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Sample records for phase evolution originating

  1. The Early Phases of Genetic Code Origin: Conjectures on the Evolution of Coded Catalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Giulio, Massimo

    2003-10-01

    A review of the most significant contributions on the early phases of genetic code origin is presented. After stressing the importance of the key intermediary role played in protein synthesis, by peptidyl-tRNA, which is attributed with a primary function in ancestral catalysis, the general lines leading to the codification of the first amino acids in the genetic code are discussed. This is achieved by means of a model of protoribosome evolution which sees protoribosome as the central organiser of ancestral biosynthesis and the mediator of the encounter between compounds (metabolite-pre-tRNAs) and catalysts (peptidyl-pre-tRNAs). The encounter between peptidyl-pre-tRNA catalysts in protoribosome is favoured by metabolic pre-mRNAs and later resulted (given the high temperature at which this evolution is supposed to have taken place) in the evolution of mRNAs with codons of the type GNS. These mRNAs codified only for those amino acids that the coevolution theory of genetic code origin sees as the precursors of all other amino acids. Some aspects of the model here discussed might be rendered real by the transfer-messenger RNA molecule (tmRNA) which is here considered a molecular fossil of ancestral protein synthesis.

  2. Field driven ferromagnetic phase evolution originating from the domain boundaries in antiferromagnetically coupled perpendicular anitsotropy films

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Juanita; Hauet, Thomas; Gunther, Christian; Hovorka, Ondrej; Berger, Andreas; Im, Mi-Young; Fischer, Peter; Hellwig, Olav

    2008-05-01

    Strong perpendicular anisotropy systems consisting of Co/Pt multilayer stacks that are antiferromagnetically coupled via thin Ru or NiO layers have been used as model systems to study the competition between local interlayer exchange and long-range dipolar interactions [1,2]. Magnetic Force Microscopy (MFM) studies of such systems reveal complex magnetic configurations with a mix of antiferromagnetic (AF) and ferromagnetic (FM) phases. However, MFM allows detecting surface stray fields only and can interact strongly with the magnetic structure of the sample, thus altering the original domain configuration of interest [3,4]. In the current study they combine magnetometry and state-of-the-art soft X-ray transmission microscopy (MXTM) to investigate the external field driven FM phase evolution originating from the domain boundaries in such antiferromagnetically coupled perpendicular anisotropy films. MXTM allows directly imaging the perpendicular component of the magnetization in an external field at sub 100 nm spatial resolution without disturbing the magnetic state of the sample [5,6]. Here they compare the domain evolution for two similar [Co(4{angstrom})/Pt(7{angstrom})]x-1/{l_brace}Co(4{angstrom})/Ru(9{angstrom})/[Co(4{angstrom})/Pt(7{angstrom})]x-1{r_brace}16 samples with slightly different Co/Pt stack thickness, i.e. slightly different strength of internal dipolar fields. After demagnetization they obtain AF domains with either sharp AF domain walls for the thinner multilayer stacks or 'tiger-tail' domain walls (one dimensional FM phase) for the thicker stacks. When increasing the external field strength the sharp domain walls in the tinner stack sample transform into the one-dimensional FM phase, which then serves as nucleation site for further FM stripe domains that spread out into all directions to drive the system towards saturation. Energy calculations reveal the subtle difference between the two samples and help to understand the observed transition, when

  3. Musical emotions: Functions, origins, evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perlovsky, Leonid

    2010-03-01

    Theories of music origins and the role of musical emotions in the mind are reviewed. Most existing theories contradict each other, and cannot explain mechanisms or roles of musical emotions in workings of the mind, nor evolutionary reasons for music origins. Music seems to be an enigma. Nevertheless, a synthesis of cognitive science and mathematical models of the mind has been proposed describing a fundamental role of music in the functioning and evolution of the mind, consciousness, and cultures. The review considers ancient theories of music as well as contemporary theories advanced by leading authors in this field. It addresses one hypothesis that promises to unify the field and proposes a theory of musical origin based on a fundamental role of music in cognition and evolution of consciousness and culture. We consider a split in the vocalizations of proto-humans into two types: one less emotional and more concretely-semantic, evolving into language, and the other preserving emotional connections along with semantic ambiguity, evolving into music. The proposed hypothesis departs from other theories in considering specific mechanisms of the mind-brain, which required the evolution of music parallel with the evolution of cultures and languages. Arguments are reviewed that the evolution of language toward becoming the semantically powerful tool of today required emancipation from emotional encumbrances. The opposite, no less powerful mechanisms required a compensatory evolution of music toward more differentiated and refined emotionality. The need for refined music in the process of cultural evolution is grounded in fundamental mechanisms of the mind. This is why today's human mind and cultures cannot exist without today's music. The reviewed hypothesis gives a basis for future analysis of why different evolutionary paths of languages were paralleled by different evolutionary paths of music. Approaches toward experimental verification of this hypothesis in

  4. Musical emotions: functions, origins, evolution.

    PubMed

    Perlovsky, Leonid

    2010-03-01

    Theories of music origins and the role of musical emotions in the mind are reviewed. Most existing theories contradict each other, and cannot explain mechanisms or roles of musical emotions in workings of the mind, nor evolutionary reasons for music origins. Music seems to be an enigma. Nevertheless, a synthesis of cognitive science and mathematical models of the mind has been proposed describing a fundamental role of music in the functioning and evolution of the mind, consciousness, and cultures. The review considers ancient theories of music as well as contemporary theories advanced by leading authors in this field. It addresses one hypothesis that promises to unify the field and proposes a theory of musical origin based on a fundamental role of music in cognition and evolution of consciousness and culture. We consider a split in the vocalizations of proto-humans into two types: one less emotional and more concretely-semantic, evolving into language, and the other preserving emotional connections along with semantic ambiguity, evolving into music. The proposed hypothesis departs from other theories in considering specific mechanisms of the mind-brain, which required the evolution of music parallel with the evolution of cultures and languages. Arguments are reviewed that the evolution of language toward becoming the semantically powerful tool of today required emancipation from emotional encumbrances. The opposite, no less powerful mechanisms required a compensatory evolution of music toward more differentiated and refined emotionality. The need for refined music in the process of cultural evolution is grounded in fundamental mechanisms of the mind. This is why today's human mind and cultures cannot exist without today's music. The reviewed hypothesis gives a basis for future analysis of why different evolutionary paths of languages were paralleled by different evolutionary paths of music. Approaches toward experimental verification of this hypothesis in

  5. Planetary Origin Evolution and Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevenson, David J.

    2005-01-01

    This wide-ranging grant supported theoretical modeling on many aspects of the formation, evolution and structure of planets and satellites. Many topics were studied during this grant period, including the evolution of icy bodies; the origin of magnetic fields in Ganymede; the thermal histories of terrestrial planets; the nature of flow inside giant planets (especially the coupling to the magnetic field) and the dynamics of silicate/iron mixing during giant impacts and terrestrial planet core formation. Many of these activities are ongoing and have not reached completion. This is the nature of this kind of research.

  6. Origins and Evolution of Life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gargaud, Muriel; López-García, Purificación; Martin, Hervé

    2011-01-01

    Part I. What Is Life?: 1. Problems raised by a definition of life M. Morange; 2. Some remarks about uses of cosmological anthropic 'principles' D. Lambert; 3. Minimal cell: the biologist point of view C. Brochier-Armanet; 4. Minimal cell: the computer scientist point of view H. Bersini; 5. Origins of life: computing and simulation approaches B. Billoud; Part II. Astronomical and Geophysical Context of the Emergence of Life: 6. Organic molecules in interstellar medium C. Ceccarelli and C. Cernicharo; 7. Cosmochemical evolution and the origin of life: insights from meteorites S. Pizzarello; 8. Astronomical constraints on the emergence of life M. Gounelle and T. Montmerle; 9. Formation of habitable planets J. Chambers; 10. The concept of galactic habitable zone N. Prantzos; 11. The young Sun and its influence on planetary atmospheres M. Güdel and J. Kasting; 12. Climates of the Earth G. Ramstein; Part III. Role of Water in the Emergence of Life: 13. Liquid water: a necessary condition to all forms of life K. Bartik, G. Bruylants, E. Locci and J. Reisse; 14. The role of water in the formation and evolution of planets T. Encrenaz; 15. Water on Mars J. P. Bibring; Part IV. From Non-Living Systems to Life: 16. Energetic constraints on prebiotic pathways: application to the emergence of translation R. Pascal and L. Boiteau; 17. Comparative genomics and early cell evolution A. Lazcano; 18. Origin and evolution of metabolisms J. Peretó; Part V. Mechanisms for Life Evolution: 19. Molecular phylogeny: inferring the patterns of evolution E. Douzery; 20. Horizontal gene transfer: mechanisms and evolutionary consequences D. Moreira; 21. The role of symbiosis in eukaryotic evolution A. Latorre, A. Durbán, A. Moya and J. Peretó; Part VI. Life in Extreme Conditions: 22. Life in extreme conditions: Deinococcus radiodurans, an organism able to survive prolonged desiccation and high doses of ionising radiation S. Sommer and M. Toueille; 23. Molecular effects of UV and ionizing

  7. Origin and early evolution of land plants

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    The origin of the sporophyte in land plants represents a fundamental phase in plant evolution. Today this subject is controversial, and scarcely considered in textbooks and journals of botany, in spite of its importance. There are two conflicting theories concerning the origin of the alternating generations in land-plants: the “antithetic” theory and the “homologous” theory. These have never been fully resolved, although, on the ground of the evidences on the probable ancestors of land plants, the antithetic theory is considered more plausible than the homologous theory. However, additional phylogenetic dilemmas are the evolution of bryophytes from algae and the transition from these first land plants to the pteridophytes. All these very large evolutionary jumps are discussed on the basis of the phyletic gradualist neo-Darwinian theory and other genetic evolutionary mechanisms. PMID:19513262

  8. Prevolutionary dynamics and the origin of evolution.

    PubMed

    Nowak, Martin A; Ohtsuki, Hisashi

    2008-09-30

    Life is that which replicates and evolves. The origin of life is also the origin of evolution. A fundamental question is when do chemical kinetics become evolutionary dynamics? Here, we formulate a general mathematical theory for the origin of evolution. All known life on earth is based on biological polymers, which act as information carriers and catalysts. Therefore, any theory for the origin of life must address the emergence of such a system. We describe prelife as an alphabet of active monomers that form random polymers. Prelife is a generative system that can produce information. Prevolutionary dynamics have selection and mutation, but no replication. Life marches in with the ability of replication: Polymers act as templates for their own reproduction. Prelife is a scaffold that builds life. Yet, there is competition between life and prelife. There is a phase transition: If the effective replication rate exceeds a critical value, then life outcompetes prelife. Replication is not a prerequisite for selection, but instead, there can be selection for replication. Mutation leads to an error threshold between life and prelife.

  9. Prevolutionary dynamics and the origin of evolution

    PubMed Central

    Nowak, Martin A.; Ohtsuki, Hisashi

    2008-01-01

    Life is that which replicates and evolves. The origin of life is also the origin of evolution. A fundamental question is when do chemical kinetics become evolutionary dynamics? Here, we formulate a general mathematical theory for the origin of evolution. All known life on earth is based on biological polymers, which act as information carriers and catalysts. Therefore, any theory for the origin of life must address the emergence of such a system. We describe prelife as an alphabet of active monomers that form random polymers. Prelife is a generative system that can produce information. Prevolutionary dynamics have selection and mutation, but no replication. Life marches in with the ability of replication: Polymers act as templates for their own reproduction. Prelife is a scaffold that builds life. Yet, there is competition between life and prelife. There is a phase transition: If the effective replication rate exceeds a critical value, then life outcompetes prelife. Replication is not a prerequisite for selection, but instead, there can be selection for replication. Mutation leads to an error threshold between life and prelife. PMID:18791073

  10. Origin and evolution of the giant planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bodenheimer, P.

    1982-01-01

    A discussion is presented of two major giant planet origin hypotheses: (1) protoplanet formation in the solar nebula in the form of a gravitationally unstable, gaseous subcondensation, subsequently evolving as a chemically homogeneous object until a stage at which a solid core may form; and (2) solid core formation by accumulation of planetesimals, followed by the accretion of solar-composition gas onto the core until it becomes unstable to collapse. Under either of the scenarios, evolution is found to comprise an early, cool phase in hydrostatic equilibrium, a hydrodynamic collapse, and a final phase of hydrostatic contraction and cooling to the present state. Attention is given to the physical processes that are most important in the determination of evolutionary characteristics. A concluding note on the cases of Uranus and Neptune is also given.

  11. Origin and thermal evolution of icy satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coradini, Angioletta; Federico, Costanzo; Forni, Olivier; Magni, Gianfranco

    1995-07-01

    The paper reviews the problem of formation and evolution of the so-called “regular satellites “ of the giant planets, and it consists of two parts: the first describes the possible origin of the satellites, the second studies their evolution, attempting to stress the relations of the present status of the satellites with their evolutionary history. The formation of regular satellite systems around giant planets is probably related to the formation of the central planet. Some characteristics of regular satellite systems are quite similar, and suggest a common origin in a disk present around the central body. This disk can originate through different mechanisms which we will describe, paying attention to the so-called “accretion disk” model, in which the satellite-forming material is captured. The disk phase links the formation of the primary body with the formation of satellites. The subsequent stages of the disk's evolution can lead first to the formation of intermediate size bodies, and through the collisional evolution of these bodies, to the birth of satellite “embryos” able to gravitationally capture smaller bodies. Given the scenario in which icy satellites may be formed by homogeneous accretion of planetesimals made of a mixtures of ice and silicates, if no melting occurs during accretion, the satellites have a homogeneous ice-rock composition. For the smaller satellites this homogeneous structure should not be substantially modified; only sporadic local events, such as large impacts, can modify the surface structure of the smaller satellites. For the larger satellites, if some degree of melting appears during accretion, a differentiation of the silicate part occurs, the amount of differentiation and hence the core size depending on the fraction of gravitational potential energy retained during the accumulation process. Melting and differentiation soon after the accretion, for the larger satellites, could also depend on the convective evolution in

  12. Russian Political Warfare: Origin, Evolution, and Application

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-01

    WARFARE: ORIGIN , EVOLUTION, AND APPLICATION by Jeffrey V. Dickey Thomas B. Everett Zane M. Galvach Matthew J. Mesko Anton V. Soltis June...blank) 2. REPORT DATE June 2015 3. REPORT TYPE AND DATES COVERED Master’s Thesis 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE RUSSIAN POLITICAL WARFARE: ORIGIN ...political warfare (PW) campaign. Analysis of the origin , history, and evolution of Soviet/Russian PW from 1917 through today reveals that Russia is

  13. Origin and evolution of ordinary chondrite meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, E. R. D.; Taylor, G. J.; Keil, K.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of heating on the chemical composition, minerology, and texture of chondrite meteorites are discussed chondrite origin and evolution. Various asteroidal and nebular heating mechanisms are considered to account meteorite compositions.

  14. Origins, Evolution, and Fate of Brown Dwarfs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Eduardo

    2003-01-01

    Research related to the origins, evolution and fate of brown dwarfs is presented. The topics include: 1) Imaging surveys for brown dwarfs; 2) Companion detection techniques; 3) Measurements of fundamental properties of brown dwarfs; 4) Classification schemes for ultracool dwarfs; 5) Origins and evolution of brown dwarfs; 6) Ultracool atmospheres and interiors; 7) Time variable phenomena in brown dwarfs; 8) Comparisons between brown dwarfs and planets; 9) Substellar mass functions; and 10) Future facilities.

  15. Breast cancer: origins and evolution.

    PubMed

    Polyak, Kornelia

    2007-11-01

    Breast cancer is not a single disease, but rather is composed of distinct subtypes associated with different clinical outcomes. Understanding this heterogeneity is key for the development of targeted cancer-preventative and -therapeutic interventions. Current models explaining inter- and intratumoral diversity are the cancer stem cell and the clonal evolution hypotheses. Although tumor initiation and progression are predominantly driven by acquired genetic alterations, recent data implicate a role for microenvironmental and epigenetic changes as well. Comprehensive unbiased studies of tumors and patient populations have significantly advanced our molecular understanding of breast cancer, but translating these findings into clinical practice remains a challenge.

  16. Eukaryotic evolution: early origin of canonical introns.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Alastair G B; MacQuarrie, Erin K; Roger, Andrew J

    2002-09-19

    Spliceosomal introns, one of the hallmarks of eukaryotic genomes, were thought to have originated late in evolution and were assumed not to exist in eukaryotes that diverged early -- until the discovery of a single intron with an aberrant splice boundary in the primitive 'protozoan' Giardia. Here we describe introns from a close relative of Giardia, Carpediemonas membranifera, that have boundary sequences of the normal eukaryotic type, indicating that canonical introns are likely to have arisen very early in eukaryotic evolution.

  17. Origin, development, and evolution of butterfly eyespots.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, Antónia

    2015-01-07

    This article reviews the latest developments in our understanding of the origin, development, and evolution of nymphalid butterfly eyespots. Recent contributions to this field include insights into the evolutionary and developmental origin of eyespots and their ancestral deployment on the wing, the evolution of eyespot number and eyespot sexual dimorphism, and the identification of genes affecting eyespot development and black pigmentation. I also compare features of old and more recently proposed models of eyespot development and propose a schematic for the genetic regulatory architecture of eyespots. Using this schematic I propose two hypotheses for why we observe limits to morphological diversity across these serially homologous traits.

  18. Origin and evolution of the Saturn system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pollack, J. B.; Consolmagno, G.

    1983-01-01

    A review is provided of current concepts concerning the formation of the Saturn system and the subsequent history of the planet, its satellites, and rings. Emphasis is placed upon numerical models of Saturn's evolution and interior models of its satellites. Alternative theories are presented and assessed for the origins of the Saturn system, the rings of Saturn, and the atmosphere of Titan.

  19. Planets and their atmospheres - Origin and evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, J. S.; Prinn, R. G.

    The origin, evolution, and composition of the planetary atmospheres are examined in an introductory review of ground-based and in situ observations and theoretical models. Chapters are devoted to the retention of volatiles by planets; evolutionary processes (such as hydrogen loss, accretion and outgassing, dissolution, photo-condensation, reactions with planetary surfaces, biochemical transformations, and atmospheric escape); and the present characteristics of the planetary, lunar-size-object, and asteroid atmospheres. Graphs, diagrams, and tables of numerical data are provided.

  20. The Origin of MoS2 Significantly Influences Its Performance for the Hydrogen Evolution Reaction due to Differences in Phase Purity.

    PubMed

    Chua, Xing Juan; Tan, Shu Min; Chia, Xinyi; Sofer, Zdenek; Luxa, Jan; Pumera, Martin

    2017-03-02

    Molybdenum disulfide (MoS2 ) is at the forefront of materials research. It shows great promise for electrochemical applications, especially for hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) catalysis. There is a significant discrepancy in the literature on the reported catalytic activity for HER catalysis on MoS2 . Here we test the electrochemical performance of MoS2 obtained from seven sources and we show that these sources provide MoS2 of various phase purity (2H and 3R, and their mixtures) and composition, which is responsible for their different electrochemical properties. The overpotentials for HER at -10 mA cm(-2) for MoS2 from seven different sources range from -0.59 V to -0.78 V vs. reversible hydrogen electrode (RHE). This is of very high importance as with much interest in 2D-MoS2 , the use of the top-down approach would usually involve the application of commercially available MoS2 . These commercially available MoS2 are rarely characterized for composition and phase purity. These key parameters are responsible for large variance of reported catalytic properties of MoS2 .

  1. Origin and evolution of spliceosomal introns.

    PubMed

    Rogozin, Igor B; Carmel, Liran; Csuros, Miklos; Koonin, Eugene V

    2012-04-16

    Evolution of exon-intron structure of eukaryotic genes has been a matter of long-standing, intensive debate. The introns-early concept, later rebranded 'introns first' held that protein-coding genes were interrupted by numerous introns even at the earliest stages of life's evolution and that introns played a major role in the origin of proteins by facilitating recombination of sequences coding for small protein/peptide modules. The introns-late concept held that introns emerged only in eukaryotes and new introns have been accumulating continuously throughout eukaryotic evolution. Analysis of orthologous genes from completely sequenced eukaryotic genomes revealed numerous shared intron positions in orthologous genes from animals and plants and even between animals, plants and protists, suggesting that many ancestral introns have persisted since the last eukaryotic common ancestor (LECA). Reconstructions of intron gain and loss using the growing collection of genomes of diverse eukaryotes and increasingly advanced probabilistic models convincingly show that the LECA and the ancestors of each eukaryotic supergroup had intron-rich genes, with intron densities comparable to those in the most intron-rich modern genomes such as those of vertebrates. The subsequent evolution in most lineages of eukaryotes involved primarily loss of introns, with only a few episodes of substantial intron gain that might have accompanied major evolutionary innovations such as the origin of metazoa. The original invasion of self-splicing Group II introns, presumably originating from the mitochondrial endosymbiont, into the genome of the emerging eukaryote might have been a key factor of eukaryogenesis that in particular triggered the origin of endomembranes and the nucleus. Conversely, splicing errors gave rise to alternative splicing, a major contribution to the biological complexity of multicellular eukaryotes. There is no indication that any prokaryote has ever possessed a spliceosome or

  2. Origin and evolution of spliceosomal introns

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Evolution of exon-intron structure of eukaryotic genes has been a matter of long-standing, intensive debate. The introns-early concept, later rebranded ‘introns first’ held that protein-coding genes were interrupted by numerous introns even at the earliest stages of life's evolution and that introns played a major role in the origin of proteins by facilitating recombination of sequences coding for small protein/peptide modules. The introns-late concept held that introns emerged only in eukaryotes and new introns have been accumulating continuously throughout eukaryotic evolution. Analysis of orthologous genes from completely sequenced eukaryotic genomes revealed numerous shared intron positions in orthologous genes from animals and plants and even between animals, plants and protists, suggesting that many ancestral introns have persisted since the last eukaryotic common ancestor (LECA). Reconstructions of intron gain and loss using the growing collection of genomes of diverse eukaryotes and increasingly advanced probabilistic models convincingly show that the LECA and the ancestors of each eukaryotic supergroup had intron-rich genes, with intron densities comparable to those in the most intron-rich modern genomes such as those of vertebrates. The subsequent evolution in most lineages of eukaryotes involved primarily loss of introns, with only a few episodes of substantial intron gain that might have accompanied major evolutionary innovations such as the origin of metazoa. The original invasion of self-splicing Group II introns, presumably originating from the mitochondrial endosymbiont, into the genome of the emerging eukaryote might have been a key factor of eukaryogenesis that in particular triggered the origin of endomembranes and the nucleus. Conversely, splicing errors gave rise to alternative splicing, a major contribution to the biological complexity of multicellular eukaryotes. There is no indication that any prokaryote has ever possessed a spliceosome

  3. Phase distribution of spliceosomal introns: implications for intron origin.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Hung D; Yoshihama, Maki; Kenmochi, Naoya

    2006-09-08

    The origin of spliceosomal introns is the central subject of the introns-early versus introns-late debate. The distribution of intron phases is non-uniform, with an excess of phase-0 introns. Introns-early explains this by speculating that a fraction of present-day introns were present between minigenes in the progenote and therefore must lie in phase-0. In contrast, introns-late predicts that the nonuniformity of intron phase distribution reflects the nonrandomness of intron insertions. In this paper, we tested the two theories using analyses of intron phase distribution. We inferred the evolution of intron phase distribution from a dataset of 684 gene orthologs from seven eukaryotes using a maximum likelihood method. We also tested whether the observed intron phase distributions from 10 eukaryotes can be explained by intron insertions on a genome-wide scale. In contrast to the prediction of introns-early, the inferred evolution of intron phase distribution showed that the proportion of phase-0 introns increased over evolution. Consistent with introns-late, the observed intron phase distributions matched those predicted by an intron insertion model quite well. Our results strongly support the introns-late hypothesis of the origin of spliceosomal introns.

  4. The origin and early evolution of roots.

    PubMed

    Kenrick, Paul; Strullu-Derrien, Christine

    2014-10-01

    Geological sites of exceptional fossil preservation are becoming a focus of research on root evolution because they retain edaphic and ecological context, and the remains of plant soft tissues are preserved in some. New information is emerging on the origins of rooting systems, their interactions with fungi, and their nature and diversity in the earliest forest ecosystems. Remarkably well-preserved fossils prove that mycorrhizal symbionts were diverse in simple rhizoid-based systems. Roots evolved in a piecemeal fashion and independently in several major clades through the Devonian Period (416 to 360 million years ago), rapidly extending functionality and complexity. Evidence from extinct arborescent clades indicates that polar auxin transport was recruited independently in several to regulate wood and root development. The broader impact of root evolution on the geochemical carbon cycle is a developing area and one in which the interests of the plant physiologist intersect with those of the geochemist. © 2014 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  5. The origin and evolution of arthropods.

    PubMed

    Budd, Graham E; Telford, Maximilian J

    2009-02-12

    The past two decades have witnessed profound changes in our understanding of the evolution of arthropods. Many of these insights derive from the adoption of molecular methods by systematists and developmental biologists, prompting a radical reordering of the relationships among extant arthropod classes and their closest non-arthropod relatives, and shedding light on the developmental basis for the origins of key characteristics. A complementary source of data is the discovery of fossils from several spectacular Cambrian faunas. These fossils form well-characterized groupings, making the broad pattern of Cambrian arthropod systematics increasingly consensual.

  6. Origins and evolution of eukaryotic RNA interference

    PubMed Central

    Shabalina, Svetlana A.; Koonin, Eugene V.

    2009-01-01

    Small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) and genome-encoded microRNAs (miRNAs) silence genes via complementary interactions with mRNAs. With thousands of miRNA genes identified and genome sequences of diverse eukaryotes available for comparison, the opportunity emerges for insights into origin and evolution of RNA interference (RNAi). The miRNA repertoires of plants and animals appear to have evolved independently. However, conservation of the key proteins involved in RNAi suggests that the last common ancestor of modern eukaryotes possessed siRNA-based mechanisms. Prokaryotes have a RNAi-like defense system that is functionally analogous but not homologous to eukaryotic RNAi. The protein machinery of eukaryotic RNAi seems to have been pieced together from ancestral proteins of archaeal, bacterial and phage origins that are involved in DNA repair and RNA-processing pathways. PMID:18715673

  7. Origin and Evolution of Rickettsial Plasmids

    PubMed Central

    El Karkouri, Khalid; Pontarotti, Pierre; Raoult, Didier; Fournier, Pierre-Edouard

    2016-01-01

    Background Rickettsia species are strictly intracellular bacteria that have undergone a reductive genomic evolution. Despite their allopatric lifestyle, almost half of the 26 currently validated Rickettsia species have plasmids. In order to study the origin, evolutionary history and putative roles of rickettsial plasmids, we investigated the evolutionary processes that have shaped 20 plasmids belonging to 11 species, using comparative genomics and phylogenetic analysis between rickettsial, microbial and non-microbial genomes. Results Plasmids were differentially present among Rickettsia species. The 11 species had 1 to 4 plasmid (s) with a size ranging from 12 kb to 83 kb. We reconstructed pRICO, the last common ancestor of the current rickettsial plasmids. pRICO was vertically inherited mainly from Rickettsia/Orientia chromosomes and diverged vertically into a single or multiple plasmid(s) in each species. These plasmids also underwent a reductive evolution by progressive gene loss, similar to that observed in rickettsial chromosomes, possibly leading to cryptic plasmids or complete plasmid loss. Moreover, rickettsial plasmids exhibited ORFans, recent gene duplications and evidence of horizontal gene transfer events with rickettsial and non-rickettsial genomes mainly from the α/γ-proteobacteria lineages. Genes related to maintenance and plasticity of plasmids, and to adaptation and resistance to stress mostly evolved under vertical and/or horizontal processes. Those involved in nucleotide/carbohydrate transport and metabolism were under the influence of vertical evolution only, whereas genes involved in cell wall/membrane/envelope biogenesis, cycle control, amino acid/lipid/coenzyme and secondary metabolites biosynthesis, transport and metabolism underwent mainly horizontal transfer events. Conclusion Rickettsial plasmids had a complex evolution, starting with a vertical inheritance followed by a reductive evolution associated with increased complexity via

  8. Origin and Evolution of Rickettsial Plasmids.

    PubMed

    El Karkouri, Khalid; Pontarotti, Pierre; Raoult, Didier; Fournier, Pierre-Edouard

    2016-01-01

    Rickettsia species are strictly intracellular bacteria that have undergone a reductive genomic evolution. Despite their allopatric lifestyle, almost half of the 26 currently validated Rickettsia species have plasmids. In order to study the origin, evolutionary history and putative roles of rickettsial plasmids, we investigated the evolutionary processes that have shaped 20 plasmids belonging to 11 species, using comparative genomics and phylogenetic analysis between rickettsial, microbial and non-microbial genomes. Plasmids were differentially present among Rickettsia species. The 11 species had 1 to 4 plasmid (s) with a size ranging from 12 kb to 83 kb. We reconstructed pRICO, the last common ancestor of the current rickettsial plasmids. pRICO was vertically inherited mainly from Rickettsia/Orientia chromosomes and diverged vertically into a single or multiple plasmid(s) in each species. These plasmids also underwent a reductive evolution by progressive gene loss, similar to that observed in rickettsial chromosomes, possibly leading to cryptic plasmids or complete plasmid loss. Moreover, rickettsial plasmids exhibited ORFans, recent gene duplications and evidence of horizontal gene transfer events with rickettsial and non-rickettsial genomes mainly from the α/γ-proteobacteria lineages. Genes related to maintenance and plasticity of plasmids, and to adaptation and resistance to stress mostly evolved under vertical and/or horizontal processes. Those involved in nucleotide/carbohydrate transport and metabolism were under the influence of vertical evolution only, whereas genes involved in cell wall/membrane/envelope biogenesis, cycle control, amino acid/lipid/coenzyme and secondary metabolites biosynthesis, transport and metabolism underwent mainly horizontal transfer events. Rickettsial plasmids had a complex evolution, starting with a vertical inheritance followed by a reductive evolution associated with increased complexity via horizontal gene transfer as well as

  9. Origin and Evolution of the Saturn System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pollack, J. B.

    1985-01-01

    As was the case for Jupiter, Saturn formed either as a result of a gas instability within the solar nebula or the accretion of a solid core that induced an instability within the surrounding solar nebula. In either case, the protoplanet's history can be divided into three major stages: early, quasi-hydrostatic evolution (stage 1); very rapid contraction (stage 2); and late, quasi-hydrostatic contraction (stage 3). During the early history of the Saturn system, giant impact events may have catastrophically disrupted most of the original satellites of Saturn. Such disruption, followed by reaccretion, may be responsible, in part, for the occurrence of Trojans and coorbital moons in the Saturn system, the apparent presence of a stochastic component in the trend of satellite density with radial distance, and the present population of ring particles. Saturn's excess luminosity and viscous dissipation are also discussed in relation to the satellite formation.

  10. The origin and evolution of Homo sapiens.

    PubMed

    Stringer, Chris

    2016-07-05

    If we restrict the use of Homo sapiens in the fossil record to specimens which share a significant number of derived features in the skeleton with extant H. sapiens, the origin of our species would be placed in the African late middle Pleistocene, based on fossils such as Omo Kibish 1, Herto 1 and 2, and the Levantine material from Skhul and Qafzeh. However, genetic data suggest that we and our sister species Homo neanderthalensis shared a last common ancestor in the middle Pleistocene approximately 400-700 ka, which is at least 200 000 years earlier than the species origin indicated from the fossils already mentioned. Thus, it is likely that the African fossil record will document early members of the sapiens lineage showing only some of the derived features of late members of the lineage. On that basis, I argue that human fossils such as those from Jebel Irhoud, Florisbad, Eliye Springs and Omo Kibish 2 do represent early members of the species, but variation across the African later middle Pleistocene/early Middle Stone Age fossils shows that there was not a simple linear progression towards later sapiens morphology, and there was chronological overlap between different 'archaic' and 'modern' morphs. Even in the late Pleistocene within and outside Africa, we find H. sapiens specimens which are clearly outside the range of Holocene members of the species, showing the complexity of recent human evolution. The impact on species recognition of late Pleistocene gene flow between the lineages of modern humans, Neanderthals and Denisovans is also discussed, and finally, I reconsider the nature of the middle Pleistocene ancestor of these lineages, based on recent morphological and genetic data.This article is part of the themed issue 'Major transitions in human evolution'.

  11. Origin and evolution of lysyl oxidases

    PubMed Central

    Grau-Bové, Xavier; Ruiz-Trillo, Iñaki; Rodriguez-Pascual, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Lysyl oxidases (LOX) are copper-dependent enzymes that oxidize primary amine substrates to reactive aldehydes. The best-studied role of LOX enzymes is the remodeling of the extracellular matrix (ECM) in animals by cross-linking collagens and elastin, although intracellular functions have been reported as well. Five different LOX enzymes have been identified in mammals, LOX and LOX-like (LOXL) 1 to 4, showing a highly conserved catalytic carboxy terminal domain and more divergence in the rest of the sequence. Here we have surveyed a wide selection of genomes in order to infer the evolutionary history of LOX. We identified LOX proteins not only in animals, but also in many other eukaryotes, as well as in bacteria and archaea – which reveals a pre-metazoan origin for this gene family. LOX genes expanded during metazoan evolution resulting in two superfamilies, LOXL2/L3/L4 and LOX/L1/L5. Considering the current knowledge on the function of mammalian LOX isoforms in ECM remodeling, we propose that LOXL2/L3/L4 members might have preferentially been involved in making cross-linked collagen IV-based basement membrane, whereas the diversification of LOX/L1/L5 forms contributed to chordate/vertebrate-specific ECM innovations, such as elastin and fibronectin. Our work provides a novel view on the evolution of this family of enzymes. PMID:26024311

  12. Origins and Evolution of Stomatal Development.

    PubMed

    Chater, Caspar C C; Caine, Robert S; Fleming, Andrew J; Gray, Julie E

    2017-06-01

    The fossil record suggests stomata-like pores were present on the surfaces of land plants over 400 million years ago. Whether stomata arose once or whether they arose independently across newly evolving land plant lineages has long been a matter of debate. In Arabidopsis, a genetic toolbox has been identified that tightly controls stomatal development and patterning. This includes the basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factors SPEECHLESS (SPCH), MUTE, FAMA, and ICE/SCREAMs (SCRMs), which promote stomatal formation. These factors are regulated via a signaling cascade, which includes mobile EPIDERMAL PATTERNING FACTOR (EPF) peptides to enforce stomatal spacing. Mosses and hornworts, the most ancient extant lineages to possess stomata, possess orthologs of these Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) stomatal toolbox genes, and manipulation in the model bryophyte Physcomitrella patens has shown that the bHLH and EPF components are also required for moss stomatal development and patterning. This supports an ancient and tightly conserved genetic origin of stomata. Here, we review recent discoveries and, by interrogating newly available plant genomes, we advance the story of stomatal development and patterning across land plant evolution. Furthermore, we identify potential orthologs of the key toolbox genes in a hornwort, further supporting a single ancient genetic origin of stomata in the ancestor to all stomatous land plants. © 2017 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  13. Origin and early evolution of photosynthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blankenship, R. E.

    1992-01-01

    Photosynthesis was well-established on the earth at least 3.5 thousand million years ago, and it is widely believed that these ancient organisms had similar metabolic capabilities to modern cyanobacteria. This requires that development of two photosystems and the oxygen evolution capability occurred very early in the earth's history, and that a presumed phase of evolution involving non-oxygen evolving photosynthetic organisms took place even earlier. The evolutionary relationships of the reaction center complexes found in all the classes of currently existing organisms have been analyzed using sequence analysis and biophysical measurements. The results indicate that all reaction centers fall into two basic groups, those with pheophytin and a pair of quinones as early acceptors, and those with iron sulfur clusters as early acceptors. No simple linear branching evolutionary scheme can account for the distribution patterns of reaction centers in existing photosynthetic organisms, and lateral transfer of genetic information is considered as a likely possibility. Possible scenarios for the development of primitive reaction centers into the heterodimeric protein structures found in existing reaction centers and for the development of organisms with two linked photosystems are presented.

  14. Origin and early evolution of photosynthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blankenship, R. E.

    1992-01-01

    Photosynthesis was well-established on the earth at least 3.5 thousand million years ago, and it is widely believed that these ancient organisms had similar metabolic capabilities to modern cyanobacteria. This requires that development of two photosystems and the oxygen evolution capability occurred very early in the earth's history, and that a presumed phase of evolution involving non-oxygen evolving photosynthetic organisms took place even earlier. The evolutionary relationships of the reaction center complexes found in all the classes of currently existing organisms have been analyzed using sequence analysis and biophysical measurements. The results indicate that all reaction centers fall into two basic groups, those with pheophytin and a pair of quinones as early acceptors, and those with iron sulfur clusters as early acceptors. No simple linear branching evolutionary scheme can account for the distribution patterns of reaction centers in existing photosynthetic organisms, and lateral transfer of genetic information is considered as a likely possibility. Possible scenarios for the development of primitive reaction centers into the heterodimeric protein structures found in existing reaction centers and for the development of organisms with two linked photosystems are presented.

  15. Origin and Evolution of Saturn's Small Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charnoz, Sebastien; Salmon, J.; Crida, A.; Brahic, A.

