Science.gov

Sample records for phase 2b trial

  1. Intentions to use preexposure prophylaxis among current phase 2B preventive HIV-1 vaccine efficacy trial participants.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Jonathan D; Sobieszczyk, Magdalena E; Madenwald, Tamra; Grove, Doug; Karuna, Shelly T; Andrasik, Michele; Sherwat, Adam; Broder, Gail; Mayer, Kenneth; Koblin, Beryl; Hammer, Scott

    2013-07-01

    In November 2010, the iPrEx study reported that preexposure prophylaxis (PrEP) with daily tenofovir disoproxil fumarate/emtricitabine reduced HIV infections by 44% among men who have sex with men and subsequent trials corroborated efficacy among heterosexual men and women. During regularly scheduled follow-up visits from January to March 2011, participants in an ongoing phase 2b vaccine efficacy trial completed an anonymous Web survey about PrEP. Among 376 respondents, 17% reported they were very likely to use PrEP in the next year. Nonwhite participants were more likely to use PrEP. Among those with some level of interest, intent to use PrEP was greatest if the drug were available through the clinical trial or health insurance. Most (91%) believed taking PrEP would not change their willingness to stay in the vaccine trial and few thought it would affect recruitment. As key stakeholders, currently enrolled trial participants can offer vital input about emerging prevention technologies that may affect the design of future HIV vaccine and nonvaccine prevention trials.

  2. Intentions to use pre-exposure prophylaxis among current phase 2B preventive HIV-1 vaccine efficacy trial participants

    PubMed Central

    Fuchs, Jonathan D.; Sobieszczyk, Magdalena E.; Madenwald, Tamra; Grove, Doug; Karuna, Shelly T.; Andrasik, Michele; Sherwat, Adam; Broder, Gail; Mayer, Kenneth; Koblin, Beryl; Hammer, Scott

    2013-01-01

    In November 2010, the iPrEx study reported that pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) with daily tenofovir disoproxil fumarate/emtricitabine reduced HIV infections by 44% among men who have sex with men and subsequent trials corroborated efficacy among heterosexual men and women. During regularly scheduled follow-up visits from January-March 2011, participants in an ongoing phase 2b vaccine efficacy trial completed an anonymous web survey about PrEP. Among 376 respondents, 17% reported they were very likely to use PrEP in the next year. Non-white participants were more likely to use PrEP. Among those with some level of interest, intent to use PrEP was greatest if the drug were available through the clinical trial or health insurance. Most (91%) believed taking PrEP would not change their willingness to stay in the vaccine trial and few thought it would affect recruitment. As key stakeholders, currently enrolled trial participants can offer vital input about emerging prevention technologies that may affect the design of future HIV vaccine and non-vaccine prevention trials. PMID:23614998

  3. Prospective randomized multicenter adjuvant dermatologic cooperative oncology group trial of low-dose interferon alfa-2b with or without a modified high-dose interferon alfa-2b induction phase in patients with lymph node-negative melanoma.

    PubMed

    Hauschild, Axel; Weichenthal, Michael; Rass, Knuth; Linse, Ruthild; Ulrich, Jens; Stadler, Rudolf; Volkenandt, Matthias; Grabbe, Stephan; Proske, Ulrike; Schadendorf, Dirk; Brockmeyer, Norbert; Vogt, Thomas; Rompel, Rainer; Kaufmann, Roland; Kaatz, Martin; Näher, Helmut; Mohr, Peter; Eigentler, Thomas; Livingstone, Elisabeth; Garbe, Claus

    2009-07-20

    PURPOSE Interferon alfa (IFN-alpha) has shown clinical efficacy in the adjuvant treatment of patients with high-risk melanoma in several clinical trials, but optimal dosing and duration of treatment are still under discussion. It has been argued that in high-dose IFN-alpha (HDI), the intravenous (IV) induction phase might be critical for the clinical benefit of the regimen. PATIENTS AND METHODS In an attempt to investigate the potential role of a modified high-dose induction phase, lymph node-negative patients with resected primary malignant melanoma of more than 1.5-mm tumor thickness were included in this prospective randomized multicenter Dermatologic Cooperative Oncology Group trial. Six hundred seventy-four patients were randomly assigned to receive 4 weeks of a modified HDI scheme. This schedule consisted of 5 times weekly 10 MU/m(2) IFN-alpha-2b IV for 2 weeks and 5 times weekly 10 MU/m(2) IFN-alpha-2b administered subcutaneously (SC) for another 2 weeks followed by 23 months of low-dose IFN-alpha-2b (LDI) 3 MU SC three times a week (arm A). LDI 3 MU three times a week was given for 24 months in arm B. Results Of 650 assessable patients, there were 92 relapses among the 321 patients receiving high-dose induction as compared with 95 relapses among the 329 patients receiving LDI only. Five-year relapse-free survival rates were 68.0% (arm A) and 67.1% (arm B), respectively. Likewise, melanoma-related fatalities were similar between both groups, resulting in 5-year overall survival rates of 80.2% (arm A) and 82.9% (arm B). CONCLUSION The addition of a 4-week modified HDI induction phase to a 2-year low-dose adjuvant IFN-alpha-2b treatment schedule did not improve the clinical outcome.

  4. Repeated nebulisation of non-viral CFTR gene therapy in patients with cystic fibrosis: a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, phase 2b trial

    PubMed Central

    Alton, Eric W F W; Armstrong, David K; Ashby, Deborah; Bayfield, Katie J; Bilton, Diana; Bloomfield, Emily V; Boyd, A Christopher; Brand, June; Buchan, Ruaridh; Calcedo, Roberto; Carvelli, Paula; Chan, Mario; Cheng, Seng H; Collie, D David S; Cunningham, Steve; Davidson, Heather E; Davies, Gwyneth; Davies, Jane C; Davies, Lee A; Dewar, Maria H; Doherty, Ann; Donovan, Jackie; Dwyer, Natalie S; Elgmati, Hala I; Featherstone, Rosanna F; Gavino, Jemyr; Gea-Sorli, Sabrina; Geddes, Duncan M; Gibson, James S R; Gill, Deborah R; Greening, Andrew P; Griesenbach, Uta; Hansell, David M; Harman, Katharine; Higgins, Tracy E; Hodges, Samantha L; Hyde, Stephen C; Hyndman, Laura; Innes, J Alastair; Jacob, Joseph; Jones, Nancy; Keogh, Brian F; Limberis, Maria P; Lloyd-Evans, Paul; Maclean, Alan W; Manvell, Michelle C; McCormick, Dominique; McGovern, Michael; McLachlan, Gerry; Meng, Cuixiang; Montero, M Angeles; Milligan, Hazel; Moyce, Laura J; Murray, Gordon D; Nicholson, Andrew G; Osadolor, Tina; Parra-Leiton, Javier; Porteous, David J; Pringle, Ian A; Punch, Emma K; Pytel, Kamila M; Quittner, Alexandra L; Rivellini, Gina; Saunders, Clare J; Scheule, Ronald K; Sheard, Sarah; Simmonds, Nicholas J; Smith, Keith; Smith, Stephen N; Soussi, Najwa; Soussi, Samia; Spearing, Emma J; Stevenson, Barbara J; Sumner-Jones, Stephanie G; Turkkila, Minna; Ureta, Rosa P; Waller, Michael D; Wasowicz, Marguerite Y; Wilson, James M; Wolstenholme-Hogg, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Lung delivery of plasmid DNA encoding the CFTR gene complexed with a cationic liposome is a potential treatment option for patients with cystic fibrosis. We aimed to assess the efficacy of non-viral CFTR gene therapy in patients with cystic fibrosis. Methods We did this randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, phase 2b trial in two cystic fibrosis centres with patients recruited from 18 sites in the UK. Patients (aged ≥12 years) with a forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) of 50–90% predicted and any combination of CFTR mutations, were randomly assigned, via a computer-based randomisation system, to receive 5 mL of either nebulised pGM169/GL67A gene–liposome complex or 0·9% saline (placebo) every 28 days (plus or minus 5 days) for 1 year. Randomisation was stratified by % predicted FEV1 (<70 vs ≥70%), age (<18 vs ≥18 years), inclusion in the mechanistic substudy, and dosing site (London or Edinburgh). Participants and investigators were masked to treatment allocation. The primary endpoint was the relative change in % predicted FEV1. The primary analysis was per protocol. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01621867. Findings Between June 12, 2012, and June 24, 2013, we randomly assigned 140 patients to receive placebo (n=62) or pGM169/GL67A (n=78), of whom 116 (83%) patients comprised the per-protocol population. We noted a significant, albeit modest, treatment effect in the pGM169/GL67A group versus placebo at 12 months' follow-up (3·7%, 95% CI 0·1–7·3; p=0·046). This outcome was associated with a stabilisation of lung function in the pGM169/GL67A group compared with a decline in the placebo group. We recorded no significant difference in treatment-attributable adverse events between groups. Interpretation Monthly application of the pGM169/GL67A gene therapy formulation was associated with a significant, albeit modest, benefit in FEV1 compared with placebo at 1 year, indicating a stabilisation of

  5. Continued Follow-Up of Phambili Phase 2b Randomized HIV-1 Vaccine Trial Participants Supports Increased HIV-1 Acquisition among Vaccinated Men

    PubMed Central

    Moodie, Zoe; Metch, Barbara; Bekker, Linda-Gail; Churchyard, Gavin; Nchabeleng, Maphoshane; Mlisana, Koleka; Laher, Fatima; Roux, Surita; Mngadi, Kathryn; Innes, Craig; Mathebula, Matsontso; Allen, Mary; Bentley, Carter; Gilbert, Peter B.; Robertson, Michael; Kublin, James; Corey, Lawrence; Gray, Glenda E.

    2015-01-01

    Background The Phase 2b double-blinded, randomized Phambili/HVTN 503 trial evaluated safety and efficacy of the MRK Ad5 gag/pol/nef subtype B HIV-1 preventive vaccine vs placebo in sexually active HIV-1 seronegative participants in South Africa. Enrollment and vaccinations stopped and participants were unblinded but continued follow-up when the Step study evaluating the same vaccine in the Americas, Caribbean, and Australia was unblinded for non-efficacy. Final Phambili analyses found more HIV-1 infections amongst vaccine than placebo recipients, impelling the HVTN 503-S recall study. Methods HVTN 503-S sought to enroll all 695 HIV-1 uninfected Phambili participants, provide HIV testing, risk reduction counseling, physical examination, risk behavior assessment and treatment assignment recall. After adding HVTN 503-S data, HIV-1 infection hazard ratios (HR vaccine vs. placebo) were estimated by Cox models. Results Of the 695 eligible, 465 (67%) enrolled with 230 from the vaccine group and 235 from the placebo group. 38% of the 184 Phambili dropouts were enrolled. Enrollment did not differ by treatment group, gender, or baseline HSV-2. With the additional 1286 person years of 503-S follow-up, the estimated HR over Phambili and HVTN 503-S follow-up was 1.52 (95% CI 1.08–2.15, p = 0.02, 82 vaccine/54 placebo infections). The HR was significant for men (HR = 2.75, 95% CI 1.49, 5.06, p = 0.001) but not for women (HR = 1.12, 95% CI 0.73, 1.72, p = 0.62). Conclusion The additional follow-up from HVTN 503-S supported the Phambili finding of increased HIV-1 acquisition among vaccinated men and strengthened the evidence of lack of vaccine effect among women. Trial Registration clinicaltrials.gov NCT00413725 SA National Health Research Database DOH-27-0207-1539 PMID:26368824

  6. ECOG Phase II trial of graded-dose peginterferon α-2b in patients with metastatic melanoma over-expressing basic fibroblast growth factor (E2602)

    PubMed Central

    Go, Ronald S.; Lee, Sandra J.; Shin, Donghoon; Callister, Steven M.; Jobe, Dean A.; Conry, Robert M.; Tarhini, Ahmad A.; Kirkwood, John M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose We investigated use of graded-dose peginterferon α-2b (Peg-IFN) in patients with stage IV melanoma overexpressing basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF-2). The primary objective was suppression of plasma FGF-2 to within normal range (≤7.5 pg/mL). Experimental Design Plasma FGF-2 was measured at baseline (Step 1), and patients with concentrations ≥15 pg/mL were eligible for study treatment (Step 2). Peg-IFN was given weekly at starting dose of 0.5 μg/kg/wk with increment every 3 weeks based on serial FGF-2 concentrations. Results Two hundred seven patients entered Step 1; 45 (22%) overexpressed FGF-2 (median=22 pg/dL). Twenty-nine eligible patients entered Step 2 and received treatment. Patients’ median age was 64 years (range, 29–84 years). Most had >2 prior therapies. FGF-2 decreased in 28 (97%) patients, with suppression to normal range in 10 (35%). Median time to FGF-2 suppression was 30 days. The best clinical responses were partial response (7%) and stable disease (17%). Median progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were 2.0 and 9.7 months, respectively. Patients who achieved FGF-2 suppression were more likely than those who did not to have a response or stable disease (P = 0.03). Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) concentrations decreased in 27 patients (93%) during treatment and paralleled those of FGF-2 over time. We found no compensatory rise in VEGF among those with FGF-2 suppression. Conclusions Graded-dose Peg-IFN suppresses FGF-2 in patients with metastatic melanoma who overexpress FGF-2. Over a third of patients had complete suppression of plasma FGF-2, which correlated with clinical response to this therapy. PMID:24122792

  7. Dacetuzumab plus rituximab, ifosfamide, carboplatin and etoposide as salvage therapy for patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma relapsing after rituximab, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine and prednisolone: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled phase 2b trial.

    PubMed

    Fayad, Luis; Ansell, Stephen M; Advani, Ranjana; Coiffier, Bertrand; Stuart, Robert; Bartlett, Nancy L; Forero-Torres, Andres; Kuliczkowski, Kazimierz; Belada, David; Ng, Edmund; Drachman, Jonathan G

    2015-01-01

    Single-agent dacetuzumab has demonstrated antitumor activity in relapsed/refractory diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). Preclinical data demonstrated improved dacetuzumab antitumor activity in combination with rituximab, ± chemotherapy. We designed a phase 2b, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial to compare rituximab, ifosfamide, carboplatin and etoposide (R-ICE) + dacetuzumab with R-ICE + placebo in patients with DLBCL who relapsed after rituximab, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine and prednisolone (R-CHOP) (ClinicalTrials.gov #NCT00529503). The primary endpoint was complete response (CR); additional endpoints included failure-free survival and overall survival (OS). Overall, 151 patients were randomized (75 dacetuzumab, 76 placebo). No notable differences between arms in demographics or subsequent treatment parameters were observed. Cytopenias, cough and infection were more frequent with dacetuzumab. Futility analysis failed to demonstrate higher CR rates with dacetuzumab (36% dacetuzumab, 42% placebo); consequently, enrollment was stopped. Unplanned post hoc analysis showed that patients who underwent subsequent autologous stem cell transplant experienced improvement in OS (hazard ratio = 0.195, p = 0.004), which may be explained by potential immunomodulatory effects of dacetuzumab on antigen-presenting cells.

  8. The 23 K superconducting phase YPd 2B 2C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Y. Y.; Rusakova, I.; Meng, R. L.; Cao, Y.; Gautier-Picard, P.; Chu, C. W.

    1994-09-01

    We have carried out a systematic structural, electric, and magnetic study on YPdBC samples with different compositions with emphasis on the as-cast and annealed YPd 5B 3C 0.3 which was first reported to superconduct at ∼ 23 K by Cava et al. We found that the tetragonal body-centered YPd 2B 2C with lattice parameters a=3.71 Å and c=10.81 Å is the phase responsible for the 23 K superconductivity and that YPd 2B 2C is metastable, which is consistent with the suggestion made by Cava et al. [1]: it is not stable at high temperatures nor stabilizable by Ni doping, although its isostructural compound, YNi 2B 2C, exists. Two new phases with Y:Pd ratios of 1:7 and 2:3, respectively, have also bee detected.

  9. Tolerability of intensified intravenous interferon alfa-2b versus the ECOG 1684 schedule as adjuvant therapy for stage III melanoma: a randomized phase III Italian Melanoma Inter-group trial (IMI – Mel.A.) [ISRCTN75125874

    PubMed Central

    Chiarion-Sileni, Vanna; Del Bianco, Paola; Romanini, Antonella; Guida, Michele; Paccagnella, Adriano; Dalla Palma, Maurizio; Naglieri, Emanuele; Ridolfi, Ruggero; Silvestri, Barbara; Michiara, Maria; De Salvo, Gian Luca

    2006-01-01

    Background High-dose interferon alfa-2b (IFNalfa-2b), according to the ECOG 1684 schedule, is the only approved adjuvant treatment for stage III melanoma patients by the FDA and EMEA. However, the risk/benefit profile has been questioned limiting its world-wide use. In the late nineties, the Italian Melanoma Inter-group started a spontaneous randomized clinical trial (RCT) to verify if a more intense, but shorter than the ECOG 1684 regimen, could improve survival without increasing the toxicity profile. The safety analysis in the first 169 patients who completed the treatment is here described. Methods Stage III melanoma patients were randomized to receive IFNalfa-2b 20 MU/m2/d intravenously (IV) 5 days/week × 4 weeks, repeated for three times on weeks 9 to 12, 17 to 20, 25 to 28 (Dose-Dense/Dose-Intense, DD/DI, arm), or IFNalfa-2b 20 MU/m2/d IV 5 days/week × 4 weeks followed by 10 MU/m2 subcutaneously (SC) three times per week × 48 weeks (High Dose Interferon, HDI, arm). Toxicity was recorded and graded, according to the WHO criteria, as the worst grade that occurred during each cycle. Results The most common toxicities in both arms were flu-like and gastrointestinal symptoms, leukopenia, liver and neuro-psichiatric morbidities; with regard to severe toxicity, only leukopenia was statistically more frequent in DD/DI arm than in HDI arm (24% vs 9%) (p = 0.0074), yet, this did not cause an increase in the infection risk. Discontinuation of treatment, due to toxicity, was observed in 13 and 17% of the patients in the DD/DI and HDI arm, respectively. The median actual dose intensity delivered in the DD/DI arm (36.4 MU/m2/week) was statistically higher than that delivered in the HDI arm (30.7 MU/m2/week) (p = 0.003). Conclusion Four cycles of intravenous high-dose IFNalfa-2b can be safely delivered with an increase in the median dose intensity. Efficacy results from this trial are eagerly awaited. PMID:16504154

  10. Magnetospheric Multiscale Mission (MMS) Phase 2B Navigation Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scaperoth, Paige Thomas; Long, Anne; Carpenter, Russell

    2009-01-01

    The Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) formation flying mission, which consists of four spacecraft flying in a tetrahedral formation, has challenging navigation requirements associated with determining and maintaining the relative separations required to meet the science requirements. The baseline navigation concept for MMS is for each spacecraft to independently estimate its position, velocity and clock states using GPS pseudorange data provided by the Goddard Space Flight Center-developed Navigator receiver and maneuver acceleration measurements provided by the spacecraft's attitude control subsystem. State estimation is performed onboard in real-time using the Goddard Enhanced Onboard Navigation System flight software, which is embedded in the Navigator receiver. The current concept of operations for formation maintenance consists of a sequence of two maintenance maneuvers that is performed every 2 weeks. Phase 2b of the MMS mission, in which the spacecraft are in 1.2 x 25 Earth radii orbits with nominal separations at apogee ranging from 30 km to 400 km, has the most challenging navigation requirements because, during this phase, GPS signal acquisition is restricted to less than one day of the 2.8-day orbit. This paper summarizes the results from high-fidelity simulations to determine if the MMS navigation requirements can be met between and immediately following the maintenance maneuver sequence in Phase 2b.

  11. Phase III Randomized Study of 4 Weeks of High-Dose Interferon-α-2b in Stage T2bNO, T3a-bNO, T4a-bNO, and T1-4N1a-2a (microscopic) Melanoma: A Trial of the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group-American College of Radiology Imaging Network Cancer Research Group (E1697).

    PubMed

    Agarwala, Sanjiv S; Lee, Sandra J; Yip, Waiki; Rao, Uma N; Tarhini, Ahmad A; Cohen, Gary I; Reintgen, Douglas S; Evans, Terry L; Brell, Joanna M; Albertini, Mark R; Atkins, Michael B; Dakhil, Shaker R; Conry, Robert M; Sosman, Jeffrey A; Flaherty, Lawrence E; Sondak, Vernon K; Carson, William E; Smylie, Michael G; Pappo, Alberto S; Kefford, Richard F; Kirkwood, John M

    2017-03-10

    Purpose To test the efficacy of 4 weeks of intravenous (IV) induction with high-dose interferon (IFN) as part of the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group regimen compared with observation (OBS) in patients with surgically resected intermediate-risk melanoma. Patients and Methods In this intergroup international trial, eligible patients had surgically resected cutaneous melanoma in the following categories: (1) T2bN0, (2) T3a-bN0, (3) T4a-bN0, and (4) T1-4N1a-2a (microscopic). Patients were randomly assigned to receive IFN α-2b at 20 MU/m(2)/d IV for 5 days (Monday to Friday) every week for 4 weeks (IFN) or OBS. Stratification factors were pathologic lymph node status, lymph node staging procedure, Breslow depth, ulceration of the primary lesion, and disease stage. The primary end point was relapse-free survival. Secondary end points included overall survival, toxicity, and quality of life. Results A total of 1,150 patients were randomly assigned. At a median follow-up of 7 years, the 5-year relapse-free survival rate was 0.70 (95% CI, 0.66 to 0.74) for OBS and 0.70, (95% CI, 0.66 to 0.74) for IFN ( P = .964). The 5-year overall survival rate was 0.83 (95% CI, 0.79 to 0.86) for OBS and 0.83 (95% CI, 0.80 to 0.86) for IFN ( P = .558). Treatment-related grade 3 and higher toxicity was 4.6% versus 57.9% for OBS and IFN, respectively ( P < .001). Quality of life was worse for the treated group. Conclusion Four weeks of IV induction as part of the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group high-dose IFN regimen is not better than OBS alone for patients with intermediate-risk melanoma as defined in this trial.

  12. Topical TrkA Kinase Inhibitor CT327 is an Effective, Novel Therapy for the Treatment of Pruritus due to Psoriasis: Results from Experimental Studies, and Efficacy and Safety of CT327 in a Phase 2b Clinical Trial in Patients with Psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Roblin, David; Yosipovitch, Gil; Boyce, Brent; Robinson, John; Sandy, James; Mainero, Valentina; Wickramasinghe, Ro; Anand, Uma; Anand, Praveen

    2015-05-01

    Pruritus is an important symptom in psoriasis with no targeted treatment. Tropomyosin-receptor kinase A (TrkA) is associated with pruritus and psoriatic plaque formation. We report the efficacy of a TrkA inhibitor, CT327, on pruritus in psoriasis. A randomised, double-blind, vehicle-controlled Phase 2b clinical trial was conducted in 160 subjects. No effect was found on psoriasis severity using Investigator's Global Assessment (primary endpoint). However, clinically and statistically significant reductions in pruritus were observed in the 108 patient subset reporting at least moderate pruritus at baseline (37.1 mm visual analogue scale improvement (95% CI [-37.5, -6.2], p = 0.0067) for lowest dose; secondary endpoint). Significant modified Psoriasis Area and Severity Index reductions were found in this subset (p < 0.05). Experiments exploring capsaicin-mediated calcium influx, important in pruritus signalling, were performed in sensory neurons. CT327 inhibited capsaicin responses, indicating action at the nerve growth factor-TrkA-TRPV1 pathway. TrkA is a key target in pruritus, and CT327 has potential to become an effective and safe first-in-class treatment.

  13. Southwest Oncology Group S0008: A Phase III Trial of High-Dose Interferon Alfa-2b Versus Cisplatin, Vinblastine, and Dacarbazine, Plus Interleukin-2 and Interferon in Patients With High-Risk Melanoma—An Intergroup Study of Cancer and Leukemia Group B, Children's Oncology Group, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group, and Southwest Oncology Group

    PubMed Central

    Flaherty, Lawrence E.; Othus, Megan; Atkins, Michael B.; Tuthill, Ralph J.; Thompson, John A.; Vetto, John T.; Haluska, Frank G.; Pappo, Alberto S.; Sosman, Jeffrey A.; Redman, Bruce G.; Moon, James; Ribas, Antoni; Kirkwood, John M.; Sondak, Vernon K.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose High-dose interferon (IFN) for 1 year (HDI) is the US Food and Drug Administration–approved adjuvant therapy for patients with high-risk melanoma. Efforts to modify IFN dose and schedule have not improved efficacy. We sought to determine whether a shorter course of biochemotherapy would be more effective. Patients and Methods S0008 (S0008: Chemotherapy Plus Biological Therapy in Treating Patients With Melanoma) was an Intergroup phase III trial that enrolled high-risk patients (stage IIIA-N2a through IIIC-N3), randomly assigning them to receive either HDI or biochemotherapy consisting of dacarbazine, cisplatin, vinblastine, interleukin-2, IFN alfa-2b (IFN-α-2b) and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor given every 21 days for three cycles. Coprimary end points were relapse-free survival (RFS) and overall survival (OS). Results In all, 432 patients were enrolled. Grade 3 and 4 adverse events occurred in 57% and 7% of HDI patients and 36% and 40% of biochemotherapy patients, respectively. At a median follow-up of 7.2 years, biochemotherapy improved RFS (hazard ratio [HR], 0.75; 95% CI, 0.58 to 0.97; P = .015), with a median RFS of 4.0 years (95% CI, 1.9 years to not reached [NR]) versus 1.9 years for HDI (95% CI, 1.2 to 2.8 years) and a 5-year RFS of 48% versus 39%. Median OS was not different (HR, 0.98; 95% CI, 0.74 to 1.31; P = .55), with a median OS of 9.9 years (95% CI, 4.62 years to NR) for biochemotherapy versus 6.7 years (95% CI, 4.5 years to NR) for HDI and a 5-year OS of 56% for both arms. Conclusion Biochemotherapy is a shorter, alternative adjuvant treatment for patients with high-risk melanoma that provides statistically significant improvement in RFS but no difference in OS and more toxicity compared with HDI. PMID:25332243

  14. [Phase I cancer trials methodology].

    PubMed

    Le Tourneau, Christophe; Faivre, Sandrine; Raymond, Eric; Diéras, Véronique

    2007-11-01

    The main objective of phase I cancer trials is to determine precisely the recommended dose of an anticancer agent as a single agent or in a context of combinations of anticancer agents (including cytotoxic agents, immunotherapy, radiotherapy...), that is administered for the first time in man, to further proceed clinical development with phase II and III trials. The recommended dose must have the greatest efficiency with acceptable toxicity. For the anticancer agents, the ratio risk/benefit is high, since toxicities associated with many cancer therapeutic agents are substantial and because the efficacy is often limited. Thus, phase I cancer trials present unique challenges in comparison to other therapeutic areas. Indeed, it is essential to minimize the numbers of patients treated at subefficient dose levels, and in the same time not to expose the patients to unacceptable toxicity. Historically, the first method that has been used is the Fibonacci escalation. The major problems raised with this method have been the lengths of the trials and the risk to treat substantial numbers of patients at nontherapeutix doses. Thus, novel methods have been then developed modifying the numbers of patients included at each dose level and the rapidity of dose escalation. These methods include pharmacologically guided dose escalation, escalation with overdose control and the continual reassessment method which are both statistically based dose escalation methods, and the accelerated titration designs. Concerning the targeted anticancer therapies, the therapeutic effect on the target, due to their higher specificity, can be obtained using doses that have few toxicity. Using the toxicity to determine the recommended dose for phase II trials, as it is the case for "classical > anticancer agents, does not seem to be sufficient. Alternatives to determine the optimal biological dose include measurement of target inhibition, pharmacokinetic analysis and functional imaging.

  15. Sarcopenia: designing phase IIB trials.

    PubMed

    Chumlea, Wm C; Cesari, M; Evans, W J; Ferrucci, L; Fielding, R A; Pahor, M; Studenski, S; Vellas, B

    2011-06-01

    Sarcopenia is the age-related involuntary loss of skeletal muscle mass and functionality that can lead to the development of disability, frailty and increased health care costs. The development of interventions aimed at preventing and/or treating sarcopenia is complex, requiring the adoption of assumptions and standards that are not well established scientifically or clinically. A number of investigators and clinicians (both from academia and industry) met in Rome (Italy) in 2009 to develop a consensus definition of sarcopenia. Subsequently, in Albuquerque (New Mexico, USA) in 2010, the same group met again to consider the complex issues necessary for designing Phase II clinical trials for sarcopenia. Current clinical trial data indicate that fat-free mass (FFM) parameters are responsive to physical activity/nutritional treatment modalities over short time periods, but pharmacological trials of sarcopenia have yet to show significant efficacy. In order to conduct a clinical trial within a reasonable time frame, groups that model or display accelerated aging and loss of FFM are necessary. Few studies have used acceptable designs for testing treatment effects, sample sizes or primary outcomes that could provide interpretable findings or effects across studies. Dual energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) is the measure of choice for assessing FFM, but sufficient time is needed for changes to be detected accurately and reliably. A tool set that would allow clinical, basic and epidemiological research on sarcopenia to advance rapidly toward diagnosis and treatment phases should be those reflecting function and strength.

  16. Safety, efficacy, and immunogenicity of VGX-3100, a therapeutic synthetic DNA vaccine targeting human papillomavirus 16 and 18 E6 and E7 proteins for cervical intraepithelial neoplasia 2/3: a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled phase 2b trial

    PubMed Central

    Trimble, Cornelia L; Morrow, Matthew P; Kraynyak, Kimberly A; Shen, Xuefei; Dallas, Michael; Yan, Jian; Edwards, Lance; Parker, R Lamar; Denny, Lynette; Giffear, Mary; Brown, Ami Shah; Marcozzi-Pierce, Kathleen; Shah, Divya; Slager, Anna M; Sylvester, Albert J; Khan, Amir; Broderick, Kate E; Juba, Robert J; Herring, Timothy A; Boyer, Jean; Lee, Jessica; Sardesai, Niranjan Y; Weiner, David B; Bagarazzi, Mark L

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Despite preventive vaccines for oncogenic human papillomaviruses (HPVs), cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) is common, and current treatments are ablative and can lead to long-term reproductive morbidity. We assessed whether VGX-3100, synthetic plasmids targeting HPV-16 and HPV-18 E6 and E7 proteins, delivered by electroporation, would cause histopathological regression in women with CIN2/3. Methods Efficacy, safety, and immunogenicity of VGX-3100 were assessed in CIN2/3 associated with HPV-16 and HPV-18, in a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled phase 2b study. Patients from 36 academic and private gynaecology practices in seven countries were randomised (3:1) to receive 6 mg VGX-3100 or placebo (1 mL), given intramuscularly at 0, 4, and 12 weeks. Randomisation was stratified by age (<25 vs ≥25 years) and CIN2 versus CIN3 by computer-generated allocation sequence (block size 4). Funder and site personnel, participants, and pathologists were masked to treatment. The primary efficacy endpoint was regression to CIN1 or normal pathology 36 weeks after the first dose. Per-protocol and modified intention-to-treat analyses were based on patients receiving three doses without protocol violations, and on patients receiving at least one dose, respectively. The safety population included all patients who received at least one dose. The trial is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov (number NCT01304524) and EudraCT (number 2012-001334-33). Findings Between Oct 19, 2011, and July 30, 2013, 167 patients received either VGX-3100 (n=125) or placebo (n=42). In the per-protocol analysis 53 (49.5%) of 107 VGX-3100 recipients and 11 (30.6%) of 36 placebo recipients had histopathological regression (percentage point difference 19.0 [95% CI 1.4–36.6]; p=0.034). In the modified intention-to-treat analysis 55 (48.2%) of 114 VGX-3100 recipients and 12 (30.0%) of 40 placebo recipients had histopathological regression (percentage point difference 18.2 [95% CI

  17. ORBITAL PHASE VARIATIONS OF THE ECCENTRIC GIANT PLANET HAT-P-2b

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, Nikole K.; Showman, Adam P.; Knutson, Heather A.; Desert, Jean-Michel; Kao, Melodie; Cowan, Nicolas B.; Laughlin, Gregory; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Burrows, Adam; Bakos, Gaspar A.; Hartman, Joel D.; Deming, Drake; Crepp, Justin R.; Mighell, Kenneth J.; Agol, Eric; Charbonneau, David; Fischer, Debra A.; Hinkley, Sasha; Johnson, John Asher; Howard, Andrew W.; and others

    2013-04-01

    We present the first secondary eclipse and phase curve observations for the highly eccentric hot Jupiter HAT-P-2b in the 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, and 8.0 {mu}m bands of the Spitzer Space Telescope. The 3.6 and 4.5 {mu}m data sets span an entire orbital period of HAT-P-2b (P = 5.6334729 d), making them the longest continuous phase curve observations obtained to date and the first full-orbit observations of a planet with an eccentricity exceeding 0.2. We present an improved non-parametric method for removing the intrapixel sensitivity variations in Spitzer data at 3.6 and 4.5 {mu}m that robustly maps position-dependent flux variations. We find that the peak in planetary flux occurs at 4.39 {+-} 0.28, 5.84 {+-} 0.39, and 4.68 {+-} 0.37 hr after periapse passage with corresponding maxima in the planet/star flux ratio of 0.1138% {+-} 0.0089%, 0.1162% {+-} 0.0080%, and 0.1888% {+-} 0.0072% in the 3.6, 4.5, and 8.0 {mu}m bands, respectively. Our measured secondary eclipse depths of 0.0996% {+-} 0.0072%, 0.1031% {+-} 0.0061%, 0.071%{sub -0.013%}{sup +0.029,} and 0.1392% {+-} 0.0095% in the 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, and 8.0 {mu}m bands, respectively, indicate that the planet cools significantly from its peak temperature before we measure the dayside flux during secondary eclipse. We compare our measured secondary eclipse depths to the predictions from a one-dimensional radiative transfer model, which suggests the possible presence of a transient day side inversion in HAT-P-2b's atmosphere near periapse. We also derive improved estimates for the system parameters, including its mass, radius, and orbital ephemeris. Our simultaneous fit to the transit, secondary eclipse, and radial velocity data allows us to determine the eccentricity (e = 0.50910 {+-} 0.00048) and argument of periapse ({omega} = 188. Degree-Sign 09 {+-} 0. Degree-Sign 39) of HAT-P-2b's orbit with a greater precision than has been achieved for any other eccentric extrasolar planet. We also find evidence for a long-term linear

  18. Orbital Phase Variations of the Eccentric Giant Planet HAT-P-2b

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Nikole K.; Knutson, Heather A.; Showman, Adam P.; Cowan, Nicolas B.; Laughlin, Gregory; Burrows, Adam; Deming, Drake; Crepp, Justin R.; Mighell, Kenneth J.; Agol, Eric; Bakos, Gáspár Á.; Charbonneau, David; Désert, Jean-Michel; Fischer, Debra A.; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Hartman, Joel D.; Hinkley, Sasha; Howard, Andrew W.; Johnson, John Asher; Kao, Melodie; Langton, Jonathan; Marcy, Geoffrey W.

    2013-04-01

    We present the first secondary eclipse and phase curve observations for the highly eccentric hot Jupiter HAT-P-2b in the 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, and 8.0 μm bands of the Spitzer Space Telescope. The 3.6 and 4.5 μm data sets span an entire orbital period of HAT-P-2b (P = 5.6334729 d), making them the longest continuous phase curve observations obtained to date and the first full-orbit observations of a planet with an eccentricity exceeding 0.2. We present an improved non-parametric method for removing the intrapixel sensitivity variations in Spitzer data at 3.6 and 4.5 μm that robustly maps position-dependent flux variations. We find that the peak in planetary flux occurs at 4.39 ± 0.28, 5.84 ± 0.39, and 4.68 ± 0.37 hr after periapse passage with corresponding maxima in the planet/star flux ratio of 0.1138% ± 0.0089%, 0.1162% ± 0.0080%, and 0.1888% ± 0.0072% in the 3.6, 4.5, and 8.0 μm bands, respectively. Our measured secondary eclipse depths of 0.0996% ± 0.0072%, 0.1031% ± 0.0061%, 0.071%^{+0.029%}_{-0.013%}, and 0.1392% ± 0.0095% in the 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, and 8.0 μm bands, respectively, indicate that the planet cools significantly from its peak temperature before we measure the dayside flux during secondary eclipse. We compare our measured secondary eclipse depths to the predictions from a one-dimensional radiative transfer model, which suggests the possible presence of a transient day side inversion in HAT-P-2b's atmosphere near periapse. We also derive improved estimates for the system parameters, including its mass, radius, and orbital ephemeris. Our simultaneous fit to the transit, secondary eclipse, and radial velocity data allows us to determine the eccentricity (e = 0.50910 ± 0.00048) and argument of periapse (ω = 188.°09 ± 0.°39) of HAT-P-2b's orbit with a greater precision than has been achieved for any other eccentric extrasolar planet. We also find evidence for a long-term linear trend in the radial velocity data. This trend suggests the presence

  19. Final Results of the Sunbelt Melanoma Trial: A Multi-Institutional Prospective Randomized Phase III Study Evaluating the Role of Adjuvant High-Dose Interferon Alfa-2b and Completion Lymph Node Dissection for Patients Staged by Sentinel Lymph Node Biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Egger, Michael E.; Edwards, Michael J.; Ross, Merrick I.; Reintgen, Douglas S.; Noyes, R. Dirk; Martin, Robert C.G.; Goydos, James S.; Beitsch, Peter D.; Urist, Marshall M.; Ariyan, Stephan; Sussman, Jeffrey J.; Davidson, B. Scott; Gershenwald, Jeffrey E.; Hagendoorn, Lee J.; Stromberg, Arnold J.; Scoggins, Charles R.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The Sunbelt Melanoma Trial is a prospective randomized trial evaluating the role of high-dose interferon alfa-2b therapy (HDI) or completion lymph node dissection (CLND) for patients with melanoma staged by sentinel lymph node (SLN) biopsy. Patients and Methods Patients were eligible if they were age 18 to 70 years with primary cutaneous melanoma ≥ 1.0 mm Breslow thickness and underwent SLN biopsy. In Protocol A, patients with a single tumor-positive lymph node after SLN biopsy underwent CLND and were randomly assigned to observation versus HDI. In Protocol B, patients with tumor-negative SLN by standard histopathology and immunohistochemistry underwent molecular staging by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Patients positive by RT-PCR were randomly assigned to observation versus CLND versus CLND+HDI. Primary end points were disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS). Results In the Protocol A intention-to-treat analysis, there were no significant differences in DFS (hazard ratio, 0.82; P = .45) or OS (hazard ratio, 1.10; P = .68) for patients randomly assigned to HDI versus observation. In the Protocol B intention-to-treat analysis, there were no significant differences in overall DFS (P = .069) or OS (P = .77) across the three randomized treatment arms. Similarly, efficacy analysis (excluding patients who did not receive the assigned treatment) did not demonstrate significant differences in DFS or OS in Protocol A or Protocol B. Median follow-up time was 71 months. Conclusion No survival benefit for adjuvant HDI in patients with a single positive SLN was found. Among patients with tumor-negative SLN by conventional pathology but with melanoma detected in the SLN by RT-PCR, there was no OS benefit for CLND or CLND+HDI. PMID:26858331

  20. Biochemical surrogate markers of liver fibrosis and activity in a randomized trial of peginterferon alfa-2b and ribavirin.

    PubMed

    Poynard, Thierry; McHutchison, John; Manns, Michael; Myers, Rob P; Albrecht, Janice

    2003-08-01

    Liver fibrosis and activity indexes were validated in patients infected by hepatitis C virus (HCV) nontreated and treated by interferon. The aim was to validate their usefulness as surrogate markers of histologic features using the data of a randomized trial of combination peginterferon alfa-2b and ribavirin. Three hundred fifty-two patients who had had 2 interpretable liver biopsies and stored serum sample before and after treatment were selected. Two hundred eight patients received peginterferon alfa-2b 1.5 mcg per kg and ribavirin and 144 patients interferon alfa-2b 3 MU three times a week and ribavirin for 48 weeks. A fibrosis and an activity index combining 5 and 6 biochemical markers were assessed at baseline and at end of follow-up (24 weeks after treatment). The biochemical markers have significant predictive values both for the diagnosis of fibrosis and for activity. For the diagnosis of bridging fibrosis and/or moderate necroinflammatory activity, the area under the receiver operating characteristics curve of the activity index was 0.76 +/- 0.03 at baseline and 0.82 +/- 0.02 at end of follow-up. A cutoff of activity index at 0.30 (range, 0.00-1.00) had 90% sensitivity and 88% positive predictive value for the diagnosis of bridging fibrosis or moderate necroinflammatory activity. Sensitivity analyses with biopsy specimens of size greater than 15 mm suggest that a part of discordances between biochemical markers and histology were due to biopsy specimen sampling error. In conclusion, these biochemical markers of fibrosis and activity could be used as surrogate markers for liver biopsy in patients with chronic hepatitis C, both for the initial evaluation and for follow-up.

  1. Irreversible Electroporation for the Ablation of Renal Cell Carcinoma: A Prospective, Human, In Vivo Study Protocol (IDEAL Phase 2b)

    PubMed Central

    van Lienden, Krijn P; Wagstaff, Peter GK; Scheltema, Matthijs JV; de Bruin, Daniel M; Zondervan, Patricia J; van Delden, Otto M; van Leeuwen, Ton G; de la Rosette, Jean JMCH; Laguna, M Pilar

    2017-01-01

    Background Irreversible electroporation (IRE) is an emerging technique delivering electrical pulses to ablate tissue, with the theoretical advantage to overcome the main shortcomings of conventional thermal ablation. Recent short-term research showed that IRE for the ablation of renal masses is a safe and feasible treatment option. In an ablate and resect design, histopathological analysis 4 weeks after radical nephrectomy demonstrated that IRE-targeted renal tumors were completely covered by ablation zone. In order to develop a validated long-term IRE follow-up study, it is essential to obtain clinical confirmation of the efficacy of this novel technology. Additionally, follow-up after IRE ablation obliges verification of a suitable imaging modality. Objective The objectives of this study are the clinical efficacy and safety of IRE ablation of renal masses and to evaluate the use of cross-sectional imaging modalities in the follow-up after IRE in renal tumors. This study conforms to the recommendations of the IDEAL Collaboration and can be categorized as a phase 2B exploration trial. Methods In this prospective clinical trial, IRE will be performed in 20 patients aged 18 years and older presenting with a solid enhancing small renal mass (SRM) (≤4 cm) who are candidates for ablation. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) will be performed at 1 day pre-IRE, and 1 week post-IRE. Computed tomography (CT), CEUS, and MRI will be performed at 3 months, 6 months, and 12 months post-IRE. Results Presently, recruitment of patients has started and the first inclusions are completed. Preliminary results and outcomes are expected in 2018. Conclusions To establish the position of IRE ablation for treating renal tumors, a structured stepwise assessment in clinical practice is required. This study will offer fundamental knowledge on the clinical efficacy of IRE ablation for SRMs, potentially positioning IRE as ablative modality for renal

  2. [Radiotherapy phase I trials' methodology: Features].

    PubMed

    Rivoirard, R; Vallard, A; Langrand-Escure, J; Guy, J-B; Ben Mrad, M; Yaoxiong, X; Diao, P; Méry, B; Pigne, G; Rancoule, C; Magné, N

    2016-12-01

    In clinical research, biostatistical methods allow the rigorous analysis of data collection and should be defined from the trial design to obtain the appropriate experimental approach. Thus, if the main purpose of phase I is to determine the dose to use during phase II, methodology should be finely adjusted to experimental treatment(s). Today, the methodology for chemotherapy and targeted therapy is well known. For radiotherapy and chemoradiotherapy phase I trials, the primary endpoint must reflect both effectiveness and potential treatment toxicities. Methodology should probably be complex to limit failures in the following phases. However, there are very few data about methodology design in the literature. The present study focuses on these particular trials and their characteristics. It should help to raise existing methodological patterns shortcomings in order to propose new and better-suited designs.

  3. Magnetic phase transitions in SmNi 2B 2C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Hagary, M.; Michor, H.; Hilscher, G.

    2000-07-01

    The magnetic properties of SmNi 2B 2C were studied by specific heat and magnetization measurements. Below the Néel temperature TN=10.2 (1) K a second anomaly in the heat capacity is observed. This may be associated with a spin reorientation transition at T ∗=8.4 - 9.4 K being sensitive to tiny changes of the composition. The strong curvature of the inverse susceptibility is well described by a Curie-Weiss law with μeff≃0.59 μB/f.u. and a temperature-independent Van Vleck susceptibility χ 0≃37×10 -7 cm3/ g.

  4. Interferon-alpha 2b quantification in inclusion bodies using reversed phase-ultra performance liquid chromatography (RP-UPLC).

    PubMed

    Cueto-Rojas, H F; Pérez, N O; Pérez-Sánchez, G; Ocampo-Juárez, I; Medina-Rivero, E

    2010-04-15

    Interferon-alpha 2b (IFN-alpha 2b) is a recombinant therapeutic cytokine produced as inclusion bodies using a strain of Escherichia coli as expression system. After fermentation and recovery, it is necessary to know the amount of recombinant IFN-alpha 2b, in order to determine the yield and the load for solubilization, and chromatographic protein purification steps. The present work details the validation of a new short run-time and fast sample-preparation method to quantify IFN-alpha 2b in inclusion bodies using Reversed Phase-Ultra Performance Liquid Chromatography (RP-UPLC). The developed method demonstrated an accuracy of 100.28%; the relative standard deviations for method precision, repeatability and inter-day precision tests were found to be 0.57%, 1.54% and 1.83%, respectively. Linearity of the method was assessed in the range of concentrations from 0.05 mg/mL to 0.5 mg/mL, the curve obtained had a determination coefficient (r(2)) of 0.9989. Detection and quantification limits were found to be 0.008 mg/mL and 0.025 mg/mL, respectively. The method also demonstrated robustness for changes in column temperature, and specificity against host proteins and other recombinant protein expressed in the same E. coli strain.

  5. A randomised controlled trial of nurse-managed trial conclusion following early phase cancer trial participation.

    PubMed

    Cox, K; Wilson, E; Arthur, A; Elkan, R; Armstrong, S

    2005-07-11

    The effect of a nurse-managed intervention, for early phase cancer trial participants at trial conclusion, on psychosocial outcomes was evaluated at two cancer centres in the Midlands, England using a randomised controlled trial. It involved 117 patients who were participating in an early phase cancer clinical trial. It was a nurse-managed trial exit, which included a trial exit interview, trial feedback information leaflet and telephone follow-up compared with standard care at trial conclusion. Psychological distress at 1 week and 4-6 weeks post-trial conclusion, patient's knowledge and understanding and patient's satisfaction were assessed. The results showed there was no significant difference between the two groups regarding scores for anxiety and depression at time one and time two. There is some suggestion that the intervention reduced anxiety from trial conclusion to follow-up (P=0.27). Patients in both groups felt they had contributed to cancer research through trial participation. However, intervention patients were more likely to feel that they knew how the trial was going (P<0.001), knew how other people in the trial were doing (P=0.001), had all the feedback they needed about the trial they took part in (P<0.01) and knew how they would be followed up (P=0.02). Patient satisfaction with the intervention was high (median score=4.5 where 5 is greatest satisfaction). In conclusion, nurse-managed trial conclusion led to positive outcomes for patients who had recently completed a clinical trial.

  6. Complex high-temperature phase transitions in Li{sub 2}B{sub 12}H{sub 12} and Na{sub 2}B{sub 12}H{sub 12}

    SciTech Connect

    Verdal, Nina; Her, Jae-Hyuk; Stavila, Vitalie; Soloninin, Alexei V.; Babanova, Olga A.; Skripov, Alexander V.; Udovic, Terrence J.; Rush, John J.

    2014-04-01

    Differential scanning calorimetry measurements of Li{sub 2}B{sub 12}H{sub 12} and Na{sub 2}B{sub 12}H{sub 12} indicate hysteretic transformations to high-temperature phases at ≈615 K and 529 K, respectively, upon heating (1 K/min) from room temperature. X-ray and neutron powder diffraction measurements corroborate the phase-change behavior. For Li{sub 2}B{sub 12}H{sub 12}, the diffraction data are consistent with a previous study suggesting that the overall face-centered-cubic arrangement of icosahedral B{sub 12}H{sub 12}{sup 2−} anions is maintained upon transformation to the high-temperature polymorph, although the anions are now orientationally disordered and the Li{sup +} cations crystallographically disordered within an enlarged lattice. For Na{sub 2}B{sub 12}H{sub 12}, the diffraction data indicate the existence of three different high-temperature phases in addition to the known low-temperature monoclinic phase. The highest-temperature structure possesses Im3{sup -}m symmetry and exhibits a body-centered-cubic arrangement of orientationally disordered anions. The interstitial, disordered Na{sup +} cations appear to favor off-center positions within the distorted tetrahedral sites formed by the anions in this structure. An intermediate Pm3{sup -}n-symmetric phase at lower temperature is the result of a partial ordering of this higher-temperature structure. A third, minor, face-centered-cubic phase coexists with these high-temperature polymorphs. {sup 1}H NMR measurements of Li{sub 2}B{sub 12}H{sub 12} and Na{sub 2}B{sub 12}H{sub 12} reveal an approximately two-orders-of-magnitude increase in the reorientational jump rate of the anions in both cases upon transformation to their high-temperature structures. The enhanced anion mobilities were corroborated by neutron scattering fixed-window scans across the respective phase boundaries. The inherent cation disorder associated with these high-temperature polymorphs suggests their potential use as superionic

  7. Moral justification of Phase 1 oncology trials.

    PubMed

    Dubov, Alex

    2014-06-01

    This article attempts to answer the following normative questions: Can one consider the design of Phase 1 trials ethically appropriate due to the unfavorable ratio of risks and benefits? What are some ethical safeguards for Phase 1 oncology research? A comparative review of literature contributed to the consolidation of the proposed ethical framework for Phase 1 oncology trials. This framework gives a special attention to issues of therapeutic misconception and vulnerability. The benefits and dangers associated with the enrollment in trials are described as well as the absence of alternatives, treatment-specific optimism, and vagueness in factual presentation during the informed consent process. The notion of therapeutic misconception is contrasted with optimism despite realism that stems from psychological, cultural, and religious factors and not necessarily from the lack of information. Close attention is given to the possible ways in which the inherent uncertainty and resulting cognitive biases may affect the informed consent process and the definition of therapeutic misconception. The article ends with recommendations for an ethical way of enrolling palliative patients in early stages of oncology research, giving special attention to provision of adequate consent, protection of vulnerability, and avoidance of therapeutic misconception.

  8. Effect of Oral JZP-110 (ADX-N05) on Wakefulness and Sleepiness in Adults with Narcolepsy: A Phase 2b Study

    PubMed Central

    Ruoff, Chad; Swick, Todd J.; Doekel, Robert; Emsellem, Helene A.; Feldman, Neil T.; Rosenberg, Russell; Bream, Gary; Khayrallah, Moise A.; Lu, Yuan; Black, Jed

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of oral JZP-110, a second-generation wake-promoting agent with dopaminergic and noradrenergic activity, for treatment of impaired wakefulness and excessive sleepiness in adults with narcolepsy. Methods: This was a phase 2b, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group trial conducted at 28 centers in the United States. Patients were adults with narcolepsy who had baseline scores ≥ 10 on the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) and baseline sleep latency ≤ 10 min on the Maintenance of Wakefulness Test (MWT). Patients received a daily placebo (n = 49) or JZP-110 (n = 44) 150 mg/day weeks 1–4 and 300 mg/day weeks 5–12. Primary efficacy endpoints were change from baseline in average MWT sleep latency, and the Clinical Global Impression-Change (CGI-C); secondary endpoints were change from baseline in ESS score and Patient Global Impression-Change. Results: Improvements were significantly greater with JZP-110 versus placebo on mean MWT sleep latency (4 w, 9.5 versus 1.4 min, P < 0.0001; 12 w, 12.8 versus 2.1 min, P < 0.0001), percentage of patients with CGI-C improvement (4 w, 80% versus 51%, P = 0.0066; 12 w, 86% versus 38%, P < 0.0001), and mean change in ESS (4 w, −5.6 versus −2.4, P = 0.0038; 12 w, −8.5 versus −2.5, P < 0.0001). Three JZP-110-treated patients (6.8%) discontinued due to adverse events (AEs). The most common AEs with JZP-110 versus placebo were insomnia (23% versus 8%), headache (16% versus 10%), nausea (14% versus 6%), diarrhea (11% versus 6%), decreased appetite (14% versus 0%), and anxiety (11% versus 0%). Conclusions: At doses of 150–300 mg/day, JZP-110 was well tolerated and significantly improved the ability to stay awake and subjective symptoms of excessive sleepiness in adults with narcolepsy. Clinical Trials Registration: Clinicaltrials.gov identifier NCT01681121. Citation: Ruoff C, Swick TJ, Doekel R, Emsellem HA, Feldman NT, Rosenberg R, Bream G, Khayrallah MA

  9. Efficient traceless solid-phase synthesis of 3,4-dihydropyrazino[1,2-b]indazoles and their 6-oxides.

    PubMed

    Pudelová, Nadezda; Krchnák, Viktor

    2009-01-01

    A highly efficient novel traceless solid-phase synthesis of 3,4-dihydropyrazino[1,2-b]indazoles and their 6-oxides was developed by using commercially available building blocks, diamines, 2-nitrobenzenesulfonyl chlorides, and bromoketones/bromoacetates. Mild reaction conditions, diversely substituted building blocks, and high purity of crude products enabled effective combinatorial syntheses of libraries.

  10. Phases I–III Clinical Trials Using Adult Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sanz-Ruiz, Ricardo; Gutiérrez Ibañes, Enrique; Arranz, Adolfo Villa; Fernández Santos, María Eugenia; Fernández, Pedro L. Sánchez; Fernández-Avilés, Francisco

    2010-01-01

    First randomized clinical trials have demonstrated that stem cell therapy can improve cardiac recovery after the acute phase of myocardial ischemia and in patients with chronic ischemic heart disease. Nevertheless, some trials have shown that conflicting results and uncertainties remain in the case of mechanisms of action and possible ways to improve clinical impact of stem cells in cardiac repair. In this paper we will examine the evidence available, analyze the main phase I and II randomized clinical trials and their limitations, discuss the key points in the design of future trials, and depict new directions of research in this fascinating field. PMID:21076533

  11. Phase I (first-in-man) prophylactic vaccine's clinical trials: Selecting a clinical trial site

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Shantanu; Goyal, Vishal; Singh, Kavita

    2015-01-01

    An appropriately equipped and staffed Phase I unit is critical for smooth conduct of a first-in-man clinical trial. The first-in-man prophylactic vaccine trial(s) requires basic infrastructure of clinical trial site, experienced and dedicated site staff and healthy adults as volunteers. The facility should have access to equipment, emergency services, laboratory, pharmacy and archiving. In terms of design, infrastructure, workflow and manpower, a Phase I unit for testing a novel vaccine or drug are quite similar. However, there are some important attributes, which should be taken into consideration, while performing pre-trial site selection for conducting phase I trial with a new or novel vaccine. PMID:25878951

  12. Phase I trials of antitumour agents: fundamental concepts

    PubMed Central

    Toloi, Diego de Araujo; Jardim, Denis Leonardo Fontes; Hoff, Paulo Marcelo Gehm; Riechelmann, Rachel Simões Pimenta

    2015-01-01

    Phase I trials are an important step in the development of new drugs. Because of the advancing knowledge of cancer’s molecular biology, these trials offer an important platform for the development of new agents and also for patient treatment. Therefore, comprehension of their peculiar terminology and methodology are increasingly important. Our objectives were to review the fundamental concepts of phase I designs and to critically contextualise this type of study as a therapeutic option for patients with refractory cancer. PMID:25729414

  13. Efficacy, Safety, and Dose of Pafuramidine, a New Oral Drug for Treatment of First Stage Sleeping Sickness, in a Phase 2a Clinical Study and Phase 2b Randomized Clinical Studies

    PubMed Central

    Burri, Christian; Yeramian, Patrick D.; Merolle, Ada; Serge, Kazadi Kyanza; Mpanya, Alain; Lutumba, Pascal; Mesu, Victor Kande Betu Ku; Lubaki, Jean-Pierre Fina; Mpoto, Alfred Mpoo; Thompson, Mark; Munungu, Blaise Fungula; Josenando, Théophilo; Bernhard, Sonja C.; Olson, Carol A.; Blum, Johannes; Tidwell, Richard R.; Pohlig, Gabriele

    2016-01-01

    Background Sleeping sickness (human African trypanosomiasis [HAT]) is caused by protozoan parasites and characterized by a chronic progressive course, which may last up to several years before death. We conducted two Phase 2 studies to determine the efficacy and safety of oral pafuramidine in African patients with first stage HAT. Methods The Phase 2a study was an open-label, non-controlled, proof-of-concept study where 32 patients were treated with 100 mg of pafuramidine orally twice a day (BID) for 5 days at two trypanosomiasis reference centers (Angola and the Democratic Republic of the Congo [DRC]) between August 2001 and November 2004. The Phase 2b study compared pafuramidine in 41 patients versus standard pentamidine therapy in 40 patients. The Phase 2b study was open-label, parallel-group, controlled, randomized, and conducted at two sites in the DRC between April 2003 and February 2007. The Phase 2b study was then amended to add an open-label sequence (Phase 2b-2), where 30 patients received pafuramidine for 10 days. The primary efficacy endpoint was parasitologic cure at 24 hours (Phase 2a) or 3 months (Phase 2b) after treatment completion. The primary safety outcome was the rate of occurrence of World Health Organization Toxicity Scale Grade 3 or higher adverse events. All subjects provided written informed consent. Findings/Conclusion Pafuramidine for the treatment of first stage HAT was comparable in efficacy to pentamidine after 10 days of dosing. The cure rates 3 months post-treatment were 79% in the 5-day pafuramidine, 100% in the 7-day pentamidine, and 93% in the 10-day pafuramidine groups. In Phase 2b, the percentage of patients with at least 1 treatment-emergent adverse event was notably higher after pentamidine treatment (93%) than pafuramidine treatment for 5 days (25%) and 10 days (57%). These results support continuation of the development program for pafuramidine into Phase 3. PMID:26881924

  14. First experimental determination of the absolute gas-phase rate coefficient for the reaction of OH with 4-hydroxy-2-butanone (4H2B) at 294 K by vapor pressure measurements of 4H2B.

    PubMed

    El Dib, Gisèle; Sleiman, Chantal; Canosa, André; Travers, Daniel; Courbe, Jonathan; Sawaya, Terufat; Mokbel, Ilham; Chakir, Abdelkhaleq

    2013-01-10

    The reaction of the OH radicals with 4-hydroxy-2-butanone was investigated in the gas phase using an absolute rate method at room temperature and over the pressure range 10-330 Torr in He and air as diluent gases. The rate coefficients were measured using pulsed laser photolysis (PLP) of H(2)O(2) to produce OH and laser induced fluorescence (LIF) to measure the OH temporal profile. An average value of (4.8 ± 1.2) × 10(-12) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) was obtained. The OH quantum yield following the 266 nm pulsed laser photolysis of 4-hydroxy-2-butanone was measured for the first time and found to be about 0.3%. The investigated kinetic study required accurate measurements of the vapor pressure of 4-hydroxy-2-butanone, which was measured using a static apparatus. The vapor pressure was found to range from 0.056 to 7.11 Torr between 254 and 323 K. This work provides the first absolute rate coefficients for the reaction of 4-hydroxy-2-butanone with OH and the first experimental saturated vapor pressures of the studied compound below 311 K. The obtained results are compared to those of the literature and the effects of the experimental conditions on the reactivity are examined. The calculated tropospheric lifetime obtained in this work suggests that once emitted into the atmosphere, 4H2B may contribute to the photochemical pollution in a local or regional scale.

  15. Vitamins B2, B6 and B12 and Risk of New Colorectal Adenomas in a Randomized Trial of Aspirin Use and Folic Acid Supplementation

    PubMed Central

    Figueiredo, Jane C.; Levine, A. Joan; Grau, Maria V.; Midttun, Øivind; Ueland, Per M.; Ahnen, Dennis J.; Barry, Elizabeth L.; Tsang, Shirley; Munroe, David; Ali, Iqbal; Haile, Robert W.; Sandler, Robert S.; Baron, John A.

    2008-01-01

    Background Folate, other vitamin B cofactors, and genes involved in folate-mediated one-carbon metabolism (FOCM) all may play important roles in colorectal neoplasia. In this study, we examined the associations between dietary and circulating plasma levels of vitamins B2, B6 and B12 and risk colorectal adenomas. Methods The Aspirin/Folate Polyp Prevention Study is a randomized clinical trial of folic acid supplementation and incidence of new colorectal adenomas in individuals with a history of adenomas (n=1,084). Diet and supplement use were ascertained through a food-frequency questionnaire administered at baseline. Blood collected at baseline was used to determine plasma B-vitamin levels. We used generalized linear regression to estimate risk ratios (RR) and 95% confidence limits (CI) as measures of association. Results We found a borderline significant inverse association with plasma B6 (pyridoxal 5′phosphate, PLP) and adenoma risk (adjusted RR Q4 vs. Q1=0.78, 95% CI=0.61-1.00, p-trend=0.08). This association was not modified by folic acid supplementation or plasma folate. However, the protective association of PLP with adenoma risk was observed only among subjects who did not drink alcohol (p-interaction=0.03). Plasma B2 (riboflavin) was inversely associated with risk of advanced lesions (adjusted RR Q4 vs. Q1=0.51; 95% CI=0.26-0.99, p-trend=0.12). No significant associations were observed between adenoma risk and plasma vitamin B12 or dietary intake of vitamin B2 and B6. When we examined specific gene-B-vitamin interactions, we observed a possible interaction between MTHFR-C677T and plasma B2 on risk of all adenomas. Conclusion Our results suggest that high levels of PLP and B2 may protect against colorectal adenomas. PMID:18708408

  16. Phase 0 - Microdosing strategy in clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Rani, P Usha; Naidu, M U R

    2008-11-01

    Drug development is an activity that is long, complex and expensive. In 2004, attrition in the drug development paradigm prompted the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to introduce its 'Critical Path' document, which highlighted the serious discordance between major scientific advances and limited drug development process. One issue addressed was that of microdosing. The concept of microdosing involves the use of extremely low, nonpharmacologically active doses of a drug to define the pharmacokinetic profile of the medication in human subjects. Microdosing, thus, appears as a new viable concept in the 'toolbox' of the drug development activity. It appears that microdosing strategy could complement standard animal-to-human scaling, redefining the existing concept of phase I clinical research. In future, when research methods and technology involved in Phase 0 studies become more sophisticated, human microdosing may be applied to a number of drugs developed subsequently.

  17. Differences in trial knowledge and motives for participation among cancer patients in phase 3 clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Godskesen, T M; Kihlbom, U; Nordin, K; Silén, M; Nygren, P

    2016-05-01

    While participants in clinical oncology trials are essential for the advancement of cancer therapies, factors decisive for patient participation have been described but need further investigation, particularly in the case of phase 3 studies. The aim of this study was to investigate differences in trial knowledge and motives for participation in phase 3 clinical cancer trials in relation to gender, age, education levels and former trial experience. The results of a questionnaire returned from 88 of 96 patients (92%) were analysed using the Mann-Whitney U-test. There were small, barely relevant differences in trial knowledge among patients when stratified by gender, age or education. Participants with former trial experience were less aware about the right to withdraw. Male participants and those aged ≥65 years were significantly more motivated by a feeling of duty, or by the opinions of close ones. Men seem more motivated than women by external factors. With the awareness that elderly and single male participants might be a vulnerable group and participants with former trial experience are less likely to be sufficiently informed, the information consent process should focus more on these patients. We conclude that the informed consent process seems to work well, with good results within most subgroups.

  18. Eldelumab [Anti-IP-10] Induction Therapy for Ulcerative Colitis: A Randomised, Placebo-Controlled, Phase 2b Study

    PubMed Central

    Colombel, Jean-Frédéric; Ghosh, Subrata; Sands, Bruce E.; Dryden, Gerald; Hébuterne, Xavier; Leong, Rupert W.; Bressler, Brian; Ullman, Thomas; Lakatos, Peter L.; Reinisch, Walter; Xu, Li-An; Luo, Allison

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Interferon-γ-inducible protein-10 [IP-10] mediates immune cell trafficking from the circulation to the inflamed colon and decreases gut epithelial cell survival. IP-10 expression is increased in patients with ulcerative colitis [UC]. We report efficacy and safety results from a dose-ranging induction study of eldelumab, a fully human monoclonal antibody to IP-10, in moderately to severely active UC. Methods: A total of 252 adults with UC [Mayo score ≥ 6 and endoscopic subscore ≥ 2] were randomised 1:1:1 to placebo or eldelumab 15 or 25 mg/kg administered intravenously on Days 1 and 8 and every other week thereafter. The primary endpoint was clinical remission [Mayo score ≤ 2; no individual subscale score > 1] at Week 11. Key secondary endpoints included Mayo score clinical response and mucosal healing at Week 11. Results: Neither eldelumab 15 or 25 mg/kg resulted in significant increases vs placebo in the proportion of patients achieving Week 11 clinical remission. Remission and response rates were 17.6% and 47.1% with eldelumab 25mg/kg, 13.1% and 44.0% with eldelumab 15mg/kg, and 9.6% and 31.3% with placebo. Clinical remission and response rates were higher in anti-tumour necrosis factor [TNF]-naïve patients treated with eldelumab compared with placebo. Eldelumab treatment was well tolerated and no immunogenicity was observed. Conclusions: The primary endpoint was not achieved with induction treatment with eldelumab 15 or 25 mg/kg in patients with UC. Trends towards clinical remission and response were observed in the overall population and were more pronounced in anti-TNF naïve patients. Eldelumab safety signals were consistent with those reported previously [ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01294410]. PMID:26721935

  19. Phase I clinical trial design in cancer drug development.

    PubMed

    Eisenhauer, E A; O'Dwyer, P J; Christian, M; Humphrey, J S

    2000-02-01

    The past decade has seen the publication of a number of new proposals for the design of phase I trials of anticancer agents. The purpose of these proposals has been to address ethical concerns about treating excessive numbers of patients at subtherapeutic doses of a new agent and to increase the overall efficiency of the process while enhancing the precision of the recommended phase II dose. In early 1998, a workshop of phase I investigators was held under the sponsorship of Bristol-Myers Squibb Pharmaceutical Research Institute (Wallingford, CT) to review the experience to date with novel phase I methodologies, with a particular focus on their efficiency and safety. This report summarizes the material presented. It was concluded that for phase I trials of antineoplastics (cytotoxics), which begin at 0.1 mouse-equivalent LD10 doses, evidence to date suggests that the historic approach of using a modified Fibonacci escalation and three patients per dose level is not necessary and is seldom used. One patient per dose level and more rapid escalation schemes, both empirically based and statistically based, are commonly used with apparent safety. There remain questions, however: Which of the dose escalation schemes is optimal? Are there alternatives to toxicity as a phase I end point, and will these end points be reliable in defining active doses? Answering these questions in a reasonable time frame will be important if new anticancer agents are not to suffer undue delays in phase I evaluation.

  20. Improving early clinical trial phase identification of promising therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Kent, Thomas A; Shah, Shreyansh D; Mandava, Pitchaiah

    2015-07-21

    This review addresses decision-making underlying the frequent failure to confirm early-phase positive trial results and how to prioritize which early agents to transition to late phase. While unexpected toxicity is sometimes responsible for late-phase failures, lack of efficacy is also frequently found. In stroke as in other conditions, early trials often demonstrate imbalances in factors influencing outcome. Other issues complicate early trial analysis, including unequally distributed noise inherent in outcome measures and variations in natural history among studies. We contend that statistical approaches to correct for imbalances and noise, while likely valid for homogeneous conditions, appear unable to accommodate disease complexity and have failed to correctly identify effective agents. While blinding and randomization are important to reduce selection bias, these methods appear insufficient to insure valid conclusions. We found potential sources of analytical errors in nearly 90% of a sample of early stroke trials. To address these issues, we recommend changes in early-phase analysis and reporting: (1) restrict use of statistical correction to studies where the underlying assumptions are validated, (2) select dichotomous over continuous outcomes for small samples, (3) consider pooled samples to model natural history to detect early therapeutic signals and increase the likelihood of replication in larger samples, (4) report subgroup baseline conditions, (5) consider post hoc methods to restrict analysis to subjects with an appropriate match, and (6) increase the strength of effect threshold given these cumulative sources of noise and potential errors. More attention to these issues should lead to better decision-making regarding selection of agents to proceed to pivotal trials.

  1. Sample size planning for phase II trials based on success probabilities for phase III.

    PubMed

    Götte, Heiko; Schüler, Armin; Kirchner, Marietta; Kieser, Meinhard

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, high failure rates in phase III trials were observed. One of the main reasons is overoptimistic assumptions for the planning of phase III resulting from limited phase II information and/or unawareness of realistic success probabilities. We present an approach for planning a phase II trial in a time-to-event setting that considers the whole phase II/III clinical development programme. We derive stopping boundaries after phase II that minimise the number of events under side conditions for the conditional probabilities of correct go/no-go decision after phase II as well as the conditional success probabilities for phase III. In addition, we give general recommendations for the choice of phase II sample size. Our simulations show that unconditional probabilities of go/no-go decision as well as the unconditional success probabilities for phase III are influenced by the number of events observed in phase II. However, choosing more than 150 events in phase II seems not necessary as the impact on these probabilities then becomes quite small. We recommend considering aspects like the number of compounds in phase II and the resources available when determining the sample size. The lower the number of compounds and the lower the resources are for phase III, the higher the investment for phase II should be.

  2. Phase 1 Clinical Trials in 83 Patients With Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Vaklavas, Christos; Tsimberidou, Apostolia-Maria; Wen, Sijin; Hong, David; Wheler, Jennifer; Ng, Chaan S.; Naing, Aung; Uehara, Cynthia; Wolff, Robert A.; Kurzrock, Razelle

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND The outcomes of patients with pancreatic cancer treated on early phase clinical trials have not been systematically analyzed. The purpose of this study was to report the presenting characteristics and outcomes of patients with locally advanced or metastatic pancreatic cancer treated on phase 1 clinical trials at a single institution. METHODS The authors reviewed the records of consecutive patients with metastatic pancreatic cancer who were treated in the Phase I Clinical Trials Program at The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center from November 2004 to March 2009. Data recorded and analyzed included survival, response, and disease characteristics. RESULTS Eighty-three patients were identified. The median age was 62 years (range, 39–81 years). Of 78 patients evaluable for response, 2 (3%) had a partial response (PR), and 10 (13%) had stable disease (SD) for ≥4 months. With a median follow-up for survivors of 3.7 months, the median survival from presentation in the phase 1 clinic was 5.0 months (95% confidence interval [CI], 3.3–6.2). The median overall survival from diagnosis was 22.1 months (95% CI, 17.9–26.5). The median time to treatment failure was 1.5 months (95% CI, 1.3–1.8). Independent factors associated with lower rates of PR/SD were liver metastases (P = .001) and performance status >0 (P = .01). Independent factors associated with shorter survival were liver metastases (P = .007), low calcium level (P = .015), and elevated CEA level (>6 ng/mL) (P = .005). CONCLUSIONS Our results suggest that phase 1 clinical trials offer a reasonable therapeutic approach for patients with advanced pancreatic cancer. PMID:20737567

  3. Spherical neutron polarimetry of the magnetic structure in HoNi{sub 2}B{sub 2}C: Interplay between magnetic phases and superconductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, M.; Zaharko, O.; Gasser, U.; Kreyssig, A.; Brown, P. J.; Canfield, P. C.

    2006-09-01

    Spherical neutron polarimetry has been used to answer open questions about different magnetic phases in HoNi{sub 2}B{sub 2}C, which are important in their interplay with superconductivity. We established that the incommensurate a{sup *} structure of k{sub 3}=(0.585 0 0) at 5.4 K in a zero magnetic field is a transverse-amplitude modulated wave with the magnetic moment along the b direction of the tetragonal structure. The depolarization of a neutron beam scattered from the k{sub 2}=(0 0 0.915) reflections reveals a multidomain state but does not allow an unambiguous determination of the spin configuration. Based on present knowledge of borocarbides and other rare-earth systems we give preference to a long-range incommensurate helical structure as the origin of the k{sub 2}=(0 0 0.915) reflections.

  4. Phase 0 clinical trials in oncology new drug development

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Umesh Chandra; Bhatia, Sandeep; Garg, Amit; Sharma, Amit; Choudhary, Vaibhav

    2011-01-01

    Research focus of pharmaceutical industry has expanded to a larger extent in last few decades putting many more new molecules, particularly targeted agents, for the clinical development. On the other hand, researchers are facing serious challenges due to high failure rates of new molecules in clinical studies. The United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in combination with academia and industry experts identified many factors responsible for failures of new molecules, and with a vision of taking traditional drug development model toward an innovative paradigm shift, issued regulatory guidance on conduct of exploratory investigational new drug (exploratory IND) studies, often called as phase 0 clinical trials, requiring reduced preclinical testing, which has special relevance to life-threatening diseases such as cancer. Phase 0 trials, utilizing much lower drug doses, provide an opportunity to explore the clinical behavior of new molecules very early in the drug development pathway, helping to identify the promising candidates and eliminating non-promising molecules, thus improving the efficiency of overall drug development with significant savings of resources. Being non-therapeutic in nature, these studies, however, pose certain ethical challenges requiring careful study designing and informed consent process. This article reviews the insights and perspectives for the feasibility, utility, planning, designing and conduct of phase 0 clinical trials, in addition to ethical issues and industrial perspective focused at oncology new drug development. PMID:21584177

  5. Phase 0 clinical trials in oncology new drug development.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Umesh Chandra; Bhatia, Sandeep; Garg, Amit; Sharma, Amit; Choudhary, Vaibhav

    2011-01-01

    Research focus of pharmaceutical industry has expanded to a larger extent in last few decades putting many more new molecules, particularly targeted agents, for the clinical development. On the other hand, researchers are facing serious challenges due to high failure rates of new molecules in clinical studies. The United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in combination with academia and industry experts identified many factors responsible for failures of new molecules, and with a vision of taking traditional drug development model toward an innovative paradigm shift, issued regulatory guidance on conduct of exploratory investigational new drug (exploratory IND) studies, often called as phase 0 clinical trials, requiring reduced preclinical testing, which has special relevance to life-threatening diseases such as cancer. Phase 0 trials, utilizing much lower drug doses, provide an opportunity to explore the clinical behavior of new molecules very early in the drug development pathway, helping to identify the promising candidates and eliminating non-promising molecules, thus improving the efficiency of overall drug development with significant savings of resources. Being non-therapeutic in nature, these studies, however, pose certain ethical challenges requiring careful study designing and informed consent process. This article reviews the insights and perspectives for the feasibility, utility, planning, designing and conduct of phase 0 clinical trials, in addition to ethical issues and industrial perspective focused at oncology new drug development.

  6. Phase I controlled trials of WR-2721 and cyclophosphamide

    SciTech Connect

    Glick, J.H.; Glover, D.; Weiler, C.; Norfleet, L.; Yuhas, J.; Kligerman, M.M.

    1984-09-01

    WR-2721 is an organic thiophosphate compound which in the animal model selectively protects against the hematologic toxicity of cyclophosphamide by factors of 1.5 to 2.0. Controlled Phase I trials of WR-2721 and cyclophosphamide were initiated to determine if WR-2721 protected against cyclophosphamide's hematolgic toxicity. Fifteen patients received WR-2721 prior to cyclophosphamide and were subsequently retreated 4 weeks later with the same cyclophosphamide dose alone. With WR-2721 pretreatment, 11/15 (73%) patients had improved WBC counts. In the second trial, 25 patients received the reverse sequence: an initial dose of cyclophosphamide alone, followed 4 weeks later by WR-2721 prior to the same dose of cyclophosphamide. With WR-2721 pretreatment, 12/25 (48%) patients had improved nadir WBC counts. No patient developed microscopic or gross hematuria or inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion. These data suggest that WR-2721 provides significant protection against cyclophosphamide-induced granulocytopenia, but the dose modification factors and degree of clinical benefit remain to be established. The current recommended WR-2721 dose for Phase II trials is 740 mg/m/sup 2/ administered over 15 minutes.

  7. Early phase clinical trials to identify optimal dosing and safety

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Natalie; Hansen, Aaron R.; Siu, Lillian L.; Abdul Razak, Albiruni R.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of early stage clinical trials is to determine the recommended dose and toxicity profile of an investigational agent or multi-drug combination. Molecularly targeted agents (MTAs) and immunotherapies have distinct toxicities from chemotherapies that are often not dose dependent and can lead to chronic and sometimes unpredictable side effects. Therefore utilizing a dose escalation method that has toxicity based endpoints may not be as appropriate for determination of recommended dose, and alternative parameters such as pharmacokinetic or pharmacodynamic outcomes are potentially appealing options. Approaches to enhance safety and optimize dosing include improved preclinical models and assessment, innovative model based design and dose escalation strategies, patient selection, the use of expansion cohorts and extended toxicity assessments. Tailoring the design of phase I trials by adopting new strategies to address the different properties of MTAs is required to enhance the development of these agents. This review will focus on the limitations to safety and dose determination that have occurred in the development of MTAs and immunotherapies. In addition, strategies are proposed to overcome these challenges to develop phase I trials that can more accurately define the recommended dose and identify adverse events. PMID:25160636

  8. Parallel multicentre randomised trial of a clinical trial question prompt list in patients considering participation in phase 3 cancer treatment trials

    PubMed Central

    Tattersall, Martin H N; Jefford, Michael; Martin, Andrew; Olver, Ian; Thompson, John F; Brown, Richard F; Butow, Phyllis N

    2017-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effect of a clinical trial question prompt list in patients considering enrolment in cancer treatment trials. Setting Tertiary cancer referral hospitals in three state capital cities in Australia. Participants 88 patients with cancer attending three cancer centres in Australia, who were considering enrolment in phase 3 treatment trials, were invited to enrol in an unblinded randomised trial of provision of a clinical trial question prompt list (QPL) before consenting to enrol in the treatment trial. Interventions We developed and pilot tested a targeted QPL for patients with cancer considering clinical trial participation (the clinical trial QPL). Consenting patients were randomised to receive the clinical trial QPL or not before further discussion with their oncologist and/or trial nurse about the treatment trial. Primary and secondary outcomes Questionnaires were completed at baseline and within 3 weeks of deciding on treatment trial participation. Main outcome measure: scores on the Quality of Informed Consent questionnaire (QuIC). Results 88 patients of 130 sought for the study were enrolled (43 males), and 45 received the clinical trial QPL. 49% of trials were chemotherapy interventions for patients with advanced disease, 35% and 16% were surgical adjuvant and radiation adjuvant trials respectively. 70 patients completed all relevant questionnaires. 28 of 43 patients in the control arm compared with 39 of 45 patients receiving the clinical trial QPL completed the QuIC (p=0.0124). There were no significant differences in the QuIC scores between the randomised groups (QuIC part A p=0.08 and QuIC part B p=0.92). There were no differences in patient satisfaction with decisions or in anxiety levels between the randomised groups. Conclusions Use of a question prompt list did not significantly change the QuIC scores in this randomised trial. ANZCTR 12606000214538 prospectively registered 31/5/2006. Trial registration number Results, ACTRN

  9. Strength and weakness of phase I to IV trials, with an emphasis on translational aspects

    PubMed Central

    Lønning, Per Eystein

    2008-01-01

    Although phase I to III trials represent the standard for introducing new drugs to clinical therapy, there has been increasing demand for translational research in oncology over the past decade. Thus, for most novel therapies such as 'targeted agents', a critical aspect for drug development in oncology has been to select the right patients for therapy. Translational research plays a pivotal role, not only in phase II trials but also in phase I and III and even in phase IV trials. The importance of distinguishing between our translational 'aims' in phase II and phase III trials is emphasized. Although translational research in phase III trials aims to identify optimal markers for clinical use, phase II studies may represent an optimal setting to explore tumour biology and the mechanisms of drug resistance in depth. PMID:19128436

  10. A 48-week randomized phase 2b study evaluating cenicriviroc versus efavirenz in treatment-naive HIV-infected adults with C-C chemokine receptor type 5-tropic virus

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Melanie; Saag, Michael; DeJesus, Edwin; Gathe, Joseph; Lalezari, Jay; Landay, Alan L.; Cade, Jerry; Enejosa, Jeffrey; Lefebvre, Eric; Feinberg, Judith

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To compare the efficacy, safety, and anti-inflammatory effects of cenicriviroc (CVC), an oral, once-daily C-C chemokine receptor types 5 and 2 antagonist, with those of efavirenz (EFV) in treatment-naive, HIV-1-infected adults. Design: A 48-week, randomized, double-blind, double-dummy phase 2b trial at 43 institutions (USA and Puerto Rico). Methods: Study participants (HIV-1 RNA ≥1000 copies/ml, CD4+ cell count ≥200 cells/μl, C-C chemokine receptor type 5-tropic virus) were randomized 2 : 2 : 1 to CVC 100 mg (CVC100), CVC 200 mg (CVC200), or EFV 600 mg, each administered with emtricitabine/tenofovir disoproxil fumarate. Key end points were virologic success (HIV-1 RNA <50 copies/ml) at week 24 (primary) and week 48 (secondary), safety/tolerability at weeks 24 and 48. Study sites and patients remained blinded until week 48. Results: A total of 143 patients were randomized (CVC100, n = 59; CVC200, n = 56; EFV, n = 28). Virologic success was obtained at week 24 in 76, 73, and 71% of study participants for CVC100, CVC200, and EFV, respectively (all P > 0.05 versus EFV), and at week 48 in 68, 64, and 50%, respectively (all P > 0.05 versus EFV). Resistance mutations emerged in five and zero CVC and EFV-treated study participants, respectively. Virologic nonresponse and nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor resistance decreased when CVC minimum plasma concentration was at least 47.8 ng/ml. Treatment-related adverse events of at least grade 2 and discontinuations because of adverse events were less frequent in CVC-treated study participants. Total and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol decreased with CVC, but increased with EFV. C-C chemokine ligand type 2 (CCL2) (aka monocyte chemotactic protein-1) increased in a dose-dependent manner, whereas soluble CD14 levels decreased with CVC. Conclusion: CVC showed efficacy and favorable safety in treatment-naive HIV-1-infected study participants, supporting selection of CVC

  11. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic characterization of a new formulation containing synergistic proportions of interferons alpha-2b and gamma (HeberPAG®) in patients with mycosis fungoides: an open-label trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The synergistic combination of interferon (IFN) alpha-2b and IFN gamma results in more potent in vitro biological effects mediated by both IFNs. The aim of this investigation was to evaluate by first time the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of this combination in patients with mycosis fungoides. Methods An exploratory, prospective, open-label clinical trial was conducted. Twelve patients, both genders, 18 to 75 years-old, with mycosis fungoides at stages IB to III, were eligible for the study. All of them received intramuscularly a single high dose (23 × 106 IU) of a novel synergistic IFN mixture (HeberPAG®) for pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic studies. Serum IFN alpha-2b and IFN gamma concentrations were measured during 96 hours by commercial enzyme immunoassays (EIA) specific for each IFN. Other blood IFN-inducible markers and laboratory variables were used as pharmacodynamics and safety criteria. Results The pharmacokinetic evaluation by EIA yielded a similar pattern for both IFNs that are also in agreement with the well-known described profiles for these molecules when these are administered separately. The average values for main parameters were: Cmax: 263 and 9.3 pg/mL; Tmax: 9.5 and 6.9 h; AUC: 4483 and 87.5 pg.h/mL, half-life (t1/2): 4.9 and 13.4 h; mean residence time (MRT): 13.9 and 13.5 h, for serum IFN alpha-2b and IFN gamma, respectively. The pharmacodynamic variables were strongly stimulated by simultaneous administration of both IFNs: serum neopterin and beta-2 microglobulin levels (β2M), and stimulation of 2’-5’ oligoadenylate synthetase (OAS1) mRNA expression. The most encouraging data was the high increment of serum neopterin, 8.0 ng/mL at 48 h, not been described before for any unmodified or pegylated IFN. Additionally, β2M concentration doubled the pre-dose value at 24–48 hours. For both variables the values remained clearly upper baseline levels at 96 hours. Conclusions HeberPAG®possesses improved

  12. Results of Phase 3 of the CATIE Schizophrenia Trial

    PubMed Central

    Stroup, T. Scott; Lieberman, Jeffrey A.; McEvoy, Joseph P.; Davis, Sonia M.; Swartz, Marvin S.; Keefe, Richard S.E.; Miller, Alexander L.; Rosenheck, Robert A.; Hsiao, John K.

