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Sample records for pharmacokinetics tissue distribution

  1. Pharmacokinetics, absorption and tissue distribution of tanshinone IIA solid dispersion.

    PubMed

    Hao, Haiping; Wang, Guangji; Cui, Nan; Li, Jing; Xie, Lin; Ding, Zuoqi

    2006-11-01

    This study was designed to elucidate the pharmacokinetics, absorption, tissue distribution and plasma protein binding properties of tanshinone IIA, a highly lipophilic compound isolated from Salvia miltiorrhiza. Tanshinone IIA was isolated using a previously well developed LC-MS/MS method. Its pharmacokinetic characteristics, absolute bioavailability, tissue distribution and plasma protein binding properties were determined. The membrane permeability was evaluated using Caco-2 cells in monolayer. The pharmacokinetic plasma profile of tanshinone IIA after a single intravenous dosing exhibited a triexponential pattern consisting of rapid distribution (t1/2 alpha, 0.024 h), slow redistribution (t1/2 beta, 0.34 h) and terminal elimination phase (t1/2 gamma, 7.5 h). Tanshinone IIA preferentially distributed into the reticuloendothelial system, especially into liver and lung, after either intravenous or oral doses. Tanshinone IIA (99.2 %) bound highly to plasma proteins, among which lipoprotein played an important role (77.5 %). Tanshinone IIA absorption was extremely poor with an absolute bioavailability below 3.5 %. Absorptive saturation was deduced from the fact that the AUC and Cmax increased less proportionally to dose and Tmax was significantly prolonged. The poor absorption of tanshinone IIA may be caused by its low aqueous solubility and limited membrane permeability. There were no significant differences of the apparent permeability coefficient for all tested concentrations and for the apical to basolateral and reverse direction transport, suggesting a passive transport mode and no involvement of an efflux protein. In conclusion, tanshinone IIA has a suitable pharmacokinetic behavior except for its poor absorption. A pharmaceutical strategy for promoting its absorption should be designed to develop tanshinone IIA as a new drug candidate. PMID:17024606

  2. Pharmacokinetics, tissue distribution and safety of cinnarizine delivered in lipid emulsion.

    PubMed

    Shi, Shuai; Chen, Hao; Lin, Xia; Tang, Xing

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the potential of cinnarizine loaded in lipid emulsion to modify the pharmacokinetics, tissue distribution and safety of cinnarizine. The cinnarizine-loaded emulsion (CLE) which can remain stable over 18-month storage at 4+/-2 degrees C was prepared by high-pressure homogenization. Nicomp 380 particle sizing system and HPLC were used to evaluate CLE in vitro, while UPLC/MS/MS for pharmacokinetic and tissue distribution study. The pharmacokinetics and tissue distributions of CLE were assessed by comparing with the solution form after intravenous administration to rats at a dose of 2mg/kg. The CLE showed significant higher AUC and lower clearance and distribution volume than those of solution form. This helped cinnarizine to reach higher level in vessel, and circulate in the blood stream for a longer time resulting in better therapeutic effect. The tissue distribution exhibited significant lower uptake of CLE emulsion in lung and brain, indicating the advantage of CLE over the solution form in reducing drug precipitation in vivo and toxicity in CNS. Drug safety assessment studies including hemolysis test, intravenous stimulation and injection anaphylaxis revealed that the CLE was safe for intravenous injection. PMID:19770029

  3. The effect of stealth liposomes on pharmacokinetics, tissue distribution and anti-tumor activity of oridonin.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chuanjin; Wei, Yunyang; Yu, Li; Zhang, Liang

    2009-01-01

    High-purity oridonin was isolated and identified from Rabdosia rubescens hemsl by preparative high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Stealth liposomes of oridonin were prepared by thin-film ultrasonic dispersion using polyethylene glycol-distearoylphosphatidyleth-anolamine(PEG2000-DSPE) as the surface-coating material. A reversed-phase HPLC method was developed and validated to determine the concentrations of oridonin in the serum and tissues of mice. The tissue distribution and pharmacokinetics of oridonin stealth liposomes and oridonin solution in mice were investigated. The results showed that the distribution and pharmacokinetics of oridonin stealth liposomes in mice were changed as compared to the distribution and pharmacokinetics of oridonin solution. The levels of stealth liposomal oridonin in the heart tissues were reduced, while the levels of stealth liposomal oridonin in the blood were increased. The stealth liposomes were very effective at inhibiting the rate of solid tumor growth. The PEG2000-DSPE of liposomes prolonged the circulation time of oridonin in mouse blood, reduced accumulation in the reticuloendothelial system and increased the anti-tumor activity of oridonin.

  4. Pharmacokinetics, tissue distribution, and metabolism of nitrofurantoin in the channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stehly, G.R.; Plakas, S.M.

    1993-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics, tissue distribution, and metabolism of the drug nitrofurantoin were examined in the channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) after intravascular or oral dosing. Mean plasma concentrations of nitrofurantoin after intravascular administration at 1 and 10 mg/kg of body weight were best fit to two- and three-compartment pharmacokinetic models, respectively. Nitrofurantoin was rapidly eliminated from the plasma after intravascular dosing; at 1 and 10 mg/kg, the terminal half-lives were 23 and 46 min, respectively. After oral dosing at 1 mg/kg, peak plasma concentrations (0.06 mu g/ml) occurred at 2 h; the bioavailability was 17%. Residues of nitrofurantoin and its metabolites in the tissues were initially eliminated rapidly but persisted at the later sampling times. Residue concentrations were highest in the plasma and excretory tissues. Approximately 21% and 4% of the oral dose were eliminated in the urine and bile, respectively. Parent nitrofurantoin was the major radiolabelled compound found in the urine; however, the percentage of total residues composed of metabolites increased with time. Biliary residues consisted mostly of nitrofurantoin metabolites. High-performance liquid chromatography revealed the presence of at least five metabolites in the urine and bile.

  5. Influence of co-administered danshensu on pharmacokinetic fate and tissue distribution of paeonol in rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Hua; Wang, Siwang; Zhang, Bangle; Xie, Yanhua; Wang, Jianbo; Yang, Qian; Cao, Wei; Hu, Jing; Duan, Linrui

    2012-01-01

    Cortex Moutan (root bark of Paeonia suffruticosa Andrew) and Radix Salviae miltiorrhizae (root and rhizome of Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge) are two herbs widely used in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) to treat cerebrovascular and cardiovascular diseases. In clinical practice, these two herbs are prescribed together. Studies on the pharmacokinetic interaction between the active constituents of these two herbs (paeonol and danshensu, respectively) can provide substantial foundation for understanding its mechanism and empirical evidence to support the clinical practice. A simple and sensitive high-performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) method coupled with ultraviolet detector was developed for determination of paeonol in plasma and different tissues (heart, liver, spleen, lung, kidney, and brain) of male Sprague-Dawley rats. When co-administering danshensu, the peak plasma concentration of paeonol was decreased (p < 0.01), the mean residence time (MRT) was prolonged (p < 0.001), the volume of distribution (Vd/F) was increased (p < 0.001), and the concentrations of paeonol in heart, brain, and lung were dramatically increased (p < 0.01 or p < 0.001), compared with these values for rats administered paeonol alone. The results showed that the co-administration of danshensu could alter pharmacokinetic fate and tissue distribution of paeonol in rats, especially in heart and brain, providing substantial foundation for the investigation of the impact of danshensu on paeonol in clinical applications.

  6. Tissue Distribution, Excretion and Pharmacokinetics of the Environmental Pollutant Dibenzo[def,p]chrysene in Mice.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yuan-Wan; El-Bayoumy, Karam; Aliaga, Cesar; Awad, Alaa S; Gowda, Krishne; Amin, Shantu; Chen, Kun-Ming

    2015-07-20

    Dibenzo[def,p]chrysene (DBP), a representative example of the class of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH), is known to induce tumors in multiple organ sites including the ovary, lung, mammary glands, and oral cavity in rodents. The goal of this study was to test the hypothesis that the levels of DBP and its metabolites that reach and retain the levels for an extended time in the target organs as well as the capacity of these organs to metabolize this carcinogen to active metabolites that can damage DNA may account for its tissue selective tumorigenicity. Therefore, we used the radiolabeled [(3)H] DBP to accurately assess the tissue distribution, excretion, and pharmacokinetics of this carcinogen. We also compared the levels of DBPDE-DNA adducts in a select target organ (ovary) and nontarget organs (kidney and liver) in mice treated orally with DBP. Our results showed that after 1 week, 91.40 ± 7.23% of the radioactivity was recovered in the feces; the corresponding value excreted in the urine was less than 2% after 1 week. After 24 h, the stomach had the highest radioactivity followed by the intestine and the liver; however, after 1 week, levels of the radioactivity in these organs were the lowest among tissues examined including the ovary and liver; the pharmacokinetic analysis of DBP was conducted using a one compartment open model. The level of (-)-anti-trans-DBPDE-dA in the ovaries (8.91 ± 0.08 adducts/10(7) dA) was significantly higher (p < 0.01) than the levels of adducts in kidneys (0.69 ± 0.09 adducts/10(7) dA) and livers (0.63 ± 0.11 adducts/10(7) dA). Collectively, the results of the tissue distribution and pharmacokinetic analysis may not fully support our hypothesis, but the capacity of the target organs vs nontarget organs to metabolize DBP to active intermediates that can damage DNA may account for its tissue selective tumorigenicity.

  7. Tissue Distribution, Excretion and Pharmacokinetics of the Environmental Pollutant Dibenzo[def,p]chrysene in Mice.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yuan-Wan; El-Bayoumy, Karam; Aliaga, Cesar; Awad, Alaa S; Gowda, Krishne; Amin, Shantu; Chen, Kun-Ming

    2015-07-20

    Dibenzo[def,p]chrysene (DBP), a representative example of the class of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH), is known to induce tumors in multiple organ sites including the ovary, lung, mammary glands, and oral cavity in rodents. The goal of this study was to test the hypothesis that the levels of DBP and its metabolites that reach and retain the levels for an extended time in the target organs as well as the capacity of these organs to metabolize this carcinogen to active metabolites that can damage DNA may account for its tissue selective tumorigenicity. Therefore, we used the radiolabeled [(3)H] DBP to accurately assess the tissue distribution, excretion, and pharmacokinetics of this carcinogen. We also compared the levels of DBPDE-DNA adducts in a select target organ (ovary) and nontarget organs (kidney and liver) in mice treated orally with DBP. Our results showed that after 1 week, 91.40 ± 7.23% of the radioactivity was recovered in the feces; the corresponding value excreted in the urine was less than 2% after 1 week. After 24 h, the stomach had the highest radioactivity followed by the intestine and the liver; however, after 1 week, levels of the radioactivity in these organs were the lowest among tissues examined including the ovary and liver; the pharmacokinetic analysis of DBP was conducted using a one compartment open model. The level of (-)-anti-trans-DBPDE-dA in the ovaries (8.91 ± 0.08 adducts/10(7) dA) was significantly higher (p < 0.01) than the levels of adducts in kidneys (0.69 ± 0.09 adducts/10(7) dA) and livers (0.63 ± 0.11 adducts/10(7) dA). Collectively, the results of the tissue distribution and pharmacokinetic analysis may not fully support our hypothesis, but the capacity of the target organs vs nontarget organs to metabolize DBP to active intermediates that can damage DNA may account for its tissue selective tumorigenicity. PMID:26034881

  8. Pharmacokinetics and tissue distribution of two novel isomerism anticancer platinum compounds.

    PubMed

    He, Donglin; Yin, Shuhui; Han, Fuguo; Zhu, Jingjie; Shi, Yun; Tong, Zhiyuan; Liu, Qingfei

    2016-11-01

    LLC-0601(S,S) and LLC-0601(R,R) are two novel synthesized isomerism platinum compounds both with encouraging anticancer activity. However, the previous study showed that toxicity of LLC-0601(R,R) was much higher than that of LLC-0601(S,S) with higher body weight loss and mortality rate of tested rats. This paper is focused on the comparison of the two compounds with their pharmacokinetic (PK) profiles in rats and tissue distribution in mice after intravenous administration. The atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS) method was successfully developed and applied for the determination of platinum in plasma and tissues. The results showed that main PK parameters such as half-life, AUC and MRT of the two compounds had no significant difference after intravenous administration to rats (p  > 0.05). The tissue distribution after intravenous administration to mice showed that the concentration of LLC-0601(R,R) in heart at 0.083 h was higher than that of LLC-0601(S,S) (p  < 0.05) and it was the same case for AUC5min-4 h (p  < 0.05). Different distribution of the two compounds in heart was possibly the main reason of different toxicity and more in-depth research on the metabolites and other mechanism are needed to investigate the toxicity. PMID:27042965

  9. Docetaxel-loaded liposomes: preparation, pH sensitivity, pharmacokinetics, and tissue distribution*

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hong; Li, Rui-ying; Lu, Xia; Mou, Zhen-zhen; Lin, Gui-mei

    2012-01-01

    Docetaxel (DTX), as a member of taxoid family, has been widely used in the treatment of cancers. The present study prepared pH-sensitive DTX-loaded liposomes (DTX-Lips) by thin-film dispersion method and various physico-chemical and morphological properties were examined. The pH sensitivity of in vitro DTX release and the in vivo pharmacokinetics and tissue distribution using Kunming mice were also investigated. The mean particle size and zeta potential of DTX liposomes were (277±2) nm and (−32.60±0.26) mV, respectively. Additionally, in vitro drug release study showed that the cumulative release rate was 1.3 times more at pH 5.0 than at pH 7.4, suggesting a pH-dependent release ability of DTX-Lips. Pharmacokinetic and pharmaceutical studies in comparison with Duopafei® showed that the half-time period (t 1/2) and area under the curve (AUC) of DTX-Lips in mouse plasma were 1.8 times longer and 2.6 times higher, respectively, and that DTX-Lips selectively accumulated in macrophage-rich organs such as liver and spleen. These results together suggest that the DTX-Lips could be a promising formulation for the clinical administration of DTX. PMID:23225853

  10. Bioavailability, Pharmacokinetics and Tissue Distribution of P57AS3 (P57) from Hoodia gordonii Mouse Model

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    P57AS3, an oxypregnane steroidal glycoside (P57) is known to be responsible for the diet suppressing activity of Hoodia gordonii, a dietary supplement used for weight loss. In this study, bioavailability, pharmacokinetics and tissue distribution of P57 was determined in CD1 female mice after adminis...

  11. Pharmacokinetics, tissue distribution, and the lactone/carboxylate equilibrium of hydroxycamptothecin delivered via aerosol in mice.

    PubMed

    Hu, Wei; Zhang, Chao; Hu, Wenjin; Fang, Yun; Hou, Wenjie

    2012-10-01

    Aerosol delivery is a route which is advantageous to the therapy of pulmonary diseases, such as lung cancer. The pharmacokinetics and tissue distribution after aerosol delivery of carboxylate form of hydroxycamptothecin (C-HCPT) were investigated. The concentrations of the three different types (lactone, carboxylate and the total of both forms) of HCPT were measured by HPLC analysis. The initial experiment showed no evident difference between lactone and carboxylate in the lungs during the aerosol treatment, compared with the HCPT content in plasma. The AUC(inf) value of lactone in the lungs was higher than that of carboxylate, which was 138,176.00 min ng g⁻¹ and 128,460.00 min ng g⁻¹, respectively. Meanwhile, AUC(inf) in the plasma during the entire treatment indicated that the lactone content was always at a lower level, and the carboxylate form tended to predominate, as shown by the lactone/carboxylate (L/C) equilibrium. The tissue distribution results showed that the lactone proportion in the liver increased up to the maximum value of 69.69% after aerosol administration, whereas the mean L/C equilibrium index for the liver was 2.07±1.06, and the C(max) and AUC(0-∞) values of the total HCPT were highest in the tissues. Based on these results we speculated that the initial wholly carboxylate form of the HCPT atomized liquid did not influence the transformation to lactone form. Moreover, the deposition of the total HCPT and lactone was higher in the lungs and other tissues than in the plasma after the aerosol treatment. This study will be beneficial to the therapy of pulmonary carcinoma. PMID:22858157

  12. Pharmacokinetics and tissue distribution of spinosin after intravenous administration in rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Yu-Juan; Dai, Yue-Han; Yu, Ye-Ling; Li, Yan; Deng, Yu-Lin

    2007-08-01

    Spinosin is the major effective single constituent in the traditional Chinese herb Semen Ziziphi Spinosae, which is used for sedation and hypnosis. For the further use of spinosin in treating insomnia, the pharmacokinetics and tissue distribution of spinosin after intravenous administration to rats was investigated. An HPLC method with an ODS column (250 mm x 4.6 mm, i.d.) and a mobile phase of acetonitrile-water-acetic acid (23:77:1) was used for the determination of spinosin in the plasma and tissues of rats. Vanillin was used as an internal standard, and spinosin was detected at 334 nm. The calibration curve of spinosin in plasma showed good linearity over the concentration range of 1-300 microg/ml, and the quantitation of limit of plasma was 1 microg/ml. The linear range of concentrations of spinosin in the heart, spleen, stomach, lung, testis, brain, and intestine was 0.1-40 microg/ml and the quantitation limit was 0.1 microg/ml. The linear range of concentrations of spinosin in the liver and kidney was 1-150 microg/ml, and the quantitation limit was 1 microg/ml. The correlation coefficients of all calibration curves were between 0.9939 and 0.9980. The intra and interrun precision for all samples was less than < or =11.0%. The time-concentration curve of spinosin after the intravenous administration of a single dose of 20 mg/kg to rats corresponded to the two-compartment model. The main pharmacokinetic parameters T(0.5alpha), T(0.5beta), CLs, AUC(0-T), and V(c) were 6.66 min, 51.5 min, 1.42 l.min(-1), 2.83 mg.min.ml(-1), and 14.0 l.kg(-1), respectively. At 20 min, a concentration peak occurred in liver and brain tissues. The highest level of spinosin occurred in the liver, followed by the spleen and kidney. The lowest level of spinosin appeared in the testis, followed by the brain. Spinosin was not detected in smooth and skeletal muscle. After intravenous administration, the drug was distributed extensively and transferred quickly in rats in vivo. PMID

  13. In vivo pharmacokinetics, tissue distribution and underlying mechanisms of various PEI(-PEG)/siRNA complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Malek, Anastasia; Merkel, Olivia; Fink, Ludger; Czubayko, Frank; Kissel, Thomas; Aigner, Achim

    2009-04-01

    Background: RNA interference (RNAi) represents a novel therapeutic strategy allowing the knockdown of any pathologically relevant target gene. Since it relies on the action of small interfering RNAs (siRNAs), the in vivo delivery of siRNAs is instrumental. Polyethylenimines (PEIs) and PEGylated PEIs have been shown previously to complex siRNAs, thus mediating siRNA protection against nucleolytic degradation, cellular uptake and intracellular release. Purpose: The present study determines in vivo pharmacokinetics, tissue distribution/efficacy of siRNA delivery and adverse effects of a broad panel of PEI(-PEG)-based siRNA complexes. The aim is to systematically evaluate the effects of different degrees and patterns of PEGylation in PEI-PEG copolymers on the in vivo behavior of PEI(-PEG)/siRNA complexes in mice. Results: Upon i.v. injection of radioactively labeled, PEI(-PEG) complexed siRNAs, marked differences in the pharmacokinetics and biodistribution of the complexes are observed, with the fate of the PEI(-PEG)/siRNA complexes being mainly dependent on the degree of uptake in liver, spleen, lung and kidney. Thus, the role of these tissues is investigated in greater detail using representative PEI(-PEG)/siRNA complexes. The induction of erythrocyte aggregation and hemorrhage is dependent on the degree and pattern of PEGylation as well as on the PEI/siRNA (N/P) ratio, and represents one important effect in the lung. Furthermore, siRNA uptake in liver and spleen, but not in lung or kidney, is mediated by macrophage and is dependent on macrophage activity. In the kidney PEI(-PEG)/siRNA uptake is mostly passive and reflects the total stability of the complexes. Conclusion: Liver, lung, spleen and kidney are the major players determining the in vivo biodistribution of PEI(-PEG)/siRNA complexes. Beyond their physicochemical and in vitro bioactivity characteristics, PEI(-PEG)/siRNA complexes show marked differences in vivo which can be explained by distinct effects in

  14. Pharmacokinetics, tissue distribution and mass balance of radiolabeled dihydroartemisinin in male rats

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Lisa H; Li, Qigui; Zhang, Jing; Weina, Peter J

    2009-01-01

    Background Dihydroartemisinin (DHA), a powerful anti-malarial drug, has been used as monotherapy and artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) for more than decades. So far, however, the tissue distribution and metabolic profile of DHA data are not available from animal and humans. Methods Pharmacokinetics, tissue distribution, mass balance, and elimination of [14C] DHA have been studieded in rats following a single intravenous administration. Protein binding was performed with rat and human plasma. Drug concentrations were obtained up to 192 hr from measurements of total radioactivity and drug concentration to determine the contribution by the parent and metabolites to the total dose of drug injected from whole blood, plasma, urine and faecal samples. Results Drug was widely distributed after 1 hr and rapidly declined at 24 hr in all tissues except spleen until 96 hrs. Only 0.81% of the total radioactivity was detected in rat brain tissue. DHA revealed a high binding capacity with both rat and human plasma proteins (76–82%). The concentration of total radioactivity in the plasma fraction was less than 25% of that in blood total. Metabolism of DHA was observed with high excretion via bile into intestines and approximately 89–95% dose of all conjugations were accounted for in blood, urine and faeces. However, the majority of elimination of [14C] DHA was through urinary excretion (52% dose). The mean terminal half-lives of plasma and blood radioactivity (75.57–122.13 h) were significantly prolonged compared with that of unchanged DHA (1.03 h). Conclusion In rat brain, the total concentration of [14C] was 2-fold higher than that in plasma, indicating the radioactivity could easily penetrate the brain-blood barrier. Total radioactivity distributed in RBC was about three- to four-fold higher than that in plasma, suggesting that the powerful anti-malarial potency of DHA in the treatment of blood stage malaria may relate to the high RBC binding. Biliary excretion

  15. Pharmacokinetics and tissue distribution study of PA-824 in rats by LC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Wang, Libin; Ma, Yetao; Duan, Hongtao; Yao, Jiahui; Liang, Li; Zhang, Ruitao; Zhou, Xuejiao; Liu, Xueying; Wang, Qingwei; Zhang, Shengyong

    2015-12-01

    A simple, sensitive and rapid LC-MS/MS method has been developed and validated for determination of PA-824 in rat biological samples using darunavir as internal standard. Chromatographic separation was achieved on an Inertsil(®)ODS3 C18 column (150mm×4.6mm, 5μm) using gradient elution of methanol-0.1% ammonia in water (90:10, v/v) with fast gradient elution at a flow rate of 0.6mL/min and run time of 5min. The mass spectrometer was run in positive electrospray ionization (ESI) mode using multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) to monitor the mass transitions. The optimized ion transition pairs for quantitation were m/z360.1→m/z175.0 for PA-824, m/z548.5→m/z504.2 for IS. The method was validated for accuracy, precision, linearity, range, selectivity, lower limit of quantification (LLOQ), recovery, matrix effect and robustness. All validation parameters met the acceptance criteria according to regulatory guidelines. The LLOQ was 0.05μg/mL. The calibration curves showed a good linearity over the concentration range of 0.05-50μg/mL. The calibration curves for all biological samples showed good linearity (r(2)>0.9978) over the concentration ranges tested. The recoveries obtained for PA-824 were ≥88.8%. The developed method was successfully applied to investigate the pharmacokinetics and tissue distribution of PA-824 in rats following oral administration. It was also the first study to investigate the tissue distribution of PA-824 in rats following oral administration.

  16. Noninvasive assessment of tissue distribution and tumor pharmacokinetics of Pc 181, a silicon phthalocyanine analogue, in mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Lihua; Guo, Jianxia; Clausen, Dana M.; Eiseman, Julie L.

    2010-02-01

    Objective: In in vitro photodynamic therapy, the LD50 of Pc 181 has been reported to be 7 to 8 times less than that of silicon phthalocyanine 4 (Pc 4). The Optical Pharmacokinetic System (OPS) can measure photosensitizer concentrations in accessible tissues non-invasively. We used OPS to evaluate the tumor pharmacokinetics of Pc 181 and Pc 4 and the tissue drug distribution in SCID mice bearing either human breast cancer MDA-MB-231 or human head and neck squamous cell carcinoma SCC-15 xenografts. Methods: Following iv administration of 2.5 mg/kg Pc 181 or 2 mg/kg Pc 4 to SCID mice, OPS measurements were taken on tumor and normal tissues between 5 and 4320 min in vivo or in situ. Results: Large variations in tumor Pc 181 concentrations were observed among mice. In MDA-MB-231 tumors, the Pc 181 concentration peaked at 240 min, and was retained in the tumor. Tumor Pc 181 concentrations were much less than the tumor Pc 4 concentrations at an equimolar dose. Pc 181 concentrations were the highest in liver, followed by spleen, and kidney. In mice bearing SCC-15 xenografts, skin and underlying tissue Pc 181 concentrations were higher than tumor concentrations at all time points examined. Conclusions: This first Pc 181 pharmacokinetics study described a tissue Pc 181 distribution similar to that of Pc 4. However, tumor Pc 181 concentrations were lower than those of Pc 4 at equimolar doses.

  17. Tissue distribution and pharmacokinetics of stable polyacrylamide nanoparticles following intravenous injection in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Wenger, Yvan; Schneider, Randal J.; Reddy, G. Ramachandra; Kopelman, Raoul; Jolliet, Olivier; Philbert, Martin A.

    2011-03-15

    A variety of polymer nanoparticles (NP) are under development for imaging and therapeutic use. However, little is known about their behavior. This study examined pharmacokinetics, distribution and elimination of stable polyacrylamide (PAA) nanoparticles ({approx} 31 nm average diameter). PAA NPs and polyethylene glycol-coated PAA NPs were injected into the tail veins of healthy male rats. Blood, tissues and excreta were collected at times ranging from 5 min to 120 h and their radioactive content was quantified. A mathematical model was then applied to analyze the distribution dynamics of both NPs. Elimination from the blood could be accounted for by a quick but finite relocation to the major organs (about 20%, 0.6 to 1.3 h half-lives), and a slower distribution to the carcass (about 70%, 35 to 43 h half-lives). Excreted urinary levels correlated with blood concentrations. Combined cumulative urinary and fecal output accounted for less than 6% of the dose at 120 h. Compared to five other polymeric nanoparticles, the studied particles are at the highest half-lives and Area Under the Curve (4000 to 5000%-h). These two parameters decrease by three orders of magnitude when nanoparticle size increases from the 30 nm range up to 250 nm. For similar sizes, pegylated nanoparticles are more persistent in the blood than non-pegylated ones, but this difference is much smaller in the 30 nm and relatively high dose range than above 100 nm. Persistence of PAA NPs is not associated with acute toxicity signs as measured by typical serum markers of inflammation and cellular damage.

  18. Tissue Distribution and Pharmacokinetics of Stable Polyacrylamide Nanoparticles Following Intravenous Injection in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    WENGER, Yvan; SCHNEIDER, Randal J.; REDDY, G. Ramachandra; KOPELMAN, Raoul; JOLLIET, Olivier; PHILBERT, Martin A.

    2011-01-01

    A variety of polymer nanoparticles (NP) are under development for imaging and therapeutic use. However, little is known about their behavior. This study examined pharmacokinetics, distribution and elimination of stable polyacrylamide (PAA) nanoparticles (~31 nm average diameter). PAA-NPs and polyethylene glycol-coated PAA-NPs were injected into the tail veins of healthy male rats. Blood, tissues and excreta were collected at times ranging from 5 minutes to 120 hours and their radioactive content was quantified. A mathematical model was then applied to analyze the distribution dynamics of both NPs. Elimination from the blood could be accounted for by a quick but finite relocation to the major organs (about 20%, 0.6 to 1.3h half-lives), and a slower distribution to the carcass (about 70%, 35 to 43h half-lives). Excreted urinary levels correlated with blood concentrations. Combined cumulative urinary and fecal output accounted for less than 6% of the dose at 120h. Compared to five other polymeric nanoparticles, the studied particles are at the highest half-lives and Area Under the Curve (4000 to 5000 %-h). These two parameters decrease by three orders of magnitude when nanoparticle size increases from the 30 nm range up to 250 nm. For similar sizes, pegylated nanoparticles are more persistent in the blood than non pegylated ones, but this difference is much smaller in the 30 nm and relatively high dose range than above 100 nm. Persistence of PAA NPs is not associated with acute toxicity signs as measured by typical serum markers of inflammation and cellular damage. PMID:21134391

  19. Study on pharmacokinetics and tissue distribution of the isocorydine derivative (AICD) in rats by HPLC-DAD method

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yali; Yan, Qian; Zhong, Mei; Zhao, Quanyi; Liu, Junxi; Di, Duolong; Liu, Jinxia

    2015-01-01

    A simple and effective high-performance liquid chromatography with diode-array detection method coupled with a liquid-liquid extraction pretreatment has been developed for determining the pharmacokinetics and tissue distribution of a novel structurally modified derivative (8-acetamino-isocorydine) of isocorydine. According to the in vivo experiments data calculations by DAS 2.0 software, a two-compartment metabolic model was suitable for describing the pharmacokinetic of 8-acetamino-isocorydine in rats. 8-Acetamino-isocorydine was absorbed well after oral administration, and the absolute bioavailability was 76.5%. The half-life of 8-acetamino-isocorydine after intravenous and oral administration was 2.2 h and 2.0 h, respectively. In vivo, 8-acetamino-isocorydine was highly distributed in the lungs, kidney and liver; however, relatively little entered the brain, suggesting that 8-acetamino-isocorydine could not easily pass through the blood brain barrier. Our work describes the first characterization of the pharmacokinetic parameters and tissue distribution of 8-acetamino-isocorydine. The acquired data will provide useful information for the in vivo pharmacology of 8-acetamino-isocorydine, and can be applied to new drug research. PMID:26579452

  20. Abcb1 in Pigs: Molecular cloning, tissues distribution, functional analysis, and its effect on pharmacokinetics of enrofloxacin.

    PubMed

    Guo, Tingting; Huang, Jinhu; Zhang, Hongyu; Dong, Lingling; Guo, Dawei; Guo, Li; He, Fang; Bhutto, Zohaib Ahmed; Wang, Liping

    2016-01-01

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp) is one of the best-known ATP-dependent efflux transporters, contributing to differences in pharmacokinetics and drug-drug interactions. Until now, studies on pig P-gp have been scarce. In our studies, the full-length porcine P-gp cDNA was cloned and expressed in a Madin-Darby Canine Kidney (MDCK) cell line. P-gp expression was then determined in tissues and its role in the pharmacokinetics of oral enrofloxacin in pigs was studied. The coding region of pig Abcb1 gene was 3,861 bp, encoding 1,286 amino acid residues (Mw = 141,966). Phylogenetic analysis indicated a close evolutionary relationship between porcine P-gp and those of cow and sheep. Pig P-gp was successfully stably overexpressed in MDCK cells and had efflux activity for rhodamine 123, a substrate of P-gp. Tissue distribution analysis indicated that P-gp was highly expressed in brain capillaries, small intestine, and liver. In MDCK-pAbcb1 cells, enrofloxacin was transported by P-gp with net efflux ratio of 2.48 and the efflux function was blocked by P-gp inhibitor verapamil. High expression of P-gp in the small intestine could modify the pharmacokinetics of orally administrated enrofloxacin by increasing the Cmax, AUC and Ka, which was demonstrated using verapamil, an inhibitor of P-gp. PMID:27572343

  1. Abcb1 in Pigs: Molecular cloning, tissues distribution, functional analysis, and its effect on pharmacokinetics of enrofloxacin

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Tingting; Huang, Jinhu; Zhang, Hongyu; Dong, Lingling; Guo, Dawei; Guo, Li; He, Fang; Bhutto, Zohaib Ahmed; Wang, Liping

    2016-01-01

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp) is one of the best-known ATP-dependent efflux transporters, contributing to differences in pharmacokinetics and drug-drug interactions. Until now, studies on pig P-gp have been scarce. In our studies, the full-length porcine P-gp cDNA was cloned and expressed in a Madin-Darby Canine Kidney (MDCK) cell line. P-gp expression was then determined in tissues and its role in the pharmacokinetics of oral enrofloxacin in pigs was studied. The coding region of pig Abcb1 gene was 3,861 bp, encoding 1,286 amino acid residues (Mw = 141,966). Phylogenetic analysis indicated a close evolutionary relationship between porcine P-gp and those of cow and sheep. Pig P-gp was successfully stably overexpressed in MDCK cells and had efflux activity for rhodamine 123, a substrate of P-gp. Tissue distribution analysis indicated that P-gp was highly expressed in brain capillaries, small intestine, and liver. In MDCK-pAbcb1 cells, enrofloxacin was transported by P-gp with net efflux ratio of 2.48 and the efflux function was blocked by P-gp inhibitor verapamil. High expression of P-gp in the small intestine could modify the pharmacokinetics of orally administrated enrofloxacin by increasing the Cmax, AUC and Ka, which was demonstrated using verapamil, an inhibitor of P-gp. PMID:27572343

  2. The tissue distribution in mice and pharmacokinetics in rabbits of oxaliplatin liposome.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao-ping; Geng, Dan-qing; Xu, Hai-xing; Sui, Xiao-hui

    2009-01-01

    A rapid, sensitive, and simple high-performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) method with an ultraviolet detector (UV) has been developed for the determination of oxaliplatin in the plasma of rabbits and tissues of mice. The sample preparation was carried out by complexation with 0.5 mL of DETC (diethyl-dithiocarbamate) solution and extracted by ether and chloroform. Then, 20 microL of supernatant was injected into the HPLC system with 0.25 mol/L of sodium chloride solution and methanol (30:70 v/v) as the mobile phase at a flow rate of 1.0 mL/min. Separation was performed with a C(18) column at 25 degrees C. The peak was detected at 254 nm. The calibration curve was linear (R(2) > or = 0.9995) in the concentration range of 0.1 approximately 200 microg/mL in plasma and tissues. The intra- and interday variation coefficients were not more than 2.61 and 3.83%, respectively. The limit of detection was 20 ng/mL. The mean recoveries of oxaliplatin were ranged from 97.83 to 104.17% in plasma and tissues. The present method has been successfully applied to the pharmacokinetic study of oxaliplatin liposome in mice and rabbits.

  3. The Pharmacokinetics and Tissue Distribution of Honokiol and its Metabolites in Rats.

    PubMed

    Jun-Jun, Wang; Xiao-Lei, Miao; Jing-Ya, Chen; Yong, Chen

    2016-10-01

    Honokiol (HK) is the main bioactive compound isolated from the bark of Magnolia officinalis. The present work is the first to report the pharmacokinetics and distribution of HK and its two metabolites of hydroxylated HK conjugated with glucuronic and sulfuric acid (M1) and HK monoglucuronide (M2) in plasma, liver, kidney and brain following oral administration of HK (40 mg/kg) to healthy Wistar rats. The results showed that only HK but not M1 or M2 was found in brain. Additionally, our work indicated that M2 not HK was the major compound in liver and plasma. The elimination of HK in liver, kidney and brain, and M2 in liver and kidney was more rapid than in plasma. The finding suggested that some of the pharmacological activity of HK might be generated by M2 but not HK.

  4. Tissue distribution model and pharmacokinetics of nuciferine based on UPLC-MS/MS and BP-ANN.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yanyan; Bao, Shihui; Tian, Weiqiang; Wen, Congcong; Hu, Lufeng; Lin, Chongliang

    2015-01-01

    Nuciferine has shown remarkable biological activities and been considered as a promising drug. In this study, a sensitive and selective ultra performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS) method was developed and validated for determination of nuciferine in tissue and plasma. An electrospray ionization source was applied and operated in positive ion mode; multiple reactions monitoring (MRM) mode was used for quantification using target fragment ions m/z 296.0→265.1 for nuciferine, and m/z 322.0→307.0 for berberrubine internal standard (IS). Based on the UPLC-MS/MS method, the tissue distribution profile of nuciferine in mice and plasma pharmacokinetics in rat were studied. The results showed nuciferine was absorbed through intestinal tract and distributed into tissues rapidly. The bioavailability of nuciferine was identified at 17.9%. It can across through blood brain barrier, the concentrations in liver and kidney are highest, then followed by spleen, lung heart and brain. Nuciferine is eliminated quickly in the tissues and plasma, the t1/2 within 5 hour. The concentrations in these tissues are correlated to each other, and can be predicted by a back-propagation artificial neural network model. PMID:26770351

  5. Tissue distribution model and pharmacokinetics of nuciferine based on UPLC-MS/MS and BP-ANN

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yanyan; Bao, Shihui; Tian, Weiqiang; Wen, Congcong; Hu, Lufeng; Lin, Chongliang

    2015-01-01

    Nuciferine has shown remarkable biological activities and been considered as a promising drug. In this study, a sensitive and selective ultra performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS) method was developed and validated for determination of nuciferine in tissue and plasma. An electrospray ionization source was applied and operated in positive ion mode; multiple reactions monitoring (MRM) mode was used for quantification using target fragment ions m/z 296.0→265.1 for nuciferine, and m/z 322.0→307.0 for berberrubine internal standard (IS). Based on the UPLC-MS/MS method, the tissue distribution profile of nuciferine in mice and plasma pharmacokinetics in rat were studied. The results showed nuciferine was absorbed through intestinal tract and distributed into tissues rapidly. The bioavailability of nuciferine was identified at 17.9%. It can across through blood brain barrier, the concentrations in liver and kidney are highest, then followed by spleen, lung heart and brain. Nuciferine is eliminated quickly in the tissues and plasma, the t1/2 within 5 hour. The concentrations in these tissues are correlated to each other, and can be predicted by a back-propagation artificial neural network model. PMID:26770351

  6. Comparative pharmacokinetic and tissue distribution profiles of four major bioactive components in normal and hepatic fibrosis rats after oral administration of Fuzheng Huayu recipe.

    PubMed

    Yang, Tao; Liu, Shan; Wang, Chang-Hong; Tao, Yan-Yan; Zhou, Hua; Liu, Cheng-Hai

    2015-10-10

    Fuzheng Huayu recipe (FZHY) is a herbal product for the treatment of liver fibrosis approved by the Chinese State Food and Drug Administration (SFDA), but its pharmacokinetics and tissue distribution had not been investigated. In this study, the liver fibrotic model was induced with intraperitoneal injection of dimethylnitrosamine (DMN), and FZHY was given orally to the model and normal rats. The plasma pharmacokinetics and tissue distribution profiles of four major bioactive components from FZHY were analyzed in the normal and fibrotic rat groups using an ultrahigh performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS) method. Results revealed that the bioavailabilities of danshensu (DSS), salvianolic acid B (SAB) and rosmarinic acid (ROS) in liver fibrotic rats increased 1.49, 3.31 and 2.37-fold, respectively, compared to normal rats. There was no obvious difference in the pharmacokinetics of amygdalin (AMY) between the normal and fibrotic rats. The tissue distribution of DSS, SAB, and AMY trended to be mostly in the kidney and lung. The distribution of DSS, SAB, and AMY in liver tissue of the model rats was significantly decreased compared to the normal rats. Significant differences in the pharmacokinetics and tissue distribution profiles of DSS, ROS, SAB and AMY were observed in rats with hepatic fibrosis after oral administration of FZHY. These results provide a meaningful basis for developing a clinical dosage regimen in the treatment of hepatic fibrosis by FZHY. PMID:26048667

  7. Pharmacokinetics in rats and tissue distribution in mouse of magnoflorine by ultra performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Shihui; Geng, Peiwu; Wang, Shuanghu; Zhou, Yunfang; Hu, Lufeng; Yang, Xuezhi

    2015-01-01

    Magnoflorine is one of the most widespread aporphine alkaloids. In this work, a sensitive and selective ultra performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS) method for the determination of magnoflorine in rat plasma and mouse tissue have been developed and validated. After addition of nuciferine as an internal standard (IS), protein precipitation by acetonitrile-methanol (9:1, v/v) was used for samples treatment. Chromatographic separation was achieved on a UPLC BEH C18 column (2.1 mm×100 mm, 1.7 μm) with 0.1% formic acid and acetonitrile as the mobile phase with gradient elution. An electrospray ionization source was applied and operated in positive ion mode; multiple reactions monitoring (MRM) mode was used for quantification using target fragment ions m/z 342.8→298.2 for magnoflorine and m/z 296.0→265.1 for IS. Calibration plots were linear throughout the range 2-2000 ng/mL for magnoflorine in rat plasma and tissue. Mean recoveries of magnoflorine in rat plasma were better than 83.0%. RSD of intra-day and inter-day precision were both less than 9%. The accuracy of the method was between 95.5% and 107.5%. The method was successfully applied to pharmacokinetics and tissue distribution study of magnoflorine. The absolute bioavailability of magnoflorine was reported as 22.6%. The magnoflorine underwent a rapid and wide distribution to tissues; the level of magnoflorine in liver is highest, then followed by heart, spleen and lung. Based on tissue distribution data, a back-propagation artificial neural network (BP-ANN) method was developed and it could be used to predict the concentrations of magnoflorine in tissues. PMID:26884929

  8. Pharmacokinetics and tissue distribution of inositol hexaphosphate in C.B17 SCID mice bearing human breast cancer xenografts.

    PubMed

    Eiseman, Julie; Lan, Jing; Guo, Jianxia; Joseph, Erin; Vucenik, Ivana

    2011-10-01

    Inositol hexaphosphate (IP(6)) is effective in preclinical cancer prevention and chemotherapy. In addition to cancer, IP(6) has many other beneficial effects for human health, such as reduction in risk of developing cardiovascular disease and diabetes and inhibition of kidney stone formation. Studies presented here describe the pharmacokinetics, tissue distribution, and metabolism of IP(6) following intravenous (IV) or per os (PO) administration to mice. SCID mice bearing MDA-MB-231 xenografts were treated with 20 mg/kg IP(6) (3 μCi per mouse [(14)C]-uniformly ring-labeled IP(6)) and euthanized at various times after IP(6) treatment. Plasma and tissues were analyzed for [(14)C]-IP(6) and metabolites by high-performance liquid chromatography with radioactivity detection. Following IV administration of IP(6), plasma IP(6) concentrations peaked at 5 minutes and were detectable until 45 minutes. Liver IP(6) concentrations were more than 10-fold higher than plasma concentrations, whereas other normal tissue concentrations were similar to plasma. Only inositol was detected in xenografts. After PO administration, IP(6) was detected in liver; but only inositol was detectable in other tissues. After both IV and PO administration, exogenous IP(6) was rapidly dephosphorylated to inositol; however, alterations in endogenous IPs were not examined.

  9. Pharmacokinetics and tissue distribution study of ginkgolide L in rats by ultra-high performance liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ji-Xin; Liu, Xin-Guang; Fan, Zhi-Ying; Dong, Xin; Lou, Feng-Chang; Li, Ping; Yang, Hua

    2015-12-01

    An ultra-high performance liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS) approach was developed and validated for the determination of ginkgolide L (GL) in rat plasma and tissues using diazepam as internal standard (IS). Detection was performed on a triple quadrupole MS system using multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mode in positive mode. Sample preparation was carried out through a liquid-liquid extraction with ethyl acetate. The chromatographic separation was achieved by using an Agilent ZORBAX SB-Aq column with a mobile phase of 0.5% aqueous formic acid (A) and methanol (B). The monitored transitions were set at m/z 391.14→271.10 for GL and m/z 285.08→193.10 for IS, respectively. The validated method was successfully applied to the pharmacokinetic and tissue distribution study of GL in rats after intravenous administration. Good linearity was found between 2.5-2000ng/mL (r>0.996) for plasma samples, and calibration curves were also linear for other tissue samples over a wide range. The results indicated that GL has linear pharmacokinetic properties after intravenous administration at three doses. GL could distribute to tissues quickly and the major distribution tissue of GL in rats was liver. This was the first report of pharmacokinetic and tissue distribution data for GL.

  10. Relationship of pharmacokinetics and drug distribution in tissue to increased safety of amphotericin B colloidal dispersion in dogs.

    PubMed Central

    Fielding, R M; Singer, A W; Wang, L H; Babbar, S; Guo, L S

    1992-01-01

    The safety, pharmacokinetics, and distribution in tissue of an amphotericin B (AmB)-cholesteryl sulfate colloidal dispersion (ABCD) were compared with those of micellar amphotericin B-deoxycholate (m-AmB). Dogs received 14 daily injections of ABCD (0.6 to 10 mg/kg of body weight per day) or m-AmB (0.6 mg/kg/day). Safety was evaluated by monitoring body weight, hematology, clinical chemistry, and urinalysis during the study and by microscopic examination of tissues at the time of necropsy (day 16). AmB concentrations in plasma were measured in some groups on days 1, 7, and 14 and in necropsy tissue samples. ABCD produced a spectrum of toxic effects in the kidneys, gut, and liver similar to those of m-AmB, but ABCD was eightfold safer than m-AmB. The highest tolerated dose of ABCD (5.0 mg/kg/day) produced effects similar to those of m-AmB (0.6 mg/kg/day). ABCD produced lower concentrations in plasma than an equal dose of m-AmB did. Clearances on days 7 and 14 were higher for ABCD (304 and 295 ml/h.kg) than they were for m-AmB (67 and 53 ml/h.kg). Concentrations in plasma reached steady state after ABCD administration, but they increased after repeated dosing with m-AmB. Diurnal fluctuations in AmB concentrations in plasma were observed 4 to 8 h after the time of dosing. ABCD resulted in lower AmB concentrations in tissue than m-AmB did, except in the reticuloendothelial system. Up to 90% of AmB administered as ABCD was recovered from the liver and spleen on day 16. Reduced drug levels in the kidneys and gut correlated with reduced indications of toxicity in these organs after ABCD administration. Although ABCD increased concentrations of AmB in the reticuloendothelial system, increased toxicity was not observed in these organs. Images PMID:1605595

  11. Pharmacokinetics of Antiretrovirals in Mucosal Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Cottrell, M.L.; Srinivas, N.; Kashuba, A.D.M.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction In the absence of an HIV vaccine or cure, antiretroviral (ARV) based prevention strategies are being investigated to reduce HIV incidence. These prevention strategies depend on achieving effective drug concentrations at the site HIV exposure which is most commonly the mucosal tissues of the lower gastrointestinal tract and the female genital tract. Areas covered This article collates all known data regarding drug exposure in these vulnerable mucosal tissues, and reviews important mechanisms of ARV drug distribution. Research papers and abstracts describing antiretroviral pharmacokinetics in the female genital tract and lower gastrointestinal mucosal tissues available in MEDLINE® or presented at scientific conferences prior to December 2014 are reviewed in detail. Important influences on ARV mucosal tissue distribution, including protein binding, active drug transport, and endogenous hormones, are also reviewed. Expert opinion ARVs exhibit highly variable pharmacokinetics in mucosal tissues. In general, antiretroviral exposure is higher in the lower gastrointestinal tract compared to the female genital tract, but concentrations required for protective efficacy are largely unknown. The expected site of HIV exposure represents an important consideration when designing and optimizing antiretroviral based prevention strategies. PMID:25797064

  12. Pharmacokinetics and tissue distribution of spray-dried carboplatin microspheres: lung targeting via intravenous route.

    PubMed

    Harsha, Sree; Al-Khars, Mohammed; Al-Hassan, Mohammed; Kumar, N Prem; Nair, Anroop B; Attimarad, Mahesh; Al-Dhubiab, Bandar E

    2014-03-01

    For cancer therapy, microspheres can be used to increase effectiveness while decreasing side effects of treatments. We prepared gelatin microspheres containing carboplatin (GCPtM) for treating lung cancer. We prepared gelatin microspheres of carboplatin (GCPtM) for use in treating lung cancer. Microspheres were prepared using a Buchi B-90 nano spray-drier. Surface morphology was found to be shriveled to nearly spherical, with an average size of 14.7 μm. Drug loading and percentage yield were found to be 72 ± 0.4 and 88 ± 0.2 %, respectively. In vitro release studies indicated that diffusion followed the Peppas model, with 99.3 % of total carboplatin released from GCPtM after 12 h, while for the pure drug this value was 92.4 % in 0.5 h. Liquification was observed during stability studies at 37 °C with an relative humidity of 75 %. Plasma concentration profile was described using a two-compartment model after intravenous injection of GCPtM. Carboplatin containing microspheres distributed in the lung, spleen, liver, and blood were found to be primarily distributed in the lungs. We used a powder technology (spray-dryer) method in this study to significantly reduce the overall production time and desired particle size, without using organic solvents; additionally, this method is economically feasible. Thus, microsphere may be an effective method for successfully delivering carboplatin to the lungs.

  13. Comparative pharmacokinetics and tissue distribution of schisandrin, deoxyschisandrin and schisandrin B in rats after combining acupuncture and herb medicine (schisandra chinensis).

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaoyan; Zhou, Yuan; Yin, Fangzhou; Dai, Guoliang; Li, Lin; Xu, Bin; Ji, De; Sun, Yong; Mao, Chunqin; Lu, Tulin

    2014-08-01

    Recently, combination therapy with acupuncture and medicine as a practical strategy to treat diseases has gained increasing attention. The present study aimed to investigate whether acupuncture stimulation at ST.36 had a potential impact on the pharmacokinetics and tissue distribution of lignans. An HPLC-ESI/MS analytical method was established and successfully applied to a comparative study of drug concentration in plasma and tissues of three lignans. The parameters area under the plasma concentration-time curve from time zero to the final measurable point and from time zero to infinity, and peak concentration were significantly increased, with a prolonged mean residence time and a corresponding decrease in clearance in comparision with the Schisandra-alone group. Additionally, tissue concentrations of three lignans were improved in the group with acupuncture, especially in liver. The results indicated that acupuncture has a synergistic effect on the pharmacokinetics and tissue distribution of the three lignans, which could postpone their elimination, resulting in a longer blood circulating time in rat plasma and prolonged residence time in target tissues, leading to higher tissue concentration. The findings provide some scientific evidence for the mechanism of the combined use of acupuncture and herbal medicine. Furthermore, we suggest that acupuncture and its combination with herbal medicine should be investigated further as a possible adjuvant therapy in clinical treatment for liver injury.

  14. Silymarin in liposomes and ethosomes: pharmacokinetics and tissue distribution in free-moving rats by high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Chang, Li-Wen; Hou, Mei-Ling; Tsai, Tung-Hu

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study was to prepare silymarin formulations (silymarin entrapped in liposomes and ethosomes, formulations referred to as LSM and ESM, respectively) to improve oral bioavailability of silymarin and evaluate its tissue distribution by liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) in free-moving rats. Silibinin is the major active constituent of silymarin, which is the main component to be analyzed. A rapid, sensitive, and repeatable LC-MS/MS method was developed and validated in terms of precision, accuracy, and extraction recovery. Furthermore, the established method was applied to study the pharmacokinetics and tissue distribution of silymarin in rats. The size, ζ potential, and drug release of the formulations were characterized. These results showed that the LSM and ESM encapsulated formulations of silymarin may provide more efficient tissue distribution and increased oral bioavailability, thus improving its therapeutic bioactive properties in the body.

  15. Silymarin in liposomes and ethosomes: pharmacokinetics and tissue distribution in free-moving rats by high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Chang, Li-Wen; Hou, Mei-Ling; Tsai, Tung-Hu

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study was to prepare silymarin formulations (silymarin entrapped in liposomes and ethosomes, formulations referred to as LSM and ESM, respectively) to improve oral bioavailability of silymarin and evaluate its tissue distribution by liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) in free-moving rats. Silibinin is the major active constituent of silymarin, which is the main component to be analyzed. A rapid, sensitive, and repeatable LC-MS/MS method was developed and validated in terms of precision, accuracy, and extraction recovery. Furthermore, the established method was applied to study the pharmacokinetics and tissue distribution of silymarin in rats. The size, ζ potential, and drug release of the formulations were characterized. These results showed that the LSM and ESM encapsulated formulations of silymarin may provide more efficient tissue distribution and increased oral bioavailability, thus improving its therapeutic bioactive properties in the body. PMID:25375210

  16. Preclinical Pharmacokinetics, Tissue Distribution, and Plasma Protein Binding of Sodium (±)-5-Bromo-2-(α-Hydroxypentyl) Benzoate (BZP), an Innovative Potent Anti-ischemic Stroke Agent

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Xin; Li, Hong-Meng; Wei, Jing-Yao; Liu, Bing-Jie; Zhang, Yu-Hai; Wang, Gao-Ju; Chang, Jun-Biao; Qiao, Hai-Ling

    2016-01-01

    Sodium (±)-5-bromo-2-(α-hydroxypentyl) benzoate (BZP) is a potential cardiovascular drug and exerts potent neuroprotective effect against transient and long-term ischemic stroke in rats. BZP could convert into 3-butyl-6-bromo-1(3H)-isobenzofuranone (Br-NBP) in vitro and in vivo. However, the pharmacokinetic profiles of BZP and Br-NBP still have not been evaluated. For the purpose of investigating the pharmacokinetic profiles, tissue distribution, and plasma protein binding of BZP and Br-NBP, a rapid, sensitive, and specific method based on liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) has been developed for determination of BZP and Br-NBP in biological samples. The results indicated that BZP and Br-NBP showed a short elimination half-life, and pharmacokinetic profile in rats (3, 6, and 12 mg/kg; i.v.) and beagle dogs (1, 2, and 4 mg/kg; i.v.gtt) were obtained after single dosing of BZP. After multiple dosing of BZP, there was no significant accumulation of BZP and Br-NBP in the plasma of rats and beagle dogs. Following i.v. single dose (6 mg/kg) of BZP to rats, BZP and Br-NBP were distributed rapidly into all tissues examined, with the highest concentrations of BZP and Br-NBP in lung and kidney, respectively. The brain distribution of Br-NBP in middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) rats was more than in normal rats (P < 0.05). The plasma protein binding degree of BZP at three concentrations (8000, 20,000, and 80,000 ng/mL) from rat, beagle dog, and human plasma were 98.1–98.7, 88.9–92.7, and 74.8–83.7% respectively. In conclusion, both BZP and Br-NBP showed short half-life, good dose-linear pharmacokinetic profile, wide tissue distribution, and different degree protein binding to various species plasma. This was the first preclinical pharmacokinetic investigation of BZP and Br-NBP in both rats and beagle dogs, which provided vital guidance for further preclinical research and the subsequent clinical trials. PMID:27588003

  17. Preclinical Pharmacokinetics, Tissue Distribution, and Plasma Protein Binding of Sodium (±)-5-Bromo-2-(α-Hydroxypentyl) Benzoate (BZP), an Innovative Potent Anti-ischemic Stroke Agent.

    PubMed

    Tian, Xin; Li, Hong-Meng; Wei, Jing-Yao; Liu, Bing-Jie; Zhang, Yu-Hai; Wang, Gao-Ju; Chang, Jun-Biao; Qiao, Hai-Ling

    2016-01-01

    Sodium (±)-5-bromo-2-(α-hydroxypentyl) benzoate (BZP) is a potential cardiovascular drug and exerts potent neuroprotective effect against transient and long-term ischemic stroke in rats. BZP could convert into 3-butyl-6-bromo-1(3H)-isobenzofuranone (Br-NBP) in vitro and in vivo. However, the pharmacokinetic profiles of BZP and Br-NBP still have not been evaluated. For the purpose of investigating the pharmacokinetic profiles, tissue distribution, and plasma protein binding of BZP and Br-NBP, a rapid, sensitive, and specific method based on liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) has been developed for determination of BZP and Br-NBP in biological samples. The results indicated that BZP and Br-NBP showed a short elimination half-life, and pharmacokinetic profile in rats (3, 6, and 12 mg/kg; i.v.) and beagle dogs (1, 2, and 4 mg/kg; i.v.gtt) were obtained after single dosing of BZP. After multiple dosing of BZP, there was no significant accumulation of BZP and Br-NBP in the plasma of rats and beagle dogs. Following i.v. single dose (6 mg/kg) of BZP to rats, BZP and Br-NBP were distributed rapidly into all tissues examined, with the highest concentrations of BZP and Br-NBP in lung and kidney, respectively. The brain distribution of Br-NBP in middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) rats was more than in normal rats (P < 0.05). The plasma protein binding degree of BZP at three concentrations (8000, 20,000, and 80,000 ng/mL) from rat, beagle dog, and human plasma were 98.1-98.7, 88.9-92.7, and 74.8-83.7% respectively. In conclusion, both BZP and Br-NBP showed short half-life, good dose-linear pharmacokinetic profile, wide tissue distribution, and different degree protein binding to various species plasma. This was the first preclinical pharmacokinetic investigation of BZP and Br-NBP in both rats and beagle dogs, which provided vital guidance for further preclinical research and the subsequent clinical trials. PMID:27588003

  18. Multiscale Modeling of Antibody-Drug Conjugates: Connecting Tissue and Cellular Distribution to Whole Animal Pharmacokinetics and Potential Implications for Efficacy.

    PubMed

    Cilliers, Cornelius; Guo, Hans; Liao, Jianshan; Christodolu, Nikolas; Thurber, Greg M

    2016-09-01

    Antibody-drug conjugates exhibit complex pharmacokinetics due to their combination of macromolecular and small molecule properties. These issues range from systemic concerns, such as deconjugation of the small molecule drug during the long antibody circulation time or rapid clearance from nonspecific interactions, to local tumor tissue heterogeneity, cell bystander effects, and endosomal escape. Mathematical models can be used to study the impact of these processes on overall distribution in an efficient manner, and several types of models have been used to analyze varying aspects of antibody distribution including physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models and tissue-level simulations. However, these processes are quantitative in nature and cannot be handled qualitatively in isolation. For example, free antibody from deconjugation of the small molecule will impact the distribution of conjugated antibodies within the tumor. To incorporate these effects into a unified framework, we have coupled the systemic and organ-level distribution of a PBPK model with the tissue-level detail of a distributed parameter tumor model. We used this mathematical model to analyze new experimental results on the distribution of the clinical antibody-drug conjugate Kadcyla in HER2-positive mouse xenografts. This model is able to capture the impact of the drug-antibody ratio (DAR) on tumor penetration, the net result of drug deconjugation, and the effect of using unconjugated antibody to drive ADC penetration deeper into the tumor tissue. This modeling approach will provide quantitative and mechanistic support to experimental studies trying to parse the impact of multiple mechanisms of action for these complex drugs. PMID:27287046

  19. Application of a liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method to the pharmacokinetics, tissue distribution and excretion studies of Dactylicapnos scandens in rats.

    PubMed

    Guo, Changchuan; Jiang, Yan; Li, Li; Hong, Lan; Wang, Yuqing; Shen, Qian; Lou, Yan; Hu, Haihong; Zhou, Hui; Yu, Lushan; Jiang, Huidi; Zeng, Su

    2013-02-23

    The herbal ingredients of isocorydine and protopine were isolated from Dactylicapnos scandens. This study was aimed at developing a liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS/MS) method to quantify isocorydine and protopine in rat plasma and tissues for pharmacokinetic, tissue distribution and excretion studies. Biological samples were processed with ethyl acetate extraction, and corydaline was chosen as the internal standard (IS). The analytes were separated by a C(18) column and detected with a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer using positive ion ESI in the multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mode. The MS/MS ion transitions monitored were m/z 342.0→278.9 for isocorydine, 354.1→188.0 for protopine and 370.0→192.0 for IS, respectively. Excellent linearity was observed over the concentration range between 10 and 3000 ng/mL for isocorydine and 10-300 ng/mL for protopine. The lower limit of quantification (LLOQ) was 10 ng/mL for both isocorydine and protopine. This novel method was rapid, accurate, high sensitive and high selective. It was successfully applied to the pharmacokinetic, tissue distribution and excretion studies of D. scandens. These preclinical data of D. scandens would be useful for the clinical reference. PMID:23245239

  20. Determination of tissue distribution of potent antitumor agent ureidomustin (BO-1055) by HPLC and its pharmacokinetic application in rats.

    PubMed

    Chien, Shin-I; Yen, Jiin-Cherng; Kakadiya, Rajesh; Chen, Ching-Huang; Lee, Te-Chang; Su, Tsann-Long; Tsai, Tung-Hu

    2013-02-15

    Ureidomustin hydrochloride (BO-1055) was designed as a water-soluble nitrogen-mustard, which exhibited potent anticancer activity and was selected as a candidate for preclinical studies. However, up to date, there is rarely an easy and economic method to quantize ureidomustin in the biological samples. The aim of this study is to develop a simple yet valid quantization method to tackle this challenge. Here we present a combined high-performance liquid chromatography with photodiode array (HPLC-PDA) method in quantizing the ureidomustin in the plasma and various organs of Sprague-Dawley rats. The method was validated in terms of precision, accuracy, and extraction recovery. Furthermore, the established method was applied to study pharmacokinetics of ureidomustin in the rat's plasma and verified via a liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method. Calibration curves of the plasma and organ samples were falling at the range between 0.5-50μg/mL and 0.1-50μg/mL (r(2)≥0.999 and CV≤±15%), respectively. The limits of detection (LOD) were 0.1μg/mL for plasma samples and 0.05μg/mL for organ samples, while the detection limits of quantification (LOQ) were 0.5μg/mL for plasma samples and 0.1μg/mL for organ samples. The average recovery of ureidomustin was about 83%. These results demonstrated a linear pharmacokinetic pattern at dosages of 10 and 30mg/kg. The pharmacokinetic data revealed that ureidomustin was best fitted to a two-compartment model with a rapid distribution phase and a slow elimination phase. Besides, after a short intravenous administration time at the dose of 10mg/kg, ureidomustin was found to be quickly distributed to all organs in rats, accumulated mainly in the kidney, and only a limited amount was detected in the brain. PMID:23353940

  1. Pharmacokinetics and tissue distribution of novel platinum containing anticancer agent BP‐C1 studied in rabbits using sector field inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Navolotskii, Denis V.; Ivanenko, Natalya B.; Fedoros, Elena I.; Panchenko, Andrey V.

    2015-01-01

    A method of platinum quantification in whole blood samples after microwave digestion using sector field inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry has been developed. The following analytical figures of merit have been established: limit of detection 1.1 µg/L for blood samples, dynamic range 3.6–200 µg/L, intra‐day precision (relative standard deviation, n = 9) did not exceed 5%. Spiked samples were analyzed for method validation. The method was used for pharmacokinetics studies of a novel anti‐cancer drug BP‐С1, a complex of cis‐configured platinum and benzene‐poly‐carboxylic acids. Main pharmacokinetic parameters (area under curve, maximum concentration, clearance, half‐life times for α‐ and β‐phase) were estimated for two dosage forms of BP‐C1 0.05 and 0.125 mass %. Pharmacokinetic curves were assessed for single and course administration. Studies were performed using rabbits (n = 6) as a model. BP‐C1 was injected intramuscularly. The study established dose proportionality of the tested dosage forms and suggested clinical dosing schedule: 5 days of injections followed by 2 days’ break. Platinum tissue distribution was studied in tissue samples collected 20 days after the last injection. Predominant platinum accumulation was observed in kidneys, liver, and muscles near injection site. ‘Slow’ phase of platinum excretion kinetics may be related to the muscles at the injection site. © 2015 The Authors. Drug Testing and Analysis published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:26061351

  2. Determination of xanthotoxin using a liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry and its application to pharmacokinetics and tissue distribution model in rat

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Weiqiang; Cai, Jinzhang; Xu, Yanyan; Luo, Xinhua; Zhang, Jin; Zhang, Zixue; Zhang, Qingwei; Wang, Xianqin; Hu, Lufeng; Lin, Guanyang

    2015-01-01

    A simple and selective liquid chromatography mass spectrometry method for determination of xanthotoxin in rat plasma and various tissues for pharmacokinetic was developed. Chromatographic separation was achieved on a C18 (2.1 mm × 150 mm, 5 μm) column with acetonitrile-0.1% formic acid in water as mobile phase with gradient elution. An electrospray ionization source was applied and operated in positive ion mode; selective ion monitoring (SIM) mode was used for quantification using target fragment ions m/z 217 for xanthotoxin and m/z 326 for the internal standard. The resulting calibration curves offered satisfactory linearity (R2 > 0.99) within the test range. Mean recoveries of xanthotoxin in rat plasma were in the range of 79.9%-84.6%. RSD of intra-day and inter-day precision were both < 14%. The accuracy of the method ranged from 87.5% to 109.8%. The assay was successfully applied to the pharmacokinetics and tissue distribution model studies of xanthotoxin in rats. The oral bioavailability of xanthotoxin was 73.2% in rats. PMID:26629000

  3. Pharmacokinetics and tissue distribution of bovine testicular hyaluronidase and vinblastine in mice: an attempt to optimize the mode of adjuvant hyaluronidase administration in cancer chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Muckenschnabel, I; Bernhardt, G; Spruss, T; Buschauer, A

    1998-09-11

    The influence of the route of administration (i.v., i.p. and s.c.) on pharmacokinetics and tissue distribution of bovine testicular hyaluronidase and vinblastine was studied in mice (plasma, skeletal muscle, liver, kidney and human melanoma). After i.v. injection, hyaluronidase was accumulated in liver and kidney, whereas i.p. and s.c. administration led to almost equal distribution in plasma, muscle, liver and kidney. In melanoma, the highest levels of hyaluronidase were found after s.c. injection of the enzyme close to the tumor. Hyaluronidase s.c. increased the intratumoral concentration of s.c. co-administered vinblastine most efficiently, making local simultaneous application as in interstitial chemotherapy most promising.

  4. Determination of a novel anticancer c-Met inhibitor LS-177 in rat plasma and tissues with a validated UPLC-MS/MS method: application to pharmacokinetics and tissue distribution study.

    PubMed

    Ju, Ping; Liu, Zhenzhen; Jiang, Yu; Zhao, Simin; Zhang, Lunhui; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Gu, Liqiang; Tang, Xing; Bi, Kaishun; Chen, Xiaohui

    2015-07-01

    LS-177 is a novel small-molecule kinase inhibitor employed to interrupt the c-Met signaling pathway. A rapid and sensitive ultraperformance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS) method was developed and validated for determination of LS-177 in rat plasma and tissues. The biosamples were extracted by liquid-liquid extraction with methyl tert-butyl ether and separated on a C18 column (50 × 4.6 mm, 2.6 µm) using a gradient elution mobile phase consisting of acetonitrile-0.1% formic acid water. Under the optimal conditions, the selectivity of the method was satisfactory with no endogenous interference. The intraday and interday precisions (relative standard deviation) were <10.5% and the accuracy (relative error) was from -12.5 to 12.5% at all quality control levels. Excellent recovery and negligible matrix effects were observed. Stability studies showed that LS-177 was stable during the preparation and analytical processes. The UPLC-MS/MS method was successfully applied to pharmacokinetic and tissue distribution studies. The results indicated that there was no significant drug accumulation after multiple-dose oral administration of LS-177. The tissue distribution study exhibited significant higher uptakes of LS-177 in stomach, intestine, lung and liver among all of the tissues. The results in pharmacokinetics and tissue distribution may provide a meaningful basis for clinical application.

  5. Pharmacokinetics, tissue distribution and excretion of isoalantolactone and alantolactone in rats after oral administration of Radix Inulae extract.

    PubMed

    Xu, Renjie; Zhou, Guisheng; Peng, Ying; Wang, Mengyue; Li, Xiaobo

    2015-04-28

    Radix Inulae is endemic to China and has been used in traditional medicine to treat upper body pain, emesis and diarrhoea, and to eliminate parasites. Here, an UPLC-MS/MS method was developed and applied to study the pharmacokinetics, distribution and excretion of isoalantolactone and alantolactone, which are two main active sesquiterpene lactones in Radix Inulae, in Sprague-Dawley rats following oral administration of total Radix Inulae extract. Isoalantolactone, alantolactone and osthole (internal standard) were prepared using acetonitrile precipitation, and the separation of isoalantolactone and alantolactone was achieved by isocratic elution using water (containing 0.1% formic acid) and acetonitrile as the mobile phase using a ZORBAX Eclipse Plus C18 column. The total run time was 6.4 min. The present study showed poor absorption of isoalantolactone and alantolactone in vivo. The apparent Cmax, Tmax, T1/2 and total exposure (AUC0-12h) in rat plasma were 37.8 ng/mL, 120 min, 351.7 min and 6112.3 ng-min/mL for isoalantolactone and 25.9 ng/mL, 90 min, 321.0 min and 4918.9 ng-min/mL for alantolactone, respectively. It was shown that the highest concentration was achieved in the small intestine and feces clearance was shown to be the dominant elimination pathway of the lactones.

  6. Comparative pharmacokinetics, distributions in tissue, and interactions with blood proteins of conventional and sterically stabilized liposomes containing 2',3'-dideoxyinosine.

    PubMed Central

    Harvie, P; Désormeaux, A; Bergeron, M C; Tremblay, M; Beauchamp, D; Poulin, L; Bergeron, M G

    1996-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics and distribution in tissue of 2',3'-dideoxyinosine (ddI) encapsulated in sterically stabilized liposomes have been evaluated in rats. Most of the sterically stabilized liposomes concentrated in the spleen with a peak level at 24 h after their intravenous injection. An extended half-life in plasma was observed for sterically stabilized liposomes (14.5 h) compared with that of conventional liposomes (3.9 h). The systemic clearance of ddI incorporated in sterically stabilized liposomes was 180 times lower than that of the free drug. The levels of in vitro and in vivo protein binding on both conventional and sterically stabilized liposomes were also evaluated. Results suggest that the amount of proteins associated with liposomes might not be the only factor involved in the in vivo clearance of liposomes, as this process may also be influenced by the nature of the bound blood proteins. PMID:8787911

  7. Investigation on pharmacokinetics, tissue distribution and excretion of a novel platinum anticancer agent in rats by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS).

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jie; Wen, Yanli; Zhang, Wei; Zhao, Di; Fan, Ali; Zhang, Yongjie; Deng, Shuhua; Wang, Xin; Liu, Qingwang; Lu, Yang; Wang, Zhimei; Gou, Shaohua; Chen, Xijing

    2014-08-01

    1. DN604 is a new platinum agent with encouraging anticancer activity. The present study was to explore the pharmacokinetic profiles, distribution and excretion of platinum in Sprague-Dawley rats after intravenous administration of DN604. A sensitive and selective inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) method was established for determination of platinum in biological specimens. The pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated by a non-compartmental method. 2. The area under concentration-time curve AUC0-t and AUC0-∞ for platinum originating from DN604 at 10 mg/kg were 25.15 ± 1.29 and 28.72 ± 1.04 μg/hml, respectively. The mean residence time MRT was 36.59 ± 6.65 h. The volume of distribution Vz was 11.42 ± 2.49 l/kg and clearance CL was 0.18 ± 0.01 l/h/kg. In addition, the elimination half-life T1/2z was 44.83 ± 9.75 h. After intravenous administration of DN604, platinum was extensively distributed in most of tested tissues except brain. The majority of platinum excreted via urine, and its accumulative excretion ratio during the period of 120 h was 63.5% ± 7.7% for urine, but only 6.94% ± 0.11% for feces. 3. The satisfactory half-life, wide distribution and high excretion made this novel platinum agent worthy of further research and development.

  8. LC-UV Determination of Baicalin in Rabbit Plasma and Tissues for Application in Pharmacokinetics and Tissue Distribution Studies of Baicalin after Intravenous Administration of Liposomal and Injectable Formulations.

    PubMed

    Wei, Yumeng; Pi, Chao; Yang, Gang; Xiong, Xiaoming; Lan, Yongshu; Yang, Hongru; Zhou, Yang; Ye, Yun; Zou, Yonggen; Zheng, Wenwu; Zhao, Ling

    2016-04-19

    A simple and sensitive LC-UV method to investigate the pharmacokinetics and biodistribution pattern of baicalin in rabbits was established and validated. Baicalin and the internal standard, rutin, were extracted from biosamples using acetonitrile as protein precipitation after pretreated with ammonium acetate buffer (pH 3.5; 1 M) to obtain a pure chromatographic peak and high extraction recovery. Chromatographic separation was achieved on a reverse-phase C18 column with a gradient elution at flow rate of 1.0 mL/min. UV absorption was set at 278 nm. Chromatographic response was linear over the ranges of 0.05-10.00 μg/mL in plasma and 0.05-300.00 μg/g in tissues with the limits of quantification of 50.0 ng/mL in plasma and tissues, and the limit of detection of baicalin in bio-samples of 15 ng/mL. The RSD of intra-and inter-day for the biosamples were from 4.19% to 10.84% and from 4.37% to 10.93%, respectively. The accuracy of plasma and tissue samples ranged from 81.6% to 95.2% and 80.8% to 98.4%, respectively. The extraction recoveries ranged from 81.5% to 88.3% for plasma, from 73.1% to 93.2% for tissues, respectively. Baicalin was stable in rabbit biosamples. The validated method was successfully applied to the study of the pharmacokinetics and tissue distribution of baicalin after intravenous administration of liposomal and injectable formulations to rabbits. Compared to baicalin injection, the pharmacokinetics and biodistribution behavior of baicalin was altered significantly in rabbits treated with its liposomes and drug concentration in the lungs was greatly increased.

  9. Pharmacokinetics and tissue distribution of ginkgolide A, ginkgolide B, and ginkgolide K after intravenous infusion of ginkgo diterpene lactones in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuyao; Ouyang, Bingchen; Aa, Jiye; Geng, Jianliang; Fei, Fei; Wang, Pei; Wang, Jiankun; Peng, Ying; Geng, Ting; Li, Yanjing; Huang, Wenzhe; Wang, Zhenzhong; Xiao, Wei; Wang, Guangji

    2016-07-15

    Ginkgo diterpene lactones are compounds that are extracted from the Ginkgo biloba leaf and possess pharmacologic activities with neuroprotective effects. To address the poor bioavailability of ginkgo diterpene lactones, ginkgo diterpene lactone meglumine injection (GDLI) was formulated and is commercially available. In this study, a simple, sensitive and reliable liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method was developed and validated for assessing the total amount and the amount of the prototype forms of ginkgolides A (GA), B (GB) and K (GK) in rat plasma and tissues. This method was used to calculate the concentrations of the hydrolysed carboxylic forms and assess the pharmacokinetics of the ginkgolides after intravenous (i.v.) GDLI administration in rats. Generally, all three ginkgolide forms showed dose-dependent plasma concentrations, and no obvious differences in pharmacokinetic parameters, i.e., area under the curve (AUC) of plasma concentration versus time and half-life, were observed after GDLI administration on 7 consecutive days. These ginkgolides primarily existed in the carboxylic form in the plasma, and the systemic concentrations of the carboxylic forms of GA and GB were 11- to 17- and 3- to 4-fold higher than those of their prototype forms, respectively. In contrast, dramatically increased levels of the GA and GB prototype lactones were detected in the liver and heart. GA, GB, and GK were extensively distributed in various organs/tissues; the highest levels were found in the kidneys, liver, and intestine, and the lowest levels were found in the brain. These data suggest that ginkgolides have difficulty crossing the blood-brain barrier and that their targets for protecting against cerebral ischaemia are located outside the central system.

  10. Pharmacokinetics and tissue distribution of ginkgolide A, ginkgolide B, and ginkgolide K after intravenous infusion of ginkgo diterpene lactones in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuyao; Ouyang, Bingchen; Aa, Jiye; Geng, Jianliang; Fei, Fei; Wang, Pei; Wang, Jiankun; Peng, Ying; Geng, Ting; Li, Yanjing; Huang, Wenzhe; Wang, Zhenzhong; Xiao, Wei; Wang, Guangji

    2016-07-15

    Ginkgo diterpene lactones are compounds that are extracted from the Ginkgo biloba leaf and possess pharmacologic activities with neuroprotective effects. To address the poor bioavailability of ginkgo diterpene lactones, ginkgo diterpene lactone meglumine injection (GDLI) was formulated and is commercially available. In this study, a simple, sensitive and reliable liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method was developed and validated for assessing the total amount and the amount of the prototype forms of ginkgolides A (GA), B (GB) and K (GK) in rat plasma and tissues. This method was used to calculate the concentrations of the hydrolysed carboxylic forms and assess the pharmacokinetics of the ginkgolides after intravenous (i.v.) GDLI administration in rats. Generally, all three ginkgolide forms showed dose-dependent plasma concentrations, and no obvious differences in pharmacokinetic parameters, i.e., area under the curve (AUC) of plasma concentration versus time and half-life, were observed after GDLI administration on 7 consecutive days. These ginkgolides primarily existed in the carboxylic form in the plasma, and the systemic concentrations of the carboxylic forms of GA and GB were 11- to 17- and 3- to 4-fold higher than those of their prototype forms, respectively. In contrast, dramatically increased levels of the GA and GB prototype lactones were detected in the liver and heart. GA, GB, and GK were extensively distributed in various organs/tissues; the highest levels were found in the kidneys, liver, and intestine, and the lowest levels were found in the brain. These data suggest that ginkgolides have difficulty crossing the blood-brain barrier and that their targets for protecting against cerebral ischaemia are located outside the central system. PMID:27182682

  11. Pharmacokinetics, tissue distribution, excretion, and metabolite profiling of PEGylated rFIX (nonacog beta pegol, N9-GP) in rats.

    PubMed

    Sternebring, Ola; Christensen, Jesper Kammersgaard; Bjørnsdottir, Inga

    2016-09-20

    Nonacog beta pegol (N9-GP) is a novel recombinant factor IX conjugated with a 40-kDa branched polyethylene glycol (PEG) to extend plasma half-life (t½) compared with native FIX, developed for the treatment of haemophilia B. This is the first time distribution, metabolism, and excretion data of N9-GP have been presented. ADME studies were performed using single i.v. doses of radiolabelled N9-GP administered to rats, focussing on the biological fate of the 40-kDa PEG. Results indicated that N9-GP-related radioactivity was distributed throughout the body, being most abundant in highly vascularised tissues, and with lowest levels seen in the central nervous system. N9-GP was cleared from plasma within 1week after dosing, while total radioactivity was eliminated more slowly, in a more pronounced biphasic manner. N9-GP seems to be cleared via receptor-mediated uptake (e.g., in the liver) or via the reticuloendothelial system with subsequent proteolysis. PEG is thereafter either cleared alongside the protein or released back into circulation. Furthermore, N9-GP-related radioactivity was excreted in both faeces and urine as 40kDa PEG and degradation products. Some PEG-related radioactivity (not in any particular organ) was present in the carcass 12weeks postdose, consistent with the long terminal elimination t½ of plasma radioactivity. As shown here for N9-GP, and previously for other protein-PEG conjugate products, disposition kinetics of conjugates and individual constituents appears to be compound specific. In addition to the size/structure of the PEG and protein moieties, protein-specific clearance pathways may contribute to the disposition of intact conjugate and PEG moiety. PMID:27378188

  12. A Bottom-Up Whole-Body Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Model to Mechanistically Predict Tissue Distribution and the Rate of Subcutaneous Absorption of Therapeutic Proteins.

