additionally, the tail fiber genes were analyzed, leading to the identification of putative host-specific sequence variations. Furthermore, a K139-encoded Dam methyltransferase was characterized.

  11. Phage & phosphatase: a novel phage-based probe for rapid, multi-platform detection of bacteria.

    PubMed

    Alcaine, S D; Pacitto, D; Sela, D A; Nugen, S R

    2015-11-21

    Genetic engineering of bacteriophages allows for the development of rapid, highly specific, and easily manufactured probes for the detection of bacterial pathogens. A challenge for novel probes is the ease of their adoption in real world laboratories. We have engineered the bacteriophage T7, which targets Escherichia coli, to carry the alkaline phosphatase gene, phoA. This inclusion results in phoA overexpression following phage infection of E. coli. Alkaline phosphatase is commonly used in a wide range of diagnostics, and thus a signal produced by our phage-based probe could be detected using common laboratory equipment. Our work demonstrates the successful: (i) modification of T7 phage to carry phoA; (ii) overexpression of alkaline phosphatase in E. coli; and (iii) detection of this T7-induced alkaline phosphatase activity using commercially available colorimetric and chemilumiscent methods. Furthermore, we demonstrate the application of our phage-based probe to rapidly detect low levels of bacteria and discern the antibiotic resistance of E. coli isolates. Using our bioengineered phage-based probe we were able to detect 10(3) CFU per mL of E. coli in 6 hours using a chemiluminescent substrate and 10(4) CFU per mL within 7.5 hours using a colorimetric substrate. We also show the application of this