    2009-01-01

    Objective The Clinical Antipsychotic Trials of Intervention Effectiveness (CATIE) study examined the comparative effectiveness of antipsychotic treatments for individuals with chronic schizophrenia. Patients who had discontinued antipsychotic treatment in phases 1 and 2 were eligible for phase 3, in which they selected one of nine antipsychotic regimens with the help of their study doctor. We describe the characteristics of the patients who selected each treatment option and their outcomes. Method Two hundred and seventy patients entered phase 3. The open-label treatment options were monotherapy with oral aripiprazole, clozapine, olanzapine, perphenazine, quetiapine, risperidone, ziprasidone, long-acting injectable fluphenazine decanoate, or a combination of any two of these treatments. Results Few patients selected fluphenazine decanoate (n=9) or perphenazine (n=4). Similar numbers selected each of the other options (range 33–41). Of the seven common choices, those who selected clozapine and combination antipsychotic treatment were the most symptomatic, and those who selected aripiprazole and ziprasidone had the highest body mass index. Symptoms improved for all groups, although the improvements were modest for the groups starting with relatively mild levels of symptoms. Side effect profiles of the medications varied considerably but medication discontinuations due to intolerability were rare (7% overall). Conclusions Patients and their doctors made treatment selections based on clinical factors, including severity of symptoms, response to prior treatments, and physical health status. Fluphenazine decanoate was rarely used among those with evidence of treatment non-adherence and clozapine was underutilized for those with poor previous response. Combination antipsychotic treatment warrants further study. PMID:19027269

  13. Thymostimulin in advanced hepatocellular carcinoma: A phase II trial

    PubMed Central

    Dollinger, Matthias M; Behrens, Christa M; Lesske, Joachim; Behl, Susanne; Behrmann, Curd; Fleig, Wolfgang E

    2008-01-01

    Background Thymostimulin is a thymic peptide fraction with immune-mediated cytotoxicity against hepatocellular carcinoma in vitro. In a phase II trial, we investigated safety and efficacy including selection criteria for best response in advanced or metastasised hepatocellular carcinoma. Methods 44 patients (84 % male, median age 69 years) not suitable or refractory to conventional therapy received thymostimulin 75 mg subcutaneously five times per week for a median of 8.2 months until progression or complete response. 3/44 patients were secondarily accessible to local ablation or chemoembolisation. Primary endpoint was overall survival, secondary endpoint tumor response or progression-free survival. A multivariate Cox's regression model was used to identify variables affecting survival. Results Median survival was 11.5 months (95% CI 7.9–15.0) with a 1-, 2- and 3-year survival of 50%, 23% and 9%. In the univariate analysis, a low Child-Pugh-score (p = 0.01), a low score in the Okuda- and CLIP-classification (p < 0.001) or a low AFP-level (p < 0.001) were associated with better survival, but not therapy modalities other than thymostimulin (p = 0.1) or signs of an invasive HCC phenotype such as vascular invasion (p = 0.3) and metastases (p = 0.1). The only variables independently related to survival in the Cox's regression model were Okuda stage and presence of liver cirrhosis (p < 0.01) as well as response to thymostimulin (p < 0.05). Of 39/44 patients evaluable for response, two obtained complete responses (one after concomitant radiofrequency ablation), five partial responses (objective response 18%), twenty-four stable disease (tumor control rate 79%) and eight progressed. Median progression-free survival was 6.4 months (95% CI 0.8–12). Grade 1 local reactions following injection were the only side effects. Conclusion Outcome in our study rather depended on liver function and intrahepatic tumor growth (presence of liver cirrhosis and Okuda stage) in addition

  14. Standards for Clinical Trials in Male and Female Sexual Dysfunction: I. Phase I to Phase IV Clinical Trial Design.

    PubMed

    Fisher, William A; Gruenwald, Ilan; Jannini, Emmanuele A; Lev-Sagie, Ahinoam; Lowenstein, Lior; Pyke, Robert E; Reisman, Yakov; Revicki, Dennis A; Rubio-Aurioles, Eusebio

    2016-12-01

    This series of articles outlines standards for clinical trials of treatments for male and female sexual dysfunctions, with a focus on research design and patient-reported outcome assessment. These articles consist of revision, updating, and integration of articles on standards for clinical trials in male and female sexual dysfunction from the 2010 International Consultation on Sexual Medicine developed by the authors as part of the 2015 International Consultation on Sexual Medicine. We are guided in this effort by several principles. In contrast to previous versions of these guidelines, we merge discussion of standards for clinical trials in male and female sexual dysfunction in an integrated approach that emphasizes the common foundational practices that underlie clinical trials in the two settings. We present a common expected standard for clinical trial design in male and female sexual dysfunction, a common rationale for the design of phase I to IV clinical trials, and common considerations for selection of study population and study duration in male and female sexual dysfunction. We present a focused discussion of fundamental principles in patient- (and partner-) reported outcome assessment and complete this series of articles with specific discussions of selected aspects of clinical trials that are unique to male and to female sexual dysfunction. Our consideration of standards for clinical trials in male and female sexual dysfunction attempts to embody sensitivity to existing and new regulatory guidance and to address implications of the evolution of the diagnosis of sexual dysfunction that have been brought forward in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition. The first article in this series focuses on phase I to phase IV clinical trial design considerations. Subsequent articles in this series focus on the measurement of patient-reported outcomes, unique aspects of clinical trial design for men, and unique aspects of clinical

  15. Phase I trial of cremophor EL with bolus doxorubicin.

    PubMed

    Millward, M J; Webster, L K; Rischin, D; Stokes, K H; Toner, G C; Bishop, J F; Olver, I N; Linahan, B M; Linsenmeyer, M E; Woodcock, D M

    1998-10-01

    Cremophor EL (cremophor), a component of the paclitaxel formulation, can potentially reverse P-glycoprotein-associated multidrug resistance. A Phase I trial of cremophor as a 6-h infusion every 3 weeks was performed with bolus doxorubicin (50 mg/m2). The cremophor dose was escalated from 1 to 60 ml/m2. A standard paclitaxel premedication was given before cremophor. Using a bioassay, potentially active cremophor levels (> or = 1 microl/ml) were measured in plasma from patients receiving cremophor doses of 30, 45, and 60 ml/m2. A cross-over design was used to assess the influence of cremophor 30 ml/m2 on the pharmacokinetics of doxorubicin and doxorubicinol. The plasma area under the concentration versus time curve (AUC) of doxorubicin increased from 1448 +/- 350 to 1786 +/- 264 ng/ml x h (P = 0.02) in the presence of cremophor, whereas the AUC of doxorubicinol increased from 252 +/- 104 to 486 +/- 107 ng/ml x h (P = 0.02). This pharmacokinetic interaction was associated with significantly increased neutropenia. With reduction of the doxorubicin dose to 35 mg/m2, the cremophor dose was increased to 60 ml/m2. Dose-limiting toxicities occurred in two of six patients after 45 ml/m2 and two of four patients after 60 ml/m2, which included febrile neutropenia and grade III cremophor-related toxicities of rash, pruritus, headache, and hypotension. All patients who received 45 ml/m2 cremophor reached plasma levels > or = 1.5 microl/ml, but at 60 ml/m2, only two of four reached this level, and the calculated plasma clearance of cremophor was significantly faster at this dose. One patient with hepatoma resistant to epirubicin achieved a near-complete response. Cremophor 45 ml/m2 over 6 h with 35 mg/m2 doxorubicin is recommended for further studies. The pharmacokinetic interaction between cremophor and doxorubicin is quantitatively similar to that described in trials of paclitaxel with doxorubicin and suggests that the cremophor in the paclitaxel formulation is responsible.

  16. Dermatological side-effects of telaprevir-based triple therapy for chronic hepatitis C in phase III trials in Japan.

    PubMed

    Torii, Hideshi; Sueki, Hirohiko; Kumada, Hiromitsu; Sakurai, Yuko; Aoki, Keiji; Yamada, Ichimaro; Ohtsuki, Mamitaro

    2013-08-01

    Telaprevir-based triple therapy is highly effective for chronic hepatitis C. However, concern has been expressed over the high frequency and severity of its dermatological side-effects compared with those associated with peginterferon (PEG-IFN) and ribavirin (RBV) therapy. Thus, here, we evaluated the dermatological adverse reactions of telaprevir-based triple therapy in Japanese multicenter phase III clinical trials in an attempt to characterize the dermatological side-effects and establish appropriate management plans. In these trials, 126 treatment-naïve patients and 141 treatment-failure patients were administrated telaprevir, PEG-IFN-α-2b and RBV for 12 weeks followed by PEG-IFN-α-2b and RBV for another 12 weeks (T12/PR24 group), and 63 treatment-naïve patients were administrated PEG-IFN-α-2b and RBV for 48 weeks (PR48 group). Dermatological adverse reactions developed in over 80% patients in both groups, and most of them were grade 1 or 2. In the T12/PR24 group, there were more grade 2 or grade 3 events, and the time to onset was earlier than that in the PR48 group. Most reactions could be managed with topical corticosteroids and oral antihistamines, and the rates of discontinuation due to dermatological reactions were not high even in the T12/PR24 group. In the T12/PR24 group, however, two cases of Stevens-Johnson syndrome and one case of drug rash with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms, which corresponds to drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome in Japan, were reported. For appropriate treatments of individual dermatological adverse reactions, the judgment of discontinuation of antiviral drugs and treatment based on the severity are extremely important in this triple therapy.

  17. The application of human phase 0 microdosing trials: A systematic review and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Svendsen, Pernille; El-Galaly, Tarec C; Dybkær, Karen; Bøgsted, Martin; Laursen, Maria B; Schmitz, Alexander; Jensen, Paw; Johnsen, Hans E

    2016-01-01

    A decreasing number of new therapeutic drugs reaching the clinic has led to the publication of regulatory guidelines on human microdosing trials by the European Medicines Agency in 2004 and the US Food and Drug Administration in 2006. Microdosing trials are defined by the administration of 1/100th of the therapeutic dose and designed to investigate basic drug properties. This review investigates the current application of phase 0 trials in medical research. Thirty-three studies found in PubMed and EMBASE were systematically reviewed for aim and analytical method. Pharmacokinetic studies have been a major focus of phase 0 trials, but drug distribution, drug-drug interactions, imaging and pharmacogenomics have also been investigated. Common analytical methods were tandem mass liquid chromatography, accelerator mass spectrometry and positron emission tomography. New ongoing trials are investigating the pharmacodynamics and chemoresistance of marketed drugs, suggesting that the application of phase 0 trials is still evolving.

  18. Boeing XF2B-1 (F2B-1)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1931-01-01

    Boeing XF2B-1 (F2B-1): Serving as the prototype for the F2B-1 shipboard fighter, the XF2B-1 differed visually in having a pointed spinner and an unbalanced rudder. Like many aircraft of its day, the Boeing model 69 was powered by a Pratt & Whitney Wasp radial engine.

  19. Optimizing operational efficiencies in early phase trials: the Pediatric Trials Network experience

    PubMed Central

    England, Amanda; Wade, Kelly; Smith, P. Brian; Berezny, Katherine; Laughon, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Performing drug trials in pediatrics is challenging. In support of the Best Pharmaceuticals for Children Act, the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development funded the formation of the Pediatric Trials Network (PTN) in 2010. Since its inception, the PTN has developed strategies to increase both efficiency and safety of pediatric drug trials. Through use of innovative techniques such as sparse and scavenged blood sampling as well as opportunistic study design, participation in trials has grown. The PTN has also strived to improve consistency of adverse event reporting in neonatal drug trials through the development of a standardized adverse event table. We review how the PTN is optimizing operational efficiencies in pediatric drug trials to increase the safety of drugs in children. PMID:26968616

  20. Phase 3 Oncology Clinical Trials in South Africa: Experimentation or Therapeutic Misconception?

    PubMed

    Malan, Tina; Moodley, Keymanthri

    2016-02-01

    Although clinical research in oncology is vital to improve current understanding of cancer and to validate new treatment options, voluntary informed consent is a critical component. Oncology research participants are a particularly vulnerable population; hence, therapeutic misconception often leads to ethical and legal challenges. We conducted a qualitative study administering semi-structured questionnaires on 29 adult, Phase 3, oncology clinical trial participants at three different private oncology clinical trial sites in South Africa. A descriptive content analysis was performed to identify perceptions of these participants regarding Phase 3 clinical trials. We found that most participants provided consent to be included in the trial for self-benefit. More than half of the participants had a poor understanding of Phase 3 clinical trials, and almost half the participants believed the clinical trial did not pose any significant risk to them. The word "hope" was used frequently by participants, displaying clear optimism with regard to the clinical trial and its outcome. This indicated that therapeutic misconception does occur in the South African oncology research setting and has the potential to lead to underestimation of the risks of a Phase 3 clinical trial. Emphasizing the experimental nature of a clinical trial during the consent process is critical to address therapeutic misconception in oncology research.

  1. Field-induced gapless electron pocket in the superconducting vortex phase of YNi2B2C as probed by magnetoacoustic quantum oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nössler, J.; Seerig, R.; Yasin, S.; Uhlarz, M.; Zherlitsyn, S.; Behr, G.; Drechsler, S.-L.; Fuchs, G.; Rosner, H.; Wosnitza, J.

    2017-01-01

    By use of ultrasound studies we resolved magnetoacoustic quantum oscillation deep into the mixed state of the multiband nonmagnetic superconductor YNi2B2C . Below the upper critical field, only a very weak additional damping appears that can be well explained by the field inhomogeneity caused by the flux-line lattice in the mixed state. This is clear evidence for no or a vanishingly small gap for one of the bands, namely, the spheroidal α band. This contrasts de Haas-van Alphen data obtained by use of torque magnetometry for the same sample, with a rapidly vanishing oscillation signal in the mixed state. This points to a strongly distorted flux-line lattice in the latter case that, in general, can hamper a reliable extraction of gap parameters by use of such techniques.

  2. Distress among caregivers of phase I trial participants: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Moss, Angela; Eckhardt, S. Gail; Laudenslager, Mark L.; Kilbourn, Kristin; Mauss, Iris B.; Bowles, Daniel W.; Hecker, Sharon; Fairclough, Diane L.; Kutner, Jean S.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The number of patients with cancer enrolling in phase I trials is expected to increase as these trials incorporate patient selection and exhibit greater efficacy in the era of targeted therapies. Despite the fact that people with advanced cancer often require a caregiver, little is known about the experience of caregivers of people enrolling in oncology phase I clinical trials. We conducted a cross-sectional study assessing the distress and emotion regulation of caregivers of phase I trial participants to inform the design of future interventions targeting the unique needs of this population. Methods Caregivers of oncology patients were approached at the patient’s phase I clinical trial screening visit. Caregiver participants completed a one-time survey incorporating validated instruments to comprehensively assess distress and emotion regulation. Basic demographic information about both the caregiver and patient was collected. Results Caregivers exhibited greater distress than population norms. Emotion regulation was also moderately impaired. Respondents identified positive aspects of caregiving despite exhibiting moderate distress. Conclusion Enrollment of a patient in a phase I clinical trial is a time of stress for their caregivers. This pilot study demonstrates the feasibility of engaging caregivers of phase I trial participants and the need to better support them through this component of their caregiving experience. PMID:25120010

  3. Overview of phase IV clinical trials for postmarket drug safety surveillance: a status report from the ClinicalTrials.gov registry

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xinji; Zhang, Yuan; Ye, Xiaofei; Guo, Xiaojing; Zhang, Tianyi; He, Jia

    2016-01-01

    Objective Phase IV trials are often used to investigate drug safety after approval. However, little is known about the characteristics of contemporary phase IV clinical trials and whether these studies are of sufficient quality to advance medical knowledge in pharmacovigilance. We aimed to determine the fundamental characteristics of phase IV clinical trials that evaluated drug safety using the ClinicalTrials.gov registry data. Methods A data set of 19 359 phase IV clinical studies registered in ClinicalTrials.gov was downloaded. The characteristics of the phase IV trials focusing on safety only were compared with those evaluating both safety and efficacy. We also compared the characteristics of the phase IV trials in three major therapeutic areas (cardiovascular diseases, mental health and oncology). Multivariable logistic regression was used to evaluate factors associated with the use of blinding and randomisation. Results A total of 4772 phase IV trials were identified, including 330 focusing on drug safety alone and 4392 evaluating both safety and efficacy. Most of the phase IV trials evaluating drug safety (75.9%) had enrolment <300 with 96.5% <3000. Among these trials, 8.2% were terminated or withdrawn. Factors associated with the use of blinding and randomisation included the intervention model, clinical specialty and lead sponsor. Conclusions Phase IV trials evaluating drug safety in the ClinicalTrials.gov registry were dominated by small trials that might not have sufficient power to detect less common adverse events. An adequate sample size should be emphasised for phase IV trials with safety surveillance as main task. PMID:27881517

  4. Embracing failure: What the Phase III progesterone studies can teach about TBI clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Donald G.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: Despite positive preclinical studies and two positive Phase II clinical trials, two large Phase III clinical trials of progesterone treatment of acute traumatic brain injury (TBI) recently ended with negative results, so a 100% failure rate continues to plague the field of TBI trials. Methods: This paper reviews and analyses the trial structures and outcomes and discusses the implications of these failures for future drug and clinical trial development. Persistently negative trial outcomes have led to disinvestment in new drug research by companies and policy-makers and disappointment for patients and their families, failures which represent a major public health concern. The problem is not limited to TBI. Failure rates are high for trials in stroke, sepsis, cardiology, cancer and orthopaedics, among others. Results: This paper discusses some of the reasons why the Phase III trials have failed. These reasons may include faulty extrapolation from pre-clinical data in designing clinical trials and the use of subjective outcome measures that accurately reflect neither the nature of the deficits nor long-term quantitative recovery. Conclusions: Better definitions of injury and healing and better outcome measures are essential to change the embrace of failure that has dominated the field for over 30 years. This review offers suggestions to improve the situation. PMID:26274493

  5. Microbicide trials for preventing HIV/AIDS in South Africa: phase II trial partricipants' experiences and psychological needs.

    PubMed

    Pistorius, A G; van de Wijgert, J H H M; Sebola, M; Friedland, B; Nagel, E; Bokaba, C; Hoosen, A A

    2004-08-01

    The Microbicide Division of the Department of Medical Microbiology at MEDUNSA, South Africa, recently completed a phase II expanded safety trial of the candidate microbicide Carraguard. A microbicide is a vaginal product that women might use, if proven safe and effective, to protect themselves from HIV and possibly other sexually transmitted infections (STIs). The study participants were from Ga-Rankuwa and its neighbouring areas, an historically disadvantaged residential township near Pretoria. We conducted six focus group discussions with phase II trial participants to evaluate their experiences with trial participation and their psychological needs. Participants spontaneously talked about their experiences with the study gel and speculum examinations. They felt that they had received high quality medical care. They indicated that their personal hygiene and knowledge of the female reproductive system, HIV and other STIs had improved, which helped their familie and empowered them as women. Participants valued being able to discuss their anxiety about HIV/AIDS wit study staff. They felt that the study provided them with a supportive environment in which their personal problems (not necessarily restricted to HIV/AIDS) could be addressed. Some recommended that the study staf improve their professionalism and punctuality. They suggested the formation of participant support groups, an expressed a preference to remain involved in the trial. Some participants appeared to have become dependent o services provided during the trial. We have taken the results of these focus group discussions into account during planning for a phase III efficacy trial of Carraguard to be conducted in the same and other similar communities.

  6. Phase II clinical trials on Investigational drugs for the Treatment of Pancreatic Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Edward J.; Semrad, Thomas J.; Bold, Richard J.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Despite some recent advances in treatment options, pancreatic cancer remains a devastating disease with poor outcomes. In a trend contrary to most malignancies, both incidence and mortality continue to rise due to pancreatic cancer. The majority of patients present with advanced disease and there are no treatment options for this stage that have demonstrated a median survival greater than 1 year. As the penultimate step prior to phase III studies involving hundreds of patients, phase II clinical trials provide an early opportunity to evaluate the efficacy of new treatments that are desperately needed for this disease. Areas Covered This review covers the results of published phase II clinical trials in advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma published within the past 5 years. The treatment results are framed in the context of the current standards of care and the historic challenge of predicting phase III success from phase II trial results. Expert opinion Promising therapies remain elusive in pancreatic cancer based on recent phase II clinical trial results. Optimization and standardization of clinical trial design in the phase II setting, with consistent incorporation of biomarkers, is needed to more accurately identify promising therapies that warrant phase III evaluation. PMID:25809274

  7. Giving monoclonal antibodies to healthy volunteers in phase 1 trials: is it safe?

    PubMed Central

    Tranter, Elizabeth; Peters, Gary; Boyce, Malcolm; Warrington, Steve

    2013-01-01

    Many monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) have been studied in healthy volunteers in phase 1, but few data have been published on the safety of that practice. We aimed to review the available data, and thereby to estimate the risks of participation in phase 1 trials of MAbs. We searched PubMed, the ClinicalTrials.gov database and Google, using the search terms ‘monoclonal antibody’, ‘phase 1’ and ‘healthy volunteers’. We identified 70 completed trials of MAbs in healthy volunteers, but the published data were too sparse to allow confident assessment of the risks of MAbs in healthy volunteers. Our best estimate of risk of a life-threatening adverse event was between 1 : 425 and 1 : 1700 volunteer-trials, but all such events occurred in a single trial (of TGN1412). In a phase 1 trial of a small molecule, the risk of death or a life-threatening adverse event appears to be 1 : 100 000–1 000 000 volunteer-trials, which is similar to the risk of many ordinary daily activities. Most people would consider that level of risk to be ‘minimal’ or ‘negligible’ and, therefore, acceptable. On that basis, the safety record of MAbs in healthy volunteers has been ruined by the TGN1412 disaster. However, that experience is unlikely to be repeated, because of improvements in governance and practice of phase 1 trials. If the experience of TGN1412 is disregarded, it seems reasonable to continue using healthy volunteers in phase 1 trials of MAbs, provided that there are scientific and medical reasons to conclude that the risk is truly minimal. PMID:23438102

  8. Microstructure, microhardness, phase analysis and chemical composition of laser remelted FeB-Fe2B surface layers produced on Vanadis-6 steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartkowska, Aneta; Swadźba, Radosław; Popławski, Mikołaj; Bartkowski, Dariusz

    2016-12-01

    The paper presents the study results of the diffusion boronized layer and their laser modification. Diffusion boronized processes were carried out on Vanadis-6 steel at 900 °C for 5 h. Boronized layers were characterized by dual-phase microstructure consisting of iron borides having a microhardness in the range from 1800 to 1400 HV. The laser heat treatment was carried out using CO2 laser after diffusion boronizing process. The research goals of this paper was analysis of microstructure, microhardness as well as phase and chemical composition of boronized layers after laser modification. Microstructure of boronized layer after laser modification consisted of remelted zone, heat affected zone and substrate. Remelted zone was characterized by microstructure consisted of boron-martensite eutectic. In this zone, the phases of borides and carbides were detected. Boronized layers after laser modification were characterized by the mild gradient of microhardness from surface to the substrate.

  9. Maximizing return on socioeconomic investment in phase II proof-of-concept trials.

    PubMed

    Chen, Cong; Beckman, Robert A

    2014-04-01

    Phase II proof-of-concept (POC) trials play a key role in oncology drug development, determining which therapeutic hypotheses will undergo definitive phase III testing according to predefined Go-No Go (GNG) criteria. The number of possible POC hypotheses likely far exceeds available public or private resources. We propose a design strategy for maximizing return on socioeconomic investment in phase II trials that obtains the greatest knowledge with the minimum patient exposure. We compare efficiency using the benefit-cost ratio, defined to be the risk-adjusted number of truly active drugs correctly identified for phase III development divided by the risk-adjusted total sample size in phase II and III development, for different POC trial sizes, powering schemes, and associated GNG criteria. It is most cost-effective to conduct small POC trials and set the corresponding GNG bars high, so that more POC trials can be conducted under socioeconomic constraints. If δ is the minimum treatment effect size of clinical interest in phase II, the study design with the highest benefit-cost ratio has approximately 5% type I error rate and approximately 20% type II error rate (80% power) for detecting an effect size of approximately 1.5δ. A Go decision to phase III is made when the observed effect size is close to δ. With the phenomenal expansion of our knowledge in molecular biology leading to an unprecedented number of new oncology drug targets, conducting more small POC trials and setting high GNG bars maximize the return on socioeconomic investment in phase II POC trials.

  10. Challenges Facing Early Phase Trials Sponsored by the National Cancer Institute: An Analysis of Corrective Action Plans to Improve Accrual.

    PubMed

    Massett, Holly A; Mishkin, Grace; Rubinstein, Larry; Ivy, S Percy; Denicoff, Andrea; Godwin, Elizabeth; DiPiazza, Kate; Bolognese, Jennifer; Zwiebel, James A; Abrams, Jeffrey S

    2016-11-15

    Accruing patients in a timely manner represents a significant challenge to early phase cancer clinical trials. The NCI Cancer Therapy Evaluation Program analyzed 19 months of corrective action plans (CAP) received for slow-accruing phase I and II trials to identify slow accrual reasons, evaluate whether proposed corrective actions matched these reasons, and assess the CAP impact on trial accrual, duration, and likelihood of meeting primary scientific objectives. Of the 135 CAPs analyzed, 69 were for phase I trials and 66 for phase II trials. Primary reasons cited for slow accrual were safety/toxicity (phase I: 48%), design/protocol concerns (phase I: 42%, phase II: 33%), and eligibility criteria (phase I: 41%, phase II: 35%). The most commonly proposed corrective actions were adding institutions (phase I: 43%, phase II: 85%) and amending the trial to change eligibility or design (phase I: 55%, phase II: 44%). Only 40% of CAPs provided proposed corrective actions that matched the reasons given for slow accrual. Seventy percent of trials were closed to accrual at time of analysis (phase I = 48; phase II = 46). Of these, 67% of phase I and 70% of phase II trials met their primary objectives, but they were active three times longer than projected. Among closed trials, 24% had an accrual rate increase associated with a greater likelihood of meeting their primary scientific objectives. Ultimately, trials receiving CAPs saw improved accrual rates. Future trials may benefit from implementing CAPs early in trial life cycles, but it may be more beneficial to invest in earlier accrual planning. Clin Cancer Res; 22(22); 5408-16. ©2016 AACRSee related commentary by Mileham and Kim, p. 5397.

  11. Play the winner for phase II/III clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Yao, Q; Wei, L J

    In comparing two treatments under a typical sequential clinical trial setting, a 50-50 randomization design generates reliable data for making efficient inferences about the treatment difference for the benefit of patients in the general population. However, if the treatment difference is large and the endpoint of the study is potentially fatal, it does not seem appropriate to sacrifice a large number of study patients who are assigned to the inferior arm. An adaptive design is a data-dependent treatment allocation rule that sequentially uses accumulating information about the treatment difference during the trial to modify the allocation rule for new study patients. In this article, we utilize real trials from AIDS and cancer to illustrate the advantage of using adaptive designs. Specifically we show that, with adaptive designs, the loss of power for testing the equality of two treatments is negligible. Moreover, the study patients do not have to pay a handsome price for the benefit of future patients. We also propose multi-stage adaptive rules to relax the administrative burden of implementing the study and to handle continuous response variables, such as the failure time in survival analysis.

  12. Ropeginterferon alfa-2b, a novel IFNα-2b, induces high response rates with low toxicity in patients with polycythemia vera.

    PubMed

    Gisslinger, Heinz; Zagrijtschuk, Oleh; Buxhofer-Ausch, Veronika; Thaler, Josef; Schloegl, Ernst; Gastl, Guenther A; Wolf, Dominik; Kralovics, Robert; Gisslinger, Bettina; Strecker, Karin; Egle, Alexander; Melchardt, Thomas; Burgstaller, Sonja; Willenbacher, Ella; Schalling, Martin; Them, Nicole C; Kadlecova, Pavla; Klade, Christoph; Greil, Richard

    2015-10-08

    In this prospective, open-label, multicenter phase 1/2 dose escalation study, we used a next-generation, mono-pegylated interferon (IFN) α-2b isoform, ropeginterferon alfa-2b. The unique feature of ropeginterferon alfa-2b is a longer elimination half-life, which allows administration every 2 weeks. We present data from 51 polycythemia vera patients. The main goal was to define the maximum tolerated dose and to assess safety and efficacy. A dose range of 50 to 540 µg was tested without the appearance of dose-limiting toxicities. All drug-related adverse events were known toxicities associated with IFN-α. The cumulative overall response rate was 90%, comprising complete response in 47% and partial response in 43% of patients; the best individual molecular response level was a complete response in 21% of patients and partial response in 47%. Notably, we did not observe any correlation between the dose level and the response rate or response duration, suggesting that already low levels of ropeginterferon alfa-2b are sufficient to induce significant hematologic and molecular responses. These data suggest promising efficacy and safety of ropeginterferon alfa-2b and support the development of the drug in a randomized phase 3 clinical trial. The study was disclosed at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT01193699 before including the first patient.

  13. Dissipative quantum coherent dynamics probed in phase-space: electronically resonant 5-color 4-wave mixing on I2(B) in solid Kr.

    PubMed

    Segale, D; Apkarian, V A

    2011-07-14

    Spectrally resolved, 4-wave mixing measurements in five resonant colors are used to interrogate vibronic quantum coherences in phase-space. We highlight the principles through measurements on the B-state of I(2) in solid Kr--a prototype of a system strongly coupled to its environment. The measurements consist of preparing a superposition of wavepackets on the B-state and interrogating their cross-coherence as they get entangled with the environment. The study provides direct realizations of fundamental quantum principles in the mechanics of molecular matter, among them: the distinction between quantum and classical coherent dynamics of a system entangled with the environment, coherent dissipation, event-driven decoherence, environment selected coherent states, and non-local mechanics.

  14. Definitional-mission report: Combined-cycle power plant, Sultan Iskandar Power Station Phase 2-B, Tenaga Nasional BHD, Malaysia. Export trade information

    SciTech Connect

    Kadagathur, G.

    1990-12-10

    Tenaga Nasional BHD (TEN) formerly known as National Electricity Board of Malaysia is proposing to construct a Combined Cycle Power Plant at Pasir Gudang. The project is known as Sultan Iskandar Power Station Phase 2 (SIPS-2). U.S. engineering companies and U.S. equipment manufacturers are having difficulty in procuring contracts from the Malaysian Power Industry. To date, the industry is dominated by consortia with British and Swiss participation. Several U.S. engineering companies have approached the US Trade and Development Program (TDP) to assist them in breaking into the Malaysian utility market by supporting their effort on their current proposals for SIPS-2 project. It is recommended that TDP should approve a grant to TEN that would provide funds for engineering upto the preparation of equipment specifications and associated technology transfer. The grant along with the weak dollar should be attractive enough for TEN to strongly consider consortia with U.S. companies very favorably. The project also offers a potential for the export of U.S. manufactured equipment in the range of $170 million.

  15. Evaluating Intermittent Androgen-Deprivation Therapy Phase III Clinical Trials: The Devil Is in the Details

    PubMed Central

    Tangen, Catherine; Higano, Celestia; Vogelzang, Nicholas; Thompson, Ian

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Intermittent androgen deprivation (IAD) has been widely tested in prostate cancer. However, phase III trials testing continuous androgen deprivation (CAD) versus IAD have reached inconclusive and seemingly contradictory results. Different design and conduct issues must be critically evaluated to better interpret the results. Patients and Methods Seven published phase III trials were examined for prespecified design and outcomes. Treatment specifications; primary end point; superiority versus noninferiority design assumptions, including magnitude of assumed versus observed noninferiority margin (NIM); duration of follow-up; and quality-of-life (QOL) outcomes were considered in terms of the results and conclusions reported. Results Five trials had a superiority and three had a noninferiority primary hypothesis. Only three trials had a uniform population and overall survival (OS) end point. All trials observed better outcomes in terms of OS and progression-free survival (PFS) than assumed at time of study design, translating into prespecified NIMs or hazard ratios that reflected larger absolute differences in OS or PFS between arms. Lower-than-expected event rates also reduced statistical power for the trials. Other factors, including length of follow-up, cause of death, QOL, and primary end point, and their impact on trial interpretation are discussed. Conclusion No trial to date has demonstrated survival superiority of IAD compared with CAD. Trials concluding IAD is noninferior to CAD were based on wide NIMs that included clinically important survival differences, not likely to be considered comparable by physicians or patients. Interim analyses relying on short follow-up and including a majority of non–prostate cancer deaths will favor a noninferiority conclusion and should be interpreted cautiously. Adequate follow-up is required to ensure capture of prostate cancer deaths in both superiority and noninferiority trials. PMID:26552421

  16. From protection to entitlement: selecting research subjects for early phase clinical trials involving breakthrough therapies.

    PubMed

    Jecker, Nancy S; Wightman, Aaron G; Rosenberg, Abby R; Diekema, Douglas S

    2017-04-13

    Our goals are to (1) set forth and defend a multiprinciple system for selecting individuals who meet trial eligibility criteria to participate in early phase clinical trials testing chimeric antigen receptor (CAR T-cell) for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia when demand for participation exceeds spaces available in a trial; (2) show the relevance of these selection criteria to other breakthrough experimental therapies; (3) argue that distinct distributive justice criteria apply to breakthrough experimental therapies, standard research and healthcare and (4) argue that as evidence of benefit increases, the emphasis of justice in research shifts from protecting subjects from harm to ensuring fair access to benefits.

  17. Innovations for phase I dose-finding designs in pediatric oncology clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Doussau, Adelaide; Geoerger, Birgit; Jiménez, Irene; Paoletti, Xavier

    2016-03-01

    Phase I oncology clinical trials are designed to identify the optimal dose that will be recommended for phase II trials. In pediatric oncology, the conduct of those trials raises specific challenges, as the disease is rare with limited therapeutic options. In addition, the tolerance profile is known from adult trials. This paper provides a review of the major recent developments in the design of these trials, inspired by the need to cope with the specific challenges of dose finding in cancer pediatric oncology. We reviewed simulation studies comparing designs dedicated to address these challenges. We also reviewed the design used in published dose-finding trials in pediatric oncology over the period 2009-2014. Three main fields of innovation were identified. First, designs that were developed in order to relax the rules for more flexible inclusions. Second, methods to incorporate data emerging from adult studies. Third, designs accounting for toxicity evaluation at repeated cycles in pediatric oncology. In addition to this overview, we propose some further directions for designing pediatric dose-finding trials.

  18. Flexible designs for phase II comparative clinical trials involving two response variables.

    PubMed

    Bersimis, S; Sachlas, A; Papaioannou, T

    2015-01-30

    The aim of phase II clinical trials is to determine whether an experimental treatment is sufficiently promising and safe to justify further testing. The need for reduced sample size arises naturally in phase II clinical trials owing to both technical and ethical reasons, motivating a significant part of research in the field during recent years, while another significant part of the research effort is aimed at more complex therapeutic schemes that demand the consideration of multiple endpoints to make decisions. In this paper, our attention is restricted to phase II clinical trials in which two treatments are compared with respect to two dependent dichotomous responses proposing some flexible designs. These designs permit the researcher to terminate the clinical trial when high rates of favorable or unfavorable outcomes are observed early enough requiring in this way a small number of patients. From the mathematical point of view, the proposed designs are defined on bivariate sequences of multi-state trials, and the corresponding stopping rules are based on various distributions related to the waiting time until a certain number of events appear in these sequences. The exact distributions of interest, under a unified framework, are studied using the Markov chain embedding technique, which appears to be very useful in clinical trials for the sample size determination. Tables of expected sample size and power are presented. The numerical illustration showed a very good performance for these new designs.

  19. Extending Clinical Equipoise to Phase 1 Trials Involving Patients: Unresolved Problems

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, James A.; Kimmelman, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Notwithstanding requirements for scientific/social value and risk/ benefit proportionality in major research ethics policies, there are no widely accepted standards for these judgments in Phase 1 trials. This paper examines whether the principle of clinical equipoise can be used as a standard for assessing the ratio of risk to direct-benefit presented by drugs administered in one category of Phase 1 study—first-in-human trials involving patients. On the basis of the supporting evidence for, and architecture of, Phase 1 studies, the articles offers two provisional conclusions: (1) the risks of drug administration in such trials cannot generally be justified on therapeutic grounds but by appeal to the social value of the research; and (2) a framework for adjudicating the ratio of risk/ social-value must be developed. PMID:20506695

  20. [Phase I clinical trial design of anticancer agents--a Fibonacci and a modified Fibonacci sequence].

    PubMed

    Kusaba, H; Tamura, T

    2000-05-01

    A Phase I clinical trial of an anticancer agent is the first evaluation in humans, and it is an important step in drug development. From the ethical point of view, the goal is to escalate to the maximum tolerated dose quickly, yet safely, to minimize the likelihood of treating patients at doses that are too low or high. It is expected that the contradictions between safety and efficacy in the Phase I clinical trials will be solved by developing methods. The modified Fibonacci sequence has been generally adopted for dose escalation, although it includes some problems. It is necessary to recognize that the method used for Phase I clinical trials for anticancer agents remains unsatisfactory, and that it is also necessary to develop more ethical and scientific methods.

  1. Toward phase 4 trials in heart failure: A social and corporate responsibility of the medical profession

    PubMed Central

    Iyngkaran, Pupalan; Beneby, Glen S

    2015-01-01

    Congestive heart failure (CHF) is a chronic condition, requiring polypharmacy, allied health supports and regular monitoring. All these factors are needed to ensure compliance and to deliver the positive outcomes demonstrated from randomized controlled trials. Unfortunately many centers around the world are unable to match trial level support. The outcomes for many communities are thus unclear. Research design factors in post-marketing surveillance to address this issue. Phase 4 studies is the name given to trials designed to obtain such community level data and thus address issues of external validity. CHF phase 4 studies are relatively underutilized. We feel the onus for this research lies with the health profession. In this commentary we provide arguments as to why phase 4 studies should be viewed as a social and corporate responsibility of health professional that care for clients with CHF. PMID:26713277

  2. Toward phase 4 trials in heart failure: A social and corporate responsibility of the medical profession.

    PubMed

    Iyngkaran, Pupalan; Beneby, Glen S

    2015-12-26

    Congestive heart failure (CHF) is a chronic condition, requiring polypharmacy, allied health supports and regular monitoring. All these factors are needed to ensure compliance and to deliver the positive outcomes demonstrated from randomized controlled trials. Unfortunately many centers around the world are unable to match trial level support. The outcomes for many communities are thus unclear. Research design factors in post-marketing surveillance to address this issue. Phase 4 studies is the name given to trials designed to obtain such community level data and thus address issues of external validity. CHF phase 4 studies are relatively underutilized. We feel the onus for this research lies with the health profession. In this commentary we provide arguments as to why phase 4 studies should be viewed as a social and corporate responsibility of health professional that care for clients with CHF.

  3. Methotrexate, Doxorubicin, and Cisplatin (MAP) Plus Maintenance Pegylated Interferon Alfa-2b Versus MAP Alone in Patients With Resectable High-Grade Osteosarcoma and Good Histologic Response to Preoperative MAP: First Results of the EURAMOS-1 Good Response Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Bielack, Stefan S.; Smeland, Sigbjørn; Whelan, Jeremy S.; Marina, Neyssa; Jovic, Gordana; Hook, Jane M.; Krailo, Mark D.; Gebhardt, Mark; Pápai, Zsuzsanna; Meyer, James; Nadel, Helen; Randall, R. Lor; Deffenbaugh, Claudia; Nagarajan, Rajaram; Brennan, Bernadette; Letson, G. Douglas; Teot, Lisa A.; Goorin, Allen; Baumhoer, Daniel; Kager, Leo; Werner, Mathias; Lau, Ching C.; Sundby Hall, Kirsten; Gelderblom, Hans; Meyers, Paul; Gorlick, Richard; Windhager, Reinhard; Helmke, Knut; Eriksson, Mikael; Hoogerbrugge, Peter M.; Schomberg, Paula; Tunn, Per-Ulf; Kühne, Thomas; Jürgens, Heribert; van den Berg, Henk; Böhling, Tom; Picton, Susan; Renard, Marleen; Reichardt, Peter; Gerss, Joachim; Butterfass-Bahloul, Trude; Morris, Carol; Hogendoorn, Pancras C.W.; Seddon, Beatrice; Calaminus, Gabriele; Michelagnoli, Maria; Dhooge, Catharina; Sydes, Matthew R.; Bernstein, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Purpose EURAMOS-1, an international randomized controlled trial, investigated maintenance therapy with pegylated interferon alfa-2b (IFN-α-2b) in patients whose osteosarcoma showed good histologic response (good response) to induction chemotherapy. Patients and Methods At diagnosis, patients age ≤ 40 years with resectable high-grade osteosarcoma were registered. Eligibility after surgery for good response random assignment included ≥ two cycles of preoperative MAP (methotrexate, doxorubicin, and cisplatin), macroscopically complete surgery of primary tumor, < 10% viable tumor, and no disease progression. These patients were randomly assigned to four additional cycles MAP with or without IFN-α-2b (0.5 to 1.0 μg/kg per week subcutaneously, after chemotherapy until 2 years postregistration). Outcome measures were event-free survival (EFS; primary) and overall survival and toxicity (secondary). Results Good response was reported in 1,041 of 2,260 registered patients; 716 consented to random assignment (MAP, n = 359; MAP plus IFN-α-2b, n = 357), with baseline characteristics balanced by arm. A total of 271 of 357 started IFN-α-2b; 105 stopped early, and 38 continued to receive treatment at data freeze. Refusal and toxicity were the main reasons for never starting IFN-α-2b and for stopping prematurely, respectively. Median IFN-α-2b duration, if started, was 67 weeks. A total of 133 of 268 patients who started IFN-α-2b and provided toxicity information reported grade ≥ 3 toxicity during IFN-α-2b treatment. With median follow-up of 44 months, 3-year EFS for all 716 randomly assigned patients was 76% (95% CI, 72% to 79%); 174 EFS events were reported (MAP, n = 93; MAP plus IFN-α-2b, n = 81). Hazard ratio was 0.83 (95% CI, 0.61 to 1.12; P = .214) from an adjusted Cox model. Conclusion At the preplanned analysis time, MAP plus IFN-α-2b was not statistically different from MAP alone. A considerable proportion of patients never started IFN-α-2b or stopped

  4. Communicating and Understanding the Purpose of Pediatric Phase I Cancer Trials

    PubMed Central

    Cousino, Melissa K.; Zyzanski, Stephen J.; Yamokoski, Amy D.; Hazen, Rebecca A.; Baker, Justin N.; Noll, Robert B.; Rheingold, Susan R.; Geyer, J. Russell; Alexander, Stewart C.; Drotar, Dennis; Kodish, Eric D.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Quality informed consent should provide a clear understanding of the purpose of the research. Given the ethical challenges of pediatric phase I cancer trials, it is important to investigate physician-parent communication during informed consent conferences (ICCs) and parental understanding of the purpose of these studies. Methods In the multisite Informed Consent in Pediatric Phase I Cancer Trials study, 85 ICCs for phase I research between June 2008 and May 2011 were directly observed, and 60 parents were subsequently interviewed. The scientific purpose was defined as composite understanding of drug safety, dose finding, and dose escalation. We determined the frequency with which physicians explained these and other phase I–related concepts during the ICC. Parent interviews were analyzed to determine understanding. Results The child was present at 83 of 85 ICCs. Only 32% of parents demonstrated substantial understanding of the scientific purpose of phase I cancer trials; 35% demonstrated little or no understanding. Parents of higher socioeconomic status and racial majority status were more likely to understand the scientific purpose. Factors associated with understanding included physician explanation of the goal of the applicable phase I protocol offered (explained in 85% of ICCs) and explanation of the dose cohorts (explained in 43% of ICCs). Physicians explained drug safety in 23% of ICCs, dose finding in 52% of ICCs, and dose escalation in 53% of ICCs. Conclusion Many parents of children participating in phase I trials do not understand the purpose of these trials. Physician-parent communication about the purpose of phase I research is lacking during ICCs. PMID:23071225

  5. A new approach to designing phase I-II cancer trials for cytotoxic chemotherapies.

    PubMed

    Bartroff, Jay; Lai, Tze Leung; Narasimhan, Balasubramanian

    2014-07-20

    Recently, there has been much work on early phase cancer designs that incorporate both toxicity and efficacy data, called phase I-II designs because they combine elements of both phases. However, they do not explicitly address the phase II hypothesis test of H0 : p ≤ p0 , where p is the probability of efficacy at the estimated maximum tolerated dose η from phase I and p0 is the baseline efficacy rate. Standard practice for phase II remains to treat p as a fixed, unknown parameter and to use Simon's two-stage design with all patients dosed at η. We propose a phase I-II design that addresses the uncertainty in the estimate p=p(η) in H0 by using sequential generalized likelihood theory. Combining this with a phase I design that incorporates efficacy data, the phase I-II design provides a common framework that can be used all the way from the first dose of phase I through the final accept/reject decision about H0 at the end of phase II, utilizing both toxicity and efficacy data throughout. Efficient group sequential testing is used in phase II that allows for early stopping to show treatment effect or futility. The proposed phase I-II design thus removes the artificial barrier between phase I and phase II and fulfills the objectives of searching for the maximum tolerated dose and testing if the treatment has an acceptable response rate to enter into a phase III trial.

  6. New Round of Studies Begin in Phase 0/I/II Cancer Prevention Clinical Trials Program | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The NCI Division of Cancer Prevention’s Phase 0/I/II Cancer Prevention Clinical Trials Program, also known as the Consortia for Early Phase Prevention Trials, is beginning a new round of studies in the effort toward systematic early clinical development of promising preventive agents for people at increased risk of developing cancer. Infographic Highlight New Round of Studies Begin in Phase 0/I/II Cancer Prevention Clinical Trials Program |

  7. How to Evaluate Phase Differences between Trial Groups in Ongoing Electrophysiological Signals

    PubMed Central

    VanRullen, Rufin

    2016-01-01

    A growing number of studies endeavor to reveal periodicities in sensory and cognitive functions, by comparing the distribution of ongoing (pre-stimulus) oscillatory phases between two (or more) trial groups reflecting distinct experimental outcomes. A systematic relation between the phase of spontaneous electrophysiological signals, before a stimulus is even presented, and the eventual result of sensory or cognitive processing for that stimulus, would be indicative of an intrinsic periodicity in the underlying neural process. Prior studies of phase-dependent perception have used a variety of analytical methods to measure and evaluate phase differences, and there is currently no established standard practice in this field. The present report intends to remediate this need, by systematically comparing the statistical power of various measures of “phase opposition” between two trial groups, in a number of real and simulated experimental situations. Seven measures were evaluated: one parametric test (circular Watson-Williams test), and three distinct measures of phase opposition (phase bifurcation index, phase opposition sum, and phase opposition product) combined with two procedures for non-parametric statistical testing (permutation, or a combination of z-score and permutation). While these are obviously not the only existing or conceivable measures, they have all been used in recent studies. All tested methods performed adequately on a previously published dataset (Busch et al., 2009). On a variety of artificially constructed datasets, no single measure was found to surpass all others, but instead the suitability of each measure was contingent on several experimental factors: the time, frequency, and depth of oscillatory phase modulation; the absolute and relative amplitudes of post-stimulus event-related potentials for the two trial groups; the absolute and relative trial numbers for the two groups; and the number of permutations used for non-parametric testing

  8. [The role of the expansion cohort in phase I trials in oncology: guidelines of the phase I HUB].

    PubMed

    Ezzalfani, Monia; Dugué, Audrey; Mollevi, Caroline; Pulido, Marina; Bonnetain, Franck; Filleron, Thomas; Gal, Jocelyn; Gauthier, Mélanie; Le Deley, Marie Cécile; Le Tourneau, Christophe; Médioni, Jacques; Nguyen, Jean-Michel; Chabaud, Sylvie; Teixeira, Luis; Thivat, Emilie; You, Benoît; Kramar, Andrew; Paoletti, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    At the end of the dose escalation step of phase I trials in oncology, it is increasingly frequent to include patients in expansion cohorts. However, the objective of the expansion cohorts, the number of patients included and their justification are insufficiently explained in the protocols. These cohorts are sometimes of considerable size. The aim of this article is to outline the methodology of expansion cohorts in order to provide recommendations for their planning in practice. This work has been undertaken in collaboration with the statisticians of the early phase investigation centers (CLIP(2)), supported by INCA. First, we have outlined the recent articles published on the expansion cohorts in phase I. We then proposed recommendations, in terms of objectives and number of patients to be included, to guide investigators and facilitate the use of these expansion cohorts in practice. Manji et al. have identified 149 phase I clinical trials using expansion cohorts in oncology with a review of the literature between 2006 and 2011 (Manji et al., 2013). Objectives of the expansion cohort were reported in 111 trials (74%). In these trials, safety was the most reported objective (80% of trials), followed by efficacy (45%). According to this review, the number of patients included in these cohorts was insufficiently justified. This result was confirmed by the study of literature that we conducted over the period 2011-2014. We propose to define the number of patients to be included in expansion cohorts in terms of (1) their objectives, (2) the statistical criteria and (3) the clinical context of the trial. The toxicity study remains the primary objective to evaluate in the expansion phase. In some contexts, the activity study is considered as co-primary objective, either for identifying preliminary signs of activity in studies like screening, or for studying the activity when the target population is known. This study is then considered as phase I/II, and experience

  9. Application of Bayesian hierarchical models for phase I/II clinical trials in oncology.

    PubMed

    Yada, Shinjo; Hamada, Chikuma

    2017-03-01

    Treatment during cancer clinical trials sometimes involves the combination of multiple drugs. In addition, in recent years there has been a trend toward phase I/II trials in which a phase I and a phase II trial are combined into a single trial to accelerate drug development. Methods for the seamless combination of phases I and II parts are currently under investigation. In the phase II part, adaptive randomization on the basis of patient efficacy outcomes allocates more patients to the dose combinations considered to have higher efficacy. Patient toxicity outcomes are used for determining admissibility to each dose combination and are not used for selection of the dose combination itself. In cases where the objective is not to find the optimum dose combination solely for efficacy but regarding both toxicity and efficacy, the need exists to allocate patients to dose combinations with consideration of the balance of existing trade-offs between toxicity and efficacy. We propose a Bayesian hierarchical model and an adaptive randomization with consideration for the relationship with toxicity and efficacy. Using the toxicity and efficacy outcomes of patients, the Bayesian hierarchical model is used to estimate the toxicity probability and efficacy probability in each of the dose combinations. Here, we use Bayesian moving-reference adaptive randomization on the basis of desirability computed from the obtained estimator. Computer simulations suggest that the proposed method will likely recommend a higher percentage of target dose combinations than a previously proposed method.

  10. Strategies to minimize risks and exploitation in phase one trials on healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Shamoo, Adil E; Resnik, David B

    2006-01-01

    Most of the literature on phase one trials has focused on ethical and safety issues in research on patients with advanced cancer, but this article focuses on healthy, adult subjects. The article makes six specific recommendations for protecting the rights and welfare of healthy subjects in phase one trials: 1) because phase one trials are short in duration (usually 1 to 3 months), researchers should gather more data on the short-term and long-term risks of participation in phase one studies by healthy subjects; 2) researchers should develop strict inclusion/exclusion criteria that exclude unhealthy or vulnerable subjects, such as decisionally impaired people, in phase one studies; 3) subjects should not participate in more than one phase one study at the same time and should wait at least 30 days between participating in different studies; 4) researchers should develop a database to keep track of phase one participants; 5) subjects should be guaranteed a minimum wage equivalent to the equivalent type of unskilled labor, but there should be no upper limits on wages; and 6) subjects should be allowed to engage in collective bargaining with research sponsors.

  11. Strategies to Minimize Risks and Exploitation in Phase One Trials on Healthy Subjects*

    PubMed Central

    Shamoo, Adil E.; Resnik, David B.

    2014-01-01

    Most of the literature on phase one trials has focused on ethical and safety issues in research on patients with advanced cancer, but this article focuses on healthy, adult subjects. The article makes six specific recommendations for protecting the rights and welfare of healthy subjects in phase one trials: 1) because phase one trials are short in duaration (usually 1 to 3 months), researchers should gather more data on the short-term and long-term risks of participation in phase one studies by healthy subjects; 2) researchers should develop strict inclusion/exclusion criteria that exclude unhealthy or vulnerable subjects, such as decisionally impaired people, in phase one studies; 3) subjects should not participate in more than one phase one study at the same time and should wait at least 30 days between participating in different studies; 4) researchers should develop a database to keep track of phase one participants; 5) subjects should be guaranteed a minimum wage equivalent to the equivalent type of unskilled labor, but there should be no upper limits on wages; and 6) subjects should be allowed to engage in collective bargaining with research sponsors. PMID:16754430

  12. Negotiating decisions during informed consent for pediatric Phase I oncology trials.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Patricia A; Magtanong, Ruth V; Leek, Angela C; Hizlan, Sabahat; Yamokoski, Amy D; Kodish, Eric D

    2012-04-01

    During informed consent conferences (ICCs) for Phase I trials, oncologists must present complex information while addressing concerns. Research on communication that evolves during ICCs remains largely unexplored. We examined communication during ICCs for pediatric Phase I cancer trials using a stratified random sample from six pediatric cancer centers. A grounded theory approach identified key communication steps and factors influencing the negotiation of decisions for trial participation. Analysis suggests that during ICCs, families, patients, and clinicians exercise choice and control by negotiating micro-decisions in two broad domains: drug logic and logistics, and administration/scheduling. Micro-decisions unfold in a four-step communication process: (1) introduction of an issue; (2) response; (3) negotiation of the issue; and (4) resolution and decision. Negotiation over smaller micro-decisions is prominent in ICCs and merits further study.

  13. Hepatocellular carcinoma: reasons for phase III failure and novel perspectives on trial design.

    PubMed

    Llovet, Josep M; Hernandez-Gea, Virginia

    2014-04-15

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a major health problem. Most patients with HCC experience a recurrence after resection/ablation or are diagnosed at advanced stages. Sorafenib remains the only approved systemic drug for these patients. Molecular therapies targeting signaling cascades involved in hepatocarcinogenesis have been explored in phase III clinical trials. However, none of the drugs tested have shown positive results in the first-line (brivanib, sunitinib, erlotinib, and linifanib) or second-line (brivanib, everolimus) setting after sorafenib progression. Reasons for failure are heterogeneous and include lack of understanding of critical drivers of tumor progression/dissemination, liver toxicity, flaws in trial design, or marginal antitumoral potency. These trials are also challenging time to progression as a surrogate endpoint of survival. Trials ongoing testing drugs head-to-head versus sorafenib in "all comers" might have difficulties in achieving superior results in the first line. Novel trials are also designed testing drugs in biomarker-based subpopulations of patients with HCC. Most common mutations, however, are undruggable, such as p53 and CTNNB1. Two types of studies are proposed: (i) phase II pivotal proof-of-concept studies testing drugs blocking potential oncogenic addiction loops, such as the one testing MEK inhibitors in RAS(+) patients or amplification of FGF19 as a target; and (ii) phase II to III studies using biomarker-based trial enrichment for defining HCC subpopulations, such as the case of enriching for MET-positive tumors. These strategies have been deemed successful in breast, melanoma, and lung cancers, and are expected to change the landscape of trial design of HCC.

  14. Effectiveness of a Therapeutic Summer Camp for Children with ADHD: Phase I Clinical Intervention Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hantson, Julie; Wang, Pan Pan; Grizenko-Vida, Michael; Ter-Stepanian, Marina; Harvey, William; Joober, Ridha; Grizenko, Natalie

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a 2-week therapeutic summer day camp for children with ADHD, which included a social skills training program and parent psychoeducation and training program. This was an open-label, nonrandomized Phase I Clinical Intervention Trial. Method: Parents completed the Weiss…

  15. Phase 0 clinical trials in cancer drug development: from FDA guidance to clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Kinders, Robert; Parchment, Ralph E; Ji, Jay; Kummar, Shivaani; Murgo, Anthony J; Gutierrez, Martin; Collins, Jerry; Rubinstein, Larry; Pickeral, Oxana; Steinberg, Seth M; Yang, Sherry; Hollingshead, Melinda; Chen, Alice; Helman, Lee; Wiltrout, Robert; Simpson, Mel; Tomaszewski, Joseph E; Doroshow, James H

    2007-12-01

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recently introduced the Exploratory Investigational New Drug Guidance to expedite the clinical evaluation of new therapeutic and imaging agents. Early clinical studies performed under the auspices of this guidance, so-called "Phase 0" trials, have been initiated at the National Cancer Institute to integrate qualified pharmacodynamic biomarker assays into first-in-human cancer clinical trials of molecularly targeted agents. The goal of this integration is to perform molecular proof-of-concept investigations at the earliest stage of cancer drug development. Phase 0 trials do not offer any possibility of patient benefit; instead, intensive, real-time pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic analyses of patient tumor samples and/or surrogate tissues are performed to inform subsequent trials. Phase 0 studies do not replace formal Phase I drug safety testing and require a substantial investment of resources in assay development early on; however, they offer the promise of more rational selection of agents for further, large-scale development as well as the molecular identification of potential therapeutic failures early in the development process.

  16. Webcam Delivery of the Camperdown Program for Adolescents Who Stutter: A Phase II Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carey, Brenda; O'Brian, Sue; Lowe, Robyn; Onslow, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: This Phase II clinical trial examined stuttering adolescents' responsiveness to the Webcam-delivered Camperdown Program. Method: Sixteen adolescents were treated by Webcam with no clinic attendance. Primary outcome was percentage of syllables stuttered (%SS). Secondary outcomes were number of sessions, weeks and hours to maintenance,…

  17. Webcam Delivery of the Camperdown Program for Adolescents Who Stutter: A Phase I Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carey, Brenda; O'Brian, Sue; Onslow, Mark; Packman, Ann; Menzies, Ross

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: This Phase I clinical trial explored the viability of webcam Internet delivery of the Camperdown Program for adolescents who stutter. Method and Procedure: Participants were 3 adolescents ages 13, 15, and 16 years, with moderate-severe stuttering. Each was treated with the Camperdown Program delivered by webcam with no clinic attendance.…

  18. Webcam Delivery of the Lidcombe Program for Early Stuttering: A Phase I Clinical Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Brian, Sue; Smith, Kylie; Onslow, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The Lidcombe Program is an operant treatment for early stuttering shown with meta-analysis to have a favorable odds ratio. However, many clients are unable to access the treatment because of distance and lifestyle factors. In this Phase I trial, we explored the potential efficacy, practicality, and viability of an Internet webcam Lidcombe…

  19. Combining Dosimetry & Toxicity: Analysis of two UK Phase III Clinical trials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulliford, Sarah L.

    2014-03-01

    There are many advantages to performing a clinical trial when implementing a novel radiotherapy technique. The clinical trials framework enables the safety and efficacy of the "experimental arm" to be tested and ensures practical support, rigorous quality control and data monitoring for participating centres. In addition to the clinical and follow-up data collected from patients within the trial, it is also possible to collect 3-D dosimetric information from the corresponding radiotherapy treatment plans. Analysing the combination of dosimetric, clinical and follow-up data enhances the understanding of the relationship between the dose delivered to both the target and normal tissue structures and reported outcomes & toxicity. Aspects of the collection, collation and analysis of data from two UK multicentre Phase III radiotherapy trials are presented here. MRC-RT01 dose-escalation prostate radiotherapy trial ISRCTN47772397 was one of the first UK multi-centre radiotherapy trials to collect 3-D dosimetric data. A number of different analysis methodologies were implemented to investigate the relationship between the dose distribution to the rectum and specific rectal toxicities. More recently data was collected from the PARSPORT trial (Parotid Sparing IMRT vs conventional head and neck radiotherapy) ISRCTN48243537. In addition to the planned analysis, dosimetric analysis was employed to investigate an unexpected finding that acute fatigue was more prevalent in the IMRT arm of the trial. It can be challenging to collect 3-D dosimetric information from multicentre radiotherapy trials. However, analysing the relationship between dosimetric and toxicity data provides invaluable information which can influence the next generation of radiotherapy techniques.

  20. Novel approaches to incorporating pharmacoeconomic studies into phase III clinical trials for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Fillit, H; Cummings, J; Neumann, P; McLaughlin, T; Salavtore, P; Leibman, C

    2010-10-01

    The societal and individual costs of Alzheimer's disease are significant, worldwide. As the world ages, these costs are increasing rapidly, while health systems face finite budgets. As a result, many regulators and payers will require or at least consider phase III cost-effectiveness data (in addition to safety and efficacy data) for drug approval and reimbursement, increasing the risks and costs of drug development. Incorporating pharmacoeconomic studies in phase III clinical trials for Alzheimer's disease presents a number of challenges. We propose several specific suggestions to improve the design of pharmacoeconomic studies in phase III clinical trials. We propose that acute episodes of care are key outcome measures for pharmacoeconomic studies. To improve the possibility of detecting a pharmacoeconomic impact in phase III, we suggest several strategies including; study designs for enrichment of pharmacoeconomic outcomes that include co-morbidity of patients; reducing variability of care that can affect pharmacoeconomic outcomes through standardized care management; employing administrative claims data to better capture meaningful pharmacoeconomic data; and extending clinical trials in open label follow-up periods in which pharmacoeconomic data are captured electronically by administrative claims. Specific aspects of power analysis for pharmacoeconomic studies are presented. The particular pharmacoeconomic challenges caused by the use of biomarkers in clinical trials, the increasing use of multinational studies, and the pharmacoeconomic challenges presented by biologicals in development for Alzheimer's disease are discussed. In summary, since we are entering an era in which pharmacoeconomic studies will be essential in drug development for supporting regulatory approval, payor reimbursement and integration of new therapies into clinical care, we must consider the design and incorporation of pharmacoeconomic studies in phase III clinical trials more seriously

  1. 78 FR 39736 - Draft Guidance for Industry: Considerations for the Design of Early-Phase Clinical Trials of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-02

    ... of Early-Phase Clinical Trials of Cellular and Gene Therapy Products; Availability AGENCY: Food and... Design of Early-Phase Clinical Trials of Cellular and Gene Therapy Products'' dated July 2013. The draft... (CT) and gene therapy (GT) products (referred to collectively as CGT products) with recommendations...

  2. Pancreatic Cancer Stage 2B

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2B Description: Stage IIB pancreatic cancer; drawing shows cancer in the pancreas and in nearby lymph nodes. Also shown are the bile duct, pancreatic duct, and duodenum. Stage IIB pancreatic cancer. Cancer has spread to nearby lymph nodes and ...

  3. A phase 3 randomized trial comparing inolimomab vs usual care in steroid-resistant acute GVHD.

    PubMed

    Socié, Gérard; Vigouroux, Stéphane; Yakoub-Agha, Ibrahim; Bay, Jacques-Olivier; Fürst, Sabine; Bilger, Karin; Suarez, Felipe; Michallet, Mauricette; Bron, Dominique; Gard, Philippe; Medeghri, Zakaria; Lehert, Philippe; Lai, Chinglin; Corn, Tim; Vernant, Jean-Paul

    2017-02-02

    Treatment of steroid-resistant acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) remains an unmet clinical need. Inolimomab, a monoclonal antibody to CD25, has shown encouraging results in phase 2 trials. This phase 3 randomized, open-label, multicenter trial compared inolimomab vs usual care in adult patients with steroid-refractory acute GVHD. Patients were randomly selected to receive treatment with inolimomab or usual care (the control group was treated with antithymocyte globulin [ATG]). The primary objective was to evaluate overall survival at 1 year without changing baseline allocated therapy. A total of 100 patients were randomly placed: 49 patients in the inolimomab arm and 51 patients in the ATG arm. The primary criteria were reached by 14 patients (28.5%) in the inolimomab and 11 patients (21.5%) in the ATG arms, with a hazard ratio of 0.874 (P = .28). With a minimum follow-up of 1 year, 26 (53%) and 31 (60%) patients died in the inolimomab and ATG arms, respectively. Adverse events were similar in the 2 arms, with fewer viral infections in the inolimomab arm compared with the ATG arm. The primary end point of this randomized phase 3 trial was not achieved. The lack of a statistically significant effect confirms the need for development of more effective treatments for acute GVHD. This trial is registered to https://www.clinicaltrialsregister.eu/ctr-search/search as EUDRACT 2007-005009-24.

  4. From total empiricism to a rational design of metronomic chemotherapy phase I dosing trials.

    PubMed

    Lam, Thomas; Hetherington, John W; Greenman, John; Maraveyas, Anthony

    2006-02-01

    'Metronomic chemotherapy' represents a novel anti-angiogenic strategy whereby low-dose chemotherapy is utilized in a continuous fashion in order to target tumor endothelium. There are many potential advantages of this strategy and clinical trials are already underway. However, although the scheduling of metronomic chemotherapy is relatively unequivocal, metronomic dosing principles are at present poorly defined. Arbitrarily, 10-33% of the maximum tolerated dose comprises 'the dose range'. We argue that this is too empirical and propose a set of phase I metronomic chemotherapy dosing strategies based on a principled approach which may help to reduce the problem of empiricism in dosing for metronomic chemotherapy trials.

  5. Inter-trial alignment of EEG data and phase-locking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Testorf, M. E.; Horak, P.; Connolly, A.; Holmes, G. L.; Jobst, B. C.

    2015-09-01

    Neuro-scientific studies are often aimed at imaging brain activity, which is time-locked to external stimuli. This provides the possibility to use statistical methods to extract even weak signal components, which occur with each stimulus. For electroencephalographic recordings this concept is limited by inevitable time jitter, which cannot be controlled in all cases. Our study is based on a cross-correlation analysis of trials to alignment trials based on the recorded data. This is demonstrated both with simulated signals and with clinical EEG data, which were recorded intracranially. Special attention is given to the evaluation of the time-frequency resolved phase-locking across multiple trails.

  6. Phase I trial outcomes in older patients with advanced solid tumours

    PubMed Central

    Khan, K H; Yap, T A; Ring, A; Molife, L R; Bodla, S; Thomas, K; Zivi, A; Smith, A; Judson, I; Banerji, U; de Bono, J S; Kaye, S B

    2016-01-01

    Background: This study had two aims: (a) to test the hypothesis that advanced age is associated with lower levels of tolerability and clinical benefit to experimental Phase I trial agents; (b) to assess the validity of the Royal Marsden Hospital (RMH) prognostic score as a patient selection tool in older patients. Methods: Clinico-pathological characteristics and treatment outcomes of all patients treated consecutively from 2005 to 2009 in phase I trials at the RMH were recorded. All toxicity and clinical outcome data were compared between patients aged below and above 65 years of age. Results: One thousand and four patients were treated in 30 Phase I trials, with 315 (31%) patients aged 65 years and older. Grade 3–5 toxicities (22.8% vs 24.8% (P=0.52)), trial discontinuation (6% vs 4% P=0.33), and dose interruptions (8.0% vs 8.0% (P=0.96)) were observed at similar rates in patients below and above 65 years of age, respectively. The overall response rate 5.2% vs 4.1%, progression-free survival (PFS) 1.9 vs 3.5 months and clinical benefit rate (CBR) at 6 months 15.2% vs 14.3% were comparable in both groups. To avoid bias due to the potential therapeutic benefit of abiraterone, comparisons were repeated excluding prostate cancer patients with similar results (ORR 4.6% vs 4%, PFS 1.8 vs 3.0 months, CBR at 6 months 13.5% vs 9.5%). Multivariate analysis indicated that the previously identified RMH score (including albumin and lactate dehydrogenase levels) was an accurate predictor of outcome. Conclusions: Phase I clinical trials should be considered in patients with advanced cancers regardless of age, as older patients who enter these have similar safety and efficacy outcomes as their younger counterparts. The RMH prognostic score can assist in the selection of suitable older patients. PMID:26757260

  7. The Role of Age on Dose Limiting Toxicities (DLTs) in Phase I Dose-escalation Trials

    PubMed Central

    Schwandt, A; Harris, P. J.; Hunsberger, S.; Deleporte, A.; Smith, G. L.; Vulih, D.; Anderson, B. D.; Ivy, S. P.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Elderly oncology patients are not enrolled in early phase trials in proportion to the numbers of geriatric patients with cancer. There may be concern that elderly patients will not tolerate investigational agents as well as younger patients resulting in a disproportionate number of dose-limiting toxicities (DLTs). Recent single-institution studies provide conflicting data on the relationship between age and DLT. Experimental Design We retrospectively reviewed data about patients treated on single-agent, dose-escalation, phase I clinical trials sponsored by the Cancer Therapy Evaluation Program (CTEP) of the National Cancer Institute. Patients’ dose levels were described as percentage of maximum tolerated dose (%MTD), the highest dose level at which <33% of patients had a DLT, or recommended phase II dose (RP2D). Mixed-effect logistic regression models were used to analyze relationships between the probability of a DLT and age and other explanatory variables. Results Increasing dose, increasing age, and worsening performance status (PS) were significantly related to an increased probability of a DLT in this model (p<0.05). There was no association between dose level administered and age (p=0.57). Conclusions This analysis of phase I dose-escalation trials involving over 500 patients older than 70 years of age, is the largest reported. As age and dose level increased and PS worsened, the probability of a DLT increased. While increasing age was associated with occurrence of DLT, this risk remained within accepted thresholds of risk for phase I trials. There was no evidence of age bias on enrollment of patients on low or high dose levels. PMID:25028396

  8. Edoxaban: Review of pharmacology and key phase I to III clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Plitt, Anna; Giugliano, Robert P

    2014-09-01

    Vitamin K antagonists (VKAs) remain the standard therapy for anticoagulation in prevention and treatment of venous thromboembolism (VTE) and for the prevention of stroke in atrial fibrillation (AF). Due to numerous limitations of VKAs, target-specific oral anticoagulants have been developed. Edoxaban is a direct activated factor X inhibitor with attractive features among which are once daily dosing, no need for routine monitoring, and minimal drug-drug interactions. In patients undergoing orthopedic surgery, edoxaban was superior to enoxaparin in preventing VTE. Furthermore, a recent large-scale phase III trial in patients with symptomatic VTE demonstrated that edoxaban was noninferior to warfarin in preventing recurrent VTE and reduced bleeding. In the largest trial of anticoagulation in patients with AF to date, edoxaban was noninferior to warfarin in the prevention of stroke or systemic embolism and reduced bleeding and cardiovascular mortality. This review provides an overview of the pharmacology, clinical trial results, and potential indications for edoxaban.

  9. Analysis of Impact of Post-Treatment Biopsies in Phase I Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Sweis, Randy F.; Drazer, Michael W.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The use of biopsy-derived pharmacodynamic biomarkers is increasing in early-phase clinical trials. It remains unknown whether drug development is accelerated or enhanced by their use. We examined the impact of biopsy-derived pharmacodynamic biomarkers on subsequent drug development through a comprehensive analysis of phase I oncology studies from 2003 to 2010 and subsequent publications citing the original trials. Methods We conducted a search to identify and examine publications of phase I oncology studies including the use of biopsy-derived pharmacodynamic biomarkers between 2003 and 2010. Characteristics of those studies were extracted and analyzed, along with outcomes from the biomarker data. We then compiled and reviewed publications of subsequent phase II and III trials citing the original phase I biomarker studies to determine the impact on drug development. Results We identified 4,840 phase I oncology publications between 2003 and 2010. Seventy-two studies included a biopsy-derived pharmacodynamic biomarker. The proportion of biomarker studies including nondiagnostic biopsies increased over time (P = .002). A minimum of 1,873 tumor biopsies were documented in the 72 studies, 12 of which reported a statistically significant biomarker result. Thirty-three percent of studies (n = 24) were referenced by subsequent publications specifically with regard to the biomarkers. Only five positive biomarker studies were cited subsequently, and maximum tolerated dose was used for subsequent drug development in all cases. Conclusion Despite their increased use, the impact of biopsy-derived pharmacodynamic biomarkers in phase I oncology studies on subsequent drug development remains uncertain. No impact on subsequent dose or schedule was demonstrated. This issue requires further evaluation, given the risk and cost of such studies. PMID:26668350

  10. Intraspinal Neural Stem Cell Transplantation in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis: Phase 1 Trial Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Feldman, Eva L; Boulis, Nicholas M; Hur, Junguk; Johe, Karl; Rutkove, Seward B; Federici, Thais; Polak, Meraida; Bordeau, Jane; Sakowski, Stacey A; Glass, Jonathan D

    2014-01-01

    Objective The US Food and Drug Administration–approved trial, “A Phase 1, Open-Label, First-in-Human, Feasibility and Safety Study of Human Spinal Cord-Derived Neural Stem Cell Transplantation for the Treatment of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis, Protocol Number: NS2008-1,” is complete. Our overall objective was to assess the safety and feasibility of stem cell transplantation into lumbar and/or cervical spinal cord regions in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) subjects. Methods Preliminary results have been reported on the initial trial cohort of 12 ALS subjects. Here, we describe the safety and functional outcome monitoring results for the final trial cohort, consisting of 6 ALS subjects receiving 5 unilateral cervical intraspinal neural stem cell injections. Three of these subjects previously received 10 total bilateral lumbar injections as part of the earlier trial cohort. All injections utilized a novel spinal-mounted stabilization and injection device to deliver 100,000 neural stem cells per injection, for a dosing range up to 1.5 million cells. Subject assessments included detailed pre- and postsurgical neurological outcome measures. Results The cervical injection procedure was well tolerated and disease progression did not accelerate in any subject, verifying the safety and feasibility of cervical and dual-targeting approaches. Analyses on outcome data revealed preliminary insight into potential windows of stem cell biological activity and identified clinical assessment measures that closely correlate with ALS Functional Rating Scale-Revised scores, a standard assessment for ALS clinical trials. Interpretation This is the first report of cervical and dual-targeted intraspinal transplantation of neural stem cells in ALS subjects. This approach is feasible and well-tolerated, supporting future trial phases examining therapeutic dosing and efficacy. PMID:24510776

  11. An integrated dose-finding tool for phase I trials in oncology.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shengjie; Wang, Sue-Jane; Ji, Yuan

    2015-11-01

    In the past 25 years, the 3+3 design has been the most popular approach for planning phase I dose-finding trials in oncology. During the same time period, major development of more efficient model-based designs has been made by statistical researchers aiming to improve the clinical practice of dose finding in oncology. Despite the effort, 3+3 is still the most frequently used designs in practice. Part of the reason is due to the lack of software tools that allow comparison of different designs, including 3+3 and other model-based methods, in a head-to-head and easy-to-use fashion. To this end, we introduce NextGen-DF, a next-generation tool for designing oncology dose-finding trials that allows for construction, comparison, and calibration of multiple designs via internet, in real time, and independent of computer operating systems. Through NextGen-DF, we present massive and user-generated comparison results based on over 4 million simulated trials, which clearly indicate the inferiority of 3+3. To our knowledge, the reported crowd-sourcing results are the largest and most objective comparison across major dose-finding methods to date. NextGen-DF is expected to improve patient care and drug development by providing safer and more efficient designs for phase I oncology trials. NextGen-DF is available at www.compgenome.org/NGDF.

  12. Clinical Trials: D-Methionine to Reduce Noise-Induced Hearing Loss. Phase 3

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-03-01

    placebo-controlled Phase 3 clinical trial of oral D-met to reduce noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) and tinnitus . The goal of the study is to...primary objective of this study is to determine the efficacy of D-Met in preventing NIHL or reducing tinnitus secondary to a minimum of 500 rounds...an oral, orange flavored suspension of D-methionine can prevent noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) and tinnitus in our troops. Hypotheses

  13. Phase 3 Clinical Trials: D-Methionine to Reduce Noise-Induced Hearing Loss

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    Phase 3 clinical trial of oral D-met to reduce noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) and tinnitus . The goal of the study is to develop a safe, oral...this study is to determine the efficacy of D- Met in preventing NIHL or reducing tinnitus secondary to a minimum of 500 rounds of M-16 weapons training...and tinnitus in our troops. Hypotheses: Primary Hypothesis: Administration of oral D-methionine prior to and during weapons training will

  14. Phase 0/I/II Cancer Prevention Clinical Trials Program (Consortia) | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    Five cancer research centers lead multiple collaborative networks to assess potential cancer preventive agents and to conduct early clinical development of promising preventive agents. Also called the Consortia for Early Phase Prevention Trials, the studies require extensive biomarker analysis, investigation of the biologic effects of the cancer preventive agents on their intended molecular targets and on multiple endpoints associated with carcinogenesis, and correlation with clinically relevant endpoints. | Systematic early clinical development of promising preventive agents through five major medical research centers.

  15. The impact of FDA and EMEA guidelines on drug development in relation to Phase 0 trials.

    PubMed

    Marchetti, S; Schellens, J H M

    2007-09-03

    An increase in the number of identified therapeutic cancer targets achieved through recent biomedical research has resulted in the generation of a large number of molecules that need to be tested further. Current development of (anticancer) drugs is a rather inefficient process that for an average new molecule takes around 10-15 years. It is also a challenging process as it is associated with high costs and a low rate of approval. It is known that less than 10% of new molecular entities entering clinical Phase I testing progress beyond the investigational programme and reach the market; this probability is even lower for anticancer agents. In 2003, the US Food and Drug Administration (US FDA) declared the urgent need for new toolkits to improve the critical development path that leads from scientific discovery to the patient. In this scenario, Phase 0 (zero) trials should allow an early evaluation in humans of pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic profiles of test compounds through administration of sub-pharmacological doses and for a short time period to a low number of humans. Typically, Phase 0 studies have no therapeutic or diagnostic intent. Owing to the low doses administered and the low risk of toxicity, shorter preclinical packages to support these studies are required. Phase 0 trials have been proposed to help in making an early selection of promising candidates for further evaluation in Phase I-III trials, providing a potentially useful instrument for drug discovery, particularly in the field of oncology. Phase 0 studies are expected to reduce costs of drug development, and to limit the preclinical in vitro and in vivo testing and the time period of drug development. However, there are also concerns about the utility and feasibility of Phase 0 studies. In January 2006, guidelines on exploratory investigational new drug studies in humans have been published by the US FDA, and currently a Phase 0 programme is ongoing at the National Cancer Institute to

  16. Drug induced interstitial lung disease in oncology phase I trials.

    PubMed

    Yonemori, Kan; Hirakawa, Akihiro; Kawachi, Asuka; Kinoshita, Fumie; Okuma, Hitomi; Nishikawa, Tadaaki; Tamura, Kenji; Fujiwara, Yasuhiro; Takebe, Naoko

    2016-12-01

    Interstitial lung disease is a serious drug-related condition that can cause life threatening organ failure. The incidence and risk factors of drug-induced interstitial lung disease (DILD) are unknown in oncology phase I trials. This study analyzed clinical information from 8906 patients with malignancies who were enrolled in 470 phase I trials sponsored by the Cancer Therapy Evaluation Program, National Cancer Institute, from 1988 to 2014. Logistic and Cox statistical analyses were utilized to determine clinical differences between patients who developed DILD and patients who did not. In this study, the overall incidence rate of patients with pulmonary toxicity was 2.7%. The overall incidence rate for DILD was 0.77%, whereas for grade 3 or 4 DILD it was 0.31%. Median time to occurrence of DILD was 1.4 months. The Cox hazard analysis indicated smaller body surface area and a combination of thoracic radiation with investigational drug regimens were significant risk factors for time to occurrence of interstitial lung disease. Investigators should carefully monitor for DILD in oncology patients enrolled in phase I trials with identified risk factors. A 6-month observation period would be sufficient to detect the onset of most DILD in such patients.