    PubMed

    Gill, Katherine L; Gardner, Iain; Li, Linzhong; Jamei, Masoud

    2016-01-01

    The ability to predict subcutaneous (SC) absorption rate and tissue distribution of therapeutic proteins (TPs) using a bottom-up approach is highly desirable early in the drug development process prior to clinical data being available. A whole-body physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model, requiring only a few drug parameters, to predict plasma and interstitial fluid concentrations of TPs in humans after intravenous and subcutaneous dosing has been developed. Movement of TPs between vascular and interstitial spaces was described by considering both convection and diffusion processes using a 2-pore framework. The model was optimised using a variety of literature sources, such as tissue lymph/plasma concentration ratios in humans and animals, information on the percentage of dose absorbed following SC dosing via lymph in animals and data showing loss of radiolabelled IgG from the SC dosing site in humans. The resultant model was used to predict t max and plasma concentration profiles for 12 TPs (molecular weight 8-150 kDa) following SC dosing. The predicted plasma concentration profiles were generally comparable to observed data. t max was predicted within 3-fold of reported values, with one third of the predictions within 0.8-1.25-fold. There was no systematic bias in simulated C max values, although a general trend for underprediction of t max was observed. No clear trend between prediction accuracy of t max and TP isoelectric point or molecular size was apparent. The mechanistic whole-body PBPK model described here can be applied to predict absorption rate of TPs into blood and movement into target tissues following SC dosing.

  13. A HPLC-MS/MS method for determination of 6'''-feruloylspinosin in rat plasma and tissues: Pharmacokinetics and tissue distribution study.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Longdong; Liu, Yan; Chen, Xiaoyan; Xie, Junbo; Zhang, Yanqing; Yang, Ke; Zhou, Hongjian; Duan, Yayun; Zheng, Wei; Xie, Wenlin

    2016-03-20

    A sensitive, reliable and accurate HPLC-MS/MS method was developed and validated for the quantification of 6'''-feruloylspinosin in rat plasma and tissues with puerarin as the internal standard. The separation was performed on a Proshell 120 EC-C18 column (4.6×150 mm, 2.7 μm) with a mobile phase consisting of acetonitrile and 0.1% formic acid (20:80, v/v) at 0.3 mL/min. The quantification was performed by MRM with m/z [M-H](-) 783.3→427.2 for 6'''-feruloylspinosin and m/z [M-H](-) 415.4→295.4 for the internal standard, respectively. The calibration curves covered over a concentration range of 20-2000 ng/mL in plasma and various tissues samples (heart, liver, spleen, lung, kidney, stomach, intestine, muscle, cerebrum and cerebellum) with good linearity (r(2)≥0.9914). Both the intra- and inter-day precisions were less than 14.70%, and the accuracy (RE%) ranged from -5.80% to 4.93%. The extraction recoveries were within 75.21-92.96%, and the matrix effect ranged from 87.21% to 113.44%. Compared with spinosin, 6'''-feruloylspinosin was distributed in rats faster whereas more slowly eliminated from the plasma. 6'''-Feruloylspinosin could be distributed rapidly and widely in various tissues, and transfer across the blood-brain barrier. In addition, both 6'''-feruloylspinosin and spinosin could enhance the expression of GABAAα1, GABAAα5, GABABR1 mRNA in rat hippocampal neurons significantly, indicating the bioactivity mechanism of 6'''-feruloylspinosin was involved in the GABA receptors. PMID:26780157

  14. A HPLC-MS/MS method for determination of 6'''-feruloylspinosin in rat plasma and tissues: Pharmacokinetics and tissue distribution study.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Longdong; Liu, Yan; Chen, Xiaoyan; Xie, Junbo; Zhang, Yanqing; Yang, Ke; Zhou, Hongjian; Duan, Yayun; Zheng, Wei; Xie, Wenlin

    2016-03-20

    A sensitive, reliable and accurate HPLC-MS/MS method was developed and validated for the quantification of 6'''-feruloylspinosin in rat plasma and tissues with puerarin as the internal standard. The separation was performed on a Proshell 120 EC-C18 column (4.6×150 mm, 2.7 μm) with a mobile phase consisting of acetonitrile and 0.1% formic acid (20:80, v/v) at 0.3 mL/min. The quantification was performed by MRM with m/z [M-H](-) 783.3→427.2 for 6'''-feruloylspinosin and m/z [M-H](-) 415.4→295.4 for the internal standard, respectively. The calibration curves covered over a concentration range of 20-2000 ng/mL in plasma and various tissues samples (heart, liver, spleen, lung, kidney, stomach, intestine, muscle, cerebrum and cerebellum) with good linearity (r(2)≥0.9914). Both the intra- and inter-day precisions were less than 14.70%, and the accuracy (RE%) ranged from -5.80% to 4.93%. The extraction recoveries were within 75.21-92.96%, and the matrix effect ranged from 87.21% to 113.44%. Compared with spinosin, 6'''-feruloylspinosin was distributed in rats faster whereas more slowly eliminated from the plasma. 6'''-Feruloylspinosin could be distributed rapidly and widely in various tissues, and transfer across the blood-brain barrier. In addition, both 6'''-feruloylspinosin and spinosin could enhance the expression of GABAAα1, GABAAα5, GABABR1 mRNA in rat hippocampal neurons significantly, indicating the bioactivity mechanism of 6'''-feruloylspinosin was involved in the GABA receptors.

  15. Sunitinib-ibuprofen drug interaction affects the pharmacokinetics and tissue distribution of sunitinib to brain, liver, and kidney in male and female mice differently.

    PubMed

    Lau, Christine Li Ling; Chan, Sook Tyng; Selvaratanam, Manimegahlai; Khoo, Hui Wen; Lim, Adeline Yi Ling; Modamio, Pilar; Mariño, Eduardo L; Segarra, Ignacio

    2015-08-01

    Tyrosine kinase inhibitor sunitinib (used in GIST, advanced RCC, and pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors) undergoes CYP3A4 metabolism and is an ABCB1B and ABCG2 efflux transporters substrate. We assessed the pharmacokinetic interaction with ibuprofen (an NSAID used by patients with cancer) in Balb/c male and female mice. Mice (study group) were coadministered (30 min apart) 30 mg/kg of ibuprofen and 60 mg/kg of sunitinib PO and compared with the control groups, which received sunitinib alone (60 mg/kg, PO). Sunitinib concentration in plasma, brain, kidney, and liver was measured by HPLC as scheduled and noncompartmental pharmacokinetic parameters estimated. In female control mice, sunitinib AUC0→∞ decreased in plasma (P < 0.05), was higher in liver and brain (P < 0.001), and lower in kidney (P < 0.001) vs. male control mice. After ibuprofen coadministration, female mice showed lower AUC0→∞ in plasma (P < 0.01), brain, liver, and kidney (all P < 0.001). However, in male mice, AUC0→∞ remained unchanged in plasma, increased in liver and kidney, and decreased in brain (all P < 0.001). The tissue-to-plasma AUC0→∞ ratio was similar between male and female control mice, but changed after ibuprofen coadministration: Male mice showed 1.6-fold higher liver-to-plasma ratio (P < 0.001) while remained unchanged in female mice and in kidney (male and female mice) but decreased 55% in brain (P < 0.05). The tissue-to-plasma partial AUC ratio, the drug tissue targeting index, and the tissue-plasma hysteresis-like plots also showed sex-based ibuprofen-sunitinib drug interaction differences. The results illustrate the relevance of this DDI on sunitinib pharmacokinetics and tissue uptake. These may be due to gender-based P450 and efflux/transporters differences.

  16. Estimation of placental and lactational transfer and tissue distribution of atrazine and its main metabolites in rodent dams, fetuses, and neonates with physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Zhoumeng; Fisher, Jeffrey W.; Wang, Ran; Ross, Matthew K.; Filipov, Nikolay M.

    2013-11-15

    Atrazine (ATR) is a widely used chlorotriazine herbicide, a ubiquitous environmental contaminant, and a potential developmental toxicant. To quantitatively evaluate placental/lactational transfer and fetal/neonatal tissue dosimetry of ATR and its major metabolites, physiologically based pharmacokinetic models were developed for rat dams, fetuses and neonates. These models were calibrated using pharmacokinetic data from rat dams repeatedly exposed (oral gavage; 5 mg/kg) to ATR followed by model evaluation against other available rat data. Model simulations corresponded well to the majority of available experimental data and suggest that: (1) the fetus is exposed to both ATR and its major metabolite didealkylatrazine (DACT) at levels similar to maternal plasma levels, (2) the neonate is exposed mostly to DACT at levels two-thirds lower than maternal plasma or fetal levels, while lactational exposure to ATR is minimal, and (3) gestational carryover of DACT greatly affects its neonatal dosimetry up until mid-lactation. To test the model's cross-species extrapolation capability, a pharmacokinetic study was conducted with pregnant C57BL/6 mice exposed (oral gavage; 5 mg/kg) to ATR from gestational day 12 to 18. By using mouse-specific parameters, the model predictions fitted well with the measured data, including placental ATR/DACT levels. However, fetal concentrations of DACT were overestimated by the model (10-fold). This overestimation suggests that only around 10% of the DACT that reaches the fetus is tissue-bound. These rodent models could be used in fetal/neonatal tissue dosimetry predictions to help design/interpret early life toxicity/pharmacokinetic studies with ATR and as a foundation for scaling to humans. - Highlights: • We developed PBPK models for atrazine in rat dams, fetuses, and neonates. • We conducted pharmacokinetic (PK) study with atrazine in pregnant mice. • Model predictions were in good agreement with experimental rat and mouse PK data.

  17. Pharmacokinetics and tissue distribution of docetaxel liposome mediated by a novel galactosylated cholesterol derivatives synthesized by lipase-catalyzed esterification in non-aqueous phase.

    PubMed

    Luo, Li-Hua; Zheng, Pin-Jing; Nie, Hua; Chen, Yu-Chao; Tong, Dan; Chen, Jin; Cheng, Yi

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to synthesize a novel galactosylated cholesterol derivative, cholesterol-diethenyl decanedioate-lactitol (CHS-DD-LA) through lipase-catalyzed esterification in non-aqueous and to evaluate the preparation, pharmacokinetics and biodistribution of docetaxel (DOC) liposomes modified with CHS-DD-LA (G-DOC-L), which may actively gather at the liver compared with the conventional DOC liposomes (DOC-L) and commercial dosage form of DOC injection (DOC-i). A rapid and simple liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) assay was developed for the determination of the DOC concentration in plasma and tissues with Taxol as the internal standard (IS). To measure the liver-targeting effect of the G-DOC-L, relative uptake rate (Re), peak concentration ratio (Ce), targeting efficiency (Te) and relative targeting efficiency (RTe) were reduced as the evaluation parameters. The results showed that the entrapment efficiency, particle size and Zeta potential of G-DOC-L was 76.8 ± 3.5%, 95.6 nm and 27.19 mV, respectively. After i.v. administration at the dose of 2.5 mg/kg in rats, a decrease in the AUC, MRT and an increase in CL (p < 0.05) were observed in the G-DOC-L group compared with DOC-L. All these results suggested that galactose-anchored liposomes could rapidly be removed from the circulation in vivo. The tissue distribution of G-DOC-L was widely different from that of DOC-L. The Re of G-DOC-L, DOC-L on liver was 4.011, 0.102; Ce was 3.391, 0.111; Te was 55.01, 3.08, respectively, demonstrating that G-DOC-L had an excellent effect on liver-targeting, which may help to improve the therapeutic effect of hepatic diseases.

  18. A HPLC-MS/MS method for the quantitation of free, conjugated, and total HDND-7, a novel hesperetin derivative, in rat plasma and tissues: Application to the pharmacokinetic and tissue distribution study.

    PubMed

    Shen, Chenlin; Chen, Ruonan; Qian, Zhengyue; Huang, Cheng; Meng, Xiaoming; Ma, Taotao; Chen, Zhaolin; Huang, Xiaohui; Li, Lan; Zang, Hongmei; Li, Jun

    2016-01-25

    A sensitive and reliable HPLC-MS/MS method was developed and validated for the determination of free (unconjugated), glucuronidated, sulfated, and total (free and conjugated) HDND-7 in rat plasma and tissues. Plasma and tissues samples were treated prior to and after the enzyme hydrolysis. Chromatographic separation was achieved on a Phenomenex Luna C18 column (150 × 4.6mm, 3 μm), using isocratic mobile phase consisting of 0.1% formic acid-acetonitrile (50:50, v/v) at a flow rate of 300 μl/min. The detection was performed on a triple quadruple tandem mass spectrometer using positive electrospray ionization (ESI) source with a chromatographic run time of 5.0 min. The detection was operated by multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) of the transitions of m/z 429.3 → 223.9 for HDND-7 and 272.9 → 152.9 for naringenin (IS), respectively. This method was validated in terms of specificity, linearity, precision, accuracy, and stability. The calibration curves for plasma and tissues were linear over a wide concentration range of 0.02-40 μg/ml with a lower limit of quantification (LLOQ) of 0.02 μg/ml. Mean extraction recoveries in plasma and tissues ranged from 87.4 to 97.1% and from 54.2 to 70.5%, respectively. The intra- and inter-day precision values were below 15% and the accuracy was within ± 15%. The samples were stable under all the tested conditions. This method has been successfully applied to the pharmacokinetic study following oral doses of 25, 50 and 100mg/kg and intravenous dose of 25mg/kg, and tissue distribution study following oral dose of 50mg/kg.

  19. Pharmacokinetics, tissue distribution and excretion of manganese (III) meso-tetra [3-(2-(2-methoxy)-ethoxy) ethoxy] phenyl porphyrin chloride, a novel superoxide dismutase mimic, in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Bao-Qiu; Fang, Shi-Hong; Dong, Xin; Li, Na; Gao, Ji-You; Yang, Gui-Qin; Gong, Xian-Chang; Wang, Shu-Juan; Wang, Feng-Shan

    2013-12-01

    Manganese (III) 5, 10, 15, 20-tetrakis [3-(2-(2-methoxy)-ethoxy) ethoxy] phenyl porphyrin chloride, designated HSJ-0017, is a novel superoxide dismutase mimic. It exhibits strong free-radical scavenging activities in vitro and in vivo. The aim of the present study was to investigate the pharmacokinetics, tissue distribution and excretion of HSJ-0017 in Wistar rats following a single intravenous administration. Wistar rats were given different doses of HSJ-0017 by single intravenous injection. Biological samples of rats were collected and were assayed by the HPLC method. The pharmacokinetics, tissue distribution and excretion of HSJ-0017 were investigated. The pharmacokinetic data of HSJ-0017 in rats following intravenous injection was best-fit by a two-compartment model. T max of HSJ-0017 in plasma following intravenous injection was 0.083 h. AUC and plasma drug concentration were found to increase in a dose-related fashion. The highest concentrations of HSJ-0017 were detected in the liver (82.25 ± 13.99 μg/g) of rats, followed by the kidney, small intestine, lung, plasma, heart, spleen, and stomach within 2 h postdose. No HSJ-0017 was detected in the uterus, parorchis or brain of rats during the 24-h period of examination. The total cumulative excretion of HSJ-0017 in rat bile and urine were found to be 78.85 and 67.58 %, respectively. Our study has led to the view that the HSJ-0017 can be rapidly distributed to tissues after intravenous administration, but cannot diffuse through the blood-brain barrier. The faecal and biliary excretion of unchanged HSJ-0017 are the major routes of HSJ-0017 elimination.

  20. Plasma pharmacokinetics, bioavailability and tissue distribution of agnuside following peroral and intravenous administration in mice using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ramakrishna, Rachumallu; Bhateria, Manisha; Singh, Rajbir; Puttrevu, Santosh Kumar; Bhatta, Rabi Sankar

    2016-06-01

    Agnuside (AGN), an iridoid glycoside, is the chemotaxonomic marker of the genus Vitex which has gained enormous attention by virtue of its potential health benefits. Regardless of claiming many therapeutic applications reports demonstrating its pharmacokinetics or quantification in biomatrices are lacking. This is the first report which presents a sensitive liquid chromatography coupled to a tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method for the quantification of AGN in mice plasma and various tissues (including liver, intestine, spleen, kidney, heart, lungs and brain). AGN was extracted from the biological samples using protein precipitation followed by liquid-liquid extraction and the separation was achieved on C18 reversed phase column with a mobile phase consisted of 0.1% formic acid in acetonitrile-0.1% formic acid in triple distilled water (92:8, v/v) at a flow rate of 0.7mL/min. The MS/MS detection was performed by electrospray ionization (ESI) using multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) in negative scan mode. The bioanalytical method was found linear over the concentration range of 1-4000ng/mL for plasma and tissue homogenates (r(2)≥0.990). The lower limit of quantitation (LLOQ) for all matrices was 1ng/mL. Intra-day and inter-day variance and accuracy ranged from 90 to 110% and 1-10%, respectively. Matrix effect and recoveries were well within the satisfactory limits. The validated method was applied successfully to measure AGN concentrations in plasma and tissues following intravenous (i.v.) and peroral (p.o.) administration to mice. Maximal AGN concentrations in plasma and tissues were reached within 30-45min. The mean absolute bioavailability (%F) of AGN was∼0.7%. After oral administration, AGN was most abundant in intestine, followed by kidney, liver, spleen, brain, lungs and heart. The identified target tissues of AGN may help in understanding its pharmacological action in vivo.

  1. Investigation on pharmacokinetics, tissue distribution and excretion of 1-triacontanol in rats by gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (GC-MS/MS).

    PubMed

    Wang, Chunfeng; Fan, Ali; Deng, Shuhua; Gao, Wenchao; Zhang, Wei; Yang, Wei; Zhu, Xiaojie; Lu, Yang; Chen, Xijing

    2015-01-01

    1. 1-Triacontanol (TA) recently shows promising anti-tumor activity. The present study was aimed to develop a sensitive gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method to explore the pharmacokinetic profiles, distribution and excretion of TA in Sprague-Dawley rats after oral administration of TA. Chromatography separation was performed on a HP-5MS column. 1-Octacosanal was used as the internal standard (IS). Quantification of TA and IS was carried out at m/z 495.6 → 97.0 and m/z 467.5 → 97.0, respectively, in positive electron ionization and multiple reaction monitoring mode. The pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated by non-compartmental analysis. 2. The area under concentration-time curve AUC0-6 h and AUC0-∞ for TA at 60 mg/kg were 87.737 ± 13.574 and 93.617 ± 17.62, respectively. The mean residence time was 3.25 ± 0.17 h. In addition, the elimination half-lives (t1/2) were (2.37 ± 1.23, 1.27 ± 0.49, 2.07 ± 0.93) h after single oral administration of 30, 60 and 120 mg/kg of TA. After oral administration, TA was extensively distributed in stomach and intestine. The majority of TA excreted via feces, and its accumulative excretion ratio during the period of 72 h was 26.68 ± 7.14%, but only 0.0023 ± 0.0015% and 0.0027 ± 0.0006% for urines and bile, respectively. The absolute bioavailability (F, %) of TA was about 2.0%.

  2. Intravenous administration to rabbits of non-stealth and stealth doxorubicin-loaded solid lipid nanoparticles at increasing concentrations of stealth agent: pharmacokinetics and distribution of doxorubicin in brain and other tissues.

    PubMed

    Zara, Gian Paolo; Cavalli, Roberta; Bargoni, Alessandro; Fundarò, Anna; Vighetto, Daniela; Gasco, Maria Rosa

    2002-06-01

    The pharmacokinetics and tissue distribution of doxorubicin incorporated in non-stealth solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN) and in stealth solid lipid nanoparticles (SSLN) (three formulations at increasing concentrations of stearic acid-PEG 2000 as stealth agent) after intravenous administration to conscious rabbits have been studied. The control was the commercial doxorubicin solution. The experiments lasted 6 h and blood samples were collected at fixed times after the injections. In all samples, the concentration of doxorubicin and doxorubicinol were determined. Doxorubicin AUC increased as a function of the amount of stealth agent present in the SLN. Doxorubicin was still present in the blood 6 h after the injection of SLN or SSLN, while no doxorubicin was detectable after the i.v. injection of doxorubicin solution. Tissue distribution of doxorubicin was determined 30 min, 2 and 6 h after the administration of the five formulations. Doxorubicin was present in the brain only after the SLN administration. The increase in the stealth agent affected the doxorubicin transported into the brain; 6 h after injection, doxorubicin was detectable in the brain only with the SSLN at the highest amount of stealth agent. In the other rabbit tissues (liver, lungs, spleeen, heart and kidneys) the amount of doxorubicin present was always lower after the injection of any of the four types of SLN than after the commercial solution. In particular, all SLN formulations significantly decreased heart and liver concentrations of doxorubicin.

  3. Assessement of the pharmacokinetics, tissue distribution and excretion studies of a novel antiplatelet agent S007-867, following administration to rats.

    PubMed

    Chandasana, Hardik; Chhonker, Yashpal S; Laxman, Tulsankar Sachin; Prasad, Yarra Durga; K S, Anil Kumar; Dikshit, Dinesh K; Bhatta, Rabi S

    2016-07-01

    S007-867 is a promising novel antiplatelet agent with better efficacy and lesser bleeding risk than existing agents. The present study investigated the absorption, tissue distribution, and excretion of S007-867 in rat model for further advancement of the molecule. A simple and robust ultra fast liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UFLC-MS/MS) bioanalytical method was used to determine S007-867 in various matrices. Following oral administration, the compound was quickly dispersed in the various tissues and peak concentration levels were achieved within 0.5-1 h. Overall, exposure of drug, i.e., AUC in different tissues was found in the order of small intestine > liver > heart > spleen > lungs > kidney > brain. The total recoveries of the S007-867 within 96 h were 3.36% in urine and faeces. This might be due to a first-pass effect by the liver and intestine as most of the drug was eliminated in metabolite form. These findings provide a crucial information about further development of S007-867 as antithrombotic agent. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Preclinical pharmacokinetics, tissue distribution and excretion studies of a novel anti-candidal agent-thiosemicarbazide derivative of isoniazid (TSC-INH) by validated UPLC-MS/MS assay.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Muzaffar; Ezzeldin, Essam; Bhat, Mashooq A; Raish, Mohammad; Al-Rashood, Khalid A

    2016-01-01

    A simple and sensitive UPLC-MS/MS assay was developed and validated for rapid determination of thiosemicarbazide derivative of isoniazid (TSC-INH), a potent anti-candidal agent in rat plasma, tissues, urine and feces. All biological samples were prepared by protein precipitation method using celecoxib as an internal standard (IS). Chromatographic separation was achieved on Acquity BEH™ C18 (50×2.1 mm, 1.7 μm) column using gradient mobile phase of acetonitrile and water (containing 0.1% formic acid) at flow rate of 0.3 mL/min. The MRM transitions were monitored at m/z 305.00→135.89 for TSC-INH and m/z 380.08→316.03 for IS in ESI negative mode. All validation parameter results were within the acceptable range described in guideline for bioanalytical method validation. The pharmacokinetic study showed that the compound TSC-INH was orally active with 66% absolute bioavailability in rats. It was rapidly absorbed with peak plasma concentration of 1985.92 ng/mL achieved within 1 h after single oral dose (10 mg/kg) administration. TSC-INH exhibited rapid distribution across the body with highest levels in liver and lungs. Penetration in brain tissues suggests that TSC-INH crossed the blood brain barrier. Only 5.23% of the orally administered drug was excreted as unconverted form in urine and feces implying that TSC-INH was metabolized extensively before excretion. With the preliminary knowledge of in vivo pharmacokinetics and disposition properties, this study will be beneficial for further development of compound TSC-INH in future studies.

  5. Tissue pharmacokinetics of levofloxacin in human soft tissue infections

    PubMed Central

    Bellmann, Romuald; Kuchling, Gerald; Dehghanyar, Pejman; Zeitlinger, Markus; Minar, Erich; Mayer, Bernhard X; Müller, Markus; Joukhadar, Christian

    2004-01-01

    Aims The present study addressed the ability of levofloxacin to penetrate into subcutaneous adipose tissues in patients with soft tissue infection. Methods Tissue concentrations of levofloxacin in inflamed and healthy subcutaneous adipose tissue were measured in six patients by microdialysis after administration of a single intravenous dose of 500 mg. Levofloxacin was assayed by high-performance liquid chromatography. Results The mean concentration vs time profile of free levofloxacin in plasma was identical to that in inflamed and healthy tissues. The ratios of the mean area under the free levofloxacin concentration vs time curve from 0 to 10 h (AUC(0,10 h)) in tissue to that in plasma were 1.2 ± 1.0 for inflamed and 1.1 ± 0.6 for healthy subcutaneous adipose tissue (mean ± SD). The mean difference in the ratio of the AUCtissue : AUCplasma for inflamed and healthy tissue was 0.09 (95% confidence interval −0.58, 0.759, P > 0.05). Interindividual variability in tissue penetration was high, as indicated by a coefficient of variation of approximately 82% for AUCtissue : AUCplasma ratios. Conclusions The penetration of levofloxacin into tissue appears to be unaffected by local inflammation. Our plasma and tissue data suggest that an intravenous dose of 500 mg levofloxacin provides effective antibacterial concentrations at the target site. However, in treatment resistant patients, tissue concentrations may be sub-therapeutic. PMID:15089808

  6. Pharmacokinetics of tilmicosin in equine tissues and plasma.

    PubMed

    Clark, C; Dowling, P M; Ross, S; Woodbury, M; Boison, J O

    2008-02-01

    The macrolide antibiotic tilmicosin has potential for treating bacterial respiratory tract infections in horses. A pharmacokinetic study evaluated the disposition of tilmicosin in the horse after oral (4 mg/kg) or subcutaneous (s.c.) (10 mg/kg) administration. Tilmicosin was not detected in equine plasma or tissues after oral administration at this dose. With s.c. injection, tilmicosin concentrations reached a maximum concentration of approximately 200 ng/mL in the plasma of the horses. Tilmicosin concentrations in plasma persisted with a mean residence time (MRT) of 19 h. Maximum tissue residue concentrations (C(max)) of tilmicosin measured in equine lung, kidney, liver and muscle tissues after s.c. administration were 2784, 4877, 1398, and 881 ng/g, respectively. The MRT of tilmicosin in these tissues was approximately 27 h. Subcutaneous administration of tilmicosin resulted in severe reactions at the injection sites.

  7. Pharmacokinetics and tissue elimination of flunixin in veal calves.

    PubMed

    Kissell, Lindsey W; Brinson, Patrick D; Gehring, Ronette; Tell, Lisa A; Wetzlich, Scott E; Baynes, Ronald E; Riviere, Jim E; Smith, Geof W

    2016-06-01

    OBJECTIVE To describe plasma pharmacokinetic parameters and tissue elimination of flunixin in veal calves. ANIMALS 20 unweaned Holstein calves between 3 and 6 weeks old. PROCEDURES Each calf received flunixin (2.2 mg/kg, IV, q 24 h) for 3 days. Blood samples were collected from all calves before the first dose and at predetermined times after the first and last doses. Beginning 24 hours after injection of the last dose, 4 calves were euthanized each day for 5 days. Plasma and tissue samples were analyzed by ultraperformance liquid chromatography. Pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated by compartmental and noncompartmental methods. RESULTS Mean ± SD plasma flunixin elimination half-life, residence time, and clearance were 1.32 ± 0.94 hours, 12.54 ± 10.96 hours, and 64.6 ± 40.7 mL/h/kg, respectively. Mean hepatic and muscle flunixin concentrations decreased to below FDA-established tolerance limits (0.125 and 0.025 μg/mL, respectively) for adult cattle by 3 and 2 days, respectively, after injection of the last dose of flunixin. Detectable flunixin concentrations were present in both the liver and muscle for at least 5 days after injection of the last dose. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE The labeled slaughter withdrawal interval for flunixin in adult cattle is 4 days. Because administration of flunixin to veal calves represents extralabel drug use, any detectable flunixin concentrations in edible tissues are considered a violation. Results indicated that a slaughter withdrawal interval of several weeks may be necessary to ensure that violative tissue residues of flunixin are not detected in veal calves treated with that drug.

  8. Pharmacokinetic analysis of tissue microcirculation using nested models: multimodel inference and parameter identifiability.

    PubMed

    Brix, Gunnar; Zwick, Stefan; Kiessling, Fabian; Griebel, Jürgen

    2009-07-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the identifiability of physiological tissue parameters by pharmacokinetic modeling of concentration-time curves derived under conditions that are realistic for dynamic-contrast-enhanced (DCE) imaging and to assess the information-theoretic approach of multimodel inference using nested models. Tissue curves with a realistic noise level were simulated by means of an axially distributed multipath reference model using typical values reported in literature on plasma flow, permeability-surface area product, and volume fractions of the intravascular and interstitial space. The simulated curves were subsequently analyzed by a two-compartment model containing these physiological quantities as fit parameters as well as by two reduced models with only three and two parameters formulated for the case of a permeability-limited and a flow-limited scenario, respectively. The competing models were ranked according to Akaike's information criterion (AIC), balancing the bias versus variance trade-off. To utilize the information available from all three models, model-averaged parameters were estimated using Akaike weights that quantify the relative strength of evidence in favor of each model. As compared to the full model, the reduced models yielded equivalent or even superior AIC values for scenarios where the structural information in the tissue curves on either the plasma flow or the capillary permeability was limited. Multimodel inference took effect to a considerable extent in half of the curves and improved the precision of the estimated tissue parameters. As theoretically expected, the plasma flow was subject to a systematic (but largely correctable) overestimation, whereas the other three physiological tissue parameters could be determined in a numerically robust and almost unbiased manner. The presented concept of pharmacokinetic analysis of noisy DCE data using three nested models under an information-theoretic paradigm offers

  9. Pharmacokinetic Behaviors of Intravenously Administered siRNA in Glandular Tissues.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yuanyu; Cheng, Qiang; Ji, Jia-Li; Zheng, Shuquan; Du, Lili; Meng, Lingwei; Wu, Yidi; Zhao, Deyao; Wang, Xiaoxia; Lai, Li; Cao, Huiqing; Xiao, Kai; Gao, Shan; Liang, Zicai

    2016-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) is a pivotal issue for siRNA-based drug development. In this study, we comprehensively investigated the behavior of siRNAs in vivo in various tissues and demonstrated that intravenously-injected naked siRNA accumulated remarkably in the submandibular gland, bulbourethral gland, and pancreas, with a respective half-life of ~22.7, ~45.6, and ~30.3 h. This was further confirmed by gel separation of tissue homogenates and/or supernatants. In vivo imaging and cryosectioning suggested that delivery carriers significantly influence the distribution and elimination profiles of siRNA. Gene-silencing assays revealed that neither naked nor liposome-formulated siRNA resulted in gene knockdown in the submandibular and bulbourethral glands after systemic administration, suggesting that these glands function as drug reservoirs that enable slow siRNA release into the circulation. But robust gene-silencing was achieved by local injection of liposome-encapsulated siRNA into the submandibular gland. Our results enhance understanding of the pharmacokinetic properties of siRNAs and we believe that they will facilitate the development of siRNA therapy, especially for the submandibular gland. PMID:27446488

  10. Pharmacokinetic Behaviors of Intravenously Administered siRNA in Glandular Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yuanyu; Cheng, Qiang; Ji, Jia-Li; Zheng, Shuquan; Du, Lili; Meng, Lingwei; Wu, Yidi; Zhao, Deyao; Wang, Xiaoxia; Lai, Li; Cao, Huiqing; Xiao, Kai; Gao, Shan; Liang, Zicai

    2016-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) is a pivotal issue for siRNA-based drug development. In this study, we comprehensively investigated the behavior of siRNAs in vivo in various tissues and demonstrated that intravenously-injected naked siRNA accumulated remarkably in the submandibular gland, bulbourethral gland, and pancreas, with a respective half-life of ~22.7, ~45.6, and ~30.3 h. This was further confirmed by gel separation of tissue homogenates and/or supernatants. In vivo imaging and cryosectioning suggested that delivery carriers significantly influence the distribution and elimination profiles of siRNA. Gene-silencing assays revealed that neither naked nor liposome-formulated siRNA resulted in gene knockdown in the submandibular and bulbourethral glands after systemic administration, suggesting that these glands function as drug reservoirs that enable slow siRNA release into the circulation. But robust gene-silencing was achieved by local injection of liposome-encapsulated siRNA into the submandibular gland. Our results enhance understanding of the pharmacokinetic properties of siRNAs and we believe that they will facilitate the development of siRNA therapy, especially for the submandibular gland. PMID:27446488

  11. Effect of natural borneol on the pharmacokinetics and distribution of nimodipine in mice.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chun; Liao, Qiongfeng; Yao, Meicun; Xu, Xinjun; Zhou, Yuting; Hou, Xueying; Xie, Zhiyong

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of natural borneol (NB) on the pharmacokinetics and distribution of nimodipine in mice. A single dose of nimodipine was administered intravenously (2 mg/kg) to mice pretreated with NB (250 mg/kg) or vehicle. Blood as well as brain, liver, and kidney tissue samples were collected at 5, 10, 20, 40, and 60 min post-dose nimodipine. The concentrations of nimodipine in plasma and tissues were determined by ultra performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) coupled with UV detection, and the pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated based on non-compartmental analysis. NB increased the plasma AUC5-60 min by 26 % compared to the vehicle. In addition, brain concentrations of nimodipine in NB-treated mice were significantly higher than those in control mice with the increased AUC5-60 min by 30 %. In liver and kidney, NB also caused 26 and 47 % increase in AUC5-60 min, respectively. These results implicated that NB may inhibit the metabolism or elimination of nimodipine and enhance its distribution in brain and kidney tissue.

  12. Pharmacokinetics, metabolism and distribution of PEGs and PEGylated proteins: quo vadis?

    PubMed

    Baumann, Andreas; Tuerck, Dietrich; Prabhu, Saileta; Dickmann, Leslie; Sims, Jennifer

    2014-10-01

    The pharmacokinetics (PK), metabolism and biodistribution of polyethylene glycol (PEG) in PEGylated proteins are important to understand the increased cellular vacuolation reported in various tissues in animals. The tissue distribution profile of PEGylated proteins and 'metabolic' PEG is guided largely by absolute PEG load, PEG molecular weight and, where applicable, receptor-mediated uptake via the protein moiety. High molecular weight PEGs show slow renal clearance, and consequently have a greater potential to accumulate within cells. The intracellular nonbiodegradable PEG can accumulate within the lysosome ultimately causing distension and vacuolation observed by standard histological examinations. Improved bioanalytical methodologies will contribute to the identification of specific PK parameters including distribution behavior to support development of PEGylated proteins as therapeutics.

  13. Pharmacokinetics of human activated protein C. 2nd communication: tissue distribution study of a lyophilized purified human activated protein C after single or repeated intravenous administration in male mice and placental transfer and milk passage study after intravenous administration in pregnant and lactating mice.

    PubMed

    Ishii, S; Mochizuki, T; Nagao, T; Kudo, S; Fujita, A; Taniguchi, K; Kondo, S; Kiyoki, M

    1995-05-01

    Tissue distribution studies of human activated protein C (CAS 42617-41-4, APC) were performed in mice after single or repeated administration, and placental transfer and milk passage study were investigated. At 15 min after a single intravenous administration of 125I-APC, radioactivity was mainly distributed to the blood and blood rich organ, such as liver, and then rapidly eliminated. The radioactivity distributed to tissues was almost negligible at 24 h after administration except for the thyroid. The qualitative study of the distribution of radioactivity to tissues by whole body autoradiography demonstrated the correspondence to the result of the quantitative assay of distribution of radioactivity after single administration of 125I-APC. The influence of repeated administration of APC on its pharmacokinetic disposition was studied by administering 125I-APC once a day to mice for 14 days. Though plasma radioactivity at 15 min in mice during repeated administration of 125I-APC was almost similar to that at 15 min after a single administration, the radioactivity at 24 h after administration was 2 times higher than that after a single administration. The profile of plasma radioactivity during and after repeated administration corresponded to the simulation curve which was described with the pharmacokinetic parameters obtained previously after the single administration. Distribution profile after repeated administration at 15 min after the 4th, 7th, 10th and 14th administration was almost similar to that at 15 min after a single administration except for the thyroid and spleen. In the thyroid, the radioactivity was 500 times higher than that after a single administration, and HPLC analysis demonstrated that the radioactivity was attributed to thyroglobulin. As to the spleen, the radioactivity was about 52% of that after a single administration. During the repeated administration, the spleen became larger than that after a single administration and the final weight

  14. Multichannel imaging to quantify four classes of pharmacokinetic distribution in tumors

    PubMed Central

    Bhatnagar, Sumit; Deschenes, Emily; Liao, Jianshan; Cilliers, Cornelius; Thurber, Greg M.

    2014-01-01

    Low and heterogeneous delivery of drugs and imaging agents to tumors results in decreased efficacy and poor imaging results. Systemic delivery involves a complex interplay of drug properties and physiological factors, and heterogeneity in the tumor microenvironment makes predicting and overcoming these limitations exceptionally difficult. Theoretical models have indicated that there are four different classes of pharmacokinetic behavior in tissue, depending on the fundamental steps in distribution. In order to study these limiting behaviors, we used multichannel fluorescence microscopy and stitching of high-resolution images to examine the distribution of four agents in the same tumor microenvironment. A validated generic partial differential equation model with a graphical user interface was used to select fluorescent agents exhibiting these four classes of behavior, and the imaging results agreed with predictions. BODIPY-FL exhibited higher concentrations in tissue with high blood flow, cetuximab gave perivascular distribution limited by permeability, high plasma protein and target binding resulted in diffusion-limited distribution for Hoechst 33342, and Integrisense 680 was limited by the number of binding sites in the tissue. Together, the probes and simulations can be used to investigate distribution in other tumor models, predict tumor drug distribution profiles, and design and interpret in vivo experiments. PMID:25048378

  15. Multichannel imaging to quantify four classes of pharmacokinetic distribution in tumors.

    PubMed

    Bhatnagar, Sumit; Deschenes, Emily; Liao, Jianshan; Cilliers, Cornelius; Thurber, Greg M

    2014-10-01

    Low and heterogeneous delivery of drugs and imaging agents to tumors results in decreased efficacy and poor imaging results. Systemic delivery involves a complex interplay of drug properties and physiological factors, and heterogeneity in the tumor microenvironment makes predicting and overcoming these limitations exceptionally difficult. Theoretical models have indicated that there are four different classes of pharmacokinetic behavior in tissue, depending on the fundamental steps in distribution. In order to study these limiting behaviors, we used multichannel fluorescence microscopy and stitching of high-resolution images to examine the distribution of four agents in the same tumor microenvironment. A validated generic partial differential equation model with a graphical user interface was used to select fluorescent agents exhibiting these four classes of behavior, and the imaging results agreed with predictions. BODIPY-FL exhibited higher concentrations in tissue with high blood flow, cetuximab gave perivascular distribution limited by permeability, high plasma protein and target binding resulted in diffusion-limited distribution for Hoechst 33342, and Integrisense 680 was limited by the number of binding sites in the tissue. Together, the probes and simulations can be used to investigate distribution in other tumor models, predict tumor drug distribution profiles, and design and interpret in vivo experiments. PMID:25048378

  16. Sensitive high performance liquid chromatographic assay for assessment of doxorubicin pharmacokinetics in mouse plasma and tissues.

    PubMed

    Urva, Shweta R; Shin, Beom Soo; Yang, Victor C; Balthasar, Joseph P

    2009-03-15

    A sensitive high performance liquid chromatography method (HPLC) has been developed for the quantification of doxorubicin in mouse plasma and tissues. Samples of serum or tissue homogenates, 20 microl, were analyzed following a single step protein precipitation using perchloric acid (35%, v/v). Doxorubicin was separated from the internal standard, daunorubicin, on a Zorbax 300SB C(18) column at 35 degrees C. Mobile phase was comprised of acetonitrile and water (25:75) containing 0.1% triethylamine, and was adjusted to pH 3 with phosphoric acid. Peaks eluting from the column were detected with a fluorescence detector with excitation and emission wavelengths of 480 and 560 nm, respectively. Standard curves were linear in the range 5-1000 ng/ml, and correlation coefficients were typically greater than 0.999. Intra-assay recoveries ranged from 94.7 to 99.9%, and inter-assay recoveries were in the range of 95.2-101%. The associated coefficient of variation (CV) was less than 10% in all cases. The method was successfully applied to investigate doxorubicin plasma pharmacokinetics and tissue distribution in athymic Fox(nu) mice.

  17. Pharmacokinetics, distribution, metabolism, and excretion of the dual reuptake inhibitor [(14)C]-nefopam in rats.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jian; Solon, Eric; Shen, Helen; Modi, Nishit B; Mittur, Aravind

    2016-11-01

    1. This study examined the pharmacokinetics, distribution, metabolism, and excretion of [(14)C] nefopam in rats after a single oral administration. Blood, plasma, and excreta were analyzed for total radioactivity, nefopam, and metabolites. Metabolites were profiled and identified. Radioactivity distribution was determined by quantitative whole-body autoradiography. 2. The pharmacokinetic profiles of total radioactivity and nefopam were similar in male and female rats. Radioactivity partitioned approximately equally between plasma and red blood cells. A majority of the radioactivity was excreted in urine within 24 hours and mass balance was achieved within 7 days. 3. Intact nefopam was a minor component in plasma and excreta. Numerous metabolites were identified in plasma and urine generated by multiple pathways including: hydroxylation/oxidation metabolites (M11, M22a and M22b, M16, M20), some of which were further glucuronidated (M6a to M6c, M7a to M7c, M8a and M8b, M3a to M3d); N-demethylation of nefopam to metabolite M21, which additionally undergoes single or multiple hydroxylations or sulfation (M9, M14, M23), with some of the hydroxylated metabolites further glucuronidated (M2a to M2d). 4. Total radioactivity rapidly distributed with highest concentrations found in the urinary bladder, stomach, liver, kidney medulla, small intestine, uveal tract, and kidney cortex without significant accumulation or persistence. Radioactivity reversibly associated with melanin-containing tissues.

  18. Recombinant human tripeptidyl peptidase-1 infusion to the monkey CNS: Safety, pharmacokinetics, and distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Vuillemenot, Brian R.; Kennedy, Derek; Reed, Randall P.; Boyd, Robert B.; Butt, Mark T.; Musson, Donald G.; Keve, Steve; Cahayag, Rhea; Tsuruda, Laurie S.; O'Neill, Charles A.

    2014-05-15

    CLN2 disease is caused by deficiency in tripeptidyl peptidase-1 (TPP1), leading to neurodegeneration and death. The safety, pharmacokinetics (PK), and CNS distribution of recombinant human TPP1 (rhTPP1) were characterized following a single intracerebroventricular (ICV) or intrathecal-lumbar (IT-L) infusion to cynomolgus monkeys. Animals received 0, 5, 14, or 20 mg rhTPP1, ICV, or 14 mg IT-L, in artificial cerebrospinal fluid (aCSF) vehicle. Plasma and CSF were collected for PK analysis. Necropsies occurred at 3, 7, and 14 days post-infusion. CNS tissues were sampled for rhTPP1 distribution. TPP1 infusion was well tolerated and without effect on clinical observations or ECG. A mild increase in CSF white blood cells (WBCs) was detected transiently after ICV infusion. Isolated histological changes related to catheter placement and infusion were observed in ICV treated animals, including vehicle controls. The CSF and plasma exposure profiles were equivalent between animals that received an ICV or IT-L infusion. TPP1 levels peaked at the end of infusion, at which point the enzyme was present in plasma at 0.3% to 0.5% of CSF levels. TPP1 was detected in brain tissues with half-lives of 3–14 days. CNS distribution between ICV and IT-L administration was similar, although ICV resulted in distribution to deep brain structures including the thalamus, midbrain, and striatum. Direct CNS infusion of rhTPP1 was well tolerated with no drug related safety findings. The favorable nonclinical profile of ICV rhTPP1 supports the treatment of CLN2 by direct administration to the CNS. - Highlights: • TPP1 enzyme replacement therapy to the CNS is in development for CLN2 disease. • Toxicology, pharmacokinetics, and CNS distribution were assessed in monkeys. • TPP1 infusion directly to the brain did not result in any safety concerns. • A positive pharmacokinetic and distribution profile resulted from TPP1 infusion. • This study demonstrates the feasibility of ICV administered

  19. Pharmacokinetics of orbifloxacin and its concentration in body fluids and in endometrial tissues of mares.

    PubMed

    Haines, G R; Brown, M P; Gronwall, R R; Merritt, K A; Baltzley, L K

    2001-07-01

    Pharmacokinetics and distribution of orbifloxacin into body fluids and endometrium was studied in 6 mares after intragastric (IG) administration at a single dose rate of 7.5 mg/kg body weight. Orbifloxacin concentrations were serially measured in serum, synovial fluid, peritoneal fluid, urine, cerebrospinal fluid, and endometrial tissues over 24 hours. Minimum inhibitory concentrations of orbifloxacin were determined for 120 equine pathogens over an 11-month period. The mean peak serum concentration (Cmax) was 2.41+/-0.30 microg/mL at 1.5 hours after administration and decreased to 0.17+/-0.01 microg/mL (Cmin) at 24 hours. The mean elimination half-life (t1/2) was 9.06+/-1.33 hours and area under the serum concentration vs time curve (AUC) was 20.54+/-1.70 mg h/L. Highest mean peritoneal fluid concentration was 2.15+/-0.49 microg/mL at 2 hours. Highest mean synovial fluid concentration was 1.17+/-0.28 microg/mL at 4 hours. Highest mean urine concentration was 536.67+/-244.79 microg/mL at 2 hours. Highest mean endometrial concentration was 0.72+/-0.23 microg/g at 1.5 hours. Mean CSF concentration was 0.46+/-0.55 microg/mL at 3 hours. The minimum inhibitory concentration of orbifloxacin required to inhibit 90% of isolates (MIC90) ranged from < or = 0.12 to > 8.0 microg/mL, with gram-negative organisms being more sensitive than gram-positive organisms. Orbifloxacin was uniformly absorbed in the 6 mares and was well distributed into body fluids and endometrial tissue. At a dosage of 7.5 mg/kg once a day, many gram-negative pathogens, such as Actinobacillus equuli, Escherichia coli, Pasteurella spp., and Salmonella spp. would be expected to be susceptible to orbifloxacin.

  20. Pharmacokinetics of orbifloxacin and its concentration in body fluids and in endometrial tissues of mares.

    PubMed Central

    Haines, G R; Brown, M P; Gronwall, R R; Merritt, K A; Baltzley, L K

    2001-01-01

    Pharmacokinetics and distribution of orbifloxacin into body fluids and endometrium was studied in 6 mares after intragastric (IG) administration at a single dose rate of 7.5 mg/kg body weight. Orbifloxacin concentrations were serially measured in serum, synovial fluid, peritoneal fluid, urine, cerebrospinal fluid, and endometrial tissues over 24 hours. Minimum inhibitory concentrations of orbifloxacin were determined for 120 equine pathogens over an 11-month period. The mean peak serum concentration (Cmax) was 2.41+/-0.30 microg/mL at 1.5 hours after administration and decreased to 0.17+/-0.01 microg/mL (Cmin) at 24 hours. The mean elimination half-life (t1/2) was 9.06+/-1.33 hours and area under the serum concentration vs time curve (AUC) was 20.54+/-1.70 mg h/L. Highest mean peritoneal fluid concentration was 2.15+/-0.49 microg/mL at 2 hours. Highest mean synovial fluid concentration was 1.17+/-0.28 microg/mL at 4 hours. Highest mean urine concentration was 536.67+/-244.79 microg/mL at 2 hours. Highest mean endometrial concentration was 0.72+/-0.23 microg/g at 1.5 hours. Mean CSF concentration was 0.46+/-0.55 microg/mL at 3 hours. The minimum inhibitory concentration of orbifloxacin required to inhibit 90% of isolates (MIC90) ranged from < or = 0.12 to > 8.0 microg/mL, with gram-negative organisms being more sensitive than gram-positive organisms. Orbifloxacin was uniformly absorbed in the 6 mares and was well distributed into body fluids and endometrial tissue. At a dosage of 7.5 mg/kg once a day, many gram-negative pathogens, such as Actinobacillus equuli, Escherichia coli, Pasteurella spp., and Salmonella spp. would be expected to be susceptible to orbifloxacin. PMID:11480524

  1. Influence of molecular size on tissue distribution of antibody fragments

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhe; Krippendorff, Ben-Fillippo; Sharma, Sharad; Walz, Antje C.; Lavé, Thierry; Shah, Dhaval K.

    2016-01-01

    Biodistribution coefficients (BC) allow estimation of the tissue concentrations of proteins based on the plasma pharmacokinetics. We have previously established the BC values for monoclonal antibodies. Here, this concept is extended by development of a relationship between protein size and BC values. The relationship was built by deriving the BC values for various antibody fragments of known molecular weight from published biodistribution studies. We found that there exists a simple exponential relationship between molecular weight and BC values that allows the prediction of tissue distribution of proteins based on molecular weight alone. The relationship was validated by a priori predicting BC values of 4 antibody fragments that were not used in building the relationship. The relationship was also used to derive BC50 values for all the tissues, which is the molecular weight increase that would result in 50% reduction in tissue uptake of a protein. The BC50 values for most tissues were found to be ~35 kDa. An ability to estimate tissue distribution of antibody fragments based on the BC vs. molecular size relationship established here may allow better understanding of the biologics concentrations in tissues responsible for efficacy or toxicity. This relationship can also be applied for rational development of new biotherapeutic modalities with optimal biodistribution properties to target (or avoid) specific tissues. PMID:26496429

  2. Pharmacokinetics and tissue concentrations of tylosin in selected avian species

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Locke, D.; Bush, M.; Carpenter, J.W.

    1982-01-01

    Tissue and plasma concentrations and the biological half-life of tylosin in avian species of a variety of body sizes and metabolic rates were studied. The species chosen were eastern bobwhite quail (Colinus virginianus virginianus), pigeons (Columba livia), greater sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis tabida), and emus (Dromaius novaehollandiae). In the 1st phase of this study, tylosin was administered IM to quail, pigeons, and emus at a dosage rate of 25 mg/kg of body weight and to cranes at a dosage rate of 15 mg/kg. The average peak plasma concentrations of tylosin in quail, pigeons, cranes, and emus were 4.31, 5.63, 3.62, and 3.26 microgram/ml, respectively. These peak concentrations occurred at 0.5 to 1.5 hours after administration. The biological half-life of tylosin averaged 1.2 hours in quail, pigeons, and cranes, and was 4.7 hours in emus. In the 2nd phase of this study, tylosin concentrations in the tissues of quail, pigeons, and cranes were markedly higher than were plasma concentrations at corresponding sampling times. Six hours after antibiotic administration, tissue concentrations of tylosin in all species remained within the minimum inhibitory concentration for most pathogenic organisms. Dosage regimens of 25 mg of tylosin/kg 4 times daily for quail and pigeons, 15 mg/kg 3 times daily for cranes, and 25 mg/kg 3 times daily for emus would be needed to establish and maintain therapeutic tissue concentrations.

  3. A Rapid and Sensitive HPLC Method for Quantitation of Paclitaxel in Biological Samples using Liquid-Liquid Extraction and UV Detection: Application to Pharmacokinetics and Tissues Distribution Study of Paclitaxel Loaded Targeted Polymeric Micelles in Tumor Bearing Mice.

    PubMed

    Rezazadeh, Mahboubeh; Emami, Jaber; Mostafavi, Abolfazl; Rostami, Mahboubeh; Hassanzadeh, Farshid; Sadeghi, Hojjat; Minaiyan, Mohsen; Lavasanifar, Afsaneh

    2015-01-01

    A simple, rapid, and sensitive reversed-phase HPLC method was developed and validated for determination of paclitaxel (PTX) in plasma, various organs and tumor tissues of tumor-bearing mice. Tissue specimens of liver, kidneys, spleen, lungs, heart and tumor were separately homogenized in normal saline. Plasma or tissue homogenate (250 µl) containing PTX and internal standard (diazepam) were extracted by diethyl ether (6 ml). The separation was achieved on a µ-Bondapak C18 HPLC column using sodium acetate buffer solution (0.01 M)/acetonitrile (58/42 v/v) at pH 5 ± 0.1 and flow rate of 1.9 mL/min. The effluent was monitored at 227 nm and column temperature was adjusted at 58ºC. The internal standard and PTX were eluted at 4.2 and 5.2 min, respectively and no interfering peaks were observed. Calibration curves were linear over the concentration range of 0.25-10 µg/ml of PTX in plasma and 0.3-20 µg/ml PTX in tissue homogenates with acceptable precision and accuracy (<15%). The mean recoveries of the drug after plasma extraction was 87.4% ± 3.6 while those of tissue homogenates ranged from 62.1± 4.5 to 75.5± 3.2 depending on the type of tissues studied. PTX was stable in samples with no evidence of degradation during 3 freeze-thaw cycles and 3 months storage at -70 °C. The developed HPLC method was applied to quantify PTX in the mouse plasma and tissues after intravenous administration of 10 mg equivalent PTX/Kg dose of PTX-loaded tocopherol succinate-chitosan-polyethylene glycol-folate (TS-CS-PEG-FA) micelles formulation or Anzatax® (Cremophor® EL- based formulation of PTX) to female Balb/c mice.

  4. Ivermectin Pharmacokinetics, Metabolism, and Tissue/Egg Residue Profiles in Laying Hens.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Laura; Dominguez, Paula; Farias, Cristina; Canton, Lucila; Virkel, Guillermo; Maté, Laura; Ceballos, Laura; Lanusse, Carlos; Alvarez, Luis

    2015-12-01

    The goals were to determine the ivermectin (IVM) plasma pharmacokinetics, tissue and egg residue profiles, and in vitro metabolism in laying hens. Experiments conducted were (1) 8 hens were intravenously treated with IVM and blood samples taken; (2) 88 hens were treated with IVM administered daily in water (5 days) (40 were kept and their daily eggs collected; 48 were sacrificed in groups (n = 8) at different times and tissue samples taken and analyzed); (3) IVM biotransformation was studied in liver microsomes. Pharmacokinetic parameters were AUC = 85.1 ng·day/mL, Vdss = 4.43 L/kg, and T1/2el = 1.73 days. Low IVM tissue residues were quantified with the highest measured in liver and skin+fat. IVM residues were not found in egg white, but significant amounts were quantified in yolk. Residues measured in eggs were greater than some MRL values, suggesting that a withdrawal period would be necessary for eggs after IVM use in laying hens. PMID:26553292

  5. Understanding pharmacokinetics using realistic computational models of fluid dynamics: biosimulation of drug distribution within the CSF space for intrathecal drugs.

    PubMed

    Kuttler, Andreas; Dimke, Thomas; Kern, Steven; Helmlinger, Gabriel; Stanski, Donald; Finelli, Luca A

    2010-12-01

    We introduce how biophysical modeling in pharmaceutical research and development, combining physiological observations at the tissue, organ and system level with selected drug physiochemical properties, may contribute to a greater and non-intuitive understanding of drug pharmacokinetics and therapeutic design. Based on rich first-principle knowledge combined with experimental data at both conception and calibration stages, and leveraging our insights on disease processes and drug pharmacology, biophysical modeling may provide a novel and unique opportunity to interactively characterize detailed drug transport, distribution, and subsequent therapeutic effects. This innovative approach is exemplified through a three-dimensional (3D) computational fluid dynamics model of the spinal canal motivated by questions arising during pharmaceutical development of one molecular therapy for spinal cord injury. The model was based on actual geometry reconstructed from magnetic resonance imaging data subsequently transformed in a parametric 3D geometry and a corresponding finite-volume representation. With dynamics controlled by transient Navier-Stokes equations, the model was implemented in a commercial multi-physics software environment established in the automotive and aerospace industries. While predictions were performed in silico, the underlying biophysical models relied on multiple sources of experimental data and knowledge from scientific literature. The results have provided insights into the primary factors that can influence the intrathecal distribution of drug after lumbar administration. This example illustrates how the approach connects the causal chain underlying drug distribution, starting with the technical aspect of drug delivery systems, through physiology-driven drug transport, then eventually linking to tissue penetration, binding, residence, and ultimately clearance. Currently supporting our drug development projects with an improved understanding of systems

  6. PET measurement of C-11-methylphenidate pharmacokinetics and distribution in the human brain

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Y.S.; Fowler, J.S.; Wang, G.J.

    1994-05-01

    Methylphenidate (MP), a psychostimulant drug which binds to the dopamine transporter (DAT), is the most commonly prescribed psychotropic medication for children in the USA yet little is known about its pharmacokinetics and distribution in the human brain. PET was used to measure the pharmacokinetics of d,l-threo-[{sup 11}C]methylphenidate (MP*) the labelled form of the prescribed drug (ritalin) in eight normal male subjects (age range 20-74 years). Four subjects had 2 repeated scans to assess test/retest reproducibility and 4 had one wan as baseline and the second 10 minutes after administration of 0.5 mg/kg MP to assess specific to nonspecific binding. Dynamic scans were started immediately after injection of MP*(5-10 mCi) for 90 min on the CTI-931 (6 x 6 x 6.5 mm FWHM). Time activity curves for tissue concentration and for unchanged tracer in plasma were used to calculate the distribution volume (DV) in basal ganglia (BG), cerebellum (CB) and global (GL) regions using graphical analysis. Binding of MP* was highest in the BG (0.008% dose/cc) uptake in CB corresponded to (0.006) and in GL to (0.005). Kinetic analysis revealed fast uptake of MP* with peak uptake in BG occurring 5-20 min PI, and in CB and GL at 5-13 min PI. Half time clearance for MP* occurred 90 min PI for BG and 60 min for CB and GL. Test/retest variability was <10% (range -0.5 to +7.0% for the DV ratio (BG/CB)). Pretreatment with MP selectively reduced uptake in BG wherein it did not affect uptake in CB or GL. The ratio of the DV in BG to that in CB changed from 2.12{plus_minus}0.1 to 1.35{plus_minus}0.04. The lack of an effect of MP in CB an area with a high density of norepinephrine (NE) transporters suggests that MP* is not binding to the NE transporter.

  7. A pharmacokinetic study of a topical anesthetic (EMLA® ) in mouse soft tissue laceration.

    PubMed

    Al-Musawi, Alaa; Matar, Kamal; Kombian, Samuel B; Andersson, Lars

    2012-12-01

    The use of topical anesthesia instead of injection of local anesthetics for managing soft tissue lacerations in the emergency situations may be a relief for both patients and surgeons. Topical anesthesia in the form of a cream eutectic mixture of local anesthetics (EMLA®) containing 2.5% lidocaine and 2.5% prilocaine has been reported as an efficient anesthetic on skin before venipuncture anesthesia and as an alternative to injection anesthesia in some minor surgery situations. The aim of this study was to compare the pharmacokinetics of EMLA® when applied in a laceration with topical skin application in the mouse. A total of 120 Albino Laboratory-bred strain mouse (BALB-c) male mice were divided into three groups with regard to application mode of EMLA®. Group A: with laceration, 48 mice; Group B: on intact shaved skin, 48 mice; Group C: control group (24 mice) with same procedures but without application of EMLA®. Blood levels were collected at 0, 10, 20, 30, 45, 60, 75, and 90 min post-EMLA® application. Plasma sample analysis was carried out by employing liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometric (LC-MS/MS) method, and the pharmacokinetic analysis of the mouse plasma samples was estimated by standard non-compartmental methods. The pharmacokinetic parameters of lidocaine and prilocaine were significantly altered following EMLA® application to lacerated mouse skin in contrast to intact skin. The absorption of lidocaine and prilocaine was rapid following application of EMLA® to lacerated and intact mouse skin. Maximum drug plasma concentration (C(max) ) and area under the drug plasma concentration-time curve (AUC) values of lidocaine were significantly increased by 448.6% and 161.5%, respectively, following application of EMLA to lacerated mouse skin in comparison with intact mouse skin. Similarly, prilocaine's C(max) and AUC values were also increased by 384% and 265.7%, respectively, following EMLA application to lacerated mouse skin, in

  8. A paradigm shift in pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PKPD) modeling: rule of thumb for estimating free drug level in tissue compared with plasma to guide drug design.

    PubMed

    Poulin, Patrick

    2015-07-01

    fraction in plasma derived from a static in vitro environment might be biased to guide drug design (the old paradigm), and, hence, it is recommended to use a PBPK model to reproduce more accurately the in vivo condition in tissue (the new paradigm). This newly developed approach can be used to predict free drug concentration in diverse tissue compartments for small molecules in toxicology and pharmacology studies, which can be leveraged to optimize the pharmacokinetics drivers of tissue distribution based upon physicochemical and physiological input parameters in an attempt to optimize free drug level in tissue. Overall, this present study provides guidance on the application of plasma and tissue concentration information in PBPK/PD research in preclinical and clinical studies, which is in accordance with the recent literature.

  9. Differential pharmacokinetics and the brain distribution of morphine and ephedrine constitutional isomers in rats after oral administration with Keke capsule using rapid-resolution LC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Song, Yonggui; Su, Dan; Lu, Tulin; Mao, Chunqin; Ji, De; Liu, Yali; Wei, Binbin; Fan, Ronghua

    2014-02-01

    Opioid and ephedra alkaloids known as the active ingredients for Keke capsule, which is used to treat coughs and bronchial asthma, could have potential adverse effects on the central nervous system. Therefore, an efficient, sensitive rapid-resolution LC-MS/MS method for the simultaneous determination of morphine, ephedrine, and pseudoephedrine in rat plasma and brain tissue homogenate has been developed. The method was validated in the plasma and brain tissue samples, showed good linearity over a wide concentration range (r(2) > 0.99). The intra- and interday assay variability was less than 15% for all analytes, and the accuracy was between -8.8 and 5.7%. The study provided the pharmacokinetics profiles and the brain regional distribution of the three active alkaloids after oral administration of Keke capsule. The results also indicated that significant difference in pharmacokinetics parameters of the epimers was observed between ephedrine and pseudoephedrine.

  10. Absorption, Distribution, Excretion, and Pharmacokinetics of 14C-Pyronaridine Tetraphosphate in Male and Female Sprague-Dawley Rats

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sang Hyun; Pradeep, Kannampalli

    2010-01-01

    The main objective of this investigation was to determine the absorption, distribution, excretion, and pharmacokinetics of the antimalarial drug pyronaridine tetraphosphate (PNDP) in Sprague-Dawley rats. Following oral administration of a single dose (10 mg/Kg) of 14C-PNDP, it was observed that the drug was readily absorbed from the small intestine within 1 hour following oral administration and was widely distributed in most of the tissues investigated as determined from the observed radioactivity in the tissues. The peak value of the drug in the blood was reached at around 8 hours postadministration, and radioactivity was detected in most of the tissues from 4 hours onwards. 14C-PNDP showed a poor permeability across the blood-brain barrier, and the absorption, distribution, and excretion of 14C-PNDP were found to be gender-independent as both male and female rats showed a similar pattern of radioactivity. Excretion of the drug was predominantly through the urine with a peak excretion post 24 hours of administration. A small amount of the drug was also excreted in the feces and also in the breath. It was found that the Cmax, AUC (0-inf), and Tmax values were similar to those observed in the Phase II clinical trials of pyronaridine/artesunate (Pyramax) conducted in Uganda. PMID:20379367

  11. Evaluation of Oral and IntravenousRoute Pharmacokinetics, Plasma Protein Binding and Uterine Tissue Dose Metrics of Bisphenol A: A Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Teeguarden, Justin G.; Waechter, John M.; Clewell, III, H. J.; Covington, Tammie R.; Barton, H. A.

    2005-06-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is a weakly estrogenic monomer used in the production of polycarbonate plastic and epoxy resins, both of which are used in food contact and other applications. A physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model of BPA pharmacokinetics in rats and humans was developed to provide a physiological context in which the processes controlling BPA pharmacokinetics (e.g. plasma protein binding, enterohepatic recirculation of the glucuronide (BPAG)) could be incorporated. A uterine tissue compartment was included to allow the correlation of simulated ER binding of BPA with increases in uterine wet weight (UWW) in rats. Intravenous and oral-route blood kinetics of BPA in rats and oral-route plasma and urinary elimination kinetics in humans were well described by the model. Simulations of rat oral-route BPAG pharmacokinetics were less exact, most likely the result of oversimplification of the GI tract compartment. Comparison of metabolic clearance rates derived from fitting rat i.v. and oral-route data implied that intestinal glucuronidation of BPA is significant. In rats but not humans, terminal elimination rates were strongly influenced by enterohepatic recirculation. In the absence of BPA binding to plasma proteins, simulations showed high ER occupancy at doses without uterine effects. Restricting free BPA to the measured unbound amount demonstrated the importance of including plasma binding in BPA kinetic models: the modeled relationship between ER occupancy and UWW increases was consistent with expectations for a receptor mediated response with low ER occupancy at doses with no response and increasing occupancy with larger increases in UWW.

  12. Pharmacokinetic studies of ginkgolide K in rat plasma and tissues after intravenous administration using ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Fan, Zhi-Ying; Liu, Xin-Guang; Guo, Ru-Zhou; Dong, Xin; Gao, Wen; Li, Ping; Yang, Hua

    2015-04-15

    Ginkgolide K (GK), a derivative compound of ginkgolide B, has been recently isolated from the leaves of Ginkgo biloba. It is a powerful natural platelet activate factor (PAF) antagonist, and also has obvious protect effects for cerebral ischemia. However, no reports have been described for the pharmacokinetic study of GK. In this study, a simple, sensitive and reliable ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS) method has been developed for the determination of GK in rat plasma and tissues. Biological samples were pretreated by an efficient liquid-liquid extraction with ethyl acetate. The chromatographic separation was achieved on an Agilent ZORBAX SB-Aq column (4.6 mm × 50 mm, 1.8 μm) with a mobile phase of 0.5% aqueous formic acid (A)-menthol (B). Quantitation was carried out on a triple quadruple mass spectrometry using positive electrospray ionization in multiple reaction monitoring mode. Diazepam was used as internal standard (IS). The ion transitions monitored were set at m/z 407.10 → 389.20 and m/z 285.08 → 193.10 for GK and IS, respectively. The developed method was fully validated and successfully applied to the pharmacokinetics and tissue distribution study of GK after intravenous administration. The current results have indicated that pharmacokinetic parameters of GK vary in a dose-dependent manner with rapid elimination in 4h. The major distribution tissues of GK in rats were liver and kidney. This study would provide critical information to promote the future study of GK.

  13. Pharmacokinetics and distributions of bevacizumab by intravitreal injection of bevacizumab-PLGA microspheres in rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Zhuo; Ji, Yan-Li; Ma, Xiang; Wen, Jian-Guo; Wei, Wei; Huang, Shu-Man

    2015-01-01

    AIM To investigate the pharmacokinetics and distributions of bevacizumab by intravitreal injection of prepared bevacizumab-poly (L-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microspheres in rabbits, to provide evidence for clinical application of this kind of bevacizumab sustained release dosage form. METHODS Bevacizumab was encapsulated into PLGA microsphere via the solid-in-oil-in-hydrophilic oil (S/O/hO) method. Fifteen healthy New Zealand albino-rabbits were used in experiments. The eyes of each rabbit received an intravitreal injection. The left eyes were injected with prepared bevacizumab-PLGA microspheres and the right eyes were injected with bevacizumab solution. After intravitreal injection, rabbits were randomly selected at days 3, 7, 14, 28 and 42 respectively, three animals each day. Then we used immunofluorescence staining to observe the distribution and duration of bevacizumab in rabbit eye tissues, and used the sandwich ELISA to quantify the concentration of free bevacizumab from the rabbit aqueous humor and vitreous after intravitreal injection. RESULTS The results show that the concentration of bevacizumab in vitreous and aqueous humor after administration of PLGA formulation was higher than that of bevacizumab solution. The T1/2 of intravitreal injection of bevacizumab-PLGA microspheres is 9.6d in vitreous and 10.2d in aqueous humor, and the T1/2 of intravitreal injection of soluble bevacizumab is 3.91d in vitreous and 4.1d in aqueous humor. There were statistical significant difference for comparison the results of the bevacizumab in vitreous and aqueous humor between the left and right eyes (P<0.05). The AUC0-t of the sustained release dosage form was 1-fold higher than that of the soluble form. The relative bioavailability was raised significantly. The immunofluorescence staining of PLGA-encapsulated bevacizumab (b-PLGA) in rabbit eye tissues was still observed up to 42d. It was longer than that of the soluble form. CONCLUSION The result of this study

  14. Pharmacokinetics of Single- and Multiple-Dose Oral Clarithromycin in Soft Tissues Determined by Microdialysis▿

    PubMed Central

    Traunmüller, Friederike; Zeitlinger, Markus; Zeleny, Petra; Müller, Markus; Joukhadar, Christian

    2007-01-01

    The antimicrobial spectrum of clarithromycin renders this antibiotic a frequently used option in the treatment of skin and soft-tissue infections. In most cases, these infections are caused by extracellularly proliferating microorganisms. Thus, clarithromycin concentrations achieved in the interstitial space are considered particularly important for clinical efficacy. In the present study, clarithromycin concentrations in plasma and interstitial-space fluid of subcutaneous adipose tissue and skeletal muscle of six healthy male volunteers were assessed by means of the microdialysis technique after oral single-dose administration of 250 mg and multiple doses of 500 mg of clarithromycin twice a day (b.i.d.). The ratios of the area under the concentration-time curve of free clarithromycin from 0 to 24 h calculated for a single dose of 250 mg (fAUC0-24) in interstitial-space fluid to the fAUC0-24 in plasma were 0.29 ± 0.17 and 0.42 ± 0.18 for subcutis and skeletal muscle, respectively. For 500 mg of clarithromycin at the steady state (3 to 5 days of intake twice daily), the fAUC0-24(b.i.d.) ratios at the steady state were 0.39 ± 0.04 and 0.41 ± 0.19 for subcutis and skeletal muscle, respectively. The half-life was around 2 h after a single dose but increased to approximately 4 h in plasma and tissues after repetitive clarithromycin administration. Based on subsequently performed pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic calculations, a dosing regimen of 500 mg b.i.d. may be ineffective in the treatment of soft-tissue infections caused by pathogens with a drug MIC higher than 0.125 mg/liter. PMID:17606673

  15. Pharmacokinetics of single- and multiple-dose oral clarithromycin in soft tissues determined by microdialysis.

    PubMed

    Traunmüller, Friederike; Zeitlinger, Markus; Zeleny, Petra; Müller, Markus; Joukhadar, Christian

    2007-09-01

    The antimicrobial spectrum of clarithromycin renders this antibiotic a frequently used option in the treatment of skin and soft-tissue infections. In most cases, these infections are caused by extracellularly proliferating microorganisms. Thus, clarithromycin concentrations achieved in the interstitial space are considered particularly important for clinical efficacy. In the present study, clarithromycin concentrations in plasma and interstitial-space fluid of subcutaneous adipose tissue and skeletal muscle of six healthy male volunteers were assessed by means of the microdialysis technique after oral single-dose administration of 250 mg and multiple doses of 500 mg of clarithromycin twice a day (b.i.d.). The ratios of the area under the concentration-time curve of free clarithromycin from 0 to 24 h calculated for a single dose of 250 mg (fAUC(0-24)) in interstitial-space fluid to the fAUC(0-24) in plasma were 0.29 +/- 0.17 and 0.42 +/- 0.18 for subcutis and skeletal muscle, respectively. For 500 mg of clarithromycin at the steady state (3 to 5 days of intake twice daily), the fAUC(0-24(b.i.d.)) ratios at the steady state were 0.39 +/- 0.04 and 0.41 +/- 0.19 for subcutis and skeletal muscle, respectively. The half-life was around 2 h after a single dose but increased to approximately 4 h in plasma and tissues after repetitive clarithromycin administration. Based on subsequently performed pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic calculations, a dosing regimen of 500 mg b.i.d. may be ineffective in the treatment of soft-tissue infections caused by pathogens with a drug MIC higher than 0.125 mg/liter. PMID:17606673

  16. Plasma and tissue pharmacokinetics of marbofloxacin in experimentally infected chickens with Mycoplasma gallisepticum and Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Ding, H; Wang, L; Shen, X; Gu, X; Zeng, D; Zeng, Z

    2013-10-01

    The plasma and tissue pharmacokinetics of marbofloxacin in chickens experimentally infected with Mycoplasma gallisepticum and Escherichia coli were studied. Marbofloxacin was given to 66 infected chickens by oral administration at a dosage of 5 mg/kg b.w., once a day for three days. Plasma, brain, kidney, liver, lung, muscle and trachea were collected and marbofloxacin concentrations were analyzed by a high performance liquid chromatography method. In the infected chickens, maximal marbofloxacin concentrations in plasma, brain, kidney, liver, lung, muscle and trachea were 1.84, 1.33, 7.35, 5.61, 3.12, 2.98, and 4.51 g/mL (g); the elimination half-lives of marbofloxacin were 6.8, 2.74, 9.31, 8.45, 9.55, 11.53 and 5.46 h for plasma, brain, kidney, liver, lung, muscle and trachea, respectively. AUC were calculated to be 9.68, 8.04, 45.1, 27.03, 20.56, 19.47, and 32.68 μg/mL (g) for plasma, brain, kidney, liver, lung, muscle and trachea, respectively. Marbofloxacin concentration in tissues except for brain exceeded marbofloxacin concentration in plasma, with AUC(tissue) /AUC(plasma) ranging from 2.01 to 4.66 and Peak(tissue) /Peak(plasma) ranging from 1.62 to 3.99. The results showed that a marbofloxacin dosage of 5 mg/kg administered orally at 24 h intervals may provide successful treatment of chicken with MG and E. coli infection.

  17. Pharmacokinetics of Unbound Linezolid in Plasma and Tissue Interstitium of Critically Ill Patients after Multiple Dosing Using Microdialysis

    PubMed Central

    Buerger, Cornelia; Plock, Nele; Dehghanyar, Pejman; Joukhadar, Christian; Kloft, Charlotte

    2006-01-01

    The antimicrobial agent linezolid is approved for the treatment of severe infections caused by, e.g., methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus strains. In order to evaluate the penetration of linezolid into the interstitial space fluid (ISF) of subcutaneous adipose tissue and skeletal muscle of the target population, a microdialysis study was performed with 12 patients with sepsis or septic shock after multiple intravenous infusions. Unbound linezolid concentrations were determined for plasma and microdialysates by use of a validated high-performance liquid chromatography method. Individual compartmental pharmacokinetic (PK) analysis was performed using WinNonlin. In vivo microdialysis was found to be feasible for the determination of unbound linezolid concentrations at steady state in the ISF of critically ill patients. On average, linezolid showed good distribution into ISF but with high interindividual variability. A two-compartment model was fitted to unbound concentrations in plasma with a geometric mean distribution volume of 62.9 liters and a mean clearance of 9.18 liters/h at steady state. However, disposition characteristics changed intraindividually within the time course. In addition, an integrated model for simultaneous prediction of concentrations in all matrices was developed and revealed similar results. Based on the model-predicted unbound concentrations in ISF, a scheme of more-frequent daily dosing of linezolid for some critically ill patients might be taken into consideration to avoid subinhibitory unbound concentrations in the infected tissue. The developed integrated model will be a valuable basis for further PK data analysis to explore refined dosing guidelines that achieve effective antimicrobial therapy in all patients by use of the population PK approach. PMID:16801426

  18. Oritavancin Pharmacokinetics and Bone Penetration in Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Ostiguy, Valerie; Cadieux, Cordelia; Malouin, Mireille; Belanger, Odette; Far, Adel Rafai; Parr, Thomas R.

    2015-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics and bone concentrations of oritavancin were investigated after a single intravenous dose was administered to rabbits. The pharmacokinetic profile of oritavancin in rabbits showed that it is rapidly distributed to bone tissues, with concentrations remaining stable for up to 168 h, the last measured time point. Based on these findings, further evaluation of oritavancin for the treatment of infections in bone tissues is warranted. PMID:26239977

  19. A high oxfendazole dose to control porcine cysticercosis: pharmacokinetics and tissue residue profiles.

    PubMed

    Moreno, L; Lopez-Urbina, M T; Farias, C; Domingue, G; Donadeu, M; Dungu, B; García, H H; Gomez-Puerta, L A; Lanusse, C; González, A E

    2012-10-01

    Oxfendazole (OFZ) is efficacious for porcine cysticercosis at 30 mg/kg. OFZ is not registered to be used at this dose. The assessment of the OFZ and metabolites [(fenbendazole sulphone (FBZSO2), fenbendazole (FBZ)] plasma pharmacokinetic and tissue residue profiles after its oral administration to pigs and the withdrawal period for human consumption were reported. Forty-eight pigs allocated into two groups received OFZ (30 mg/kg) orally as a commercial (CF) or as experimental formulation (SMF). Samples (blood, muscle, liver, kidney and fat) were collected over 30 days post-treatment and analyzed by HPLC. OFZ was the main compound recovered in plasma, followed by FBZSO2 and low FBZ concentrations. OFZ AUC0-LOQ (209.9±33.9 μg·h/ml) and Cmax (5.40±0.65 μg/ml) parameters for the CF tended to be higher than those for the SMF (AUC0-LOQ: 159.4±18.3 μg h/ml, Cmax: 3.80±0.35 μg/ml). The highest total residue (OFZ+FBZSO2+FBZ) concentrations were quantified in liver, followed by kidney, muscle and fat tissue. FBZSO2 residue levels were the highest found in muscle (0.68±0.39 μg/g) and fat (0.69±0.39 μg/g). In liver and kidney the highest residues corresponded to FBZ (5.29±4.36 μg/g) and OFZ (2.86±0.75 μg/g), respectively. A withdrawal time of 17 days post-treatment was established before tissues are delivered for human consumption.

