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Sample records for phase 2b trial

  1. SOME DESIGN ISSUES IN PHASE 2B VERSUS PHASE 3 PREVENTION TRIALS FOR TESTING EFFICACY OF PRODUCTS OR CONCEPTS

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, Peter B.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY After one or more Phase 2 trials show that a candidate preventive vaccine induces immune responses that putatively protect against an infectious disease for which there is no licensed vaccine, the next step is to evaluate the efficacy of the candidate. The trial-designer faces the question of what is the optimal size of the initial efficacy trial? Part of the answer will entail deciding between a large Phase 3 licensure trial or an intermediate-sized Phase 2b screening trial, the latter of which may be designed to directly contribute to the evidence-base for licensing the candidate, or, to test a scientific concept for moving the vaccine field forward, acknowledging that the particular candidate will never be licensable. Using the HIV vaccine field as a case study, we describe distinguishing marks of Phase 2b and Phase 3 prevention efficacy trials, and compare the expected utility of these trial types using Pascal’s decision-theoretic framework. By integrating values/utilities on (1) Correct or incorrect conclusions resulting from the trial; (2) Timeliness of obtaining the trial results; (3) Precision for estimating the intervention effect; and (4) Resources expended; this decision framework provides a more complete approach to selecting the optimal efficacy trial size than a traditional approach that is based primarily on power calculations. Our objective is to help inform the decision-process for planning an initial efficacy trial design. PMID:20419758

  2. Intentions to use preexposure prophylaxis among current phase 2B preventive HIV-1 vaccine efficacy trial participants.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Jonathan D; Sobieszczyk, Magdalena E; Madenwald, Tamra; Grove, Doug; Karuna, Shelly T; Andrasik, Michele; Sherwat, Adam; Broder, Gail; Mayer, Kenneth; Koblin, Beryl; Hammer, Scott

    2013-07-01

    In November 2010, the iPrEx study reported that preexposure prophylaxis (PrEP) with daily tenofovir disoproxil fumarate/emtricitabine reduced HIV infections by 44% among men who have sex with men and subsequent trials corroborated efficacy among heterosexual men and women. During regularly scheduled follow-up visits from January to March 2011, participants in an ongoing phase 2b vaccine efficacy trial completed an anonymous Web survey about PrEP. Among 376 respondents, 17% reported they were very likely to use PrEP in the next year. Nonwhite participants were more likely to use PrEP. Among those with some level of interest, intent to use PrEP was greatest if the drug were available through the clinical trial or health insurance. Most (91%) believed taking PrEP would not change their willingness to stay in the vaccine trial and few thought it would affect recruitment. As key stakeholders, currently enrolled trial participants can offer vital input about emerging prevention technologies that may affect the design of future HIV vaccine and nonvaccine prevention trials.

  3. Intentions to use pre-exposure prophylaxis among current phase 2B preventive HIV-1 vaccine efficacy trial participants

    PubMed Central

    Fuchs, Jonathan D.; Sobieszczyk, Magdalena E.; Madenwald, Tamra; Grove, Doug; Karuna, Shelly T.; Andrasik, Michele; Sherwat, Adam; Broder, Gail; Mayer, Kenneth; Koblin, Beryl; Hammer, Scott

    2013-01-01

    In November 2010, the iPrEx study reported that pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) with daily tenofovir disoproxil fumarate/emtricitabine reduced HIV infections by 44% among men who have sex with men and subsequent trials corroborated efficacy among heterosexual men and women. During regularly scheduled follow-up visits from January-March 2011, participants in an ongoing phase 2b vaccine efficacy trial completed an anonymous web survey about PrEP. Among 376 respondents, 17% reported they were very likely to use PrEP in the next year. Non-white participants were more likely to use PrEP. Among those with some level of interest, intent to use PrEP was greatest if the drug were available through the clinical trial or health insurance. Most (91%) believed taking PrEP would not change their willingness to stay in the vaccine trial and few thought it would affect recruitment. As key stakeholders, currently enrolled trial participants can offer vital input about emerging prevention technologies that may affect the design of future HIV vaccine and non-vaccine prevention trials. PMID:23614998

  4. Fostering community understanding of sufficient benefit and early stopping for a phase 2B HIV prevention clinical trial in Africa.

    PubMed

    White, Rhonda; Chileshe, Modesta; Dawson, Liza; Donnell, Deborah; Hillier, Sharon; Morar, Neetha; Noguchi, Lisa; Dixon, Dennis

    2011-02-01

    Most trials of interventions are designed to address the traditional null hypothesis of no benefit. VOICE, a phase 2B HIV prevention trial funded by NIH and conducted in Africa, is designed to assess if the intervention will prevent a substantial fraction of infections. Planned interim analysis may provide conclusive evidence against the traditional null hypothesis without establishing substantial benefit. At this interim point, the Data and Safety Monitoring Board would then face the dilemma of knowing the product has some positive effect, but perhaps not as great an effect as the protocol has declared necessary. In March 2008, NIH program staff recommended that the VOICE protocol team discuss the stopping rules with stakeholders prior to initiating the protocol. The goals of the workshop were to inform community representatives about the potential ethical dilemma associated with stopping rules and engage in dialogue about these issues. We describe the resulting community consultation and summarize the outcomes. A 2-day workshop was convened with the goal of having a clear and transparent consultation with the stakeholders around the question, 'Given emerging evidence that a product could prevent some infections, would the community support a decision to continue accruing to the trial?' Participants included research staff and community stakeholders. Lectures with visual aids, discussions, and exercises using interactive learning tasks were used, with a focus on statistics and interpreting data from trials, particularly interim data. Results of oral and written evaluations by participants were reviewed. The feedback was mostly positive, with some residual confusion regarding statistical concepts. However, discussions with attendees later revealed that not all felt prepared to engage fully in the workshop. This was the presenters' first experience facilitating a formal discussion with an audience that had no advanced science, research, or mathematics training

  5. Fostering Community Understanding of Sufficient Benefit and Early Stopping for a Phase 2B HIV Prevention Clinical Trial in Africa

    PubMed Central

    White, Rhonda; Chileshe, Modesta; Dawson, Liza; Donnell, Deborah; Hillier, Sharon; Morar, Neetha; Noguchi, Lisa; Dixon, Dennis

    2012-01-01

    Background Most trials of interventions are designed to address the traditional null hypothesis of no benefit. VOICE, a phase 2B HIV prevention trial funded by NIH and conducted in Africa, is designed to assess if the intervention will prevent a substantial fraction of infections. Planned interim analysis may provide conclusive evidence against the traditional null hypothesis without establishing substantial benefit. At this interim point, the Data and Safety Monitoring Board would then face the dilemma of knowing the product has some positive effect, but perhaps not as great an effect as the protocol has declared necessary. Purpose In March 2008, NIH program staff recommended that the VOICE protocol team discuss the stopping rules with stakeholders prior to initiating the protocol. The goals of the workshop were to inform community representatives about the potential ethical dilemma associated with stopping rules and engage in dialogue about these issues. We describe the resulting community consultation and summarize the outcomes. Methods A 2-day workshop was convened with the goal of having a clear and transparent consultation with the stakeholders around the question, ‘Given emerging evidence that a product could prevent some infections, would the community support a decision to continue accruing to the trial?’ Participants included research staff and community stakeholders. Lectures with visual aids, discussions, and exercises using interactive learning tasks were used, with a focus on statistics and interpreting data from trials, particularly interim data. Results Results of oral and written evaluations by participants were reviewed. The feedback was mostly positive, with some residual confusion regarding statistical concepts. However, discussions with attendees later revealed that not all felt prepared to engage fully in the workshop. Limitations This was the presenters’ first experience facilitating a formal discussion with an audience that had no

  6. Prospective randomized multicenter adjuvant dermatologic cooperative oncology group trial of low-dose interferon alfa-2b with or without a modified high-dose interferon alfa-2b induction phase in patients with lymph node-negative melanoma.

    PubMed

    Hauschild, Axel; Weichenthal, Michael; Rass, Knuth; Linse, Ruthild; Ulrich, Jens; Stadler, Rudolf; Volkenandt, Matthias; Grabbe, Stephan; Proske, Ulrike; Schadendorf, Dirk; Brockmeyer, Norbert; Vogt, Thomas; Rompel, Rainer; Kaufmann, Roland; Kaatz, Martin; Näher, Helmut; Mohr, Peter; Eigentler, Thomas; Livingstone, Elisabeth; Garbe, Claus

    2009-07-20

    PURPOSE Interferon alfa (IFN-alpha) has shown clinical efficacy in the adjuvant treatment of patients with high-risk melanoma in several clinical trials, but optimal dosing and duration of treatment are still under discussion. It has been argued that in high-dose IFN-alpha (HDI), the intravenous (IV) induction phase might be critical for the clinical benefit of the regimen. PATIENTS AND METHODS In an attempt to investigate the potential role of a modified high-dose induction phase, lymph node-negative patients with resected primary malignant melanoma of more than 1.5-mm tumor thickness were included in this prospective randomized multicenter Dermatologic Cooperative Oncology Group trial. Six hundred seventy-four patients were randomly assigned to receive 4 weeks of a modified HDI scheme. This schedule consisted of 5 times weekly 10 MU/m(2) IFN-alpha-2b IV for 2 weeks and 5 times weekly 10 MU/m(2) IFN-alpha-2b administered subcutaneously (SC) for another 2 weeks followed by 23 months of low-dose IFN-alpha-2b (LDI) 3 MU SC three times a week (arm A). LDI 3 MU three times a week was given for 24 months in arm B. Results Of 650 assessable patients, there were 92 relapses among the 321 patients receiving high-dose induction as compared with 95 relapses among the 329 patients receiving LDI only. Five-year relapse-free survival rates were 68.0% (arm A) and 67.1% (arm B), respectively. Likewise, melanoma-related fatalities were similar between both groups, resulting in 5-year overall survival rates of 80.2% (arm A) and 82.9% (arm B). CONCLUSION The addition of a 4-week modified HDI induction phase to a 2-year low-dose adjuvant IFN-alpha-2b treatment schedule did not improve the clinical outcome.

  7. TG4010 immunotherapy and first-line chemotherapy for advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (TIME): results from the phase 2b part of a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, phase 2b/3 trial.

    PubMed

    Quoix, Elisabeth; Lena, Hervé; Losonczy, Gyorgy; Forget, Frédéric; Chouaid, Christos; Papai, Zsolt; Gervais, Radj; Ottensmeier, Christian; Szczesna, Aleksandra; Kazarnowicz, Andrzej; Beck, Joseph T; Westeel, Virginie; Felip, Enriqueta; Debieuvre, Didier; Madroszyk, Anne; Adam, Julien; Lacoste, Gisèle; Tavernaro, Annette; Bastien, Bérangère; Halluard, Céline; Palanché, Tania; Limacher, Jean-Marc

    2016-02-01

    MUC1 is a tumour-associated antigen expressed by many solid tumours, including non-small-cell lung cancer. TG4010 is a modified vaccinia Ankara expressing MUC1 and interleukin 2. In a previous study, TG4010 combined with chemotherapy showed activity in non-small-cell lung cancer and the baseline value of CD16, CD56, CD69 triple-positive activated lymphocytes (TrPAL) was shown to be potentially predictive of TG4010 efficacy. In this phase 2b part of the phase 2b/3 TIME trial, we further assess TG4010 in combination with first-line chemotherapy and use of the TrPAL biomarker in this setting. In this phase 2b part of a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, phase 2b/3 trial, we recruited previously untreated patients aged 18 years or older with stage IV non-small-cell lung cancer without a known activating EGFR mutation and with MUC1 expression in at least 50% of tumoural cells. Patients were randomly allocated (1:1) by an external service provider to subcutaneous injections of 10(8) plaque-forming units of TG4010 or placebo from the beginning of chemotherapy every week for 6 weeks and then every 3 weeks up to progression, discontinuation for any reason, or toxic effects, stratified according to baseline value of TrPAL (≤ or > the upper limit of normal [ULN]) and, in addition, a dynamic minimisation procedure was used, taking into account chemotherapy regimen, histology, addition or not of bevacizumab, performance status, and centre. Patients, site staff, monitors, the study funder, data managers, and the statistician were masked to treatment identity. The primary endpoint was progression-free survival, assessed every 6 weeks, to validate the predictive value of the TrPAL biomarker. If patients with TrPAL values of less than or equal to the ULN had a Bayesian probability of more than 95% that the true hazard ratio (HR) for progression-free survival was less than 1, and if those with TrPAL values of greater than the ULN had a probability of more than 80% that

  8. Repeated nebulisation of non-viral CFTR gene therapy in patients with cystic fibrosis: a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, phase 2b trial

    PubMed Central

    Alton, Eric W F W; Armstrong, David K; Ashby, Deborah; Bayfield, Katie J; Bilton, Diana; Bloomfield, Emily V; Boyd, A Christopher; Brand, June; Buchan, Ruaridh; Calcedo, Roberto; Carvelli, Paula; Chan, Mario; Cheng, Seng H; Collie, D David S; Cunningham, Steve; Davidson, Heather E; Davies, Gwyneth; Davies, Jane C; Davies, Lee A; Dewar, Maria H; Doherty, Ann; Donovan, Jackie; Dwyer, Natalie S; Elgmati, Hala I; Featherstone, Rosanna F; Gavino, Jemyr; Gea-Sorli, Sabrina; Geddes, Duncan M; Gibson, James S R; Gill, Deborah R; Greening, Andrew P; Griesenbach, Uta; Hansell, David M; Harman, Katharine; Higgins, Tracy E; Hodges, Samantha L; Hyde, Stephen C; Hyndman, Laura; Innes, J Alastair; Jacob, Joseph; Jones, Nancy; Keogh, Brian F; Limberis, Maria P; Lloyd-Evans, Paul; Maclean, Alan W; Manvell, Michelle C; McCormick, Dominique; McGovern, Michael; McLachlan, Gerry; Meng, Cuixiang; Montero, M Angeles; Milligan, Hazel; Moyce, Laura J; Murray, Gordon D; Nicholson, Andrew G; Osadolor, Tina; Parra-Leiton, Javier; Porteous, David J; Pringle, Ian A; Punch, Emma K; Pytel, Kamila M; Quittner, Alexandra L; Rivellini, Gina; Saunders, Clare J; Scheule, Ronald K; Sheard, Sarah; Simmonds, Nicholas J; Smith, Keith; Smith, Stephen N; Soussi, Najwa; Soussi, Samia; Spearing, Emma J; Stevenson, Barbara J; Sumner-Jones, Stephanie G; Turkkila, Minna; Ureta, Rosa P; Waller, Michael D; Wasowicz, Marguerite Y; Wilson, James M; Wolstenholme-Hogg, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Lung delivery of plasmid DNA encoding the CFTR gene complexed with a cationic liposome is a potential treatment option for patients with cystic fibrosis. We aimed to assess the efficacy of non-viral CFTR gene therapy in patients with cystic fibrosis. Methods We did this randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, phase 2b trial in two cystic fibrosis centres with patients recruited from 18 sites in the UK. Patients (aged ≥12 years) with a forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) of 50–90% predicted and any combination of CFTR mutations, were randomly assigned, via a computer-based randomisation system, to receive 5 mL of either nebulised pGM169/GL67A gene–liposome complex or 0·9% saline (placebo) every 28 days (plus or minus 5 days) for 1 year. Randomisation was stratified by % predicted FEV1 (<70 vs ≥70%), age (<18 vs ≥18 years), inclusion in the mechanistic substudy, and dosing site (London or Edinburgh). Participants and investigators were masked to treatment allocation. The primary endpoint was the relative change in % predicted FEV1. The primary analysis was per protocol. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01621867. Findings Between June 12, 2012, and June 24, 2013, we randomly assigned 140 patients to receive placebo (n=62) or pGM169/GL67A (n=78), of whom 116 (83%) patients comprised the per-protocol population. We noted a significant, albeit modest, treatment effect in the pGM169/GL67A group versus placebo at 12 months' follow-up (3·7%, 95% CI 0·1–7·3; p=0·046). This outcome was associated with a stabilisation of lung function in the pGM169/GL67A group compared with a decline in the placebo group. We recorded no significant difference in treatment-attributable adverse events between groups. Interpretation Monthly application of the pGM169/GL67A gene therapy formulation was associated with a significant, albeit modest, benefit in FEV1 compared with placebo at 1 year, indicating a stabilisation of

  9. Repeated nebulisation of non-viral CFTR gene therapy in patients with cystic fibrosis: a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, phase 2b trial.

    PubMed

    Alton, Eric W F W; Armstrong, David K; Ashby, Deborah; Bayfield, Katie J; Bilton, Diana; Bloomfield, Emily V; Boyd, A Christopher; Brand, June; Buchan, Ruaridh; Calcedo, Roberto; Carvelli, Paula; Chan, Mario; Cheng, Seng H; Collie, D David S; Cunningham, Steve; Davidson, Heather E; Davies, Gwyneth; Davies, Jane C; Davies, Lee A; Dewar, Maria H; Doherty, Ann; Donovan, Jackie; Dwyer, Natalie S; Elgmati, Hala I; Featherstone, Rosanna F; Gavino, Jemyr; Gea-Sorli, Sabrina; Geddes, Duncan M; Gibson, James S R; Gill, Deborah R; Greening, Andrew P; Griesenbach, Uta; Hansell, David M; Harman, Katharine; Higgins, Tracy E; Hodges, Samantha L; Hyde, Stephen C; Hyndman, Laura; Innes, J Alastair; Jacob, Joseph; Jones, Nancy; Keogh, Brian F; Limberis, Maria P; Lloyd-Evans, Paul; Maclean, Alan W; Manvell, Michelle C; McCormick, Dominique; McGovern, Michael; McLachlan, Gerry; Meng, Cuixiang; Montero, M Angeles; Milligan, Hazel; Moyce, Laura J; Murray, Gordon D; Nicholson, Andrew G; Osadolor, Tina; Parra-Leiton, Javier; Porteous, David J; Pringle, Ian A; Punch, Emma K; Pytel, Kamila M; Quittner, Alexandra L; Rivellini, Gina; Saunders, Clare J; Scheule, Ronald K; Sheard, Sarah; Simmonds, Nicholas J; Smith, Keith; Smith, Stephen N; Soussi, Najwa; Soussi, Samia; Spearing, Emma J; Stevenson, Barbara J; Sumner-Jones, Stephanie G; Turkkila, Minna; Ureta, Rosa P; Waller, Michael D; Wasowicz, Marguerite Y; Wilson, James M; Wolstenholme-Hogg, Paul

    2015-09-01

    Lung delivery of plasmid DNA encoding the CFTR gene complexed with a cationic liposome is a potential treatment option for patients with cystic fibrosis. We aimed to assess the efficacy of non-viral CFTR gene therapy in patients with cystic fibrosis. We did this randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, phase 2b trial in two cystic fibrosis centres with patients recruited from 18 sites in the UK. Patients (aged ≥12 years) with a forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) of 50-90% predicted and any combination of CFTR mutations, were randomly assigned, via a computer-based randomisation system, to receive 5 mL of either nebulised pGM169/GL67A gene-liposome complex or 0.9% saline (placebo) every 28 days (plus or minus 5 days) for 1 year. Randomisation was stratified by % predicted FEV1 (<70 vs ≥70%), age (<18 vs ≥18 years), inclusion in the mechanistic substudy, and dosing site (London or Edinburgh). Participants and investigators were masked to treatment allocation. The primary endpoint was the relative change in % predicted FEV1. The primary analysis was per protocol. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01621867. Between June 12, 2012, and June 24, 2013, we randomly assigned 140 patients to receive placebo (n=62) or pGM169/GL67A (n=78), of whom 116 (83%) patients comprised the per-protocol population. We noted a significant, albeit modest, treatment effect in the pGM169/GL67A group versus placebo at 12 months' follow-up (3.7%, 95% CI 0.1-7.3; p=0.046). This outcome was associated with a stabilisation of lung function in the pGM169/GL67A group compared with a decline in the placebo group. We recorded no significant difference in treatment-attributable adverse events between groups. Monthly application of the pGM169/GL67A gene therapy formulation was associated with a significant, albeit modest, benefit in FEV1 compared with placebo at 1 year, indicating a stabilisation of lung function in the treatment group. Further improvements in

  10. Continued Follow-Up of Phambili Phase 2b Randomized HIV-1 Vaccine Trial Participants Supports Increased HIV-1 Acquisition among Vaccinated Men

    PubMed Central

    Moodie, Zoe; Metch, Barbara; Bekker, Linda-Gail; Churchyard, Gavin; Nchabeleng, Maphoshane; Mlisana, Koleka; Laher, Fatima; Roux, Surita; Mngadi, Kathryn; Innes, Craig; Mathebula, Matsontso; Allen, Mary; Bentley, Carter; Gilbert, Peter B.; Robertson, Michael; Kublin, James; Corey, Lawrence; Gray, Glenda E.

    2015-01-01

    Background The Phase 2b double-blinded, randomized Phambili/HVTN 503 trial evaluated safety and efficacy of the MRK Ad5 gag/pol/nef subtype B HIV-1 preventive vaccine vs placebo in sexually active HIV-1 seronegative participants in South Africa. Enrollment and vaccinations stopped and participants were unblinded but continued follow-up when the Step study evaluating the same vaccine in the Americas, Caribbean, and Australia was unblinded for non-efficacy. Final Phambili analyses found more HIV-1 infections amongst vaccine than placebo recipients, impelling the HVTN 503-S recall study. Methods HVTN 503-S sought to enroll all 695 HIV-1 uninfected Phambili participants, provide HIV testing, risk reduction counseling, physical examination, risk behavior assessment and treatment assignment recall. After adding HVTN 503-S data, HIV-1 infection hazard ratios (HR vaccine vs. placebo) were estimated by Cox models. Results Of the 695 eligible, 465 (67%) enrolled with 230 from the vaccine group and 235 from the placebo group. 38% of the 184 Phambili dropouts were enrolled. Enrollment did not differ by treatment group, gender, or baseline HSV-2. With the additional 1286 person years of 503-S follow-up, the estimated HR over Phambili and HVTN 503-S follow-up was 1.52 (95% CI 1.08–2.15, p = 0.02, 82 vaccine/54 placebo infections). The HR was significant for men (HR = 2.75, 95% CI 1.49, 5.06, p = 0.001) but not for women (HR = 1.12, 95% CI 0.73, 1.72, p = 0.62). Conclusion The additional follow-up from HVTN 503-S supported the Phambili finding of increased HIV-1 acquisition among vaccinated men and strengthened the evidence of lack of vaccine effect among women. Trial Registration clinicaltrials.gov NCT00413725 SA National Health Research Database DOH-27-0207-1539 PMID:26368824

  11. Phase 1/2 clinical trial of interferon alpha2b and weekly liposome-encapsulated all-trans retinoic acid in patients with advanced renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Boorjian, Stephen A; Milowsky, Matthew I; Kaplan, Jodi; Albert, Martin; Cobham, Marta Vallee; Coll, Deirdre M; Mongan, Nigel P; Shelton, Gary; Petrylak, Daniel; Gudas, Lorraine J; Nanus, David M

    2007-09-01

    To evaluate the feasibility, efficacy, and biologic effects of weekly liposome-encapsulated all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA-IV) plus interferon alpha2b (IFN) in patients with advanced renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Twenty-six patients with metastatic RCC were treated on a phase 1/2 trial with weekly ATRA-IV and IFN SQ daily 5 d/wk. Twelve patients received ATRA-IV at three dose levels (60, 75, and 90 mg/m2) according to phase 1 methodology, and 14 additional patients received 90 mg/m2. Response was assessed according to an intention-to-treat analysis. Serum retinoic acid (RA) concentrations were assayed and peripheral blood mononuclear cell mRNA expression of RA and IFN-inducible genes (RARalpha, RARbeta2, IRF1, CRABP2, and TRAIL) were examined. No dose limiting toxicities occurred at 60 mg/m2; grade 3 leukopenia affected 1/6 patients at 75 mg/m2, whereas 3 patients received 90 mg/m2 without a dose limiting toxicities. Fourteen additional patients received 90 mg/m2 ATRA-IV without grade 3/4 toxicity. Five of 26 (19%) patients achieved a major response, with a median duration of 14 months (range 9 to 23); 9 additional patients (41%) demonstrated stable disease or minor response lasting > or =4 months. No significant differences in serum (RA) after ATRA infusion were detected between weeks 1 and 8 of treatment. Peripheral blood mononuclear cell mRNA expression did not correlate with clinical response. The addition of weekly ATRA-IV to IFN therapy is feasible and well tolerated, resulting in sustainable increased serum (RA). This regimen demonstrates antitumor activity in metastatic RCC, and suggests ATRA-IV augments IFN therapy.

  12. Safety and efficacy of uric acid in patients with acute stroke (URICO-ICTUS): a randomised, double-blind phase 2b/3 trial.

    PubMed

    Chamorro, Angel; Amaro, Sergio; Castellanos, Mar; Segura, Tomás; Arenillas, Juan; Martí-Fábregas, Joan; Gállego, Jaime; Krupinski, Jurek; Gomis, Meritxell; Cánovas, David; Carné, Xavier; Deulofeu, Ramón; Román, Luis San; Oleaga, Laura; Torres, Ferran; Planas, Anna M

    2014-05-01

    Uric acid is an antioxidant with neuroprotective effects in experimental models of stroke. We assessed whether uric acid therapy would improve functional outcomes at 90 days in patients with acute ischaemic stroke. URICO-ICTUS was a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, phase 2b/3 trial that recruited patients with acute ischaemic stroke admitted to ten Spanish stroke centres. Patients were included if they were aged 18 years or older, had received alteplase within 4·5 h of symptom onset, and had an eligible National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score (>6 and ≤25) and premorbid (assessed by anamnesis) modified Rankin Scale (mRS) score (≤2). Patients were randomly allocated (1:1) to receive uric acid 1000 mg or placebo (both infused intravenously in 90 min during the infusion of alteplase), stratified by centre and baseline stroke severity. The primary outcome was the proportion of patients with excellent outcome (ie, an mRS score of 0-1, or 2 if premorbid score was 2) at 90 days, analysed in the target population (all randomly assigned patients who had been correctly diagnosed with ischaemic stroke and had begun study medication). The study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00860366. Between July 1, 2011, and April 30, 2013, we randomly assigned 421 patients, of whom 411 (98%) were included in the target population (211 received uric acid and 200 received placebo). 83 (39%) patients who received uric acid and 66 (33%) patients who received placebo had an excellent outcome (adjusted risk ratio 1·23 [95% CI 0·96-1·56]; p=0·099). No clinically relevant or statistically significant differences were reported between groups with respect to death (28 [13%] patients who received uric acid vs 31 [16%] who received placebo), symptomatic intracerebral haemorrhage (nine [4%] vs six [3%]), and gouty arthritis (one [<1%] vs four [2%]). 516 adverse events occurred in the uric acid group and 532 in the placebo group, of which 61 (12

  13. Calcium upregulation by percutaneous administration of gene therapy in patients with cardiac disease (CUPID 2): a randomised, multinational, double-blind, placebo-controlled, phase 2b trial.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, Barry; Butler, Javed; Felker, G Michael; Ponikowski, Piotr; Voors, Adriaan A; Desai, Akshay S; Barnard, Denise; Bouchard, Alain; Jaski, Brian; Lyon, Alexander R; Pogoda, Janice M; Rudy, Jeffrey J; Zsebo, Krisztina M

    2016-03-19

    Sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase (SERCA2a) activity is deficient in the failing heart. Correction of this abnormality by gene transfer might improve cardiac function. We aimed to investigate the clinical benefits and safety of gene therapy through infusion of adeno-associated virus 1 (AAV1)/SERCA2a in patients with heart failure and reduced ejection fraction. We did this randomised, multinational, double-blind, placebo-controlled, phase 2b trial at 67 clinical centres and hospitals in the USA, Europe, and Israel. High-risk ambulatory patients with New York Heart Association class II-IV symptoms of heart failure and a left ventricular ejection fraction of 0·35 or less due to an ischaemic or non-ischaemic cause were randomly assigned (1:1), via an interactive voice and web-response system, to receive a single intracoronary infusion of 1 × 10(13) DNase-resistant particles of AAV1/SERCA2a or placebo. Randomisation was stratified by country and by 6 min walk test distance. All patients, physicians, and outcome assessors were masked to treatment assignment. The primary efficacy endpoint was time to recurrent events, defined as hospital admission because of heart failure or ambulatory treatment for worsening heart failure. Primary efficacy endpoint analyses and safety analyses were done by modified intention to treat. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01643330. Between July 9, 2012, and Feb 5, 2014, we randomly assigned 250 patients to receive either AAV1/SERCA2a (n=123) or placebo (n=127); 243 (97%) patients comprised the modified intention-to-treat population. Patients were followed up for at least 12 months; median follow-up was 17·5 months (range 1·8-29·4 months). AAV1/SERCA2a did not improve time to recurrent events compared with placebo (104 vs 128 events; hazard ratio 0·93, 95% CI 0·53-1·65; p=0·81). No safety signals were noted. 20 (16%) patients died in the placebo group and 25 (21%) patients died in the AAV1

  14. Tafenoquine treatment of Plasmodium vivax malaria: suggestive evidence that CYP2D6 reduced metabolism is not associated with relapse in the Phase 2b DETECTIVE trial.

    PubMed

    St Jean, Pamela L; Xue, Zhengyu; Carter, Nick; Koh, Gavin C K W; Duparc, Stephan; Taylor, Maxine; Beaumont, Claire; Llanos-Cuentas, Alejandro; Rueangweerayut, Ronnatrai; Krudsood, Srivicha; Green, Justin A; Rubio, Justin P

    2016-02-18

    Tafenoquine (TQ) and primaquine (PQ) are 8-aminoquinolines (8-AQ) with anti-hypnozoite activity against vivax malaria. PQ is the only FDA-approved medicine for preventing relapsing Plasmodium vivax infection and TQ is currently in phase 3 clinical trials for the same indication. Recent studies have provided evidence that cytochrome P450 (CYP) metabolism via CYP2D6 plays a role in PQ efficacy against P. vivax and have suggested that this effect may extend to other 8-AQs, including TQ. Here, a retrospective pharmacogenetic (PGx) investigation was performed to assess the impact of CYP2D6 metabolism on TQ and PQ efficacy in the treatment of P. vivax in the DETECTIVE study (TAF112582), a recently completed, randomized, phase 2b dose-ranging clinical trial. The impact of CYP2D6 on TQ pharmacokinetics (PK) was also investigated in TAF112582 TQ-treated subjects and in vitro CYP metabolism of TQ was explored. A limitation of the current study is that TAF112582 was not designed to be well powered for PGx, thus our findings are based on TQ or PQ efficacy in CYP2D6 intermediate metabolizers (IM), as there were insufficient poor metabolizers (PM) to draw any conclusion on the impact of the PM phenotype on efficacy. The impact of genetically-predicted CYP2D6 reduced metabolism on relapse-free efficacy six months post-dosing of TQ or PQ, both administered in conjunction with chloroquine (CQ), was assessed using exact statistical methods in 198 P. vivax-infected study participants comparing IM to extensive metabolizers (EM). The influence of CYP2D6 metabolizer phenotypes on TQ PK was assessed comparing median TQ area under the curve (AUC). In vitro metabolism of TQ was investigated using recombinant, over-expressed human CYP enzymes and human hepatocytes. Metabolite identification experiments were performed using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Reduction of CYP2D6 activity was not associated with an increase in relapse-rate in TQ-treated subjects (p = 0.57). In contrast

  15. Efficacy and safety of tralokinumab in patients with severe uncontrolled asthma: a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, phase 2b trial.

    PubMed

    Brightling, Christopher E; Chanez, Pascal; Leigh, Richard; O'Byrne, Paul M; Korn, Stephanie; She, Dewei; May, Richard D; Streicher, Katie; Ranade, Koustubh; Piper, Edward

    2015-09-01

    Interleukin 13 is a central mediator of asthma. Tralokinumab is a human interleukin-13 neutralising monoclonal antibody. We aimed to assess the efficacy and safety of two dosing regimens of tralokinumab in patients with severe uncontrolled asthma. We did a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group, multicentre, phase 2b study at 98 sites in North America, South America, Europe, and Asia. Patients aged 18-75 years with severe asthma and two to six exacerbations in the previous year were randomly assigned (1:1), via an interactive voice-response or web-response system, to one of two dosing regimen groups (every 2 weeks, or every 2 weeks for 12 weeks then every 4 weeks) and further randomised (2:1), via computer-generated permuted-block randomisation (block size of six), to receive tralokinumab 300 mg or placebo for 1 year. All participants received high-dose fluticasone and salmeterol and continued other pre-study controller drugs. Treatment was administered by an unmasked study investigator not involved in the management of patients; all other study site personnel, patients, the study funder, and data analysts were masked to treatment allocation. The primary endpoint was the annual asthma exacerbation rate at week 52 in the intention-to-treat population. Key secondary endpoints included prebronchodilator forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1), Asthma Control Questionnaire-6 (ACQ-6), and Asthma Quality of Life Questionnaire-Standardised Version (AQLQ[S]). This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01402986. Between Oct 4, 2011, and Feb 22, 2014, we randomly assigned 452 patients to receive placebo (n=151) or tralokinumab every 2 weeks (n=150) or every 4 weeks (n=151), of whom 383 (85%) completed the treatment period up to week 52. The annual asthma exacerbation rate at week 52 was similar between patients receiving tralokinumab every 2 weeks (0.91 per patient per year [95% CI 0.76-1.08]) and every 4 weeks (0.97 [0.81-1.14]), and

  16. Effect of nitazoxanide in adults and adolescents with acute uncomplicated influenza: a double-blind, randomised, placebo-controlled, phase 2b/3 trial.

    PubMed

    Haffizulla, Jason; Hartman, Aaron; Hoppers, Melanie; Resnick, Harvey; Samudrala, Steve; Ginocchio, Christine; Bardin, Matthew; Rossignol, Jean-François

    2014-07-01

    Influenza is an important cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Treatment options are scarce, and new drugs with novel mechanisms of action are needed. We aimed to assess the efficacy and safety of nitazoxanide, a thiazolide anti-infective, for treatment of acute uncomplicated influenza. We did a double-blind, randomised, placebo-controlled, phase 2b/3 trial in 74 primary care clinics in the USA between Dec 27, 2010, and April 30, 2011. We enrolled participants aged 12-65 years with fever, at least one respiratory symptom, and one constitutional symptom of influenza within 48 h of symptom onset. We randomly assigned participants to receive either nitazoxanide 600 mg, nitazoxanide 300 mg, or placebo twice daily for 5 days, (ratio 1:1:1) and followed them up for 28 days. Randomisation lists were computer generated and done in blocks of three. Sponsor, investigators, study monitors, patients, and laboratory personnel were all masked to treatment allocation in the study. The primary endpoint was the time from first dose to alleviation of symptoms. The primary analysis was by intention-to-treat for participants with influenza infection confirmed by RT-PCR or culture at baseline. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01227421. Of 650 participants screened, 624 (96%) were enrolled. Of these, 212 were randomly assigned to receive placebo twice a day, 201 to receive nitazoxanide 300 mg twice a day, and 211 to receive nitazoxanide 600 mg a day. The median duration of symptoms for participants receiving placebo was 116·7 h (95% CI 108·1-122·1) compared with 95·5 h (84·0-108·0; p=0·0084) for those receiving 600 mg nitazoxanide and 109·1 h (96·1-129·5, p=0·52) for those receiving 300 mg nitazoxanide. Adverse events were similar between the three groups, the most common being headache reported by 24 (11%) of 212 patients enrolled in placebo group, 12 (6%) of 201 patients in the low-dose group, and 17 (8%) of 211 patients in the high

  17. Treatment of plaque psoriasis with an ointment formulation of the Janus kinase inhibitor, tofacitinib: a Phase 2b randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Papp, Kim A; Bissonnette, Robert; Gooderham, Melinda; Feldman, Steven R; Iversen, Lars; Soung, Jennifer; Draelos, Zoe; Mamolo, Carla; Purohit, Vivek; Wang, Cunshan; Ports, William C

    2016-10-03

    Most psoriasis patients have mild to moderate disease, commonly treated topically. Current topical agents have limited efficacy and undesirable side effects associated with long-term use. Tofacitinib is a small molecule Janus kinase inhibitor investigated for the topical treatment of psoriasis. This was a 12-week, randomized, double-blind, parallel-group, vehicle-controlled Phase 2b study of tofacitinib ointment (2 % and 1 %) applied once (QD) or twice (BID) daily in adults with mild to moderate plaque psoriasis. Primary endpoint: proportion of patients with Calculated Physician's Global Assessment (PGA-C) clear or almost clear and ≥2 grade improvement from baseline at Weeks 8 and 12. Secondary endpoints: proportion of patients with PGA-C clear or almost clear; proportion achieving Psoriasis Area and Severity Index 75 (PASI75) response; percent change from baseline in PASI and body surface area; change from baseline in Itch Severity Item (ISI). Adverse events (AEs) were monitored and clinical laboratory parameters measured. Overall, 435 patients were randomized and 430 patients received treatment. The proportion of patients with PGA-C clear or almost clear and ≥2 grade improvement from baseline at Week 8 was 18.6 % for 2 % tofacitinib QD (80 % confidence interval [CI] for difference from vehicle: 3.8, 18.2 %) and 22.5 % for 2 % tofacitinib BID (80 % CI: 3.1, 18.5 %); this was significantly higher vs vehicle for both dosage regimens. No significant difference vs vehicle was seen at Week 12. Significantly more patients achieved PGA-C clear or almost clear with 2 % tofacitinib QD and BID and 1 % tofacitinib QD (not BID) at Week 8, and with 2 % tofacitinib BID at Week 12. Pruritus was significantly reduced vs vehicle with 2 % and 1 % tofacitinib BID (starting Day 2), and 2 % tofacitinib QD (starting Day 3). Overall, 44.2 % of patients experienced AEs, 8.1 % experienced application site AEs, and 2.3 % experienced serious AEs. The highest incidence

  18. ECOG Phase II trial of graded-dose peginterferon α-2b in patients with metastatic melanoma over-expressing basic fibroblast growth factor (E2602)

    PubMed Central

    Go, Ronald S.; Lee, Sandra J.; Shin, Donghoon; Callister, Steven M.; Jobe, Dean A.; Conry, Robert M.; Tarhini, Ahmad A.; Kirkwood, John M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose We investigated use of graded-dose peginterferon α-2b (Peg-IFN) in patients with stage IV melanoma overexpressing basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF-2). The primary objective was suppression of plasma FGF-2 to within normal range (≤7.5 pg/mL). Experimental Design Plasma FGF-2 was measured at baseline (Step 1), and patients with concentrations ≥15 pg/mL were eligible for study treatment (Step 2). Peg-IFN was given weekly at starting dose of 0.5 μg/kg/wk with increment every 3 weeks based on serial FGF-2 concentrations. Results Two hundred seven patients entered Step 1; 45 (22%) overexpressed FGF-2 (median=22 pg/dL). Twenty-nine eligible patients entered Step 2 and received treatment. Patients’ median age was 64 years (range, 29–84 years). Most had >2 prior therapies. FGF-2 decreased in 28 (97%) patients, with suppression to normal range in 10 (35%). Median time to FGF-2 suppression was 30 days. The best clinical responses were partial response (7%) and stable disease (17%). Median progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were 2.0 and 9.7 months, respectively. Patients who achieved FGF-2 suppression were more likely than those who did not to have a response or stable disease (P = 0.03). Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) concentrations decreased in 27 patients (93%) during treatment and paralleled those of FGF-2 over time. We found no compensatory rise in VEGF among those with FGF-2 suppression. Conclusions Graded-dose Peg-IFN suppresses FGF-2 in patients with metastatic melanoma who overexpress FGF-2. Over a third of patients had complete suppression of plasma FGF-2, which correlated with clinical response to this therapy. PMID:24122792

  19. Simeprevir with pegylated interferon alfa 2a or 2b plus ribavirin in treatment-naive patients with chronic hepatitis C virus genotype 1 infection (QUEST-2): a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled phase 3 trial.

    PubMed

    Manns, Michael; Marcellin, Patrick; Poordad, Fred; de Araujo, Evaldo Stanislau Affonso; Buti, Maria; Horsmans, Yves; Janczewska, Ewa; Villamil, Federico; Scott, Jane; Peeters, Monika; Lenz, Oliver; Ouwerkerk-Mahadevan, Sivi; De La Rosa, Guy; Kalmeijer, Ronald; Sinha, Rekha; Beumont-Mauviel, Maria

    2014-08-02

    Pegylated interferon (peginterferon) alfa 2a or 2b plus ribavirin regimens were the standard of care in patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, but the sustained virological response can be suboptimum in patients with HCV genotype 1 infection. The efficacy, safety, and tolerability of the combination of simeprevir, a one-pill, once-daily, oral HCV NS3/4A protease inhibitor versus placebo, plus peginterferon alfa 2a or 2b plus ribavirin was assessed in treatment-naive patients with HCV genotype 1 infection. In the QUEST-2, phase 3 study, done at 76 sites in 14 countries (Europe, and North and South Americas), patients with confirmed chronic HCV genotype 1 infection and no history of HCV treatment were randomly assigned with a computer-generated allocation sequence in a ratio of 2:1 and stratified by HCV genotype 1 subtype and host IL28B genotype to receive simeprevir (150 mg once daily, orally), peginterferon alfa 2a (180 μg once weekly, subcutaneous injection) or 2b (according to bodyweight; 50 μg, 80 μg, 100 μg, 120 μg, or 150 μg once weekly, subcutaneous injection), plus ribavirin (1000-1200 mg/day or 800-1400 mg/day, orally; simeprevir group) or placebo (once daily, orally), peginterferon alfa 2a or 2b, plus ribavirin (placebo group) for 12 weeks, followed by just peginterferon alfa 2a or 2b plus ribavirin. Total treatment duration was 24 weeks or 48 weeks (simeprevir group) based on criteria for response-guided therapy (ie, HCV RNA <25 IU/mL undetectable or detectable at week 4 and undetectable week 12) or 48 weeks (placebo). Patients, study personnel, and the sponsor were masked to treatment assignment. The primary efficacy endpoint was sustained virological response at 12 weeks after the planned end of treatment (SVR12). Analyses were by intention to treat. The trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01290679. Results from the primary (SVR12, week 60) analysis are presented. 209 (81%) of 257 patients in the simeprevir group and

  20. Dacetuzumab plus rituximab, ifosfamide, carboplatin and etoposide as salvage therapy for patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma relapsing after rituximab, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine and prednisolone: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled phase 2b trial.

    PubMed

    Fayad, Luis; Ansell, Stephen M; Advani, Ranjana; Coiffier, Bertrand; Stuart, Robert; Bartlett, Nancy L; Forero-Torres, Andres; Kuliczkowski, Kazimierz; Belada, David; Ng, Edmund; Drachman, Jonathan G

    2015-01-01

    Single-agent dacetuzumab has demonstrated antitumor activity in relapsed/refractory diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). Preclinical data demonstrated improved dacetuzumab antitumor activity in combination with rituximab, ± chemotherapy. We designed a phase 2b, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial to compare rituximab, ifosfamide, carboplatin and etoposide (R-ICE) + dacetuzumab with R-ICE + placebo in patients with DLBCL who relapsed after rituximab, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine and prednisolone (R-CHOP) (ClinicalTrials.gov #NCT00529503). The primary endpoint was complete response (CR); additional endpoints included failure-free survival and overall survival (OS). Overall, 151 patients were randomized (75 dacetuzumab, 76 placebo). No notable differences between arms in demographics or subsequent treatment parameters were observed. Cytopenias, cough and infection were more frequent with dacetuzumab. Futility analysis failed to demonstrate higher CR rates with dacetuzumab (36% dacetuzumab, 42% placebo); consequently, enrollment was stopped. Unplanned post hoc analysis showed that patients who underwent subsequent autologous stem cell transplant experienced improvement in OS (hazard ratio = 0.195, p = 0.004), which may be explained by potential immunomodulatory effects of dacetuzumab on antigen-presenting cells.

  1. The 23 K superconducting phase YPd 2B 2C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Y. Y.; Rusakova, I.; Meng, R. L.; Cao, Y.; Gautier-Picard, P.; Chu, C. W.

    1994-09-01

    We have carried out a systematic structural, electric, and magnetic study on YPdBC samples with different compositions with emphasis on the as-cast and annealed YPd 5B 3C 0.3 which was first reported to superconduct at ∼ 23 K by Cava et al. We found that the tetragonal body-centered YPd 2B 2C with lattice parameters a=3.71 Å and c=10.81 Å is the phase responsible for the 23 K superconductivity and that YPd 2B 2C is metastable, which is consistent with the suggestion made by Cava et al. [1]: it is not stable at high temperatures nor stabilizable by Ni doping, although its isostructural compound, YNi 2B 2C, exists. Two new phases with Y:Pd ratios of 1:7 and 2:3, respectively, have also bee detected.

  2. Magnetospheric Multiscale Mission (MMS) Phase 2B Navigation Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scaperoth, Paige Thomas; Long, Anne; Carpenter, Russell

    2009-01-01

    The Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) formation flying mission, which consists of four spacecraft flying in a tetrahedral formation, has challenging navigation requirements associated with determining and maintaining the relative separations required to meet the science requirements. The baseline navigation concept for MMS is for each spacecraft to independently estimate its position, velocity and clock states using GPS pseudorange data provided by the Goddard Space Flight Center-developed Navigator receiver and maneuver acceleration measurements provided by the spacecraft's attitude control subsystem. State estimation is performed onboard in real-time using the Goddard Enhanced Onboard Navigation System flight software, which is embedded in the Navigator receiver. The current concept of operations for formation maintenance consists of a sequence of two maintenance maneuvers that is performed every 2 weeks. Phase 2b of the MMS mission, in which the spacecraft are in 1.2 x 25 Earth radii orbits with nominal separations at apogee ranging from 30 km to 400 km, has the most challenging navigation requirements because, during this phase, GPS signal acquisition is restricted to less than one day of the 2.8-day orbit. This paper summarizes the results from high-fidelity simulations to determine if the MMS navigation requirements can be met between and immediately following the maintenance maneuver sequence in Phase 2b.

  3. Once daily dolutegravir (S/GSK1349572) in combination therapy in antiretroviral-naive adults with HIV: planned interim 48 week results from SPRING-1, a dose-ranging, randomised, phase 2b trial.

    PubMed

    van Lunzen, Jan; Maggiolo, Franco; Arribas, José R; Rakhmanova, Aza; Yeni, Patrick; Young, Benjamin; Rockstroh, Jürgen K; Almond, Steve; Song, Ivy; Brothers, Cindy; Min, Sherene

    2012-02-01

    Dolutegravir (S/GSK1349572) is a new HIV-1 integrase inhibitor that has antiviral activity with once daily, unboosted dosing. SPRING-1 is an ongoing study designed to select a dose for phase 3 assessment. We present data from preplanned primary and interim analyses. In a phase 2b, multicentre, dose-ranging study, treatment-naive adults were randomly assigned (1:1:1:1) to receive 10 mg, 25 mg, or 50 mg dolutegravir or 600 mg efavirenz. Dose but not drug allocation was masked. Randomisation was by a central integrated voice-response system according to a computer-generated code. Study drugs were given with either tenofovir plus emtricitabine or abacavir plus lamivudine. Our study was done at 34 sites in France, Germany, Italy, Russia, Spain, and the USA beginning on July 9, 2009. Eligible participants were seropositive for HIV-1, aged 18 years or older, and had plasma HIV RNA viral loads of at least 1000 copies per mL and CD4 counts of at least 200 cells per μL. Our primary endpoint was the proportion of participants with viral load of less than 50 copies per mL at week 16 and we present data to week 48. Analyses were done on the basis of allocation group and included all participants who received at least one dose of study drug. This study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00951015. 205 patients were randomly allocated and received at least one dose of study drug: 53, 51, and 51 to receive 10 mg, 25 mg, and 50 mg dolutegravir, respectively, and 50 to receive efavirenz. Week 16 response rates to viral loads of at most 50 copies per mL were 93% (144 of 155 participants) for all doses of dolutegravir (with little difference between dose groups) and 60% (30 of 50) for efavirenz; week 48 response rates were 87% (139 of 155) for all doses of dolutegravir and 82% (41 of 50) for efavirenz. Response rates between nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor subgroups were similar. We identified three virological failures in the dolutegravir groups and one in

  4. Tolerability of intensified intravenous interferon alfa-2b versus the ECOG 1684 schedule as adjuvant therapy for stage III melanoma: a randomized phase III Italian Melanoma Inter-group trial (IMI – Mel.A.) [ISRCTN75125874

    PubMed Central

    Chiarion-Sileni, Vanna; Del Bianco, Paola; Romanini, Antonella; Guida, Michele; Paccagnella, Adriano; Dalla Palma, Maurizio; Naglieri, Emanuele; Ridolfi, Ruggero; Silvestri, Barbara; Michiara, Maria; De Salvo, Gian Luca

    2006-01-01

    Background High-dose interferon alfa-2b (IFNalfa-2b), according to the ECOG 1684 schedule, is the only approved adjuvant treatment for stage III melanoma patients by the FDA and EMEA. However, the risk/benefit profile has been questioned limiting its world-wide use. In the late nineties, the Italian Melanoma Inter-group started a spontaneous randomized clinical trial (RCT) to verify if a more intense, but shorter than the ECOG 1684 regimen, could improve survival without increasing the toxicity profile. The safety analysis in the first 169 patients who completed the treatment is here described. Methods Stage III melanoma patients were randomized to receive IFNalfa-2b 20 MU/m2/d intravenously (IV) 5 days/week × 4 weeks, repeated for three times on weeks 9 to 12, 17 to 20, 25 to 28 (Dose-Dense/Dose-Intense, DD/DI, arm), or IFNalfa-2b 20 MU/m2/d IV 5 days/week × 4 weeks followed by 10 MU/m2 subcutaneously (SC) three times per week × 48 weeks (High Dose Interferon, HDI, arm). Toxicity was recorded and graded, according to the WHO criteria, as the worst grade that occurred during each cycle. Results The most common toxicities in both arms were flu-like and gastrointestinal symptoms, leukopenia, liver and neuro-psichiatric morbidities; with regard to severe toxicity, only leukopenia was statistically more frequent in DD/DI arm than in HDI arm (24% vs 9%) (p = 0.0074), yet, this did not cause an increase in the infection risk. Discontinuation of treatment, due to toxicity, was observed in 13 and 17% of the patients in the DD/DI and HDI arm, respectively. The median actual dose intensity delivered in the DD/DI arm (36.4 MU/m2/week) was statistically higher than that delivered in the HDI arm (30.7 MU/m2/week) (p = 0.003). Conclusion Four cycles of intravenous high-dose IFNalfa-2b can be safely delivered with an increase in the median dose intensity. Efficacy results from this trial are eagerly awaited. PMID:16504154

  5. Efficacy and immunogenicity of a Vi-tetanus toxoid conjugate vaccine in the prevention of typhoid fever using a controlled human infection model of Salmonella Typhi: a randomised controlled, phase 2b trial.

    PubMed

    Jin, Celina; Gibani, Malick M; Moore, Maria; Juel, Helene B; Jones, Elizabeth; Meiring, James; Harris, Victoria; Gardner, Jonathan; Nebykova, Anna; Kerridge, Simon A; Hill, Jennifer; Thomaides-Brears, Helena; Blohmke, Christoph J; Yu, Ly-Mee; Angus, Brian; Pollard, Andrew J

    2017-09-28

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi (S Typhi) is responsible for an estimated 20 million infections and 200 000 deaths each year in resource poor regions of the world. Capsular Vi-polysaccharide-protein conjugate vaccines (Vi-conjugate vaccines) are immunogenic and can be used from infancy but there are no efficacy data for the leading candidate vaccine being considered for widespread use. To address this knowledge gap, we assessed the efficacy of a Vi-tetanus toxoid conjugate vaccine using an established human infection model of S Typhi. In this single-centre, randomised controlled, phase 2b study, using an established outpatient-based human typhoid infection model, we recruited healthy adult volunteers aged between 18 and 60 years, with no previous history of typhoid vaccination, infection, or prolonged residency in a typhoid-endemic region. Participants were randomly assigned (1:1:1) to receive a single dose of Vi-conjugate (Vi-TT), Vi-polysaccharide (Vi-PS), or control meningococcal vaccine with a computer-generated randomisation schedule (block size 6). Investigators and participants were masked to treatment allocation, and an unmasked team of nurses administered the vaccines. Following oral ingestion of S Typhi, participants were assessed with daily blood culture over a 2-week period and diagnosed with typhoid infection when meeting pre-defined criteria. The primary endpoint was the proportion of participants diagnosed with typhoid infection (ie, attack rate), defined as persistent fever of 38°C or higher for 12 h or longer or S Typhi bacteraemia, following oral challenge administered 1 month after Vi-vaccination (Vi-TT or Vi-PS) compared with control vaccination. Analysis was per protocol. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT02324751, and is ongoing. Between Aug 18, 2015, and Nov 4, 2016, 112 participants were enrolled and randomly assigned; 34 to the control group, 37 to the Vi-PS group, and 41 to the Vi-TT group. 103 participants

  6. Afatinib versus gefitinib as first-line treatment of patients with EGFR mutation-positive non-small-cell lung cancer (LUX-Lung 7): a phase 2B, open-label, randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Park, Keunchil; Tan, Eng-Huat; O'Byrne, Ken; Zhang, Li; Boyer, Michael; Mok, Tony; Hirsh, Vera; Yang, James Chih-Hsin; Lee, Ki Hyeong; Lu, Shun; Shi, Yuankai; Kim, Sang-We; Laskin, Janessa; Kim, Dong-Wan; Arvis, Catherine Dubos; Kölbeck, Karl; Laurie, Scott A; Tsai, Chun-Ming; Shahidi, Mehdi; Kim, Miyoung; Massey, Dan; Zazulina, Victoria; Paz-Ares, Luis

    2016-05-01

    The irreversible ErbB family blocker afatinib and the reversible EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor gefitinib are approved for first-line treatment of EGFR mutation-positive non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We aimed to compare the efficacy and safety of afatinib and gefitinib in this setting. This multicentre, international, open-label, exploratory, randomised controlled phase 2B trial (LUX-Lung 7) was done at 64 centres in 13 countries. Treatment-naive patients with stage IIIB or IV NSCLC and a common EGFR mutation (exon 19 deletion or Leu858Arg) were randomly assigned (1:1) to receive afatinib (40 mg per day) or gefitinib (250 mg per day) until disease progression, or beyond if deemed beneficial by the investigator. Randomisation, stratified by EGFR mutation type and status of brain metastases, was done centrally using a validated number generating system implemented via an interactive voice or web-based response system with a block size of four. Clinicians and patients were not masked to treatment allocation; independent review of tumour response was done in a blinded manner. Coprimary endpoints were progression-free survival by independent central review, time-to-treatment failure, and overall survival. Efficacy analyses were done in the intention-to-treat population and safety analyses were done in patients who received at least one dose of study drug. This ongoing study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01466660. Between Dec 13, 2011, and Aug 8, 2013, 319 patients were randomly assigned (160 to afatinib and 159 to gefitinib). Median follow-up was 27·3 months (IQR 15·3-33·9). Progression-free survival (median 11·0 months [95% CI 10·6-12·9] with afatinib vs 10·9 months [9·1-11·5] with gefitinib; hazard ratio [HR] 0·73 [95% CI 0·57-0·95], p=0·017) and time-to-treatment failure (median 13·7 months [95% CI 11·9-15·0] with afatinib vs 11·5 months [10·1-13·1] with gefitinib; HR 0·73 [95% CI 0·58-0·92], p=0·0073) were

  7. Long-acting intramuscular cabotegravir and rilpivirine in adults with HIV-1 infection (LATTE-2): 96-week results of a randomised, open-label, phase 2b, non-inferiority trial.

    PubMed

    Margolis, David A; Gonzalez-Garcia, Juan; Stellbrink, Hans-Jürgen; Eron, Joseph J; Yazdanpanah, Yazdan; Podzamczer, Daniel; Lutz, Thomas; Angel, Jonathan B; Richmond, Gary J; Clotet, Bonaventura; Gutierrez, Felix; Sloan, Louis; Clair, Marty St; Murray, Miranda; Ford, Susan L; Mrus, Joseph; Patel, Parul; Crauwels, Herta; Griffith, Sandy K; Sutton, Kenneth C; Dorey, David; Smith, Kimberly Y; Williams, Peter E; Spreen, William R

    2017-09-23

    Cabotegravir and rilpivirine are antiretroviral drugs in development as long-acting injectable formulations. The LATTE-2 study evaluated long-acting cabotegravir plus rilpivirine for maintenance of HIV-1 viral suppression through 96 weeks. In this randomised, phase 2b, open-label study, treatment-naive adults infected with HIV-1 initially received oral cabotegravir 30 mg plus abacavir-lamivudine 600-300 mg once daily. The objective of this study was to select an intramuscular dosing regimen based on a comparison of the antiviral activity, tolerability, and safety of the two intramuscular dosing regimens relative to oral cabotegravir plus abacavir-lamivudine. After a 20-week induction period on oral cabotegravir plus abacavir-lamivudine, patients with viral suppression (plasma HIV-1 RNA <50 copies per mL) were randomly assigned (2:2:1) to intramuscular long-acting cabotegravir plus rilpivirine at 4-week intervals (long-acting cabotegravir 400 mg plus rilpivirine 600 mg; two 2 mL injections) or 8-week intervals (long-acting cabotegravir 600 mg plus rilpivirine 900 mg; two 3 mL injections) or continued oral cabotegravir plus abacavir-lamivudine. Randomisation was computer-generated with stratification by HIV-1 RNA (<50 copies per mL, yes or no) during the first 12 weeks of the induction period. The primary endpoints were the proportion of patients with viral suppression at week 32 (as defined by the US Food and Drug Administration snapshot algorithm), protocol-defined virological failures, and safety events through 96 weeks. All randomly assigned patients who received at least one dose of study drug during the maintenance period were included in the primary efficacy and safety analyses. The primary analysis used a Bayesian approach to evaluate the hypothesis that the proportion with viral suppression for each long-acting regimen is not worse than the oral regimen proportion by more than 10% (denoted comparable) according to a prespecified decision rule (ie, posterior

  8. Overall safety profile of boceprevir plus peginterferon alfa-2b and ribavirin in patients with chronic hepatitis C genotype 1: a combined analysis of 3 phase 2/3 clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Manns, Michael P; McCone, Jonathan; Davis, Mitchell N; Rossaro, Lorenzo; Schiff, Eugene; Shiffman, Mitchel L; Bacon, Bruce; Bourliere, Marc; Sulkowski, Mark S; Bruno, Savino; Balart, Luis; Bronowicki, Jean-Pierre; Kwo, Paul; Poordad, Fred; Felizarta, Franco; Reddy, K Rajender; Helmond, Frans A; Sings, Heather L; Pedicone, Lisa D; Burroughs, Margaret; Brass, Clifford A; Albrecht, Janice K; Vierling, John M

    2014-05-01

    Triple therapy with peginterferon/ribavirin (PR) plus an NS3 protease inhibitor has emerged as the standard-of-care for patients with chronic hepatitis C genotype-1. We provide a detailed safety analysis comparing PR to boceprevir plus PR (BOC/PR) across three phase 2/3 studies. SPRINT-1 was an open-label phase 2 study in 595 treatment-naive patients. In the two phase 3 studies, 1500 patients (1097 treatment-naive, SPRINT-2; 403 treatment-failure, RESPOND-2) were randomized to receive PR alone, or one of two regimens where BOC was added to PR after a 4-wk PR lead-in. In this analysis, the respective BOC/PR and PR arms were combined for all three trials. The benefit of shortened duration of treatment using response-guided therapy (RGT) was also explored in the SPRINT-2 trial. Only two adverse events, anaemia and dysgeusia, occurred 20% more often with the BOC-containing regimens compared with PR. Nausea, diarrhoea and neutropenia were the only other common events with an incidence of at least 5% greater when BOC was added to the PR backbone. The proportions of patients reporting serious adverse events (AE), life-threatening AEs, and study drug discontinuation because of an AE were similar in the PR and BOC/PR arms. In treatment-naive patients, RGT generally did not result in a lower frequency of common AEs; however, RGT led to decreased exposure to all 3 study drugs and to a decrease in the mean duration of several clinically relevant AEs such as anaemia, neutropenia, fatigue and depression, as well as earlier normalization of haemoglobin and neutrophil counts. The safety profile of BOC combination therapy largely reflects the known profile of peginterferon and ribavirin, with incremental haematolgical effects and dysgeusia. Shorter treatment duration with RGT significantly reduced the duration of AEs. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Final results of the EORTC 18871/DKG 80-1 randomised phase III trial. rIFN-alpha2b versus rIFN-gamma versus ISCADOR M versus observation after surgery in melanoma patients with either high-risk primary (thickness >3 mm) or regional lymph node metastasis.

    PubMed

    Kleeberg, U R; Suciu, S; Bröcker, E B; Ruiter, D J; Chartier, C; Liénard, D; Marsden, J; Schadendorf, D; Eggermont, A M M

    2004-02-01

    Between 1988 and 1996, the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer Melanoma Group (EORTC-MG) performed a prospective, randomised phase III adjuvant trial to evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of low dose recombinant interferon-alpha 2 b (rIFN-alpha2b) (1 MU) or recombinant interferon gamma (rIFN-gamma), (0.2 mg) both given subcutaneously (s.c.), every other day (qod), for 12 months in comparison with an untreated control group. The German Cancer Society (DKG) added a fourth arm with Iscador M, a popular mistletoe extract. High-risk stage II patients (thickness >3 mm) and stage III patients (positive lymph nodes) without distant metastasis were randomised and followed until their first progression or death. An intention-to-treat analysis was performed. From 1988 to 1996, a total of 830 patients were randomised: 423 in the three-arm EORTC 18871 trial and 407 patients in the four-arm DKG 80-1 trial. The median follow-up was 8.2 years and a total of 537 relapses and 475 deaths were reported. At 8 years, the disease-free interval (DFI) rate was 32.4% and the overall survival (OS) rate was 40.0%. In terms of the DFI, the hazard ratio estimates (95% Confidence Intervals (CI)) were: 1.04 (0.84, 1.30) for the comparison of rIFN-alpha2b versus control, 0.96 (0.77, 1.20) for rIFN-gamma versus control, and 1.32 (0.93, 1.87) for Iscador M versus control. In terms of OS, the corresponding estimates (95% CI) for the 3 treatment comparisons were: for IFN-alpha2b 0.96 (0.76, 1.21), for rIFN-gamma 0.87 (0.69, 1.10) and for Iscador M 1.21 (0.84, 1.75), respectively. The results show no clinical benefit for adjuvant treatment with low dose rIFN-alpha2b or rIFN-gamma or with Iscador M in high-risk melanoma patients.

  10. Interferon alfa-2b in mixed cryoglobulinaemia: a controlled crossover trial.

    PubMed Central

    Ferri, C; Marzo, E; Longombardo, G; La Civita, L; Lombardini, F; Giuggioli, D; Vanacore, R; Liberati, A M; Mazzoni, A; Greco, F

    1993-01-01

    To confirm the positive results of a preliminary trial, 26 patients with mixed cryoglobulinaemia were enrolled in a controlled, randomised, crossover trial with interferon alfa-2b. A significant improvement was seen in the purpura score and alanine aminotransferase activities during six months' treatment, and was associated with a significant decrease in cryocrit and a returning to normal of the lymphocyte CD4/CD8 ratio (in eight of nine patients). No significant variations were seen during the six month period without interferon. Only six patients withdrew from treatment, three because of side effects and three because of poor compliance. PMID:8314485

  11. Intensified chemotherapy with ACVBP plus rituximab versus standard CHOP plus rituximab for the treatment of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (LNH03-2B): an open-label randomised phase 3 trial.

    PubMed

    Récher, Christian; Coiffier, Bertrand; Haioun, Corinne; Molina, Thierry Jo; Fermé, Christophe; Casasnovas, Olivier; Thiéblemont, Catherine; Bosly, André; Laurent, Guy; Morschhauser, Franck; Ghesquières, Hervé; Jardin, Fabrice; Bologna, Serge; Fruchart, Christophe; Corront, Bernadette; Gabarre, Jean; Bonnet, Christophe; Janvier, Maud; Canioni, Danielle; Jais, Jean-Philippe; Salles, Gilles; Tilly, Hervé

    2011-11-26

    The outcome of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma has been substantially improved by the addition of the anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody rituximab to chemotherapy regimens. We aimed to assess, in patients aged 18-59 years, the potential survival benefit provided by a dose-intensive immunochemotherapy regimen plus rituximab compared with standard treatment plus rituximab. We did an open-label randomised trial comparing dose-intensive rituximab, doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide, vindesine, bleomycin, and prednisone (R-ACVBP) with subsequent consolidation versus standard rituximab, doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide, vincristine, and prednisone (R-CHOP). Random assignment was done with a computer-assisted randomisation-allocation sequence with a block size of four. Patients were aged 18-59 years with untreated diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and an age-adjusted international prognostic index equal to 1. Our primary endpoint was event-free survival. Our analyses of efficacy and safety were of the intention-to-treat population. This study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00140595. One patient withdrew consent before treatment and 54 did not complete treatment. After a median follow-up of 44 months, our 3-year estimate of event-free survival was 81% (95% CI 75-86) in the R-ACVBP group and 67% (59-73) in the R-CHOP group (hazard ratio [HR] 0·56, 95% CI 0·38-0·83; p=0·0035). 3-year estimates of progression-free survival (87% [95% CI, 81-91] vs 73% [66-79]; HR 0·48 [0·30-0·76]; p=0·0015) and overall survival (92% [87-95] vs 84% [77-89]; HR 0·44 [0·28-0·81]; p=0·0071) were also increased in the R-ACVBP group. 82 (42%) of 196 patients in the R-ACVBP group experienced a serious adverse event compared with 28 (15%) of 183 in the R-CHOP group. Grade 3-4 haematological toxic effects were more common in the R-ACVBP group, with a higher proportion of patients experiencing a febrile neutropenic episode (38% [75 of 196] vs 9% [16 of 183]). Compared with standard R

  12. The Preparation and Characterization of INTEC Phase 2b Composition Variation Study Glasses

    SciTech Connect

    B. A. Staples; B. A. Scholes; L. L. Torres; C. A. Musick; B. R. Boyle; D. K. Peeler; J. D. Vienna

    2000-02-01

    The second phase of the composition variation study (CVS) for the development of glass compositions to immobilize Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) high level wastes (HLW) is complete. This phase of the CVS addressed waste composition of high activity waste fractions (HAW) from the initial separations flowsheet. Updated estimates if INTEC calcined HLW compositions and of high activity waste fractions proposed to be separated from dissolved calcine were used as the waste component for this CVS phase. These wastes are of particular interest because high aluminum, calcium, zirconium, fluorine, potassium, and low iron and sodium content places them outside the vitrification experience in the Department of Energy complex. Because of the presence of calcium and fluorine, two major zirconia calcine components not addressed in Phase I, a series of scooping tests, designated Phase 2a, were performed. The results of these tests provided information on the effects of calcium and fluoride solubility and their impacts on product properties and composition boundary information for Phase 2b. Details and results of Phase 2a are reported separately. Through application of statistical techniques and the results of Phase 2a, a test matrix was defined for Phase 2b of the CVS. From this matrix, formulations were systematically selected for preparation and characterization with respect to visual and optical homogeneity, viscosity as a function of melt temperature, liquidus temperature (TL), and leaching properties based on response to the product consistency test. The results of preparing and characterizing the Phase 2b glasses are presented in this document. Based on the results, several formulations investigated have suitable properties for further development. A full analysis of the composition-product characteristic relationship of glasses being developed for immobilizing INTEC wastes will be performed at the completion of composition-property relationship

  13. Phase III Randomized Study of 4 Weeks of High-Dose Interferon-α-2b in Stage T2bNO, T3a-bNO, T4a-bNO, and T1-4N1a-2a (microscopic) Melanoma: A Trial of the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group-American College of Radiology Imaging Network Cancer Research Group (E1697).

    PubMed

    Agarwala, Sanjiv S; Lee, Sandra J; Yip, Waiki; Rao, Uma N; Tarhini, Ahmad A; Cohen, Gary I; Reintgen, Douglas S; Evans, Terry L; Brell, Joanna M; Albertini, Mark R; Atkins, Michael B; Dakhil, Shaker R; Conry, Robert M; Sosman, Jeffrey A; Flaherty, Lawrence E; Sondak, Vernon K; Carson, William E; Smylie, Michael G; Pappo, Alberto S; Kefford, Richard F; Kirkwood, John M

    2017-03-10

    Purpose To test the efficacy of 4 weeks of intravenous (IV) induction with high-dose interferon (IFN) as part of the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group regimen compared with observation (OBS) in patients with surgically resected intermediate-risk melanoma. Patients and Methods In this intergroup international trial, eligible patients had surgically resected cutaneous melanoma in the following categories: (1) T2bN0, (2) T3a-bN0, (3) T4a-bN0, and (4) T1-4N1a-2a (microscopic). Patients were randomly assigned to receive IFN α-2b at 20 MU/m(2)/d IV for 5 days (Monday to Friday) every week for 4 weeks (IFN) or OBS. Stratification factors were pathologic lymph node status, lymph node staging procedure, Breslow depth, ulceration of the primary lesion, and disease stage. The primary end point was relapse-free survival. Secondary end points included overall survival, toxicity, and quality of life. Results A total of 1,150 patients were randomly assigned. At a median follow-up of 7 years, the 5-year relapse-free survival rate was 0.70 (95% CI, 0.66 to 0.74) for OBS and 0.70, (95% CI, 0.66 to 0.74) for IFN ( P = .964). The 5-year overall survival rate was 0.83 (95% CI, 0.79 to 0.86) for OBS and 0.83 (95% CI, 0.80 to 0.86) for IFN ( P = .558). Treatment-related grade 3 and higher toxicity was 4.6% versus 57.9% for OBS and IFN, respectively ( P < .001). Quality of life was worse for the treated group. Conclusion Four weeks of IV induction as part of the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group high-dose IFN regimen is not better than OBS alone for patients with intermediate-risk melanoma as defined in this trial.

  14. Topical TrkA Kinase Inhibitor CT327 is an Effective, Novel Therapy for the Treatment of Pruritus due to Psoriasis: Results from Experimental Studies, and Efficacy and Safety of CT327 in a Phase 2b Clinical Trial in Patients with Psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Roblin, David; Yosipovitch, Gil; Boyce, Brent; Robinson, John; Sandy, James; Mainero, Valentina; Wickramasinghe, Ro; Anand, Uma; Anand, Praveen

    2015-05-01

    Pruritus is an important symptom in psoriasis with no targeted treatment. Tropomyosin-receptor kinase A (TrkA) is associated with pruritus and psoriatic plaque formation. We report the efficacy of a TrkA inhibitor, CT327, on pruritus in psoriasis. A randomised, double-blind, vehicle-controlled Phase 2b clinical trial was conducted in 160 subjects. No effect was found on psoriasis severity using Investigator's Global Assessment (primary endpoint). However, clinically and statistically significant reductions in pruritus were observed in the 108 patient subset reporting at least moderate pruritus at baseline (37.1 mm visual analogue scale improvement (95% CI [-37.5, -6.2], p = 0.0067) for lowest dose; secondary endpoint). Significant modified Psoriasis Area and Severity Index reductions were found in this subset (p < 0.05). Experiments exploring capsaicin-mediated calcium influx, important in pruritus signalling, were performed in sensory neurons. CT327 inhibited capsaicin responses, indicating action at the nerve growth factor-TrkA-TRPV1 pathway. TrkA is a key target in pruritus, and CT327 has potential to become an effective and safe first-in-class treatment.

  15. Southwest Oncology Group S0008: A Phase III Trial of High-Dose Interferon Alfa-2b Versus Cisplatin, Vinblastine, and Dacarbazine, Plus Interleukin-2 and Interferon in Patients With High-Risk Melanoma—An Intergroup Study of Cancer and Leukemia Group B, Children's Oncology Group, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group, and Southwest Oncology Group

    PubMed Central

    Flaherty, Lawrence E.; Othus, Megan; Atkins, Michael B.; Tuthill, Ralph J.; Thompson, John A.; Vetto, John T.; Haluska, Frank G.; Pappo, Alberto S.; Sosman, Jeffrey A.; Redman, Bruce G.; Moon, James; Ribas, Antoni; Kirkwood, John M.; Sondak, Vernon K.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose High-dose interferon (IFN) for 1 year (HDI) is the US Food and Drug Administration–approved adjuvant therapy for patients with high-risk melanoma. Efforts to modify IFN dose and schedule have not improved efficacy. We sought to determine whether a shorter course of biochemotherapy would be more effective. Patients and Methods S0008 (S0008: Chemotherapy Plus Biological Therapy in Treating Patients With Melanoma) was an Intergroup phase III trial that enrolled high-risk patients (stage IIIA-N2a through IIIC-N3), randomly assigning them to receive either HDI or biochemotherapy consisting of dacarbazine, cisplatin, vinblastine, interleukin-2, IFN alfa-2b (IFN-α-2b) and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor given every 21 days for three cycles. Coprimary end points were relapse-free survival (RFS) and overall survival (OS). Results In all, 432 patients were enrolled. Grade 3 and 4 adverse events occurred in 57% and 7% of HDI patients and 36% and 40% of biochemotherapy patients, respectively. At a median follow-up of 7.2 years, biochemotherapy improved RFS (hazard ratio [HR], 0.75; 95% CI, 0.58 to 0.97; P = .015), with a median RFS of 4.0 years (95% CI, 1.9 years to not reached [NR]) versus 1.9 years for HDI (95% CI, 1.2 to 2.8 years) and a 5-year RFS of 48% versus 39%. Median OS was not different (HR, 0.98; 95% CI, 0.74 to 1.31; P = .55), with a median OS of 9.9 years (95% CI, 4.62 years to NR) for biochemotherapy versus 6.7 years (95% CI, 4.5 years to NR) for HDI and a 5-year OS of 56% for both arms. Conclusion Biochemotherapy is a shorter, alternative adjuvant treatment for patients with high-risk melanoma that provides statistically significant improvement in RFS but no difference in OS and more toxicity compared with HDI. PMID:25332243

  16. Randomized phase II clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Jung, Sin-Ho; Sargent, Daniel J

    2014-01-01

    Traditionally, Phase II trials have been conducted as single-arm trials to compare the response probabilities between an experimental therapy and a historical control. Historical control data, however, often have a small sample size, are collected from a different patient population, or use a different response assessment method, so that a direct comparison between a historical control and an experimental therapy may be severely biased. Randomized Phase II trials entering patients prospectively to both experimental and control arms have been proposed to avoid any bias in such cases. The small sample sizes for typical Phase II clinical trials imply that the use of exact statistical methods for their design and analysis is appropriate. In this article, we propose two-stage randomized Phase II trials based on Fisher's exact test, which does not require specification of the response probability of the control arm for testing. Through numerical studies, we observe that the proposed method controls the type I error accurately and maintains a high power. If we specify the response probabilities of the two arms under the alternative hypothesis, we can identify good randomized Phase II trial designs by adopting the Simon's minimax and optimal design concepts that were developed for single-arm Phase II trials.

  17. Synergistic effect of sodium ions and fluoride ions on synthesis of pure-phase TiO2(B) nanorings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Wenwen; Zou, Yu; Zhou, Han; Wang, Lili; Meng, Xiangfu

    2017-06-01

    TiO2(B) has received growing interest as negative electrode materials for Li-ion batteries in recent years. However, its metastability is an intrinsic obstacle for obtaining highly pure-phase TiO2(B). In this study, we reported the synthesis of pure-phase TiO2(B) nanorings with high crystallinity via one-pot hydrothermal method in the presence of sodium fluoride (NaF) solution. The as-prepared TiO2(B) nanorings were systematically characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscope (SEM), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The TiO2(B) nanorings had an outer diameter of about 400 nm and inner diameter of about 150 nm. Sodium fluoride was used as phase and morphology control agent. The growth mechanism revealed that sodium ions (Na+) and fluoride ions (F-) had a synergistic effect on the synthesis of pure-phase TiO2(B) nanorings. The morphologies and crystalline phases were easily tailored by tuning the concentration of NaF. The effect of hydrothermal condition on growth of TiO2(B) nanorings was investigated in detail. The as-prepared TiO2(B) nanorings displayed high performance as negative electrode materials in Li-ion batteries.