    2009-09-01

    All Saturn’ small satellites, orbiting below Mimas'orbit, share some common physical and dynamical properties : they have strong water absorption bands (Poulet & Cuzzi, 2002 Icarus 160, 350-358, Cuzzi et al., in press) , they have strange and elongated shapes and are under dense (Charnoz et al, 2007 Science 318, 1622, Porco et al. 2007 Science 318, 1602). They are also dynamically coupled with Saturn rings. In addition, due to their small size, they should not be primordial because of the meteoroid bombardment. They dynamically evolve under the tidal torque of the planet and the rings, in addition to satellite's perturbations. A theory of their origin still needs to be done. We show in the present work that these small satellites may be the natural result of the viscous spreading of Saturn's rings. Using a new 1D coupled hydrodynamic + dynamical evolution code, we compute that the rings viscous spreading may naturally form a population of 10-50 km size satellites, with and orbital organisation similar to the today population of small satellites. Self-regulation processes are at work limiting the maximum mass of small satellite to about the mass of Janus, consistently with observations. This satellite formation scenario of a new kind (due to the viscous spreading of a disk) seems to explain the composition, the shape, the total mass, and the low density of Saturn's small satellites. It would give also an interesting explanation to the origin of the F ring. In conclusion, Saturn's small satellites may be considered as a specific category of satellites whose origin is very different either from Saturn's main satellites of Saturn's captured satellites. They could be the "children” of the rings.

  16. Origin and evolution of planetary atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, John S.

    1992-01-01

    This report concerns several research tasks related to the origin and evolution of planetary atmospheres and the large-scale distribution of volatile elements in the Solar System. These tasks and their present status are as follows: (1) we have conducted an analysis of the volatility and condensation behavior of compounds of iron, aluminum, and phosphorus in the atmosphere of Venus in response to publish interpretations of the Soviet Venera probe XRF experiment data, to investigate the chemistry of volcanic gases, injection of volatiles by cometary and asteroidal impactors, and reactions in the troposphere; (2) we have completed and are now writing up our research on condensation-accretion modeling of the terrestrial planets; (3) we have laid the groundwork for a detailed study of the effects of water transport in the solar nebula on the bulk composition, oxidation state, and volatile content of preplanetary solids; (4) we have completed an extensive laboratory study of cryovolcanic materials in the outer solar system; (5) we have begun to study the impact erosion and shock alteration of the atmosphere of Mars resulting from cometary and asteroidal bombardment; and (6) we have developed a new Monte Carlo model of the cometary and asteroidal bombardment flux on the terrestrial planets, including all relevant chemical and physical processes associated with atmospheric entry and impact, to assess both the hazards posed by this bombardment to life on Earth and the degree of cross-correlation between the various phenomena (NO(x) production, explosive yield, crater production, iridium signature, etc.) that characterize this bombardment. The purpose of these investigations has been to contribute to the developing understanding of both the dynamics of long-term planetary atmosphere evolution and the short-term stability of planetary surface environments.

  17. Origin and early evolution of angiosperms.

    PubMed

    Soltis, Douglas E; Bell, Charles D; Kim, Sangtae; Soltis, Pamela S

    2008-01-01

    Contributions from paleobotany, phylogenetics, genomics, developmental biology, and developmental genetics have yielded tremendous insight into Darwin's "abominable mystery"--the origin and rapid diversification of the angiosperms. Analyses of morphological and molecular data reveal a revised "anthophyte clade" consisting of the fossils glossopterids, Pentoxylon, Bennettitales, and Caytonia as sister to angiosperms. Molecular estimates of the age of crown group angiosperms have converged on 140-180 million years ago (Ma), older than the oldest fossils (132 Ma), suggesting that older fossils remain to be discovered. Whether the first angiosperms were forest shrubs (dark-and-disturbed hypothesis) or aquatic herbs (wet-and-wild hypothesis) remains unclear. The near-basal phylogenetic position of Nymphaeales (water lilies), which may include the well-known fossil Archaefructus, certainly indicates that the aquatic habit arose early. After initial, early "experiments," angiosperms radiated rapidly (evolution. Although the flower is the central feature of the angiosperms, its origin and subsequent diversification remain major questions. Variation in spatial expression of floral regulators may control major differences in floral morphology between basal angiosperms and eudicot models.

  18. The origin and evolution of Homo sapiens

    PubMed Central

    Stringer, Chris

    2016-01-01

    If we restrict the use of Homo sapiens in the fossil record to specimens which share a significant number of derived features in the skeleton with extant H. sapiens, the origin of our species would be placed in the African late middle Pleistocene, based on fossils such as Omo Kibish 1, Herto 1 and 2, and the Levantine material from Skhul and Qafzeh. However, genetic data suggest that we and our sister species Homo neanderthalensis shared a last common ancestor in the middle Pleistocene approximately 400–700 ka, which is at least 200 000 years earlier than the species origin indicated from the fossils already mentioned. Thus, it is likely that the African fossil record will document early members of the sapiens lineage showing only some of the derived features of late members of the lineage. On that basis, I argue that human fossils such as those from Jebel Irhoud, Florisbad, Eliye Springs and Omo Kibish 2 do represent early members of the species, but variation across the African later middle Pleistocene/early Middle Stone Age fossils shows that there was not a simple linear progression towards later sapiens morphology, and there was chronological overlap between different ‘archaic’ and ‘modern’ morphs. Even in the late Pleistocene within and outside Africa, we find H. sapiens specimens which are clearly outside the range of Holocene members of the species, showing the complexity of recent human evolution. The impact on species recognition of late Pleistocene gene flow between the lineages of modern humans, Neanderthals and Denisovans is also discussed, and finally, I reconsider the nature of the middle Pleistocene ancestor of these lineages, based on recent morphological and genetic data. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Major transitions in human evolution’. PMID:27298468

  19. Origin and evolution of the ribosome.

    PubMed

    Fox, George E

    2010-09-01

    The modern ribosome was largely formed at the time of the last common ancestor, LUCA. Hence its earliest origins likely lie in the RNA world. Central to its development were RNAs that spawned the modern tRNAs and a symmetrical region deep within the large ribosomal RNA, (rRNA), where the peptidyl transferase reaction occurs. To understand pre-LUCA developments, it is argued that events that are coupled in time are especially useful if one can infer a likely order in which they occurred. Using such timing events, the relative age of various proteins and individual regions within the large rRNA are inferred. An examination of the properties of modern ribosomes strongly suggests that the initial peptides made by the primitive ribosomes were likely enriched for l-amino acids, but did not completely exclude d-amino acids. This has implications for the nature of peptides made by the first ribosomes. From the perspective of ribosome origins, the immediate question regarding coding is when did it arise rather than how did the assignments evolve. The modern ribosome is very dynamic with tRNAs moving in and out and the mRNA moving relative to the ribosome. These movements may have become possible as a result of the addition of a template to hold the tRNAs. That template would subsequently become the mRNA, thereby allowing the evolution of the code and making an RNA genome useful. Finally, a highly speculative timeline of major events in ribosome history is presented and possible future directions discussed.

  20. Origin and evolution of high throughput screening

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, D A; Williams, J A

    2007-01-01

    This article reviews the origin and evolution of high throughput screening (HTS) through the experience of an individual pharmaceutical company, revealing some of the mysteries of the early stages of drug discovery to the wider pharmacology audience. HTS in this company (Pfizer, Groton, USA) had its origin in natural products screening in 1986, by substituting fermentation broths with dimethyl sulphoxide solutions of synthetic compounds, using 96-well plates and reduced assay volumes of 50-100μl. A nominal 30mM source compound concentration provided high μM assay concentrations. Starting at 800 compounds each week, the process reached a steady state of 7200 compounds per week by 1989. Screening in the Applied Biotechnology and Screening Group was centralized with screens operating in lock-step to maximize efficiency. Initial screens were full files run in triplicate. Autoradiography and image analysis were introduced for 125I receptor ligand screens. Reverse transcriptase (RT) coupled with quantitative PCR and multiplexing addressed several targets in a single assay. By 1992 HTS produced ‘hits' as starting matter for approximately 40% of the Discovery portfolio. In 1995, the HTS methodology was expanded to include ADMET targets. ADME targets required each compound to be physically detected leading to the development of automated high throughput LC-MS. In 1996, 90 compounds/week were screened in microsomal, protein binding and serum stability assays. Subsequently, the mutagenic Ames assay was adapted to a 96-well plate liquid assay and novel algorithms permitted automated image analysis of the micronucleus assay. By 1999 ADME HTS was fully integrated into the discovery cycle. PMID:17603542

  1. Origin and evolution of the Saturn system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pollack, J. B.; Consolmagno, G.

    1984-01-01

    As was the case for Jupiter, Saturn formed either as a result of a gas instability within the solar nebula or the accretion of a solid core that induced an instability within the surrounding solar nebula. In either case, the proto-planet's history is divided into three major stages: early, quasi-hydrostatic evolution (stage 1); hydrodynamical collapse (stage 2); and late, quasi-hydrostatic contraction (stage 3). During stage 1, Saturn had a radius of several hundred times that of its present radius, R(s), while stage 3 began when Saturn had a radius of 3.5 R(s). Stages 1 and 2 lasted 10(6) to 10(7) years and 1 year, respectively, while stage 3 is continuing through the present epoch. During the early history of the Saturn system, giant impact events may have catastrophically disrupted most of the original satellites of Saturn. Such disruption, followed by reaccretion, may be responsible, in part for the occurrence of Trojans and co-orbital moons in the Saturn system, the apparent presence of a stochastic component in the trend of satellite density with radial distance, and the present population of ring particles.

  2. Origin and evolution of the Saturn system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pollack, J. B.; Consolmagno, G.

    1984-01-01

    As was the case for Jupiter, Saturn formed either as a result of a gas instability within the solar nebula or the accretion of a solid core that induced an instability within the surrounding solar nebula. In either case, the proto-planet's history is divided into three major stages: early, quasi-hydrostatic evolution (stage 1); hydrodynamical collapse (stage 2); and late, quasi-hydrostatic contraction (stage 3). During stage 1, Saturn had a radius of several hundred times that of its present radius, R(s), while stage 3 began when Saturn had a radius of 3.5 R(s). Stages 1 and 2 lasted one-million to 10-million years and one year, respectively, while stage 3 is continuing through the present epoch. During the early history of the Saturn system, giant impact events may have catastrophically disrupted most of the original satellites of Saturn. Such disruption, followed by reaccretion, may be responsible, in part for the occurrence of Trojans and co-orbital moons in the Saturn system, the apparent presence of a stochastic component in the trend of satellite density with radial distance, and the present population of ring particles.

  3. Origin and evolution of syphilis: drifting myth.

    PubMed

    Sehgal, Virendra N; Verma, Prashant; Chatterjee, Kingshuk; Chaudhuri, Anita; Chatterjee, Gautam; Rasool, Farhan

    2012-01-01

    The venereal form of treponematosis, caused by the spirochete Treponema pallidum, plagued every major city in the preantibiotic era. "Civilization means syphilization," was an idea touted by Richard von Krafft-Ebing in the late 19th, and early 20th centuries that the effects of modern life make men more susceptible to syphilis and other diseases. Christopher Columbus was thought of as an importer of syphilis to Europe. Because his serendipitous voyages to the New World initiated the process of Spanish colonization, which foreshadowed general European colonization of the New World, it is difficult to rule out the cultural and political animosity created by Columbus and his men. These recent revelations are intriguing and may create dialogue that may subsequently challenge the age-old theory of "East to West" spread of venereal syphilis. This contribution warrants the continuation of study in this direction, taking into account skeletal studies that utilized radiocarbon dating technique and the phylogenetic analysis of the bacterial strains, offering a possible consensus on the origin and evolution of syphilis.

  4. Quantum Darwinian Evolution Implies Tumor Origination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, W. Grant

    2011-03-01

    Quantum uncertainty limits operating on metastable amino DNA protons drive the arrangement, keto-amino ? enol-imine, which contributes to time-dependent stochastic mutations. Product enol-imine protons participate in coupled quantum oscillations at frequencies of about 1013 s-1 until ``measured by'' an evolutionarily selected quantum reader, the transcriptase. This introduces entanglement states between coherent protons and transcriptase components, which ultimately yield an ensemble of decohered, non-reequilibrated enol and imine isomers that participate in ``molecular clock'' base substitutions at G'-C' and *G-*C sites. This introduces a quantum Darwinian evolution model which (a) simulates incidence of cancer data and (b) implies insight into quantum origins of evolutionary extinction. Data identify an inherited ``genetic space,'' s, which is initially mutation-free and satisfies the inequality, 1 = s = 0.97. When accumulated stochastic mutations cause s-values to approach their evolutionarily allowed threshold limit, s 0.97 + e, age-related degenerative disease is manifested. This implies a gain in evolutionary advantage which protects the gene pool against acquiring unsafe levels of mutation. Data requiring coherent states imply that classical duplex DNA contains an embedded microphysical subset of electron lone-pairs and hydrogen bonded protons that govern time-dependent genetic specificity in terms of quantum probability laws.

  5. The Journal of Anatomy: origin and evolution.

    PubMed

    Morriss-Kay, Gillian

    2016-07-01

    The Journal of Anatomy was launched 150 years ago as the Journal of Anatomy and Physiology, in an age when anatomy and physiology were not regarded as separate disciplines. European science in general was advancing rapidly at the time (it was 7 years after publication of Darwin's Origin of Species), and the recent demise of the Natural History Review meant that there was no English language publication covering these subjects. The founding editors were George Murray Humphry of Cambridge and William Turner of Edinburgh, together with Alfred Newton of Cambridge and Edward Perceval Wright of Dublin (the last two served only for a year). The pivotal event leading to the Journal's foundation was the 1866 meeting of the British Association, at which Humphry delivered the 'Address in Physiology' (printed in the first issue). Turner, who was also present at the 1866 British Association meeting, remained as a member of the editorial team for 50 years and was a major contributor of Journal articles. The title was changed to Journal of Anatomy in October 1916, when it was taken under the wing, in terms of both management and ownership, by the Anatomical Society. This article reviews the early years of the Journal's publication in more detail than later years because of the historical interest of this less familiar material. The subject matter, which has remained surprisingly consistent over the years, is illustrated by examples from some notable contributions. The evolution of illustration techniques is surveyed from 1866 to the present day; the final section provides brief summaries of all of the chief editors.

  6. Origin and evolution of photosynthetic reaction centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, John M.; Pierson, Beverly K.

    1987-09-01

    The prototype reaction center may have used protoporphyrin-IX associated with small peptides to transfer electrons or protons across the primitive cell membrane. The precursor of all contemporary reaction centers contained chlorophylla molecules as both primary electron donor and initial electron acceptor and an Fe-S center as secondary acceptor (RC-1 type). The biosynthetic pathway for chlorophylla evolved along with the evolution of a better organized reaction center associated with cytochromes and quinones in a primitive cyclic electron transport system. This reaction center probably functioned initially in photoassimilation, but was easily adapted to CO2 fixation using H2 and H2S as reductants. During this phase bacteriochlorophyllg may have evolved from chlorophylla in response to competition for light, and thereby initiated the gram-positive line of eubacteria. A second reaction center (RC-2) evolved from RC-1 between 3.5 and 2.5 Ga ago in response to the competition for reductants for CO2 fixation. The new organism containing RC-2 in series with RC-1 would have been able to use poor reducing agents such as the abundant aqueous ferrous ion in place of H2 and H2S. This new organism is proposed to be the common ancestor of all phototrophic eubacteria except those related to the gram-positive bacteria. All organisms containing bacteriochlorophylla lost either RC-1 or RC-2, while those organisms containing chlorophylla (ancestors of cyanobacteria) added a water-splitting enzyme to RC-2 between 3.0 and 2.5 Ga ago in order to use H2O in place of hydrated ferrous ion as electron donor for autotrophic photosynthesis.

  7. The spectroscopic evolution of the recurrent nova T Pyxidis during its 2011 outburst. I. The optically thick phase and the origin of moving lines in novae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shore, S. N.; Augusteijn, T.; Ederoclite, A.; Uthas, H.

    2011-09-01

    Aims: We aim to derive the physical properties of the recurrent nova T Pyx and the structure of the ejecta during the early stages of expansion of the 2011 outburst. Methods: The nova was observed with high resolution spectroscopy (R ≈ 65 000), from one day after discovery of the outburst and until the last visibility of the star at the end of May 2011. The interstellar absorption lines of Na I, Ca II, CH, CH+, and archival H I 21 cm emission line observations were used to determine a kinematical distance. Interstellar diffuse absorption features have been used to determine the extinction independent of previous assumptions. Sample Fe-peak line profiles show the optical depth and radial velocity evolution of the discrete components. Results: We propose a distance to T Pyx ≥ 4.5 kpc, with a strict lower limit of 3.5 kpc (the previously accepted distance). We derive an extinction, E(B - V) ≈ 0.5 ± 0.1, that is higher than previous estimates. The first observation, Apr. 15, displayed He I, He II, C III, and N III emission lines and a maximum velocity derived from the P Cyg profiles of the Balmer and He I lines of ≈2500 km s-1 that is characteristic of the fireball stage. These ions were undetectable in the second spectrum, Apr. 23, and we use the recombination time to estimate the mass of the ejecta, 10-5f M⊙ for a filling factor f. Numerous absorption-line systems were detected in the Balmer, Fe-peak, Ca II, and Na I lines, mirrored in broader emission-line components, that showed an "accelerated" displacement in velocity. We also show that the time sequence of these absorptions, which are common to all lines and arise only in the ejecta, can be described by a recombination front moving outward in the expanding gas without either a stellar wind or circumstellar collisions. By the end of May, the ejecta were showing signs of turning optically thin in the ultraviolet. Appendices are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  8. Origin and Evolution of Planetary Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, Douglas

    We propose here to continue our promising investigations into satellite systems in order to elucidate general planetary formation processes. We will investigate the origin and evolution of planetary satellites with both numerical and analytical methods, focusing first on Jupiter's Galilean satellites and then on the large saturnian moons. Our objective is to determine the state of these systems immediately after their formation; these constraints will be useful to researchers who simulate satellite formation and will provide guidance for scientists interested in tidal evolution of exoplanets. There are a number of important parallels between the formation of planetary systems and the subsequent development of planetary satellite systems. Although planetary formation has been studied in much greater detail, there are abundant and perhaps more detailed clues to general formation processes awaiting discovery in the satellite systems of the four giant planets. Thus these systems are important local sources of information that can be mined for insight into critical formation processes. We will use our sophisticated N-Body codes to investigate satellite formation and evolutionary processes with the following key goals: Determine the initial configuration of Jupiter's Galilean satellites by using their current inclinations as fossil clues to past resonance passages Determine the timing of dynamical events affecting the Galilean satellites and put strong constraints on the tidal Q values of Io, Europa, and Jupiter and iii) Investigate the resonant history of the saturnian satellites Mimas through Iapetus, paying particular attention to free inclinations and eccentricities. Andrew Howard/UC Berkeley A Window on Planet Formation from Precise Physical Properties of Kepler Planets and Stars The Kepler mission has detected more than 1200 planets and is transforming our understanding of planet formation, migration, and evolution. From the ensemble of Kepler planets, we have

  9. Origin and Evolution of Planetary Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, Douglas

    We propose here to continue our promising investigations into satellite systems in order to elucidate general planetary formation processes. We will investigate the origin and evolution of planetary satellites with both numerical and analytical methods, focusing first on Jupiter's Galilean satellites and then on the large saturnian moons. Our objective is to determine the state of these systems immediately after their formation; these constraints will be useful to researchers who simulate satellite formation and will provide guidance for scientists interested in tidal evolution of exoplanets. There are a number of important parallels between the formation of planetary systems and the subsequent development of planetary satellite systems. Although planetary formation has been studied in much greater detail, there are abundant and perhaps more detailed clues to general formation processes awaiting discovery in the satellite systems of the four giant planets. Thus these systems are important local sources of information that can be mined for insight into critical formation processes. We will use our sophisticated N-Body codes to investigate satellite formation and evolutionary processes with the following key goals: Determine the initial configuration of Jupiter's Galilean satellites by using their current inclinations as fossil clues to past resonance passages Determine the timing of dynamical events affecting the Galilean satellites and put strong constraints on the tidal Q values of Io, Europa, and Jupiter and iii) Investigate the resonant history of the saturnian satellites Mimas through Iapetus, paying particular attention to free inclinations and eccentricities. Andrew Howard/UC Berkeley - A Window on Planet Formation from Precise Physical Properties of Kepler Planets and Stars The Kepler mission has detected more than 1200 planets and is transforming our understanding of planet formation, migration, and evolution. From the ensemble of Kepler planets, we have

  10. Chemical evolution and the origin of life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oro, J.

    1983-01-01

    A review is presented of recent advances made in the understanding of the formation of carbon compounds in the universe and the occurrence of processes of chemical evolution. Topics discussed include the principle of evolutionary continuity, evolution as a fundamental principle of the physical universe, the nuclear synthesis of biogenic elements, organic cosmochemistry and interstellar molecules, the solar nebula and the solar system in chemical evolution, the giant planets and Titan in chemical evolution, and comets and their interaction with the earth. Also examined are carbonaceous chondrites, environment of the primitive earth, energy sources available on the primitive earth, the synthesis of biochemical monomers and oligomers, the abiotic transcription of nucleotides, unified prebiotic and enzymatic mechanisms, phospholipids and membranes, and protobiological evolution.

  11. Chemical evolution and the origin of life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oro, J.

    1983-01-01

    A review is presented of recent advances made in the understanding of the formation of carbon compounds in the universe and the occurrence of processes of chemical evolution. Topics discussed include the principle of evolutionary continuity, evolution as a fundamental principle of the physical universe, the nuclear synthesis of biogenic elements, organic cosmochemistry and interstellar molecules, the solar nebula and the solar system in chemical evolution, the giant planets and Titan in chemical evolution, and comets and their interaction with the earth. Also examined are carbonaceous chondrites, environment of the primitive earth, energy sources available on the primitive earth, the synthesis of biochemical monomers and oligomers, the abiotic transcription of nucleotides, unified prebiotic and enzymatic mechanisms, phospholipids and membranes, and protobiological evolution.

  12. Origin and Evolution of the Mitochondrial Proteome

    PubMed Central

    Kurland, C. G.; Andersson, S. G. E.

    2000-01-01

    The endosymbiotic theory for the origin of mitochondria requires substantial modification. The three identifiable ancestral sources to the proteome of mitochondria are proteins descended from the ancestral α-proteobacteria symbiont, proteins with no homology to bacterial orthologs, and diverse proteins with bacterial affinities not derived from α-proteobacteria. Random mutations in the form of deletions large and small seem to have eliminated nonessential genes from the endosymbiont-mitochondrial genome lineages. This process, together with the transfer of genes from the endosymbiont-mitochondrial genome to nuclei, has led to a marked reduction in the size of mitochondrial genomes. All proteins of bacterial descent that are encoded by nuclear genes were probably transferred by the same mechanism, involving the disintegration of mitochondria or bacteria by the intracellular membranous vacuoles of cells to release nucleic acid fragments that transform the nuclear genome. This ongoing process has intermittently introduced bacterial genes to nuclear genomes. The genomes of the last common ancestor of all organisms, in particular of mitochondria, encoded cytochrome oxidase homologues. There are no phylogenetic indications either in the mitochondrial proteome or in the nuclear genomes that the initial or subsequent function of the ancestor to the mitochondria was anaerobic. In contrast, there are indications that relatively advanced eukaryotes adapted to anaerobiosis by dismantling their mitochondria and refitting them as hydrogenosomes. Accordingly, a continuous history of aerobic respiration seems to have been the fate of most mitochondrial lineages. The initial phases of this history may have involved aerobic respiration by the symbiont functioning as a scavenger of toxic oxygen. The transition to mitochondria capable of active ATP export to the host cell seems to have required recruitment of eukaryotic ATP transport proteins from the nucleus. The identity of the

  13. Origin and thermal evolution of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schubert, G.; Solomon, Sean C.; Turcotte, D. L.; Drake, M. J.; Sleep, N. H.

    1993-01-01

    The thermal evolution of Mars is governed by subsolidus mantle convection beneath a thick lithosphere. Models of the interior evolution are developed by parameterizing mantle convective heat transport in terms of mantle viscosity, the superadiabatic temperature rise across the mantle and mantle heat production. Geological, geophysical, and geochemical observations of the composition and structure of the interior and of the timing of major events in Martian evolution, such as global differentiation, atmospheric outgassing and the formation of the hemispherical dichotomy and Tharsis, are used to constrain the model computations. Isotope systematics of SNC meteorites suggest core formation essentially contemporaneously with the completion of accretion. Other aspects of this investigation are discussed.

  14. The Origin and Evolution of Interstellar Dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dwek, Eli; Houches, Les

    2006-01-01

    In this lecture I will discuss the many different manifestation of interstellar dust, and current dust models that satisfy interstellar extinction, diffuse infrared emission, and interstellar abundances constraints. Dust is made predominantly in AGB stars and Type I1 supernovae, and I will present observational evidence for the presence of dust in these sources. I will then present chemical evolution models that follow the abundance of dust which is determined by the combined processes of formation, destruction by interstellar shock waves, and accretion in molecular clouds. The model will be applied to the evolution of PAHs and the evolution of dust in the high-redshift galaxy (z=6.42) JD11.

  15. The Origin and Evolution of Interstellar Dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dwek, Eli; Houches, Les

    2006-01-01

    In this lecture I will discuss the many different manifestation of interstellar dust, and current dust models that satisfy interstellar extinction, diffuse infrared emission, and interstellar abundances constraints. Dust is made predominantly in AGB stars and Type I1 supernovae, and I will present observational evidence for the presence of dust in these sources. I will then present chemical evolution models that follow the abundance of dust which is determined by the combined processes of formation, destruction by interstellar shock waves, and accretion in molecular clouds. The model will be applied to the evolution of PAHs and the evolution of dust in the high-redshift galaxy (z=6.42) JD11.

  16. Insect Evolution: The Origin of Wings.

    PubMed

    Ross, Andrew

    2017-02-06

    The debate on the evolution of wings in insects has reached a new level. The study of primitive fossil insect nymphs has revealed that wings developed from a combination of the dorsal part of the thorax and the body wall.

  17. Origin and Evolution of the Cometary Reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dones, Luke; Brasser, Ramon; Kaib, Nathan; Rickman, Hans

    2015-12-01

    Comets have three known reservoirs: the roughly spherical Oort Cloud (for long-period comets), the flattened Kuiper Belt (for ecliptic comets), and, surprisingly, the asteroid belt (for main-belt comets). Comets in the Oort Cloud were thought to have formed in the region of the giant planets and then placed in quasi-stable orbits at distances of thousands or tens of thousands of AU through the gravitational effects of the planets and the Galaxy. The planets were long assumed to have formed in place. However, the giant planets may have undergone two episodes of migration. The first would have taken place in the first few million years of the Solar System, during or shortly after the formation of the giant planets, when gas was still present in the protoplanetary disk around the Sun. The Grand Tack (Walsh et al. in Nature 475:206-209, 2011) models how this stage of migration could explain the low mass of Mars and deplete, then repopulate the asteroid belt, with outer-belt asteroids originating between, and outside of, the orbits of the giant planets. The second stage of migration would have occurred later (possibly hundreds of millions of years later) due to interactions with a remnant disk of planetesimals, i.e., a massive ancestor of the Kuiper Belt. Safronov (Evolution of the Protoplanetary Cloud and Formation of the Earth and the Planets, 1969) and Fernández and Ip (Icarus 58:109-120, 1984) proposed that the giant planets would have migrated as they interacted with leftover planetesimals; Jupiter would have moved slightly inward, while Saturn and (especially) Uranus and Neptune would have moved outward from the Sun. Malhotra (Nature 365:819-821, 1993) showed that Pluto's orbit in the 3:2 resonance with Neptune was a natural outcome if Neptune captured Pluto into resonance while it migrated outward. Building on this work, Tsiganis et al. (Nature 435:459-461, 2005) proposed the Nice model, in which the giant planets formed closer together than they are now, and

  18. Origin of morphotropic phase boundaries in ferroelectrics.

    PubMed

    Ahart, Muhtar; Somayazulu, Maddury; Cohen, R E; Ganesh, P; Dera, Przemyslaw; Mao, Ho-kwang; Hemley, Russell J; Ren, Yang; Liermann, Peter; Wu, Zhigang

    2008-01-31

    A piezoelectric material is one that generates a voltage in response to a mechanical strain (and vice versa). The most useful piezoelectric materials display a transition region in their composition phase diagrams, known as a morphotropic phase boundary, where the crystal structure changes abruptly and the electromechanical properties are maximal. As a result, modern piezoelectric materials for technological applications are usually complex, engineered, solid solutions, which complicates their manufacture as well as introducing complexity in the study of the microscopic origins of their properties. Here we show that even a pure compound, in this case lead titanate, can display a morphotropic phase boundary under pressure. The results are consistent with first-principles theoretical predictions, but show a richer phase diagram than anticipated; moreover, the predicted electromechanical coupling at the transition is larger than any known. Our results show that the high electromechanical coupling in solid solutions with lead titanate is due to tuning of the high-pressure morphotropic phase boundary in pure lead titanate to ambient pressure. We also find that complex microstructures or compositions are not necessary to obtain strong piezoelectricity. This opens the door to the possible discovery of high-performance, pure-compound electromechanical materials, which could greatly decrease costs and expand the utility of piezoelectric materials.

  19. Theory of the origin, evolution, and nature of life.

    PubMed

    Andrulis, Erik D

    2011-12-23

    Life is an inordinately complex unsolved puzzle. Despite significant theoretical progress, experimental anomalies, paradoxes, and enigmas have revealed paradigmatic limitations. Thus, the advancement of scientific understanding requires new models that resolve fundamental problems. Here, I present a theoretical framework that economically fits evidence accumulated from examinations of life. This theory is based upon a straightforward and non-mathematical core model and proposes unique yet empirically consistent explanations for major phenomena including, but not limited to, quantum gravity, phase transitions of water, why living systems are predominantly CHNOPS (carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen, oxygen, phosphorus, and sulfur), homochirality of sugars and amino acids, homeoviscous adaptation, triplet code, and DNA mutations. The theoretical framework unifies the macrocosmic and microcosmic realms, validates predicted laws of nature, and solves the puzzle of the origin and evolution of cellular life in the universe.

  20. Theory of the Origin, Evolution, and Nature of Life

    PubMed Central

    Andrulis, Erik D.

    2011-01-01

    Life is an inordinately complex unsolved puzzle. Despite significant theoretical progress, experimental anomalies, paradoxes, and enigmas have revealed paradigmatic limitations. Thus, the advancement of scientific understanding requires new models that resolve fundamental problems. Here, I present a theoretical framework that economically fits evidence accumulated from examinations of life. This theory is based upon a straightforward and non-mathematical core model and proposes unique yet empirically consistent explanations for major phenomena including, but not limited to, quantum gravity, phase transitions of water, why living systems are predominantly CHNOPS (carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen, oxygen, phosphorus, and sulfur), homochirality of sugars and amino acids, homeoviscous adaptation, triplet code, and DNA mutations. The theoretical framework unifies the macrocosmic and microcosmic realms, validates predicted laws of nature, and solves the puzzle of the origin and evolution of cellular life in the universe. PMID:25382118

  1. Origin and thermal evolution of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schubert, Gerald; Soloman, S. C.; Turcotte, D. L.; Drake, M. J.; Sleep, N. H.

    1990-01-01

    The thermal evolution of Mars is governed by subsolidus mantle convection beneath a thick lithosphere. Models of the interior evolution are developed by parameterizing mantle convective heat transport in terms of mantle viscosity, the superadiabatic temperature rise across the mantle, and mantle heat production. Geological, geophysical, and geochemical observations of the compositon and structure of the interior and of the timing of major events in Martian evolution are used to constrain the model computations. Such evolutionary events include global differentiation, atmospheric outgassing, and the formation of the hemispherical dichotomy and Tharsis. Numerical calculations of fully three-dimensional, spherical convection in a shell the size of the Martian mantle are performed to explore plausible patterns of Martian mantel convection and to relate convective features, such as plumes, to surface features, such as Tharsis. The results from the model calculations are presented.

  2. The origin and evolution of atmospheric oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, Joel S.

    1988-01-01

    This paper discusses the chemical processes involved in the evolution of the earth's atmospheric oxygen and ozone, as well as the sources, sinks, and transfer rates of oxygen in the present atmosphere. Special attention is given the evolution of atmospheric O3 as a function of the buildup of O2, with the results of calculations presented as the vertical profiles of O3, in terms of the present atmospheric level (PAL) oxygen values. Calculations show that the total O3 column density that is approximately half of the present level was reached when atmospheric oxygen level reached 0.1 PAL. At this level of ozone, the biological shielding of the earth's surface from the UV radiation is believed to have been achieved.

  3. Origin and evolution of metabolic pathways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fani, Renato; Fondi, Marco

    2009-03-01

    The emergence and evolution of metabolic pathways represented a crucial step in molecular and cellular evolution. In fact, the exhaustion of the prebiotic supply of amino acids and other compounds that were likely present in the ancestral environment, imposed an important selective pressure, favoring those primordial heterotrophic cells which became capable of synthesizing those molecules. Thus, the emergence of metabolic pathways allowed primitive organisms to become increasingly less-dependent on exogenous sources of organic compounds. Comparative analyses of genes and genomes from organisms belonging to Archaea, Bacteria and Eukarya revealed that, during evolution, different forces and molecular mechanisms might have driven the shaping of genomes and the arisal of new metabolic abilities. Among these gene elongations, gene and operon duplications undoubtedly played a major role since they can lead to the (immediate) appearance of new genetic material that, in turn, might undergo evolutionary divergence giving rise to new genes coding for new metabolic abilities. Gene duplication has been invoked in the different schemes proposed to explain why and how the extant metabolic pathways have arisen and shaped. Both the analysis of completely sequenced genomes and directed evolution experiments strongly support one of them, i.e. the patchwork hypothesis, according to which metabolic pathways have been assembled through the recruitment of primitive enzymes that could react with a wide range of chemically related substrates. However, the analysis of the structure and organization of genes belonging to ancient metabolic pathways, such as histidine biosynthesis and nitrogen fixation, suggested that other different hypothesis, i.e. the retrograde hypothesis or the semi-enzymatic theory, may account for the arisal of some metabolic routes.

  4. The origin, evolution and signatures of primordial magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subramanian, Kandaswamy

    2016-07-01

    The universe is magnetized on all scales probed so far. On the largest scales, galaxies and galaxy clusters host magnetic fields at the micro Gauss level coherent on scales up to ten kpc. Recent observational evidence suggests that even the intergalactic medium in voids could host a weak  ˜  10-16 Gauss magnetic field, coherent on Mpc scales. An intriguing possibility is that these observed magnetic fields are a relic from the early universe, albeit one which has been subsequently amplified and maintained by a dynamo in collapsed objects. We review here the origin, evolution and signatures of primordial magnetic fields. After a brief summary of magnetohydrodynamics in the expanding universe, we turn to magnetic field generation during inflation and phase transitions. We trace the linear and nonlinear evolution of the generated primordial fields through the radiation era, including viscous effects. Sensitive observational signatures of primordial magnetic fields on the cosmic microwave background, including current constraints from Planck, are discussed. After recombination, primordial magnetic fields could strongly influence structure formation, especially on dwarf galaxy scales. The resulting signatures on reionization, the redshifted 21 cm line, weak lensing and the Lyman-α forest are outlined. Constraints from radio and γ-ray astronomy are summarized. Astrophysical batteries and the role of dynamos in reshaping the primordial field are briefly considered. The review ends with some final thoughts on primordial magnetic fields.

  5. The origin, evolution and signatures of primordial magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Subramanian, Kandaswamy

    2016-07-01

    The universe is magnetized on all scales probed so far. On the largest scales, galaxies and galaxy clusters host magnetic fields at the micro Gauss level coherent on scales up to ten kpc. Recent observational evidence suggests that even the intergalactic medium in voids could host a weak  ∼  10(-16) Gauss magnetic field, coherent on Mpc scales. An intriguing possibility is that these observed magnetic fields are a relic from the early universe, albeit one which has been subsequently amplified and maintained by a dynamo in collapsed objects. We review here the origin, evolution and signatures of primordial magnetic fields. After a brief summary of magnetohydrodynamics in the expanding universe, we turn to magnetic field generation during inflation and phase transitions. We trace the linear and nonlinear evolution of the generated primordial fields through the radiation era, including viscous effects. Sensitive observational signatures of primordial magnetic fields on the cosmic microwave background, including current constraints from Planck, are discussed. After recombination, primordial magnetic fields could strongly influence structure formation, especially on dwarf galaxy scales. The resulting signatures on reionization, the redshifted 21 cm line, weak lensing and the Lyman-α forest are outlined. Constraints from radio and γ-ray astronomy are summarized. Astrophysical batteries and the role of dynamos in reshaping the primordial field are briefly considered. The review ends with some final thoughts on primordial magnetic fields.

  6. Phase Transformations and Microstructural Evolution: Part II

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, Amy Jean

    2015-10-30

    The activities of the Phase Transformations Committee of the Materials Processing & Manufacturing Division (MPMD) of The Minerals, Metals & Materials Society (TMS) are oriented toward understanding the fundamental aspects of phase transformations. Emphasis is placed on the thermodynamic driving forces for phase transformations, the kinetics of nucleation and growth, interfacial structures and energies, transformation crystallography, surface reliefs, and, above all, the atomic mechanisms of phase transformations. Phase transformations and microstructural evolution are directly linked to materials processing, properties, and performance. In this issue, aspects of liquid–solid and solid-state phase transformations and microstructural evolution are highlighted. Many papers in this issue are highlighted by this paper, giving a brief summary of what they bring to the scientific community.