  20. The Subcellular Distribution of Small Molecules: from Pharmacokinetics to Synthetic Biology

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Nan; Tsai, Hobart Ng; Zhang, Xinyuan; Rosania, Gus R.

    2011-01-01

    The systemic pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of small molecules are determined by subcellular transport phenomena. Although approaches used to study the subcellular distribution of small molecules have gradually evolved over the past several decades, experimental analysis and prediction of cellular pharmacokinetics remains a challenge. In this article, we surveyed the progress of subcellular distribution research since the 1960s, with a focus on the advantages, disadvantages and limitations of the various experimental techniques. Critical review of the existing body of knowledge pointed to many opportunities to advance the rational design of organelle-targeted chemical agents. These opportunities include: 1) development of quantitative, nonfluorescence-based, whole cell methods and techniques to measure the subcellular distribution of chemical agents in multiple compartments; 2) exploratory experimentation with nonspecific transport probes that have not been enriched with putative, organelle-targeting features; 3) elaboration of hypothesis-driven, mechanistic and modeling-based approaches to guide experiments aimed at elucidating subcellular distribution and transport; and 4) introduction of revolutionary conceptual approaches borrowed from the field of synthetic biology combined with cutting edge experimental strategies. In our laboratory, state-of-the-art subcellular transport studies are now being aimed at understanding the formation of new intracellular membrane structures in response to drug therapy, exploring the function of drug-membrane complexes as intracellular drug depots, and synthesizing new organelles with extraordinary physical and chemical properties. PMID:21805990

  1. Intratumoral Pharmacokinetics: Challenges to Nanobiomaterials.

    PubMed

    Al-Abd, Ahmed M; Al-Abbasi, Fahad A; Torchilin, Vladimir P

    2015-01-01

    Resistance of solid tumors to treatment is significantly attributed to pharmacokinetic reasons at both cellular and multi-cellular levels. Anticancer agent must be bio-available at the site of action in a cytotoxic concentration to exert its proposed activity. Solid tumor tissue is characterized by high density of vascular bed however; the vast majority of these blood vessels are not functioning. The vast majority of solid tumors can be described as poorly perfused with blood; and anticancer agents need to penetrate/distribute avascularly within solid tumor micro-milieu. Classic pharmacokinetic parameters correlate drug status within central compartment (blood) to all perfused body tissues according to their degree of perfusion. Yet, these classic pharmacokinetic parameters cannot fully elucidate the intratumoral drug penetration/distribution status of anticancer drugs due to the great discrepancies in perfusion between normal and solid tumor tissues. Herein, we will discuss the recently proposed pharmacokinetic parameters that might accurately portray the distribution of anticancer agents within solid tumor micro-milieu. In addition, we will present the new challenges attributed to these new pharmacokinetic parameters towards designing nanobiomaterial drug delivery system. PMID:26027565

  2. Diet-Induced Obesity Alters Vincristine Pharmacokinetics in Blood and Tissues of Mice

    PubMed Central

    Behan, James W.; Avramis, Vassilios I.; Yun, Jason P.; Louie, Stan G.; Mittelman, Steven D.

    2010-01-01

    Obesity is associated with poorer outcome from many cancers, including leukemia. One possible contributor to this could be suboptimal chemotherapy dosing in obese patients. We have previously found that vincristine (VCR) is less effective in obese compared to non-obese mice with leukemia, despite weight-based dosing. In the present study, we administered 3H-VCR to obese and control mice to determine whether obesity would cause suboptimal VCR exposure. Blood VCR concentrations were fitted with a 3-compartment model using pharmacokinetic analysis (two-stage PK) in 3 subsets of VCR concentrations vs. time method. Tissue and blood VCR concentrations were also analyzed using non-compartmental modeling. Blood VCR concentrations showed a triexponential decay and tended to be slightly higher in the obese mice at all time-points. However, the t½β and t½γ were shorter in the obese mice (9.7 vs. 44.5 minutes and 60.3 vs. 85.6 hours, respectively), resulting in a lower AUC0→∞ (13,099 vs. 15,384 ng/ml*hr). Had the dose of VCR been “capped”, as is done in clinical practice, the AUC0→∞ would have been 36% lower in the obese mice than the controls. Tissue disposition of VCR revealed a biexponential decay from spleen, liver, and adipose. Interestingly, VCR slowly accumulated in the bone marrow of control mice, but had a slow decay from the marrow in the obese mice. Thus, obesity alters VCR PK, causing a lower overall exposure in circulation and bone marrow. Given the high prevalence of obesity, additional PK studies should be performed in obese subjects to optimize chemotherapy dosing regimens. PMID:20083201

  3. Pharmacokinetics and tissue residues of norfloxacin and its N-desethyl- and oxo-metabolites in healthy pigs.

    PubMed

    Anadón, A; Martinez-Larrañaga, M R; Diaz, M J; Fernandez, R; Martinez, M A; Fernandez, M C

    1995-06-01

    The pharmacokinetic properties of norfloxacin were determined in healthy pigs after single intramuscular (i.m.) and intravenous (i.v.) dosage of 8 mg/kg body weight. After i.m. and i.v. administration, the plasma concentration-time graph was characteristic of a two-compartment open model. After single i.m. administration, norfloxacin was absorbed rapidly, with a tmax of 1.46 +/- 0.06 h. The elimination half-life (t1/2 beta) and the mean residence time of norfloxacin in plasma were 4.99 +/- 0.28 and 6.05 +/- 0.22 h, respectively, after i.m. administration and 3.65 +/- 0.16 and 3.34 +/- 0.16 h, respectively, after i.v. administration. Intramuscular bioavailability was found to be 53.7 +/- 4.4%. Plasma concentrations greater than 0.2 microgram/mL were achieved at 20 min and persisted up to 8 h post-administration. Maximal plasma concentration was 1.11 +/- 0.03 micrograms/mL. Statistically significant differences between the two routes of administration were found for the half-lives of both distribution and elimination phases (t1/2 alpha, t1/2 beta) and apparent volume of distribution (Vd(area)). In pigs, norfloxacin was mainly converted to desethylenenorfloxacin and oxonorfloxacin. Considerable tissue concentrations of norfloxacin, desethylenenorfloxacin, and oxonorfloxacin were found when norfloxacin was administered intramuscularly (8 mg/kg on 4 consecutive days). The concentration of the parent fluoroquinolone in liver and kidney ranged between 0.015 and 0.017 microgram/g on day 12 after the end of dosing.

  4. Pharmacokinetics of difloxacin and its concentration in body fluids and endometrial tissues of mares after repeated intragastric administration

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Pharmacokinetics of difloxacin and its distribution within the body fluids and endometrium of 6 mares were studied after intragastric (IG) administration of 5 individual doses. Difloxacin concentrations were serially measured in serum, urine, peritoneal fluid, synovial fluid, cerebrospinal fluid, and endometrium over 120 h. Bacterial susceptibility to difloxacin was determined for 174 equine pathogens over a 7-month period. Maximum serum concentration (Cmax) was 2.25 ± 0.70 μg/mL at 3.12 ± 2.63 h and Cmax after the 5th dose was 2.41 ± 0.86 μg/mL at 97.86 ± 1.45 h. The mean elimination half-life (t1/2) was 8.75 ± 2.77 h and area under the serum concentration versus time curve (AUC) was 25.13 ± 8.79 μg h/mL. Highest mean synovial fluid concentration was 1.26 ± 0.49 μg/mL at 100 h. Highest mean peritoneal fluid concentration was 1.50 ± 0.56 μg/mL at 98 h. Highest mean endometrial concentration was 0.78 ± 0.48 μg/g at 97.5 h. Mean cerebrospinal fluid concentration was 0.87 ± 0.52 μg/mL at 99 h. Highest mean urine concentration was 92.05 ± 30.35 μg/mL at 104 h. All isolates of Salmonella spp. and Pasteurella spp. were susceptible. In general, gram-negative organisms were more susceptible than gram-positives. Difloxacin appears to be safe, adequately absorbed, and well distributed to body fluids and endometrial tissues of mares and may be useful in the treatment of susceptible bacterial infections in adult horses. PMID:16187554

  5. Potential of aerosolized rifampicin lipospheres for modulation of pulmonary pharmacokinetics and bio-distribution.

    PubMed

    Singh, Charan; Koduri, L V Seshu Kumar; Dhawale, Vaibhav; Bhatt, Tara Datt; Kumar, Rajdeo; Grover, Vikas; Tikoo, Kulbhushan; Suresh, Sarasija

    2015-11-30

    The aim of the present study was to establish the potential of rifampicin loaded phospholipid lipospheres carrier for pulmonary application. Lipospheres were prepared with rifampicin and phospholipid in the ratio of 1:1 using spray drying method. Further, lipospheres were evaluated for flow properties and surface area measurement. The formulated lipospheres were evaluated in vitro for aerodynamic characterization and in vivo for lung pharmacokinetics and biodistribution studies in Sprague Dawley rats. Powder flow properties finding suggested the free flowing nature of the lipospheres. In-vitro aerosol performance study indicated more than 80±5% of the emitted dose (ED) and 77.61±3% fine particles fraction (FPF). Mass median aerodynamic diameter (MMAD) and geometric standard deviation (GSD) were found to be 2.72±0.13 μm and 3.28±0.12, respectively. In-vitro aerosol performance study revealed the higher deposition at 3, 4 and 5 stages which simulates the trachea-primary bronchus, secondary and terminal bronchus of the human lung, respectively. The drug concentration from nebulized lipospheres in the non-targeted tissues was lesser than from rifampicin-aqueous solution. The pulmonary pharmacokinetic study demonstrated improved bioavailability, longer residence of drug in the lung and targeting factor of 8.03 for lipospheres as compared to rifampicin-aqueous solution. Thus, the results of the study demonstrated the potential of rifampicin lipospheres formulation would be of use as an alternative to existing oral therapy.

  6. Physiologically-based pharmacokinetic modelling of distribution, bioaccumulation and excretion of POPs in Greenland sledge dogs (Canis familiaris).

    PubMed

    Sonne, Christian; Gustavson, Kim; Letcher, Robert J; Dietz, Rune

    2015-10-01

    We used PBPK (physiologically-based pharmacokinetic) modelling to investigate distribution, bioaccumulation and excretion of the seven POPs (persistent organic pollutants) CB-99, CB-153, HCB, oxychlordane, p,p'-DDE, BDE-47 and BDE-99 in 4 adult captive Greenland sledge dog (Canis familiaris) bitches fed minke whale (Balaenoptera acuterostrata) blubber for 500-635 days. The PBPK modelled POP concentrations in adipose tissue, liver, kidney and plasma were mostly within a factor 2 of actual measured tissue levels even for those at the lower concentration end. The excretion route for oxychlordane and CB-153 was modelled to be via faeces while lung alveolar excretion dominated for BDE-47, BDE-99, HCB, p,p'-DDE and CB-99. Furthermore the model suggested the retained mass of POPs after 500 and 635 days of exposure, respectively, to be relatively low despite these POPs being highly recalcitrant. The retention increased in the following order (% of total intake); p,p'-DDE (1%)

  7. Physiologically-based pharmacokinetic modelling of distribution, bioaccumulation and excretion of POPs in Greenland sledge dogs (Canis familiaris).

    PubMed

    Sonne, Christian; Gustavson, Kim; Letcher, Robert J; Dietz, Rune

    2015-10-01

    We used PBPK (physiologically-based pharmacokinetic) modelling to investigate distribution, bioaccumulation and excretion of the seven POPs (persistent organic pollutants) CB-99, CB-153, HCB, oxychlordane, p,p'-DDE, BDE-47 and BDE-99 in 4 adult captive Greenland sledge dog (Canis familiaris) bitches fed minke whale (Balaenoptera acuterostrata) blubber for 500-635 days. The PBPK modelled POP concentrations in adipose tissue, liver, kidney and plasma were mostly within a factor 2 of actual measured tissue levels even for those at the lower concentration end. The excretion route for oxychlordane and CB-153 was modelled to be via faeces while lung alveolar excretion dominated for BDE-47, BDE-99, HCB, p,p'-DDE and CB-99. Furthermore the model suggested the retained mass of POPs after 500 and 635 days of exposure, respectively, to be relatively low despite these POPs being highly recalcitrant. The retention increased in the following order (% of total intake); p,p'-DDE (1%)

  8. Pharmacokinetic studies of phellodendrine in rat plasma and tissues after intravenous administration using ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Li, Yi; Liu, Xin-Guang; Wang, Hui-Ying; Dong, Xin; Gao, Wen; Xu, Xiao-Jun; Li, Ping; Yang, Hua

    2016-09-01

    Phellodendrine, a quaternary ammonium alkaloid extracted from the dried bark of Phellodendrom chinensis Schneid and Phellodendrom amurense Rupr, has the effect of suppressing cellular immune response, reducing blood pressure and antinephritis. However, few investigations have been conducted for the pharmacokinetic study of phellodendrine. Thus, a rapid, simple and reliable ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-tandem quadrupole mass spectrometry (UHPLC-QQQ MS/MS) method has been established for quantification of phellodendrine in rat plasma and tissues by using magnoflorine as internal standard. The chromatographic separation was achieved on an Agilent ZORBAX SB-C18 column (4.6mm×50mm, 1.8μm) by gradient elution using 0.1% aqueous formic acid (A) and methanol (B). Triple quadrupole mass detection with multiple reaction monitoring mode was used to monitor the ion transitions, at m/z 342.20→192.20 for phellodendrine and m/z 342.20→58.20 for internal standard, respectively. The developed method was fully validated and successfully applied to the pharmacokinetics and tissue distribution study of phellodendrine after intravenous administration. The lower limits of quantification were 0.5ng/mL for plasma samples, 2.5ng/g for brain and 1ng/g for other tested tissues. Precisions and accuracy values were within the Food and Drug Administration acceptance criteria, the recovery and matrix effects were between 87.8-113.5%. The area under the curve (AUC0-t) ranged from 15.58 to 57.41mg/L min and Cmax were between 1.63-4.93mg/L. The results showed that phellodendrine was eliminated in 120min in plasma and most of tissues and the highest concentrations of phellodendrine were found in the kidney. This study may provide a basis for the further study of phellodendrine.

  9. Tissue and subcellular distribution of CLIC1

    PubMed Central

    Ulmasov, Barbara; Bruno, Jonathan; Woost, Philip G; Edwards, John C

    2007-01-01

    Background CLIC1 is a chloride channel whose cellular role remains uncertain. The distribution of CLIC1 in normal tissues is largely unknown and conflicting data have been reported regarding the cellular membrane fraction in which CLIC1 resides. Results New antisera to CLIC1 were generated and were found to be sensitive and specific for detecting this protein. These antisera were used to investigate the distribution of CLIC1 in mouse tissue sections and three cultured cell lines. We find CLIC1 is expressed in the apical domains of several simple columnar epithelia including glandular stomach, small intestine, colon, bile ducts, pancreatic ducts, airway, and the tail of the epididymis, in addition to the previously reported renal proximal tubule. CLIC1 is expressed in a non-polarized distribution in the basal epithelial cell layer of the stratified squamous epithelium of the upper gastrointesitinal tract and the basal cells of the epididymis, and is present diffusely in skeletal muscle. Distribution of CLIC1 was examined in Panc1 cells, a relatively undifferentiated, non-polarized human cell line derived from pancreatic cancer, and T84 cells, a human colon cancer cell line which can form a polarized epithelium that is capable of regulated chloride transport. Digitonin extraction was used to distinguish membrane-inserted CLIC1 from the soluble cytoplasmic form of the protein. We find that digitonin-resistant CLIC1 is primarily present in the plasma membrane of Panc1 cells. In T84 cells, we find digitonin-resistant CLIC1 is present in an intracellular compartment which is concentrated immediately below the apical plasma membrane and the extent of apical polarization is enhanced with forskolin, which activates transepithelial chloride transport and apical membrane traffic in these cells. The sub-apical CLIC1 compartment was further characterized in a well-differentiated mouse renal proximal tubule cell line. The distribution of CLIC1 was found to overlap that of

  10. Pharmacokinetics and tissue penetration of a single dose of ceftriaxone (1,000 milligrams intravenously) for antibiotic prophylaxis in thoracic surgery.

    PubMed Central

    Martin, C; Ragni, J; Lokiec, F; Guillen, J C; Auge, A; Pecking, M; Gouin, F

    1992-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics and tissue penetration of ceftriaxone after a single intravenous injection of 1,000 mg to 17 patients for antibiotic prophylaxis in thoracic surgery were studied. The patients were scheduled for elective noncardiac thoracic surgery. Adequate levels in serum (higher than or equal to the MIC for 90% of isolates of Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus spp., Escherichia coli, Haemophilus influenzae, and Klebsiella pneumoniae) were found for all patients throughout the surgical procedures. Mean maximal (5-min) and final (24-h) ceftriaxone levels in serum were 157 +/- 42 and 8.6 +/- 4.5 mg/liter, respectively. The beta-phase elimination half-life was 8.6 +/- 3 h, the plasma clearance was 18.4 +/- 6.25 ml/min, and the apparent volume of distribution at steady state was 0.21 +/- 0.07 liters/kg. At the time of the thoracotomy, the ceftriaxone concentrations were 13.5 +/- 7.8 micrograms/g in thoracic wall fat and 27 +/- 9 micrograms/g in lung tissue. At the time of closure, the ceftriaxone concentration was 15 +/- 9 micrograms/g in thoracic wall fat. During the different steps of the surgical procedures, 100% of patients had adequate levels in tissue (higher than or equal to the MIC for 90% of isolates of Streptococcus spp., E. coli, H. influenzae, and K. pneumoniae). For S. aureus, 90 to 100% of patients had adequate tissue ceftriaxone levels. PMID:1482149

  11. The Holy Grail of Polymer Therapeutics for Cancer Therapy: An Overview on the Pharmacokinetics and Bio Distribution.

    PubMed

    Dyawanapelly, Sathish; Junnuthula, Vijayabhaskar Reddy; Singh, AkhileshVikram

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, multifaceted clinical benefits of polymeric therapeutics have been reported. Over the past decades, cancer has been one of the leading causes of mortality in the world. Many clinically approved chemotherapeutics encounter potential challenges against deadly cancer. Moreover, safety and efficacy of anticancer agents have been limited by undesirable pharmacokinetics and biodistribution. To address these limitations, various polymer drug conjugates are being studied and developed to improve the antitumor efficacy. Among other therapeutics, polymer therapeutics are well established platforms that circumvent anticancer therapeutics from enzymatic metabolism via direct conjugation to therapeutic molecules. Interestingly, polymer therapeutics meets an unmet need of small molecules. Further clinical study showed that polymer-drug conjugation can achieve desired pharmacokinetics and biodistribution properties of several anticancer drugs. The present retrospective review mainly enlightens the most recent preclinical and clinical studies include safety, stability, pharmacokinetic behavior and distribution of polymer therapeutics.

  12. EVALUATION OF ORAL AND INTRAVENOUS ROUTE PHARMACOKINETICS, PLASMA PROTEIN BINDING AND UTERINE TISSUE DOSE METRICS OF BPA: A PHYSIOLOGICALLY BASED PHARMACOKINETIC APPROACH

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is a weakly estrogenic monomer used in the production of polycarbonate plastics and epoxy resins, both of which are used in food contact applications. A physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model of BPA pharmacokinetics in rats and humans was developed t...

  13. EVALUATION OF ORAL AND INTRAVENOUS ROUTE PHARMACOKINETICS, PLASMA PROTEIN BINDING AND UTERINE TISSUE DOSE METRICS OF BPA: A PHYSIOLOGICALLY BASED PHARMACOKINETIC APPROACH

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is a weakly estrogenic monomer used in the production of polycarbonate plastics and epoxy resins, both of which are used in food contact applications. A physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model of BPA pharmacokinetics in rats and humans was developed ...

  14. Tissue-dependent biosynthesis and pharmacokinetics of Protopophyrin IX following intravenous injection of δ-aminolevulinic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ronn, Avigdor M.; Lofgren, Lennart A.

    1995-05-01

    Two significant questions arise when a drug for photodynamic therapy is introduced to the preclinical arena: (1) pharmacokinetics for the uptake and elimination and (2) relative retention by various tissues. Theses were addressed by following the pharmacokinetics in 21 rabbits with 130 tumors at different drug doses and at time intervals ranging from minutes to 24 hours. Kinetics were studied spectrofluorometrically by following extracting Protoporphyrin IX (PPIX), a metabolite of delta- aminolevulinic acid (ALA). Samples were compared to a standard, and are thus quantitative. The rise time in plasma was rapid, and reached maximum one hour post injection with drug doses of 50, 100, and 200 mg/kg. The single exponential fall time displayed a half life of fifty minutes, resulting in a complete elimination of PPIX in 24 hours. Uptake and retention in multiple tissues were measured 3 hours post injection of 100 mg/g ALA in 3 animals, with skin, tumor, and plasma measured in all 21 animals. Organs with high vascularity displayed higher values of PPIX. Results of this study indicate that ALA utilized as a systemically administered sensitizer maybe of significant value in PDT of selected tumor types.

  15. Influence of enrofloxacin traces in drinking water to doxycycline tissue pharmacokinetics in healthy and infected by Mycoplasma gallisepticum broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Gbylik-Sikorska, Malgorzata; Posyniak, Andrzej; Sniegocki, Tomasz; Sell, Bartosz; Gajda, Anna; Sawicka, Anna; Olszewska-Tomczyk, Monika; Bladek, Tomasz; Tomczyk, Grzegorz; Zmudzki, Jan

    2016-04-01

    Most of antibiotics, administrated in the treatment of poultry diseases are dissolved in drinking water, and it can lead to water supply systems contamination, especially when the regular cleaning is not using. This situation can lead to unconscious administration of low doses of antibiotics to untreated animals. The aim of this study was to clarify the impact of the exposure of enrofloxacin traces (500 μg l(-1)) to doxycycline pharmacokinetics in healthy and experimentally Mycoplasma gallisepticum infected broiler chickens., Two experimental groups, received of enrofloxacin in water and all groups, received 20 mg kg(-1) bw of doxycycline. The compounds concentrations in muscles and livers were determined by LC-MS/MS. The maximum drug tissue concentration (Cmax) of doxycycline was highest in liver obtained from infected chickens which, received enrofloxacin traces (ENR + DC/MG). It was about 40% higher than in healthy chickens from group I which received only doxycycline. It was found that the concentration-time curve AUC(0-t) values in group ENR + DC/MG were almost 75% higher than in the group (DC) and 35% higher than in group (ENR + DC) which also received enrofloxacin traces. The constant exposure of broiler chickens on enrofloxacin traces as well as infection, may significantly influenced on doxycycline tissue pharmacokinetic profile.

  16. A sensitive LC-MS/MS method for quantifying capsaicin and dihydrocapsaicin in rabbit plasma and tissue: application to a pharmacokinetic study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dimin; Meng, Fanhua; Yu, Lin; Sun, Lu; Sun, Lili; Guo, Jifen

    2015-04-01

    Prescription and nonprescription products for topical management of pain, including cream, lotion and patch forms, contain capsaicin (CAP) and dihydrocapsaicin (DHC). There are few in vivo studies on absorption, bioavailability and disposition of CAP and DHC. We established a sensitive and rapid LC-MS/MS assay to determine CAP and DHC levels in rabbit plasma and tissue. Bio-samples prepared by liquid-liquid extraction using n-hexane-dichloromethane-isopropanol (100: 50: 5, v/v/v) mixture were separated by isocratic chromatography with an Extend C18 column. The mobile phase was acetonitrile-water-formic acid (70: 30: 0.1, v/v/v). The method was linear from 0.125 to 50 ng/mL for a 100 μL bio-sample, and the lower quantification limit was 0.125 ng/mL. Total run time to analyze each sample was 3.5 min. We used this validated method to study pharmacokinetics and tissue distribution of CAP gel administered topically to rabbits. A very small amount of CAP and DHC was absorbed into the systemic circulation. The highest plasma concentration was 2.39 ng/mL, and the mean peak plasma concentration value after 12 h of CAP gel application was 1.68 ng/mL. Drug concentration in treated skin was relatively high, with low concentration in other tissues. Thus, topical CAP gel had strong local effects and weaker systemic effects.

  17. Comparative Population Plasma and Tissue Pharmacokinetics of Micafungin in Critically Ill Patients with Severe Burn Injuries and Patients with Complicated Intra-Abdominal Infection.

    PubMed

    García-de-Lorenzo, A; Luque, S; Grau, S; Agrifoglio, A; Cachafeiro, L; Herrero, E; Asensio, M J; Sánchez, S M; Roberts, J A

    2016-10-01

    Severely burned patients have altered drug pharmacokinetics (PKs), but it is unclear how different they are from those in other critically ill patient groups. The aim of the present study was to compare the population pharmacokinetics of micafungin in the plasma and burn eschar of severely burned patients with those of micafungin in the plasma and peritoneal fluid of postsurgical critically ill patients with intra-abdominal infection. Fifteen burn patients were compared with 10 patients with intra-abdominal infection; all patients were treated with 100 to 150 mg/day of micafungin. Micafungin concentrations in serial blood, peritoneal fluid, and burn tissue samples were determined and were subjected to a population pharmacokinetic analysis. The probability of target attainment was calculated using area under the concentration-time curve from 0 to 24 h/MIC cutoffs of 285 for Candida parapsilosis and 3,000 for non-parapsilosis Candida spp. by Monte Carlo simulations. Twenty-five patients (18 males; median age, 50 years; age range, 38 to 67 years; median total body surface area burned, 50%; range of total body surface area burned, 35 to 65%) were included. A three-compartment model described the data, and only the rate constant for the drug distribution from the tissue fluid to the central compartment was statistically significantly different between the burn and intra-abdominal infection patients (0.47 ± 0.47 versus 0.15 ± 0.06 h(-1), respectively; P < 0.05). Most patients would achieve plasma PK/pharmacodynamic (PD) targets of 90% for non-parapsilosis Candida spp. and C. parapsilosis with MICs of 0.008 and 0.064 mg/liter, respectively, for doses of 100 mg daily and 150 mg daily. The PKs of micafungin were not significantly different between burn patients and intra-abdominal infection patients. After the first dose, micafungin at 100 mg/day achieved the PK/PD targets in plasma for MIC values of ≤0.008 mg/liter and ≤0.064 mg/liter for non-parapsilosis Candida spp

  18. Local carboplatin delivery and tissue distribution in livers after radiofrequency ablation.

    PubMed

    Szymanski-Exner, A; Gallacher, A; Stowe, N T; Weinberg, B; Haaga, J R; Gao, J

    2003-11-01

    This study investigated the local drug pharmacokinetics of intralesional drug delivery after radiofrequency ablation of the liver. We hypothesized that the tissue architecture damaged by the ablation process facilitates the drug penetration in the liver and potentially enlarges the therapeutic margin in the local treatment of cancer. The delivery rate and tissue distribution of carboplatin, an anticancer agent, released from poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) implants into rat livers after radiofrequency ablation were quantified by atomic absorption spectroscopy. Results showed that carboplatin clearance through blood perfusion was significantly slower in the ablated livers, leading to a more extensive tissue retention and distribution of the drug. The concentration of Pt at the implant-tissue interface ranged from 234 to 1440 microg Pt/(g liver) in the ablated livers over 144 h versus 56 to 177 microg Pt/(g liver) in the normal tissue. The maximum penetration distance at which Pt level reached above 6 microg/g (calculated based on a reported IC90 value for carboplatin) was 8-10 mm and 4-6 mm in ablated and normal liver, respectively. Histological analysis of the necrotic lesions showed widespread destruction of tissue structure and vasculature, supporting the initial hypothesis. This study demonstrated that intralesional drug delivery could provide a sustained, elevated concentration of anticancer drug at the ablation boundary that has the potential to eliminate residual cancer cells surviving radiofrequency ablation. PMID:14566792

  19. Pharmacokinetics and distribution of dietary tributyltin and methylmercury in the snow crab (Chionoecetes opilio)

    SciTech Connect

    Rouleau, C.; Gobeil, C.; Tjaelve, H.

    1999-10-01

    The pharmacokinetics and distribution of a single 5-{micro}g dietary dose of radiolabeled [{sup 113}Sn]tributyltin (TBT) and [{sup 203}Hg]methylmercury (MeHg) were studied over 154 days in the snow crab, using in vivo gamma counting and whole-body autoradiography. Experiment was done under conditions typical of those encountered in the cold natural habitat of this crustacean. Retention efficiency was high for both compounds, and two kinetic pools could be distinguished. Elimination of the first pool proceeded within 20--80 days, but it accounted for 27--62% of the assimilated TBT, compared to 8--11% for MeHg. Biological half-life of the second pool was 33--187 days for TBT and 520--650 days for MeHg. Autoradiographic and dissection data revealed a less homogeneous distribution of the radiolabel and much higher radioactivity in gut lumen for TBT compared to MeHg. This suggests that the larger size of the first pool in the case of TBT resulted from metabolization in the hepatopancreas and fecal elimination of the metabolites. The whole-body biomagnification factor (BMF) that would result from the long-term chronic exposure of snow crab to TBT-contaminated food was estimated as 0.1--0.6. Although these BMF values were an order of magnitude lower than those estimated for MeHg, they are not negligible and indicate that uptake of TBT via food may be an important accumulation route.

  20. Pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic relationship of marbofloxacin against Pasteurella multocida in a tissue-cage model in yellow cattle.

    PubMed

    Shan, Q; Wang, J; Yang, F; Ding, H; Liang, C; Lv, Z; Li, Z; Zeng, Z

    2014-06-01

    The fluoroquinolone antimicrobial drug marbofloxacin was administered to yellow cattle intravenously and intramuscularly at a dose of 2 mg/kg of body weight in a two-period crossover study. The pharmacokinetic properties of marbofloxacin in serum, inflamed tissue-cage fluid (exudate), and noninflamed tissue-cage fluid (transudate) were studied by using a tissue-cage model. The in vitro and ex vivo activities of marbofloxacin in serum, exudate, and transudate against a pathogenic strain of Pasteurella multocida (P. multocida) were determined. Integration of in vivo pharmacokinetic data with the in vitro MIC provided mean values for the area under the curve (AUC)/MIC for serum, exudate, and transudate of 155.75, 153.00, and 138.88, respectively, after intravenous dosing and 160.50, 151.00, and 137.63, respectively, after intramuscular dosing. After intramuscular dosing, the maximum concentration/MIC ratios for serum, exudate, and transudate were 21.13, 9.13, and 8.38, respectively. The ex vivo growth inhibition data after intramuscular dosing were fitted to the inhibitory sigmoid Emax equation to provide the values of AUC/MIC required to produce bacteriostasis, bactericidal activity, and elimination of bacteria. The respective values for serum were 17.25, 31.29, and 109.62, and slightly lower values were obtained for transudate and exudate. It is proposed that these findings might be used with MIC50 or MIC90 data to provide a rational approach to the design of dosage schedules which optimize efficacy in respect of bacteriological as well as clinical cures.

  1. Validated LC-MS/MS method for simultaneous quantification of resveratrol levels in mouse plasma and brain and its application to pharmacokinetic and brain distribution studies.

    PubMed

    Ramalingam, Prakash; Ko, Young Tag

    2016-02-01

    A rapid, selective, and sensitive liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method was developed and validated to simultaneously determine resveratrol levels in plasma and brain tissue in mice for supporting pharmacokinetic and brain distribution studies. Analytes were separated using a Sepax BR-C18 analytical column (5μm, 120Å, 1.0×100mm) and eluted using an isocratic elution mobile phase acetonitrile and 0.01% formic acid [60:40, v/v] at a flow rate of 0.1mL/min. Precursor and product ion transitions for analyte resveratrol m/z 226.9>184.8 and curcumin m/z 367.1>148.9 were monitored using triple quadrupole mass spectrometer with multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) in negative ionization mode. The method was validated with respect to accuracy, within- and between-day precision, linearity, limit of quantification, recovery, and matrix effects of analyte. The inter- and intra-day accuracy and precision were within the range of the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) acceptance criteria, for both matrices. The method was also successfully applied to pharmacokinetic and brain distribution studies of resveratrol after intravenous administration of free resveratrol and resveratrol-loaded solid lipid nanoparticles to mice. The combined use of serial blood sampling, small sample volume, simple extraction, and capillary depletion method drastically improved resveratrol analysis from biological matrices.

  2. Pharmacokinetics and tissue behavior of enrofloxacin and its metabolite ciprofloxacin in turbot Scophthalmus maximus at two water temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Junping; Li, Jian; Zhao, Fazhen; Liu, Ping; Chang, Zhiqiang

    2012-07-01

    Turbot Scophthalmus maximus, an important aquaculture species in China, currently suffers from epizootic diseases because of high density aquaculture. Enrofloxacin has been used to treat various systemic bacterial fish infections. However, studies concerning the pharmacokinetics of enrofloxacin in turbot are limited. In this study, the pharmacokinetics of enrofloxacin and its metabolite ciprofloxacin, were investigated in the turbot following intravenous and oral administration at 10 mg enrofloxacin/kg body weight, at 16°C and 10°C water temperatures. The concentrations of enrofloxacin and ciprofloxacin in the main tissues (plasma, muscle, liver and kidney) were detected by HPLC. The results show that the plasma concentration-time data for enrofloxacin were best described as a two-compartment open model after intravenous and oral administration. Three pharmacokinetic equations were established between the concentrations and temperatures. The kinetic profile of enrofloxacin was temperature dependent. The absorption half-life of enrofloxacin was 1.99 h and 2.17 h after oral administration, whereas the elimination half-life of the drug was 98.63 h and 136.59 h at 16°C and 10°C, respectively. The peak concentration of enrofloxacin in plasma and tissues was higher at 16°C than that at 10°C, and the peak plasma concentration time in the liver was the shortest at both temperatures among those of other tissues. The plasma C max /MIC ratio varied between 11.08 and 5 540.00 at 16°C; and between 7.92 and 3 960.00 at 10°C. The AUC/MIC ratio was 467.82-280 690.00 at 16°C, and 359.48-215 690.00 at 10°C. These ratios indicate that it is possible to obtain therapeutic efficacy. Very low levels of ciprofloxacin were detected. The AUC ratios of ciprofloxacin and enrofloxacin in plasma suggest that plasma ciprofloxacin might play a minor role in enrofloxacin treatment for turbot.

  3. Pharmacokinetics and milk distribution characteristics of orbifloxacin following intravenous and intramuscular injection in lactating ewes.

    PubMed

    Goudah, A; Cho, H-J; Shin, H-C; Shim, J-H; Regmi, N L; Shimoda, M; Abd El-Aty, A M

    2009-08-01

    The purpose of the current investigation is to elucidate the pharmacokinetic profiles of orbifloxacin (OBFX) in lactating ewes (n = 6) following intravenous (i.v.) and intramuscular (i.m.) administrations of 2.5 mg/kg W. In a crossover study, frequent blood, milk, and urine samples were drawn for up to 48 h after the end of administration, and were then assayed to determine their respective drug concentrations through microbiological assay using Klebsiella pneumoniae as the test micro-organism. Plasma pharmacokinetic parameters were derived from plasma concentration-time data using a compartmental and noncompartmental analysis, and validated a relatively rapid elimination from the blood compartment, with a slope of the terminal phase of 0.21 +/- 0.02 and 0.19 +/- 0.06 per hour and a half-life of 3.16 +/- 0.43 and 3.84 +/- 0.59 h, for i.v. and i.m. dosing, respectively. OBFX was widely distributed with a volume of distribution V((d(ss))) of 1.31 +/- 0.12 L/kg, as suggested by the low percentage of protein binding (22.5%). The systemic body clearance (Cl(B)) was 0.32 +/- 0.12 L/h x kg. Following i.m. administration, the maximum plasma concentration (C(max)) of 1.53 +/- 0.34 microg/mL was reached at t(max) 1.25 +/- 0.21 h. The drug was completely absorbed after i.m. administration, with a bioavailability of 114.63 +/- 11.39%. The kinetic milk AUC(milk)/AUC(plasma) ratio indicated a wide penetration of orbifloxacin from the bloodstream to the mammary gland. OBFX urine concentrations were higher than the concurrent plasma concentrations, and were detected up to 30 h postinjection by both routes. Taken together, these findings indicate that systemic administration of orbifloxacin could be efficacious against susceptible mammary and urinary pathogens in lactating ewes.

  4. Radiosensitizing activity and pharmacokinetics of multiple dose administered KU-2285 in peripheral nerve tissue in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Iwai, Hiroyuki; Matsuno, Etsuko ); Sasai, Keisuke; Abe, Mitsuyuki; Shibamoto, Yuta )

    1994-06-15

    In a clinical trial in which a 2-nitroimidazole radiosensitizer was administered repeatedly, the dose-limiting toxicity was found to be peripheral neuropathy. In the present study, the in vivo radiosensitizing activity of KU-2285 in combination with radiation dose fractionation, and the pharmacokinetics of cumulative dosing of KU-2285 in the peripheral nerves were examined. The ability of three nitroimidazoles, misonidazole (MISO), etanidazole (SR-2508) and KU-2285, to sensitize SCCVII tumors to radiation treatment has been compared for drug doses in the range 0-200 mg/kg. Single radiation doses or two different fractionation schedules (6 Gy/fractions [times] three fractions/48 h or 5 Gy/fractions [times] five fractions/48 h) were used; the tumor cell survival was determined using an in vivo/in vitro colony assay. The pharmacokinetics in the sciatic nerves were undertaken, when KU-2285 or etanidazole were injected at a dose of 200 mg/kg intravenously one, two, three, or four times at 2-h intervals. At less than 100 mg/kg, KU-2285 sensitized SCCVII tumors more than MISO and SR-2508 by fractionated irradiation. Evaluation of pharmacokinetics in the peripheral nerves showed that the apparent biological half-life of SR-2508 increased with the increases in the number of administrations, whereas that of KU-2285 became shorter. Since most clinical radiotherapy is given in small multiple fractions, KU-2285 appears to be a hypoxic cell radiosensitizer that could be useful in such regimens, and that poses no risk of chronic peripheral neurotoxicity. 12 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Pharmacokinetics and brain distribution of tetrahydropalmatine and tetrahydroberberine after oral administration of DA-9701, a new botanical gastroprokinetic agent, in rats.

    PubMed

    Jung, Ji Won; Kwon, Yong Sam; Jeong, Jin Seok; Son, Miwon; Kang, Hee Eun

    2015-01-01

    DA-9701, a new botanical gastroprokinetic agent, has potential for the management of delayed gastric emptying in Parkinson's disease if it has no central anti-dopaminergic activity. Therefore, we examined the pharmacokinetics of DA-9701 components having dopamine D2 receptor antagonizing activity, tetrahydropalmatine (THP) and tetrahydroberberine (THB), following various oral doses (80-328 mg/kg) of DA-9701. The distribution of THP and THB to the brain and/or other tissues was also evaluated after single or multiple oral administrations of DA-9701. Oral administration of DA-9701 yielded dose-proportional area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC0-8 h) and maximum plasma concentration (Cmax) values for THP and THB, indicating linear pharmacokinetics (except for THB at the lowest dose). THP and THB's large tissue-to-plasma concentration ratios indicated considerable tissue distribution. High concentrations of THP and THB in the stomach and small intestine suggest an explanation for DA-9701's potent gastroprokinetic activity. The maximum concentrations of THP and THB in brain following multiple oral DA-9701 for 7 d (150 mg/kg/d) was observed at 30 min after the last oral DA-9701 treatment: 131±67.7 ng/g for THP and 6.97±4.03 ng/g for THB. Although both THP and THB pass through the blood-brain barrier, as indicated by brain-to-plasma concentration ratios greater than unity (approximately 2-4), oral administration of DA-9701 at the effective dose in humans is not expected to lead to sufficient brain concentrations to exert central dopamine D2 receptor antagonism.

  6. Pharmacokinetics and distribution of fluvoxamine to the brain in rats under oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Kobuchi, Shinji; Fukushima, Keizo; Ito, Yukako; Sugioka, Nobuyuki; Takada, Kanji

    2012-07-01

    The effects of oxidative stress (OS) on the pharmacokinetics of fluvoxamine (FLV), particularly on FLV distribution in the plasma, were studied in ferric-nitrilotriacetate-induced OS rat models (OS rats). The study protocol involved a continuous FLV infusion (25.0 μg/kg/min). The resulting mean plasma FLV concentration measured in steady state OS rats was 0.13 ± 0.01 μg/mL, which was significantly lower than plasma concentrations measured in control rats (0.19 ± 0.01 μg/mL). Moreover, the mean FLV concentration in the OS rat brain (0.51 ± 0.08 μg/g) was determined to be approximately half the concentration in control rat brains (0.95 ± 0.11 μg/g). The FLV concentrations in both the unbound fraction of plasma and erythrocytes of OS rats were significantly greater than that of control rats. These results suggest the potential attenuation of FLV's pharmacological effects in patients under OS.

  7. A hybrid approach to advancing quantitative prediction of tissue distribution of basic drugs in human

    SciTech Connect

    Poulin, Patrick; Ekins, Sean; Theil, Frank-Peter

    2011-01-15

    A general toxicity of basic drugs is related to phospholipidosis in tissues. Therefore, it is essential to predict the tissue distribution of basic drugs to facilitate an initial estimate of that toxicity. The objective of the present study was to further assess the original prediction method that consisted of using the binding to red blood cells measured in vitro for the unbound drug (RBCu) as a surrogate for tissue distribution, by correlating it to unbound tissue:plasma partition coefficients (Kpu) of several tissues, and finally to predict volume of distribution at steady-state (V{sub ss}) in humans under in vivo conditions. This correlation method demonstrated inaccurate predictions of V{sub ss} for particular basic drugs that did not follow the original correlation principle. Therefore, the novelty of this study is to provide clarity on the actual hypotheses to identify i) the impact of pharmacological mode of action on the generic correlation of RBCu-Kpu, ii) additional mechanisms of tissue distribution for the outlier drugs, iii) molecular features and properties that differentiate compounds as outliers in the original correlation analysis in order to facilitate its applicability domain alongside the properties already used so far, and finally iv) to present a novel and refined correlation method that is superior to what has been previously published for the prediction of human V{sub ss} of basic drugs. Applying a refined correlation method after identifying outliers would facilitate the prediction of more accurate distribution parameters as key inputs used in physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) and phospholipidosis models.

  8. Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Putcha, Lakshmi; Cintron, Nitza M.

    1990-01-01

    The Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics Panel met on 29-30 Aug. 1988 at the Lunar and Planetary Institute in Houston, Texas to discuss pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic implications of space flight and make recommendations for operational and research strategies. Based on the knowledge available on the physiological changes that occur during space flight, the dependence of pharmacokinetics on physiological factors, and the therapeutic requirements for future space missions, the panel made several recommendations for research. It was suggested that using medications available with a large (wide) therapeutic window will avoid unforeseen therapeutic consequences during flight. The sequence for conducting research was outlined as follows: (1) identify ground-based simulation models (e.g., antiorthostatic bed rest) for conducting pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic research; (2) estimate parametric changes in these models using pharmacologic agents that have different pharmacokinetic characteristics and a narrow therapeutic index; (3) verify these findings during flight; and (4) develop and identify appropriate and effective drug delivery systems, dosage forms, and regimens. The panel recommended gaining a thorough understanding of the pharmacokinetic deviations of medications that have a narrow therapeutic index (e.g. cardiovascular drugs and sedative hypnotics) in order to ensure safe and effective treatment during flight with these agents. It was also suggested that basic information on physiological factors such as organ blood flow, protein composition and binding, tissue distribution, and metabolism by hepatic enzymes must be accumulated by conducting ground-based animal and human studies using models of weightlessness. This information will be useful to construct and identify physiologically based pharmacokinetic models that can provide valuable information on the pharmacodynamic consequences of space flight and aid in identifying appropriate therapeutic

  9. Interrogating the relationship between rat in vivo tissue distribution and drug property data for >200 structurally unrelated molecules.

    PubMed

    Harrell, Andrew W; Sychterz, Caroline; Ho, May Y; Weber, Andrew; Valko, Klara; Negash, Kitaw

    2015-10-01

    The ability to explain distribution patterns from drug physicochemical properties and binding characteristics has been explored for more than 200 compounds by interrogating data from quantitative whole body autoradiography studies (QWBA). These in vivo outcomes have been compared to in silico and in vitro drug property data to determine the most influential properties governing drug distribution. Consistent with current knowledge, in vivo distribution was most influenced by ionization state and lipophilicity which in turn affected phospholipid and plasma protein binding. Basic and neutral molecules were generally better distributed than acidic counterparts demonstrating weaker plasma protein and stronger phospholipid binding. The influence of phospholipid binding was particularly evident in tissues with high phospholipid content like spleen and lung. Conversely, poorer distribution of acidic drugs was associated with stronger plasma protein and weaker phospholipid binding. The distribution of a proportion of acidic drugs was enhanced, however, in tissues known to express anionic uptake transporters such as the liver and kidney. Greatest distribution was observed into melanin containing tissues of the eye, most likely due to melanin binding. Basic molecules were consistently better distributed into parts of the eye and skin containing melanin than those without. The data, therefore, suggest that drug binding to macromolecules strongly influences the distribution of total drug for a large proportion of molecules in most tissues. Reducing lipophilicity, a strategy often used in discovery to optimize pharmacokinetic properties such as absorption and clearance, also decreased the influence of nonspecific binding on drug distribution. PMID:26516585

  10. Interrogating the relationship between rat in vivo tissue distribution and drug property data for >200 structurally unrelated molecules

    PubMed Central

    Harrell, Andrew W; Sychterz, Caroline; Ho, May Y; Weber, Andrew; Valko, Klara; Negash, Kitaw

    2015-01-01

    The ability to explain distribution patterns from drug physicochemical properties and binding characteristics has been explored for more than 200 compounds by interrogating data from quantitative whole body autoradiography studies (QWBA). These in vivo outcomes have been compared to in silico and in vitro drug property data to determine the most influential properties governing drug distribution. Consistent with current knowledge, in vivo distribution was most influenced by ionization state and lipophilicity which in turn affected phospholipid and plasma protein binding. Basic and neutral molecules were generally better distributed than acidic counterparts demonstrating weaker plasma protein and stronger phospholipid binding. The influence of phospholipid binding was particularly evident in tissues with high phospholipid content like spleen and lung. Conversely, poorer distribution of acidic drugs was associated with stronger plasma protein and weaker phospholipid binding. The distribution of a proportion of acidic drugs was enhanced, however, in tissues known to express anionic uptake transporters such as the liver and kidney. Greatest distribution was observed into melanin containing tissues of the eye, most likely due to melanin binding. Basic molecules were consistently better distributed into parts of the eye and skin containing melanin than those without. The data, therefore, suggest that drug binding to macromolecules strongly influences the distribution of total drug for a large proportion of molecules in most tissues. Reducing lipophilicity, a strategy often used in discovery to optimize pharmacokinetic properties such as absorption and clearance, also decreased the influence of nonspecific binding on drug distribution. PMID:26516585

  11. Pharmacokinetics of telithromycin in plasma and soft tissues after single-dose administration to healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Gattringer, Rainer; Urbauer, Eleonora; Traunmüller, Friederike; Zeitlinger, Markus; Dehghanyar, Pejman; Zeleny, Petra; Graninger, Wolfgang; Müller, Markus; Joukhadar, Christian

    2004-12-01

    By use of microdialysis we assessed the concentrations of telithromycin in muscle and adipose tissue to test its ability to penetrate soft tissues. The ratios of the area under the concentration-versus-time curve from 0 to 24 h to the MIC indicated that free concentrations of telithromycin in tissue and plasma might be effective against Streptococcus pyogenes but not against staphylococci and human and animal bite pathogens. PMID:15561839

  12. Pharmacokinetics of Telithromycin in Plasma and Soft Tissues after Single-Dose Administration to Healthy Volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Gattringer, Rainer; Urbauer, Eleonora; Traunmüller, Friederike; Zeitlinger, Markus; Dehghanyar, Pejman; Zeleny, Petra; Graninger, Wolfgang; Müller, Markus; Joukhadar, Christian

    2004-01-01

    By use of microdialysis we assessed the concentrations of telithromycin in muscle and adipose tissue to test its ability to penetrate soft tissues. The ratios of the area under the concentration-versus-time curve from 0 to 24 h to the MIC indicated that free concentrations of telithromycin in tissue and plasma might be effective against Streptococcus pyogenes but not against staphylococci and human and animal bite pathogens. PMID:15561839

  13. Tissue Distribution and Efficacy of Gold Nanorods Coupled with Laser Induced Photoplasmonic Therapy in Ehrlich Carcinoma Solid Tumor Model

    PubMed Central

    El-Sayed, Mostafa A.; Shabaka, Ali A.; El-Shabrawy, Osama A.; Yassin, Nemat A.; Mahmoud, Sawsan S.; El-Shenawy, Siham M.; Al-Ashqar, Emad; Eisa, Wael H.; Farag, Niveen M.; El-Shaer, Marwa A.; Salah, Nabila; Al-Abd, Ahmed M.

    2013-01-01

    Gold nanorods (GNR) within tumor microregions are characterized by their ability to absorb near IR light and emit heat in what is called photoplasmonic effect. Yet, the efficacy of nanoparticles is limited due to intratumoral tissue distribution reasons. In addition, distribution of GNRs to normal tissue might result in non specific toxicity. In the current study, we are assessing the intratumoral and tissue distribution of PEGylated GNRs on the top of its antitumor characteristics when given intravenously or intratumoral to solid tumor bearing mice and coupled with laser photoplasmonic sessions. PEGylated GNRs with a longitudinal size of less than 100 nm were prepared with aspect ratio of 4.6 showing strong surface plasmon absorption at wavelength 800 nm. Pharmacokinetics of GNR after single I.V. administration (0.1 mg/kg) showed very short systemic circulating time (less than 3 h). On the other hand, tissue distribution of I.V. GNR (0.1 mg/kg) to normal animals showed preferential deposition in spleen tissue. Repeated administration of I.V. GNR resulted in preferential accumulation in both liver and spleen tissues. In addition, I.V. administration of GNR to Ehrlich carcinoma tumor bearing mice resulted in similar tissue distribution; tumor accumulation and anti-tumor effect compared to intratumoral administration. In conclusion, the concentration of GNR achieved within tumors microregions after I.V. administration was comparable to I.T. administration and sufficient to elicit tumoral growth arrest when coupled with laser-aided photoplasmonic treatment. PMID:24098446

  14. UNCERTAINTIES IN TRICHLOROETHYLENE PHARMACOKINETIC MODELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Understanding the pharmacokinetics of a chemical¯its absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion in humans and laboratory animals ¯ is critical to the assessment of its human health risks. For trichloroethylene (TCE), numerous physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK)...

  15. Simultaneous confocal fluorescence microscopy and optical coherence tomography for drug distribution and tissue integrity assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rinehart, Matthew T.; LaCroix, Jeffrey; Henderson, Marcus; Katz, David; Wax, Adam

    2011-03-01

    The effectiveness of microbicidal gels, topical products developed to prevent infection by sexually transmitted diseases including HIV/AIDS, is governed by extent of gel coverage, pharmacokinetics of active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs), and integrity of vaginal epithelium. While biopsies provide localized information about drug delivery and tissue structure, in vivo measurements are preferable in providing objective data on API and gel coating distribution as well as tissue integrity. We are developing a system combining confocal fluorescence microscopy with optical coherence tomography (OCT) to simultaneously measure local concentrations and diffusion coefficients of APIs during transport from microbicidal gels into tissue, while assessing tissue integrity. The confocal module acquires 2-D images of fluorescent APIs multiple times per second allowing analysis of lateral diffusion kinetics. The custom Fourier domain OCT module has a maximum a-scan rate of 54 kHz and provides depth-resolved tissue integrity information coregistered with the confocal fluorescence measurements. The combined system is validated by imaging phantoms with a surrogate fluorophore. Time-resolved API concentration measured at fixed depths is analyzed for diffusion kinetics. This multimodal system will eventually be implemented in vivo for objective evaluation of microbicide product performance.

  16. Intravitreal clearance and volume of distribution of compounds in rabbits: In silico prediction and pharmacokinetic simulations for drug development.

    PubMed

    del Amo, Eva M; Vellonen, Kati-Sisko; Kidron, Heidi; Urtti, Arto

    2015-09-01

    The aims of this research were to (1) create a curated universal database of intravitreal volumes of distribution (Vss, ivt) and clearances (CL ivt) of small molecular weight compounds and macromolecules and (2) to develop quantitative structure property relationship (QSPR) and pharmacokinetic models for the estimation of vitreal drug concentrations based on the compound structure. Vss, ivt and CL ivt values were determined from the available literature on intravitreal drug administration using compartmental models and curve fitting. A simple QSPR model for CL ivt of small molecular weight compounds was obtained with two descriptors: Log D7.4 and hydrogen bond donor capacity. The model predicted the internal and external test sets reliably with a mean fold error of 1.50 and 1.33, respectively (Q(2)Y=0.62). For 80% of the compounds the Vss, ivt was 1.18-2.28 ml; too narrow range for QSPR model building. Integration of the estimated Vss, ivt and predicted CL ivt parameters into pharmacokinetic simulation models allows prediction of vitreous drug concentrations after intravitreal administration. The present work presents for the first time a database of CL ivt and Vss, ivt values and the dependence of the CL ivt values on the molecular structure. The study provides also useful in silico tools to investigate a priori the intravitreal pharmacokinetic profiles for intravitreally injected candidate compounds and drug delivery systems.

  17. Pharmacokinetics of enoxacin and its oxometabolite after multiple oral dosing and penetration into prostatic tissue.

    PubMed

    Hamel, B; Mottet, N; Audran, M; Costa, P; Bressolle, F

    2000-12-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the concentrations of enoxacin and its oxo-metabolite in human prostatic tissue after multiple oral doses (400 mg bd) in 13 patients. On the first day of treatment, elimination half-lives were 6.8 h for enoxacin and 7.1 h for its metabolite; they were increased on day 4 (10.3 and 13.2 h, respectively). The ratios of drug concentration in prostatic tissue and plasma averaged 2.2 for enoxacin and 1.4 for its metabolite. In conclusion, concentrations of enoxacin achieved within the prostatic tissue were higher than plasma concentrations suggesting that there was an active transport mechanism.

  18. [Study on pharmacokinetics of cefuroxime by dynamics of its distribution in oral fluid of patients with sinusitis].

    PubMed

    Kulapina, O I; Mikhailova, M S

    2014-01-01

    A method for quantitative determination of cefuroxime in mixed saliva of patients with sinusitis by using spectrophotometer Shimadzu UV-1800, combined with the IBM PC is described. The conditions of the determination were the following: λ = 266 nm, a quartz cuvette, the analysis time of 10 minutes. The method for determination of cefuroxime is characterized by high specificity, accuracy, use of small amounts of oral fluid and expressivity. The method may be recommended for the use in the clinical practice for optimizing cefuroxime therapy in patients. The pharmacokinetics of cefuroxime was investigated by the dynamics of its distribution in the oral fluid of patients with various infectious-somatic disorders.

  19. Modeling Pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Bois, Frederic Y; Brochot, Céline

    2016-01-01

    Pharmacokinetics is the study of the fate of xenobiotics in a living organism. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models provide realistic descriptions of xenobiotics' absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion processes. They model the body as a set of homogeneous compartments representing organs, and their parameters refer to anatomical, physiological, biochemical, and physicochemical entities. They offer a quantitative mechanistic framework to understand and simulate the time-course of the concentration of a substance in various organs and body fluids. These models are well suited for performing extrapolations inherent to toxicology and pharmacology (e.g., between species or doses) and for integrating data obtained from various sources (e.g., in vitro or in vivo experiments, structure-activity models). In this chapter, we describe the practical development and basic use of a PBPK model from model building to model simulations, through implementation with an easily accessible free software. PMID:27311461

  20. Plasma pharmacokinetics, tissue disposition, excretion and metabolism of vinleucinol in mice as determined by high-performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    van Tellingen, O; Sonneveldt, A L; Beijnen, J H; Nooijen, W J; Kettenes-van den Bosch, J J; Versluis, C; Bult, A

    1994-01-01

    We investigated the pharmacokinetics of the experimental semisynthetic vinca alkaloid vinleucinol (VileE; O4-deacetyl-3-de(methoxycarbonyl)-3-[[[1-ethoxycarbonyl-2- methylbutyl]amino]carbonyl]-vincaleukoblastine). The study was performed in male FVB mice receiving 10.5 mg/kg VileE i.v. or p.o. Plasma, urine, faeces and tissue samples were analysed by a selective method based on ion-exchange normal-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with fluorescence detection and liquid-liquid extraction for sample clean-up. Apart from the parent drug, two other metabolic compounds were detected. One of these metabolites is vinleucinol acid (VileA; O4-deacetyl-3-de(methoxycarbonyl)-3-[[[1-carboxyl-2- methylbutyl]amino]carbonyl]-vincaleukoblastine), which possesses no cytotoxic activity. The structure proposed for the second metabolite (VileX) was based on tandem mass spectrometry (MS-MS) and infrared (IR) spectroscopy data. Metabolization of VileE to VileX must occur in the amino acid moiety of the molecule, with a (beta- or gamma-) lactone ring being formed after oxidation of the (beta- or gamma) carbon of the amino acid. VileX is a major metabolite, which is excreted in faeces and urine after i.v. administration and accounting for up to 23% of the administered dose. The activity of VileX against cultured L1210 cells is four times that of the parent drug VileE and comparable with that of vinblastine (VBL). At 48 h after administration of VileE, the concentration of VileX exceeds that of the parent drug in many tissues. These findings indicate that the metabolite VileX may be at least largely responsible for the activity observed against xenografts in mice after administration of the parent drug, VileE.

  1. Uptake and Tissue Distribution of Pharmaceuticals and Personal Care Products in Wild Fish from Treated-Wastewater-Impacted Streams.

    PubMed

    Tanoue, Rumi; Nomiyama, Kei; Nakamura, Haruna; Kim, Joon-Woo; Isobe, Tomohiko; Shinohara, Ryota; Kunisue, Tatsuya; Tanabe, Shinsuke

    2015-10-01

    A fish plasma model (FPM) has been proposed as a screening technique to prioritize potential hazardous pharmaceuticals to wild fish. However, this approach does not account for inter- or intraspecies variability of pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic parameters. The present study elucidated the uptake potency (from ambient water), tissue distribution, and biological risk of 20 pharmaceutical and personal care product (PPCP) residues in wild cyprinoid fish inhabiting treated-wastewater-impacted streams. In order to clarify the uncertainty of the FPM for PPCPs, we compared the plasma bioaccumulation factor in the field (BAFplasma = measured fish plasma/ambient water concentration ratio) with the predicted plasma bioconcentration factor (BCFplasma = fish plasma predicted by use of theoretical partition coefficients/ambient water concentration ratio) in the actual environment. As a result, the measured maximum BAFplasma of inflammatory agents was up to 17 times higher than theoretical BCFplasma values, leading to possible underestimation of toxicological risk on wild fish. When the tissue-blood partition coefficients (tissue/blood concentration ratios) of PPCPs were estimated, higher transportability into tissues, especially the brain, was found for psychotropic agents, but brain/plasma ratios widely varied among individual fish (up to 28-fold). In the present study, we provide a valuable data set on the intraspecies variability of PPCP pharmacokinetics, and our results emphasize the importance of determining PPCP concentrations in possible target organs as well as in the blood to assess the risk of PPCPs on wild fish. PMID:26348835

  2. Uptake and Tissue Distribution of Pharmaceuticals and Personal Care Products in Wild Fish from Treated-Wastewater-Impacted Streams.

    PubMed

    Tanoue, Rumi; Nomiyama, Kei; Nakamura, Haruna; Kim, Joon-Woo; Isobe, Tomohiko; Shinohara, Ryota; Kunisue, Tatsuya; Tanabe, Shinsuke

    2015-10-01

    A fish plasma model (FPM) has been proposed as a screening technique to prioritize potential hazardous pharmaceuticals to wild fish. However, this approach does not account for inter- or intraspecies variability of pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic parameters. The present study elucidated the uptake potency (from ambient water), tissue distribution, and biological risk of 20 pharmaceutical and personal care product (PPCP) residues in wild cyprinoid fish inhabiting treated-wastewater-impacted streams. In order to clarify the uncertainty of the FPM for PPCPs, we compared the plasma bioaccumulation factor in the field (BAFplasma = measured fish plasma/ambient water concentration ratio) with the predicted plasma bioconcentration factor (BCFplasma = fish plasma predicted by use of theoretical partition coefficients/ambient water concentration ratio) in the actual environment. As a result, the measured maximum BAFplasma of inflammatory agents was up to 17 times higher than theoretical BCFplasma values, leading to possible underestimation of toxicological risk on wild fish. When the tissue-blood partition coefficients (tissue/blood concentration ratios) of PPCPs were estimated, higher transportability into tissues, especially the brain, was found for psychotropic agents, but brain/plasma ratios widely varied among individual fish (up to 28-fold). In the present study, we provide a valuable data set on the intraspecies variability of PPCP pharmacokinetics, and our results emphasize the importance of determining PPCP concentrations in possible target organs as well as in the blood to assess the risk of PPCPs on wild fish.

  3. Pharmacokinetic study of arctigenin in rat plasma and organ tissue by RP-HPLC method.

    PubMed

    He, Fan; Dou, De-Qiang; Hou, Qiang; Sun, Yu; Kang, Ting-Guo

    2013-01-01

    A high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) technique was developed for the determination of arctigenin in plasma and various organs of rats after the oral administration of 30, 50 and 70 mgkg(-1) of arctigenin to the Sprague-Dawley rats. Results showed that the validated HPLC method was simple, fast, reproducible and suitable to the determination of arctigenin in rat plasma and organ tissue and one-compartmental model with zero-order absorption process can well describe the changes of arctigenin concentration in the plasma. The concentration of compound was highest in the spleen, less in the liver and the least in the lung.

  4. Concentration distribution around a growing gas bubble in tissue.

    PubMed

    Mohammadein, S A; Mohamed, K G

    2010-05-01

    This paper presents the concentration distribution around a growing nitrogen gas bubble in the blood and other tissues of divers who surface too quickly, when the ambient pressure through the decompression process is variable and constant. This effort is a modification of Sirinivasan et al. model (1999) [9]. The mathematical model is solved analytically to find the growth rate of a gas bubble in a tissue after decompression in the ambient pressure. Moreover, the concentration distribution around the growing bubble is introduced. The growth process is affected by ascent rate alpha (t), tissue diffusivity D(T), initial concentration difference DeltaC(0), surface tension sigma and void fraction varphi(0).

  5. Distribution of arginase in tissues of cat (Felis catus).

    PubMed

    Aminlari, Mahmoud; Shahbazkia, Homayoon R; Esfandiari, Azadeh

    2007-04-01

    Arginase (EC 3.5.3.1), the final enzyme in the urea cycle, catalyses the hydrolysis of l-arginine to l-ornithine and urea. High activity of this enzyme in the liver indicates its primary role in ammonia detoxification. However, its wide tissue distribution suggests that this enzyme might perform other functions besides hepatic ureagenesis. Although the distribution and properties of arginase from many tissues of human, laboratory animals and some domestic animals have been studied, little is known about the pattern of distribution and physiological roles of this enzyme in the cat. The purpose of this study was to examine and compare the distribution of arginase in different tissues of the cat. A selection of tissue samples was assayed for arginase by the diacetyl monoxime method of determination of enzymatically formed urea. The protein content of tissues and enzymatic activities were calculated as units per gram tissue and units per milligram protein of the tissue. Results showed that the liver was the richest source of arginase followed by the oesophageal and tongue mucosal layers. Significant activity of this enzyme was found in the mucosa of the small intestine, kidney cortex, lung, testis and ovary. The results of this study will be discussed in terms of the involvement of arginase in several biochemical and physiological functions in this species.

  6. Tissue distribution of trace elements and DDE in brown pelicans

    SciTech Connect

    Ohlendorf, H.M.; Anderson, D.W.; Boellstorff, D.E.; Mulhern, B.M.

    1985-08-01

    Trace elements and organochlorine pollutants commonly occur in avian tissues. However, concentrations vary among species in the same geographic area, and some compounds can be distributed differently in body tissues among different species. In addition, some heavy metal concentrations vary with the bird's age. The purpose of this paper was to obtain a sample of brown pelicans from these populations to determine which brown pelican tissues contain the highest concentrations of organochlorine pollutants and several trace elements, how much variation might exist in a general sample, and what interrelationships might exist among the tissues and compounds studied.

  7. Development and validation of an UPLC-MS/MS method for the quantification of ethoxzolamide in plasma and bioequivalent buffers: Applications to absorption, brain distribution, and pharmacokinetic studies

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Song; Zhao, Jing; Yin, Taijun; Ma, Yong; Xu, Beibei; Moore, Anthony N.; Dash, Pramod K.; Hu, Ming

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop and validate an UPLC-MS/MS method to quantify ethoxzolamide in plasma (EZ) and apply the method to absorption, brain distribution, as well as pharmacokinetic studies. A C18 column was used with 0.1% of formic acid in acetonitrile and 0.1% of formic acid in water as the mobile phases to resolve EZ. The mass analysis was performed in a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer using multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) with positive scan mode. The results show that the linear range of EZ is 4.88–10,000.00 nM. The intra-day variance is less than 12.43 % and the accuracy is between 88.88–08.00 %. The inter-day variance is less than 12.87 % and accuracy is between 89.27–115.89 %. Protein precipitation was performed using methanol to extract EZ from plasma and brain tissues. Only 40 µL of plasma is needed for analysis due to the high sensitivity of this method, which could be completed in less than three minutes. This method was used to study the pharmacokinetics of EZ in SD rats, and the transport of EZ in Caco-2 and MDCK-MDR1 overexpressing cell culture models. Our data show that EZ is not a substrate for p-glycoprotein (P-gp) and its entry into the brain may not limited by the blood-brain barrier. PMID:25706567

  8. Paediatric pharmacokinetics: key considerations

    PubMed Central

    Batchelor, Hannah Katharine; Marriott, John Francis

    2015-01-01

    A number of anatomical and physiological factors determine the pharmacokinetic profile of a drug. Differences in physiology in paediatric populations compared with adults can influence the concentration of drug within the plasma or tissue. Healthcare professionals need to be aware of anatomical and physiological changes that affect pharmacokinetic profiles of drugs to understand consequences of dose adjustments in infants and children. Pharmacokinetic clinical trials in children are complicated owing to the limitations on blood sample volumes and perception of pain in children resulting from blood sampling. There are alternative sampling techniques that can minimize the invasive nature of such trials. Population based models can also limit the sampling required from each individual by increasing the overall sample size to generate robust pharmacokinetic data. This review details key considerations in the design and development of paediatric pharmacokinetic clinical trials. PMID:25855821

  9. Distribution of miRNA expression across human tissues.

    PubMed

    Ludwig, Nicole; Leidinger, Petra; Becker, Kurt; Backes, Christina; Fehlmann, Tobias; Pallasch, Christian; Rheinheimer, Steffi; Meder, Benjamin; Stähler, Cord; Meese, Eckart; Keller, Andreas

    2016-05-01

    We present a human miRNA tissue atlas by determining the abundance of 1997 miRNAs in 61 tissue biopsies of different organs from two individuals collected post-mortem. One thousand three hundred sixty-four miRNAs were discovered in at least one tissue, 143 were present in each tissue. To define the distribution of miRNAs, we utilized a tissue specificity index (TSI). The majority of miRNAs (82.9%) fell in a middle TSI range i.e. were neither specific for single tissues (TSI > 0.85) nor housekeeping miRNAs (TSI < 0.5). Nonetheless, we observed many different miRNAs and miRNA families that were predominantly expressed in certain tissues. Clustering of miRNA abundances revealed that tissues like several areas of the brain clustered together. Considering -3p and -5p mature forms we observed miR-150 with different tissue specificity. Analysis of additional lung and prostate biopsies indicated that inter-organism variability was significantly lower than inter-organ variability. Tissue-specific differences between the miRNA patterns appeared not to be significantly altered by storage as shown for heart and lung tissue. MiRNAs TSI values of human tissues were significantly (P = 10(-8)) correlated with those of rats; miRNAs that were highly abundant in certain human tissues were likewise abundant in according rat tissues. We implemented a web-based repository enabling scientists to access and browse the data (https://ccb-web.cs.uni-saarland.de/tissueatlas).

  10. Multimodal assessment of spatial distribution of drug-tracer uptake by brain tissue after intra-arterial injections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh-Moon, Rajinder; Chaudhuri, Durba; Wang, Mei; Straubinger, Robert; Bigio, Irving J.; Joshi, Shailendra

    2014-02-01

    It is challenging to track the rapid changes in drug concentrations after intra-arterial (IA) administration to elucidate the pharmacokinetics of this method of drug delivery. Traditional pharmacokinetic parameters (such as protein binding) that are highly relevant to intravenous (IV) administration do not seem to apply to IA injections. Regional drug delivery is affected by the biomechanics of drug injection, resting blood flow, and local tissue extraction. In-vivo and ex-vivo, optical methods for spatial mapping of drug deposition can assist in visualizing drug distributions and aid in the screening of potential drugs and carrier candidates. We present a multimodal approach for the assessment of drug distribution in postmortem tissue specimens using diffuse reflectance spectroscopy, multispectral imaging, and confocal microscopy and demonstrate feasibility of distinguishing route of administration advantages of liposome-dye conjugate delivery. The results of this study suggest that insight on drug dynamics gained by this aggregated approach can be used to help screen and/or optimize potential drug candidates and drug delivery protocols.

  11. Route-dependent pharmacokinetics, distribution, and placental permeability of organic and inorganic selenium in hamsters.

    PubMed

    Willhite, C C; Ferm, V H; Zeise, L

    1990-10-01

    Inorganic selenium (Se) salts (selenite and selenate oxyanions) and the organic selenoamino acids (selenomethionine and seleniferous grains) are teratogenic and embryolethal in domestic and wild birds. Selenium bioaccumulation has been held responsible for reproductive failure among waterfowl at the Kesterson Reservoir (California), the Ouray and Stewart Lake Wildlife Refuges (Utah), and the Carson Sink (Nevada). Anecdotal field and controlled laboratory reports have implicated Se exposure in mammalian embryotoxicity (including human), but developmental toxicity studies in hamsters failed to demonstrate an adverse response, except at maternally toxic doses (Ferm et al., Reprod. Toxicol., in press). Uptake, distribution, and elimination of Se after a single bolus equimolar dose (60 mumol/kg) of selenate or selenomethionine by oral or intravenous administration were compared using day 8 pregnant hamsters. Intravenous selenate was eliminated ten times more rapidly from maternal plasma than oral selenate, but concentrated in liver, kidney, and placenta to the same degree. Intravenous (iv) L-selenomethionine achieved lower maximum circulating total [Se], but it was eliminated more slowly than iv selenate. Larger areas under the plasma and peripheral tissue [Se]:time curve (AUC) after oral or parenteral selenomethionine than after equimolar selenate were consistent with previous studies in rodents and in humans. Embryonic [Se] plateaued at 3 nmol/g after selenate, but embryonic [Se] after selenomethionine continued to accumulate (80 nmol/g) as gestation progressed. The lack of a teratogenic response in hamsters at doses of either selenate or selenomethionine less than those associated with maternal intoxication cannot be attributed to lack of Se accumulation in early embryonic and placental tissue.

  12. Distribution of tissue enzymes in three species of pinnipeds.

    PubMed

    Fauquier, Deborah A; Mazet, Jonna A K; Gulland, Frances M D; Spraker, Terry R; Christopher, Mary M

    2008-03-01

    In domestic animal medicine, changes in serum enzyme levels are routinely used as diagnostic tools to detect liver disease. Hepatic disease occurs in pinnipeds, but limited data are available on the tissue distribution of serum enzymes in marine mammals. The objectives of this study were to determine the tissue distribution of seven serum enzymes in three pinniped species. Enzymes evaluated were alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), sorbitol dehydrogenase (SDH), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), creatine kinase (CK), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), and gamma-glutamyl transferase (GGT) in tissues from California sea lions (Zalophus californianus) (n = 5), harbor seals (Phoca vitulina) (n = 5), and northern elephant seals (Mirounga angustirostris) (n = 5) that stranded and then died at a rehabilitation center. Samples were evaluated in duplicate from liver, skeletal muscle, cardiac muscle, kidney, adrenal, spleen, pancreas, lung, lymph node, and intestine. Patterns of tissue enzyme distribution were similar in all species, with SDH activity highest in liver and kidney, CK activity highest in skeletal and cardiac muscle, ALP activity highest in adrenal, and GGT activity highest in the kidney. Aspartate aminotransferase and LDH activities were less specific, with high activity in multiple tissues. Tissue ALT activity was high in the liver of all species, but was also high in cardiac muscle (California sea lions), skeletal muscle (harbor seals), and kidney (elephant seals). These results suggest that concurrent analysis of SDH, ALT, and CK would provide high specificity and sensitivity for the detection of hepatic lesions, and allow differentiation of liver from skeletal muscle lesions in pinniped species. PMID:18432090

  13. Microdialysis versus other techniques for the clinical assessment of in vivo tissue drug distribution.

    PubMed

    Brunner, Martin; Langer, Oliver

    2006-01-01

    Quantification of target site pharmacokinetics (PK) is crucial for drug discovery and development. Clinical microdialysis (MD) has increasingly been employed for the description of drug distribution and receptor phase PK of the unbound fraction of various analytes. Costs for MD experiments are comparably low and given suitable analytics, target tissue PK of virtually any drug molecule can be quantified. The major limitation of MD stems from the fact that organs such as brain, lung or liver are not readily accessible without surgery. Recently, non-invasive imaging techniques, i.e. positron emission tomography (PET) or magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), have become available for in vivo drug distribution assessment and allow for drug concentration measurements in practically every human organ. Spatial resolution of MRS imaging, however, is low and although PET enables monitoring of regional drug concentration differences with a spatial resolution of a few millimetres, discrimination between bound and unbound drug or parent compound and metabolite is difficult. Radiotracer development is furthermore time and labour intensive and requires special expertise and radiation exposure and costs originating from running a PET facility cannot be neglected. The recent complementary use of MD and imaging has permitted to exploit individual strengths of these diverse techniques. In conclusion, MD and imaging techniques have provided drug distribution data that have so far not been available. Used alone or in combination, these methods may potentially play an important role in future drug research and development with the potential to serve as translational tools for clinical decision making.

  14. Cold exposure induces alterations in porcine triiodothyronine tissue distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Quesada, M.H.; Reed, H.L.; Hesslink, R.; Licauco, G.; Castro, S.; Homer, L.; Young, B. Univ. of Alberta, Edmonton )

    1991-03-11

    Evidence suggests that thyroid hormone plays an active role in modulation of tissue metabolism in response to cold challenge. In an attempts to identify tissues that may have increased capacity for triiodothyronine (T{sub 3}) and be actively involved in the thermogenic process, the authors investigated the T{sub 3} tissue distribution in 5 month old swine exposed to cold (4C) (N = 5) for three weeks, compared with controls at a thermoneutral temperature (20C) (N = 4). Both groups were injected I.V. with ({sup 125}I)T{sub 3} three hours before sacrifice. ({sup 125}I)T{sub 3} was organically extracted from heart, kidney, thyroid gland, adrenal, brain, 4 different types of striated muscles and fat tissues and counted to determine the CPM/gm of tissue. Serum total T{sub 3} and free T{sub 3} were elevated. The bulk of the tissue/serum ratios of cold exposed swine compared with controls were unchanged. However, calculation of the T{sub 3} organ pools revealed that the majority was elevated 2 to 3 times over control. Increases in tissue distribution volume (TVD) occurred in hip fat. Body and organ weights tended to increase but not to a significant degree except for the thyroid gland, which increased 66% over the average control value. The physiological significance of the cold associated augmented organ pool and the increased TCD in hip fat needs to be explored.

  15. Simultaneous determination of aditoprim and its three major metabolites in pigs, broilers and carp tissues, and its application in tissue distribution and depletion studies.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liye; Huang, Lingli; Pan, Yuanhu; Wu, Qinghua; Xie, Shuyu; Yuan, Zonghui

    2016-08-01

    Aditoprim (ADP) is a recently developed dihydrofolate reductase inhibitor that has shown promise for therapeutic use in veterinary medicine because of its excellent pharmacokinetic properties. In this study, a sensitive and reliable multi-residue chromatography-ultraviolet (HPLC-UV) method for the quantitative analysis of ADP and its three major metabolites was developed, and the tissue distribution and depletion profiles of ADP and its major metabolites in pigs, broilers and carp were investigated. Edible and additional tissues (heart, lung, stomach, intestine and swim bladder) were collected for analysis at six different withdrawal periods after ADP administration for 7 days. ADP, N-monomethyl-ADP and N-didesmethyl-ADP were detected in almost all tissues in the three species. The liver, kidney and lung showed higher residue concentrations, and the liver showed a longer residue half-life (t1/2) than other tissues. In the liver, ADP was the most abundant component with the longest persistence. The results suggest that the liver was the residual target tissue and ADP was the marker residue, and the conclusive withdrawal time (WDT) of 20 days in pigs, 16 days in broilers and 25 days in carp was estimated using the assessment methodologies approved by the Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives (JECFA). PMID:27310088

  16. Simultaneous determination of aditoprim and its three major metabolites in pigs, broilers and carp tissues, and its application in tissue distribution and depletion studies.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liye; Huang, Lingli; Pan, Yuanhu; Wu, Qinghua; Xie, Shuyu; Yuan, Zonghui

    2016-08-01

    Aditoprim (ADP) is a recently developed dihydrofolate reductase inhibitor that has shown promise for therapeutic use in veterinary medicine because of its excellent pharmacokinetic properties. In this study, a sensitive and reliable multi-residue chromatography-ultraviolet (HPLC-UV) method for the quantitative analysis of ADP and its three major metabolites was developed, and the tissue distribution and depletion profiles of ADP and its major metabolites in pigs, broilers and carp were investigated. Edible and additional tissues (heart, lung, stomach, intestine and swim bladder) were collected for analysis at six different withdrawal periods after ADP administration for 7 days. ADP, N-monomethyl-ADP and N-didesmethyl-ADP were detected in almost all tissues in the three species. The liver, kidney and lung showed higher residue concentrations, and the liver showed a longer residue half-life (t1/2) than other tissues. In the liver, ADP was the most abundant component with the longest persistence. The results suggest that the liver was the residual target tissue and ADP was the marker residue, and the conclusive withdrawal time (WDT) of 20 days in pigs, 16 days in broilers and 25 days in carp was estimated using the assessment methodologies approved by the Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives (JECFA).