  17. Design of Phase II cancer trials for evaluation of cytostatic/cytotoxic agents.

    PubMed

    Kocherginsky, Masha; Cohen, Ezra E W; Karrison, Theodore

    2009-01-01

    For experimental anticancer agents that may have both cytostatic and cytotoxic effects, assessment of response rates alone may not capture the full impact of the treatment. Oncologists are therefore interested in assessing both response and stable disease rates in early phase clinical trials of such therapies. We describe the design of a single-arm, Phase II clinical trial for the simultaneous evaluation of objective response and stable disease (lack of early tumor progression) rates using standard RECIST criteria. Demonstration of a sufficiently high rate for either of these endpoints will lead to rejection of the null hypothesis and a conclusion that the treatment warrants further study. A design is chosen that satisfies the desired type I error constraint and has sufficient statistical power at several selected points within the alternative hypothesis space using a restricted search algorithm. An early stopping rule for lack of efficacy is incorporated. The method is illustrated by the design of a Phase II clinical trial in head and neck cancer.

  18. The fiduciary obligation of the physician-researcher in phase IV trials

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In this manuscript, we argue that within the context of phase IV, physician-researchers retain their fiduciary obligation to treat the patient-participants. Discussion We first clarify why the perspective that research ethics ought to be differentiated from clinical ethics is not applicable in phase IV, and therefore, why therapeutic orientation is most convivial in this phase. Next, assuming that ethics guidelines may be representative of common morality, we show that ethics guidelines see physician-researchers primarily as physicians and only secondarily as researchers. We then elaborate on what a fiduciary obligation is and how some of the obligations are default duties. Lastly, we look at the fiduciary obligation of the physician-researcher in phase IV interventional trials. Conclusion The fiduciary obligation to treat is not as easily waived as in earlier trials. Assuming the entwinement of research and practice in phase IV, physician-researchers, in collaboration with other researchers, investigators, and research ethics committees, should ensure that in terms of study design, methodology, and research practice, the therapeutic value of the research to the patient-participants is not diminished. PMID:24507449

  19. The design of phase II clinical trials testing cancer therapeutics: consensus recommendations from the clinical trial design task force of the national cancer institute investigational drug steering committee.

    PubMed

    Seymour, Lesley; Ivy, S Percy; Sargent, Daniel; Spriggs, David; Baker, Laurence; Rubinstein, Larry; Ratain, Mark J; Le Blanc, Michael; Stewart, David; Crowley, John; Groshen, Susan; Humphrey, Jeffrey S; West, Pamela; Berry, Donald

    2010-03-15

    The optimal design of phase II studies continues to be the subject of vigorous debate, especially studies of newer molecularly targeted agents. The observations that many new therapeutics "fail" in definitive phase III studies, coupled with the numbers of new agents to be tested as well as the increasing costs and complexity of clinical trials, further emphasize the critical importance of robust and efficient phase II design. The Clinical Trial Design Task Force (CTD-TF) of the National Cancer Institute (NCI) Investigational Drug Steering Committee (IDSC) has published a series of discussion papers on phase II trial design in Clinical Cancer Research. The IDSC has developed formal recommendations about aspects of phase II trial design that are the subject of frequent debate, such as endpoints (response versus progression-free survival), randomization (single-arm designs versus randomization), inclusion of biomarkers, biomarker-based patient enrichment strategies, and statistical design (e.g., two-stage designs versus multiple-group adaptive designs). Although these recommendations in general encourage the use of progression-free survival as the primary endpoint, randomization, inclusion of biomarkers, and incorporation of newer designs, we acknowledge that objective response as an endpoint and single-arm designs remain relevant in certain situations. The design of any clinical trial should always be carefully evaluated and justified based on characteristic specific to the situation.

  20. Novel therapies for resistant focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FONT) phase II clinical trial: study design

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The lack of adequate randomized clinical trials (RCT) has hindered identification of new therapies that are safe and effective for patients with primary focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS), especially in patients who fail to respond to corticosteroids and immunosuppressive therapies. Recent basic science advances have led to development of alternative treatments that specifically target aberrant pathways of fibrosis which are relevant to disease progression in FSGS. There is a need for a flexible Phase II study design which will test such novel antifibrotic strategies in order to identify agents suitable for phase III testing. Methods/Design The Novel Therapies for Resistant Focal Segmental Glomerulosclerosis (FONT) project is a multicenter Phase I/II RCT designed to investigate the potential efficacy of novel therapies for resistant FSGS. Adalimumab and galactose will be evaluated against conservative therapy consisting of the combination of lisinopril, losartan and atorvastatin. The sample size is defined to assure that if one of the treatments has a superior response rate compared to that of the other treatments, it will be selected with high probability for further evaluation. Comparison of primary and secondary endpoints in each study arm will enable a choice to be made of which treatments are worthy of further study in future Phase III RCT. Discussion This report highlights the key features of the FONT II RCT including the two-step outcome analysis that will expedite achievement of the study objectives. The proposed phase II study design will help to identify promising agents for further testing while excluding ineffective agents. This staged approach can help to prevent large expenditures on unworthy therapeutic agents in the management of serious but rare kidney diseases Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT00814255 PMID:21310077

  1. Phase 1 Clinical Trial of Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy Concomitant With Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy for Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Bondiau, Pierre-Yves; Courdi, Adel; Bahadoran, Phillipe; Chamorey, Emmanuel; Queille-Roussel, Catherine; Lallement, Michel; Birtwisle-Peyrottes, Isabelle; Chapellier, Claire; Pacquelet-Cheli, Sandrine; Ferrero, Jean-Marc

    2013-04-01

    Purpose: Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) allows stereotactic irradiation of thoracic tumors. It may have a real impact on patients who may not otherwise qualify for breast-conserving surgery. We conducted a phase 1 trial that tested 5 dose levels of SBRT concomitant with neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT) before to surgery. The purpose of the current dose escalation study was to determine the maximum tolerable dose of SBRT in the treatment of breast cancer. Methods and Materials: To define toxicity, we performed dermatologic examinations that included clinical examinations by 2 separate physicians and technical evaluations using colorimetry, dermoscopy, and skin ultrasonography. Dermatologic examinations were performed before NACT, 36 and 56 days after the beginning of NACT, and before surgery. Surgery was performed 4 to 8 weeks after the last chemotherapy session. Efficacy, the primary endpoint, was determined by the pathologic complete response (pCR) rate. Results: Maximum tolerable dose was not reached. Only 1 case of dose-limiting toxicity was reported (grade 3 dermatologic toxicity), and SBRT was overall well tolerated. The pCR rate was 36%, with none being observed at the first 2 dose levels, and the highest rate being obtained at dose level 3 (25.5 Gy delivered in 3 fractions). Furthermore, the breast-conserving surgery rate was up to 92% compared with an 8% total mastectomy rate. No surgical complications were reported. Conclusions: This study demonstrates that SBRT can be safely combined with NACT. Regarding the efficacy endpoints, this trial showed promising results in terms of pCR rate (36%) and breast-conserving rate (92%). The findings provide a strong rationale for extending the study into a phase 2 trial. In view of the absence of correlation between dose and pCR, and given that the data from dose level 3 met the statistical requirements, a dose of 25.5 Gy in 3 fractions should be used for the phase 2 trial.

  2. Similar efficacy for phase I trials in comparison with DTIC for advanced malignant melanoma: an analysis of melanoma outcomes in CTEP-sponsored phase I trials 1995-2011.

    PubMed

    Luke, Jason J; Rubinstein, Lawrence V; Smith, Gary L; Ivy, S Percy; Harris, Pamela J

    2013-04-01

    After ipilimumab, vemurafenib, and interleukin-2, standard of care chemotherapy for melanoma remains dacarbazine (response rate ∼9%). Despite this, many physicians hesitate to refer patients to phase I protocols given a perceived lack of clinical benefit and potential for harm. To better understand the validity of these perceptions, the experience of all patients with melanoma treated on phase I trials sponsored by the National Cancer Institute-Cancer Therapy Evaluation Program (NCI-CTEP) from 1995 to 2011 were analyzed and compared with the pooled results of six contemporary phase III trials of dacarbazine. A total of 937 patients with melanoma were treated in 148 CTEP phase I trials. The majority were men with a median of two prior therapies (46% receiving prior dacarbazine). Response and clinical benefit rates in these trials were not clinically different from those of dacarbazine (phase I: 6.3 and 26.8% vs. dacarbazine: 8.8 and 27.9%) although grades 3 and 4 toxicity was significantly higher (54 vs. 28%). Efficacy and toxicity were generally consistent within phase I subgroups (targeted agents, immunotherapies, or chemotherapeutics) though targeted therapy was associated with a lower response rate, immunotherapy with lower clinical benefit rate, and chemotherapy with higher incidence of grade 4 toxicity. Thus, the perception of limited efficacy of phase I trials for patients with melanoma was disproven, whereas the perception of toxicity was observed. However, this difference in toxicity may have been largely because of the nature of phase I vs. phase III trials (i.e. more heavily pretreated) and because of the phase I trials often being multiagent as opposed to dacarbazine alone.

  3. Oral contraceptive cycle phase does not affect 200-m swim time trial performance.

    PubMed

    Rechichi, Claire; Dawson, Brian

    2012-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine whether swimming performance was affected by acute hormonal fluctuation within a monophasic oral contraceptive (OC) cycle. Six competitive swimmers and water polo players completed a 200-m time trial at 3 time points of a single OC cycle: during the consumption phase (CONS), early (WITH1), and late in the withdrawal phase (WITH2). Split times and stroke rate were recorded during the time trial, and heart rate, blood lactate, glucose, and pH were measured after each performance test. Resting endogenous serum estradiol and progesterone concentrations were also assessed. No significant differences were observed between phases for body composition, 200-m swim time, mean stroke rate, peak heart rate, or blood glucose (p > 0.05). The mean peak blood lactate was significantly lower during WITH2 (9.9 ± 3.0 mmol·L(-1)) compared with that of CONS (12.5 ± 3.0 mmol·L(-1)) and mean pH higher during WITH2 (7.183 ± 0.111) compared with that of CONS (7.144 ± 0.092). Serum estradiol levels were significantly greater during WITH2 compared with that during WITH1 and CONS, but there was no difference in serum progesterone levels. These results demonstrate that for monophasic OC users, cycle phase does not impact the 200-m swimming performance. There was a reduction in blood lactate and an increase in pH during the withdrawal phase, possibly because of an increase in fluid retention, plasma volume, and cellular alkalosis. Therefore, female 200-m swimmers taking a monophasic OC need not be concerned by the phase of their cycle with regard to competition and optimizing performance. However, coaches and scientists should exercise caution when interpreting blood lactate results obtained from swimming tests and consider controlling for cycle phase for athletes taking an OC.

  4. A simulation study of methods for selecting subgroup-specific doses in phase 1 trials.

    PubMed

    Morita, Satoshi; Thall, Peter F; Takeda, Kentaro

    2017-03-01

    Patient heterogeneity may complicate dose-finding in phase 1 clinical trials if the dose-toxicity curves differ between subgroups. Conducting separate trials within subgroups may lead to infeasibly small sample sizes in subgroups having low prevalence. Alternatively,it is not obvious how to conduct a single trial while accounting for heterogeneity. To address this problem,we consider a generalization of the continual reassessment method on the basis of a hierarchical Bayesian dose-toxicity model that borrows strength between subgroups under the assumption that the subgroups are exchangeable. We evaluate a design using this model that includes subgroup-specific dose selection and safety rules. A simulation study is presented that includes comparison of this method to 3 alternative approaches,on the basis of nonhierarchical models,that make different types of assumptions about within-subgroup dose-toxicity curves. The simulations show that the hierarchical model-based method is recommended in settings where the dose-toxicity curves are exchangeable between subgroups. We present practical guidelines for application and provide computer programs for trial simulation and conduct.

  5. Molecular predictors of response to decitabine in advanced chronic myelomonocytic leukemia: a phase 2 trial.

    PubMed

    Braun, Thorsten; Itzykson, Raphael; Renneville, Aline; de Renzis, Benoit; Dreyfus, François; Laribi, Kamel; Bouabdallah, Krimo; Vey, Norbert; Toma, Andrea; Recher, Christian; Royer, Bruno; Joly, Bertrand; Vekhoff, Anne; Lafon, Ingrid; Sanhes, Laurence; Meurice, Guillaume; Oréar, Cédric; Preudhomme, Claude; Gardin, Claude; Ades, Lionel; Fontenay, Michaela; Fenaux, Pierre; Droin, Nathalie; Solary, Eric

    2011-10-06

    Hydroxyurea is the standard therapy of chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML) presenting with advanced myeloproliferative and/or myelodysplastic features. Response to hypomethylating agents has been reported in heterogeneous series of CMML. We conducted a phase 2 trial of decitabine (DAC) in 39 patients with advanced CMML defined according to a previous trial. Median number of DAC cycles was 10 (range, 1-24). Overall response rate was 38% with 4 complete responses (10%), 8 marrow responses (21%), and 3 stable diseases with hematologic improvement (8%). Eighteen patients (46%) demonstrated stable disease without hematologic improvement, and 6 (15%) progressed to acute leukemia. With a median follow-up of 23 months, overall survival was 48% at 2 years. Mutations in ASXL1, TET2, AML1, NRAS, KRAS, CBL, FLT3, and janus kinase 2 (JAK2) genes, and hypermethylation of the promoter of the tumor suppressor gene TIF1γ, did not predict response or survival on DAC therapy. Lower CJUN and CMYB gene expression levels independently predicted improved overall survival. This trial confirmed DAC efficacy in approximately 40% of CMML patients with advanced myeloproliferative or myelodysplastic features and suggested that CJUN and CMYB expression could be potential biomarkers in this setting. This trial is registered at EudraCT (eudract.ema.europa.eu) as #2008-000470-21 and www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT01098084.

  6. A Simulation Study of Methods for Selecting Subgroup-Specific Doses in Phase I Trials

    PubMed Central

    Morita, Satoshi; Thall, Peter F.; Takeda, Kentaro

    2016-01-01

    Summary Patient heterogeneity may complicate dose-finding in phase I clinical trials if the dose-toxicity curves differ between subgroups. Conducting separate trials within subgroups may lead to infeasibly small sample sizes in subgroups having low prevalence. Alternatively, it is not obvious how to conduct a single trial while accounting for heterogeneity. To address this problem, we consider a generalization of the continual reassessment method (O’Quigley, et al., 1990) based on a hierarchical Bayesian dose-toxicity model that borrows strength between subgroups under the assumption that the subgroups are exchangeable. We evaluate a design using this model that includes subgroup-specific dose selection and safety rules. A simulation study is presented that includes comparison of this method to three alternative approaches, based on non-hierarchical models, that make different types of assumptions about within-subgroup dose-toxicity curves. The simulations show that the hierarchical model-based method is recommended in settings where the dose-toxicity curves are exchangeable between subgroups. We present practical guidelines for application, and provide computer programs for trial simulation and conduct. PMID:28111916

  7. Phase I clinical trial of safety of L-serine for ALS patients.

    PubMed

    Levine, Todd D; Miller, Robert G; Bradley, Walter G; Moore, Dan H; Saperstein, David S; Flynn, Lynne E; Katz, Jonathan S; Forshew, Dallas A; Metcalf, James S; Banack, Sandra A; Cox, Paul A

    2017-02-01

    We performed a randomized, double-blind phase I clinical trial for six months on the effects of oral L-serine in patients with ALS. The protocol called for enrollment of patients with a diagnosis of probable or definite ALS, age 18-85 years, disease duration of less than three years and forced vital capacity (FVC) ≥ 60%. Patients were randomly assigned to four different oral twice-daily dose regimens (0.5, 2.5, 7.5, or 15 g/dose). Blood, urine and CSF samples, ALS Functional Rating Scale-Revised (ALSFRS-R) scores and forced vital capacity (FVC) were obtained throughout the trial. Disease progression was compared with matched historical placebo controls from five previous ALS therapeutic trials. Of 20 patients enrolled, one withdrew before receiving study drug and two withdrew with gastro-intestinal problems. Three patients died during the trial. L-serine was generally well tolerated by the patients and L-serine did not appear to accelerate functional decline of patients as measured by slope of their ALSFRS-R scores. Based on this small study, L-serine appears to be generally safe for patients with ALS.

  8. Phase III Preclinical Trials in Translational Stroke Research: Community Response on Framework and Guidelines.

    PubMed

    Boltze, Johannes; Wagner, Daniel-Christoph; Henninger, Nils; Plesnila, Nikolaus; Ayata, Cenk

    2016-08-01

    The multicenter phase III preclinical trial concept is currently discussed to enhance the predictive value of preclinical stroke research. After public announcement, we collected a community feedback on the concept with emphasis on potential design features and guidelines by an anonymous survey. Response analysis was conducted after plausibility checks by applying qualitative and quantitative measures. Most respondents supported the concept, including the implementation of a centralized steering committee. Based on received feedback, we suggest careful, stepwise implementation and to leave selected competencies and endpoint analysis at the discretion of participating centers. Strict application of quality assurance methods is accepted, but should be harmonized. However, received responses also indicate that the application of particular quality assurance models may require more attention throughout the community. Interestingly, clear and pragmatic preferences were given regarding publication and financing, suggesting the establishing of writing committees similar to large-scale clinical trials and global funding resources for financial support. The broad acceptance among research community encourages phase III preclinical trial implementation.

  9. Pirfenidone for idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis: analysis of pooled data from three multinational phase 3 trials.

    PubMed

    Noble, Paul W; Albera, Carlo; Bradford, Williamson Z; Costabel, Ulrich; du Bois, Roland M; Fagan, Elizabeth A; Fishman, Robert S; Glaspole, Ian; Glassberg, Marilyn K; Lancaster, Lisa; Lederer, David J; Leff, Jonathan A; Nathan, Steven D; Pereira, Carlos A; Swigris, Jeffrey J; Valeyre, Dominique; King, Talmadge E

    2016-01-01

    Pirfenidone is an antifibrotic agent that has been evaluated in three multinational phase 3 trials in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). We analysed pooled data from the multinational trials to obtain the most precise estimates of the magnitude of treatment effect on measures of disease progression.All patients randomised to pirfenidone 2403 mg·day(-1) or placebo in the CAPACITY or ASCEND studies were included in the analysis. Pooled analyses of outcomes at 1 year were based on the pre-specified end-points and analytic methods described in the ASCEND study protocol.A total of 1247 patients were included in the analysis. At 1 year, pirfenidone reduced the proportion of patients with a ≥10% decline in per cent predicted forced vital capacity or death by 43.8% (95% CI 29.3-55.4%) and increased the proportion of patients with no decline by 59.3% (95% CI 29.0-96.8%). A treatment benefit was also observed for progression-free survival, 6-min walk distance and dyspnoea. Gastrointestinal and skin-related adverse events were more common in the pirfenidone group, but rarely led to discontinuation.Analysis of data from three phase 3 trials demonstrated that treatment with pirfenidone for 1 year resulted in clinically meaningful reductions in disease progression in patients with IPF.

  10. The sleep apnea cardiovascular endpoints (SAVE) trial: Rationale and start-up phase.

    PubMed

    McEvoy, R Doug; Anderson, Craig S; Antic, Nick A; Chen, Baoyuan; He, Quanying; Heeley, Emma; Huang, Shaoguang; Huang, Yining; Wang, Jiguang; Zhong, Nanshan

    2010-09-01

    THE SLEEP APNEA CARDIOVASCULAR ENDPOINTS (SAVE) STUDY (CLINICAL TRIALS REGISTRATION NUMBER: NCT00738170) is an academic initiated and conducted, multinational, open, blinded endpoint, randomised controlled trial designed to determine whether treatment of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) with continuous positive airways pressure (CPAP) can reduce the incidence of serious cardiovascular events in patients with established cardiovascular disease. The answer to this question is of major importance to populations undergoing ageing and lifestyle changes all over the world. The SAVE study brings together respiratory, sleep and cardiovascular clinician-scientists in a unique interdisciplinary collaborative effort with industry sponsors to conduct the largest and most ambitious clinical trial yet conducted in the field of sleep apnea, with a global recruitment target of 5000 patients. Following its launch in Australia and China in late 2008, SAVE has now entered a phase of international expansion with new recruitment networks being established in New Zealand, India and Latin America. This article describes the rationale for the SAVE study, the considerations behind its design, and progress thus far in establishing the recruitment network. The report emphasises the important role that Chinese sleep and cardiovascular investigators have played in the start-up phase of this landmark international project.

  11. Pediatric phase I trial design using maximum target inhibition as the primary endpoint.

    PubMed

    Meany, Holly; Balis, Frank M; Aikin, Alberta; Whitcomb, Patricia; Murphy, Robert F; Steinberg, Seth M; Widemann, Brigitte C; Fox, Elizabeth

    2010-06-16

    The extent to which a drug inhibits a target responsible for a therapeutic effect is a more rational primary endpoint for dose-finding studies of more selective anticancer drugs than the conventional endpoint of dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) used for cytotoxic agents. An adaptive phase I trial design incorporating maximum target inhibition as the primary endpoint was developed to define the optimal dose of talabostat, a dipeptidyl peptidase (DPP) inhibitor, in children with relapsed or refractory solid tumors. The relationship between dose and effect (percent inhibition of serum DPP-4) was assessed using a maximum effect model. Maximum target inhibition was defined as greater than 90% DPP-4 inhibition in five or more of six patients 24 hours post-dose. If DLT was to occur, the trial would adapt to a traditional phase I design with a more conservative dose escalation. At the 600 microg/m(2) dose level, serum DPP-4 inhibition at 24 hours was 85%. No talabostat-related DLT occurred. The maximum effect model predicted that 1200 microg/m(2) of talabostat would maximally inhibit DPP-4. This adaptive trial design appears to be feasible, safe, and efficient and warrants further evaluation for development of molecularly targeted agents.

  12. A modified varying-stage adaptive phase II/III clinical trial design.

    PubMed

    Dong, Gaohong; Vandemeulebroecke, Marc

    2016-07-01

    Conventionally, adaptive phase II/III clinical trials are carried out with a strict two-stage design. Recently, a varying-stage adaptive phase II/III clinical trial design has been developed. In this design, following the first stage, an intermediate stage can be adaptively added to obtain more data, so that a more informative decision can be made. Therefore, the number of further investigational stages is determined based upon data accumulated to the interim analysis. This design considers two plausible study endpoints, with one of them initially designated as the primary endpoint. Based on interim results, another endpoint can be switched as the primary endpoint. However, in many therapeutic areas, the primary study endpoint is well established. Therefore, we modify this design to consider one study endpoint only so that it may be more readily applicable in real clinical trial designs. Our simulations show that, the same as the original design, this modified design controls the Type I error rate, and the design parameters such as the threshold probability for the two-stage setting and the alpha allocation ratio in the two-stage setting versus the three-stage setting have a great impact on the design characteristics. However, this modified design requires a larger sample size for the initial stage, and the probability of futility becomes much higher when the threshold probability for the two-stage setting gets smaller. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. One-stage and two-stage designs for phase II clinical trials with survival endpoints.

    PubMed

    Whitehead, John

    2014-09-28

    This work is motivated by trials in rapidly lethal cancers or cancers for which measuring shrinkage of tumours is infeasible. In either case, traditional phase II designs focussing on tumour response are unsuitable. Usually, tumour response is considered as a substitute for the more relevant but longer-term endpoint of death. In rapidly lethal cancers such as pancreatic cancer, there is no need to use a surrogate, as the definitive endpoint is (sadly) available so soon. In uveal cancer, there is no counterpart to tumour response, and so, mortality is the only realistic response available. Cytostatic cancer treatments do not seek to kill tumours, but to mitigate their effects. Trials of such therapy might also be based on survival times to death or progression, rather than on tumour shrinkage. Phase II oncology trials are often conducted with all study patients receiving the experimental therapy, and this approach is considered here. Simple extensions of one-stage and two-stage designs based on binary responses are presented. Outcomes based on survival past a small number of landmark times are considered: here, the case of three such times is explored in examples. This approach allows exact calculations to be made for both design and analysis purposes. Simulations presented here show that calculations based on normal approximations can lead to loss of power when sample sizes are small. Two-stage versions of the procedure are also suggested.

  14. A product of independent beta probabilities dose escalation design for dual-agent phase I trials.

    PubMed

    Mander, Adrian P; Sweeting, Michael J

    2015-04-15

    Dual-agent trials are now increasingly common in oncology research, and many proposed dose-escalation designs are available in the statistical literature. Despite this, the translation from statistical design to practical application is slow, as has been highlighted in single-agent phase I trials, where a 3 + 3 rule-based design is often still used. To expedite this process, new dose-escalation designs need to be not only scientifically beneficial but also easy to understand and implement by clinicians. In this paper, we propose a curve-free (nonparametric) design for a dual-agent trial in which the model parameters are the probabilities of toxicity at each of the dose combinations. We show that it is relatively trivial for a clinician's prior beliefs or historical information to be incorporated in the model and updating is fast and computationally simple through the use of conjugate Bayesian inference. Monotonicity is ensured by considering only a set of monotonic contours for the distribution of the maximum tolerated contour, which defines the dose-escalation decision process. Varied experimentation around the contour is achievable, and multiple dose combinations can be recommended to take forward to phase II. Code for R, Stata and Excel are available for implementation.

  15. Predictive factors of renal toxicities related to anti-VEGFR multikinase inhibitors in phase 1 trials.

    PubMed

    Boissier, Emilie; Mir, Olivier; Hollebecque, Antoine; Izzedine, Hassan; Ederhy, Stéphane; Gazzah, Anas; Bahleda, Rastislav; Massard, Christophe; Macquin-Mavier, Isabelle; Tournigand, Christophe; Spano, Jean-Philippe; Soria, Jean-Charles; Rousseau, Benoît

    2017-02-01

    Purpose Renal toxicities are common with angiogenesis multikinase inhibitors (AMKI), and can be limiting in phase I trials. Factors associated with such toxicities are poorly known. The aims of this exploratory study were to describe renovascular toxicities associated with AMKI, impact on drug development and to identify baseline parameters associated with the occurrence of renal toxicities in phase I trials. Methods Consecutive patients treated with AMKI in Gustave Roussy phase I unit between October 2005 and August 2013 were included. We retrospectively collected baseline characteristics and renovascular side effects. Associations were assessed in univariate and multivariate analyses. Results Overall, 168 patients were included: male 53.0 %, mean age 55.5 years old, history of hypertension 26.8 %, diabetes 6.0 %, atherosclerosis 13.6 %, stage 3 Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD, NKF-KDOQI) 17.2 %. Incidences of reno-vascular side effects were: hypertension 47.6 %, proteinuria 19.0 %, renal failure 11.9 % and thrombotic microangiopathy 10.1 %. Eighty percent of dose limiting toxicities (DLTs) were related to a renal toxicity. Multivariate analysis showed that onset of renal failure was associated with history of hypertension (p = 0.0003) and stage 3 CKD (p = 0.032). Conclusions A majority of the DLTs associated with AMKI in phase 1 trials are renal toxicities. Baseline hypertension and stage 3 CKD (NKF-KDOQI) might help to better identify patients at risk of AMKI-related renal toxicities.

  16. Proposal for a "phase II" multicenter trial model for preclinical new antiepilepsy therapy development.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Terence J; Ben-Menachem, Elinor; Bertram, Edward H; Collins, Stephen D; Kokaia, Merab; Lerche, Holger; Klitgaard, Henrik; Staley, Kevin J; Vaudano, Elisabetta; Walker, Matthew C; Simonato, Michele

    2013-08-01

    There is a pressing need to address the current major gaps in epilepsy treatment, in particular drug-resistant epilepsy, antiepileptogenic therapies, and comorbidities. A major concern in the development of new therapies is that current preclinical testing is not sufficiently predictive for clinical efficacy. Methodologic limitations of current preclinical paradigms may partly account for this discrepancy. Here we propose and discuss a strategy for implementing a "phase II" multicenter preclinical drug trial model based on clinical phase II/III studies designed to generate more rigorous preclinical data for efficacy. The goal is to improve the evidence resulting from preclinical studies for investigational new drugs that have shown strong promise in initial preclinical "phase I" studies. This should reduce the risk for expensive clinical studies in epilepsy and therefore increase the appeal for funders (industry and government) to invest in their clinical development.

  17. Precision Medicine for Molecularly Targeted Agents and Immunotherapies in Early-Phase Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Lopez, Juanita; Harris, Sam; Roda, Desam; Yap, Timothy A

    2015-01-01

    Precision medicine in oncology promises the matching of genomic, molecular, and clinical data with underlying mechanisms of a range of novel anticancer therapeutics to develop more rational and effective antitumor strategies in a timely manner. However, despite the remarkable progress made in the understanding of novel drivers of different oncogenic processes, success rates for the approval of oncology drugs remain low with substantial fiscal consequences. In this article, we focus on how recent rapid innovations in technology have brought greater clarity to the biological and clinical complexities of different cancers and advanced the development of molecularly targeted agents and immunotherapies in clinical trials. We discuss the key challenges of identifying and validating predictive biomarkers of response and resistance using both tumor and surrogate tissues, as well as the hurdles associated with intratumor heterogeneity. Finally, we outline evolving strategies employed in early-phase trial designs that incorporate omics-based technologies. PMID:26609214

  18. A phase 1 clinical trial of nerve growth factor gene therapy for Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Tuszynski, Mark H; Thal, Leon; Pay, Mary; Salmon, David P; U, Hoi Sang; Bakay, Roy; Patel, Piyush; Blesch, Armin; Vahlsing, H Lee; Ho, Gilbert; Tong, Gang; Potkin, Steven G; Fallon, James; Hansen, Lawrence; Mufson, Elliott J; Kordower, Jeffrey H; Gall, Christine; Conner, James

    2005-05-01

    Cholinergic neuron loss is a cardinal feature of Alzheimer disease. Nerve growth factor (NGF) stimulates cholinergic function, improves memory and prevents cholinergic degeneration in animal models of injury, amyloid overexpression and aging. We performed a phase 1 trial of ex vivo NGF gene delivery in eight individuals with mild Alzheimer disease, implanting autologous fibroblasts genetically modified to express human NGF into the forebrain. After mean follow-up of 22 months in six subjects, no long-term adverse effects of NGF occurred. Evaluation of the Mini-Mental Status Examination and Alzheimer Disease Assessment Scale-Cognitive subcomponent suggested improvement in the rate of cognitive decline. Serial PET scans showed significant (P < 0.05) increases in cortical 18-fluorodeoxyglucose after treatment. Brain autopsy from one subject suggested robust growth responses to NGF. Additional clinical trials of NGF for Alzheimer disease are warranted.

  19. Therapeutic Intervention in Multiple Sclerosis with Alpha B-Crystallin: A Randomized Controlled Phase IIa Trial

    PubMed Central

    van Noort, Johannes M.; Bsibsi, Malika; Nacken, Peter J.; Verbeek, Richard; Venneker, Edna H.G.

    2015-01-01

    As a molecular chaperone and activator of Toll-like receptor 2-mediated protective responses by microglia and macrophages, the small heat shock protein alpha B-crystallin (HspB5) exerts therapeutic effects in different animal models for neuroinflammation, including the model for multiple sclerosis (MS). Yet, HspB5 can also stimulate human antigen-specific memory T cells to release IFN-γ, a cytokine with well-documented detrimental effects during MS. In this study, we explored in a Phase IIa randomized clinical trial the therapeutic application of HspB5 in relapsing-remitting MS (RR-MS), using intravenous doses sufficient to support its protective effects, but too low to trigger pathogenic memory T-cell responses. These sub-immunogenic doses were selected based on in vitro analysis of the dose-response profile of human T cells and macrophages to HspB5, and on the immunological effects of HspB5 in healthy humans as established in a preparatory Phase I study. In a 48-week randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind Phase IIa trial, three bimonthly intravenous injections of 7.5, 12.5 or 17.5 mg HspB5 were found to be safe and well tolerated in RR-MS patients. While predefined clinical endpoints did not differ significantly between the relatively small groups of MS patients treated with either HspB5 or placebo, repeated administration especially of the lower doses of HspB5 led to a progressive decline in MS lesion activity as monitored by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which was not seen in the placebo group. Exploratory linear regression analysis revealed this decline to be significant in the combined group receiving either of the two lower doses, and to result in a 76% reduction in both number and total volumes of active MRI lesions at 9 months into the study. These data provide the first indication for clinical benefit resulting from intervention in RR-MS with HspB5. Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov Phase I: NCT02442557; Phase IIa: NCT02442570 PMID

  20. Phase I trial evaluating the antiviral agent Cidofovir in combination with chemoradiation in cervical cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Deutsch, Eric; Haie-Meder, Christine; Bayar, Mohamed Amine; Mondini, Michele; Laporte, Mélanie; Mazeron, Renaud; Adam, Julien; Varga, Andrea; Vassal, Gilles; Magné, Nicolas; Chargari, Cyrus; Lanoy, Emilie; Pautier, Patricia; Levy, Antonin; Soria, Jean-Charles

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This phase I trial aimed to assess the safety and determine the recommended Phase II dose (RP2D) of Cidofovir combined with chemoradiotherapy in patients with stage IB2-IVA cervical cancer. Experimental design Incremental doses (1, 2.5, 5 and 6.5 mg/kg) of IV Cidofovir were administered weekly for two weeks, and then every 2 weeks from the start of chemoradiotherapy to the initiation of utero-vaginal brachytherapy. Biological expression of HPV was analyzed during treatment and tumor response was assessed according to RECIST v1.0 criteria. Results A total of 15 patients were treated with Cidofovir. Dose-limiting toxicities occurred in 2/6 patients at the 6.5 mg/kg dose level (G3 proteinuria, and G3 acute pyelonephritis with G3 febrile neutropenia). No toxicity occurred at the 5 mg/kg dose level, but only 3 patients received this dose due to trial interruption because of low accrual. The most frequent G3-4 adverse effects observed during the trial were: abdominal pain (n=3), infection (n=2), leuckoneutropenia (n=2), and others (n=6). No toxic death or major renal side effect occurred. The best response was that 8/9 evaluable patients achieved a complete response (89%). In the intention to treat population, the 2-year overall and progression-free survival rates were 93% and 76%, respectively. Biological monitoring of HPV-related markers (decreased p16 expression, and increased p53 and pRb levels) was possible on sequential tumor biopsy samples. The genomic alterations identified were PIK3CA (n=5; one also had a KRAS mutation), and HRAS (n=1) mutations. Conclusion Cidofovir at a dose of 5mg/kg combined with chemoradiotherapy appeared tolerable and yielded tumor regressions. Due to early trial interruption, the RP2D was not confirmed. PMID:27016411

  1. Muscle cramping in phase I clinical trials of tirapazamine (SR 4233) with and without radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Doherty, N.; Coleman, C.N.; Shulman, L. ); Hancock, S.L.; Marquez, C.; Mariscal, C. ); Kaye, S.; Rampling, R. ); Senan, S.; Roemeling, R.V. )

    1994-05-15

    Tirapazamine (SR 4233) is a benzotriazine di-N-oxide which acts as a hypoxic cytotoxic agent and as a radiation enhancer when given shortly before or after radiation. Three Phase I clinical trials were designed to determine the maximum tolerated dose, toxicities, pharmacokinetics, and effects on irradiated tumors and normal tissues. Tirapazamine 9 mg/m[sup 2] to 21 mg/m[sup 2] was given IV 1/2 to 1 h prior to radiation on a multiple dose schedule of 10 consecutive doses. This was later revised to a three times-per-week schedule for 12 doses. In a second clinical trial, tirapazamine was given in a single dose of 18 mg/m[sup 2] to 293 mg/m[sup 2] IV after irradiation. In a third trial, tirapazamine was administered without irradiation in single doses of 36 mg/m[sup 2] to 250 mg/m[sup 2], with an option for retreatment. Subjects reported muscle cramping of varying degrees of severity on all three dose schedules. One patient experienced Grade 3 cramping and treatment was discontinued. The most frequent site of cramping were the lower extremities. Creatine phosphokinase (CPK) values were elevated in three patients with associated muscle soreness in one patient. MB (cardiac) isoenzymes were elevated in one patient with no evidence of cardiac muscle damage, and returned to baseline at drug completion. No consistent abnormalities in clinical laboratory values were found. Stretching of the muscle was most effective in relieving the cramping. Muscle cramping has been the most frequently reported toxicity in Phase I studies of tirapazamine, though it does not appear to be dose limiting. Dose escalation on the three clinical trials continues. In vitro studies to investigate the cramping are ongoing. 8 refs., 2 tabs.

  2. Two Phase 3 Trials of Dupilumab versus Placebo in Atopic Dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Eric L; Bieber, Thomas; Guttman-Yassky, Emma; Beck, Lisa A; Blauvelt, Andrew; Cork, Michael J; Silverberg, Jonathan I; Deleuran, Mette; Kataoka, Yoko; Lacour, Jean-Philippe; Kingo, Külli; Worm, Margitta; Poulin, Yves; Wollenberg, Andreas; Soo, Yuhwen; Graham, Neil M H; Pirozzi, Gianluca; Akinlade, Bolanle; Staudinger, Heribert; Mastey, Vera; Eckert, Laurent; Gadkari, Abhijit; Stahl, Neil; Yancopoulos, George D; Ardeleanu, Marius

    2016-12-15

    Background Dupilumab, a human monoclonal antibody against interleukin-4 receptor alpha, inhibits signaling of interleukin-4 and interleukin-13, type 2 cytokines that may be important drivers of atopic or allergic diseases such as atopic dermatitis. Methods In two randomized, placebo-controlled, phase 3 trials of identical design (SOLO 1 and SOLO 2), we enrolled adults with moderate-to-severe atopic dermatitis whose disease was inadequately controlled by topical treatment. Patients were randomly assigned in a 1:1:1 ratio to receive, for 16 weeks, subcutaneous dupilumab (300 mg) or placebo weekly or the same dose of dupilumab every other week alternating with placebo. The primary outcome was the proportion of patients who had both a score of 0 or 1 (clear or almost clear) on the Investigator's Global Assessment and a reduction of 2 points or more in that score from baseline at week 16. Results We enrolled 671 patients in SOLO 1 and 708 in SOLO 2. In SOLO 1, the primary outcome occurred in 85 patients (38%) who received dupilumab every other week and in 83 (37%) who received dupilumab weekly, as compared with 23 (10%) who received placebo (P<0.001 for both comparisons with placebo). The results were similar in SOLO 2, with the primary outcome occurring in 84 patients (36%) who received dupilumab every other week and in 87 (36%) who received dupilumab weekly, as compared with 20 (8%) who received placebo (P<0.001 for both comparisons). In addition, in the two trials, an improvement from baseline to week 16 of at least 75% on the Eczema Area and Severity Index was reported in significantly more patients who received each regimen of dupilumab than in patients who received placebo (P<0.001 for all comparisons). Dupilumab was also associated with improvement in other clinical end points, including reduction in pruritus and symptoms of anxiety or depression and improvement in quality of life. Injection-site reactions and conjunctivitis were more frequent in the dupilumab

  3. First update of the International Xenotransplantation Association consensus statement on conditions for undertaking clinical trials of porcine islet products in type 1 diabetes--Chapter 2b: genetically modified source pigs.

    PubMed

    Cowan, Peter J; Ayares, David; Wolf, Eckhard; Cooper, David K C

    2016-01-01

    Genetic modification of the source pig offers the opportunity to improve the engraftment and survival of islet xenografts. The type of modification can be tailored to the transplant setting; for example, intraportal islet xenografts have been shown to benefit from the expression of anticoagulant and anti-inflammatory transgenes, whereas cytoprotective transgenes are probably more relevant for encapsulated islets. The rapid development of pig genetic engineering, particularly with the introduction of genome editing techniques such as CRISPR-Cas, has accelerated the generation of new pig lines with multiple modifications. With pre-clinical testing in progress, it is an opportune time to consider any implications of genetic modification for the conditions for undertaking clinical trials. Obviously, the stringent requirements to fulfill designated pathogen-free status that are applied to wild-type pigs will apply equally to genetically modified (GM) source pigs. In addition, it is important from a safety perspective that the genetic modifications are characterized at the molecular level (e.g., integration site, absence of off-target mutations), the phenotypic level (e.g., durability and stability of transgene expression), and the functional level (e.g., protection of islets in vitro or in vivo, absence of detrimental effects on insulin secretion). The assessment of clinical trial protocols using GM pig islets will need to be performed on a case-by-case basis, taking into account a range of factors including the particular genetic modification(s) and the site and method of delivery.

  4. Phase 0 Clinical Chemoprevention Trial of the AKT Inhibitor SR13668

    PubMed Central

    Reid, Joel M.; Walden, Chad; Qin, Rui; Allen Ziegler, Katie L.; Haslam, John L.; Rajewski, Roger A.; Warndahl, Roger; Fitting, Cindy L.; Boring, Daniel; Szabo, Eva; Crowell, James; Perloff, Marjorie; Jong, Ling; Mandrekar, Sumithra J.; Ames, Matthew M.; Limburg, Paul J.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose SR13668, an orally active AKT pathway inhibitor, has demonstrated cancer chemopreventive potential in preclinical studies. To accelerate the clinical development of this promising agent, we designed and conducted the first-ever phase 0 chemoprevention trial to evaluate and compare the effects of food and formulation on SR13668 bioavailability. Patients and Methods Healthy adult volunteers were randomly assigned to receive a single, 38 mg oral dose of SR13668 in one of five different formulations, with or without food. Based on existing animal data, SR13668 in a PEG400/Labrasol® oral solution was defined as the reference formulation. Blood samples were obtained pre- and post-agent administration for pharmacokinetic analyses. Area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC0-∞) was defined as the primary endpoint. Data were analyzed and compared using established statistical methods for phase 0 trials with a limited sample size. Results Participants (N=20) were rapidly accrued over a 5-month period. Complete pharmacokinetic data were available for 18 randomized participants. AUC0-∞ values were highest in the fed state (range = 122–439 ng/mL × hours) and were statistically significantly different across formulations (p = 0.007), with Solutol® HS15 providing the highest bioavailability. SR13668 time to peak plasma concentration (3 hours; range, 2 – 6 hours) and half-life were (11.2 ± 3.1 hours) were not formulation dependent. Conclusions Using a novel, highly efficient study design, we rapidly identified a lead formulation of SR13668 for further clinical testing. Our findings support application of the phase 0 trial paradigm to accelerate chemoprevention agent development. PMID:21372034

  5. A varying-stage adaptive phase II/III clinical trial design.

    PubMed

    Dong, Gaohong

    2014-04-15

    Currently, adaptive phase II/III clinical trials are typically carried out with a strict two-stage design. The first stage is a learning stage called phase II, and the second stage is a confirmatory stage called phase III. Following phase II analysis, inefficacious or harmful dose arms are dropped, then one or two promising dose arms are selected for the second stage. However, there are often situations in which researchers are in dilemma to make 'go or no-go' decision and/or to select 'best' dose arm(s), as data from the first stage may not provide sufficient information for their decision making. In this case, it is challenging to follow a strict two-stage plan. Therefore, we propose a varying-stage adaptive phase II/III clinical trial design, in which we consider whether there is a need to have an intermediate stage to obtain more data, so that a more informative decision could be made. Hence, the number of further investigational stages in our design is determined on the basis of data accumulated to the interim analysis. With respect to adaptations, we consider dropping dose arm(s), switching another plausible endpoint as the primary study endpoint, re-estimating sample size, and early stopping for futility. We use an adaptive combination test to perform final analyses. By applying closed testing procedure, we control family-wise type I error rate at the nominal level of α in the strong sense. We delineate other essential design considerations including the threshold parameters and the proportion of alpha allocated in the two-stage versus three-stage setting.

  6. An evaluation of a Simon 2-Stage phase II clinical trial design incorporating toxicity monitoring.

    PubMed

    Ray, H E; Rai, S N

    2011-05-01

    Phase II clinical trials are usually designed to measure efficacy but patient safety is also a very important aspect. Previous authors suggested a methodology that allows one to monitor the cumulative number of toxic events after each patient is treated, which is also known as continuous toxicity monitoring. In this work we describe how to combine the continuous toxicity monitoring methodology with the Simon 2-Stage design for response. Then we investigate through simulation the combined procedure's type I and type II error rates under various combinations of design parameters. We include the underlying relationship between toxicity and response in our examination of the error rates.

  7. Nine-year change in statistical design, profile, and success rates of Phase II oncology trials.

    PubMed

    Ivanova, Anastasia; Paul, Barry; Marchenko, Olga; Song, Guochen; Patel, Neerali; Moschos, Stergios J

    2016-01-01

    We investigated nine-year trends in statistical design and other features of Phase II oncology clinical trials published in 2005, 2010, and 2014 in five leading oncology journals: Cancer, Clinical Cancer Research, Journal of Clinical Oncology, Annals of Oncology, and Lancet Oncology. The features analyzed included cancer type, multicenter vs. single-institution, statistical design, primary endpoint, number of treatment arms, number of patients per treatment arm, whether or not statistical methods were well described, whether the drug was found effective based on rigorous statistical testing of the null hypothesis, and whether the drug was recommended for future studies.

  8. Phase II trial of 4'-epi-doxorubicin in locally advanced or metastatic gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Cazap, E; Estevez, R; Bruno, M; Levy, D; Algamiz, C; Chacon, R; Badano, C; Romero, A; Desimone, G; Roca, E

    1988-06-30

    Patients with locally advanced or metastatic gastric adenocarcinoma received an i.v. bolus of 4'-epi-doxorubicin, 75/mg/m2/cycle, every 21 days. Partial responses were observed in 5 of 23 evaluable patients (21.7%). Treatment was generally well tolerated and toxicity was mild. The response rate to epirubicin appears to be very similar to that reported for doxorubicin. Larger doses of epirubicin could be safely used in future studies, and further evaluation of epirubicin in phase III trials is indicated.

  9. Use of placebos in Phase 1 preventive HIV vaccine clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yunda; Karuna, Shelly T; Janes, Holly; Frahm, Nicole; Nason, Martha; Edlefsen, Paul T; Kublin, James G; Corey, Lawrence; McElrath, M Juliana; Gilbert, Peter B

    2015-02-04

    Phase 1 preventive HIV vaccine trials are often designed as randomized, double-blind studies with the inclusion of placebo recipients. Careful consideration is needed to determine when the inclusion of placebo recipients is highly advantageous and when it is optional for achieving the study objectives of assessing vaccine safety, tolerability and immunogenicity. The inclusion of placebo recipients is generally important to form a reference group that ensures fair evaluation and interpretation of subjective study endpoints, or endpoints whose levels may change due to exposures besides vaccination. In some settings, however, placebo recipients are less important because other data sources and tools are available to achieve the study objectives.

  10. Web-based data management for a phase II clinical trial in ALS.

    PubMed

    Buchsbaum, Richard; Kaufmann, Petra; Barsdorf, Alexandra I; Arbing, Rachel; Montes, Jacqueline; Thompson, John L P

    2009-01-01

    The objective was to report on the creation, features and performance of a web-based data management system for a two-stage phase II randomized clinical trial of Co-Enzyme Q10 in ALS. We created a relatively comprehensive web-based data system that provided electronic data entry; patient management utilities; adverse event reporting, safety monitoring, and invoice generation; and standardized coding for medications and adverse events. In stage 1, clinical sites submitted 7207 forms reporting on 105 patients followed for 10 months. Less than 0.7% of submitted forms contained errors. At the time of the delivery of the analysis data set, only four errors remained unresolved. Data were available quickly, with a median time from event to data posting of two days. The data set was locked and the analysis data set produced nine days after the final patient visit. A survey of trial personnel yielded generally positive feedback, with 75% of respondents wishing to use a similar system in the future. Given sufficient resources, a comprehensive web-based data management system can meet the need for clean, available data in clinical trials in ALS and similar diseases, and can contribute significantly to their efficient execution.

  11. Culture and Use of Mesenchymal Stromal Cells in Phase I and II Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Philippe, Bourin; Luc, Sensebé; Valérie, Planat-Bénard; Jérôme, Roncalli; Alessandra, Bura-Rivière; Louis, Casteilla

    2010-01-01

    Present in numerous tissues, mesenchymal stem cells/multipotent stromal cells (MSCs) can differentiate into different cell types from a mesoderm origin. Their potential has been extended to pluripotency, by their possibility of differentiating into tissues and cells of nonmesodermic origin. Through the release of cytokines, growth factors and biologically active molecules, MSCs exert important paracrine effects during tissue repair and inflammation. Moreover, MSCs have immunosuppressive properties related to non-HLA restricted immunosuppressive capacities. All these features lead to an increasing range of possible applications of MSCs, from treating immunological diseases to tissue and organ repair, that should be tested in phase I and II clinical trials. The most widely used MSCs are cultured from bone marrow or adipose tissue. For clinical trial implementation, BM MSCs and ADSCs should be produced according to Good Manufacturing Practices. Safety remains the major concern and must be ensured during culture and validated with relevant controls. We describe some applications of MSCs in clinical trials. PMID:21052537

  12. [The use of placebos in phase III clinical trials in Brazil].

    PubMed

    Rubenich, Gustavo Butzge; Heck, Stephanie Tomasi; Hellmann, Fernando; Schlemper Junior, Bruno Rodolfo

    2015-03-01

    In 2008, Brazil's Federal Council of Medicine [Conselho Federal de Medicina] (CFM)--regulatory and supervisory agency on the ethical practice of medicine--banned the participation of Brazilian doctors in studies using placebos for diseases with efficient and effective treatment. This position differs with the Helsinki Declaration, which allows the use of placebos in methodologically justified conditions. To ascertain whether the CMF's ethical regulation modified the use of placebos in phase III clinical trials in Brazil, characteristics of the records in ClinicalTrials.gov were researched in the periods from 2003 to 2007 and from 2009 to 2013. The conclusions reached were: a) the regulations issued by the CFM in 2008 were ineffective and the position adopted by the Helsinki Declaration prevails; b) there was significant sponsorship by the multinational pharmaceutical industry of trials with placebos; c) the research was predominantly on new drugs for chronic diseases, with little study done of the neglected diseases which are of great importance to Brazil.

  13. Detection of Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator Activity in Early-Phase Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Rowe, Steven M.; Accurso, Frank; Clancy, John P.

    2007-01-01

    Advances in our understanding of cystic fibrosis pathogenesis have led to strategies directed toward treatment of underlying causes of the disease rather than treatments of disease-related symptoms. To expedite evaluation of these emerging therapies, early-phase clinical trials require extension of in vivo cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR)–detecting assays to multicenter trial formats, including nasal potential difference and sweat chloride measurements. Both of these techniques can be used to fulfill diagnostic criteria for the disease, and can discriminate various levels of CFTR function. Full realization of these assays in multicenter clinical trials requires identification of sources of nonbiological intra- and intersite variability, and careful attention to study design and statistical analysis of study-generated data. In this review, we discuss several issues important to the performance of these assays, including efforts to identify and address aspects that can contribute to inconsistent and/or potentially erroneous results. Adjunctive means of detecting CFTR including mRNA expression, immunocytochemical localization, and other methods are also discussed. Recommendations are presented to advance our understanding of these biomarkers and to improve their capacity to predict cystic fibrosis outcomes. PMID:17652506

  14. Methadone induction in primary care (ANRS-Methaville): a phase III randomized intervention trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In France, the rapid scale-up of buprenorphine, an opioid maintenance treatment (OMT), in primary care for drug users has led to an impressive reduction in HIV prevalence among injecting drug users (IDU) but has had no major effect on Hepatitis C incidence. To date, patients willing to start methadone can only do so in a methadone clinic (a medical centre for drug and alcohol dependence (CSAPA) or a hospital setting) and are referred to primary care physicians after dose stabilization. This study aims to assess the effectiveness of methadone in patients who initiated treatment in primary care compared with those who initiated it in a CSAPA, by measuring abstinence from street opioid use after one year of treatment. Methods/Design The ANRS-Methaville study is a randomized multicenter non-inferiority control trial comparing methadone induction (lasting approximately 2 weeks) in primary care and in CSAPA. The model of care chosen for methadone induction in primary care was based on study-specific pre-training of all physicians, exclusion criteria and daily supervision of methadone during the initiation phase. Between January 2009 and January 2011, 10 sites each having one CSAPA and several primary care physicians, were identified to recruit patients to be randomized into two groups, one starting methadone in primary care (n = 147), the other in CSAPA (n = 48). The primary outcome of the study is the proportion of participants abstinent from street opioids after 1 year of treatment i.e. non-inferiority of primary care model in terms of the proportion of patients not using street opioids compared with the proportion observed in those starting methadone in a CSAPA. Discussion The ANRS-Methaville study is the first in France to use an interventional trial to improve access to OMT for drug users. Once the non-inferiority results become available, the Ministry of Health and agency for the safety of health products may change the the New Drug Application

  15. Progressive Staging of Pilot Studies to Improve Phase III Trials for Motor Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Dobkin, Bruce H.

    2014-01-01

    Based on the suboptimal research pathways that finally led to multicenter randomized clinical trials (MRCTs) of treadmill training with partial body weight support and of robotic assistive devices, strategically planned successive stages are proposed for pilot studies of novel rehabilitation interventions Stage 1, consideration-of-concept studies, drawn from animal experiments, theories, and observations, delineate the experimental intervention in a small convenience sample of participants, so the results must be interpreted with caution. Stage 2, development-of-concept pilots, should optimize the components of the intervention, settle on most appropriate outcome measures, and examine dose-response effects. A well-designed study that reveals no efficacy should be published to counterweight the confirmation bias of positive trials. Stage 3, demonstration-of-concept pilots, can build out from what has been learned to test at least 15 participants in each arm, using random assignment and blinded outcome measures. A control group should receive an active practice intervention aimed at the same primary outcome. A third arm could receive a substantially larger dose of the experimental therapy or a combinational intervention. If only 1 site performed this trial, a different investigative group should aim to reproduce positive outcomes based on the optimal dose of motor training. Stage 3 studies ought to suggest an effect size of 0.4 or higher, so that approximately 50 participants in each arm will be the number required to test for efficacy in a stage 4, proof-of-concept MRCT. By developing a consensus around acceptable and necessary practices for each stage, similar to CONSORT recommendations for the publication of phase III clinical trials, better quality pilot studies may move quickly into better designed and more successful MRCTs of experimental interventions. PMID:19240197

  16. A phase I trial of chlorambucil administered in short pulses in patients with advanced malignancies.

    PubMed

    Blumenreich, M S; Woodcock, T M; Sherrill, E J; Richman, S P; Gentile, P S; Epremian, B E; Kubota, T T; Allegra, J C

    1988-01-01

    We carried out a phase I trial with chlorambucil. Thirty patients with advanced cancer were entered in six dose levels: 36, 48, 60, 84, 108, and 144 mg/m2. The drug was given in six divided oral doses every 6 hours and the regimen was repeated every 3 weeks. The median age was 62 years (31-84), median Karnofsky performance status (KPS) 60 (40-90). All patients but one had received prior radiation therapy, chemotherapy, or both. Central nervous system toxicity was dose limiting, occurring in 5 of 6 patients at 144 mg/m2. It was characterized by transient seizures, hallucinations, lethargy, stupor, and coma. Metoclopramide was successful in controlling nausea and vomiting, which was severe if the antiemetic was not used. Leukopenia (3 patients) and thrombocytopenia (2 patients) were mild. One patient with colorectal carcinoma had a minor response, and two patients with non-small cell lung cancer had stable disease. A safe dose for phase II trials is 108 mg/m2 in six 6-hourly oral doses.

  17. Optimal adaptive two-stage designs for early phase II clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Shan, Guogen; Wilding, Gregory E; Hutson, Alan D; Gerstenberger, Shawn

    2016-04-15

    Simon's optimal two-stage design has been widely used in early phase clinical trials for Oncology and AIDS studies with binary endpoints. With this approach, the second-stage sample size is fixed when the trial passes the first stage with sufficient activity. Adaptive designs, such as those due to Banerjee and Tsiatis (2006) and Englert and Kieser (2013), are flexible in the sense that the second-stage sample size depends on the response from the first stage, and these designs are often seen to reduce the expected sample size under the null hypothesis as compared with Simon's approach. An unappealing trait of the existing designs is that they are not associated with a second-stage sample size, which is a non-increasing function of the first-stage response rate. In this paper, an efficient intelligent process, the branch-and-bound algorithm, is used in extensively searching for the optimal adaptive design with the smallest expected sample size under the null, while the type I and II error rates are maintained and the aforementioned monotonicity characteristic is respected. The proposed optimal design is observed to have smaller expected sample sizes compared to Simon's optimal design, and the maximum total sample size of the proposed adaptive design is very close to that from Simon's method. The proposed optimal adaptive two-stage design is recommended for use in practice to improve the flexibility and efficiency of early phase therapeutic development.

  18. Bayesian Optimal Interval Design: A Simple and Well-Performing Design for Phase I Oncology Trials.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Ying; Hess, Kenneth R; Hilsenbeck, Susan G; Gilbert, Mark R

    2016-09-01

    Despite more than two decades of publications that offer more innovative model-based designs, the classical 3 + 3 design remains the most dominant phase I trial design in practice. In this article, we introduce a new trial design, the Bayesian optimal interval (BOIN) design. The BOIN design is easy to implement in a way similar to the 3 + 3 design, but is more flexible for choosing the target toxicity rate and cohort size and yields a substantially better performance that is comparable with that of more complex model-based designs. The BOIN design contains the 3 + 3 design and the accelerated titration design as special cases, thus linking it to established phase I approaches. A numerical study shows that the BOIN design generally outperforms the 3 + 3 design and the modified toxicity probability interval (mTPI) design. The BOIN design is more likely than the 3 + 3 design to correctly select the MTD and allocate more patients to the MTD. Compared with the mTPI design, the BOIN design has a substantially lower risk of overdosing patients and generally a higher probability of correctly selecting the MTD. User-friendly software is freely available to facilitate the application of the BOIN design. Clin Cancer Res; 22(17); 4291-301. ©2016 AACR.

  19. Efficacy and safety of liposomal anthracyclines in phase I/II clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Alberts, David S; Muggia, Franco M; Carmichael, James; Winer, Eric P; Jahanzeb, Mohammad; Venook, Alan P; Skubitz, Keith M; Rivera, Edgardo; Sparano, Joseph A; DiBella, Nicholas J; Stewart, Simon J; Kavanagh, John J; Gabizon, Alberto A

    2004-12-01

    Preclinical studies have established the pharmacologic advantages of liposomal anthracyclines, including pharmacokinetic profiles after bolus dosing that resemble continuous infusion of conventional anthracyclines, increased drug concentrations in tumor cells compared with the surrounding tissues, and reduced toxicity relative to conventional anthracycline treatment. Based on these studies, many phase I and phase II clinical trials were conducted to assess the safety and potential activity of liposomal anthracyclines in the management of both solid and hematologic tumors. These studies provided valuable insight into the safety of pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (Doxil/Caelyx [PLD]), nonpegylated liposomal doxorubicin (Myocet [NPLD]), and liposomal daunorubicin (DaunoXome [DNX]) over a range of doses, either as single-agent therapy or in combination with other cytotoxic agents. Other liposomal anthracyclines in development may be well tolerated but their activity remains to be elucidated by clinical trials. The available data also suggest that liposomal anthracyclines have activity not only against tumor types with known sensitivity to conventional anthracyclines, but also potentially for tumors that are typically anthracycline-resistant. Despite the availability of clinical data from a wide variety of tumor types and patient populations, further studies of liposomal anthracycline therapy are needed to fully establish their safety, efficacy, and dosing in the treatment of these patients.

  20. Effect of Carbon Ion Radiotherapy for Sacral Chordoma: Results of Phase I-II and Phase II Clinical Trials

    SciTech Connect

    Imai, Reiko; Kamada, Tadashi; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Sugawara, Shinji; Serizawa, Itsuko; Tsujii, Hirohiko; Tatezaki, Shin-ichiro

    2010-08-01

    Purpose: To summarize the results of treatment for sacral chordoma in Phase I-II and Phase II carbon ion radiotherapy trials for bone and soft-tissue sarcomas. Patients and Methods: We performed a retrospective analysis of 38 patients with medically unresectable sacral chordomas treated with the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba, Japan between 1996 and 2003. Of the 38 patients, 30 had not received previous treatment and 8 had locally recurrent tumor after previous resection. The applied carbon ion dose was 52.8-73.6 Gray equivalents (median, 70.4) in a total of 16 fixed fractions within 4 weeks. Results: The median patient age was 66 years. The cranial tumor extension was S2 or greater in 31 patients. The median clinical target volume was 523 cm{sup 3}. The median follow-up period was 80 months. The 5-year overall survival rate was 86%, and the 5-year local control rate was 89%. After treatment, 27 of 30 patients with primary tumor remained ambulatory with or without supportive devices. Two patients experienced severe skin or soft-tissue complications requiring skin grafts. Conclusion: Carbon ion radiotherapy appears effective and safe in the treatment of patients with sacral chordoma and offers a promising alternative to surgery.

  1. Design of phase I combination trials: recommendations of the Clinical Trial Design Task Force of the NCI Investigational Drug Steering Committee.

    PubMed

    Paller, Channing J; Bradbury, Penelope A; Ivy, S Percy; Seymour, Lesley; LoRusso, Patricia M; Baker, Laurence; Rubinstein, Larry; Huang, Erich; Collyar, Deborah; Groshen, Susan; Reeves, Steven; Ellis, Lee M; Sargent, Daniel J; Rosner, Gary L; LeBlanc, Michael L; Ratain, Mark J

    2014-08-15

    Anticancer drugs are combined in an effort to treat a heterogeneous tumor or to maximize the pharmacodynamic effect. The development of combination regimens, while desirable, poses unique challenges. These include the selection of agents for combination therapy that may lead to improved efficacy while maintaining acceptable toxicity, the design of clinical trials that provide informative results for individual agents and combinations, and logistic and regulatory challenges. The phase I trial is often the initial step in the clinical evaluation of a combination regimen. In view of the importance of combination regimens and the challenges associated with developing them, the Clinical Trial Design (CTD) Task Force of the National Cancer Institute Investigational Drug Steering Committee developed a set of recommendations for the phase I development of a combination regimen. The first two recommendations focus on the scientific rationale and development plans for the combination regimen; subsequent recommendations encompass clinical design aspects. The CTD Task Force recommends that selection of the proposed regimens be based on a biologic or pharmacologic rationale supported by clinical and/or robust and validated preclinical evidence, and accompanied by a plan for subsequent development of the combination. The design of the phase I clinical trial should take into consideration the potential pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic interactions as well as overlapping toxicity. Depending on the specific hypothesized interaction, the primary endpoint may be dose optimization, pharmacokinetics, and/or pharmacodynamics (i.e., biomarker).

  2. Photosensitizer Radachlorin®: Skin cancer PDT phase II clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Kochneva, Elena V; Filonenko, Elena V; Vakulovskaya, Elena G; Scherbakova, Elena G; Seliverstov, Oleg V; Markichev, Nikolay A; Reshetnickov, Andrei V

    2010-12-01

    "Radachlorin"(®), also known in the EU as Bremachlorin, a composition of 3 chlorophyll a derivatives in an aqueous solution, was introduced into the Russian Pharmacopoeia. Its GMP (Good Manufacturing Practice) facility based manufacturing method was patented. Laboratory experiments and clinical phase I were performed. Protocols were designed for PDT of basal cell carcinoma of the skin to result in GCP (Good Clinical Practice)-conformed randomized phase II clinical studies. "Radachlorin"(®) solution for intravenous infusions 0.35% 10mL in the doses of 0.5-0.6 and 1.0-1.2mg/kg and a gel for topical application 0.1% 25g in the dose of 0.1g/cm(2) were photoactivated by 2.5W 662nm semiconductor laser "LAKHTA-MILON(®)" (St. Petersburg, Russia) in light doses of 200, 300 (solution), 400, 600, 800 (gel) J/cm(2). Safety study showed no side effects and a good tolerability of "Radachlorin"(®) by patients. There was no normal skin/subdermal tissue damage after both laser and sun light exposure. The main part (98%) of the drug was excreted or metabolized in the first 48h. Drug administration at a dose of 1.0-1.2mg/kg and irradiation at 3h with 662±3nm light at a dose of 300J/cm(2) (solution) and 4 PDT sessions at an interval of 1 week with 3h gel exposure, followed by 400J/cm(2) light exposure (gel) were found to be the optimal treatment regimes. Having successfully passed clinical trials, "Radachlorin"(®) achieved marketing authorization in Russia in 2009 and a conditional approval in South Korea in 2008. It is a candidate for phase III clinical trials in the EC and may be commercialized as a prospective second-generation photosensitizer.

  3. Tritherapy (Spinalon)-Elicited Spinal Locomotor Network Activation: Phase I-IIa Clinical Trial in Spinal Cord-Injured Patients

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    PROTOCOL SPIN-01 Tri- therapy (SPINALON)-elicited spinal locomotor network activation: Phase I-Ila clinicaltrials in spinalcord-injured patients Clinical...STUDY) described in the Protocol SPIN-01 (PROTOCOL) being entitled: "Tri- therapy (SPINALON)-elicited spinal locomotor network activation: Phase I...Report SC100155 SPIN-01 Tri- therapy (SPINALON)-elicited spinal locomotor network activation: Phase I-IIa clinical trials in spinal cord-injured

  4. Empagliflozin for Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: An Overview of Phase 3 Clinical Trials.

    PubMed

    Levine, Matthew J

    2016-06-13

    Sodium glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors have a unique mechanism of action leading to excretion of glucose in the urine and subsequent lowering of plasma glucose. This mechanism is independent of β-cell function; thus, these agents are effective treatment for type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) at theoretically any disease stage. This class should not confer an additional risk of hypoglycemia (unless combined with insulin or an insulin secretagogue) and has the potential to be combined with other classes of glucose-lowering agents. Empagliflozin is one of three currently approved SGLT2 inhibitors in the United States, and has shown a favorable benefit-risk ratio in phase 3 clinical trials as monotherapy and as add-on to other glucose-lowering therapy in broad patient populations. In addition to its glucose-lowering effects, empagliflozin has been shown to reduce body weight and blood pressure without a compensatory increase in heart rate. Moreover, on top of standard of care, empagliflozin is the first glucose-lowering agent to demonstrate cardiovascular risk reduction in patients at high risk of cardiovascular disease in a prospective outcomes trial: a 14% reduction in risk of the 3-point composite endpoint of death from cardiovascular causes, nonfatal myocardial infarction, or nonfatal stroke. Like other SGLT2 inhibitors, empagliflozin is associated with a higher rate of genital mycotic infections than placebo and has the potential for volume depletion-associated events. This review summarizes the empagliflozin phase 3 clinical trials program and its potential significance in the treatment of patients with T2DM. Evidence from these clinical trials show reductions in glycated hemoglobin (-0.59 to -0.82%) with a low risk of hypoglycemia except when used with insulin or insulin secretagogues, and moderate reductions in body weight (-2.1 to -2.5 kg) and systolic blood pressure (-2.9 to -5.2 mm Hg), thus supporting the use of empagliflozin as monotherapy or in

  5. Clinical and Biomarker Outcomes of the Phase II Vandetanib Study from the BATTLE Trial

    PubMed Central

    Tsao, Anne S.; Liu, Suyu; Lee, J. Jack; Alden, Christine M.; Blumenschein, George R.; Herbst, Roy; Davis, Suzanne E.; Kim, Edward; Lippman, Scott; Heymach, John; Tran, Hai; Tang, XiMing; Wistuba, Ignacio; Hong, Waun Ki

    2016-01-01

    Background The Biomarker-integrated Approaches of Targeted Therapy for Lung Cancer Elimination trial1 prospectively obtained serum and tumor core biopsies and randomized 255 chemorefractory non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients into four phase II trials: erlotinib, erlotinib-bexarotene, vandetanib, or sorafenib. Herein, we report the clinical and biomarker results of the phase II vandetanib trial. Results Fifty-four patients received vandetanib. The 8-week disease control rate was 33%, median progression-free survival (PFS) 1.81 months, and median overall survival (OS) 6.5 months. No demographic subgroups had PFS or OS benefit. Eight patients with EGFR mutations had a trend for higher 8-week disease control rate (63% versus 31%; p = 0.12) but worse OS (5.9 months versus 9 months; p = 0.8). Patients with EGFR gene amplification (n = 6) had a worse OS (3.9 months versus 9.5 months; p = 0.04). KRAS mutation patients (3.9 months versus 9.5 months; p = 0.23) also had a worse OS. For the serum biomarker analysis, patients with below the median serum expression of interleukin 9c (p = 0.019) and eotaxin (p = 0.007) had a shorter PFS. A trend toward a shorter PFS was also seen in patients with higher than the median neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (p = 0.079) and lower than the median TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (p = 0.087). Conclusion Our trial results are largely consistent with the literature in unselected pretreated NSCLC patients. Although vandetanib improved median PFS in EGFR mutation patients with epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor–resistance compared with EGFR wild-type, there was no OS advantage. Although vandetanib is no longer in development in NSCLC, identification of a molecular phenotype that responds to dual epidermal growth factor receptor and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor inhibition would contribute to the field. PMID:23584298

  6. Non-Publication Is Common among Phase 1, Single-Center, Not Prospectively Registered, or Early Terminated Clinical Drug Trials

    PubMed Central

    Souverein, Patrick C.; Brekelmans, Cecile T. M.; Janssen, Susan W. J.; Koëter, Gerard H.; Leufkens, Hubert G. M.; Bouter, Lex M.

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the occurrence and determinants of non-publication of clinical drug trials in the Netherlands.All clinical drug trials reviewed by the 28 Institutional Review Boards (IRBs) in the Netherlands in 2007 were followed-up from approval to publication. Candidate determinants were the sponsor, phase, applicant, centers, therapeutic effect expected, type of trial, approval status of the drug(s), drug type, participant category, oncology or other disease area, prospective registration, and early termination. The main outcome was publication as peer reviewed article. The percentage of trials that were published, crude and adjusted odds ratio (OR), and 95% confidence interval (CI) were used to quantify the associations between determinants and publication. In 2007, 622 clinical drug trials were reviewed by IRBs in the Netherlands. By the end of follow-up, 19 of these were rejected by the IRB, another 19 never started inclusion, and 10 were still running. Of the 574 trials remaining in the analysis, 334 (58%) were published as peer-reviewed article. The multivariable logistic regression model identified the following determinants with a robust, statistically significant association with publication: phase 2 (60% published; adjusted OR 2.6, 95% CI 1.1–5.9), phase 3 (73% published; adjusted OR 4.1, 95% CI 1.7–10.0), and trials not belonging to phase 1–4 (60% published; adjusted OR 3.2, 95% CI 1.5 to 6.5) compared to phase 1 trials (35% published); trials with a company or investigator as applicant (63% published) compared to trials with a Contract Research Organization (CRO) as applicant (50% published; adjusted OR 1.7; 95% CI 1.1–2.8); and multicenter trials also conducted in other EU countries (68% published; adjusted OR 2.2, 95% CI 1.1–4.4) or also outside the European Union (72% published; adjusted OR 2.0, 95% CI 1.0–4.0) compared to single-center trials (45% published). Trials that were not prospectively registered

  7. Historical controls for metastatic pancreatic cancer: benchmarks for planning and analyzing single-arm phase II trials.

    PubMed

    Philip, Philip A; Chansky, Kari; LeBlanc, Michael; Rubinstein, Lawrence; Seymour, Lesley; Ivy, S Percy; Alberts, Steven R; Catalano, Paul J; Crowley, John

    2014-08-15

    We compiled and analyzed a database of cooperative group trials in advanced pancreatic cancer to develop historical benchmarks for overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS). Such benchmarks are essential for evaluating new therapies in a single-arm setting. The analysis included patients with untreated metastatic pancreatic cancer receiving regimens that included gemcitabine, between 1995 and 2005. Prognostic baseline factors were selected by their significance in Cox regression analysis. Outlier trial arms were identified by comparing individual 6-month OS and PFS rates against the entire group. The dataset selected for the generation of OS and PFS benchmarks was then tested for intertrial arm variability using a logistic-normal model with the selected baseline prognostic factors as fixed effects and the individual trial arm as a random effect. A total of 1,132 cases from eight trials qualified. Performance status and sex were independently significant for OS, and performance status was prognostic for PFS. Outcomes for one trial (NCCTG-034A) were significantly different from the other trial arms. When this trial was excluded, the remaining trial arms were homogeneous for OS and PFS outcomes after adjusting for performance status and sex. Benchmark values for 6-month OS and PFS are reported along with a method for using these values in future study design and analysis. The benchmark survival values were generated from a dataset that was homogeneous between trials. The benchmarks can be used to enable single-arm phase II trials using a gemcitabine platform, especially under certain circumstances. Such circumstances might be when a randomized control arm is not practically feasible, an early signal of activity of an experimental agent is being explored such as in expansion cohorts of phase I studies, and in patients who are not candidates for combination cytotoxic therapy.

  8. Early Investigational Therapeutics for Gastrointestinal Motility Disorders: From Animal Studies to Phase II Trials

    PubMed Central

    Valentin, Nelson; Acosta, Andres; Camilleri, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The most common gastrointestinal disorders which include evidence of dysmotility include: gastroparesis, the lower functional gastrointestinal disorders associated with altered bowel function [such as chronic (functional) diarrhea, chronic idiopathic constipation (CIC)], and opioid induced constipation (OIC). These conditions, which are grouped as gastrointestinal motility and functional disorders, are characterized by abnormal motor, sensory, or secretory functions that alter bowel function and result in a significant disease burden, since currently available treatments do not completely alleviate symptoms. New drugs are being developed for these disorders, targeting mechanisms involved in the pathophysiology of these diseases, specifically, motor function, intestinal secretion and bile acid modulation. Areas Covered The article provides a brief overview of motility disorders and the drugs approved and currently available for these indications. It also provides an evaluation of the efficacy, safety and possible mechanisms of the drugs currently under investigation for the treatment of gastroparesis, chronic diarrhea, CIC and OIC, based on animal to phase II studies. Medications with complete phase III trials are excluded from this discussion. Expert opinion Treatment of gastrointestinal motility disorders requires the understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms, biomarkers to identify subgroups of these disorders, and robust pharmacological studies from animal to phase II studies. These are prerequisites for the development of efficacious medications and individualizing therapy in order to enhance the treatment of these patients. PMID:25971881

  9. The costs and effectiveness of large Phase III pre-licensure vaccine clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Black, Steven

    2015-01-01

    Prior to the 1980s, most vaccines were licensed based upon safety and effectiveness studies in several hundred individuals. Beginning with the evaluation of Haemophilus influenzae type b conjugate vaccines, much larger pre-licensure trials became common. The pre-licensure trial for Haemophilus influenzae oligosaccharide conjugate vaccine had more than 60,000 children and that of the seven-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine included almost 38,000 children. Although trial sizes for both of these studies were driven by the sample size required to demonstrate efficacy, the sample size requirements for safety evaluations of other vaccines have subsequently increased. With the demonstration of an increased risk of intussusception following the Rotashield brand rotavirus vaccine, this trend has continued. However, routinely requiring safety studies of 20,000-50,000 or more participants has two major downsides. First, the cost of performing large safety trials routinely prior to licensure of a vaccine is very large, with some estimates as high at US$200 million euros for one vaccine. This high financial cost engenders an opportunity cost whereby the number of vaccines that a company is willing or able to develop to meet public health needs becomes limited by this financial barrier. The second downside is that in the pre-licensure setting, such studies are very time consuming and delay the availability of a beneficial vaccine substantially. One might argue that in some situations, this financial commitment is warranted such as for evaluations of the risk of intussusception following newer rotavirus vaccines. However, it must be noted that while an increased risk of intussusception was not identified in large pre-licensure studies, in post marketing evaluations an increased risk of this outcome has been identified. Thus, even the extensive pre-licensure evaluations conducted did not identify an associated risk. The limitations of large Phase III trials have also been

  10. Maintaining the cold chain shipping environment for Phase I clinical trial distribution.

    PubMed

    Elliott, M A; Halbert, G W

    2005-08-11

    The study aimed to demonstrate satisfactory inter-UK transit of cold storage clinical trial material. The product environment had to be maintained between 0 and 8 degrees C throughout transit until delivery. Straightforward, low cost and simplified shipping arrangements were sought that would be appropriate for small-scale Phase I clinical trial activities. A laboratory test defined an optimal three frozen gel pack configuration to maintain refrigerated environmental conditions for dummy product packs in a single type and size of insulated shipper. The internal environment was temperature monitored at 30-min intervals in all tests. Twelve Glasgow to London transits were then studied over 2 years to include all seasonal temperature variations. A configuration using three frozen gel packs and 4 h pre-chill of the transit container maintained the internal environment at 0-8 degrees C for up to 48 h during autumn, winter and spring. A modified four frozen gel pack configuration was suitable for summer transit. Thus cold shipment verification was successfully carried out for a small-scale distribution operation. It was proven that refrigerated shipping conditions could be maintained using a straightforward and cost effective 'passive' type system consisting of frozen gel packs and insulated transit containers.

  11. In situ photoimmunotherapy for melanoma: an ongoing phase I clinical trial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naylor, Mark F.; Nordquist, Robert E.; Teague, T. Kent; Perry, Lisa A.; Chen, Wei R.

    2007-02-01

    In situ Photoimmunotherapy (ISPI) was developed to treat metastatic tumors using a combination of phototherapy and immunotherapy. It utilizes local intervention through photothermal destruction of existing solid tumors and through immune response modifier to elicit host anti-tumor responses. Such combination in pre-clinical studies has shown promise in cancer treatment by eradicating the primary tumors and also controlling metastases at distant sites. ISPI has been used in our preliminary clinical studies for melanoma patients and the outcome has been extremely encouraging. In 2006, we began enrolling patients in a new phase I immunotherapy trial for advanced cutaneous melanoma. This trial is based on our previous results which indicated that we had developed an effective treatment for advanced melanoma. Of the first six patients treated, (4 stage IV, and 2 surgically unresectable stage III), 2 of the stage IV patients are still alive, one tumor free, and one with a possible treatable recurrence after 2 1/2 years. We have also discovered that recurrences of the skin cancer can be retreated by the same technique and that treatment seems to blunt the virulence of the disease and make it more treatable. These initial results indicate that ISPI probably will have the ability to prolong survival in selected cases of advanced melanoma, and potentially cure a significant percentage of treated patients.

  12. Evaluation of a prototype dengue-1 DNA vaccine in a Phase 1 clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Beckett, Charmagne G; Tjaden, Jeffrey; Burgess, Timothy; Danko, Janine R; Tamminga, Cindy; Simmons, Monika; Wu, Shuenn-Jue; Sun, Peifang; Kochel, Tadeusz; Raviprakash, Kanakatte; Hayes, Curtis G; Porter, Kevin R

    2011-01-29

    Candidate dengue DNA vaccine constructs for each dengue serotype were developed by incorporating pre-membrane and envelope genes into a plasmid vector. A Phase 1 clinical trial was performed using the dengue virus serotype-1 (DENV-1) vaccine construct (D1ME(100)). The study was an open-label, dose-escalation, safety and immunogenicity trial involving 22 healthy flavivirus-naïve adults assigned to one of two groups. Each group received three intramuscular injections (0, 1, and 5 months) of either a high dose (5.0mg, n=12) or a low dose (1.0mg, n=10) DNA vaccine using the needle-free Biojector(®) 2000. The most commonly reported solicited signs and symptoms were local mild pain or tenderness (10/22, 45%), local mild swelling (6/22, 27%), muscle pain (6/22, 27%) and fatigue (6/22, 27%). Five subjects (41.6%) in the high dose group and none in the low dose group developed detectable anti-dengue neutralizing antibodies. T-cell IFN gamma responses were detected in 50% (4/8) and 83.3% (10/12) of subjects in the low and high dose groups, respectively. The safety profile of the DENV-1 DNA vaccine is acceptable at both doses administered in the study. These results demonstrate a favorable reactogenicity and safety profile of the first in human evaluation of a DENV-1 DNA vaccine.

  13. Phase I clinical trial of an injectable contraceptive for the male.

    PubMed

    Guha, S K; Singh, G; Anand, S; Ansari, S; Kumar, S; Koul, V

    1993-10-01

    Earlier studies on the rat and the monkey had demonstrated that an injection of styrene maleic anhydride (SMA) in a solvent vehicle of dimethyl sulphoxide (DMSO) into the lumen of the vas deferens is toxicologically safe and has contraceptive action. Phase I clinical trial was therefore undertaken on 38 male volunteers giving varying doses of SMA, ranging between 5 mg and 140 mg, into each vas deferens. A dose of 70 mg is the predicted therapeutic dose based on animal data. That the compound is within the vas deferens lumen during the period of the safety assessment is inferred from the effect on the spermatozoa count in ejaculates which reach azoospermic levels in the higher dose ranges. The treatment is well tolerated with only minimal side effects in a few cases and no long-term adverse effects.

  14. Phase I Randomized Clinical Trial of VRC DNA and rAd5 HIV-1 Vaccine Delivery by Intramuscular (IM), Subcutaneous (SC) and Intradermal (ID) Administration (VRC 011)

    PubMed Central

    Enama, Mary E.; Ledgerwood, Julie E.; Novik, Laura; Nason, Martha C.; Gordon, Ingelise J.; Holman, LaSonji; Bailer, Robert T.; Roederer, Mario; Koup, Richard A.; Mascola, John R.; Nabel, Gary J.; Graham, Barney S.

    2014-01-01

    Background Phase 1 evaluation of the VRC HIV DNA and rAd5 vaccines delivered intramuscularly (IM) supported proceeding to a Phase 2 b efficacy study. Here we report comparison of the IM, subcutaneous (SC) and intradermal (ID) routes of administration. Methods Sixty subjects were randomized to 6 schedules to evaluate the IM, SC or ID route for prime injections. Three schedules included DNA primes (Wks 0,4,8) and 3 schedules included rAd5 prime (Wk0); all included rAd5 IM boost (Wk24). DNA vaccine dosage was 4 mg IM or SC, but 0.4 mg ID, while all rAd5 vaccinations were 1010 PU. All injections were administered by needle and syringe. Results Overall, 27/30 subjects completed 3 DNA primes; 30/30 subjects completed rAd5 primes. Mild local pruritus (itchiness), superficial skin lesions and injection site nodules were associated with ID and SC, but not IM injections. All routes induced T-cell and antibody immune responses after rAd5 boosting. Overall, >95% had Env antibody and >80% had Env T-cell responses. Conclusions The pattern of local reactogenicity following ID and SC injections differed from IM injections but all routes were well-tolerated. There was no evidence of an immunogenicity advantage following SC or ID delivery, supporting IM delivery as the preferred route of administration. Trial Registration Clinicaltrials.gov NCT00321061 PMID:24621858

  15. [Phase I trial of a recombinant human interleukin 2. Results in patients with disseminated solid tumors].

