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Sample records for phage display derived

  1. Drugs derived from phage display

    PubMed Central

    Nixon, Andrew E; Sexton, Daniel J; Ladner, Robert C

    2014-01-01

    Phage display, one of today’s fundamental drug discovery technologies, allows identification of a broad range of biological drugs, including peptides, antibodies and other proteins, with the ability to tailor critical characteristics such as potency, specificity and cross-species binding. Further, unlike in vivo technologies, generating phage display-derived antibodies is not restricted by immunological tolerance. Although more than 20 phage display-derived antibody and peptides are currently in late-stage clinical trials or approved, there is little literature addressing the specific challenges and successes in the clinical development of phage-derived drugs. This review uses case studies, from candidate identification through clinical development, to illustrate the utility of phage display as a drug discovery tool, and offers a perspective for future developments of phage display technology. PMID:24262785

  2. Strategies for Vaccine Design Using Phage Display-Derived Peptides.

    PubMed

    Goulart, Luiz R; Santos, Paula de S

    2016-01-01

    Development of peptide vaccines through the phage display technology is a powerful strategy that relies on short peptides expressed in the phage capsid surface to induce highly targeted immune responses. Phage display-derived immunogenic peptides can be used directly as a phage-fused peptide reagent or as a synthetic peptide with specific modifications, according to target molecule and disease pathogen/parasite. Peptides' selection (mimotopes) can be performed against monoclonal or polyclonal antibodies to disclose determinant regions (epitopes) that can induce a neutralizing response. Validations of mimotopes are performed in vitro and in vivo, based on cell culture and animal models, to demonstrate its immunogenic potential for final vaccine formulations with an appropriate adjuvant. Here we present specific methods for the discovery of novel immunogenic peptides based on phage display.

  3. Phage display-derived human antibodies in clinical development and therapy.

    PubMed

    Frenzel, André; Schirrmann, Thomas; Hust, Michael

    2016-10-01

    Over the last 3 decades, monoclonal antibodies have become the most important class of therapeutic biologicals on the market. Development of therapeutic antibodies was accelerated by recombinant DNA technologies, which allowed the humanization of murine monoclonal antibodies to make them more similar to those of the human body and suitable for a broad range of chronic diseases like cancer and autoimmune diseases. In the early 1990s in vitro antibody selection technologies were developed that enabled the discovery of "fully" human antibodies with potentially superior clinical efficacy and lowest immunogenicity. Antibody phage display is the first and most widely used of the in vitro selection technologies. It has proven to be a robust, versatile platform technology for the discovery of human antibodies and a powerful engineering tool to improve antibody properties. As of the beginning of 2016, 6 human antibodies discovered or further developed by phage display were approved for therapy. In 2002, adalimumab (Humira®) became the first phage display-derived antibody granted a marketing approval. Humira® was also the first approved human antibody, and it is currently the best-selling antibody drug on the market. Numerous phage display-derived antibodies are currently under advanced clinical investigation, and, despite the availability of other technologies such as human antibody-producing transgenic mice, phage display has not lost its importance for the discovery and engineering of therapeutic antibodies. Here, we provide a comprehensive overview about phage display-derived antibodies that are approved for therapy or in clinical development. A selection of these antibodies is described in more detail to demonstrate different aspects of the phage display technology and its development over the last 25 years.

  4. Phage display-derived human antibodies in clinical development and therapy

    PubMed Central

    Frenzel, André; Schirrmann, Thomas; Hust, Michael

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Over the last 3 decades, monoclonal antibodies have become the most important class of therapeutic biologicals on the market. Development of therapeutic antibodies was accelerated by recombinant DNA technologies, which allowed the humanization of murine monoclonal antibodies to make them more similar to those of the human body and suitable for a broad range of chronic diseases like cancer and autoimmune diseases. In the early 1990s in vitro antibody selection technologies were developed that enabled the discovery of “fully” human antibodies with potentially superior clinical efficacy and lowest immunogenicity. Antibody phage display is the first and most widely used of the in vitro selection technologies. It has proven to be a robust, versatile platform technology for the discovery of human antibodies and a powerful engineering tool to improve antibody properties. As of the beginning of 2016, 6 human antibodies discovered or further developed by phage display were approved for therapy. In 2002, adalimumab (Humira®) became the first phage display-derived antibody granted a marketing approval. Humira® was also the first approved human antibody, and it is currently the best-selling antibody drug on the market. Numerous phage display-derived antibodies are currently under advanced clinical investigation, and, despite the availability of other technologies such as human antibody-producing transgenic mice, phage display has not lost its importance for the discovery and engineering of therapeutic antibodies. Here, we provide a comprehensive overview about phage display-derived antibodies that are approved for therapy or in clinical development. A selection of these antibodies is described in more detail to demonstrate different aspects of the phage display technology and its development over the last 25 years. PMID:27416017

  5. A Phage Display Screening Derived Peptide with Affinity for the Adeninyl Moiety

    PubMed Central

    Elmlund, Louise; Söderberg, Pernilla; Suriyanarayanan, Subramanian; Nicholls, Ian A.

    2014-01-01

    Phage display screening of a surface-immobilized adenine derivative led to the identification of a heptameric peptide with selectivity for adenine as demonstrated through quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) studies. The peptide demonstrated a concentration dependent affinity for an adeninyl moiety decorated surface (KD of 968 ± 53.3 μM), which highlights the power of piezoelectric sensing in the study of weak interactions. PMID:25587414

  6. Phage display-derived binders able to distinguish Listeria monocytogenes from other Listeria species.

    PubMed

    Morton, Josephine; Karoonuthaisiri, Nitsara; Charlermroj, Ratthaphol; Stewart, Linda D; Elliott, Christopher T; Grant, Irene R

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to produce phage display-derived binders with the ability to distinguish Listeria monocytogenes from other Listeria spp., which may have potential utility to enhance detection of Listeria monocytogenes. To obtain binders with the desired binding specificity a series of surface and solution phage-display biopannings were performed. Initially, three rounds of surface biopanning against gamma-irradiated L. monocytogenes serovar 4b cells were performed followed by an additional surface biopanning round against L. monocytogenes 4b which included prior subtraction biopanning against gamma-irradiated L. innocua cells. In an attempt to further enhance binder specificity for L. monocytogenes 4b two rounds of solution biopanning were performed, both rounds included initial subtraction solution biopanning against L. innocua. Subsequent evaluations were performed on the phage clones by phage binding ELISA. All phage clones tested from the second round of solution biopanning had higher specificity for L. monocytogenes 4b than for L. innocua and three other foodborne pathogens (Salmonella spp., Escherichia coli and Campylobacter jejuni). Further evaluation with five other Listeria spp. revealed that one phage clone in particular, expressing peptide GRIADLPPLKPN, was highly specific for L. monocytogenes with at least 43-fold more binding capability to L. monocytogenes 4b than to any other Listeria sp. This proof-of-principle study demonstrates how a combination of surface, solution and subtractive biopanning was used to maximise binder specificity. L. monocytogenes-specific binders were obtained which could have potential application in novel detection tests for L. monocytogenes, benefiting both the food and medical industries.

  7. Advance in phage display technology for bioanalysis.

    PubMed

    Tan, Yuyu; Tian, Tian; Liu, Wenli; Zhu, Zhi; J Yang, Chaoyong

    2016-06-01

    Phage display technology has emerged as a powerful tool for target gene expression and target-specific ligand selection. It is widely used to screen peptides, proteins and antibodies with the advantages of simplicity, high efficiency and low cost. A variety of targets, including ions, small molecules, inorganic materials, natural and biological polymers, nanostructures, cells, bacteria, and even tissues, have been demonstrated to generate specific binding ligands by phage display. Phages and target-specific ligands screened by phage display have been widely used as affinity reagents in therapeutics, diagnostics and biosensors. In this review, comparisons of different types of phage display systems are first presented. Particularly, microfluidic-based phage display, which enables screening with high throughput, high efficiency and integration, is highlighted. More importantly, we emphasize the advances in biosensors based on phages or phage-derived probes, including nonlytic phages, lytic phages, peptides or proteins screened by phage display, phage assemblies and phage-nanomaterial complexes. However, more efficient and higher throughput phage display methods are still needed to meet an explosion in demand for bioanalysis. Furthermore, screening of cyclic peptides and functional peptides will be the hotspot in bioanalysis.

  8. Phage Display Derived IgNAR V Region Binding Domains for Therapeutic Development.

    PubMed

    Ubah, Obinna C; Barelle, Caroline J; Buschhaus, Magdalena J; Porter, Andrew J

    2016-01-01

    Phage display technology has revolutionized the science of drug discovery by transforming the generation and manipulation of ligands, such as antibody fragments, enzymes, and peptides. The basis of this technology is the expression of recombinant proteins or peptides fused to a phage coat protein, and subsequent isolation of ligands based on a variety of catalytic, physicochemical/binding kinetic and/or biological characteristics. An incredible number of diagnostic and therapeutic domains have been successfully isolated using phage display technology. The variable domain of the New Antigen Receptors (VNAR) found in cartilaginous fish, is also amenable to phage display selection. Whilst not an antibody, VNARs are unquestionable the oldest (450 million years), and smallest antigen binding, single-domains so far identified in the vertebrate kingdom. Their role as an integral part of the adaptive immune system of sharks has been well established, enhancing our understanding of the evolutionary origins of humoral immunity and the unusual but divergent ancestry of the VNARs themselves. VNARs exhibit remarkable physicochemical properties, such as small size, stability in extreme conditions, solubility, molecular flexibility, high affinity and selectivity for target. The purpose of this review is to illustrate the important role phage display has played in the isolation and characterization of potent therapeutic and diagnostic VNAR domains.

  9. Novel phage display-derived mycolic acid-specific antibodies with potential for tuberculosis diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Chan, Conrad E; Zhao, Bryan Z; Cazenave-Gassiot, Amaury; Pang, Shyue-Wei; Bendt, Anne K; Wenk, Markus R; MacAry, Paul A; Hanson, Brendon J

    2013-10-01

    Tuberculosis is a major cause of mortality and morbidity due to infectious disease. However, current clinical diagnostic methodologies such as PCR, sputum culture, or smear microscopy are not ideal. Antibody-based assays are a suitable alternative but require specific antibodies against a suitable biomarker. Mycolic acid, which has been found in patient sputum samples and comprises a large portion of the mycobacterial cell wall, is an ideal target. However, generating anti-lipid antibodies using traditional hybridoma methodologies is challenging and has limited the exploitation of this lipid as a diagnostic marker. We describe here the isolation and characterization of four anti-mycolic acid antibodies from a nonimmune antibody phage display library that can detect mycolic acids down to a limit of 4.5ng. All antibodies were specific for the methoxy subclass of mycolic acid with weak binding for α mycolic acid and did not show any binding to closely related lipids or other Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) derived lipids. We also determined the clinical utility of these antibodies based on their limit of detection for mycobacteria colony forming units (CFU). In combination with an optimized alkaline hydrolysis method for rapid lipid extraction, these antibodies can detect 10(5) CFU of Mycobacterium bovis BCG, a close relative of Mtb and therefore represent a novel approach for the development of diagnostic assays for lipid biomarkers.

  10. MimoDB: a new repository for mimotope data derived from phage display technology.

    PubMed

    Ru, Beibei; Huang, Jian; Dai, Ping; Li, Shiyong; Xia, Zhongkui; Ding, Hui; Lin, Hao; Guo, Fengbiao; Wang, Xianlong

    2010-11-15

    Peptides selected from phage-displayed random peptide libraries are valuable in two aspects. On one hand, these peptides are candidates for new diagnostics, therapeutics and vaccines. On the other hand, they can be used to predict the networks or sites of protein-protein interactions. MimoDB, a new repository for these peptides, was developed, in which 10,716 peptides collected from 571 publications were grouped into 1,229 sets. Besides peptide sequences, other important information, such as the target, template, library and complex structure, was also included. MimoDB can be browsed and searched through a user-friendly web interface. For computational biologists, MimoDB can be used to derive customized data sets and benchmarks, which are useful for new algorithm development and tool evaluation. For experimental biologists, their results can be searched against the MimoDB database to exclude possible target-unrelated peptides. The MimoDB database is freely accessible at http://immunet.cn/mimodb/.

  11. Discovery and Characterization of Phage Display-Derived Human Monoclonal Antibodies against RSV F Glycoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Aimin; Callahan, Cheryl; Pristatsky, Pavlo; Swoyer, Ryan; Cejas, Pedro; Nahas, Debbie; Galli, Jennifer; Cosmi, Scott; DiStefano, Daniel; Hoang, Van M.; Bett, Andrew; Casimiro, Danilo

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a leading cause of lower respiratory tract infection in infants, the elderly and in immunosuppressed populations. The vast majority of neutralizing antibodies isolated from human subjects target the RSV fusion (F) glycoprotein, making it an attractive target for the development of vaccines and therapeutic antibodies. Currently, Synagis® (palivizumab) is the only FDA approved antibody drug for the prevention of RSV infection, and there is a great need for more effective vaccines and therapeutics. Phage display is a powerful tool in antibody discovery with the advantage that it does not require samples from immunized subjects. In this study, Morphosys HuCAL GOLD® phage libraries were used for panning against RSV prefusion and postfusion F proteins. Panels of human monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against RSV F protein were discovered following phage library panning and characterized. Antibodies binding specifically to prefusion or postfusion F proteins and those binding both conformations were identified. 3B1 is a prototypic postfusion F specific antibody while 2E1 is a prototypic prefusion F specific antibody. 2E1 is a potent broadly neutralizing antibody against both RSV A and B strains. Epitope mapping experiments identified a conformational epitope spanning across three discontinuous sections of the RSV F protein, as well as critical residues for antibody interaction. PMID:27258388

  12. The neutralizing human recombinant antibodies to pathogenic Orthopoxviruses derived from a phage display immune library.

    PubMed

    Tikunova, Nina; Dubrovskaya, Viktoriya; Morozova, Vera; Yun, Tatiana; Khlusevich, Yana; Bormotov, Nikolai; Laman, Aleksandr; Brovko, Fedor; Shvalov, Aleksandr; Belanov, Eugeni

    2012-01-01

    A panel of recombinant human antibodies to orthopoxviruses was isolated from a combinatorial phage display library of human scFv antibodies constructed from the Vh and Vl genes cloned from the peripheral blood lymphocytes of Vaccinia virus (VACV) immune donors. Plaque-reduction neutralization tests showed that seven selected phage-displaying scFv antibodies (pdAbs) neutralized both CPXV and VACV, and five of them neutralized Monkeypox virus (MPXV). Western blot analysis of VACV and CPXV proteins demonstrated that seven neutralizing antibodies recognized a 35 kDa protein. To identify this target protein, we produced a recombinant J3L protein of CPXV and showed that all the selected neutralizing antibodies recognized this protein. Neutralizing pdAb b9 was converted into fully human mAb b9 (fh b9), and scFv b9 displayed high binding affinities (K(d) of 0.7 and 3.2 nM). The fh b9 reduced VACV plaque formation in a dose-dependent manner.

  13. Competitive Mirror Image Phage Display Derived Peptide Modulates Amyloid Beta Aggregation and Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Rudolph, Stephan; Klein, Antonia Nicole; Tusche, Markus; Schlosser, Christine; Elfgen, Anne; Brener, Oleksandr; Teunissen, Charlotte; Gremer, Lothar; Funke, Susanne Aileen; Kutzsche, Janine; Willbold, Dieter

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer´s disease is the most prominent type of dementia and currently no causative treatment is available. According to recent studies, oligomeric species of the amyloid beta (Aβ) peptide appear to be the most toxic Aβ assemblies. Aβ monomers, however, may be not toxic per se and may even have a neuroprotective role. Here we describe a competitive mirror image phage display procedure that allowed us to identify preferentially Aβ1–42 monomer binding and thereby stabilizing peptides, which destabilize and thereby eliminate toxic oligomer species. One of the peptides, called Mosd1 (monomer specific d-peptide 1), was characterized in more detail. Mosd1 abolished oligomers from a mixture of Aβ1–42 species, reduced Aβ1–42 toxicity in cell culture, and restored the physiological phenotype in neuronal cells stably transfected with the gene coding for human amyloid precursor protein. PMID:26840229

  14. Pitfalls to avoid when using phage display for snake toxins.

    PubMed

    Laustsen, Andreas Hougaard; Lauridsen, Line Præst; Lomonte, Bruno; Andersen, Mikael Rørdam; Lohse, Brian

    2017-02-01

    Antivenoms against bites and stings from snakes, spiders, and scorpions are associated with immunological side effects and high cost of production, since these therapies are still derived from the serum of hyper-immunized production animals. Biotechnological innovations within envenoming therapies are thus warranted, and phage display technology may be a promising avenue for bringing antivenoms into the modern era of biologics. Although phage display technology represents a robust and high-throughput approach for the discovery of antibody-based antitoxins, several pitfalls may present themselves when animal toxins are used as targets for phage display selection. Here, we report selected critical challenges from our own phage display experiments associated with biotinylation of antigens, clone picking, and the presence of amber codons within antibody fragment structures in some phage display libraries. These challenges may be detrimental to the outcome of phage display experiments, and we aim to help other researchers avoiding these pitfalls by presenting their solutions.

  15. Enhanced pulmonary absorption of a macromolecule through coupling to a sequence-specific phage display-derived peptide.

    PubMed

    Morris, Christopher J; Smith, Mathew W; Griffiths, Peter C; McKeown, Neil B; Gumbleton, Mark

    2011-04-10

    With the aim of identifying a peptide sequence that promotes pulmonary epithelial transport of macromolecule cargo we used a stringent peptide-phage display library screening protocol against rat lung alveolar epithelial primary cell cultures. We identified a peptide-phage clone (LTP-1) displaying the disulphide-constrained 7-mer peptide sequence, C-TSGTHPR-C, that showed significant pulmonary epithelial translocation across highly restrictive polarised cell monolayers. Cell biological data supported a differential alveolar epithelial cell interaction of the LTP-1 peptide-phage clone and the corresponding free synthetic LTP-1 peptide. Delivering select phage-clones to the intact pulmonary barrier of an isolated perfused rat lung (IPRL) resulted in 8.7% of lung deposited LTP-1 peptide-phage clone transported from the IPRL airways to the vasculature compared (p<0.05) to the cumulative transport of less than 0.004% for control phage-clone groups. To characterise phage-independent activity of LTP-1 peptide, the LTP-1 peptide was conjugated to a 53kDa anionic PAMAM dendrimer. Compared to respective peptide-dendrimer control conjugates, the LTP-1-PAMAM conjugate displayed a two-fold (bioavailability up to 31%) greater extent of absorption in the IPRL. The LTP-1 peptide-mediated enhancement of transport, when LTP-1 was either attached to the phage clone or conjugated to dendrimer, was sequence-dependent and could be competitively inhibited by co-instillation of excess synthetic free LTP-1 peptide. The specific nature of the target receptor or mechanism involved in LTP-1 lung transport remains unclear although the enhanced transport is enabled through a mechanism that is non-disruptive with respect to the pulmonary transport of hydrophilic permeability probes. This study shows proof-of principle that array technologies can be effectively exploited to identify peptides mediating enhanced transmucosal delivery of macromolecule therapeutics across an intact organ.

  16. [Peptide phage display in biotechnology and biomedicine].

    PubMed

    Kuzmicheva, G A; Belyavskaya, V A

    2016-07-01

    To date peptide phage display is one of the most common combinatorial methods used for identifying specific peptide ligands. Phage display peptide libraries containing billions different clones successfully used for selection of ligands with high affinity and selectivity toward wide range of targets including individual proteins, bacteria, viruses, spores, different kind of cancer cells and variety of nonorganic targets (metals, alloys, semiconductors etc.) Success of using filamentous phage in phage display technologies relays on the robustness of phage particles and a possibility to genetically modify its DNA to construct new phage variants with novel properties. In this review we are discussing characteristics of the most known non-commercial peptide phage display libraries of different formats (landscape libraries in particular) and their successful applications in several fields of biotechnology and biomedicine: discovery of peptides with diagnostic values against different pathogens, discovery and using of peptides recognizing cancer cells, trends in using of phage display technologies in human interactome studies, application of phage display technologies in construction of novel nano materials.

  17. Epitope Mapping with Random Phage Display Library

    PubMed Central

    Midoro-Horiuti, Terumi; Goldblum, Randall M.

    2017-01-01

    Random phage display library is used to map conformational as well as linear epitopes. These libraries are available in varying lengths and with circularization. We provide here a protocol conveying our experience using a commercially available peptide phage display library, which in our hands provides good results. PMID:24515483

  18. Methods for Selecting Phage Display Antibody Libraries.

    PubMed

    Jara-Acevedo, Ricardo; Diez, Paula; Gonzalez-Gonzalez, Maria; Degano, Rosa Maria; Ibarrola, Nieves; Gongora, Rafael; Orfao, Alberto; Fuentes, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    The selection process aims sequential enrichment of phage antibody display library in clones that recognize the target of interest or antigen as the library undergoes successive rounds of selection. In this review, selection methods most commonly used for phage display antibody libraries have been comprehensively described.

  19. Phage display: concept, innovations, applications and future.

    PubMed

    Pande, Jyoti; Szewczyk, Magdalena M; Grover, Ashok K

    2010-01-01

    Phage display is the technology that allows expression of exogenous (poly)peptides on the surface of phage particles. The concept is simple in principle: a library of phage particles expressing a wide diversity of peptides is used to select those that bind the desired target. The filamentous phage M13 is the most commonly used vector to create random peptide display libraries. Several methods including recombinant techniques have been developed to increase the diversity of the library. On the other extreme, libraries with various biases can be created for specific purposes. For instance, when the sequence of the peptide that binds the target is known, its affinity and selectivity can be increased by screening libraries created with limited mutagenesis of the peptide. Phage libraries are screened for binding to synthetic or native targets. The initial screening of library by basic biopanning has been extended to column chromatography including negative screening and competition between selected phage clones to identify high affinity ligands with greater target specificity. The rapid isolation of specific ligands by phage display is advantageous in many applications including selection of inhibitors for the active and allosteric sites of the enzymes, receptor agonists and antagonists, and G-protein binding modulatory peptides. Phage display has been used in epitope mapping and analysis of protein-protein interactions. The specific ligands isolated from phage libraries can be used in therapeutic target validation, drug design and vaccine development. Phage display can also be used in conjunction with other methods. The past innovations and those to come promise a bright future for this field.

  20. Evolution of phage display: from bioactive peptides to bioselective nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Petrenko, Va

    2008-08-01

    New phage-derived biorecognition nanomaterials have emerged recently as a result of the in-depth study of the genetics and structure of filamentous phage and the evolution of phage display technology. This review focuses on the progress made in the development of these new nanomaterials and discusses the prospects of using phage as a bioselectable molecular recognition interface in medical and technical devices. The author used data obtained both in his research group and sourced using Science Citation Index (Web of Science) search resources. The merging of phage display technologies with nanotechnology over the past few years has proved promising and has already shown its vitality and productivity by contributing vigorously to different areas of medicine and technology, such as medical diagnostics and monitoring, molecular imaging, targeted drug and gene delivery, vaccine development, as well as bone and tissue repair.

  1. Chemical Synthesis and In Vitro Evaluation of a Phage Display-Derived Peptide Active against Infectious Salmon Anemia Virus

    PubMed Central

    Ojeda, Nicolás; Cárdenas, Constanza; Guzmán, Fanny

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Infectious salmon anemia virus (ISAV) is the etiological agent of the disease by the same name and causes major losses in the salmon industry worldwide. Epizootic ISAV outbreaks have occurred in Norway and, to a lesser degree, in Canada. In 2007, an ISAV outbreak in Chile destroyed most of the seasonal production and endangered the entire Chilean salmon industry. None of the existing prophylactic approaches have demonstrated efficacy in providing absolute protection from or even a palliative effect on ISAV proliferation. Sanitary control measures for ISAV, based on molecular epidemiology data, have proven insufficient, mainly due to high salmon culture densities and a constant presence of a nonpathogenic strain of the virus. This report describes an alternative treatment approach based on interfering peptides selected from a phage display library. The screening of a phage display heptapeptide library resulted in the selection of a novel peptide with significant in vitro antiviral activity against ISAV. This peptide specifically interacted with the viral hemagglutinin-esterase protein, thereby impairing virus binding, with plaque reduction assays showing a significant reduction in viral yields. The identified peptide acts at micromolar concentrations against at least two different pathogenic strains of the virus, without detectable cytotoxic effects on the tested fish cells. Therefore, antiviral peptides represent a novel alternative for controlling ISAV and, potentially, other fish pathogens. IMPORTANCE Identifying novel methods for the efficient control of infectious diseases is imperative for the future of global aquaculture. The present study used a phage display heptapeptide library to identify a peptide with interfering activity against a key protein of the infectious salmon anemia virus (ISAV). A piscine orthomyxovirus, ISAV is a continuous threat to the commercial sustainability of cultured salmon production worldwide. The complex epidemiological

  2. Chemical Synthesis and In Vitro Evaluation of a Phage Display-Derived Peptide Active against Infectious Salmon Anemia Virus.

    PubMed

    Ojeda, Nicolás; Cárdenas, Constanza; Guzmán, Fanny; Marshall, Sergio H

    2016-04-01

    Infectious salmon anemia virus (ISAV) is the etiological agent of the disease by the same name and causes major losses in the salmon industry worldwide. Epizootic ISAV outbreaks have occurred in Norway and, to a lesser degree, in Canada. In 2007, an ISAV outbreak in Chile destroyed most of the seasonal production and endangered the entire Chilean salmon industry. None of the existing prophylactic approaches have demonstrated efficacy in providing absolute protection from or even a palliative effect on ISAV proliferation. Sanitary control measures for ISAV, based on molecular epidemiology data, have proven insufficient, mainly due to high salmon culture densities and a constant presence of a nonpathogenic strain of the virus. This report describes an alternative treatment approach based on interfering peptides selected from a phage display library. The screening of a phage display heptapeptide library resulted in the selection of a novel peptide with significant in vitro antiviral activity against ISAV. This peptide specifically interacted with the viral hemagglutinin-esterase protein, thereby impairing virus binding, with plaque reduction assays showing a significant reduction in viral yields. The identified peptide acts at micromolar concentrations against at least two different pathogenic strains of the virus, without detectable cytotoxic effects on the tested fish cells. Therefore, antiviral peptides represent a novel alternative for controlling ISAV and, potentially, other fish pathogens. Identifying novel methods for the efficient control of infectious diseases is imperative for the future of global aquaculture. The present study used a phage display heptapeptide library to identify a peptide with interfering activity against a key protein of the infectious salmon anemia virus (ISAV). A piscine orthomyxovirus, ISAV is a continuous threat to the commercial sustainability of cultured salmon production worldwide. The complex epidemiological strategy of this

  3. Ricin Detection Using Phage Displayed Single Domain Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Goldman, Ellen R.; Liu, Jinny L.; Bernstein, Rachael D.; Swain, Marla D.; Mitchell, Stanley Q.; Anderson, George P.

    2009-01-01

    Phage-displayed single domain antibodies (sdAb) were compared to monomeric solubly expressed sdAb and llama polyclonal antibodies for the detection of ricin. SdAb are comprised of the variable domain derived from camelid heavy chain only antibodies (HcAb). Although HcAb lack variable light chains, they as well as their derivative sdAb are able to bind antigens with high affinity. The small size of sdAb (∼16 kDa), while advantageous in many respects, limits the number of labels that can be incorporated. The ability to incorporate multiple labels is a beneficial attribute for reporter elements. Opportunely, sdAb are often selected using phage display methodology. Using sdAb displayed on bacteriophage M13 as the reporter element gives the potential for incorporating a very high number of labels. We have demonstrated the use of both sdAb and phage- displayed sdAb for the detection of ricin using both enzyme linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) and Luminex fluid array assays. The phage-displayed sdAb led to five to ten fold better detection of ricin in both the ELISA and Luminex assays, resulting in limits of detection of 1 ng/mL and 64 pg/mL respectively. The phage-displayed sdAb were also dramatically more effective for the visualization of binding to target in nitrocellulose dot blot assays, a method frequently used for epitope mapping. PMID:22389616

  4. Human IgG monoclonal anti-alpha(IIb)beta(3)-binding fragments derived from immunized donors using phage display.

    PubMed

    Jacobin, Marie-Josée; Laroche-Traineau, Jeanny; Little, Melvyn; Keller, Armin; Peter, Karlheinz; Welschof, Martin; Nurden, Alan; Clofent-Sanchez, Gisèle

    2002-02-15

    Previous studies of the immune response in polytransfused Glanzmann thrombasthenia (GT) patients and in autoimmune thrombocytopenic purpura (AITP) have relied on serum analysis and have shown the frequent development of Abs directed against the alpha(IIb)beta(3) integrin. However, little is known about the molecular diversity of the humoral immune response to alpha(IIb)beta(3) due to the paucity of mAbs issuing from these pathologies. We have isolated human IgG anti-alpha(IIb)beta(3) binding fragments using combinatorial libraries of single-chain IgG created from the B cells of a GT and an AITP patient, both with serum Abs. Ab screening was performed using activated platelets or activated alpha(IIb)beta(3)-expressing Chinese hamster ovary cells. Sequencing of selected phage Abs showed that a broad selection of genes from virtually all V gene families had been used, indicating the diversity of the immune response. About one-half of the V(H) and V(L) segments of our IgG anti-alpha(IIb)beta(3) fragments displayed extensive hypermutations in the complementarity-determining region, supporting the idea that an Ag-driven immune response was occurring in both patients. The H chain complementarity-determining region 3 analysis of phage Abs revealed motifs other than the well-known RGD and KQAGDV integrin-binding sequences. To our knowledge, our study is the first to illustrate multiple human IgG anti-alpha(IIb)beta(3) reactivities and structural variations linked to the anti-platelet human immune response. Human alpha(IIb)beta(3) Abs preferentially directed against the activated form of the integrin were further characterized because platelet alpha(IIb)beta(3) inhibitors are potential therapeutic reagents for treating acute coronary syndromes. Currently available alpha(IIb)beta(3) antagonists do not specifically recognize the activated form of the integrin.

  5. Recognition of epoxy with phage displayed peptides.

    PubMed

    Swaminathan, Swathi; Cui, Yue

    2013-07-01

    The development of a general approach for non-destructive chemical and biological functionalization of epoxy could expand opportunities for both fundamental studies and creating various device platforms. Epoxy shows unique electrical, mechanical, chemical and biological compatibility and has been widely used for fabricating a variety of devices. Phage display has emerged as a powerful method for selecting peptides that possess enhanced selectivity and binding affinity toward a variety of targets. In this letter, we demonstrate for the first time a powerful yet benign approach for identifying binding motifs to epoxy via comprehensively screened phage displayed peptides. Our results show that the epoxy can be selectively recognized with peptide-displaying phages. Further, along with the development of epoxy-based microstructures; recognition of the epoxy with phage displayed peptides can be specifically localized in these microstructures. We anticipate that these results could open up exciting opportunities in the use of peptide-recognized epoxy in fundamental biochemical recognition studies, as well as in applications ranging from analytical devices, hybrid materials, surface and interface, to cell biology.

  6. Production and Evaluation of Antibodies and Phage Display-Derived Peptide Ligands for Immunomagnetic Separation of Mycobacterium bovis

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Linda D.; McNair, James; McCallan, Lyanne; Thompson, Suzan; Kulakov, Leonid A.

    2012-01-01

    This study describes the development and optimization of an immunomagnetic separation (IMS) method to isolate Mycobacterium bovis cells from lymph node tissues. Gamma-irradiated whole M. bovis AF2122/97 cells and ethanol-extracted surface antigens of such cells were used to produce M. bovis-specific polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies in rabbits and mice. They were also used to generate M. bovis-specific peptide ligands by phage display biopanning. The various antibodies and peptide ligands obtained were used to coat MyOne tosyl-activated Dynabeads (Life Technologies), singly or in combination, and evaluated for IMS. Initially, M. bovis capture from Middlebrook 7H9 broth suspensions (concentration range, 10 to 105 CFU/ml) was evaluated by IMS combined with an M. bovis-specific touchdown PCR. IMS-PCR results and, subsequently, IMS-culture results indicated that the beads with greatest immunocapture capability for M. bovis in broth were those coated simultaneously with a monoclonal antibody and a biotinylated 12-mer peptide. These dually coated beads exhibited minimal capture (mean of 0.36% recovery) of 12 other Mycobacterium spp. occasionally encountered in veterinary tuberculosis (TB) diagnostic laboratories. When the optimized IMS method was applied to various M. bovis-spiked lymph node matrices, it demonstrated excellent detection sensitivities (50% limits of detection of 3.16 and 57.7 CFU/ml of lymph node tissue homogenate for IMS-PCR and IMS-culture, respectively). The optimized IMS method therefore has the potential to improve isolation of M. bovis from lymph nodes and hence the diagnosis of bovine tuberculosis. PMID:22322353

  7. Phage display: applications, innovations, and issues in phage and host biology.

    PubMed

    Wilson, D R; Finlay, B B

    1998-04-01

    In the 7 years since the first publications describing phage-displayed peptide libraries, phage display has been successfully employed in a variety of research. Innovations in vector design and methods to identify target clones account for much of this success. At the same time, not all ventures have been entirely successful and it appears that phage and host biology play important roles in this. A key issue concerns the role played by a displayed peptide or protein in its successful expression and incorporation into virions. While few studies have examined these issues specifically in context of phage display, the literature as a whole provides insight. Accordingly, we review phage biology, relevant aspects of host biology, and phage display applications with the goals of illustrating (i) relevant aspects of the interplay between phage-host biology and successful phage display and (ii) the limitations and considerable potential of this important technology.

  8. Phage display technology: clinical applications and recent innovations.

    PubMed

    Azzazy, Hassan M E; Highsmith, W Edward

    2002-09-01

    Phage display is a molecular diversity technology that allows the presentation of large peptide and protein libraries on the surface of filamentous phage. Phage display libraries permit the selection of peptides and proteins, including antibodies, with high affinity and specificity for almost any target. A crucial advantage of this technology is the direct link that exists between the experimental phenotype and its encapsulated genotype, which allows the evolution of the selected binders into optimized molecules. Phage display facilitates engineering of antibodies with regard to their size, valency, affinity, and effector functions. The selection of antibodies and peptides from libraries displayed on the surface of filamentous phage has proven significant for routine isolation of peptides and antibodies for diagnostic and therapeutic applications. This review serves as an introduction to phage display, antibody engineering, the development of phage-displayed peptides and antibody fragments into viable diagnostic reagents, and recent trends in display technology.

  9. On The Influence Of Vector Design On Antibody Phage Display

    PubMed Central

    Soltes, Glenn; Hust, Michael; Ng, Kitty K.Y.; Bansal, Aasthaa; Field, Johnathan; Stewart, Donald I.H.; Dübel, Stefan; Cha, Sanghoon; Wiersma, Erik J

    2007-01-01

    Phage display technology is an established technology particularly useful for the generation of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). The isolation of phagemid-encoded mAb fragments depends on several features of a phage preparation. The aims of this study were to optimize phage display vectors, and to ascertain if different virion features can be optimized independently of each other. Comparisons were made between phagemid virions assembled by g3p-deficient helper phage, Hyperphage, Ex-phage or Phaberge, or corresponding g3p-sufficient helper phage, M13K07. All g3p-deficient helper phage provided a similar level of antibody display, significantly higher than that of M13K07. Hyperphage packaged virions at least 100-fold more efficiently than did Ex-phage or Phaberge. Phaberge's packaging efficiency improved by using a SupE strain. Different phagemids were also compared. Removal of a 56 base pair fragment from the promoter region resulted in increased display level and increased virion production. This critical fragment encodes a lacZ'-like peptide and is also present in other commonly used phagemids. Increasing display level did not show statistical correlation with phage production, phage infectivity or bacterial growth rate. However, phage production was positively correlated to phage infectivity. In summary, this study demonstrates simultaneously optimization of multiple and independent features of importance for phage selection. PMID:16996161

  10. Probing Tumor Microenvironment with In Vivo Phage Display

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-07-01

    peptides may result in an efficient probe for breast tumor imaging and therapy . 15. SUBJECT TERMS Carcinoma-associated fibroblast; phage display...In Vivo Phage Display PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Dr. Erkki Ruoslahti CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Sanford Burnham Medical Research Institute...COVERED 01 July 2012 – 30 June 2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Probing Tumor Microenvironment with In Vivo Phage Display 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH

  11. Probing Tumor Microenvironment with in Vivo Phage Display

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-07-01

    Vivo Phage Display PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Kazuki N. Sugahara, M.D., Ph.D...TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Probing Tumor Microenvironment with In Vivo Phage Display 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-12-1-0174 5c...cells and the matrix. The goal of our group is to make technical improvements in our phage display system, and find peptides that target carcinoma

  12. Purification of anti-MUC1 antibodies by peptide mimotope affinity chromatography using peptides derived from a polyvalent phage display library.

    PubMed

    Smith, Richard G; Missailidis, Sotiris; Price, Michael R

    2002-01-05

    A polyvalent, lytic phage display system (T7Select415-1b) displaying a random peptide library has been investigated for its ability to discover novel mimotopes reactive with the therapeutic monoclonal antibody C595. Sequence analysis of enriched phage lead to the identification of a predominant sequence RNREAPRGKICS, and two other consensus sequences RXXP and RXP. The novel synthetic peptide RNREAPRGKICS was linked to beaded agarose and the performance as a mimotope affinity chromatography matrix evaluated. Antibody purified using the novel matrix was found to be of higher specific reactivity than antibody purified using the conventional epitope matrix (peptide APDTRPAPG). The RNREAPRGKICS peptide binding to C595 demonstrated a higher equilibrium association constant (K(A)=0.75 x 10(6)) than the epitope peptide (K(A)=0.16 x 10(6)). Circular dichroism showed that the novel peptide had a more highly ordered structure at 4 degrees C and room temperature, than the epitope peptide.

  13. 99mTc-HYNIC-TNF analogs (WH701) derived from phage display peptide libraries for imaging TNF-receptor-positive ovarian carcinoma: preclinical evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Yan; Xia, Jinsong; Wu, H.; Li, H. F.

    2002-04-01

    Radiolabeled bioactive peptides which bind specifically to surface receptors over expressed in tumor cells are considered as alternatives for tumor detection with ECT. In this investigation, 99mTc-hydrazinonicotinyl - TNF analogs (WH701) was labeled using ethylenediaminediacetic acid (EDDA) as coligand (a number of TNF analogs had been selected and synthesized using random phage-display peptides library in our lab) and Pharmacokinetics and feasibility studies were performed.

  14. An affinity improved single-chain antibody from phage display of a library derived from monoclonal antibodies detects fumonisins by immunoassay.

    PubMed

    Hu, Zu-Quan; Li, He-Ping; Wu, Ping; Li, Ya-Bo; Zhou, Zhu-Qing; Zhang, Jing-Bo; Liu, Jin-Long; Liao, Yu-Cai

    2015-03-31

    Fumonisin B analogs, particularly FB1, FB2, and FB3, are major mycotoxins found in cereals. Single-chain fragment variable (scFv) antibodies represent a promising alternative immunoassay system. A phage-displayed antibody library derived from four monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) generated against FB1 was used to screen high binding affinity scFv antibodies; the best candidate was designated H2. Surface plasmon resonance measurements confirmed that the H2 scFv displayed a 82-fold higher binding affinity than its parent mAb. Direct competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay demonstrated that the H2 antibody could competitively bind to free FB1, FB2, and FB3, with an IC50 of 0.11, 0.04, and 0.10 μM, respectively; it had no cross-reactivity to deoxynivalenol, nivalenol and aflatoxin. Validation assays with naturally contaminated samples revealed a linear relationship between the H2 antibody-based assay results and chemical analysis results, that could be expressed as y=1.7072x+5.5606 (R(2)=0.8883). Homology modeling of H2 revealed a favorable binding structure highly complementary to the three fumonisins. Molecular docking analyses suggested that the preferential binding of the H2 scFv to FB2 was due to the presence of a hydrogen radical in its R1 position, leading to a proper electrostatic matching and hydrophobic interaction. The H2 scFv antibody can be used for the rapid, accurate, and specific detection of fumonisin contamination in agricultural samples.

  15. An improved helper phage system for efficient isolation of specific antibody molecules in phage display.

    PubMed

    Baek, Hyunjung; Suk, Kyoung-ho; Kim, Yong-hwan; Cha, Sanghoon

    2002-03-01

    Phage display technology has been applied in many fields of biological and medical sciences to study molecular interactions and especially in the generation of monoclonal antibodies of human origin. However, extremely low display level of antibody molecules on the surface of phage is an intrinsic problem of a phagemid-based display system resulting in low success rate of isolating specific binding molecules. We show here that display of single-chain antibody fragment (scFv) generated with pIGT3 phagemid can be increased dramatically by using a genetically modified Ex-phage. Ex-phage has a mutant pIII gene that produces a functional wild-type pIII in suppressing Escherichia coli strains but does not make any pIII in non-suppressing E.coli strains. Packaging phagemids encoding antibody-pIII fusion in F+ non-suppressing E.coli strains with Ex-phage enhanced the display level of antibody fragments on the surfaces of recombinant phage particles resulting in an increase of antigen-binding reactivity >100-fold compared to packaging with M13KO7 helper phage. Thus, the Ex-phage and pIGT3 phagemid vector provides a system for the efficient enrichment of specific binding antibodies from a phage display library and, thereby, increases the chance of obtaining more diverse antibodies specific for target antigens.

  16. DeltaPhage--a novel helper phage for high-valence pIX phagemid display.

    PubMed

    Nilssen, Nicolay R; Frigstad, Terje; Pollmann, Sylvie; Roos, Norbert; Bogen, Bjarne; Sandlie, Inger; Løset, Geir Å

    2012-09-01

    Phage display has been instrumental in discovery of novel binding peptides and folded domains for the past two decades. We recently reported a novel pIX phagemid display system that is characterized by a strong preference for phagemid packaging combined with low display levels, two key features that support highly efficient affinity selection. However, high diversity in selected repertoires are intimately coupled to high display levels during initial selection rounds. To incorporate this additional feature into the pIX display system, we have developed a novel helper phage termed DeltaPhage that allows for high-valence display on pIX. This was obtained by inserting two amber mutations close to the pIX start codon, but after the pVII translational stop, conditionally inactivating the helper phage encoded pIX. Until now, the general notion has been that display on pIX is dependent on wild-type complementation, making high-valence display unachievable. However, we found that DeltaPhage does facilitate high-valence pIX display when used with a non-suppressor host. Here, we report a side-by-side comparison with pIII display, and we find that this novel helper phage complements existing pIX phagemid display systems to allow both low and high-valence display, making pIX display a complete and efficient alternative to existing pIII phagemid display systems.

  17. Phage display as a promising approach for vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Aghebati-Maleki, Leili; Bakhshinejad, Babak; Baradaran, Behzad; Motallebnezhad, Morteza; Aghebati-Maleki, Ali; Nickho, Hamid; Yousefi, Mehdi; Majidi, Jafar

    2016-09-29

    Bacteriophages are specific antagonists to bacterial hosts. These viral entities have attracted growing interest as optimal vaccine delivery vehicles. Phages are well-matched for vaccine design due to being highly stable under harsh environmental conditions, simple and inexpensive large scale production, and potent adjuvant capacities. Phage vaccines have efficient immunostimulatory effects and present a high safety profile because these viruses have made a constant relationship with the mammalian body during a long-standing evolutionary period. The birth of phage display technology has been a turning point in the development of phage-based vaccines. Phage display vaccines are made by expressing multiple copies of an antigen on the surface of immunogenic phage particles, thereby eliciting a powerful and effective immune response. Also, the ability to produce combinatorial peptide libraries with a highly diverse pool of randomized ligands has transformed phage display into a straightforward, versatile and high throughput screening methodology for the identification of potential vaccine candidates against different diseases in particular microbial infections. These libraries can be conveniently screened through an affinity selection-based strategy called biopanning against a wide variety of targets for the selection of mimotopes with high antigenicity and immunogenicity. Also, they can be panned against the antiserum of convalescent individuals to recognize novel peptidomimetics of pathogen-related epitopes. Phage display has represented enormous promise for finding new strategies of vaccine discovery and production and current breakthroughs promise a brilliant future for the development of different phage-based vaccine platforms.

  18. Oligopeptide m13 phage display in pathogen research.

    PubMed

    Kügler, Jonas; Zantow, Jonas; Meyer, Torsten; Hust, Michael

    2013-10-16

    Phage display has become an established, widely used method for selection of peptides, antibodies or alternative scaffolds. The use of phage display for the selection of antigens from genomic or cDNA libraries of pathogens which is an alternative to the classical way of identifying immunogenic proteins is not well-known. In recent years several new applications for oligopeptide phage display in disease related fields have been developed which has led to the identification of various new antigens. These novel identified immunogenic proteins provide new insights into host pathogen interactions and can be used for the development of new diagnostic tests and vaccines. In this review we focus on the M13 oligopeptide phage display system for pathogen research but will also give examples for lambda phage display and for applications in other disease related fields. In addition, a detailed technical work flow for the identification of immunogenic oligopeptides using the pHORF system is given. The described identification of immunogenic proteins of pathogens using oligopeptide phage display can be linked to antibody phage display resulting in a vaccine pipeline.

  19. Oligopeptide M13 Phage Display in Pathogen Research

    PubMed Central

    Kügler, Jonas; Zantow, Jonas; Meyer, Torsten; Hust, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Phage display has become an established, widely used method for selection of peptides, antibodies or alternative scaffolds. The use of phage display for the selection of antigens from genomic or cDNA libraries of pathogens which is an alternative to the classical way of identifying immunogenic proteins is not well-known. In recent years several new applications for oligopeptide phage display in disease related fields have been developed which has led to the identification of various new antigens. These novel identified immunogenic proteins provide new insights into host pathogen interactions and can be used for the development of new diagnostic tests and vaccines. In this review we focus on the M13 oligopeptide phage display system for pathogen research but will also give examples for lambda phage display and for applications in other disease related fields. In addition, a detailed technical work flow for the identification of immunogenic oligopeptides using the pHORF system is given. The described identification of immunogenic proteins of pathogens using oligopeptide phage display can be linked to antibody phage display resulting in a vaccine pipeline. PMID:24136040

  20. Nanoscale bacteriophage biosensors beyond phage display

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jong-Wook; Song, Jangwon; Hwang, Mintai P; Lee, Kwan Hyi

    2013-01-01

    Bacteriophages are traditionally used for the development of phage display technology. Recently, their nanosized dimensions and ease with which genetic modifications can be made to their structure and function have put them in the spotlight towards their use in a variety of biosensors. In particular, the expression of any protein or peptide on the extraluminal surface of bacteriophages is possible by genetically engineering the genome. In addition, the relatively short replication time of bacteriophages offers researchers the ability to generate mass quantities of any given bacteriophage-based biosensor. Coupled with the emergence of various biomarkers in the clinic as a means to determine pathophysiological states, the development of current and novel technologies for their detection and quantification is imperative. In this review, we categorize bacteriophages by their morphology into M13-based filamentous bacteriophages and T4- or T7-based icosahedral bacteriophages, and examine how such advantages are utilized across a variety of biosensors. In essence, we take a comprehensive approach towards recent trends in bacteriophage-based biosensor applications and discuss their outlook with regards to the field of biotechnology. PMID:24143096

  1. Nanoscale bacteriophage biosensors beyond phage display.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jong-Wook; Song, Jangwon; Hwang, Mintai P; Lee, Kwan Hyi

    2013-01-01

    Bacteriophages are traditionally used for the development of phage display technology. Recently, their nanosized dimensions and ease with which genetic modifications can be made to their structure and function have put them in the spotlight towards their use in a variety of biosensors. In particular, the expression of any protein or peptide on the extraluminal surface of bacteriophages is possible by genetically engineering the genome. In addition, the relatively short replication time of bacteriophages offers researchers the ability to generate mass quantities of any given bacteriophage-based biosensor. Coupled with the emergence of various biomarkers in the clinic as a means to determine pathophysiological states, the development of current and novel technologies for their detection and quantification is imperative. In this review, we categorize bacteriophages by their morphology into M13-based filamentous bacteriophages and T4- or T7-based icosahedral bacteriophages, and examine how such advantages are utilized across a variety of biosensors. In essence, we take a comprehensive approach towards recent trends in bacteriophage-based biosensor applications and discuss their outlook with regards to the field of biotechnology.

  2. Cytotoxic Tumor-Targeting Peptides From In Vivo Phage Display.

    PubMed

    Northup, Jessica R Newton; Deutscher, Susan L

    2016-01-01

    We previously utilized an in vivo peptide phage display selection technique, which included the use of detergent elution of phage from excised tumor, to obtain tumor-targeting phage with the ability to extravasate the vasculature and bind directly to prostate tumor tissue. It is hypothesized that this same in vivo phage selection technique can be used to functionally select for molecules that not only bind to cancer cells but also kill them. Here we analyzed two different in vivo phage display selected phage clones, G1 and H5, retrieved from PC-3 human prostate carcinoma xenografted tumors. First, cell de-attachment as an endpoint criterion for apoptosis and cell cycle was examined. After 2.5 hours incubation with G1 phage, PC-3 cell attachment was reduced by 23.8% and the percent of cell population in M phase reduced by 32.1%. In comparison, PC-3 cells incubated with H5 phage had a reduction of 25.0% cell attachment and 33.6% of cell population in M phase. These changes in combination with elevated caspase activation within cells in M phase, and no significant changes to G1/G0 or S phase cell populations suggest that the cytotoxic phages are targeting actively dividing PC-3 cells. Microscopic studies were also performed to further analyze the nature of cytotoxicity of these two phage clones. It was found that G1 phage induced and co- localized with tubulin based projections within apoptotic cells, while H5 phage did not. These phage may form the foundation for a new class of targeted prostate cancer therapeutic agents.

  3. Fully human antibodies from transgenic mouse and phage display platforms.

    PubMed

    Lonberg, Nils

    2008-08-01

    Over the past two decades, technologies have emerged for generating monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) derived from human immunoglobulin gene sequences. These fully human MAbs provide an alternative to re-engineered, or de-immunized, rodent MAbs as a source of low immunogenicity therapeutic antibodies. There are now two marketed fully human therapeutic MAbs, adalimumab and panitumumab, and several dozen more in various stages of human clinical testing. Most of the drugs, including adalimumab and panitumumab, were generated using either phage display or transgenic mouse platforms. The reported clinical experience with fully human MAbs demonstrates that these two platforms are, and should continue to be, a significant source of active and well tolerated experimental therapeutics. While this body of reported clinical data does not yet provide a clear distinction between the platforms, the available descriptions of the drug discovery processes used to identify the clinical candidates highlight one difference. It appears that lead optimization is more commonly applied to phage display derived leads than transgenic mouse derived leads.

  4. Phage display library screening for identification of interacting protein partners.

    PubMed

    Addepalli, Balasubrahmanyam; Rao, Suryadevara; Hunt, Arthur G

    2015-01-01

    Phage display is a versatile high-throughput screening method employed to understand and improve the chemical biology, be it production of human monoclonal antibodies or identification of interacting protein partners. A majority of cell proteins operate in a concerted fashion either by stable or transient interactions. Such interactions can be mediated by recognition of small amino acid sequence motifs on the protein surface. Phage display can play a crucial role in identification of such motifs. This report describes the use of phage display for the identification of high affinity sequence motifs that could be responsible for interactions with a target (bait) protein.

  5. Chemical posttranslational modification of phage-displayed peptides.

    PubMed

    Ng, Simon; Tjhung, Katrina F; Paschal, Beth M; Noren, Christopher J; Derda, Ratmir

    2015-01-01

    Phage-displayed peptide library has fueled the discovery of novel ligands for diverse targets. A new type of phage libraries that displays not only linear and disulfide-constrained cyclic peptides but moieties that cannot be encoded genetically or incorporated easily by bacterial genetic machinery has emerged recently. Chemical posttranslational modification of phage library is one of the simplest approaches to encode nonnatural moieties. It confers the library with new functionality and makes it possible to select and evolve molecules with properties not found in the peptides, for instance, glycopeptides recognized by carbohydrate-binding protein and peptides with photoswitching capability. To this end, we describe the newly emerging techniques to chemically modify the phage library and quantify the efficiency of the reaction with a biotin-capture assay. Finally, we provide the methods to construct N-terminal Ser peptide library that allows site-selective modification of phage.

  6. Phage display creates innovative applications to combat hepatitis B virus

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Wen Siang; Ho, Kok Lian

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) has killed countless lives in human history. The invention of HBV vaccines in the 20th century has reduced significantly the rate of the viral infection. However, currently there is no effective treatment for chronic HBV carriers. Newly emerging vaccine escape mutants and drug resistant strains have complicated the viral eradication program. The entire world is now facing a new threat of HBV and human immunodeficiency virus co-infection. Could phage display provide solutions to these life-threatening problems? This article reviews critically and comprehensively the innovative and potential applications of phage display in the development of vaccines, therapeutic agents, diagnostic reagents, as well as gene and drug delivery systems to combat HBV. The application of phage display in epitope mapping of HBV antigens is also discussed in detail. Although this review mainly focuses on HBV, the innovative applications of phage display could also be extended to other infectious diseases. PMID:25206271

  7. Generation of Recombinant Antibodies Against Toxins and Viruses by Phage Display for Diagnostics and Therapy.

    PubMed

    Unkauf, Tobias; Miethe, Sebastian; Fühner, Viola; Schirrmann, Thomas; Frenzel, André; Hust, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Antibody phage display is an in vitro technology to generate recombinant antibodies. In particular for pathogens like viruses or toxins, antibody phage display is an alternative to hybridoma technology, since it circumvents the limitations of the immune system. Phage display allows the generation of human antibodies from naive antibody gene libraries when either immunized patients are not available or immunization is not ethically feasible. This technology also allows the construction of immune libraries to select in vivo affinity matured antibodies if immunized patients or animals are available.In this review, we describe the generation of human and human-like antibodies from naive antibody gene libraries and antibodies from immune antibody gene libraries. Furthermore, we give an overview about phage display derived recombinant antibodies against viruses and toxins for diagnostics and therapy.

  8. Filamentous bacteriophage: biology, phage display and nanotechnology applications.

    PubMed

    Rakonjac, Jasna; Bennett, Nicholas J; Spagnuolo, Julian; Gagic, Dragana; Russel, Marjorie

    2011-01-01

    Filamentous bacteriophage, long and thin filaments that are secreted from the host cells without killing them, have been an antithesis to the standard view of head-and-tail bacterial killing machines. Episomally replicating filamentous phage Ff of Escherichia coli provide the majority of information about the principles and mechanisms of filamentous phage infection, episomal replication and assembly. Chromosomally- integrated "temperate" filamentous phage have complex replication and integration, which are currently under active investigation. The latter are directly or indirectly implicated in diseases caused by bacterial pathogens Vibrio cholerae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Neisseria meningitidis. In the first half of the review, both the Ff and temperate phage are described and compared. A large section of the review is devoted to an overview of phage display technology and its applications in nanotechnology.

  9. Selective posttranslational modification of phage-displayed polypeptides

    SciTech Connect

    Tsao, Meng-Lin; Tian, Feng; Schultz, Peter

    2013-11-19

    The invention relates to posttranslational modification of phage-displayed polypeptides. These displayed polypeptides comprise at least one unnatural amino acid, e.g., an aryl-azide amino acid such as p-azido-L-phenylalanine, or an alkynyl-amino acid such as para-propargyloxyphenylalanine, which are incorporated into the phage-displayed fusion polypeptide at a selected position by using an in vivo orthogonal translation system comprising a suitable orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase and a suitable orthogonal tRNA species. These unnatural amino acids advantageously provide targets for posttranslational modifications such as azide-alkyne [3+2] cycloaddition reactions and Staudinger modifications.

  10. Selective posttranslational modification of phage-displayed polypeptides

    SciTech Connect

    Tsao, Meng-Lin; Tian, Feng; Schultz, Peter

    2013-02-05

    The invention relates to posttranslational modification of phage-displayed polypeptides. These displayed polypeptides comprise at least one unnatural amino acid, e.g., an aryl-azide amino acid such as p-azido-L-phenylalanine, or an alkynyl-amino acid such as para-propargyloxyphenylalanine, which are incorporated into the phage-displayed fusion polypeptide at a selected position by using an in vivo orthogonal translation system comprising a suitable orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase and a suitable orthogonal tRNA species. These unnatural amino acids advantageously provide targets for posttranslational modifications such as azide-alkyne [3+2]cycloaddition reactions and Staudinger modifications.

  11. Phage display as a powerful tool to engineer protease inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Zani, Marie-Louise; Moreau, Thierry

    2010-11-01

    Since its introduction by Georges Smith some 25 years ago, phage display has proved to be a powerful molecular technique for selecting proteins with desired biological properties from huge libraries. Early on, various protease inhibitor scaffolds were displayed at the surface of filamentous phages to select new inhibitors with shifted specificities and enhanced affinities towards one or more target protease(s). The past two decades have seen a number of natural protease inhibitors subjected to phage display, mostly to shift and increase their inhibitory specificity, but also to explore the molecular mechanisms by which they interact with their cognate enzymes with low or very high selectivity. This review focuses on the major uses of phage display in the field of protein protease inhibitors. The exquisite molecular mechanisms by which natural protease inhibitors prevent unwanted or excessive proteolysis in cells and tissues are also examined along with some of the general principles underlying the way phage display is applied to these molecules. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Biochemical functionalization of peptide nanotubes with phage displayed peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swaminathan, Swathi; Cui, Yue

    2016-09-01

    The development of a general approach for the biochemical functionalization of peptide nanotubes (PNTs) could open up existing opportunities in both fundamental studies as well as a variety of applications. PNTs are spontaneously assembled organic nanostructures made from peptides. Phage display has emerged as a powerful approach for identifying selective peptide binding motifs. Here, we demonstrate for the first time the biochemical functionalization of PNTs via peptides identified from a phage display peptide library. The phage-displayed peptides are shown to recognize PNTs. These advances further allow for the development of bifunctional peptides for the capture of bacteria and the self-assembly of silver particles onto PNTs. We anticipate that these results could provide significant opportunities for using PNTs in both fundamental studies and practical applications, including sensors and biosensors nanoelectronics, energy storage devices, drug delivery, and tissue engineering.

  13. A phagemid vector using the E. coli phage shock promoter facilitates phage display of toxic proteins.

    PubMed

    Beekwilder, J; Rakonjac, J; Jongsma, M; Bosch, D

    1999-03-04

    Phage display is a powerful tool with which to adapt the specificity of protease inhibitors. To this end, a library of variants of the potato protease inhibitor PI2 was introduced in a canonical phagemid vector. Although PI2 is a natural trypsin inhibitor, we were unable to select trypsin-binding variants from the library. Instead, only mutants carrying deletions or amber stop codons were found. Bacteria carrying these mutations had a much faster growth rate than those carrying the wt PI2-encoding gene, even when the promoter was repressed. To overcome these problems, two new phagemid vectors for g3-mediated phage display were constructed. The first vector has a lower plasmid copy number, as compared to the canonical vector. Bacteria harboring this new vector are much less affected by the presence of the PI2-g3 fusion gene, which appears from a markedly reduced growth retardation. A second vector was equipped with the promoter of the Escherichia coli psp operon, instead of the lac promoter, to control the PI2-g3 gene fusion expression. The psp promoter is induced upon helper phage infection. A phagemid vector with this promoter controlling a PI2-g3 gene fusion did not affect the viability of the host. Furthermore, both new vectors were shown to produce phage particles that display the inhibitor protein and were therefore considered suitable for phage display. The inhibitor library was introduced in both new vectors. Trypsin-binding phages with inhibitory sequences were selected, instead of sequences with stop codons or deletions. This demonstrates the usefulness of these new vectors for phage display of proteins that affect the viability of E. coli.

  14. Phage Display of a Biologically Active Bacillus thuringiensis Toxin

    PubMed Central

    Kasman, Laura M.; Lukowiak, Andrew A.; Garczynski, Stephen F.; McNall, Rebecca J.; Youngman, Phil; Adang, Michael J.

    1998-01-01

    Activated forms of Bacillus thuringiensis insecticidal toxins have consistently been found to form insoluble and inactive precipitates when they are expressed in Escherichia coli. Genetic engineering of these proteins to improve their effectiveness as biological pesticides would be greatly facilitated by the ability to express them in E. coli, since the molecular biology tools available for Bacillus are limited. To this end, we show that activated B. thuringiensis toxin (Cry1Ac) can be expressed in E. coli as a translational fusion with the minor phage coat protein of filamentous phage. Phage particles displaying this fusion protein were viable, infectious, and as lethal as pure toxin on a molar basis when the phage particles were fed to insects susceptible to native Cry1Ac. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and Western blot analysis showed the fusion protein to be antigenically equivalent to native toxin, and micropanning with anti-Cry1Ac antibody was positive for the toxin-expressing phage. Phage display of B. thuringiensis toxins has many advantages over previous expression systems for these proteins and should make it possible to construct large libraries of toxin variants for screening or biopanning. PMID:9687463

  15. Plasmids and packaging cell lines for use in phage display

    DOEpatents

    Bradbury, Andrew M.

    2012-07-24

    The invention relates to a novel phagemid display system for packaging phagemid DNA into phagemid particles which completely avoids the use of helper phage. The system of the invention incorporates the use of bacterial packaging cell lines which have been transformed with helper plasmids containing all required phage proteins but not the packaging signals. The absence of packaging signals in these helper plasmids prevents their DNA from being packaged in the bacterial cell, which provides a number of significant advantages over the use of both standard and modified helper phage. Packaged phagemids expressing a protein or peptide of interest, in fusion with a phage coat protein such as g3p, are generated simply by transfecting phagemid into the packaging cell line.

  16. Phage display in the study of infectious diseases.

    PubMed

    Mullen, Lisa M; Nair, Sean P; Ward, John M; Rycroft, Andrew N; Henderson, Brian

    2006-03-01

    Microbial infections are dependent on the panoply of interactions between pathogen and host and identifying the molecular basis of such interactions is necessary to understand and control infection. Phage display is a simple functional genomic methodology for screening and identifying protein-ligand interactions and is widely used in epitope mapping, antibody engineering and screening for receptor agonists or antagonists. Phage display is also used widely in various forms, including the use of fragment libraries of whole microbial genomes, to identify peptide-ligand and protein-ligand interactions that are of importance in infection. In particular, this technique has proved successful in identifying microbial adhesins that are vital for colonization.

  17. Phage display selection and evaluation of cancer drug targets.

    PubMed

    Romanov, Victor I

    2003-04-01

    Techniques for the construction of phage display libraries of combinatorial proteins have dramatically improved. This has allowed researchers to expand the applications to the field of cancer biology. The most direct use of protein phage-displayed libraries is the selection of ligands for individual proteins. This includes identification of peptide ligands for receptor signaling molecules: integrins, cytokine and growth factor receptors. Selected peptides may be used as competitors for natural ligands and for the mapping of binding epitopes. This approach has been exploited for delineation of intracellular signal transduction pathways and for the selection of enzyme substrates and inhibitors. Recently, more complicated biological systems were used as targets for biopanning. This includes combination of soluble proteins, cellular surfaces and even the vasculature of whole organs. cDNA expression libraries in phage-based vectors have been recently introduced. The use of phage as a vector for targeted gene therapy is also considered. These and other applications of phage display for cancer research will be reviewed.

  18. Fluorescent T7 display phages obtained by translational frameshift

    PubMed Central

    Slootweg, Erik J.; Keller, Hans J.H.G.; Hink, Mark A.; Borst, Jan Willem; Bakker, Jaap; Schots, Arjen

    2006-01-01

    Lytic phages form a powerful platform for the display of large cDNA libraries and offer the possibility to screen for interactions with almost any substrate. To visualize these interactions directly by fluorescence microscopy, we constructed fluorescent T7 phages by exploiting the flexibility of phages to incorporate modified versions of its capsid protein. By applying translational frameshift sequences, helper plasmids were constructed that expressed a fixed ratio of both wild-type capsid protein (gp10) and capsid protein fused to enhanced yellow fluorescent protein (EYFP). The frameshift sequences were inserted between the 3′ end of the capsid gene and the sequence encoding EYFP. Fluorescent fusion proteins are only formed when the ribosome makes a −1 shift in reading frame during translation. Using standard fluorescence microscopy, we could sensitively monitor the enrichment of specific binders in a cDNA library displayed on fluorescent T7 phages. The perspectives of fluorescent display phages in the fast emerging field of single molecule detection and sorting technologies are discussed. PMID:17040895

  19. Peptides Derived from a Phage Display Library Inhibit Adhesion and Protect the Host against Infection by Paracoccidioides brasiliensis and Paracoccidioides lutzii.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Haroldo C; Michaloski, Jussara S; da Silva, Julhiany F; Scorzoni, Liliana; de Paula E Silva, Ana C A; Marcos, Caroline M; Assato, Patrícia A; Yamazaki, Daniella S; Fusco-Almeida, Ana M; Giordano, Ricardo J; Mendes-Giannini, Maria J S

    2016-01-01

    Paracoccidioides brasiliensis and Paracoccidioides lutzii are dimorphic fungi and are the etiological agents of paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM). Adhesion is one of the most important steps in infections with Paracoccidioides and is responsible for the differences in the virulence of isolates of these fungi. Because of the importance of adhesion to the establishment of an infection, this study focused on the preliminary development of a new therapeutic strategy to inhibit adhesion by Paracoccidioides, thus inhibiting infection and preventing the disease. We used two phage display libraries to select peptides that strongly bind to the Paracoccidioides cell wall to inhibit adhesion to host cells and extracellular matrix (ECM) components (laminin, fibronectin, and type I and type IV collagen). This approach allowed us to identify four peptides that inhibited up to 64% of the adhesion of Paracoccidioides to pneumocytes in vitro and inhibited the adhesion to the ECM components by up to 57%. Encouraged by these results, we evaluated the ability of these peptides to protect Galleria mellonella from Paracoccidioides infection by treating G. mellonella larvae with the different peptides prior to infection with Paracoccidioides and observing larval survival. The results show that all of the peptides tested increased the survival of the larvae infected with P. brasiliensis by up to 64% and by up to 60% in those infected with P. lutzii. These data may open new horizons for therapeutic strategies to prevent PCM, and anti-adhesion therapy could be an important strategy.

  20. Peptides Derived from a Phage Display Library Inhibit Adhesion and Protect the Host against Infection by Paracoccidioides brasiliensis and Paracoccidioides lutzii

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Haroldo C.; Michaloski, Jussara S.; da Silva, Julhiany F.; Scorzoni, Liliana; de Paula e Silva, Ana C. A.; Marcos, Caroline M.; Assato, Patrícia A.; Yamazaki, Daniella S.; Fusco-Almeida, Ana M.; Giordano, Ricardo J.; Mendes-Giannini, Maria J. S.

    2016-01-01

    Paracoccidioides brasiliensis and Paracoccidioides lutzii are dimorphic fungi and are the etiological agents of paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM). Adhesion is one of the most important steps in infections with Paracoccidioides and is responsible for the differences in the virulence of isolates of these fungi. Because of the importance of adhesion to the establishment of an infection, this study focused on the preliminary development of a new therapeutic strategy to inhibit adhesion by Paracoccidioides, thus inhibiting infection and preventing the disease. We used two phage display libraries to select peptides that strongly bind to the Paracoccidioides cell wall to inhibit adhesion to host cells and extracellular matrix (ECM) components (laminin, fibronectin, and type I and type IV collagen). This approach allowed us to identify four peptides that inhibited up to 64% of the adhesion of Paracoccidioides to pneumocytes in vitro and inhibited the adhesion to the ECM components by up to 57%. Encouraged by these results, we evaluated the ability of these peptides to protect Galleria mellonella from Paracoccidioides infection by treating G. mellonella larvae with the different peptides prior to infection with Paracoccidioides and observing larval survival. The results show that all of the peptides tested increased the survival of the larvae infected with P. brasiliensis by up to 64% and by up to 60% in those infected with P. lutzii. These data may open new horizons for therapeutic strategies to prevent PCM, and anti-adhesion therapy could be an important strategy. PMID:28066254

  1. Phages and HIV-1: From Display to Interplay

    PubMed Central

    Delhalle, Sylvie; Schmit, Jean-Claude; Chevigné, Andy

    2012-01-01

    The complex hide-and-seek game between HIV-1 and the host immune system has impaired the development of an efficient vaccine. In addition, the high variability of the virus impedes the long-term control of viral replication by small antiviral drugs. For more than 20 years, phage display technology has been intensively used in the field of HIV-1 to explore the epitope landscape recognized by monoclonal and polyclonal HIV-1-specific antibodies, thereby providing precious data about immunodominant and neutralizing epitopes. In parallel, biopanning experiments with various combinatorial or antibody fragment libraries were conducted on viral targets as well as host receptors to identify HIV-1 inhibitors. Besides these applications, phage display technology has been applied to characterize the enzymatic specificity of the HIV-1 protease. Phage particles also represent valuable alternative carriers displaying various HIV-1 antigens to the immune system and eliciting antiviral responses. This review presents and summarizes the different studies conducted with regard to the nature of phage libraries, target display mode and biopanning procedures. PMID:22606007

  2. Development of Anti-Infectives Using Phage Display: Biological Agents against Bacteria, Viruses, and Parasites

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Johnny X.; Bishop-Hurley, Sharon L.

    2012-01-01

    The vast majority of anti-infective therapeutics on the market or in development are small molecules; however, there is now a nascent pipeline of biological agents in development. Until recently, phage display technologies were used mainly to produce monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) targeted against cancer or inflammatory disease targets. Patent disputes impeded broad use of these methods and contributed to the dearth of candidates in the clinic during the 1990s. Today, however, phage display is recognized as a powerful tool for selecting novel peptides and antibodies that can bind to a wide range of antigens, ranging from whole cells to proteins and lipid targets. In this review, we highlight research that exploits phage display technology as a means of discovering novel therapeutics against infectious diseases, with a focus on antimicrobial peptides and antibodies in clinical or preclinical development. We discuss the different strategies and methods used to derive, select, and develop anti-infectives from phage display libraries and then highlight case studies of drug candidates in the process of development and commercialization. Advances in screening, manufacturing, and humanization technologies now mean that phage display can make a significant contribution in the fight against clinically important pathogens. PMID:22664969

  3. The isolation of novel phage display-derived human recombinant antibodies against CCR5, the major co-receptor of HIV.

    PubMed

    Shimoni, Moria; Herschhorn, Alon; Britan-Rosich, Yelena; Kotler, Moshe; Benhar, Itai; Hizi, Amnon

    2013-08-01

    Selecting for antibodies against specific cell-surface proteins is a difficult task due to many unrelated proteins that are expressed on the cell surface. Here, we describe a method to screen antibody-presenting phage libraries against native cell-surface proteins. We applied this method to isolate antibodies that selectively recognize CCR5, which is the major co-receptor for HIV entry (consequently, playing a pivotal role in HIV transmission and pathogenesis). We employed a phage screening strategy by using cells that co-express GFP and CCR5, along with an excess of control cells that do not express these proteins (and are otherwise identical to the CCR5-expressing cells). These control cells are intended to remove most of the phages that bind the cells nonspecifically; thus leading to an enrichment of the phages presenting anti-CCR5-specific antibodies. Subsequently, the CCR5-presenting cells were quantitatively sorted by flow cytometry, and the bound phages were eluted, amplified, and used for further successive selection rounds. Several different clones of human single-chain Fv antibodies that interact with CCR5-expressing cells were identified. The most specific monoclonal antibody was converted to a full-length IgG and bound the second extracellular loop of CCR5. The experimental approach presented herein for screening for CCR5-specific antibodies can be applicable to screen antibody-presenting phage libraries against any cell-surface expressed protein of interest.

  4. A peptide derived from phage display library exhibits anti-tumor activity by targeting GRP78 in gastric cancer multidrug resistance cells.

    PubMed

    Kang, Jianqin; Zhao, Guohong; Lin, Tao; Tang, Shanhong; Xu, Guanghui; Hu, Sijun; Bi, Qian; Guo, Changcun; Sun, Li; Han, Shuang; Xu, Qian; Nie, Yongzhan; Wang, Biaoluo; Liang, Shuhui; Ding, Jie; Wu, Kaichun

    2013-10-10

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) remains a significant challenge to the clinical treatment of gastric cancer (GC). In the present study, using a phage display approach combined with MTT assays, we screened a specific peptide GMBP1 (Gastric cancer MDR cell-specific binding peptide), ETAPLSTMLSPY, which could bind to the surface of GC MDR cells specifically and reverse their MDR phenotypes. Immunocytochemical staining showed that the potential receptor of GMBP1 was located at the membrane and cytoplasm of MDR cells. In vitro and in vivo drug sensitivity assays, FACS analysis and Western blotting confirmed that GMBP1 was able to re-sensitize MDR cells to chemical drugs. Western blotting and proteomic approaches were used to screen the receptor of GMBP1, and GRP78, a MDR-related protein, was identified as a receptor of GMBP1. This result was further supported by immunofluoresence microscopy and Western blot. Additionally, Western blotting demonstrated that pre-incubation of GMBP1 in MDR cells greatly diminished MDR1, Bcl-2 and GRP78 expression but increased the expression of Bax, whereas downregulation of GRP78, function as a receptor and directly target for GMBP1, only inhibited MDR1 expression. Our findings suggest that GMBP1 could re-sensitize GC MDR cells to a variety of chemotherapeutic agents and this role might be mediated partly through down-regulating GRP78 expression and then inhibiting MDR1 expression. These findings indicate that peptide GMBP1 likely recognizes a novel GRP78 receptor and mediates cellular activities associated with the MDR phenotype, which provides new insight into research on the management of MDR in gastric cancer cells.

  5. Peptide phage display as a tool for drug discovery: targeting membrane receptors.

    PubMed

    Molek, Peter; Strukelj, Borut; Bratkovic, Tomaz

    2011-01-21

    Ligands selected from phage-displayed random peptide libraries tend to be directed to biologically relevant sites on the surface of the target protein. Consequently, peptides derived from library screenings often modulate the target protein's activity in vitro and in vivo and can be used as lead compounds in drug design and as alternatives to antibodies for target validation in both genomics and drug discovery. This review discusses the use of phage display to identify membrane receptor modulators with agonistic or antagonistic activities. Because isolating or producing recombinant membrane proteins for use as target molecules in library screening is often impossible, innovative selection strategies such as panning against whole cells or tissues, recombinant receptor ectodomains, or neutralizing antibodies to endogenous binding partners were devised. Prominent examples from a two-decade history of peptide phage display will be presented, focusing on the design of affinity selection experiments, methods for improving the initial hits, and applications of the identified peptides.