  7. Phase Transformations and Microstructural Evolution: Part I

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, Amy Jean

    2015-08-29

    The activities of the Phase Transformations Committee of the Materials Processing & Manufacturing Division (MPMD) of The Minerals, Metals & Materials Society (TMS) are oriented toward understanding the fundamental aspects of phase transformations. Emphasis is placed on the thermodynamic driving forces for phase transformations, the kinetics of nucleation and growth, interfacial structures and energies, transformation crystallography, surface reliefs, and, above all, the atomic mechanisms of phase transformations. Phase transformations and microstructural evolution are directly linked to materials processing, properties, and performance, including in extreme environments, of structural metal alloys. In this paper, aspects of phase transformations and microstructural evolution are highlighted from the atomic to the microscopic scale for ferrous and non-ferrous alloys. Many papers from this issue are highlighted with small summaries of their scientific achievements given.

  8. Phase Transformations and Microstructural Evolution: Part II

    DOE PAGES

    Clarke, Amy Jean

    2015-10-30

    The activities of the Phase Transformations Committee of the Materials Processing & Manufacturing Division (MPMD) of The Minerals, Metals & Materials Society (TMS) are oriented toward understanding the fundamental aspects of phase transformations. Emphasis is placed on the thermodynamic driving forces for phase transformations, the kinetics of nucleation and growth, interfacial structures and energies, transformation crystallography, surface reliefs, and, above all, the atomic mechanisms of phase transformations. Phase transformations and microstructural evolution are directly linked to materials processing, properties, and performance. In this issue, aspects of liquid–solid and solid-state phase transformations and microstructural evolution are highlighted. Many papers in thismore » issue are highlighted by this paper, giving a brief summary of what they bring to the scientific community.« less

  9. Phase Transformations and Microstructural Evolution: Part I

    DOE PAGES

    Clarke, Amy Jean

    2015-08-29

    The activities of the Phase Transformations Committee of the Materials Processing & Manufacturing Division (MPMD) of The Minerals, Metals & Materials Society (TMS) are oriented toward understanding the fundamental aspects of phase transformations. Emphasis is placed on the thermodynamic driving forces for phase transformations, the kinetics of nucleation and growth, interfacial structures and energies, transformation crystallography, surface reliefs, and, above all, the atomic mechanisms of phase transformations. Phase transformations and microstructural evolution are directly linked to materials processing, properties, and performance, including in extreme environments, of structural metal alloys. In this paper, aspects of phase transformations and microstructural evolution aremore » highlighted from the atomic to the microscopic scale for ferrous and non-ferrous alloys. Many papers from this issue are highlighted with small summaries of their scientific achievements given.« less

  10. The Origin and Evolution of Dinosaurs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sereno, Paul C.

    Phylogenetic studies and new fossil evidence have yielded fundamental insights into the pattern and timing of dinosaur evolution and the emergence of functionally modern birds. The dinosaurian radiation began in the Middle Triassic and significantly predates their rise to global dominance by the end of the period. The phylogenetic history of ornithischian and saurichian dinosaurs reveals evolutionary trends such as increasing body size. Adaptations to herbivory dinosaurs were not tightly correlated with marked floral changes. Dinosaurian biogeography during the era of continental breakup principally involved dispersal and regional extinction.

  11. The origin and evolution of cell types.

    PubMed

    Arendt, Detlev; Musser, Jacob M; Baker, Clare V H; Bergman, Aviv; Cepko, Connie; Erwin, Douglas H; Pavlicev, Mihaela; Schlosser, Gerhard; Widder, Stefanie; Laubichler, Manfred D; Wagner, Günter P

    2016-12-01

    Cell types are the basic building blocks of multicellular organisms and are extensively diversified in animals. Despite recent advances in characterizing cell types, classification schemes remain ambiguous. We propose an evolutionary definition of a cell type that allows cell types to be delineated and compared within and between species. Key to cell type identity are evolutionary changes in the 'core regulatory complex' (CoRC) of transcription factors, that make emergent sister cell types distinct, enable their independent evolution and regulate cell type-specific traits termed apomeres. We discuss the distinction between developmental and evolutionary lineages, and present a roadmap for future research.

  12. Origin and Evolution of the Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McWilliam, Andrew; Rauch, Michael

    2004-09-01

    Introduction; List of participants; 1. Mount Wilson Observatory contributions to the study of cosmic abundances of the chemical elements George W. Preston; 2. Synthesis of the elements in stars: B2FH and beyond E. Margaret Burbidge; 3. Stellar nucleosynthesis: a status report 2003 David Arnett; 4. Advances in r-process nucleosynthesis John J. Cowan and Christopher Sneden; 5. Element yields of intermediate-mass stars Richard B. C. Henry; 6. The impact of rotation on chemical abundances in red giant branch stars Corinne Charbonnel; 7. s-processing in AGB stars and the composition of carbon stars Maurizio Busso, Oscar Straniero, Roberto Gallino, and Carlos Abia; 8. Models of chemical evolution Francesca Matteucci; 9. Model atmospheres and stellar abundance analysis Bengt Gustafsson; 10. The light elements: lithium, beryllium, and boron Ann Merchant Boesgaard; 11. Extremely metal-poor stars John E. Norris; 12. Thin and thick galactic disks Poul E. Nissen; 13. Globular clusters and halo field stars Christopher Sneden, Inese I. Ivans and Jon P. Fulbright; 14. Chemical evolution in ω Centauri Verne V. Smith; 15. Chemical composition of the Magellanic Clouds, from young to old stars Vanessa Hill; 16. Detailed composition of stars in dwarf spheroidal galaxies Matthew D. Shetrone; 17. The evolutionary history of Local Group irregular galaxies Eva K. Grebel; 18. Chemical evolution of the old stellar populations of M31 R. Michael Rich; 19. Stellar winds of hot massive stars nearby and beyond the Local Group Fabio Bresolin and Rolf P. Kudritzki; 20. Presolar stardust grains Donald D. Clayton and Larry R. Nittler; 21. Interstellar dust B. T. Draine; 22. Interstellar atomic abundances Edward B. Jenkins; 23. Molecules in the interstellar medium Tommy Wiklind; 24. Metal ejection by galactic winds Crystal L. Martin; 25. Abundances from the integrated light of globular clusters and galaxies Scott C. Trager; 26. Abundances in spiral and irregular galaxies Donald R. Garnett; 27

  13. The origin and evolution of model organisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hedges, S. Blair

    2002-01-01

    The phylogeny and timescale of life are becoming better understood as the analysis of genomic data from model organisms continues to grow. As a result, discoveries are being made about the early history of life and the origin and development of complex multicellular life. This emerging comparative framework and the emphasis on historical patterns is helping to bridge barriers among organism-based research communities.

  14. The origin and evolution of model organisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hedges, S. Blair

    2002-01-01

    The phylogeny and timescale of life are becoming better understood as the analysis of genomic data from model organisms continues to grow. As a result, discoveries are being made about the early history of life and the origin and development of complex multicellular life. This emerging comparative framework and the emphasis on historical patterns is helping to bridge barriers among organism-based research communities.

  15. Origin of Archean granitoids and continental evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rapp, R. P.

    The origin of a stable, permanent crust is inextricably linked to granitoid genesis. The oldest terranes on Earth contain abundant granitoids, presumably representing the low density material that buoyed the crust and prevented its recycling into the mantle. The question of the origin of these rocks is thus fundamental to understanding Earth history: What was their source material, and what processes caused it to melt? Analogies with modern felsic magma genesis are tempting but not necessarily applicable, first because there are obvious reasons to doubt that present conditions characterized the early Archean (modern geotherms, well-established subduction zones, massive stable continental crust, and others), and also because early granitoids differed in detail from most of their modern counterparts.In this article, R.P. Rapp, who has done extensive experiments on the moderate-to-high-pressure melting behavior of mafic rocks, presents a decidedly non-uniformitarian view of the origin of the tonalite-trondhjemite-granodiorite suite that characterizes the early Archean crust.—Calvin Miller, “Friends of Granite” editor, Vanderbilt University

  16. Origin and evolution of the Amazonian craton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibbs, A. K.; Wirth, K. R.

    1986-01-01

    The Amazonian craton appears to be formed and modifed by processes much like those of the better-known Precambrian cratons, but the major events did not always follow conventional sequences nor did they occur synchronously with those of other cratons. Much of the craton's Archean style continental crust formation, recorded in granite-greenstone and high-grade terranes, occurred in the Early Proterozoic: a period of relative quiescence in many other Precambrian regions. The common Archean to Proterozoic transition in geological style did not occur here, but an analogous change from abundant marine volcanism to dominantly continental sedimentary and eruptive styles occurred later. Amazonian geology is summarized, explaining the evolution of the craton.

  17. The origins and evolution of leadership.

    PubMed

    King, Andrew J; Johnson, Dominic D P; Van Vugt, Mark

    2009-10-13

    How groups of individuals achieve coordination and collective action is an important topic in the natural sciences, but until recently the role of leadership in this process has been largely overlooked. In contrast, leadership is arguably one of the most important themes in the social sciences, permeating all aspects of human social affairs: the election of Barack Obama, the war in Iraq, and the collapse of the banks are all high-profile events that draw our attention to the fundamental role of leadership and followership. Converging ideas and developments in both the natural and social sciences suggest that leadership and followership share common properties across humans and other animals, pointing to ancient roots and evolutionary origins. Here, we draw upon key insights from the animal and human literature to lay the foundation for a new science of leadership inspired by an evolutionary perspective. Identifying the origins of human leadership and followership, as well as which aspects are shared with other animals and which are unique, offers ways of understanding, predicting, and improving leadership today.

  18. Origin and evolution of Nipah virus.

    PubMed

    Lo Presti, Alessandra; Cella, Eleonora; Giovanetti, Marta; Lai, Alessia; Angeletti, Silvia; Zehender, Gianguglielmo; Ciccozzi, Massimo

    2016-03-01

    Nipah virus, member of the Paramyxoviridae family, is classified as a Biosafety Level-4 agent and category C priority pathogen. Nipah virus disease is endemic in south Asia and outbreaks have been reported in Malaysia, Singapore, India, and Bangladesh. Bats of the genus Pteropus appear to be the natural reservoir of this virus. The aim of this study was to investigate the genetic diversity of Nipah virus, to estimate the date of origin and the spread of the infection. The mean value of Nipah virus N gene evolutionary rate, was 6.5 × 10(-4) substitution/site/year (95% HPD: 2.3 × 10(-4)-1.18 × 10(-3)). The time-scaled phylogenetic analysis showed that the root of the tree originated in 1947 (95% HPD: 1888-1988) as the virus entered in south eastern Asiatic regions. The segregation of sequences in two main clades (I and II) indicating that Nipah virus had two different introductions: one in 1995 (95% HPD: 1985-2002) which correspond to clade I, and the other in 1985 (95% HPD: 1971-1996) which correspond to clade II. The phylogeographic reconstruction indicated that the epidemic followed two different routes spreading to the other locations. The trade of infected pigs may have played a role in the spread of the virus. Bats of the Pteropus genus, that are able to travel to long distances, may have contributed to the spread of the infection. Negatively selected sites, statistically supported, could reflect the stability of the viral N protein.

  19. The origin and evolution of word order

    PubMed Central

    Gell-Mann, Murray; Ruhlen, Merritt

    2011-01-01

    Recent work in comparative linguistics suggests that all, or almost all, attested human languages may derive from a single earlier language. If that is so, then this language—like nearly all extant languages—most likely had a basic ordering of the subject (S), verb (V), and object (O) in a declarative sentence of the type “the man (S) killed (V) the bear (O).” When one compares the distribution of the existing structural types with the putative phylogenetic tree of human languages, four conclusions may be drawn. (i) The word order in the ancestral language was SOV. (ii) Except for cases of diffusion, the direction of syntactic change, when it occurs, has been for the most part SOV > SVO and, beyond that, SVO > VSO/VOS with a subsequent reversion to SVO occurring occasionally. Reversion to SOV occurs only through diffusion. (iii) Diffusion, although important, is not the dominant process in the evolution of word order. (iv) The two extremely rare word orders (OVS and OSV) derive directly from SOV. PMID:21987807

  20. Sixth Symposium on Chemical Evolution and the Origin and Evolution of Life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acevedo, Sara (Editor); DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Editor); Chang, Sherwood (Editor)

    1998-01-01

    The 6th Symposium on Chemical Evolution and the Origin and Evolution of Life was convened at NASA Ames Research Center, November 17-20, 1997. This Symposium is convened every three years under the auspices of NASA's Exobiology Program Office. All Principal Investigators funded by this Program present their most recent research accomplishments at the Symposium. Scientific papers were presented in the following areas: cosmic evolution of the biogenic elements, prebiotic evolution (both planetary and chemical), evolution of early organisms and evolution of organisms in extreme environments, solar system exploration, and star and planet formation. The Symposium was attended by over 200 scientists from NASA centers and Universities nationwide.

  1. The origin and evolution of phototropins

    PubMed Central

    Li, Fay-Wei; Rothfels, Carl J.; Melkonian, Michael; Villarreal, Juan C.; Stevenson, Dennis W.; Graham, Sean W.; Wong, Gane K.-S.; Mathews, Sarah; Pryer, Kathleen M.

    2015-01-01

    Plant phototropism, the ability to bend toward or away from light, is predominantly controlled by blue-light photoreceptors, the phototropins. Although phototropins have been well-characterized in Arabidopsis thaliana, their evolutionary history is largely unknown. In this study, we complete an in-depth survey of phototropin homologs across land plants and algae using newly available transcriptomic and genomic data. We show that phototropins originated in an ancestor of Viridiplantae (land plants + green algae). Phototropins repeatedly underwent independent duplications in most major land-plant lineages (mosses, lycophytes, ferns, and seed plants), but remained single-copy genes in liverworts and hornworts—an evolutionary pattern shared with another family of photoreceptors, the phytochromes. Following each major duplication event, the phototropins differentiated in parallel, resulting in two specialized, yet partially overlapping, functional forms that primarily mediate either low- or high-light responses. Our detailed phylogeny enables us to not only uncover new phototropin lineages, but also link our understanding of phototropin function in Arabidopsis with what is known in Adiantum and Physcomitrella (the major model organisms outside of flowering plants). We propose that the convergent functional divergences of phototropin paralogs likely contributed to the success of plants through time in adapting to habitats with diverse and heterogeneous light conditions. PMID:26322073

  2. Origin and Evolution of Europa's Oxygen Exosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oza, Apurva V.; Leblanc, Francois; Schmidt, Carl; Johnson, Robert E.

    2016-10-01

    Europa's icy surface is constantly bombarded by sulfur and oxygen ions originating from the Io plasma torus. The momentum transferred to molecules in Europa's surface results in the sputtering of water ice, populating a water product exosphere. We simulate Europa's neutral exosphere using a ballistic 3D Monte Carlo routine and find that the O2 exosphere, while global, is not uniformly symmetric in Europa local time. The O2 exosphere, sourced at a rate of ~ 5 kg/s with a disk-averaged column density of NO2 ~ 2.5 x 1014 O2/cm2, preferentially accumulates towards Europa's dusk. These dawn-dusk atmospheric inhomogeneities escalate as the surface-bounded O2 dissociates into an atomic O corona via electron impact. The inhomogeneities persist and evolve throughout the satellite's orbit, implying a diurnal cycle of the exosphere, recently evidenced by a detailed HST oxygen aurorae campaign (Roth et al. 2016). We conclude that the consistently observed 50% increase in FUV auroral emission from dusk to dawn is principally driven by the day-to-night thermal diffusion of O2 coupled with the Coriolis acceleration. This leads to a dawn-to-dusk gradient, peaking at Europa's leading hemisphere. This exospheric oxygen cycle, dependent on both orbital longitude and magnetic latitude, is fundamentally due to the bulk-sputtering vector changing with respect to the subsolar and subjovian points throughout the orbit. In principle, a similar mechanism should be present at other tidally-locked, rapidly orbiting satellite exospheres.

  3. The Origin and Evolution of Ribonucleotide Reduction

    PubMed Central

    Lundin, Daniel; Berggren, Gustav; Logan, Derek T.; Sjöberg, Britt-Marie

    2015-01-01

    Ribonucleotide reduction is the only pathway for de novo synthesis of deoxyribonucleotides in extant organisms. This chemically demanding reaction, which proceeds via a carbon-centered free radical, is catalyzed by ribonucleotide reductase (RNR). The mechanism has been deemed unlikely to be catalyzed by a ribozyme, creating an enigma regarding how the building blocks for DNA were synthesized at the transition from RNA- to DNA-encoded genomes. While it is entirely possible that a different pathway was later replaced with the modern mechanism, here we explore the evolutionary and biochemical limits for an origin of the mechanism in the RNA + protein world and suggest a model for a prototypical ribonucleotide reductase (protoRNR). From the protoRNR evolved the ancestor to modern RNRs, the urRNR, which diversified into the modern three classes. Since the initial radical generation differs between the three modern classes, it is difficult to establish how it was generated in the urRNR. Here we suggest a model that is similar to the B12-dependent mechanism in modern class II RNRs. PMID:25734234

  4. Origin and Evolution of the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Cuixiang

    2014-01-01

    Since the Moon is the only natural satellite of the Earth, the research on the formation of the Moon can not only find out the formation mechanism of the satellites of Solar System planets but also reveal the evolution law of galaxies in the universe. Hence many hypotheses have been proposed for the Moon's formation, including fission,capture,condensation,and impact event hypothesis, but they all have problems. Recently, the author of this abstract discovered the formation mechanism of the Moon, which can be called ``evolution theory'', and described as follows: During some violent volcanic eruptions of the Earth, some rock debris such as pumice through deep rock hole could achieve a velocity no less than the first cosmic velocity (7.9 km/s) to enter an orbit around the Earth, one of the biggest debris is the young Moon. The orbit of the young Moon might be much closer to the Earth than it is today. There were a lot of ejecta from the Earth in the space. Hence, the Moon has merged these ejecta to become larger and larger, and farther and farther away from the Earth.This can be proved as follows: When the Moon moved around the Earth normally, the centrifugal force produced by the Moon's rotation around the Earth and the Earth's gravitation pull on the Moon had the same size. Let M be the mass of the Earth, m 1 be the mass of the Moon, r m be the radius of the Moon, r be the centroid distance between the Earth and the Moon, v be the tangential velocity of the Moon around the Earth, then Gm 1 M/r 2=m 1 v 2/r, therefore $v=\\sqrt{GM/r}$ . Near the orbit of the Moon, there were also many smaller prograde planetesimals moving around the Earth in circular orbits of radius r x (r-r m \\sqrt{GM/r}$ , which implies v x > v, these planetesimals would finally catch and merge with the Moon.Especially,if a planetesimals was large enough, it would impact the Moon forcefully, making the Moon's velocity increase to a larger

  5. [Thermodynamics of the origin of life, evolution and aging].

    PubMed

    Gladyshev, G P

    2014-01-01

    Briefly discusses the history of the search of thermodynamic approach to explain the origin of life, evolution and aging of living beings. The origin of life is the result of requirement by the quasi-equilibrium hierarchical thermodynamics, in particular, the supramolecular thermodynamics. The evolution and aging of living beings is accompanied with changes of chemical and supramolecular compositions of living bodies, as well as with changes in the composition and structure of all hierarchies of the living world. The thermodynamic principle of substance stability predicts the existence of a single genetic code in our universe. The thermodynamic theory optimizes physiology and medicine and recommends antiaging diets and medicines. Hierarchical thermodynamics forms the design diversity of culture and art. The thermodynamic theory of origin of life, evolution and aging is the development of Clausius-Gibbs thermodynamics. Hierarchical thermodynamics is the mirror of Darwin-Wallace's-theory.

  6. Origin and evolution of asthenospheric layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czechowski, Leszek; Grad, Marek

    2013-04-01

    is probably in the range from 3 to 5. We investigate the processes of formation and evolution of low viscosity layers ("asthenospheric layers") in the upper mantle. The time scale of the temperature changes is of the order of 10 Myr. The characteristic time of stress changes could be much shorter depending on tectonic processes. Eventually processes of formation and vanishing of low viscosity layers is very dynamical. In a relatively short time (below 1 Myr) the pattern the viscosity distribution and velocity gradient could change substantially. Using results from deep seismic sounding and surface wave tomography we have found that below some regions there are structures in the mantle that could be a forming/vanishing low viscosity layers. Reflectors in the lower lithosphere are observed beneath Trans-European suture zone between Precambrian and Palaeozoic platforms. In a thick Baltic shield lithosphere (200 km or more) low velocity zones and seismic reflectors are observed in the depth range 60-100 km, which could be interpreted as mechanical low Vp velocity zones, in contrast to thermal velocity zone in deeper asthenosphere.

  7. Origin and Evolution of the Cometary Reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dones, L.; Kaib, N. A.; Brasser, R.

    2014-12-01

    Comets have three known reservoirs: the roughly spherical Oort Cloud (for long-period comets), the flattened Kuiper Belt (for ecliptic comets), and, surprisingly, the asteroid belt (for main-belt comets). Comets in the Oort Cloud are thought to have formed in the region of the giant planets and then placed in quasi-stable orbits at distances of thousands or tens of thousands of AU through the gravitational effects of the planets and the Galaxy. Originally the planets were thought to have formed in place. However, Fernández and Ip (1984) proposed that Jupiter would have migrated slightly inward, while Saturn and (especially) Uranus and Neptune would have migrated outward as they interacted with a massive disk of planetesimals. Malhotra (1993) showed that Pluto's orbit in the 3:2 resonance with Neptune was a natural outcome if Neptune captured Pluto into resonance while it migrated outward. Building on this work, Tsiganis et al. (2005) proposed the "Nice" model, in which the giant planets formed closer together than they are now, and, perhaps many hundreds of Myr later, underwent a dynamical instability that led to a flood of comets and asteroids throughout the Solar System (Gomes et al. 2005). In this scenario, it is somewhat a matter of luck whether an icy planetesimal ends up in the Kuiper Belt or Oort Cloud (Brasser and Morbidelli 2013), as a Trojan asteroid (Morbidelli et al. 2005, Nesvorný and Vokrouhlický 2009, Nesvorný et al. 2013), or as a distant "irregular" satellite of a giant planet (Nesvorný et al. 2007). Comets could even have been captured into the asteroid belt (Levison et al. 2009). The remarkable finding of two "inner Oort cloud" bodies, Sedna and 2012 VP113 (Brown et al. 2004, Sheppard and Trujillo 2014), suggests that the Sun formed in a denser environment, i.e., in a star cluster (Brasser et al. 2006, Kaib and Quinn 2008, Brasser et al. 2012). My talk will focus on how, in spite of this unexpected complexity, we can attempt to surmise the

  8. The origin and early evolution of dinosaurs.

    PubMed

    Langer, Max C; Ezcurra, Martin D; Bittencourt, Jonathas S; Novas, Fernando E

    2010-02-01

    The oldest unequivocal records of Dinosauria were unearthed from Late Triassic rocks (approximately 230 Ma) accumulated over extensional rift basins in southwestern Pangea. The better known of these are Herrerasaurus ischigualastensis, Pisanosaurus mertii, Eoraptor lunensis, and Panphagia protos from the Ischigualasto Formation, Argentina, and Staurikosaurus pricei and Saturnalia tupiniquim from the Santa Maria Formation, Brazil. No uncontroversial dinosaur body fossils are known from older strata, but the Middle Triassic origin of the lineage may be inferred from both the footprint record and its sister-group relation to Ladinian basal dinosauromorphs. These include the typical Marasuchus lilloensis, more basal forms such as Lagerpeton and Dromomeron, as well as silesaurids: a possibly monophyletic group composed of Mid-Late Triassic forms that may represent immediate sister taxa to dinosaurs. The first phylogenetic definition to fit the current understanding of Dinosauria as a node-based taxon solely composed of mutually exclusive Saurischia and Ornithischia was given as "all descendants of the most recent common ancestor of birds and Triceratops". Recent cladistic analyses of early dinosaurs agree that Pisanosaurus mertii is a basal ornithischian; that Herrerasaurus ischigualastensis and Staurikosaurus pricei belong in a monophyletic Herrerasauridae; that herrerasaurids, Eoraptor lunensis, and Guaibasaurus candelariensis are saurischians; that Saurischia includes two main groups, Sauropodomorpha and Theropoda; and that Saturnalia tupiniquim is a basal member of the sauropodomorph lineage. On the contrary, several aspects of basal dinosaur phylogeny remain controversial, including the position of herrerasaurids, E. lunensis, and G. candelariensis as basal theropods or basal saurischians, and the affinity and/or validity of more fragmentary taxa such as Agnosphitys cromhallensis, Alwalkeria maleriensis, Chindesaurus bryansmalli, Saltopus elginensis, and

  9. Metastable Phase Evolution in Oxide Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levi, Carlos G.

    2005-03-01

    Multi-component ceramics are often synthesized by routes that facilitate mixing at the molecular scale and subsequently generate a solid product at low homologous temperatures. Examples include chemical and physical vapor deposition, thermal spray, and pyrolytic decomposition of precursor solutions. In these processes the solid evolves rapidly from a highly energized state, typically in a temperature regime wherein long-range diffusion is largely constrained and the equilibrium configuration can be kinetically suppressed. The resulting product may exhibit various forms of metastability such as amorphization, nanocrystallinity, extended solid solubility and alternate crystalline forms. The approach allows access to novel combinations of structure and composition with unprecedented defect structures that, if reasonably durable, could have properties of potential technological interest. Understanding phase selection and evolution is facilitated by having a suitable reference framework depicting the thermodynamic hierarchy of the phases available to the system under the relevant processing conditions. When transformations are partitionless the phase menu and hierarchy can be readily derived from the relative position of the T0 curves/surfaces for the different pairs of phases. The result is a phase hierarchy map, which is an analog of the phase diagram for partitionless equilibrium. Such maps can then be used to assess the kinetic effects on the selection of metastable states and their subsequent evolution. This presentation will discuss the evolution of metastable phases in oxides, with emphasis on systems involving fluorite phases and their ordered or distorted derivatives. The concepts will be illustrated primarily with zirconia-based systems, notably those of interest in thermal barrier coatings, fuel cells and ferroelectrics (ZrO2-MO3/2, where M = Y, Sc, the lanthanides and combinations thereof, as well as ZrO2-YO3/2-TiO2, ZrO2-TiO2-PbO, etc.). Of particular

  10. Origin and use of crystallization phase diagrams

    PubMed Central

    Rupp, Bernhard

    2015-01-01

    Crystallization phase diagrams are frequently used to conceptualize the phase relations and also the processes taking place during the crystallization of macromolecules. While a great deal of freedom is given in crystallization phase diagrams owing to a lack of specific knowledge about the actual phase boundaries and phase equilibria, crucial fundamental features of phase diagrams can be derived from thermodynamic first principles. Consequently, there are limits to what can be reasonably displayed in a phase diagram, and imagination may start to conflict with thermodynamic realities. Here, the commonly used ‘crystallization phase diagrams’ are derived from thermodynamic excess properties and their limitations and appropriate use is discussed. PMID:25760697

  11. Equations of State: Gateway to Planetary Origin and Evolution (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melosh, J.

    2013-12-01

    Research over the past decades has shown that collisions between solid bodies govern many crucial phases of planetary origin and evolution. The accretion of the terrestrial planets was punctuated by planetary-scale impacts that generated deep magma oceans, ejected primary atmospheres and probably created the moons of Earth and Pluto. Several extrasolar planetary systems are filled with silicate vapor and condensed 'tektites', probably attesting to recent giant collisions. Even now, long after the solar system settled down from its violent birth, a large asteroid impact wiped out the dinosaurs, while other impacts may have played a role in the origin of life on Earth and perhaps Mars, while maintaining a steady exchange of small meteorites between the terrestrial planets and our moon. Most of these events are beyond the scale at which experiments are possible, so that our main research tool is computer simulation, constrained by the laws of physics and the behavior of materials during high-speed impact. Typical solar system impact velocities range from a few km/s in the outer solar system to 10s of km/s in the inner system. Extrasolar planetary systems expand that range to 100s of km/sec typical of the tightly clustered planetary systems now observed. Although computer codes themselves are currently reaching a high degree of sophistication, we still rely on experimental studies to determine the Equations of State (EoS) of materials critical for the correct simulation of impact processes. The recent expansion of the range of pressures available for study, from a few 100 GPa accessible with light gas guns up to a few TPa from current high energy accelerators now opens experimental access to the full velocity range of interest in our solar system. The results are a surprise: several groups in both the USA and Japan have found that silicates and even iron melt and vaporize much more easily in an impact than previously anticipated. The importance of these findings is

  12. Dual-phase evolution in complex adaptive systems

    PubMed Central

    Paperin, Greg; Green, David G.; Sadedin, Suzanne

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the origins of complexity is a key challenge in many sciences. Although networks are known to underlie most systems, showing how they contribute to well-known phenomena remains an issue. Here, we show that recurrent phase transitions in network connectivity underlie emergent phenomena in many systems. We identify properties that are typical of systems in different connectivity phases, as well as characteristics commonly associated with the phase transitions. We synthesize these common features into a common framework, which we term dual-phase evolution (DPE). Using this framework, we review the literature from several disciplines to show that recurrent connectivity phase transitions underlie the complex properties of many biological, physical and human systems. We argue that the DPE framework helps to explain many complex phenomena, including perpetual novelty, modularity, scale-free networks and criticality. Our review concludes with a discussion of the way DPE relates to other frameworks, in particular, self-organized criticality and the adaptive cycle. PMID:21247947

  13. The origin and dynamic evolution of chemical information transfer

    PubMed Central

    Steiger, Sandra; Schmitt, Thomas; Schaefer, H. Martin

    2011-01-01

    Although chemical communication is the most widespread form of communication, its evolution and diversity are not well understood. By integrating studies of a wide range of terrestrial plants and animals, we show that many chemicals are emitted, which can unintentionally provide information (cues) and, therefore, act as direct precursors for the evolution of intentional communication (signals). Depending on the content, design and the original function of the cue, there are predictable ways that selection can enhance the communicative function of chemicals. We review recent progress on how efficacy-based selection by receivers leads to distinct evolutionary trajectories of chemical communication. Because the original function of a cue may channel but also constrain the evolution of functional communication, we show that a broad perspective on multiple selective pressures acting upon chemicals provides important insights into the origin and dynamic evolution of chemical information transfer. Finally, we argue that integrating chemical ecology into communication theory may significantly enhance our understanding of the evolution, the design and the content of signals in general. PMID:21177681

  14. High rates of evolution preceded the origin of birds.

    PubMed

    Puttick, Mark N; Thomas, Gavin H; Benton, Michael J

    2014-05-01

    The origin of birds (Aves) is one of the great evolutionary transitions. Fossils show that many unique morphological features of modern birds, such as feathers, reduction in body size, and the semilunate carpal, long preceded the origin of clade Aves, but some may be unique to Aves, such as relative elongation of the forelimb. We study the evolution of body size and forelimb length across the phylogeny of coelurosaurian theropods and Mesozoic Aves. Using recently developed phylogenetic comparative methods, we find an increase in rates of body size and body size dependent forelimb evolution leading to small body size relative to forelimb length in Paraves, the wider clade comprising Aves and Deinonychosauria. The high evolutionary rates arose primarily from a reduction in body size, as there were no increased rates of forelimb evolution. In line with a recent study, we find evidence that Aves appear to have a unique relationship between body size and forelimb dimensions. Traits associated with Aves evolved before their origin, at high rates, and support the notion that numerous lineages of paravians were experimenting with different modes of flight through the Late Jurassic and Early Cretaceous. © 2014 The Authors. Evolution published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  15. Urey Prize Lecture: Planetary Evolution and the Origin of Life.

    PubMed

    McKay, C P

    1991-01-01

    The origin of life appears to be closely tied to the formation and early evolution of the solar system. Key questions deal with the source of abiotic organic material on the early Earth, the nature of interstellar organic material and its relationship to the observed organic compounds in the outer solar system, and the possible origin of life on Mars early in its history. From the perspective of planetary environments, liquid water is the essential requirement for life and serves as a surrogate indicator for life. New models and analyses in conjunction with data returned from upcoming missions promise to significantly advance our knowledge of how life originated in our solar system.

  16. Introduction to 'Origin and evolution of the nervous system'.

    PubMed

    Strausfeld, Nicholas J; Hirth, Frank

    2015-12-19

    In 1665, Robert Hooke demonstrated in Micrographia the power of the microscope and comparative observations, one of which revealed similarities between the arthropod and vertebrate eyes. Utilizing comparative observations, Saint-Hilaire in 1822 was the first to propose that the ventral nervous system of arthropods corresponds to the dorsal nervous system of vertebrates. Since then, studies on the origin and evolution of the nervous system have become inseparable from studies about Metazoan origins and the origins of organ systems. The advent of genome sequence data and, in turn, phylogenomics and phylogenetics have refined cladistics and expanded our understanding of Metazoan phylogeny. However, the origin and evolution of the nervous system is still obscure and many questions and problems remain. A recurrent problem is whether and to what extent sequence data provide reliable guidance for comparisons across phyla. Are genetic data congruent with the geological fossil records? How can we reconcile evolved character loss with phylogenomic records? And how informative are genetic data in relation to the specification of nervous system morphologies? These provide some of the background and context for a Royal Society meeting to discuss new data and concepts that might achieve insights into the origin and evolution of brains and nervous systems.

  17. [Origin of new genes: from evolution to design].

    PubMed

    Wang, Qian; Cheng, Jian; Jiang, Huifeng

    2017-03-25

    Life system has created rich and colorful genes, to protect the inheritance and prosperity after more than 4 billion years of natural evolution. However, the natural evolution is an extremely slow process, and the origin and evolution of new gene with new function often takes millions of years. Therefore, natural evolution alone cannot meet the rapid development of industrial biotechnological production needs. Using synthetic biology techniques, researchers can design and synthesize new genes based on the known enzyme catalysis mechanism and protein structure according to industrial production requirements, and create various biochemical reactions that cannot be catalyzed by natural living organisms. Although the new gene design technology shows exciting application prospects, there are now still many scientific and technological challenges, such as low success rate of design, low catalytic activity and high synthesis cost. With the rapid development of synthetic biology, the design, transformation, synthesis, screening and other technologies will be integrated into a mature technological process for the new gene design.

  18. Origin of evolution versus origin of life: a shift of paradigm.

    PubMed

    Tessera, Marc

    2011-01-01

    The question of the primordial ancestor must be approached through the search for the origin of evolution, not through the search for the origin of life. There is a major issue with the concept of life because it is impossible to define, thus is not a scientific but a metaphysical concept. On the contrary, evolution may be defined by as few as three conditions. These do not necessarily involve biopolymers. However, such an approach must give clues to explain the emergence of distinct lineages to allow Darwinian natural selection. A plausible solution exists within an autotrophic lipidic vesicle-based model that is presented. The model requires the existence of hydrothermal sites such as the Lost City Hydrothermal Field leading to specific constraints. For this reason Mars and Europa may be questioned as possible cradles of evolution. If we replace the search for the origin of life by the one for the origin of evolution our priority first is to find a consensus on the minimal conditions that would allow evolution to emerge and persist anywhere in the universe.

  19. Origin of Evolution versus Origin of Life: A Shift of Paradigm

    PubMed Central

    Tessera, Marc

    2011-01-01

    The question of the primordial ancestor must be approached through the search for the origin of evolution, not through the search for the origin of life. There is a major issue with the concept of life because it is impossible to define, thus is not a scientific but a metaphysical concept. On the contrary, evolution may be defined by as few as three conditions. These do not necessarily involve biopolymers. However, such an approach must give clues to explain the emergence of distinct lineages to allow Darwinian natural selection. A plausible solution exists within an autotrophic lipidic vesicle-based model that is presented. The model requires the existence of hydrothermal sites such as the Lost City Hydrothermal Field leading to specific constraints. For this reason Mars and Europa may be questioned as possible cradles of evolution. If we replace the search for the origin of life by the one for the origin of evolution our priority first is to find a consensus on the minimal conditions that would allow evolution to emerge and persist anywhere in the universe. PMID:21747687

  20. Evolution of structure during phase transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, J.E.; Wilcoxon, J.P.; Anderson, R.A.

    1996-03-01

    Nanostructured materials can be synthesized by utilizing the domain growth that accompanies first-order phase separation. Structural control can be achieved by appropriately selecting the quench depth and the quench time, but in order to do this in a mindful fashion one must understand the kinetics of domain growth. The authors have completed detailed light scattering studies of the evolution of structure in both temperature- and field-quenched phase transitions in two and three dimensional systems. They have studied these systems in the quiescent state and in shear and have developed theoretical models that account for the experimental results.

  1. Origin and Evolution of RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase.

    PubMed

    de Farias, Savio T; Dos Santos Junior, Ariosvaldo P; Rêgo, Thais G; José, Marco V

    2017-01-01

    RNA-dependent RNA polymerases (RdRp) are very ancient enzymes and are essential for all viruses with RNA genomes. We reconstruct the origin and evolution of this polymerase since the initial stages of the origin of life. The origin of the RdRp was traced back from tRNA ancestors. At the origin of the RdRp the most ancient part of the protein is the cofactor-binding site that had the capacity of binding to simple molecules as magnesium, calcium, and ribonucleotides. Our results suggest that RdRp originated from junctions of proto-tRNAs that worked as the first genes at the emergence of the primitive translation system, where the RNA was the informational molecule. The initial domain, worked as a building block for the emergence of the fingers and thumb domains. From the ancestral RdRp, we could establish the evolutionary stages of viral evolution from a rooted ancestor to modern viruses. It was observed that the selective pressure under the RdRp was the organization and functioning of the genome, where RNA double-stranded and RNA single-stranded virus formed a separate group. We propose an evolutionary route to the polymerases and the results suggest an ancient scenario for the origin of RNA viruses.