    PubMed

    Tursz, T; Dorval, T; Berthaud, P; Jouve, M; Avril, M F; Garcia-Giralt, E; Le Chevalier, T; Spielmann, M; Sevin, D; Palangie, T

    1991-02-16

    A phase I trial of Roussel-Uclaf recombinant human interleukin 2 (IL 2) was performed on 31 cancer bearing patients of the Institut Gustave-Roussy, Villejuif, and the Institut Curie, Paris. This study allowed to define a schedule for administration of IL 2 in continuous infusion over 5 day cycles. This schedule is manageable in patients without major visceral failure. It is reproducibly feasible in conventional medical oncology units, without specialized intensive care facilities. Toxicities, although numerous, are acceptable for IL 2 doses below 24,000,000 IU/m2/day. There is a close relationship between secondary effect severity and IL 2 doses received. Main toxicities were: fever with chills, fatigue and general discomfort in 23 patients, nauseas and vomiting in 12, diarrhea in 10 and cutaneous rashes with erythema and dermal vascularitis in 13. One peculiar feature of this study was the minimal occurrence of manifestation related to leaky capillary syndrome prominant in other studies. Oliguria, functional renal failure and edema were observed in only 4 patients with functionally unique kidney. Five patients had severe anemia, 2 grade III thrombocytopenia, 1 grade IV hepatic cytolysis, 4 severe confusion episodes and 2 hypothyroidism with anti-thyroid microsome auto-antibodies. All these toxicities were reversible after withdrawal of IL 2 treatment. During this phase I trial, 3 therapeutic objective responses were observed, all 3 occurring in patients with metastatic melanoma treated with IL 2 doses equal to, or above 16,000,00 IU/m2/d. Recombinant IL 2 Roussel-Uclaf thus can be administered through a simple, manageable and efficient regimen.

  16. Phase 3 Trials of Thermosensitive Ciprofloxacin Gel for Middle Ear Effusion in Children with Tubes

    PubMed Central

    Park, Albert H.; White, David R.; Moss, Jonathan R.; Bear, Moraye; LeBel, Carl

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the efficacy, safety, and microbiology of a thermosensitive otic suspension of ciprofloxacin (OTO-201) in children with bilateral middle ear effusion undergoing tympanostomy tube placement. Study Design Two randomized, double-blind, sham-controlled phase 3 trials. Patients were randomized to intratympanic OTO-201 or sham. Setting Children with bilateral middle ear effusion undergoing tympanostomy tube placement. Subjects/Methods Studies evaluated 532 patients (6 months to 17 years old) in a combined analysis of efficacy (treatment failure: presence of otorrhea, otic or systemic antibiotic use, lost to follow-up, missed visits), safety (audiometry, otoscopy, tympanometry), and microbiology. Results There was a lower cumulative proportion of treatment failures in patients receiving OTO-201 vs tympanostomy tubes alone (1) on days 4, 8, 15, and 29; (2) on day 15, primary end point (23.0% vs 45.1%; age-adjusted odds ratio, 0.341; P < .001; reduction in relative risk, 49%); and (3) on day 15, blinded-assessor otorrhea treatment failure (7.0% vs 19.4%; age-adjusted odds ratio, 0.303; P < .001; reduction in relative risk, 64%). Per-protocol and subgroup analyses (baseline demographics, pathogen type, culture status, effusion type, microbiologic response) supported these findings. There were no drug-related serious adverse events; the most frequent treatment-emergent adverse events in both groups were pyrexia, postoperative pain, nasopharyngitis, cough, and upper respiratory tract infection. OTO-201 administration had no evidence of increased tube occlusion and no negative effect on audiometry, tympanometry, or otoscopy. Conclusions Combined analysis of 2 phase 3 trials demonstrated a lower cumulative proportion of treatment failures through day 15 compared with TT alone when OTO-201 was administered intratympanically for otitis media with bilateral middle ear effusion at time of tympanostomy tube placement. PMID:27188702

  17. Randomised phase 2 trial of intra-coronary nitrite during acute myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Daniel A; Pellaton, Cyril; Velmurugan, Shanti; Rathod, Krishnaraj Sinha; Andiapen, Mervyn; Antoniou, Sotiris; van Eijl, Sven; Webb, Andrew J; Westwood, Mark A; Parmar, Mahesh K; Mathur, Anthony; Ahluwalia, Amrita

    2015-01-01

    Rationale Pre-clinical evidence demonstrates that inorganic nitrite, following its in situ conversion to nitric oxide, attenuates consequent myocardial reperfusion injury. Objective We investigated whether intra-coronary injection of nitrite during primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) might improve infarct size in ST-elevated myocardial infarction (STEMI). Methods and Results Patients undergoing primary PCI (n=80) were randomised to receive intracoronary (10mL) sodium nitrite (1.8μmol) or NaCl (placebo) before balloon inflation. The primary endpoint was infarct size assessed by measuring creatine kinase (CK) release. Secondary outcomes included infarct size assessed by troponin T release and by cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) on day 2. Baseline characteristics were similar between the groups. No evidence of differences in CK release (p=0.92), troponin T (p=0.85) or CMR-assessed infarct size (p=0.254) were evident. In contrast there was an improvement in myocardial salvage index (p=0.05) and reduction in MACE at 1 year (2.6% vs 15.8%, p=0.04) in the nitrite group. In a 66-patient sub-group with TIMI≤1 flow there was reduced serum CK (p=0.030) and a 19% reduction in CMR-determined infarct size (p=0.034) with nitrite. No adverse effects of nitrite were detected. Conclusions In this phase II study intra-coronary nitrite infusion did not alter infarct size although a trend to improved myocardial salvage index and a significant reduction in MACE was evident. In a sub-group of patients with TIMI flow≤1 nitrite reduced infarct size and MACE and improved myocardial salvage index indicating that a phase III clinical trial assessing intra-coronary nitrite administration as an adjunct to PCI in STEMI patients is warranted. Clinical Trial Registration URL: http://clinicaltrials.gov NCT01584453. PMID:25512434

  18. Neovastat, a naturally occurring multifunctional antiangiogenic drug, in phase III clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Falardeau, P; Champagne, P; Poyet, P; Hariton, C; Dupont, E

    2001-12-01

    more than 6 months. Two phase III clinical trials are currently underway. A phase III double-blind placebo-controlled study is being conducted to evaluate the efficacy of Neovastat in addition to induction chemotherapy/radiotherapy combined modality treatment in patients with unresectable non-small cell lung cancer stage IIIA and IIIB. A second phase III randomized, double-blind placebo-controlled study evaluates the efficacy of Neovastat as a monotherapy in metastatic renal cell carcinoma patients who have progressed following a first-line immunotherapy. Neovastat efficacy is also being evaluated in a registration phase II trial in patients with early relapse or refractory multiple myeloma.

  19. Peginterferon Alfa-2b (PEG-Intron)

    MedlinePlus

    ... alpha-2b is a combination of interferon and polyethylene glycol, which helps the interferon stay active in ... 2b, other alpha interferons, any other medications, or polyethylene glycol (PEG). Ask your doctor if you are ...

  20. Enrollment and Stopping Rules for Managing Toxicity Requiring Long Follow-Up in Phase II Oncology Trials.

    PubMed

    Song, Guochen; Ivanova, Anastasia

    2015-01-01

    Monitoring of toxicity is often conducted in Phase II trials in oncology to avoid an excessive number of toxicities if the wrong dose is chosen for Phase II. Existing stopping rules for toxicity use information from patients who have already completed follow-up. We describe a stopping rule that uses all available data to determine whether to stop for toxicity or not when follow-up for toxicity is long. We propose an enrollment rule that prescribes the maximum number of patients that may be enrolled at any given point in the trial.

  1. A Randomized Controlled Phase Ib Trial of the Malaria Vaccine Candidate GMZ2 in African Children

    PubMed Central

    Hounkpatin, Aurore B.; Schaumburg, Frieder; Ngoa, Ulysse Ateba; Esen, Meral; Fendel, Rolf; de Salazar, Pablo Martinez; Mürbeth, Raymund E.; Milligan, Paul; Imbault, Nathalie; Imoukhuede, Egeruan Babatunde; Theisen, Michael; Jepsen, Søren; Noor, Ramadhani A.; Okech, Brenda; Kremsner, Peter G.; Mordmüller, Benjamin

    2011-01-01

    Background GMZ2 is a fusion protein of Plasmodium falciparum merozoite surface protein 3 (MSP3) and glutamate rich protein (GLURP) that mediates an immune response against the blood stage of the parasite. Two previous phase I clinical trials, one in naïve European adults and one in malaria-exposed Gabonese adults showed that GMZ2 was well tolerated and immunogenic. Here, we present data on safety and immunogenicity of GMZ2 in one to five year old Gabonese children, a target population for future malaria vaccine efficacy trials. Methodology/Principal Findings Thirty children one to five years of age were randomized to receive three doses of either 30 µg or 100 µg of GMZ2, or rabies vaccine. GMZ2, adjuvanted in aluminum hydroxide, was administered on Days 0, 28 and 56. All participants received a full course of their respective vaccination and were followed up for one year. Both 30 µg and 100 µg GMZ2 vaccine doses were well tolerated and induced antibodies and memory B-cells against GMZ2 as well as its antigenic constituents MSP3 and GLURP. After three doses of vaccine, the geometric mean concentration of antibodies to GMZ2 was 19-fold (95%CI: 11,34) higher in the 30 µg GMZ2 group than in the rabies vaccine controls, and 16-fold (7,36) higher in the 100 µg GMZ2 group than the rabies group. Geometric mean concentration of antibodies to MSP3 was 2.7-fold (1.6,4.6) higher in the 30 µg group than in the rabies group and 3.8-fold (1.5,9.6) higher in the 100 µg group. Memory B-cells against GMZ2 developed in both GMZ2 vaccinated groups. Conclusions/Significance Both 30 µg as well as 100 µg intramuscular GMZ2 are immunogenic, well tolerated, and safe in young, malaria-exposed Gabonese children. This result confirms previous findings in naïve and malaria-exposed adults and supports further clinical development of GMZ2. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00703066 PMID:21829466

  2. Bevacizumab, Oxaliplatin, and Capecitabine With Radiation Therapy in Rectal Cancer: Phase I Trial Results

    SciTech Connect

    Czito, Brian G. . E-mail: czito001@mc.duke.edu; Bendell, Johanna C.; Willett, Christopher G.; Morse, Michael A.; Blobe, Gerard C.; Tyler, Douglas S.; Thomas, John; Ludwig, Kirk A.; Mantyh, Christopher R.; Ashton, Jill; Yu Daohai; Hurwitz, Herbert I.

    2007-06-01

    Purpose: The overexpression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is associated with poor outcomes in colorectal cancer patients. Bevacizumab, a VEGF inhibitor, enhances the effects of chemotherapy and radiation therapy on tumor cytotoxicity in preclinical models, including colorectal cancer. A Phase I trial was undertaken to evaluate the combination of bevacizumab, capecitabine, oxaliplatin, and radiation therapy in patients with rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Patients with pathologically confirmed adenocarcinoma of the rectum were eligible. Pretreatment staging included computerized tomography, endoscopic ultrasound, and surgical evaluation. Patients received 50.4 Gy of external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) to the tumor in 28 fractions. Capecitabine, oxaliplatin, and bevacizumab were administered concurrently with radiation therapy. After EBRT completion, patients were restaged and evaluated for surgery. Primary endpoints included the determination of dose-limiting toxicity and a recommended Phase II dose, non dose-limiting toxicity, and preliminary radiographic and pathologic response rates. Results: Eleven patients were enrolled. All were evaluable for toxicity and efficacy. Dose level 2 was associated with unacceptable toxicity (primarily diarrhea). Dose level 1 had an acceptable toxicity profile. The recommended Phase II dose in our study was bevacizumab 15 mg/kg Day 1 + 10 mg/kg Days 8 and 22, oxaliplatin 50 mg/m{sup 2} weekly, and capecitabine 625 mg/m{sup 2} bid during radiation days. Six patients had clinical responses. Two patients had a pathologic complete response, and 3 had microscopic disease only. One patient experienced a postoperative abscess, one a syncopal episode during adjuvant chemotherapy, and one a subclinical myocardial infarction during adjuvant chemotherapy. Conclusions: The combination of bevacizumab, capecitabine, oxaliplatin, and radiation therapy in rectal cancer was tolerable, with encouraging response rates. Further

  3. High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy as a Monotherapy for Favorable-Risk Prostate Cancer: A Phase II Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Barkati, Maroie; Williams, Scott G.; Foroudi, Farshad; Tai, Keen Hun; Chander, Sarat; Dyk, Sylvia van; See, Andrew; Duchesne, Gillian M.

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: There are multiple treatment options for favorable-risk prostate cancer. High-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy as a monotherapy is appealing, but its use is still investigational. A Phase II trial was undertaken to explore the value of such treatment in low-to-intermediate risk prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: This was a single-institution, prospective study. Eligible patients had low-risk prostate cancer features but also Gleason scores of 7 (51% of patients) and stage T2b to T2c cancer. Treatment with HDR brachytherapy with a single implant was administered over 2 days. One of four fractionation schedules was used in a dose escalation study design: 3 fractions of 10, 10.5, 11, or 11.5 Gy. Patients were assessed with the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 2.0 for urinary toxicity, the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer scoring schema for rectal toxicity, and the Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite (EPIC) questionnaire to measure patient-reported health-related quality of life. Biochemical failure was defined as a prostate-specific antigen (PSA) nadir plus 2 ng/ml. Results: Between 2003 and 2008, 79 patients were enrolled. With a median follow-up of 39.5 months, biochemical relapse occurred in 7 patients. Three- and 5-year actuarial biochemical control rates were 88.4% (95% confidence interval [CI], 78.0-96.2%) and 85.1% (95% CI, 72.5-94.5%), respectively. Acute grade 3 urinary toxicity was seen in only 1 patient. There was no instance of acute grade 3 rectal toxicity. Rates of late grade 3 rectal toxicity, dysuria, hematuria, urinary retention, and urinary incontinence were 0%, 10.3%, 1.3%, 9.0%, and 0%, respectively. No grade 4 or greater toxicity was recorded. Among the four (urinary, bowel, sexual, and hormonal) domains assessed with the EPIC questionnaire, only the sexual domain did not recover with time. Conclusions: HDR brachytherapy as a monotherapy for favorable

  4. NCI will no longer support investigator-initiated phase III clinical trials through R01 and P01s grants | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The NCI has traditionally provided support for all phases of clinical trials and interventions via grants and cooperative agreements (including the R03, R21, R01, P01, U01, U10, and UM1 mechanisms). Historically, the majority of early phase trials have been conducted under R03, R21, R01, P01, U01, and UM1 activity codes, whereas most Phase III clinical trials have been conducted under the U10 activity code, with a limited number of Phase III clinical trials performed under the R01, P01, and U01 activity codes... |

  5. Secretion of human interferon alpha 2b by Streptomyces lividans.

    PubMed

    Pimienta, E; Fando, R; Sánchez, J C; Vallin, C

    2002-02-01

    Biologically active human interferon alpha 2b (HuIFNalpha-2b) was secreted into the culture medium by Streptomyces lividans transformed with recombinant plasmids coding for HuIFNalpha-2b fused to the Streptomyces exfoliatus M11 lipase A signal sequence. Levels were low, 15 or 100 ng/ml, depending on the plasmid used. Neither processed nor unprocessed HuIFNalpha-2b was detected in cell lysates of the transformants secreting the recombinant product. However, the secreted recombinant product was found to partially degrade when cultures reached the stationary phase by the action of an, as yet, unidentified mycelium-associated factor. Experimental evidence suggests that the degrading factor is related to mycelium-associated proteolytic activity.

  6. Predictive In Silico Studies of Human 5-hydroxytryptamine Receptor Subtype 2B (5-HT2B) and Valvular Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Reid, Terry-Elinor; Kumar, Krishna

    2014-01-01

    Serotonin (5-HT) receptors are neuromodulator neurotransmitter receptors which when activated generate a signal transduction pathway within cells resulting in cell-cell communication. 5-hydroxytryptamine (serotonin) receptor 2B (5-HT2B) is a subtype of the seven members of 5-hydroxytrytamine (5-HT) family of receptors which is the largest member of the super family of 7-transmembrane G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs). Not only do 5-HT receptors play physiological roles in the cardiovascular system, gastrointestinal and endocrine function and the central nervous, but they also play a role in behavioral functions. In particular 5-HT2B receptor is wide spread with regards to its distribution throughout bodily tissues and is expressed at high levels in the lungs, peripheral tissues, liver, kidney and prostate just to name a few. Hence 5-HT2B participates in multiple biological functions including CNS regulation, regulation of gastrointestinal motality, cardiovascular regulation and 5-HT transport system regulation. While 5-HT2B is a viable drug target and has therapeutic indications for treating obesity, psychotherapy, Parkinson’s disease etc. there is a growing concern regarding adverse drug reactions, specifically valvulopathy associated with 5-HT2B agonists. Due to the sequence homology experienced by 5-HT2 subtypes there is also a concern regarding the off target effects of 5-HT2A and 5-HT2C agonists. The concept of subtype selectivity is of paramount importance and can be tackled with the aid of in silico studies, specifically cheminformatics, to develop models to predict valvulopathy associated toxicity of drug candidates prior to clinical trials. This review has highlighted three in silico approaches thus far that have been successful in either predicting 5-HT2B toxicity of molecules or identifying important interactions between 5-HT2B and drug molecules that bring about valvulopathy related toxicities. PMID:23675941

  7. Phase II randomised discontinuation trial of the MET/VEGF receptor inhibitor cabozantinib in metastatic melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Daud, Adil; Kluger, Harriet M; Kurzrock, Razelle; Schimmoller, Frauke; Weitzman, Aaron L; Samuel, Thomas A; Moussa, Ali H; Gordon, Michael S; Shapiro, Geoffrey I

    2017-01-01

    Background: A phase II randomised discontinuation trial assessed cabozantinib (XL184), an orally bioavailable inhibitor of tyrosine kinases including VEGF receptors, MET, and AXL, in a cohort of patients with metastatic melanoma. Methods: Patients received cabozantinib 100 mg daily during a 12-week lead-in. Patients with stable disease (SD) per Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumours (RECIST) at week 12 were randomised to cabozantinib or placebo. Primary endpoints were objective response rate (ORR) at week 12 and postrandomisation progression-free survival (PFS). Results: Seventy-seven patients were enroled (62% cutaneous, 30% uveal, and 8% mucosal). At week 12, the ORR was 5% 39% of patients had SD. During the lead-in phase, reduction in target lesions from baseline was seen in 55% of evaluable patients overall and in 59% of evaluable patients with uveal melanoma. Median PFS after randomisation was 4.1 months with cabozantinib and 2.8 months with placebo (hazard ratio of 0.59; P=0.284). Median PFS from study day 1 was 3.8 months, 6-month PFS was 33%, and median overall survival was 9.4 months. The most common grade 3/4 adverse events were fatigue (14%), hypertension (10%), and abdominal pain (8%). One treatment-related death was reported from peritonitis due to diverticular perforation. Conclusions: Cabozantinib has clinical activity in patients with metastatic melanoma, including uveal melanoma. Further clinical investigation is warranted. PMID:28103611

  8. Volunteer feedback and perceptions after participation in a phase I, first-in-human Ebola vaccine trial: An anonymous survey

    PubMed Central

    Dayer, Julie-Anne; Siegrist, Claire-Anne; Huttner, Angela

    2017-01-01

    The continued participation of volunteers in clinical trials is crucial to advances in healthcare. Few data are available regarding the satisfaction and impressions of healthy volunteers after participation in phase I trials, many of which lead to unexpected adverse events. We report feedback from over 100 adult volunteers who took part in a first-in-human trial conducted in a high-income country testing an experimental Ebola vaccine causing significant reactogenicity, as well as unexpected arthritis in one fifth of participants. The anonymous, internet-based satisfaction survey was sent by email to all participants upon their completion of this one-year trial; it asked 24 questions concerning volunteers’ motivations, impressions of the trial experience, and overall satisfaction. Answers were summarized using descriptive statistics. Of the 115 trial participants, 103 (90%) filled out the survey. Fifty-five respondents (53%) were male. Thirty-five respondents (34%) were healthcare workers, many of whom would deploy to Ebola-affected countries. All respondents cited scientific advancement as their chief motivation for participation, while 100/103 (97%) and 61/103 (59%) reported additional “humanitarian reasons” and potential protection from Ebolavirus, respectively. Although investigators had documented adverse events in 97% of trial participants, only 74 of 103 respondents (72%) recalled experiencing an adverse event. All reported an overall positive experience, and 93/103 (90%) a willingness to participate in future trials. Given the high level of satisfaction, no significant associations could be detected between trial experiences and satisfaction, even among respondents reporting adverse events lasting weeks or months. Despite considerable reactogenicity and unexpected vaccine-related arthritis, all survey respondents reported overall satisfaction. While this trial’s context was unique, the positive feedback is likely due at least in part to the intense

  9. Design and implementation of the START (STem cells for ARDS Treatment) trial, a phase 1/2 trial of human mesenchymal stem/stromal cells for the treatment of moderate-severe acute respiratory distress syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Despite advances in supportive care, moderate-severe acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is associated with high mortality rates, and novel therapies to treat this condition are needed. Compelling pre-clinical data from mouse, rat, sheep and ex vivo perfused human lung models support the use of human mesenchymal stem (stromal) cells (MSCs) as a novel intravenous therapy for the early treatment of ARDS. Methods This article describes the study design and challenges encountered during the implementation and phase 1 component of the START (STem cells for ARDS Treatment) trial, a phase 1/2 trial of bone marrow-derived human MSCs for moderate-severe ARDS. A trial enrolling 69 subjects is planned (9 subjects in phase 1, 60 subjects in phase 2 treated with MSCs or placebo in a 2:1 ratio). Results This report describes study design features that are unique to a phase 1 trial in critically ill subjects and the specific challenges of implementation of a cell-based therapy trial in the ICU. Conclusions Experience gained during the design and implementation of the START study will be useful to investigators planning future phase 1 clinical trials based in the ICU, as well as trials of cell-based therapy for other acute illnesses. Trial registration Clinical Trials Registration: NCT01775774 and NCT02097641. PMID:25593740

  10. Toward better early-phase brain tumor clinical trials: a reappraisal of current methods and proposals for future strategies.

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Frederick F.; Gilbert, Mark R.; Puduvalli, Vinay K.; Weinberg, Jeffrey; Levin, Victor A.; Yung, W. K. Alfred; Sawaya, Raymond; Fuller, Gregory N.; Conrad, Charles A.

    2002-01-01

    Although no optimal treatment is currently available for malignant brain tumors, as the molecular mechanisms underlying brain tumor development have been delineated, new chemotherapeutic agents that act directly on specific molecular targets have become available. Defining a specific molecular target raises the possibility that the molecular effects of a given agent can be analyzed in patients in a clinical trial. Specifically, whereas standard phase I and II clinical trials classically determine the safety and efficacy of agents by using indirect global end points, these new biological agents afford the opportunity to incorporate molecular end points into phase I and II clinical trials to determine whether the agent under investigation is actually doing what it was intended to do. This work presents avenues for improving current brain tumor clinical trial designs based on the molecular specificity of new agents and the unique features of brain tumors. Specifically, the authors recommend brain-applicable phase I and II clinical trial strategies that take advantage of the targeted nature of new agents to maximize information about their efficacy, toxicity, and molecular effects. PMID:12356357

  11. Design of a Phase III cluster randomized trial to assess the efficacy and safety of a malaria transmission blocking vaccine.

    PubMed

    Delrieu, Isabelle; Leboulleux, Didier; Ivinson, Karen; Gessner, Bradford D

    2015-03-24

    Vaccines interrupting Plasmodium falciparum malaria transmission targeting sexual, sporogonic, or mosquito-stage antigens (SSM-VIMT) are currently under development to reduce malaria transmission. An international group of malaria experts was established to evaluate the feasibility and optimal design of a Phase III cluster randomized trial (CRT) that could support regulatory review and approval of an SSM-VIMT. The consensus design is a CRT with a sentinel population randomly selected from defined inner and buffer zones in each cluster, a cluster size sufficient to assess true vaccine efficacy in the inner zone, and inclusion of ongoing assessment of vaccine impact stratified by distance of residence from the cluster edge. Trials should be conducted first in areas of moderate transmission, where SSM-VIMT impact should be greatest. Sample size estimates suggest that such a trial is feasible, and within the range of previously supported trials of malaria interventions, although substantial issues to implementation exist.

  12. Reducing sample sizes in two-stage phase II cancer trials by using continuous tumour shrinkage end-points.

    PubMed

    Wason, James M S; Mander, Adrian P; Eisen, Tim G

    2011-05-01

    Reducing the number of patients required for a clinical trial is important for shortening development time. Phase II cancer trials assess the tumour-shrinking effect of a novel compound through a binary end-point formed from the percentage change in total lesion diameter. We compare single-arm two-stage designs which use the binary end-point to those which directly use the continuous end-point. Using the continuous end-point results in lower expected and maximum sample sizes. For larger trials the reduction is around 37%. This assumes that the dichotomisation point of the continuous end-point is chosen to give the best sample size, with the trial design using the binary end-point performing even worse otherwise. We consider a previous trial designed using a Simon two-stage design and show that if the continuous end-point had been used, the expected and maximum sample sizes of the trial would be reduced by around 50%. Using the continuous end-point in a two-stage cancer trial results in large sample size reductions. The methods discussed in this paper work best when the number of complete responses is low, as is true in several types of cancer. We discuss what could be done if this is not the case.

  13. Hope for a cure and altruism are the main motives behind participation in phase 3 clinical cancer trials.

    PubMed

    Godskesen, T; Hansson, M G; Nygren, P; Nordin, K; Kihlbom, U

    2015-01-01

    It is necessary to carry out randomised clinical cancer trials (RCTs) in order to evaluate new, potentially useful treatments for future cancer patients. Participation in clinical trials plays an important role in determining whether a new treatment is the best therapy or not. Therefore, it is important to understand on what basis patients decide to participate in clinical trials and to investigate the implications of this understanding for optimising the information process related to study participation. The aims of this study were to (1) describe motives associated with participation in RCTs, (2) assess if patients comprehend the information related to trial enrolment, and (3) describe patient experiences of trial participation. Questionnaires were sent to 96 cancer patients participating in one of nine ongoing clinical phase 3 trials at the Department of Oncology, Uppsala University Hospital in Sweden. Eighty-eight patients completed the questionnaire (response rate 92%); 95% of these were patients in adjuvant therapy and 5% participated in clinical trials on palliative care. Two main reasons for participation were identified: personal hope for a cure and altruism. Patients show adequate understanding of the information provided to them in the consent process and participation entails high patient satisfaction.

  14. Generalized optimal design for two-arm, randomized phase II clinical trials with endpoints from the exponential dispersion family.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Wei; Mahnken, Jonathan D; He, Jianghua; Mayo, Matthew S

    2016-11-01

    For two-arm randomized phase II clinical trials, previous literature proposed an optimal design that minimizes the total sample sizes subject to multiple constraints on the standard errors of the estimated event rates and their difference. The original design is limited to trials with dichotomous endpoints. This paper extends the original approach to be applicable to phase II clinical trials with endpoints from the exponential dispersion family distributions. The proposed optimal design minimizes the total sample sizes needed to provide estimates of population means of both arms and their difference with pre-specified precision. Its applications on data from specific distribution families are discussed under multiple design considerations. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Biomarker-Guided Non-Adaptive Trial Designs in Phase II and Phase III: A Methodological Review

    PubMed Central

    Antoniou, Miranta; Kolamunnage-Dona, Ruwanthi; Jorgensen, Andrea L.

    2017-01-01

    Biomarker-guided treatment is a rapidly developing area of medicine, where treatment choice is personalised according to one or more of an individual’s biomarker measurements. A number of biomarker-guided trial designs have been proposed in the past decade, including both adaptive and non-adaptive trial designs which test the effectiveness of a biomarker-guided approach to treatment with the aim of improving patient health. A better understanding of them is needed as challenges occur both in terms of trial design and analysis. We have undertaken a comprehensive literature review based on an in-depth search strategy with a view to providing the research community with clarity in definition, methodology and terminology of the various biomarker-guided trial designs (both adaptive and non-adaptive designs) from a total of 211 included papers. In the present paper, we focus on non-adaptive biomarker-guided trial designs for which we have identified five distinct main types mentioned in 100 papers. We have graphically displayed each non-adaptive trial design and provided an in-depth overview of their key characteristics. Substantial variability has been observed in terms of how trial designs are described and particularly in the terminology used by different authors. Our comprehensive review provides guidance for those designing biomarker-guided trials. PMID:28125057

  16. Phase II Trial of Hypofractionated Image-Guided Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Localized Prostate Adenocarcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Jarad M.; Rosewall, Tara; Bayley, Andrew; Bristow, Robert; Chung, Peter; Crook, Juanita; Gospodarowicz, Mary; McLean, Michael; Menard, Cynthia; Milosevic, Michael; Warde, Padraig; Catton, Charles

    2007-11-15

    Purpose: To assess in a prospective trial the feasibility and late toxicity of hypofractionated radiotherapy (RT) for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Eligible patients had clinical stage T1c-2cNXM0 disease. They received 60 Gy in 20 fractions over 4 weeks with intensity-modulated radiotherapy including daily on-line image guidance with intraprostatic fiducial markers. Results: Between June 2001 and March 2004, 92 patients were treated with hypofractionated RT. The cohort had a median prostate-specific antigen value of 7.06 ng/mL. The majority had Gleason grade 5-6 (38%) or 7 (59%) disease, and 82 patients had T1c-T2a clinical staging. Overall, 29 patients had low-risk, 56 intermediate-risk, and 7 high-risk disease. Severe acute toxicity (Grade 3-4) was rare, occurring in only 1 patient. Median follow-up was 38 months. According to the Phoenix definition for biochemical failure, the rate of biochemical control at 14 months was 97%. According to the previous American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology definition, biochemical control at 3 years was 76%. The incidence of late toxicity was low, with no severe (Grade {>=}3) toxicity at the most recent assessment. Conclusions: Hypofractionated RT using 60 Gy in 20 fractions over 4 weeks with image guidance is feasible and is associated with low rates of late bladder and rectal toxicity. At early follow-up, biochemical outcome is comparable to that reported for conventionally fractionated controls. The findings are being tested in an ongoing, multicenter, Phase III trial.

  17. A phase 1 clinical trial of flavopiridol consolidation in chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients following chemoimmunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Awan, Farrukh T.; Jones, Jeffrey A.; Maddocks, Kami; Poi, Ming; Grever, Michael R.; Johnson, Amy; Byrd, John C.; Andritsos, Leslie A.

    2016-01-01

    Patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) who receive chemoimmunotherapy and do not achieve complete remission experience significantly shortened progression-free interval (PFS). Additionally, the majority of patients treated for relapsed disease demonstrate evidence of measurable disease. Eradication of minimal residual disease (MRD) results in improved PFS and overall survival. Maintenance therapy might result in eradication of MRD and improve response duration but might be associated with an increase in incidence of infectious complications. Flavopiridol is a broad cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitor with established safety and efficacy in patients with relapsed CLL, particularly patients with high-risk cytogenetic features. A pharmacologically derived schedule was utilized as consolidation therapy in this phase I study to assess the safety and feasibility of outpatient therapy with flavopiridol in patients with low tumor burden. Flavopiridol was administered as a 30-min loading dose of 30 mg/m2 followed by a 4-h infusion of 30 mg/ m2 once weekly for 3 weeks every 5 weeks (1 cycle) for planned 2 cycles in ten patients. Therapy was extremely well tolerated and no patient developed acute tumor lysis syndrome. The most common toxicities were gastrointestinal. Of the patients, 22 % improved their response from a PR to CR. Eighty-eight percent experienced a reduction in tumor burden as measured by extent of bone marrow involvement including patients with del17p and complex karyotype. The study establishes the safety and efficacy of flavopiridol as consolidation therapy after chemoimmunotherapy for patients with CLL. Further evaluation is required in larger trials for the utility of CDK inhibitors as consolidation or maintenance strategies. Registration number at ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00377104. PMID:27118540

  18. Phase 1 Clinical Trials of DAS181, an Inhaled Sialidase, in Healthy Adults

    PubMed Central

    Zenilman, Jonathan M.; Fuchs, Edward J.; Hendrix, Craig W.; Radebaugh, Christine; Jurao, Robert; Nayak, Seema U.; Hamilton, Robert G.; Griffiss, J. McLeod

    2015-01-01

    DAS181, (study drug, Fludase®) was developed for treatment of influenza and parainfluenza infections. Delivered by inhalation, DAS181 cleaves sialic acid receptors from respiratory epithelial cells. Treatment of influenza for three days with DAS181 reduced viral shedding. To increase deposition in the upper airways and decrease systemic absorption, the particle size was increased to 10 microns. We conducted two Phase I trials with three cohorts, randomized 2:1, active drug to placebo. The initial cohort got a single 20 mg dose of DAS181, or placebo; the second, 20 mg DAS181 or placebo for 10 days, and the third got 20 mg of DAS181or placebo for 3 days. Formulations differed slightly in their excipients. Subjects in the 1- and 3-day cohorts completed dosing without serious adverse events. Two subjects in the 10-day cohort stopped at Day 9 after developing respiratory and systemic symptoms, and a third experienced a decrease in FEV1 (Forced Expiratory Volume in 1 second) after the 9th dose and a further decline after the 10th dose. Plasma DAS181, in the 10-day cohort, peaked and began falling before the last dose. Antibodies, predominately IgG with neutralizing activity, were detected in 15/18 subjects by Day 30. The highest IgG concentrations were in the 10-day cohort. The respiratory adverse events occurring after seven days and rapid drug clearance during continued dosing are consistent with the induction of DAS181 antibodies. This could preclude use of this medication for longer than seven days or for repeated courses. (These studies have been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration nos. NCT 00527865 and NCT 01651494.) PMID:26391974

  19. Phase 1 clinical trials of DAS181, an inhaled sialidase, in healthy adults.

    PubMed

    Zenilman, Jonathan M; Fuchs, Edward J; Hendrix, Craig W; Radebaugh, Christine; Jurao, Robert; Nayak, Seema U; Hamilton, Robert G; McLeod Griffiss, J

    2015-11-01

    DAS181, (study drug, Fludase®) was developed for treatment of influenza and parainfluenza infections. Delivered by inhalation, DAS181 cleaves sialic acid receptors from respiratory epithelial cells. Treatment of influenza for three days with DAS181 reduced viral shedding. To increase deposition in the upper airways and decrease systemic absorption, the particle size was increased to 10μm. We conducted two Phase I trials with three cohorts, randomized 2:1, active drug to placebo. The initial cohort got a single 20mg dose of DAS181, or placebo; the second, 20mg DAS181 or placebo for 10days, and the third got 20mg of DAS181 or placebo for 3days. Formulations differed slightly in their excipients. Subjects in the 1- and 3-day cohorts completed dosing without serious adverse events. Two subjects in the 10-day cohort stopped at Day 9 after developing respiratory and systemic symptoms, and a third experienced a decrease in FEV1 (Forced Expiratory Volume in 1s) after the 9th dose and a further decline after the 10th dose. Plasma DAS181, in the 10-day cohort, peaked and began falling before the last dose. Antibodies, predominately IgG with neutralizing activity, were detected in 15/18 subjects by Day 30. The highest IgG concentrations were in the 10-day cohort. The respiratory adverse events occurring after seven days and rapid drug clearance during continued dosing are consistent with the induction of DAS181 antibodies. This could preclude use of this medication for longer than seven days or for repeated courses. (These studies have been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration Nos. NCT 00527865 and NCT 01651494.).

  20. Phase I Trial of Interleukin-12 Plasmid Electroporation in Patients With Metastatic Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Daud, Adil I.; DeConti, Ronald C.; Andrews, Stephanie; Urbas, Patricia; Riker, Adam I.; Sondak, Vernon K.; Munster, Pamela N.; Sullivan, Daniel M.; Ugen, Kenneth E.; Messina, Jane L.; Heller, Richard

    2008-01-01

    Purpose Gene-based immunotherapy for cancer is limited by the lack of safe, efficient, reproducible, and titratable delivery methods. Direct injection of DNA into tissue, although safer than viral vectors, suffers from low gene transfer efficiency. In vivo electroporation, in preclinical models, significantly enhances gene transfer efficiency while retaining the safety advantages of plasmid DNA. Patients and Methods A phase I dose escalation trial of plasmid interleukin (IL)-12 electroporation was carried out in patients with metastatic melanoma. Patients received electroporation on days 1, 5, and 8 during a single 39-day cycle, into metastatic melanoma lesions with six 100-μs pulses at a 1,300-V/cm electric field through a penetrating six-electrode array immediately after DNA injection. Pre- and post-treatment biopsies were obtained at defined time points for detailed histologic evaluation and determination of IL-12 protein levels. Results Twenty-four patients were treated at seven dose levels, with minimal systemic toxicity. Transient pain after electroporation was the major adverse effect. Post-treatment biopsies showed plasmid dose proportional increases in IL-12 protein levels as well as marked tumor necrosis and lymphocytic infiltrate. Two (10%) of 19 patients with nonelectroporated distant lesions and no other systemic therapy showed complete regression of all metastases, whereas eight additional patients (42%) showed disease stabilization or partial response. Conclusion This report describes the first human trial, to our knowledge, of gene transfer utilizing in vivo DNA electroporation. The results indicated this modality to be safe, effective, reproducible, and titratable. PMID:19029422

  1. Phase I trial of sunitinib and temsirolimus in metastatic renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Matthew T.; Millikan, Randall E.; Altinmakas, Emre; Xiao, Lianchun; Wen, Sin Jen; Siefker-Radtke, Arlene O.; Aparicio, Ana; Corn, Paul G.; Tannir, Nizar M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Preclinical data suggest that anti-VEGF agents plus mTOR inhibitors yield synergistic antitumor effects. A phase I trial using a 3+3 dose escalation design of sunitinib (S) plus temsirolimus (T) was stopped after the first dose pair led to 2 of 3 patients experiencing dose-limiting toxicity (DLT). Patients and Methods To explore multiple potential dosing pairs of S and T a 2 stage outcome-adaptive Bayesian dose-finding method was designed. The primary objective was to find the maximum tolerated doses (MTD) of S and T in patients with advanced RCC. A 3-wk treatment cycle consisted of daily S, 2 wks on, 1 wk off, plus weekly T. Results Twenty patients received study drugs; median number of prior therapies 1. Number of patients (S and T doses in mg): 2 (S12.5, T6), 1 (S25, T12.5), 1 (S12.5, T8), 8 (S12.5 alt 25, T9), 2 (S25, T6), 2 (S25 alt 37.5, T6), 2 (S37.5, T6), 2 (S37.5, T8). Six patients required dose reduction, 3 due to grade 3 stomatitis, 2 due to grade 3 thrombocytopenia; mean number of cycles 6.6 ± 5.3, mean time on study 159±120 days. One patient experienced DLT in cycle 1 and was non-evaluable, 1 had a partial response, 16 had stable disease, and 2 had progressive disease (PD) as best response. There were 21 grade 3/4 adverse events but no treatment-related deaths. Conclusions The MTD of S and T were not determined because of premature trial closure. S 37.5 mg/d, 2 wks on, 1 wk off, plus T 8–10 mg weekly are close to MTD. PMID:25465491

  2. Phylodynamics of HIV-1 from a Phase-III AIDS Vaccine Trial in North America

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Losada, Marcos; Jobes, David V.; Sinangil, Faruk; Crandall, Keith A.; Posada, David; Berman, Phillip W.

    2010-01-01

    In 2003, a phase III placebo-controlled trial (VAX004) of a candidate HIV-1 vaccine (AIDSVAX B/B) was completed in 5,403 volunteers at high risk for HIV-1 infection from North America and the Netherlands. A total of 368 individuals became infected with HIV-1 during the trial. The envelope glycoprotein gene (gp120) from the HIV-1 subtype B viruses infecting 349 patients was sequenced from clinical samples taken as close as possible to the time of diagnosis, rendering a final data set of 1,047 sequences (1,032 from North America and 15 from the Netherlands). Here, we used these data in combination with other sequences available in public databases to assess HIV-1 variation as a function of vaccination treatment, geographic region, race, risk behavior, and viral load. Viral samples did not show any phylogenetic structure for any of these factors, but individuals with different viral loads showed significant differences (P = 0.009) in genetic diversity. The estimated time of emergence of HIV-1 subtype B was 1966–1970. Despite the fact that the number of AIDS cases has decreased in North America since the early 90s, HIV-1 genetic diversity seems to have remained almost constant over time. This study represents one of the largest molecular epidemiologic surveys of viruses responsible for new HIV-1 infections in North America and could help the selection of epidemiologically representative vaccine antigens to include in the next generation of candidate HIV-1 vaccines. PMID:19864468

  3. PRECREST: A phase II prevention and biomarker trial of creatine in at-risk Huntington disease

    PubMed Central

    Doros, Gheorghe; Gevorkian, Sona; Malarick, Keith; Reuter, Martin; Coutu, Jean-Philippe; Triggs, Tyler D.; Wilkens, Paul J.; Matson, Wayne; Salat, David H.; Hersch, Steven M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To assess the safety and tolerability of high-dose creatine, the feasibility of enrolling premanifest and 50% at-risk subjects in a prevention trial, and the potential of cognitive, imaging, and blood markers. Methods: Sixty-four eligible consenting participants were randomly allocated (1:1) to 15 g twice daily of creatine monohydrate or placebo for a 6-month double-blind phase followed by a 12-month open-label extension. Subjects included premanifest (tested) and at-risk (not tested) individuals without clinical symptoms or signs of Huntington disease (HD). Primary outcomes were safety and tolerability. Exploratory endpoints included fine motor, visuospatial, and memory performance; structural and diffusion MRI; and selected blood markers. Results: Forty-seven HD carriers and 17 non-HD controls were enrolled. Fifteen discontinued treatment (2 assigned to placebo); all were followed for the entire study period. Primary analysis was by intent to treat. The most common adverse events were gastrointestinal. Neuroimaging demonstrated treatment-related slowing of cortical and striatal atrophy at 6 and 18 months. Conclusion: We describe a design that preserves the autonomy of subjects not wanting genetic testing while including controls for assessing the specificity of treatment effects. Our results demonstrate the feasibility of prevention trials for HD and the safety of high-dose creatine, provide possible evidence of disease modification, support future studies of creatine, and illustrate the value of prodromal biomarkers. Classification of evidence: This study provides Class I evidence that high-dose creatine is safe and tolerable. PMID:24510496

  4. Treatment of Geographic Atrophy With Subconjunctival Sirolimus: Results of a Phase I/II Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Wai T.; Dresner, Samuel; Forooghian, Farzin; Glaser, Tanya; Doss, Lauren; Zhou, Mei; Cunningham, Denise; Shimel, Katherine; Harrington, Molly; Hammel, Keri; Cukras, Catherine A.; Ferris, Frederick L.; Chew, Emily Y.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate the safety and effects of subconjunctival sirolimus, an mTOR inhibitor and immunosuppressive agent, for the treatment of geographic atrophy (GA). Methods. The study was a single-center, open-label phase II trial, enrolling 11 participants with bilateral GA; eight participants completed 24 months of follow-up. Sirolimus (440 μg) was administered every 3 months as a subconjunctival injection in only one randomly assigned eye in each participant for 24 months. Fellow eyes served as untreated controls. The primary efficacy outcome measure was the change in the total GA area at 24 months. Secondary outcomes included changes in visual acuity, macular sensitivity, central retinal thickness, and total drusen area. Results. The study drug was well tolerated with few symptoms and related adverse events. Study treatment in study eyes was not associated with structural or functional benefits relative to the control fellow eyes. At month 24, mean GA area increased by 54.5% and 39.7% in study and fellow eyes, respectively (P = 0.41), whereas mean visual acuity decreased by 21.0 letters and 3.0 letters in study and fellow eyes, respectively (P = 0.03). Substantial differences in mean changes in drusen area, central retinal thickness, and macular sensitivity were not detected for all analysis time points up to 24 months. Conclusions. Repeated subconjunctival sirolimus was well-tolerated in patients with GA, although no positive anatomic or functional effects were identified. Subconjunctival sirolimus may not be beneficial in the prevention of GA progression, and may potentially be associated with effects detrimental to visual acuity. (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00766649.) PMID:23548622

  5. A phase 1 clinical trial of flavopiridol consolidation in chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients following chemoimmunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Awan, Farrukh T; Jones, Jeffrey A; Maddocks, Kami; Poi, Ming; Grever, Michael R; Johnson, Amy; Byrd, John C; Andritsos, Leslie A

    2016-06-01

    Patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) who receive chemoimmunotherapy and do not achieve complete remission experience significantly shortened progression-free interval (PFS). Additionally, the majority of patients treated for relapsed disease demonstrate evidence of measurable disease. Eradication of minimal residual disease (MRD) results in improved PFS and overall survival. Maintenance therapy might result in eradication of MRD and improve response duration but might be associated with an increase in incidence of infectious complications. Flavopiridol is a broad cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitor with established safety and efficacy in patients with relapsed CLL, particularly patients with high-risk cytogenetic features. A pharmacologically derived schedule was utilized as consolidation therapy in this phase I study to assess the safety and feasibility of outpatient therapy with flavopiridol in patients with low tumor burden. Flavopiridol was administered as a 30-min loading dose of 30 mg/m(2) followed by a 4-h infusion of 30 mg/m(2) once weekly for 3 weeks every 5 weeks (1 cycle) for planned 2 cycles in ten patients. Therapy was extremely well tolerated and no patient developed acute tumor lysis syndrome. The most common toxicities were gastrointestinal. Of the patients, 22 % improved their response from a PR to CR. Eighty-eight percent experienced a reduction in tumor burden as measured by extent of bone marrow involvement including patients with del17p and complex karyotype. The study establishes the safety and efficacy of flavopiridol as consolidation therapy after chemoimmunotherapy for patients with CLL. Further evaluation is required in larger trials for the utility of CDK inhibitors as consolidation or maintenance strategies.Registration number at ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00377104.

  6. Immunotherapy with CpG-ODN in neoplastic meningitis: A phase I trial

    PubMed Central

    Ursu, Renata; Taillibert, Sophie; Banissi, Claire; Vicaut, Eric; Bailon, Olivier; Le Rhun, Emilie; Guillamo, Jean-Sebastien; Psimaras, Dimitri; Tibi, Annick; Sacko, Adama; Marantidou, Athina; Belin, Catherine; Carpentier, Antoine F

    2015-01-01

    TLR-9 agonists are immunostimulating agents that have antitumor effects in animal models. A phase I trial was conducted to define the safety profile of subcutaneous injections, combined with intrathecally administration of CpG-28, a TRL 9 agonist, in patients with neoplastic meningitis (NM). Cohorts of 3–6 patients with NM were treated for 5 weeks with escalating doses of CpG-28. The primary endpoint was tolerance. Secondary endpoints were progression free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS). Twenty-nine patients were treated with CpG-28. The primary cancers were malignant glioma, lung carcinoma, breast cancer, melanoma or melanocytoma, ependymoma, and colorectal cancer. The median age was 56 years and median Karnovsky Performance status (KPS) was 70%. The treatment was well tolerated. Adverse effects that were possibly or probably related to the studied drug were grade 2 lymphopenia, anemia and neutropenia, local erythema at injection sites, fever and seizure. There were five serious adverse events: two confusions, two infections of ventricular devices and one grade 4 thrombopenia and neutropenia. The median PFS was 7 weeks and median OS was 15 weeks. Interestingly, the median survival was slightly (but not significantly) higher in the eight patients who were concomitantly treated with bevacizumab (19 weeks vs 15 weeks; P = 0.11). CpG-28 was well tolerated at doses up to 0.3 mg/kg subcutaneously and 18 mg intrathecally. Additional trials are warranted. PMID:26094710

  7. Erythropoietin Neuroprotection in Neonatal Cardiac Surgery: A Phase I/II Safety and Efficacy Trial

    PubMed Central

    Andropoulos, Dean B.; Brady, Ken; Easley, R. Blaine; Dickerson, Heather A.; Voigt, Robert G.; Shekerdemian, Lara S.; Meador, Marcie R.; Eisenman, Carol A.; Hunter, Jill V.; Turcich, Marie; Rivera, Carlos; McKenzie, E. Dean; Heinle, Jeffrey S.; Fraser, Charles D.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Neonates undergoing complex congenital heart surgery have a significant incidence of neurological problems. Erythropoietin has anti-apoptotic, anti-excitatory, and anti-inflammatory properties to prevent neuronal cell death in animal models, and improves neurodevelopmental outcomes in full term neonates with hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy. We designed a prospective phase I/II trial of erythropoietin neuroprotection in neonatal cardiac surgery to assess safety, and indicate efficacy. Methods Neonates undergoing surgery for D-transposition of the great vessels, hypoplastic left heart syndrome, or aortic arch reconstruction were randomized to 3 perioperative doses of erythropoietin, or placebo. Neurodevelopmental testing with Bayley Scales of Infant and Toddler Development III was performed at age 12 months. Results 59 patients received study drug. Safety profile, including MRI brain injury, clinical events, and death, was not different between groups. 3 patients in each group died. 42 patients (22 erythropoietin, 20 placebo, 79% of survivors) returned for 12-month follow-up. The mean Cognitive Scores were erythropoietin, 101.1 ± 13.6, placebo, 106.3 ± 10.8 (p=0.19); Language Scores were erythropoietin 88.5 ± 12.8, placebo 92.4 ± 12.4 (p=0.33); and Motor Scores were erythropoietin 89.9 ± 12.3, placebo 92.6 ± 14.1, (p=0.51). Conclusions Safety profile for erythropoietin administration was not different than placebo. Neurodevelopmental outcomes were not different between groups, however this pilot study was not powered to definitively address this outcome. Lessons learned from the current study suggest optimized study design features for a larger prospective trial to definitively address the utility of erythropoietin for neuroprotection in this population. PMID:23102686

  8. 78 FR 69690 - Draft Guidance for Industry: Considerations for the Design of Early-Phase Clinical Trials of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-20

    ... of Early-Phase Clinical Trials of Cellular and Gene Therapy Products; Extension of Comment Period... and Gene Therapy Products'' that appeared in the Federal Register of July 2, 2013 (78 FR 39736). The... (CT) and gene therapy (GT) products (referred to collectively as CGT products) with recommendations...

  9. Follow-up of 6-10-Year-Old Stuttering Children after Lidcombe Program Treatment: A Phase I Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koushik, Sarita; Shenker, Rosalee; Onslow, Mark

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: This Phase I trial sought to establish (1) whether the Lidcombe Program is viable for school-age children, (2) whether there is any indication that it requires modification for school-age children, (3) whether treatment effects are durable, (4) how many treatment sessions appear to be required to significantly reduce stuttering frequency…

  10. Effectiveness of a hand-held fan for breathlessness: a randomised phase II trial

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Breathlessness is common and distressing in advanced disease. This phase II study aimed to determine the use and acceptance of a hand-held fan (HHF) to relieve breathlessness, to test the effectiveness of the HHF and to evaluate the recruitment into the study. Methods RCT embedded within a longitudinal study testing a HHF over time compared to a wristband. Patients were included in the longitudinal study when suffering from breathlessness due to advanced cancer or COPD III/IV and could opt in the RCT. Primary outcome was use of the HHF and the wristband after two months. Secondary outcomes were recruitment into the trial and change of breathlessness severity after two months, measured on the modified Borg scale. Baseline data were collected in a personal interview and follow-up data by monthly postal questionnaires. Results 109 patients were recruited in the longitudinal study of which 70 patients (64%) participated in the RCT. Non-participants had statistically significant less breathlessness (Borg mean 2.6 (SD 1.48) versus 3.7 (SD 1.83); p = 0.003) and a better functional status (Karnofsky status mean 61.9 (SD 11.2) versus 66.7 (SD 11.0); p = 0.03). Attrition due to drop out or death was high in both groups. After two months, about half of the patients used the HHF but only 20% the wristband without a statistical difference (Fisher's exact test p = 0.2). 9/16 patients judged the HHF as helpful after two months and 4/5 patients the wristband. There was no difference in mean breathlessness change scores between the HHF (Borg change score: mean 0.6 (SD 2.10)) and the wristband (mean 0.8 (SD 2.67)) after two months (p = 0.90). Conclusions Symptom burden and low functional status did not restrain patients from participation in the study. Finding a control for a visible intervention is challenging and needs careful consideration to what is acceptable to patients. The preliminary evidence of effectiveness of the HHF could not be proved. Patients often stopped

  11. Cerebral near infrared spectroscopy oximetry in extremely preterm infants: phase II randomised clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Pellicer, Adelina; Alderliesten, Thomas; Austin, Topun; van Bel, Frank; Benders, Manon; Claris, Olivier; Dempsey, Eugene; Franz, Axel R; Fumagalli, Monica; Gluud, Christian; Grevstad, Berit; Hagmann, Cornelia; Lemmers, Petra; van Oeveren, Wim; Pichler, Gerhard; Plomgaard, Anne Mette; Riera, Joan; Sanchez, Laura; Winkel, Per; Wolf, Martin; Greisen, Gorm

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine if it is possible to stabilise the cerebral oxygenation of extremely preterm infants monitored by cerebral near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) oximetry. Design Phase II randomised, single blinded, parallel clinical trial. Setting Eight tertiary neonatal intensive care units in eight European countries. Participants 166 extremely preterm infants born before 28 weeks of gestation: 86 were randomised to cerebral NIRS monitoring and 80 to blinded NIRS monitoring. The only exclusion criterion was a decision not to provide life support. Interventions Monitoring of cerebral oxygenation using NIRS in combination with a dedicated treatment guideline during the first 72 hours of life (experimental) compared with blinded NIRS oxygenation monitoring with standard care (control). Main outcome measures The primary outcome measure was the time spent outside the target range of 55-85% for cerebral oxygenation multiplied by the mean absolute deviation, expressed in %hours (burden of hypoxia and hyperoxia). One hour with an oxygenation of 50% gives 5%hours of hypoxia. Secondary outcomes were all cause mortality at term equivalent age and a brain injury score assessed by cerebral ultrasonography. Randomisation Allocation sequence 1:1 with block sizes 4 and 6 in random order concealed for the investigators. The allocation was stratified for gestational age (<26 weeks or ≥26 weeks). Blinding Cerebral oxygenation measurements were blinded in the control group. All outcome assessors were blinded to group allocation. Results The 86 infants randomised to the NIRS group had a median burden of hypoxia and hyperoxia of 36.1%hours (interquartile range 9.2-79.5%hours) compared with 81.3 (38.5-181.3) %hours in the control group, a reduction of 58% (95% confidence interval 35% to 73%, P<0.001). In the experimental group the median burden of hypoxia was 16.6 (interquartile range 5.4-68.1) %hours, compared with 53.6 (17.4-171.3) %hours in the control group (P=0.0012). The

  12. Choice of Starting Dose for Biopharmaceuticals in First-in-Human Phase I Cancer Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Aaron R.; Cook, Natalie; Ricci, M. Stacey; Razak, Albiruni; Le Tourneau, Christophe; McKeever, Kathleen; Roskos, Lorin; Dixit, Rakesh; Hinrichs, Mary Jane

    2015-01-01

    Background. First-in-human (FIH) trials of low-molecular-weight anticancer agents conventionally derive a safe start dose (SD) from one-tenth the severely toxic dose in 10% of rodents or one-sixth the highest nonseverely toxic dose (HNSTD) in nonrodent species. No consensus has been reached on whether this paradigm can be safely applied to biotechnology-derived products (BDPs). Materials and Methods. A comprehensive search was conducted to identify all BDPs (excluding immune checkpoint inhibitors and antibody drug conjugates) with sufficient nonclinical and clinical data to assess the safety of hypothetical use of one-sixth HNSTD in an advanced cancer FIH trial. Results. The search identified 23 BDPs, of which 21 were monoclonal antibodies. The median ratio of the maximum tolerated or maximum administered dose (MTD or MAD) to the actual FIH SD was 36 (range, 8–500). Only 2 BDPs reached the MTD. Hypothetical use of one-sixth HNSTD (allometrically scaled to humans) would not have exceeded the MTD or MAD for all 23 BDPs and would have reduced the median ratio of the MTD or MAD to a SD to 6.1 (range, 3.5–55.3). Pharmacodynamic (PD) markers were included in some animal toxicology studies and were useful to confirm the hypothetical SD of one-sixth HNSTD. Conclusion. One-sixth HNSTD would not have resulted in unacceptable toxicities in the data available. Supporting its use could reduce the number of dose escalations needed to reach the recommended dose. A low incidence of toxicities in animals and humans underscores the need to identify the pharmacokinetic and PD parameters to guide SD selection of BDPs for FIH cancer trials. Implications for Practice: Start dose (SD) for biotechnology-derived products (BDPs) can be safely derived from one-sixth the highest nonseverely toxic dose in nonrodent species and may reduce the number of dose escalations needed to reach the recommended dose in first-in-human studies while limiting unnecessary exposure to high drug levels in

  13. A Phase 2 Randomized Clinical Trial of Intravitreal Bevacizumab for Diabetic Macular Edema

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Objective To provide data on the short-term effect of intravitreal bevacizumab for diabetic macular edema (DME). Design Randomized phase 2 clinical trial. Participants 121 eyes of 121 subjects (109 eligible for analysis) with DME and Snellen acuity equivalent ranging from 20/32-20/320. Interventions Random assignment to one of five groups: focal photocoagulation at baseline (N=19, Group A), intravitreal injection of 1.25mg bevacizumab at baseline and 6 weeks (N=22, Group B), intravitreal injection of 2.5mg bevacizumab at baseline and 6 weeks (N=24, Group C), intravitreal injection of 1.25mg bevacizumab at baseline and sham injection at 6 weeks (N=22, Group D), or intravitreal injection of 1.25mg bevacizumab at baseline and 6 weeks with photocoagulation at 3 weeks (N=22, Group E). Main Outcome Measures Central subfield thickness (CST) on optical coherence tomography and best-corrected visual acuity (VA) were measured at baseline and after 3, 6, 9, 12, 18, and 24 weeks. Results At baseline, median CST was 411 microns and median Snellen VA equivalent was 20/50. Compared with Group A, Groups B and C had a greater reduction in CST at 3 weeks and about one line better median visual acuity over 12 weeks. There were no meaningful differences between Groups B and C in CST reduction or VA improvement. A CST reduction >11% (the reliability limit) was present at 3 weeks in 36/84 (43%) bevacizumab-treated eyes and in 5/18 (28%) eyes treated with laser alone, and at 6 weeks in 31/84 (37%) and 9/18 (50%) eyes, respectively. Combining focal photocoagulation with bevacizumab resulted in no apparent short-term benefit or adverse outcomes. Endophthalmitis developed in one eye. The following events occurred during the first 24 weeks in subjects treated with bevacizumab without attributing cause to the drug: myocardial infarction (N=2), congestive heart failure (N=1), elevated blood pressure (N=3), and worsened renal function (N=3). Conclusion These results demonstrate that

  14. Validation of prognostic scoring and assessment of clinical benefit for patients with bone sarcomas enrolled in phase I clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Livingston, J. Andrew; Hess, Kenneth R.; Naing, Aung; Hong, David S.; Patel, Shreyaskumar; Benjamin, Robert S.; Ludwig, Joseph A.; Conley, Anthony; Herzog, Cynthia E.; Anderson, Pete; Meric-Bernstam, Funda; Kurzrock, Razelle; Subbiah, Vivek

    2016-01-01

    Background We sought to validate the Royal Marsden Hospital (RMH) and MD Anderson Cancer Center (MDACC) prognostic scoring systems for the selection of bone sarcoma patients for phase I clinical trials and to identify additional risk factors related to survival. Patients and Methods We retrospectively reviewed the baseline characteristics and outcomes of 92 bone sarcoma patients who were referred to MDACC's Phase I Clinical Trials Program. Results Ninety-two patients with Ewing sarcoma (N = 47), osteosarcoma (N = 22), chondrosarcoma (N = 16), and other tumors (N = 7) were evaluated; 78 were enrolled in at least 1 of 43 different phase I trials. The median overall survival (OS) was 8.8 months (95% confidence interval [CI] = 6.8–13.7 months). Independent factors that predicted shorter survival were male sex, >2 metastatic sites, >3 previous therapies, hemoglobin level <10.5 g/dL, platelet count >200 x103/L, creatinine level ≥1.3 mg/dL, and lactate dehydrogenase level >ULN. Patients with good RMH scores (0-1) had longer OS than patients with poor RMH scores (2-3) (HR = 5.8, 95% CI = 2.9–11.0; P < 0.0001), as did patients with low MDACC scores (0-1) as compared to patients with higher MDACC scores (2–4) (HR = 3.2, 95% CI = 1.9–5.6; P < 0.0001). Conclusion The RMH prognostic score can be used to predict the OS of bone cancer patients referred for phase I trials. The MDACC score added no value to the RMH score and therefore does not have a role in assessment of patients with bone tumors. Patients with advanced bone sarcomas should be considered for phase I trials. PMID:27486883

  15. INSAT-2A and 2B development mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sathyanarayan, M. N.; Rao, M. Nageswara; Nataraju, B. S.; Viswanatha, N.; Chary, M. Laxmana; Balan, K. S.; Murthy, V. Sridhara; Aller, Raju; Kumar, H. N. Suresha

    1994-01-01

    The Indian National Satellite (INSAT) 2A and 2B have deployment mechanisms for deploying the solar array, two C/S band antenna reflectors and a coilable lattice boom with sail. The mechanisms have worked flawlessly on both satellites. The configuration details, precautions taken during the design phase, the test philosophy, and some of the critical analysis activities are discussed.

  16. The Bayesian basket design for genomic variant-driven phase II trials.

    PubMed

    Simon, Richard; Geyer, Susan; Subramanian, Jyothi; Roychowdhury, Sameek

    2016-02-01

    Basket clinical trials are a new category of early clinical trials in which a treatment is evaluated in a population of patients with tumors of various histologic types and primary sites selected for containing specific genomic abnormalities. The objective of such studies is generally to discover histologic types in which the treatment is active. Basket trials are early discovery trials whose results should be confirmed in expanded histology specific cohorts. In this report, we develop a design for planning, monitoring, and analyzing basket trials. A website for using the new design is available at https://brbnci.shinyapps.io/BasketTrials/ and the software is available at GitHub in the "Basket Trials" repository of account brbnci.

  17. Addition of erlotinib to fluoropyrimidine-oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy with or without bevacizumab: Two sequential phase I trials.

    PubMed

    Carlomagno, Chiara; Daniele, Gennaro; Bianco, Roberto; Marciano, Roberta; Damiano, Vincenzo; Matano, Elide; Nappi, Lucia; Pepe, Stefano; DE Placido, Sabino; Tortora, Giampaolo

    2011-05-01

    The combination of EGFR inhibitors and anti-angiogenic drugs has a strong pre-clinical rationale, yet its use has produced controversial clinical results. We conducted two sequential phase I trials to evaluate the feasibility and the recommended dose of erlotinib when combined with fluoropyrimidine-oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy with or without bevacizumab. A total of 21 metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) patients were treated in two sequential phase I trials. In the first trial, 12 patients were treated with escalating doses of erlotinib plus FOLFOX. In the second, 9 patients were treated with escalating doses of erlotinib combined with oxaliplatin, capecitabine and bevacizumab. No MTD was reached in either of the trials. The only dose-limiting toxicities observed were neutropenia and diarrhea. No unexpected toxicities were noted. Hematological toxicity was the most frequently noted adverse event with infusional 5FU therapy, while gastrointestinal toxicity was the most common adverse event. In the second trial most patients withdrew from treatment due to toxicity, and less than half completed the therapeutic program as per protocol, mostly due to toxicity. In conclusion, the present study confirms the disappointing results of the double combination of EGFR inhibitors and anti-angiogenic drugs in mCRC patients.

  18. Randomized Phase II Trial of Adjuvant WT-1 Analog Peptide Vaccine in Patients with Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma after Completion of Multimodality Therapy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-01

    10-1-0699 TITLE: Randomized Phase II Trial of Adjuvant WT-1 Analog Peptide Vaccine in Patients with Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma after...Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39.18 W81XWH-10-1-0699 Randomized Phase II Trial of Adjuvant WT-1 Analog Peptide Vaccine in Patients with Malignant... peptides that are given together with Montanide and GM-CSF as immunologic adjuvants. This WT1 vaccine was previously tested in a small pilot trial

  19. Protocol for the CHEST Australia Trial: a phase II randomised controlled trial of an intervention to reduce time-to-consult with symptoms of lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Sonya R; Murchie, Peter; Campbell, Neil; Walter, Fiona M; Mazza, Danielle; Habgood, Emily; Kutzer, Yvonne; Martin, Andrew; Goodall, Stephen; Barnes, David J

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Lung cancer is the most common cancer worldwide, with 1.3 million new cases diagnosed every year. It has one of the lowest survival outcomes of any cancer because over two-thirds of patients are diagnosed when curative treatment is not possible. International research has focused on screening and community interventions to promote earlier presentation to a healthcare provider to improve early lung cancer detection. This paper describes the protocol for a phase II, multisite, randomised controlled trial, for patients at increased risk of lung cancer in the primary care setting, to facilitate early presentation with symptoms of lung cancer. Methods/analysis The intervention is based on a previous Scottish CHEST Trial that comprised of a primary-care nurse consultation to discuss and implement a self-help manual, followed by self-monitoring reminders to improve symptom appraisal and encourage help-seeking in patients at increased risk of lung cancer. We aim to recruit 550 patients from two Australian states: Western Australia and Victoria. Patients will be randomised to the Intervention (a health consultation involving a self-help manual, monthly prompts and spirometry) or Control (spirometry followed by usual care). Eligible participants are long-term smokers with at least 20 pack years, aged 55 and over, including ex-smokers if their cessation date was less than 15 years ago. The primary outcome is consultation rate for respiratory symptoms. Ethics and dissemination Ethical approval has been obtained from The University of Western Australia's Human Research Ethics Committee (RA/4/1/6018) and The University of Melbourne Human Research Committee (1 441 433). A summary of the results will be disseminated to participants and we plan to publish the main trial outcomes in a single paper. Further publications are anticipated after further data analysis. Findings will be presented at national and international conferences from late 2016. Trial

  20. Pilot Phase II Trial of Imatinib Mesylate in Neurofibromatosis Type 1 patients with Plexiform Neurofibromas

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, Kent A.; Nalepa, Grzegorz; Yang, Feng-Chun; Bowers, Daniel C.; Ho, Chang Y.; Hutchins, Gary D.; Croop, James M.; Vik, Terry A.; Denne, Scott C.; Parada, Luis F.; Hingtgen, Cynthia M.; Walsh, Laurence E.; Yu, Menggang; Pradhan, Kamnesh R.; Edwards-Brown, Mary K.; Cohen, Mervyn D.; Fletcher, James W.; Travers, Jeffrey B.; Staser, Karl W.; Lee, Melissa W.; Sherman, Marcie R.; Davis, Cynthia J.; Miller, Lucy C.; Ingram, David A.; Clapp, D. Wade

    2016-01-01

    Summary BACKGROUND Plexiform neurofibromas (PN) are slow growing chemoradiotherapy resistant tumours arising in patients with neurofibromatosis type I (NF1). Currently there are no viable therapeutic options for patients whose life-threatening plexiform neurofibromas cannot be surgically removed due to proximity to vital body structures. Based on identification of molecular targets in genetic mouse models of human NF1 tumours, we hypothesized that the oral kinase inhibitor, imatinib mesylate, may be effective in targeted treatment of these chemoradiotherapy-refractory tumours. METHODS An open-label pilot Phase II clinical trial was designed to test whether treatment with imatinib mesylate can decrease volume burden of clinically significant plexiform neurofibromas in NF1 patients. The entry criteria require patients only to have NF1 and a clinically significant plexiform neurofibroma with the specified age limitations (age 3–65). Patients were treated with daily oral imatinib at 440 mg/m2/day for children and 800 mg/day for adults divided twice daily for 6 months. The primary endpoint measure of significant response was a 20% or more reduction in plexiform size by sequential volumetric MRI imaging. Clinical data was analyzed on an intent to treat basis, however to determine the activity of imatinib on NF1-related plexiform tumours, patients able to take imatinib for 6 months were evaluated for their response. Secondary outcomes included evaluation of safety of imatinib mesylate in this group of patients. The trial is registered at http://clinicaltrials.gov/; study number 0512-25. The trial currently is closed to enrollment, however there is a single patient that continues to respond and remains on study. FINDINGS On an intent to treat basis, 6 out of 36 patients or 17% (95% CI: 6 – 33%) experienced objective response to imatinib mesylate. In the evaluable study population of patients (n=23) who received drug for at least six months, six patients (26%; 95% CI

  1. A Multi-Institution Phase I Trial of Ruxolitinib in Patients with Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia (CMML)

    PubMed Central

    Padron, Eric; Dezern, Amy; Andrade-Campos, Marcio; Vaddi, Kris; Scherle, Peggy; Zhang, Qing; Ma, Yan; Balasis, Maria E.; Tinsley, Sara; Ramadan, Hanadi; Zimmerman, Cassandra; Steensma, David P.; Roboz, Gail J.; Lancet, Jeffrey E.; List, Alan F.; Sekeres, Mikkael A.; Komrokji, Rami S.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To conduct a phase I clinical trial exploring the safety and efficacy of ruxolitinib, a JAK1/2 inhibitor, for chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML). Experimental Design Patients with CMML-1 were included without regard to previous therapy. Key exclusion criteria included an absolute neutrophil count (ANC) <0.25 × 103 cells/dL and a platelet count <35 × 103 cells/dL. Four cohorts were enrolled using a "rolling six" study design, with doses ranging from 5 to 20 mg twice daily of ruxolitinib in 5-mg dose escalations. Results Between March 2013 and January 2015, 20 patients were enrolled and treated with ruxolitinib. Seventy percent of patients had the proliferative subtype and 47% had higher risk disease by the Global MD Anderson Scoring System. Eight patients (42%) received a prior hypomethylating agent. No dose-limiting toxicities for ruxolitinib were identified. One subject had grade (G)3 thrombocytopenia with no other drug-associated G3 or G4 adverse events. The mean duration of therapy was 122 days (range, 28–409 days). Four had hematologic improvement and one patient had a partial response per 2006 International Working Group (IWG) criteria. Five of 9 patients with splenomegaly had a reduction in spleen size. Ten of 11 patients with reported disease-related symptoms had clinically meaningful or complete resolution. When combining IWG and spleen responses, a total response rate of 35% (n = 7) was identified. Correlative analysis demonstrated a reduction in inflammatory cytokines and GM-CSF–dependent STAT5 phosphorylation. Conclusions The recommended phase II dose of ruxolitinib is 20 mg twice daily. We demonstrate that ruxolitinib has promising activity in CMML with particular benefit in those with disease-related B symptoms that warrants further study. PMID:26858309

  2. Initial report of the phase I trial of the hypoxic cell radiosensitizer SR-2508

    SciTech Connect

    Coleman, C.N.; Urtasun, R.C.; Wasserman, T.H.; Hancock, S.; Harris, J.W.; Halsey, J.; Hirst, V.K.

    1984-09-01

    From March 15, through August 31, 1983, 37 patients have been entered on the RTOG Phase I trial of SR-2508. The drug was given intravenously three times weekly for three weeks. The starting total dose was 11.7 g/m/sup 2/ and the highest total dose given was 32 g/m/sup 2/. The lower lipophilicity of SR-2508 has produced the expected decrease in terminal half-life (5.4 hrs) of drug excretion and increase in total drug excreted unchanged in the urine (71%) compared to misonidazole or desmethylmisonidazole. The maximum single dose (3.7 g/m/sup 2/) administered was well tolerated. With multiple doses peripheral neuropathy is the dose-limiting toxicity. The lowest cumulative dose producing toxicity was 21.6 g/m/sup 2/, the highest non-toxic dose was 29.7 g/m/sup 2/. The use of an individual patient's drug exposure as measured by the area under the curve of drug concentration vs time may be an excellent predictor of toxicity. This may eventually permit individualization of dose and prevention of serious toxicity. A single dose of 2 g/m/sup 2/ will produce a tumor concentration of drug (approx. 100 ..mu..g/ml) that will yield a sensitizer enhancement ratio of 1.5 to 1.7.

  3. Phage idiotype vaccination: first phase I/II clinical trial in patients with multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Multiple myeloma is characterized by clonal expansion of B cells producing monoclonal immunoglobulins or fragments thereof, which can be detected in the serum and/or urine and are ideal target antigens for patient-specific immunotherapies. Methods Using phage particles as immunological carriers, we employed a novel chemically linked idiotype vaccine in a clinical phase I/II trial including 15 patients with advanced multiple myeloma. Vaccines composed of purified paraproteins linked to phage were manufactured successfully for each patient. Patients received six intradermal immunizations with phage idiotype vaccines in three different dose groups. Results Phage idiotype was well tolerated by all study participants. A subset of patients (80% in the middle dose group) displayed a clinical response indicated by decrease or stabilization of paraprotein levels. Patients exhibiting a clinical response to phage vaccines also raised idiotype-specific immunoglobulins. Induction of a cellular immune response was demonstrated by a cytotoxicity assay and delayed type hypersensitivity tests. Conclusion We present a simple, time- and cost-efficient phage idiotype vaccination strategy, which represents a safe and feasible patient-specific therapy for patients with advanced multiple myeloma and produced promising anti-tumor activity in a subset of patients. PMID:24885819

  4. A phase I trial of the HIV protease inhibitor nelfinavir in adults with solid tumors

    PubMed Central

    Blumenthal, Gideon M.; Gills, Joell J.; Ballas, Marc S.; Bernstein, Wendy B.; Komiya, Takefumi; Dechowdhury, Roopa; Morrow, Betsy; Root, Hyejeong; Chun, Guinevere; Helsabeck, Cynthia; Steinberg, Seth M.; LoPiccolo, Jaclyn; Kawabata, Shigeru; Gardner, Erin R.; Figg, William D.; Dennis, Phillip A.

    2014-01-01

    Nelfinavir is an HIV protease inhibitor being repurposed as an anti-cancer agent in preclinical models and in small oncology trials, yet the MTD of nelfinavir has not been determined. Therefore, we conducted a Phase Ia study to establish the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) and dose limiting toxicities (DLT) of nelfinavir in subjects with advanced solid tumors. Adults with refractory cancers were given oral nelfinavir twice daily with pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic analyses. Twenty-eight subjects were enrolled. Nelfinavir was generally well tolerated. Common adverse events included diarrhea, anemia, and lymphopenia, which were mostly mild. The DLT was rapid-onset neutropenia that was reversible. The MTD was established at 3125 mg twice daily. In an expansion cohort at the MTD, one of 11 (9%) evaluable subjects had a confirmed partial response. This, plus two minor responses, occurred in subjects with neuroendocrine tumors of the midgut or pancreatic origin. Thirty-six percent of subjects had stable disease for more than 6 months. In peripheral blood mononuclear cells, Nelfinavir inhibited AKT and induced markers of ER stress. In summary, nelfinavir is well tolerated in cancer patients at doses 2.5 times the FDA-approved dose for HIV management and showed preliminary activity in tumors of neuroendocrine origin. PMID:25327558

  5. Design of a phase III clinical trial with prospective biomarker validation: SWOG S0819.

    PubMed

    Redman, Mary W; Crowley, John J; Herbst, Roy S; Hirsch, Fred R; Gandara, David R

    2012-08-01

    The role of cetuximab in the treatment of advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is currently unclear. The molecular target of cetuximab, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), as measured by FISH, has shown potential as a predictive biomarker for cetuximab efficacy in NSCLC. SWOG S0819 is a phase III trial evaluating both the value of cetuximab in this setting and EGFR FISH as a predictive biomarker. This work describes the decision process for determining the design and interim monitoring plan for S0819. Six possible designs were evaluated in terms of their properties and the hypotheses that can be addressed within the design constraints. A subgroup-focused, multiple-hypothesis design was selected for S0819 that incorporates coprimary endpoints to assess cetuximab in both the overall study population and among EGFR FISH-positive (FISH(+)) patients, with the sample size determined based on evaluation in the EGFR FISH(+) group. The chosen interim monitoring plan specifies interim evaluations of both efficacy and futility in the EGFR FISH(+) group alone. The futility-monitoring plan to determine early stopping in the EGFR FISH-nonpositive group is based on evaluation within the positive group, the entire study population, and the nonpositive group. SWOG S0819 uses a design that addresses both the biomarker-driven and general-efficacy objectives of this study.

  6. Phase I Trial of Tipifarnib (R115777) Concurrent With Radiotherapy in Patients with Glioblastoma Multiforme

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen-Jonathan Moyal, Elizabeth . E-mail: moyal.elizabeth@claudiusregaud.fr; Laprie, Anne; Delannes, Martine; Poublanc, Muriel; Catalaa, Isabelle; Dalenc, Florence; Berchery, Delphine; Sabatier, Jean; Bousquet, Philippe; De Porre, Peter; Alaux, Beatrice; Toulas, Christine

    2007-08-01

    Purpose: To conduct a Phase I trial to determine the maximally tolerated dose (MTD) of tipifarnib in combination with conventional three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (RT) for patients with glioblastoma multiforme. Methods and Materials: After resection or biopsy, tipifarnib was given 1 week before and then continuously during RT (60 Gy), followed by adjuvant administration until progression. The tipifarnib dose during RT was escalated in cohorts of 3 starting at 200 mg/day. Results: Thirteen patients were enrolled, and 12 were evaluable for MTD. Of these patients, 7 had undergone biopsy, 4 had partial resection, and 1 had gross total resection. No dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) was observed during the concomitant treatment at 200 mg. All 3 patients at 300 mg experienced DLT during the concomitant treatment: 1 with sudden death and 2 with acute pneumonitis. The MTD was reached at 300 mg. The adjuvant treatment was suppressed from the protocol after a case of pneumonitis during this treatment. Six additional patients were included at 200 mg/day of the new protocol, confirming the safety of this treatment. Of the 9 evaluable patients, 1 had partial response, 4 had stable disease, and 3 had rapid progression; the patient with gross total resection was relapse-free after 21 months. Median survival of the evaluable patients was 12 months (range, 5.2-21 months). Conclusion: Tipifarnib (200 mg/day) concurrent with standard radiotherapy is well tolerated in patients with glioblastoma. Preliminary efficacy results are encouraging.

  7. Intensified Adjuvant Treatment of Prostate Carcinoma: Feasibility Analysis of a Phase I/II Trial

    PubMed Central

    Mantini, Giovanna; Fersino, Sergio; Frascino, Vincenzo; Massaccesi, Mariangela; Fionda, Bruno; Luzi, Stefano; Balducci, Mario; De Belvis, Antonio; Morganti, Alessio Giuseppe; Valentini, Vincenzo

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To perform a preliminary feasibility acute and late toxicity evaluation of an intensified and modulated adjuvant treatment in prostate cancer (PCa) patients after radical prostatectomy. Material and Methods. A phase I/II has been designed. Eligible patients were 79 years old or younger, with an ECOG of 0–2, previously untreated, histologically proven prostate adenocarcinoma with no distant metastases, pT2–4 N0-1, and with at least one of the following risk factors: capsular perforation, positive surgical margins, and seminal vesicle invasion. All patients received a minimum dose on tumor bed of 64.8 Gy, or higher dose (70.2 Gy; 85.4%), according to the pathological stage, pelvic lymph nodes irradiation (57.7%), and/or hormonal therapy (69.1%). Results. 123 patients were enrolled and completed the planned treatment, with good tolerance. Median follow-up was 50.6 months. Grade 3 acute toxicity was only 2.4% and 3.3% for genitourinary (GU) and gastrointestinal (GI) tract, respectively. No patient had late grade 3 GI toxicity, and the GU grade 3 toxicity incidence was 5.8% at 5 years. 5-year BDSF was 90.2%. Conclusions. A modulated and intensified adjuvant treatment in PCa was feasible in this trial. A further period of observation can provide a complete assessment of late toxicity and confirm the BDSF positive results. PMID:25093169

  8. Stopped hearts, amputated toes and NASA: contemporary legends among healthy volunteers in US phase I clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Jill A.

    2015-01-01

    The first stage of testing new pharmaceuticals in humans is referred to as a phase I clinical trial. The purpose of these studies is to test the safety of the drugs and to establish appropriate doses that can later be given to patients. Most of these studies are conducted under controlled, in-patient conditions using healthy volunteers who are paid for their participation. To explore healthy volunteers’ experiences in clinical trials, an ethnographic study was conducted at six in-patient phase I clinics in the USA. In addition to the observation of clinic activities (from informed consent procedures to dosing to blood draws), 268 semi-structured interviews were conducted, 33 with clinic staff and 235 with healthy volunteers. Drawing on this dataset, this article explores healthy volunteers’ exchange of contemporary legends about phase I clinical trials. In addition to potentially scaring the listener and communicating distrust in the medical community, these incredible stories help participants cope with perceived stigma and establish a gradient of risk of trial participation, creating potential boundaries to their participation in medical research. The article argues that contemporary legends play a productive role in society, shaping how people view themselves and others and influencing their decisions about risky activities. PMID:25601069

  9. Stopped hearts, amputated toes and NASA: contemporary legends among healthy volunteers in US phase I clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Jill A

    2015-01-01

    The first stage of testing new pharmaceuticals in humans is referred to as a phase I clinical trial. The purpose of these studies is to test the safety of the drugs and to establish appropriate doses that can later be given to patients. Most of these studies are conducted under controlled, in-patient conditions using healthy volunteers who are paid for their participation. To explore healthy volunteers' experiences in clinical trials, an ethnographic study was conducted at six in-patient phase I clinics in the USA. In addition to the observation of clinic activities (from informed consent procedures to dosing to blood draws), 268 semi-structured interviews were conducted, 33 with clinic staff and 235 with healthy volunteers. Drawing on this dataset, this article explores healthy volunteers' exchange of contemporary legends about phase I clinical trials. In addition to potentially scaring the listener and communicating distrust in the medical community, these incredible stories help participants cope with perceived stigma and establish a gradient of risk of trial participation, creating potential boundaries to their participation in medical research. The article argues that contemporary legends play a productive role in society, shaping how people view themselves and others and influencing their decisions about risky activities.