  17. Tissue distribution of human acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase messenger RNA

    SciTech Connect

    Jbilo, O.; Barteles, C.F.; Chatonnet, A.; Toutant, J.P.; Lockridge, O.

    1994-12-31

    Tissue distribution of human acetyicholinesterase and butyryicholinesterase messenger RNA. 1 Cholinesterase inhibitors occur naturally in the calabar bean (eserine), green potatoes (solanine), insect-resistant crab apples, the coca plant (cocaine) and snake venom (fasciculin). There are also synthetic cholinesterase inhibitors, for example man-made insecticides. These inhibitors inactivate acetyicholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase as well as other targets. From a study of the tissue distribution of acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase mRNA by Northern blot analysis, we have found the highest levels of butyrylcholinesterase mRNA in the liver and lungs, tissues known as the principal detoxication sites of the human body. These results indicate that butyrylcholinesterase may be a first line of defense against poisons that are eaten or inhaled.

  18. Continuous versus short-term infusion of cefuroxime: assessment of concept based on plasma, subcutaneous tissue, and bone pharmacokinetics in an animal model.

    PubMed

    Tøttrup, Mikkel; Bibby, Bo M; Hardlei, Tore F; Bue, Mats; Kerrn-Jespersen, Sigrid; Fuursted, Kurt; Søballe, Kjeld; Birke-Sørensen, Hanne

    2015-01-01

    The relatively short half-lives of most β-lactams suggest that continuous infusion of these time-dependent antimicrobials may be favorable compared to short-term infusion. Nevertheless, only limited solid-tissue pharmacokinetic data are available to support this theory. In this study, we randomly assigned 12 pigs to receive cefuroxime as either a short-term or continuous infusion. Measurements of cefuroxime were obtained every 30 min in plasma, subcutaneous tissue, and bone. For the measurements in solid tissues, microdialysis was applied. A two-compartment population model was fitted separately to the drug concentration data for the different tissues using a nonlinear mixed-effects regression model. Estimates of the pharmacokinetic parameters and time with concentrations above the MIC were derived using Monte Carlo simulations. Except for subcutaneous tissue in the short-term infusion group, the tissue penetration was incomplete for all tissues. For short-term infusion, the tissue penetration ratios were 0.97 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.67 to 1.39), 0.61 (95% CI, 0.51 to 0.73), and 0.45 (95% CI, 0.36 to 0.56) for subcutaneous tissue, cancellous bone, and cortical bone, respectively. For continuous infusion, they were 0.53 (95% CI, 0.33 to 0.84), 0.38 (95% CI, 0.23 to 0.57), and 0.27 (95% CI, 0.13 to 0.48) for the same tissues, respectively. The absolute areas under the concentration-time curve were also lower in the continuous infusion group. Nevertheless, a significantly longer time with concentrations above the MIC was found for continuous infusion up until MICs of 4, 2, 2, and 0.5 μg/ml for plasma and the same three tissues mentioned above, respectively. For drugs with a short half-life, like cefuroxime, continuous infusion seems to be favorable compared to short-term infusion; however, incomplete tissue penetration and high MIC strains may jeopardize the continuous infusion approach.

  19. Pharmacokinetics, distribution and excretion of YM155 monobromide, a novel small-molecule survivin suppressant, in male and pregnant or lactating female rats.

    PubMed

    Minematsu, Tsuyoshi; Sonoda, Takuya; Hashimoto, Tadashi; Iwai, Megumi; Oppeneer, Todd; Felder, Laurie; Shirai, Nobuaki; Miyashita, Aiji; Usui, Takashi

    2012-04-01

    YM155 monobromide is a novel small-molecule survivin suppressant. The pharmacokinetics, distribution and excretion of YM155/[14C]YM155 were investigated using males and pregnant or lactating female rats after a single intravenous bolus administration. For the 0.1, 0.3 and 1 mg/kg YM155 doses given to male rats, increases in area under the plasma concentration-time curves were approximately proportional to the increase in the dose level. After administering [14C]YM155, radioactivity concentrations in the kidney and liver were highest among the tissues in both male and pregnant rats: e.g. 14.8- and 5.24-fold, respectively, and higher than in plasma at 0.1 h after dosing to male rats. The YM155 concentrations in the brain were lowest: 25-fold lower than in plasma. The transfer of radioactivity into fetuses was low (about 2-fold lower than in plasma). In lactating rats, the radioactivity was transferred into milk at a level 8- to 21-fold higher than for plasma. Radioactivity was primarily excreted in feces (64.0%) and urine (35.2%). The fecal excretion was considered to have occurred mainly by biliary excretion and partly by secretion across the gastrointestinal membrane from the blood to the lumen.

  20. Tissue distribution, disposition, and metabolism of cyclosporine in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, O.; Schreier, E.; Heitz, F.; Maurer, G.

    1987-05-01

    Tissue distribution, disposition, and metabolism of /sup 3/H-cyclosporine were studied in rats after single and repeated oral doses of 10 and 30 mg/kg and after an iv dose of 3 mg/kg. The oral doses of 10 and 30 mg/kg were dissolved in polyethylene glycol 200/ethanol or in olive oil/Labrafil/ethanol. Absorption from both formulations was slow and incomplete, with peak /sup 3/H blood levels at 3-4 hr. Approximately 30% of the radioactive dose was absorbed, which is consistent with oral bioavailability data for cyclosporine. More than 70% of the radioactivity was excreted in feces and up to 15% in urine. Elimination via the bile accounted for 10 and 60% of the oral and iv doses, respectively. Since unchanged cyclosporine predominated in both blood and tissues at early time points, the half-lives of the distribution phases (t 1/2 alpha) of parent drug and of total radioactivity were similar. In blood, kidney, liver, and lymph nodes, t 1/2 alpha of cyclosporine ranged from 6-10 hr. Elimination of radioactivity from the systemic circulation was multiphasic, with a terminal half-life of 20-30 hr. /sup 3/H-Cyclosporine was extensively distributed throughout the body, with highest concentrations in liver, kidney, endocrine glands, and adipose tissue. The concentrations of both total radioactivity and parent drug were greater in tissues than in blood, which is consistent with the high lipid solubility of cyclosporine and some of its metabolites. Skin and adipose tissue were the main storage sites for unchanged cyclosporine. Elimination half-lives were slower for most tissues than for blood and increased with multiple dosing. The amount of unchanged drug was negligible in urine and bile.

  1. Optimizing nanomedicine pharmacokinetics using physiologically based pharmacokinetics modelling

    PubMed Central

    Moss, Darren Michael; Siccardi, Marco

    2014-01-01

    The delivery of therapeutic agents is characterized by numerous challenges including poor absorption, low penetration in target tissues and non-specific dissemination in organs, leading to toxicity or poor drug exposure. Several nanomedicine strategies have emerged as an advanced approach to enhance drug delivery and improve the treatment of several diseases. Numerous processes mediate the pharmacokinetics of nanoformulations, with the absorption, distribution, metabolism and elimination (ADME) being poorly understood and often differing substantially from traditional formulations. Understanding how nanoformulation composition and physicochemical properties influence drug distribution in the human body is of central importance when developing future treatment strategies. A helpful pharmacological tool to simulate the distribution of nanoformulations is represented by physiologically based pharmacokinetics (PBPK) modelling, which integrates system data describing a population of interest with drug/nanoparticle in vitro data through a mathematical description of ADME. The application of PBPK models for nanomedicine is in its infancy and characterized by several challenges. The integration of property–distribution relationships in PBPK models may benefit nanomedicine research, giving opportunities for innovative development of nanotechnologies. PBPK modelling has the potential to improve our understanding of the mechanisms underpinning nanoformulation disposition and allow for more rapid and accurate determination of their kinetics. This review provides an overview of the current knowledge of nanomedicine distribution and the use of PBPK modelling in the characterization of nanoformulations with optimal pharmacokinetics. Linked Articles This article is part of a themed section on Nanomedicine. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2014.171.issue-17 PMID:24467481

  2. Imepitoin as novel treatment option for canine idiopathic epilepsy: pharmacokinetics, distribution, and metabolism in dogs

    PubMed Central

    Rundfeldt, C; Gasparic, A; Wlaź, P

    2014-01-01

    Imepitoin is a novel anti-epileptic licensed in the European Union for the treatment of canine idiopathic epilepsy. The aim of this study was to characterize the pharmacokinetics of imepitoin in dogs and to evaluate the interaction with drug metabolizing enzymes. Upon administration of imepitoin tablets at a dose of 30 mg/kg to beagle dogs, high plasma levels were observed within 30 min following oral dosing, with maximal plasma concentrations of 14.9–17.2 μg/mL reached after 2–3 h. In a crossover study, co-administration of imepitoin tablets with food reduced the total AUC by 30%, but it did not result in significant changes in Tmax and Cmax, indicating lack of clinical relevance. No clinically relevant effects of sex and no accumulation or metabolic tolerance were observed upon twice daily dosing. Following single dose administration of 10–100 mg/kg, dose linearity was found. Administering [14C] imepitoin, high enteral absorption of 92% and primary fecal excretion were identified. Plasma protein binding was only 55%. At therapeutic plasma concentrations, imepitoin did not inhibit microsomal cytochrome P450 family liver enzymes in vitro. In rats, no relevant induction of liver enzymes was found. Therefore, protein binding or metabolism-derived drug–drug interactions are unlikely. Based on these data, imepitoin can be dosed twice daily, but the timing of tablet administration in relation to feeding should be kept consistent. PMID:24611573

  3. Imepitoin as novel treatment option for canine idiopathic epilepsy: pharmacokinetics, distribution, and metabolism in dogs.

    PubMed

    Rundfeldt, C; Gasparic, A; Wlaź, P

    2014-10-01

    Imepitoin is a novel anti-epileptic licensed in the European Union for the treatment of canine idiopathic epilepsy. The aim of this study was to characterize the pharmacokinetics of imepitoin in dogs and to evaluate the interaction with drug metabolizing enzymes. Upon administration of imepitoin tablets at a dose of 30 mg/kg to beagle dogs, high plasma levels were observed within 30 min following oral dosing, with maximal plasma concentrations of 14.9-17.2 μg/mL reached after 2-3 h. In a crossover study, co-administration of imepitoin tablets with food reduced the total AUC by 30%, but it did not result in significant changes in Tmax and Cmax , indicating lack of clinical relevance. No clinically relevant effects of sex and no accumulation or metabolic tolerance were observed upon twice daily dosing. Following single dose administration of 10-100 mg/kg, dose linearity was found. Administering [(14) C] imepitoin, high enteral absorption of 92% and primary fecal excretion were identified. Plasma protein binding was only 55%. At therapeutic plasma concentrations, imepitoin did not inhibit microsomal cytochrome P450 family liver enzymes in vitro. In rats, no relevant induction of liver enzymes was found. Therefore, protein binding or metabolism-derived drug-drug interactions are unlikely. Based on these data, imepitoin can be dosed twice daily, but the timing of tablet administration in relation to feeding should be kept consistent.

  4. Lisdexamfetamine: A pharmacokinetic review.

    PubMed

    Comiran, Eloisa; Kessler, Félix Henrique; Fröehlich, Pedro Eduardo; Limberger, Renata Pereira

    2016-06-30

    Lisdexamfetamine (LDX) is a d-amphetamine (d-AMPH) pro-drug used to treat Attention Deficit and Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) and Binge Eating Disorder (BED) symptoms. The in vivo pharmacodynamics of LDX is the same as that of its active product d-AMPH, although there are a few qualitative and quantitative differences due to pharmacokinetics. Due to the specific pharmacokinetics of the long-acting stimulants, this article revises the pharmacokinetic studies on LDX, the newest amphetamine pro-drug. The Medline/Pubmed, Science Direct and Biblioteca Virtual em Saúde (Lilacs and Ibecs) (2007-2016) databases were searched for articles and their list of references. As for basic pharmacokinetics studies, since LDX is a newly developed medication, there are few results concerning biotransformation, distribution and the use of different biological matrices for analysis. This is the first robust review on this topic, gathering data from all clinical pharmacokinetics studies available in the literature. The particular pharmacokinetics of LDX plays a major role in studying this pro-drug, since this knowledge was essential to understand some reports on clinical effects in literature, e.g. the small likelihood of reducing the effect by interactions, the effect of long duration use and the still questionable reduction of the potential for abuse. In general the already well-known pharmacokinetic properties of amphetamine make LDX relatively predictable, simplifying the use of LDX in clinical practice. PMID:27125257

  5. Lisdexamfetamine: A pharmacokinetic review.

    PubMed

    Comiran, Eloisa; Kessler, Félix Henrique; Fröehlich, Pedro Eduardo; Limberger, Renata Pereira

    2016-06-30

    Lisdexamfetamine (LDX) is a d-amphetamine (d-AMPH) pro-drug used to treat Attention Deficit and Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) and Binge Eating Disorder (BED) symptoms. The in vivo pharmacodynamics of LDX is the same as that of its active product d-AMPH, although there are a few qualitative and quantitative differences due to pharmacokinetics. Due to the specific pharmacokinetics of the long-acting stimulants, this article revises the pharmacokinetic studies on LDX, the newest amphetamine pro-drug. The Medline/Pubmed, Science Direct and Biblioteca Virtual em Saúde (Lilacs and Ibecs) (2007-2016) databases were searched for articles and their list of references. As for basic pharmacokinetics studies, since LDX is a newly developed medication, there are few results concerning biotransformation, distribution and the use of different biological matrices for analysis. This is the first robust review on this topic, gathering data from all clinical pharmacokinetics studies available in the literature. The particular pharmacokinetics of LDX plays a major role in studying this pro-drug, since this knowledge was essential to understand some reports on clinical effects in literature, e.g. the small likelihood of reducing the effect by interactions, the effect of long duration use and the still questionable reduction of the potential for abuse. In general the already well-known pharmacokinetic properties of amphetamine make LDX relatively predictable, simplifying the use of LDX in clinical practice.

  6. Fourier polarimetry of the birefringence distribution of myocardium tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ushenko, O. G.; Dubolazov, O. V.; Ushenko, V. O.; Gorsky, M. P.; Soltys, I. V.; Olar, O. V.

    2015-11-01

    The results of optical modeling of biological tissues polycrystalline multilayer networks have been presented. Algorithms of reconstruction of parameter distributions were determined that describe the linear and circular birefringence. For the separation of the manifestations of these mechanisms we propose a method of space-frequency filtering. Criteria for differentiation of causes of death due to coronary heart disease (CHD) and acute coronary insufficiency (ACI) were found.

  7. Tissue distribution of Epstein-Barr virus genotypes.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, H L; Lung, M L; Chan, K H; Griffin, B E; Ng, M H

    1996-01-01

    The genome of naturally occurring Epstein-Barr virus contains either two or three copies of a 29-bp tandem repeat sequence in the first intron of the BZLF gene. These genotypes differ markedly in their distribution between blood and epithelial tissues, presumably because they have adapted to separate life cycles in these sites. The genotype prevalent in the blood also appears to be better able to transform B lymphocytes. PMID:8794387

  8. Microanalysis, Pharmacokinetics and Tissue Distribution of Polysaccharide-Protein Complexes from Longan Pulp in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Min, Ting; Sun, Jie; Yi, Yang; Wang, Hong-Xun; Hang, Fei; Ai, You-Wei; Wang, Li-Mei

    2015-01-01

    A high performance size exclusion-fluorescence detection (HPSEC-FD) method combined with fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) prelabeling was established for the microanalysis of polysaccharide–protein complexes from longan pulp (LPP). FITC-labeled LPP (LPPF) was fractionated by gel filtration chromatography. The weight-average molecular weight and FITC substitution degree of LPPF were 39.01 kDa and 0.20%, respectively. The HPSEC-FD calibration curves linear over the range of 1–200 µg/mL in mouse plasma, spleen and lung samples with correlation coefficients greater than 0.995. The inter-day and intra-day precisions of the method were not more than 6.9%, and the relative recovery ranged from 93.7% to 106.4%. The concentration–time curve of LPPF in plasma following intravenous (i.v.) administration at 40 mg/kg body weight well fitted to a two-compartment model. LPPF rapidly eliminated from plasma according to the short half-lives (t1/2α = 2.23 min, t1/2β = 39.11 min) and mean retention times (MRT0–t = 1.15 h, MRT0–∞ = 1.39 h). After administration over 5 to 360 min, the concentration of LPPF in spleen homogenate decreased from 7.41 to 3.68 µg/mL; the concentration in lung homogenate decreased from 9.08 to 3.40 µg/mL. On the other hand, the increasing concentration of LPPF fraction with low molecular weight in heart homogenate was observed. PMID:26501257

  9. A continuous fiber distribution material model for human cervical tissue.

    PubMed

    Myers, Kristin M; Hendon, Christine P; Gan, Yu; Yao, Wang; Yoshida, Kyoko; Fernandez, Michael; Vink, Joy; Wapner, Ronald J

    2015-06-25

    The uterine cervix during pregnancy is the vital mechanical barrier which resists compressive and tensile loads generated from a growing fetus. Premature cervical remodeling and softening is hypothesized to result in the shortening of the cervix, which is known to increase a woman׳s risk of preterm birth. To understand the role of cervical material properties in preventing preterm birth, we derive a cervical material model based on previous mechanical, biochemical and histological experiments conducted on nonpregnant and pregnant human hysterectomy cervical tissue samples. In this study we present a three-dimensional fiber composite model that captures the equilibrium material behavior of the tissue in tension and compression. Cervical tissue is modeled as a fibrous composite material, where a single family of preferentially aligned and continuously distributed collagen fibers are embedded in a compressible neo-Hookean ground substance. The total stress in the collagen solid network is calculated by integrating the fiber stresses. The shape of the fiber distribution is described by an ellipsoid where semi-principal axis lengths are fit to optical coherence tomography measurements. The composite material model is fit to averaged mechanical testing data from uni-axial compression and tension experiments, and averaged material parameters are reported for nonpregnant and term pregnant human cervical tissue. The model is then evaluated by investigating the stress and strain state of a uniform thick-walled cylinder under a compressive stress with collagen fibers preferentially aligned in the circumferential direction. This material modeling framework for the equilibrium behavior of human cervical tissue serves as a basis to determine the role of preferentially-aligned cervical collagen fibers in preventing cervical deformation during pregnancy.

  10. Discovery of novel hepatoselective HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors for treating hypercholesterolemia: a bench-to-bedside case study on tissue selective drug distribution.

    PubMed

    Pfefferkorn, Jeffrey A; Litchfield, John; Hutchings, Richard; Cheng, Xue-Min; Larsen, Scott D; Auerbach, Bruce; Bush, Mark R; Lee, Chitase; Erasga, Noe; Bowles, Daniel M; Boyles, David C; Lu, Gina; Sekerke, Catherine; Askew, Valerie; Hanselman, Jeffrey C; Dillon, Lisa; Lin, Zhiwu; Robertson, Andrew; Olsen, Karl; Boustany, Carine; Atkinson, Karen; Goosen, Theunis C; Sahasrabudhe, Vaishali; Chupka, Jonathan; Duignan, David B; Feng, Bo; Scialis, Renato; Kimoto, Emi; Bi, Yi-An; Lai, Yurong; El-Kattan, Ayman; Bakker-Arkema, Rebecca; Barclay, Paul; Kindt, Erick; Le, Vu; Mandema, Jaap W; Milad, Mark; Tait, Bradley D; Kennedy, Robert; Trivedi, Bharat K; Kowala, Mark

    2011-05-01

    The design of drugs with selective tissue distribution can be an effective strategy for enhancing efficacy and safety, but understanding the translation of preclinical tissue distribution data to the clinic remains an important challenge. As part of a discovery program to identify next generation liver selective HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors we report the identification of (3R,5R)-7-(4-((3-fluorobenzyl)carbamoyl)-5-cyclopropyl-2-(4-fluorophenyl)-1H-imidazol-1-yl)-3,5-dihydroxyheptanoic acid (26) as a candidate for treating hypercholesterlemia. Clinical evaluation of 26 (PF-03491165), as well as the previously reported 2 (PF-03052334), provided an opportunity for a case study comparison of the preclinical and clinical pharmacokinetics as well as pharmacodynamics of tissue targeted HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors.

  11. Rat and human membrane dipeptidase: tissue distribution and developmental changes.

    PubMed

    Kera, Y; Liu, Z; Matsumoto, T; Sorimachi, Y; Nagasaki, H; Yamada, R H

    1999-05-01

    Distribution and developmental changes in membrane dipeptidase activity were examined in rat and human tissues. The activity to hydrolyze glycyl-D-alanine in rat and human tissues was completely or almost completely inhibited by 5 mM cilastatin, suggesting that the activity was due to membrane dipeptidase and that the contribution of leucine aminopeptidase to the activity was minor. In 8-week-old rats, the activity was high in lung, kidney, pancreas and testis, and in each pooled sample of ileal mucosa, duodenal mucosa, jejunal mucosa and adrenal mucosa. A low activity was found in spleen, liver, serum and heart. The activity in lung, kidney, adrenal and intestinal mucosa increased up to the age of 5 or 8 weeks, while that in pancreas, testis and spleen reached a maximal level at around 3 weeks and declined thereafter. The distribution profile of the enzyme in postmortem tissues of adult humans was similar to that in rat, except for an extremely low activity in lung. The enzyme was also found in serum and urine from healthy volunteers. In urine, the activity was significantly correlated to the creatinine content. No clear dependence of the activity on gender or age was observed in urine and serum.

  12. Non-tissue-like features in the time-of-flight distributions of plastic tissue phantoms.

    PubMed

    Nardo, Luca; Brega, Adriano; Bondani, Maria; Andreoni, Alessandra

    2008-05-01

    We measure high-temporal-resolution time-of-flight distributions of picosecond laser pulses in the visible and near-infrared, scattered in the forward direction by solid and liquid phantoms, and compare them to those obtained by using ex vivo tissues. We demonstrate that time-of-flight distributions from solid phantoms made of Delrin, Nylon, and Teflon are modulated by ripples that are absent in the biological samples and disappear when the temporal and/or angular resolution of the measuring apparatus is decreased. This behavior prevents the use of such materials as tissue phantoms when spatial mode and time selection are required, such as in imaging methods exploiting early arriving photons.

  13. Compartmental Targeting for mTHPC-Based Photodynamic Treatment In Vivo: Correlation of Efficiency, Pharmacokinetics, and Regional Distribution of Apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Garrier, Julie; Bressenot, Aude; Graefe, Susanna

    2010-10-01

    Purpose: The present study investigates the efficacy of compartmental targeting in xenografted tumors treated by meta-tetra(hydroxyphenyl)chlorin (mTHPC)-mediated photodynamic therapy (PDT). The therapeutic efficacy was, furthermore, related to a regional photoinduced distribution of apoptosis and an mTHPC biodistribution profile. Methods and Materials: Mice bearing EMT6 tumors were subjected to a single irradiation (10 J/cm{sup 2}) of red laser light (652 nm) at different intervals after a single- (0.3 mg/kg or 0.15 mg/kg) or double-intravenous (2 x 0.15 mg/kg) injection(s) of mTHPC. Efficiency of the treatment was evaluated by monitoring tumor regrowth. mTHPC pharmacokinetics were assessed by high-performance liquid chromatography analysis of excised organs. The regional distribution of apoptosis in tumor sections was investigated with a newly developed colabelling immunohistochemistry technique. Results: A fractionated double-injection protocol of mTHPC with 24-h and 3-h drug-light intervals (DLI) yielded 100% tumor cure, with tumors presenting a massive apoptosis of neoplastic cells along with a distortion of vessels. The best efficiency for a single injection (0.3 mg/kg) was about 54% tumor cure and corresponded to a DLI of 3 h. At this DLI, tumors showed apoptosis of endothelial cells in residual vessels. Concentrations of mTHPC observed in plasma and tumor for the fractionated injection were not statistically different and were less than the total drug dose in each compartment. Conclusions: The present work suggests that clinical PDT protocols with mTHPC could be greatly improved by fractionation of the drug administration. Time points should be chosen based on the intratumoral spatiotemporal drug distribution.

  14. Comparison of normal tissue pharmacokinetics with {sup 111}In/{sup 9}Y monoclonal antibody m170 for breast and prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Lehmann, Joerg; O'Donnell, Robert T.; Richman, Carol M. . E-mail: sjdenardo@ucdavis.edu

    2006-11-15

    Purpose: Radioactivity deposition in normal tissues limits the dose deliverable by radiopharmaceuticals (RP) in radioimmunotherapy (RIT). This study investigated the absorbed radiation dose in normal tissues for prostate cancer patients in comparison to breast cancer patients for 2 RPs using the monoclonal antibody (MAb) m170. Methods and Materials: {sup 111}In-DOTA-glycylglycylglycyl-L-p-isothiocyanatophenylalanine amide (GGGF)-m170 and {sup 111}In-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-N,N',N'',N'''-tetraacetic acid (DOTA) 2-iminothiolane (2IT)-m170, representing the same MAb and chelate with and without a cleavable linkage, were studied in 13 breast cancer and 26 prostate cancer patients. Dosimetry for {sup 9}Y was calculated using {sup 111}In MAb pharmacokinetics from the initial imaging study for each patient, using reference man- and patient-specific masses. Results: The reference man-specific radiation doses (cGy/MBq) were not significantly different for the breast and the prostate cancer patients for both RPs in all but one tissue-RP combination (liver, DOTA-2IT). The patient-specific doses had differences between the groups most of which can be related to weight differences. Conclusions: Similar normal tissue doses were calculated for two groups of patients having different cancers and genders. This similarity combined with continued careful analysis of the imaging data might allow the use of higher starting doses in early phase RIT studies.

  15. PhRMA CPCDC initiative on predictive models of human pharmacokinetics, part 2: comparative assessment of prediction methods of human volume of distribution.

    PubMed

    Jones, Rhys Do; Jones, Hannah M; Rowland, Malcolm; Gibson, Christopher R; Yates, James W T; Chien, Jenny Y; Ring, Barbara J; Adkison, Kimberly K; Ku, M Sherry; He, Handan; Vuppugalla, Ragini; Marathe, Punit; Fischer, Volker; Dutta, Sandeep; Sinha, Vikash K; Björnsson, Thorir; Lavé, Thierry; Poulin, Patrick

    2011-10-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the performance of various empirical, semimechanistic and mechanistic methodologies with and without protein binding corrections for the prediction of human volume of distribution at steady state (Vss ). PhRMA member companies contributed a set of blinded data from preclinical and clinical studies, and 18 drugs with intravenous clinical pharmacokinetics (PK) data were available for the analysis. In vivo and in vitro preclinical data were used to predict Vss by 24 different methods. Various statistical and outlier techniques were employed to assess the predictability of each method. There was not simply one method that predicts Vss accurately for all compounds. Across methods, the maximum success rate in predicting human Vss was 100%, 94%, and 78% of the compounds with predictions falling within tenfold, threefold, and twofold error, respectively, of the observed Vss . Generally, the methods that made use of in vivo preclinical data were more predictive than those methods that relied solely on in vitro data. However, for many compounds, in vivo data from only two species (generally rat and dog) were available and/or the required in vitro data were missing, which meant some methods could not be properly evaluated. It is recommended to initially use the in vitro tissue composition-based equations to predict Vss in preclinical species and humans, putting the assumptions and compound properties into context. As in vivo data become available, these predictions should be reassessed and rationalized to indicate the level of confidence (uncertainty) in the human Vss prediction. The top three methods that perform strongly at integrating in vivo data in this way were the Øie-Tozer, the rat -dog-human proportionality equation, and the lumped-PBPK approach. Overall, the scientific benefit of this study was to obtain greater characterization of predictions of human Vss from several methods available in the literature.

  16. Melatonin membrane receptors in peripheral tissues: Distribution and functions

    PubMed Central

    Slominski, Radomir M.; Reiter, Russel J.; Schlabritz-Loutsevitch, Natalia; Ostrom, Rennolds S.; Slominski, Andrzej T.

    2012-01-01

    Many of melatonin’s actions are mediated through interaction with the G-protein coupled membrane bound melatonin receptors type 1 and type 2 (MT1 and MT2, respectively) or, indirectly with nuclear orphan receptors from the RORα/RZR family. Melatonin also binds to the quinone reductase II enzyme, previously defined the MT3 receptor. Melatonin receptors are widely distributed in the body; herein we summarize their expression and actions in non-neural tissues. Several controversies still exist regarding, for example, whether melatonin binds the RORα/RZR family. Studies of the peripheral distribution of melatonin receptors are important since they are attractive targets for immunomodulation, regulation of endocrine, reproductive and cardiovascular functions, modulation of skin pigmentation, hair growth, cancerogenesis, and aging. Melatonin receptor agonists and antagonists have an exciting future since they could define multiple mechanisms by which melatonin modulates the complexity of such a wide variety of physiological and pathological processes. PMID:22245784

  17. Organophosphorus Insecticide Pharmacokinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Timchalk, Charles

    2010-01-01

    This chapter highlights a number of current and future applications of pharmacokinetics to assess organophosphate (OP) insecticide dosimetry, biological response and risk in humans exposed to these agents. Organophosphates represent a large family of pesticides where insecticidal as well as toxicological mode of action is associated with their ability to target and inhibit acetylcholinesterase (AChE). Pharmacokinetics entails the quantitative integration of physiological and metabolic processes associated with the absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion (ADME) of drugs and xenobiotics. Pharmacokinetic studies provide important data on the amount of toxicant delivered to a target site as well as species-, age-, gender-specific and dose-dependent differences in biological response. These studies have been conducted with organophosphorus insecticides in multiple species, at various dose levels, and across different routes of exposure to understand their in vivo pharmacokinetics and how they contribute to the observed toxicological response. To access human exposure to organophosphorus insecticides, human pharmacokinetic studies have been conducted and used to develop biological monitoring strategies based on the quantitation of key metabolites in biological fluids. Pharmacokinetic studies with these insecticides are also useful to facilitate extrapolation of dosimetry and biological response from animals to humans and for the assessment of human health risk. In this regard, physiologically based pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic (PBPK/PD) models are being utilized to assess risk and understand the toxicological implications of known or suspected exposures to various insecticides. In this chapter a number of examples are presented that illustrate the utility and limitation of pharmacokinetic studies to address human health concerns associated with organophosphorus insecticides.

  18. Studies of nontarget-mediated distribution of human full-length IgG1 antibody and its FAb fragment in cardiovascular and metabolic-related tissues.

    PubMed

    Davidsson, Pia; Söderling, Ann-Sofi; Svensson, Lena; Ahnmark, Andrea; Flodin, Christine; Wanag, Ewa; Screpanti-Sundqvist, Valentina; Gennemark, Peter

    2015-05-01

    Tissue distribution and pharmacokinetics (PK) of full-length nontargeted antibody and its antigen-binding fragment (FAb) were evaluated for a range of tissues primarily of interest for cardiovascular and metabolic diseases. Mice were intravenously injected with a dose of 10 mg/kg of either human IgG1or its FAb fragment; perfused tissues were collected at a range of time points over 3 weeks for the human IgG1 antibody and 1 week for the human FAb antibody. Tissues were homogenized and antibody concentrations were measured by specific immunoassays on the Gyros system. Exposure in terms of maximum concentration (Cmax ) and area under the curve was assessed for all nine tissues. Tissue exposure of full-length antibody relative to plasma exposure was found to be between 1% and 10%, except for brain (0.2%). Relative concentrations of FAb antibody were the same, except for kidney tissue, where the antibody concentration was found to be ten times higher than in plasma. However, the absolute tissue uptake of full-length IgG was significantly higher than the absolute tissue uptake of the FAb antibody. This study provides a reference PK state for full-length whole and FAb antibodies in tissues related to cardiovascular and metabolic diseases that do not include antigen or antibody binding.

  19. Distribution and pharmacokinetics of methamphetamine in the human body: clinical implications

    SciTech Connect

    Volkow, N.D.; Fowler, J.; Volkow, N.D.; Fowler, J.S.; Wang, G.-J.; Shumay, E.; Telang, F.; Thanos, P.; Alexoff, D.

    2010-12-01

    Methamphetamine is one of the most toxic of the drugs of abuse, which may reflect its distribution and accumulation in the body. However no studies have measured methamphetamine's organ distribution in the human body. Positron Emission Tomography (PET) was used in conjunction with [{sup 11}C]d-methamphetamine to measure its whole-body distribution and bioavailability as assessed by peak uptake (% Dose/cc), rate of clearance (time to reach 50% peak-clearance) and accumulation (area under the curve) in healthy participants (9 Caucasians and 10 African Americans). Methamphetamine distributed through most organs. Highest uptake (whole organ) occurred in lungs (22% Dose; weight {approx}1246 g), liver (23%; weight {approx}1677 g) and intermediate in brain (10%; weight {approx}1600 g). Kidneys also showed high uptake (per/cc basis) (7%; weight 305 g). Methamphetamine's clearance was fastest in heart and lungs (7-16 minutes), slowest in brain, liver and stomach (>75 minutes), and intermediate in kidneys, spleen and pancreas (22-50 minutes). Lung accumulation of [{sup 11}C]d-methamphetamine was 30% higher for African Americans than Caucasians (p < 0.05) but did not differ in other organs. The high accumulation of methamphetamine, a potent stimulant drug, in most body organs is likely to contribute to the medical complications associated with methamphetamine abuse. In particular, we speculate that methamphetamine's high pulmonary uptake could render this organ vulnerable to infections (tuberculosis) and pathology (pulmonary hypertension). Our preliminary findings of a higher lung accumulation of methamphetamine in African Americans than Caucasians merits further investigation and questions whether it could contribute to the infrequent use of methamphetamine among African Americans.

  20. Laser induced heat source distribution in bio-tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaoxia; Fan, Shifu; Zhao, Youquan

    2006-09-01

    During numerical simulation of laser and tissue thermal interaction, the light fluence rate distribution should be formularized and constituted to the source term in the heat transfer equation. Usually the solution of light irradiative transport equation is given in extreme conditions such as full absorption (Lambert-Beer Law), full scattering (Lubelka-Munk theory), most scattering (Diffusion Approximation) et al. But in specific conditions, these solutions will induce different errors. The usually used Monte Carlo simulation (MCS) is more universal and exact but has difficulty to deal with dynamic parameter and fast simulation. Its area partition pattern has limits when applying FEM (finite element method) to solve the bio-heat transfer partial differential coefficient equation. Laser heat source plots of above methods showed much difference with MCS. In order to solve this problem, through analyzing different optical actions such as reflection, scattering and absorption on the laser induced heat generation in bio-tissue, a new attempt was made out which combined the modified beam broaden model and the diffusion approximation model. First the scattering coefficient was replaced by reduced scattering coefficient in the beam broaden model, which is more reasonable when scattering was treated as anisotropic scattering. Secondly the attenuation coefficient was replaced by effective attenuation coefficient in scattering dominating turbid bio-tissue. The computation results of the modified method were compared with Monte Carlo simulation and showed the model provided reasonable predictions of heat source term distribution than past methods. Such a research is useful for explaining the physical characteristics of heat source in the heat transfer equation, establishing effective photo-thermal model, and providing theory contrast for related laser medicine experiments.

  1. Differential bioavailability, clearance, and tissue distribution of the acyclic tomato carotenoids lycopene and phytoene in mongolian gerbils.

    PubMed

    Moran, Nancy Engelmann; Clinton, Steven K; Erdman, John W

    2013-12-01

    Lycopene (LYC) is the major tomato carotenoid and is the focus of substantial research. Phytoene (PE), a minor tomato carotenoid, is found in human blood and tissues in similar concentrations to LYC. To determine which metabolic differences underlie this phenomenon, Mongolian gerbils (Meriones unguiculatus, n = 56) were fed control or tomato powder (TP)-containing diets (to establish steady-state serum and tissue carotenoid concentrations similar to tomato-fed humans) for 26 d. The TP-fed gerbils were then provided either a single, oral, cottonseed oil (CO) vehicle dose and tissues were collected at 6 h or they were provided unlabeled PE or LYC in CO and tissues were evaluated at 6, 12, or 24 h. In vehicle-dosed, TP-fed gerbils, LYC was the major carotenoid (≥ 55% carotenoids) in liver, spleen, testes, and the prostate-seminal vesicle complex, whereas PE was the major serum and adipose carotenoid (≥ 37% total carotenoid) and phytofluene was the major carotenoid (≥ 38%) in adrenals and lungs. PE dosing increased hepatic, splenic, and serum PE concentrations compared with vehicle dosing (P < 0.05) from 6 to 24 h, whereas LYC dosing increased only serum LYC at 6 and 12 h (P < 0.05) compared with vehicle dosing. This suggested PE was more bioavailable and cleared more slowly than LYC. To precisely track absorptive and distributive differences, (14)C-PE or (14)C-LYC (n = 2/group) was provided to TP-fed gerbils. Bioavailability assessed by carcass (14)C-content was 23% for PE and 8% for LYC. Nearly every extra-hepatic tissue accumulated greater dose radioactivity after (14)C-PE than (14)C-LYC dosing. Thus, LYC and PE, which structurally differ only by saturation, pharmacokinetically differ in bioavailability, tissue deposition, and clearance. PMID:24108134

  2. Distribution of opiate alkaloids in brain tissue of experimental animals

    PubMed Central

    Pilija, Vladimir; Mimica-Dukic, Neda; Budakov, Branislav; Cvjeticanin, Stanko

    2012-01-01

    The present study examined regional distribution of opiate alkaloids from seized heroin in brain regions of experimental animals in order to select parts with the highest content of opiates. Their analysis should contribute to resolve causes of death due to heroin intake. The tests were performed at different time periods (5, 15, 45 and 120 min) after male and female Wistar rats were treated with seized heroin. Opiate alkaloids (codeine, morphine, acetylcodeine, 6-acetylmorphine and 3,6-diacetylmorphine) were quantitatively determined in brain regions known for their high concentration of µ-opiate receptors: cortex, brainstem, amygdala and basal ganglia, by using gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC–MS). The highest content of opiate alkaloids in the brain tissue of female animals was found 15 min and in male animals 45 min after treatment. The highest content of opiates was determined in the basal ganglia of the animals of both genders, indicating that this part of brain tissue presents a reliable sample for identifying and assessing contents of opiates after heroin intake. PMID:23554560

  3. A mathematical model of temperature distribution in frozen tissue.

    PubMed

    Poledna, J; Berger, W

    1996-02-01

    A computer simulation for a frozen region expansion around a cryoprobe in liver tissue is presented and compared with experimental measurements in liver tissue. Both the analytical solution under simplifying assumptions and the numerical solution of the heat equation were tested. No analytical solution is possible when studying the freezing process in the time scope of minutes. The problem is that the solution needs spherical coordinate transformation, which is singular in the origin. For the frozen region, the analytical solution is not constrained, and conclusions are unrealistic. Neither does it account for the cryoprobe diameter. The numeric solution to the same problem is much more informative. It adopts the natural boundary conditions that are the constant temperatures of both the cooling medium and the bath. Comparisons between the numerical solution and experimental measurements show good approximation of the problem by the model of temperature distribution in a homogeneous medium which freezes around a cryoprobe. Differences were smaller than the apparent measurement errors. Our approach allows relevant results to be obtained within the time period available during the surgery.

  4. Localized bacterial infection in a distributed model for tissue inflammation.

    PubMed

    Lauffenburger, D A; Kennedy, C R

    1983-01-01

    Phagocyte motility and chemotaxis are included in a distributed mathematical model for the inflammatory response to bacterial invasion of tissue. Both uniform and non-uniform steady state solutions may occur for the model equations governing bacteria and phagocyte densities in a macroscopic tissue region. The non-uniform states appear to be more dangerous because they allow large bacteria densities concentrated in local foci, and in some cases greater total bacteria and phagocyte populations. Using a linear stability analysis, it is shown that a phagocyte chemotactic response smaller than a critical value can lead to a non-uniform state, while a chemotactic response greater than this critical value stabilizes the uniform state. This result is the opposite of that found for the role of chemotaxis in aggregation of slimemold amoebae because, in the inflammatory response, the chemotactic population serves as an inhibitor rather than an activator. We speculate that these non-uniform steady states could be related to the localized cell aggregation seen in chronic granulomatous inflammation. The formation of non-uniform states is not necessarily a consequence of defective phagocyte chemotaxis, however. Rather, certain values of the kinetic parameters can yield values for the critical chemotactic response which are greater than the normal response. Numerical computations of the transient inflammatory response to bacterial challenge are presented, using parameter values estimated from the experimental literature wherever possible. PMID:6827185

  5. Human subcutaneous tissue distribution of fluconazole: comparison of microdialysis and suction blister techniques

    PubMed Central

    Sasongko, Lucy; Williams, Kenneth M; Day, Richard O; McLachlan, Andrew J

    2003-01-01

    Aims To investigate uptake of fluconazole into the interstitial fluid of human subcutaneous tissue using the microdialysis and suction blister techniques. Methods A sterile microdialysis probe (CMA/60) was inserted subcutaneously into the upper arm of five healthy volunteers following an overnight fast. Blisters were induced on the lower arm using gentle suction prior to ingestion of a single oral dose of fluconazole (200 mg). Microdialysate, blister fluid and blood were sampled over 8 h. Fluconazole concentrations were determined in each sample using a validated HPLC assay. In vivo recovery of fluconazole from the microdialysis probe was determined in each subject by perfusing the probe with fluconazole solution at the end of the 8 h sampling period. Individual in vivo recovery was used to calculate fluconazole concentrations in subcutaneous interstitial fluid. A physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model was used to predict fluconazole concentrations in human subcutaneous interstitial fluid. Results There was a lag-time (approximately 0.5 h) between detection of fluconazole in microdialysate compared with plasma in each subject. The in vivo recovery of fluconazole from the microdialysis probe ranged from 57.0 to 67.2%. The subcutaneous interstitial fluid concentrations obtained by microdialysis were very similar to the unbound concentrations of fluconazole in plasma with maximum concentration of 4.29 ± 1.19 µg ml−1 in subcutaneous interstitial fluid and 3.58 ± 0.14 µg ml−1 in plasma. Subcutaneous interstitial fluid-to-plasma partition coefficient (Kp) of fluconazole was 1.16 ± 0.22 (95% CI 0.96, 1.35). By contrast, fluconazole concentrations in blister fluid were significantly lower (P < 0.05, paired t-test) than unbound plasma concentrations over the first 3 h and maximum concentrations in blister fluid had not been achieved at the end of the sampling period. There was good agreement between fluconazole concentrations derived from microdialysis

  6. The tissue distribution of lipoprotein lipase determines where chylomicrons bind.

    PubMed

    Savonen, Roger; Hiden, Michaela; Hultin, Magnus; Zechner, Rudolf; Levak-Frank, Sanja; Olivecrona, Gunilla; Olivecrona, Thomas

    2015-03-01

    To determine the role of LPL for binding of lipoproteins to the vascular endothelium, and for the distribution of lipids from lipoproteins, four lines of induced mutant mice were used. Rat chylomicrons labeled in vivo with [(14)C]oleic acid (primarily in TGs, providing a tracer for lipolysis) and [(3)H]retinol (primarily in ester form, providing a tracer for the core lipids) were injected. TG label was cleared more rapidly than core label. There were no differences between the mouse lines in the rate at which core label was cleared. Two minutes after injection, about 5% of the core label, and hence chylomicron particles, were in the heart of WT mice. In mice that expressed LPL only in skeletal muscle, and had much reduced levels of LPL in the heart, binding of chylomicrons was reduced to 1%, whereas in mice that expressed LPL only in the heart, the binding was increased to over 10%. The same patterns of distribution were evident at 20 min when most of the label had been cleared. Thus, the amount of LPL expressed in muscle and heart governed both the binding of chylomicron particles and the assimilation of chylomicron lipids in the tissue. PMID:25589507

  7. Pharmacokinetic analysis of the uptake of liposomes by macrophages and foam cells in vitro and their distribution to atherosclerotic lesions in mice.

    PubMed

    Chono, Sumio; Tauchi, Yoshihiko; Morimoto, Kazuhiro

    2006-02-01

    In order to evaluate the efficacy of liposomes as a drug carrier for atherosclerotic therapy, a pharmacokinetic analysis of the uptake of liposomes by macrophages and foam cells in vitro and their distribution to atherosclerotic lesions in mice was carried out. In brief, liposomes of three particle sizes (500, 200 and 70 nm) were prepared, and the uptake of liposomes by these cells in vitro and the aortic distribution following intravenous administration to atherogenic mice were examined. The internalization rate constant calculated by measuring uptake and binding was size-dependent in both types of cells in vitro. The aortic clearance (CL(a)) was size-independent in atherogenic mice and the CL(a) of 200 nm particles was the highest. Surprisingly, the aortic distribution in vivo did not correspond with the internalization to macrophages and foam cells in vitro. These results suggest that there is an optimal size for the distribution of liposomes to atherosclerotic lesions.

  8. Simultaneous determination of nintedanib and its metabolite BIBF 1202 in different tissues of mice by UPLC-MS/MS and its application in drug tissue distribution study.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiao-wei; Su, Xin-juan; Zhang, Yu-niao; Zheng, Xiao-kang; Lv, Peng-fei; Hu, Jie

    2015-10-01

    A sensitive and rapid ultra performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS) method was developed to simultaneous determine nintedanib and BIBF 1202 in mice plasma and tissue using carbamazepine as the internal standard (IS). Sample preparation was accomplished through a protein precipitation procedure with acetonitrile. The analyte and IS were separated on an Acquity UPLC BEH C18 column (2.1mm×50mm, 1.7μm) with the mobile phase of acetonitrile and 0.1% formic acid in water with gradient elution at a flow rate of 0.40mL/min. The detection was performed on a triple quadrupole tandem mass spectrometer equipped with electrospray ionization (ESI) by multiple reactions monitoring (MRM) of the transitions at m/z 540.3→113.1 for nintedanib, m/z 526.3→113.1 for BIBF 1202 and m/z 237.1→194.1 for IS, respectively. The linearity of this method was found to be within the concentration range of 1-1000ng/mL with a lower limit of quantification of 1.0ng/mL for each drug. Only 3.0min was needed for an analytical run. The inter-day and intra-day precision and accuracy of quality control (QC) samples, evaluated both in plasma and tissue homogenates, were all within 15%. The method was successfully applied to the pharmacokinetic and tissue distribution study of nintedanib and BIBF 1202 in mice after oral administration of nintedanib.

  9. The influence of cardiovascular physiology on dose/pharmacokinetic and pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic relationships.

    PubMed

    Fagiolino, Pietro; Eiraldi, Rosa; Vázquez, Marta

    2006-01-01

    Inter- and intraindividual variability in the relationship between dose and clinical--or pharmacodynamic--response of a drug can be analysed in two steps: firstly, by considering the plasma pharmacokinetic response to a given dose and, secondly, by the connection between both pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic responses. As the cardiovascular system is the means of transport of endogenous and exogenous substances, blood flow fraction destined to each organ determines the relative mass of solute in plasma, which is constantly in contact with the tissue. Hence, not only the rate but also the extent of drug transfer would be increased when tissues are irrigated by a higher fraction of cardiac output. Aging and circadian rhythms present similar cardiac output distribution patterns when moving from young to aged adult and from nocturnal to diurnal hours. These two changes lead to an increased blood flow delivery to the extra-splanchnic-renal region in the elderly and in the morning, but with a decreased cardiac output in aged individuals and an increased one during the day. This scenario allows us to forecast substance concentrations outside the blood vessels, which are responsible for the extent of drug elimination and the intensity of drug effect. So available data on disposition and pharmacodynamics of drugs might be explained from another point of view that challenges current knowledge. Furthermore, the administration of cardiovascular active drugs might reverse the chronological sequence between pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic responses, since they could modify blood flow distribution.

  10. Effect of cyclosporine and rifampin on the pharmacokinetics of macitentan, a tissue-targeting dual endothelin receptor antagonist.

    PubMed

    Bruderer, Shirin; Aänismaa, Päivi; Homery, Marie-Claude; Häusler, Stephanie; Landskroner, Kyle; Sidharta, Patricia N; Treiber, Alexander; Dingemanse, Jasper

    2012-03-01

    Macitentan is a dual endothelin receptor antagonist under phase 3 investigation in pulmonary arterial hypertension. We investigated the effect of cyclosporine (Cs) and rifampin on the pharmacokinetics of macitentan and its metabolites ACT-132577 and ACT-373898 in healthy male subjects. In addition, in vitro studies were performed to investigate interactions between macitentan and its active metabolite ACT-132577 with human organic anion-transporting polypeptides (OATPs). The clinical study (AC-055-111) was conducted as a two-part, one-sequence, crossover study. Ten subjects in each part received multiple-dose macitentan followed by multiple-dose co-administration of Cs (part A) or rifampin (part B). In the presence of Cs, steady-state area under the plasma concentration-time profiles during a dose interval (AUC(τ)) for macitentan and ACT-373898 increased 10% and 7%, respectively, and decreased 3% for ACT-132577. Steady-state AUC(τ) of macitentan and ACT-373898 in the presence of rifampin decreased 79% and 64%, respectively. For ACT-132577, no relevant difference in AUC(τ) between the two treatments was observed. Macitentan co-administered with Cs or rifampin was well tolerated. The complementary in vitro studies demonstrated no marked differences in uptake rates of macitentan and ACT-132577 between the wild-type and OATP over-expressing cells over the concentration range tested. Concomitant treatment with Cs did not have any clinically relevant effect on the exposure to macitentan or its metabolites, at steady-state. Concomitant treatment with rifampin reduced significantly the exposure to macitentan and its metabolite ACT-373898 at steady-state but did not affect the exposure to the active metabolite ACT-132577 to a clinically relevant extent.

  11. Obesity Alters Adipose Tissue Macrophage Iron Content and Tissue Iron Distribution

    PubMed Central

    Orr, Jeb S.; Kennedy, Arion; Anderson-Baucum, Emily K.; Webb, Corey D.; Fordahl, Steve C.; Erikson, Keith M.; Zhang, Yaofang; Etzerodt, Anders; Moestrup, Søren K.; Hasty, Alyssa H.

    2014-01-01

    Adipose tissue (AT) expansion is accompanied by the infiltration and accumulation of AT macrophages (ATMs), as well as a shift in ATM polarization. Several studies have implicated recruited M1 ATMs in the metabolic consequences of obesity; however, little is known regarding the role of alternatively activated resident M2 ATMs in AT homeostasis or how their function is altered in obesity. Herein, we report the discovery of a population of alternatively activated ATMs with elevated cellular iron content and an iron-recycling gene expression profile. These iron-rich ATMs are referred to as MFehi, and the remaining ATMs are referred to as MFelo. In lean mice, ~25% of the ATMs are MFehi; this percentage decreases in obesity owing to the recruitment of MFelo macrophages. Similar to MFelo cells, MFehi ATMs undergo an inflammatory shift in obesity. In vivo, obesity reduces the iron content of MFehi ATMs and the gene expression of iron importers as well as the iron exporter, ferroportin, suggesting an impaired ability to handle iron. In vitro, exposure of primary peritoneal macrophages to saturated fatty acids also alters iron metabolism gene expression. Finally, the impaired MFehi iron handling coincides with adipocyte iron overload in obese mice. In conclusion, in obesity, iron distribution is altered both at the cellular and tissue levels, with AT playing a predominant role in this change. An increased availability of fatty acids during obesity may contribute to the observed changes in MFehi ATM phenotype and their reduced capacity to handle iron. PMID:24130337

  12. Rapid, sensitive and selective HPLC-MS/MS method for the quantification of topically applied besifloxacin in rabbit plasma and ocular tissues: Application to a pharmacokinetic study.

    PubMed

    Gu, Xiao-Fei; Mao, Bai-Yang; Xia, Min; Yang, Yang; Zhang, Jia-Li; Yang, Da-Song; Wu, Wei-Xin; Du, Ying-Xiang; Di, Bin; Su, Meng-Xiang

    2016-01-01

    Besifloxacin is a fourth-generation broad-spectrum fluoroquinolone registered for the topical treatment of bacterial conjunctivitis. In this study, a rapid, sensitive and selective liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method was developed for quantification of besifloxacin in rabbit plasma and ocular tissues using nateglinide as the internal standard (IS). The analyte and IS were separated on a Sepax GP-Phenyl column by isocratic elution with methanol-acetonitrile-5 mM ammonium formate-formic acid (29:55:16:0.1, v/v/v/v) as the mobile phase at a flow rate of 1.2 mL/min, and the total run time was 3.0 min. An electrospray ionization (ESI) source was applied and operated in the positive ion mode; multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mode was used for quantification, and the monitored transitions were 394.2→377.1 for besifloxacin and m/z 318.3→166.1 for the IS. The calibration curve was linear over the range of 0.103-206 ng/mL for plasma and 2.06-2060 ng/mL for tears, aqueous humor, conjunctiva and cornea with correlation coefficient (r) greater than 0.99. The lower limit of quantification (LLOQ) for besifloxacin was 0.103 ng/mL for plasma and 2.06 ng/mL for other ocular tissues with good accuracy and precision. Intra- and inter-batch precision were both lower than 15% and accuracy ranged from 85% to 115% at all QC levels. The method was successfully applied to the pharmacokinetic study of besifloxacin in rabbit plasma and ocular tissues after single and multiple topical administrations. PMID:26340560

  13. Tissue distribution of lidocaine in critical care patients after intubation.

    PubMed

    Moriya, Fumio; Hashimoto, Yoshiaki

    2003-11-26

    We investigated tissue distribution of lidocaine in 33 patients after endotracheal intubation with Xylocaine jelly that contains 2% lidocaine hydrochloride. Blood levels of monoethylglycinexylidide (MEGX), an active metabolite of lidocaine, were also determined. Five patients (Group A) were alive on arrival and six patients (Group B) resumed heartbeats after cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). The survival times for Groups A and B ranged from 3 to 72 h. The remaining 22 patients (Group C) did not survive cardiopulmonary arrest on arrival (CPAOA). Systemic distribution of lidocaine was measured in nine patients from Group C. The liver-to-kidney lidocaine ratios and cerebrum-to-cerebrospinal fluid lidocaine ratios were: Group A, 0.1-0.7 and 1.4-3.6, respectively; Group B, 0.2-0.8 and 1.2-2.3, respectively; Group C, 0.1-17 and 0.2-1.0, respectively. MEGX was detected in all blood samples from Group A and only two samples from Group B. No MEGX was detected in samples from Group C. Our results indicate that the absorption of tracheal lidocaine during natural circulation results in a cerebrum-to-cerebrospinal fluid lidocaine ratio of 1.2 or more, whereas absorption during artificial circulation by cardiac massage gives a ratio of 1.0 or less. The cerebrum-to-cerebrospinal fluid lidocaine ratio may be a more useful index to estimate circulatory dynamics of patients during CPR than the liver-to-kidney lidocaine ratio. MEGX was not a useful parameter for monitoring circulatory changes during cardiac massage.

  14. Ovarian phagocyte subsets and their distinct tissue distribution patterns.

    PubMed

    Carlock, Colin; Wu, Jean; Zhou, Cindy; Ross, April; Adams, Henry; Lou, Yahuan

    2013-01-01

    Ovarian macrophages, which play critical roles in various ovarian events, are probably derived from multiple lineages. Thus, a systemic classification of their subsets is a necessary first step for determination of their functions. Utilizing antibodies to five phagocyte markers, i.e. IA/IE (major histocompatibility complex class II), F4/80, CD11b (Mac-1), CD11c, and CD68, this study investigated subsets of ovarian phagocytes in mice. Three-color immunofluorescence and flow cytometry, together with morphological observation on isolated ovarian cells, demonstrated complicated phenotypes of ovarian phagocytes. Four macrophage and one dendritic cell subset, in addition to many minor phagocyte subsets, were identified. A dendritic cell-like population with a unique phenotype of CD11c(high)IA/IE⁻F4/80⁻ was also frequently observed. A preliminary age-dependent study showed dramatic increases in IA/IE⁺ macrophages and IA/IE⁺ dendritic cells after puberty. Furthermore, immunofluorescences on ovarian sections showed that each subset displayed a distinct tissue distribution pattern. The pattern for each subset may hint to their role in an ovarian function. In addition, partial isolation of ovarian macrophage subset using CD11b antibodies was attempted. Establishment of this isolation method may have provided us a tool for more precise investigation of each subset's functions at the cellular and molecular levels.

  15. Pharmacokinetic drivers of toxicity for basic molecules: Strategy to lower pKa results in decreased tissue exposure and toxicity for a small molecule Met inhibitor

    SciTech Connect

    Diaz, Dolores; Ford, Kevin A.; Hartley, Dylan P.; Harstad, Eric B.; Cain, Gary R.; Achilles-Poon, Kirsten; Nguyen, Trung; Peng, Jing; Zheng, Zhong; Merchant, Mark; Sutherlin, Daniel P.; Gaudino, John J.; Kaus, Robert; Lewin-Koh, Sock C.; Choo, Edna F.; Liederer, Bianca M.; Dambach, Donna M.

    2013-01-01

    Several toxicities are clearly driven by free drug concentrations in plasma, such as toxicities related to on-target exaggerated pharmacology or off-target pharmacological activity associated with receptors, enzymes or ion channels. However, there are examples in which organ toxicities appear to correlate better with total drug concentrations in the target tissues, rather than with free drug concentrations in plasma. Here we present a case study in which a small molecule Met inhibitor, GEN-203, with significant liver and bone marrow toxicity in preclinical species was modified with the intention of increasing the safety margin. GEN-203 is a lipophilic weak base as demonstrated by its physicochemical and structural properties: high LogD (distribution coefficient) (4.3) and high measured pKa (7.45) due to the basic amine (N-ethyl-3-fluoro-4-aminopiperidine). The physicochemical properties of GEN-203 were hypothesized to drive the high distribution of this compound to tissues as evidenced by a moderately-high volume of distribution (Vd > 3 l/kg) in mouse and subsequent toxicities of the compound. Specifically, the basicity of GEN-203 was decreased through addition of a second fluorine in the 3-position of the aminopiperidine to yield GEN-890 (N-ethyl-3,3-difluoro-4-aminopiperidine), which decreased the volume of distribution of the compound in mouse (Vd = 1.0 l/kg), decreased its tissue drug concentrations and led to decreased toxicity in mice. This strategy suggests that when toxicity is driven by tissue drug concentrations, optimization of the physicochemical parameters that drive tissue distribution can result in decreased drug concentrations in tissues, resulting in lower toxicity and improved safety margins. -- Highlights: ► Lower pKa for a small molecule: reduced tissue drug levels and toxicity. ► New analysis tools to assess electrostatic effects and ionization are presented. ► Chemical and PK drivers of toxicity can be leveraged to improve safety.

  16. Nanodrugs: pharmacokinetics and safety

    PubMed Central

    Onoue, Satomi; Yamada, Shizuo; Chan, Hak-Kim

    2014-01-01

    To date, various nanodrug systems have been developed for different routes of administration, which include dendrimers, nanocrystals, emulsions, liposomes, solid lipid nanoparticles, micelles, and polymeric nanoparticles. Nanodrug systems have been employed to improve the efficacy, safety, physicochemical properties, and pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic profile of pharmaceutical substances. In particular, functionalized nanodrug systems can offer enhanced bioavailability of orally taken drugs, prolonged half-life of injected drugs (by reducing immunogenicity), and targeted delivery to specific tissues. Thus, nanodrug systems might lower the frequency of administration while providing maximized pharmacological effects and minimized systemic side effects, possibly leading to better therapeutic compliance and clinical outcomes. In spite of these attractive pharmacokinetic advantages, recent attention has been drawn to the toxic potential of nanodrugs since they often exhibit in vitro and in vivo cytotoxicity, oxidative stress, inflammation, and genotoxicity. A better understanding of the pharmacokinetic and safety characteristics of nanodrugs and the limitations of each delivery option is necessary for the further development of efficacious nanodrugs with high therapeutic potential and a wide safety margin. This review highlights the recent progress in nanodrug system development, with a focus on the pharmacokinetic advantages and safety challenges. PMID:24591825

  17. Obesity alters adipose tissue macrophage iron content and tissue iron distribution.

    PubMed

    Orr, Jeb S; Kennedy, Arion; Anderson-Baucum, Emily K; Webb, Corey D; Fordahl, Steve C; Erikson, Keith M; Zhang, Yaofang; Etzerodt, Anders; Moestrup, Søren K; Hasty, Alyssa H

    2014-02-01

    Adipose tissue (AT) expansion is accompanied by the infiltration and accumulation of AT macrophages (ATMs), as well as a shift in ATM polarization. Several studies have implicated recruited M1 ATMs in the metabolic consequences of obesity; however, little is known regarding the role of alternatively activated resident M2 ATMs in AT homeostasis or how their function is altered in obesity. Herein, we report the discovery of a population of alternatively activated ATMs with elevated cellular iron content and an iron-recycling gene expression profile. These iron-rich ATMs are referred to as MFe(hi), and the remaining ATMs are referred to as MFe(lo). In lean mice, ~25% of the ATMs are MFe(hi); this percentage decreases in obesity owing to the recruitment of MFe(lo) macrophages. Similar to MFe(lo) cells, MFe(hi) ATMs undergo an inflammatory shift in obesity. In vivo, obesity reduces the iron content of MFe(hi) ATMs and the gene expression of iron importers as well as the iron exporter, ferroportin, suggesting an impaired ability to handle iron. In vitro, exposure of primary peritoneal macrophages to saturated fatty acids also alters iron metabolism gene expression. Finally, the impaired MFe(hi) iron handling coincides with adipocyte iron overload in obese mice. In conclusion, in obesity, iron distribution is altered both at the cellular and tissue levels, with AT playing a predominant role in this change. An increased availability of fatty acids during obesity may contribute to the observed changes in MFe(hi) ATM phenotype and their reduced capacity to handle iron.

  18. Tetrasaccharide iteration synthesis of a heparin-like dodecasaccharide and radiolabelling for in vivo tissue distribution studies

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Steen U.; Miller, Gavin J.; Cole, Claire; Rushton, Graham; Avizienyte, Egle; Jayson, Gordon C.; Gardiner, John M.

    2013-01-01

    Heparin-like oligosaccharides mediate numerous important biological interactions, of which many are implicated in various diseases. Synthetic improvements are central to the development of such oligosaccharides as therapeutics and, in addition, there are no methods to elucidate the pharmacokinetics of structurally defined heparin-like oligosaccharides. Here we report an efficient two-cycle [4+4+4] tetrasaccharide-iteration-based approach for rapid chemical synthesis of a structurally defined heparin-related dodecasaccharide, combined with the incorporation of a latent aldehyde tag, unmasked in the final step of chemical synthesis, providing a generic end group for labelling/conjugation. We exploit this latent aldehyde tag for 3H radiolabelling to provide the first example of this kind of agent for monitoring in vivo tissue distribution and in vivo stability of a biologically active, structurally defined heparin related dodecasaccharide. Such studies are critical for the development of related saccharide therapeutics, and the data here establish that a biologically active, synthetic, heparin-like dodecasaccharide provides good organ distribution, and serum lifetimes relevant to developing future oligosaccharide therapeutics. PMID:23828390

  19. Metabolism of 2,6-dichloro-4-(3,3-dichloroallyloxy)phenyl 3-[5-(trifluoromethyl)-2-pyridyloxy]propyl ether (pyridalyl) in rats after repeated oral administration and a simple physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling in brown and white adipose tissues.

    PubMed

    Nagahori, Hirohisa; Matsunaga, Haruyuki; Tomigahara, Yoshitaka; Isobe, Naohiko; Kaneko, Hideo

    2010-05-01

    Male and female Sprague-Dawley rats received repeated oral administration of 14C-2,6-dichloro-4-(3,3-dichloroallyloxy)phenyl 3- [5-(trifluoromethyl)-2-pyridyloxy]propyl ether (14C-pyridalyl) at 5 mg/kg/day for 14 consecutive days, and 14C excretion, 14C concentration in tissues, and the metabolic fate were determined. Most 14C was excreted into feces. The 14C concentrations in the blood and tissues attained steady-state levels at days 6 to 10, whereas those in white adipose tissues increased until day 14. Tissue 14C concentrations were highest in brown and white adipose tissue (38.37-57.50 ppm) but were 5.60 ppm or less in all the other tissues. Total 14C residues in blood and tissues on the 27th day after the first administration accounted for 2.6 to 3.2% of the total dose. A major fecal metabolite resulted from O-dealkylation. Analysis of metabolites in tissues revealed that the majority of 14C in perirenal adipose tissue and lungs was pyridalyl, accounting for greater than 90 and 60%, respectively, of the total, whereas a major metabolite in whole blood, kidneys, and liver was a dehalogenated metabolite. The experimental data were simulated with simple physiologically based pharmacokinetics using four-compartment models with assumption of lymphatic absorption and membrane permeability in adipose tissues. The different kinetics in brown and white adipose tissues was reasonably predicted in this model, with large distribution volume in adipose tissues and high hepatic clearance in liver. Sex-related difference of pyridalyl concentration in liver was considered to be a result of different unbound fraction times the hepatic intrinsic clearance (f x CL(int)) of 1.8 and 12 l/h for male and female, respectively. PMID:20164113

  20. Dose dependent pharmacokinetics of naproxen in man.

    PubMed

    Niazi, S K; Alam, S M; Ahmad, S I

    1996-05-01

    The pharmacokinetics of one of the most widely used non-steroidal antiinflammatory drugs, naproxen, were studied in 28 healthy human volunteers at the two most commonly used dose levels, viz., 250 mg and 500 mg, in a cross-over design. The plasma levels of naproxen were analysed by a modified high-pressure liquid chromatography method. The plasma concentrations at higher doses were not proportional to dose, indicating a non-linearity in the pharmacokinetics at the dose levels studied; this finding is new since earlier studies had studied only higher doses and assumed that at lower doses the pharmacokinetics would be linear. There was, however, no significant difference in the elimination half-life (rate constant), time to reach peak concentration (Cmax), mean residence time (MRT), or area under first moment curve (AUMC). The clearance and distribution volume of naproxen were substantially increased at higher dose resulting in statistically lower proportional concentration and the total area under the curve (AUC). These observations are explained on the basis of a change in the plasma protein binding resulting in more free naproxen available for quicker clearance and wider penetration into tissues. These findings have several important clinical implications for the long-term use of naproxen as an antiarthritic drug. It is proposed that the clinical efficacy of naproxen can be increased and side-effects reduced by giving it in small divided doses instead of large doses.

  1. Population pharmacokinetic modelling of non-linear brain distribution of morphine: influence of active saturable influx and P-glycoprotein mediated efflux

    PubMed Central

    Groenendaal, D; Freijer, J; de Mik, D; Bouw, M R; Danhof, M; de Lange, E C M

    2007-01-01

    Background and purpose: Biophase equilibration must be considered to gain insight into the mechanisms underlying the pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK-PD) correlations of opioids. The objective was to characterise in a quantitative manner the non-linear distribution kinetics of morphine in brain. Experimental approach: Male rats received a 10-min infusion of 4 mg kg−1 of morphine, combined with a continuous infusion of the P-glycoprotein (Pgp) inhibitor GF120918 or vehicle, or 40 mg kg−1 morphine alone. Unbound extracellular fluid (ECF) concentrations obtained by intracerebral microdialysis and total blood concentrations were analysed using a population modelling approach. Key results: Blood pharmacokinetics of morphine was best described with a three-compartment model and was not influenced by GF120918. Non-linear distribution kinetics in brain ECF was observed with increasing dose. A one compartment distribution model was developed, with separate expressions for passive diffusion, active saturable influx and active efflux by Pgp. The passive diffusion rate constant was 0.0014 min−1. The active efflux rate constant decreased from 0.0195 min−1 to 0.0113 min−1 in the presence of GF120918. The active influx was insensitive to GF120918 and had a maximum transport (Nmax/Vecf) of 0.66 ng min−1 ml−1 and was saturated at low concentrations of morphine (C50=9.9 ng ml−1). Conclusions and implications: Brain distribution of morphine is determined by three factors: limited passive diffusion; active efflux, reduced by 42% by Pgp inhibition; low capacity active uptake. This implies blood concentration-dependency and sensitivity to drug-drug interactions. These factors should be taken into account in further investigations on PK-PD correlations of morphine. PMID:17471182

  2. Plasma, tumor and tissue pharmacokinetics of Docetaxel delivered via nanoparticles of different sizes and shapes in mice bearing SKOV-3 human ovarian carcinoma xenograft

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Kevin S.; Hasan, Warefta; Rawal, Sumit; Walsh, Mark D.; Enlow, Elizabeth M.; Luft, J. Christopher; Bridges, Arlene S.; Kuijer, Jennifer L.; Napier, Mary E.; Zamboni, William C.; DeSimone, Joseph M.

    2013-01-01

    The particle fabrication technique PRINT® was used to fabricate monodisperse size and shape specific poly(lactide-co-glycolide) particles loaded with the chemotherapeutic Docetaxel. The pharmacokinetics of two cylindrical shaped particles with diameter=80nm; height=320nm (PRINT-Doc-80×320) and d=200nm; h=200nm (PRINT-Doc-200×200) were compared to Docetaxel in mice bearing human ovarian carcinoma SKOV-3 flank xenografts. The Docetaxel plasma exposure was ~20-fold higher for both particles compared to docetaxel. Additionally, the volume of distribution (Vd) of Docetaxel in PRINT formulations was ~18-fold (PRINT-Doc-80×320) and ~33-fold (PRINT-Doc-200×200) lower than Docetaxel. The prolonged duration of Docetaxel in plasma when dosed with PRINT formulations subsequently lead to increased tumor exposure of Docetaxel from 0-168 hours (~53% higher for PRINT-Doc-80×320 and ~76% higher for PRINT-Doc-200×200 particles). PRINT-Doc-80×320 had lower exposures in the liver, spleen and lung compared with PRINT-Doc-200×200. Thus, the use of particles with smaller feature size may be preferred to decrease clearance by organs of the mononuclear phagocyte system. PMID:23219874

  3. Pharmacokinetics & Neurophysiology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Andrew S.; Salpekar, Jay A.

    2009-01-01

    Medications administered in clinical practice obtain their therapeutic effect only to the extent that the drug is present in the appropriate concentration at the desired site. To achieve this goal, the prescribing clinician must be aware of how a drug may interact with the physiology of the patient. Pharmacokinetics is the study of this process…

  4. Visualisation of the distributions of melanin and indocyanine green in biological tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Genina, E A; Fedosov, I V; Bashkatov, A N; Zimnyakov, D A; Tuchin, V V; Altshuler, G B

    2008-03-31

    A double-wavelength laser scanning microphotometer with the high spectral and spatial resolutions is developed for studying the distribution of endogenic and exogenic dyes in biological tissues. Samples of hair and skin biopsy with hair follicles stained with indocyanine green are studied. The spatial distribution of indocyanine green and melanin in the biological tissue is determined from the measured optical transmittance. (laser biology)

  5. [Temperature distribution based on Monte Carlo method of optical transmission in tissues of laser ablation].

    PubMed

    Wang, Yafen; Bai, Jingfeng

    2013-07-01

    Monte Carlo method was used for calculation of finite-diameter laser distribution in tissues through convolution operation. Photo-thermal ablation model was set up on the basis of Pennes bioheat equation, and tissue temperature distribution was simulated by using finite element method by ANSYS through the model. The simulation result is helpful for clinical application of laser.

  6. LASER BIOLOGY: Visualisation of the distributions of melanin and indocyanine green in biological tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genina, E. A.; Fedosov, I. V.; Bashkatov, A. N.; Zimnyakov, D. A.; Altshuler, G. B.; Tuchin, V. V.

    2008-03-01

    A double-wavelength laser scanning microphotometer with the high spectral and spatial resolutions is developed for studying the distribution of endogenic and exogenic dyes in biological tissues. Samples of hair and skin biopsy with hair follicles stained with indocyanine green are studied. The spatial distribution of indocyanine green and melanin in the biological tissue is determined from the measured optical transmittance.

  7. Quantitatively differentiating microstructures of tissues by frequency distributions of Mueller matrix images.

    PubMed

    He, Chao; He, Honghui; Li, Xianpeng; Chang, Jintao; Wang, Ye; Liu, Shaoxiong; Zeng, Nan; He, Yonghong; Ma, Hui

    2015-10-01

    We present a new way to extract characteristic features of the Mueller matrix images based on their frequency distributions and the central moments. We take the backscattering Mueller matrices of tissues with distinctive microstructures, and then analyze the frequency distribution histograms (FDHs) of all the matrix elements. For anisotropic skeletal muscle and isotropic liver tissues, we find that the shapes of the FDHs and their central moment parameters, i.e., variance, skewness, and kurtosis, are not sensitive to the sample orientation. Comparisons among different tissues further indicate that the frequency distributions of Mueller matrix elements and their corresponding central moments can be used as indicators for the characteristic microstructural features of tissues. A preliminary application to human cervical cancerous tissues shows that the distribution curves and central moment parameters may have the potential to give quantitative criteria for cancerous tissues detections.

  8. Quantitatively differentiating microstructures of tissues by frequency distributions of Mueller matrix images.

    PubMed

    He, Chao; He, Honghui; Li, Xianpeng; Chang, Jintao; Wang, Ye; Liu, Shaoxiong; Zeng, Nan; He, Yonghong; Ma, Hui

    2015-10-01

    We present a new way to extract characteristic features of the Mueller matrix images based on their frequency distributions and the central moments. We take the backscattering Mueller matrices of tissues with distinctive microstructures, and then analyze the frequency distribution histograms (FDHs) of all the matrix elements. For anisotropic skeletal muscle and isotropic liver tissues, we find that the shapes of the FDHs and their central moment parameters, i.e., variance, skewness, and kurtosis, are not sensitive to the sample orientation. Comparisons among different tissues further indicate that the frequency distributions of Mueller matrix elements and their corresponding central moments can be used as indicators for the characteristic microstructural features of tissues. A preliminary application to human cervical cancerous tissues shows that the distribution curves and central moment parameters may have the potential to give quantitative criteria for cancerous tissues detections. PMID:26502227

  9. Quantitatively differentiating microstructures of tissues by frequency distributions of Mueller matrix images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Chao; He, Honghui; Li, Xianpeng; Chang, Jintao; Wang, Ye; Liu, Shaoxiong; Zeng, Nan; He, Yonghong; Ma, Hui

    2015-10-01

    We present a new way to extract characteristic features of the Mueller matrix images based on their frequency distributions and the central moments. We take the backscattering Mueller matrices of tissues with distinctive microstructures, and then analyze the frequency distribution histograms (FDHs) of all the matrix elements. For anisotropic skeletal muscle and isotropic liver tissues, we find that the shapes of the FDHs and their central moment parameters, i.e., variance, skewness, and kurtosis, are not sensitive to the sample orientation. Comparisons among different tissues further indicate that the frequency distributions of Mueller matrix elements and their corresponding central moments can be used as indicators for the characteristic microstructural features of tissues. A preliminary application to human cervical cancerous tissues shows that the distribution curves and central moment parameters may have the potential to give quantitative criteria for cancerous tissues detections.

  10. Pharmacokinetics of tildipirosin in porcine plasma, lung tissue, and bronchial fluid and effects of test conditions on in vitro activity against reference strains and field isolates of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Rose, M; Menge, M; Bohland, C; Zschiesche, E; Wilhelm, C; Kilp, S; Metz, W; Allan, M; Röpke, R; Nürnberger, M

    2013-04-01

    The pharmacokinetics of tildipirosin (Zuprevo(®) 40 mg/mL solution for injection for pigs), a novel 16-membered-ring macrolide for the treatment for swine respiratory disease (SRD), was investigated in studies collecting blood plasma and postmortem samples of lung tissue and bronchial fluid (BF) from swine. In view of factors influencing the in vitro activity of macrolides, and for the interpretation of tildipirosin pharmacokinetics in relation to minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC), additional experiments were conducted to study the effects of pH, carbon dioxide-enriched atmosphere, buffers, and serum on tildipirosin MICs for various reference strains and Actinobacillus (A.) pleuropneumoniae field isolates. After single intramuscular (i.m.) injection at 4 mg/kg body weight, maximum plasma concentration (Cmax) was 0.9 μg/mL observed within 23 min (Tmax ). Mean residence time from the time of dosing to the time of last measurable concentration (MRTlast) and terminal half-life (T1/2) both were about 4 days. A dose-response relationship with no significant sex effect is observed for area under the plasma concentration-time curve from time 0 to the last sampling time with a quantifiable drug concentration (AUClast) over the range of doses up to 6 mg/kg. However, linear dose proportionality could not be proven with statistical methods. The time-concentration profile of tildipirosin in BF and lung far exceeded that in blood plasma. In lung, tildipirosin concentrations reached 3.1 μg/g at 2 h, peaked at 4.3 μg/g at day 1, and slowly declined to 0.8 μg/g at day 17. In BF, tildipirosin levels were 14.3, 7.0, and 6.5 μg/g at days 5, 10, and 14. T1/2 in lung was ∼7 days. Tildipirosin is rapidly and extensively distributed to the respiratory tract followed by slow elimination. Culture media pH and carbon dioxide-enriched atmosphere (CO2 -EA) had a marked impact on in vitro activity of tildipirosin in reference strains of various rapidly growing aerobic and

  11. Comparison of 225actinium chelates: tissue distribution and radiotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Davis, I A; Glowienka, K A; Boll, R A; Deal, K A; Brechbiel, M W; Stabin, M; Bochsler, P N; Mirzadeh, S; Kennel, S J

    1999-07-01

    The biodistribution and tissue toxicity of intravenously administered 225-actinium (225Ac) complexed with acetate, ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA), 1, 4, 7, 10, 13-pentaazacyclopentadecane-N, N', N", N"', N"-pentaacetic acid (PEPA), or the "a" isomer of cyclohexyl diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (CHX-DTPA), were examined. The percent of injected dose per organ and per gram of tissue for each chelate complex was determined. 225Ac-CHX-DTPA was evaluated further for radiotoxic effects. Mice receiving > or =185 kBq 225Ac-CHX-DTPA suffered 100% morbidity by 5 days and 100% mortality by 8 days postinjection, and all animals evaluated had significant organ damage. The in vivo instability of the 225Ac-CHX-DTPA complex likely allowed accumulation of free 225Ac in organs, which resulted in tissue pathology.