  2. Chemical Evolution and the Origin of Life: Bibliography 1975

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    West, Martha W. (Compiler); Koch, Rowena A. (Compiler); Chang, Sherwood (Compiler)

    1977-01-01

    This bibliography is the sixth annual supplement to the comprehensive bibliography on the same subject which was published in Space Life Sci.We would like to draw attention to a recently published cumulative bibliography on this same subject: Biochemical Origin of Life: Chemistry and Life. Soil and Water and Its Relationship to Origin of Life. MR - Studies of Prebiotic Polypeptides. Energy, Matter, and Life. Prospects for the Future Orientation of Scientific Research. Photochemical Formation of Self Sustaining Coacervates. Photochemical Formation of Self-Sustaining Coacervates. Comparative Study of Abiogenesis of Cysteine and Other Amino Acids Catalyzed by Various Metal Ions. Protein Structure and the Molecular Evolution of Biological Energy Conversion. Origin of Life. Clues from Relations Between Chemical Compositions of Living Organisms and Natural Environments. Shock Synthesis of Amino Acids II.', Origins of Life 6(1-2). Dynamics of the Chemical Evolution of Earth's Primitive Atmosphere. The Mechanisms of Amino Acids Synthesis by High Temperature Shock-Waves. Theory of Chemical Evolution. Physical Foundations of Probability of Biogenesis.

  3. Chemical Evolution and the Origin of Life: Bibliography 1975

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    West, Martha W. (Compiler); Koch, Rowena A. (Compiler); Chang, Sherwood (Compiler)

    1977-01-01

    This bibliography is the sixth annual supplement to the comprehensive bibliography on the same subject which was published in Space Life Sci.We would like to draw attention to a recently published cumulative bibliography on this same subject: Biochemical Origin of Life: Chemistry and Life. Soil and Water and Its Relationship to Origin of Life. MR - Studies of Prebiotic Polypeptides. Energy, Matter, and Life. Prospects for the Future Orientation of Scientific Research. Photochemical Formation of Self Sustaining Coacervates. Photochemical Formation of Self-Sustaining Coacervates. Comparative Study of Abiogenesis of Cysteine and Other Amino Acids Catalyzed by Various Metal Ions. Protein Structure and the Molecular Evolution of Biological Energy Conversion. Origin of Life. Clues from Relations Between Chemical Compositions of Living Organisms and Natural Environments. Shock Synthesis of Amino Acids II.', Origins of Life 6(1-2). Dynamics of the Chemical Evolution of Earth's Primitive Atmosphere. The Mechanisms of Amino Acids Synthesis by High Temperature Shock-Waves. Theory of Chemical Evolution. Physical Foundations of Probability of Biogenesis.

  4. Origin and evolution of fleshy fruit in woody bamboos.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Sanchez, Eduardo; Sosa, Victoria

    2015-10-01

    Several hypotheses have been suggested to explain the origin of fleshy fruit in monocots. One is that they originated in the understory of tropical regions and another is that fleshy fruit originated in tropical rainforests where high year-round rainfall implies that seasonality is not a limiting factor. Here we identify the time of origin and ecological preferences of woody bamboos to understand the evolution of the fleshy fruit known as the bacoid caryopsis. Bayesian Inference, Maximum Likelihood and molecular dating analyses were run based on eight plastid and two nuclear regions for 68 bamboo species. Climate data and soil parameters were gathered for 464 localities for these species. The ancestral type of caryopsis was reconstructed by parsimony. According to these analyses the bacoid caryopsis may have evolved independently seven times from the Late Miocene to the Early Pliocene and Mid-Pliocene to Mid-Pleistocene via convergent evolution. Our results suggest that in bamboos neither current climatic variables nor soil parameters were significantly correlated with the appearance of this type of fruit, nor do they have a phylogenetic signal. It is remarkable, however, that the first appearance of the bacoid caryopsis in bamboos might be associated with historical preferences for warmer and wetter climate during the Miocene. Further research is needed to identify whether other factors, such as vivipary or dispersal by small animals, rather than climate, could be responsible for the evolution of this trait in woody bamboos.

  5. Origin and evolution of planetary and satellite atmospheres

    SciTech Connect

    Atreya, S.K.; Pollack, J.B.; Matthews, M.S.

    1989-01-01

    The present volume on the origin and evolution of planet and satellite atmospheres discusses the chemistry of interstellar gas and grains, planetary accretion, cometary composition, the inventories of asteroid volatiles, key similarities and differences among the terrestrial planets' atmospheric compositions, and planets' atmospheric escape and water loss. Also discussed are planetary atmosphere-planetary interior evolutionary coupling, the atmospheric composition of the outer planets, the structure and composition of giant planet interiors, the tenuous atmosphere of Io, the sources of the atmospheres of the outer solar system's satellites, the present state and chemical evolution of the Titan, Triton, and Pluto atmospheres, and the thermal structure and heat balance of the outer planets.

  6. The origin and evolution of the woolly mammoth.

    PubMed

    Lister, A M; Sher, A V

    2001-11-02

    The mammoth lineage provides an example of rapid adaptive evolution in response to the changing environments of the Pleistocene. Using well-dated samples from across the mammoth's Eurasian range, we document geographical and chronological variation in adaptive morphology. This work illustrates an incremental (if mosaic) evolutionary sequence but also reveals a complex interplay of local morphological innovation, migration, and extirpation in the origin and evolution of a mammalian species. In particular, northeastern Siberia is identified as an area of successive allopatric innovations that apparently spread to Europe, where they contributed to a complex pattern of stasis, replacement, and transformation.

  7. Origin and evolution of the genetic code: the universal enigma.

    PubMed

    Koonin, Eugene V; Novozhilov, Artem S

    2009-02-01

    The genetic code is nearly universal, and the arrangement of the codons in the standard codon table is highly nonrandom. The three main concepts on the origin and evolution of the code are the stereochemical theory, according to which codon assignments are dictated by physicochemical affinity between amino acids and the cognate codons (anticodons); the coevolution theory, which posits that the code structure coevolved with amino acid biosynthesis pathways; and the error minimization theory under which selection to minimize the adverse effect of point mutations and translation errors was the principal factor of the code's evolution. These theories are not mutually exclusive and are also compatible with the frozen accident hypothesis, that is, the notion that the standard code might have no special properties but was fixed simply because all extant life forms share a common ancestor, with subsequent changes to the code, mostly, precluded by the deleterious effect of codon reassignment. Mathematical analysis of the structure and possible evolutionary trajectories of the code shows that it is highly robust to translational misreading but there are numerous more robust codes, so the standard code potentially could evolve from a random code via a short sequence of codon series reassignments. Thus, much of the evolution that led to the standard code could be a combination of frozen accident with selection for error minimization although contributions from coevolution of the code with metabolic pathways and weak affinities between amino acids and nucleotide triplets cannot be ruled out. However, such scenarios for the code evolution are based on formal schemes whose relevance to the actual primordial evolution is uncertain. A real understanding of the code origin and evolution is likely to be attainable only in conjunction with a credible scenario for the evolution of the coding principle itself and the translation system.

  8. The origin and evolution of the neural crest.

    PubMed

    Donoghue, Philip C J; Graham, Anthony; Kelsh, Robert N

    2008-06-01

    Many of the features that distinguish the vertebrates from other chordates are derived from the neural crest, and it has long been argued that the emergence of this multipotent embryonic population was a key innovation underpinning vertebrate evolution. More recently, however, a number of studies have suggested that the evolution of the neural crest was less sudden than previously believed. This has exposed the fact that neural crest, as evidenced by its repertoire of derivative cell types, has evolved through vertebrate evolution. In this light, attempts to derive a typological definition of neural crest, in terms of molecular signatures or networks, are unfounded. We propose a less restrictive, embryological definition of this cell type that facilitates, rather than precludes, investigating the evolution of neural crest. While the evolutionary origin of neural crest has attracted much attention, its subsequent evolution has received almost no attention and yet it is more readily open to experimental investigation and has greater relevance to understanding vertebrate evolution. Finally, we provide a brief outline of how the evolutionary emergence of neural crest potentiality may have proceeded, and how it may be investigated.

  9. Urey Prize Lecture - Planetary evolution and the origin of life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckay, Christopher P.

    1991-01-01

    One of the principal questions concerning planetary evolution and life's origins relates to the early-earth organic material's origination in situ, outer solar system importation, or simple irrelevance to the emergence of organisms. Additional considerations encompass the character of interstellar organic material and its relationship to outer solar system organic compounds, and the possibility of life's emergence in the early Mars. Attention is given to the essentiality of liquid water for life-forms, in the role not only of a reaction medium among molecules but that of a basis for hydrophylic and hydrophobic groups' bonding.

  10. Origin and evolution of valleys on Martian volcanoes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gulick, Virginia C.; Baker, Victor R.

    1990-01-01

    Medium (1:2,000,000) and high (1:500,000) resolution Viking images were used to locate, map, and analyze drainage systems of six moderate-sized Martian volcanoes of various ages (including Ceraunius Tholus, Hecates Tholus, Alba Patera, Hadriaca Patera, Apollinaris Patera, and Tyrrhena Patera) in order to determine the origin and the evolution of valley forms on these volcanoes. The morphological characteristics of the drainage forms were compared to those of terrestrial volcanic valleys of known origin. On the basis of studies of valleys on the Hawaiian volcanoes, an evolutionary sequence for valleys on the Martian volcanoes is proposed.

  11. Urey Prize Lecture - Planetary evolution and the origin of life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckay, Christopher P.

    1991-01-01

    One of the principal questions concerning planetary evolution and life's origins relates to the early-earth organic material's origination in situ, outer solar system importation, or simple irrelevance to the emergence of organisms. Additional considerations encompass the character of interstellar organic material and its relationship to outer solar system organic compounds, and the possibility of life's emergence in the early Mars. Attention is given to the essentiality of liquid water for life-forms, in the role not only of a reaction medium among molecules but that of a basis for hydrophylic and hydrophobic groups' bonding.

  12. Origins of Solar Systems Workshop: The Origin, Evolution, and Detectability of Short Period Comets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stern, S. Alan

    1993-01-01

    The origin of the short period comets (SPC) (periods less than 200 years), the dynamical formation of their present reservoir(s), the cause and rate of their transport to the inner planetary region where they can be detected, and the magnitude of selection effects in their discovery are important research questions directly coupled to the goals of understanding the origin and evolution of the Solar System. To address these questions in an intensive way, an interdisciplinary, five month long Workshop from Jan. to May 1993 at Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) in San Antonio was convened. The goal of this Workshop was to advance the state of understanding about the origins, dynamical evolution, and present location of short period comets and their reservoir(s).

  13. HIGH RATES OF EVOLUTION PRECEDED THE ORIGIN OF BIRDS

    PubMed Central

    Puttick, Mark N; Thomas, Gavin H; Benton, Michael J; Polly, P David

    2014-01-01

    The origin of birds (Aves) is one of the great evolutionary transitions. Fossils show that many unique morphological features of modern birds, such as feathers, reduction in body size, and the semilunate carpal, long preceded the origin of clade Aves, but some may be unique to Aves, such as relative elongation of the forelimb. We study the evolution of body size and forelimb length across the phylogeny of coelurosaurian theropods and Mesozoic Aves. Using recently developed phylogenetic comparative methods, we find an increase in rates of body size and body size dependent forelimb evolution leading to small body size relative to forelimb length in Paraves, the wider clade comprising Aves and Deinonychosauria. The high evolutionary rates arose primarily from a reduction in body size, as there were no increased rates of forelimb evolution. In line with a recent study, we find evidence that Aves appear to have a unique relationship between body size and forelimb dimensions. Traits associated with Aves evolved before their origin, at high rates, and support the notion that numerous lineages of paravians were experimenting with different modes of flight through the Late Jurassic and Early Cretaceous. PMID:24471891

  14. Origin and evolution of contact binaries of W UMa type

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahunen, T.; Vilhu, O.

    Angular momentum loss estimates for single stars are employed to discuss three theories for contact binary evolution. Two of the theories of the metamorphoses of W UMa stars involve the fission of a rapidly rotating star at the end of the pre-main sequence contraction phase, resulting in a constant level of angular momentum and small mass ratios. The second sequence comprises an evolution of the companion from angular momentum loss from a detached or semidetached binary. Chromospheric Ca(+) emission observations are noted to correlate with rotational velocity predicted for the second type of evolution of angular momentum loss rate. The models display cyclic behavior on a time scale of one to ten million years, although the contact never breaks. It is concluded that the constant angular momentum models require a formation process which yield unequal components, while the detached, followed by contact, process is the most natural production mechanism.

  15. Leishmania: origin, evolution and future since the Precambrian.

    PubMed

    Tuon, Felipe Francisco; Neto, Vicente Amato; Amato, Valdir Sabbaga

    2008-11-01

    This brief review discusses the history of leishmaniasis, considering its origin from the Paleoartic, Neoartic or Neotropic. We reassess some of the theories of the likely origin of this protozoan since the beginning of life on Earth, passing through the Mesozoic and continuing to the appearance of humans. The relationship between this parasite or its ancestors, possible vectors and hosts with regard to ecological modifications is discussed. Recent molecular techniques have helped to elucidate some of the evolutionary questions regarding Leishmania, but have also brought doubts about the origin and evolution of this human parasite. PCR has been used for studies in the new discipline of paleoparasitology, helping to elucidate some of the remaining evolutionary questions. Understanding of this global condition is fundamental in determining the best approach to use against the parasite, specifically for the development of an efficient vaccine.

  16. On the Origin and Evolution of Galactic Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lesch, H.; Chiba, M.

    The existence of large-scale magnetic fields in galaxies is still a challenge for theoretical astrophysics. Are magnetic fields of primordial origin, produced somehow during the initial stages of cosmic evolution or are they intrinsically produced by the galaxies themselves? Especially observations of m G fields in high redshift (z = 2-3) damped Lyman alpha clouds, which are supposed to be the progenitors of disk galaxies, raise questions about the origin of such strong fields only one or two Gigayears after the Big Bang. Recent observations of galactic magnetic fields in nearby disk galaxies as well as in high redshift objects are reviewed and the role of electrodynamical coupling of the fields and the gas motions in different stages of galaxy evolution is emphasized. By presenting two different scenarios-action of a turbulent dynamo in axisymmetric differentially rotating disks and magnetic field amplification by non-axisymmetric dynamical processes (protogalactic collapse and subsequent excitation of spiral arms and bars) - we illustrate the basic problems of magnetic field production and amplification in galactic systems. It is shown that origin and amplification via dynamical processes leads to appropriate time scales and efficiencies to account for the strong magnetic fields in high redshift objects as well as the field structure in nearby disk galaxies. We describe the implications for galaxy formation if such strong fields exist in the epoch prior to galaxy formation. Finally we discuss our conclusion that the origin and evolution of galactic magnetic fields can only be understood by considering the time-varying velocity field of the conductor, the galactic interstellar medium in all stages of a galactic lifetime, in detail.

  17. Origin and evolution of carnivorism in the Ascomycota (fungi)

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ence; Xu, Lingling; Yang, Ying; Zhang, Xinyu; Xiang, Meichun; Wang, Chengshu; An, Zhiqiang; Liu, Xingzhong

    2012-01-01

    Carnivorism is one of the basic life strategies of fungi. Carnivorous fungi possess the ability to trap and digest their preys by sophisticated trapping devices. However, the origin and development of fungal carnivorism remains a gap in evolution biology. In this study, five protein-encoding genes were used to construct the phylogeny of the carnivorous fungi in the phylum Ascomycota; these fungi prey on nematodes by means of specialized trapping structures such as constricting rings and adhesive traps. Our analysis revealed a definitive pattern of evolutionary development for these trapping structures. Molecular clock calibration based on two fossil records revealed that fungal carnivorism diverged from saprophytism about 419 Mya, which was after the origin of nematodes about 550–600 Mya. Active carnivorism (fungi with constricting rings) and passive carnivorism (fungi with adhesive traps) diverged from each other around 246 Mya, shortly after the occurrence of the Permian–Triassic extinction event about 251.4 Mya. The major adhesive traps evolved around 198–208 Mya, which was within the time frame of the Triassic–Jurassic extinction event about 201.4 Mya. However, no major carnivorous ascomycetes divergence was correlated to the Cretaceous–Tertiary extinction event, which occurred more recently (about 65.5 Mya). Therefore, a causal relationship between mass extinction events and fungal carnivorism evolution is not validated in this study. More evidence including additional fossil records is needed to establish if fungal carnivorism evolution was a response to mass extinction events. PMID:22715289

  18. Origin and evolution of carnivorism in the Ascomycota (fungi).

    PubMed

    Yang, Ence; Xu, Lingling; Yang, Ying; Zhang, Xinyu; Xiang, Meichun; Wang, Chengshu; An, Zhiqiang; Liu, Xingzhong

    2012-07-03

    Carnivorism is one of the basic life strategies of fungi. Carnivorous fungi possess the ability to trap and digest their preys by sophisticated trapping devices. However, the origin and development of fungal carnivorism remains a gap in evolution biology. In this study, five protein-encoding genes were used to construct the phylogeny of the carnivorous fungi in the phylum Ascomycota; these fungi prey on nematodes by means of specialized trapping structures such as constricting rings and adhesive traps. Our analysis revealed a definitive pattern of evolutionary development for these trapping structures. Molecular clock calibration based on two fossil records revealed that fungal carnivorism diverged from saprophytism about 419 Mya, which was after the origin of nematodes about 550-600 Mya. Active carnivorism (fungi with constricting rings) and passive carnivorism (fungi with adhesive traps) diverged from each other around 246 Mya, shortly after the occurrence of the Permian-Triassic extinction event about 251.4 Mya. The major adhesive traps evolved around 198-208 Mya, which was within the time frame of the Triassic-Jurassic extinction event about 201.4 Mya. However, no major carnivorous ascomycetes divergence was correlated to the Cretaceous-Tertiary extinction event, which occurred more recently (about 65.5 Mya). Therefore, a causal relationship between mass extinction events and fungal carnivorism evolution is not validated in this study. More evidence including additional fossil records is needed to establish if fungal carnivorism evolution was a response to mass extinction events.

  19. Origin and Evolution of Life on Terrestrial Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brack, A.; Horneck, G.; Cockell, C. S.; Bérces, A.; Belisheva, N. K.; Eiroa, Carlos; Henning, Thomas; Herbst, Tom; Kaltenegger, Lisa; Léger, Alain; Liseau, Réne; Lammer, Helmut; Selsis, Franck; Beichman, Charles; Danchi, William; Fridlund, Malcolm; Lunine, Jonathan; Paresce, Francesco; Penny, Alan; Quirrenbach, Andreas; Röttgering, Huub; Schneider, Jean; Stam, Daphne; Tinetti, Giovanna; White, Glenn J.

    2010-01-01

    The ultimate goal of terrestrial planet-finding missions is not only to discover terrestrial exoplanets inside the habitable zone (HZ) of their host stars but also to address the major question as to whether life may have evolved on a habitable Earth-like exoplanet outside our Solar System. We note that the chemical evolution that finally led to the origin of life on Earth must be studied if we hope to understand the principles of how life might evolve on other terrestrial planets in the Universe. This is not just an anthropocentric point of view: the basic ingredients of terrestrial life, that is, reduced carbon-based molecules and liquid H2O, have very specific properties. We discuss the origin of life from the chemical evolution of its precursors to the earliest life-forms and the biological implications of the stellar radiation and energetic particle environments. Likewise, the study of the biological evolution that has generated the various life-forms on Earth provides clues toward the understanding of the interconnectedness of life with its environment.

  20. Origin and evolution of life on terrestrial planets.

    PubMed

    Brack, A; Horneck, G; Cockell, C S; Bérces, A; Belisheva, N K; Eiroa, Carlos; Henning, Thomas; Herbst, Tom; Kaltenegger, Lisa; Léger, Alain; Liseau, Réne; Lammer, Helmut; Selsis, Franck; Beichman, Charles; Danchi, William; Fridlund, Malcolm; Lunine, Jonathan; Paresce, Francesco; Penny, Alan; Quirrenbach, Andreas; Röttgering, Huub; Schneider, Jean; Stam, Daphne; Tinetti, Giovanna; White, Glenn J

    2010-01-01

    The ultimate goal of terrestrial planet-finding missions is not only to discover terrestrial exoplanets inside the habitable zone (HZ) of their host stars but also to address the major question as to whether life may have evolved on a habitable Earth-like exoplanet outside our Solar System. We note that the chemical evolution that finally led to the origin of life on Earth must be studied if we hope to understand the principles of how life might evolve on other terrestrial planets in the Universe. This is not just an anthropocentric point of view: the basic ingredients of terrestrial life, that is, reduced carbon-based molecules and liquid H(2)O, have very specific properties. We discuss the origin of life from the chemical evolution of its precursors to the earliest life-forms and the biological implications of the stellar radiation and energetic particle environments. Likewise, the study of the biological evolution that has generated the various life-forms on Earth provides clues toward the understanding of the interconnectedness of life with its environment.

  1. Origin and evolution of MIR1444 genes in Salicaceae

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Meizhen; Li, Caili; Lu, Shanfa

    2017-01-01

    miR1444s are functionally significant miRNAs targeting polyphenol oxidase (PPO) genes for cleavage. MIR1444 genes were reported only in Populus trichocarpa. Through the computational analysis of 215 RNA-seq data, four whole genome sequences of Salicaceae species and deep sequencing of six P. trichocarpa small RNA libraries, we investigated the origin and evolution history of MIR1444s. A total of 23 MIR1444s were identified. Populus and Idesia species contain two MIR1444 genes, while Salix includes only one. Populus and Idesia MIR1444b genes and Salix MIR1444s were phylogenetically separated from Populus and Idesia MIR1444a genes. Ptr-miR1444a and ptr-miR1444b showed sequence divergence. Compared with ptr-miR1444b, ptr-miR1444a started 2 nt upstream of precursor, resulting in differential regulation of PPO targets. Sequence alignments showed that MIR1444 genes exhibited extensive similarity to their PPO targets, the characteristics of MIRs originated from targets through an inverted gene duplication event. Genome sequence comparison showed that MIR1444 genes in Populus and Idesia were expanded through the Salicoid genome duplication event. A copy of MIR1444 gene was lost in Salix through DNA segment deletion during chromosome rearrangements. The results provide significant information for the origin of plant miRNAs and the mechanism of Salicaceae gene evolution and divergence. PMID:28071760

  2. Molecular evolution of Pediculus humanus and the origin of clothing.

    PubMed

    Kittler, Ralf; Kayser, Manfred; Stoneking, Mark

    2003-08-19

    The human head louse (Pediculus humanus capitis) and body louse (P. humanus corporis or P. h. humanus) are strict, obligate human ectoparasites that differ mainly in their habitat on the host : the head louse lives and feeds exclusively on the scalp, whereas the body louse feeds on the body but lives in clothing. This ecological differentiation probably arose when humans adopted frequent use of clothing, an important event in human evolution for which there is no direct archaeological evidence. We therefore used a molecular clock approach to date the origin of body lice, assuming that this should correspond with the frequent use of clothing. Sequences were obtained from two mtDNA and two nuclear DNA segments from a global sample of 40 head and body lice, and from a chimpanzee louse to use as an outgroup. The results indicate greater diversity in African than non-African lice, suggesting an African origin of human lice. A molecular clock analysis indicates that body lice originated not more than about 72,000 +/- 42,000 years ago; the mtDNA sequences also indicate a demographic expansion of body lice that correlates with the spread of modern humans out of Africa. These results suggest that clothing was a surprisingly recent innovation in human evolution.

  3. The Origin and Early Evolution of Membrane Proteins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pohorille, Andrew; Schweighofter, Karl; Wilson, Michael A.

    2006-01-01

    The origin and early evolution of membrane proteins, and in particular ion channels, are considered from the point of view that the transmembrane segments of membrane proteins are structurally quite simple and do not require specific sequences to fold. We argue that the transport of solute species, especially ions, required an early evolution of efficient transport mechanisms, and that the emergence of simple ion channels was protobiologically plausible. We also argue that, despite their simple structure, such channels could possess properties that, at the first sight, appear to require markedly larger complexity. These properties can be subtly modulated by local modifications to the sequence rather than global changes in molecular architecture. In order to address the evolution and development of ion channels, we focus on identifying those protein domains that are commonly associated with ion channel proteins and are conserved throughout the three main domains of life (Eukarya, Prokarya, and Archaea). We discuss the potassium-sodium-calcium superfamily of voltage-gated ion channels, mechanosensitive channels, porins, and ABC-transporters and argue that these families of membrane channels have sufficiently universal architectures that they can readily adapt to the diverse functional demands arising during evolution.

  4. The Origin and Early Evolution of Membrane Proteins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pohorille, Andrew; Schweighofter, Karl; Wilson, Michael A.

    2006-01-01

    The origin and early evolution of membrane proteins, and in particular ion channels, are considered from the point of view that the transmembrane segments of membrane proteins are structurally quite simple and do not require specific sequences to fold. We argue that the transport of solute species, especially ions, required an early evolution of efficient transport mechanisms, and that the emergence of simple ion channels was protobiologically plausible. We also argue that, despite their simple structure, such channels could possess properties that, at the first sight, appear to require markedly larger complexity. These properties can be subtly modulated by local modifications to the sequence rather than global changes in molecular architecture. In order to address the evolution and development of ion channels, we focus on identifying those protein domains that are commonly associated with ion channel proteins and are conserved throughout the three main domains of life (Eukarya, Prokarya, and Archaea). We discuss the potassium-sodium-calcium superfamily of voltage-gated ion channels, mechanosensitive channels, porins, and ABC-transporters and argue that these families of membrane channels have sufficiently universal architectures that they can readily adapt to the diverse functional demands arising during evolution.

  5. The Origin and Early Evolution of Roots1

    PubMed Central

    Kenrick, Paul; Strullu-Derrien, Christine

    2014-01-01

    Geological sites of exceptional fossil preservation are becoming a focus of research on root evolution because they retain edaphic and ecological context, and the remains of plant soft tissues are preserved in some. New information is emerging on the origins of rooting systems, their interactions with fungi, and their nature and diversity in the earliest forest ecosystems. Remarkably well-preserved fossils prove that mycorrhizal symbionts were diverse in simple rhizoid-based systems. Roots evolved in a piecemeal fashion and independently in several major clades through the Devonian Period (416 to 360 million years ago), rapidly extending functionality and complexity. Evidence from extinct arborescent clades indicates that polar auxin transport was recruited independently in several to regulate wood and root development. The broader impact of root evolution on the geochemical carbon cycle is a developing area and one in which the interests of the plant physiologist intersect with those of the geochemist. PMID:25187527

  6. Orbital evolution and origin of the Martian satellites

    SciTech Connect

    Szeto, A.M.K.

    1983-07-01

    The orbital evolution of the Martian satellites is considered from a dynamical point of view. Celestial mechanics relevant to the calculation of satellite orbital evolution is introduced and the physical parameters to be incorporated in the modeling of tidal dissipation are discussed. Results of extrapolating the satellite orbits backward and forward in time are presented and compared with those of other published work. Collision probability calculations and results for the Martian satellite system are presented and discussed. The implications of these calculations for the origin scenarios of the satellites are assessed. It is concluded that Deimos in its present form could not have been captured, for if it had been, it would have collided with Phobos at some point. An accretion model is therefore preferred over capture, although such a model consistent with the likely carbonaceous chondritic composition of the satellites has yet to be established. 91 references.

  7. Origin and evolution of sulfadoxine resistant Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed

    Vinayak, Sumiti; Alam, Md Tauqeer; Mixson-Hayden, Tonya; McCollum, Andrea M; Sem, Rithy; Shah, Naman K; Lim, Pharath; Muth, Sinuon; Rogers, William O; Fandeur, Thierry; Barnwell, John W; Escalante, Ananias A; Wongsrichanalai, Chansuda; Ariey, Frederick; Meshnick, Steven R; Udhayakumar, Venkatachalam

    2010-03-26

    The Thailand-Cambodia border is the epicenter for drug-resistant falciparum malaria. Previous studies have shown that chloroquine (CQ) and pyrimethamine resistance originated in this region and eventually spread to other Asian countries and Africa. However, there is a dearth in understanding the origin and evolution of dhps alleles associated with sulfadoxine resistance. The present study was designed to reveal the origin(s) of sulfadoxine resistance in Cambodia and its evolutionary relationship to African and South American dhps alleles. We sequenced 234 Cambodian Plasmodium falciparum isolates for the dhps codons S436A/F, A437G, K540E, A581G and A613S/T implicated in sulfadoxine resistance. We also genotyped 10 microsatellite loci around dhps to determine the genetic backgrounds of various alleles and compared them with the backgrounds of alleles prevalent in Africa and South America. In addition to previously known highly-resistant triple mutant dhps alleles SGEGA and AGEAA (codons 436, 437, 540, 581, 613 are sequentially indicated), a large proportion of the isolates (19.3%) contained a 540N mutation in association with 437G/581G yielding a previously unreported triple mutant allele, SGNGA. Microsatellite data strongly suggest the strength of selection was greater on triple mutant dhps alleles followed by the double and single mutants. We provide evidence for at least three independent origins for the double mutants, one each for the SGKGA, AGKAA and SGEAA alleles. Our data suggest that the triple mutant allele SGEGA and the novel allele SGNGA have common origin on the SGKGA background, whereas the AGEAA triple mutant was derived from AGKAA on multiple, albeit limited, genetic backgrounds. The SGEAA did not share haplotypes with any of the triple mutants. Comparative analysis of the microsatellite haplotypes flanking dhps alleles from Cambodia, Kenya, Cameroon and Venezuela revealed an independent origin of sulfadoxine resistant alleles in each of these regions.

  8. Origin and Evolution of Sulfadoxine Resistant Plasmodium falciparum

    PubMed Central

    Mixson-Hayden, Tonya; McCollum, Andrea M.; Sem, Rithy; Shah, Naman K.; Lim, Pharath; Muth, Sinuon; Rogers, William O.; Fandeur, Thierry; Barnwell, John W.; Escalante, Ananias A.; Wongsrichanalai, Chansuda; Ariey, Frederick; Meshnick, Steven R.; Udhayakumar, Venkatachalam

    2010-01-01

    The Thailand-Cambodia border is the epicenter for drug-resistant falciparum malaria. Previous studies have shown that chloroquine (CQ) and pyrimethamine resistance originated in this region and eventually spread to other Asian countries and Africa. However, there is a dearth in understanding the origin and evolution of dhps alleles associated with sulfadoxine resistance. The present study was designed to reveal the origin(s) of sulfadoxine resistance in Cambodia and its evolutionary relationship to African and South American dhps alleles. We sequenced 234 Cambodian Plasmodium falciparum isolates for the dhps codons S436A/F, A437G, K540E, A581G and A613S/T implicated in sulfadoxine resistance. We also genotyped 10 microsatellite loci around dhps to determine the genetic backgrounds of various alleles and compared them with the backgrounds of alleles prevalent in Africa and South America. In addition to previously known highly-resistant triple mutant dhps alleles SGEGA and AGEAA (codons 436, 437, 540, 581, 613 are sequentially indicated), a large proportion of the isolates (19.3%) contained a 540N mutation in association with 437G/581G yielding a previously unreported triple mutant allele, SGNGA. Microsatellite data strongly suggest the strength of selection was greater on triple mutant dhps alleles followed by the double and single mutants. We provide evidence for at least three independent origins for the double mutants, one each for the SGKGA, AGKAA and SGEAA alleles. Our data suggest that the triple mutant allele SGEGA and the novel allele SGNGA have common origin on the SGKGA background, whereas the AGEAA triple mutant was derived from AGKAA on multiple, albeit limited, genetic backgrounds. The SGEAA did not share haplotypes with any of the triple mutants. Comparative analysis of the microsatellite haplotypes flanking dhps alleles from Cambodia, Kenya, Cameroon and Venezuela revealed an independent origin of sulfadoxine resistant alleles in each of these regions

  9. The nature, origin and evolution of embedded star clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lada, Charles J.; Lada, Elizabeth A.

    1991-01-01

    The recent development of imaging infrared array cameras has enabled the first systematic studies of embedded protoclusters in the galaxy. Initial investigations suggest that rich embedded clusters are quite numerous and that a significant fraction of all stars formed in the galaxy may begin their lives in such stellar systems. These clusters contain extremely young stellar objects and are important laboratories for star formation research. However, observational and theoretical considerations suggest that most embedded clusters do not survive emergence from molecular clouds as bound clusters. Understanding the origin, nature, and evolution of embedded clusters requires understanding the intimate physical relation between embedded clusters and the dense molecular cloud cores from which they form.

  10. Origin and evolution of the earth-moon system.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alfven, H.; Arrhenius, G.

    1972-01-01

    The general problem of formation of secondary bodies around a central body is studied, and comparison is made with other satellite systems (Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus). The normal satellite systems of Neptune and the earth are reconstructed. The capture theory, the tidal evolution of the lunar orbit, destruction of a normal satellite system, asteroids and the earth-moon system, and accretion and heat structure of the moon are discussed. It is concluded that the moon originated as a planet accreted in a jet stream near the orbit of the earth, and was probably captured in a retrograde orbit.

  11. Origin, Evolution and Clinical Application of the Thermometer.

    PubMed

    Wright, William F; Mackowiak, Philip A

    2016-05-01

    Although Galileo, Fahrenheit and Celsius are the names generally associated with the origin of the thermometer and its scale, many others were involved in bringing into existence the instrument we use today to monitor body temperature. In fact, the seed from which the thermometer arose was planted long before those credited with inventing it made their contributions, and nurtured by many other investigators during its evolution and clinical application. Copyright © 2016 Southern Society for Clinical Investigation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. On the origins of novelty in development and evolution.

    PubMed

    Moczek, Armin P

    2008-05-01

    The origin of novel traits is what draws many to evolutionary biology, yet our understanding of the mechanisms that underlie the genesis of novelty remains limited. Here I review definitions of novelty including its relationship to homology. I then discuss how ontogenetic perspectives may allow us to move beyond current roadblocks in our understanding of the mechanics of innovation. Specifically, I explore the roles of canalization, plasticity and threshold responses during development in generating a reservoir of cryptic genetic variation free to drift and accumulate in natural populations. Environmental or genetic perturbations that exceed the buffering capacity of development can then release this variation, and, through evolution by genetic accommodation, result in rapid diversification, recurrence of lost phenotypes as well as the origins of novel features. I conclude that, in our quest to understand the nature of innovation, the nature of development deserves to take center stage.

  13. Human origins and evolution: Cold Spring Harbor, deja vu.

    PubMed

    White, T D

    2009-01-01

    The Cold Spring Harbor Symposia of the 1950s were key to integrating human evolutionary studies into biology. That integration provided a solid foundation for systematic and functional interpretations of an expanding base of fossil and molecular evidence during the latter half of the 20th century. Today, the paleontological record of human evolution amassed during the last 150 years illuminates the human clade on life's tree. However, the rise of Hennegian parsimony cladistics and punctuationalism during the end of the last century witnessed the partial abandonment of classificatory conventions cemented by Mayr, Simpson, Dobzhansky, and others at Cold Spring Harbor. This has led to an artificial, postmillennial amplification of apparent species diversity in the hominid clade. Work on a stratigraphically thick and temporally deep sedimentary sequence in the Middle Awash study area of Ethiopia's Afar Depression reveals an assembly order of hominid anatomies and behaviors that was impossible for Darwin to discern. Large parts of that record appear to reflect phyletic evolution, consistent with the lessons and expectations of Cold Spring Harbor in 1950. Molecular biology cannot reveal the assembly sequences or contexts of human origins and evolution without reference to adequate geological, geochronological, paleobiological, and archaeological records. Today's consilience of these disparate data sets would have impressed Charles Darwin.

  14. Quantum Tunnelling to the Origin and Evolution of Life.

    PubMed

    Trixler, Frank

    2013-08-01

    Quantum tunnelling is a phenomenon which becomes relevant at the nanoscale and below. It is a paradox from the classical point of view as it enables elementary particles and atoms to permeate an energetic barrier without the need for sufficient energy to overcome it. Tunnelling might seem to be an exotic process only important for special physical effects and applications such as the Tunnel Diode, Scanning Tunnelling Microscopy (electron tunnelling) or Near-field Optical Microscopy operating in photon tunnelling mode. However, this review demonstrates that tunnelling can do far more, being of vital importance for life: physical and chemical processes which are crucial in theories about the origin and evolution of life can be traced directly back to the effects of quantum tunnelling. These processes include the chemical evolution in stellar interiors and within the cold interstellar medium, prebiotic chemistry in the atmosphere and subsurface of planetary bodies, planetary habitability via insolation and geothermal heat as well as the function of biomolecular nanomachines. This review shows that quantum tunnelling has many highly important implications to the field of molecular and biological evolution, prebiotic chemistry and astrobiology.