  10. Pharmcodynamics (PD) and Pharmacokinetics (PK) of E7389 (Eribulin, Halichondrin B Analog) During a Phase I Trial in Patients with Advanced Solid Tumors: A California Cancer Consortium Trial

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Robert J.; Synold, Timothy W.; Longmate, Jeffrey A.; Quinn, David I; Gandara, David; Lenz, Heinz-Josef; Ruel, Christopher; Xi, Bixin; Lewis, Michael D.; Colevas, A. Dimitrios; Doroshow, James; Newman, Edward M.

    2015-01-01

    Background The California Cancer Consortium completed a Phase I trial of E7389 (eribulin mesylate), an analog of the marine natural product halichondrin B. This trial was to determine the pharmacodynamics, pharmacokinetics, and MTD of E7389 administered by bolus injection weekly for three weeks out of four. Methods This trial included a rapid titration design. Real-time pharmacokinetics were utilized to guide dose escalation. Initially, single patient cohorts were enrolled with intra- and inter-patient dose-doubling. The second phase was a standard 3 + 3 dose escalation schedule. At the MTD, a cohort of patients was enrolled for target validation studies (separate manuscript). The starting dose was 0.125 mg/m2, and doses were doubled within and between patients in the first phase. Blood and urine sampling for E7389 pharmacokinetics was performed on doses 1 and 3 of cycle 1. Levels were determined using a LC/MS/MS assay. Results 40 patients were entered. Thirty-eight were evaluable for toxicity, thirty-five for response. The rapid escalation ended with a grade 3 elevation of alkaline phosphatase at 0.5 mg/m2/wk. The second phase ended at 2.0 mg/m2/wk with dose-limiting toxicities of grade 3 and 4 febrile neutropenia. Other toxicities included hypoglycemia, hypophosphatemia, and fatigue. The MTD was 1.4 mg/m2/wk. Responses included 4 partial responses, (lung cancer [2], urothelial [1], and melanoma [1]). Conclusions E7389 was well-tolerated in this trial with the major toxicity being myelosuppression. PD shows that E7389 induces significant morphologic changes (bundle formation) in the microtubules of peripheral blood mononuclear cells and tumor cells in vivo. The data suggest that lower intra-tumoral levels of β-tubulin III or higher intra-tumoral levels of MAP4 may correlate with response to E7389, while lower intra-tumoral levels of stathmin may be associated with progression. PK data reveals that E7389 exhibits a tri-exponential elimination from the plasma of

  11. Irreversible Electroporation (IRE) Fails to Demonstrate Efficacy in a Prospective Multicenter Phase II Trial on Lung Malignancies: The ALICE Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Ricke, Jens Jürgens, Julian H. W.; Deschamps, Frederic; Tselikas, Lambros; Uhde, Katja; Kosiek, Ortrud; Baere, Thierry De

    2015-04-15

    PurposeTo assess safety and efficacy of irreversible electroporation (IRE) of lung malignancies.Materials and MethodsPatients with primary and secondary lung malignancies and preserved lung function were included in this prospective single arm trial. Primary and secondary endpoints were safety and efficacy. Recruitment goal was 36 subjects in 2 centers. Patients underwent IRE under general anesthesia with probe placement performed in Fluoroscopy-CT. The IRE system employed was NanoKnife{sup ®} (Angiodynamics). System settings for the ablation procedure followed the manufacturer’s recommendations. The Mann–Whitney U test was used to evaluate the correlation of nine technical parameters with local tumor control. Median follow up was 12 months.ResultsThe expected efficacy was not met at interim analysis and the trial was stopped prematurely after inclusion of 23 patients (13/10 between both centers). The dominant tumor entity was colorectal (n = 13). The median tumor diameter was 16 mm (8–27 mm). Pneumothoraces were observed in 11 of 23 patients with chest tubes required in 8 (35 %). Frequently observed alveolar hemorrhage never led to significant hemoptysis. 14/23 showed progressive disease (61 %). Stable disease was found in 1 (4 %), partial remission in 1 (4 %) and complete remission in 7 (30 %) patients. The relative increase of the current during ablation was significantly higher in the group treated successfully as compared to the group presenting local recurrence (p < 0.05). Needle tract seeding was found in three cases (13 %).ConclusionsIRE is not effective for the treatment of lung malignancies. We hypothesize that the energy deposition with current IRE probes is highly sensitive to air exposure.

  12. Pediatric Phase II Trials of Poly-ICLC in the Management of Newly Diagnosed and Recurrent Brain Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Hartman, Lisa L.R.; Crawford, John R.; Makale, Milan T.; Milburn, Mehrzad; Joshi, Shweta; Salazar, Andres M.; Hasenauer, Beth; VandenBerg, Scott R.; MacDonald, Tobey J.; Durden, Donald L.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Brain tumors are the most common solid tumor diagnosed in childhood that account for significant morbidity and mortality. New therapies are urgently needed; hence, we conducted the first ever prospective open-label phase II trials of the biological response modifier, poly-ICLC, in children with brain tumors. Poly-ICLC is a synthetic double-stranded RNA that has direct antiviral, antineoplastic, and immune adjuvant effects. A total of 47 children representing a variety of brain tumor histopathologic subtypes were treated with poly-ICLC. On the basis of the results of the initial phase II trial, an expanded prospective phase II trial in low-grade glioma (LGG) has been initiated. MRI was used to acquire volume-based measures of tumor response. No dose-limiting toxicities have been observed. In the initial study 3 of 12 subjects with progressive high-grade gliomas (HGGs) responded, and 2 of 4 children with progressive LGG experienced stable disease for 18 to 24 months. In the follow-up LGG phase II study, 2 of 5 LGG patients were stable over 18 months, with 1 stable for 6 months. Overall 5 of 10 LGG patients have responded. On the basis of low toxicity and the promising LGG response, poly-ICLC may be effective for childhood LGG, and the results justify biomarker studies for personalization of poly-ICLC as a single agent or adjuvant. PMID:24309609

  13. Pediatric phase II trials of poly-ICLC in the management of newly diagnosed and recurrent brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Hartman, Lisa L R; Crawford, John R; Makale, Milan T; Milburn, Mehrzad; Joshi, Shweta; Salazar, Andres M; Hasenauer, Beth; VandenBerg, Scott R; MacDonald, Tobey J; Durden, Donald L

    2014-08-01

    Brain tumors are the most common solid tumor diagnosed in childhood that account for significant morbidity and mortality. New therapies are urgently needed; hence, we conducted the first ever prospective open-label phase II trials of the biological response modifier, poly-ICLC, in children with brain tumors. Poly-ICLC is a synthetic double-stranded RNA that has direct antiviral, antineoplastic, and immune adjuvant effects. A total of 47 children representing a variety of brain tumor histopathologic subtypes were treated with poly-ICLC. On the basis of the results of the initial phase II trial, an expanded prospective phase II trial in low-grade glioma (LGG) has been initiated. MRI was used to acquire volume-based measures of tumor response. No dose-limiting toxicities have been observed. In the initial study 3 of 12 subjects with progressive high-grade gliomas (HGGs) responded, and 2 of 4 children with progressive LGG experienced stable disease for 18 to 24 months. In the follow-up LGG phase II study, 2 of 5 LGG patients were stable over 18 months, with 1 stable for 6 months. Overall 5 of 10 LGG patients have responded. On the basis of low toxicity and the promising LGG response, poly-ICLC may be effective for childhood LGG, and the results justify biomarker studies for personalization of poly-ICLC as a single agent or adjuvant.

  14. Amyloid PET Screening for Enrichment of Early-Stage Alzheimer Disease Clinical Trials: Experience in a Phase 1b Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Sevigny, Jeff; Suhy, Joyce; Chiao, Ping; Chen, Tianle; Klein, Gregory; Purcell, Derk; Oh, Joonmi; Verma, Ajay; Sampat, Mehul; Barakos, Jerome

    2016-01-01

    Amyloid positron emission tomography (PET) imaging is being investigated as a screening tool to identify amyloid-positive patients as an enrichment strategy for Alzheimer disease (AD) clinical trial enrollment. In a multicenter, phase 1b trial, patients meeting clinical criteria for prodromal or mild AD underwent florbetapir PET scanning at screening. PET, magnetic resonance imaging, and coregistered PET/magnetic resonance imaging scans were reviewed by 2 independent readers and binary visual readings tabulated. Semiquantitative values of cortical to whole cerebellar standard uptake value ratios were computed (threshold 1.10). Of 278 patients with an evaluable PET scan, 170 (61%) and 185 (67%) were amyloid-positive by visual reading and quantitative analysis, respectively; 39% were excluded from the study due to an amyloid-negative scan based on visual readings. More ApoE ε4 carriers than noncarriers were amyloid-positive (80% vs. 43%). Comparison of visual readings with quantitative results identified 21 discordant cases (92% agreement). Interreader and intrareader agreements from visual readings were 98% and 100%, respectively. Amyloid PET imaging is an effective and feasible screening tool for enrollment of amyloid-positive patients with early stages of AD into clinical trials.

  15. The Bipolar Depression Electrical Treatment Trial (BETTER): Design, Rationale, and Objectives of a Randomized, Sham-Controlled Trial and Data from the Pilot Study Phase

    PubMed Central

    Pereira Junior, Bernardo de Sampaio; Nunes, Paula; Benseñor, Isabela Martins; Lotufo, Paulo Andrade; Machado-Vieira, Rodrigo; Brunoni, André R.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Bipolar depression (BD) is a prevalent condition, with poor therapeutic options and a high degree of refractoriness. This justifies the development of novel treatment strategies, such as transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) that showed promising results in unipolar depression. Methods. We describe a randomized, sham-controlled, double-blinded trial using tDCS for refractory, acutely symptomatic BD (the bipolar depression electrical treatment trial, BETTER). Sixty patients will be enrolled and assessed with clinical and neuropsychological tests. The primary outcome is change (over time and across groups) in the scores of the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (17 items). Biological markers such as blood neurotrophins and interleukins, genetic polymorphisms, heart rate variability, and motor cortical excitability will be assessed. Twelve anodal-left/cathodal-right 2 mA tDCS sessions over the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex will be performed in 6 weeks. Results. In the pilot phase, five patients received active tDCS and were double-blindly assessed, two presenting clinical response. TDCS was well-tolerated, with no changes in cognitive scores. Conclusion. This upcoming clinical trial will address the efficacy of tDCS for BD on different degrees of refractoriness. The evaluation of biological markers will also help in understanding the pathophysiology of BD and the mechanisms of action of tDCS. PMID:25878904

  16. Antiangiogenic Therapy in Advanced Non-small-cell Lung Cancer: A Meta-analysis of Phase III Randomized Trials.

    PubMed

    Raphael, Jacques; Chan, Kelvin; Karim, Safiya; Kerbel, Robert; Lam, Henry; Santos, Keemo Delos; Saluja, Ronak; Verma, Sunil

    2017-01-12

    We conducted a meta-analysis to evaluate the efficacy of adding any antiangiogenic therapy (AT) to the standard of care in advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The electronic databases Ovid PubMed, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and Embase were searched to identify eligible trials. We included all phase III randomized trials with any line and type of treatment, histology. and AT dose. Pooled hazard ratios (HRs) for overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS), and pooled odds ratio (OR) for overall response rates (RR) were calculated. We divided the population into 2 subgroups based on the bevacizumab dose. Data of 19,098 patients from 25 phase III trials were analyzed. Compared with the standard of care, the addition of AT did not prolong OS (HR 0.98; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.96-1.00; P = .1 and HR 0.97; 95% CI, 0.94-1.00; P = .06 for groups 1 and 2, respectively). However, there was a significant improvement in PFS with the addition of AT (HR 0.85; 95% CI, 0.79-0.91; P < .00001 and HR 0.81; 95% CI, 0.75-0.88; P < .00001 for groups 1 and 2, respectively) and overall RR (OR 1.61; 95% CI, 1.30-2.01; P < .0001 and OR 1.72; 95% CI, 1.39-2.14; P < .00001 for groups 1 and 2, respectively). This is the first meta-analysis including only all phase III trials with AT in NSCLC showing no significant effect on OS and an improvement in PFS and RR only. The role of AT in advanced NSCLC is still questionable; strong validated biomarkers are eagerly needed to predict which subgroup might benefit the most from such therapy.

  17. Protocol for Care After Lymphoma (CALy) trial: a phase II pilot randomised controlled trial of a lymphoma nurse-led model of survivorship care

    PubMed Central

    Joske, David; Bulsara, Max; Bulsara, Caroline; Monterosso, Leanne

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Lymphoma is the sixth most common cancer diagnosed in Australia and internationally. Owing to the aggressive nature of the disease and intensity of treatment, survivors face long-term effects that impact on quality of life. Current models of follow-up post-treatment fail to address these complex issues. Given that 74% of patients with lymphoma cancer now survive 5 years beyond diagnosis and treatment, it is important to address this gap in care. Aim To determine self-reported informational and practical needs, anxiety, depression, stress, coping and empowerment at baseline, 3 and 6 months. Methods and analysis A pilot randomised controlled trial will test the effect of a nurse-led lymphoma survivorship clinic compared with usual post-treatment care at a large tertiary cancer centre in Western Australia. The intervention will comprise three face-to-face appointments with delivery of tailored resources, a survivorship care plan and treatment summary (SCP TS). The SCP TS will be given to the participant and general practitioner (GP). Intervention participants will be interviewed at completion to explore the perceived value of the intervention components and preferred dose. An evaluation developed for GPs will assess receipt and use of SCP TS. The primary intent of analysis will be to address the feasibility of a larger trial and requisite effect and sample size. Ethics and dissemination Ethics approval has been granted by the University of Notre Dame Australia and Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital in Western Australia. Peer-reviewed publications and conference presentations will report the results of this phase II trial. Trial registration number ANZCTRN12615000530527; Pre-results. PMID:27194317

  18. Model based design and analysis of phase II HIV-1 trials.

    PubMed

    Rekić, Dinko; Röshammar, Daniel; Simonsson, Ulrika S H

    2013-08-01

    This work explores the advantages of a model based drug development (MBDD) approach for the design and analysis of antiretroviral phase II trials. Two different study settings were investigated: (1) a 5-arm placebo-controlled parallel group dose-finding/proof of concept (POC) study and (2) a comparison of investigational drug and competitor. Studies were simulated using a HIV-1 dynamics model in NONMEM. The Monte-Carlo Mapped Power method determined the sample size required for detecting a dose-response relationship and a significant difference in effect compared to the competitor using a MBDD approach. Stochastic simulation and re-estimation were used for evaluation of model parameter precision and bias given different sample sizes. Results were compared to those from an unpaired, two-sided t test and ANOVA (p ≤ 0.05). In all scenarios, the MBDD approach resulted in smaller study sizes and more precisely estimated treatment effect than conventional statistical analysis. Using a MBDD approach, a sample size of 15 patients could be used to show POC and estimate ED50 with a good precision (relative standard error, 25.7 %). A sample size of 10 patients per arm was needed using the MBDD approach for detecting a difference in treatment effect of ≥20 % at 80 % power, a 3.4-fold reduction in sample size compared to a t test. The MBDD approach can be used to achieve more precise dose-response characterization facilitating decision making and dose selection. If necessitated, the sample size needed to reach a desired power can potentially be reduced compared to traditional statistical analyses. This may allow for comparison against competitors already in early clinical studies.

  19. Preoperative Radiation Therapy With Concurrent Capecitabine, Bevacizumab, and Erlotinib for Rectal Cancer: A Phase 1 Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Prajnan; Eng, Cathy; Rodriguez-Bigas, Miguel A.; Chang, George J.; Skibber, John M.; You, Y. Nancy; Maru, Dipen M.; Munsell, Mark F.; Clemons, Marilyn V.; Kopetz, Scott E.; Garrett, Christopher R.; Shureiqi, Imad; Delclos, Marc E.; Krishnan, Sunil; Crane, Christopher H.

    2014-02-01

    Purpose: The goal of this phase 1 trial was to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of concurrent capecitabine, bevacizumab, and erlotinib with preoperative radiation therapy for rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Patients with clinical stage II to III rectal adenocarcinoma, within 12 cm from the anal verge, were treated in 4 escalating dose levels, using the continual reassessment method. Patients received preoperative radiation therapy with concurrent bevacizumab (5 mg/kg intravenously every 2 weeks), erlotinib, and capecitabine. Capecitabine dose was increased from 650 mg/m{sup 2} to 825 mg/m{sup 2} orally twice daily on the days of radiation therapy; erlotinib dose was increased from 50 mg orally daily in weeks 1 to 3, to 50 mg daily in weeks 1 to 6, to 100 mg daily in weeks 1 to 6. Patients underwent surgery at least 9 weeks after the last dose of bevacizumab. Results: A total of 19 patients were enrolled, and 18 patients were considered evaluable. No patient had grade 4 acute toxicity, and 1 patient had grade 3 acute toxicity (hypertension). The MTD was not reached. All 18 evaluable patients underwent surgery, with low anterior resection in 7 (39%), proctectomy with coloanal anastomosis in 4 patients (22%), posterior pelvic exenteration in 1 (6%), and abdominoperineal resection in 6 (33%). Of the 18 patients, 8 (44%) had pathologic complete response, and 1 had complete response of the primary tumor with positive nodes. Three patients (17%) had grade 3 postoperative complications (ileus, small bowel obstruction, and infection). With a median follow-up of 34 months, 1 patient developed distant metastasis, and no patient had local recurrence or died. The 3-year disease-free survival was 94%. Conclusions: The combination of preoperative radiation therapy with concurrent capecitabine, bevacizumab, and erlotinib was well tolerated. The pathologic complete response rate appears promising and may warrant further investigation.

  20. Intraoperative Radiotherapy in Early-Stage Breast Cancer: Results of the Montpellier Phase II Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Lemanski, Claire; Azria, David; Gourgon-Bourgade, Sophie; Gutowski, Marian; Rouanet, Phillippe; Saint-Aubert, Bernard; Ailleres, Norbert; Fenoglietto, Pascal; Dubois, Jean-Bernard

    2010-03-01

    Purpose: We recently presented the intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) technique given as a reliable alternative to conventional boost radiation after breast-conserving surgery. The low crude numbers of recurrence in elderly patients led us to investigate the feasibility and the efficacy of this procedure as a sole treatment. Methods and Materials: We included 94 patients older than 65 years in this phase II trial. Among them, 42 patients presented with all the inclusion criteria, i.e., stages pT0 to pT1 and pN0, ductal invasive unifocal carcinoma, and tumor-free margin of >2 mm. IORT was delivered using a dedicated linear accelerator. One 21-Gy fraction was prescribed and specified at the 90% isodose, using electrons. In vivo dosimetry was performed for all patients. The primary endpoint was the quality index. Secondary endpoints were quality of life, local recurrences, cosmetic results, and specific and overall rates of survival. Results: The median follow-up was 30 months (range, 12-49 months), and median age was 72 years (range, 66-80 years). The median tumor diameter was 10 mm. All patients received the total prescribed dose. No acute grade 3 toxicities were observed. Endpoints for all but one patient corresponded to acceptable quality index criteria. Pretreatment quality-of-life scores were maximal, and no significant decrease was observed during follow-up. Cosmesis was good to excellent at 6 months. Two patients experienced recurrence but underwent salvage mastectomy. Conclusion: Our results confirm that exclusive partial-breast IORT is feasible for treating early-stage breast cancer in the elderly. IORT may be considered an alternative treatment for a selected population and offers a safe one-step treatment.

  1. Phase II Trial of Neoadjuvant Bevacizumab, Capecitabine, and Radiotherapy for Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Crane, Christopher H.; Eng, Cathy; Feig, Barry W.; Das, Prajnan; Skibber, John M.; Chang, George J.; Wolff, Robert A.; Krishnan, Sunil; Hamilton, Stanley; Janjan, Nora A.; Maru, Dipen M.; Ellis, Lee M.; Rodriguez-Bigas, Miguel A.

    2010-03-01

    Purpose: We designed this Phase II trial to assess the efficacy and safety of the addition of bevacizumab to concurrent neoadjuvant capecitabine-based chemoradiation in locally advanced rectal cancer. Methods: Between April 2004 and December 2007, 25 patients with clinically staged T3N1 (n = 20) or T3N0 (n = 5) rectal cancer received neoadjuvant therapy with radiotherapy (50.4 Gy in 28 fractions over 5.5 weeks), bevacizumab every 2 weeks (3 doses of 5 mg/kg), and capecitabine (900 mg/m{sup 2} orally twice daily only on days of radiation), followed by surgical resection a median of 7.3 weeks later. Results: Procedures included abdominoperineal resection (APR; 6 patients), proctectomy with coloanal anastamosis (8 patients), low anterior resection (10 patients), and local excision (1 patient). Eight (32%) of 25 patients had a pathologic complete response, and 6 (24%) of 25 had <10% viable tumor cells in the specimen. No patient had Grade 3 hand-foot syndrome, gastrointestinal toxicity, or significant hematologic toxicity. Three wound complications required surgical intervention (one coloanal anastamostic dehiscence requiring completion APR and two perineal wound dehiscences after initial APR). Five minor complications occurred that resolved without operative intervention. With a median follow-up of 22.7 months (range, 4.5-32.4 months), all patients were alive; one patient has had a recurrence in the pelvis (2-year actuarial rate, 6.2%) and 3 had distant recurrences. Conclusions: The addition of bevacizumab to neoadjuvant chemoradiation resulted in encouraging pathologic complete response without an increase in acute toxicity. The impact of bevacizumab on perineal wound and anastamotic healing due to concurrent bevacizumab requires further study.

  2. Contura Multi-Lumen Balloon Breast Brachytherapy Catheter: Comparative Dosimetric Findings of a Phase 4 Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Arthur, Douglas W.; Vicini, Frank A.; Julian, Thomas B.; Cuttino, Laurie W.; Mukhopadhyay, Nitai D.

    2013-06-01

    Purpose: Final dosimetric findings of a completed, multi-institutional phase 4 registry trial using the Contura Multi-Lumen Balloon (MLB) breast brachytherapy catheter to deliver accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) in patients with early-stage breast cancer are presented. Methods and Materials: Three dosimetric plans with identical target coverage were generated for each patient for comparison: multilumen multidwell (MLMD); central-lumen multidwell (CLMD); and central-lumen single-dwell (CLSD) loading of the Contura catheter. For this study, a successful treatment plan achieved ideal dosimetric goals and included the following: ≥95% of the prescribed dose (PD) covering ≥95% of the target volume (TV); maximum skin dose ≤125% of the PD; maximum rib dose ≤145% of the PD; and V150 ≤50 cc and V200 ≤10 cc. Results: Between January 2008 and February 2011, 23 institutions participated. A total of 318 patients were available for dosimetric review. Using the Contura MLB, all dosimetric criteria were met in 78.93% of cases planned with MLMD versus 55.38% with the CLMD versus 37.66% with the CLSD (P≤.0001). Evaluating all patients with the full range of skin to balloon distance represented, median maximum skin dose was reduced by 12% and median maximum rib dose by 13.9% when using MLMD-based dosimetric plans compared to CLSD. The dosimetric benefit of MLMD was further demonstrated in the subgroup of patients where skin thickness was <5 mm, where MLMD use allowed a 38% reduction in median maximum skin dose over CLSD. For patients with rib distance <5 mm, the median maximum rib dose reduction was 27%. Conclusions: Use of the Contura MLB catheter produced statistically significant improvements in dosimetric capabilities between CLSD and CLMD treatments. This device approach demonstrates the ability not only to overcome the barriers of limited skin thickness and close rib proximity, but to consistently achieve a higher standard of dosimetric planning goals.

  3. Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Localized Prostate Cancer: Interim Results of a Prospective Phase II Clinical Trial

    SciTech Connect

    King, Christopher R. Brooks, James D.; Gill, Harcharan; Pawlicki, Todd; Cotrutz, Cristian; Presti, Joseph C.

    2009-03-15

    Purpose: The radiobiology of prostate cancer favors a hypofractionated dose regimen. We report results of a prospective Phase II clinical trial of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for localized prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Forty-one low-risk prostate cancer patients with 6 months' minimum follow-up received 36.25 Gy in five fractions of 7.25 Gy with image-guided SBRT alone using the CyberKnife. The early (<3 months) and late (>6 months) urinary and rectal toxicities were assessed using validated quality of life questionnaires (International Prostate Symptom Score, Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite) and the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) toxicity criteria. Patterns of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) response are analyzed. Results: The median follow-up was 33 months. There were no RTOG Grade 4 acute or late rectal/urinary complications. There were 2 patients with RTOG Grade 3 late urinary toxicity and none with RTOG Grade 3 rectal complications. A reduced rate of severe rectal toxicities was observed with every-other-day vs. 5 consecutive days treatment regimen (0% vs. 38%, p = 0.0035). A benign PSA bounce (median, 0.4 ng/mL) was observed in 12 patients (29%) occurring at 18 months (median) after treatment. At last follow-up, no patient has had a PSA failure regardless of biochemical failure definition. Of 32 patients with 12 months minimum follow-up, 25 patients (78%) achieved a PSA nadir {<=}0.4 ng/mL. A PSA decline to progressively lower nadirs up to 3 years after treatment was observed. Conclusions: The early and late toxicity profile and PSA response for prostate SBRT are highly encouraging. Continued accrual and follow-up will be necessary to confirm durable biochemical control rates and low toxicity profiles.

  4. Phase I Trial of Bortezomib and Concurrent External Beam Radiation in Patients With Advanced Solid Malignancies

    SciTech Connect

    Pugh, Thomas J.; Chen Changhu; Rabinovitch, Rachel; Eckhardt, S. Gail; Rusthoven, Kyle E.; Swing, Robyn; Raben, David

    2010-10-01

    Purpose: To determine the maximal tolerated dose of bortezomib with concurrent external beam radiation therapy in patients with incurable solid malignant tumors requiring palliative therapy. Methods and Materials: An open label, dose escalation, phase I clinical trial evaluated the safety of three dose levels of bortezomib administered intravenously (1.0 mg/m{sup 2}, 1.3 mg/m{sup 2}, and 1.6 mg/m{sup 2}/ dose) once weekly with concurrent radiation in patients with histologically confirmed solid tumors and a radiographically appreciable lesion suitable for palliative radiation therapy. All patients received 40 Gy in 16 fractions to the target lesion. Dose-limiting toxicity was the primary endpoint, defined as any grade 4 hematologic toxicity, any grade {>=}3 nonhematologic toxicity, or any toxicity requiring treatment to be delayed for {>=}2 weeks. Results: A total of 12 patients were enrolled. Primary sites included prostate (3 patients), head and neck (3 patients), uterus (1 patient), abdomen (1 patient), breast (1 patient), kidney (1 patient), lung (1 patient), and colon (1 patient). The maximum tolerated dose was not realized with a maximum dose of 1.6 mg/m{sup 2}. One case of dose-limiting toxicity was appreciated (grade 3 urosepsis) and felt to be unrelated to bortezomib. The most common grade 3 toxicity was lymphopenia (10 patients). Common grade 1 to 2 events included nausea (7 patients), infection without neutropenia (6 patients), diarrhea (5 patients), and fatigue (5 patients). Conclusions: The combination of palliative external beam radiation with concurrent weekly bortezomib therapy at a dose of 1.6 mg/m{sup 2} is well tolerated in patients with metastatic solid tumors. The maximum tolerated dose of once weekly bortezomib delivered concurrently with radiation therapy is greater than 1.6 mg/m{sup 2}.

  5. Phase I clinical trial of O-Acetylated pectin conjugate, a plant polysaccharide based typhoid vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Szu, Shousun C.; Lin, Kimi F-Y; Hunt, Steven; Chu, Chiayung; Thinh, Nguyen Duc

    2014-01-01

    Background Typhoid fever remains an important cause of morbidity and mortality in the developing countries. Vi capsular polysaccharide conjugate vaccine demonstrated safety and efficacy in young children in high endemic regions. A novel typhoid conjugate vaccine based on plant polysaccharide pectin was studied in a phase I trial. Methods Fruit pectin, having the same carbohydrate backbone structure as Vi, was purified from citrus peel and used as the polysaccharide source to prepare a semi-synthetic typhoid conjugate vaccine. Pectin was chemically O-acetylated (OAcPec) to antigenically resemble Vi and conjugated to carrier protein rEPA, a recombinant exoprotein A from Pseudomonas aeruginosa. 25 healthy volunteers, 18–45 years old, were injected once with OAcPec-rEPA. Safety and IgG antibodies reactive with Vi and pectin were analyzed. Results No vaccine associated serious adverse reaction was reported. Six weeks after the injection of OAcPec-rEPA, 64% of the volunteers elicited >4 fold rise of anti-Vi IgG. At 26 weeks the level declined, but the difference between the levels at 6 and 26 weeks are not statistically significant. There is a direct correlation between the level of anti-Vi IgG before and after the injection (R2 = 0.96). The anti-Vi IgG can be absorbed by Vi, but not by pectin. There was no corresponding increase of anti-pectin after the injection, indicating the antibody response to OAcPec-rEPA was specific to Vi. There is no Vi-rEPA data in US adults for comparison of immune responses. The OAcPec-rEPA elicited significantly less IgG anti-Vi in US adults than those by Vi-rEPA in Vietnamese adults. Conclusion The O-acetylated pectin conjugate, a plant based typhoid vaccine, is safe and immunogenic in adult volunteers. PMID:24657719

  6. Dose finding with drug combinations in cancer phase I clinical trials using conditional escalation with overdose control.

    PubMed

    Tighiouart, Mourad; Piantadosi, Steven; Rogatko, André

    2014-09-28

    We present a Bayesian adaptive design for dose finding of a combination of two drugs in cancer phase I clinical trials. The goal is to estimate the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) as a curve in the two-dimensional Cartesian plane. We use a logistic model to describe the relationship between the doses of the two agents and the probability of dose limiting toxicity. The model is re-parameterized in terms of parameters clinicians can easily interpret. Trial design proceeds using univariate escalation with overdose control, where at each stage of the trial, we seek a dose of one agent using the current posterior distribution of the MTD of this agent given the current dose of the other agent. At the end of the trial, an estimate of the MTD curve is proposed as a function of Bayes estimates of the model parameters. We evaluate design operating characteristics in terms of safety of the trial design and percent of dose recommendation at dose combination neighborhoods around the true MTD curve. We also examine the performance of the approach under model misspecifications for the true dose-toxicity relationship.

  7. A Phase I/II adaptive design for heterogeneous groups with application to a stereotactic body radiation therapy trial.

    PubMed

    Wages, Nolan A; Read, Paul W; Petroni, Gina R

    2015-01-01

    Dose-finding studies that aim to evaluate the safety of single agents are becoming less common, and advances in clinical research have complicated the paradigm of dose finding in oncology. A class of more complex problems, such as targeted agents, combination therapies and stratification of patients by clinical or genetic characteristics, has created the need to adapt early-phase trial design to the specific type of drug being investigated and the corresponding endpoints. In this article, we describe the implementation of an adaptive design based on a continual reassessment method for heterogeneous groups, modified to coincide with the objectives of a Phase I/II trial of stereotactic body radiation therapy in patients with painful osseous metastatic disease. Operating characteristics of the Institutional Review Board approved design are demonstrated under various possible true scenarios via simulation studies.

  8. Phase II dose-response trials: A simulation study to compare analysis method performance under design considerations.

    PubMed

    Rekowski, Jan; Köllmann, Claudia; Bornkamp, Björn; Ickstadt, Katja; Scherag, André

    2017-02-21

    Phase II trials are intended to provide information about the dose-response relationship and to support the choice of doses for a pivotal phase III trial. Recently, new analysis methods have been proposed to address these objectives, and guidance is needed to select the most appropriate analysis method in specific situations. We set up a simulation study to evaluate multiple performance measures of one traditional and three more recent dose-finding approaches under four design options and illustrate the investigated analysis methods with an example from clinical practice. Our results reveal no general recommendation for a particular analysis method across all design options and performance measures. However, we also demonstrate that the new analysis methods are worth the effort compared to the traditional ANOVA-based approach.

  9. [Basic requirements on post-marketing clinical re-evaluation of chinese medicine and phase IV clinical trials].

    PubMed

    Xie, Yanming; Wang, Yanping; Tian, Feng; Wang, Yongyan

    2011-10-01

    As information on safety and effectiveness is not comprehensive, gained from the researches for listing approval of Chinese medicine, it is very necessary to conduct post-marketing clinical re-evaluation of Chinese medicine. Effectiveness, safety and economic evaluation are three main aspects of post-marketing clinical re-evaluation. In this paper, the difference and relations between the post-marketing clinical re-evaluation and the phase IV clinical trials were discussed, and the basic requests and suggestions were proposed, according to the domestic and foreign relevant regulations and experts' suggestions, and discussed the requirements of the phase IV clinical trials on indications, design methods, inclusion and exclusion criteria, sample size, etc.

  10. Targeting radioimmunotherapy of hepatocellular carcinoma with iodine ({sup 131}I) metuximab injection: Clinical Phase I/II trials

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Zhinan . E-mail: chcerc2@fmmu.edu.cn; Mi Li; Xu Jing

    2006-06-01

    Purpose: HAb18G/CD147 is a hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC)-associated antigen. We developed iodine ({sup 131}I) metuximab injection (Licartin), a novel {sup 131}I-labeled HAb18G/CD147-specific monoclonal antibody F(ab'){sub 2} fragment, and evaluated its safety, pharmacokinetics, and clinical efficacy on HCC in Phase I/II trials. Methods and Materials: In a Phase I trial, 28 patients were randomly assigned to receive the injection in 9.25-, 18.5-, 27.75-, or 37-MBq/kg doses by hepatic artery infusion. In a multicenter Phase II trial, 106 patients received the injection (27.75 MBq/kg) on Day 1 of a 28-day cycle. Response rate and survival rate were the endpoints. Results: No life-threatening toxic effects were found. The safe dosage was 27.75 MBq/kg. The blood clearance fitted a biphasic model, and its half-life was 90.56-63.93 h. In the Phase II trial, the injection was found to be targeted and concentrated to tumor tissues. Of the 73 patients completing two cycles, 6 (8.22%) had a partial response, 14 (19.18%) minor response, and 43 (58.90%) stable disease. The 21-month survival rate was 44.54%. The survival rate of progression-free patients was significantly higher than that of patients with progressive disease after either one or two cycles (p < 0.0001 or p 0.0019). Conclusion: Iodine ({sup 131}I) metuximab injection is safe and active for HCC patients.

  11. Velaglucerase alfa (VPRIV) enzyme replacement therapy in patients with Gaucher disease: Long-term data from phase III clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Derralynn A; Gonzalez, Derlis E; Lukina, Elena A; Mehta, Atul; Kabra, Madhulika; Elstein, Deborah; Kisinovsky, Isaac; Giraldo, Pilar; Bavdekar, Ashish; Hangartner, Thomas N; Wang, Nan; Crombez, Eric; Zimran, Ari

    2015-07-01

    Type 1 Gaucher disease is an inherited lysosomal enzyme deficiency with variable age of symptom onset. Common presenting signs include thrombocytopenia, anemia, hepatosplenomegaly, bone abnormalities, and, additionally in children, growth failure. Fifty-seven patients aged 3-62 years at the baseline of two phase III trials for velaglucerase alfa treatment were enrolled in the single extension study. In the extension, they received every-other-week velaglucerase alfa intravenous infusions for 1.2-4.8 years at 60 U/kg, although 10 patients experienced dose reduction. No patient experienced a drug-related serious adverse event or withdrew due to an adverse event. One patient died following a convulsion that was reported as unrelated to the study drug. Only one patient tested positive for anti-velaglucerase alfa antibodies. Combining the experience of the initial phase III trials and the extension study, significant improvements were observed in the first 24 months from baseline in hematology variables, organ volumes, plasma biomarkers, and, in adults, the lumbar spine bone mineral density Z-score. Improvements were maintained over longer-term treatment. Velaglucerase alfa had a good long-term safety and tolerability profile, and patients continued to respond clinically, which is consistent with the results of the extension study to the phase I/II trial of velaglucerase alfa. EudraCT number 2008-001965-27; www.clinicaltrials.gov identifier NCT00635427.

  12. Velaglucerase alfa (VPRIV) enzyme replacement therapy in patients with Gaucher disease: Long-term data from phase III clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Derralynn A; Gonzalez, Derlis E; Lukina, Elena A; Mehta, Atul; Kabra, Madhulika; Elstein, Deborah; Kisinovsky, Isaac; Giraldo, Pilar; Bavdekar, Ashish; Hangartner, Thomas N; Wang, Nan; Crombez, Eric; Zimran, Ari

    2015-01-01

    Type 1 Gaucher disease is an inherited lysosomal enzyme deficiency with variable age of symptom onset. Common presenting signs include thrombocytopenia, anemia, hepatosplenomegaly, bone abnormalities, and, additionally in children, growth failure. Fifty-seven patients aged 3–62 years at the baseline of two phase III trials for velaglucerase alfa treatment were enrolled in the single extension study. In the extension, they received every-other-week velaglucerase alfa intravenous infusions for 1.2–4.8 years at 60 U/kg, although 10 patients experienced dose reduction. No patient experienced a drug-related serious adverse event or withdrew due to an adverse event. One patient died following a convulsion that was reported as unrelated to the study drug. Only one patient tested positive for anti-velaglucerase alfa antibodies. Combining the experience of the initial phase III trials and the extension study, significant improvements were observed in the first 24 months from baseline in hematology variables, organ volumes, plasma biomarkers, and, in adults, the lumbar spine bone mineral density Z-score. Improvements were maintained over longer-term treatment. Velaglucerase alfa had a good long-term safety and tolerability profile, and patients continued to respond clinically, which is consistent with the results of the extension study to the phase I/II trial of velaglucerase alfa. EudraCT number 2008-001965-27; http://www.clinicaltrials.gov identifier NCT00635427. Am. J. Hematol. 90:584–591, 2015. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25801797

  13. Eligibility of patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer for phase III chemotherapy trials

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Evidence that chemotherapy improves survival and quality of life in patients with stage IIIB & IV non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is based on large randomized controlled trials. The purpose of this study was to determine eligibility of patients with advanced NSCLC for major chemotherapy trials. Methods Physicians treating stage IIIB/IV NSCLC at Sydney Cancer Centre assessed patient eligibility for the E1594, SWOG9509 and TAX326 trials for patients presenting from October 2001 to December 2002. A review of the centre's registry was used to obtain missing data. Results 199 patients with advanced NSCLC were registered during the 14-month period. Characteristics of 100 patients were defined prospectively, 85 retrospectively: 77% males, median age 68 (range 32–88), 64% stage IV disease. Only 35% met trial eligibility for E1594 and 28% for SWOG9509 and TAX326. Common reasons for ineligibility were: co-morbidities 75(40%); ECOG Performance Status ≥2 72(39%); symptomatic brain metastasis 15(8%); and previous cancers 21(11%). Many patients were ineligible by more than one criterion. Conclusion The majority of patients with advanced NSCLC were ineligible for the large chemotherapy trials. The applicability of trial results to advanced lung cancer populations may be limited. Future trials should be conducted in a more representative population. PMID:19402889

  14. Investigation of Class 2b Trucks

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, S.C.

    2002-04-03

    The popularity of trucks in the class 2 category--that is, those with a 6,000 to 10,000 pounds (lbs) gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR)--has increased since the late 1970s/early 1980s. The purpose of this research is to identify and examine vehicles in the upper portion of the class 2 weight range (designated as vehicle class 2b) and to assess their impact. Vehicles in class 2b (8,500-10,000 lbs GVWR) include pickup trucks, sport utility vehicles (SUVs), and large vans (i.e., not minivans). Oak Ridge National Laboratory researched each individual truck model to determine which models were class 2b trucks and arrived at four methodologies to derive sales volumes. Two methods--one for calendar year and one for model year sales--were recommended for producing believable and reliable results. The study indicates that 521,000 class 2b trucks were sold in calendar year 1999--6.4% of sales of all trucks under 10,000 lbs. Eighty-two percent of class 2b trucks sold in 1999 were pickups; one third of class 2b trucks sold in 1999 were diesel. There were 5.8 million class 2b trucks on the road in 2000, which amounts to 7.8% of all trucks under 10,000 lbs. Twenty-four percent of the class 2b truck population is diesel. Estimates show that class 2b trucks account for 8% of annual miles traveled by trucks under 10,000 lbs and 9% of fuel use. Data on class 2b trucks are scarce. As the Tier 2 standards, which apply to passenger vehicles in the 8,500-10,000 lb GVWR category, become effective, additional data on class 2b trucks may become available--not only emissions data, but data in all areas. At the moment, distinguishing class 2b trucks from class 2 trucks in general is a substantial task requiring data on an individual model level.

  15. Thymostimulin versus placebo for palliative treatment of locally advanced or metastasised hepatocellular carcinoma: a phase III clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Thymostimulin is a thymic peptide fraction with immune-mediated cytotoxicity against hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in vitro and palliative efficacy in advanced HCC in two independent phase II trials. The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of thymostimulin in a phase III trial. Methods The study was designed as a prospective randomised, placebo-controlled, double-blind, multicenter clinical phase III trial. Between 10/2002 and 03/2005, 135 patients with locally advanced or metastasised HCC (Karnofsky ≥60%/Child-Pugh ≤ 12) were randomised to receive thymostimulin 75 mg s.c. 5×/week or placebo stratified according to liver function. Primary endpoint was twelve-month survival, secondary endpoints overall survival (OS), time to progression (TTP), tumor response, safety and quality of life. A subgroup analysis according to liver function, KPS and tumor stage (Okuda, CLIP and BCLC) formed part of the protocol. Results Twelve-month survival was 28% [95%CI 17-41; treatment] and 32% [95%CI 19-44; control] with no significant differences in median OS (5.0 [95% CI 3.7-6.3] vs. 5.2 [95% CI 3.5-6.9] months; p = 0.87, HR = 1.04 [95% CI 0.7-1.6]) or TTP (5.3 [95%CI 2.0-8.6] vs. 2.9 [95%CI 2.6-3.1] months; p = 0.60, HR = 1.13 [95% CI 0.7-1.8]). Adjustment for liver function, Karnofsky status or tumor stage did not affect results. While quality of life was similar in both groups, fewer patients on thymostimulin suffered from accumulating ascites and renal failure. Conclusions In our phase III trial, we found no evidence of any benefit to thymostimulin in the treatment of advanced HCC and there is therefore no justification for its use as single-agent treatment. The effect of thymostimulin on hepato-renal function requires further confirmation. Trial Registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN64487365. PMID:20735834

  16. Peginterferon Alfa-2b Injection (Sylatron)

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2b injection is used in people with malignant melanoma (a life-threatening cancer that begins in certain ... is used to reduce the chance that malignant melanoma will come back and must be started within ...

  17. Clinical Phase IIB Trial of Oxycyte Perflurocarbon in Severe Human Traumatic Brain Injury

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-10-01

    clinical trial in Switzerland and Israel and the first batch of results in the first cohort of patients was obtained and proved to be satisfactory. Based... Neurological injury [brain and cord] is always accompanied by tissue ischemia/hypoxia and much of the damage seems to be mediated by this secondary mechanism...Stop TBI”] was designed to comply with suggestions provided by the FDA. The trial was designed to enroll 128 patients in the following centers

  18. Adherence and its Measurement in Phase 2/3 Microbicide Trials

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Polly F.; Goetghebeur, Els; Morrow, Kathleen; Pool, Robert; Taylor, Doug; Tillman, Stephanie N.; van der Straten, Ariane

    2009-01-01

    Adherence optimization and measurement have emerged as critically challenging issues for clinical trials of topical microbicides. Although microbicide trials have routinely collected adherence data, their utilization in trial design, implementation, and interpretation has been inconsistent. Drawing on data-driven presentations from several focused meetings, this paper synthesizes lessons from past microbicide trials and provides recommendations for future trials of microbicide and other HIV prevention technologies. First, it describes four purposes for adherence data collection, with particular attention to intention-to-treat versus adherence-adjusted analyses for determining effectiveness. Second, the microbicide field’s experiences with adherence measures and data collection modes are discussed, including the strengths and weaknesses of various options and approaches for improving measurement. Then, several approaches to optimizing trial participants’ adherence are presented. The paper concludes with a set of recommendations for immediate use or further research. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s10461-009-9635-x) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. PMID:19924525

  19. Oral ponesimod in relapsing–remitting multiple sclerosis: a randomised phase II trial

    PubMed Central

    Olsson, Tomas; Boster, Aaron; Fernández, Óscar; Freedman, Mark S; Pozzilli, Carlo; Bach, Doris; Berkani, Ouali; Mueller, Markus S; Sidorenko, Tatiana; Radue, Ernst-Wilhelm; Melanson, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Objective This double-blind, placebo-controlled, dose-finding phase IIb study evaluated the efficacy and safety of ponesimod, an oral selective S1P1 receptor modulator, for the treatment of patients with relapsing–remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS). Methods 464 patients were randomised to receive once-daily oral ponesimod 10, 20 or 40 mg, or placebo for 24 weeks. The primary endpoint was the cumulative number of new T1 gadolinium-enhanced (T1 Gd+) lesions per patient recorded every 4 weeks from weeks 12 to 24 after study drug initiation. Secondary endpoints were the annualised confirmed relapse rate (ARR) and time to first confirmed relapse. Safety and tolerability were also evaluated. Results The mean cumulative number of new T1 Gd+ lesions at weeks 12–24 was significantly lower in the ponesimod 10 mg (3.5; rate ratio (RR) 0.57; p=0.0318), 20 mg (1.1; RR 0.17; p<0.0001) and 40 mg (1.4; RR 0.23; p<0.0001) groups compared with placebo (6.2). The mean ARR was lower with 40 mg ponesimod versus placebo, with a maximum reduction of 52% (0.25 vs 0.53; p=0.0363). The time to first confirmed relapse was increased with ponesimod compared with placebo. The proportion of patients with ≥1 treatment-emergent adverse events (AEs) was similar across ponesimod groups and the placebo group. Frequently reported AEs with higher incidence in the three ponesimod groups compared with placebo were anxiety, dizziness, dyspnoea, increased alanine aminotransferase, influenza, insomnia and peripheral oedema. Conclusions Once-daily treatment with ponesimod 10, 20 or 40 mg significantly reduced the number of new T1 Gd+ lesions and showed a beneficial effect on clinical endpoints. Ponesimod was generally well tolerated, and further investigation of ponesimod for the treatment of RRMS is under consideration. Trial registration number NCT01006265. PMID:24659797

  20. Phase I trial of 96-hour continuous infusion of dexrazoxane in patients with advanced malignancies.

    PubMed

    Tetef, M L; Synold, T W; Chow, W; Leong, L; Margolin, K; Morgan, R; Raschko, J; Shibata, S; Somlo, G; Yen, Y; Groshen, S; Johnson, K; Lenz, H J; Gandara, D; Doroshow, J H

    2001-06-01

    Dexrazoxane is a bidentate chelator of divalent cations. Pretreatment with short infusions of dexrazoxane prior to bolus doxorubicin has been shown to lessen the incidence and severity of anthracycline-associated cardiac toxicity. However, because of rapid, diffusion-mediated cellular uptake and the short plasma half-life of dexrazoxane, combined with prolonged cellular retention of doxorubicin, dexrazoxane may be more effective when administered as a continuous infusion. Thus, a Phase I pharmacokinetic trial of a 96-h infusion of dexrazoxane was performed. Dexrazoxane doses were escalated in cohorts of 3 to 6 patients per dose level. All patients received granulocyte-colony stimulating factor at a dose of 5 microg/kg/day starting 24 h after completion of the dexrazoxane infusion. Plasma samples were collected and analyzed for dexrazoxane by high-performance liquid chromatography. Urine collections were performed at baseline and during the infusion to determine the renal clearance of dexrazoxane and the excretion rate of divalent cations. Twenty-two patients were enrolled at doses ranging from 125 to 250 mg/m(2)/day. Grade 3 and 4 toxicities included grade 4 thrombocytopenia in 2 patients treated at 250 mg/m(2)/day, grade 3 thrombocytopenia and grade 4 nausea and vomiting in 1 patient treated at 221 mg/m(2)/day, grade 4 diarrhea and grade 3 nausea and vomiting in 1 patient treated at 221 mg/m(2)/day, and grade 3 hypertension in 1 patient treated at 166.25 mg/m(2)/day. Steady-state dexrazoxane levels ranged from 496 microg/l (2.2 microM) to 1639 microg/l (7.4 microM). Dexrazoxane plasma CL(ss) and elimination t(1/2) were 7.2 +/- 1.6 l/h/m(2) and 2.0 +/- 0.8 h, respectively. The mean percentage of administered dexrazoxane recovered in the urine at steady state was 30% (range, 10-66%). Urinary iron and zinc excretion during the dexrazoxane infusion increased in 12 of 18 and 19 of 19 patients by a median of 3.7- and 2.4-fold, respectively. These results suggest that

  1. Randomized Placebo-Controlled Phase II Trial of Autologous Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Blanco, Yolanda; Marín, Pedro; Moreno, Beatriz; Berenguer, Joan; Gabilondo, Iñigo; Martínez-Heras, Eloy; Sola-Valls, Nuria; Arnaiz, Joan-Albert; Andreu, Enrique J.; Fernández, Begoña; Bullich, Santi; Sánchez-Dalmau, Bernardo; Graus, Francesc; Villoslada, Pablo; Saiz, Albert

    2014-01-01

    Objective Uncontrolled studies of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in multiple sclerosis suggested some beneficial effect. In this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover phase II study we investigated their safety and efficacy in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis patients. Efficacy was evaluated in terms of cumulative number of gadolinium-enhancing lesions (GEL) on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at 6 months and at the end of the study. Methods Patients unresponsive to conventional therapy, defined by at least 1 relapse and/or GEL on MRI scan in past 12 months, disease duration 2 to 10 years and Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) 3.0–6.5 were randomized to receive IV 1–2×106 bone-marrow-derived-MSCs/Kg or placebo. After 6 months, the treatment was reversed and patients were followed-up for another 6 months. Secondary endpoints were clinical outcomes (relapses and disability by EDSS and MS Functional Composite), and several brain MRI and optical coherence tomography measures. Immunological tests were explored to assess the immunomodulatory effects. Results At baseline 9 patients were randomized to receive MSCs (n = 5) or placebo (n = 4). One patient on placebo withdrew after having 3 relapses in the first 5 months. We did not identify any serious adverse events. At 6 months, patients treated with MSCs had a trend to lower mean cumulative number of GEL (3.1, 95% CI = 1.1–8.8 vs 12.3, 95% CI = 4.4–34.5, p = 0.064), and at the end of study to reduced mean GEL (−2.8±5.9 vs 3±5.4, p = 0.075). No significant treatment differences were detected in the secondary endpoints. We observed a non-significant decrease of the frequency of Th1 (CD4+ IFN-γ+) cells in blood of MSCs treated patients. Conclusion Bone-marrow-MSCs are safe and may reduce inflammatory MRI parameters supporting their immunomodulatory properties. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01228266 PMID:25436769

  2. Certolizumab Pegol Efficacy Across Methotrexate Regimens: A Pre‐Specified Analysis of Two Phase III Trials

    PubMed Central

    Furst, Daniel E.; Keystone, Edward C.; van der Heijde, Désirée; Luijtens, Kristel; Ionescu, Lucian; Goel, Niti; Emery, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Objective Anti–tumor necrosis factor (anti‐TNF) agents are frequently used in combination with methotrexate (MTX) to treat rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We investigated the effect of a background MTX dose, in combination with anti‐TNF certolizumab pegol (CZP), on treatment efficacy and safety in RA patients. Methods A pre‐specified subgroup analysis comparing 2 MTX dosage categories (<15 mg/week and ≥15 mg/week) was carried out using data pooled from phase III clinical trials, Rheumatoid Arthritis Prevention of Structural Damage 1 (RAPID 1) and RAPID 2, according to treatment group: CZP 200 mg, CZP 400 mg, or placebo, every 2 weeks. Inclusion criteria required MTX dosage ≥10 mg/week. Efficacy end points included week 24 American College of Rheumatology criteria for 20%, 50%, and 70% improvement (ACR20/50/70) responses analyzed by logistic regression, and changes from baseline in the Disease Activity Score in 28 joints using the erythrocyte sedimentation rate (DAS28‐ESR) and the modified Sharp/van der Heijde score (SHS) were analyzed by analysis of covariance. Incidence rates of treatment‐emergent adverse events (TEAEs) were categorized by baseline MTX dose. Post hoc sensitivity analysis investigated 3 MTX dose categories: ≤10 mg/week, >10 and ≤15 mg/week, and >15 mg/week. Results A total of 638, 635, and 325 patients received CZP 200 mg, CZP 400 mg, and placebo, respectively. At week 24, treatment responses in both CZP groups were uninfluenced by baseline MTX dose category, and were superior to the placebo group for all investigated end points: ACR20/50/70, DAS28‐ESR, and SHS. TEAE incidence rates were higher in patients receiving MTX ≥15 mg/week for most TEAE types across treatment groups. Conclusion CZP efficacy was not affected by background MTX dose category. It can be hypothesized that to minimize TEAEs, background MTX doses could be tailored to individual patient tolerance without affecting CZP efficacy. PMID:26238672

  3. Phase 3 Randomized Trial on Larynx Preservation Comparing Sequential vs Alternating Chemotherapy and Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Rolland, F.; Tesselaar, M.; Bardet, E.; Leemans, C. R.; Geoffrois, L.; Hupperets, P.; Barzan, L.; de Raucourt, D.; Chevalier, D.; Licitra, L.; Lunghi, F.; Stupp, R.; Lacombe, D.; Bogaerts, J.; Horiot, J. C.; Bernier, J.; Vermorken, J. B.

    2009-01-01

    Background Both induction chemotherapy followed by irradiation and concurrent chemotherapy and radiotherapy have been reported as valuable alternatives to total laryngectomy in patients with advanced larynx or hypopharynx cancer. We report results of the randomized phase 3 trial 24954 from the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer. Methods Patients with resectable advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the larynx (tumor stage T3–T4) or hypopharynx (T2–T4), with regional lymph nodes in the neck staged as N0–N2 and with no metastasis, were randomly assigned to treatment in the sequential (or control) or the alternating (or experimental) arm. In the sequential arm, patients with a 50% or more reduction in primary tumor size after two cycles of cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil received another two cycles, followed by radiotherapy (70 Gy total). In the alternating arm, a total of four cycles of cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil (in weeks 1, 4, 7, and 10) were alternated with radiotherapy with 20 Gy during the three 2-week intervals between chemotherapy cycles (60 Gy total). All nonresponders underwent salvage surgery and postoperative radiotherapy. The Kaplan–Meier method was used to obtain time-to-event data. Results The 450 patients were randomly assigned to treatment (224 to the sequential arm and 226 to the alternating arm). Median follow-up was 6.5 years. Survival with a functional larynx was similar in sequential and alternating arms (hazard ratio of death and/or event = 0.85, 95% confidence interval = 0.68 to 1.06), as were median overall survival (4.4 and 5.1 years, respectively) and median progression-free interval (3.0 and 3.1 years, respectively). Grade 3 or 4 mucositis occurred in 64 (32%) of the 200 patients in the sequential arm who received radiotherapy and in 47 (21%) of the 220 patients in the alternating arm. Late severe edema and/or fibrosis was observed in 32 (16%) patients in the sequential arm and in 25 (11%) in the

  4. Long-Term Results From the Contura Multilumen Balloon Breast Brachytherapy Catheter Phase 4 Registry Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Cuttino, Laurie W.; Arthur, Douglas W.; Vicini, Frank; Julian, Thomas; Mukhopadhyay, Nitai

    2014-12-01

    Purpose: To describe the long-term outcomes from a completed, multi-institutional phase 4 registry trial using the Contura multilumen balloon (CMLB) breast brachytherapy catheter to deliver accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) in patients with early-stage breast cancer. Methods and Materials: Three hundred forty-two evaluable patients were enrolled by 23 institutions between January 2008 and February 2011. All patients received 34 Gy in 10 fractions, delivered twice daily. Rigorous target coverage and normal tissue dose constraints were observed. Results: The median follow-up time was 36 months (range, 1-54 months). For the entire patient cohort of 342 patients, 10 patients experienced an ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR). Eight of these IBTR were classified as true recurrences/marginal miss (TRMM), and 2 were elsewhere failures (EF). Local recurrence-free survival was 97.8% at 3 years. For the entire cohort, 88% of patients had good to excellent overall cosmesis. The overall incidence of infection was 8.5%. Symptomatic seroma was reported in only 4.4% of patients. A separate analysis was performed to determine whether improved outcomes would be observed for patients treated at high-volume centers with extensive brachytherapy experience. Three IBTR were observed in this cohort, only 1 of which was classified as a TRMM. Local recurrence-free survival at high-volume centers was 98.1% at 3 years. Overall cosmetic outcome and toxicity were superior in patients treated at high-volume centers. In these patients, 95% had good to excellent overall cosmesis. Infection was observed in only 2.9% of patients, and symptomatic seroma was reported in only 1.9%. Conclusion: Use of the CMLB for APBI delivery is associated with acceptable long-term local control and toxicity. Local recurrence-free survival was 97.8% at 3 years. Significant (grade 3) toxicity was uncommon, and no grade 4 toxicity was observed. Treatment at high-volume centers was associated

  5. Impact of source data verification on data quality in clinical trials: an empirical post hoc analysis of three phase 3 randomized clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Jeppe Ragnar; Byrjalsen, Inger; Bihlet, Asger; Kalakou, Faidra; Hoeck, Hans Christian; Hansen, Gitte; Hansen, Henrik Bo; Karsdal, Morten Asser; Riis, Bente Juel

    2015-01-01

    AIM The aim of this project was to perform an empirical evaluation of the impact of on site source data verification (SDV) on the data quality in a clinical trial database to guide an informed decision on selection of the monitoring approach. METHODS We used data from three randomized phase III trials monitored with a combination of complete SDV or partial SDV. After database lock, individual subject data were extracted from the clinical database and subjected to post hoc complete SDV. Error rates were calculated with focus on the degree of on study monitoring and relevance and analyzed for potential impact on end points. RESULTS Data from a total of 2566 subjects including more than 3 million data fields were 100% source data verified post hoc. An overall error rate of 0.45% was found. No sites had 0% errors. 100% SDV yielded an error rate of 0.27% as compared with partial SDV having an error rate of 0.53% (P < 0.0001). Comparing partly and fully monitored subjects, minor differences were identified between variables of major importance to efficacy or safety. CONCLUSIONS The findings challenge the notion that a 0% error rate is obtainable with on site monitoring. Data indicate consistently low error rates across the three trials analyzed. The use of complete vs. partial SDV offers a marginal absolute error rate reduction of 0.26%, i.e. a need to perform complete SDV of about 370 data points to avoid one unspecified error and does not support complete SDV as a means of providing meaningful improvements in data accuracy. PMID:25327707

  6. A randomized two-stage design for phase II clinical trials based on a Bayesian predictive approach.

    PubMed

    Cellamare, Matteo; Sambucini, Valeria

    2015-03-15

    The rate of failure in phase III oncology trials is surprisingly high, partly owing to inadequate phase II studies. Recently, the use of randomized designs in phase II is being increasingly recommended, to avoid the limits of studies that use a historical control. We propose a two-arm two-stage design based on a Bayesian predictive approach. The idea is to ensure a large probability, expressed in terms of the prior predictive probability of the data, of obtaining a substantial posterior evidence in favour of the experimental treatment, under the assumption that it is actually more effective than the standard agent. This design is a randomized version of the two-stage design that has been proposed for single-arm phase II trials by Sambucini. We examine the main features of our novel design as all the parameters involved vary and compare our approach with Jung's minimax and optimal designs. An illustrative example is also provided online as a supplementary material to this article.

  7. Suvorexant in Patients with Insomnia: Pooled Analyses of Three-Month Data from Phase-3 Randomized Controlled Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Herring, W. Joseph; Connor, Kathleen M.; Snyder, Ellen; Snavely, Duane B.; Zhang, Ying; Hutzelmann, Jill; Matzura-Wolfe, Deborah; Benca, Ruth M.; Krystal, Andrew D.; Walsh, James K.; Lines, Christopher; Roth, Thomas; Michelson, David

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: Suvorexant is an orexin receptor antagonist approved for treating insomnia at a maximum dose of 20 mg. Phase-3 trials evaluated two age-adjusted (non-elderly/elderly) dose-regimes of 40/30 mg and 20/15 mg with the primary focus on 40/30 mg. We report here results from pooled analyses of the 20/15 mg dose-regime, which was evaluated as a secondary objective in the trials. Methods: Prespecified analysis of pooled data from two identical randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group, 3-month trials in non-elderly (18–64 years) and elderly (≥ 65 years) patients with insomnia. Patients were randomized to suvorexant 20/15 mg (non-elderly/elderly), suvorexant 40/30 mg (non-elderly/elderly), or placebo; by design, fewer patients were randomized to 20/15 mg. Efficacy was assessed by self-reported and polysomnography (PSG; subset of patients) sleep maintenance and onset endpoints. Results: Suvorexant 20/15 mg (N = 493 treated) was effective compared to placebo (N = 767 treated) on patient-reported and PSG sleep maintenance and onset endpoints at Night-1 (PSG endpoints) / Week-1 (subjective endpoints), Month-1 and Month-3, except for effects on PSG sleep onset at Month-3. Suvorexant 20/15 mg was generally well tolerated, with 3% of patients discontinuing due to adverse events over 3 months vs. 5.2% on placebo. Somnolence was the most common adverse event (6.7% vs. 3.3% for placebo). There was no systematic evidence of rebound or withdrawal signs or symptoms when suvorexant was discontinued after 3 months of nightly use. Conclusions: Suvorexant 20/15 mg improved sleep onset and maintenance over 3 months of nightly treatment and was generally safe and well tolerated. Clinical Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov trial registration numbers: NCT01097616, NCT01097629. Citation: Herring WJ, Connor KM, Snyder E, Snavely DB, Zhang Y, Hutzelmann J, Matzura-Wolfe D, Benca RM, Krystal AD, Walsh JK, Lines C, Roth T, Michelson D. Suvorexant in

  8. Comparison of adequate relief with symptom, global, and responder endpoints in linaclotide phase 3 trials in IBS-C

    PubMed Central

    Camilleri, Michael; Lembo, Anthony J; Lavins, Bernard J; MacDougall, James E; Carson, Robyn T; Williams, Valerie SL; Nelson, Lauren M; Shiff, Steven J; Currie, Mark G; Kurtz, Caroline B

    2015-01-01

    Background Optimal clinical trial endpoints for irritable bowel syndrome with constipation (IBS-C) are uncertain. Objective The objective of this article is to compare adequate relief (AR) to abdominal/bowel symptoms, global endpoints, and FDA and EMA responder criteria; and to use AR as an anchor to assess clinically meaningful change (CMC) in IBS-C symptoms. Methods Using pooled 12-week data from two phase 3 linaclotide clinical trials, daily abdominal/bowel symptoms and weekly global assessments were correlated with AR. Symptom CMC thresholds were estimated using AR as an anchor. Agreement between AR and FDA/EMA responder criteria was assessed. Results Correlations of AR with percentage change in abdominal symptoms, bowel symptoms, and global endpoints ranged from 0.48–0.54, 0.32–0.39, and 0.61–0.71, respectively. Using AR as an anchor, CMC thresholds were 29% improvement in abdominal pain, 29% improvement in abdominal discomfort, and 0.7/week increase in CSBMs, similar to thresholds for IBS-C responder endpoints recommended by the FDA and EMA. There was considerable agreement of weekly responder rates between AR and the FDA and EMA endpoints (on average, 70%–76% and 71%–82% of weeks with agreement, respectively). Conclusions AR bridges IBS-C clinical trials, putting into perspective the disparate primary endpoints recommended by professional societies and regulatory authorities, and allowing researchers, practitioners, and regulators to compare trial results. PMID:25653859

  9. Safety and preliminary immunogenicity of Cuban pneumococcal conjugate vaccine candidate in healthy children: a randomized phase I clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Dotres, Carlos P; Puga, Rinaldo; Ricardo, Yariset; Broño, Carmen R; Paredes, Beatriz; Echemendía, Vladimir; Rosell, Sandra; González, Nadezhda; García-Rivera, Dagmar; Valdés, Yury; Goldblatt, David; Vérez-Bencomo, Vicente

    2014-09-15

    A new heptavalent conjugate vaccine (PCV7-TT) is under development in Cuba. PCV7-TT contains 2 μg of serotypes 1, 5, 14, 18C, 19F, 23F and 4 μg of 6B, each one conjugated to tetanus toxoid (TT). This vaccine was designed with the serotypes that cause most invasive pneumococcal diseases (IPD) worldwide. In the present study, we investigated the safety and explored the immunogenicity of PCV7-TT during a controlled, randomized and double blind clinical trial phase I in 4-5-year-old children. PCV7-TT was well tolerated and as safe as Synflorix used as control vaccine. Following a single-dose vaccination, all individual serotypes included in PCV7-TT induced statistically significant increase of IgG GMC and OPA GMT. These are the first clinical results of PCV7-TT in children and they pave the way toward next clinical trials in children and infants. This clinical trial was published in the Cuban Public Register of Clinical Trials with code RPCEC00000173.

  10. Toxicity and Efficacy Probability Interval Design for Phase I Adoptive Cell Therapy Dose-Finding Clinical Trials.

    PubMed

    Li, Daniel H; Whitmore, James B; Guo, Wentian; Ji, Yuan

    2017-01-01

    Recent trials of adoptive cell therapy (ACT), such as the chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell therapy, have demonstrated promising therapeutic effects for cancer patients. A main issue in the product development is to determine the appropriate dose of ACT. Traditional phase I trial designs for cytotoxic agents explicitly assume that toxicity increases monotonically with dose levels and implicitly assume the same for efficacy to justify dose escalation. ACT usually induces rapid responses, and the monotonic dose-response assumption is unlikely to hold due to its immunobiologic activities. We propose a toxicity and efficacy probability interval (TEPI) design for dose finding in ACT trials. This approach incorporates efficacy outcomes to inform dosing decisions to optimize efficacy and safety simultaneously. Rather than finding the maximum tolerated dose (MTD), the TEPI design is aimed at finding the dose with the most desirable outcome for safety and efficacy. The key features of TEPI are its simplicity, flexibility, and transparency, because all decision rules can be prespecified prior to trial initiation. We conduct simulation studies to investigate the operating characteristics of the TEPI design and compare it to existing methods. In summary, the TEPI design is a novel method for ACT dose finding, which possesses superior performance and is easy to use, simple, and transparent. Clin Cancer Res; 23(1); 13-20. ©2016 AACR.

  11. Evaluating results from the multiple myeloma patient subset treated with denosumab or zoledronic acid in a randomized phase 3 trial.

    PubMed

    Raje, N; Vadhan-Raj, S; Willenbacher, W; Terpos, E; Hungria, V; Spencer, A; Alexeeva, Y; Facon, T; Stewart, A K; Feng, A; Braun, A; Balakumaran, A; Roodman, G D

    2016-01-08

    In a phase 3 trial of denosumab vs zoledronic acid in patients (n=1776) with bone metastases and solid tumors or multiple myeloma, denosumab was superior to zoledronic acid for the primary end point of prevention of skeletal-related events. There was no difference in overall survival between the two groups; however, an ad hoc overall survival analysis in the multiple myeloma subset of patients (n=180) favored zoledronic acid (hazard ratio (HR) 2.26; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.13-4.50; P=0.014). In the present analysis, we found imbalances between the groups with respect to baseline risk characteristics. HRs with two-sided 95% CIs were estimated using the Cox model. After adjustment in a covariate analysis, the CI crossed unity (HR 1.86; 95% CI 0.90-3.84; P=0.0954). Furthermore, we found a higher rate of early withdrawals for the reasons of lost to follow-up and withdrawal of consent in the zoledronic acid group; after accounting for these, the HR was 1.31 (95% CI 0.80-2.15; P=0.278). In conclusion, the survival results in multiple myeloma patients in this trial were confounded and will eventually be resolved by an ongoing phase 3 trial.

  12. Effects of background noise on inter-trial phase coherence and auditory N1-P2 responses to speech stimuli.

    PubMed

    Koerner, Tess K; Zhang, Yang

    2015-10-01

    This study investigated the effects of a speech-babble background noise on inter-trial phase coherence (ITPC, also referred to as phase locking value (PLV)) and auditory event-related responses (AERP) to speech sounds. Specifically, we analyzed EEG data from 11 normal hearing subjects to examine whether ITPC can predict noise-induced variations in the obligatory N1-P2 complex response. N1-P2 amplitude and latency data were obtained for the /bu/syllable in quiet and noise listening conditions. ITPC data in delta, theta, and alpha frequency bands were calculated for the N1-P2 responses in the two passive listening conditions. Consistent with previous studies, background noise produced significant amplitude reduction and latency increase in N1 and P2, which were accompanied by significant ITPC decreases in all the three frequency bands. Correlation analyses further revealed that variations in ITPC were able to predict the amplitude and latency variations in N1-P2. The results suggest that trial-by-trial analysis of cortical neural synchrony is a valuable tool in understanding the modulatory effects of background noise on AERP measures.

  13. A robust two-stage design identifying the optimal biological dose for phase I/II clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Zang, Yong; Lee, J Jack

    2017-01-15

    We propose a robust two-stage design to identify the optimal biological dose for phase I/II clinical trials evaluating both toxicity and efficacy outcomes. In the first stage of dose finding, we use the Bayesian model averaging continual reassessment method to monitor the toxicity outcomes and adopt an isotonic regression method based on the efficacy outcomes to guide dose escalation. When the first stage ends, we use the Dirichlet-multinomial distribution to jointly model the toxicity and efficacy outcomes and pick the candidate doses based on a three-dimensional volume ratio. The selected candidate doses are then seamlessly advanced to the second stage for dose validation. Both toxicity and efficacy outcomes are continuously monitored so that any overly toxic and/or less efficacious dose can be dropped from the study as the trial continues. When the phase I/II trial ends, we select the optimal biological dose as the dose obtaining the minimal value of the volume ratio within the candidate set. An advantage of the proposed design is that it does not impose a monotonically increasing assumption on the shape of the dose-efficacy curve. We conduct extensive simulation studies to examine the operating characteristics of the proposed design. The simulation results show that the proposed design has desirable operating characteristics across different shapes of the underlying true dose-toxicity and dose-efficacy curves. The software to implement the proposed design is available upon request. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Clinical Trial Simulation to Inform Phase 2: Comparison of Concentrated vs. Distributed First-in-Patient Study Designs in Psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Dodds, M G; Salinger, D H; Mandema, J; Gibbs, J P; Gibbs, M A

    2013-07-24

    Clinical trial simulation (CTS) and model-based meta-analysis (MBMA) can increase our understanding of small, first-in-patient (FIP) trial design performance to inform Phase 2 decision making. In this work, we compared dose-ranging designs vs. designs testing only placebo and the maximum dose for early decision making in psoriasis. Based on MBMA of monoclonal antibodies in the psoriasis space, a threshold of greater than a 50 percentage point improvement over placebo effect at the highest feasible drug dose was required for the advancement in psoriasis. Studies testing only placebo and the maximum dose made the correct advancement decision marginally more often than dose-ranging designs in the majority of the cases. However, dose-ranging studies in FIP trials offer important design advantages in the form of dose-response (D-R) information to inform Phase 2 dose selection. CTS can increase the efficiency and quality of drug development decision making by studying the limitations and benefits of study designs prospectively.CPT: Pharmacometrics & Systems Pharmacology (2013) 2, e58; doi:10.1038/psp.2013.32; published online 24 July 2013.

  15. Phase II cancer clinical trials with a one-sample log-rank test and its corrections based on the Edgeworth expansion.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiaoqun; Peng, Paul; Tu, Dongsheng

    2011-01-01

    The response rate has been frequently used as the primary endpoint of phase II cancer clinical trials. It may not be an appropriate endpoint when a new treatment is not expected to produce any tumour shrinkage. When a large database for a historical control is available, the direct comparison of survival curves between a new treatment and the historical control may be made in phase II cancer clinical trials. In this paper, a one-sample log-rank test is introduced for the design and analysis of phase II cancer clinical trials with time-to-event endpoints. Corrections to the one-sample log-rank test are also derived based on the Edgeworth expansion. Simulations showed that the original one-sample log-rank test may be preferred if strictly controlling for type I error is important or when the sample size of a phase II trial is as large as 50, and a corrected one-sample log-rank test is used if the sample size of a phase II trial is small. A data set from a clinical trial conducted by the NCIC Clinical Trials Group is used to illustrate the proposed procedures.

  16. A randomized, phase III trial of capecitabine plus bevacizumab (Cape-Bev) versus capecitabine plus irinotecan plus bevacizumab (CAPIRI-Bev) in first-line treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer: The AIO KRK 0110 Trial/ML22011 Trial

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Several randomized trials have indicated that combination chemotherapy applied in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) does not significantly improve overall survival when compared to the sequential use of cytotoxic agents (CAIRO, MRC Focus, FFCD 2000-05). The present study investigates the question whether this statement holds true also for bevacizumab-based first-line treatment including escalation- and de-escalation strategies. Methods/Design The AIO KRK 0110/ML22011 trial is a two-arm, multicenter, open-label randomized phase III trial comparing the efficacy and safety of capecitabine plus bevacizumab (Cape-Bev) versus capecitabine plus irinotecan plus bevacizumab (CAPIRI-Bev) in the first-line treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer. Patients with unresectable metastatic colorectal cancer, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) performance status 0-1, will be assigned in a 1:1 ratio to receive either capecitabine 1250 mg/m2 bid for 14d (d1-14) plus bevacizumab 7.5 mg/kg (d1) q3w (Arm A) or capecitabine 800 mg/m2 BID for 14d (d1-14), irinotecan 200 mg/m2 (d1) and bevacizumab 7.5 mg/kg (d1) q3w (Arm B). Patients included into this trial are required to consent to the analysis of tumour tissue and blood for translational investigations. In Arm A, treatment escalation from Cape-Bev to CAPIRI-Bev is recommended in case of progressive disease (PD). In Arm B, de-escalation from CAPIRI-Bev to Cape-Bev is possible after 6 months of treatment or in case of irinotecan-associated toxicity. Re-escalation to CAPIRI-Bev after PD is possible. The primary endpoint is time to failure of strategy (TFS). Secondary endpoints are overall response rate (ORR), overall survival, progression-free survival, safety and quality of life. Conclusion The AIO KRK 0110 trial is designed for patients with disseminated, but asymptomatic mCRC who are not potential candidates for surgical resection of metastasis. Two bevacizumab-based strategies are compared: one starting as single

  17. Assessment and development of an industrial wet oxidation system for burning waste and low upgrade fuels. Final report, Phase 2B: Pilot demonstration of the MODAR supercritical water oxidation process

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-01-01

    Stone & Webster Engineering Corporation is Project Manager for the Development and Demonstration of an Industrial Wet Oxidation System for Burning Wastes and Low Grade Fuel. This program has been ongoing through a Cooperative Agreement sponsored by the Department of Energy, initiated in June 1988. This report presents a comprehensive discussion of the results of the demonstration project conducted under this cooperative agreement with the overall goal of advancing the state-of-the-art in the practice of Supercritical Water Oxidation (SCWO). In recognition of the Government`s support of this project, we have endeavored to include all material and results that are not proprietary in as much detail as possible while still protecting MODAR`s proprietary technology. A specific example is in the discussion of materials of construction where results are presented while, in some cases, the specific materials are not identified. The report presents the results chronologically. Background material on the earlier phases (Section 2) provide an understanding of the evolution of the program, and bring all reviewers to a common starting point. Section 3 provides a discussion of activities from October 1991 through July 1992, during which the pilot plant was designed; and various studies including computational fluid dynamic modeling of the reactor vessel, and a process HAZOP analyses were conducted. Significant events during fabrication are presented in Section 4. The experimental results of the test program (December 1992--August 1993) are discussed in Section 5.

  18. A Randomized Phase 2 Trial of 177Lu Radiolabeled Anti-PSMA Monoclonal Antibody J591 in Patients With High-Risk Castrate Biochemically Relapsed Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    Award Number: W81XWH-09-1-0596 TITLE: A Randomized Phase 2 Trial of 177Lu Radiolabeled Anti- PSMA Monoclonal Antibody J591 in Patients With High...1-0596 A Randomized Phase 2 Trial of 177Lu Radiolabeled Anti- PSMA Monoclonal Antibody J591 in Patients With High-Risk Castrat Biochemically Relapsed...in December 2014 with approval to proceed without modifications. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Prostate cancer, PSA, PSMA , monoclonal antibody

  19. Randomized Phase II Trial of Adjuvant WT-1 Analog Peptide Vaccine in Patients with Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma after Completion of Multimodality Therapy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    Scheinberg DA. Vaccination with Synthetic Analog Peptides Derived from WT1 Oncoprotein Induces T Cell Responses in Patients with Complete Remission ...TITLE:Randomized Phase II Trial of Adjuvant WT-1 Analog Peptide Vaccine in Patients with Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma after Completion of...TITLE:Randomized Phase II Trial of Adjuvant WT-1 Analog Peptide Vaccine in Patients with Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma after Completion of Multimodality

  20. AplusB: A Web Application for Investigating A + B Designs for Phase I Cancer Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Wheeler, Graham M.; Sweeting, Michael J.; Mander, Adrian P.

    2016-01-01

    In phase I cancer clinical trials, the maximum tolerated dose of a new drug is often found by a dose-escalation method known as the A + B design. We have developed an interactive web application, AplusB, which computes and returns exact operating characteristics of A + B trial designs. The application has a graphical user interface (GUI), requires no programming knowledge and is free to access and use on any device that can open an internet browser. A customised report is available for download for each design that contains tabulated operating characteristics and informative plots, which can then be compared with other dose-escalation methods. We present a step-by-step guide on how to use this application and provide several illustrative examples of its capabilities. PMID:27403961

  1. Current and future directions for Phase II trials in high-grade glioma.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Brian M; Lee, Eudocia Q; Reardon, David A; Wen, Patrick Y

    2013-04-01

    Despite surgery, radiation and chemotherapy, the prognosis for high-grade glioma (HGG) is poor. Our understanding of the molecular pathways involved in gliomagenesis and progression has increased in recent years, leading to the development of novel agents that specifically target these pathways. Results from most single-agent trials have been modest at best, however. Despite the initial success of antiangiogenesis agents in HGG, the clinical benefit is short-lived and most patients eventually progress. Several novel agents, multi-targeted agents and combination therapies are now in clinical trials for HGG and several more strategies are being pursued.

  2. Randomized two-stage Phase II clinical trial designs based on Barnard's exact test.

    PubMed

    Shan, Guogen; Ma, Changxing; Hutson, Alan D; Wilding, Gregory E

    2013-01-01

    In areas such as oncology, two-stage designs are often preferred as compared to one-stage designs due to the ability to stop the trial early when faced with evidence of lack of sufficient efficacy and the associated sample size savings. We present exact two-stage designs based on Barnard's exact test for differences in proportions and compare the designs to those proposed by Kepner ( 2010 ) and Jung ( 2010 ). In addition, we present tables of decision rules under a variety of assumed realities for use in trial planning. The procedure is recommended for use due to the substantial sample size savings experienced.

  3. Persistent Electrochemical Performance in Epitaxial VO2(B).

    PubMed

    Lee, Shinbuhm; Sun, Xiao-Guang; Lubimtsev, Andrew A; Gao, Xiang; Ganesh, Panchapakesan; Ward, Thomas Z; Eres, Gyula; Chisholm, Matthew F; Dai, Sheng; Lee, Ho Nyung

    2017-04-12

    Discovering high-performance energy storage materials is indispensable for renewable energy, electric vehicle performance, and mobile computing. Owing to the open atomic framework and good room temperature conductivity, bronze-phase vanadium dioxide [VO2(B)] has been regarded as a highly promising electrode material for Li ion batteries. However, previous attempts were unsuccessful to show the desired cycling performance and capacity without chemical modification. Here, we show with epitaxial VO2(B) films that one can accomplish the theoretical limit for capacity with persistent charging-discharging cyclability owing to the high structural stability and unique open pathways for Li ion conduction. Atomic-scale characterization by scanning transmission electron microscopy and density functional theory calculations also reveal that the unique open pathways in VO2(B) provide the most stable sites for Li adsorption and diffusion. Thus, this work ultimately demonstrates that VO2(B) is a highly promising energy storage material and has no intrinsic hindrance in achieving superior cyclability with a very high power and capacity in a Li-ion conductor.

  4. Comprehensive safety assessment of a human inactivated diploid enterovirus 71 vaccine based on a phase III clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei; Kong, Yujia; Jiang, Zhiwei; Li, Chanjuan; Wang, Ling; Xia, Jielai

    2016-01-01

    abstract Human enterovirus 71 (EV71) is a causative agent of hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD). In a previous phase III trial in children, a human diploid cell-based inactivated EV71 vaccine elicited EV71 specific immune responses and protection against EV71 associated HFMD. This study aimed to assess the factors influencing the severity of adverse events observed in this previous trial. This was a randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled, phase III clinical trial of a human diploid vaccine carried out in 12,000 children in Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region, China (ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01569581). Solicited events were recorded for 7 days and unsolicited events were reported for 28 days after each injection. Age trend analysis of adverse reaction was conducted in each treatment group. Multiple logistic regression models were built to identify factors influencing the severity of adverse reactions. Fewer solicited adverse reactions were observed in older participants within the first 7 days after vaccination (P < 0.0001), except local pain and pruritus. More severe adverse reactions were observed after the initial injection than after the booster injection. Serious cold or respiratory tract infections (RTI) were observed more often in children aged 6–36 months than in older children. Only the severity of local swelling was associated with body mass index. Children with throat discomfort before injection had a higher risk of serious cold or RTI. These results indicated that the human diploid cell-based vaccine achieved a satisfactory safety profile. PMID:26837471

  5. Assessments of fatigue and disease activity in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus enrolled in the Phase 2 clinical trial with blisibimod.