  6. Prospective identification of parasitic sequences in phage display screens

    PubMed Central

    Matochko, Wadim L.; Cory Li, S.; Tang, Sindy K.Y.; Derda, Ratmir

    2014-01-01

    Phage display empowered the development of proteins with new function and ligands for clinically relevant targets. In this report, we use next-generation sequencing to analyze phage-displayed libraries and uncover a strong bias induced by amplification preferences of phage in bacteria. This bias favors fast-growing sequences that collectively constitute <0.01% of the available diversity. Specifically, a library of 109 random 7-mer peptides (Ph.D.-7) includes a few thousand sequences that grow quickly (the ‘parasites’), which are the sequences that are typically identified in phage display screens published to date. A similar collapse was observed in other libraries. Using Illumina and Ion Torrent sequencing and multiple biological replicates of amplification of Ph.D.-7 library, we identified a focused population of 770 ‘parasites’. In all, 197 sequences from this population have been identified in literature reports that used Ph.D.-7 library. Many of these enriched sequences have confirmed function (e.g. target binding capacity). The bias in the literature, thus, can be viewed as a selection with two different selection pressures: (i) target-binding selection, and (ii) amplification-induced selection. Enrichment of parasitic sequences could be minimized if amplification bias is removed. Here, we demonstrate that emulsion amplification in libraries of ∼106 diverse clones prevents the biased selection of parasitic clones. PMID:24217917

  7. Identification of nose-to-brain homing peptide through phage display.

    PubMed

    Wan, Xiao-Mei; Chen, Yong-Ping; Xu, Wen-Rui; Yang, Wen-Jun; Wen, Long-Ping

    2009-02-01

    Brain delivery of drug molecules through the nasal passage represents a viable approach for bypassing the blood-brain barrier (BBB) but remains a major challenge due to lack of efficient homing carriers. To screen for potential peptides with the ability to transport into the brain via the nasal passage, we applied a C7C phage peptide display library (Ph.D.-C7C) intra-nasally to anesthetized rats and recovered phage from the brain tissue 45 min after phage administration. After three rounds of panning, 10 positive phage clones were selected and sequenced. Clone7, which exhibited highest translocation efficiency, was chosen for further studies. After nasal administration, Clone7 entered the brain within 30 min and exhibited translocation efficiency about 50-fold higher than a random phage. A 11-amino acid synthetic peptide derived from the displayed sequence of Clone7 (ACTTPHAWLCG) efficiently inhibited the nasal-brain translocation of Clone7. Both phage recovery results and fluorescent microscopy images revealed the presence of many more Clone7 phage in the brain than in the liver, kidney and other internal organs after the nasal administration, suggesting that Clone7 bypassed the BBB and entered brain directly. Furthermore, both Clone7 and the ACTTPHAWLCG peptide were found to be heavily distributed along the olfactory nerve after the nasal administration, further suggesting a direct passage route into the brain via the olfactory region. These results demonstrated the feasibility of using the in vivo phage display approach for selecting peptides with the nose-to-brain homing capability and may have implications for the development of novel targeting carriers useful for brain delivery.

  8. Recombinant antibodies for diagnostics and therapy against pathogens and toxins generated by phage display.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, Philipp; Fühner, Viola; Unkauf, Tobias; Moreira, Gustavo Marcal Schmidt Garcia; Frenzel, André; Miethe, Sebastian; Hust, Michael

    2016-10-01

    Antibodies are valuable molecules for the diagnostic and treatment of diseases caused by pathogens and toxins. Traditionally, these antibodies are generated by hybridoma technology. An alternative to hybridoma technology is the use of antibody phage display to generate recombinant antibodies. This in vitro technology circumvents the limitations of the immune system and allows-in theory-the generation of antibodies against all conceivable molecules. Phage display technology enables obtaining human antibodies from naïve antibody gene libraries when either patients are not available or immunization is not ethically feasible. On the other hand, if patients or immunized/infected animals are available, it is common to construct immune phage display libraries to select in vivo affinity-matured antibodies. Because the phage packaged DNA sequence encoding the antibodies is directly available, the antibodies can be smoothly engineered according to the requirements of the final application. In this review, an overview of phage display derived recombinant antibodies against bacterial, viral, and eukaryotic pathogens as well as toxins for diagnostics and therapy is given. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Selection of phage-displayed peptides that bind to a particular ligand-bound antibody.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Fujie; Hu, Yunfeng; Sutton, Jori; Asawapornmongkol, Lily; Fuller, Roberta; Olson, Arthur J; Barbas, Carlos F; Lerner, Richard A

    2008-06-01

    Phage-displayed peptides that selectively bind to aldolase catalytic antibody 93F3 when bound to a particular 1,3-diketone hapten derivative have been developed using designed selection strategies with libraries containing 7-12 randomized amino acid residues. These phage-displayed peptides discriminated the particular 93F3-diketone complex from ligand-free 93F3 and from 93F3 bound to other 1,3-diketone hapten derivatives. By altering the selection procedures, phage-displayed peptides that bind to antibody 93F3 in the absence of 1,3-diketone hapten derivatives have also been developed. With using these phage-displayed peptides, ligand-bound states of the antibody were distinguished from each other. A docking model of one of the peptides bound to the antibody 93F3-diketone complex was created using a sequential divide-and-conquer peptide docking strategy; the model suggests that the peptide interacts with both the antibody and the ligand through a delicate hydrogen bonding network.

  10. Humoral immune responses against gonadotropin releasing hormone elicited by immunization with phage-peptide constructs obtained via phage display.

    PubMed

    Samoylov, Alexandre; Cochran, Anna; Schemera, Bettina; Kutzler, Michelle; Donovan, Caitlin; Petrenko, Valery; Bartol, Frank; Samoylova, Tatiana

    2015-12-20

    Phage display is based on genetic engineering of phage coat proteins resulting in fusion peptides displayed on the surface of phage particles. The technology is widely used for generation of phages with novel characteristics for numerous applications in biomedicine and far beyond. The focus of this study was on development of phage-peptide constructs that stimulate production of antibodies against gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH). Phage-peptide constructs that elicit production of neutralizing GnRH antibodies can be used for anti-fertility and anti-cancer applications. Phage-GnRH constructs were generated via selection from a phage display library using several types of GnRH antibodies as selection targets. Such phage constructs were characterized for sequence similarities to GnRH peptide and frequency of their occurrence in the selection rounds. Five of the constructs with suitable characteristics were tested in mice as a single dose 5×10(11) virions (vir) vaccine and were found to be able to stimulate production of GnRH-specific antibodies, but not to suppress testosterone (indirect indicator of GnRH antibody neutralizing properties). Next, one of the constructs was tested at a higher dose of 2×10(12) vir per mouse in combination with a poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA)-based adjuvant. This resulted in multifold increase in GnRH antibody production and significant reduction of serum testosterone, indicating that antibodies produced in response to the phage-GnRH immunization possess neutralizing properties. To achieve optimal immune responses for desired applications, phage-GnRH constructs can be modified with respect to flanking sequences of GnRH-like peptides displayed on phage. Anticipated therapeutic effects also might be attained using optimized phage doses, a combination of several constructs in a single treatment, or application of adjuvants and advanced phage delivery systems.

  11. Detection of Food Allergens by Phage-Displayed Produced Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Madrid, Raquel; de la Cruz, Silvia; García, Aina; Martín, Rosario; González, Isabel; García, Teresa

    2017-01-01

    Phage display is a powerful tool to produce recombinant antibodies against a given antigen without animal immunization. This technology employs libraries of recombinant bacteriophages that display billions of different functional antibody fragments on their surface. They are selected by panning in vitro against the target antigen in search for specific binders. In this chapter, we describe the selection of single chain variable fragment (scFv) antibodies to be used for detection of allergenic proteins from nuts in food products. The artificial libraries TomLinson I+J (MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology and MRC Centre for Protein Engineering) were employed that resulted in successful phage-ELISA systems for detection of almond and walnut proteins in commercial food products.

  12. Functional expression and affinity selection of single-chain cro by phage display: isolation of novel DNA-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, M T; Mossing, M C; Widersten, M

    2000-07-01

    A robust selection system affording phage display of the DNA-binding helix-turn-helix protein Cro is presented. The aim of the work was to construct an experimental system allowing for the construction and isolation of Cro-derived protein with new DNA-binding properties. A derivative of the phage lambda Cro repressor, scCro8, in which the protein subunits had been covalently connected via a peptide linker was expressed in fusion with the gene 3 protein of Escherichia coli filamentous phage. The phage-displayed single-chain Cro was shown to retain the DNA binding properties of its wild-type Cro counterpart regarding DNA sequence specificity and binding affinity. A kinetic analysis revealed the rate constant of dissociation of the single-chain Cro-phage/DNA complex to be indistinguishable from that of the free single-chain Cro. Affinity selection using a biotinylated DNA with a target consensus operator sequence allowed for a 3000-fold enrichment of phages displaying single-chain Cro over control phages. The selection was based on entrapment of phage/DNA complexes formed in solution on streptavidin-coated paramagnetic beads. The expression system was subsequently used to isolate variant scCro8 proteins, mutated in their DNA-binding residues, that specifically recognized new, unnatural target DNA ligands.

  13. Shotgun Phage Display - Selection for Bacterial Receptins or other Exported Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Rosander, Anna; Bjerketorp, Joakim; Frykberg, Lars

    2003-01-01

    Shotgun phage display cloning involves construction of libraries from randomly fragmented bacterial chromosomal DNA, cloned genes, or eukaryotic cDNAs, into a phagemid vector. The library obtained consists of phages expressing polypeptides corresponding to all genes encoded by the organism, or overlapping peptides derived from the cloned gene. From such a library, polypeptides with affinity for another molecule can be isolated by affinity selection, panning. The technique can be used to identify bacterial receptins and identification of their minimal binding domain, and but also to identify epitopes recognised by antibodies. In addition, after modification of the phagemid vector, the technique has also been used to identify bacterial extracytoplasmic proteins. PMID:14569614

  14. Probing ADAMTS13 substrate specificity using phage display.

    PubMed

    Desch, Karl C; Kretz, Colin; Yee, Andrew; Gildersleeve, Robert; Metzger, Kristin; Agrawal, Nidhi; Cheng, Jane; Ginsburg, David

    2015-01-01

    Von Willebrand factor (VWF) is a large, multimeric protein that regulates hemostasis by tethering platelets to the subendothelial matrix at sites of vascular damage. The procoagulant activity of plasma VWF correlates with the length of VWF multimers, which is proteolytically controlled by the metalloprotease ADAMTS13. To probe ADAMTS13 substrate specificity, we created phage display libraries containing randomly mutated residues of a minimal ADAMTS13 substrate fragment of VWF, termed VWF73. The libraries were screened for phage particles displaying VWF73 mutant peptides that were resistant to proteolysis by ADAMTS13. These peptides exhibited the greatest mutation frequency near the ADAMTS13 scissile residues. Kinetic assays using mutant and wild-type substrates demonstrated excellent agreement between rates of cleavage for mutant phage particles and the corresponding mutant peptides. Cleavage resistance of selected mutations was tested in vivo using hydrodynamic injection of corresponding full-length expression plasmids into VWF-deficient mice. These studies confirmed the resistance to cleavage resulting from select amino acid substitutions and uncovered evidence of alternate cleavage sites and recognition by other proteases in the circulation of ADAMTS13 deficient mice. Taken together, these studies demonstrate the key role of specific amino acids residues including P3-P2' and P11', for substrate specificity and emphasize the importance in flowing blood of other ADAMTS13-VWF exosite interactions outside of VWF73.

  15. A Genetically Modified Adenoviral Vector with a Phage Display-Derived Peptide Incorporated into Fiber Fibritin Chimera Prolongs Survival in Experimental Glioma

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Julius W.; Kane, J. Robert; Young, Jacob S.; Chang, Alan L.; Kanojia, Deepak; Morshed, Ramin A.; Miska, Jason; Ahmed, Atique U.; Balyasnikova, Irina V.; Han, Yu; Zhang, Lingjiao; Curiel, David T.; Lesniak, Maciej S.

    2015-01-01

    The dismal clinical context of advanced-grade glioma demands the development of novel therapeutic strategies with direct patient impact. Adenovirus-mediated virotherapy represents a potentially effective approach for glioma therapy. In this research, we generated a novel glioma-specific adenovirus by instituting more advanced genetic modifications that can maximize the efficiency and safety of therapeutic adenoviral vectors. In this regard, a glioma-specific targeted fiber was developed through the incorporation of previously published glioma-specific, phage-panned peptide (VWT peptide) on a fiber fibritin-based chimeric fiber, designated as “GliomaFF.” We showed that the entry of this virus was highly restricted to glioma cells, supporting the specificity imparted by the phage-panned peptide. In addition, the stability of the targeting moiety presented by fiber fibritin structure permitted greatly enhanced infectivity. Furthermore, the replication of this virus was restricted in glioma cells by controlling expression of the E1 gene under the activity of the tumor-specific survivin promoter. Using this approach, we were able to explore the combinatorial efficacy of various adenoviral modifications that could amplify the specificity, infectivity, and exclusive replication of this therapeutic adenovirus in glioma. Finally, virotherapy with this modified virus resulted in up to 70% extended survival in an in vivo murine glioma model. These data demonstrate that this novel adenoviral vector is a safe and efficient treatment for this difficult malignancy. PMID:26058317

  16. SiteLight: binding-site prediction using phage display libraries.

    PubMed

    Halperin, Inbal; Wolfson, Haim; Nussinov, Ruth

    2003-07-01

    Phage display enables the presentation of a large number of peptides on the surface of phage particles. Such libraries can be tested for binding to target molecules of interest by means of affinity selection. Here we present SiteLight, a novel computational tool for binding site prediction using phage display libraries. SiteLight is an algorithm that maps the 1D peptide library onto a three-dimensional (3D) protein surface. It is applicable to complexes made up of a protein Template and any type of molecule termed Target. Given the three-dimensional structure of a Template and a collection of sequences derived from biopanning against the Target, the Template interaction site with the Target is predicted. We have created a large diverse data set for assessing the ability of SiteLight to correctly predict binding sites. SiteLight predictive mapping enables discrimination between the binding and nonbinding parts of the surface. This prediction can be used to effectively reduce the surface by 75% without excluding the binding site. In 63% of the cases we have tested, there is at least one binding site prediction that overlaps the interface by at least 50%. These results suggest the applicability of phage display libraries for automated binding site prediction on three-dimensional structures. For most effective binding site prediction we propose using a random phage display library twice, to scan both binding partners of a given complex. The derived peptides are mapped to the other binding partner (now used as a Template). Here, the surface of each partner is reduced by 75%, focusing their relative positions with respect to each other significantly. Such information can be utilized to improve docking algorithms and scoring functions.

  17. Selection and maturation of antibodies by phage display through fusion to pIX.

    PubMed

    Tornetta, Mark; Reddy, Ramachandra; Wheeler, John C

    2012-09-01

    Antibody discovery and optimization by M13 phage display have evolved significantly over the past twenty years. Multiple methods of antibody display and selection have been developed - direct display on pIII or indirect display through a Cysteine disulfide linkage or a coiled-coil adapter protein. Here we describe display of Fab libraries on the smaller pIX protein at the opposite end of the virion and its application to discovery of novel antibodies from naive libraries. Antibody selection based on pIX-mediated display produces results comparable to other in vitro methods and uses an efficient direct infection of antigen-bound phages, eliminating any chemical dissociation step(s). Additionally, some evidence suggests that pIX-mediated display can be more efficient than pIII-mediated display in affinity selections. Functional assessment of phage-derived antibodies can be hindered by insufficient affinities or lack of epitopic diversity. Here we describe an approach to managing primary hits from our Fab phage libraries into epitope bins and subsequent high-throughput maturation of clones to isolate epitope- and sequence-diverse panels of high affinity binders. Use of the Octet biosensor was done to examine Fab binding in a facile label-free method and determine epitope competition groups. A receptor extracellular domain and chemokine were subjected to this method of binning and affinity maturation. Parental clones demonstrated improvement in affinity from 1-100nM to 10-500pM. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. A novel helper phage for HaloTag-mediated co-display of enzyme and substrate on phage.

    PubMed

    Delespaul, Wouter; Peeters, Yves; Herdewijn, Piet; Robben, Johan

    2015-05-01

    Phage display is an established technique for the molecular evolution of peptides and proteins. For the selection of enzymes based on catalytic activity however, simultaneous coupling of an enzyme and its substrate to the phage surface is required. To facilitate this process of co-display, we developed a new helper phage displaying HaloTag, a modified haloalkane dehalogenase that binds specifically and covalently to functionalized haloalkane ligands. The display of functional HaloTag was demonstrated by capture on streptavidin-coated magnetic beads, after coupling a biotinylated haloalkane ligand, or after on-phage extension of a DNA oligonucleotide primer with a biotinylated nucleotide by phi29 DNA polymerase. We also achieved co-display of HaloTag and phi29 DNA polymerase, thereby opening perspectives for the molecular evolution of this enzyme (and others) towards new substrate specificities.

  19. Antigen discovery using whole-genome phage display libraries.

    PubMed

    Beghetto, Elisa; Gargano, Nicola

    2013-01-01

    In the last two decades phage display technology has been used for investigating complex biological processes and isolating molecules of practical value in several applications. Bacteriophage lambda, representing a classical cloning and expression system, has also been exploited for generating display libraries of small peptides and protein domains. More recently, large cDNA and whole-genome lambda-display libraries of human pathogens have been generated for the discovery of new antigens for biomedical applications. Here, we describe the construction of a whole-genome library of a common pathogen-Streptococcus pneumoniae-and the use of this library for the molecular dissection of the human B-cell response against bacterial infection and colonization.

  20. Phage displayed HBV core antigen with immunogenic activity.

    PubMed

    Bahadir, Aylin Ozdemir; Balcioglu, Bertan Koray; Uzyol, Kamil Serkan; Hatipoglu, Ibrahim; Sogut, Ibrahim; Basalp, Aynur; Erdag, Berrin

    2011-12-01

    Hepatitis B is a major public health problem worldwide, which may lead to chronic liver diseases such as cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. The hepatitis B core antigen (HBcAg) is one of the major viral proteins, which forms the inner core of hepatitis B virus (HBV) particles. In this study, filamentous bacteriophage M13 was genetically modified to display the polypeptides of HBcAg in order to develop an alternative carrier system. HBcAg gene was inserted into the minor coat protein (pIII) gene of M13, and HBcAg was expressed on the phage surface as a whole protein. Antigenicity and immunogenicity of HBcAg were tested by immunizing BALB/c mice three times with HBcAg-displaying recombinant phages. After successful immunization, one of the mice with high antibody titer to HBcAg was selected for fusion, and four monoclonal antibodies specific for HBcAg were developed. This result showed that HBcAg-displaying recombinant bacteriophages are immunogenic and can potentially be used for the development of monoclonal antibodies.

  1. Identification of gliadin-binding peptides by phage display

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Coeliac disease (CD) is a common and complex disorder of the small intestine caused by intolerance to wheat gluten and related edible cereals like barley and rye. Peptides originating from incomplete gliadin digestion activate the lamina propria infiltrating T cells to release proinflammatory cytokines, which in turn cause profound tissue remodelling of the small intestinal wall. There is no cure for CD except refraining from consuming gluten-containing products. Results Phage from a random oligomer display library were enriched by repeated pannings against immobilised gliadin proteins. Phage from the final panning round were plated, individual plaques picked, incubated with host bacteria, amplified to a population size of 1011 to 1012 and purified. DNA was isolated from 1000 purified phage populations and the region covering the 36 bp oligonucleotide insert from which the displayed peptides were translated, was sequenced. Altogether more than 150 different peptide-encoding sequences were identified, many of which were repeatedly isolated under various experimental conditions. Amplified phage populations, each expressing a single peptide, were tested first in pools and then one by one for their ability to inhibit binding of human anti-gliadin antibodies in ELISA assays. These experiments showed that several of the different peptide-expressing phage tested inhibited the interaction between gliadin and anti-gliadin antibodies. Finally, four different peptide-encoding sequences were selected for further analysis, and the corresponding 12-mer peptides were synthesised in vitro. By ELISA assays it was demonstrated that several of the peptides inhibited the interaction between gliadin molecules and serum anti-gliadin antibodies. Moreover, ELISA competition experiments as well as dot-blot and western blot revealed that the different peptides interacted with different molecular sites of gliadin. Conclusions We believe that several of the isolated and

  2. Phage display screen for peptides that bind Bcl-2 protein.

    PubMed

    Park, Hye-Yeon; Kim, Joungmok; Cho, June-Haeng; Moon, Ji Young; Lee, Su-Jae; Yoon, Moon-Young

    2011-01-01

    Bcl-2 family proteins are key regulators of apoptosis associated with human disease, including cancer. Bcl-2 protein has been found to be overexpressed in many cancer cells. Therefore, Bcl-2 protein is a potential diagnostic target for cancer detection. In the present study, the authors have identified several Bcl-2 binding peptides with high affinity (picomolar range) from a 5-round M13 phage display library screening. These peptides can be used to develop novel diagnostic probes or potent inhibitors with diverse polyvalencies.

  3. Advancement and applications of peptide phage display technology in biomedical science.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chien-Hsun; Liu, I-Ju; Lu, Ruei-Min; Wu, Han-Chung

    2016-01-19

    Combinatorial phage library is a powerful research tool for high-throughput screening of protein interactions. Of all available molecular display techniques, phage display has proven to be the most popular approach. Screening phage-displayed random peptide libraries is an effective means of identifying peptides that can bind target molecules and regulate their function. Phage-displayed peptide libraries can be used for (i) B-cell and T-cell epitope mapping, (ii) selection of bioactive peptides bound to receptors or proteins, disease-specific antigen mimics, peptides bound to non-protein targets, cell-specific peptides, or organ-specific peptides, and (iii) development of peptide-mediated drug delivery systems and other applications. Targeting peptides identified using phage display technology may be useful for basic research and translational medicine. In this review article, we summarize the latest technological advancements in the application of phage-displayed peptide libraries to applied biomedical sciences.

  4. Deep sequencing of phage display libraries to support antibody discovery.

    PubMed

    Ravn, Ulla; Didelot, Gérard; Venet, Sophie; Ng, Kwok-Ting; Gueneau, Franck; Rousseau, François; Calloud, Sébastien; Kosco-Vilbois, Marie; Fischer, Nicolas

    2013-03-15

    The use of next generation sequencing (NGS) for the analysis of antibody sequences both in phage display libraries and during in vitro selection processes has become increasingly popular in the last few years. Here, our methods developed for DNA preparation, sequencing and data analysis are presented. A key parameter has also been to develop new software designed for high throughput antibody sequence analysis that is used in combination with publicly available tools. As an example of our methods, we provide data from the extensive analysis of five scFv libraries generated using different heavy chain CDR3 diversification strategies. The results not only confirm that the library designs were correct but also reveal differences in quality not easily identified by standard DNA sequencing approaches. The very large number of reads permits extensive sequence coverage after the selection process. Furthermore, as samples can be multiplexed, costs decrease and more information is gained per NGS run. Using examples of results obtained post phage display selections against two antigens, frequency and clustering analysis identified novel antibody fragments that were then shown to be specific for the target antigen. In summary, the methods described here demonstrate how NGS analysis enhances quality control of complex antibody libraries as well as facilitates the antibody discovery process.

  5. A novel approach for separating bacteriophages from other bacteriophages using affinity chromatography and phage display.

    PubMed

    Ceglarek, Izabela; Piotrowicz, Agnieszka; Lecion, Dorota; Miernikiewicz, Paulina; Owczarek, Barbara; Hodyra, Katarzyna; Harhala, Marek; Górski, Andrzej; Dąbrowska, Krystyna

    2013-11-14

    Practical applications of bacteriophages in medicine and biotechnology induce a great need for technologies of phage purification. None of the popular methods offer solutions for separation of a phage from another similar phage. We used affinity chromatography combined with competitive phage display (i) to purify T4 bacteriophage from bacterial debris and (ii) to separate T4 from other contaminating bacteriophages. In 'competitive phage display' bacterial cells produced both wild types of the proteins (expression from the phage genome) and the protein fusions with affinity tags (expression from the expression vectors). Fusion proteins were competitively incorporated into the phage capsid. It allowed effective separation of T4 from a contaminating phage on standard affinity resins.

  6. Phage display for the generation of antibodies for proteome research, diagnostics and therapy.

    PubMed

    Schirrmann, Thomas; Meyer, Torsten; Schütte, Mark; Frenzel, André; Hust, Michael

    2011-01-10

    Twenty years after its development, antibody phage display using filamentous bacteriophage represents the most successful in vitro antibody selection technology. Initially, its development was encouraged by the unique possibility of directly generating recombinant human antibodies for therapy. Today, antibody phage display has been developed as a robust technology offering great potential for automation. Generation of monospecific binders provides a valuable tool for proteome research, leading to highly enhanced throughput and reduced costs. This review presents the phage display technology, application areas of antibodies in research, diagnostics and therapy and the use of antibody phage display for these applications.

  7. Intravenous infusion of phage-displayed antibody library in human cancer patients: enrichment and cancer-specificity of tumor-homing phage-antibodies.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Girja S; Krag, David N; Peletskaya, Elena N; Pero, Stephanie C; Sun, Yu-Jing; Carman, Chelsea L; McCahill, Laurence E; Roland, Thomas A

    2013-08-01

    Phage display is a powerful method for target discovery and selection of ligands for cancer treatment and diagnosis. Our goal was to select tumor-binding antibodies in cancer patients. Eligibility criteria included absence of preexisting anti-phage-antibodies and a Stage IV cancer status. All patients were intravenously administered 1 × 10(11) TUs/kg of an scFv library 1 to 4 h before surgical resection of their tumors. No significant adverse events related to the phage library infusion were observed. Phage were successfully recovered from all tumors. Individual clones from each patient were assessed for binding to the tumor from which clones were recovered. Multiple tumor-binding phage-antibodies were identified. Soluble scFv antibodies were produced from the phage clones showing higher tumor binding. The tumor-homing phage-antibodies and derived soluble scFvs were found to bind varying numbers (0-5) of 8 tested normal human tissues (breast, cervix, colon, kidney, liver, spleen, skin, and uterus). The clones that showed high tumor-specificity were found to bind corresponding tumors from other patients also. Clone enrichment was observed based on tumor binding and DNA sequence data. Clone sequences of multiple variable regions showed significant matches to certain cancer-related antibodies. One of the clones (07-2,355) that was found to share a 12-amino-acid-long motif with a reported IL-17A antibody was further studied for competitive binding for possible antigen target identification. We conclude that these outcomes support the safety and utility of phage display library panning in cancer patients for ligand selection and target discovery for cancer treatment and diagnosis.

  8. Intra-domain phage display (ID-PhD) of peptides and protein mini-domains censored from canonical pIII phage display.

    PubMed

    Tjhung, Katrina F; Deiss, Frédérique; Tran, Jessica; Chou, Ying; Derda, Ratmir

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we describe multivalent display of peptide and protein sequences typically censored from traditional N-terminal display on protein pIII of filamentous bacteriophage M13. Using site-directed mutagenesis of commercially available M13KE phage cloning vector, we introduced sites that permit efficient cloning using restriction enzymes between domains N1 and N2 of the pIII protein. As infectivity of phage is directly linked to the integrity of the connection between N1 and N2 domains, intra-domain phage display (ID-PhD) allows for simple quality control of the display and the natural variations in the displayed sequences. Additionally, direct linkage to phage propagation allows efficient monitoring of sequence cleavage, providing a convenient system for selection and evolution of protease-susceptible or protease-resistant sequences. As an example of the benefits of such an ID-PhD system, we displayed a negatively charged FLAG sequence, which is known to be post-translationally excised from pIII when displayed on the N-terminus, as well as positively charged sequences which suppress production of phage when displayed on the N-terminus. ID-PhD of FLAG exhibited sub-nanomolar apparent Kd suggesting multivalent nature of the display. A TEV-protease recognition sequence (TEVrs) co-expressed in tandem with FLAG, allowed us to demonstrate that 99.9997% of the phage displayed the FLAG-TEVrs tandem and can be recognized and cleaved by TEV-protease. The residual 0.0003% consisted of phage clones that have excised the insert from their genome. ID-PhD is also amenable to display of protein mini-domains, such as the 33-residue minimized Z-domain of protein A. We show that it is thus possible to use ID-PhD for multivalent display and selection of mini-domain proteins (Affibodies, scFv, etc.).

  9. Characterization and Selection of 3-(1-Naphthoyl)-Indole Derivative-Specific Alpaca VHH Antibodies Using a Phage Display Library.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Hiroshi; Murakami, Akikazu; Yoshida, Maiko; Muraoka, Jin; Wakai, Junko; Kenjyou, Noriko; Ito, Yuji

    2016-08-01

    A new alpaca VHH antibody library against 3-(1-naphthoyl)-indole derivatives was developed from alpaca immunized with 7-(3-(1-naphthoyl)-1H-indol-1-yl)-heptanoic acid-keyhole limpet hemocyanin (Hep-KLH) protein conjugates as the immunogen. From this library, two 3-(1-naphthoyl)-indole derivative-specific clones, named NN01 and NN02, were isolated using biopanning technology. The binding specificity of these clones was confirmed using a competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (c-ELISA). Based on the results of c-ELISA, a median inhibitory concentration (IC50) of these two VHH antibodies, NN01 and NN02, in the case of 7-(3-(1-naphthoyl)-1H-indol-1-yl)-heptanoic acid (Hep; one of 3-(1-naphthoyl)-indole derivatives) as an inhibitor exhibited an approximate 3 × 10(-7) M and 6 × 10(-7) M, respectively. Thus, VHH antibodies produced in this study could be considered a useful tool for the detection of 3-(1-naphthoyl)-indole derivatives.

  10. Phage display as a technology delivering on the promise of peptide drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Hamzeh-Mivehroud, Maryam; Alizadeh, Ali Akbar; Morris, Michael B; Church, W Bret; Dastmalchi, Siavoush

    2013-12-01

    Phage display represents an important approach in the development pipeline for producing peptides and peptidomimetics therapeutics. Using randomly generated DNA sequences and molecular biology techniques, large diverse peptide libraries can be displayed on the phage surface. The phage library can be incubated with a target of interest and the phage which bind can be isolated and sequenced to reveal the displayed peptides' primary structure. In this review, we focus on the 'mechanics' of the phage display process, whilst highlighting many diverse and subtle ways it has been used to further the drug-development process, including the potential for the phage particle itself to be used as a drug carrier targeted to a particular pathogen or cell type in the body.

  11. Phage display vectors for the in vitro generation of human antibody fragments.

    PubMed

    Hust, Michael; Dübel, Stefan

    2005-01-01

    A major source of human antibodies are phage display libraries, which are constructed from various genetic sources. Antibodies are expressed as scFV and Fab antibody fragments using various vector systems. This review offers a comprehensive overview of M13 phage display antibody vectors and discusses their applications.

  12. DeltaPhage—a novel helper phage for high-valence pIX phagemid display

    PubMed Central

    Nilssen, Nicolay R.; Frigstad, Terje; Pollmann, Sylvie; Roos, Norbert; Bogen, Bjarne; Sandlie, Inger; Løset, Geir Å.

    2012-01-01

    Phage display has been instrumental in discovery of novel binding peptides and folded domains for the past two decades. We recently reported a novel pIX phagemid display system that is characterized by a strong preference for phagemid packaging combined with low display levels, two key features that support highly efficient affinity selection. However, high diversity in selected repertoires are intimately coupled to high display levels during initial selection rounds. To incorporate this additional feature into the pIX display system, we have developed a novel helper phage termed DeltaPhage that allows for high-valence display on pIX. This was obtained by inserting two amber mutations close to the pIX start codon, but after the pVII translational stop, conditionally inactivating the helper phage encoded pIX. Until now, the general notion has been that display on pIX is dependent on wild-type complementation, making high-valence display unachievable. However, we found that DeltaPhage does facilitate high-valence pIX display when used with a non-suppressor host. Here, we report a side-by-side comparison with pIII display, and we find that this novel helper phage complements existing pIX phagemid display systems to allow both low and high-valence display, making pIX display a complete and efficient alternative to existing pIII phagemid display systems. PMID:22539265

  13. Next generation phage display by use of pVII and pIX as display scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Løset, Geir Åge; Sandlie, Inger

    2012-09-01

    Phage display technology has evolved to become an extremely versatile and powerful platform for protein engineering. The robustness of the phage particle, its ease of handling and its ability to tolerate a range of different capsid fusions are key features that explain the dominance of phage display in combinatorial engineering. Implementation of new technology is likely to ensure the continuation of its success, but has also revealed important short comings inherent to current phage display systems. This is in particular related to the biology of the two most popular display capsids, namely pIII and pVIII. Recent findings using two alternative capsids, pVII and pIX, located to the phage tip opposite that of pIII, suggest how they may be exploited to alleviate or circumvent many of these short comings. This review addresses important aspects of the current phage display standard and then discusses the use of pVII and pIX. These may both complement current systems and be used as alternative scaffolds for display and selection to further improve phage display as the ultimate combinatorial engineering platform. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. A cell-penetrating peptide from a novel pVII-pIX phage-displayed random peptide library.

    PubMed

    Gao, Changshou; Mao, Shenlan; Ditzel, Henrik J; Farnaes, Lauge; Wirsching, Peter; Lerner, Richard A; Janda, Kim D

    2002-12-01

    A novel random peptide library was constructed using a phage-display format on the coat proteins pVII and pIX of filamentous bacteriophage. Panning against B-lymphocyte WI-L2 cells yielded one unique peptide-phage, denoted CHL8, that specifically bound to and penetrated the cells. Studies of each peptide derived from CHL8, denoted pep7 and pep9, established that only pep7 mediated the observed activity and only as a homodimer. Peptide libraries displayed on pVII-pIX should serve as a novel source of bioactive ligands for a variety of applications.

  15. Novel p16 binding peptide development for p16-overexpressing cancer cell detection using phage display.

    PubMed

    Khemthongcharoen, Numfon; Ruangpracha, Athisake; Sarapukdee, Pongsak; Rattanavarin, Santi; Jolivot, Romuald; Jarujareet, Ungkarn; Plaimas, Kitiporn; Bhattarakosol, Parvapan; Patumraj, Suthiluk; Piyawattanametha, Wibool

    2015-04-01

    Protein p(16INK4a) (p16) is a well-known biomarker for diagnosis of human papillomavirus (HPV) related cancers. In this work, we identify novel p16 binding peptides by using phage display selection method. A random heptamer phage display library was screened on purified recombinant p16 protein-coated plates to elute only the bound phages from p16 surfaces. Binding affinity of the bound phages was compared with each other by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), fluorescence imaging technique, and bioinformatic computations. Binding specificity and binding selectivity of the best candidate phage-displayed p16 binding peptide were evaluated by peptide blocking experiment in competition with p16 monoclonal antibody and fluorescence imaging technique, respectively. Five candidate phage-displayed peptides were isolated from the phage display selection method. All candidate p16 binding phages show better binding affinity than wild-type phage in ELISA test, but only three of them can discriminate p16-overexpressing cancer cell, CaSki, from normal uterine fibroblast cell, HUF, with relative fluorescence intensities from 2.6 to 4.2-fold greater than those of wild-type phage. Bioinformatic results indicate that peptide 'Ser-His-Ser-Leu-Leu-Ser-Ser' binds to p16 molecule with the best binding score and does not interfere with the common protein functions of p16. Peptide blocking experiment shows that the phage-displayed peptide 'Ser-His-Ser-Leu-Leu-Ser-Ser' can conceal p16 from monoclonal antibody interaction. This phage clone also selectively interacts with the p16 positive cell lines, and thus, it can be applied for p16-overexpressing cell detection. Copyright © 2015 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Purification of phage display-modified bacteriophage T4 by affinity chromatography

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Affinity chromatography is one of the most efficient protein purification strategies. This technique comprises a one-step procedure with a purification level in the order of several thousand-fold, adaptable for various proteins, differentiated in their size, shape, charge, and other properties. The aim of this work was to verify the possibility of applying affinity chromatography in bacteriophage purification, with the perspective of therapeutic purposes. T4 is a large, icosahedral phage that may serve as an efficient display platform for foreign peptides or proteins. Here we propose a new method of T4 phage purification by affinity chromatography after its modification with affinity tags (GST and Histag) by in vivo phage display. As any permanent introduction of extraneous DNA into a phage genome is strongly unfavourable for medical purposes, integration of foreign motifs with the phage genome was not applied. The phage was propagated in bacteria expressing fusions of the phage protein Hoc with affinity tags from bacterial plasmids, independently from the phage expression system. Results Elution profiles of phages modified with the specific affinity motifs (compared to non-specific phages) document their binding to the affinity resins and effective elution with standard competitive agents. Non-specific binding was also observed, but was 102-105 times weaker than the specific one. GST-modified bacteriophages were also effectively released from glutathione Sepharose by proteolytic cleavage. The possibility of proteolytic release was designed at the stage of expression vector construction. Decrease in LPS content in phage preparations was dependent on the washing intensity; intensive washing resulted in preparations of 11-40 EU/ml. Conclusions Affinity tags can be successfully incorporated into the T4 phage capsid by the in vivo phage display technique and they strongly elevate bacteriophage affinity to a specific resin. Affinity chromatography can be

  17. Bacteriophages and phage-derived proteins--application approaches.

    PubMed

    Drulis-Kawa, Zuzanna; Majkowska-Skrobek, Grazyna; Maciejewska, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Currently, the bacterial resistance, especially to most commonly used antibiotics has proved to be a severe therapeutic problem. Nosocomial and community-acquired infections are usually caused by multidrug resistant strains. Therefore, we are forced to develop an alternative or supportive treatment for successful cure of life-threatening infections. The idea of using natural bacterial pathogens such as bacteriophages is already well known. Many papers have been published proving the high antibacterial efficacy of lytic phages tested in animal models as well as in the clinic. Researchers have also investigated the application of non-lytic phages and temperate phages, with promising results. Moreover, the development of molecular biology and novel generation methods of sequencing has opened up new possibilities in the design of engineered phages and recombinant phage-derived proteins. Encouraging performances were noted especially for phage enzymes involved in the first step of viral infection responsible for bacterial envelope degradation, named depolymerases. There are at least five major groups of such enzymes - peptidoglycan hydrolases, endosialidases, endorhamnosidases, alginate lyases and hyaluronate lyases - that have application potential. There is also much interest in proteins encoded by lysis cassette genes (holins, endolysins, spanins) responsible for progeny release during the phage lytic cycle. In this review, we discuss several issues of phage and phage-derived protein application approaches in therapy, diagnostics and biotechnology in general.

  18. Bacteriophages and Phage-Derived Proteins – Application Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Drulis-Kawa, Zuzanna; Majkowska-Skrobek, Grazyna; Maciejewska, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Currently, the bacterial resistance, especially to most commonly used antibiotics has proved to be a severe therapeutic problem. Nosocomial and community-acquired infections are usually caused by multidrug resistant strains. Therefore, we are forced to develop an alternative or supportive treatment for successful cure of life-threatening infections. The idea of using natural bacterial pathogens such as bacteriophages is already well known. Many papers have been published proving the high antibacterial efficacy of lytic phages tested in animal models as well as in the clinic. Researchers have also investigated the application of non-lytic phages and temperate phages, with promising results. Moreover, the development of molecular biology and novel generation methods of sequencing has opened up new possibilities in the design of engineered phages and recombinant phage-derived proteins. Encouraging performances were noted especially for phage enzymes involved in the first step of viral infection responsible for bacterial envelope degradation, named depolymerases. There are at least five major groups of such enzymes – peptidoglycan hydrolases, endosialidases, endorhamnosidases, alginate lyases and hyaluronate lyases – that have application potential. There is also much interest in proteins encoded by lysis cassette genes (holins, endolysins, spanins) responsible for progeny release during the phage lytic cycle. In this review, we discuss several issues of phage and phage-derived protein application approaches in therapy, diagnostics and biotechnology in general. PMID:25666799

  19. [Directed evolution of antibody molecules in phage-displayed combinatorial libraries].

    PubMed

    Fujii, Ikuo

    2007-01-01

    Advances in methods for conformational prediction, structural analysis and site-directed mutagenesis of proteins and peptides have contributed to the understanding of their structure and function. However, with the exception of a few successes, the generation of practical functional molecules solely by rational design remains a difficult challenge. The aim of our study is to investigate molecular design relying on evolutionary processes, called as "directed evolution", to generate a novel class of biofunctional molecules. This evolutionary approach consists of three steps; 1) constructions of protein/peptide libraries based on structural information, 2) expressions of the libraries on phage particles, and 3) selections with investigator-imposed selective pressures. In this work, we study on directed evolution with antibody libraries. We have succeeded in generating highly active catalytic antibodies in phage-displayed antibody (Fab) libraries. To evolve catalytic antibodies toward higher catalytic activity, we have mimicked an enzyme-evolutional process, in which an enzyme has evolved their ability to use binding energies for catalysis by increasing the affinity for the transition state of a reaction and decreasing the affinity for the ground state. Thus, phage-displayed libraries derived from an original catalytic antibody were selected against a newly-devised TSA, which was programmed to optimize the differential affinity for the transition state relative to the ground state, to provide variants with improved reaction rates (k(cat)). The in vitro evolution has great potential for generating novel catalysts as well as for providing opportunities to examine the evolutionary dynamics of enzymes.

  20. Efficient identification of phosphatidylserine-binding proteins by ORF phage display

    SciTech Connect

    Caberoy, Nora B.; Zhou, Yixiong; Alvarado, Gabriela; Fan, Xianqun; Li, Wei

    2009-08-14

    To efficiently elucidate the biological roles of phosphatidylserine (PS), we developed open-reading-frame (ORF) phage display to identify PS-binding proteins. The procedure of phage panning was optimized with a phage clone expressing MFG-E8, a well-known PS-binding protein. Three rounds of phage panning with ORF phage display cDNA library resulted in {approx}300-fold enrichment in PS-binding activity. A total of 17 PS-binding phage clones were identified. Unlike phage display with conventional cDNA libraries, all 17 PS-binding clones were ORFs encoding 13 real proteins. Sequence analysis revealed that all identified PS-specific phage clones had dimeric basic amino acid residues. GST fusion proteins were expressed for 3 PS-binding proteins and verified for their binding activity to PS liposomes, but not phosphatidylcholine liposomes. These results elucidated previously unknown PS-binding proteins and demonstrated that ORF phage display is a versatile technology capable of efficiently identifying binding proteins for non-protein molecules like PS.

  1. Chromato-panning: an efficient new mode of identifying suitable ligands from phage display libraries

    PubMed Central

    Noppe, Wim; Plieva, Fatima; Galaev, Igor Yu; Pottel, Hans; Deckmyn, Hans; Mattiasson, Bo

    2009-01-01

    Background Phage Display technology is a well established technique for high throughput screening of affinity ligands. Here we describe a new compact chromato-panning procedure for selection of suitable binders from a phage peptide display library. Results Both phages and E. coli cells pass non-hindered through the interconnected pores of macroporous gel, so called cryogel. After coupling a ligand to a monolithic cryogel column, the phage library was applied on the column and non-bound phages were washed out. The selection of strong phage-binders was achieved already after the first panning cycle due to the efficient separation of phage-binders from phage-non-binders in chromatographic mode rather than in batch mode as in traditional biopanning procedures. E. coli cells were applied on the column for infection with the specifically bound phages. Conclusion Chromato-panning allows combining several steps of the panning procedure resulting in 4–8 fold decrease of total time needed for phage selection. PMID:19292898

  2. Towards proteome scale antibody selections using phage display.

    PubMed

    Mersmann, Michael; Meier, Doris; Mersmann, Jana; Helmsing, Saskia; Nilsson, Peter; Gräslund, Susanne; Colwill, Karen; Hust, Michael; Dübel, Stefan

    2010-05-31

    In vitro antibody generation by panning a large universal gene library with phage display was employed to generate antibodies to more than 60 different antigens. Of particular interest was a comparison of pannings on 20 different SH2 domains provided by the Structural Genomics Consortium (SGC). Streamlined methods for high throughput antibody generation developed within the 'Antibody Factory' of the German National Genome Research Network (NGFN) were demonstrated to minimise effort and provide a reliable and robust source for antibodies. For the SH2 domains, in two successive series of selections, 2668 clones were analysed, resulting in 347 primary hits in ELISA. Half of these hits were further analysed, and more than 90 different scFv antibodies to all antigens were identified. The validation of selected antibodies by cross-reactivity ELISA, western blot and on protein microarrays demonstrated the versatility of the in vitro antibody selection pipeline to generate a renewable resource of highly specific monoclonal binders in proteome scale numbers with substantially reduced effort and time.

  3. Semi-Parametric Bayesian Inference for Phage Display Data

    PubMed Central

    León-Novelo, Luis G.; Müller, Peter; Arap, Wadih; Kolonin, Mikhail; Sun, Jessica; Pasqualini, Renata; Do, Kim-Anh

    2012-01-01

    Summary We discuss inference for a human phage display experiment with three stages. The data are tripeptide counts by tissue and stage. The primary aim of the experiment is to identify ligands that bind with high affinity to a given tissue. We formalize the research question as inference about the monotonicity of mean counts over stages. The inference goal is then to identify a list of peptide-tissue pairs with significant increase over stages. We use a semi-parametric Dirichlet process mixture of Poisson model. The posterior distribution under this model allows the desired inference about the monotonicity of mean counts. However, the desired inference summary as a list of peptide-tissue pairs with significant increase involves a massive multiplicity problem. We consider two alternative approaches to address this multiplicity issue. First we propose an approach based on the control of the posterior expected false discovery rate. We notice that the implied solution ignores the relative size of the increase. This motivates a second approach based on a utility function that includes explicit weights for the size of the increase. PMID:23339534

  4. Specific ligands for classical swine fever virus screened from landscape phage display library.

    PubMed

    Yin, Long; Luo, Yuzi; Liang, Bo; Wang, Fei; Du, Min; Petrenko, Valery A; Qiu, Hua-Ji; Liu, Aihua

    2014-09-01

    Classical swine fever (CSF) is a devastating infectious disease caused by classical swine fever virus (CSFV). The screening of CSFV-specific ligands is of great significance for diagnosis and treatment of CSF. Affinity selection from random peptide libraries is an efficient approach to discover ligands with high stability and specificity. Here, we screened phage ligands for the CSFV E2 protein from f8/8 landscape phage display library by biopanning and obtained four phage clones specific for the E2 protein of CSFV. Viral blocking assays indicated that the phage clone displaying the octapeptide sequence DRATSSNA remarkably inhibited the CSFV replication in PK-15 cells at a titer of 10(10) transduction units, as evidenced by significantly decreased viral RNA copies and viral titers. The phage-displayed E2-binding peptides have the potential to be developed as antivirals for CSF.

  5. Phage-display selection on tumor histological specimens with laser capture microdissection

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yujing; Shukla, Girja S.; Weaver, Donald; Pero, Stephanie C.; Krag, David N.

    2010-01-01

    A method was developed to obtain phage-display ligands that bind to a select population of cells in histological specimens of freshly harvested solid human cancers. It combines phage-display panning with laser capture microdissection (LCM). This method allows selection of phage ligands bound to subpopulations of specific cells contained in tumor tissue on histological sections. Naïve phage scFv library was incubated directly on a histological section of human breast cancer that was snap frozen immediately after surgical resection. Tumor and stromal cells were captured by LCM and bound phages were recovered by bacterial infection. Individual phage clones selected after panning were evaluated for their binding ability by immunofluorescence staining on tumor tissue from the same patient. One phage-display antibody clone selected on tumor stroma showed selective binding on tumor stroma but did not bind to malignant cell population. The expressed scFv of this clone showed no significant binding to normal tissue, or 13 other breast cancers, or 4 colon cancer samples. Using the same method, phage display antibody clones were selected on tumor cells which showed binding to tumor cells and normal tissue. This method is applicable for selection of ligands to virtually any portion of a histological specimen amenable to LCM. This may speed the process of generating ligands to any subset of cells or noncellular feature present on histological specimens. PMID:19538966

  6. Quick selection of a chimeric T2 phage that displays active enzyme on the viral capsid.

    PubMed

    Tanji, Yasunori; Murofushi, Keita; Miyanaga, Kazuhiko

    2005-01-01

    We designed a bacteriophage T2 system to display proteins fused at the N-terminus of the head protein small outer capsid (SOC) of a T2 phage. To facilitate selection of chimeric phage, a T2 phage encoding the beta-galactosidase gene (betagal) upstream of the soc gene was constructed. The phage, named T2betaGal, produces blue plaques on agar plates containing XGal. Subsequently, a plasmid encoding the target protein upstream of soc was constructed and used to transform E. coli B(E) cells. Transformed cells were infected with T2betaGal and homologous recombination between phage DNA and the plasmid resulted in a chimeric phage that produced transparent plaques due to the excision of the betagal gene. Chitosanase of Bacillus sp. strain K17 (ChoK), consisting of 453 amino acids, was used as a model target protein. Recombinant T2 phage that produced ChoK was named T2ChoK. T2ChoK was produced from T2betaGal at a recombination frequency of about 0.1%. On the other hand, the value for T2betaGal produced from wild-type T2 was 0.001 %. This new system enables us to select recombinant phage very quickly and accurately. The number of molecules of ChoK was calculated at 14.7 per single phage. Latent period and burst size were estimated for the chimeric phages.

  7. Phage Display Technology in Biomaterials Engineering: Progress and Opportunities for Applications in Regenerative Medicine.

    PubMed

    Martins, Ivone M; Reis, Rui L; Azevedo, Helena S

    2016-11-18

    The field of regenerative medicine has been gaining momentum steadily over the past few years. The emphasis in regenerative medicine is to use various in vitro and in vivo approaches that leverage the intrinsic healing mechanisms of the body to treat patients with disabling injuries and chronic diseases such as diabetes, osteoarthritis, and degenerative disorders of the cardiovascular and central nervous system. Phage display has been successfully employed to identify peptide ligands for a wide variety of targets, ranging from relatively small molecules (enzymes, cell receptors) to inorganic, organic, and biological (tissues) materials. Over the past two decades, phage display technology has advanced tremendously and has become a powerful tool in the most varied fields of research, including biotechnology, materials science, cell biology, pharmacology, and diagnostics. The growing interest in and success of phage display libraries is largely due to its incredible versatility and practical use. This review discusses the potential of phage display technology in biomaterials engineering for applications in regenerative medicine.

  8. Phage display-based strategies for cloning and optimization of monoclonal antibodies directed against human pathogens.

    PubMed

    Clementi, Nicola; Mancini, Nicasio; Solforosi, Laura; Castelli, Matteo; Clementi, Massimo; Burioni, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    In the last two decades, several phage display-selected monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have been described in the literature and a few of them have managed to reach the clinics. Among these, the anti-respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) Palivizumab, a phage-display optimized mAb, is the only marketed mAb directed against microbial pathogens. Palivizumab is a clear example of the importance of choosing the most appropriate strategy when selecting or optimizing an anti-infectious mAb. From this perspective, the extreme versatility of phage-display technology makes it a useful tool when setting up different strategies for the selection of mAbs directed against human pathogens, especially when their possible clinical use is considered. In this paper, we review the principal phage display strategies used to select anti-infectious mAbs, with particular attention focused on those used against hypervariable pathogens, such as HCV and influenza viruses.

  9. Phage display biopanning and isolation of target-unrelated peptides: in search of nonspecific binders hidden in a combinatorial library.

    PubMed

    Bakhshinejad, Babak; Zade, Hesam Motaleb; Shekarabi, Hosna Sadat Zahed; Neman, Sara

    2016-12-01

    Phage display is known as a powerful methodology for the identification of targeting ligands that specifically bind to a variety of targets. The high-throughput screening of phage display combinatorial peptide libraries is performed through the affinity selection method of biopanning. Although phage display selection has proven very successful in the discovery of numerous high-affinity target-binding peptides with potential application in drug discovery and delivery, the enrichment of false-positive target-unrelated peptides (TUPs) without any actual affinity towards the target remains a major problem of library screening. Selection-related TUPs may emerge because of binding to the components of the screening system rather than the target. Propagation-related TUPs may arise as a result of faster growth rate of some phage clones enabling them to outcompete slow-propagating clones. Amplification of the library between rounds of biopanning makes a significant contribution to the selection of phage clones with propagation advantage. Distinguishing nonspecific TUPs from true target binders is of particular importance for the translation of biopanning findings from basic research to clinical applications. Different experimental and in silico approaches are applied to assess the specificity of phage display-derived peptides towards the target. Bioinformatic tools are playing a rapidly growing role in the analysis of biopanning data and identification of target-irrelevant TUPs. Recent progress in the introduction of efficient strategies for TUP detection holds enormous promise for the discovery of clinically relevant cell- and tissue-homing peptides and paves the way for the development of novel targeted diagnostic and therapeutic platforms in pharmaceutical areas.

  10. Phage displayed peptides/antibodies recognizing growth factors and their tyrosine kinase receptors as tools for anti-cancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Ronca, Roberto; Benzoni, Patrizia; De Luca, Angela; Crescini, Elisabetta; Dell'era, Patrizia

    2012-01-01

    The basic idea of displaying peptides on a phage, introduced by George P. Smith in 1985, was greatly developed and improved by McCafferty and colleagues at the MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology and, later, by Barbas and colleagues at the Scripps Research Institute. Their approach was dedicated to building a system for the production of antibodies, similar to a naïve B cell repertoire, in order to by-pass the standard hybridoma technology that requires animal immunization. Both groups merged the phage display technology with an antibody library to obtain a huge number of phage variants, each of them carrying a specific antibody ready to bind its target molecule, allowing, later on, rare phage (one in a million) to be isolated by affinity chromatography. Here, we will briefly review the basis of the technology and the therapeutic application of phage-derived bioactive molecules when addressed against key players in tumor development and progression: growth factors and their tyrosine kinase receptors.

  11. Screening specific polypeptides of breast cancer stem cells from a phage display random peptide library

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fei; Qi, Chun-Ling; Kong, Mian; Liu, Ting-Ting; Li, Lei; Li, Bao-Jiang

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to identify polypeptides that specifically bond to breast cancer stem cells from a phage display random 12 peptide library, in addition to the affinity and specificity of polypeptides. A phage display random 12 peptide library was screened using breast cancer stem cells as targets isolated from the MDA-MB-231 cell line using the serum-free culture technique with hs578bst and MDA-MB-231 cells as subtract-screening cells. Positive and specific binding clones were amplified and sent for sequencing. The affinity and specificity of the positive clones were subsequently identified by ELISA and 3,3′-diaminobenzidine staining. The results demonstrated that phages were gathered ~500 times following three rounds of biopanning. ELISA identified that the affinity to breast cancer stem cells of the no. 6 phage was 6.14 times higher than that in the control group. In addition, immunohistochemistry observed that the no. 6 phage exhibited high-specificity bonding to breast cancer stem cells, and the peptide sequence of the positive phage was GYSASRSTIPGK following DNA sequencing and translation. Thus, the present study isolated a specific peptide that bonds to breast cancer stem cells from a phage display random peptide library, which may facilitate further studies regarding the stem cell-targeted therapy of breast cancer. PMID:28105180

  12. Biopanning Phage-Display Libraries on Small Tissue Sections Captured by Laser Capture Microdissection

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yujing; Shukla, Girja S; Kennedy, Guy G; Warshaw, David M; Weaver, Donald L; Pero, Stephanie C; Floyd, Lisa; Krag, David N

    2010-01-01

    Phage-display technology has been widely used for developing tumor-targeting agents. Laser capture microdissection (LCM) has proven to be an accurate method to select specific cells from histological sections. Our goal was to develop a method to combine phage-display with LCM to obtain phage-displayed ligands that bind to selected cells in human solid tumors. Two panning strategies were evaluated and optimized. The first strategy was to pan on patient tissue mounted to LCM slides before LCM occurred. The poor panning output showed that phage did not tolerate the drying conditions during LCM. The second strategy was to pan on tumor cells from the patient tumor tissue that were isolated by LCM. The catapulted tumor cells were transferred to a filter unit which retained cells but allowed rinsing of unbound phage. Six commercially available filter units were evaluated and the one with the lowest nonspecific binding to phage was selected for the panning steps. The smallest number of cells (500) in which panning could be successfully accomplished was also determined. A micropipette system was developed to further decrease background by removing catapulted cells from the filter unit after panning was complete. This left behind nearly all background binding phage in the filter unit. This strategy led to the selection of individual phage antibody clones (5 out of 79 tested) specific for tumor cells of the patient’s cancer tissue. Immunofluorescence staining on tumor tissues from the same patient showed that these clones have selective signals on tumor island cells, while the scFv library only showed low nonspecific signals on tumor tissues. We established a method of panning on a small number of LCM-captured solid tumor specimens. The quick identification of specific phage-displayed antibodies in the cancer tissue of human patients will greatly enhance the therapy and diagnosis of cancer. PMID:21822461

  13. Identification of immunogenic polypeptides from a Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae genome library by phage display.

    PubMed

    Kügler, Jonas; Nieswandt, Simone; Gerlach, Gerald F; Meens, Jochen; Schirrmann, Thomas; Hust, Michael

    2008-09-01

    The identification of immunogenic polypeptides of pathogens is helpful for the development of diagnostic assays and therapeutic applications like vaccines. Routinely, these proteins are identified by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and Western blot using convalescent serum, followed by mass spectrometry. This technology, however, is limited, because low or differentially expressed proteins, e.g. dependent on pathogen-host interaction, cannot be identified. In this work, we developed and improved a M13 genomic phage display-based method for the selection of immunogenic polypeptides of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae, a pathogen causing porcine enzootic pneumonia. The fragmented genome of M. hyopneumoniae was cloned into a phage display vector, and the genomic library was packaged using the helperphage Hyperphage to enrich open reading frames (ORFs). Afterwards, the phage display library was screened by panning using convalescent serum. The analysis of individual phage clones resulted in the identification of five genes encoding immunogenic proteins, only two of which had been previously identified and described as immunogenic. This M13 genomic phage display, directly combining ORF enrichment and the presentation of the corresponding polypeptide on the phage surface, complements proteome-based methods for the identification of immunogenic polypeptides and is particularly well suited for the use in mycoplasma species.

  14. Selection of phage-displayed peptides for the detection of imidacloprid in water and soil.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhiping; Liu, Jianfeng; Wang, Kai; Li, Wenhui; Shelver, Weilin L; Li, Qing X; Li, Ji; Xu, Ting

    2015-09-15

    Imidacloprid is the most widely used neonicotinoid insecticide in the world and shows widespread environment and human exposures. A phage clone designated L7-1 that selectively binds to imidacloprid was selected from a commercial phage display library containing linear 7-mer randomized amino acid residues. Using the clone L7-1, a competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for imidacloprid was developed. The half-maximum signal inhibition concentration (IC50) and the limit of detection (LOD) of the phage ELISA for imidacloprid were 96 and 2.3 ng ml(-1), respectively. This phage ELISA showed relatively low cross-reactivity with all of the tested compounds structurally similar to imidacloprid, less than 2% with the exception of 6-chloronicotinic acid, a metabolite of imidacloprid that showed 11.5%. The average recoveries of the phage ELISA for imidacloprid in water and soil samples were in the ranges of 74.6 to 86.3% and 72.5 to 93.6%, respectively. The results of the competitive phage ELISA for imidacloprid in the fortified samples agreed well with those of a high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method. The simple phage-displayed peptide technology has been proven to be a convenient and efficient method for the development of an alternative format of ELISA for small molecules.

  15. Display of HIV-1 Envelope Protein on Lambda Phage Scaffold as a Vaccine Platform.

    PubMed

    Mattiacio, Jonelle L; Brewer, Matt; Dewhurst, Stephen

    2017-01-01

    The generation of a strong antibody response to target antigens is a major goal for vaccine development. Here we describe the display of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) envelope spike protein (Env) on a virus-like scaffold provided by the lambda phage capsid. Phage vectors, in general, have advantages over mammalian virus vectors due to their genetic tractability, inexpensive production, suitability for scale-up, as well as their physical stability, making them an attractive vaccine platform.

  16. Progress in phage display: evolution of the technique and its application.

    PubMed

    Bratkovic, Tomaz

    2010-03-01

    Phage display, the presentation of (poly)peptides as fusions to capsid proteins on the surface of bacterial viruses, celebrates its 25th birthday in 2010. The technique, coupled with in vitro selection, enables rapid identification and optimization of proteins based on their structural or functional properties. In the last two decades, it has advanced tremendously and has become widely accepted by the scientific community. This by no means exhaustive review aims to inform the reader of the key modifications in phage display. Novel display formats, innovative library designs and screening strategies are discussed. I will also briefly review some recent uses of the technology to illustrate its incredible versatility.

  17. Exploitation of rolling circle amplification for the construction of large phage-display antibody libraries.

    PubMed

    Shahsavarian, Melody A; Le Minoux, Damien; Matti, Kalyankumar M; Kaveri, Srini; Lacroix-Desmazes, Sébastien; Boquet, Didier; Friboulet, Alain; Avalle, Bérangère; Padiolleau-Lefèvre, Séverine

    2014-05-01

    Phage display antibody libraries have proven to have a significant role in the discovery of therapeutic antibodies and polypeptides with desired biological and physicochemical properties. Obtaining a large and diverse phage display antibody library, however, is always a challenging task. Various steps of this technique can still undergo optimization in order to obtain an efficient library. In the construction of a single chain fragment variable (scFv) phage display library, the cloning of the scFv fragments into a phagemid vector is of crucial importance. An efficient restriction enzyme digestion of the scFv DNA leads to its proper ligation with the phagemid followed by its successful cloning and expression. Here, we are reporting a different approach to enhance the efficiency of the restriction enzyme digestion step. We have exploited rolling circle amplification (RCA) to produce a long strand of DNA with tandem repeats of scFv sequences, which is found to be highly susceptible to restriction digestion. With this important modification, we are able to construct a large phage display antibody library of naive SJL/J mice. The size of the library is estimated as ~10(8) clones. The number of clones containing a scFv fragment is estimated at 90%. Hence, the present results could considerably aid the utilization of the phage-display technique in order to get an efficiently large antibody library.

  18. Localization of melanin in conidia of Alternaria alternata using phage display antibodies.

    PubMed

    Carzaniga, Raffaella; Fiocco, Daniela; Bowyer, Paul; O'Connell, Richard J

    2002-03-01

    Melanins derived from 1,8-dihydroxynaphthalene (DHN) are important for the pathogenicity and survival of fungi causing disease in both plants and animals. However, precise information on their location within fungal cell walls is lacking. To obtain antibodies for the immunocytochemical localization of melanin, 83 phage antibodies binding to 1,8-DHN were selected from a naive semisynthetic single-chain Fv (scFv) phage display library. Sequence analysis of the heavy chain binding domains of 17 antibodies showed a high frequency of positively charged amino acids. One antibody, designated M1, was characterized in detail. M1 bound specifically to 1,8-DHN in competitive inhibition enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, showing no cross-reaction with nine structurally related phenolic compounds. Epitope recognition required two hydroxyl groups in a 1,8 configuration. M1 also bound to naturally occurring melanin isolated from mycelia of Alternaria alternata, suggesting that epitopes remain accessible in polymerized melanin. Transmission electron microscopy-immunogold labeling, using M1 in the form of soluble scFv fragments, showed that melanin was located in the septa and outer (primary) walls of wild-type A. alternata conidia, but not those of an albino mutant, AKT88-1. The M1 antibody provides a new tool for detecting melanized pathogens in plant and animal tissues and for precisely mapping the distribution of the polymer within spores, appressoria, and hyphae.

  19. Survey on the phage resistance mechanisms displayed by a dairy Lactobacillus helveticus strain.

    PubMed

    Zago, Miriam; Orrù, Luigi; Rossetti, Lia; Lamontanara, Antonella; Fornasari, Maria Emanuela; Bonvini, Barbara; Meucci, Aurora; Carminati, Domenico; Cattivelli, Luigi; Giraffa, Giorgio

    2017-09-01

    In this study the presence and functionality of phage defence mechanisms in Lactobacillus helveticus ATCC 10386, a strain of dairy origin which is sensitive to ΦLh56, were investigated. After exposure of ATCC 10386 to ΦLh56, the whole-genome sequences of ATCC 10386 and of a phage-resistant derivative (LhM3) were compared. LhM3 showed deletions in the S-layer protein and a higher expression of the genes involved in the restriction/modification (R/M) system. Genetic data were substantiated by measurements of bacteriophage adsorption rates, efficiency of plaquing, cell wall protein size and by gene expression analysis. In LhM3 two phage resistance mechanisms, the inhibition of phage adsorption and the upregulation of Type I R/M genes, take place and explain its resistance to ΦLh56. Although present in both ATCC 10386 and LhM3 genomes, the CRISPR machinery did not seem to play a role in the phage resistance of LhM3. Overall, the natural selection of phage resistant strains resulted successful in detecting variants carrying multiple phage defence mechanisms in L. helveticus. The concurrent presence of multiple phage-resistance systems should provide starter strains with increased fitness and robustness in dairy ecosystems. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Antibody VH and VL recombination using phage and ribosome display technologies reveals distinct structural routes to affinity improvements with VH-VL interface residues providing important structural diversity.

    PubMed

    Groves, Maria A T; Amanuel, Lily; Campbell, Jamie I; Rees, D Gareth; Sridharan, Sudharsan; Finch, Donna K; Lowe, David C; Vaughan, Tristan J

    2014-01-01

    In vitro selection technologies are an important means of affinity maturing antibodies to generate the optimal therapeutic profile for a particular disease target. Here, we describe the isolation of a parent antibody, KENB061 using phage display and solution phase selections with soluble biotinylated human IL-1R1. KENB061 was affinity matured using phage display and targeted mutagenesis of VH and VL CDR3 using NNS randomization. Affinity matured VHCDR3 and VLCDR3 library blocks were recombined and selected using phage and ribosome display protocol. A direct comparison of the phage and ribosome display antibodies generated was made to determine their functional characteristics.In our analyses, we observed distinct differences in the pattern of beneficial mutations in antibodies derived from phage and ribosome display selections, and discovered the lead antibody Jedi067 had a ~3700-fold improvement in KD over the parent KENB061. We constructed a homology model of the Fv region of Jedi067 to map the specific positions where mutations occurred in the CDR3 loops. For VL CDR3, positions 94 to 97 carry greater diversity in the ribosome display variants compared with the phage display. The positions 95a, 95b and 96 of VLCDR3 form part of the interface with VH in this model. The model shows that positions 96, 98, 100e, 100f, 100 g, 100h, 100i and 101 of the VHCDR3 include residues at the VH and VL interface. Importantly, Leu96 and Tyr98 are conserved at the interface positions in both phage and ribosome display indicating their importance in maintaining the VH-VL interface. For antibodies derived from ribosome display, there is significant diversity at residues 100a to 100f of the VH CDR3 compared with phage display. A unique deletion of isoleucine at position 102 of the lead candidate, Jedi067, also occurs in the VHCDR3.As anticipated, recombining the mutations via ribosome display led to a greater structural diversity, particularly in the heavy chain CDR3, which in turn

  1. Phage display and hybridoma generation of antibodies to human CXCR2 yields antibodies with distinct mechanisms and epitopes.

    PubMed

    Rossant, Christine J; Carroll, Danielle; Huang, Ling; Elvin, John; Neal, Frances; Walker, Edward; Benschop, Joris J; Kim, Eldar E; Barry, Simon T; Vaughan, Tristan J

    2014-01-01

    Generation of functional antibodies against integral membrane proteins such as the G-protein coupled receptor CXCR2 is technically challenging for several reasons, including limited epitope accessibility, the requirement for a lipid environment to maintain structure and their existence in dynamic conformational states. Antibodies to human CXCR2 were generated by immunization in vivo and by in vitro selection methods. Whole cell immunization of transgenic mice and screening of phage display libraries using CXCR2 magnetic proteoliposomes resulted in the isolation of antibodies with distinct modes of action. The hybridoma-derived antibody fully inhibited IL-8 and Gro-α responses in calcium flux and β-arrestin recruitment assays. The phage-display derived antibodies were allosteric antagonists that showed ligand dependent differences in functional assays. The hybridoma and phage display antibodies did not cross-compete in epitope competition assays and mapping using linear and CLIPS peptides confirmed that they recognized distinct epitopes of human CXCR2. This illustrates the benefits of using parallel antibody isolation approaches with different antigen presentation methods to successfully generate functionally and mechanistically diverse antagonistic antibodies to human CXCR2. The method is likely to be broadly applicable to other complex membrane proteins.

  2. Phage display and hybridoma generation of antibodies to human CXCR2 yields antibodies with distinct mechanisms and epitopes

    PubMed Central

    Rossant, Christine J; Carroll, Danielle; Huang, Ling; Elvin, John; Neal, Frances; Walker, Edward; Benschop, Joris J; Kim, Eldar E; Barry, Simon T; Vaughan, Tristan J

    2014-01-01

    Generation of functional antibodies against integral membrane proteins such as the G-protein coupled receptor CXCR2 is technically challenging for several reasons, including limited epitope accessibility, the requirement for a lipid environment to maintain structure and their existence in dynamic conformational states. Antibodies to human CXCR2 were generated by immunization in vivo and by in vitro selection methods. Whole cell immunization of transgenic mice and screening of phage display libraries using CXCR2 magnetic proteoliposomes resulted in the isolation of antibodies with distinct modes of action. The hybridoma-derived antibody fully inhibited IL-8 and Gro-α responses in calcium flux and β-arrestin recruitment assays. The phage-display derived antibodies were allosteric antagonists that showed ligand dependent differences in functional assays. The hybridoma and phage display antibodies did not cross-compete in epitope competition assays and mapping using linear and CLIPS peptides confirmed that they recognized distinct epitopes of human CXCR2. This illustrates the benefits of using parallel antibody isolation approaches with different antigen presentation methods to successfully generate functionally and mechanistically diverse antagonistic antibodies to human CXCR2. The method is likely to be broadly applicable to other complex membrane proteins. PMID:25484064

  3. Exploring the Secretomes of Microbes and Microbial Communities Using Filamentous Phage Display

    PubMed Central

    Gagic, Dragana; Ciric, Milica; Wen, Wesley X.; Ng, Filomena; Rakonjac, Jasna

    2016-01-01

    Microbial surface and secreted proteins (the secretome) contain a large number of proteins that interact with other microbes, host and/or environment. These proteins are exported by the coordinated activities of the protein secretion machinery present in the cell. A group of bacteriophage, called filamentous phage, have the ability to hijack bacterial protein secretion machinery in order to amplify and assemble via a secretion-like process. This ability has been harnessed in the use of filamentous phage of Escherichia coli in biotechnology applications, including screening large libraries of variants for binding to “bait” of interest, from tissues in vivo to pure proteins or even inorganic substrates. In this review we discuss the roles of secretome proteins in pathogenic and non-pathogenic bacteria and corresponding secretion pathways. We describe the basics of phage display technology and its variants applied to discovery of bacterial proteins that are implicated in colonization of host tissues and pathogenesis, as well as vaccine candidates through filamentous phage display library screening. Secretome selection aided by next-generation sequence analysis was successfully applied for selective display of the secretome at a microbial community scale, the latter revealing the richness of secretome functions of interest and surprising versatility in filamentous phage display of secretome proteins from large number of Gram-negative as well as Gram-positive bacteria and archaea. PMID:27092113

  4. Novel peptides functionally targeting in vivo human lung cancer discovered by in vivo peptide displayed phage screening.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyoung Jin; Lee, Jae Hee; Chung, Hye Kyung; Choi, Jinhyang; Park, Jaesook; Park, Seok Soon; Ju, Eun Jin; Park, Jin; Shin, Seol Hwa; Park, Hye Ji; Ko, Eun Jung; Suh, Nayoung; Kim, InKi; Hwang, Jung Jin; Song, Si Yeol; Jeong, Seong-Yun; Choi, Eun Kyung

    2015-02-01

    Discovery of the cancer-specific peptidic ligands have been emphasized for active targeting drug delivery system and non-invasive imaging. For the discovery of useful and applicable peptidic ligands, in vivo peptide-displayed phage screening has been performed in this study using a xenograft mouse model as a mimic microenvironment to tumor. To seek human lung cancer-specific peptides, M13 phage library displaying 2.9 × 10(9) random peptides was intravenously injected into mouse model bearing A549-derived xenograft tumor through the tail vein. Then the phages emerged from a course of four rounds of biopanning in the xenograft tumor tissue. Novel peptides were categorized into four groups according to a sequence-homology phylogenicity, and in vivo tumor-targeting capacity of these peptides was validated by whole body imaging with Cy5.5-labeled phages in various cancer types. The result revealed that novel peptides accumulated only in adenocarcinoma lung cancer cell-derived xenograft tissue. For further confirmation of the specific targeting ability, in vitro cell-binding assay and immunohistochemistry in vivo tumor tissue were performed with a selected peptide. The peptide was found to bind intensely to lung cancer cells both in vitro and in vivo, which was efficiently compromised with unlabeled phages in an in vitro competition assay. In conclusion, the peptides specifically targeting human lung cancer were discovered in this study, which is warranted to provide substantive feasibilities for drug delivery and imaging in terms of a novel targeted therapeutics and diagnostics.

  5. Array-in-well binding assay for multiparameter screening of phage displayed antibodies.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Gamarra, Susan; Hattara, Liisa; Batra, Gaurav; Saviranta, Petri; Lamminmäki, Urpo

    2017-03-01

    Phage display is a well-established and powerful tool for the development of recombinant antibodies. In a standard phage display selection process using a high quality antibody phage library, a large number of unique antibody clones can be generated in short time. However, the pace of the antibody discovery project eventually depends on the methodologies used in the next screening phase to identify the clones with the most promising binding characteristics e.g., in terms of specificity, affinity and epitope. Here, we report an array-in-well binding assay, a miniaturized and multiplexed immunoassay that integrates the epitope mapping to the evaluation of the binding activity of phage displayed antibody fragments in a single well. The array-in-well assay design used here incorporates a set of partially overlapping 15-mer peptides covering the complete primary sequence of the target antigen, the intact antigen itself and appropriate controls printed as an array with 10×10 layout at the bottom of a well of a 96-well microtiter plate. The streptavidin-coated surface of the well facilitates the immobilization of the biotinylated analytes as well-confined spots. Phage displayed antibody fragments bound to the analyte spots are traced using anti-phage antibody labelled with horseradish peroxidase for tyramide signal amplification based highly sensitive detection. In this study, we generated scFv antibodies against HIV-1 p24 protein using a synthetic antibody phage library, evaluated the binders with array-in-well binding assay and further classified them into epitopic families based on their capacity to recognize linear epitopes. The array-in-well assay enables the integration of epitope mapping to the screening assay for early classification of antibodies with simplicity and speed of a standard ELISA procedure to advance the antibody development projects. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Is phage display technology on target for developing peptide-based cancer drugs?

    PubMed

    Landon, Linda A; Zou, Jun; Deutscher, Susan L

    2004-06-01

    New tumor targeting agents are required to advance cancer diagnosis and treatment. Bacteriophage (phage) display technology, a molecular genetic means of combinatorial drug discovery, is an emerging approach to identify and improve peptide molecules as pharmaceuticals. Peptides are thought to have clinically desirable benefits over currently used biomolecules, such as antibodies, because of their rapid blood clearance, increased diffusion and tissue penetration, non-immunogenic nature and ease of synthesis. Using phage display, one can rapidly and simultaneously survey billion-clone peptide libraries, resulting in large numbers of "hits". However, only a few lead compounds resulting from the hits historically reach the drug market. Hence determining which peptide may best translate into a useful drug is of particular importance. Examination of successfully marketed drugs has highlighted key features of a winning agent, including low molecular weight, high affinity, stability, solubility, lipophilicity and conformational rigidity. Although peptide modulators of tumor cell function and cancer targeting agents have been developed, the majority of peptide-based drugs reported thus far are immune and cardiac regulators. In this review, we will highlight how phage display has been employed to isolate peptides that target key steps in cancer progression--from tumor growth to metastasis--and how phage display technology can be harnessed to select a priori peptides with inherent features essential for anti-cancer drug efficacy. In 2003, phage display provided us with several novel peptides not only in clinical trials but approved by the FDA for use as therapeutics in a variety of diseases--suggesting that the future looks bright for phage display in anti-cancer drug development.