  15. Quantum Tunnelling to the Origin and Evolution of Life

    PubMed Central

    Trixler, Frank

    2013-01-01

    Quantum tunnelling is a phenomenon which becomes relevant at the nanoscale and below. It is a paradox from the classical point of view as it enables elementary particles and atoms to permeate an energetic barrier without the need for sufficient energy to overcome it. Tunnelling might seem to be an exotic process only important for special physical effects and applications such as the Tunnel Diode, Scanning Tunnelling Microscopy (electron tunnelling) or Near-field Optical Microscopy operating in photon tunnelling mode. However, this review demonstrates that tunnelling can do far more, being of vital importance for life: physical and chemical processes which are crucial in theories about the origin and evolution of life can be traced directly back to the effects of quantum tunnelling. These processes include the chemical evolution in stellar interiors and within the cold interstellar medium, prebiotic chemistry in the atmosphere and subsurface of planetary bodies, planetary habitability via insolation and geothermal heat as well as the function of biomolecular nanomachines. This review shows that quantum tunnelling has many highly important implications to the field of molecular and biological evolution, prebiotic chemistry and astrobiology. PMID:24039543

  16. The clonal origin and clonal evolution of epithelial tumours

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Sergio Britto; Novelli, Marco; Wright, Nicholas A

    2000-01-01

    While the origin of tumours, whether from one cell or many, has been a source of fascination for experimental oncologists for some time, in recent years there has been a veritable explosion of information about the clonal architecture of tumours and their antecedents, stimulated, in the main, by the ready accessibility of new molecular techniques. While most of these new results have apparently confirmed the monoclonal origin of human epithelial (and other) tumours, there are a significant number of studies in which this conclusion just cannot be made. Moreover, analysis of many articles show that the potential impact of such considerations as patch size and clonal evolution on determinations of clonality have largely been ignored, with the result that a number of these studies are confounded. However, the clonal architecture of preneoplastic lesions provide some interesting insights — many lesions which might have been hitherto regarded as hyperplasias are apparently clonal in derivation. If this is indeed true, it calls into some question our hopeful corollary that a monoclonal origin presages a neoplastic habitus. Finally, it is clear, for many reasons, that methods of analysis which involve the disaggregation of tissues, albeit microdissected, are far from ideal and we should be putting more effort into techniques where the clonal architecture of normal tissues, preneoplastic and preinvasive lesions and their derivative tumours can be directly visualized in situ. PMID:10762440

  17. Possible origins and evolution of the hepatitis B virus (HBV).

    PubMed

    Locarnini, Stephen; Littlejohn, Margaret; Aziz, Muhammad Nazri; Yuen, Lilly

    2013-12-01

    All members of the family Hepadnaviridae are primarily viruses which contain double-stranded DNA genomes that are replicated via reverse transcription of a pregenomic RNA template. There are two subgroups within this family: mammalian and avian. The avian member's include the duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV), heron hepatitis B virus, Ross goose hepatitis B virus, stork hepatitis B virus and the recently identified parrot hepatitis B virus. More recently, the detection of endogenous avian hepadnavirus DNA integrated into the genomes of zebra finches has revealed a deep evolutionary origin of hepadnaviruses that was not previously recognised, dating back over 40 million years ago. The non-primate mammalian members of the Hepadnaviridae include the woodchuck hepatitis virus (WHV), the ground squirrel hepatitis virus and arctic squirrel virus, as well as the recently described bat hepatitis virus. The identification of hepatitis B virus (HBV) in higher primates such as chimpanzee, gorilla, orangutan, and gibbons that cluster with the human genotypes further implies a more complex origin of this virus. By studying the molecular epidemiology of HBV in indigenous and relict populations in Asia-Pacific we propose a model for the origin and evolution of HBV that involves multiple cross-species transmissions and subsequent recombination events on a background of genotype C HBV infection. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Origin and evolution of laminin gene family diversity.

    PubMed

    Fahey, Bryony; Degnan, Bernard M

    2012-07-01

    Laminins are a family of multidomain glycoproteins that are important contributors to the structure of metazoan extracellular matrices. To investigate the origin and evolution of the laminin family, we characterized the full complement of laminin-related genes in the genome of the sponge, Amphimedon queenslandica. As a representative of the Demospongiae, a group consistently placed within the earliest diverging branch of animals by molecular phylogenies, Amphimedon is uniquely placed to provide insight into early steps in the evolution of metazoan gene families. Five Amphimedon laminin-related genes possess the conserved molecular features, and most of the domains found in bilaterian laminins, but all display domain architectures distinct from those of the canonical laminin chain types known from model bilaterians. This finding prompted us to perform a comparative genomic analysis of laminins and related genes from a choanoflagellate and diverse metazoans and to conduct phylogenetic analyses using the conserved Laminin N-terminal domain in order to explore the relationships between genes with distinct architectures. Laminin-like genes appear to have originated in the holozoan lineage (choanoflagellates + metazoans + several other unicellular opisthokont taxa), with several laminin domains originating later and appearing only in metazoan (animal) or eumetazoan (placozoans + ctenophores + cnidarians + bilaterians) laminins. Typical bilaterian α, β, and γ laminin chain forms arose in the eumetazoan stem and another chain type that is conserved in Amphimedon, the cnidarian, Nematostella vectensis, and the echinoderm, Strongylocentrotus purpuratus, appears to have been lost independently from the placozoan, Trichoplax adhaerens, and from multiple bilaterians. Phylogenetic analysis did not clearly reconstruct relationships between the distinct laminin chain types (with the exception of the α chains) but did reveal how several members of the netrin family were

  19. Origin and geochemical evolution of the Michigan basin brine

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, T.P.

    1989-01-01

    Chemical and isotopic data were collected on 126 oil field brine samples and were used to investigate the origin and geochemical evolution of water in 8 geologic formations in the Michigan basin. Two groups of brine are found in the basin, the Na-Ca-Cl brine in the upper Devonian formations, and Ca-Na-Cl brine from the lower Devonian and Silurian aged formations. Water in the upper Devonian Berea, Traverse, and Dundee formations originated from seawater concentrated into halite facies. This brine evolved by halite precipitation, dolomitization, aluminosilicate reactions, and the removal of SO{sub 4} by bacterial action or by CaSO{sub 4} precipitation. The stable isotopic composition (D, O) is thought to represent dilution of evapo-concentrated seawater by meteoric water. Water in the lower Devonian Richfield, Detroit River Group, and Niagara-Salina formations is very saline Ca-Na-Cl brine. Cl/Br suggest it originated from seawater concentrated through the halite and into the MgSO{sub 4} salt facies, with an origin linked to the Silurian and Devonian salt deposits. Dolomitization and halite precipitation increased the Ca/Na, aluminosilicate reactions removed K, and bacterial action or CaSO{sub 4} precipitation removed SO{sub 4} from this brine. Water chemistry in the Ordovician Trenton-Black River formations indicates dilution of evapo-concentrated seawater by fresh or seawater. Possible saline end-members include Ordovician seawater, present-day upper Devonian brine, or Ca-Cl brine from the deeper areas in the basin.

  20. Giant viruses in the environment: their origins and evolution.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Takashi

    2011-07-01

    The recent identification of giant viruses has raised important questions, not only regarding their origin and evolution, but also regarding the differentiation between viruses and living organisms. These viruses possess large genomes encoding genes potentially involved in various metabolic processes and even protein synthesis, indicating their putative autonomy. Giant viruses of the Phycodnaviridae and Mimiviridae families appear to share a common evolutionary ancestor with members of the nucleo-cytoplasmic large DNA viruses. Many giant viruses are associated with protists in aquatic environments and might have evolved in protist cells. They may therefore play important roles in material cycling in natural ecosystems. With the advent of environmental metagenomic projects, there will be more chances to encounter novel giant viruses in the future.

  1. The origin and early evolution of life on earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oro, J.; Miller, Stanley L.; Lazcano, Antonio

    1990-01-01

    Results of the studies that have provided insights into the cosmic and primitive earth environments are reviewed with emphasis on those environments in which life is thought to have originated. The evidence bearing on the antiquity of life on the earth and the prebiotic significance of organic compounds found in interstellar clouds and in primitive solar-system bodies such as comets, dark asteroids, and carbonaceous chondrites are assessed. The environmental models of the Hadean and early Archean earth are discussed, as well as the prebiotic formation of organic monomers and polymers essential to life. The processes that may have led to the appearance in the Archean of the first cells are considered, and possible effects of these processes on the early steps of biological evolution are analyzed. The significance of these results to the study of the distribution of life in the universe is evaluated.

  2. The origin and early evolution of life on earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oro, J.; Miller, Stanley L.; Lazcano, Antonio

    1990-01-01

    Results of the studies that have provided insights into the cosmic and primitive earth environments are reviewed with emphasis on those environments in which life is thought to have originated. The evidence bearing on the antiquity of life on the earth and the prebiotic significance of organic compounds found in interstellar clouds and in primitive solar-system bodies such as comets, dark asteroids, and carbonaceous chondrites are assessed. The environmental models of the Hadean and early Archean earth are discussed, as well as the prebiotic formation of organic monomers and polymers essential to life. The processes that may have led to the appearance in the Archean of the first cells are considered, and possible effects of these processes on the early steps of biological evolution are analyzed. The significance of these results to the study of the distribution of life in the universe is evaluated.

  3. Evolution of the Archaea: emerging views on origins and phylogeny.

    PubMed

    Fournier, Gregory P; Dick, Amanda A; Williams, David; Gogarten, J Peter

    2011-01-01

    Of the three domains of life, the Archaea are the most recently discovered and, from the perspective of systematics, perhaps the least understood. More than three decades after their discovery, there is still no overwhelming consensus as to their phylogenetic status, with diverse evidence supporting in varying degrees their monophyly, paraphyly, or even polyphyly. As a further complication, their evolutionary history is inextricably linked to the origin of Eukarya, one of the most challenging problems in evolutionary biology. This exclusive relationship between the eukaryal nucleocytoplasm and the Archaea is further supported by a new methodology for rooting the ribosomal Tree of Life based on amino acid composition. Novel approaches such as utilizing horizontal gene transfers as synchronizing events and branch length analysis of deep paralogs will help to clarify temporal relationships between these lineages, and may prove useful in evaluating the numerous conflicting hypotheses related to the evolution of the Archaea and Eukarya.

  4. The Origins of Novel Protein Interactions during Animal Opsin Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Plachetzki, David C.; Degnan, Bernard M.; Oakley, Todd H.

    2007-01-01

    Background Biologists are gaining an increased understanding of the genetic bases of phenotypic change during evolution. Nevertheless, the origins of phenotypes mediated by novel protein-protein interactions remain largely undocumented. Methodology/Principle Findings Here we analyze the evolution of opsin visual pigment proteins from the genomes of early branching animals, including a new class of opsins from Cnidaria. We combine these data with existing knowledge of the molecular basis of opsin function in a rigorous phylogenetic framework. We identify adaptive amino acid substitutions in duplicated opsin genes that correlate with a diversification of physiological pathways mediated by different protein-protein interactions. Conclusions/Significance This study documents how gene duplication events early in the history of animals followed by adaptive structural mutations increased organismal complexity by adding novel protein-protein interactions that underlie different physiological pathways. These pathways are central to vision and other photo-reactive phenotypes in most extant animals. Similar evolutionary processes may have been at work in generating other metazoan sensory systems and other physiological processes mediated by signal transduction. PMID:17940617

  5. The Origin and Early Evolution of Membrane Proteins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pohorille, Andrew; Schweighofer, Karl; Wilson, Michael A.

    2005-01-01

    Membrane proteins mediate functions that are essential to all cells. These functions include transport of ions, nutrients and waste products across cell walls, capture of energy and its transduction into the form usable in chemical reactions, transmission of environmental signals to the interior of the cell, cellular growth and cell volume regulation. In the absence of membrane proteins, ancestors of cell (protocells), would have had only very limited capabilities to communicate with their environment. Thus, it is not surprising that membrane proteins are quite common even in simplest prokaryotic cells. Considering that contemporary membrane channels are large and complex, both structurally and functionally, a question arises how their presumably much simpler ancestors could have emerged, perform functions and diversify in early protobiological evolution. Remarkably, despite their overall complexity, structural motifs in membrane proteins are quite simple, with a-helices being most common. This suggests that these proteins might have evolved from simple building blocks. To explain how these blocks could have organized into functional structures, we performed large-scale, accurate computer simulations of folding peptides at a water-membrane interface, their insertion into the membrane, self-assembly into higher-order structures and function. The results of these simulations, combined with analysis of structural and functional experimental data led to the first integrated view of the origin and early evolution of membrane proteins.

  6. Origin and Evolution of the Sodium -Pumping NADH: Ubiquinone Oxidoreductase

    PubMed Central

    Reyes-Prieto, Adrian; Barquera, Blanca; Juárez, Oscar

    2014-01-01

    The sodium -pumping NADH: ubiquinone oxidoreductase (Na+-NQR) is the main ion pump and the primary entry site for electrons into the respiratory chain of many different types of pathogenic bacteria. This enzymatic complex creates a transmembrane gradient of sodium that is used by the cell to sustain ionic homeostasis, nutrient transport, ATP synthesis, flagellum rotation and other essential processes. Comparative genomics data demonstrate that the nqr operon, which encodes all Na+-NQR subunits, is found in a large variety of bacterial lineages with different habitats and metabolic strategies. Here we studied the distribution, origin and evolution of this enzymatic complex. The molecular phylogenetic analyses and the organizations of the nqr operon indicate that Na+-NQR evolved within the Chlorobi/Bacteroidetes group, after the duplication and subsequent neofunctionalization of the operon that encodes the homolog RNF complex. Subsequently, the nqr operon dispersed through multiple horizontal transfer events to other bacterial lineages such as Chlamydiae, Planctomyces and α, β, γ and δ -proteobacteria. Considering the biochemical properties of the Na+-NQR complex and its physiological role in different bacteria, we propose a detailed scenario to explain the molecular mechanisms that gave rise to its novel redox- dependent sodium -pumping activity. Our model postulates that the evolution of the Na+-NQR complex involved a functional divergence from its RNF homolog, following the duplication of the rnf operon, the loss of the rnfB gene and the recruitment of the reductase subunit of an aromatic monooxygenase. PMID:24809444

  7. Origin and evolution of the sodium -pumping NADH: ubiquinone oxidoreductase.

    PubMed

    Reyes-Prieto, Adrian; Barquera, Blanca; Juárez, Oscar

    2014-01-01

    The sodium -pumping NADH: ubiquinone oxidoreductase (Na+-NQR) is the main ion pump and the primary entry site for electrons into the respiratory chain of many different types of pathogenic bacteria. This enzymatic complex creates a transmembrane gradient of sodium that is used by the cell to sustain ionic homeostasis, nutrient transport, ATP synthesis, flagellum rotation and other essential processes. Comparative genomics data demonstrate that the nqr operon, which encodes all Na+-NQR subunits, is found in a large variety of bacterial lineages with different habitats and metabolic strategies. Here we studied the distribution, origin and evolution of this enzymatic complex. The molecular phylogenetic analyses and the organizations of the nqr operon indicate that Na+-NQR evolved within the Chlorobi/Bacteroidetes group, after the duplication and subsequent neofunctionalization of the operon that encodes the homolog RNF complex. Subsequently, the nqr operon dispersed through multiple horizontal transfer events to other bacterial lineages such as Chlamydiae, Planctomyces and α, β, γ and δ -proteobacteria. Considering the biochemical properties of the Na+-NQR complex and its physiological role in different bacteria, we propose a detailed scenario to explain the molecular mechanisms that gave rise to its novel redox- dependent sodium -pumping activity. Our model postulates that the evolution of the Na+-NQR complex involved a functional divergence from its RNF homolog, following the duplication of the rnf operon, the loss of the rnfB gene and the recruitment of the reductase subunit of an aromatic monooxygenase.

  8. Origin and evolution of developmental enhancers in the mammalian neocortex.

    PubMed

    Emera, Deena; Yin, Jun; Reilly, Steven K; Gockley, Jake; Noonan, James P

    2016-05-10

    Morphological innovations such as the mammalian neocortex may involve the evolution of novel regulatory sequences. However, de novo birth of regulatory elements active during morphogenesis has not been extensively studied in mammals. Here, we use H3K27ac-defined regulatory elements active during human and mouse corticogenesis to identify enhancers that were likely active in the ancient mammalian forebrain. We infer the phylogenetic origins of these enhancers and find that ∼20% arose in the mammalian stem lineage, coincident with the emergence of the neocortex. Implementing a permutation strategy that controls for the nonrandom variation in the ages of background genomic sequences, we find that mammal-specific enhancers are overrepresented near genes involved in cell migration, cell signaling, and axon guidance. Mammal-specific enhancers are also overrepresented in modules of coexpressed genes in the cortex that are associated with these pathways, notably ephrin and semaphorin signaling. Our results also provide insight into the mechanisms of regulatory innovation in mammals. We find that most neocortical enhancers did not originate by en bloc exaptation of transposons. Young neocortical enhancers exhibit smaller H3K27ac footprints and weaker evolutionary constraint in eutherian mammals than older neocortical enhancers. Based on these observations, we present a model of the enhancer life cycle in which neocortical enhancers initially emerge from genomic background as short, weakly constrained "proto-enhancers." Many proto-enhancers are likely lost, but some may serve as nucleation points for complex enhancers to evolve.

  9. On the origin and evolution of life in the Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCabe, Michael; Lucas, Holly

    2010-10-01

    A simple stochastic model for evolution, based upon the need to pass a sequence of n critical steps is applied to both terrestrial and extraterrestrial origins of life. In the former case, the time at which humans have emerged during the habitable period of Earth suggests a value of n=4. Progressively adding earlier evolutionary transitions gives an optimum fit when n=5, implying either that their initial transitions are not critical or that habitability began around 6 Ga ago. The origin of life on Mars or elsewhere within the Solar System is excluded by the latter case and the simple anthropic argument is that extraterrestrial life is scarce in the Universe because it does not have time to evolve. Alternatively, the timescale can be extended if the migration of basic progenotic material to Earth is possible. If extra transitions are included in the model to allow for Earth migration, then the start of habitability needs to be even earlier than 6 Ga ago. Our present understanding of Galactic habitability and dynamics does not exclude this possibility. We conclude that Galactic punctuated equilibrium, proposed as a way round the anthropic problem, is not the only way of making life more common in the Galaxy.

  10. Origins and Evolution of Stomatal Development1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    The fossil record suggests stomata-like pores were present on the surfaces of land plants over 400 million years ago. Whether stomata arose once or whether they arose independently across newly evolving land plant lineages has long been a matter of debate. In Arabidopsis, a genetic toolbox has been identified that tightly controls stomatal development and patterning. This includes the basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factors SPEECHLESS (SPCH), MUTE, FAMA, and ICE/SCREAMs (SCRMs), which promote stomatal formation. These factors are regulated via a signaling cascade, which includes mobile EPIDERMAL PATTERNING FACTOR (EPF) peptides to enforce stomatal spacing. Mosses and hornworts, the most ancient extant lineages to possess stomata, possess orthologs of these Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) stomatal toolbox genes, and manipulation in the model bryophyte Physcomitrella patens has shown that the bHLH and EPF components are also required for moss stomatal development and patterning. This supports an ancient and tightly conserved genetic origin of stomata. Here, we review recent discoveries and, by interrogating newly available plant genomes, we advance the story of stomatal development and patterning across land plant evolution. Furthermore, we identify potential orthologs of the key toolbox genes in a hornwort, further supporting a single ancient genetic origin of stomata in the ancestor to all stomatous land plants. PMID:28356502

  11. Origin and evolution of the canal raphe system in diatoms.

    PubMed

    Ruck, Elizabeth C; Theriot, Edward C

    2011-11-01

    One lineage of pennate diatoms has a slit through the siliceous cell wall, called a "raphe," that functions in motility. Raphid pennate diatoms number in the perhaps tens of thousands of species, with the diversity of raphe forms potentially matching this number. Three lineages-the Bacillariales, Rhopalodiales, and Surirellales-possess a complex and presumably highly derived raphe that is physically separated from the cell interior, most often by a set of siliceous braces. Because the relationship among these three lineages is unclear, the number of origins of the canal raphe system and the homology of it and its constitutive parts among these lineages, is equally unclear. We reconstructed the phylogeny of raphid pennate diatoms and included, for the first time, members of all three canal raphid diatom lineages, and used the phylogeny to test specific hypotheses about the origin of the canal raphe. The canal raphe appears to have evolved twice, once in the common ancestor of Bacillariales and once in the common ancestor of Rhopalodiales and Surirellales, which form a monophyletic group in our analyses. These results recommend careful follow-up morphogenesis studies of the canal raphe in these two lineages to determine the underlying developmental basis for this remarkable case of parallel evolution. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  12. Himalayan Origin and Evolution of Myricaria (Tamaricaeae) in the Neogene

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ming-Li; Meng, Hong-Hu; Zhang, Hong-Xiang; Vyacheslav, Byalt V.; Sanderson, Stewart C.

    2014-01-01

    Background Myricaria consists of about twelve-thirteen species and occurs in Eurasian North Temperate zone, most species in the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau (QTP) and adjacent areas. Methodology/Principal Findings Twelve species of Myricaria plus two other genera Tamarix and Reaumuria in Tamaricaceae, were sampled, and four markers, ITS, rps16, psbB-psbH, and trnL-trnF were sequenced. The relaxed Bayesian molecular clock BEAST method was used to perform phylogenetic analysis and molecular dating, and Diva, S-Diva, and maximum likelihood Lagrange were used to estimate the ancestral area. The results indicated that Myricaria could be divided into four phylogenetic clades, which correspond to four sections within the genus, of them two are newly described in this paper. The crown age of Myricaria was dated to early Miocene ca. 20 Ma, at the probable early uplifting time of the Himalayas. The Himalayas were also shown as the center of origin for Myricaria from the optimization of ancestral distribution. Migration and dispersal of Myricaria were indicated to have taken place along the Asian Mountains, including the Himalayas, Kunlun, Altun, Hendukosh, Tianshan, Altai, and Caucasus etc., westward to Europe, eastward to Central China, and northward to the Mongolian Plateau. Conclusions/Significance Myricaria spatiotemporal evolution presented here, especially the Himalayan origin at early Miocene ca. 20 Ma, and then migrated westward and eastward along the Asian mountains, offers a significant evolutionary case for QTP and Central Asian biogeography. PMID:24905234

  13. Origin and evolution of valleys on Martian volcanoes

    SciTech Connect

    Gulick, V.C.; Baker, V.R. )

    1990-08-30

    Morphological analyses of six Martian volcanoes, Ceraunius Tholus, Hecates Tholus, Alba Patera, Hadriaca Patera, Apollinaris Patera, and Tyrrhena Patera, indicate that fluvial processes were the dominant influence in the initiation and subsequent development of many dissecting valleys. Lava processes and possibly volcanic density flows were also important as valley-forming processes. Fluvial valleys are especially well developed on Alba Patera, Ceraunius Tholus, and Hecates Tholus. These valleys are inset into the surrounding landscape. They formed in regions of subdued lava flow morphology, contain tributaries, and tend to widen slightly in the downstream direction. Lava channels on Alba Patera are located on the crest of lava flows and have a discontinuous, irregular surface morphology, and distributary patterns. These channels sometimes narrow toward their termini. Possible volcanic density flow channels are located on the northern flank of Ceraunius Tholus. Valleys dissecting Apollinaris Patera, Hadriaca Patera, and Tyrrhena Patera appear to have a complex evolution, probably a mixed fluvial and lava origin. They are inset into a subdued (possibly mantled) surface, lack tributaries, and either have fairly constant widths or widen slightly downvalley. Valleys surrounding the caldera of Apollinaris appear to have formed by fluvial and possibly by volcanic density flow processes, while those on the Apollinaris fan structure may have a mixed lava and fluvial origin. Valleys on Tyrrhena have broad flat floors and theater heads, which have been extensively enlarged, probably by sapping.

  14. Mitogenomic analyses provide new insights into cetacean origin and evolution.

    PubMed

    Arnason, Ulfur; Gullberg, Anette; Janke, Axel

    2004-05-26

    The evolution of the order Cetacea (whales, dolphins, porpoises) has, for a long time, attracted the attention of evolutionary biologists. Here we examine cetacean phylogenetic relationships on the basis of analyses of complete mitochondrial genomes that represent all extant cetacean families. The results suggest that the ancestors of recent cetaceans had an explosive evolutionary radiation 30-35 million years before present. During this period, extant cetaceans divided into the two primary groups, Mysticeti (baleen whales) and Odontoceti (toothed whales). Soon after this basal split, the Odontoceti diverged into the four extant lineages, sperm whales, beaked whales, Indian river dolphins and delphinoids (iniid river dolphins, narwhals/belugas, porpoises and true dolphins). The current data set has allowed test of two recent morphological hypotheses on cetacean origin. One of these hypotheses posits that Artiodactyla and Cetacea originated from the extinct group Mesonychia, and the other that Mesonychia/Cetacea constitutes a sister group to Artiodactyla. The current results are inconsistent with both these hypotheses. The findings suggest that the claimed morphological similarities between Mesonychia and Cetacea are the result of evolutionary convergence rather than common ancestry.

  15. Origin and evolution of developmental enhancers in the mammalian neocortex

    PubMed Central

    Emera, Deena; Yin, Jun; Reilly, Steven K.; Gockley, Jake; Noonan, James P.

    2016-01-01

    Morphological innovations such as the mammalian neocortex may involve the evolution of novel regulatory sequences. However, de novo birth of regulatory elements active during morphogenesis has not been extensively studied in mammals. Here, we use H3K27ac-defined regulatory elements active during human and mouse corticogenesis to identify enhancers that were likely active in the ancient mammalian forebrain. We infer the phylogenetic origins of these enhancers and find that ∼20% arose in the mammalian stem lineage, coincident with the emergence of the neocortex. Implementing a permutation strategy that controls for the nonrandom variation in the ages of background genomic sequences, we find that mammal-specific enhancers are overrepresented near genes involved in cell migration, cell signaling, and axon guidance. Mammal-specific enhancers are also overrepresented in modules of coexpressed genes in the cortex that are associated with these pathways, notably ephrin and semaphorin signaling. Our results also provide insight into the mechanisms of regulatory innovation in mammals. We find that most neocortical enhancers did not originate by en bloc exaptation of transposons. Young neocortical enhancers exhibit smaller H3K27ac footprints and weaker evolutionary constraint in eutherian mammals than older neocortical enhancers. Based on these observations, we present a model of the enhancer life cycle in which neocortical enhancers initially emerge from genomic background as short, weakly constrained “proto-enhancers.” Many proto-enhancers are likely lost, but some may serve as nucleation points for complex enhancers to evolve. PMID:27114548

  16. The origin and evolution of the Cretaceous Benue Trough (Nigeria)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benkhelil, J.

    The intracontinental Benue Trough was initiated during the Lower Cretaceous in relation with the Atlantic Ocean opening. The first stage of its evolution started in the Aptian, forming isolated basins with continental sedimentation. In the Albian times, a great delta developed in the Upper Benue Trough, while the first marine transgression coming from the opening Gulf of Guinea occurred in the south and reached the Middle Benue. The widespread Turonian transgression made the Atlantic and Tethys waters communicate through the Sahara, Niger basins and the Benue Trough. The tectonic evolution of the Benue Trough was closely controlled by transcurrent faulting through an axial fault system, developing local compressional and tensional regimes and resulting in basins and basement horsts along releasing and restraining bends of the faults. Two major compressional phases occurred: in the Abakaliki area (southern Benue) during the Santonian; and at the end of the Cretaceous in the Upper Benue Trough. In Abakaliki, the sedimentary infilling was severely deformed through folding and flattening, and moderate folding and fracturing occurred in the northeast. The Cretaceous magmatism was restricted to main fault zones in most of the trough but was particularly active in the Abakaliki Trough, where it has alkaline affinities. From Albian to Santonian, the magmatism was accompanied in part of the Abakaliki Trough by a low-grade metamorphism. Geophysical data indicate a crustal thinning beneath the Benue Trough and, at a superficial level, an axial basement high flanked by two elongated deep basins including isolated sub-basins. The model of the tectonic evolution of the trough is based upon a general sinistral wrenching along the trough responsible for the structural arrangement and the geometry of the sub-basins. During the early stages of the Gulf of Guinea opening the Benue Trough was probably the expression on land of the Equatorial Fracture Zones.

  17. The integumentary skeleton of tetrapods: origin, evolution, and development

    PubMed Central

    Vickaryous, Matthew K; Sire, Jean-Yves

    2009-01-01

    Although often overlooked, the integument of many tetrapods is reinforced by a morphologically and structurally diverse assemblage of skeletal elements. These elements are widely understood to be derivatives of the once all-encompassing dermal skeleton of stem-gnathostomes but most details of their evolution and development remain confused and uncertain. Herein we re-evaluate the tetrapod integumentary skeleton by integrating comparative developmental and tissue structure data. Three types of tetrapod integumentary elements are recognized: (1) osteoderms, common to representatives of most major taxonomic lineages; (2) dermal scales, unique to gymnophionans; and (3) the lamina calcarea, an enigmatic tissue found only in some anurans. As presently understood, all are derivatives of the ancestral cosmoid scale and all originate from scleroblastic neural crest cells. Osteoderms are plesiomorphic for tetrapods but demonstrate considerable lineage-specific variability in size, shape, and tissue structure and composition. While metaplastic ossification often plays a role in osteoderm development, it is not the exclusive mode of skeletogenesis. All osteoderms share a common origin within the dermis (at or adjacent to the stratum superficiale) and are composed primarily (but not exclusively) of osseous tissue. These data support the notion that all osteoderms are derivatives of a neural crest-derived osteogenic cell population (with possible matrix contributions from the overlying epidermis) and share a deep homology associated with the skeletogenic competence of the dermis. Gymnophionan dermal scales are structurally similar to the elasmoid scales of most teleosts and are not comparable with osteoderms. Whereas details of development are lacking, it is hypothesized that dermal scales are derivatives of an odontogenic neural crest cell population and that skeletogenesis is comparable with the formation of elasmoid scales. Little is known about the lamina calcarea. It is

  18. The integumentary skeleton of tetrapods: origin, evolution, and development.

    PubMed

    Vickaryous, Matthew K; Sire, Jean-Yves

    2009-04-01

    Although often overlooked, the integument of many tetrapods is reinforced by a morphologically and structurally diverse assemblage of skeletal elements. These elements are widely understood to be derivatives of the once all-encompassing dermal skeleton of stem-gnathostomes but most details of their evolution and development remain confused and uncertain. Herein we re-evaluate the tetrapod integumentary skeleton by integrating comparative developmental and tissue structure data. Three types of tetrapod integumentary elements are recognized: (1) osteoderms, common to representatives of most major taxonomic lineages; (2) dermal scales, unique to gymnophionans; and (3) the lamina calcarea, an enigmatic tissue found only in some anurans. As presently understood, all are derivatives of the ancestral cosmoid scale and all originate from scleroblastic neural crest cells. Osteoderms are plesiomorphic for tetrapods but demonstrate considerable lineage-specific variability in size, shape, and tissue structure and composition. While metaplastic ossification often plays a role in osteoderm development, it is not the exclusive mode of skeletogenesis. All osteoderms share a common origin within the dermis (at or adjacent to the stratum superficiale) and are composed primarily (but not exclusively) of osseous tissue. These data support the notion that all osteoderms are derivatives of a neural crest-derived osteogenic cell population (with possible matrix contributions from the overlying epidermis) and share a deep homology associated with the skeletogenic competence of the dermis. Gymnophionan dermal scales are structurally similar to the elasmoid scales of most teleosts and are not comparable with osteoderms. Whereas details of development are lacking, it is hypothesized that dermal scales are derivatives of an odontogenic neural crest cell population and that skeletogenesis is comparable with the formation of elasmoid scales. Little is known about the lamina calcarea. It is

  19. Prebiological evolution and the physics of the origin of life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delaye, Luis; Lazcano, Antonio

    2005-03-01

    The basic tenet of the heterotrophic theory of the origin of life is that the maintenance and reproduction of the first living systems depended primarily on prebiotically synthesized organic molecules. It is unlikely that any single mechanism can account for the wide range of organic compounds that may have accumulated on the primitive Earth, suggesting that the prebiotic soup was formed by contributions from endogenous syntheses in reducing environments, metal sulphide-mediated synthesis in deep-sea vents, and exogenous sources such as comets, meteorites and interplanetary dust. The wide range of experimental conditions under which amino acids and nucleobases can be synthesized suggests that the abiotic syntheses of these monomers did not take place under a narrow range defined by highly selective reaction conditions, but rather under a wide variety of settings. The robustness of this type of chemistry is supported by the occurrence of most of these biochemical compounds in the Murchison meteorite. These results lend strong credence to the hypothesis that the emergence of life was the outcome of a long, but not necessarily slow, evolutionary processes. The origin of life may be best understood in terms of the dynamics and evolution of sets of chemical replicating entities. Whether such entities were enclosed within membranes is not yet clear, but given the prebiotic availability of amphiphilic compounds this may have well been the case. This scheme is not at odds with the theoretical models of self-organized emerging systems, but what is known of biology suggest that the essential traits of living systems could have not emerged in the absence of genetic material able to store, express and, upon replication, transmit to its progeny information capable of undergoing evolutionary change. How such genetic polymer first evolved is a central issue in origin-of-life studies.

  20. Prebiological evolution and the physics of the origin of life.

    PubMed

    Delaye, Luis; Lazcano, Antonio

    2005-03-01

    The basic tenet of the heterotrophic theory of the origin of life is that the maintenance and reproduction of the first living systems depended primarily on prebiotically synthesized organic molecules. It is unlikely that any single mechanism can account for the wide range of organic compounds that may have accumulated on the primitive Earth, suggesting that the prebiotic soup was formed by contributions from endogenous syntheses in reducing environments, metal sulphide-mediated synthesis in deep-sea vents, and exogenous sources such as comets, meteorites and interplanetary dust. The wide range of experimental conditions under which amino acids and nucleobases can be synthesized suggests that the abiotic syntheses of these monomers did not take place under a narrow range defined by highly selective reaction conditions, but rather under a wide variety of settings. The robustness of this type of chemistry is supported by the occurrence of most of these biochemical compounds in the Murchison meteorite. These results lend strong credence to the hypothesis that the emergence of life was the outcome of a long, but not necessarily slow, evolutionary processes. The origin of life may be best understood in terms of the dynamics and evolution of sets of chemical replicating entities. Whether such entities were enclosed within membranes is not yet clear, but given the prebiotic availability of amphiphilic compounds this may have well been the case. This scheme is not at odds with the theoretical models of self-organized emerging systems, but what is known of biology suggest that the essential traits of living systems could have not emerged in the absence of genetic material able to store, express and, upon replication, transmit to its progeny information capable of undergoing evolutionary change. How such genetic polymer first evolved is a central issue in origin-of-life studies.

  1. Origins and evolution of viruses of eukaryotes: The ultimate modularity.

    PubMed

    Koonin, Eugene V; Dolja, Valerian V; Krupovic, Mart

    2015-05-01

    Viruses and other selfish genetic elements are dominant entities in the biosphere, with respect to both physical abundance and genetic diversity. Various selfish elements parasitize on all cellular life forms. The relative abundances of different classes of viruses are dramatically different between prokaryotes and eukaryotes. In prokaryotes, the great majority of viruses possess double-stranded (ds) DNA genomes, with a substantial minority of single-stranded (ss) DNA viruses and only limited presence of RNA viruses. In contrast, in eukaryotes, RNA viruses account for the majority of the virome diversity although ssDNA and dsDNA viruses are common as well. Phylogenomic analysis yields tangible clues for the origins of major classes of eukaryotic viruses and in particular their likely roots in prokaryotes. Specifically, the ancestral genome of positive-strand RNA viruses of eukaryotes might have been assembled de novo from genes derived from prokaryotic retroelements and bacteria although a primordial origin of this class of viruses cannot be ruled out. Different groups of double-stranded RNA viruses derive either from dsRNA bacteriophages or from positive-strand RNA viruses. The eukaryotic ssDNA viruses apparently evolved via a fusion of genes from prokaryotic rolling circle-replicating plasmids and positive-strand RNA viruses. Different families of eukaryotic dsDNA viruses appear to have originated from specific groups of bacteriophages on at least two independent occasions. Polintons, the largest known eukaryotic transposons, predicted to also form virus particles, most likely, were the evolutionary intermediates between bacterial tectiviruses and several groups of eukaryotic dsDNA viruses including the proposed order "Megavirales" that unites diverse families of large and giant viruses. Strikingly, evolution of all classes of eukaryotic viruses appears to have involved fusion between structural and replicative gene modules derived from different sources along

  2. Second Symposium on Chemical Evolution and the Origin of Life

    SciTech Connect

    Devincenzi, D.L.; Dufour, P.A.

    1986-05-01

    Recent findings by NASA Exobiology investigators are reported. Scientific papers are presented in the following areas: cosmic evolution of biogenic compounds, prebiotic evolution (planetary and molecular), early evolution of life (biological and geochemical), evolution of advanced life, solar system exploration, and the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence (SETI).

  3. Second Symposium on Chemical Evolution and the Origin of Life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Devincenzi, D. L. (Editor); model. (Editor)

    1986-01-01

    Recent findings by NASA Exobiology investigators are reported. Scientific papers are presented in the following areas: cosmic evolution of biogenic compounds, prebiotic evolution (planetary and molecular), early evolution of life (biological and geochemical), evolution of advanced life, solar system exploration, and the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence (SETI).