    PubMed

    Petri, M A; Martin, R S; Scheinberg, M A; Furie, R A

    2017-01-01

    This report evaluates the effects of blisibimod (A-623, AMG 623), a potent and selective inhibitor of B-cell activating factor (BAFF), on patient-reported fatigue and disease activity in the Phase 2b PEARL-SC clinical trial in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). A total of 547 individuals who met the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) classification criteria for SLE, were positive for anti-double-stranded DNA or antinuclear antibodies, and had a Safety of Estrogens in Lupus Erythematosus National Assessment-Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Disease Activity Index (SELENA-SLEDAI) score ≥6 at baseline, were randomized to receive placebo or blisibimod for at least 24 weeks. Patient self-reported fatigue was evaluated using the Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy (FACIT)-Fatigue scale, and disease activity was evaluated using Physician's Global Assessment, SELENA-SLEDAI, and British Isles Lupus Assessment Group Score. Statistically significant improvements in FACIT-Fatigue score were observed among individuals randomized to blisibimod, especially in the 200 mg QW group where favorable effects on disease activity with blisibimod compared to placebo were observed as early as Week 8. The mean improvement from baseline of 6.9 points at Week 24, compared with 4.4 points with placebo, met the criteria for minimal clinically important improvement difference defined for patients with SLE. Despite concomitant improvements in FACIT-Fatigue, SLE Responder Index (SRI) and SLE biomarkers (reported previously), FACIT-Fatigue score correlated only weakly with disease activity. While poor correlation between fatigue and disease activity is not new, the observation that correlation remains poor despite concurrent population improvements in disease and fatigue brings a new facet to our understanding of SLE.

  6. Challenges and Potential Solutions to Meeting Accrual Goals in a Phase II Chemoprevention Trial for Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Nagi; Crocker, Theresa; Smith, Tiffany; Pow-Sang, Julio; Spiess, Philippe E.; Egan, Kathleen; Quinn, Gwen; Schell, Michael; Sebti, Said; Kazi, Aslam; Chuang, Tian; Salup, Raoul; Helal, Mohamed; Zagaja, Gregory; Trabulsi, Edouard; McLarty, Jerry; Fazili, Tajammul; Williams, Christopher R.; Schreiber, Fred; Slaton, Joel; Anderson, J Kyle

    2011-01-01

    Objective The goal of this report is to describe the on going strategies, successes, challenges and solutions for recruitment in this multi-center, phase II chemoprevention trial targeting men at high risk for prostate cancer. Methods We developed and implemented a multi-center clinical trial in institutions with supportive infrastructure, lead by a recruitment team of experienced and committed physicians and clinical trial staff, implementing multi-media and community outreach strategies to meet recruitment goals. Screening logs were reviewed to identify trends as well as patient, protocol and infrastructure -related barriers impacting accrual and revisions to protocol implemented. Results Between January 2008 and February 2011 a total of 3547 individuals were prescreened with 94% (n=3092) determined to be ineligible based on diagnosis of cancer or benign biopsy results. Of these, 216 were considered eligible for further screening with 52% (n=113) declining to participate due to patient related factors and 14% (n=29) eliminated due to protocol-related criteria for exclusion. Ninety four (94) subjects consented to participate with 34% of these subjects (n=74) meeting all eligibility criteria to be randomized to receive study agent or placebo. Across all sites, 99% of the recruitment of subjects in this clinical trial is via physician recruitment and referral with less than 1% responding to other recruitment strategies. Conclusion A contemporary approach to subject recruitment and frequent evaluation is needed to assure responsiveness to emerging challenges to accrual and the evolving scientific literature. A focus on investing on improving systems for physician recruitment may be key to meeting recruitment target in chemoprevention trials. PMID:22101219

  7. Efficacy of extended-release tramadol for treatment of prescription opioid withdrawal: A two-phase randomized controlled trial*

    PubMed Central

    Lofwall, Michelle R.; Babalonis, Shanna; Nuzzo, Paul A.; Siegel, Anthony; Campbell, Charles; Walsh, Sharon L.

    2013-01-01

    Background Tramadol is an atypical analgesic with monoamine and modest mu opioid agonist activity. The purpose of this study was to evaluate: 1) the efficacy of extended-release (ER) tramadol in treating prescription opioid withdrawal and 2) whether cessation of ER tramadol produces opioid withdrawal. Methods Prescription opioid users with current opioid dependence and observed withdrawal participated in this inpatient, two-phase double blind, randomized placebo-controlled trial. In Phase 1 (days 1-7), participants were randomly assigned to matched oral placebo or ER tramadol (200 or 600 mg daily). In Phase 2 (days 8-13), all participants underwent double blind crossover to placebo. Breakthrough withdrawal medications were available for all subjects. Enrollment continued until 12 completers/group was achieved. Results Use of breakthrough withdrawal medication differed significantly (p<0.05) among groups in both phases; the 200 mg group received the least amount in Phase 1, and the 600 mg group received the most in both phases. In Phase 1, tramadol 200 mg produced significantly lower peak ratings than placebo on ratings of insomnia, lacrimation, muscular tension, and sneezing. Only tramadol 600 mg produced miosis in Phase 1. In Phase 2, tramadol 600 mg produced higher peak ratings of rhinorrhea, irritable, depressed, heavy/sluggish, and hot/cold flashes than placebo. There were no serious adverse events and no signal of abuse liability for tramadol. Conclusions ER tramadol 200 mg modestly attenuated opioid withdrawal. Mild opioid withdrawal occurred after cessation of treatment with 600 mg tramadol. These data support the continued investigation of tramadol as a treatment for opioid withdrawal. PMID:23755929

  8. Performing phase I clinical trials of anticancer agents: perspectives from within the European union and Japan.

    PubMed

    Forster, Martin D; Saijo, Nagahiro; Seymour, Lesley; Calvert, Hilary

    2010-03-15

    Drug discovery and early clinical development is an international endeavor, conducted in partnership between commercial entities such as biotechnology and pharmaceutical companies and academic investigators. Although once considered quite disparate, early clinical trials requirements and conduct are largely harmonized between the European Union, Japan, and the United States, increasing the opportunities for productive commercial-academic collaborations.

  9. Camperdown Program for Adults Who Stutter: A Student Training Clinic Phase I Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cocomazzo, Nadia; Block, Susan; Carey, Brenda; O'Brian, Sue; Onslow, Mark; Packman, Ann; Iverach, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: During speech pathology professional preparation there is a need for adequate student instruction with speech-restructuring treatments for adults. An important part of that clinical educational experience is to participate in a clinical setting that produces outcomes equivalent to those attained during clinical trials. A previous…

  10. Syllable-Timed Speech Treatment for School-Age Children Who Stutter: A Phase I Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrews, Cheryl; O'Brian, Sue; Harrison, Elisabeth; Onslow, Mark; Packman, Ann; Menzies, Ross

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: This clinical trial determined the outcomes of a simple syllable-timed speech (STS) treatment for school-age children who stutter. Method: Participants were 10 children, ages 6-11 years, who stutter. Treatment involved training the children and their parents to use STS at near normal speech rates. The technique was practiced in the clinic…

  11. Data-driven risk identification in phase III clinical trials using central statistical monitoring.

    PubMed

    Timmermans, Catherine; Venet, David; Burzykowski, Tomasz

    2016-02-01

    Our interest lies in quality control for clinical trials, in the context of risk-based monitoring (RBM). We specifically study the use of central statistical monitoring (CSM) to support RBM. Under an RBM paradigm, we claim that CSM has a key role to play in identifying the "risks to the most critical data elements and processes" that will drive targeted oversight. In order to support this claim, we first see how to characterize the risks that may affect clinical trials. We then discuss how CSM can be understood as a tool for providing a set of data-driven key risk indicators (KRIs), which help to organize adaptive targeted monitoring. Several case studies are provided where issues in a clinical trial have been identified thanks to targeted investigation after the identification of a risk using CSM. Using CSM to build data-driven KRIs helps to identify different kinds of issues in clinical trials. This ability is directly linked with the exhaustiveness of the CSM approach and its flexibility in the definition of the risks that are searched for when identifying the KRIs. In practice, a CSM assessment of the clinical database seems essential to ensure data quality. The atypical data patterns found in some centers and variables are seen as KRIs under a RBM approach. Targeted monitoring or data management queries can be used to confirm whether the KRIs point to an actual issue or not.

  12. South Yorkshire Cohort: a 'cohort trials facility' study of health and weight - Protocol for the recruitment phase

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Growing levels of both obesity and chronic disease in the general population pose a major public health problem. In the UK, an innovative 'health and weight' cohort trials facility, the 'South Yorkshire Cohort', is being built in order to provide robust evidence to inform policy, commissioning and clinical decisions in this field. This protocol reports the design of the facility and outlines the recruitment phase methods. Method/Design The South Yorkshire Cohort health and weight study uses the cohort multiple randomised controlled trial design. This design recruits a large observational cohort of patients with the condition(s) of interest which then provides a facility for multiple randomised controlled trials (with large representative samples of participants, long term outcomes as standard, increased comparability between each trial conducted within the cohort and increased efficiency particularly for trials of expensive interventions) as well as ongoing information as to the natural history of the condition and treatment as usual. This study aims to recruit 20,000 participants to the population based South Yorkshire Cohort health and weight research trials facility. Participants are recruited by invitation letters from their General Practitioners. Data is collected using postal and/or online patient self completed Health Questionnaires. NHS numbers will be used to facilitate record linkage and access to routine data. Participants are eligible if they are: aged 16 - 85 years, registered with one of 40 practices in South Yorkshire, provide consent for further contact from the researchers and to have their information used to look at the benefit of health treatments. The first wave of data is being collected during 2010/12 and further waves are planned at 2 - 5 year intervals for the planned 20 year duration of the facility. Discussion The South Yorkshire Cohort combines the strengths of the standard observational, longitudinal cohort study design with

  13. A Phase II Multicenter Trial With Rivaroxaban in the Treatment of Livedoid Vasculopathy Assessing Pain on a Visual Analog Scale

    PubMed Central

    Drabik, Attyla; Hillgruber, Carina

    2014-01-01

    Background Livedoid vasculopathy is an orphan skin disease characterized by recurrent thrombosis of the cutaneous microcirculation. It manifests itself almost exclusively in the ankles, the back of the feet, and the distal part of the lower legs. Because of the vascular occlusion, patients suffer from intense local ischemic pain. Incidence of livedoid vasculopathy is estimated to be around 1:100,000. There are currently no approved treatments for livedoid vasculopathy, making off-label therapy the only option. In Europe, thromboprophylactic treatment with low-molecular-weight heparins has become widely accepted. Objective The aim of this trial is the statistical verification of the therapeutic effects of the anticoagulant rivaroxaban in patients suffering from livedoid vasculopathy. Methods We performed a therapeutic phase IIa trial designed as a prospective, one-armed, multicenter, interventional series of cases with a calculated sample size of 20 patients. The primary outcome is the assessment of local pain on the visual analog scale (VAS) as an intraindividual difference of 2 values between baseline and 12 weeks. Results Enrollment started in December 2012 and was still open at the date of submission. The study is expected to finish in November 2014. Conclusions Livedoid vasculopathy is associated with increased thrombophilia in the cutaneous microcirculation and the continuous use of anticoagulants helps improve the symptoms. The causes of cutaneous infarctions are heterogenous, but ultimately follow the known mechanisms of the coagulation cascade. Rivaroxaban affects the coagulation cascade and inhibits the factor Xa–dependent conversion of prothrombin to thrombin, thereby considerably reducing the risk of thrombosis. Trial Registration Trial Registration EudraCT Number: 2012-000108-13-DE; https://www.clinicaltrialsregister.eu/ctr-search/search?query=eudract_number:2012-000108-13 (Archived by WebCite at http://www.webcitation.org/6UCktWVCA); German Clinical

  14. Treatment of primary glioblastoma multiforme with cetuximab, radiotherapy and temozolomide (GERT) – phase I/II trial: study protocol

    PubMed Central

    Combs, Stephanie E; Heeger, Steffen; Haselmann, Renate; Edler, Lutz; Debus, Jürgen; Schulz-Ertner, Daniela

    2006-01-01

    Background The implementation of combined radiochemotherapy (RCHT) with temozolomide (TMZ) has lead to a significant increase in overall survival times in patients with Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), however, outcome still remains unsatisfactory. The majority of GBMs show an overexpression and/or amplification of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Therefore, addition of EGFR-inhibition with cetuximab to the current standard treatment approach with radiotherapy and TMZ seems promising. Methods/design GERT is a one-armed single-center phase I/II trial. In a first step, dose-escalation of TMZ from 50 mg/m2 to 75 mg/m2 together with radiotherapy and cetuximab will be performed. Should safety be proven, the phase II trial will be initiated with the standard dose of 75 mg/m2 of TMZ. Cetuximab will be applied in the standard application dose of 400 mg/m2 in week 1, thereafter at a dose of 250 mg/m2 weekly. A total of 46 patients will be included into this phase I/II trial. Primary endpoints are feasibility and toxicity, secondary endpoints are overall and progression-free survival. An interim analysis will be performed after inclusion of 15 patients into the main study. Patients' enrolment will be performed over a period of 2 years. The observation time will end 2 years after inclusion of the last patient. Discussion The goal of this study is to evaluate the safety and efficacy of combined RCHT-immunotherapy with TMZ and cetuximab as first-line treatment for patients with primary GBM. PMID:16709245

  15. Randomized phase II/III clinical trial of elpamotide for patients with advanced pancreatic cancer: PEGASUS-PC Study.

    PubMed

    Yamaue, Hiroki; Tsunoda, Takuya; Tani, Masaji; Miyazawa, Motoki; Yamao, Kenji; Mizuno, Nobumasa; Okusaka, Takuji; Ueno, Hideki; Boku, Narikazu; Fukutomi, Akira; Ishii, Hiroshi; Ohkawa, Shinichi; Furukawa, Masayuki; Maguchi, Hiroyuki; Ikeda, Masafumi; Togashi, Yosuke; Nishio, Kazuto; Ohashi, Yasuo

    2015-07-01

    Gemcitabine is a key drug for the treatment of pancreatic cancer; however, with its limitation in clinical benefits, the development of another potent therapeutic is necessary. Vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 is an essential target for tumor angiogenesis, and we have conducted a phase I clinical trial using gemcitabine and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 peptide (elpamotide). Based on the promising results of this phase I trial, a multicenter, randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind phase II/III clinical trial has been carried out for pancreatic cancer. The eligibility criteria included locally advanced or metastatic pancreatic cancer. Patients were assigned to either the Active group (elpamotide + gemcitabine) or Placebo group (placebo + gemcitabine) in a 2:1 ratio by the dynamic allocation method. The primary endpoint was overall survival. The Harrington-Fleming test was applied to the statistical analysis in this study to evaluate the time-lagged effect of immunotherapy appropriately. A total of 153 patients (Active group, n = 100; Placebo group, n = 53) were included in the analysis. No statistically significant differences were found between the two groups in the prolongation of overall survival (Harrington-Fleming P-value, 0.918; log-rank P-value, 0.897; hazard ratio, 0.87, 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.486-1.557). Median survival time was 8.36 months (95% CI, 7.46-10.18) for the Active group and 8.54 months (95% CI, 7.33-10.84) for the Placebo group. The toxicity observed in both groups was manageable. Combination therapy of elpamotide with gemcitabine was well tolerated. Despite the lack of benefit in overall survival, subgroup analysis suggested that the patients who experienced severe injection site reaction, such as ulceration and erosion, might have better survival.

  16. Subcutaneous Progesterone Is Effective and Safe for Luteal Phase Support in IVF: An Individual Patient Data Meta-Analysis of the Phase III Trials

    PubMed Central

    Doblinger, Jakob; Cometti, Barbara; Trevisan, Silvia; Griesinger, Georg

    2016-01-01

    Objective To summarize efficacy and safety data on a new progesterone compound which is available for subcutaneous administration as compared to vaginally administered progesterone for luteal phase support in patients undergoing IVF treatment. Design Data from two randomized phase III trials (07EU/Prg06 and 07USA/Prg05) performed according to GCP standards with a total sample size of 1435 per-protocol patients were meta-analyzed on an individual patient data level. Setting University affiliated reproductive medicine unit. Patients Subcutaneous progesterone was administered to a total of 714 subjects and vaginal progesterone was administered to a total of 721 subjects who underwent fresh embryo transfer after ovarian stimulation followed by IVF or ICSI. The subjects were between 18 and 42 years old and had a BMI <30kg/m2. Interventions Subcutaneous progesterone 25 mg daily vs. either progesterone vaginal gel 90 mg daily (07EU/Prg06) or 100 mg intravaginal twice a day (07USA/Prg05) for luteal phase support in IVF patients. Main outcome measures Ongoing pregnancy rate beyond 10 gestational weeks, live birth rate and OHSS risk. Results The administration of subcutaneous progesterone versus intra-vaginal progesterone had no impact on ongoing pregnancy likelihood (OR = 0.865, 95% CI 0.694 to 1.077; P = n.s.), live birth likelihood (OR = 0.889, 95% CI 0.714 to 1.106; P = n.s.) or OHSS risk (OR = 0.995, 95% CI 0.565 to 1.754; P = n.s.) in regression analyses accounting for clustering of patients within trials, while adjusting for important confounders. Only female age and number of oocytes retrieved were significant predictors of live birth likelihood and OHSS risk. Conclusion No statistical significant or clinical significant differences exist between subcutaneous and vaginal progesterone for luteal phase support. PMID:26991890

  17. Operating characteristics of a Simon two-stage phase II clinical trial design incorporating continuous toxicity monitoring.

    PubMed

    Ray, H E; Rai, S N

    2012-01-01

    Phase II clinical trials are usually designed to measure efficacy, but safety is also an important end point. Previous authors recommended a method to monitor toxic events after each patient is enrolled, which is also known as continuously monitoring the toxicity. In this work, we investigate combining the usual Simon two-stage design to monitor response with the continuous toxicity monitoring methodology. Theoretical justification is given for the nominal size, probability of early termination, and average sample size under the null hypothesis of the combined testing procedure. A series of simulations are performed to investigate the performance of the combined procedure.

  18. Phase 3 trial evaluating the immunogenicity, safety, and tolerability of manufacturing scale 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine.

    PubMed

    Gadzinowski, Janusz; Albrecht, Piotr; Hasiec, Barbara; Konior, Ryszard; Dziduch, Jerzy; Witor, Anita; Mellelieu, Tracey; Tansey, Susan P; Jones, Thomas; Sarkozy, Denise; Emini, Emilio A; Gruber, William C; Scott, Daniel A

    2011-04-05

    13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13) includes polysaccharide conjugates from six pneumococcal serotypes in addition to those in the licensed 7-valent vaccine, thereby offering expanded protection against pneumococcal disease. The phase 3 trial reported here was conducted per a regulatory requirement to evaluate the immunogenicity, safety, and tolerability of two lots of the final PCV13 formulation that differed with respect to production scale but not the manufacturing process. The anti-pneumococcal polysaccharide immunogenicity and safety/tolerability were found to be similar between the two PCV13 vaccine lots.

  19. Using “Clinical Trial Diaries” to Track Patterns of Participation for Serial Healthy Volunteers in U.S. Phase I Studies

    PubMed Central

    Edelblute, Heather B.; Fisher, Jill A.

    2015-01-01

    Phase I testing of investigational drugs relies on healthy volunteers as research participants. Many U.S. healthy volunteers enroll repeatedly in clinical trials for the financial compensation. Serial participants are incentivized to ignore restrictions on their participation, and no centralized clinical trial registry prevents dual enrollment. Little is currently known about how healthy volunteers participate in studies over time, hampering the development of policies to protect this group. We detail a methodology developed as part of a longitudinal study to track in real-time healthy volunteers’ Phase I participation. Illustrating these data through three case studies, we document how healthy volunteers use strategies, such as qualifying for studies at more than one clinic and traveling significant distances, to maximize their participation. Our findings suggest that “clinical trial diaries” can generate critical information about serial research participation and point to ethical issues unique to healthy volunteers’ involvement in Phase I clinical trials. PMID:25742668

  20. Is pre-trial quality assurance necessary? Experiences of the CONVERT Phase III randomized trial for good performance status patients with limited-stage small-cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, E; Lyn, E; Faivre-Finn, C

    2014-01-01

    Objective: This study is an analysis of the pre-trial quality assurance (QA) exercises submitted by clinicians from radiotherapy (RT) centres across Europe and Canada to qualify for participation in the CONVERT trial. Methods: QA exercises submitted by 64 clinicians at 64 RT centres were included in this analysis. The exercises included the completion of a trial-specific questionnaire and submission of a treatment plan, for both trial arms, for a patient fitting the eligibility criteria of the trial. This article describes the QA programme set up for the CONVERT trial and identifies deviations from the trial protocol. Patient eligibility, disease and critical structure outlining and treatment planning technique were assessed. Results: Results from QA trial-specific questionnaires received between February 2008 and September 2011, returned as part of the QA exercise, indicated that the majority of centres (70.3%) were using 6-MV photons and type B treatment planning system algorithms (57.8%). 90.6% of clinicians assessed submitted data for patients who fitted the eligibility criteria for the trial. There were inconsistencies in outlining of gross tumour volume (GTV) and organs at risk, mainly heart and oesophagus, and in the use of margins around the GTV. Conclusion: Such a QA programme helps to ensure that centres conform to trial protocol and should reduce inconsistencies in RT planning that may confound the results of the CONVERT trial. Advances in knowledge: Few studies reporting pre-trial QA have been published to date. This article outlines the importance of such a QA programme in the context of multicentre Phase III studies. PMID:24620839

  1. Study protocol of the SACURA trial: a randomized phase III trial of efficacy and safety of UFT as adjuvant chemotherapy for stage II colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Adjuvant chemotherapy for stage III colon cancer is internationally accepted as standard treatment with established efficacy, but the usefulness of adjuvant chemotherapy for stage II colon cancer remains controversial. The major Western guidelines recommend adjuvant chemotherapy for “high-risk stage II” cancer, but this is not clearly defined and the efficacy has not been confirmed. Methods/design SACURA trial is a multicenter randomized phase III study which aims to evaluate the superiority of 1-year adjuvant treatment with UFT to observation without any adjuvant treatment after surgery for stage II colon cancer in a large population, and to identify “high-risk factors of recurrence/death” in stage II colon cancer and predictors of efficacy and adverse events of the chemotherapy. Patients aged between 20 and 80 years with curatively resected stage II colon cancer are randomly assigned to a observation group or UFT adjuvant therapy group (UFT at 500–600 mg/day as tegafur in 2 divided doses after meals for 5 days, followed by 2-day rest. This 1-week treatment cycle is repeated for 1 year). The patients are followed up for 5 years until recurrence or death. Treatment delivery and adverse events are entered into a web-based case report form system every 3 months. The target sample size is 2,000 patients. The primary endpoint is disease-free survival, and the secondary endpoints are overall survival, recurrence-free survival, and incidence and severity of adverse events. In an additional translational study, the mRNA expression of 5-FU-related enzymes, microsatellite instability and chromosomal instability, and histopathological factors including tumor budding are assessed to evaluate correlation with recurrences, survivals and adverse events. Discussion A total of 2,024 patients were enrolled from October 2006 to July 2010. The results of this study will provide important information that help to improve the therapeutic strategy for

  2. Embolization with larger-caliber coils can increase packing density: Evidence from the pilot phase of a randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Cloutier, Francis; Khoury, Naim; Ghostine, Jimmy; Farzin, Behzad; Kotowski, Marc; Weill, Alain; Roy, Daniel; Raymond, Jean

    2017-02-01

    Background and purpose Endovascular coil embolization of cerebral aneurysms is associated with suboptimal angiographic results in up to 20-30% of patients. Coil packing density has been used as an index of the success of the initial procedure. The trial sought to study the effects of using 15-caliber coils, as compared with 10-caliber coils, on packing density. Methods Does Embolization with Larger coils lead to better Treatment of Aneurysms (DELTA) is an investigator-initiated multicenter prospective, randomized, controlled clinical trial. Patients are randomized 1:1 to embolization with either 10-caliber coils exclusively (control group) or the highest safely achievable proportion of 15-caliber coils and 10-caliber coils if necessary (intervention group) in 4-12-mm aneurysms. The endpoint of the pilot phase of the trial was the capacity to increase packing density of the initial procedure, calculated using a mathematical transformation of the dimensions entered into the case report forms. Secondary outcomes included the total number of coils used per aneurysm, total fluoroscopy time, initial angiographic outcomes and any adverse or undesirable event. Results Seventy patients were recruited between June 2014 and November 2015. Compared with 10-caliber coils, the 15-caliber coil group had a higher median packing density (44% vs 24%, p = 0.017). Results of other outcome measures were similar for the two groups. Conclusion Coiling of small and medium aneurysms randomized to 15-caliber coils achieved higher packing densities compared with coiling using 10-caliber coils.

  3. Activity of 129 Single-Agent Drugs in 228 Phase I and II Clinical Trials in Multiple Myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Kortuem, K. Martin; Zidich, Kaitlyn; Schuster, Steven R.; Khan, Meaghan L.; Jimenez-Zepeda, Victor H.; Mikhael, Joseph R.; Fonseca, Rafael; Stewart, A. Keith

    2014-01-01

    Background More than 400 preclinical studies report ≥ 1 compound as cytotoxic to multiple myeloma (MM) cells; however, few of these agents became relevant in the clinic. Thus, the utility of such assays in predicting future clinical value is debatable. Patients and Methods We examined the application of early-phase trial experiences to predict future clinical adoption. We identified 129 drugs explored as single agents in 228 trials involving 7421 patients between 1961 and 2013. Results All drugs in common use in MM (melphalan, dexamethasone, prednisone, cyclophosphamide, bendamustine, thalidomide, lenalidomide, pomalidomide, bortezomib, carfilzomib, and doxorubicin) demonstrated a best reported response rate of ≥ 22%. Older agents, including teniposide, fotemustine, paclitaxel, and interferon, also appear active by this criterion; however, if mean response rates from all reported trials for an agent are considered, then only drugs with a mean response rate of 15% partial response are in clinical use. Conclusion Our analysis suggests that thresholds of 20% for best or 15% for mean response are highly predictive of future clinical success. Below these thresholds, no drug has yet reached regulatory approval or widespread use in the clinic. Thus, this benchmark provides 1 element of the framework for guiding choice of drugs for late-stage clinical testing. PMID:24565465

  4. On Simon's two-stage design for single-arm phase IIA cancer clinical trials under beta-binomial distribution.

    PubMed

    Liu, Junfeng; Lin, Yong; Shih, Weichung Joe

    2010-05-10

    Simon (Control. Clin. Trials 1989; 10:1-10)'s two-stage design has been broadly applied to single-arm phase IIA cancer clinical trials in order to minimize either the expected or the maximum sample size under the null hypothesis of drug inefficacy, i.e. when the pre-specified amount of improvement in response rate (RR) is not expected to be observed. This paper studies a realistic scenario where the standard and experimental treatment RRs follow two continuous distributions (e.g. beta distribution) rather than two single values. The binomial probabilities in Simon's (Control. Clin. Trials 1989; 10:1-10) design are replaced by prior predictive Beta-binomial probabilities that are the ratios of two beta functions and domain-restricted RRs involve incomplete beta functions to induce the null hypothesis acceptance probability. We illustrate that Beta-binomial mixture model based two-stage design retains certain desirable properties for hypothesis testing purpose. However, numerical results show that such designs may not exist under certain hypothesis and error rate (type I and II) setups within maximal sample size approximately 130. Furthermore, we give theoretical conditions for asymptotic two-stage design non-existence (sample size goes to infinity) in order to improve the efficiency of design search and to avoid needless searching.

  5. Toxicity-dependent feasibility bounds for the escalation with overdose control approach in phase I cancer trials.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, Graham M; Sweeting, Michael J; Mander, Adrian P

    2017-03-15

    Phase I trials of anti-cancer therapies aim to identify a maximum tolerated dose (MTD), defined as the dose that causes unacceptable toxicity in a target proportion of patients. Both rule-based and model-based methods have been proposed for MTD recommendation. The escalation with overdose control (EWOC) approach is a model-based design where the dose assigned to the next patient is one that, given all available data, has a posterior probability of exceeding the MTD equal to a pre-specified value known as the feasibility bound. The aim is to conservatively dose-escalate and approach the MTD, avoiding severe overdosing early on in a trial. The EWOC approach has been applied in practice with the feasibility bound either fixed or varying throughout a trial, yet some of the methods may recommend incoherent dose-escalation, that is, an increase in dose after observing severe toxicity at the current dose. We present examples where varying feasibility bounds have been used in practice, and propose a toxicity-dependent feasibility bound approach that guarantees coherent dose-escalation and incorporates the desirable features of other EWOC approaches. We show via detailed simulation studies that the toxicity-dependent feasibility bound approach provides improved MTD recommendation properties to the original EWOC approach for both discrete and continuous doses across most dose-toxicity scenarios, with comparable performance to other approaches without recommending incoherent dose escalation. © 2017 The Authors. Statistics in Medicine Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Bayesian decision sequential analysis with survival endpoint in phase II clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lili; Woodworth, George

    2009-04-30

    Chen and Chaloner (Statist. Med. 2006; 25:2956-2966. DOI: 10.1002/sim.2429) present a Bayesian stopping rule for a single-arm clinical trial with a binary endpoint. In some cases, earlier stopping may be possible by basing the stopping rule on the time to a binary event. We investigate the feasibility of computing exact, Bayesian, decision-theoretic time-to-event stopping rules for a single-arm group sequential non-inferiority trial relative to an objective performance criterion. For a conjugate prior distribution, exponential failure time distribution, and linear and threshold loss structures, we obtain the optimal Bayes stopping rule by backward induction. We compute frequentist operating characteristics of including Type I error, statistical power, and expected run length. We also briefly address design issues.

  7. Feeding and Bleeding: The Institutional Banalization of Risk to Healthy Volunteers in Phase I Pharmaceutical Clinical Trials.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Jill A

    2015-03-01

    Phase I clinical trials are the first stage of testing new pharmaceuticals in humans. The majority of these studies are conducted under controlled, inpatient conditions using healthy volunteers who are paid for their participation. This article draws on an ethnographic study of six phase I clinics in the United States, including 268 semistructured interviews with research staff and healthy volunteers. In it, I argue that an institutional banalization of risk structures the perceptions of research staff and healthy volunteers participating in the studies. For research staff, there are three mechanisms by which risk becomes banal: a perceived homogeneity of studies, Fordist work regimes, and data-centric discourse. For healthy volunteers, repeat study participation contributes to the institutional banalization of risk both through the process of desensitization to risk and the formation of trust in the clinics. I argue that the institutional banalization of risk also renders invisible ethical concerns about exploitation of underprivileged groups in pharmaceutical research.

  8. Feeding and Bleeding: The Institutional Banalization of Risk to Healthy Volunteers in Phase I Pharmaceutical Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Jill A.

    2015-01-01

    Phase I clinical trials are the first stage of testing new pharmaceuticals in humans. The majority of these studies are conducted under controlled, inpatient conditions using healthy volunteers who are paid for their participation. This article draws on an ethnographic study of six phase I clinics in the United States, including 268 semistructured interviews with research staff and healthy volunteers. In it, I argue that an institutional banalization of risk structures the perceptions of research staff and healthy volunteers participating in the studies. For research staff, there are three mechanisms by which risk becomes banal: a perceived homogeneity of studies, Fordist work regimes, and data-centric discourse. For healthy volunteers, repeat study participation contributes to the institutional banalization of risk both through the process of desensitization to risk and the formation of trust in the clinics. I argue that the institutional banalization of risk also renders invisible ethical concerns about exploitation of underprivileged groups in pharmaceutical research. PMID:25914430

  9. Interventions to Increase Enrollment in a Large Multicenter Phase 3 Trial of Carotid Stenting versus Endarterectomy

    PubMed Central

    Longbottom, Mary E.; Roberts, Jamie N.; Tom, MeeLee; Hughes, Susan E.; Howard, Virginia J.; Sheffet, Alice J.; Meschia, James F.; Brott, Thomas G.

    2012-01-01

    Background Randomized clinical trials often encounter slow enrollment. Failing to meet sample size requirements has scientific, financial, and ethical implications. Aims We report interventions used to accelerate recruitment in a large multicenter clinical trial that was not meeting prespecified enrollment commitments. Methods The Carotid Revascularization Endarterectomy versus Stenting Trial (CREST) began randomization in December 2000. To accelerate enrollment, multiple recruitment tactics were initiated, which included expanding the number of sites; hiring a Recruitment Director (May 2003); broadening eligibility criteria (April 2005); branding with a study logo, website, and recruitment materials; increasing site visits by study leadership; sending emails to the site teams after every enrollment; distributing electronic newsletters; and implementing investigator and coordinator conferences. Results From December 2000 through May 2003, 14 sites became active (54 patients randomized); from June 2003 through April 2005, 44 sites were added (404 patients randomized); and from May 2005 through July 2008, 54 sites were added (2044 patients randomized). During these time intervals, the number of patients enrolled per site per year was 1.5, 3.6, and 5.6. For the single years 2004 to 2008, the mean monthly randomization rates per year were 19.7, 38.1, 56.4, 53.0, and 54.7 (annualized), respectively. Enrollment was highest after recruitment tactics were implemented: 677 patients in 2006, 636 in 2007, and 657 in 2008 (annualized). The prespecified sample size of 2502 patients, 47% asymptomatic, was accomplished July 2008. Conclusions Aggressive recruitment tactics and investment in a full-time Recruitment Director who can lead implementation may be effective in accelerating recruitment in multicenter trials. PMID:22631861

  10. Phase II Trial of Abiraterone Acetate Plus Prednisone in Black Men With Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sfakianos, John; Liaw, Bobby; Gimpel-Tetra, Kiev; Kemeny, Margaret; Bulone, Linda; Shahin, Mohammad; Oh, William Kyu; Galsky, Matthew David

    2016-01-01

    Lessons Learned The safety and activity findings of abiraterone acetate plus prednisone treatment in black men with mCRPC were similar to results from previously conducted studies with largely white populations. Poor trial accrual continues to be a challenge in black men with mCRPC and further efforts are needed to address such underrepresentation. Background. Self-identified black men have higher incidence and mortality from prostate cancer in the United States compared with white men but are dramatically underrepresented in clinical trials exploring novel therapies for metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). Methods. Black men with mCRPC were treated with abiraterone acetate (AA), 1,000 mg daily, and prednisone (P), 5 mg twice daily. The primary objective was to determine antitumor activity (defined by a ≥30% decline in prostate-specific antigen [PSA] level) and to correlate germline polymorphisms in androgen metabolism genes with antitumor activity. Secondary objectives included determining safety, post-treatment changes in measurable disease, and time to disease progression. Results. From April 2013 to March 2016, a total of 11 black men were enrolled and received AA plus P (AA+P); 7 of 10 evaluable patients were docetaxel naive. Post-treatment declines in PSA level of ≥30% were achieved in 90% of patients. The side effect profile was consistent with prior clinical trials exploring AA+P in mCRPC. Due to poor accrual, the study was closed prematurely with insufficient sample size for the planned pharmacogenetic analyses. Conclusion. In this small prospective study terminated for poor accrual, the safety and activity of AA+P in black men with mCRPC was similar to that reported in prior studies exploring AA in largely white populations. Further efforts are needed to address underrepresentation of black men in mCRPC trials. PMID:27742908

  11. Quetiapine v. lithium in the maintenance phase following a first episode of mania: randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Berk, Michael; Daglas, Rothanthi; Dandash, Orwa; Yücel, Murat; Henry, Lisa; Hallam, Karen; Macneil, Craig; Hasty, Melissa; Pantelis, Christos; Murphy, Brendan P; Kader, Linda; Damodaran, Saji; Wong, Michael T H; Conus, Philippe; Ratheesh, Aswin; McGorry, Patrick D; Cotton, Sue M

    2017-03-02

    BackgroundLithium and quetiapine are considered standard maintenance agents for bipolar disorder yet it is unclear how their efficacy compares with each other.AimsTo investigate the differential effect of lithium and quetiapine on symptoms of depression, mania, general functioning, global illness severity and quality of life in patients with recently stabilised first-episode mania.MethodMaintenance trial of patients with first-episode mania stabilised on a combination of lithium and quetiapine, subsequently randomised to lithium or quetiapine monotherapy (up to 800 mg/day) and followed up for 1 year. (Trial registration: Australian and New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry - ACTRN12607000639426.)ResultsIn total, 61 individuals were randomised. Within mixed-model repeated measures analyses, significant omnibus treatment × visit interactions were observed for measures of overall psychopathology (Brief Psychotic Rating Scale (BPRS), P = 0.005, Clinical Global Impressions - Bipolar, severity, P = 0.006), psychotic symptoms (BPRS, positive symptoms, P = 0.047) and functioning (Global Assessment of Functioning Scale, P = 0.001; Social and Occupational Functioning Scale, P = 0.001). Planned and post hoc comparisons further demonstrated the superiority of lithium treatment over quetiapine.ConclusionsIn people with first-episode mania treated with a combination of lithium and quetiapine, continuation treatment with lithium rather than quetiapine is superior in terms of mean levels of symptoms during a 1-year evolution.

  12. Phase I and Pharmacologic Trial of Cytosine Arabinoside with the Selective Checkpoint 1 Inhibitor Sch 900776 in Refractory Acute Leukemias

    PubMed Central

    Karp, Judith E.; Thomas, Brian M.; Greer, Jacqueline M.; Sorge, Christopher; Gore, Steven D.; Pratz, Keith W.; Smith, B. Douglas; Flatten, Karen S.; Peterson, Kevin; Schneider, Paula; Mackey, Karen; Freshwater, Tomoko; Levis, Mark J.; McDevitt, Michael A.; Carraway, Hetty E.; Gladstone, Douglas E.; Showel, Margaret M.; Loechner, Sabine; Parry, David A.; Horowitz, Jo Ann; Isaacs, Randi; Kaufmann, Scott H.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Incorporation of cytarabine into DNA activates checkpoint kinase 1 (Chk1), which stabilizes stalled replication forks, induces S-phase slowing, and diminishes cytarabine cytotoxicity. The selective Chk1 inhibitor SCH 900776 abrogates cytarabine-induced S-phase arrest and enhances cytarabine cytotoxicity in acute leukemia cell lines and leukemic blasts in vitro. To extend these findings to the clinical setting, we have conducted a phase I study of cytarabine and SCH 900776. Experimental Design Twenty-four adults with relapsed and refractory acute leukemias received timed sequential, continuous infusion cytarabine 2 g/m2 over 72 hours (667 mg/m2/24 hours) beginning on day 1 and again on day 10. SCH 900776 was administered as a 15- to 30-minute infusion on days 2, 3, 11, and 12. The starting dose of SCH 900776 was 10 mg/m2/dose. Results Dose-limiting toxicities consisting of corrected QT interval prolongation and grade 3 palmar-plantar erythrodysesthesia occurred at 140 mg flat dosing (dose level 5, equivalent to 80 mg/m2). Complete remissions occurred in 8 of 24 (33%) patients, with 7 of 8 at 40 mg/m2 or higher. SCH 900776 did not accumulate at any dose level. Marrow blasts obtained pretreatment and during therapy showed increased phosphorylation of H2Ax after SCH 900776 beginning at 40 mg/m2, consistent with unrepaired DNA damage. Conclusions These data support a randomized phase II trial of cytarabine +/− SCH 900776 at a recommended flat dose of 100 mg (equivalent to 56 mg/m2) for adults with poor-risk leukemias. The trial (SP P05247) was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as NCT #00907517. PMID:23092873

  13. Rapid hydrothermal synthesis of VO2 (B) and its conversion to thermochromic VO2 (M1).

    PubMed

    Popuri, Srinivasa Rao; Miclau, Marinela; Artemenko, Alla; Labrugere, Christine; Villesuzanne, Antoine; Pollet, Michaël

    2013-05-06

    The present study provides a rapid way to obtain VO2 (B) under economical and environmentally friendly conditions. VO2 (B) is one of the well-known polymorphs of vanadium dioxide and is a promising cathode material for aqueous lithium ion batteries. VO2 (B) was successfully synthesized by rapid single-step hydrothermal process using V2O5 and citric acid as precursors. The present study shows that phase-pure VO2 (B) polytype can be easily obtained at 180 °C for 2 h and 220 °C for 1 h, that is, the lowest combination of temperature and duration reported so far. The obtained VO2 (B) is characterized by X-ray powder diffraction, high-resolution scanning electron microscopy, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. In addition, we present an indirect way to obtain VO2 (M1) by annealing VO2 (B) under vacuum for 1 h.

  14. Approaches to phase 1 clinical trial design focused on safety, efficiency, and selected patient populations: a report from the clinical trial design task force of the national cancer institute investigational drug steering committee.

    PubMed

    Ivy, S Percy; Siu, Lillian L; Garrett-Mayer, Elizabeth; Rubinstein, Larry

    2010-03-15

    The goals and objectives of phase 1 clinical trials are changing to include further evaluation of endpoints such as molecular targeted effects, in addition to dose-toxicity profile of the investigational agent. Because of these changes in focus, the National Cancer Institute and Investigational Drug Steering Committee's Task Force on Clinical Trial Design met to evaluate the most efficient ways to design and implement early clinical trials with novel therapeutics. Clinical approaches discussed included the conventional 3 + 3 cohort expansion phase 1 design, multi-institutional phase 1 studies, accelerated titration designs, continual reassessment methods, the study of specific target patient populations, and phase 0 studies. Each of these approaches uniquely contributes to some aspect of the phase 1 study, with all focused on dose and schedule determination, patient safety, and limited patient exposure to ineffective doses of investigational agent. The benefit of labor-intensive generation of preliminary biomarker evidence of target inhibition, as well as the value of molecular profiling of the study population, is considered. New drug development is expensive and the failure rate remains high. By identifying patient populations expected to respond to the study agent and tailoring the treatment with a novel drug, investigators will be one step closer to personalizing cancer treatment. The "fail early and fast" approach is acceptable if the appropriate patient population is evaluated in the phase 1 trial. The approaches outlined in this overview address the merits, advantages, disadvantages, and obstacles encountered during first in human studies.

  15. Experimental Treatment of Ebola Virus Disease with TKM-130803: A Single-Arm Phase 2 Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Rojek, Amanda; Gannon, Fiona; Carson, Gail; Idriss, Baimba; Massaquoi, Thomas; Gandi, Regina; Joseph, Sebatu; Osman, Hassan K.; Brooks, Timothy J. G.; Simpson, Andrew J. H.; Goodfellow, Ian; Thorne, Lucy; Arias, Armando; Merson, Laura; Castle, Lyndsey; Howell-Jones, Rebecca; Pardinaz-Solis, Raul; Hope-Gill, Benjamin; Ferri, Mauricio; Grove, Jennifer; Kowalski, Mark; Stepniewska, Kasia; Lang, Trudie; Whitehead, John; Olliaro, Piero; Samai, Mohammed; Horby, Peter W.

    2016-01-01

    Background TKM-130803, a small interfering RNA lipid nanoparticle product, has been developed for the treatment of Ebola virus disease (EVD), but its efficacy and safety in humans has not been evaluated. Methods and Findings In this single-arm phase 2 trial, adults with laboratory-confirmed EVD received 0.3 mg/kg of TKM-130803 by intravenous infusion once daily for up to 7 d. On days when trial enrolment capacity was reached, patients were enrolled into a concurrent observational cohort. The primary outcome was survival to day 14 after admission, excluding patients who died within 48 h of admission. After 14 adults with EVD had received TKM-130803, the pre-specified futility boundary was reached, indicating a probability of survival to day 14 of ≤0.55, and enrolment was stopped. Pre-treatment geometric mean Ebola virus load in the 14 TKM-130803 recipients was 2.24 × 109 RNA copies/ml plasma (95% CI 7.52 × 108, 6.66 × 109). Two of the TKM-130803 recipients died within 48 h of admission and were therefore excluded from the primary outcome analysis. Of the remaining 12 TKM-130803 recipients, nine died and three survived. The probability that a TKM-130803 recipient who survived for 48 h will subsequently survive to day 14 was estimated to be 0.27 (95% CI 0.06, 0.58). TKM-130803 infusions were well tolerated, with 56 doses administered and only one possible infusion-related reaction observed. Three patients were enrolled in the observational cohort, of whom two died. Conclusions Administration of TKM-130803 at a dose of 0.3 mg/kg/d by intravenous infusion to adult patients with severe EVD was not shown to improve survival when compared to historic controls. Trial registration Pan African Clinical Trials Registry PACTR201501000997429 PMID:27093560

  16. Early phase drug development for treatment of chronic pain--options for clinical trial and program design.

    PubMed

    Kalliomäki, Jarkko; Miller, Frank; Kågedal, Matts; Karlsten, Rolf

    2012-07-01

    Due to high prevalence and unmet medical need, chronic pain has become an important area for development of new medicines. Chronic pain disorders are heterogeneous with regard to pathophysiological mechanisms and clinical presentation. While a mechanism-based classification of pain is generally advocated, it is not yet applicable for diagnostic use. Many new analgesic drug candidates believed to act on scientifically relevant pain targets have failed to show efficacy in clinical trials. These might be true observations of inferior efficacy and/or safety. However, in part, these failures may be due to difficulties with selection of an appropriate study population and/or appropriate doses. For a new chemical entity (NCE) with a novel pharmacological mechanism, the only guidance for selection of study population and doses is often based on preclinical data. Thus, there may be considerable uncertainty in defining the population with a pain generating mechanism targeted by the NCE. Therefore, further exploration of the right population and dose may be needed in early clinical phase why alternatives to conventional trial designs may be considered. We have reviewed characteristics of three alternative design options from an early (Phase 2) drug development perspective; enriched enrolment, dose titration and adaptive dosing. The advantages and disadvantages of each type of study design were analyzed and discussed from a clinical development program perspective. It is concluded that these designs can be useful in addressing different types of issues in early development of novel analgesic drugs for chronic pain.

  17. Developing a Bayesian adaptive design for a phase I clinical trial: a case study for a novel HIV treatment.

    PubMed

    Mason, Alexina J; Gonzalez-Maffe, Juan; Quinn, Killian; Doyle, Nicki; Legg, Ken; Norsworthy, Peter; Trevelion, Roy; Winston, Alan; Ashby, Deborah

    2017-02-28

    The design of phase I studies is often challenging, because of limited evidence to inform study protocols. Adaptive designs are now well established in cancer but much less so in other clinical areas. A phase I study to assess the safety, pharmacokinetic profile and antiretroviral efficacy of C34-PEG4 -Chol, a novel peptide fusion inhibitor for the treatment of HIV infection, has been set up with Medical Research Council funding. During the study workup, Bayesian adaptive designs based on the continual reassessment method were compared with a more standard rule-based design, with the aim of choosing a design that would maximise the scientific information gained from the study. The process of specifying and evaluating the design options was time consuming and required the active involvement of all members of the trial's protocol development team. However, the effort was worthwhile as the originally proposed rule-based design has been replaced by a more efficient Bayesian adaptive design. While the outcome to be modelled, design details and evaluation criteria are trial specific, the principles behind their selection are general. This case study illustrates the steps required to establish a design in a novel context. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Phase I clinical trial of a five-peptide cancer vaccine combined with cyclophosphamide in advanced solid tumors.

    PubMed

    Murahashi, Mutsunori; Hijikata, Yasuki; Yamada, Kazunari; Tanaka, Yoshihiro; Kishimoto, Junji; Inoue, Hiroyuki; Marumoto, Tomotoshi; Takahashi, Atsushi; Okazaki, Toshihiko; Takeda, Kazuyoshi; Hirakawa, Masakazu; Fujii, Hiroshi; Okano, Shinji; Morita, Masaru; Baba, Eishi; Mizumoto, Kazuhiro; Maehara, Yoshihiko; Tanaka, Masao; Akashi, Koichi; Nakanishi, Yoichi; Yoshida, Koji; Tsunoda, Takuya; Tamura, Kazuo; Nakamura, Yusuke; Tani, Kenzaburo

    2016-05-01

    We designed a phase I trial to investigate the safety, immune responses and clinical benefits of a five-peptide cancer vaccine in combination with chemotherapy. Study subjects were patients positive for HLA-A2402 with locally advanced, metastatic, and/or recurrent gastrointestinal, lung or cervical cancer. Eighteen patients including nine cases of colorectal cancer were treated with escalating doses of cyclophosphamide 4days before vaccination. Five HLA-A2402-restricted, tumor-associated antigen (TAA) epitope peptides from KOC1, TTK, URLC10, DEPDC1 and MPHOSPH1 were injected weekly for 4weeks. Treatment was well tolerated without any adverse events above grade 3. Analysis of peripheral blood lymphocytes showed that the number of regulatory T cells dropped from baseline after administration of cyclophosphamide and confirmed that TAA-specific T cell responses were associated significantly with longer overall survival. This phase I clinical trial demonstrated safety and promising immune responses that correlated with vaccine-induced T-cell responses. Therefore, this approach warrants further clinical studies.

  19. Phase I Trial of Simultaneous In-Field Boost With Helical Tomotherapy for Patients With One to Three Brain Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Rodrigues, George; Yartsev, Slav; Yaremko, Brian; Perera, Francisco; Dar, A. Rashid; Hammond, Alex; Lock, Michael; Yu, Edward; Ash, Robert; Caudrelier, Jean-Michelle; Khuntia, Deepak; Bailey, Laura; Bauman, Glenn

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: Stereotactic radiosurgery is an alternative to surgical resection for selected intracranial lesions. Integrated image-guided intensity-modulated-capable radiotherapy platforms such as helical tomotherapy (HT) could potentially replace traditional radiosurgery apparatus. The present study's objective was to determine the maximally tolerated dose of a simultaneous in-field boost integrated with whole brain radiotherapy for palliative treatment of patients with one to three brain metastases using HT. Methods and Materials: The inclusion/exclusion criteria and endpoints were consistent with the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 9508 radiosurgery trial. The cohorts were constructed with a 3 + 3 design; however, additional patients were enrolled in the lower dose tolerable cohorts during the toxicity assessment periods. Whole brain radiotherapy (30 Gy in 10 fractions) was delivered with a 5-30-Gy (total lesion dose of 35-60 Gy in 10 fractions) simultaneous in-field boost delivered to the brain metastases. The maximally tolerated dose was determined by the frequency of neurologic Grade 3-5 National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria, version 3.0, dose-limiting toxicity events within each Phase I cohort. Results: A total of 48 patients received treatment in the 35-Gy (n = 3), 40-Gy (n = 16), 50-Gy (n = 15), 55-Gy (n = 8), and 60-Gy (n = 6) cohorts. No patients experienced dose-limiting toxicity events in any of the trial cohorts. The 3-month RECIST assessments available for 32 of the 48 patients demonstrated a complete response in 2, a partial response in 16, stable disease in 6, and progressive disease in 8 patients. Conclusion: The delivery of 60 Gy in 10 fractions to one to three brain metastases synchronously with 30 Gy whole brain radiotherapy was achieved without dose-limiting central nervous system toxicity as assessed 3 months after treatment. This approach is being tested in a Phase II efficacy trial.

  20. CARDIO-i2b2: integrating arrhythmogenic disease data in i2b2.

    PubMed

    Segagni, Daniele; Tibollo, Valentina; Dagliati, Arianna; Napolitano, Carlo; G Priori, Silvia; Bellazzi, Riccardo

    2012-01-01

    The CARDIO-i2b2 project is an initiative to customize the i2b2 bioinformatics tool with the aim to integrate clinical and research data in order to support translational research in cardiology. In this work we describe the implementation and the customization of i2b2 to manage the data of arrhytmogenic disease patients collected at the Fondazione Salvatore Maugeri of Pavia in a joint project with the NYU Langone Medical Center (New York, USA). The i2b2 clinical research chart data warehouse is populated with the data obtained by the research database called TRIAD. The research infrastructure is extended by the development of new plug-ins for the i2b2 web client application able to properly select and export phenotypic data and to perform data analysis.

  1. Multiple Intravenous Infusions Phase 2b: Laboratory Study

    PubMed Central

    Pinkney, Sonia; Fan, Mark; Chan, Katherine; Koczmara, Christine; Colvin, Christopher; Sasangohar, Farzan; Masino, Caterina; Easty, Anthony; Trbovich, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    Background Administering multiple intravenous (IV) infusions to a single patient via infusion pump occurs routinely in health care, but there has been little empirical research examining the risks associated with this practice or ways to mitigate those risks. Objectives To identify the risks associated with multiple IV infusions and assess the impact of interventions on nurses’ ability to safely administer them. Data Sources and Review Methods Forty nurses completed infusion-related tasks in a simulated adult intensive care unit, with and without interventions (i.e., repeated-measures design). Results Errors were observed in completing common tasks associated with the administration of multiple IV infusions, including the following (all values from baseline, which was current practice): setting up and programming multiple primary continuous IV infusions (e.g., 11.7% programming errors) identifying IV infusions (e.g., 7.7% line-tracing errors) managing dead volume (e.g., 96.0% flush rate errors following IV syringe dose administration) setting up a secondary intermittent IV infusion (e.g., 11.3% secondary clamp errors) administering an IV pump bolus (e.g., 11.5% programming errors) Of 10 interventions tested, 6 (1 practice, 3 technology, and 2 educational) significantly decreased or even eliminated errors compared to baseline. Limitations The simulation of an adult intensive care unit at 1 hospital limited the ability to generalize results. The study results were representative of nurses who received training in the interventions but had little experience using them. The longitudinal effects of the interventions were not studied. Conclusions Administering and managing multiple IV infusions is a complex and risk-prone activity. However, when a patient requires multiple IV infusions, targeted interventions can reduce identified risks. A combination of standardized practice, technology improvements, and targeted education is required. PMID:26316919

  2. Single blind randomized Phase III trial to investigate the benefit of a focal lesion ablative microboost in prostate cancer (FLAME-trial): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The treatment results of external beam radiotherapy for intermediate and high risk prostate cancer patients are insufficient with five-year biochemical relapse rates of approximately 35%. Several randomized trials have shown that dose escalation to the entire prostate improves biochemical disease free survival. However, further dose escalation to the whole gland is limited due to an unacceptable high risk of acute and late toxicity. Moreover, local recurrences often originate at the location of the macroscopic tumor, so boosting the radiation dose at the macroscopic tumor within the prostate might increase local control. A reduction of distant metastases and improved survival can be expected by reducing local failure. The aim of this study is to investigate the benefit of an ablative microboost to the macroscopic tumor within the prostate in patients treated with external beam radiotherapy for prostate cancer. Methods/Design The FLAME-trial (Focal Lesion Ablative Microboost in prostatE cancer) is a single blind randomized controlled phase III trial. We aim to include 566 patients (283 per treatment arm) with intermediate or high risk adenocarcinoma of the prostate who are scheduled for external beam radiotherapy using fiducial markers for position verification. With this number of patients, the expected increase in five-year freedom from biochemical failure rate of 10% can be detected with a power of 80%. Patients allocated to the standard arm receive a dose of 77 Gy in 35 fractions to the entire prostate and patients in the experimental arm receive 77 Gy to the entire prostate and an additional integrated microboost to the macroscopic tumor of 95 Gy in 35 fractions. The secondary outcome measures include treatment-related toxicity, quality of life and disease-specific survival. Furthermore, by localizing the recurrent tumors within the prostate during follow-up and correlating this with the delivered dose, we can obtain accurate dose-effect information

  3. Preclinical Rationale for the Phase III Trials in Metastatic Pancreatic Cancer: Is Wishful Thinking Clouding Successful Drug Development for Pancreatic Cancer?

    PubMed

    Thota, Ramya; Maitra, Anirban; Berlin, Jordan D

    2017-02-01

    Prior phase III trials in advanced pancreatic cancer have been predominantly unsuccessful. In this review, we attempt to understand how past preclinical data were translated into phase III clinical trials in metastatic pancreatic cancer as described in the article. A systematic literature review conducted through the MEDLINE, Embase, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials databases, from January 1997 to June 2015 using key words-phase III clinical trials, metastatic/advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma or pancreatic cancer identified 30 randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that met criteria. The trials were limited to RCTs in the first-line treatment of patients with metastatic pancreatic cancer. The success rate of first-line phase III studies in advanced pancreatic cancer was only 13%. In 60% of the RCTs, no preclinical experiments were referenced in biologically cognate pancreatic models. Nine (30%) of the RCTs were designed based on preclinical evidence from in vitro cell lines alone without additional in vivo validation in xenograft models. It remains uncertain how strongly the preclinical data influence the development of clinical regimens but so far the studies developed based on more solid preclinical evidence have been successful.

  4. A post hoc analysis of subgroup outcomes and creatinine in the phase III clinical trial (EMPOWER) of dexpramipexole in ALS.

    PubMed

    Bozik, Michael E; Mitsumoto, Hiroshi; Brooks, Benjamin R; Rudnicki, Stacy A; Moore, Dan H; Zhang, Bing; Ludolph, Albert; Cudkowicz, Merit E; van den Berg, Leonard H; Mather, James; Petzinger, Thomas; Archibald, Donald

    2014-09-01

    Our objective was to compare the phase II and phase III (EMPOWER) studies of dexpramipexole in ALS and evaluate potential EMPOWER responder subgroups and biomarkers based on significant inter-study population differences. In a post hoc analysis, we compared the baseline population characteristics of both dexpramipexole studies and analyzed EMPOWER efficacy outcomes and laboratory measures in subgroups defined by significant inter-study differences. Results showed that, compared with phase II, the proportion of El Escorial criteria (EEC) definite participants decreased (p = 0.005), riluzole use increased (p = 0.002), and mean symptom duration increased (p = 0.037) significantly in EMPOWER. Baseline creatinine (p < 0.001) and on-study creatinine change (p < 0.001) correlated significantly with ALSFRS-R in EMPOWER. In the EMPOWER subgroup defined by EEC-definite ALS, riluzole use, and < median symptom duration (15.3 months), dexpramipexole-treated participants had reduced ALSFRS-R slope decline (p = 0.015), decreased mortality (p = 0.011), and reduced creatinine loss (p = 0.003). In conclusion, significant differences existed between the phase II and EMPOWER study populations in ALS clinical trials of dexpramipexole. In a post hoc analysis of EMPOWER subgroups defined by these differences, potential clinical benefits of dexpramipexole were identified in the subgroup of riluzole-treated, short-symptom duration, EEC-definite ALS participants. Creatinine loss correlated with disease progression and was reduced in dexpramipexole-treated participants, suggesting it as a candidate biomarker.

  5. Lipoplatin monotherapy: A phase II trial of second-line treatment of metastatic non-small-cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Ravaioli, A; Papi, M; Pasquini, E; Marangolo, M; Rudnas, B; Fantini, M; Nicoletti, S V L; Drudi, F; Panzini, I; Tamburini, E; Gianni, L; Pasini, G

    2009-02-01

    Lipoplatin is a liposome encapsulated form of cisplatin. phase i studies on lipoplatin have demonstrated that the compound has an excellent toxicity profile. therefore we performed a phase ii trial in heavily pre-treated patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSClC), performance status 0-2 in which the primary endpoint was response rate and secondary endpoints were safety and overall survival.Nineteen patients, average age 64 years old, with stage iV NSClC, were treated with lipoplatin 100 mg/m(2) every two weeks, as second line chemotherapy.We observed 1 partial remission (5.2%) and 3 stable diseases (15.9%). Time to progression (ttp) was 16 weeks and median overall survival (OS) was 31 weeks (7.2 months). We observed G1-G2 toxicity during chemotherapy, mainly gastrointestinal with nausea and vomiting (4 patients), asthenia (3 patients), mucositis (2 patients) and anemia (4 patients).Our phase ii study does not support a more extensive use of lipoplatin in phase III studies. An increase of dosage and a better selection of patients are mandatory to understand the real therapeutic activity of lipoplatin.

  6. Zika Phase I Clinical Trial Material—From Research to Release in 90 Days | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Over the past 12 months, we’ve grown accustomed to seeing Zika in the news. The virus has been linked to thousands of cases of microcephaly in Brazilian babies. Numerous countries, including the United States, have reported Zika-related deaths. And there is no vaccine available at this time. In the face of what has become a global health crisis, the Vaccine Research Center (VRC) at the NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) responded to a call from Anthony Fauci, Ph.D., head, NIAID, to get a candidate vaccine into human trials by the summer of 2016.

  7. A Phase 1 trial of intravenous boronophenylalanine-fructose complex in patients with glioblastoma multiforme

    SciTech Connect

    Bergland, R.; Elowitz, E.; Chadha, M.; Coderre, J.A.; Joel, D.

    1996-10-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) of glioblastoma multiforme was initially performed at the Brookhaven National Laboratory in the early 1950`s While this treatment for malignant brain tumors has continued in Japan, new worldwide interest has been stimulated by the development of new and more selective boron compounds. Boronophenylalanine (BPA) is a blood-brain barrier penetrating compound that has been used in BNCT of malignant melanomas. SPA has been employed experimentally in BNCT of rat gliosarcoma and has potential use in the treatment of human glioblastoma. As a preface to clinical BNCT trials, we studied the biodistribution of SPA in patients with glioblastoma.

  8. Field production and functional evaluation of chloroplast-derived interferon-α2b

    PubMed Central

    Arlen, Philip A.; Falconer, Regina; Cherukumilli, Sri; Cole, Amy; Cole, Alexander M.; Oishi, Karen K.; Daniell, Henry

    2008-01-01

    Summary Type I interferons (IFNs) inhibit viral replication and cell growth and enhance the immune response, and therefore have many clinical applications. IFN-α2b ranks third in world market use for a biopharmaceutical, behind only insulin and erythropoietin. The average annual cost of IFN-α2b for the treatment of hepatitis C infection is $26 000, and is therefore unavailable to the majority of patients in developing countries. Therefore, we expressed IFN-α2b in tobacco chloroplasts, and transgenic lines were grown in the field after obtaining United States Department of Agriculture Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (USDA-APHIS) approval. Stable, site-specific integration of transgenes into chloroplast genomes and homoplasmy through several generations were confirmed. IFN-α2b levels reached up to 20% of total soluble protein, or 3 mg per gram of leaf (fresh weight). Transgenic IFN-α2b had similar in vitro biological activity to commercially produced PEG-Intron™ when tested for its ability to protect cells against cytopathic viral replication in the vesicular stomatitis virus cytopathic effect (VSV CPE) assay and to inhibit early-stage human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. The antitumour and immunomodulating properties of IFN-α2b were also seen in vivo . Chloroplast-derived IFN-α2b increased the expression of major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC I) on splenocytes and the total number of natural killer (NK) cells. Finally, IFN-α2b purified from chloroplast transgenic lines (cpIFN-α2b) protected mice from a highly metastatic tumour line. This demonstration of high levels of expression of IFN-α2b, transgene containment and biological activity akin to that of commercial preparations of IFN-α2b facilitated the first field production of a plant-derived human blood protein, a critical step towards human clinical trials and commercialization. PMID:17490449

  9. Phase II Trial of Combination Thalidomide plus Temozolomide in Patients with Metastatic Malignant Melanoma: Southwest Oncology Group S0508

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Joseph I.; Moon, James; Hutchins, Laura F.; Sosman, Jeffrey A.; Kast, W. Martin; Da Silva, Diane M.; Liu, P.Y.; Thompson, John A.; Flaherty, Lawrence E.; Sondak, Vernon K.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose In limited institution Phase II studies, thalidomide and temozolomide has yielded response rates (RR) up to 32% for advanced melanoma, leading to the use of this combination as “standard” by some. We conducted a multi-center Phase II trial to better define the clinical efficacy of thalidomide and temozolomide and the immune modulatory effects of thalidomide, when combined with temozolomide, in patients with metastatic melanoma. Patients and Methods Patients must have had stage IV cutaneous melanoma, no active brain metastases, Zubrod PS 0–1, up to 1 prior systemic therapy excluding thalidomide, temozolomide or dacarbazine, adequate organ function, and given informed consent. The primary endpoint was 6-month progression-free survival (PFS). Secondary endpoints included survival (OS), RR, toxicities, and assessment of relationships between biomarkers and clinical outcomes. Patients received thalidomide (200mg/d escalated to 400mg/d for patients <70, or 100mg/d escalated to 250mg/d for patients ≥70) plus temozolomide (75mg/m2/d × 6 weeks then 2 weeks rest). Results Sixty-four patients were enrolled; 2 refused treatment. The 6-month PFS was 15% (95% CI, 6%–23%); 1-year OS was 35% (95% CI, 24%–47%); RR was 13% (95% CI, 5%–25%), all partial. One treatment-related death occurred from myocardial infarction; 3 other Grade 4 events occurred including pulmonary embolism, neutropenia and CNS ischemia. There was no significant correlation between biomarkers and PFS or OS. Conclusion This combination of thalidomide and temozolomide does not appear to have a clinical benefit that exceeds dacarbazine alone. We would not recommend it further for phase III trials or for standard community use. PMID:19918923

  10. Phase II clinical trial of peptide cocktail therapy for patients with advanced pancreatic cancer: VENUS-PC study.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Nobuaki; Hazama, Shoichi; Iguchi, Haruo; Uesugi, Kazuhiro; Tanaka, Hiroaki; Hirakawa, Kosei; Aruga, Atsushi; Hatori, Takashi; Ishizaki, Hidenobu; Umeda, Yuzo; Fujiwara, Toshiyoshi; Ikemoto, Tetsuya; Shimada, Mitsuo; Yoshimatsu, Kazuhiko; Shimizu, Ryoichi; Hayashi, Hiroto; Sakata, Koichiro; Takenouchi, Hiroko; Matsui, Hiroto; Shindo, Yoshitaro; Iida, Michihisa; Koki, Yasunobu; Arima, Hideki; Furukawa, Hiroyuki; Ueno, Tomio; Yoshino, Shigefumi; Nakamura, Yusuke; Oka, Masaaki; Nagano, Hiroaki

    2017-01-01

    We previously conducted a phase I clinical trial combining the HLA-A*2402-restricted KIF20A-derived peptide vaccine with gemcitabine for advanced pancreatic cancer (PC) and confirmed its safety and immunogenicity in cancer patients. In this study, we conducted a multicenter, single-armed, phase II trial using two antiangiogenic cancer vaccines targeting VEGFR1 and VEGFR2 in addition to the KIF20A peptide. We attempted to evaluate the clinical benefit of the cancer vaccination in combination with gemcitabine. Chemotherapy naïve PC patients were enrolled to evaluate primarily the 1-year survival rate, and secondarily overall survival (OS), progression free survival (PFS), response rate (RR), disease control rate (DCR) and the peptide-specific immune responses. All enrolled patients received therapy without the HLA-A information, and the HLA genotypes were used for classification of the patients. Between June 2012 and May 2013, a total of 68 patients were enrolled. No severe systemic adverse effects of Grade 3 or higher related to these three peptides were observed. The 1-year survival rates between the HLA-A*2402-matched and -unmatched groups were not significantly different. In the HLA-A*2402 matched group, patients showing peptide-specific CTL induction for KIF20A or VEGFR1 showed a better prognosis compared to those without such induction (P = 0.023, P = 0.009, respectively). In the HLA-A*2402-matched group, the patients who showed a strong injection site reaction had a better survival rate (P = 0.017) compared to those with a weak or no injection site reaction. This phase II study demonstrated that this therapeutic peptide cocktail might be effective in patients who demonstrate peptide-specific immune reactions although predictive biomarkers are needed for patient selection in its further clinical application.

  11. Toxicological Studies of 212Pb Intravenously or Intraperitoneally Injected into Mice for a Phase 1 Trial

    PubMed Central

    Milenic, Diane E.; Molinolo, Alfredo A.; Solivella, María S.; Banaga, Eileen; Torgue, Julien; Besnainou, Sarah; Brechbiel, Martin W.; Baidoo, Kwamena E.

    2015-01-01

    Faced with the novelty of a 212Pb-labeled monoclonal antibody (mAb) for clinical translation, concerns were expressed by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regarding 212Pb prematurely released from the mAb-chelate conjugate. The objective of this study was to simulate the worst case scenario of such a failure. Groups of Balb/c mice (n = 9–20) were administered 212Pb by intraperitoneal (0.0925–1.85 MBq) or intravenous (0.0925–1.11 MBq) injection and then euthanized at 7 or 90 days to assess acute or chronic effects. Weights were recorded prior to injection of the 212Pb and at the end of the observation periods. Blood samples were collected for clinical chemistry and blood cell analysis. Thirty tissues were harvested and formalin fixed for histopathological examination. Treatment related effects of the 212Pb were observed in the bone marrow, spleen, kidneys and the liver. Histological alterations in these organs were considered mild to moderate, indicating low grade toxicity, and not considered severe enough to affect function. This data was presented to the FDA and determined to be acceptable. The clinical trial with 212Pb-TCMC-trastuzumab was approved in January 2011 and the trial opened at the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) in July. PMID:26213947

  12. A phase 1/2a follistatin gene therapy trial for becker muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Mendell, Jerry R; Sahenk, Zarife; Malik, Vinod; Gomez, Ana M; Flanigan, Kevin M; Lowes, Linda P; Alfano, Lindsay N; Berry, Katherine; Meadows, Eric; Lewis, Sarah; Braun, Lyndsey; Shontz, Kim; Rouhana, Maria; Clark, Kelly Reed; Rosales, Xiomara Q; Al-Zaidy, Samiah; Govoni, Alessandra; Rodino-Klapac, Louise R; Hogan, Mark J; Kaspar, Brian K

    2015-01-01

    Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD) is a variant of dystrophin deficiency resulting from DMD gene mutations. Phenotype is variable with loss of ambulation in late teenage or late mid-life years. There is currently no treatment for this condition. In this BMD proof-of-principle clinical trial, a potent myostatin antagonist, follistatin (FS), was used to inhibit the myostatin pathway. Extensive preclinical studies, using adeno-associated virus (AAV) to deliver follistatin, demonstrated an increase in strength. For this trial, we used the alternatively spliced FS344 to avoid potential binding to off target sites. AAV1.CMV.FS344 was delivered to six BMD patients by direct bilateral intramuscular quadriceps injections. Cohort 1 included three subjects receiving 3 × 10(11) vg/kg/leg. The distance walked on the 6MWT was the primary outcome measure. Patients 01 and 02 improved 58 meters (m) and 125 m, respectively. Patient 03 showed no change. In Cohort 2, Patients 05 and 06 received 6 × 10(11) vg/kg/leg with improved 6MWT by 108 m and 29 m, whereas, Patient 04 showed no improvement. No adverse effects were encountered. Histological changes corroborated benefit showing reduced endomysial fibrosis, reduced central nucleation, more normal fiber size distribution with muscle hypertrophy, especially at high dose. The results are encouraging for treatment of dystrophin-deficient muscle diseases.

  13. Position on zinc delivery to olfactory nerves in intranasal insulin phase I-III clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Hamidovic, A

    2015-11-01

    Zinc in pancreatic insulin is essential for processing and action of the peptide, while in commercial preparations zinc promotes hexameric structure and prevents aggregate formation. In 2002, for the first time, insulin was delivered to humans intranasally with resulting cerebrospinal fluid insulin increases, but steady peripheral insulin levels. The novel method of increasing brain insulin levels without changes in the periphery resulted in an expansion of brain insulin research in clinical trials. As pre-clinical research has shown that brain insulin modulates a number functions, including food cravings and eating behavior, learning and memory functions, stress and mood regulation; realization of beneficial effects of insulin in modulating these functions in clinical populations became a possibility with the new direct-to-brain insulin delivery methodology. However, zinc, being integral to insulin structure and function, is neurotoxic, and has resulted in adverse effects to human health. In the last century, intranasal zinc was given preventively during the time of polio outbreak, and in the 21st century intranasal zinc was widely used over the counter to prevent common cold. In both cases, patients experienced partial or complete loss of smell. This paper is the first one to analyze zinc salts and concentrations of those two epidemiological adversities and directly compare formulations distributed to the public with animal toxicity data. The information gained from animal and epidemiological data provides a foundation for the formation of opinion given in this paper regarding safety of intranasal zinc in emerging clinical trials with intranasal insulin.

  14. A Phase 1 Trial of pharmacologic interactions between transdermal selegiline and a 4-hour cocaine infusion

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Debra S; Everhart, Thomas; Jacob, Peyton; Lin, Emil; Mendelson, John E; Jones, Reese T

    2009-01-01

    Background The selective MAO-B inhibitor selegiline has been evaluated in clinical trials as a potential medication for the treatment of cocaine dependence. This study evaluated the safety of and pharmacologic interactions between 7 days of transdermal selegiline dosed with patches (Selegiline Transdermal System, STS) that deliver 6 mg/24 hours and 2.5 mg/kg of cocaine administered over 4 hours. Methods Twelve nondependent cocaine-experienced subjects received deuterium-labeled cocaine-d5 intravenously (IV) 0.5 mg/kg over 10 minutes followed by 2 mg/kg over 4 hours before and after one week of transdermal selegiline 6 mg/24 hours. Plasma and urine were collected for analysis of selegiline, cocaine, catecholamine and metabolite concentrations. Pharmacodynamic measures were obtained. Results Selegiline did not change cocaine pharmacokinetic parameters. Selegiline administration increased phenylethylamine (PEA) urinary excretion and decreased urinary MHPG-sulfate concentration after cocaine when compared to cocaine alone. No serious adverse effects occurred with the combination of selegiline and cocaine, and cocaine-induced physiological effects were unchanged after selegiline. Only 1 peak subjective cocaine effects rating changed, and only a few subjective ratings decreased across time after selegiline. Conclusion No pharmacological interaction occurred between selegiline and a substantial dose of intravenous cocaine, suggesting the combination will be safe in pharmacotherapy trials. Selegiline produced few changes in subjective response to the cocaine challenge perhaps because of some psychoactive neurotransmitters changing in opposite directions. PMID:19646280

  15. Combine and conquer: challenges for targeted therapy combinations in early phase trials.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Juanita S; Banerji, Udai

    2017-01-01

    Our increasing understanding of cancer biology has led to the development of molecularly targeted anticancer drugs. The full potential of these agents has not, however, been realised, owing to the presence of de novo (intrinsic) resistance, often resulting from compensatory signalling pathways, or the development of acquired resistance in cancer cells via clonal evolution under the selective pressures of treatment. Combinations of targeted treatments can circumvent some mechanisms of resistance to yield a clinical benefit. We explore the challenges in identifying the best drug combinations and the best combination strategies, as well as the complexities of delivering these treatments to patients. Recognizing treatment-induced toxicity and the inability to use continuous pharmacodynamically effective doses of many targeted treatments necessitates creative intermittent scheduling. Serial tumour profiling and the use of parallel co-clinical trials can contribute to understanding mechanisms of resistance, and will guide the development of adaptive clinical trial designs that can accommodate hypothesis testing, in order to realize the full potential of combination therapies.

  16. A Phase 1/2a Follistatin Gene Therapy Trial for Becker Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Mendell, Jerry R; Sahenk, Zarife; Malik, Vinod; Gomez, Ana M; Flanigan, Kevin M; Lowes, Linda P; Alfano, Lindsay N; Berry, Katherine; Meadows, Eric; Lewis, Sarah; Braun, Lyndsey; Shontz, Kim; Rouhana, Maria; Clark, Kelly Reed; Rosales, Xiomara Q; Al-Zaidy, Samiah; Govoni, Alessandra; Rodino-Klapac, Louise R; Hogan, Mark J; Kaspar, Brian K

    2015-01-01

    Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD) is a variant of dystrophin deficiency resulting from DMD gene mutations. Phenotype is variable with loss of ambulation in late teenage or late mid-life years. There is currently no treatment for this condition. In this BMD proof-of-principle clinical trial, a potent myostatin antagonist, follistatin (FS), was used to inhibit the myostatin pathway. Extensive preclinical studies, using adeno-associated virus (AAV) to deliver follistatin, demonstrated an increase in strength. For this trial, we used the alternatively spliced FS344 to avoid potential binding to off target sites. AAV1.CMV.FS344 was delivered to six BMD patients by direct bilateral intramuscular quadriceps injections. Cohort 1 included three subjects receiving 3 × 1011 vg/kg/leg. The distance walked on the 6MWT was the primary outcome measure. Patients 01 and 02 improved 58 meters (m) and 125 m, respectively. Patient 03 showed no change. In Cohort 2, Patients 05 and 06 received 6 × 1011 vg/kg/leg with improved 6MWT by 108 m and 29 m, whereas, Patient 04 showed no improvement. No adverse effects were encountered. Histological changes corroborated benefit showing reduced endomysial fibrosis, reduced central nucleation, more normal fiber size distribution with muscle hypertrophy, especially at high dose. The results are encouraging for treatment of dystrophin-deficient muscle diseases. PMID:25322757

  17. A Phase 2 Randomized Trial of a Rifapentine plus Moxifloxacin-Based Regimen for Treatment of Pulmonary Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Conde, Marcus B.; Mello, Fernanda C. Q.; Duarte, Rafael Silva; Cavalcante, Solange C.; Rolla, Valeria; Dalcolmo, Margareth; Loredo, Carla; Durovni, Betina; Armstrong, Derek T.; Efron, Anne; Barnes, Grace L.; Marzinke, Mark A.; Savic, Radojka M.; Dooley, Kelly E.; Cohn, Silvia; Moulton, Lawrence H.; Chaisson, Richard E.; Dorman, Susan E.

    2016-01-01

    Background The combination of rifapentine and moxifloxacin administered daily with other anti-tuberculosis drugs is highly active in mouse models of tuberculosis chemotherapy. The objective of this phase 2 clinical trial was to determine the bactericidal activity, safety, and tolerability of a regimen comprised of rifapentine, moxifloxacin, isoniazid, and pyrazinamide administered daily during the first 8 weeks of pulmonary tuberculosis treatment. Methods Adults with sputum smear-positive pulmonary tuberculosis were randomized to receive either rifapentine (approximately 7.5 mg/kg) plus moxifloxacin (investigational arm), or rifampin (approximately 10 mg/kg) plus ethambutol (control) daily for 8 weeks, along with isoniazid and pyrazinamide. The primary endpoint was sputum culture status at completion of 8 weeks of treatment. Results 121 participants (56% of accrual target) were enrolled. At completion of 8 weeks of treatment, negative cultures using Löwenstein-Jensen (LJ) medium occurred in 47/60 (78%) participants in the investigational arm vs. 43/51 (84%, p = 0.47) in the control arm; negative cultures using liquid medium occurred in 37/47 (79%) in the investigational arm vs. 27/41 (66%, p = 0.23) in the control arm. Time to stable culture conversion was shorter for the investigational arm vs. the control arm using liquid culture medium (p = 0.03), but there was no difference using LJ medium. Median rifapentine area under the concentration-time curve (AUC0-24) was 313 mcg*h/mL, similar to recent studies of rifapentine dosed at 450–600 mg daily. Median moxifloxacin AUC0-24 was 28.0 mcg*h/mL, much lower than in trials where rifapentine was given only intermittently with moxifloxacin. The proportion of participants discontinuing assigned treatment for reasons other than microbiological ineligibility was higher in the investigational arm vs. the control arm (11/62 [18%] vs. 3/59 [5%], p = 0.04) although the proportions of grade 3 or higher adverse events were

  18. A Method for Utilizing Bivariate Efficacy Outcome Measures to Screen Regimens for Activity in 2-Stage Phase II Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Rubinstein, Larry; Litwin, Samuel; Yothers, Greg

    2012-01-01

    Background Most phase II clinical trials utilize a single primary endpoint to determine the promise of a regimen for future study. However, many disorders manifest themselves in complex ways. For example, migraine headaches can cause pain, auras, photophobia, and emesis. Investigators may believe a drug is effective at reducing migraine pain and the severity of emesis during an attack. Nevertheless, they could still be interested in proceeding with development of the drug if it is effective against only one of these symptoms. Such a study would be a candidate for a clinical trial with co-primary endpoints. Purpose The purpose of the article is to provide a method for designing a 2-stage clinical trial with dichotomous co-primary endpoints of efficacy that has the ability to detect activity on either response measure with high probability when the drug is active on one or both measures, while at the same time rejecting the drug with high probability when there is little activity on both dimensions. The design enables early closure for futility and is flexible with regard to attained accrual. Methods The design is proposed in the context of cancer clinical trials where tumor response is used to assess a drug's ability to kill tumor cells and progression-free survival (PFS) status after a certain period is used to evaluate the drug's ability to stabilize tumor growth. Both endpoints are assumed to be distributed as binomial random variables, and uninteresting probabilities of success are determined from historical controls. Given the necessity of accrual flexibility, exhaustive searching algorithms to find optimum designs do not seem feasible at this time. Instead, critical values are determined for realized sample sizes using specific procedures. Then accrual windows are found to achieve a design's desired level of significance, probability of early termination (PET), and power. Results The design is illustrated with a clinical trial that examined bevacizumab in

  19. A randomized controlled trial with bright light and melatonin for delayed sleep phase disorder: effects on subjective and objective sleep.