  7. Phage display selects for amylases with improved low pH starch-binding.

    PubMed

    Verhaert, Raymond M D; Beekwilder, Jules; Olsthoorn, René; van Duin, Jan; Quax, Wim J

    2002-06-13

    Directed evolution of secreted industrial enzymes is hampered by the lack of powerful selection techniques. We have explored surface display to select for enzyme variants with improved binding performance on complex polymeric substrates. By a combination of saturation mutagenesis and phage display we selected alpha-amylase variants, which have the ability to bind starch substrate at industrially preferred low pH conditions. First we displayed active alpha-amylase on the surface of phage fd. Secondly we developed a selection system that is based on the ability of alpha-amylase displaying phages to bind to cross-linked starch. This system was used to probe the involvement of specific beta-strands in substrate interaction. Finally, a saturated library of alpha-amylase mutants with one or more amino acid residues changed in their Cbeta4 starch-binding domain was subjected to phage display selection. Mutant molecules with good starch-binding and hydrolytic capacity could be isolated from the phage library by repeated binding and elution of phage particles at lowered pH value. Apart from the wild type alpha-amylase a specific subset of variants, with only changes in three out of the seven possible positions, was selected. All selected variants could hydrolyse starch and heptamaltose at low pH. Interestingly, variants were found with a starch hydrolysis ratio at pH 4.5/7.5 that is improved relative to the wild type alpha-amylase. These data demonstrate that useful alpha-amylase mutants can be selected via surface display on the basis of their binding properties to starch at lowered pH values.

  8. Specific and selective probes for Staphylococcus aureus from phage-displayed random peptide libraries.

    PubMed

    De Plano, Laura M; Carnazza, Santina; Messina, Grazia M L; Rizzo, Maria Giovanna; Marletta, Giovanni; Guglielmino, Salvatore P P

    2017-09-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a major human pathogen causing health care-associated and community-associated infections. Early diagnosis is essential to prevent disease progression and to reduce complications that can be serious. In this study, we selected, from a 9-mer phage peptide library, a phage clone displaying peptide capable of specific binding to S. aureus cell surface, namely St.au9IVS5 (sequence peptide RVRSAPSSS).The ability of the isolated phage clone to interact specifically with S. aureus and the efficacy of its bacteria-binding properties were established by using enzyme linked immune-sorbent assay (ELISA). We also demonstrated by Western blot analysis that the most reactive and selective phage peptide binds a 78KDa protein on the bacterial cell surface. Furthermore, we observed selectivity of phage-bacteria-binding allowing to identify clinical isolates of S. aureus in comparison with a panel of other bacterial species. In order to explore the possibility of realizing a selective bacteria biosensor device, based on immobilization of affinity-selected phage, we have studied the physisorbed phage deposition onto a mica surface. Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) was used to determine the organization of phage on mica surface and then the binding performance of mica-physisorbed phage to bacterial target was evaluated during the time by fluorescent microscopy. The system is able to bind specifically about 50% of S. aureus cells after 15' and 90% after one hour. Due to specificity and rapidness, this biosensing strategy paves the way to the further development of new cheap biosensors to be used in developing countries, as lab-on-chip (LOC) to detect bacterial agents in clinical diagnostics applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Identification of peptide sequences that target to the brain using in vivo phage display.

    PubMed

    Li, Jingwei; Zhang, Qizhi; Pang, Zhiqing; Wang, Yuchen; Liu, Qingfeng; Guo, Liangran; Jiang, Xinguo

    2012-06-01

    Phage display technology could provide a rapid means for the discovery of novel peptides. To find peptide ligands specific for the brain vascular receptors, we performed a modified phage display method. Phages were recovered from mice brain parenchyma after administrated with a random 7-mer peptide library intravenously. A longer circulation time was arranged according to the biodistributive brain/blood ratios of phage particles. Following sequential rounds of isolation, a number of phages were sequenced and a peptide sequence (CTSTSAPYC, denoted as PepC7) was identified. Clone 7-1, which encodes PepC7, exhibited translocation efficiency about 41-fold higher than the random library phage. Immunofluorescence analysis revealed that Clone 7-1 had a significant superiority on transport efficiency into the brain compared with native M13 phage. Clone 7-1 was inhibited from homing to the brain in a dose-dependent fashion when cyclic peptides of the same sequence were present in a competition assay. Interestingly, the linear peptide (ATSTSAPYA, Pep7) and a scrambled control peptide PepSC7 (CSPATSYTC) did not compete with the phage at the same tested concentration (0.2-200 pg). Labeled by Cy5.5, PepC7 exhibited significant brain-targeting capability in in vivo optical imaging analysis. The cyclic conformation of PepC7 formed by disulfide bond, and the correct structure itself play a critical role in maintaining the selectivity and affinity for the brain. In conclusion, PepC7 is a promising brain-target motif never been reported before and it could be applied to targeted drug delivery into the brain.

  10. Construction of human antibody gene libraries and selection of antibodies by phage display.

    PubMed

    Frenzel, André; Kügler, Jonas; Wilke, Sonja; Schirrmann, Thomas; Hust, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Antibody phage display is the most commonly used in vitro selection technology and has yielded thousands of useful antibodies for research, diagnostics, and therapy.The prerequisite for successful generation and development of human recombinant antibodies using phage display is the construction of a high-quality antibody gene library. Here, we describe the methods for the construction of human immune and naive scFv gene libraries.The success also depends on the panning strategy for the selection of binders from these libraries. In this article, we describe a panning strategy that is high-throughput compatible and allows parallel selection in microtiter plates.

  11. Combinatorial discovery of tumor targeting peptides using phage display.

    PubMed

    Landon, Linda A; Deutscher, Susan L

    2003-10-15

    Peptides possess appropriate pharmacokinetic properties to serve as cancer imaging or therapeutic targeting agents. Currently, only a small number of rationally-derived, labeled peptide analogues that target only a limited subset of antigens are available. Thus, finding new cancer targeting peptides is a central goal in the field of molecular targeting. Novel tumor-avid peptides can be efficiently identified via affinity selections using complex random peptide libraries containing millions of peptides that are displayed on bacteriophage. In vitro and in situ affinity selections may be used to identify peptides with high affinity for the target antigen in vitro. Unfortunately, it has been found that peptides selected in vitro or in situ may not effectively target tumors in vivo due to poor peptide stability and other problems. To improve in vivo targeting, methodological combinatorial chemistry innovations allow selections to be conducted in the environment of the whole animal. Thus, new targeting peptides with optimal in vivo properties can be selected in vivo in tumor-bearing animals. In vivo selections have been proven successful in identifying peptides that target the vasculature of specific organs. In addition, in vivo selections have identified peptides that bind specifically to the surface of or are internalized into tumor cells. In the future, direct selection of peptides for cancer imaging may be expedited using genetically engineered bacteriophage libraries that encode peptides with intrinsic radiometal-chelation or fluorescent sequences.

  12. Targeting pancreatic islets with phage display assisted by laser pressure catapult microdissection.

    PubMed

    Yao, Virginia J; Ozawa, Michael G; Trepel, Martin; Arap, Wadih; McDonald, Donald M; Pasqualini, Renata

    2005-02-01

    Heterogeneity of the microvasculature in different organs has been well documented by multiple methods including in vivo phage display. However, less is known about the diversity of blood vessels within functionally distinct regions of organs. Here, we combined in vivo phage display with laser pressure catapult microdissection to identify peptide ligands for vascular receptors in the islets of Langerhans in the murine pancreas. Protein database analyses of the peptides, CVSNPRWKC and CHVLWSTRC, showed sequence identity to two ephrin A-type ligand homologues, A2 and A4. Confocal microscopy confirmed that most immunoreactivity of CVSNPRWKC and CHVLWSTRC phage was associated with blood vessels in pancreatic islets. Antibodies recognizing EphA4, a receptor for ephrin-A ligands, were similarly associated with islet blood vessels. Importantly, binding of both islet-homing phage and anti-EphA4 antibody was strikingly increased in blood vessels of pancreatic islet tumors in RIP-Tag2 transgenic mice. These results indicate that endothelial cells of blood vessels in pancreatic islets preferentially express EphA4 receptors, and this expression is increased in tumors. Our findings show in vivo phage display and laser pressure catapult microdissection can be combined to reveal endothelial cell specialization within focal regions of the microvasculature.

  13. An Electrochemiluminescence Immunosensor Based on Gold-Magnetic Nanoparticles and Phage Displayed Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Mu, Xihui; Tong, Zhaoyang; Huang, Qibin; Liu, Bing; Liu, Zhiwei; Hao, Lanqun; Dong, Hua; Zhang, Jinping; Gao, Chuan

    2016-01-01

    Using the multiple advantages of the ultra-highly sensitive electrochemiluminescence (ECL) technique, Staphylococcus protein A (SPA) functionalized gold-magnetic nanoparticles and phage displayed antibodies, and using gold-magnetic nanoparticles coated with SPA and coupled with a polyclonal antibody (pcAb) as magnetic capturing probes, and Ru(bpy)32+-labeled phage displayed antibody as a specific luminescence probe, this study reports a new way to detect ricin with a highly sensitive and specific ECL immunosensor and amplify specific detection signals. The linear detection range of the sensor was 0.0001~200 µg/L, and the limit of detection (LOD) was 0.0001 µg/L, which is 2500-fold lower than that of the conventional ELISA technique. The gold-magnetic nanoparticles, SPA and Ru(bpy)32+-labeled phage displayed antibody displayed different amplifying effects in the ECL immunosensor and can decrease LOD 3-fold, 3-fold and 20-fold, respectively, compared with the ECL immunosensors without one of the three effects. The integrated amplifying effect can decrease the LOD 180-fold. The immunosensor integrates the unique advantages of SPA-coated gold-magnetic nanoparticles that improve the activity of the functionalized capturing probe, and the amplifying effect of the Ru(bpy)32+-labeled phage displayed antibodies, so it increases specificity, interference-resistance and decreases LOD. It is proven to be well suited for the analysis of trace amounts of ricin in various environmental samples with high recovery ratios and reproducibility. PMID:26927130

  14. An Electrochemiluminescence Immunosensor Based on Gold-Magnetic Nanoparticles and Phage Displayed Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Mu, Xihui; Tong, Zhaoyang; Huang, Qibin; Liu, Bing; Liu, Zhiwei; Hao, Lanqun; Dong, Hua; Zhang, Jinping; Gao, Chuan

    2016-02-27

    Using the multiple advantages of the ultra-highly sensitive electrochemiluminescence (ECL) technique, Staphylococcus protein A (SPA) functionalized gold-magnetic nanoparticles and phage displayed antibodies, and using gold-magnetic nanoparticles coated with SPA and coupled with a polyclonal antibody (pcAb) as magnetic capturing probes, and Ru(bpy)₃(2+)-labeled phage displayed antibody as a specific luminescence probe, this study reports a new way to detect ricin with a highly sensitive and specific ECL immunosensor and amplify specific detection signals. The linear detection range of the sensor was 0.0001~200 µg/L, and the limit of detection (LOD) was 0.0001 µg/L, which is 2500-fold lower than that of the conventional ELISA technique. The gold-magnetic nanoparticles, SPA and Ru(bpy)₃(2+)-labeled phage displayed antibody displayed different amplifying effects in the ECL immunosensor and can decrease LOD 3-fold, 3-fold and 20-fold, respectively, compared with the ECL immunosensors without one of the three effects. The integrated amplifying effect can decrease the LOD 180-fold. The immunosensor integrates the unique advantages of SPA-coated gold-magnetic nanoparticles that improve the activity of the functionalized capturing probe, and the amplifying effect of the Ru(bpy)₃(2+)-labeled phage displayed antibodies, so it increases specificity, interference-resistance and decreases LOD. It is proven to be well suited for the analysis of trace amounts of ricin in various environmental samples with high recovery ratios and reproducibility.

  15. Labeling and distribution of linear peptides identified using in vivo phage display selection for tumors.

    PubMed

    Kennel, S J; Mirzadeh, S; Hurst, G B; Foote, L J; Lankford, T K; Glowienka, K A; Chappell, L L; Kelso, J R; Davern, S M; Safavy, A; Brechbiel, M W

    2000-11-01

    To develop targeting molecules to be used for vascular targeting of short half-lived alpha-emitters for radioimmunotherapy, linear peptide phage display libraries were selected in vivo for binding to IC-12 rat tracheal tumors growing in severe combined immune deficient mice. After three rounds of selection, 15 phage clones were analyzed for DNA sequence, and the deduced translation products of cDNA inserts were compared. Three consensus sequences were chosen from three separate experimental selection series and peptides of these sequences with added -gly-gly-tyr were obtained. Peptides were radiolabeled on tyrosine with (125)I and the biodistribution in tumor-bearing mice was determined. The radioiodinated peptides were stable in vitro and when injected in tumor-bearing mice approximately 3.0 %ID/g accumulated in the tumor; however, much of the (125)I was found in the gastrointestinal tract and thyroid, indicative of dehalogenation of the labeled peptide. Radiolabeling peptide 2 with N-succinimidyl-3-(125)I-iodobenzoate resulted in faster excretion, which in turn resulted in lower levels in tumor and other organs, especially thyroid and gastrointestinal tract. Peptide 2 was derivatized with the bifunctional isothiocyanates of cyclohexyl-B diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) or CHX-A" DTPA by direct conjugation or with a hydroxylamine derivative of 1B4M-DTPA (2-(p-[O-(carboxamylmethyl)hydroxylamine]benzyl)-6-methyl-diethylenetriamine-N,N,N',N",N"-pentaacetic acid ) coupled at the N-terminus. The primary molecular species in the conjugated products were shown by mass spectrometry to have one DTPA per peptide. Peptide chelate conjugates were radiolabeled with (213)Bi and the products tested for biodistribution in tumor-bearing mice. The data show that chelation of (213)Bi to peptides was accomplished by both the direct method of DTPA attachment and by the method using the linker at the N-terminus. Only small amounts of peptide accumulated at tumor sites. We

  16. Immunodiagnosis of Canine Visceral Leishmaniasis Using Mimotope Peptides Selected from Phage Displayed Combinatorial Libraries

    PubMed Central

    Toledo-Machado, Christina Monerat; Machado de Avila, Ricardo Andrez; NGuyen, Christophe; Granier, Claude; Bueno, Lilian Lacerda; Carneiro, Claudia Martins; Menezes-Souza, Daniel; Carneiro, Rubens Antonio; Chávez-Olórtegui, Carlos; Fujiwara, Ricardo Toshio

    2015-01-01

    ELISA and RIFI are currently used for serodiagnosis of canine visceral leishmaniasis (CVL). The accuracy of these tests is controversial in endemic areas where canine infections by Trypanosoma cruzi may occur. We evaluated the usefulness of synthetic peptides that were selected through phage display technique in the serodiagnosis of CVL. Peptides were chosen based on their ability to bind to IgGs purified from infected dogs pooled sera. We selected three phage clones that reacted only with those IgGs. Peptides were synthesized, polymerized with glutaraldehyde, and used as antigens in ELISA assays. Each individual peptide or a mix of them was reactive with infected dogs serum. The assay was highly sensitive and specific when compared to soluble Leishmania antigen that showed cross-reactivity with anti-T. cruzi IgGs. Our results demonstrate that phage display technique is useful for selection of peptides that may represent valuable synthetic antigens for an improved serodiagnosis of CVL. PMID:25710003

  17. Construction and selection of human Fab antibody phage display library of liver cancer.

    PubMed

    Shui, Xuan; Huang, Jian; Li, Yue-Hui; Xie, Ping-Li; Li, Guan-Cheng

    2009-10-01

    The aim of this study was to construct the fully humanized anti-hepatoma Fab fragment phage libraries and select antibodies against hepatoma specifically. PBMCs of liver cancer patients were immunized in vitro with HpeG(2) cells and were then transformed by Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). After total RNA was extracted, the heavy chain Fd and kappa/lambda light chain were amplified by RT-PCR and cloned into the vector pComb3 to construct the libraries of Fab fragments. The libraries were then panned by HpeG(2) cells. By means of ELISA and immunochemistry, the Fab phage antibodies binding with hepatoma were selected and identified. The Fd and light chain PCR products were subsequently inserted into pComb3, and the volume of Fab libraries reached 1.7 x 10(7). The libraries were enriched about 138-fold by three cycles of panning. 540 phage clones were picked randomly. Using cell ELISA and immunohistochemistry with cultured cells, one clone Fab phage antibody, which had binding activity with hepatoma, was picked out. Fully humanized anti-hepatoma Fab antibody phage display libraries were constructed. One phage clone was selected and confirmed to specifically bind to hepatoma cells. The selected Fab antibody may be further developed and applied to clinical diagnosis and therapy.

  18. Attaching the phage display-selected GLA peptide to liposomes: factors influencing target binding.

    PubMed

    van Rooy, Inge; Hennink, Wim E; Storm, Gert; Schiffelers, Raymond M; Mastrobattista, Enrico

    2012-02-14

    In our previous study, phage display selections were performed by in situ perfusion of a random peptide library through a mouse brain. This yielded two peptides (GLA and GYR) that showed significant binding to human brain endothelial cells (hCMEC/D3) when displayed on phage particles, but not to human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). In the present study, these peptides were produced synthetically and coupled to liposomes to investigate the capacity of the peptides to act as ligands for targeting to hCMEC/D3 cells. Flow cytometry studies showed that these peptides when coupled to liposomes showed weak binding to the target brain endothelial cells. We hypothesized that the weak endothelial cell binding of the selected peptides when coupled to liposomes as compared to the binding of the peptides displayed on phage particles may be ascribed to: change of vehicle shape, change of peptide density, or change of peptide conformation. Peptide density on the liposomes influenced binding of the liposomes to the cells, however, this effect was minor. To study the influence of the peptide conformation, the GLA peptide was recombinantly produced fused to the N1-N2 domains of the phage p3 minor coat protein (p3-GLA) to mimic its conformation when displayed on phage particles. Binding of liposomes modified with either the GLA peptide or the p3-GLA protein to hCMEC/D3 cells was studied, and the p3-GLA-liposomes showed a higher binding to the cells compared to the GLA-liposomes. The experiments demonstrate that bringing the GLA peptide into the original phage protein environment restores and improves the peptide binding capacity and suggest that the GLA peptide, with some modifications, may be used as a brain-targeting ligand in the future.

  19. Heterogeneous catalysis on the phage surface: Display of active human enteropeptidase.

    PubMed

    Gasparian, Marine E; Bobik, Tatyana V; Kim, Yana V; Ponomarenko, Natalia A; Dolgikh, Dmitry A; Gabibov, Alexander G; Kirpichnikov, Mikhail P

    2013-11-01

    Enteropeptidase (EC 3.4.21.9) plays a key role in mammalian digestion as the enzyme that physiologically activates trypsinogen by highly specific cleavage of the trypsinogen activation peptide following the recognition sequence D4K. The high specificity of enteropeptidase makes it a powerful tool in modern biotechnology. Here we describe the application of phage display technology to express active human enteropeptidase catalytic subunits (L-HEP) on M13 filamentous bacteriophage. The L-HEP/C122S gene was cloned in the g3p-based phagemid vector pHEN2m upstream of the sequence encoding the phage g3p protein and downstream of the signal peptide-encoding sequence. Heterogeneous catalysis of the synthetic peptide substrate (GDDDDK-β-naphthylamide) cleavage by phage-bound L-HEP was shown to have kinetic parameters similar to those of soluble enzyme, with the respective Km values of 19 μM and 20 μM and kcat of 115 and 92 s(-1). Fusion proteins containing a D4K cleavage site were cleaved with phage-bound L-HEP/C122S as well as by soluble L-HEP/C122S, and proteolysis was inhibited by soybean trypsin inhibitor. Rapid large-scale phage production, one-step purification of phage-bound L-HEP, and easy removal of enzyme activity from reaction samples by PEG precipitation make our approach suitable for the efficient removal of various tag sequences fused to the target proteins. The functional phage display technology developed in this study can be instrumental in constructing libraries of mutants to analyze the effect of structural changes on the activity and specificity of the enzyme or generate its desired variants for biotechnological applications.

  20. Real-time analysis of dual-display phage immobilization and autoantibody screening using quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring.

    PubMed

    Rajaram, Kaushik; Losada-Pérez, Patricia; Vermeeren, Veronique; Hosseinkhani, Baharak; Wagner, Patrick; Somers, Veerle; Michiels, Luc

    2015-01-01

    Over the last three decades, phage display technology has been used for the display of target-specific biomarkers, peptides, antibodies, etc. Phage display-based assays are mostly limited to the phage ELISA, which is notorious for its high background signal and laborious methodology. These problems have been recently overcome by designing a dual-display phage with two different end functionalities, namely, streptavidin (STV)-binding protein at one end and a rheumatoid arthritis-specific autoantigenic target at the other end. Using this dual-display phage, a much higher sensitivity in screening specificities of autoantibodies in complex serum sample has been detected compared to single-display phage system on phage ELISA. Herein, we aimed to develop a novel, rapid, and sensitive dual-display phage to detect autoantibodies presence in serum samples using quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring as a sensing platform. The vertical functionalization of the phage over the STV-modified surfaces resulted in clear frequency and dissipation shifts revealing a well-defined viscoelastic signature. Screening for autoantibodies using antihuman IgG-modified surfaces and the dual-display phage with STV magnetic bead complexes allowed to isolate the target entities from complex mixtures and to achieve a large response as compared to negative control samples. This novel dual-display strategy can be a potential alternative to the time consuming phage ELISA protocols for the qualitative analysis of serum autoantibodies and can be taken as a departure point to ultimately achieve a point of care diagnostic system.

  1. Phage Displayed Peptides to Avian H5N1 Virus Distinguished the Virus from Other Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Chengfeng; Ren, Xiaofeng

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was to identify potential ligands and develop a novel diagnostic test to highly pathogenic avian influenza A virus (HPAI), subtype H5N1 viruses using phage display technology. The H5N1 viruses were used as an immobilized target in a biopanning process using a 12-mer phage display random peptide library. After five rounds of panning, three phages expressing peptides HAWDPIPARDPF, AAWHLIVALAPN or ATSHLHVRLPSK had a specific binding activity to H5N1 viruses were isolated. Putative binding motifs to H5N1 viruses were identified by DNA sequencing. In terms of the minimum quantity of viruses, the phage-based ELISA was better than antiserum-based ELISA and a manual, semi-quantitative endpoint RT-PCR for detecting H5N1 viruses. More importantly, the selected phages bearing the specific peptides to H5N1 viruses were capable of differentiating this virus from other avian viruses in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. PMID:21887228

  2. Phage displayed peptides to avian H5N1 virus distinguished the virus from other viruses.

    PubMed

    Wu, Dan; Li, Guangxing; Qin, Chengfeng; Ren, Xiaofeng

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was to identify potential ligands and develop a novel diagnostic test to highly pathogenic avian influenza A virus (HPAI), subtype H5N1 viruses using phage display technology. The H5N1 viruses were used as an immobilized target in a biopanning process using a 12-mer phage display random peptide library. After five rounds of panning, three phages expressing peptides HAWDPIPARDPF, AAWHLIVALAPN or ATSHLHVRLPSK had a specific binding activity to H5N1 viruses were isolated. Putative binding motifs to H5N1 viruses were identified by DNA sequencing. In terms of the minimum quantity of viruses, the phage-based ELISA was better than antiserum-based ELISA and a manual, semi-quantitative endpoint RT-PCR for detecting H5N1 viruses. More importantly, the selected phages bearing the specific peptides to H5N1 viruses were capable of differentiating this virus from other avian viruses in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays.

  3. Phage-displayed peptide targeting on the Puumala hantavirus neutralization site.

    PubMed Central

    Heiskanen, T; Lundkvist, A; Vaheri, A; Lankinen, H

    1997-01-01

    We have selected ligands for Puumala hantavirus, the causative agent of nephropathia epidemica, from a seven-amino-acid peptide library flanked by cysteines and displayed on a filamentous phage. To direct the selection to areas on the virus particle which are essential for infection, phages were competitively eluted with neutralizing monoclonal antibodies specific for the viral glycoproteins. The selected phage populations were specific for the same sites as the antibodies and mimicked their functions. The peptide insert, CHWMFSPWC, when displayed on the phages, completely inhibited Puumala virus infection in cell culture at the same effective concentration as the eluting antibody specific for envelope glycoprotein G2. The binding of the phage clones to the virus and inhibition of infection were not necessarily coincident; Pro-6 was critical for virus inhibition, while consensus residues Trp-2 and Phe-4 were essential for binding. The strategy described can be applied to any virus for production of molecules mimicking the effect of neutralizing antibodies. PMID:9094664

  4. Phage displayed peptide recognizing porcine aminopeptidase N is a potent small molecule inhibitor of PEDV entry

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Three phage-displayed peptides designated H, S and F that recognize porcine aminopeptidase N (pAPN), the cellular receptor of porcine transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV) were able to inhibit cell infection by TGEV. These same peptides had no inhibitory effects on infection of Vero cells by po...

  5. Direct selection and phage display of a Gram-positive secretome

    PubMed Central

    Jankovic, Dragana; Collett, Michael A; Lubbers, Mark W; Rakonjac, Jasna

    2007-01-01

    Surface, secreted and transmembrane protein-encoding open reading frames, collectively the secretome, can be identified in bacterial genome sequences using bioinformatics. However, functional analysis of translated secretomes is possible only if many secretome proteins are expressed and purified individually. We have now developed and applied a phage display system for direct selection, identification, expression and purification of bacterial secretome proteins. PMID:18078523

  6. Improvement and efficient display of Bacillus thuringiensis toxins on M13 phages and ribosomes.

    PubMed

    Pacheco, Sabino; Cantón, Emiliano; Zuñiga-Navarrete, Fernando; Pecorari, Frédéric; Bravo, Alejandra; Soberón, Mario

    2015-12-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) produces insecticidal proteins that have been used worldwide in the control of insect-pests in crops and vectors of human diseases. However, different insect species are poorly controlled by the available Bt toxins or have evolved resistance to these toxins. Evolution of Bt toxicity could provide novel toxins to control insect pests. To this aim, efficient display systems to select toxins with increased binding to insect membranes or midgut proteins involved in toxicity are likely to be helpful. Here we describe two display systems, phage display and ribosome display, that allow the efficient display of two non-structurally related Bt toxins, Cry1Ac and Cyt1Aa. Improved display of Cry1Ac and Cyt1Aa on M13 phages was achieved by changing the commonly used peptide leader sequence of the coat pIII-fusion protein, that relies on the Sec translocation pathway, for a peptide leader sequence that relies on the signal recognition particle pathway (SRP) and by using a modified M13 helper phage (Phaberge) that has an amber mutation in its pIII genomic sequence and preferentially assembles using the pIII-fusion protein. Also, both Cry1Ac and Cyt1Aa were efficiently displayed on ribosomes, which could allow the construction of large libraries of variants. Furthermore, Cry1Ac or Cyt1Aa displayed on M13 phages or ribosomes were specifically selected from a mixture of both toxins depending on which antigen was immobilized for binding selection. These improved systems may allow the selection of Cry toxin variants with improved insecticidal activities that could counter insect resistances.

  7. Molecular specialization of breast vasculature: A breast-homing phage-displayed peptide binds to aminopeptidase P in breast vasculature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Essler, Markus; Ruoslahti, Erkki

    2002-02-01

    In vivo phage display identifies peptides that selectively home to the vasculature of individual organs, tissues, and tumors. Here we report the identification of a cyclic nonapeptide, CPGPEGAGC, which homes to normal breast tissue with a 100-fold selectivity over nontargeted phage. The homing of the phage is inhibited by its cognate synthetic peptide. Phage localization in tissue sections showed that the breast-homing phage binds to the blood vessels in the breast, but not in other tissues. The phage also bound to the vasculature of hyperplastic and malignant lesions in transgenic breast cancer mice. Expression cloning with a phage-displayed cDNA library yielded a phage that specifically bound to the breast-homing peptide. The cDNA insert was homologous to a fragment of aminopeptidase P. The homing peptide bound aminopeptidase P from malignant breast tissue in affinity chromatography. Antibodies against aminopeptidase P inhibited the in vitro binding of the phage-displayed cDNA to the peptide and the in vivo homing of phage carrying the peptide. These results indicate that aminopeptidase P is the receptor for the breast-homing peptide. This peptide may be useful in designing drugs for the prevention and treatment of breast cancer.

  8. Induction of anti-EGFR immune response with mimotopes identified from a phage display peptide library by panitumumab

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Hong; Di, Jiabo; Wang, Zaozao; Xing, Jiadi; Wu, Fan; Wu, Wei; Wang, Xicheng; Shen, Lin; Jiang, Beihai; Su, Xiangqian

    2016-01-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is overexpressed in several epithelial tumors. Anti-EGFR humanized monoclonal antibodies, cetuximab and panitumumab, in combination with chemotherapy have improved the prognosis for patients with wild-type RAS tumors. To identify mimotopes of EGFR and develop mimotope-based EGFR vaccines, we screened a phage display peptide library with panitumumab. Two EGFR mimotopes P19 and P26, which could be recognized by panitumumab specifically, were isolated. To enhance the immune responses, we generated recombinant proteins of P19 or P26 fused to a heat-shock cognate protein 70 (Hsc70), and evaluated the efficacy of Hsc70-P19 and Hsc70-P26 as vaccines in vivo. Immunization with Hsc70-P19 or Hsc70-P26 fusion protein stimulated the immune system to produce specific antibodies against peptides as well as EGFR. Moreover, antibodies elicited against mimotopes could induce antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC), complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC), and inhibit the proliferation of EGFR-overexpressing A431 cells. Treatment with Hsc70-P19 and Hsc70-P26 significantly reduced tumor growth in BALB/c transplantable lung cancer models. Although there was no sequence homology between the phage-derived peptides and EGFR by alignments, both peptides mimic the conformational structure of EGFR binding to panitumumab. In conclusion, the mimotopes we identified from phage display peptide library could be promising candidate vaccines for active anti-EGFR immunotherapy against cancers. PMID:27659529

  9. Induction of anti-EGFR immune response with mimotopes identified from a phage display peptide library by panitumumab.

    PubMed

    Wang, Aidong; Cui, Ming; Qu, Hong; Di, Jiabo; Wang, Zaozao; Xing, Jiadi; Wu, Fan; Wu, Wei; Wang, Xicheng; Shen, Lin; Jiang, Beihai; Su, Xiangqian

    2016-11-15

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is overexpressed in several epithelial tumors. Anti-EGFR humanized monoclonal antibodies, cetuximab and panitumumab, in combination with chemotherapy have improved the prognosis for patients with wild-type RAS tumors. To identify mimotopes of EGFR and develop mimotope-based EGFR vaccines, we screened a phage display peptide library with panitumumab. Two EGFR mimotopes P19 and P26, which could be recognized by panitumumab specifically, were isolated. To enhance the immune responses, we generated recombinant proteins of P19 or P26 fused to a heat-shock cognate protein 70 (Hsc70), and evaluated the efficacy of Hsc70-P19 and Hsc70-P26 as vaccines in vivo. Immunization with Hsc70-P19 or Hsc70-P26 fusion protein stimulated the immune system to produce specific antibodies against peptides as well as EGFR. Moreover, antibodies elicited against mimotopes could induce antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC), complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC), and inhibit the proliferation of EGFR-overexpressing A431 cells. Treatment with Hsc70-P19 and Hsc70-P26 significantly reduced tumor growth in BALB/c transplantable lung cancer models. Although there was no sequence homology between the phage-derived peptides and EGFR by alignments, both peptides mimic the conformational structure of EGFR binding to panitumumab. In conclusion, the mimotopes we identified from phage display peptide library could be promising candidate vaccines for active anti-EGFR immunotherapy against cancers.

  10. Identification of hepatitis A virus mimotopes by phage display, antigenicity and immunogenicity.

    PubMed

    Larralde, Osmany G; Martinez, Raiza; Camacho, Frank; Amin, Nevis; Aguilar, Alicia; Talavera, Arturo; Stott, David I; Perez, Ela M

    2007-03-01

    A phage-displayed peptide approach was used to identify ligands mimicking antigenic determinants of hepatitis A virus (HAV) for the first time. Bacteriophages displaying HAV mimotopes were isolated from a phage-display peptide library by affinity selection on serum antibodies from hepatitis A patients. Selected phage-peptides were screened for reactivity with sera from HAV infected patients and healthy controls. Four cloned peptides with different sequences were identified as mimotopes of HAV; three of them showed similarity in their amino acid sequences with at least one of the VP3 and VP1 antigenic proteins of HAV. One clone was recognised by 92% of the positive sera. The phagotopes competed effectively with HAV for absorption of anti-HAV-specific antibodies in human sera, as determined by ELISA. The four phage clones induced neutralising anti-HAV antibodies in immunised mice. These results demonstrate the potential of this method to elucidate the disease related epitopes of HAV and to use these mimotopes in diagnostic applications or in the development of a mimotope-based hepatitis A vaccine without the necessity of manipulation of the virus.

  11. Recombinant human antibody fragment against tetanus toxoid produced by phage display

    PubMed Central

    Neelakantam, B.; Sridevi, N. V.; Shukra, A. M.; Sugumar, P.; Samuel, S.

    2014-01-01

    Phage display technology is a powerful in vitro method for the identification of specific monoclonal antibodies (antibody fragments) to an antigenic target and allows the rapid generation and selection of high affinity, fully human antibodies directed toward any disease target appropriate for antibody therapy. In the present study, we exploited the phage display technology for the selection of an antigen binding fragment (Fabs) toward tetanus toxoid using human naïve phage antibody library constructed from peripheral blood lymphocytes of naïve human donors. The phages displaying Fab were subjected to three rounds of bio-panning with tetanus toxoid as antigen on a solid phase. The high affinity antibody fragments were expressed in HB2151 strain of Escherichia coli and purified by immobilized metal affinity chromatography. The binding activity and specificity of the antibody fragment was established by its reactivity toward tetanus toxoid and non-reactivity toward other related toxins as determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and immunoblot analysis. The selected Fab fragment forming the antigen-binding complexes with the toxoid in flocculation assay indicates that the Fab may have a potential neutralizing ability toward antigen. PMID:24678405

  12. [Research on utilization of phage display technology to screen chloramine ketone simulated surface point].

    PubMed

    Xiong, Yonghua; Chen, Xuelan; Liu, Xiaoxing

    2010-09-01

    Utilize phage display technology to screen chloramine ketone simulated surface point, providing the basis for establishing drug-free ELISA test system. Use the anti chloramine ketone monoclonal antibody as the ligand, and screen the Ph.D. -7(TM) phage display peptide library to select the chloramine ketone simulated surface point. After 4 rounds of screening, select the phase, which can combine the chloramines ketone monoclonal antibody with different degrees, and further, determine the positive clone with competitive inhibition of the hydrochloric chloramine ketone by the indirect competitive ELISA method. It is discovered that all the 10 phages can combine the chloramine ketone monoclonal antibody with different degrees. Use the indirect competitive ELISA method to determine, the phenomenon that 5 positive clones, among them, have competitive inhibition with the hydrochloric chloramine ketone exists. The sequencing results of those 5 positive clones show that 4 different amino acid sequenced are obtained. Tentatively judge these 4 phages display the chloramine ketone simulated antigen surface points.

  13. Evaluation of Phage Display Discovered Peptides as Ligands for Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen (PSMA)

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, W. Barry

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify potential ligands of PSMA suitable for further development as novel PSMA-targeted peptides using phage display technology. The human PSMA protein was immobilized as a target followed by incubation with a 15-mer phage display random peptide library. After one round of prescreening and two rounds of screening, high-stringency screening at the third round of panning was performed to identify the highest affinity binders. Phages which had a specific binding activity to PSMA in human prostate cancer cells were isolated and the DNA corresponding to the 15-mers were sequenced to provide three consensus sequences: GDHSPFT, SHFSVGS and EVPRLSLLAVFL as well as other sequences that did not display consensus. Two of the peptide sequences deduced from DNA sequencing of binding phages, SHSFSVGSGDHSPFT and GRFLTGGTGRLLRIS were labeled with 5-carboxyfluorescein and shown to bind and co-internalize with PSMA on human prostate cancer cells by fluorescence microscopy. The high stringency requirements yielded peptides with affinities KD∼1 µM or greater which are suitable starting points for affinity maturation. While these values were less than anticipated, the high stringency did yield peptide sequences that apparently bound to different surfaces on PSMA. These peptide sequences could be the basis for further development of peptides for prostate cancer tumor imaging and therapy. PMID:23935860

  14. Identification and characterization of Strychnine binding peptide using phage display screening.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fang; Wang, Min; Qiu, Zheng; Wang, Xiao-Meng; Xu, Chun-Lei; Zhang, Xia

    2017-04-04

    Phage display has been proved in drug development as a high-throughput method for identifying specific cellular target of different drugs. However, phage display remains an intricate process for insoluble small chemicals because of the difficulty of presenting the molecules to the phages without occupying or destroying the very limited functional groups. In the present study, with Strychnine (Stry) selected as a model compound, we have developed an alternative in vitro bio-panning method against insoluble suspension. In this study, a phage library displaying random sequences of fifteen peptides was employed to screen for interactions between Stry and its cellular selective binding peptides, which are of great value to have a complete understanding of the mechanism of Stry for its antitumor activity. After four rounds of biopanning, a selection of 100 binding clones were randomly selected and subjected to modified anti-proliferation assays and diffusion assays to evaluate their binding affinity to Stry, after which eleven clones were identified as positive binding clones. After DNA sequencing and characterization, the corresponding peptides were found to be associated with tumorigenesis, indicating that Stry may play its antitumor activity by mediating several related actions of tumor development. Our study provided a feasible scheme for the interaction of chemical compounds with cellular binding peptides. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  15. Phage antibody display libraries: a powerful antibody discovery platform for immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Aizhi; Tohidkia, Mohammad R; Siegel, Donald L; Coukos, George; Omidi, Yadollah

    2016-01-01

    Phage display technology (PDT), a combinatorial screening approach, provides a molecular diversity tool for creating libraries of peptides/proteins and discovery of new recombinant therapeutics. Expression of proteins such as monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) on the surface of filamentous phage can permit the selection of high affinity and specificity therapeutic mAbs against virtually any target antigen. Using a number of diverse selection platforms (e.g. solid phase, solution phase, whole cell and in vivo biopannings), phage antibody libraries (PALs) from the start point provides great potential for the isolation of functional mAb fragments with diagnostic and/or therapeutic purposes. Given the pivotal role of PDT in the discovery of novel therapeutic/diagnostic mAbs, in the current review, we provide an overview on PALs and discuss their impact in the advancement of engineered mAbs.

  16. Cancer immunotherapy by a recombinant phage vaccine displaying EGFR mimotope: an in vivo study.

    PubMed

    Asadi-Ghalehni, Majid; Ghaemmaghami, Mohamad; Klimka, Alexander; Javanmardi, Masoud; Navari, Mohsen; Rasaee, Mohammad Javad

    2015-06-01

    To date, several small molecule inhibitors and monoclonal-antibodies (like ICR-62) have been used to treat tumors over-expressing epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). However, the limitations associated with these conventional applications accentuate the necessity of alternative approaches. Mimotopes as compelling molecular tools could rationally be employed to circumvent these drawbacks. In the present study, an M13 phage displaying ICR-62 binding peptide mimotope is exploited as a vaccine candidate. It exhibited high affinity towards ICR62 and polyclonal anti-P-BSA antibodies. Following the mice immunization, phage-based mimotope vaccine induced humoral immunity. Elicited anti-EGFR mimotope antibodies were detected using ELISA method. Moreover, the phage vaccine was tested on the Lewis lung carcinoma mice model to investigate the prophylactic and therapeutic effects. The tumor volume was measured and recorded in different animal groups to evaluate the anti-tumor effects of the vaccine. Our data indicate that the reported phage-based mimotope could potentially elicit specific antibodies resulting in low titers of EGFR-specific antibodies and reduced tumor growth. However, in vivo experiments of prophylactic or therapeutic vaccination showed no specific advantage. Furthermore, phage-mimotope vaccine might be a promising approach in the field of cancer immunotherapy.

  17. Screening of a specific peptide binding to esophageal squamous carcinoma cells from phage displayed peptide library.

    PubMed

    Ma, Caixia; Li, Chunyan; Jiang, Dongliang; Gao, Xiaojie; Han, Juanjuan; Xu, Nan; Wu, Qiong; Nie, Guochao; Chen, Wei; Lin, Fenghuei; Hou, Yingchun

    2015-06-01

    To select a specifically binding peptide for imaging detection of human esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC), a phage-displayed 12-mer peptide library was used to screen the peptide that bind to ESCC cells specifically. After four rounds of bio-panning, the phage recovery rate gradually increased, and specific phage clones were effectively enriched. The 60 randomly selected phage clones were tested using cellular enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and 41 phage clones were identified as positive clones with the over 2.10 ratio of absorbance higher than other clones, IRP and PBS controls. From the sequencing results of the positive clones, 14 peptide sequences were obtained and ESCP9 consensus sequence was identified as the peptide with best affinity to ESCC cells via competitive inhibition, fluorescence microscopy, and flow cytometry. The results indicate that the peptide ESCP9 can bind to ESCC cells specifically and sensitively, and it is a potential candidate to be developed as an useful molecule to the imaging detection and targeting therapy for ESCC.

  18. Multivalent pIX phage display selects for distinct and improved antibody properties.

    PubMed

    Høydahl, Lene S; Nilssen, Nicolay R; Gunnarsen, Kristin S; Pré, M Fleur du; Iversen, Rasmus; Roos, Norbert; Chen, Xi; Michaelsen, Terje E; Sollid, Ludvig M; Sandlie, Inger; Løset, Geir Å

    2016-12-14

    Phage display screening readily allows for the identification of a multitude of antibody specificities, but to identify optimal lead candidates remains a challenge. Here, we direct the antibody-capsid fusion away from the signal sequence-dependent secretory SEC pathway in E. coli by utilizing the intrinsic signal sequence-independent property of pIX to obtain virion integration. This approach was combined with the use of an engineered helper phage known to improve antibody pIX display and retrieval. By direct comparison with pIII display, we demonstrate that antibody display using this pIX system translates into substantially improved retrieval of desired specificities with favorable biophysical properties in de novo selection. We show that the effect was due to less E. coli host toxicity during phage propagation conferred by the lack of a signal sequence. This pIX combinatorial display platform provides a generic alternative route for obtaining good binders with high stability and may thus find broad applicability.

  19. Multivalent pIX phage display selects for distinct and improved antibody properties

    PubMed Central

    Høydahl, Lene S.; Nilssen, Nicolay R.; Gunnarsen, Kristin S.; Pré, M. Fleur du; Iversen, Rasmus; Roos, Norbert; Chen, Xi; Michaelsen, Terje E.; Sollid, Ludvig M.; Sandlie, Inger; Løset, Geir Å.

    2016-01-01

    Phage display screening readily allows for the identification of a multitude of antibody specificities, but to identify optimal lead candidates remains a challenge. Here, we direct the antibody-capsid fusion away from the signal sequence-dependent secretory SEC pathway in E. coli by utilizing the intrinsic signal sequence-independent property of pIX to obtain virion integration. This approach was combined with the use of an engineered helper phage known to improve antibody pIX display and retrieval. By direct comparison with pIII display, we demonstrate that antibody display using this pIX system translates into substantially improved retrieval of desired specificities with favorable biophysical properties in de novo selection. We show that the effect was due to less E. coli host toxicity during phage propagation conferred by the lack of a signal sequence. This pIX combinatorial display platform provides a generic alternative route for obtaining good binders with high stability and may thus find broad applicability. PMID:27966617

  20. Romulus and Remus, Two Phage Isolates Representing a Distinct Clade within the Twortlikevirus Genus, Display Suitable Properties for Phage Therapy Applications

    PubMed Central

    Vandersteegen, Katrien; Kropinski, Andrew M.; Nash, John H. E.; Noben, Jean-Paul; Hermans, Katleen

    2013-01-01

    The renewed interest in controlling Staphylococcus aureus infections using their natural enemies, bacteriophages, has led to the isolation of a limited number of virulent phages so far. These phages are all members of the Twortlikevirus, displaying little variance. We present two novel closely related (95.9% DNA homology) lytic myoviruses, Romulus and Remus, with double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) genomes of 131,333 bp and 134,643 bp, respectively. Despite their relatedness to Staphylococcus phages K, G1, ISP, and Twort and Listeria phages A511 and P100, Romulus and Remus can be proposed as isolates of a new species within the Twortlikevirus genus. A distinguishing feature for these phage genomes is the unique distribution of group I introns compared to that in other staphylococcal myoviruses. In addition, a hedgehog/intein domain was found within their DNA polymerase genes, and an insertion sequence-encoded transposase exhibits splicing behavior and produces a functional portal protein. From a phage therapy application perspective, Romulus and Remus infected approximately 70% of the tested S. aureus isolates and displayed promising lytic activity against these isolates. Furthermore, both phages showed a rapid initial adsorption and demonstrated biofilm-degrading capacity in a proof-of-concept experiment. PMID:23302893

  1. Romulus and Remus, two phage isolates representing a distinct clade within the Twortlikevirus genus, display suitable properties for phage therapy applications.

    PubMed

    Vandersteegen, Katrien; Kropinski, Andrew M; Nash, John H E; Noben, Jean-Paul; Hermans, Katleen; Lavigne, Rob

    2013-03-01

    The renewed interest in controlling Staphylococcus aureus infections using their natural enemies, bacteriophages, has led to the isolation of a limited number of virulent phages so far. These phages are all members of the Twortlikevirus, displaying little variance. We present two novel closely related (95.9% DNA homology) lytic myoviruses, Romulus and Remus, with double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) genomes of 131,333 bp and 134,643 bp, respectively. Despite their relatedness to Staphylococcus phages K, G1, ISP, and Twort and Listeria phages A511 and P100, Romulus and Remus can be proposed as isolates of a new species within the Twortlikevirus genus. A distinguishing feature for these phage genomes is the unique distribution of group I introns compared to that in other staphylococcal myoviruses. In addition, a hedgehog/intein domain was found within their DNA polymerase genes, and an insertion sequence-encoded transposase exhibits splicing behavior and produces a functional portal protein. From a phage therapy application perspective, Romulus and Remus infected approximately 70% of the tested S. aureus isolates and displayed promising lytic activity against these isolates. Furthermore, both phages showed a rapid initial adsorption and demonstrated biofilm-degrading capacity in a proof-of-concept experiment.

  2. Combining Phage and Yeast Cell Surface Antibody Display to Identify Novel Cell Type-Selective Internalizing Human Monoclonal Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Bidlingmaier, Scott; Su, Yang; Liu, Bin

    2015-01-01

    Using phage antibody display, large libraries can be generated and screened to identify monoclonal antibodies with affinity for target antigens. However, while library size and diversity is an advantage of the phage display method, there is limited ability to quantitatively enrich for specific binding properties such as affinity. One way of overcoming this limitation is to combine the scale of phage display selections with the flexibility and quantitativeness of FACS-based yeast surface display selections. In this chapter we describe protocols for generating yeast surface antibody display libraries using phage antibody display selection outputs as starting material and FACS-based enrichment of target antigen-binding clones from these libraries. These methods should be widely applicable for the identification of monoclonal antibodies with specific binding properties.

  3. Multidrug-resistance drug-binding peptides generated by using a phage display library.

    PubMed

    Popkov, M; Lussier, I; Medvedkine, V; Estève, P O; Alakhov, V; Mandeville, R

    1998-01-15

    A phage display library of random decapeptides was used to generate peptide ligands that can bind multidrug-resistance (MDR) drugs mimicking, in this respect, the drug-binding activity of P-glycoprotein. Seven peptide sequences were identified that specifically bound doxorubicin. Five of these sequences expressed the core consensus motif WXXW. The displacement assay showed that the phages expressing these peptides bound MDR type drugs (vinblastine, doxorubicin, verapamil, and genistein) with the same selectivity as P-glycoprotein and did not interact with non-MDR type drugs, such as arabinosylcytosine (Ara-C) and melphalan. One of the selected peptides that showed a highest capacity for the binding (VCDWWGWGIC) was synthesized and displayed competition with the phage for doxorubicin binding. The structure modeling suggested that all the selected sequences contained a hydrophobic envelope in which MDR drugs could be docked with substantial energy minimization. Western blot analysis showed that monospecific antibody obtained against the phage expressing VCDWWGWGIC peptide could specifically recognize P-glycoprotein in the membrane fraction of MDR phenotype MCF-7ADR cells. The MDR drug-binding sequences generated during this work could provide an important tool for design and screening of new chemotherapeutic agents.

  4. Generation and analysis of the improved human HAL9/10 antibody phage display libraries.

    PubMed

    Kügler, Jonas; Wilke, Sonja; Meier, Doris; Tomszak, Florian; Frenzel, André; Schirrmann, Thomas; Dübel, Stefan; Garritsen, Henk; Hock, Björn; Toleikis, Lars; Schütte, Mark; Hust, Michael

    2015-02-19

    Antibody phage display is a proven key technology that allows the generation of human antibodies for diagnostics and therapy. From naive antibody gene libraries - in theory - antibodies against any target can be selected. Here we describe the design, construction and characterization of an optimized antibody phage display library. The naive antibody gene libraries HAL9 and HAL10, with a combined theoretical diversity of 1.5×10(10) independent clones, were constructed from 98 healthy donors using improved phage display vectors. In detail, most common phagemids employed for antibody phage display are using a combined His/Myc tag for detection and purification. We show that changing the tag order to Myc/His improved the production of soluble antibodies, but did not affect antibody phage display. For several published antibody libraries, the selected number of kappa scFvs were lower compared to lambda scFvs, probably due to a lower kappa scFv or Fab expression rate. Deletion of a phenylalanine at the end of the CL linker sequence in our new phagemid design increased scFv production rate and frequency of selected kappa antibodies significantly. The HAL libraries and 834 antibodies selected against 121 targets were analyzed regarding the used germline V-genes, used V-gene combinations and CDR-H3/-L3 length and composition. The amino acid diversity and distribution in the CDR-H3 of the initial library was retrieved in the CDR-H3 of selected antibodies showing that all CDR-H3 amino acids occurring in the human antibody repertoire can be functionally used and is not biased by E. coli expression or phage selection. Further, the data underline the importance of CDR length variations. The highly diverse universal antibody gene libraries HAL9/10 were constructed using an optimized scFv phagemid vector design. Analysis of selected antibodies revealed that the complete amino acid diversity in the CDR-H3 was also found in selected scFvs showing the functionality of the naive CDR

  5. Dense display of HIV-1 envelope spikes on the lambda phage scaffold does not result in the generation of improved antibody responses to HIV-1 Env.

    PubMed

    Mattiacio, Jonelle; Walter, Scott; Brewer, Matt; Domm, William; Friedman, Alan E; Dewhurst, Stephen

    2011-03-21

    The generation of strong, virus-neutralizing antibody responses to the HIV-1 envelope spike (Env) is a major goal in HIV-1 vaccine research. To try to enhance the Env-specific response, we displayed oligomeric gp140 on a virus-like scaffold provided by the lambda phage capsid. To do this, an in vitro complementation system was used to "decorate" phage particles with glycosylated, mammalian cell-derived envelope oligomers. We compared the immune response to lambda phage particles displaying HIV-1 Env to that elicited by soluble oligomeric gp140 in rabbits. Env-binding antibody titers were higher in animals that received oligomeric gp140 as compared to Env decorated phage particles, as were virus neutralizing antibody responses. The Env decorated phage particles were, however, able to efficiently boost a protein-primed humoral response to levels equivalent to those elicited by high-dose adjuvanted Env oligomers. These results show that display of HIV-1 envelope spikes on the bacteriophage lambda capsid does not result in an improved, Env-specific humoral immune response. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Antibody Phage Display Assisted Identification of Junction Plakoglobin as a Potential Biomarker for Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Cooksley-Decasper, Seraina; Reiser, Hans; Thommen, Daniela S.; Biedermann, Barbara; Neidhart, Michel; Gawinecka, Joanna; Cathomas, Gieri; Franzeck, Fabian C.; Wyss, Christophe; Klingenberg, Roland; Nanni, Paolo; Roschitzki, Bernd; Matter, Christian; Wolint, Petra; Emmert, Maximilian Y.; Husmann, Marc; Amann-Vesti, Beatrice; Maier, Wilibald; Gay, Steffen; Lüscher, Thomas F.

    2012-01-01

    To date, no plaque-derived blood biomarker is available to allow diagnosis, prognosis or monitoring of atherosclerotic vascular diseases. In this study, specimens of thrombendarterectomy material from carotid and iliac arteries were incubated in protein-free medium to obtain plaque and control secretomes for subsequent subtractive phage display. The selection of nine plaque secretome-specific antibodies and the analysis of their immunopurified antigens by mass spectrometry led to the identification of 22 proteins. One of them, junction plakoglobin (JUP-81) and its smaller isoforms (referred to as JUP-63, JUP-55 and JUP-30 by molecular weight) were confirmed by immunohistochemistry and immunoblotting with independent antibodies to be present in atherosclerotic plaques and their secretomes, coronary thrombi of patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) and macrophages differentiated from peripheral blood monocytes as well as macrophage-like cells differentiated from THP1 cells. Plasma of patients with stable coronary artery disease (CAD) (n = 15) and ACS (n = 11) contained JUP-81 at more than 2- and 14-fold higher median concentrations, respectively, than plasma of CAD-free individuals (n = 13). In conclusion, this proof of principle study identified and verified JUP isoforms as potential plasma biomarkers for atherosclerosis. Clinical validation studies are needed to determine its diagnostic efficacy and clinical utility as a biomarker for diagnosis, prognosis or monitoring of atherosclerotic vascular diseases. PMID:23110151

  7. Immunogenic peptides from phage display libraries with potential of protecting mice against the Pseudorabies virus.

    PubMed

    Gazarian, Karlen; Gazarian, Tatiana; Betancourt, José Iván Sánchez; Alonso Morales, Rogelio A

    2011-12-29

    Phage display selection of combinatorial peptide libraries has demonstrated its almost unlimited potential in identifying binding ligands for many targets. The method shows promise for selection of immunogenic peptides against pathogens by antibodies. We have undertaken a study designed to select such mimics for one of the representatives of Herpesviridae, the Pseudorabies virus (PrV), infecting pigs and causing severe neurological complications known as Aujeszky's disease. By screening a 12mer linear and a 7mer cysteine-constrained libraries with immunoglobulins of a rabbit immunized with the virus, a family of 10 antigenic and immunogenic peptides was derived sharing a sequence motif K(L/P/V)GDP(R/K/L). Groups of six C57BL/6 mice were immunized with bacteriophages expressing peptides with this motif sequences. Some of the mice were found to be positive in seroneutralization assay; in a challenge setting, all but two immunized mice survived, albeit presenting some disease symptoms. We discuss the perspectives and limits of generating peptide leads by library screening with immune polyclonal antiserum for designing pure epitope-based vaccines to PrV in the future.

  8. Phage display selection of scFv to murine endothelial cell membranes.

    PubMed

    Kennel, Stephen J; Lankford, Trish; Foote, Linda; Wall, Melissa; Davern, Sandra

    2004-08-01

    The diversity of endothelial cells is becoming more apparent and more important in defining vessel systems that supply blood to normal organs and to tumors. Reagents that identify expression of cell surface determinants on these cells are crucial for differentiating among different vessel types. As a first step in this process we have selected a panel of 25 scFvs from a phage display library that bind to the endothelial cell line LEII. The scFvs are of high affinity and bind to some tumor cells as well as to the target endothelial cell. The scFvs can be divided into 8 epitope groups by use of competition binding studies. DNA sequencing of the members of these groups generally support the classification. This work shows that phage display is a rapid and efficient method for identification of reagents for cell surface molecules.

  9. Phage-display technology--finding a needle in a vast molecular haystack.

    PubMed

    Rodi, D J; Makowski, L

    1999-02-01

    Screening of phage-displayed libraries of proteins and peptides has, for nearly a decade, proven to be a highly effective method for finding much needed 'needles' in a vast molecular 'haystack'. Over the past year, it has been used to solve an increasing diversity of problems, including identification of binding motifs for much smaller targets and the use of novel screening methods to identify chemical activities.

  10. Highly Selective Tumor Targeting With Phage Display and Laser Capture Microdissection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-01

    References Golchin, M. and R. Aitken (2008). "Isolation by phage display of recombinant antibodies able to block adherence of Escherichia coli ...this collection of information is estimated to average 1 hour per response, including the time for reviewing instructions, searching existing data...conjugated chicken anti-rabbit antibody and blood vessels were visualized with Alex 568 conjugated goat anti-mouse secondary antibody. The slides were

  11. Identification of immunogenic proteins and generation of antibodies against Salmonella Typhimurium using phage display.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Torsten; Schirrmann, Thomas; Frenzel, André; Miethe, Sebastian; Stratmann-Selke, Janin; Gerlach, Gerald F; Strutzberg-Minder, Katrin; Dübel, Stefan; Hust, Michael

    2012-06-15

    Solely in Europoe, Salmonella Typhimurium causes more than 100,000 infections per year. Improved detection of livestock colonised with S. Typhimurium is necessary to prevent foodborne diseases. Currently, commercially available ELISA assays are based on a mixture of O-antigens (LPS) or total cell lysate of Salmonella and are hampered by cross-reaction. The identification of novel immunogenic proteins would be useful to develop ELISA based diagnostic assays with a higher specificity. A phage display library of the entire Salmonella Typhimurium genome was constructed and 47 immunogenic oligopeptides were identified using a pool of convalescent sera from pigs infected with Salmonella Typhimurium. The corresponding complete genes of seven of the identified oligopeptids were cloned. Five of them were produced in E. coli. The immunogenic character of these antigens was validated with sera from pigs infeced with S. Tyhimurium and control sera from non-infected animals. Finally, human antibody fragments (scFv) against these five antigens were selected using antibody phage display and characterised. In this work, we identified novel immunogenic proteins of Salmonella Typhimurium and generated antibody fragments against these antigens completely based on phage display. Five immunogenic proteins were validated using a panel of positive and negative sera for prospective applications in diagnostics of Salmonela Typhimurium.

  12. A high affinity phage-displayed peptide as a recognition probe for the detection of Salmonella Typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Shailaja; Kulabhusan, Prabir Kumar; Joshi, Manali; Bodas, Dhananjay; Paknikar, Kishore M

    2016-08-10

    Salmonellosis is one of the most common and widely distributed foodborne diseases. A sensitive and robust detection method of Salmonella Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) in food can critically prevent a disease outbreak. In this work, the use of phage displayed peptides was explored for the detection of S. Typhimurium. A phage-displayed random dodecapeptide library was subjected to biopanning against lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of S. Typhimurium. The peptide NFMESLPRLGMH (pep49) derived from biopanning displayed a high affinity (25.8nM) for the LPS of S. Typhimurium and low cross-reactivity with other strains of Salmonella and related Gram-negative bacteria. Molecular insights into the interaction of pep49 with the LPS of S. Typhimurium was gleaned using atomistic molecular dynamics simulations and docking. It was deduced that the specificity of pep49 with S. Typhimurium LPS originated from the interactions of pep49 with abequose that is found only in the O-antigen of S. Typhimurium. Further, pep49 was able to detect S. Typhimurium at a LOD of 10(3) CFU/mL using ELISA, and may be a potential cost efficient alternative to antibodies.

  13. Identification and immunogenicity of an immunodominant mimotope of Avibacterium paragallinarum from a phage display peptide library.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongjun; Gao, Yaping; Gong, Yumei; Chen, Xiaoling; Liu, Chuan; Zhou, Xuemei; Blackall, P J; Zhang, Peijun; Yang, Hanchun

    2007-01-31

    Avibacterium paragallinarum is the causative agent of infectious coryza. The protective antigens of this important pathogen have not yet been clearly identified. In this paper, we applied phage display technique to screen the immunodominant mimotopes of a serovar A strain of A. paragallinarum by using a random 12-peptide library, and evaluated the immunogenicity in chickens of the selected mimotope. Polyclonal antibody directed against A. paragallinarum strain 0083 (serovar A) was used as the target antibody and phage clones binding to this target were screened from the 12-mer random peptide library. More than 50% of the phage clones selected in the third round carried the consensus peptide motif sequence A-DP(M)L. The phage clones containing the peptide motif reacted with the target antibody and this interaction could be blocked, in a dose-dependent manner, by A. paragallinarum. One of the peptide sequences, YGLLAVDPLFKP, was selected and the corresponding oligonucleotide sequence was synthesized and then inserted into the expression vector pFliTrx. The recombinant plasmid was transferred into an expression host Escherichia coli GI826 by electroporation, resulting in a recombinant E. coli expressing the peptide on the bacterial surface. Intramuscular injection of the epitope-expressing recombinant bacteria into chickens induced a specific serological response to serovar A. A. paragallinarum. The chickens given the recombinant E. coli showed significant protection against challenge with A. paragallinarum 0083. These results indicated a potential for the use of the mimotope in the development of molecular vaccines for infectious coryza.

  14. Inorganic binding peptides designed by phage display techniques for biotechnology applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Chih-Wei

    Biomacromolecules play an important role in the control of hard tissue structure and function via specific molecular recognition interactions between proteins of the matrix and inorganic species of the biomineral phase. During the construction of the tissue, biomacromolecules are usually folded into a certain comformation, analogous to a "lock" for fitting with other proteins or smaller molecules as a "key". Currently, the rational design of molecular recognition in biomacro-molecules is still hard to accomplish because the protein conformation is too complex to precisely predict based on the existing conformational information of proteins found in biological systems. In the past two decades, the combinatorial approach (e.g. phage display techniques) has been used to select short binding peptides with molecular recognition to an inorganic target material without a prior knowledge of the amino acid sequence required for the specific binding. The technique has been referred to as "biopanning" because bacteriophages are used to "screen" for peptides that exhibit strong binding to a target material of interest. In this study, two diverse applications were chosen to demonstrate the utility of the biopanning approach. In one project, phage display techniques were used to pan for Indium Zinc Oxide (InZnO) binding peptides to serve as linkers between transducer devices and biosensing elements for demonstration of the feasibility of reversibly electro-activated biosensors. The amorphous InZnO, with its homogeneous surface, led to three consensus peptide sequences, AGFPNSTHSSNL, SHAPDSTWFALF, and TNSSSQFVVAIP. In addition, it was demonstrated that some selected phage clones of the InZnO binding peptides were able to be released from the InZnO surface after applying a voltage of 1400 mV on an electro-activated releasing device. In the second project, phage display techniques were used to select phage clones that bind specifically to francolite mineral in order to achieve

  15. Automated panning and screening procedure on microplates for antibody generation from phage display libraries.

    PubMed

    Turunen, Laura; Takkinen, Kristiina; Söderlund, Hans; Pulli, Timo

    2009-03-01

    Antibody phage display technology is well established and widely used for selecting specific antibodies against desired targets. Using conventional manual methods, it is laborious to perform multiple selections with different antigens simultaneously. Furthermore, manual screening of the positive clones requires much effort. The authors describe optimized and automated procedures of these processes using a magnetic bead processor for the selection and a robotic station for the screening step. Both steps are performed in a 96-well microplate format. In addition, adopting the antibody phage display technology to automated platform polyethylene glycol precipitation of the enriched phage pool was unnecessary. For screening, an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay protocol suitable for a robotic station was developed. This system was set up using human gamma-globulin as a model antigen to select antibodies from a VTT naive human single-chain antibody (scFv) library. In total, 161 gamma-globulin-selected clones were screened, and according to fingerprinting analysis, 9 of the 13 analyzed clones were different. The system was further tested using testosterone bovine serum albumin (BSA) and beta-estradiol-BSA as antigens with the same library. In total, 1536 clones were screened from 4 rounds of selection with both antigens, and 29 different testosterone-BSA and 23 beta-estradiol-BSA binding clones were found and verified by sequencing. This automated antibody phage display procedure increases the throughput of generating wide panels of target-binding antibody candidates and allows the selection and screening of antibodies against several different targets in parallel with high efficiency.

  16. Peptide sequences mediating tropism to intact blood-brain barrier: an in vivo biodistribution study using phage display.

    PubMed

    Smith, Mathew W; Al-Jayyoussi, Ghaith; Gumbleton, Mark

    2012-11-01

    Peptide motifs that demonstrate tropism for the blood brain barrier (BBB) are of real translational value in developing innovative delivery strategies for biological brain targeted therapies. In vivo peptide-phage display affords peptide selection against the full complement of biological markers within the correct cellular macro- and micro-environments. Here a stringent in vivo biopanning protocol was employed in the rat aimed at identifying cyclic 7-mer peptide motifs that mediate tropism to brain microvasculature. Five rounds of biopanning identified 349 unique peptide motifs in the brain tissue gray matter compartment (microvasculature and parenchyma). While in general no consensus was evident linking peptide physico-chemical properties and brain tropism, peptides bearing c-SxTSSTx-c or c-xxxSSTx-c motifs were found to be present in high abundance. Based on amino acid frequency distribution of the 349 unique peptides sequences a theoretical 'idealized' peptide pattern, c-PP(S/P)SSST-c, could be derived. For the most abundant experimental peptide sequence found in brain tissue, c-SYTSSTM-c, an in vivo pharmacokinetic and whole body tissue biodistribution study was performed. Based upon tissue exposure data (i.e. tissue AUC((0-infinity))) the sequence c-SYTSSTM-c efficiently retargeted phage virions to the brain providing an approximate 5-fold greater (P<0.05) accumulation in brain over control phage; in all other organs no significant (P>0.05) difference in tissue tropism between c-SYTSSTM-c and control phages were evident. This peptide and more generally the peptide motifs, -SxTSSTx- or -xxxSSTx-, warrant further investigation as agents mediating sequence-dependent tropism to brain microvasculature potentially able to deliver biologic cargo to the CNS.

  17. PEGylation enables the specific tumor accumulation of a peptide identified by phage display.

    PubMed

    Mier, Walter; Krämer, Susanne; Zitzmann, Sabine; Altmann, Annette; Leotta, Karin; Schierbaum, Ursula; Schnölzer, Martina; Eisenhut, Michael; Haberkorn, Uwe

    2013-04-28

    Peptides are excellent alternatives to small molecules and proteinaceous drugs. Their high medicinal potential for diagnostic and therapeutic applications has prompted the development of tumor targeting peptides. Despite its excellent tumor binding capacity, FROP-DOTA (H-Glu-Asn-Tyr-Glu-Leu-Met-Asp-Leu-Leu-Ala-Tyr-Leu-Lys(DOTA)-NH2), a peptide that we had identified in phage display libraries, revealed slow binding kinetics. Consequently, biodistribution studies showed that its excretion forestalled a significant tumor accumulation. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the conjugation of PEG to FROP-DOTA resulted in a derivative with a prolonged residence time in the blood. A synthetic method for the PEGylation of the tumor specific peptide FROP-DOTA was developed. Thereafter, binding studies were done in vitro and a biodistribution was performed in tumor bearing animals. These were compared to the data obtained with FROP-DOTA. The binding kinetics of the PEGylated FROP-DOTA was even slower than that of FROP-DOTA. Biodistribution studies of the labeled conjugate in mice bearing human FRO82-2 tumors showed a time dependent increased uptake of the PEGylated peptide with a high retention (at 24 h p.i. 76% of the maximal activity concentration persisted in the tumor). The highest uptake values were determined at 120 min p.i. reaching 2.3%ID/g tumor as compared to 0.06%ID/g observed for the non-PEGylated derivative at 135 min p.i. Apparently, PEGylation provides a substantially improved stabilization in the circulation which allowed a stable tumor accumulation.

  18. Shotgun phage display of Lactobacillus casei BL23 against collagen and fibronectin.

    PubMed

    Munoz-Provencio, Diego; Monedero, Vicente

    2011-02-01

    Lactobacilli are normal constituents of the intestinal microbiota, and some strains show the capacity to bind to extracellular matrix proteins and components of the mucosal layer, which represents an adaptation to persist in this niche. A shotgun phage-display library of Lactobacillus casei BL23 was constructed and screened for peptides able to bind to fibronectin and collagen. Clones showing binding to these proteins were isolated, which encoded overlapping fragments of a putative transcriptional regulator (LCABL_29260), a hypothetical protein exclusively found in the L. casei/rhamnosus group (LCABL_01820), and a putative phage-related endolysin (LCABL_13470). The construction of different glutathione S-transferase (GST) fusions confirmed the binding activity and demonstrated that the three identified proteins could interact with fibronectin, fibrinogen, and collagen. The results illustrate the utility of phage display for the isolation of putative adhesins in lactobacilli. However, it remains to be determined whether the primary function of these proteins actually is adhesion to mucosal surfaces.

  19. Strategies for the construction and use of peptide and antibody libraries displayed on phages.

    PubMed

    Pini, Alessandro; Giuliani, Andrea; Ricci, Claudia; Runci, Ylenia; Bracci, Luisa

    2004-12-01

    Combinatorial chemistry and biology have become popular methods for the identification of bio-active molecules in drug discovery. A widely used technique in combinatorial biology is "phage display", by which peptides, antibody fragments and enzymes are displayed on the surface of bacteriophages, and can be selected by simple procedures of biopanning. The construction of phage libraries of peptides or antibody fragments provides a huge source of ligands and bio-active molecules that can be isolated from the library without laborious studies on antigen characteristics and prediction of ligand structure. This "irrational" approach for the construction of new drugs is extremely rapid and is now used by thousands of laboratories world-wide. The bottleneck in this procedure is the availability of large reliable libraries that can be used repeatedly over the years without loss of ligand expression and diversity. Construction of personalized libraries is therefore important for public and private laboratories engaged in the isolation of specific molecules for therapeutic or diagnostic use. Here we report the general strategies for constructing large phage peptide and antibody libraries, based on the experience of researchers who built the world's most widely used libraries. Particular attention is paid to advanced strategies for the construction, preservation and panning.

  20. Protection against Influenza A Virus Challenge with M2e-Displaying Filamentous Escherichia coli Phages

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Lei; Ibañez, Lorena Itatí; Van den Bossche, Veronique; Roose, Kenny; Youssef, Sameh A.; de Bruin, Alain; Fiers, Walter; Saelens, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    Human influenza viruses are responsible for annual epidemics and occasional pandemics that cause severe illness and mortality in all age groups worldwide. Matrix protein 2 (M2) of influenza A virus is a tetrameric type III membrane protein that functions as a proton-selective channel. The extracellular domain of M2 (M2e) is conserved in human and avian influenza A viruses and is being pursued as a component for a universal influenza A vaccine. To develop a M2e vaccine that is economical and easy to purify, we genetically fused M2e amino acids 2–16 to the N-terminus of pVIII, the major coat protein of filamentous bacteriophage f88. We show that the resulting recombinant f88−M2e2-16 phages are replication competent and display the introduced part of M2e on the phage surface. Immunization of mice with purified f88−M2e2-16 phages in the presence of incomplete Freund’s adjuvant, induced robust M2e-specific serum IgG and protected BALB/c mice against challenge with human and avian influenza A viruses. Thus, replication competent filamentous bacteriophages can be used as efficient and economical carriers to display conserved B cell epitopes of influenza A. PMID:25973787

  1. Phage display of ScFv peptides recognizing the thymidine(6–4)thymidine photoproduct

    PubMed Central

    Zavala, Anamaria G.; Lancaster, Thaddeus; Groopman, John D.; Strickland, Paul T.; Chandrasegaran, Srinivasan

    2000-01-01

    Solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation induces DNA photoproducts in skin cells and is the predominant cause of human skin cancers. To understand human susceptibility to skin cancer and to facilitate the development of prevention measures, highly specific reagents to detect and quantitate UV-induced DNA adducts in human skin will be needed. One approach towards this end is the use of monoclonal antibody-based molecular dosimetry methods. To facilitate the development of photoproduct-specific antibody reagents we have: (i) cloned and sequenced a single chain variable fragment (ScFv) gene coding for one such high affinity monoclonal antibody, αUVssDNA-1 (mAb C3B6), recognizing the thymidine(6–4)thymidine photoproduct; (ii) expressed and displayed the cloned ScFv gene on the surface of phage; (iii) selected functional recombinant phage by panning; (iv) purified the ScFv peptide; (v) shown that the purified ScFv peptide binds to UV-irradiated polythymidylic acid but not unirradiated polythymidylic acid. This is the first demonstration of the use of phage display to select a ScFv recognizing DNA damage. In addition, this is the initial step towards immortalizing the antibody gene for genetic manipulation, structure–function studies and application to human investigations. PMID:10710441

  2. Expanding the versatility of phage display II: improved affinity selection of folded domains on protein VII and IX of the filamentous phage.

    PubMed

    Løset, Geir Åge; Roos, Norbert; Bogen, Bjarne; Sandlie, Inger

    2011-02-24

    Phage display is a leading technology for selection of binders with affinity for specific target molecules. Polypeptides are normally displayed as fusions to the major coat protein VIII (pVIII) or the minor coat protein III (pIII). Whereas pVIII display suffers from drawbacks such as heterogeneity in display levels and polypeptide fusion size limitations, toxicity and infection interference effects have been described for pIII display. Thus, display on other coat proteins such as pVII or pIX might be more attractive. Neither pVII nor pIX display have gained widespread use or been characterized in detail like pIII and pVIII display. Here we present a side-by-side comparison of display on pIII with display on pVII and pIX. Polypeptides of interest (POIs) are fused to pVII or pIX. The N-terminal periplasmic signal sequence, which is required for phage integration of pIII and pVIII and that has been added to pVII and pIX in earlier studies, is omitted altogether. Although the POI display level on pIII is higher than on pVII and pIX, affinity selection with pVII and pIX display libraries is shown to be particularly efficient. Display through pVII and/or pIX represent platforms with characteristics that differ from those of the pIII platform. We have explored this to increase the performance and expand the use of phage display. In the paper, we describe effective affinity selection of folded domains displayed on pVII or pIX. This makes both platforms more attractive alternatives to conventional pIII and pVIII display than they were before.