  4. ORIGIN: metal creation and evolution from the cosmic dawn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    den Herder, Jan-Willem; Piro, Luigi; Ohashi, Takaya; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Hartmann, Dieter H.; Kaastra, Jelle S.; Amati, L.; Andersen, M. I.; Arnaud, M.; Attéia, J.-L.; Bandler, S.; Barbera, M.; Barcons, X.; Barthelmy, S.; Basa, S.; Basso, S.; Boer, M.; Branchini, E.; Branduardi-Raymont, G.; Borgani, S.; Boyarsky, A.; Brunetti, G.; Budtz-Jorgensen, C.; Burrows, D.; Butler, N.; Campana, S.; Caroli, E.; Ceballos, M.; Christensen, F.; Churazov, E.; Comastri, A.; Colasanti, L.; Cole, R.; Content, R.; Corsi, A.; Costantini, E.; Conconi, P.; Cusumano, G.; de Plaa, J.; De Rosa, A.; Del Santo, M.; Di Cosimo, S.; De Pasquale, M.; Doriese, R.; Ettori, S.; Evans, P.; Ezoe, Y.; Ferrari, L.; Finger, H.; Figueroa-Feliciano, T.; Friedrich, P.; Fujimoto, R.; Furuzawa, A.; Fynbo, J.; Gatti, F.; Galeazzi, M.; Gehrels, N.; Gendre, B.; Ghirlanda, G.; Ghisellini, G.; Gilfanov, M.; Giommi, P.; Girardi, M.; Grindlay, J.; Cocchi, M.; Godet, O.; Guedel, M.; Haardt, F.; den Hartog, R.; Hepburn, I.; Hermsen, W.; Hjorth, J.; Hoekstra, H.; Holland, A.; Hornstrup, A.; van der Horst, A.; Hoshino, A.; in't Zand, J.; Irwin, K.; Ishisaki, Y.; Jonker, P.; Kitayama, T.; Kawahara, H.; Kawai, N.; Kelley, R.; Kilbourne, C.; de Korte, P.; Kusenko, A.; Kuvvetli, I.; Labanti, M.; Macculi, C.; Maiolino, R.; Hesse, M. Mas; Matsushita, K.; Mazzotta, P.; McCammon, D.; Méndez, M.; Mignani, R.; Mineo, T.; Mitsuda, K.; Mushotzky, R.; Molendi, S.; Moscardini, L.; Natalucci, L.; Nicastro, F.; O'Brien, P.; Osborne, J.; Paerels, F.; Page, M.; Paltani, S.; Pedersen, K.; Perinati, E.; Ponman, T.; Pointecouteau, E.; Predehl, P.; Porter, S.; Rasmussen, A.; Rauw, G.; Röttgering, H.; Roncarelli, M.; Rosati, P.; Quadrini, E.; Ruchayskiy, O.; Salvaterra, R.; Sasaki, S.; Sato, K.; Savaglio, S.; Schaye, J.; Sciortino, S.; Shaposhnikov, M.; Sharples, R.; Shinozaki, K.; Spiga, D.; Sunyaev, R.; Suto, Y.; Takei, Y.; Tanvir, N.; Tashiro, M.; Tamura, T.; Tawara, Y.; Troja, E.; Tsujimoto, M.; Tsuru, T.; Ubertini, P.; Ullom, J.; Ursino, E.; Verbunt, F.; van de Voort, F.; Viel, M.; Wachter, S.; Watson, D.; Weisskopf, M.; Werner, N.; White, N.; Willingale, R.; Wijers, R.; Yamasaki, N.; Yoshikawa, K.; Zane, S.

    2012-10-01

    ORIGIN is a proposal for the M3 mission call of ESA aimed at the study of metal creation from the epoch of cosmic dawn. Using high-spectral resolution in the soft X-ray band, ORIGIN will be able to identify the physical conditions of all abundant elements between C and Ni to red-shifts of z = 10, and beyond. The mission will answer questions such as: When were the first metals created? How does the cosmic metal content evolve? Where do most of the metals reside in the Universe? What is the role of metals in structure formation and evolution? To reach out to the early Universe ORIGIN will use Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) to study their local environments in their host galaxies. This requires the capability to slew the satellite in less than a minute to the GRB location. By studying the chemical composition and properties of clusters of galaxies we can extend the range of exploration to lower redshifts ( z ˜0.2). For this task we need a high-resolution spectral imaging instrument with a large field of view. Using the same instrument, we can also study the so far only partially detected baryons in the Warm-Hot Intergalactic Medium (WHIM). The less dense part of the WHIM will be studied using absorption lines at low redshift in the spectra for GRBs. The ORIGIN mission includes a Transient Event Detector (coded mask with a sensitivity of 0.4 photon/cm2/s in 10 s in the 5-150 keV band) to identify and localize 2000 GRBs over a five year mission, of which ˜65 GRBs have a redshift >7. The Cryogenic Imaging Spectrometer, with a spectral resolution of 2.5 eV, a field of view of 30 arcmin and large effective area below 1 keV has the sensitivity to study clusters up to a significant fraction of the virial radius and to map the denser parts of the WHIM (factor 30 higher than achievable with current instruments). The payload is complemented by a Burst InfraRed Telescope to enable onboard red-shift determination of GRBs (hence securing proper follow up of high-z bursts) and also

  5. ORIGIN: Metal Creation and Evolution from the Cosmic Dawn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kouveliotou, C.; vanderHorst, A.; Weisskopf, M.; White, N.; denHerder, J. W.; Costantini, E.; denHartog, R.; Hermsen, W.; in'tZhand, J.; Kaastra, J.; hide

    2012-01-01

    ORIGIN is a proposal for the M3 mission call of ESA aimed at the study of metal creation from the epoch of cosmic dawn. Using high-spectral resolution in the soft X-ray band, ORIGIN will be able to identify the physical conditions of all abundant elements between C and Ni to red-shifts of z=10, and beyond. The mission will answer questions such as: When were the first metals created? How does the cosmic metal content evolve? Where do most of the metals reside in the Universe? What is the role of metals in structure formation and evolution? To reach out to the early Universe ORIGIN will use Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) to study their local environments in their host galaxies. This requires the capability to slew the satellite in less than a minute to the GRB location. By studying the chemical composition and properties of clusters of galaxies we can extend the range of exploration to lower redshifts (z approx. 0.2). For this task we need a high-resolution spectral imaging instrument with a large field of view. Using the same instrument, we can also study the so far only partially detected baryons in the Warm-Hot Intergalactic Medium (WHIM). The less dense part of the WHIM will be studied using absorption lines at low redshift in the spectra for GRBs. The ORIGIN mission includes a Transient Event Detector (coded mask with a sensitivity of 0.4 photon/sq cm/s in 10 s in the 5-150 keV band) to identify and localize 2000 GRBs over a five year mission, of which approx.65 GRBs have a redshift >7. The Cryogenic Imaging Spectrometer, with a spectral resolution of 2.5 eV, a field of view of 30 arcmin and large effective area below 1 keV has the sensitivity to study clusters up to a significant fraction of the virial radius and to map the denser parts of the WHIM (factor 30 higher than achievable with current instruments). The payload is complemented by a Burst InfraRed Telescope to enable onboard red-shift determination of GRBs (hence securing proper follow up of high-z bursts

  6. Developmental genes and the origin and evolution of Metazoa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobs, D. K.

    1994-01-01

    The author discusses the role of developmental genes in evolution of life and the use of molecular approaches to confirm morphologic homology, to aid in understanding developmental mechanisms of evolution of novel structures, and to investigate some aspects of the evolution of life. Topics examined include developmental genes and homology; the role of co-optation and divergence, homeosis, and heterochrony as mechanisms of evolution; and life history evolution and model organisms.

  7. Developmental genes and the origin and evolution of Metazoa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobs, D. K.

    1994-01-01

    The author discusses the role of developmental genes in evolution of life and the use of molecular approaches to confirm morphologic homology, to aid in understanding developmental mechanisms of evolution of novel structures, and to investigate some aspects of the evolution of life. Topics examined include developmental genes and homology; the role of co-optation and divergence, homeosis, and heterochrony as mechanisms of evolution; and life history evolution and model organisms.

  8. The origin and evolution of adamantanes and diamantanes in petroleum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Chenchen; Xiong, Yongqiang; Li, Yun; Chen, Yuan; Liu, Jinzhong; Zhang, Haizu; Adedosu, Taofik Adewale; Peng, Ping'an

    2013-11-01

    This study investigates the origin and evolution of adamantanes and diamantanes in petroleum, based on the results of pyrolysis experiments on different group components of crude oil and quantitative analyses of diamondoids in the pyrolysates. Results show that the formation and evolution of lower diamondoids in petroleum occurs in three main stages: (1) early generation during the formation of oil (< ca. 0.8-1.0% EasyRo), (2) generation during the cracking of oil (>1.0% EasyRo), and (3) destruction during the late period of oil cracking. The lower diamondoids that formed during the early generation stage include free diamondoids present in the original oil and diamondoids released or transformed from group fractions of oil at relatively low levels of maturity (< ca. 0.8-1.0% EasyRo). During the process of oil cracking, all four group fractions (saturated, aromatic, resin, and asphaltene fractions) can produce adamantanes and diamantanes. Overall, adamantanes are generated primarily within the maturity range 1.0-2.3% EasyRo, and diamantanes within the maturity range 1.6-2.7% EasyRo. Group composition of the oil is probably a major factor controlling the yield and distribution of diamondoids in the main generation stage. The yield ratios of diamondoids can be used as maturity indices to assess the thermal maturity of oil, while the isomerization ratios of diamondoids are potential source facies indices for the generation stage of diamondoids. The destruction of diamondoids is observed at thermal maturity ranges >2.3% EasyRo in adamantanes and >2.7% EasyRo in diamantanes. The thermal stability of diamondoid compounds becomes a critical factor influencing the isomerization index of diamondoids during the destruction stage. The isomerization ratios of some diamondoids (e.g., MAI, DMAI-1, DMAI-2, TMAI-1, TMAI-2, and EAI) are well correlated with maturity within certain maturity ranges, indicating that isomerization indices provide good estimates of the thermal maturity

  9. Origin of time before inflation from a topological phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellini, Mauricio

    2017-09-01

    We study the origin of the universe (or pre-inflation) by suggesting that the primordial space-time in the universe suffered a global topological phase transition, from a 4D Euclidean manifold to an asymptotic 4D hyperbolic one. We introduce a complex time, τ, such that its real part becomes dominant after started the topological phase transition. Before the big bang, τ is a space-like coordinate, so that can be considered as a reversal variable. After the phase transition is converted in a causal variable. The formalism solves in a natural manner the quantum to classical transition of the geometrical relativistic quantum fluctuations: σ, which has a geometric origin.

  10. Tessera terrain, Venus: Characterization and models for origin and evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Bindschadler, D.L.; Head, J.W. )

    1991-04-10

    Tessera terrain is the dominant tectonic landform in the northern high latitudes of Venus mapped by the Venera 15 and 16 orbiters and is concentrated in the region between the mountain ranges of western Ishtar Terra and Aphrodite Terra. Tesserae are characterized by regionally high topography, a high degree of small scale surface roughness, and sets of intersecting tectonic features. Available Pioneer Venus line of sight gravity data suggest that tessera terrain is compensated at shallow depths relative to many topographic highs on Venus and may be supported by crustal thickness variations. Three types of tessera terrain can be defined on the basis of structural patterns: subparallel ridged terrains (T{sub sr}), trough and ridge terrain (T{sub tr}), and disrupted terrain (T{sub ds}). Observed characteristics of tessera terrain are compared to predictions of models in order to begin to address the question of its origin and evolution. Formational models, in which high topography is created along with surface deformation, include (1) horizontal convergence, (2) mantle upwelling, (3) crustal underplating, and (4) a seafloor spreading analogy. Modification models, in which deformation occurs as a response to the presence of elevated regions, consist of (1) gravity sliding and (2) gravitational relaxation. The authors find that horizontal convergence and late stage gravitational relaxation are the most consistent with basic observations for subparallel ridged terrain and disrupted terrain. Understanding of the basic structural characteristics of trough and ridge terrain is more tentative, and models involving a spreading process or convergence and relaxation merit further study.

  11. Can chimpanzee biology highlight human origin and evolution?

    PubMed

    Roffman, Itai; Nevo, Eviatar

    2010-07-01

    The closest living relatives of humans are their chimpanzee/bonobo (Pan) sister species, members of the same subfamily "Homininae". This classification is supported by over 50 years of research in the fields of chimpanzee cultural diversity, language competency, genomics, anatomy, high cognition, psychology, society, self-consciousness and relation to others, tool use/production, as well as Homo level emotions, symbolic competency, memory recollection, complex multifaceted problem-solving capabilities, and interspecies communication. Language competence and symbolism can be continuously bridged from chimpanzee to man. Emotions, intercommunity aggression, body language, gestures, facial expressions, and vocalization of intonations seem to parallel between the sister taxa Homo and Pan. The shared suite of traits between Pan and Homo genus demonstrated in this article integrates old and new information on human-chimpanzee evolution, bilateral informational and cross-cultural exchange, promoting the urgent need for Pan cultures in the wild to be protected, as they are part of the cultural heritage of mankind. Also, we suggest that bonobos, Pan paniscus, based on shared traits with Australopithecus, need to be included in Australopithecine's subgenus, and may even represent living-fossil Australopithecines. Unfolding bonobo and chimpanzee biology highlights our common genetic and cultural evolutionary origins.

  12. Origins and early evolution of the translation machinery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, George E.

    2010-09-01

    The modern ribosome is a complex biological machine that is responsible for chiral synthesis of cellular proteins according to the genetic code as specified by a mRNA. Major portions of the ribosomal machinery were likely in place before the last universal common ancestor (LUCA) of life. The early evolution of the ribosome has implications for the origin of the genetic code, the emergence of chirality in peptide synthesis, and the emergence of LUCA. Although codon assignments may remain a mystery, the history of the ribosome provides a context for dating the first usage of mRNA. In the case of chirality, the modern ribosome suggests that a small initial chiral preference for L-amino acids in the environment may have been greatly enhanced by a two step process in which the charging of a primitive tRNA and the subsequent synthesis of a peptide bond both had the same chiral preference. The resulting ability to make largely chiral peptides may have provided an advantage over other prebiotic mechanisms for making peptides. Finally, the late addition of factors such as EF-G may have greatly accelerated the emerging ribosome's ability to synthesize proteins, thereby allowing entities with this novel capability to emerge as the LUCA.

  13. Milgram's Obedience to Authority experiments: origins and early evolution.

    PubMed

    Russell, Nestar John Charles

    2011-03-01

    Stanley Milgram's Obedience to Authority experiments remain one of the most inspired contributions in the field of social psychology. Although Milgram undertook more than 20 experimental variations, his most (in)famous result was the first official trial run - the remote condition and its 65% completion rate. Drawing on many unpublished documents from Milgram's personal archive at Yale University, this article traces the historical origins and early evolution of the obedience experiments. Part 1 presents the previous experiences that led to Milgram's conception of his rudimentary research idea and then details the role of his intuition in its refinement. Part 2 traces the conversion of Milgram's evolving idea into a reality, paying particular attention to his application of the exploratory method of discovery during several pilot studies. Both parts illuminate Milgram's ad hoc introduction of various manipulative techniques and subtle tension-resolving refinements. The procedural adjustments continued until Milgram was confident that the first official experiment would produce a high completion rate, a result contrary to expectations of people's behaviour. Showing how Milgram conceived of, then arrived at, this first official result is important because the insights gained may help others to determine theoretically why so many participants completed this experiment.

  14. The origin and evolution of the term "clone".

    PubMed

    Steensma, David P

    2017-06-01

    In biology, the term "clone" is most widely used to designate genetically identical cells or organisms that are asexually descended from a common progenitor. The concept of clonality in hematology-oncology has received much attention in recent years, as the advent of next-generation sequencing platforms has provided new tools for detection of clonal populations in patients, and experiments on primary cells have provided fascinating new insights into the clonal architecture of human malignancies. The term "clone" is used more loosely by the general public to mean any close or identical copy. Cloning of humans has been a staple of science fiction films and dystopian novels since Aldous Huxley's Brave New World was published in 1932. Here I trace the origin and evolution of the word clone, from its first use as an agricultural and botanical term in 1903, to its widespread adoption in biology, adaptation by artists, and contemporary use in hematology-oncology. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. The origin and early evolution of life on Earth.

    PubMed

    Oró, J; Miller, S L; Lazcano, A

    1990-01-01

    We do not have a detailed knowledge of the processes that led to the appearance of life on Earth. In this review we bring together some of the most important results that have provided insights into the cosmic and primitive Earth environments, particularly those environments in which life is thought to have originated. To do so, we first discuss the evidence bearing on the antiquity of life on our planet and the prebiotic significance of organic compounds found in interstellar clouds and in primitive solar system bodies such as comets, dark asteroids, and carbonaceous chondrites. This is followed by a discussion on the environmental models of the Hadean and early Archean Earth, as well as on the prebiotic formation of organic monomers and polymers essential to life. We then consider the processes that may have led to the appearance in the Archean of the first cells, and how these processes may have affected the early steps of biological evolution. Finally, the significance of these results to the study of the distribution of life in the Universe is discussed.

  16. Origin and genetic evolution of the vertebrate skeleton.

    PubMed

    Wada, Hiroshi

    2010-02-01

    The current understanding of the origin and evolution of the genetic cassette for the vertebrate skeletal system is reviewed. Molecular phylogenetic analyses of fibrillar collagen genes, which encode the main component of both cartilage and mineralized bone, suggest that genome duplications in vertebrate ancestors were essential for producing distinct collagen fibers for cartilage and mineralized bone. Several data Indicate co-expression of the ancestral copy of fibrillar collagen with the SoxE and Runx transcription factors. Therefore, the genetic cassette may have already existed in protochordate ancestors, and may operate in the development of the pharyngeal gill skeleton. Accompanied by genome duplications in vertebrate ancestors, this genetic cassette may have also been duplicated and co-opted for cartilage and bone. Subsequently, the genetic cassette for cartilage recruited novel genetic material via domain shuffling. Aggrecan, acquired by means of domain shuffling, performs an essential role in cartilage as a shock absorber. In contrast, the cassette for bone recruited new genetic material produced by tandem duplication of the SPARC/osteonectin genes. Some of the duplicated copies of SPARC/osteonectin became secretory Cabinding phosphoproteins (SCPPs) performing a central role in mineralization by regulating the calcium phosphate concentration. Comparative genome analysis revealed similar molecular evolutionary histories for the genetic cassettes for cartilage and bone, namely duplication of the ancestral genetic cassette and recruitment of novel genetic material.

  17. Biotic interactions as drivers of algal origin and evolution.

    PubMed

    Brodie, Juliet; Ball, Steven G; Bouget, François-Yves; Chan, Cheong Xin; De Clerck, Olivier; Cock, J Mark; Gachon, Claire; Grossman, Arthur R; Mock, Thomas; Raven, John A; Saha, Mahasweta; Smith, Alison G; Vardi, Assaf; Yoon, Hwan Su; Bhattacharya, Debashish

    2017-08-31

    Contents 1 I. 2 II. 2 III. 7 IV. 9 9 References 9 SUMMARY: Biotic interactions underlie life's diversity and are the lynchpin to understanding its complexity and resilience within an ecological niche. Algal biologists have embraced this paradigm, and studies building on the explosive growth in omics and cell biology methods have facilitated the in-depth analysis of nonmodel organisms and communities from a variety of ecosystems. In turn, these advances have enabled a major revision of our understanding of the origin and evolution of photosynthesis in eukaryotes, bacterial-algal interactions, control of massive algal blooms in the ocean, and the maintenance and degradation of coral reefs. Here, we review some of the most exciting developments in the field of algal biotic interactions and identify challenges for scientists in the coming years. We foresee the development of an algal knowledgebase that integrates ecosystem-wide omics data and the development of molecular tools/resources to perform functional analyses of individuals in isolation and in populations. These assets will allow us to move beyond mechanistic studies of a single species towards understanding the interactions amongst algae and other organisms in both the laboratory and the field. © 2017 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2017 New Phytologist Trust.

  18. Can Chimpanzee Biology Highlight Human Origin and Evolution?

    PubMed Central

    Roffman, Itai; Nevo, Eviatar

    2010-01-01

    The closest living relatives of humans are their chimpanzee/bonobo (Pan) sister species, members of the same subfamily “Homininae”. This classification is supported by over 50 years of research in the fields of chimpanzee cultural diversity, language competency, genomics, anatomy, high cognition, psychology, society, self-consciousness and relation to others, tool use/production, as well as Homo level emotions, symbolic competency, memory recollection, complex multifaceted problem-solving capabilities, and interspecies communication. Language competence and symbolism can be continuously bridged from chimpanzee to man. Emotions, intercommunity aggression, body language, gestures, facial expressions, and vocalization of intonations seem to parallel between the sister taxa Homo and Pan. The shared suite of traits between Pan and Homo genus demonstrated in this article integrates old and new information on human–chimpanzee evolution, bilateral informational and cross-cultural exchange, promoting the urgent need for Pan cultures in the wild to be protected, as they are part of the cultural heritage of mankind. Also, we suggest that bonobos, Pan paniscus, based on shared traits with Australopithecus, need to be included in Australopithecine’s subgenus, and may even represent living-fossil Australopithecines. Unfolding bonobo and chimpanzee biology highlights our common genetic and cultural evolutionary origins. PMID:23908781

  19. Origin of noncoding DNA sequences: molecular fossils of genome evolution.

    PubMed

    Naora, H; Miyahara, K; Curnow, R N

    1987-09-01

    The total amount of noncoding sequences on chromosomes of contemporary organisms varies significantly from species to species. We propose a hypothesis for the origin of these noncoding sequences that assumes that (i) an approximately equal to 0.55-kilobase (kb)-long reading frame composed the primordial gene and (ii) a 20-kb-long single-stranded polynucleotide is the longest molecule (as a genome) that was polymerized at random and without a specific template in the primordial soup/cell. The statistical distribution of stop codons allows examination of the probability of generating reading frames of approximately equal to 0.55 kb in this primordial polynucleotide. This analysis reveals that with three stop codons, a run of at least 0.55-kb equivalent length of nonstop codons would occur in 4.6% of 20-kb-long polynucleotide molecules. We attempt to estimate the total amount of noncoding sequences that would be present on the chromosomes of contemporary species assuming that present-day chromosomes retain the prototype primordial genome structure. Theoretical estimates thus obtained for most eukaryotes do not differ significantly from those reported for these specific organisms, with only a few exceptions. Furthermore, analysis of possible stop-codon distributions suggests that life on earth would not exist, at least in its present form, had two or four stop codons been selected early in evolution.

  20. Environmental evolution: Effects of the origin and evolution of life on Planet Earth

    SciTech Connect

    Margulis, L.; Olendzenski, L.

    1992-01-01

    This book is a multiauthored textbook in planetary evolutionary biogeochemistry, emphasizing the major effects biota have had on the planetary environment and based on a long standing, one semister course at Boston University. A series of chapters described planetary atmospheres in the inner solar system, alternative views on the chemical origin of life, present-day microbial communities and the structures they build, the endosymbiotic origin of eukaryotic cells, and the fossil record of the late Precambrian. Four concluding chapters discuss the Phanerozoic, including the Gaia hypotheseis, plate tectonics, plant secondary compounds, and the role of chromosome fission in mammaliean evolution. A section on assignments, presentations, supplementary material, and background reading, and a comprehensive glossary are included.

  1. Phase evolution in zirconolite glass-ceramic wasteforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maddrell, Ewan R.; Paterson, Hannah C.; May, Sarah E.; Burns, Kerry M.

    2017-09-01

    The evolution of crystalline phases in a model glass-ceramic wasteform system has been studied as a function of temperature and time. The work has shown that perovskite and sphene form as transient phases before final formation of zirconolite. The study also suggests some evidence for subtle structural transformations within the zirconolite phase.

  2. Origins and evolution of viruses of eukaryotes: The ultimate modularity

    SciTech Connect

    Koonin, Eugene V.; Dolja, Valerian V.; Krupovic, Mart

    2015-05-15

    Viruses and other selfish genetic elements are dominant entities in the biosphere, with respect to both physical abundance and genetic diversity. Various selfish elements parasitize on all cellular life forms. The relative abundances of different classes of viruses are dramatically different between prokaryotes and eukaryotes. In prokaryotes, the great majority of viruses possess double-stranded (ds) DNA genomes, with a substantial minority of single-stranded (ss) DNA viruses and only limited presence of RNA viruses. In contrast, in eukaryotes, RNA viruses account for the majority of the virome diversity although ssDNA and dsDNA viruses are common as well. Phylogenomic analysis yields tangible clues for the origins of major classes of eukaryotic viruses and in particular their likely roots in prokaryotes. Specifically, the ancestral genome of positive-strand RNA viruses of eukaryotes might have been assembled de novo from genes derived from prokaryotic retroelements and bacteria although a primordial origin of this class of viruses cannot be ruled out. Different groups of double-stranded RNA viruses derive either from dsRNA bacteriophages or from positive-strand RNA viruses. The eukaryotic ssDNA viruses apparently evolved via a fusion of genes from prokaryotic rolling circle-replicating plasmids and positive-strand RNA viruses. Different families of eukaryotic dsDNA viruses appear to have originated from specific groups of bacteriophages on at least two independent occasions. Polintons, the largest known eukaryotic transposons, predicted to also form virus particles, most likely, were the evolutionary intermediates between bacterial tectiviruses and several groups of eukaryotic dsDNA viruses including the proposed order “Megavirales” that unites diverse families of large and giant viruses. Strikingly, evolution of all classes of eukaryotic viruses appears to have involved fusion between structural and replicative gene modules derived from different sources

  3. THE STRUCTURE, ORIGIN, AND EVOLUTION OF INTERSTELLAR HYDROCARBON GRAINS

    SciTech Connect

    Chiar, J. E.; Ricca, A.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Adamson, A. J. E-mail: Alessandra.Ricca@1.nasa.gov E-mail: aadamson@gemini.edu

    2013-06-10

    Many materials have been considered for the carrier of the hydrocarbon absorption bands observed in the diffuse interstellar medium (ISM). In order to refine the model for ISM hydrocarbon grains, we analyze the observed aromatic (3.28, 6.2 {mu}m) and aliphatic (3.4 {mu}m) hydrocarbon absorption features in the diffuse ISM along the line of sight toward the Galactic center Quintuplet Cluster. Observationally, sp {sup 2} bonds can be measured in astronomical spectra using the 6.2 {mu}m CC aromatic stretch feature, whereas the 3.4 {mu}m aliphatic feature can be used to quantify the fraction of sp {sup 3} bonds. The fractional abundance of these components allows us to place the Galactic diffuse ISM hydrocarbons on a ternary phase diagram. We conclude that the Galactic hydrocarbon dust has, on average, a low H/C ratio and sp {sup 3} content and is highly aromatic. We have placed the results of our analysis within the context of the evolution of carbon dust in the ISM. We argue that interstellar carbon dust consists of a large core of aromatic carbon surrounded by a thin mantle of hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H), a structure that is a natural consequence of the processing of stardust grains in the ISM.

  4. On the origin and early evolution of biological catalysis and other studies on chemical evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oro, J.; Lazcano, A.

    1991-01-01

    One of the lines of research in molecular evolution which we have developed for the past three years is related to the experimental and theoretical study of the origin and early evolution of biological catalysis. In an attempt to understand the nature of the first peptidic catalysts and coenzymes, we have achieved the non-enzymatic synthesis of the coenzymes ADPG, GDPG, and CDP-ethanolamine, under conditions considered to have been prevalent on the primitive Earth. We have also accomplished the prebiotic synthesis of histidine, as well as histidyl-histidine, and we have measured the enhancing effects of this catalytic dipeptide on the dephosphorylation of deoxyribonucleotide monophosphates, the hydrolysis of oligo A, and the oligomerization 2', 3' cAMP. We reviewed and further developed the hypothesis that RNA preceded double stranded DNA molecules as a reservoir of cellular genetic information. This led us to undertake the study of extant RNA polymerases in an attempt to discover vestigial sequences preserved from early Archean times. In addition, we continued our studies of on the chemical evolution of organic compounds in the solar system and beyond.

  5. Geometric phases, evolution loops and generalized oscillator potentials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fernandez, David J.

    1995-01-01

    The geometric phases for dynamical processes where the evolution operator becomes the identity (evolution loops) are studied. The case of time-independent Hamiltonians with equally spaced energy levels is considered; special emphasis is made on the potentials having the same spectrum as the harmonic oscillator potential (the generalized oscillator potentials) and their recently found coherent states.

  6. Geometric Phase for Adiabatic Evolutions of General Quantum States

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Biao; Liu, Jie; Niu, Qian; Singh, David J

    2005-01-01

    The concept of a geometric phase (Berry's phase) is generalized to the case of noneigenstates, which is applicable to both linear and nonlinear quantum systems. This is particularly important to nonlinear quantum systems, where, due to the lack of the superposition principle, the adiabatic evolution of a general state cannot be described in terms of eigenstates. For linear quantum systems, our new geometric phase reduces to a statistical average of Berry's phases. Our results are demonstrated with a nonlinear two-level model.

  7. Origin and evolution of influenza virus hemagglutinin genes.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Yoshiyuki; Nei, Masatoshi

    2002-04-01

    Influenza A, B, and C viruses are the etiological agents of influenza. Hemagglutinin (HA) is the major envelope glycoprotein of influenza A and B viruses, and hemagglutinin-esterase (HE) in influenza C viruses is a protein homologous to HA. Because influenza A virus pandemics in humans appear to occur when new subtypes of HA genes are introduced from aquatic birds that are known to be the natural reservoir of the viruses, an understanding of the origin and evolution of HA genes is of particular importance. We therefore conducted a phylogenetic analysis of HA and HE genes and showed that the influenza A and B virus HA genes diverged much earlier than the divergence between different subtypes of influenza A virus HA genes. The rate of amino acid substitution for A virus HAs from duck, a natural reservoir, was estimated to be 3.19 x 10(-4) per site per year, which was slower than that for human and swine A virus HAs but similar to that for influenza B and C virus HAs (HEs). Using this substitution rate from the duck, we estimated that the divergences between different subtypes of A virus HA genes occurred from several thousand to several hundred years ago. In particular, the earliest divergence time was estimated to be about 2,000 years ago. Also, the A virus HA gene diverged from the B virus HA gene about 4,000 years ago and from the C virus HE gene about 8,000 years ago. These time estimates are much earlier than the previous ones.

  8. Testis-specific glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase: origin and evolution.

    PubMed

    Kuravsky, Mikhail L; Aleshin, Vladimir V; Frishman, Dmitrij; Muronetz, Vladimir I

    2011-06-10

    Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPD) catalyses one of the glycolytic reactions and is also involved in a number of non-glycolytic processes, such as endocytosis, DNA excision repair, and induction of apoptosis. Mammals are known to possess two homologous GAPD isoenzymes: GAPD-1, a well-studied protein found in all somatic cells, and GAPD-2, which is expressed solely in testis. GAPD-2 supplies energy required for the movement of spermatozoa and is tightly bound to the sperm tail cytoskeleton by the additional N-terminal proline-rich domain absent in GAPD-1. In this study we investigate the evolutionary history of GAPD and gain some insights into specialization of GAPD-2 as a testis-specific protein. A dataset of GAPD sequences was assembled from public databases and used for phylogeny reconstruction by means of the Bayesian method. Since resolution in some clades of the obtained tree was too low, syntenic analysis was carried out to define the evolutionary history of GAPD more precisely. The performed selection tests showed that selective pressure varies across lineages and isoenzymes, as well as across different regions of the same sequences. The obtained results suggest that GAPD-1 and GAPD-2 emerged after duplication during the early evolution of chordates. GAPD-2 was subsequently lost by most lineages except lizards, mammals, as well as cartilaginous and bony fishes. In reptilians and mammals, GAPD-2 specialized to a testis-specific protein and acquired the novel N-terminal proline-rich domain anchoring the protein in the sperm tail cytoskeleton. This domain is likely to have originated by exonization of a microsatellite genomic region. Recognition of the proline-rich domain by cytoskeletal proteins seems to be unspecific. Besides testis, GAPD-2 of lizards was also found in some regenerating tissues, but it lacks the proline-rich domain due to tissue-specific alternative splicing.

  9. ON THE ORIGIN OF THE EXTREME-ULTRAVIOLET LATE PHASE OF SOLAR FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Kai; Wang Yuming; Zhang Jie; Cheng Xin

    2013-05-10

    Solar flares typically have an impulsive phase that is followed by a gradual phase as best seen in soft X-ray emissions. A recent discovery based on the EUV Variability Experiment observations on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) reveals that some flares exhibit a second large peak separated from the first main phase peak by tens of minutes to hours, which is coined as the flare's EUV late phase. In this paper, we address the origin of the EUV late phase by analyzing in detail two late phase flares, an M2.9 flare on 2010 October 16 and an M1.4 flare on 2011 February 18, using multi-passband imaging observations from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on board SDO. We find that (1) the late phase emission originates from a different magnetic loop system, which is much larger and higher than the main phase loop system. (2) The two loop systems have different thermal evolution. While the late phase loop arcade reaches its peak brightness progressively at a later time spanning for more than one hour from high to low temperatures, the main phase loop arcade reaches its peak brightness at almost the same time (within several minutes) in all temperatures. (3) Nevertheless, the two loop systems seem to be connected magnetically, forming an asymmetric magnetic quadruple configuration. (4) Further, the footpoint brightenings in UV wavelengths show a systematic delay of about one minute from the main flare region to the remote footpoint of the late phase arcade system. We argue that the EUV late phase is the result of a long-lasting cooling process in the larger magnetic arcade system.

  10. Phase avalanches in near-adiabatic evolutions

    SciTech Connect

    Vertesi, T.; Englman, R.

    2006-02-15

    In the course of slow, nearly adiabatic motion of a system, relative changes in the slowness can cause abrupt and high magnitude phase changes, ''phase avalanches,'' superimposed on the ordinary geometric phases. The generality of this effect is examined for arbitrary Hamiltonians and multicomponent (>2) wave packets and is found to be connected (through the Blaschke term in the theory of analytic signals) to amplitude zeros in the lower half of the complex time plane. Motion on a nonmaximal circle on the Poincare-sphere suppresses the effect. A spectroscopic transition experiment can independently verify the phase-avalanche magnitudes.

  11. Micromechanics and constitutive models for soft active materials with phase evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Binglian

    Soft active materials, such as shape memory polymers, liquid crystal elastomers, soft tissues, gels etc., are materials that can deform largely in response to external stimuli. Micromechanics analysis of heterogeneous materials based on finite element method is a typically numerical way to study the thermal-mechanical behaviors of soft active materials with phase evolution. While the constitutive models that can precisely describe the stress and strain fields of materials in the process of phase evolution can not be found in the databases of some commercial finite element analysis (FEA) tools such as ANSYS or Abaqus, even the specific constitutive behavior for each individual phase either the new formed one or the original one has already been well-known. So developing a computationally efficient and general three dimensional (3D) thermal-mechanical constitutive model for soft active materials with phase evolution which can be implemented into FEA is eagerly demanded. This paper first solved this problem theoretically by recording the deformation history of each individual phase in the phase evolution process, and adopted the idea of effectiveness by regarding all the new formed phase as an effective phase with an effective deformation to make this theory computationally efficient. A user material subroutine (UMAT) code based on this theoretical constitutive model has been finished in this work which can be added into the material database in Abaqus or ANSYS and can be easily used for most soft active materials with phase evolution. Model validation also has been done through comparison between micromechanical FEA and experiments on a particular composite material, shape memory elastomeric composite (SMEC) which consisted of an elastomeric matrix and the crystallizable fibre. Results show that the micromechanics and the constitutive models developed in this paper for soft active materials with phase evolution are completely relied on.

  12. Mimas: Constraints on Origin and Evolution from Libration Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neveu, Marc; Rhoden, Alyssa R.

    2016-10-01

    In stark contrast with its neighbor moon Enceladus, Mimas is surprisingly geologically quiet, despite an orbital configuration prone to levels of tidal dissipation 30 times higher. While Mimas' lack of activity could be due to a stiff, frigid interior, libration data from the Cassini spacecraft suggest its interior is not homogeneous [1]. Here, we present 1-D models of Mimas' thermal and structural evolution under two accretion scenarios: primordial, undifferentiated formation in the Saturnian subnebula [2]; and late, layered formation from a debris ring created by the disruption of one or more previous moons [3]. In the primordial scenario, our simulations yield two possible outcomes. If tidal dissipation proceeds at levels higher than those obtained using an Andrade rheology [4], Mimas differentiates and an ocean persists until the present day. This should quickly circularize its orbit, but the current orbit is eccentric. In addition, Mimas lacks surface fractures that should result from strong tidal stresses in an ice shell atop an ocean [5]. If dissipation proceeds at lower levels obtained using a Maxwell rheology, it is too weak to drive differentiation; this does not match the observed libration [1]. In the late accretion scenario, Mimas forms already differentiated. As a result, even its deepest ice is within only 100 km of the frigid surface, and poorly insulated by overlying thermally conductive crystalline ice. Thus, all ice remains cold and poorly dissipative, even if dissipation is an order of magnitude above that provided by the Andrade rheology [4]. If Mimas' rocky core is slightly non-hydrostatic [1], this matches the observed libration. We conclude that Mimas' libration is compatible with a late origin from a debris ring, but not with primordial accretion. Consistent with findings from many authors (e.g. [6]), these models cannot produce an ocean on Enceladus unless its orbital eccentricity is higher than observed.References:[1] Tajeddine et al

  13. [Evolution of the origin of strain of Shancigu (Rhizoma Pleionis)].