  12. Evaluation of the blood-brain barrier transport, population pharmacokinetics, and brain distribution of benztropine analogs and cocaine using in vitro and in vivo techniques.

    PubMed

    Raje, Sangeeta; Cao, Jianjing; Newman, Amy Hauck; Gao, Huanling; Eddington, Natalie D

    2003-11-01

    The N-substituted 3alpha-[bis(4'-fluorophenyl)methoxy]tropanes (AHN 2-003, AHN 1-055, AHN 2-005, and JHW 007) bind with high affinity to the dopamine transporter and inhibit dopamine uptake more potently than cocaine, but they demonstrate behavioral profiles in animal models of psychostimulant abuse that are unlike that of cocaine. The objective of this study was to characterize the in vitro permeability, brain distribution, and pharmacokinetics of the benztropine (BZT) analogs. Transport studies of cocaine and the BZT analogs (10-4 M) were conducted across bovine brain microvessel endothelial cells. Male Sprague-Dawley rats (approximately 300 g) were administered BZT analogs (10 mg/kg) or cocaine (5 mg/kg) via the tail vein. Blood and brain samples were collected over 36 h and assayed using UV-high-performance liquid chromatography. Transport of both AHN 1-055 (2.15 x 10-4 cm/s) and JHW 007 (2.83 x 10-4 cm/s) was higher (p < 0.05) than that of cocaine (1.63 x 10-4 cm/s). The volume of distribution (12.3-30.5 l/kg) of the analogs was significantly higher than cocaine (0.9 l/kg). The BZT analogs displayed a > or =8-fold higher elimination half-life (4.12-16.49 h) compared with cocaine (0.49 h). The brain-to-plasma partition coefficients were at least two-fold higher for the BZTs versus cocaine, except for AHN 2-003. The BZT analogs are highly permeable across the blood-brain barrier and possess a pharmacokinetic profile different from that of cocaine. These characteristics, in addition to their distinctive behavioral profiles, suggest that the BZT analogs may be promising candidates for the treatment of cocaine abuse.

  13. Investigating the pharmacokinetics and biological distribution of silver-loaded polyphosphoester-based nanoparticles using 111Ag as a radiotracer

    PubMed Central

    Aweda, Tolulope A.; Zhang, Shiyi; Mupanomunda, Chiedza; Burkemper, Jennifer; Heo, Gyu Seong; Bandara, Nilantha; Lin, Mai; Cutler, Cathy S.; Cannon, Carolyn L.; Youngs, Wiley; Wooley, Karen L.; Lapi, Suzanne E.

    2015-01-01

    Purified 111Ag was used as a radiotracer to investigate silver loading and release, pharmacokinetics and biodistribution of polyphosphoester-based degradable shell crosslinked knedel-like (SCK) nanoparticles as a comparison to the previously reported small molecule, N-heterocyclic silver carbene complex analogue (SCC1) for the delivery of therapeutic silver ions in mouse models. Biodistribution studies were conducted by aerosol administration of 111Ag acetate, [111Ag]SCC1 and [111Ag]SCK doses directly into the lungs of C57BL/6 mice. Nebulization of the 111Ag antimicrobials resulted in an average uptake of 1.07 ± 0.12% of the total aerosolized dose given per mouse. The average dose taken into the lungs of mice was estimated to be 2.6 ± 0.3% of the dose inhaled per mouse for [111Ag]SCC1 and twice as much dose was observed for the [111Ag]SCKs (5.0 ± 0.3% and 5.9 ± 0.8% for [111Ag]aSCK and [111Ag]zSCK, respectively) at 1 h post administration (p.a.). [111Ag]SCKs also exhibited higher dose retention in the lungs; 62 – 68% for [111Ag]SCKs and 43% for [111Ag]SCC1 of the initial 1 h dose was observed in the lungs at 24 h post administration (p.a.). This study demonstrates the utility of 111Ag as a useful tool for monitoring the pharmacokinetics of silver loaded antimicrobials in vivo. PMID:25952472

  14. Investigating the pharmacokinetics and biological distribution of silver-loaded polyphosphoester-based nanoparticles using (111) Ag as a radiotracer.

    PubMed

    Aweda, Tolulope A; Zhang, Shiyi; Mupanomunda, Chiedza; Burkemper, Jennifer; Heo, Gyu Seong; Bandara, Nilantha; Lin, Mai; Cutler, Cathy S; Cannon, Carolyn L; Youngs, Wiley J; Wooley, Karen L; Lapi, Suzanne E

    2015-05-30

    Purified (111) Ag was used as a radiotracer to investigate silver loading and release, pharmacokinetics, and biodistribution of polyphosphoester-based degradable shell crosslinked knedel-like (SCK) nanoparticles as a comparison to the previously reported small molecule, N-heterocyclic silver carbene complex analog (SCC1) for the delivery of therapeutic silver ions in mouse models. Biodistribution studies were conducted by aerosol administration of (111) Ag acetate, [(111) Ag]SCC1, and [(111) Ag]SCK doses directly into the lungs of C57BL/6 mice. Nebulization of the (111) Ag antimicrobials resulted in an average uptake of 1.07 ± 0.12% of the total aerosolized dose given per mouse. The average dose taken into the lungs of mice was estimated to be 2.6 ± 0.3% of the dose inhaled per mouse for [(111) Ag]SCC1 and twice as much dose was observed for the [(111) Ag]SCKs (5.0 ± 0.3% and 5.9 ± 0.8% for [(111) Ag]aSCK and [(111) Ag]zSCK, respectively) at 1 h post administration (p.a.). [(111) Ag]SCKs also exhibited higher dose retention in the lungs; 62-68% for [(111) Ag]SCKs and 43% for [(111) Ag]SCC1 of the initial 1 h dose were observed in the lungs at 24 h p.a.. This study demonstrates the utility of (111) Ag as a useful tool for monitoring the pharmacokinetics of silver-loaded antimicrobials in vivo.

  15. Investigating the pharmacokinetics and biological distribution of silver-loaded polyphosphoester-based nanoparticles using (111) Ag as a radiotracer.

    PubMed

    Aweda, Tolulope A; Zhang, Shiyi; Mupanomunda, Chiedza; Burkemper, Jennifer; Heo, Gyu Seong; Bandara, Nilantha; Lin, Mai; Cutler, Cathy S; Cannon, Carolyn L; Youngs, Wiley J; Wooley, Karen L; Lapi, Suzanne E

    2015-05-30

    Purified (111) Ag was used as a radiotracer to investigate silver loading and release, pharmacokinetics, and biodistribution of polyphosphoester-based degradable shell crosslinked knedel-like (SCK) nanoparticles as a comparison to the previously reported small molecule, N-heterocyclic silver carbene complex analog (SCC1) for the delivery of therapeutic silver ions in mouse models. Biodistribution studies were conducted by aerosol administration of (111) Ag acetate, [(111) Ag]SCC1, and [(111) Ag]SCK doses directly into the lungs of C57BL/6 mice. Nebulization of the (111) Ag antimicrobials resulted in an average uptake of 1.07 ± 0.12% of the total aerosolized dose given per mouse. The average dose taken into the lungs of mice was estimated to be 2.6 ± 0.3% of the dose inhaled per mouse for [(111) Ag]SCC1 and twice as much dose was observed for the [(111) Ag]SCKs (5.0 ± 0.3% and 5.9 ± 0.8% for [(111) Ag]aSCK and [(111) Ag]zSCK, respectively) at 1 h post administration (p.a.). [(111) Ag]SCKs also exhibited higher dose retention in the lungs; 62-68% for [(111) Ag]SCKs and 43% for [(111) Ag]SCC1 of the initial 1 h dose were observed in the lungs at 24 h p.a.. This study demonstrates the utility of (111) Ag as a useful tool for monitoring the pharmacokinetics of silver-loaded antimicrobials in vivo. PMID:25952472

  16. Prediction of drug distribution in subcutaneous xenografts of human tumor cell lines and healthy tissues in mouse: application of the tissue composition-based model to antineoplastic drugs.

    PubMed

    Poulin, Patrick; Chen, Yung-Hsiang; Ding, Xiao; Gould, Stephen E; Hop, Cornelis Eca; Messick, Kirsten; Oeh, Jason; Liederer, Bianca M

    2015-04-01

    Advanced tissue composition-based models can predict the tissue-plasma partition coefficient (Kp ) values of drugs under in vivo conditions on the basis of in vitro and physiological input data. These models, however, focus on healthy tissues and do not incorporate data from tumors. The objective of this study was to apply a tissue composition-based model to six marketed antineoplastic drugs (docetaxel, DOC; doxorubicin, DOX; gemcitabine, GEM; methotrexate, MTX; topotecan, TOP; and fluorouracil, 5-FU) to predict their Kp values in three human tumor xenografts (HCT-116, H2122, and PC3) as well as in healthy tissues (brain, muscle, lung, and liver) under steady-state in vivo conditions in female NCR nude mice. The mechanisms considered in the tissue/tumor composition-based model are the binding to lipids and to plasma proteins, but the transporter effect was also investigated. The method consisted of analyzing tissue composition, performing the pharmacokinetics studies in mice, and calculating the corresponding in vivo Kp values. Analyses of tumor composition indicated that the tumor xenografts contained no or low amounts of common transporters by contrast to lipids. The predicted Kp values were within twofold and threefold of the measured values in 77% and 93% of cases, respectively. However, predictions for brain for each drug, for liver for MTX, and for each tumor xenograft for GEM were disparate from the observed values, and, therefore, not well served by the model. Overall, this study is the first step toward the mechanism-based prediction of Kp values of small molecules in healthy and tumor tissues in mouse when no transporter and permeation limitation effect is evident. This approach will be useful in selecting compounds based on their abilities to penetrate human cancer xenografts with a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model, thereby increasing therapeutic index for chemotherapy in oncology study.

  17. Pharmacokinetics and molecular detoxication.

    PubMed Central

    Cashman, J R; Perotti, B Y; Berkman, C E; Lin, J

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents a comprehensive overview of the pharmacokinetic parameters used from in vivo and in vitro studies that are important in order to understand the major conceptual approaches of toxicokinetics and the disposition of environmental chemicals. In vitro biochemical information concerning the detoxication of environmental chemicals is also presented. The discussion leads to a more complete appreciation for the use of in vitro measurements for in vivo correlations. The concept of interspecies scaling in the interpolation and extrapolation of fundamental biochemical metabolic processes is illustrated with a number of examples. Additional examples of in vitro-in vivo correlations are presented in the evaluation of the impact of chemical exposure to humans. Finally, several important metabolic detoxication enzymes are presented, including the mammalian microsomal cytochrome P450 and flavin-containing monooxygenases as well as carboxylesterases and glucuronosyltransferases, to provide insight into the processes of chemical detoxication in mammalian tissue and blood. Because interspecies scaling and the pharmacokinetics of chemical disposition have already shown their usefulness in understanding some examples of chemical disposition, our summary focuses on showing the usefulness of the pharmacokinetic equations and providing confidence in using the approach for in vitro-in vivo correlations. Ultimately, the presentation may provide the reader with a conceptual framework for future evaluation of the human health risks associated with environmental toxicants. PMID:8722108

  18. Distribution and chemical form of mercury in commercial fish tissues.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Naoko; Tayama, Misato; Inouye, Minoru; Yasutake, Akira

    2012-01-01

    We analyzed total Hg concentrations in various tissue samples obtained from 7 commercially available fish species. MeHg contents were also estimated for muscle and liver samples by a selective analysis of inorganic Hg. Among the tissues, high Hg accumulations were shown in liver, muscle, heart and spleen throughout all fish species. Carnivorous fish, such as scorpion fish, sea bream and Japanese whiting, tended to show higher Hg accumulations in the muscle, with the highest Hg levels being shown by scorpion fish. Although the liver was expected to show the highest Hg accumulations among tissues throughout all fish species, the highest accumulation in the liver was observed only in scorpion fish. In contrast, the muscle level was significantly higher than the liver in Pacific saury and Japanese whiting. MeHg accumulated in fish is considered to show a sustained increase throughout the life of the fish, due to its long biological half-life. In fact, in the present study, muscle Hg levels in Japanese whiting, Japanese flying fish, and halfbeak showed good correlations with body weights. However, such correlations were not clear in scorpion fish, sea bream, Jack mackerel and Pacific saury. Selective analyses of inorganic Hg levels revealed that most of the Hg (> 95%) in fish muscle existed as MeHg, while the rates of MeHg contents in the liver varied from 56% in scorpion fish to 84% in Jack mackerel. As a result, fish muscle showed the highest MeHg accumulations in all fish species examined. These results suggest that reliable information on total Hg contents in fish muscle might be sufficient to avoid the risk of MeHg exposure caused by eating fish, even when one consumes other tissues such as fish liver.

  19. Tissue distribution and elimination of rotenone in rainbow trout

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gingerich, W.H.

    1986-01-01

    The fate of a single i.v. dose (120 μg/kg) of the piscicide [14C]rotenone was evaluated in rainbow trout for periods up to 72 h after dosing. Rotenone was rapidly cleared from the plasma; less than 2% of the dose remained in the plasma compartment after 20 min. The highest concentrations of rotenone residues (% dose/g tissue) were in the hepatobiliary system, bile, intestine, and in heart, lateral line swimming muscle, and posterior kidney; tissues that are highly dependent on oxidative metabolism. Although rotenone activity was present in all cell fractions examined, greater than 40% was associated with the mitochondrial fraction of liver, kidney, and muscle. More than 85% of the activity extracted from these tissues, except the liver, was parent rotenone. Elimination from whole body and major tissue depots conformed to simple first-order kinetics; the estimated half-life from whole body was 68.5 h. Branchial elimination accounted for 5% of the injected dose over a 4-h period, and urinary elimination was less than 2% over a 48-h period. Rotenone was eliminated essentially unchanged across the gills; however, parent rotenone was not found in either urine or bile. More than 80% of the activity in both urine and bile eluted from HPLC chromatographs as a highly polar fraction that was not hydrolyzed by incubation with either β-glucuronidase or sulfatase. The results imply that hepatobiliary excretion is the major route of elimination for rotenone residues in the trout and that metabolism to a more polar form is a prerequisite for elimination in both the bile and the urine

  20. Distribution and chemical form of mercury in commercial fish tissues.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Naoko; Tayama, Misato; Inouye, Minoru; Yasutake, Akira

    2012-01-01

    We analyzed total Hg concentrations in various tissue samples obtained from 7 commercially available fish species. MeHg contents were also estimated for muscle and liver samples by a selective analysis of inorganic Hg. Among the tissues, high Hg accumulations were shown in liver, muscle, heart and spleen throughout all fish species. Carnivorous fish, such as scorpion fish, sea bream and Japanese whiting, tended to show higher Hg accumulations in the muscle, with the highest Hg levels being shown by scorpion fish. Although the liver was expected to show the highest Hg accumulations among tissues throughout all fish species, the highest accumulation in the liver was observed only in scorpion fish. In contrast, the muscle level was significantly higher than the liver in Pacific saury and Japanese whiting. MeHg accumulated in fish is considered to show a sustained increase throughout the life of the fish, due to its long biological half-life. In fact, in the present study, muscle Hg levels in Japanese whiting, Japanese flying fish, and halfbeak showed good correlations with body weights. However, such correlations were not clear in scorpion fish, sea bream, Jack mackerel and Pacific saury. Selective analyses of inorganic Hg levels revealed that most of the Hg (> 95%) in fish muscle existed as MeHg, while the rates of MeHg contents in the liver varied from 56% in scorpion fish to 84% in Jack mackerel. As a result, fish muscle showed the highest MeHg accumulations in all fish species examined. These results suggest that reliable information on total Hg contents in fish muscle might be sufficient to avoid the risk of MeHg exposure caused by eating fish, even when one consumes other tissues such as fish liver. PMID:22863865

  1. Distribution of alpha-amylase activity in selected broiler tissues.

    PubMed

    Rodeheaver, D P; Wyatt, R D

    1986-02-01

    In an examination of broiler alpha-amylase, significant variation in the serum enzyme activity level was noted, adult levels were lower than those of young chicks. Analysis of alpha-amylase activity in various body fluids and tissues of 11-day and 7-week-old broilers indicated that the liver cannot be considered a source of alpha-amylase, although there was activity in both liver tissue and bile of 10 units/g wet weight and 35 units/100 ml, respectively. Fluid from the oral cavity had low levels of alpha-amylase activity, less than 100 units/100 ml, which decreased with age, indicating that the salivary glands may synthesize some alpha-amylase but are not a primary source. Sonication of the pancreatic homogenates was found to significantly increase the apparent activity of alpha-amylase 35-fold over unsonicated homogenates. The pancreas was the major source of alpha-amylase with activities ranging from 89 X 10(2) to 445 X 10(2) units/g wet weight. The level of activity increased with age of the bird. The electrophoretic zymograms of serum, liver, and pancreatic homogenates indicate a similar pancreatic origin for the alpha-amylase found in each tissue or fluid.

  2. Adipose tissue distribution, plasma insulin, and cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Björntorp, P

    1987-07-01

    Hyperinsulinaemia is of great importance, being a primary risk factor for cardiovascular disease and non-insulin dependent diabetes (NIDDM). Furthermore, unwanted effects of increased exposure of tissues to insulin are known. Hyperinsulinaemia may, in principle, be caused by primary hypersecretion, or be a secondary consequence of diminished effectiveness of insulin in the periphery. Obesity is the commonest condition characterized by insulin resistance, which is seen most frequently when excess adipose tissue is localized to the abdominal region. Insulin resistance in obesity is found in several tissues, however, with liver and muscle being quantitative the most important. Muscle insulin sensitivity is regulated by genetic factors, hormonal effects, and the influence of free fatty acids, as well as the state of physical activity. There is evidence for the action of each of these factors in obesity. The pathogenetic mechanisms linking hyperinsulinaemia with cardiovascular disease and NIDDM are unknown. Comparisons between development of NIDDM in experimental animal models and in humans in prospective studies however, provide useful hypotheses for further studies.

  3. Hyperglycemic Challenge and Distribution of Adipose Tissue in Obese Baboons

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, Tanmay; Slaughter, Gymama; Ego-Osuala, Chimdi; Kochunov, Peter; Bastarrachea, Raul A.; Mattern, Vicki; Andrade, Marcia; Higgins, Paul B.; Comuzzie, Anthony G.; Voruganti, V. Saroja

    2014-01-01

    Background Blood glucose levels regulate the rate of insulin secretion, which is the body’s mechanism for preventing excessive elevation in blood glucose. Impaired glucose metabolism and insulin resistance have been linked to excess body fat composition. Here, we quantify abdominal muscle and abdominal adipose tissue compartments in a large nonhuman primate, the baboon, and investigate their relationship with serum glucose response to a hyperglycemic challenge. Methods Five female baboons were fasted for 16 hours prior to 90 minute body imaging experiment that consisted of a 20-min baseline, followed by a bolus infusion of glucose (500mg/kg). The blood glucose was sampled at regular intervals. The total volumes of the muscle, visceral and subcutaneous adipose tissue were measured. Results and discussion We found that adipose tissue composition predicted fluctuations in glucose responses to a hyperglycemic challenge of a non-human primate. Animals with higher visceral adiposity showed significantly reduced glucose elimination. The glucose responses were positively correlated with body weight, visceral and muscle fat (p < 0.005). Polynomial regression analysis showed that body weight, visceral and muscle were significant Conclusions These results reveal the similarity between humans and baboons with respect to glucose metabolism and strengthen the utility of baboon for biomedical research. PMID:25429366

  4. USE OF A PHYSIOLOGICALLY BASED PHARMACOKINETIC MODEL (PBPK) FOR RATS TO STUDY THE INFLUENCE OF BODY FAT MASS AND INDUCTION OF CYP1A2 ON THE PHARMACOKINETICS OF TCDD

    EPA Science Inventory

    2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) is a highly lipophilic chemical which distributes into adipose tissue, especially at low doses. However, at high doses TCDD sequesters in liver because it induces CYP1A2 that binds TCDD. A physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) mod...

  5. [11C]-Labeled Metformin Distribution in the Liver and Small Intestine Using Dynamic Positron Emission Tomography in Mice Demonstrates Tissue-Specific Transporter Dependency.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Jonas B; Sundelin, Elias I; Jakobsen, Steen; Gormsen, Lars C; Munk, Ole L; Frøkiær, Jørgen; Jessen, Niels

    2016-06-01

    Metformin is the most commonly prescribed oral antidiabetic drug, with well-documented beneficial preventive effects on diabetic complications. Despite being in clinical use for almost 60 years, the underlying mechanisms for metformin action remain elusive. Organic cation transporters (OCT), including multidrug and toxin extrusion proteins (MATE), are essential for transport of metformin across membranes, but tissue-specific activity of these transporters in vivo is incompletely understood. Here, we use dynamic positron emission tomography with [(11)C]-labeled metformin ([(11)C]-metformin) in mice to investigate the role of OCT and MATE in a well-established target tissue, the liver, and a putative target of metformin, the small intestine. Ablation of OCT1 and OCT2 significantly reduced the distribution of metformin in the liver and small intestine. In contrast, inhibition of MATE1 with pyrimethamine caused accumulation of metformin in the liver but did not affect distribution in the small intestine. The demonstration of OCT-mediated transport into the small intestine provides evidence of direct effects of metformin in this tissue. OCT and MATE have important but separate roles in uptake and elimination of metformin in the liver, but this is not due to changes in biliary secretion. [(11)C]-Metformin holds great potential as a tool to determine the pharmacokinetic properties of metformin in clinical studies.

  6. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics utilizing unbound target tissue exposure as part of a disposition-based rationale for lead optimization of benzoxaboroles in the treatment of Stage 2 Human African Trypanosomiasis.

    PubMed

    Wring, Stephen; Gaukel, Eric; Nare, Bakela; Jacobs, Robert; Beaudet, Beth; Bowling, Tana; Mercer, Luke; Bacchi, Cyrus; Yarlett, Nigel; Randolph, Ryan; Parham, Robin; Rewerts, Cindy; Platner, Jacob; Don, Robert

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY This review presents a progression strategy for the discovery of new anti-parasitic drugs that uses in vitro susceptibility, time-kill and reversibility measures to define the therapeutically relevant exposure required in target tissues of animal infection models. The strategy is exemplified by the discovery of SCYX-7158 as a potential oral treatment for stage 2 (CNS) Human African Trypanosomiasis (HAT). A critique of current treatments for stage 2 HAT is included to provide context for the challenges of achieving target tissue disposition and the need for establishing pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK-PD) measures early in the discovery paradigm. The strategy comprises 3 stages. Initially, compounds demonstrating promising in vitro activity and selectivity for the target organism over mammalian cells are advanced to in vitro metabolic stability, barrier permeability and tissue binding assays to establish that they will likely achieve and maintain therapeutic concentrations during in-life efficacy studies. Secondly, in vitro time-kill and reversibility kinetics are employed to correlate exposure (based on unbound concentrations) with in vitro activity, and to identify pharmacodynamic measures that would best predict efficacy. Lastly, this information is used to design dosing regimens for pivotal pharmacokinetic-pharmacodyamic studies in animal infection models.

  7. [Investigation of light penetration depth and distribution inside citrus tissue].

    PubMed

    Wu, Chen-Kai; Zhang, Liang; Shen, Huang-Tong; Fu, Xia-Ping

    2014-03-01

    Experiment was carried out to explore the light intensity change inside citrus samples in the present study. An experimental platform was set up, including a light box, a spectrometer, a sample stage, an optic fiber probe, light sources, etc. The sample stage is adjustable in three dimensions. The optic fiber probe was used to measure the light changes by observing the light attenuation and intensity variation within the citrus tissues. A 632 nm laser source and a 50 W tungsten halogen lamp light source were used. Light intensity and transmittance were investigated at different positions within the citrus fruit. The band with most significant intensity difference was selected to analyze the light intensity and transmittance trends in different positions inside the citrus fruit In order to examine the influence significance of the sample factor on test results, SPSS software was used to do the analysis of variation (ANOVA) of different samples. The results showed that light intensity and transmittance have a positive correlation with puncture depth, while citrus peel and stone have a more obvious attenuation effect than citrus flesh, and the influence of the sample factor on the test results is not significant. Further research can be carried out by improving the experimental device. The method used and results obtained in this study are valuable for studies on light transmission properties inside fruit tissue, not only for citrus but also for other kinds of fruits.

  8. Distribution of biglycan and decorin in rat dental tissue.

    PubMed

    Tenório, D M H; Santos, M F; Zorn, T M T

    2003-08-01

    Biglycan and decorin are small leucine-rich proteoglycans that play several biological and structural roles in different tissues and organs. Several reports have indicated that biglycan participates in odontoblast and ameloblast differentiation and in the calcification process. In the present study we show that the expression of biglycan changes from within the ameloblasts and odontoblasts to the extracellular space according to the stage of animal development. In predentin and in the pulp space, however, biglycan was continually expressed throughout the period of investigation. In contrast, decorin was absent in odontoblasts and in ameloblasts and was exclusively expressed in predentin throughout the period of observation. In young rats, however, decorin was expressed in the extracellular spaces of the pulp, where it was concentrated mainly in the peripheral pulp.

  9. Primary structure and tissue distribution of anglerfish carboxypeptidase H.

    PubMed

    Roth, W W; Mackin, R B; Spiess, J; Goodman, R H; Noe, B D

    1991-07-01

    Most peptide hormones are synthesized as part of larger precursor proteins which must be processed after translation to generate bioactive peptides. This usually involves cleavage of the precursor by an endopeptidase at sites marked by basic amino acids, followed by removal of N- or C-terminal basic residues by the action of an aminopeptidase or carboxypeptidase. These processing events have been observed in a variety of species, from yeast to mammals. As part of an effort to characterize prohormone processing enzymes in the anglerfish, Lophius americanus, we have cloned and sequenced a cDNA for the fish prohormone processing carboxypeptidase H (CPH). Polyadenylated RNA from anglerfish (AF) islet organs was used to construct a cDNA library in phage lambda gt11. The library was screened with a probe derived from the cDNA for rat CPH. A 2400 base pair AF cDNA clone was isolated. This cDNA encodes a polypeptide which is similar in size and composition to mammalian CPH. The sequence data indicate that the AF CPH precursor is a 454 amino acid polypeptide. The derived amino acid sequence of the putative fish CPH is 81% homologous to the rat and bovine CPH enzymes. Significantly, all of the amino acid residues thought to be important for metal ion and substrate binding, glycosylation, and catalytic activity of mammalian CPH are conserved in the fish enzyme. Northern hybridization using RNA from AF tissues indicates that a 2.5 kb fish CPH mRNA is expressed in brain, pituitary and islet organs, but not in other tissues which do not secrete peptide hormones. PMID:1778303

  10. Distribution of purine nucleotides in uremic fluids and tissues.

    PubMed

    Rutkowski, Bolesław; Rutkowski, Przemysław; Słomińska, Ewa; Swierczyński, Julian

    2010-09-01

    There are almost 100 different substances called uremic toxins. In this study, we analyze all findings concerning the new family of uremic compounds--nicotinamide end products: N-methyl-2-pyridone-5-carboxamide (Met2PY), N-methyl-4-pyridone-5-carboxamide, newly described 4-pyridone-3-carboxamide-1-beta-D-ribonucleoside (4PYR) and 4-pyridone-3-carboxamide-1-beta-D-ribonucleoside triphosphate (4PYTP). After few years of studies, we have found that these substances have higher plasma concentration in patients with chronic renal failure (CRF) in comparison with the healthy population. We noted a 40-fold increase in plasma 4PYR concentration in patients with CRF. This increment correlates significantly with the decline of kidney function measured as an increase of serum creatinine concentration and decrease of estimated glomerular filtration rate. Tested compounds are present and measurable in physiological fluids and tissues. We found higher saliva Met2PY concentration in patients with CRF in comparison with controls. Saliva Met2PY correlated negatively with estimated glomerular filtration rate and positively with serum creatinine concentration. One-third of studied group had higher concentration of Met2PY in the saliva than in plasma, and this segment of patients may be called as "good excretors." In rats with experimental CRF, we found that both Met2PY and N-methyl-4-pyridone-5-carboxamide accumulated in selected tissues. We also demonstrated formation of 4PYTP in intact human erythrocytes during incubation with the precursor 4PYR. Incubation with 4PYR leads to lowering concentration of adenosine-5'-triphosphate. 4PYTP formation may be a way to remove 4PYR from the circulation and save adenosine-5'-triphosphate depletion. Summarizing, end products of the nicotinamide family are members of uremic toxins; however, exact pathophysiological role of these compounds in the development of uremic syndrome needs further studies. PMID:20797575

  11. In vivo experiments of laser thermotherapy on liver tissue with FBG temperature distribution sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Na; Chen, Shaofeng; Zhu, Hongfei; Liu, Shupeng; Chen, Zhenyi; Pang, Fufei; Wang, Tingyun

    2012-06-01

    In this paper, we report an in vivo experimental study of liver tissue during Laser Induced Interstitial Thermotherapy (LITT). Single FBG was used in the experiments to measure the temperature distribution profile of the bio tissue in real time. Ideally, the goal of LITT is to kill pathological tissue thoroughly and minimize its damage to surrounding healthy tissue, especially vital organs. The extent of treated tissue damage in the therapy is mainly dependent on the irradiation time and the laser power density at the tissue surface. Therefore, monitoring the dynamic change of the exact temperature distribution of the tissue is a key point for the safety of this treatment. In our experiments, FBG was embedded in the laser irradiated bio tissues and used as fully distributed temperature sensor. During the therapy, its reflection spectra were recorded and transmitted to PC in real time. The temperature profile along the FBG axial was reconstructed from its reflection spectrum by the spectra inversion program running on the PC. We studied the dependence of the temperature distribution and the laser output power experimentally and compared the results of in vivo and in vitro under similar laser irradiating conditions. Experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness of this method. Due to influence of body temperature, the in vivo measured temperature is higher than the in vitro one with an almost constant temperature difference value, but the slope and trend of the measured temperature curves in vivo and in vitro are almost identical.

  12. Quantitative comparison of autoradioluminographic and radiometric tissue distribution studies using carbon-14 labeled xenobiotics.

    PubMed

    Potchoiba, M J; West, M; Nocerini, M R

    1998-03-01

    The tissue distribution of two 14C drugs were quantitatively compared using the techniques of whole body autoradioluminography (WBAL) and radiometry. Quantitative analysis of tissue radioactivity in whole body cryosections was accomplished from storage phosphor images using the MicroComputer Imaging Device. After obtaining whole body sections from four frozen rats and three frozen ferrets, each WBAL-sectioned specimen was partially thawed before obtaining tissue samples for radiometric analysis. For all tissues examined, concentrations of radioactivity determined by WBAL were comparable with those determined by dissection and liquid scintillation analysis (DLSA), except for renal tissue obtained from different kidneys of the same ferret and for rat ocular tissues. A 2-fold difference was observed between WBAL and DLSA evaluations of radioactivity in the contralateral kidneys of one ferret. DLSA evaluation only provided an assessment of total radioactivity in the eye, whereas WBAL evaluation determined the selective distribution of radioactivity to ocular tissues. Resolution in DLSA evaluation of ocular tissues was restricted by limitations of the dissection procedure. These results indicated that the quantitation of tissue radioactivity by WBAL was as precise as DLSA evaluation, and WBAL also provided results to the quantitative distribution of radioactivity to localized sites in organs not feasible by DLSA.

  13. The analysis and distribution of mescaline in postmortem tissues.

    PubMed

    Henry, Joni L; Epley, Jahna; Rohrig, Timothy P

    2003-09-01

    Mescaline (3,4,5-trimethoxyphenethylamine) is a hallucinogenic alkaloid found in the peyote cactus. This report documents mescaline distribution in a death caused by multiple gunshot wounds. Mescaline was extracted with a butyl chloride liquid-liquid method and identified by mass spectrometry. Quantitative analysis was performed by gas chromatography using a nitrogen-phosphorus detector. Concentrations of the drug were 2.95 mg/L, 2.36 mg/L, 8.2 mg/kg, and 2.2 mg/kg in blood, vitreous, liver, and brain, respectively.

  14. Tissue levels of (3(-14)C) coumarin in the rat: distribution and excretion.

    PubMed Central

    Piller, N. B.

    1977-01-01

    The benzo-pyrones (including coumarin) are a very effective therapy for mild thermal oedema and cases of acute and chronic lymphoedema. In this preliminary report the distribution of a single injected dose of coumarin was followed in normal tissues of rats for 100 hours. Comparisons are to be made later with drug levels in thermally injured and lymphoedematous tissues. The resluts show 7-4% of the injected dose to remain in the tissues after 100 h. During this time 30-9% was excreted in the faeces and approximately 47% excreted in the urine. At any given time most of the dose was present in the gut, muscular tissues, skin and liver. For the gut tissues this was 33%, for the muscular tissues 28%, for the skin 18% and for the liver 16%. The highest concentrations per gram of tissue were however in the kidney and liver, representing the two organs of metabolism and excretion of the coumarin. PMID:836764

  15. Tissue Regeneration and Stem Cell Distribution in Adriamycin Induced Glomerulopathy

    PubMed Central

    Zickri, Maha Baligh; Fattah, Marwa Mohamed Abdel; Metwally, Hala Gabr

    2012-01-01

    Background and Objectives Glomerulosclerosis develops secondary to various kidney diseases. It was postulated that adriamycin (ADR) induce chronic glomerulopathy. Treatment combinations for one year did not significantly modify renal function in resistant focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS). Recurrence of FSGS after renal transplantation impacts long-term graft survival and limits access to transplantation. The present study aimed at investigating the relation between the possible therapeutic effect of human mesenchymal stem cells (HMSCs), isolated from cord blood on glomerular damage and their distribution by using ADR induced nephrotoxicity as a model in albino rat. Methods and Results Thirty three male albino rats were divided into control group, ADR group where rats were given single intraperitoneal (IP) injection of 5 mg/kg adriamycin. The rats were sacrificed 10, 20 and 30 days following confirmation of glomerular injury. In stem cell therapy group, rats were injected with HMSCs following confirmation of renal injury and sacrificed 10, 20 and 30 days after HMSCs therapy. Kidney sections were exposed to histological, histochemical, immunohistochemical, morphometric and serological studies. In response to SC therapy multiple Malpighian corpuscles (MC) appeared with patent Bowman's space (Bs) 10 and 20 days following therapy. One month following therapy no remarkable shrunken glomeruli were evident. Glomerular area and serum creatinine were significantly different in ADR group in comparison to control and SC therapy groups. Conclusions ADR induced glomerulosclerosis regressed in response to cord blood HMSC therapy. A reciprocal relation was recorded between the extent of renal regeneration and the distribution of undifferentiated mesenchymal stem cells. PMID:24298364

  16. Population pharmacokinetics, brain distribution, and pharmacodynamics of 2nd generation dopamine transporter selective benztropine analogs developed as potential substitute therapeutics for treatment of cocaine abuse.

    PubMed

    Syed, Shariq A; Newman, Amy H; Othman, Ahmed A; Eddington, Natalie D

    2008-05-01

    A second generation of N-substituted 3alpha-[bis(4'-fluorophenyl)methoxy]-tropanes (GA 1-69, JHW 005 and JHW 013) binds with high affinity to the dopamine transporter (DAT) and are highly selective toward DAT compared to muscarinic receptor binding (M1). The objective of this study was to characterize brain distribution, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics [extracellular brain dopamine (DA) levels] of three novel N-substituted benztropine (BZT) analogs in male Sprague-Dawley rats. The BZT analogs displayed a higher distribution (Vd = 8.69-34.3 vs. 0.9 L/kg) along with longer elimination (t l/2: 4.1-5.4 vs. 0.5 h) than previously reported for cocaine. Brain-to-plasma partition coefficients were 1.3-2.5 vs. 2.1 for cocaine. The effect of the BZT analogs on extracellular brain (DA) levels ranged from minimal effects (GA 1-69) to several fold elevation (approximately 850% of basal DA for JHW 013) at the highest dose evaluated. PK/PD analysis of exposure-response data resulted in lower IC50 values for the BZT analogs compared to cocaine indicating their higher potency to inhibit DA reuptake (0.1-0.3 vs. 0.7 mg/L). These BZT analogs possess significantly different PK and PD profiles as compared to cocaine suggesting that further evaluation as cocaine abuse therapeutics is warranted.

  17. Use of a novel rapid and resource-efficient cassette dosing approach to determine the pharmacokinetics and CNS distribution of small molecule 7-transmembrane receptor allosteric modulators in rat

    PubMed Central

    Bridges, Thomas M; Morrison, Ryan D; Byers, Frank W; Luo, Shuanghui; Scott Daniels, J

    2014-01-01

    Approaches to efficiently and accurately define the pharmacokinetics (PK) of large sets of small molecules in rodents have been previously described. Likewise, a variety of methods for determining brain tissue distribution (BTD) have been reported for use in the discovery of therapeutics targeting the central nervous system (CNS). Herein we describe a novel cassette approach to efficiently obtain concurrent PK and BTD data from a dose of up to five compounds in one rat over 24 h. In conjunction with fraction unbound (fu) data obtained in plasma and brain homogenate, this approach serves as an efficient means to determine compound unbound brain:unbound plasma partition coefficients (Kp,uu), thereby providing insight to compounds bearing poor permeability and/or active transporter activity impacting their permeation of the blood–brain barrier (BBB). This integrated approach was utilized in a lead optimization effort towards the discovery of CNS-penetrant allosteric modulators of a seven-transmembrane (7TM) receptor target. Rat PK and brain distribution was rapidly obtained for 70 compounds and correlated to data obtained from in vitro assessments. Two compounds that were evaluated in cassette and discrete studies, displayed agreement in PK (compound 1: cassette CLp = 1.6 mL min−1 kg−1, discrete CLp = 1.6 mL min−1 kg−1; compound 2: cassette CLp = 11 mL min−1 kg−1, discrete CLp = 8.1 mL min−1 kg−1) and BTD (compound 1: cassette Kp = 0.11, discrete Kp = 0.09; compound 2: cassette Kp < 0.05, discrete Kp = 0.04). The resulting data were used to guide medicinal chemistry efforts and to enable the progression of optimized compounds to in vivo pharmacodynamic assessments. PMID:25505618

  18. Toxicity and tissue distribution of magnetic nanoparticles in mice.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jun Sung; Yoon, Tae-Jong; Yu, Kyeong Nam; Kim, Byung Gul; Park, Sung Jin; Kim, Hyun Woo; Lee, Kee Ho; Park, Seung Bum; Lee, Jin-Kyu; Cho, Myung Haing

    2006-01-01

    The development of technology enables the reduction of material size in science. The use of particle reduction in size from micro to nanoscale not only provides benefits to diverse scientific fields but also poses potential risks to humans and the environment. For the successful application of nanomaterials in bioscience, it is essential to understand the biological fate and potential toxicity of nanoparticles. The aim of this study was to evaluate the biological distribution as well as the potential toxicity of magnetic nanoparticles to enable their diverse applications in life science, such as drug development, protein detection, and gene delivery. We recently synthesized biocompatible silica-overcoated magnetic nanoparticles containing rhodamine B isothiocyanate (RITC) within a silica shell of controllable thickness [MNPs@SiO2(RITC)]. In this study, the MNPs@SiO2(RITC) with 50-nm thickness were used as a model nanomaterial. After intraperitoneal administration of MNPs@SiO2(RITC) for 4 weeks into mice, the nanoparticles were detected in the brain, indicating that such nanosized materials can penetrate blood-brain barrier (BBB) without disturbing its function or producing apparent toxicity. After a 4-week observation, MNPs@SiO2(RITC) was still present in various organs without causing apparent toxicity. Taken together, our results demonstrated that magnetic nanoparticles of 50-nm size did not cause apparent toxicity under the experimental conditions of this study.

  19. Engineered nanomaterial uptake and tissue distribution: from cell to organism

    PubMed Central

    Kettiger, Helene; Schipanski, Angela; Wick, Peter; Huwyler, Jörg

    2013-01-01

    Improved understanding of interactions between nanoparticles and biological systems is needed to develop safety standards and to design new generations of nanomaterials. This article reviews the molecular mechanisms of cellular uptake of engineered nanoparticles, their intracellular fate, and their distribution within an organism. We have reviewed the available literature on the uptake and disposition of engineered nanoparticles. Special emphasis was placed on the analysis of experimental systems and their limitations with respect to their usefulness to predict the in vivo situation. The available literature confirms the need to study particle characteristics in an environment that simulates the situation encountered in biological systems. Phenomena such as protein binding and opsonization are of prime importance since they may have a strong impact on cellular internalization, biodistribution, and immunogenicity of nanoparticles in vitro and in vivo. Extrapolation from in vitro results to the in vivo situation in the whole organism remains a challenge. However, improved understanding of physicochemical properties of engineered nanoparticles and their influence on biological systems facilitates the design of nanomaterials that are safe, well tolerated, and suitable for diagnostic or therapeutic use in humans. PMID:24023514

  20. Distribution of CPP-Protein Complexes in Freshly Resected Human Tissue Material

    PubMed Central

    Saar, Külliki; Saar, Helgi; Hansen, Mats; Langel, Ülo; Pooga, Margus

    2010-01-01

    Interest in cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) as delivery agents has fuelled a large number of studies conducted on cultured cells and in mice. However, only a few studies have been devoted to the behaviour of CPPs in human tissues. Therefore, we performed ex vivo tissue-dipping experiments where we studied the distribution of CPP-protein complexes in samples of freshly harvested human tissue material. We used the carcinoma or hyperplasia-containing specimens of the uterus and the cervix, obtained as surgical waste from nine hysterectomies. Our aim was to evaluate the tissue of preference (epithelial versus muscular/connective tissue, carcinoma versus adjacent histologically normal tissue) for two well-studied CPPs, the transportan and the TAT-peptide. We complexed biotinylated CPPs with avidin-β-galactosidase (ABG), which enabled us to apply whole-mount X-gal staining as a robust detection method. Our results demonstrate that both peptides enhanced the tissue distribution of ABG. The enhancing effect of the tested CPPs was more obvious in the normal tissue and in some specimens we detected a striking selectivity of CPP-ABG complexes for the normal tissue. This unexpected finding encourages the evaluation of CPPs as local delivery agents in non-malignant situations, for example in the intrauterine gene therapy of benign gynaecological diseases. PMID:27713271

  1. Chiral Pesticide Pharmacokinetics: A Range of Values

    EPA Science Inventory

    Approximately 30% of pesticides are chiral and used as mixtures of two or more stereoisomers. In biological systems, these stereoisomers can exhibit significantly different pharmacokinetics (absorption, distribution, metabolism, and elimination). In spite of these differences, th...

  2. Childhood obesity, adipose tissue distribution, and the pediatric practitioner.

    PubMed

    Slyper, A H

    1998-07-01

    coronary disease tend to be obese. Very low-density lipoprotein and intermediate-density lipoprotein particles, which are small in size, may be important in atherogenesis but they cannot be identified in a fasting lipid panel. The propensity to atherogenesis cannot be interpreted readily from a fasting lipid panel, which therefore should be interpreted in conjunction with a family history for coronary risk factors. Hypertriglyceridemia may be indicative of increased visceral fat, familial combined hyperlipidemia, familial dyslipidemic hypertension, impaired glucose tolerance, or diabetes. Almost half of adult females with polycystic ovary syndrome are obese and many have a central distribution of body fat. This condition frequently has its origins in adolescence. It is associated with increased androgen secretion, hirsutism, menstrual abnormalities, and infertility, although these may not be present in every case. Adults with polycystic ovary syndrome adults are hyperlipidemic, have a high incidence of impaired glucose tolerance and noninsulin-dependent diabetes, and are at increased risk for coronary artery disease. Weight reduction and lipid lowering therefore are an important part of therapy. Obstructive sleep apnea with daytime somnolence is a common problem in obese adults. Pediatric studies suggest that obstructive sleep apnea occurs in approximately 17% of obese children and adolescents. Sleep disorders in the obese may be a major cause of learning disability and school failure, although this remains to be confirmed. Symptoms suggestive of a sleep disorder include snoring, restlessness at night with difficulty breathing, arousals and sweating, nocturnal enuresis, and daytime somnolence. Questions to exclude obstructive sleep apnea should be part of the history of all obese children, particularly for the morbidly obese. For many children and adolescents with mild obesity, and particularly for females, one can speculate that obesity may not be a great health risk PMID

  3. Childhood obesity, adipose tissue distribution, and the pediatric practitioner.

    PubMed

    Slyper, A H

    1998-07-01

    coronary disease tend to be obese. Very low-density lipoprotein and intermediate-density lipoprotein particles, which are small in size, may be important in atherogenesis but they cannot be identified in a fasting lipid panel. The propensity to atherogenesis cannot be interpreted readily from a fasting lipid panel, which therefore should be interpreted in conjunction with a family history for coronary risk factors. Hypertriglyceridemia may be indicative of increased visceral fat, familial combined hyperlipidemia, familial dyslipidemic hypertension, impaired glucose tolerance, or diabetes. Almost half of adult females with polycystic ovary syndrome are obese and many have a central distribution of body fat. This condition frequently has its origins in adolescence. It is associated with increased androgen secretion, hirsutism, menstrual abnormalities, and infertility, although these may not be present in every case. Adults with polycystic ovary syndrome adults are hyperlipidemic, have a high incidence of impaired glucose tolerance and noninsulin-dependent diabetes, and are at increased risk for coronary artery disease. Weight reduction and lipid lowering therefore are an important part of therapy. Obstructive sleep apnea with daytime somnolence is a common problem in obese adults. Pediatric studies suggest that obstructive sleep apnea occurs in approximately 17% of obese children and adolescents. Sleep disorders in the obese may be a major cause of learning disability and school failure, although this remains to be confirmed. Symptoms suggestive of a sleep disorder include snoring, restlessness at night with difficulty breathing, arousals and sweating, nocturnal enuresis, and daytime somnolence. Questions to exclude obstructive sleep apnea should be part of the history of all obese children, particularly for the morbidly obese. For many children and adolescents with mild obesity, and particularly for females, one can speculate that obesity may not be a great health risk

  4. Tissue temperature distribution measurement by MRI and laser immunology for cancer treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yichao; Gnyawali, Surya C.; Wu, Feng; Liu, Hong; Tesiram, Yasvir A.; Abbott, Andrew; Towner, Rheal A.; Chen, Wei R.

    2007-02-01

    In cancer treatment and immune response enhancement research, Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is an ideal method for non-invasive, three-dimensional temperature measurement. We used a 7.1-Tesla magnetic resonance imager for ex vivo tissues and small animal to determine temperature distribution of target tissue during laser irradiation. The feasibility of imaging is approved with high spatial resolution and high signal-noise- ratio. Tissue-simulating gel phantom gel, biological tissues, and tumor-bearing animals were used in the experiments for laser treatment and MR imaging. Thermal couple measurement of temperature in target samples was used for system calibration. An 805-nm laser was used to irradiate the samples with a laser power in the range of 1 to 2.5 watts. Using the MRI system and a specially developed processing algorithm, a clear temperature distribution matrix in the target tissue and surrounding tissue was obtained. The temperature profiles show that the selective laser photothermal effect could result in tissue temperature elevation in a range of 10 to 45 °C. The temperature resolution of the measurement was about 0.37°C including the total system error. The spatial resolution was 0.4 mm (128x128 pixels with field of view of 5.5x5.5 cm). The temperature distribution provided in vivo thermal information and future reference for optimizing dye concentration and irradiation parameters to achieve optimal thermal effects in cancer treatment.

  5. Temperature distribution in target tumor tissue and photothermal tissue destruction during laser immunotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doughty, Austin; Hasanjee, Aamr; Pettitt, Alex; Silk, Kegan; Liu, Hong; Chen, Wei R.; Zhou, Feifan

    2016-03-01

    Laser Immunotherapy is a novel cancer treatment modality that has seen much success in treating many different types of cancer, both in animal studies and in clinical trials. The treatment consists of the synergistic interaction between photothermal laser irradiation and the local injection of an immunoadjuvant. As a result of the therapy, the host immune system launches a systemic antitumor response. The photothermal effect induced by the laser irradiation has multiple effects at different temperature elevations which are all required for optimal response. Therefore, determining the temperature distribution in the target tumor during the laser irradiation in laser immunotherapy is crucial to facilitate the treatment of cancers. To investigate the temperature distribution in the target tumor, female Wistar Furth rats were injected with metastatic mammary tumor cells and, upon sufficient tumor growth, underwent laser irradiation and were monitored using thermocouples connected to locally-inserted needle probes and infrared thermography. From the study, we determined that the maximum central tumor temperature was higher for tumors of less volume. Additionally, we determined that the temperature near the edge of the tumor as measured with a thermocouple had a strong correlation with the maximum temperature value in the infrared camera measurement.

  6. Genetic deficiency of carnitine/organic cation transporter 2 (slc22a5) is associated with altered tissue distribution of its substrate pyrilamine in mice.

    PubMed

    Kato, Sayaka; Kato, Yukio; Nakamura, Tadakatsu; Sugiura, Tomoko; Kubo, Yoshiyuki; Deguchi, Yoshiharu; Tsuji, Akira

    2009-12-01

    Carnitine/organic cation transporter 2 (OCTN2) recognizes various cationic compounds as substrates in vitro, but information on its pharmacokinetic role in vivo is quite limited. This paper demonstrates altered tissue distribution of the OCTN2 substrate pyrilamine in juvenile visceral steatosis (jvs) mice, which have a hereditary defect of the octn2 gene. At 30 min after intravenous injection of pyrilamine, the tissue-to-plasma concentration ratio (K(p)) in the heart and pancreas was higher, whereas the K(p) in kidney and testis was lower in jvs mice compared with wild-type mice. Pyrilamine transport studies in isolated heart slices confirmed higher accumulation, together with lower efflux, of pyrilamine in the heart of jvs mice. The higher accumulation in heart slices of jvs mice was abolished by lowering the temperature, by increasing the substrate concentration, and in the presence of other H(1) antagonists or another OCTN2 substrate, carnitine, suggesting that OCTN2 extrudes pyrilamine from heart tissue. On the other hand, the lower distribution to the kidney of jvs mice was probably due to down-regulation of a basolateral transporter coupled with OCTN2, because, in jvs mice, (i) the K(p) of pyrilamine in kidney assessed immediately after intravenous injection (approximately 1 min) was also lower, (ii) the urinary excretion of pyrilamine was lower, and (iii) the uptake of pyrilamine in kidney slices was lower. The renal uptake of pyrilamine was saturable (K(m) approximately 236 microM) and was strongly inhibited by cyproheptadine, astemizole, ebastine and terfenadine. The present study thus indicates that genetic deficiency of octn2 alters pyrilamine disposition tissue-dependently. PMID:19821448

  7. Drug pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics: Technological considerations

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, J.S.; Volkow, N.D.; Wolf, A.P.

    1992-12-31

    Additionally, the use of PET to examine drug pharmacokinetics and pharmacadynamics and the relationship of these properties to the behavioral, therapeutic and toxic properties of drugs and substances of abuse is emerging as a powerful new scientific tool. The pharmacokinetic properties of a drug, which comprises all of the biological processes which determine the fraction of the drug available, can be measured using the labeled drug itself. For example, the labeled drug can be used to measure the absolute uptake, regional distribution and kinetics of a drug at its site of action in the body. Additionally the labeled drug and whole body its labeled metabolites and thus provide information an potential toxic effects as well as tissue half lives. On the other hand, different labeled tracers can be used to assess drug pharmacodynamics which include the biological Processes involved in the drug`s effects. For example, with appropriate radiotracers, the effects of a drug on metabolism, neurotransmitter activity, blood flew, enzyme activity or other processes can be probed.

  8. Drug pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics: Technological considerations

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, J.S.; Volkow, N.D.; Wolf, A.P.

    1992-01-01

    Additionally, the use of PET to examine drug pharmacokinetics and pharmacadynamics and the relationship of these properties to the behavioral, therapeutic and toxic properties of drugs and substances of abuse is emerging as a powerful new scientific tool. The pharmacokinetic properties of a drug, which comprises all of the biological processes which determine the fraction of the drug available, can be measured using the labeled drug itself. For example, the labeled drug can be used to measure the absolute uptake, regional distribution and kinetics of a drug at its site of action in the body. Additionally the labeled drug and whole body its labeled metabolites and thus provide information an potential toxic effects as well as tissue half lives. On the other hand, different labeled tracers can be used to assess drug pharmacodynamics which include the biological Processes involved in the drug's effects. For example, with appropriate radiotracers, the effects of a drug on metabolism, neurotransmitter activity, blood flew, enzyme activity or other processes can be probed.

  9. Tissue distribution and urinary excretion of inorganic arsenic and its methylated metabolites in C57BL6 mice following subchronic exposure to arsenate in drinking water

    SciTech Connect

    Kenyon, E.M. Hughes, M.F.; Adair, B.M.; Highfill, J.H.; Crecelius, E.A.; Clewell, H.J.; Yager, J.W.

    2008-11-01

    The relationship of exposure and tissue concentration of parent chemical and metabolites over prolonged exposure is a critical issue for chronic toxicities mediated by metabolite(s) rather than parent chemical alone. This is an issue for As{sup V} because its trivalent metabolites have unique toxicities and relatively greater potency compared to their pentavalent counterparts for many endpoints. In this study, dose-dependency in tissue distribution and urinary excretion for inorganic arsenic and its methylated metabolites was assessed in female C57Bl/6 mice exposed to 0, 0.5, 2, 10 or 50 ppm arsenic (as arsenate, As{sup V}) in their drinking water for 12 weeks. No adverse effects were observed and body weight gain did not differ significantly among groups. Urinary excretion of arsenite monomethylarsonous acid (MMA{sup III}), dimethylarsinous acid (DMA{sup III}), dimethylarsinic acid (DMA{sup V}), and trimethylarsine oxide (TMAO) increased linearly with dose, whereas As{sup V} and monomethylarsonic acid (MMA{sup V}) excretion was non-linear with respect to dose. Total tissue arsenic accumulation was greatest in kidney > lung > urinary bladder >>> skin > blood > liver. Monomethyl arsenic (MMA, i.e. MMA{sup III} + MMA{sup V}) was the predominant metabolite in kidney, whereas dimethylarsenic (DMA, i.e., DMA{sup III} + DMA{sup V}) was the predominant metabolite in lung. Urinary bladder tissue had roughly equivalent levels of inorganic arsenic and dimethylarsenic, as did skin. These data indicate that pharmacokinetic models for arsenic metabolism and disposition need to include mechanisms for organ-specific accumulation of some arsenicals and that urinary metabolite profiles are not necessarily reflective of target tissue dosimetry.

  10. Studying the distribution of deep Raman spectroscopy signals using liquid tissue phantoms with varying optical properties.

    PubMed

    Vardaki, Martha Z; Gardner, Benjamin; Stone, Nicholas; Matousek, Pavel

    2015-08-01

    In this study we employed large volume liquid tissue phantoms, consisting of a scattering agent (Intralipid), an absorption agent (Indian ink) and a synthesized calcification powder (calcium hydroxyapatite (HAP)) similar to that found in cancerous tissues (e.g. breast and prostate), to simulate human tissues. We studied experimentally the magnitude and origin of Raman signals in a transmission Raman geometry as a function of optical properties of the medium and the location of calcifications within the phantom. The goal was to inform the development of future noninvasive cancer screening applications in vivo. The results provide insight into light propagation and Raman scattering distribution in deep Raman measurements, exploring also the effect of the variation of relative absorbance of laser and Raman photons within the phantoms. Most notably when modeling breast and prostate tissues it follows that maximum signals is obtained from the front and back faces of the tissue with the central region contributing less to the measured spectrum.

  11. Effect of tissue inhomogeneities on dose distributions from Cf-252 brachytherapy source.

    PubMed

    Ghassoun, J

    2013-01-01

    The Monte Carlo method was used to determine the effect of tissue inhomogeneities on dose distribution from a Cf-252 brachytherapy source. Neutron and gamma-ray fluences, energy spectra and dose rate distributions were determined in both homogenous and inhomogeneous phantoms. Simulations were performed using the MCNP5 code. Obtained results were compared with experimentally measured values published in literature. Results showed a significant change in neutron dose rate distributions in presence of heterogeneities. However, their effect on gamma rays dose distribution is minimal.

  12. Analysis and distribution of esculetin in plasma and tissues of rats after oral administration.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji-Sun; Ha, Tae-Youl; Ahn, Jiyun; Kim, Suna

    2014-12-01

    In this study, we developed a method to quantify esculetin (6,7-dihydroxycoumarin) in plasma and tissues using HPLC coupled with ultraviolet detection and measured the level of esculetin in rat plasma after oral administration. The calibration curve for esculetin was linear in the range of 4.8 ng/mL to 476.2 ng/mL, with a correlation coefficient (r(2)) of 0.996, a limit of detection value of 33.2 ng/mL, and a limit of quantification value of 100.6 ng/mL. Recovery rates for the 95.2 ng/mL and 190.5 ng/mL samples were 95.2% and 100.3%, within-runs and 104.8% and 101.0% between-runs, respectively. The relative standard deviation was less than 7% for both runs. In the pharmacokinetic analysis, the peak plasma esculetin level was reached 5 min after administration (Cmax=173.3 ng/mL; T1/2=45 min; AUC0 ~180 min=5,167.5 ng · min/mL). At 180 min post-administration (i.e., after euthanasia), esculetin was only detectable in the liver (30.87±11.33 ng/g) and the kidney (20.29±7.02 ng/g). PMID:25580397

  13. Simultaneous detection of tissue autofluorescence decay distribution and time-gated photo-bleaching rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lihachev, Alexey; Ferulova, Inesa; Spigulis, Janis; Tamosiunas, Mindaugas

    2015-05-01

    Experimental methodology for parallel measurements of in-vivo skin autofluorescence (AF) lifetimes and photobleaching dynamic has been developed and tested. The AF lifetime decay distributions were periodically collected from fixed tissue area with subsequent detection of the fluorescence intensity decrease dynamic at different time gates after the pulse excitation. Temporal distributions of human in-vivo skin AF lifetimes and bleaching kinetics were collected and analyzed by means of commercial time-correlated single photon counting system.

  14. [Distribution of compact bone mesenchymal stem cells in lung tissue and bone marrow of mouse].

    PubMed

    Wang, Rui-Ping; Wu, Ren-Na; Guo, Yu-Qing; Zhang, Bin; Chen, Hu

    2014-02-01

    This study was aimed to investigate the distribution of compact bone mesenchymal stem cells(MSC) marked with lentiviral plasmid pGC FU-RFP-LV in lung tissue and bone marrow of mouse. The MSC were infected by lentivirus with infection efficiency 78%, the infected MSC were injected into BALB/c mice via tail veins in concentration of 1×10(6) /mouse. The mice were randomly divided into 4 group according to 4 time points as 1, 2, 5 and 7 days. The lung tissue and bone marrow were taken and made of frozen sections and smears respectively in order to observed the distributions of MSC. The results indicated that the lentiviral infected MSC displayed phenotypes and biological characteristics which conformed to MSC by immunophenotyping analysis and induction differentiation detection. After the MSC were infected with optimal viral titer MOI = 50, the cell growth no significantly changed; the fluorescent microscopy revealed that the distributions of MSC in bone marrow on day 1, 2, 5 and 7 were 0.50 ± 0.20, 0.67 ± 0.23, 0.53 ± 0.14, 0.33 ± 0.16; those in lung tissue were 0.55 ± 0.15, 0.47 ± 0.13, 0.29 ± 0.13, 0.26 ± 0.08. It is concluded that the distribution of MSC in lung tissue reaches a peak on day 1, while distribution of MSC in bone marrow reaches a peak on day 2. The distribution of mouse MSC relates with RFP gene expression and implantation of MSC in lung tissue and bone marrow.

  15. Distribution of EV71 receptors SCARB2 and PSGL-1 in human tissues.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Xiao-Yang; Guo, Li; Huang, Dong-Yang; Chang, Xiao-Lan; Qiu, Qian-Cheng

    2014-09-22

    The aim of this study was to investigate the distribution of Enterovirus 71 (EV71) receptors SCARB2 and PSGL-1 in human tissues. The samples were chosen from archived specimens, and the profiles of two receptors were detected in the gastrointestinal tract, lung, and brain in situ by immunohistochemistry. SCARB2 was detected in all the tissues studied, and strong staining was observed in the gastric fundus gland, mucosal and glandular epithelia of the intestine. Similar expression was found in bronchial epithelia and pneumocytes. In addition, SCARB2 was observed in the esophagus/gastric mucosal epithelia, neuron, glial cells, and blood vessels and the perivascular tissues of the brain. By comparison, PSGL-1 was expressed weakly in the mucosal and glandular epithelia of the small intestine and colon. PSGL-1 was expressed in a few bronchial epithelia, and weak staining was observed in the pneumocytes. However, PSGL-1 was found easily in the lamina propria of all the tissues studied, and strong staining of PSGL-1 was also observed in the neurons and glial cells. The distribution of the SCARB2 and PSGL-1 in human gastrointestinal tract, lung, and brain tissues correlated with the distribution of pathological changes seen in EV71 infection. The widespread prevalence of these receptors may help explain the multiple organ involvement in infection with EV71.

  16. Distribution of EV71 receptors SCARB2 and PSGL-1 in human tissues.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Xiao-Yang; Guo, Li; Huang, Dong-Yang; Chang, Xiao-Lan; Qiu, Qian-Cheng

    2014-09-22

    The aim of this study was to investigate the distribution of Enterovirus 71 (EV71) receptors SCARB2 and PSGL-1 in human tissues. The samples were chosen from archived specimens, and the profiles of two receptors were detected in the gastrointestinal tract, lung, and brain in situ by immunohistochemistry. SCARB2 was detected in all the tissues studied, and strong staining was observed in the gastric fundus gland, mucosal and glandular epithelia of the intestine. Similar expression was found in bronchial epithelia and pneumocytes. In addition, SCARB2 was observed in the esophagus/gastric mucosal epithelia, neuron, glial cells, and blood vessels and the perivascular tissues of the brain. By comparison, PSGL-1 was expressed weakly in the mucosal and glandular epithelia of the small intestine and colon. PSGL-1 was expressed in a few bronchial epithelia, and weak staining was observed in the pneumocytes. However, PSGL-1 was found easily in the lamina propria of all the tissues studied, and strong staining of PSGL-1 was also observed in the neurons and glial cells. The distribution of the SCARB2 and PSGL-1 in human gastrointestinal tract, lung, and brain tissues correlated with the distribution of pathological changes seen in EV71 infection. The widespread prevalence of these receptors may help explain the multiple organ involvement in infection with EV71. PMID:24997419

  17. Distribution of trace elements in normal and diseased mouse ileum and kidney tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirby, B. J.; McArdle, H.; Danks, D. M.; Legge, G. J. F.

    1991-03-01

    A proton microprobe has been utilised to determine the distribution and relative concentration of Cu, Fe and Zn in 10 day old normal and brindled mouse small intestine and kidney tissues. High Cu levels were measured in the brindled mutant ileum and kidney tissues confirming previous whole tissue results. In the ileum, peripheral concentrations of both Fe and Cu in normal and mutant villi tips were observed. Ratios of X-ray yields from outer villus tip to inner villus tip irradiated areas were taken and compared for mutant and normal mice after normalising to the bremsstrahlung yield in each case. The ratio of outer to inner Fe concentrations in the epithelium were shown to be higher than normal in the diseased tissue. In the kidney, the high Cu concentration in the mutant tissue was found to be localised to within certain regions in the proximal tubule in the nephron. Accurate determination of the Cu distribution in the small intestine and kidney tissues of the mutant mouse will provide further information on where the defective reabsorption of Cu is occurring, and may contribute to a better understanding of the homologous human condition.

  18. Tissue distribution of ochratoxin A as determined by HPLC and ELISA and histopathological effects in chickens.

    PubMed

    Biró, Krisztina; Solti, László; Barna-Vetró, Ildikó; Bagó, György; Glávits, Róbert; Szabó, Erzsébet; Fink-Gremmels, Johanna

    2002-04-01

    Ochratoxin A is a common feed contaminant, which may impair animal health and may lead to residues in edible tissues of slaughter animals. To simulate field conditions, broiler chicks were exposed to a total of 0.5 mg ochratoxin A per week for each of 4 weeks. Plasma toxin levels and tissue residues were measured by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and microplate enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Results indicate an accumulation in plasma and wide distribution into all organs, with high levels in the liver and the kidney. Microscopical changes that could primarily be associated with toxin exposure were glomerulonephrosis, tubulonephrosis, focal tubular epithelial cell proliferation and multiple, adenoma-like structures in the renal parenchyma. The HPLC and ELISA methods gave similar results for both tissue distribution and depletion. Differences in absolute tissue toxin concentrations obtained by the two methods might be attributed to the different extraction and clean-up procedures, along with antibody specificity. The findings indicate that the dose applied causes subclinical tissue lesions and measurable tissue residues. PMID:12396358

  19. Determination of surface temperature distribution in biological tissues during laser-immunotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gnyawali, Surya C.; Chen, Yichao; Wu, Feng; Bartels, Kenneth E.; Ritchey, Jerry W.; Wicksted, James P.; Liu, Hong; Chen, Wei R.

    2007-02-01

    An ideal cancer treatment method should not only cause primary tumor suppression but also induce an antitumor immunity, which is essential for control of metastatic tumors. A combination therapy using a laser, a laser-absorbing dye, and an immunoadjuvant guided by temperature measurement probes such as magnetic resonance imaging thermometry (MRT) and infrared thermography (IRT) can be an ideal treatment modality. Temperature distribution inside the target tissue is important in laser treatment. The surface temperature often serves as an indicator of the treatment effect. However, real-time monitoring of surface temperature during laser irradiation poses a great challenge. In this study, we investigated the surface temperature distribution using direct measurement and theoretical simulation. The preliminary results of in vitro and in vivo studies are presented. Gel phantom and chicken breast tissue were irradiated by an 805 nm laser and the surface temperature distribution was obtained using an infrared thermal camera. EMT-6 breast tumors in mice were treated using the 805 nm laser and with different dye and immunoadjuvant combinations, including intratumor injections of indocyanine green (ICG) and glycated chitosan (GC). Monte Carlo simulation for selective photothermal-tissue interaction was also performed for the surface temperature distributions. Our results demonstrated that the tissue temperature can be accurately monitored in real time and can be controlled by appropriate treatment parameters.

  20. Characterization and tissue distribution of conjugated metabolites of pyrene in the rat

    PubMed Central

    SAENGTIENCHAI, Aksorn; IKENAKA, Yoshinori; DARWISH, Wageh Sobhy; NAKAYAMA, Shouta M.M.; MIZUKAWA, Hazuki; ISHIZUKA, Mayumi

    2015-01-01

    Pyrene (PY) is a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) that is often used as a biomarker for human and wildlife exposure to PAHs. As the metabolites of PAHs, similar to their parent compounds, pose public health risks, it is necessary to study their characteristics and tissue-specific distribution. The present study was performed to experimentally characterize PY metabolites and analyze the tissue-specific distribution of the conjugated metabolites after oral administration of PY to rats. PY metabolites, such as pyrenediol-disulfate (PYdiol-diS), pyrenediol-sulfate (PYdiol-S), pyrene-1-sufate (PYOS), pyrene-1-glucuronide (PYOG) and 1-hydroxypyrene (PYOH), were detected in rat urine. Although glucuronide conjugate was the predominant metabolite, the metabolite composition varied among tissues. Interestingly, the proportion of PYOH was high in the large intestine. Furthermore, PYOH was the only PY metabolite detected in feces. PMID:26028020

  1. Cyclophosphamide pharmacokinetics in children.

    PubMed

    Yule, S M; Boddy, A V; Cole, M; Price, L; Wyllie, R; Tasso, M J; Pearson, A D; Idle, J R

    1996-01-01

    1. Cyclophosphamide pharmacokinetics were measured in 38 children with cancer. 2. A high degree of inter-patient variation was seen in all pharmacokinetic parameters. Cyclophosphamide half-life varied between 1.1 and 16.8 h, clearance varied between 1.2 and 10.61 h-1 m-2 and volume of distribution varied between 0.26 and 1.48 1 kg-1. 3. The half-life of cyclophosphamide was prolonged at high dose levels (P = 0.008). 4. Children who had received prior treatment with dexamethasone showed a mean increase in clearance of 2.51 h-1 m-2 (P = 0.001) presumably as a result of CYP450 enzyme induction. 5. Treatment with allopurinol or chlorpromazine was associated with a significant increase in cyclophosphamide half-life (P < 0.001 in both cases). 6. Dose and concurrent treatment may influence cyclophosphamide metabolism in vivo and thus potentially alter the drugs therapeutic effect.

  2. Pharmacokinetics of mitragynine in man

    PubMed Central

    Trakulsrichai, Satariya; Sathirakul, Korbtham; Auparakkitanon, Saranya; Krongvorakul, Jatupon; Sueajai, Jetjamnong; Noumjad, Nantida; Sukasem, Chonlaphat; Wananukul, Winai

    2015-01-01

    Background Kratom, known botanically as Mitragyna speciosa (Korth.), is an indigenous tree in Southeast Asia. Kratom is currently easily available worldwide via special shops and the Internet to use as a drug of abuse, opioid alternative, or pain killer. So far, the pharmacokinetics of this plant has been studied only in animals, and there is no such study in humans. The major abundant active alkaloid in Kratom, mitragynine, is one of the promising new chemical substances to be developed as a new drug. The aim of this study was to examine the pharmacokinetics of mitragynine and assess the linearity in pharmacokinetics in chronic users. Methods Since Kratom is illegal in Thailand, studies in healthy subjects would be unethical. We therefore conducted a prospective study by enrolling ten chronic, regular, healthy users. We adjusted the steady state in each subject by giving a known amount of Kratom tea for 7 days before commencement of the experiment. We admitted and gave different oral doses to subjects to confirm linearity in pharmacokinetics. The mitragynine blood concentrations at 17 times points and the urine concentrations during the 24-hour period were collected and measured by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method. Results Ten male subjects completed the study without adverse reactions. The median duration of abuse was 1.75 years. We analyzed one subject separately due to the abnormal behavior of blood concentration. From data of nine subjects, the pharmacokinetic parameters established were time to reach the maximum plasma concentration (0.83±0.35 hour), terminal half-life (23.24±16.07 hours), and the apparent volume of distribution (38.04±24.32 L/kg). The urine excretion of unchanged form was 0.14%. The pharmacokinetics were observed to be oral two-compartment model. Conclusion This was the first pharmacokinetic study in humans, which demonstrated linearity and was consistent with the oral two-compartment model with a terminal half

  3. The expression and distribution of α-Gal gene in various species ocular surface tissue

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Yi; Yu, Yao; Pei, Chong-Gang; Qu, Yangluowa; Gao, Gui-Ping; Yang, Ji-Lin; Zhou, Qiong; Yang, Lu; Liu, Qiu-Ping

    2012-01-01

    AIM To examine the α-Gal gene expression and distribution in the different species/genus and developing phase animal ocular surface tissue. METHODS α-Gal binding assay were carried out on various animal eye sections. Photograph, slit-lamp observation on various eye showed normal corneal transparence. RESULTS A strong α-Gal expression in invertebrates and some vertebrates ocular tissue, but no α-Gal binding in birds, fish and mammal. α-Gal expression change in the development of mice ocular surface tissue (except sclera) and display genus dependency in the different murine ocular surface tissue. CONCLUSION This study identified specific α-Gal epitopes binding area in the ocular surface of several species and may solve the problem that naive ocular surface may be used as natural α-Gal gene knockout model/high risk immunologic rejection model or ocular surface scaffold material. PMID:23166862

  4. Fleroxacin (Ro 23-6240) distribution in canine prostatic tissue and fluids.

    PubMed Central

    Gasser, T C; Graversen, P H; Madsen, P O

    1987-01-01

    The distribution of fleroxacin (Ro 23-6240) in canine prostatic tissue and fluids was investigated under steady-state conditions during intravenous infusion. Mean ratios of fleroxacin concentration in tissue and fluids over concentration in plasma were 1.57 +/- 0.25 for prostatic tissue, 1.12 +/- 0.28 for prostatic secretion, and 0.93 +/- 0.14 for prostatic interstitial fluid. These levels and concentrations in urine were several times higher than the MIC for most pathogens that cause chronic bacterial prostatitis and urinary tract infection. The MICs for several isolates of Escherichia coli were only slightly affected by canine prostatic secretion, human prostatic tissue extract, and human urine. Clinical trials with fleroxacin appear justified for chronic bacterial prostatitis and urinary tract infection. PMID:3116916

  5. Tissue distribution of sup 3 H-nicotine in rats after bolus or constant injection

    SciTech Connect

    Chowdhury, P.; Pasley, J.N.; Rayford, P.L. )

    1989-01-01

    Two groups of rats, (N = 7), were fasted for 24 hrs prior to the study. On the day of the experiment, the animals were anesthetized and infused with either 5 ml nicotine solution (200 {mu}g/L) in saline containing 5 {mu}c {sup 3}H-nicotine, (sp. activity 50-80 mCi/mol) for 90 minutes or injected as a bolus with 0.5 ml of the same nicotine (200 {mu}g/L) solution. The animals were sacrificed 60 minutes after the injection or after the infusion was stopped. Blood and tissue samples were counted by liquid scintillation counting. Percent distribution of {sup 3}H-nicotine per gm of tissue was calculated from the total radioactivity recovered in individual tissues over the total activity injected into the rat and the values were compared using student's t test. Results: Distribution of {sup 3}H-nicotine was found highest in kidney (45-49%) among all tissues examined and was not different between routes of administration. Significantly higher retention of {sup 3}H-nicotine was found with continuous infusion in esophagus, fundus, antrum, spleen, cecum, pancreas, testes, heart and muscle when {sup 3}H-nicotine retentions were compared with bolus injection. In contrast, the distribution of {sup 3}H-nicotine in adrenal gland, was significantly lower in continuous infusion group. Distribution in blood was 6 fold higher in continuous infusion (7.26%) compared to bolus (1.11%) injection. The distribution {sup 3}H-nicotine in other tissues were not different by either routes of injection.

  6. Similarities and differences of metal distributions in the tissues of molluscs by using multivariate analyses.

    PubMed

    Yap, Chee Kong; Edward, Franklin Berandah; Tan, Soon Guan

    2010-06-01

    Multivariate analysis including correlation, multiple stepwise linear regression, and cluster analyses were applied to investigate the heavy metal concentrations (Cd, Cu, Fe, Ni, Pb, and Zn) in the different parts of bivalves and gastropods. It was also aimed to distinguish statistically the differences between the marine bivalves and the gastropods with regards to the accumulation of heavy metals in the different tissues. The different parts of four species of bivalves and four species of gastropods were obtained and analyzed for heavy metals. The multivariate analyses were then applied on the data. From the multivariate analyses conducted, there were correlations found between the soft tissues of bivalves and gastropods, but none was found between the shells and the soft tissues of most of the molluscs (except for Cerithidea obtusa and Puglina cochlidium). The significant correlations (P < 0.05) found between the soft tissues were further complemented by the multiple stepwise linear regressions where heavy metals in the total soft tissues were influenced by the accumulation in the different types of soft tissues. The present study found that the distributions of heavy metals in the different parts of molluscs were related to their feeding habits and living habitats. The statistical approaches proposed in this study are recommended for use in biomonitoring studies, since multivariate analyses can reduce the cost and time involved in identifying an effective tissue to monitor the heavy metal(s) bioavailability and contamination in tropical coastal waters.

  7. PHARMACOKINETIC/PHARMACODYNAMIC MODELING OF PERMETHRIN IN THE RAT

    EPA Science Inventory

    A physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model was used to describe pharmacokinetics of permethrin and calibrated using experimental data on the concentration time-course of cis- and trans-permethrin in rat blood and brain tissues following oral administration...

  8. A model to resolve organochlorine pharmacokinetics in migrating humpback whales.

    PubMed

    Cropp, Roger; Nash, Susan Bengtson; Hawker, Darryl

    2014-07-01

    Humpback whales are iconic mammals at the top of the Antarctic food chain. Their large reserves of lipid-rich tissues such as blubber predispose them to accumulation of lipophilic contaminants throughout their lifetime. Changes in the volume and distribution of lipids in humpback whales, particularly during migration, could play an important role in the pharmacokinetics of lipophilic contaminants such as the organochlorine pesticide hexachlorobenzene (HCB). Previous models have examined constant feeding and nonmigratory scenarios. In the present study, the authors develop a novel heuristic model to investigate HCB dynamics in a humpback whale and its environment by coupling an ecosystem nutrient-phytoplankton-zooplankton-detritus (NPZD) model, a dynamic energy budget (DEB) model, and a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model. The model takes into account the seasonal feeding pattern of whales, their energy requirements, and fluctuating contaminant burdens in the supporting plankton food chain. It is applied to a male whale from weaning to maturity, spanning 20 migration and feeding cycles. The model is initialized with environmental HCB burdens similar to those measured in the Southern Ocean and predicts blubber HCB concentrations consistent with empirical concentrations observed in a southern hemisphere population of male, migrating humpback whales. Results show for the first time some important details of the relationship between energy budgets and organochlorine pharmacokinetics. PMID:24733631

  9. A model to resolve organochlorine pharmacokinetics in migrating humpback whales.

    PubMed

    Cropp, Roger; Nash, Susan Bengtson; Hawker, Darryl

    2014-07-01

    Humpback whales are iconic mammals at the top of the Antarctic food chain. Their large reserves of lipid-rich tissues such as blubber predispose them to accumulation of lipophilic contaminants throughout their lifetime. Changes in the volume and distribution of lipids in humpback whales, particularly during migration, could play an important role in the pharmacokinetics of lipophilic contaminants such as the organochlorine pesticide hexachlorobenzene (HCB). Previous models have examined constant feeding and nonmigratory scenarios. In the present study, the authors develop a novel heuristic model to investigate HCB dynamics in a humpback whale and its environment by coupling an ecosystem nutrient-phytoplankton-zooplankton-detritus (NPZD) model, a dynamic energy budget (DEB) model, and a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model. The model takes into account the seasonal feeding pattern of whales, their energy requirements, and fluctuating contaminant burdens in the supporting plankton food chain. It is applied to a male whale from weaning to maturity, spanning 20 migration and feeding cycles. The model is initialized with environmental HCB burdens similar to those measured in the Southern Ocean and predicts blubber HCB concentrations consistent with empirical concentrations observed in a southern hemisphere population of male, migrating humpback whales. Results show for the first time some important details of the relationship between energy budgets and organochlorine pharmacokinetics.