  3. Expanding the Versatility of Phage Display II: Improved Affinity Selection of Folded Domains on Protein VII and IX of the Filamentous Phage

    PubMed Central

    Løset, Geir Åge; Roos, Norbert; Bogen, Bjarne; Sandlie, Inger

    2011-01-01

    Background Phage display is a leading technology for selection of binders with affinity for specific target molecules. Polypeptides are normally displayed as fusions to the major coat protein VIII (pVIII) or the minor coat protein III (pIII). Whereas pVIII display suffers from drawbacks such as heterogeneity in display levels and polypeptide fusion size limitations, toxicity and infection interference effects have been described for pIII display. Thus, display on other coat proteins such as pVII or pIX might be more attractive. Neither pVII nor pIX display have gained widespread use or been characterized in detail like pIII and pVIII display. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we present a side-by-side comparison of display on pIII with display on pVII and pIX. Polypeptides of interest (POIs) are fused to pVII or pIX. The N-terminal periplasmic signal sequence, which is required for phage integration of pIII and pVIII and that has been added to pVII and pIX in earlier studies, is omitted altogether. Although the POI display level on pIII is higher than on pVII and pIX, affinity selection with pVII and pIX display libraries is shown to be particularly efficient. Conclusions/Significance Display through pVII and/or pIX represent platforms with characteristics that differ from those of the pIII platform. We have explored this to increase the performance and expand the use of phage display. In the paper, we describe effective affinity selection of folded domains displayed on pVII or pIX. This makes both platforms more attractive alternatives to conventional pIII and pVIII display than they were before. PMID:21390283

  4. Engineering RNA phage MS2 virus-like particles for peptide display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, Sheldon Keith

    Phage display is a powerful and versatile technology that enables the selection of novel binding functions from large populations of randomly generated peptide sequences. Random sequences are genetically fused to a viral structural protein to produce complex peptide libraries. From a sufficiently complex library, phage bearing peptides with practically any desired binding activity can be physically isolated by affinity selection, and, since each particle carries in its genome the genetic information for its own replication, the selectants can be amplified by infection of bacteria. For certain applications however, existing phage display platforms have limitations. One such area is in the field of vaccine development, where the goal is to identify relevant epitopes by affinity-selection against an antibody target, and then to utilize them as immunogens to elicit a desired antibody response. Today, affinity selection is usually conducted using display on filamentous phages like M13. This technology provides an efficient means for epitope identification, but, because filamentous phages do not display peptides in the high-density, multivalent arrays the immune system prefers to recognize, they generally make poor immunogens and are typically useless as vaccines. This makes it necessary to confer immunogenicity by conjugating synthetic versions of the peptides to more immunogenic carriers. Unfortunately, when introduced into these new structural environments, the epitopes often fail to elicit relevant antibody responses. Thus, it would be advantageous to combine the epitope selection and immunogen functions into a single platform where the structural constraints present during affinity selection can be preserved during immunization. This dissertation describes efforts to develop a peptide display system based on the virus-like particles (VLPs) of bacteriophage MS2. Phage display technologies rely on (1) the identification of a site in a viral structural protein that is

  5. Blocking peptides against HBV: PreS1 protein selected from a phage display library

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Wei; Liu, Yang; Zu, Xiangyang; Jin, Rui; Xiao, Gengfu

    2011-09-09

    Highlights: {yields} Successfully selected specific PreS1-interacting peptides by using phage displayed library. {yields} Alignment of the positive phage clones revealed a consensus PreS1 binding motif. {yields} A highly enriched peptide named P7 had a strong binding ability for PreS1. {yields} P7 could block PreS1 attachment. -- Abstract: The PreS1 protein is present on the outermost part of the hepatitis B virus (HBV) surface and has been shown to have a pivotal function in viral infectivity and assembly. The development of reagents with high affinity and specificity for PreS1 is of great significance for early diagnosis and treatment of HBV infection. A phage display library of dodecapeptide was screened for interactions with purified PreS1 protein. Alignment of the positive phage clones revealed a putative consensus PreS1 binding motif of HX{sub n}HX{sub m}HP/R. Moreover, a peptide named P7 (KHMHWHPPALNT) was highly enriched and occurred with a surprisingly high frequency of 72%. A thermodynamic study revealed that P7 has a higher binding affinity to PreS1 than the other peptides. Furthermore, P7 was able to abrogate the binding of HBV virions to the PreS1 antibody, suggesting that P7 covers key functional sites on the native PreS1 protein. This newly isolated peptide may, therefore, be a new therapeutic candidate for the treatment of HBV. The consensus motif could be modified to deliver imaging, diagnostic, and therapeutic agents to tissues affected by HBV.

  6. Using phage display selected antibodies to dissect microbiomes for complete de novo genome sequencing of low abundance microbes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Single cell genomics has revolutionized microbial sequencing, but complete coverage of genomes in complex microbiomes is imperfect due to enormous variation in organismal abundance and amplification bias. Empirical methods that complement rapidly improving bioinformatic tools will improve characterization of microbiomes and facilitate better genome coverage for low abundance microbes. Methods We describe a new approach to sequencing individual species from microbiomes that combines antibody phage display against intact bacteria with fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS). Single chain (scFv) antibodies are selected using phage display against a bacteria or microbial community, resulting in species-specific antibodies that can be used in FACS for relative quantification of an organism in a community, as well as enrichment or depletion prior to genome sequencing. Results We selected antibodies against Lactobacillus acidophilus and demonstrate a FACS-based approach for identification and enrichment of the organism from both laboratory-cultured and commercially derived bacterial mixtures. The ability to selectively enrich for L. acidophilus when it is present at a very low abundance (<0.2%) leads to complete (>99.8%) de novo genome coverage whereas the standard single-cell sequencing approach is incomplete (<68%). We show that specific antibodies can be selected against L. acidophilus when the monoculture is used as antigen as well as when a community of 10 closely related species is used demonstrating that in principal antibodies can be generated against individual organisms within microbial communities. Conclusions The approach presented here demonstrates that phage-selected antibodies against bacteria enable identification, enrichment of rare species, and depletion of abundant organisms making it tractable to virtually any microbe or microbial community. Combining antibody specificity with FACS provides a new approach for characterizing and

  7. Phage-displayed peptides selected for binding to Campylobacter jejuni are antimicrobial.

    PubMed

    Bishop-Hurley, Sharon L; Rea, Philippa J; McSweeney, Christopher S

    2010-10-01

    In developed countries, Campylobacter jejuni is a leading cause of zoonotic bacterial gastroenteritis in humans with chicken meat implicated as a source of infection. Campylobacter jejuni colonises the lower gastrointestinal tract of poultry and during processing is spread from the gastrointestinal tract onto the surface of dressed carcasses. Controlling or eliminating C.jejuni on-farm is considered to be one of the best strategies for reducing human infection. Molecules on the cell surface of C.jejuni interact with the host to facilitate its colonisation and persistence in the gastrointestinal tract of poultry. We used a subtractive phage-display protocol to affinity select for peptides binding to the cell surface of a poultry isolate of C.jejuni with the aim of finding peptides that could be used to control this microorganism in chickens. In total, 27 phage peptides, representing 11 unique clones, were found to inhibit the growth of C.jejuni by up to 99.9% in vitro. One clone was bactericidal, reducing the viability of C.jejuni by 87% in vitro. The phage peptides were highly specific. They completely inhibited the growth of two of the four poultry isolates of C.jejuni tested with no activity detected towards other Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria.

  8. Identification of small molecule binding sites within proteins using phage display technology.

    SciTech Connect

    Rodi, D. J.; Agoston, G. E.; Manon, R.; Lapcevich, R.; Green, S. J.; Makowski, L.; Biosciences Division; EntreMed Inc.; Florida State Univ.

    2001-11-01

    Affinity selection of peptides displayed on phage particles was used as the basis for mapping molecular contacts between small molecule ligands and their protein targets. Analysis of the crystal structures of complexes between proteins and small molecule ligands revealed that virtually all ligands of molecular weight 300 Da or greater have a continuous binding epitope of 5 residues or more. This observation led to the development of a technique for binding site identification which involves statistical analysis of an affinity-selected set of peptides obtained by screening of libraries of random, phage-displayed peptides against small molecules attached to solid surfaces. A random sample of the selected peptides is sequenced and used as input for a similarity scanning program which calculates cumulative similarity scores along the length of the putative receptor. Regions of the protein sequence exhibiting the highest similarity with the selected peptides proved to have a high probability of being involved in ligand binding. This technique has been employed successfully to map the contact residues in multiple known targets of the anticancer drugs paclitaxel (Taxol), docetaxel (Taxotere) and 2-methoxyestradiol and the glycosaminoglycan hyaluronan, and to identify a novel paclitaxel receptor [1]. These data corroborate the observation that the binding properties of peptides displayed on the surface of phage particles can mimic the binding properties of peptides in naturally occurring proteins. It follows directly that structural context is relatively unimportant for determining the binding properties of these disordered peptides. This technique represents a novel, rapid, high resolution method for identifying potential ligand binding sites in the absence of three-dimensional information and has the potential to greatly enhance the speed of development of novel small molecule pharmaceuticals.

  9. The influence of antibody fragment format on phage display based affinity maturation of IgG

    PubMed Central

    Steinwand, Miriam; Droste, Patrick; Frenzel, Andrè; Hust, Michael; Dübel, Stefan; Schirrmann, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Today, most approved therapeutic antibodies are provided as immunoglobulin G (IgG), whereas small recombinant antibody formats are required for in vitro antibody generation and engineering during drug development. Particularly, single chain (sc) antibody fragments like scFv or scFab are well suited for phage display and bacterial expression, but some have been found to lose affinity during conversion into IgG.   In this study, we compared the influence of the antibody format on affinity maturation of the CD30-specific scFv antibody fragment SH313-F9, with the overall objective being improvement of the IgG. The variable genes of SH313-F9 were randomly mutated and then cloned into libraries encoding different recombinant antibody formats, including scFv, Fab, scFabΔC, and FabΔC. All tested antibody formats except Fab allowed functional phage display of the parental antibody SH313-F9, and the corresponding mutated antibody gene libraries allowed isolation of candidates with enhanced CD30 binding. Moreover, scFv and scFabΔC antibody variants retained improved antigen binding after subcloning into the single gene encoded IgG-like formats scFv-Fc or scIgG, but lost affinity after conversion into IgGs. Only affinity maturation using the Fab-like FabΔC format, which does not contain the carboxy terminal cysteines, allowed successful selection of molecules with improved binding that was retained after conversion to IgG. Thus, affinity maturation of IgGs is dependent on the antibody format employed for selection and screening. In this study, only FabΔC resulted in the efficient selection of IgG candidates with higher affinity by combination of Fab-like conformation and improved phage display compared with Fab. PMID:24262918

  10. The influence of antibody fragment format on phage display based affinity maturation of IgG.

    PubMed

    Steinwand, Miriam; Droste, Patrick; Frenzel, André; Hust, Michael; Dübel, Stefan; Schirrmann, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Today, most approved therapeutic antibodies are provided as immunoglobulin G (IgG), whereas small recombinant antibody formats are required for in vitro antibody generation and engineering during drug development. Particularly,single chain (sc) antibody fragments like scFv or scFab are well suited for phage display and bacterial expression, but some have been found to lose affinity during conversion into IgG.In this study, we compared the influence of the antibody format on affinity maturation of the CD30-specific scFv antibody fragment SH313-F9, with the overall objective being improvement of the IgG. The variable genes of SH313-F9 were randomly mutated and then cloned into libraries encoding different recombinant antibody formats, including scFv, Fab, scFabΔC, and FabΔC. All tested antibody formats except Fab allowed functional phage display of the parental antibody SH313-F9, and the corresponding mutated antibody gene libraries allowed isolation of candidates with enhanced CD30 binding. Moreover, scFv and scFabΔC antibody variants retained improved antigen binding after subcloning into the single gene encoded IgG-like formats scFv-Fc or scIgG, but lost affinity after conversion into IgGs.Only affinity maturation using the Fab-like FabΔC format, which does not contain the carboxy terminal cysteines, allowed successful selection of molecules with improved binding that was retained after conversion to IgG. Thus, affinity maturation of IgGs is dependent on the antibody format employed for selection and screening. In this study, only FabΔC resulted in the efficient selection of IgG candidates with higher affinity by combination of Fab-like conformation and improved phage display compared with Fab.

  11. Structural differences of amyloid-β fibrils revealed by antibodies from phage display.

    PubMed

    Droste, Patrick; Frenzel, André; Steinwand, Miriam; Pelat, Thibaut; Thullier, Philippe; Hust, Michael; Lashuel, Hilal; Dübel, Stefan

    2015-06-18

    Beside neurofibrillary tangles, amyloid plaques are the major histological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD) being composed of aggregated fibrils of β-amyloid (Aβ). During the underlying fibrillogenic pathway, starting from a surplus of soluble Aβ and leading to mature fibrils, multiple conformations of this peptide appear, including oligomers of various shapes and sizes. To further investigate the fibrillization of β-amyloid and to have tools at hand to monitor the distribution of aggregates in the brain or even act as disease modulators, it is essential to develop highly sensitive antibodies that can discriminate between diverse aggregates of Aβ. Here we report the generation and characterization of a variety of amyloid-β specific human and human-like antibodies. Distinct fractions of monomers and oligomers of various sizes were separated by size exclusion chromatography (SEC) from Aβ42 peptides. These antigens were used for the generation of two Aβ42 specific immune scFv phage display libraries from macaque (Macaca fascicularis). Screening of these libraries as well as two naïve human phage display libraries resulted in multiple unique binders specific for amyloid-β. Three of the obtained antibodies target the N-terminal part of Aβ42 although with varying epitopes, while another scFv binds to the α-helical central region of the peptide. The affinities of the antibodies to various Aβ42 aggregates as well as their ability to interfere with fibril formation and disaggregation of preformed fibrils were determined. Most significantly, one of the scFv is fibril-specific and can discriminate between two different fibril forms resulting from variations in the acidity of the milieu during fibrillogenesis. We demonstrated that the approach of animal immunization and subsequent phage display based antibody selection is applicable to generate highly specific anti β-amyloid scFvs that are capable of accurately discriminating between minute conformational

  12. Silent Encoding of Chemical Post-Translational Modifications in Phage-Displayed Libraries.

    PubMed

    Tjhung, Katrina F; Kitov, Pavel I; Ng, Simon; Kitova, Elena N; Deng, Lu; Klassen, John S; Derda, Ratmir

    2016-01-13

    In vitro selection of chemically modified peptide libraries presented on phage, while a powerful technology, is limited to one chemical post-translational modification (cPTM) per library. We use unique combinations of redundant codons to encode cPTMs with "silent barcodes" to trace multiple modifications within a mixed modified library. As a proof of concept, we produced phage-displayed peptide libraries Ser-[X]4-Gly-Gly-Gly, with Gly and Ser encoded using unique combinations of codons (TCA-[X]4-GGAGGAGGA, AGT-[X]4-GGTGGTGGT, etc., where [X]4 denotes a random NNK library). After separate chemical modification and pooling, mixed-modified libraries can be panned and deep-sequenced to identify the enriched peptide sequence and the accompanying cPTM simultaneously. We panned libraries bearing combinations of modifications (sulfonamide, biotin, mannose) against matched targets (carbonic anhydrase, streptavidin, concanavalin A) to identify desired ligands. Synthesis and validation of sequences identified by deep sequencing revealed that specific cPTMs are significantly enriched in panning against the specific targets. Panning on carbonic anhydrase yielded a potent ligand, sulfonamide-WIVP, with Kd = 6.7 ± 2.1 nM, a 20-fold improvement compared with the control ligand sulfonamide-GGGG. Silent encoding of multiple cPTMs can be readily incorporated into other in vitro display technologies such as bacteriophage T7 or mRNA display.

  13. Selection of peptides binding to metallic borides by screening M13 phage display libraries

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Metal borides are a class of inorganic solids that is much less known and investigated than for example metal oxides or intermetallics. At the same time it is a highly versatile and interesting class of compounds in terms of physical and chemical properties, like semiconductivity, ferromagnetism, or catalytic activity. This makes these substances attractive for the generation of new materials. Very little is known about the interaction between organic materials and borides. To generate nanostructured and composite materials which consist of metal borides and organic modifiers it is necessary to develop new synthetic strategies. Phage peptide display libraries are commonly used to select peptides that bind specifically to metals, metal oxides, and semiconductors. Further, these binding peptides can serve as templates to control the nucleation and growth of inorganic nanoparticles. Additionally, the combination of two different binding motifs into a single bifunctional phage could be useful for the generation of new composite materials. Results In this study, we have identified a unique set of sequences that bind to amorphous and crystalline nickel boride (Ni3B) nanoparticles, from a random peptide library using the phage display technique. Using this technique, strong binders were identified that are selective for nickel boride. Sequence analysis of the peptides revealed that the sequences exhibit similar, yet subtle different patterns of amino acid usage. Although a predominant binding motif was not observed, certain charged amino acids emerged as essential in specific binding to both substrates. The 7-mer peptide sequence LGFREKE, isolated on amorphous Ni3B emerged as the best binder for both substrates. Fluorescence microscopy and atomic force microscopy confirmed the specific binding affinity of LGFREKE expressing phage to amorphous and crystalline Ni3B nanoparticles. Conclusions This study is, to our knowledge, the first to identify peptides that

  14. Substrates of the Arabidopsis thaliana Protein Isoaspartyl Methyltransferase 1 Identified Using Phage Display and Biopanning*

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Tingsu; Nayak, Nihar; Majee, Susmita Maitra; Lowenson, Jonathan; Schäfermeyer, Kim R.; Eliopoulos, Alyssa C.; Lloyd, Taylor D.; Dinkins, Randy; Perry, Sharyn E.; Forsthoefel, Nancy R.; Clarke, Steven G.; Vernon, Daniel M.; Zhou, Zhaohui Sunny; Rejtar, Tomas; Downie, A. Bruce

    2010-01-01

    The role of protein isoaspartyl methyltransferase (PIMT) in repairing a wide assortment of damaged proteins in a host of organisms has been inferred from the affinity of the enzyme for isoaspartyl residues in a plethora of amino acid contexts. The identification of PIMT target proteins in plant seeds, where the enzyme is highly active and proteome long-lived, has been hindered by large amounts of isoaspartate-containing storage proteins. Mature seed phage display libraries circumvented this problem. Inclusion of the PIMT co-substrate, S-adenosylmethionine (AdoMet), during panning permitted PIMT to retain aged phage in greater numbers than controls lacking co-substrate or when PIMT protein binding was poisoned with S-adenosyl homocysteine. After four rounds, phage titer plateaued in AdoMet-containing pans, whereas titer declined in both controls. This strategy identified 17 in-frame PIMT target proteins, including a cupin-family protein similar to those identified previously using on-blot methylation. All recovered phage had at least one susceptible Asp or Asn residue. Five targets were recovered independently. Two in-frame targets were produced in Escherichia coli as recombinant proteins and shown by on-blot methylation to acquire isoAsp, becoming a PIMT target. Both gained isoAsp rapidly in solution upon thermal insult. Mutant analysis of plants deficient in any of three in-frame PIMT targets resulted in demonstrable phenotypes. An over-representation of clones encoding proteins involved in protein production suggests that the translational apparatus comprises a subgroup for which PIMT-mediated repair is vital for orthodox seed longevity. Impaired PIMT activity would hinder protein function in these targets, possibly resulting in poor seed performance. PMID:20870712

  15. Application of phage peptide display technology for the study of food allergen epitopes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xueni; Dreskin, Stephen C

    2017-06-01

    Phage peptide display technology has been used to identify IgE-binding mimotopes (mimics of natural epitopes) that mimic conformational epitopes. This approach is effective in the characterization of those epitopes that are important for eliciting IgE-mediated allergic responses by food allergens and those that are responsible for cross-reactivity among allergenic food proteins. Application of this technology will increase our understanding of the mechanisms whereby food allergens elicit allergic reactions, will facilitate the discovery of diagnostic reagents and may lead to mimotope-based immunotherapy. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Engineering sortase A by screening a second-generation library using phage display.

    PubMed

    Schmohl, Lena; Bierlmeier, Jan; Gerth, Fabian; Freund, Christian; Schwarzer, Dirk

    2017-02-10

    Sortase-mediated ligation is one of the most commonly used chemo-enzymatic techniques for the site-specific modification of proteins. We have established a new library of sortase mutants for directed evolution of sortase substrate selectivity. Phage display screens of this second-generation library yielded sortase mutants that ligate substrate proteins containing an APxTG or FPxTG recognition sequence instead of the canonical LPxTG sorting motif. These findings indicate that the second-generation sortase library is well suited for sortase engineering in order to increase the versatility of sortase-mediated ligation. Copyright © 2017 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Phage display: development of nanocarriers for targeted drug delivery to the brain

    PubMed Central

    Bakhshinejad, Babak; Karimi, Marzieh; Khalaj-Kondori, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    The blood brain barrier represents a formidable obstacle for the transport of most systematically administered neurodiagnostics and neurotherapeutics to the brain. Phage display is a high throughput screening strategy that can be used for the construction of nanomaterial peptide libraries. These libraries can be screened for finding brain targeting peptide ligands. Surface functionalization of a variety of nanocarriers with these brain homing peptides is a sophisticated way to develop nanobiotechnology-based drug delivery platforms that are able to cross the blood brain barrier. These efficient drug delivery systems raise our hopes for the diagnosis and treatment of various brain disorders in the future. PMID:26199590

  18. Cu-free cycloaddition for identifying catalytic active adenylation domains of nonribosomal peptide synthetases by phage display.

    PubMed

    Zou, Yekui; Yin, Jun

    2008-10-15

    To engineer the substrate specificities of nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPS), we developed a method to display NRPS modules on M13 phages and select catalytically active adenylation (A) domains that would load azide functionalized substrate analogs to the neighboring peptidyl carrier protein (PCP) domains. Biotin conjugated difluorinated cyclooctyne was used for copper free cycloaddition with an azide substituted substrate attached to PCP. Biotin-labeled phages were selected by binding to streptavidin.

  19. A method for the generation of combinatorial antibody libraries using pIX phage display.

    PubMed

    Gao, Changshou; Mao, Shenlan; Kaufmann, Gunnar; Wirsching, Peter; Lerner, Richard A; Janda, Kim D

    2002-10-01

    For more than a decade, phage displayed combinatorial antibody libraries have been used to generate and select a wide variety of antibodies. We previously reported that the phage coat proteins pVII and pIX could be used to display the heterodimeric structure of the antibody Fv region. Herein, aspects of this technology were invoked and extended to construct a large, human single-chain Fv (scFv) library of 4.5 x 10(9) members displayed on pIX of filamentous bacteriophage. Furthermore, the diversity, quality, and utility of the library were demonstrated by the selection of scFv clones against six different protein antigens. Notably, more than 90% of the selected clones showed positive binding for their respective antigens after as few as three rounds of panning. Analyzed scFvs were also found to be of high affinity. For example, kinetic analysis (BIAcore) revealed that scFvs against staphylococcal enterotoxin B and cholera toxin B subunit had a nanomolar and subnanomolar dissociation constant, respectively, affording affinities comparable to, or exceeding that, of mAbs obtained from immunization. High specificity was also attained, not only between very distinct proteins, but also in the case of the Ricinus communis ("ricin") agglutinins (RCA(60) and RCA(120)), despite >80% sequence homology between the two. The results suggested that the performance of pIX-display libraries can potentially exceed that of the pIII-display format and make it ideally suited for panning a wide variety of target antigens.

  20. Validation of phage display method for protease inhibitor selection using synthetic hybrid peptides.

    PubMed

    de Marco, Renato; Azzolini, Simone S; Lovato, Diogo V; Torquato, Ricardo J S; Amino, Rogerio; de Miranda, Antonio; Tanaka, Aparecida S

    2010-11-01

    A recombinant Haematobia irritans irritans trypsin inhibitor (HiTI - Mw 7030 kDa)) phagemid library was constructed and displayed functionally on the tip of the filamentous M13 phage. A combinatorial library of 7.2 x 10(6) mutants was created with HiTI mutations restricted to the P1'-P3' and P5' positions of the reactive site. This combinatorial library was selected for trypsin-like Pr2 proteases of Metarhizium anisopliae fungus, and 11 HiTI mutants containing the following substitutions: K17G, S18R, D19G, S21A, among 60 sequenced clones, were obtained. In order to confirm the inhibitory activity of the selected sequences, we transferred the selected sequence to the shortest protease inhibitor, the sunflower trypsin inhibitor (SFTI), for inhibitory activity analysis. The hybrid peptide containing the mutated sequence (SFTI-Mut, GRCTRGRGLACFPD-NH2; Ki = 14 µM) presented an apparent inhibition constant (Ki(app)) for Pr2 proteases ≈20-fold lower than the control peptide containing the original HiTI sequence (SFTI-HiTI, GRCTRKSDLSCFPD-NH2; Ki = 259 µM). In conclusion, the present work enabled the selection of a specific HiTI mutant for Pr2 proteases of M. anisopliae fungus using a HiTI combinatorial library on M13 phage surface. Selection of strong binders by phage display and their validation as inhibitors using synthetic hybrid peptides proved to be a powerful technique to generate specific serine protease inhibitors suitable for studies of drug design and enzyme-inhibitor interaction.

  1. Production of a single-chain fragment of the murine anti-idiotypic antibody ACA125 as phage-displayed and soluble antibody by recombinant phage antibody technique.

    PubMed

    Schlebusch, H; Reinartz, S; Kaiser, R; Grünn, U; Wagner, U

    1997-02-01

    The F(ab')2 fragment of the murine monoclonal anti-idiotypic antibody ACA125 mimicking the tumor-associated antigen CA125 is used as a vaccine for the induction of an anti-tumoral immunity in patients with ovarian carcinoma. We tried to generate a single-chain fragment (ScFv) composed of ACA125 heavy- and light-chain variable domains connected by a polypeptide linker as an alternative to the corresponding F(ab')2 fragment. Heavy- and light-chain genes of antibody-producing mouse hybridoma cell line were amplified separately and assembled into a ScFv gene with linker DNA by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The ScFv gene was ligated into the phagemid vector pCANTAB5E, which allows the production of both phage-displayed and soluble ScFv. Transformed Escherichia coli TG1 cells were infected with M13K07 helper phage to yield recombinant phage, which display ScFv fragments as a g3p fusion protein on the surface of the filamentous phage M13. Recombinant phages could be selected by binding to the idiotypic antibody OC125 after one round of panning and directly used to reinfect E. coli TG1 cells. The E. coli nonsuppressor strain HB2151 was infected with an antigen-positive phage clone, previously screened by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), to express soluble ScFv fragments. Functional soluble ScFv binding to the idiotypic antibody OC125 F(ab')2 could be detected in the bacterial periplasm by Western blot and ELISA. The variable heavy- and light-chain genes of the ACA125 ScFv fragment were further sequenced and compared with known antibody sequences.

  2. A novel strategy for the functional cloning of enzymes using filamentous phage display: the case of nucleotidyl transferases

    PubMed Central

    Brunet, Erika; Chauvin, Camille; Choumet, Valérie; Jestin, Jean-Luc

    2002-01-01

    In vitro selections for catalytic activity have been designed for the isolation of genes encoding enzymes from libraries of proteins displayed on filamentous phages. The proteins are generally expressed as C-terminal fusions with the N-terminus of the minor coat protein p3 for display on phages. As full-length cDNAs generally contain several stop codons near their 3′ end, this approach cannot be used for their expression on the surface of phages. Here we show that in vitro selection for catalytic activity is compatible with a system for expression of proteins as N-terminal fusions on the surface of bacteriophages. It is highlighted for the Stoffel fragment of Taq DNA polymerase I and makes use of (p3–Jun/Fos–Stoffel fragment) fusions. The efficiency of the selection is measured by an enrichment factor found to be about 55 for a phage polymerase versus a phage not expressing a polymerase. This approach could provide a method for the functional cloning of nucleotidyl transferases from cDNA libraries using filamentous phage display. PMID:11972355

  3. SRP and Sec pathway leader peptides for antibody phage display and antibody fragment production in E. coli.

    PubMed

    Thie, Holger; Schirrmann, Thomas; Paschke, Matthias; Dübel, Stefan; Hust, Michael

    2008-06-01

    Antibody phage display is a key technology for the generation of recombinant (human) antibodies for research, diagnostics and therapy. Most antibody fragments can only be folded correctly in the oxidizing environment of the periplasm of Escherichia coli. A multitude of leader peptides has been used for secretion of antibody::pIII fusion proteins into the periplasm, but a systematic study of their impact on the performance of antibody phage display systems has not been reported so far. In this work we have analysed the influence of various leader peptides on antibody phage display efficiency and production yields of soluble antibody fragments. Four leader peptides using the Sec pathway (PelB, OmpA, PhoA and pIII) and three using the SRP pathway (DsbA, TorT and TolB) were compared. Both pathways are compatible with antibody phage display and the production of soluble antibody fragments. The applicability of the SRP pathway to antibody phage display and the production of functional scFvs is shown here for the first time.

  4. Selection of recombinant anti-SH3 domain antibodies by high-throughput phage display

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Haiming; Economopoulos, Nicolas O; Liu, Bernard A; Uetrecht, Andrea; Gu, Jun; Jarvik, Nick; Nadeem, Vincent; Pawson, Tony; Moffat, Jason; Miersch, Shane; Sidhu, Sachdev S

    2015-01-01

    Antibodies are indispensable tools in biochemical research and play an expanding role as therapeutics. While hybridoma technology is the dominant method for antibody production, phage display is an emerging technology. Here, we developed and employed a high-throughput pipeline that enables selection of antibodies against hundreds of antigens in parallel. Binding selections using a phage-displayed synthetic antigen-binding fragment (Fab) library against 110 human SH3 domains yielded hundreds of Fabs targeting 58 antigens. Affinity assays demonstrated that representative Fabs bind tightly and specifically to their targets. Furthermore, we developed an efficient affinity maturation strategy adaptable to high-throughput, which increased affinity dramatically but did not compromise specificity. Finally, we tested Fabs in common cell biology applications and confirmed recognition of the full-length antigen in immunoprecipitation, immunoblotting and immunofluorescence assays. In summary, we have established a rapid and robust high-throughput methodology that can be applied to generate highly functional and renewable antibodies targeting protein domains on a proteome-wide scale. PMID:26332758

  5. Identification of Novel Single-Domain Antibodies against FGF7 Using Phage Display Technology.

    PubMed

    Jafari, Behzad; Hamzeh-Mivehroud, Maryam; Moosavi-Movahedi, Ali A; Dastmalchi, Siavoush

    2017-08-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 7 (FGF7) is a member of the fibroblast growth factor (FGF) family of proteins. FGF7 is of stromal origin and produces a paracrine effect on epithelial cells. In the current investigation, we aimed to identify new single-domain antibodies (sdAbs) against FGF7 using phage display technology. The vector harboring the codon-optimized DNA sequence for FGF7 protein was transformed into Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) pLysS, and then the protein was expressed at the optimized condition. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, circular dichroism spectropolarimetry, and in vitro scratch assay experiments were used to confirm the proper folding and functionality of the purified FGF7 protein. The purity of the produced FGF7 was 92%, with production yield of 3.5 mg/L of culture. Panning against the purified FGF7 was performed, and the identified single-domain antibodies showed significant affinity. Further investigation on one of the selected sdAb displaying phage clones showed concentration-dependent binding to FGF7. The selected sdAb can be used for developing novel tumor-suppressing agents where inhibition of FGF7 is required.

  6. Unique secreted–surface protein complex of Lactobacillus rhamnosus, identified by phage display

    PubMed Central

    Gagic, Dragana; Wen, Wesley; Collett, Michael A; Rakonjac, Jasna

    2013-01-01

    Proteins are the most diverse structures on bacterial surfaces; hence, they are candidates for species- and strain-specific interactions of bacteria with the host, environment, and other microorganisms. Genomics has decoded thousands of bacterial surface and secreted proteins, yet the function of most cannot be predicted because of the enormous variability and a lack of experimental data that would allow deduction of function through homology. Here, we used phage display to identify a pair of interacting extracellular proteins in the probiotic bacterium Lactobacillus rhamnosus HN001. A secreted protein, SpcA, containing two bacterial immunoglobulin-like domains type 3 (Big-3) and a domain distantly related to plant pathogen response domain 1 (PR-1-like) was identified by screening of an L. rhamnosus HN001 library using HN001 cells as bait. The SpcA-“docking” protein, SpcB, was in turn detected by another phage display library screening, using purified SpcA as bait. SpcB is a 3275-residue cell-surface protein that contains general features of large glycosylated Serine-rich adhesins/fibrils from gram-positive bacteria, including the hallmark signal sequence motif KxYKxGKxW. Both proteins are encoded by genes within a L. rhamnosus-unique gene cluster that distinguishes this species from other lactobacilli. To our knowledge, this is the first example of a secreted-docking protein pair identified in lactobacilli. PMID:23233310

  7. Application of M13 phage display for identifying immunogenic proteins from tick (Ixodes scapularis) saliva.

    PubMed

    Becker, Martin; Felsberger, André; Frenzel, André; Shattuck, Wendy M C; Dyer, Megan; Kügler, Jonas; Zantow, Jonas; Mather, Thomas N; Hust, Michael

    2015-05-30

    Ticks act as vectors for a large number of different pathogens, perhaps most notably Borrelia burgdorferi, the causative agent of Lyme disease. The most prominent tick vector in the United States is the blacklegged tick, Ixodes scapularis. Tick bites are of special public health concern since there are no vaccines available against most tick-transmitted pathogens. Based on the observation that certain non-natural host animals such as guinea pigs or humans can develop adaptive immune responses to tick bites, anti-tick vaccination is a potential approach to tackle health risks associated with tick bites. The aim of this study was to use an oligopeptide phage display strategy to identify immunogenic salivary gland proteins from I. scapularis that are recognized by human immune sera. Oligopeptide libraries were generated from salivary gland mRNA of 18 h fed nymphal I. scapularis. Eight immunogenic oligopeptides were selected using human immune sera. Three selected immunogenic oligopeptides were cloned and produced as recombinant proteins. The immunogenic character of an identified metalloprotease (MP1) was validated with human sera. This enzyme has been described previously and was hypothesized as immunogenic which was confirmed in this study. Interestingly, it also has close homologs in other Ixodes species. An immunogenic protein of I. scapularis was identified by oligopeptide phage display. MP1 is a potential candidate for vaccine development.

  8. Peptidic Tumor Targeting Agents: The Road from Phage Display Peptide Selections to Clinical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Kathlynn C.

    2014-01-01

    Cancer has become the number one cause of death amongst Americans, killing approximately 1,600 people per day. Novel methods for early detection and the development of effective treatments are an eminent priority in medicine. For this reason, isolation of tumor-specific ligands is a growing area of research. Tumor-specific binding agents can be used to probe the tumor cell surface phenotype and customize treatment accordingly by conjugating the appropriate cell-targeting ligand to an anticancer drug. This refines the molecular diagnosis of the tumor and creates guided drugs that can target the tumor while sparing healthy tissues. Additionally, these targeting agents can be used as in vivo imaging agents that allow for earlier detection of tumors and micrometastasis. Phage display is a powerful technique for the isolation of peptides that bind to a particular target with high affinity and specificity. The biopanning of intact cancer cells or tumors in animals can be used to isolate peptides that bind to cancer-specific cell surface biomarkers. Over the past 10 years, unbiased biopanning of phage-displayed peptide libraries has generated a suite of cancer targeting peptidic ligands. This review discusses the recent advances in the isolation of cancer-targeting peptides by unbiased biopanning methods and highlights the use of the isolated peptides in clinical applications. PMID:20030617

  9. Selection of recombinant anti-SH3 domain antibodies by high-throughput phage display.

    PubMed

    Huang, Haiming; Economopoulos, Nicolas O; Liu, Bernard A; Uetrecht, Andrea; Gu, Jun; Jarvik, Nick; Nadeem, Vincent; Pawson, Tony; Moffat, Jason; Miersch, Shane; Sidhu, Sachdev S

    2015-11-01

    Antibodies are indispensable tools in biochemical research and play an expanding role as therapeutics. While hybridoma technology is the dominant method for antibody production, phage display is an emerging technology. Here, we developed and employed a high-throughput pipeline that enables selection of antibodies against hundreds of antigens in parallel. Binding selections using a phage-displayed synthetic antigen-binding fragment (Fab) library against 110 human SH3 domains yielded hundreds of Fabs targeting 58 antigens. Affinity assays demonstrated that representative Fabs bind tightly and specifically to their targets. Furthermore, we developed an efficient affinity maturation strategy adaptable to high-throughput, which increased affinity dramatically but did not compromise specificity. Finally, we tested Fabs in common cell biology applications and confirmed recognition of the full-length antigen in immunoprecipitation, immunoblotting and immunofluorescence assays. In summary, we have established a rapid and robust high-throughput methodology that can be applied to generate highly functional and renewable antibodies targeting protein domains on a proteome-wide scale. © 2015 The Protein Society.

  10. A Novel Heptapeptide with Tyrosinase Inhibitory Activity Identified from a Phage Display Library.

    PubMed

    Nie, Huali; Liu, Lin; Yang, Huiqin; Guo, Hongzhen; Liu, Xiang; Tan, Yuanhao; Wang, Wen; Quan, Jing; Zhu, Limin

    2017-01-01

    Peptidic inhibition of the enzyme tyrosinase, responsible for skin pigmentation and food browning, would be extremely useful for the food, cosmetics, and pharmaceutical industries. In order to identify novel inhibitory peptides, a library of short sequence oligopeptides was screened to reveal direct interaction with the tyrosinase. A phage displaying heptapeptide (IQSPHFF) was found to bind most strongly to tyrosinase. The inhibitory activity of the heptapeptide was evaluated using mushroom tyrosinase. The results showed that the peptide inhibited both the monophenolase and diphenolase activities of mushroom tyrosinase with IC50 values of 1.7 and 4.0 mM, respectively. The heptapeptide is thought to be a reversible competitive inhibitor of diphenolase with the inhibition constants (Ki) of 0.765 mM. To further investigate how the heptapeptide exerts its inhibitory effect, a docking study between tyrosinase and heptapeptide was performed. The simulation showed that the heptapeptide binds in the active site of the enzyme near the catalytically active Cu ions and forms hydrogen bonds with five histidine residues on the active site. Phage display technology is thus a useful approach for the screening of potential tyrosinase inhibitors and could be widely applicable to a much wider range of enzymes.

  11. [Construction of T7 phage display library from the anther of Honglian hybrid line of rice].

    PubMed

    Hu, Chao-Feng; Peng, Xiao-Jue; Zhou, Yang-Yong; Tan, Yan-Ping; Li, Shao-Qing; Zhu, Ying-Guo

    2008-06-01

    Phage display is a powerful method to study protein-protein interactions. In order to study the molecular mechanism of cytoplasmic male sterility and fertility restoration in Honglian rice, the mRNA was isolated with PolyA Tract mRNA Isolation Kit from the anther of F1 hybrid rice and the double strand (ds) cDNA was synthesized by reverse transcription. Then the directional EcoRI /Hind III linkers were ligated into the ends of ds cDNA and the ds cDNA was further digested with EcoR I and Hind, which resulted in ds cDNA with EcoR I and Hind III ends. The digested ds cDNA fragments longer than 300 bp in length were fractionated with Mini Column, then ligated into the T7 Select 10-3b vertor with EcoR I and Hind III ends. After packaging in vitro, the T7 Select 10-3b vertor was transformed into BL T5403 to construct the T7 phage display library. Analysis showed that the library contained 1.03 x 106 clones per microliter, and approximately 100% of the clones in library was recombinant. The titer of the amplied library was 2.14 x 1012 pfu/mL, and the insert length of the recombinants over 300 bp was about 97%.

  12. Subtractive phage display selection for screening and identification of peptide sequences with potential use in serodiagnosis of paracoccidioidomycosis caused by Paracoccidioides brasiliensis.

    PubMed

    Portes, L da Silva; Kioshima, E S; de Camargo, Z P; Batista, W L; Xander, P

    2017-08-10

    Paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM) is a systemic granulomatous disease endemic in Latin America whose aetiologic agents are the thermodimorphic fungi Paracoccidioides brasiliensis and Paracoccidioides lutzii. Despite technological advances, some problems have been reported for the fungal antigens used for serological diagnosis, and inconsistencies among laboratories have been reported. The use of synthetic peptides in the serological diagnosis of infectious diseases has proved to be a valuable strategy because in some cases, the reactions are more specific and sensitive. In this study, we used a subtractive selection with a phage display library against purified polyclonal antibodies for negative and positive PCM sera caused by P. brasiliensis. The binding phages were sequenced and tested in a binding assay to evaluate its interaction with sera from normal individuals and PCM patients. Synthetic peptides derived from these phage clones were tested in a serological assay, and we observed a significant recognition of LP15 by sera from PCM patients infected with P. brasiliensis. Our results demonstrated that subtractive phage display selection may be useful for identifying new epitopes that can be applied to the serodiagnosis of PCM caused by P. brasiliensis. Letters in Applied Microbiology © 2017 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  13. Wide screening of phage-displayed libraries identifies immune targets in planta.

    PubMed

    Rioja, Cristina; Van Wees, Saskia C; Charlton, Keith A; Pieterse, Corné M J; Lorenzo, Oscar; García-Sánchez, Susana

    2013-01-01

    Microbe-Associated Molecular Patterns and virulence effectors are recognized by plants as a first step to mount a defence response against potential pathogens. This recognition involves a large family of extracellular membrane receptors and other immune proteins located in different sub-cellular compartments. We have used phage-display technology to express and select for Arabidopsis proteins able to bind bacterial pathogens. To rapidly identify microbe-bound phage, we developed a monitoring method based on microarrays. This combined strategy allowed for a genome-wide screening of plant proteins involved in pathogen perception. Two phage libraries for high-throughput selection were constructed from cDNA of plants infected with Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA14, or from combined samples of the virulent isolate DC3000 of Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato and its avirulent variant avrRpt2. These three pathosystems represent different degrees in the specificity of plant-microbe interactions. Libraries cover up to 2 × 10(7) different plant transcripts that can be displayed as functional proteins on the surface of T7 bacteriophage. A number of these were selected in a bio-panning assay for binding to Pseudomonas cells. Among the selected clones we isolated the ethylene response factor ATERF-1, which was able to bind the three bacterial strains in competition assays. ATERF-1 was rapidly exported from the nucleus upon infiltration of either alive or heat-killed Pseudomonas. Moreover, aterf-1 mutants exhibited enhanced susceptibility to infection. These findings suggest that ATERF-1 contains a microbe-recognition domain with a role in plant defence. To identify other putative pathogen-binding proteins on a genome-wide scale, the copy number of selected-vs.-total clones was compared by hybridizing phage cDNAs with Arabidopsis microarrays. Microarray analysis revealed a set of 472 candidates with significant fold change. Within this set defence-related genes, including well

  14. Wide Screening of Phage-Displayed Libraries Identifies Immune Targets in Planta

    PubMed Central

    Rioja, Cristina; Van Wees, Saskia C.; Charlton, Keith A.; Pieterse, Corné M. J.; Lorenzo, Oscar; García-Sánchez, Susana

    2013-01-01

    Microbe-Associated Molecular Patterns and virulence effectors are recognized by plants as a first step to mount a defence response against potential pathogens. This recognition involves a large family of extracellular membrane receptors and other immune proteins located in different sub-cellular compartments. We have used phage-display technology to express and select for Arabidopsis proteins able to bind bacterial pathogens. To rapidly identify microbe-bound phage, we developed a monitoring method based on microarrays. This combined strategy allowed for a genome-wide screening of plant proteins involved in pathogen perception. Two phage libraries for high-throughput selection were constructed from cDNA of plants infected with Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA14, or from combined samples of the virulent isolate DC3000 of Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato and its avirulent variant avrRpt2. These three pathosystems represent different degrees in the specificity of plant-microbe interactions. Libraries cover up to 2×107 different plant transcripts that can be displayed as functional proteins on the surface of T7 bacteriophage. A number of these were selected in a bio-panning assay for binding to Pseudomonas cells. Among the selected clones we isolated the ethylene response factor ATERF-1, which was able to bind the three bacterial strains in competition assays. ATERF-1 was rapidly exported from the nucleus upon infiltration of either alive or heat-killed Pseudomonas. Moreover, aterf-1 mutants exhibited enhanced susceptibility to infection. These findings suggest that ATERF-1 contains a microbe-recognition domain with a role in plant defence. To identify other putative pathogen-binding proteins on a genome-wide scale, the copy number of selected-vs.-total clones was compared by hybridizing phage cDNAs with Arabidopsis microarrays. Microarray analysis revealed a set of 472 candidates with significant fold change. Within this set defence-related genes, including well

  15. Antibody Fab display and selection through fusion to the pIX coat protein of filamentous phage.

    PubMed

    Tornetta, Mark; Baker, Scott; Whitaker, Brian; Lu, Jin; Chen, Qiang; Pisors, Eileen; Shi, Lei; Luo, Jinquan; Sweet, Raymond; Tsui, Ping

    2010-08-31

    Fab antibody display on filamentous phage is widely applied to de novo antibody discovery and engineering. Here we describe a phagemid system for the efficient display and affinity selection of Fabs through linkage to the minor coat protein pIX. Display was successful by fusion of either Fd or Lc through a short linker to the amino terminus of pIX and co-expression of the counter Lc or Fd as a secreted, soluble fragment. Assembly of functional Fab was confirmed by demonstration of antigen-specific binding using antibodies of known specificity. Phage displaying a Fab specific for RSV-F protein with Fd linked to pIX showed efficient, antigen-specific enrichment when mixed with phage displaying a different specificity. The functionality of this system for antibody engineering was evaluated in an optimization study. A RSV-F protein specific antibody with an affinity of about 2nM was randomized at 4 positions in light chain CDR1. Three rounds of selection with decreasing antigen concentration yielded Fabs with an affinity improvement up to 70-fold and showed a general correlation between enrichment frequency and affinity. We conclude that the pIX coat protein complements other display systems in filamentous phage as an efficient vehicle for low copy display and selection of Fab proteins. 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Antibody VH and VL recombination using phage and ribosome display technologies reveals distinct structural routes to affinity improvements with VH-VL interface residues providing important structural diversity

    PubMed Central

    Groves, Maria AT; Amanuel, Lily; Campbell, Jamie I; Rees, D Gareth; Sridharan, Sudharsan; Finch, Donna K; Lowe, David C; Vaughan, Tristan J

    2014-01-01

    In vitro selection technologies are an important means of affinity maturing antibodies to generate the optimal therapeutic profile for a particular disease target. Here, we describe the isolation of a parent antibody, KENB061 using phage display and solution phase selections with soluble biotinylated human IL-1R1. KENB061 was affinity matured using phage display and targeted mutagenesis of VH and VL CDR3 using NNS randomization. Affinity matured VHCDR3 and VLCDR3 library blocks were recombined and selected using phage and ribosome display protocol. A direct comparison of the phage and ribosome display antibodies generated was made to determine their functional characteristics. PMID:24256948

  17. Construction of transforming growth factor alpha (TGF-alpha) phage library and identification of high binders of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) by phage display.

    PubMed

    Tang, X B; Dallaire, P; Hoyt, D W; Sykes, B D; O'Connor-McCourt, M; Malcolm, B A

    1997-10-01

    TGF-alpha, a 50 amino acid growth factor containing 3 disulfide bonds, was fused to the N-terminal domain of the pIII protein of fusN, a derivative of phagemid fd-tet, to form a TGF-alpha phage. The fusion phage showed binding activity to epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). A library of approximately 4 x 10(7) variants of TGF-alpha was generated with substitutions of total of 10 amino acids located in the C-loop region. This C-loop subdomain of TGF-alpha consists of a small antiparallel double hairpin structure involving interactions between intra-polypeptide segments. Mutants isolated from the phage library with greatly increased binding affinity were selected through panning with A431 cells (a cell line expressing an elevated number of EGFRs). Following two rounds of stringent selection, variant phages with higher binding affinity than wild type TGF-alpha were identified and the phage DNAs were sequenced for the alignment analysis. Absolute selection at position 42 as Arg, preferential selection at position 38 and 45 as Tyr or Phe with aromatic side chain and selection at position 41 with acidic residues, were obtained. Although an amino acid residue with smaller side chain at position 35 and one with larger side chain at position 36 were preferred, the steric hindering of the structure in side chains was minimized between these adjacent amino acids.

  18. Injected phage-displayed-VP28 vaccine reduces shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei mortality by white spot syndrome virus infection.

    PubMed

    Solís-Lucero, G; Manoutcharian, K; Hernández-López, J; Ascencio, F

    2016-08-01

    White spot syndrome virus (WSSV) is the most important viral pathogen for the global shrimp industry causing mass mortalities with huge economic losses. Recombinant phages are capable of expressing foreign peptides on viral coat surface and act as antigenic peptide carriers bearing a phage-displayed vaccine. In this study, the full-length VP28 protein of WSSV, widely known as potential vaccine against infection in shrimp, was successfully cloned and expressed on M13 filamentous phage. The functionality and efficacy of this vaccine immunogen was demonstrated through immunoassay and in vivo challenge studies. In ELISA assay phage-displayed VP28 was bind to Litopenaeus vannamei immobilized hemocyte in contrast to wild-type M13 phage. Shrimps were injected with 2 × 10(10) cfu animal(-1) single dose of VP28-M13 and M13 once and 48 h later intramuscularly challenged with WSSV to test the efficacy of the vaccine against the infection. All dead challenged shrimps were PCR WSSV-positive. The accumulative mortality of the vaccinated and challenged shrimp groups was significantly lower (36.67%) than the unvaccinated group (66.67%). Individual phenoloxidase and superoxide dismutase activity was assayed on 8 and 48 h post-vaccination. No significant difference was found in those immunological parameters among groups at any sampled time evaluated. For the first time, phage display technology was used to express a recombinant vaccine for shrimp. The highest percentage of relative survival in vaccinated shrimp (RPS = 44.99%) suggest that the recombinant phage can be used successfully to display and deliver VP28 for farmed marine crustaceans.

  19. Identification of Late Embryogenesis Abundant (LEA) protein putative interactors using phage display.

    PubMed

    Kushwaha, Rekha; Lloyd, Taylor D; Schäfermeyer, Kim R; Kumar, Santosh; Downie, Allan Bruce

    2012-01-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana seeds without functional SEED MATURATION PROTEIN1 (SMP1), a boiling soluble protein predicted to be of intrinsic disorder, presumed to be a LATE EMBRYOGENESIS ABUNDANT (LEA) family protein based on sequence homology, do not enter secondary dormancy after 3 days at 40 °C. We hypothesized that SMP1 may protect a heat labile protein involved in the promotion of secondary dormancy. Recombinant SMP1 and GmPM28, its soybean (Glycine max), LEA4 homologue, protected the labile GLUCOSE-6-PHOSPHATE DEHYROGENASE enzyme from heat stress, as did a known protectant, Bovine Serum Albumin, whether the LEA protein was in solution or attached to the bottom of microtiter plates. Maintenance of a biological function for both recombinant LEA proteins when immobilized encouraged a biopanning approach to screen for potential protein interactors. Phage display with two Arabidopsis seed, T7 phage, cDNA libraries, normalized for transcripts present in the mature, dehydrated, 12-, 24-, or 36-h imbibed seeds, were used in biopans against recombinant SMP1 and GmPM28. Phage titer increased considerably over four rounds of biopanning for both LEA proteins, but not for BSA, at both 25 and at 41 °C, regardless of the library used. The prevalence of multiple, independent clones encoding portions of specific proteins repeatedly retrieved from different libraries, temperatures and baits, provides evidence suggesting these LEA proteins are discriminating which proteins they protect, a novel finding. The identification of putative LEA-interacting proteins provides targets for reverse genetic approaches to further dissect the induction of secondary dormancy in seeds in response to heat stress.

  20. Discovery of Peptide ligands for hepatic stellate cells using phage display.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhijin; Jin, Wei; Liu, Hao; Zhao, Zhen; Cheng, Kun

    2015-06-01

    Regardless of its cause, liver fibrosis is characterized by the excessive accumulation of extracellular matrix (ECM) in the liver. Hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) are the main producers responsible for the excessive production of ECM and profibrogenic cytokines in fibrotic liver. Therefore, development of HSC-specific delivery systems is essential for the success of antifibrotic agents. The objective of this study is to identify peptide ligands targeting the insulin-like growth factor 2 receptor (IGF2R), which is overexpressed on HSCs. We expect to use the peptide ligands for the future development of HSC-targeted drug delivery system. Protein- and whole cell-based phage display biopannings were conducted to identify phage/peptide candidates. Phage ELISA, cellular uptake, and cell viability assay were employed to evaluate the binding affinity and specificity of these peptide ligands to recombinant human IGF2R and HSCs. IGF2R siRNA was used to silence the IGF2R protein expression in human hepatic stellate cells (LX-2) to confirm the specificity of the identified peptide ligands. Among the identified peptide candidates, peptide-431 shows the highest binding affinity and specificity to recombinant human IGF2R protein and HSCs. The equilibrium dissociation constant (Kd) of peptide-431 is 6.19 μM for LX-2 cells and 12.35 μM for rat hepatic stellate cells HSC-T6. Cellular uptake of peptide-431 in LX-2 cells is significantly reduced after silencing IGF2R with siRNA. Peptide-431 also enhances the uptake of a proapoptotic peptide (KLA peptide) in LX-2 and HSC-T6 cells, indicating that peptide-431 can be used as a targeting ligand to deliver antifibrotic agents into not only rat but also human HSCs. Dimerization of peptide-431 further increase its binding affinity to LX-2 cells by approximately 9-fold.

  1. Phage display of xylan-binding module of xylanase J from alkaliphilic Bacillus sp. strain 41M-1.

    PubMed

    Miyakubo, H; Sugio, A; Kubo, T; Nakai, R; Wakabayashi, K; Nakamura, S

    2000-01-01

    Xylanase J from alkaliphilic Bacillus sp. strain 41M-1 has a family 11/G catalytic domain and a xylan-binding module (XBM). The XBM of xylanase J was displayed on the surface of filamentous bacteriophage. The XBM expressed on the phage surface retained binding activity to xylan. Random mutations were introduced in the XBM gene by error-prone PCR, and the repertoire was cloned for display on phage. Sequence analysis of the xylan-binding activity-deficient mutants revealed that Phe 284 and Trp317 of the XBM would contribute to the xylan-binding activity.

  2. Phage Display against Corneal Epithelial Cells Produced Bioactive Peptides That Inhibit Aspergillus Adhesion to the Corneas

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Ge; Li, Siyuan; Zhao, Wei; He, Kun; Xi, Haijie; Li, Weihua; Zhou, Qingjun; Wang, Yiqiang

    2012-01-01

    Dissection of host-pathogen interactions is important for both understanding the pathogenesis of infectious diseases and developing therapeutics for the infectious diseases like various infectious keratitis. To enhance the knowledge about pathogenesis infectious keratitis, a random 12-mer peptide phage display library was screened against cultured human corneal epithelial cells (HCEC). Fourteen sequences were obtained and BLASTp analysis showed that most of their homologue counterparts in GenBank were for defined or putative proteins in various pathogens. Based on known or predicted functions of the homologue proteins, ten synthetic peptides (Pc-A to Pc-J) were measured for their affinity to bind cells and their potential efficacy to interfere with pathogen adhesion to the cells. Besides binding to HCEC, most of them also bound to human corneal stromal cells and umbilical endothelial cells to different extents. When added to HCEC culture, the peptides induced expression of MyD88 and IL-17 in HCEC, and the stimulated cell culture medium showed fungicidal potency to various extents. While peptides Pc-C and Pc-E inhibited Aspergillus fumigatus (A.f) adhesion to HCEC in a dose-dependent manner, the similar inhibition ability of peptides Pc-A and Pc-B required presence of their homologue ligand Alb1p on A.f. When utilized in an eyeball organ culture model and an in vivo A.f keratitis model established in mouse, Pc-C and Pc-E inhibited fungal adhesion to corneas, hence decreased corneal disruption caused by inflammatory infiltration. Affinity pull-down of HCEC membrane proteins with peptide Pc-C revealed several molecules as potential receptors for this peptide. In conclusion, besides proving that phage display-selected peptides could be utilized to interfere with adhesion of pathogens to host cells, hence could be exploited for managing infectious diseases including infectious keratitis, we also proposed that the phage display technique and the resultant peptides could

  3. Inhibition of multidrug resistant Listeria monocytogenes by peptides isolated from combinatorial phage display libraries.

    PubMed

    Flachbartova, Z; Pulzova, L; Bencurova, E; Potocnakova, L; Comor, L; Bednarikova, Z; Bhide, M

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to isolate and characterize novel antimicrobial peptides from peptide phage library with antimicrobial activity against multidrug resistant Listeria monocytogenes. Combinatorial phage-display library was used to affinity select peptides binding to the cell surface of multidrug resistant L. monocytogenes. After several rounds of affinity selection followed by sequencing, three peptides were revealed as the most promising candidates. Peptide L2 exhibited features common to antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), and was rich in Asp, His and Lys residues. Peptide L3 (NSWIQAPDTKSI), like peptide L2, inhibited bacterial growth in vitro, without any hemolytic or cytotoxic effects on eukaryotic cells. L1 peptide showed no inhibitory effect on Listeria. Structurally, peptides L2 and L3 formed random coils composed of α-helix and β-sheet units. Peptides L2 and L3 exhibited antimicrobial activity against multidrug resistant isolates of L. monocytogenes with no haemolytic or toxic effects. Both peptides identified in this study have the potential to be beneficial in human and veterinary medicine.

  4. Adhesive peptides selected by phage display: characterization, applications and similarities with fibrinogen.

    PubMed

    Gebhardt, K; Lauvrak, V; Babaie, E; Eijsink, V; Lindqvist, B H

    1996-01-01

    Phase clones with affinity for polystyrene/polyurethane magnetic particles were isolated from a 10-men peptide display library. Sequence analysis revealed that 40 out of 80 clones contained the consensus WXXWXXXW. Some of the selected phages showed high surface activity and adsorbed to plastic surfaces even in the presence of blocking agents or surfactants. Covalent attachment of a synthetic peptide (KG), carrying one of the selected sequences to alkaline phosphatase (AP) or bovine serum albumin (BSA) enhanced binding of AP to a wide range of materials and improved the ability of BSA to prevent binding of antibodies and phages to polystyrene. Interestingly, the WXXW/XXXW motif occurs in the beta- and gamma-chains of the natural "adhesive" protein fibrinogen, and a synthetic peptide carrying the gamma-chain 369-376 sequence turned out to have essentially the same binding properties as the KG peptide. Furthermore, adsorption in different types of polystyrene was similar for AP carrying either the KG or gamma-chain peptide intact fibrinogen and plasmin-generated fragment D1. The latter fragment contains two copies of the WXXWXXXW motif but lacks the alpha-chain: protuberances previously implicated in fibrinogen adsorption. Thus, our study may have revealed a hitherto unknown structural determinant for fibrinogen's adsorptivity, located in the 13-kDa C terminal region of the gamma-chain.

  5. High affinity antibodies against Lex and sialyl Lex from a phage display library.

    PubMed

    Dinh, Q; Weng, N P; Kiso, M; Ishida, H; Hasegawa, A; Marcus, D M

    1996-07-15

    Our previous studies of seven murine mAbs against the carbohydrate Lex Ag demonstrated that they were all encoded by VH441 and V kappa 24B. To obtain higher affinity Abs, and to ascertain whether their L chains could be encoded by other genes, we constructed a phage display library in a modified pComb 8 vector. The library contained random L chains, and Fd segments enriched in VH domains encoded by the VHX24 gene family. We selected phage with an Lex-BSA Ag, and obtained two Fab mAbs, clones 23 and 24, whose affinities were more than 100-fold higher than hybridoma mAb PM81. Both new mAbs were encoded by VH441, and their L chains were encoded by genes of the V kappa Ox1 and V kappa 9 families. In contrast to hybridoma mAb PM81, which binds only Lex, clones 23 and 24 bound sialyl Lex (SLex) as well as Lex, and clone 23 also binds the backbone carbohydrate structure nLacCer. Analysis of the binding of these three mAbs to synthetic glycolipids that contained structural modifications indicated that they recognize different aspects of the Lex structure, and suggested that they bind to limited regions of the oligosaccharide.

  6. From Phage Display to Nanoparticle Delivery: Functionalizing Liposomes with Multivalent Peptides Improves Targeting to a Cancer Biomarker

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Bethany Powell; Li, Shunzi; Brown, Kathlynn C.

    2013-01-01

    Phage display is commonly used to isolate peptides that bind to a desired cell type. While chemical synthesis of selected peptides often results in ligands with low affinity, a multivalent tetrameric presentation of the peptides dramatically improves affinity. One of the primary uses of these peptides is conjugation to nanoparticle-based therapeutics for specific delivery to target cell types. We set out to optimize the path from phage display peptide selection to peptide presentation on a nanoparticle surface for targeted delivery. Here, we examine the effects of peptide valency, density, and affinity on nanoparticle delivery and therapeutic efficacy, using the αvβ6-specific H2009.1 peptide as a model phage-selected peptide and liposomal doxorubicin as a model therapeutic nanoparticle. Liposomes displaying the higher affinity multivalent H2009.1 tetrameric peptide demonstrate 5-10 fold higher drug delivery than liposomes displaying the lower affinity monomeric H2009.1 peptide, even when the same number of peptide subunits are displayed on the liposome. Importantly, a 6-fold greater toxicity is observed towards αvβ6-expressing cells for liposomes displaying tetrameric verses monomeric H2009.1 peptides. Additionally, liposomal targeting and toxicity increase with increasing concentrations of H2009.1 tetrameric peptide on the liposome surface. Thus, both the multivalent peptide and the multivalent liposome scaffold work together to increase targeting to αvβ6-expressing cells. This multi-layered approach to developing high affinity targeted nanoparticles may improve the utility of moderate affinity peptides. As tetramerization is known to increase affinity for a variety of phage-selected peptides, it is anticipated that the tetrameric scaffold may act as a general method for taking peptides from phage display to nanoparticle display. PMID:23186007

  7. From phage display to nanoparticle delivery: functionalizing liposomes with multivalent peptides improves targeting to a cancer biomarker.

    PubMed

    Gray, Bethany Powell; Li, Shunzi; Brown, Kathlynn C

    2013-01-16

    Phage display is commonly used to isolate peptides that bind to a desired cell type. While chemical synthesis of selected peptides often results in ligands with low affinity, a multivalent tetrameric presentation of the peptides dramatically improves affinity. One of the primary uses of these peptides is conjugation to nanoparticle-based therapeutics for specific delivery to target cell types. We set out to optimize the path from phage display peptide selection to peptide presentation on a nanoparticle surface for targeted delivery. Here, we examine the effects of peptide valency, density, and affinity on nanoparticle delivery and therapeutic efficacy, using the α(v)β(6)-specific H2009.1 peptide as a model phage-selected peptide and liposomal doxorubicin as a model therapeutic nanoparticle. Liposomes displaying the higher affinity multivalent H2009.1 tetrameric peptide demonstrate 5-10-fold higher drug delivery than liposomes displaying the lower affinity monomeric H2009.1 peptide, even when the same number of peptide subunits are displayed on the liposome. Importantly, a 6-fold greater toxicity is observed toward α(v)β(6)-expressing cells for liposomes displaying tetrameric verses monomeric H2009.1 peptides. Additionally, liposomal targeting and toxicity increase with increasing concentrations of H2009.1 tetrameric peptide on the liposome surface. Thus, both the multivalent peptide and the multivalent liposome scaffold work together to increase targeting to α(v)β(6)-expressing cells. This multilayered approach to developing high affinity targeted nanoparticles may improve the utility of moderate affinity peptides. As tetramerization is known to increase affinity for a variety of phage-selected peptides, it is anticipated that the tetrameric scaffold may act as a general method for taking peptides from phage display to nanoparticle display.

  8. High-throughput sequencing enhanced phage display enables the identification of patient-specific epitope motifs in serum.

    PubMed

    Christiansen, Anders; Kringelum, Jens V; Hansen, Christian S; Bøgh, Katrine L; Sullivan, Eric; Patel, Jigar; Rigby, Neil M; Eiwegger, Thomas; Szépfalusi, Zsolt; de Masi, Federico; Nielsen, Morten; Lund, Ole; Dufva, Martin

    2015-08-06

    Phage display is a prominent screening technique with a multitude of applications including therapeutic antibody development and mapping of antigen epitopes. In this study, phages were selected based on their interaction with patient serum and exhaustively characterised by high-throughput sequencing. A bioinformatics approach was developed in order to identify peptide motifs of interest based on clustering and contrasting to control samples. Comparison of patient and control samples confirmed a major issue in phage display, namely the selection of unspecific peptides. The potential of the bioinformatic approach was demonstrated by identifying epitopes of a prominent peanut allergen, Ara h 1, in sera from patients with severe peanut allergy. The identified epitopes were confirmed by high-density peptide micro-arrays. The present study demonstrates that high-throughput sequencing can empower phage display by (i) enabling the analysis of complex biological samples, (ii) circumventing the traditional laborious picking and functional testing of individual phage clones and (iii) reducing the number of selection rounds.

  9. Multiplexed fluid array screening of phage displayed anti-ricin single domain antibodies for rapid assessment of specificity.

    PubMed

    Anderson, George P; Matney, Russell; Liu, Jinny L; Hayhurst, Andrew; Goldman, Ellen R

    2007-12-01

    Phage display is a well-known technique that facilitates the selection of peptides or proteins that bind to a desired target. Using this tool, binding elements contained in the natural immune repertoires of the source animal or from a synthetically generated collection may be selected. The unpaired variable domain of the llama's heavy-chain-only classes of immunoglobulins represents an ideal source of genetic material to create phage display libraries. Initial panning of a semi-synthetic llama library yielded only one binder to the toxin ricin. In an effort to increase the number of monoclonal phage binders selected, the Luminex xMAP technology (Luminex, Austin, TX, USA) was used in addition to the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to screen clonal populations of phage after three rounds of selection. The xMAP technology detected phage displayed single domain antibody (sdAb) bound to ricin immobilized on the surface of microspheres under equilibrium conditions. This enhanced capability led directly to the identification of additional single domain antibodies of interest. The selected sdAbs were expressed, purified, and then evaluated for their specificity as well as enhanced thermal stability in comparison to conventional immunoglobulin G (IgG). We determined equilibrium dissociation constants and demonstrated their use as effective capture molecules in sandwich immunoassays.

  10. High-throughput sequencing enhanced phage display enables the identification of patient-specific epitope motifs in serum

    PubMed Central

    Christiansen, Anders; Kringelum, Jens V.; Hansen, Christian S.; Bøgh, Katrine L.; Sullivan, Eric; Patel, Jigar; Rigby, Neil M.; Eiwegger, Thomas; Szépfalusi, Zsolt; Masi, Federico de; Nielsen, Morten; Lund, Ole; Dufva, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Phage display is a prominent screening technique with a multitude of applications including therapeutic antibody development and mapping of antigen epitopes. In this study, phages were selected based on their interaction with patient serum and exhaustively characterised by high-throughput sequencing. A bioinformatics approach was developed in order to identify peptide motifs of interest based on clustering and contrasting to control samples. Comparison of patient and control samples confirmed a major issue in phage display, namely the selection of unspecific peptides. The potential of the bioinformatic approach was demonstrated by identifying epitopes of a prominent peanut allergen, Ara h 1, in sera from patients with severe peanut allergy. The identified epitopes were confirmed by high-density peptide micro-arrays. The present study demonstrates that high-throughput sequencing can empower phage display by (i) enabling the analysis of complex biological samples, (ii) circumventing the traditional laborious picking and functional testing of individual phage clones and (iii) reducing the number of selection rounds. PMID:26246327

  11. Selection of Ceratitis capitata (Diptera: Tephritidae) Specific Recombinant Monoclonal Phage Display Antibodies for Prey Detection Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Monzó, César; Urbaneja, Alberto; Ximénez-Embún, Miguel; García-Fernández, Julia; García, José Luis; Castañera, Pedro

    2012-01-01

    Several recombinant antibodies against the Mediterranean fruit fly, Ceratitis capitata (Wiedemann) (Diptera: Tephritidae), one of the most important pests in agriculture worldwide, were selected for the first time from a commercial phage display library of human scFv antibodies. The specificity and sensitivity of the selected recombinant antibodies were compared with that of a rabbit polyclonal serum raised in parallel using a wide range of arthropod species as controls. The selected recombinant monoclonal antibodies had a similar or greater specificity when compared with classical monoclonal antibodies. The selected recombinant antibodies were successfully used to detect the target antigen in the gut of predators and the scFv antibodies were sequenced and compared. These results demonstrate the potential for recombinant scFv antibodies to be used as an alternative to the classical monoclonal antibodies or even molecular probes in the post-mortem analysis studies of generalist predators. PMID:23272105

  12. Construction of human antibody gene libraries and selection of antibodies by phage display.

    PubMed

    Schirrmann, Thomas; Hust, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Recombinant antibodies as therapeutics offer new opportunities for the treatment of many tumor diseases. To date, 18 antibody-based drugs are approved for cancer treatment and hundreds of anti-tumor antibodies are under development. The first clinically approved antibodies were of murine origin or human-mouse chimeric. However, since murine antibody domains are immunogenic in human patients and could result in human anti-mouse antibody (HAMA) responses, currently mainly humanized and fully human antibodies are developed for therapeutic applications.Here, in vitro antibody selection technologies directly allow the selection of human antibodies and the corresponding genes from human antibody gene libraries. Antibody phage display is the most common way to generate human antibodies and has already yielded thousands of recombinant antibodies for research, diagnostics and therapy. Here, we describe methods for the construction of human scFv gene libraries and the antibody selection.

  13. Identification of Novel Immunogenic Proteins of Neisseria gonorrhoeae by Phage Display

    PubMed Central

    Connor, Daniel O.; Zantow, Jonas; Hust, Michael; Bier, Frank F.; von Nickisch-Rosenegk, Markus

    2016-01-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae is one of the most prevalent sexually transmitted diseases worldwide with more than 100 million new infections per year. A lack of intense research over the last decades and increasing resistances to the recommended antibiotics call for a better understanding of gonococcal infection, fast diagnostics and therapeutic measures against N. gonorrhoeae. Therefore, the aim of this work was to identify novel immunogenic proteins as a first step to advance those unresolved problems. For the identification of immunogenic proteins, pHORF oligopeptide phage display libraries of the entire N. gonorrhoeae genome were constructed. Several immunogenic oligopeptides were identified using polyclonal rabbit antibodies against N. gonorrhoeae. Corresponding full-length proteins of the identified oligopeptides were expressed and their immunogenic character was verified by ELISA. The immunogenic character of six proteins was identified for the first time. Additional 13 proteins were verified as immunogenic proteins in N. gonorrhoeae. PMID:26859666

  14. Identification of Novel Immunogenic Proteins of Neisseria gonorrhoeae by Phage Display.

    PubMed

    Connor, Daniel O; Zantow, Jonas; Hust, Michael; Bier, Frank F; von Nickisch-Rosenegk, Markus

    2016-01-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae is one of the most prevalent sexually transmitted diseases worldwide with more than 100 million new infections per year. A lack of intense research over the last decades and increasing resistances to the recommended antibiotics call for a better understanding of gonococcal infection, fast diagnostics and therapeutic measures against N. gonorrhoeae. Therefore, the aim of this work was to identify novel immunogenic proteins as a first step to advance those unresolved problems. For the identification of immunogenic proteins, pHORF oligopeptide phage display libraries of the entire N. gonorrhoeae genome were constructed. Several immunogenic oligopeptides were identified using polyclonal rabbit antibodies against N. gonorrhoeae. Corresponding full-length proteins of the identified oligopeptides were expressed and their immunogenic character was verified by ELISA. The immunogenic character of six proteins was identified for the first time. Additional 13 proteins were verified as immunogenic proteins in N. gonorrhoeae.

  15. Selection of Ceratitis capitata (Diptera: Tephritidae) specific recombinant monoclonal phage display antibodies for prey detection analysis.

    PubMed

    Monzó, César; Urbaneja, Alberto; Ximénez-Embún, Miguel; García-Fernández, Julia; García, José Luis; Castañera, Pedro

    2012-01-01

    Several recombinant antibodies against the Mediterranean fruit fly, Ceratitis capitata (Wiedemann) (Diptera: Tephritidae), one of the most important pests in agriculture worldwide, were selected for the first time from a commercial phage display library of human scFv antibodies. The specificity and sensitivity of the selected recombinant antibodies were compared with that of a rabbit polyclonal serum raised in parallel using a wide range of arthropod species as controls. The selected recombinant monoclonal antibodies had a similar or greater specificity when compared with classical monoclonal antibodies. The selected recombinant antibodies were successfully used to detect the target antigen in the gut of predators and the scFv antibodies were sequenced and compared. These results demonstrate the potential for recombinant scFv antibodies to be used as an alternative to the classical monoclonal antibodies or even molecular probes in the post-mortem analysis studies of generalist predators.

  16. Phage-displayed peptide library screening for preferred human substrate peptide sequences for transglutaminase 7.

    PubMed

    Kuramoto, Katsuma; Yamasaki, Risa; Shimizu, Yoshitaka; Tatsukawa, Hideki; Hitomi, Kiyotaka

    2013-09-01

    Transglutaminases are a family of enzymes that catalyze cross-linking reactions between proteins. Among the members, there is currently no information regarding the substrate preferences of transglutaminase 7 (TG7), that would clarify its physiological significance. We previously obtained several highly reactive substrate peptide sequences of transglutaminases from a random peptide library. In this study, we screened for preferred substrate sequences for TG7 from a phage-displayed 12-mer peptide library. The most preferred sequence was selected based on reactivity and isozyme specificity. We firstly exhibited the tendency for the preference of substrate sequence for TG7. Then, using the most efficient peptide, Z3S, we established an in vitro assay system to assess enzymatic activity of TG7.

  17. Selective inhibitors of digestive enzymes from Aedes aegypti larvae identified by phage display.

    PubMed

    Soares, Tatiane Sanches; Soares Torquato, Ricardo Jose; Alves Lemos, Francisco Jose; Tanaka, Aparecida Sadae

    2013-01-01

    Dengue is a serious disease transmitted by the mosquito Aedes aegypti during blood meal feeding. It is estimated that the dengue virus is transmitted to millions of individuals each year in tropical and subtropical areas. Dengue control strategies have been based on controlling the vector, Ae. aegypti, using insecticide, but the emergence of resistance poses new challenges. The aim of this study was the identification of specific protease inhibitors of the digestive enzymes from Ae. aegypti larvae, which may serve as a prospective alternative biocontrol method. High affinity protein inhibitors were selected by all of the digestive serine proteases of the 4th instar larval midgut, and the specificity of these inhibitors was characterized. These inhibitors were obtained from a phage library displaying variants of HiTI, a trypsin inhibitor from Haematobia irritans, that are mutated in the reactive loop (P1-P4'). Based on the selected amino acid sequence pattern, seven HiTI inhibitor variants were cloned, expressed and purified. The results indicate that the HiTI variants named T6 (RGGAV) and T128 (WNEGL) were selected by larval trypsin-like (IC(50) of 1.1 nM) and chymotrypsin-like enzymes (IC(50) of 11.6 nM), respectively. The variants T23 (LLGGL) and T149 (GGVWR) inhibited both larval chymotrypsin-like (IC(50) of 4.2 nM and 29.0 nM, respectively) and elastase-like enzymes (IC(50) of 1.2 nM for both). Specific inhibitors were successfully obtained for the digestive enzymes of Ae. aegypti larvae by phage display. Our data also strongly suggest the presence of elastase-like enzymes in Ae. aegypti larvae. The HiTI variants T6 and T23 are good candidates for the development as a larvicide to control the vector.