  18. Efficiency and safety of the combination of moxifloxacin, pretomanid (PA-824), and pyrazinamide during the first 8 weeks of antituberculosis treatment: a phase 2b, open-label, partly randomised trial in patients with drug-susceptible or drug-resistant pulmonary tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Dawson, Rodney; Diacon, Andreas H; Everitt, Daniel; van Niekerk, Christo; Donald, Peter R; Burger, Divan A; Schall, Robert; Spigelman, Melvin; Conradie, Almari; Eisenach, Kathleen; Venter, Amour; Ive, Prudence; Page-Shipp, Liesl; Variava, Ebrahim; Reither, Klaus; Ntinginya, Nyanda E; Pym, Alexander; von Groote-Bidlingmaier, Florian; Mendel, Carl M

    2015-05-02

    New antituberculosis regimens are urgently needed to shorten tuberculosis treatment. Following on from favourable assessment in a 2 week study, we investigated a novel regimen for efficacy and safety in drug-susceptible and multidrug-resistant (MDR) tuberculosis during the first 8 weeks of treatment. We did this phase 2b study of bactericidal activity--defined as the decrease in colony forming units (CFUs) of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in the sputum of patients with microscopy smear-positive pulmonary tuberculosis-at eight sites in South Africa and Tanzania. We enrolled treatment-naive patients with drug-susceptible, pulmonary tuberculosis, who were randomly assigned by computer-generated sequences to receive either 8 weeks of moxifloxacin, 100 mg pretomanid (formerly known as PA-824), and pyrazinamide (MPa100Z regimen); moxifloxacin, 200 mg pretomanid, and pyrazinamide (MPa200Z regimen); or the current standard care for drug-susceptible pulmonary tuberculosis, isoniazid, rifampicin, PZA, and ethambutol (HRZE regimen). A group of patients with MDR tuberculosis received MPa200Z (DRMPa200Z group). The primary outcome was bactericidal activity measured by the mean daily rate of reduction in M tuberculosis CFUs per mL overnight sputum collected once a week, with joint Bayesian non-linear mixed-effects regression modelling. We also assessed safety and tolerability by monitoring adverse events. This study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01498419. Between March 24, 2012, and July 26, 2013 we enrolled 207 patients and randomly assigned them to treatment groups; we assigned 60 patients to the MPa100Z regimen, 62 to the MPa200Z regimen, and 59 to the HRZE regimen. We non-randomly assigned 26 patients with drug-resistant tuberculosis to the DRMPa200Z regimen. In patients with drug-susceptible tuberculosis, the bactericidal activity of MPa200Z (n=54) on days 0-56 (0·155, 95% Bayesian credibility interval 0·133-0·178) was significantly greater than for HRZE

  19. ORBITAL PHASE VARIATIONS OF THE ECCENTRIC GIANT PLANET HAT-P-2b

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, Nikole K.; Showman, Adam P.; Knutson, Heather A.; Desert, Jean-Michel; Kao, Melodie; Cowan, Nicolas B.; Laughlin, Gregory; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Burrows, Adam; Bakos, Gaspar A.; Hartman, Joel D.; Deming, Drake; Crepp, Justin R.; Mighell, Kenneth J.; Agol, Eric; Charbonneau, David; Fischer, Debra A.; Hinkley, Sasha; Johnson, John Asher; Howard, Andrew W.; and others

    2013-04-01

    We present the first secondary eclipse and phase curve observations for the highly eccentric hot Jupiter HAT-P-2b in the 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, and 8.0 {mu}m bands of the Spitzer Space Telescope. The 3.6 and 4.5 {mu}m data sets span an entire orbital period of HAT-P-2b (P = 5.6334729 d), making them the longest continuous phase curve observations obtained to date and the first full-orbit observations of a planet with an eccentricity exceeding 0.2. We present an improved non-parametric method for removing the intrapixel sensitivity variations in Spitzer data at 3.6 and 4.5 {mu}m that robustly maps position-dependent flux variations. We find that the peak in planetary flux occurs at 4.39 {+-} 0.28, 5.84 {+-} 0.39, and 4.68 {+-} 0.37 hr after periapse passage with corresponding maxima in the planet/star flux ratio of 0.1138% {+-} 0.0089%, 0.1162% {+-} 0.0080%, and 0.1888% {+-} 0.0072% in the 3.6, 4.5, and 8.0 {mu}m bands, respectively. Our measured secondary eclipse depths of 0.0996% {+-} 0.0072%, 0.1031% {+-} 0.0061%, 0.071%{sub -0.013%}{sup +0.029,} and 0.1392% {+-} 0.0095% in the 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, and 8.0 {mu}m bands, respectively, indicate that the planet cools significantly from its peak temperature before we measure the dayside flux during secondary eclipse. We compare our measured secondary eclipse depths to the predictions from a one-dimensional radiative transfer model, which suggests the possible presence of a transient day side inversion in HAT-P-2b's atmosphere near periapse. We also derive improved estimates for the system parameters, including its mass, radius, and orbital ephemeris. Our simultaneous fit to the transit, secondary eclipse, and radial velocity data allows us to determine the eccentricity (e = 0.50910 {+-} 0.00048) and argument of periapse ({omega} = 188. Degree-Sign 09 {+-} 0. Degree-Sign 39) of HAT-P-2b's orbit with a greater precision than has been achieved for any other eccentric extrasolar planet. We also find evidence for a long-term linear

  20. Orbital Phase Variations of the Eccentric Giant Planet HAT-P-2b

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Nikole K.; Knutson, Heather A.; Showman, Adam P.; Cowan, Nicolas B.; Laughlin, Gregory; Burrows, Adam; Deming, Drake; Crepp, Justin R.; Mighell, Kenneth J.; Agol, Eric; Bakos, Gáspár Á.; Charbonneau, David; Désert, Jean-Michel; Fischer, Debra A.; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Hartman, Joel D.; Hinkley, Sasha; Howard, Andrew W.; Johnson, John Asher; Kao, Melodie; Langton, Jonathan; Marcy, Geoffrey W.

    2013-04-01

    We present the first secondary eclipse and phase curve observations for the highly eccentric hot Jupiter HAT-P-2b in the 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, and 8.0 μm bands of the Spitzer Space Telescope. The 3.6 and 4.5 μm data sets span an entire orbital period of HAT-P-2b (P = 5.6334729 d), making them the longest continuous phase curve observations obtained to date and the first full-orbit observations of a planet with an eccentricity exceeding 0.2. We present an improved non-parametric method for removing the intrapixel sensitivity variations in Spitzer data at 3.6 and 4.5 μm that robustly maps position-dependent flux variations. We find that the peak in planetary flux occurs at 4.39 ± 0.28, 5.84 ± 0.39, and 4.68 ± 0.37 hr after periapse passage with corresponding maxima in the planet/star flux ratio of 0.1138% ± 0.0089%, 0.1162% ± 0.0080%, and 0.1888% ± 0.0072% in the 3.6, 4.5, and 8.0 μm bands, respectively. Our measured secondary eclipse depths of 0.0996% ± 0.0072%, 0.1031% ± 0.0061%, 0.071%^{+0.029%}_{-0.013%}, and 0.1392% ± 0.0095% in the 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, and 8.0 μm bands, respectively, indicate that the planet cools significantly from its peak temperature before we measure the dayside flux during secondary eclipse. We compare our measured secondary eclipse depths to the predictions from a one-dimensional radiative transfer model, which suggests the possible presence of a transient day side inversion in HAT-P-2b's atmosphere near periapse. We also derive improved estimates for the system parameters, including its mass, radius, and orbital ephemeris. Our simultaneous fit to the transit, secondary eclipse, and radial velocity data allows us to determine the eccentricity (e = 0.50910 ± 0.00048) and argument of periapse (ω = 188.°09 ± 0.°39) of HAT-P-2b's orbit with a greater precision than has been achieved for any other eccentric extrasolar planet. We also find evidence for a long-term linear trend in the radial velocity data. This trend suggests the presence

  1. Safety, efficacy, and immunogenicity of VGX-3100, a therapeutic synthetic DNA vaccine targeting human papillomavirus 16 and 18 E6 and E7 proteins for cervical intraepithelial neoplasia 2/3: a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled phase 2b trial

    PubMed Central

    Trimble, Cornelia L; Morrow, Matthew P; Kraynyak, Kimberly A; Shen, Xuefei; Dallas, Michael; Yan, Jian; Edwards, Lance; Parker, R Lamar; Denny, Lynette; Giffear, Mary; Brown, Ami Shah; Marcozzi-Pierce, Kathleen; Shah, Divya; Slager, Anna M; Sylvester, Albert J; Khan, Amir; Broderick, Kate E; Juba, Robert J; Herring, Timothy A; Boyer, Jean; Lee, Jessica; Sardesai, Niranjan Y; Weiner, David B; Bagarazzi, Mark L

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Despite preventive vaccines for oncogenic human papillomaviruses (HPVs), cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) is common, and current treatments are ablative and can lead to long-term reproductive morbidity. We assessed whether VGX-3100, synthetic plasmids targeting HPV-16 and HPV-18 E6 and E7 proteins, delivered by electroporation, would cause histopathological regression in women with CIN2/3. Methods Efficacy, safety, and immunogenicity of VGX-3100 were assessed in CIN2/3 associated with HPV-16 and HPV-18, in a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled phase 2b study. Patients from 36 academic and private gynaecology practices in seven countries were randomised (3:1) to receive 6 mg VGX-3100 or placebo (1 mL), given intramuscularly at 0, 4, and 12 weeks. Randomisation was stratified by age (<25 vs ≥25 years) and CIN2 versus CIN3 by computer-generated allocation sequence (block size 4). Funder and site personnel, participants, and pathologists were masked to treatment. The primary efficacy endpoint was regression to CIN1 or normal pathology 36 weeks after the first dose. Per-protocol and modified intention-to-treat analyses were based on patients receiving three doses without protocol violations, and on patients receiving at least one dose, respectively. The safety population included all patients who received at least one dose. The trial is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov (number NCT01304524) and EudraCT (number 2012-001334-33). Findings Between Oct 19, 2011, and July 30, 2013, 167 patients received either VGX-3100 (n=125) or placebo (n=42). In the per-protocol analysis 53 (49.5%) of 107 VGX-3100 recipients and 11 (30.6%) of 36 placebo recipients had histopathological regression (percentage point difference 19.0 [95% CI 1.4–36.6]; p=0.034). In the modified intention-to-treat analysis 55 (48.2%) of 114 VGX-3100 recipients and 12 (30.0%) of 40 placebo recipients had histopathological regression (percentage point difference 18.2 [95% CI

  2. Complex Structures in the Reentrant Phase Diagram of HoNi_2B_2C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Childers, J.; Zhang, J.; Olinger, A., Jr.; Metlushko, V.; Delong, L.; Canfield, P.

    1996-03-01

    HoNi_2B_2C exhibits a resistive onset to superconductivity near 9.0 K, followed by transitions to incommensurate magnetic order (IMO) at 6.0 K and 5.5 K, and commensurate antiferromagnetic order (AFM) at TN = 5.2 K. Vibrating reed (VR) and resistance data reveal two previously unobserved lines of magnetic anomalies in both the upper superconducting (SC) and lower reentrant SC regions for H || a*b*. The wide region between the upper onset of SC and the first magnetic anomaly reflects weak vortex pinning, possibly due to a subtle buildup of IMO from well above 8K. The interplay between SC and magnetic order is evident in abrupt displacements of transition lines to IMO near their crossing with the reentrant normal transition line for 5.2phase transitions. * Funded by NSF Grant #EHR-9108764 ** Funded by DoE DER/OBS Contract #W-7405-Eng-82

  3. [Phase I cancer trials methodology].

    PubMed

    Le Tourneau, Christophe; Faivre, Sandrine; Raymond, Eric; Diéras, Véronique

    2007-11-01

    The main objective of phase I cancer trials is to determine precisely the recommended dose of an anticancer agent as a single agent or in a context of combinations of anticancer agents (including cytotoxic agents, immunotherapy, radiotherapy...), that is administered for the first time in man, to further proceed clinical development with phase II and III trials. The recommended dose must have the greatest efficiency with acceptable toxicity. For the anticancer agents, the ratio risk/benefit is high, since toxicities associated with many cancer therapeutic agents are substantial and because the efficacy is often limited. Thus, phase I cancer trials present unique challenges in comparison to other therapeutic areas. Indeed, it is essential to minimize the numbers of patients treated at subefficient dose levels, and in the same time not to expose the patients to unacceptable toxicity. Historically, the first method that has been used is the Fibonacci escalation. The major problems raised with this method have been the lengths of the trials and the risk to treat substantial numbers of patients at nontherapeutix doses. Thus, novel methods have been then developed modifying the numbers of patients included at each dose level and the rapidity of dose escalation. These methods include pharmacologically guided dose escalation, escalation with overdose control and the continual reassessment method which are both statistically based dose escalation methods, and the accelerated titration designs. Concerning the targeted anticancer therapies, the therapeutic effect on the target, due to their higher specificity, can be obtained using doses that have few toxicity. Using the toxicity to determine the recommended dose for phase II trials, as it is the case for "classical > anticancer agents, does not seem to be sufficient. Alternatives to determine the optimal biological dose include measurement of target inhibition, pharmacokinetic analysis and functional imaging.

  4. Sarcopenia: designing phase IIB trials.

    PubMed

    Chumlea, Wm C; Cesari, M; Evans, W J; Ferrucci, L; Fielding, R A; Pahor, M; Studenski, S; Vellas, B

    2011-06-01

    Sarcopenia is the age-related involuntary loss of skeletal muscle mass and functionality that can lead to the development of disability, frailty and increased health care costs. The development of interventions aimed at preventing and/or treating sarcopenia is complex, requiring the adoption of assumptions and standards that are not well established scientifically or clinically. A number of investigators and clinicians (both from academia and industry) met in Rome (Italy) in 2009 to develop a consensus definition of sarcopenia. Subsequently, in Albuquerque (New Mexico, USA) in 2010, the same group met again to consider the complex issues necessary for designing Phase II clinical trials for sarcopenia. Current clinical trial data indicate that fat-free mass (FFM) parameters are responsive to physical activity/nutritional treatment modalities over short time periods, but pharmacological trials of sarcopenia have yet to show significant efficacy. In order to conduct a clinical trial within a reasonable time frame, groups that model or display accelerated aging and loss of FFM are necessary. Few studies have used acceptable designs for testing treatment effects, sample sizes or primary outcomes that could provide interpretable findings or effects across studies. Dual energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) is the measure of choice for assessing FFM, but sufficient time is needed for changes to be detected accurately and reliably. A tool set that would allow clinical, basic and epidemiological research on sarcopenia to advance rapidly toward diagnosis and treatment phases should be those reflecting function and strength.

  5. SARCOPENIA: DESIGNING PHASE IIB TRIALS

    PubMed Central

    CHUMLEA, WM.C.; CESARI, M.; EVANS, W.J.; FERRUCCI, L.; FIELDING, R.A.; PAHOR, M.; STUDENSKI, S.; VELLAS, B.

    2012-01-01

    Sarcopenia is the age-related involuntary loss of skeletal muscle mass and functionality that can lead to the development of disability, frailty and increased health care costs. The development of interventions aimed at preventing and/or treating sarcopenia is complex, requiring the adoption of assumptions and standards that are not well established scientifically or clinically. A number of investigators and clinicians (both from academia and industry) met in Rome (Italy) in 2009 to develop a consensus definition of sarcopenia. Subsequently, in Albuquerque (New Mexico, USA) in 2010, the same group met again to consider the complex issues necessary for designing Phase II clinical trials for sarcopenia. Current clinical trial data indicate that fat-free mass (FFM) parameters are responsive to physical activity/nutritional treatment modalities over short time periods, but pharmacological trials of sarcopenia have yet to show significant efficacy. In order to conduct a clinical trial within a reasonable time frame, groups that model or display accelerated aging and loss of FFM are necessary. Few studies have used acceptable designs for testing treatment effects, sample sizes or primary outcomes that could provide interpretable findings or effects across studies. Dual energy x ray absorptiometry (DXA) is the measure of choice for assessing FFM, but sufficient time is needed for changes to be detected accurately and reliably. A tool set that would allow clinical, basic and epidemiological research on sarcopenia to advance rapidly toward diagnosis and treatment phases should be those reflecting function and strength. PMID:21623466

  6. Final Results of the Sunbelt Melanoma Trial: A Multi-Institutional Prospective Randomized Phase III Study Evaluating the Role of Adjuvant High-Dose Interferon Alfa-2b and Completion Lymph Node Dissection for Patients Staged by Sentinel Lymph Node Biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Egger, Michael E.; Edwards, Michael J.; Ross, Merrick I.; Reintgen, Douglas S.; Noyes, R. Dirk; Martin, Robert C.G.; Goydos, James S.; Beitsch, Peter D.; Urist, Marshall M.; Ariyan, Stephan; Sussman, Jeffrey J.; Davidson, B. Scott; Gershenwald, Jeffrey E.; Hagendoorn, Lee J.; Stromberg, Arnold J.; Scoggins, Charles R.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The Sunbelt Melanoma Trial is a prospective randomized trial evaluating the role of high-dose interferon alfa-2b therapy (HDI) or completion lymph node dissection (CLND) for patients with melanoma staged by sentinel lymph node (SLN) biopsy. Patients and Methods Patients were eligible if they were age 18 to 70 years with primary cutaneous melanoma ≥ 1.0 mm Breslow thickness and underwent SLN biopsy. In Protocol A, patients with a single tumor-positive lymph node after SLN biopsy underwent CLND and were randomly assigned to observation versus HDI. In Protocol B, patients with tumor-negative SLN by standard histopathology and immunohistochemistry underwent molecular staging by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Patients positive by RT-PCR were randomly assigned to observation versus CLND versus CLND+HDI. Primary end points were disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS). Results In the Protocol A intention-to-treat analysis, there were no significant differences in DFS (hazard ratio, 0.82; P = .45) or OS (hazard ratio, 1.10; P = .68) for patients randomly assigned to HDI versus observation. In the Protocol B intention-to-treat analysis, there were no significant differences in overall DFS (P = .069) or OS (P = .77) across the three randomized treatment arms. Similarly, efficacy analysis (excluding patients who did not receive the assigned treatment) did not demonstrate significant differences in DFS or OS in Protocol A or Protocol B. Median follow-up time was 71 months. Conclusion No survival benefit for adjuvant HDI in patients with a single positive SLN was found. Among patients with tumor-negative SLN by conventional pathology but with melanoma detected in the SLN by RT-PCR, there was no OS benefit for CLND or CLND+HDI. PMID:26858331

  7. Final Results of the Sunbelt Melanoma Trial: A Multi-Institutional Prospective Randomized Phase III Study Evaluating the Role of Adjuvant High-Dose Interferon Alfa-2b and Completion Lymph Node Dissection for Patients Staged by Sentinel Lymph Node Biopsy.

    PubMed

    McMasters, Kelly M; Egger, Michael E; Edwards, Michael J; Ross, Merrick I; Reintgen, Douglas S; Noyes, R Dirk; Martin, Robert C G; Goydos, James S; Beitsch, Peter D; Urist, Marshall M; Ariyan, Stephan; Sussman, Jeffrey J; Davidson, B Scott; Gershenwald, Jeffrey E; Hagendoorn, Lee J; Stromberg, Arnold J; Scoggins, Charles R

    2016-04-01

    The Sunbelt Melanoma Trial is a prospective randomized trial evaluating the role of high-dose interferon alfa-2b therapy (HDI) or completion lymph node dissection (CLND) for patients with melanoma staged by sentinel lymph node (SLN) biopsy. Patients were eligible if they were age 18 to 70 years with primary cutaneous melanoma ≥ 1.0 mm Breslow thickness and underwent SLN biopsy. In Protocol A, patients with a single tumor-positive lymph node after SLN biopsy underwent CLND and were randomly assigned to observation versus HDI. In Protocol B, patients with tumor-negative SLN by standard histopathology and immunohistochemistry underwent molecular staging by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Patients positive by RT-PCR were randomly assigned to observation versus CLND versus CLND+HDI. Primary end points were disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS). In the Protocol A intention-to-treat analysis, there were no significant differences in DFS (hazard ratio, 0.82; P = .45) or OS (hazard ratio, 1.10; P = .68) for patients randomly assigned to HDI versus observation. In the Protocol B intention-to-treat analysis, there were no significant differences in overall DFS (P = .069) or OS (P = .77) across the three randomized treatment arms. Similarly, efficacy analysis (excluding patients who did not receive the assigned treatment) did not demonstrate significant differences in DFS or OS in Protocol A or Protocol B. Median follow-up time was 71 months. No survival benefit for adjuvant HDI in patients with a single positive SLN was found. Among patients with tumor-negative SLN by conventional pathology but with melanoma detected in the SLN by RT-PCR, there was no OS benefit for CLND or CLND+HDI. © 2016 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  8. Young patients with non-germinal center B-cell-like diffuse large B-cell lymphoma benefit from intensified chemotherapy with ACVBP plus rituximab compared with CHOP plus rituximab: analysis of data from the Groupe d'Etudes des Lymphomes de l'Adulte/lymphoma study association phase III trial LNH 03-2B.

    PubMed

    Molina, Thierry Jo; Canioni, Danielle; Copie-Bergman, Christiane; Recher, Christian; Brière, Josette; Haioun, Corinne; Berger, Françoise; Fermé, Christophe; Copin, Marie-Christine; Casasnovas, Olivier; Thieblemont, Catherine; Petrella, Tony; Leroy, Karen; Salles, Gilles; Fabiani, Bettina; Morschauser, Franck; Mounier, Nicolas; Coiffier, Bertrand; Jardin, Fabrice; Gaulard, Philippe; Jais, Jean-Philippe; Tilly, Hervé

    2014-12-10

    To determine whether any tumor biomarkers could account for the survival advantage observed in the LNH 03-2B trial among patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) and low-intermediate risk according to the International Prognostic Index when treated with dose-intensive rituximab, doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide, vindesine, bleomycin, and prednisone (R-ACVBP) compared with standard rituximab, doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide, vincristine, and prednisone (R-CHOP). Using immunohistochemistry, expression of CD10, BCL6, MUM1, MYC, and BCL2 and coexpression of MYC/BCL2 were examined. The interaction effects between each biomarker and treatment arm on survival were studied in a restricted model and a full model incorporating clinical parameters. Among the 379 patients analyzed in the trial, 229 tumors were evaluable for germinal center B-cell-like (GCB)/non-GCB subclassification according to the Hans algorithm. Among all the biomarkers, only the interaction between the Hans algorithm and the treatment arm was significant for progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) in univariable (PFS, P = .04; OS, P = .01) and multivariable (PFS, P = .03; OS, P = .01) analyses. Non-GCB tumors predicted worse PFS (hazard ratio [HR], 3.21; 95% CI, 1.29 to 8.00; P = .01) and OS (HR, 6.09; 95% CI, 1.37 to 27.03; P = .02) among patients treated with R-CHOP compared with patients who received R-ACVBP, whereas there were no significant survival differences between these regimens among patients with GCB tumors. The survival benefit related to R-ACVBP over R-CHOP is at least partly linked to improved survival among patients with non-GCB DLBCL. Therefore, the Hans algorithm could be considered a theragnostic biomarker for selecting young patients with DLBCL who can benefit from an intensified R-ACVBP immunochemotherapy regimen. © 2014 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  9. A randomized trial of a low-dose Rasagiline and Pramipexole combination (P2B001) in early Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Olanow, C Warren; Kieburtz, Karl; Leinonen, Mika; Elmer, Lawrence; Giladi, Nir; Hauser, Robert A; Klepiskaya, Olga S; Kreitzman, David L; Lew, Mark F; Russell, David S; Kadosh, Shaul; Litman, Pninit; Friedman, Hadas; Linvah, Nurit; The P B Study Group, For

    2017-05-01

    Rasagiline and pramipexole act to improve striatal dopaminergic transmission in PD via distinct and potentially synergistic mechanisms. We performed a placebo-controlled study to determine whether 2 doses of a novel slow-release, low-dose combination of rasagiline and pramipexole (P2B001) are effective and have a good safety profile in patients with early untreated PD. Previously untreated patients with early PD were randomized (1:1:1) to once-daily treatment with P2B001 (0.3 mg pramipexole/0.75 mg rasagiline), P2B001 (0.6 mg pramipexole/0.75 mg rasagiline) or placebo in a 12-week multicenter double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. The primary endpoint was the change from baseline to final visit in Total-UPDRS score versus placebo. Secondary measures included responder analyses of patients achieving ≥4 UPDRS point reduction, and changes in Parkinson Disease Quality of Life Scale-39 and UPDRS activities of daily living and motor scores. A total of 149 participants were randomized and 136 (91.3%) completed the study. Adjusted mean change from baseline to final visit versus placebo in Total-UPDRS score was -4.67 ± 1.28 points for the P2B001 0.6/0.75 mg group (P = .0004) and -3.84 ± 1.25 points for the 0.3/0.75 mg group (P = .003). Significant benefits were also observed for both doses in the responder analysis (P = .0002 and P = .0001), Parkinson Disease Quality of Life Scale-39 scores (P = .05 and P = .01), and the UPDRS motor (P = .02 and P = .006) and activities of daily living (P = .005 and P = .0004) subscores. Adverse events of P2B001 were comparable to placebo apart from transient nausea and somnolence, which were more common with P2B001 treatment. P2B001 offers a promising treatment option for patients with early PD with good clinical efficacy and a low risk of adverse events. © 2017 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society. © 2017 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder

  10. Irreversible Electroporation for the Ablation of Renal Cell Carcinoma: A Prospective, Human, In Vivo Study Protocol (IDEAL Phase 2b)

    PubMed Central

    van Lienden, Krijn P; Wagstaff, Peter GK; Scheltema, Matthijs JV; de Bruin, Daniel M; Zondervan, Patricia J; van Delden, Otto M; van Leeuwen, Ton G; de la Rosette, Jean JMCH; Laguna, M Pilar

    2017-01-01

    Background Irreversible electroporation (IRE) is an emerging technique delivering electrical pulses to ablate tissue, with the theoretical advantage to overcome the main shortcomings of conventional thermal ablation. Recent short-term research showed that IRE for the ablation of renal masses is a safe and feasible treatment option. In an ablate and resect design, histopathological analysis 4 weeks after radical nephrectomy demonstrated that IRE-targeted renal tumors were completely covered by ablation zone. In order to develop a validated long-term IRE follow-up study, it is essential to obtain clinical confirmation of the efficacy of this novel technology. Additionally, follow-up after IRE ablation obliges verification of a suitable imaging modality. Objective The objectives of this study are the clinical efficacy and safety of IRE ablation of renal masses and to evaluate the use of cross-sectional imaging modalities in the follow-up after IRE in renal tumors. This study conforms to the recommendations of the IDEAL Collaboration and can be categorized as a phase 2B exploration trial. Methods In this prospective clinical trial, IRE will be performed in 20 patients aged 18 years and older presenting with a solid enhancing small renal mass (SRM) (≤4 cm) who are candidates for ablation. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) will be performed at 1 day pre-IRE, and 1 week post-IRE. Computed tomography (CT), CEUS, and MRI will be performed at 3 months, 6 months, and 12 months post-IRE. Results Presently, recruitment of patients has started and the first inclusions are completed. Preliminary results and outcomes are expected in 2018. Conclusions To establish the position of IRE ablation for treating renal tumors, a structured stepwise assessment in clinical practice is required. This study will offer fundamental knowledge on the clinical efficacy of IRE ablation for SRMs, potentially positioning IRE as ablative modality for renal

  11. Phase I study of pegylated interferon-alpha-2b as an adjuvant therapy in Japanese patients with malignant melanoma.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Naoya; Uhara, Hisashi; Wada, Hidefumi; Matsuda, Kenji; Yamamoto, Keiko; Shimamoto, Takashi; Kiyohara, Yoshio

    2016-10-01

    In the adjuvant setting for malignant melanoma, interferon (IFN)-α-2b and pegylated (PEG) IFN-α-2b were approved in several countries including the USA before these were approved in Japan. To resolve the "drug-lag" issue, this phase I study was designed to evaluate the safety and tolerability in Japanese patients with stage II or III malignant melanoma who had undergone surgery, by treating with PEG IFN-α-2b. As with a previously reported phase III study, patients were to receive PEG IFN-α-2b 6 μg/kg per week s.c. during an 8-week induction phase, followed by a maintenance phase at a dose of 3 μg/kg per week up to 5 years. Dose-limiting toxicity and pharmacokinetics were assessed during the initial 8 weeks. Of the nine patients enrolled, two patients had dose-limiting toxicities that resolved after discontinuation of treatment. The most frequently reported drug-related adverse events (DRAE) included pyrexia, decreased neutrophil and white blood cell counts, and arthralgia. Grade 3 DRAE included decreased neutrophil count. No deaths, serious adverse events and grade 4 adverse events were reported. Distant metastasis occurred in one patient. No apparent differences in area under the concentration-time curve and maximum observed serum concentration were observed between Japanese and historical non-Japanese pharmacokinetic data, suggesting no marked racial differences. No neutralizing antibody was detected in these patient samples. PEG IFN-α-2b was tolerated in Japanese patients, and eventually approved in Japan in May 2015 for adjuvant therapy in patients with stage III malignant melanoma. Because the number of patients was limited, further investigation would be crucial. © 2016 Merck Sharp & Dohme Corp., a subsidiary of Merck & Co., Inc. The Journal of Dermatology published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japanese Dermatological Association.

  12. Magnetic phase transitions in SmNi 2B 2C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Hagary, M.; Michor, H.; Hilscher, G.

    2000-07-01

    The magnetic properties of SmNi 2B 2C were studied by specific heat and magnetization measurements. Below the Néel temperature TN=10.2 (1) K a second anomaly in the heat capacity is observed. This may be associated with a spin reorientation transition at T ∗=8.4 - 9.4 K being sensitive to tiny changes of the composition. The strong curvature of the inverse susceptibility is well described by a Curie-Weiss law with μeff≃0.59 μB/f.u. and a temperature-independent Van Vleck susceptibility χ 0≃37×10 -7 cm3/ g.

  13. Biochemical surrogate markers of liver fibrosis and activity in a randomized trial of peginterferon alfa-2b and ribavirin.

    PubMed

    Poynard, Thierry; McHutchison, John; Manns, Michael; Myers, Rob P; Albrecht, Janice

    2003-08-01

    Liver fibrosis and activity indexes were validated in patients infected by hepatitis C virus (HCV) nontreated and treated by interferon. The aim was to validate their usefulness as surrogate markers of histologic features using the data of a randomized trial of combination peginterferon alfa-2b and ribavirin. Three hundred fifty-two patients who had had 2 interpretable liver biopsies and stored serum sample before and after treatment were selected. Two hundred eight patients received peginterferon alfa-2b 1.5 mcg per kg and ribavirin and 144 patients interferon alfa-2b 3 MU three times a week and ribavirin for 48 weeks. A fibrosis and an activity index combining 5 and 6 biochemical markers were assessed at baseline and at end of follow-up (24 weeks after treatment). The biochemical markers have significant predictive values both for the diagnosis of fibrosis and for activity. For the diagnosis of bridging fibrosis and/or moderate necroinflammatory activity, the area under the receiver operating characteristics curve of the activity index was 0.76 +/- 0.03 at baseline and 0.82 +/- 0.02 at end of follow-up. A cutoff of activity index at 0.30 (range, 0.00-1.00) had 90% sensitivity and 88% positive predictive value for the diagnosis of bridging fibrosis or moderate necroinflammatory activity. Sensitivity analyses with biopsy specimens of size greater than 15 mm suggest that a part of discordances between biochemical markers and histology were due to biopsy specimen sampling error. In conclusion, these biochemical markers of fibrosis and activity could be used as surrogate markers for liver biopsy in patients with chronic hepatitis C, both for the initial evaluation and for follow-up.

  14. Interferon-alpha 2b quantification in inclusion bodies using reversed phase-ultra performance liquid chromatography (RP-UPLC).

    PubMed

    Cueto-Rojas, H F; Pérez, N O; Pérez-Sánchez, G; Ocampo-Juárez, I; Medina-Rivero, E

    2010-04-15

    Interferon-alpha 2b (IFN-alpha 2b) is a recombinant therapeutic cytokine produced as inclusion bodies using a strain of Escherichia coli as expression system. After fermentation and recovery, it is necessary to know the amount of recombinant IFN-alpha 2b, in order to determine the yield and the load for solubilization, and chromatographic protein purification steps. The present work details the validation of a new short run-time and fast sample-preparation method to quantify IFN-alpha 2b in inclusion bodies using Reversed Phase-Ultra Performance Liquid Chromatography (RP-UPLC). The developed method demonstrated an accuracy of 100.28%; the relative standard deviations for method precision, repeatability and inter-day precision tests were found to be 0.57%, 1.54% and 1.83%, respectively. Linearity of the method was assessed in the range of concentrations from 0.05 mg/mL to 0.5 mg/mL, the curve obtained had a determination coefficient (r(2)) of 0.9989. Detection and quantification limits were found to be 0.008 mg/mL and 0.025 mg/mL, respectively. The method also demonstrated robustness for changes in column temperature, and specificity against host proteins and other recombinant protein expressed in the same E. coli strain.

  15. Complex high-temperature phase transitions in Li{sub 2}B{sub 12}H{sub 12} and Na{sub 2}B{sub 12}H{sub 12}

    SciTech Connect

    Verdal, Nina; Her, Jae-Hyuk; Stavila, Vitalie; Soloninin, Alexei V.; Babanova, Olga A.; Skripov, Alexander V.; Udovic, Terrence J.; Rush, John J.

    2014-04-01

    Differential scanning calorimetry measurements of Li{sub 2}B{sub 12}H{sub 12} and Na{sub 2}B{sub 12}H{sub 12} indicate hysteretic transformations to high-temperature phases at ≈615 K and 529 K, respectively, upon heating (1 K/min) from room temperature. X-ray and neutron powder diffraction measurements corroborate the phase-change behavior. For Li{sub 2}B{sub 12}H{sub 12}, the diffraction data are consistent with a previous study suggesting that the overall face-centered-cubic arrangement of icosahedral B{sub 12}H{sub 12}{sup 2−} anions is maintained upon transformation to the high-temperature polymorph, although the anions are now orientationally disordered and the Li{sup +} cations crystallographically disordered within an enlarged lattice. For Na{sub 2}B{sub 12}H{sub 12}, the diffraction data indicate the existence of three different high-temperature phases in addition to the known low-temperature monoclinic phase. The highest-temperature structure possesses Im3{sup -}m symmetry and exhibits a body-centered-cubic arrangement of orientationally disordered anions. The interstitial, disordered Na{sup +} cations appear to favor off-center positions within the distorted tetrahedral sites formed by the anions in this structure. An intermediate Pm3{sup -}n-symmetric phase at lower temperature is the result of a partial ordering of this higher-temperature structure. A third, minor, face-centered-cubic phase coexists with these high-temperature polymorphs. {sup 1}H NMR measurements of Li{sub 2}B{sub 12}H{sub 12} and Na{sub 2}B{sub 12}H{sub 12} reveal an approximately two-orders-of-magnitude increase in the reorientational jump rate of the anions in both cases upon transformation to their high-temperature structures. The enhanced anion mobilities were corroborated by neutron scattering fixed-window scans across the respective phase boundaries. The inherent cation disorder associated with these high-temperature polymorphs suggests their potential use as superionic

  16. A phase 1b/2b multicenter study of oral panobinostat plus azacitidine in adults with MDS, CMML or AML with ⩽30% blasts.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Manero, G; Sekeres, M A; Egyed, M; Breccia, M; Graux, C; Cavenagh, J D; Salman, H; Illes, A; Fenaux, P; DeAngelo, D J; Stauder, R; Yee, K; Zhu, N; Lee, J-H; Valcarcel, D; MacWhannell, A; Borbenyi, Z; Gazi, L; Acharyya, S; Ide, S; Marker, M; Ottmann, O G

    2017-05-26

    Treatment with azacitidine (AZA), a demethylating agent, prolonged overall survival (OS) vs conventional care in patients with higher-risk myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). As median survival with monotherapy is <2 years, novel agents are needed to improve outcomes. This phase 1b/2b trial (n=113) was designed to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) or recommended phase 2 dose (RP2D) of panobinostat (PAN)+AZA (phase 1b) and evaluate the early efficacy and safety of PAN+AZA vs AZA monotherapy (phase 2b) in patients with higher-risk MDS, chronic myelomonocytic leukemia or oligoblastic acute myeloid leukemia with <30% blasts. The MTD was not reached; the RP2D was PAN 30 mg plus AZA 75 mg/m(2). More patients receiving PAN+AZA achieved a composite complete response ([CR)+morphologic CR with incomplete blood count+bone marrow CR (27.5% (95% CI, 14.6-43.9%)) vs AZA (14.3% (5.4-28.5%)). However, no significant difference was observed in the 1-year OS rate (PAN+AZA, 60% (50-80%); AZA, 70% (50-80%)) or time to progression (PAN+AZA, 70% (40-90%); AZA, 70% (40-80%)). More grade 3/4 adverse events (97.4 vs 81.0%) and on-treatment deaths (13.2 vs 4.8%) occurred with PAN+AZA. Further dose or schedule optimization may improve the risk/benefit profile of this regimen.Leukemia advance online publication, 14 July 2017; doi:10.1038/leu.2017.159.

  17. [Radiotherapy phase I trials' methodology: Features].

    PubMed

    Rivoirard, R; Vallard, A; Langrand-Escure, J; Guy, J-B; Ben Mrad, M; Yaoxiong, X; Diao, P; Méry, B; Pigne, G; Rancoule, C; Magné, N

    2016-12-01

    In clinical research, biostatistical methods allow the rigorous analysis of data collection and should be defined from the trial design to obtain the appropriate experimental approach. Thus, if the main purpose of phase I is to determine the dose to use during phase II, methodology should be finely adjusted to experimental treatment(s). Today, the methodology for chemotherapy and targeted therapy is well known. For radiotherapy and chemoradiotherapy phase I trials, the primary endpoint must reflect both effectiveness and potential treatment toxicities. Methodology should probably be complex to limit failures in the following phases. However, there are very few data about methodology design in the literature. The present study focuses on these particular trials and their characteristics. It should help to raise existing methodological patterns shortcomings in order to propose new and better-suited designs.

  18. Effect of Oral JZP-110 (ADX-N05) on Wakefulness and Sleepiness in Adults with Narcolepsy: A Phase 2b Study

    PubMed Central

    Ruoff, Chad; Swick, Todd J.; Doekel, Robert; Emsellem, Helene A.; Feldman, Neil T.; Rosenberg, Russell; Bream, Gary; Khayrallah, Moise A.; Lu, Yuan; Black, Jed

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of oral JZP-110, a second-generation wake-promoting agent with dopaminergic and noradrenergic activity, for treatment of impaired wakefulness and excessive sleepiness in adults with narcolepsy. Methods: This was a phase 2b, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group trial conducted at 28 centers in the United States. Patients were adults with narcolepsy who had baseline scores ≥ 10 on the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) and baseline sleep latency ≤ 10 min on the Maintenance of Wakefulness Test (MWT). Patients received a daily placebo (n = 49) or JZP-110 (n = 44) 150 mg/day weeks 1–4 and 300 mg/day weeks 5–12. Primary efficacy endpoints were change from baseline in average MWT sleep latency, and the Clinical Global Impression-Change (CGI-C); secondary endpoints were change from baseline in ESS score and Patient Global Impression-Change. Results: Improvements were significantly greater with JZP-110 versus placebo on mean MWT sleep latency (4 w, 9.5 versus 1.4 min, P < 0.0001; 12 w, 12.8 versus 2.1 min, P < 0.0001), percentage of patients with CGI-C improvement (4 w, 80% versus 51%, P = 0.0066; 12 w, 86% versus 38%, P < 0.0001), and mean change in ESS (4 w, −5.6 versus −2.4, P = 0.0038; 12 w, −8.5 versus −2.5, P < 0.0001). Three JZP-110-treated patients (6.8%) discontinued due to adverse events (AEs). The most common AEs with JZP-110 versus placebo were insomnia (23% versus 8%), headache (16% versus 10%), nausea (14% versus 6%), diarrhea (11% versus 6%), decreased appetite (14% versus 0%), and anxiety (11% versus 0%). Conclusions: At doses of 150–300 mg/day, JZP-110 was well tolerated and significantly improved the ability to stay awake and subjective symptoms of excessive sleepiness in adults with narcolepsy. Clinical Trials Registration: Clinicaltrials.gov identifier NCT01681121. Citation: Ruoff C, Swick TJ, Doekel R, Emsellem HA, Feldman NT, Rosenberg R, Bream G, Khayrallah MA

  19. Y chromosome b2/b3 deletions and male infertility: A comprehensive meta-analysis, trial sequential analysis and systematic review.

    PubMed

    Bansal, Sandeep Kumar; Gupta, Gopal; Rajender, Singh

    2016-01-01

    The correlation of Y-chromosome b2/b3 partial deletions with spermatogenic failure remains dubious. We undertook a systematic review of the literature followed by meta-analyses and trial sequential analyses in order to compare the frequency of b2/b3 deletions between oligo/azoospermic infertile and normozoospermicmen. Out of twenty-four studies reviewed for meta-analysis, twenty reported no correlation between this deletion and male infertility and two studies each reported a direct and inverse correlation. In the collective analysis, 241 out of 8892 (2.71%) oligo/azoospermic individuals and 118 out of 5842 (2.02%) normozoospermic controls had a b2/b3 deletion, suggesting a relatively higher frequency of deletions in the cases. Eventually, meta-analysis showed a significant correlation between b2/b3 deletions and the risk of spermatogenic loss/infertility (Fixed model: OR=1.313, 95% CI=1.04-1.65, p=0.02; Random model: OR=1.315, 95% CI=1.02-1.70, p=0.037). Further meta-analysis on studies grouped by ethnicity and geographic regions showed that the b2/b3 deletions are significantly associated with spermatogenic loss/infertility in Mongolians, Nigro-Caucasians, East Asians and Africans, but not in Caucasians, Europeans, South Asians and Dravidians. In summary, the Y-chromosome b2/b3 deletions increase infertility risk; however, it may be significant only in the Mongolian populations and the East Asian region. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Phase 2b study of the clinical efficacy and safety of collagenase Clostridium histolyticum in patients with Peyronie disease.

    PubMed

    Gelbard, Martin; Lipshultz, Larry I; Tursi, James; Smith, Ted; Kaufman, Greg; Levine, Laurence A

    2012-06-01

    Collagenase Clostridium histolyticum is an investigational nonsurgical treatment for Peyronie disease. In this phase 2b, double-blind, randomized, placebo controlled study we determined the safety and efficacy of collagenase C. histolyticum and assessed a patient reported outcome questionnaire. A total of 147 subjects were randomized into 4 groups to receive collagenase C. histolyticum or placebo (3:1) with or without penile plaque modeling (1:1). Per treatment cycle 2 injections of collagenase C. histolyticum (0.58 mg) were given 24 to 72 hours apart. Subjects received up to 3 cycles at 6-week intervals. When designated, investigator modeling was done 24 to 72 hours after the second injection of each cycle. We evaluated penile curvature by goniometer measurement, patient reported outcomes and adverse event profiles. After collagenase C. histolyticum treatment significant improvements in penile curvature (29.7% vs 11.0%, p=0.001) and patient reported outcome symptom bother scores (p=0.05) were observed compared to placebo. In modeled subjects 32.4% improvement in penile curvature was observed in those on collagenase C. histolyticum compared to 2.5% worsening of curvature in those on placebo (p<0.001). Those treated with collagenase C. histolyticum who underwent modeling also showed improved Peyronie disease symptom bother scores (p=0.004). In subjects without modeling there were minimal differences between the active and placebo cohorts. Most adverse events in the collagenase C. histolyticum group occurred at the injection site and were mild or moderate in severity. No treatment related serious adverse events were reported. Collagenase C. histolyticum treatment was well tolerated. We noted significant improvement in penile curvature and patient reported outcome symptom bother scores, suggesting that this may be a safe, nonsurgical alternative for Peyronie disease. Copyright © 2012 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier

  1. A randomised controlled trial of nurse-managed trial conclusion following early phase cancer trial participation.

    PubMed

    Cox, K; Wilson, E; Arthur, A; Elkan, R; Armstrong, S

    2005-07-11

    The effect of a nurse-managed intervention, for early phase cancer trial participants at trial conclusion, on psychosocial outcomes was evaluated at two cancer centres in the Midlands, England using a randomised controlled trial. It involved 117 patients who were participating in an early phase cancer clinical trial. It was a nurse-managed trial exit, which included a trial exit interview, trial feedback information leaflet and telephone follow-up compared with standard care at trial conclusion. Psychological distress at 1 week and 4-6 weeks post-trial conclusion, patient's knowledge and understanding and patient's satisfaction were assessed. The results showed there was no significant difference between the two groups regarding scores for anxiety and depression at time one and time two. There is some suggestion that the intervention reduced anxiety from trial conclusion to follow-up (P=0.27). Patients in both groups felt they had contributed to cancer research through trial participation. However, intervention patients were more likely to feel that they knew how the trial was going (P<0.001), knew how other people in the trial were doing (P=0.001), had all the feedback they needed about the trial they took part in (P<0.01) and knew how they would be followed up (P=0.02). Patient satisfaction with the intervention was high (median score=4.5 where 5 is greatest satisfaction). In conclusion, nurse-managed trial conclusion led to positive outcomes for patients who had recently completed a clinical trial.

  2. Time2bHealthy - An online childhood obesity prevention program for preschool-aged children: A randomised controlled trial protocol.

    PubMed

    Hammersley, Megan L; Jones, Rachel A; Okely, Anthony D

    2017-10-01

    The use of parent-focused internet-based programs for the prevention and treatment of childhood obesity has shown promise but there is an acknowledged gap in parent-focused interventions which target the early childhood stage. The aim of this study is to determine the efficacy of Time2bHealthy - an online healthy lifestyle program for parents of preschool-aged children. The program will be evaluated using a two-arm, parallel, randomised controlled design. The 11-week program is underpinned by Social Cognitive Theory and consists of interactive modules on healthy eating, physical activity, screen-time and sleep. The intervention also involves elements of social media, where participants share discuss ideas and experiences and they can interact and obtain information with experts. Time2bHealthy is being compared to a comparison condition. Outcomes include change in BMI (primary outcome), dietary intake, physical activity, sleep, child feeding, parental role-modelling and parent self-efficacy. Process evaluation data, such as adherence and engagement with the online forums, will also be collected. Time2bHealthy is the first randomised controlled trial to our knowledge to assess the efficacy of an online parent-focussed healthy lifestyle program for preschool-aged children in changing body mass index. Early childhood is a crucial time for establishing healthy lifestyle behaviours and parents play an important role. This study therefore fills an important gap in the literature. If found to be efficacious, Time2bHealthy has potential for broad-reach access and translation into primary health care services. The study is registered with the Australian and New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (12616000119493). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Hydrothermal phase stability study of Li{sub 2}B{sub 4}O{sub 7}

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, Jeffrey J.; Matthew Mann, J.; Zens, Timothy W.C.; McClory, John W.

    2014-08-15

    Growth of Li{sub 2}B{sub 4}O{sub 7} by the hydrothermal method was attempted in 10{sup −6} M LiOH, by both spontaneous nucleation and transport growth. Li{sub 2}B{sub 4}O{sub 7} grew out of the first spontaneous nucleation reaction, while the seed dissolved and γ-LiBO{sub 2} formed during the transport growth reactions. A species thermodynamic stability study showed that γ-LiBO{sub 2} formed exclusively from 350 °C to 550 °C, and Li{sub 3}B{sub 5}O{sub 8}(OH){sub 2} was observed at 250 °C; Li{sub 2}B{sub 4}O{sub 7} was not observed. A solubility study on Li{sub 2}B{sub 4}O{sub 7} did not achieve equilibrium conditions, but did demonstrate that γ-LiBO{sub 2} is significantly more thermodynamically stable than Li{sub 2}B{sub 4}O{sub 7} under the tested conditions. Formation of Li{sub 2}B{sub 4}O{sub 7} hydrothermally was shown to result from kinetic growth. - Graphical abstract: Every boron in lithium γ-metaborate is tetrahedrally coordinated with oxygen, and each tetrahedron is linked to four other tetrahedrons, creating a strong B-O lattice surrounding the lithium atoms. - Highlights: • Li{sub 2}B{sub 4}O{sub 7} was grown hydrothermally via spontaneous nucleation in 10{sup −6} M LiOH. • γ-LiBO{sub 2} formed from 350 °C to 550 °C and Li{sub 3}B{sub 5}O{sub 8}(OH){sub 2} was observed at 250 °C. • A solubility study showed γ-LiBO{sub 2} to be more thermodynamically stable than Li{sub 2}B{sub 4}O{sub 7}. • Hydrothermal formation of Li{sub 2}B{sub 4}O{sub 7} was shown to result from kinetic growth.

  4. A randomized phase 2b study of peginterferon lambda-1a for the treatment of chronic HCV infection.

    PubMed

    Muir, Andrew J; Arora, Sanjeev; Everson, Gregory; Flisiak, Robert; George, Jacob; Ghalib, Reem; Gordon, Stuart C; Gray, Todd; Greenbloom, Susan; Hassanein, Tarek; Hillson, Jan; Horga, Maria Arantxa; Jacobson, Ira M; Jeffers, Lennox; Kowdley, Kris V; Lawitz, Eric; Lueth, Stefan; Rodriguez-Torres, Maribel; Rustgi, Vinod; Shemanski, Lynn; Shiffman, Mitchell L; Srinivasan, Subasree; Vargas, Hugo E; Vierling, John M; Xu, Dong; Lopez-Talavera, Juan C; Zeuzem, Stefan

    2014-12-01

    Peginterferon lambda-1a (Lambda) is a type-III interferon with similar antiviral activity to alfa interferons but with a diminished extrahepatic receptor distribution, reducing the risk for extrahepatic adverse events. This was a randomized, blinded, actively-controlled, multicentre phase 2b dose-ranging study in patients chronically infected with HCV genotypes 1-4. Treatment-naive patients received Lambda (120/180/240 μg) or peginterferon alfa-2a (alfa; 180 μg) once-weekly with ribavirin for 24 (genotypes [GT] 2,3) or 48 (GT1,4) weeks. Rates of undetectable HCV-RNA at week 12 (complete early virologic response [cEVR]; primary end point) were significantly higher in GT1,4 patients receiving Lambda vs. alfa (170/304, 56% vs. 38/103, 37%); with similar cEVR rates for GT2,3 (80/88, 91% vs. 26/30, 87%). Rates of undetectable HCV-RNA at week 4 were significantly higher on 180 μg (15/102, 15% GT1,4; 22/29, 76% GT2,3) and 240 μg (17/104, 16% GT1,4; 20/30, 67% GT2,3) Lambda than alfa (6/103, 6% GT1,4; 9/30, 30% GT2,3). Sustained virologic responses (post-treatment week 24) were comparable between Lambda and alfa for GT1,4 (37-46% Lambda; 37% alfa) and GT2,3 (60-76% Lambda; 53% alfa). Aminotransferase and/or bilirubin elevations were the primary dose-limiting abnormalities for Lambda; a sponsor-mandated 240 to 180 μg dose reduction was therefore implemented. Serious adverse events were comparable (3-13% Lambda; 3-7% alfa). Grade 3-4 haemoglobin, neutrophil, and platelet reductions were lower on Lambda than alfa. Among alfa patients, 28/133 (21%) had peginterferon and 31/133 (23%) had ribavirin dose reductions for haematologic abnormalities vs. 0/392 and 8/392 (2%) on Lambda. Lambda demonstrated fewer musculoskeletal (16-28% vs. 47-63%) and influenza-like events (8-23% vs. 40-46%) than alfa. Lambda was associated with improved or similar rates of virologic response with fewer extrahepatic adverse events than alfa in chronic HCV infection. Copyright © 2014 European

  5. Efficient Traceless Solid-Phase Synthesis of 3,4-Dihydropyrazino[1,2-b]indazoles and their 6-Oxides

    PubMed Central

    Pudelová, Naděžda; Krchňák, Viktor

    2009-01-01

    A highly efficient novel traceless solid-phase synthesis of 3,4-dihydropyrazino[1,2-b]indazoles and their 6-oxides was developed by using commercially available building blocks, diamines, 2-nitrobenzenesulfonyl chlorides, and bromoketones/bromoacetates. Mild reaction conditions, diversely substituted building blocks and high purity of crude products enabled effective combinatorial syntheses of libraries. PMID:19245249

  6. Efficient traceless solid-phase synthesis of 3,4-dihydropyrazino[1,2-b]indazoles and their 6-oxides.

    PubMed

    Pudelová, Nadezda; Krchnák, Viktor

    2009-01-01

    A highly efficient novel traceless solid-phase synthesis of 3,4-dihydropyrazino[1,2-b]indazoles and their 6-oxides was developed by using commercially available building blocks, diamines, 2-nitrobenzenesulfonyl chlorides, and bromoketones/bromoacetates. Mild reaction conditions, diversely substituted building blocks, and high purity of crude products enabled effective combinatorial syntheses of libraries.

  7. Moral justification of Phase 1 oncology trials.

    PubMed

    Dubov, Alex

    2014-06-01

    This article attempts to answer the following normative questions: Can one consider the design of Phase 1 trials ethically appropriate due to the unfavorable ratio of risks and benefits? What are some ethical safeguards for Phase 1 oncology research? A comparative review of literature contributed to the consolidation of the proposed ethical framework for Phase 1 oncology trials. This framework gives a special attention to issues of therapeutic misconception and vulnerability. The benefits and dangers associated with the enrollment in trials are described as well as the absence of alternatives, treatment-specific optimism, and vagueness in factual presentation during the informed consent process. The notion of therapeutic misconception is contrasted with optimism despite realism that stems from psychological, cultural, and religious factors and not necessarily from the lack of information. Close attention is given to the possible ways in which the inherent uncertainty and resulting cognitive biases may affect the informed consent process and the definition of therapeutic misconception. The article ends with recommendations for an ethical way of enrolling palliative patients in early stages of oncology research, giving special attention to provision of adequate consent, protection of vulnerability, and avoidance of therapeutic misconception.

  8. Metoclopramide Nasal Spray Reduces Symptoms of Gastroparesis in Women, but not Men, With Diabetes: Results of a Phase 2B Randomized Study.

    PubMed

    Parkman, Henry P; Carlson, Marilyn R; Gonyer, Dave

    2015-07-01

    Metoclopramide nasal spray, unlike oral tablets, is absorbed even when patients have delayed gastric emptying or nausea and vomiting. We performed a randomized phase 2b study to evaluate the efficacy and safety of 10-mg and 14-mg metoclopramide nasal spray vs placebo in patients with diabetes and gastroparesis. We performed a multicenter, double-blind study of 285 subjects (71% female) with type 1 or type 2 diabetes and a previous diagnosis of gastroparesis. Subjects were assigned randomly to groups given metoclopramide nasal spray (10 or 14 mg) or placebo 30 minutes before meals and bedtime for 28 days. The primary end point was the change in total symptom score from baseline to week 4, based on symptom items (nausea, bloating, early satiety, and upper abdominal pain) reported in daily diaries. We performed a prespecified subgroup analysis of male vs female subjects. Subjects given metoclopramide nasal spray had an overall reduction in symptom scores, although there was no statistically significant difference in reduction between the metoclopramide groups and the placebo group. Gastroparesis symptom scores were reduced significantly in female subjects given either dose of metoclopramide compared with placebo (mean reduction from 10-mg dose, 1.2 ± 1.18; P = .0247; mean reduction from 14-mg dose, 1.3 ± 0.94; P = .0215). In men, symptom scores decreased more in the placebo group than the metoclopramide groups. The most common treatment-emergent adverse effects were dysgeusia, headache, and fatigue. Metoclopramide nasal spray reduces symptoms of gastroparesis in women, but not in men, with diabetes. Patient sex therefore might be considered in the selection of treatment for diabetic gastroparesis. ClinicalTrials.gov no: NCT00845858. Copyright © 2015 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Design of Phase II Non-inferiority Trials.

    PubMed

    Jung, Sin-Ho

    2017-09-01

    With the development of inexpensive treatment regimens and less invasive surgical procedures, we are confronted with non-inferiority study objectives. A non-inferiority phase III trial requires a roughly four times larger sample size than that of a similar standard superiority trial. Because of the large required sample size, we often face feasibility issues to open a non-inferiority trial. Furthermore, due to lack of phase II non-inferiority trial design methods, we do not have an opportunity to investigate the efficacy of the experimental therapy through a phase II trial. As a result, we often fail to open a non-inferiority phase III trial and a large number of non-inferiority clinical questions still remain unanswered. In this paper, we want to develop some designs for non-inferiority randomized phase II trials with feasible sample sizes. At first, we review a design method for non-inferiority phase III trials. Subsequently, we propose three different designs for non-inferiority phase II trials that can be used under different settings. Each method is demonstrated with examples. Each of the proposed design methods is shown to require a reasonable sample size for non-inferiority phase II trials. The three different non-inferiority phase II trial designs are used under different settings, but require similar sample sizes that are typical for phase II trials.

  10. Efficacy, Safety, and Dose of Pafuramidine, a New Oral Drug for Treatment of First Stage Sleeping Sickness, in a Phase 2a Clinical Study and Phase 2b Randomized Clinical Studies

    PubMed Central

    Burri, Christian; Yeramian, Patrick D.; Merolle, Ada; Serge, Kazadi Kyanza; Mpanya, Alain; Lutumba, Pascal; Mesu, Victor Kande Betu Ku; Lubaki, Jean-Pierre Fina; Mpoto, Alfred Mpoo; Thompson, Mark; Munungu, Blaise Fungula; Josenando, Théophilo; Bernhard, Sonja C.; Olson, Carol A.; Blum, Johannes; Tidwell, Richard R.; Pohlig, Gabriele

    2016-01-01

    Background Sleeping sickness (human African trypanosomiasis [HAT]) is caused by protozoan parasites and characterized by a chronic progressive course, which may last up to several years before death. We conducted two Phase 2 studies to determine the efficacy and safety of oral pafuramidine in African patients with first stage HAT. Methods The Phase 2a study was an open-label, non-controlled, proof-of-concept study where 32 patients were treated with 100 mg of pafuramidine orally twice a day (BID) for 5 days at two trypanosomiasis reference centers (Angola and the Democratic Republic of the Congo [DRC]) between August 2001 and November 2004. The Phase 2b study compared pafuramidine in 41 patients versus standard pentamidine therapy in 40 patients. The Phase 2b study was open-label, parallel-group, controlled, randomized, and conducted at two sites in the DRC between April 2003 and February 2007. The Phase 2b study was then amended to add an open-label sequence (Phase 2b-2), where 30 patients received pafuramidine for 10 days. The primary efficacy endpoint was parasitologic cure at 24 hours (Phase 2a) or 3 months (Phase 2b) after treatment completion. The primary safety outcome was the rate of occurrence of World Health Organization Toxicity Scale Grade 3 or higher adverse events. All subjects provided written informed consent. Findings/Conclusion Pafuramidine for the treatment of first stage HAT was comparable in efficacy to pentamidine after 10 days of dosing. The cure rates 3 months post-treatment were 79% in the 5-day pafuramidine, 100% in the 7-day pentamidine, and 93% in the 10-day pafuramidine groups. In Phase 2b, the percentage of patients with at least 1 treatment-emergent adverse event was notably higher after pentamidine treatment (93%) than pafuramidine treatment for 5 days (25%) and 10 days (57%). These results support continuation of the development program for pafuramidine into Phase 3. PMID:26881924

  11. Fabrication of TiO2 hierarchical architecture assembled by nanowires with anatase/TiO2(B) phase-junctions for efficient photocatalytic hydrogen production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Yong; Ouyang, Feng

    2017-05-01

    TiO2 hierarchical architecture assembled by nanowires with anatase/TiO2(B) phase-junctions was prepared by a hydrothermal process followed by calcinations. The optimum calcination treatment (450 °C) not only led to the formation of anatase/TiO2(B) phase-junctions, but also kept the morphology of 1D nanowire and hierarchical architecture well. The T-450 load 0.5 wt% Pt cocatalysts showed the best photocatalytic hydrogen production activity, with a maximum hydrogen production rate of 7808 μmol g-1 h-1. The high photocatalytic activity is ascribed to the combined effects of the following three factors: (1) the hierarchical architecture exhibits better light harvesting; (2) the larger specific surface area provides more surface active sites for the photocatalytic reaction; (3) the 1D nanowires and anatase/TiO2(B) phase-junctions both can enhance the separation of photoinduced electron-hole pairs and inhibit their recombination.

  12. Diagnostic phase antibody response to the human papillomavirus type 16 E2 protein is associated with successful treatment of genital HPV lesions with systemic interferon alpha-2b.

    PubMed

    Stellato, G; Paavonen, J; Nieminen, P; Hibma, M; Vilja, P; Lehtinen, M

    1997-02-01

    Systemic interferon alpha-2b treatment reduces relapses of genital human papillomavirus (HPV) lesions in some but not all females. The aim of the present study was to investigate possible predictive pretreatment factors for the outcome of therapy. HPV DNA status and HPV antibody response were evaluated in 100 randomized patients treated with laser ablation and systemic interferon alpha-2b or placebo, and followed up to 6 months. Overall, adjuvant therapy with systemic interferon-alpha did not differ from placebo. However, detectable diagnostic phase levels of serum antibodies to e.g. HPV16 open reading frame (ORF) E2 derived peptide 141EEASVTVVEGQVDYY155 predicted 10-fold difference in the risk of recurrence of HPV infection following adjuvant interferon alpha-2b therapy as compared with placebo (odds ratio, OR, 0.5, 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.1-2.3; OR, 4.6, 95% CI 0.5-41, respectively). This trend was statistically significant in the whole study population (2P < 0.05), and in patients with high viral load (2P < 0.01). Evaluation of the E2 antibody responses may help to identify women with genital HPV lesions who respond to systemic interferon alpha-2b treatment.

  13. First experimental determination of the absolute gas-phase rate coefficient for the reaction of OH with 4-hydroxy-2-butanone (4H2B) at 294 K by vapor pressure measurements of 4H2B.

    PubMed

    El Dib, Gisèle; Sleiman, Chantal; Canosa, André; Travers, Daniel; Courbe, Jonathan; Sawaya, Terufat; Mokbel, Ilham; Chakir, Abdelkhaleq

    2013-01-10

    The reaction of the OH radicals with 4-hydroxy-2-butanone was investigated in the gas phase using an absolute rate method at room temperature and over the pressure range 10-330 Torr in He and air as diluent gases. The rate coefficients were measured using pulsed laser photolysis (PLP) of H(2)O(2) to produce OH and laser induced fluorescence (LIF) to measure the OH temporal profile. An average value of (4.8 ± 1.2) × 10(-12) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) was obtained. The OH quantum yield following the 266 nm pulsed laser photolysis of 4-hydroxy-2-butanone was measured for the first time and found to be about 0.3%. The investigated kinetic study required accurate measurements of the vapor pressure of 4-hydroxy-2-butanone, which was measured using a static apparatus. The vapor pressure was found to range from 0.056 to 7.11 Torr between 254 and 323 K. This work provides the first absolute rate coefficients for the reaction of 4-hydroxy-2-butanone with OH and the first experimental saturated vapor pressures of the studied compound below 311 K. The obtained results are compared to those of the literature and the effects of the experimental conditions on the reactivity are examined. The calculated tropospheric lifetime obtained in this work suggests that once emitted into the atmosphere, 4H2B may contribute to the photochemical pollution in a local or regional scale.

  14. Experiences of establishing an academic early phase clinical trials unit.

    PubMed

    Brown, Sarah R; Sherratt, Debbie; Booth, Gill; Brown, Julia; Collinson, Fiona; Gregory, Walter; Flanagan, Louise

    2017-08-01

    Early phase trials are essential in drug development, determining appropriate dose levels and assessing preliminary activity. These trials are undertaken by industry and academia, with increasing collaborations between the two. There is pressure to perform these trials quickly, safely, and robustly. However, there are inherent differences between developing and managing early phase, compared to late phase, drug trials. This article describes an approach to establishing an academically led early phase trial portfolio, highlighting lessons learned and sharing experiences. In 2009, the University of Leeds Clinical Trials Research Unit became the Clinical Trials Coordinating Office for Myeloma UK's phase I and II trials. We embarked on a transition from working extensively in phase III to early phase trials development and conduct. This involved evaluating and revising our well-established standard operating procedures, visiting other academic early phase units, and developing essential new documentation and processes. A core team of trial and data managers and statisticians was established to facilitate expertise and knowledge retention. A detailed training plan was implemented focussing on essential standard practices for early phase. These included pharmacovigilance, recruitment, trial design and set-up, data and site monitoring, and oversight committees. Training in statistical methods for early phase trials was incorporated. Initial scoping of early phase trial management and conduct was essential in establishing this early phase portfolio. Many of the processes developed were successful. However, regular review and evaluation were implemented to enable changes and ensure efficiencies. It is recommended that others embarking on this venture build on the experiences described in this article.

  15. Bayesian methods for phase I clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Gatsonis, C; Greenhouse, J B

    1992-07-01

    Phase I clinical trials are conducted to determine the dose-response curve of a new drug with respect to toxic side effects and, in particular, to estimate the maximum tolerated dose (MTD). In this paper we take a Bayesian approach to the problem of making inferences about the MTD. Working with broad classes of priors, we obtain the posterior distribution of the MTD and study its properties. We also address the question of providing updated assessments of the risk of toxicity for new patients entering the study at a specific dose level. These assessments would be useful in deciding issues of study management and ethics. Our analysis pays particular attention to the sensitivity of the inferences and risk assessments to the choice of prior and the choice of model for the dose-response relationship.

  16. Computer simulation of monolayer growth kinetics of Fe 2B phase during the paste-boriding process: Influence of the paste thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keddam, M.

    2006-11-01

    This paper deals with the effect of boron paste thickness on the study of the monolayer growth kinetics of Fe2B phase forming on AISI 1045 steel by the paste-boriding process. A mathematical diffusion model based on the Fick's phenomenological equations was applied in order to estimate the growth rate constant at (Fe2B/γ-Fe) interface, the layer thickness of iron boride as well as the associated mass gain depending on the boriding parameters such as time, temperature and surface boron concentration related to the boron paste thickness. The simulation results are found to be in a fairly good agreement with the experimental data derived from the literature.

  17. Tafenoquine plus chloroquine for the treatment and relapse prevention of Plasmodium vivax malaria (DETECTIVE): a multicentre, double-blind, randomised, phase 2b dose-selection study.

    PubMed

    Llanos-Cuentas, Alejandro; Lacerda, Marcus V; Rueangweerayut, Ronnatrai; Krudsood, Srivicha; Gupta, Sandeep K; Kochar, Sanjay K; Arthur, Preetam; Chuenchom, Nuttagarn; Möhrle, Jörg J; Duparc, Stephan; Ugwuegbulam, Cletus; Kleim, Jörg-Peter; Carter, Nick; Green, Justin A; Kellam, Lynda

    2014-03-22

    Clinical effectiveness of previous regimens to treat Plasmodium vivax infection have been hampered by compliance. We aimed to assess the dose-response, safety, and tolerability of single-dose tafenoquine plus 3-day chloroquine for P vivax malaria radical cure. In this double-blind, randomised, dose-ranging phase 2b study, men and women (aged ≥16 years) with microscopically confirmed P vivax monoinfection (parasite density >100 to <100,000 per μL blood) were enrolled from community health centres and hospitals across seven sites in Brazil, Peru, India, and Thailand. Patients with glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase enzyme activity of less than 70% were excluded. Eligible patients received chloroquine (days 1-3) and were randomly assigned (1:1:1:1:1:1) by a computer-generated randomisation schedule to receive single-dose tafenoquine 50 mg, 100 mg, 300 mg, or 600 mg, primaquine 15 mg for 14 days, or chloroquine alone. Randomisation was stratified by baseline parasite count (≤7500 and >7500 per μL blood). The primary efficacy endpoint was relapse-free efficacy at 6 months from initial dose (ie, clearance of initial infection without subsequent microscopically confirmed infection), analysed by intention to treat. This study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01376167. Between Sept 19, 2011, and March 25, 2013, 329 patients were randomly assigned to a treatment group (chloroquine plus tafenoquine 50 mg [n=55], 100 mg [n=57], 300 mg [n=57], 600 mg [n=56]; or to chloroquine plus primaquine [n=50]; or chloroquine alone [n=54]). Relapse-free efficacy at 6 months was 57·7% (95% CI 43-70) with tafenoquine 50 mg, 54·1% (40-66) with tafenoquine 100 mg, 89·2% (77-95) with tafenoquine 300 mg, 91·9% (80-97) with tafenoquine 600 mg, 77·3% (63-87) with primaquine, and 37·5% (23-52) with chloroquine alone. Tafenoquine 300 mg and 600 mg had better efficacy than chloroquine alone (treatment differences 51·7% [95% CI 35-69], p<0·0001, with tafenoquine 300 mg and

  18. Eldelumab [Anti-IP-10] Induction Therapy for Ulcerative Colitis: A Randomised, Placebo-Controlled, Phase 2b Study.

    PubMed

    Sandborn, William J; Colombel, Jean-Frédéric; Ghosh, Subrata; Sands, Bruce E; Dryden, Gerald; Hébuterne, Xavier; Leong, Rupert W; Bressler, Brian; Ullman, Thomas; Lakatos, Peter L; Reinisch, Walter; Xu, Li-An; Luo, Allison

    2016-04-01

    Interferon-γ-inducible protein-10 [IP-10] mediates immune cell trafficking from the circulation to the inflamed colon and decreases gut epithelial cell survival. IP-10 expression is increased in patients with ulcerative colitis [UC]. We report efficacy and safety results from a dose-ranging induction study of eldelumab, a fully human monoclonal antibody to IP-10, in moderately to severely active UC. A total of 252 adults with UC [Mayo score ≥ 6 and endoscopic subscore ≥ 2] were randomised 1:1:1 to placebo or eldelumab 15 or 25 mg/kg administered intravenously on Days 1 and 8 and every other week thereafter. The primary endpoint was clinical remission [Mayo score ≤ 2; no individual subscale score > 1] at Week 11. Key secondary endpoints included Mayo score clinical response and mucosal healing at Week 11. Neither eldelumab 15 or 25 mg/kg resulted in significant increases vs placebo in the proportion of patients achieving Week 11 clinical remission. Remission and response rates were 17.6% and 47.1% with eldelumab 25mg/kg, 13.1% and 44.0% with eldelumab 15mg/kg, and 9.6% and 31.3% with placebo. Clinical remission and response rates were higher in anti-tumour necrosis factor [TNF]-naïve patients treated with eldelumab compared with placebo. Eldelumab treatment was well tolerated and no immunogenicity was observed. The primary endpoint was not achieved with induction treatment with eldelumab 15 or 25 mg/kg in patients with UC. Trends towards clinical remission and response were observed in the overall population and were more pronounced in anti-TNF naïve patients. Eldelumab safety signals were consistent with those reported previously [ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01294410]. Copyright © 2015 European Crohn’s and Colitis Organisation (ECCO). Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Eldelumab [Anti-IP-10] Induction Therapy for Ulcerative Colitis: A Randomised, Placebo-Controlled, Phase 2b Study

    PubMed Central

    Colombel, Jean-Frédéric; Ghosh, Subrata; Sands, Bruce E.; Dryden, Gerald; Hébuterne, Xavier; Leong, Rupert W.; Bressler, Brian; Ullman, Thomas; Lakatos, Peter L.; Reinisch, Walter; Xu, Li-An; Luo, Allison

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Interferon-γ-inducible protein-10 [IP-10] mediates immune cell trafficking from the circulation to the inflamed colon and decreases gut epithelial cell survival. IP-10 expression is increased in patients with ulcerative colitis [UC]. We report efficacy and safety results from a dose-ranging induction study of eldelumab, a fully human monoclonal antibody to IP-10, in moderately to severely active UC. Methods: A total of 252 adults with UC [Mayo score ≥ 6 and endoscopic subscore ≥ 2] were randomised 1:1:1 to placebo or eldelumab 15 or 25 mg/kg administered intravenously on Days 1 and 8 and every other week thereafter. The primary endpoint was clinical remission [Mayo score ≤ 2; no individual subscale score > 1] at Week 11. Key secondary endpoints included Mayo score clinical response and mucosal healing at Week 11. Results: Neither eldelumab 15 or 25 mg/kg resulted in significant increases vs placebo in the proportion of patients achieving Week 11 clinical remission. Remission and response rates were 17.6% and 47.1% with eldelumab 25mg/kg, 13.1% and 44.0% with eldelumab 15mg/kg, and 9.6% and 31.3% with placebo. Clinical remission and response rates were higher in anti-tumour necrosis factor [TNF]-naïve patients treated with eldelumab compared with placebo. Eldelumab treatment was well tolerated and no immunogenicity was observed. Conclusions: The primary endpoint was not achieved with induction treatment with eldelumab 15 or 25 mg/kg in patients with UC. Trends towards clinical remission and response were observed in the overall population and were more pronounced in anti-TNF naïve patients. Eldelumab safety signals were consistent with those reported previously [ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01294410]. PMID:26721935

  20. Are phase I trials safe for older patients?

    PubMed

    Baldini, Capucine; Le Saux, Olivia; Helissey, Carole; Aspeslagh, Sandrine; Castanon, Eduardo; Varga, Andreea; Gazzah, Anas; Bahleda, Rastio; Mir, Olivier; Massard, Christophe; Soria, Jean-Charles; Hollebecque, Antoine

    2017-09-07

    Phase I clinical trials in oncology primarily aim to assess the toxicity profile of new drugs and determine recommended phase II doses (RP2D). Since the cancer rate increases with age and our population is continually aging, RP2D must necessarily be assessed in older patients. Few clinical studies include older patients, however, and particularly few Phase I trials. We reviewed published data on the safety and efficacy of Phase I trials in older patients. The majority of studies included primarily young, fit patients, with age thresholds varying widely from 65 to 80years. However, age does not seem to be associated with more toxicity or less efficacy. While Phase I trials seem feasible in fit older patients, geriatric-medicine score systems should be included in the clinical trial design in order to better characterize this population. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Albinterferon Alfa-2b was not inferior to pegylated interferon-α in a randomized trial of patients with chronic hepatitis C virus genotype 2 or 3.

    PubMed

    Nelson, David R; Benhamou, Yves; Chuang, Wan-Long; Lawitz, Eric J; Rodriguez-Torres, Maribel; Flisiak, Robert; Rasenack, Jens W F; Kryczka, Wiesław; Lee, Chuan-Mo; Bain, Vincent G; Pianko, Stephen; Patel, Keyur; Cronin, Patrick W; Pulkstenis, Erik; Subramanian, G Mani; McHutchison, John G

    2010-10-01

    A phase 3 active-controlled study was conducted to assess the efficacy/safety of albinterferon alfa-2b (albIFN), a novel, long-acting, genetic fusion polypeptide of recombinant human albumin and interferon alfa-2b, in patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype 2/3. In all, 933 patients were randomized to open-label subcutaneous treatment with pegylated interferon-alfa-2a (Peg-IFNalfa-2a) 180 μg/wk, or albIFN 900 or 1200 μg every 2 weeks for 24 weeks, each administered with oral ribavirin 800 mg/day. The primary end point of the study was sustained virologic response (SVR) (HCV-RNA level, <15 IU/mL at week 48). During the study, the data monitoring committee recommended dose modification for all patients receiving albIFN 1200 μg to 900 μg, impacting 38% of this treatment arm. By intention-to-treat analysis, SVR rates were 84.8% (95% confidence interval, 80.4%-88.6%), 79.8% (95% confidence interval, 74.9%-84.1%), and 80.0% (95% confidence interval, 75.1%-84.3%) with Peg-IFNalfa-2a, and albIFN 900 and 1200 μg, respectively. The primary hypothesis of noninferiority of SVR was established for albIFN 900 μg (P = .009) and 1200 μg (P = .006). Independent positive predictors of SVR by multivariate regression analysis were pretreatment HCV-RNA level less than 400,000 IU/mL, age younger than 45 years, body mass index less than 30 kg/m(2), genotype 2, normal γ-glutamyl transpeptidase and increased alanine aminotransferase levels at baseline, fibrosis stage F0-F2, no steatosis, and Asian geographic region (Peg-IFNalfa-2a only). The 3 treatment groups showed similar rates of serious (7%-8%) and severe (13%-16%) adverse events, and discontinuations owing to adverse events (3.6%-5.5%). Albinterferon alfa-2b 900 μg every 2 weeks provides an alternative efficacious treatment option in patients with chronic HCV genotype 2 or 3. Copyright © 2010 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Rethinking Phase II Clinical Trial Design in Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Lavine, Kory J.; Mann, Douglas L.