  10. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic interactions between palifermin and heparin.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bing-Bing; Gillespie, Brad; Smith, Brian; Smith, William; Lissmats, Agneta; Rudebeck, Mattias; Kullenberg, Torbjörn; Olsson, Birgitta

    2015-10-01

    Oral mucositis, a severe complication during chemo- and/or radiotherapy, is prevented with palifermin treatment, a recombinant human keratinocyte growth factor (KGF/FGF-7). The FGF family belongs to the larger family of heparin-binding growth factors. Because it has been shown that heparin modulates binding of KGF to the KGF receptor and subsequently affects cellular proliferation induced by the KGF mitogenic signal, it is critical to understand the drug-drug interactions between palifermin and heparin, particularly because of heparin's narrow therapeutic margin. Two studies were performed in healthy subjects to characterize the effect of palifermin on the pharmacodynamics of heparin (activated partial thromboplastin time) and evaluate the impact of heparin on the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics (Ki67 staining of buccal mucosal tissue) of palifermin. Results demonstrated a pronounced pharmacokinetic interaction; heparin coadministration increased the palifermin AUC 4- to 5-fold and decreased its half-life by 40%-45%, suggesting an approximate 70%-80% decrease in palifermin clearance and volume of distribution. These changes in the pharmacokinetics of palifermin during coadministration of heparin, however, did not affect the pharmacodynamic effect of palifermin, or the anticoagulant activity of heparin, and did not lead to increased safety findings. Therefore, these results suggest that dose adjustments for heparin and palifermin are not warranted when administered concurrently.

  11. Measurement of rat heart fatty acid binding protein by ELISA. Tissue distribution, developmental changes and subcellular distribution.

    PubMed

    Crisman, T S; Claffey, K P; Saouaf, R; Hanspal, J; Brecher, P

    1987-05-01

    A class of soluble, low molecular weight proteins collectively called fatty acid binding proteins (FABP) are thought to function in the intracellular movement of fatty acids. To understand more clearly the role of FABP in cardiac metabolism, we used ELISA and immunoblotting techniques to study the distribution of heart FABP in several rat tissues, compare male and female rat heart content, quantitate developmental changes, and determine its subcellular distribution. Immunoreactive protein was found in appreciable amounts in rat heart, red skeletal muscle and kidney. Adult rat heart contained about 1.5 mg FABP/g tissue wet weight with the atrial content being approximately 50% of the ventricular concentration. No significant difference was detected between the sexes. The amount of FABP increased progressively during development from fetal to adult animals, and measureable amounts were found in 17-day-old fetal tissue. Comparisons between myoglobin and FABP showed that FABP appeared earlier than myoglobin in development, but myoglobin was more abundant than FABP at birth. Using immunoblots it was determined that rat heart FABP was localized in the cytosol with no detectable intramitochondrial material. PMID:3625779

  12. Familial lipoprotein lipase-activity deficiency: study of total body fatness and subcutaneous fat tissue distribution.

    PubMed

    Brun, L D; Gagné, C; Julien, P; Tremblay, A; Moorjani, S; Bouchard, C; Lupien, P J

    1989-10-01

    Total body fatness and subcutaneous fat tissue distribution were evaluated in 19 hyperchylomicronemic patients. Eleven were males, aged 10 to 57 years, and eight were females, aged 13 to 46 years. Familial lipoprotein-lipase-activity deficiency was diagnosed by the absence of lipoprotein-lipase activity in the plasma withdrawn ten and 20 minutes after intravenous injection of ten units of heparin per kilogram of body weight. The 19 patients had skin-fold measurements for evaluation of subcutaneous fat distribution. Fifteen also underwent body density measurements by underwater weighing. Percent body fat was calculated from body density. These anthropometric data were plotted against the regression curves of 1638 normal controls of both sexes (aged 10 to 54 years) for fat tissue weight, percent body fat, subcutaneous fat/total fat mass ratio and trunk/extremity skin-fold ratio. Impairments in the process of building fat tissue reserves could not be shown in the 19 hyperchylomicronemic patients, in spite of the absence of lipoprotein-lipase activity in their postheparin plasma. It is hypothesized that normal fat tissue mass in these patients could be due partly to de novo synthesis of fatty acids by adipocytes, hydrolysis of plasma triglycerides by hepatic lipase, and/or contribution of a specific fat-tissue lipase to the catabolism of plasma triglyceride-rich lipoproteins.

  13. Distribution of lead, cadmium, and zinc in tissues of hens and chickens from Slovenia

    SciTech Connect

    Doganoc, D.Z.

    1996-12-01

    Lead (Pb) and cadmium (Cd) are environmental contaminants which are present in almost all living organisms and are non-essential for plants, animals and human beings. Zinc (Zn) is an essential element which occurs together with Cd and is linked with it. Little information exists about the contamination of tissues of hens and chickens with these elements. The primary aim of this study was to investigate the distribution of lead, cadmium, and zinc in different tissues of poultry and eggs in Slovenia. 10 refs., 7 tabs.

  14. Extraction of optical properties and prediction of light distribution in rat brain tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azimipour, Mehdi; Baumgartner, Ryan; Liu, Yuming; Jacques, Steven L.; Eliceiri, Kevin; Pashaie, Ramin

    2014-07-01

    Predicting the distribution of light inside any turbid media, such as biological tissue, requires detailed information about the optical properties of the medium, including the absorption and scattering coefficients and the anisotropy factor. Particularly, in biophotonic applications where photons directly interact with the tissue, this information translates to system design optimization, precision in light delivery, and minimization of unintended consequences, such as phototoxicity or photobleaching. In recent years, optogenetics has opened up a new area in deep brain stimulation with light and the method is widely adapted by researchers for the study of the brain circuitries and the dynamics of neurological disorders. A key factor for a successful optogenetic stimulation is delivering an adequate amount of light to the targeted brain objects. The adequate amount of light needed to stimulate each brain object is identified by the tissue optical properties as well as the type of opsin expressed in the tissue, wavelength of the light, and the physical dimensions of the targeted area. Therefore, to implement a precise light delivery system for optogenetics, detailed information about the optical properties of the brain tissue and a mathematical model that incorporates all determining factors is needed to find a good estimation of light distribution in the brain. In general, three measurements are required to obtain the optical properties of any tissue, namely diffuse transmitted light, diffuse reflected light, and transmitted ballistic beam. In this report, these parameters were measured in vitro using intact rat brain slices of 500 μm thickness via a two-integrating spheres optical setup. Then, an inverse adding doubling method was used to extract the optical properties of the tissue from the collected data. These experiments were repeated to cover the whole brain tissue with high spatial resolution for the three different cuts (transverse, sagittal, and coronal

  15. Development of a Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Model for Triadimefon and its Metabolite Triandimenol in Rats and Humans

    EPA Science Inventory

    physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model was developed for the conazole fungicide triadimefon and its primary metabolite, triadimenol. Rat tissue:blood partition coefficients and metabolic constants were measured in vitro for both compounds. Pharmacokinetic data for par...

  16. Studies on the tissue distribution of the puromycin-sensitive enkephalin-degrading aminopeptidases.

    PubMed

    McLellan, S; Dyer, S H; Rodriguez, G; Hersh, L B

    1988-11-01

    An antiserum generated to the soluble form of the rat brain puromycin-sensitive enkephalin-degrading aminopeptidase was used to determine the tissue distribution of the soluble and membrane-associated forms of this enzyme. All tissues examined contained significant levels of the soluble enzyme form, with this enzyme accounting for greater than 90% of the arylamidase activity in brain, heart, and skeletal muscle. Native gel electrophoresis coupled with activity staining as well as inhibition studies were used to confirm the presence of this enzyme in various tissues. Serum was found not to contain this particular aminopeptidase. In contrast to the results obtained with the soluble enzyme form, brain was the only tissue found to contain the membrane-associated enzyme form. Although all tissues contained membrane-associated aminopeptidase activity only the brain enzyme could be maintained in solution in the absence of detergent. In addition, the brain membrane-associated enzyme could be distinguished from the membrane-associated aminopeptidase activity in other tissues on the basis of its sensitivity to inhibition by puromycin.

  17. Interspecies Mixed-Effect Pharmacokinetic Modeling of Penicillin G in Cattle and Swine

    PubMed Central

    Li, Mengjie; Gehring, Ronette; Tell, Lisa; Baynes, Ronald; Huang, Qingbiao

    2014-01-01

    Extralabel drug use of penicillin G in food-producing animals may cause an excess of residues in tissue which will have the potential to damage human health. Of all the antibiotics, penicillin G may have the greatest potential for producing allergic responses to the consumer of food animal products. There are, however, no population pharmacokinetic studies of penicillin G for food animals. The objective of this study was to develop a population pharmacokinetic model to describe the time-concentration data profile of penicillin G across two species. Data were collected from previously published pharmacokinetic studies in which several formulations of penicillin G were administered to diverse populations of cattle and swine. Liver, kidney, and muscle residue data were also used in this study. Compartmental models with first-order absorption and elimination were fit to plasma and tissue concentrations using a nonlinear mixed-effect modeling approach. A 3-compartment model with extra tissue compartments was selected to describe the pharmacokinetics of penicillin G. Typical population parameter estimates (interindividual variability) were central volumes of distribution of 3.45 liters (12%) and 3.05 liters (8.8%) and central clearance of 105 liters/h (32%) and 16.9 liters/h (14%) for cattle and swine, respectively, with peripheral clearance of 24.8 liters/h (13%) and 9.65 liters/h (23%) for cattle and 13.7 liters/h (85%) and 0.52 liters/h (40%) for swine. Body weight and age were the covariates in the final pharmacokinetic models. This study established a robust model of penicillin for a large and diverse population of food-producing animals which could be applied to other antibiotics and species in future analyses. PMID:24867969

  18. Altered distributions of bone tissue mineral and collagen properties in women with fragility fractures.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhen Xiang; Lloyd, Ashley A; Burket, Jayme C; Gourion-Arsiquaud, Samuel; Donnelly, Eve

    2016-03-01

    Heterogeneity of bone tissue properties is emerging as a potential indicator of altered bone quality in pathologic tissue. The objective of this study was to compare the distributions of tissue properties in women with and without histories of fragility fractures using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) imaging. We extended a prior study that examined the relationship of the mean FTIR properties to fracture risk by analyzing in detail the widths and the tails of the distributions of FTIR properties in biopsies from fracture and non-fracture cohorts. The mineral and matrix properties of cortical and trabecular iliac crest tissue were compared in biopsies from women with a history of fragility fracture (+Fx; n=21, age: mean 54±SD 15y) and with no history of fragility fracture (-Fx; n=12, age: 57±5y). A subset of the patients included in the -Fx group were taking estrogen-plus-progestin hormone replacement therapy (HRT) (-Fx+HRT n=8, age: 58±5y) and were analyzed separately from patients with no history of HRT (-Fx-HRT n=4, age: 56±7y). When the FTIR parameter mean values were examined by treatment group, the trabecular tissue of -Fx-HRT patients had a lower mineral:matrix ratio (M:M) and collagen maturity (XLR) than that of -Fx+HRT patients (-22% M:M, -18% XLR) and +Fx patients (-17% M:M, -18% XLR). Across multiple FTIR parameters, tissue from the -Fx-HRT group had smaller low-tail (5th percentile) values than that from the -Fx+HRT or +Fx groups. In trabecular collagen maturity and crystallinity (XST), the -Fx-HRT group had smaller low-tail values than those in the -Fx+HRT group (-16% XLR, -5% XST) and the +Fx group (-17% XLR, -7% XST). The relatively low values of trabecular mineral:matrix ratio and collagen maturity and smaller low-tail values of collagen maturity and crystallinity observed in the -Fx-HRT group are characteristic of younger tissue. Taken together, our data suggest that the presence of newly formed tissue that includes small/imperfect crystals

  19. A Systems Approach for Tumor Pharmacokinetics

    PubMed Central

    Thurber, Greg Michael; Weissleder, Ralph

    2011-01-01

    Recent advances in genome inspired target discovery, small molecule screens, development of biological and nanotechnology have led to the introduction of a myriad of new differently sized agents into the clinic. The differences in small and large molecule delivery are becoming increasingly important in combination therapies as well as the use of drugs that modify the physiology of tumors such as anti-angiogenic treatment. The complexity of targeting has led to the development of mathematical models to facilitate understanding, but unfortunately, these studies are often only applicable to a particular molecule, making pharmacokinetic comparisons difficult. Here we develop and describe a framework for categorizing primary pharmacokinetics of drugs in tumors. For modeling purposes, we define drugs not by their mechanism of action but rather their rate-limiting step of delivery. Our simulations account for variations in perfusion, vascularization, interstitial transport, and non-linear local binding and metabolism. Based on a comparison of the fundamental rates determining uptake, drugs were classified into four categories depending on whether uptake is limited by blood flow, extravasation, interstitial diffusion, or local binding and metabolism. Simulations comparing small molecule versus macromolecular drugs show a sharp difference in distribution, which has implications for multi-drug therapies. The tissue-level distribution differs widely in tumors for small molecules versus macromolecular biologic drugs, and this should be considered in the design of agents and treatments. An example using antibodies in mouse xenografts illustrates the different in vivo behavior. This type of transport analysis can be used to aid in model development, experimental data analysis, and imaging and therapeutic agent design. PMID:21935441

  20. A systems approach for tumor pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Thurber, Greg Michael; Weissleder, Ralph

    2011-01-01

    Recent advances in genome inspired target discovery, small molecule screens, development of biological and nanotechnology have led to the introduction of a myriad of new differently sized agents into the clinic. The differences in small and large molecule delivery are becoming increasingly important in combination therapies as well as the use of drugs that modify the physiology of tumors such as anti-angiogenic treatment. The complexity of targeting has led to the development of mathematical models to facilitate understanding, but unfortunately, these studies are often only applicable to a particular molecule, making pharmacokinetic comparisons difficult. Here we develop and describe a framework for categorizing primary pharmacokinetics of drugs in tumors. For modeling purposes, we define drugs not by their mechanism of action but rather their rate-limiting step of delivery. Our simulations account for variations in perfusion, vascularization, interstitial transport, and non-linear local binding and metabolism. Based on a comparison of the fundamental rates determining uptake, drugs were classified into four categories depending on whether uptake is limited by blood flow, extravasation, interstitial diffusion, or local binding and metabolism. Simulations comparing small molecule versus macromolecular drugs show a sharp difference in distribution, which has implications for multi-drug therapies. The tissue-level distribution differs widely in tumors for small molecules versus macromolecular biologic drugs, and this should be considered in the design of agents and treatments. An example using antibodies in mouse xenografts illustrates the different in vivo behavior. This type of transport analysis can be used to aid in model development, experimental data analysis, and imaging and therapeutic agent design. PMID:21935441

  1. Distribution of 3H-nicotine in rat tissues under the influence of simulated microgravity.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, P; Soulsby, M E; Pasley, J N

    1999-06-01

    Rat tail suspension offers a useful model to reproduce physiologic responses to weightlessness. The present study was conducted in the head-down-tilt (HDT) rat model to assess changes in metabolism of body tissues employing 3H-nicotine. Twelve male rats were used in the study. Half of the rats were tail suspended at 30 degrees for two weeks on a 12/12 light/dark cycle. During this period, body weight, food and fluid intakes were measured. At term, animals were anesthetized and injected i.v. with a solution containing 4 microcuries of nicotine. After 90 min the animals were sacrificed, exsanguinated and tissues (brain, blood, trachea, salivary gland, lung, heart, esophagus, spleen, kidneys and testes) were harvested. The distribution of 3H-nicotine per gram of each tissue was determined and calculated as percent of total injected radioactivity. Final body weights of suspended animals were significantly (P < 0.05) lower than those of controls (309 +/- 21 vs 350 +/- 11 g). 3H-Nicotine was retained in greatest amounts by the kidneys, followed in order by salivary glands, spleen, and gastrointestinal tissues. Compared to non-suspended control, the tissue retention of nicotine in suspended animals was decreased in the following tissues: esophagus (25%), aorta (25%), fundus (25%), trachea (22%), adrenals (18%), spleen (17%), and pancreas (12%). The decreased retention of nicotine in tissues from suspended animals may be indicative of the fluid shifts and changes in blood flow to those tissue beds. The lack of differences in nicotine retention in liver and kidney between control and suspended groups may implicate a normal metabolic function of these organs even under simulated weightlessness.

  2. [Tetrahydrocannabinol pharmacokinetics; new synthetic cannabinoids; road safety and cannabis].

    PubMed

    Goullé, Jean-Perre; Guerbet, Michel

    2014-03-01

    Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) is the main psychoactive ingredient of cannabis, a drug which is commonly smoked This paper focuses on the pharmacokinetics of THC. The average THC content in cannabis plant material has risen by a factor offour over the past 20 years, from 4% to 16%. This increase has important implications not only for the pharmacokinetics but also for the pharmacology of THC The mean bioavailability of THC in smoked cannabis is about 25%. In a cigarette containing 3.55% of THC, a peak plasma level of about 160 ng/mL occurs approximately 10 min after inhalation. THC is quickly cleared from plasma in a multiphasic manner and is widely distributed to tissues, leading to its pharmacologic effects. Body fat is a long-term storage site. This particular pharmacokinetic behavior explains the lack of correlation between the THC blood level and clinical effects, contrary to ethanol. The main THC metabolites are 11-OH-THC (the only active metabolite) and THC-COOH, which is eliminated in feces and urine over several weeks. Therefore, abstinence can be established by analyzing THC-COOH in urine, while blood THC analysis is used to confirm recent exposure. Cannabis is the main illicit drug found among vehicle drivers. Various traffic safety studies indicate that recent use of this drug at least doubles the risk of causing an accident, and that simultaneous alcohol consumption multiplies this risk by afactor of 14. Since 2009, synthetic cannabinoids have emerged on the illicit drug market. These substances act on the same CB1 receptors as THC, but with higher afinity. Their pharmacokinetics differs from that of THC, as they are metabolized into multiple derivatives, most of which are more active than THC itself. PMID:26427296

  3. Photon beam dose distributions for patients with implanted temporary tissue expanders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asena, A.; Kairn, T.; Crowe, S. B.; Trapp, J. V.

    2015-01-01

    This study examines the effects of temporary tissue expanders (TTEs) on the dose distributions of photon beams in breast cancer radiotherapy treatments. EBT2 radiochromic film and ion chamber measurements were taken to quantify the attenuation and backscatter effects of the inhomogeneity. Results illustrate that the internal magnetic port present in a tissue expander causes a dose reduction of approximately 25% in photon tangent fields immediately downstream of the implant. It was also shown that the silicone elastomer shell of the tissue expander reduced the dose to the target volume by as much as 8%. This work demonstrates the importance for an accurately modelled high-density implant in the treatment planning system for post-mastectomy breast cancer patients.

  4. Predicting tissue distribution and partitioning in terminal sire sheep using x-ray computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Macfarlane, J M; Lewis, R M; Emmans, G C; Young, M J; Simm, G

    2009-01-01

    The utility of x-ray computed tomography (CT) scanning in predicting carcass tissue distribution and fat partitioning in vivo in terminal sire sheep was examined using data from 160 lambs representing combinations of 3 breeds (Charollais, Suffolk, and Texel), 3 genetic lines, and both sexes. One-fifth of the lambs were slaughtered at each of 14, 18, and 22 wk of age, and the remaining two-fifths at 26 wk of age. The left side of each carcass was dissected into 8 joints with each joint dissected into fat (intermuscular and subcutaneous), lean, and bone. Chemical fat content of the LM was measured. Tissue distribution was described by proportions of total carcass tissue and lean weight contained within the leg, loin, and shoulder regions of the carcass and within the higher-priced joints. Fat partitioning variables included proportion of total carcass fat contained in the subcutaneous depot and intramuscular fat content of the LM. Before slaughter, all lambs were CT scanned at 7 anatomical positions (ischium, midshaft of femur, hip, second and fifth lumbar vertebrae, sixth and eighth thoracic vertebrae). Areas of fat, lean, and bone (mm(2)) and average fat and lean density (Hounsfield units) were measured from each cross-sectional scan. Areas of intermuscular and subcutaneous fat were measured on 2 scans (ischium and eighth thoracic vertebra). Intramuscular fat content was predicted with moderate accuracy (R(2) = 56.6) using information from only 2 CT scans. Four measures of carcass tissue distribution were predicted with moderate to high accuracy: the proportion of total carcass (R(2) = 54.7) and lean (R(2) = 46.2) weight contained in the higher-priced joints and the proportion of total carcass (R(2) = 77.7) and lean (R(2) = 55.0) weight in the leg region. Including BW in the predictions did not improve their accuracy (P > 0.05). Although breed-line-sex combination significantly affected fit of the regression for some tissue distribution variables, the values

  5. Whole-body imaging of the distribution of mercury released from dental fillings into monkey tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, L.J.; Kloiber, R.; Leininger, R.W.; Vimy, M.J.; Lorscheider, F.L. )

    1990-11-01

    The fate of mercury (Hg) released from dental silver amalgam tooth fillings into human mouth air is uncertain. A previous report about sheep revealed uptake routes and distribution of amalgam Hg among body tissues. The present investigation demonstrates the bodily distribution of amalgam Hg in a monkey whose dentition, diet, feeding regimen, and chewing pattern closely resemble those of humans. When amalgam fillings, which normally contain 50% Hg, are made with a tracer of radioactive {sup 203}Hg and then placed into monkey teeth, the isotope appears in high concentration in various organs and tissues within 4 wk. Whole-body images of the monkey revealed that the highest levels of Hg were located in the kidney, gastrointestinal tract, and jaw. The dental profession's advocacy of silver amalgam as a stable tooth restorative material is not supported by these findings.

  6. Orientational tomography of optical axes directions distributions of multilayer biological tissues birefringent polycrystalline networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zabolotna, Natalia I.; Dovhaliuk, Rostyslav Y.

    2013-09-01

    We present a novel measurement method of optic axes orientation distribution which uses a relatively simple measurement setup. The principal difference of our method from other well-known methods lies in direct approach for measuring the orientation of optical axis of polycrystalline networks biological crystals. Our test polarimetry setup consists of HeNe laser, quarter wave plate, two linear polarizers and a CCD camera. We also propose a methodology for processing of measured optic axes orientation distribution which consists of evaluation of statistical, correlational and spectral moments. Such processing of obtained data can be used to classify particular tissue sample as "healthy" or "pathological". For our experiment we use thin layers of histological section of normal and muscular dystrophy tissue sections. It is shown that the difference between mentioned moments` values of normal and pathological samples can be quite noticeable with relative difference up to 6.26.

  7. Pharmacokinetic analysis and optimization of hydroxycamptothecin-loaded nanoparticles for liver targeting.

    PubMed

    Li, Yimu; Wei, Pei; Li, Jin; Li, Lingbing

    2012-07-01

    In this paper, a pharmacokinetic model to describe the tissue distribution process of nanoparticles was established. To test the possibility of the model, nanoparticles composed of poly(butylcyanoacrylate) and hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrins (HP-β-CD) was prepared with a poorly soluble anticancer drug, hydroxycamptothecin (HCPT). Characteristics were determined including particle's size, morphology and in vitro release. The tissue distribution of nanoparticles was also studied. Further, mathematical equation was fitted to the curve of drug concentration-time in liver of hydroxycamptothecin-loaded nanoparticles and the pharmacokinetic parameters of liver were obtained. The effectiveness of hydroxycamptothecin-loaded nanoparticles for liver targeting was evaluated. The results showed that nanoparticles composed of poly(butylcyanoacrylate) and hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrins (HP-β-CD) exhibited enhanced liver targeting in rats after i.v. injection. More importantly, the pharmacokinetic parameters (transport constant from blood to target organ KT, drug release rate from nanoparticles Kr and drug elimination constant in target organ Ke) provided some quantitative measure of liver distribution and were useful guidelines for development of targeted drug delivery systems.

  8. Tissue distribution and residue depletion of metronidazole in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Mitrowska, Kamila; Pekala, Agnieszka; Posyniak, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    Tissue distribution and residue depletion of metronidazole (MNZ) was studied in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) following oral administration of MNZ in feed at the average dose of 25 mg kg(-1) body weight day(-1) for 7 days at 11 ± 2°C. The MNZ concentration in feed was 0.25% while daily feed intake was 1% of body weight. The concentrations of MNZ and its main metabolite, hydroxymetronidazole (MNZOH), in fish tissues were determined by LC-MS/MS. The drug was well distributed in tissues with maximum concentrations on day 1 post-administration. At this time, the mean MNZ concentrations in muscle, skin, kidney, liver and gill were 14,999, 20,269, 15,070, 10,102 and 16,467 µg kg(-1) respectively. MNZ was converted into MNZOH with the ratio of MNZOH:MNZ up to 7% in all fish tissues throughout the withdrawal period. This shows that MNZ itself is the main residue in rainbow trout. MNZ was detected at the level close to the decision limit (0.20 µg kg(-1)) in muscle, skin and muscle with adhering skin up to 42 days, while in kidney, liver and gill it was up to 28 days post-administration. MNZOH was eliminated more rapidly from fish tissues and it was present in muscle alone up to 21 days. The elimination half-lives of MNZ and MNZOH in rainbow trout tissues were 1.83-2.53 and 1.24-2.12 days, respectively. When muscle without skin was analysed, higher MNZ and MNZOH concentrations were detected, and for a longer period of time, than in muscle with adhering skin. Thus muscle alone could be more appropriate for the effective residue control of MNZ in rainbow trout. For the same reason, it is also essential to ensure direct cooling immediately after sampling, since MNZ and its metabolite degrade in fish muscle and skin stored in non-freezing conditions.

  9. A1 demonstrates restricted tissue distribution during embryonic development and functions to protect against cell death.

    PubMed Central

    Carrió, R.; López-Hoyos, M.; Jimeno, J.; Benedict, M. A.; Merino, R.; Benito, A.; Fernández-Luna, J. L.; Núñez, G.; García-Porrero, J. A.; Merino, J.

    1996-01-01

    Members of the bcl-2 gene family are essential regulators of cell survival in a wide range of biological processes. A1, a member of the family, is known to be expressed in certain adult tissues. However, the precise tissue distribution and function of A1 remains poorly understood. We show here that A1 is expressed in multiple tissues during murine embryonic development. In the embryo, A1 was detected first at embryonic day 11.5 in liver, brain, and limbs. At day 13.5 of gestation, A1 expression was observed in the central nervous system, liver, perichondrium, and digital zones of developing limbs in a pattern different from that of bcl-X. In the central nervous system of 15.5-day embryos, A1 was expressed at high levels in the ventricular zone and cortical plate of brain cortex. Significantly, the interdigital zones of limbs and the intermediate region of the developing brain cortex, two sites associated with extensive cell death, were devoid of A1 and bcl-X. The expression of A1 was retained in many adult tissues. To assess the ability of A1 to modulate cell death, stable transfectants expressing different amounts of A1 protein were generated in K562 cells. Expression of A1 was associated with retardation of apoptotic cell death induced by actinomycin D and cycloheximide as well as by okadaic acid. Confocal microscopy showed that the A1 protein was localized to the cytoplasm in a pattern similar to that of Bcl-2. These results demonstrate that the expression of A1 is wider than previously reported in adult tissues. Furthermore, its distribution in multiple tissues of the embryo suggests that A1 plays a role in the regulation of physiological cell death during embryonic development. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 5 PMID:8952545

  10. A lead isotope distribution study in swine tissue using ICP-MS

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    May, T.W.; Wiedmeyer, Ray H.; Brown, L.D.; Casteel, S.W.

    1999-01-01

    In the United States lead is an ubiquitous environmental pollutant that is a serious human health hazard, especially for women of childbearing age, developing fetuses, and young children. Information concerning the uptake and distribution of lead to maternal and fetal tissues during pregnancy is poorly documented. A study was designed using domestic swine and lead isotope enrichment methodology to focus on maternal absorption and distribution of lead into bone and soft tissues, including the fetal compartment, under varying conditions of oral lead exposure and during altered physiological states (pregnant vs unbred). Total lead levels and Pb207/Pb206 ratios in bone (femur and vertebra), blood, and soft tissues (liver, kidney, brain) were determined by ICP-MS. Lead in fetal tissues derived from maternal bone could be differentiated from that derived from exogenous dosing. Unbred swine absorbed much less lead than pregnant females receiving the same dose. The accuracy and precision of ICP-MS at the instrumental level and for the entire method (sample collection, digestion, and analysis) were evaluated for both Pb207/Pb206 ratios and total lead. Several changes were suggested in method design to improve both instrumental and total method precision.

  11. New method for generating breast models featuring glandular tissue spatial distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paixão, L.; Oliveira, B. B.; Oliveira, M. A.; Teixeira, M. H. A.; Fonseca, T. C. F.; Nogueira, M. S.

    2016-02-01

    Mammography is the main radiographic technique used for breast imaging. A major concern with mammographic imaging is the risk of radiation-induced breast cancer due to the high sensitivity of breast tissue. The mean glandular dose (DG) is the dosimetric quantity widely accepted to characterize the risk of radiation induced cancer. Previous studies have concluded that DG depends not only on the breast glandular content but also on the spatial distribution of glandular tissue within the breast. In this work, a new method for generating computational breast models featuring skin composition and glandular tissue distribution from patients undergoing digital mammography is proposed. Such models allow a more accurate way of calculating individualized breast glandular doses taking into consideration the glandular tissue fraction. Sixteen breast models of four patients with different glandularity breasts were simulated and the results were compared with those obtained from recommended DG conversion factors. The results show that the internationally recommended conversion factors may be overestimating the mean glandular dose to less dense breasts and underestimating the mean glandular dose for denser breasts. The methodology described in this work constitutes a powerful tool for breast dosimetry, especially for risk studies.

  12. Tissue distribution study of columbianadin and its active metabolite columbianetin in rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, You-Bo; Yang, Xiu-Wei

    2016-02-01

    Columbianadin, one of the main bioactive constituents of the roots of Angelica pubescens Maxim. f. biserrata Shan et Yuan, has been found to possess obvious pharmacological effects in previous studies. In this study, a valid and sensitive reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) method was established and validated for the determination of columbianadin (CBN) and its active metabolite columbianetin (CBT) in rat tissue samples. Sample separation was performed on an RP-HPLC column using a mobile phase of MeOH-H2 O (75:25, v/v) at a flow rate of 1.0 mL/min. The UV absorbance of the samples was measured at the wavelength 325 nm. The calibration curves for CBN were linear over the ranges of 0.5-20 µg/g for brain, testes and muscle, 1.0-10.0 µg/g for stomach and intestine, and 0.2-20.0 µg/g for heart, liver, spleen, lung and kidney. The calibration curves for CBT were linear over the ranges of 0.5-25 µg/g for stomach and intestine, and 0.1-10.0 µg/g for heart, liver, spleen, lung and kidney. The analysis method was successfully applied to a tissue distribution study of CBN and CBT after intravenous administration of CBN to rats. The results of this study indicated that CBN could be detected in all of the selected tissues after i.v. administration. CBN was distributed to rat tissues rapidly and could be metabolized to CBT in most detected tissues. Of the detected tissues, heart had the highest uptake of CBN, which suggested that heart might be one of the main target tissues of CBN. Concentrations of CBT were obviously higher in the digestive system than in other assayed tissues. The information provided by this research is very useful for gaining knowledge of the capacities of CBN and CBT to access different tissues.

  13. Visualizing metabolite distribution and enzymatic conversion in plant tissues by desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry imaging.

    PubMed

    Li, Bin; Knudsen, Camilla; Hansen, Natascha Krahl; Jørgensen, Kirsten; Kannangara, Rubini; Bak, Søren; Takos, Adam; Rook, Fred; Hansen, Steen H; Møller, Birger Lindberg; Janfelt, Christian; Bjarnholt, Nanna

    2013-06-01

    In comparison with the technology platforms developed to localize transcripts and proteins, imaging tools for visualization of metabolite distributions in plant tissues are less well developed and lack versatility. This hampers our understanding of plant metabolism and dynamics. In this study, we demonstrate that desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry imaging (DESI-MSI) of tissue imprints on porous Teflon may be used to accurately image the distribution of even labile plant metabolites such as hydroxynitrile glucosides, which normally undergo enzymatic hydrolysis by specific β-glucosidases upon cell disruption. This fast and simple sample preparation resulted in no substantial differences in the distribution and ratios of all hydroxynitrile glucosides between leaves from wild-type Lotus japonicus and a β-glucosidase mutant plant that lacks the ability to hydrolyze certain hydroxynitrile glucosides. In wild-type, the enzymatic conversion of hydroxynitrile glucosides and the concomitant release of glucose were easily visualized when a restricted area of the leaf tissue was damaged prior to sample preparation. The gene encoding the first enzyme in hydroxynitrile glucoside biosynthesis in L. japonicus leaves, CYP79D3, was found to be highly expressed during the early stages of leaf development, and the hydroxynitrile glucoside distribution in mature leaves reflected this early expression pattern. The utility of direct DESI-MSI of plant tissue was demonstrated using cryo-sections of cassava (Manihot esculenta) tubers. The hydroxynitrile glucoside levels were highest in the outer cell layers, as verified by LC-MS analyses. The unexpected discovery of a hydroxynitrile-derived di-glycoside shows the potential of DESI-MSI to discover and guide investigations into new metabolic routes.

  14. Tissue distribution of amyloid deposits in Abyssinian cats with familial amyloidosis.

    PubMed

    DiBartola, S P; Tarr, M J; Benson, M D

    1986-07-01

    The tissue distribution of amyloid deposits was studied in 15 related Abyssinian cats with familial amyloidosis. There was interstitial medullary amyloidosis in the kidneys of all 15 cats but only 11 had detectable glomerular involvement. The thyroid glands, stomach and colon were affected in all cats examined. Most of the cats also had amyloid deposits in the small intestine, spleen, heart, adrenals, pancreas, liver, lymph nodes and bladder. In 50 per cent or fewer of the cats examined, there was involvement of the parathyroids, lung and gonads. The central nervous system was not involved in any of the 3 cats evaluated. In 8 of the cats, no concurrent inflammatory disease could be detected. The tissue distribution of amyloid deposits resembled that found in other breeds of domestic cats with systemic amyloidosis. Despite the wide tissue distribution of amyloid deposits, clinical signs were related to renal amyloidosis. Familial amyloidosis in the Abyssinian cat may represent a valuable spontaneous animal model for the study of Familial Mediterranean Fever in man and the pathogenesis of reactive amyloidosis in general. PMID:3734172

  15. Effects of an implant on temperature distribution in tissue during ultrasound diathermy.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ming-Kuan; Shieh, Jay; Chen, Chuin-Shan; Chiang, Hongsen; Huang, Chang-Wei; Chen, Wen-Shiang

    2016-09-01

    The effects of an implant on temperature distribution in a tissue-mimicking hydrogel phantom during the application of therapeutic ultrasound were investigated. In vitro experiments were conducted to compare the influences of plastic and metal implants on ultrasound diathermy and to calibrate parameters in finite element simulation models. The temperature histories and characteristics of the opaque (denatured) areas in the hydrogel phantoms predicted by the numerical simulations show good correlation with those observed in the in vitro experiments. This study provides an insight into the temperature profile in the vicinity of an implant by therapeutic ultrasound heating typically used for physiotherapy. A parametric study was conducted through numerical simulations to investigate the effects of several factors, such as implant material type, ultrasound operation frequency, implant thickness and tissue thickness on the temperature distribution in the hydrogel phantom. The results indicate that the implant material type and implant thickness are the main parameters influencing the temperature distribution. In addition, once the implant material and ultrasound operation frequency are chosen, an optimal implant thickness can be obtained so as to avoid overheating injuries in tissue. PMID:27150744

  16. Explicit Pharmacokinetic Modeling: Tools for Documentation, Verification, and Portability

    EPA Science Inventory

    Quantitative estimates of tissue dosimetry of environmental chemicals due to multiple exposure pathways require the use of complex mathematical models, such as physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models. The process of translating the abstract mathematics of a PBPK mode...

  17. Study of tanshinone IIA tissue distribution in rat by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method.

    PubMed

    Bi, Hui-chang; Law, Francis C P; Zhong, Guo-ping; Xu, Chen-shu; Pan, Ying; Ding, Liang; Chen, Xiao; Zhao, Li-zi; Xu, Qiong; Huang, Min

    2007-05-01

    A liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) method was developed and validated for determining tanshinone IIA in rat tissues. After a single step liquid-liquid extraction with diethyl ether, tanshinone IIA and loratadine (internal standard) was subjected to LC/MS/MS analysis using positive electro-spray ionization under selected reaction monitoring mode. Chromatographic separation of tanshinone IIA and loratadine was achieved on a Hypersil BDS C(18) column (i.d. 2.1 x 50 mm, 5 microm) with a mobile phase consisting of methanol-1% formic acid (90:10, v/v) at a flow rate of 300 microL/min. The intra-day and inter-day precision of the method were less than 10.2 and 12.4%, respectively. The intra-day and inter-day accuracies ranged from 99.7 to 109.7%. The lowest limit of quantification for tanshinone IIA was 1 ng/mL. The method was applied to a tanshinone IIA tissue distribution study after an oral dose of 60 mg/kg to rats. Tanshinone IIA tissue concentrations decreased in the order of stomach > small intestine > lung > liver > fat > muscle > kidneys > spleen > heart > plasma > brain > testes. Tanshinone IIA still could be detected in most of the tissues at 20 h post-dosing. These results indicate that the LC/MS/MS method was rapid and sensitive to quantify tanshinone IIA in different rat tissues. PMID:17357178

  18. Uptake, tissue distribution and depuration of triclosan in the guppy Poecilia vivipara acclimated to freshwater.

    PubMed

    Escarrone, Ana Laura Venquiaruti; Caldas, Sergiane Souza; Primel, Ednei Gilberto; Martins, Samantha Eslava; Nery, Luiz Eduardo Maia

    2016-08-01

    The agent triclosan has been extensively used in different personal care products as a broad-spectrum antimicrobial and preservative agent. Due to its continuous release into the environment, including discharge via wastewater treatment plants, triclosan has been widely detected in aquatic environments. There is growing interest in improving the knowledge about the environmental fate of triclosan due to its possible bioaccumulation and the toxicity it may pose to organisms, such as fish and other non-target species. To investigate the distribution and bioconcentration of triclosan in fish, Poecilia vivipara was exposed to 0.2mgL(-1). Contents of triclosan in whole fish, brain, gonads, liver, muscle and gills were quantified by LC-MS/MS. When lipid normalised concentration was used, the liver exhibited the highest concentration followed by the gills, gonads, brain and muscle tissues. Bioconcentration was increased with time reaching a steady-state around 7-14days for most all tissues. After 24h depuration, triclosan concentrations declined >80% in all tissues except liver, in which triclosan takes longer to be depurated. These results not only clearly indicate that triclosan accumulated in P. vivipara, with tissue-specific bioconcentration factors (BCF) that ranged from 40.2 to 1025.4, but also show that the elimination of triclosan after transferring the fish to triclosan-free freshwater is rapid in all tissues. PMID:27101458

  19. Uptake, tissue distribution and depuration of triclosan in the guppy Poecilia vivipara acclimated to freshwater.

    PubMed

    Escarrone, Ana Laura Venquiaruti; Caldas, Sergiane Souza; Primel, Ednei Gilberto; Martins, Samantha Eslava; Nery, Luiz Eduardo Maia

    2016-08-01

    The agent triclosan has been extensively used in different personal care products as a broad-spectrum antimicrobial and preservative agent. Due to its continuous release into the environment, including discharge via wastewater treatment plants, triclosan has been widely detected in aquatic environments. There is growing interest in improving the knowledge about the environmental fate of triclosan due to its possible bioaccumulation and the toxicity it may pose to organisms, such as fish and other non-target species. To investigate the distribution and bioconcentration of triclosan in fish, Poecilia vivipara was exposed to 0.2mgL(-1). Contents of triclosan in whole fish, brain, gonads, liver, muscle and gills were quantified by LC-MS/MS. When lipid normalised concentration was used, the liver exhibited the highest concentration followed by the gills, gonads, brain and muscle tissues. Bioconcentration was increased with time reaching a steady-state around 7-14days for most all tissues. After 24h depuration, triclosan concentrations declined >80% in all tissues except liver, in which triclosan takes longer to be depurated. These results not only clearly indicate that triclosan accumulated in P. vivipara, with tissue-specific bioconcentration factors (BCF) that ranged from 40.2 to 1025.4, but also show that the elimination of triclosan after transferring the fish to triclosan-free freshwater is rapid in all tissues.

  20. Determination of doxorubicin in rabbit ocular tissues and pharmacokinetics after intravitreal injection of a single dose of doxorubicin-loaded poly-beta-hydroxybutyrate microspheres.

    PubMed

    Hu, Tao; Le, Qihua; Wu, Zhiyi; Wu, Wei

    2007-01-01

    A validated HPLC method was developed for the quantification of doxorubicin in rabbit ocular tissues using solid phase extraction and ultraviolet detection. Chromatographic separation of doxorubicin in various ocular tissues was performed on a C18 column. The mobile phase was composed of 0.2 M KH2PO4 buffer solution, acetonitrile and triethylamine in volumetric ratio of 70/30/0.2, adjusted to pH 4.0 with orthophosphoric acid. The calibration curve was linear over the range of 0.03-10, 0.03-10, 0.05-10 and 0.05-10 microg/ml in vitreous body, iris, retina/choroids and sclera, respectively. The intra-day and inter-day precisions in all ocular tissues were smaller than 4.95% and 5.73%, and the accuracies were about 100%. The extraction recoveries of doxorubicin in all of the ocular tissues were between 83.47% and 96.33%. After intravitreal administration of doxorubicin-loaded poly-beta-hydroxybutyrate microspheres, doxorubicin level in ocular tissues was much lower than that for administration of free doxorubicin, which was helpful to reduce the associated toxicity to surrounding tissues. Doxorubicin was detectable even after tens of days in the studied ocular tissues. PMID:16884884

  1. EXPRESSION AND DISTRIBUTION OF THIOL-REGULATING ENZYME GLUTAREDOXIN 2 (GRX2) IN PORCINE OCULAR TISSUES*

    PubMed Central

    Upadhyaya, Bijaya; Tian, Xiaoli; Wu, Hongli; Lou, Marjorie F.

    2014-01-01

    Glutaredoxin2 (Grx2) is a mitochondrial isozyme of the cytosolic glutaredoxin1 (thioltransferase or TTase). Both belong to the large oxidoreductase family and play an important role in maintaining thiol/disulfide redox homeostasis in the cells. Grx2 is recently found in the lens where its activities of disulfide reductase and peroxidase, similar to TTase, can protect the lens against oxidative stress. Since other eye tissues are also highly sensitive to oxidative stress, and TTase’s distribution in the eye is known, we focused on this study by investigating the Grx2 distribution in the ocular tissues in comparison to the lens. Fresh porcine eyes were dissected into cornea, iris, ciliary body, the lens, vitreous humor, retina, and optic nerve. Each tissue (pooled from three eyes) was homogenized and processed for mitochondrial isolation. The mitochondrial fraction was analyzed for Grx2 protein using Western blotting with anti-Grx2 antibody, and Grx2 activity using the published procedure. The eye tissues were also measured for Grx2 mRNA expression by RT-PCR with GAPDH as the control. Grx2-rich mouse liver and purified recombinant mouse Grx2 were used as positive controls for the above analyses. It was found that Grx2 was present in all the tested ocular tissues, except vitreous humor. In comparison with the mouse liver, the protein levels of Grx2 in porcine ciliary body and the lens were 27-fold and 0.75-fold, respectively. Comparing to the lens, Grx2 protein was highest in the ciliary body (13.5-fold), followed by retina (9.2-fold), iris and optic nerve (2-fold), and cornea (1.2-fold). Enzyme activity assays showed that the retina had the highest Grx2 specific activity (3.9 mU/mg protein), followed by ciliary body (3.1 mU/mg), the lens (0.58 mU/mg), and optic nerve (0.32 mU/mg). Grx2 gene expression in these ocular tissues was further confirmed by RT-PCR analysis. Grx2 mRNA expression showed the highest in ciliary body, followed by retina, optic nerve, cornea

  2. Noninvasive imaging of the distribution in oxygen in tissue in vivo using near-infrared phosphors.

    PubMed Central

    Vinogradov, S A; Lo, L W; Jenkins, W T; Evans, S M; Koch, C; Wilson, D F

    1996-01-01

    A newly developed water-soluble phosphor suitable for measuring oxygen pressure in the blood (Green 2W) was used for noninvasive, in vivo imaging of oxygen distribution in the vascular systems of mice. Oxygen quenches the phosphorescence of Green 2W, measured in the presence of 2% albumin, according to the Stern-volmer relationship. This oxygen-dependent quenching of phosphorescence has been used to obtain digital maps of the oxygen distribution in the tissue vasculature. EMT-6 mammary carcinoma tumors were grown by injecting 1 x 10(6) cells in 0.1-ml carrier into the subcutaneous space over the muscle on the hindquarter. When the tumors were approximately 8 mm in diameter, 300 micrograms of phosphorescence probe (Green 2W; absorption maximum 636 nm) was injected into the tail vein. The mice were immobilized with intraperotoneal Ketamine (133 mg/kg) and Xylazine (10 mg/kg) and illuminated with flashes (< 4-microseconds t1/2) of light of 630 +/- 12 nm. The emitted phosphorescence (790-nm maximum) was imaged an intensified CCD camera. Images were collected beginning at 30, 50, 80, 120, 180, 240, 420, and 2500 microseconds after the flash and used to calculate digital maps of the phosphorescence lifetimes and oxygen pressure. Both the illumination light and the phosphorescence were in the near-infrared region of the spectrum, where tissue has greatly decreased absorbance. The light therefore readily passed through the skin and centimeter thicknesses of tissue. The oxygen maps could be obtained by illuminating from the side of the mouse opposite the camera (and tumor). The tumors were readily observed as regions with oxygen pressures substantially below those of the surrounding tissue. Thus, phosphorescence measurements can noninvasively detect volumes of tissue with below-normal oxygen pressure in the presence of much larger volumes of tissue with normal oxygen pressures. In addition, tissue oxygen pressures can be monitored in real time, even through centimeter

  3. Tissue distribution and elimination after oral and intravenous administration of different titanium dioxide nanoparticles in rats

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to obtain kinetic data that can be used in human risk assessment of titanium dioxide nanomaterials. Methods Tissue distribution and blood kinetics of various titanium dioxide nanoparticles (NM-100, NM-101, NM-102, NM-103, and NM-104), which differ with respect to primary particle size, crystalline form and hydrophobicity, were investigated in rats up to 90 days post-exposure after oral and intravenous administration of a single or five repeated doses. Results For the oral study, liver, spleen and mesenteric lymph nodes were selected as target tissues for titanium (Ti) analysis. Ti-levels in liver and spleen were above the detection limit only in some rats. Titanium could be detected at low levels in mesenteric lymph nodes. These results indicate that some minor absorption occurs in the gastrointestinal tract, but to a very limited extent. Both after single and repeated intravenous (IV) exposure, titanium rapidly distributed from the systemic circulation to all tissues evaluated (i.e. liver, spleen, kidney, lung, heart, brain, thymus, reproductive organs). Liver was identified as the main target tissue, followed by spleen and lung. Total recovery (expressed as % of nominal dose) for all four tested nanomaterials measured 24 h after single or repeated exposure ranged from 64-95% or 59-108% for male or female animals, respectively. During the 90 days post-exposure period, some decrease in Ti-levels was observed (mainly for NM-100 and NM-102) with a maximum relative decrease of 26%. This was also confirmed by the results of the kinetic analysis which revealed that for each of the investigated tissues the half-lifes were considerable (range 28–650 days, depending on the TiO2-particle and tissue investigated). Minor differences in kinetic profile were observed between the various particles, though these could not be clearly related to differences in primary particle size or hydrophobicity. Some indications were observed for an

  4. Pharmacokinetics-pharmacology disconnection of herbal medicines and its potential solutions with cellular pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic strategy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jingwei; Zhou, Fang; Lu, Meng; Ji, Wei; Niu, Fang; Zha, Weibin; Wu, Xiaolan; Hao, Haiping; Wang, Guangji

    2012-06-01

    Recently, there is a global trend of using herbal medicines to treat various chronic diseases and promote health. But the controversy over the safety and efficacy of herbal medicines is a focus of attention, primarily because of the many unknown and unrevealed natures of herbal medicines, which strongly restricts their application and development. Pharmacokinetics is a bridge linking the herbal medicines and their pharmacological responses. It is assumed in traditional pharmacokinetics that an excellent drug should have appropriate pharmacokinetic behaviours and its pharmacological effect is related with plasma drug concentrations. However, most herbal medicines exhibit excellent pharmacological responses despite poor pharmacokinetic behaviours. As most drugs are intracellulartargeted, we put forward cellular pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic strategy, which is focused on the intracellular fate of drugs. This strategy could partially explain the marked pharmacological activities of herbal medicines from their intracellular pharmacokinetic behaviours, rather than their plasma concentrations. It is a helpful complementarity to traditional pharmacokinetics, and takes a potential role in the research and development of new herb-origined drugs. In this review, the pharmacokinetics-pharmacology disconnections of herbal medicines (such as ginseng, berberine and danshen) are retrospected. Then our proposed cellular pharmacokineticpharmacodynamic strategy, its characteristics, as well as its research procedures are described, followed by the subcellular distributions of drug transporters and metabolic enzymes which are the determinants of cellular pharmacokinetics-pharmacodynamics. Finally, our successful applications of cellular pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic strategy in elucidating ginsenoside Rh2 as an adjuvant agent and tanshinone IIA as an anticancer agent are illustrated.

  5. The Application of Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Modeling to Determine Route-Specific Contributions to Tissue Dosimetry of Trihalomethanes in Drinking Water

    EPA Science Inventory

    This project summary describes an improved approach for estimating route-specific exposures and tissue doses for trihalomethane (THM) compounds found in drinking water.

  1. Cloning and tissue distribution of appetite-regulating peptides in pirapitinga (Piaractus brachypomus).

    PubMed

    Volkoff, H

    2015-10-01

    Pirapitinga (or red-bellied pacu, Piaractus brachypomus, Characiforme, Serrasalmidae) is an economically important South American fish for which the endocrine mechanism of the regulation of feeding has never been examined. To better understand these mechanisms, cDNAs encoding the appetite-regulating peptides orexin, cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART), apelin, cholecystokinin (CCK), peptide YY (PYY), leptin and ghrelin were isolated in pirapitinga and their mRNA distributions examined in peripheral tissues and brain. When compared to other fish, the sequences obtained for all peptides were most similar to those of other Characiforme fish (i.e. Mexican cavefish) and Siluriformes (catfish) as well as Cypriniformes (i.e. goldfish, zebrafish). All peptides were widely expressed within the brain. With the exception of CART, which was only expressed in brain, the mRNAs of all peptides were present in several peripheral tissues, including gastrointestinal tract, kidneys and gills. The widespread and peptide-specific distributions suggest that each peptide might have distinct physiological actions in the brain and on peripheral tissues, in particular on the gastrointestinal tract, which include feeding regulation. This preliminary study opens new avenues for further functional studies on the endocrine regulation of feeding in Serrasalmidae fish, including pirapitinga. PMID:25846408

  2. Tissue distribution and functional analysis of Sushi domain-containing protein 4.

    PubMed

    Tu, Zhidan; Cohen, Mark; Bu, Hong; Lin, Feng

    2010-05-01

    Sushi domain-containing protein 4 (SUSD4) was a hypothetical cell surface protein whose tissue distribution and function were completely unknown. However, recent microarray-based studies have identified deletions of SUSD4 gene in patients with autism or Fryns syndrome, both of which are genetic diseases with severe abnormal neurological development and/or functions. In this article, we described the cloning, expression, refolding, tissue distribution, and functional analysis of this novel protein. Using polyclonal antibodies generated by immunizing chickens with the recombinant SUSD4, we found that SUSD4 is detectable in murine brains, eyes, spinal cords, and testis but not other tissues. In brains, SUSD4 is highly expressed in the white matter on oligodendrocytes/axons, and in eyes, it is exclusively expressed on the photoreceptor outer segments. In in vitro complement assays, SUSD4 augments the alternative but not the classical pathway of complement activation at the C3 convertase step. In in vivo studies, knocking down SUSD4 expression in zebrafish markedly increases ratios of mortality and developmental abnormality. These results provide the first insight into the important physiological roles of SUSD4 and could help to better understand the pathogenesis of autism and Fryns syndrome.

  3. Toxicokinetics and tissue distribution of cadmium-based Quantum Dots in the marine mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Thiago Lopes; Gomes, Tânia; Pinheiro, José Paulo; Sousa, Vânia Serrão; Nunes, Luís Miguel; Teixeira, Margarida Ribau; Bebianno, Maria João

    2015-09-01

    Environmental health hazards of Quantum Dots (QDs) are of emergent concern, but limited data is available about their toxicokinetics (TK) and tissue distribution in marine bivalves. This study investigated the QDs behavior in seawater, their TK and tissue distribution in Mytilus galloprovincialis, in comparison with soluble Cd. Mussels were exposed to CdTe QDs and soluble Cd for 21 days at 10 μgCd L(-1) followed by a 50 days depuration. TK of QDs in mussels is related to the homo-aggregate uptake, surface charge, aggregation and precipitation as key factors. There were tissue- and time-dependent differences in the TK of both Cd forms, and soluble Cd is the most bioavailable form. Digestive gland is a preferential site for QDs storage and both Cd forms are not eliminated by mussels (t1/2>50 days). Results indicate that the TK model of CdTe QDs in marine mussels is distinct from their soluble counterparts.

  4. Heterotopic ossification: review of histologic findings and tissue distribution in a 10-year experience.

    PubMed

    Liu, Katharine; Tripp, Sheryl; Layfield, Lester J

    2007-01-01

    Heterotopic ossification (HO) within tissues involved by a pathologic process is a well-recognized phenomenon. It is most frequently observed in atherosclerotic plaques, in soft tissue around joints, and in the central nervous system. Less frequently, carcinomas and some benign neoplasms will undergo heterotopic ossification. We performed a retrospective review of our experience with HO over a 10-year period to determine the frequency and tissue site distribution of heterotopic ossification. A computerized review of surgical pathology records of approximately 126,000 reports revealed 85 cases in which heterotopic ossification, ectopic bone or metaplastic bone was specifically mentioned in the surgical pathology diagnosis. Twenty-two cases were neoplasms of non-osseous tissues, and 63 cases were non-neoplastic lesions. Immunohistochemical staining for bone morphogenic proteins (BMP) 1, 4, and 6 was performed. Fourteen cases showed staining for BMP-1, 22 cases showed staining for BMP-4, and five cases showed weak staining for BMP-6. HO is a relatively infrequent finding and is more commonly seen in degenerative and reparative conditions than in neoplasms. PMID:17728073

  5. Modified oleic cottonseeds show altered content, composition and tissue-specific distribution of triacylglycerol molecular species.

    PubMed

    Horn, Patrick J; Sturtevant, Drew; Chapman, Kent D

    2014-01-01

    Targeted increases in monounsaturated (oleic acid) fatty acid content of refined cottonseed oil could support improved human nutrition and cardiovascular health. Genetic modifications of cottonseed fatty acid composition have been accomplished using several different molecular strategies. Modification of oleic acid content in cottonseed embryos using a dominant-negative protein approach, while successful in effecting change in the desired fatty acid composition, resulted in reduced oil content and seed viability. Here these changes in fatty acid composition were associated with changes in dominant molecular species of triacylglycerols (TAGs) and their spatial distributions within embryo tissues. A combination of mass spectrometry (MS)-based lipidomics approaches, including MS imaging of seed cryo-sections, revealed that cotton embryos expressing a non-functional allele of a Brassica napus delta-12 desaturase showed altered accumulation of TAG species, especially within cotyledonary tissues. While lipid analysis of seed extracts could demonstrate detailed quantitative changes in TAG species in transgenics, the spatial contribution of metabolite compartmentation could only be visualized by MS imaging. Our results suggest tissue-specific differences in TAG biosynthetic pathways within cotton embryos, and indicate the importance of considering the location of metabolites in tissues in addition to their identification and quantification when developing a detailed view of cellular metabolism.

  6. Imaging the Tissue Distribution of Glucose in Livers Using A PARACEST Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Jimin; Trokowski, Robert; Zhang, Shanrong; Malloy, Craig R.; Sherry, A. Dean

    2009-01-01

    Noninvasive imaging of glucose in tissues could provide important insights about glucose gradients in tissue, the origins of gluconeogenesis, or perhaps differences in tissue glucose utilization in vivo. Direct spectral detection of glucose in vivo by 1H NMR is complicated by interfering signals from other metabolites and the much larger water signal. One potential way to overcome these problems is to use an exogenous glucose sensor that reports glucose concentrations indirectly through the water signal by chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST). Such a method is demonstrated here in mouse liver perfused with a Eu3+-based glucose sensor containing two phenylboronate moieties as the recognition site. Activation of the sensor by applying a frequency-selective presaturation pulse at 42 ppm resulted in a 17% decrease in water signal in livers perfused with 10 mM sensor and 10 mM glucose compared with livers with the same amount of sensor but without glucose. It was shown that livers perfused with 5 mM sensor but no glucose can detect glucose exported from hepatocytes after hormonal stimulation of glycogenolysis. CEST images of livers perfused in the magnet responded to changes in glucose concentrations demonstrating that the method has potential for imaging the tissue distribution of glucose in vivo. PMID:18958853

  7. Drug-induced modulation of Tc-99m pyrophosphate tissue distribution: what is involved

    SciTech Connect

    Wahner, H.W.; Dewanjee, M.K.

    1981-06-01

    More than ten years after their introduction, Tc-99m-labeled phosphates and phosphonates (TcP) continue to be of interest to the investigator and to hold promise for new clinical applications in the future. Initially, TcP compounds were valued because of their bone-seeking properties. Emphasis shifted from bone to soft tissue when Bonte et al. introduced Tc-99m-labeled pyrophosphate (TcPPi) for myocardial infarct scanning. Detailed information about TcPPi uptake in ischemic and necrotic myocardial tissue at the subcellular level has accumulated. Therefore, understanding of the mechanism of TcPPi uptake in infarcted myocardium is more detailed than understanding of uptake by bone. A new, and potentially powerful, approach to the use of TcP is being proposed by Carr et al. The authors attempt to modulate favorably the tissue distribution of TcPPi by prior administration of drugs in pharmacological quantities. The authors demonstrate that uptake of TcPPi can be enhanced in the necrotic myocardium, uptake by bone can be reduced, and the lesion-to-blood ratio can be altered favorably when vitamin D/sub 3/ or desoxycorticosterone acetate (DOCA) is administered in pharmacological doses before the TcPPi injection. A short review is presented of background information helpful for interpreting the drug effects on TcPPi uptake in bone or necrotic myocardial tissue.

  8. Reconstruction of fluorescence distribution hidden in biological tissue using mesoscopic epifluorescence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Björn, Saskia; Englmeier, Karl-Hans; Ntziachristos, Vasilis; Schulz, Ralf

    2011-04-01

    Mesoscopic epifluorescence tomography is a novel technique that discovers fluorescence bio-distribution in small animals by tomographic means in reflectance geometry. A collimated laser beam is scanned over the skin surface to excite fluorophores hidden within the tissue while a CCD camera acquires an image of the fluorescence emission for each source position. This configuration is highly efficient in the visible spectrum range where trans-illumination imaging of small animals is not feasible due to the high tissue absorption and scattering in biological organisms. The reconstruction algorithm is similar to the one used in fluorescence molecular tomography. However, diffusion theory cannot be employed since the source-detector separation for most image pixels is comparable to or below the scattering length of the tissue. Instead Monte Carlo simulations are utilized to predict the sensitivity functions. In a phantom study we show the effect of using enhanced source grid arrangements during the data acquisition and the reconstruction process to minimize boundary artefacts. Furthermore, we present ex vivo data that show high spatial resolution and quantitative accuracy in heterogeneous tissues using GFP-like fluorescence in B6-albino mice up to a depth of 1100 μm.

  9. Species and tissue distribution of cholecystokinin/gastrin-like substances in some invertebrates.

    PubMed

    Larson, B A; Vigna, S R

    1983-06-01

    Twenty-six species of invertebrates representing eight phyla were surveyed for the presence of cholecystokinin/gastrin-like (CCK/gastrin-like) peptides by radioimmunoassay of various tissue extracts. This is the first report of the presence of CCK/gastrin-like peptides in representatives of the phylum Ectoprocta, the arthropodan classes Crustacea and Merostomata, and in the nervous systems of the gastropod mollusc Aplysia californica and the oligochaete annelid Lumbricus terrestris. It has been proposed that CCK/gastrin evolved in the invertebrates as a neural peptide and was subsequently exploited by the vertebrates as a regulatory peptide in both the nervous system and the gastrointestinal endocrine system. The present results indicate that some gastropod molluscs, a merostomatan arthropod, and an annelid have detectable CCK/gastrin in both nervous and gut tissue. However, extractable CCK/gastrin was found only in gut tissue and not in the central nervous system of a crustacean arthropod. The tissue origin of the extracted CCK/gastrin in Bugula (phylum Ectoprocta) was not determined. Final resolution of the question of the nervous versus gut endocrine cellular origin of CCK/gastrin in invertebrates awaits further investigation. CCK/gastrin-like peptides are widely distributed among the invertebrates, which thus provide a rich source of comparative material for study of these regulatory substances.

  10. Reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatographic determination of enoxacin and 4-oxo-enoxacin in human plasma and prostatic tissue. Application to a pharmacokinetic study.

    PubMed

    Hamel, B; Audran, M; Costa, P; Bressolle, F

    1998-07-01

    A simple high-performance liquid chromatographic method has been developed for the simultaneous determination of enoxacin and 4-oxo-enoxacin in plasma and prostatic tissue. The work-up procedure involves a liquid-liquid extraction step followed by isocratic chromatography on a reversed-phase analytical column, with ultraviolet absorbance detection (lambda = 340 nm). Using a mobile phase of 20.9% (v/v) acetonitrile buffer (pH 2.1), adequate retention time and separation among the analytes has been obtained using tetrabutylammonium hydroxide included in the eluent. Retention times are 5.2 min for enoxacin, 6.8 min for pefloxacin and 12 min for 4-oxo-enoxacin. For plasma and prostatic tissue, the precision of the assay was below 9%. The percent recovery from the nominal values for accuracy ranged from 94 to 108%. The limits of quantitation were 20 ng/ml for plasma and 50 ng/g for tissue (precision < 18%). The detection limits were 10 ng/ml and 25 ng/g, respectively. The calibration curves were linear from 20 to 1000 ng/ml for plasma and from 50 to 2500 ng/g for tissue. In plasma, the extraction recoveries averaged 52% for enoxacin and 63% for 4-oxo-enoxacin. In prostatic tissue, they were 57 and 76% for the two analytes, respectively. This method has been employed for the determination of enoxacin and 4-oxo-enoxacin in plasma and prostatic tissue samples from patients following repeated oral administration of enoxacin (400 mg twice a day for four days).

  11. Pharmacokinetics of cefuroxime in porcine cortical and cancellous bone determined by microdialysis.

    PubMed

    Tøttrup, Mikkel; Hardlei, Tore Forsingdal; Bendtsen, Michael; Bue, Mats; Brock, Birgitte; Fuursted, Kurt; Søballe, Kjeld; Birke-Sørensen, Hanne

    2014-06-01

    Traditionally, the pharmacokinetics of antimicrobials in bone have been investigated using bone biopsy specimens, but this approach suffers from considerable methodological limitations. Consequently, new methods are needed. The objectives of this study were to assess the feasibility of microdialysis (MD) for measuring cefuroxime in bone and to obtain pharmacokinetic profiles for the same drug in porcine cortical and cancellous bone. The measurements were conducted in bone wax sealed and unsealed drill holes in cortical bone and in drill holes in cancellous bone and in subcutaneous tissue. As a reference, the free and total plasma concentrations were also measured. The animals received a bolus of 1,500 mg cefuroxime over 30 min. No significant differences were found between the key pharmacokinetic parameters for sealed and unsealed drill holes in cortical bone. The mean ± standard error of the mean area under the concentration-time curve (AUC) values from 0 to 5 h were 6,013 ± 1,339, 3,222 ± 1086, 2,232 ± 635, and 952 ± 290 min · μg/ml for free plasma, subcutaneous tissue, cancellous bone, and cortical bone, respectively (P < 0.01, analysis of variance). The AUC for cortical bone was also significantly different from that for cancellous bone (P = 0.04). This heterogeneous tissue distribution was also reflected in other key pharmacokinetic parameters. This study validates MD as a suitable method for measuring cefuroxime in bone. Cefuroxime penetration was impaired for all tissues, and bone may not be considered one distinct compartment.

  12. Pharmacokinetics of melamine in pigs following intravenous administration.

    PubMed

    Baynes, Ronald E; Smith, Geof; Mason, Sharon E; Barrett, Erica; Barlow, Beth M; Riviere, Jim E

    2008-03-01

    Melamine-contaminated pet food was recently added as a supplement to livestock feed. There is little or no information concerning the pharmacokinetics of melamine in livestock, and the aim of this study was to obtain pharmacokinetic parameters for this contaminant in pigs. Melamine was administered intravenously to five weanling pigs at a dose of 6.13 mg/kg and plasma samples were collected over 24 h, extracted for melamine, and then analyzed by HPLC-UV. The data was shown to best fit a one-compartment model with melamine's half-life of 4.04 (+/- 0.37) h, clearance of 0.11 (+/- 0.01) L/h/kg, and volume of distribution of 0.61 (+/- 0.04) L/kg. These data are comparable to the only mammalian study in rats and suggests that melamine is readily cleared by the kidney and there is unlikely to be significant tissue binding. Further tissue residue studies are required to assess the depletion kinetics of this contaminant in the pig which will determine whether residue levels in the kidney should be of public health concern if pigs were exposed to a similar dose.

  13. Bioaccumulation and tissue distribution of a quaternary ammonium surfactant in three aquatic species

    SciTech Connect

    Knezovich, J.P.; Lawton, M.P.; Inouye, L.S.

    1989-01-01

    Quaternary ammonium compounds (QACs) are commonly used as surfactants in drilling muds and fabric softeners and as biocides in antiseptics and disinfectants. QACs and cationic polyelectrolytes elicit acute toxic effects in aquatic organisms by disrupting the structure and function of gill tissues, which may result in the suffocation of the organism. Little information is available, however, on the relative availability and distribution of QACs in the tissues of aquatic organisms. Information of this nature is required to understand the potential consequences of releases of sublethal concentrations of QACs into the aquatic environment. In this study, hexadecylpyridinium bromide (HPB; CAS 140-72-7) was selected as a compound for initial study because it belongs to a chemical class (alkylpyridinium QACs) that includes the most toxic and environmentally persistent QACs. Clams, minnows, and tadpoles were chosen as test organisms to define the relative availability of HPB to organisms that occupy distinctly different ecological niches.

  14. Tissue distribution, synthesis stage, and ethylene induction of pineapple (Ananas comosus) chitinases.

    PubMed

    Taira, Toki; Toma, Noriko; Ichi, Marika; Takeuchi, Makoto; Ishihara, Masanobu

    2005-04-01

    We examined the tissue distribution, synthesis stage, and ethylene induction of three types of pineapple chitinase using chitinase activity gel and immunoblot analysis. Type A (acidic class III) exists in all tissues, while type B (weakly basic class I, which has strong antifungal activity) and type C (acidic class I) are localized mainly in the leaf and stem. In a pericarp, type A exists at all stages during fruit development, while type B and type C exist only at the early stage. Synthesis of type A is induced by ethylene, while that of types B and C is not affected by it. These results suggest that the physiological roles of these three types of chitinase in pineapple are different.

  15. Distribution of the human intracellular serpin protease inhibitor 8 in human tissues.

    PubMed

    Strik, Merel C; Bladergroen, Bellinda A; Wouters, Dorine; Kisiel, Walter; Hooijberg, Jan Hendrik; Verlaan, Angelique R; Hordijk, Peter L; Schneider, Pascal; Hack, C Erik; Kummer, J Alain

    2002-11-01

    Ovalbumin-like serine protease inhibitors are mainly localized intracellularly and their in vivo functions are largely unknown. To elucidate their physiological role(s), we studied the expression of one of these inhibitors, protease inhibitor 8 (PI-8), in normal human tissues by immunohistochemistry using a PI-8-specific monoclonal antibody. PI-8 was strongly expressed in the nuclei of squamous epithelium of mouth, pharynx, esophagus, and epidermis, and by the epithelial layer of skin appendages, particularly by more differentiated epithelial cells. PI-8 was also expressed by monocytes and by neuroendocrine cells in the pituitary gland, pancreas, and digestive tract. Monocytes showed nuclear and cytoplasmic localization of PI-8, whereas neuroendocrine cells showed only cytoplasmic staining. In vitro nuclear localization of PI-8 was confirmed by confocal analysis using serpin-transfected HeLa cells. Furthermore, mutation of the P(1) residue did not affect the subcellular distribution pattern of PI-8, indicating that its nuclear localization is independent of the interaction with its target protease. We conclude that PI-8 has a unique distribution pattern in human tissues compared to the distribution patterns of other intracellular serpins. Additional studies must be performed to elucidate its physiological role.

  16. Comparative expression and tissue distribution analyses of astacin-like squid metalloprotease in squid and cuttlefish.

    PubMed

    Kanzawa, Nobuyuki; Ogawa, Takuya; Asakura, Masanori; Okiyama, Keisuke; Honda, Michiyo; Tsuchiya, Takahide

    2008-01-01

    Astacin-like squid metalloprotease (ALSM) is a member of the astacin family of metalloproteases. In the present study, we investigated the expression and tissue distribution of ALSM in bigfin reef squid (Sepioteuthis lessoniana) and golden cuttlefish (Sepia esculenta). Myosin heavy chain hydrolysis tests showed ALSM-I-like activity in both species. We isolated partial cDNA clones showing high sequence similarity to ALSM-I and -III, suggesting that ALSM is common to squid and cuttlefish. Phylogenetic analysis showed that ALSMs are classified into two clades: ALSM-I forms one clade, and ALSM-II and -III form the other. ALSM was expressed in several tissues in bigfin reef squid, though expression was confined to the liver in cuttlefish. ALSMs are distributed in digestive organs but not in mantle muscle of squid and cuttlefish. Immunofluorescence analysis further showed that cellular localization of ALSM is evident not only in hepatic cells but also in pancreatic cells of bigfin reef squid. Thus, ALSM is commonly expressed in squid and cuttlefish, but its expression levels and distribution are distinct.

  17. Distribution of lymphocyte subsets in the small intestine lymphoid tissue of 1-month-old lambs.

    PubMed

    Corpa, J M; Juste, R A; García Marín, J F; Reyes, L E; González, J; Pérez, V

    2001-04-01

    Distribution of lymphocyte subpopulations along the small intestine lymphoid tissue has been examined in 1-month-old lambs using flow cytometric and immunohistochemical techniques. Monoclonal antibodies against CD4, CD8, gamma delta, CD45R and B receptors have been employed in samples from continuous ileal Peyer's patch (IPP), discrete jejunal Peyer's patches (JPP), ileocaecal valve lymphoid tissue (ICVPP), mesenteric lymph node (MLN) and intra-epithelial (IEL) and lamina propria (LPL) lymphocytes. Histological studies were also done. Differences in the lymphocyte distribution have been observed between some of the regions examined, especially between IPP and JPP for most of the markers. A remarkable feature was the existence of morphological and lymphocyte distribution differences between ICVPP and IPP, locations that had been traditionally considered as similar. The antibody against CD45R receptor used in this study, that was supposed to mark B cells and some T cells, detected cell populations located in the dome of the follicles in all the samples, whereas the centre was negative. Lymphocytes positive to the B marker employed were located mainly in the centre, suggesting that both antibodies would mark B cells in different maturation status.

  18. Distribution of Particles in the Z-axis of Tissue Sections: Relevance for Counting Methods.

    PubMed

    von Bartheld, Christopher S

    2012-01-01

    The distribution of particles in the z-axis of thick tissue sections has gained considerable attention, primarily because of implications for the accuracy of modern stereological counting methods. Three major types of artifacts can affect these sections: loss of particles from the surfaces of tissue sections (lost caps), homogeneous collapse in the z-axis, and differential deformation in the z-axis. Initially it was assumed that thick sections were not compromised by differential shrinkage or compression (differential uniform deformation). Studies in the last decade showed that such artifacts are common and that they depend on embedding media and sectioning devices. Paraffin, glycolmethacrylate and vibratome sections are affected by this artifact, but not celloidin sections or cryostat-derived cryosections. Differential distribution of particles in the z-axis is likely due to compression of the surface areas (margins) during sectioning, resulting in differential particle densities in the core and margin of tissue sections. This deformation of tissue sections can be rapidly assessed by measuring the position of particles in the z-axis. The analysis is complicated by potential secondary effects on section surfaces through loss of particles, the so-called "lost caps" phenomenon. Secondary effects necessitate the use of guard spaces, while their use in case of primary effects (compression due to sectioning) would enhance the artifact's impact on bias. Symmetric versus asymmetric patterns of z-axis distortion can give clues to distinguish primary and secondary effects. Studies that use the optical disector need to take these parameters into account to minimize biases.

  19. Tissue distribution of cells derived from the area opaca in heterospecific quail-chick blastodermal chimeras.

    PubMed

    Karagenç, Levent; Sandikci, Mustafa

    2010-01-01

    The objective of the current study was to determine the tissue distribution of cells derived from the area opaca in heterospecific quail-chick blastodermal chimeras. Quail-chick chimeras were constructed by transferring dissociated cells from the area opaca of the stage X-XII (EG&K) quail embryo into the subgerminal cavity of the unincubated chick blastoderm. The distribution of quail cells in embryonic as well as extra-embryonic tissues of the recipient embryo were examined using the QCPN monoclonal antibody after 6 days of incubation in serial sections taken at 100-mum intervals. Data gathered in the present study demonstrated that, when introduced into the subgerminal cavity of a recipient embryo, cells of the area opaca are able to populate not only extra-embryonic structures such as the amnion and the yolk sac, but also various embryonic tissues derived from the ectoderm and less frequently the mesoderm. Ectodermal chimerism was confined mainly to the head region and was observed in tissues derived from the neural ectoderm and the surface ectoderm, including the optic cup, diencephalon and lens. Although the possibility of random incorporation of transplanted cells into these embryonic structures cannot be excluded, these results would suggest that area opaca, a peripheral ring of cells in the avian embryo destined to form the extra-embryonic ectoderm and endoderm of the yolk sac, might harbor cells that have the potential to give rise to various cell types in the recipient chick embryo, including those derived from the surface ectoderm and neural ectoderm.

  20. Intravenous ampicillin pharmacokinetics in the third trimester of pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Kubacka, R T; Johnstone, H E; Tan, H S; Reeme, P D; Myre, S A

    1983-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of a single dose of intravenous ampicillin were studied in nine patients during their third trimester of pregnancy. Each volunteer was given either 500 mg (5.7-8.8 mg/kg) or 1 g (15.4-21.4 mg/kg) of sodium ampicillin by rapid infusion. Postinfusion plasma concentration-time curves followed biexponential decay in all subjects. Calculated parameters included a mean plasma distribution volume of 177.1 +/- 97.5 ml/kg, tissue or peripheral distribution volume of 246.2 +/- 143.9 ml/kg, elimination half-life of 1.60 +/- 0.51 h, and total body clearance of 4.59 +/- 1.48 ml/min/kg. Dose-dependent disposition was not observed. Gestation-specific drug therapy research during pregnancy is discussed. PMID:6845399

  1. Mechanisms of Vascular Damage by Hemorrhagic Snake Venom Metalloproteinases: Tissue Distribution and In Situ Hydrolysis

    PubMed Central

    Baldo, Cristiani; Jamora, Colin; Yamanouye, Norma; Zorn, Telma M.; Moura-da-Silva, Ana M.

    2010-01-01

    Background Envenoming by viper snakes constitutes an important public health problem in Brazil and other developing countries. Local hemorrhage is an important symptom of these accidents and is correlated with the action of snake venom metalloproteinases (SVMPs). The degradation of vascular basement membrane has been proposed as a key event for the capillary vessel disruption. However, SVMPs that present similar catalytic activity towards extracellular matrix proteins differ in their hemorrhagic activity, suggesting that other mechanisms might be contributing to the accumulation of SVMPs at the snakebite area allowing capillary disruption. Methodology/Principal Findings In this work, we compared the tissue distribution and degradation of extracellular matrix proteins induced by jararhagin (highly hemorrhagic SVMP) and BnP1 (weakly hemorrhagic SVMP) using the mouse skin as experimental model. Jararhagin induced strong hemorrhage accompanied by hydrolysis of collagen fibers in the hypodermis and a marked degradation of type IV collagen at the vascular basement membrane. In contrast, BnP1 induced only a mild hemorrhage and did not disrupt collagen fibers or type IV collagen. Injection of Alexa488-labeled jararhagin revealed fluorescent staining around capillary vessels and co-localization with basement membrane type IV collagen. The same distribution pattern was detected with jararhagin-C (disintegrin-like/cysteine-rich domains of jararhagin). In opposition, BnP1 did not accumulate in the tissues. Conclusions/Significance These results show a particular tissue distribution of hemorrhagic toxins accumulating at the basement membrane. This probably occurs through binding to collagens, which are drastically hydrolyzed at the sites of hemorrhagic lesions. Toxin accumulation near blood vessels explains enhanced catalysis of basement membrane components, resulting in the strong hemorrhagic activity of SVMPs. This is a novel mechanism that underlies the difference between

  2. Automated anatomical interpretation of ion distributions in tissue: linking imaging mass spectrometry to curated atlases.