    PubMed

    Saxvig, Ingvild West; Wilhelmsen-Langeland, Ane; Pallesen, Ståle; Vedaa, Oystein; Nordhus, Inger Hilde; Bjorvatn, Bjørn

    2014-02-01

    Delayed sleep phase disorder (DSPD) is assumed to be common amongst adolescents, with potentially severe consequences in terms of school attendance and daytime functioning. The most common treatment approaches for DSPD are based on the administration of bright light and/or exogenous melatonin with or without adjunct behavioural instructions. Much is generally known about the chronobiological effects of light and melatonin. However, placebo-controlled treatment studies for DSPD are scarce, in particular in adolescents and young adults, and no standardized guidelines exist regarding treatment. The aim of the present study was, therefore, to investigate the short- and long-term effects on sleep of a DSPD treatment protocol involving administration of timed bright light and melatonin alongside gradual advancement of rise time in adolescents and young adults with DSPD in a randomized controlled trial and an open label follow-up study. A total of 40 adolescents and young adults (age range 16-25 years) diagnosed with DSPD were recruited to participate in the study. The participants were randomized to receive treatment for two weeks in one of four treatment conditions: dim light and placebo capsules, bright light and placebo capsules, dim light and melatonin capsules or bright light and melatonin capsules. In a follow-up study, participants were re-randomized to either receive treatment with the combination of bright light and melatonin or no treatment in an open label trial for approximately three months. Light and capsules were administered alongside gradual advancement of rise times. The main end points were sleep as assessed by sleep diaries and actigraphy recordings and circadian phase as assessed by salivary dim light melatonin onset (DLMO). During the two-week intervention, the timing of sleep and DLMO was advanced in all treatment conditions as seen by about 1 h advance of bed time, 2 h advance of rise time and 2 h advance of DLMO in all four groups. Sleep

  20. Hepatic tumor ablation with clustered microwave antennae: the US Phase II Trial

    PubMed Central

    Iannitti, David A.; Martin, Robert C.G.; Simon, Caroline J.; Hope, William W.; Newcomb, William L.; McMasters, Kelly M.; Dupuy, Damian

    2007-01-01

    Background: Thermal ablation techniques have become important treatment options for patients with unresectable hepatic malignancies. Microwave ablation (MWA) is a new thermal ablative technique that uses electromagnetic energy to produce coagulation necrosis. We report outcomes from the first clinical trial in the United States using MWA and a 915 MHz generator. Patients and methods: Patients with unresectable primary or metastatic liver cancer were enrolled in a multi-institutional trial from March 2004 through May 2006. Demographic information, diagnosis, treatment, and outcomes were documented. Results: Eighty-seven patients underwent 94 ablation procedures for 224 hepatic tumors. Forty-two ablations (45%) were performed open, 7 (7%) laparoscopically, and 45 (48%) percutaneously. The average tumor size was 3.6 cm (range 0.5–9.0 cm). Single antenna ablation volumes were 10.0 ml (range 7.8–14.0 ml), and clustered antennae ablation volumes were 50.5 ml (range 21.1–146.5 ml). Outcome variables were measured with a mean follow-up of 19 months. Local recurrence at the ablation site occurred in 6 (2.7%) tumors, and regional recurrence occurred in 37 (43%) patients. With a mean follow-up of 19 months, 41 (47%) patients were alive with no evidence of disease. There were no procedure-related deaths. The overall mortality rate was 2.3%. Conclusions: Microwave ablation is a safe and effective technology for hepatic tumor ablation. In our study, clustered antennae resulted in larger ablation volumes. Further studies with histological confirmation are needed to verify clinical results. PMID:18333126

  1. RS-61443--a phase I clinical trial and pilot rescue study.

    PubMed

    Sollinger, H W; Deierhoi, M H; Belzer, F O; Diethelm, A G; Kauffman, R S

    1992-02-01

    RS-61443, a morpholinoethyl ester of mycophenolic acid, inhibits the synthesis of guanosine monophosphate, which plays a pivotal role in lymphocyte metabolism. The drug blocks proliferative responses of T and B lymphocytes, and inhibits antibody formation and the generation of cytotoxic T cells. In vivo, RS-61443 prolongs the survival of islet allografts in mice, heart allografts in rats, and kidney allografts in dogs. Reversal of ongoing acute rejection was demonstrated in rat heart allografts and kidney allografts in dogs. Preliminary evidence suggests that the drug prevents chronic rejection. The purpose of this study was to test the safety and tolerance in patients receiving primary cadaver kidneys. RS-61443 in doses from 100 mg/day p.o. to 3500 mg/day p.o. was given to patients in combination with cyclosporine and prednisone. Further study goals were to evaluate the pharmacokinetics of RS-61443, watch for the occurrence of opportunistic infections and acute rejection, and establish dosages for further clinical trials. Forty-eight patients were entered, with six patients in each dose group. RS-61443 was well tolerated in all dose groups, with only one adverse event possibly related to the drug (hemorrhagic gastritis). There was a statistically significant correlation between rejection episodes and dose (P = 0.022), patients with rejection episodes versus dose (P = 0.038), and number of OKT3/prednisone courses versus dose (P = 0.008). There was no overt nephrotoxicity or hepatotoxicity. Preliminary results of a rescue trial in 20 patients with kidney transplants will also be presented.

  2. Genomics-based early-phase clinical trials in oncology: recommendations from the task force on Methodology for the Development of Innovative Cancer Therapies.

    PubMed

    Liu, Stephen V; Miller, Vincent A; Lobbezoo, Marinus W; Giaccone, Giuseppe

    2014-11-01

    The Methodology for the Development of Innovative Cancer Therapies (MDICT) task force discussed incorporation of genomic profiling into early (Phase I and II) clinical trials in oncology. The task force reviewed the challenges of standardising genomics data in a manner conducive to conducting clinical trials. Current barriers to successful and efficient implementation were identified and discussed, as well as the methods of genomic analysis, the proper setting for study and strategies to facilitate timely completion of genomics-based studies. The importance of properly capturing and cataloguing outcomes was also discussed. Several recommendations regarding the use of genomics in these trials are provided.

  3. Divided attention can enhance early-phase memory encoding: the attentional boost effect and study trial duration.

    PubMed

    Mulligan, Neil W; Spataro, Pietro

    2015-07-01

    Divided attention during encoding typically produces marked reductions in later memory. The attentional boost effect (ABE) is a surprising variation on this phenomenon. In this paradigm, each study stimulus (e.g., a word) is presented along with a target or a distractor (e.g., different colored circles) in a detection task. Later memory is better for stimuli co-occurring with targets. The present experiments indicate that the ABE arises during an early phase of memory encoding that involves initial stimulus perception and comprehension rather than at a later phase entailing controlled, elaborative rehearsal. Experiment 1 demonstrated that the ABE was robust at a short study duration (700 ms) and did not increase with increasing study trial durations (1,500 ms and 4,000 ms). Furthermore, the target condition is boosted to the level of memory performance in a full-attention condition for the short duration but not the long duration. Both results followed from the early-phase account. This account also predicts that for very short study times (limiting the influence of late-phase controlled encoding and thus minimizing the usual negative effect of divided attention), the target condition will produce better memory than will the full-attention condition. Experiment 2 used a study time of 400 ms and found that words presented with targets lead to greater recognition accuracy than do either words presented with distractors or words in the full-attention condition. Consistent with the early-phase account, a divided attention condition actually produced superior memory than did the full-attention condition, a very unusual but theoretically predicted result.

  4. SHARE: a French multicenter phase III trial comparing accelerated partial irradiation versus standard or hypofractionated whole breast irradiation in breast cancer patients at low risk of local recurrence.

    PubMed

    Belkacemi, Yazid; Bourgier, Céline; Kramar, Andrew; Auzac, Guillaume; Dumas, Isabelle; Lacornerie, Thomas; Mége, Jean-Pierre; Mijonnet, Sylvie; Lemonnier, Jerôme; Lartigau, Eric

    2013-02-01

    The standard treatment for breast cancer patients at low risk of recurrence is based on conservative surgery followed by radiation therapy delivered to the whole breast. The accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) concept, developed more than 15 years ago, could be an option in selected patients. However, the ideal patient profile for APBI is still not clearly identified. Recent reports from the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) and the Groupe Européen de Curiethérapie-European Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (GEC-ESTRO) have suggested selection criteria for "suitable patients" who could receive APBI outside of clinical trials. Currently, there are 6 ongoing phase III trials. All are characterized by a significant heterogeneity regarding inclusion criteria and stratification factors. The French UNICANCER trial (SHARE; ClinicalTrials.gov identifier NCT01247233) will randomize 2,800 patients in 3 arms: APBI (1 week) using 3-dimensional (3D) conformal radiotherapy, standard radiotherapy (6.5 weeks), and hypofractionated radiotherapy (3 weeks). In this article, we review the reported retrospective studies as well as older randomized trials. We will also describe the differences between the 6 ongoing phase III trials and the particularities of the French SHARE trial.

  5. Effects of laser immunotherapy on late-stage, metastatic breast cancer patients in a Phase II clinical trial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrel, Gabriela L.; Zhou, Feifan; Li, Xiaosong; Hode, Tomas; Nordquist, Robert E.; Alleruzzo, Luciano; Chen, Wei R.

    2014-03-01

    Laser immunotherapy (LIT), a novel technique with a local intervention to induce systemic antitumor effects, was developed to treat metastatic cancers. The pre-clinical studies of LIT have shown its unique characteristics in generating a specific antitumor immunity in treating metastatic tumors in rats and mice. For late-stage, metastatic breast cancer patients, who were considered to be out of other available treatment options, we conducted a small Phase II clinical trial using LIT starting in 2009 in Lima, Peru. This Phase II study was closed in December of 2012, as acknowldged by the Ministry of Health (MOH) of Peur letter 438-2014-OGITT/INS dated March 5th, 2014. Ten patients were enrolled and received LIT in one or multiple 4-week treatment cycles. At the study closing date, four patients were alive and two of them remained cancer free. Here, following the successful conclusion of our Phase II study, we report the clinical effects of LIT on metastatic breast cancer patients. Specifically, we present the overall status of all the patients three years after the treatment and also the outcomes of two long-term surviving patients.

  6. Rituximab in the Treatment of Refractory Adult and Juvenile Dermatomyositis and Adult Polymyositis: A Randomized, Placebo-phase Trial

    PubMed Central

    Oddis, Chester V.; Reed, Ann M.; Aggarwal, Rohit; Rider, Lisa G.; Ascherman, Dana P.; Levesque, Marc C.; Barohn, Richard J.; Feldman, Brian M.; Harris-Love, Michael O.; Koontz, Diane C.; Fertig, Noreen; Kelley, Stephanie S.; Pryber, Sherrie L.; Miller, Frederick W.; Rockette, Howard E.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To assess the safety and efficacy of rituximab in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-phase, trial of adult and pediatric myositis. Methods Adults with refractory polymyositis and adults and children with refractory dermatomyositis were enrolled. Entry criteria included muscle weakness and ≥2 additional abnormal core set measures (CSM) for adults. JDM patients required ≥ 3 abnormal CSM with or without muscle weakness. Patients were randomized to either ‘rituximab early’ or ‘rituximab late’ and glucocorticoid and immunosuppressive therapy were allowed at entry. The primary endpoint compared the time to achieve the preliminary International Myositis Assessment and Clinical Studies Group definition of improvement (DOI) between the 2 groups. The secondary endpoints were time to achieve ≥20% improvement in muscle strength, and the proportion of early and late rituximab patients achieving DOI at week 8. Results Among 200 randomized patients (76 PM/76 DM/48 JDM), 195 showed no difference in the time to DOI between the rituximab late (n=102) and rituximab early (n=93) groups (p=0.74, log rank) with a median time to DOI of 20.2 weeks and 20.0 weeks respectively. The secondary endpoints also did not significantly differ between the two treatment groups. However, 161 (83%) of randomized patients met the DOI and individual CSM improved in both groups throughout the 44-week trial. Conclusion Although there were no significant differences in the two treatment arms for the primary and secondary endpoints, 83% of refractory adult and juvenile myositis patients met the DOI. The role of B cell depleting therapies in myositis warrants further study with consideration for a different trial design. PMID:23124935

  7. Cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors for non-small-cell lung cancer: A phase II trial and literature review.

    PubMed

    Yokouchi, Hiroshi; Kanazawa, Kenya; Ishida, Takashi; Oizumi, Satoshi; Shinagawa, Naofumi; Sukoh, Noriaki; Harada, Masao; Ogura, Shigeaki; Munakata, Mitsuru; Dosaka-Akita, Hirotoshi; Isobe, Hiroshi; Nishimura, Masaharu

    2014-09-01

    Several preclinical and clinical studies have demonstrated that cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitors are efficient for the treatment of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, two recent phase III clinical trials using COX-2 inhibitors in combination with platinum-based chemotherapy failed to demonstrate a survival benefit. Thus, validation and discussion regarding the usefulness of COX-2 inhibitors for patients with NSCLC are required. We conducted a prospective trial using COX-2 inhibitors for the treatment of 50 NSCLC patients accrued between April, 2005 and July, 2006. Patients with untreated advanced NSCLC received oral meloxicam (150 mg daily), carboplatin (area under the curve = 5 mg/ml × min on day 1) and docetaxel (60 mg/m(2) on day 1) every 3 weeks. The primary endpoint was response rate. The response and disease control rates were 36.0 and 76.0%, respectively. The time-to-progression (TTP) and overall survival (OS) were 5.7 months [95% confidence interval (CI): 4.6-6.7] and 13.7 months (95% CI: 11.4-15.9), respectively. The 1-year survival ratio was 56.0%. Grade 3 neuropathy was observed in only 1 patient. We performed tumor immunohistochemistry for COX-2 and p27 and investigated the correlation between their expression and clinical outcome. COX-2 expression in the tumor tended to correlate with a higher response rate (50.0% in the high- and 18.2% in the low-COX-2 group; P=0.092). Based on our results and previous reports, various trial designs, such as the prospective use of COX-2 inhibitors only for patients with COX-2-positive NSCLC, including the exploratory analysis of biomarkers associated with the COX-2 pathway, may be worth further consideration.

  8. The SafeBoosC phase II clinical trial: an analysis of the interventions related with the oximeter readings

    PubMed Central

    Riera, Joan; Hyttel-Sorensen, Simon; Bravo, María Carmen; Cabañas, Fernando; López-Ortego, Paloma; Sanchez, Laura; Ybarra, Marta; Dempsey, Eugene; Greisen, Gorm; Austin, Topun; Claris, Olivier; Fumagalli, Monica; Gluud, Christian; Lemmers, Petra; Pichler, Gerhard; Plomgaard, Anne Mette; van Bel, Frank; Wolf, Martin; Pellicer, Adelina

    2016-01-01

    Background The SafeBoosC phase II randomised clinical trial recently demonstrated the benefits of a combination of cerebral regional tissue oxygen saturation (rStO2) by near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) and a treatment guideline to reduce the oxygen imbalance in extremely preterm infants. Aims To analyse rStO2-alarm-related clinical decisions and their heterogeneity in the NIRS experimental group (NIRS monitoring visible) and their impact on rStO2 and SpO2. Methods Continuous data from NIRS devices and the alarms (area under the curve of the rStO2 out of range had accumulated 0.2%h during 10 min), clinical data at discrete time points and interventions prompted by the alarms were recorded. Results Sixty-seven infants had data that fulfilled the requirements for this analysis. 1107 alarm episodes were analysed. The alarm triggered a treatment guideline intervention in 25% of the cases; the type of intervention chosen varied among clinical sites. More than 55% of alarms were not followed by an intervention (‘No action’); additionally, in 5% of alarms the rStO2 value apparently was considered non-reliable and the sensor was repositioned. The percentage of unresolved alarms at 30 min after ‘No action’ almost doubled the treatment guideline intervention (p<0.001). Changes in peripheral oxygen saturation (SpO2), were observed only after treatment guideline interventions. Conclusions This study shows that 25% of rStO2 alarms were followed by a clinical intervention determined by the treatment guideline. However, the rStO2 and SpO2 returned to normal ranges after the intervention, supporting the notion that decisions taken by the clinicians were appropriate. Trial registration number ClinicalTrial.gov NCT01590316. PMID:26645538

  9. Sorafenib plus hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy with cisplatin versus sorafenib for advanced hepatocellular carcinoma: randomized phase II trial

    PubMed Central

    Ikeda, M.; Shimizu, S.; Sato, T.; Morimoto, M.; Kojima, Y.; Inaba, Y.; Hagihara, A.; Kudo, M.; Nakamori, S.; Kaneko, S.; Sugimoto, R.; Tahara, T.; Ohmura, T.; Yasui, K.; Sato, K.; Ishii, H.; Furuse, J.; Okusaka, T.

    2016-01-01

    Background Sorafenib (Sor) is acknowledged as a standard therapy for advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). This trial was conducted to evaluate the effect of addition of hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy with cisplatin (SorCDDP) to Sor for the treatment of advanced HCC. Patients and methods We conducted a multicenter open-labeled randomized phase II trial in chemo-naïve patients with advanced HCC with Child-Pugh scores of 5–7. Eligible patients were randomly assigned 2:1 to receive SorCDDP (sorafenib: 400 mg bid; cisplatin: 65 mg/m2, day 1, every 4–6 weeks) or Sor (400 mg bid). The primary end point was overall survival. Results A total of 108 patients were randomized (Sor, n = 42; SorCDDP, n = 66). The median survival in the Sor and SorCDDP arms were 8.7 and 10.6 months, respectively [stratified hazard ratio (95% confidence interval), 0.60 (0.38–0.96), P = 0.031]. The median time to progression and the response rate were, respectively, 2.8 months and 7.3% in the Sor arm and 3.1 months and 21.7% in the SorCDDP arm. The adverse events were more frequent in the SorCDDP arm than in the Sor arm, but well-tolerated. Conclusion SorCDDP yielded favorable overall survival when compared with Sor in patients with advanced HCC. Clinical Trial registration UMIN-CTR (http://www.umin.ac.jp/ctr/index-j.htm), identification number: UMIN000005703. PMID:27573564

  10. Monitoring safety in a phase III real‐world effectiveness trial: use of novel methodology in the Salford Lung Study

    PubMed Central

    Harvey, Catherine; Brewster, Jill; Bakerly, Nawar Diar; Elkhenini, Hanaa F.; Stanciu, Roxana; Williams, Claire; Brereton, Jacqui; New, John P.; McCrae, John; McCorkindale, Sheila; Leather, David

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background The Salford Lung Study (SLS) programme, encompassing two phase III pragmatic randomised controlled trials, was designed to generate evidence on the effectiveness of a once‐daily treatment for asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in routine primary care using electronic health records. Objective The objective of this study was to describe and discuss the safety monitoring methodology and the challenges associated with ensuring patient safety in the SLS. Refinements to safety monitoring processes and infrastructure are also discussed. The study results are outside the remit of this paper. The results of the COPD study were published recently and a more in‐depth exploration of the safety results will be the subject of future publications. Achievements The SLS used a linked database system to capture relevant data from primary care practices in Salford and South Manchester, two university hospitals and other national databases. Patient data were collated and analysed to create daily summaries that were used to alert a specialist safety team to potential safety events. Clinical research teams at participating general practitioner sites and pharmacies also captured safety events during routine consultations. Confidence in the safety monitoring processes over time allowed the methodology to be refined and streamlined without compromising patient safety or the timely collection of data. The information technology infrastructure also allowed additional details of safety information to be collected. Conclusion Integration of multiple data sources in the SLS may provide more comprehensive safety information than usually collected in standard randomised controlled trials. Application of the principles of safety monitoring methodology from the SLS could facilitate safety monitoring processes for future pragmatic randomised controlled trials and yield important complementary safety and effectiveness data. © 2016 The Authors

  11. Deliberate and Crisis Action Planning and Execution Segments Increment 2B (DCAPES Inc 2B)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-03-01

    Defense Acquisition Management Information Retrieval (DAMIR) UNCLASSIFIED DCAPES Inc 2B 2016 MAR UNCLASSIFIED 2 Table of Contents Common...M - Millions of Dollars MAIS - Major Automated Information System MAIS OE - MAIS Original Estimate MAR – MAIS Annual Report MDA - Milestone...Logistics DCAPES Inc 2B 2016 MAR UNCLASSIFIED 3 Lt Col Christopher Thrower 201 East Moore Drive Building 856, Room 154 Maxwell Air Force Base-Gunter

  12. Treatment patterns of adjuvant interferon-α2b for high-risk melanoma: a retrospective study of the Grupo Español Multidisciplinar de Melanoma - Prima study.

    PubMed

    Espinosa, Enrique; Soriano, Virtudes; Malvehy, Josep; Berrocal, Alfonso; Martínez de Prado, Purificación; Quindós, María; Soria, Ainara; Márquez-Rodas, Iván; Palacio, Isabel; Cerezuela, Pablo; López-Vivanco, Guillermo; Alonso, Lorenzo; Samaniego, Elia; Ballesteros, Ana; Puértolas, Teresa; Díaz-Beveridge, Rodrigo; de la Cruz-Merino, Luis; López Castro, Rafael; López López, Rafael; Stevinson, Kendall; Del Barrio, Patricia; Tornamira, Maria V; Guillém, Vicente; Martín-Algarra, Salvador

    2016-06-01

    Adjuvant interferon-α2b (IFN-α2b) has been studied extensively in clinical trials, but there have been few studies of real-world use. The aim of this study is to describe the IFN-α2b real-world patterns in patients with high-risk melanoma in Spain. This was a retrospective and multicentre chart review study of an unselected cohort of patients with melanoma at high risk for relapse (stage IIB/IIC/III) treated with IFN-α2b. Patterns were assessed in terms of dose and compliance to planned treatment. A survival analysis was carried out for the full population and according to Kirkwood scheme compliance and the presence of ulceration. Of 327 patients treated with IFN-α2b, 318 received a high-dose regimen following the standard Kirkwood scheme; thus, patterns are described for this regimen. A total of 121 (38%) and 88 (28%) patients had at least one dose reduction during the induction and maintenance phases, respectively. Dose delay was required in fewer than 10% of patients. A total of 78, 40 and 38% of the patients completed the induction phase, maintenance phase and completed treatment, respectively. The median progression-free and overall survival for the full population were 3.2 and 10.5 years, respectively. There were no differences in progression-free survival and overall survival according to Kirkwood scheme compliance and the presence of ulceration. The most frequent adverse events were neutropenia (31%) and fatigue (30%). High-dose IFN-α2b is the most frequently used regimen in Spain as an adjuvant systemic treatment for high-risk melanoma. Despite poor compliance, in this retrospective study, IFN-α2b treatment provided a benefit consistent with that described previously.

  13. Treatment patterns of adjuvant interferon-α2b for high-risk melanoma: a retrospective study of the Grupo Español Multidisciplinar de Melanoma – Prima study

    PubMed Central

    Soriano, Virtudes; Malvehy, Josep; Berrocal, Alfonso; Martínez de Prado, Purificación; Quindós, María; Soria, Ainara; Márquez-Rodas, Iván; Palacio, Isabel; Cerezuela, Pablo; López-Vivanco, Guillermo; Alonso, Lorenzo; Samaniego, Elia; Ballesteros, Ana; Puértolas, Teresa; Díaz-Beveridge, Rodrigo; de la Cruz-Merino, Luis; López Castro, Rafael; López López, Rafael; Stevinson, Kendall; del Barrio, Patricia; Tornamira, Maria V.; Guillém, Vicente; Martín-Algarra, Salvador

    2016-01-01

    Adjuvant interferon-α2b (IFN-α2b) has been studied extensively in clinical trials, but there have been few studies of real-world use. The aim of this study is to describe the IFN-α2b real-world patterns in patients with high-risk melanoma in Spain. This was a retrospective and multicentre chart review study of an unselected cohort of patients with melanoma at high risk for relapse (stage IIB/IIC/III) treated with IFN-α2b. Patterns were assessed in terms of dose and compliance to planned treatment. A survival analysis was carried out for the full population and according to Kirkwood scheme compliance and the presence of ulceration. Of 327 patients treated with IFN-α2b, 318 received a high-dose regimen following the standard Kirkwood scheme; thus, patterns are described for this regimen. A total of 121 (38%) and 88 (28%) patients had at least one dose reduction during the induction and maintenance phases, respectively. Dose delay was required in fewer than 10% of patients. A total of 78, 40 and 38% of the patients completed the induction phase, maintenance phase and completed treatment, respectively. The median progression-free and overall survival for the full population were 3.2 and 10.5 years, respectively. There were no differences in progression-free survival and overall survival according to Kirkwood scheme compliance and the presence of ulceration. The most frequent adverse events were neutropenia (31%) and fatigue (30%). High-dose IFN-α2b is the most frequently used regimen in Spain as an adjuvant systemic treatment for high-risk melanoma. Despite poor compliance, in this retrospective study, IFN-α2b treatment provided a benefit consistent with that described previously. PMID:26958991

  14. In vitro activity of tigecycline against patient isolates collected during phase 3 clinical trials for hospital acquired pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Peter J; Tuckman, Margareta; Jones, C Hal

    2010-02-03

    The in vitro activity of tigecycline was evaluated against 819 baseline pathogens isolated from 383 patients enrolled in the phase 3 clinical trial investigating the efficacy of tigecycline in hospital acquired pneumonia (HAP). The trials were global, enrolling patients in 27 countries. Tigecycline was active against the most prevalent pathogens in HAP, including gram-positive and gram-negative strains (90% of MICs ≤2 µg/mL for the entire collection). The spectrum of activity of tigecycline included important pathogens such as Staphylococcus aureus (including methicillin-resistant S. aureus), Enterococcus faecalis, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumannii/calcoaceticus complex, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumonia, and Enterobacter cloacae. As reported previously, a few genera, such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa and the Proteeae, were generally less susceptible to tigecycline by comparison to other gram-negative pathogens. The excellent in vitro, expanded, broad-spectrum activity of tigecycline in the clinical isolates confirmed the potential utility of tigecycline for pathogens associated with with hospital acquired pneumonia infections.

  15. In vitro activity of tigecycline against patient isolates collected during phase 3 clinical trials for diabetic foot infections.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Peter J; Ruzin, Alexey; Tuckman, Margareta; Jones, C Hal

    2010-04-01

    The in vitro activity of tigecycline and comparative antimicrobial agents was evaluated against 1828 primary baseline pathogens isolated from 844 patients enrolled in the phase 3 clinical trials investigating the efficacy of tigecycline in diabetic foot infection (DFI). The trials were global, enrolling patients in 30 countries. Tigecycline was active against the most prevalent pathogens in DFI, including Gram-positive and Gram-negative isolates of both aerobic and anaerobic bacteria with 95% of MICs < or =2 microg/mL for the entire collection. The spectrum of activity of tigecycline included important pathogens for DFI, such as Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecalis, Streptococcus agalactiae, Escherichia coli, Enterobacter cloacae, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Bacteroides fragilis. As reported previously, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and several pathogens in the Proteeae group were generally less susceptible to tigecycline by comparison to other Gram-negative pathogens. The excellent in vitro expanded broad-spectrum activity of tigecycline in the clinical isolates confirmed the potential utility of tigecycline for pathogens associated with DFIs.

  16. In vitro activity of tigecycline against patient isolates collected during phase 3 clinical trials for hospital acquired pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Peter J.; Tuckman, Margareta; Jones, C. Hal

    2010-01-01

    The in vitro activity of tigecycline was evaluated against 819 baseline pathogens isolated from 383 patients enrolled in the phase 3 clinical trial investigating the efficacy of tigecycline in hospital acquired pneumonia (HAP). The trials were global, enrolling patients in 27 countries. Tigecycline was active against the most prevalent pathogens in HAP, including gram-positive and gram-negative strains (90% of MICs ≤2 µg/mL for the entire collection). The spectrum of activity of tigecycline included important pathogens such as Staphylococcus aureus (including methicillin-resistant S. aureus), Enterococcus faecalis, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumannii/calcoaceticus complex, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumonia, and Enterobacter cloacae. As reported previously, a few genera, such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa and the Proteeae, were generally less susceptible to tigecycline by comparison to other gram-negative pathogens. The excellent in vitro, expanded, broad-spectrum activity of tigecycline in the clinical isolates confirmed the potential utility of tigecycline for pathogens associated with with hospital acquired pneumonia infections. PMID:24470884

  17. Efficacy of thalidomide for the treatment of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: A phase II open label clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    STOMMEL, ELIJAH W.; COHEN, JEFFREY A.; FADUL, CAMILO E.; COGBILL, CHRISTOPHER H.; GRABER, DAVID J.; KINGMAN, LINDA; MACKENZIE, TODD; SMITH, JACQUELINE Y. CHANNON; HARRIS, BRENT T.

    2013-01-01

    Neuroinflammation through the cytokine, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) is thought to play an important role in the pathogenesis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). We conducted a preliminary phase II trial of thalidomide, which reduces levels of TNF-α pre-transcriptionally and post-transcriptionally in vivo and has been shown to prolong disease duration and extend the lifespan of transgenic animal models of ALS. Patients who met diagnostic criteria for ALS received thalidomide at escalating doses to a target dose of 400 mg/day. The primary endpoints in the trial were the ALS Functional Rating Scale (ALSFRS) and pulmonary function testing (PFT) curves after nine months of thalidomide treatment that were compared to historical controls. Secondary endpoints were: survival stratified for newly diagnosed and progressive disease, toxicity, quality of life, and serum cytokine measurements. Twenty-three patients were enrolled, but only 18 were evaluable for the primary outcome. There was no improvement in the ALSFRS or PFT compared to historical controls. Thalidomide had several side-effects in our ALS patients. There was no significant shift in cytokine profile after treatment compared to baseline. In conclusion, treatment of ALS with the TNF-α inhibitor, thalidomide, does not appear to effectively modulate disease progression and can cause adverse effects. PMID:19922130

  18. First-in-Human Phase 1 Trial of Agarose Beads Containing Murine RENCA Cells in Advanced Solid Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Barry H.; Parikh, Tapan; Andrada, Zoe P.; Fahey, Thomas J.; Berman, Nathaniel; Wiles, Madeline; Nazarian, Angelica; Thomas, Joanne; Arreglado, Anna; Akahoho, Eugene; Wolf, David J.; Levine, Daniel M.; Parker, Thomas S.; Gazda, Lawrence S.; Ocean, Allyson J.

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE Agarose macrobeads containing mouse renal adenocarcinoma cells (RMBs) release factors, suppressing the growth of cancer cells and prolonging survival in spontaneous or induced tumor animals, mediated, in part, by increased levels of myocyte-enhancing factor (MEF2D) via EGFR-and AKT-signaling pathways. The primary objective of this study was to determine the safety of RMBs in advanced, treatment-resistant metastatic cancers, and then its efficacy (survival), which is the secondary objective. METHODS Thirty-one patients underwent up to four intraperitoneal implantations of RMBs (8 or 16 macrobeads/kg) via laparoscopy in this single-arm trial (FDA BB-IND 10091; NCT 00283075). Serial physical examinations, laboratory testing, and PET-CT imaging were performed before and three months after each implant. RESULTS RMBs were well tolerated at both dose levels (mean 660.9 per implant). AEs were (Grade 1/2) with no treatment-related SAEs. CONCLUSION The data support the safety of RMB therapy in advanced-malignancy patients, and the preliminary evidence for their potential efficacy is encouraging. A Phase 2 efficacy trial is ongoing. PMID:27499645

  19. A mouse-human phase 1 co-clinical trial of a protease-activated fluorescent probe for imaging cancer

    PubMed Central

    Whitley, Melodi Javid; Cardona, Diana M.; Lazarides, Alexander L.; Spasojevic, Ivan; Ferrer, Jorge M.; Cahill, Joan; Lee, Chang-Lung; Snuderl, Matija; Blazer, Dan G.; Hwang, E. Shelley; Greenup, Rachel A.; Mosca, Paul J.; Mito, Jeffrey K.; Cuneo, Kyle C.; Larrier, Nicole A.; O’Reilly, Erin K.; Riedel, Richard F.; Eward, William C.; Strasfeld, David B.; Fukumura, Dai; Jain, Rakesh K.; Lee, W. David; Griffith, Linda G.; Bawendi, Moungi G.; Kirsch, David G.; Brigman, Brian E.

    2016-01-01

    Local recurrence is a common cause of treatment failure for patients with solid tumors. Intraoperative detection of microscopic residual cancer in the tumor bed could be used to decrease the risk of a positive surgical margin, reduce rates of reexcision, and tailor adjuvant therapy. We used a protease-activated fluorescent imaging probe, LUM015, to detect cancer in vivo in a mouse model of soft tissue sarcoma (STS) and ex vivo in a first-in-human phase 1 clinical trial. In mice, intravenous injection of LUM015 labeled tumor cells, and residual fluorescence within the tumor bed predicted local recurrence. In 15 patients with STS or breast cancer, intravenous injection of LUM015 before surgery was well tolerated. Imaging of resected human tissues showed that fluorescence from tumor was significantly higher than fluorescence from normal tissues. LUM015 biodistribution, pharmacokinetic profiles, and metabolism were similar in mouse and human subjects. Tissue concentrations of LUM015 and its metabolites, including fluorescently labeled lysine, demonstrated that LUM015 is selectively distributed to tumors where it is activated by proteases. Experiments in mice with a constitutively active PEGylated fluorescent imaging probe support a model where tumor-selective probe distribution is a determinant of increased fluorescence in cancer. These co-clinical studies suggest that the tumor specificity of protease-activated imaging probes, such as LUM015, is dependent on both biodistribution and enzyme activity. Our first-in-human data support future clinical trials of LUM015 and other protease-sensitive probes. PMID:26738797

  20. A mouse-human phase 1 co-clinical trial of a protease-activated fluorescent probe for imaging cancer.

    PubMed

    Whitley, Melodi Javid; Cardona, Diana M; Lazarides, Alexander L; Spasojevic, Ivan; Ferrer, Jorge M; Cahill, Joan; Lee, Chang-Lung; Snuderl, Matija; Blazer, Dan G; Hwang, E Shelley; Greenup, Rachel A; Mosca, Paul J; Mito, Jeffrey K; Cuneo, Kyle C; Larrier, Nicole A; O'Reilly, Erin K; Riedel, Richard F; Eward, William C; Strasfeld, David B; Fukumura, Dai; Jain, Rakesh K; Lee, W David; Griffith, Linda G; Bawendi, Moungi G; Kirsch, David G; Brigman, Brian E

    2016-01-06

    Local recurrence is a common cause of treatment failure for patients with solid tumors. Intraoperative detection of microscopic residual cancer in the tumor bed could be used to decrease the risk of a positive surgical margin, reduce rates of reexcision, and tailor adjuvant therapy. We used a protease-activated fluorescent imaging probe, LUM015, to detect cancer in vivo in a mouse model of soft tissue sarcoma (STS) and ex vivo in a first-in-human phase 1 clinical trial. In mice, intravenous injection of LUM015 labeled tumor cells, and residual fluorescence within the tumor bed predicted local recurrence. In 15 patients with STS or breast cancer, intravenous injection of LUM015 before surgery was well tolerated. Imaging of resected human tissues showed that fluorescence from tumor was significantly higher than fluorescence from normal tissues. LUM015 biodistribution, pharmacokinetic profiles, and metabolism were similar in mouse and human subjects. Tissue concentrations of LUM015 and its metabolites, including fluorescently labeled lysine, demonstrated that LUM015 is selectively distributed to tumors where it is activated by proteases. Experiments in mice with a constitutively active PEGylated fluorescent imaging probe support a model where tumor-selective probe distribution is a determinant of increased fluorescence in cancer. These co-clinical studies suggest that the tumor specificity of protease-activated imaging probes, such as LUM015, is dependent on both biodistribution and enzyme activity. Our first-in-human data support future clinical trials of LUM015 and other protease-sensitive probes.

  1. Neural Stem Cell Tumorigenicity and Biodistribution Assessment for Phase I Clinical Trial in Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Garitaonandia, Ibon; Gonzalez, Rodolfo; Christiansen-Weber, Trudy; Abramihina, Tatiana; Poustovoitov, Maxim; Noskov, Alexander; Sherman, Glenn; Semechkin, Andrey; Snyder, Evan; Kern, Russell

    2016-01-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells (PSC) have the potential to revolutionize regenerative medicine. However undifferentiated PSC can form tumors and strict quality control measures and safety studies must be conducted before clinical translation. Here we describe preclinical tumorigenicity and biodistribution safety studies that were required by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and Australian Therapeutic Goods Administration (TGA) prior to conducting a Phase I clinical trial evaluating the safety and tolerability of human parthenogenetic stem cell derived neural stem cells ISC-hpNSC for treating Parkinson’s disease (ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier NCT02452723). To mitigate the risk of having residual PSC in the final ISC-hpNSC population, we conducted sensitive in vitro assays using flow cytometry and qRT-PCR analyses and in vivo assays to determine acute toxicity, tumorigenicity and biodistribution. The results from these safety studies show the lack of residual undifferentiated PSC, negligible tumorigenic potential by ISC-hpNSC and provide additional assurance to their clinical application. PMID:27686862

  2. Radiosensitization of Chemotherapy-Refractory, Locally Advanced or Locally Recurrent Breast Cancer With Trastuzumab: A Phase II Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Horton, Janet K.; Halle, Jan; Ferraro, Madlyn; Carey, Lisa; Moore, Dominic T.; Ollila, David; Sartor, Carolyn I.

    2010-03-15

    Purpose: Trastuzumab (Herceptin), an anti-human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) antibody, has been shown to be an effective radiosensitizer in preclinical studies. The present Phase II trial evaluated trastuzumab plus radiotherapy in patients with HER2-positive, chemotherapy-refractory, locally advanced or locoregionally recurrent breast cancer. Methods and Materials: Eligible patients had measurable disease, normal cardiac function, and biopsy-confirmed residual HER2-positive disease. Patients received weekly trastuzumab (2 mg/kg intravenously), concurrent with radiotherapy (50 Gy) to the breast and regional lymph nodes for 5 weeks. If feasible, surgery followed radiotherapy. The primary endpoint was safety, and the secondary endpoint was efficacy (pathologic response and interval to symptomatic local progression). Results: Of the 19 patients enrolled, 7 were ineligible and received radiotherapy alone and 12 received therapy per protocol. Of these 12 patients, 11 had a Stage T4 diagnosis. Grade 3 toxicities included skin (n = 2) and lymphopenia (n = 1). One patient experienced delayed wound healing after surgery. No patients developed symptomatic cardiac dysfunction. Of the 7 patients who had undergone mastectomy, 3 (43%) had a substantial pathologic response (complete response or microscopic residual disease), significantly more than a comparison cohort (2 of 38 or 5%, p = .02). The median interval to symptomatic local progression was not reached. The median overall survival was 39 months. Conclusion: This is the first prospective trial providing evidence for a radiosensitizing effect of trastuzumab in breast cancer. The combination of trastuzumab and radiotherapy was well tolerated.

  3. Phase II trial of pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (Caelyx) plus Gemcitabine in chemotherapeutically pretreated patients with advanced breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Ulrich-Pur, Herbert; Kornek, Gabriela V; Haider, Karin; Kwasny, Werner; Payrits, Thomas; Dworan, Nina; Vormittag, Laurenz; Depisch, Dieter; Lang, Fritz; Scheithauer, Werner

    2007-01-01

    A phase II trial was performed to investigate the efficacy and tolerance of combined gemcitabine and liposomal doxorubicin +/- recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) in patients with chemotherapeutically pretreated metastatic breast cancer. Thirty-four patients were entered in this trial. Chemotherapy consisted of gemcitabine and liposomal doxorubicin +/- G-CSF. Twenty seven patients received this regimen as 2nd line therapy, five patients as 3rd line and two patients as 4th line therapy after having failed taxane- and/or anthracycline-based chemotherapy or other drug combinations. After a median of six courses, an overall response rate of 26% (9 PR in 34 enrolled patients) was observed; 14 patients had disease stabilization (41%), and eight (24%) progressed. Three patients were not evaluable for response due to anaphylaxis after the first course and protracted thrombocytopenia. The median TTP was 7.5 months, and median overall survival was 15 months. Myelosuppression was the most frequently observed toxicity. Non-haematological side effects were generally mild to moderate. Our data suggest that gemcitabine and liposomal doxorubicin +/- G-CSF is an effective and fairly well tolerated regimen for chemotherapeutically pretreated patients with advanced breast cancer.

  4. Effects of treatment with an Hsp90 inhibitor in tumors based on 15 phase II clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Wang, He; Lu, Mingjie; Yao, Mengqian; Zhu, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Heat shock protein (Hsp)90 serves as a chaperone protein that promotes the proper folding of proteins involved in a variety of signal transduction processes involved in cell growth. Hsp90 inhibitors, which inhibit the activity of critical client proteins, have emerged as the accessory therapeutic agents for multiple human cancer types. To better understand the effects of Hsp90 inhibitors in cancer treatment, the present study reviewed 15 published phase II clinical trials to investigate whether Hsp90 inhibitors will benefit patients with cancer. Information of complete response, partial response, stable disease, objective response and objective response rate was collected to evaluate clinical outcomes. Overall, Hsp90 inhibitors are effective against a variety of oncogene-addicted cancers, including those that have developed resistance to specific receptors. PMID:27602225

  5. Gadolinium-Based Nanoparticles and Radiation Therapy for Multiple Brain Melanoma Metastases: Proof of Concept before Phase I Trial

    PubMed Central

    Kotb, Shady; Detappe, Alexandre; Lux, François; Appaix, Florence; Barbier, Emmanuel L.; Tran, Vu-Long; Plissonneau, Marie; Gehan, Hélène; Lefranc, Florence; Rodriguez-Lafrasse, Claire; Verry, Camille; Berbeco, Ross; Tillement, Olivier; Sancey, Lucie

    2016-01-01

    Nanoparticles containing high-Z elements are known to boost the efficacy of radiation therapy. Gadolinium (Gd) is particularly attractive because this element is also a positive contrast agent for MRI, which allows for the simultaneous use of imaging to guide the irradiation and to delineate the tumor. In this study, we used the Gd-based nanoparticles, AGuIX®. After intravenous injection into animals bearing B16F10 tumors, some nanoparticles remained inside the tumor cells for more than 24 hours, indicating that a single administration of nanoparticles might be sufficient for several irradiations. Combining AGuIX® with radiation therapy increases tumor cell death, and improves the life spans of animals bearing multiple brain melanoma metastases. These results provide preclinical proof-of-concept for a phase I clinical trial. PMID:26909115

  6. Odour reduction strategies for biosolids produced from a Western Australian wastewater treatment plant: results from Phase I laboratory trials.

    PubMed

    Gruchlik, Yolanta; Heitz, Anna; Joll, Cynthia; Driessen, Hanna; Fouché, Lise; Penney, Nancy; Charrois, Jeffrey W A

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated sources of odours from biosolids produced from a Western Australian wastewater treatment plant and examined possible strategies for odour reduction, specifically chemical additions and reduction of centrifuge speed on a laboratory scale. To identify the odorous compounds and assess the effectiveness of the odour reduction measures trialled in this study, headspace solid-phase microextraction gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (HS SPME-GC-MS) methods were developed. The target odour compounds included volatile sulphur compounds (e.g. dimethyl sulphide, dimethyl disulphide and dimethyl trisulphide) and other volatile organic compounds (e.g. toluene, ethylbenzene, styrene, p-cresol, indole and skatole). In our laboratory trials, aluminium sulphate added to anaerobically digested sludge prior to dewatering offered the best odour reduction strategy amongst the options that were investigated, resulting in approximately 40% reduction in the maximum concentration of the total volatile organic sulphur compounds, relative to control.

  7. Defining the optimal dose of rifapentine for pulmonary tuberculosis: Exposure-response relations from two phase II clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Savic, R M; Weiner, M; MacKenzie, W R; Engle, M; Whitworth, W C; Johnson, J L; Nsubuga, P; Nahid, P; Nguyen, N V; Peloquin, C A; Dooley, K E; Dorman, S E

    2017-01-25

    Rifapentine is a highly active antituberculosis antibiotic with treatment-shortening potential; however, exposure-response relations and the dose needed for maximal bactericidal activity have not been established. We used pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic data from 657 adults with pulmonary tuberculosis participating in treatment trials to compare rifapentine (n = 405) with rifampin (n = 252) as part of intensive-phase therapy. Population pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic analyses were performed with nonlinear mixed-effects modeling. Time to stable culture conversion of sputum to negative was determined in cultures obtained over 4 months of therapy. Rifapentine exposures were lower in participants who were coinfected with human immunodeficiency virus, black, male, or fasting when taking drug. Rifapentine exposure, large lung cavity size, and geographic region were independently associated with time to culture conversion in liquid media. Maximal treatment efficacy is likely achieved with rifapentine at 1,200 mg daily. Patients with large lung cavities appear less responsive to treatment, even at high rifapentine doses.

  8. ‘I’m still a hustler’: entrepreneurial responses to precarity by participants in phase I clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Monahan, Torin; Fisher, Jill A.

    2016-01-01

    This paper questions the implications of entrepreneurial responses to conditions of employment precarity by ‘healthy volunteers’ in phase I clinical trials in the United States. Such individuals are typically serial participants who often identify as professional volunteers and seek out drug studies as their primary source of income. Drawing on extensive qualitative research, this paper illustrates how healthy volunteers selectively import the identity of ‘hustler’ from the street environment and reposition it as connoting a set of valuable creative skills that give them a competitive edge over other participants. An entrepreneurial ethos allows them to view personal sacrifice and exposure to potentially dangerous drugs as smart investments leading to financially stable futures. These discursive moves normalize extractive, and at times dehumanizing, labour relations that offload expenses and risks to workers. PMID:27524854

  9. Phase III trial comparing two low dose rates in brachytherapy of cervix carcinoma: Report at two years

    SciTech Connect

    Lambin, P.; Gerbaulet, A.; Kramer, A.; Haie-Meder, C.; Malaise, E.P.; Chassagne, D. ); Scalliet, P. )

    1993-02-15

    This Phase III randomized trial examined the effect of two low dose rates (0.73 or 0.38 Gy[center dot]h[sup [minus]1]) on the local control, survival, relapse-free survival, complications, and secondary effects in the treatment of cervical cancers. A total of 204 Stage Ib or II cervical carcinoma patients were included between January 1985 and September 1988. Treatment consisted of uterovaginal [sup 137]Cs irradiation followed by surgery. The two groups were similar for age, tumor stage and medical or surgical history. Their brachytherapy parameters were also similar (60 Gy pear dimensions, dose to critical organs, total kerma, etc....). There were no differences in the short-term effects or therapeutic outcome. However, overall complications and side effects observed after 6 months were significantly more frequent (p < 0.01) in the higher dose rate group. 40 refs., 4 figs., 6 tabs.

  10. SUPERFUND TREATABILITY CLEARINGHOUSE: FULL SCALE ROTARY KILN INCINERATOR FIELD TRIAL: PHASE I, VERIFICATION TRIAL BURN ON DIOXIN/HERBICIDE ORANGE CONTAMINATED SOIL

    EPA Science Inventory

    This treatability study reports on the results of one of a series of field trials using various remedial action technologies that may be capable of restoring Herbicide Orange (HO)XDioxin contaminated sites. A full-scale field trial using a rotary kiln incinerator capable of pro...

  11. Rift Valley Fever MP-12 Vaccine Phase 2 Clinical Trial: Safety, Immunogenicity, and Genetic Characterization of Virus Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Pittman, Phillip R.; Norris, Sarah L.; Brown, Elizabeth S.; Ranadive, Manmohan V.; Schibly, Barbara A.; Bettinger, George E.; Lokugamage, Nandadeva; Korman, Lawrence; Morrill, John C.; Peters, Clarence J.

    2016-01-01

    An outbreak or deliberate release of Rift Valley fever (RVF) virus could have serious public health and socioeconomic consequences. A safe RVF vaccine capable of eliciting long-lasting immunity after a single injection is urgently needed. The live attenuated RVF MP-12 vaccine candidate has shown promise in Phase 1 clinical trials; no evidence of reversion to virulence has been identified in numerous animal studies. The objective of this Phase 2 clinical trial was to (a) further examine the safety and immunogenicity of RVF MP-12 in RVF virus–naïve humans and (b) characterize isolates of RVF MP-12 virus recovered from the blood of vaccinated subjects to evaluate the genetic stability of MP-12 attenuation. We found that RVF MP-12 was well tolerated, causing mostly mild reactions that resolved without sequelae. Of 19 subjects, 18 (95%) and 19 (100%) achieved, respectively, 80% and 50% plaque reduction neutralization titers (PRNT80 and PRNT50) ≥ 1:20 by postvaccination day 28. All 18 PRNT80 responders maintained PRNT80 and PRNT50 ≥ 1:40 until at least postvaccination month 12. Viremia was undetectable in the plasma of any subject by direct plaque assay techniques. However, 5 of 19 vaccinees were positive for MP-12 isolates in plasma by blind passage of plasma on Vero cells. Vaccine virus was also recovered from buffy coat material from one of those vaccinees and from one additional vaccinee. Through RNA sequencing of MP-12 isolates, we found no reversions of amino acids to those of the parent virulent virus (strain ZH548). Five years after a single dose of RVF MP-12 vaccine, 8 of 9 vaccinees (89%) maintained a PRNT80 ≥ 1:20. These findings support the continued development of RVF MP-12 as a countermeasure against RVF virus in humans. PMID:26706271

  12. A Phase II Trial of Arc-Based Hypofractionated Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy in Localized Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Lock, Michael; Best, Lara; Wong, Eugene; Bauman, Glenn; D'Souza, David; Venkatesan, Varagur; Sexton, Tracy; Ahmad, Belal; Izawa, Jonathan; Rodrigues, George

    2011-08-01

    Purpose: To evaluate acute and late genitourinary (GU) and gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity and biochemical control of hypofractionated, image-guided (fiducial markers or ultrasound guidance), simplified intensity-modulated arc therapy for localized prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: This Phase II prospective clinical trial for T1a-2cNXM0 prostate cancer enrolled 66 patients who received 63.2 Gy in 20 fractions over 4 weeks. Fiducial markers were used for image guidance in 30 patients and daily ultrasound for the remainder. Toxicity was scored according to the National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0. Results: Median follow-up was 36 months. Acute Phase Grade 2 and 3 toxicity was 34% and 9% for GU vs. 25% and 10% for GI symptoms. One Grade 4 acute GI toxicity occurred in a patient with unrecognized Crohn's disease. Late Grade 2 and 3 toxicity for GU was 14% and 5%, and GI toxicity was 25% and 3%. One late GI Grade 4 toxicity was observed in a patient with significant comorbidities (anticoagulation, vascular disease). Acute GI toxicity {>=}Grade 2 was shown to be a predictor for late toxicity Grade {>=}2 (p < 0.001). The biochemical disease-free survival at 3 years was 95%. Conclusions: Hypofractionated simplified intensity-modulated arc therapy radiotherapy given as 63.2 Gy in 20 fractions demonstrated promising biochemical control rates; however, higher rates of acute Grade 3 GU and GI toxicity and higher late Grade 2 GU and GI toxicity were noted. Ongoing randomized controlled trials should ultimately clarify issues regarding patient selection and the true rate of severe toxicity that can be directly attributed to hypofractionated radiotherapy.

  13. Phase I/II Trial of Sorafenib in Combination with Vinorelbine as First-Line Chemotherapy for Metastatic Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ferrario, Cristiano; Strepponi, Ivan; Charamis, Helen; Langleben, Adrian; Scarpi, Emanuela; Nanni, Oriana; Miller, Wilson H.; Panasci, Lawrence C.

    2016-01-01

    Background Preclinical models have reported a synergistic interaction between sorafenib and vinorelbine. We investigated the toxicity, efficacy, and pharmacokinetics interaction of this combination as first-line treatment for patients with metastatic breast cancer. Methods Patients were HER2-negative and treated with vinorelbine 30 mg/m2 IV days 1,8 every 21 plus daily oral sorafenib. In the phase I portion (3+3 design) patients received sorafenib 200 mg BID (cohort 1) or 400 mg BID (cohort 2). In the phase II expansion, 21 more evaluable patients were planned to receive the maximum tolerated dose (MTD). Pharmacokinetic analysis was performed in 6 patients: blood concentrations were compared for each drug in the presence or absence of the other drug. Results In cohort 1, one patient experienced a dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) (grade 3 pancreatitis), requiring the expansion of this cohort to 6 patients, without further documented DLTs. In cohort 2, one patient of six experienced a grade 4 DLT (asymptomatic rise in amylase not requiring drug discontinuation), establishing this dose level as the MTD (sorafenib 400 mg BID). After expansion at the MTD, a total of 27 patients (median age 57) were treated for a median of 8 cycles. One grade 5 febrile neutropenia occurred. With repeated cycles, 52% of patients required at least 1 dose reduction of either drug. One patient experienced a sustained grade 3 fatigue resulting in treatment discontinuation. The response rate was 30%. Median PFS was 5.7 months (95% CI 4.4–7.6), and clinical benefit (absence of disease progression at 6 months) was 48%. PK analysis showed a significant interaction between the two drugs, resulting in a higher Cmax of vinorelbine in the presence of sorafenib. Conclusion The combination of sorafenib and vinorelbine at full doses is feasible but not devoid of toxicity, likely also due to a significant PK interaction. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00764972 PMID:27992451

  14. Phase I clinical trial combining imatinib mesylate and IL-2: HLA-DR(+) NK cell levels correlate with disease outcome.

    PubMed

    Chaput, Nathalie; Flament, Caroline; Locher, Clara; Desbois, Mélanie; Rey, Annie; Rusakiewicz, Sylvie; Poirier-Colame, Vichnou; Pautier, Patricia; Le Cesne, Axel; Soria, Jean-Charles; Paci, Angelo; Rosenzwajg, Michelle; Klatzmann, David; Eggermont, Alexander; Robert, Caroline; Zitvogel, Laurence

    2013-02-01

    We performed a Phase I clinical trial from October 2007 to October 2009, enrolling patients affected by refractory solid tumors, to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of interleukin (IL)-2 combined with low dose cyclophosphamide (CTX) and imatinib mesylate (IM). In a companion paper published in this issue of OncoImmunology, we show that the MTD of IL-2 is 6 MIU/day for 5 consecutive days, and that IL-2 increases the impregnation of both IM and of its main metabolite, CGP74588. Among the secondary objectives, we wanted to determine immunological markers that might be associated with progression-free survival (PFS) and/or overall survival (OS). The combination therapy markedly reduced the absolute counts of B, CD4(+) T and CD8(+) T cells in a manner that was proportional to IL-2 dose. There was a slight (less than 2-fold) increase in the proportion of regulatory T cells (Tregs) among CD4(+) T cells in response to IM plus IL-2. The natural killer (NK)-cell compartment was activated, exhibiting a significant upregulation of HLA-DR, tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) and CD56. The abundance of HLA-DR(+) NK cells after one course of combination therapy positively correlated with both PFS and OS. The IL-2-induced rise of the CD4(+):CD8(+) T-cell ratio calculated after the first cycle of treatment was also positively associated with OS. Overall, the combination of IM and IL-2 promoted the rapid expansion of HLA-DR(+) NK cells and increased the CD4(+):CD8(+) T-cell ratio, both being associated with clinical benefits. This combinatorial regimen warrants further investigation in Phase II clinical trials, possibly in patients affected by gastrointestinal stromal tumors, a setting in which T and NK cells may play an important therapeutic role.

  15. Rift Valley fever MP-12 vaccine Phase 2 clinical trial: Safety, immunogenicity, and genetic characterization of virus isolates.

    PubMed

    Pittman, Phillip R; Norris, Sarah L; Brown, Elizabeth S; Ranadive, Manmohan V; Schibly, Barbara A; Bettinger, George E; Lokugamage, Nandadeva; Korman, Lawrence; Morrill, John C; Peters, Clarence J

    2016-01-20

    An outbreak or deliberate release of Rift Valley fever (RVF) virus could have serious public health and socioeconomic consequences. A safe RVF vaccine capable of eliciting long-lasting immunity after a single injection is urgently needed. The live attenuated RVF MP-12 vaccine candidate has shown promise in Phase 1 clinical trials; no evidence of reversion to virulence has been identified in numerous animal studies. The objective of this Phase 2 clinical trial was to (a) further examine the safety and immunogenicity of RVF MP-12 in RVF virus-naïve humans and (b) characterize isolates of RVF MP-12 virus recovered from the blood of vaccinated subjects to evaluate the genetic stability of MP-12 attenuation. We found that RVF MP-12 was well tolerated, causing mostly mild reactions that resolved without sequelae. Of 19 subjects, 18 (95%) and 19 (100%) achieved, respectively, 80% and 50% plaque reduction neutralization titers (PRNT80 and PRNT50)≥1:20 by postvaccination day 28. All 18 PRNT80 responders maintained PRNT80 and PRNT50≥1:40 until at least postvaccination month 12. Viremia was undetectable in the plasma of any subject by direct plaque assay techniques. However, 5 of 19 vaccinees were positive for MP-12 isolates in plasma by blind passage of plasma on Vero cells. Vaccine virus was also recovered from buffy coat material from one of those vaccinees and from one additional vaccinee. Through RNA sequencing of MP-12 isolates, we found no reversions of amino acids to those of the parent virulent virus (strain ZH548). Five years after a single dose of RVF MP-12 vaccine, 8 of 9 vaccinees (89%) maintained a PRNT80≥1:20. These findings support the continued development of RVF MP-12 as a countermeasure against RVF virus in humans.

  16. Pioglitazone in early Parkinson's disease: a phase 2, multicentre, double-blind, randomised trial

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background A systematic assessment of potential disease-modifying compounds for Parkinson's disease concluded that pioglitazone could hold promise for the treatment of patients with this disease. We assessed the effect of pioglitazone on the progression of Parkinson's disease in a multicentre, double-blind, placebo-controlled, futility clinical trial. Methods Participants with the diagnosis of early Parkinson's disease on a stable regimen of 1 mg/day rasagiline or 10 mg/day selegiline were randomly assigned (1:1:1) to 15 mg/day pioglitazone, 45 mg/day pioglitazone, or placebo. Investigators were masked to the treatment assignment. Only the statistical centre and the central pharmacy knew the treatment name associated with the randomisation number. The primary outcome was the change in the total Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) score between the baseline and 44 weeks, analysed by intention to treat. The primary null hypothesis for each dose group was that the mean change in UPDRS was 3 points less than the mean change in the placebo group. The alternative hypothesis (of futility) was that pioglitazone is not meaningfully different from placebo. We rejected the null if there was significant evidence of futility at the one-sided alpha level of 0.10. The study is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01280123. Findings 210 patients from 35 sites in the USA were enrolled between May 10, 2011, and July 31, 2013. The primary analysis included 72 patients in the 15 mg group, 67 in the 45 mg group, and 71 in the placebo group. The mean total UPDRS change at 44 weeks was 4.42 (95% CI 2.55–6.28) for 15 mg pioglitazone, 5.13 (95% CI 3.17–7.08) for 45 mg pioglitazone, and 6.25 (95% CI 4.35–8.15) for placebo (higher change scores are worse). The mean difference between the 15 mg and placebo groups was −1.83 (80% CI −3.56 to −0.10) and the null hypothesis could not be rejected (p=0.19). The mean difference between the 45 mg and placebo

  17. Characteristics of a cluster-randomized phase IV human papillomavirus vaccination effectiveness trial.

    PubMed

    Lehtinen, Matti; Apter, Dan; Baussano, Iacopo; Eriksson, Tiina; Natunen, Kari; Paavonen, Jorma; Vänskä, Simopekka; Bi, Dan; David, Marie-Pierre; Datta, Sanjoy; Struyf, Frank; Jenkins, David; Pukkala, Eero; Garnett, Geoff; Dubin, Gary

    2015-03-03

    High-risk human papillomaviruses (hrHPV) cause anogenital and oropharyngeal cancers. HPV-16/18 virus-like particle vaccine formulated with an AS04 adjuvant is very efficacious against hrHPV associated precancers but the herd effects of different vaccination scenarios are not known. Our cluster randomized trial (NCT00534638) assesses the overall and herd effects of vaccinating girls vs. girls and boys. In two school-years (2007-2008 and 2008-2009) we invited 80,272 1992-1995 born early adolescents to a CRT in 33 communities a priori stratified by low, intermediate and high HPV-16/18 seroprevalence. In 11 Arm A communities 90% of participating girls and boys were assigned to receive HPV-16/18 vaccine, in 11 Arm B communities 90% of girls were assigned to receive HPV-16/18 vaccine - boys were assigned to receive hepatitis B-virus (HBV) vaccine, and in 11 Arm C communities all were assigned to receive HBV-vaccine. Prevalence of HPV in vaccinated and unvaccinated girls is studied at age 18.5 years. Recruitment resulted in equal enrolment of four birth cohorts (born 1992-1995) comprising altogether 32,175 (40% response) early adolescents: 20,514 girls (50.5-53.0% response by arm) and 11,661 boys (21.9-31.6%% response by arm). At the age of 15 years, 79.3% of the vaccinees completed a questionnaire. Among them >98% were living at, and during the week-ends 1.3-1.6% stayed outside, the study site communities. Smoking habit and alcohol consumption were similar in the different trial arms, also mean-age of menarche (12.4 years) and 1st ejaculation (12.6 years), and sexual behaviour (among those <25%, who had had sexual debut) did not differ by arm: mean-age at the sexual debut 14.3 and 14.4 in girls and boys, and proportions of those with multiple (≥5) life-time sexual partners (6.5-7.5%) at the age of 15 years. Uniform residential, life-style and sexual behaviour characteristics indicate successful randomization/enrolment of the CRT. Our CRT will verify modelled

  18. Phase 3 Trial of (177)Lu-Dotatate for Midgut Neuroendocrine Tumors.

    PubMed

    Strosberg, Jonathan; El-Haddad, Ghassan; Wolin, Edward; Hendifar, Andrew; Yao, James; Chasen, Beth; Mittra, Erik; Kunz, Pamela L; Kulke, Matthew H; Jacene, Heather; Bushnell, David; O'Dorisio, Thomas M; Baum, Richard P; Kulkarni, Harshad R; Caplin, Martyn; Lebtahi, Rachida; Hobday, Timothy; Delpassand, Ebrahim; Van Cutsem, Eric; Benson, Al; Srirajaskanthan, Rajaventhan; Pavel, Marianne; Mora, Jaime; Berlin, Jordan; Grande, Enrique; Reed, Nicholas; Seregni, Ettore; Öberg, Kjell; Lopera Sierra, Maribel; Santoro, Paola; Thevenet, Thomas; Erion, Jack L; Ruszniewski, Philippe; Kwekkeboom, Dik; Krenning, Eric

    2017-01-12

    Background Patients with advanced midgut neuroendocrine tumors who have had disease progression during first-line somatostatin analogue therapy have limited therapeutic options. This randomized, controlled trial evaluated the efficacy and safety of lutetium-177 ((177)Lu)-Dotatate in patients with advanced, progressive, somatostatin-receptor-positive midgut neuroendocrine tumors. Methods We randomly assigned 229 patients who had well-differentiated, metastatic midgut neuroendocrine tumors to receive either (177)Lu-Dotatate (116 patients) at a dose of 7.4 GBq every 8 weeks (four intravenous infusions, plus best supportive care including octreotide long-acting repeatable [LAR] administered intramuscularly at a dose of 30 mg) ((177)Lu-Dotatate group) or octreotide LAR alone (113 patients) administered intramuscularly at a dose of 60 mg every 4 weeks (control group). The primary end point was progression-free survival. Secondary end points included the objective response rate, overall survival, safety, and the side-effect profile. The final analysis of overall survival will be conducted in the future as specified in the protocol; a prespecified interim analysis of overall survival was conducted and is reported here. Results At the data-cutoff date for the primary analysis, the estimated rate of progression-free survival at month 20 was 65.2% (95% confidence interval [CI], 50.0 to 76.8) in the (177)Lu-Dotatate group and 10.8% (95% CI, 3.5 to 23.0) in the control group. The response rate was 18% in the (177)Lu-Dotatate group versus 3% in the control group (P<0.001). In the planned interim analysis of overall survival, 14 deaths occurred in the (177)Lu-Dotatate group and 26 in the control group (P=0.004). Grade 3 or 4 neutropenia, thrombocytopenia, and lymphopenia occurred in 1%, 2%, and 9%, respectively, of patients in the (177)Lu-Dotatate group as compared with no patients in the control group, with no evidence of renal toxic effects during the observed time frame

  19. Two Phase II randomized trials on the CRTh2 antagonist AZD1981 in adults with asthma

    PubMed Central

    Kuna, Piotr; Bjermer, Leif; Tornling, Göran

    2016-01-01

    Background Chemoattractant receptor-homologous molecule expressed on T helper type 2 (Th2) cell (CRTh2) receptor antagonists is being investigated for asthma. Objectives The aim of this study was to assess the effects of the CRTh2 receptor antagonist, AZD1981 (with/without inhaled corticosteroids [ICSs]), on lung function and asthma control. Patients and methods Adults aged 18–60 years were enrolled in two randomized, placebo-controlled, parallel-group trials (protocol number: D9830C00003 [study 1, n=209] and protocol number: D9830C00004 [study 2, n=510]). In study 1, patients with stable asthma (forced expiratory volume in 1 second [FEV1]: 65%−110%) were withdrawn from ICS (<400 µg/d) and randomized to AZD1981 1,000 mg twice daily (bid) or placebo. In study 2, patients with uncontrolled asthma (FEV1: 40%−85%) despite ICS therapy (≥500 µg/d) were randomized to 50 mg, 400 mg, or 1,000 mg bid AZD1981 or placebo. The primary efficacy variable for both trials was the change in morning peak expiratory flow after 4 weeks of treatment. Secondary variables included Asthma Control Questionnaire (ACQ-5) scores, FEV1 assessments, safety, and tolerability. In study 2, efficacy was also assessed according to atopic status. Results Following 4 weeks of treatment, there was a nonsignificant increase in morning peak expiratory flow on AZD1981 1,000 mg bid (9.5 L/min vs placebo, P=0.086 [study 1] and 12 L/min vs placebo, P=0.16 [study 2]). In study 2, all doses of AZD1981 provided significant improvements in ACQ-5 scores (0.26–0.3 units vs placebo, P=0.010–0.022); however, there was no dose–response relationship. Improved ACQ-5 scores and FEV1 were observed in the majority of atopic patients treated with AZD1981. AZD1981 was well tolerated across treatment groups. Conclusion Further research may be warranted in atopic patients to fully evaluate the clinical efficacy of AZD1981. PMID:27621597

  20. Microdosing and Other Phase 0 Clinical Trials: Facilitating Translation in Drug Development.

    PubMed

    Burt, T; Yoshida, K; Lappin, G; Vuong, L; John, C; de Wildt, S N; Sugiyama, Y; Rowland, M

    2016-04-01

    A number of drivers and developments suggest that microdosing and other phase 0 applications will experience increased utilization in the near-to-medium future. Increasing costs of drug development and ethical concerns about the risks of exposing humans and animals to novel chemical entities are important drivers in favor of these approaches, and can be expected only to increase in their relevance. An increasing body of research supports the validity of extrapolation from the limited drug exposure of phase 0 approaches to the full, therapeutic exposure, with modeling and simulations capable of extrapolating even non-linear scenarios. An increasing number of applications and design options demonstrate the versatility and flexibility these approaches offer to drug developers including the study of PK, bioavailability, DDI, and mechanistic PD effects. PET microdosing allows study of target localization, PK and receptor binding and occupancy, while Intra-Target Microdosing (ITM) allows study of local therapeutic-level acute PD coupled with systemic microdose-level exposure. Applications in vulnerable populations and extreme environments are attractive due to the unique risks of pharmacotherapy and increasing unmet healthcare needs. All phase 0 approaches depend on the validity of extrapolation from the limited-exposure scenario to the full exposure of therapeutic intent, but in the final analysis the potential for controlled human data to reduce uncertainty about drug properties is bound to be a valuable addition to the drug development process.

  1. Treatment Extension of Pegylated Interferon Alpha and Ribavirin Does Not Improve SVR in Patients with Genotypes 2/3 without Rapid Virological Response (OPTEX Trial): A Prospective, Randomized, Two-Arm, Multicentre Phase IV Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Heidrich, Benjamin; Cordes, Hans-Jörg; Klinker, Hartwig; Möller, Bernd; Naumann, Uwe; Rössle, Martin; Kraus, Michael R.; Böker, Klaus H.; Roggel, Christoph; Schuchmann, Marcus; Stoehr, Albrecht; Trein, Andreas; Hardtke, Svenja; Gonnermann, Andrea; Koch, Armin; Wedemeyer, Heiner; Manns, Michael P.; Cornberg, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Although sofosbuvir has been approved for patients with genotypes 2/3 (G2/3), many parts of the world still consider pegylated Interferon alpha (P) and ribavirin (R) as standard of care for G2/3. Patients with rapid virological response (RVR) show response rates >80%. However, SVR (sustained virological response) in non-RVR patients is not satisfactory. Longer treatment duration may be required but evidence from prospective trials are lacking. A total of 1006 chronic HCV genotype 2/3 patients treated with P/R were recruited into a German HepNet multicenter screening registry. Of those, only 226 patients were still HCV RNA positive at week 4 (non-RVR). Non-RVR patients with ongoing response after 24 weeks P-2b/R qualified for OPTEX, a randomized trial investigating treatment extension of additional 24 weeks (total 48 weeks, Group A) or additional 12 weeks (total 36 weeks, group B) of 1.5 μg/kg P-2b and 800-1400 mg R. Due to the low number of patients without RVR, the number of 150 anticipated study patients was not met and only 99 non-RVR patients (n=50 Group A, n=49 Group B) could be enrolled into the OPTEX trial. Baseline factors did not differ between groups. Sixteen patients had G2 and 83 patients G3. Based on the ITT (intention-to-treat) analysis, 68% [55%; 81%] in Group A and 57% [43%; 71%] in Group B achieved SVR (p= 0.31). The primary endpoint of better SVR rates in Group A compared to a historical control group (SVR 70%) was not met. In conclusion, approximately 23% of G2/3 patients did not achieve RVR in a real world setting. However, subsequent recruitment in a treatment-extension study was difficult. Prolonged therapy beyond 24 weeks did not result in higher SVR compared to a historical control group. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00803309 PMID:26057627

  2. [Radiologic detection of triombrast in liposomes of liver and spleen (first phase of clinical trial)].

    PubMed

    Rozenberg, O A; Loshakova, L V; Mikhaĭlova, N Ia; Tiutin, L A; Ternovoĭ, S K; Balashov, A T; Khanson, K P

    1993-01-01

    Clinical trials of the liposomal form of water-soluble x-ray contrast agent triombrast (90 mg of iodine in 1 ml) was carried out in 23 patients with Hodgkin's disease, 9 with liver cirrhosis, and 6 with malignant tumors of different localizations. Distinct images of the liver and spleen appeared 2-2.5 h after intravenous injection of the formulation. They could be observed during 4-6 h by plane radiography. Liposomal hepatolienography permits identification of the structural alteration sites 0.8-1.0 cm in size in these organs. Administration of higher doses of the formulation (more that 0.5 ml/kg) was associated with such side effects as fever and hyperthermia in 30% of patients parallel with the side effects common for iodine-containing x-ray contrast agents. These side effects could be eliminated by previous administration of prednisolone and pipolphen. These side effects were not observed after injection of lower doses of the formulation (less than 0.5 ml/kg) sufficient for an essential improvement of the image contrast during computer-aided tomography.

  3. Neoadjuvant radiochemotherapy for locally advanced gastric cancer: Long-term results of a phase I trial

    SciTech Connect

    Allal, Abdelkarim S. . E-mail: abdelkarim.allal@hcuge.ch; Zwahlen, Daniel; Bruendler, Marie-Anne; Peyer, Raymond de; Morel, Philippe; Huber, Olivier; Roth, Arnaud D.

    2005-12-01

    Purpose: To assess the long-term results of radiation therapy (RT) when added preoperatively to systemic chemotherapy in patients with locally advanced gastric cancer. Methods and Materials: Patients presenting with T3-4 or N+ gastric cancer received two cycles of cisplatin 100 mg/m{sup 2} d1, 5FU 800 mg/m{sup 2} d1-4, and Leucovorin 60 mg twice daily d1-4; one cycle before and one concomitantly with hyperfractionated RT (median dose, 38.4; range, 31.2-45.6 Gy). All patients underwent a total or subtotal gastrectomy with D2 lymph node resection. Results: Nineteen patients were accrued and 18 completed the neoadjuvant therapeutic program. All patients were subsequently operated and no fatality occurred. At a mean follow-up of 8 years for the surviving patients, no severe late toxicity was observed. The 5-year locoregional control, disease-free, and overall survival were of 85%, 41%, and 35%, respectively. The peritoneum was the most frequent site of relapse. Among long terms survivors, no severe (Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Grade 3-4) late complication was reported. Conclusions: The present neoadjuvant treatment does not seem to increase the operative risk, nor the late side effects. The encouraging locoregional control rate suggests that the neoadjuvant approach should be considered for future trials in locally advanced gastric cancer. Also, the frequency of peritoneal recurrence stresses the need for a more efficient systemic or intraperitoneal treatment.

  4. Chemoradiotherapy with or without AE-941 in stage III non-small cell lung cancer: a randomized phase III trial.

    PubMed

    Lu, Charles; Lee, J Jack; Komaki, Ritsuko; Herbst, Roy S; Feng, Lei; Evans, William K; Choy, Hak; Desjardins, Pierre; Esparaz, Benjamin T; Truong, Mylene T; Saxman, Scott; Kelaghan, Joseph; Bleyer, Archie; Fisch, Michael J

    2010-06-16

    BACKGROUND AE-941 is a standardized aqueous shark cartilage extract with antiangiogenic properties that has previously been evaluated in phase I and II clinical trials. Our objective was to determine the effect of adding AE-941 to chemoradiotherapy on overall survival of patients with unresectable stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). METHODS A randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled, phase III clinical trial was designed to test the efficacy of AE-941 in unresectable stage III NSCLC patients who were treated with chemoradiotherapy. Between June 5, 2000, and February 6, 2006, 379 eligible patients were enrolled in community and academic oncology centers across the United States and Canada. In February 2006, the trial was closed to new patient entry before meeting the target sample size because of insufficient accrual. All subjects received induction chemotherapy followed by concurrent chemotherapy with chest radiotherapy. Each participating center administered one of the two chemotherapy regimens, either carboplatin and paclitaxel, or cisplatin and vinorelbine. The primary endpoint was overall survival, and secondary endpoints were time to progression, progression-free survival, tumor response rate, and toxic effects. Event-time distributions were estimated by the Kaplan-Meier method. All statistical tests were two-sided. RESULTS There was no statistically significant difference in overall survival between the chemoradiotherapy plus AE-941 group (n = 188; median survival = 14.4 months, 95% confidence interval = 12.6 to 17.9 months) and the chemoradiotherapy plus placebo group (n = 191; median survival = 15.6 months, 95% confidence interval = 13.8 to 18.1 months) (P = .73). Time to progression, progression-free survival, and tumor response rates were not statistically significantly different between the AE-941 and the placebo groups. No differences between the two groups were observed in common grade 3 or higher toxic effects attributable to

  5. A First-Time-In-Human Phase I Clinical Trial of Bispecific Antibody-Targeted, Paclitaxel-Packaged Bacterial Minicells

    PubMed Central

    Rosenthal, Mark; McArthur, Grant A.; Pattison, Scott T.; Pattison, Stacey L.; MacDiarmid, Jennifer; Brahmbhatt, Himanshu; Scott, Andrew M.

    2015-01-01

    paclitaxel, were shown to be safe in patients with advanced solid tumors with modest clinical efficacy observed. Further study in Phase II trials is planned. Trial Registration Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN12609000672257 PMID:26659127

  6. A phase I-II trial of fludarabine, bendamustine and rituximab (FBR) in previously treated patients with CLL.

    PubMed

    Jain, Nitin; Balakrishnan, Kumudha; Ferrajoli, Alessandra; O'Brien, Susan M; Burger, Jan A; Kadia, Tapan M; Cortes, Jorge E; Ayres, Mary L; Tambaro, Francesco Paolo; Keating, Michael J; Gandhi, Varsha; Wierda, William G

    2016-09-15

    Chemoimmunotherapy regimens have been the standard first-line therapy for patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). For young, fit patients the standard of care is combination of fludarabine, cyclophosphamide, and rituximab (FCR). Based on the preclinical work demonstrating that bendamustine combined with fludarabine resulted in increased DNA damage, we designed a phase I-II clinical trial with fludarabine, bendamustine, and rituximab (FBR) for patients with relapsed/refractory CLL. Treatment consisted of fludarabine 20 mg/m2 daily x 3 days and rituximab 375-500 mg/m2 x 1 day. Phase I included bendamustine at increasing doses of 20, 30, 40, or 50 mg/m2 daily x 3 days; phase II was with FR, and B at the selected dose. DNA damage response (H2AX phosphorylation) was evaluated in a subset of patients. Fifty-one patients were enrolled. The median age was 62 years; median number of prior therapies was 2; 40% had del(11q); and 41 patients had received prior FCR-based therapies. Hematologic toxicity was more common in ≥40 mg/m2 dose cohorts. Maximum tolerated dose (MTD) was not identified. Bendamustine-elicited H2AX phosphorylation was not dose-dependent, but markedly increased after fludarabine. We identified bendamustine 30 mg/m2 as the safe dose for phase II. The overall response rate (ORR) was 67% with 36% complete response (CR) / CR with incomplete count recovery (CRi). Younger patients (<65 years) had significantly higher ORR (81% vs. 50%; p=0.038). The median progression-free survival was 19 months, and the median overall survival was 52.5 months. FBR is an effective and tolerable CIT regimen for patients with relapsed CLL.

  7. Innovative clinical trial designs to rationalize TB vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Ellis, R D; Hatherill, M; Tait, D; Snowden, M; Churchyard, G; Hanekom, W; Evans, T; Ginsberg, A M

    2015-05-01

    A recent trial of a leading tuberculosis (TB) vaccine candidate in 3000 South African infants failed to show protection over that from BCG alone, and highlights the difficulties in clinical development of TB vaccines. Progression of vaccine candidates to efficacy trials against TB disease rests on demonstration of safety and immunogenicity in target populations and protection against challenge in preclinical models, but immunologic correlates of protection are unknown, and animal models may not be predictive of results in humans. Even in populations most heavily affected by TB the sample sizes required for Phase 2b efficacy trials using TB disease as an endpoint are in the thousands. Novel clinical trial models have been developed to evaluate candidate TB vaccines in selected populations using biologically relevant outcomes and innovative statistical approaches. Such proof of concept studies can be used to more rationally select vaccine candidates for advancement to large scale trials against TB disease.

  8. Mast Cell Stabilizer (Ketotifen) in Fibromyalgia: Phase 1 Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Ang, Dennis C.; Hilligoss, Janna; Stump, Timothy

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Compared to healthy controls, patients with fibromyalgia (FM) have more mast cells in the skin. Whether mast cells are involved in the pathogenesis of FM is unclear. We sought to determine the effects of a mast cell stabilizer (ketotifen) on FM symptoms. Methods Fifty-one FM subjects were randomized to daily oral ketotifen 2 mg BID (n=24) for 8 weeks or placebo (N=27). Mean age of subjects was 51.2 years (standard deviation/SD 8.4); 88% were female and 88% were white; 22% were taking concomitant opiates; and mean pressure pain sensitivity (range 0-20) was 10.0 (0.4). At study entry, the weekly average pain intensity was 6.4 (1.1) and the mean score on the Revised Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQR) was 66.8 (14.0). Results We found no statistically significant treatment group differences from baseline in either group for the two primary measures: weekly average pain intensity [ketotifen −1.3 (1.9) vs. placebo −1.5 (1.9), p=0.7]; and FIQR score [−12.1 (19.5) vs. −12.2 (18.1), p=0.9]. No secondary outcome measures (BPI pain intensity, and pressure pain sensitivity) reached statistical significance; results did not differ in the intent-to-treat and completer analyses. Other than transient sedation [6 (28.6%) vs. 1 (4.0%)], ketotifen was well tolerated. Discussion The study results question whether skin mast cells play a major role in the pathogenesis of FM. However, given the role of mast cells in peripheral and central nociception, and the minimal side effects of ketotifen, a randomized clinical trial using increasing doses of ketotifen may be warranted. PMID:25370135

  9. Phase I trials using Sleeping Beauty to generate CD19-specific CAR T cells

    PubMed Central

    Kebriaei, Partow; Singh, Harjeet; Huls, M. Helen; Figliola, Matthew J.; Bassett, Roland; Olivares, Simon; Jena, Bipulendu; Dawson, Margaret J.; Kumaresan, Pappanaicken R.; Su, Shihuang; Maiti, Sourindra; Dai, Jianliang; Moriarity, Branden; Forget, Marie-Andrée; Senyukov, Vladimir; Orozco, Aaron; Liu, Tingting; McCarty, Jessica; Jackson, Rineka N.; Moyes, Judy S.; Rondon, Gabriela; Qazilbash, Muzaffar; Ciurea, Stefan; Alousi, Amin; Nieto, Yago; Rezvani, Katy; Marin, David; Popat, Uday; Hosing, Chitra; Shpall, Elizabeth J.; Kantarjian, Hagop; Keating, Michael; Wierda, William; Do, Kim Anh; Largaespada, David A.; Lee, Dean A.; Hackett, Perry B.; Champlin, Richard E.; Cooper, Laurence J.N.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND. T cells expressing antigen-specific chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) improve outcomes for CD19-expressing B cell malignancies. We evaluated a human application of T cells that were genetically modified using the Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon/transposase system to express a CD19-specific CAR. METHODS. T cells were genetically modified using DNA plasmids from the SB platform to stably express a second-generation CD19-specific CAR and selectively propagated ex vivo with activating and propagating cells (AaPCs) and cytokines. Twenty-six patients with advanced non-Hodgkin lymphoma and acute lymphoblastic leukemia safely underwent hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) and infusion of CAR T cells as adjuvant therapy in the autologous (n = 7) or allogeneic settings (n = 19). RESULTS. SB-mediated genetic transposition and stimulation resulted in 2,200- to 2,500-fold ex vivo expansion of genetically modified T cells, with 84% CAR expression, and without integration hotspots. Following autologous HSCT, the 30-month progression-free and overall survivals were 83% and 100%, respectively. After allogeneic HSCT, the respective 12-month rates were 53% and 63%. No acute or late toxicities and no exacerbation of graft-versus-host disease were observed. Despite a low antigen burden and unsupportive recipient cytokine environment, CAR T cells persisted for an average of 201 days for autologous recipients and 51 days for allogeneic recipients. CONCLUSIONS. CD19-specific CAR T cells generated with SB and AaPC platforms were safe, and may provide additional cancer control as planned infusions after HSCT. These results support further clinical development of this nonviral gene therapy approach. TRIAL REGISTRATION. Autologous, NCT00968760; allogeneic, NCT01497184; long-term follow-up, NCT01492036. FUNDING. National Cancer Institute, private foundations, and institutional funds. Please see Acknowledgments for details. PMID:27482888

  10. A Phase III Randomized Trial of the Timing of Meloxicam With Iodine-125 Prostate Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Crook, Juanita; Patil, Nikhilesh; Wallace, Kris; Borg, Jette; Zhou, David; Ma, Clement; Pond, Greg

    2010-06-01

    Purpose: Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medication is used to reduce prostate edema and urinary symptoms following prostate brachytherapy. We hypothesized that a cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitor regimen started 1 week prior to seed implant might diminish the inflammatory response, thus reducing edema, retention rates, and symptom severity. Methods and Materials: From March 2004 to February 2008, 316 men consented to an institutional review board-approved randomized study of a 4-week course of meloxicam, 7.5 mg orally twice per day, starting either on the day of implant or 1 week prior to implant. Brachytherapy was performed using iodine-125 seeds and was preplanned and performed under transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) and fluoroscopic guidance. Prostate volume obtained by MR imaging at 1 month was compared to baseline prostate volume obtained by TRUS planimetry and expressed as an edema factor. The trial endpoints were prostate edema at 1 month, International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) questionnaire results at 1 and 3 months, and any need for catheterization. Results: Results for 300 men were analyzed. Median age was 61 (range, 45-79 years), and median TRUS prostate volume was 35.7 cc (range, 18.1-69.5 cc). Median IPSS at baseline was 5 (range, 0-24) and was 15 at 1 month, 16 at 3 months, and 10 at 6 months. Catheterization was required for 7% of patients (6.2% day 0 arm vs. 7.9% day -7 arm; p = 0.65). The median edema factor at 1 month was 1.02 (range, 0.73-1.7). 1.01 day 0 arm vs. 1.05 day -7 arm. Baseline prostate volume remained the primary predictor of postimplant urinary retention. Conclusions: Starting meloxicam 1 week prior to brachytherapy compared to starting immediately after the procedure did not reduce 1-month edema, improve IPSSs at 1 or 3 months, or reduce the need for catheterization.