    2014-01-01

    The incidence and economic burden of heart failure continue to rise worldwide, despite implementation of a number of effective heart failure therapies. Although there have been a number phase I–II studies of potential novel heart failure therapies over the past decade, none of these new compounds have been successful in phase III clinical trials. While there are likely a number of reasons for this failure, one of the problems that has become increasingly apparent is the inability of phase II trials to correctly identify novel therapies that will be successful in phase III clinical trials. In the following review, we will discuss the some of the problems inherent with current phase II heart failure clinical trials, as well as discuss possible ways to rethink phase II development of new therapies for heart failure. PMID:25343020

  3. Comparison of reporting phase I trial results in ClinicalTrials.gov and matched publications.

    PubMed

    Shepshelovich, D; Goldvaser, H; Wang, L; Abdul Razak, A R; Bedard, P L

    2017-09-14

    Background Data on completeness of reporting of phase I cancer clinical trials in publications are lacking. Methods The ClinicalTrials.gov database was searched for completed adult phase I cancer trials with reported results. PubMed was searched for matching primary publications published prior to November 1, 2016. Reporting in primary publications was compared with the ClinicalTrials.gov database using a 28-point score (2=complete; 1=partial; 0=no reporting) for 14 items related to study design, outcome measures and safety profile. Inconsistencies between primary publications and ClinicalTrials.gov were recorded. Linear regression was used to identify factors associated with incomplete reporting. Results After a review of 583 trials in ClinicalTrials.gov , 163 matching primary publications were identified. Publications reported outcomes that did not appear in ClinicalTrials.gov in 25% of trials. Outcomes were upgraded, downgraded or omitted in publications in 47% of trials. The overall median reporting score was 23/28 (interquartile range 21-25). Incompletely reported items in >25% publications were: inclusion criteria (29%), primary outcome definition (26%), secondary outcome definitions (53%), adverse events (71%), serious adverse events (80%) and dates of study start and database lock (91%). Higher reporting scores were associated with phase I (vs phase I/II) trials (p<0.001), multicenter trials (p<0.001) and publication in journals with lower impact factor (p=0.004). Conclusions Reported results in primary publications for early phase cancer trials are frequently inconsistent or incomplete compared with ClinicalTrials.gov entries. ClinicalTrials.gov may provide more comprehensive data from new cancer drug trials.

  4. Phases I–III Clinical Trials Using Adult Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sanz-Ruiz, Ricardo; Gutiérrez Ibañes, Enrique; Arranz, Adolfo Villa; Fernández Santos, María Eugenia; Fernández, Pedro L. Sánchez; Fernández-Avilés, Francisco

    2010-01-01

    First randomized clinical trials have demonstrated that stem cell therapy can improve cardiac recovery after the acute phase of myocardial ischemia and in patients with chronic ischemic heart disease. Nevertheless, some trials have shown that conflicting results and uncertainties remain in the case of mechanisms of action and possible ways to improve clinical impact of stem cells in cardiac repair. In this paper we will examine the evidence available, analyze the main phase I and II randomized clinical trials and their limitations, discuss the key points in the design of future trials, and depict new directions of research in this fascinating field. PMID:21076533

  5. Vitamins B2, B6 and B12 and Risk of New Colorectal Adenomas in a Randomized Trial of Aspirin Use and Folic Acid Supplementation

    PubMed Central

    Figueiredo, Jane C.; Levine, A. Joan; Grau, Maria V.; Midttun, Øivind; Ueland, Per M.; Ahnen, Dennis J.; Barry, Elizabeth L.; Tsang, Shirley; Munroe, David; Ali, Iqbal; Haile, Robert W.; Sandler, Robert S.; Baron, John A.

    2008-01-01

    Background Folate, other vitamin B cofactors, and genes involved in folate-mediated one-carbon metabolism (FOCM) all may play important roles in colorectal neoplasia. In this study, we examined the associations between dietary and circulating plasma levels of vitamins B2, B6 and B12 and risk colorectal adenomas. Methods The Aspirin/Folate Polyp Prevention Study is a randomized clinical trial of folic acid supplementation and incidence of new colorectal adenomas in individuals with a history of adenomas (n=1,084). Diet and supplement use were ascertained through a food-frequency questionnaire administered at baseline. Blood collected at baseline was used to determine plasma B-vitamin levels. We used generalized linear regression to estimate risk ratios (RR) and 95% confidence limits (CI) as measures of association. Results We found a borderline significant inverse association with plasma B6 (pyridoxal 5′phosphate, PLP) and adenoma risk (adjusted RR Q4 vs. Q1=0.78, 95% CI=0.61-1.00, p-trend=0.08). This association was not modified by folic acid supplementation or plasma folate. However, the protective association of PLP with adenoma risk was observed only among subjects who did not drink alcohol (p-interaction=0.03). Plasma B2 (riboflavin) was inversely associated with risk of advanced lesions (adjusted RR Q4 vs. Q1=0.51; 95% CI=0.26-0.99, p-trend=0.12). No significant associations were observed between adenoma risk and plasma vitamin B12 or dietary intake of vitamin B2 and B6. When we examined specific gene-B-vitamin interactions, we observed a possible interaction between MTHFR-C677T and plasma B2 on risk of all adenomas. Conclusion Our results suggest that high levels of PLP and B2 may protect against colorectal adenomas. PMID:18708408

  6. Spherical neutron polarimetry of the magnetic structure in HoNi{sub 2}B{sub 2}C: Interplay between magnetic phases and superconductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, M.; Zaharko, O.; Gasser, U.; Kreyssig, A.; Brown, P. J.; Canfield, P. C.

    2006-09-01

    Spherical neutron polarimetry has been used to answer open questions about different magnetic phases in HoNi{sub 2}B{sub 2}C, which are important in their interplay with superconductivity. We established that the incommensurate a{sup *} structure of k{sub 3}=(0.585 0 0) at 5.4 K in a zero magnetic field is a transverse-amplitude modulated wave with the magnetic moment along the b direction of the tetragonal structure. The depolarization of a neutron beam scattered from the k{sub 2}=(0 0 0.915) reflections reveals a multidomain state but does not allow an unambiguous determination of the spin configuration. Based on present knowledge of borocarbides and other rare-earth systems we give preference to a long-range incommensurate helical structure as the origin of the k{sub 2}=(0 0 0.915) reflections.

  7. Phase I (first-in-man) prophylactic vaccine's clinical trials: Selecting a clinical trial site

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Shantanu; Goyal, Vishal; Singh, Kavita

    2015-01-01

    An appropriately equipped and staffed Phase I unit is critical for smooth conduct of a first-in-man clinical trial. The first-in-man prophylactic vaccine trial(s) requires basic infrastructure of clinical trial site, experienced and dedicated site staff and healthy adults as volunteers. The facility should have access to equipment, emergency services, laboratory, pharmacy and archiving. In terms of design, infrastructure, workflow and manpower, a Phase I unit for testing a novel vaccine or drug are quite similar. However, there are some important attributes, which should be taken into consideration, while performing pre-trial site selection for conducting phase I trial with a new or novel vaccine. PMID:25878951

  8. Phase I trials of antitumour agents: fundamental concepts

    PubMed Central

    Toloi, Diego de Araujo; Jardim, Denis Leonardo Fontes; Hoff, Paulo Marcelo Gehm; Riechelmann, Rachel Simões Pimenta

    2015-01-01

    Phase I trials are an important step in the development of new drugs. Because of the advancing knowledge of cancer’s molecular biology, these trials offer an important platform for the development of new agents and also for patient treatment. Therefore, comprehension of their peculiar terminology and methodology are increasingly important. Our objectives were to review the fundamental concepts of phase I designs and to critically contextualise this type of study as a therapeutic option for patients with refractory cancer. PMID:25729414

  9. Ultrafast-Charging and Long-Life Li-Ion Battery Anodes of TiO2-B and Anatase Dual-Phase Nanowires.

    PubMed

    Li, Kaikai; Li, Baohua; Wu, Junxiong; Kang, Feiyu; Kim, Jang-Kyo; Zhang, Tong-Yi

    2017-10-06

    Ideal lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) should possess a high power density, be charged extremely fast (e.g., 100C), and have a long service life. To achieve them all, all battery components, including anodes, cathodes, and electrolytes should have excellent structural and functional characteristics. The present work reports ultrafast-charging and long-life LIB anodes made from TiO2-B/anatase dual-phase nanowires. The dual-phase nanowires are fabricated with anatase TiO2 nanoparticles through a facile and cost-effective hydrothermal process, which can be easily scaled up for mass production. The anodes exhibit remarkable electrochemical performance with reversible capacities of ∼225, 172, and 140 mAh g(-1) at current rates of 1C, 10C, and 60C, respectively. They deliver exceptional capacity retention of not less than 126 and 93 mAh g(-1) after 1000 cycles at 60C and 100C, respectively, potentially worthwhile for high-power applications. These values are among the best when the high-rate capabilities are compared with the literature data for similar TiO2-based anodes. The Ragone plot confirms both the exceptionally high energy and power densities of the devices prepared using the dual-phase nanowires. The electrochemical tests and operando Raman spectra present fast electrochemical kinetics for both Li(+) and electron transports in the TiO2 dual-phase nanowires than in anatase nanoparticles due to the excellent Li(+) diffusion coefficient and electronic conductivity of nanowires.

  10. Single-arm Phase II cancer survival trial designs.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jianrong

    2016-01-01

    The current practice for designing single-arm Phase II trials with time-to-event endpoints is limited to using either a maximum likelihood estimate test under the exponential model or a naive approach based on dichotomizing the event time at a landmark time point. A trial designed under the exponential model may not be reliable, and the naive approach is inefficient. The modified one-sample log-rank test statistic proposed in this article fills the void. In general, the proposed test can be used to design single-arm Phase II survival trials under any parametric survival distribution. Simulation results showed that it preserves type I error well and provides adequate power for Phase II cancer trial designs with time-to-event endpoints.

  11. Clinical trials and SCID row: the ethics of phase 1 trials in the developing world.

    PubMed

    Kimmelman, Jonathan

    2007-12-01

    Relatively little has been written about the ethics of conducting early phase clinical trials involving subjects from the developing world. Below, I analyze ethical issues surrounding one of gene transfer's most widely praised studies conducted to date: in this study, Italian investigators recruited two subjects from the developing world who were ineligible for standard of care because of economic considerations. Though the study seems to have rendered a cure in these two subjects, it does not appear to have complied with various international guidelines that require that clinical trials conducted in the developing world be responsive to their populations' health needs. Nevertheless, policies devised to address large scale, late stage trials, such as the AZT short-course placebo trials, map somewhat awkwardly to early phase studies. I argue that interest in conducting translational research in the developing world, particularly in the context of hemophilia trials, should motivate more rigorous ethical thinking around clinical trials involving economically disadvantaged populations.

  12. A double-blind, randomised, placebo-controlled, phase 2b study evaluating sorafenib in combination with paclitaxel as a first-line therapy in patients with HER2-negative advanced breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Gradishar, William J; Kaklamani, Virginia; Sahoo, Tarini P; Lokanatha, Dasappa; Raina, Vinod; Bondarde, Shailesh; Jain, Minish; Ro, Sunhee Kwon; Lokker, Nathalie A; Schwartzberg, Lee

    2013-01-01

    We conducted a phase 2b, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled screening trial to evaluate the addition of the multikinase inhibitor sorafenib (antiproliferative/antiangiogenic) to first-line paclitaxel for human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-negative locally recurrent/metastatic breast cancer. Patients were randomised to paclitaxel (90mg/m(2), weekly, intravenously, 3 weeks on/1 week off) plus sorafenib (400mg, orally, twice daily) or placebo. The primary endpoint was progression-free survival (PFS). A sample size of 220 patients was planned with relative risk ≤ 0.82 (1-sided α=0.14) after 120 events supporting a treatment effect. Patients were randomised in India (n=170), the United States (n=52) and Brazil (n=15). Median PFS was 6.9 months for sorafenib versus 5.6 months for placebo (hazard ratio (HR)=0.788; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.558-1.112; P=0.1715 [1-sided P=0.0857]). The addition of sorafenib increased time to progression (median, 8.1 versus 5.6 months; HR=0.674; 95% CI 0.465-0.975; P=0.0343) and improved overall response (67% versus 54%; P=0.0468). Overall survival did not statistically differ (median, 16.8 versus 17.4 months; HR=1.022; 95% CI 0.715-1.461; P=0.904). Grade 3/4 toxicities (sorafenib versus placebo) included hand-foot skin reaction (31% versus 3%), neutropenia (13% versus 7%) and anaemia (11% versus 6%). Two treatment-related deaths occurred (malaria and liver dysfunction) in the sorafenib arm. The addition of sorafenib to paclitaxel improved disease control but did not significantly improve PFS to support a phase 3 trial of similar design. Toxicity of the combination was manageable with dose reductions. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Effect of BG-12 on contrast-enhanced lesions in patients with relapsing--remitting multiple sclerosis: subgroup analyses from the phase 2b study.

    PubMed

    Kappos, Ludwig; Gold, Ralf; Miller, David H; MacManus, David G; Havrdova, Eva; Limmroth, Volker; Polman, Chris H; Schmierer, Klaus; Yousry, Tarek A; Eraksoy, Mefkure; Meluzinova, Eva; Dufek, Michal; Yang, Minhua; Dawson, Kate; O'Neill, Gilmore N

    2012-03-01

    In a phase 2b study in patients with relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS), BG-12 240 mg three times daily significantly reduced the number of new gadolinium-enhanced (Gd+) lesions from weeks 12 to 24 (primary end point) by 69% compared with placebo. In this analysis, the effect of BG-12 240 mg three times daily on the number of Gd+ lesions from weeks 12 to 24 was evaluated in subgroups based on baseline disease characteristics and demographics. Two hundred and fifty-seven patients were randomized equally to receive BG-12 (120 mg once daily or three times daily or 240 mg three times daily) or placebo. BG-12 240 mg three times daily significantly reduced the number of new Gd+ lesions compared with placebo in the following subgroups: Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) score ≤ 2.5 (74%), EDSS score > 2.5 (63%), no Gd+ lesions (80%), ≥ 1 Gd+ lesion (55%), age < 40 years (49%), age ≥ 40 years (89%), female patients (81%), disease duration ≤ 6 years (81%) and disease duration > 6 years (54%) (all comparisons p < 0.05). BG-12 demonstrated efficacy in patients with RRMS by decreasing new Gd+ lesion development across a range of subgroups defined by baseline disease characteristics or demographics.

  14. A translation system reconstituted with human factors proves that processing of encephalomyocarditis virus proteins 2A and 2B occurs in the elongation phase of translation without eukaryotic release factors.

    PubMed

    Machida, Kodai; Mikami, Satoshi; Masutani, Mamiko; Mishima, Kurumi; Kobayashi, Tominari; Imataka, Hiroaki

    2014-11-14

    The genomic RNA of encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV) encodes a single polyprotein, and the primary scission of the polyprotein occurs between nonstructural proteins 2A and 2B by an unknown mechanism. To gain insight into the mechanism of 2A-2B processing, we first translated the 2A-2B region in vitro with eukaryotic and prokaryotic translation systems. The 2A-2B processing occurred only in the eukaryotic systems, not in the prokaryotic systems, and the unprocessed 2A-2B protein synthesized by a prokaryotic system remained uncleaved when incubated with a eukaryotic cell extract. These results suggest that 2A-2B processing is a eukaryote-specific, co-translational event. To define the translation factors required for 2A-2B processing, we constituted a protein synthesis system with eukaryotic elongation factors 1 and 2, eukaryotic release factors 1 and 3 (eRF1 and eRF3), aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, tRNAs, ribosome subunits, and a plasmid template that included the hepatitis C virus internal ribosome entry site. We successfully reproduced 2A-2B processing in the reconstituted system even without eRFs. Our results indicate that this unusual event occurs in the elongation phase of translation. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  15. Calculations of phase equilibrium parameters of the quaternary systems KBr-K2SO4-K2B4O7-H2O and NaBr-Na2SO4-Na2B4O7-H2O at 298 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Rui-Zhi; Wang, Dan; Yang, Yu-Yan; Sang, Shi-Hua

    2017-07-01

    Some of the parameters and equilibrium constants of quaternary salts solutions KBr-K2SO4-K2B4O7-H2O and NaBr-Na2SO4-Na2B4O7-H2O at 298 K are calculated using the correlation equation of the Pitzer parameters. The solubilities data of the ternary subsystems were fitted by multiple linear regression method. The phase diagram was plotted. A comparison between the calculated and experimental results for the systems shows that the predicted solubilities agree well with experimental data.

  16. Phase I and phase II objective response rates are correlated in pediatric cancer trials: an argument for better clinical trial efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, Jonathan C.; Huang, Peng; Cohen, Kenneth J.

    2016-01-01

    While many phase I trials report tumor response, formal analysis of efficacy is deferred to phase II. We reviewed paired phase I and II pediatric oncology trials to ascertain the relationship between phase I and II objective response (OR%). Single-agent phase I trials were paired with corresponding phase II trials (comparable study drug, dosing schedule, and population). Phase I trials without efficacy data or a matching phase II trial were excluded. OR% was tabulated for all trials, and phase II authors' subjective conclusions regarding efficacy were documented. 35 pairs of trials were analyzed. The correlation between phase I and II OR% was 0.93. Between phase II studies with a “positive” conclusion versus a “negative” one, there was a statistically significant difference in mean phase I OR% (32.0% vs. 4.5%, p < 0.001). Thirteen phase II studies were undertaken despite phase I OR% of 0%; only one had a “positive” conclusion, and none exceeded OR% of 15%. Objective response rates are highly correlated between phase I and II pediatric oncology trials. Though not a formal measure of drug efficacy, phase I OR% may provide an estimate of phase II response, inform phase II study design, and should be given greater consideration. PMID:27164535

  17. Phase II cancer clinical trials with heterogeneous patient populations.

    PubMed

    Jung, Sin-Ho; Chang, Myron N; Kang, Sun J

    2012-01-01

    The patient population for a Phase II trial often consists of multiple subgroups in terms of risk level. In this case, a popular design approach is to specify the response rate and the prevalence of each subgroup, to calculate the response rate of the whole population by the weighted average of the response rates across subgroups, and to choose a standard Phase II design such as Simon's optimal or minimax design to test the response rate for the whole population. In this case, although the prevalence of each subgroup is accurately specified, the observed prevalence among the accrued patients to the study may be quite different from the expected one because of the small sample size, which is typical in most Phase II trials. The fixed rejection value for a chosen standard Phase II design may be either too conservative (i.e., increasing the false rejection probability of the experimental therapy) if the trial accrues more high-risk patients than expected, or too anti-conservative (i.e., increasing the false acceptance probability of the experimental therapy) if the trial accrues more low-risk patients than expected. We can avoid such problems by adjusting the rejection values, depending on the observed prevalence from the trial. In this paper, we investigate the performance of the flexible designs compared with the standard design with fixed rejection values under various settings.

  18. Phase 0 - Microdosing strategy in clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Rani, P Usha; Naidu, M U R

    2008-11-01

    Drug development is an activity that is long, complex and expensive. In 2004, attrition in the drug development paradigm prompted the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to introduce its 'Critical Path' document, which highlighted the serious discordance between major scientific advances and limited drug development process. One issue addressed was that of microdosing. The concept of microdosing involves the use of extremely low, nonpharmacologically active doses of a drug to define the pharmacokinetic profile of the medication in human subjects. Microdosing, thus, appears as a new viable concept in the 'toolbox' of the drug development activity. It appears that microdosing strategy could complement standard animal-to-human scaling, redefining the existing concept of phase I clinical research. In future, when research methods and technology involved in Phase 0 studies become more sophisticated, human microdosing may be applied to a number of drugs developed subsequently.

  19. Sample size planning for phase II trials based on success probabilities for phase III.

    PubMed

    Götte, Heiko; Schüler, Armin; Kirchner, Marietta; Kieser, Meinhard

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, high failure rates in phase III trials were observed. One of the main reasons is overoptimistic assumptions for the planning of phase III resulting from limited phase II information and/or unawareness of realistic success probabilities. We present an approach for planning a phase II trial in a time-to-event setting that considers the whole phase II/III clinical development programme. We derive stopping boundaries after phase II that minimise the number of events under side conditions for the conditional probabilities of correct go/no-go decision after phase II as well as the conditional success probabilities for phase III. In addition, we give general recommendations for the choice of phase II sample size. Our simulations show that unconditional probabilities of go/no-go decision as well as the unconditional success probabilities for phase III are influenced by the number of events observed in phase II. However, choosing more than 150 events in phase II seems not necessary as the impact on these probabilities then becomes quite small. We recommend considering aspects like the number of compounds in phase II and the resources available when determining the sample size. The lower the number of compounds and the lower the resources are for phase III, the higher the investment for phase II should be.

  20. Differences in trial knowledge and motives for participation among cancer patients in phase 3 clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Godskesen, T M; Kihlbom, U; Nordin, K; Silén, M; Nygren, P

    2016-05-01

    While participants in clinical oncology trials are essential for the advancement of cancer therapies, factors decisive for patient participation have been described but need further investigation, particularly in the case of phase 3 studies. The aim of this study was to investigate differences in trial knowledge and motives for participation in phase 3 clinical cancer trials in relation to gender, age, education levels and former trial experience. The results of a questionnaire returned from 88 of 96 patients (92%) were analysed using the Mann-Whitney U-test. There were small, barely relevant differences in trial knowledge among patients when stratified by gender, age or education. Participants with former trial experience were less aware about the right to withdraw. Male participants and those aged ≥65 years were significantly more motivated by a feeling of duty, or by the opinions of close ones. Men seem more motivated than women by external factors. With the awareness that elderly and single male participants might be a vulnerable group and participants with former trial experience are less likely to be sufficiently informed, the information consent process should focus more on these patients. We conclude that the informed consent process seems to work well, with good results within most subgroups. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Controversial HIV vaccine enters phase III trials amid skepticism.

    PubMed

    1998-12-01

    Clinics have begun enrolling volunteers in the first phase III trial of an HIV vaccine. Developing the vaccine has been a goal for nearly two decades, but leading scientists are skeptical about the effectiveness of a vaccine which does not use live viruses. More than 34 different candidate vaccines have been tested in phase I, and three are in phase II. The vaccine, AIDSVAX, is designed to train the immune system to protect itself against infection by creating antibodies. The scientific and political issues associated with the vaccine are presented.

  2. Phase I clinical trial design in cancer drug development.

    PubMed

    Eisenhauer, E A; O'Dwyer, P J; Christian, M; Humphrey, J S

    2000-02-01

    The past decade has seen the publication of a number of new proposals for the design of phase I trials of anticancer agents. The purpose of these proposals has been to address ethical concerns about treating excessive numbers of patients at subtherapeutic doses of a new agent and to increase the overall efficiency of the process while enhancing the precision of the recommended phase II dose. In early 1998, a workshop of phase I investigators was held under the sponsorship of Bristol-Myers Squibb Pharmaceutical Research Institute (Wallingford, CT) to review the experience to date with novel phase I methodologies, with a particular focus on their efficiency and safety. This report summarizes the material presented. It was concluded that for phase I trials of antineoplastics (cytotoxics), which begin at 0.1 mouse-equivalent LD10 doses, evidence to date suggests that the historic approach of using a modified Fibonacci escalation and three patients per dose level is not necessary and is seldom used. One patient per dose level and more rapid escalation schemes, both empirically based and statistically based, are commonly used with apparent safety. There remain questions, however: Which of the dose escalation schemes is optimal? Are there alternatives to toxicity as a phase I end point, and will these end points be reliable in defining active doses? Answering these questions in a reasonable time frame will be important if new anticancer agents are not to suffer undue delays in phase I evaluation.

  3. Bayesian adaptive phase II screening design for combination trials

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Chunyan; Yuan, Ying; Johnson, Valen E

    2013-01-01

    Background Trials of combination therapies for the treatment of cancer are playing an increasingly important role in the battle against this disease. To more efficiently handle the large number of combination therapies that must be tested, we propose a novel Bayesian phase II adaptive screening design to simultaneously select among possible treatment combinations involving multiple agents. Methods Our design is based on formulating the selection procedure as a Bayesian hypothesis testing problem in which the superiority of each treatment combination is equated to a single hypothesis. During the trial conduct, we use the current values of the posterior probabilities of all hypotheses to adaptively allocate patients to treatment combinations. Results Simulation studies show that the proposed design substantially outperforms the conventional multiarm balanced factorial trial design. The proposed design yields a significantly higher probability for selecting the best treatment while allocating substantially more patients to efficacious treatments. Limitations The proposed design is most appropriate for the trials combining multiple agents and screening out the efficacious combination to be further investigated. Conclusions The proposed Bayesian adaptive phase II screening design substantially outperformed the conventional complete factorial design. Our design allocates more patients to better treatments while providing higher power to identify the best treatment at the end of the trial. PMID:23359875

  4. Sorafenib dose escalation in treatment-naïve patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma: a non-randomised, open-label, Phase 2b study.

    PubMed

    Gore, Martin E; Jones, Robert J; Ravaud, Alain; Kuczyk, Markus; Demkow, Tomasz; Bearz, Alessandra; Shapiro, JoAnn; Strauss, Uwe Phillip; Porta, Camillo

    2017-06-01

    To assess the efficacy and safety of sorafenib dose escalation in metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC). Intra-patient dose escalation may enhance the clinical benefit of targeted anticancer agents in metastatic disease. In this non-randomised, open-label, Phase 2b study, treatment-naïve patients with mRCC were initially treated with the standard oral sorafenib dose [400 mg twice daily (BID)]. Two dose escalations were planned, each 200 mg BID after 28 days at the prior level. Dose reductions, interruptions, or delayed escalations were used to manage adverse events (AEs). The primary endpoint was objective response rate (ORR) in the modified intent-to-treat (mITT) population, which comprised patients with ≥6 months of treatment including ≥4 months of therapy at their highest tolerated dose. Secondary endpoints included progression-free survival (PFS) and safety. In all, 83 patients received sorafenib. The dose received for the longest duration was 400, 600, and 800 mg BID in 48.2%, 15.7%, and 24.1% of patients, respectively. The ORR was 44.4% [n = 8/18; 95% confidence interval (CI) 21.5-69.2] and 17.9% (n = 12/67; 95% CI 9.6-29.2) in the mITT and ITT populations, respectively. The median (95% CI) PFS was 7.4 (6.0-11.7) months (ITT). The most common AEs of any grade were hand-foot skin reaction (66.3%) and diarrhoea (63.9%). Sorafenib demonstrated clinical benefit in treatment-naïve patients with mRCC. However, relatively few patients could sustain doses of >400 mg BID. There was evidence that, where tolerated, escalation from the standard sorafenib dose may have enhanced clinical benefit. However, this study does not support dose escalation for most patients with treatment-naïve mRCC. Alternative protocols for sorafenib dose escalation could be explored. © 2016 The Authors BJU International © 2016 BJU International Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. A 48-week randomized phase 2b study evaluating cenicriviroc versus efavirenz in treatment-naive HIV-infected adults with C-C chemokine receptor type 5-tropic virus

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Melanie; Saag, Michael; DeJesus, Edwin; Gathe, Joseph; Lalezari, Jay; Landay, Alan L.; Cade, Jerry; Enejosa, Jeffrey; Lefebvre, Eric; Feinberg, Judith

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To compare the efficacy, safety, and anti-inflammatory effects of cenicriviroc (CVC), an oral, once-daily C-C chemokine receptor types 5 and 2 antagonist, with those of efavirenz (EFV) in treatment-naive, HIV-1-infected adults. Design: A 48-week, randomized, double-blind, double-dummy phase 2b trial at 43 institutions (USA and Puerto Rico). Methods: Study participants (HIV-1 RNA ≥1000 copies/ml, CD4+ cell count ≥200 cells/μl, C-C chemokine receptor type 5-tropic virus) were randomized 2 : 2 : 1 to CVC 100 mg (CVC100), CVC 200 mg (CVC200), or EFV 600 mg, each administered with emtricitabine/tenofovir disoproxil fumarate. Key end points were virologic success (HIV-1 RNA <50 copies/ml) at week 24 (primary) and week 48 (secondary), safety/tolerability at weeks 24 and 48. Study sites and patients remained blinded until week 48. Results: A total of 143 patients were randomized (CVC100, n = 59; CVC200, n = 56; EFV, n = 28). Virologic success was obtained at week 24 in 76, 73, and 71% of study participants for CVC100, CVC200, and EFV, respectively (all P > 0.05 versus EFV), and at week 48 in 68, 64, and 50%, respectively (all P > 0.05 versus EFV). Resistance mutations emerged in five and zero CVC and EFV-treated study participants, respectively. Virologic nonresponse and nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor resistance decreased when CVC minimum plasma concentration was at least 47.8 ng/ml. Treatment-related adverse events of at least grade 2 and discontinuations because of adverse events were less frequent in CVC-treated study participants. Total and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol decreased with CVC, but increased with EFV. C-C chemokine ligand type 2 (CCL2) (aka monocyte chemotactic protein-1) increased in a dose-dependent manner, whereas soluble CD14 levels decreased with CVC. Conclusion: CVC showed efficacy and favorable safety in treatment-naive HIV-1-infected study participants, supporting selection of CVC

  6. Improving early clinical trial phase identification of promising therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Kent, Thomas A; Shah, Shreyansh D; Mandava, Pitchaiah

    2015-07-21

    This review addresses decision-making underlying the frequent failure to confirm early-phase positive trial results and how to prioritize which early agents to transition to late phase. While unexpected toxicity is sometimes responsible for late-phase failures, lack of efficacy is also frequently found. In stroke as in other conditions, early trials often demonstrate imbalances in factors influencing outcome. Other issues complicate early trial analysis, including unequally distributed noise inherent in outcome measures and variations in natural history among studies. We contend that statistical approaches to correct for imbalances and noise, while likely valid for homogeneous conditions, appear unable to accommodate disease complexity and have failed to correctly identify effective agents. While blinding and randomization are important to reduce selection bias, these methods appear insufficient to insure valid conclusions. We found potential sources of analytical errors in nearly 90% of a sample of early stroke trials. To address these issues, we recommend changes in early-phase analysis and reporting: (1) restrict use of statistical correction to studies where the underlying assumptions are validated, (2) select dichotomous over continuous outcomes for small samples, (3) consider pooled samples to model natural history to detect early therapeutic signals and increase the likelihood of replication in larger samples, (4) report subgroup baseline conditions, (5) consider post hoc methods to restrict analysis to subjects with an appropriate match, and (6) increase the strength of effect threshold given these cumulative sources of noise and potential errors. More attention to these issues should lead to better decision-making regarding selection of agents to proceed to pivotal trials.

  7. National Program for Inspection of Non-Federal Dams. Farm Brook Site 2B Dam (CT 01547), Connecticut Coastal Basin, Hamden, Connecticut. Phase I Inspection Report.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-09-01

    E. EDGAR , III As stated Colonel, Corps of Engineers Division Engineer S-. 10 5 I FARM BROOK SITE 2B DAM CT 01547 I iCONNECTICUT COASTAL BASIN HAMDEN...construction is complete. Prepared by: Edgar P. Steele T. R. Wire Subj: Connecticut WP-08, Farm Brook, Site 2B Reviewed and Approved by: lorn P...30𔃻 D. REa-NFORC.EQ ~ZNCETE IPE OP BERM ELEV. 64.0 50LE0, 00 - ORINAL (5ROUND LINE 0ow~~l;Dow REAM ANE 3-0-005 FT/FT.- CONCRETE CRADLE -~GROUT R

  8. Phase 1 Clinical Trials in 83 Patients With Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Vaklavas, Christos; Tsimberidou, Apostolia-Maria; Wen, Sijin; Hong, David; Wheler, Jennifer; Ng, Chaan S.; Naing, Aung; Uehara, Cynthia; Wolff, Robert A.; Kurzrock, Razelle

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND The outcomes of patients with pancreatic cancer treated on early phase clinical trials have not been systematically analyzed. The purpose of this study was to report the presenting characteristics and outcomes of patients with locally advanced or metastatic pancreatic cancer treated on phase 1 clinical trials at a single institution. METHODS The authors reviewed the records of consecutive patients with metastatic pancreatic cancer who were treated in the Phase I Clinical Trials Program at The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center from November 2004 to March 2009. Data recorded and analyzed included survival, response, and disease characteristics. RESULTS Eighty-three patients were identified. The median age was 62 years (range, 39–81 years). Of 78 patients evaluable for response, 2 (3%) had a partial response (PR), and 10 (13%) had stable disease (SD) for ≥4 months. With a median follow-up for survivors of 3.7 months, the median survival from presentation in the phase 1 clinic was 5.0 months (95% confidence interval [CI], 3.3–6.2). The median overall survival from diagnosis was 22.1 months (95% CI, 17.9–26.5). The median time to treatment failure was 1.5 months (95% CI, 1.3–1.8). Independent factors associated with lower rates of PR/SD were liver metastases (P = .001) and performance status >0 (P = .01). Independent factors associated with shorter survival were liver metastases (P = .007), low calcium level (P = .015), and elevated CEA level (>6 ng/mL) (P = .005). CONCLUSIONS Our results suggest that phase 1 clinical trials offer a reasonable therapeutic approach for patients with advanced pancreatic cancer. PMID:20737567

  9. Randomized Phase II Trial of Sulindac for Lung Cancer Chemoprevention

    PubMed Central

    Limburg, Paul J.; Mandrekar, Sumithra J.; Aubry, Marie Christine; Ziegler, Katie L. Allen; Zhang, Jun; Yi, Joanne E.; Henry, Michael; Tazelaar, Henry D.; Lam, Stephen; McWilliams, Annette; Midthun, David E.; Edell, Eric S.; Rickman, Otis B.; Mazzone, Peter; Tockman, Melvyn; Beamis, John F.; Lamb, Carla; Simoff, Michael; Loprinzi, Charles; Szabo, Eva; Jett, James

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Sulindac represents a promising candidate agent for lung cancer chemoprevention, but clinical trial data have not been previously reported. We conducted a randomized, phase II chemoprevention trial involving current or former cigarette smokers (≥ 30 pack-years) utilizing the multi-center, inter-disciplinary infrastructure of the Cancer Prevention Network (CPN). Methods At least 1 bronchial dysplastic lesion identified by fluorescence bronchoscopy was required for randomization. Intervention assignments were sulindac 150 mg bid or an identical placebo bid for six months. Trial endpoints included changes in histologic grade of dysplasia (per-participant as primary endpoint and per lesion as secondary endpoint), number of dysplastic lesions (per-participant), and Ki67 labeling index. Results Slower than anticipated recruitment led to trial closure after randomizing participants (n = 31 and n = 30 in the sulindac and placebo arms, respectively). Pre- and post-intervention fluorescence bronchoscopy data were available for 53/61 (87%) randomized, eligible participants. The median (range) of dysplastic lesions at baseline was 2 (1-12) in the sulindac arm and 2 (1-7) in the placebo arm. Change in dysplasia was categorized as regression:stable:progression for 15:3:8 (58%:12%:31%) subjects in the sulindac arm and 15:2:10 (56%:7%:37%) subjects in the placebo arm; these distributions were not statistically different (p=0.85). Median Ki67 expression (% cells stained positive) was significantly reduced in both the placebo (30 versus 5; p = 0.0005) and sulindac (30 versus 10; p = 0.0003) arms, but the difference between arms was not statistically significant (p = 0.92). Conclusions Data from this multi-center, phase II squamous cell lung cancer chemoprevention trial do not demonstrate sufficient benefits from sulindac 150 mg bid for 6 months to warrant additional phase III testing. Investigation of pathway-focused agents is necessary for lung cancer chemoprevention

  10. Dispositional Optimism and Therapeutic Expectations in Early Phase Oncology Trials

    PubMed Central

    Jansen, Lynn A.; Mahadevan, Daruka; Appelbaum, Paul S.; Klein, William MP; Weinstein, Neil D.; Mori, Motomi; Daffé, Racky; Sulmasy, Daniel P.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Prior research has identified unrealistic optimism as a bias that might impair informed consent among patient-subjects in early phase oncology trials. Optimism, however, is not a unitary construct – it can also be defined as a general disposition, or what is called dispositional optimism. We assessed whether dispositional optimism would be related to high expectations for personal therapeutic benefit reported by patient-subjects in these trials but not to the therapeutic misconception. We also assessed how dispositional optimism related to unrealistic optimism. Methods Patient-subjects completed questionnaires designed to measure expectations for therapeutic benefit, dispositional optimism, unrealistic optimism, and the therapeutic misconception. Results Dispositional optimism was significantly associated with higher expectations for personal therapeutic benefit (Spearman r=0.333, p<0.0001), but was not associated with the therapeutic misconception. (Spearman r=−0.075, p=0.329). Dispositional optimism was weakly associated with unrealistic optimism (Spearman r=0.215, p=0.005). In multivariate analysis, both dispositional optimism (p=0.02) and unrealistic optimism (p<0.0001) were independently associated with high expectations for personal therapeutic benefit. Unrealistic optimism (p=.0001), but not dispositional optimism, was independently associated with the therapeutic misconception. Conclusion High expectations for therapeutic benefit among patient-subjects in early phase oncology trials should not be assumed to result from misunderstanding of specific information about the trials. Our data reveal that these expectations are associated with either a dispositionally positive outlook on life or biased expectations about specific aspects of trial participation. Not all manifestations of optimism are the same, and different types of optimism likely have different consequences for informed consent in early phase oncology research. PMID:26882017

  11. Randomized phase II trial of sulindac for lung cancer chemoprevention.

    PubMed

    Limburg, Paul J; Mandrekar, Sumithra J; Aubry, Marie Christine; Ziegler, Katie L Allen; Zhang, Jun; Yi, Joanne E; Henry, Michael; Tazelaar, Henry D; Lam, Stephen; McWilliams, Annette; Midthun, David E; Edell, Eric S; Rickman, Otis B; Mazzone, Peter; Tockman, Melvyn; Beamis, John F; Lamb, Carla; Simoff, Michael; Loprinzi, Charles; Szabo, Eva; Jett, James

    2013-03-01

    Sulindac represents a promising candidate agent for lung cancer chemoprevention, but clinical trial data have not been previously reported. We conducted a randomized, phase II chemoprevention trial involving current or former cigarette smokers (≥30 pack-years) utilizing the multi-center, inter-disciplinary infrastructure of the Cancer Prevention Network (CPN). At least 1 bronchial dysplastic lesion identified by fluorescence bronchoscopy was required for randomization. Intervention assignments were sulindac 150mg bid or an identical placebo bid for 6 months. Trial endpoints included changes in histologic grade of dysplasia (per-participant as primary endpoint and per lesion as secondary endpoint), number of dysplastic lesions (per-participant), and Ki67 labeling index. Slower than anticipated recruitment led to trial closure after randomizing participants (n=31 and n=30 in the sulindac and placebo arms, respectively). Pre- and post-intervention fluorescence bronchoscopy data were available for 53/61 (87%) randomized, eligible participants. The median (range) of dysplastic lesions at baseline was 2 (1-12) in the sulindac arm and 2 (1-7) in the placebo arm. Change in dysplasia was categorized as regression:stable:progression for 15:3:8 (58%:12%:31%) subjects in the sulindac arm and 15:2:10 (56%:7%:37%) subjects in the placebo arm; these distributions were not statistically different (p=0.85). Median Ki67 expression (% cells stained positive) was significantly reduced in both the placebo (30 versus 5; p=0.0005) and sulindac (30 versus 10; p=0.0003) arms, but the difference between arms was not statistically significant (p=0.92). Data from this multi-center, phase II squamous cell lung cancer chemoprevention trial do not demonstrate sufficient benefits from sulindac 150mg bid for 6 months to warrant additional phase III testing. Investigation of pathway-focused agents is necessary for lung cancer chemoprevention. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights

  12. Fit 2-B FATHERS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maiorano, Joseph J.

    2001-01-01

    Fit 2-B FATHERS is a parenting-skills education program for incarcerated adult males. The goals of this program are for participants to have reduced recidivism rates and a reduced risk of their children acquiring criminal records. These goals are accomplished by helping participants become physically, practically, and socially fit for the demands…

  13. Biomarker-Guided Adaptive Trial Designs in Phase II and Phase III: A Methodological Review

    PubMed Central

    Antoniou, Miranta; Jorgensen, Andrea L; Kolamunnage-Dona, Ruwanthi

    2016-01-01

    Background Personalized medicine is a growing area of research which aims to tailor the treatment given to a patient according to one or more personal characteristics. These characteristics can be demographic such as age or gender, or biological such as a genetic or other biomarker. Prior to utilizing a patient’s biomarker information in clinical practice, robust testing in terms of analytical validity, clinical validity and clinical utility is necessary. A number of clinical trial designs have been proposed for testing a biomarker’s clinical utility, including Phase II and Phase III clinical trials which aim to test the effectiveness of a biomarker-guided approach to treatment; these designs can be broadly classified into adaptive and non-adaptive. While adaptive designs allow planned modifications based on accumulating information during a trial, non-adaptive designs are typically simpler but less flexible. Methods and Findings We have undertaken a comprehensive review of biomarker-guided adaptive trial designs proposed in the past decade. We have identified eight distinct biomarker-guided adaptive designs and nine variations from 107 studies. Substantial variability has been observed in terms of how trial designs are described and particularly in the terminology used by different authors. We have graphically displayed the current biomarker-guided adaptive trial designs and summarised the characteristics of each design. Conclusions Our in-depth overview provides future researchers with clarity in definition, methodology and terminology for biomarker-guided adaptive trial designs. PMID:26910238

  14. Phase 0 clinical trials in oncology new drug development

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Umesh Chandra; Bhatia, Sandeep; Garg, Amit; Sharma, Amit; Choudhary, Vaibhav

    2011-01-01

    Research focus of pharmaceutical industry has expanded to a larger extent in last few decades putting many more new molecules, particularly targeted agents, for the clinical development. On the other hand, researchers are facing serious challenges due to high failure rates of new molecules in clinical studies. The United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in combination with academia and industry experts identified many factors responsible for failures of new molecules, and with a vision of taking traditional drug development model toward an innovative paradigm shift, issued regulatory guidance on conduct of exploratory investigational new drug (exploratory IND) studies, often called as phase 0 clinical trials, requiring reduced preclinical testing, which has special relevance to life-threatening diseases such as cancer. Phase 0 trials, utilizing much lower drug doses, provide an opportunity to explore the clinical behavior of new molecules very early in the drug development pathway, helping to identify the promising candidates and eliminating non-promising molecules, thus improving the efficiency of overall drug development with significant savings of resources. Being non-therapeutic in nature, these studies, however, pose certain ethical challenges requiring careful study designing and informed consent process. This article reviews the insights and perspectives for the feasibility, utility, planning, designing and conduct of phase 0 clinical trials, in addition to ethical issues and industrial perspective focused at oncology new drug development. PMID:21584177

  15. Phase 0 clinical trials in oncology new drug development.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Umesh Chandra; Bhatia, Sandeep; Garg, Amit; Sharma, Amit; Choudhary, Vaibhav

    2011-01-01

    Research focus of pharmaceutical industry has expanded to a larger extent in last few decades putting many more new molecules, particularly targeted agents, for the clinical development. On the other hand, researchers are facing serious challenges due to high failure rates of new molecules in clinical studies. The United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in combination with academia and industry experts identified many factors responsible for failures of new molecules, and with a vision of taking traditional drug development model toward an innovative paradigm shift, issued regulatory guidance on conduct of exploratory investigational new drug (exploratory IND) studies, often called as phase 0 clinical trials, requiring reduced preclinical testing, which has special relevance to life-threatening diseases such as cancer. Phase 0 trials, utilizing much lower drug doses, provide an opportunity to explore the clinical behavior of new molecules very early in the drug development pathway, helping to identify the promising candidates and eliminating non-promising molecules, thus improving the efficiency of overall drug development with significant savings of resources. Being non-therapeutic in nature, these studies, however, pose certain ethical challenges requiring careful study designing and informed consent process. This article reviews the insights and perspectives for the feasibility, utility, planning, designing and conduct of phase 0 clinical trials, in addition to ethical issues and industrial perspective focused at oncology new drug development.

  16. Bayesian approach to two-stage phase II trial.

    PubMed

    Pepple, P A; Choi, S C

    1997-05-01

    Consider the situation in which there are several different therapeutic agents. It is desired to select the best agent and to examine its efficacy relative to the control. Too often clinical trials terminate with negative outcomes in part due to inadequate phase II studies. A two-stage phase II based on a Bayesian approach is considered in order to reduce such likelihood. The first stage consists of selecting the best agent and the second stage consists of examining the relative efficacy of the selected agent compared to the control. A formal phase III clinical trial can be initiated when the particular agent is shown to be promising on the basis of the proposed phase II study. The Bayesian approach employed uses an ad hoc likelihood due to the fact that the exact likelihood is complex and intractable. In this sense the proposed approach is thus an approximation. A simulation study is conducted to investigate the performance of the proposed Bayesian approach and compared to two fixed-sample-size approaches. Due to the fact that the procedure is approximate, the simulation study is essential to assess the usefulness of the procedure. The study suggests that the Bayesian approach is an attractive alternative to fixed-sample-size approaches.

  17. Therapeutic misconception in early phase gene transfer trials.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Gail E; Easter, Michele M; Zimmer, Catherine; King, Nancy M P; Davis, Arlene M; Rothschild, Barbra Bluestone; Churchill, Larry R; Wilfond, Benjamin S; Nelson, Daniel K

    2006-01-01

    Many subjects in early phase clinical trials expect to benefit in some way from the research intervention. It is understandable that people hope for improvement in their condition, no matter what the evidence. Yet unreasonable expectation of medical benefit may reflect problems with informed consent: Investigators may not disclose clearly that direct medical benefit from an early phase experimental intervention is unlikely or impossible, or subjects may not appreciate the differences between treatment and research. This paper presents findings from recent interviews with researchers and subjects and analysis of consent forms in early phase gene transfer research, a cutting-edge technology often called 'gene therapy'. We use three variables to construct a composite measure of therapeutic misconception TM, tapping misconceptions about the purposes of early phase research and the potential for direct medical benefit in these trials. Our multivariate model demonstrates the importance of both subject- and study-level factors as predictors of this TM index: education, disease type, and communication by study personnel about the likelihood of benefit. We hope that this work will deepen the discussion of how to define and measure TM, and refine the specification of factors that are related to subjects' TM.

  18. Investigational drugs in phase I and phase II clinical trials for thalassemia.

    PubMed

    Motta, Irene; Scaramellini, Natalia; Cappellini, Maria Domenica

    2017-07-01

    Regular transfusion and iron chelation are the current treatment of severe forms of thalassemia. As a consequence of this demanding supportive treatment, there are several unmet therapeutic needs. Due to a deeper understanding in the pathophysiology of thalassemia, new therapeutic strategies have been developed that are now in pre-clinical and clinical trials. Areas covered: Activin receptor ligand traps (luspatercept and sotatercept), drugs targeting ineffective erythropoiesis, showed encouraging results in Phase I and II clinical trials. A phase III clinical trial is currently ongoing. Ruxolitinib, a Jak2 inhibitor, has been tested to limit stress erythropoiesis in a phase II clinical trial. In addition, improvement in iron chelation has been developed. Moreover, several trials of gene therapy are currently active in different countries with different lentiviral vectors. Expert opinion: The most promising molecules are the activin receptor ligand traps. Together with gene therapy these could be an alternative to bone marrow transplant, aiming towards a curative strategy. The main limit to gene therapy seems to be the conditioning regimen, thus an in vivo gene therapy would be more suitable. At pre-clinical level gene editing is showing extremely encouraging results.

  19. Early phase clinical trials to identify optimal dosing and safety

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Natalie; Hansen, Aaron R.; Siu, Lillian L.; Abdul Razak, Albiruni R.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of early stage clinical trials is to determine the recommended dose and toxicity profile of an investigational agent or multi-drug combination. Molecularly targeted agents (MTAs) and immunotherapies have distinct toxicities from chemotherapies that are often not dose dependent and can lead to chronic and sometimes unpredictable side effects. Therefore utilizing a dose escalation method that has toxicity based endpoints may not be as appropriate for determination of recommended dose, and alternative parameters such as pharmacokinetic or pharmacodynamic outcomes are potentially appealing options. Approaches to enhance safety and optimize dosing include improved preclinical models and assessment, innovative model based design and dose escalation strategies, patient selection, the use of expansion cohorts and extended toxicity assessments. Tailoring the design of phase I trials by adopting new strategies to address the different properties of MTAs is required to enhance the development of these agents. This review will focus on the limitations to safety and dose determination that have occurred in the development of MTAs and immunotherapies. In addition, strategies are proposed to overcome these challenges to develop phase I trials that can more accurately define the recommended dose and identify adverse events. PMID:25160636

  20. Phase I controlled trials of WR-2721 and cyclophosphamide

    SciTech Connect

    Glick, J.H.; Glover, D.; Weiler, C.; Norfleet, L.; Yuhas, J.; Kligerman, M.M.

    1984-09-01

    WR-2721 is an organic thiophosphate compound which in the animal model selectively protects against the hematologic toxicity of cyclophosphamide by factors of 1.5 to 2.0. Controlled Phase I trials of WR-2721 and cyclophosphamide were initiated to determine if WR-2721 protected against cyclophosphamide's hematolgic toxicity. Fifteen patients received WR-2721 prior to cyclophosphamide and were subsequently retreated 4 weeks later with the same cyclophosphamide dose alone. With WR-2721 pretreatment, 11/15 (73%) patients had improved WBC counts. In the second trial, 25 patients received the reverse sequence: an initial dose of cyclophosphamide alone, followed 4 weeks later by WR-2721 prior to the same dose of cyclophosphamide. With WR-2721 pretreatment, 12/25 (48%) patients had improved nadir WBC counts. No patient developed microscopic or gross hematuria or inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion. These data suggest that WR-2721 provides significant protection against cyclophosphamide-induced granulocytopenia, but the dose modification factors and degree of clinical benefit remain to be established. The current recommended WR-2721 dose for Phase II trials is 740 mg/m/sup 2/ administered over 15 minutes.

  1. A 48-week randomized phase 2b study evaluating cenicriviroc versus efavirenz in treatment-naive HIV-infected adults with C-C chemokine receptor type 5-tropic virus.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Melanie; Saag, Michael; DeJesus, Edwin; Gathe, Joseph; Lalezari, Jay; Landay, Alan L; Cade, Jerry; Enejosa, Jeffrey; Lefebvre, Eric; Feinberg, Judith

    2016-03-27

    To compare the efficacy, safety, and anti-inflammatory effects of cenicriviroc (CVC), an oral, once-daily C-C chemokine receptor types 5 and 2 antagonist, with those of efavirenz (EFV) in treatment-naive, HIV-1-infected adults. A 48-week, randomized, double-blind, double-dummy phase 2b trial at 43 institutions (USA and Puerto Rico). Study participants (HIV-1 RNA ≥1000 copies/ml, CD4 cell count ≥200 cells/μl, C-C chemokine receptor type 5-tropic virus) were randomized 2 : 2 : 1 to CVC 100 mg (CVC100), CVC 200 mg (CVC200), or EFV 600 mg, each administered with emtricitabine/tenofovir disoproxil fumarate. Key end points were virologic success (HIV-1 RNA <50 copies/ml) at week 24 (primary) and week 48 (secondary), safety/tolerability at weeks 24 and 48. Study sites and patients remained blinded until week 48. A total of 143 patients were randomized (CVC100, n = 59; CVC200, n = 56; EFV, n = 28). Virologic success was obtained at week 24 in 76, 73, and 71% of study participants for CVC100, CVC200, and EFV, respectively (all P > 0.05 versus EFV), and at week 48 in 68, 64, and 50%, respectively (all P > 0.05 versus EFV). Resistance mutations emerged in five and zero CVC and EFV-treated study participants, respectively. Virologic nonresponse and nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor resistance decreased when CVC minimum plasma concentration was at least 47.8 ng/ml. Treatment-related adverse events of at least grade 2 and discontinuations because of adverse events were less frequent in CVC-treated study participants. Total and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol decreased with CVC, but increased with EFV. C-C chemokine ligand type 2 (CCL2) (aka monocyte chemotactic protein-1) increased in a dose-dependent manner, whereas soluble CD14 levels decreased with CVC. CVC showed efficacy and favorable safety in treatment-naive HIV-1-infected study participants, supporting selection of CVC200 for phase 3 studies. NCT01338883.

  2. Cholesteryl ester transfer protein TaqI B2B2 genotype is associated with higher HDL cholesterol levels and lower risk of coronary heart disease end points in men with HDL deficiency: Veterans Affairs HDL Cholesterol Intervention Trial.

    PubMed

    Brousseau, Margaret E; O'Connor, John J; Ordovas, Jose M; Collins, Dorothea; Otvos, James D; Massov, Tatyana; McNamara, Judith R; Rubins, Hanna B; Robins, Sander J; Schaefer, Ernst J

    2002-07-01

    We have previously reported that genetic variation at the cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) TaqIB locus is correlated with plasma lipid levels and coronary heart disease (CHD) risk in the Framingham Offspring Study (FOS). In FOS, the B2 allele was associated with increased levels of high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol (HDL-C), decreased CETP activity, and reduced CHD risk for men having the B2B2 genotype. The present study was undertaken to further define the relationship between this polymorphism and CHD risk at the population level. We tested for associations between the CETP TaqIB genotype and plasma lipoprotein levels, response to gemfibrozil therapy, and CHD end points in 852 men participating in the Veterans Affairs HDL-C Intervention Trial (VA-HIT), a study designed to explore the potential benefits of raising HDL levels in men having established CHD with low HDL-C (< or =40 mg/dL) as their primary lipid abnormality. In VA-HIT, 13.9% of the men had the B2B2 genotype relative to 19.1% of the men in FOS (-27%, P<0.03), whereas more men in VA-HIT had the B1B1 genotype (15%, P<0.05). Similar to our finding in FOS, B2B2 men in VA-HIT had the highest mean level of HDL-C (32.6+/-4.8 mg/dL), followed by B1B2 men (32.0+/-5.3 mg/dL), and, last, by B1B1 men (30.9+/-4.9 mg/dL). Interestingly, B1B1 men, who had the least favorable plasma lipid profile at baseline, had the greatest triglyceride-lowering response to gemfibrozil (-34%, P=0.006). CETP TaqIB genotype was also associated with the risk of CHD end points in VA-HIT, with an adjusted risk ratio of 0.52 for B2B2 men (P=0.08). Our data demonstrate that in men with CHD and HDL deficiency, the CETP TaqI B2B2 genotype is (1) significantly reduced and (2) associated with higher levels of plasma HDL-C and lower CHD risk. Together with our earlier report, these results support the concept that increased HDL-C levels, resulting from reduced CETP activity, are associated with decreased CHD risk.

  3. Boeing XF2B-1 (F2B-1)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1931-01-01

    Boeing XF2B-1 (F2B-1): Serving as the prototype for the F2B-1 shipboard fighter, the XF2B-1 differed visually in having a pointed spinner and an unbalanced rudder. Like many aircraft of its day, the Boeing model 69 was powered by a Pratt & Whitney Wasp radial engine.

  4. Clinical Utility of Metrics Based on Tumor Measurements in Phase II Trials to Predict Overall Survival Outcomes in Phase III Trials by Using Resampling Methods

    PubMed Central

    An, Ming-Wen; Han, Yu; Meyers, Jeffrey P.; Bogaerts, Jan; Sargent, Daniel J.; Mandrekar, Sumithra J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Phase II clinical trials inform go/no-go decisions for proceeding to phase III trials, and appropriate end points in phase II trials are critical for facilitating this decision. Phase II solid tumor trials have traditionally used end points such as tumor response defined by Response Evaluation Criteria for Solid Tumors (RECIST). We previously reported that absolute and relative changes in tumor measurements demonstrated potential, but not convincing, improvement over RECIST to predict overall survival (OS). We have evaluated the metrics by using additional measures of clinical utility and data from phase III trials. Methods Resampling methods were used to assess the clinical utility of metrics to predict phase III outcomes from simulated phase II trials. In all, 2,000 phase II trials were simulated from four actual phase III trials (two positive for OS and two negative for OS). Cox models for three metrics landmarked at 12 weeks and adjusted for baseline tumor burden were fit for each phase II trial: absolute changes, relative changes, and RECIST. Clinical utility was assessed by positive predictive value and negative predictive value, that is, the probability of a positive or negative phase II trial predicting an effective or ineffective phase III conclusion, by prediction error, and by concordance index (c-index). Results Absolute and relative change metrics had higher positive predictive value and negative predictive value than RECIST in five of six treatment comparisons and lower prediction error curves in all six. However, differences were negligible. No statistically significant difference in c-index across metrics was found. Conclusion The absolute and relative change metrics are not meaningfully better than RECIST in predicting OS. PMID:26503199

  5. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic characterization of a new formulation containing synergistic proportions of interferons alpha-2b and gamma (HeberPAG®) in patients with mycosis fungoides: an open-label trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The synergistic combination of interferon (IFN) alpha-2b and IFN gamma results in more potent in vitro biological effects mediated by both IFNs. The aim of this investigation was to evaluate by first time the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of this combination in patients with mycosis fungoides. Methods An exploratory, prospective, open-label clinical trial was conducted. Twelve patients, both genders, 18 to 75 years-old, with mycosis fungoides at stages IB to III, were eligible for the study. All of them received intramuscularly a single high dose (23 × 106 IU) of a novel synergistic IFN mixture (HeberPAG®) for pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic studies. Serum IFN alpha-2b and IFN gamma concentrations were measured during 96 hours by commercial enzyme immunoassays (EIA) specific for each IFN. Other blood IFN-inducible markers and laboratory variables were used as pharmacodynamics and safety criteria. Results The pharmacokinetic evaluation by EIA yielded a similar pattern for both IFNs that are also in agreement with the well-known described profiles for these molecules when these are administered separately. The average values for main parameters were: Cmax: 263 and 9.3 pg/mL; Tmax: 9.5 and 6.9 h; AUC: 4483 and 87.5 pg.h/mL, half-life (t1/2): 4.9 and 13.4 h; mean residence time (MRT): 13.9 and 13.5 h, for serum IFN alpha-2b and IFN gamma, respectively. The pharmacodynamic variables were strongly stimulated by simultaneous administration of both IFNs: serum neopterin and beta-2 microglobulin levels (β2M), and stimulation of 2’-5’ oligoadenylate synthetase (OAS1) mRNA expression. The most encouraging data was the high increment of serum neopterin, 8.0 ng/mL at 48 h, not been described before for any unmodified or pegylated IFN. Additionally, β2M concentration doubled the pre-dose value at 24–48 hours. For both variables the values remained clearly upper baseline levels at 96 hours. Conclusions HeberPAG®possesses improved

  6. Field-induced gapless electron pocket in the superconducting vortex phase of YNi2B2C as probed by magnetoacoustic quantum oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nössler, J.; Seerig, R.; Yasin, S.; Uhlarz, M.; Zherlitsyn, S.; Behr, G.; Drechsler, S.-L.; Fuchs, G.; Rosner, H.; Wosnitza, J.

    2017-01-01

    By use of ultrasound studies we resolved magnetoacoustic quantum oscillation deep into the mixed state of the multiband nonmagnetic superconductor YNi2B2C . Below the upper critical field, only a very weak additional damping appears that can be well explained by the field inhomogeneity caused by the flux-line lattice in the mixed state. This is clear evidence for no or a vanishingly small gap for one of the bands, namely, the spheroidal α band. This contrasts de Haas-van Alphen data obtained by use of torque magnetometry for the same sample, with a rapidly vanishing oscillation signal in the mixed state. This points to a strongly distorted flux-line lattice in the latter case that, in general, can hamper a reliable extraction of gap parameters by use of such techniques.

  7. Planning future clinical trials in Machado Joseph disease: Lessons from a phase 2 trial.

    PubMed

    Saute, Jonas Alex Morales; Rieder, Carlos R M; Castilhos, Raphael Machado; Monte, Thais Lampert; Schumacher-Schuh, Artur Francisco; Donis, Karina Carvalho; D'Ávila, Rui; Souza, Gabriele Nunes; Russo, Aline Dutra; Furtado, Gabriel Vasata; Gheno, Tailise Conte; Souza, Diogo Onofre Gomes; Saraiva-Pereira, Maria Luiza; Portela, Luis Valmor Cruz; Camey, Suzi; Torman, Vanessa Bielefeld Leotti; Jardim, Laura Bannach

    2015-11-15

    In a recent phase 2 clinical trial in spinocerebellar ataxia type 3/Machado Joseph disease (SCA3/MJD), a neurogenetic disorder without specific therapy, benefits of lithium carbonate were found only on secondary efficacy outcomes, all related to ataxic features. In order to help designing future studies, we further analyzed the trial data searching for treatment response modifiers and metric properties of spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA) scales. Efficacy analysis was performed with the Neurological Examination Score for the Assessment of Spinocerebellar Ataxia (NESSCA) and the Scale for the Assessment and Rating of Ataxia (SARA) subscores and with the subgroup of patients with independent gait according to the 8-meter walking-time (8MW). Interactions of clinical/molecular findings with treatment response, minimally important differences (MIDs), and sample size estimations for NESSCA, SARA, Spinocerebellar Ataxia Functional Index (SCAFI) and Composite Cerebellar Functional Score (CCFS) were evaluated. 62 SCA3/MJD patients had been randomly assigned (1:1) for the double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. While cerebellar NESSCA (range: 0-7 points) differed between groups 0.64 points (95% CI 0.23 to 1.05, p<0.001) over the whole 48weeks of study, favoring lithium, no effect was found on non-ataxia subscores. Among patients able to perform the 8MW on baseline, NESSCA (p=0.010) and SCAFI (p=0.015) differed between groups favoring lithium. Finally, estimated sample sizes for the scales were provided. Lithium efficacy on cerebellar NESSCA, and on SCAFI and CCFS in the primary analysis, together with the lack of effect on non-ataxia features suggests that lithium should be tested in phase 3 trials in SCA3/MJD and that ataxia scales should be preferred to multisystem neurological instruments as the primary outcome. The inclusion of early stage patients is advisable in future clinical trials in SCA3/MJD. clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT01096082. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B

  8. Clinical Perspectives from Randomized Phase 3 Trials on Prostate Cancer: An Analysis of the ClinicalTrials.gov Database.

    PubMed

    Tsikkinis, Alexandros; Cihoric, Nikola; Giannarini, Gianluca; Hinz, Stefan; Briganti, Alberto; Wust, Peter; Ost, Piet; Ploussard, Guillaume; Massard, Christophe; Surcel, Cristian I; Sooriakumaran, Prasanna; Isbarn, Hendrik; De Visschere, Peter J L; Futterer, Jurgen J; van der Bergh, Roderick C N; Dal Pra, Alan; Aebersold, Daniel M; Budach, Volker; Ghadjar, Pirus

    2015-09-01

    It is not easy to overview pending phase 3 trials on prostate cancer (PCa), and awareness of these trials would benefit clinicians. To identify all phase 3 trials on PCa registered in the ClinicalTrials.gov database with pending results. On September 29, 2014, a database was established from the records for 175 538 clinical trials registered on ClinicalTrials.gov. A search of this database for the substring "prostat" identified 2951 prostate trials. Phase 3 trials accounted for 441 studies, of which 333 concerned only PCa. We selected only ongoing or completed trials with pending results, that is, for which the primary endpoint had not been published in a peer-reviewed medical journal. We identified 123 phase 3 trials with pending results. Trials were conducted predominantly in North America (n=63; 51%) and Europe (n=47; 38%). The majority were on nonmetastatic disease (n=82; 67%), with 37 (30%) on metastatic disease and four trials (3%) including both. In terms of intervention, systemic treatment was most commonly tested (n=71; 58%), followed by local treatment 34 (28%), and both systemic and local treatment (n=11; 9%), with seven (6%) trials not classifiable. The 71 trials on systemic treatment included androgen deprivation therapy (n=34; 48%), chemotherapy (n=15; 21%), immunotherapy (n=9; 13%), other systemic drugs (n=9; 13%), radiopharmaceuticals (n=2; 3%), and combinations (n=2; 3%). Local treatments tested included radiation therapy (n=27; 79%), surgery (n=5; 15%), and both (n=2; 2%). A limitation is that not every clinical trial is registered on ClinicalTrials.gov. There are many PCa phase 3 trials with pending results, most of which address questions regarding systemic treatments for both nonmetastatic and metastatic disease. Radiation therapy and androgen deprivation therapy are the interventions most commonly tested for local and systemic treatment, respectively. This report describes all phase 3 trials on prostate cancer registered in the ClinicalTrials

  9. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic characterization of a new formulation containing synergistic proportions of interferons alpha-2b and gamma (HeberPAG) in patients with mycosis fungoides: an open-label trial.

    PubMed

    García-Vega, Yanelda; García-García, Idrian; Collazo-Caballero, Sonia E; Santely-Pravia, Egla E; Cruz-Ramírez, Alieski; Tuero-Iglesias, Angela D; Alfonso-Alvarado, Cristian; Cabrera-Placeres, Mileidys; Castro-Basart, Nailet; Duncan-Roberts, Yaquelín; Carballo-Treto, Tania I; Soto-Matos, Josanne; Izquierdo-Toledo, Yoandy; Vázquez-Blomquist, Dania; García-Iglesias, Elizeth; Bello-Rivero, Iraldo

    2012-12-28

    The synergistic combination of interferon (IFN) alpha-2b and IFN gamma results in more potent in vitro biological effects mediated by both IFNs. The aim of this investigation was to evaluate by first time the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of this combination in patients with mycosis fungoides. An exploratory, prospective, open-label clinical trial was conducted. Twelve patients, both genders, 18 to 75 years-old, with mycosis fungoides at stages IB to III, were eligible for the study. All of them received intramuscularly a single high dose (23 × 10(6) IU) of a novel synergistic IFN mixture (HeberPAG) for pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic studies. Serum IFN alpha-2b and IFN gamma concentrations were measured during 96 hours by commercial enzyme immunoassays (EIA) specific for each IFN. Other blood IFN-inducible markers and laboratory variables were used as pharmacodynamics and safety criteria. The pharmacokinetic evaluation by EIA yielded a similar pattern for both IFNs that are also in agreement with the well-known described profiles for these molecules when these are administered separately. The average values for main parameters were: Cmax: 263 and 9.3 pg/mL; Tmax: 9.5 and 6.9 h; AUC: 4483 and 87.5 pg.h/mL, half-life (t(1/2)): 4.9 and 13.4 h; mean residence time (MRT): 13.9 and 13.5 h, for serum IFN alpha-2b and IFN gamma, respectively. The pharmacodynamic variables were strongly stimulated by simultaneous administration of both IFNs: serum neopterin and beta-2 microglobulin levels (β2M), and stimulation of 2'-5' oligoadenylate synthetase (OAS1) mRNA expression. The most encouraging data was the high increment of serum neopterin, 8.0 ng/mL at 48 h, not been described before for any unmodified or pegylated IFN. Additionally, β2M concentration doubled the pre-dose value at 24-48 hours. For both variables the values remained clearly upper baseline levels at 96 hours. HeberPAG possesses improved pharmacodynamic properties that may be very useful in

  10. Microstructure, microhardness, phase analysis and chemical composition of laser remelted FeB-Fe2B surface layers produced on Vanadis-6 steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartkowska, Aneta; Swadźba, Radosław; Popławski, Mikołaj; Bartkowski, Dariusz

    2016-12-01

    The paper presents the study results of the diffusion boronized layer and their laser modification. Diffusion boronized processes were carried out on Vanadis-6 steel at 900 °C for 5 h. Boronized layers were characterized by dual-phase microstructure consisting of iron borides having a microhardness in the range from 1800 to 1400 HV. The laser heat treatment was carried out using CO2 laser after diffusion boronizing process. The research goals of this paper was analysis of microstructure, microhardness as well as phase and chemical composition of boronized layers after laser modification. Microstructure of boronized layer after laser modification consisted of remelted zone, heat affected zone and substrate. Remelted zone was characterized by microstructure consisted of boron-martensite eutectic. In this zone, the phases of borides and carbides were detected. Boronized layers after laser modification were characterized by the mild gradient of microhardness from surface to the substrate.

  11. Phase II Study of Adjuvant Immunotherapy with the CSF-470 Vaccine Plus Bacillus Calmette–Guerin Plus Recombinant Human Granulocyte Macrophage-Colony Stimulating Factor vs Medium-Dose Interferon Alpha 2B in Stages IIB, IIC, and III Cutaneous Melanoma Patients: A Single Institution, Randomized Study

    PubMed Central

    Mordoh, José; Pampena, María Betina; Aris, Mariana; Blanco, Paula Alejandra; Lombardo, Mónica; von Euw, Erika María; Mac Keon, Soledad; Yépez Crow, Michelle; Bravo, Alicia Inés; O’Connor, Juan Manuel; Orlando, Ana Gabriela; Ramello, Franco; Levy, Estrella Mariel; Barrio, María Marcela

    2017-01-01

    The irradiated, allogeneic, cellular CSF-470 vaccine plus Bacillus Calmette–Guerin (BCG) and recombinant human granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (rhGM-CSF) is being tested against medium-dose IFN-α2b in stages IIB–III cutaneous melanoma (CM) patients (pts) after surgery in an open, randomized, Phase II/III study. We present the results of the Phase II part of the ongoing CASVAC-0401 study (ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01729663). Thirty-one pts were randomized to the CSF-470 vaccine (n = 20) or to the IFN-α2b arm (n = 11). During the 2-year treatment, immunized pts should receive 13 vaccinations. On day 1 of each visit, 1.6 × 107 irradiated CSF-470 cells plus 106 colony-forming units BCG plus 100 µg rhGM-CSF were administered intradermally, followed on days 2–4 by 100 µg rhGM-CSF. IFN-α2b pts should receive 10 million units (MU)/day/5 days a week for 4 weeks; then 5 MU thrice weekly for 23 months. Toxicity and quality of life (QOL) were evaluated at each visit. With a mean and a maximum follow-up of 39.4 and 83 months, respectively, a significant benefit in the distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS) for CSF-470 was observed (p = 0.022). Immune monitoring showed an increase in antitumoral cellular and humoral response in vaccinated pts. CSF-470 was well tolerated; 20/20 pts presented grades 1–2 dermic reactions at the vaccination site; 3/20 pts presented grade 3 allergic reactions. Other adverse events (AEs) were grade 1. Pts in the IFN-α2b arm presented grades 2–3 hematological (7/11), hepatic (2/11), and cardiac (1/11) toxicity; AEs in 9/11 pts forced treatment interruptions. QOL was significantly superior in the vaccine arm (p < 0.0001). Our results suggest that CSF-470 vaccine plus BCG plus GM-CSF can significantly prolong, with lower toxicity, the DMFS of high-risk CM pts with respect to medium-dose IFN-α2b. The continuation of a Phase III part of the CASVAC-0401 study is encouraged. PMID:28620382

  12. Two Phase 3 Trials of Adalimumab for Hidradenitis Suppurativa.

    PubMed

    Kimball, Alexa B; Okun, Martin M; Williams, David A; Gottlieb, Alice B; Papp, Kim A; Zouboulis, Christos C; Armstrong, April W; Kerdel, Francisco; Gold, Michael H; Forman, Seth B; Korman, Neil J; Giamarellos-Bourboulis, Evangelos J; Crowley, Jeffrey J; Lynde, Charles; Reguiai, Ziad; Prens, Errol-Prospero; Alwawi, Eihab; Mostafa, Nael M; Pinsky, Brett; Sundaram, Murali; Gu, Yihua; Carlson, Dawn M; Jemec, Gregor B E

    2016-08-04

    Hidradenitis suppurativa is a painful, chronic inflammatory skin disease with few options for effective treatment. In a phase 2 trial, adalimumab, an antibody against tumor necrosis factor α, showed efficacy against hidradenitis suppurativa. PIONEER I and II were similarly designed, phase 3 multicenter trials of adalimumab for hidradenitis suppurativa, with two double-blind, placebo-controlled periods. In period 1, patients were randomly assigned in a 1:1 ratio to 40 mg of adalimumab weekly or matching placebo for 12 weeks. In period 2, patients were reassigned to adalimumab at a weekly or every-other-week dose or to placebo for 24 weeks. The primary end point was a clinical response, defined as at least a 50% reduction from baseline in the abscess and inflammatory-nodule count, with no increase in abscess or draining-fistula counts, at week 12. We enrolled 307 patients in PIONEER I and 326 in PIONEER II. Clinical response rates at week 12 were significantly higher for the groups receiving adalimumab weekly than for the placebo groups: 41.8% versus 26.0% in PIONEER I (P=0.003) and 58.9% versus 27.6% in PIONEER II (P<0.001). Patients receiving adalimumab had significantly greater improvement than the placebo groups in rank-ordered secondary outcomes (lesions, pain, and the modified Sartorius score for disease severity) at week 12 in PIONEER II only. Serious adverse events in period 1 (excluding worsening of underlying disease) occurred in 1.3% of patients receiving adalimumab and 1.3% of those receiving placebo in PIONEER I and in 1.8% and 3.7% of patients, respectively, in PIONEER II. In period 2, the rates of serious adverse events were 4.6% or less in all the groups in both studies, with no significant between-group differences. Treatment with adalimumab (40 mg weekly), as compared with placebo, resulted in significantly higher clinical response rates in both trials at 12 weeks; rates of serious adverse events were similar in the study groups. (Funded by Abb

  13. Strength and weakness of phase I to IV trials, with an emphasis on translational aspects

    PubMed Central

    Lønning, Per Eystein

    2008-01-01

    Although phase I to III trials represent the standard for introducing new drugs to clinical therapy, there has been increasing demand for translational research in oncology over the past decade. Thus, for most novel therapies such as 'targeted agents', a critical aspect for drug development in oncology has been to select the right patients for therapy. Translational research plays a pivotal role, not only in phase II trials but also in phase I and III and even in phase IV trials. The importance of distinguishing between our translational 'aims' in phase II and phase III trials is emphasized. Although translational research in phase III trials aims to identify optimal markers for clinical use, phase II studies may represent an optimal setting to explore tumour biology and the mechanisms of drug resistance in depth. PMID:19128436

  14. Phase I clinical trial combining imatinib mesylate and IL-2

    PubMed Central

    Chaput, Nathalie; Flament, Caroline; Locher, Clara; Desbois, Mélanie; Rey, Annie; Rusakiewicz, Sylvie; Poirier-Colame, Vichnou; Pautier, Patricia; Le Cesne, Axel; Soria, Jean-Charles; Paci, Angelo; Rosenzwajg, Michelle; Klatzmann, David; Eggermont, Alexander; Robert, Caroline; Zitvogel, Laurence

    2013-01-01

    We performed a Phase I clinical trial from October 2007 to October 2009, enrolling patients affected by refractory solid tumors, to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of interleukin (IL)-2 combined with low dose cyclophosphamide (CTX) and imatinib mesylate (IM). In a companion paper published in this issue of OncoImmunology, we show that the MTD of IL-2 is 6 MIU/day for 5 consecutive days, and that IL-2 increases the impregnation of both IM and of its main metabolite, CGP74588. Among the secondary objectives, we wanted to determine immunological markers that might be associated with progression-free survival (PFS) and/or overall survival (OS). The combination therapy markedly reduced the absolute counts of B, CD4+ T and CD8+ T cells in a manner that was proportional to IL-2 dose. There was a slight (less than 2-fold) increase in the proportion of regulatory T cells (Tregs) among CD4+ T cells in response to IM plus IL-2. The natural killer (NK)-cell compartment was activated, exhibiting a significant upregulation of HLA-DR, tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) and CD56. The abundance of HLA-DR+ NK cells after one course of combination therapy positively correlated with both PFS and OS. The IL-2-induced rise of the CD4+:CD8+ T-cell ratio calculated after the first cycle of treatment was also positively associated with OS. Overall, the combination of IM and IL-2 promoted the rapid expansion of HLA-DR+ NK cells and increased the CD4+:CD8+ T-cell ratio, both being associated with clinical benefits. This combinatorial regimen warrants further investigation in Phase II clinical trials, possibly in patients affected by gastrointestinal stromal tumors, a setting in which T and NK cells may play an important therapeutic role. PMID:23525357

  15. Dissipative quantum coherent dynamics probed in phase-space: electronically resonant 5-color 4-wave mixing on I2(B) in solid Kr.

    PubMed

    Segale, D; Apkarian, V A

    2011-07-14

    Spectrally resolved, 4-wave mixing measurements in five resonant colors are used to interrogate vibronic quantum coherences in phase-space. We highlight the principles through measurements on the B-state of I(2) in solid Kr--a prototype of a system strongly coupled to its environment. The measurements consist of preparing a superposition of wavepackets on the B-state and interrogating their cross-coherence as they get entangled with the environment. The study provides direct realizations of fundamental quantum principles in the mechanics of molecular matter, among them: the distinction between quantum and classical coherent dynamics of a system entangled with the environment, coherent dissipation, event-driven decoherence, environment selected coherent states, and non-local mechanics.