    PubMed

    Li, Guangyan; Song, Xiangwen; Han, Bangxing; Fang, Shiying

    2015-05-01

    Shancigu (Rhizome Pleionis) was first recorded in the Ben cao shiyi (Supplements to Chinese Materia Medica). The source of the strain of this medicinal was unclear because of its too simple description in the medical books in the Tang and Song dynasties. Its original plant could be Cremastra appendiculata (D.Don) Makino, Tulipa edulis (Miq.) Baker and so on. The original plant of Shanciguwas Tulipaedulis since the Ming dynasty to the Republican period. The name of "Guangcigu" began to appear in the Republican period because of the changes of its processing method. The original plants evolved into Cremastra appendiculata, Pleione bulbocodioides (Franch.) Rolfe and Pleione yunnanensis Rolfe, with Tulipa edulisas the original plant of Guangcigu (Bulbus of Tulipasedulis). It is found that only the Tulipaedulis is the unequivocal origin with the longest medicinal history through sorting out of the original plants of Shancigu. Hence, it is suggested that Tulipa edulis should be recovered as the original strain of Shancigu.

  14. Unique Pitch Evolution in the Smectic -C-alpha* Phase

    SciTech Connect

    Liu,Z.; McCoy, B.; Wang, S.; Pindak, R.; Caliebe, W.; Barois, P.; Fernandes, P.; Nguyen, H.; Hsu, C.; Wang, .

    2007-01-01

    Employing resonant x-ray diffraction, we observed unique pitch evolutions in the smectic-C{alpha}* phase in mixtures of two antiferroelectric liquid crystals. Our results show that the pitch in this phase continuously evolves across 4 layers, contradicting a theoretical model that predicts that the smectic-C{sub FI2}* phase intervenes in the smectic-C{alpha}* phase. The phase sequences we found can be explained by another model that includes one type of long-range interaction among smectic layers.

  15. Primordial stellar evolution - The protostar phase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahler, S. W.; Palla, F.; Salpeter, E. E.

    1986-01-01

    The structure and evolution of a protostar forming from a cloud composed of pure hydrogen and helium gas are calculated. Using an accretion rate of 0.0044 solar mass/yr, the collapse of the cloud is followed numerically as a sequence of steady state accretion flows onto the hydrostatic core, which grows from an initial mass of 0.01 solar mass to 10.5 solar masses. The core is surrounded by an optically thick radiative precursor for most of its evolution. The core radius reaches 47 solar radii when the mass is 1 solar mass. For sufficiently massive cores, the deep interior contracts strongly, driving out a 'luminosity wave' which reaches the surface when the mass is 8 solar masses. This results in a large increase in core radius, the establishment of surface convection, and the disappearance of the radiative precursor. The dependence of core radius on the mass and accretion rate is analytically derived, and a new table or Rosseland mean opacities for metal-free gas is presented.

  16. Prebiological evolution and the metabolic origins of life.

    PubMed

    Pratt, Andrew J

    2011-01-01

    The chemoton model of cells posits three subsystems: metabolism, compartmentalization, and information. A specific model for the prebiological evolution of a reproducing system with rudimentary versions of these three interdependent subsystems is presented. This is based on the initial emergence and reproduction of autocatalytic networks in hydrothermal microcompartments containing iron sulfide. The driving force for life was catalysis of the dissipation of the intrinsic redox gradient of the planet. The codependence of life on iron and phosphate provides chemical constraints on the ordering of prebiological evolution. The initial protometabolism was based on positive feedback loops associated with in situ carbon fixation in which the initial protometabolites modified the catalytic capacity and mobility of metal-based catalysts, especially iron-sulfur centers. A number of selection mechanisms, including catalytic efficiency and specificity, hydrolytic stability, and selective solubilization, are proposed as key determinants for autocatalytic reproduction exploited in protometabolic evolution. This evolutionary process led from autocatalytic networks within preexisting compartments to discrete, reproducing, mobile vesicular protocells with the capacity to use soluble sugar phosphates and hence the opportunity to develop nucleic acids. Fidelity of information transfer in the reproduction of these increasingly complex autocatalytic networks is a key selection pressure in prebiological evolution that eventually leads to the selection of nucleic acids as a digital information subsystem and hence the emergence of fully functional chemotons capable of Darwinian evolution.

  17. Texture Evolution and Phase Transformation in Titanium Investigated by In-Situ Neutron Diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Dong; Stoica, Alexandru Dan; An, Ke; Yang, Ling; Bei, Hongbin; Mills, Rebecca A; Skorpenske, Harley David; Wang, Xun-Li

    2011-01-01

    We report in-situ neutron diffraction studies of texture evolution and the (hcp) (bcc) phase transformation in commercially pure cold-drawn titanium upon continuous heating and cooling, complemented by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) measurements. We show that the recrystallization of the phase at elevated temperature enhanced the preexisting fiber texture, which eventually facilitated the nucleation and growth of the phase favored by the Burgers orientation relationship, i.e., {0001} //{110} . More strikingly, upon completion of the transformation, the {110} texture (or preferred orientation) in was eliminated immediately by the rapid grain growth of intergranular allotriomorphs. This resulted in the loss of the original -texture when Ti was transformed back to from to upon subsequent cooling, distinct from the known texture memory effect for rolling textures in titanium. Our present work provides useful experimental results for understanding the mechanisms of texture evolution and phase transformation in titanium and its alloys and, by and large, low-symmetry alloys such as zirconium.

  18. Geometric origin of dynamically induced freezing of quantum evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Matos-Abiague, A.; Berakdar, J.

    2006-02-15

    The phenomenon of dynamical, field-induced freezing of quantum evolution is discussed. It occurs when a time-dependent state is dynamically driven in such a way that the evolution of the corresponding wave function is effectively localized within a small region in the projective Hilbert space. As a consequence, the dynamics of the system is frozen and the expectation values of all physical observables hardly change with time. Necessary and sufficient conditions for inducing dynamical freezing are inferred from a general analysis of the geometry of quantum evolution. The relevance of the dynamical freezing for a sustainable in time, dynamical control is discussed and exemplified by a study of the coherent control of the kicked rotor motion.

  19. Origin and evolution of SINEs in eukaryotic genomes.

    PubMed

    Kramerov, D A; Vassetzky, N S

    2011-12-01

    Short interspersed elements (SINEs) are one of the two most prolific mobile genomic elements in most of the higher eukaryotes. Although their biology is still not thoroughly understood, unusual life cycle of these simple elements amplified as genomic parasites makes their evolution unique in many ways. In contrast to most genetic elements including other transposons, SINEs emerged de novo many times in evolution from available molecules (for example, tRNA). The involvement of reverse transcription in their amplification cycle, huge number of genomic copies and modular structure allow variation mechanisms in SINEs uncommon or rare in other genetic elements (module exchange between SINE families, dimerization, and so on.). Overall, SINE evolution includes their emergence, progressive optimization and counteraction to the cell's defense against mobile genetic elements.

  20. Origin and evolution of SINEs in eukaryotic genomes

    PubMed Central

    Kramerov, D A; Vassetzky, N S

    2011-01-01

    Short interspersed elements (SINEs) are one of the two most prolific mobile genomic elements in most of the higher eukaryotes. Although their biology is still not thoroughly understood, unusual life cycle of these simple elements amplified as genomic parasites makes their evolution unique in many ways. In contrast to most genetic elements including other transposons, SINEs emerged de novo many times in evolution from available molecules (for example, tRNA). The involvement of reverse transcription in their amplification cycle, huge number of genomic copies and modular structure allow variation mechanisms in SINEs uncommon or rare in other genetic elements (module exchange between SINE families, dimerization, and so on.). Overall, SINE evolution includes their emergence, progressive optimization and counteraction to the cell's defense against mobile genetic elements. PMID:21673742

  1. Diversity and evolution of multiple orc/cdc6-adjacent replication origins in haloarchaea.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhenfang; Liu, Hailong; Liu, Jingfang; Liu, Xiaoqing; Xiang, Hua

    2012-09-14

    While multiple replication origins have been observed in archaea, considerably less is known about their evolutionary processes. Here, we performed a comparative analysis of the predicted (proved in part) orc/cdc6-associated replication origins in 15 completely sequenced haloarchaeal genomes to investigate the diversity and evolution of replication origins in halophilic Archaea. Multiple orc/cdc6-associated replication origins were predicted in all of the analyzed haloarchaeal genomes following the identification of putative ORBs (origin recognition boxes) that are associated with orc/cdc6 genes. Five of these predicted replication origins in Haloarcula hispanica were experimentally confirmed via autonomous replication activities. Strikingly, several predicted replication origins in H. hispanica and Haloarcula marismortui are located in the distinct regions of their highly homologous chromosomes, suggesting that these replication origins might have been introduced as parts of new genomic content. A comparison of the origin-associated Orc/Cdc6 homologs and the corresponding predicted ORB elements revealed that the replication origins in a given haloarchaeon are quite diverse, while different haloarchaea can share a few conserved origins. Phylogenetic and genomic context analyses suggested that there is an original replication origin (oriC1) that was inherited from the ancestor of archaea, and several other origins were likely evolved and/or translocated within the haloarchaeal species. This study provides detailed information about the diversity of multiple orc/cdc6-associated replication origins in haloarchaeal genomes, and provides novel insight into the evolution of multiple replication origins in Archaea.

  2. On the Origin and Evolution of s-PROCESS Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schramm, David N.; Tinsley, Beatrice M.

    The evolution of s-process abundances in the solar neighborhood is studied, using alternative stellar production sites and Galactic models. Production in either low-mass or medium-mass stars, as suggested in Ulrich's alternative models for FG Sge for example, can account for the solar-system abundances. Either case is consistent with independent limits on subsequent neutron exposure of nuclei produced in explosive oxygen and silicon burning and of r-process material. The cases could be distinguished by observations of the ratios of s-process to primary metal abundances in stars of different ages. The predictions are not strongly dependent on the model used for Galactic evolution.

  3. Tumor archaeology: tracking leukemic evolution to its origins.

    PubMed

    Dick, John E

    2014-05-28

    Unearthing of the BRAF mutation in self-renewing hematopoietic stem cells reveals an unexpected origin for hairy cell leukemia-a mature B cell malignancy-and a potential new therapeutic target (Chung et al., this issue).

  4. A new mechanistic scenario for the origin and evolution of vertebrate cartilage.

    PubMed

    Cattell, Maria; Lai, Su; Cerny, Robert; Medeiros, Daniel Meulemans

    2011-01-01

    The appearance of cellular cartilage was a defining event in vertebrate evolution because it made possible the physical expansion of the vertebrate "new head". Despite its central role in vertebrate evolution, the origin of cellular cartilage has been difficult to understand. This is largely due to a lack of informative evolutionary intermediates linking vertebrate cellular cartilage to the acellular cartilage of invertebrate chordates. The basal jawless vertebrate, lamprey, has long been considered key to understanding the evolution of vertebrate cartilage. However, histological analyses of the lamprey head skeleton suggest it is composed of modern cellular cartilage and a putatively unrelated connective tissue called mucocartilage, with no obvious transitional tissue. Here we take a molecular approach to better understand the evolutionary relationships between lamprey cellular cartilage, gnathostome cellular cartilage, and lamprey mucocartilage. We find that despite overt histological similarity, lamprey and gnathostome cellular cartilage utilize divergent gene regulatory networks (GRNs). While the gnathostome cellular cartilage GRN broadly incorporates Runx, Barx, and Alx transcription factors, lamprey cellular cartilage does not express Runx or Barx, and only deploys Alx genes in certain regions. Furthermore, we find that lamprey mucocartilage, despite its distinctive mesenchymal morphology, deploys every component of the gnathostome cartilage GRN, albeit in different domains. Based on these findings, and previous work, we propose a stepwise model for the evolution of vertebrate cellular cartilage in which the appearance of a generic neural crest-derived skeletal tissue was followed by a phase of skeletal tissue diversification in early agnathans. In the gnathostome lineage, a single type of rigid cellular cartilage became dominant, replacing other skeletal tissues and evolving via gene cooption to become the definitive cellular cartilage of modern jawed

  5. A New Mechanistic Scenario for the Origin and Evolution of Vertebrate Cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Cattell, Maria; Lai, Su; Cerny, Robert; Medeiros, Daniel Meulemans

    2011-01-01

    The appearance of cellular cartilage was a defining event in vertebrate evolution because it made possible the physical expansion of the vertebrate “new head”. Despite its central role in vertebrate evolution, the origin of cellular cartilage has been difficult to understand. This is largely due to a lack of informative evolutionary intermediates linking vertebrate cellular cartilage to the acellular cartilage of invertebrate chordates. The basal jawless vertebrate, lamprey, has long been considered key to understanding the evolution of vertebrate cartilage. However, histological analyses of the lamprey head skeleton suggest it is composed of modern cellular cartilage and a putatively unrelated connective tissue called mucocartilage, with no obvious transitional tissue. Here we take a molecular approach to better understand the evolutionary relationships between lamprey cellular cartilage, gnathostome cellular cartilage, and lamprey mucocartilage. We find that despite overt histological similarity, lamprey and gnathostome cellular cartilage utilize divergent gene regulatory networks (GRNs). While the gnathostome cellular cartilage GRN broadly incorporates Runx, Barx, and Alx transcription factors, lamprey cellular cartilage does not express Runx or Barx, and only deploys Alx genes in certain regions. Furthermore, we find that lamprey mucocartilage, despite its distinctive mesenchymal morphology, deploys every component of the gnathostome cartilage GRN, albeit in different domains. Based on these findings, and previous work, we propose a stepwise model for the evolution of vertebrate cellular cartilage in which the appearance of a generic neural crest-derived skeletal tissue was followed by a phase of skeletal tissue diversification in early agnathans. In the gnathostome lineage, a single type of rigid cellular cartilage became dominant, replacing other skeletal tissues and evolving via gene cooption to become the definitive cellular cartilage of modern jawed

  6. Comparing Common Origins: Using Biotechnology To Teach Evolution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLaughlin, John; Glasson, George

    2001-01-01

    Presents an innovative, inquiry-oriented lesson plan for using biotechnology to teach evolution. Using acrylamide gel electrophoresis, students learn how to isolate and compare different proteins from the muscle tissue of readily available seafood specimens to determine phylogenetic relationships. Uses a 5E (engagement, exploration, explanation,…

  7. Comparing Common Origins: Using Biotechnology To Teach Evolution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLaughlin, John; Glasson, George

    2001-01-01

    Presents an innovative, inquiry-oriented lesson plan for using biotechnology to teach evolution. Using acrylamide gel electrophoresis, students learn how to isolate and compare different proteins from the muscle tissue of readily available seafood specimens to determine phylogenetic relationships. Uses a 5E (engagement, exploration, explanation,…

  8. Thermodynamic geometry: Evolution, correlation and phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellucci, S.; Tiwari, B. N.

    2011-06-01

    Under the fluctuation of the electric charge and atomic mass, this paper considers the theory of the thin film depletion layer formation of an ensemble of finitely excited, non-empty d/f-orbital heavy materials, from the thermodynamic geometric perspective. At each state of the local adiabatic evolutions, we examine the nature of the thermodynamic parameters, viz., electric charge and mass, changing at each respective embedding. The definition of the intrinsic Riemannian geometry and differential topology offers the properties of (i) local heat capacities, (ii) global stability criterion and (iv) global correlation length. Under the Gaussian fluctuations, such an intrinsic geometric consideration is anticipated to be useful in the statistical coating of the thin film layer of a desired quality-fine high cost material on a low cost durable coatant. From the perspective of everyday applications, thermodynamic geometry is thus intrinsically self-consistent with the theory of local and global economic optimizations. Following the above procedure, the quality of the thin layer depletion could self-consistently be examined to produce quality products economically.

  9. What Teachers Should Know about the Evolution-Intentional Design Debate on the Origin of Life.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brekke, Stewart E.

    This paper discusses the beginning of life on Earth, the formation of life forms, evolution, and the origin of life. The paper suggests that how life first appeared on earth is not known and may never be known. (YDS)

  10. Impact origin of the Sudbury structure: Evolution of a theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowman, Paul D., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reviews the origin, development, and present status of the widely accepted theory, proposed by Robert S. Dietz in 1962, that the Sudbury structure was formed by meteoritic or asteroidal impact. The impact theory for the origin of the Sudbury structure seems supported by a nearly conclusive body of evidence. However, even assuming an impact origin to be correct, at least three major questions require further study: (1) the original size and shape of the crater, before tectonic deformation and erosion; (2) the source of the melt now forming the Sudbury Igneous Complex; and (3) the degree, if any, to which the Ni-Cu-platinum group elements are meteoritic. The history of the impact theory illustrates several under-appreciated aspects of scientific research: (1) the importance of cross-fertilization between space research and terrestrial geology; (2) the role of the outsider in stimulating thinking by insiders; (3) the value of small science, at least in the initial stages of an investigation, Dietz's first field work having been at his own expense; and (4) the value of analogies (here, between the Sudbury Igneous Complex and the maria), which although incorrect in major aspects, may trigger research on totally new lines. Finally, the Sudbury story illustrates the totally unpredictable and, by implication, unplannable nature of basic research, in that insight to the origin of the world's then-greatest Ni deposit came from the study of tektites and the Moon.

  11. The atmospheres of the earth and the other planets: Origin, evolution and composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, Joel S.

    1988-01-01

    The current understanding of the composition, chemistry, and structure of the atmospheres of the other planets and the origin, early history, and evolution of the earth's atmosphere is reviewed. The information on the atmospheres of the other planets is based on the successful Mariner, Viking, Pioneer, and Voyager missions to these planets. The information on the origin, early history, and evolution of the atmosphere, which is somewhat speculative, is largely based on numerical studies with geochemical and photochemical models.

  12. The origin and evolution of mutations in Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Welch, John S.; Ley, Timothy J.; Link, Daniel C.; Miller, Christopher A.; Larson, David E.; Koboldt, Daniel C.; Wartman, Lukas D.; Lamprecht, Tamara L.; Liu, Fulu; Xia, Jun; Kandoth, Cyriac; Fulton, Robert S.; McLellan, Michael D.; Dooling, David J.; Wallis, John W.; Chen, Ken; Harris, Christopher C.; Schmidt, Heather K.; Kalicki-Veizer, Joelle M.; Lu, Charles; Zhang, Qunyuan; Lin, Ling; O’Laughlin, Michelle D.; McMichael, Joshua F.; Delehaunty, Kim D.; Fulton, Lucinda A.; Magrini, Vincent J.; McGrath, Sean D.; Demeter, Ryan T.; Vickery, Tammi L.; Hundal, Jasreet; Cook, Lisa L.; Swift, Gary W.; Reed, Jerry P.; Alldredge, Patricia A.; Wylie, Todd N.; Walker, Jason R.; Watson, Mark A.; Heath, Sharon E.; Shannon, William D.; Varghese, Nobish; Nagarajan, Rakesh; Payton, Jacqueline E.; Baty, Jack D.; Kulkarni, Shashikant; Klco, Jeffery M.; Tomasson, Michael H.; Westervelt, Peter; Walter, Matthew J.; Graubert, Timothy A.; DiPersio, John F.; Ding, Li; Mardis, Elaine R.; Wilson, Richard K.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Most mutations in cancer genomes are thought to be acquired after the initiating event, which may cause genomic instability, driving clonal evolution. However, for acute myeloid leukemia (AML), normal karyotypes are common, and genomic instability is unusual. To better understand clonal evolution in AML, we sequenced the genomes of AML samples with a known initiating event (PML-RARA) vs. normal karyotype AML samples, and the exomes of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs) from healthy people. Collectively, the data suggest that most of the mutations found in AML genomes are actually random events that occurred in HSPCs before they acquired the initiating mutation; the mutational history of that cell is “captured” as the clone expands. In many cases, only one or two additional, cooperating mutations are needed to generate the malignant founding clone. Cells from the founding clone can acquire additional cooperating mutations, yielding subclones that can contribute to disease progression and/or relapse. PMID:22817890

  13. Fourth Symposium on Chemical Evolution and the Origin and Evolution of Life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wharton, Robert A., Jr. (Editor); Andersen, Dale T. (Editor); Bzik, Sara E. (Editor); Rummel, John D. (Editor)

    1991-01-01

    This symposium was held at the NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, California, July 24-27, 1990. The NASA exobiology investigators reported their recent research findings. Scientific papers were presented in the following areas: cosmic evolution of biogenic compounds, prebiotic evolution (planetary and molecular), early evolution of life (biological and geochemical), evolution of advanced life, solar system exploration, and the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence (SETI).

  14. Molecular origins of rapid and continuous morphological evolution.

    PubMed

    Fondon, John W; Garner, Harold R

    2004-12-28

    Mutations in cis-regulatory sequences have been implicated as being the predominant source of variation in morphological evolution. We offer a hypothesis that gene-associated tandem repeat expansions and contractions are a major source of phenotypic variation in evolution. Here, we describe a comparative genomic study of repetitive elements in developmental genes of 92 breeds of dogs. We find evidence for selection for divergence at coding repeat loci in the form of both elevated purity and extensive length polymorphism among different breeds. Variations in the number of repeats in the coding regions of the Alx-4 (aristaless-like 4) and Runx-2 (runt-related transcription factor 2) genes were quantitatively associated with significant differences in limb and skull morphology. We identified similar repeat length variation in the coding repeats of Runx-2, Twist, and Dlx-2 in several other species. The high frequency and incremental effects of repeat length mutations provide molecular explanations for swift, yet topologically conservative morphological evolution.

  15. Origin and evolution of the Saturn system: Observational consequences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pollack, J. B.

    1978-01-01

    A number of important cosmogonic questions concerning the Saturn system can be addressed with a Saturn-orbiter-dual-probe spacecraft mission. These questions include: The origin of the Saturn system; the source of Saturn's excess luminosity; the mechanism by which the irregular satellites were captured; the influence of Saturn's early luminosity on the composition of its regular satellites; and the origin of the rings. The first two topics can be studied by measurements made from an entry probe into Saturn's atmosphere, while the remaining issues can be investigated by measurements conducted from an orbiter. Background information is provided on these five questions describing the critical experiments needed to help resolve them.

  16. PLANET TOPERS: Planets, Tracing the Transfer, Origin, Preservation, and Evolution of their ReservoirS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dehant, V.; Asael, D.; Baland, R. M.; Baludikay, B. K.; Beghin, J.; Belza, J.; Beuthe, M.; Breuer, D.; Chernonozhkin, S.; Claeys, Ph.; Cornet, Y.; Cornet, L.; Coyette, A.; Debaille, V.; Delvigne, C.; Deproost, M. H.; De WInter, N.; Duchemin, C.; El Atrassi, F.; François, C.; De Keyser, J.; Gillmann, C.; Gloesener, E.; Goderis, S.; Hidaka, Y.; Höning, D.; Huber, M.; Hublet, G.; Javaux, E. J.; Karatekin, Ö.; Kodolanyi, J.; Revilla, L. Lobo; Maes, L.; Maggiolo, R.; Mattielli, N.; Maurice, M.; McKibbin, S.; Morschhauser, A.; Neumann, W.; Noack, L.; Pham, L. B. S.; Pittarello, L.; Plesa, A. C.; Rivoldini, A.; Robert, S.; Rosenblatt, P.; Spohn, T.; Storme, J.-Y.; Tosi, N.; Trinh, A.; Valdes, M.; Vandaele, A. C.; Vanhaecke, F.; Van Hoolst, T.; Van Roosbroek, N.; Wilquet, V.; Yseboodt, M.

    2016-11-01

    The Interuniversity Attraction Pole (IAP) `PLANET TOPERS' (Planets: Tracing the Transfer, Origin, Preservation, and Evolution of their Reservoirs) addresses the fundamental understanding of the thermal and compositional evolution of the different reservoirs of planetary bodies (core, mantle, crust, atmosphere, hydrosphere, cryosphere, and space) considering interactions and feedback mechanisms. Here we present the first results after 2 years of project work.

  17. PLANET TOPERS: Planets, Tracing the Transfer, Origin, Preservation, and Evolution of their ReservoirS.

    PubMed

    Dehant, V; Asael, D; Baland, R M; Baludikay, B K; Beghin, J; Belza, J; Beuthe, M; Breuer, D; Chernonozhkin, S; Claeys, Ph; Cornet, Y; Cornet, L; Coyette, A; Debaille, V; Delvigne, C; Deproost, M H; De WInter, N; Duchemin, C; El Atrassi, F; François, C; De Keyser, J; Gillmann, C; Gloesener, E; Goderis, S; Hidaka, Y; Höning, D; Huber, M; Hublet, G; Javaux, E J; Karatekin, Ö; Kodolanyi, J; Revilla, L Lobo; Maes, L; Maggiolo, R; Mattielli, N; Maurice, M; McKibbin, S; Morschhauser, A; Neumann, W; Noack, L; Pham, L B S; Pittarello, L; Plesa, A C; Rivoldini, A; Robert, S; Rosenblatt, P; Spohn, T; Storme, J -Y; Tosi, N; Trinh, A; Valdes, M; Vandaele, A C; Vanhaecke, F; Van Hoolst, T; Van Roosbroek, N; Wilquet, V; Yseboodt, M

    2016-11-01

    The Interuniversity Attraction Pole (IAP) 'PLANET TOPERS' (Planets: Tracing the Transfer, Origin, Preservation, and Evolution of their Reservoirs) addresses the fundamental understanding of the thermal and compositional evolution of the different reservoirs of planetary bodies (core, mantle, crust, atmosphere, hydrosphere, cryosphere, and space) considering interactions and feedback mechanisms. Here we present the first results after 2 years of project work.

  18. Origins and Evolution of the TPSR Alliance Community of Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balague, Gloria

    2016-01-01

    Teaching for personal and social responsibility (TPSR) is unconventional in nature, and this article describes the origins of the program and the many hurdles it had to overcome. It is not strictly a form of kinesiology, social work or education. It focuses instead on the whole person: kids' needs, interests and vulnerabilities. But TPSR also…

  19. Origins and Evolution of the TPSR Alliance Community of Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balague, Gloria

    2016-01-01

    Teaching for personal and social responsibility (TPSR) is unconventional in nature, and this article describes the origins of the program and the many hurdles it had to overcome. It is not strictly a form of kinesiology, social work or education. It focuses instead on the whole person: kids' needs, interests and vulnerabilities. But TPSR also…

  20. Evolution: ctenophore genomes and the origin of neurons.

    PubMed

    Marlow, Heather; Arendt, Detlev

    2014-08-18

    Recent sequencing of ctenophore genomes opens a new era in the study of this unique and phylogenetically distant group. The presence of neurodevelopmental genes, pre- and postsynaptic modules, and transmitter molecules is consistent with a single origin of neurons. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Chemical evolution and the origin of life: bibliography supplement 1977.

    PubMed

    Pleasant, L G; Ponnamperuma, C

    1980-01-01

    This bibliography is the eighth annual supplement to the comprehensive bibliography on the same subject which was published in Space Life Sci. 2 (1970), 225-295; 3 (1972), 293-304; 4 (1973), 309-329 and in Origins of Life 5 (1974), 505-527; 6 (1975), 285-300; 7 (1976), 75-85; 8 (1977), 59-66; 9 (1978), 67-74.

  2. Origin and Evolution of the Universal Genetic Code.

    PubMed

    Koonin, Eugene V; Novozhilov, Artem S

    2017-08-30

    The standard genetic code (SGC) is virtually universal among extant life forms. Although many deviations from the universal code exist, particularly in organelles and prokaryotes with small genomes, they are limited in scope and obviously secondary. The universality of the code likely results from the combination of a frozen accident, i.e., the deleterious effect of codon reassignment in the SGC, and the inhibitory effect of changes in the code on horizontal gene transfer. The structure of the SGC is nonrandom and ensures high robustness of the code to mutational and translational errors. However, this error minimization is most likely a by-product of the primordial code expansion driven by the diversification of the repertoire of protein amino acids, rather than a direct result of selection. Phylogenetic analysis of translation system components, in particular aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, shows that, at a stage of evolution when the translation system had already attained high fidelity, the correspondence between amino acids and cognate codons was determined by recognition of amino acids by RNA molecules, i.e., proto-tRNAs. We propose an experimentally testable scenario for the evolution of the code that combines recognition of amino acids by unique sites on proto-tRNAs (distinct from the anticodons), expansion of the code via proto-tRNA duplication, and frozen accident. Expected final online publication date for the Annual Review of Genetics Volume 51 is November 23, 2017. Please see http://www.annualreviews.org/page/journal/pubdates for revised estimates.

  3. The evolution of milk secretion and its ancient origins.

    PubMed

    Oftedal, O T

    2012-03-01

    Lactation represents an important element of the life history strategies of all mammals, whether monotreme, marsupial, or eutherian. Milk originated as a glandular skin secretion in synapsids (the lineage ancestral to mammals), perhaps as early as the Pennsylvanian period, that is, approximately 310 million years ago (mya). Early synapsids laid eggs with parchment-like shells intolerant of desiccation and apparently dependent on glandular skin secretions for moisture. Mammary glands probably evolved from apocrine-like glands that combined multiple modes of secretion and developed in association with hair follicles. Comparative analyses of the evolutionary origin of milk constituents support a scenario in which these secretions evolved into a nutrient-rich milk long before mammals arose. A variety of antimicrobial and secretory constituents were co-opted into novel roles related to nutrition of the young. Secretory calcium-binding phosphoproteins may originally have had a role in calcium delivery to eggs; however, by evolving into large, complex casein micelles, they took on an important role in transport of amino acids, calcium and phosphorus. Several proteins involved in immunity, including an ancestral butyrophilin and xanthine oxidoreductase, were incorporated into a novel membrane-bound lipid droplet (the milk fat globule) that became a primary mode of energy transfer. An ancestral c-lysozyme lost its lytic functions in favor of a role as α-lactalbumin, which modifies a galactosyltransferase to recognize glucose as an acceptor, leading to the synthesis of novel milk sugars, of which free oligosaccharides may have predated free lactose. An ancestral lipocalin and an ancestral whey acidic protein four-disulphide core protein apparently lost their original transport and antimicrobial functions when they became the whey proteins β-lactoglobulin and whey acidic protein, which with α-lactalbumin provide limiting sulfur amino acids to the young. By the late

  4. Models of Ceres' Surface as a Function of Origin and Evolution Scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castillo, J. C.; Frank, E.; Grazier, K.; Raymond, C. A.

    2012-12-01

    After its spectacular encounter with Vesta, the Dawn spacecraft is now on its way to the largest object in the main belt, Ceres. The last few years have seen a growing interest in the origin and evolution of this object and increased observational constraints on its geophysical properties and surface chemistry. In 2005, McCord and Sotin (2005) introduced the idea that Ceres could have held a deep ocean for some period of time. Rivkin (2006) discovered carbonates at the surface of Ceres, evidence for chemistry in aqueous environments, an idea reinforced by and Milliken and Rivkin's (2009) suggestion that brucite is a major component of Ceres' surface. See also Rivkin et al. (this conference) for the state of the art on Ceres' surface composition inferred from astronomical observations. In parallel, recent developments in Solar system dynamical evolution (Walsh et al. 2011; Grazier et al. 2012) and cosmochemistry models (Dodson-Robinson et al. 2009) and measurements (d'Alexander et al. 2012) indicate that asteroid volatiles may have been supplied from different sources and included second-phase low-eutectic impurities such as ammonia hydrates. Hence, the upcoming rendezvous of Dawn at Ceres offers the prospect of obtaining constraints on the origin of volatiles in the main belt and the habitability potential of large wet asteroids such as Ceres. Ceres' surface chemistry is the product of multiple parameters and processes: (1) the composition of accreted materials, volatile composition, and the possibility for hydrothermal activity in planetesimals prior to accretion in Ceres (i.e., in objects of the size of chondrite parent bodies); (2) evolution of the rock and ocean chemistry as a consequence of one or several episodes of hydrothermal activity (Castillo-Rogez and McCord 2010), (3) the transportation mechanism that may encompass solid-state convection or cryovolcanism and act as a possible filter against certain species in the ocean; (4) exogenic processing (esp. UV

  5. Biomaterial evolution parallels behavioral innovation in the origin of orb-like spider webs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackledge, Todd A.; Kuntner, Matjaž; Marhabaie, Mohammad; Leeper, Thomas C.; Agnarsson, Ingi

    2012-11-01

    Correlated evolution of traits can act synergistically to facilitate organism function. But, what happens when constraints exist on the evolvability of some traits, but not others? The orb web was a key innovation in the origin of >12,000 species of spiders. Orb evolution hinged upon the origin of novel spinning behaviors and innovations in silk material properties. In particular, a new major ampullate spidroin protein (MaSp2) increased silk extensibility and toughness, playing a critical role in how orb webs stop flying insects. Here, we show convergence between pseudo-orb-weaving Fecenia and true orb spiders. As in the origin of true orbs, Fecenia dragline silk improved significantly compared to relatives. But, Fecenia silk lacks the high compliance and extensibility found in true orb spiders, likely due in part to the absence of MaSp2. Our results suggest how constraints limit convergent evolution and provide insight into the evolution of nature's toughest fibers.

  6. Biomaterial evolution parallels behavioral innovation in the origin of orb-like spider webs

    PubMed Central

    Blackledge, Todd A.; Kuntner, Matjaž; Marhabaie, Mohammad; Leeper, Thomas C.; Agnarsson, Ingi

    2012-01-01

    Correlated evolution of traits can act synergistically to facilitate organism function. But, what happens when constraints exist on the evolvability of some traits, but not others? The orb web was a key innovation in the origin of >12,000 species of spiders. Orb evolution hinged upon the origin of novel spinning behaviors and innovations in silk material properties. In particular, a new major ampullate spidroin protein (MaSp2) increased silk extensibility and toughness, playing a critical role in how orb webs stop flying insects. Here, we show convergence between pseudo-orb-weaving Fecenia and true orb spiders. As in the origin of true orbs, Fecenia dragline silk improved significantly compared to relatives. But, Fecenia silk lacks the high compliance and extensibility found in true orb spiders, likely due in part to the absence of MaSp2. Our results suggest how constraints limit convergent evolution and provide insight into the evolution of nature's toughest fibers. PMID:23150784

  7. Untangling the origin of viruses and their impact on cellular evolution.

    PubMed

    Nasir, Arshan; Sun, Feng-Jie; Kim, Kyung Mo; Caetano-Anollés, Gustavo

    2015-04-01

    The origin and evolution of viruses remain mysterious. Here, we focus on the distribution of viral replicons in host organisms, their morphological features, and the evolution of highly conserved protein and nucleic acid structures. The apparent inability of RNA viral replicons to infect contemporary akaryotic species suggests an early origin of RNA viruses and their subsequent loss in akaryotes. A census of virion morphotypes reveals that advanced forms were unique to viruses infecting a specific supergroup, while simpler forms were observed in viruses infecting organisms in all forms of cellular life. Results hint toward an ancient origin of viruses from an ancestral virus harboring either filamentous or spherical virions. Finally, phylogenetic trees built from protein domain and tRNA structures in thousands of genomes suggest that viruses evolved via reductive evolution from ancient cells. The analysis presents a complete account of the evolutionary history of cells and viruses and identifies viruses as crucial agents influencing cellular evolution.

  8. Biomaterial evolution parallels behavioral innovation in the origin of orb-like spider webs.

    PubMed

    Blackledge, Todd A; Kuntner, Matjaž; Marhabaie, Mohammad; Leeper, Thomas C; Agnarsson, Ingi

    2012-01-01

    Correlated evolution of traits can act synergistically to facilitate organism function. But, what happens when constraints exist on the evolvability of some traits, but not others? The orb web was a key innovation in the origin of >12,000 species of spiders. Orb evolution hinged upon the origin of novel spinning behaviors and innovations in silk material properties. In particular, a new major ampullate spidroin protein (MaSp2) increased silk extensibility and toughness, playing a critical role in how orb webs stop flying insects. Here, we show convergence between pseudo-orb-weaving Fecenia and true orb spiders. As in the origin of true orbs, Fecenia dragline silk improved significantly compared to relatives. But, Fecenia silk lacks the high compliance and extensibility found in true orb spiders, likely due in part to the absence of MaSp2. Our results suggest how constraints limit convergent evolution and provide insight into the evolution of nature's toughest fibers.

  9. The universal relation of galactic chemical evolution: the origin of the mass-metallicity relation

    SciTech Connect

    Zahid, H. Jabran; Dima, Gabriel I.; Kudritzki, Rolf-Peter; Kewley, Lisa J.; Geller, Margaret J.; Hwang, Ho Seong; Silverman, John D.; Kashino, Daichi

    2014-08-20

    We examine the mass-metallicity relation for z ≲ 1.6. The mass-metallicity relation follows a steep slope with a turnover, or 'knee', at stellar masses around 10{sup 10} M {sub ☉}. At stellar masses higher than the characteristic turnover mass, the mass-metallicity relation flattens as metallicities begin to saturate. We show that the redshift evolution of the mass-metallicity relation depends only on the evolution of the characteristic turnover mass. The relationship between metallicity and the stellar mass normalized to the characteristic turnover mass is independent of redshift. We find that the redshift-independent slope of the mass-metallicity relation is set by the slope of the relationship between gas mass and stellar mass. The turnover in the mass-metallicity relation occurs when the gas-phase oxygen abundance is high enough that the amount of oxygen locked up in low-mass stars is an appreciable fraction of the amount of oxygen produced by massive stars. The characteristic turnover mass is the stellar mass, where the stellar-to-gas mass ratio is unity. Numerical modeling suggests that the relationship between metallicity and the stellar-to-gas mass ratio is a redshift-independent, universal relationship followed by all galaxies as they evolve. The mass-metallicity relation originates from this more fundamental universal relationship between metallicity and the stellar-to-gas mass ratio. We test the validity of this universal metallicity relation in local galaxies where stellar mass, metallicity, and gas mass measurements are available. The data are consistent with a universal metallicity relation. We derive an equation for estimating the hydrogen gas mass from measurements of stellar mass and metallicity valid for z ≲ 1.6 and predict the cosmological evolution of galactic gas masses.