  18. A New Peptide Ligand for Targeting Human Carbonic Anhydrase IX, Identified through the Phage Display Technology

    PubMed Central

    Askoxylakis, Vasileios; Garcia-Boy, Regine; Rana, Shoaib; Krämer, Susanne; Hebling, Ulrike; Mier, Walter; Altmann, Annette; Markert, Annette; Debus, Jürgen; Haberkorn, Uwe

    2010-01-01

    Carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX) is a transmembrane enzyme found to be overexpressed in various tumors and associated with tumor hypoxia. Ligands binding this target may be used to visualize hypoxia, tumor manifestation or treat tumors by endoradiotherapy. Methods Phage display was performed with a 12 amino acid phage display library by panning against a recombinant extracellular domain of human carbonic anhydrase IX. The identified peptide CaIX-P1 was chemically synthesized and tested in vitro on various cell lines and in vivo in Balb/c nu/nu mice carrying subcutaneously transplanted tumors. Binding, kinetic and competition studies were performed on the CAIX positive human renal cell carcinoma cell line SKRC 52, the CAIX negative human renal cell carcinoma cell line CaKi 2, the human colorectal carcinoma cell line HCT 116 and on human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). Organ distribution studies were carried out in mice, carrying SKRC 52 tumors. RNA expression of CAIX in HCT 116 and HUVEC cells was investigated by quantitative real time PCR. Results In vitro binding experiments of 125I-labeled-CaIX-P1 revealed an increased uptake of the radioligand in the CAIX positive renal cell carcinoma cell line SKRC 52. Binding of the radioligand in the colorectal carcinoma cell line HCT 116 increased with increasing cell density and correlated with the mRNA expression of CAIX. Radioligand uptake was inhibited up to 90% by the unlabeled CaIX-P1 peptide, but not by the negative control peptide octreotide at the same concentration. No binding was demonstrated in CAIX negative CaKi 2 and HUVEC cells. Organ distribution studies revealed a higher accumulation in SKRC 52 tumors than in heart, spleen, liver, muscle, intestinum and brain, but a lower uptake compared to blood and kidney. Conclusions These data indicate that CaIX-P1 is a promising candidate for the development of new ligands targeting human carbonic anhydrase IX. PMID:21209841

  19. Unique secreted-surface protein complex of Lactobacillus rhamnosus, identified by phage display.

    PubMed

    Gagic, Dragana; Wen, Wesley; Collett, Michael A; Rakonjac, Jasna

    2013-02-01

    Proteins are the most diverse structures on bacterial surfaces; hence, they are candidates for species- and strain-specific interactions of bacteria with the host, environment, and other microorganisms. Genomics has decoded thousands of bacterial surface and secreted proteins, yet the function of most cannot be predicted because of the enormous variability and a lack of experimental data that would allow deduction of function through homology. Here, we used phage display to identify a pair of interacting extracellular proteins in the probiotic bacterium Lactobacillus rhamnosus HN001. A secreted protein, SpcA, containing two bacterial immunoglobulin-like domains type 3 (Big-3) and a domain distantly related to plant pathogen response domain 1 (PR-1-like) was identified by screening of an L. rhamnosus HN001 library using HN001 cells as bait. The SpcA-"docking" protein, SpcB, was in turn detected by another phage display library screening, using purified SpcA as bait. SpcB is a 3275-residue cell-surface protein that contains general features of large glycosylated Serine-rich adhesins/fibrils from gram-positive bacteria, including the hallmark signal sequence motif KxYKxGKxW. Both proteins are encoded by genes within a L. rhamnosus-unique gene cluster that distinguishes this species from other lactobacilli. To our knowledge, this is the first example of a secreted-docking protein pair identified in lactobacilli. © 2012 The Authors. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

  20. Combining phage display with de novo protein sequencing for reverse engineering of monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Rickert, Keith W; Grinberg, Luba; Woods, Robert M; Wilson, Susan; Bowen, Michael A; Baca, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    The enormous diversity created by gene recombination and somatic hypermutation makes de novo protein sequencing of monoclonal antibodies a uniquely challenging problem. Modern mass spectrometry-based sequencing will rarely, if ever, provide a single unambiguous sequence for the variable domains. A more likely outcome is computation of an ensemble of highly similar sequences that can satisfy the experimental data. This outcome can result in the need for empirical testing of many candidate sequences, sometimes iteratively, to identity one which can replicate the activity of the parental antibody. Here we describe an improved approach to antibody protein sequencing by using phage display technology to generate a combinatorial library of sequences that satisfy the mass spectrometry data, and selecting for functional candidates that bind antigen. This approach was used to reverse engineer 2 commercially-obtained monoclonal antibodies against murine CD137. Proteomic data enabled us to assign the majority of the variable domain sequences, with the exception of 3-5% of the sequence located within or adjacent to complementarity-determining regions. To efficiently resolve the sequence in these regions, small phage-displayed libraries were generated and subjected to antigen binding selection. Following enrichment of antigen-binding clones, 2 clones were selected for each antibody and recombinantly expressed as antigen-binding fragments (Fabs). In both cases, the reverse-engineered Fabs exhibited identical antigen binding affinity, within error, as Fabs produced from the commercial IgGs. This combination of proteomic and protein engineering techniques provides a useful approach to simplifying the technically challenging process of reverse engineering monoclonal antibodies from protein material.

  1. Combining phage display with de novo protein sequencing for reverse engineering of monoclonal antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Rickert, Keith W.; Grinberg, Luba; Woods, Robert M.; Wilson, Susan; Bowen, Michael A.; Baca, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The enormous diversity created by gene recombination and somatic hypermutation makes de novo protein sequencing of monoclonal antibodies a uniquely challenging problem. Modern mass spectrometry-based sequencing will rarely, if ever, provide a single unambiguous sequence for the variable domains. A more likely outcome is computation of an ensemble of highly similar sequences that can satisfy the experimental data. This outcome can result in the need for empirical testing of many candidate sequences, sometimes iteratively, to identity one which can replicate the activity of the parental antibody. Here we describe an improved approach to antibody protein sequencing by using phage display technology to generate a combinatorial library of sequences that satisfy the mass spectrometry data, and selecting for functional candidates that bind antigen. This approach was used to reverse engineer 2 commercially-obtained monoclonal antibodies against murine CD137. Proteomic data enabled us to assign the majority of the variable domain sequences, with the exception of 3–5% of the sequence located within or adjacent to complementarity-determining regions. To efficiently resolve the sequence in these regions, small phage-displayed libraries were generated and subjected to antigen binding selection. Following enrichment of antigen-binding clones, 2 clones were selected for each antibody and recombinantly expressed as antigen-binding fragments (Fabs). In both cases, the reverse-engineered Fabs exhibited identical antigen binding affinity, within error, as Fabs produced from the commercial IgGs. This combination of proteomic and protein engineering techniques provides a useful approach to simplifying the technically challenging process of reverse engineering monoclonal antibodies from protein material. PMID:26852694

  2. Directed Selection of Recombinant Human Monoclonal Antibodies to Herpes Simplex Virus Glycoproteins from Phage Display Libraries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanna, Pietro Paolo; Williamson, R. Anthony; de Logu, Alessandro; Bloom, Floyd E.; Burton, Dennis R.

    1995-07-01

    Human monoclonal antibodies have considerable potential in the prophylaxis and treatment of viral disease. However, only a few such antibodies suitable for clinical use have been produced to date. We have previously shown that large panels of human recombinant monoclonal antibodies against a plethora of infectious agents, including herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2, can be established from phage display libraries. Here we demonstrate that facile cloning of recombinant Fab fragments against specific viral proteins in their native conformation can be accomplished by panning phage display libraries against viral glycoproteins "captured" from infected cell extracts by specific monoclonal antibodies immobilized on ELISA plates. We have tested this strategy by isolating six neutralizing recombinant antibodies specific for herpes simplex glycoprotein gD or gB, some of which are against conformationally sensitive epitopes. By using defined monoclonal antibodies for the antigen-capture step, this method can be used for the isolation of antibodies to specific regions and epitopes within the target viral protein. For instance, monoclonal antibodies to a nonneutralizing epitope can be used in the capture step to clone antibodies to neutralizing epitopes, or antibodies to a neutralizing epitope can be used to clone antibodies to a different neutralizing epitope. Furthermore, by using capturing antibodies to more immunodominant epitopes, one can direct the cloning to less immunogenic ones. This method should be of value in generating antibodies to be used both in the prophylaxis and treatment of viral infections and in the characterization of the mechanisms of antibody protective actions at the molecular level.

  3. Variable domain antibodies specific for viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) selected from a randomized IgNAR phage display library.

    PubMed

    Ohtani, Maki; Hikima, Jun-ichi; Jung, Tae-Sung; Kondo, Hidehiro; Hirono, Ikuo; Takeyama, Haruko; Aoki, Takashi

    2013-02-01

    Phage display libraries are used to screen for nucleotide sequences that encode immunoglobulin variable (V) regions that are specific for a target antigen. We previously constructed an immunoglobulin new antigen receptor (IgNAR) phage display library. Here we used this library to obtain an IgNAR V region that is specific for viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV). A phage clone (clone 653) was found to be specific for VHSV by the biopanning method. The V region of clone 653 was used to construct a 6 × His tagged recombinant IgNAR-653 V protein (rIgNAR-653) using the Escherichia coli pET system. The rIgNAR-653 protein bound specifically to VHSV, confirming its activity.

  4. Rapid Development of New Protein Biosensors Utilizing Peptides Obtained via Phage Display

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jun; Park, Jong Pil; Dooley, Kevin; Cropek, Donald M.; West, Alan C.; Banta, Scott

    2011-01-01

    There is a consistent demand for new biosensors for the detection of protein targets, and a systematic method for the rapid development of new sensors is needed. Here we present a platform where short unstructured peptides that bind to a desired target are selected using M13 phage display. The selected peptides are then chemically synthesized and immobilized on gold, allowing for detection of the target using electrochemical techniques such as electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). A quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) is also used as a diagnostic tool during biosensor development. We demonstrate the utility of this approach by creating a novel peptide-based electrochemical biosensor for the enzyme alanine aminotransferase (ALT), a well-known biomarker of hepatotoxicity. Biopanning of the M13 phage display library over immobilized ALT, led to the rapid identification of a new peptide (ALT5-8) with an amino acid sequence of WHWRNPDFWYLK. Phage particles expressing this peptide exhibited nanomolar affinity for immobilized ALT (Kd,app = 85±20 nM). The newly identified ALT5-8 peptide was then chemically synthesized with a C-terminal cysteine for gold immobilization. The performance of the gold-immobilized peptides was studied with cyclic voltammetry (CV), QCM, and EIS. Using QCM, the sensitivity for ALT detection was 8.9±0.9 Hz/(µg/mL) and the limit of detection (LOD) was 60 ng/mL. Using EIS measurements, the sensitivity was 142±12 impedance percentage change %/(µg/mL) and the LOD was 92 ng/mL. In both cases, the LOD was below the typical concentration of ALT in human blood. Although both QCM and EIS produced similar LODs, EIS is preferable due to a larger linear dynamic range. Using QCM, the immobilized peptide exhibited a nanomolar dissociation constant for ALT (Kd = 20.1±0.6 nM). These results demonstrate a simple and rapid platform for developing and assessing the performance of sensitive, peptide-based biosensors for new protein targets. PMID

  5. Subtractive phage display selection from canine visceral leishmaniasis identifies novel epitopes that mimic Leishmania infantum antigens with potential serodiagnosis applications.

    PubMed

    Costa, Lourena E; Lima, Mayara I S; Chávez-Fumagalli, Miguel A; Menezes-Souza, Daniel; Martins, Vivian T; Duarte, Mariana C; Lage, Paula S; Lopes, Eliane G P; Lage, Daniela P; Ribeiro, Tatiana G; Andrade, Pedro H R; de Magalhães-Soares, Danielle F; Soto, Manuel; Tavares, Carlos A P; Goulart, Luiz R; Coelho, Eduardo A F

    2014-01-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) is a zoonotic disease that is endemic to Brazil, where dogs are the main domestic parasite reservoirs, and the percentages of infected dogs living in regions where canine VL (CVL) is endemic have ranged from 10% to 62%. Despite technological advances, some problems have been reported with CVL serodiagnosis. The present study describes a sequential subtractive selection through phage display technology from polyclonal antibodies of negative and positive sera that resulted in the identification of potential bacteriophage-fused peptides that were highly sensitive and specific to antibodies of CVL. A negative selection was performed in which phage clones were adhered to purified IgGs from healthy and Trypanosoma cruzi-infected dogs to eliminate cross-reactive phages. The remaining supernatant nonadhered phages were submitted to positive selection against IgG from the blood serum of dogs that were infected with Leishmania infantum. Phage clones that adhered to purified IgGs from the CVL-infected serum samples were selected. Eighteen clones were identified and their reactivities tested by a phage enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (phage-ELISA) against the serum samples from infected dogs (n = 31) compared to those from vaccinated dogs (n = 21), experimentally infected dogs with cross-reactive parasites (n = 23), and healthy controls (n = 17). Eight clones presented sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of 100%, and they showed no cross-reactivity with T. cruzi- or Ehrlichia canis-infected dogs or with dogs vaccinated with two different commercial CVL vaccines in Brazil. Our study identified eight mimotopes of L. infantum antigens with 100% accuracy for CVL serodiagnosis. The use of these mimotopes by phage-ELISA proved to be an excellent assay that was reproducible, simple, fast, and inexpensive, and it can be applied in CVL-monitoring programs.

  6. Bispecific monoclonal antibodies against a viral and an enzyme: utilities in ultrasensitive virus ELISA and phage display technology.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fei; Guttikonda, S; Suresh, M R

    2003-03-01

    A quadroma (hybrid-hybridoma) secreting bispecific antibodies with one paratope specific for M13 bacteriophage coat protein and another paratope specific for alkaline phosphatase (AP) was developed by electro-fusion of the two parental hybridomas and selected by a fluorescence activated cell sorter (FACS). The anti-phage M13/anti-AP bsMAbs were purified from anti-phage M13 monospecific MAb by a novel affinity method using Mimetic Blue A6XL as immune complexes with AP. The purified bsMAbs with potentially every molecule uniformly bound with AP generated an immuno-probe with the theoretical highest specificity. An ultrasensitive sandwich ELISA for detecting viruses was developed by using this bsMAb coupled with an amplified ELISA procedure. The sensitivity of the assay was increased 1000 times compared with conventional ELISA to achieve detection of 100 phage particles which is approximately 2.3 fg of phage coat protein. This type of bsMAb probe and ELISA format can be used to design new body fluid assays for viral load of HIV, hepatitis and other human pathogens as rapid and inexpensive alternatives to the PCR based method. This unique bispecific probe also allowed rapid and sensitive detection of bound M13/fd phage clones while panning for specific phages displaying peptide mimics against an antigen from a phage display peptide library. Furthermore, we demonstrate the principle virus purification using bsMAb as affinity ligand with a mild phosphate buffer elution. The results indicate that bsMAb could be used to develop affinity chromatography for purifying highly contagious and pathogenic viruses avoiding procedures employing prolonged high-speed centrifugation.

  7. Identification and binding mechanism of phage displayed peptides with specific affinity to acid-alkali treated titanium.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yuhua; Tan, Jing; Wu, Baohua; Wang, Jianxin; Qu, Shuxin; Weng, Jie; Feng, Bo

    2016-10-01

    Acid-alkali treatment is one of means widely used for preparing bioactive titanium surfaces. Peptides with specific affinity to titanium surface modified by acid-alkali two-steps treatment were obtained via phage display technology. Out of the eight new unique peptides, titanium-binding peptide 54 displayed by monoclonal M13 phage at its pIII coat protein (TBP54-M13 phage) was proved to have higher binding affinity to the substrate. The binding interaction occurred at the domain from phenylalanine at position 1 to arginine at position 6 in the sequences of TBP54 (FAETHRGFHFSF) mainly via the reaction of these residues with the Ti surface. Together the coordination and electrostatic interactions controlled the specific binding of the phage to the substrate. The binding affinity was dependent on the surface basic hydroxyl group content. In addition, the phage showed a different interaction way with the Ti surface without acid-alkali treatment along with an impaired affinity. This study could provide more understanding of the interaction mechanism between the selected peptide and its specific substrate, and develop a promising method for the biofunctionalization of titanium.

  8. Beyond phage display: non-traditional applications of the filamentous bacteriophage as a vaccine carrier, therapeutic biologic, and bioconjugation scaffold

    PubMed Central

    Henry, Kevin A.; Arbabi-Ghahroudi, Mehdi; Scott, Jamie K.

    2015-01-01

    For the past 25 years, phage display technology has been an invaluable tool for studies of protein–protein interactions. However, the inherent biological, biochemical, and biophysical properties of filamentous bacteriophage, as well as the ease of its genetic manipulation, also make it an attractive platform outside the traditional phage display canon. This review will focus on the unique properties of the filamentous bacteriophage and highlight its diverse applications in current research. Particular emphases are placed on: (i) the advantages of the phage as a vaccine carrier, including its high immunogenicity, relative antigenic simplicity and ability to activate a range of immune responses, (ii) the phage’s potential as a prophylactic and therapeutic agent for infectious and chronic diseases, (iii) the regularity of the virion major coat protein lattice, which enables a variety of bioconjugation and surface chemistry applications, particularly in nanomaterials, and (iv) the phage’s large population sizes and fast generation times, which make it an excellent model system for directed protein evolution. Despite their ubiquity in the biosphere, metagenomics work is just beginning to explore the ecology of filamentous and non-filamentous phage, and their role in the evolution of bacterial populations. Thus, the filamentous phage represents a robust, inexpensive, and versatile microorganism whose bioengineering applications continue to expand in new directions, although its limitations in some spheres impose obstacles to its widespread adoption and use. PMID:26300850

  9. Putative phage-display epitopes of the porcine epidemic diarrhea virus S1 protein and their anti-viral activity

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) is a pathogen of swine that causes severe diarrhea and dehydration resulting in substantial morbidity and mortality in newborn piglets. Phage display is a technique with wide application, in particular, the identification of key antigen epitopes for the develop...

  10. A DsbA-Deficient Periplasm Enables Functional Display of a Protein with Redox-Sensitive Folding on M13 Phage.

    PubMed

    Chen, Minyong; Samuelson, James C

    2016-06-14

    The requirements for target protein folding in M13 phage display are largely underappreciated. Here we chose Fbs1, a carbohydrate binding protein, as a model to address this issue. Importantly, folding of Fbs1 is impaired in an oxidative environment. Fbs1 can be displayed on M13 phage using the SRP or Sec pathway. However, the displayed Fbs1 protein is properly folded only when Fbs1 is translocated via the SRP pathway and displayed using Escherichia coli cells with a DsbA-negative periplasm. This study indicates M13 phage display may be improved using a system specifically designed according to the folding requirements of each target protein.

  11. Phage Display Breast Carcinoma cDNA Libraries: Isolation of Clones Which Specifically Bind to Membrane Glycoproteins, Mucins, and Endothelial Cell Surface

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-07-01

    Display of Peptides and Proteins: A Laboratory Manual, ed. B. Kay. 1996, San Diego: Academic Press. 10. Smith, G.P., Filamentous fusion phage : novel expression vectors that display cloned antigens on the virion surface . Science

  12. Identification and characterization of tumor antigens by using antibody phage display and intrabody strategies

    PubMed Central

    Goenaga, Anne-Laure; Zhou, Yu; Legay, Christine; Bougherara, Houcine; Huang, Lan; Liu, Bin; Drummond, Daryl C.; Kirpotin, Dmitri B.; Auclair, Christian; Marks, James D.; Poul, Marie-Alix

    2009-01-01

    To generate a panel of antibodies binding human breast cancers, a human single chain Fv phage display library was selected for rapid internalization into the SK-BR-3 breast cancer cell line. Thirteen unique antibodies were identified within the 55 cell binding antibodies studied, all of them showing specific staining of tumor cells compare to normal epithelial cells. Two of the antibodies bound the ErbB2 oncogene while 6 bound the tumor marker transferrin receptor (TfR). By developing a scFv immunoprecipitation method, we were able to use LC-MS/MS to identify the antigen bound by one of the antibodies (3GA5) as FPRP (prostaglandin F2alpha receptor-regulatory protein)/EWI-F/CD9P-1 (CD9 partner 1) an Ig superfamily member that has been described to interact directly with CD9 and CD81 tetraspanins and to be overexpressed in adherent cancer cell lines. Although the 3GA5 scFv had no direct anti-proliferative effect, intracellular expression of the scFv was able to knockdown CD9P-1 expression and could be used to further define the role of the tetraspanin system in proliferation and metastasis. Moreover, the 3GA5 scFv was rapidly internalized into breast tumor cells and could have potential for the targeted delivery of cytotoxic agents to breast cancers. This study is the proof of principle that the direct selection of phage antibody libraries on tumor cells can effectively lead to the identification and functional characterization of relevant tumor markers. PMID:17498801

  13. Viral morphogenesis is the dominant source of sequence censorship in M13 combinatorial peptide phage display.

    SciTech Connect

    Rodi, D. J.; Soares, A. S.; Makowski, L.; Biosciences Division; BNL

    2002-01-01

    Novel statistical methods have been developed and used to quantitate and annotate the sequence diversity within combinatorial peptide libraries on the basis of small numbers (1-200) of sequences selected at random from commercially available M13 p3-based phage display libraries. These libraries behave statistically as though they correspond to populations containing roughly 4.0{+-}1.6% of the random dodecapeptides and 7.9{+-}2.6% of the random constrained heptapeptides that are theoretically possible within the phage populations. Analysis of amino acid residue occurrence patterns shows no demonstrable influence on sequence censorship by Escherichia coli tRNA isoacceptor profiles or either overall codon or Class II codon usage patterns, suggesting no metabolic constraints on recombinant p3 synthesis. There is an overall depression in the occurrence of cysteine, arginine and glycine residues and an overabundance of proline, threonine and histidine residues. The majority of position-dependent amino acid sequence bias is clustered at three positions within the inserted peptides of the dodecapeptide library, +1, +3 and +12 downstream from the signal peptidase cleavage site. Conformational tendency measures of the peptides indicate a significant preference for inserts favoring a {beta}-turn conformation. The observed protein sequence limitations can primarily be attributed to genetic codon degeneracy and signal peptidase cleavage preferences. These data suggest that for applications in which maximal sequence diversity is essential, such as epitope mapping or novel receptor identification, combinatorial peptide libraries should be constructed using codon-corrected trinucleotide cassettes within vector-host systems designed to minimize morphogenesis-related censorship.

  14. [Construction and panning of scFv phage display library against recombinant interleukin 4 receptor].

    PubMed

    Yang, Guangyong; Guo, Haitao; Liu, Ximing; He, Guangzhi; Tian, Weiyi; Cai, Kun; Wang, Ping; Wang, Wenjia

    2016-06-01

    Objective To construct the recombinant human interleukin 4 receptor (rhIL-4R) single-chain Fv (scFv) antibody library by phage display technique to obtain the anti-IL-4R scFv clones selected from the library. Methods Total RNA was extracted from splenocytes of the BALB/c mice immunized with rhIL-4R. Complementary DNA fragments of variable heavy (VH) and variable light (VL) chains of the antibodies were prepared by reverse transcription PCR and assembled into scFv by splice overlap extension PCR (SOE-PCR). Both scFv and the pCANTAB5E vector were respectively double-digested with restriction endonuclease Sfi I and Not I, connected with T4 ligase, and then transformed into the competent cells E.coli TG1; it was cultured in medium to obtain the phage scFv antibody library; after three rounds of enrichment and panning, the specific antigen scFv with high affinity was selected for the sequencing. Results After three rounds of panning, we obtained a diversity of approximately 2×10(8) anti-rhIL-4R scFv antibody library. Sequencing analysis of one positive clone showed that the anti-rhIL-4R scFv was 741 bp and coded 247 amino acids. The analysis of VBASE2 database indicated that VH and VL gene sequences of anti-rhIL-4R protein all had three complementarity determining regions and four backbone areas.Conclusion The anti-rhIL-4R scFv was obtained from the scFv antibody library.

  15. Identification of Relevant Conformational Epitopes on the HER2 Oncoprotein by Using Large Fragment Phage Display (LFPD)

    PubMed Central

    Gabrielli, Federico; Salvi, Roberto; Garulli, Chiara; Kalogris, Cristina; Arima, Serena; Tardella, Luca; Monaci, Paolo; Pupa, Serenella M.; Tagliabue, Elda; Montani, Maura; Quaglino, Elena; Stramucci, Lorenzo; Curcio, Claudia

    2013-01-01

    We developed a new phage-display based approach, the Large Fragment Phage Display (LFPD), that can be used for mapping conformational epitopes on target molecules of immunological interest. LFPD uses a simplified and more effective phage-display approach in which only a limited set of larger fragments (about 100 aa in length) are expressed on the phage surface. Using the human HER2 oncoprotein as a target, we identified novel B-cell conformational epitopes. The same homologous epitopes were also detected in rat HER2 and all corresponded to the epitopes predicted by computational analysis (PEPITO software), showing that LFPD gives reproducible and accurate results. Interestingly, these newly identified HER2 epitopes seem to be crucial for an effective immune response against HER2-overexpressing breast cancers and might help discriminating between metastatic breast cancer and early breast cancer patients. Overall, the results obtained in this study demonstrated the utility of LFPD and its potential application to the detection of conformational epitopes on many other molecules of interest, as well as, the development of new and potentially more effective B-cell conformational epitopes based vaccines. PMID:23555577

  16. Immune TB Antibody Phage Display Library as a Tool To Study B Cell Immunity in TB Infections.

    PubMed

    Hamidon, Nurul Hamizah; Suraiya, Siti; Sarmiento, Maria E; Acosta, Armando; Norazmi, Mohd Nor; Lim, Theam Soon

    2017-09-07

    B cells and in particular antibodies has always played second fiddle to cellular immunity in regard to tuberculosis (TB). However, recent studies has helped position humoral immunity especially antibodies back into the foray in relation to TB immunity. Therefore, the ability to correlate the natural antibody responses of infected individuals toward TB antigens would help strengthen this concept. Phage display is an intriguing approach that can be utilized to study antibody-mediated responses against a particular infection via harvesting the B cell repertoire from infected individuals. The development of disease-specific antibody libraries or immune libraries is useful to better understand antibody-mediated immune responses against specific disease antigens. This study describes the generation of an immune single-chain variable fragment (scFv) library derived from TB-infected individuals. The immune library with an estimated diversity of 10(9) independent clones was then applied for the identification of monoclonal antibodies against Mycobacterium tuberculosis α-crystalline as a model antigen. Biopanning of the library isolated three monoclonal antibodies with unique gene usage. This strengthens the role of antibodies in TB immunity in addition to the role played by cellular immunity. The developed library can be applied against other TB antigens and aid antibody-derived TB immunity studies in the future.

  17. Screening and identification of a peptide specifically targeted to NCI-H1299 cells from a phage display peptide library.

    PubMed

    Tu, Xiangan; Zang, Linquan; Lan, Daiyan; Liang, Weican

    2009-01-01

    Ligands that are capable of binding to tumor cell surface biomarkers specifically used in the early diagnosis of cancer and targeted drug delivery in cancer chemotherapy have been extensively investigated. Phage display technology has been demonstrated to be a powerful tool in this field. In this study, the non-small cell lung cancer NCI-H1299 and the normal lung small airway epithelial cell lines were used for subtractive screening in vitro with a phage display 12-peptide library. After three rounds of panning, there was an obvious enrichment in the phages specifically binding to the NCI-H1299 cells, and the output/input ratio of phages increased approximately 875-fold (from 0.4x104 to 3.5x106). A group of peptides capable of binding specifically to the NCI-H1299 cells was obtained, and the affinity of these peptides to bind to the targeted cells and tissues was studied. Through cell-based ELISA, immunocytochemical staining, immunohistochemical staining and immunofluorescence, an M13 phage was isolated and identified from the above screenings, and a synthetic peptide, ZT-1 (sequence QQMHLMSYAPGP), corresponding to the sequence of the surface protein of the M13 phage, was demonstrated to be capable of binding to the tumor cell surfaces of NCI-H1299 and A549 cells and biopsy specimens, but not to normal lung tissue samples, other cancer cells, or non-tumor adjacent lung tissues. In conclusion, the peptide ZT-1 may be a potential candidate biomarker ligand that can be used for targeted drug delivery in lung cancer therapy.

  18. Screening and identification of a peptide specifically targeted to NCI-H1299 from a phage display peptide library.

    PubMed

    Zang, Linquan; Shi, Lei; Guo, Jiao; Pan, Qin; Wu, Wei; Pan, Xuediao; Wang, Junye

    2009-08-18

    In this study, a NCI-H1299 (Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer, NSCLC) and a normal lung cell line (Small Airway Epithelial Cells, SAEC) were used for the subtractive screening in vitro with a phage display-12 peptide library. After three rounds of panning, there was an obvious enrichment for the phages specifically binding to the NCI-H1299 cells, and the output/input ratio of phages increased about 875-fold (from 0.4x10(4) to 3.5x10(6)). A group of peptides being capable of binding specifically to the NCI-H1299 cells were obtained, and the affinity of these peptides to bind to the targeted cells and tissues was studied. Through a cell-based ELISA, immunocytochemical staining, immunohistochemical staining, and immunofluorescence, a M13 phage isolated and identified from the above screenings, and a synthetic peptide ZS-1 (sequence EHMALTYPFRPP) corresponded to the sequence of the surface protein of the M13 phage were demonstrated to be capable of binding to the tumor cell surfaces of NCI-H1299 and A549 cell lines and biopsy specimens, but not to normal lungs tissue samples, other different cancer cells, or nontumor surrounding lung tissues. In conclusion, the peptide ZS-1 may be a potential candidate of biomarker ligands used for targeted drug delivery in therapy of lung cancer.

  19. Construction of genetically engineered M13K07 helper phage for simultaneous phage display of gold binding peptide 1 and nuclear matrix protein 22 ScFv antibody.

    PubMed

    Fatemi, Farnaz; Amini, Seyed Mohammad; Kharrazi, Sharmin; Rasaee, Mohammad Javad; Mazlomi, Mohammad Ali; Asadi-Ghalehni, Majid; Rajabibazl, Masoumeh; Sadroddiny, Esmaeil

    2017-08-24

    The most common techniques of antibody phage display are based on the use of M13 filamentous bacteriophages. This study introduces a new genetically engineered M13K07 helper phage displaying multiple copies of a known gold binding peptide on p8 coat proteins. The recombinant helper phages were used to rescue a phagemid vector encoding the p3 coat protein fused to the nuclear matrix protein 22 (NMP22) ScFv antibody. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), UV-vis absorbance spectroscopy, and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) analysis revealed that the expression of gold binding peptide 1 (GBP1) on major coat protein p8 significantly enhances the gold-binding affinity of M13 phages. The recombinant bacteriophages at concentrations above 5×10(4) pfu/ml red-shifted the UV-vis absorbance spectra of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs); however, the surface plasmon resonance of gold nanoparticles was not changed by the wild type bacteriophages at concentrations up to 10(12) pfu/ml. The phage ELISA assay demonstrated the high affinity binding of bifunctional bacteriophages to NMP22 antigen at concentrations of 10(5) and 10(6) pfu/ml. Thus, the p3 end of the bifunctional bacteriophages would be able to bind to specific target antigen, while the AuNPs were assembled along the coat of virus for signal generation. Our results indicated that the complex of antigen-bacteriophages lead to UV-vis spectral changes of AuNPs and NMP22 antigen in concentration range of 10-80μg/ml can be detected by bifunctional bacteriophages at concentration of 10(4) pfu/ml. The ability of bifunctional bacteriophages to bind to antigen and generate signal at the same time, makes this approach applicable for identifying different antigens in immunoassay techniques. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Cloning of linear DNAs in vivo by overexpressed T4 DNA ligase: construction of a T4 phage hoc gene display vector.

    PubMed

    Ren, Z J; Baumann, R G; Black, L W

    1997-08-22

    A method was developed to clone linear DNAs by overexpressing T4 phage DNA ligase in vivo, based upon recombination deficient E. coli derivatives that carry a plasmid containing an inducible T4 DNA ligase gene. Integration of this ligase-plasmid into the chromosome of such E. coli allows standard plasmid isolation following linear DNA transformation of the strains containing high levels of T4 DNA ligase. Intramolecular ligation allows high efficiency recircularization of cohesive and blunt-end terminated linear plasmid DNAs following transformation. Recombinant plasmids could be constructed in vivo by co-transformation with linearized vector plus insert DNAs, followed by intermolecular ligation in the T4 ligase strains to yield clones without deletions or rearrangements. Thus, in vitro packaged lox-site terminated plasmid DNAs injected from phage T4 were recircularized by T4 ligase in vivo with an efficiency comparable to CRE recombinase. Clones that expressed a capsid-binding 14-aa N-terminal peptide extension derivative of the HOC (highly antigenic outer capsid) protein for T4 phage hoc gene display were constructed by co-transformation with a linearized vector and a PCR-synthesized hoc gene. Therefore, the T4 DNA ligase strains are useful for cloning linear DNAs in vivo by transformation or transduction of DNAs with nonsequence-specific but compatible DNA ends.

  1. Triosephosphate isomerase of Taenia solium (TTPI): phage display and antibodies as tools for finding target regions to inhibit catalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Sanabria-Ayala, Víctor; Belmont, Iaraset; Abraham, Landa

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies demonstrated that antibodies against triosephosphate isomerase of Taenia solium (TTPI) can alter its enzymatic catalysis. In the present study, we used antibodies produced against the NH2-terminal region of TTPI (1/3NH2TTPI) and the phage display technology to find target regions to inhibit TTPI activity. As a first step, we obtained polyclonal antibodies against non-conserved regions from the 1/3NH2TTPI, which had an inhibitory effect of about 74 % on catalytic activity. Afterward, they were used to screen a library of phage-displayed dodecapeptides; as a result, 41 phage mimotope clones were isolated and grouped according to their amino acid sequence, finding the consensus A1 (VPTXPI), A2 (VPTXXI), B (LTPGQ), and D (DPLPR). Antibodies against selected phage mimotope clones were obtained by rabbit's immunization; these ones clearly recognized TTPI by both Western blot and ELISA. However, only the mimotope PDTS16 (DSVTPTSVMAVA) clone, which belongs to the VPTXXI consensus, raised antibodies capable of inhibiting the TTPI catalytic activity in 45 %. Anti-PDTS16 antibodies were confronted to several synthetic peptides that encompass the 1/3NH2TTPI, and they only recognized three, which share the motif FDTLQK belonging to the helix-α1 in TTPI. This suggests that this motif is the main part of the epitope recognized by anti-PDTS16 antibodies and revealed its importance for TTPI catalysis.

  2. Selection of antibodies to cell surface determinants on mouse thymic epithelial cells using a phage display library.

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, D B; George, A J; Ritter, M A

    1997-01-01

    The network of thymic epithelium contributes significantly to the thymic stromal cell environment, which plays a vital role in the generation and maturation of thymocytes. Monoclonal antibodies (mAb) have revealed considerable heterogeneity within this epithelial component of the mouse thymic microenvironment, but many of these antibodies recognize epitopes that are located inside the cell and so cannot be used in functional studies. As an alternative approach to isolate antibodies specific to thymic epithelium, we used a phage display library expressing single chain Fv antibodies. For selection, a thymic cell suspension was incubated with the phage display library, and major histocompatibility complex class II positive cells, the majority of which are epithelial, were then specifically selected. Phage bound to these cells were eluted and the selection procedure was repeated for a further five rounds. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that these phage antibodies show differential staining of thymic epithelial subsets. Flow cytometric analysis of a thymic epithelial cell line using a panel of these antibodies demonstrated that they recognize epitopes on the cell surface. Furthermore, some of these antibodies also labelled human thymic epithelium, suggesting that the epitopes recognized by these antibodies are conserved between human and rodent thymus. Our approach therefore provides a rapid method to select antibodies specific for thymic epithelial cell surface determinants in their native configuration. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:9301539

  3. Phage-displayed peptides that mimic epitopes of hepatitis E virus capsid.

    PubMed

    Larralde, Osmany; Petrik, Juraj

    2017-08-01

    Hepatitis E is an emerging zoonotic infection of increasing public health threat for the UK, especially for immunosuppressed individuals. A human recombinant vaccine has been licensed only in China and is not clear whether it protects against hepatitis E virus (HEV) genotype 3, the most prevalent in Europe. The aim of this study was to use phage display technology as a tool to identify peptides that mimic epitopes of HEV capsid (mimotopes). We identified putative linear and conformational mimotopes using sera from Scottish blood donors that have the immunological imprint of past HEV infection. Four mimotopes did not have homology with the primary sequence of HEV ORF2 capsid but competed effectively with a commercial HEV antigen for binding to anti-HEV reference serum. When the reactivity profile of each mimotope was compared with Wantai HEV-IgG ELISA, the most sensitive HEV immunoassay, mimotopes showed 95.2-100% sensitivity while the specificity ranged from 81.5 to 95.8%. PepSurf algorithm was used to map affinity-selected peptides onto the ORF2 crystal structure of HEV genotype 3, which predicted that these four mimototopes are clustered in the P domain of ORF2 capsid, near conformational epitopes of anti-HEV neutralising monoclonal antibodies. These HEV mimotopes may have potential applications in the design of structural vaccines and the development of new diagnostic tests.

  4. Selective inhibition of miR-21 by phage display screened peptide

    PubMed Central

    Bose, Debojit; Nahar, Smita; Rai, Manish Kumar; Ray, Arjun; Chakraborty, Kausik; Maiti, Souvik

    2015-01-01

    miRNAs are nodal regulators of gene expression and deregulation of miRNAs is causally associated with different diseases, including cancer. Modulation of miRNA expression is thus of therapeutic importance. Small molecules are currently being explored for their potential to downregulate miRNAs. Peptides have shown to have better potency and selectivity toward their targets but their potential in targeting and modulating miRNAs remain unexplored. Herein, using phage display we found a very selective peptide against pre-miR-21. Interestingly, the peptide has the potential to downregulate miR-21, by binding to pre-miR-21 and hindering Dicer processing. It is selective towards miR-21 inside the cell. By antagonising miR-21 function, the peptide is able to increase the expression of its target proteins and thereby increase apoptosis and suppress cell proliferation, invasion and migration. This peptide can further be explored for its anti-cancer activity in vivo and may be even extended to clinical studies. PMID:25824952

  5. Epitope mapping of metuximab on CD147 using phage display and molecular docking.

    PubMed

    He, Bifang; Mao, Canquan; Ru, Beibei; Han, Hesong; Zhou, Peng; Huang, Jian

    2013-01-01

    Metuximab is the generic name of Licartin, a new drug for radioimmunotherapy of hepatocellular carcinoma. Although it is known to be a mouse monoclonal antibody against CD147, the complete epitope mediating the binding of metuximab to CD147 remains unknown. We panned the Ph.D.-12 phage display peptide library against metuximab and got six mimotopes. The following bioinformatics analysis based on mimotopes suggested that metuximab recognizes a conformational epitope composed of more than 20 residues. The residues of its epitope may include T28, V30, K36, L38, K57, F74, D77, S78, D79, D80, Q81, G83, S86, N98, Q100, L101, H102, G103, P104, V131, P132, and K191. The homology modeling of metuximab and the docking of CD147 to metuximab were also performed. Based on the top one docking model, the epitope was predicted to contain 28 residues: AGTVFTTV (23-30), I37, D45, E84, V88, EPMGTANIQLH (92-102), VPP (131-133), Q164, and K191. Almost half of the residues predicted on the basis of mimotope analysis also appear in the docking result, indicating that both results are reliable. As the predicted epitopes of metuximab largely overlap with interfaces of CD147-CD147 interactions, a structural mechanism of metuximab is proposed as blocking the formation of CD147 dimer.

  6. Isolation and characterization of anti ROR1 single chain fragment variable antibodies using phage display technique.

    PubMed

    Aghebati-Maleki, Leili; Younesi, Vahid; Jadidi-Niaragh, Farhad; Baradaran, Behzad; Majidi, Jafar; Yousefi, Mehdi

    2017-01-01

    Receptor tyrosine kinase-like orphan receptor (ROR1) belongs to one of the families of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs). RTKs are involved in the various physiologic cellular functions including proliferation, migration, survival, signaling and differentiation. Several RTKs are deregulated in various cancers implying the targeting potential of these molecules in cancer therapy. ROR1 has recently been shown to be expressed in various types of cancer cells but not in normal adult cells. Hence a molecular inhibitor of extracellular domain of ROR1 that inhibits ROR1-cell surface interaction is of great therapeutic importance. In an attempt to develop molecular inhibitors of ROR1, we screened single chain variable fragment (scFv) phage display libraries, Tomlinson I + J, against one specific synthetic oligopeptide from extracellular domain of ROR1 and selected scFvs were characterized using various immunological techniques. Several ROR1 specific scFvs were selected following five rounds of panning procedure. The scFvs showed specific binding to ROR1 using immunological techniques. Our results demonstrate successful isolation and characterization of specific ROR1 scFvs that may have great therapeutic potential in cancer immunotherapy.

  7. A system for repertoire cloning and phage display of murine and leporid antibody fragments.

    PubMed

    Schüller, Carolin; Wiebe, Julia C; Pegel, Antje; Kramer, Karl; Skerra, Arne; Hock, Bertold

    2010-01-01

    Even though rabbit antibodies (Abs) are known to exceed murine Abs with respect to specificity, affinity, and stability, cloned leporid immune repertoires have been rarely considered in recombinant Ab preparation for environmental analysis. We have developed a set of four tet(p/o)-based phasmid vectors that allow the efficient cloning of both murine and leporid Ab repertoires. These vectors differ in the design of the cloning sites, choice of signal peptides, and antibiotic selection markers. A set of 39 primer oligodeoxynucleotides has been developed for the PCR amplification of rabbit Ab genes, representing the most exhaustive coverage of the leporid immune repertoire described so far. The atrazine-specific murine Fab fragment K411B and a cloned V-gene repertoire from sulfonamide-immunized rabbits were used to compare these phasmids with respect to expression of Fab fragments, phagemid titers, and number of Fab displaying phagemid particles. Our results show that the ratio of recombinant phagemids could be increased up to 65% of total phage titer by utilizing the appropriate phasmid. Based on this system, the selection of two sulfonamide-specific rabbit Abs, SA2 23 and SA2 90, was accomplished after a single phagemid panning round.

  8. Evolution of binding affinity in a WW domain probed by phage display.

    PubMed Central

    Dalby, P. A.; Hoess, R. H.; DeGrado, W. F.

    2000-01-01

    The WW domain is an approximately 38 residue peptide-binding motif that binds a variety of sequences, including the consensus sequence xPPxY. We have displayed hYAP65 WW on the surface of M13 phage and randomized one-third of its three-stranded antiparallel beta-sheet. Improved binding to the hydrophobic peptide, GTPPPPYTVG (WW1), was selected in the presence of three different concentrations of proteinase K to simultaneously drive selection for improved stability as well as high-affinity binding. While some of the selected binders show cooperative unfolding transitions, others show noncooperative thermal unfolding curves. Two novel WW consensus sequences have been identified, which bind to the xPPxY motif with higher affinity than the wild-type hYAP65 WW domain. These WW domain sequences are not precedented in any natural WW domain sequence. Thus, there appear to be a large number of motifs capable of recognizing the target peptide sequence, only a subset of which appear to be used in natural proteins. PMID:11206058

  9. Identification of a novel skin penetration enhancement peptide by phage display peptide library screening.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sunny; Sahdev, Preety; Perumal, Omathanu; Tummala, Hemachand

    2012-05-07

    Skin is an important site for local or systemic application of drugs. However, a majority of drugs have poor permeability through the skin's topmost layer, stratum corneum (SC). The aim of this study was to identify safe and smaller peptides that could enhance the skin penetration of drug molecules. By screening phage display peptide library, we have identified a T2 peptide (LVGVFH), which enhanced the penetration of bacteriophages (~800 nm long bacterial viruses) across porcine and mouse skin. Pretreating the skin with synthetic T2 peptide at pH 4.5 resulted in significant penetration enhancement of hydrophilic drug 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) across skin. FTIR spectroscopy showed that the T2 peptide interacted with skin lipids to enhance the skin penetration. Pretreating the skin with T2 peptide enhanced the partitioning of small molecules with different lipophilicities (5-FU, fluorescein isothiocyanate, and rhodamine 123 hydrochloride) into skin. Fluorescence studies showed that T2 peptide enhanced the diffusion of these molecules into intercellular lipids of SC and thus enhanced the penetration into the skin. Histidine at the c-terminus of T2 peptide was identified to be critical for the skin penetration enhancement. T2 peptide interacted with skin lipids to cause skin penetration enhancement. The study identified a novel, safe, and noninvasive peptide to improve the skin penetration of drugs without chemical conjugation.

  10. Anti-idiotypic VHH phage display-mediated immuno-PCR for ultrasensitive determination of mycotoxin zearalenone in cereals.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xianxian; He, Qinghua; Xu, Yang; Liu, Xing; Shu, Mei; Tu, Zhui; Li, Yanping; Wang, Wei; Cao, Dongmei

    2016-01-15

    Immunoassay is frequently used to analyze mycotoxin contamination. However, the introduction of mycotoxins or their conjugates in conventional immunoassay threatens the safety of individuals and the environment. The variable domain of heavy-chain antibodies (VHHs) can be used as alternative compounds to produce anti-idiotypic antibodies, which work as non-toxic surrogate reagents in immunoassay. In this work, anti-zearalenone (ZEN) monoclonal antibody (mAb) was used as the target for biopanning anti-idiotypic VHH from a naïve alpaca VHH phage display library. After four panning cycles, one anti-idiotypic VHH phage clone (Z1) was isolated and the Z1 based phage ELISA for ZEN showed a half inhibitory concentration (IC50) of 0.25±0.02ng/mL, a linear range of 0.11-0.55ng/mL, and a limit of detection (LOD) of 0.08ng/mL. Furthermore, the phage particles of Z1 were also applied to immuno-polymerase chain reaction (PD-IPCR), which supplied both the detection antigens and deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) templates. Compared with that of phage ELISA, the LOD of Z1 based PD-IPCR was 12-fold improved, with a detection limit of 6.5pg/mL and a linear range of 0.01-100ng/mL. The proposed method was then validated with liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Results showed the reliability of PD-IPCR for the determination of ZEN in cereal samples. The use of anti-idiotypic VHH phage as non-toxic surrogate and signal-amplification function of PCR make it a promising method for actual ZEN analysis in cereals. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Phage display-based generation of novel internalizing antibody fragments for immunotoxin-based treatment of acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Fitting, Jenny; Blume, Tobias; ten Haaf, Andre; Blau, Wolfgang; Gattenlöhner, Stefan; Tur, Mehmet Kemal; Barth, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    The current standard treatment for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is chemotherapy based on cytarabine and daunorubicine (7 + 3), but it discriminates poorly between malignant and benign cells. Dose-limiting off‑target effects and intrinsic drug resistance result in the inefficient eradication of leukemic blast cells and their survival beyond remission. This minimal residual disease is the major cause of relapse and is responsible for a 5-year survival rate of only 24%. More specific and efficient approaches are therefore required to eradicate malignant cells while leaving healthy cells unaffected. In this study, we generated scFv antibodies that bind specifically to the surface of AML blast cells and AML bone marrow biopsy specimens. We isolated the antibodies by phage display, using subtractive whole-cell panning with AML M2‑derived Kasumi‑1 cells. By selecting for internalizing scFv antibody fragments, we focused on potentially novel agents for intracellular drug delivery and tumor modulation. Two independent methods showed that 4 binders were internalized by Kasumi-1 cells. Furthermore, we observed the AML‑selective inhibition of cell proliferation and the induction of apoptosis by a recombinant immunotoxin comprising one scFv fused to a truncated form of Pseudomonas exotoxin A (ETA'). This method may therefore be useful for the selection of novel disease-specific internalizing antibody fragments, providing a novel immunotherapeutic strategy for the treatment of AML patients. PMID:25760770

  12. Isolation of soluble scFv antibody fragments specific for small biomarker molecule, L-Carnitine, using phage display.

    PubMed

    Abou El-Magd, Rabab M; Vozza, Nicolas F; Tuszynski, Jack A; Wishart, David S

    2016-01-01

    Isolation of single chain antibody fragment (scFv) clones from naïve Tomlinson I+J phage display libraries that specifically bind a small biomarker molecule, L-Carnitine, was performed using iterative affinity selection procedures. L-Carnitine has been described as a conditionally essential nutrient for humans. Abnormally high concentrations of L-Carnitine in urine are related to many health disorders including diabetes mellitus type 2 and lung cancer. ELISA-based affinity characterization results indicate that selectants preferentially bind to L-Carnitine in the presence of key bioselecting component materials and closely related L-Carnitine derivatives. In addition, the affinity results were confirmed using biophysical fluorescence quenching for tyrosine residues in the V segment. Small-scale production of the soluble fragment yielded 1.3mg/L using immunopure-immobilized protein A affinity column. Circular Dichroism data revealed that the antibody fragment (Ab) represents a folded protein that mainly consists of β-sheets. These novel antibody fragments may find utility as molecular affinity interface receptors in various electrochemical biosensor platforms to provide specific L-Carnitine binding capability with potential applications in metabolomic devices for companion diagnostics and personalized medicine applications. It may also be used in any other biomedical application where detection of the L-Carnitine level is important.

  13. Use of in vivo phage display to engineer novel adenoviruses for targeted delivery to the cardiac vasculature.

    PubMed

    Nicol, Campbell G; Denby, Laura; Lopez-Franco, Oscar; Masson, Rachel; Halliday, Crawford A; Nicklin, Stuart A; Kritz, Angelika; Work, Lorraine M; Baker, Andrew H

    2009-06-18

    We performed in vivo phage display in the stroke prone spontaneously hypertensive rat, a cardiovascular disease model, and the normotensive Wistar Kyoto rat to identify cardiac targeting peptides, and then assessed each in the context of viral gene delivery. We identified both common and strain-selective peptides, potentially indicating ubiquitous markers and those found selectively in dysfunctional microvasculature of the heart. We show the utility of the peptide, DDTRHWG, for targeted gene delivery in human cells and rats in vivo when cloned into the fiber protein of subgroup D adenovirus 19p. This study therefore identifies cardiac targeting peptides by in vivo phage display and the potential of a candidate peptide for vector targeting strategies.

  14. The T7-Related Pseudomonas putida Phage ϕ15 Displays Virion-Associated Biofilm Degradation Properties

    PubMed Central

    Cornelissen, Anneleen; Ceyssens, Pieter-Jan; T'Syen, Jeroen; Van Praet, Helena; Noben, Jean-Paul; Shaburova, Olga V.; Krylov, Victor N.; Volckaert, Guido; Lavigne, Rob

    2011-01-01

    Formation of a protected biofilm environment is recognized as one of the major causes of the increasing antibiotic resistance development and emphasizes the need to develop alternative antibacterial strategies, like phage therapy. This study investigates the in vitro degradation of single-species Pseudomonas putida biofilms, PpG1 and RD5PR2, by the novel phage ϕ15, a ‘T7-like virus’ with a virion-associated exopolysaccharide (EPS) depolymerase. Phage ϕ15 forms plaques surrounded by growing opaque halo zones, indicative for EPS degradation, on seven out of 53 P. putida strains. The absence of haloes on infection resistant strains suggests that the EPS probably act as a primary bacterial receptor for phage infection. Independent of bacterial strain or biofilm age, a time and dose dependent response of ϕ15-mediated biofilm degradation was observed with generally a maximum biofilm degradation 8 h after addition of the higher phage doses (104 and 106 pfu) and resistance development after 24 h. Biofilm age, an in vivo very variable parameter, reduced markedly phage-mediated degradation of PpG1 biofilms, while degradation of RD5PR2 biofilms and ϕ15 amplification were unaffected. Killing of the planktonic culture occurred in parallel with but was always more pronounced than biofilm degradation, accentuating the need for evaluating phages for therapeutic purposes in biofilm conditions. EPS degrading activity of recombinantly expressed viral tail spike was confirmed by capsule staining. These data suggests that the addition of high initial titers of specifically selected phages with a proper EPS depolymerase are crucial criteria in the development of phage therapy. PMID:21526174

  15. Directed evolution of the forkhead-associated domain to generate anti-phosphospecific reagents by phage-display

    PubMed Central

    Pershad, Kritika; Wypisniak, Karolina; Kay, Brian K.

    2012-01-01

    While affinity reagents are valuable tools for monitoring protein phosphorylation and studying signaling events in cells, generating them through immunization of animals with phosphopeptides is expensive, laborious and time consuming. An attractive alternative is to use protein evolution techniques and isolate new anti-phosphopeptide binding specificities from a library of variants of a phosphopeptide-binding domain. To explore this strategy, we attempted to display on the surface of bacteriophage M13, the N-terminal Forkhead-associated domain (FHA1) of yeast Rad53p, which is a naturally occurring phosphothreonine (pT)-binding domain, and found it to be non-functional due to misfolding in the bacterial periplasm. To overcome this limitation, a library of FHA1 variants was constructed by mutagenic PCR and functional variants were isolated after three rounds of affinity selection with its pT peptide ligand. A hydrophobic residue at position 34 in the β1-strand was discovered to be essential for phage-display of a functional FHA1 domain. Additionally, by heating the phage library to 50°C prior to affinity selection with its cognate pT peptide, we identified a variant (G2) that was ~8°C more thermal stable than the wild-type domain. Using G2 as a scaffold, we constructed phage-displayed libraries of FHA1 variants and affinity selected for variants that bound selectively to five pT peptides. These reagents are renewable and have high protein yields (~20–25 mg/L), when expressed in Escherichia coli. Thus, we have changed the specificity of the FHA1 domain and demonstrated that engineering phosphopeptide-binding domains is an attractive avenue for generating new anti-phosphopeptide binding specificities in vitro by phage-display. PMID:22985966

  16. Neutralizing human recombinant antibodies against herpes simplex virus type 1 glycoproteins B from a phage-displayed scFv antibody library.

    PubMed

    Bagheri, Vahid; Nejatollahi, Foroogh; Esmaeili, Seyed Alireza; Momtazi, Amir Abbas; Motamedifar, Mohamad; Sahebkar, Amirhossein

    2017-01-15

    The HSV-1 envelope glycoprotein B (gB) plays a critical role in virus entry into host cells. Neutralizing antibodies can therefore potentially prevent virus entry into target cells and cell-to-cell spread of infection. Our present study focused on the selection of neutralizing single-chain Fv (scFv) antibodies of a phage-displayed nonimmune human scFv antibody library against gB of HSV-1. To enrich specific scFvs, two phage antibodies were isolated against amino acid residues 31-43 derived from the N-terminal part of gB using panning technique. Two scFvs, scFv-gB1 and scFv-gB2, with frequencies of 45% and 20% were obtained from scFv clones after performing PCR and MvaI fingerprinting. In phage ELISA analysis, both gB1 and gB2 scFvs demonstrated high reactivity with the gB peptide. In the neutralization assay, scFv-gB1 and scFv-gB2 represented neutralizing effects of 55% and 59%, respectively. Upon further enhancement of the neutralizing effects of these antibodies, they can be considered as new potential alternatives in the treatment and prophylaxis of HSV-1 infections.

  17. Next-Generation Sequencing of a Single Domain Antibody Repertoire Reveals Quality of Phage Display Selected Candidates

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Kendrick B.; Naciri, Jennifer; Liu, Jinny L.; Anderson, George P.; Goldman, Ellen R.; Zabetakis, Dan

    2016-01-01

    Next-Generation Sequencing and bioinformatics are powerful tools for analyzing the large number of DNA sequences present in an immune library. In this work, we constructed a cDNA library of single domain antibodies from a llama immunized with staphylococcal enterotoxin B. The resulting library was sequenced, resulting in approximately 8.5 million sequences with 5.4 million representing intact, useful sequences. The sequenced library was interrogated using sequences of known SEB-binding single domain antibodies from the library obtained through phage display panning methods in a previous study. New antibodies were identified, produced, and characterized, and were shown to have affinities and melting temperatures comparable to those obtained by traditional panning methods. This demonstrates the utility of using NGS as a complementary tool to phage-displayed biopanning as a means for rapidly obtaining additional antibodies from an immune library. It also shows that phage display, using a library of high diversity, is able to select high quality antibodies even when they are low in frequency. PMID:26895405

  18. Novel single chain antibodies to the prion protein identified by phage display.

    PubMed

    Adamson, Catherine S; Yao, Yongxiu; Vasiljevic, Snezana; Sy, Man-Sun; Ren, Junyuan; Jones, Ian M

    2007-02-05

    A well defined structure is available for the carboxyl half of the cellular prion protein (PrP(c)), while the structure of the amino terminal half of the molecule remains ill defined. The unstructured nature of the polypeptide has meant that relatively few of the many antibodies generated against PrP(c) recognise this region. To circumvent this problem, we have used a previously characterised and well expressed fragment derived from the amino terminus of PrP(c) as bait for panning a single chain antibody phage (scFv-P) library. Using this approach, we identified and characterised 1 predominant and 3 additional scFv-Ps that contained different V(H) and V(L) sequences and that bound specifically to the PrP(c) target. Epitope mapping revealed that all scFv-Ps recognised linear epitopes between PrP(c) residues 76 and 156. When compared with existing monoclonal antibodies (MAb), the binding of the scFvs was significantly different in that high level binding was evident on truncated forms of PrP(c) that reacted poorly or not at all with several pre-existing MAbs. These data suggest that the isolated scFv-Ps bind to novel epitopes within the amino-central region of PrP(c). In addition, the binding of MAbs to known linear epitopes within PrP(c) depends strongly on the endpoints of the target PrP(c) fragment used.

  19. Antigen-specific therapy of EAE via intranasal delivery of filamentous phage displaying a myelin immunodominant epitope.

    PubMed

    Rakover, Idan S; Zabavnik, Natalia; Kopel, Rela; Paz-Rozner, Miri; Solomon, Beka

    2010-08-25

    The presence of anti-myelin antibodies (Abs) in patients with early multiple sclerosis (MS) and in MS animal models has led to renewed interest in the role of B cells, plasma cells and their products in the pathogenesis of the disease, and in their therapeutic potential. Here, we present a novel strategy based on filamentous phage display of the myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein immunodominant epitope (MOG 36-44) fused to the main coat protein. Filamentous phages are well characterized, both structurally and genetically. We found that the fibrous shape of the phage (1000 nm long and 6 nm wide) enables penetration into the central nervous system (CNS) when administered nasally. Thus, intranasal treatment of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) in mice, with phage MOG, showed improved neuronal function, reduced levels of proinflammatory cytokines, particularly monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1), interferon gamma (IFN-gamma) and IL-6, but no change in IL-10 or IL-12 levels. Moreover, the treatment induced depletion of the autoantibodies against MOG and prevented demyelination resulting in improved clinical scores and the reduced inflammation in the CNS and periphery in EAE mice compared to untreated sick animals. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Improved binding activity of antibodies against major histocompatibility complex class I chain-related gene A by phage display technology for cancer-targeted therapy.

    PubMed

    Phumyen, Achara; Jumnainsong, Amonrat; Leelayuwat, Chanvit

    2012-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex class I chain-related gene A (MICA) is an NKG2D ligand that is over-expressed under cellular stress including cancer transformation and viral infection. High expression of MICA in cancer tissues or patients' sera is useful for prognostic or follow-up markers in cancer patients. In this study, phage display technology was employed to improve antigen-binding activities of anti-MICA monoclonal antibodies (WW2G8, WW6B7, and WW9B8). The 12 amino acid residues in the complementarity determining regions (CDRs) on the V domain of the heavy chain CDR3 (HCDR3) of these anti-MICA antibodies were modified by PCR-random mutagenesis, and phages displaying mutated anti-MICA Fab were constructed. After seven rounds of panning, five clones of phages displaying mutant anti-MICA Fab which exhibited 3-7-folds higher antigen-binding activities were isolated. Two clones of the mutants (phage-displayed mutant Fab WW9B8.1 and phage-displayed mutant Fab WW9B8.21) were confirmed to have antigen-binding specificity for cell surface MICA proteins by flow cytometry. These phage clones are able to recognize MICA in a native form according to positive results obtained by indirect ELISA and flow cytometry. Thus, these phage particles could be potentially used for further development of nanomedicine specifically targeting cancer cells expressing MICA proteins.

  1. Improved Binding Activity of Antibodies against Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I Chain-Related Gene A by Phage Display Technology for Cancer-Targeted Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Phumyen, Achara; Jumnainsong, Amonrat; Leelayuwat, Chanvit

    2012-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex class I chain-related gene A (MICA) is an NKG2D ligand that is over-expressed under cellular stress including cancer transformation and viral infection. High expression of MICA in cancer tissues or patients' sera is useful for prognostic or follow-up markers in cancer patients. In this study, phage display technology was employed to improve antigen-binding activities of anti-MICA monoclonal antibodies (WW2G8, WW6B7, and WW9B8). The 12 amino acid residues in the complementarity determining regions (CDRs) on the V domain of the heavy chain CDR3 (HCDR3) of these anti-MICA antibodies were modified by PCR-random mutagenesis, and phages displaying mutated anti-MICA Fab were constructed. After seven rounds of panning, five clones of phages displaying mutant anti-MICA Fab which exhibited 3–7-folds higher antigen-binding activities were isolated. Two clones of the mutants (phage-displayed mutant Fab WW9B8.1 and phage-displayed mutant Fab WW9B8.21) were confirmed to have antigen-binding specificity for cell surface MICA proteins by flow cytometry. These phage clones are able to recognize MICA in a native form according to positive results obtained by indirect ELISA and flow cytometry. Thus, these phage particles could be potentially used for further development of nanomedicine specifically targeting cancer cells expressing MICA proteins. PMID:23226940

  2. Combination of phage and Gram-positive bacterial display of human antibody repertoires enables isolation of functional high affinity binders.

    PubMed

    Hu, Francis Jingxin; Volk, Anna-Luisa; Persson, Helena; Säll, Anna; Borrebaeck, Carl; Uhlen, Mathias; Rockberg, Johan

    2017-08-01

    Surface display couples genotype with a surface exposed phenotype and thereby allows screening of gene-encoded protein libraries for desired characteristics. Of the various display systems available, phage display is by far the most popular, mainly thanks to its ability to harbour large size libraries. Here, we describe the first use of a Gram-positive bacterial host for display of a library of human antibody genes which, when combined with phage display, provides ease of use for screening, sorting and ranking by flow cytometry. We demonstrate the utility of this method by identifying low nanomolar affinity scFv fragments towards human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2). The ranking and performance of the scFv isolated by flow sorting in surface-immobilised form was retained when expressed as soluble scFv and analysed by biolayer interferometry, as well as after expression as full-length antibodies in mammalian cells. We also demonstrate the possibility of using Gram-positive bacterial display to directly improve the affinity of the identified binders via an affinity maturation step using random mutagenesis and flow sorting. This combined approach has the potential for a more complete scan of the antibody repertoire and for affinity maturation of human antibody formats. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. DNA immunization combined with scFv phage display identifies antagonistic GCGR specific antibodies and reveals new epitopes on the small extracellular loops.

    PubMed

    van der Woning, Bas; De Boeck, Gitte; Blanchetot, Christophe; Bobkov, Vladimir; Klarenbeek, Alex; Saunders, Michael; Waelbroeck, Magali; Laeremans, Toon; Steyaert, Jan; Hultberg, Anna; De Haard, Hans

    2016-01-01

    The identification of functional monoclonal antibodies directed against G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) is challenging because of the membrane-embedded topology of these molecules. Here, we report the successful combination of llama DNA immunization with scFv-phage display and selections using virus-like particles (VLP) and the recombinant extracellular domain of the GPCR glucagon receptor (GCGR), resulting in glucagon receptor-specific antagonistic antibodies. By immunizing outbred llamas with plasmid DNA containing the human GCGR gene, we sought to provoke their immune system, which generated a high IgG1 response. Phage selections on VLPs allowed the identification of mAbs against the extracellular loop regions (ECL) of GCGR, in addition to multiple VH families interacting with the extracellular domain (ECD) of GCGR. Identifying mAbs binding to the ECL regions of GCGR is challenging because the large ECD covers the small ECLs in the energetically most favorable 'closed conformation' of GCGR. Comparison of Fab with scFv-phage display demonstrated that the multivalent nature of scFv display is essential for the identification of GCGR specific clones by selections on VLPs because of avid interaction. Ten different VH families that bound 5 different epitopes on the ECD of GCGR were derived from only 2 DNA-immunized llamas. Seven VH families demonstrated interference with glucagon-mediated cAMP increase. This combination of technologies proved applicable in identifying multiple functional binders in the class B GPCR context, suggesting it is a robust approach for tackling difficult membrane proteins.

  4. Tetanus Neurotoxin Neutralizing Antibodies Screened from a Human Immune scFv Antibody Phage Display Library

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Han; Yu, Rui; Fang, Ting; Yu, Ting; Chi, Xiangyang; Zhang, Xiaopeng; Liu, Shuling; Fu, Ling; Yu, Changming; Chen, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Tetanus neurotoxin (TeNT) produced by Clostridium tetani is one of the most poisonous protein substances. Neutralizing antibodies against TeNT can effectively prevent and cure toxicosis. Using purified Hc fragments of TeNT (TeNT-Hc) as an antigen, three specific neutralizing antibody clones recognizing different epitopes were selected from a human immune scFv antibody phage display library. The three antibodies (2-7G, 2-2D, and S-4-7H) can effectively inhibit the binding between TeNT-Hc and differentiated PC-12 cells in vitro. Moreover, 2-7G inhibited TeNT-Hc binding to the receptor via carbohydrate-binding sites of the W pocket while 2-2D and S-4-7H inhibited binding of the R pocket. Although no single mAb completely protected mice from the toxin, they could both prolong survival when challenged with 20 LD50s (50% of the lethal dose) of TeNT. When used together, the mAbs completely neutralized 1000 LD50s/mg Ab, indicating their high neutralizing potency in vivo. Antibodies recognizing different carbohydrate-binding pockets could have higher synergistic toxin neutralization activities than those that recognize the same pockets. These results could lead to further production of neutralizing antibody drugs against TeNT and indicate that using TeNT-Hc as an antigen for screening human antibodies for TeNT intoxication therapy from human immune antibody library was convenient and effective. PMID:27626445

  5. Tetanus Neurotoxin Neutralizing Antibodies Screened from a Human Immune scFv Antibody Phage Display Library.

    PubMed

    Wang, Han; Yu, Rui; Fang, Ting; Yu, Ting; Chi, Xiangyang; Zhang, Xiaopeng; Liu, Shuling; Fu, Ling; Yu, Changming; Chen, Wei

    2016-09-11

    Tetanus neurotoxin (TeNT) produced by Clostridium tetani is one of the most poisonous protein substances. Neutralizing antibodies against TeNT can effectively prevent and cure toxicosis. Using purified Hc fragments of TeNT (TeNT-Hc) as an antigen, three specific neutralizing antibody clones recognizing different epitopes were selected from a human immune scFv antibody phage display library. The three antibodies (2-7G, 2-2D, and S-4-7H) can effectively inhibit the binding between TeNT-Hc and differentiated PC-12 cells in vitro. Moreover, 2-7G inhibited TeNT-Hc binding to the receptor via carbohydrate-binding sites of the W pocket while 2-2D and S-4-7H inhibited binding of the R pocket. Although no single mAb completely protected mice from the toxin, they could both prolong survival when challenged with 20 LD50s (50% of the lethal dose) of TeNT. When used together, the mAbs completely neutralized 1000 LD50s/mg Ab, indicating their high neutralizing potency in vivo. Antibodies recognizing different carbohydrate-binding pockets could have higher synergistic toxin neutralization activities than those that recognize the same pockets. These results could lead to further production of neutralizing antibody drugs against TeNT and indicate that using TeNT-Hc as an antigen for screening human antibodies for TeNT intoxication therapy from human immune antibody library was convenient and effective.

  6. Selection of binding targets in parasites using phage-display and aptamer libraries in vivo and in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Tonelli, R. R.; Colli, W.; Alves, M. J. M.

    2012-01-01

    Parasite infections are largely dependent on interactions between pathogen and different host cell populations to guarantee a successful infectious process. This is particularly true for obligatory intracellular parasites as Plasmodium, Toxoplasma, and Leishmania, to name a few. Adhesion to and entry into the cell are essential steps requiring specific parasite and host cell molecules. The large amount of possible involved molecules poses additional difficulties for their identification by the classical biochemical approaches. In this respect, the search for alternative techniques should be pursued. Among them two powerful methodologies can be employed, both relying upon the construction of highly diverse combinatorial libraries of peptides or oligonucleotides that randomly bind with high affinity to targets on the cell surface and are selectively displaced by putative ligands. These are, respectively, the peptide-based phage display and the oligonucleotide-based aptamer techniques. The phage display technique has been extensively employed for the identification of novel ligands in vitro and in vivo in different areas such as cancer, vaccine development, and epitope mapping. Particularly, phage display has been employed in the investigation of pathogen–host interactions. Although this methodology has been used for some parasites with encouraging results, in trypanosomatids its use is, as yet, scanty. RNA and DNA aptamers, developed by the SELEX process (Systematic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential Enrichment), were described over two decades ago and since then contributed to a large number of structured nucleic acids for diagnostic or therapeutic purposes or for the understanding of the cell biology. Similarly to the phage display technique scarce use of the SELEX process has been used in the probing of parasite–host interaction. In this review, an overall survey on the use of both phage display and aptamer technologies in different pathogenic organisms will

  7. Isolation of a recombinant antibody specific for a surface marker of the corneal endothelium by phage display.

    PubMed

    Dorfmueller, Simone; Tan, Hwee Ching; Ngoh, Zi Xian; Toh, Kai Yee; Peh, Gary; Ang, Heng-Pei; Seah, Xin-Yi; Chin, Angela; Choo, Andre; Mehta, Jodhbir S; Sun, William

    2016-02-23

    Cell surface antigens are important targets for monoclonal antibodies, but they are often difficult to work with due to their association with the cell membrane. Phage display is a versatile technique that can be applied to generate binders against difficult targets. Here we used antibody phage display to isolate a binder for a rare and specialized cell, the human corneal endothelial cell. The human corneal endothelium is a medically important cell layer; defects in this layer account for about half of all corneal transplants. Despite its importance, no specific antigens have been found to mark this cell type. By panning a phage library directly on human corneal endothelial cells, we isolated an antibody that bound to these cells and not the other types of corneal cells. Subsequently, we identified the antibody's putative target to be CD166 by immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry. This approach can be used to isolate antibodies against other poorly-characterized cell types, such as stem cells or cancer cells, without any prior knowledge of their discriminating markers.

  8. Phage display revisited: Epitope mapping of a monoclonal antibody directed against Neisseria meningitidis adhesin A using the PROFILER technology

    PubMed Central

    Cariccio, Veronica Lanza; Domina, Maria; Benfatto, Salvatore; Venza, Mario; Venza, Isabella; Faleri, Agnese; Bruttini, Marco; Bartolini, Erika; Giuliani, Marzia Monica; Santini, Laura; Brunelli, Brunella; Norais, Nathalie; Borgogni, Erica; Midiri, Angelina; Galbo, Roberta; Romeo, Letizia; Biondo, Carmelo; Masignani, Vega; Teti, Giuseppe; Felici, Franco; Beninati, Concetta

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT There is a strong need for rapid and reliable epitope mapping methods that can keep pace with the isolation of increasingly larger numbers of mAbs. We describe here the identification of a conformational epitope using Phage-based Representation OF ImmunoLigand Epitope Repertoire (PROFILER), a recently developed high-throughput method based on deep sequencing of antigen-specific lambda phage-displayed libraries. A novel bactericidal monoclonal antibody (mAb 9F11) raised against Neisseria meningitidis adhesin A (NadA), an important component of the Bexsero® anti-meningococcal vaccine, was used to evaluate the technique in comparison with other epitope mapping methods. The PROFILER technology readily identified NadA fragments that were capable of fully recapitulating the reactivity of the entire antigen against mAb 9F11. Further analysis of these fragments using mutagenesis and hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass-spectrometry allowed us to identify the binding site of mAb 9F11 (A250-D274) and an adjoining sequence (V275-H312) that was also required for the full functional reconstitution of the epitope. These data suggest that, by virtue of its ability to detect a great variety of immunoreactive antigen fragments in phage-displayed libraries, the PROFILER technology can rapidly and reliably identify epitope-containing regions and provide, in addition, useful clues for the functional characterization of conformational mAb epitopes. PMID:26963435

  9. Parallel in Vivo and in Vitro Selection Using Phage Display Identifies Protease-dependent Tumor-targeting Peptides*

    PubMed Central

    Whitney, Mike; Crisp, Jessica L.; Olson, Emilia S.; Aguilera, Todd A.; Gross, Larry A.; Ellies, Lesley G.; Tsien, Roger Y.

    2010-01-01

    We recently developed activatable cell-penetrating peptides (ACPPs) that target contrast agents to in vivo sites of matrix metalloproteinase activity, such as tumors. Here we use parallel in vivo and in vitro selection with phage display to identify novel tumor-homing ACPPs with no bias for primary sequence or target protease. Specifically, phage displaying a library of ACPPs were either injected into tumor-bearing mice, followed by isolation of cleaved phage from dissected tumor, or isolated based on selective cleavage by extracts of tumor versus normal tissue. Selected sequences were synthesized as fluorescently labeled peptides, and tumor-specific cleavage was confirmed by digestion with tissue extracts. The most efficiently cleaved peptide contained the substrate sequence RLQLKL and labeled tumors and metastases from several cancer models with up to 5-fold contrast. This uniquely identified ACPP was not cleaved by matrix metalloproteinases or various coagulation factors but was efficiently cleaved by plasmin and elastases, both of which have been shown to be aberrantly overexpressed in tumors. The identification of an ACPP that targets tumor expressed proteases without rational design highlights the value of unbiased selection schemes for the development of potential therapeutic agents. PMID:20460372

  10. Efficient identification of murine M2 macrophage peptide targeting ligands by phage display and next-generation sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Gary W.; Livesay, Brynn R.; Kacherovsky, Nataly A.; Cieslewicz, Maryelise; Lutz, Emi; Waalkes, Adam; Jensen, Michael C.; Salipante, Stephen J.; Pun, Suzie H.

    2015-01-01

    Peptide ligands are used to increase the specificity of drug carriers to their target cells and to facilitate intracellular delivery. One method to identify such peptide ligands, phage display, enables high-throughput screening of peptide libraries for ligands binding to therapeutic targets of interest. However, conventional methods for identifying target binders in a library by Sanger sequencing are low-throughput, labor-intensive, and provide a limited perspective (< 0.01%) of the complete sequence space. Moreover, the small sample space can be dominated by non-specific, preferentially amplifying “parasitic sequences” and plastic-binding sequences, which may lead to the identification of false positives or exclude the identification of target-binding sequences. To overcome these challenges, we employed next-generation Illumina sequencing to couple high-throughput screening and high-throughput sequencing, enabling more comprehensive access to the phage display library sequence space. In this work, we define the hallmarks of binding sequences in next-generation sequencing data, and develop a method that identifies several target-binding phage clones for murine, alternatively-activated (M2) macrophages with a high (100%) success rate: sequences and binding motifs were reproducibly present across biological replicates; binding motifs were identified across multiple unique sequences; and an unselected, amplified library accurately filtered out parasitic sequences. In addition, we validate the Multiple Em for Motif Elicitation tool as an efficient and principled means of discovering binding sequences. PMID:26161996

  11. Modular protein expression by RNA trans-splicing enables flexible expression of antibody formats in mammalian cells from a dual-host phage display vector.

    PubMed

    Shang, Yonglei; Tesar, Devin; Hötzel, Isidro

    2015-10-01

    A recently described dual-host phage display vector that allows expression of immunoglobulin G (IgG) in mammalian cells bypasses the need for subcloning of phage display clone inserts to mammalian vectors for IgG expression in large antibody discovery and optimization campaigns. However, antibody discovery and optimization campaigns usually need different antibody formats for screening, requiring reformatting of the clones in the dual-host phage display vector to an alternative vector. We developed a modular protein expression system mediated by RNA trans-splicing to enable the expression of different antibody formats from the same phage display vector. The heavy-chain region encoded by the phage display vector is directly and precisely fused to different downstream heavy-chain sequences encoded by complementing plasmids simply by joining exons in different pre-mRNAs by trans-splicing. The modular expression system can be used to efficiently express structurally correct IgG and Fab fragments or other antibody formats from the same phage display clone in mammalian cells without clone reformatting.