  16. Use of Expansion Cohorts in Phase I Trials and Probability of Success in Phase II for 381 Anticancer Drugs.

    PubMed

    Bugano, Diogo D G; Hess, Kenneth; Jardim, Denis L F; Zer, Alona; Meric-Bernstam, Funda; Siu, Lillian L; Razak, Albiruni R A; Hong, David S

    2017-08-01

    Purpose: Evaluate the association between the use of phase I expansion cohorts (ECs) and drug performance in phase II as well as time to approval by the FDA.Experimental Design: We performed a systematic search of MEDLINE for single-agent dose-finding adult oncology phase I trials published in 2006 to 2011 and subsequent phase II trials. Successful phase II trials were those that met their primary endpoints. Dates of approval were obtained from the Drugs@FDA website in April 2014. A logistic regression model was used to determine the associations between variables and success in phase II.Results: We identified 533 phase I trials evaluating 381 drugs; 112 drugs had at least one phase I trial with an expansion cohort. Phase I trials with expansion cohorts of two to 20 patients were associated with a higher rate of successful phase II trials than those with no expansion cohort [48% vs. 27%; OR, 2.1; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.1-4.0; P = 0.037]. Phase II success rates were the same for expansion cohort with two to 20 and more than 20 patients (48% vs. 52%). Other positive associations were disease-specific trials (OR, 1.7; 95% CI, 1.0-2.9; P = 0.037), industry sponsorship (OR, 2.9; 95% CI, 1.5-5.7; P = 0.0024), and response rate of 6% to 20% (OR, 2.89; 95% CI, 1.6-5.2; P = 0.0007). Drugs tested in phase I trials with expansion cohorts had a higher rate of 5-year approval (19% vs. 5%; HR, 4.4; 95% CI, 2.2-8.8; P < 0.001).Conclusions: The use of expansion cohorts in phase I trials was associated with success of subsequent phase II trials. However, confounders may play a role in this association. Clin Cancer Res; 23(15); 4020-6. ©2017 AACR. ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  17. Results of Phase 3 of the CATIE Schizophrenia Trial

    PubMed Central

    Stroup, T. Scott; Lieberman, Jeffrey A.; McEvoy, Joseph P.; Davis, Sonia M.; Swartz, Marvin S.; Keefe, Richard S.E.; Miller, Alexander L.; Rosenheck, Robert A.; Hsiao, John K.

    2009-01-01

    Objective The Clinical Antipsychotic Trials of Intervention Effectiveness (CATIE) study examined the comparative effectiveness of antipsychotic treatments for individuals with chronic schizophrenia. Patients who had discontinued antipsychotic treatment in phases 1 and 2 were eligible for phase 3, in which they selected one of nine antipsychotic regimens with the help of their study doctor. We describe the characteristics of the patients who selected each treatment option and their outcomes. Method Two hundred and seventy patients entered phase 3. The open-label treatment options were monotherapy with oral aripiprazole, clozapine, olanzapine, perphenazine, quetiapine, risperidone, ziprasidone, long-acting injectable fluphenazine decanoate, or a combination of any two of these treatments. Results Few patients selected fluphenazine decanoate (n=9) or perphenazine (n=4). Similar numbers selected each of the other options (range 33–41). Of the seven common choices, those who selected clozapine and combination antipsychotic treatment were the most symptomatic, and those who selected aripiprazole and ziprasidone had the highest body mass index. Symptoms improved for all groups, although the improvements were modest for the groups starting with relatively mild levels of symptoms. Side effect profiles of the medications varied considerably but medication discontinuations due to intolerability were rare (7% overall). Conclusions Patients and their doctors made treatment selections based on clinical factors, including severity of symptoms, response to prior treatments, and physical health status. Fluphenazine decanoate was rarely used among those with evidence of treatment non-adherence and clozapine was underutilized for those with poor previous response. Combination antipsychotic treatment warrants further study. PMID:19027269

  18. Definitional-mission report: Combined-cycle power plant, Sultan Iskandar Power Station Phase 2-B, Tenaga Nasional BHD, Malaysia. Export trade information

    SciTech Connect

    Kadagathur, G.

    1990-12-10

    Tenaga Nasional BHD (TEN) formerly known as National Electricity Board of Malaysia is proposing to construct a Combined Cycle Power Plant at Pasir Gudang. The project is known as Sultan Iskandar Power Station Phase 2 (SIPS-2). U.S. engineering companies and U.S. equipment manufacturers are having difficulty in procuring contracts from the Malaysian Power Industry. To date, the industry is dominated by consortia with British and Swiss participation. Several U.S. engineering companies have approached the US Trade and Development Program (TDP) to assist them in breaking into the Malaysian utility market by supporting their effort on their current proposals for SIPS-2 project. It is recommended that TDP should approve a grant to TEN that would provide funds for engineering upto the preparation of equipment specifications and associated technology transfer. The grant along with the weak dollar should be attractive enough for TEN to strongly consider consortia with U.S. companies very favorably. The project also offers a potential for the export of U.S. manufactured equipment in the range of $170 million.

  19. Parallel multicentre randomised trial of a clinical trial question prompt list in patients considering participation in phase 3 cancer treatment trials

    PubMed Central

    Tattersall, Martin H N; Jefford, Michael; Martin, Andrew; Olver, Ian; Thompson, John F; Brown, Richard F; Butow, Phyllis N

    2017-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effect of a clinical trial question prompt list in patients considering enrolment in cancer treatment trials. Setting Tertiary cancer referral hospitals in three state capital cities in Australia. Participants 88 patients with cancer attending three cancer centres in Australia, who were considering enrolment in phase 3 treatment trials, were invited to enrol in an unblinded randomised trial of provision of a clinical trial question prompt list (QPL) before consenting to enrol in the treatment trial. Interventions We developed and pilot tested a targeted QPL for patients with cancer considering clinical trial participation (the clinical trial QPL). Consenting patients were randomised to receive the clinical trial QPL or not before further discussion with their oncologist and/or trial nurse about the treatment trial. Primary and secondary outcomes Questionnaires were completed at baseline and within 3 weeks of deciding on treatment trial participation. Main outcome measure: scores on the Quality of Informed Consent questionnaire (QuIC). Results 88 patients of 130 sought for the study were enrolled (43 males), and 45 received the clinical trial QPL. 49% of trials were chemotherapy interventions for patients with advanced disease, 35% and 16% were surgical adjuvant and radiation adjuvant trials respectively. 70 patients completed all relevant questionnaires. 28 of 43 patients in the control arm compared with 39 of 45 patients receiving the clinical trial QPL completed the QuIC (p=0.0124). There were no significant differences in the QuIC scores between the randomised groups (QuIC part A p=0.08 and QuIC part B p=0.92). There were no differences in patient satisfaction with decisions or in anxiety levels between the randomised groups. Conclusions Use of a question prompt list did not significantly change the QuIC scores in this randomised trial. ANZCTR 12606000214538 prospectively registered 31/5/2006. Trial registration number Results, ACTRN

  20. Thymostimulin in advanced hepatocellular carcinoma: A phase II trial

    PubMed Central

    Dollinger, Matthias M; Behrens, Christa M; Lesske, Joachim; Behl, Susanne; Behrmann, Curd; Fleig, Wolfgang E

    2008-01-01

    Background Thymostimulin is a thymic peptide fraction with immune-mediated cytotoxicity against hepatocellular carcinoma in vitro. In a phase II trial, we investigated safety and efficacy including selection criteria for best response in advanced or metastasised hepatocellular carcinoma. Methods 44 patients (84 % male, median age 69 years) not suitable or refractory to conventional therapy received thymostimulin 75 mg subcutaneously five times per week for a median of 8.2 months until progression or complete response. 3/44 patients were secondarily accessible to local ablation or chemoembolisation. Primary endpoint was overall survival, secondary endpoint tumor response or progression-free survival. A multivariate Cox's regression model was used to identify variables affecting survival. Results Median survival was 11.5 months (95% CI 7.9–15.0) with a 1-, 2- and 3-year survival of 50%, 23% and 9%. In the univariate analysis, a low Child-Pugh-score (p = 0.01), a low score in the Okuda- and CLIP-classification (p < 0.001) or a low AFP-level (p < 0.001) were associated with better survival, but not therapy modalities other than thymostimulin (p = 0.1) or signs of an invasive HCC phenotype such as vascular invasion (p = 0.3) and metastases (p = 0.1). The only variables independently related to survival in the Cox's regression model were Okuda stage and presence of liver cirrhosis (p < 0.01) as well as response to thymostimulin (p < 0.05). Of 39/44 patients evaluable for response, two obtained complete responses (one after concomitant radiofrequency ablation), five partial responses (objective response 18%), twenty-four stable disease (tumor control rate 79%) and eight progressed. Median progression-free survival was 6.4 months (95% CI 0.8–12). Grade 1 local reactions following injection were the only side effects. Conclusion Outcome in our study rather depended on liver function and intrahepatic tumor growth (presence of liver cirrhosis and Okuda stage) in addition

  1. Single-arm phase II trial design under parametric cure models.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jianrong

    2015-01-01

    The current practice of designing single-arm phase II survival trials is limited under the exponential model. Trial design under the exponential model may not be appropriate when a portion of patients are cured. There is no literature available for designing single-arm phase II trials under the parametric cure model. In this paper, a test statistic is proposed, and a sample size formula is derived for designing single-arm phase II trials under a class of parametric cure models. Extensive simulations showed that the proposed test and sample size formula perform very well under different scenarios. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Single-Arm Phase II Trial Design Under Parametric Cure Models

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jianrong

    2015-01-01

    The current practice of designing single-arm phase II survival trials is limited under the exponential model. Trial design under the exponential model may not be appropriate when a portion of patients are cured. There is no literature available for designing single-arm phase II trials under the parametric cure model. In this article, a test statistic is proposed, and a sample size formula is derived for designing single-arm phase II trials under a class of parametric cure models. Extensive simulations showed that the proposed test and sample size formula perform very well under different scenarios. PMID:25846141

  3. Phase-II trials in osteosarcoma recurrences: A systematic review of past experience.

    PubMed

    Omer, Natacha; Le Deley, Marie-Cécile; Piperno-Neumann, Sophie; Marec-Berard, Perrine; Italiano, Antoine; Corradini, Nadège; Bellera, Carine; Brugières, Laurence; Gaspar, Nathalie

    2017-04-01

    The most appropriate design of Phase-II trials evaluating new therapies in osteosarcoma remains poorly defined. To study consistency in phase-II clinical trials evaluating new therapies for osteosarcoma recurrences with respect to eligibility criteria, response assessment, end-points, statistical design and reported results. Systematic review of clinical trials registered on clinicaltrials.gov, clinicaltrialsregister.eu and French National Cancer Institute website or referenced in PubMed and American Society of Clinical Oncology websites, between 2003 and 2016, using the following criteria: (osteosarcoma OR bone sarcoma) AND (Phase-II). Among the 99 trials identified, 80 were Phase-II, 17 I/II and 2 II/III, evaluating mostly targeted therapy (n = 40), and chemotherapy alone (n = 26). Results were fully (n = 28) or partially (abstract, n = 6) published. Twenty-four trials were dedicated to osteosarcoma, 22 had an osteosarcoma stratum. Twenty-eight out of 99 trials refer to the age range observed at recurrence (28%). Overall, 65 trials were run in multicentre settings, including 17 international trials. Only 9 trials were randomised. The primary end-point was tumour response in 71 trials (response rate, n = 40 or best response, n = 31), with various definitions (complete + partial ± minor response and stable disease), mainly evaluated with RECIST criteria (n = 69); it was progression-free survival in 24 trials and OS in 3. In single-arm trials evaluating response rate, the null hypothesis tested (when available, n = 12) varied from 5% to 25%. No robust historical data can currently be derived from past efficacy Phase-II trials. There is an urgent need to develop international randomised Phase-II trials across all age ranges with standardised primary end-point. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Ropeginterferon alfa-2b, a novel IFNα-2b, induces high response rates with low toxicity in patients with polycythemia vera.

    PubMed

    Gisslinger, Heinz; Zagrijtschuk, Oleh; Buxhofer-Ausch, Veronika; Thaler, Josef; Schloegl, Ernst; Gastl, Guenther A; Wolf, Dominik; Kralovics, Robert; Gisslinger, Bettina; Strecker, Karin; Egle, Alexander; Melchardt, Thomas; Burgstaller, Sonja; Willenbacher, Ella; Schalling, Martin; Them, Nicole C; Kadlecova, Pavla; Klade, Christoph; Greil, Richard

    2015-10-08

    In this prospective, open-label, multicenter phase 1/2 dose escalation study, we used a next-generation, mono-pegylated interferon (IFN) α-2b isoform, ropeginterferon alfa-2b. The unique feature of ropeginterferon alfa-2b is a longer elimination half-life, which allows administration every 2 weeks. We present data from 51 polycythemia vera patients. The main goal was to define the maximum tolerated dose and to assess safety and efficacy. A dose range of 50 to 540 µg was tested without the appearance of dose-limiting toxicities. All drug-related adverse events were known toxicities associated with IFN-α. The cumulative overall response rate was 90%, comprising complete response in 47% and partial response in 43% of patients; the best individual molecular response level was a complete response in 21% of patients and partial response in 47%. Notably, we did not observe any correlation between the dose level and the response rate or response duration, suggesting that already low levels of ropeginterferon alfa-2b are sufficient to induce significant hematologic and molecular responses. These data suggest promising efficacy and safety of ropeginterferon alfa-2b and support the development of the drug in a randomized phase 3 clinical trial. The study was disclosed at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT01193699 before including the first patient.

  5. Ropeginterferon alfa-2b, a novel IFNα-2b, induces high response rates with low toxicity in patients with polycythemia vera

    PubMed Central

    Zagrijtschuk, Oleh; Buxhofer-Ausch, Veronika; Thaler, Josef; Schloegl, Ernst; Gastl, Guenther A.; Wolf, Dominik; Kralovics, Robert; Gisslinger, Bettina; Strecker, Karin; Egle, Alexander; Melchardt, Thomas; Burgstaller, Sonja; Willenbacher, Ella; Schalling, Martin; Them, Nicole C.; Kadlecova, Pavla; Klade, Christoph; Greil, Richard

    2015-01-01

    In this prospective, open-label, multicenter phase 1/2 dose escalation study, we used a next-generation, mono-pegylated interferon (IFN) α-2b isoform, ropeginterferon alfa-2b. The unique feature of ropeginterferon alfa-2b is a longer elimination half-life, which allows administration every 2 weeks. We present data from 51 polycythemia vera patients. The main goal was to define the maximum tolerated dose and to assess safety and efficacy. A dose range of 50 to 540 µg was tested without the appearance of dose-limiting toxicities. All drug-related adverse events were known toxicities associated with IFN-α. The cumulative overall response rate was 90%, comprising complete response in 47% and partial response in 43% of patients; the best individual molecular response level was a complete response in 21% of patients and partial response in 47%. Notably, we did not observe any correlation between the dose level and the response rate or response duration, suggesting that already low levels of ropeginterferon alfa-2b are sufficient to induce significant hematologic and molecular responses. These data suggest promising efficacy and safety of ropeginterferon alfa-2b and support the development of the drug in a randomized phase 3 clinical trial. The study was disclosed at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT01193699 before including the first patient. PMID:26261238

  6. Dermatological side-effects of telaprevir-based triple therapy for chronic hepatitis C in phase III trials in Japan.

    PubMed

    Torii, Hideshi; Sueki, Hirohiko; Kumada, Hiromitsu; Sakurai, Yuko; Aoki, Keiji; Yamada, Ichimaro; Ohtsuki, Mamitaro

    2013-08-01

    Telaprevir-based triple therapy is highly effective for chronic hepatitis C. However, concern has been expressed over the high frequency and severity of its dermatological side-effects compared with those associated with peginterferon (PEG-IFN) and ribavirin (RBV) therapy. Thus, here, we evaluated the dermatological adverse reactions of telaprevir-based triple therapy in Japanese multicenter phase III clinical trials in an attempt to characterize the dermatological side-effects and establish appropriate management plans. In these trials, 126 treatment-naïve patients and 141 treatment-failure patients were administrated telaprevir, PEG-IFN-α-2b and RBV for 12 weeks followed by PEG-IFN-α-2b and RBV for another 12 weeks (T12/PR24 group), and 63 treatment-naïve patients were administrated PEG-IFN-α-2b and RBV for 48 weeks (PR48 group). Dermatological adverse reactions developed in over 80% patients in both groups, and most of them were grade 1 or 2. In the T12/PR24 group, there were more grade 2 or grade 3 events, and the time to onset was earlier than that in the PR48 group. Most reactions could be managed with topical corticosteroids and oral antihistamines, and the rates of discontinuation due to dermatological reactions were not high even in the T12/PR24 group. In the T12/PR24 group, however, two cases of Stevens-Johnson syndrome and one case of drug rash with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms, which corresponds to drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome in Japan, were reported. For appropriate treatments of individual dermatological adverse reactions, the judgment of discontinuation of antiviral drugs and treatment based on the severity are extremely important in this triple therapy.

  7. Elk velvet antler in rheumatoid arthritis: phase II trial.

    PubMed

    Allen, Marion; Oberle, Kathleen; Grace, Michael; Russell, Anthony

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this phase II clinical trial was to examine safety of elk velvet antler taken concurrently with rheumatoid arthritis medications and to determine efficacy by dose to enable sample size estimation and dose standardization for a larger study. Forty patients with stage II rheumatoid arthritis were randomly assigned to 1 of 4 arms of 10 patients each. One group received placebo and the other 3 groups received 2, 4, or 6 capsules (215 mg) of elk velvet antler with appropriate placebos to total 6 capsules daily. All subjects continued to take their arthritis medications. Outcome variables were reported adverse events and health status. At 1 month, there were no significant differences between groups in number of adverse events or health status. The greatest improvement was in the 6 elk velvet antler group, the least was in the placebo group. Differences were not statistically significant. It was concluded that elk velvet antler can be taken safely in conjunction with a number of rheumatoid arthritis medications and should be studied further to assess efficacy.

  8. Standards for Clinical Trials in Male and Female Sexual Dysfunction: I. Phase I to Phase IV Clinical Trial Design.

    PubMed

    Fisher, William A; Gruenwald, Ilan; Jannini, Emmanuele A; Lev-Sagie, Ahinoam; Lowenstein, Lior; Pyke, Robert E; Reisman, Yakov; Revicki, Dennis A; Rubio-Aurioles, Eusebio

    2016-12-01

    This series of articles outlines standards for clinical trials of treatments for male and female sexual dysfunctions, with a focus on research design and patient-reported outcome assessment. These articles consist of revision, updating, and integration of articles on standards for clinical trials in male and female sexual dysfunction from the 2010 International Consultation on Sexual Medicine developed by the authors as part of the 2015 International Consultation on Sexual Medicine. We are guided in this effort by several principles. In contrast to previous versions of these guidelines, we merge discussion of standards for clinical trials in male and female sexual dysfunction in an integrated approach that emphasizes the common foundational practices that underlie clinical trials in the two settings. We present a common expected standard for clinical trial design in male and female sexual dysfunction, a common rationale for the design of phase I to IV clinical trials, and common considerations for selection of study population and study duration in male and female sexual dysfunction. We present a focused discussion of fundamental principles in patient- (and partner-) reported outcome assessment and complete this series of articles with specific discussions of selected aspects of clinical trials that are unique to male and to female sexual dysfunction. Our consideration of standards for clinical trials in male and female sexual dysfunction attempts to embody sensitivity to existing and new regulatory guidance and to address implications of the evolution of the diagnosis of sexual dysfunction that have been brought forward in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition. The first article in this series focuses on phase I to phase IV clinical trial design considerations. Subsequent articles in this series focus on the measurement of patient-reported outcomes, unique aspects of clinical trial design for men, and unique aspects of clinical

  9. Speed of Accrual Into Phase III Oncology Trials: A Comparison Across Geographic Locations.

    PubMed

    Ruther, Nancy R; Mathiason, Michelle A; Wee, Sandra K; Emmel, Ann E; Go, Ronald S

    2015-12-01

    We sought to determine the speed at which patients were accrued into published phase III oncology trials across geographic locations and to identify the factors that may influence this process. We searched OVID-Medline and identified all phase III oncology therapeutic trials published in 2006 to 2010. The speed of accrual for each trial was calculated by dividing the number of patients enrolled by the number of months the trial was open (patients/mo). Five hundred forty-six trials were included in our study. Most of the trials were for adults (96%), late-stage cancers (78%), sponsored by either cooperative groups or academic centers (66%), and had negative results (58%). The most common trial locations were multinational (45%), United States (16%), Italy (7%), Germany (6%), Japan (6%), and France (5%). Compared with trials conducted in a single country, multinational trials accrued significantly more patients per trial, completed enrollment faster, and were published sooner (all P≤0.01). Multivariate analyses showed that multinational (P=0.001), breast cancer (P=0.001), industry sponsored (P=0.001), and equivalency trials (P=0.039) accrued significantly faster than other types of trials. Placebo-controlled and non-placebo-controlled trials accrued at similar speeds. We found no difference in speed of accrual between the United States and Europe. Speed of accrual for phase III oncology trials is fastest among multinational trials and independently influenced by the type of trial sponsor, cancer investigated, and study outcome, but not by placebo use. Trials conducted in single countries seem to accrue at similar speeds.

  10. Traumatic optic neuropathy treatment trial (TONTT): open label, phase 3, multicenter, semi-experimental trial.

    PubMed

    Kashkouli, Mohsen Bahmani; Yousefi, Sahar; Nojomi, Marzieh; Sanjari, Mostafa Soltan; Pakdel, Farzad; Entezari, Morteza; Etezad-Razavi, Mohammad; Razeghinejad, Mohammad Reza; Esmaeli, Manuchehr; Shafiee, Masoud; Bagheri, Mansoureh

    2017-10-06

    Intravenously administered erythropoietin (EPO) was firstly commenced (phase 1) in patients with indirect traumatic optic neuropathy (TON) by this group in 2011. It was re-tested by another group (phase 2) in 2014. This multicenter clinical trial was designed to compare its effect with intravenous steroid and observation. Included were TON patients ≥5 years of age and with trauma-treatment interval of ≤3 weeks. Follow-up visits were set at 1, 2, 3, 7, 14, 30, and at least 90 days after treatment. EPO and methylprednisolone were infused intravenously every day for three consecutive days. Primary outcome measure was change in the best corrected visual acuity (BCVA). Secondary outcomes included change in color vision and relative afferent pupillary defect (RAPD), side effects, and factors affecting the final visual improvement. Out of 120 patients, 100 (EPO: 69, steroid: 15, observation: 16) were finally included. All three groups showed a significant improvement of BCVA which was not significantly different between the groups (adjusted for pretreatment BCVA). Color vision was significantly improved in the EPO group. Late treatment (>3 days) (odds ratio = 2.53) and initial BCVA of NLP (odds ratio = 5.74) significantly worsened visual recovery. No side effect was observed in any group. EPO, steroid, and observation showed a significant improvement of BCVA in patients with TON. Initial BCVA of NLP and late treatment (>3 days) were significant risk factors for visual improvement.

  11. Phase I trial of cremophor EL with bolus doxorubicin.

    PubMed

    Millward, M J; Webster, L K; Rischin, D; Stokes, K H; Toner, G C; Bishop, J F; Olver, I N; Linahan, B M; Linsenmeyer, M E; Woodcock, D M

    1998-10-01

    Cremophor EL (cremophor), a component of the paclitaxel formulation, can potentially reverse P-glycoprotein-associated multidrug resistance. A Phase I trial of cremophor as a 6-h infusion every 3 weeks was performed with bolus doxorubicin (50 mg/m2). The cremophor dose was escalated from 1 to 60 ml/m2. A standard paclitaxel premedication was given before cremophor. Using a bioassay, potentially active cremophor levels (> or = 1 microl/ml) were measured in plasma from patients receiving cremophor doses of 30, 45, and 60 ml/m2. A cross-over design was used to assess the influence of cremophor 30 ml/m2 on the pharmacokinetics of doxorubicin and doxorubicinol. The plasma area under the concentration versus time curve (AUC) of doxorubicin increased from 1448 +/- 350 to 1786 +/- 264 ng/ml x h (P = 0.02) in the presence of cremophor, whereas the AUC of doxorubicinol increased from 252 +/- 104 to 486 +/- 107 ng/ml x h (P = 0.02). This pharmacokinetic interaction was associated with significantly increased neutropenia. With reduction of the doxorubicin dose to 35 mg/m2, the cremophor dose was increased to 60 ml/m2. Dose-limiting toxicities occurred in two of six patients after 45 ml/m2 and two of four patients after 60 ml/m2, which included febrile neutropenia and grade III cremophor-related toxicities of rash, pruritus, headache, and hypotension. All patients who received 45 ml/m2 cremophor reached plasma levels > or = 1.5 microl/ml, but at 60 ml/m2, only two of four reached this level, and the calculated plasma clearance of cremophor was significantly faster at this dose. One patient with hepatoma resistant to epirubicin achieved a near-complete response. Cremophor 45 ml/m2 over 6 h with 35 mg/m2 doxorubicin is recommended for further studies. The pharmacokinetic interaction between cremophor and doxorubicin is quantitatively similar to that described in trials of paclitaxel with doxorubicin and suggests that the cremophor in the paclitaxel formulation is responsible.

  12. The application of human phase 0 microdosing trials: A systematic review and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Svendsen, Pernille; El-Galaly, Tarec C; Dybkær, Karen; Bøgsted, Martin; Laursen, Maria B; Schmitz, Alexander; Jensen, Paw; Johnsen, Hans E

    2016-01-01

    A decreasing number of new therapeutic drugs reaching the clinic has led to the publication of regulatory guidelines on human microdosing trials by the European Medicines Agency in 2004 and the US Food and Drug Administration in 2006. Microdosing trials are defined by the administration of 1/100th of the therapeutic dose and designed to investigate basic drug properties. This review investigates the current application of phase 0 trials in medical research. Thirty-three studies found in PubMed and EMBASE were systematically reviewed for aim and analytical method. Pharmacokinetic studies have been a major focus of phase 0 trials, but drug distribution, drug-drug interactions, imaging and pharmacogenomics have also been investigated. Common analytical methods were tandem mass liquid chromatography, accelerator mass spectrometry and positron emission tomography. New ongoing trials are investigating the pharmacodynamics and chemoresistance of marketed drugs, suggesting that the application of phase 0 trials is still evolving.

  13. Pancreatic Cancer Stage 2B

    MedlinePlus

    ... hyphen, e.g. -historical Searches are case-insensitive Pancreatic Cancer Stage 2B Add to My Pictures View /Download : ... 1500x1200 View Download Large: 3000x2400 View Download Title: Pancreatic Cancer Stage 2B Description: Stage IIB pancreatic cancer; drawing ...

  14. Health-related quality of life assessment in contemporary phase III trials in advanced colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Adamowicz, Krzysztof; Saad, Everardo D; Jassem, Jacek

    2016-11-01

    Health-related quality of life (HRQOL) is often used as an endpoint in cancer clinical trials. We assessed the frequency and correlates of HRQOL use in phase III trials in advanced colorectal cancer. We searched PubMed for phase III trials published between January 1998 and December 2014, as well as for companion papers reporting on HRQOL separately. We excluded papers reporting on correlative biology or prognostic factors in isolation from the main trial results, as well as trials on supportive care and on local therapy. We retrieved 111 trials that enrolled a total of 61,531 patients in 241 trial arms. HRQOL was reportedly used as an endpoint in 40 trials (36%), in all but two as a secondary endpoint. There was a significant decrease in the use of HRQOL, with frequencies of 46% in trials published between 1998 and 2006, and 27% between 2007 and 2014 (P=0.04). Trials with HRQOL as endpoint were significantly larger than trials without such endpoint. Formal statistical comparisons involving HRQOL parameters were reported in 36 of 40 trials (90%) with HRQOL assessment, with a significant difference between arms found in 14 (39%), six of which favoring the experimental arm. HRQOL gains were usually accompanied by improvements in efficacy endpoints, but were not related to the number of patients or chemotherapy line. HRQOL has been formally assessed in about one-third of recent phase III trials in advanced colorectal cancer, with a significant gain in HRQOL in about 40% of cases. It is questionable whether HRQOL results may largely help select between competing treatments. This assumption may be one of the reasons for the apparent decreased use of HRQOL as an endpoint in phase III trials in this disease. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. The Scientific Impact of Positive and Negative Phase 3 Cancer Clinical Trials.

    PubMed

    Unger, Joseph M; Barlow, William E; Ramsey, Scott D; LeBlanc, Michael; Blanke, Charles D; Hershman, Dawn L

    2016-07-01

    Positive phase 3 cancer clinical trials are widely hailed, while trials with negative results are often interpreted as scientific failures. We hypothesized that these interpretations would be reflected in the scientific literature. To compare the scientific impact of positive vs negative phase 3 cancer clinical treatment trials. We examined the phase 3 trial history of SWOG, a national cancer clinical trials consortium, over a 30-year period (1985-2014). Scientific impact was assessed according to multiple publication and citation outcomes. Citation data were obtained using Google Scholar. Citation counts were compared using generalized estimating equations for Poisson regression. Any trial that was formally evaluated for the randomized treatment comparison was included for analysis of publication and citation outcomes. Trials were categorized as positive if they achieved a statistically significant result in favor of the new experimental treatment for the protocol-specified primary end point. Trials were categorized as negative if they achieved a statistically significant result in favor of standard therapy or a null result with no statistically significant benefit for either the experimental or standard therapy. Impact factors for the journals publishing the primary trial results, and the number of citations for the primary trial articles and all secondary articles associated with the trials. Ninety-four studies enrolling n = 46 424 patients were analyzed. Twenty-eight percent of trials were positive (26 of 94). The primary publications from positive trials were published in journals with higher mean (SD) 2-year impact factors (28 [19] vs 18 [13]; P = .007) and were cited twice as often as negative trials (mean per year, 43 vs 21; relative risk, 2.0; 95% CI, 1.1-3.9; P = .03). However, the number of citations from all primary and secondary articles did not significantly differ between positive and negative trials (mean per year, 55 vs 45; relative

  16. A phase 3 trial of IV immunoglobulin for Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Relkin, Norman R; Thomas, Ronald G; Rissman, Robert A; Brewer, James B; Rafii, Michael S; van Dyck, Christopher H; Jack, Clifford R; Sano, Mary; Knopman, David S; Raman, Rema; Szabo, Paul; Gelmont, David M; Fritsch, Sandor; Aisen, Paul S

    2017-05-02

    We tested biweekly infusions of IV immunoglobulin (IVIg) as a possible treatment for mild to moderate Alzheimer disease (AD) dementia. In a phase 3, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, we randomly assigned 390 participants with mild to moderate AD to receive placebo (low-dose albumin) or IVIg (Gammagard Liquid; Baxalta, Bannockburn, IL) administered IV at doses of 0.2 or 0.4 g/kg every 2 weeks for 18 months. The primary cognitive outcome was change from baseline to 18 months on the 11-item cognitive subscale of the Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale; the primary functional outcome was 18-month change on the Alzheimer's Disease Cooperative Study-Activities of Daily Living Inventory. Safety and tolerability data, as well as serial MRIs and plasma samples, were collected throughout the study from all enrolled participants. No beneficial effects were observed in the dual primary outcome measures for the 2 IVIg doses tested. Significant decreases in plasma Aβ42 (but not Aβ40) levels were observed in IVIg-treated participants. Analysis of safety data showed no difference between IVIg and placebo in terms of the rate of occurrence of amyloid-related imaging abnormalities (brain edema or microhemorrhage). IVIg-treated participants had more systemic reactions (chills, rashes) but fewer respiratory infections than participants receiving placebo. Participants with mild to moderate AD showed good tolerability of treatment with low-dose human IVIg for 18 months but did not show beneficial effects on cognition or function relative to participants who received placebo. NCT00818662. This study provides Class II evidence that IVIg infusions performed every 2 weeks do not improve cognition or function at 18 months in patients with mild to moderate AD. © 2017 American Academy of Neurology.

  17. Analysis of the Yield of Phase II Combination Therapy Trials in Medical Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Maitland, Michael L.; Hudoba, Christine; Snider, Kelly L.; Ratain, Mark J.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Phase II clinical studies screen for treatment regimens that improve patient care, but screening combination regimens is especially challenging. We hypothesized that recognized flaws of single arm trials could be magnified in combination treatment studies, leading to many reported positive phase II trials but a low fraction resulting practice-changing phase III trials. Experimental Design We searched medline and identified 363 combination chemotherapy clinical trials published in 2001 and 2002. Studies were rated as positive, negative, or inconclusive based on standardized review of abstract and text. The Web of Science Index (Thomson Reuters, NY, NY) was searched for all articles published between 2003 and October 2007 that cited at least one of these 363 published trials. Results Of 363 published phase II combination chemotherapy trials, 262 (0.72) were declared to be positive. Among 3760 unique subsequent citing papers, 20 reported randomized phase III trials of the same combination in the same disease as the source paper, and 10 of these resulted in improved standards of care. Estimating from these data, the likelihood that a published, positive phase II combination chemotherapy trial will result in a subsequent trial demonstrating an improvement in standard of care within five years was 0.038 [95% confidence interval- 0.016, 0.064]. Conclusions The contributory value of combination chemotherapy phase II trials performed by 2001-02 standards is low despite the participation of more than 16,000 subjects. Future phase II studies of combination regimens require better methods to screen for treatments most likely to improve standards of care. PMID:20837695

  18. Phase 3 Oncology Clinical Trials in South Africa: Experimentation or Therapeutic Misconception?

    PubMed

    Malan, Tina; Moodley, Keymanthri

    2016-02-01

    Although clinical research in oncology is vital to improve current understanding of cancer and to validate new treatment options, voluntary informed consent is a critical component. Oncology research participants are a particularly vulnerable population; hence, therapeutic misconception often leads to ethical and legal challenges. We conducted a qualitative study administering semi-structured questionnaires on 29 adult, Phase 3, oncology clinical trial participants at three different private oncology clinical trial sites in South Africa. A descriptive content analysis was performed to identify perceptions of these participants regarding Phase 3 clinical trials. We found that most participants provided consent to be included in the trial for self-benefit. More than half of the participants had a poor understanding of Phase 3 clinical trials, and almost half the participants believed the clinical trial did not pose any significant risk to them. The word "hope" was used frequently by participants, displaying clear optimism with regard to the clinical trial and its outcome. This indicated that therapeutic misconception does occur in the South African oncology research setting and has the potential to lead to underestimation of the risks of a Phase 3 clinical trial. Emphasizing the experimental nature of a clinical trial during the consent process is critical to address therapeutic misconception in oncology research.

  19. Distress among caregivers of phase I trial participants: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Moss, Angela; Eckhardt, S. Gail; Laudenslager, Mark L.; Kilbourn, Kristin; Mauss, Iris B.; Bowles, Daniel W.; Hecker, Sharon; Fairclough, Diane L.; Kutner, Jean S.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The number of patients with cancer enrolling in phase I trials is expected to increase as these trials incorporate patient selection and exhibit greater efficacy in the era of targeted therapies. Despite the fact that people with advanced cancer often require a caregiver, little is known about the experience of caregivers of people enrolling in oncology phase I clinical trials. We conducted a cross-sectional study assessing the distress and emotion regulation of caregivers of phase I trial participants to inform the design of future interventions targeting the unique needs of this population. Methods Caregivers of oncology patients were approached at the patient’s phase I clinical trial screening visit. Caregiver participants completed a one-time survey incorporating validated instruments to comprehensively assess distress and emotion regulation. Basic demographic information about both the caregiver and patient was collected. Results Caregivers exhibited greater distress than population norms. Emotion regulation was also moderately impaired. Respondents identified positive aspects of caregiving despite exhibiting moderate distress. Conclusion Enrollment of a patient in a phase I clinical trial is a time of stress for their caregivers. This pilot study demonstrates the feasibility of engaging caregivers of phase I trial participants and the need to better support them through this component of their caregiving experience. PMID:25120010

  20. Elements of style: consent form language and the therapeutic misconception in phase 1 gene transfer trials.

    PubMed

    Kimmelman, Jonathan; Levenstadt, Aaron

    2005-04-01

    The therapeutic misconception arises wherever human subjects misinterpret the primary purpose of a clinical trial as therapeutic. Such misconceptions are particularly prevalent in trials involving severely ill subjects or novel and well-publicized investigational agents. In order to identify possible sources of the therapeutic misconception in gene transfer trials, 286 phase 1 human gene transfer consent documents were analyzed for their description of purpose, alternatives, and their use of the term gene transfer. We report that 20% of trials fail to explain their purpose as safety and dosage, only 41% of oncology trials identify comfort care as an alternative to participation, and that the term gene therapy is used with twice the frequency of the term gene transfer. Trends and coherence in consent form language were analyzed as well. Our results indicate that consent forms used in gene transfer phase 1 trials often contain language that promotes, or does little to deter, therapeutic misconceptions.

  1. Does phase 1 trial enrollment preclude quality end-of-life care? Phase 1 trial enrollment and end-of-life care characteristics in children with cancer.

    PubMed

    Levine, Deena R; Johnson, Liza-Marie; Mandrell, Belinda N; Yang, Jie; West, Nancy K; Hinds, Pamela S; Baker, Justin N

    2015-05-01

    End-of-life care (EOLC) discussions and treatment-related decisions, including phase 1 trial enrollment, in patients with incurable disease are complex and can influence the quality of EOLC received. The current study was conducted in pediatric oncology patients to determine whether end-of-life characteristics differed between those who were and were not enrolled in a phase 1 trial. The authors reviewed the medical records of 380 pediatric oncology patients (aged <22 years at the time of death) who died during a 3.5-year period. Of these, 103 patients with hematologic malignancies were excluded. A total of 277 patients with a diagnosis of a brain tumor or other solid tumor malignancy were divided into 2 groups based on phase 1 trial enrollment: a phase 1 cohort (PIC; 120 patients) and a non-phase 1 cohort (NPIC; 157 patients). The EOLC characteristics of these 2 cohorts were compared using regression analysis and chi-square testing. A comparison of patients in the PIC and NPIC revealed no significant differences in either demographic characteristics (including sex, race, religious affiliation, referral origin, diagnosis, or age at diagnosis, with the exception of age at the time of death [P =.03]) or in EOLC indices (such as use or timing of do not attempt resuscitation orders, hospice use or length of stay, forgoing life-sustaining therapies, location of death, time from first EOLC discussion to death, and total number of EOLC discussions). The results of the current study of a large cohort of deceased pediatric cancer patients indicate that enrollment on a phase 1 trial does not affect EOLC characteristics, suggesting that quality EOLC can be delivered regardless of phase 1 trial participation. © 2014 American Cancer Society.

  2. Physician and nurse beliefs of phase 1 trials in pediatric oncology.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Margaux J; Pressey, Joseph; Adams, Julia; Hensler, Molly A; Madan-Swain, Avi

    2014-01-01

    In order to improve the survival of children with cancer, novel therapies must be identified. Promising agents are tested in phase 1 trials in order to identify appropriate dosing and describe toxicity in children. The identification and referral of candidate patients for phase 1 trials rely heavily on medical providers who must balance their own perceptions of phase 1 trials with the desires and willingness of the patient and his/her family. The goal of the present study was to evaluate and compare physician and nurse perceptions regarding the beliefs, expectations, and perceived benefits of phase 1 clinical trials. A survey consisting of 21 questions was sent to 419 physicians and nurses practicing pediatric oncology at 30 different institutions. With the exception of 10 demographic questions, items were either rank ordered or rated on 5-point Likert scales. Ninety-four physicians and 122 nurses completed the online survey. Physicians and nurses differed in their knowledge of the goals and medical effects of phase 1 clinical trials. Physicians and nurses hold positive beliefs regarding phase 1 clinical trials and support their role in the treatment of children with cancer. Education is necessary to increase nurses' knowledge of the goals and outcomes. These findings suggest that continued education of nurses as well as physicians about the goals, execution, and monitoring of phase 1 therapy would be worthwhile.

  3. Molecular targeted therapy for pancreatic adenocarcinoma: A review of completed and ongoing late phase clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Mosquera, Catalina; Maglic, Dino; Zervos, Emmanuel E

    2016-12-01

    Molecular targeted therapy is widely utilized and effective in a number of solid tumors. In pancreatic adenocarcinoma, targeted therapy has been extensively evaluated; however, survival improvement of this aggressive disease using a targeted strategy has been minimal. The purpose of this study is to review therapeutic molecular targets in completed and ongoing later phase (II and III) clinical trials to have a better understanding of the rationale and progress towards targeted molecular therapies for pancreatic cancer. The PubMed database and the NCDI clinical trial website (www.clinicaltrials.gov) were queried to identify phase II and III completed and published (PubMed) and ongoing (clinicaltrials.gov) trials using the keywords: pancreatic cancer and molecular targeted therapy. The search engines were further limited by adding Phase II or III, active enrollment and North American. A total of 14 completed and published phase II/III clinical trials and 17 ongoing trials were identified. Evaluated strategies included inhibition of growth factor receptors (EGFR, PDGFR, VGFR, IGF-1R), tyrosine kinase inhibitors, MEK1/2, mTOR blockade and PI3K and HER2-neu pathway inhibitors. Only one trial conducted by the National Cancer Institute of Canada and the PANTAR trial have demonstrated a survival improvement from EGFR inhibition using erlotinib. These trials ultimately led to FDA approval of erlotinib/Tarceva in advanced stage disease. It remains unclear whether new combinations of cytotoxic chemotherapy or immunotherapy plus molecular targeted therapy will be beneficial in management of pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Despite a number of phase II and III trials, to date, only erlotinib has emerged as an approved targeted therapy in pancreatic adenocarcinoma. There are several ongoing late phase trials evaluating a number of targets, the results of which will become available over the next 1 to 2 years. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Adaptive Clinical Trials: Overview of Early-Phase Designs and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Marchenko, Olga; Fedorov, Valerii; Lee, J. Jack; Nolan, Christy; Pinheiro, José

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we describe developments in adaptive design methodology and discuss implementation strategies and operational challenges in early phase adaptive clinical trials. The BATTLE trial – the first completed, biomarker-based, Bayesian adaptive randomized study in lung cancer – is presented as a case study to illustrate main ideas and share learnings. PMID:28670507

  5. Embracing failure: What the Phase III progesterone studies can teach about TBI clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Donald G.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: Despite positive preclinical studies and two positive Phase II clinical trials, two large Phase III clinical trials of progesterone treatment of acute traumatic brain injury (TBI) recently ended with negative results, so a 100% failure rate continues to plague the field of TBI trials. Methods: This paper reviews and analyses the trial structures and outcomes and discusses the implications of these failures for future drug and clinical trial development. Persistently negative trial outcomes have led to disinvestment in new drug research by companies and policy-makers and disappointment for patients and their families, failures which represent a major public health concern. The problem is not limited to TBI. Failure rates are high for trials in stroke, sepsis, cardiology, cancer and orthopaedics, among others. Results: This paper discusses some of the reasons why the Phase III trials have failed. These reasons may include faulty extrapolation from pre-clinical data in designing clinical trials and the use of subjective outcome measures that accurately reflect neither the nature of the deficits nor long-term quantitative recovery. Conclusions: Better definitions of injury and healing and better outcome measures are essential to change the embrace of failure that has dominated the field for over 30 years. This review offers suggestions to improve the situation. PMID:26274493

  6. Optimizing operational efficiencies in early phase trials: the Pediatric Trials Network experience

    PubMed Central

    England, Amanda; Wade, Kelly; Smith, P. Brian; Berezny, Katherine; Laughon, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Performing drug trials in pediatrics is challenging. In support of the Best Pharmaceuticals for Children Act, the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development funded the formation of the Pediatric Trials Network (PTN) in 2010. Since its inception, the PTN has developed strategies to increase both efficiency and safety of pediatric drug trials. Through use of innovative techniques such as sparse and scavenged blood sampling as well as opportunistic study design, participation in trials has grown. The PTN has also strived to improve consistency of adverse event reporting in neonatal drug trials through the development of a standardized adverse event table. We review how the PTN is optimizing operational efficiencies in pediatric drug trials to increase the safety of drugs in children. PMID:26968616

  7. Tissue uptake of BSH in patients with glioblastoma in the EORTC 11961 phase I BNCT trial.

    PubMed

    Hideghéty, Katalin; Sauerwein, Wolfgang; Wittig, Andrea; Götz, Claudia; Paquis, Philippe; Grochulla, Frank; Haselsberger, Klaus; Wolbers, John; Moss, Ray; Huiskamp, Rene; Fankhauser, Heinz; de Vries, Martin; Gabel, Detlef

    2003-01-01

    The uptake of the boron compound Na2B12H10-SH (BSH) in tumor and normal tissues was investigated in the frame of the EORTC phase I trial 'Postoperative treatment of glioblastoma with BNCT at the Petten Irradiation Facility' (protocol 11961). The boron concentration in blood, tumor, normal brain, dura, muscle, skin and bone was detected using inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy in 13 evaluable patients. In a first group of 10 patients 100 mg BSH/kg bodyweight (BW) were administered; a second group of 3 patients received 22.9 mg BSH/kg BW. The toxicity due to BSH was evaluated. The average boron concentration in the tumor was 19.9 +/- 9.1 ppm (1 standard deviation (SD)) in the high dose group and 9.8 +/- 3.3 ppm in the low dose group, the tumor/blood ratios were 0.6 +/- 0.2 and 0.9 +/- 0.2, respectively. The highest boron uptake has been detected in the dura, very low uptake was found in the bone, the cerebro-spinal fluid and especially in the brain (brain/blood ratio 0.2 +/- 0.02 and 0.4 +/- 0.2). No toxicity was detected except flush-like symptoms in 2 cases during a BSH infusion at a much higher speed than prescribed. BSH proved to be safe for clinical application at a dose of 100 mg BSH/kg infused and at a dose rate of 1 mg/kg/min. The study underlines the importance of a further investigation of BSH uptake in order to obtain enough data for significant statistical analysis. The boron concentration in blood seems to be a quite reliable parameter to predict the boron concentration in other tissues.

  8. Communication about the risks and benefits of phase I pediatric oncology trials.

    PubMed

    Hazen, Rebecca A; Zyzanski, Stephen; Baker, Justin N; Drotar, Dennis; Kodish, Eric

    2015-03-01

    Phase 1 pediatric oncology trials offer only a small chance of direct benefit and may have significant risks and an impact on quality of life. To date, research has not examined discussions of risks and benefits during informed consent conferences for phase 1 pediatric oncology trials. The objective of the current study was to examine clinician and family communication about risks, benefits, and quality of life during informed consent conferences for phase 1 pediatric oncology trials. Participants included clinician investigators, parents, and children recruited from 6 sites conducting phase 1 pediatric oncology trials. Eighty-five informed consent conferences were observed and audiotaped. Trained coders assessed discussions of risks, benefits, and quality of life. Types of risks discussed were coded (e.g., unanticipated risks, digestive system risks, and death). Types of benefits were categorized as therapeutic (e.g., discussion of how participation may or may not directly benefit child), psychological, bridge to future trial, and altruism. Risks and benefits were discussed in 95% and 88% of informed consent conferences, respectively. Therapeutic benefit was the most frequently discussed benefit. The impact of trial participation on quality of life was discussed in the majority (88%) of informed consent conferences. Therapeutic benefit, risks, and quality of life were frequently discussed. The range of information discussed during informed consent conferences suggests the need for considering a staged process of informed consent for phase 1 pediatric oncology trials. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Practical characteristics of adaptive design in phase 2 and 3 clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Sato, A; Shimura, M; Gosho, M

    2017-08-28

    Adaptive design methods are expected to be ethical, reflect real medical practice, increase the likelihood of research and development success and reduce the allocation of patients into ineffective treatment groups by the early termination of clinical trials. However, the comprehensive details regarding which types of clinical trials will include adaptive designs remain unclear. We examined the practical characteristics of adaptive design used in clinical trials. We conducted a literature search of adaptive design clinical trials published from 2012 to 2015 using PubMed, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, with common search terms related to adaptive design. We systematically assessed the types and characteristics of adaptive designs and disease areas employed in the adaptive design trials. Our survey identified 245 adaptive design clinical trials. The number of trials by the publication year increased from 2012 to 2013 and did not greatly change afterwards. The most frequently used adaptive design was group sequential design (n = 222, 90.6%), especially for neoplasm or cardiovascular disease trials. Among the other types of adaptive design, adaptive dose/treatment group selection (n = 21, 8.6%) and adaptive sample-size adjustment (n = 19, 7.8%) were frequently used. The adaptive randomization (n = 8, 3.3%) and adaptive seamless design (n = 6, 2.4%) were less frequent. Adaptive dose/treatment group selection and adaptive sample-size adjustment were frequently used (up to 23%) in "certain infectious and parasitic diseases," "diseases of nervous system," and "mental and behavioural disorders" in comparison with "neoplasms" (<6.6%). For "mental and behavioural disorders," adaptive randomization was used in two trials of eight trials in total (25%). Group sequential design and adaptive sample-size adjustment were used frequently in phase 3 trials or in trials where study phase was not specified, whereas the other types of adaptive

  10. Phase II clinical trials on Investigational drugs for the Treatment of Pancreatic Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Edward J.; Semrad, Thomas J.; Bold, Richard J.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Despite some recent advances in treatment options, pancreatic cancer remains a devastating disease with poor outcomes. In a trend contrary to most malignancies, both incidence and mortality continue to rise due to pancreatic cancer. The majority of patients present with advanced disease and there are no treatment options for this stage that have demonstrated a median survival greater than 1 year. As the penultimate step prior to phase III studies involving hundreds of patients, phase II clinical trials provide an early opportunity to evaluate the efficacy of new treatments that are desperately needed for this disease. Areas Covered This review covers the results of published phase II clinical trials in advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma published within the past 5 years. The treatment results are framed in the context of the current standards of care and the historic challenge of predicting phase III success from phase II trial results. Expert opinion Promising therapies remain elusive in pancreatic cancer based on recent phase II clinical trial results. Optimization and standardization of clinical trial design in the phase II setting, with consistent incorporation of biomarkers, is needed to more accurately identify promising therapies that warrant phase III evaluation. PMID:25809274

  11. Overview of phase IV clinical trials for postmarket drug safety surveillance: a status report from the ClinicalTrials.gov registry

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xinji; Zhang, Yuan; Ye, Xiaofei; Guo, Xiaojing; Zhang, Tianyi; He, Jia

    2016-01-01

    Objective Phase IV trials are often used to investigate drug safety after approval. However, little is known about the characteristics of contemporary phase IV clinical trials and whether these studies are of sufficient quality to advance medical knowledge in pharmacovigilance. We aimed to determine the fundamental characteristics of phase IV clinical trials that evaluated drug safety using the ClinicalTrials.gov registry data. Methods A data set of 19 359 phase IV clinical studies registered in ClinicalTrials.gov was downloaded. The characteristics of the phase IV trials focusing on safety only were compared with those evaluating both safety and efficacy. We also compared the characteristics of the phase IV trials in three major therapeutic areas (cardiovascular diseases, mental health and oncology). Multivariable logistic regression was used to evaluate factors associated with the use of blinding and randomisation. Results A total of 4772 phase IV trials were identified, including 330 focusing on drug safety alone and 4392 evaluating both safety and efficacy. Most of the phase IV trials evaluating drug safety (75.9%) had enrolment <300 with 96.5% <3000. Among these trials, 8.2% were terminated or withdrawn. Factors associated with the use of blinding and randomisation included the intervention model, clinical specialty and lead sponsor. Conclusions Phase IV trials evaluating drug safety in the ClinicalTrials.gov registry were dominated by small trials that might not have sufficient power to detect less common adverse events. An adequate sample size should be emphasised for phase IV trials with safety surveillance as main task. PMID:27881517

  12. Overview of phase IV clinical trials for postmarket drug safety surveillance: a status report from the ClinicalTrials.gov registry.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xinji; Zhang, Yuan; Ye, Xiaofei; Guo, Xiaojing; Zhang, Tianyi; He, Jia

    2016-11-23

    Phase IV trials are often used to investigate drug safety after approval. However, little is known about the characteristics of contemporary phase IV clinical trials and whether these studies are of sufficient quality to advance medical knowledge in pharmacovigilance. We aimed to determine the fundamental characteristics of phase IV clinical trials that evaluated drug safety using the ClinicalTrials.gov registry data. A data set of 19 359 phase IV clinical studies registered in ClinicalTrials.gov was downloaded. The characteristics of the phase IV trials focusing on safety only were compared with those evaluating both safety and efficacy. We also compared the characteristics of the phase IV trials in three major therapeutic areas (cardiovascular diseases, mental health and oncology). Multivariable logistic regression was used to evaluate factors associated with the use of blinding and randomisation. A total of 4772 phase IV trials were identified, including 330 focusing on drug safety alone and 4392 evaluating both safety and efficacy. Most of the phase IV trials evaluating drug safety (75.9%) had enrolment <300 with 96.5% <3000. Among these trials, 8.2% were terminated or withdrawn. Factors associated with the use of blinding and randomisation included the intervention model, clinical specialty and lead sponsor. Phase IV trials evaluating drug safety in the ClinicalTrials.gov registry were dominated by small trials that might not have sufficient power to detect less common adverse events. An adequate sample size should be emphasised for phase IV trials with safety surveillance as main task. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  13. Improving N1 classification by grouping EEG trials with phases of pre-stimulus EEG oscillations.

    PubMed

    Han, Li; Liang, Zhang; Jiacai, Zhang; Changming, Wang; Li, Yao; Xia, Wu; Xiaojuan, Guo

    2015-04-01

    A reactive brain-computer interface using electroencephalography (EEG) relies on the classification of evoked ERP responses. As the trial-to-trial variation is evitable in EEG signals, it is a challenge to capture the consistent classification features distribution. Clustering EEG trials with similar features and utilizing a specific classifier adjusted to each cluster can improve EEG classification. In this paper, instead of measuring the similarity of ERP features, the brain states during image stimuli presentation that evoked N1 responses were used to group EEG trials. The correlation between momentary phases of pre-stimulus EEG oscillations and N1 amplitudes was analyzed. The results demonstrated that the phases of time-frequency points about 5.3 Hz and 0.3 s before the stimulus onset have significant effect on the ERP classification accuracy. Our findings revealed that N1 components in ERP fluctuated with momentary phases of EEG. We also further studied the influence of pre-stimulus momentary phases on classification of N1 features. Results showed that linear classifiers demonstrated outstanding classification performance when training and testing trials have close momentary phases. Therefore, this gave us a new direction to improve EEG classification by grouping EEG trials with similar pre-stimulus phases and using each to train unit classifiers respectively.

  14. Methotrexate, Doxorubicin, and Cisplatin (MAP) Plus Maintenance Pegylated Interferon Alfa-2b Versus MAP Alone in Patients With Resectable High-Grade Osteosarcoma and Good Histologic Response to Preoperative MAP: First Results of the EURAMOS-1 Good Response Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Bielack, Stefan S.; Smeland, Sigbjørn; Whelan, Jeremy S.; Marina, Neyssa; Jovic, Gordana; Hook, Jane M.; Krailo, Mark D.; Gebhardt, Mark; Pápai, Zsuzsanna; Meyer, James; Nadel, Helen; Randall, R. Lor; Deffenbaugh, Claudia; Nagarajan, Rajaram; Brennan, Bernadette; Letson, G. Douglas; Teot, Lisa A.; Goorin, Allen; Baumhoer, Daniel; Kager, Leo; Werner, Mathias; Lau, Ching C.; Sundby Hall, Kirsten; Gelderblom, Hans; Meyers, Paul; Gorlick, Richard; Windhager, Reinhard; Helmke, Knut; Eriksson, Mikael; Hoogerbrugge, Peter M.; Schomberg, Paula; Tunn, Per-Ulf; Kühne, Thomas; Jürgens, Heribert; van den Berg, Henk; Böhling, Tom; Picton, Susan; Renard, Marleen; Reichardt, Peter; Gerss, Joachim; Butterfass-Bahloul, Trude; Morris, Carol; Hogendoorn, Pancras C.W.; Seddon, Beatrice; Calaminus, Gabriele; Michelagnoli, Maria; Dhooge, Catharina; Sydes, Matthew R.; Bernstein, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Purpose EURAMOS-1, an international randomized controlled trial, investigated maintenance therapy with pegylated interferon alfa-2b (IFN-α-2b) in patients whose osteosarcoma showed good histologic response (good response) to induction chemotherapy. Patients and Methods At diagnosis, patients age ≤ 40 years with resectable high-grade osteosarcoma were registered. Eligibility after surgery for good response random assignment included ≥ two cycles of preoperative MAP (methotrexate, doxorubicin, and cisplatin), macroscopically complete surgery of primary tumor, < 10% viable tumor, and no disease progression. These patients were randomly assigned to four additional cycles MAP with or without IFN-α-2b (0.5 to 1.0 μg/kg per week subcutaneously, after chemotherapy until 2 years postregistration). Outcome measures were event-free survival (EFS; primary) and overall survival and toxicity (secondary). Results Good response was reported in 1,041 of 2,260 registered patients; 716 consented to random assignment (MAP, n = 359; MAP plus IFN-α-2b, n = 357), with baseline characteristics balanced by arm. A total of 271 of 357 started IFN-α-2b; 105 stopped early, and 38 continued to receive treatment at data freeze. Refusal and toxicity were the main reasons for never starting IFN-α-2b and for stopping prematurely, respectively. Median IFN-α-2b duration, if started, was 67 weeks. A total of 133 of 268 patients who started IFN-α-2b and provided toxicity information reported grade ≥ 3 toxicity during IFN-α-2b treatment. With median follow-up of 44 months, 3-year EFS for all 716 randomly assigned patients was 76% (95% CI, 72% to 79%); 174 EFS events were reported (MAP, n = 93; MAP plus IFN-α-2b, n = 81). Hazard ratio was 0.83 (95% CI, 0.61 to 1.12; P = .214) from an adjusted Cox model. Conclusion At the preplanned analysis time, MAP plus IFN-α-2b was not statistically different from MAP alone. A considerable proportion of patients never started IFN-α-2b or stopped

  15. Methotrexate, Doxorubicin, and Cisplatin (MAP) Plus Maintenance Pegylated Interferon Alfa-2b Versus MAP Alone in Patients With Resectable High-Grade Osteosarcoma and Good Histologic Response to Preoperative MAP: First Results of the EURAMOS-1 Good Response Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Bielack, Stefan S; Smeland, Sigbjørn; Whelan, Jeremy S; Marina, Neyssa; Jovic, Gordana; Hook, Jane M; Krailo, Mark D; Gebhardt, Mark; Pápai, Zsuzsanna; Meyer, James; Nadel, Helen; Randall, R Lor; Deffenbaugh, Claudia; Nagarajan, Rajaram; Brennan, Bernadette; Letson, G Douglas; Teot, Lisa A; Goorin, Allen; Baumhoer, Daniel; Kager, Leo; Werner, Mathias; Lau, Ching C; Sundby Hall, Kirsten; Gelderblom, Hans; Meyers, Paul; Gorlick, Richard; Windhager, Reinhard; Helmke, Knut; Eriksson, Mikael; Hoogerbrugge, Peter M; Schomberg, Paula; Tunn, Per-Ulf; Kühne, Thomas; Jürgens, Heribert; van den Berg, Henk; Böhling, Tom; Picton, Susan; Renard, Marleen; Reichardt, Peter; Gerss, Joachim; Butterfass-Bahloul, Trude; Morris, Carol; Hogendoorn, Pancras C W; Seddon, Beatrice; Calaminus, Gabriele; Michelagnoli, Maria; Dhooge, Catharina; Sydes, Matthew R; Bernstein, Mark

    2015-07-10

    EURAMOS-1, an international randomized controlled trial, investigated maintenance therapy with pegylated interferon alfa-2b (IFN-α-2b) in patients whose osteosarcoma showed good histologic response (good response) to induction chemotherapy. At diagnosis, patients age ≤ 40 years with resectable high-grade osteosarcoma were registered. Eligibility after surgery for good response random assignment included ≥ two cycles of preoperative MAP (methotrexate, doxorubicin, and cisplatin), macroscopically complete surgery of primary tumor, < 10% viable tumor, and no disease progression. These patients were randomly assigned to four additional cycles MAP with or without IFN-α-2b (0.5 to 1.0 μg/kg per week subcutaneously, after chemotherapy until 2 years postregistration). Outcome measures were event-free survival (EFS; primary) and overall survival and toxicity (secondary). Good response was reported in 1,041 of 2,260 registered patients; 716 consented to random assignment (MAP, n = 359; MAP plus IFN-α-2b, n = 357), with baseline characteristics balanced by arm. A total of 271 of 357 started IFN-α-2b; 105 stopped early, and 38 continued to receive treatment at data freeze. Refusal and toxicity were the main reasons for never starting IFN-α-2b and for stopping prematurely, respectively. Median IFN-α-2b duration, if started, was 67 weeks. A total of 133 of 268 patients who started IFN-α-2b and provided toxicity information reported grade ≥ 3 toxicity during IFN-α-2b treatment. With median follow-up of 44 months, 3-year EFS for all 716 randomly assigned patients was 76% (95% CI, 72% to 79%); 174 EFS events were reported (MAP, n = 93; MAP plus IFN-α-2b, n = 81). Hazard ratio was 0.83 (95% CI, 0.61 to 1.12; P = .214) from an adjusted Cox model. At the preplanned analysis time, MAP plus IFN-α-2b was not statistically different from MAP alone. A considerable proportion of patients never started IFN-α-2b or stopped prematurely. Long-term follow-up for events and

  16. Giving monoclonal antibodies to healthy volunteers in phase 1 trials: is it safe?

    PubMed Central

    Tranter, Elizabeth; Peters, Gary; Boyce, Malcolm; Warrington, Steve

    2013-01-01

    Many monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) have been studied in healthy volunteers in phase 1, but few data have been published on the safety of that practice. We aimed to review the available data, and thereby to estimate the risks of participation in phase 1 trials of MAbs. We searched PubMed, the ClinicalTrials.gov database and Google, using the search terms ‘monoclonal antibody’, ‘phase 1’ and ‘healthy volunteers’. We identified 70 completed trials of MAbs in healthy volunteers, but the published data were too sparse to allow confident assessment of the risks of MAbs in healthy volunteers. Our best estimate of risk of a life-threatening adverse event was between 1 : 425 and 1 : 1700 volunteer-trials, but all such events occurred in a single trial (of TGN1412). In a phase 1 trial of a small molecule, the risk of death or a life-threatening adverse event appears to be 1 : 100 000–1 000 000 volunteer-trials, which is similar to the risk of many ordinary daily activities. Most people would consider that level of risk to be ‘minimal’ or ‘negligible’ and, therefore, acceptable. On that basis, the safety record of MAbs in healthy volunteers has been ruined by the TGN1412 disaster. However, that experience is unlikely to be repeated, because of improvements in governance and practice of phase 1 trials. If the experience of TGN1412 is disregarded, it seems reasonable to continue using healthy volunteers in phase 1 trials of MAbs, provided that there are scientific and medical reasons to conclude that the risk is truly minimal. PMID:23438102

  17. Phase IIB/III Trial of Tenecteplase in Acute Ischemic Stroke: Results of a Prematurely Terminated Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Haley, E. Clarke; Thompson, John L.P.; Grotta, James C.; Lyden, Patrick D.; Hemmen, Thomas G.; Brown, Devin L.; Fanale, Christopher; Libman, Richard; Kwiatkowski, Thomas G.; Llinas, Rafael H.; Levine, Steven R.; Johnston, Karen C.; Buchsbaum, Richard; Levy, Gilberto; Levin, Bruce

    2010-01-01

    Background: Intravenous alteplase (rt-PA) remains the only approved treatment for acute ischemic stroke, but its use remains limited. In a previous pilot dose-escalation study, intravenous tenecteplase showed promise as a potentially safer alternative. Therefore, a Phase IIB clinical trial was begun to a) choose a best dose of tenecteplase to carry forward, and b) to provide evidence for either promise or futility of further testing of tenecteplase versus rt-PA. If promise was established, then the trial would continue as a Phase III efficacy trial comparing the selected tenecteplase dose to standard rt-PA. Methods: The trial began as a small, multi-center, randomized, double-blind, controlled clinical trial comparing 0.1, 0.25, and 0.4 mg/kg tenecteplase with standard 0.9 mg/kg rt-PA in patients with acute stroke within 3 hours of onset. An adaptive sequential design used an early (24 hour) assessment of major neurological improvement balanced against occurrence of symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) to choose a “best” dose of tenecteplase to carry forward. Once a “best” dose was established, the trial was to continue until at least 100 pairs of the selected tenecteplase dose versus standard rt-PA could be compared by 3 month outcome using the modified Rankin Scale in an interim analysis. Decision rules were devised to yield a clear recommendation to either stop for futility or to continue into Phase III. Results: The trial was prematurely terminated for slow enrollment after only 112 patients had been randomized at 8 clinical centers between 2006 and 2008. The 0.4 mg/kg dose was discarded as inferior after only 73 patients were randomized, but the selection procedure was still unable to distinguish between 0.1 mg/kg and 0.25 mg/kg as a propitious dose at the time the trial was stopped. There were no statistically persuasive differences in 3 month outcomes between the remaining tenecteplase groups and rt-PA. Symptomatic ICH rates were highest in the

  18. Phase IIB/III trial of tenecteplase in acute ischemic stroke: results of a prematurely terminated randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Haley, E Clarke; Thompson, John L P; Grotta, James C; Lyden, Patrick D; Hemmen, Thomas G; Brown, Devin L; Fanale, Christopher; Libman, Richard; Kwiatkowski, Thomas G; Llinas, Rafael H; Levine, Steven R; Johnston, Karen C; Buchsbaum, Richard; Levy, Gilberto; Levin, Bruce

    2010-04-01

    Intravenous alteplase (rtPA) remains the only approved treatment for acute ischemic stroke, but its use remains limited. In a previous pilot dose-escalation study, intravenous tenecteplase showed promise as a potentially safer alternative. Therefore, a Phase IIB clinical trial was begun to (1) choose a best dose of tenecteplase to carry forward; and (2) to provide evidence for either promise or futility of further testing of tenecteplase versus rtPA. If promise was established, then the trial would continue as a Phase III efficacy trial comparing the selected tenecteplase dose to standard rtPA. The trial began as a small, multicenter, randomized, double-blind, controlled clinical trial comparing 0.1, 0.25, and 0.4 mg/kg tenecteplase with standard 0.9 mg/kg rtPA in patients with acute stroke within 3 hours of onset. An adaptive sequential design used an early (24-hour) assessment of major neurological improvement balanced against occurrence of symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage to choose a "best" dose of tenecteplase to carry forward. Once a "best" dose was established, the trial was to continue until at least 100 pairs of the selected tenecteplase dose versus standard rtPA could be compared by 3-month outcome using the modified Rankin Scale in an interim analysis. Decision rules were devised to yield a clear recommendation to either stop for futility or to continue into Phase III. The trial was prematurely terminated for slow enrollment after only 112 patients had been randomized at 8 clinical centers between 2006 and 2008. The 0.4-mg/kg dose was discarded as inferior after only 73 patients were randomized, but the selection procedure was still unable to distinguish between 0.1 mg/kg and 0.25 mg/kg as a propitious dose at the time the trial was stopped. There were no statistically persuasive differences in 3-month outcomes between the remaining tenecteplase groups and rtPA. Symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage rates were highest in the discarded 0.4-mg

  19. Publication and reporting conduct for pharmacodynamic analyses of tumor tissue in early-phase oncology trials.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Georgina A; Kimmelman, Jonathan

    2012-12-01

    In principle, nondiagnostic biopsies for pharmacodynamic (PD) studies are carried out to inform decision-making in drug development. Because such procedures have no therapeutic value, their ethical justification requires that results be published. We aimed to assess the frequency of nonpublication of PD data in early phase cancer trials and to identify factors that prevent full publication of data. We identified a sample of early-phase cancer trials containing invasive nondiagnostic tissue procurement for PD analysis from American Society of Clinical Oncology and American Association for Cancer Research meeting abstracts published between 1995 and 2005. These trials were followed to publication to determine frequency of nonpublication of PD data. Corresponding authors on early-phase cancer trials using invasive nondiagnostic research procedures were also surveyed to identify factors preventing full publication of PD data. In a sample of 90 trials, 22.2% (20 trials) resulted in no trial publication. Of published trials expected to contain PD reports, 16 (17.8%) did not include any PD data, and 21 (23.3%) reported incomplete PD data. We surveyed 92 authors; nonpublication was regarded as a frequent occurrence, and the most commonly cited barrier to full publication of PD data was strategic considerations in publication (58.8% of responding authors). Our results suggest ways that investigators, study planners, and reviewers can improve the burden/knowledge value balance in PD studies. ©2012 AACR.

  20. Inside information: Financial conflicts of interest for research subjects in early phase clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Helft, Paul R; Ratain, Mark J; Epstein, Richard A; Siegler, Mark

    2004-05-05

    In recent years, several research subjects have told us that they had bought or intended to buy stock in the companies sponsoring the clinical trials in which they were enrolled. This situation has led us to ask what, if any, are physician-investigators' scientific, ethical, and legal responsibilities concerning research subjects who choose to buy stock in the companies sponsoring the clinical trials in which they are participating. Although the scope of this problem is unknown and is likely to be small, this commentary examines the scientific, ethical, and legal concerns raised by such activities on the part of research subjects enrolled in early phase clinical trials. In addition, this commentary also outlines the basis for our opinion that research subjects involved in an early phase clinical trial should avoid the financial conflicts of interest created by trading stock in the company sponsoring the clinical trial.

  1. A Bayesian design for phase II clinical trials with delayed responses based on multiple imputation

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Chunyan; Liu, Suyu; Yuan, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Interimmonitoring is routinely conducted in phase II clinical trials to terminate the trial early if the experimental treatment is futile. Interim monitoring requires that patients’ responses be ascertained shortly after the initiation of treatment so that the outcomes are known by the time the interim decision must be made. However, in some cases, response outcomes require a long time to be assessed, which causes difficulties for interim monitoring. To address this issue, we propose a Bayesian trial design to allow for continuously monitoring phase II clinical trials in the presence of delayed responses. We treat the delayed responses as missing data and handle them using a multiple imputation approach. Extensive simulations show that the proposed design yields desirable operating characteristics under various settings and dramatically reduces the trial duration. PMID:24817556

  2. Maximizing return on socioeconomic investment in phase II proof-of-concept trials.

    PubMed

    Chen, Cong; Beckman, Robert A

    2014-04-01

    Phase II proof-of-concept (POC) trials play a key role in oncology drug development, determining which therapeutic hypotheses will undergo definitive phase III testing according to predefined Go-No Go (GNG) criteria. The number of possible POC hypotheses likely far exceeds available public or private resources. We propose a design strategy for maximizing return on socioeconomic investment in phase II trials that obtains the greatest knowledge with the minimum patient exposure. We compare efficiency using the benefit-cost ratio, defined to be the risk-adjusted number of truly active drugs correctly identified for phase III development divided by the risk-adjusted total sample size in phase II and III development, for different POC trial sizes, powering schemes, and associated GNG criteria. It is most cost-effective to conduct small POC trials and set the corresponding GNG bars high, so that more POC trials can be conducted under socioeconomic constraints. If δ is the minimum treatment effect size of clinical interest in phase II, the study design with the highest benefit-cost ratio has approximately 5% type I error rate and approximately 20% type II error rate (80% power) for detecting an effect size of approximately 1.5δ. A Go decision to phase III is made when the observed effect size is close to δ. With the phenomenal expansion of our knowledge in molecular biology leading to an unprecedented number of new oncology drug targets, conducting more small POC trials and setting high GNG bars maximize the return on socioeconomic investment in phase II POC trials. ©2014 AACR.

  3. Microbicide trials for preventing HIV/AIDS in South Africa: phase II trial partricipants' experiences and psychological needs.

    PubMed

    Pistorius, A G; van de Wijgert, J H H M; Sebola, M; Friedland, B; Nagel, E; Bokaba, C; Hoosen, A A

    2004-08-01

    The Microbicide Division of the Department of Medical Microbiology at MEDUNSA, South Africa, recently completed a phase II expanded safety trial of the candidate microbicide Carraguard. A microbicide is a vaginal product that women might use, if proven safe and effective, to protect themselves from HIV and possibly other sexually transmitted infections (STIs). The study participants were from Ga-Rankuwa and its neighbouring areas, an historically disadvantaged residential township near Pretoria. We conducted six focus group discussions with phase II trial participants to evaluate their experiences with trial participation and their psychological needs. Participants spontaneously talked about their experiences with the study gel and speculum examinations. They felt that they had received high quality medical care. They indicated that their personal hygiene and knowledge of the female reproductive system, HIV and other STIs had improved, which helped their familie and empowered them as women. Participants valued being able to discuss their anxiety about HIV/AIDS wit study staff. They felt that the study provided them with a supportive environment in which their personal problems (not necessarily restricted to HIV/AIDS) could be addressed. Some recommended that the study staf improve their professionalism and punctuality. They suggested the formation of participant support groups, an expressed a preference to remain involved in the trial. Some participants appeared to have become dependent o services provided during the trial. We have taken the results of these focus group discussions into account during planning for a phase III efficacy trial of Carraguard to be conducted in the same and other similar communities.

  4. Challenges Facing Early Phase Trials Sponsored by the National Cancer Institute: An Analysis of Corrective Action Plans to Improve Accrual.

    PubMed

    Massett, Holly A; Mishkin, Grace; Rubinstein, Larry; Ivy, S Percy; Denicoff, Andrea; Godwin, Elizabeth; DiPiazza, Kate; Bolognese, Jennifer; Zwiebel, James A; Abrams, Jeffrey S

    2016-11-15

    Accruing patients in a timely manner represents a significant challenge to early phase cancer clinical trials. The NCI Cancer Therapy Evaluation Program analyzed 19 months of corrective action plans (CAP) received for slow-accruing phase I and II trials to identify slow accrual reasons, evaluate whether proposed corrective actions matched these reasons, and assess the CAP impact on trial accrual, duration, and likelihood of meeting primary scientific objectives. Of the 135 CAPs analyzed, 69 were for phase I trials and 66 for phase II trials. Primary reasons cited for slow accrual were safety/toxicity (phase I: 48%), design/protocol concerns (phase I: 42%, phase II: 33%), and eligibility criteria (phase I: 41%, phase II: 35%). The most commonly proposed corrective actions were adding institutions (phase I: 43%, phase II: 85%) and amending the trial to change eligibility or design (phase I: 55%, phase II: 44%). Only 40% of CAPs provided proposed corrective actions that matched the reasons given for slow accrual. Seventy percent of trials were closed to accrual at time of analysis (phase I = 48; phase II = 46). Of these, 67% of phase I and 70% of phase II trials met their primary objectives, but they were active three times longer than projected. Among closed trials, 24% had an accrual rate increase associated with a greater likelihood of meeting their primary scientific objectives. Ultimately, trials receiving CAPs saw improved accrual rates. Future trials may benefit from implementing CAPs early in trial life cycles, but it may be more beneficial to invest in earlier accrual planning. Clin Cancer Res; 22(22); 5408-16. ©2016 AACRSee related commentary by Mileham and Kim, p. 5397.

  5. Development of drugs for celiac disease: review of endpoints for Phase 2 and 3 trials

    PubMed Central

    Gottlieb, Klaus; Dawson, Jill; Hussain, Fez; Murray, Joseph A.

    2015-01-01

    Celiac disease is a lifelong disorder for which there is currently only one known, effective treatment: a gluten-free diet. New treatment approaches have recently emerged; several drugs are in Phase 2 trials and results appear promising; however, discussion around regulatory endpoints is in its infancy. We will briefly discuss the drugs that are under development and then shift our attention to potential trial endpoints, such as patient-reported outcomes, histology, serology, gene expression analysis and other tests. We will outline the differing requirements for proof-of-concept Phase 2 trials and Phase 3 registration trials, with a particular emphasis on current thinking in regulatory agencies. We conclude our paper with recommendations and a glossary of regulatory terms, to enable readers who are less familiar with regulatory language to take maximum advantage of this review. PMID:25725041

  6. Understanding cognitive processes behind acceptance or refusal of phase I trials.

    PubMed

    Pravettoni, Gabriella; Mazzocco, Ketti; Gorini, Alessandra; Curigliano, Giuseppe

    2016-04-01

    Participation in phase I trials gives patients the chance to obtain control over their disease by trying an experimental therapy. The patients' vulnerability, the informed consent process aiming at understanding the purpose and potential benefits of the phase I trial, and the complexity of the studies may impact the patient's final decision. Emotionally difficult health conditions may induce patients to succumb to cognitive biases, allocating attention only on a part of the provided information. Filling the gap in patients' information process can foster the implementation of strategies to help physicians tailor clinical trials' communication providing personalized support and tailored medical information around patients' need, so avoiding cognitive biases in patients and improving informed shared decision quality. The aim of the present review article focuses on the analysis of cognitive and psychological factors that affect patients' decision to participate or not to early phase clinical trials. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  7. Design-phase prediction of potential cancer clinical trial accrual success using a research data mart

    PubMed Central

    London, Jack W; Balestrucci, Luanne; Chatterjee, Devjani; Zhan, Tingting

    2013-01-01

    Background Many cancer interventional clinical trials are not completed because the required number of eligible patients are not enrolled. Objective To assess the value of using a research data mart (RDM) during the design of cancer clinical trials as a predictor of potential patient accrual, so that less trials fail to meet enrollment requirements. Materials and methods The eligibility criteria for 90 interventional cancer trials were translated into i2b2 RDM queries and cohort sizes obtained for the 2 years prior to the trial initiation. These RDM cohort numbers were compared to the trial accrual requirements, generating predictions of accrual success. These predictions were then compared to the actual accrual performance to evaluate the ability of this methodology to predict the trials’ likelihood of enrolling sufficient patients. Results Our methodology predicted successful accrual (specificity) with 0.969 (=31/32 trials) accuracy (95% CI 0.908 to 1) and predicted failed accrual (sensitivity) with 0.397 (=23/58 trials) accuracy (95% CI 0.271 to 0.522). The positive predictive value, or precision rate, is 0.958 (=23/24) (95% CI 0.878 to 1). Discussion A prediction of ‘failed accrual’ by this methodology is very reliable, whereas a prediction of accrual success is less so, as causes of accrual failure other than an insufficient eligible patient pool are not considered. Conclusions The application of this methodology to cancer clinical design would significantly improve cancer clinical research by reducing the costly efforts expended initiating trials that predictably will fail to meet accrual requirements. PMID:23851466

  8. Predictive value of phase I trials for safety in later trials and final approved dose: analysis of 61 approved cancer drugs.