    PubMed

    Verbeeck, Nico; Yang, Junhai; De Moor, Bart; Caprioli, Richard M; Waelkens, Etienne; Van de Plas, Raf

    2014-09-16

    Imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) has become a prime tool for studying the distribution of biomolecules in tissue. Although IMS data sets can become very large, computational methods have made it practically feasible to search these experiments for relevant findings. However, these methods lack access to an important source of information that many human interpretations rely upon: anatomical insight. In this work, we address this need by (1) integrating a curated anatomical data source with an empirically acquired IMS data source, establishing an algorithm-accessible link between them and (2) demonstrating the potential of such an IMS-anatomical atlas link by applying it toward automated anatomical interpretation of ion distributions in tissue. The concept is demonstrated in mouse brain tissue, using the Allen Mouse Brain Atlas as the curated anatomical data source that is linked to MALDI-based IMS experiments. We first develop a method to spatially map the anatomical atlas to the IMS data sets using nonrigid registration techniques. Once a mapping is established, a second computational method, called correlation-based querying, gives an elementary demonstration of the link by delivering basic insight into relationships between ion images and anatomical structures. Finally, a third algorithm moves further beyond both registration and correlation by providing automated anatomical interpretation of ion images. This task is approached as an optimization problem that deconstructs ion distributions as combinations of known anatomical structures. We demonstrate that establishing a link between an IMS experiment and an anatomical atlas enables automated anatomical annotation, which can serve as an important accelerator both for human and machine-guided exploration of IMS experiments.

  3. Tissue Iron Distribution Assessed by MRI in Patients with Iron Loading Anemias

    PubMed Central

    Gutiérrez, Lucía; House, Michael J.; Vasavda, Nisha; Drašar, Emma; Gonzalez-Gascon y Marin, Isabel; Kulasekararaj, Austin G.; St Pierre, Tim G.; Thein, Swee L.

    2015-01-01

    Bone marrow, spleen, liver and kidney proton transverse relaxation rates (R2), together with cardiac R2* from patients with sickle cell disease (SCD), paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH) and non-transfusion dependent thalassemia (NTDT) have been compared with a control group. Increased liver and bone marrow R2 values for the three groups of patients in comparison with the controls have been found. SCD and PNH patients also present an increased spleen R2 in comparison with the controls. The simultaneous measurement of R2 values for several tissue types by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has allowed the identification of iron distribution patterns in diseases associated with iron imbalance. Preferential liver iron loading is found in the highly transfused SCD patients, while the low transfused ones present a preferential iron loading of the spleen. Similar to the highly transfused SCD group, PNH patients preferentially accumulate iron in the liver. A reduced spleen iron accumulation in comparison with the liver and bone marrow loading has been found in NTDT patients, presumably related to the differential increased intestinal iron absorption. The correlation between serum ferritin and tissue R2 is moderate to good for the liver, spleen and bone marrow in SCD and PNH patients. However, serum ferritin does not correlate with NTDT liver R2, spleen R2 or heart R2*. As opposed to serum ferritin measurements, tissue R2 values are a more direct measurement of each tissue’s iron loading. This kind of determination will allow a better understanding of the different patterns of tissue iron biodistribution in diseases predisposed to tissue iron accumulation. PMID:26406992

  4. Sex differences in adipose tissue: It is not only a question of quantity and distribution.

    PubMed

    Fuente-Martín, Esther; Argente-Arizón, Pilar; Ros, Purificación; Argente, Jesús; Chowen, Julie A

    2013-07-01

    Obesity and its associated secondary complications are active areas of investigation in search of effective treatments. As a result of this intensified research numerous differences between males and females at all levels of metabolic control have come to the forefront. These differences include not only the amount and distribution of adipose tissue, but also differences in its metabolic capacity and functions between the sexes. Here, we review some of the recent advances in our understanding of these dimorphisms and emphasize the fact that these differences between males and females must be taken into consideration in hopes of obtaining successful treatments for both sexes.

  5. Distribution and isolation of four laminin variants; tissue restricted distribution of heterotrimers assembled from five different subunits.

    PubMed Central

    Engvall, E; Earwicker, D; Haaparanta, T; Ruoslahti, E; Sanes, J R

    1990-01-01

    The distribution of subunits of the basement membrane proteins laminin and merosin in human and rabbit tissue was studied by immunofluorescence using monoclonal antibodies. The laminin A chain is present in epithelial, endothelial, and smooth muscle basement membranes. Merosin, as defined by its heavy chain M, is present in striated muscle and peripheral nerve. The A subunit colocalizes with at least two B subunits: B2 plus either B1 or the recently discovered B1 homologue S. The M subunit most often colocalizes with B1 and B2. Exceptions include the myotendinous junction, where M colocalizes with S, and the trophoblast basement membrane, where the M subunit colocalizes with S as well as B1. The presence of all five known subunits of the laminin family in placenta allowed isolation of their parent molecules in native form by the use of monoclonal antibodies in affinity chromatography. Four different heterotrimeric proteins could be identified: B1 chain-containing laminin (A-B1-B2), S chain-containing laminin (A-S-B2), B1-containing merosin (M-B1-B2), and S-containing merosin (M-S-B2). The data show that the proteins in the laminin family are heterotrimers composed of one heavy and two light chains; that most basement membranes contain predominantly one protein of the laminin family; and that laminin, as defined by the A subunit, has a much more restricted distribution than previously thought. Images PMID:2099832

  6. Pharmacokinetics and biodegradation of chitosan in rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hui; Jiang, Zhiwen; Han, Baoqin; Niu, Shuyi; Dong, Wen; Liu, Wanshun

    2015-10-01

    Chitosan, an excellent biomedical material, has received a widespread in vivo application. In contrast, its metabolism and distribution once being implanted were less documented. In this study, the pharmacokinetics and biodegradation of fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) labeled and muscle implantation administrated chitosan in rats were investigated with fluorescence spectrophotometry, histological assay and gel chromatography. After implantation, chitosan was degraded gradually during its distribution to diverse organs. Among the tested organs, liver and kidney were found to be the first two highest in chitosan content, which was followed by heart, brain and spleen. Urinary excretion was believed to be the major pathway of chitosan elimination, yet 80% of chitosan administered to rats was not trackable in their urine. This indicated that the majority of chitosan was degraded in tissues. In average, the molecular weight of the degradation products of chitosan in diverse organs and urine was found to be <65 kDa. This further confirmed the in vivo degradation of chitosan. Our findings provided new evidences for the intensive and safe application of chitosan as a biomedical material.

  7. Tissue distribution of cadmium-109 after tracheal and gastric administration in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Doi, R.; Chowdhury, P.; Nishikawa, M.; Rayford, P.L. )

    1993-10-01

    Cadmium is known to be a toxic trace element and its ingestion into the human body via dietary, inhalation, occupational, or non-occupational sources can induce a variety of pulmonary, renal, or reproductive dysfunction. Many acute and chronic studies with cadmium have been conducted in experimental animals to determine its mechanism of action, and it has been reported that cadmium may enhance or deactivate several enzyme systems in vitro or in vivo, and it may act as a potent calcium blocker, and can inhibit calmodulin activity. In addition, cadmium is distributed and retained in organ systems such as liver, kidney and lung. We have previously shown that a significant amount of cadmium is accumulated in lung, kidney, liver and gastrointestinal tract following intravenous or intraperitoneal injection. This study was conducted to delineate the tissue distribution of cadmium in animals following more physiologic route of exposure, such as tracheal and gastric administration of cadmium. 14 refs., 2 figs.

  8. The influence of prior total body irradiation on the tissue distribution of mouse lymphoma/leukemia.

    PubMed

    Cobb, L M; Butler, S A

    1986-01-01

    The effect of a single dose of 10 Gy X rays on the distribution of subsequently injected mouse lymphoma/leukemia cells was studied. The organ distribution of an acute myeloid leukemia (A46) was not affected by prior (90 days) administration of 10 Gy X rays. A T-cell lymphoblastic lymphoma/leukemia (A55) and a B-cell lymphoblastic lymphoma/leukemia (A31) produced enhanced infiltration of the lung when 10 Gy of total body irradiation (TBI) was given 90 days before the tumor cells. The infiltration was predominantly in the peribronchiolar and perivascular spaces. Enhancement was not seen in any tissues other than lung. The possibility is raised that in those acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients whose treatment includes TBI, residual circulating cells may be encouraged to infiltrate the lung.

  9. Distribution and elimination of [14C] sarafloxacin hydrochloride from tissues of juvenile channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gingerich, W.H.; Meinertz, J.R.; Dawson, V.K.; Gofus, J.E.; Delaney, L.J.; Bunnell, P.R.

    1995-01-01

    The distribution and loss of radioactivity from tissues were determined in 60 juvenile channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) following oral dosing with the candidate fish therapeutant Sarafin® ([14C] sarafloxacin hydrochloride) at 10 mg/kg for 5 consecutive days. Twelve groups of 5 fish each were sampled at selected times ranging from 3 to 240 h after the last dose was administered, The concentration and content of sarafloxacin-equivalent activity was determined in liver, gallbladder, kidney, skin, and skinless fillet by sample oxidation and liquid scintillation counting; content of sarafloxacin-equivalent activity was determined in stomach and anterior and posterior intestines, Skinless fillet tissues were also analyzed for sarafloxacin and for potential metabolites by gradient-elution high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with in-line radiometric and fluorescence detection, Loss of radioactivity from the whole body conformed to a bimodal elimination pattern with a rapid initial phase (t1/2=11 h) and a slower secondary phase (t1/2=222 h). Tissue and contents of the gastrointestinal tract (i.e. stomach and anterior and posterior intestines) were a principal depot of activity during the first four sample times (3, 6, 12, and 24 h); the combined head, skeleton, and fins (i.e. residual carcass) were the principal depot of activity in samples taken after 24 h. Of those tissues sampled 3 h after the last dose, relative sarafloxacin concentration was greatest in the liver (4.06 μg equivalents/g) and least in the residual carcass (1.13 μg equivalents/g), Intermediate concentrations were found in the kidney (2.04 μg equivalents/g), skinless fillet (1.71 μg equivalents/ g), and the skin (1.51 μg equivalents/g). Concentrations of sarafloxacin-equivalent residues in edible skinless fillet were consistently among the lowest of all tissues examined. The highest mean concentration of parent-equivalent material in the fillet tissue was found 12 h after

  10. Pharmacokinetics and disposition of WR-1065 in the rhesus monkey

    SciTech Connect

    Mangold, D.J.; Huelle, B.K.; Miller, M.A.; Geary, R.S.; Sanchez-Barona, D.O.; Swynnerton, N.F.; Fleckenstein, L.; Ludden, T.M. )

    1990-05-01

    The pharmacokinetics of WR-1065 (S-2-(3-aminopropylamino)ethanethiol) were investigated following iv, intraduodenal, and intraportal administrations in the rhesus monkey. Pharmacokinetic parameters were estimated by compartmental modeling of plasma concentration data from 10-min and 120-min iv infusions. Higher apparent volumes of distribution (Vc and Vss) and higher mean residence time (MRT) were observed at the slower infusion rate but a constant total dose. The values reflect a change in the distribution of WR-1065, possibly due to to saturation of binding in plasma and tissue. However, clearance remained unchanged. For a monkey administered approximately twice the 60 mg/kg dose infused over 120 min, data analysis indicates a disproportional increase in AUC and a substantial decrease in clearance. Low and erratic plasma concentrations of free drug (analytically determined without reductive cleavage) were observed following intraduodenal administration of WR-1065, demonstrating the drug's poor oral bioavailability. Results of intraduodenal administrations of radiolabeled drug indicated than an appreciable amount of the radiolabel in the dose reached the systemic circulation. However, after either intraduodenal or iv administration, only 31% of the AUC (radiolabel) could be accounted for as total (free and disulfide-bound) WR-1065 by specific analysis in separate experiments. Low levels of total cysteamine strongly suggest it to be a minor contributor to the disposition of the drug. Free WR-1065 AUC values following intraportal administration were similar to values obtained after iv administration.

  11. VISUALIZATION OF TISSUE DISTRIBUTION AND METABOLISM OF BENZO[A]PYRENE IN EARLY EMBRYONIC MEDAKA (ORYZIAS LATIPES)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fish early life stages are highly sensitive to exposure to persistent bioaccumulative toxicants (PBTs). The factors that contribute to this are unknown, but may include the distribution of PBTs to sensitive tissues during critical stages of development. Multiphoton laser scannin...

  12. Chronic ingestion of Mn/sub 3/O/sub 4/ by young rats: tissue accumulation, distribution, and depletion

    SciTech Connect

    Rehnberg, G.L.; Hein, J.F.; Carter, S.D.; Linko, R.S.; Laskey, J.W.

    1981-02-01

    Mn accumulation, distribution, and disappearance were evaluated in selected tissues of preweanling rats dosed daily with particulate Mn/sub 3/O/sub 4/ for 12 or 27 d postpartum. Significant findings include a high rate of Mn absorption and localization in tissues, especially the cerebrum, hypothalamus, and pituitary. In these tissues, the return of Mn concentrations to control levels was much slower when Mn dosing was continued beyond 18-20 d postpartum.

  13. Label Distribution in Tissues of Wheat Seedlings Cultivated with Tritium-Labeled Leonardite Humic Acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulikova, Natalia A.; Abroskin, Dmitry P.; Badun, Gennady A.; Chernysheva, Maria G.; Korobkov, Viktor I.; Beer, Anton S.; Tsvetkova, Eugenia A.; Senik, Svetlana V.; Klein, Olga I.; Perminova, Irina V.

    2016-06-01

    Humic substances (HS) play important roles in the biotic-abiotic interactions of the root plant and soil contributing to plant adaptation to external environments. However, their mode of action on plants remains largely unknown. In this study the HS distribution in tissues of wheat seedlings was examined using tritium-labeled humic acid (HA) derived from leonardite (a variety of lignites) and microautoradiography (MAR). Preferential accumulation of labeled products from tritiated HA was found in the roots as compared to the shoots, and endodermis was shown to be the major control point for radial transport of label into vascular system of plant. Tritium was also found in the stele and xylem tissues indicating that labeled products from tritiated HA could be transported to shoot tissues via the transpiration stream. Treatment with HA lead to an increase in the content of polar lipids of photosynthetic membranes. The observed accumulation of labeled HA products in root endodermis and positive impact on lipid synthesis are consistent with prior reported observations on physiological effects of HS on plants such as enhanced growth and development of lateral roots and improvement/repairs of the photosynthetic status of plants under stress conditions.

  14. Improved SPECT reconstruction of Tc-99m sestamibi distribution in breast tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krol, Andrzej; Feiglin, David H.; Gagne, George M.; Huda, Walter; Tillapough-Fay, Gwen M.; Hellwig, Bradford J.; Thomas, Deaver F.

    1998-06-01

    This paper describes a new image reconstruction method to reduce the presence of image artifacts in scintimammography. SPECT data are mathematically modified prior to conventional image processing, followed by an inverse transform, which permits the tomographic visualization of low signals in the presence of large background intensities observed in scintimammography. Images of Tc-99m sestamibi distribution were obtained in a modeled `breast tissue', with a high activity in the `myocardium' as compared to the `breast tissue' (i.e. 20:1). Image reconstruction with the modified algorithm were qualitatively correct and demonstrated the regions of enhanced uptake (lesions) with no evidence of artifacts from the background counts in the heart. Comparison with MRI demonstrated that the hot regions were properly located and correlated with the MRI data. In contrast, a standard (i.e. Filtered Back Projection) reconstruction resulted in streak artifacts in place of `breast tissue' which rendered them clinically useless. This new approach to scintimammography offers the prospect of significantly reducing image artifacts and improving imaging accuracy.

  15. Label Distribution in Tissues of Wheat Seedlings Cultivated with Tritium-Labeled Leonardite Humic Acid.

    PubMed

    Kulikova, Natalia A; Abroskin, Dmitry P; Badun, Gennady A; Chernysheva, Maria G; Korobkov, Viktor I; Beer, Anton S; Tsvetkova, Eugenia A; Senik, Svetlana V; Klein, Olga I; Perminova, Irina V

    2016-01-01

    Humic substances (HS) play important roles in the biotic-abiotic interactions of the root plant and soil contributing to plant adaptation to external environments. However, their mode of action on plants remains largely unknown. In this study the HS distribution in tissues of wheat seedlings was examined using tritium-labeled humic acid (HA) derived from leonardite (a variety of lignites) and microautoradiography (MAR). Preferential accumulation of labeled products from tritiated HA was found in the roots as compared to the shoots, and endodermis was shown to be the major control point for radial transport of label into vascular system of plant. Tritium was also found in the stele and xylem tissues indicating that labeled products from tritiated HA could be transported to shoot tissues via the transpiration stream. Treatment with HA lead to an increase in the content of polar lipids of photosynthetic membranes. The observed accumulation of labeled HA products in root endodermis and positive impact on lipid synthesis are consistent with prior reported observations on physiological effects of HS on plants such as enhanced growth and development of lateral roots and improvement/repairs of the photosynthetic status of plants under stress conditions. PMID:27350412

  16. Correlations of trace elements in breast human tissues: Evaluation of spatial distribution using μ-XRF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Marina Piacenti da; Silva, Deisy Mara da; Ribeiro-Silva, Alfredo; Poletti, Martin Eduardo

    2012-05-01

    The aim of this work is to investigate microscopic correlations between trace elements in breast human tissues. A synchrotron X-ray fluorescence microprobe system (μ-XRF) was used to obtain two-dimensional distribution of trace element Ca, Fe, Cu and Zn in normal (6 samples) and malignant (14 samples) breast tissues. The experiment was performed in X-ray Fluorescence beam line at Laboratório Nacional de Luz Síncrotron (LNLS), Campinas, Brazil. The white microbeam was generated with a fine conical capillary with a 20 μm output diameter. The samples were supported on a XYZ table. An optical microscope with motorized zoom was used for sample positioning and choice the area to be scanned. Automatic two-dimensional scans were programmed and performed with steps of 30 μm in each direction (x, y) on the selected area. The fluorescence signals were recorded using a Si(Li) detector, positioned at 90 degrees with respect to the incident beam, with a collection time of 10 s per point. The elemental maps obtained from each sample were overlap to observe correlation between trace elements. Qualitative results showed that the pairs of elements Ca-Zn and Fe-Cu could to be correlated in malignant breast tissues. Quantitative results, achieved by Spearman correlation tests, indicate that there is a spatial correlation between these pairs of elements (p < 0.001) suggesting the importance of these elements in metabolic processes associated with the development of the tumor.

  17. Topical application of ALA and ALA hexyl ester on a subcutaneous murine mammary adenocarcinoma: tissue distribution.

    PubMed

    Perotti, C; Casas, A; Fukuda, H; Sacca, P; Batlle, A

    2003-02-10

    Although 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA)-based photodynamic therapy (PDT) has proven to be clinically beneficial for the treatment of certain cancers, including a variety of skin cancers, optimal tissue localisation still remains a problem. An approach to improve the bioavailability of protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) is the use of ALA derivatives instead of ALA. In this work, we employed a subcutaneous murine mammary adenocarcinoma to study the tissue distribution pattern of the ALA hexyl ester (He-ALA) in comparison with ALA after their topical application in different vehicles. He-ALA induced porphyrin synthesis in the skin overlying the tumour (SOT), but it did not reach the tumour tissue as efficiently. Only 5 h after He-ALA lotion application, tumour porphyrin levels surpassed control values. He-ALA delivered in cream induced a substantially lower porphyrin synthesis in SOT, reinforcing the importance of the vehicle in the use of topical PDT. Porphyrin levels in internal organs remained almost within control values when He-ALA was employed. The addition of DMSO to ALA formulation slightly increased tumour and SOT porphyrin biosynthesis, but it did not when added to He-ALA lotion.

  18. Maternal transfer of dechloranes and their distribution among tissues in contaminated ducks.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ping-Fan; Yu, Lian-Lian; Li, Long; Zhang, Yun; Li, Xing-Hong

    2016-05-01

    The tissue concentrations of dechlorane plus and its analogues were determined in ducks collected from several e-waste recycling villages of Taizhou, China. Compared with the published literature, the relatively high concentrations of these compounds were detected in ducks, indicating serious DP contamination. Since both the duck meat and eggs were important components for diet, this result reminded us of keeping a watchful eye on human dietary exposure to DP and its analogues in this study area. The wet-weight concentrations of DP and its analogues were significantly related to tissue lipid content (p < 0.05), indicating that the lipid pools predominantly impacted the distribution of DPs in ducks. On the basis of lipid adjustment, the significantly lower levels in brain than those in liver and blood, displayed the occurrence of liver sequestration and blood-brain barrier to DP and its analogues in the duck (p < 0.05). The maternal transfer of DP and Mirex was not obviously limited, and the transferring extent of Dec 602 was over one. The stereo-selected accumulation of two DP isomers occurred among tissues with preference to syn-DP in blood, and to anti-DP in brain. The values of lipid-adjusted monodechlorinated products mainly originated from the exterior environment in ducks.

  19. Label Distribution in Tissues of Wheat Seedlings Cultivated with Tritium-Labeled Leonardite Humic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Kulikova, Natalia A.; Abroskin, Dmitry P.; Badun, Gennady A.; Chernysheva, Maria G.; Korobkov, Viktor I.; Beer, Anton S.; Tsvetkova, Eugenia A.; Senik, Svetlana V.; Klein, Olga I.; Perminova, Irina V.

    2016-01-01

    Humic substances (HS) play important roles in the biotic-abiotic interactions of the root plant and soil contributing to plant adaptation to external environments. However, their mode of action on plants remains largely unknown. In this study the HS distribution in tissues of wheat seedlings was examined using tritium-labeled humic acid (HA) derived from leonardite (a variety of lignites) and microautoradiography (MAR). Preferential accumulation of labeled products from tritiated HA was found in the roots as compared to the shoots, and endodermis was shown to be the major control point for radial transport of label into vascular system of plant. Tritium was also found in the stele and xylem tissues indicating that labeled products from tritiated HA could be transported to shoot tissues via the transpiration stream. Treatment with HA lead to an increase in the content of polar lipids of photosynthetic membranes. The observed accumulation of labeled HA products in root endodermis and positive impact on lipid synthesis are consistent with prior reported observations on physiological effects of HS on plants such as enhanced growth and development of lateral roots and improvement/repairs of the photosynthetic status of plants under stress conditions. PMID:27350412

  20. Mouse tissue distribution and persistence of the food-born fusariotoxins Enniatin B and Beauvericin.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Carrasco, Yelko; Heilos, Daniela; Richter, Lennart; Süssmuth, Roderich D; Heffeter, Petra; Sulyok, Michael; Kenner, Lukas; Berger, Walter; Dornetshuber-Fleiss, Rita

    2016-04-15

    The fusariotoxins Enniatin B (Enn B) and Beauvericin (Bea) have recently aroused interest as food contaminants and as potential anticancer drugs. However, limited data are available about their toxic profile. Aim of this study was to investigate their pharmacological behavior in vivo and their persistence in mice. Therefore, liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) was used to analyze the distribution of Enn B and Bea in selected tissue samples and biological fluids originating from mice treated intraperitoneally with these cyclohexadepsipeptides. Overall, no toxicological signs during life time or pathological changes were observed. Moreover, both fusariotoxins were found in all tissues and serum but not in urine. Highest amounts were measured in liver and fat demonstrating the moleculeś tendency to bioaccumulate in lipophilic tissues. While for Bea no metabolites could be detected, for Enn B three phase I metabolites (dioxygenated-Enn B, mono- and di-demethylated-Enn B) were found in liver and colon, with dioxygenated-Enn B being most prominent. Consequently, contribution of hepatic as well as intestinal metabolism seems to be involved in the overall metabolism of Enn B. Thus, despite their structural similarity, the metabolism of Enn B and Bea shows distinct discrepancies which might affect long-term effects and tolerability in humans. PMID:26892719

  1. Uptake and tissue distribution of dietary and aqueous cadmium by carp (Cyprinus carpio).

    PubMed

    Kraal, M H; Kraak, M H; de Groot, C J; Davids, C

    1995-07-01

    The aim of this study was to assess whether contaminated prey can be a major source of Cd for fish. For this purpose, the uptake and tissue distribution of dietary and aqueous cadmium by the carp (Cyprinus carpio) was studied. The fish were exposed to either Cd-contaminated food or Cd-contaminated water for 4 weeks in laboratory experiments. When exposed to contaminated food, the fish were kept in clean water and fed contaminated chironomid larvae, equilibrated with 99 micrograms Cd. liter-1. During exposure to contaminated water (nominal 100 micrograms Cd. liter-1; actual 80 micrograms Cd. liter-1) the fish were fed uncontaminated food. The Cd accumulation in the tissues of fish fed contaminated larvae was, in decreasing order, gut > kidney > liver = gill > muscle. In the water experiment this order was gut > gill > kidney > liver > muscle. In almost all tissues the Cd uptake was similar for both routes; only the gill had accumulated more Cd from Cd-contaminated water than from Cd-contaminated food. Considering the ongoing discussion of the importance of Cd transfer from contaminated food to predators, these findings suggest that uptake of Cd from Cd-contaminated prey by fish plays an important role in contaminated waters. PMID:8521785

  2. Tissue distribution of residual antimony in rats treated with multiple doses of meglumine antimoniate.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Deise Riba; Miranda, Elaine Silva; Saint'Pierre, Tatiana Dillenburg; Paumgartten, Francisco José Roma

    2014-07-01

    Meglumine antimoniate (MA) and sodium stibogluconate are pentavalent antimony (SbV) drugs used since the mid-1940s. Notwithstanding the fact that they are first-choice drugs for the treatment of leishmaniases, there are gaps in our knowledge of their toxicological profile, mode of action and kinetics. Little is known about the distribution of antimony in tissues after SbV administration. In this study, we evaluated the Sb content of tissues from male rats 24 h and three weeks after a 21-day course of treatment with MA (300 mg SbV/kg body wt/d, subcutaneous). Sb concentrations in the blood and organs were determined by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. In rats, as with in humans, the Sb blood levels after MA dosing can be described by a two-compartment model with a fast (t1/2 = 0.6 h) and a slow (t1/2 > 24 h) elimination phase. The spleen was the organ that accumulated the highest amount of Sb, while bone and thyroid ranked second in descending order of tissues according to Sb levels (spleen > bone, thyroid, kidneys > liver, epididymis, lungs, adrenals > prostate > thymus, pancreas, heart, small intestines > skeletal muscle, testes, stomach > brain). The pathophysiological consequences of Sb accumulation in the thyroid and Sb speciation in the liver, thyroid, spleen and bone warrant further studies.

  3. Tissue distribution of residual antimony in rats treated with multiple doses of meglumine antimoniate.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Deise Riba; Miranda, Elaine Silva; Saint'Pierre, Tatiana Dillenburg; Paumgartten, Francisco José Roma

    2014-07-01

    Meglumine antimoniate (MA) and sodium stibogluconate are pentavalent antimony (SbV) drugs used since the mid-1940s. Notwithstanding the fact that they are first-choice drugs for the treatment of leishmaniases, there are gaps in our knowledge of their toxicological profile, mode of action and kinetics. Little is known about the distribution of antimony in tissues after SbV administration. In this study, we evaluated the Sb content of tissues from male rats 24 h and three weeks after a 21-day course of treatment with MA (300 mg SbV/kg body wt/d, subcutaneous). Sb concentrations in the blood and organs were determined by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. In rats, as with in humans, the Sb blood levels after MA dosing can be described by a two-compartment model with a fast (t1/2 = 0.6 h) and a slow (t1/2 > 24 h) elimination phase. The spleen was the organ that accumulated the highest amount of Sb, while bone and thyroid ranked second in descending order of tissues according to Sb levels (spleen > bone, thyroid, kidneys > liver, epididymis, lungs, adrenals > prostate > thymus, pancreas, heart, small intestines > skeletal muscle, testes, stomach > brain). The pathophysiological consequences of Sb accumulation in the thyroid and Sb speciation in the liver, thyroid, spleen and bone warrant further studies. PMID:25075781

  4. Tissue distribution of residual antimony in rats treated with multiple doses of meglumine antimoniate

    PubMed Central

    Coelho, Deise Riba; Miranda, Elaine Silva; Saint’Pierre, Tatiana Dillenburg; Paumgartten, Francisco José Roma

    2014-01-01

    Meglumine antimoniate (MA) and sodium stibogluconate are pentavalent antimony (SbV) drugs used since the mid-1940s. Notwithstanding the fact that they are first-choice drugs for the treatment of leishmaniases, there are gaps in our knowledge of their toxicological profile, mode of action and kinetics. Little is known about the distribution of antimony in tissues after SbV administration. In this study, we evaluated the Sb content of tissues from male rats 24 h and three weeks after a 21-day course of treatment with MA (300 mg SbV/kg body wt/d, subcutaneous). Sb concentrations in the blood and organs were determined by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. In rats, as with in humans, the Sb blood levels after MA dosing can be described by a two-compartment model with a fast (t1/2 = 0.6 h) and a slow (t1/2 >> 24 h) elimination phase. The spleen was the organ that accumulated the highest amount of Sb, while bone and thyroid ranked second in descending order of tissues according to Sb levels (spleen >> bone, thyroid, kidneys > liver, epididymis, lungs, adrenals > prostate > thymus, pancreas, heart, small intestines > skeletal muscle, testes, stomach > brain). The pathophysiological consequences of Sb accumulation in the thyroid and Sb speciation in the liver, thyroid, spleen and bone warrant further studies. PMID:25075781

  5. Uptake, tissue distribution, and metabolism of malachite green in the channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Plakas, S.M.; El Said, K. R.; Stehly, G.R.; Gingerich, W.H.; Allen, J.L.

    1996-01-01

    The disposition of malachite green was determined in channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) after intravascular dosing (0.8 mg . Kg-1) or waterborne exposure (0.8 mg . L-1 for 1 h). After intravascular dosing, mean plasma concentrations of the parent compound exhibited a triphasic decline with a terminal elimination half-life of 6.2 h. Malachite green was rapidly absorbed and concentrated in the tissues during waterborne exposure. The rate of accumulation was directly related to pH of the exposure water. After waterborne exposure, elimination of the parent compound from plasma also was triphasic with a terminal half-life of 4.7 h. In muscle, the half-life of the parent compound was approximately 67 h. Malachite green and its metabolites were widely distributed in all tissues. In fish exposed to C-14-labeled malachite green, total drug equivalent concentrations were highest in abdominal fat and lowest in plasma. Malachite green was rapidly and extensively metabolized to its reduced form, leucomalachite green, which was slowly eliminated from the tissues. Leucomalachite green is an appropriate target analyte for monitoring exposure of channel catfish to this drug.

  6. [Tissue distribution and bioconcentration factors of tetrabromobisphenol A in five fishes in Lake Chaohu].

    PubMed

    Yang, Su-Wen; Wang, Sheng-Rui; Yan, Zhen-Guang; Zhang, Pu-Qing

    2012-06-01

    Tissue distribution and bioconcentration factors of tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA) in five economic fishes in Chaohu Lake were measured with SPE-HPLC. The results showed that, the average concentration of TBBPA was 4.70-11.20 ng x g(-1) (dry weight) in these fishes, in an order as White fish > Silver Carp > Bighead Carp > Common Carp > Longsnout Catfish. The highest concentration of TBBPA was found in the kidney, followed by liver and gill. The concentrations in fat and muscle were very low. Silver carp was really different from the other four fishes with the highest measured level in liver, followed by kidney and gills. In addition, the TBBPA concentration in tissues of the white fish showed positive correlation with the fish weight, especially in liver and kidney, but the trend is not significant in the back and belly tissues. The bioaccumulation factors of TBBPA for the 5 fishes were 9.56-22.64 based on the average concentration of TBBPA in water (0.52 microg x L(-1)) detected in this study, indicating insignificant bioconcentration effects of TBBPA on five fishes in Chaohu Lake.

  7. [Tissue distribution and bioconcentration factors of tetrabromobisphenol A in five fishes in Lake Chaohu].

    PubMed

    Yang, Su-Wen; Wang, Sheng-Rui; Yan, Zhen-Guang; Zhang, Pu-Qing

    2012-06-01

    Tissue distribution and bioconcentration factors of tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA) in five economic fishes in Chaohu Lake were measured with SPE-HPLC. The results showed that, the average concentration of TBBPA was 4.70-11.20 ng x g(-1) (dry weight) in these fishes, in an order as White fish > Silver Carp > Bighead Carp > Common Carp > Longsnout Catfish. The highest concentration of TBBPA was found in the kidney, followed by liver and gill. The concentrations in fat and muscle were very low. Silver carp was really different from the other four fishes with the highest measured level in liver, followed by kidney and gills. In addition, the TBBPA concentration in tissues of the white fish showed positive correlation with the fish weight, especially in liver and kidney, but the trend is not significant in the back and belly tissues. The bioaccumulation factors of TBBPA for the 5 fishes were 9.56-22.64 based on the average concentration of TBBPA in water (0.52 microg x L(-1)) detected in this study, indicating insignificant bioconcentration effects of TBBPA on five fishes in Chaohu Lake. PMID:22946165

  8. Correlations of trace elements in breast human tissues: Evaluation of spatial distribution using {mu}-XRF

    SciTech Connect

    Piacenti da Silva, Marina; Silva, Deisy Mara da; Ribeiro-Silva, Alfredo; Poletti, Martin Eduardo

    2012-05-17

    The aim of this work is to investigate microscopic correlations between trace elements in breast human tissues. A synchrotron X-ray fluorescence microprobe system ({mu}-XRF) was used to obtain two-dimensional distribution of trace element Ca, Fe, Cu and Zn in normal (6 samples) and malignant (14 samples) breast tissues. The experiment was performed in X-ray Fluorescence beam line at Laboratorio Nacional de Luz Sincrotron (LNLS), Campinas, Brazil. The white microbeam was generated with a fine conical capillary with a 20 {mu}m output diameter. The samples were supported on a XYZ table. An optical microscope with motorized zoom was used for sample positioning and choice the area to be scanned. Automatic two-dimensional scans were programmed and performed with steps of 30 {mu}m in each direction (x, y) on the selected area. The fluorescence signals were recorded using a Si(Li) detector, positioned at 90 degrees with respect to the incident beam, with a collection time of 10 s per point. The elemental maps obtained from each sample were overlap to observe correlation between trace elements. Qualitative results showed that the pairs of elements Ca-Zn and Fe-Cu could to be correlated in malignant breast tissues. Quantitative results, achieved by Spearman correlation tests, indicate that there is a spatial correlation between these pairs of elements (p < 0.001) suggesting the importance of these elements in metabolic processes associated with the development of the tumor.

  9. Immunoanatomic distribution of cytostructural and tissue-associated antigens in the human urinary tract.

    PubMed Central

    Cordon-Cardo, C.; Finstad, C. L.; Bander, N. H.; Melamed, M. R.

    1987-01-01

    The main objective of the present study is to define the expression and/or modulation of antigenic phenotypes in cells of the normal human kidney and urothelium according to cell type. Fourteen antibodies detecting differentiation and structural antigens expressed in the human urinary tract have been used to define the immunoanatomic distribution of these antigenic systems. They include urinary tract antigens (Tamm-Horsfall glycoprotein and prostate-specific antigen), tissue-associated antigens (epithelial membrane antigen, Factor VIII antigen, and Protein S-100), and cytoskeletal antigens of the intermediate filament classes (cytokeratins, vimentin, desmin, glial fibrillary acidic protein, and neurofilaments. Immunofluorescence and immunoperoxidase analyses performed on normal human fetal and adult tissue sections have demonstrated that these antigens are expressed by different cell types and domains of the nephron. Studies correlating normal fetal and adult tissues reveal that some of the antigens appear at distinct stages of maturation, representing early and late antigenic expression events. These antibodies offer a wide range of potential applications that include studies of embryogenesis of the human urinary tract and immunopathologic analyses of neoplastic and nonneoplastic diseases of the human kidney and urothelium. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:3548401

  10. Molecular Characterization and Tissue Distribution of Estrogen Receptor Genes in Domestic Yak

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Mei; Xiong, Xian-Rong; Lan, Dao-liang; Li, Jian

    2014-01-01

    Estrogen and its receptors are essential hormones for normal reproductive function in males and females during developmental stage. To better understand the effect of estrogen receptor (ER) gene in yak (Bos grunniens), reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was carried out to clone ERα and ERβ genes. Bioinformatics methods were used to analyze the evolutionary relationship between yaks and other species, and real-time PCR was performed to identify the mRNA expression of ERα and ERβ. Sequence analysis showed that the ER open reading frames (ORFs) encoded 596 and 527 amino acid proteins. The yak ERα and ERβ shared 45.3% to 99.5% and 53.9% to 99.1% protein sequence identities with other species homologs, respectively. Real-time PCR analysis revealed that ERα and ERβ were expressed in a variety of tissues, but the expression level of ERα was higher than that of ERβ in all tissues, except testis. The mRNA expression of ERα was highest in the mammary gland, followed by uterus, oviduct, and ovary, and lowest in the liver, kidney, lung, testis, spleen, and heart. The ERβ mRNA level was highest in the ovary; intermediary in the uterus and oviduct; and lowest in the heart, liver, spleen, lung, kidney, mammary gland, and testis. The identification and tissue distribution of ER genes in yaks provides a foundation for the further study on their biological functions. PMID:25358360

  11. Maternal transfer of dechloranes and their distribution among tissues in contaminated ducks.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ping-Fan; Yu, Lian-Lian; Li, Long; Zhang, Yun; Li, Xing-Hong

    2016-05-01

    The tissue concentrations of dechlorane plus and its analogues were determined in ducks collected from several e-waste recycling villages of Taizhou, China. Compared with the published literature, the relatively high concentrations of these compounds were detected in ducks, indicating serious DP contamination. Since both the duck meat and eggs were important components for diet, this result reminded us of keeping a watchful eye on human dietary exposure to DP and its analogues in this study area. The wet-weight concentrations of DP and its analogues were significantly related to tissue lipid content (p < 0.05), indicating that the lipid pools predominantly impacted the distribution of DPs in ducks. On the basis of lipid adjustment, the significantly lower levels in brain than those in liver and blood, displayed the occurrence of liver sequestration and blood-brain barrier to DP and its analogues in the duck (p < 0.05). The maternal transfer of DP and Mirex was not obviously limited, and the transferring extent of Dec 602 was over one. The stereo-selected accumulation of two DP isomers occurred among tissues with preference to syn-DP in blood, and to anti-DP in brain. The values of lipid-adjusted monodechlorinated products mainly originated from the exterior environment in ducks. PMID:26651433

  12. Coupled electro-mechanical models of fiber-distributed active tissues.

    PubMed

    Pandolfi, Anna; Gizzi, Alessio; Vasta, Marcello

    2016-08-16

    We discuss a constitutive model for stochastically distributed fiber reinforced tissues, where the active behavior of the fibers depends on the relative orientation of the electric field. Unlike other popular approaches, based on numerical integration over the unit sphere, or on the use of second order structure tensors, for the passive behavior we adopt a second order approximation of the strain energy density of the distribution. The purely mechanical quantities result to be dependent on two (second and fourth order, respectively) averaged structure tensors. In line with the approximation used for the passive behavior, we model the active behavior accounting for the statistical fiber distribution. We extend the Helmholtz free energy density by introducing a directional active potential, dependent on a stochastic permittivity tensor associated to a particular direction, and approximate the total active potential through a second order Taylor expansion of the permittivity tensor. The approximation allows us to derive explicitly the active stress and the active constitutive tensors, which result to be dependent on the same two averaged structure tensors that characterize the passive response. Active anisotropy follows from the distribution of the fibers and inherits its stochastic parameters. Examples of passive and active behaviors predicted by the model in terms of response to biaxial testing are presented, and comparisons with passive experimental data are provided.

  13. MRI Assessment of Lean and Adipose Tissue Distribution in Female Patients with Cushing’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Geer, Eliza B.; Shen, Wei; Gallagher, Dympna; Punyanitya, Mark; Looker, Helen C.; Post, Kalmon D.; Freda, Pamela U.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Chronic hypercortisolemia due to Cushing’s Disease (CD) results in abnormal adipose tissue (AT) distribution. Whole-body magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used to examine lean and AT distribution in female patients with CD to further understand the role of glucocorticoid excess in the development of abnormal AT distribution and obesity. Design Cross-sectional and case control study. Patients 15 females with CD and 12 healthy controls. Measurements Mass of skeletal muscle (SM) and AT in the visceral (VAT), subcutaneous (SAT), and inter-muscular (IMAT) compartments from whole-body MRI and serum levels of insulin, glucose, and leptin were measured. Results CD patients had leptin values that correlated to total AT (TAT) and SAT (p < 0.05) but not to VAT. CD patients had higher VAT/TAT ratios (p < 0.01) and lower SAT/TAT ratios (p < 0.05) compared to controls. TAT, VAT, and trunk SAT (TrSAT) were greater in CD patients (p < 0.01). SM was less in CD (p < 0.001) but IMAT was not different. Conclusions TAT, VAT, trSAT, and the proportion of AT in the visceral depot were greater in CD, though the proportion in the subcutaneous depot was less. SM was less but IMAT was not different. These findings have implications for understanding the role of cortisol in the abnormal AT distribution and metabolic risk seen in patients exposed to chronic excess glucocorticoids. PMID:20550536

  14. Quantitative Polymerase Chain Reaction Analysis of the Mouse Cyp2j Subfamily: Tissue Distribution and Regulation.

    PubMed

    Graves, Joan P; Gruzdev, Artiom; Bradbury, J Alyce; DeGraff, Laura M; Li, Huiling; House, John S; Hoopes, Samantha L; Edin, Matthew L; Zeldin, Darryl C

    2015-08-01

    Members of the cytochrome P450 CYP2J subfamily are expressed in multiple tissues in mice and humans. These enzymes are active in the metabolism of fatty acids to generate bioactive compounds. Herein we report new methods and results for quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) analysis for the seven genes (Cyp2j5, Cyp2j6, Cyp2j8, Cyp2j9, Cyp2j11, Cyp2j12, and Cyp2j13) of the mouse Cyp2j subfamily. SYBR Green primer sets were developed and compared with commercially available TaqMan primer/probe assays for specificity toward mouse Cyp2j cDNA, and analysis of tissue distribution and regulation of Cyp2j genes. Each TaqMan primer/probe set and SYBR Green primer set were shown to be specific for their intended mouse Cyp2j cDNA. Tissue distribution of the mouse Cyp2j isoforms confirmed similar patterns of expression between the two qPCR methods. Cyp2j5 and Cyp2j13 were highly expressed in male kidneys, and Cyp2j11 was highly expressed in both male and female kidneys. Cyp2j6 was expressed in multiple tissues, with the highest expression in the small intestine and duodenum. Cyp2j8 was detected in various tissues, with highest expression found in the skin. Cyp2j9 was highly expressed in the brain, liver, and lung. Cyp2j12 was predominately expressed in the brain. We also determined the Cyp2j isoform expression in Cyp2j5 knockout mice to determine whether there was compensatory regulation of other Cyp2j isoforms, and we assessed Cyp2j isoform regulation during various inflammatory models, including influenza A, bacterial lipopolysaccharide, house dust mite allergen, and corn pollen. Both qPCR methods detected similar suppression of Cyp2j6 and Cyp2j9 during inflammation in the lung.

  15. Tissue Distribution of Glutamate Synthase and Glutamine Synthetase in Rice Leaves 1

    PubMed Central

    Yamaya, Tomoyuki; Hayakawa, Toshihiko; Tanasawa, Keisuke; Kamachi, Kazunari; Mae, Tadahiko; Ojima, Kunihiko

    1992-01-01

    To further explore the function of NADH-dependent glutamate synthase (GOGAT), the tissue distribution of NADH-GOGAT protein and activity was investigated in rice (Oryza sativa L.) leaves. The distributions of ferredoxin (Fd)-dependent GOGAT, plastidic glutamine synthetase, and cytosolic glutamine synthetase proteins were also determined in the same tissues. High levels of NADH-GOGAT protein (33.1 μg protein/g fresh weight) and activity were detected in the 10th leaf blade before emergence. The unexpanded, nongreen portion of the 9th leaf blade contained more than 50% of the NADH-GOGAT protein and activity per gram fresh weight when compared with the 10th leaf. The expanding, green portion of the 9th leaf blade outside of the sheath contained a slightly lower abundance of NADH-GOGAT protein than the nongreen portion of the 9th blade on a fresh weight basis. The fully expanded leaf blades at positions lower than the 9th leaf had decreased NADH-GOGAT levels as a function of increasing age, and the oldest, 5th blade contained only 4% of the NADH-GOGAT protein compared with the youngest 10th leaf blade. Fd-GOGAT protein, on the other hand, was the major form of GOGAT in the green tissues, and the highest amount of Fd-GOGAT protein (111 μg protein/g fresh weight) was detected in the 7th leaf blade. In the nongreen 10th leaf blade, the content of Fd-GOGAT protein was approximately 7% of that found in the 7th leaf blade. In addition, the content of NADH-GOGAT protein in the 10th leaf blade was about 4 times higher than that of Fd-GOGAT protein. The content of plastidic glutamine synthetase polypeptide was also the highest in the 7th leaf blade (429 μg/g fresh weight) and lowest in nongreen blades and sheaths. On the other hand, the relative abundance of the cytosolic glutamine synthetase polypeptide was the highest in the oldest leaf blade, decreasing to 10 to 20% of that value in young, nongreen leaves. These results suggest that NADH-GOGAT is important for the

  16. Preparation and evaluation of enrofloxacin microspheres and tissue distribution in rats

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Fan; Kang, Jijun; Yang, Fang; Zhao, Zhensheng; Kong, Tao

    2015-01-01

    New enrofloxacin microspheres were formulated, and their physical properties, lung-targeting ability, and tissue distribution in rats were examined. The microspheres had a regular and round shape. The mean diameter was 10.06 µm, and the diameter of 89.93% of all microspheres ranged from 7.0 µm to 30.0 µm. Tissue distribution of the microspheres was evaluated along with a conventional enrofloxacin preparation after a single intravenous injection (7.5 mg of enrofloxacin/kg bw). The results showed that the elimination half-life (t1/2β) of enrofloxacin from lung was prolonged from 7.94 h for the conventional enrofloxacin to 13.28 h for the microspheres. Area under the lung concentration versus time curve from 0 h to ∞ (AUC0-∞) was increased from 11.66 h·µg/g to 508.00 h·µg/g. The peak concentration (Cmax) in lung was increased from 5.95 µg/g to 93.36 µg/g. Three lung-targeting parameters were further assessed and showed that the microspheres had remarkable lung-targeting capabilities. PMID:25643802

  17. Tissue distribution and vitamin D dependence of IMCAL in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Kowarski, S.; Cowen, L.A.; Takahashi, M.T.; Schachter, D.

    1987-09-01

    Integral membrane calcium-binding protein (IMCAL) is a vitamin D-dependent integral membrane protein that binds calcium with relatively high affinity. Specific immunoassays for IMCAL utilizing rabbit polyclonal and mouse monoclonal antibodies were developed and applied to studies of its tissue distribution and regulation by vitamin D/sub 3/ and dietary calcium in the rat. The results indicate that vitamin D-dependent, cross-reactive protein is present in small intestinal mucosa, cecal mucosa, bone, kidney, brain, testis, heart, lung, spleen, and skin. Rats maintained on a low- (0.02%) compared with a high- (2.0%) calcium diet had significantly higher content of IMCAL in duodenal mucosa, cecal mucosa, bone, kidney, brain, testis, and heart. Treatment of rats on the high-calcium diet with 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D/sub 3/ increased the IMCAL content of the duodenal mucosa, cecal mucosa, and kidney. The widespread tissue distribution of vitamin D-dependent IMCAL, its close correlation in intestinal mucosa with the calcium transport mechanism, and its occurrence in isolated preparations of enterocyte plasma membranes (microvillus and basolateral membranes) suggest that the protein is involved in the regulation of calcium flux in a number of cell types.

  18. Effect of tissue inhomogeneity on dose distribution of point sources of low-energy electrons.

    PubMed

    Kwok, C S; Bialobzyski, P J; Yu, S K; Prestwich, W V

    1990-01-01

    Perturbation in dose distributions of point sources of low-energy electrons at planar interfaces of cortical bone (CB) and red marrow (RM) was investigated experimentally and by Monte Carlo codes EGS and the TIGER series. Ultrathin LiF thermoluminescent dosimeters were used to measure the dose distributions of point sources of 204Tl and 147Pm in RM. When the point sources were at 12 mg/cm2 from a planar interface of CB and RM equivalent plastics, dose enhancement ratios in RM averaged over the region 0-12 mg/cm2 from the interface were measured to be 1.08 +/- 0.03 (SE) and 1.03 +/- 0.03 (SE) for 204Tl and 147Pm, respectively. The Monte Carlo codes predicted 1.05 +/- 0.02 and 1.01 +/- 0.02 for the two nuclides, respectively. However, EGS gave consistently 3% higher dose in the dose scoring region than the TIGER series when point sources of monoenergetic electrons up to 0.75 MeV energy were considered in the homogeneous RM situation or in the CB and RM heterogeneous situation. By means of the TIGER series, it was demonstrated that aluminum, which is normally assumed to be equivalent to CB in radiation dosimetry, leads to an overestimation of backscattering of low-energy electrons in soft tissue at a CB-soft-tissue interface by as much as a factor of 2.

  19. Analysis of adipose tissue distribution using whole-body magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wald, Diana; Schwarz, Tobias; Dinkel, Julien; Delorme, Stefan; Teucher, Birgit; Kaaks, Rudolf; Meinzer, Hans-Peter; Heimann, Tobias

    2011-03-01

    Obesity is an increasing problem in the western world and triggers diseases like cancer, type two diabetes, and cardiovascular diseases. In recent years, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become a clinically viable method to measure the amount and distribution of adipose tissue (AT) in the body. However, analysis of MRI images by manual segmentation is a tedious and time-consuming process. In this paper, we propose a semi-automatic method to quantify the amount of different AT types from whole-body MRI data with less user interaction. Initially, body fat is extracted by automatic thresholding. A statistical shape model of the abdomen is then used to differentiate between subcutaneous and visceral AT. Finally, fat in the bone marrow is removed using morphological operators. The proposed method was evaluated on 15 whole-body MRI images using manual segmentation as ground truth for adipose tissue. The resulting overlap for total AT was 93.7% +/- 5.5 with a volumetric difference of 7.3% +/- 6.4. Furthermore, we tested the robustness of the segmentation results with regard to the initial, interactively defined position of the shape model. In conclusion, the developed method proved suitable for the analysis of AT distribution from whole-body MRI data. For large studies, a fully automatic version of the segmentation procedure is expected in the near future.

  20. Structure of the human laminin {gamma}2 chain gene (LAMC2): Alternative splicing with different tissue distribution of two transcripts

    SciTech Connect

    Airenne, T.; Haakana, H.; Kallunki, T.

    1996-02-15

    This article discusses the exon-intron structure and tissue distribution of the laminin {gamma}2 chain (LAMC2) gene, which is mutated in some cases of junctional epidermolysis bullosa. The article also discusses the transcription and splicing of this gene, which result in alternative uses of the last two exons of the gene. The different tissue distributions of the transcripts indicate different functions for the gene in vivo. 36 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. Distribution and accumulation of rotenone in tissues of warm water fishes

    SciTech Connect

    Rach, J.J.; Gingerich, W.H.

    1986-03-01

    The tissue distribution of rotenoid residues was determined in tissues of common carp Cyprinus carpio (88.2 g), bluegills Lepomis macrochirus (47.9 g), and yellow perch Perca flavescens (67.7 g) after the fish were exposed to 50..mu..g/L of rotenone-6a/sup 14/C(15.9 x 10/sup 4/ Bq/..mu..M). Exposures were terminated 1 h after the fish were moribund and failed to respond to gentle prodding. The fish were dissected, and various tissues were oxidized to determine /sup 14/C-rotenone accumulation and distribution. Major rotenone metabolites were identified by gradient-elution high performance liquid chromatography. The exposure time required for fish to reach total incapacitation was 3 h for bluegills and yellow perch, and 11.25 h for common carp. The mean rotenoid concentrations (..mu..g/100g fish) in the whole body were 22.4 in yellow perch, 39.7 in bluegills, and 107.8 in common carp. The percentage of rotenone-derived /sup 14/C activity was higher in the carcass components than in the head or viscera; the skin and bone contained about 60% of the carcass activity. The highest relative rotenoid concentrations were found in the liver, bile, gills, brain, and heart. Percentages of total rotenoid material as parent rotenone were highest in yellow perch (70.0 in the viscera and 84.4 in the fillet), followed by those for bluegills (22.7 and 27.8) and common carp (9.7 and 48.5).

  2. Effect of urinary alkalinisation and acidification on the tissue distribution of hexachlorophene in rats.

    PubMed

    Flanagan, R J; Ruprah, M; Strutt, A V; Malarkey, P; Cockburn, A

    1995-10-01

    1. Urinary alkalinisation may be helpful in treating acute poisoning with uncouplers of oxidative phosphorylation containing a phenolic hydroxyl (pKa 4-6) or other acidic moiety. 2. We studied the effects of urine alkalinisation and acidification on the tissue distribution of hexachlorophene (HCP, pKa 5.7) in male Sprague Dawley rats (10 rats/group). 3. Ammonium chloride (10 mL kg-1, 2% m/v) or sodium bicarbonate (10 mL kg-1, 2% m/v) were administered by gavage on three occasions over 24 h, prior to a single gavage dose of HCP (180 mg kg-1). Controls received aqueous sodium chloride (10 mL kg-1, 0.9% m/v) followed by either HCP (180 mg kg-1) or vehicle alone. 4. Urine pH, body mass and body temperature were monitored during the study and, at the conclusion of the experiment (12 h post-HCP dose), organ mass (liver, kidney, brain), and plasma, urine and tissue HCP concentrations were measured. 5. No clinical features of toxicity were observed in any group. However, sodium bicarbonate significantly reduced median HCP in liver--median plasma and kidney HCP concentrations were also reduced but not significantly. Conversely, ammonium chloride significantly increased median HCP concentrations in liver and kidney--median plasma HCP was also increased but not significantly. 6. The results provide some support for the hypothesis that blood pH influences the tissue distribution of uncouplers of oxidative phosphorylation containing an acidic moiety. Urinary alkalinisation may be useful in treating acute poisoning with these compounds.

  3. Influence of ammonium chloride on the tissue distribution of anticholinergic drugs in rats.

    PubMed

    Ishizaki, J; Yokogawa, K; Nakashima, E; Ohkuma, S; Ichimura, F

    1998-07-01

    Ammonium chloride (NH4Cl) increases lysosomal pH and thereby abolishes intralysosomal accumulation of drugs. Its effect on the tissue distribution of biperiden and trihexyphenidyl in rats has been investigated. The tissue-plasma concentration ratios (Kp) of these drugs in various tissues were determined by infusion studies at steady-state in the presence or absence of NH4Cl. Treatment with NH4Cl reduced the Kp values for both drugs, causing the largest reduction in Kp in the lung (52.1 to 11.8 for biperiden and 59.5 to 18.9 for trihexyphenidyl; ratios of decrease 0.77 and 0.68, respectively), followed by the heart and kidneys, with relatively small reductions in the brain, gut, muscle and fat. Subcellular fractionation studies in the lung indicated that the subcellular fraction-plasma concentration ratio of each drug at the steady state (K(p,sf)) was reduced by treatment with NH4Cl, with the largest decrease in the post-nuclear fraction (ratio of decrease 0.82 for biperiden and 0.74 for trihexyphenidyl), followed by the nucleus, microsomes and supernatant, in that order. A strong correlation was found between the ratio of decrease in K(p,sf) after NH4Cl treatment and the specific activity of acid phosphatases, a marker of lysosomes, in each fraction (biperiden, r = 0.948; trihexyphenidyl, r = 0.945). These results suggest that acidic organelles contribute significantly to the distribution kinetics of anticholinergic drugs.

  4. Sequestration, tissue distribution and developmental transmission of cyanogenic glucosides in a specialist insect herbivore.

    PubMed

    Zagrobelny, Mika; Olsen, Carl Erik; Pentzold, Stefan; Fürstenberg-Hägg, Joel; Jørgensen, Kirsten; Bak, Søren; Møller, Birger Lindberg; Motawia, Mohammed Saddik

    2014-01-01

    Considering the staggering diversity of bioactive natural products present in plants, insects are only able to sequester a small number of phytochemicals from their food plants. The mechanisms of how only some phytochemicals are sequestered and how the sequestration process takes place remains largely unknown. In this study the model system of Zygaena filipendulae (Lepidoptera) and their food plant Lotus corniculatus is used to advance the knowledge of insect sequestration. Z. filipendulae larvae are dependent on sequestration of the cyanogenic glucosides linamarin and lotaustralin from their food plant, and have a much lower fitness if reared on plants without these compounds. This study investigates the fate of the cyanogenic glucosides during ingestion, sequestration in the larvae, and in the course of insect ontogeny. To this purpose, double-labeled linamarin and lotaustralin were chemically synthesized carrying two stable isotopes, a (2)H labeled aglucone and a (13)C labeled glucose moiety. In addition, a small amount of (14)C was incorporated into the glucose residue. The isotope-labeled compounds were applied onto cyanogenic L. corniculatus leaves that were subsequently presented to the Z. filipendulae larvae. Following ingestion by the larvae, the destiny of the isotope labeled cyanogenic glucosides was monitored in different tissues of larvae and adults at selected time points, using radio-TLC and LC-MS analyses. It was shown that sequestered compounds are taken up intact, contrary to earlier hypotheses where it was suggested that the compounds would have to be hydrolyzed before transport across the gut. The uptake from the larval gut was highly stereo selective as the β-glucosides were retained while the α-glucosides were excreted and recovered in the frass. Sequestered compounds were rapidly distributed into all analyzed tissues of the larval body, partly retained throughout metamorphosis and transferred into the adult insect where they were

  5. Measurement of temperature distributions after pulsed IR radiation impact in biological tissue models with fluorescent thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romano, Valerio; Greber, Charlotte M.; Frenz, Martin; Forrer, Martin; Weber, Heinz P.

    1991-06-01

    Precise cutting of biological tissue is possible with the Er:YAG laser because of the strong absorption of radiation exhibited by water containing media at 2.94 micrometers wavelength. To achieve control over the thermal damage caused to the tissue and over the extent of the coagulation zone, a thorough knowledge of the local temperature distribution arising near the impact zone is necessary. Calculations are possible in some simple cases, whereas in others, where liquified tissue material acts as a secondary heat source long after the pulse, a time resolved direct measurement of the temperature distributions with microscopical spatial resolution would be desirable. We have developed a method for measuring two-dimensional temperature distributions in optically transparent media with a high time resolution (up to 4 ns) and with microscopical spatial resolution by imaging the temperature dependent fluorescence distribution of 2 micrometers thin films positioned inside the target. With this method we have measured the temperature distributions at different times after the impact of single pulses from an Er:YAG laser at various fluences in gelatin targets, which we use as model for biological tissue. The results are compared with the thermal damage inflicted in vitro to different types of animal tissue. A strong dependence of the temperature distributions and their dynamical behavior on pulse fluence and water content of the target is observed, in congruence with the coagulation zones observed biological tissue.

  6. Distribution of particulate matter and tissue remodeling in the human lung.

    PubMed Central

    Pinkerton, K E; Green, F H; Saiki, C; Vallyathan, V; Plopper, C G; Gopal, V; Hung, D; Bahne, E B; Lin, S S; Ménache, M G; Schenker, M B

    2000-01-01

    We examined the relationship between intrapulmonary particle distribution of carbonaceous and mineral dusts and remodeling of the airways along anatomically distinct airway paths in the lungs of Hispanic males from the central valley of California. Lung autopsy specimens from the Fresno County Coroner's Office were prepared by intratracheal instillation of 2% glutaraldehyde at 30 cm H(2)O pressure. Two distinct airway paths into the apico-posterior and apico-anterior portions of the left upper lung lobe were followed. Tissue samples for histologic analysis were generally taken from the intrapulmonary second, fourth, sixth, and ninth airway generations. Parenchymal tissues beyond the 12th airway generation of each airway path were also analyzed. There was little evidence of visible particle accumulation in the larger conducting airways (generations 2-6), except in bronchial-associated lymphoid tissues and within peribronchial connective tissue. In contrast, terminal and respiratory bronchioles arising from each pathway revealed varying degrees of wall thickening and remodeling. Walls with marked thickening contained moderate to heavy amounts of carbonaceous and mineral dusts. Wall thickening was associated with increases in collagen and interstitial inflammatory cells, including dust-laden macrophages. These changes were significantly greater in first-generation respiratory bronchioles compared to second- and third-generation respiratory bronchioles. These findings suggest that accumulation of carbonaceous and mineral dust in the lungs is significantly affected by lung anatomy with the greatest retention in centers of lung acini. Furthermore, there is significant remodeling of this transitional zone in humans exposed to ambient particulate matter. PMID:11102298

  7. Distribution of trace elements in tissues of shrimp species Litopenaeus vannamei (Boone, 1931) from Bahia, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Silva, E; Viana, Z C V; Onofre, C R E; Korn, M G A; Santos, V L C S

    2016-02-01

    In this study, concentrations of trace elements in tissues of shrimp species (Litopenaeus vannamei) from farming and zone natural coastal located in the northeastern Brazil were investigated. The elements determination was performed by optical emission spectrometry with inductively coupled plasma (ICP OES). The following ranges of concentrations in the tissues were obtained in µg g-1 dry weight: Al: 13.4-886.5, Cd: 0.93-1.80; Cu: 24.8-152; Fe: 3.2-410.9; Mn: 0.36-24.4; Se: 0.094-9.81 and Zn: 20.3-109.4. The shrimp muscle can be a good iron source (about 88.9 mg-1g dry weight). The distribution of Se concentration in tissues showed much variation between locations, and the concentration levels found in shrimp muscles of wild samples were high, where its levels in 67% of muscle and 50% of others tissues samples exceeded the ANVISA limit, indicating evidence of selenium bioaccumulation. Significant correlation was observed between the following pairs of elements: Fe-Zn (r= -0.70), Mn-Cu (r= -0.74), Se-Cu (r= -0.68), Se-Mn (r= 0.82) in the muscles; Fe-Al (r= 0.99), Mn-Al (r= 0.62), Mn-Fe (r= 0.62), Se-Al (r = 0.88), Se-Fe (r= 0.87), Se-Mn (r= 0.58) in the exoskeleton and Cu-Zn (r = 0.68), Al-Cu (r= 0.88), Fe-Cu (r= 0.95) and Fe-Al (r= 0.97) in the viscera. PMID:26909636

  8. Microfocus study of metal distribution and speciation in tissue extracted from revised metal on metal hip implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hart, Alister J.; Sandison, Ann; Quinn, Paul; Sampson, Barry; Atkinson, Kirk D.; Skinner, John A.; Goode, Angela; Powell, Jonathan J.; Mosselmans, J. Frederick W.

    2009-11-01

    Unexplained tissue inflammation in metal-on-metal hip replacements is suspected to be caused by implant-derived nanoparticles. The aim of this study was to investigate the nature of the metal particles in tissue surrounding metal-on-metal (MOM) hips that has been extracted during revision. Mapping of tissue surrounding the failed MOM hips was performed using microfocus X-ray Fluorescence (XRF). This revealed mainly Cr which was localized to the cellular regions. There was co-localisation of Co, were present, to areas of high Cr abundance. XANES of the tissue and appropriate standards revealed that the most common species were Cr(III) and Co(II). EXAFS analysis of the tissue and various metal standards revealed that the most abundant implant-related species was Cr(III) phosphate. Different tissue preparation methods, including frozen sectioning, were examined but were found not to affect the distribution or speciation of the metals in the tissue.

  9. Distribution and characterization of rhogocyte cell types in the mantle tissue of Haliotis laevigata.

    PubMed

    Sairi, Fareed; Valtchev, Peter; Gomes, Vincent G; Dehghani, Fariba

    2015-04-01

    Molluscan rhogocytes are known to be the only cells able to synthesize hemocyanin that is one of the largest respiratory proteins in nature. However, investigation of rhogocyte cells in vitro is limited due to difficulty in isolating and establishing marine cell culture. The aim of this study was to investigate the nature and distribution of rhogocyte cells of Haliotis laevigata in the mantle tissue with respect to the expression of the two known isoforms of hemocyanin. Rhogocyte cells were identified using immunofluorescence-fluorescence in situ hybridization (IF-FISH) that involved simultaneous staining of localized hemocyanin by a polyclonal antibody while the mRNA was hybridized with FISH probes. The distribution of rhogocyte cells was demonstrated using flow cytometry, followed by cell sorting with fluorescence-activated cell sorter (FACS) and confocal microscope imaging for further characterization. Our results suggested that the mantle tissue is dominated by two distinct populations of rhogocyte cells that synthesize hemocyanin type 1. Observation with confocal microscopy of both populations revealed hemocyanin localization in the periphery of the cell membrane. Cell population with higher antibody signal had irregular and elongated cell morphology with punctate mRNA probe signals. The second population with lower antibody signal had ovoid morphology and wide distribution of mRNA probe signals. We suggest that these populations represent two distinct phases of hemocyanin biosynthesis of a single isoform, which is closely related to Haliotis tuberculata type 1 hemocyanin (HtH1). The knowledge acquired in this study enhances the understanding of the biology of rhogocyte cells and biosynthesis of hemocyanin. PMID:25382219

  10. Distribution and characterization of rhogocyte cell types in the mantle tissue of Haliotis laevigata.

    PubMed

    Sairi, Fareed; Valtchev, Peter; Gomes, Vincent G; Dehghani, Fariba

    2015-04-01

    Molluscan rhogocytes are known to be the only cells able to synthesize hemocyanin that is one of the largest respiratory proteins in nature. However, investigation of rhogocyte cells in vitro is limited due to difficulty in isolating and establishing marine cell culture. The aim of this study was to investigate the nature and distribution of rhogocyte cells of Haliotis laevigata in the mantle tissue with respect to the expression of the two known isoforms of hemocyanin. Rhogocyte cells were identified using immunofluorescence-fluorescence in situ hybridization (IF-FISH) that involved simultaneous staining of localized hemocyanin by a polyclonal antibody while the mRNA was hybridized with FISH probes. The distribution of rhogocyte cells was demonstrated using flow cytometry, followed by cell sorting with fluorescence-activated cell sorter (FACS) and confocal microscope imaging for further characterization. Our results suggested that the mantle tissue is dominated by two distinct populations of rhogocyte cells that synthesize hemocyanin type 1. Observation with confocal microscopy of both populations revealed hemocyanin localization in the periphery of the cell membrane. Cell population with higher antibody signal had irregular and elongated cell morphology with punctate mRNA probe signals. The second population with lower antibody signal had ovoid morphology and wide distribution of mRNA probe signals. We suggest that these populations represent two distinct phases of hemocyanin biosynthesis of a single isoform, which is closely related to Haliotis tuberculata type 1 hemocyanin (HtH1). The knowledge acquired in this study enhances the understanding of the biology of rhogocyte cells and biosynthesis of hemocyanin.

  11. Microcomputer-Based Programs for Pharmacokinetic Simulations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Ronald C.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Microcomputer software that simulates drug-concentration time profiles based on user-assigned pharmacokinetic parameters such as central volume of distribution, elimination rate constant, absorption rate constant, dosing regimens, and compartmental transfer rate constants is described. The software is recommended for use in undergraduate…

  12. Spatial distribution of theobromine--a low MW drug--in tissues via matrix-free NALDI-MS imaging.

    PubMed

    Tata, Alessandra; Montemurro, Chiara; Porcari, Andreia M; Silva, Kamila C; Lopes de Faria, José B; Eberlin, Marcos N

    2014-09-01

    The ability of nano-assisted laser desorption-ionization mass spectrometry imaging (NALDI-IMS) to provide selective chemical monitoring with appropriate spatial distribution of a low molecular drug in a biological tissue was investigated. NALDI-IMS is a matrix-free laser desorption ionization (LDI) protocol based on imprinting of tissue constituents on a nanostructured surface. Using the accumulation of theobromine in rat kidney as a model, NALDI-IMS was found to provide well-resolved images of the special distribution of this low molecular weight (MW) drug in tissue. PMID:25066957

  13. Applications of a Pharmacokinetic Simulation Program in Pharmacy Courses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ingram, D.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    Presents a multicompartment model which illustrates aspects of drug absorption, distribution, and elimination in the human body for a course in pharmacokinetics. The course work consists of the interpretation of computer generated simulated data. (Author/CMV)

  14. Modeling Laser-Tissue Interactions: Implementing the Heat Diffusion Equation and Wave Equation to Simulate Thermal Interactions of Absorber Distributions in Biological Tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrera, Frederick; Ahmed, Elharith; Nash, Patrick; Sardar, Dhiraj

    2011-03-01

    The tracking of photons through turbid media (e.g. tissues) has been studied extensively from an experimental vantage point. These turbid media are difficult to characterize- since their components are exceedingly variegated- and thus present many challenges to clinicians who require models which precisely predict the location and time evolution of energy deposition. Furthermore, the interaction of the turbid media sample with the source of radiation typically involves many dynamic mechanisms (e.g. photothermal etc.) Using diffuse light transport, and an electromagnetic wave approach (e.g. Maxwell's equations), an analysis of thermal energy distribution in tissues is performed. Assuming a highly absorbing chromophore model of melanocytes in tissues, a comparison of the variation of thermal energy is determined for different collections of melanocyte spatial distributions. This work was funded by NIH/NIGMS MBRS-RISE GM60655.

  15. Tissue distribution of (Lipocurc™) liposomal curcumin and tetrahydrocurcumin following two- and eight-hour infusions in Beagle dogs.

    PubMed

    Matabudul, Dharmendr; Pucaj, Kresimir; Bolger, Gordon; Vcelar, Brigitta; Majeed, Muhammed; Helson, Lawrence

    2012-10-01

    This study interrogated whether different durations of intravenous infusions of lipocurc™ would alter curcumin metabolism, tissue distribution and whether treating necropsied tissues of Beagle dogs with phosphoric acid prior to measuring curcumin and its metabolite, tetrahydrocurcumin (THC), would stabilize the compounds allowing for accurate analytic measurements. Two cohorts comprising two male and two female dogs were infused each intravenously with 10 mg/kg lipocurc™, either over two hours or over eight hours. Tissue data from each cohort was averaged from four dogs. Curcumin and THC distributed among all 13 tissues were examined at necropsy. The highest curcumin level was observed in the lungs followed by the liver. Tissue levels of curcumin in the lung, spleen and liver increased substantially following the eight-hour infusion compared to the two-hour infusion. The pancreas, kidney and urinary bladder also contained relatively high curcumin levels. Tissue partition coefficients for curcumin and THC were also higher for the eight-hour infusion than the two-hour infusion. The tissue THC/curcumin ratio varied in a tissue-specific manner and was lower for the eight-hour compared to the two-hour infusion. In conclusion, this raised the possibility that prolonged infusion of curcumin may facilitate distribution into tissues via a transporter-dependent mechanism and elevated tissue concentrations of curcumin may inhibit or saturate a putative reductase enzyme converting curcumin to THC. The addition of phosphoric acid stabilized the levels of curcumin and THC in some but not all the examined tissues, raising issues of tissue-specific curcumin and THC stability.

  16. Comparative tissue pharmacokinetics and efficacy of moxidectin, abamectin and ivermectin in lambs infected with resistant nematodes: Impact of drug treatments on parasite P-glycoprotein expression☆

    PubMed Central

    Lloberas, Mercedes; Alvarez, Luis; Entrocasso, Carlos; Virkel, Guillermo; Ballent, Mariana; Mate, Laura; Lanusse, Carlos; Lifschitz, Adrian

    2012-01-01

    The high level of resistance to the macrocyclic lactones has encouraged the search for strategies to optimize their potential as antiparasitic agents. There is a need for pharmaco-parasitological studies addressing the kinetic-dynamic differences between various macrocyclic lactones under standardized in vivo conditions. The current work evaluated the relationship among systemic drug exposure, target tissue availabilities and the pattern of drug accumulation within resistant Haemonchus contortus for moxidectin, abamectin and ivermectin. Drug concentrations in plasma, target tissues and parasites were measured by high performance liquid chromatography. Additionally, the efficacy of the three molecules was evaluated in lambs infected with resistant nematodes by classical parasitological methods. Furthermore, the comparative determination of the level of expression of P-glycoprotein (P-gp2) in H. contortus recovered from lambs treated with each drug was performed by real time PCR. A longer persistence of moxidectin (P < 0.05) concentrations in plasma was observed. The concentrations of the three compounds in the mucosal tissue and digestive contents were significant higher than those measured in plasma. Drug concentrations were in a range between 452 ng/g (0.5 day post-treatment) and 32 ng/g (2 days post-treatment) in the gastrointestinal (GI) contents (abomasal and intestinal). Concentrations of the three compounds in H. contortus were in a similar range to those observed in the abomasal contents (positive correlation P = 0.0002). Lower moxidectin concentrations were recovered within adult H. contortus compared to abamectin and ivermectin at day 2 post-treatment. However, the efficacy against H. contortus was 20.1% (ivermectin), 39.7% (abamectin) and 89.6% (moxidectin). Only the ivermectin treatment induced an enhancement on the expression of P-gp2 in the recovered adult H. contortus, reaching higher values at 12 and 24 h post-administration compared to

  17. Bioelectrical impedance modelling of gentamicin pharmacokinetic parameters.

    PubMed

    Zarowitz, B J; Pilla, A M; Peterson, E L

    1989-10-01

    1. Bioelectrical impedance analysis was used to develop descriptive models of gentamicin pharmacokinetic parameters in 30 adult in-patients receiving therapy with gentamicin. 2. Serial blood samples obtained from each subject at steady state were analyzed and used to derive gentamicin pharmacokinetic parameters. 3. Multiple regression equations were developed for clearance, elimination rate constant and volume of distribution at steady state and were all statistically significant at P less than 0.05. 4. Clinical validation of this innovative technique is warranted before clinical use is recommended.

  18. Selective tissue distribution and long circulation endowed by paclitaxel loaded PEGylated poly(ε-caprolactone-co-L-lactide) micelles leading to improved anti-tumor effects and low systematic toxicity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Feihu; Shen, Yuanyuan; Xu, Xiaofen; Lv, Li; Li, Yanggong; Liu, Jieying; Li, Min; Guo, Aijie; Guo, Shengrong; Jin, Fang

    2013-11-01

    High tumor targeting and sustained drug concentration are key points for successful anti-tumor therapy, however, it is a challenging task. In this work, a novel micelle formulation of paclitaxel (PTX) has been prepared for the purpose of prolonging the blood circulation time as well as improving the accumulation of the drug within the tumor tissue. PEGylated P(CL-co-LLA) (poly(ε-caprolactone-co-L-lactide)) micelles containing PTX were prepared by solid dispersion-sonication method with a higher drug-loading efficiency and encapsulation ratio (28.4% and 94.7%, respectively). Pharmacokinetic study revealed that the drug-loading micelles exhibited a higher AUC values and a prolonged residence time of drug in the blood circulation than those of PTX injection. As demonstrated by tissue distribution and anti-tumor study in S180 tumor-bearing mice, the PEG-P(CL-co-LLA)/PTX micelles displayed modified tissue distribution of PTX and increased accumulation of PTX in tumor, therefore, resulted in anti-tumor effects enhancement and drug concentration in the normal tissues reduction. Furthermore, the preliminary safety tests were performed by measuring the body weight, histopathology, blood cell counts and clinical chemistry parameters, and the results showed no subacute toxicity to hematological system, major organs or tissues in mice. Taken together, our valuation shows that PEG-P(CL-co-LLA) micelles is a potential drug delivery system of PTX for the effective treatment of the tumor and systematic toxicity reduction, thus, the micellar formulation can provide a useful alternative dosage form for i.v. administration of PTX.

  19. Different approaches for quantifying ventilation distribution and lung tissue properties by functional EIT.

    PubMed

    Hahn, G; Dittmar, J; Just, A; Quintel, M; Hellige, G

    2010-08-01

    We investigated five different methods which can be applied to quantitatively construct functional tomograms of the lungs. The focus was on the sensitivity of functional tomograms to errors in acquired data. To quantify this sensitivity, theoretical, error-free data sets of well-known properties were artificially generated based on a 'living thorax model'. Physiological time courses and a typical distribution of errors caused by a typical Goe-MF II EIT system were used for the calculations which encompassed a range up to 50 times greater than the initial error level (4 microV(rms max)-400 microV(rms max)). Additionally, low-pass filtering and principal component analysis (PCA) were used to quantify the effect of preprocessing the raw data. The results demonstrate that all methods based on fitting the local to the global time course were superior to the common functional tomograms utilizing standard deviation or maximum and minimum detection. Ventilation distribution was best quantified by the so-called VT methods. Filling capacity--a lung tissue property--was least dependent on increasing error levels. The errors introduced by filtering are significant with respect to a quantitative analysis of ventilation distribution. A preprocessing of raw data by applying a PCA performed well on the data sets which had been constructed but were, nonetheless, realistic. This approach appears to be highly promising for application on real data which is known to be erroneous.