  12. Uses of Phage Display in Agriculture: A Review of Food-Related Protein-Protein Interactions Discovered by Biopanning over Diverse Baits

    PubMed Central

    Kushwaha, Rekha; Payne, Christina M.; Downie, A. Bruce

    2013-01-01

    This review highlights discoveries made using phage display that impact the use of agricultural products. The contribution phage display made to our fundamental understanding of how various protective molecules serve to safeguard plants and seeds from herbivores and microbes is discussed. The utility of phage display for directed evolution of enzymes with enhanced capacities to degrade the complex polymers of the cell wall into molecules useful for biofuel production is surveyed. Food allergies are often directed against components of seeds; this review emphasizes how phage display has been employed to determine the seed component(s) contributing most to the allergenic reaction and how it has played a central role in novel approaches to mitigate patient response. Finally, an overview of the use of phage display in identifying the mature seed proteome protection and repair mechanisms is provided. The identification of specific classes of proteins preferentially bound by such protection and repair proteins leads to hypotheses concerning the importance of safeguarding the translational apparatus from damage during seed quiescence and environmental perturbations during germination. These examples, it is hoped, will spur the use of phage display in future plant science examining protein-ligand interactions. PMID:23710253

  13. PHASTpep: Analysis Software for Discovery of Cell-Selective Peptides via Phage Display and Next-Generation Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Dasa, Siva Sai Krishna; Kelly, Kimberly A.

    2016-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing has enhanced the phage display process, allowing for the quantification of millions of sequences resulting from the biopanning process. In response, many valuable analysis programs focused on specificity and finding targeted motifs or consensus sequences were developed. For targeted drug delivery and molecular imaging, it is also necessary to find peptides that are selective—targeting only the cell type or tissue of interest. We present a new analysis strategy and accompanying software, PHage Analysis for Selective Targeted PEPtides (PHASTpep), which identifies highly specific and selective peptides. Using this process, we discovered and validated, both in vitro and in vivo in mice, two sequences (HTTIPKV and APPIMSV) targeted to pancreatic cancer-associated fibroblasts that escaped identification using previously existing software. Our selectivity analysis makes it possible to discover peptides that target a specific cell type and avoid other cell types, enhancing clinical translatability by circumventing complications with systemic use. PMID:27186887

  14. A mimotope of pre-S2 region of surface antigen of viral hepatitis B screened by phage display.

    PubMed

    Zhang, W Y; Wan, Y; Li, D G; Tang, Y; Zhou, W

    2001-09-01

    To acquire the phage-displayed mimotopes which mimic the specificity of hepatitis B virus surface antigen (HBsAg), a random peptide library expressing linear peptide with 12 amino acids in length were used to screen with the serum from a hepatitis B virus infected patient in the recovery phase. After 3 rounds of biopanning, the positive phages were confirmed by competitive ELISA using HBsAg/P33. Two phagotopes were identified and one of them was confirmed as mimotope by competition experiment. Based on the mimotpe, a multiple antigenic peptide with four branches was synthesized by solid phase peptide synthesis. The antiginicity and specificity of the synthesized antigen was tested in BALB/c mice compared with the native epitope-based antigen. The results showed that the mimotope-based antigen could evoke higher titer of antibodies with the same specificity of the epitope-based antigen. Those findings indicate mimotopes can be used in antigen and vaccine design.

  15. Identification of peptide sequences that selectively bind to pentaerythritol trinitrate hemisuccinate-a surrogate of PETN, via phage display technology.

    PubMed

    Kubas, George; Rees, William; Caguiat, Jonathan; Asch, David; Fagan, Diana; Cortes, Pedro

    2017-03-01

    The present research investigates the identification of amino acid sequences that selectively bind to a pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) explosive surrogate. Through the use of a phage display technique and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA), a peptide library was tested against pentaerythritol trinitrate hemisuccinate (PETNH), a surrogate of PETN, to screen for those with amino acids having affinity toward the explosive. The results suggest that the library contains peptides selective to PETNH. Following three rounds of panning, clones were picked and tested for specificity toward PETNH. ELISA results from these samples show that each phage clone has some level of selectivity for binding to PETNH. The peptides from these clones have been sequenced and shown to contain certain common amino acid segments among them. This work represents a technological platform for identifying amino-acid sequences selective toward any bio-chem analyte of interest.

  16. Selection of staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB)-binding peptide using phage display technology

    SciTech Connect

    Soykut, Esra Acar; Dudak, Fahriye Ceyda; Boyaci, Ismail Hakki

    2008-05-23

    In this study, peptides were selected to recognize staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB) which cause food intoxication and can be used as a biological war agent. By using commercial M13 phage library, single plaque isolation of 38 phages was done and binding affinities were investigated with phage-ELISA. The specificities of the selected phage clones showing high affinity to SEB were checked by using different protein molecules which can be found in food samples. Furthermore, the affinities of three selected phage clones were determined by using surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensors. Sequence analysis was realized for three peptides showing high binding affinity to SEB and WWRPLTPESPPA, MNLHDYHRLFWY, and QHPQINQTLYRM amino acid sequences were obtained. The peptide sequence with highest affinity to SEB was synthesized with solid phase peptide synthesis technique and thermodynamic constants of the peptide-SEB interaction were determined by using isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) and compared with those of antibody-SEB interaction. The binding constant of the peptide was determined as 4.2 {+-} 0.7 x 10{sup 5} M{sup -1} which indicates a strong binding close to that of antibody.

  17. Prophylactic vaccination with phage-displayed epitope of C. albicans elicits protective immune responses against systemic candidiasis in C57BL/6 mice.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qiong; Wang, Li; Lu, Da-ning; Gao, Rui-juan; Song, Jin-na; Hua, Pan-yu; Yuan, Da-wei

    2005-07-01

    Epitope LKVIRK on 47 kDa of heat shock protein (Hsp) 90 of Candida albicans, corresponding to residues 386-391 of the Hsp90, is recognized by patients recovering from invasive candidiasis. The efficacy of hybrid phage displaying epitope LKVIRK in the N-terminal region of the major coat protein (pVIII) in inducing anti-invasive candidiasis immune response was studied in C57BL/6 mice. Indirect phage-ELISA results demonstrated that the mice immunized with hybrid phage had significantly higher titers of epitope LKVIRK-specific serum IgG as compared to those immunized with heat-killed C. albicans (HK-CA). C57BL/6 mice immunized either with hybrid phage or with wild-type phage also developed significant levels of delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) response and splenocyte proliferation, as well as with HK-CA. In addition, high levels of IFN-gamma in the CD4(+) splenocytes from phage-immunized mice were detected as well during 1 week post-inoculation. Furthermore, mice immunized with hybrid phage acquired a resistance to systemic C. albicans infection as confirmed by fewer C. albicans cells in the kidneys, and had a longer lifespan compared to control groups following intravenous challenge with C. albicans. These results indicate that hybrid phage displaying epitope LKVIRK may serve as a potential vaccine conferring a resistance to systemic candidiasis.

  18. A new non-muscle-invasive bladder tumor-homing peptide identified by phage display in vivo

    PubMed Central

    YANG, XIAOFENG; ZHANG, FAN; LUO, JUNQIAN; PANG, JIANZHI; YAN, SANHUA; LUO, FANG; LIU, JIEHAO; WANG, WEI; CUI, YONGPING; SU, XIXI

    2016-01-01

    Bladder cancer is common and widespread, and its incidence is increasing. Many new diagnostic methods combined with state-of-the-art technology have been introduced in cystoscopy to collect real-time images of the bladder mucosa for diagnosis, but often miss inconspicuous early-stage tumors. Fluorophore-labeled peptides with high sensitivity and specificity for cancer would be a desirable tool for the detection and treatment of tiny or residual bladder tumors. Phage display and the human non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer cell line BIU-87 were used to identify a peptide. The isolated phage display peptide (CSSPIGRHC, named NYZL1) was tested in vitro for its binding specificity and affinity. Accumulation into xenograft tumors in a nude mouse model was analyzed with FITC-labeled NYZL1. NYZL1, with strong tumor-homing ability, was identified by in vivo phage library selection in the bladder cancer model. The NYZL1 phage and synthetic FITC-labeled NYZL1 peptides bound to tumor tissues and cells, but were hardly detected in normal control organs. Notably, accumulation of FITC-NYZL1 in bladder tumor cells was time-dependent. Biodistribution studies of xenografts of BIU-87 cells showed accumulation of injected FITC-NYZL1 in the tumors, and the bound peptide could not be removed by perfusion after 24 h. The mouse model of bladder tumor showed increased fluorescence intensity in the tumor-bearing bladder in comparison with normal bladder tissues after 4–6 h. In conclusion, NYZL1 may represent a lead peptide structure applicable in the development of optical molecular imaging. PMID:27221614

  19. Monoclonal antibody proteomics: use of antibody mimotope displaying phages and the relevant synthetic peptides for mAb scouting.

    PubMed

    Hajdú, István; Flachner, Beáta; Bognár, Melinda; Végh, Barbara M; Dobi, Krisztina; Lőrincz, Zsolt; Lázár, József; Cseh, Sándor; Takács, László; Kurucz, István

    2014-08-01

    Monoclonal antibody proteomics uses nascent libraries or cloned (Plasmascan™, QuantiPlasma™) libraries of mAbs that react with individual epitopes of proteins in the human plasma. At the initial phase of library creation, cognate protein antigen and the epitope interacting with the antibodies are not known. Scouting for monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) with the best binding characteristics is of high importance for mAb based biomarker assay development. However, in the absence of the identity of the cognate antigen the task represents a challenge. We combined phage display, and surface plasmon resonance (Biacore) experiments to test whether specific phages and the respective mimotope peptides obtained from large scale studies are applicable to determine key features of antibodies for scouting. We show here that mAb captured phage-mimotope heterogeneity that is the diversity of the selected peptide sequences, is inversely correlated with an important binding descriptor; the off-rate of the antibodies and that represents clues for driving the selection of useful mAbs for biomarker assay development. Carefully chosen synthetic mimotope peptides are suitable for specificity testing in competitive assays using the target proteome, in our case the human plasma.

  20. High-content Analysis of Antibody Phage-display Library Selection Outputs Identifies Tumor Selective Macropinocytosis-dependent Rapidly Internalizing Antibodies*

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Kevin D.; Bidlingmaier, Scott M.; Zhang, Yafeng; Su, Yang; Liu, Bin

    2014-01-01

    Many forms of antibody-based targeted therapeutics, including antibody drug conjugates, utilize the internalizing function of the targeting antibody to gain intracellular entry into tumor cells. Ideal antibodies for developing such therapeutics should be capable of both tumor-selective binding and efficient endocytosis. The macropinocytosis pathway is capable of both rapid and bulk endocytosis, and recent studies have demonstrated that it is selectively up-regulated by cancer cells. We hypothesize that receptor-dependent macropinocytosis can be achieved using tumor-targeting antibodies that internalize via the macropinocytosis pathway, improving potency and selectivity of the antibody-based targeted therapeutic. Although phage antibody display libraries have been utilized to find antibodies that bind and internalize to target cells, no methods have been described to screen for antibodies that internalize specifically via macropinocytosis. We hereby describe a novel screening strategy to identify phage antibodies that bind and rapidly enter tumor cells via macropinocytosis. We utilized an automated microscopic imaging-based, High Content Analysis platform to identify novel internalizing phage antibodies that colocalize with macropinocytic markers from antibody libraries that we have generated previously by laser capture microdissection-based selection, which are enriched for internalizing antibodies binding to tumor cells in situ residing in their tissue microenvironment (Ruan, W., Sassoon, A., An, F., Simko, J. P., and Liu, B. (2006) Identification of clinically significant tumor antigens by selecting phage antibody library on tumor cells in situ using laser capture microdissection. Mol. Cell. Proteomics. 5, 2364–2373). Full-length human IgG molecules derived from macropinocytosing phage antibodies retained the ability to internalize via macropinocytosis, validating our screening strategy. The target antigen for a cross-species binding antibody with a highly

  1. Identification of high-affinity VEGFR3-binding peptides through a phage-displayed random peptide library

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yan; Li, Cai-Yun

    2015-01-01

    Objective Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) interaction with its receptor, VEGFR-3/Flt-4, regulates lymphangiogenesis. VEGFR-3/Flt-4 expression in cancer cells has been correlated with clinical stage, lymph node metastasis, and lymphatic invasion. The objective of this study is to identify a VEGFR-3/Flt-4-interacting peptide that could be used to inhibit VEGFR-3 for ovarian cancer therapy. Methods The extracellular fragment of recombinant human VEGFR-3/Flt-4 (rhVEGFR-3/Flt-4) fused with coat protein pIII was screened against a phage-displayed random peptide library. Using affinity enrichment and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) screening, positive clones of phages were amplified. Three phage clones were selected after four rounds of biopanning, and the specific binding of the peptides to rhVEGFR-3 was detected by ELISA and compared with that of VEGF-D. Immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence analyses of ovarian cancer tissue sections was undertaken to demonstrate the specificity of the peptides. Results After four rounds of biopanning, ELISA confirmed the specificity of the enriched bound phage clones for rhVEGFR-3. Sequencing and translation identified three different peptides. Non-competitive ELISA revealed that peptides I, II, and III had binding affinities for VEGFR-3 with Kaff (affinity constant) of 16.4±8.6 µg/mL (n=3), 9.2±2.1 µg/mL (n=3), and 174.8±31.1 µg/mL (n=3), respectively. In ovarian carcinoma tissue sections, peptide III (WHWLPNLRHYAS), which had the greatest binding affinity, also co-localized with VEGFR-3 in endothelial cells lining lymphatic vessels; its labeling of ovarian tumors in vivo was also confirmed. Conclusion These finding showed that peptide III has high specificity and activity and, therefore, may represent a potential therapeutic approach to target VEGF-VEGFR-3 signaling for the treatment or diagnosis of ovarian cancer. PMID:26197772

  2. Development of single chain variable fragment (scFv) antibodies against Xylella fastidiosa subsp. pauca by phage display.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Qing; Jordan, Ramon; Brlansky, Ronald H; Istomina, Olga; Hartung, John

    2015-10-01

    Xylella fastidiosa is a member of the gamma proteobacteria. It is fastidious, insect-vectored and xylem-limited and causes a variety of diseases, some severe, on a wide range of economically important perennial crops, including grape and citrus. Antibody based detection assays are commercially available for X. fastidiosa, and are effective at the species, but not at the subspecies level. We have made a library of scFv antibody fragments directed against X. fastidiosa subsp. pauca strain 9a5c (citrus) by using phage display technology. Antibody gene repertoires were PCR-amplified using 23 primers for the heavy chain variable region (V(H)) and 21 primers for the light chain variable region (V(L)). The V(H) and V(L) were joined by overlap extension PCR, and then the genes of the scFv library were ligated into the phage vector pKM19. The library contained 1.2×10(7) independent clones with full-length scFv inserts. In each of 3cycles of affinity-selection with 9a5c, about 1.0×10(12) phage were used for panning with 4.1×10(6), 7.1×10(6), 2.1×10(7) phage recovered after the first, second and third cycles, respectively. Sixty-six percent of clones from the final library bound X. fastidiosa 9a5c in an ELISA. Some of these scFv antibodies recognized strain 9a5c and did not recognize X. fastidiosa strains that cause Pierce's disease of grapevine.

  3. Isolation of a peptide from Ph.D.-C7C phage display library for detection of Cry1Ab.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yun; Wang, Qian; Wu, Ai-Hua; Hao, Zhen-Ping; Liu, Xian-Jin

    2017-03-06

    Traditional ELISA methods of using animal immunity yield antibodies for detection Cry toxin. Not only is this incredibly harmful to the animals, but is also time-intensive. Here we developed a simple method to yield the recognition element. Using a critical selection strategy and immunoassay we confirmed a clone from the Ph.D-C7C phage library, which has displayed the most interesting Cry1Ab-binding characteristics examined in this study (Fig. 1). The current study indicates that isolating peptide is an alternative method for the preparation of a recognition element, and that the developed assay is a potentially useful tool for detecting Cry1Ab.

  4. Development of a Novel Human Single Chain Antibody Against EGFRVIII Antigen by Phage Display Technology

    PubMed Central

    Rahbarnia, Leila; Farajnia, Safar; Babaei, Hossein; Majidi, Jafar; Akbari, Bahman; Ahdi khosroshahi, Shiva

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: EGFRvIII as the most common mutant variant of the epidermal growth factor receptor is resulting from deletion of exons 2–7 in the coding sequence and junction of exons 1 and 8 through a novel glycine residue. EGFRvIII is highly expressed in glioblastoma, carcinoma of the breast, ovary, and lung but not in normal cells. The aim of the present study was identification of a novel single chain antibody against EGFRvIII as a promising target for cancer therapy. Methods: In this study, a synthetic peptide corresponding to EGFRvIII protein was used for screening a naive human scFv phage library. A novel five-round selection strategy was used for enrichment of rare specific clones. Results: After five rounds of screening, six positive scFv clones against EGFRvIII were selected using monoclonal phage ELISA, among them, only three clones had expected size in PCR reaction. The specific interaction of two of the scFv clones with EGFRvIII was confirmed by indirect ELISA. One phage clone with higher affinity in scFv ELISA was purified for further analysis. The purity of the produced scFv antibody was confirmed using SDS-PAGE and Western blotting analyses. Conclusion: In the present study, a human anti- EGFRvIII scFv with high affinity was first identified from a scFv phage library. This study can be the groundwork for developing more effective diagnostic and therapeutic agents against EGFRvIII expressing cancers. PMID:28101463

  5. Isolation of a highly specific ligand for the alpha 5 beta 1 integrin from a phage display library

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    Our previous studies showed that the alpha 5 beta 1 integrin selects cysteine pair-containing RGD peptides from a phage display library based on a random hexapeptide. We have therefore searched for more selective peptides for this integrin using a larger phage display library, where heptapeptides are flanked by cysteine residues, thus making the inserts potentially cyclic. Most of the phage sequences that bound to alpha 5 beta 1 (69 of 125) contained the RGD motif. Some of the heptapeptides contained an NGR motif. As the NGR sequence occurs in the cell-binding region of the fibronectin molecule, this sequence could contribute to the specific recognition of fibronectin by alpha 5 beta 1. Selection for high affinity peptides for alpha 5 beta 1 surprisingly yielded a sequence RRETAWA that does not bear obvious resemblance to known integrin ligand sequences. The synthetic cyclic peptide GACRRETAWACGA (*CRRETAWAC*) was a potent inhibitor of alpha 5 beta 1-mediated cell attachment to fibronectin. This peptide is nearly specific for the alpha 5 beta 1 integrin, because much higher concentrations were needed to inhibit the alpha v beta 1 integrin, and there was no effect on alpha v beta 3- and alpha v beta 5-mediated cell attachment to vitronectin. The peptide also did not bind to the alpha IIb beta 3 integrin. *CRRETAWAC* appears to interact with the same or an overlapping binding site in alpha 5 beta 1 as RGD, because cell attachment to *CRRETAWAC* coated on plastic was divalent cation dependent and could be blocked by an RGD-containing peptide. These results reveal a novel binding specificity in the alpha 5 beta 1 integrin. PMID:7507494

  6. Next-generation sequencing enables the discovery of more diverse positive clones from a phage-displayed antibody library

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Wonjun; Yoon, Aerin; Lee, Sanghoon; Kim, Soohyun; Han, Jungwon; Chung, Junho

    2017-01-01

    Phage display technology provides a powerful tool to screen a library for a binding molecule via an enrichment process. It has been adopted as a critical technology in the development of therapeutic antibodies. However, a major drawback of phage display technology is that because the degree of the enrichment cannot be controlled during the bio-panning process, it frequently results in a limited number of clones. In this study, we applied next-generation sequencing (NGS) to screen clones from a library and determine whether a greater number of clones can be identified using NGS than using conventional methods. Three chicken immune single-chain variable fragment (scFv) libraries were subjected to bio-panning on prostate-specific antigen (PSA). Phagemid DNA prepared from the original libraries as well as from the Escherichia coli pool after each round of bio-panning was analyzed using NGS, and the heavy chain complementarity-determining region 3 (HCDR3) sequences of the scFv clones were determined. Subsequently, through two-step linker PCR and cloning, the entire scFv gene was retrieved and analyzed for its reactivity to PSA in a phage enzyme immunoassay. After four rounds of bio-panning, the conventional colony screening method was performed for comparison. The scFv clones retrieved from NGS analysis included all clones identified by the conventional colony screening method as well as many additional clones. The enrichment of the HCDR3 sequence throughout the bio-panning process was a positive predictive factor for the selection of PSA-reactive scFv clones. PMID:28336957

  7. Development of a hyperimmune anti-MUC-1 single chain antibody fragments phage display library for targeting breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Winthrop, M D; DeNardo, S J; DeNardo, G L

    1999-10-01

    Radioimmunotherapy (RIT) has demonstrated potential for improving clinical cancer therapy. Optimizing the approach has proven difficult thus far. Antibody phage display libraries provide unique molecules that could improve RIT. A phage display library of single chain antibody fragments (scFv) against the MUC-1 mucin molecule, which is expressed on 90% of human breast cancers, was produced from the spleen cells of MUC-1 hyperimmunized BALB/c mice. Increased serum IgG levels, 15 times baseline, were detected following the third immunization. RNA from the spleen cells was isolated, cDNA was made, and variable heavy and variable light immunoglobulin chain gene regions were amplified using PCR technology. The variable heavy and variable light chain gene regions were combined with a flexible linker, ligated into the pCANTAB 5E phagemid vector, and electroporated into TG1 Escherichia coli cells. A library of 10(7) initial colonies was compiled. Forty-six of 288 colonies screened for reactivity demonstrated binding to MUC-1-expressing MCF-7 breast cancer cell membrane fragments. Anti-MUC-1 library diversity evaluated by BstNI digest demonstrated that 52% of the anti-MUC-1 scFv binding MCF-7 possessed individual banding patterns representative of approximately 5 x 10(5) colonies likely able to recognize distinct epitopes present on MUC-1 positive human breast cancers. In summary, the anti-MUC-1 scFv antibody phage library contains diverse scFv molecules, which should provide unique characteristics and epitope recognition. These molecules will be used in the development of pretargeting RIT strategies designed to improve the clinical outcome of patients with breast cancer.

  8. Generation of Potent Anti-Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Neutralizing Antibodies from Mouse Phage Display Library for Cancer Therapy.

    PubMed

    Lai, Yan-Da; Wu, Yen-Yu; Tsai, Yi-Jiue; Tsai, Yi-San; Lin, Yu-Ying; Lai, Szu-Liang; Huang, Chao-Yang; Lok, Ying-Yung; Hu, Chih-Yung; Lai, Jiann-Shiun

    2016-02-05

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is an important stimulator for angiogenesis in solid tumors. Blocking VEGF activity is an effective therapeutic strategy to inhibit tumor growth and metastasis. Avastin, a humanized monoclonal antibody recognizes VEGF, has been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration. To generate potential VEGF-recognizing antibodies with better tumor regression ability than that of Avastin, we have designed a systematic antibody selection plan. From mice immunized with recombinant human VEGF, we generated three phage display libraries, scFv-M13KO7, Fab-M13KO7, and scFv-Hyperphage, in single-chain Fv (scFv) or Fab format, displayed using either M13KO7 helper phage or Hyperphage. Solid-phase and solution-phase selection strategies were then applied to each library, generating six panning combinations. A total of sixty-four antibodies recognizing VEGF were obtained. Based on the results of epitope mapping, binding affinity, and biological functions in tumor inhibition, eight antibodies were chosen to examine their abilities in tumor regression in a mouse xenograft model using human COLO 205 cancer cells. Three of them showed improvement in the inhibition of tumor growth (328%-347% tumor growth ratio (% of Day 0 tumor volume) on Day 21 vs. 435% with Avastin). This finding suggests a potential use of these three antibodies for VEGF-targeted therapy.

  9. Production of recombinant scFv against p24 of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 by phage display technology.

    PubMed

    Mohammadzadeh, Sara; Rajabibazl, Masoumeh; Fourozandeh, Mehdi; Rasaee, Mohammad Javad; Rahbarizadeh, Fatemeh; Mohammadi, Mohammad

    2014-02-01

    Phage display has a fundamental role in protein isolation and engineering. Isolated proteins produced with this method can be modified for specific binding and affinity. P24 is the most produced protein during human immune deficiency virus (HIV) replication; especially in the early steps of HIV-1 infection, its evaluation may have diagnostic values. To test the HIV-1 infection, p24 antigen assay appears to be a very promising alternative to RNA assays. In this study, we have generated a recombinant mouse single chain antibody fragment against p24 of the HIV-1 with the use of phage display technology. After isolation of antibody variable-region (V) gene of B cells extracted from the spleen of an immunized mouse, a library of single chain Fv fragments (scFv) was constructed. The library was used in a series of bio-panning processes against recombinant p24 protein expressed from Escherichia coli. The isolated scFv antibody specifically recognizes the HIV-1 capsid protein p24. The affinity constant of the isolated scFv antibody (MF85) was found to be 2×10(-9) M. Our studies showed that the MF85 scFV antibody has similar properties as that of monoclonal antibodies produced by the hybridoma technology.

  10. Phage display screening of epithelial cell monolayers treated with EGTA: identification of peptide FDFWITP that modulates tight junction activity.

    PubMed

    Herman, Richard E; Makienko, Ekaterina G; Prieve, Mary G; Fuller, Mark; Houston, Michael E; Johnson, Paul H

    2007-12-01

    Phage display was used to screen for peptides that modulate the activity of epithelial cell tight junctions. Panning with a phage library that displays random 7-mers was performed using monolayers of human bronchial epithelial cells (16HBE14o(-)) treated with a calcium chelator, ethylene glycol-bis(2-aminoethylether)- N, N, N', N'-tetraacetic acid (EGTA), to increase accessibility to the junctional complex/paracellular space, followed by subtractive panning. A novel peptide, FDFWITP, identified as a potential tight junction modulator, was synthesized in linear and cyclic forms with lysine residues added to improve solubility. The cyclic form of the peptide reduced transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) in a concentration-dependent manner (80% reduction at 100 microM and 95% reduction at 500 microM) and was reversible within 2 h; the linear form only affected TER at the highest concentration. Interestingly, the constrained peptide did not increase permeation of the model small molecule, fluorescein. The highly selective activity of FDFWITP supports the hypothesis that ions and small molecules may be transported paracellularly across tight junctions by separate pathways.

  11. "Blind" targeting in action: From phage display to breast cancer cell targeting with peptide-gold nanoconjugates.

    PubMed

    Galbiati, Elisabetta; Gambini, Luca; Civitarese, Viola; Bellini, Michela; Ambrosini, Dario; Allevi, Raffaele; Avvakumova, Svetlana; Romeo, Sergio; Prosperi, Davide

    2016-09-01

    Tumor homing peptides (THPs) specific for a representative breast cancer cell line (MCF-7) were carefully selected basing on a phage-displayed peptide library freely available on the web, namely the "TumorHoPe: A Database of Tumor Homing Peptides". The selected THPs were synthesized and evaluated in terms of their affinity toward MCF-7 cells. Out of 5 tested THPs, 3 best-performing peptide sequences and 1 scrambled sequence were separately conjugated to spherical gold nanoparticles yielding stable nanoconjugates. THP nanoconjugates were examined for their ability to actively target MCF-7 cells in comparison to noncancerous 3T3-L1 fibroblast cells. These THP-gold nanoconjugates exhibited good selectivity and binding affinity by flow cytometry, and low cytotoxicity as assayed by cell death experiments. The uptake of targeted nanoconjugates by the breast cancer cells was confirmed by transmission electron microscopy analysis. This work demonstrates that it is possible to exploit the conjugation of short peptides selected from phage-displayed libraries to develop nanomaterials reliably endowed with tumor targeting potential irrespective of a specific knowledge of the target cell biology.

  12. Human antibody fragments specific for the epidermal growth factor receptor selected from large non-immunised phage display libraries.

    PubMed

    Souriau, Christelle; Rothacker, Julie; Hoogenboom, Hennie R; Nice, Edouard

    2004-09-01

    Antibodies to EGFR have been shown to display anti-tumour effects mediated in part by inhibition of cellular proliferation and angiogenesis, and by enhancement of apoptosis. Humanised antibodies are preferred for clinical use to reduce complications with HAMA and HAHA responses frequently seen with murine and chimaeric antibodies. We have used depletion and subtractive selection strategies on cells expressing the EGFR to sample two large antibody fragment phage display libraries for the presence of human antibodies which are specific for the EGFR. Four Fab fragments and six scFv fragments were identified, with affinities of up to 2.2nM as determined by BIAcore analysis using global fitting of the binding curves to obtain the individual rate constants (ka and kd). This overall approach offers a generic screening method for the identification of growth factor specific antibodies and antibody fragments from large expression libraries and has potential for the rapid development of new therapeutic and diagnostic reagents.

  13. CHO expression of a novel human recombinant IgG1 anti-RhD antibody isolated by phage display.

    PubMed

    Miescher, S; Zahn-Zabal, M; De Jesus, M; Moudry, R; Fisch, I; Vogel, M; Kobr, M; Imboden, M A; Kragten, E; Bichler, J; Mermod, N; Stadler, B M; Amstutz, H; Wurm, F

    2000-10-01

    Replacement of the hyperimmune anti-Rhesus (Rh) D immunoglobulin, currently used to prevent haemolytic disease of the newborn, by fully recombinant human anti-RhD antibodies would solve the current logistic problems associated with supply and demand. The combination of phage display repertoire cloning with precise selection procedures enables isolation of specific genes that can then be inserted into mammalian expression systems allowing production of large quantities of recombinant human proteins. With the aim of selecting high-affinity anti-RhD antibodies, two human Fab libraries were constructed from a hyperimmune donor. Use of a new phage panning procedure involving bromelin-treated red blood cells enabled the isolation of two high-affinity Fab-expressing phage clones. LD-6-3 and LD-6-33, specific for RhD. These showed a novel reaction pattern by recognizing the D variants D(III), D(IVa), D(IVb), D(Va), D(VI) types I and II. D(VII), Rh33 and DFR. Full-length immunoglobulin molecules were constructed by cloning the variable regions into expression vectors containing genomic DNA encoding the immunoglobulin constant regions. We describe the first, stable, suspension growth-adapted Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell line producing a high affinity recombinant human IgG1 anti-RhD antibody adapted to pilot-scale production. Evaluation of the Fc region of this recombinant antibody by either chemiluminescence or antibody-dependent cell cytotoxicity (ADCC) assays demonstrated macrophage activation and lysis of red blood cells by human lymphocytes. A consistent source of recombinant human anti-RhD immunoglobulin produced by CHO cells is expected to meet the stringent safety and regulatory requirements for prophylactic application.

  14. Targeting cytokines: production and characterization of anti-TNF-α scFvs by phage display technology.

    PubMed

    Abdolalizadeh, Jalal; Nouri, Mohammad; Zolbanin, Jafar Majidi; Barzegari, Abolfazl; Baradaran, Behzad; Barar, Jaleh; Coukos, George; Omidi, Yadollah

    2013-01-01

    The antibody display technology (ADT) such as phage display (PD) has substantially improved the production of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) and Ab fragments through bypassing several limitations associated with the traditional approach of hybridoma technology. In the current study, we capitalized on the PD technology to produce high affinity single chain variable fragment (scFv) against tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF- α), which is a potent pro-inflammatory cytokine and plays important role in various inflammatory diseases and malignancies. To pursue production of scFv antibody fragments against human TNF- α, we performed five rounds of biopanning using stepwise decreased amount of TNF-α (1 to 0.1 μ g), a semi-synthetic phage antibody library (Tomlinson I + J) and TG1 cells. Antibody clones were isolated and selected through enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) screening. The selected scFv antibody fragments were further characterized by means of ELISA, PCR, restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) and Western blot analyses as well as fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry. Based upon binding affinity to TNF-α , 15 clones were selected out of 50 positive clones enriched from PD in vitro selection. The selected scFvs displayed high specificity and binding affinity with Kd values at nm range to human TNF-α . The immunofluorescence analysis revealed significant binding of the selected scFv antibody fragments to the Raji B lymphoblasts. The effectiveness of the selected scFv fragments was further validated by flow cytometry analysis in the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) treated mouse fibroblast L929 cells. Based upon these findings, we propose the selected fully human anti-TNF-α scFv antibody fragments as potential immunotherapy agents that may be translated into preclinical/clinical applications.

  15. Identification of a novel peptide ligand targeting visceral adipose tissue via transdermal route by in vivo phage display.

    PubMed

    Lee, Nam Kyung; Kim, Hong Shin; Kim, Kyung Hyun; Kim, Eun-Bae; Cho, Chong Su; Kang, Sang Kee; Choi, Yun Jaie

    2011-11-01

    To find novel peptide ligands targeting visceral adipose tissue (visceral fat) via transdermal route, in vivo phage display screening was conducted by dermal administration of a phage-peptide library to rats and a peptide sequence, CGLHPAFQC (designated as TDA1), was identified as a targeting ligand to visceral adipose tissue through the consecutive transdermal biopannings. Adipocyte-specific affinity and transdermal activity of the TDA1 were validated in vitro and targeting ability of the dermally administered TDA1 to visceral adipose tissue was also confirmed in vivo. TDA1 was effectively translocated into systemic circulation after dermal administration and selectively targeted visceral adipose tissue without any preference to other organs tested. Fluorescent microscopic analysis revealed that the TDA1 could be specifically localized in the hair follicles of the skin, as well as in the visceral adipose tissue. Thus, we inferred that dermally administered TDA1 would first access systemic circulation via hair follicles as its transdermal route and then could target visceral fat effectively. The overall results suggest that the TDA1 peptide could be potentially applied as a homing moiety for delivery of anti-obesity therapeutics to visceral fat through the convenient transdermal pathway.

  16. Targeting essential Eimeria ninakohlyakimovae sporozoite ligands for caprine host endothelial cell invasion with a phage display peptide library.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, A; Pérez, D; Muñoz, M C; Molina, J M; Taubert, A; Jacobs-Lorena, M; Vega-Rodríguez, J; López, A M; Hermosilla, C

    2015-11-01

    Eimeria ninakohlyakimovae is an important coccidian parasite of goats which causes severe diarrhoea in young animals. Specific molecules that mediate E. ninakohlyakimovae host interactions and molecular mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis are still unknown. Although strong circumstantial evidence indicates that E. ninakohlyakimovae sporozoite interactions with caprine endothelial host cells (ECs) are specific, hardly any information is available about the interacting molecules that confer host cell specificity. In this study, we describe a novel method to identify surface proteins of caprine umbilical vein endothelial cells (CUVEC) using a phage display library. After several panning rounds, we identified a number of peptides that specifically bind to the surface of CUVEC. Importantly, caprine endothelial cell peptide 2 (PCEC2) and PCEC5 selectively reduced the infection rate by E. ninakohlyakimovae sporozoites. These preliminary data give new insight for the molecular identification of ligands involved in the interaction between E. ninakohlyakimovae sporozoites and host ECs. Further studies using this phage approach might be useful to identify new potential target molecules for the development of anti-coccidial drugs or even new vaccine strategies.

  17. Generation and Validation of a Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 Clone Set for Protein Expression and Phage Display

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaohu; Petrosino, Joseph; Hemphill, Lisa; Wan, Xiufeng; Leaphart, Adam B.; Weinstock, George M.; Palzkill, Timothy; Zhou, Jizhong

    2008-01-01

    A comprehensive gene collection for S. oneidensis was constructed using the lambda recombinase (Gateway) cloning system. A total of 3584 individual ORFs (85%) have been successfully cloned into the entry plasmids. To validate the use of the clone set, three sets of ORFs were examined within three different destination vectors constructed in this study. Success rates for heterologous protein expression of S. oneidensis His- or His/GST- tagged proteins in E. coli were approximately 70%. The ArcA and NarP transcription factor proteins were tested in an in vitro binding assay to demonstrate that functional proteins can be successfully produced using the clone set. Further functional validation of the clone set was obtained from phage display experiments in which a phage encoding thioredoxin was successfully isolated from a pool of 80 different clones after three rounds of biopanning using immobilized anti-thioredoxin antibody as a target. This clone set complements existing genomic (e.g., whole-genome microarray) and other proteomic tools (e.g., mass spectrometry-based proteomic analysis), and facilitates a wide variety of integrated studies, including protein expression, purification, and functional analyses of proteins both in vivo and in vitro. PMID:18714347

  18. Small regulatory RNAs in lambdoid bacteriophages and phage-derived plasmids: Not only antisense.

    PubMed

    Nejman-Faleńczyk, Bożena; Bloch, Sylwia; Licznerska, Katarzyna; Felczykowska, Agnieszka; Dydecka, Aleksandra; Węgrzyn, Alicja; Węgrzyn, Grzegorz

    2015-03-01

    Until recently, only two small regulatory RNAs encoded by lambdoid bacteriophages were known. These transcripts are derived from paQ and pO promoters. The former one is supposed to act as an antisense RNA for expression of the Q gene, encoding a transcription antitermination protein. The latter transcript, called oop RNA, was initially proposed to have a double role, in establishing expression of the cI gene and in providing a primer for DNA replication. Although the initially proposed mechanisms by which oop RNA could influence the choice between two alternative developmental pathways of the phage and the initiation of phage DNA replication were found not true, the pO promoter has been demonstrated to be important for both regulation of phage development and control of DNA replication. Namely, the pO-derived transcript is an antisense RNA for expression of the cII gene, and pO is a part of a dual promoter system responsible for regulation of initiation of DNA synthesis from the oriλ region. Very recent studies identified a battery of small RNAs encoded by lambdoid bacteriophages existing as prophages in chromosomes of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli strains. Some of them have very interesting functions, like anti-small RNAs.

  19. Real-Time Assessment of Staphylococcus aureus Biofilm Disruption by Phage-Derived Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Gutiérrez, Diana; Fernández, Lucía; Martínez, Beatriz; Ruas-Madiedo, Patricia; García, Pilar; Rodríguez, Ana

    2017-01-01

    A current focus of research is the development of new tools for removing bacterial biofilms in industrial settings. Bacteriophage-encoded proteins, such as endolysins, virion-associated peptidoglycan hydrolases, and exopolysaccharide depolymerases, have been shown to be efficient against these structures. However, the current screening techniques for the identification of antibiofilm properties of phage-derived proteins have important shortcomings. The aim of this work was to use the rapid, reproducible and accurate technology “real-time cell analyzer” for screening and comparing the antibiofilm ability of four phage-derived compounds, three lytic proteins (LysH5, CHAP-SH3b, and HydH5-SH3b) and one exopolysaccharide depolymerase (Dpo7) against Staphylococcus aureus biofilms, which have been associated with recurrent contamination of food products. The data generated after biofilm treatment allowed for the calculation of different antibiofilm parameters: (1) the minimum biofilm eradicating concentration that removes 50% of the biofilm (ranging from 3.5 ± 1.1 to 6.6 ± 0.5 μM), (2) the lowest concentration needed to observe an antibiofilm effect (∼1.5 μM for all the proteins), and (3) the specific antibiofilm activity and the percentage of biofilm removal that revealed LysH5 as the best antibiofilm compound. Overall, this technology might be used to quickly assess and compare by standardized parameters the disaggregating activity of phage antibiofilm proteins. PMID:28883818

  20. Real-Time Assessment of Staphylococcus aureus Biofilm Disruption by Phage-Derived Proteins.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez, Diana; Fernández, Lucía; Martínez, Beatriz; Ruas-Madiedo, Patricia; García, Pilar; Rodríguez, Ana

    2017-01-01

    A current focus of research is the development of new tools for removing bacterial biofilms in industrial settings. Bacteriophage-encoded proteins, such as endolysins, virion-associated peptidoglycan hydrolases, and exopolysaccharide depolymerases, have been shown to be efficient against these structures. However, the current screening techniques for the identification of antibiofilm properties of phage-derived proteins have important shortcomings. The aim of this work was to use the rapid, reproducible and accurate technology "real-time cell analyzer" for screening and comparing the antibiofilm ability of four phage-derived compounds, three lytic proteins (LysH5, CHAP-SH3b, and HydH5-SH3b) and one exopolysaccharide depolymerase (Dpo7) against Staphylococcus aureus biofilms, which have been associated with recurrent contamination of food products. The data generated after biofilm treatment allowed for the calculation of different antibiofilm parameters: (1) the minimum biofilm eradicating concentration that removes 50% of the biofilm (ranging from 3.5 ± 1.1 to 6.6 ± 0.5 μM), (2) the lowest concentration needed to observe an antibiofilm effect (∼1.5 μM for all the proteins), and (3) the specific antibiofilm activity and the percentage of biofilm removal that revealed LysH5 as the best antibiofilm compound. Overall, this technology might be used to quickly assess and compare by standardized parameters the disaggregating activity of phage antibiofilm proteins.

  1. Identification of a GTP-bound Rho specific scFv molecular sensor by phage display selection

    PubMed Central

    Goffinet, Marine; Chinestra, Patrick; Lajoie-Mazenc, Isabelle; Medale-Giamarchi, Claire; Favre, Gilles; Faye, Jean-Charles

    2008-01-01

    Background The Rho GTPases A, B and C proteins, members of the Rho family whose activity is regulated by GDP/GTP cycling, function in many cellular pathways controlling proliferation and have recently been implicated in tumorigenesis. Although overexpression of Rho GTPases has been correlated with tumorigenesis, only their GTP-bound forms are able to activate the signalling pathways implicated in tumorigenesis. Thus, the focus of much recent research has been to identify biological tools capable of quantifying the level of cellular GTP-bound Rho, or determining the subcellular location of activation. However useful, these tools used to study the mechanism of Rho activation still have limitations. The aim of the present work was to employ phage display to identify a conformationally-specific single chain fragment variable (scFv) that recognizes the active, GTP-bound, form of Rho GTPases and is able to discriminate it from the inactive, GDP-bound, Rho in endogenous settings. Results After five rounds of phage selection using a constitutively activated mutant of RhoB (RhoBQ63L), three scFvs (A8, C1 and D11) were selected for subsequent analysis. Further biochemical characterization was pursued for the single clone, C1, exhibiting an scFv structure. C1 was selective for the GTP-bound form of RhoA, RhoB, as well as RhoC, and failed to recognize GTP-loaded Rac1 or Cdc42, two other members of the Rho family. To enhance its production, soluble C1 was expressed in fusion with the N-terminal domain of phage protein pIII (scFv C1-N1N2), it appeared specifically associated with GTP-loaded recombinant RhoA and RhoB via immunoprecipitation, and endogenous activated Rho in HeLa cells as determined by immunofluorescence. Conclusion We identified an antibody, C1-N1N2, specific for the GTP-bound form of RhoB from a phage library, and confirmed its specificity towards GTP-bound RhoA and RhoC, as well as RhoB. The success of C1-N1N2 in discriminating activated Rho in

  2. Production and characterization of recombinant scFv against digoxin by phage display technology.

    PubMed

    Alirezapour, Behruz; Rajabibazl, Masoumeh; Rasaee, Mohhamad Javad; Omidfar, Kobra

    2013-06-01

    The cardiac glycoside digoxin is widely used for the treatment of congestive heart failure and cardiac arrhythmias. Digoxin is a highly toxic drug and consequently is routinely measured in sera of treated patients. In such cases, antibodies are required against digoxin for detection as well as detoxification purposes. To obtain recombinant single chain antibody against digoxin, RNA was extracted from spleen of BALB/c mice immunized with digoxin-BSA and converted to cDNA. The gene fragment corresponding to the variable regions of the repertoire of antibody genes were amplified by PCR. ScFv construct was generated by randomly joining individual heavy- and light-chain variable domains through gene splicing by overlapping extension PCR. Recombinant phage library expressing scFv polypeptides were produced. Phages with higher affinity toward digoxin were selected in the biopanning process. Sensitivity of produced recombinant MAb (AR85) was determined to be about 100 pg/well, while intact MAb (BBA) produced by hybridoma technology (data not shown) was reported to be around 100 pg/well too. The saturation value for recombinant scFv MAb was found to be 1000 ng/well while that for hybridoma MAb was reported to be 10 ng/well. The affinity constant of recombinant MAb (AR85) towards digoxin was also found to be around ka=3.8×10(7) M(-1) while that for hybridoma MAb (BBA) was reported to be ka=2.6×10(8) M(-1).

  3. Isolation of scFv fragments specific for monokine induced by interferon-gamma (MIG) using phage display.

    PubMed

    Eteshola, Edward

    2010-06-30

    Iterative affinity selection procedures were used to isolate a number of single chain Fv (scFv) antibody fragment clones from naïve Tomlinson I+J phage display libraries that specifically recognize and bind a chemokine, monokine induced by interferon-gamma (MIG/CXCL9). MIG is an important transplant rejection/biology chemokine protein. ELISA-based affinity characterization results indicate that selectants preferentially bind to MIG in the presence of key biopanning component materials and closely related chemokine proteins. These novel antibody fragments may find utility as molecular affinity interface receptors in various electrochemical biosensor platforms to provide specific MIG binding capability with potential applications in transplant rejection monitoring, and other biomedical applications where detection of MIG level is important. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Construction of Recombinant Single Chain Variable Fragment (ScFv) Antibody Against Superantigen for Immunodetection Using Antibody Phage Display Technology.

    PubMed

    Singh, Pawan Kumar; Agrawal, Ranu; Kamboj, D V; Singh, Lokendra

    2016-01-01

    Superantigens are a class of antigens that bind to the major histocompatibility complex class (MHC) II and T-cell receptor (TCR) and cause the nonspecific activation of T cells, resulting in a massive release of pro-inflammatory mediators. They are produced by the gram-positive organisms Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pyogenes, and by a variety of other microbes such as viruses and mycoplasma, and cause toxic shock syndrome (TSS) and even death in some cases. The immunodetection of superantigens is difficult due to the polyclonal activation of T-cells leading to nonspecific antibody production. The production of recombinant monoclonal antibodies against superantigens can solve this problem and are far better than polyclonal antibodies in terms of detection. Here, we describe the construction of recombinant single chain variable fragments (ScFv) antibodies against superantigens with specific reference to SEB (staphylococcal enterotoxin B) using antibody phage display technology.

  5. Phage display cDNA cloning and expression analysis of hydrophobins from the entomopathogenic fungus Beauveria (Cordyceps) bassiana.

    PubMed

    Cho, Eun-Min; Kirkland, Brett H; Holder, Diane J; Keyhani, Nemat O

    2007-10-01

    Hydrophobins are small amphipathic proteins that function in a broad range of growth and developmental processes in fungi. They are involved in the formation of aerial structures, the attachment of fungal cells to surfaces, and act in signalling in response to surface cues and pathogenesis. Beauveria bassiana is an important entomopathogenic fungus used as an arthropod biological control agent. To examine the feasibility of using phage display technology to clone cDNAs encoding hydrophobins, biopanning experiments were performed using a variety of affinity resins, including N,N'-diacetylchitobiose-, fucose-, lactose-, maltose- and melibiose-coupled agarose beads. After five rounds of iterative biopanning, cDNAs corresponding to two B. bassiana (class I) hydrophobins were selectively enriched using melibiose- or lactose-coupled agarose beads. Expression analysis revealed that the hyd1 gene was expressed in all samples tested, including aerial conidia, in vitro blastospores, submerged conidia, and cells sporulating on chitin and insect cuticle, with hyd1 expression peaking in growing mycelia. In contrast, the hyd2 gene was not appreciably expressed in any of the single-cell types (aerial conidia, blastospores and submerged conidia), but was constitutively expressed in growing mycelia and when cells were sporulating on chitin and insect cuticle. MS fingerprinting of an approximately 10 kDa protein found in boiling SDS-insoluble, trifluoroacetic acid-soluble extracts from aerial conidia identified the major component of the B. bassiana rodlet layer to be the hyd2 gene product. These results reveal the differential regulation of the isolated hydrophobins and indicate that phage display represents a novel approach to cDNA cloning of hydrophobins.

  6. Use of Phage Display To Identify Potential Pseudomonas aeruginosa Gene Products Relevant to Early Cystic Fibrosis Airway Infections

    PubMed Central

    Beckmann, Christiane; Brittnacher, Mitchell; Ernst, Robert; Mayer-Hamblett, Nicole; Miller, Samuel I.; Burns, Jane L.

    2005-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa airway infections are a major cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with cystic fibrosis. Treatment of established infections is difficult, even with microbiologically active agents. Thus, prevention of infection is an important goal of management. Isolates from cystic fibrosis patients appear to originate from the environment but adapt to the milieu of the airway of the cystic fibrosis patient and evolve toward a common phenotype. Identification of the antigens expressed early in infection may lead to novel targets for vaccine development. Immunogenic peptides were identified in a J404 random nonapeptide phage display library with serum from cystic fibrosis patients obtained within the first year of P. aeruginosa infection. One hundred sixty-five reactive clones were verified by plaque lift assays, and their inserts were sequenced. The sequenced nonapeptides were compared with the published sequence of strain PAO1, identifying homologies to 76 genes encoding outer membrane and secreted proteins. The majority of these were proteins involved in small-molecule transport, membrane structural proteins, and secreted factors. An in silico analysis was performed that suggested that the occurrence of multiple matches to predominantly outer membrane and secreted proteins was not attributable to random chance. Finally, gene expression array data from early isolates of P. aeruginosa from cystic fibrosis patients was compared with the results from phage display analysis. Eleven outer membrane and secreted proteins were common between the two data sets. These included genes involved in iron acquisition, antibiotic efflux, fimbrial biogenesis, and pyocin synthesis. These results demonstrate the feasibility and validity of this novel approach and suggest potential targets for future development. PMID:15618183

  7. Stepwise Molecular Display Utilizing Icosahedral and Helical Complexes of Phage Coat and Decoration Proteins in the Development of Robust Nanoscale Display Vehicles

    PubMed Central

    Parent, Kristin N.; Deedas, Christina T.; Egelman, Edward H.; Casjens, Sherwood R.; Baker, Timothy S.; Teschke, Carolyn M.

    2012-01-01

    A stepwise addition protocol was developed to display cargo using bacteriophage P22 capsids and the phage decorator (Dec) protein. Three-dimensional image reconstructions of frozen-hydrated samples of P22 particles with nanogold-labeled Dec bound to them revealed the locations of the N- and C- termini of Dec. Each terminus is readily accessible for molecular display through affinity tags such as nickel-nitrilotriacetic acid, providing a total of 240 cargo-binding sites. Dec was shown by circular dichroism to be a β–sheet rich protein, and fluorescence anisotropy binding experiments demonstrated that Dec binds to P22 heads with high (~110 nM) affinity. Dec also binds to P22 nanotubes, which are helically symmetric assemblies that form when the P22 coat protein contains the F170A amino acid substitution. Several classes of tubes with Dec bound to them were visualized by cryo-electron microscopy and their three-dimensional structures were determined by helical reconstruction methods. In all instances, Dec trimers bound to P22 capsids and nanotubes at positions where three neighboring capsomers (oligomers of six coat protein subunits) lie in close proximity to one another. Stable interactions between Dec and P22 allow for the development of robust, nanoscale size, display vehicles. PMID:22575828

  8. Phage Display of the Serpin Alpha-1 Proteinase Inhibitor Randomized at Consecutive Residues in the Reactive Centre Loop and Biopanned with or without Thrombin

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Benjamin M.; Matochko, Wadim L.; Gierczak, Richard F.; Bhakta, Varsha; Derda, Ratmir; Sheffield, William P.

    2014-01-01

    In spite of the power of phage display technology to identify variant proteins with novel properties in large libraries, it has only been previously applied to one member of the serpin superfamily. Here we describe phage display of human alpha-1 proteinase inhibitor (API) in a T7 bacteriophage system. API M358R fused to the C-terminus of T7 capsid protein 10B was directly shown to form denaturation-resistant complexes with thrombin by electrophoresis and immunoblotting following exposure of intact phages to thrombin. We therefore developed a biopanning protocol in which thrombin-reactive phages were selected using biotinylated anti-thrombin antibodies and streptavidin-coated magnetic beads. A library consisting of displayed API randomized at residues 357 and 358 (P2–P1) yielded predominantly Pro-Arg at these positions after five rounds of thrombin selection; in contrast the same degree of mock selection yielded only non-functional variants. A more diverse library of API M358R randomized at residues 352–356 (P7–P3) was also probed, yielding numerous variants fitting a loose consensus of DLTVS as judged by sequencing of the inserts of plaque-purified phages. The thrombin-selected sequences were transferred en masse into bacterial expression plasmids, and lysates from individual colonies were screening for API-thrombin complexing. The most active candidates from this sixth round of screening contained DITMA and AAFVS at P7–P3 and inhibited thrombin 2.1-fold more rapidly than API M358R with no change in reaction stoichiometry. Deep sequencing using the Ion Torrent platform confirmed that over 800 sequences were significantly enriched in the thrombin-panned versus naïve phage display library, including some detected using the combined phage display/bacterial lysate screening approach. Our results show that API joins Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) as a serpin amenable to phage display and suggest the utility of this approach for the selection of

  9. Protective immune responses against systemic candidiasis mediated by phage-displayed specific epitope of Candida albicans heat shock protein 90 in C57BL/6J mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guiyun; Sun, Meiyan; Fang, Jinbo; Yang, Qiong; Tong, Haibin; Wang, Li

    2006-08-28

    Specific epitope (DEPAGE) of Candida albicans heat shock protein 90 (SE-CA-HSP90) was successfully expressed on the surface of filamentous phage fd, fused to the major coat protein pVIII. Protective immune responses mediated by hybrid-phage expressing SE-CA-HSP90 in C57BL/6J mice were evaluated in this paper. The results showed that hybrid-phage particles induced the specific antibody response against SE-CA-HSP90, enhanced delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) response, natural killer (NK) cell activity and concanavalin A (ConA)-induced splenocyte proliferation. Furthermore, this study demonstrated that hybrid-phage-immunized mice had fewer colony forming unites (CFU) in the kidneys compared with wild-type phage-immunized mice and TE (1.0mM EDTA, 0.01M Tris-HCl, pH 8.0)-injected mice and showed statistically significant survival advantage over TE-injected group. In conclusion, the results suggest that the hybrid-phage displaying SE-CA-HSP90 may be considered as a potential candidate for producing vaccines against systemic candidiasis.

  10. Isolation of cell surface-specific human monoclonal antibodies using phage display and magnetically-activated cell sorting: applications in immunohematology.

    PubMed

    Siegel, D L; Chang, T Y; Russell, S L; Bunya, V Y

    1997-08-07

    A method is described for the isolation of filamentous phage-displayed human monoclonal antibodies directed at unpurifiable cell surface-expressed molecules. To optimize the capture of antigen-specific phage and minimize the binding of irrelevant phage antibodies, a simultaneous positive and negative selection strategy is employed. Cells bearing the antigen of interest are pre-coated with magnetic beads and diluted into an excess of unmodified antigen-negative cells. Following incubation of the cell admixture with a Fab/phage library, the antigen-positive cell population is retrieved using magnetically-activated cell sorting and antigen-specific Fab/phage are eluted and propagated in bacterial culture. Utilizing this protocol with magnetically-labeled Rh(D)-positive and excess unlabeled Rh(D)-negative human red blood cells and a Fab/phage library constructed from human peripheral blood lymphocytes, dozens of unique clinically-useful gamma 1 kappa and gamma 1 lambda anti-Rh(D) antibodies were isolated from a single alloimmunized individual. This cell-surface selection method is readily adaptable for use in other systems, such as for the identification of putative tumor-specific antigens and provides a rapid (< 1 month), high-yield approach for isolating self-replicative antibody reagents directed at novel or conformationally-dependent cell-surface epitopes.

  11. A novel in vivo method for isolating antibodies from a phage display library by neuronal retrograde transport selectively yields antibodies against p75(NTR.).

    PubMed

    Tani, Hiroaki; Osbourn, Jane K; Walker, Edward H; Rush, Robert A; Ferguson, Ian A

    2013-01-01

    The neurotrophin receptor p75(NTR) is utilized by a variety of pathogens to gain entry into the central nervous system (CNS). We tested if this entry portal might be exploited using a phage display library to isolate internalizing antibodies that target the CNS in vivo. By applying a phage library that expressed human single chain variable fragment (scFv) antibodies on their surface to a transected sciatic nerve, we showed that (1) phage conjugated to anti-p75(NTR) antibody or phage scFv library pre-panned against p75(NTR) are internalized by neurons expressing p75(NTR); (2) subsequent retrograde axonal transport separates internalized phage from the applied phage; and, (3) internalized phage can be recovered from a proximal ligature made on a nerve. This approach resulted in 13-fold increase in the number of phage isolated from the injured nerve compared with the starting population, and isolation of 18 unique internalizing p75(NTR) antibodies that were transported from the peripheral nerve into the spinal cord, through the blood-brain barrier. In addition, antibodies recognizing other potentially internalized antigens were identified through in vivo selection using a fully diverse library. Because p75(NTR) expression is upregulated in motor neurons in response to injury and in disease, the p75(NTR) antibodies may have substantial potential for cell-targeted drug/gene delivery. In addition, this novel selection method provides the potential to generate panels of antibodies that could be used to identify further internalization targets, which could aid drug delivery across the blood-brain barrier.

  12. An anti-tumor protein produced by Trichinella spiralis and identified by screening a T7 phage display library, induces apoptosis in human hepatoma H7402 cells

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Trichinella spiralis infection confers effective resistance to tumor cell expansion. In this study, a T7 phage cDNA display library was constructed to express genes encoded by T. spiralis. Organic phase multi-cell screening was used to sort through candidate proteins in a transfected human chronic m...

  13. Phage-Displayed Peptides that Mimic Aflatoxins and its Application in Immunoassay

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yanru; Wang, Hong; Li, Peiwu; Zhang, Qi; Kim, Hee Joo; Gee, Shirley J.; Hammock, Bruce D.

    2013-01-01

    To search for an alternative to using protein conjugated aflatoxin as a coating antigen in aflatoxin detection by an ELISA method, a random-8-peptide library was constructed and used as a source of peptides that mimic aflatoxins (termed as mimotopes). Five mimotope peptides were obtained by panning-elution from the library and were successfully used in an indirect competitive ELISA for analyzing total aflatoxin concentration. The assay exhibited an IC50 value of 14 µg/kg in samples (with 1 in 7 dilution of sample extract) for aflatoxins. The linear range is 4–24 µg/kg. Further validation indicated relatively good recovery (60–120%) in peanut, rice and corn. Natural contaminated samples (peanut and feedstuff) were analyzed for aflatoxin concentration by both conventional ELISA and phage ELISA. The results showed good correlation. It can be concluded that the mimotope preparation is an effective substitute for the aflatoxin based coating antigen in ELISA and can be used in real sample analysis. PMID:23394544

  14. Fast and Sequence-Specific Palladium-Mediated Cross-Coupling Reaction Identified from Phage Display

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Fast and specific bioorthogonal reactions are highly desirable because they provide efficient tracking of biomolecules that are present in low abundance and/or involved in fast dynamic process in living systems. Toward this end, classic strategy involves the optimization of substrate structures and reaction conditions in test tubes, testing their compatibility with biological systems, devising synthetic biology schemes to introduce the modified substrates into living cells or organisms, and finally validating the superior kinetics for enhanced capacity in tracking biomolecules in vivo—a lengthy process often mired by unexpected results. Here, we report a streamlined approach in which the “microenvironment” of a bioorthogonal chemical reporter is exploited directly in biological systems via phage-assisted interrogation of reactivity (PAIR) to optimize not only reaction kinetics but also specificity. Using the PAIR strategy, we identified a short alkyne-containing peptide sequence showing fast kinetics (k2 = 13 000 ± 2000 M–1 s–1) in a palladium-mediated cross-coupling reaction. Site-directed mutagenesis studies suggested that the residues surrounding the alkyne moiety facilitate the assembly of a key palladium–alkyne intermediate along the reaction pathway. When this peptide sequence was inserted into the extracellular domain of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), this reactive sequence directed the specific labeling of EGFR in live mammalian cells. PMID:25025771

  15. K-Ras(G12D)-selective inhibitory peptides generated by random peptide T7 phage display technology.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Kotaro; Kamada, Yusuke; Sameshima, Tomoya; Yaguchi, Masahiro; Niida, Ayumu; Sasaki, Shigekazu; Miwa, Masanori; Ohkubo, Shoichi; Sakamoto, Jun-Ichi; Kamaura, Masahiro; Cho, Nobuo; Tani, Akiyoshi

    2017-03-11

    Amino-acid mutations of Gly(12) (e.g. G12D, G12V, G12C) of V-Ki-ras2 Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (K-Ras), the most promising drug target in cancer therapy, are major growth drivers in various cancers. Although over 30 years have passed since the discovery of these mutations in most cancer patients, effective mutated K-Ras inhibitors have not been marketed. Here, we report novel and selective inhibitory peptides to K-Ras(G12D). We screened random peptide libraries displayed on T7 phage against purified recombinant K-Ras(G12D), with thorough subtraction of phages bound to wild-type K-Ras, and obtained KRpep-2 (Ac-RRCPLYISYDPVCRR-NH2) as a consensus sequence. KRpep-2 showed more than 10-fold binding- and inhibition-selectivity to K-Ras(G12D), both in SPR analysis and GDP/GTP exchange enzyme assay. KD and IC50 values were 51 and 8.9 nM, respectively. After subsequent sequence optimization, we successfully generated KRpep-2d (Ac-RRRRCPLYISYDPVCRRRR-NH2) that inhibited enzyme activity of K-Ras(G12D) with IC50 = 1.6 nM and significantly suppressed ERK-phosphorylation, downstream of K-Ras(G12D), along with A427 cancer cell proliferation at 30 μM peptide concentration. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a K-Ras(G12D)-selective inhibitor, contributing to the development and study of K-Ras(G12D)-targeting drugs.

  16. The use of hybrid phage displaying antigen epitope and recombinant protein in the diagnosis of systemic Candida albicans infection in rabbits and cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Quanping, Su; Yanyan, Huai; Yicun, Wang; Zhigang, Ju; Yuling, Geng; Li, Wang

    2010-12-01

    Hsp90 and Sap2 are 2 immunodominant antigens of Candida albicans. Both of them can induce the production of antibody. In this article, systemically infected rabbits were used to study the Hsp90 and Sap2 antibody production. Also, pET28a-Hsp90 protein, pET28a-Sap2 protein, hybrid phage displaying LKVIRK epitope, and hybrid phage displaying VKYTS epitope were used for diagnosis of the antibody in cancer patients. The results showed that the Sap2 antibody appeared earlier than Hsp90 antibody in systemically infected rabbits. Meanwhile, both of the antibodies can perform protection in rabbits. The conclusion is that Sap2 antibody, which appears at early stage in systemic candidiasis, may be better than Hsp90 antibody for the diagnosis of invasive candidiasis. For 141 sera of cancer patients, 52 sera were detected Sap2 antibody and 57 sera were detected Hsp90 antibody. Only 14 sera contained both the 2 antibodies. Although recombinant protein was slightly more sensitive than hybrid phage, there was no significant difference between them. For its easy preparation, less expensive hybrid phage displaying antigen epitope may be a better agent for diagnosis of candidiasis.

  17. Screening and identification of human ZnT8-specific single-chain variable fragment (scFv) from type 1 diabetes phage display library.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qian; Wang, Xiaodong; Gu, Yong; Zhang, Xiao; Qin, Yao; Chen, Heng; Xu, Xinyu; Yang, Tao; Zhang, Mei

    2016-07-01

    Zinc transporter 8 (ZnT8) is a major autoantigen and a predictive marker in type 1 diabetes (T1D). To investigate ZnT8-specific antibodies, a phage display library from T1D was constructed and single-chain antibodies against ZnT8 were screened and identified. Human T1D single-chain variable fragment (scFv) phage display library consists of approximately 1×10(8) clones. After four rounds of bio-panning, seven unique clones were positive by phage ELISA. Among them, C27 and C22, which demonstrated the highest affinity to ZnT8, were expressed in Escherichia coli Top10F' and then purified by affinity chromatography. C27 and C22 specifically bound ZnT8 N/C fusion protein and ZnT8 C terminal dimer with one Arg325Trp mutation. The specificity to human islet cells of these scFvs were further confirmed by immunohistochemistry. In conclusion, we have successfully constructed a T1D phage display antibody library and identified two ZnT8-specific scFv clones, C27 and C22. These ZnT8-specific scFvs are potential agents in immunodiagnostic and immunotherapy of T1D.

  18. Phage therapy pharmacology: calculating phage dosing.

    PubMed

    Abedon, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    Phage therapy, which can be described as a phage-mediated biocontrol of bacteria (or, simply, biocontrol), is the application of bacterial viruses-also bacteriophages or phages-to reduce densities of nuisance or pathogenic bacteria. Predictive calculations for phage therapy dosing should be useful toward rational development of therapeutic as well as biocontrol products. Here, I consider the theoretical basis of a number of concepts relevant to phage dosing for phage therapy including minimum inhibitory concentration (but also "inundation threshold"), minimum bactericidal concentration (but also "clearance threshold"), decimal reduction time (D value), time until bacterial eradication, threshold bacterial density necessary to support phage population growth ("proliferation threshold"), and bacterial density supporting half-maximal phage population growth rates (K(B)). I also address the concepts of phage killing titers, multiplicity of infection, and phage peak densities. Though many of the presented ideas are not unique to this chapter, I nonetheless provide variations on derivations and resulting formulae, plus as appropriate discuss relative importance. The overriding goal is to present a variety of calculations that are useful toward phage therapy dosing so that they may be found in one location and presented in a manner that allows facile appreciation, comparison, and implementation. The importance of phage density as a key determinant of the phage potential to eradicate bacterial targets is stressed throughout the chapter.

  19. Screening of paclitaxel-binding molecules from a library of random peptides displayed on T7 phage particles using paclitaxel-photoimmobilized resin.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Sota; Morohashi, Kengo; Sunoki, Takashi; Kuramochi, Kouji; Kobayashi, Susumu; Sugawara, Fumio

    2007-01-01

    Paclitaxel (Taxol), an effective anticancer agent, is known to bind to tubulin and induce tubulin polymerization. Several other binding proteins of paclitaxel, such as Bcl-2, heat shock proteins, and NSC-1, have also been reported. Here, we describe a T7 phage-based display to screen for paclitaxel-binding molecules from a random peptide library using paclitaxel-photoimmobilized TentaGel resin. Specific phage particles that bind the paclitaxel-immobilized resin were obtained. Among them, two phage clones included the same consensus amino acid sequence (KACGRTRVTS). Analysis of the protein database using BLAST revealed that a portion of this sequence is conserved in the zinc finger domain of human NFX1. Binding affinity of paclitaxel against the partial recombinant protein of NFX1 (424aa-876aa) was confirmed by pull-down assays and surface plasmon resonance analyses.

  20. Construction of an artificially randomized IgNAR phage display library: screening of variable regions that bind to hen egg white lysozyme.

    PubMed

    Ohtani, Maki; Hikima, Jun-ichi; Jung, Tae Sung; Kondo, Hidehiro; Hirono, Ikuo; Aoki, Takashi

    2013-02-01

    To develop a multi-antigen-specific immunoglobulin new antigen receptor (IgNAR) variable (V) region phage display library, CDR3 in the V region of IgNAR from banded houndshark (Triakis scyllium) was artificially randomized, and clones specific for hen egg white lysozyme (HEL) were obtained by the biopanning method. The nucleotide sequence of CDR3 in the V region was randomly rearranged by PCR. Randomized CDR3-containing segments of the V region were ligated into T7 phage vector to construct a phage display library and resulted in a phage titer of 3.7 × 10(7) PFU/ml. Forty clones that contained randomized CDR3 inserts were sequenced and shown to have different nucleotide sequences. The HEL-specific clones were screened by biopanning using HEL-coated ELISA plates. After six rounds of screening, nine clones were identified as HEL-specific, eight of which showed a strong affinity to HEL in ELISA compared to a negative control (i.e., empty phage clone). The deduced amino acid sequences of CDR3 from the HEL-specific phage clones fell into four types (I-IV): type I contains a single cysteine residue and type II-IV contain two cysteine residues. These results indicated that the artificially randomized IgNAR library is useful for the rapid isolation of antigen-specific IgNAR V region without immunization of target antigen and showed that it is possible to isolate an antigen-specific IgNAR V region from this library.

  1. Purification of molecular machines and nanomotors using phage-derived monoclonal antibody fragments.

    PubMed

    Esteban, Olga; Christ, Daniel; Stock, Daniela

    2013-01-01

    Molecular machines and nanomotors are sophisticated biological assemblies that convert potential energy stored either in transmembrane ion gradients or in ATP into kinetic energy. Studying these highly dynamic biological devices by X-ray crystallography is challenging, as they are difficult to produce, purify, and crystallize. Phage display technology allows us to put a handle on these molecules in the form of highly specific antibody fragments that can also stabilize conformations and allow versatile labelling for electron microscopy, immunohistochemistry, and biophysics experiments.Here, we describe a widely applicable protocol for selecting high-affinity monoclonal antibody fragments against a complex molecular machine, the A-type ATPase from T. thermophilus that allows fast and simple purification of this transmembrane rotary motor from its wild-type source. The approach can be readily extended to other integral membrane proteins and protein complexes as well as to soluble molecular machines and nanomotors.

  2. Identification and characterisation of the proteins bound by specific phage-displayed recombinant antibodies (scFv) obtained against Brazil nut and almond extracts.

    PubMed

    de la Cruz, Silvia; Madrid, Raquel; García-García, Aina; Alcocer, Marcos; Martín, Rosario; González, Isabel; García, Teresa

    2017-08-28

    Almonds and Brazil nuts are widely consumed allergenic nuts whose presence must be declared according to food labelling regulations. Their detection in food products has been recently achieved by ELISA methods with recombinant antibodies (scFv) isolated against complete Brazil nut and almond protein extracts. The screening of phage-scFv libraries against complete protein extracts confers a series of advantages over the use of purified proteins, as recombinant proteins might alter their native folding. However, using this strategy, the nature of the target detected by phage-displayed antibodies remains unknown, and requires further research to identify whether they are nut allergens or other molecules present in the extract, but not related to their allergenic potential. Electrophoretic, chromatographic, immunological and spectrometric techniques revealed that the Brazil nut (BE95) and almond (PD1F6 and PD2C9) specific phage-scFvs detected conformational epitopes of the Brazil nut and almond 11S globulins, recognised by WHO/IUIS as Ber e 2 and Pru du 6 major allergens. Circular dichroism data indicated that severe heat treatment would entail loss of epitope structure, disabling scFv for target detection. The presence of important Brazil nut and almond allergens (Ber e 2 and Pru du 6) in foodstuffs can be determined by using phage-display antibodies BE95, PD1F6 and PD2C9 as affinity probes in ELISA. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  3. Selection and characterization of naturally occurring single-domain (IgNAR) antibody fragments from immunized sharks by phage display.

    PubMed

    Dooley, Helen; Flajnik, Martin F; Porter, Andrew J

    2003-09-01

    The novel immunoglobulin isotype novel antigen receptor (IgNAR) is found in cartilaginous fish and is composed of a heavy-chain homodimer that does not associate with light chains. The variable regions of IgNAR function as independent domains similar to those found in the heavy-chain immunoglobulins of Camelids. Here, we describe the successful cloning and generation of a phage-displayed, single-domain library based upon the variable domain of IgNAR. Selection of such a library generated from nurse sharks (Ginglymostoma cirratum) immunized with the model antigen hen egg-white lysozyme (HEL) enabled the successful isolation of intact antigen-specific binders matured in vivo. The selected variable domains were shown to be functionally expressed in Escherichia coli, extremely stable, and bind to antigen specifically with an affinity in the nanomolar range. This approach can therefore be considered as an alternative route for the isolation of minimal antigen-binding fragments with favorable characteristics.

  4. Identification of atherosclerosis-associated conformational heat shock protein 60 epitopes by phage display and structural alignment.

    PubMed

    Perschinka, Hannes; Wellenzohn, Bernd; Parson, Walther; van der Zee, Ruurd; Willeit, Johann; Kiechl, Stefan; Wick, Georg

    2007-09-01

    Autoimmune reactions to HSP60 are believed to play a key role during development of early atherosclerosis. Due to the high degree of phylogenetic conservation between microbial and human HSP60, bacterial infections might be responsible for inducing cross-reactivity to self HSP60, which is expressed on the surface of arterial endothelial cells stressed by classical atherosclerosis risk factors. Conformational epitopes recognized by polyclonal anti-mycobacterial HSP60 antibodies from subjects with atherosclerosis were identified using a phage displayed random library of cyclic constrained 7mer peptides. After five rounds of selection, DNA sequencing of strongly binding clones revealed that one peptide motif (CIGSPSTNC) was present in 64% of all clones, and a second motif (CSFHYQNRC) in 14%. Using a newly developed method for structural alignment of small constrained peptides onto a protein surface, we located the motif present in 14% of all clones on the surface of mycobacterial HSP60. The motif present in 64% of all clones was found on the surface of mycobacterial HSP60 as well as in the homologous region of human HSP60, which makes this epitope a promising candidate for further investigations on cross-reactive epitopes involved in early atherogenesis.

  5. Isolation of Pathogenic Monoclonal Anti-Desmoglein 1 Human Antibodies by Phage Display of Pemphigus Foliaceus Autoantibodies

    PubMed Central

    Ishii, Ken; Lin, Chenyan; Siegel, Don L.; Stanley, John R.

    2008-01-01

    Pemphigus foliaceus (PF) is a blistering disease caused by autoantibodies to desmoglein 1 (Dsg1) that cause loss of epidermal cell adhesion. To better understand PF pathophysiology, we used phage display to isolate anti-Dsg1 mAbs as single-chain variable fragments (scFvs) from a PF patient. Initial panning of the library isolated only non-pathogenic scFvs. We then used these scFvs to block non-pathogenic epitopes and were able to isolate two unique scFvs, each of which caused typical PF blisters in mice or human epidermis models, showing that a single mAb can disrupt Dsg1 function to cause disease. Both pathogenic scFvs bound conformational epitopes in the N terminus of Dsg1. Other PF sera showed a major antibody response against the same or nearby epitopes defined by these pathogenic scFvs. Finally, we showed restriction of the heavy-chain gene usage of all anti-Dsg1 clones to only five genes, which determined their immunological properties despite promiscuous light-chain gene usage. These mAbs will be useful for studying Dsg1 function and mechanisms of blister formation in PF and for developing targeted therapies and tools to monitor disease activity. PMID:18007588

  6. Yeast surface display is a novel tool for the rapid immunological characterization of plant-derived food allergens.

    PubMed

    Popovic, Milica; Prodanovic, Radivoje; Ostafe, Raluca; Schillberg, Stefan; Fischer, Rainer; Gavrovic-Jankulovic, Marija

    2015-03-01

    High-throughput characterization of allergens relies often on phage display technique which is subject to the limitations of a prokaryotic expression system. Substituting the phage display platform with a yeast surface display could lead to fast immunological characterization of allergens with complex structures. Our objective was to evaluate the potential of yeast surface display for characterization of plant-derived food allergens. The coding sequence of mature actinidin (Act d 1) was cloned into pCTCON2 surface display vector. Flow cytometry was used to confirm localization of recombinant Act d 1 on the surface of yeast cells using rabbit polyclonal antisera IgG and IgE from sera of kiwifruit-allergic individuals. Immunological (dot blot, immunoblot ELISA and ELISA inhibition), biochemical (enzymatic activity in gel) and biological (basophil activation) characterization of Act d 1 after solubilization from the yeast cell confirmed that recombinant Act d 1 produced on the surface of yeast cell is similar to its natural counterpart isolated from green kiwifruit. Yeast surface display is a potent technique that enables fast immunochemical characterization of allergens in situ without the need for protein purification and offers an alternative that could lead to improvement of standard immunodiagnostic and immunotherapeutic approaches.