  11. Disclosure of competing financial interests and role of sponsors in phase III cancer trials.

    PubMed

    Tuech, Jean-Jacques; Moutel, Grégoire; Pessaux, Patrick; Thoma, Véronique; Schraub, Simon; Herve, Christian

    2005-10-01

    Financial relationships between industry, researchers and academic institutions are becoming increasingly complex, raising concern about sponsors' involvement in the conduct of biomedical research. A review of published randomised trials (RCTs) in cancer research was performed to assess adherence to the 1997 disclosure requirements and to document the nature of the disclosed interests. Source(s) of study support, author-sponsor relationships and the role of the study sponsor were assessed for all RCTs published between 1999 and 2003 in 12 international journals. A total of 655 cancer RCTs were identified. Of these, 516 (78.8%) disclosed the source of sponsorship. The nature of the relationship between the authors and the study sponsor was included in 219 of the 227 industry-sponsored studies. The most commonly cited relationships were (131 studies had multiple relations): grants (93.6%); employment (39.2%); consultant/honorarium (12.7%) and stock ownership and participation in a speaker's bureau (12, 5.5% each). Only 41 (18%) of the 227 industry-sponsored RCTs reported the role of the sponsor. Of these, 20 explicitly stated that the sponsor had no role in the study. Twenty-one papers described the sponsor's role, the degree of sponsor involvement was variable and usually described vaguely. Among these papers, four stated that researchers had full access to all data, one that the researchers had no limits on publication and one that 'the decision to submit the paper for publication was determined by the study sponsor'. In conclusion, no researcher should be expected to produce 'findings' without full access to the data, freedom from interference in analysis and interpretation and liberty to publish all results, however disappointing to the stakeholder they may be. In the meantime, researchers do well to arm themselves with the rules for research partnerships and editors to take on the role of watchdog.

  12. Phase 1 trial of dichloroacetate (DCA) in adults with recurrent malignant brain tumors

    PubMed Central

    Dunbar, E. M.; Coats, B. S.; Shroads, A. L.; Langaee, T.; Lew, A.; Forder, J. R.; Shuster, J. J.; Wagner, D. A.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Recurrent malignant brain tumors (RMBTs) carry a poor prognosis. Dichloroacetate (DCA) activates mitochondrial oxidative metabolism and has shown activity against several human cancers. Design We conducted an open-label study of oral DCA in 15 adults with recurrent WHO grade III – IV gliomas or metastases from a primary cancer outside the central nervous system. The primary objective was detection of a dose limiting toxicity for RMBTs at 4 weeks of treatment, defined as any grade 4 or 5 toxicity, or grade 3 toxicity directly attributable to DCA, based on the National Cancer Institute’s Common Toxicity Criteria for Adverse Events, version 4.0. Secondary objectives involved safety, tolerability and hypothesis-generating data on disease status. Dosing was based on haplotype variation in glutathione transferase zeta 1/maleylacetoacetate isomerase (GSTZ1/MAAI), which participates in DCA and tyrosine catabolism. Results Eight patients completed at least 1 four week cycle. During this time, no dose-limiting toxicities occurred. No patient withdrew because of lack of tolerance to DCA, although 2 subjects experienced grade 0–1 distal parasthesias that led to elective withdrawal and/or dose-adjustment. All subjects completing at least 1 four week cycle remained clinically stable during this time and remained on DCA for an average of 75.5 days (range 26–312). Conclusions Chronic, oral DCA is feasible and well-tolerated in patients with recurrent malignant gliomas and other tumors metastatic to the brain using the dose range established for metabolic diseases. The importance of genetic-based dosing is confirmed and should be incorporated into future trials of chronic DCA administration. PMID:24297161

  13. Phase 1 Trial of Bi-shRNA STMN1 BIV in Refractory Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Barve, Minal; Wang, Zhaohui; Kumar, Padmasini; Jay, Christopher M; Luo, Xiuquan; Bedell, Cynthia; Mennel, Robert G; Wallraven, Gladice; Brunicardi, Francis Charles; Senzer, Neil; Nemunaitis, John; Rao, Donald D

    2015-01-01

    Stathmin1 (STMN1) is a microtubule modulator that is expressed in multiple cancers and correlates with poor survival. We previously demonstrated in vivo safety of bifunctional (bi) shRNA STMN1 bilamellar invaginated vesicle (BIV) and that systemic delivery correlated with antitumor activity. Patients with superficial advanced refractory cancer with no other standard options were entered into trial. Study design involved dose escalation (four patients/cohort) using a modified Fibonacci schema starting at 0.7 mg DNA administered via single intratumoral injection. Biopsy at baseline, 24/48 hours and resection 8 days after injection provided tissue for determination of cleavage product using next-generation sequencing (NGS) and reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR), 5′ RLM rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) assay. Serum pharmacokinetics of circulating plasmid was done. Twelve patients were entered into three dose levels (0.7, 1.4, 7.0 mg DNA). No ≥ grade 3 toxic effects to drug were observed. Maximum circulating plasmid was detected at 30 seconds with less than 10% detectable in all subjects at 24 hours. No toxic effects were observed. Predicted cleavage product was detected by both NGS (n = 7/7 patients analyzed, cohorts 1, 2) and RLM RACE (n = 1/1 patients analyzed cohort 3). In conclusion, bi-shRNA STMN1 BIV is well tolerated and detection of mRNA target sequence-specific cleavage product confirmed bi-shRNA BIV mechanism of action. PMID:25619726

  14. Phase 1 Trial of Bi-shRNA STMN1 BIV in Refractory Cancer.

    PubMed

    Barve, Minal; Wang, Zhaohui; Kumar, Padmasini; Jay, Christopher M; Luo, Xiuquan; Bedell, Cynthia; Mennel, Robert G; Wallraven, Gladice; Brunicardi, Francis Charles; Senzer, Neil; Nemunaitis, John; Rao, Donald D

    2015-06-01

    Stathmin1 (STMN1) is a microtubule modulator that is expressed in multiple cancers and correlates with poor survival. We previously demonstrated in vivo safety of bifunctional (bi) shRNA STMN1 bilamellar invaginated vesicle (BIV) and that systemic delivery correlated with antitumor activity. Patients with superficial advanced refractory cancer with no other standard options were entered into trial. Study design involved dose escalation (four patients/cohort) using a modified Fibonacci schema starting at 0.7 mg DNA administered via single intratumoral injection. Biopsy at baseline, 24/48 hours and resection 8 days after injection provided tissue for determination of cleavage product using next-generation sequencing (NGS) and reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR), 5' RLM rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) assay. Serum pharmacokinetics of circulating plasmid was done. Twelve patients were entered into three dose levels (0.7, 1.4, 7.0 mg DNA). No ≥ grade 3 toxic effects to drug were observed. Maximum circulating plasmid was detected at 30 seconds with less than 10% detectable in all subjects at 24 hours. No toxic effects were observed. Predicted cleavage product was detected by both NGS (n = 7/7 patients analyzed, cohorts 1, 2) and RLM RACE (n = 1/1 patients analyzed cohort 3). In conclusion, bi-shRNA STMN1 BIV is well tolerated and detection of mRNA target sequence-specific cleavage product confirmed bi-shRNA BIV mechanism of action.

  15. A Phase II Trial of a Combination Herbal Supplement for Men with Biochemically Recurrent Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dorff, Tanya B.; Groshen, Susan; Tsao-Wei, Denice D.; Xiong, Shigang; Gross, Mitchell E.; Vogelzang, Nicholas; Quinn, David I.; Pinski, Jacek K.

    2014-01-01

    Background Men with biochemical recurrence (BCR) of prostate cancer are typically observed or treated with androgen deprivation therapy. Non-hormonal, non-toxic treatments to slow the rise of PSA are desirable. We studied a combination herbal supplement, Prostate Health Cocktail (PHC), in prostate cancer cell lines and in a population of men with BCR. Methods PC3, LAPC3, and LNCaP cells were incubated with increasing concentrations of PHC suspension. Men previously treated for prostate cancer with surgery, radiation, or both with rising PSA but no radiographic metastases were treated with 3 capsules of PHC daily; the primary endpoint was 50% PSA decline. Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) were identified using parylene membrane filters. Results PHC showed a strong dose-dependent anti-proliferative effect in androgen-sensitive and independent cell lines in vitro and suppression of androgen receptor expression. 40 eligible patients were enrolled in the clinical trial. Median baseline PSA was 2.8 ng/mL (1.1-84.1) and 15 men (38%) had a PSA decline on study (1%-55% reduction) ; 25 (62%) had rising PSA on study. The median duration of PSA stability was 6.4 months. Two patients had grade 2/3 transaminitis; the only other grade 2 toxicities were hyperglycemia, hypercalcemia and flatulence. There were no significant changes in testosterone or dihydrotestosterone. CTCs were identified in 19 men (47%). Conclusion Although the primary endpoint was not met, Prostate Health Cocktail was well tolerated and was associated with PSA declines and stabilization in a significant number of patients. This is the first report of detecting CTCs in men with BCR prostate cancer. Randomized studies are needed to better define the effect of PHC in men with BCR. PMID:25245366

  16. Differences in Methadone Metabolism by CYP2B6 Variants.

    PubMed

    Gadel, Sarah; Friedel, Christina; Kharasch, Evan D

    2015-07-01

    Methadone is a long-acting opioid with considerable unexplained interindividual variability in clearance. Cytochrome P450 2B6 (CYP2B6) mediates clinical methadone clearance and metabolic inactivation via N-demethylation to 2-ethyl-1,5-dimethyl-3,3-diphenylpyrrolidine (EDDP). Retrospective studies suggest that individuals with the CYP2B6*6 allelic variant have higher methadone plasma concentrations. Catalytic activities of CYP2B6 variants are highly substrate- and expression-system dependent. This investigation evaluated methadone N-demethylation by expressed human CYP2B6 allelic variants in an insect cell coexpression system containing P450 reductase. Additionally, the influence of coexpressing cytochrome b5, whose role in metabolism can be inhibitory or stimulatory depending on the P450 isoform and substrate, on methadone metabolism, was evaluated. EDDP formation from therapeutic (0.25-1 μM) R- and S-methadone concentrations was CYP2B6.4 ≥ CYP2B6.1 ≥ CYP2B6.5 > CYP2B6.9 ≈ CYP2B6.6, and undetectable from CYP2B6.18. Coexpression of b5 had small and variant-specific effects at therapeutic methadone concentrations but at higher concentrations stimulated EDDP formation by CYP2B6.1, CYP2B6.4, CYP2B6.5, and CYP2B6.9 but not CYP2B6.6. In vitro intrinsic clearances were generally CYP2B6.4 ≥ CYP2B6.1 > CYP2B6.5 > CYP2B6.9 ≥ CYP2B6.6. Stereoselective methadone metabolism (S>R) was maintained with all CYP2B6 variants. These results show that methadone N-demethylation by CYP2B6.4 is greater compared with CYP2B6.1, whereas CYP2B6.9 and CYP2B6.6 (which both contain the 516G>T, Q172H polymorphism), are catalytically deficient. The presence or absence of b5 in expression systems may explain previously reported disparate catalytic activities of CYP2B6 variants for specific substrates. Differences in methadone metabolism by CYP2B6 allelic variants provide a mechanistic understanding of pharmacogenetic variability in clinical methadone metabolism and clearance.

  17. Analysis of phase II methodologies for single-arm clinical trials with multiple endpoints in rare cancers: An example in Ewing's sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Dutton, P; Love, S B; Billingham, L; Hassan, A B

    2016-09-01

    Trials run in either rare diseases, such as rare cancers, or rare sub-populations of common diseases are challenging in terms of identifying, recruiting and treating sufficient patients in a sensible period. Treatments for rare diseases are often designed for other disease areas and then later proposed as possible treatments for the rare disease after initial phase I testing is complete. To ensure the trial is in the best interests of the patient participants, frequent interim analyses are needed to force the trial to stop promptly if the treatment is futile or toxic. These non-definitive phase II trials should also be stopped for efficacy to accelerate research progress if the treatment proves to be particularly promising. In this paper, we review frequentist and Bayesian methods that have been adapted to incorporate two binary endpoints and frequent interim analyses. The Eurosarc Trial of Linsitinib in advanced Ewing Sarcoma (LINES) is used as a motivating example and provides a suitable platform to compare these approaches. The Bayesian approach provides greater design flexibility, but does not provide additional value over the frequentist approaches in a single trial setting when the prior is non-informative. However, Bayesian designs are able to borrow from any previous experience, using prior information to improve efficiency.

  18. Design and conduct of early-phase radiotherapy trials with targeted therapeutics: lessons from the PRAVO experience.

    PubMed

    Ree, Anne Hansen; Hollywood, Donal

    2013-07-01

    New strategies to facilitate the improvement of physical and integrated biological optimization of high-precision treatment protocols are an important priority for modern radiation oncology. From a clinical perspective, as knowledge accumulates from molecular radiobiology, there is a complex and exciting opportunity to investigate novel approaches to rational patient treatment stratification based on actionable tumor targets, together with the appropriate design of next-generation early-phase radiotherapy trials utilizing targeted therapeutics, to formally evaluate relevant clinical and biomarker endpoints. A unique aspect in the development pathway of systemic agents with presumed radiosensitizing activity will also be the need for special attention on patient eligibility and the rigorous definition of radiation dose-volume relationships and potential dose-limiting toxicities. Based on recent experience from systematically investigating histone deacetylase inhibitors as radiosensitizing agents, from initial studies in preclinical tumor models through the conduct of a phase I clinical study to evaluate tumor activity of the targeted agent as well as patient safety and tumor response to the combined treatment modality, this communication will summarize principles relating to early clinical evaluation of combining radiotherapy and targeted therapeutics.

  19. Combined autophagy and proteasome inhibition: a phase 1 trial of hydroxychloroquine and bortezomib in patients with relapsed/refractory myeloma.

    PubMed

    Vogl, Dan T; Stadtmauer, Edward A; Tan, Kay-See; Heitjan, Daniel F; Davis, Lisa E; Pontiggia, Laura; Rangwala, Reshma; Piao, Shengfu; Chang, Yunyoung C; Scott, Emma C; Paul, Thomas M; Nichols, Charles W; Porter, David L; Kaplan, Janeen; Mallon, Gayle; Bradner, James E; Amaravadi, Ravi K

    2014-08-01

    The efficacy of proteasome inhibition for myeloma is limited by therapeutic resistance, which may be mediated by activation of the autophagy pathway as an alternative mechanism of protein degradation. Preclinical studies demonstrate that autophagy inhibition with hydroxychloroquine augments the antimyeloma efficacy of the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib. We conducted a phase I trial combining bortezomib and hydroxychloroquine for relapsed or refractory myeloma. We enrolled 25 patients, including 11 (44%) refractory to prior bortezomib. No protocol-defined dose-limiting toxicities occurred, and we identified a recommended phase 2 dose of hydroxychloroquine 600 mg twice daily with standard doses of bortezomib, at which we observed dose-related gastrointestinal toxicity and cytopenias. Of 22 patients evaluable for response, 3 (14%) had very good partial responses, 3 (14%) had minor responses, and 10 (45%) had a period of stable disease. Electron micrographs of bone marrow plasma cells collected at baseline, after a hydroxychloroquine run-in, and after combined therapy showed therapy-associated increases in autophagic vacuoles, consistent with the combined effects of increased trafficking of misfolded proteins to autophagic vacuoles and inhibition of their degradative capacity. Combined targeting of proteasomal and autophagic protein degradation using bortezomib and hydroxychloroquine is therefore feasible and a potentially useful strategy for improving outcomes in myeloma therapy.

  20. Phase I clinical trial of CpG oligonucleotide 7909 (PF-03512676) in patients with previously treated chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Zent, Clive S; Smith, Brian J; Ballas, Zuhair K; Wooldridge, James E; Link, Brian K; Call, Timothy G; Shanafelt, Tait D; Bowen, Deborah A; Kay, Neil E; Witzig, Thomas E; Weiner, George J

    2012-02-01

    CpG oligonucleotide 7909 (CpG 7909, PF-03512676), a synthetic 24mer single stranded agonist of TLR9 expressed by B cells and plasmacytoid dendritic cells, is immunomodulatory and can cause activation-induced death of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) cells. We report a phase I study of CpG 7909 in 41 patients with early relapsed CLL. A single intravenous dose of CpG 7909 was well tolerated with no clinical effects and no significant toxicity up to 1.05 mg/kg. Single dose subcutaneous CpG 7909 had a maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of 0.45 mg/kg with dose limiting toxicity of myalgia and constitutional effects. Multiple weekly subcutaneous doses at the MTD were well tolerated. CpG 7909 administration induced immunologic changes in CLL and non-malignant cells that were dose and route dependent. We conclude that multidose therapy with subcutaneous CpG 7909 (0.45 mg/kg) could be used in future phase II combination clinical trials for CLL.

  1. Phase II trial of biweekly docetaxel, cisplatin, and 5-fluorouracil chemotherapy for advanced esophageal squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Yoshihiro; Yoshida, Kazuhiro; Yamada, Atsuko; Tanahashi, Toshiyuki; Okumura, Naoki; Matsuhashi, Nobuhisa; Yamaguchi, Kazuya; Miyazaki, Tatsuhiko

    2016-06-01

    The prognosis of esophageal cancer patients is still unsatisfactory. Although a docetaxel, cisplatin, and 5-Fu (DCF) regimen has been reported, it is often difficult to accomplish because of severe toxicity. Therefore, we developed a new biweekly DCF (Bi-DCF) regimen and previously reported the recommended dose in a phase I dose-escalation study. We then performed a phase II study of Bi-DCF for advanced esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Patients with clinical stage II/III were eligible. Patients received 2 courses of chemotherapy: docetaxel 35 mg/m(2) with cisplatin 40 mg/m(2) on days 1 and 15 and 400 mg/m(2) 5-fluorouracil on days 1-5 and 15-19 every 4 weeks. After completion of the chemotherapy, patients received esophagectomy. The primary endpoint was the completion rate of protocol treatment. Thirty-two patients were enrolled. The completion rate of protocol treatment (completion of two courses of preoperative chemotherapy and R0 surgery) was 100 %. During chemotherapy, the most common grade 3 or 4 toxicities were neutropenia (31.3 %). No treatment-related death was observed, and the incidence of operative morbidity was tolerable. The overall response rate after the chemotherapy was 90.3 %. This Bi-DCF regimen was well tolerated and highly active. This trial was registered with the University Hospital Medical Information Network (No. UMIN 000014625).

  2. Tensor network trial states for chiral topological phases in two dimensions and a no-go theorem in any dimension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubail, J.; Read, N.

    2015-11-01

    Trial wave functions that can be represented by summing over locally coupled degrees of freedom are called tensor network states (TNSs); they have seemed difficult to construct for two-dimensional topological phases that possess protected gapless edge excitations. We show it can be done for chiral states of free fermions, using a Gaussian Grassmann integral, yielding px±i py and Chern insulator states, in the sense that the fermionic excitations live in a topologically nontrivial bundle of the required type. We prove that any strictly short-range quadratic parent Hamiltonian for these states is gapless; the proof holds for a class of systems in any dimension of space. The proof also shows, quite generally, that sets of compactly supported Wannier-type functions do not exist for band structures in this class. We construct further examples of TNSs that are analogs of fractional (including non-Abelian) quantum Hall phases; it is not known whether parent Hamiltonians for these are also gapless.

  3. Phase 3 trial of first generation protease inhibitor therapy for hepatitis C virus/human immunodeficiency virus coinfection

    PubMed Central

    Sherman, Kenneth E; Kang, Minhee; Sterling, Richard; Umbleja, Triin; Marks, Kristen; Kiser, Jennifer J; Alston-Smith, Beverly; Greaves, Wayne; Butt, Adeel A; the ACTG 5294 BIRTH Study Team

    2017-01-01

    AIM To evaluate efficacy/safety of hepatitis C virus (HCV) protease inhibitor boceprevir with pegylated interferon (PEG-IFN) alfa and weight-based ribavirin (RBV) in a phase 3 trial. METHODS A prospective, multicenter, phase 3, open-label, single-arm study of PEG-IFN alfa, weight-based RBV, and boceprevir, with a PEG-IFN/RBV lead-in phase was performed. The HCV/human immunodeficiency virus coinfected study population included treatment naïve (TN) and treatment experienced (TE) patients. Treatment duration ranged from 28 to 48 wk dependent upon response-guided criteria. All patients had HCV Genotype 1 with a viral load > 10000 IU/mL. Compensated cirrhosis was allowed. Sample size was determined to establish superiority to historical (PEG-IFN plus RBV) rates in sustained viral response (SVR). RESULTS A total of 257 enrolled participants were analyzed (135 TN and 122 TE). In the TN group, 81.5% were male and 54.1% were black. In the TE group, 76.2% were male and 47.5% were white. Overall SVR12 rates (HCV RNA < lower limit of quantification, target not detected, target not detected) were 35.6% in TN and 30.3% in TE. Response rates at SVR24 were 28% in TN and 10% in TE, and exceeded those in historical controls. The highest rate was observed in TN non-cirrhotic participants (36.8% and the lowest in TE cirrhotics (26.3%). Cirrhotic TN participants had a 27.8% SVR12 rate and 32.1% of TE non-cirrhotics achieved SVR12. Significantly lower response rates were observed among black participants; in the TE, SVR12 was 39.7% in white participants but only 13.2% of black subjects (P = 0.002). Among the TN, SVR12 was 42.1% among whites and 27.4% among blacks (P = 0.09). CONCLUSION The trial met its hypothesis of improved SVR compared to historical controls but overall SVR rates were low. All-oral HCV treatments will mitigate these difficulties. PMID:28217259

  4. Cost effectiveness of peginterferon α-2b plus ribavirin versus interferon α-2b plus ribavirin for initial treatment of chronic hepatitis C

    PubMed Central

    Siebert, U; Sroczynski, G; Rossol, S; Wasem, J; Ravens-Sieberer, U; Kurth, B M; Manns, M P; McHutchison, J G; Wong, J B

    2003-01-01

    Background: Peginterferon α-2b plus ribavirin therapy in previously untreated patients with chronic hepatitis C yields the highest sustained virological response rates of any treatment strategy but is expensive. Aims: To estimate the cost effectiveness of treatment with peginterferon α-2b plus ribavirin compared with interferon α-2b plus ribavirin for initial treatment of patients with chronic hepatitis C. Methods: Individual patient level data from a randomised clinical trial with peginterferon plus ribavirin were applied to a previously published and validated Markov model to project lifelong clinical outcomes. Quality of life and economic estimates were based on German patient data. We used a societal perspective and applied a 3% annual discount rate. Results: Compared with no antiviral therapy, peginterferon plus fixed or weight based dosing of ribavirin increased life expectancy by 4.2 and 4.7 years, respectively. Compared with standard interferon α-2b plus ribavirin, peginterferon plus fixed or weight based dosing of ribavirin increased life expectancy by 0.5 and by 1.0 years with incremental cost effectiveness ratios of €11 800 and €6600 per quality adjusted life year (QALY), respectively. Subgroup analyses by genotype, viral load, sex, and histology showed that peginterferon plus weight based ribavirin remained cost effective compared with other well accepted medical treatments. Conclusions: Peginterferon α-2b plus ribavirin should reduce the incidence of liver complications, prolong life, improve quality of life, and be cost effective for the initial treatment of chronic hepatitis C. PMID:12584228

  5. TEAMS: Toxicity- and Efficacy-based Dose Insertion Design with Adaptive Model Selection for Phase I/II Dose-Escalation Trials in Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Wentian; Ni, Yang; Ji, Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Summary In many oncology clinical trials it is necessary to insert new candidate doses when the prespecified doses are poorly elicited. Formal statistical designs with dose insertion are lacking. We propose a dose insertion design for phase I/II clinical trials in oncology based on both efficacy and toxicity outcomes. We also implement Bayesian model selection during the course of the trial so that better models can be adaptively chosen to achieve more accurate inference. The new design, TEAMS, achieves great operating characteristics in extensive simulation studies due to its ability to adaptively insert new doses as well as perform model selection. As a result, appropriate doses are inserted when necessary and desirable doses are selected with higher probabilities at the end of the trial. PMID:26528377

  6. Telecom 2-B and 2-C (TC2B and TC2C)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dulac, J.; Alvarez, H.

    1991-01-01

    The DSN (Deep Space Network) mission support requirements for Telecom 2-B and 2-C (TC2B and TC2C) are summarized. These Telecom missions will provide high-speed data link applications, telephone, and television service between France and overseas territories as a follow-on to TC2A. Mission objectives are outlined and the DSN support requirements are defined through the presentation of tables and narratives describing the spacecraft flight profile; DSN support coverage; frequency assignments; support parameters for telemetry, command and support systems; and tracking support responsibility.

  7. Phase 3 trial of defibrotide for the treatment of severe veno-occlusive disease and multi-organ failure

    PubMed Central

    Riches, Marcie L.; Kernan, Nancy A.; Brochstein, Joel A.; Mineishi, Shin; Termuhlen, Amanda M.; Arai, Sally; Grupp, Stephan A.; Guinan, Eva C.; Martin, Paul L.; Steinbach, Gideon; Krishnan, Amrita; Nemecek, Eneida R.; Giralt, Sergio; Rodriguez, Tulio; Duerst, Reggie; Doyle, John; Antin, Joseph H.; Smith, Angela; Lehmann, Leslie; Champlin, Richard; Gillio, Alfred; Bajwa, Rajinder; D’Agostino, Ralph B.; Massaro, Joseph; Warren, Diane; Miloslavsky, Maja; Hume, Robin L.; Iacobelli, Massimo; Nejadnik, Bijan; Hannah, Alison L.; Soiffer, Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    Hepatic veno-occlusive disease (VOD), also called sinusoidal obstruction syndrome (SOS), is a potentially life-threatening complication of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Untreated hepatic VOD/SOS with multi-organ failure (MOF) is associated with >80% mortality. Defibrotide has shown promising efficacy treating hepatic VOD/SOS with MOF in phase 2 studies. This phase 3 study investigated safety and efficacy of defibrotide in patients with established hepatic VOD/SOS and advanced MOF. Patients (n = 102) given defibrotide 25 mg/kg per day were compared with 32 historical controls identified out of 6867 medical charts of HSCT patients by blinded independent reviewers. Baseline characteristics between groups were well balanced. The primary endpoint was survival at day +100 post-HSCT; observed rates equaled 38.2% in the defibrotide group and 25% in the controls (23% estimated difference; 95.1% confidence interval [CI], 5.2-40.8; P = .0109, using a propensity-adjusted analysis). Observed day +100 complete response (CR) rates equaled 25.5% for defibrotide and 12.5% for controls (19% difference using similar methodology; 95.1% CI, 3.5-34.6; P = .0160). Defibrotide was generally well tolerated with manageable toxicity. Related adverse events (AEs) included hemorrhage or hypotension; incidence of common hemorrhagic AEs (including pulmonary alveolar [11.8% and 15.6%] and gastrointestinal bleeding [7.8% and 9.4%]) was similar between the defibrotide and control groups, respectively. Defibrotide was associated with significant improvement in day +100 survival and CR rate. The historical-control methodology offers a novel, meaningful approach for phase 3 evaluation of orphan diseases associated with high mortality. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT00358501. PMID:26825712

  8. Phase 3 trial of defibrotide for the treatment of severe veno-occlusive disease and multi-organ failure.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Paul G; Riches, Marcie L; Kernan, Nancy A; Brochstein, Joel A; Mineishi, Shin; Termuhlen, Amanda M; Arai, Sally; Grupp, Stephan A; Guinan, Eva C; Martin, Paul L; Steinbach, Gideon; Krishnan, Amrita; Nemecek, Eneida R; Giralt, Sergio; Rodriguez, Tulio; Duerst, Reggie; Doyle, John; Antin, Joseph H; Smith, Angela; Lehmann, Leslie; Champlin, Richard; Gillio, Alfred; Bajwa, Rajinder; D'Agostino, Ralph B; Massaro, Joseph; Warren, Diane; Miloslavsky, Maja; Hume, Robin L; Iacobelli, Massimo; Nejadnik, Bijan; Hannah, Alison L; Soiffer, Robert J

    2016-03-31

    Hepatic veno-occlusive disease (VOD), also called sinusoidal obstruction syndrome (SOS), is a potentially life-threatening complication of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Untreated hepatic VOD/SOS with multi-organ failure (MOF) is associated with >80% mortality. Defibrotide has shown promising efficacy treating hepatic VOD/SOS with MOF in phase 2 studies. This phase 3 study investigated safety and efficacy of defibrotide in patients with established hepatic VOD/SOS and advanced MOF. Patients (n = 102) given defibrotide 25 mg/kg per day were compared with 32 historical controls identified out of 6867 medical charts of HSCT patients by blinded independent reviewers. Baseline characteristics between groups were well balanced. The primary endpoint was survival at day +100 post-HSCT; observed rates equaled 38.2% in the defibrotide group and 25% in the controls (23% estimated difference; 95.1% confidence interval [CI], 5.2-40.8;P= .0109, using a propensity-adjusted analysis). Observed day +100 complete response (CR) rates equaled 25.5% for defibrotide and 12.5% for controls (19% difference using similar methodology; 95.1% CI, 3.5-34.6;P= .0160). Defibrotide was generally well tolerated with manageable toxicity. Related adverse events (AEs) included hemorrhage or hypotension; incidence of common hemorrhagic AEs (including pulmonary alveolar [11.8% and 15.6%] and gastrointestinal bleeding [7.8% and 9.4%]) was similar between the defibrotide and control groups, respectively. Defibrotide was associated with significant improvement in day +100 survival and CR rate. The historical-control methodology offers a novel, meaningful approach for phase 3 evaluation of orphan diseases associated with high mortality. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #.

  9. Phase I trial of a yeast-based therapeutic cancer vaccine (GI-6301) targeting the transcription factor brachyury

    PubMed Central

    Heery, Christopher R.; Singh, B. Harpreet; Rauckhorst, Myrna; Marté, Jennifer L.; Donahue, Renee N.; Grenga, Italia; Rodell, Timothy C.; Dahut, William; Arlen, Philip M.; Madan, Ravi A.; Schlom, Jeffrey; Gulley, James L.

    2015-01-01

    The nuclear transcription factor brachyury has previously been shown to be a strong mediator of the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in human carcinoma cells and a strong negative prognostic factor in several tumor types. Brachyury is overexpressed in a range of human carcinoma as well as in chordoma, a rare tumor for which there is no standard systemic therapy. Preclinical studies have shown a recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae (yeast) vaccine encoding brachyury (GI-6301) can activate human T cells in vitro. A Phase I dose escalation (3+3 design) trial enrolled 34 patients at 4 dose levels (3, 3, 16, and 11 patients, respectively, at 4, 16, 40, and 80 yeast units (YU)). Expansion cohorts were enrolled at 40 and 80 YU dose levels for analysis of immune response and clinical activity. We observed brachyury-specific T-cell immune responses in the majority of evaluable patients despite most having been heavily pretreated. No evidence of autoimmunity or other serious adverse events were observed. Two chordoma patients showed evidence of disease control (one mixed response and one partial response). A patient with colorectal carcinoma, who enrolled on study with a large progressing pelvic mass and rising CEA, remains on study for greater than 1 year with stable disease, evidence of decreased tumor density and decreased serum CEA. This study is the first-in-human to demonstrate the safety and immunogenicity of this therapeutic cancer vaccine and provides rationale for exploration in Phase II studies. A randomized Phase II chordoma study is enrolling. PMID:26130065

  10. Phase I/II Trial of Single Session Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Previously Un-irradiated Spinal Metastases

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Amit K.; Shiu, Almon S.; Yang, James; Wang, Xin-Shelley; Allen, Pamela; Brown, Barry W.; Grossman, Patricia; Frija, Erik K.; McAleer, Mary Frances; Azeem, Syed; Brown, Paul D.; Rhines, Laurence D.; Chang, Eric L.

    2013-01-01

    Background This Phase I/II study tests the hypothesis that single-fraction SBRT for previously un-irradiated spinal metastases is a safe, feasible, and efficacious treatment approach. Methods All patients were evaluated by a multidisciplinary team. Spinal MRI was performed before treatment and at regular intervals to both define target volume and response to treatment. SBRT was delivered to a peripheral dose of 16–24 Gy in 1 fraction while limiting dose to the spinal cord. Higher doses were used for renal cell histology. The NCI Common Toxicity Criteria 2.0 and McCormick neurological function score were used as toxicity assessment tools. Results A total of 61 patients harboring 63 tumors of the non-cervical spine were enrolled and treated with SBRT between 2005 and 2010 on a prospective Phase I/II trial at the University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center. Mean follow-up was 20 months. Actuarial 18-month imaging local control for all patients was 88%. Actuarial 18-month overall survival for all patients was 64%. Median survival for all patients was 30 months. No significant differences in outcomes were noted with respect to tumor histology and SBRT dose. Two patients experienced radiation adverse events (Grade 3 or higher). Actuarial 18-month freedom from neurologic deterioration from any cause as was 82%. Conclusions This Phase I/II data support an expanded indication for SBRT as first-line treatment of selected spinal metastases patients. Additional studies that can prospectively identify predictive factors for spinal cord toxicity after SBRT are warranted to minimize the incidence of this serious yet rare complication. PMID:22511344

  11. Phase I-II Trial of Cetuximab, Capecitabine, Oxaliplatin, and Radiotherapy as Preoperative Treatment in Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Roedel, Claus Arnold, Dirk; Hipp, Matthias; Liersch, Torsten; Dellas, Kathrin; Iesalnieks, Igors; Hermann, Robert Michael; Lordick, Florian; Hohenberger, Werner; Sauer, Rolf

    2008-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the safety and activity of preoperative radiotherapy (RT) with concurrent cetuximab, capecitabine, and oxaliplatin in rectal cancer patients. Patients and Methods: A total of 60 patients with rectal cancer (T3-T4 or N+, M1 allowed) entered the trial at five investigator sites; the data from 58 patients were assessable. Cetuximab was given as an initial dose of 400 mg/m{sup 2} 7 days before the start of RT, and then at 250 mg/m{sup 2} once weekly during RT (50.4 Gy in 28 fractions). Capecitabine and oxaliplatin were administered according to an established schedule of oxaliplatin (50 mg/m{sup 2} on Days 1, 8, 22, and 29) and capecitabine (Days 1-14 and 22-35) at three dose levels: 1,000, 1,300, and 1,650 mg/m{sup 2}/d during the Phase I part of the study. The main endpoint of the Phase II was the pathologic complete response rate. Results: Thirteen patients were included in the Phase I part of the study, and the maximal tolerated dose was not reached. Overall, 48 patients were treated at the recommended dose of capecitabine (1,650 mg/m{sup 2}) and 45 patients (94%) underwent surgery. A pathologic complete response was observed in 4 patients (9%), and moderate (n = 12), minimal (n = 10), and no tumor regression (n = 2) was noted in 24 (53%) of 45 patients. The mean radiation dose intensity, cetuximab, capecitabine, oxaliplatin was 98%, 95%, 94%, and 94%, respectively. The incidence of Grade 3-4 diarrhea was restricted to 19%. Postoperative complications of any grade occurred in 33% of patients. Conclusions: The results of our study have shown that cetuximab can be combined safely with capecitabine and oxaliplatin plus RT. The low pathologic complete response rate achieved should stimulate additional preclinical investigations to establish the best sequence of triple combinations.

  12. Phase II Study of Temsirolimus in Women With Recurrent or Metastatic Endometrial Cancer: A Trial of the NCIC Clinical Trials Group

    PubMed Central

    Oza, Amit M.; Elit, Laurie; Tsao, Ming-Sound; Kamel-Reid, Suzanne; Biagi, Jim; Provencher, Diane Michele; Gotlieb, Walter H.; Hoskins, Paul J.; Ghatage, Prafull; Tonkin, Katia S.; Mackay, Helen J.; Mazurka, John; Sederias, Joana; Ivy, Percy; Dancey, Janet E.; Eisenhauer, Elizabeth A.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) is a tumor suppressor gene, and loss of function mutations are common and appear to be important in the pathogenesis of endometrial carcinomas. Loss of PTEN causes deregulated phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase/serine-threonine kinase/mammalian target of rapamycin (PI3K/Akt/mTOR) signaling which may provide neoplastic cells with a selective survival advantage by enhancing angiogenesis, protein translation, and cell cycle progression. Temsirolimus, an ester derivative of rapamycin that inhibits mTOR, was evaluated in this setting. Patients and Methods Sequential phase II studies evaluated single-agent activity of temsirolimus in women with recurrent or metastatic chemotherapy-naive or chemotherapy-treated endometrial cancer. Temsirolimus 25 mg intravenously was administered weekly in 4-week cycles. Results In the chemotherapy-naive group, 33 patients received a median of four cycles (range, one to 23 cycles). Of the 29 patients evaluable for response, four (14%) had an independently confirmed partial response and 20 (69%) had stable disease as best response, with a median duration of 5.1 months (range, 3.7 to 18.4 months) and 9.7 months (range, 2.1 to 14.6 months). Only five patients (18%) had progressive disease. In the chemotherapy-treated group, 27 patients received a median of three cycles (range, one to six cycles). Of the 25 patients evaluable for response, one (4%) had an independently confirmed partial response, and 12 patients (48%) had stable disease, with a median duration of 4.3 months (range, 3.6 to 4.9 months) and 3.7 months (range, 2.4 to 23.2 months). PTEN loss (immunohistochemistry and mutational analysis) and molecular markers of PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway did not correlate with the clinical outcome. Conclusion mTOR inhibition with temsirolimus has encouraging single-agent activity in endometrial cancer which is higher in chemotherapy-naive patients than in chemotherapy-treated patients and is independent of PTEN

  13. Phase II clinical trials with time-to-event endpoints: optimal two-stage designs with one-sample log-rank test.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Minjung; Jung, Sin-Ho

    2014-05-30

    Phase II clinical trials are often conducted to determine whether a new treatment is sufficiently promising to warrant a major controlled clinical evaluation against a standard therapy. We consider single-arm phase II clinical trials with right censored survival time responses where the ordinary one-sample logrank test is commonly used for testing the treatment efficacy. For planning such clinical trials, this paper presents two-stage designs that are optimal in the sense that the expected sample size is minimized if the new regimen has low efficacy subject to constraints of the type I and type II errors. Two-stage designs, which minimize the maximal sample size, are also determined. Optimal and minimax designs for a range of design parameters are tabulated along with examples.

  14. Antimalarial efficacy of a quantified extract of Nauclea pobeguinii stem bark in human adult volunteers with diagnosed uncomplicated falciparum malaria. Part 1: a clinical phase IIA trial.

    PubMed

    Mesia, Kahunu; Tona, Lutete; Mampunza, Ma Miezi; Ntamabyaliro, Nsengi; Muanda, Tsobo; Muyembe, Tamfum; Cimanga, Kanyanga; Totté, Jozef; Mets, Tony; Pieters, Luc; Vlietinck, Arnold J

    2012-02-01

    The aim of this phase IIA clinical trial was to assess the efficacy of an 80 % ethanolic quantified extract (containing 5.6 % strictosamide as the putative active constituent) from Nauclea pobeguinii stem bark denoted as PR 259 CT1 in a small group of adult patients diagnosed with uncomplicated falciparum malaria. Results obtained from a phase I clinical trial on healthy male volunteers indicated that the oral administration during meals of two 500 mg capsules three times daily (each eight hours) during seven days was well tolerated and showed only mild and self-resolving adverse effects. This PR 259 CT1 drug regimen was obtained by mathematical conversion of animal doses obtained in several in vivo studies in mice to human equivalent doses as in falciparum malaria patients. The phase IIA study was an open cohort study in eleven appraisable adult patients suffering from proven Plasmodium falciparum malaria. The study was specifically designed to assess the efficacy of PR 259 CT1 administered with a dose regimen of two 500 mg capsules three times daily for three days, followed by outpatient treatment of one 500 mg capsule three times daily for the next four days, in order to prove that this therapeutic dose, which was calculated from animal doses, was effective to treat adult malaria patients and consequently useful for a future Phase IIB clinical trial. This study would then substitute a dose-escalating trial, which in general is used to find the appropriate dose for clinical studies. The phase IIA clinical trial was carried out according to the WHO 2003 14-day test, and the results revealed that all eleven patients were completely cleared of parasitemia and fever on days 3, 7, and 14 except for one patient, who experienced a recurrence of parasitemia at days 7 until 14. Besides this adequate clinical and parasitological response (ACPR), this trial also demonstrated that PR 259 CT1 was well tolerated with only mild and self-resolving adverse effects

  15. Feasibility of preoperative chemotherapy for locally advanced, operable colon cancer: the pilot phase of a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    FOxTROT Collaborative Group

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background Preoperative (neoadjuvant) chemotherapy and radiotherapy are more effective than similar postoperative treatment for oesophageal, gastric, and rectal cancers, perhaps because of more effective micrometastasis eradication and reduced risk of incomplete excision and tumour cell shedding during surgery. The FOxTROT trial aims to investigate the feasibility, safety, and efficacy of preoperative chemotherapy for colon cancer. Methods In the pilot stage of this randomised controlled trial, 150 patients with radiologically staged locally advanced (T3 with ≥5 mm invasion beyond the muscularis propria or T4) tumours from 35 UK centres were randomly assigned (2:1) to preoperative (three cycles of OxMdG [oxaliplatin 85 mg/m2, l-folinic acid 175 mg, fluorouracil 400 mg/m2 bolus, then 2400 mg/m2 by 46 h infusion] repeated at 2-weekly intervals followed by surgery and a further nine cycles of OxMdG) or standard postoperative chemotherapy (12 cycles of OxMdG). Patients with KRAS wild-type tumours were randomly assigned (1:1) to receive panitumumab (6 mg/kg; every 2 weeks with the first 6 weeks of chemotherapy) or not. Treatment allocation was through a central randomisation service using a minimised randomisation procedure including age, radiological T and N stage, site of tumour, and presence of defunctioning colostomy as stratification variables. Primary outcome measures of the pilot phase were feasibility, safety, and tolerance of preoperative therapy, and accuracy of radiological staging. Analysis was by intention to treat. This trial is registered, number ISRCTN 87163246. Findings 96% (95 of 99) of patients started and 89% (85 of 95) completed preoperative chemotherapy with grade 3–4 gastrointestinal toxicity in 7% (seven of 94) of patients. All 99 tumours in the preoperative group were resected, with no significant differences in postoperative morbidity between the preoperative and control groups: 14% (14 of 99) versus 12% (six of 51) had

  16. Metronomic cyclophosphamide therapy in hormone-naive patients with non-metastatic biochemical recurrent prostate cancer: a phase II trial.

    PubMed

    Calcagno, Fabien; Mouillet, Guillaume; Adotevi, Olivier; Maurina, Tristan; Nguyen, Thierry; Montcuquet, Philippe; Curtit, E; Kleinclauss, F; Pivot, Xavier; Borg, Christophe; Thiery-Vuillemin, Antoine

    2016-08-01

    After curative local therapy, biochemical recurrence is a mode of relapse among patient with prostate cancer (PC). Deferring androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) or offering non-hormonal therapies may be an appropriate option for these non-symptomatic patients with no proven metastases. Metronomic cyclophosphamide (MC) has shown activity in metastatic PC setting and was chosen to be assessed in biochemical relapse. This prospective single-arm open-label phase II study was conducted to evaluate MC regimen in patients with biochemical recurrent PC. MC was planned to be administered orally at a daily dose of 50 mg for 6 months. Primary endpoint was PSA response. Thirty-eight patients were included and treated. Median follow-up was 45.5 months (range 17-100). Among them, 14 patients (37 %) achieved PSA stabilisation and 22 patients (58 %) experienced PSA progression. Response rate was 5 % with one complete response (2.6 %), and 1 partial response with PSA decrease >50 % (2.6 %). The median time until androgen deprivation therapy initiation was around 15 months. The treatment was well tolerated. Neither grade 3-4 toxicity nor serious adverse events were observed. This first prospective clinical trial with MC therapy in patients with non-metastatic biochemical recurrence of PC displayed modest efficacy when measured with PSA response rate, without significant toxicity. It might offer a new safe and non-expensive option to delay initiation of ADT. These results would need to be confirmed with larger prospective randomised trials.

  17. Phase I Trial of Maintenance Sorafenib after Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation for FLT3-ITD AML

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yi-Bin; Li, Shuli; Lane, Andrew A.; Connolly, Christine; Del Rio, Candice; Valles, Betsy; Curtis, Morgan; Ballen, Karen; Cutler, Corey; Dey, Bimalangshu R.; El-Jawahri, Areej; Fathi, Amir T.; Ho, Vincent T.; Joyce, Amy; McAfee, Steven; Rudek, Michelle; Rajkhowa, Trivikram; Verselis, Sigitas; Antin, Joseph H.; Spitzer, Thomas R.; Levis, Mark; Soiffer, Robert

    2014-01-01

    The FLT3-ITD mutation is associated with a high relapse rate for patients with AML even after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Sorafenib is a tyrosine kinase inhibitor which inhibits the FLT3 tyrosine kinase and has shown encouraging activity in FLT3-ITD AML. We conducted a phase I trial of maintenance sorafenib after HSCT in patients with FLT3-ITD AML (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01398501). Patients received a variety of conditioning regimens and graft sources. A dose escalation 3+3 cohort design was used to define the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) with an additional 10 patients treated at the MTD. Sorafenib was initiated between days 45 and 120 after HSCT continued for twelve 28-day cycles. Twenty-two patients were enrolled (status at HSCT: CR1=16, CR2=3, refractory=3). The MTD was established at 400 mg BID with one DLT observed (pericardial effusion). Two patients died of transplant-related causes, both unrelated to sorafenib. Two patients stopped sorafenib after relapse and 5 stopped due to attributable toxicities after the DLT period. Median follow-up for surviving patients is 16.7 months after HSCT (range, 8.1–35.0). There was one case of grade II acute GVHD after starting sorafenib and the 12-month cumulative incidence of chronic GVHD was 38% (90% CI, 21%–56%). For all patients, one-year progression-free survival (PFS) is 85% (90% CI, 66%–94%) and one-year overall survival (OS) is 95% (90% CI, 79%–99%) after HSCT. For patients in CR1 / CR2 prior to HSCT (n=19), one-year PFS is 95% (90% CI, 76%–99%) and one-year OS is 100% with only one patient who has relapsed. Sorafenib is safe after HSCT for FLT3-ITD AML and merits further investigation for the prevention of relapse. PMID:25239228

  18. Responders vs clinical response: a critical analysis of data from linaclotide phase 3 clinical trials in IBS-C

    PubMed Central

    Lacy, B E; Lembo, A J; MacDougall, J E; Shiff, S J; Kurtz, C B; Currie, M G; Johnston, J M

    2014-01-01

    Background US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) set a rigorous standard for defining patient responders in irritable bowel syndrome-C (IBS-C; i.e., FDA's Responder Endpoint) for regulatory approval. However, this endpoint's utility for health-care practitioners to assess clinical response has not been determined. We analyzed pooled IBS-C linaclotide trial data to evaluate clinically significant responses in linaclotide-treated patients who did not meet the FDA responder definition. Methods Percentages of FDA non-responders reporting improvement in abdominal pain, bowel function and/or global relief measures were determined using pooled data from two linaclotide Phase 3 IBS-C trials. Key Results 1602 IBS-C patients enrolled; 34% of linaclotide-treated and 17% of placebo-treated patients met the FDA Responder Endpoint (p < 0.0001). Among FDA non-responders at week 12, 63% of linaclotide-treated patients reported their abdominal pain was at least somewhat relieved, compared with 48% of placebo-treated patients. For stool frequency, 62% of linaclotide-treated patients reported that they were at least somewhat improved at week 12, compared with 46% of placebo-treated patients. For global IBS symptoms, 65% of linaclotide-treated patients reported at least some IBS-symptom relief, 43% reported adequate relief of IBS symptoms, and 57% reported being satisfied with linaclotide treatment, vs placebo rates of 48%, 34%, and 41% respectively. Conclusions & Inferences Most linaclotide-treated IBS-C patients who were FDA non-responders reported some improvement in abdominal pain and stool frequency, and global relief/satisfaction. In addition to the FDA Responder Endpoint, differing response thresholds and symptom-specific change from baseline should be considered by clinicians for a complete understanding of clinical response to linaclotide and other IBS-C therapies. PMID:24382134

  19. Phase II trial of nanoparticle albumin-bound paclitaxel as second-line chemotherapy for unresectable or recurrent gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sasaki, Yasutsuna; Nishina, Tomohiro; Yasui, Hirofumi; Goto, Masahiro; Muro, Kei; Tsuji, Akihito; Koizumi, Wasaburo; Toh, Yasushi; Hara, Takuo; Miyata, Yoshinori

    2014-01-01

    This multicenter phase II study first investigated the efficacy and safety of nanoparticle albumin-bound paclitaxel (nab-paclitaxel) when given every 3 weeks to patients with unresectable or recurrent gastric cancer who had received a prior round of fluoropyrimidine-containing chemotherapy. Patients with unresectable or recurrent gastric cancer who experienced progression despite fluoropyrimidine-containing treatment were studied. Nab-paclitaxel was given i.v. at 260 mg/m2 on day 1 of each 21-day cycle without anti-allergic premedication until disease progression or study discontinuation. The primary endpoint was the overall response rate. The secondary endpoints were the disease control rate, progression-free survival, overall survival, and safety. From April 2008 to July 2010, 56 patients were enrolled, 55 patients received the study treatment, and 54 patients were evaluable for responses. According to an independent review committee, the overall response rate was 27.8% (15/54; 95% confidence interval [CI], 16.5–41.6) and the disease control rate was 59.3% (32/54; 95% CI, 45.0–72.4). One patient had a complete response. The median progression-free survival and overall survival were 2.9 months (95% CI, 2.4–3.6) and 9.2 months (95% CI, 6.9–11.4), respectively. The most common grade 3/4 toxicities were neutropenia (49.1%), leucopenia (20.0%), lymphopenia (10.9%), and peripheral sensory neuropathy (23.6%). There were no treatment-related deaths. Nab-paclitaxel, given every 3 weeks, showed promising activity against previously treated unresectable or recurrent gastric cancers, with well-tolerated toxicities. (Trial registration, ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00661167). PMID:24716542

  20. Readability and Content Assessment of Informed Consent Forms for Phase II-IV Clinical Trials in China

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Gaiyan; Liu, Xinchun; Huang, Lihua; Shu, Jingxian; Xu, Nana; Chen, Ruifang; Huang, Zhijun; Yang, Guoping; Wang, Xiaomin; Xiang, Yuxia; Lu, Yao; Yuan, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To explore the readability and content integrity of informed consent forms (ICFs) used in China and to compare the quality of Chinese local ICFs with that of international ICFs. Methods The length, readability and content of 155 consent documents from phase II-IV drug clinical trials from the Third Xiangya Hospital Ethics Committee from November 2009 to January 2015 were evaluated. Reading difficulty was tested using a readability formula adapted for the Chinese language. An ICF checklist containing 27 required elements was successfully constructed to evaluate content integrity. The description of alternatives to participation was assessed. The quality of ICFs from different sponsorships were also compared. Results Among the 155 evaluable trials, the ICFs had a median length of 5286 words, corresponding to 7 pages. The median readability score was 4.31 (4.02–4.41), with 63.9% at the 2nd level and 36.1% at the 3rd level. Five of the 27 elements were frequently neglected. The average score for the description of alternatives to participation was 1.06, and 27.7% of the ICFs did not mention any alternatives. Compared with Chinese local ICFs, international ICFs were longer, more readable and contained more of the required elements (P < 0.05). Conclusion The ICFs used in China were difficult to read for most participants. These forms had poor description of alternatives to participation, and failed to provide a high degree of information disclosure, including an explanation of informed consent, follow-up processing of the data/sample, inclusion/exclusion criteria, double blinding, and unpredictable risks. International ICFs had better readability and content integrity than Chinese local ICFs. More efforts should thus be made to improve the quality of consent documents in China. PMID:27701471

  1. PREVENTION OF CONVERSION TO ABNORMAL TCD WITH HYDROXYUREA IN SICKLE CELL ANEMIA: A PHASE III INTERNATIONAL RANDOMIZED CLINICAL TRIAL

    PubMed Central

    Hankins, Jane S.; McCarville, M. Beth; Rankine-Mullings, Angela; Reid, Marvin E.; Lobo, Clarisse L.C.; Moura, Patricia G.; Ali, Susanna; Soares, Deanne; Aldred, Karen; Jay, Dennis W.; Aygun, Banu; Bennett, John; Kang, Guolian; Goldsmith, Jonathan C.; Smeltzer, Matthew P.; Boyett, James M.; Ware, Russell E.

    2015-01-01

    Children with sickle cell anemia (SCA) and conditional transcranial Doppler (TCD) ultrasound velocities (170-199 cm/sec) may develop stroke. However, with limited available clinical data, the current standard of care for conditional TCD velocities is observation. The efficacy of hydroxyurea in preventing conversion from conditional to abnormal TCD (≥200 cm/sec), which confers a higher stroke risk, has not been studied prospectively in a randomized trial. Sparing Conversion to Abnormal TCD Elevation (SCATE #NCT01531387) was an NHLBI-funded Phase III multicenter international clinical trial comparing alternative therapy (hydroxyurea) to standard care (observation) to prevent conversion from conditional to abnormal TCD velocity in children with SCA. SCATE enrolled 38 children from the United States, Jamaica, and Brazil [HbSS (36), HbSβ0-thalassemia (1), and HbSD (1), median age 5.4 years (range, 2.7-9.8)]. Due to slow patient accrual and administrative delays, SCATE was terminated early. In an intention-to-treat analysis, the cumulative incidence of abnormal conversion was 9% (95% CI 0 to 35%) in the hydroxyurea arm and 47% (95% CI 6 to 81%) in observation arm at 15 months (p=0.16). In post-hoc analysis according to treatment received, significantly fewer children on hydroxyurea converted to abnormal TCD velocities, compared to observation (0% versus 50%, p=0.02). After a mean of 10.1 months, a significant change in mean TCD velocity was observed with hydroxyurea treatment (−15.5 versus +10.2 cm/sec, p=0.02). No stroke events occurred in either arm. Hydroxyurea reduces TCD velocities in children with SCA and conditional velocities. PMID:26414435

  2. Phase I-II clinical trial of hyaluronan-cisplatin nanoconjugate in dogs with naturally occurring malignant tumors.

    PubMed

    Cai, Shuang; Zhang, Ti; Forrest, W C; Yang, Qiuhong; Groer, Chad; Mohr, Eva; Aires, Daniel J; Axiak-Bechtel, Sandra M; Flesner, Brian K; Henry, Carolyn J; Selting, Kimberly A; Tate, Deborah; Swarz, Jeffrey A; Bryan, Jeffrey N; Forrest, M Laird

    2016-09-01

    OBJECTIVE To conduct a phase I-II clinical trial of hyaluronan-cisplatin nanoconjugate (HA-Pt) in dogs with naturally occurring malignant tumors. ANIMALS 18 healthy rats, 9 healthy mice, and 16 dogs with cancer. PROCEDURES HA-Pt was prepared and tested by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry; DNA-platinum adduct formation and antiproliferation effects of cisplatin and HA-Pt were compared in vitro. Effects of cisplatin (IV) and HA-Pt (SC) in rodents were tested by clinicopathologic assays. In the clinical trial, dogs with cancer received 1 to 4 injections of HA-Pt (10 to 30 mg/m(2), intratumoral or peritumoral, q 3 wk). Blood samples were collected for pharmacokinetic analysis; CBC, serum BUN and creatinine concentration measurement, and urinalysis were conducted before and 1 week after each treatment. Some dogs underwent hepatic enzyme testing. Tumors were measured before the first treatment and 3 weeks after each treatment to assess response. RESULTS No adverse drug effects were detected in pretrial assessments in rodents. Seven of 16 dogs completed the study; 3 had complete tumor responses, 3 had stable disease, and 1 had progressive disease. Three of 7 dogs with oral and nasal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) that completed the study had complete responses. Myelosuppression and cardiotoxicosis were identified in 6 and 2 dogs, respectively; none had nephrotoxicosis. Four of 5 dogs with hepatic enzymes assessed had increased ALT activities, attributed to diaquated cisplatin products in the HA-Pt. Pharmacokinetic data fit a 3-compartment model. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE HA-Pt treatment resulted in positive tumor responses in some dogs, primarily those with SCC. The adverse effect rate was high. IMPACT FOR HUMAN MEDICINE Oral SCC in dogs has characteristics similar to human head and neck SCC; these results could be useful in developing human treatments.

  3. Phase I trial of an implanted battery-powered, programmable drug delivery system for continuous doxorubicin administration.

    PubMed

    Vogelzang, N J; Ruane, M; DeMeester, T R

    1985-03-01

    A second generation, implantable drug administration device (DAD, Medtronic, Inc, Minneapolis) which contains a 20-mL drug reservoir, a lithium-thionyl-chloride battery, a peristaltic roller pump, a microprocessor circuit, and an acoustic transducer has entered clinical trials. After surgical placement, drug is entered into and removed from the DAD percutaneously through a Silastic "fill port" using a standard gauge needle and syringe. The pump is noninvasively programmed using a hand-held telemetry wand to administer the drug in a continuous infusion, bolus, or bolus-delay mode. Because of the apparent improved therapeutic index of continuous-infusion doxorubicin (CID), a phase I trial of the Medtronic DAD with CID was begun. Thirteen pumps in 13 patients have functioned for a median of 153 days (range, 11 to 395 days) with one pump still functioning. Four pumps ceased function at 170, 278, 331, and 370 days, respectively; there was a catheter-tip clot on one of the pumps that later malfunctioned. All other pumps functioned until the death of the respective patients. In 84 pump refills, without drug extravasation, the median drug delivery error (actual residual volume--calculated residual volume/calculated residual volume X 100%) was 14%. Doxorubicin was compatible with all components of the drug pathway and did not significantly decompose during two weeks in the drug reservoir. The starting dose of CID was 2.0 mg/m2/d and the maximum tolerated dose was 4.1 mg/m2/d (range, 3.5 to 5.5). A median cumulative doxorubicin dose of 244 mg/m2 per patient (range, 10 to 583 mg/m2) has been infused.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  4. Prevention of conversion to abnormal transcranial Doppler with hydroxyurea in sickle cell anemia: A Phase III international randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Hankins, Jane S; McCarville, Mary Beth; Rankine-Mullings, Angela; Reid, Marvin E; Lobo, Clarisse L C; Moura, Patricia G; Ali, Susanna; Soares, Deanne P; Aldred, Karen; Jay, Dennis W; Aygun, Banu; Bennett, John; Kang, Guolian; Goldsmith, Jonathan C; Smeltzer, Matthew P; Boyett, James M; Ware, Russell E

    2015-12-01

    Children with sickle cell anemia (SCA) and conditional transcranial Doppler (TCD) ultrasound velocities (170-199 cm/sec) may develop stroke. However, with limited available clinical data, the current standard of care for conditional TCD velocities is observation. The efficacy of hydroxyurea in preventing conversion from conditional to abnormal TCD (≥200 cm/sec), which confers a higher stroke risk, has not been studied prospectively in a randomized trial. Sparing Conversion to Abnormal TCD Elevation (SCATE #NCT01531387) was a National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute-funded Phase III multicenter international clinical trial comparing alternative therapy (hydroxyurea) to standard care (observation) to prevent conversion from conditional to abnormal TCD velocity in children with SCA. SCATE enrolled 38 children from the United States, Jamaica, and Brazil [HbSS (36), HbSβ(0) -thalassemia (1), and HbSD (1), median age = 5.4 years (range, 2.7-9.8)]. Because of the slow patient accrual and administrative delays, SCATE was terminated early. In an intention-to-treat analysis, the cumulative incidence of abnormal conversion was 9% (95% CI = 0-35%) in the hydroxyurea arm and 47% (95% CI = 6-81%) in observation arm at 15 months (P = 0.16). In post hoc analysis according to treatment received, significantly fewer children on hydroxyurea converted to abnormal TCD velocities when compared with observation (0% vs. 50%, P = 0.02). After a mean of 10.1 months, a significant change in mean TCD velocity was observed with hydroxyurea treatment (-15.5 vs. +10.2 cm/sec, P = 0.02). No stroke events occurred in either arm. Hydroxyurea reduces TCD velocities in children with SCA and conditional velocities.

  5. Susceptibility of Clostridium difficile isolates from a Phase 2 clinical trial of cadazolid and vancomycin in C. difficile infection

    PubMed Central

    Gerding, D. N.; Hecht, D. W.; Louie, T.; Nord, C. E.; Talbot, G. H.; Cornely, O. A.; Buitrago, M.; Best, E.; Sambol, S.; Osmolski, J. R.; Kracker, H.; Locher, H. H.; Charef, P.; Wilcox, M.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the susceptibilities of Clostridium difficile isolates to cadazolid, a novel antibiotic for the treatment of C. difficile infection. Methods Ribotyping and susceptibilities were determined for C. difficile isolates from a multicentre, double-blind, Phase 2 study of oral cadazolid in patients with C. difficile infection (NCT01222702, ClinicalTrials.gov; EudraCT 2010-020941-29, European Clinical Trials Database). Patients were randomized to receive 250, 500 or 1000 mg of cadazolid twice daily or 125 mg of vancomycin four times daily, for 10 days. MICs of cadazolid, vancomycin, fidaxomicin, linezolid and moxifloxacin were determined at baseline for all patients and post-baseline for patients with clinical failure or recurrence, using the agar dilution method. Results Seventy-eight of 84 patients had an evaluable toxigenic C. difficile isolate at baseline. The most frequent PCR ribotype was 027 (15.4%). Cadazolid MICs for baseline isolates (including epidemic strain 027) ranged from 0.06 to 0.25 mg/L. Baseline cadazolid MICs were similar to those of fidaxomicin and lower than those of vancomycin, linezolid and moxifloxacin. For each clinical outcome group (clinical cure, clinical failure, sustained clinical response and clinical failure or recurrence), the baseline cadazolid MIC range was 0.06–0.25 mg/L. Mean (min–max) cadazolid faecal concentration (μg/g) on day 5 was 884 (101–2710), 1706 (204–4230) and 3226 (1481–12 600) for the doses 250, 500 and 1000 mg, respectively. Conclusions For all cadazolid doses, the faecal concentration was in excess of several thousand-fold the MIC90 for C. difficile. The MIC of cadazolid for all C. difficile isolates, including epidemic strains, was low and in the same narrow range regardless of treatment outcome. PMID:26433782

  6. Predictors of post-treatment relapse to smoking in successful quitters: Pooled data from two phase III varenicline trials

    PubMed Central

    Heffner, Jaimee L.; Lee, Theodore C.; Arteaga, Carmen; Anthenelli, Robert M.

    2010-01-01

    Background Identifying predictors of smoking relapse helps to elucidate the challenges of long-term smoking cessation and provides direction for improved treatment development. Methods In this post hoc data analysis, we examined predictors of relapse from end-of-treatment (week 13) through 1-year follow-up (week 52) for treatment-responding participants who achieved the primary efficacy endpoint of 4-week continuous abstinence (weeks 9–12), during two phase III varenicline trials. Results Of 626 smokers classified as treatment responders for all treatment groups across both trials, 301 (48%) relapsed during follow-up (weeks 13–52). The odds of relapsing were almost 5 times greater (odds ratio [OR]=4.92, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 2.77–8.97; p<.001) for treatment responders who did not initiate continuous abstinence until the final 4 weeks of the treatment period compared with those who initiated continuous abstinence by their quit date. Participants who reported >30 days of abstinence during the year prior to study entry were significantly more likely to relapse than those who reported 0 days of abstinence (OR=2.38, 95% CI: 1.17–5.04; p=.013). Conclusion Results of these analyses suggest that the ability to quit smoking on the initial quit date and maintain abstinence throughout the treatment period is a good prognostic indicator for long-term abstinence. The relationship between post-treatment relapse and longer pretreatment periods of abstinence is counterintuitive, yet not without precedence in the literature. PMID:20071105

  7. A phase I clinical trial of bavituximab and paclitaxel in patients with HER2 negative metastatic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Chalasani, Pavani; Marron, Marilyn; Roe, Denise; Clarke, Kathryn; Iannone, Maria; Livingston, Robert B; Shan, Joseph S; Stopeck, Alison T

    2015-07-01

    Bavituximab is a chimeric monoclonal antibody that targets phosphatidylserine (PS). PS is externalized on cells in the tumor microenvironment when exposed to hypoxia and/or other physiological stressors. On attaching to PS, bavituximab is thought to promote antitumor immunity through its effects on PS receptors in monocytes, and myeloid-derived suppressor cells, as well as trigger antitumor effects by inducing an antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity on tumor-associated endothelial cells. We conducted a phase I clinical trial of bavituximab in combination with paclitaxel in patients with HER2-negative metastatic breast cancer. Patients were treated with weekly paclitaxel (80 mg/m(2) for 3/4 weeks) and weekly bavituximab (3 mg/kg for 4/4 weeks). Correlative studies included the measurement of circulating microparticles, endothelial cells, and apoptotic tumor cells by flow cytometry. Fourteen patients with metastatic breast cancer were enrolled; all were evaluable for toxicity and 13 were evaluable for response. Treatment resulted in an overall response rate (RR) of 85% with a median progression-free survival (PFS) of 7.3 months. Bone pain, fatigue, headache, and neutropenia were the most common adverse effects. Infusion-related reactions were the most common adverse event related to bavituximab therapy. Correlative studies showed an increase in the PS-expressing apoptotic circulating tumor cells in response to bavituximab, but not with paclitaxel. No changes in the number of circulating endothelial cells or apoptotic endothelial cells were observed with therapy. Platelet and monocyte-derived microparticles decreased after initiation of bavituximab. Bavituximab in combination with paclitaxel is well tolerated for treatment of patients with metastatic breast cancer with promising results observed in terms of clinical RRs and PFS. The toxicity profile of bavituximab is notable for manageable infusion-related reactions with no evidence for increased

  8. Phase I trial of motexafin-lutetium-mediated interstitial photodynamic therapy in patients with locally recurrent prostate cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stripp, Diana C. H.; Mick, Rosemarie; Zhu, Timothy C.; Whittington, Richard; Smith, Debbie; Dimofte, Andreea; Finlay, Jarod C.; Miles, Jeremy; Busch, Theresa M.; Shin, Daniel; Kachur, Alex; Tochner, Zelig A.; Malkowicz, S. Bruce; Glatstein, Eli; Hahn, Stephen M.

    2004-06-01

    Therapeutic options for patients with locally recurrent prostate cancer after treatment with radiation therapy are limited. An ongoing Phase I trial of interstitial photodynamic therapy (PDT) with the photosensitizer motexafin lutetium (MLu) was initiated in year 2000 for men with locally recurrent prostate cancer. The primary objective of this trial is to determine the maximally tolerated dose of motexafin lutetium-mediated PDT. Twelve men with biopsy-proven recurrent prostate cancer and no evidence of distant metastatic disease have been enrolled. Pre-treatment evaluation included an MRI of the prostate, bone scan, laboratory studies, cystoscopy, and transrectal ultrasound. Treatment plans were generated based upon the ultrasound findings. PDT dose was escalated by increasing the motexafin lutetium dose, increasing the 732 nm light dose, and decreasing the drug-light interval. Motexafin lutetium doses ranged from 0.5 to 2 mg/kg administered IV 3, 6, or 24 hours prior to 732 nm light delivery. The light dose measured in real time with in situ spherical detectors was 25-100 J/cm2 for all patients. Light was delivered through optical fibers inserted through a transperineal brachytherapy template in the operating room and optical property measurements were made before and after light therapy. Prostate biopsies were obtained before and after light delivery for spectrofluorometric measurements of photosensitizer uptake. Twelve patients have completed protocol treatment on eight dose levels without dose-limiting toxicity. Grade I PDT-related genitourinary symptoms were observed. One patient had Grade II urinary urgency that was urinary catheter-related. No rectal or other GI PDT-related toxicities were observed. Measurements of motexafin lutetium in prostate tissue demonstrated the presence of photosensitizer at all dose levels. Conclusions: Motexafin lutetium-mediated PDT designed to treat comprehensively the entired prostate gland has been well-tolerated at the doses

  9. Phase III randomized trial of sunitinib versus capecitabine in patients with previously treated HER2-negative advanced breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Mei-Ching; Lee, Soo Chin; Vanlemmens, Laurence; Ferrero, Jean-Marc; Tabei, Toshio; Pivot, Xavier; Iwata, Hiroji; Aogi, Kenjiro; Lugo-Quintana, Roberto; Harbeck, Nadia; Brickman, Marla J.; Zhang, Ke; Kern, Kenneth A.; Martin, Miguel

    2010-01-01

    This multicenter, randomized, open-label phase III trial (planned enrollment: 700 patients) was conducted to test the hypothesis that single-agent sunitinib improves progression-free survival (PFS) compared with capecitabine as treatment for advanced breast cancer (ABC). Patients with HER2-negative ABC that recurred after anthracycline and taxane therapy were randomized (1:1) to sunitinib 37.5 mg/day or capecitabine 1,250 mg/m2 (1,000 mg/m2 in patients >65 years) BID on days 1–14 q3w. The independent data-monitoring committee (DMC) determined during the first interim analysis (238 patients randomized to sunitinib, 244 to capecitabine) that the trial be terminated due to futility in reaching the primary endpoint. No statistical evidence supported the hypothesis that sunitinib improved PFS compared with capecitabine (one-sided P = 0.999). The data indicated that PFS was shorter with sunitinib than capecitabine (median 2.8 vs. 4.2 months, respectively; HR, 1.47; 95% CI, 1.16–1.87; two-sided P = 0.002). Median overall survival (15.3 vs. 24.6 months; HR, 1.17; two-sided P = 0.350) and objective response rates (11 vs. 16%; odds ratio, 0.65; P = 0.109) were numerically inferior with sunitinib versus capecitabine. While no new or unexpected safety findings were reported, sunitinib treatment was associated with higher frequencies and greater severities of many common adverse events (AEs) compared with capecitabine, resulting in more temporary discontinuations due to AEs with sunitinib (66 vs. 51%). The relative dose intensity was lower with sunitinib than capecitabine (73 vs. 95%). Based on these efficacy and safety results, sunitinib should not be used as monotherapy for patients with ABC. PMID:20339913

  10. A phase II trial of accelerated radiotherapy using weekly stereotactic conformal boost for supratentorial glioblastoma multiforme: RTOG 0023

    SciTech Connect

    Cardinale, Robert; Choucair, Ali; Gillin, Michael; Chakravarti, Arnab; Schultz, Christopher; Souhami, Luis; Chen, Allan; Pham, Huong; Mehta, Minesh

    2006-08-01

    Purpose: This phase II trial was performed to assess the feasibility, toxicity, and efficacy of dose-intense accelerated radiation therapy using weekly fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT) boost for patients with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). Methods and Materials: Patients with histologically confirmed GBM with postoperative enhancing tumor plus tumor cavity diameter <60 mm were enrolled. A 50-Gy dose of standard radiation therapy (RT) was given in daily 2-Gy fractions. In addition, patients received four FSRT treatments, once weekly, during Weeks 3 to 6. FSRT dosing of either 5 Gy or 7 Gy per fraction was given for a cumulative dose of 70 or 78 Gy in 29 (25 standard RT + 4 FSRT) treatments over 6 weeks. After the RT course, carmustine (BCNU) at 80 mg/m{sup 2} was given for 3 days, every 8 weeks, for 6 cycles. Results: A total of 76 patients were analyzed. Toxicity included: 3 Grade 4 chemotherapy, 3 acute Grade 4 radiotherapy, and 1 Grade 3 late. The median survival time was 12.5 months. No survival difference is seen when compared with the RTOG historical database. Patients with gross total resection (41%) had a median survival time of 16.6 months vs. 12.0 months for historic controls with gross total resection (p = 0.14). Conclusion: This first, multi-institutional FSRT boost trial for GBM was feasible and well tolerated. There is no significant survival benefit using this dose-intense RT regimen. Subset analysis revealed a trend toward improved outcome for GTR patients suggesting that patients with minimal disease burden may benefit from this form of accelerated RT.

  11. Phase II Prospective Randomized Trial of a Low-Fat Diet with Fish Oil Supplementation in Men Undergoing Radical Prostatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Aronson, William J.; Kobayashi, Naoko; Barnard, R. James; Henning, Susanne; Jardack, Patricia M.; Liu, Bingrong; Gray, Ashley; Wan, Junxiang; Konijeti, Ramdev; Freedland, Stephen J.; Castor, Brandon; Heber, David; Elashoff, David; Said, Jonathan; Cohen, Pinchas; Galet, Colette

    2011-01-01

    Preclinical studies suggest lowering dietary fat and decreasing the ratio of omega-6 to omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids decreases the risk of prostate cancer development and progression. We conducted a phase II randomized trial to test the effect of decreasing dietary fat combined with decreasing the dietary omega-6:omega-3 ratio on biomarkers related to prostate cancer development and progression. Patients undergoing radical prostatectomy were randomly assigned to receive a low-fat diet with 5 grams of fish oil daily (dietary omega-6:omega-3 ratio of 2:1) or a control western diet (omega-6:omega-3 ratio of 15:1) for 4–6 weeks prior to surgery. The primary endpoint was change in serum IGF-1 between arms. Secondary endpoints were serum IGFBP-1, prostate prostaglandin E-2 levels, omega-6:omega-3 fatty acid ratios, COX-2 and markers of proliferation and apoptosis. Fifty-five patients were randomized and 48 completed the trial. There was no treatment difference in the primary outcome. Positive secondary outcomes in the low-fat fish oil vs. western group were reduced benign and malignant prostate tissue omega-6:omega-3 ratios, reduced proliferation (Ki67 index), and reduced proliferation in an ex-vivo bioassay when patient sera was applied to prostate cancer cells in vitro. In summary, 4–6 weeks of a low-fat diet and fish oil capsules to achieve an omega-6:omega-3 fatty acid ratio of 2:1 had no effect on serum IGF-1 levels, though in secondary analyses the intervention resulted in decreased prostate cancer proliferation and decreased prostate tissue omega-6:omega-3 ratios. These results support further studies evaluating reduction of dietary fat with fish oil supplementation on modulating prostate cancer biology. PMID:22027686

  12. Phase I Trial Using Patupilone (Epothilone B) and Concurrent Radiotherapy for Central Nervous System Malignancies

    SciTech Connect

    Fogh, Shannon; Machtay, Mitchell; Werner-Wasik, Maria; Curran, Walter J.; Bonanni, Roseann; Axelrod, Rita; Andrews, David; Dicker, Adam P.

    2010-07-15

    Purpose: Based on preclinical data indicating the radiosensitizing potential of epothilone B, the present study was designed to evaluate the toxicity and response rate of patupilone, an epothilone B, with concurrent radiotherapy (RT) for the treatment of central nervous system malignancies. Methods and Materials: The present Phase I study evaluated the toxicities associated with patupilone combined with RT to establish the maximal tolerated dose. Eligible patients had recurrent gliomas (n = 10) primary (n = 5) or metastatic (n = 17) brain tumors. Dose escalation occurred if no dose-limiting toxicities, defined as any Grade 4-5 toxicity or Grade 3 toxicity requiring hospitalization, occurred during treatment. Results: Of 14 patients, 5 were treated with weekly patupilone at 1.5 mg/m{sup 2}, 4 at 2.0 mg/m{sup 2}, 4 at 2.5 mg/m{sup 2}, and 1 at 4 mg/m{sup 2}. Of 18 patients, 7 were treated in the 6-mg/m{sup 2} group, 6 in the 8-mg/m{sup 2} group, and 5 in the 10-mg/m{sup 2} group. Primary central nervous system malignancies received RT to a median dose of 60 Gy. Central nervous system metastases received whole brain RT to a median dose of 37.4 Gy, and patients with recurrent gliomas underwent stereotactic RT to a median dose of 37.5 Gy. One dose-limiting toxicity (pneumonia) was observed in group receiving 8-mg/m{sup 2} every 3 weeks. At the subsequent dose level (10 mg/m{sup 2}), two Grade 4 dose-limiting toxicities occurred (renal failure and pulmonary hemorrhage); thus, 8 mg/m{sup 2} every 3 weeks was the maximal tolerated dose and the recommended Phase II dose. Conclusion: Combined with a variety of radiation doses and fractionation schedules, concurrent patupilone was well tolerated and safe, with a maximal tolerated dose of 8 mg/m{sup 2} every 3 weeks.

  13. Holmium-166 radioembolization for the treatment of patients with liver metastases: design of the phase I HEPAR trial

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Intra-arterial radioembolization with yttrium-90 microspheres ( 90Y-RE) is an increasingly used therapy for patients with unresectable liver malignancies. Over the last decade, radioactive holmium-166 poly(L-lactic acid) microspheres ( 166Ho-PLLA-MS) have been developed as a possible alternative to 90Y-RE. Next to high-energy beta-radiation, 166Ho also emits gamma-radiation, which allows for imaging by gamma scintigraphy. In addition, Ho is a highly paramagnetic element and can therefore be visualized by MRI. These imaging modalities are useful for assessment of the biodistribution, and allow dosimetry through quantitative analysis of the scintigraphic and MR images. Previous studies have demonstrated the safety of 166Ho-PLLA-MS radioembolization ( 166Ho-RE) in animals. The aim of this phase I trial is to assess the safety and toxicity profile of 166Ho-RE in patients with liver metastases. Methods The HEPAR study (Holmium Embolization Particles for Arterial Radiotherapy) is a non-randomized, open label, safety study. We aim to include 15 to 24 patients with liver metastases of any origin, who have chemotherapy-refractory disease and who are not amenable to surgical resection. Prior to treatment, in addition to the standard technetium-99m labelled macroaggregated albumin ( 99mTc-MAA) dose, a low radioactive safety dose of 60-mg 166Ho-PLLA-MS will be administered. Patients are treated in 4 cohorts of 3-6 patients, according to a standard dose escalation protocol (20 Gy, 40 Gy, 60 Gy, and 80 Gy, respectively). The primary objective will be to establish the maximum tolerated radiation dose of 166Ho-PLLA-MS. Secondary objectives are to assess tumour response, biodistribution, performance status, quality of life, and to compare the 166Ho-PLLA-MS safety dose and the 99mTc-MAA dose distributions with respect to the ability to accurately predict microsphere distribution. Discussion This will be the first clinical study on 166Ho-RE. Based on preclinical studies

  14. A wet dressing for male genital surgery: A phase II clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Vilar, Fábio de Oliveira; Pinto, Flávia Cristina Morone; Albuquerque, Amanda Vasconcelos; Martins, Ana Gabriela Santos; de Araújo, Luiz Alberto Pereira; Aguiar, José Lamartine de Andrade; Lima, Salvador Vilar Correia

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: This study was to confirm the safety and efficacy of BC dressing when used in surgical male wound healing at the urogenital area. Methods: Open, non-controlled clinical study of phase II. A total of 141 patients, among those children, adolescents and adults with hypospadias (112), epispadias (04), phymosis (13) and Peyronie's disease (12) that had a BC dressing applied over the operated area after surgery. A written informed consent was obtained from all participants. Study exclusion criteria were patients with other alternative treatment indications due to the severity, extent of the injury or the underlying disease. The outcomes evaluated were efficacy, safe and complete healing. The costs were discussed. Results: In 68% patients, the BC dressing fell off spontaneously. The BC was removed without complications in 13% of patients at the outpatient clinic during the follow-up visit and 17% not reported the time of removal. In 3% of the cases, the dressing fell off early. Complete healing was observed between 8th and 10th days after surgery. The BC dressings have shown a good tolerance by all the patients and there were no reports of serious adverse events. Conclusion: The bacterial cellulose dressings have shown efficacy, safety and that can be considered as a satisfactory alternative for postoperative wound healing in urogenital area and with low cost. PMID:27649111

  15. AB-180 circulatory support system: summary of development and phase I clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Griffin, W P; Savage, E B; Clark, R E;