    PubMed

    Jardim, Denis L; Hess, Kenneth R; Lorusso, Patricia; Kurzrock, Razelle; Hong, David S

    2014-01-15

    Phase I trials use a small number of patients to define a maximum tolerated dose (MTD) and the safety of new agents. We compared data from phase I and registration trials to determine whether early trials predicted later safety and final dose. We searched the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) website for drugs approved in nonpediatric cancers (January 1990-October 2012). The recommended phase II dose (R2PD) and toxicities from phase I were compared with doses and safety in later trials. In 62 of 85 (73%) matched trials, the dose from the later trial was within 20% of the RP2D. In a multivariable analysis, phase I trials of targeted agents were less predictive of the final approved dose (OR, 0.2 for adopting ± 20% of the RP2D for targeted vs. other classes; P = 0.025). Of the 530 clinically relevant toxicities in later trials, 70% (n = 374) were described in phase I. A significant relationship (P = 0.0032) between increasing the number of patients in phase I (up to 60) and the ability to describe future clinically relevant toxicities was observed. Among 28,505 patients in later trials, the death rate that was related to drug was 1.41%. In conclusion, dosing based on phase I trials was associated with a low toxicity-related death rate in later trials. The ability to predict relevant toxicities correlates with the number of patients on the initial phase I trial. The final dose approved was within 20% of the RP2D in 73% of assessed trials. ©2013 AACR.

  9. Vaccine trials in the developing world: operational lessons learnt from a phase IV poliomyelitis vaccine trial in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Geldenhuys, H; Waggie, Z; Jacks, M; Geldenhuys, M; Traut, L; Tameris, M; Hatherill, M; Hanekom, W A; Sutter, R; Hussey, G; Mahomed, H

    2012-08-31

    Conducting vaccine trials in developing nations is necessary but operationally complex. We describe operational lessons learnt from a phase IV poliomyelitis vaccine trial in a semi-rural region of South Africa. We reviewed operational data collected over the duration of the trial with respect to staff recruitment and training, participant recruitment and retention, and cold chain maintenance. RESULTS-LESSONS LEARNT: The recruitment model we used that relied on the 24h physical presence of a team member in the birthing unit was expensive and challenging to manage. Forecasting of enrolment rates was complicated by incomplete baseline data and by the linear nature of forecasts that do not take into account changing variables. We found that analyzing key operational data to monitor progress of the trial enabled us to identify problem areas timeously, and to facilitate a collegial problem-solving process by the extended trial team. Pro-actively nurturing a working relationship with the public sector health care system and the community was critical to our success. Despite the wide geographical area and lack of fixed addresses, we maintained an excellent retention rate through community assistance and the use of descriptive residential information. Training needs of team members were ongoing and dynamic and we discovered that these needs that were best met by an in-house, targeted and systemized training programme. The use of vaccine refrigerators instead of standard frost-free refrigerators is cost-effective and necessary to maintain the cold-chain. Operational challenges of a vaccine trial in developing world populations include inexperienced staff, the close liaison required between researchers and public health care services, impoverished participants that require complex recruitment and retention strategies, and challenges of distance and access. These challenges can be overcome by innovative strategies that allow for the unique characteristics of the setting, trial

  10. Early phase clinical trials in pediatric hematology and oncology.

    PubMed

    Corbacioglu, S

    2012-04-01

    Pediatric oncology is an unrivaled success story in the recent history of medicine. This success is mostly based on a persistent refinement of evidence based therapeutic concepts. With that regard physicians and their staff are highly experience in the conduct of prospective evidence based trials and are therefore competent partners for the pharmaceutical industry. In times of personalized medicine the individual target population is diminishing and the borders of indications are not more disease based. A situation that requires new concepts from the industry. Therefore children with cancer could benefit early from the current developments as well as the pharmaceutical industry could benefit from the legislative incentives through highly recruiting and well conducted prospective trials. Pivotal is a functional platform of communication in order to maintain a close dialogue between academia and pharmaceutical companies. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  11. Play the winner for phase II/III clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Yao, Q; Wei, L J

    In comparing two treatments under a typical sequential clinical trial setting, a 50-50 randomization design generates reliable data for making efficient inferences about the treatment difference for the benefit of patients in the general population. However, if the treatment difference is large and the endpoint of the study is potentially fatal, it does not seem appropriate to sacrifice a large number of study patients who are assigned to the inferior arm. An adaptive design is a data-dependent treatment allocation rule that sequentially uses accumulating information about the treatment difference during the trial to modify the allocation rule for new study patients. In this article, we utilize real trials from AIDS and cancer to illustrate the advantage of using adaptive designs. Specifically we show that, with adaptive designs, the loss of power for testing the equality of two treatments is negligible. Moreover, the study patients do not have to pay a handsome price for the benefit of future patients. We also propose multi-stage adaptive rules to relax the administrative burden of implementing the study and to handle continuous response variables, such as the failure time in survival analysis.

  12. Influenza antivirals currently in late-phase clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Koszalka, Paulina; Tilmanis, Danielle; Hurt, Aeron C

    2017-05-01

    Influenza antiviral drugs are important for the control of influenza, most specifically for the treatment of influenza patients with severe disease following infection with a seasonal influenza virus, a newly emerging influenza strain, or in the event of a pandemic. Many influenza antivirals that are currently under investigation in late-stage clinical trials differ in their mechanism of action compared to drugs currently licensed for the treatment of influenza. Nitazoxanide and DAS181 target components of the host cell and alter the ability of the virus to replicate efficiently, while small molecule drugs such as T705, JNJ63623872 and S-033188 bind to the viral polymerase complex and restrict viral replication. Monoclonal antibodies that are currently in clinical trial for the treatment of influenza most commonly are targeted to the stem region of the haemagglutinin molecule. Early findings from animal models and in vitro studies suggest that many of the new antiviral drugs when tested in combination with oseltamivir have improved effectiveness over monotherapy. Clinical trials assessing both monotherapy and combination therapy are currently under investigation. It is hoped that as new antivirals are licensed, they will improve the standard of care and outcomes for influenza patients with severe disease. © 2017 The Authors. Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Pain in the Early Phase of Pediatric Pancreatitis (PINEAPPLE Trial): Pre-Study Protocol of a Multinational Prospective Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Zsoldos, Fanni; Párniczky, Andrea; Mosztbacher, Dóra; Tóth, Anna; Lásztity, Natália; Hegyi, Peter

    2016-01-01

    There are unexpectedly large differences between the incidences of acute pancreatitis (AP) as indicated by different hospitals. Retrospective studies suggest that the reason behind this is the large differences that exist between the local managements of abdominal pain at emergency units. Unfortunately, no evidence-based medicine (EBM) guidelines are available to give proper instruction concerning the necessity of serum pancreatic enzyme measurement during abdominal pain. Pain in Early Phase of Pediatric Pancreatitis (PINEAPPLE) is an observational, multinational observational clinical trial to explore the route from the first sign of abdominal pain to the diagnosis of pancreatitis (PINEAPPLE trial). The PINEAPPLE-R subtrial is a retrospective review on the records of children (patients under 18) appearing at emergency units - a review of their clinical symptoms, results of imaging examinations and laboratory parameters. The PINEAPPLE-P subtrial is a prospective trial designed to develop a fast and simple EBM guideline that helps to evaluate (in a reliable and cost-efficient way) the necessity of pancreatic enzyme test and abdominal ultrasonography (or even computed tomography) when a child has abdominal pain. The trial has been registered at the ISRCTN registry and has received the relevant ethical approval. The PINEAPPLE trial will help to recognize AP in children in a highly efficient manner. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. [The role of the expansion cohort in phase I trials in oncology: guidelines of the phase I HUB].

    PubMed

    Ezzalfani, Monia; Dugué, Audrey; Mollevi, Caroline; Pulido, Marina; Bonnetain, Franck; Filleron, Thomas; Gal, Jocelyn; Gauthier, Mélanie; Le Deley, Marie Cécile; Le Tourneau, Christophe; Médioni, Jacques; Nguyen, Jean-Michel; Chabaud, Sylvie; Teixeira, Luis; Thivat, Emilie; You, Benoît; Kramar, Andrew; Paoletti, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    At the end of the dose escalation step of phase I trials in oncology, it is increasingly frequent to include patients in expansion cohorts. However, the objective of the expansion cohorts, the number of patients included and their justification are insufficiently explained in the protocols. These cohorts are sometimes of considerable size. The aim of this article is to outline the methodology of expansion cohorts in order to provide recommendations for their planning in practice. This work has been undertaken in collaboration with the statisticians of the early phase investigation centers (CLIP(2)), supported by INCA. First, we have outlined the recent articles published on the expansion cohorts in phase I. We then proposed recommendations, in terms of objectives and number of patients to be included, to guide investigators and facilitate the use of these expansion cohorts in practice. Manji et al. have identified 149 phase I clinical trials using expansion cohorts in oncology with a review of the literature between 2006 and 2011 (Manji et al., 2013). Objectives of the expansion cohort were reported in 111 trials (74%). In these trials, safety was the most reported objective (80% of trials), followed by efficacy (45%). According to this review, the number of patients included in these cohorts was insufficiently justified. This result was confirmed by the study of literature that we conducted over the period 2011-2014. We propose to define the number of patients to be included in expansion cohorts in terms of (1) their objectives, (2) the statistical criteria and (3) the clinical context of the trial. The toxicity study remains the primary objective to evaluate in the expansion phase. In some contexts, the activity study is considered as co-primary objective, either for identifying preliminary signs of activity in studies like screening, or for studying the activity when the target population is known. This study is then considered as phase I/II, and experience

  15. A new approach to designing phase I-II cancer trials for cytotoxic chemotherapies.

    PubMed

    Bartroff, Jay; Lai, Tze Leung; Narasimhan, Balasubramanian

    2014-07-20

    Recently, there has been much work on early phase cancer designs that incorporate both toxicity and efficacy data, called phase I-II designs because they combine elements of both phases. However, they do not explicitly address the phase II hypothesis test of H0 : p ≤ p0 , where p is the probability of efficacy at the estimated maximum tolerated dose η from phase I and p0 is the baseline efficacy rate. Standard practice for phase II remains to treat p as a fixed, unknown parameter and to use Simon's two-stage design with all patients dosed at η. We propose a phase I-II design that addresses the uncertainty in the estimate p=p(η) in H0 by using sequential generalized likelihood theory. Combining this with a phase I design that incorporates efficacy data, the phase I-II design provides a common framework that can be used all the way from the first dose of phase I through the final accept/reject decision about H0 at the end of phase II, utilizing both toxicity and efficacy data throughout. Efficient group sequential testing is used in phase II that allows for early stopping to show treatment effect or futility. The proposed phase I-II design thus removes the artificial barrier between phase I and phase II and fulfills the objectives of searching for the maximum tolerated dose and testing if the treatment has an acceptable response rate to enter into a phase III trial.

  16. Communicating and Understanding the Purpose of Pediatric Phase I Cancer Trials

    PubMed Central

    Cousino, Melissa K.; Zyzanski, Stephen J.; Yamokoski, Amy D.; Hazen, Rebecca A.; Baker, Justin N.; Noll, Robert B.; Rheingold, Susan R.; Geyer, J. Russell; Alexander, Stewart C.; Drotar, Dennis; Kodish, Eric D.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Quality informed consent should provide a clear understanding of the purpose of the research. Given the ethical challenges of pediatric phase I cancer trials, it is important to investigate physician-parent communication during informed consent conferences (ICCs) and parental understanding of the purpose of these studies. Methods In the multisite Informed Consent in Pediatric Phase I Cancer Trials study, 85 ICCs for phase I research between June 2008 and May 2011 were directly observed, and 60 parents were subsequently interviewed. The scientific purpose was defined as composite understanding of drug safety, dose finding, and dose escalation. We determined the frequency with which physicians explained these and other phase I–related concepts during the ICC. Parent interviews were analyzed to determine understanding. Results The child was present at 83 of 85 ICCs. Only 32% of parents demonstrated substantial understanding of the scientific purpose of phase I cancer trials; 35% demonstrated little or no understanding. Parents of higher socioeconomic status and racial majority status were more likely to understand the scientific purpose. Factors associated with understanding included physician explanation of the goal of the applicable phase I protocol offered (explained in 85% of ICCs) and explanation of the dose cohorts (explained in 43% of ICCs). Physicians explained drug safety in 23% of ICCs, dose finding in 52% of ICCs, and dose escalation in 53% of ICCs. Conclusion Many parents of children participating in phase I trials do not understand the purpose of these trials. Physician-parent communication about the purpose of phase I research is lacking during ICCs. PMID:23071225

  17. [Phase I clinical trial design of anticancer agents--a Fibonacci and a modified Fibonacci sequence].

    PubMed

    Kusaba, H; Tamura, T

    2000-05-01

    A Phase I clinical trial of an anticancer agent is the first evaluation in humans, and it is an important step in drug development. From the ethical point of view, the goal is to escalate to the maximum tolerated dose quickly, yet safely, to minimize the likelihood of treating patients at doses that are too low or high. It is expected that the contradictions between safety and efficacy in the Phase I clinical trials will be solved by developing methods. The modified Fibonacci sequence has been generally adopted for dose escalation, although it includes some problems. It is necessary to recognize that the method used for Phase I clinical trials for anticancer agents remains unsatisfactory, and that it is also necessary to develop more ethical and scientific methods.

  18. Toward phase 4 trials in heart failure: A social and corporate responsibility of the medical profession

    PubMed Central

    Iyngkaran, Pupalan; Beneby, Glen S

    2015-01-01

    Congestive heart failure (CHF) is a chronic condition, requiring polypharmacy, allied health supports and regular monitoring. All these factors are needed to ensure compliance and to deliver the positive outcomes demonstrated from randomized controlled trials. Unfortunately many centers around the world are unable to match trial level support. The outcomes for many communities are thus unclear. Research design factors in post-marketing surveillance to address this issue. Phase 4 studies is the name given to trials designed to obtain such community level data and thus address issues of external validity. CHF phase 4 studies are relatively underutilized. We feel the onus for this research lies with the health profession. In this commentary we provide arguments as to why phase 4 studies should be viewed as a social and corporate responsibility of health professional that care for clients with CHF. PMID:26713277

  19. Extending Clinical Equipoise to Phase 1 Trials Involving Patients: Unresolved Problems

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, James A.; Kimmelman, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Notwithstanding requirements for scientific/social value and risk/ benefit proportionality in major research ethics policies, there are no widely accepted standards for these judgments in Phase 1 trials. This paper examines whether the principle of clinical equipoise can be used as a standard for assessing the ratio of risk to direct-benefit presented by drugs administered in one category of Phase 1 study—first-in-human trials involving patients. On the basis of the supporting evidence for, and architecture of, Phase 1 studies, the articles offers two provisional conclusions: (1) the risks of drug administration in such trials cannot generally be justified on therapeutic grounds but by appeal to the social value of the research; and (2) a framework for adjudicating the ratio of risk/ social-value must be developed. PMID:20506695

  20. Toward phase 4 trials in heart failure: A social and corporate responsibility of the medical profession.

    PubMed

    Iyngkaran, Pupalan; Beneby, Glen S

    2015-12-26

    Congestive heart failure (CHF) is a chronic condition, requiring polypharmacy, allied health supports and regular monitoring. All these factors are needed to ensure compliance and to deliver the positive outcomes demonstrated from randomized controlled trials. Unfortunately many centers around the world are unable to match trial level support. The outcomes for many communities are thus unclear. Research design factors in post-marketing surveillance to address this issue. Phase 4 studies is the name given to trials designed to obtain such community level data and thus address issues of external validity. CHF phase 4 studies are relatively underutilized. We feel the onus for this research lies with the health profession. In this commentary we provide arguments as to why phase 4 studies should be viewed as a social and corporate responsibility of health professional that care for clients with CHF.

  1. Flexible designs for phase II comparative clinical trials involving two response variables.

    PubMed

    Bersimis, S; Sachlas, A; Papaioannou, T

    2015-01-30

    The aim of phase II clinical trials is to determine whether an experimental treatment is sufficiently promising and safe to justify further testing. The need for reduced sample size arises naturally in phase II clinical trials owing to both technical and ethical reasons, motivating a significant part of research in the field during recent years, while another significant part of the research effort is aimed at more complex therapeutic schemes that demand the consideration of multiple endpoints to make decisions. In this paper, our attention is restricted to phase II clinical trials in which two treatments are compared with respect to two dependent dichotomous responses proposing some flexible designs. These designs permit the researcher to terminate the clinical trial when high rates of favorable or unfavorable outcomes are observed early enough requiring in this way a small number of patients. From the mathematical point of view, the proposed designs are defined on bivariate sequences of multi-state trials, and the corresponding stopping rules are based on various distributions related to the waiting time until a certain number of events appear in these sequences. The exact distributions of interest, under a unified framework, are studied using the Markov chain embedding technique, which appears to be very useful in clinical trials for the sample size determination. Tables of expected sample size and power are presented. The numerical illustration showed a very good performance for these new designs.

  2. From protection to entitlement: selecting research subjects for early phase clinical trials involving breakthrough therapies.

    PubMed

    Jecker, Nancy S; Wightman, Aaron G; Rosenberg, Abby R; Diekema, Douglas S

    2017-04-13

    Our goals are to (1) set forth and defend a multiprinciple system for selecting individuals who meet trial eligibility criteria to participate in early phase clinical trials testing chimeric antigen receptor (CAR T-cell) for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia when demand for participation exceeds spaces available in a trial; (2) show the relevance of these selection criteria to other breakthrough experimental therapies; (3) argue that distinct distributive justice criteria apply to breakthrough experimental therapies, standard research and healthcare and (4) argue that as evidence of benefit increases, the emphasis of justice in research shifts from protecting subjects from harm to ensuring fair access to benefits.

  3. Evaluating Intermittent Androgen-Deprivation Therapy Phase III Clinical Trials: The Devil Is in the Details

    PubMed Central

    Tangen, Catherine; Higano, Celestia; Vogelzang, Nicholas; Thompson, Ian

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Intermittent androgen deprivation (IAD) has been widely tested in prostate cancer. However, phase III trials testing continuous androgen deprivation (CAD) versus IAD have reached inconclusive and seemingly contradictory results. Different design and conduct issues must be critically evaluated to better interpret the results. Patients and Methods Seven published phase III trials were examined for prespecified design and outcomes. Treatment specifications; primary end point; superiority versus noninferiority design assumptions, including magnitude of assumed versus observed noninferiority margin (NIM); duration of follow-up; and quality-of-life (QOL) outcomes were considered in terms of the results and conclusions reported. Results Five trials had a superiority and three had a noninferiority primary hypothesis. Only three trials had a uniform population and overall survival (OS) end point. All trials observed better outcomes in terms of OS and progression-free survival (PFS) than assumed at time of study design, translating into prespecified NIMs or hazard ratios that reflected larger absolute differences in OS or PFS between arms. Lower-than-expected event rates also reduced statistical power for the trials. Other factors, including length of follow-up, cause of death, QOL, and primary end point, and their impact on trial interpretation are discussed. Conclusion No trial to date has demonstrated survival superiority of IAD compared with CAD. Trials concluding IAD is noninferior to CAD were based on wide NIMs that included clinically important survival differences, not likely to be considered comparable by physicians or patients. Interim analyses relying on short follow-up and including a majority of non–prostate cancer deaths will favor a noninferiority conclusion and should be interpreted cautiously. Adequate follow-up is required to ensure capture of prostate cancer deaths in both superiority and noninferiority trials. PMID:26552421

  4. Innovations for phase I dose-finding designs in pediatric oncology clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Doussau, Adelaide; Geoerger, Birgit; Jiménez, Irene; Paoletti, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    Phase I oncology clinical trials are designed to identify the optimal dose that will be recommended for phase II trials. In pediatric oncology, the conduct of those trials raise specific challenges, as the disease is rare with limited therapeutic options. In addition, the tolerance profile is known from adult trials. This paper provides a review of the major recent developments in the design of these trials, inspired by the need to cope with the specific challenges of dose finding in cancer pediatric oncology. We reviewed simulation studies comparing designs dedicated to address these challenges. We also reviewed the design used in published dose-finding trials in pediatric oncology over the period 2009–2014. Three main fields of innovation were identified. First, designs that were developed in order to relax the rules for more flexible inclusions. Second, methods to incorporate data emerging from adult studies. Third, designs accounting for toxicity evaluation at repeated cycles in pediatric oncology. In addition to this overview, we propose some further directions for designing pediatric dose-finding trials. PMID:26825023

  5. Innovations for phase I dose-finding designs in pediatric oncology clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Doussau, Adelaide; Geoerger, Birgit; Jiménez, Irene; Paoletti, Xavier

    2016-03-01

    Phase I oncology clinical trials are designed to identify the optimal dose that will be recommended for phase II trials. In pediatric oncology, the conduct of those trials raises specific challenges, as the disease is rare with limited therapeutic options. In addition, the tolerance profile is known from adult trials. This paper provides a review of the major recent developments in the design of these trials, inspired by the need to cope with the specific challenges of dose finding in cancer pediatric oncology. We reviewed simulation studies comparing designs dedicated to address these challenges. We also reviewed the design used in published dose-finding trials in pediatric oncology over the period 2009-2014. Three main fields of innovation were identified. First, designs that were developed in order to relax the rules for more flexible inclusions. Second, methods to incorporate data emerging from adult studies. Third, designs accounting for toxicity evaluation at repeated cycles in pediatric oncology. In addition to this overview, we propose some further directions for designing pediatric dose-finding trials.

  6. Phase II trial of CoQ10 for ALS finds insufficient evidence to justify Phase III

    PubMed Central

    Kaufmann, Petra; Thompson, John L.P.; Levy, Gilberto; Buchsbaum, Richard; Shefner, Jeremy; Krivickas, Lisa S.; Katz, Jonathan; Rollins, Yvonne; Barohn, Richard J.; Jackson, Carlayne E.; Tiryaki, Ezgi; Lomen-Hoerth, Catherine; Armon, Carmel; Tandan, Rup; Rudnicki, Stacy A.; Rezania, Kourosh; Sufit, Robert; Pestronk, Alan; Novella, Steven P.; Heiman-Patterson, Terry; Kasarskis, Edward J.; Pioro, Erik P.; Montes, Jacqueline; Arbing, Rachel; Vecchio, Darleen; Barsdorf, Alexandra; Mitsumoto, Hiroshi; Levin, Bruce

    2010-01-01

    Objective Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a devastating, and currently incurable, neuromuscular disease in which oxidative stress and mitochondrial impairment are contributing to neuronal loss. Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10), an antioxidant and mitochondrial cofactor, has shown promise in ALS transgenic mice, and in clinical trials for neurodegenerative diseases other than ALS. Our aims were to choose between two high doses of CoQ10 for ALS, and to determine if it merits testing in a Phase III clinical trial. Methods We designed and implemented a multi-center trial with an adaptive, two-stage, bias-adjusted, randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind, Phase II design (n=185). The primary outcome in both stages was decline in the ALS Functional Rating Scale-revised (ALSFRSr) score over 9 months. Stage 1 (dose selection, 35 participants per group) compared CoQ10 doses of 1,800 and 2,700 mg/day. Stage 2 (futility test, 75 patients per group) compared the dose selected in Stage 1 against placebo. Results Stage 1 selected the 2,700 mg dose. In Stage 2, the pre-specified primary null hypothesis that this dose is superior to placebo was not rejected. It was rejected, however, in an accompanying pre-specified sensitivity test, and further supplementary analyses. Pre-specified secondary analyses showed no significant differences between CoQ10 at 2,700 mg/day and placebo. There were no safety concerns. Interpretation CoQ10 at 2,700 mg daily for 9 months shows insufficient promise to warrant Phase III testing. Given this outcome, the adaptive Phase II design incorporating a dose selection and a futility test avoided the need for a much larger conventional Phase III trial. PMID:19743457

  7. How to Evaluate Phase Differences between Trial Groups in Ongoing Electrophysiological Signals

    PubMed Central

    VanRullen, Rufin

    2016-01-01

    A growing number of studies endeavor to reveal periodicities in sensory and cognitive functions, by comparing the distribution of ongoing (pre-stimulus) oscillatory phases between two (or more) trial groups reflecting distinct experimental outcomes. A systematic relation between the phase of spontaneous electrophysiological signals, before a stimulus is even presented, and the eventual result of sensory or cognitive processing for that stimulus, would be indicative of an intrinsic periodicity in the underlying neural process. Prior studies of phase-dependent perception have used a variety of analytical methods to measure and evaluate phase differences, and there is currently no established standard practice in this field. The present report intends to remediate this need, by systematically comparing the statistical power of various measures of “phase opposition” between two trial groups, in a number of real and simulated experimental situations. Seven measures were evaluated: one parametric test (circular Watson-Williams test), and three distinct measures of phase opposition (phase bifurcation index, phase opposition sum, and phase opposition product) combined with two procedures for non-parametric statistical testing (permutation, or a combination of z-score and permutation). While these are obviously not the only existing or conceivable measures, they have all been used in recent studies. All tested methods performed adequately on a previously published dataset (Busch et al., 2009). On a variety of artificially constructed datasets, no single measure was found to surpass all others, but instead the suitability of each measure was contingent on several experimental factors: the time, frequency, and depth of oscillatory phase modulation; the absolute and relative amplitudes of post-stimulus event-related potentials for the two trial groups; the absolute and relative trial numbers for the two groups; and the number of permutations used for non-parametric testing

  8. Statistical controversies in clinical research: requiem for the 3 + 3 design for phase I trials.

    PubMed

    Paoletti, X; Ezzalfani, M; Le Tourneau, C

    2015-09-01

    More than 95% of published phase I trials have used the 3 + 3 design to identify the dose to be recommended for phase II trials. However, the statistical community agrees on the limitations of the 3 + 3 design compared with model-based approaches. Moreover, the mechanisms of action of targeted agents strongly challenge the hypothesis that the maximum tolerated dose constitutes the optimal dose, and more outcomes including clinical and biological activity increasingly need to be taken into account to identify the optimal dose. We review key elements from clinical publications and from the statistical literature to show that the 3 + 3 design lacks the necessary flexibility to address the challenges of targeted agents. The design issues raised by expansion cohorts, new definitions of dose-limiting toxicity and trials of combinations are not easily addressed by the 3 + 3 design or its extensions. Alternative statistical proposals have been developed to make a better use of the complex data generated by phase I trials. Their applications require a close collaboration between all actors of early phase clinical trials. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society for Medical Oncology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. New Round of Studies Begin in Phase 0/I/II Cancer Prevention Clinical Trials Program | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The NCI Division of Cancer Prevention’s Phase 0/I/II Cancer Prevention Clinical Trials Program, also known as the Consortia for Early Phase Prevention Trials, is beginning a new round of studies in the effort toward systematic early clinical development of promising preventive agents for people at increased risk of developing cancer. Infographic Highlight New Round of Studies Begin in Phase 0/I/II Cancer Prevention Clinical Trials Program |

  10. Strategies to Minimize Risks and Exploitation in Phase One Trials on Healthy Subjects*

    PubMed Central

    Shamoo, Adil E.; Resnik, David B.

    2014-01-01

    Most of the literature on phase one trials has focused on ethical and safety issues in research on patients with advanced cancer, but this article focuses on healthy, adult subjects. The article makes six specific recommendations for protecting the rights and welfare of healthy subjects in phase one trials: 1) because phase one trials are short in duaration (usually 1 to 3 months), researchers should gather more data on the short-term and long-term risks of participation in phase one studies by healthy subjects; 2) researchers should develop strict inclusion/exclusion criteria that exclude unhealthy or vulnerable subjects, such as decisionally impaired people, in phase one studies; 3) subjects should not participate in more than one phase one study at the same time and should wait at least 30 days between participating in different studies; 4) researchers should develop a database to keep track of phase one participants; 5) subjects should be guaranteed a minimum wage equivalent to the equivalent type of unskilled labor, but there should be no upper limits on wages; and 6) subjects should be allowed to engage in collective bargaining with research sponsors. PMID:16754430

  11. Strategies to minimize risks and exploitation in phase one trials on healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Shamoo, Adil E; Resnik, David B

    2006-01-01

    Most of the literature on phase one trials has focused on ethical and safety issues in research on patients with advanced cancer, but this article focuses on healthy, adult subjects. The article makes six specific recommendations for protecting the rights and welfare of healthy subjects in phase one trials: 1) because phase one trials are short in duration (usually 1 to 3 months), researchers should gather more data on the short-term and long-term risks of participation in phase one studies by healthy subjects; 2) researchers should develop strict inclusion/exclusion criteria that exclude unhealthy or vulnerable subjects, such as decisionally impaired people, in phase one studies; 3) subjects should not participate in more than one phase one study at the same time and should wait at least 30 days between participating in different studies; 4) researchers should develop a database to keep track of phase one participants; 5) subjects should be guaranteed a minimum wage equivalent to the equivalent type of unskilled labor, but there should be no upper limits on wages; and 6) subjects should be allowed to engage in collective bargaining with research sponsors.

  12. SPIRIT trial: A phase III pragmatic trial of an advance care planning intervention in ESRD.

    PubMed

    Song, Mi-Kyung; Unruh, Mark L; Manatunga, Amita; Plantinga, Laura C; Lea, Janice; Jhamb, Manisha; Kshirsagar, Abhijit V; Ward, Sandra E

    2017-10-06

    Advance care planning (ACP) is a central tenet of dialysis care, but the vast majority of dialysis patients report never engaging in ACP discussions with their care providers. Over the last decade, we have developed and iteratively tested SPIRIT (Sharing Patient's Illness Representation to Increase Trust), a theory-based, patient- and family-centered advance care planning intervention. SPIRIT is a six-step, two-session, face-to-face intervention to promote cognitive and emotional preparation for end-of-life decision making for patients with ESRD and their surrogates. In these explanatory trials, SPIRIT was delivered by trained research nurses. Findings consistently revealed that patients and surrogates in SPIRIT showed significant improvement in preparedness for end-of-life decision making, and surrogates in SPIRIT reported significantly improved post-bereavement psychological outcomes after the patient's death compared to a no treatment comparison condition. As a critical next step, we are conducting an effectiveness-implementation study. This study is a multicenter, clinic-level cluster randomized pragmatic trial to evaluate the effectiveness of SPIRIT delivered by dialysis care providers as part of routine care in free-standing outpatient dialysis clinics, compared to usual care plus delayed SPIRIT implementation. Simultaneously, we will evaluate the implementation of SPIRIT, including sustainability. We will recruit 400 dyads of patients at high risk of death in the next year and their surrogates from 30 dialysis clinics in four states. This trial of SPIRIT will generate novel, meaningful insights about improving ACP in dialysis care. ClinicalTrials.govNCT03138564, registered 05/01/2017. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Application of Bayesian hierarchical models for phase I/II clinical trials in oncology.

    PubMed

    Yada, Shinjo; Hamada, Chikuma

    2017-03-01

    Treatment during cancer clinical trials sometimes involves the combination of multiple drugs. In addition, in recent years there has been a trend toward phase I/II trials in which a phase I and a phase II trial are combined into a single trial to accelerate drug development. Methods for the seamless combination of phases I and II parts are currently under investigation. In the phase II part, adaptive randomization on the basis of patient efficacy outcomes allocates more patients to the dose combinations considered to have higher efficacy. Patient toxicity outcomes are used for determining admissibility to each dose combination and are not used for selection of the dose combination itself. In cases where the objective is not to find the optimum dose combination solely for efficacy but regarding both toxicity and efficacy, the need exists to allocate patients to dose combinations with consideration of the balance of existing trade-offs between toxicity and efficacy. We propose a Bayesian hierarchical model and an adaptive randomization with consideration for the relationship with toxicity and efficacy. Using the toxicity and efficacy outcomes of patients, the Bayesian hierarchical model is used to estimate the toxicity probability and efficacy probability in each of the dose combinations. Here, we use Bayesian moving-reference adaptive randomization on the basis of desirability computed from the obtained estimator. Computer simulations suggest that the proposed method will likely recommend a higher percentage of target dose combinations than a previously proposed method.

  14. Variations in Unrealistic Optimism Between Acceptors and Decliners of Early Phase Cancer Trials.

    PubMed

    Jansen, Lynn A; Mahadevan, Daruka; Appelbaum, Paul S; Klein, William M P; Weinstein, Neil D; Mori, Motomi; Degnin, Catherine; Sulmasy, Daniel P

    2017-10-01

    Research has found that patient-subjects in early phase cancer trials exhibit unrealistic optimism regarding the risks and possible benefits of trial participation. Unrealistic optimism is associated with therapeutic misconception and failures to appreciate research-related information. This is the first study to assess whether those who decline to participate in these trials also exhibit unrealistic optimism. It is also the first study to assess whether there are significant differences in appreciation of research-related risks/benefits and therapeutic misconception between these two groups. We approached 261 patients at two academic medical centers who were offered enrollment in a Phase I, II, or I/II cancer trial (between 2012 and 2016). Two hundred thirty-three patients agreed to enroll in an early phase cancer trial, 171 of whom agreed to be interviewed for the study. Twenty-eight patients declined the offer to enroll, 15 of whom agreed to be interviewed for the study. Subjects participated in a structured face-to-face interview with a research associate trained to administer the study questionnaires. Acceptors demonstrated a significantly higher level of unrealistic optimism than decliners ( p < .05). Decliners had significantly less therapeutic misconception than acceptors (3.37 [ SD = 0.85] vs. 3.79 [ SD = 0.77], p = .042). There was a significant difference on one of the appreciation questions between acceptors and decliners ( p = .009). Comparative assessment of acceptors and decliners to early phase cancer trials casts light on whether unrealistic optimism is consequential for the decision to participate in these trials. The different levels of unrealistic optimism exhibited by these groups suggest that it may be a factor that affects the decision to participate.

  15. Bayesian design of single-arm phase II clinical trials with continuous monitoring.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Valen E; Cook, John D

    2009-06-01

    Bayesian designs are increasingly used to conduct phase II clinical trials. However, stopping boundaries in most Bayesian designs are defined from posterior credible intervals. The use of designs based on posterior credible intervals results in a loss of efficiency when compared to formal stopping rules based on Bayesian hypothesis tests. Such designs also introduce an unnecessary element of subjectivity in the interpretation of trial results. We derive a new class of Bayesian designs based on formal hypothesis tests. The prior densities used to define the alternative hypotheses in these tests assign no mass to parameter values that are consistent with the null hypotheses and are called nonlocal alternative prior densities. We show that Bayesian designs based on hypothesis tests and nonlocal alternative prior densities are more efficient than common Bayesian designs based on posterior credible intervals and common frequentist designs. In contrast to trial designs based on Bayesian credible intervals, we demonstrate that the mis-specification of the prior densities used to describe the anticipated effect of the experimental treatment in designs based on hypothesis tests cannot increase the expected weight of evidence in favor of the trial agent. Extension of test-based designs to phase I-II designs and randomized phase II designs remains an open research question. Phase II single-arm trials designed using Bayesian hypothesis tests with nonlocal alternatives provide better operating characteristics, use fewer patients per correct decision, and provide more directly interpretable results than other commonly used Bayesian and frequentist designs. Because the mis-specification of the prior density on the effect of the experimental agent decreases the expected weight of evidence that is collected in favor of the experimental treatment, the use of Bayesian hypothesis tests to design clinical trials also eliminates a potential source of bias often associated with trials

  16. Historical controls for phase II surgically based trials requiring gross total resection of glioblastoma multiforme.

    PubMed

    Butowski, Nicholas; Lamborn, Kathleen R; Berger, Mitchel S; Prados, Michael D; Chang, Susan M

    2007-10-01

    New treatments for patients with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) are frequently tested in phase II surgically based clinical trials that require gross total resection (GTR). In order to determine efficacy in such single-arm phase II clinical trials, the results are often compared to those from a historical control group that is not limited to patients with GTR. Recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) can define risk groups within historical control groups; however, RPA analyses to date included patients irrespective of whether a patient had a GTR or not. To provide a more appropriate historical control group for surgically based trials requiring a GTR, we sought to determine survival for a group of patients with newly diagnosed GBM, all of who underwent GTR and were treated on prospective clinical trials. GTR was defined as removal of >90% of the enhancing mass, determined by postoperative magnetic resonance imaging. Of 893 patients with GBM treated during these trials, 153 underwent GTR. The median survival for the GTR group was 71 weeks (95% CI 65-76) which was better than those who did not have a GTR. Within the GTR group, the median age was 54 years (range 25-77 years), and median Karnofsky Performance Score was 90 (range 60-100). Considering only patients with GTR, age at diagnosis continued to be a statistically significant prognostic factor. Patients treated during surgically based phase II studies should be matched with a historical control group restricted to patients with similar pretreatment variables, including GTR.

  17. Self-reported conflicts of interest of authors, trial sponsorship, and the interpretation of editorials and related phase III trials in oncology.

    PubMed

    Bariani, Giovanni M; de Celis Ferrari, Anezka C R; Hoff, Paulo M; Krzyzanowska, Monika K; Riechelmann, Rachel P

    2013-06-20

    Growing participation by industry in cancer research has resulted in increased reporting of conflicts of interest (COI). We aimed to test any association between authors' conclusions and self-reported COI or trial sponsorship in cancer studies. Editorials and related phase III trials published in six clinical oncology journals in the last 3.5 years were analyzed independently by two investigators who classified study conclusions according to authors' endorsement of the experimental therapy. Logistic regression multivariable models were used to assess predictors of favorable conclusions of editorialists and of phase III authors. From January 2008 to October 2011, 1,485 articles were retrieved: 150 phase III trials and 150 editorials were eligible. Among the phase III trials, 82 (54.7%) had positive results, and 78 (52.0%) were entirely or partially funded by industry. Any COI were disclosed in 103 phase III trials (68.7%) and in 71 editorials (47.3%). Multivariable analysis showed that phase III trial results were the only significant predictor for a positive conclusion by trial authors (odds ratio [OR], 92.2; 95% CI, 19.7 to 431.6; P < .001). Sponsorship did not predict for positive conclusion by phase III authors (OR, 0.86; 95% CI, 0.3 to 2.5; P = .788). The only factor associated with positive conclusions by editorial authors was a positive conclusion by phase III trial authors (OR, 36.3; 95% CI, 6.8 to 194.2; P < .001). The interpretation of recently published phase III cancer trials by their authors or by editorialists was not influenced by financial relationships or industry sponsorship. Increased awareness of COI policies may have led to more integrity in cancer research reporting.

  18. Negotiating decisions during informed consent for pediatric Phase I oncology trials.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Patricia A; Magtanong, Ruth V; Leek, Angela C; Hizlan, Sabahat; Yamokoski, Amy D; Kodish, Eric D

    2012-04-01

    During informed consent conferences (ICCs) for Phase I trials, oncologists must present complex information while addressing concerns. Research on communication that evolves during ICCs remains largely unexplored. We examined communication during ICCs for pediatric Phase I cancer trials using a stratified random sample from six pediatric cancer centers. A grounded theory approach identified key communication steps and factors influencing the negotiation of decisions for trial participation. Analysis suggests that during ICCs, families, patients, and clinicians exercise choice and control by negotiating micro-decisions in two broad domains: drug logic and logistics, and administration/scheduling. Micro-decisions unfold in a four-step communication process: (1) introduction of an issue; (2) response; (3) negotiation of the issue; and (4) resolution and decision. Negotiation over smaller micro-decisions is prominent in ICCs and merits further study.

  19. Negotiating Decisions during Informed Consent for Pediatric Phase I Oncology Trials

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, Patricia A.; Magtanong, Ruth V.; Leek, Angela C.; Hizlan, Sabahat; Yamokoski, Amy D.; Kodish, Eric D.

    2012-01-01

    During informed consent conferences (ICCs) for Phase I trials, oncologists must present complex information while addressing concerns. Research on communication that evolves during ICCs remains largely unexplored. We examined communication during ICCs for pediatric Phase I cancer trials using a stratified random sample from six pediatric cancer centers. A grounded theory approach identified key communication steps and factors influencing the negotiation of decisions for trial participation. Analysis suggests that during ICCs, families, patients, and clinicians exercise choice and control by negotiating micro-decisions in two broad domains: drug logic and logistics, and administration/scheduling. Micro-decisions unfold in a four-step communication process: (1) introduction of an issue; (2) response; (3) negotiation of the issue; and (4) resolution and decision. Negotiation over smaller micro-decisions is prominent in ICCs and merits further study. PMID:22565583

  20. Next-generation fire extinguishing agent. Phase 2: Laboratory tests and scoping trials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tapscott, Robert E.; May, John H.; Moore, Joanne P.; Lee, Michael E.; Walker, Joseph L.

    1990-04-01

    Concepts were orginated for next-generation fire extinguishing agents. In Phase 2, laboratory tests and scoping trials were performed to initiate a program for replacement of halon fire extinguishants in Air Force fire protection and firefighter training. Facilities were also established to perform laser Raman spectroscopic investigations of flame suppression halon agents, and initial, baseline Raman studies were carried out.

  1. Webcam Delivery of the Lidcombe Program for Early Stuttering: A Phase I Clinical Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Brian, Sue; Smith, Kylie; Onslow, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The Lidcombe Program is an operant treatment for early stuttering shown with meta-analysis to have a favorable odds ratio. However, many clients are unable to access the treatment because of distance and lifestyle factors. In this Phase I trial, we explored the potential efficacy, practicality, and viability of an Internet webcam Lidcombe…

  2. Webcam Delivery of the Camperdown Program for Adolescents Who Stutter: A Phase II Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carey, Brenda; O'Brian, Sue; Lowe, Robyn; Onslow, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: This Phase II clinical trial examined stuttering adolescents' responsiveness to the Webcam-delivered Camperdown Program. Method: Sixteen adolescents were treated by Webcam with no clinic attendance. Primary outcome was percentage of syllables stuttered (%SS). Secondary outcomes were number of sessions, weeks and hours to maintenance,…

  3. Webcam Delivery of the Camperdown Program for Adolescents Who Stutter: A Phase I Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carey, Brenda; O'Brian, Sue; Onslow, Mark; Packman, Ann; Menzies, Ross

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: This Phase I clinical trial explored the viability of webcam Internet delivery of the Camperdown Program for adolescents who stutter. Method and Procedure: Participants were 3 adolescents ages 13, 15, and 16 years, with moderate-severe stuttering. Each was treated with the Camperdown Program delivered by webcam with no clinic attendance.…

  4. Webcam Delivery of the Lidcombe Program for Early Stuttering: A Phase I Clinical Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Brian, Sue; Smith, Kylie; Onslow, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The Lidcombe Program is an operant treatment for early stuttering shown with meta-analysis to have a favorable odds ratio. However, many clients are unable to access the treatment because of distance and lifestyle factors. In this Phase I trial, we explored the potential efficacy, practicality, and viability of an Internet webcam Lidcombe…

  5. Webcam Delivery of the Camperdown Program for Adolescents Who Stutter: A Phase II Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carey, Brenda; O'Brian, Sue; Lowe, Robyn; Onslow, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: This Phase II clinical trial examined stuttering adolescents' responsiveness to the Webcam-delivered Camperdown Program. Method: Sixteen adolescents were treated by Webcam with no clinic attendance. Primary outcome was percentage of syllables stuttered (%SS). Secondary outcomes were number of sessions, weeks and hours to maintenance,…

  6. Effectiveness of a Therapeutic Summer Camp for Children with ADHD: Phase I Clinical Intervention Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hantson, Julie; Wang, Pan Pan; Grizenko-Vida, Michael; Ter-Stepanian, Marina; Harvey, William; Joober, Ridha; Grizenko, Natalie

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a 2-week therapeutic summer day camp for children with ADHD, which included a social skills training program and parent psychoeducation and training program. This was an open-label, nonrandomized Phase I Clinical Intervention Trial. Method: Parents completed the Weiss…

  7. Effectiveness of a Therapeutic Summer Camp for Children with ADHD: Phase I Clinical Intervention Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hantson, Julie; Wang, Pan Pan; Grizenko-Vida, Michael; Ter-Stepanian, Marina; Harvey, William; Joober, Ridha; Grizenko, Natalie

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a 2-week therapeutic summer day camp for children with ADHD, which included a social skills training program and parent psychoeducation and training program. This was an open-label, nonrandomized Phase I Clinical Intervention Trial. Method: Parents completed the Weiss…

  8. Phase 0 clinical trials in cancer drug development: from FDA guidance to clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Kinders, Robert; Parchment, Ralph E; Ji, Jay; Kummar, Shivaani; Murgo, Anthony J; Gutierrez, Martin; Collins, Jerry; Rubinstein, Larry; Pickeral, Oxana; Steinberg, Seth M; Yang, Sherry; Hollingshead, Melinda; Chen, Alice; Helman, Lee; Wiltrout, Robert; Simpson, Mel; Tomaszewski, Joseph E; Doroshow, James H

    2007-12-01

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recently introduced the Exploratory Investigational New Drug Guidance to expedite the clinical evaluation of new therapeutic and imaging agents. Early clinical studies performed under the auspices of this guidance, so-called "Phase 0" trials, have been initiated at the National Cancer Institute to integrate qualified pharmacodynamic biomarker assays into first-in-human cancer clinical trials of molecularly targeted agents. The goal of this integration is to perform molecular proof-of-concept investigations at the earliest stage of cancer drug development. Phase 0 trials do not offer any possibility of patient benefit; instead, intensive, real-time pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic analyses of patient tumor samples and/or surrogate tissues are performed to inform subsequent trials. Phase 0 studies do not replace formal Phase I drug safety testing and require a substantial investment of resources in assay development early on; however, they offer the promise of more rational selection of agents for further, large-scale development as well as the molecular identification of potential therapeutic failures early in the development process.

  9. Webcam Delivery of the Camperdown Program for Adolescents Who Stutter: A Phase I Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carey, Brenda; O'Brian, Sue; Onslow, Mark; Packman, Ann; Menzies, Ross

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: This Phase I clinical trial explored the viability of webcam Internet delivery of the Camperdown Program for adolescents who stutter. Method and Procedure: Participants were 3 adolescents ages 13, 15, and 16 years, with moderate-severe stuttering. Each was treated with the Camperdown Program delivered by webcam with no clinic attendance.…

  10. Critical aspects of the Bayesian approach to phase I cancer trials.

    PubMed

    Neuenschwander, Beat; Branson, Michael; Gsponer, Thomas

    2008-06-15

    The Bayesian approach to finding the maximum-tolerated dose in phase I cancer trials is discussed. The suggested approach relies on a realistic dose-toxicity model, allows one to include prior information, and supports clinical decision making by presenting within-trial information in a transparent way. The modeling and decision-making components are flexible enough to be extendable to more complex settings. Critical aspects are emphasized and a comparison with the continual reassessment method (CRM) is performed with data from an actual trial and a simulation study. The comparison revealed similar operating characteristics while avoiding some of the difficulties encountered in the actual trial when applying the CRM. (c) 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Enabling recruitment success in bariatric surgical trials: pilot phase of the By-Band-Sleeve study.

    PubMed

    Paramasivan, S; Rogers, C A; Welbourn, R; Byrne, J P; Salter, N; Mahon, D; Noble, H; Kelly, J; Mazza, G; Whybrow, P; Andrews, R C; Wilson, C; Blazeby, J M; Donovan, J L

    2017-07-03

    Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) involving surgical procedures are challenging for recruitment and infrequent in the specialty of bariatrics. The pilot phase of the By-Band-Sleeve study (gastric bypass versus gastric band versus sleeve gastrectomy) provided the opportunity for an investigation of recruitment using a qualitative research integrated in trials (QuinteT) recruitment intervention (QRI). The QRI investigated recruitment in two centers in the pilot phase comparing bypass and banding, through the analysis of 12 in-depth staff interviews, 84 audio recordings of patient consultations, 19 non-participant observations of consultations and patient screening data. QRI findings were developed into a plan of action and fed back to centers to improve information provision and recruitment organization. Recruitment proved to be extremely difficult with only two patients recruited during the first 2 months. The pivotal issue in Center A was that an effective and established clinical service could not easily adapt to the needs of the RCT. There was little scope to present RCT details or ensure efficient eligibility assessment, and recruiters struggled to convey equipoise. Following presentation of QRI findings, recruitment in Center A increased from 9% in the first 2 months (2/22) to 40% (26/65) in the 4 months thereafter. Center B, commencing recruitment 3 months after Center A, learnt from the emerging issues in Center A and set up a special clinic for trial recruitment. The trial successfully completed pilot recruitment and progressed to the main phase across 11 centers. The QRI identified key issues that enabled the integration of the trial into the clinical setting. This contributed to successful recruitment in the By-Band-Sleeve trial-currently the largest in bariatric practice-and offers opportunities to optimize recruitment in other trials in bariatrics.International Journal of Obesity advance online publication, 15 August 2017; doi:10.1038/ijo.2017.153.

  12. Phase i trials in melanoma: A framework to translate preclinical findings to the clinic.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eunjung; Rebecca, Vito W; Smalley, Keiran S M; Anderson, Alexander R A

    2016-11-01

    One of major issues in clinical trials in oncology is their high failure rate, despite the fact that the trials were designed based on the data from successful equivalent preclinical studies. This is in part due to the intrinsic homogeneity of preclinical model systems and the contrasting heterogeneity of actual patient responses. We present a mathematical model-driven framework, phase i (virtual/imaginary) trials, that integrates the heterogeneity of actual patient responses and preclinical studies through a cohort of virtual patients. The framework includes an experimentally calibrated mathematical model, a cohort of heterogeneous virtual patients, an assessment of stratification factors, and treatment optimisation. We show the detailed process through the lens of melanoma combination therapy (chemotherapy and an AKT inhibitor), using both preclinical and clinical data. The mathematical model predicts melanoma treatment response and resistance to mono and combination therapies and was calibrated and then validated with in vitro experimental data. The validated model and a genetic algorithm were used to generate virtual patients whose tumour volume responses to the combination therapy matched statistically the actual heterogeneous patient responses in the clinical trial. Analyses on simulated cohorts revealed key model parameters such as a tumour volume doubling rate and a therapy-induced phenotypic switch rate that may have clinical correlates. Finally, our approach predicts optimal AKT inhibitor scheduling suggesting more effective but less toxic treatment strategies. Our proposed computational framework to implement phase i trials in cancer can readily capture observed heterogeneous clinical outcomes and predict patient survival. Importantly, phase i trials can be used to optimise future clinical trial design. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Publication of interventional phase 3 and 4 clinical trials in radiation oncology: an observational study.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Alija, Jaime; Gallego, Pedro; Linares, Isabel; Ambroa, Eva; Pedro, Agustí

    2017-09-21

    Clinical trials produce the best data available for decision-making in modern evidence-based medicine. We aimed to determine the rate of non-publication of interventional phase 3 and 4 clinical trials involving patients with cancer undergoing radiotherapy. The ClinicalTrials.gov database was searched for interventional phase 3 and 4 trials in radiotherapy with a primary completion date before 1 January 2013. We determined how many of these registry entries have not published the compulsory deposition of their results in the database and performed a systematic search for published studies in peer-reviewed journals. Of 576 trials, 484 (84.0%) did not deposit a summary result in the registry. In addition, 44.9% of them did not publish their results in a peer-reviewed journal. Similar percentages were found for most cancer subtypes: brain (41%), breast (38%), cervical (66%), colorectal (38%), lung (48%), prostate (45%), bladder (56%), head and neck (56%) and lymphoma (33%). Our results show that most trials in radiation oncology did not report the results in the registry. Almost half of these trials have not been published in the biomedical literature. This means that a large number of study participants were exposed to the risks of trial participation without the supposed benefits that sharing and publishing of results would offer to future generations of patients. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  14. Toxicity and feasibility of adjuvant high-dose interferon alpha-2b in patients with melanoma in clinical oncologic practice

    PubMed Central

    Ravaud, A; Bedane, C; Geoffrois, L; Lesimple, T; Delaunay, M

    1999-01-01

    To assess the feasibility and toxicity profile of high-dose interferon alpha-2b (IFN-α-2b) in the adjuvant treatment of patients with cutaneous malignant melanoma outside the reference ECOG 1684 clinical trial, we conducted a prospective follow-up in an identical population of patients (cutaneous melanoma, T4 and/or N1) treated by intravenous IFN-α-2b:20 MIU m−2, 5 days a week for 4 weeks; and subcutaneous:10 MIU m−2, 3 times a week for 11 months. Thirty-six consecutive patients were considered in four different institutions. The frequency and severity of side-effects related to IFN-α, as well as the percentage of the planned dose given to patients, were identical to those reported in the initial report by ECOG. Fifty per cent and 47% of patients had a grade 3/4 WHO toxicity in the induction and consolidation phase respectively. A dose modification was necessary for 47.2% and 55.8% of the patients in the induction and consolidation phase respectively. The schedule and dose of high-dose IFN-α-2b in the adjuvant treatment of cutaneous malignant melanoma, as reported by ECOG 1684, is feasible. The significant toxicity reported in ECOG 1684 was also seen in our patients. Nevertheless, this protocol will not be a ‘standard’ treatment until the publication of the ECOG 1690 trial. © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10468294

  15. Novel approaches to incorporating pharmacoeconomic studies into phase III clinical trials for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Fillit, H; Cummings, J; Neumann, P; McLaughlin, T; Salavtore, P; Leibman, C

    2010-10-01

    The societal and individual costs of Alzheimer's disease are significant, worldwide. As the world ages, these costs are increasing rapidly, while health systems face finite budgets. As a result, many regulators and payers will require or at least consider phase III cost-effectiveness data (in addition to safety and efficacy data) for drug approval and reimbursement, increasing the risks and costs of drug development. Incorporating pharmacoeconomic studies in phase III clinical trials for Alzheimer's disease presents a number of challenges. We propose several specific suggestions to improve the design of pharmacoeconomic studies in phase III clinical trials. We propose that acute episodes of care are key outcome measures for pharmacoeconomic studies. To improve the possibility of detecting a pharmacoeconomic impact in phase III, we suggest several strategies including; study designs for enrichment of pharmacoeconomic outcomes that include co-morbidity of patients; reducing variability of care that can affect pharmacoeconomic outcomes through standardized care management; employing administrative claims data to better capture meaningful pharmacoeconomic data; and extending clinical trials in open label follow-up periods in which pharmacoeconomic data are captured electronically by administrative claims. Specific aspects of power analysis for pharmacoeconomic studies are presented. The particular pharmacoeconomic challenges caused by the use of biomarkers in clinical trials, the increasing use of multinational studies, and the pharmacoeconomic challenges presented by biologicals in development for Alzheimer's disease are discussed. In summary, since we are entering an era in which pharmacoeconomic studies will be essential in drug development for supporting regulatory approval, payor reimbursement and integration of new therapies into clinical care, we must consider the design and incorporation of pharmacoeconomic studies in phase III clinical trials more seriously

  16. 78 FR 39736 - Draft Guidance for Industry: Considerations for the Design of Early-Phase Clinical Trials of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-02

    ... of Early-Phase Clinical Trials of Cellular and Gene Therapy Products; Availability AGENCY: Food and... Design of Early-Phase Clinical Trials of Cellular and Gene Therapy Products'' dated July 2013. The draft... (CT) and gene therapy (GT) products (referred to collectively as CGT products) with recommendations to...

  17. Combining Dosimetry & Toxicity: Analysis of two UK Phase III Clinical trials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulliford, Sarah L.

    2014-03-01

    There are many advantages to performing a clinical trial when implementing a novel radiotherapy technique. The clinical trials framework enables the safety and efficacy of the "experimental arm" to be tested and ensures practical support, rigorous quality control and data monitoring for participating centres. In addition to the clinical and follow-up data collected from patients within the trial, it is also possible to collect 3-D dosimetric information from the corresponding radiotherapy treatment plans. Analysing the combination of dosimetric, clinical and follow-up data enhances the understanding of the relationship between the dose delivered to both the target and normal tissue structures and reported outcomes & toxicity. Aspects of the collection, collation and analysis of data from two UK multicentre Phase III radiotherapy trials are presented here. MRC-RT01 dose-escalation prostate radiotherapy trial ISRCTN47772397 was one of the first UK multi-centre radiotherapy trials to collect 3-D dosimetric data. A number of different analysis methodologies were implemented to investigate the relationship between the dose distribution to the rectum and specific rectal toxicities. More recently data was collected from the PARSPORT trial (Parotid Sparing IMRT vs conventional head and neck radiotherapy) ISRCTN48243537. In addition to the planned analysis, dosimetric analysis was employed to investigate an unexpected finding that acute fatigue was more prevalent in the IMRT arm of the trial. It can be challenging to collect 3-D dosimetric information from multicentre radiotherapy trials. However, analysing the relationship between dosimetric and toxicity data provides invaluable information which can influence the next generation of radiotherapy techniques.

  18. Emerging drugs for antipsychotic-induced tardive dyskinesia: investigational drugs in Phase II and Phase III clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Lockwood, Jonathan Tomas; Remington, Gary

    2015-09-01

    Antipsychotic drugs (APs) represent the mainstay of treatment for schizophrenia and other forms of psychosis. Tardive dyskinesia (TD) is a motor disorder associated with the ongoing use of APs and is characterized by involuntary, repetitive movements that are potentially irreversible. Current treatment is wanting, due in part to our limited understanding of the mechanisms underlying TD. Risk of TD associated with APs appears linked to continuous blockade of dopamine D2 receptors in the basal ganglia. Proposed mechanisms include increased dopamine activation of D2 receptors caused by supersensitivity and neurodegeneration of dopamine-producing neurons due to biochemical changes incurred by ongoing AP exposure. Existing treatments are designed to reverse or prevent the neurochemical/biological changes caused by dopamine D2 receptor blockade and include vesicular monoamine transporter (VMAT) inhibitors, antioxidants, compounds with serotonin receptor agonism as well as antagonism, GABA agonists and cholinergic agents. Randomized, controlled trials in Phase II and Phase III (ClinicalTrials.org/ClinicalTrialsRegister.eu) are summarized and discussed. Effective adjunctive treatment for the symptoms of TD will depend on gaining a better understanding of the neurological changes induced by chronic dopamine D2 receptor antagonism from APs.

  19. A new trial design to accelerate tuberculosis drug development: the Phase IIC Selection Trial with Extended Post-treatment follow-up (STEP).

    PubMed

    Phillips, Patrick P J; Dooley, Kelly E; Gillespie, Stephen H; Heinrich, Norbert; Stout, Jason E; Nahid, Payam; Diacon, Andreas H; Aarnoutse, Rob E; Kibiki, Gibson S; Boeree, Martin J; Hoelscher, Michael

    2016-03-23

    The standard 6-month four-drug regimen for the treatment of drug-sensitive tuberculosis has remained unchanged for decades and is inadequate to control the epidemic. Shorter, simpler regimens are urgently needed to defeat what is now the world's greatest infectious disease killer. We describe the Phase IIC Selection Trial with Extended Post-treatment follow-up (STEP) as a novel hybrid phase II/III trial design to accelerate regimen development. In the Phase IIC STEP trial, the experimental regimen is given for the duration for which it will be studied in phase III (presently 3 or 4 months) and patients are followed for clinical outcomes of treatment failure and relapse for a total of 12 months from randomisation. Operating characteristics of the trial design are explored assuming a classical frequentist framework as well as a Bayesian framework with flat and sceptical priors. A simulation study is conducted using data from the RIFAQUIN phase III trial to illustrate how such a design could be used in practice. With 80 patients per arm, and two (2.5 %) unfavourable outcomes in the STEP trial, there is a probability of 0.99 that the proportion of unfavourable outcomes in a potential phase III trial would be less than 12 % and a probability of 0.91 that the proportion of unfavourable outcomes would be less than 8 %. With six (7.5 %) unfavourable outcomes, there is a probability of 0.82 that the proportion of unfavourable outcomes in a potential phase III trial would be less than 12 % and a probability of 0.41 that it would be less than 8 %. Simulations using data from the RIFAQUIN trial show that a STEP trial with 80 patients per arm would have correctly shown that the Inferior Regimen should not proceed to phase III and would have had a high chance (0.88) of either showing that the Successful Regimen could proceed to phase III or that it might require further optimisation. Collection of definitive clinical outcome data in a relatively small number of participants over

  20. Utility of colposcopy in a phase 2 portion of a microbicide clinical trial of BufferGel and 0.5% PRO 2000 Gel.

    PubMed

    Chirenje, Zvavahera M; Mâsse, Benoît R; Maslankowski, Lisa A; Ramjee, Gita; Coletti, Anne S; Tembo, Tchangani N; Magure, Tsitsi M; Soto-Torres, Lydia; Kelly, Cliff; Hillier, Sharon; Karim, Abdool

    2012-08-27

    The majority of new HIV infections are acquired through heterosexual transmission. There is urgent need for prevention methods to compliment behavior change and condom use. Topical microbicide represent a potential strategy for reduction of HIV transmission in women. Monthly Colposcopy evaluations were performed during pelvic examinations among 299 women enrolled in the Phase 2 portion of HPTN 035 study at four sites (1 in USA, 3 in Southern Africa). This was a phase 2/2b, multisite, randomized, and controlled clinical trial with four arms: BufferGel, 0.5% PRO2000 Gel, placebo gel and no gel. At two of the sites, pelvic examinations were conducted by the use of naked eye without colposcopy. A colposcopy finding of any kind was detected in 48% of participants at baseline compared to 40% at 3 months (p =0.04). The lower rates were also observed in vaginal discharge (22% at baseline, 16% at 3 months, p=0.06), erythema (15% at baseline, 8% at 3 months, p=0.004). The trend towards significance at p=0.05 disappear when utilizing stringent statistical significance levels. A pelvic finding of any kind was detected in 71% of colposcopy participants compared to 41% of participants who had naked eye examination only conducted at two sites that performed both colposcopy and naked eye without colposcopy. Use of colposcopy yielded significantly higher rates of participants with deep epithelial disruption, erythema and ecchymosis. We observed no cases of incident Chlamydia, Gonorrhea, or Syphilis during the three month follow up. There were 2 cases of incident HIV during 3-month study period neither of which was associated with any abnormal colposcopy evaluation findings. No safety signals were observed in the 4 study arms, allowing seamless transition from phase 2 to 2b. Colposcopy utility in microbicide clinical trials has minimal value given high rates of background noise findings of no relevant clinical significance.

  1. End points for phase II trials in intensive care: recommendations from the Australian and New Zealand Clinical Trials Group consensus panel meeting.

    PubMed

    Young, Paul; Hodgson, Carol; Dulhunty, Joel; Saxena, Manoj; Bailey, Michael; Bellomo, Rinaldo; Davies, Andrew; Finfer, Simon; Kruger, Peter; Lipman, Jeffrey; Myburgh, John; Peake, Sandra; Seppelt, Ian; Streat, Stephen; Tate, Rhiannon; Webb, Steven

    2012-09-01

    There is uncertainty about which end points should be used for Phase II trials in critically ill patients. To systematically evaluate potential end points for Phase II trials in critically ill patients. A report outlining a process of literature review and recommendations from a consensus meeting conducted on behalf of the Australian and New Zealand Intensive Care Society Clinical Trials Group (ANZICS CTG) in October 2011. The consensus panel concluded that there are no adequately validated end points for Phase II trials in critically ill patients. However, the following were identified as potential Phase II end points: hospital-free days to Day 90, ICU-free days to Day 28, ventilator-free days to Day 28, cardiovascular support-free days to Day 28, and renal replacement therapy-free days to Day 28. We recommend that these end points be evaluated further.

  2. A phase 3 randomized trial comparing inolimomab vs usual care in steroid-resistant acute GVHD.

    PubMed

    Socié, Gérard; Vigouroux, Stéphane; Yakoub-Agha, Ibrahim; Bay, Jacques-Olivier; Fürst, Sabine; Bilger, Karin; Suarez, Felipe; Michallet, Mauricette; Bron, Dominique; Gard, Philippe; Medeghri, Zakaria; Lehert, Philippe; Lai, Chinglin; Corn, Tim; Vernant, Jean-Paul

    2017-02-02

    Treatment of steroid-resistant acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) remains an unmet clinical need. Inolimomab, a monoclonal antibody to CD25, has shown encouraging results in phase 2 trials. This phase 3 randomized, open-label, multicenter trial compared inolimomab vs usual care in adult patients with steroid-refractory acute GVHD. Patients were randomly selected to receive treatment with inolimomab or usual care (the control group was treated with antithymocyte globulin [ATG]). The primary objective was to evaluate overall survival at 1 year without changing baseline allocated therapy. A total of 100 patients were randomly placed: 49 patients in the inolimomab arm and 51 patients in the ATG arm. The primary criteria were reached by 14 patients (28.5%) in the inolimomab and 11 patients (21.5%) in the ATG arms, with a hazard ratio of 0.874 (P = .28). With a minimum follow-up of 1 year, 26 (53%) and 31 (60%) patients died in the inolimomab and ATG arms, respectively. Adverse events were similar in the 2 arms, with fewer viral infections in the inolimomab arm compared with the ATG arm. The primary end point of this randomized phase 3 trial was not achieved. The lack of a statistically significant effect confirms the need for development of more effective treatments for acute GVHD. This trial is registered to https://www.clinicaltrialsregister.eu/ctr-search/search as EUDRACT 2007-005009-24.

  3. Adaptive Dose-Finding Studies: A Review of Model-Guided Phase I Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Iasonos, Alexia; O'Quigley, John

    2014-01-01

    Purpose We provide a comprehensive review of adaptive phase I clinical trials in oncology that used a statistical model to guide dose escalation to identify the maximum-tolerated dose (MTD). We describe the clinical setting, practical implications, and safety of such applications, with the aim of understanding how these designs work in practice. Methods We identified 53 phase I trials published between January 2003 and September 2013 that used the continual reassessment method (CRM), CRM using escalation with overdose control, or time-to-event CRM for late-onset toxicities. Study characteristics, design parameters, dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) definition, DLT rate, patient-dose allocation, overdose, underdose, sample size, and trial duration were abstracted from each study. In addition, we examined all studies in terms of safety, and we outlined the reasons why escalations occur and under what circumstances. Results On average, trials accrued 25 to 35 patients over a 2-year period and tested five dose levels. The average DLT rate was 18%, which is lower than in previous reports, whereas all levels above the MTD had an average DLT rate of 36%. On average, 39% of patients were treated at the MTD, and 74% were treated at either the MTD or an adjacent level (one level above or below). Conclusion This review of completed phase I studies confirms the safety and generalizability of model-guided, adaptive dose-escalation designs, and it provides an approach for using, interpreting, and understanding such designs to guide dose escalation in phase I trials. PMID:24982451

  4. Phase I trial outcomes in older patients with advanced solid tumours

    PubMed Central

    Khan, K H; Yap, T A; Ring, A; Molife, L R; Bodla, S; Thomas, K; Zivi, A; Smith, A; Judson, I; Banerji, U; de Bono, J S; Kaye, S B

    2016-01-01

    Background: This study had two aims: (a) to test the hypothesis that advanced age is associated with lower levels of tolerability and clinical benefit to experimental Phase I trial agents; (b) to assess the validity of the Royal Marsden Hospital (RMH) prognostic score as a patient selection tool in older patients. Methods: Clinico-pathological characteristics and treatment outcomes of all patients treated consecutively from 2005 to 2009 in phase I trials at the RMH were recorded. All toxicity and clinical outcome data were compared between patients aged below and above 65 years of age. Results: One thousand and four patients were treated in 30 Phase I trials, with 315 (31%) patients aged 65 years and older. Grade 3–5 toxicities (22.8% vs 24.8% (P=0.52)), trial discontinuation (6% vs 4% P=0.33), and dose interruptions (8.0% vs 8.0% (P=0.96)) were observed at similar rates in patients below and above 65 years of age, respectively. The overall response rate 5.2% vs 4.1%, progression-free survival (PFS) 1.9 vs 3.5 months and clinical benefit rate (CBR) at 6 months 15.2% vs 14.3% were comparable in both groups. To avoid bias due to the potential therapeutic benefit of abiraterone, comparisons were repeated excluding prostate cancer patients with similar results (ORR 4.6% vs 4%, PFS 1.8 vs 3.0 months, CBR at 6 months 13.5% vs 9.5%). Multivariate analysis indicated that the previously identified RMH score (including albumin and lactate dehydrogenase levels) was an accurate predictor of outcome. Conclusions: Phase I clinical trials should be considered in patients with advanced cancers regardless of age, as older patients who enter these have similar safety and efficacy outcomes as their younger counterparts. The RMH prognostic score can assist in the selection of suitable older patients. PMID:26757260

  5. Inter-trial alignment of EEG data and phase-locking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Testorf, M. E.; Horak, P.; Connolly, A.; Holmes, G. L.; Jobst, B. C.

    2015-09-01

    Neuro-scientific studies are often aimed at imaging brain activity, which is time-locked to external stimuli. This provides the possibility to use statistical methods to extract even weak signal components, which occur with each stimulus. For electroencephalographic recordings this concept is limited by inevitable time jitter, which cannot be controlled in all cases. Our study is based on a cross-correlation analysis of trials to alignment trials based on the recorded data. This is demonstrated both with simulated signals and with clinical EEG data, which were recorded intracranially. Special attention is given to the evaluation of the time-frequency resolved phase-locking across multiple trails.

  6. From total empiricism to a rational design of metronomic chemotherapy phase I dosing trials.

    PubMed

    Lam, Thomas; Hetherington, John W; Greenman, John; Maraveyas, Anthony

    2006-02-01

    'Metronomic chemotherapy' represents a novel anti-angiogenic strategy whereby low-dose chemotherapy is utilized in a continuous fashion in order to target tumor endothelium. There are many potential advantages of this strategy and clinical trials are already underway. However, although the scheduling of metronomic chemotherapy is relatively unequivocal, metronomic dosing principles are at present poorly defined. Arbitrarily, 10-33% of the maximum tolerated dose comprises 'the dose range'. We argue that this is too empirical and propose a set of phase I metronomic chemotherapy dosing strategies based on a principled approach which may help to reduce the problem of empiricism in dosing for metronomic chemotherapy trials.

  7. Analysis of Impact of Post-Treatment Biopsies in Phase I Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Sweis, Randy F.; Drazer, Michael W.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The use of biopsy-derived pharmacodynamic biomarkers is increasing in early-phase clinical trials. It remains unknown whether drug development is accelerated or enhanced by their use. We examined the impact of biopsy-derived pharmacodynamic biomarkers on subsequent drug development through a comprehensive analysis of phase I oncology studies from 2003 to 2010 and subsequent publications citing the original trials. Methods We conducted a search to identify and examine publications of phase I oncology studies including the use of biopsy-derived pharmacodynamic biomarkers between 2003 and 2010. Characteristics of those studies were extracted and analyzed, along with outcomes from the biomarker data. We then compiled and reviewed publications of subsequent phase II and III trials citing the original phase I biomarker studies to determine the impact on drug development. Results We identified 4,840 phase I oncology publications between 2003 and 2010. Seventy-two studies included a biopsy-derived pharmacodynamic biomarker. The proportion of biomarker studies including nondiagnostic biopsies increased over time (P = .002). A minimum of 1,873 tumor biopsies were documented in the 72 studies, 12 of which reported a statistically significant biomarker result. Thirty-three percent of studies (n = 24) were referenced by subsequent publications specifically with regard to the biomarkers. Only five positive biomarker studies were cited subsequently, and maximum tolerated dose was used for subsequent drug development in all cases. Conclusion Despite their increased use, the impact of biopsy-derived pharmacodynamic biomarkers in phase I oncology studies on subsequent drug development remains uncertain. No impact on subsequent dose or schedule was demonstrated. This issue requires further evaluation, given the risk and cost of such studies. PMID:26668350

  8. The Role of Age on Dose Limiting Toxicities (DLTs) in Phase I Dose-escalation Trials

    PubMed Central

    Schwandt, A; Harris, P. J.; Hunsberger, S.; Deleporte, A.; Smith, G. L.; Vulih, D.; Anderson, B. D.; Ivy, S. P.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Elderly oncology patients are not enrolled in early phase trials in proportion to the numbers of geriatric patients with cancer. There may be concern that elderly patients will not tolerate investigational agents as well as younger patients resulting in a disproportionate number of dose-limiting toxicities (DLTs). Recent single-institution studies provide conflicting data on the relationship between age and DLT. Experimental Design We retrospectively reviewed data about patients treated on single-agent, dose-escalation, phase I clinical trials sponsored by the Cancer Therapy Evaluation Program (CTEP) of the National Cancer Institute. Patients’ dose levels were described as percentage of maximum tolerated dose (%MTD), the highest dose level at which <33% of patients had a DLT, or recommended phase II dose (RP2D). Mixed-effect logistic regression models were used to analyze relationships between the probability of a DLT and age and other explanatory variables. Results Increasing dose, increasing age, and worsening performance status (PS) were significantly related to an increased probability of a DLT in this model (p<0.05). There was no association between dose level administered and age (p=0.57). Conclusions This analysis of phase I dose-escalation trials involving over 500 patients older than 70 years of age, is the largest reported. As age and dose level increased and PS worsened, the probability of a DLT increased. While increasing age was associated with occurrence of DLT, this risk remained within accepted thresholds of risk for phase I trials. There was no evidence of age bias on enrollment of patients on low or high dose levels. PMID:25028396

  9. Presentation and subsequent publication rates of phase I oncology clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Camacho, Luis H; Bacik, Jennifer; Cheung, Alexander; Spriggs, David R

    2005-10-01

    Many trials submitted to scientific meetings are not reported in peer-reviewed journals. Results may vary substantially and the lack of final publication constitutes a form of reporting bias. The authors sought to determine the presentation and publication rates of Phase I trials submitted to a major oncology meeting and the factors impeding their subsequent publication. The authors identified all Phase I studies submitted to the annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology in 1997, categorizing them as novel (agents not approved by the Food and Drug Administration at the time of submission) or nonnovel (at least one agent approved), and as industry sponsored or not. MEDLINE searches and an E-mailed questionnaire confirmed publication in peer-reviewed literature and the reasons for nonpublication. Approximately 54% of the 275 Phase I studies were selected for presentation. Abstracts reporting novel agents were more likely selected for presentation than those reporting nonnovel compounds (68% vs. 38%; P < 0.0001). Seventy-two percent of the presented abstracts were subsequently published, compared with 62% of those not presented (P = 0.08). The overall publication rate was 67% at 7.5 years. Presentation status was associated with time to publication (P = 0.01), with abstracts chosen for presentation being published sooner. The median time from presentation to publication was found to be 3.4 years. Lack of time and author relocation were the major obstacles to publication. The underreporting of final results of Phase I oncology trials remains a serious problem. In the future, investigators must commit to the publication of final results in a timely manner. Journals should provide mechanisms for rapid reporting of Phase I trials.

  10. Run-In Phase III Trial Design With Pharmacodynamics Predictive Biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Developments in biotechnology have stimulated the use of predictive biomarkers to identify patients who are likely to benefit from a targeted therapy. Several randomized phase III designs have been introduced for development of a targeted therapy using a diagnostic test. Most such designs require biomarkers measured before treatment. In many cases, it has been very difficult to identify such biomarkers. Promising candidate biomarkers can sometimes be effectively measured after a short run-in period on the new treatment. Methods We introduce a new design for phase III trials with a candidate predictive pharmacodynamic biomarker measured after a short run-in period. Depending on the therapy and the biomarker performance, the trial would either randomize all patients but perform a separate analysis on the biomarker-positive patients or only randomize marker-positive patients after the run-in period. We evaluate the proposed design compared with the conventional phase III design and discuss how to design a run-in trial based on phase II studies. Results The proposed design achieves a major sample size reduction compared with the conventional randomized phase III design in many cases when the biomarker has good sensitivity (≥0.7) and specificity (≥0.7). This requires that the biomarker be measured accurately and be indicative of drug activity. However, the proposed design loses some of its advantage when the proportion of potential responders is large (>50%) or the effect on survival from run-in period is substantial. Conclusions Incorporating a pharmacodynamic biomarker requires careful consideration but can expand the capacity of clinical trials to personalize treatment decisions and enhance therapeutics development. PMID:24096624

  11. Edoxaban: Review of pharmacology and key phase I to III clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Plitt, Anna; Giugliano, Robert P

    2014-09-01

    Vitamin K antagonists (VKAs) remain the standard therapy for anticoagulation in prevention and treatment of venous thromboembolism (VTE) and for the prevention of stroke in atrial fibrillation (AF). Due to numerous limitations of VKAs, target-specific oral anticoagulants have been developed. Edoxaban is a direct activated factor X inhibitor with attractive features among which are once daily dosing, no need for routine monitoring, and minimal drug-drug interactions. In patients undergoing orthopedic surgery, edoxaban was superior to enoxaparin in preventing VTE. Furthermore, a recent large-scale phase III trial in patients with symptomatic VTE demonstrated that edoxaban was noninferior to warfarin in preventing recurrent VTE and reduced bleeding. In the largest trial of anticoagulation in patients with AF to date, edoxaban was noninferior to warfarin in the prevention of stroke or systemic embolism and reduced bleeding and cardiovascular mortality. This review provides an overview of the pharmacology, clinical trial results, and potential indications for edoxaban.