  7. Purification of storage granule protein-23. A novel protein identified by phage display technology and interaction with type I plasminogen activator inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Lang, I M; Chuang, T L; Barbas, C F; Schleef, R R

    1996-11-22

    Type 1 plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI-1) is a key regulator of the fibrinolytic cascade that is stored in a rapidly releasable form within platelet alpha-granules. To identify proteins that may participate in the targeting or storage of this potent inhibitor, this report investigates the applicability of utilizing filamentous bacteriophages to display proteins expressed by cells containing a regulated secretory pathway and their enrichment based upon an interaction with PAI-1. For this purpose, RNA was extracted from AtT-20 cells (i.e. a classical model cell system for intracellular protein sorting), reverse transcribed, amplified using polymerase chain reaction primers containing internal restriction sites, and cloned into the phagemid pCOMB3H for expression as fusion constructs with the bacteriophage gene III protein. Escherichia coli was transformed with the phagemids and infected with VCSM13 helper phage, and the resulting AtT-20 cDNA-bacteriophage library was enriched by panning against solid- and solution-phase PAI-1. The enriched cDNA library was subcloned into a prokaryotic expression vector system that replaces the gene III protein with a decapeptide tag for immunologic quantitation. One novel cDNA clone (i.e. A-61), which preferentially recognized solution-phase PAI-1 and reacted positively with antibodies derived from a rabbit immunized with alpha-granules, was subcloned into the prokaryotic expression vector pTrcHis to create a construct containing an N-terminal six-histidine purification tag. This construct was expressed in E. coli, purified by nickel-chelate chromatography followed by preparative SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and utilized for the generation of polyclonal antibodies. Immunoblotting analysis employing antibodies against the purified A-61 construct revealed a 23-kDa protein present in the regulated secretory pathway of AtT-20 cells. The 23-kDa molecule was purified from media conditioned by AtT-20 cells by ion exchange

  8. Phage-peptide display identifies the interferon-responsive, death-activated protein kinase family as a novel modifier of MDM2 and p21WAF1.

    PubMed

    Burch, Lindsay R; Scott, Mary; Pohler, Elizabeth; Meek, David; Hupp, Ted

    2004-03-12

    Phage-peptide display is a versatile tool for identifying novel protein-protein interfaces. Our previous work highlighted the selection of phage-peptides that bind to specific isoforms of MDM2 protein and in this work we subjected the putative MDM2-binding proteins to phage-peptide display to expand further on putative protein interaction maps. One peptide that bound MDM2 had significant homology to members of the death-activated protein kinase (DAPK) family, an enzyme family of no known direct link to the p53 pathway. We examined whether a nuclear member of the DAPK family named DAPK3 or ZIP kinase had direct links to the p53 pathway. ZIP kinase was cloned, purified, and the enzyme was able to phosphorylate MDM2 at Ser166, a site previously reported to be modified by Akt kinase, thus demonstrating that ZIP kinase is a bona fide MDM2-binding protein. Native ZIP kinase fractions were then subjected to phage-peptide display and one ZIP kinase consensus peptide motif was identified in p21(WAF1). ZIP kinase phosphorylates p21(WAF1) at Thr145 and alanine-substituted mutations in the p21(WAF1) phosphorylation site alter its ability to be phosphorylated by ZIP kinase. Thus, although ZIP kinase consensus sites were then defined as containing a minimal RKKx(T/S) consensus motif, alternate contacts in ZIP kinase binding are implicated, since amino acid residues surrounding the phospho-acceptor site can effect the specific activity of the kinase. Transfected ZIPK can promote the phosphorylation of p21(WAF1) at Thr145 in vivo and can increase the half-life of p21(WAF1), while the half-life of p21(WAF1[T145A]) is not effected by ZIP kinase. Thus, phage-peptide display identified an interferon-responsive protein kinase family as a novel modifier of two components of the p53 pathway, MDM2 and p21(WAF1), and underscores the utility of phage-peptide display for gaining novel insights into biochemical pathways.

  9. Screening a Phage Display Library for Two Novel OmpU-Binding Peptides with Adhesion Antagonistic Activity against Vibrio mimicus

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Huizhu; Xiao, Ning; Li, Jinnian; Kong, Lingyan; Hou, Liting

    2016-01-01

    Vibrio mimicus is a pathogen that causes ascites disease in fish. We have previously demonstrated that the outer membrane protein U (OmpU) is an important adhesin in V. mimicus. Here eight specific OmpU-binding phage clones, which presented three different OmpU-binding peptides (designated P1, P2, P3), were screened from a commercially available phage displayed 12-mer peptide library using rOmpU protein as target. Then, synthetic OmpU-binding peptides were measured for their adhesion antagonistic activity and binding affinity via adhesion inhibition test and non-competitive ELISA, respectively. The results showed that after co-incubated with the mixture of rOmpU and P3, visible green fluorescence could be observed on the epithelioma papulosum cyprinidi (EPC) cells surface; while the EPC cells co-incubated with the mixture of rOmpU and P1/P2 exhibited little green fluorescence. The average adhesion number of V. mimicus 04–14 isolate before and after treatment with peptide was 21.4 ± 1.5, 20.8 ± 0.8 (irrelevant peptide), 20.2 ± 0.5 (P3), 5.1 ± 0.7 (P1) and 3.4 ± 0.8 (P2), respectively. There was a significant decrease in the adhesive level of 04–14 isolate treated with P1/ P2 compared to the untreated isolate (p<0.01). The affinity constants of P1 and P2 were (6.17 ± 0.19) × 108 L/mol and (1.24 ± 0.56) × 109 L/mol, respectively. Furthermore, protective effects of P1 and P2 on grass carps challenged with V. mimicus were preliminary detected. It was found there was delayed death of fish in the groups treated with P1/P2, and the survival rate of challenged fish improved with the increase of the dose of adhesion antagonistic peptide. Taken together, two novel OmpU-binding peptides, which possessed adhesion antagonistic activity, high affinity and a certain degree of antibacterial activity against V. mimicus, were screened and identified. PMID:27832083

  10. Purification of polyclonal anti-conformational antibodies for use in affinity selection from random peptide phage display libraries: A study using the hydatid vaccine EG95

    PubMed Central

    Read, A.J.; Gauci, C.G.; Lightowlers, M.W.

    2009-01-01

    The use of polyclonal antibodies to screen random peptide phage display libraries often results in the recognition of a large number of peptides that mimic linear epitopes on various proteins. There appears to be a bias in the use of this technology toward the selection of peptides that mimic linear epitopes. In many circumstances the correct folding of a protein immunogen is required for conferring protection. The use of random peptide phage display libraries to identify peptide mimics of conformational epitopes in these cases requires a strategy for overcoming this bias. Conformational epitopes on the hydatid vaccine EG95 have been shown to result in protective immunity in sheep, whereas linear epitopes are not protective. In this paper we describe a strategy that results in the purification of polyclonal antibodies directed against conformational epitopes while eliminating antibodies directed against linear epitopes. These affinity purified antibodies were then used to select a peptide from a random peptide phage display library that has the capacity to mimic conformational epitopes on EG95. This peptide was subsequently used to affinity purify monospecific antibodies against EG95. PMID:19349218

  11. Uses of phage display in agriculture: sequence analysis and comparative modeling of late embryogenesis abundant client proteins suggest protein-nucleic acid binding functionality.

    PubMed

    Kushwaha, Rekha; Downie, A Bruce; Payne, Christina M

    2013-01-01

    A group of intrinsically disordered, hydrophilic proteins-Late Embryogenesis Abundant (LEA) proteins-has been linked to survival in plants and animals in periods of stress, putatively through safeguarding enzymatic function and prevention of aggregation in times of dehydration/heat. Yet despite decades of effort, the molecular-level mechanisms defining this protective function remain unknown. A recent effort to understand LEA functionality began with the unique application of phage display, wherein phage display and biopanning over recombinant Seed Maturation Protein homologs from Arabidopsis thaliana and Glycine max were used to retrieve client proteins at two different temperatures, with one intended to represent heat stress. From this previous study, we identified 21 client proteins for which clones were recovered, sometimes repeatedly. Here, we use sequence analysis and homology modeling of the client proteins to ascertain common sequence and structural properties that may contribute to binding affinity with the protective LEA protein. Our methods uncover what appears to be a predilection for protein-nucleic acid interactions among LEA client proteins, which is suggestive of subcellular residence. The results from this initial computational study will guide future efforts to uncover the protein protective mechanisms during heat stress, potentially leading to phage-display-directed evolution of synthetic LEA molecules.

  12. Expression and characterization of recombinant interleukin-21 receptor and its targeting single-chain variable fragment antibodies selected from a human phage display library.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qinhang; Zhang, Juan; Luo, Chen; Zhang, Tao; Wang, Tong; Wang, Min

    2012-10-01

    Interleukin-21 receptor (IL-21R) is widely expressed in lymphocytes, and plays an important role in immunological cell proliferation and cytokine production. The present study aims to express a recombinant extracellular domain of human IL-21R (rhIL-21R-ECD) with high yield, and to screen the anti-IL-21R single-chain variable fragments (scFvs) from a synthetic human phage display library. The rhIL-21R-ECD, being expressed mainly as insoluble inclusion bodies in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3), was purified and refolded. ELISA analysis showed that the refolded rhIL-21R-ECD bound to its ligand IL-21 in a concentration-dependent manner. Using a phage display technique, anti-IL-21R scFvs were screened from a naïve human phage display library by biopanning. After four rounds of panning, positive clones were isolated, sequenced, and characterized. The clone with highest activity was designated as C2. Flow cytometry analysis showed that the scFv C2 could recognize IL-21R on Jurkat cells. Furthermore, proliferation assay revealed a concentration-dependent inhibitory effect of C2 on the Jurkat cell, with fifty percent inhibitory concentration (IC(50)) of 78 nM. A human scFv antibody C2 with a high binding specificity to IL-21R was isolated and characterized. The antibody showed a concentration-dependent inhibitory effect on Jurkat cell proliferation.

  13. Selection of recombinant antibodies by phage display technology and application for detection of allergenic Brazil nut (Bertholletia excelsa) in processed foods.

    PubMed

    de la Cruz, Silvia; López-Calleja, Inés María; Alcocer, Marcos; González, Isabel; Martín, Rosario; García, Teresa

    2013-10-30

    Current immunological methods for detection of Brazil nut allergens in foods are based on polyclonal antibodies raised in animals. Phage display technology allows the procurement of high-affinity antibodies avoiding animal immunization steps and therefore attaining the principle of replacement supported by animal welfare guidelines. In this study, we screened Tomlinson I and J libraries for specific binders against Brazil nut by employing a Brazil nut protein extract and a purified Brazil nut 2S globulin, and we successfully isolated a phage single chain variable fragment (named BE95) that specifically recognizes Brazil nut proteins. The selected phage scFv was further used as affinity probe to develop an indirect phage-ELISA for detection of Brazil nut in experimental binary mixtures and in commercial food products, with a limit of detection of 5 mg g(-1). This study describes for the first time the isolation of recombinant antibody fragments specific for an allergenic tree nut protein from a naïve library and paves the way to develop new immunoassays for food analysis based on probes that can be produced in vitro when required and do not rely on animal immunization.

  14. Screening and evaluating the mimic peptides as a useful serum biomarker of ankylosing spondylitis using a phage display technique.

    PubMed

    Wang, Min; Li, Xianping; Chen, Jingwei; Zhou, Yong; Cao, Hong; Wu, Xiang; Jiang, Hongmin

    2011-08-01

    To screen specific serum biomarker for ankylosing spondylitis (AS) using a phage random peptide library. A phage random peptide library of random peptide 12-mers was immunoscreened with purified immunoglobulin (Ig) G from sera of AS patients. Positive clones obtained after three rounds of biopanning were detected with ELISA and sequenced. Reaction of the screened positive clones with sera from AS patients, systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients, rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients, osteoarthritis (OA) patients and healthy controls was detected using phage ELISA. Correlation among erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), C-reactive protein (CRP), and the absorbance value of the positive clone in phage ELISA was examined in AS patients. Seventeen out of twenty randomly selected phage clones exhibited specific reaction with purified sera IgG from AS patients, among them seven coming from the same clone whose inserted peptide sequence was LALPPLAPNHHH (named "AS1"). Phage ELISA results showed that the positive reaction rate of the AS1 clone was 92.0% with AS patients, significantly different (P < 0.01) from those with SLE patients (56.7%), RA patients (50.0%), OA patients (13.3%), and healthy controls (14.0%). Absorbance value of the AS1 clone in phage ELISA was significantly higher than those in the other groups (P < 0.05). In addition, the absorbance value of the AS1 clone showed no statistically significant correlation with ESR and CRP in AS patients, suggesting that AS1 detects AS patients through a unique mechanism other than inflammation. The short peptide AS1 obtained through screening of a phage random peptide library with purified serum IgG from AS patients can specifically react with the sera of AS patients, and thereby may be a candidate of AS-specific serum biomarkers.

  15. Designer and natural peptide toxin blockers of the KcsA potassium channel identified by phage display

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Ruiming; Dai, Hui; Mendelman, Netanel; Cuello, Luis G.; Chill, Jordan H.; Goldstein, Steve A. N.

    2015-01-01

    Peptide neurotoxins are powerful tools for research, diagnosis, and treatment of disease. Limiting broader use, most receptors lack an identified toxin that binds with high affinity and specificity. This paper describes isolation of toxins for one such orphan target, KcsA, a potassium channel that has been fundamental to delineating the structural basis for ion channel function. A phage-display strategy is presented whereby ∼1.5 million novel and natural peptides are fabricated on the scaffold present in ShK, a sea anemone type I (SAK1) toxin stabilized by three disulfide bonds. We describe two toxins selected by sorting on purified KcsA, one novel (Hui1, 34 residues) and one natural (HmK, 35 residues). Hui1 is potent, blocking single KcsA channels in planar lipid bilayers half-maximally (Ki) at 1 nM. Hui1 is also specific, inhibiting KcsA-Shaker channels in Xenopus oocytes with a Ki of 0.5 nM whereas Shaker, Kv1.2, and Kv1.3 channels are blocked over 200-fold less well. HmK is potent but promiscuous, blocking KcsA-Shaker, Shaker, Kv1.2, and Kv1.3 channels with Ki of 1–4 nM. As anticipated, one Hui1 blocks the KcsA pore and two conserved toxin residues, Lys21 and Tyr22, are essential for high-affinity binding. Unexpectedly, potassium ions traversing the channel from the inside confer voltage sensitivity to the Hui1 off-rate via Arg23, indicating that Lys21 is not in the pore. The 3D structure of Hui1 reveals a SAK1 fold, rationalizes KcsA inhibition, and validates the scaffold-based approach for isolation of high-affinity toxins for orphan receptors. PMID:26627718

  16. An interferon alpha2 mutant optimized by phage display for IFNAR1 binding confers specifically enhanced antitumor activities.

    PubMed

    Kalie, Eyal; Jaitin, Diego A; Abramovich, Renne; Schreiber, Gideon

    2007-04-13

    All alpha-interferons (IFNalpha) bind the IFNAR1 receptor subunit with low affinity. Increasing the binding affinity was shown to specifically increase the antiproliferative potency of IFNalpha2. Here, we constructed a phage display library by randomizing three positions on IFNalpha2 previously shown to confer weak binding to IFNAR1. The tightest binding variant selected, comprised of mutations H57Y, E58N, and Q61S (YNS), was shown to bind IFNAR1 60-fold tighter compared with wild-type IFNalpha2, and 3-fold tighter compared with IFNbeta. Binding of YNS to IFNAR2 was comparable with wild-type IFNalpha2. The YNS mutant conferred a 150-fold higher antiproliferative potency in WISH cells compared with wild-type IFNalpha2, whereas its antiviral activity was increased by only 3.5-fold. The high antiproliferative activity was related to an induction of apoptosis, as demonstrated by annexin V binding assays, and to specific gene induction, particularly TRAIL. To determine the potency of the YNS mutant in a xenograft cancer model, we injected it twice a week to nude mice carrying transplanted MDA231 human breast cancer cells. After 5 weeks, no tumors remained in mice treated with YNS, whereas most mice treated with wild-type IFNalpha2 showed visible tumors. Histological analysis of these tumors showed a significant anti-angiogenic effect of YNS, compared with wild-type IFNalpha2. This work demonstrates the application of detailed biophysical understanding in the process of protein engineering, yielding an interferon variant with highly increased biological potency.

  17. Unique Biological Properties of Catalytic Domain Directed Human Anti-CAIX Antibodies Discovered through Phage-Display Technology

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Chen; Lo, Agnes; Yammanuru, Anuradha; Tallarico, Aimee St. Clair; Brady, Kristen; Murakami, Akikazu; Barteneva, Natasha; Zhu, Quan; Marasco, Wayne A.

    2010-01-01

    Carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX, gene G250/MN-encoded transmembrane protein) is highly expressed in various human epithelial tumors such as renal clear cell carcinoma (RCC), but absent from the corresponding normal tissues. Besides the CA signal transduction activity, CAIX may serve as a biomarker in early stages of oncogenesis and also as a reliable marker of hypoxia, which is associated with tumor resistance to chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Although results from preclinical and clinical studies have shown CAIX as a promising target for detection and therapy for RCC, only a limited number of murine monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) and one humanized mAb are available for clinical testing and development. In this study, paramagnetic proteoliposomes of CAIX (CAIX-PMPLs) were constructed and used for anti-CAIX antibody selection from our 27 billion human single-chain antibody (scFv) phage display libraries. A panel of thirteen human scFvs that specifically recognize CAIX expressed on cell surface was identified, epitope mapped primarily to the CA domain, and affinity-binding constants (KD) determined. These human anti-CAIX mAbs are diverse in their functions including induction of surface CAIX internalization into endosomes and inhibition of the carbonic anhydrase activity, the latter being a unique feature that has not been previously reported for anti-CAIX antibodies. These human anti-CAIX antibodies are important reagents for development of new immunotherapies and diagnostic tools for RCC treatment as well as extending our knowledge on the basic structure-function relationships of the CAIX molecule. PMID:20224781

  18. Prevention of passively transferred experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis by a phage library-derived cyclic peptide

    PubMed Central

    Venkatesh, Natarajan; Im, Sin-Heyog; Balass, Moshe; Fuchs, Sara; Katchalski-Katzir, Ephraim

    2000-01-01

    Many pathogenic antibodies in myasthenia gravis (MG) and its animal model, experimental autoimmune MG (EAMG), are directed against the main immunogenic region (MIR) of the acetylcholine receptor (AcChoR). These antibodies are highly conformation dependent; hence, linear peptides derived from native receptor sequences are poor candidates for their immunoneutralization. We employed a phage-epitope library to identify peptide-mimotopes capable of preventing the pathogenicity of the anti-MIR mAb 198. We identified a 15-mer peptide (PMTLPENYFSERPYH) that binds specifically to mAb 198 and inhibits its binding to AcChoR. A 10-fold increase in the affinity of this peptide was achieved by incorporating flanking amino acid residues from the coat protein as present in the original phage library. This extended peptide (AEPMTLPENYFSERPYHPPPP) was constrained by the addition of cysteine residues on both ends of the peptide, thus generating a cyclic peptide that inhibited the binding of mAb 198 to AcChoR with a potency that is three orders of magnitude higher when compared with the parent library peptide. This cyclic peptide inhibited the in vitro binding of mAb 198 to AcChoR and prevented the antigenic modulation of AcChoR caused by mAb 198 in human muscle cell cultures. The cyclic peptide also reacted with several other anti-MIR mAbs and the sera of EAMG rats. In addition, this peptide blocked the ability of mAb 198 to passively transfer EAMG in rats. Further derivatization of the cyclic peptide may aid in the design of suitable synthetic mimotopes for modulation of MG. PMID:10639153

  19. Joining the in vitro immunization of alpaca lymphocytes and phage display: rapid and cost effective pipeline for sdAb synthesis.

    PubMed

    Comor, Lubos; Dolinska, Saskia; Bhide, Katarina; Pulzova, Lucia; Jiménez-Munguía, Irene; Bencurova, Elena; Flachbartova, Zuzana; Potocnakova, Lenka; Kanova, Evelina; Bhide, Mangesh

    2017-01-23

    Camelids possess unique functional heavy chain antibodies, which can be produced and modified in vitro as a single domain antibody (sdAb or nanobody) with full antigen binding ability. Production of sdAb in conventional manner requires active immunization of Camelidae animal, which is laborious, time consuming, costly and in many cases not feasible (e.g. in case of highly toxic or infectious antigens). In this study, we describe an alternative pipeline that includes in vitro stimulation of naïve alpaca B-lymphocytes by antigen of interest (in this case endothelial cell binding domain of OspA of Borrelia) in the presence of recombinant alpaca interleukins 2 and 4, construction of sdAb phage library, selection of antigen specific sdAb expressed on phages (biopanning) and confirmation of binding ability of sdAb to the antigen. By joining the in vitro immunization and the phage display ten unique phage clones carrying sdAb were selected. Out of ten, seven sdAb showed strong antigen binding ability in phage ELISA. Furthermore, two soluble forms of sdAb were produced and their differential antigen binding affinity was measured with bio-layer interferometry. A proposed pipeline has potential to reduce the cost substantially required for maintenance of camelid herd for active immunization. Furthermore, in vitro immunization can be achieved within a week to enrich mRNA copies encoding antigen-specific sdAbs in B cell. This rapid and cost effective pipeline can help researchers to develop efficiently sdAb for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes.

  20. A peptide isolated from phage display libraries is a structural and functional mimic of an RGD-binding site on integrins

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    Many integrins recognize short RGD-containing amino acid sequences and such peptide sequences can be identified from phage libraries by panning with an integrin. Here, in a reverse strategy, we have used such libraries to isolate minimal receptor sequences that bind to fibronectin and RGD-containing fibronectin fragments in affinity panning. A predominant cyclic motif, *CWDDG/LWLC*, was obtained (the asterisks denote a potential disulfide bond). Studies using the purified phage and the corresponding synthetic cyclic peptides showed that *CWDDGWLC*-expressing phage binds specifically to fibronectin and to fibronectin fragments containing the RGD sequence. The binding did not require divalent cations and was inhibited by both RGD and *CWDDGWLC*-containing synthetic peptides. Conversely, RGD-expressing phage attached specifically to immobilized *CWDDGWLC*-peptide and the binding could be blocked by the respective synthetic peptides in solution. Moreover, fibronectin bound to a *CWDDGWLC*-peptide affinity column, and could be eluted with an RGD-containing peptide. The *CWDDGWLC*-peptide inhibited RGD-dependent cell attachment to fibronectin and vitronectin, but not to collagen. A region of the beta subunit of RGD-binding integrins that has been previously demonstrated to be involved in ligand binding includes a polypeptide stretch, KDDLW (in beta 3) similar to WDDG/LWL. Synthetic peptides corresponding to this region in beta 3 were found to bind RGD-displaying phage and conversion of its two aspartic residues into alanines greatly reduced the RGD binding. Polyclonal antibodies raised against the *CWDDGWLC*- peptide recognized beta 1 and beta 3 in immunoblots. These data indicate that the *CWDDGWLC*-peptide is a functional mimic of ligand binding sites of RGD-directed integrins, and that the structurally similar site in the integrin beta subunit is a binding site for RGD. PMID:7657703

  1. MimoPro: a more efficient Web-based tool for epitope prediction using phage display libraries

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background A B-cell epitope is a group of residues on the surface of an antigen which stimulates humoral responses. Locating these epitopes on antigens is important for the purpose of effective vaccine design. In recent years, mapping affinity-selected peptides screened from a random phage display library to the native epitope has become popular in epitope prediction. These peptides, also known as mimotopes, share the similar structure and function with the corresponding native epitopes. Great effort has been made in using this similarity between such mimotopes and native epitopes in prediction, which has resulted in better outcomes than statistics-based methods can. However, it cannot maintain a high degree of satisfaction in various circumstances. Results In this study, we propose a new method that maps a group of mimotopes back to a source antigen so as to locate the interacting epitope on the antigen. The core of this method is a searching algorithm that is incorporated with both dynamic programming (DP) and branch and bound (BB) optimization and operated on a series of overlapping patches on the surface of a protein. These patches are then transformed to a number of graphs using an adaptable distance threshold (ADT) regulated by an appropriate compactness factor (CF), a novel parameter proposed in this study. Compared with both Pep-3D-Search and PepSurf, two leading graph-based search tools, on average from the results of 18 test cases, MimoPro, the Web-based implementation of our proposed method, performed better in sensitivity, precision, and Matthews correlation coefficient (MCC) than both did in epitope prediction. In addition, MimoPro is significantly faster than both Pep-3D-Search and PepSurf in processing. Conclusions Our search algorithm designed for processing well constructed graphs using an ADT regulated by CF is more sensitive and significantly faster than other graph-based approaches in epitope prediction. MimoPro is a viable alternative to both

  2. A conformational epitope mapped in the bovine herpesvirus type 1 envelope glycoprotein B by phage display and the HSV-1 3D structure.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Greyciele R; Goulart, Luiz Ricardo; Cunha-Junior, Jair P; Bataus, Luiz A M; Japolla, Greice; Brito, Wilia M E D; Campos, Ivan T N; Ribeiro, Cristina; Souza, Guilherme R L

    2015-08-01

    The selected dodecapeptide (1)DRALYGPTVIDH(12) from a phage-displayed peptide library and the crystal structure of the envelope glycoprotein B (Env gB) from Herpes Simplex Virus type 1 (HSV-1) led us to the identification of a new discontinuous epitope on the Bovine herpesvirus type 1 (BoHV-1) Env gB. In silico analysis revealed a short BoHV-1 gB motif ((338)YKRD(341)) within a epitope region, with a high similarity to the motifs shared by the dodecapeptide N-terminal region ((5)YxARD(1)) and HSV-1 Env gB ((326)YARD(329)), in which the (328)Arg residue is described to be a neutralizing antibody target. Besides the characterization of an antibody-binding site of the BoHV-1 Env gB, we have demonstrated that the phage-fused peptide has the potential to be used as a reagent for virus diagnosis by phage-ELISA assay, which discriminated BoHV-1 infected serum samples from negative ones.

  3. Identification of a new epitope for HIV-neutralizing antibodies in the gp41 membrane proximal external region by an Env-tailored phage display library.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Mingkui; Meyer, Torsten; Koch, Stefanie; Koch, Joachim; von Briesen, Hagen; Benito, José M; Soriano, Vincent; Haberl, Annette; Bickel, Markus; Dübel, Stefan; Hust, Michael; Dietrich, Ursula

    2013-02-01

    HIV controllers are a valuable source for the identification of HIV-neutralizing antibodies, as chronic infection over decades allows extensive affinity maturation of antibodies for improved Ag recognition. We analyzed a small cohort of elite controllers (ECs) for HIV-neutralizing antibodies using a panel of standardized HIV-1 pseudovirions on TZM-bl cells. An HIV-1 Env-tailored phage display library was generated to select epitopes targeted by neutralizing antibodies in the EC26 plasma sample showing the broadest neutralizing activity. Selected Env fragments were mostly allocated to the membrane proximal external region of gp41. After preabsorbing the EC26 plasma with the selected phage EC26-2A4, we achieved 50% depletion of its neutralizing activity. Furthermore, antibodies affinity-purified with the EC26-2A4 epitope from EC26 plasma showed neutralizing activity, proving that the selected phage indeed contains an epitope targeted by neutralizing plasma antibodies. Epitope fine mapping of the purified plasma antibodies on peptide arrays identified a new epitope overlapping, but clearly distinct, from the prominent 2F5 epitope. Of note, the purified antibodies did not show autoreactivity with cardiolipin, whereas low reactivity with phosphatidylserine comparable to mAb 2F5 was observed. Thus, this new epitope represents a promising candidate for further analysis in view of HIV vaccine development. © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Selection of scFv Antibody Fragments Binding to Human Blood versus Lymphatic Endothelial Surface Antigens by Direct Cell Phage Display

    PubMed Central

    Keller, Thomas; Kalt, Romana; Raab, Ingrid; Schachner, Helga; Mayrhofer, Corina; Kerjaschki, Dontscho; Hantusch, Brigitte

    2015-01-01

    The identification of marker molecules specific for blood and lymphatic endothelium may provide new diagnostic tools and identify new targets for therapy of immune, microvascular and cancerous diseases. Here, we used a phage display library expressing human randomized single-chain Fv (scFv) antibodies for direct panning against live cultures of blood (BECs) and lymphatic (LECs) endothelial cells in solution. After six panning rounds, out of 944 sequenced antibody clones, we retrieved 166 unique/diverse scFv fragments, as indicated by the V-region sequences. Specificities of these phage clone antibodies for respective compartments were individually tested by direct cell ELISA, indicating that mainly pan-endothelial cell (EC) binders had been selected, but also revealing a subset of BEC-specific scFv antibodies. The specific staining pattern was recapitulated by twelve phage-independently expressed scFv antibodies. Binding capacity to BECs and LECs and differential staining of BEC versus LEC by a subset of eight scFv antibodies was confirmed by immunofluorescence staining. As one antigen, CD146 was identified by immunoprecipitation with phage-independent scFv fragment. This antibody, B6-11, specifically bound to recombinant CD146, and to native CD146 expressed by BECs, melanoma cells and blood vessels. Further, binding capacity of B6-11 to CD146 was fully retained after fusion to a mouse Fc portion, which enabled eukaryotic cell expression. Beyond visualization and diagnosis, this antibody might be used as a functional tool. Overall, our approach provided a method to select antibodies specific for endothelial surface determinants in their native configuration. We successfully selected antibodies that bind to antigens expressed on the human endothelial cell surfaces in situ, showing that BECs and LECs share a majority of surface antigens, which is complemented by cell-type specific, unique markers. PMID:25993332

  5. Peptide sequences identified by phage display are immunodominant functional motifs of Pet and Pic serine proteases secreted by Escherichia coli and Shigella flexneri.

    PubMed

    Ulises, Hernández-Chiñas; Tatiana, Gazarian; Karlen, Gazarian; Guillermo, Mendoza-Hernández; Juan, Xicohtencatl-Cortes; Carlos, Eslava

    2009-12-01

    Plasmid-encoded toxin (Pet) and protein involved in colonization (Pic), are serine protease autotransporters of Enterobacteriaceae (SPATEs) secreted by enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAEC), which display the GDSGSG sequence or the serine motif. Our research was directed to localize functional sites in both proteins using the phage display method. From a 12mer linear and a 7mer cysteine-constrained (C7C) libraries displayed on the M13 phage pIII protein we selected different mimotopes using IgG purified from sera of children naturally infected with EAEC producing Pet and Pic proteins, and anti-Pet and anti-Pic IgG purified from rabbits immunized with each one of these proteins. Children IgG selected a homologous group of sequences forming the consensus sequence, motif, PQPxK, and the motifs PGxI/LN and CxPDDSSxC were selected by the rabbit anti-Pet and anti-Pic IgGs, respectively. Analysis of the amino terminal region of a panel of SPATEs showed the presence in all of them of sequences matching the PGxI/LN or CxPDDSSxC motifs, and in a three-dimensional model (Modeller 9v2) designed for Pet, both these motifs were found in the globular portion of the protein, close to the protease active site GDSGSG. Antibodies induced in mice by mimotopes carrying the three aforementioned motifs were reactive with Pet, Pic, and with synthetic peptides carrying the immunogenic mimotope sequences TYPGYINHSKA and LLPQPPKLLLP, thus confirming that the peptide moiety of the selected phages induced the antibodies specific for the toxins. The antibodies induced in mice to the PGxI/LN and CxPDDSSxC mimotopes inhibited fodrin proteolysis and macrophage chemotaxis biological activities of Pet. Our results showed that we were able to generate, by a phage display procedure, mimotopes with sequence motifs PGxI/LN and CxPDDSSxC, and to identify them as functional motifs of the Pet, Pic and other SPATEs involved in their biological activities.

  6. Phage display and bacterial expression of a recombinant Fab specific for Pseudomonas aeruginosa serotype O6 lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed Central

    Tout, N L; Lam, J S

    1997-01-01

    Immunotherapy with antibodies (Abs) against the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of Pseudomonas aeruginosa remains an alternative to serotype-specific LPS-based vaccines due to their limited use and to antibiotics due to the intrinsic resistance to antimicrobials observed in P. aeruginosa. We have chosen a monoclonal Ab (MAb), MF23-1, that binds to the O antigen of the most clinically relevant serotype, IATS O6, for producing a recombinant antibody. Heavy (H) and light (L) chain genes were isolated from MF23-1 to form a functional Fab molecule in the periplasm of Escherichia coli and on the surface of phage by using phagemid vector pComb3. The entire kappa L chain gene was used, but the H chain gene was amplified to 2 amino acids past cysteine 128 which is involved in interchain disulfide bond formation with the L chain. The truncated H chain associated with the L chain in the periplasm of E. coli to form a functional Fab molecule that bound in both enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and immunofluorescence assay to O6 LPS. Therefore, the remainder of the CH1 past cysteine 128 is not essential for stable formation of the Fab portion of MF23-1. This recombinant Fab (r-Fab) was shown to be specific for the LPS of the most predominant clinical isolate, serotype O6, while no cross-reactivity was detected to the LPS of the other 19 remaining serotypes. This r-Fab was also expressed on the surface of filamentous phage upon addition of helper phage to recombinant E. coli containing phagemid. Recombinant phage from clones MT13 and MT24 bound specifically to O6 LPS in ELISA. These results represent an important step toward the design of therapeutic Abs to be used against P. aeruginosa infections. PMID:9067648

  7. Identification of a novel aFGF-binding peptide with anti-tumor effect on breast cancer from phage display library

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Xiaoyong; Cai, Cuizan; Xiao, Fei; Xiong, Yaoling; Huang, Yadong; Zhang, Qihao; Xiang, Qi; Lou, Guofeng; Lian, Mengyang; Su, Zhijian; Zheng, Qing

    2014-03-21

    Highlights: • A specific aFGF-binding peptide AP8 was identified from a phage display library. • AP8 could inhibit aFGF-stimulated cell proliferation in a dose-dependent manner. • AP8 arrested the cell cycle at the G0/G1 phase by suppressing Cyclin D1. • AP8 could block the activation of Erk1/2 and Akt kinase. • AP8 counteracted proliferation and cell cycle via influencing PA2G4 and PCNA. - Abstract: It has been reported that acidic fibroblast growth factor (aFGF) is expressed in breast cancer and via interactions with fibroblast growth factor receptors (FGFRs) to promote the stage and grade of the disease. Thus, aFGF/FGFRs have been considered essential targets in breast cancer therapy. We identified a specific aFGF-binding peptide (AGNWTPI, named AP8) from a phage display heptapeptide library with aFGF after four rounds of biopanning. The peptide AP8 contained two (TP) amino acids identical and showed high homology to the peptides of the 182–188 (GTPNPTL) site of high-affinity aFGF receptor FGFR1. Functional analyses indicated that AP8 specifically competed with the corresponding phage clone A8 for binding to aFGF. In addition, AP8 could inhibit aFGF-stimulated cell proliferation, arrested the cell cycle at the G0/G1 phase by increasing PA2G4 and suppressing Cyclin D1 and PCNA, and blocked the aFGF-induced activation of Erk1/2 and Akt kinase in both breast cancer cells and vascular endothelial cells. Therefore, these results indicate that peptide AP8, acting as an aFGF antagonist, is a promising therapeutic agent for the treatment of breast cancer.

  8. Phage display of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-2 (TIMP-2): identification of selective inhibitors of collagenase-1 (metalloproteinase 1 (MMP-1)).

    PubMed

    Bahudhanapati, Harinath; Zhang, Yingnan; Sidhu, Sachdev S; Brew, Keith

    2011-09-09

    Tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-2 (TIMP-2) is a broad spectrum inhibitor of the matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), which function in extracellular matrix catabolism. Here, phage display was used to identify variants of human TIMP-2 that are selective inhibitors of human MMP-1, a collagenase whose unregulated action is linked to cancer, arthritis, and fibrosis. Using hard randomization of residues 2, 4, 5, and 6 (L1) and soft randomization of residues 34-40 (L2) and 67-70 (L3), a library was generated containing 2 × 10(10) variants of TIMP-2. Five clones were isolated after five rounds of selection with MMP-1, using MMP-3 as a competitor. The enriched phages selectively bound MMP-1 relative to MMP-3 and contained mutations only in L1. The most selective variant (TM8) was used to generate a second library in which residues Cys(1)-Gln(9) were soft-randomized. Four additional clones, selected from this library, showed a similar affinity for MMP-1 as wild-type TIMP-2 but reduced affinity for MMP-3. Variants of the N-terminal domain of TIMP-2 (N-TIMP-2) with the sequences of the most selective clones were expressed and characterized for inhibitory activity against eight MMPs. All were effective inhibitors of MMP-1 with nanomolar K(i) values, but TM8, containing Ser(2) to Asp and Ser(4) to Ala substitutions, was the most selective having a nanomolar K(i) value for MMP-1 but no detectable inhibitory activity toward MMP-3 and MMP-14 up to 10 μM. This study suggests that phage display and selection with other MMPs may be an effective method for discovering tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase variants that discriminate between specified MMPs as targets.

  9. Characterization of spontaneous phage-resistant derivatives of Lactobacillus delbrueckii commercial strains.

    PubMed

    Guglielmotti, Daniela M; Reinheimer, Jorge A; Binetti, Ana G; Giraffa, Giorgio; Carminati, Domenico; Quiberoni, Andrea

    2006-09-01

    A total of 44 spontaneous phage-resistant mutants were isolated from three commercial Lactobacillus delbrueckii strains by secondary culture and agar plate methods. Phenotypic characteristics related to their phage-resistance capacities, i.e. plaquing efficiency, phage-resistance stability, lysogeny and adsorption rates were determined. The morphological, biochemical (sugar fermentation patterns) and technological (acidifying and proteolytic activities and acidification kinetics) properties of mutants were also studied. Amplification and restriction analysis of the 16S rRNA gene (PCR-ARDRA) was applied to confirm strain identity at the subspecies level. Random amplification of polymorphic DNA (RAPD-PCR) was used to determine genetic diversity among the isolates and their respective parent strains. The secondary culture method was the most useful for obtaining phage-resistant mutants. Phage resistance stability was a variable property among the isolates, but a high level of resistance was exhibited as quantified by the efficiency of plaquing. Furthermore, a total absence of spontaneous lysogeny was demonstrated. Adsorption rates were heterogeneously distributed among the three groups of mutants. All mutants isolated from two sensitive strains were similar to them with respect to technological properties. Two groups of mutants with distinctive technological properties were isolated from the other sensitive strain. PCR-ARDRA revealed that two out of three sensitive strains identified commercially as Lb. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus were actually Lb. delbrueckii subsp. lactis. Some of the phage-resistant mutants that were obtained might be used in culture rotation programs without regulatory restrictions when commercial strains become sensitive to phages present in industrial environments.

  10. VERO stable cell lines expressing full-length human epidermal growth factor receptors 2 and 3: platforms for subtractive phage display.

    PubMed

    Hedayatizadeh-Omran, Akbar; Valadan, Reza; Rafiei, Alireza; Tehrani, Mohsen; Alizadeh-Navaei, Reza

    2015-09-01

    Cross-talk between human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 and 3 (HER2 and HER3) may potentially contribute to therapeutic resistance in human breast cancer. Subtractive phage display allows highly specific selection for antibody fragments directed against cells surface HER2 and HER3. The strategies to select conformation- and activation-specific antibodies against HER2 and HER3 require tightly regulated HER2 and HER3 expressing cells that allow controlled activation/inactivation of these receptors during panning procedures. To achieve this, first, we found that the VERO cell line is an appropriate cell line for heterogeneous expression of HER2 and HER3, and then we established a panel of VERO stable cell lines expressing high levels of HER2 and HER3 alone and in combination. We also showed that HER2 and HER3 expressed in VERO cells were biologically active and could form heterodimer following neuregulin1 treatment. The cell line established here not only provided platforms for phage display-based methods but also could be used in any HER-related studies.

  11. Engineering a genetically encoded competitive inhibitor of the KEAP1–NRF2 interaction via structure-based design and phage display

    PubMed Central

    Guntas, Gurkan; Lewis, Steven M.; Mulvaney, Kathleen M.; Cloer, Erica W.; Tripathy, Ashutosh; Lane, Thomas R.; Major, Michael B.; Kuhlman, Brian

    2016-01-01

    In its basal state, KEAP1 binds the transcription factor NRF2 (Kd = 5 nM) and promotes its degradation by ubiquitylation. Changes in the redox environment lead to modification of key cysteines within KEAP1, resulting in NRF2 protein accumulation and the transcription of genes important for restoring the cellular redox state. Using phage display and a computational loop grafting protocol, we engineered a monobody (R1) that is a potent competitive inhibitor of the KEAP1–NRF2 interaction. R1 bound to KEAP1 with a Kd of 300 pM and in human cells freed NRF2 from KEAP1 resulting in activation of the NRF2 promoter. Unlike cysteine-reactive small molecules that lack protein specificity, R1 is a genetically encoded, reversible inhibitor designed specifically for KEAP1. R1 should prove useful for studying the role of the KEAP1–NRF2 interaction in several disease states. The structure-based phage display strategy employed here is a general approach for engineering high-affinity binders that compete with naturally occurring interactions. PMID:26489878

  12. Masked Selection: A Straightforward and Flexible Approach for the Selection of Binders Against Specific Epitopes and Differentially Expressed Proteins by Phage Display*

    PubMed Central

    Even-Desrumeaux, Klervi; Nevoltris, Damien; Lavaut, Marie Noelle; Alim, Karima; Borg, Jean-Paul; Audebert, Stéphane; Kerfelec, Brigitte; Baty, Daniel; Chames, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Phage display is a well-established procedure to isolate binders against a wide variety of antigens that can be performed on purified antigens, but also on intact cells. As selection steps are performed in vitro, it is possible to focus the outcome of the selection on relevant epitopes by performing some additional steps, such as depletion or competitive elutions. However in practice, the efficiency of these steps is often limited and can lead to inconsistent results. We have designed a new selection method named masked selection, based on the blockade of unwanted epitopes to favor the targeting of relevant ones. We demonstrate the efficiency and flexibility of this method by selecting single-domain antibodies against a specific portion of a fusion protein, by selecting binders against several members of the seven transmembrane receptor family using transfected HEK cells, or by selecting binders against unknown breast cancer markers not expressed on normal samples. The relevance of this approach for antibody-based therapies was further validated by the identification of four of these markers, Epithelial cell adhesion molecule, Transferrin receptor 1, Metastasis cell adhesion molecule, and Sushi containing domain 2, using immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry. This new phage display strategy can be applied to any type of antibody fragments or alternative scaffolds, and is especially suited for the rapid discovery and identification of cell surface markers. PMID:24361863

  13. Phage display evolution of a peptide substrate for yeast biotin ligase and application to two-color quantum dot labeling of cell surface proteins.

    PubMed

    Chen, Irwin; Choi, Yoon-Aa; Ting, Alice Y

    2007-05-23

    Site-specific protein labeling with Escherichia coli biotin ligase (BirA) has been used to introduce fluorophores, quantum dots (QDs), and photocross-linkers onto recombinant proteins fused to a 15-amino acid acceptor peptide (AP) substrate for BirA and expressed on the surface of living mammalian cells. Here, we used phage display to engineer a new and orthogonal biotin ligase-AP pair for site-specific protein labeling. Yeast biotin ligase (yBL) does not recognize the AP, but we discovered a new 15-amino acid substrate for yBL called the yeast acceptor peptide (yAP), using two generations of phage display selection from 15-mer peptide libraries. The yAP is not recognized by BirA, and thus, we were able to specifically label AP and yAP fusion proteins coexpressed in the same cell with differently colored QDs. We fused the yAP to a variety of recombinant proteins and demonstrated biotinylation by yBL at the N-terminus, C-terminus, and within a flexible internal region. yBL is extremely sequence-specific, as endogenous proteins on the surface of yeast and HeLa cells are not biotinylated. This new methodology expands the scope of biotin ligase labeling to two-color imaging and yeast-based applications.

  14. Phage-Displayed T-Cell Epitope Grafted into Immunoglobulin Heavy-Chain Complementarity-Determining Regions: an Effective Vaccine Design Tested in Murine Cysticercosis

    PubMed Central

    Manoutcharian, Karen; Terrazas, Luis Ignacio; Gevorkian, Goar; Acero, Gonzalo; Petrossian, Pavel; Rodriguez, Miriam; Govezensky, Tzipe

    1999-01-01

    A new type of immunogenic molecule was engineered by replacing all three complementarity-determining-region (CDR) loops of the human immunoglobulin (Ig) heavy-chain variable (VH) domain with the Taenia crassiceps epitope PT1 (PPPVDYLYQT) and by displaying this construct on the surfaces of M13 bacteriophage. When BALB/c mice were immunized with such phage particles (PIgphage), a strong protection against challenge infection in very susceptible female hosts was obtained. When specifically stimulated, the in vivo-primed CD4+ and CD8+ T cells isolated from mice immunized with PT1, both as a free peptide and as the PIgphage construct, proliferated in vitro, indicating efficient epitope presentation by both major histocompatibility complex class II and class I molecules in the specifically antigen-pulsed macrophages used as antigen-presenting cells. These data demonstrate the immunogenic potential of recombinant phage particles displaying CDR epitope-grafted Ig VH domains and establish an alternative approach to the design of an effective subunit vaccine for prevention of cysticercosis. The key advantage of this type of immunogen is that no adjuvant is required for its application. The proposed strategy for immunogen construction is potentially suitable for use in any host-pathogen interaction. PMID:10456929

  15. Antibody binding site mapping of SARS-CoV spike protein receptor-binding domain by a combination of yeast surface display and phage peptide library screening.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoping; Wang, Jingxue; Wen, Kun; Mou, Zhirong; Zou, Liyun; Che, Xiaoyan; Ni, Bing; Wu, Yuzhang

    2009-12-01

    The receptor-binding domain (RBD) of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) spike (S) protein plays an important role in viral infection, and is a potential major neutralizing determinant. In this study, three hybridoma cell lines secreting specific monoclonal antibodies against the RBD of the S protein were generated and their exact binding sites were identified. Using yeast surface display, the binding sites of these antibodies were defined to two linear regions on the RBD: S(337-360) and S(380-399). Using these monoclonal antibodies in phage peptide library screening identified 10 distinct mimotopes 12 amino acids in length. Sequence comparison between native epitopes and these mimotopes further confirmed the binding sites, and revealed key amino acid residues involved in antibody binding. None of these antibodies could neutralize the murine leukemia virus pseudotyped expressing the SARS-CoV spike protein (MLV/SARS-CoV). However, these mAbs could be useful in the diagnosis of SARS-CoV due to their exclusive reactivity with SARS-CoV. Furthermore, this study established a feasible platform for epitope mapping. Yeast surface display combined with phage peptide library screening provides a convenient strategy for the identification of epitope peptides from certain antigenic proteins.

  16. Targeting human embryonic stem cells with quantum dot-conjugated phages.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wenxiu; Jin, Lei; Yuan, Hang; Tan, Zhiyang; Zhou, Changhua; Li, Lin Song; Ma, Lan

    2013-11-05

    Targeting embryonic stem cells (ESCs) is important for ESC labeling, drug delivery and cell fate control. In this study, we identified twenty-two phage clones that bind specifically to the hESC cell line X-01, which was derived from human blastocysts of Chinese origin. One phage (H178), which displays the sequence VGGEAWSSPTDL, showed higher binding affinity to hESCs than to a monkey ES cell line (RS366.4) and two mouse ES cell lines (R1 and E14). Using quantum dots (QDs) conjugated to the H178 phage, we demonstrate that the phage can specifically bind to hESCs in vitro. Our results suggest a possible interaction between the selected peptide and the stem cell extracellular matrix (ECM). The selection method described here allows rapid and efficient screening of unique phage clones and targeting cells. The phages displaying peptides identified by this study have potential applications for cargo delivery and receptor studies.

  17. Phage display biopanning identifies the translation initiation and elongation factors (IF1α-3 and eIF-3) as components of Hsp70-peptide complexes in breast tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Siebke, Christina; James, Tharappel C; Cummins, Robert; O'Grady, Tony; Kay, Elaine; Bond, Ursula

    2012-03-01

    The heat shock protein, HSP70, is over-expressed in many tumours and acts at the crossroads of key intracellular processes in its role as a molecular chaperone. HSP70 associates with a vast array of peptides, some of which are antigenic and can mount adaptive immune responses against the tumour from which they are derived. The pool of peptides associated with HSP70 represents a unique barcode of protein metabolism in tumour cells. With a view to identifying unique protein targets that may be developed as tumour biomarkers, we used purified HSP70 and its associated peptide pool (HSP70-peptide complexes, HSP70-PCs) from different human breast tumour cell lines as targets for phage display biopanning. Our results show that HSP70-PCs from each cell line interact with unique sets of peptides within the phage display library. One of the peptides, termed IST, enriched in the biopanning process, was used in a 'pull-down' assay to identify the original protein from which the HSP70-associated peptides may have been derived. The eukaryotic translation initiation factor 3 (eIF-3), a member of the elongation factor EF1α family, and the HSP GRP78, were pulled down by the IST peptide. All of these proteins are known to be up-regulated in cancer cells. Immunohistochemical staining of tumour tissue microarrays showed that the peptide co-localised with HSP70 in breast tumour tissue. The data indicate that the reservoir of peptides associated with HSP70 can act as a unique indicator of cellular protein activity and a novel source of potential tumour biomarkers.

  18. De novo selection of high-affinity antibodies from synthetic fab libraries displayed on phage as pIX fusion proteins.

    PubMed

    Shi, Lei; Wheeler, John C; Sweet, Raymond W; Lu, Jin; Luo, Jinquan; Tornetta, Mark; Whitaker, Brian; Reddy, Ramachandra; Brittingham, Raymond; Borozdina, Lina; Chen, Qiang; Amegadzie, Bernard; Knight, David M; Almagro, Juan C; Tsui, Ping

    2010-03-26

    Filamentous phage was the first display platform employed to isolate antibodies in vitro and is still the most broadly used. The success of phage display is due to its robustness, ease of use, and comprehensive technology development, as well as a broad range of selection methods developed during the last two decades. We report here the first combinatorial synthetic Fab libraries displayed on pIX, a fusion partner different from the widely used pIII. The libraries were constructed on four V(L) and three V(H) domains encoded by IGV and IGJ germ-line genes frequently used in human antibodies, which were diversified to mirror the variability observed in the germ-line genes and antibodies isolated from natural sources. Two sets of libraries were built, one with diversity focused on V(H) by keeping V(L) in the germ-line gene configuration and the other with diversity in both V domains. After selection on a diverse panel of proteins, numerous specific Fabs with affinities ranging from 0.2 nM to 20 nM were isolated. V(H) diversity was sufficient for isolating Fabs to most antigens, whereas variability in V(L) was required for isolation of antibodies to some targets. After the application of an integrated maturation process consisting of reshuffling V(L) diversity, the affinity of selected antibodies was improved up to 100-fold to the low picomolar range, suitable for in vivo studies. The results demonstrate the feasibility of displaying complex Fab libraries as pIX fusion proteins for antibody discovery and optimization and lay the foundation for studies on the structure-function relationships of antibodies.

  19. Identification of antigenic epitopes of the SapA protein of Campylobacter fetus using a phage display peptide library.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hailing; Yu, Shenye; Liu, Huifang; Si, Wei; Wang, Chunlai; Liu, Siguo

    2012-12-01

    In this study, we immunized mice with prokaryotically expressed recombinant surface layer protein, SapA, of Campylobacter fetus, generated hybridomas secreting mouse monoclonal antibodies (mAb) targeting SapA, and purified the mAb A2D5 from mouse ascites using saturated ammonium sulfate solution. The mAb A2D5, coated onto ELISA plates, was used to screen the phage random 12-peptide library through three rounds of panning. Following panning, 15 phage clones were randomly chosen and tested for reactivity with mAb A2D5 by indirect ELISA. Single-stranded DNA from positive clones was sequenced and compared with the sequence of SapA to predict the key epitope. ELISA and/or Western blot analyses further validated that synthetic peptides and recombinant peptide mimotopes all interact with mAb A2D5. Nine of ten positive phage clones identified by screening were sequenced successfully. Seven clones shared the same sequence HYDRHNYHWWHT; one had the sequence LSKNLPLTALGN; and the final one had the sequence SGMKEPELRSYS. These three sequences shared high homology with SapA J05577 in the region GNEKDFVTKIYSIALGNTSDVDGINYW, in which the underlined amino acids may serve as key residues in the epitope. ELISA and/or Western blot analyses showed that mAb A2D5 not only interacted with the four synthetic peptide mimotopes, but also with 14 prokaryotically expressed recombinant peptide mimotopes. The mimotopes identified in this study will aid future studies into the pathological processes and immune mechanisms of the SapA protein of C. fetus. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Biomagnetic separation of Salmonella Typhimurium with high affine and specific ligand peptides isolated by phage display technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steingroewer, Juliane; Bley, Thomas; Bergemann, Christian; Boschke, Elke

    2007-04-01

    Analyses of food-borne pathogens are of great importance in order to minimize the health risk for customers. Thus, very sensitive and rapid detection methods are required. Current conventional culture techniques are very time consuming. Modern immunoassays and biochemical analysis also require pre-enrichment steps resulting in a turnaround time of at least 24 h. Biomagnetic separation (BMS) is a promising more rapid method. In this study we describe the isolation of high affine and specific peptides from a phage-peptide library, which combined with BMS allows the detection of Salmonella spp. with a similar sensitivity as that of immunomagnetic separation using antibodies.

  1. Establishment of a sensitive time-resolved fluoroimmunoassay for detection of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Ie toxin based nanobody from a phage display library.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chongxin; Liu, Xiaoqin; Zhang, Cunzheng; Zhang, Xiao; Zhong, Jianfeng; Liu, Yuan; Hu, Xiaodan; Lin, Manman; Liu, Xianjin

    2017-02-01

    Cry1Ie toxin was an insect-resistant protein used in genetically modified crops (GMC). In this study, a large human VH gene nanobodies phage displayed library was employed to select anti-Cry1Ie toxin antibody by affinity panning. After 5 rounds of panning, total 12 positive monoclonal phage particles were obtained. One of the identified positive phage nanobody was expressed in E.coli BL21 and the purified protein was indicated as a molecular mass of approximately 20 kDa by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Then a sensitive indirect competitive time-resolved fluoroimmunoassay (IC-TRFIA) was established for detection of Cry1Ie toxin by the purified protein. The working range of detection for Cry1Ie toxin standards in the IC-TRFIA were 0.08-6.44 ng mL(-1) and the medium inhibition of control (IC50) was 0.73 ng mL(-1). It showed a weak cross-reactivity with Cry1Ab toxin (at 5.6%), but did not recognize Cry1B, Cry1C, Cry1F, and Cry2A toxins (were <0.1%). The average recoveries of Cry1Ie toxin from respectively spiked in rice, corn and soil samples were in the range of 83.5%-96.6% and with a coefficient of variation (CV) among 2.0%-8.6%. These results showed the IC-TRFIA was promising for detection of Cry1Ie toxin in agricultural and environmental samples.

  2. Identification of a Conserved B-cell Epitope on Reticuloendotheliosis Virus Envelope Protein by Screening a Phage-displayed Random Peptide Library

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Mei; Shi, Xingming; Zhang, Jing; Zhao, Yan; Cui, Hongyu; Hu, Shunlei; Gao, Hongbo; Cui, Xianlan; Wang, Yun-Feng

    2012-01-01

    Background The gp90 protein of avian reticuloendotheliosis-associated virus (REV-A) is an important envelope glycoprotein, which is responsible for inducing protective antibody immune responses in animals. B-cell epitopes on the gp90 protein of REV have not been well studied and reported. Methods and Results This study describes the identification of a linear B-cell epitope on the gp90 protein by screening a phage-displayed 12-mer random peptide library with the neutralizing monoclonal antibody (mAb) A9E8 directed against the gp90. The mAb A9E8 recognized phages displaying peptides with the consensus motif SVQYHPL. Amino acid sequence of the motif exactly matched 213SVQYHPL219 of the gp90. Further identification of the displayed B cell epitope was conducted using a set of truncated peptides expressed as GST fusion proteins and the Western blot results indicated that 213SVQYHPL219 was the minimal determinant of the linear B cell epitope recognized by the mAb A9E8. Moreover, an eight amino acid peptide SVQYHPLA was proven to be the minimal unit of the epitope with the maximal binding activity to mAb A9E8. The REV-A-positive chicken serum reacted with the minimal linear epitopes in Western blot, revealing the importance of the eight amino acids of the epitope in antibody-epitope binding activity. Furthermore, we found that the epitope is a common motif shared among REV-A and other members of REV group. Conclusions and Significance We identified 213SVQYHPL219 as a gp90-specific linear B-cell epitope recognized by the neutralizing mAb A9E8. The results in this study may have potential applications in development of diagnostic techniques and epitope-based marker vaccines against REV-A and other viruses of the REV group. PMID:23185456

  3. Cryptosporidium parvum: identification of a new surface adhesion protein on sporozoite and oocyst by screening of a phage-display cDNA library.

    PubMed

    Yao, Longquan; Yin, Jigang; Zhang, Xichen; Liu, Quan; Li, Jianhua; Chen, Lifeng; Zhao, Yueping; Gong, Pengtao; Liu, Chengwu

    2007-04-01

    Cryptosporidium parvum is a significant cause of diarrheal disease worldwide. The specific molecules that mediate C. parvum-host interaction and the molecular mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis are unknown. In this study we described a novel phage display method to identify surface adhesion proteins of C. parvum. A cDNA library of the sporozoite and oocyst stages of C. parvum expressed on the surface of T7 phage was screened with intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) from the newborn Cryptosporidium-free Holstein calves. Proteins that selectively and specifically bound to IECs were then enriched using a multi-step panning procedure. Two proteins of C. parvum were selected, one was previously reported (p23), which was an important surface adhesion protein; the other was a novel surface adherence protein (CP12). Sequence analysis showed that CP12 has a N-terminal signal peptide, a transmembrane region, a N-glycosylation site, a casein kinase II phosphorylation site and two N-myristoylation sites. Immunofluorescence assay (IFA) using antibody specific for rCP12 demonstrated that the antibody can specifically bind the surface of sporozoite and oocyst, especially apical region of sporozoite. The surface localization of CP12 and its involvement in the host-parasite interaction suggest that it may serve as an effective target for specific preventive and therapeutic measures for cryptosporidiosis.

  4. Protection of rhesus macaques against disease progression from pathogenic SHIV-89.6PD by vaccination with phage-displayed HIV-1 epitopes.

    PubMed

    Chen, X; Scala, G; Quinto, I; Liu, W; Chun, T W; Justement, J S; Cohen, O J; vanCott, T C; Iwanicki, M; Lewis, M G; Greenhouse, J; Barry, T; Venzon, D; Fauci, A S

    2001-11-01

    The antigenic polymorphism of HIV-1 is a major obstacle in developing an effective vaccine. Accordingly, we screened random peptide libraries (RPLs) displayed on phage with antibodies from HIV-infected individuals and identified an array of HIV-specific epitopes that behave as antigenic mimics of conformational epitopes of gp120 and gp41 proteins. We report that the selected epitopes are shared by a collection of HIV-1 isolates of clades A-F. The phage-borne epitopes are immunogenic in rhesus macaques, where they elicit envelope-specific antibody responses. Upon intravenous challenge with 60 MID50 of pathogenic SHIV-89.6PD, all monkeys became infected; however, in contrast to the naive and mock-immunized monkeys, four of five mimotope-immunized monkeys experienced lower levels of peak viremia, followed by viral set points of undetectable or transient levels of viremia and a mild decline of CD4+ T cells, and were protected from progression to AIDS-like illness. These results provide a new approach to the design of broadly protective HIV-1 vaccines.

  5. Identification of a Conserved Linear B-Cell Epitope of Streptococcus dysgalactiae GapC Protein by Screening Phage-Displayed Random Peptide Library

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Ziyao; Zhou, Xue; Yu, Liquan; Sun, Hunan; Wu, Zhijun; Yu, Yongzhong; Song, Baifen; Ma, Jinzhu; Tong, Chunyu; Wang, Xintong; Zhu, Zhanbo; Cui, Yudong

    2015-01-01

    The GapC of Streptococcus dysgalactiae (S. dysgalactiae) is a highly conserved surface protein that can induce protective humoral immune response in animals. However, B-cell epitopes on the S. dysgalactiae GapC have not been well identified. In this study, a monoclonal antibody (mAb5B7) against the GapC1-150 protein was prepared. After passive transfer, mAb5B7 could partially protect mice against S. dysgalactiae infection. Eleven positive phage clones recognized by mAb5B7 were identified by screening phage-displayed random 12-peptide library, most of which matched the consensus motif DTTQGRFD. The motif sequence exactly matches amino acids 48-55 of the S. dysgalactiae GapC protein. In addition, the motif 48DTTQGRFD55 shows high homology among various streptococcus species. Site-directed mutagenic analysis further confirmed that residues D48, T50, Q51, G52 and F54 formed the core motif of 48DTTQGRFD55. This motif was the minimal determinant of the B-cell epitope recognized by the mAb5B7. As expected, epitope-peptide evoked protective immune response against S. dysgalactiae infection in immunized mice. Taken together, this identified conserved B-cell epitope within S. dysgalactiae GapC could provide very valuable insights for vaccine design against S. dysgalactiae infection. PMID:26121648

  6. Identification of the immunogenic epitopes of the whole venom component of the Hemiscorpius lepturus scorpion using the phage display peptide library.

    PubMed

    Jahdasani, Roghaye; Jamnani, Fatemeh Rahimi; Behdani, Mahdi; Habibi-Anbouhi, Mahdi; Yardehnavi, Najmeh; Shahbazzadeh, Delavar; Kazemi-Lomedasht, Fatemeh

    2016-12-15

    The venom of the Hemiscorpius lepturus scorpion contains mixtures of bioactive compounds that disturb biochemical and physiological functions of the victims. Hemiscorpius lepturus envenomation is recognized as a serious health concern in tropical regions. So far, there is no preventive procedure, and the main focus is on treatment of victims with an antiserum purified from hyper-immunized horses. Although antisera can neutralize the venom, they, in some cases, lead to anaphylactic shock and even death. Selection of peptides mimicking antigenic and immunogenic epitopes of toxins from random peptide libraries is a novel approach for the development of recombinant toxins and poly-epitopic vaccine. To achieve this aim, a phage display peptide library and three rounds of biopanning were performed on immobilized antibodies (IgGs) purified from the sera of hyper-immunized horses. The results show that the highest binding of the phage to immobilized horse antibodies occurred in the third round of biopanning. Over 125 individual clones carrying mimotopes of Hemiscorpius lepturus toxins were selected and subjected for sequencing. The sequencing results identified unique peptides mimicking the antigenic and immunogenic epitopes of Hemiscorpius lepturus toxins. The results of this study provide a basis for further studies and the development of a putative epitopic vaccine and a recombinant toxin. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Binding mechanism and electrochemical properties of M13 phage-sulfur composite.

    PubMed

    Dong, Dexian; Zhang, Yongguang; Sutaria, Sanjana; Konarov, Aishuak; Chen, Pu

    2013-01-01

    Self-assembly of nanostructured materials has been proven a powerful technique in material design and synthesis. By phage display screening, M13 phage was found to strongly bind sulfur particles. Fourier transform infrared and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements indicated that the strong sulfur-binding ability of M13 phage derives from newly generated S-O and C-S bonds. Using this phage assembled sulfur composite in a lithium battery, the first discharge capacity reached 1117 mAh g(-1), which is more than twice that of the sulfur only cathode. Besides, the negative polysulfide shuttle effect in a lithium-sulfur battery was significantly suppressed.

  8. Development of human antibody fragments using antibody phage display for the detection and diagnosis of Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV)

    PubMed Central

    Kirsch, Martina Inga; Hülseweh, Birgit; Nacke, Christoph; Rülker, Torsten; Schirrmann, Thomas; Marschall, Hans-Jürgen; Hust, Michael; Dübel, Stefan

    2008-01-01

    Background Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV) belongs to the Alphavirus group. Several species of this family are also pathogenic to humans and are recognized as potential agents of biological warfare and terrorism. The objective of this work was the generation of recombinant antibodies for the detection of VEEV after a potential bioterrorism assault or an natural outbreak of VEEV. Results In this work, human anti-VEEV single chain Fragments variable (scFv) were isolated for the first time from a human naïve antibody gene library using optimized selection processes. In total eleven different scFvs were identified and their immunological specificity was assessed. The specific detection of the VEEV strains TC83, H12/93 and 230 by the selected antibody fragments was proved. Active as well as formalin inactivated virus particles were recognized by the selected antibody fragments which could be also used for Western blot analysis of VEEV proteins and immunohistochemistry of VEEV infected cells. The anti-VEEV scFv phage clones did not show any cross-reactivity with Alphavirus species of the Western equine encephalitis virus (WEEV) and Eastern equine encephalitis virus (EEEV) antigenic complex, nor did they react with Chikungunya virus (CHIKV), if they were used as detection reagent. Conclusion For the first time, this study describes the selection of antibodies against a human pathogenic virus from a human naïve scFv antibody gene library using complete, active virus particles as antigen. The broad and sensitive applicability of scFv-presenting phage for the immunological detection and diagnosis of Alphavirus species was demonstrated. The selected antibody fragments will improve the fast identification of VEEV in case of a biological warfare or terroristic attack or a natural outbreak. PMID:18764933

  9. Discovery of peptidic miR-21 processing inhibitor by mirror image phage display: A novel method to generate RNA binding D-peptides.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Kotaro; Otake, Kentaro; Umemoto, Tadashi

    2017-02-15

    A novel method to generate RNA binding D-peptide has been developed. To achieve the screening method, phage display was applied to "Mirrored" RNA (L-enantiomer of RNA). We have selected pre-miR21 as an initial screening target to demonstrate the method. The mirrored pre-miR-21 binding peptide sequences were successfully obtained, and were chemically synthesized using D-amino acids. D-peptide is expected to have favorable properties as a drug candidate such as protease resistance and low immunogenicity. As a result of binding evaluation of the D-peptide to pre-miR-21, the EC50 value was 440nM. In addition, the D-peptide possessed inhibition activity to miR-21 processing.

  10. Utilization of Multi-Immunization and Multiple Selection Strategies for Isolation of Hapten-Specific Antibodies from Recombinant Antibody Phage Display Libraries

    PubMed Central

    Tullila, Antti; Nevanen, Tarja K.

    2017-01-01

    Phage display technology provides a powerful tool for the development of novel recombinant antibodies. In this work, we optimized and streamlined the recombinant antibody discovery process for haptens as an example. A multi-immunization approach was used in order to avoid the need for construction of multiple antibody libraries. Selection methods were developed to utilize the full potential of the recombinant antibody library by applying four different elution conditions simultaneously. High-throughput immunoassays were used to analyse the binding properties of the individual antibody clones. Different carrier proteins were used in the immunization, selection, and screening phases to avoid enrichment of the antibodies for the carrier protein epitopes. Novel recombinant antibodies against mycophenolic acid and ochratoxin A, with affinities up to 39 nM and 34 nM, respectively, were isolated from a multi-immunized fragment antigen-binding (Fab) library. PMID:28561803

  11. Utilization of Multi-Immunization and Multiple Selection Strategies for Isolation of Hapten-Specific Antibodies from Recombinant Antibody Phage Display Libraries.

    PubMed

    Tullila, Antti; Nevanen, Tarja K

    2017-05-31

    Phage display technology provides a powerful tool for the development of novel recombinant antibodies. In this work, we optimized and streamlined the recombinant antibody discovery process for haptens as an example. A multi-immunization approach was used in order to avoid the need for construction of multiple antibody libraries. Selection methods were developed to utilize the full potential of the recombinant antibody library by applying four different elution conditions simultaneously. High-throughput immunoassays were used to analyse the binding properties of the individual antibody clones. Different carrier proteins were used in the immunization, selection, and screening phases to avoid enrichment of the antibodies for the carrier protein epitopes. Novel recombinant antibodies against mycophenolic acid and ochratoxin A, with affinities up to 39 nM and 34 nM, respectively, were isolated from a multi-immunized fragment antigen-binding (Fab) library.

  12. In vivo phage display screening for tumor vascular targets in glioblastoma identifies a llama nanobody against dynactin-1-p150Glued

    PubMed Central

    Verhoeff, Joost J.C.; Mäkinen, Petri I.; Lappalainen, Jari P.; Ylä-Herttuala, Seppo; Raats, Jos; van Wijk, Erwin; Roepman, Ronald; Letteboer, Stef J.; Verrijp, Kiek; Leenders, William P.J.

    2016-01-01

    Diffuse gliomas are primary brain cancers that are characterised by infiltrative growth. Whereas high-grade glioma characteristically presents with perinecrotic neovascularisation, large tumor areas thrive on pre-existent vasculature as well. Clinical studies have revealed that pharmacological inhibition of the angiogenic process does not improve survival of glioblastoma patients. Direct targeting of tumor vessels may however still be an interesting therapeutic approach as it allows pinching off the blood supply to tumor cells. Such tumor vessel targeting requires the identification of tumor-specific vascular targeting agents (TVTAs). Here we describe a novel TVTA, C-C7, which we identified via in vivo biopanning of a llama nanobody phage display library in an orthotopic mouse model of diffuse glioma. We show that C-C7 recognizes a subpopulation of tumor blood vessels in glioma xenografts and clinical glioma samples. Additionally, C-C7 recognizes macrophages and activated endothelial cells in atherosclerotic lesions. By using C-C7 as bait in yeast-2-hybrid (Y2H) screens we identified dynactin-1-p150Glued as its binding partner. The interaction was confirmed by co-immunostainings with C-C7 and a commercial anti-dynactin-1-p150Glued antibody, and via co-immunoprecipitation/western blot studies. Normal brain vessels do not express dynactin-1-p150Glued and its expression is reduced under anti-VEGF therapy, suggesting that dynactin-1-p150Glued is a marker for activated endothelial cells. In conclusion, we show that in vivo phage display combined with Y2H screenings provides a powerful approach to identify tumor-targeting nanobodies and their binding partners. Using this combination of methods we identify dynactin-1-p150Glued as a novel targetable protein on activated endothelial cells and macrophages. PMID:27689404

  13. A Conserved Epitope Mapped with a Monoclonal Antibody against the VP3 Protein of Goose Parvovirus by Using Peptide Screening and Phage Display Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chenxi; Liu, Hongyu; Li, Jinzhe; Liu, Dafei; Meng, Runze; Zhang, Qingshan; Shaozhou, Wulin; Bai, Xiaofei; Zhang, Tingting; Liu, Ming; Zhang, Yun

    2016-01-01

    Background Waterfowl parvovirus (WPV) infection causes high mortality and morbidity in both geese (Anser anser) and Muscovy ducks (Cairina moschata), resulting in significant losses to the waterfowl industries. The VP3 protein of WPV is a major structural protein that induces neutralizing antibodies in the waterfowl. However, B-cell epitopes on the VP3 protein of WPV have not been characterized. Methods and Results To understand the antigenic determinants of the VP3 protein, we used the monoclonal antibody (mAb) 4A6 to screen a set of eight partially expressed overlapping peptides spanning VP3. Using western blotting and an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), we localized the VP3 epitope between amino acids (aa) 57 and 112. To identify the essential epitope residues, a phage library displaying 12-mer random peptides was screened with mAb 4A6. Phage clone peptides displayed a consensus sequence of YxRFHxH that mimicked the sequence 82Y/FNRFHCH88, which corresponded to amino acid residues 82 to 88 of VP3 protein of WPVs. mAb 4A6 binding to biotinylated fragments corresponding to amino acid residues 82 to 88 of the VP3 protein verified that the 82FxRFHxH88 was the VP3 epitope and that amino acids 82F is necessary to retain maximal binding to mAb 4A6. Parvovirus-positive goose and duck sera reacted with the epitope peptide by dot blotting assay, revealing the importance of these amino acids of the epitope in antibody-epitope binding reactivity. Conclusions and Significance We identified the motif FxRFHxH as a VP3-specific B-cell epitope that is recognized by the neutralizing mAb 4A6. This finding might be valuable in understanding of the antigenic topology of VP3 of WPV. PMID:27191594

  14. A Conserved Epitope Mapped with a Monoclonal Antibody against the VP3 Protein of Goose Parvovirus by Using Peptide Screening and Phage Display Approaches.

    PubMed

    Li, Chenxi; Liu, Hongyu; Li, Jinzhe; Liu, Dafei; Meng, Runze; Zhang, Qingshan; Shaozhou, Wulin; Bai, Xiaofei; Zhang, Tingting; Liu, Ming; Zhang, Yun

    2016-01-01

    Waterfowl parvovirus (WPV) infection causes high mortality and morbidity in both geese (Anser anser) and Muscovy ducks (Cairina moschata), resulting in significant losses to the waterfowl industries. The VP3 protein of WPV is a major structural protein that induces neutralizing antibodies in the waterfowl. However, B-cell epitopes on the VP3 protein of WPV have not been characterized. To understand the antigenic determinants of the VP3 protein, we used the monoclonal antibody (mAb) 4A6 to screen a set of eight partially expressed overlapping peptides spanning VP3. Using western blotting and an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), we localized the VP3 epitope between amino acids (aa) 57 and 112. To identify the essential epitope residues, a phage library displaying 12-mer random peptides was screened with mAb 4A6. Phage clone peptides displayed a consensus sequence of YxRFHxH that mimicked the sequence 82Y/FNRFHCH88, which corresponded to amino acid residues 82 to 88 of VP3 protein of WPVs. mAb 4A6 binding to biotinylated fragments corresponding to amino acid residues 82 to 88 of the VP3 protein verified that the 82FxRFHxH88 was the VP3 epitope and that amino acids 82F is necessary to retain maximal binding to mAb 4A6. Parvovirus-positive goose and duck sera reacted with the epitope peptide by dot blotting assay, revealing the importance of these amino acids of the epitope in antibody-epitope binding reactivity. We identified the motif FxRFHxH as a VP3-specific B-cell epitope that is recognized by the neutralizing mAb 4A6. This finding might be valuable in understanding of the antigenic topology of VP3 of WPV.

  15. Screening a phage display library for a novel FGF8b-binding peptide with anti-tumor effect on prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Wenhui; Chen, Xilei; Li, Tao; Li, Yanmei; Wang, Ruixue; He, Dan; Luo, Wu; Li, Xiaokun; Wu, Xiaoping

    2013-05-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 8b (FGF8b) is the major isoform of FGF8 expressed in prostate cancer and it correlates with the stage and grade of the disease. FGF8b has been considered as a potential target for prostate cancer therapy. Here we isolated 12 specific FGF8b-binding phage clones by screening a phage display heptapeptide library with FGF8b. The peptide (HSQAAVP, named as P12) corresponding to one of these clones showed high homology to the immunoglobulin-like (Ig-like) domain II(D2) of high-affinity FGF8b receptor (FGFR3c), contained 3 identical amino acids (AVP) to the authentic FGFR3 D2 sequence aa 163–169 (LLAVPAA) directly participating in ligand binding, carried the same charges as its corresponding motif (aa163–169) in FGFR3c, suggesting that P12 may have a greater potential to interrupt FGF8b binding to its receptors than other identified heptapeptides do. Functional analysis indicated that synthetic P12 peptides mediate significant inhibition of FGF8b-induced cell proliferation, arrest cell cycle at the G0/G1 phase via suppression of Cyclin D1 and PCNA, and blockade of the activations of Erk1/2 and Akt cascades in both prostate cancer cells and vascular endothelial cells. The results demonstrated that the P12 peptide acting as an FGF8b antagonist may have therapeutic potential in prostate cancer. - Highlights: ► A novel FGF8b-binding peptide P12 was isolated from a phage display library. ► The mechanisms for P12 peptide inhibiting cell proliferation were proposed. ► P12 caused cell cycle arrest at G0/G1 phase via suppression of Cyclin D1 and PCNA. ► P12 suppressed FGF8b-induced activations of Akt and MAP kinases. ► P12 acting as an FGF8b antagonist may have therapeutic potential in prostate cancer.