  20. Tissue distribution and dependence of responsiveness of human antigen-specific memory B cells.

    PubMed

    Giesecke, Claudia; Frölich, Daniela; Reiter, Karin; Mei, Henrik E; Wirries, Ina; Kuhly, Rainer; Killig, Monica; Glatzer, Timor; Stölzel, Katharina; Perka, Carsten; Lipsky, Peter E; Dörner, Thomas

    2014-04-01

    Memory B cells (mBCs) are a key to immunologic memory, yet their distribution within lymphoid organs and the individual role of these for mBC functionality remain largely unknown. This study characterized the distribution and phenotype of human (Ag-specific) mBCs in peripheral blood (PB), spleen, tonsil, and bone marrow. We found that the spleen harbors most mBCs, followed by tonsils, BM, and PB, and we detected no major differences in expression of markers associated with higher maturity. Testing the distribution of tetanus toxoid-specific (TT(+)) mBCs revealed their presence in PB during steady state, yet absolute numbers suggested their largest reservoir in the spleen, followed by tonsils. To explore the role of both tissues in the maintenance of reactive B cell memory, we revaccinated controls and splenectomized and tonsillectomized individuals with TT. All donor groups exhibited comparable emergence of anti-TT IgG, TT(+) plasma cells, and TT(+) mBCs in the PB, together with similar molecular characteristics of TT(+) plasma cells. In summary, human mBCs recirculate through PB and reside in different lymphoid organs that do not reflect different mBC maturity stages. The spleen and tonsil, although harboring the largest number of overall and TT(+) mBCs, appear to be dispensable to preserve adequate responsiveness to secondary antigenic challenge.

  1. Comprehensive radiolabeling, stability, and tissue distribution studies of technetium-99m single amino acid chelates (SAAC).

    PubMed

    Maresca, Kevin P; Hillier, Shawn M; Femia, Frank J; Zimmerman, Craig N; Levadala, Murali K; Banerjee, Sangeeta R; Hicks, Justin; Sundararajan, Chitra; Valliant, John; Zubieta, Jon; Eckelman, William C; Joyal, John L; Babich, John W

    2009-08-19

    Technetium tricarbonyl chemistry has been a subject of interest in radiopharmaceutical development over the past decade. Despite the extensive work done on developing chelates for Tc(I), a rigorous investigation of the impact of changing donor groups and labeling conditions on radiochemical yields and/or distribution has been lacking. This information is crucially important if these platforms are going to be used to develop molecular imaging probes. Previous studies on the coordination chemistry of the {M(CO)(3)}(+) core have established alkylamine, aromatic nitrogen heterocycles, and carboxylate donors as effective chelating ligands. These observations led to the design of tridentate ligands derived from the amino acid lysine. Such amino acid analogues provide a tridentate donor set for chelation to the metal and an amino acid functionality for conjugation to biomolecules. We recently developed a family of single amino acid chelates (SAAC) that serve this function and can be readily incorporated into peptides via solid-phase synthesis techniques. As part of these continuing studies, we report here on the radiolabeling with technetium-99m ((99m)Tc) and stability of a series of SAAC analogues of lysine. The complexes studied include cationic, neutral, and anionic complexes. The results of tissue distribution studies with these novel complexes in normal rats demonstrate a range of distribution in kidney, liver, and intestines.

  2. Comprehensive radiolabeling, stability, and tissue distribution studies of technetium-99m single amino acid chelates (SAAC).

    PubMed

    Maresca, Kevin P; Hillier, Shawn M; Femia, Frank J; Zimmerman, Craig N; Levadala, Murali K; Banerjee, Sangeeta R; Hicks, Justin; Sundararajan, Chitra; Valliant, John; Zubieta, Jon; Eckelman, William C; Joyal, John L; Babich, John W

    2009-08-19

    Technetium tricarbonyl chemistry has been a subject of interest in radiopharmaceutical development over the past decade. Despite the extensive work done on developing chelates for Tc(I), a rigorous investigation of the impact of changing donor groups and labeling conditions on radiochemical yields and/or distribution has been lacking. This information is crucially important if these platforms are going to be used to develop molecular imaging probes. Previous studies on the coordination chemistry of the {M(CO)(3)}(+) core have established alkylamine, aromatic nitrogen heterocycles, and carboxylate donors as effective chelating ligands. These observations led to the design of tridentate ligands derived from the amino acid lysine. Such amino acid analogues provide a tridentate donor set for chelation to the metal and an amino acid functionality for conjugation to biomolecules. We recently developed a family of single amino acid chelates (SAAC) that serve this function and can be readily incorporated into peptides via solid-phase synthesis techniques. As part of these continuing studies, we report here on the radiolabeling with technetium-99m ((99m)Tc) and stability of a series of SAAC analogues of lysine. The complexes studied include cationic, neutral, and anionic complexes. The results of tissue distribution studies with these novel complexes in normal rats demonstrate a range of distribution in kidney, liver, and intestines. PMID:19572702

  3. Characterisation and tissue distribution of the PISCF allatostatin receptor in the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum.

    PubMed

    Audsley, Neil; Vandersmissen, Hans Peter; Weaver, Robert; Dani, Paulina; Matthews, June; Down, Rachel; Vuerinckx, Kristel; Kim, Young-Joon; Vanden Broeck, Jozef

    2013-01-01

    The insect PISCF/allatostatins (ASTs) are pleiotropic peptides that are involved in the regulation of juvenile hormone biosynthesis, are myoinhibitory on the gut and the heart, and suppress feeding in various insects, but their roles in beetles are poorly understood. To provide further insight into the significance of PISCF/ASTs in beetles, the PISCF/AST receptor from Tribolium castaneum has been characterised and its tissue distribution determined. The biological activity of the T. castaneum PISCF/AST (Trica-AS) was also investigated. The Trica-AS receptor shows high sequence homology to other insect PISCF/AST receptors, which are related to the mammalian somatostatin/opioid receptors, a family of G protein-coupled receptors. The Trica-AS receptor was activated in a dose-dependent manner by both Trica-AS and T. castaneum allatostatin double C (Trica-ASTCC) as well as Manduca sexta-allatostatin (Manse-AS). Other allatoregulatory peptides (a FLG/AST, a MIP/AST and an allatotropin) and somatostatin(14) were inactive on this receptor. Receptor transcript levels in tissues, determined by qRT-PCR, were highest in the head and the gut, with variable amounts in the fat body and reproductive organs. There were measurable differences in receptor levels of the head, fat body and reproductive organs between males and females. There was also a widespread distribution of Trica-AS in various tissues of T. castaneum. The Trica-AS peptide precursor was most abundant in the head and there was a significant difference between levels in the heads and reproductive organs of males and females. Whole mount immunocytochemistry localised Trica-AS in the median and lateral neurosecretory cells of the brain, in the corpus cardiacum and throughout the ventral nerve cord. The peptide was also present in midgut neurosecretory cells, but no immunostaining was detected in the reproductive organs or Malpighian tubules. The widespread distribution of both Trica-AS and its receptor suggest this

  4. The influence of weightlessness on pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Gandia, Peggy; Saivin, Sylvie; Houin, Georges

    2005-12-01

    The primary hostile factor during a spaceflight is the lack of gravity, which can induce space motion sickness and act on bones, muscles and the cardiovascular system. These physiological effects may modify the pharmacokinetics of the drugs administered during the flight producing reduced pharmacological activity or appearance of adverse effects. Given the small number of spaceflights and the difficulties of conducting experiments during missions, pharmacokinetic data obtained in flight are insufficient to determine if drug monitoring is necessary for the drugs present in the onboard medical kit. Therefore, validated earthbound models like tail-suspension performed with animals and long-term bedrest performed with human volunteers are used to simulate weightlessness and to study the pharmacokinetic variations of either absorption, distribution, or elimination of drugs. As a result of these studies, it is possible to make some dosing recommendations but more information is necessary to predict with precision all of the pharmacokinetic variations occurring in spaceflight. To collect more pharmacokinetic information, head-down bedrest studies are still the best solution and as saliva is an appropriate substitution for plasma for some drugs, salivary sampling can be planned during flights.

  5. Tissue-specific distribution and whole-body burden estimates of persistent organic pollutants in the bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus).

    PubMed

    Yordy, Jennifer E; Pabst, D Ann; McLellan, William A; Wells, Randall S; Rowles, Teri K; Kucklick, John R

    2010-06-01

    Most exposure assessments for free-ranging cetaceans focus on contaminant concentrations measured in blubber, and few data are available for other tissues or the factors governing contaminant distribution among tissues. The goal of this study was to provide a detailed description of the distribution of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) within the common bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) body and assess the role of lipid dynamics in mediating contaminant distribution. Thirteen tissues (brain, blubber, heart, liver, lung, kidney, mammary gland, melon, skeletal muscle, spleen, thyroid, thymus, and testis/uterus) were sampled during necropsy from bottlenose dolphins (n = 4) and analyzed for lipid and 85 POPs, including polychlorinated biphenyls, organochlorine pesticides, and polybrominated diphenyl ethers. Significant correlations between tissue POP concentrations and lipid suggest that distribution of POPs is generally related to tissue lipid content. However, blubber:tissue partition coefficients ranged widely from 0.753 to 6.25, suggesting that contaminant distribution is not entirely lipid-dependent. Tissue-specific and whole-body contaminant burdens confirmed that blubber, the primary site of metabolic lipid storage, is also the primary site for POP accumulation, contributing >90% to the whole-body burdens. Observations also suggest that as lipid mobilizes from blubber, contaminants may redistribute, leading to elevated tissue concentrations. These results suggest that individuals with reduced blubber lipid may be at increased risk for exposure-related health effects. However, this study also provides evidence that the melon, a metabolically inert lipid-rich structure, may serve as an alternate depot for POPs, thus preventing the bulk of blubber contaminants from being directly available to other tissues. This unique physiological adaptation should be taken into consideration when assessing contaminant-related health effects in wild cetacean populations

  6. [Advances on pharmacokinetics of traditional Chinese medicine under disease states].

    PubMed

    Gong, Zi-peng; Chen, Ying; Zhang, Rui-jie; Yang, Qing; Zhu, Xiao-xin

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, more and more research shows that the pharmacokinetic parameter of traditional Chinese medicine can be affected by the disease states. It's possible that drug metabolic enzymes, transporters, cell membrane permeability and the change of microbes group could be interfered with physiological and pathological changes, which enables the pharmacokinetics of traditional Chinese medicine in the body to be altered, including the process of absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion, and then the pharmacokinetic parameters of traditional chinese medicine are altered. It's found that investigating the pharmacokinetic of traditional Chinese medicine in the pathological state is more useful than that of in normal state because the great part of traditional Chinese medicine is mainly used to treat disease. This article reflects the latest research on the pharmacokinetic of traditional Chinese medicine in the disease state such as diabete, cerebral ischemia, liver injury, inflammatory disease, nervous system disorders and fever in order to provide certain reference for clinicians designing reasonable administration dose.

  7. Ethnic and genetic factors in methadone pharmacokinetics: A population pharmacokinetic study☆

    PubMed Central

    Bart, Gavin; Lenz, Scott; Straka, Robert J.; Brundage, Richard C.

    2014-01-01

    Background Treatment of opiate use disorders with methadone is complicated by wide interindividual variability in pharmacokinetics. To identify potentially contributing covariates in methadone pharmacokinetics, we used population pharmacokinetic modeling to estimate clearance (CL/F) and volume of distribution (V/F) for each methadone enantiomer in an ethnically diverse methadone maintained population. Methods Plasma levels of the opiate-active R-methadone and opiate-inactive S-methadone were measured in 206 methadone maintained subjects approximately two and twenty-three hours after a daily oral dose of racmethadone. A linear one-compartment population pharmacokinetic model with first-order conditional estimation with interaction (FOCE-I) was used to evaluate methadone CL/F and V/F. The influence of covariates on parameter estimates was evaluated using stepwise covariate modeling. Covariates included ethnicity, gender, weight, BMI, age, methadone dose, and 21 single nucleotide polymorphisms in genes implicated in methadone pharmacokinetics. Results In the final model, for each enantiomer, Hmong ethnicity reduced CL/F by approximately 30% and the rs2032582 (ABCB1 2677G > T/A) GG genotype was associated with a 20% reduction in CL/F. The presence of the rs3745274 minor allele (CYP2B6 515G > T) reduced CL/F by up to 20% for S-methadone only. A smaller effect of age was noted on CL/F for R-methadone. Conclusion This is the first report showing the influence of the rs2032582 and rs3745274 variants on methadone pharmacokinetics rather than simply dose requirements or plasma levels. Population pharmacokinetics is a valuable method for identifying the influences on methadone pharmacokinetic variability. PMID:25456329

  8. Distribution of a macaque immunosuppressive type D retrovirus in neural, lymphoid, and salivary tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Lackner, A.A.; Rodriguez, M.H.; Bush, C.E.; Munn, R.J.; Kwang, Hweising; Moore, P.F.; Osborn, K.G.; Marx, P.A.; Gardner, M.B.; Lowenstine, L.J. )

    1988-06-01

    Simian acquired immune deficiency syndrome (SAIDS) in rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) at the California Primate Research Center is caused by a type D retrovirus designated SAIDS retrovirus serotype 1 (SRV-1). This syndrome is characterized by profound immunosuppression and death associated with opportunistic infections. Neurologic signs and lesions have not been described as part of this syndrome. The distribution of SRV-1 in the salivary glands, lymph nodes, spleens, thymuses, and brains of eight virus-infected rhesus macaques was examined by immunohistochemistry. Electron microscopy, in situ RNA hybridization, and Southern blot hybridization were also performed on selected tissues to detect viral particles, RNA, and DNA, respectively. In seven of eight SRV-1-infected animals, the transmembrane envelope glycoprotein (gp20) of SRV-1 was present in three or more tissues, but never in the brain. In the remaining animal, no viral antigen was detected in any tissue. In this same group of animals, viral nucleic acid was detected in the lymph nodes of six of six animals by Southern blot hybridization, in the salivary glands of two of five animals by both Southern blot and in situ hybridizations, and, surprisingly, in the brains of three of three animals by Southern blot and of three of five animals by in situ hybridization, including the one animal in which viral gp20 was undetectable. None of these animals had neurologic signs or lesions. The detection of viral nucleic acid in the absence of viral antigen in the brain suggests latent SRV-1 infection of the central nervous system.

  9. Drosophila melanogaster lipins are tissue-regulated and developmentally regulated and present specific subcellular distributions.

    PubMed

    Valente, Valeria; Maia, Rafaela Martins; Vianna, Murilo Carlos Bizam; Paçó-Larson, Maria Luisa

    2010-11-01

    Lipins constitute a novel family of Mg(2+)-dependent phosphatidate phosphatases that catalyze the dephosphorylation of phosphatidic acid to yield diacylglycerol, an important intermediate in lipid metabolism and cell signaling. Whereas a single lipin is detected in less complex organisms, in mammals there are distinct lipin isoforms and paralogs that are differentially expressed among tissues. Compatible with organism tissue complexity, we show that the single Drosophila Lpin1 ortholog (CG8709, here named DmLpin) expresses at least three isoforms (DmLpinA, DmLpinK and DmLpinJ) in a temporal and spatially regulated manner. The highest levels of lipin in the fat body, where DmLpinA and DmLpinK are expressed, correlate with the highest levels of triacylglycerol (TAG) measured in this tissue. DmLpinK is the most abundant isoform in the central nervous system, where TAG levels are significantly lower than in the fat body. In the testis, where TAG levels are even lower, DmLpinJ is the predominant isoform. Together, these data suggest that DmLpinA might be the isoform that is mainly involved in TAG production, and that DmLpinK and DmLpinJ could perform other cellular functions. In addition, we demonstrate by immunofluorescence that lipins are most strongly labeled in the perinuclear region of the fat body and ventral ganglion cells. In visceral muscles of the larval midgut and adult testis, lipins present a sarcomeric distribution. In the ovary chamber, the lipin signal is concentrated in the internal rim of the ring canal. These specific subcellular localizations of the Drosophila lipins provide the basis for future investigations on putative novel cellular functions of this protein family. PMID:20977671

  10. Pathogenesis, tissue distribution and host response to Rhabdochlamydia porcellionis infection in rough woodlouse Porcellio scaber.

    PubMed

    Kostanjšek, Rok; Pirc Marolt, Tinkara

    2015-02-01

    Rhabdochlamydia porcellionis is a known intracellular pathogen in digestive glands of the terrestrial isopod crustacean Porcellio scaber. To describe the pathogenesis, tissue distribution and host response to R. porcellionis, we conducted microscopic observations and localization of infection in tissues by Fluorescent In Situ Hybridization (FISH). Digestive glands were confirmed as the primary site of infection. From there, R. porcellionis disseminates either through the apical membrane of infected cells into the lumen of digestive glands and further throughout the digestive tract or into the surrounding hemocoel by rupture of the basal membrane and lamina of infected digestive gland cells. Once in the hemocoel, R. porcellionis infects hindgut cells, hemocytes and hemopoetic tissues while the ventral nerve cord and gonads seem to be devoid of infection despite the presence of rhabdochlamydia on the surface of these organs. The host response to R. porcellionis includes aggregation of hemocytes around the infected cells and formation of multilayered melanized nodules exhibiting endogenous fluorescence. The structure of nodules is asymmetric when hemocytes are deposited on the basal side of infected gut and digestive glands cells, or symmetric, when nodules entrapping clusters of rhabdochlamydiae are deposited on other organs in the hemocoel. The study also revealed a high prevalence of infection in P. scaber populations (up to 27%) and confirmed its detrimental effect on the host. Although agility, behavior and molting cycle of infected animals appear unaffected, in the later stages R. porcellionis infection manifests as severe damage to the digestive system and decreased feeding, which eventually lead to the death of the host organism.

  11. First isolation of Toxoplasma gondii from cats of Colima, Mexico: tissue distribution and genetic characterization.

    PubMed

    Rico-Torres, Claudia Patricia; Del Viento-Camacho, Alejandra; Caballero-Ortega, Heriberto; Besné-Mérida, Alejandro; Luna-Pastén, Héctor; Correa, Dolores; Palma-García, José Manuel

    2015-04-15

    Toxoplasma gondii is among the commonest zoonotic infectious agents worldwide. It infects many warm-blooded animals, including felines, the definitive hosts. This parasite is now classified in 15 haplogroups spread out around the world. Few reports reveal a predominance of genotypes I and III in Mexico, although recombinant and atypical variants have also been found in humans and animals. The aim of this study was to detect, isolate and genotype T. gondii from cats of Colima Mexico, and to analyze tissue distribution of the parasite. IgG specific antibodies were investigated in 48 serum samples from unwanted and stray cats by indirect ELISA. Isolation in mice and molecular characterization by PCR-RFLP and sequencing were attempted using pools of brain, heart, liver, lung, spleen and brachiocephalic muscle samples of seropositive cats. Fourteen animals (29.2%) were seropositive, the frequency ranged between 27.3 and 40% among the different localities. Ten seropositive animals were euthanized, eight of them were positive for the B1 gene by conventional PCR. More frequently infected tissues were the brachiocephalic muscle (75.0%) the brain (63.0%) and the spleen (63.0%). Genotype III was determined for the SAG3 locus of the parasite infecting an unwanted cat. Tachyzoites were isolated from the peritoneal cavity of two mice inoculated with the tissue pool of one kitten. Type I alleles were found in SAG1, SAG2, SAG3, BTUB, GRA6, c29-2 and PK1 loci, while c22-8 was type II, and L358 and Apico were type III. This genotype corresponds to ToxoDB genotype #28. This is the first T. gondii isolate genetically characterized in Colima, Mexico and is different to other isolations of the country.

  12. Arsenic-induced biochemical and genotoxic effects and distribution in tissues of Sprague-Dawley rats

    PubMed Central

    Patlolla, Anita K.; Todorov, Todor I.; Tchounwou, Paul B.; van der Voet, Gijsbert; Centeno, Jose A.

    2012-01-01

    Arsenic (As) is a well documented human carcinogen. However, its mechanisms of toxic action and carcinogenic potential in animals have not been conclusive. In this research, we investigated the biochemical and genotoxic effects of As and studied its distribution in selected tissues of Sprague-Dawley rats. Four groups of six male rats, each weighing approximately 60 ± 2 g, were injected intraperitoneally, once a day for 5 days with doses of 5, 10, 15, 20 mg/kg bw of arsenic trioxide. A control group was also made of 6 animals injected with distilled water. Following anaesthetization, blood was collected and enzyme analysis was performed by spectrophotometry following standard protocols. At the end of experimentation, the animals were sacrificed, and the lung, liver, brain and kidney were collected 24 h after the fifth day treatment. Chromosome and micronuclei preparation was obtained from bone marrow cells. Arsenic exposure significantly increased (p<0.05) the activities of plasma alanine aminotransferase-glutamate pyruvate transaminase (ALT/GPT), and aspartate aminotransferase-glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase (AST/GOT), as well as the number of structural chromosomal aberrations (SCA) and frequency of micronuclei (MN) in the bone marrow cells. In contrast, the mitotic index in these cells was significantly reduced (p<0.05). These findings indicate that aminotransferases are candidate biomarkers for arsenic-induced hepatotoxicity. Our results also demonstrate that As has a strong genotoxic potential, as measured by the bone marrow SCA and MN tests in Sprague-Dawley rats. Total arsenic concentrations in tissues were measured by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). A dynamic reaction cell (DRC) with hydrogen gas was used to eliminate the ArCl interference at mass 75, in the measurement of total As. Total As doses in tissues tended to correlate with specific exposure levels. PMID:23175155

  13. Molecular cloning, tissue distribution, and immune function of goose TLR7.

    PubMed

    Qi, Yulin; Chen, Shun; Zhao, Qiurong; Wang, Mingshu; Jia, Renyong; Zhu, Dekang; Liu, Mafeng; Liu, Fei; Chen, Xiaoyue; Cheng, Anchun

    2015-02-01

    TLR7 is a transmembrane endosomal protein that plays an essential role in innate antiviral responses via the recognition of conserved viral molecular patterns. Here, we cloned the full-length cDNA of goose TLR7 and carried out a molecular characterization of goose TLR7. The goose TLR7 gene is 3900 bp and encodes a 1045 amino acid protein with high homology to poultry (93% to duck and 83% to chicken). Similar conclusions were made by phylogenetic analysis. The predicted protein secondary structure of goose TLR7 contained a conserved Toll/interleukin-1 receptor domain and characteristic leucine-rich repeat regions, which has also been reported for duck TLR7. Additionally, the tissue distribution of goose TLR7 suggests that immune-associated tissues, especially the cecal tonsil and bursa of Fabricius, have high goose TLR7 expression levels. Goose TLR7 is abundantly expressed in lung tissues, which is distinct from its expression in chickens. Similar to duck TLR7, goose spleen mononuclear cells (MNCs) exposed to the mammalian TLR7 agonists R848 and Imiquimod showed significant induction of the production of proinflammatory cytokines and IFN-α. New type gosling viral enteritis virus (NGVEV) infection resulted in high mRNA expression levels of goose TLR7 in the spleen. By contrast, no direct interaction between NGVEV and goose TLR7 was detected after infecting goose spleen MNCs with NGVEV in vitro. However, triggering of goose TLR7 resulted in the rapid up-regulation of proinflammatory cytokines and anti-viral molecules, suggesting that goose TLR7 plays an important role in anti-viral defense.

  14. Intestinal absorption and tissue distribution of ( sup 14 C)pyrroloquinoline quinone in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Smidt, C.R.; Unkefer, C.J.; Houck, D.R.; Rucker, R.B. )

    1991-05-01

    Pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) functions as a cofactor for prokaryotic oxidoreductases, such as methanol dehydrogenase and membrane-bound glucose dehydrogenase. In animals fed chemically defined diets, PQQ improves reproductive outcome and neonatal growth. Consequently, the present study was undertaken to determine the extent to which PQQ is absorbed by the intestine, its tissue distribution, and route of excretion. About 28 micrograms of PQQ (0.42 microCi/mumol), labeled with {sup 14}C derived from L-tyrosine, was administered orally to Swiss-Webster mice (18-20 g) to estimate absorption. PQQ was readily absorbed (62%, range 19-89%) in the lower intestine, and was excreted by the kidneys (81% of the absorbed dose) within 24 hr. The only tissues that retained significant amounts of ({sup 14}C)PQQ at 24 hr were skin and kidney. For kidney, it was assumed that retention of ({sup 14}C)PQQ represented primarily PQQ destined for excretion. For skin, the concentration of ({sup 14}C)PQQ increased from 0.3% of the absorbed dose at 6 hr to 1.3% at 24 hr. Furthermore, most of the ({sup 14}C)PQQ in blood (greater than 95%) was associated with the blood cell fraction, rather than plasma.

  15. Tissue Distribution of Porcine FTO and Its Effect on Porcine Intramuscular Preadipocytes Proliferation and Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiaoling; Zhou, Bo; Luo, Yanliu; Huang, Zhiqing; Jia, Gang; Liu, Guangmang; Zhao, Hua

    2016-01-01

    The fat mass and obesity associated (FTO) gene plays an important role in adipogenesis. However, its function during porcine intramuscular preadipocyte proliferation and differentiation remains poorly understood. In this study, we prepared the antiserum against porcine FTO (pFTO), which was used to determine its subcellular localization and tissue distribution. Our data indicated that pFTO was localized predominantly in the nucleus. Real-time quantitative PCR and western blot analysis showed that pFTO was highly expressed in the lung and subcutaneous adipose tissue. Overexpression of pFTO in porcine intramuscular preadipocytes significantly promoted cell proliferation and lipid deposition. Furthermore, overexpression of pFTO in differentiating porcine intramuscular preadipocytes also significantly increased the mRNA levels of adipocyte differentiation transcription factors peroxisome proliferators-activated receptor γ (PPARγ), CCAAT/enhancer binding protein α (C/EBPα), lipoprotein lipase (LPL) and fatty acid synthase (FAS). Our findings provide the first functional evidence to reveal a role of pFTO in porcine intramuscular preadipocyte proliferation and differentiation. PMID:26964098

  16. Toxicokinetics and tissue distribution of titanium in ionic form after intravenous and oral administration.

    PubMed

    Golasik, Magdalena; Herman, Małgorzata; Olbert, Magdalena; Librowski, Tadeusz; Szklarzewicz, Janusz; Piekoszewski, Wojciech

    2016-04-15

    Titanium is widely used both in food and cosmetics, as well as in surgery and industry. Contrary to most studies, the present work focused on the determination of the toxicokinetic parameters of titanium in ionic form, as well as on its tissue biodistribution in rats. The animals were administered either a single intravenous dose of 6 mg Ti/kg b.w., or received the same dose orally every day for 30 days. The concentration of titanium in the serum and organs was measured by a graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. Metal rapidly distributed from the circulation to the investigated organs after both routes of administration, and kidney was identified as the main target tissue, followed by liver and spleen. One month of oral exposure to Ti led to the increase of its concentration in liver, kidneys, spleen, and heart. In the intravenous study, both the highest area under concentration-time curves and the longest elimination half-life time were recorded in the kidney followed by serum, spleen and liver. The present study contributes to the knowledge of the toxicokinetics of titanium in ionic form, which may be especially useful when assessing the health risks of long-term exposure to titanium alloy implants in patients.

  17. Distribution and load of elephant endotheliotropic herpesviruses in tissues from associated fatalities of Asian elephants.

    PubMed

    Seilern-Moy, Katharina; Darpel, Karin; Steinbach, Falko; Dastjerdi, Akbar

    2016-07-15

    Elephant Endotheliotropic Herpesviruses (EEHVs) are the cause of a highly fatal haemorrhagic disease in elephants primarily affecting young Asian elephants (Elephas maximus) in both captivity and in the wild. The viruses have emerged as a significant threat to Asian elephant conservation, critically affecting overall sustainability of their population. So far insight into the pathogenesis of EEHV infections has been restricted to examination of EEHV-infected tissues. However, little is known about distribution and burden of the viruses within the organs of fatal cases, crucial elements in the understanding of the virus pathogenesis. This study was therefore undertaken to assess the extent of organ and cell involvement in fatal cases of EEHV-1A, 1B and 5 using a quantitative real-time PCR. EEHV-1 and 5 DNA were detectable in all the tissues examined, albeit with substantial differences in the viral DNA load. The highest EEHV-1A DNA load was observed in the liver, followed by the heart, thymus and tongue. EEHV-1B and 5 showed the highest DNA load in the heart, followed by tongue and liver. This study provides new insights into EEHV pathogenicity and has implications in choice of sample type for disease investigation and virus isolation.

  18. Distribution and load of elephant endotheliotropic herpesviruses in tissues from associated fatalities of Asian elephants.

    PubMed

    Seilern-Moy, Katharina; Darpel, Karin; Steinbach, Falko; Dastjerdi, Akbar

    2016-07-15

    Elephant Endotheliotropic Herpesviruses (EEHVs) are the cause of a highly fatal haemorrhagic disease in elephants primarily affecting young Asian elephants (Elephas maximus) in both captivity and in the wild. The viruses have emerged as a significant threat to Asian elephant conservation, critically affecting overall sustainability of their population. So far insight into the pathogenesis of EEHV infections has been restricted to examination of EEHV-infected tissues. However, little is known about distribution and burden of the viruses within the organs of fatal cases, crucial elements in the understanding of the virus pathogenesis. This study was therefore undertaken to assess the extent of organ and cell involvement in fatal cases of EEHV-1A, 1B and 5 using a quantitative real-time PCR. EEHV-1 and 5 DNA were detectable in all the tissues examined, albeit with substantial differences in the viral DNA load. The highest EEHV-1A DNA load was observed in the liver, followed by the heart, thymus and tongue. EEHV-1B and 5 showed the highest DNA load in the heart, followed by tongue and liver. This study provides new insights into EEHV pathogenicity and has implications in choice of sample type for disease investigation and virus isolation. PMID:27102836

  19. Tissue distribution and phenobarbital induction of target SLC- and ABC- transporters in cattle.

    PubMed

    Zancanella, V; Giantin, M; Lopparelli, R M; Nebbia, C; Dacasto, M

    2013-08-01

    In veterinary pharmaco-toxicological sciences, few data about uptake and efflux drug transporters (DTs) expression and regulation phenomena have been published. In this study, the tissue distribution and transcriptional modulation of solute carrier (SLC) and ATP-binding cassette (ABC) DTs were investigated in cattle orally administered with phenobarbital (PB) by using a quantitative real-time RT-PCR approach. The criterion for target gene selection was the PB-responsiveness in human and rodent model species. All target DTs were expressed in the liver. Only two of the seven PB-responsive target DTs (SLCO1B3 and SLC10A1) were not constitutively expressed in cattle extra-hepatic tissues. The greatest number of DTs (SLCO2B1, ABCB1, ABCC2, ABCG2) were expressed in intestine and testis, followed by, adrenal gland (SLCO2B1, ABCB1, ABCG2), lung (ABCB1, ABCG2), kidney, and skeletal muscle (ABCG2). PB administration never altered DTs mRNA levels, except for an increase in hepatic ABCC2 mRNA and a down-regulation of renal ABCG2. Altogether, these results confirm only to some extent data obtained in humans and laboratory species; clearly, they should be considered a preliminary step for further molecular investigations about species-differences in DT gene expression and regulation as well as in DT expression and function.

  20. Heterogeneous receptor binding of classical quaternary muscarinic antagonists. I. Bovine tissue distribution.

    PubMed

    Roffel, A F; Ensing, K; in 't Hout, W G; de Zeeuw, R A; Zaagsma, J

    1991-01-01

    In competition experiments with the tertiary radioligand [3H]dexetimide, classical quaternary muscarinic antagonists like ipratropium bromide and N-methylscopolamine bromide distinguished two muscarinic binding sites in bovine brain (total brain minus cerebellum) membranes, in contrast to their tertiary analogues, atropine and scopolamine, which recognized only one binding site. This binding behavior was found to be almost identical in bovine striatal membranes, both in terms of binding affinities and proportions of high (Q1) and low (Q2) affinity binding sites. Both in total brain and in striatal membranes, the Q1/Q2 binding heterogeneity was independent of pirenzepine binding heterogeneity (M1/M2). In peripheral tissues, the binding properties of quaternary muscarinic antagonists varied. Whereas tertiary as well as quaternary compounds showed only high affinity binding towards muscarinic receptors in bovine atrial and left ventricular membranes, heterogeneous binding behavior was observed with quaternary but not with tertiary antagonists in bovine tracheal smooth muscle membranes. The tissue distribution found in the present study suggests that bovine tracheal smooth muscle contraction studies might shed light on the functional significance of the anomalous binding behavior of quaternary muscarinic antagonists. PMID:1824191

  1. Tissue Distribution and Associated Toxicological Effects of Decabrominated Diphenyl Ether in Subchronically Exposed Male Rats

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fuxin; Wang, Jianshe; Hu, Guocheng; Luo, Xiaojun; Mai, Bixian; Dai, Jiayin

    2011-01-01

    Concerns about decabrominated diphenyl ether (BDE-209) have arisen recently due to its increasing concentrations in the environment. We investigated the tissue concentration, distribution, and the debromination of BDE-209 after oral exposure, using rats as a model. Three groups of male rats were administrated by oral gavage with corn oil containing 0, 10, or 50 mg/kg bw/day of BDE-209 over 90 days. After exposure, BDE-209 and its metabolites levels in the liver, kidney, and adipose of the rats were measured. The mRNA expression levels of cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes in liver, serum thyroid hormone levels, and open-field tests were also measured. BDE-209 and several octa- and nona-BDE congeners were detected in the tissues of the dosed rats, indicating that BDE-209 was bioavailable and biotransformative in male rats. BDE-209 and its debrominated congeners had no mRNA level effect on selective genes from the CYP family in the liver or on the spontaneous behavior of adult male rats. Conversely, the level of thyroid hormone, total triiodothyronine (T3) in rats from the dosed treatments increased significantly compared to the control group. PMID:23724291

  2. Bioaccumulation Efficiency, Tissue Distribution, and Environmental Occurrence of Hepatitis E Virus in Bivalve Shellfish from France

    PubMed Central

    Grodzki, Marco; Schaeffer, Julien; Piquet, Jean-Côme; Le Saux, Jean-Claude; Chevé, Julien; Ollivier, Joanna; Le Pendu, Jacques

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV), an enteric pathogen of both humans and animals, is excreted by infected individuals and is therefore present in wastewaters and coastal waters. As bivalve molluscan shellfish are known to concentrate viral particles during the process of filter feeding, they may accumulate this virus. The bioaccumulation efficiencies of oysters (Crassostrea gigas), flat oysters (Ostrea edulis), mussels (Mytilus edulis), and clams (Ruditapes philippinarum) were compared at different time points during the year. Tissue distribution analysis showed that most of the viruses were concentrated in the digestive tissues of the four species. Mussels and clams were found to be more sensitive to sporadic contamination events, as demonstrated by rapid bioaccumulation in less than 1 h compared to species of oysters. For oysters, concentrations increased during the 24-h bioaccumulation period. Additionally, to evaluate environmental occurrence of HEV in shellfish, an environmental investigation was undertaken at sites potentially impacted by pigs, wild boars, and human waste. Of the 286 samples collected, none were contaminated with hepatitis E virus, despite evidence that this virus is circulating in some French areas. It is possible that the number of hepatitis E viral particles discharged into the environment is too low to detect or that the virus may have a very short period of persistence in pig manure and human waste. PMID:24795382

  3. Analysis of elemental concentration censored distributions in breast malignant and breast benign neoplasm tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubala-Kukuś, A.; Banaś, D.; Braziewicz, J.; Góźdź, S.; Majewska, U.; Pajek, M.

    2007-07-01

    The total reflection X-ray fluorescence method was applied to study the trace element concentrations in human breast malignant and breast benign neoplasm tissues taken from the women who were patients of Holycross Cancer Centre in Kielce (Poland). These investigations were mainly focused on the development of new possibilities of cancer diagnosis and therapy monitoring. This systematic comparative study was based on relatively large (˜ 100) population studied, namely 26 samples of breast malignant and 68 samples of breast benign neoplasm tissues. The concentrations, being in the range from a few ppb to 0.1%, were determined for thirteen elements (from P to Pb). The results were carefully analysed to investigate the concentration distribution of trace elements in the studied samples. The measurements of concentration of trace elements by total reflection X-ray fluorescence were limited, however, by the detection limit of the method. It was observed that for more than 50% of elements determined, the concentrations were not measured in all samples. These incomplete measurements were treated within the statistical concept called left-random censoring and for the estimation of the mean value and median of censored concentration distributions, the Kaplan-Meier estimator was used. For comparison of concentrations in two populations, the log-rank test was applied, which allows to compare the censored total reflection X-ray fluorescence data. Found statistically significant differences are discussed in more details. It is noted that described data analysis procedures should be the standard tool to analyze the censored concentrations of trace elements analysed by X-ray fluorescence methods.

  4. Biomagnification and tissue distribution of perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) in market-size rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Goeritz, Ina; Falk, Sandy; Stahl, Thorsten; Schäfers, Christoph; Schlechtriem, Christian

    2013-09-01

    The present study investigated the biomagnification potential as well as the substance and tissue-specific distribution of perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) in market-size rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). Rainbow trout with an average body weight of 314 ± 21 g were exposed to perfluorobutane sulfonate (PFBS), perfluorohexane sulfonate (PFHxS), perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS), perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), and perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA) in the diet for 28 d. The accumulation phase was followed by a 28-d depuration phase, in which the test animals were fed with nonspiked trout feed. On days 0, 7, 14, 28, 31, 35, 42, and 56 of the present study, fish were sampled from the test basin for PFAS analysis. Biomagnification factors (BMFs) for all test compounds were determined based on a kinetic approach. Distribution factors were calculated for each test compound to illustrate the disposition of PFASs in rainbow trout after 28 d of exposure. Dietary exposure of market-size rainbow trout to PFASs did not result in biomagnification; BMF values were calculated as 0.42 for PFOS, >0.23 for PFNA, >0.18 for PFHxS, >0.04 for PFOA, and >0.02 for PFBS, which are below the biomagnification threshold of 1. Liver, blood, kidney, and skin were identified as the main target tissues for PFASs in market-size rainbow trout. Evidence was shown that despite relative low PFAS contamination, the edible parts of the fish (the fillet and skin) can significantly contribute to the whole-body burden.

  5. Kinetics of Satratoxin G Tissue Distribution and Excretion Following Intranasal Exposure in the Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Amuzie, Chidozie J.; Islam, Zahidul; Kim, Jae Kyung; Seo, Ji-Hyun; Pestka, James J.

    2010-01-01

    Intranasal exposure of mice to satratoxin G (SG), a macrocyclic trichothecene produced by the indoor air mold Stachybotrys chartarum, selectively induces apoptosis in olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) of the nose and brain. The purpose of this study was to measure the kinetics of distribution and clearance of SG in the mouse. Following intranasal instillation of female C57B16 mice with SG (500 μg/kg bw), the toxin was detectable from 5 to 60 min in blood and plasma, with the highest concentrations, 30 and 19 ng/ml, respectively, being observed at 5 min. SG clearance from plasma was rapid and followed single-compartment kinetics (t1/2 = 20 min) and differed markedly from that of other tissues. SG concentrations were maximal at 15–30 min in nasal turbinates (480 ng/g), kidney (280 ng/g), lung (250 ng/g), spleen (200 ng/g), liver (140 ng/g), thymus (90 ng/g), heart (70 ng/g), olfactory bulb (14 ng/g), and brain (3 ng/g). The half-lives of SG in the nasal turbinate and thymus were 7.6 and 10.1 h, respectively, whereas in other organs, these ranged from 2.3 to 4.4 h. SG was detectable in feces and urine, but cumulative excretion over 5 days via these routes accounted for less than 0.3% of the total dose administered. Taken together, SG was rapidly taken up from the nose, distributed to tissues involved in respiratory, immune, and neuronal function, and subsequently cleared. However, a significant amount of the toxin was retained in the nasal turbinate, which might contribute to SG’s capacity to evoke OSN death. PMID:20466779

  6. Tissue and Stage-Specific Distribution of Wolbachia in Brugia malayi

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Kerstin; Beatty, Wandy L.; Jiang, Daojun; Weil, Gary J.; Fischer, Peter U.

    2011-01-01

    Background Most filarial parasite species contain Wolbachia, obligatory bacterial endosymbionts that are crucial for filarial development and reproduction. They are targets for alternative chemotherapy, but their role in the biology of filarial nematodes is not well understood. Light microscopy provides important information on morphology, localization and potential function of these bacteria. Surprisingly, immunohistology and in situ hybridization techniques have not been widely used to monitor Wolbachia distribution during the filarial life cycle. Methods/Principal Findings A monoclonal antibody directed against Wolbachia surface protein and in situ hybridization targeting Wolbachia 16S rRNA were used to monitor Wolbachia during the life cycle of B. malayi. In microfilariae and vector stage larvae only a few cells contain Wolbachia. In contrast, large numbers of Wolbachia were detected in the lateral chords of L4 larvae, but no endobacteria were detected in the genital primordium. In young adult worms (5 weeks p.i.), a massive expansion of Wolbachia was observed in the lateral chords adjacent to ovaries or testis, but no endobacteria were detected in the growth zone of the ovaries, uterus, the growth zone of the testis or the vas deferens. Confocal laser scanning and transmission electron microscopy showed that numerous Wolbachia are aligned towards the developing ovaries and single endobacteria were detected in the germline. In inseminated females (8 weeks p.i.) Wolbachia were observed in the ovaries, embryos and in decreasing numbers in the lateral chords. In young males Wolbachia were found in distinct zones of the testis and in large numbers in the lateral chords in the vicinity of testicular tissue but never in mature spermatids or spermatozoa. Conclusions Immunohistology and in situ hybridization show distinct tissue and stage specific distribution patterns for Wolbachia in B. malayi. Extensive multiplication of Wolbachia occurs in the lateral chords of L4

  7. Modeling metal bioaccumulation and tissue distribution in killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus) in three contaminated estuaries.

    PubMed

    Dutton, Jessica; Fisher, Nicholas S

    2014-01-01

    The present study experimentally assessed the uptake, loss, and resulting tissue distribution of As(V), Cd, Cr(III), Hg(II), and methylmercury (MeHg) in killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus) following aqueous exposure in water collected from 3 contaminated field sites-Baltimore Harbor and Elizabeth River (Chesapeake Bay), and Mare Island (San Francisco Bay)-using a radiotracer technique. Uptake rate constants (L g-1 d-1) were highest for MeHg (0.370-0.781) and lowest for As (0.00028-0.00065). Loss rate constants (d-1) were highest for As (0.046-0.096) and lowest for MeHg (0.006-0.009). Tissue distribution data showed that MeHg was redistributed around the body throughout the 9-d depuration period, and drinking may be an uptake mechanism for Cd from the aqueous phase in higher-salinity water. The kinetic parameters calculated in the present study were entered into a bioaccumulation model to calculate the predicted body burden of each metal at steady state and the percentage body burden attributable to dietary exposure on a site-specific basis. Calculated body burdens varied between field sites for all metals except Cr. The predicted values for Cd, Hg(II), and MeHg matched independent field data from contaminated estuaries, indicating that the model can account for the major processes governing metal concentration in killifish. The diet accounted for >97% of the body burden of Cd and MeHg and was the predominant exposure route for As and Cr.

  8. Clinical Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics of Bosutinib.

    PubMed

    Abbas, Richat; Hsyu, Poe-Hirr

    2016-10-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is a clonal myeloproliferative stem cell disorder. Bosutinib is an oral, once-daily SRC/ABL tyrosine kinase inhibitor with very potent inhibitory activity. Bosutinib is effective against all phases of intolerant or resistant Philadelphia chromosome-positive CML that do not harbor the T315I or V299LABL kinase domain mutations. Peak plasma concentrations of bosutinib occur at 4-6 h following oral administration, and dose-proportional increases in exposure are observed at doses ranging from 200 to 800 mg. Absorption of bosutinib increases with food. Bosutinib is distributed extensively into the tissues. It is highly plasma protein bound (94 %) and is primarily metabolized in the liver by cytochrome P450 3A4. Bosutinib is well tolerated overall and has a unique but manageable toxicity profile. This article provides a review of the available clinical pharmacokinetic, pharmacodynamic, and drug-drug interaction data on bosutinib in healthy subjects, patients with CML, and special populations.

  9. Synthetic cannabinoids pharmacokinetics and detection methods in biological matrices.

    PubMed

    Castaneto, Marisol S; Wohlfarth, Ariane; Desrosiers, Nathalie A; Hartman, Rebecca L; Gorelick, David A; Huestis, Marilyn A

    2015-05-01

    Synthetic cannabinoids (SC), originally developed as research tools, are now highly abused novel psychoactive substances. We present a comprehensive systematic review covering in vivo and in vitro animal and human pharmacokinetics and analytical methods for identifying SC and their metabolites in biological matrices. Of two main phases of SC research, the first investigated therapeutic applications, and the second abuse-related issues. Administration studies showed high lipophilicity and distribution into brain and fat tissue. Metabolite profiling studies, mostly with human liver microsomes and human hepatocytes, structurally elucidated metabolites and identified suitable SC markers. In general, SC underwent hydroxylation at various molecular sites, defluorination of fluorinated analogs and phase II metabolites were almost exclusively glucuronides. Analytical methods are critical for documenting intake, with different strategies applied to adequately address the continuous emergence of new compounds. Immunoassays have different cross-reactivities for different SC classes, but cannot keep pace with changing analyte targets. Gas chromatography and liquid chromatography mass spectrometry assays - first for a few, then numerous analytes - are available but constrained by reference standard availability, and must be continuously updated and revalidated. In blood and oral fluid, parent compounds are frequently present, albeit in low concentrations; for urinary detection, metabolites must be identified and interpretation is complex due to shared metabolic pathways. A new approach is non-targeted HRMS screening that is more flexible and permits retrospective data analysis. We suggest that streamlined assessment of new SC's pharmacokinetics and advanced HRMS screening provide a promising strategy to maintain relevant assays.

  10. Pharmacokinetics and biodegradation performance of a hydroxypropyl chitosan derivative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Kai; Han, Baoqin; Dong, Wen; Song, Fulai; Liu, Weizhi; Liu, Wanshun

    2015-10-01

    Hydroxypropyl chitosan (HP-chitosan) has been shown to have promising applications in a wide range of areas due to its biocompatibility, biodegradability and various biological activities, especially in the biomedical and pharmaceutical fields. However, it is not yet known about its pharmacokinetics and biodegradation performance, which are crucial for its clinical applications. In order to lay a foundation for its further applications and exploitations, here we carried out fluorescence intensity and GPC analyses to determine the pharmacokinetics mode of fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled HP-chitosan (FITC-HP-chitosan) and its biodegradability. The results showed that after intraperitoneal administration at a dose of 10 mg per rat, FITC-HP-chitosan could be absorbed rapidly and distributed to liver, kidney and spleen through blood. It was indicated that FITC-HP-chitosan could be utilized effectively, and 88.47% of the FITC-HP-chitosan could be excreted by urine within 11 days with a molecular weight less than 10 kDa. Moreover, our data indicated that there was an obvious degradation process occurred in liver (< 10 kDa at 24 h). In summary, HP-chitosan has excellent bioavailability and biodegradability, suggesting the potential applications of hydroxypropyl-modified chitosan as materials in drug delivery, tissue engineering and biomedical area.

  11. Two-Dimensional N-Glycan Distribution Mapping of Hepatocellular Carcinoma Tissues by MALDI-Imaging Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Powers, Thomas W; Holst, Stephanie; Wuhrer, Manfred; Mehta, Anand S; Drake, Richard R

    2015-01-01

    A new mass spectrometry imaging approach to simultaneously map the two-dimensional distribution of N-glycans in tissues has been recently developed. The method uses Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization Imaging Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-IMS) to spatially profile the location and distribution of multiple N-linked glycan species released by peptide N-glycosidase F in frozen or formalin-fixed tissues. Multiple formalin-fixed human hepatocellular carcinoma tissues were evaluated with this method, resulting in a panel of over 30 N-glycans detected. An ethylation reaction of extracted N-glycans released from adjacent slides was done to stabilize sialic acid containing glycans, and these structures were compared to N-glycans detected directly from tissue profiling. In addition, the distribution of singly fucosylated N-glycans detected in tumor tissue microarray cores were compared to the histochemistry staining pattern of a core fucose binding lectin. As this MALDI-IMS workflow has the potential to be applied to any formalin-fixed tissue block or tissue microarray, the advantages and limitations of the technique in context with other glycomic methods are also summarized. PMID:26501333

  12. SU-E-I-44: Some Preliminary Analysis of Angular Distribution of X-Ray Scattered On Soft Tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Ganezer, K; Krmar, M; Cvejic, Z; Rakic, S; Pajic, B

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The angular distribution of x-radiation scattered at small angles (up to 16 degrees) from several different animal soft tissue (skin, fat, muscle, retina, etc) were measured using standard equipment devoted to study of crystal structure which provides excellent geometry conditions of measurements. showed measurable differences for different tissues. In the simplest possible case when measured samples do not differ in structure (different concentration solutions) it can be seen that intensity of scattered radiation is decreasing function of the concentration and the peak of the maximum of scattering distribution depends on the concentration as well. Methods: An x-ray scattering profile usually consists of sharp diffraction peak; however some properties of the spatial profiles of scattered radiation as intensity, the peak position, height, area, FWHM, the ratio of peak heights, etc. Results: The data contained measurable differences for different tissues. In the simplest possible case when measured samples do not differ in structure (different concentration solutions) it can be seen that intensity of scattered radiation is decreasing function of the concentration and the peak of the maximum of scattering distribution depends on the concentration as well. Measurements of different samples in the very preliminary phase showed that simple biological material used in study showed slightly different scattering pattern, especially at higher angles (around 10degrees). Intensity of radiation scattered from same tissue type is very dependent on water content and several more parameters. Conclusion: This preliminary study using animal soft tissues on the angular distributions of scattered x-rays suggests that angular distributions of X-rays scattered off of soft tissues might be useful in distinguishing healthy tissue from malignant soft tissue.

  13. Phylogenetic sequence analysis, recombinant expression, and tissue distribution of a channel catfish estrogen receptor beta

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Xia, Zhenfang; Gale, William L.; Chang, Xiaotian; Langenau, David; Patino, Reynaldo; Maule, Alec G.; Densmore, Llewellyn D.

    2000-01-01

    An estrogen receptor β (ERβ) cDNA fragment was amplified by RT-PCR of total RNAextracted from liver and ovary of immature channel catfish. This cDNA fragment was used to screen an ovarian cDNA library made from an immature female fish. A clone was obtained that contained an open reading frame encoding a 575-amino-acid protein with a deduced molecular weight of 63.9 kDa. Maximum parsimony and Neighbor Joining analyses were used to generate a phylogenetic classification of channel catfish ERβ on the basis of 25 full-length teleost and tetrapod ER sequences. The consensus tree obtained indicated the existence of two major vertebrate ER subtypes, α and β. Within each subtype, and in accordance with established phylogenetic relationships, teleost and tetrapod ER were monophyletic confirming the results of a previous analysis (Z. Xiaet al., 1999, Gen. Comp. Endocrinol. 113, 360–368). Extracts of COS-7 cells transfectedwith channel catfish ERβ cDNA bound estrogen with high affinity (Kd = 0.21 nM) and specificity. The affinity of channel catfish ERβ for estrogen was higher than previously reported for channel catfish ERα. As determined by qualitative RT-PCR, the tissue distributions of ERα and ERβ were similar but not identical. Both ER subtypes were present in ovary and testis. ERα was found in all other tissues examined from juvenile and mature fish of both sexes. ERβ was also found in most tissues except, in most cases, whole blood and head kidney. Interestingly, the pattern of expression of ER subtypes in head kidney always corresponded to the pattern in whole blood. In conclusion, we isolated a channel catfish ERβ with ligand-binding affinity and tissue expression patterns different from ERα. Also, we confirmed the validity of our previously proposed general classification scheme for vertebrate ER into α and β subtypes and within each subtype, into teleost and tetrapod clades.

  14. VISUALIZING THE STRESS DISTRIBUTION WITHIN VASCULAR TISSUES USING INTRAVASCULAR ULTRASOUND ELASTOGRAPHY: A PRELIMINARY INVESTIGATION

    PubMed Central

    Richards, Michael S.; Perucchio, Renato; Doyley, Marvin M.

    2015-01-01

    A methodology for computing the stress distribution of vascular tissue using finite element-based, intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) reconstruction elastography is described. This information could help cardiologists detect life-threatening atherosclerotic plaques and predict their propensity to rupture. The calculation of vessel stresses requires the measurement of strain from the ultrasound images, a calibrating pressure measurement and additional model assumptions. In this work, we conducted simulation studies to investigate the effect of varying the model assumptions, specifically Poisson’s ratio and the outer boundary conditions, on the resulting stress fields. In both simulation and phantom studies, we created vessel geometries with two fibrous cap thicknesses to determine if we could detect a difference in peak stress (spatially) between the two. The results revealed that (i) Poisson’s ratios had negligible impact on the accuracy of stress elastograms, (ii) the outer boundary condition assumption had the greatest effect on the resulting modulus and stress distributions and (iii) in simulation and in phantom experiments, our stress imaging technique was able to detect an increased peak stress for the vessel geometry with the smaller cap thickness. This work is a first step toward understanding and creating a robust stress measurement technique for evaluating atherosclerotic plaques using IVUS elastography. PMID:25837424

  15. Simulation of differential drug pharmacokinetics under heat and exercise stress using a physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling approach.

    PubMed

    Sidhu, Pardeep; Peng, Henry T; Cheung, Bob; Edginton, Andrea

    2011-05-01

    Under extreme conditions of heat exposure and exercise stress, the human body undergoes major physiological changes. Perturbations in organ blood flows, gastrointestinal properties, and vascular physiology may impact the body's ability to absorb, distribute, and eliminate drugs. Clinical studies on the effect of these stressors on drug pharmacokinetics demonstrate that the likelihood of pharmacokinetic alteration is dependent on drug properties and the intensity of the stressor. The objectives of this study were to use literature data to quantify the correlation between exercise and heat exposure intensity to changing physiological parameters and further, to use this information for the parameterization of a whole-body, physiologically based pharmacokinetic model for the purposes of determining those drug properties most likely to demonstrate altered drug pharmacokinetics under stress. Cardiac output and most organ blood flows were correlated with heart rate using regression analysis. Other altered parameters included hematocrit and intravascular albumin concentration. Pharmacokinetic simulations of intravenous and oral administration of hypothetical drugs with either a low or high value of lipophilicity, unbound fraction in plasma, and unbound intrinsic hepatic clearance demonstrated that the area under the curve of those drugs with a high unbound intrinsic clearance was most affected (up to a 130% increase) following intravenous administration, whereas following oral administration, pharmacokinetic changes were smaller (<40% increase in area under the curve) for all hypothetical compounds. A midazolam physiologically based pharmacokinetic model was also used to demonstrate that simulated changes in pharmacokinetic parameters under exercise and heat stress were generally consistent with those reported in the literature.

  16. Staurosporine analysis and its pharmacokinetics in the blood of rats

    SciTech Connect

    Gurley, L.R.; Umbarger, K.O.; Kim, J.M.; Bradbury, E.M.; Lehnert, B.E.

    1994-07-01

    Staurosporine (Stsp), a protein kinase inhibitor, has been found to have a differential effect on the proliferation of normal and transformed cells in vitro. Essentially nothing is known about the distribution and pharmacokinetics of Stsp in the body. To facilitate such investigations, we have developed a High-Performance Liquid Chromatography method for measuring the levels of Stsp in blood. Stsp was measured in both plasma and RBC of rat blood. In vivo, Stsp was rapidly sequestered in some other tissue compartment, which rapidly decreased the concentration of Stsp in plasma to nondetectable levels. Using a postchromatography computerized analysis program that amplified the Stsp UV absorption peak from the HPLC. nanogram levels of Stsp were detected in vivo. Using this detection system for pharmacokinetic studies it was found that, in vivo, Stsp had a half-life of 51.6 min in plasma and 75.3 min in RBC. Tissue adsorption studies demonstrated that up to 99% of the Stsp was adsorbed by the heart and lung tissue in one pass through these organs. Extrapolation of the data from these studies suggest that 1{minus}g Stsp injections should produce a 2- to 7-ng/ml plasma Stsp level in vivo which is in the effective range to produce G1 arrest in normal cells. The short half-life of Stsp in plasma indicates that it will be necessary to infuse Stsp at some low level following the initial bolus injection in order to maintain Stsp levels in plasma at the 1- to 10-ng/ml level for the 2- to 3-day period necessary to achieve G1 arrest in vivo.

  17. Pharmacokinetics of PEGylated recombinant human endostatin (M2ES) in rats

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zuo-gang; Jia, Lin; Guo, Li-fang; Yu, Min; Sun, Xu; Nie, Wen; Fu, Yan; Rao, Chun-ming; Wang, Jun-zhi; Luo, Yong-zhang

    2015-01-01

    Aim: M2ES is PEGylated recombinant human endostatin. In this study we investigated the pharmacokinetics, tissue distribution, and excretion of M2ES in rats. Methods: 125I-radiolabeled M2ES was administered to rats by intravenous bolus injection at 3 mg/kg. The pharmacokinetics, tissue distribution and excretion of M2ES were investigated using the trichloroacetic acid (TCA) precipitation method. Results: The serum M2ES concentration-time curve after a single intravenous dose of 3 mg/kg in rats was fitted with a non-compartment model. The pharmacokinetic parameters were evaluated as follows: Cmax=28.3 μg·equ/mL, t1/2=71.5 h, AUC(0–∞)=174.6 μg·equ·h/mL, Cl=17.2 mL·h−1·kg−1, MRT=57.6 h, and Vss=989.8 mL/kg for the total radioactivity; Cmax=30.3 μg·equ/mL, t1/2=60.1 h, AUC(0–∞)=146.2 μg·equ·h/mL, Cl=20.6 mL·h−1·kg−1, MRT=47.4 h, and Vss=974.6 mL/kg for the TCA precipitate radioactivity. M2ES was rapidly and widely distributed in various tissues and showed substantial deposition in kidney, adrenal gland, lung, spleen, bladder and liver. The radioactivity recovered in the urine and feces by 432 h post-dose was 71.3% and 8.3%, respectively. Only 0.98% of radioactivity was excreted in the bile by 24 h post-dose. Conclusion: PEG modification substantially prolongs the circulation time of recombinant human endostatin and effectively improves its pharmacokinetic behavior. M2ES is extensively distributed in most tissues of rats, including kidney, adrenal gland, lung, spleen, bladder and liver. Urinary excretion was the major elimination route for M2ES. PMID:26027657

  18. A novel tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase in blood clam Tegillarca granosa: molecular cloning, tissue distribution and expression analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qing; Bao, Yongbo; Huo, Lihui; Gu, Hailong; Lin, Zhihua

    2012-09-01

    Tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases (TIMPs) were originally characterized as inhibitors of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), but their range of activities has been found to be broader as it includes the inhibition of several of the MMPs, etc. The cDNA encoding TIMP-4-like gene from blood clam Tegillarca granosa (designated as Tg-TIMP-4-like) which is the first tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase identified in blood clams, was cloned and characterized. It was of 1164 bp, and an open reading frame (ORF) of 666 bp encoding a putative protein of 222 amino acids. The predicted amino acid sequence comprised all recognized functional domains found in other TIMP homologues and showed the highest (30.56%) identity to the TIMP-1.3 from Crassostrea gigas. Several highly conserved motifs including several TIMP signatures, amino acid residue Cys³⁰ responsible for coordinating the metal ions, the Cys-X-Cys motif and the putative NTR (netrin) domain were almost completely conserved in the deduced amino acid of Tg-TIMP-4 like, which indicated that Tg-TIMP-4-like should be a member of the TIMP family. The mRNA expression of Tg-TIMP-4-like in the tissues of mantle, adductor muscle, foot, gill, hemocyte and hepatopancreas was examined by quantitative real-time PCR (qT-PCR) and mRNA transcripts of Tg-TIMP-4-like were mainly detected in hemocyte, and weakly detected in the other tissues. We also observed that Tg-TIMP-4 like mRNA accumulated significantly during Vibrio parahaemolyticus, Peptidogylcan (PGN) and Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge, whereas the timing and quantitative differences of mRNA expression against different challenge indicated that Tg-TIMP-4-like may play a pivotal role in mollusc defense mechanisms. PMID:22771965

  19. Impact of Internal Metallic Ports in Temporary Tissue Expanders on Postmastectomy Radiation Dose Distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Susie A.; Ogunleye, Tomiwa; Dhabbaan, Anees; Huang, Eugene H.; Losken, Albert; Gabram, Sheryl; Davis, Lawrence; Torres, Mylin A.

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: Temporary tissue expanders (TTE) with an internal magnetic metal port (IMP) have been increasingly used for breast reconstruction in post-mastectomy patients who receive radiation therapy (XRT). We evaluated XRT plans of patients with IMP to determine its effect on XRT dose distribution. Methods and Materials: Original treatment plans with CT simulation scans of 24 consecutive patients who received XRT (ORI), planned without heterogeneity corrections, to a reconstructed breast containing an IMP were used. Two additional treatment plans were then generated: one treatment plan with the IMP assigned the electron density of the rare earth magnet, nickel plated neodymium-iron-boron (HET), and a second treatment plan with the IMP assigned a CT value of 1 to simulate a homogeneous breast without an IMP (BRS). All plans were prescribed 50 Gy to the reconstructed breast (CTV). Results: CTV coverage by 50 Gy was significantly lower in the HET (mean 87.7% CTV) than in either the ORI (mean 99.7% CTV, P<.001) or BRS plans (mean 95.0% CTV, P<.001). The effect of the port was more pronounced on CT slices containing the IMP with prescription dose coverage of the CTV being less in the HET than in either ORI (mean difference 33.6%, P<.01) or BRS plans (mean difference 30.1%, P<.001). HET had a less homogeneous and conformal dose distribution than BRS or ORI. Conclusion: IMPs increase dose heterogeneity and reduce dose to the breast CTV through attenuation of the beam. For optimal XRT treatment, heterogeneity corrections should be used in XRT planning for patients with TTE with IMP, as the IMP impacts dose distribution.

  20. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic models of small molecules and therapeutic antibodies: a mini-review on fundamental concepts and applications.

    PubMed

    Ferl, Gregory Z; Theil, Frank-Peter; Wong, Harvey

    2016-03-01

    The mechanisms of absorption, distribution, metabolism and elimination of small and large molecule therapeutics differ significantly from one another and can be explored within the framework of a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model. This paper briefly reviews fundamental approaches to PBPK modeling, in which drug kinetics within tissues and organs are explicitly represented using physiologically meaningful parameters. The differences in PBPK models applied to small/large molecule drugs are highlighted, thus elucidating differences in absorption, distribution and elimination properties between these two classes of drugs in a systematic manner. The absorption of small and large molecules differs with respect to their common extravascular routes of delivery (oral versus subcutaneous). The role of the lymphatic system in drug distribution, and the involvement of tissues as sites of elimination (through catabolism and target mediated drug disposition) are unique features of antibody distribution and elimination that differ from small molecules, which are commonly distributed into the tissues but are eliminated primarily by liver metabolism. Fundamental differences exist in the ability to predict human pharmacokinetics based upon preclinical data due to differing mechanisms governing small and large molecule disposition. These differences have influence on the evolving utilization of PBPK modeling in the discovery and development of small and large molecule therapeutics.

  1. Pharmacokinetic Profile of Spectinomycin in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Madhura, Dora Babu; Lee, Richard; Meibohm, Bernd

    2014-01-01

    Short Summary Following intravenous (IV) administration, the pharmacokinetics of spectinomycin in rats was found to be on par with its profile in other mammalian species including humans with respect to its overall excretion and half-life at effective concentrations. This study, however, indicates that a small fraction of the spectinomycin dose is retained in peripheral tissues for a prolonged period of time at low concentrations. PMID:24020122

  2. Toxicity and tissue distribution of pentachlorophenol and permethrin in pipistrelle bats experimentally exposed to treated timber.

    PubMed

    Shore, R F; Myhill, D G; French, M C; Leach, D V; Stebbings, R E

    1991-01-01

    The dependence of bats in Britain on houses as roosts may result in them being exposed to pesticides used in remedial timber treatments. Pentachlorophenol (PCP) and permethrin are used as a fungicide and an insecticide for timber treatment, respectively. The present study investigated toxicity and distribution in body tissues of these two pesticides in pipistrelle bats. Four groups of nine to ten bats were kept in separate outdoor flight enclosures and were provided with roost boxes treated with either PCP only, permethrin, PCP/permethrin mixture or solvent only (control). At the start of the experiment, mean (+/-SE) PCP and permethrin concentrations on the surface of wooden blocks that had been treated in the same way as roost boxes were 69.32+/-6.76 mg g(-1) (n=6) and 3.3+/-1.6 mg g(-1) (n=3), respectively. All bats exposed to PCP and PCP/permethrin treated boxes died within 24 and 120 h, respectively; nine out of the ten controls survived the 32 day experimental period (P<0.001; both groups compared with control). Bats exposed to permethrin treated boxes survived as well as controls. Mean (+/-SE) carcass PCP concentration (excluding deposits on fur) of bats exposed to PCP and PCP/permethrin treated boxes was 13.11+/-2.52 microg g(-1)BW (n=20). PCP burdens on fur were positively correlated with total weight of PCP in the carcass (P<0.001). PCP was present in fat depots, liver, kidney and the remainder of the body which, despite containing low PCP concentrations, was the main PCP reservoir (66.4+/-5.0% of carcass PCP load; n=20). Total PCP in the carcass was significantly correlated with lipid weight (P<0.005). Permethrin was not detectable in body washes and tissues of bats exposed to PCP/permethrin mixture or permethrin. PMID:15092084

  3. Bioavailability, tissue distribution and hypoglycaemic effect of vanadium in magnesium-deficient rats.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Cristina; Torres, Miguel; Bermúdez-Peña, María C; Aranda, Pilar; Montes-Bayón, María; Sanz-Medel, Alfredo; Llopis, Juan

    2011-12-01

    Vanadium is an element whose role as a micronutrient and hypoglycaemic drug has yet to be fully clarified. The present study was undertaken to investigate the bioavailability and tissue distribution of vanadium and its interactions with magnesium in healthy and in magnesium-deficient rats, in order to determine its role as a micronutrient and antidiabetic agent. Four groups were used: control (456.4 mg magnesium and 0.06 mg vanadium/kg food); control treated with 1mg vanadium/day; magnesium-deficient (164.4 mg magnesium/kg food and 0.06 mg vanadium/kg food); and magnesium-deficient treated with 1 mg vanadium/day. The vanadium was supplied in the drinking water as bis(maltolato)oxovanadium (IV). The experiment had a duration of five weeks. We measured vanadium and magnesium in excreta, serum, skeletal muscle, kidney, liver, adipose tissue and femur. Fasting glucose, insulin and total antioxidant status (TAS) in serum were studied. The vanadium treatment applied to the control rats reduced the absorption, retention, serum level and femur content of magnesium. Magnesium deficiency increased the retention and serum level of vanadium, the content of vanadium in the kidney, liver and femur (organs where magnesium had been depleted), serum glycaemia and insulin, and reduced TAS. V treatment given to magnesium-deficient rats corrected magnesium content in muscle, kidney and liver and levels of serum glucose, insulin and TAS. In conclusion, our results show interactions between magnesium and vanadium in the digestive and renal systems. Treatment with vanadium to magnesium-deficient rats corrected many of the alterations that had been generated by the magnesium deficiency.

  4. Tumour control probability derived from dose distribution in homogeneous and heterogeneous models: assuming similar pharmacokinetics, 125Sn-177Lu is superior to 90Y-177Lu in peptide receptor radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walrand, Stephan; Hanin, François-Xavier; Pauwels, Stanislas; Jamar, François

    2012-07-01

    Clinical trials on 177Lu-90Y therapy used empirical activity ratios. Radionuclides (RN) with larger beta maximal range could favourably replace 90Y. Our aim is to provide RN dose-deposition kernels and to compare the tumour control probability (TCP) of RN combinations. Dose kernels were derived by integration of the mono-energetic beta-ray dose distributions (computed using Monte Carlo) weighted by their respective beta spectrum. Nine homogeneous spherical tumours (1-25 mm in diameter) and four spherical tumours including a lattice of cold, but alive, spheres (1, 3, 5, 7 mm in diameter) were modelled. The TCP for 93Y, 90Y and 125Sn in combination with 177Lu in variable proportions (that kept constant the renal cortex biological effective dose) were derived by 3D dose kernel convolution. For a mean tumour-absorbed dose of 180 Gy, 2 mm homogeneous tumours and tumours including 3 mm diameter cold alive spheres were both well controlled (TCP > 0.9) using a 75-25% combination of 177Lu and 90Y activity. However, 125Sn-177Lu achieved a significantly better result by controlling 1 mm-homogeneous tumour simultaneously with tumours including 5 mm diameter cold alive spheres. Clinical trials using RN combinations should use RN proportions tuned to the patient dosimetry. 125Sn production and its coupling to somatostatin analogue appear feasible. Assuming similar pharmacokinetics 125Sn is the best RN for combination with 177Lu in peptide receptor radiotherapy justifying pharmacokinetics studies in rodent of 125Sn-labelled somatostatin analogues.

  5. Pharmacokinetics of sulfamethazine in buffaloes.

    PubMed

    Khan, F H; Nawaz, M; Anwar-Ul-Hassan, S

    1980-01-01

    Pharmacokinetic parameters which describe distribution and elimination of sulfamethazine were determined in buffaloes. Following intravenous administration of a single dose (100 mg/kg), disposition of the drug was described in terms of biexponential expression: Cp = Ae alpha t + Be-beta t. Based on total (free and bound) sulfonamide levels in the plasma, pseudo-distribution equilibrium was rapidly attained and the half-life value of 5.54 +/- 0.41 h (mean +/- S.D., n = 8) was recorded. Body clearance was 56 +/- 7 ml x kg-1 x h-1. Based on this study we suggest an intravenous dosage regimen consisting of 38.4 mg sulfamethazine/kg body-weight repeated at 12 h inrervals. With this dosage level the predicted plasma concentrations will oscillate between 125 and 25 micrograms/ml during the steady-state. The influence of febrile states and bacterial diseases on predicted levels remains to be verified experimentally. PMID:7436332

  6. Modeling the collagen fibril network of biological tissues as a nonlinearly elastic material using a continuous volume fraction distribution function

    PubMed Central

    Shirazi, Reza; Vena, Pasquale; Sah, Robert L.; Klisch, Stephen M.

    2012-01-01

    Despite distinct mechanical functions, biological soft tissues have a common microstructure in which a ground matrix is reinforced by a collagen fibril network. The microstructural properties of the collagen network contribute to continuum mechanical tissue properties that are strongly anisotropic with tensile-compressive asymmetry. In this study, a novel approach based on a continuous distribution of collagen fibril volume fractions is developed to model fibril reinforced soft tissues as a nonlinearly elastic and anisotropic material. Compared with other approaches that use a normalized number of fibrils for the definition of the distribution function, this representation is based on a distribution parameter (i.e. volume fraction) that is commonly measured experimentally while also incorporating pre-stress of the collagen fibril network in a tissue natural configuration. After motivating the form of the collagen strain energy function, examples are provided for two volume fraction distribution functions. Consequently, collagen second-Piola Kirchhoff stress and elasticity tensors are derived, first in general form and then specifically for a model that may be used for immature bovine articular cartilage. It is shown that the proposed strain energy is a convex function of the deformation gradient tensor and, thus, is suitable for the formation of a polyconvex tissue strain energy function. PMID:23390357

  7. Calculation of dose distribution in compressible breast tissues using finite element modeling, Monte Carlo simulation and thermoluminescence dosimeters.

    PubMed

    Mohammadyari, Parvin; Faghihi, Reza; Mosleh-Shirazi, Mohammad Amin; Lotfi, Mehrzad; Hematiyan, Mohammad Rahim; Koontz, Craig; Meigooni, Ali S

    2015-12-01

    Compression is a technique to immobilize the target or improve the dose distribution within the treatment volume during different irradiation techniques such as AccuBoost(®) brachytherapy. However, there is no systematic method for determination of dose distribution for uncompressed tissue after irradiation under compression. In this study, the mechanical behavior of breast tissue between compressed and uncompressed states was investigated. With that, a novel method was developed to determine the dose distribution in uncompressed tissue after irradiation of compressed breast tissue. Dosimetry was performed using two different methods, namely, Monte Carlo simulations using the MCNP5 code and measurements using thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD). The displacement of the breast elements was simulated using a finite element model and calculated using ABAQUS software. From these results, the 3D dose distribution in uncompressed tissue was determined. The geometry of the model was constructed from magnetic resonance images of six different women volunteers. The mechanical properties were modeled by using the Mooney-Rivlin hyperelastic material model. Experimental dosimetry was performed by placing the TLD chips into the polyvinyl alcohol breast equivalent phantom. The results determined that the nodal displacements, due to the gravitational force and the 60 Newton compression forces (with 43% contraction in the loading direction and 37% expansion in the orthogonal direction) were determined. Finally, a comparison of the experimental data and the simulated data showed agreement within 11.5%  ±  5.9%.

  8. Calculation of dose distribution in compressible breast tissues using finite element modeling, Monte Carlo simulation and thermoluminescence dosimeters.

    PubMed

    Mohammadyari, Parvin; Faghihi, Reza; Mosleh-Shirazi, Mohammad Amin; Lotfi, Mehrzad; Hematiyan, Mohammad Rahim; Koontz, Craig; Meigooni, Ali S

    2015-12-01

    Compression is a technique to immobilize the target or improve the dose distribution within the treatment volume during different irradiation techniques such as AccuBoost(®) brachytherapy. However, there is no systematic method for determination of dose distribution for uncompressed tissue after irradiation under compression. In this study, the mechanical behavior of breast tissue between compressed and uncompressed states was investigated. With that, a novel method was developed to determine the dose distribution in uncompressed tissue after irradiation of compressed breast tissue. Dosimetry was performed using two different methods, namely, Monte Carlo simulations using the MCNP5 code and measurements using thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD). The displacement of the breast elements was simulated using a finite element model and calculated using ABAQUS software. From these results, the 3D dose distribution in uncompressed tissue was determined. The geometry of the model was constructed from magnetic resonance images of six different women volunteers. The mechanical properties were modeled by using the Mooney-Rivlin hyperelastic material model. Experimental dosimetry was performed by placing the TLD chips into the polyvinyl alcohol breast equivalent phantom. The results determined that the nodal displacements, due to the gravitational force and the 60 Newton compression forces (with 43% contraction in the loading direction and 37% expansion in the orthogonal direction) were determined. Finally, a comparison of the experimental data and the simulated data showed agreement within 11.5%  ±  5.9%. PMID:26572554

  9. Calculation of dose distribution in compressible breast tissues using finite element modeling, Monte Carlo simulation and thermoluminescence dosimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammadyari, Parvin; Faghihi, Reza; Mosleh-Shirazi, Mohammad Amin; Lotfi, Mehrzad; Rahim Hematiyan, Mohammad; Koontz, Craig; Meigooni, Ali S.

    2015-12-01

    Compression is a technique to immobilize the target or improve the dose distribution within the treatment volume during different irradiation techniques such as AccuBoost® brachytherapy. However, there is no systematic method for determination of dose distribution for uncompressed tissue after irradiation under compression. In this study, the mechanical behavior of breast tissue between compressed and uncompressed states was investigated. With that, a novel method was developed to determine the dose distribution in uncompressed tissue after irradiation of compressed breast tissue. Dosimetry was performed using two different methods, namely, Monte Carlo simulations using the MCNP5 code and measurements using thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD). The displacement of the breast elements was simulated using a finite element model and calculated using ABAQUS software. From these results, the 3D dose distribution in uncompressed tissue was determined. The geometry of the model was constructed from magnetic resonance images of six different women volunteers. The mechanical properties were modeled by using the Mooney-Rivlin hyperelastic material model. Experimental dosimetry was performed by placing the TLD chips into the polyvinyl alcohol breast equivalent phantom. The results determined that the nodal displacements, due to the gravitational force and the 60 Newton compression forces (with 43% contraction in the loading direction and 37% expansion in the orthogonal direction) were determined. Finally, a comparison of the experimental data and the simulated data showed agreement within 11.5%  ±  5.9%.

  10. Methods to identify and characterize developmental neurotoxicity for human health risk assessment. III: pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic considerations.

    PubMed Central

    Dorman, D C; Allen, S L; Byczkowski, J Z; Claudio, L; Fisher, J E; Fisher, J W; Harry, G J; Li, A A; Makris, S L; Padilla, S; Sultatos, L G; Mileson, B E

    2001-01-01

    We review pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic factors that should be considered in the design and interpretation of developmental neurotoxicity studies. Toxicologic effects on the developing nervous system depend on the delivered dose, exposure duration, and developmental stage at which exposure occurred. Several pharmacokinetic processes (absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion) govern chemical disposition within the dam and the nervous system of the offspring. In addition, unique physical features such as the presence or absence of a placental barrier and the gradual development of the blood--brain barrier influence chemical disposition and thus modulate developmental neurotoxicity. Neonatal exposure may depend on maternal pharmacokinetic processes and transfer of the xenobiotic through the milk, although direct exposure may occur through other routes (e.g., inhalation). Measurement of the xenobiotic in milk and evaluation of biomarkers of exposure or effect following exposure can confirm or characterize neonatal exposure. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic models that incorporate these and other determinants can estimate tissue dose and biologic response following in utero or neonatal exposure. These models can characterize dose--response relationships and improve extrapolation of results from animal studies to humans. In addition, pharmacologic data allow an experimenter to determine whether exposure to the test chemical is adequate, whether exposure occurs during critical periods of nervous system development, whether route and duration of exposure are appropriate, and whether developmental neurotoxicity can be differentiated from direct actions of the xenobiotic. PMID:11250810

  11. Tissomics: two- and three-dimensional distribution of nuclei in brain tissue using laser scanning cytometry (LSC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenz, Domnik; Mittag, Anja; Mosch, Birgit; Bocsi, Jozsef; Arendt, Thomas; Tarnok, Attila