  12. Peginterferon Alfa-2b Injection (Sylatron)

    MedlinePlus

    ... injection is in a class of medications called interferons. It works by stopping the growth of cancer ... allergic to peginterferon alfa-2b injection (PegIntron, Sylatron), interferon alfa-2b (Intron), any other medications, or any ...

  13. Comparison of futility monitoring guidelines using completed phase III oncology trials.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiang; Freidlin, Boris; Korn, Edward L; Halabi, Susan; Mandrekar, Sumithra; Dignam, James J

    2017-02-01

    Futility (inefficacy) interim monitoring is an important component in the conduct of phase III clinical trials, especially in life-threatening diseases. Desirable futility monitoring guidelines allow timely stopping if the new therapy is harmful or if it is unlikely to demonstrate to be sufficiently effective if the trial were to continue to its final analysis. There are a number of analytical approaches that are used to construct futility monitoring boundaries. The most common approaches are based on conditional power, sequential testing of the alternative hypothesis, or sequential confidence intervals. The resulting futility boundaries vary considerably with respect to the level of evidence required for recommending stopping the study. We evaluate the performance of commonly used methods using event histories from completed phase III clinical trials of the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group, Cancer and Leukemia Group B, and North Central Cancer Treatment Group. We considered published superiority phase III trials with survival endpoints initiated after 1990. There are 52 studies available for this analysis from different disease sites. Total sample size and maximum number of events (statistical information) for each study were calculated using protocol-specified effect size, type I and type II error rates. In addition to the common futility approaches, we considered a recently proposed linear inefficacy boundary approach with an early harm look followed by several lack-of-efficacy analyses. For each futility approach, interim test statistics were generated for three schedules with different analysis frequency, and early stopping was recommended if the interim result crossed a futility stopping boundary. For trials not demonstrating superiority, the impact of each rule is summarized as savings on sample size, study duration, and information time scales. For negative studies, our results show that the futility approaches based on testing the alternative hypothesis

  14. Statistical issues for design and analysis of single-arm multi-stage phase II cancer clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Jung, Sin-Ho

    2015-05-01

    Phase II trials have been very widely conducted and published every year for cancer clinical research. In spite of the fast progress in design and analysis methods, single-arm two-stage design is still the most popular for phase II cancer clinical trials. Because of their small sample sizes, statistical methods based on large sample approximation are not appropriate for design and analysis of phase II trials. As a prospective clinical research, the analysis method of a phase II trial is predetermined at the design stage and it is analyzed during and at the end of the trial as planned by the design. The analysis method of a trial should be matched with the design method. For two-stage single arm phase II trials, Simon's method has been the standards for choosing an optimal design, but the resulting data have been analyzed and published ignoring the two-stage design aspect with small sample sizes. In this article, we review analysis methods that exactly get along with the exact two-stage design method. We also discuss some statistical methods to improve the existing design and analysis methods for single-arm two-stage phase II trials. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. First update of the International Xenotransplantation Association consensus statement on conditions for undertaking clinical trials of porcine islet products in type 1 diabetes--Chapter 2b: genetically modified source pigs.

    PubMed

    Cowan, Peter J; Ayares, David; Wolf, Eckhard; Cooper, David K C

    2016-01-01

    Genetic modification of the source pig offers the opportunity to improve the engraftment and survival of islet xenografts. The type of modification can be tailored to the transplant setting; for example, intraportal islet xenografts have been shown to benefit from the expression of anticoagulant and anti-inflammatory transgenes, whereas cytoprotective transgenes are probably more relevant for encapsulated islets. The rapid development of pig genetic engineering, particularly with the introduction of genome editing techniques such as CRISPR-Cas, has accelerated the generation of new pig lines with multiple modifications. With pre-clinical testing in progress, it is an opportune time to consider any implications of genetic modification for the conditions for undertaking clinical trials. Obviously, the stringent requirements to fulfill designated pathogen-free status that are applied to wild-type pigs will apply equally to genetically modified (GM) source pigs. In addition, it is important from a safety perspective that the genetic modifications are characterized at the molecular level (e.g., integration site, absence of off-target mutations), the phenotypic level (e.g., durability and stability of transgene expression), and the functional level (e.g., protection of islets in vitro or in vivo, absence of detrimental effects on insulin secretion). The assessment of clinical trial protocols using GM pig islets will need to be performed on a case-by-case basis, taking into account a range of factors including the particular genetic modification(s) and the site and method of delivery.

  16. Dispositional optimism and therapeutic expectations in early-phase oncology trials.

    PubMed

    Jansen, Lynn A; Mahadevan, Daruka; Appelbaum, Paul S; Klein, William M P; Weinstein, Neil D; Mori, Motomi; Daffé, Racky; Sulmasy, Daniel P

    2016-04-15

    Prior research has identified unrealistic optimism as a bias that might impair informed consent among patient-subjects in early-phase oncology trials. However, optimism is not a unitary construct; it also can be defined as a general disposition, or what is called dispositional optimism. The authors assessed whether dispositional optimism would be related to high expectations for personal therapeutic benefit reported by patient-subjects in these trials but not to the therapeutic misconception. The authors also assessed how dispositional optimism related to unrealistic optimism. Patient-subjects completed questionnaires designed to measure expectations for therapeutic benefit, dispositional optimism, unrealistic optimism, and the therapeutic misconception. Dispositional optimism was found to be significantly associated with higher expectations for personal therapeutic benefit (Spearman rank correlation coefficient [r], 0.333; P<.0001), but was not associated with the therapeutic misconception (Spearman r, -0.075; P = .329). Dispositional optimism was found to be weakly associated with unrealistic optimism (Spearman r, 0.215; P = .005). On multivariate analysis, both dispositional optimism (P = .02) and unrealistic optimism (P<.0001) were found to be independently associated with high expectations for personal therapeutic benefit. Unrealistic optimism (P = .0001), but not dispositional optimism, was found to be independently associated with the therapeutic misconception. High expectations for therapeutic benefit among patient-subjects in early-phase oncology trials should not be assumed to result from misunderstanding of specific information regarding the trials. The data from the current study indicate that these expectations are associated with either a dispositionally positive outlook on life or biased expectations concerning specific aspects of trial participation. Not all manifestations of optimism are the same, and different types of optimism likely have

  17. Hypothermia for Traumatic Brain Injury in Children-A Phase II Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Beca, John; McSharry, Brent; Erickson, Simon; Yung, Michael; Schibler, Andreas; Slater, Anthony; Wilkins, Barry; Singhal, Ash; Williams, Gary; Sherring, Claire; Butt, Warwick

    2015-07-01

    To perform a pilot study to assess the feasibility of performing a phase III trial of therapeutic hypothermia started early and continued for at least 72 hours in children with severe traumatic brain injury. Multicenter prospective randomized controlled phase II trial. All eight of the PICUs in Australia and New Zealand and one in Canada. Children 1-15 years old with severe traumatic brain injury and who could be randomized within 6 hours of injury. The control group had strict normothermia to a temperature of 36-37°C for 72 hours. The intervention group had therapeutic hypothermia to a temperature of 32-33°C for 72 hours followed by slow rewarming at a rate compatible with maintaining intracranial pressure and cerebral perfusion pressure. Of 764 children admitted to PICU with traumatic brain injury, 92 (12%) were eligible and 55 (7.2%) were recruited. There were five major protocol violations (9%): three related to recruitment and consent processes and two to incorrect temperature management. Rewarming took a median of 21.5 hours (16-35 hr) and was performed without compromise in the cerebral perfusion pressure. There was no increase in any complications, including infections, bleeding, and arrhythmias. There was no difference in outcomes 12 months after injury; in the therapeutic hypothermia group, four (17%) had a bad outcome (pediatric cerebral performance category, 4-6) and three (13%) died, whereas in the normothermia group, three (12%) had a bad outcome and one (4%) died. Early therapeutic hypothermia in children with severe traumatic brain injury does not improve outcome and should not be used outside a clinical trial. Recruitment rates were lower and outcomes were better than expected. Conventional randomized controlled trials in children with severe traumatic brain injury are unlikely to be feasible. A large international trials group and alternative approaches to trial design will be required to further inform practice.

  18. Intraspinal Neural Stem Cell Transplantation in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis: Phase 1 Trial Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Feldman, Eva L; Boulis, Nicholas M; Hur, Junguk; Johe, Karl; Rutkove, Seward B; Federici, Thais; Polak, Meraida; Bordeau, Jane; Sakowski, Stacey A; Glass, Jonathan D

    2014-01-01

    Objective The US Food and Drug Administration–approved trial, “A Phase 1, Open-Label, First-in-Human, Feasibility and Safety Study of Human Spinal Cord-Derived Neural Stem Cell Transplantation for the Treatment of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis, Protocol Number: NS2008-1,” is complete. Our overall objective was to assess the safety and feasibility of stem cell transplantation into lumbar and/or cervical spinal cord regions in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) subjects. Methods Preliminary results have been reported on the initial trial cohort of 12 ALS subjects. Here, we describe the safety and functional outcome monitoring results for the final trial cohort, consisting of 6 ALS subjects receiving 5 unilateral cervical intraspinal neural stem cell injections. Three of these subjects previously received 10 total bilateral lumbar injections as part of the earlier trial cohort. All injections utilized a novel spinal-mounted stabilization and injection device to deliver 100,000 neural stem cells per injection, for a dosing range up to 1.5 million cells. Subject assessments included detailed pre- and postsurgical neurological outcome measures. Results The cervical injection procedure was well tolerated and disease progression did not accelerate in any subject, verifying the safety and feasibility of cervical and dual-targeting approaches. Analyses on outcome data revealed preliminary insight into potential windows of stem cell biological activity and identified clinical assessment measures that closely correlate with ALS Functional Rating Scale-Revised scores, a standard assessment for ALS clinical trials. Interpretation This is the first report of cervical and dual-targeted intraspinal transplantation of neural stem cells in ALS subjects. This approach is feasible and well-tolerated, supporting future trial phases examining therapeutic dosing and efficacy. PMID:24510776

  19. The impact of FDA and EMEA guidelines on drug development in relation to Phase 0 trials.

    PubMed

    Marchetti, S; Schellens, J H M

    2007-09-03

    An increase in the number of identified therapeutic cancer targets achieved through recent biomedical research has resulted in the generation of a large number of molecules that need to be tested further. Current development of (anticancer) drugs is a rather inefficient process that for an average new molecule takes around 10-15 years. It is also a challenging process as it is associated with high costs and a low rate of approval. It is known that less than 10% of new molecular entities entering clinical Phase I testing progress beyond the investigational programme and reach the market; this probability is even lower for anticancer agents. In 2003, the US Food and Drug Administration (US FDA) declared the urgent need for new toolkits to improve the critical development path that leads from scientific discovery to the patient. In this scenario, Phase 0 (zero) trials should allow an early evaluation in humans of pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic profiles of test compounds through administration of sub-pharmacological doses and for a short time period to a low number of humans. Typically, Phase 0 studies have no therapeutic or diagnostic intent. Owing to the low doses administered and the low risk of toxicity, shorter preclinical packages to support these studies are required. Phase 0 trials have been proposed to help in making an early selection of promising candidates for further evaluation in Phase I-III trials, providing a potentially useful instrument for drug discovery, particularly in the field of oncology. Phase 0 studies are expected to reduce costs of drug development, and to limit the preclinical in vitro and in vivo testing and the time period of drug development. However, there are also concerns about the utility and feasibility of Phase 0 studies. In January 2006, guidelines on exploratory investigational new drug studies in humans have been published by the US FDA, and currently a Phase 0 programme is ongoing at the National Cancer Institute to

  20. A qualitative study evaluating causality attribution for serious adverse events during early phase oncology clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Som D; Coombes, Megan E; Levine, Mitch; Cosby, Jarold; Kowaleski, Brenda; Arnold, Andrew

    2011-10-01

    In early phase oncology trials, novel targeted therapies are increasingly being tested in combination with traditional agents creating greater potential for enhanced and new toxicities. When a patient experiences a serious adverse event (SAE), investigators must determine whether the event is attributable to the investigational drug or not. This study seeks to understand the clinical reasoning, tools used and challenges faced by the researchers who assign causality to SAE's. Thirty-two semi-structured interviews were conducted with medical oncologists and trial coordinators at six Canadian academic cancer centres. Interviews were recorded and transcribed verbatim. Individual interview content analysis was followed by thematic analysis across the interview set. Our study found that causality assessment tends to be a rather complex process, often without complete clinical and investigational data at hand. Researchers described using a common processing strategy whereby they gather pertinent information, eliminate alternative explanations, and consider whether or not the study drug resulted in the SAE. Many of the interviewed participants voiced concern that causality assessments are often conducted quickly and tend to be highly subjective. Many participants were unable to identify any useful tools to help in assigning causality and welcomed more objectivity in the overall process. Attributing causality to SAE's is a complex process. Clinical trial researchers apply a logical system of reasoning, but feel that the current method of assigning causality could be improved. Based on these findings, future research involving the development of a new causality assessment tool specifically for use in early phase oncology clinical trials may be useful.

  1. An integrated dose-finding tool for phase I trials in oncology.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shengjie; Wang, Sue-Jane; Ji, Yuan

    2015-11-01

    In the past 25 years, the 3+3 design has been the most popular approach for planning phase I dose-finding trials in oncology. During the same time period, major development of more efficient model-based designs has been made by statistical researchers aiming to improve the clinical practice of dose finding in oncology. Despite the effort, 3+3 is still the most frequently used designs in practice. Part of the reason is due to the lack of software tools that allow comparison of different designs, including 3+3 and other model-based methods, in a head-to-head and easy-to-use fashion. To this end, we introduce NextGen-DF, a next-generation tool for designing oncology dose-finding trials that allows for construction, comparison, and calibration of multiple designs via internet, in real time, and independent of computer operating systems. Through NextGen-DF, we present massive and user-generated comparison results based on over 4 million simulated trials, which clearly indicate the inferiority of 3+3. To our knowledge, the reported crowd-sourcing results are the largest and most objective comparison across major dose-finding methods to date. NextGen-DF is expected to improve patient care and drug development by providing safer and more efficient designs for phase I oncology trials. NextGen-DF is available at www.compgenome.org/NGDF.

  2. Non-Publication Is Common among Phase 1, Single-Center, Not Prospectively Registered, or Early Terminated Clinical Drug Trials.

    PubMed

    van den Bogert, Cornelis A; Souverein, Patrick C; Brekelmans, Cecile T M; Janssen, Susan W J; Koëter, Gerard H; Leufkens, Hubert G M; Bouter, Lex M

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the occurrence and determinants of non-publication of clinical drug trials in the Netherlands.All clinical drug trials reviewed by the 28 Institutional Review Boards (IRBs) in the Netherlands in 2007 were followed-up from approval to publication. Candidate determinants were the sponsor, phase, applicant, centers, therapeutic effect expected, type of trial, approval status of the drug(s), drug type, participant category, oncology or other disease area, prospective registration, and early termination. The main outcome was publication as peer reviewed article. The percentage of trials that were published, crude and adjusted odds ratio (OR), and 95% confidence interval (CI) were used to quantify the associations between determinants and publication. In 2007, 622 clinical drug trials were reviewed by IRBs in the Netherlands. By the end of follow-up, 19 of these were rejected by the IRB, another 19 never started inclusion, and 10 were still running. Of the 574 trials remaining in the analysis, 334 (58%) were published as peer-reviewed article. The multivariable logistic regression model identified the following determinants with a robust, statistically significant association with publication: phase 2 (60% published; adjusted OR 2.6, 95% CI 1.1-5.9), phase 3 (73% published; adjusted OR 4.1, 95% CI 1.7-10.0), and trials not belonging to phase 1-4 (60% published; adjusted OR 3.2, 95% CI 1.5 to 6.5) compared to phase 1 trials (35% published); trials with a company or investigator as applicant (63% published) compared to trials with a Contract Research Organization (CRO) as applicant (50% published; adjusted OR 1.7; 95% CI 1.1-2.8); and multicenter trials also conducted in other EU countries (68% published; adjusted OR 2.2, 95% CI 1.1-4.4) or also outside the European Union (72% published; adjusted OR 2.0, 95% CI 1.0-4.0) compared to single-center trials (45% published). Trials that were not prospectively registered (48

  3. Sensation seeking amongst healthy volunteers participating in phase I clinical trials.

    PubMed Central

    Farré, M; Lamas, X; Camí, J

    1995-01-01

    1. Phase I clinical trials are usually carried out in healthy volunteers. In addition to economic gain, factors that may influence willingness to participate include scientific interest, curiosity and choice for risky activities. 2. We assessed the relationship between personality variables and volunteering for clinical pharmacology research. Two personality questionnaires, the Sensation Seeking Scale (SSS, form V) and the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire (EPQ), were administered to 48 male healthy university students who volunteered to participate in a phase I clinical trial and to 43 male university students who were not willing to participate in phase I clinical trials. General norm data were also used for the comparison of results. 3. When healthy volunteers were compared with unwilling subjects, significant differences were found in thrill-and-adventure seeking (7.9 vs 6.7, P = 0.0034), experience seeking (6.4 vs 5.2, P = 0.0012), disinhibition (6.2 vs 4.3, P < 0.0001), boredom susceptibility (3.9 vs 2.8, P = 0.0073), total sensation seeking trait (24.3 vs 19.0, P < 0.0001), extraversion (15.1 vs 13.3, P = 0.0490), and psychoticism (4.4 vs 3.5, P = 0.0086). When healthy volunteers were compared with general norm data similar statistically significant differences were found in all these scales, except for boredom susceptibility and psychoticism. 4. The personality profile of healthy volunteers was characterized by a higher sensation seeking trait and extraversion as compared with individuals who were not willing to participate in phase I clinical trials and general norm data. PMID:7640147

  4. Phase 0/I/II Cancer Prevention Clinical Trials Program (Consortia) | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    Five cancer research centers lead multiple collaborative networks to assess potential cancer preventive agents and to conduct early clinical development of promising preventive agents. Also called the Consortia for Early Phase Prevention Trials, the studies require extensive biomarker analysis, investigation of the biologic effects of the cancer preventive agents on their intended molecular targets and on multiple endpoints associated with carcinogenesis, and correlation with clinically relevant endpoints. | Systematic early clinical development of promising preventive agents through five major medical research centers.

  5. The fiduciary obligation of the physician-researcher in phase IV trials

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In this manuscript, we argue that within the context of phase IV, physician-researchers retain their fiduciary obligation to treat the patient-participants. Discussion We first clarify why the perspective that research ethics ought to be differentiated from clinical ethics is not applicable in phase IV, and therefore, why therapeutic orientation is most convivial in this phase. Next, assuming that ethics guidelines may be representative of common morality, we show that ethics guidelines see physician-researchers primarily as physicians and only secondarily as researchers. We then elaborate on what a fiduciary obligation is and how some of the obligations are default duties. Lastly, we look at the fiduciary obligation of the physician-researcher in phase IV interventional trials. Conclusion The fiduciary obligation to treat is not as easily waived as in earlier trials. Assuming the entwinement of research and practice in phase IV, physician-researchers, in collaboration with other researchers, investigators, and research ethics committees, should ensure that in terms of study design, methodology, and research practice, the therapeutic value of the research to the patient-participants is not diminished. PMID:24507449

  6. Differences in Funding Sources of Phase III Oncology Clinical Trials by Treatment Modality and Cancer Type.

    PubMed

    Jairam, Vikram; Yu, James B; Aneja, Sanjay; Wilson, Lynn D; Lloyd, Shane

    2017-06-01

    Given the limited resources available to conduct clinical trials, it is important to understand how trial sponsorship differs among different therapeutic modalities and cancer types and to consider the ramifications of these differences. We searched clinicaltrials.gov for a cross-sectional register of active, phase III, randomized controlled trials (RCTs) studying treatment-related endpoints such as survival and recurrence for the 24 most prevalent malignancies. We classified the RCTs into 7 categories of therapeutic modality: (1) chemotherapy/other cancer-directed drugs, (2) targeted therapy, (3) surgery, (4) radiation therapy (RT), (5) RT with other modalities, (6) multimodality therapy without RT, and (7) other. RCTs were categorized as being funded by one or more of the following groups: (1) government, (2) hospital/university, (3) industry, and (4) other. χ analysis was performed to detect differences in funding source distribution between modalities and cancer types. The percentage of multimodality trials (5%) and radiation RCTs (4%) funded by industry was less than that for chemotherapy (32%, P<0.01) or targeted therapy (48%, P<0.01). Trials studying targeted therapy were less likely to have hospital/university funding than any of the other modalities (P<0.01 in each comparison). Trials of chemotherapy were more likely to be funded by industry if they also studied targeted therapy (P<0.01). RCTs studying targeted therapies are more likely to be funded by industry than trials studying multimodality therapy or radiation. The impact of industry funding versus institutional or governmental sources of funding for cancer research is unclear and requires further study.

  7. Phase I/II trial evaluating carbon ion radiotherapy for the treatment of recurrent rectal cancer: the PANDORA-01 trial.

    PubMed

    Combs, Stephanie E; Kieser, Meinhard; Habermehl, Daniel; Weitz, Jürgen; Jäger, Dirk; Fossati, Piero; Orrechia, Roberto; Engenhart-Cabillic, Rita; Pötter, Richard; Dosanjh, Manjit; Jäkel, Oliver; Büchler, Markus W; Debus, Jürgen

    2012-04-03

    I part is toxicity, the primary endpoint in the Phase II part is progression-free survival. With conventional photon irradiation treatment of recurrent rectal cancer is limited, and the clinical effect is only moderate. With carbon ions, an improved outcome can be expected due to the physical and biological characteristics of the carbon ion beam. However, the optimal dose applicable in this clincial situation as re-irradiation still has to be determined. This, as well as efficacy, is to be evaluated in the present Phase I/II trial. NCT01528683.

  8. Drug induced interstitial lung disease in oncology phase I trials.

    PubMed

    Yonemori, Kan; Hirakawa, Akihiro; Kawachi, Asuka; Kinoshita, Fumie; Okuma, Hitomi; Nishikawa, Tadaaki; Tamura, Kenji; Fujiwara, Yasuhiro; Takebe, Naoko

    2016-12-01

    Interstitial lung disease is a serious drug-related condition that can cause life threatening organ failure. The incidence and risk factors of drug-induced interstitial lung disease (DILD) are unknown in oncology phase I trials. This study analyzed clinical information from 8906 patients with malignancies who were enrolled in 470 phase I trials sponsored by the Cancer Therapy Evaluation Program, National Cancer Institute, from 1988 to 2014. Logistic and Cox statistical analyses were utilized to determine clinical differences between patients who developed DILD and patients who did not. In this study, the overall incidence rate of patients with pulmonary toxicity was 2.7%. The overall incidence rate for DILD was 0.77%, whereas for grade 3 or 4 DILD it was 0.31%. Median time to occurrence of DILD was 1.4 months. The Cox hazard analysis indicated smaller body surface area and a combination of thoracic radiation with investigational drug regimens were significant risk factors for time to occurrence of interstitial lung disease. Investigators should carefully monitor for DILD in oncology patients enrolled in phase I trials with identified risk factors. A 6-month observation period would be sufficient to detect the onset of most DILD in such patients.

  9. Design of Phase II cancer trials for evaluation of cytostatic/cytotoxic agents.

    PubMed

    Kocherginsky, Masha; Cohen, Ezra E W; Karrison, Theodore

    2009-01-01

    For experimental anticancer agents that may have both cytostatic and cytotoxic effects, assessment of response rates alone may not capture the full impact of the treatment. Oncologists are therefore interested in assessing both response and stable disease rates in early phase clinical trials of such therapies. We describe the design of a single-arm, Phase II clinical trial for the simultaneous evaluation of objective response and stable disease (lack of early tumor progression) rates using standard RECIST criteria. Demonstration of a sufficiently high rate for either of these endpoints will lead to rejection of the null hypothesis and a conclusion that the treatment warrants further study. A design is chosen that satisfies the desired type I error constraint and has sufficient statistical power at several selected points within the alternative hypothesis space using a restricted search algorithm. An early stopping rule for lack of efficacy is incorporated. The method is illustrated by the design of a Phase II clinical trial in head and neck cancer.

  10. It's Only a Phase: Applying the 5 Phases of Clinical Trials to the NSCR Model Improvement Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elgart, S. R.; Milder, C. M.; Chappell, L. J.; Semones, E. J.

    2017-01-01

    NASA limits astronaut radiation exposures to a 3% risk of exposure-induced death from cancer (REID) at the upper 95% confidence level. Since astronauts approach this limit, it is important that the estimate of REID be as accurate as possible. The NASA Space Cancer Risk 2012 (NSCR-2012) model has been the standard for NASA's space radiation protection guidelines since its publication in 2013. The model incorporates elements from U.S. baseline statistics, Japanese atomic bomb survivor research, animal models, cellular studies, and radiation transport to calculate astronaut baseline risk of cancer and REID. The NSCR model is under constant revision to ensure emerging research is incorporated into radiation protection standards. It is important to develop guidelines, however, to determine what new research is appropriate for integration. Certain standards of transparency are necessary in order to assess data quality, statistical quality, and analytical quality. To this effect, all original source code and any raw data used to develop the code are required to confirm there are no errors which significantly change reported outcomes. It is possible to apply a clinical trials approach to select and assess the improvement concepts that will be incorporated into future iterations of NSCR. This poster describes the five phases of clinical trials research, pre-clinical research, and clinical research phases I-IV, explaining how each step can be translated into an appropriate NSCR model selection guideline.

  11. Secretion of human interferon alpha 2b by Streptomyces lividans.

    PubMed

    Pimienta, E; Fando, R; Sánchez, J C; Vallin, C

    2002-02-01

    Biologically active human interferon alpha 2b (HuIFNalpha-2b) was secreted into the culture medium by Streptomyces lividans transformed with recombinant plasmids coding for HuIFNalpha-2b fused to the Streptomyces exfoliatus M11 lipase A signal sequence. Levels were low, 15 or 100 ng/ml, depending on the plasmid used. Neither processed nor unprocessed HuIFNalpha-2b was detected in cell lysates of the transformants secreting the recombinant product. However, the secreted recombinant product was found to partially degrade when cultures reached the stationary phase by the action of an, as yet, unidentified mycelium-associated factor. Experimental evidence suggests that the degrading factor is related to mycelium-associated proteolytic activity.

  12. Resistance-associated amino acid variants associated with boceprevir plus pegylated interferon-α2b and ribavirin in patients with chronic hepatitis C in the SPRINT-1 trial.

    PubMed

    Ogert, Robert A; Howe, John A; Vierling, John M; Kwo, Paul Y; Lawitz, Eric J; McCone, Jonathan; Schiff, Eugene R; Pound, David; Davis, Mitchell N; Gordon, Stuart C; Ravendhran, Natarajan; Rossaro, Lorenzo; Jacobson, Ira M; Ralston, Robert; Chaudhri, Eirum; Qiu, Ping; Pedicone, Lisa D; Brass, Clifford A; Albrecht, Janice K; Barnard, Richard J O; Hazuda, Daria J; Howe, Anita Y M

    2013-01-01

    Resistance to direct-acting antivirals represents a new challenge in the treatment of chronic hepatitis C. SPRINT-1 was a randomized study of treatment-naive patients with genotype (G) 1 hepatitis C infection (n=595) that evaluated the safety and efficacy of boceprevir (BOC) when added to pegylated interferon-α2b plus ribavirin (PR). Plasma samples collected at protocol-specified visits were analysed by population sequencing for detection of BOC-associated resistance-associated variants (RAVs). A total of 17/24 (71%) patients randomized to BOC with baseline RAVs achieved sustained virological response (SVR). V55A/I (n=14), Q41H (n=11) and T54S (n=9) were the most frequently detected polymorphisms at baseline. Seven non-SVR patients with baseline RAVs had V55A (relapse, n=3; breakthrough, n=1; and non-response, n=1) and/or R155K (non-response, n=2). In total, 63/144 (44%) patients with sequenced post-baseline samples (2 SVR, 61 non-SVR) had detectable RAVs after BOC treatment (G1a: R155K [39/49; 80%], V36M [37/49; 76%] and T54S [24/49; 49%]; G1b: T54S [3/11; 27%], T54A [4/11; 35%], A156S [2/11; 18%] and V170A [2/11; 18%]). RAV frequency varied according to the virological response: 90%, 67%, 27% and 37% of breakthrough, incomplete virological response, relapse and non-responder patients, respectively, had post-baseline RAVs present. Similar RAVs were identified in both the PR lead-in and no-lead-in arms and the frequency of post-baseline RAVs was highest in the low-dose ribavirin arm. SVR rates were not compromised among patients with RAVs at baseline; however, a lower starting mg/kg dose of ribavirin was associated with a higher frequency of post-baseline RAVs.

  13. Phase I Clinical Trials in 85 Patients with Gynecologic Cancer: The M. D. Anderson Cancer Center Experience

    PubMed Central

    Moroney, John; Wheler, Jennifer; Hong, David; Naing, Aung; Falchook, Gerald; Bodurka, Diane; Coleman, Robert; Lu, Karen; Xiao, Lianchun; Kurzrock, Razelle

    2010-01-01

    Objective Disseminated gynecologic cancers are usually fatal due to chemoresistance. Recently, rationally-developed, targeted agents are entering the early clinical trials setting. We assessed patients with metastatic gynecologic cancers in a dedicated Phase I clinical trials clinic in order to determine their outcome. Methods We reviewed records for 89 consecutive patients with gynecologic cancers referred to the Phase I Clinical Trials Program, 85 (96%) of whom were treated on ≥1 trial. Results Cancer diagnoses were: ovarian (N = 43), uterine (N = 19), cervix (N = 17), and other. Median age was 58 years; median number of prior cytotoxic regimens, five. Two patients (2.4%) achieved a CR, four (4.7%), a PR, and eight (9.4%), SD ≥ six months (total CR/PR/SD ≥ six months = 16.5%) for the first phase I trial. Twenty-five patients enrolled on a second trial and three on a third (N = 113 trials total). Combining response data for all trials, of the 85 patients, two achieved CR (2.4%), nine achieved PR (10.6%), and 12 (14%) had SD for ≥ six months. One-year survival was 30% (95% C.I., 21% to 44%). There was no difference in time-to-treatment failure (TTF) on Phase I versus the patient's last standard treatment. Conclusion Twenty-three of 85 patients (27%) with advanced, heavily-pretreated, gynecologic cancers achieved CR/PR/SD ≥ six months on a phase I trial, and overall TTF on phase I was comparable to that of last conventional therapy, suggesting that participation in a phase I trial is a reasonable option for these patients. PMID:20347123

  14. Phase I clinical trials in 85 patients with gynecologic cancer: the M. D. Anderson Cancer Center experience.

    PubMed

    Moroney, John; Wheler, Jennifer; Hong, David; Naing, Aung; Falchook, Gerald; Bodurka, Diane; Coleman, Robert; Lu, Karen; Xiao, Lianchun; Kurzrock, Razelle

    2010-06-01

    Disseminated gynecologic cancers are usually fatal due to chemoresistance. Recently, rationally developed, targeted agents are entering the early clinical trials setting. We assessed patients with metastatic gynecologic cancers in a dedicated phase I clinical trials clinic in order to determine their outcome. We reviewed records for 89 consecutive patients with gynecologic cancers referred to the Phase I Clinical Trials Program, 85 (96%) of whom were treated on > or = 1 trial. Cancer diagnoses were ovarian (N=43), uterine (N=19), cervix (N=17), and other. Median age was 58 years; median number of prior cytotoxic regimens, five. Two patients (2.4%) achieved a CR; four (4.7%), a PR; and eight (9.4%), SD > or = 6 months (total CR/PR/SD > or = 6 months=16.5%) for the first phase I trial. Twenty-five patients enrolled on a second trial and three, on a third (N=113 trials total). Combining response data for all trials, of the 85 patients, two achieved CR (2.4%), nine achieved PR (10.6%), and 12 (14%) had SD for > or = 6 months. One-year survival was 30% (95% CI, 21% to 44%). There was no difference in time-to-treatment failure (TTF) on phase I versus the patient's last standard treatment. Twenty-three of 85 patients (27%) with advanced, heavily pretreated, gynecologic cancers achieved CR/PR/SD > or = 6 months on a phase I trial, and overall TTF on phase I was comparable to that of last conventional therapy, suggesting that participation in a phase I trial is a reasonable option for these patients. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Novel therapies for resistant focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FONT) phase II clinical trial: study design

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The lack of adequate randomized clinical trials (RCT) has hindered identification of new therapies that are safe and effective for patients with primary focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS), especially in patients who fail to respond to corticosteroids and immunosuppressive therapies. Recent basic science advances have led to development of alternative treatments that specifically target aberrant pathways of fibrosis which are relevant to disease progression in FSGS. There is a need for a flexible Phase II study design which will test such novel antifibrotic strategies in order to identify agents suitable for phase III testing. Methods/Design The Novel Therapies for Resistant Focal Segmental Glomerulosclerosis (FONT) project is a multicenter Phase I/II RCT designed to investigate the potential efficacy of novel therapies for resistant FSGS. Adalimumab and galactose will be evaluated against conservative therapy consisting of the combination of lisinopril, losartan and atorvastatin. The sample size is defined to assure that if one of the treatments has a superior response rate compared to that of the other treatments, it will be selected with high probability for further evaluation. Comparison of primary and secondary endpoints in each study arm will enable a choice to be made of which treatments are worthy of further study in future Phase III RCT. Discussion This report highlights the key features of the FONT II RCT including the two-step outcome analysis that will expedite achievement of the study objectives. The proposed phase II study design will help to identify promising agents for further testing while excluding ineffective agents. This staged approach can help to prevent large expenditures on unworthy therapeutic agents in the management of serious but rare kidney diseases Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT00814255 PMID:21310077

  16. Oral contraceptive cycle phase does not affect 200-m swim time trial performance.

    PubMed

    Rechichi, Claire; Dawson, Brian

    2012-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine whether swimming performance was affected by acute hormonal fluctuation within a monophasic oral contraceptive (OC) cycle. Six competitive swimmers and water polo players completed a 200-m time trial at 3 time points of a single OC cycle: during the consumption phase (CONS), early (WITH1), and late in the withdrawal phase (WITH2). Split times and stroke rate were recorded during the time trial, and heart rate, blood lactate, glucose, and pH were measured after each performance test. Resting endogenous serum estradiol and progesterone concentrations were also assessed. No significant differences were observed between phases for body composition, 200-m swim time, mean stroke rate, peak heart rate, or blood glucose (p > 0.05). The mean peak blood lactate was significantly lower during WITH2 (9.9 ± 3.0 mmol·L(-1)) compared with that of CONS (12.5 ± 3.0 mmol·L(-1)) and mean pH higher during WITH2 (7.183 ± 0.111) compared with that of CONS (7.144 ± 0.092). Serum estradiol levels were significantly greater during WITH2 compared with that during WITH1 and CONS, but there was no difference in serum progesterone levels. These results demonstrate that for monophasic OC users, cycle phase does not impact the 200-m swimming performance. There was a reduction in blood lactate and an increase in pH during the withdrawal phase, possibly because of an increase in fluid retention, plasma volume, and cellular alkalosis. Therefore, female 200-m swimmers taking a monophasic OC need not be concerned by the phase of their cycle with regard to competition and optimizing performance. However, coaches and scientists should exercise caution when interpreting blood lactate results obtained from swimming tests and consider controlling for cycle phase for athletes taking an OC.

  17. Similar efficacy for phase I trials in comparison with DTIC for advanced malignant melanoma: an analysis of melanoma outcomes in CTEP-sponsored phase I trials 1995-2011.

    PubMed

    Luke, Jason J; Rubinstein, Lawrence V; Smith, Gary L; Ivy, S Percy; Harris, Pamela J

    2013-04-01

    After ipilimumab, vemurafenib, and interleukin-2, standard of care chemotherapy for melanoma remains dacarbazine (response rate ∼9%). Despite this, many physicians hesitate to refer patients to phase I protocols given a perceived lack of clinical benefit and potential for harm. To better understand the validity of these perceptions, the experience of all patients with melanoma treated on phase I trials sponsored by the National Cancer Institute-Cancer Therapy Evaluation Program (NCI-CTEP) from 1995 to 2011 were analyzed and compared with the pooled results of six contemporary phase III trials of dacarbazine. A total of 937 patients with melanoma were treated in 148 CTEP phase I trials. The majority were men with a median of two prior therapies (46% receiving prior dacarbazine). Response and clinical benefit rates in these trials were not clinically different from those of dacarbazine (phase I: 6.3 and 26.8% vs. dacarbazine: 8.8 and 27.9%) although grades 3 and 4 toxicity was significantly higher (54 vs. 28%). Efficacy and toxicity were generally consistent within phase I subgroups (targeted agents, immunotherapies, or chemotherapeutics) though targeted therapy was associated with a lower response rate, immunotherapy with lower clinical benefit rate, and chemotherapy with higher incidence of grade 4 toxicity. Thus, the perception of limited efficacy of phase I trials for patients with melanoma was disproven, whereas the perception of toxicity was observed. However, this difference in toxicity may have been largely because of the nature of phase I vs. phase III trials (i.e. more heavily pretreated) and because of the phase I trials often being multiagent as opposed to dacarbazine alone. © 2013 Wolters Kluwer Health | Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.

  18. Predictive In Silico Studies of Human 5-hydroxytryptamine Receptor Subtype 2B (5-HT2B) and Valvular Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Reid, Terry-Elinor; Kumar, Krishna

    2014-01-01

    Serotonin (5-HT) receptors are neuromodulator neurotransmitter receptors which when activated generate a signal transduction pathway within cells resulting in cell-cell communication. 5-hydroxytryptamine (serotonin) receptor 2B (5-HT2B) is a subtype of the seven members of 5-hydroxytrytamine (5-HT) family of receptors which is the largest member of the super family of 7-transmembrane G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs). Not only do 5-HT receptors play physiological roles in the cardiovascular system, gastrointestinal and endocrine function and the central nervous, but they also play a role in behavioral functions. In particular 5-HT2B receptor is wide spread with regards to its distribution throughout bodily tissues and is expressed at high levels in the lungs, peripheral tissues, liver, kidney and prostate just to name a few. Hence 5-HT2B participates in multiple biological functions including CNS regulation, regulation of gastrointestinal motality, cardiovascular regulation and 5-HT transport system regulation. While 5-HT2B is a viable drug target and has therapeutic indications for treating obesity, psychotherapy, Parkinson’s disease etc. there is a growing concern regarding adverse drug reactions, specifically valvulopathy associated with 5-HT2B agonists. Due to the sequence homology experienced by 5-HT2 subtypes there is also a concern regarding the off target effects of 5-HT2A and 5-HT2C agonists. The concept of subtype selectivity is of paramount importance and can be tackled with the aid of in silico studies, specifically cheminformatics, to develop models to predict valvulopathy associated toxicity of drug candidates prior to clinical trials. This review has highlighted three in silico approaches thus far that have been successful in either predicting 5-HT2B toxicity of molecules or identifying important interactions between 5-HT2B and drug molecules that bring about valvulopathy related toxicities. PMID:23675941

  19. Phase 1 Clinical Trial of Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy Concomitant With Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy for Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Bondiau, Pierre-Yves; Courdi, Adel; Bahadoran, Phillipe; Chamorey, Emmanuel; Queille-Roussel, Catherine; Lallement, Michel; Birtwisle-Peyrottes, Isabelle; Chapellier, Claire; Pacquelet-Cheli, Sandrine; Ferrero, Jean-Marc

    2013-04-01

    Purpose: Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) allows stereotactic irradiation of thoracic tumors. It may have a real impact on patients who may not otherwise qualify for breast-conserving surgery. We conducted a phase 1 trial that tested 5 dose levels of SBRT concomitant with neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT) before to surgery. The purpose of the current dose escalation study was to determine the maximum tolerable dose of SBRT in the treatment of breast cancer. Methods and Materials: To define toxicity, we performed dermatologic examinations that included clinical examinations by 2 separate physicians and technical evaluations using colorimetry, dermoscopy, and skin ultrasonography. Dermatologic examinations were performed before NACT, 36 and 56 days after the beginning of NACT, and before surgery. Surgery was performed 4 to 8 weeks after the last chemotherapy session. Efficacy, the primary endpoint, was determined by the pathologic complete response (pCR) rate. Results: Maximum tolerable dose was not reached. Only 1 case of dose-limiting toxicity was reported (grade 3 dermatologic toxicity), and SBRT was overall well tolerated. The pCR rate was 36%, with none being observed at the first 2 dose levels, and the highest rate being obtained at dose level 3 (25.5 Gy delivered in 3 fractions). Furthermore, the breast-conserving surgery rate was up to 92% compared with an 8% total mastectomy rate. No surgical complications were reported. Conclusions: This study demonstrates that SBRT can be safely combined with NACT. Regarding the efficacy endpoints, this trial showed promising results in terms of pCR rate (36%) and breast-conserving rate (92%). The findings provide a strong rationale for extending the study into a phase 2 trial. In view of the absence of correlation between dose and pCR, and given that the data from dose level 3 met the statistical requirements, a dose of 25.5 Gy in 3 fractions should be used for the phase 2 trial.

  20. Perceptions of control and unrealistic optimism in early-phase cancer trials.

    PubMed

    Jansen, Lynn A; Mahadevan, Daruka; Appelbaum, Paul S; Klein, William M P; Weinstein, Neil D; Mori, Motomi; Degnin, Catherine; Sulmasy, Daniel P

    2017-08-03

    Recent research has found unrealistic optimism (UO) among patient-subjects in early-phase oncology trials. Our aim was to investigate the cognitive and motivational factors that evoke this bias in this context. We expected perceptions of control to be a strong correlate of unrealistic optimism. A study of patient-subjects enrolled in early-phase oncology trials was conducted at two sites in the USA. Respondents completed questionnaires designed to assess unrealistic optimism and several risk attribute variables that have been found to evoke the bias in other contexts. One hundred and seventy-one patient-subjects agreed to be interviewed for our study. Significant levels of perceived controllability were found with respect to all nine research-related questions. Perceptions of control were found to predict unrealistic optimism. Two other risk attribute variables, awareness of indicators (p=0.024) and mental image (p=0.022), were correlated with unrealistic optimism. However, in multivariate regression analysis, awareness and mental image dropped out of the model and perceived controllability was the only factor independently associated with unrealistic optimism (p<0.0001). Patient-subjects reported that they can, at least partially, control the benefits they receive from participating in an early-phase oncology trial. This sense of control may underlie unrealistic optimism about benefiting personally from trial participation. Effective interventions to counteract unrealistic optimism may need to address the psychological factors that give rise to distorted risk/benefit processing. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  1. The design of phase II clinical trials testing cancer therapeutics: consensus recommendations from the clinical trial design task force of the national cancer institute investigational drug steering committee.

    PubMed

    Seymour, Lesley; Ivy, S Percy; Sargent, Daniel; Spriggs, David; Baker, Laurence; Rubinstein, Larry; Ratain, Mark J; Le Blanc, Michael; Stewart, David; Crowley, John; Groshen, Susan; Humphrey, Jeffrey S; West, Pamela; Berry, Donald

    2010-03-15

    The optimal design of phase II studies continues to be the subject of vigorous debate, especially studies of newer molecularly targeted agents. The observations that many new therapeutics "fail" in definitive phase III studies, coupled with the numbers of new agents to be tested as well as the increasing costs and complexity of clinical trials, further emphasize the critical importance of robust and efficient phase II design. The Clinical Trial Design Task Force (CTD-TF) of the National Cancer Institute (NCI) Investigational Drug Steering Committee (IDSC) has published a series of discussion papers on phase II trial design in Clinical Cancer Research. The IDSC has developed formal recommendations about aspects of phase II trial design that are the subject of frequent debate, such as endpoints (response versus progression-free survival), randomization (single-arm designs versus randomization), inclusion of biomarkers, biomarker-based patient enrichment strategies, and statistical design (e.g., two-stage designs versus multiple-group adaptive designs). Although these recommendations in general encourage the use of progression-free survival as the primary endpoint, randomization, inclusion of biomarkers, and incorporation of newer designs, we acknowledge that objective response as an endpoint and single-arm designs remain relevant in certain situations. The design of any clinical trial should always be carefully evaluated and justified based on characteristic specific to the situation.

  2. Camperdown Program for adults who stutter: a student training clinic Phase I trial.

    PubMed

    Cocomazzo, Nadia; Block, Susan; Carey, Brenda; O'Brian, Sue; Onslow, Mark; Packman, Ann; Iverach, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    During speech pathology professional preparation there is a need for adequate student instruction with speech-restructuring treatments for adults. An important part of that clinical educational experience is to participate in a clinical setting that produces outcomes equivalent to those attained during clinical trials. A previous report showed that this is possible with a traditional, intensive speech-restructuring treatment. Considering the treatment process advantages and time efficiency of the Camperdown Program, it is arguably a compelling prospect for clinician education. Therefore, the present study is a Phase I trial of the treatment at a student university clinic, with a similar design to a previous report. During speech pathology professional preparation there is a need for adequate student instruction with speech-restructuring treatments for adults. An important part of that clinical educational experience is to participate in a clinical setting that produces outcomes equivalent to those attained during clinical trials. A previous report showed that this is possible with a traditional, intensive speech-restructuring treatment. Considering the treatment process advantages and time efficiency of the Camperdown Program, it is arguably a compelling prospect for clinician education. The present study is a Phase I trial of the treatment at a student university clinic, with a similar design to a previous report. The design was a non-randomized Phase I clinical trial with 12 adult participants. Primary outcomes were per cent syllables stuttered (%SS) within and beyond the clinic, and speech naturalness scores from pre- and post-treatment stutter-free speech samples. Pooled %SS scores pre-treatment were 5.7, at immediate post-treatment were 1.0, and at 12 months post-treatment were 2.4. The group speech naturalness scores post-treatment did not increase to a clinically significant extent. Results essentially replicate the previous study by producing similar

  3. Proposal for a "phase II" multicenter trial model for preclinical new antiepilepsy therapy development.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Terence J; Ben-Menachem, Elinor; Bertram, Edward H; Collins, Stephen D; Kokaia, Merab; Lerche, Holger; Klitgaard, Henrik; Staley, Kevin J; Vaudano, Elisabetta; Walker, Matthew C; Simonato, Michele

    2013-08-01

    There is a pressing need to address the current major gaps in epilepsy treatment, in particular drug-resistant epilepsy, antiepileptogenic therapies, and comorbidities. A major concern in the development of new therapies is that current preclinical testing is not sufficiently predictive for clinical efficacy. Methodologic limitations of current preclinical paradigms may partly account for this discrepancy. Here we propose and discuss a strategy for implementing a "phase II" multicenter preclinical drug trial model based on clinical phase II/III studies designed to generate more rigorous preclinical data for efficacy. The goal is to improve the evidence resulting from preclinical studies for investigational new drugs that have shown strong promise in initial preclinical "phase I" studies. This should reduce the risk for expensive clinical studies in epilepsy and therefore increase the appeal for funders (industry and government) to invest in their clinical development.

  4. Predictive factors of renal toxicities related to anti-VEGFR multikinase inhibitors in phase 1 trials.

    PubMed

    Boissier, Emilie; Mir, Olivier; Hollebecque, Antoine; Izzedine, Hassan; Ederhy, Stéphane; Gazzah, Anas; Bahleda, Rastislav; Massard, Christophe; Macquin-Mavier, Isabelle; Tournigand, Christophe; Spano, Jean-Philippe; Soria, Jean-Charles; Rousseau, Benoît

    2017-02-01

    Purpose Renal toxicities are common with angiogenesis multikinase inhibitors (AMKI), and can be limiting in phase I trials. Factors associated with such toxicities are poorly known. The aims of this exploratory study were to describe renovascular toxicities associated with AMKI, impact on drug development and to identify baseline parameters associated with the occurrence of renal toxicities in phase I trials. Methods Consecutive patients treated with AMKI in Gustave Roussy phase I unit between October 2005 and August 2013 were included. We retrospectively collected baseline characteristics and renovascular side effects. Associations were assessed in univariate and multivariate analyses. Results Overall, 168 patients were included: male 53.0 %, mean age 55.5 years old, history of hypertension 26.8 %, diabetes 6.0 %, atherosclerosis 13.6 %, stage 3 Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD, NKF-KDOQI) 17.2 %. Incidences of reno-vascular side effects were: hypertension 47.6 %, proteinuria 19.0 %, renal failure 11.9 % and thrombotic microangiopathy 10.1 %. Eighty percent of dose limiting toxicities (DLTs) were related to a renal toxicity. Multivariate analysis showed that onset of renal failure was associated with history of hypertension (p = 0.0003) and stage 3 CKD (p = 0.032). Conclusions A majority of the DLTs associated with AMKI in phase 1 trials are renal toxicities. Baseline hypertension and stage 3 CKD (NKF-KDOQI) might help to better identify patients at risk of AMKI-related renal toxicities.

  5. Recent Developments in Cytotoxic Therapy for Advanced Gastric or Gastroesophageal Carcinoma: The Phase III Trials

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    Gastric cancer remains a significant health problem around the world. It is often diagnosed in late stages and almost 50% of patients have unresectable disease. Median survival, when cancer is in advanced stages, is often less than 9 months. Once metastatic, it is an incurable condition, and in most circumstances, fewer than 10% of patients survive 24 months. Most patients with metastatic gastric or gastroesophageal cancer have baseline symptoms, some of which are quite severe. Therapy for advanced gastric or gastroesophageal cancer is palliative in nature. For a long time, the number of randomized trials conducted in patients with gastric or gastroesophageal cancer had been unacceptably low; however, in the past 10 years, the number of phase III trials has increased and it is hoped that the momentum will continue to build and more trials will be completed. Several new classes of active agents have emerged, including taxanes, camptothecins, fluoropyrimidine analogs (particularly, capecitabine and S-1), and a platinum analog (oxaliplatin). The most recent phase III data suggest that docetaxel, when added to the reference regimen of cisplatin and 5-FU (CF), results in a statistically significant prolongation of time-to-progression and overall survival, higher response rate, doubling of the 2-year survival rate, better quality of life, improved clinical benefit, and a higher rate of complicated neutropenia. Other important phase III trials demonstrate that 5-FU can be substituted with capecitabine and cisplatin can be substituted with oxaliplatin. However, in a randomized phase III trial, irinotecan plus infusional 5-FU, when compared with CF, was not superior (it was noninferior), suggesting that irinotecan may be best suited for second-line treatment of these patients. Further developments in cytotoxic therapy will be driven by the use of more sophisticated oral agents (eg, S-1) and newer clinical algorithms that will employ therapy only until maximum response is

  6. A modified varying-stage adaptive phase II/III clinical trial design.

    PubMed

    Dong, Gaohong; Vandemeulebroecke, Marc

    2016-07-01

    Conventionally, adaptive phase II/III clinical trials are carried out with a strict two-stage design. Recently, a varying-stage adaptive phase II/III clinical trial design has been developed. In this design, following the first stage, an intermediate stage can be adaptively added to obtain more data, so that a more informative decision can be made. Therefore, the number of further investigational stages is determined based upon data accumulated to the interim analysis. This design considers two plausible study endpoints, with one of them initially designated as the primary endpoint. Based on interim results, another endpoint can be switched as the primary endpoint. However, in many therapeutic areas, the primary study endpoint is well established. Therefore, we modify this design to consider one study endpoint only so that it may be more readily applicable in real clinical trial designs. Our simulations show that, the same as the original design, this modified design controls the Type I error rate, and the design parameters such as the threshold probability for the two-stage setting and the alpha allocation ratio in the two-stage setting versus the three-stage setting have a great impact on the design characteristics. However, this modified design requires a larger sample size for the initial stage, and the probability of futility becomes much higher when the threshold probability for the two-stage setting gets smaller. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. The sleep apnea cardiovascular endpoints (SAVE) trial: Rationale and start-up phase.

    PubMed

    McEvoy, R Doug; Anderson, Craig S; Antic, Nick A; Chen, Baoyuan; He, Quanying; Heeley, Emma; Huang, Shaoguang; Huang, Yining; Wang, Jiguang; Zhong, Nanshan

    2010-09-01

    THE SLEEP APNEA CARDIOVASCULAR ENDPOINTS (SAVE) STUDY (CLINICAL TRIALS REGISTRATION NUMBER: NCT00738170) is an academic initiated and conducted, multinational, open, blinded endpoint, randomised controlled trial designed to determine whether treatment of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) with continuous positive airways pressure (CPAP) can reduce the incidence of serious cardiovascular events in patients with established cardiovascular disease. The answer to this question is of major importance to populations undergoing ageing and lifestyle changes all over the world. The SAVE study brings together respiratory, sleep and cardiovascular clinician-scientists in a unique interdisciplinary collaborative effort with industry sponsors to conduct the largest and most ambitious clinical trial yet conducted in the field of sleep apnea, with a global recruitment target of 5000 patients. Following its launch in Australia and China in late 2008, SAVE has now entered a phase of international expansion with new recruitment networks being established in New Zealand, India and Latin America. This article describes the rationale for the SAVE study, the considerations behind its design, and progress thus far in establishing the recruitment network. The report emphasises the important role that Chinese sleep and cardiovascular investigators have played in the start-up phase of this landmark international project.

  8. Pirfenidone for idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis: analysis of pooled data from three multinational phase 3 trials.

    PubMed

    Noble, Paul W; Albera, Carlo; Bradford, Williamson Z; Costabel, Ulrich; du Bois, Roland M; Fagan, Elizabeth A; Fishman, Robert S; Glaspole, Ian; Glassberg, Marilyn K; Lancaster, Lisa; Lederer, David J; Leff, Jonathan A; Nathan, Steven D; Pereira, Carlos A; Swigris, Jeffrey J; Valeyre, Dominique; King, Talmadge E

    2016-01-01

    Pirfenidone is an antifibrotic agent that has been evaluated in three multinational phase 3 trials in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). We analysed pooled data from the multinational trials to obtain the most precise estimates of the magnitude of treatment effect on measures of disease progression.All patients randomised to pirfenidone 2403 mg·day(-1) or placebo in the CAPACITY or ASCEND studies were included in the analysis. Pooled analyses of outcomes at 1 year were based on the pre-specified end-points and analytic methods described in the ASCEND study protocol.A total of 1247 patients were included in the analysis. At 1 year, pirfenidone reduced the proportion of patients with a ≥10% decline in per cent predicted forced vital capacity or death by 43.8% (95% CI 29.3-55.4%) and increased the proportion of patients with no decline by 59.3% (95% CI 29.0-96.8%). A treatment benefit was also observed for progression-free survival, 6-min walk distance and dyspnoea. Gastrointestinal and skin-related adverse events were more common in the pirfenidone group, but rarely led to discontinuation.Analysis of data from three phase 3 trials demonstrated that treatment with pirfenidone for 1 year resulted in clinically meaningful reductions in disease progression in patients with IPF.

  9. Pediatric phase I trial design using maximum target inhibition as the primary endpoint.

    PubMed

    Meany, Holly; Balis, Frank M; Aikin, Alberta; Whitcomb, Patricia; Murphy, Robert F; Steinberg, Seth M; Widemann, Brigitte C; Fox, Elizabeth

    2010-06-16

    The extent to which a drug inhibits a target responsible for a therapeutic effect is a more rational primary endpoint for dose-finding studies of more selective anticancer drugs than the conventional endpoint of dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) used for cytotoxic agents. An adaptive phase I trial design incorporating maximum target inhibition as the primary endpoint was developed to define the optimal dose of talabostat, a dipeptidyl peptidase (DPP) inhibitor, in children with relapsed or refractory solid tumors. The relationship between dose and effect (percent inhibition of serum DPP-4) was assessed using a maximum effect model. Maximum target inhibition was defined as greater than 90% DPP-4 inhibition in five or more of six patients 24 hours post-dose. If DLT was to occur, the trial would adapt to a traditional phase I design with a more conservative dose escalation. At the 600 microg/m(2) dose level, serum DPP-4 inhibition at 24 hours was 85%. No talabostat-related DLT occurred. The maximum effect model predicted that 1200 microg/m(2) of talabostat would maximally inhibit DPP-4. This adaptive trial design appears to be feasible, safe, and efficient and warrants further evaluation for development of molecularly targeted agents.

  10. Designing Phase II B trials in sarcopenia: the best target population.

    PubMed

    Pahor, M; Cesari, M

    2011-08-01

    Despite the existing limitations and controversies regarding the definition of sarcopenia and its clinical consequences, the current scientific evidence strongly suggests that muscle decline is a primary determinant of the disabling process (and likely of other major health-related events). In fact, the muscle loss (in terms of mass as well as strength) occurring with aging has been growingly associated with mobility impairment and disability in older persons. Unfortunately, current evidence is mainly from observational studies. Times are mature to begin testing interventions aimed at modifying the sarcopenia process through the design and development of specific clinical trials. Considering the emergence of many promising interventions towards this age-related condition (e.g., physical exercise [in particular, resistance training], testosterone, antioxidant supplementations), the need for Phase II trial designs is high. In the present report, we discuss which are the major issues related to the design of Phase II clinical trials on sarcopenia with particular focus on the participant's characteristics to be considered as possible inclusion and exclusion criteria.

  11. Phase III Preclinical Trials in Translational Stroke Research: Community Response on Framework and Guidelines.

    PubMed

    Boltze, Johannes; Wagner, Daniel-Christoph; Henninger, Nils; Plesnila, Nikolaus; Ayata, Cenk

    2016-08-01

    The multicenter phase III preclinical trial concept is currently discussed to enhance the predictive value of preclinical stroke research. After public announcement, we collected a community feedback on the concept with emphasis on potential design features and guidelines by an anonymous survey. Response analysis was conducted after plausibility checks by applying qualitative and quantitative measures. Most respondents supported the concept, including the implementation of a centralized steering committee. Based on received feedback, we suggest careful, stepwise implementation and to leave selected competencies and endpoint analysis at the discretion of participating centers. Strict application of quality assurance methods is accepted, but should be harmonized. However, received responses also indicate that the application of particular quality assurance models may require more attention throughout the community. Interestingly, clear and pragmatic preferences were given regarding publication and financing, suggesting the establishing of writing committees similar to large-scale clinical trials and global funding resources for financial support. The broad acceptance among research community encourages phase III preclinical trial implementation.

  12. One-stage and two-stage designs for phase II clinical trials with survival endpoints.

    PubMed

    Whitehead, John

    2014-09-28

    This work is motivated by trials in rapidly lethal cancers or cancers for which measuring shrinkage of tumours is infeasible. In either case, traditional phase II designs focussing on tumour response are unsuitable. Usually, tumour response is considered as a substitute for the more relevant but longer-term endpoint of death. In rapidly lethal cancers such as pancreatic cancer, there is no need to use a surrogate, as the definitive endpoint is (sadly) available so soon. In uveal cancer, there is no counterpart to tumour response, and so, mortality is the only realistic response available. Cytostatic cancer treatments do not seek to kill tumours, but to mitigate their effects. Trials of such therapy might also be based on survival times to death or progression, rather than on tumour shrinkage. Phase II oncology trials are often conducted with all study patients receiving the experimental therapy, and this approach is considered here. Simple extensions of one-stage and two-stage designs based on binary responses are presented. Outcomes based on survival past a small number of landmark times are considered: here, the case of three such times is explored in examples. This approach allows exact calculations to be made for both design and analysis purposes. Simulations presented here show that calculations based on normal approximations can lead to loss of power when sample sizes are small. Two-stage versions of the procedure are also suggested.

  13. A product of independent beta probabilities dose escalation design for dual-agent phase I trials.

    PubMed

    Mander, Adrian P; Sweeting, Michael J

    2015-04-15

    Dual-agent trials are now increasingly common in oncology research, and many proposed dose-escalation designs are available in the statistical literature. Despite this, the translation from statistical design to practical application is slow, as has been highlighted in single-agent phase I trials, where a 3 + 3 rule-based design is often still used. To expedite this process, new dose-escalation designs need to be not only scientifically beneficial but also easy to understand and implement by clinicians. In this paper, we propose a curve-free (nonparametric) design for a dual-agent trial in which the model parameters are the probabilities of toxicity at each of the dose combinations. We show that it is relatively trivial for a clinician's prior beliefs or historical information to be incorporated in the model and updating is fast and computationally simple through the use of conjugate Bayesian inference. Monotonicity is ensured by considering only a set of monotonic contours for the distribution of the maximum tolerated contour, which defines the dose-escalation decision process. Varied experimentation around the contour is achievable, and multiple dose combinations can be recommended to take forward to phase II. Code for R, Stata and Excel are available for implementation.

  14. An adaptive model switching approach for phase I dose-finding trials.

    PubMed

    Daimon, Takashi; Zohar, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    Model-based phase I dose-finding designs rely on a single model throughout the study for estimating the maximum tolerated dose (MTD). Thus, one major concern is about the choice of the most suitable model to be used. This is important because the dose allocation process and the MTD estimation depend on whether or not the model is reliable, or whether or not it gives a better fit to toxicity data. The aim of our work was to propose a method that would remove the need for a model choice prior to the trial onset and then allow it sequentially at each patient's inclusion. In this paper, we described model checking approach based on the posterior predictive check and model comparison approach based on the deviance information criterion, in order to identify a more reliable or better model during the course of a trial and to support clinical decision making. Further, we presented two model switching designs for a phase I cancer trial that were based on the aforementioned approaches, and performed a comparison between designs with or without model switching, through a simulation study. The results showed that the proposed designs had the advantage of decreasing certain risks, such as those of poor dose allocation and failure to find the MTD, which could occur if the model is misspecified. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Phase I clinical trial of safety of L-serine for ALS patients.

    PubMed

    Levine, Todd D; Miller, Robert G; Bradley, Walter G; Moore, Dan H; Saperstein, David S; Flynn, Lynne E; Katz, Jonathan S; Forshew, Dallas A; Metcalf, James S; Banack, Sandra A; Cox, Paul A

    2017-02-01

    We performed a randomized, double-blind phase I clinical trial for six months on the effects of oral L-serine in patients with ALS. The protocol called for enrollment of patients with a diagnosis of probable or definite ALS, age 18-85 years, disease duration of less than three years and forced vital capacity (FVC) ≥ 60%. Patients were randomly assigned to four different oral twice-daily dose regimens (0.5, 2.5, 7.5, or 15 g/dose). Blood, urine and CSF samples, ALS Functional Rating Scale-Revised (ALSFRS-R) scores and forced vital capacity (FVC) were obtained throughout the trial. Disease progression was compared with matched historical placebo controls from five previous ALS therapeutic trials. Of 20 patients enrolled, one withdrew before receiving study drug and two withdrew with gastro-intestinal problems. Three patients died during the trial. L-serine was generally well tolerated by the patients and L-serine did not appear to accelerate functional decline of patients as measured by slope of their ALSFRS-R scores. Based on this small study, L-serine appears to be generally safe for patients with ALS.

  16. A simulation study of methods for selecting subgroup-specific doses in phase 1 trials.

    PubMed

    Morita, Satoshi; Thall, Peter F; Takeda, Kentaro

    2017-03-01

    Patient heterogeneity may complicate dose-finding in phase 1 clinical trials if the dose-toxicity curves differ between subgroups. Conducting separate trials within subgroups may lead to infeasibly small sample sizes in subgroups having low prevalence. Alternatively,it is not obvious how to conduct a single trial while accounting for heterogeneity. To address this problem,we consider a generalization of the continual reassessment method on the basis of a hierarchical Bayesian dose-toxicity model that borrows strength between subgroups under the assumption that the subgroups are exchangeable. We evaluate a design using this model that includes subgroup-specific dose selection and safety rules. A simulation study is presented that includes comparison of this method to 3 alternative approaches,on the basis of nonhierarchical models,that make different types of assumptions about within-subgroup dose-toxicity curves. The simulations show that the hierarchical model-based method is recommended in settings where the dose-toxicity curves are exchangeable between subgroups. We present practical guidelines for application and provide computer programs for trial simulation and conduct.

  17. Molecular predictors of response to decitabine in advanced chronic myelomonocytic leukemia: a phase 2 trial.

    PubMed

    Braun, Thorsten; Itzykson, Raphael; Renneville, Aline; de Renzis, Benoit; Dreyfus, François; Laribi, Kamel; Bouabdallah, Krimo; Vey, Norbert; Toma, Andrea; Recher, Christian; Royer, Bruno; Joly, Bertrand; Vekhoff, Anne; Lafon, Ingrid; Sanhes, Laurence; Meurice, Guillaume; Oréar, Cédric; Preudhomme, Claude; Gardin, Claude; Ades, Lionel; Fontenay, Michaela; Fenaux, Pierre; Droin, Nathalie; Solary, Eric

    2011-10-06

    Hydroxyurea is the standard therapy of chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML) presenting with advanced myeloproliferative and/or myelodysplastic features. Response to hypomethylating agents has been reported in heterogeneous series of CMML. We conducted a phase 2 trial of decitabine (DAC) in 39 patients with advanced CMML defined according to a previous trial. Median number of DAC cycles was 10 (range, 1-24). Overall response rate was 38% with 4 complete responses (10%), 8 marrow responses (21%), and 3 stable diseases with hematologic improvement (8%). Eighteen patients (46%) demonstrated stable disease without hematologic improvement, and 6 (15%) progressed to acute leukemia. With a median follow-up of 23 months, overall survival was 48% at 2 years. Mutations in ASXL1, TET2, AML1, NRAS, KRAS, CBL, FLT3, and janus kinase 2 (JAK2) genes, and hypermethylation of the promoter of the tumor suppressor gene TIF1γ, did not predict response or survival on DAC therapy. Lower CJUN and CMYB gene expression levels independently predicted improved overall survival. This trial confirmed DAC efficacy in approximately 40% of CMML patients with advanced myeloproliferative or myelodysplastic features and suggested that CJUN and CMYB expression could be potential biomarkers in this setting. This trial is registered at EudraCT (eudract.ema.europa.eu) as #2008-000470-21 and www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT01098084.

  18. A Simulation Study of Methods for Selecting Subgroup-Specific Doses in Phase I Trials

    PubMed Central

    Morita, Satoshi; Thall, Peter F.; Takeda, Kentaro

    2016-01-01

    Summary Patient heterogeneity may complicate dose-finding in phase I clinical trials if the dose-toxicity curves differ between subgroups. Conducting separate trials within subgroups may lead to infeasibly small sample sizes in subgroups having low prevalence. Alternatively, it is not obvious how to conduct a single trial while accounting for heterogeneity. To address this problem, we consider a generalization of the continual reassessment method (O’Quigley, et al., 1990) based on a hierarchical Bayesian dose-toxicity model that borrows strength between subgroups under the assumption that the subgroups are exchangeable. We evaluate a design using this model that includes subgroup-specific dose selection and safety rules. A simulation study is presented that includes comparison of this method to three alternative approaches, based on non-hierarchical models, that make different types of assumptions about within-subgroup dose-toxicity curves. The simulations show that the hierarchical model-based method is recommended in settings where the dose-toxicity curves are exchangeable between subgroups. We present practical guidelines for application, and provide computer programs for trial simulation and conduct. PMID:28111916

  19. INSAT-2A and 2B development mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sathyanarayan, M. N.; Rao, M. Nageswara; Nataraju, B. S.; Viswanatha, N.; Chary, M. Laxmana; Balan, K. S.; Murthy, V. Sridhara; Aller, Raju; Kumar, H. N. Suresha

    1994-01-01

    The Indian National Satellite (INSAT) 2A and 2B have deployment mechanisms for deploying the solar array, two C/S band antenna reflectors and a coilable lattice boom with sail. The mechanisms have worked flawlessly on both satellites. The configuration details, precautions taken during the design phase, the test philosophy, and some of the critical analysis activities are discussed.

  20. Therapeutic Intervention in Multiple Sclerosis with Alpha B-Crystallin: A Randomized Controlled Phase IIa Trial

    PubMed Central

    van Noort, Johannes M.; Bsibsi, Malika; Nacken, Peter J.; Verbeek, Richard; Venneker, Edna H.G.

    2015-01-01

    As a molecular chaperone and activator of Toll-like receptor 2-mediated protective responses by microglia and macrophages, the small heat shock protein alpha B-crystallin (HspB5) exerts therapeutic effects in different animal models for neuroinflammation, including the model for multiple sclerosis (MS). Yet, HspB5 can also stimulate human antigen-specific memory T cells to release IFN-γ, a cytokine with well-documented detrimental effects during MS. In this study, we explored in a Phase IIa randomized clinical trial the therapeutic application of HspB5 in relapsing-remitting MS (RR-MS), using intravenous doses sufficient to support its protective effects, but too low to trigger pathogenic memory T-cell responses. These sub-immunogenic doses were selected based on in vitro analysis of the dose-response profile of human T cells and macrophages to HspB5, and on the immunological effects of HspB5 in healthy humans as established in a preparatory Phase I study. In a 48-week randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind Phase IIa trial, three bimonthly intravenous injections of 7.5, 12.5 or 17.5 mg HspB5 were found to be safe and well tolerated in RR-MS patients. While predefined clinical endpoints did not differ significantly between the relatively small groups of MS patients treated with either HspB5 or placebo, repeated administration especially of the lower doses of HspB5 led to a progressive decline in MS lesion activity as monitored by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which was not seen in the placebo group. Exploratory linear regression analysis revealed this decline to be significant in the combined group receiving either of the two lower doses, and to result in a 76% reduction in both number and total volumes of active MRI lesions at 9 months into the study. These data provide the first indication for clinical benefit resulting from intervention in RR-MS with HspB5. Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov Phase I: NCT02442557; Phase IIa: NCT02442570 PMID

  1. Study protocol of REGOSARC trial: activity and safety of regorafenib in advanced soft tissue sarcoma: a multinational, randomized, placebo-controlled, phase II trial.

    PubMed

    Brodowicz, Thomas; Liegl-Atzwager, Bernadette; Tresch, Emmanuelle; Taieb, Sophie; Kramar, Andrew; Gruenwald, Viktor; Vanseymortier, Marie; Clisant, Stéphanie; Blay, Jean-Yves; Le Cesne, Axel; Penel, Nicolas

    2015-03-14

    Angiogenesis, among other signaling pathways, plays a key-role in sarcoma biology. Regorafenib (RE) has recently been shown to be effective in imatinib and sunitinib-refractory GIST in a phase III trial. We are conducting an international trial (France, Austria and Germany) consisting in 4 parallel double-blind placebo-controlled randomized (1/1) phase II trials to assess the activity and safety of RE in doxorubicin-refractory STS (ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01900743). Each phase II trial is dedicated to one of the 4 following histological subgroups: liposarcoma, leiomyosarcoma, synovial sarcoma and other sarcoma. Within each randomized trial the following stratification factors will be applied: countries and prior exposure to pazopanib. Key-eligibility criteria are: measurable disease, age ≥18, not > 3 previous systemic treatment lines for metastatic disease, metastatic disease not amenable to surgical resection. The primary endpoint is progression-free survival (PFS) according to central radiological review. Secondary endpoints are: Toxicity (NCI-CTC AE V4.0); time to progression; Growth modulation index in pts receiving RE after randomization; 3 and 6 months PFS-Rates, best response rate and overall survival. Each phase II trial will be separately analyzed. In 3 trials, statistical assumptions are: PFS0 = 1.6 & PFS1 = 4.6 months; 1-sided α = 0.1; β = 0.05 with a total sample size of 192 pts. To take into account the rarity of synovial sarcoma, the statistical assumptions are: PFS0 = 1.6 & PFS1 = 4.6 months; 1-sided α = 0.1; β = 0.2 Tumor assessment is done monthly during the 4 first months, and every 3 months thereafter. After central radiological confirmation of tumor progression, an optional open-label option is offered to eligible patients. The design of this trial allows an assessment of regorafenib activity over placebo in four sarcoma strata and might provide evidence for launching a phase III trial. This study

  2. Precision Medicine for Molecularly Targeted Agents and Immunotherapies in Early-Phase Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Lopez, Juanita; Harris, Sam; Roda, Desam; Yap, Timothy A

    2015-01-01

    Precision medicine in oncology promises the matching of genomic, molecular, and clinical data with underlying mechanisms of a range of novel anticancer therapeutics to develop more rational and effective antitumor strategies in a timely manner. However, despite the remarkable progress made in the understanding of novel drivers of different oncogenic processes, success rates for the approval of oncology drugs remain low with substantial fiscal consequences. In this article, we focus on how recent rapid innovations in technology have brought greater clarity to the biological and clinical complexities of different cancers and advanced the development of molecularly targeted agents and immunotherapies in clinical trials. We discuss the key challenges of identifying and validating predictive biomarkers of response and resistance using both tumor and surrogate tissues, as well as the hurdles associated with intratumor heterogeneity. Finally, we outline evolving strategies employed in early-phase trial designs that incorporate omics-based technologies. PMID:26609214

  3. Autologous anticancer antigen preparation for specific immunotherapy in advanced cancer patients. A phase I clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Slanetz, C A; McCollester, D L; Kanor, S

    1982-01-01

    A phase I clinical trial was performed to detect adverse reactions in far advanced cancer patients treated with a unique specific cancer immunotherapy. The vaccines consisted of autologous tumor cell membranes and manganese phosphate gel. From 133 patients admitted into the trial, 95 vaccine batches were made. No batch was toxic in animals. One batch was bacteriologically contaminated. Sufficient patients survived or complied to receive 32 complete and 23 partial courses for a total of 707 SC and ID injections. Minor swelling and occasional minimal pain occurred at injection sites. There were two possible vaccine-related systemic reactions but no evidence of tumor transplantation, tumor acceleration, sepsis or autoimmune disease. Subjective and objective improvement occurred in a number of patients. The vaccines are safe. Their efficacy must be determined. The value of ID vaccine skin testing and the unexpectedly little bacteriological contamination require further study.

  4. A phase 1 clinical trial of nerve growth factor gene therapy for Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Tuszynski, Mark H; Thal, Leon; Pay, Mary; Salmon, David P; U, Hoi Sang; Bakay, Roy; Patel, Piyush; Blesch, Armin; Vahlsing, H Lee; Ho, Gilbert; Tong, Gang; Potkin, Steven G; Fallon, James; Hansen, Lawrence; Mufson, Elliott J; Kordower, Jeffrey H; Gall, Christine; Conner, James

    2005-05-01

    Cholinergic neuron loss is a cardinal feature of Alzheimer disease. Nerve growth factor (NGF) stimulates cholinergic function, improves memory and prevents cholinergic degeneration in animal models of injury, amyloid overexpression and aging. We performed a phase 1 trial of ex vivo NGF gene delivery in eight individuals with mild Alzheimer disease, implanting autologous fibroblasts genetically modified to express human NGF into the forebrain. After mean follow-up of 22 months in six subjects, no long-term adverse effects of NGF occurred. Evaluation of the Mini-Mental Status Examination and Alzheimer Disease Assessment Scale-Cognitive subcomponent suggested improvement in the rate of cognitive decline. Serial PET scans showed significant (P < 0.05) increases in cortical 18-fluorodeoxyglucose after treatment. Brain autopsy from one subject suggested robust growth responses to NGF. Additional clinical trials of NGF for Alzheimer disease are warranted.

  5. [Phase III clinical trial using autologous mesenchymal stem cells for stroke patients].

    PubMed

    Honmou, Osamu

    2016-04-01

    We conduct a double-blind randomized placebo-controlled clinical trial (Phase III: confirmatory trial) of intravenous infusion of autologous mesenchymal stem cells for cerebral infarction patients. The objectives of this study were to examine feasibility, safety, and efficacy of cell therapy using auto serum-expanded autologous mesenchymal stem cells derived from bone marrow in the stroke patients. Inclusion criteria is (1) Cerebral infarction onset within 40 days, (2) Supra-tentorial cerebral infarction(NINDS-III 1990) diagnosed by MRI(or CT), MRA (3D-CTA or DSA), ECG, chest X-ray etc., (3) Classified under grade 4 or 5 of mRS (modified Rankin scale), (4) Age between 20 to 80, (5) The written informed consent from subjects and legal representative is provided.