  16. Comparison of the efficiency of antibody selection from semi-synthetic scFv and non-immune Fab phage display libraries against protein targets for rapid development of diagnostic immunoassays.

    PubMed

    Chan, Conrad E Z; Chan, Annie H Y; Lim, Angeline P C; Hanson, Brendon J

    2011-10-28

    Rapid development of diagnostic immunoassays against novel emerging or genetically modified pathogens in an emergency situation is dependent on the timely isolation of specific antibodies. Non-immune antibody phage display libraries are an efficient in vitro method for selecting monoclonal antibodies and hence ideal in these circumstances. Such libraries can be constructed from a variety of sources e.g. B cell cDNA or synthetically generated, and use a variety of antibody formats, typically scFv or Fab. However, antibody source and format can impact on the quality of antibodies generated and hence the effectiveness of this methodology for the timely production of antibodies. We have carried out a comparative screening of two antibody libraries, a semi-synthetic scFv library and a human-derived Fab library against the protective antigen toxin component of Bacillus anthracis and the epsilon toxin of Clostridium botulinum. We have shown that while the synthetic library produced a diverse collection of specific scFv-phage, these contained a high frequency of unnatural amber stops and glycosylation sites which limited their conversion to IgG, and also a high number which lost specificity when expressed as IgG. In contrast, these limitations were overcome by the use of a natural human library. Antibodies from both libraries could be used to develop sandwich ELISA assays with similar sensitivity. However, the ease and speed with which full-length IgG could be generated from the human-derived Fab library makes screening this type of library the preferable method for rapid antibody generation for diagnostic assay development.

  17. Identification of peptides with targeted adhesion to bone-like mineral via phage display and computational modeling.

    PubMed

    Segvich, Sharon; Biswas, Subhashis; Becker, Udo; Kohn, David H

    2009-01-01

    The challenges in engineering bone scaffolds reflect the complexity of bone as an organ. The organic-inorganic hybrid system design aims to provide signals within a conductive apatite layer to promote cell adhesion, proliferation and ultimately differentiation into bone tissue. Dual functioning peptides designed to specifically adhere to the apatite layer, while promoting cell adhesion via cell recognition sequences, may increase cell adhesion, leading to increased osteogenesis. The aim of this study is to identify peptide sequences with preferential adsorption towards apatite-based materials. Bone-like mineral films and hydroxyapatite disks were panned with a phage library to elucidate peptide sequences with favorable adsorption. Peptide sequences were analyzed using the web-based biotechnology tool RELIC and validated with a modified ELISA, in addition to being investigated using a newly developed method of high-throughput computational modeling. Peptides having the highest affinity and greatest potential to be incorporated into a dual functioning peptide design are APWHLSSQYSRT, VTKHLNQISQSY and STLPIPHEFSRE. These experiments provide a method of rationally designing peptides that adhere to apatite and that may improve bone tissue regeneration. This work also provides structure for investigating peptide/protein adsorption on apatite substrates with varied carbonate, or other impurity, content. Copyright 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. Chemokine CCR3 ligands-binding peptides derived from a random phage-epitope library.

    PubMed

    Houimel, Mehdi; Mazzucchelli, Luca

    2013-01-01

    Eosinophils are major effectors cells implicated in a number of chronic inflammatory diseases in humans, particularly bronchial asthma and allergic rhinitis. The human chemokine receptor C-C receptor 3 (hCCR3) provides a mechanism for the recruitment of eosinophils into tissue and thus has recently become an attractive biological target for therapeutic intervention. In order to develop peptides antagonists of hCCR3-hCCL11 (human eotaxin) interactions, a random bacteriophage hexapeptide library was used to map structural features of hCCR3 by determining the epitopes of neutralizing anti-hCCR3 mAb 7B11. This mAb t is selective for hCCR3 and exhibit potent antagonist activity in receptor binding and functional assays. After three rounds of biopanning, four mAb7B11-binding peptides were identified from a 6-mer linear peptide library. The phage bearing the peptides showed specific binding to immobilized mAb 7B11 with over 94% of phages bound being competitively inhibited by free synthetic peptides. In FACScan analysis all selected phage peptides were able to strongly inhibit the binding of mAb 7B11 to hCCR3-transfected preB-300-19 murine cells. Furthermore, synthetic peptides of the corresponding phage epitopes were effective in blocking the antibody-hCCR3 interactions and to inhibit the binding of hCCL11 to hCCR3 transfectants. Chemically synthesized peptides CKGERF, FERKGK, SSMKVK and RHVSSQ, effectively competed for (125)I-hCCL11 binding to hCCR3 with IC(50) ranging from 3.5 to 9.7μM. Calcium release and chemotaxis of hCCR3 transfectants or human eosinophils were inhibited by all peptides in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, they showed inhibitory effects on chemotaxis of human eosinophils induced by hCCL11, hCCL5, hCCL7, hCCL8, and hCCL24. Specificities of all selected peptides were assessed with hCXCR1, hCXCR2, hCXCR3, and hCCR5 receptors. Peptides CKGERF and FERKGK showed inhibitory effects on eosinophil chemotaxis in a murine model of mCCL11-induced

  19. Mimotope peptides selected from phage display combinatorial library by serum antibodies of pigs experimentally infected with Taenia solium as leads to developing diagnostic antigens for human neurocysticercosis.

    PubMed

    Gazarian, Karlen; Rowlay, Merril; Gazarian, Tatiana; Vazquez Buchelli, Jorge Enrique; Hernández Gonzáles, Marisela

    2012-12-01

    Neurocysticercosis is caused by penetration of the tapeworm Taenia solium larvae into the central nervous system resulting in a diverse range of neurologic complications including epilepsy in endemic areas that globalization spreads worldwide. Sensitive and specific immunodiagnosis is needed for the early detection and elimination of the parasite, but the lack of standardized, readily obtainable antigens is a challenge. Here, we used the phage display for resolving the problem. The rationale of the strategy rests on the concept that the screening of combinatorial libraries with polyclonal serum to pathogens reveals families of peptides mimicking the pathogen most immunodominant epitopes indispensable for the successful diagnosis. The screening of a 7mer library with serum IgG of four pigs experimentally infected with parasite followed by computer aided segregation of the selected sequences resulted in the discovery of four clusters of homologous sequences of which one presented a family of ten mimotopes selected by three infected pig serum IgGs; the common motif sequence LSPF carried by the family was considered to be the core of an immunodominant epitope of the parasite critical for the binding with the antibody that selected the mimotopes. The immunoassay testing permitted to select a mimotope whose synthetic peptide free of the phage with the amino acid sequence Leu-Ser-Fen-Pro-Ser-Val-Val that distinguished well a panel of 21 cerebrospinal fluids of neurocysticercosis patients from the fluids of individuals with neurological complications of other etiology. This peptide is proposed as a lead for developing a novel molecularly defined diagnostic antigen(s) for the neurocysticercosis.

  20. Phage display library selection of a hypoxia-binding scFv antibody for liver cancer metabolic marker discovery

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hang; Gao, Zhihui; Li, Yao; Sun, Zhongyuan; Xiang, Rong; Zhang, Sihe

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxia, which is frequently observed in liver cancer and metastasis, influences tumor progression and resistance to therapy. Although hypoxia-associated biomarkers are of use in other cancers, none is recognized as a surrogate for hypoxia in liver cancer. In this study, we generated seven unique human single-chain Fv (scFv) antibodies (Abs) specific to hypoxic liver cancer cells, using normoxia-depleted vs hypoxia-selected phage library panning technology. By developing the scFv immunoprecipitation-based mass spectrometry method, the antigen that bound with one of the Abs (H103) was identified as the M2 splice isoform of pyruvate kinase (PKM2), an enzyme that is a key regulator of aerobic glycolysis in cancer cells. Increased expression of PKM2 was induced by hypoxia in liver cancer cell lines. Immunohistochemical (IHC) staining showed that PKM2 was highly expressed in moderately and well differentiated hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) tissues with a hypovascular staining pattern. High expression of PKM2 was also localized in the perinecrotic area of intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC) tissues. The percentage of the HCC or ICC tumor expressing PKM2 was significantly higher with more tumor necrosis, low microvessel density, and advanced stage. Moreover, the H103 scFv Ab was efficiently internalized into hypoxic liver cancer cells and could have potential for targeted drug delivery. Conclusion: our study, for the first time, developed hypoxia-specific scFv Ab H103 to liver cancer cells, and revealed that PKM2 is a promising biomarker for hypoxia in HCC and ICC tissues. These allow further exploration of this valuable Ab and PKM2 antigen for hypoxia targeting in liver cancer. PMID:27203546

  1. Identification of two linear B-cell epitopes from West Nile virus NS1 by screening a phage-displayed random peptide library

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The West Nile virus (WNV) nonstructural protein 1 (NS1) is an important antigenic protein that elicits protective antibody responses in animals and can be used for the serological diagnosis of WNV infection. Although previous work has demonstrated the vital role of WNV NS1-specific antibody responses, the specific epitopes in the NS1 have not been identified. Results The present study describes the identification of two linear B-cell epitopes in WNV NS1 through screening a phage-displayed random 12-mer peptide library with two monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) 3C7 and 4D1 that directed against the NS1. The mAbs 3C7 and 4D1 recognized phages displaying peptides with the consensus motifs LTATTEK and VVDGPETKEC, respectively. Exact sequences of both motifs were found in the NS1 (895LTATTEK901 and 925VVDGPETKEC934). Further identification of the displayed B cell epitopes were conducted using a set of truncated peptides expressed as MBP fusion proteins. The data indicated that 896TATTEK901 and925VVDGPETKEC934 are minimal determinants of the linear B cell epitopes recognized by the mAbs 3C7 and 4D1, respectively. Antibodies present in the serum of WNV-positive horses recognized the minimal linear epitopes in Western blot analysis, indicating that the two peptides are antigenic in horses during infection. Furthermore, we found that the epitope recognized by 3C7 is conserved only among WNV strains, whereas the epitope recognized by 4D1 is a common motif shared among WNV and other members of Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) serocomplex. Conclusions We identified TATTEK and VVDGPETKEC as NS1-specific linear B-cell epitopes recognized by the mAbs 3C7 and 4D1, respectively. The knowledge and reagents generated in this study may have potential applications in differential diagnosis and the development of epitope-based marker vaccines against WNV and other viruses of JEV serocomplex. PMID:21729328

  2. OVCAR-3 Spheroid-Derived Cells Display Distinct Metabolic Profiles

    PubMed Central

    Vermeersch, Kathleen A.; Wang, Lijuan; Mezencev, Roman; McDonald, John F.; Styczynski, Mark P.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Recently, multicellular spheroids were isolated from a well-established epithelial ovarian cancer cell line, OVCAR-3, and were propagated in vitro. These spheroid-derived cells displayed numerous hallmarks of cancer stem cells, which are chemo- and radioresistant cells thought to be a significant cause of cancer recurrence and resultant mortality. Gene set enrichment analysis of expression data from the OVCAR-3 cells and the spheroid-derived putative cancer stem cells identified several metabolic pathways enriched in differentially expressed genes. Before this, there had been little previous knowledge or investigation of systems-scale metabolic differences between cancer cells and cancer stem cells, and no knowledge of such differences in ovarian cancer stem cells. Methods To determine if there were substantial metabolic changes corresponding with these transcriptional differences, we used two-dimensional gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry to measure the metabolite profiles of the two cell lines. Results These two cell lines exhibited significant metabolic differences in both intracellular and extracellular metabolite measurements. Principal components analysis, an unsupervised dimensional reduction technique, showed complete separation between the two cell types based on their metabolite profiles. Pathway analysis of intracellular metabolomics data revealed close overlap with metabolic pathways identified from gene expression data, with four out of six pathways found enriched in gene-level analysis also enriched in metabolite-level analysis. Some of those pathways contained multiple metabolites that were individually statistically significantly different between the two cell lines, with one of the most broadly and consistently different pathways, arginine and proline metabolism, suggesting an interesting hypothesis about cancerous and stem-like metabolic phenotypes in this pair of cell lines. Conclusions Overall, we demonstrate for the

  3. The comparison of BLyS-binding peptides from phage display library and computer-aided design on BLyS-TACI interaction.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yacong; Hao, Xiafei; Feng, Jiannan; Shen, Beifen; Wei, Jing; Sun, Jian

    2015-02-01

    BLyS antagonists have become the therapeutic reagents in the treatment of autoimmune disorders. BLyS binding peptides and their Fc fusion proteins may be alternative BLyS antagonists in such application. In this study, the activity of BLyS binding peptide 814 obtained from phage display library and peptide TA designed by computer-aided modeling on the interaction of BLyS-TACI was compared. In addition, to maintain the spatial conformation and stability of the peptides, human IgG1 Fc fragment was fused to peptides 814 and TA to form peptide-Fc fusion proteins, steady and innovative peptibodies. The prokaryotic expression plasmids pET30a-814-Fc and pET30a-TA-Fc for these peptibodies were acquired by genetic engineering, and confirmed by DNA sequencing. After the right plasmids were transformed into Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3), the fusion proteins were expressed and purified by protein A affinity column. As a result of competitive ELISA, peptides 814 and TA at 100μg/ml displayed 52.2% and 28.6% inhibition on the interaction of TACI-Fc with BLyS respectively. Moreover, 814-Fc and TA-Fc fusion proteins could bind to BLyS in a dosage-dependent manner as TACI-Fc did, and displayed 54.7% and 26.1% inhibition on the interaction of TACI-Fc-Myc with BLyS at 100μg/ml respectively. So 814-Fc and TA-Fc proteins had the similar bioactivity as the peptides did. Furthermore, compared with TA-Fc, 814-Fc showed two-fold inhibition effect on BLyS binding to TACI, suggesting that 814-Fc could inhibit BLyS bioactivity significantly and might serve as a potential antagonist to treat autoimmune diseases associated with BLyS overexpression. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Gene expression response of Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis phage type 8 to the subinhibitory concentrations of the plant - derived compounds, trans-cinnamaldehyde, and eugenol

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Background: Salmonella Enteritidis phage type 8 (PT8) is a major poultry-associated Salmonella strain implicated in foodborne outbreaks in the United States. We previously reported that two GRAS-status, plant-derived compounds, trans-cinnamaldehyde (TC) and eugenol (EG) significantly reduced S. Ent...

  5. Dissecting the Binding Mode of Low Affinity Phage Display Peptide Ligands to Protein Targets by Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange Coupled to Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Phage display (PD) is frequently used to discover peptides capable of binding to biological protein targets. The structural characterization of peptide–protein complexes is often challenging due to their low binding affinities and high structural flexibility. Here, we investigate the use of hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) to characterize interactions of low affinity peptides with their cognate protein targets. The HDX-MS workflow was optimized to accurately detect low-affinity peptide–protein interactions by use of ion mobility, electron transfer dissociation, nonbinding control peptides, and statistical analysis of replicate data. We show that HDX-MS can identify regions in the two epigenetic regulator proteins KDM4C and KDM1A that are perturbed through weak interactions with PD-identified peptides. Two peptides cause reduced HDX on opposite sides of the active site of KDM4C, indicating distinct binding modes. In contrast, the perturbation site of another PD-selected peptide inhibiting the function of KDM1A maps to a GST-tag. Our results demonstrate that HDX-MS can validate and map weak peptide–protein interactions and pave the way for understanding and optimizing the binding of peptide scaffolds identified through PD and similar ligand discovery approaches. PMID:25325890

  6. Peptide mimics selected from immune sera using phage display technology can replace native antigens in the diagnosis of Epstein-Barr virus infection.

    PubMed

    Casey, J L; Coley, A M; Parisi, K; Foley, M

    2009-02-01

    There is an expanding area of small molecule discovery, especially in the area of peptide mimetics. Peptide sequences can be used to substitute for the entire native antigen for use in diagnostic assays. Our approach is to select peptides that mimic epitopes of the natural immune response to Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) that may be recognised by antibodies typically produced after infection with EBV. We screened a random peptide library on sera from rabbits immunised with a crude preparation of EBV and serum antibodies from a patient with a high titer of EBV antibodies. We selected four peptides (Eb1-4) with the highest relative binding affinity with immune rabbit sera and a single peptide with high affinity to human serum antibodies. The peptides were coupled to the carrier molecule BSA and the recognition of the peptides by IgM antibodies in clinical samples after infection with EBV was measured. The sensitivities were Eb1 94%, Eb2, 3, 4 88%, H1 81% and all had 100% specificity. This study illustrates that the phage display approach to select epitope mimics can be applied to polyclonal antibodies and peptides that represent several diagnostically important epitopes can be selected simultaneously. This panel of EBV peptides representing a wide coverage of immunodominant epitopes could replace crude antigen preparations currently used for capture in commercial diagnostic tests for EBV.

  7. Peptide mimics selected from immune sera using phage display technology can replace native antigens in the diagnosis of Epstein–Barr virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Casey, J.L.; Coley, A.M.; Parisi, K.; Foley, M.

    2009-01-01

    There is an expanding area of small molecule discovery, especially in the area of peptide mimetics. Peptide sequences can be used to substitute for the entire native antigen for use in diagnostic assays. Our approach is to select peptides that mimic epitopes of the natural immune response to Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) that may be recognised by antibodies typically produced after infection with EBV. We screened a random peptide library on sera from rabbits immunised with a crude preparation of EBV and serum antibodies from a patient with a high titer of EBV antibodies. We selected four peptides (Eb1–4) with the highest relative binding affinity with immune rabbit sera and a single peptide with high affinity to human serum antibodies. The peptides were coupled to the carrier molecule BSA and the recognition of the peptides by IgM antibodies in clinical samples after infection with EBV was measured. The sensitivities were Eb1 94%, Eb2, 3, 4 88%, H1 81% and all had 100% specificity. This study illustrates that the phage display approach to select epitope mimics can be applied to polyclonal antibodies and peptides that represent several diagnostically important epitopes can be selected simultaneously. This panel of EBV peptides representing a wide coverage of immunodominant epitopes could replace crude antigen preparations currently used for capture in commercial diagnostic tests for EBV. PMID:19073711

  8. A Phage Display Selected 7-mer Peptide Inhibitor of the Tannerella forsythia Metalloprotease-Like Enzyme Karilysin can be Truncated to Ser-Trp-Phe-Pro

    PubMed Central

    Skottrup, Peter Durand; Sørensen, Grete; Ksiazek, Miroslaw; Potempa, Jan; Riise, Erik

    2012-01-01

    Tannerella forsythia is a gram-negative bacteria, which is strongly associated with the development of periodontal disease. Karilysin is a newly identified metalloprotease-like enzyme, that is secreted from T. forsythia. Karilysin modulates the host immune response and is therefore considered a likely drug target. In this study peptides were selected towards the catalytic domain from Karilysin (Kly18) by phage display. The peptides were linear with low micromolar binding affinities. The two best binders (peptide14 and peptide15), shared the consensus sequence XWFPXXXGGG. A peptide15 fusion with Maltose Binding protein (MBP) was produced with peptide15 fused to the N-terminus of MBP. The peptide15-MBP was expressed in E. coli and the purified fusion-protein was used to verify Kly18 specific binding. Chemically synthesised peptide15 (SWFPLRSGGG) could inhibit the enzymatic activity of both Kly18 and intact Karilysin (Kly48). Furthermore, peptide15 could slow down the autoprocessing of intact Kly48 to Kly18. The WFP motif was important for inhibition and a truncation study further demonstrated that the N-terminal serine was also essential for Kly18 inhibition. The SWFP peptide had a Ki value in the low micromolar range, which was similar to the intact peptide15. In conclusion SWFP is the first reported inhibitor of Karilysin and can be used as a valuable tool in structure-function studies of Karilysin. PMID:23119051

  9. A phage display selected 7-mer peptide inhibitor of the Tannerella forsythia metalloprotease-like enzyme Karilysin can be truncated to Ser-Trp-Phe-Pro.

    PubMed

    Skottrup, Peter Durand; Sørensen, Grete; Ksiazek, Miroslaw; Potempa, Jan; Riise, Erik

    2012-01-01

    Tannerella forsythia is a gram-negative bacteria, which is strongly associated with the development of periodontal disease. Karilysin is a newly identified metalloprotease-like enzyme, that is secreted from T. forsythia. Karilysin modulates the host immune response and is therefore considered a likely drug target. In this study peptides were selected towards the catalytic domain from Karilysin (Kly18) by phage display. The peptides were linear with low micromolar binding affinities. The two best binders (peptide14 and peptide15), shared the consensus sequence XWFPXXXGGG. A peptide15 fusion with Maltose Binding protein (MBP) was produced with peptide15 fused to the N-terminus of MBP. The peptide15-MBP was expressed in E. coli and the purified fusion-protein was used to verify Kly18 specific binding. Chemically synthesised peptide15 (SWFPLRSGGG) could inhibit the enzymatic activity of both Kly18 and intact Karilysin (Kly48). Furthermore, peptide15 could slow down the autoprocessing of intact Kly48 to Kly18. The WFP motif was important for inhibition and a truncation study further demonstrated that the N-terminal serine was also essential for Kly18 inhibition. The SWFP peptide had a Ki value in the low micromolar range, which was similar to the intact peptide15. In conclusion SWFP is the first reported inhibitor of Karilysin and can be used as a valuable tool in structure-function studies of Karilysin.

  10. High throughput cytotoxicity screening of anti-HER2 immunotoxins conjugated with antibody fragments from phage-displayed synthetic antibody libraries

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Shin-Chen; Chen, Hong-Sen; Lin, Hung-Wei; Chao, Wei-Ting; Chen, Yao-Sheng; Fu, Chi-Yu; Yu, Chung-Ming; Huang, Kai-Fa; Wang, Andrew H.-J.; Yang, An-Suei

    2016-01-01

    Immunotoxins are an important class of antibody-based therapeutics. The potency of the immunotoxins depends on the antibody fragments as the guiding modules targeting designated molecules on cell surfaces. Phage-displayed synthetic antibody scFv libraries provide abundant antibody fragment candidates as targeting modules for the immunoconjugates, but the discovery of optimally functional immunoconjugates is limited by the scFv-payload conjugation procedure. In this work, cytotoxicity screening of non-covalently assembled immunotoxins was developed in high throughput format to discover highly functional synthetic antibody fragments for delivering toxin payloads. The principles governing the efficiency of the antibodies as targeting modules have been elucidated from large volume of cytotoxicity data: (a) epitope and paratope of the antibody-based targeting module are major determinants for the potency of the immunotoxins; (b) immunotoxins with bivalent antibody-based targeting modules are generally superior in cytotoxic potency to those with corresponding monovalent targeting module; and (c) the potency of the immunotoxins is positively correlated with the densities of the cell surface antigen. These findings suggest that screening against the target cells with a large pool of antibodies from synthetic antibody libraries without the limitations of natural antibody responses can lead to optimal potency and minimal off-target toxicity of the immunoconjugates. PMID:27550798

  11. Comprehensive mapping of functional epitopes on dengue virus glycoprotein E DIII for binding to broadly neutralizing antibodies 4E11 and 4E5A by phage display.

    PubMed

    Frei, Julia C; Kielian, Margaret; Lai, Jonathan R

    2015-11-01

    Here we investigated the binding of Dengue virus envelope glycoprotein domain III (DIII) by two broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs), 4E11 and 4E5A. There are four serotypes of Dengue virus (DENV-1 to -4), whose DIII sequences vary by up to 49%. We used combinatorial alanine scanning mutagenesis, a phage display approach, to map functional epitopes (those residues that contribute most significantly to the energetics of antibody-antigen interaction) on these four serotypes. Our results showed that 4E11, which binds strongly to DENV-1, -2, and -3, and moderately to DENV-4, recognized a common conserved core functional epitope involving DIII residues K310, L/I387, L389, and W391. There were also unique recognition features for each serotype, suggesting that 4E11 has flexible recognition requirements. Similar scanning studies for the related bNAb 4E5A, which binds more tightly to DENV-4, identified broader functional epitopes on DENV-1. These results provide useful information for immunogen and therapeutic antibody design.

  12. Generation of Recombinant Antibodies against the beta-(1,6)-Branched beta-(1,3)-D-Glucan Schizophyllan from Immunized Mice via Phage Display

    PubMed Central

    Buchmeier, Sabine; Frenzel, André; Tinnefeld, Philip

    2017-01-01

    beta-(1,6)-Branched beta-(1,3)-D-glucans like schizophyllan from the basidiomycete Schizophyllum commune excite various immunostimulatory effects and have been clinically tested as adjuvants. Some of the glucans are also applicable in food or petrol industry due to their viscosity and temperature stability in aqueous solution. Antibodies against these glucans could be used as tool for analysis of glucan preparations or for further research of its bioactivity. Therefore, an immune phage display library was constructed from mice immunized with schizophyllan. Three recombinant monoclonal antibodies were isolated from this library by affinity selection (panning) on schizophyllan. The half-maximal effective concentration (EC50) values for those antibodies varied between 16.4 ng mL−1 and 21.3 ng mL−1. The clones showed binding specificity not only for schizophyllan but also for other beta-(1,6)-branched beta-(1,3)-D-glucans of similar macromolecular structure. Denaturation of the secondary structure led to a reduced antibody binding, indicating an epitope requiring the correct conformation of the triple helical structure of the glucans. PMID:28620550

  13. Discovering neutralizing antibodies targeting the stem epitope of H1N1 influenza hemagglutinin with synthetic phage-displayed antibody libraries.

    PubMed

    Tung, Chao-Ping; Chen, Ing-Chien; Yu, Chung-Ming; Peng, Hung-Pin; Jian, Jhih-Wei; Ma, Shiou-Hwa; Lee, Yu-Ching; Jan, Jia-Tsrong; Yang, An-Suei

    2015-10-12

    Broadly neutralizing antibodies developed from the IGHV1-69 germline gene are known to bind to the stem region of hemagglutinin in diverse influenza viruses but the sequence determinants for the antigen recognition, including neutralization potency and binding affinity, are not clearly understood. Such understanding could inform designs of synthetic antibody libraries targeting the stem epitope on hemagglutinin, leading to artificially designed antibodies that are functionally advantageous over antibodies from natural antibody repertoires. In this work, the sequence space of the complementarity determining regions of a broadly neutralizing antibody (F10) targeting the stem epitope on the hemagglutinin of a strain of H1N1 influenza virus was systematically explored; the elucidated antibody-hemagglutinin recognition principles were used to design a phage-displayed antibody library, which was then used to discover neutralizing antibodies against another strain of H1N1 virus. More than 1000 functional antibody candidates were selected from the antibody library and were shown to neutralize the corresponding strain of influenza virus with up to 7 folds higher potency comparing with the parent F10 antibody. The antibody library could be used to discover functionally effective antibodies against other H1N1 influenza viruses, supporting the notion that target-specific antibody libraries can be designed and constructed with systematic sequence-function information.

  14. Toward a code for the interactions of zinc fingers with DNA: selection of randomized fingers displayed on phage.

    PubMed Central

    Choo, Y; Klug, A

    1994-01-01

    We have used two selection techniques to study sequence-specific DNA recognition by the zinc finger, a small, modular DNA-binding minidomain. We have chosen zinc fingers because they bind as independent modules and so can be linked together in a peptide designed to bind a predetermined DNA site. In this paper, we describe how a library of zinc fingers displayed on the surface of bacteriophage enables selection of fingers capable of binding to given DNA triplets. The amino acid sequences of selected fingers which bind the same triplet are compared to examine how sequence-specific DNA recognition occurs. Our results can be rationalized in terms of coded interactions between zinc fingers and DNA, involving base contacts from a few alpha-helical positions. In the paper following this one, we describe a complementary technique which confirms the identity of amino acids capable of DNA sequence discrimination from these positions. Images PMID:7972027

  15. Phage display reveals multiple contact sites between FhuA, an outer membrane receptor of Escherichia coli, and TonB.

    PubMed

    Carter, David M; Gagnon, Jean-Nicolas; Damlaj, Moussab; Mandava, Suneeta; Makowski, Lee; Rodi, Diane J; Pawelek, Peter D; Coulton, James W

    2006-03-17

    The ferric hydroxamate uptake receptor FhuA from Escherichia coli transports siderophores across the outer membrane (OM). TonB-ExbB-ExbD transduces energy from the cytoplasmic membrane to the OM by contacts between TonB and OM receptors that contain the Ton box, a consensus sequence near the N terminus. Although the Ton box is a region of known contact between OM receptors and TonB, our biophysical studies established that TonB binds to FhuA through multiple regions of interaction. Panning of phage-displayed random peptide libraries (Ph.D.-12, Ph.D.-C7C) against TonB identified peptide sequences that specifically interact with TonB. Analyses of these sequences using the Receptor Ligand Contacts (RELIC) suite of programs revealed clusters of multiply aligned peptides that mapped to FhuA. These clusters localized to a continuous periplasm-accessible surface: Ton box/switch helix; cork domain/beta1 strand; and periplasmic turn 8. Guided by such matches, synthetic oligonucleotides corresponding to DNA sequences identical to fhuA were fused to malE; peptides corresponding to the above regions were displayed at the N terminus of E.coli maltose-binding protein (MBP). Purified FhuA peptides fused to MBP bound specifically to TonB by ELISA. Furthermore, they competed with ligand-loaded FhuA for binding to TonB. RELIC also identified clusters of multiply aligned peptides corresponding to the Ton box regions in BtuB, FepA, and FecA; to periplasmic turn 8 in BtuB and FecA; and to periplasmic turns 1 and 2 in FepA. These experimental outcomes identify specific molecular contacts made between TonB and OM receptors that extend beyond the well-characterized Ton box.

  16. A phage-displayed chicken single-chain antibody fused to alkaline phosphatase detects Fusarium pathogens and their presence in cereal grains.

    PubMed

    Hu, Zu-Quan; Li, He-Ping; Zhang, Jing-Bo; Huang, Tao; Liu, Jin-Long; Xue, Sheng; Wu, Ai-Bo; Liao, Yu-Cai

    2013-02-18

    Fusarium and its poisonous mycotoxins are distributed worldwide and are of particular interest in agriculture and food safety. A simple analytical method to detect pathogens is essential for forecasting diseases and controlling mycotoxins. This article describes a proposed method for convenient and sensitive detection of Fusarium pathogens that uses the fusion of single-chain variable fragment (scFv) and alkaline phosphatase (AP). A highly reactive scFv antibody specific to soluble cell wall-bound proteins (SCWPs) of F. verticillioides was selected from an immunized chicken phagemid library by phage display. The antibody was verified to bind on the surface of ungerminated conidiospores and mycelia of F. verticillioides. The scFv-AP fusion was constructed, and soluble expression in bacteria was confirmed. Both the antibody properties and enzymatic activity were retained, and the antigen-binding capacity of the fusion was enhanced by the addition of a linker. Surface plasmon resonance measurements confirmed that the fusion displayed 4-fold higher affinity compared with the fusion's parental scFv antibody. Immunoblot analyses showed that the fusion had good binding capacity to the components from SCWPs of F. verticillioides, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays revealed that the detection limit of the fungus was below 10(-2) μg mL(-1), superior to the scFv antibody. The fusion protein was able to detect fungal concentrations as low as 10(-3) mg g(-1) of maize grains in both naturally and artificially contaminated samples. Thus, the fusion can be applied in rapid and simple diagnosis of Fusarium contamination in field and stored grain or in food. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Lateral flow assay for rapid detection of white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) using a phage-displayed peptide as bio-recognition probe.

    PubMed

    Kulabhusan, Prabir Kumar; Rajwade, Jyutika M; Sahul Hameed, A S; Paknikar, Kishore M

    2017-03-27

    White spot disease caused by the white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) has a major socio-economic impact on shrimp farming in India. It has been realized that a field-usable diagnostic capable of rapid detection of WSSV can prevent huge economic losses in disease outbreaks. In this work, we explored the possibility of using a peptide as bio-recognition probe in a field-usable device for the detection of WSSV from infected shrimps and prawns. A commercially available random phage-display library was screened against rVP28 (a major structural protein of WSSV, expressed as a recombinant protein in Escherichia coli). A bacteriophage clone VP28-4L was obtained, and its binding to purified rVP28 protein as well as WSSV from infected shrimp Litopaeneus vannamei tissue was confirmed by ELISA and western blot. The apparent equilibrium dissociation constant (Kd,app) was calculated to be 810 nM. VP28-4L did not show cross-reactivity with any other shrimp viruses. A 12-mer peptide (pep28, with the sequence 'TFQAFDLSPFPS') displayed on the VP28-4L was synthesized, and its diagnostic potential was evaluated in a lateral flow assay (LFA). Visual detection of WSSV could be achieved using biotinylated-pep28 and streptavidin-conjugated gold nanoparticles. In LFA, 12.5 μg/mL of the virus could be detected from L. vannamei gill tissue homogenate within 20 min. Pep28 thus becomes an attractive candidate in bio-recognition of WSSV in field-usable diagnostic platforms benefitting the aquaculture sector.

  18. NOVEL AMYLOID-BETA SPECIFIC scFv and VH ANTIBODY FRAGMENTS FROM HUMAN AND MOUSE PHAGE DISPLAY ANTIBODY LIBRARIES

    PubMed Central

    Medecigo, M.; Manoutcharian, K.; Vasilevko, V.; Govezensky, T.; Munguia, M. E.; Becerril, B.; Luz-Madrigal, A.; Vaca, L.; Cribbs, D. H.; Gevorkian, G.

    2010-01-01

    Anti-amyloid immunotherapy has been proposed as an appropriate therapeutic approach for Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Significant efforts have been made towards the generation and assessment of antibody-based reagents capable of preventing and clearing amyloid aggregates as well as preventing their synaptotoxic effects. In this study, we selected a novel set of human anti-amyloid-beta peptide 1-42 (Aβ1-42) recombinant monoclonal antibodies in a single chain fragment variable (scFv) and a single domain (VH) formats. We demonstrated that these antibody fragments recognize in a specific manner amyloid beta deposits in APP/Tg mouse brains, inhibit toxicity of oligomeric Aβ1-42 in neuroblastoma cell cultures in a concentration-dependently manner and reduced amyloid deposits in APP/Tg2576 mice after intracranial administration. These antibody fragments recognize epitopes in the middle/C-terminus region of Aβ, which makes them strong therapeutic candidates due to the fact that most of the Aβ species found in the brains of AD patients display extensive N-terminus truncations/modifications. PMID:20451261

  19. Novel amyloid-beta specific scFv and VH antibody fragments from human and mouse phage display antibody libraries.

    PubMed

    Medecigo, M; Manoutcharian, K; Vasilevko, V; Govezensky, T; Munguia, M E; Becerril, B; Luz-Madrigal, A; Vaca, L; Cribbs, D H; Gevorkian, G

    2010-06-01

    Anti-amyloid immunotherapy has been proposed as an appropriate therapeutic approach for Alzheimer's disease (AD). Significant efforts have been made towards the generation and assessment of antibody-based reagents capable of preventing and clearing amyloid aggregates as well as preventing their synaptotoxic effects. In this study, we selected a novel set of human anti-amyloid-beta peptide 1-42 (Abeta1-42) recombinant monoclonal antibodies in a single chain fragment variable (scFv) and a single-domain (VH) format. We demonstrated that these antibody fragments recognize in a specific manner amyloid-beta deposits in APP/Tg mouse brains, inhibit toxicity of oligomeric Abeta1-42 in neuroblastoma cell cultures in a concentration-dependent manner and reduced amyloid deposits in APP/Tg2576 mice after intracranial administration. These antibody fragments recognize epitopes in the middle/C-terminus region of Abeta, which makes them strong therapeutic candidates due to the fact that most of the Abeta species found in the brains of AD patients display extensive N-terminus truncations/modifications. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Phage therapy pharmacology phage cocktails.

    PubMed

    Chan, Benjamin K; Abedon, Stephen T

    2012-01-01

    Phage therapy is the clinical or veterinary application of bacterial viruses (bacteriophages) as antibacterial "drugs." More generally, phages can be used as biocontrol agents against plant as well as foodborne pathogens. In this chapter, we consider the therapeutic use of phage cocktails, which is the combining of two or more phage types to produce more pharmacologically diverse formulations. The primary motivation for the use of cocktails is their broader spectra of activity in comparison to individual phage isolates: they can impact either more bacterial types or achieve effectiveness under a greater diversity of conditions. The combining of phages can also facilitate better targeting of multiple strains making up individual bacterial species or covering multiple species that might be responsible for similar disease states, in general providing, relative to individual phage isolates, a greater potential for presumptive or empirical treatment. Contrasting the use of phage banks, or even phage isolation against specific etiologies that have been obtained directly from patients under treatment, here we consider the utility as well as potential shortcomings associated with the use of phage cocktails as therapeutic antibacterial agents.

  1. Identification and characterization of a spontaneously aggregating amyloid-forming variant of human PrP((90-231)) through phage-display screening of variants randomized between residues 101 and 112.

    PubMed

    Verma, Archana; Sharma, Swati; Ganguly, Nirmal Kumar; Majumdar, Siddharta; Guptasarma, Purnananda; Luthra-Guptasarma, Manni

    2008-01-01

    The N-terminal 'unstructured' region of the human prion protein [PrP((90-231))] is believed to play a role in its aggregation because mutations in this region are associated with seeding-independent deposition disorders like Gerstmann-Straussler-Scheinker disease (GSS). One way of examining the effects of such mutations is to search combinatorially derived libraries for sequence variants showing a propensity to aggregate and/or the ability to interact with prion molecules folded into a beta-sheet-based conformation (i.e., beta-PrP or PrP(Sc)). We created a library of 1.8x10(7) variants randomized between positions 101 and 112, displayed it on filamentous bacteriophage, and 'spiked' it with a approximately 25% population of phages-bearing wild-type prion (wt-PrP). Screening was performed through four rounds of biopanning and amplification against immobilized beta-PrP, and yielded three beta-PrP-binding populations: wt-PrP (26% representation) and two non-wt-PrP variants ( approximately 10% and approximately 64% representation, respectively). The remarkable enrichment of one non-wt-PrP variant (MutPrP) incorporating residues KPSKPKTNMKHM in place of KGVLTWFSPLWQ, despite its initial representation at a 5 million-fold lower level than wt-PrP, caused us to produce it and discover: (i) that it readily aggregates into thioflavin-T-binding amyloids between pH 6.0 and 9.0, (ii) that it adopts a soluble beta-sheet based monomeric structure at pH 10.0, (iii) that it is less thermally stable and more compact than wt-PrP, and (iv) that it displays significantly greater resistance to proteolysis than wt-PrP. Our results suggest that sequence variations in the 101-112 region can indeed predispose the prion for aggregation.

  2. The use of phage display technique for the isolation of androgen receptor interacting peptides with (F/W)XXL(F/W) and FXXLY new signature motifs.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Cheng-Lung; Chen, Yuh-Ling; Yeh, Shuyuan; Ting, Huei-Ju; Hu, Yueh-Chiang; Lin, Hank; Wang, Xin; Chang, Chawnshang

    2003-06-27

    Early studies suggested that the signature motif, LXXLL, within steroid hormone receptor p160 coregulators may play important roles for the mediation of receptor-coregulator interaction. Interestingly, several androgen receptor (AR) coregulators, such as ARA70 and ARA55, may not use such a unique motif to mediate their coregulator activity. Here we apply the phage display technique to identify some new signature motifs, (F/W)XXL(F/W) and FXXLY (where F is phenylalanine, W is tryptophan, L is leucine, Y is tyrosine, and X is any amino acid) that can influence the interaction between AR and AR coregulators. Sequence analyses found that several AR coregulators, such as ARA70, ARA55, ARA54, and FHL2, contain FXXL(F/Y) motifs. Both glutathione S-transferase pull-down assays and transient transfection reporter assays demonstrate that these AR coregulators may use the FXXL(F/Y) motif to interact with AR and exert their AR coregulator activity. Exchanging the amino acid of Phe, Trp, or Tyr in this newly identified signature motif cluster may influence these peptides to interact with AR. The motif-containing peptides, as well as ARA70 or ARA54, may require selective flanking sequences for the better interaction with AR. In addition to influencing the AR transactivation, these motifs in AR-interacting peptides/proteins were also able to influence the AR N-/C-terminal interaction. Together, our data suggest that AR interacting peptides and/or AR coregulators may utilize the (F/W)XXL(F/W) and FXXLY motifs to mediate their interaction with AR and exert their influences on the AR transactivation.

  3. Generation of AcGFP fusion with single-chain Fv selected from a phage display library constructed from mice hyperimmunized against 5-methyl 2'-deoxycytidine.

    PubMed

    Ohshima, Motohiro; Inoue, Kazuyuki; Hayashi, Hideki; Tsuji, Daiki; Mizugaki, Michinao; Itoh, Kunihiko

    2010-11-01

    DNA methylation is involved in many diseases such as cancer and autoimmunity. We generated recombinant single-chain Fv (scFv) antibodies against 5-methyl-2'-deoxycytidine (m(5)dCyd) using phage display technology and a hyperimmunized mouse, and the scFv of most interest were constructed as fusion proteins with green fluorescent protein obtained from Aequorea coerulescens GFP (AcGFP). Using RNA isolated from mouse spleens, we constructed a scFv library consisting of λ light chains. The scFv library was selected against m(5)Cyd-BSA and enriched through four rounds of panning. The scFv library was concentrated about 390-fold and an individual clone was reacted with m(5)Cyd-BSA. Two scFvs with high reactivity for m(5)Cyd-BSA termed 1-2 and 1-12 were produced. Furthermore, methylated DNA-binding activities of the scFvs were confirmed using an indirect immunofluorescence assay. Additionally, N- and C-terminal scFv 1-2 fusion with AcGFP were constructed, and we observed the N-terminal AcGFP exhibited much higher fluorescence intensity than the C-terminal fusions. The AcGFP-scFv 1-2 modified N-terminus of scFv with AcGFP had high fluorescence intensity, but the scFv 1-2-AcGFP modified C-terminus of scFv with AcGFP had low fluorescence intensity. The cross-reactivity of AcGFP-scFv 1-2 was similar to scFv 1-2, and thus, AcGFP-scFv 1-2 could be used in a direct immunofluorescence assay. The scFv fusion proteins may be useful for the detection and quantification of cellular methylated DNA in various specimens.

  4. Selection of peptide ligands for the antimucin core antibody C595 using phage display technology: definition of candidate epitopes for a cancer vaccine.

    PubMed

    Laing, P; Tighe, P; Kwiatkowski, E; Milligan, J; Price, M; Sewell, H

    1995-06-01

    Aims-To further define the specificity of the antimucin core antibody C595 by fitting it with a family of hexapeptide ligands by immunoselection of filamentous bacteriophage from a gene III display library of approximately 6.4 x 10(7) random hexapeptides.Methods-Three rounds of immuno-selection were used to enrich for C595 binding phage. DNA sequencing revealed the hexapeptides expressed. Bacteriophage and corresponding synthetic hexapeptides were used in ELISA assay to determine binding affinities.Results-Twenty nine clones from this selected population were analysed. Seven contained the natural epitope RPAP, encoded by two different DNA sequences; 17/29 contained the motif RLPP. In all, 28/29 clones contained the motif RXXP and one clone (RVRPAP) contained the motif RXXP in two peptidic registers; 24/28 clones (6/8 DNA sequences) contained a hydrophobic residue (V or I) at position 1 relative to the RXXP motif. In addition the proximity of RXXP to glycine (position 5) suggests that this contributes in the natural epitope to antibody/antigen binding, which was not detected by chemical synthetic methods. One clone, KSKAGV, bears no obvious relationship to the natural epitope and therefore qualifies as a weakly binding mimotope.Conclusions-This approach has rapidly defined the specificity of this antibody in unprecedented detail, and provides a more comprehensive molecular basis for exploring the immune recognition of the MUC1 mucin by the C595 antibody. Importantly, the novel but related epitopes seen provide peptide specificities and a strategy which may prove useful in generating cancer vaccine candidates.

  5. Analysis of the CD2 and spliceosomal Sm B/B' polyproline-arginine motifs defined by a monoclonal antibody using a phage-displayed random peptide library.

    PubMed

    Monos, Dimitri; Heliopoulos, John; Argyris, Elias; Cordopatis, Paul; Zompra, Aikaterini; Kamoun, Malek

    2006-01-01

    The cytoplasmic region of the CD2 receptor of lymphocytes contains proline-rich motifs, which are involved in T cell activation and interleukin-2 production. An intracellular CD2 binding protein, CD2BP2, interacts with two tandem PPPPGHR segments of the CD2 tail. CD2BP2 contains a GYF (glycine-tyrosine-phenylalanine) domain that confers binding to these proline-rich sequences. Monoclonal antibody 3E10 that was previously raised against a peptide containing the CD2 PPPPGHR segment reacts with the native CD2 molecule and spliceosomal Sm B/B' proteins. To identify the exact epitope on the CD2 peptide recognized by 3E10, a phage-displayed combinatorial peptide library was used. Analysis of the selected clones revealed that the mAb 3E10 binds preferentially to the motif PxxPPGxR. Experiments using amino acid substitutions with synthetic peptides confirmed the reactivity of mAb 3E10 with this motif. In addition, we show that several similarities exist between this motif and the CD2BP2-GFY recognition motif PPGxR/K. Binding of antibody 3E10 indicates some degree of degeneracy, which is consistent with its ability to recognize structurally related polyproline-arginine motifs found in intracellular proteins including Sm B/B' proteins and other RNA binding proteins. Thus, mAb 3E10 can be used to specifically identify a sub-class of proline-rich motifs, and as such can be used to study the potential role of these proline-rich sequences in mediating protein-protein interactions.

  6. Isolation of a monoclonal antibody from a phage display library binding the rhesus macaque MHC class I allomorph Mamu-A1*001

    PubMed Central

    Holman, Nathan; Weinfurter, Jason T.; Harsla, Trevor R.; Wiseman, Roger W.; Belli, Aaron J.; Michaels, Anthony J.; Reimann, Keith A.; DeMars, Robert I.

    2017-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies that bind to human leukocyte antigen (HLA) are useful tools for HLA-typing, tracking donor-recipient chimerisms after bone marrow transplants, and characterizing specific major histocompatibility complexes (MHC) on cell surfaces. Unfortunately, equivalent reagents are not available for rhesus macaques, which are commonly used animal as models in organ transplant and infectious disease research. To address this deficiency, we isolated an antibody that recognizes the common Indian rhesus macaque MHC class I molecule, Mamu-A1*001. We induced Mamu-A1*001-binding antibodies by alloimmunizing a female Mamu-A1*001-negative rhesus macaque with peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from a male Mamu-A1*001-positive donor. A Fab phage display library was constructed with PBMC from the alloimmunized macaque and panned to isolate an antibody that binds to Mamu-A1*001 but not to other common rhesus macaque MHC class I molecules. The isolated antibody distinguishes PBMC from Mamu-A1*001-positive and -negative macaques. Additionally, the Mamu-A1*001-specific antibody binds the cynomolgus macaque MHC class I ortholog Mafa-A1*001:01 but not variants Mafa-A1*001:02/03, indicating a high degree of binding specificity. The Mamu-A1*001-specific antibody will be useful for identifying Mamu-A1*001-positive rhesus macaques, for detecting Mamu-A1*001-positive cells in populations of Mamu-A1*001-negative cells, and for examining disease processes that alter expression of Mamu-A1*001 on cell surfaces. Moreover, the alloimmunization process we describe will be useful for isolating additional MHC allomorph-specific monoclonal antibodies or antibodies against other polymorphic host proteins which are difficult to isolate with traditional technologies. PMID:28719653

  7. High Affinity Small Protein Inhibitors of Human Chymotrypsin C (CTRC) Selected by Phage Display Reveal Unusual Preference for P4′ Acidic Residues*

    PubMed Central

    Szabó, András; Héja, Dávid; Szakács, Dávid; Zboray, Katalin; Kékesi, Katalin A.; Radisky, Evette S.; Sahin-Tóth, Miklós; Pál, Gábor

    2011-01-01

    Human chymotrypsin C (CTRC) is a pancreatic protease that participates in the regulation of intestinal digestive enzyme activity. Other chymotrypsins and elastases are inactive on the regulatory sites cleaved by CTRC, suggesting that CTRC recognizes unique sequence patterns. To characterize the molecular determinants underlying CTRC specificity, we selected high affinity substrate-like small protein inhibitors against CTRC from a phage library displaying variants of SGPI-2, a natural chymotrypsin inhibitor from Schistocerca gregaria. On the basis of the sequence pattern selected, we designed eight inhibitor variants in which amino acid residues in the reactive loop at P1 (Met or Leu), P2′ (Leu or Asp), and P4′ (Glu, Asp, or Ala) were varied. Binding experiments with CTRC revealed that (i) inhibitors with Leu at P1 bind 10-fold stronger than those with P1 Met; (ii) Asp at P2′ (versus Leu) decreases affinity but increases selectivity, and (iii) Glu or Asp at P4′ (versus Ala) increase affinity 10-fold. The highest affinity SGPI-2 variant (KD 20 pm) bound to CTRC 575-fold tighter than the parent molecule. The most selective inhibitor variant exhibited a KD of 110 pm and a selectivity ranging from 225- to 112,664-fold against other human chymotrypsins and elastases. Homology modeling and mutagenesis identified a cluster of basic amino acid residues (Lys51, Arg56, and Arg80) on the surface of human CTRC that interact with the P4′ acidic residue of the inhibitor. The acidic preference of CTRC at P4′ is unique among pancreatic proteases and might contribute to the high specificity of CTRC-mediated digestive enzyme regulation. PMID:21515688

  8. Production and radioimmunoimaging of novel fully human phage display recombinant antibodies and growth inhibition of lung adenocarcinoma cell line overexpressing Prx I.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yi; Pang, Hua; Li, Shujie; Cao, Hui; Peng, Zhiping; Fan, Chunbo; Li, Shaolin

    2009-07-01

    The Peroxiredoxin I (Prx I) is a member of the Peroxiredoxin family, which is overexpressed in many diverse tumor types and is an anti-apoptosis protein for tumor cell proliferation and survival. Therapeutic strategies targeting the Prx I may therefore be effective broad-spectrum anticancer agents. We constructed a phage display single-chain variable fragment (scFv) antibody library and sieve out the fully human, lung adenocarcinoma-sepcific monoclonal antibodies. The selection on Prx I was performed using above-mentioned lung adenocarcinoma-sepcific monoclonal antibodies with high affinity to Prx I overexpressing lung adenocarcinoma cells. The candidate scFv sequences, based on enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) screening data, were chosen for soluble expression, and a 30 kDa band was observed on polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis as predicted. The purified antibodies were characterized by immunoblotting and showed high specificity to Prx I-overexpressing lung adenocarcinoma cells A549. Radioimmunoimaging was taken to evaluate specificity and distribution of antibodies in vivo. The radiolocalization index (RI) of tumor/serum and tumor/muscle gradually increased, reaching its peak (4.06 +/- 0.13 and 5.17 +/- 0.97, respectively) at 48 h postadministration. Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging showed the radioactivity was aggregated in tumor locations and tumor imaging was clearly observed. The internalized scFv resulted in antibody-mediated cell apoptosis and downregulation of Prx I expression. These results demonstrate that the scFv possesses strong antitumor activity on lung adenocarcinoma and may therefore be an effective therapeutic candidate for the treatment of cancers that are dependent on Prx I for growth and survival.

  9. An integrated microfluidic system for screening of phage-displayed peptides specific to colon cancer cells and colon cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Che, Yu-Jui; Wu, Huei-Wen; Hung, Lien-Yu; Liu, Ching-Ann; Chang, Hwan-You; Wang, Kuan; Lee, Gwo-Bin

    2015-09-01

    Affinity reagents recognizing biomarkers specifically are essential components of clinical diagnostics and target therapeutics. However, conventional methods for screening of these reagents often have drawbacks such as large reagent consumption, the labor-intensive or time-consuming procedures, and the involvement of bulky or expensive equipment. Alternatively, microfluidic platforms could potentially automate the screening process within a shorter period of time and reduce reagent and sample consumption dramatically. It has been demonstrated recently that a subpopulation of tumor cells known as cancer stem cells possess high drug resistance and proliferation potential and are regarded as the main cause of metastasis. Therefore, a peptide that recognizes cancer stem cells and differentiates them from other cancer cells will be extremely useful in early diagnosis and target therapy. This study utilized M13 phage display technology to identify peptides that bind, respectively, to colon cancer cells and colon cancer stem cells using an integrated microfluidic system. In addition to positive selection, a negative selection process was integrated on the chip to achieve the selection of peptides of high affinity and specificity. We successfully screened three peptides specific to colon cancer cells and colon cancer stem cells, namely, HOLC-1, HOLC-2, and COLC-1, respectively, and their specificity was measured by the capture rate between target, control, and other cell lines. The capture rates are 43.40 ± 7.23%, 45.16 ± 7.12%, and 49.79 ± 5.34% for colon cancer cells and colon cancer stem cells, respectively, showing a higher specificity on target cells than on control and other cell lines. The developed technique may be promising for early diagnosis of cancer cells and target therapeutics.

  10. Rapid, Multiplexed Microfluidic Phage Display

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    entirely of silicone ( polydimethylsiloxane , PDMS) simplifies fabrication, while rendering the completed chip flexible, portable, and disposable. A...biopanning. (d) Photograph of completed device, with green and red food dye representing flow and control channels, respectively. Fig. 2 Simplified

  11. Phage display—A powerful technique for immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Bazan, Justyna; Całkosiński, Ireneusz; Gamian, Andrzej

    2012-01-01

    One of the most effective molecular diversity techniques is phage display. This technology is based on a direct linkage between phage phenotype and its encapsulated genotype, which leads to presentation of molecule libraries on the phage surface. Phage display is utilized in studying protein-ligand interactions, receptor binding sites and in improving or modifying the affinity of proteins for their binding partners. Generating monoclonal antibodies and improving their affinity, cloning antibodies from unstable hybridoma cells and identifying epitopes, mimotopes and functional or accessible sites from antigens are also important advantages of this technology. Techniques originating from phage display have been applied to transfusion medicine, neurological disorders, mapping vascular addresses and tissue homing of peptides. Phages have been applicable to immunization therapies, which may lead to development of new tools used for treating autoimmune and cancer diseases. This review describes the phage display technology and presents the recent advancements in therapeutic applications of phage display. PMID:22906939

  12. Generation of Novel Single-Chain Antibodies by Phage-Display Technology to Direct Imaging Agents Highly Selective to Pancreatic β- or α-Cells In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Ueberberg, Sandra; Meier, Juris J.; Waengler, Carmen; Schechinger, Wolfgang; Dietrich, Johannes W.; Tannapfel, Andrea; Schmitz, Inge; Schirrmacher, Ralf; Köller, Manfred; Klein, Harald H.; Schneider, Stephan

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Noninvasive determination of pancreatic β-cell mass in vivo has been hampered by the lack of suitable β-cell–specific imaging agents. This report outlines an approach for the development of novel ligands homing selectively to islet cells in vivo. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS To generate agents specifically binding to pancreatic islets, a phage library was screened for single-chain antibodies (SCAs) on rat islets using two different approaches. 1) The library was injected into rats in vivo, and islets were isolated after a circulation time of 5 min. 2) Pancreatic islets were directly isolated, and the library was panned in the islets in vitro. Subsequently, the identified SCAs were extensively characterized in vitro and in vivo. RESULTS We report the generation of SCAs that bind highly selective to either β- or α-cells. These SCAs are internalized by target cells, disappear rapidly from the vasculature, and exert no toxicity in vivo. Specific binding to β- or α-cells was detected in cell lines in vitro, in rats in vivo, and in human tissue in situ. Electron microscopy demonstrated binding of SCAs to the endoplasmatic reticulum and the secretory granules. Finally, in a biodistribution study the labeling intensity derived from [125I]-labeled SCAs after intravenous administration in rats strongly predicted the β-cell mass and was inversely related to the glucose excursions during an intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test. CONCLUSIONS Our data provide strong evidence that the presented SCAs are highly specific for pancreatic β-cells and enable imaging and quantification in vivo. PMID:19592622

  13. On the mechanism of targeting of phage fusion protein-modified nanocarriers: only the binding peptide sequence matters

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tao; Kulkarni, Nikita; D’Souza, Gerard G.M.; Petrenko, Valery A.; Torchilin, Vladimir P.

    2011-01-01

    The integration of pharmaceutical nanocarriers with phage display techniques is emerging as a new paradigm for targeted cancer nanomedicines. We explored the direct use of landscape phage fusion proteins for the self-assembly of phage-derived binding peptides to liposomes for cancer cell targeting. The primary purpose of this study was to elucidate the targeting mechanism with a particular emphasis on the relative contributions of the two motifs that make up the landscape phage fusion protein (a binding peptide and the phage pVIII coat protein) to the targeting efficiency. Using transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering, we confirmed the formation of phage-liposomes. Using FACS analysis, fluorescence microscopy, and fluorescence photospectrometry, we found that liposomes modified with MCF-7-specific phage fusion proteins (MCF-7 binding peptide, DMPGTVLP, fused to the phage PVIII coat protein) provided a strong and specific association with target MCF-7 cancer cells but not with co-cultured, non-target cells including C166-GFP and NIH3T3. The substitution for the binding peptide fused to phage pVIII coat protein abolished the targeting specificity. The addition of free binding peptide, DMPGTVLP, competitively inhibited the interaction of MCF-7-specific phage-liposomes with target MCF-7 cells but showed no reduction of MCF-7-associated plain liposomes. The proteolysis of the binding peptide reduced MCF-7 cell-associated phage-liposomes in a proteinase K (PK) concentration-dependent manner with no effect on the binding of plain liposomes to MCF-7 cells. Overall, only the binding peptide motif was involved in the targeting specificity of phage-liposomes. The presence of phage pVIII coat protein did not interfere with the targeting efficiency. PMID:21675738

  14. Phage-Derived Protein Induces Increased Platelet Activation and Is Associated with Mortality in Patients with Invasive Pneumococcal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Cremers, Amelieke J.; van der Gaast-de Jongh, Christa E.; Ferwerda, Gerben; Meis, Jacques F.; Roeleveld, Nel; Bentley, Stephen D.; Pastura, Alexander S.; van Hijum, Sacha A. F. T.; van der Ven, Andre J.; de Mast, Quirijn; Zomer, Aldert

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT To improve our understanding about the severity of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD), we investigated the association between the genotype of Streptococcus pneumoniae and disease outcomes for 349 bacteremic patients. A pneumococcal genome-wide association study (GWAS) demonstrated a strong correlation between 30-day mortality and the presence of the phage-derived gene pblB, encoding a platelet-binding protein whose effects on platelet activation were previously unknown. Platelets are increasingly recognized as key players of the innate immune system, and in sepsis, excessive platelet activation contributes to microvascular obstruction, tissue hypoperfusion, and finally multiorgan failure, leading to mortality. Our in vitro studies revealed that pblB expression was induced by fluoroquinolones but not by the beta-lactam antibiotic penicillin G. Subsequently, we determined pblB induction and platelet activation by incubating whole blood with the wild type or a pblB knockout mutant in the presence or absence of antibiotics commonly administered to our patient cohort. pblB-dependent enhancement of platelet activation, as measured by increased expression of the α-granule protein P-selectin, the binding of fibrinogen to the activated αIIbβ3 receptor, and the formation of platelet-monocyte complex occurred irrespective of antibiotic exposure. In conclusion, the presence of pblB on the pneumococcal chromosome potentially leads to increased mortality in patients with an invasive S. pneumoniae infection, which may be explained by enhanced platelet activation. This study highlights the clinical utility of a bacterial GWAS, followed by functional characterization, to identify bacterial factors involved in disease severity. PMID:28096486

  15. A novel Omp25-binding peptide screened by phage display can inhibit Brucella abortus 2308 infection in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Junbo; Guo, Fei; Huang, Xiaoqiang; Zhang, Hui; Wang, Yuanzhi; Yin, Shuanghong; Li, Zhiqiang

    2014-01-01

    Brucellosis is a globally distributed zoonotic disease affecting animals and humans, and current antibiotic and vaccine strategies are not optimal. The surface-exposed protein Omp25 is involved in Brucella virulence and plays an important role in Brucella pathogenesis during infection, suggesting that Omp25 could be a useful target for selecting potential therapeutic molecules to inhibit Brucella pathogenesis. In this study, we identified, we believe for the first time, peptides that bind specifically to the Omp25 protein of pathogens, using a phage panning technique, After four rounds of panning, 42 plaques of eluted phages were subjected to pyrosequencing. Four phage clones that bound better than the other clones were selected following confirmation by ELISA and affinity constant determination. The peptides selected could significantly inhibit Brucella abortus 2308 (S2308) internalization and intracellular growth in RAW264.7 macrophages, and significantly induce secretion of TNF-α and IL-12 in peptide- and S2308-treated cells. Any observed peptide (OP11, OP27, OP35 or OP40) could significantly inhibit S2308 infection in BALB/c mice. Moreover, the peptide OP11 was the best candidate peptide for inhibiting S2308 infection in vitro and in vivo. These results suggest that peptide OP11 has potential for exploitation as a peptide drug in resisting S2308 infection. PMID:24722798

  16. Recombinant phage probes for Listeria monocytogenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carnazza, S.; Gioffrè, G.; Felici, F.; Guglielmino, S.

    2007-10-01

    Monitoring of food and environmental samples for biological threats, such as Listeria monocytogenes, requires probes that specifically bind biological agents and ensure their immediate and efficient detection. There is a need for robust and inexpensive affinity probes as an alternative to antibodies. These probes may be recruited from random peptide libraries displayed on filamentous phage. In this study, we selected from two phage peptide libraries phage clones displaying peptides capable of specific and strong binding to the L. monocytogenes cell surface. The ability of isolated phage clones to interact specifically with L. monocytogenes was demonstrated using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and confirmed by co-precipitation assay. We also assessed the sensitivity of phage-bacteria binding by PCR on phage-captured Listeria cells, which could be detected at a concentration of 104 cells ml-1. In addition, as proof-of-concept, we tested the possibility of immobilizing the affinity-selected phages to a putative biosensor surface. The quality of phage deposition was monitored by ELISA and fluorescent microscopy. Phage-bacterial binding was confirmed by high power optical phase contrast microscopy. Overall, the results of this work validate the concept of affinity-selected recombinant filamentous phages as probes for detecting and monitoring bacterial agents under any conditions that warrant their recognition, including in food products.

  17. The habits of highly effective phages: population dynamics as a framework for identifying therapeutic phages

    PubMed Central

    Bull, James J.; Gill, Jason J.

    2014-01-01

    The use of bacteriophages as antibacterial agents is being actively researched on a global scale. Typically, the phages used are isolated from the wild by plating on the bacteria of interest, and a far larger set of candidate phages is often available than can be used in any application. When an excess of phages is available, how should the best phages be identified? Here we consider phage-bacterial population dynamics as a basis for evaluating and predicting phage success. A central question is whether the innate dynamical properties of phages are the determinants of success, or instead, whether extrinsic, indirect effects can be responsible. We address the dynamical perspective, motivated in part by the absence of dynamics in previously suggested principles of phage therapy. Current mathematical models of bacterial-phage dynamics do not capture the realities of in vivo dynamics, nor is this likely to change, but they do give insight to qualitative properties that may be generalizable. In particular, phage adsorption rate may be critical to treatment success, so understanding the effects of the in vivo environment on host availability may allow prediction of useful phages prior to in vivo experimentation. Principles for predicting efficacy may be derived by developing a greater understanding of the in vivo system, or such principles could be determined empirically by comparing phages with known differences in their dynamic properties. The comparative approach promises to be a powerful method of discovering the key to phage success. We offer five recommendations for future study: (i) compare phages differing in treatment efficacy to identify the phage properties associated with success, (ii) assay dynamics in vivo, (iii) understand mechanisms of bacterial escape from phages, (iv) test phages in model infections that are relevant to the intended clinical applications, and (v) develop new classes of models for phage growth in spatially heterogeneous environments

  18. Phage displaying peptides mimic schistosoma antigenic epitopes selected by rat natural antibodies and protective immunity induced by their immunization in mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Min; Yi, Xin-Yuan; Li, Xian-Ping; Zhou, Dong-Ming; Larry, McReynolds; Zeng, Xian-Fang

    2005-05-21

    To obtain the short peptides mimic antigenic epitopes selected by rat natural antibodies to schistosomes, and to explore their immunoprotection against schistosomiasis in mice. Adults worm antigens (AWA) were analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and enzyme-linked transferred immunoblotting methods with normal SD rat sera (NRS). The killing effects on schistosomula with fresh and heat-inactivated sera from SD rats were observed. Then the purified IgG from sera of SD rats was used to biopan a phage random peptide library and 20 randomly selected positive clones were detected by ELISA and 2 of them were sequenced. Sixty female mice were immunized thrice with positive phage clones (0, 2nd), 4th wk). Each mouse was challenged with 40 cercariae, and all mice were killed 42 d after challenge. The worms and the liver eggs were counted. NRS could specifically react to the molecules of 75,000, 47,000, 34,500 and 23,000 of AWA. Sera from SD rats showed that the mortality rate of schistosomula was 76.2%, and when the sera were heat-inactivated in vitro, the mortality rate was decreased to 41.0% after being cultured for 48 h. The specific phages bound to IgG were enriched about 300-folds after three rounds of biopanning. Twenty clones were detected by ELISA, 19 of them bound to the specific IgG of rat sera. Immunization with these epitopes was carried out in mice. Compared with the control groups, the mixture of two mimic peptides could induce 34.9% (P=0.000) worm reduction and 67.6% (P=0.000) total liver egg reduction in mice. Two different mimic peptides could respectively induce 31.0% (P=0.001), 14.5% (P=0.074) worm reduction and 61.2% (P=0.000), 35.7% (P=0.000) total liver egg reduction. The specific antibody could be induced by immunization of the mimic peptides, and the antibody titer in immunized mice reached more than 1:6,400 as detected by ELISA. Specific peptides mimic antigenic molecules can be obtained by biopanning the

  19. Binding Mechanism and Electrochemical Properties of M13 Phage-Sulfur Composite

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Dexian; Zhang, Yongguang; Sutaria, Sanjana; Konarov, Aishuak; Chen, Pu

    2013-01-01

    Self-assembly of nanostructured materials has been proven a powerful technique in material design and synthesis. By phage display screening, M13 phage was found to strongly bind sulfur particles. Fourier transform infrared and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements indicated that the strong sulfur-binding ability of M13 phage derives from newly generated S-O and C-S bonds. Using this phage assembled sulfur composite in a lithium battery, the first discharge capacity reached 1117 mAh g-1, which is more than twice that of the sulfur only cathode. Besides, the negative polysulfide shuttle effect in a lithium-sulfur battery was significantly suppressed. PMID:24324560

  20. Assembly of the small outer capsid protein, Soc, on bacteriophage T4: a novel system for high density display of multiple large anthrax toxins and foreign proteins on phage capsid.

    PubMed

    Li, Qin; Shivachandra, Sathish B; Zhang, Zhihong; Rao, Venigalla B

    2007-07-27

    Bacteriophage T4 capsid is a prolate icosahedron composed of the major capsid protein gp23*, the vertex protein gp24*, and the portal protein gp20. Assembled on its surface are 810 molecules of the non-essential small outer capsid protein, Soc (10 kDa), and 155 molecules of the highly antigenic outer capsid protein, Hoc (39 kDa). In this study Soc, a "triplex" protein that stabilizes T4 capsid, is targeted for molecular engineering of T4 particle surface. Using a defined in vitro assembly system, anthrax toxins, protective antigen, lethal factor and their domains, fused to Soc were efficiently displayed on the capsid. Both the N and C termini of the 80 amino acid Soc polypeptide can be simultaneously used to display antigens. Proteins as large as 93 kDa can be stably anchored on the capsid through Soc-capsid interactions. Using both Soc and Hoc, up to 1662 anthrax toxin molecules are assembled on the phage T4 capsid under controlled conditions. We infer from the binding data that a relatively high affinity capsid binding site is located in the middle of the rod-shaped Soc, with the N and C termini facing the 2- and 3-fold symmetry axes of the capsid, respectively. Soc subunits interact at these interfaces, gluing the adjacent capsid protein hexamers and generating a cage-like outer scaffold. Antigen fusion does interfere with the inter-subunit interactions, but these interactions are not essential for capsid binding and antigen display. These features make the T4-Soc platform the most robust phage display system reported to date. The study offers insights into the architectural design of bacteriophage T4 virion, one of the most stable viruses known, and how its capsid surface can be engineered for novel applications in basic molecular biology and biotechnology.

  1. Analysis of transduction in wastewater bacterial populations by targeting the phage-derived 16S rRNA gene sequences.

    PubMed

    Del Casale, Antonio; Flanagan, Paul V; Larkin, Michael J; Allen, Christopher C R; Kulakov, Leonid A

    2011-04-01

    Bacterial 16S rRNA genes transduced by bacteriophages were identified and analyzed in order to estimate the extent of the bacteriophage-mediated horizontal gene transfer in the wastewater environment. For this purpose, phage and bacterial DNA was isolated from the oxidation tank of a municipal wastewater treatment plant. Phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequences cloned from a phage metagenome revealed that bacteriophages transduce genetic material in several major groups of bacteria. The groups identified were as follows: Betaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, Alphaproteobacteria, Actinomycetales and Firmicutes. Analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequences in the total bacterial DNA from the same sample revealed that several bacterial groups found in the oxidation tank were not present in the phage metagenome (e.g. Deltaproteobacteria, Nitrospira, Planctomycetes and many Actinobacteria genera). These results suggest that transduction in a wastewater environment occurs in several bacterial groups; however, not all species are equally involved into this process. The data also showed that a number of distinctive bacterial strains participate in transduction-mediated gene transfer within identified bacterial groupings. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analysis confirmed that profiles of the transduced 16S rRNA gene sequences and those present in the whole microbial community show significant differences.

  2. Gold nanoprobe functionalized with specific fusion protein selection from phage display and its application in rapid, selective and sensitive colorimetric biosensing of Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Liu, Pei; Han, Lei; Wang, Fei; Petrenko, Valery A; Liu, Aihua

    2016-08-15

    Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) is one of the most ubiquitous pathogens in public healthcare worldwide. It holds great insterest in establishing robust analytical method for S. aureus. Herein, we report a S. aureus-specific recognition element, isolated from phage monoclone GQTTLTTS, which was selected from f8/8 landscape phage library against S. aureus in a high-throughput way. By functionalizing cysteamine (CS)-stabilized gold nanoparticles (CS-AuNPs) with S. aureus-specific pVIII fusion protein (fusion-pVIII), a bifunctional nanoprobe (CS-AuNPs@fusion-pVIII) for S. aureus was developed. In this strategy, the CS-AuNPs@fusion-pVIII could be induced to aggregate quickly in the presence of target S. aureus, resulting in a rapid colorimetric response of gold nanoparticles. More importantly, the as-designed probe exhibited excellent selectivity over other bacteria. Thus, the CS-AuNPs@fusion-pVIII could be used as the indicator of target S. aureus. This assay can detect as low as 19CFUmL(-1)S. aureus within 30min. Further, this approach can be applicable to detect S. aureus in real water samples. Due to its sensitivity, specificity and rapidness, this proposed method is promising for on-site testing of S. aureus without using any costly instruments.

  3. Characterization of two polyvalent phages infecting Enterobacteriaceae

    PubMed Central

    Hamdi, Sana; Rousseau, Geneviève M.; Labrie, Simon J.; Tremblay, Denise M.; Kourda, Rim Saïed; Ben Slama, Karim; Moineau, Sylvain

    2017-01-01

    Bacteriophages display remarkable genetic diversity and host specificity. In this study, we explore phages infecting bacterial strains of the Enterobacteriaceae family because of their ability to infect related but distinct hosts. We isolated and characterized two novel virulent phages, SH6 and SH7, using a strain of Shigella flexneri as host bacterium. Morphological and genomic analyses revealed that phage SH6 belongs to the T1virus genus of the Siphoviridae family. Conversely, phage SH7 was classified in the T4virus genus of the Myoviridae family. Phage SH6 had a short latent period of 16 min and a burst size of 103 ± 16 PFU/infected cell while the phage SH7 latent period was 23 min with a much lower burst size of 26 ± 5 PFU/infected cell. Moreover, phage SH6 was sensitive to acidic conditions (pH < 5) while phage SH7 was stable from pH 3 to 11 for 1 hour. Of the 35 bacterial strains tested, SH6 infected its S. flexneri host strain and 8 strains of E. coli. Phage SH7 lysed additionally strains of E. coli O157:H7, Salmonella Paratyphi, and Shigella dysenteriae. The broader host ranges of these two phages as well as their microbiological properties suggest that they may be useful for controlling bacterial populations. PMID:28091598

  4. Developing bifunctional beta-lactamase molecules with built-in target-recognizing module for prodrug therapy: identification of Enterobacter Cloacae P99 cephalosporinase loops suitable for randomization and phage-display selection.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Girja S; Krag, David N

    2009-01-01

    This study was focused on developing catalytically active beta-lactamase enzyme molecules that have target-recognizing sites built within their scaffold. Using phage-display approach, nine libraries were constructed by inserting the randomized linear or cysteine-constrained heptapeptides in the five different loops on the outer surface of P99 beta-lactamase molecule. The pIII signal peptide of Sec-pathway was employed for a periplasmic translocation of the beta-lactamase fusion protein, which we found more efficient than the DsbA signal peptide of SRP-pathway. The randomized heptapeptide loops replaced native amino acids between positions (34)Y-(37)K, (238)M-(246)A, (275)N-(280)A, (305)A-(311)S, or (329)I-(334)I of the P99 beta-lactamase molecules for generating the loop-1 to -5 libraries, respectively. The diversity of each loop library was judged by counting the primary and beta-lactamase-active clones. The linear peptide inserts in the loop-2 library showed the maximum number of the beta-lactamase-active clones, followed by the loop-5, loop-3, and loop-4. The insertion of the cysteine-constrained loops exhibited a dramatic loss of the enzyme-active beta-lactamase clones. The complexity of the loop-2 linear library, as determined by the frequency and diversity of amino acid distributions in the randomized region, appears consistent with the standards of other types of phage display library systems. The selection of the loop-2 linear library on streptavidin protein as a test target identified several beta-lactamase clones that specifically bound to streptavidin. In conclusion, this study identified the suitability of the loop-2 of P99 beta-lactamase for constructing a phage-display library of the beta-lactamase enzyme-active molecules that can be selected against a target. This is an enabling step in our long-term goal of developing bifunctional beta-lactamase molecules against cancer-specific targets for enzyme prodrug therapy of cancer.

  5. Ecofriendly antiglare film derived from biomass using ultraviolet curing nanoimprint lithography for high-definition display