  6. Suboptimal Dosing Parameters as Possible Factors in the Negative Phase III Clinical Trials of Progesterone for Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Howard, Randy B; Sayeed, Iqbal; Stein, Donald G

    2017-06-01

    To date, outcomes for all Phase III clinical trials for traumatic brain injury (TBI) have been negative. The recent disappointing results of the Progesterone for the Treatment of Traumatic Brain Injury (ProTECT) and Study of a Neuroprotective Agent, Progesterone, in Severe Traumatic Brain Injury (SyNAPSe) Phase III trials for progesterone in TBI have triggered considerable speculation about the reasons for the negative outcomes of these two studies in particular and for those of all previous Phase III TBI clinical trials in general. Among the factors proposed to explain the ProTECT III and SyNAPSe results, the investigators themselves and others have cited: 1) the pathophysiological complexity of TBI itself; 2) issues with the quality and clinical relevance of the preclinical animal models; 3) insufficiently sensitive clinical endpoints; and 4) inappropriate clinical trial designs and strategies. This paper highlights three critical trial design factors that may have contributed substantially to the negative outcomes: 1) suboptimal doses and treatment durations in the Phase II studies; 2) the strategic decision not to perform Phase IIB studies to optimize these variables before initiating Phase III; and 3) the lack of incorporation of the preclinical and Chinese Phase II results, as well as allometric scaling principles, into the Phase III designs. Given these circumstances and the exceptional pleiotropic potential of progesterone as a TBI (and stroke) therapeutic, we are advocating a return to Phase IIB testing. We advocate the incorporation of dose and schedule optimization focused on lower doses and a longer duration of treatment, combined with the addressing of other potential trial design problems raised by the authors in the recently published trial results.

  7. Muscle cramping in phase I clinical trials of tirapazamine (SR 4233) with and without radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Doherty, N.; Coleman, C.N.; Shulman, L. ); Hancock, S.L.; Marquez, C.; Mariscal, C. ); Kaye, S.; Rampling, R. ); Senan, S.; Roemeling, R.V. )

    1994-05-15

    Tirapazamine (SR 4233) is a benzotriazine di-N-oxide which acts as a hypoxic cytotoxic agent and as a radiation enhancer when given shortly before or after radiation. Three Phase I clinical trials were designed to determine the maximum tolerated dose, toxicities, pharmacokinetics, and effects on irradiated tumors and normal tissues. Tirapazamine 9 mg/m[sup 2] to 21 mg/m[sup 2] was given IV 1/2 to 1 h prior to radiation on a multiple dose schedule of 10 consecutive doses. This was later revised to a three times-per-week schedule for 12 doses. In a second clinical trial, tirapazamine was given in a single dose of 18 mg/m[sup 2] to 293 mg/m[sup 2] IV after irradiation. In a third trial, tirapazamine was administered without irradiation in single doses of 36 mg/m[sup 2] to 250 mg/m[sup 2], with an option for retreatment. Subjects reported muscle cramping of varying degrees of severity on all three dose schedules. One patient experienced Grade 3 cramping and treatment was discontinued. The most frequent site of cramping were the lower extremities. Creatine phosphokinase (CPK) values were elevated in three patients with associated muscle soreness in one patient. MB (cardiac) isoenzymes were elevated in one patient with no evidence of cardiac muscle damage, and returned to baseline at drug completion. No consistent abnormalities in clinical laboratory values were found. Stretching of the muscle was most effective in relieving the cramping. Muscle cramping has been the most frequently reported toxicity in Phase I studies of tirapazamine, though it does not appear to be dose limiting. Dose escalation on the three clinical trials continues. In vitro studies to investigate the cramping are ongoing. 8 refs., 2 tabs.

  8. Moxifloxacin in the Initial Therapy of Tuberculosis: A Randomized, Phase 2 Trial

    PubMed Central

    Conde, Marcus B.; Efron, Anne; Loredo, Carla; Muzy De Souza, Gilvan R.; Graça, Nadja P.; Cezar, Michelle C.; Ram, Malathi; Chaudhary, Mohammad A.; Bishai, William R.; Kritski, Afranio L.; Chaisson, Richard E.

    2009-01-01

    Background New therapies are needed to shorten the time required to cure tuberculosis and to treat drug-resistant strains. The fluoroquinolone moxifloxacin is a promising new agent that may have additive activity to existing antituberculosis agents. We conducted a Phase 2 clinical trial to determine the activity and safety of moxifloxacin in the initial stage of tuberculosis treatment. Methods We performed a randomized, double-blind trial of a moxifloxacin-containing regimen in patients with sputum smear-positive tuberculosis in Brazil. All participants received isoniazid, rifampin and pyrazinamide at standard doses and were randomized to receive either moxifloxacin or ethambutol and matching placebos five days per week for eight weeks. The primary endpoint was the proportion of patients whose sputum culture converted to negative by Week 8. Clinical trial identifier: NCT00082173. Results One hundred seventy patients were enrolled, and 146 met all study eligibility criteria. In an intention to treat analysis where missing results were considered treatment failures, 59 patients (80%) assigned to moxifloxacin converted their 8-week sputum culture to negative vs. 45 (63%) of those assigned to ethambutol (p=0.03). Among patients with available cultures at Week 8, conversion rates were 92% (59/64) for moxifloxacin vs. 72% (45/61) for ethambutol (p=0.006). No differences in toxicity were observed. In a multivariate analysis, younger age (odds ratio 0.98, p=0.05), heavy baseline sputum smear positivity (OR 0.45, p <0.001) and treatment with moxifloxacin (OR 1.88, p<0.001) were significantly associated with sputum culture conversion. Conclusion Moxifloxacin significantly improves culture conversion in the initial phase of tuberculosis treatment. Trials to assess whether moxifloxacin can be used to shorten the duration of tuberculosis therapy are justified. PMID:19345831

  9. Phase I trial evaluating the antiviral agent Cidofovir in combination with chemoradiation in cervical cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Deutsch, Eric; Haie-Meder, Christine; Bayar, Mohamed Amine; Mondini, Michele; Laporte, Mélanie; Mazeron, Renaud; Adam, Julien; Varga, Andrea; Vassal, Gilles; Magné, Nicolas; Chargari, Cyrus; Lanoy, Emilie; Pautier, Patricia; Levy, Antonin; Soria, Jean-Charles

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This phase I trial aimed to assess the safety and determine the recommended Phase II dose (RP2D) of Cidofovir combined with chemoradiotherapy in patients with stage IB2-IVA cervical cancer. Experimental design Incremental doses (1, 2.5, 5 and 6.5 mg/kg) of IV Cidofovir were administered weekly for two weeks, and then every 2 weeks from the start of chemoradiotherapy to the initiation of utero-vaginal brachytherapy. Biological expression of HPV was analyzed during treatment and tumor response was assessed according to RECIST v1.0 criteria. Results A total of 15 patients were treated with Cidofovir. Dose-limiting toxicities occurred in 2/6 patients at the 6.5 mg/kg dose level (G3 proteinuria, and G3 acute pyelonephritis with G3 febrile neutropenia). No toxicity occurred at the 5 mg/kg dose level, but only 3 patients received this dose due to trial interruption because of low accrual. The most frequent G3-4 adverse effects observed during the trial were: abdominal pain (n=3), infection (n=2), leuckoneutropenia (n=2), and others (n=6). No toxic death or major renal side effect occurred. The best response was that 8/9 evaluable patients achieved a complete response (89%). In the intention to treat population, the 2-year overall and progression-free survival rates were 93% and 76%, respectively. Biological monitoring of HPV-related markers (decreased p16 expression, and increased p53 and pRb levels) was possible on sequential tumor biopsy samples. The genomic alterations identified were PIK3CA (n=5; one also had a KRAS mutation), and HRAS (n=1) mutations. Conclusion Cidofovir at a dose of 5mg/kg combined with chemoradiotherapy appeared tolerable and yielded tumor regressions. Due to early trial interruption, the RP2D was not confirmed. PMID:27016411

  10. The Effect of Hepatic Impairment on Outcomes in Phase I Clinical Trials in Cancer Subjects.

    PubMed

    Mansfield, Aaron S; Rudek, Michelle A; Vulih, Diana; Smith, Gary L; Harris, Pamela Jo; Ivy, S Percy

    2016-11-15

    The NCI Cancer Therapy Evaluation Program sponsors hepatic dysfunction phase I clinical trials (HDCT) and phase 1 clinical trials (P1CT) to determine safe doses and schedules of antineoplastic therapeutics. We sought to compare clinical outcomes between these trial types while stratifying by hepatotoxic agents. Individual subject data were extracted from the records of 51 NCI-sponsored HDCT and P1CT. The NCI's Organ Dysfunction Working Group's hepatic impairment categorization and two drug-induced liver injury (DILI) scales (FDA R ratio and Hy's law) were used to classify subjects. The number of cycles administered and treatment discontinuation reason were also evaluated and compared between groups. There were 513 and 1,328 subjects treated on HDCT (n = 9) and P1CT (n = 42), respectively. There were differing patterns of DILI with significant worsening of total bilirubin in subjects on HDCT, and worsening of alanine aminotransferase (ALT) in subjects on P1CT. Cholestatic peak patterns of liver impairment (predominant increases in alkaline phosphatase rather than transaminases) were more frequent in HDCT. Criteria for Hy's law were met by 11 subjects on P1CT, but not by any subjects on HDCT. Disease progression was the most common reason for treatment discontinuation, followed by adverse events at similar frequencies in both HDCT and P1CT. The differential effects on hepatotoxicity suggest that underlying hepatic function may affect susceptibility to and patterns of DILI. The incorporation of additional measures of hepatic function may help identify those at highest risk of hepatotoxicity in future trials because baseline liver tests did not. Clin Cancer Res; 22(22); 5472-9. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  11. Keeping a Step Ahead: formative phase of a workplace intervention trial to prevent obesity.

    PubMed

    Zapka, Jane; Lemon, Stephenie C; Estabrook, Barbara B; Jolicoeur, Denise G

    2007-11-01

    Ecological interventions hold promise for promoting overweight and obesity prevention in worksites. Given the paucity of evaluative research in the hospital worksite setting, considerable formative work is required for successful implementation and evaluation. This paper describes the formative phases of Step Ahead, a site-randomized controlled trial of a multilevel intervention that promotes physical activity and healthy eating in six hospitals in central Massachusetts. The purpose of the formative research phase was to increase the feasibility, effectiveness, and likelihood of sustainability of the intervention. The Step Ahead ecological intervention approach targets change at the organization, interpersonal work environment, and individual levels. The intervention was developed using fundamental steps of intervention mapping and important tenets of participatory research. Formative research methods were used to engage leadership support and assistance and to develop an intervention plan that is both theoretically and practically grounded. This report uses observational data, program minutes and reports, and process tracking data. Leadership involvement (key informant interviews and advisory boards), employee focus groups and advisory boards, and quantitative environmental assessments cultivated participation and support. Determining multiple foci of change and designing measurable objectives and generic assessment tools to document progress are complex challenges encountered in planning phases. Multilevel trials in diverse organizations require flexibility and balance of theory application and practice-based perspectives to affect impact and outcome objectives. Formative research is an essential component.

  12. A varying-stage adaptive phase II/III clinical trial design.

    PubMed

    Dong, Gaohong

    2014-04-15

    Currently, adaptive phase II/III clinical trials are typically carried out with a strict two-stage design. The first stage is a learning stage called phase II, and the second stage is a confirmatory stage called phase III. Following phase II analysis, inefficacious or harmful dose arms are dropped, then one or two promising dose arms are selected for the second stage. However, there are often situations in which researchers are in dilemma to make 'go or no-go' decision and/or to select 'best' dose arm(s), as data from the first stage may not provide sufficient information for their decision making. In this case, it is challenging to follow a strict two-stage plan. Therefore, we propose a varying-stage adaptive phase II/III clinical trial design, in which we consider whether there is a need to have an intermediate stage to obtain more data, so that a more informative decision could be made. Hence, the number of further investigational stages in our design is determined on the basis of data accumulated to the interim analysis. With respect to adaptations, we consider dropping dose arm(s), switching another plausible endpoint as the primary study endpoint, re-estimating sample size, and early stopping for futility. We use an adaptive combination test to perform final analyses. By applying closed testing procedure, we control family-wise type I error rate at the nominal level of α in the strong sense. We delineate other essential design considerations including the threshold parameters and the proportion of alpha allocated in the two-stage versus three-stage setting.

  13. Successful recruitment to trials: a phased approach to opening gates and building bridges.

    PubMed

    Patterson, Sue; Mairs, Hilary; Borschmann, Rohan

    2011-05-19

    The pragmatic randomised controlled trial is widely regarded as the gold standard method for evaluating the effectiveness of health care interventions. Successful conduct of trials and generalisation of findings depends upon efficient recruitment of representative samples, which often requires the collaboration of 'gatekeepers' who mediate access to potential participants. Effective negotiation of gatekeeping is thus vital to process and outcomes of trials and the quality of evidence. Whilst relevant literature contains discussion of the problems of recruitment and gatekeeping, little is known about how recruitment can be optimised and factors leading to successful recruitment. As practised researchers with first-hand experience of gatekeeping, we were aware that some researchers recruit more effectively than others and curious about the ingredients of success. With the goal of developing practical guidance, we conducted a series of workshops with 19 expert researchers to investigate and map successful recruitment. Workshops were digitally recorded and transcribed. Analysis of discussion supported modelling of effective recruitment as a process involving three phases, each comprising two key tasks. Successful negotiation of set-up, alliance, and exchange require judicious deployment of interpersonal skills in an appropriately assertive manner. Researcher flexibility and credibility are vital for success, such that a foundation for rapprochement between the worlds of research and practice is established.Our model provides a framework to support design and implementation of recruitment activities and will enable trouble shooting and support recruitment, supervision and training of effective researchers. This, in turn will support delivery of trials on time and on budget, maximising return on investment in the production of evidence. Pragmatic trials are central to development of evidence based health care but often failure to recruit the necessary sample in a timely

  14. Successful recruitment to trials: a phased approach to opening gates and building bridges

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The pragmatic randomised controlled trial is widely regarded as the gold standard method for evaluating the effectiveness of health care interventions. Successful conduct of trials and generalisation of findings depends upon efficient recruitment of representative samples, which often requires the collaboration of 'gatekeepers' who mediate access to potential participants. Effective negotiation of gatekeeping is thus vital to process and outcomes of trials and the quality of evidence. Whilst relevant literature contains discussion of the problems of recruitment and gatekeeping, little is known about how recruitment can be optimised and factors leading to successful recruitment. Discussion As practised researchers with first-hand experience of gatekeeping, we were aware that some researchers recruit more effectively than others and curious about the ingredients of success. With the goal of developing practical guidance, we conducted a series of workshops with 19 expert researchers to investigate and map successful recruitment. Workshops were digitally recorded and transcribed. Analysis of discussion supported modelling of effective recruitment as a process involving three phases, each comprising two key tasks. Successful negotiation of set-up, alliance, and exchange require judicious deployment of interpersonal skills in an appropriately assertive manner. Researcher flexibility and credibility are vital for success, such that a foundation for rapprochement between the worlds of research and practice is established. Our model provides a framework to support design and implementation of recruitment activities and will enable trouble shooting and support recruitment, supervision and training of effective researchers. This, in turn will support delivery of trials on time and on budget, maximising return on investment in the production of evidence. Summary Pragmatic trials are central to development of evidence based health care but often failure to recruit

  15. Two Phase 3 Trials of Dupilumab versus Placebo in Atopic Dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Eric L; Bieber, Thomas; Guttman-Yassky, Emma; Beck, Lisa A; Blauvelt, Andrew; Cork, Michael J; Silverberg, Jonathan I; Deleuran, Mette; Kataoka, Yoko; Lacour, Jean-Philippe; Kingo, Külli; Worm, Margitta; Poulin, Yves; Wollenberg, Andreas; Soo, Yuhwen; Graham, Neil M H; Pirozzi, Gianluca; Akinlade, Bolanle; Staudinger, Heribert; Mastey, Vera; Eckert, Laurent; Gadkari, Abhijit; Stahl, Neil; Yancopoulos, George D; Ardeleanu, Marius

    2016-12-15

    Dupilumab, a human monoclonal antibody against interleukin-4 receptor alpha, inhibits signaling of interleukin-4 and interleukin-13, type 2 cytokines that may be important drivers of atopic or allergic diseases such as atopic dermatitis. In two randomized, placebo-controlled, phase 3 trials of identical design (SOLO 1 and SOLO 2), we enrolled adults with moderate-to-severe atopic dermatitis whose disease was inadequately controlled by topical treatment. Patients were randomly assigned in a 1:1:1 ratio to receive, for 16 weeks, subcutaneous dupilumab (300 mg) or placebo weekly or the same dose of dupilumab every other week alternating with placebo. The primary outcome was the proportion of patients who had both a score of 0 or 1 (clear or almost clear) on the Investigator's Global Assessment and a reduction of 2 points or more in that score from baseline at week 16. We enrolled 671 patients in SOLO 1 and 708 in SOLO 2. In SOLO 1, the primary outcome occurred in 85 patients (38%) who received dupilumab every other week and in 83 (37%) who received dupilumab weekly, as compared with 23 (10%) who received placebo (P<0.001 for both comparisons with placebo). The results were similar in SOLO 2, with the primary outcome occurring in 84 patients (36%) who received dupilumab every other week and in 87 (36%) who received dupilumab weekly, as compared with 20 (8%) who received placebo (P<0.001 for both comparisons). In addition, in the two trials, an improvement from baseline to week 16 of at least 75% on the Eczema Area and Severity Index was reported in significantly more patients who received each regimen of dupilumab than in patients who received placebo (P<0.001 for all comparisons). Dupilumab was also associated with improvement in other clinical end points, including reduction in pruritus and symptoms of anxiety or depression and improvement in quality of life. Injection-site reactions and conjunctivitis were more frequent in the dupilumab groups than in the placebo

  16. Phase 0 Clinical Chemoprevention Trial of the AKT Inhibitor SR13668

    PubMed Central

    Reid, Joel M.; Walden, Chad; Qin, Rui; Allen Ziegler, Katie L.; Haslam, John L.; Rajewski, Roger A.; Warndahl, Roger; Fitting, Cindy L.; Boring, Daniel; Szabo, Eva; Crowell, James; Perloff, Marjorie; Jong, Ling; Mandrekar, Sumithra J.; Ames, Matthew M.; Limburg, Paul J.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose SR13668, an orally active AKT pathway inhibitor, has demonstrated cancer chemopreventive potential in preclinical studies. To accelerate the clinical development of this promising agent, we designed and conducted the first-ever phase 0 chemoprevention trial to evaluate and compare the effects of food and formulation on SR13668 bioavailability. Patients and Methods Healthy adult volunteers were randomly assigned to receive a single, 38 mg oral dose of SR13668 in one of five different formulations, with or without food. Based on existing animal data, SR13668 in a PEG400/Labrasol® oral solution was defined as the reference formulation. Blood samples were obtained pre- and post-agent administration for pharmacokinetic analyses. Area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC0-∞) was defined as the primary endpoint. Data were analyzed and compared using established statistical methods for phase 0 trials with a limited sample size. Results Participants (N=20) were rapidly accrued over a 5-month period. Complete pharmacokinetic data were available for 18 randomized participants. AUC0-∞ values were highest in the fed state (range = 122–439 ng/mL × hours) and were statistically significantly different across formulations (p = 0.007), with Solutol® HS15 providing the highest bioavailability. SR13668 time to peak plasma concentration (3 hours; range, 2 – 6 hours) and half-life were (11.2 ± 3.1 hours) were not formulation dependent. Conclusions Using a novel, highly efficient study design, we rapidly identified a lead formulation of SR13668 for further clinical testing. Our findings support application of the phase 0 trial paradigm to accelerate chemoprevention agent development. PMID:21372034

  17. Phase I trial of weekly docetaxel and daily temozolomide in patients with metastatic disease.

    PubMed

    Tamaskar, I; Mekhail, T; Dreicer, R; Olencki, T; Roman, S; Elson, P; Bukowski, R M

    2008-12-01

    Docetaxel is second generation taxoid that has shown activity against a variety of cancers and has been approved for use in cancers of the breast, lung, head and neck, ovaries and prostate. Temozolomide is an alkylating agent which crosses the blood brain barrier and has demonstrated antitumor activity against a broad range of tumor types, including malignant glioma, melanoma, non small cell lung cancer and carcinoma of the ovary and colon. A Phase I trial was conducted to determine the toxicity of this combination in refractory solid tumor patients. Twenty five patients with metastatic cancers were enrolled in a Phase I dose escalation trial. Docetaxel was administered weekly in 5 escalating doses of 25 to 35 mg/ m(2) as a one-hour bolus intravenous infusion for 3 consecutive weeks. Temozolamide was administered orally daily for 3 weeks (escalating doses of 75 to 100 mg/m(2)). Cycles were repeated at 4 week intervals. The maximum tolerated dose (MTD) was not determined in this study. The most commonly reported adverse events were mild to moderate nausea, vomiting and fatigue. Thrombocytopenia was the most commonly observed grade 3 and 4 hematological toxicity. Eight patients had dose interruptions for adverse events and only one patient had a dose reduction while receiving 30 mg/ m(2) of docetaxel and 90 mg/ m(2) of temozolomide due to grade 3 thrombocytopenia. Two patients achieved partial responses and 88% of the patients are deceased. The median survival is 8.4 months. The combination of docetaxel and temozolomide was well tolerated and these agents can be safely combined. For phase II trials, docetaxel 35 mg/ m(2) IV day 1, 8 and 15, and daily temozolomide at 100 mg/ m(2) day 1-21 are recommended.

  18. A Phase II study of olaparib in breast cancer patients: biological evaluation from a 'window of opportunity' trial.

    PubMed

    Roviello, Giandomenico; Milani, Manuela; Gobbi, Angela; Dester, Martina; Cappelletti, Maria Rosa; Allevi, Giovanni; Aguggini, Sergio; Ravelli, Andrea; Gussago, Francesca; Cocconi, Alessandra; Zanotti, Laura; Senti, Chiara; Strina, Carla; Bottini, Alberto; Generali, Daniele

    2016-10-01

    The OLTRE trial (ClinicalTrials.gov number: NCT02681562) is an open-label, 'window of opportunity' Phase II controlled trial to evaluate the biological activity of olaparib in locally advanced triple-negative breast cancer compared with other subtypes of locally advanced breast cancer patients carrying germinal BRCA mutation receiving olaparib with the same treatment approach. The primary end point is to investigate the correlation between baseline gene and protein expression profile in order to identify possible predictive markers of response to olaparib. The OLTRE trial is expected to identify the surrogate markers of the biological activity of olaparib in the treatment of patients with triple-negative breast cancer.

  19. An evaluation of a Simon 2-Stage phase II clinical trial design incorporating toxicity monitoring.

    PubMed

    Ray, H E; Rai, S N

    2011-05-01

    Phase II clinical trials are usually designed to measure efficacy but patient safety is also a very important aspect. Previous authors suggested a methodology that allows one to monitor the cumulative number of toxic events after each patient is treated, which is also known as continuous toxicity monitoring. In this work we describe how to combine the continuous toxicity monitoring methodology with the Simon 2-Stage design for response. Then we investigate through simulation the combined procedure's type I and type II error rates under various combinations of design parameters. We include the underlying relationship between toxicity and response in our examination of the error rates.

  20. Nine-year change in statistical design, profile, and success rates of Phase II oncology trials.

    PubMed

    Ivanova, Anastasia; Paul, Barry; Marchenko, Olga; Song, Guochen; Patel, Neerali; Moschos, Stergios J

    2016-01-01

    We investigated nine-year trends in statistical design and other features of Phase II oncology clinical trials published in 2005, 2010, and 2014 in five leading oncology journals: Cancer, Clinical Cancer Research, Journal of Clinical Oncology, Annals of Oncology, and Lancet Oncology. The features analyzed included cancer type, multicenter vs. single-institution, statistical design, primary endpoint, number of treatment arms, number of patients per treatment arm, whether or not statistical methods were well described, whether the drug was found effective based on rigorous statistical testing of the null hypothesis, and whether the drug was recommended for future studies.

  1. Effect of Carbon Ion Radiotherapy for Sacral Chordoma: Results of Phase I-II and Phase II Clinical Trials

    SciTech Connect

    Imai, Reiko; Kamada, Tadashi; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Sugawara, Shinji; Serizawa, Itsuko; Tsujii, Hirohiko; Tatezaki, Shin-ichiro

    2010-08-01

    Purpose: To summarize the results of treatment for sacral chordoma in Phase I-II and Phase II carbon ion radiotherapy trials for bone and soft-tissue sarcomas. Patients and Methods: We performed a retrospective analysis of 38 patients with medically unresectable sacral chordomas treated with the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba, Japan between 1996 and 2003. Of the 38 patients, 30 had not received previous treatment and 8 had locally recurrent tumor after previous resection. The applied carbon ion dose was 52.8-73.6 Gray equivalents (median, 70.4) in a total of 16 fixed fractions within 4 weeks. Results: The median patient age was 66 years. The cranial tumor extension was S2 or greater in 31 patients. The median clinical target volume was 523 cm{sup 3}. The median follow-up period was 80 months. The 5-year overall survival rate was 86%, and the 5-year local control rate was 89%. After treatment, 27 of 30 patients with primary tumor remained ambulatory with or without supportive devices. Two patients experienced severe skin or soft-tissue complications requiring skin grafts. Conclusion: Carbon ion radiotherapy appears effective and safe in the treatment of patients with sacral chordoma and offers a promising alternative to surgery.

  2. Interferon. beta. /sub 2//B-cell stimulatory factor type 2 shares identity with monocyte-derived hepatocyte-stimulating factor and regulates the major acute phase protein response in liver cells

    SciTech Connect

    Gauldie, J.; Richards, C.; Harnish, D.; Lansdorp, P.; Baumann, H.

    1987-10-01

    One of the oldest and most preserved of the homeostatic responses of the body to injury is the acute phase protein response associated with inflammation. The liver responds to hormone-like mediators by the increased synthesis of a series of plasma proteins called acute phase reactants. In these studies, the authors examined the relationship of hepatocyte-stimulating factor derived from peripheral blood monocytes to interferon ..beta../sub 2/ (IFN-..beta../sub 2/), which has been cloned. Antibodies raised against fibroblast-derived IFN-..beta.. having neutralizing activity against both IFN-..beta../sub 1/ and ..beta../sub 2/ inhibited the major hepatocyte-stimulating activity derived from monocytes. Fibroblast-derived mediator elicited the identical stimulated response in human HepG2 cells and primary rat hepatocytes as the monocyte cytokine. Finally, recombinant-derived human B-cell stimulatory factor type 2 (IFN-..beta../sub 2/) from Escherichia coli induced the synthesis of all major acute phase proteins studied in human hepatoma HepG2 and primary rat hepatocyte cultures. These data demonstrate that monocyte-derived hepatocyte-stimulating factor and IFN-..beta../sub 2/ share immunological and functional identity and that IFN-..beta../sub 2/, also known as B-cell stimulatory factor and hybridoma plasmacytoma growth factor, has the hepatocyte as a major physiologic target and thereby is essential in controlling the hepatic acute phase response.

  3. Continuation versus discontinuation of oxytocin infusion during the active phase of labour: a randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Bor, P; Ledertoug, S; Boie, S; Knoblauch, N O; Stornes, I

    2016-01-01

    To investigate whether discontinuation of oxytocin infusion increases the duration of the active phase of labour and reduces maternal and neonatal complications. Randomised controlled trial. Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Regional Hospital of Randers, Denmark. Women with singleton pregnancy in the vertex position undergoing labour induction or augmentation. Two hundred women were randomised when cervical dilation was ≤4 cm to either continue or discontinue oxytocin infusion when cervical dilation reached 5 cm. The primary outcome was duration of the active phase of labour, defined as the time period from 5 cm of cervical dilation until delivery. Secondary outcomes were mode of delivery, uterine tachysystole, hyperstimulation, abnormalities in fetal heart rate, postpartum haemorrhage rate, perineal tears, and neonatal outcomes. The active phase of labour was longer by 41 minutes (95% confidence interval 11-75 minutes) in the discontinued group (median 125 minutes in 85 women who had reached the active phase and delivered vaginally) versus the continued group (median 88 minutes in 78 women). The incidence of fetal heart rate abnormalities (51 versus 20%) and uterine hyperstimulation (12 versus 2%) was significantly greater in the continued than the discontinued oxytocin group. The incidence of tachysystole, caesarean deliveries, postpartum haemorrhage, third degree perineal tears and adverse neonatal outcomes was higher in the continued group, but did not reach significance. Discontinuation of oxytocin infusion in the active phase of labour may improve some labour outcomes but has the disadvantage of increasing the duration of the active phase of labour. Stopping oxytocin in the active phase seems to make labour less complicated but lengthens duration. © 2015 Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.

  4. Web-based data management for a phase II clinical trial in ALS.

    PubMed

    Buchsbaum, Richard; Kaufmann, Petra; Barsdorf, Alexandra I; Arbing, Rachel; Montes, Jacqueline; Thompson, John L P

    2009-01-01

    The objective was to report on the creation, features and performance of a web-based data management system for a two-stage phase II randomized clinical trial of Co-Enzyme Q10 in ALS. We created a relatively comprehensive web-based data system that provided electronic data entry; patient management utilities; adverse event reporting, safety monitoring, and invoice generation; and standardized coding for medications and adverse events. In stage 1, clinical sites submitted 7207 forms reporting on 105 patients followed for 10 months. Less than 0.7% of submitted forms contained errors. At the time of the delivery of the analysis data set, only four errors remained unresolved. Data were available quickly, with a median time from event to data posting of two days. The data set was locked and the analysis data set produced nine days after the final patient visit. A survey of trial personnel yielded generally positive feedback, with 75% of respondents wishing to use a similar system in the future. Given sufficient resources, a comprehensive web-based data management system can meet the need for clean, available data in clinical trials in ALS and similar diseases, and can contribute significantly to their efficient execution.

  5. Detection of Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator Activity in Early-Phase Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Rowe, Steven M.; Accurso, Frank; Clancy, John P.

    2007-01-01

    Advances in our understanding of cystic fibrosis pathogenesis have led to strategies directed toward treatment of underlying causes of the disease rather than treatments of disease-related symptoms. To expedite evaluation of these emerging therapies, early-phase clinical trials require extension of in vivo cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR)–detecting assays to multicenter trial formats, including nasal potential difference and sweat chloride measurements. Both of these techniques can be used to fulfill diagnostic criteria for the disease, and can discriminate various levels of CFTR function. Full realization of these assays in multicenter clinical trials requires identification of sources of nonbiological intra- and intersite variability, and careful attention to study design and statistical analysis of study-generated data. In this review, we discuss several issues important to the performance of these assays, including efforts to identify and address aspects that can contribute to inconsistent and/or potentially erroneous results. Adjunctive means of detecting CFTR including mRNA expression, immunocytochemical localization, and other methods are also discussed. Recommendations are presented to advance our understanding of these biomarkers and to improve their capacity to predict cystic fibrosis outcomes. PMID:17652506

  6. Culture and Use of Mesenchymal Stromal Cells in Phase I and II Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Philippe, Bourin; Luc, Sensebé; Valérie, Planat-Bénard; Jérôme, Roncalli; Alessandra, Bura-Rivière; Louis, Casteilla

    2010-01-01

    Present in numerous tissues, mesenchymal stem cells/multipotent stromal cells (MSCs) can differentiate into different cell types from a mesoderm origin. Their potential has been extended to pluripotency, by their possibility of differentiating into tissues and cells of nonmesodermic origin. Through the release of cytokines, growth factors and biologically active molecules, MSCs exert important paracrine effects during tissue repair and inflammation. Moreover, MSCs have immunosuppressive properties related to non-HLA restricted immunosuppressive capacities. All these features lead to an increasing range of possible applications of MSCs, from treating immunological diseases to tissue and organ repair, that should be tested in phase I and II clinical trials. The most widely used MSCs are cultured from bone marrow or adipose tissue. For clinical trial implementation, BM MSCs and ADSCs should be produced according to Good Manufacturing Practices. Safety remains the major concern and must be ensured during culture and validated with relevant controls. We describe some applications of MSCs in clinical trials. PMID:21052537

  7. [The use of placebos in phase III clinical trials in Brazil].

    PubMed

    Rubenich, Gustavo Butzge; Heck, Stephanie Tomasi; Hellmann, Fernando; Schlemper Junior, Bruno Rodolfo

    2015-03-01

    In 2008, Brazil's Federal Council of Medicine [Conselho Federal de Medicina] (CFM)--regulatory and supervisory agency on the ethical practice of medicine--banned the participation of Brazilian doctors in studies using placebos for diseases with efficient and effective treatment. This position differs with the Helsinki Declaration, which allows the use of placebos in methodologically justified conditions. To ascertain whether the CMF's ethical regulation modified the use of placebos in phase III clinical trials in Brazil, characteristics of the records in ClinicalTrials.gov were researched in the periods from 2003 to 2007 and from 2009 to 2013. The conclusions reached were: a) the regulations issued by the CFM in 2008 were ineffective and the position adopted by the Helsinki Declaration prevails; b) there was significant sponsorship by the multinational pharmaceutical industry of trials with placebos; c) the research was predominantly on new drugs for chronic diseases, with little study done of the neglected diseases which are of great importance to Brazil.

  8. Review of phase I and II trials for Wilms' tumour - Can we optimise the search for novel agents?

    PubMed

    Brok, Jesper; Pritchard-Jones, Kathy; Geller, James I; Spreafico, Filippo

    2017-07-01

    Survival rates for patients with Wilms' tumour (WT) approximate 90% with refined use of currently available interventions. However, a subgroup of patients, with initial high-risk histopathology or relapsing disease, have a poor prognosis, and it is a challenge to identify and prioritise the development of new innovative approaches for these subgroups. We conducted a systematic literature search for published phase I and II clinical trials that registered patients with WTs and characterised the early phase trial activity, quantified response rates and highlighted avenues for further development. We identified 63 trials (48 phase I, three phase I/II, and 12 phase II trials) enrolling 214 patients with WTs, alongside other malignancies. The number of annually recruited WTs did not change significantly and was less than 20% of the potential candidates. The vast majority of the trials were conducted in North America, and 56 different interventions were investigated, including conventional chemotherapy and biologically targeted therapies. Overall, 33 WTs revealed some degree of tumour control. Of these, five patients demonstrated complete remission (2%), 15 patients partial response (7%) and 13 patients stable disease (6%). None of the included novel biologically targeted therapies emerged as promising interventions, and only conventional chemotherapy was able to induce a complete and partial response. We conclude that early phase trial recruitment of WTs is below expected levels, and the clinical outcome of the included patients is dismal. Improvement of the availability and recruitment to early phase trials for WTs, especially in Europe, is needed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. A phase 3 trial of pirfenidone in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed

    King, Talmadge E; Bradford, Williamson Z; Castro-Bernardini, Socorro; Fagan, Elizabeth A; Glaspole, Ian; Glassberg, Marilyn K; Gorina, Eduard; Hopkins, Peter M; Kardatzke, David; Lancaster, Lisa; Lederer, David J; Nathan, Steven D; Pereira, Carlos A; Sahn, Steven A; Sussman, Robert; Swigris, Jeffrey J; Noble, Paul W

    2014-05-29

    In two of three phase 3 trials, pirfenidone, an oral antifibrotic therapy, reduced disease progression, as measured by the decline in forced vital capacity (FVC) or vital capacity, in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis; in the third trial, this end point was not achieved. We sought to confirm the beneficial effect of pirfenidone on disease progression in such patients. In this phase 3 study, we randomly assigned 555 patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis to receive either oral pirfenidone (2403 mg per day) or placebo for 52 weeks. The primary end point was the change in FVC or death at week 52. Secondary end points were the 6-minute walk distance, progression-free survival, dyspnea, and death from any cause or from idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. In the pirfenidone group, as compared with the placebo group, there was a relative reduction of 47.9% in the proportion of patients who had an absolute decline of 10 percentage points or more in the percentage of the predicted FVC or who died; there was also a relative increase of 132.5% in the proportion of patients with no decline in FVC (P<0.001). Pirfenidone reduced the decline in the 6-minute walk distance (P=0.04) and improved progression-free survival (P<0.001). There was no significant between-group difference in dyspnea scores (P=0.16) or in rates of death from any cause (P=0.10) or from idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (P=0.23). However, in a prespecified pooled analysis incorporating results from two previous phase 3 trials, the between-group difference favoring pirfenidone was significant for death from any cause (P=0.01) and from idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (P=0.006). Gastrointestinal and skin-related adverse events were more common in the pirfenidone group than in the placebo group but rarely led to treatment discontinuation. Pirfenidone, as compared with placebo, reduced disease progression, as reflected by lung function, exercise tolerance, and progression-free survival, in patients with

  10. Optimal adaptive two-stage designs for early phase II clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Shan, Guogen; Wilding, Gregory E; Hutson, Alan D; Gerstenberger, Shawn

    2016-04-15

    Simon's optimal two-stage design has been widely used in early phase clinical trials for Oncology and AIDS studies with binary endpoints. With this approach, the second-stage sample size is fixed when the trial passes the first stage with sufficient activity. Adaptive designs, such as those due to Banerjee and Tsiatis (2006) and Englert and Kieser (2013), are flexible in the sense that the second-stage sample size depends on the response from the first stage, and these designs are often seen to reduce the expected sample size under the null hypothesis as compared with Simon's approach. An unappealing trait of the existing designs is that they are not associated with a second-stage sample size, which is a non-increasing function of the first-stage response rate. In this paper, an efficient intelligent process, the branch-and-bound algorithm, is used in extensively searching for the optimal adaptive design with the smallest expected sample size under the null, while the type I and II error rates are maintained and the aforementioned monotonicity characteristic is respected. The proposed optimal design is observed to have smaller expected sample sizes compared to Simon's optimal design, and the maximum total sample size of the proposed adaptive design is very close to that from Simon's method. The proposed optimal adaptive two-stage design is recommended for use in practice to improve the flexibility and efficiency of early phase therapeutic development.

  11. Bayesian Optimal Interval Design: A Simple and Well-Performing Design for Phase I Oncology Trials.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Ying; Hess, Kenneth R; Hilsenbeck, Susan G; Gilbert, Mark R

    2016-09-01

    Despite more than two decades of publications that offer more innovative model-based designs, the classical 3 + 3 design remains the most dominant phase I trial design in practice. In this article, we introduce a new trial design, the Bayesian optimal interval (BOIN) design. The BOIN design is easy to implement in a way similar to the 3 + 3 design, but is more flexible for choosing the target toxicity rate and cohort size and yields a substantially better performance that is comparable with that of more complex model-based designs. The BOIN design contains the 3 + 3 design and the accelerated titration design as special cases, thus linking it to established phase I approaches. A numerical study shows that the BOIN design generally outperforms the 3 + 3 design and the modified toxicity probability interval (mTPI) design. The BOIN design is more likely than the 3 + 3 design to correctly select the MTD and allocate more patients to the MTD. Compared with the mTPI design, the BOIN design has a substantially lower risk of overdosing patients and generally a higher probability of correctly selecting the MTD. User-friendly software is freely available to facilitate the application of the BOIN design. Clin Cancer Res; 22(17); 4291-301. ©2016 AACR.

  12. Novel Agents for Multiple Myeloma to Overcome Resistance in Phase III Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Orlowski, Robert Z.

    2013-01-01

    The incorporation of novel agents such as bortezomib and lenalidomide into initial therapy for multiple myeloma has improved the response rate of induction regimens. Also, these drugs are being increasingly used in the peri-transplant setting for transplant-eligible patients, and as part of consolidation and/or maintenance after front-line treatment, including in transplant-ineligible patients. Together, these and other strategies have contributed to a prolongation of progression-free and overall survival in myeloma patients, and an increasing proportion are able to sustain a remission for many years. Despite these improvements, however, the vast majority of patients continue to suffer relapses, which suggests a prominent role for either primary, innate drug resistance, or secondary, acquired drug resistance. As a result, there remains a strong need to develop new proteasome inhibitors and immunomodulatory agents, as well as new drug classes, which would be effective in the relapsed and/or refractory setting, and overcome drug resistance. This review will focus on novel drugs that have reached phase III trials, including carfilzomib and pomalidomide, which have recently garnered regulatory approvals. In addition, agents that are in phase II or III, potentially registration-enabling trials will be described as well, to provide an overview of the possible landscape in the relapsed and/or refractory arena over the next five years. PMID:24135408

  13. Bayesian Optimal Interval Design: A Simple and Well-Performing Design for Phase I Oncology Trials

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Ying; Hess, Kenneth R.; Hilsenbeck, Susan G.; Gilbert, Mark R.

    2016-01-01

    Despite more than two decades of publications that offer more innovative model-based designs, the classical 3+3 design remains the most dominant phase I trial design in practice. In this article, we introduce a new trial design, the Bayesian optimal interval (BOIN) design. The BOIN design is easy to implement in a way similar to the 3+3 design, but is more flexible for choosing the target toxicity rate and cohort size and yields a substantially better performance that is comparable to that of more complex model-based designs. The BOIN design contains the 3+3 design and the accelerated titration design as special cases, thus linking it to established phase I approaches. A numerical study shows that the BOIN design generally outperforms the 3+3 design and the modified toxicity probability interval (mTPI) design. The BOIN design is more likely than the 3+3 design to correctly select the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) and allocate more patients to the MTD. Compared to the mTPI design, the BOIN design has a substantially lower risk of overdosing patients and generally a higher probability of correctly selecting the MTD. User-friendly software is freely available to facilitate the application of the BOIN design. PMID:27407096

  14. A phase I trial of chlorambucil administered in short pulses in patients with advanced malignancies.

    PubMed

    Blumenreich, M S; Woodcock, T M; Sherrill, E J; Richman, S P; Gentile, P S; Epremian, B E; Kubota, T T; Allegra, J C

    1988-01-01

    We carried out a phase I trial with chlorambucil. Thirty patients with advanced cancer were entered in six dose levels: 36, 48, 60, 84, 108, and 144 mg/m2. The drug was given in six divided oral doses every 6 hours and the regimen was repeated every 3 weeks. The median age was 62 years (31-84), median Karnofsky performance status (KPS) 60 (40-90). All patients but one had received prior radiation therapy, chemotherapy, or both. Central nervous system toxicity was dose limiting, occurring in 5 of 6 patients at 144 mg/m2. It was characterized by transient seizures, hallucinations, lethargy, stupor, and coma. Metoclopramide was successful in controlling nausea and vomiting, which was severe if the antiemetic was not used. Leukopenia (3 patients) and thrombocytopenia (2 patients) were mild. One patient with colorectal carcinoma had a minor response, and two patients with non-small cell lung cancer had stable disease. A safe dose for phase II trials is 108 mg/m2 in six 6-hourly oral doses.

  15. BOP2: Bayesian optimal design for phase II clinical trials with simple and complex endpoints.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Heng; Lee, J Jack; Yuan, Ying

    2017-09-20

    We propose a flexible Bayesian optimal phase II (BOP2) design that is capable of handling simple (e.g., binary) and complicated (e.g., ordinal, nested, and co-primary) endpoints under a unified framework. We use a Dirichlet-multinomial model to accommodate different types of endpoints. At each interim, the go/no-go decision is made by evaluating a set of posterior probabilities of the events of interest, which is optimized to maximize power or minimize the number of patients under the null hypothesis. Unlike other existing Bayesian designs, the BOP2 design explicitly controls the type I error rate, thereby bridging the gap between Bayesian designs and frequentist designs. In addition, the stopping boundary of the BOP2 design can be enumerated prior to the onset of the trial. These features make the BOP2 design accessible to a wide range of users and regulatory agencies and particularly easy to implement in practice. Simulation studies show that the BOP2 design has favorable operating characteristics with higher power and lower risk of incorrectly terminating the trial than some existing Bayesian phase II designs. The software to implement the BOP2 design is freely available at www.trialdesign.org. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Phase I dose escalation trial of feverfew with standardized doses of parthenolide in patients with cancer.

    PubMed

    Curry, Eardie A; Murry, Daryl J; Yoder, Christy; Fife, Karen; Armstrong, Victoria; Nakshatri, Harikrishna; O'Connell, Michael; Sweeney, Christopher J

    2004-08-01

    Feverfew is a botanical product that contains parthenolide. Parthenolide has in vitro and in vivo anti-tumor and anti-angiogenic activity. Feverfew has been used extensively without any formal pharmacokinetic analysis. A Phase I trial was conducted to evaluate the pharmacokinetics and toxicity of parthenolide given as a component of "feverfew." Feverfew (Tanacet trade mark ) was administered as a daily oral tablet in a 28-day cycle. A starting dose of 1 mg per day was explored with subsequent dose escalations to 2, 3, and 4 mg. Assessment of plasma pharmacokinetics was performed on patients accrued to the trial. Solid phase extraction and mass spectroscopy were used to evaluate parthenolide plasma concentrations. The limit of detection for parthenolide in plasma was 0.5 ng/ml. Patients were evaluated for response after every two cycles. Feverfew given on this schedule had no significant toxicity, and the maximum tolerated dose was not reached. When parthenolide was administered at doses up to 4 mg as a daily oral capsule in the feverfew preparation, there was not detectable concentration in the plasma. Because of this, parthenolide pharmacokinetics were not able to be completed. Feverfew, with up to 4 mg of parthenolide, given daily as an oral tablet is well tolerated without dose-limiting toxicity, but does not provide detectable plasma concentrations. Purification of parthenolide for administration of higher doses will be needed.

  17. Randomized phase III trial of pegfilgrastim versus filgrastim after autologus peripheral blood stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Gerds, Aaron; Fox-Geiman, Mary; Dawravoo, Kevin; Rodriguez, Tulio; Toor, Amir; Smith, Scott; Kiley, Karen; Fletcher-Gonzalez, Donna; Hicks, Chindo; Stiff, Patrick

    2010-05-01

    Nonrandomized trials suggest that pegfilgrastim, a pegylated granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, could be used in lieu of filgrastim after autologus peripheral blood stem cell transplantation. This phase III, randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial compared the efficacy, costs, and safety of single-dose pegfilgrastim (single 6 mg dose) versus daily filgrastim (5 microg/kg/day) for this indication. Seventy-eight patients, matched for age, sex, underlying disease, stage, and CD34/kg transplant dose were enrolled. Cytokines were started on day +1 posttransplant and continued to an absolute neutrophil count (ANC) of 5x10(9)/L for 3 days or 10x10(9)/L for 1 day. The median time to neutrophil engraftment (ANC >1.5x10(9)/L for 3 days or 5x10(9)/L for 1 day) was the same in both groups (12 days). No differences in platelet engraftment (11 versus 13 days), number of platelet transfusions (5 versus 4), percent with positive cultures for bacterial pathogens (23% versus 15%), days of fever (1 versus 2), deaths prior to engraftment (1 versus 1), or duration of hospital stay (19 versus 19 days) were seen between the pegfilgrastim and filgrastim groups, respectively. Using the average wholesale price for doses used in this trial, there was a per-patient savings of $961 for the pegfilgrastim group (P < .001). This phase III study failed to demonstrate a difference in time to neutrophil engraftment or any clinical sequelae between pegfilgrastim and filgrastim when given post-APBSCT, with pegfilgrastim achieving a cost savings over filgrastim. Copyright 2010 American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Phase I Clinical Trial Results of Auranofin, a Novel Antiparasitic Agent

    PubMed Central

    Capparelli, Edmund V.; Bricker-Ford, Robin; Rogers, M. John; McKerrow, James H.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Under an NIH priority to identify new drugs to treat class B parasitic agents, we performed high-throughput screens, which identified the activity of auranofin (Ridaura) against Entamoeba histolytica and Giardia intestinalis, major causes of water- and foodborne outbreaks. Auranofin, an orally administered, gold (Au)-containing compound that was approved by the FDA in 1985 for treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, was effective in vitro and in vivo against E. histolytica and both metronidazole-sensitive and -resistant strains of Giardia. We now report the results of an NIH-sponsored phase I trial to characterize the pharmacokinetics (PK) and safety of auranofin in healthy volunteers using modern techniques to measure gold levels. Subjects received orally 6 mg (p.o.) of auranofin daily, the recommended dose for rheumatoid arthritis, for 7 days and were followed for 126 days. Treatment-associated adverse events were reported by 47% of the subjects, but all were mild and resolved without treatment. The mean gold maximum concentration in plasma (Cmax) at day 7 was 0.312 μg/ml and the half-life (t1/2) 35 days, so steady-state blood levels would not be reached in short-term therapy. The highest concentration of gold, 13 μM (auranofin equivalent), or more than 25× the 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) for E. histolytica and 4× that for Giardia, was in feces at 7 days. Modeling of higher doses (9 and 21 mg/day) was performed for systemic parasitic infections, and plasma gold levels of 0.4 to 1.0 μg/ml were reached after 14 days of treatment at 21 mg/day. This phase I trial supports the idea of the safety of auranofin and provides important PK data to support its potential use as a broad-spectrum antiparasitic drug. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under identifier NCT02089048.) PMID:27821451

  19. Methadone induction in primary care (ANRS-Methaville): a phase III randomized intervention trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In France, the rapid scale-up of buprenorphine, an opioid maintenance treatment (OMT), in primary care for drug users has led to an impressive reduction in HIV prevalence among injecting drug users (IDU) but has had no major effect on Hepatitis C incidence. To date, patients willing to start methadone can only do so in a methadone clinic (a medical centre for drug and alcohol dependence (CSAPA) or a hospital setting) and are referred to primary care physicians after dose stabilization. This study aims to assess the effectiveness of methadone in patients who initiated treatment in primary care compared with those who initiated it in a CSAPA, by measuring abstinence from street opioid use after one year of treatment. Methods/Design The ANRS-Methaville study is a randomized multicenter non-inferiority control trial comparing methadone induction (lasting approximately 2 weeks) in primary care and in CSAPA. The model of care chosen for methadone induction in primary care was based on study-specific pre-training of all physicians, exclusion criteria and daily supervision of methadone during the initiation phase. Between January 2009 and January 2011, 10 sites each having one CSAPA and several primary care physicians, were identified to recruit patients to be randomized into two groups, one starting methadone in primary care (n = 147), the other in CSAPA (n = 48). The primary outcome of the study is the proportion of participants abstinent from street opioids after 1 year of treatment i.e. non-inferiority of primary care model in terms of the proportion of patients not using street opioids compared with the proportion observed in those starting methadone in a CSAPA. Discussion The ANRS-Methaville study is the first in France to use an interventional trial to improve access to OMT for drug users. Once the non-inferiority results become available, the Ministry of Health and agency for the safety of health products may change the the New Drug Application

  20. Progressive Staging of Pilot Studies to Improve Phase III Trials for Motor Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Dobkin, Bruce H.

    2014-01-01

    Based on the suboptimal research pathways that finally led to multicenter randomized clinical trials (MRCTs) of treadmill training with partial body weight support and of robotic assistive devices, strategically planned successive stages are proposed for pilot studies of novel rehabilitation interventions Stage 1, consideration-of-concept studies, drawn from animal experiments, theories, and observations, delineate the experimental intervention in a small convenience sample of participants, so the results must be interpreted with caution. Stage 2, development-of-concept pilots, should optimize the components of the intervention, settle on most appropriate outcome measures, and examine dose-response effects. A well-designed study that reveals no efficacy should be published to counterweight the confirmation bias of positive trials. Stage 3, demonstration-of-concept pilots, can build out from what has been learned to test at least 15 participants in each arm, using random assignment and blinded outcome measures. A control group should receive an active practice intervention aimed at the same primary outcome. A third arm could receive a substantially larger dose of the experimental therapy or a combinational intervention. If only 1 site performed this trial, a different investigative group should aim to reproduce positive outcomes based on the optimal dose of motor training. Stage 3 studies ought to suggest an effect size of 0.4 or higher, so that approximately 50 participants in each arm will be the number required to test for efficacy in a stage 4, proof-of-concept MRCT. By developing a consensus around acceptable and necessary practices for each stage, similar to CONSORT recommendations for the publication of phase III clinical trials, better quality pilot studies may move quickly into better designed and more successful MRCTs of experimental interventions. PMID:19240197

  1. TFAP2B mutation and dental anomalies

    PubMed Central

    Tanasubsinn, Natchaya; Sittiwangkul, Rekwan; Pongprot, Yupada; Kawasaki, Katsushige; Ohazama, Atsushi; Sastraruji, Thanapat; Kaewgahya, Massupa; Kantaputra, Piranit Nik

    2017-01-01

    Mutations inTFAP2B has been reported in patients with isolated patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) and Char syndrome. We performed mutation analysis of TFAP2B in 43 patients with isolated PDA, 7 patients with PDA with other congenital heart defects and 286 patients with isolated tooth agenesis with or without other dental anomalies. The heterozygous c.1006G>A mutation was identified in 20 individuals. Those mutation carriers consisted of 1 patient with term PDA (1/43), 16 patients with isolated tooth agenesis with or without other dental anomalies (16/286; 5.6%), 1 patient with PDA and severe valvular aortic stenosis and tooth agenesis (1/4) and 2 normal controls (2/100; 1%). The mutation is predicted to cause an amino-acid substitution p.Val336Ile in the TFAP2B protein. Tfap2b expression during early mouse tooth development supports the association of TFAP2B mutation and dental anomalies. It is hypothesized that this incidence might have been the result of founder effect. Here we report for the first time that TFAP2B mutation is associated with tooth agenesis, microdontia, supernumerary tooth and root maldevelopment. In addition, we also found that TFAP2B mutations, the common causes of PDA in Caucasian, are not the common cause of PDA in Thai population. PMID:28381879

  2. Investigation of Class 2b Trucks

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, S.C.

    2002-04-03

    The popularity of trucks in the class 2 category--that is, those with a 6,000 to 10,000 pounds (lbs) gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR)--has increased since the late 1970s/early 1980s. The purpose of this research is to identify and examine vehicles in the upper portion of the class 2 weight range (designated as vehicle class 2b) and to assess their impact. Vehicles in class 2b (8,500-10,000 lbs GVWR) include pickup trucks, sport utility vehicles (SUVs), and large vans (i.e., not minivans). Oak Ridge National Laboratory researched each individual truck model to determine which models were class 2b trucks and arrived at four methodologies to derive sales volumes. Two methods--one for calendar year and one for model year sales--were recommended for producing believable and reliable results. The study indicates that 521,000 class 2b trucks were sold in calendar year 1999--6.4% of sales of all trucks under 10,000 lbs. Eighty-two percent of class 2b trucks sold in 1999 were pickups; one third of class 2b trucks sold in 1999 were diesel. There were 5.8 million class 2b trucks on the road in 2000, which amounts to 7.8% of all trucks under 10,000 lbs. Twenty-four percent of the class 2b truck population is diesel. Estimates show that class 2b trucks account for 8% of annual miles traveled by trucks under 10,000 lbs and 9% of fuel use. Data on class 2b trucks are scarce. As the Tier 2 standards, which apply to passenger vehicles in the 8,500-10,000 lb GVWR category, become effective, additional data on class 2b trucks may become available--not only emissions data, but data in all areas. At the moment, distinguishing class 2b trucks from class 2 trucks in general is a substantial task requiring data on an individual model level.

  3. Targeted therapeutic mild hypercapnia after cardiac arrest: A phase II multi-centre randomised controlled trial (the CCC trial).

    PubMed

    Eastwood, Glenn M; Schneider, Antoine G; Suzuki, Satoshi; Peck, Leah; Young, Helen; Tanaka, Aiko; Mårtensson, Johan; Warrillow, Stephen; McGuinness, Shay; Parke, Rachael; Gilder, Eileen; Mccarthy, Lianne; Galt, Pauline; Taori, Gopal; Eliott, Suzanne; Lamac, Tammy; Bailey, Michael; Harley, Nerina; Barge, Deborah; Hodgson, Carol L; Morganti-Kossmann, Maria Cristina; Pébay, Alice; Conquest, Alison; Archer, John S; Bernard, Stephen; Stub, Dion; Hart, Graeme K; Bellomo, Rinaldo

    2016-07-01

    In intensive care observational studies, hypercapnia after cardiac arrest (CA) is independently associated with improved neurological outcome. However, the safety and feasibility of delivering targeted therapeutic mild hypercapnia (TTMH) for such patients is untested. In a phase II safety and feasibility multi-centre, randomised controlled trial, we allocated ICU patients after CA to 24h of targeted normocapnia (TN) (PaCO2 35-45mmHg) or TTMH (PaCO2 50-55mmHg). The primary outcome was serum neuron specific enolase (NSE) and S100b protein concentrations over the first 72h assessed in the first 50 patients surviving to day three. Secondary end-points included global measure of function assessment at six months and mortality for all patients. We enrolled 86 patients. Their median age was 61 years (58, 64 years) and 66 (79%) were male. Of these, 50 patients (58%) survived to day three for full biomarker assessment. NSE concentrations increased in the TTMH group (p=0.02) and TN group (p=0.005) over time, with the increase being significantly more pronounced in the TN group (p(interaction)=0.04). S100b concentrations decreased over time in the TTMH group (p<0.001) but not in the TN group (p=0.68). However, the S100b change over time did not differ between the groups (p(interaction)=0.23). At six months, 23 (59%) TTMH patients had good functional recovery compared with 18 (46%) TN patients. Hospital mortality occurred in 11 (26%) TTMH patients and 15 (37%) TN patients (p=0.31). In CA patients admitted to the ICU, TTMH was feasible, appeared safe and attenuated the release of NSE compared with TN. These findings justify further investigation of this novel treatment. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  4. Systemic Biomarkers in 2-Phase Antibiotic Periodontal Treatment: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Giannopoulou, C; Cionca, N; Almaghlouth, A; Cancela, J; Courvoisier, D S; Mombelli, A

    2016-03-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that periodontal infections may have an impact on systemic health. In patients with untreated periodontitis, very high values for several inflammatory markers in serum are expressed simultaneously. We investigated to what extent these peak values change after nonsurgical and surgical periodontal treatment, with adjunctive antibiotics administered during the first or the second treatment phase. In a single-center, randomized, placebo-controlled, and double-masked clinical trial, 80 patients with chronic or aggressive periodontitis were randomized into 2 treatment groups: group A, receiving systemic amoxicillin and metronidazole during the first, nonsurgical phase of periodontal therapy (phase 1), and group B, receiving the antibiotics during the second, surgical phase (phase 2). Serum samples were obtained at baseline (BL), 3 mo after phase 1 (M3), and 6 and 12 mo after phase 2 (M6, M12). Samples were evaluated for 15 cytokines and 9 acute-phase proteins using the Bio-Plex bead array multianalyte detection system. For each analyte, peak values were defined as greater than mean +2 SD of measurements found in 40 periodontally healthy persons. Sixty-six patients showed a peak value of at least 1 analyte at BL. At M12, the number of these patients was only 36 (P = 0.0002). This decrease was stronger in group A (BL: 35, M12: 19, P = 0.0009) than in group B (BL: 31, M12: 17, P = 0.14). Twenty patients displayed peak values of at least 4 biomarkers at BL. The nonsurgical therapy delivered in the first phase reduced most of these peaks (group A, BL: 9, M3: 4, P = 0.17; group B, BL: 11, M3: 2, P = 0.01), irrespective of adjunctive antibiotics. The reductions obtained at M3 were maintained until M12 in both groups. Initial, nonsurgical periodontal therapy reduced the incidence of peak levels of inflammatory markers. Antibiotics and further surgical therapy did not enhance the effect (Clinicaltrials.gov NCT02197260). © International & American

  5. Photosensitizer Radachlorin®: Skin cancer PDT phase II clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Kochneva, Elena V; Filonenko, Elena V; Vakulovskaya, Elena G; Scherbakova, Elena G; Seliverstov, Oleg V; Markichev, Nikolay A; Reshetnickov, Andrei V

    2010-12-01

    "Radachlorin"(®), also known in the EU as Bremachlorin, a composition of 3 chlorophyll a derivatives in an aqueous solution, was introduced into the Russian Pharmacopoeia. Its GMP (Good Manufacturing Practice) facility based manufacturing method was patented. Laboratory experiments and clinical phase I were performed. Protocols were designed for PDT of basal cell carcinoma of the skin to result in GCP (Good Clinical Practice)-conformed randomized phase II clinical studies. "Radachlorin"(®) solution for intravenous infusions 0.35% 10mL in the doses of 0.5-0.6 and 1.0-1.2mg/kg and a gel for topical application 0.1% 25g in the dose of 0.1g/cm(2) were photoactivated by 2.5W 662nm semiconductor laser "LAKHTA-MILON(®)" (St. Petersburg, Russia) in light doses of 200, 300 (solution), 400, 600, 800 (gel) J/cm(2). Safety study showed no side effects and a good tolerability of "Radachlorin"(®) by patients. There was no normal skin/subdermal tissue damage after both laser and sun light exposure. The main part (98%) of the drug was excreted or metabolized in the first 48h. Drug administration at a dose of 1.0-1.2mg/kg and irradiation at 3h with 662±3nm light at a dose of 300J/cm(2) (solution) and 4 PDT sessions at an interval of 1 week with 3h gel exposure, followed by 400J/cm(2) light exposure (gel) were found to be the optimal treatment regimes. Having successfully passed clinical trials, "Radachlorin"(®) achieved marketing authorization in Russia in 2009 and a conditional approval in South Korea in 2008. It is a candidate for phase III clinical trials in the EC and may be commercialized as a prospective second-generation photosensitizer.

  6. Therapeutic Misconception, Misestimation and Optimism in Subjects Enrolled in Phase I Trials

    PubMed Central

    Pentz, Rebecca D.; White, Margaret; Harvey, R. Donald; Farmer, Zachary Luke; Liu, Yuan; Lewis, Colleen; Dashevskaya, Olga; Owonikoko, Taofeek; Khuri, Fadlo R.

    2011-01-01

    Background Ethical concerns about Phase I trials persist. Important conceptual advances have been made in understanding concepts used to describe misunderstanding. However, a systematic empirical evaluation of the frequency of misunderstanding incorporating recent developments is lacking. Methods We queried 95 Phase I subjects to provide a more sophisticated estimate of the proportion who had therapeutic misconception (TM) - misunderstands the research purpose or how research differs from individualized care - and therapeutic misestimation (TMis) -misestimates the chance of research trial benefit as >20% or underestimates risk as 0%. Results 65/95 (68.4%) respondents had TM, associated in a multivariate analysis with lower education and family income (p= 0.008, p = 0.001), but TM was not associated with the vulnerability of having hardly any treatment options. 89/95 (94%) had TMis, though only 18% reported this was a factual estimate. Although risks of investigational agents and those exacerbated by research, such as uncertain outcomes, were mentioned (39%, 41% respondents respectively), risks novel to research, such as research biopsies, were rarely mentioned (3%). Although most of these respondents thought their chance of benefit was higher and risk lower than the population chance (optimists) (54.6%), a substantial minority (37.6%) were pessimists. Conclusions TM continues to be prevalent. Estimates of personal benefit were not usually meant to report facts so it is unknown whether respondents had TMis. Although not more vulnerable, Phase I participants need improved understanding of key TM concepts, with attention to risks not found in standard of care. PMID:22294385

  7. Clinical and Biomarker Outcomes of the Phase II Vandetanib Study from the BATTLE Trial

    PubMed Central

    Tsao, Anne S.; Liu, Suyu; Lee, J. Jack; Alden, Christine M.; Blumenschein, George R.; Herbst, Roy; Davis, Suzanne E.; Kim, Edward; Lippman, Scott; Heymach, John; Tran, Hai; Tang, XiMing; Wistuba, Ignacio; Hong, Waun Ki

    2016-01-01

    Background The Biomarker-integrated Approaches of Targeted Therapy for Lung Cancer Elimination trial1 prospectively obtained serum and tumor core biopsies and randomized 255 chemorefractory non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients into four phase II trials: erlotinib, erlotinib-bexarotene, vandetanib, or sorafenib. Herein, we report the clinical and biomarker results of the phase II vandetanib trial. Results Fifty-four patients received vandetanib. The 8-week disease control rate was 33%, median progression-free survival (PFS) 1.81 months, and median overall survival (OS) 6.5 months. No demographic subgroups had PFS or OS benefit. Eight patients with EGFR mutations had a trend for higher 8-week disease control rate (63% versus 31%; p = 0.12) but worse OS (5.9 months versus 9 months; p = 0.8). Patients with EGFR gene amplification (n = 6) had a worse OS (3.9 months versus 9.5 months; p = 0.04). KRAS mutation patients (3.9 months versus 9.5 months; p = 0.23) also had a worse OS. For the serum biomarker analysis, patients with below the median serum expression of interleukin 9c (p = 0.019) and eotaxin (p = 0.007) had a shorter PFS. A trend toward a shorter PFS was also seen in patients with higher than the median neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (p = 0.079) and lower than the median TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (p = 0.087). Conclusion Our trial results are largely consistent with the literature in unselected pretreated NSCLC patients. Although vandetanib improved median PFS in EGFR mutation patients with epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor–resistance compared with EGFR wild-type, there was no OS advantage. Although vandetanib is no longer in development in NSCLC, identification of a molecular phenotype that responds to dual epidermal growth factor receptor and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor inhibition would contribute to the field. PMID:23584298

  8. Phase 1 Trials of rVSV Ebola Vaccine in Africa and Europe.

    PubMed

    Agnandji, Selidji T; Huttner, Angela; Zinser, Madeleine E; Njuguna, Patricia; Dahlke, Christine; Fernandes, José F; Yerly, Sabine; Dayer, Julie-Anne; Kraehling, Verena; Kasonta, Rahel; Adegnika, Akim A; Altfeld, Marcus; Auderset, Floriane; Bache, Emmanuel B; Biedenkopf, Nadine; Borregaard, Saskia; Brosnahan, Jessica S; Burrow, Rebekah; Combescure, Christophe; Desmeules, Jules; Eickmann, Markus; Fehling, Sarah K; Finckh, Axel; Goncalves, Ana Rita; Grobusch, Martin P; Hooper, Jay; Jambrecina, Alen; Kabwende, Anita L; Kaya, Gürkan; Kimani, Domtila; Lell, Bertrand; Lemaître, Barbara; Lohse, Ansgar W; Massinga-Loembe, Marguerite; Matthey, Alain; Mordmüller, Benjamin; Nolting, Anne; Ogwang, Caroline; Ramharter, Michael; Schmidt-Chanasit, Jonas; Schmiedel, Stefan; Silvera, Peter; Stahl, Felix R; Staines, Henry M; Strecker, Thomas; Stubbe, Hans C; Tsofa, Benjamin; Zaki, Sherif; Fast, Patricia; Moorthy, Vasee; Kaiser, Laurent; Krishna, Sanjeev; Becker, Stephan; Kieny, Marie-Paule; Bejon, Philip; Kremsner, Peter G; Addo, Marylyn M; Siegrist, Claire-Anne

    2016-04-28

    The replication-competent recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus (rVSV)-based vaccine expressing a Zaire ebolavirus (ZEBOV) glycoprotein was selected for rapid safety and immunogenicity testing before its use in West Africa. We performed three open-label, dose-escalation phase 1 trials and one randomized, double-blind, controlled phase 1 trial to assess the safety, side-effect profile, and immunogenicity of rVSV-ZEBOV at various doses in 158 healthy adults in Europe and Africa. All participants were injected with doses of vaccine ranging from 300,000 to 50 million plaque-forming units (PFU) or placebo. No serious vaccine-related adverse events were reported. Mild-to-moderate early-onset reactogenicity was frequent but transient (median, 1 day). Fever was observed in up to 30% of vaccinees. Vaccine viremia was detected within 3 days in 123 of the 130 participants (95%) receiving 3 million PFU or more; rVSV was not detected in saliva or urine. In the second week after injection, arthritis affecting one to four joints developed in 11 of 51 participants (22%) in Geneva, with pain lasting a median of 8 days (interquartile range, 4 to 87); 2 self-limited cases occurred in 60 participants (3%) in Hamburg, Germany, and Kilifi, Kenya. The virus was identified in one synovial-fluid aspirate and in skin vesicles of 2 other vaccinees, showing peripheral viral replication in the second week after immunization. ZEBOV-glycoprotein-specific antibody responses were detected in all the participants, with similar glycoprotein-binding antibody titers but significantly higher neutralizing antibody titers at higher doses. Glycoprotein-binding antibody titers were sustained through 180 days in all participants. In these studies, rVSV-ZEBOV was reactogenic but immunogenic after a single dose and warrants further evaluation for safety and efficacy. (Funded by the Wellcome Trust and others; ClinicalTrials.gov numbers, NCT02283099, NCT02287480, and NCT02296983; Pan African Clinical Trials

  9. Empagliflozin for Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: An Overview of Phase 3 Clinical Trials.

    PubMed

    Levine, Matthew J

    2016-06-13

    Sodium glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors have a unique mechanism of action leading to excretion of glucose in the urine and subsequent lowering of plasma glucose. This mechanism is independent of β-cell function; thus, these agents are effective treatment for type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) at theoretically any disease stage. This class should not confer an additional risk of hypoglycemia (unless combined with insulin or an insulin secretagogue) and has the potential to be combined with other classes of glucose-lowering agents. Empagliflozin is one of three currently approved SGLT2 inhibitors in the United States, and has shown a favorable benefit-risk ratio in phase 3 clinical trials as monotherapy and as add-on to other glucose-lowering therapy in broad patient populations. In addition to its glucose-lowering effects, empagliflozin has been shown to reduce body weight and blood pressure without a compensatory increase in heart rate. Moreover, on top of standard of care, empagliflozin is the first glucose-lowering agent to demonstrate cardiovascular risk reduction in patients at high risk of cardiovascular disease in a prospective outcomes trial: a 14% reduction in risk of the 3-point composite endpoint of death from cardiovascular causes, nonfatal myocardial infarction, or nonfatal stroke. Like other SGLT2 inhibitors, empagliflozin is associated with a higher rate of genital mycotic infections than placebo and has the potential for volume depletion-associated events. This review summarizes the empagliflozin phase 3 clinical trials program and its potential significance in the treatment of patients with T2DM. Evidence from these clinical trials show reductions in glycated hemoglobin (-0.59 to -0.82%) with a low risk of hypoglycemia except when used with insulin or insulin secretagogues, and moderate reductions in body weight (-2.1 to -2.5 kg) and systolic blood pressure (-2.9 to -5.2 mm Hg), thus supporting the use of empagliflozin as monotherapy or in

  10. Understanding how coping strategies and quality of life maintain hope in patients deliberating phase I trial participation.

    PubMed

    van der Biessen, Diane A; van der Helm, Peer G; Klein, Dennis; van der Burg, Simone; Mathijssen, Ron H; Lolkema, Martijn P; de Jonge, Maja J

    2017-06-30

    This study aimed to understand how hope and motivation of patients considering phase I trial participation are affected by psychological factors such as coping strategies and locus of control (LoC) and general well-being as measured by the quality of life (QoL). An exploratory cross-sectional study was performed in patients with incurable cancer (N = 135) referred to our phase I unit for the first time. Patients were potentially eligible for phase I trial participation and participated in our study while deliberating phase I trial participation. We used questionnaires on hope, motivation to participate, coping, LoC, and QoL. To investigate the nature and magnitude of the relationships between the scales, a structural equation modeling (SEM) was fitted to the data. Hope significantly predicted the motivation to participate in phase I trials. Predictors of hope were a combination of flexible and tenacious goal pursuit (both P < .01), internal LoC (P < .01), and QoL (P < .01). The SEM showed an exact fit to the data, using a null hypothesis significance test: chi-square (8) = 9.30, P = .32. Patients considering phase I trial participation seem to use a pact of tenacious and flexible coping and control to stay hopeful. Furthermore, hope and QoL positively affected each other. The psychological pact may promote an adaptation enabling them to adjust to difficult circumstances by unconsciously ignoring information, called dissonance reduction. This mechanism may impair their ability to provide a valid informed consent. We suggest including a systematic exploration of patients' social context and values before proposing a phase I trial. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Motivation, recruitment, and screening of volunteers for a phase I/II HIV preventive vaccine trial in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, R A; Chinaworapong, S; Morgan, P A; Ruangyuttikarn, C; Sontirat, A; Chiu, J; Michael, R A; Nitayaphan, S; Khamboonruang, C

    1998-06-01

    Data from recruitment and screening for a phase I/II preventive HIV-1 vaccine trial in Thailand were evaluated with respect to correlates of participation at each phase. Correlates included demographic variables, motivation for interest in the trial, and factors related to communication and contact. Participants were recruited at two sites through varied methods. The majority of prescreenees reported altruistic motives for interest in the trial and blood donors emerged as a group that may have been particularly altruistic. Findings indicated site differences in attrition during recruitment and screening, but not in enrollment into the vaccine trial. Blood donation and willingness to be contacted by phone at home were significantly related to making and keeping screening appointments.

  12. Phase I Randomized Clinical Trial of VRC DNA and rAd5 HIV-1 Vaccine Delivery by Intramuscular (IM), Subcutaneous (SC) and Intradermal (ID) Administration (VRC 011)

    PubMed Central

    Enama, Mary E.; Ledgerwood, Julie E.; Novik, Laura; Nason, Martha C.; Gordon, Ingelise J.; Holman, LaSonji; Bailer, Robert T.; Roederer, Mario; Koup, Richard A.; Mascola, John R.; Nabel, Gary J.; Graham, Barney S.

    2014-01-01

    Background Phase 1 evaluation of the VRC HIV DNA and rAd5 vaccines delivered intramuscularly (IM) supported proceeding to a Phase 2 b efficacy study. Here we report comparison of the IM, subcutaneous (SC) and intradermal (ID) routes of administration. Methods Sixty subjects were randomized to 6 schedules to evaluate the IM, SC or ID route for prime injections. Three schedules included DNA primes (Wks 0,4,8) and 3 schedules included rAd5 prime (Wk0); all included rAd5 IM boost (Wk24). DNA vaccine dosage was 4 mg IM or SC, but 0.4 mg ID, while all rAd5 vaccinations were 1010 PU. All injections were administered by needle and syringe. Results Overall, 27/30 subjects completed 3 DNA primes; 30/30 subjects completed rAd5 primes. Mild local pruritus (itchiness), superficial skin lesions and injection site nodules were associated with ID and SC, but not IM injections. All routes induced T-cell and antibody immune responses after rAd5 boosting. Overall, >95% had Env antibody and >80% had Env T-cell responses. Conclusions The pattern of local reactogenicity following ID and SC injections differed from IM injections but all routes were well-tolerated. There was no evidence of an immunogenicity advantage following SC or ID delivery, supporting IM delivery as the preferred route of administration. Trial Registration Clinicaltrials.gov NCT00321061 PMID:24621858

  13. Non-Publication Is Common among Phase 1, Single-Center, Not Prospectively Registered, or Early Terminated Clinical Drug Trials

    PubMed Central

    Souverein, Patrick C.; Brekelmans, Cecile T. M.; Janssen, Susan W. J.; Koëter, Gerard H.; Leufkens, Hubert G. M.; Bouter, Lex M.

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the occurrence and determinants of non-publication of clinical drug trials in the Netherlands.All clinical drug trials reviewed by the 28 Institutional Review Boards (IRBs) in the Netherlands in 2007 were followed-up from approval to publication. Candidate determinants were the sponsor, phase, applicant, centers, therapeutic effect expected, type of trial, approval status of the drug(s), drug type, participant category, oncology or other disease area, prospective registration, and early termination. The main outcome was publication as peer reviewed article. The percentage of trials that were published, crude and adjusted odds ratio (OR), and 95% confidence interval (CI) were used to quantify the associations between determinants and publication. In 2007, 622 clinical drug trials were reviewed by IRBs in the Netherlands. By the end of follow-up, 19 of these were rejected by the IRB, another 19 never started inclusion, and 10 were still running. Of the 574 trials remaining in the analysis, 334 (58%) were published as peer-reviewed article. The multivariable logistic regression model identified the following determinants with a robust, statistically significant association with publication: phase 2 (60% published; adjusted OR 2.6, 95% CI 1.1–5.9), phase 3 (73% published; adjusted OR 4.1, 95% CI 1.7–10.0), and trials not belonging to phase 1–4 (60% published; adjusted OR 3.2, 95% CI 1.5 to 6.5) compared to phase 1 trials (35% published); trials with a company or investigator as applicant (63% published) compared to trials with a Contract Research Organization (CRO) as applicant (50% published; adjusted OR 1.7; 95% CI 1.1–2.8); and multicenter trials also conducted in other EU countries (68% published; adjusted OR 2.2, 95% CI 1.1–4.4) or also outside the European Union (72% published; adjusted OR 2.0, 95% CI 1.0–4.0) compared to single-center trials (45% published). Trials that were not prospectively registered

  14. Early investigational therapeutics for gastrointestinal motility disorders: from animal studies to Phase II trials.

    PubMed

    Valentin, Nelson; Acosta, Andres; Camilleri, Michael

    2015-06-01

    The most common gastrointestinal disorders that include evidence of dysmotility include: gastroparesis, the lower functional gastrointestinal disorders associated with altered bowel function (such as chronic [functional] diarrhea, chronic idiopathic constipation) and opioid-induced constipation. These conditions, which are grouped as gastrointestinal motility and functional disorders, are characterized by abnormal motor, sensory or secretory functions that alter bowel function and result in a significant disease burden, since currently available treatments do not completely alleviate symptoms. New drugs are being developed for these disorders, targeting mechanisms involved in the pathophysiology of these diseases, specifically, motor function, intestinal secretion and bile acid modulation. The article provides a brief overview of motility disorders and the drugs approved and currently available for these indications. It also provides an evaluation of the efficacy, safety and possible mechanisms of the drugs currently under investigation for the treatment of gastroparesis, chronic diarrhea, chronic idiopathic constipation and opioid-induced constipation, based on animal to Phase II studies. Medications with complete Phase III trials are excluded from this discussion. Treatment of gastrointestinal motility disorders requires the understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms, biomarkers to identify subgroups of these disorders and robust pharmacological studies from animal to Phase II studies. These are prerequisites for the development of efficacious medications and individualizing therapy in order to enhance the treatment of these patients.

  15. Quantification of apixaban's therapeutic utility in prevention of venous thromboembolism: selection of phase III trial dose.

    PubMed

    Leil, T A; Feng, Y; Zhang, L; Paccaly, A; Mohan, P; Pfister, M

    2010-09-01

    A model-based approach was used to integrate data from a phase II study in order to provide a quantitative rationale for selecting the apixaban dosage regimen for a phase III trial. The exposure-response models demonstrated that an increase in daily steady-state area under the plasma concentration-vs.-time curve (AUC(ss)) of 1 microg x h/ml would increase the odds ratio for major bleeding by 0.118 and decrease the odds ratio for venous thromboembolism (VTE) by 0.0499. The therapeutic utility index (TUI) was used to integrate the efficacy and safety predictions to quantify apixaban's efficacy/safety balance as a function of AUC(ss). Of the apixaban dosage regimens tested in phase II, the 2.5 mg twice-daily (b.i.d.) dosage regimen had the highest TUI (86.2%). This was also higher than the TUI for either 30 mg b.i.d. enoxaparin (82.5%) or for warfarin (71.8%). Subjects with moderate renal impairment are expected to have a 43% increase in apixaban exposure; however, apixaban's TUI suggests that dose adjustment is not needed in these subjects with renal impairment.

  16. Early Investigational Therapeutics for Gastrointestinal Motility Disorders: From Animal Studies to Phase II Trials

    PubMed Central

    Valentin, Nelson; Acosta, Andres; Camilleri, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The most common gastrointestinal disorders which include evidence of dysmotility include: gastroparesis, the lower functional gastrointestinal disorders associated with altered bowel function [such as chronic (functional) diarrhea, chronic idiopathic constipation (CIC)], and opioid induced constipation (OIC). These conditions, which are grouped as gastrointestinal motility and functional disorders, are characterized by abnormal motor, sensory, or secretory functions that alter bowel function and result in a significant disease burden, since currently available treatments do not completely alleviate symptoms. New drugs are being developed for these disorders, targeting mechanisms involved in the pathophysiology of these diseases, specifically, motor function, intestinal secretion and bile acid modulation. Areas Covered The article provides a brief overview of motility disorders and the drugs approved and currently available for these indications. It also provides an evaluation of the efficacy, safety and possible mechanisms of the drugs currently under investigation for the treatment of gastroparesis, chronic diarrhea, CIC and OIC, based on animal to phase II studies. Medications with complete phase III trials are excluded from this discussion. Expert opinion Treatment of gastrointestinal motility disorders requires the understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms, biomarkers to identify subgroups of these disorders, and robust pharmacological studies from animal to phase II studies. These are prerequisites for the development of efficacious medications and individualizing therapy in order to enhance the treatment of these patients. PMID:25971881

  17. Design of phase I combination trials: recommendations of the Clinical Trial Design Task Force of the NCI Investigational Drug Steering Committee.

    PubMed

    Paller, Channing J; Bradbury, Penelope A; Ivy, S Percy; Seymour, Lesley; LoRusso, Patricia M; Baker, Laurence; Rubinstein, Larry; Huang, Erich; Collyar, Deborah; Groshen, Susan; Reeves, Steven; Ellis, Lee M; Sargent, Daniel J; Rosner, Gary L; LeBlanc, Michael L; Ratain, Mark J

    2014-08-15

    Anticancer drugs are combined in an effort to treat a heterogeneous tumor or to maximize the pharmacodynamic effect. The development of combination regimens, while desirable, poses unique challenges. These include the selection of agents for combination therapy that may lead to improved efficacy while maintaining acceptable toxicity, the design of clinical trials that provide informative results for individual agents and combinations, and logistic and regulatory challenges. The phase I trial is often the initial step in the clinical evaluation of a combination regimen. In view of the importance of combination regimens and the challenges associated with developing them, the Clinical Trial Design (CTD) Task Force of the National Cancer Institute Investigational Drug Steering Committee developed a set of recommendations for the phase I development of a combination regimen. The first two recommendations focus on the scientific rationale and development plans for the combination regimen; subsequent recommendations encompass clinical design aspects. The CTD Task Force recommends that selection of the proposed regimens be based on a biologic or pharmacologic rationale supported by clinical and/or robust and validated preclinical evidence, and accompanied by a plan for subsequent development of the combination. The design of the phase I clinical trial should take into consideration the potential pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic interactions as well as overlapping toxicity. Depending on the specific hypothesized interaction, the primary endpoint may be dose optimization, pharmacokinetics, and/or pharmacodynamics (i.e., biomarker).

  18. The influence of industry sponsorship on the reporting of subgroup analyses within phase III randomised controlled trials in gastrointestinal oncology.

    PubMed

    Barton, Sarah; Peckitt, Clare; Sclafani, Francesco; Cunningham, David; Chau, Ian

    2015-12-01

    Correct interpretation of subgroup analyses (SGA) is important as it influences selection of therapeutic interventions for patient subsets. The primary aim of our study was to compare reporting of SGA between industry and non-industry sponsored trials. We performed a systematic literature review and extracted data from journal articles (JA) and conference abstracts (CA) published over a decade reporting SGA results of phase III randomised controlled gastrointestinal (GI) oncology trials with patient participants of ≥150. In JA, SGA was reported in 100/145 (69%) trials: 41/54 industry sponsored (76%; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 63-86%) and 59/91 non-industry sponsored (65%; 95% CI: 55-74%) trials (p = 0.16). In CA, SGA was reported in 86/204 (42%) trials: 43/83 industry sponsored (52%; 95% CI: 41-62%) and 43/121 non-industry sponsored (36%; 95% CI: 28-44%) trials (p = 0.02). Number of SGA performed per trial was significantly larger for industry compared to non-industry sponsored trials in both JA (median 6 versus 2, p = 0.003) and CA (median 1 versus 0, p = 0.023). Claims of subgroup effect were made in 52% of trials in JA and 50% in CA, with significant test of interaction evident in only 25% of JA and 16% of CA, with no difference between industry and non-industry trials. Industry sponsored trials with a significant primary end-point reported more SGA (p < 0.001 JA; p = 0.046 CA). Industry sponsored trials reported more SGA. Claimed subgroup effects were often not accompanied by significant interaction test; thus circumspection should be adopted when using SGA to deviate from standard therapeutic decision-making in GI oncology. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Assessment and development of an industrial wet oxidation system for burning waste and low upgrade fuels. Final report, Phase 2B: Pilot demonstration of the MODAR supercritical water oxidation process

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-01-01

    Stone & Webster Engineering Corporation is Project Manager for the Development and Demonstration of an Industrial Wet Oxidation System for Burning Wastes and Low Grade Fuel. This program has been ongoing through a Cooperative Agreement sponsored by the Department of Energy, initiated in June 1988. This report presents a comprehensive discussion of the results of the demonstration project conducted under this cooperative agreement with the overall goal of advancing the state-of-the-art in the practice of Supercritical Water Oxidation (SCWO). In recognition of the Government`s support of this project, we have endeavored to include all material and results that are not proprietary in as much detail as possible while still protecting MODAR`s proprietary technology. A specific example is in the discussion of materials of construction where results are presented while, in some cases, the specific materials are not identified. The report presents the results chronologically. Background material on the earlier phases (Section 2) provide an understanding of the evolution of the program, and bring all reviewers to a common starting point. Section 3 provides a discussion of activities from October 1991 through July 1992, during which the pilot plant was designed; and various studies including computational fluid dynamic modeling of the reactor vessel, and a process HAZOP analyses were conducted. Significant events during fabrication are presented in Section 4. The experimental results of the test program (December 1992--August 1993) are discussed in Section 5.

  20. Historical controls for metastatic pancreatic cancer: benchmarks for planning and analyzing single-arm phase II trials.

    PubMed

    Philip, Philip A; Chansky, Kari; LeBlanc, Michael; Rubinstein, Lawrence; Seymour, Lesley; Ivy, S Percy; Alberts, Steven R; Catalano, Paul J; Crowley, John

    2014-08-15

    We compiled and analyzed a database of cooperative group trials in advanced pancreatic cancer to develop historical benchmarks for overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS). Such benchmarks are essential for evaluating new therapies in a single-arm setting. The analysis included patients with untreated metastatic pancreatic cancer receiving regimens that included gemcitabine, between 1995 and 2005. Prognostic baseline factors were selected by their significance in Cox regression analysis. Outlier trial arms were identified by comparing individual 6-month OS and PFS rates against the entire group. The dataset selected for the generation of OS and PFS benchmarks was then tested for intertrial arm variability using a logistic-normal model with the selected baseline prognostic factors as fixed effects and the individual trial arm as a random effect. A total of 1,132 cases from eight trials qualified. Performance status and sex were independently significant for OS, and performance status was prognostic for PFS. Outcomes for one trial (NCCTG-034A) were significantly different from the other trial arms. When this trial was excluded, the remaining trial arms were homogeneous for OS and PFS outcomes after adjusting for performance status and sex. Benchmark values for 6-month OS and PFS are reported along with a method for using these values in future study design and analysis. The benchmark survival values were generated from a dataset that was homogeneous between trials. The benchmarks can be used to enable single-arm phase II trials using a gemcitabine platform, especially under certain circumstances. Such circumstances might be when a randomized control arm is not practically feasible, an early signal of activity of an experimental agent is being explored such as in expansion cohorts of phase I studies, and in patients who are not candidates for combination cytotoxic therapy. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  1. Phase I safety trial of intravenous ascorbic acid in patients with severe sepsis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Parenterally administered ascorbic acid modulates sepsis-induced inflammation and coagulation in experimental animal models. The objective of this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, phase I trial was to determine the safety of intravenously infused ascorbic acid in patients with severe sepsis. Methods Twenty-four patients with severe sepsis in the medical intensive care unit were randomized 1:1:1 to receive intravenous infusions every six hours for four days of ascorbic acid: Lo-AscA (50 mg/kg/24 h, n = 8), or Hi-AscA (200 mg/kg/24 h, n = 8), or Placebo (5% dextrose/water, n = 8). The primary end points were ascorbic acid safety and tolerability, assessed as treatment-related adverse-event frequency and severity. Patients were monitored for worsened arterial hypotension, tachycardia, hypernatremia, and nausea or vomiting. In addition Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) scores and plasma levels of ascorbic acid, C-reactive protein, procalcitonin, and thrombomodulin were monitored. Results Mean plasma ascorbic acid levels at entry for the entire cohort were 17.9 ± 2.4 μM (normal range 50-70 μM). Ascorbic acid infusion rapidly and significantly increased plasma ascorbic acid levels. No adverse safety events were observed in ascorbic acid-infused patients. Patients receiving ascorbic acid exhibited prompt reductions in SOFA scores while placebo patients exhibited no such reduction. Ascorbic acid significantly reduced the proinflammatory biomarkers C-reactive protein and procalcitonin. Unlike placebo patients, thrombomodulin in ascorbic acid infused patients exhibited no significant rise, suggesting attenuation of vascular endothelial injury. Conclusions Intravenous ascorbic acid infusion was safe and well tolerated in this study and may positively impact the extent of multiple organ failure and biomarkers of inflammation and endothelial injury. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov identifier NCT01434121. PMID

  2. Interpreting Lymphocyte Reconstitution Data From the Pivotal Phase 3 Trials of Alemtuzumab.

    PubMed

    Baker, David; Herrod, Samuel S; Alvarez-Gonzalez, Cesar; Giovannoni, Gavin; Schmierer, Klaus

    2017-08-01

    Alemtuzumab, a CD52-depleting monoclonal antibody, effectively inhibits relapsing multiple sclerosis (MS) but is associated with a high incidence of secondary B-cell autoimmunities that limit use. These effects may be avoided through control of B-cell hyperproliferation. To investigate whether the data describing the effect of alemtuzumab on lymphocyte subsets collected during the phase 3 trial program reveal mechanisms explaining efficacy and the risk for secondary autoimmunity with treatment of MS. Lymphocyte reconstitution data from regulatory submissions of the pivotal Comparison of Alemtuzumab and Rebif Efficacy in Multiple Sclerosis I and II (CARE-MS I and II) trials were obtained from the European Medicines Agency via Freedom of Information requests. Data used in this study were reported from June 22 to October 12, 2016. Tabulated data from T- and B-lymphocyte subset analysis and antidrug antibody responses were extracted from the supplied documents. Alemtuzumab depleted CD4+ T cells by more than 95%, including regulatory cells (-80%) and CD8+ T cells (>80% depletion), which remained well below reference levels throughout the trials. However, although CD19+ B cells were initially also depleted (>85%), marked (180% increase) hyperrepopulation of immature B cells occurred with conversion to mature B cells over time. These lymphocyte kinetics were associated with rapid development of alemtuzumab-binding and -neutralizing antibodies and subsequent occurrence of secondary B-cell autoimmunity. Hyperrepopulation of B cells masked a marked, long-term depletion of CD19+ memory B cells that may underpin efficacy in MS. Although blockade of memory T and B cells may limit MS, rapid CD19+ B-cell subset repopulation in the absence of effective T-cell regulation has implications for the safety and efficacy of alemtuzumab. Controlling B-cell proliferation until T-cell regulation recovers may limit secondary autoimmunity, which does not occur with other B

  3. Phylodynamics of HIV-1 from a phase III AIDS vaccine trial in Bangkok, Thailand.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Losada, Marcos; Jobes, David V; Sinangil, Faruk; Crandall, Keith A; Arenas, Miguel; Posada, David; Berman, Phillip W

    2011-03-10

    In 2003, a phase III placebo-controlled trial (VAX003) was completed in Bangkok, Thailand. Of the 2,546 individuals enrolled in the trial based on high risk for infection through injection drug use (IDU), we obtained clinical samples and HIV-1 sequence data (envelope glycoprotein gene gp120) from 215 individuals who became infected during the trial. Here, we used these data in combination with other publicly available gp120 sequences to perform a molecular surveillance and phylodynamic analysis of HIV-1 in Thailand. Phylogenetic and population genetic estimators were used to assess HIV-1 gp120 diversity as a function of vaccination treatment, viral load (VL) and CD4(+) counts, to identify transmission clusters and to investigate the timescale and demographics of HIV-1 in Thailand. Three HIV-1 subtypes were identified: CRF01_AE (85% of the infections), subtype B (13%) and CRF15_AE (2%). The Bangkok IDU cohort showed more gp120 diversity than other Asian IDU cohorts and similar diversity to that observed in sexually infected individuals. Moreover, significant differences (P<0.02) in genetic diversity were observed in CRF01_AE IDU with different VL and CD4(+) counts. No phylogenetic structure was detected regarding any of the epidemiological and clinical factors tested, although high proportions (35% to 50%) of early infections fell into clusters, which suggests that transmission chains associated with acute infection play a key role on HIV-1 spread among IDU. CRF01_AE was estimated to have emerged in Thailand in 1984.5 (1983-1986), 3-6 years before the first recognition of symptomatic patients (1989). The relative genetic diversity of the HIV-1 population has remained high despite decreasing prevalence rates since the mid 1990s. Our study and recent epidemiological reports indicate that HIV-1 is still a major threat in Thailand and suggest that HIV awareness and prevention needs to be strengthened to avoid AIDS resurgence.

  4. A Multiinstitutional Phase 2 Trial of Pazopanib Monotherapy in Advanced Anaplastic Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Suman, Vera J.; Menefee, Michael E.; Smallridge, Robert C.; Molina, Julian R.; Maples, William J.; Karlin, Nina J.; Traynor, Anne M.; Kumar, Priya; Goh, Boon Cher; Lim, Wan-Teck; Bossou, Ayoko R.; Isham, Crescent R.; Webster, Kevin P.; Kukla, Andrea K.; Bieber, Carolyn; Burton, Jill K.; Harris, Pamela; Erlichman, Charles

    2012-01-01

    Context/Objectives: Pazopanib, an inhibitor of kinases including vascular endothelial growth factor receptor, demonstrated impressive activity in progressive metastatic differentiated thyroid cancer, prompting its evaluation in anaplastic thyroid cancer (ATC). Design/Setting/Patients/Interventions/Outcome Measures: Preclinical studies, followed by a multicenter single arm phase 2 trial of continuously administered 800 mg pazopanib daily by mouth (designed to provide 90% chance of detecting a response rate of >20% at the 0.10 significance level when the true response rate is >5%), were undertaken. The primary trial end point was Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST) response. Results: Pazopanib displayed activity in the KTC2 ATC xenograft model, prompting clinical evaluation. Sixteen trial patients were enrolled; 15 were treated: 66.7% were female, median age was 66 yr (range 45–77 yr), and 11 of 15 had progressed through prior systemic therapy. Enrollment was halted, triggered by a stopping rule requiring more than one confirmed RECIST response among the first 14 of 33 potential patients. Four patients required one to two dose reductions; severe toxicities (National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria-Adverse Events version 3.0 grades >3) were hypertension (13%) and pharyngolaryngeal pain (13%). Treatment was discontinued because of the following: disease progression (12 patients), death due to a possibly treatment-related tumor hemorrhage (one patient), and intolerability (radiation recall tracheitis and uncontrolled hypertension, one patient each). Although transient disease regression was observed in several patients, there were no confirmed RECIST responses. Median time to progression was 62 d; median survival time was 111 d. Two patients are alive with disease 9.9 and 35 months after the registration; 13 died of disease. Conclusions: Despite preclinical in vivo activity in ATC, pazopanib has minimal single-agent clinical activity in

  5. Patient expectations of benefit from phase I clinical trials: linguistic considerations in diagnosing a therapeutic misconception.

    PubMed

    Weinfurt, K P; Sulmasy, D P; Schulman, K A; Meropol, N J

    2003-01-01

    The ethical treatment of cancer patients participating in clinical trials requires that patients are well-informed about the potential benefits and risks associated with participation. When patients enrolled in phase I clinical trials report that their chance of benefit is very high, this is often taken as evidence of a failure of the informed consent process. We argue, however, that some simple themes from the philosophy of language may make such a conclusion less certain. First, the patient may receive conflicting statements from multiple speakers about the expected outcome of the trial. Patients may be reporting the message they like best. Second, there is a potential problem of multivocality. Expressions of uncertainty of the frequency type (e.g., "On average, 5 out of every 100 patients will benefit") can be confused with expressions of uncertainty of the belief type (e.g., "The chance that I will benefit is about 80%"). Patients may be informed using frequency-type statements and respond using belief-type statements. Third, each speech episode involving the investigator and the patient regarding outcomes may subserve multiple speech acts, some of which may be indirect. For example, a patient reporting a high expected benefit may be reporting a belief about the future, reassuring family members, and/or attempting to improve his or her outcome by a public assertion of optimism. These sources of linguistic confusion should be considered in judging whether the patient's reported expectation is grounds for a bioethical concern that there has been a failure in the informed consent process.

  6. DD-08PHASE I CANCER CLINICAL TRIAL FOR 4-DEMETHYL-4-CHOLESTERYLOXYCARBONYLPENCLOMEDINE (DM-CHOC-PEN)

    PubMed Central

    Ware, Marcus; Weiner, Roy; Friedlander, Paul; Gordon, Crag; Saenger, Yvonne; Mahmood, Tallat; Rodgers, Andrew; Bastian, Gerald; Urien, S.; Lee; Morgan, Roy

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: DM-CHOC-PEN is a poly-chlorinated pyridine cholesteryl carbonate whose MOA is via alkylation of DNA @ N7 – guanine and via oxidative stress. The aims of this clinical trial were to determine maximum-tolerated dose (MTD), safety, dose-limiting toxicities (DLTs), pharmacokinetics (PK) of DM-CHOC-PEN and monitor for clinical responses. METHODS: DM-CHOC-PEN was administered as a 3-hr IV infusion once every 21-days to patients with advanced cancer; melanoma (n = 3), colorectal CA (n = 3), breast (n = 3) and glioblastoma multiforme (n = 6). The trial included patients with advanced cancer +/- CNS involvement. The starting dose was 39 mg/m2 with escalations to date up to 111 mg/m2. RESULTS: Twenty-six (26) patients have been treated. The MTD was 2-tiered and defined as 85.8 mg/m2 for patients with liver involvement and 98.7 mg/m2 for patients without liver abnormalities. The most common adverse effects were fatigue (n = 2), liver dysfunction – elevated bilirubin (Gr-3, n = 3; Gr-2, n = 1), ALT/AST (Gr-2, n = 3), alk phos (Gr-2, n = 3) and an allergic reaction (Gr-2, n = 1). Three (3) patients with liver metastasis demonstrated hyperbilirubinemia (Gr-3 SLT) – 2 at the 98.7 mg/m2 and one (1) at the 111 mg/m2 levels Five (5) additional patients with liver disease have been treated at 85.8 mg/m2 level without toxicity. CONCLUSIONS: DM-CHOC-PEN is safe at the presented dose levels and has a favorable PK profile. Eight (8) patients had responses or significant PFS, including 6 with CNS involvement. A Phase II trial has begun in patients with primary brain cancer and brain metastases from melanoma, breast cancer and lung cancer.

  7. Sodium superionic conduction in Na2B12H12.

    PubMed

    Udovic, Terrence J; Matsuo, Motoaki; Unemoto, Atsushi; Verdal, Nina; Stavila, Vitalie; Skripov, Alexander V; Rush, John J; Takamura, Hitoshi; Orimo, Shin-ichi

    2014-04-11

    Impedance measurements indicate that Na2B12H12 exhibits dramatic Na(+) conductivity (on the order of 0.1 S cm(-1)) above its order-disorder phase-transition at ≈529 K, rivaling that of current, solid-state, ceramic-based, Na-battery electrolytes. Superionicity may be aided by the large size, quasispherical shape, and high rotational mobility of the B12H12(2-) anions.

  8. Phase II trial of piritrexim and DTIC using an alternating dose schedule in metastatic melanoma.

    PubMed

    Feun, L G; Robinson, W A; Savaraj, N; Gonzalez, R; Liebmann, A; Offenhauser, K; Clendeninn, N J

    1995-12-01

    A Phase II trial was conducted in patients with metastatic malignant melanoma with DTIC 250 mg/m2 intravenously for 5 days alternating monthly with Piritrexim (PTX) using an intermittent, low-dose oral administration schedule. PTX was administered at a starting dose of 25 mg orally three times per day for 5 days weekly for 3 weeks followed by 1 week of rest. Twenty-one patients were entered into the study. Among the 17 patients assessable for response, 1 patient had a minor response, and 3 patients had stable disease. No partial or complete response were observed. Toxicity was tolerable and consistent mainly of myelosuppression. Using this alternating dose schedule, PTX and DTIC produced little response in metastatic melanoma.

  9. [Results of phase II clinical trial of vindesine in the treatment of malignant tumors].

    PubMed

    Wang, J; Zhang, H; Sun, Y

    1996-07-01

    A phase III clinical trial of vindesine-containing regimens organized by Chinese Medical Association was conducted from November 1993 to October 1994. In 799 evaluable cases, the overall response rate was 64.5% and the individual response rate was 74.1% for SCLC, 52.6% for NSCLC, 88.0% for malignant lymphomas, 62.6% for breast cancer, 57.5% for esophageal carcinoma, 59.0% for overian carcinoma and 94.0% for ALL. There were 1532 patients evaluable for toxicity. The dose-limiting toxicity was myelosuppression. Gastro-intestinal reactions, peripheral neuritis, alopecia and phlebtitis were also common. It is concluded that vindesine is similar to that reported as to response rate and toxicity.

  10. Phase I clinical trial of an injectable contraceptive for the male.

    PubMed

    Guha, S K; Singh, G; Anand, S; Ansari, S; Kumar, S; Koul, V

    1993-10-01

    Earlier studies on the rat and the monkey had demonstrated that an injection of styrene maleic anhydride (SMA) in a solvent vehicle of dimethyl sulphoxide (DMSO) into the lumen of the vas deferens is toxicologically safe and has contraceptive action. Phase I clinical trial was therefore undertaken on 38 male volunteers giving varying doses of SMA, ranging between 5 mg and 140 mg, into each vas deferens. A dose of 70 mg is the predicted therapeutic dose based on animal data. That the compound is within the vas deferens lumen during the period of the safety assessment is inferred from the effect on the spermatozoa count in ejaculates which reach azoospermic levels in the higher dose ranges. The treatment is well tolerated with only minimal side effects in a few cases and no long-term adverse effects.

  11. Use of placebos in Phase 1 preventive HIV vaccine clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yunda; Karuna, Shelly T; Janes, Holly; Frahm, Nicole; Nason, Martha; Edlefsen, Paul T; Kublin, James G; Corey, Lawrence; McElrath, M Juliana; Gilbert, Peter B

    2015-02-04

    Phase 1 preventive HIV vaccine trials are often designed as randomized, double-blind studies with the inclusion of placebo recipients. Careful consideration is needed to determine when the inclusion of placebo recipients is highly advantageous and when it is optional for achieving the study objectives of assessing vaccine safety, tolerability and immunogenicity. The inclusion of placebo recipients is generally important to form a reference group that ensures fair evaluation and interpretation of subjective study endpoints, or endpoints whose levels may change due to exposures besides vaccination. In some settings, however, placebo recipients are less important because other data sources and tools are available to achieve the study objectives. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Semantic priming increases left hemisphere theta power and inter-trial phase synchrony

    PubMed Central

    Salisbury, Dean F; Taylor, Grantley

    2011-01-01

    Information is stored in distributed cortical networks, but it is unclear how distributed stores are synthesized into a unified percept. Activation of local circuits in the gamma range (30<>80 Hz), and distributed stores in the low theta range (3–5 Hz) may underlie perceptual binding. Words have a crucial role in semantic memory. Within memory the activation of distributed semantic stores is facilitated by conceptually related previous items, termed semantic priming. We sought to detect event-related brain oscillations (EROs) sensitive to semantic activation and priming. Here we show that low theta evoked power and inter-trial phase locking (4–5 Hz) from 250–350 msec over left hemisphere language areas was greater to related than to unrelated words. Theta band event-related oscillations over left hemisphere language areas may provide a brain signature for semantic activation across distributed stores being facilitated by semantic priming. PMID:22176140

  13. Evaluation of a prototype dengue-1 DNA vaccine in a Phase 1 clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Beckett, Charmagne G; Tjaden, Jeffrey; Burgess, Timothy; Danko, Janine R; Tamminga, Cindy; Simmons, Monika; Wu, Shuenn-Jue; Sun, Peifang; Kochel, Tadeusz; Raviprakash, Kanakatte; Hayes, Curtis G; Porter, Kevin R

    2011-01-29

    Candidate dengue DNA vaccine constructs for each dengue serotype were developed by incorporating pre-membrane and envelope genes into a plasmid vector. A Phase 1 clinical trial was performed using the dengue virus serotype-1 (DENV-1) vaccine construct (D1ME(100)). The study was an open-label, dose-escalation, safety and immunogenicity trial involving 22 healthy flavivirus-naïve adults assigned to one of two groups. Each group received three intramuscular injections (0, 1, and 5 months) of either a high dose (5.0mg, n=12) or a low dose (1.0mg, n=10) DNA vaccine using the needle-free Biojector(®) 2000. The most commonly reported solicited signs and symptoms were local mild pain or tenderness (10/22, 45%), local mild swelling (6/22, 27%), muscle pain (6/22, 27%) and fatigue (6/22, 27%). Five subjects (41.6%) in the high dose group and none in the low dose group developed detectable anti-dengue neutralizing antibodies. T-cell IFN gamma responses were detected in 50% (4/8) and 83.3% (10/12) of subjects in the low and high dose groups, respectively. The safety profile of the DENV-1 DNA vaccine is acceptable at both doses administered in the study. These results demonstrate a favorable reactogenicity and safety profile of the first in human evaluation of a DENV-1 DNA vaccine.

  14. Maintaining the cold chain shipping environment for Phase I clinical trial distribution.

    PubMed

    Elliott, M A; Halbert, G W

    2005-08-11

    The study aimed to demonstrate satisfactory inter-UK transit of cold storage clinical trial material. The product environment had to be maintained between 0 and 8 degrees C throughout transit until delivery. Straightforward, low cost and simplified shipping arrangements were sought that would be appropriate for small-scale Phase I clinical trial activities. A laboratory test defined an optimal three frozen gel pack configuration to maintain refrigerated environmental conditions for dummy product packs in a single type and size of insulated shipper. The internal environment was temperature monitored at 30-min intervals in all tests. Twelve Glasgow to London transits were then studied over 2 years to include all seasonal temperature variations. A configuration using three frozen gel packs and 4 h pre-chill of the transit container maintained the internal environment at 0-8 degrees C for up to 48 h during autumn, winter and spring. A modified four frozen gel pack configuration was suitable for summer transit. Thus cold shipment verification was successfully carried out for a small-scale distribution operation. It was proven that refrigerated shipping conditions could be maintained using a straightforward and cost effective 'passive' type system consisting of frozen gel packs and insulated transit containers.

  15. In situ photoimmunotherapy for melanoma: an ongoing phase I clinical trial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naylor, Mark F.; Nordquist, Robert E.; Teague, T. Kent; Perry, Lisa A.; Chen, Wei R.

    2007-02-01

    In situ Photoimmunotherapy (ISPI) was developed to treat metastatic tumors using a combination of phototherapy and immunotherapy. It utilizes local intervention through photothermal destruction of existing solid tumors and through immune response modifier to elicit host anti-tumor responses. Such combination in pre-clinical studies has shown promise in cancer treatment by eradicating the primary tumors and also controlling metastases at distant sites. ISPI has been used in our preliminary clinical studies for melanoma patients and the outcome has been extremely encouraging. In 2006, we began enrolling patients in a new phase I immunotherapy trial for advanced cutaneous melanoma. This trial is based on our previous results which indicated that we had developed an effective treatment for advanced melanoma. Of the first six patients treated, (4 stage IV, and 2 surgically unresectable stage III), 2 of the stage IV patients are still alive, one tumor free, and one with a possible treatable recurrence after 2 1/2 years. We have also discovered that recurrences of the skin cancer can be retreated by the same technique and that treatment seems to blunt the virulence of the disease and make it more treatable. These initial results indicate that ISPI probably will have the ability to prolong survival in selected cases of advanced melanoma, and potentially cure a significant percentage of treated patients.

  16. Phase I trial of ATRA-IV and depakote in patients with advanced solid tumor malignancies

    PubMed Central

    David, Kevin A; Mongan, Nigel P; Smith, Christopher; Gudas, Lorraine J

    2010-01-01

    Retinoic acid derivatives have shown their greatest benefit in acute promyelocytic leukemia, but have also demonstrated pre-clinical anti-cancer effects in some solid tumors. Histone deacetylase inhibitors, by upregulating gene expression, are able to limit cancer cell proliferation and induce apoptosis. The combination of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) and the histone deacetylase inhibitor valproic acid has been previously studied in hematologic malignancies. We conducted a Phase I two-step dose escalation trial of the liposomal ATRA analog ATRA-IV and divalproex sodium (Depakote®) in nine patients with advanced solid tumors refractory to prior therapy. Side effects attributed to therapy had a severity ≤grade 2 and included skin toxicity and thrombocytopenia. The best disease response seen was disease stabilization in one patient. Expression of cellular retinoic acid binding protein-2 in peripheral blood mononuclear cells was detected as a marker of drug effect. The maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of both drugs in combination could not be established due to early closure of the trial resulting from a halt in the commercial availability of ATRA-IV. PMID:20200483

  17. Drugs in Phase II clinical trials for the treatment of age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Tolentino, Michael John; Dennrick, Abrahan; John, Elizabeth; Tolentino, Michael Steven

    2015-02-01

    The clinical development of anti-VEGF therapies for the treatment of exudative age-related macular degeneration (wet AMD) has revolutionized ophthalmology. Indeed, it has provided clinicians and patients with treatments that lessen visual loss from in a disease that once was uniformly blinding. Although blindness is yet to be eradicated from AMD, repeated intraocular anti-VEGF injections are required to preserve a patient's vision. Therefore, further advances in this field are necessary. This review provides an overview of the agents that are in mid-stage phase trials for both exudative (wet AMD) and nonexudative macular degeneration (dry AMD). For wet AMD, new agents intend to enhance efficacy, develop alternative delivery such as eye drops, investigate alternate targets and construct sustained release strategies. For advanced dry AMD, the goal is to develop a strategy to slow or stop progressive loss of retinal tissue seen in geographic atrophy, the hallmark of advanced dry AMD. It is important to develop better more sensitive biomarkers, validating different approvable clinical trial endpoints and stratifying patients on their genetic polymorphisms. These developments should help to progress the already rapidly developing field of macular degeneration therapy.

  18. High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy as a Monotherapy for Favorable-Risk Prostate Cancer: A Phase II Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Barkati, Maroie; Williams, Scott G.; Foroudi, Farshad; Tai, Keen Hun; Chander, Sarat; Dyk, Sylvia van; See, Andrew; Duchesne, Gillian M.

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: There are multiple treatment options for favorable-risk prostate cancer. High-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy as a monotherapy is appealing, but its use is still investigational. A Phase II trial was undertaken to explore the value of such treatment in low-to-intermediate risk prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: This was a single-institution, prospective study. Eligible patients had low-risk prostate cancer features but also Gleason scores of 7 (51% of patients) and stage T2b to T2c cancer. Treatment with HDR brachytherapy with a single implant was administered over 2 days. One of four fractionation schedules was used in a dose escalation study design: 3 fractions of 10, 10.5, 11, or 11.5 Gy. Patients were assessed with the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 2.0 for urinary toxicity, the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer scoring schema for rectal toxicity, and the Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite (EPIC) questionnaire to measure patient-reported health-related quality of life. Biochemical failure was defined as a prostate-specific antigen (PSA) nadir plus 2 ng/ml. Results: Between 2003 and 2008, 79 patients were enrolled. With a median follow-up of 39.5 months, biochemical relapse occurred in 7 patients. Three- and 5-year actuarial biochemical control rates were 88.4% (95% confidence interval [CI], 78.0-96.2%) and 85.1% (95% CI, 72.5-94.5%), respectively. Acute grade 3 urinary toxicity was seen in only 1 patient. There was no instance of acute grade 3 rectal toxicity. Rates of late grade 3 rectal toxicity, dysuria, hematuria, urinary retention, and urinary incontinence were 0%, 10.3%, 1.3%, 9.0%, and 0%, respectively. No grade 4 or greater toxicity was recorded. Among the four (urinary, bowel, sexual, and hormonal) domains assessed with the EPIC questionnaire, only the sexual domain did not recover with time. Conclusions: HDR brachytherapy as a monotherapy for favorable

  19. The costs and effectiveness of large Phase III pre-licensure vaccine clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Black, Steven

    2015-01-01

    Prior to the 1980s, most vaccines were licensed based upon safety and effectiveness studies in several hundred individuals. Beginning with the evaluation of Haemophilus influenzae type b conjugate vaccines, much larger pre-licensure trials became common. The pre-licensure trial for Haemophilus influenzae oligosaccharide conjugate vaccine had more than 60,000 children and that of the seven-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine included almost 38,000 children. Although trial sizes for both of these studies were driven by the sample size required to demonstrate efficacy, the sample size requirements for safety evaluations of other vaccines have subsequently increased. With the demonstration of an increased risk of intussusception following the Rotashield brand rotavirus vaccine, this trend has continued. However, routinely requiring safety studies of 20,000-50,000 or more participants has two major downsides. First, the cost of performing large safety trials routinely prior to licensure of a vaccine is very large, with some estimates as high at US$200 million euros for one vaccine. This high financial cost engenders an opportunity cost whereby the number of vaccines that a company is willing or able to develop to meet public health needs becomes limited by this financial barrier. The second downside is that in the pre-licensure setting, such studies are very time consuming and delay the availability of a beneficial vaccine substantially. One might argue that in some situations, this financial commitment is warranted such as for evaluations of the risk of intussusception following newer rotavirus vaccines. However, it must be noted that while an increased risk of intussusception was not identified in large pre-licensure studies, in post marketing evaluations an increased risk of this outcome has been identified. Thus, even the extensive pre-licensure evaluations conducted did not identify an associated risk. The limitations of large Phase III trials have also been

  20. Neovastat, a naturally occurring multifunctional antiangiogenic drug, in phase III clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Falardeau, P; Champagne, P; Poyet, P; Hariton, C; Dupont, E

    2001-12-01

    more than 6 months. Two phase III clinical trials are currently underway. A phase III double-blind placebo-controlled study is being conducted to evaluate the efficacy of Neovastat in addition to induction chemotherapy/radiotherapy combined modality treatment in patients with unresectable non-small cell lung cancer stage IIIA and IIIB. A second phase III randomized, double-blind placebo-controlled study evaluates the efficacy of Neovastat as a monotherapy in metastatic renal cell carcinoma patients who have progressed following a first-line immunotherapy. Neovastat efficacy is also being evaluated in a registration phase II trial in patients with early relapse or refractory multiple myeloma.

  1. Phase II trial of low-dose continuous (metronomic) treatment of temozolomide for recurrent glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Kong, Doo-Sik; Lee, Jung-Il; Kim, Jong Hyun; Kim, Sung Tae; Kim, Won Seog; Suh, Yeon-Lim; Dong, Seung Myung; Nam, Do-Hyun

    2010-03-01

    The prognosis for patients with recurrent glioblastomas (GBMs) is dismal, with a median survival of 3-6 months. We performed a phase II trial of low-dose continuous (metronomic) treatment using temozolomide (TMZ) for recurrent GBMs. TMZ-refractory patients with GBM who experienced disease recurrence or progression during or after the cyclic treatment schedule of TMZ after surgery and standard radiotherapy were eligible. This phase II trial included 2 cohorts of patients. The initial cohort, comprising 10 patients, received TMZ at 40 mg/m(2) everyday. After this regimen seemed safe and effective, the metronomic schedule was changed to 50 mg/m(2) everyday. The second cohort, comprising 28 patients, received TMZ at 50 mg/m(2) everyday. The 6-month progression-free survival in all 38 patients was 32.5% (95% CI: 29.3%-35.8%) and the 6-month overall survival was 56.0% (95% CI: 36.2%-75.8%). One patient developed a grade III neutropenia, grade II thrombocytopenia in 3 patients, and grade II increase of liver enzyme (GOT/GPT) in 3 patients. Of all patients included in this study, 4 patients were withdrawn from this study because of side effects including sustained hematological disorders, cryptococcal infection, and cellulitis. In a response group, quality of life measured with short form-36 was well preserved, when compared with the pretreatment status. Metronomic treatment of TMZ is an effective treatment for recurrent GBM that is even refractory to conventional treatment of TMZ and has acceptable toxicity.

  2. Randomised phase 2 trial of intra-coronary nitrite during acute myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Daniel A; Pellaton, Cyril; Velmurugan, Shanti; Rathod, Krishnaraj Sinha; Andiapen, Mervyn; Antoniou, Sotiris; van Eijl, Sven; Webb, Andrew J; Westwood, Mark A; Parmar, Mahesh K; Mathur, Anthony; Ahluwalia, Amrita

    2015-01-01

    Rationale Pre-clinical evidence demonstrates that inorganic nitrite, following its in situ conversion to nitric oxide, attenuates consequent myocardial reperfusion injury. Objective We investigated whether intra-coronary injection of nitrite during primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) might improve infarct size in ST-elevated myocardial infarction (STEMI). Methods and Results Patients undergoing primary PCI (n=80) were randomised to receive intracoronary (10mL) sodium nitrite (1.8μmol) or NaCl (placebo) before balloon inflation. The primary endpoint was infarct size assessed by measuring creatine kinase (CK) release. Secondary outcomes included infarct size assessed by troponin T release and by cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) on day 2. Baseline characteristics were similar between the groups. No evidence of differences in CK release (p=0.92), troponin T (p=0.85) or CMR-assessed infarct size (p=0.254) were evident. In contrast there was an improvement in myocardial salvage index (p=0.05) and reduction in MACE at 1 year (2.6% vs 15.8%, p=0.04) in the nitrite group. In a 66-patient sub-group with TIMI≤1 flow there was reduced serum CK (p=0.030) and a 19% reduction in CMR-determined infarct size (p=0.034) with nitrite. No adverse effects of nitrite were detected. Conclusions In this phase II study intra-coronary nitrite infusion did not alter infarct size although a trend to improved myocardial salvage index and a significant reduction in MACE was evident. In a sub-group of patients with TIMI flow≤1 nitrite reduced infarct size and MACE and improved myocardial salvage index indicating that a phase III clinical trial assessing intra-coronary nitrite administration as an adjunct to PCI in STEMI patients is warranted. Clinical Trial Registration URL: http://clinicaltrials.gov NCT01584453. PMID:25512434

  3. A phase 2 multiple ascending dose trial of bapineuzumab in mild to moderate Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Salloway, S; Sperling, R; Gilman, S; Fox, N C; Blennow, K; Raskind, M; Sabbagh, M; Honig, L S; Doody, R; van Dyck, C H; Mulnard, R; Barakos, J; Gregg, K M; Liu, E; Lieberburg, I; Schenk, D; Black, R; Grundman, M

    2009-12-15

    Bapineuzumab, a humanized anti-amyloid-beta (Abeta) monoclonal antibody for the potential treatment of Alzheimer disease (AD), was evaluated in a multiple ascending dose, safety, and efficacy study in mild to moderate AD. The study enrolled 234 patients, randomly assigned to IV bapineuzumab or placebo in 4 dose cohorts (0.15, 0.5, 1.0, or 2.0 mg/kg). Patients received 6 infusions, 13 weeks apart, with final assessments at week 78. The prespecified primary efficacy analysis in the modified intent-to-treat population assumed linear decline and compared treatment differences within dose cohorts on the Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale-Cognitive and Disability Assessment for Dementia. Exploratory analyses combined dose cohorts and did not assume a specific pattern of decline. No significant differences were found in the primary efficacy analysis. Exploratory analyses showed potential treatment differences (p < 0.05, unadjusted for multiple comparisons) on cognitive and functional endpoints in study "completers" and APOE epsilon4 noncarriers. Reversible vasogenic edema, detected on brain MRI in 12/124 (9.7%) bapineuzumab-treated patients, was more frequent in higher dose groups and APOE epsilon4 carriers. Six vasogenic edema patients were asymptomatic; 6 experienced transient symptoms. Primary efficacy outcomes in this phase 2 trial were not significant. Potential treatment differences in the exploratory analyses support further investigation of bapineuzumab in phase 3 with special attention to APOE epsilon4 carrier status. Due to varying doses and a lack of statistical precision, this Class II ascending dose trial provides insufficient evidence to support or refute a benefit of bapineuzumab.

  4. Phase 3 Trials of Thermosensitive Ciprofloxacin Gel for Middle Ear Effusion in Children with Tubes

    PubMed Central

    Park, Albert H.; White, David R.; Moss, Jonathan R.; Bear, Moraye; LeBel, Carl

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the efficacy, safety, and microbiology of a thermosensitive otic suspension of ciprofloxacin (OTO-201) in children with bilateral middle ear effusion undergoing tympanostomy tube placement. Study Design Two randomized, double-blind, sham-controlled phase 3 trials. Patients were randomized to intratympanic OTO-201 or sham. Setting Children with bilateral middle ear effusion undergoing tympanostomy tube placement. Subjects/Methods Studies evaluated 532 patients (6 months to 17 years old) in a combined analysis of efficacy (treatment failure: presence of otorrhea, otic or systemic antibiotic use, lost to follow-up, missed visits), safety (audiometry, otoscopy, tympanometry), and microbiology. Results There was a lower cumulative proportion of treatment failures in patients receiving OTO-201 vs tympanostomy tubes alone (1) on days 4, 8, 15, and 29; (2) on day 15, primary end point (23.0% vs 45.1%; age-adjusted odds ratio, 0.341; P < .001; reduction in relative risk, 49%); and (3) on day 15, blinded-assessor otorrhea treatment failure (7.0% vs 19.4%; age-adjusted odds ratio, 0.303; P < .001; reduction in relative risk, 64%). Per-protocol and subgroup analyses (baseline demographics, pathogen type, culture status, effusion type, microbiologic response) supported these findings. There were no drug-related serious adverse events; the most frequent treatment-emergent adverse events in both groups were pyrexia, postoperative pain, nasopharyngitis, cough, and upper respiratory tract infection. OTO-201 administration had no evidence of increased tube occlusion and no negative effect on audiometry, tympanometry, or otoscopy. Conclusions Combined analysis of 2 phase 3 trials demonstrated a lower cumulative proportion of treatment failures through day 15 compared with TT alone when OTO-201 was administered intratympanically for otitis media with bilateral middle ear effusion at time of tympanostomy tube placement. PMID:27188702

  5. [Phase I trial of a recombinant human interleukin 2. Results in patients with disseminated solid tumors].

    PubMed

    Tursz, T; Dorval, T; Berthaud, P; Jouve, M; Avril, M F; Garcia-Giralt, E; Le Chevalier, T; Spielmann, M; Sevin, D; Palangie, T

    1991-02-16

    A phase I trial of Roussel-Uclaf recombinant human interleukin 2 (IL 2) was performed on 31 cancer bearing patients of the Institut Gustave-Roussy, Villejuif, and the Institut Curie, Paris. This study allowed to define a schedule for administration of IL 2 in continuous infusion over 5 day cycles. This schedule is manageable in patients without major visceral failure. It is reproducibly feasible in conventional medical oncology units, without specialized intensive care facilities. Toxicities, although numerous, are acceptable for IL 2 doses below 24,000,000 IU/m2/day. There is a close relationship between secondary effect severity and IL 2 doses received. Main toxicities were: fever with chills, fatigue and general discomfort in 23 patients, nauseas and vomiting in 12, diarrhea in 10 and cutaneous rashes with erythema and dermal vascularitis in 13. One peculiar feature of this study was the minimal occurrence of manifestation related to leaky capillary syndrome prominant in other studies. Oliguria, functional renal failure and edema were observed in only 4 patients with functionally unique kidney. Five patients had severe anemia, 2 grade III thrombocytopenia, 1 grade IV hepatic cytolysis, 4 severe confusion episodes and 2 hypothyroidism with anti-thyroid microsome auto-antibodies. All these toxicities were reversible after withdrawal of IL 2 treatment. During this phase I trial, 3 therapeutic objective responses were observed, all 3 occurring in patients with metastatic melanoma treated with IL 2 doses equal to, or above 16,000,00 IU/m2/d. Recombinant IL 2 Roussel-Uclaf thus can be administered through a simple, manageable and efficient regimen.

  6. Phase I trial of daily triapine in combination with cisplatin chemotherapy for advanced-stage malignancies.

    PubMed

    Kunos, Charles A; Chu, Edward; Beumer, Jan H; Sznol, Mario; Ivy, S Percy

    2017-01-01

    Advanced-stage malignancies have increased deoxyribonucleotide demands in DNA replication and repair, making deoxyribonucleotide supply a potential exploitable target for therapy based on ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) inhibition. A dose-finding phase I trial was conducted of intravenous (i.v.) triapine, a small-molecule RNR inhibitor, and cisplatin chemotherapy in patients with advanced-stage solid tumor malignancies. Patients received dose-finding levels of i.v. triapine (48-96 mg/m(2)) and i.v. cisplatin (20-75 mg/m(2)) on 1 of 3 different schedules. The primary endpoint was to identify the maximum tolerated dose of a triapine-cisplatin combination. Secondary endpoints included the rate of triapine-cisplatin objective response and the pharmacokinetics and bioavailability of a single oral triapine dose. (Clinicaltrials.gov number, NCT00024323). The MTD was 96 mg/m(2) triapine daily days 1-4 and 75 mg/m(2) cisplatin split over day 2 and day 3. Frequent grade 3 or 4 adverse events included fatigue, dyspnea, leukopenia, thrombocytopenia, and electrolyte abnormalities. No objective responses were observed; 5 (50%) of 10 patients treated at the MTD had stable disease. Pharmacokinetics indicated an oral triapine bioavailability of 88%. The triapine-cisplatin combination may be given safely in patients with advanced-stage solid tumor malignancies. On the basis of these results, a phase I trial adequately powered to evaluate oral triapine bioavailability in women with advanced-stage uterine cervix or vulvar cancers is underway.

  7. Bryostatin Effects on Cognitive Function and PKCɛ in Alzheimer's Disease Phase IIa and Expanded Access Trials.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Thomas J; Sun, Miao-Kun; Lim, Chol; Sen, Abhik; Khan, Tapan; Chirila, Florin V; Alkon, Daniel L

    2017-01-01

    Bryostatin 1, a potent activator of protein kinase C epsilon (PKCɛ), has been shown to reverse synaptic loss and facilitate synaptic maturation in animal models of Alzheimer's disease (AD), Fragile X, stroke, and other neurological disorders. In a single-dose (25 μg/m2) randomized double-blind Phase IIa clinical trial, bryostatin levels reached a maximum at 1-2 h after the start of infusion. In close parallel with peak blood levels of bryostatin, an increase of PBMC PKCɛ was measured (p = 0.0185) within 1 h from the onset of infusion. Of 9 patients with a clinical diagnosis of AD, of which 6 received drug and 3 received vehicle within a double-blind protocol, bryostatin increased the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) score by +1.83±0.70 unit at 3 h versus -1.00±1.53 unit for placebo. Bryostatin was well tolerated in these AD patients and no drug-related adverse events were reported. The 25 μg/m2 administered dose was based on prior clinical experience with three Expanded Access advanced AD patients treated with bryostatin, in which return of major functions such as swallowing, vocalization, and word recognition were noted. In one Expanded Access patient trial, elevated PKCɛ levels closely tracked cognitive benefits in the first 24 weeks as measured by MMSE and ADCS-ADL psychometrics. Pre-clinical mouse studies showed effective activation of PKCɛ and increased levels of BDNF and PSD-95. Together, these Phase IIa, Expanded Access, and pre-clinical results provide initial encouragement for bryostatin 1 as a potential treatment for AD.

  8. Phase 3 Trials of Thermosensitive Ciprofloxacin Gel for Middle Ear Effusion in Children with Tubes.

    PubMed

    Park, Albert H; White, David R; Moss, Jonathan R; Bear, Moraye; LeBel, Carl

    2016-08-01

    To investigate the efficacy, safety, and microbiology of a thermosensitive otic suspension of ciprofloxacin (OTO-201) in children with bilateral middle ear effusion undergoing tympanostomy tube placement. Two randomized, double-blind, sham-controlled phase 3 trials. Patients were randomized to intratympanic OTO-201 or sham. Children with bilateral middle ear effusion undergoing tympanostomy tube placement. Studies evaluated 532 patients (6 months to 17 years old) in a combined analysis of efficacy (treatment failure: presence of otorrhea, otic or systemic antibiotic use, lost to follow-up, missed visits), safety (audiometry, otoscopy, tympanometry), and microbiology. There was a lower cumulative proportion of treatment failures in patients receiving OTO-201 vs tympanostomy tubes alone (1) on days 4, 8, 15, and 29; (2) on day 15, primary end point (23.0% vs 45.1%; age-adjusted odds ratio, 0.341; P < .001; reduction in relative risk, 49%); and (3) on day 15, blinded-assessor otorrhea treatment failure (7.0% vs 19.4%; age-adjusted odds ratio, 0.303; P < .001; reduction in relative risk, 64%). Per-protocol and subgroup analyses (baseline demographics, pathogen type, culture status, effusion type, microbiologic response) supported these findings. There were no drug-related serious adverse events; the most frequent treatment-emergent adverse events in both groups were pyrexia, postoperative pain, nasopharyngitis, cough, and upper respiratory tract infection. OTO-201 administration had no evidence of increased tube occlusion and no negative effect on audiometry, tympanometry, or otoscopy. Combined analysis of 2 phase 3 trials demonstrated a lower cumulative proportion of treatment failures through day 15 compared with TT alone when OTO-201 was administered intratympanically for otitis media with bilateral middle ear effusion at time of tympanostomy tube placement. © American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2016.

  9. Minimizing the Maximum Expected Sample Size in Two-Stage Phase II Clinical Trials with Continuous Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Wason, James M. S.; Mander, Adrian P.

    2012-01-01

    Two-stage designs are commonly used for Phase II trials. Optimal two-stage designs have the lowest expected sample size for a specific treatment effect, for example, the null value, but can perform poorly if the true treatment effect differs. Here we introduce a design for continuous treatment responses that minimizes the maximum expected sample size across all possible treatment effects. The proposed design performs well for a wider range of treatment effects and so is useful for Phase II trials. We compare the design to a previously used optimal design and show it has superior expected sample size properties. PMID:22651118

  10. Enrollment and Stopping Rules for Managing Toxicity Requiring Long Follow-Up in Phase II Oncology Trials.

    PubMed

    Song, Guochen; Ivanova, Anastasia

    2015-01-01

    Monitoring of toxicity is often conducted in Phase II trials in oncology to avoid an excessive number of toxicities if the wrong dose is chosen for Phase II. Existing stopping rules for toxicity use information from patients who have already completed follow-up. We describe a stopping rule that uses all available data to determine whether to stop for toxicity or not when follow-up for toxicity is long. We propose an enrollment rule that prescribes the maximum number of patients that may be enrolled at any given point in the trial.

  11. Successful treatment with a chimeric anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody (IDEC-C2B8, rituximab) for a patient with relapsed mantle cell lymphoma who developed a human anti-chimeric antibody.

    PubMed

    Maeda, T; Yamada, Y; Tawara, M; Yamasaki, R; Yakata, Y; Tsutsumi, C; Onimaru, Y; Kamihira, S; Tomonaga, M

    2001-07-01

    Mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) has a poor prognosis without cure; the median overall survival ranges only from 3 to 4 years irrespective of conventional therapeutic regimens. IDEC-C2B8 (rituximab), a chimeric monoclonal antibody against the B-cell-specific antigen CD20, induces an evaluable clinical response in patients with MCL with mild toxicities. However, the single agent rituximab cannot cure MCL. Due to its low immunogenicity, an antibody against IDEC-C2B8 (human antichimeric antibody [HACA]) has rarely been produced in vivo. We report a patient with relapsed MCL who was successfully treated with IDEC-C2B8 for over a year although she developed HACA 6 months after the initial administration of IDEC-C2B8 in the phase II clinical trial conducted by Zenyaku Kogyo Co. Ltd. We followed the pharmacokinetics of IDEC-C2B8, the serum HACA titer, and the number of B lymphocytes in the peripheral blood in relation to clinical response. The HACA became undetectable soon after subsequent administrations of IDEC-C2B8. When the serum level of IDEC-C2B8 was kept elevated, clinical responses were apparently observed and HACA disappeared during this response period. There were no significant clinical toxicities related to the appearance of HACA. The present findings suggested that IDEC-C2B8 is effective and safe even in patients who have developed HACA.

  12. Bevacizumab, Oxaliplatin, and Capecitabine With Radiation Therapy in Rectal Cancer: Phase I Trial Results

    SciTech Connect

    Czito, Brian G. . E-mail: czito001@mc.duke.edu; Bendell, Johanna C.; Willett, Christopher G.; Morse, Michael A.; Blobe, Gerard C.; Tyler, Douglas S.; Thomas, John; Ludwig, Kirk A.; Mantyh, Christopher R.; Ashton, Jill; Yu Daohai; Hurwitz, Herbert I.

    2007-06-01

    Purpose: The overexpression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is associated with poor outcomes in colorectal cancer patients. Bevacizumab, a VEGF inhibitor, enhances the effects of chemotherapy and radiation therapy on tumor cytotoxicity in preclinical models, including colorectal cancer. A Phase I trial was undertaken to evaluate the combination of bevacizumab, capecitabine, oxaliplatin, and radiation therapy in patients with rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Patients with pathologically confirmed adenocarcinoma of the rectum were eligible. Pretreatment staging included computerized tomography, endoscopic ultrasound, and surgical evaluation. Patients received 50.4 Gy of external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) to the tumor in 28 fractions. Capecitabine, oxaliplatin, and bevacizumab were administered concurrently with radiation therapy. After EBRT completion, patients were restaged and evaluated for surgery. Primary endpoints included the determination of dose-limiting toxicity and a recommended Phase II dose, non dose-limiting toxicity, and preliminary radiographic and pathologic response rates. Results: Eleven patients were enrolled. All were evaluable for toxicity and efficacy. Dose level 2 was associated with unacceptable toxicity (primarily diarrhea). Dose level 1 had an acceptable toxicity profile. The recommended Phase II dose in our study was bevacizumab 15 mg/kg Day 1 + 10 mg/kg Days 8 and 22, oxaliplatin 50 mg/m{sup 2} weekly, and capecitabine 625 mg/m{sup 2} bid during radiation days. Six patients had clinical responses. Two patients had a pathologic complete response, and 3 had microscopic disease only. One patient experienced a postoperative abscess, one a syncopal episode during adjuvant chemotherapy, and one a subclinical myocardial infarction during adjuvant chemotherapy. Conclusions: The combination of bevacizumab, capecitabine, oxaliplatin, and radiation therapy in rectal cancer was tolerable, with encouraging response rates. Further

  13. NCI will no longer support investigator-initiated phase III clinical trials through R01 and P01s grants | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The NCI has traditionally provided support for all phases of clinical trials and interventions via grants and cooperative agreements (including the R03, R21, R01, P01, U01, U10, and UM1 mechanisms). Historically, the majority of early phase trials have been conducted under R03, R21, R01, P01, U01, and UM1 activity codes, whereas most Phase III clinical trials have been conducted under the U10 activity code, with a limited number of Phase III clinical trials performed under the R01, P01, and U01 activity codes... |

  14. A Phase 3 Trial of Sebelipase Alfa in Lysosomal Acid Lipase Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Burton, Barbara K; Balwani, Manisha; Feillet, François; Barić, Ivo; Burrow, T Andrew; Camarena Grande, Carmen; Coker, Mahmut; Consuelo-Sánchez, Alejandra; Deegan, Patrick; Di Rocco, Maja; Enns, Gregory M; Erbe, Richard; Ezgu, Fatih; Ficicioglu, Can; Furuya, Katryn N; Kane, John; Laukaitis, Christina; Mengel, Eugen; Neilan, Edward G; Nightingale, Scott; Peters, Heidi; Scarpa, Maurizio; Schwab, K Otfried; Smolka, Vratislav; Valayannopoulos, Vassili; Wood, Marnie; Goodman, Zachary; Yang, Yijun; Eckert, Stephen; Rojas-Caro, Sandra; Quinn, Anthony G

    2015-09-10

    Lysosomal acid lipase is an essential lipid-metabolizing enzyme that breaks down endocytosed lipid particles and regulates lipid metabolism. We conducted a phase 3 trial of enzyme-replacement therapy in children and adults with lysosomal acid lipase deficiency, an underappreciated cause of cirrhosis and severe dyslipidemia. In this multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study involving 66 patients, we evaluated the safety and effectiveness of enzyme-replacement therapy with sebelipase alfa (administered intravenously at a dose of 1 mg per kilogram of body weight every other week); the placebo-controlled phase of the study was 20 weeks long and was followed by open-label treatment for all patients. The primary end point was normalization of the alanine aminotransferase level. Secondary end points included additional disease-related efficacy assessments, safety, and side-effect profile. Substantial disease burden at baseline included a very high level of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (≥190 mg per deciliter) in 38 of 66 patients (58%) and cirrhosis in 10 of 32 patients (31%) who underwent biopsy. A total of 65 of the 66 patients who underwent randomization completed the double-blind portion of the trial and continued with open-label treatment. At 20 weeks, the alanine aminotransferase level was normal in 11 of 36 patients (31%) in the sebelipase alfa group and in 2 of 30 (7%) in the placebo group (P=0.03), with mean changes from baseline of -58 U per liter versus -7 U per liter (P<0.001). With respect to prespecified key secondary efficacy end points, we observed improvements in lipid levels and reduction in hepatic fat content (P<0.001 for all comparisons, except P=0.04 for triglycerides). The number of patients with adverse events was similar in the two groups; most events were mild and were considered by the investigator to be unrelated to treatment. Sebelipase alfa therapy resulted in a reduction in multiple disease-related hepatic and

  15. Fractionated radiosurgery for painful spinal metastases: DOSIS - a phase II trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Visual Analogue Scale. 60 patients will be included into this two-centre phase II trial. Conclusions Results of this study will refine the methods of patient selection, target volume definition, treatment planning and delivery as well as quality assurance for radiosurgery. It is the intention of this study to form the basis for a future randomized controlled trial comparing conventional radiotherapy with fractionated radiosurgery for palliation of painful vertebral metastases. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01594892 PMID:23164174

  16. A Randomized Controlled Phase Ib Trial of the Malaria Vaccine Candidate GMZ2 in African Children

    PubMed Central

    Hounkpatin, Aurore B.; Schaumburg, Frieder; Ngoa, Ulysse Ateba; Esen, Meral; Fendel, Rolf; de Salazar, Pablo Martinez; Mürbeth, Raymund E.; Milligan, Paul; Imbault, Nathalie; Imoukhuede, Egeruan Babatunde; Theisen, Michael; Jepsen, Søren; Noor, Ramadhani A.; Okech, Brenda; Kremsner, Peter G.; Mordmüller, Benjamin

    2011-01-01

    Background GMZ2 is a fusion protein of Plasmodium falciparum merozoite surface protein 3 (MSP3) and glutamate rich protein (GLURP) that mediates an immune response against the blood stage of the parasite. Two previous phase I clinical trials, one in naïve European adults and one in malaria-exposed Gabonese adults showed that GMZ2 was well tolerated and immunogenic. Here, we present data on safety and immunogenicity of GMZ2 in one to five year old Gabonese children, a target population for future malaria vaccine efficacy trials. Methodology/Principal Findings Thirty children one to five years of age were randomized to receive three doses of either 30 µg or 100 µg of GMZ2, or rabies vaccine. GMZ2, adjuvanted in aluminum hydroxide, was administered on Days 0, 28 and 56. All participants received a full course of their respective vaccination and were followed up for one year. Both 30 µg and 100 µg GMZ2 vaccine doses were well tolerated and induced antibodies and memory B-cells against GMZ2 as well as its antigenic constituents MSP3 and GLURP. After three doses of vaccine, the geometric mean concentration of antibodies to GMZ2 was 19-fold (95%CI: 11,34) higher in the 30 µg GMZ2 group than in the rabies vaccine controls, and 16-fold (7,36) higher in the 100 µg GMZ2 group than the rabies group. Geometric mean concentration of antibodies to MSP3 was 2.7-fold (1.6,4.6) higher in the 30 µg group than in the rabies group and 3.8-fold (1.5,9.6) higher in the 100 µg group. Memory B-cells against GMZ2 developed in both GMZ2 vaccinated groups. Conclusions/Significance Both 30 µg as well as 100 µg intramuscular GMZ2 are immunogenic, well tolerated, and safe in young, malaria-exposed Gabonese children. This result confirms previous findings in naïve and malaria-exposed adults and supports further clinical development of GMZ2. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00703066 PMID:21829466

  17. Bayesian hierarchical modeling of patient subpopulations: Efficient designs of Phase II oncology clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Berry, Scott M; Broglio, Kristine R; Groshen, Susan; Berry, Donald A

    2015-01-01

    Background In oncology, the treatment paradigm is shifting toward personalized medicine, where the goal is to match patients to the treatments most likely to deliver benefit. Treatment effects in various subpopulations may provide some information about treatment effects in other subpopulations. Purpose We compare different approaches to Phase II trial design where a new treatment is being investigated in several groups of patients. We compare considering each group in an independent trial to a single trial with hierarchical modeling of the patient groups. Methods We assume four patient groups with different background response rates and simulate operating characteristics of three trial designs, Simon’s Optimal Two-Stage design, a Bayesian adaptive design with frequent interim analyses, and a Bayesian adaptive design with frequent interim analyses and hierarchical modeling across patient groups. Results Simon’s designs are based on 10% Type I and Type II error rates. The independent Bayesian designs are tuned to have similar error rates, but may have a slightly smaller mean sample size due to more frequent interim analyses. Under the null, the mean sample size is 2–4 patients smaller. A hierarchical model across patient groups can provide additional power and a further reduction in mean sample size. Under the null, the addition of the hierarchical model decreases the mean sample size an additional 4–7 patients in each group. Under the alternative hypothesis, power is increased to at least 98% in all groups. Limitations Hierarchical borrowing can make finding a single group in which the treatment is promising, if there is only one, more difficult. In a scenario where the treatment is uninteresting in all but one group, power for that one group is reduced to 65%. When the drug appears promising in some groups and not in others, there is potential for borrowing to inflate the Type I error rate. Conclusions The Bayesian hierarchical design is more likely to

  18. Phase II trial of RAD001 and bicalutamide for castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Nakabayashi, Mari; Werner, Lilian; Courtney, Kevin D; Buckle, Geoffrey; Oh, William K; Bubley, Glen J; Hayes, Julia H; Weckstein, Douglas; Elfiky, Aymen; Sims, Danny M; Kantoff, Philip W; Taplin, Mary-Ellen

    2012-12-01

    Study Type--Therapy (cohort) Level of Evidence 2a. What's known on the subject? and What does the study add? Despite expanding treatment options for castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC), therapies with long response duration remain intangible due to prostate cancer cells' natural ability to develop iterative resistance. Androgen receptor (AR) signaling has been shown to play a critical role in CRPC and its expression is regulated by the PI3K-Akt pathway. Thus inhibition of AR signalling and PI3K-Akt-mTOR (a downstream mediator of the PI3K-Akt pathway) pathway is a logical combination in CRPC and we report a phase II trial of RAD001 and bicalutamide. Our study is the first clinical trial report of an AR inhibitor of PI3K-Akt-mTOR. The AR pathway and the PI3K-Akt-mTOR pathway are two of the most relevant growth pathway for CRPC. Despite low efficacy results from our trial there will be significant interest in the field for these data (dose, schedule, response, toxicity, trial design) as newer generations of both AR inhibitors and PI3K-Akt-mTOR inhibitors are in development and likely will be tested in combination in CRPC. • To determine best overall response and duration of response of RAD001, a selective inhibitor of mammalian target of rapamycin, in combination with bicalutamide in castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). • To characterize the toxicity profile of RAD001 in combination with bicalutamide in patients with CRPC. • A phase II study was conducted to explore the efficacy and tolerability of RAD001 (10 mg daily) in combination with bicalutamide (50 mg daily) in men with progressive CRPC. • The primary endpoint was a composite of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level and measurable disease response by standard criteria. • This single-stage trial with a sample size of 38 eligible patients provided 90% power to differentiate a response rate of ≥ 40% from a response rate of ≤ 20%, as expected for bicalutamide alone (α= 0.10, power = 0

  19. Safety of bosutinib versus imatinib in the phase 3 BELA trial in newly diagnosed chronic phase chronic myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Gambacorti-Passerini, Carlo; Cortes, Jorge E; Lipton, Jeff H; Dmoszynska, Anna; Wong, Raymond S; Rossiev, Victor; Pavlov, Dmitri; Gogat Marchant, Karin; Duvillié, Ladan; Khattry, Navin; Kantarjian, Hagop M; Brümmendorf, Tim H

    2014-10-01

    Bosutinib, an orally active, Src/Abl tyrosine kinase inhibitor, has demonstrated clinical activity and acceptable tolerability in chronic phase chronic myeloid leukemia (CP CML). This updated analysis of the BELA trial assessed the safety profile and management of toxicities of bosutinib versus imatinib in adults with newly diagnosed (≤6 months) CP CML after >30 months from accrual completion. Among patients randomized to bosutinib 500 mg/d (n = 250) or imatinib 400 mg/d (n = 252), 248 and 251, respectively, received ≥1 dose of study treatment. Adverse events (AEs; any grade) with bosutinib versus imatinib were significantly more common for certain gastrointestinal events (diarrhea, 70% vs. 26%; P < 0.001; vomiting, 33% vs. 16%; P < 0.001), alanine aminotransferase (33% vs. 9%; P < 0.001) and aspartate aminotransferase (28% vs. 10%; P < 0.001) elevations, and pyrexia (19% vs. 12%; P = 0.046). AEs significantly less common with bosutinib included edema (periorbital, 2% vs. 14%; P < 0.001; peripheral, 5% vs. 12%; P = 0.006), musculoskeletal (myalgia, 5% vs. 12%; P = 0.010; muscle cramps, 5% vs. 22%; P < 0.001; bone pain, 4% vs. 11%; P = 0.003), increased creatine phosphokinase (8% vs. 20%; P < 0.001), neutropenia (13% vs. 30%; P < 0.001), and leukopenia (9% vs. 22%; P < 0.001). Between-group differences in the incidence of cardiac and vascular AEs were not significant. Diarrhea was typically transient, mostly Grade 1/2, occurring early during treatment, and was manageable with antidiarrheal medication. Despite higher rates of aminotransferase elevation with bosutinib, events were managed in most patients with dose modification and/or concomitant medication. Bosutinib had a manageable safety profile distinct from that of imatinib in patients with newly diagnosed CP CML. © 2014 The Authors. American Journal of Hematology Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Persistent electrochemical performance in epitaxial VO2(B)

    DOE PAGES

    Lee, Shinbuhm; Sun, Xiao -Guang; Lubimtsev, Andrew A.; ...

    2017-03-07

    Discovering high-performance energy storage materials is indispensable for renewable energy, electric vehicle performance, and mobile computing. Owing to the open atomic framework and good room temperature conductivity, bronze-phase vanadium dioxide [VO2(B)] has been regarded as a highly promising electrode material for Li ion batteries. However, previous attempts were unsuccessful to show the desired cycling performance and capacity without chemical modification. Here, we show with epitaxial VO2(B) films that one can accomplish the theoretical limit for capacity with persistent charging–discharging cyclability owing to the high structural stability and unique open pathways for Li ion conduction. Atomic-scale characterization by scanning transmission electronmore » microscopy and density functional theory calculations also reveal that the unique open pathways in VO2(B) provide the most stable sites for Li adsorption and diffusion. Furthermore, this work ultimately demonstrates that VO2(B) is a highly promising energy storage material and has no intrinsic hindrance in achieving superior cyclability with a very high power and capacity in a Li-ion conductor.« less

  1. Persistent Electrochemical Performance in Epitaxial VO2(B).

    PubMed

    Lee, Shinbuhm; Sun, Xiao-Guang; Lubimtsev, Andrew A; Gao, Xiang; Ganesh, Panchapakesan; Ward, Thomas Z; Eres, Gyula; Chisholm, Matthew F; Dai, Sheng; Lee, Ho Nyung

    2017-04-12

    Discovering high-performance energy storage materials is indispensable for renewable energy, electric vehicle performance, and mobile computing. Owing to the open atomic framework and good room temperature conductivity, bronze-phase vanadium dioxide [VO2(B)] has been regarded as a highly promising electrode material for Li ion batteries. However, previous attempts were unsuccessful to show the desired cycling performance and capacity without chemical modification. Here, we show with epitaxial VO2(B) films that one can accomplish the theoretical limit for capacity with persistent charging-discharging cyclability owing to the high structural stability and unique open pathways for Li ion conduction. Atomic-scale characterization by scanning transmission electron microscopy and density functional theory calculations also reveal that the unique open pathways in VO2(B) provide the most stable sites for Li adsorption and diffusion. Thus, this work ultimately demonstrates that VO2(B) is a highly promising energy storage material and has no intrinsic hindrance in achieving superior cyclability with a very high power and capacity in a Li-ion conductor.

  2. Protocol for the ProCare Trial: a phase II randomised controlled trial of shared care for follow-up of men with prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Emery, Jon; Doorey, Juanita; Jefford, Michael; King, Madeleine; Pirotta, Marie; Hayne, Dickon; Martin, Andrew; Trevena, Lyndal; Lim, Tee; Constable, Roger; Hawks, Cynthia; Hyatt, Amelia; Hamid, Akhlil; Violet, John; Gill, Suki; Frydenberg, Mark; Schofield, Penelope

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Men with prostate cancer require long-term follow-up to monitor disease progression and manage common adverse physical and psychosocial consequences of treatment. There is growing recognition of the potential role of primary care in cancer follow-up. This paper describes the protocol for a phase II multisite randomised controlled trial of a novel model of shared care for the follow-up of men after completing treatment for low-moderate risk prostate cancer. Methods and analysis The intervention is a shared care model of follow-up visits in the first 12 months after completing treatment for prostate cancer with the following specific components: a survivorship care plan, general practitioner (GP) management guidelines, register and recall systems, screening for distress and unmet needs and patient information resources. Eligible men will have completed surgery and/or radiotherapy for low-moderate risk prostate cancer within the previous 8 weeks and have a GP who consents to participate. Ninety men will be randomised to the intervention or current hospital follow-up care. Study outcome measures will be collected at baseline, 3, 6 and 12 months and include anxiety, depression, unmet needs, prostate cancer-specific quality of life and satisfaction with care. Clinical processes and healthcare resource usage will also be measured. The principal emphasis of the analysis will be on obtaining estimates of the treatment effect size and assessing feasibility in order to inform the design of a subsequent phase III trial. Ethics and dissemination Ethics approval has been granted by the University of Western Australia and from all hospital recruitment sites in Western Australia and Victoria. Results of this phase II trial will be reported in peer-reviewed publications and in conference presentations. Trial Registration Australian New Zealand Clinical Trial Registry ACTRN12610000938000 PMID:24604487

  3. Phase II randomised discontinuation trial of the MET/VEGF receptor inhibitor cabozantinib in metastatic melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Daud, Adil; Kluger, Harriet M; Kurzrock, Razelle; Schimmoller, Frauke; Weitzman, Aaron L; Samuel, Thomas A; Moussa, Ali H; Gordon, Michael S; Shapiro, Geoffrey I

    2017-01-01

    Background: A phase II randomised discontinuation trial assessed cabozantinib (XL184), an orally bioavailable inhibitor of tyrosine kinases including VEGF receptors, MET, and AXL, in a cohort of patients with metastatic melanoma. Methods: Patients received cabozantinib 100 mg daily during a 12-week lead-in. Patients with stable disease (SD) per Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumours (RECIST) at week 12 were randomised to cabozantinib or placebo. Primary endpoints were objective response rate (ORR) at week 12 and postrandomisation progression-free survival (PFS). Results: Seventy-seven patients were enroled (62% cutaneous, 30% uveal, and 8% mucosal). At week 12, the ORR was 5% 39% of patients had SD. During the lead-in phase, reduction in target lesions from baseline was seen in 55% of evaluable patients overall and in 59% of evaluable patients with uveal melanoma. Median PFS after randomisation was 4.1 months with cabozantinib and 2.8 months with placebo (hazard ratio of 0.59; P=0.284). Median PFS from study day 1 was 3.8 months, 6-month PFS was 33%, and median overall survival was 9.4 months. The most common grade 3/4 adverse events were fatigue (14%), hypertension (10%), and abdominal pain (8%). One treatment-related death was reported from peritonitis due to diverticular perforation. Conclusions: Cabozantinib has clinical activity in patients with metastatic melanoma, including uveal melanoma. Further clinical investigation is warranted. PMID:28103611

  4. Adaptive Phase I Clinical Trial Design Using Markov Models for Conditional Probability of Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Laura L.; Taylor, Jeremy M.G.; Murray, Susan

    2016-01-01

    Many phase I trials in oncology involve multiple dose administrations on the same patient over multiple cycles, with a typical cycle lasting three weeks and having about six cycles per patient with a goal to find the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) and study the dose-toxicity relationship. A patient's dose is unchanged over the cycles and the data is reduced to a binary end point, the occurrence of a toxicity and analyzed either by considering the toxicity from the first dose or from any cycle on the study. In this paper an alternative approach allowing an assessment of toxicity from each cycle and dose variations for patient over cycles is presented. A Markov model for the conditional probability of toxicity on any cycle given no toxicity in previous cycles is formulated as a function of the current and previous doses. The extra information from each cycle provides more precise estimation of the dose-toxicity relationship. Simulation results demonstrating gains in using the Markov model as compared to analyses of a single binary outcome are presented. Methods for utilizing the Markov model to conduct a phase I study, including choices for selecting doses for the next cycle for each patient, are developed and presented via simulation. PMID:26098782

  5. A phase II trial of sequential ribonucleotide reductase inhibition in aggressive myeloproliferative neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Zeidner, Joshua F.; Karp, Judith E.; Blackford, Amanda L.; Smith, B. Douglas; Gojo, Ivana; Gore, Steven D.; Levi