  10. Early animal evolution and the origins of nervous systems

    PubMed Central

    Budd, Graham E.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the evolution of early nervous systems is hazardous because we lack good criteria for determining homology between the systems of distant taxa; the timing of the evolutionary events is contested, and thus the relevant ecological and geological settings for them are also unclear. Here I argue that no simple approach will resolve the first issue, but that it remains likely that animals evolved relatively late, and that their nervous systems thus arose during the late Ediacaran, in a context provided by the changing planktonic and benthic environments of the time. The early trace fossil provides the most concrete evidence for early behavioural diversification, but it cannot simply be translated into increasing nervous system complexity: behavioural complexity does not map on a one-to-one basis onto nervous system complexity, both because of possible limitations to behaviour caused by the environment and because we know that even organisms without nervous systems are capable of relatively complex behaviour. PMID:26554037

  11. The origin and evolution of the ectodermal placodes.

    PubMed

    Graham, Anthony; Shimeld, Sebastian M

    2013-01-01

    Many of the features that distinguish the vertebrates from other chordates are found in the head. Prominent amongst these differences are the paired sense organs and associated cranial ganglia. Significantly, these structures are derived developmentally from the ectodermal placodes. It has therefore been proposed that the emergence of the ectodermal placodes was concomitant with and central to the evolution of the vertebrates. More recent studies, however, indicate forerunners of the ectodermal placodes can be readily identified outside the vertebrates, particularly in urochordates. Thus the evolutionary history of the ectodermal placodes is deeper and more complex than was previously appreciated with the full repertoire of vertebrate ectodermal placodes, and their derivatives, being assembled over a protracted period rather than arising collectively with the vertebrates.

  12. Early animal evolution and the origins of nervous systems.

    PubMed

    Budd, Graham E

    2015-12-19

    Understanding the evolution of early nervous systems is hazardous because we lack good criteria for determining homology between the systems of distant taxa; the timing of the evolutionary events is contested, and thus the relevant ecological and geological settings for them are also unclear. Here I argue that no simple approach will resolve the first issue, but that it remains likely that animals evolved relatively late, and that their nervous systems thus arose during the late Ediacaran, in a context provided by the changing planktonic and benthic environments of the time. The early trace fossil provides the most concrete evidence for early behavioural diversification, but it cannot simply be translated into increasing nervous system complexity: behavioural complexity does not map on a one-to-one basis onto nervous system complexity, both because of possible limitations to behaviour caused by the environment and because we know that even organisms without nervous systems are capable of relatively complex behaviour. © 2015 The Authors.

  13. [Origin and evolution of peptide-protein bioregulators].

    PubMed

    Chipens, G I; Freĭdlin, I S; Skliarova, S N

    1987-01-01

    Possible evolutionary pathways of cellular regulatory systems are discussed. Analysis of animal evolution suggests that peptide and protein bioregulators emerged at an early stage during formation of biochemical systems in prokaryotic cells involving protein synthesis on ribosomes, the processes of exo- and endocytosis and limited proteolysis reactions. Primary autocrine bioregulators are compared with growth factors. Models for cellular bioregulation are discussed in which both cell receptors and peptide/protein ligands, primarily immunoglobins, act as prehormones. Their internalization and limited proteolysis can lead to formation of low-molecular peptides (tetines) acting as autocrine or paracrine bioregulators. Basing on the concept of biochemical universality, it is suggested that the effects of many growth factors, hormones, immunoglobulins, mono- and lymphokins are mediated by identical or similar (carrying the same signatures) fragments which are produced in cells due to limited proteolysis reactions and which are directly involved in activation of biochemical systems in these cells.

  14. Origin, Methods, and Evolution of the Three Nurses’ Health Studies

    PubMed Central

    Bertoia, Monica L.; Lenart, Elizabeth B.; Stampfer, Meir J.; Willett, Walter C.; Speizer, Frank E.; Chavarro, Jorge E.

    2016-01-01

    We have summarized the evolution of the Nurses’ Health Study (NHS), a prospective cohort study of 121 700 married registered nurses launched in 1976; NHS II, which began in 1989 and enrolled 116 430 nurses; and NHS3, which began in 2010 and has ongoing enrollment. Over 40 years, these studies have generated long-term, multidimensional data, including lifestyle- and health-related information across the life course and an extensive repository of various biological specimens. We have described the questionnaire data collection, disease follow-up methods, biorepository resources, and data management and statistical procedures. Through integrative analyses, these studies have sustained a high level of scientific productivity and substantially influenced public health recommendations. We have highlighted recent interdisciplinary research projects and discussed future directions for collaboration and innovation. PMID:27459450

  15. The origin and evolution of the ectodermal placodes

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Anthony; Shimeld, Sebastian M

    2013-01-01

    Many of the features that distinguish the vertebrates from other chordates are found in the head. Prominent amongst these differences are the paired sense organs and associated cranial ganglia. Significantly, these structures are derived developmentally from the ectodermal placodes. It has therefore been proposed that the emergence of the ectodermal placodes was concomitant with and central to the evolution of the vertebrates. More recent studies, however, indicate forerunners of the ectodermal placodes can be readily identified outside the vertebrates, particularly in urochordates. Thus the evolutionary history of the ectodermal placodes is deeper and more complex than was previously appreciated with the full repertoire of vertebrate ectodermal placodes, and their derivatives, being assembled over a protracted period rather than arising collectively with the vertebrates. PMID:22512454

  16. Clinical Sequencing Uncovers Origins and Evolution of Lassa Virus.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Kristian G; Shapiro, B Jesse; Matranga, Christian B; Sealfon, Rachel; Lin, Aaron E; Moses, Lina M; Folarin, Onikepe A; Goba, Augustine; Odia, Ikponmwonsa; Ehiane, Philomena E; Momoh, Mambu; England, Eleina M; Winnicki, Sarah; Branco, Luis M; Gire, Stephen K; Phelan, Eric; Tariyal, Ridhi; Tewhey, Ryan; Omoniwa, Omowunmi; Fullah, Mohammed; Fonnie, Richard; Fonnie, Mbalu; Kanneh, Lansana; Jalloh, Simbirie; Gbakie, Michael; Saffa, Sidiki; Karbo, Kandeh; Gladden, Adrianne D; Qu, James; Stremlau, Matthew; Nekoui, Mahan; Finucane, Hilary K; Tabrizi, Shervin; Vitti, Joseph J; Birren, Bruce; Fitzgerald, Michael; McCowan, Caryn; Ireland, Andrea; Berlin, Aaron M; Bochicchio, James; Tazon-Vega, Barbara; Lennon, Niall J; Ryan, Elizabeth M; Bjornson, Zach; Milner, Danny A; Lukens, Amanda K; Broodie, Nisha; Rowland, Megan; Heinrich, Megan; Akdag, Marjan; Schieffelin, John S; Levy, Danielle; Akpan, Henry; Bausch, Daniel G; Rubins, Kathleen; McCormick, Joseph B; Lander, Eric S; Günther, Stephan; Hensley, Lisa; Okogbenin, Sylvanus; Schaffner, Stephen F; Okokhere, Peter O; Khan, S Humarr; Grant, Donald S; Akpede, George O; Asogun, Danny A; Gnirke, Andreas; Levin, Joshua Z; Happi, Christian T; Garry, Robert F; Sabeti, Pardis C

    2015-08-13

    The 2013-2015 West African epidemic of Ebola virus disease (EVD) reminds us of how little is known about biosafety level 4 viruses. Like Ebola virus, Lassa virus (LASV) can cause hemorrhagic fever with high case fatality rates. We generated a genomic catalog of almost 200 LASV sequences from clinical and rodent reservoir samples. We show that whereas the 2013-2015 EVD epidemic is fueled by human-to-human transmissions, LASV infections mainly result from reservoir-to-human infections. We elucidated the spread of LASV across West Africa and show that this migration was accompanied by changes in LASV genome abundance, fatality rates, codon adaptation, and translational efficiency. By investigating intrahost evolution, we found that mutations accumulate in epitopes of viral surface proteins, suggesting selection for immune escape. This catalog will serve as a foundation for the development of vaccines and diagnostics. VIDEO ABSTRACT. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Clinical sequencing uncovers origins and evolution of Lassa virus

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Kristian G.; Shapiro, B. Jesse; Matranga, Christian B.; Sealfon, Rachel; Lin, Aaron E.; Moses, Lina M.; Folarin, Onikepe A.; Goba, Augustine; Odia, Ikponmwonsa; Ehiane, Philomena E.; Momoh, Mambu; England, Eleina M.; Winnicki, Sarah; Branco, Luis M.; Gire, Stephen K.; Phelan, Eric; Tariyal, Ridhi; Tewhey, Ryan; Omoniwa, Omowunmi; Fullah, Mohammed; Fonnie, Richard; Fonnie, Mbalu; Kanneh, Lansana; Jalloh, Simbirie; Gbakie, Michael; Saffa, Sidiki; Karbo, Kandeh; Gladden, Adrianne D.; Qu, James; Stremlau, Matthew; Nekoui, Mahan; Finucane, Hilary K.; Tabrizi, Shervin; Vitti, Joseph J.; Birren, Bruce; Fitzgerald, Michael; McCowan, Caryn; Ireland, Andrea; Berlin, Aaron M.; Bochicchio, James; Tazon-Vega, Barbara; Lennon, Niall J.; Ryan, Elizabeth M.; Bjornson, Zach; Milner, Danny A.; Lukens, Amanda K.; Broodie, Nisha; Rowland, Megan; Heinrich, Megan; Akdag, Marjan; Schieffelin, John S.; Levy, Danielle; Akpan, Henry; Bausch, Daniel G.; Rubins, Kathleen; McCormick, Joseph B.; Lander, Eric S.; Günther, Stephan; Hensley, Lisa; Okogbenin, Sylvanus; Schaffner, Stephen F.; Okokhere, Peter O.; Khan, S. Humarr; Grant, Donald S.; Akpede, George O.; Asogun, Danny A.; Gnirke, Andreas; Levin, Joshua Z.; Happi, Christian T.; Garry, Robert F.; Sabeti, Pardis C.

    2015-01-01

    Summary The 2013-2015 West African epidemic of Ebola virus disease (EVD) reminds us how little is known about biosafety level-4 viruses. Like Ebola virus, Lassa virus (LASV) can cause hemorrhagic fever with high case fatality rates. We generated a genomic catalog of almost 200 LASV sequences from clinical and rodent reservoir samples. We show that whereas the 2013-2015 EVD epidemic is fueled by human-to-human transmissions, LASV infections mainly result from reservoir-to-human infections. We elucidated the spread of LASV across West Africa and show that this migration was accompanied by changes in LASV genome abundance, fatality rates, codon adaptation, and translational efficiency. By investigating intrahost evolution, we found that mutations accumulate in epitopes of viral surface proteins, suggesting selection for immune escape. This catalog will serve as a foundation for the development of vaccines and diagnostics. PMID:26276630

  18. Evolution of the Moon's orbit and the origin of life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turcotte, D. L.; Nordmann, J. C.; Cisne, J. L.

    1974-01-01

    Indications about the past history of the lunar orbit that are yielded by palaeontological data derived from periodicities in fossil corals are shown to suggest that the moon approached the earth 2,850 plus or minus 250 Myr BP. Convergent evidence in the geological record indicates that a pulse of high temperature volcanism occurred about 2800 Myr BP. The implied catastrophe roughly coincides with the first records of life. It seems within the realm of possibility that a global thermal event might have been involved in the origin of life.

  19. Evolution of the Moon's orbit and the origin of life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turcotte, D. L.; Nordmann, J. C.; Cisne, J. L.

    1974-01-01

    Indications about the past history of the lunar orbit that are yielded by palaeontological data derived from periodicities in fossil corals are shown to suggest that the moon approached the earth 2,850 plus or minus 250 Myr BP. Convergent evidence in the geological record indicates that a pulse of high temperature volcanism occurred about 2800 Myr BP. The implied catastrophe roughly coincides with the first records of life. It seems within the realm of possibility that a global thermal event might have been involved in the origin of life.

  20. Impact of solar system exploration on theories of chemical evolution and the origin of life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Devincenzi, D. L.

    1983-01-01

    The impact of solar system exploration on theories regarding chemical evolution and the origin of life is examined in detail. Major findings from missions to Mercury, Venus, the moon, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, and Titan are reviewed and implications for prebiotic chemistry are discussed. Among the major conclusions are: prebiotic chemistry is widespread throughout the solar system and universe; chemical evolution and the origin of life are intimately associated with the origin and evolution of the solar system; the rate, direction, and extent of prebiotic chemistry is highly dependent upon planetary characteristics; and continued exploration will increase understanding of how life originated on earth and allow better estimates of the likelihood of similar processes occurring elsewhere.

  1. NASA Strategic Roadmap: Origin, Evolution, Structure, and Destiny of the Universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Nicholas E.

    2005-01-01

    The NASA strategic roadmap on the Origin, Evolution, Structure and Destiny of the Universe is one of 13 roadmaps that outline NASA s approach to implement the vision for space exploration. The roadmap outlines a program to address the questions: What powered the Big Bang? What happens close to a Black Hole? What is Dark Energy? How did the infant universe grow into the galaxies, stars and planets, and set the stage for life? The roadmap builds upon the currently operating and successful missions such as HST, Chandra and Spitzer. The program contains two elements, Beyond Einstein and Pathways to Life, performed in three phases (2005-2015, 2015-2025 and >2025) with priorities set by inputs received from reviews undertaken by the National Academy of Sciences and technology readiness. The program includes the following missions: 2005-2015 GLAST, JWST and LISA; 2015-2025 Constellation-X and a series of Einstein Probes; and >2025 a number of ambitious vision missions which will be prioritized by results from the previous two phases.

  2. The origin and evolution of the genetic code.

    PubMed

    Béland, P; Allen, T F

    1994-10-21

    We argue that a primitive genetic code with only 20 separate words explains that there are 20 coded amino acids in modern life. The existence of 64 words on the modern genetic code requires modern life to read almost exclusively one strand of DNA in one direction. In our primitive code, both the original and the complementary sequence are read in either direction to give the same strings of amino acids. The algebra of complements forces synonymy of primitive codons so as to reduce the 64 independent codons of the modern code to exactly 20 independent separate words in the primitive condition. The synonymy in the modern code is the result of selection rather than algebraic forcing. The primitive code has almost no resilience to base mutations, unlike the third base redundancy of the modern code. Our primitive and the modern code are orthogonal. If palindromic proteins were coded by hairpin DNA or RNA, then (i) no punctuation would be needed; (ii) the reverse reading would give the same secondarily folded protein structure; and (iii) the sugar backbone would be read in the conventional 5' to 3' direction for the original arm and its complement. Modern copying of genetic material is almost always antiparallel. However, occasional parallel copying, as does occur in modern life, would give the complementary hairpin that would also read 5' to 3' along its entire length.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  3. Phase Transition in Sexual Reproduction and Biological Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zawierta, Marta; Waga, Wojciech; Mackiewicz, Dorota; Biecek, Przemysław; Cebrat, Stanisław

    Using Monte Carlo model of biological evolution it is discovered that populations can switch between two different strategies of their genomes' evolution: Darwinian purifying selection and complementing the haplotypes. The first one is exploited in the large panmictic populations while the second one in the small highly inbred populations. The choice depends on the crossover frequency. There is a power law relation between the critical value of crossover frequency and the size of panmictic population. Under constant inbreeding this critical value of crossover does not depend on the population size and has a character of phase transition. Close to this value sympatric speciation is observed.

  4. Evolution of bilaterian central nervous systems: a single origin?

    PubMed

    Holland, Linda Z; Carvalho, João E; Escriva, Hector; Laudet, Vincent; Schubert, Michael; Shimeld, Sebastian M; Yu, Jr-Kai

    2013-10-07

    The question of whether the ancestral bilaterian had a central nervous system (CNS) or a diffuse ectodermal nervous system has been hotly debated. Considerable evidence supports the theory that a CNS evolved just once. However, an alternative view proposes that the chordate CNS evolved from the ectodermal nerve net of a hemichordate-like ancestral deuterostome, implying independent evolution of the CNS in chordates and protostomes. To specify morphological divisions along the anterior/posterior axis, this ancestor used gene networks homologous to those patterning three organizing centers in the vertebrate brain: the anterior neural ridge, the zona limitans intrathalamica and the isthmic organizer, and subsequent evolution of the vertebrate brain involved elaboration of these ancestral signaling centers; however, all or part of these signaling centers were lost from the CNS of invertebrate chordates. The present review analyzes the evidence for and against these theories. The bulk of the evidence indicates that a CNS evolved just once - in the ancestral bilaterian. Importantly, in both protostomes and deuterostomes, the CNS represents a portion of a generally neurogenic ectoderm that is internalized and receives and integrates inputs from sensory cells in the remainder of the ectoderm. The expression patterns of genes involved in medio/lateral (dorso/ventral) patterning of the CNS are similar in protostomes and chordates; however, these genes are not similarly expressed in the ectoderm outside the CNS. Thus, their expression is a better criterion for CNS homologs than the expression of anterior/posterior patterning genes, many of which (for example, Hox genes) are similarly expressed both in the CNS and in the remainder of the ectoderm in many bilaterians. The evidence leaves hemichordates in an ambiguous position - either CNS centralization was lost to some extent at the base of the hemichordates, or even earlier, at the base of the hemichordates

  5. Evolution of bilaterian central nervous systems: a single origin?

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The question of whether the ancestral bilaterian had a central nervous system (CNS) or a diffuse ectodermal nervous system has been hotly debated. Considerable evidence supports the theory that a CNS evolved just once. However, an alternative view proposes that the chordate CNS evolved from the ectodermal nerve net of a hemichordate-like ancestral deuterostome, implying independent evolution of the CNS in chordates and protostomes. To specify morphological divisions along the anterior/posterior axis, this ancestor used gene networks homologous to those patterning three organizing centers in the vertebrate brain: the anterior neural ridge, the zona limitans intrathalamica and the isthmic organizer, and subsequent evolution of the vertebrate brain involved elaboration of these ancestral signaling centers; however, all or part of these signaling centers were lost from the CNS of invertebrate chordates. The present review analyzes the evidence for and against these theories. The bulk of the evidence indicates that a CNS evolved just once – in the ancestral bilaterian. Importantly, in both protostomes and deuterostomes, the CNS represents a portion of a generally neurogenic ectoderm that is internalized and receives and integrates inputs from sensory cells in the remainder of the ectoderm. The expression patterns of genes involved in medio/lateral (dorso/ventral) patterning of the CNS are similar in protostomes and chordates; however, these genes are not similarly expressed in the ectoderm outside the CNS. Thus, their expression is a better criterion for CNS homologs than the expression of anterior/posterior patterning genes, many of which (for example, Hox genes) are similarly expressed both in the CNS and in the remainder of the ectoderm in many bilaterians. The evidence leaves hemichordates in an ambiguous position – either CNS centralization was lost to some extent at the base of the hemichordates, or even earlier, at the base of the hemichordates

  6. Complexation and phase evolution at dimethylformamide-Ag(111) interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Wentao; Leung, Kevin; Shao, Qian; Gaskell, Karen J.; Reutt-Robey, Janice E.

    2016-09-15

    The interaction of solvent molecules with metallic surfaces impacts many interfacial chemical processes. We investigate the chemical and structure evolution that follows adsorption of the polar solvent dimethylformamide (DMF) on Ag(111). An Ag(DMF)2 coordination complex forms spontaneously by DMF etching of Ag(111), yielding mixed films of the complexes and DMF. Utilizing ultrahigh vacuum scanning tunneling microscopy (UHV-STM), in combination with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and density functional theory (DFT) computations, we map monolayer phases from the 2-D gas regime, consisting of a binary mixture of DMF and Ag(DMF)2, through the saturation monolayer limit, in which these two chemical species phase separate into ordered islands. Structural models for the near-square DMF phase and the chain-like Ag(DMF)2 phase are presented and supported by DFT computation. Interface evolution is summarized in a surface pressure-composition phase diagram, which allows structure prediction over arbitrary experimental conditions. In conclusion, this work reveals new surface coordination chemistry for an important electrolyte-electrode system, and illustrates how surface pressure can be used to tune monolayer phases.

  7. Complexation and phase evolution at dimethylformamide-Ag(111) interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Wentao; Leung, Kevin; Shao, Qian; Gaskell, Karen J.; Reutt-Robey, Janice E.

    2016-09-15

    The interaction of solvent molecules with metallic surfaces impacts many interfacial chemical processes. We investigate the chemical and structure evolution that follows adsorption of the polar solvent dimethylformamide (DMF) on Ag(111). An Ag(DMF)2 coordination complex forms spontaneously by DMF etching of Ag(111), yielding mixed films of the complexes and DMF. Utilizing ultrahigh vacuum scanning tunneling microscopy (UHV-STM), in combination with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and density functional theory (DFT) computations, we map monolayer phases from the 2-D gas regime, consisting of a binary mixture of DMF and Ag(DMF)2, through the saturation monolayer limit, in which these two chemical species phase separate into ordered islands. Structural models for the near-square DMF phase and the chain-like Ag(DMF)2 phase are presented and supported by DFT computation. Interface evolution is summarized in a surface pressure-composition phase diagram, which allows structure prediction over arbitrary experimental conditions. In conclusion, this work reveals new surface coordination chemistry for an important electrolyte-electrode system, and illustrates how surface pressure can be used to tune monolayer phases.

  8. Origin and Evolution of Plastids and Photosynthesis in Eukaryotes

    PubMed Central

    McFadden, Geoffrey I.

    2014-01-01

    Recent progress in understanding the origins of plastids from endosymbiotic cyanobacteria is reviewed. Establishing when during geological time the endosymbiosis occurred remains elusive, but progress has been made in defining the cyanobacterial lineage most closely related to plastids, and some mechanistic insight into the possible existence of cryptic endosymbioses perhaps involving Chlamydia-like infections of the host have also been presented. The phylogenetic affinities of the host remain obscure. The existence of a second lineage of primary plastids in euglyphid amoebae has now been confirmed, but the quasipermanent acquisition of plastids by animals has been shown to be more ephemeral than initially suspected. A new understanding of how plastids have been integrated into their hosts by transfer of photosynthate, by endosymbiotic gene transfer and repatriation of gene products back to the endosymbiont, and by regulation of endosymbiont division is presented in context. PMID:24691960

  9. Chemical evolution and the origin of life: bibliography supplement 1985

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wade, R. C.; Powers, J. V.; Ponnamperuma, C.

    1989-01-01

    This bibliography is the seventeenth annual supplement to the comprehensive bibliography on the same subject which was published in Space Life Sci. 2(1970), 225-295; 3(1972), 293-304; 4(1973), 309-329 and in Origins of Life 5(1974), 505-527; 6(1975), 285-300; 7(1976), 75-85; 8(1977), 59-66; 9(1978), 67-74; 10(1980), 69-87; 10(1980), 379-404; 11(1981), 273-288; 12(1982), 93-118; 13(1983), 61-80; 15(1984), 55-69; 17(1987), 171-184; 17(1987), 185-206.

  10. Origin and Evolution of the Kiwifruit Canker Pandemic

    PubMed Central

    Li, Li; Liu, Yifei; Li, Dawei; Pan, Hui; Zhong, Caihong; Rikkerink, Erik H.A.; Templeton, Matthew D.; Straub, Christina; Colombi, Elena

    2017-01-01

    Recurring epidemics of kiwifruit (Actinidia spp.) bleeding canker disease are caused by Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae (Psa). In order to strengthen understanding of population structure, phylogeography, and evolutionary dynamics, we isolated Pseudomonas from cultivated and wild kiwifruit across six provinces in China. Based on the analysis of 80 sequenced Psa genomes, we show that China is the origin of the pandemic lineage but that strain diversity in China is confined to just a single clade. In contrast, Korea and Japan harbor strains from multiple clades. Distinct independent transmission events marked introduction of the pandemic lineage into New Zealand, Chile, Europe, Korea, and Japan. Despite high similarity within the core genome and minimal impact of within-clade recombination, we observed extensive variation even within the single clade from which the global pandemic arose. PMID:28369338

  11. The origin and evolution of terrestrial and Martian rock labyrinths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brook, G. A.

    1984-01-01

    The morphological characteristics and evolutionary development of rock labyrinths on Earth (in sandstone, volcanics, and carbonates) are compared with those on Mars. On Earth rock labyrinths originate as parallel, an echelon, or intersecting narrow grabens, or develop where fault and joint networks are selectively eroded. Labyrinths frequently contain both downfaulted and erosional elements. Closed labyrinths contain depressions; open labyrinths do not, they are simple part of a fluvial network generally of low order. As closed labyrinths made up of intersecting grabens or made up of connected erosional depressions are extremely common on Mars, the research focussed on an understanding of these labyrinth types. Field investigations were carried out in Canyonlands National Park, Utah, and in the Chirachahua Mountains of Arizona. Martian labyrinths were investigated using Viking orbiter images. In addition, research was undertaken on apparent thermokarst features in Lunae Planum and Chryse Planitia where closed depressions are numerous and resemble atlas topography.

  12. The origins and evolution of freeze-etch electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Heuser, John E.

    2011-01-01

    The introduction of the Balzers freeze-fracture machine by Moor in 1961 had a much greater impact on the advancement of electron microscopy than he could have imagined. Devised originally to circumvent the dangers of classical thin-section techniques, as well as to provide unique en face views of cell membranes, freeze-fracturing proved to be crucial for developing modern concepts of how biological membranes are organized and proved that membranes are bilayers of lipids within which proteins float and self-assemble. Later, when freeze-fracturing was combined with methods for freezing cells that avoided the fixation and cryoprotection steps that Moor still had to use to prepare the samples for his original invention, it became a means for capturing membrane dynamics on the millisecond time-scale, thus allowing a deeper understanding of the functions of biological membranes in living cells as well as their static ultrastructure. Finally, the realization that unfixed, non-cryoprotected samples could be deeply vacuum-etched or even freeze-dried after freeze-fracturing opened up a whole new way to image all the other molecular components of cells besides their membranes and also provided a powerful means to image the interactions of all the cytoplasmic components with the various membranes of the cell. The purpose of this review is to outline the history of these technical developments, to describe how they are being used in electron microscopy today and to suggest how they can be improved in order to further their utility for biological electron microscopy in the future. PMID:21844598

  13. A new aspect to the origin and evolution of eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Vellai, T; Takács, K; Vida, G

    1998-05-01

    One of the most important omissions in recent evolutionary theory concerns how eukaryotes could emerge and evolve. According to the currently accepted views, the first eukaryotic cell possessed a nucleus, an endomembrane system, and a cytoskeleton but had an inefficient prokaryotic-like metabolism. In contrast, one of the most ancient eukaryotes, the metamonada Giardia lamblia, was found to have formerly possessed mitochondria. In sharp contrast with the traditional views, this paper suggests, based on the energetic aspect of genome organization, that the emergence of eukaryotes was promoted by the establishment of an efficient energy-converting organelle, such as the mitochondrion. Mitochondria were acquired by the endosymbiosis of ancient alpha-purple photosynthetic Gram-negative eubacteria that reorganized the prokaryotic metabolism of the archaebacterial-like ancestral host cells. The presence of an ATP pool in the cytoplasm provided by this cell organelle allowed a major increase in genome size. This evolutionary change, the remarkable increase both in genome size and complexity, explains the origin of the eukaryotic cell itself. The loss of cell wall and the appearance of multicellularity can also be explained by the acquisition of mitochondria. All bacteria use chemiosmotic mechanisms to harness energy; therefore the periplasm bounded by the cell wall is an essential part of prokaryotic cells. Following the establishment of mitochondria, the original plasma membrane-bound metabolism of prokaryotes, as well as the funcion of the periplasm providing a compartment for the formation of different ion gradients, has been transferred into the inner mitochondrial membrane and intermembrane space. After the loss of the essential function of periplasm, the bacterial cell wall could also be lost, which enabled the naked cells to establish direct connections among themselves. The relatively late emergence of mitochondria may be the reason why multicellularity evolved so

  14. The origin and evolution of chordate nervous systems.

    PubMed

    Holland, Linda Z

    2015-12-19

    In the past 40 years, comparisons of developmental gene expression and mechanisms of development (evodevo) joined comparative morphology as tools for reconstructing long-extinct ancestral forms. Unfortunately, both approaches typically give congruent answers only with closely related organisms. Chordate nervous systems are good examples. Classical studies alone left open whether the vertebrate brain was a new structure or evolved from the anterior end of an ancestral nerve cord like that of modern amphioxus. Evodevo plus electron microscopy showed that the amphioxus brain has a diencephalic forebrain, small midbrain, hindbrain and spinal cord with parts of the genetic mechanisms for the midbrain/hindbrain boundary, zona limitans intrathalamica and neural crest. Evodevo also showed how extra genes resulting from whole-genome duplications in vertebrates facilitated evolution of new structures like neural crest. Understanding how the chordate central nervous system (CNS) evolved from that of the ancestral deuterostome has been truly challenging. The majority view is that this ancestor had a CNS with a brain that gave rise to the chordate CNS and, with loss of a discrete brain, to one of the two hemichordate nerve cords. The minority view is that this ancestor had no nerve cord; those in chordates and hemichordates evolved independently. New techniques such as phylostratigraphy may help resolve this conundrum.

  15. On the possible origin and evolution of the genetic code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jukes, T. H.

    1974-01-01

    The genetic code is examined for indications of possible preceding codes that existed during early evolution. Eight of the 20 amino acids are coded by 'quartets' of codons with fourfold degeneracy, and 16 such quartets can exist, so that an earlier code could have provided for 15 or 16 amino acids, rather than 20. If twofold degeneracy is postulated for the first position of the codon, there could have been ten amino acids in the code. It is speculated that these may have been phenylalanine, valine, proline, alanine, histidine, glutamine, glutanic acid, aspartic acid, cysteine and glycine. There is a notable deficiency of arginine in proteins, despite the fact that it has six codons. Simultaneously, there is more lysine in proteins than would be expected from its two codons, if the four bases in mRNA are equiprobable and are arranged randomly. It is speculated that arginine is an 'intruder' into the genetic code, and that it may have displayed another amino acid such as ornithine, or may even have displayed lysine from some of its previous codon assignments. As a result, natural selection has favored lysine against the fact that it has only two codons.

  16. The origin and evolution of dust clouds in Central Asia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smirnov, V.V.; Gillette, Dale A.; Golitsyn, G.S.; MacKinnon, D.J.

    1994-01-01

    Data from a high resolution radiometer AVHRR (580-680 nm optical lengthwaves) installed on the "NOAA-11" satellite as well as TV (500-700 nm) and IR (8000-12000 nm) equipment of the Russia satellite "Meteor-2/16" were used to study the evolution of dust storms for 1-30 September 1989 in Tajikistan, Uzbekistan, Turkmenistan and Afghanistan. These data help to validate the hypothesis, that long-term dusted boundary layer (duration of the order of a day or more), but of comparatively not high optical density (4-10 km meteorological visibility range at the 20-50 km background), is formed after the northwest intrusions into a region of intensive cold fronts at the surface wind velocities of 7-15 m/s. Stability of dust clouds of vertical power to 3-3.5 km (up to an inversion level) is explained by an action of collective buoyancy factors at heating the dust particles of 2-4 ??m in mean diameter by solar radiation. The more intensive intrusions stimulate a formation of simultaneously dust and water clouds. The last partially reduce the solar radiation (by the calculations of the order of 30-50%) and decrease the role of buoyancy factors. Thus, initiated is the intensive but short-term dusted boundary layer at horizontal visibility of 50-200 m. ?? 1994.

  17. The origin and evolution of chordate nervous systems

    PubMed Central

    Holland, Linda Z.

    2015-01-01

    In the past 40 years, comparisons of developmental gene expression and mechanisms of development (evodevo) joined comparative morphology as tools for reconstructing long-extinct ancestral forms. Unfortunately, both approaches typically give congruent answers only with closely related organisms. Chordate nervous systems are good examples. Classical studies alone left open whether the vertebrate brain was a new structure or evolved from the anterior end of an ancestral nerve cord like that of modern amphioxus. Evodevo plus electron microscopy showed that the amphioxus brain has a diencephalic forebrain, small midbrain, hindbrain and spinal cord with parts of the genetic mechanisms for the midbrain/hindbrain boundary, zona limitans intrathalamica and neural crest. Evodevo also showed how extra genes resulting from whole-genome duplications in vertebrates facilitated evolution of new structures like neural crest. Understanding how the chordate central nervous system (CNS) evolved from that of the ancestral deuterostome has been truly challenging. The majority view is that this ancestor had a CNS with a brain that gave rise to the chordate CNS and, with loss of a discrete brain, to one of the two hemichordate nerve cords. The minority view is that this ancestor had no nerve cord; those in chordates and hemichordates evolved independently. New techniques such as phylostratigraphy may help resolve this conundrum. PMID:26554041

  18. Evolution of organogenesis and the origin of altriciality in mammals.

    PubMed

    Werneburg, Ingmar; Laurin, Michel; Koyabu, Daisuke; Sánchez-Villagra, Marcelo R

    2016-07-01

    Mammals feature not only great phenotypic disparity, but also diverse growth and life history patterns, especially in maturity level at birth, ranging from altriciality to precocity. Gestation length, morphology at birth, and other markers of life history are fundamental to our understanding of mammalian evolution. Based on the first synthesis of embryological data and the study of new ontogenetic series, we reconstructed estimates of the ancestral chronology of organogenesis and life-history modes in placental mammals. We found that the ancestor of marsupial and placental mammals was placental-like at birth but had a long, marsupial-like infancy. We hypothesize that mammalian viviparity might have evolved in association with the extension of growth after birth, enabled through lactation, and that mammalian altriciality is inherited from the earliest amniotes. The precocial lifestyle of extant sauropsids and that of many placental mammals were acquired secondarily. We base our conclusions on the best estimates and provide a comprehensive discussion on the methods used and the limitations of our dataset. We provide the most comprehensive embryological dataset ever published, "rescue" old literature sources, and apply available methods and illustrate thus an approach on how to investigate comparatively organogenesis in macroevolution. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. On the possible origin and evolution of the genetic code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jukes, T. H.

    1974-01-01

    The genetic code is examined for indications of possible preceding codes that existed during early evolution. Eight of the 20 amino acids are coded by 'quartets' of codons with fourfold degeneracy, and 16 such quartets can exist, so that an earlier code could have provided for 15 or 16 amino acids, rather than 20. If twofold degeneracy is postulated for the first position of the codon, there could have been ten amino acids in the code. It is speculated that these may have been phenylalanine, valine, proline, alanine, histidine, glutamine, glutanic acid, aspartic acid, cysteine and glycine. There is a notable deficiency of arginine in proteins, despite the fact that it has six codons. Simultaneously, there is more lysine in proteins than would be expected from its two codons, if the four bases in mRNA are equiprobable and are arranged randomly. It is speculated that arginine is an 'intruder' into the genetic code, and that it may have displayed another amino acid such as ornithine, or may even have displayed lysine from some of its previous codon assignments. As a result, natural selection has favored lysine against the fact that it has only two codons.

  20. Origin and evolution of the deep thermochemical structure beneath Eurasia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flament, N.; Williams, S.; Müller, R. D.; Gurnis, M.; Bower, D. J.

    2017-01-01

    A unique structure in the Earth's lowermost mantle, the Perm Anomaly, was recently identified beneath Eurasia. It seismologically resembles the large low-shear velocity provinces (LLSVPs) under Africa and the Pacific, but is much smaller. This challenges the current understanding of the evolution of the plate-mantle system in which plumes rise from the edges of the two LLSVPs, spatially fixed in time. New models of mantle flow over the last 230 million years reproduce the present-day structure of the lower mantle, and show a Perm-like anomaly. The anomaly formed in isolation within a closed subduction network ~22,000 km in circumference prior to 150 million years ago before migrating ~1,500 km westward at an average rate of 1 cm year-1, indicating a greater mobility of deep mantle structures than previously recognized. We hypothesize that the mobile Perm Anomaly could be linked to the Emeishan volcanics, in contrast to the previously proposed Siberian Traps.

  1. Origin and evolution of the deep thermochemical structure beneath Eurasia

    PubMed Central

    Flament, N.; Williams, S.; Müller, R. D.; Gurnis, M.; Bower, D. J.

    2017-01-01

    A unique structure in the Earth's lowermost mantle, the Perm Anomaly, was recently identified beneath Eurasia. It seismologically resembles the large low-shear velocity provinces (LLSVPs) under Africa and the Pacific, but is much smaller. This challenges the current understanding of the evolution of the plate–mantle system in which plumes rise from the edges of the two LLSVPs, spatially fixed in time. New models of mantle flow over the last 230 million years reproduce the present-day structure of the lower mantle, and show a Perm-like anomaly. The anomaly formed in isolation within a closed subduction network ∼22,000 km in circumference prior to 150 million years ago before migrating ∼1,500 km westward at an average rate of 1 cm year−1, indicating a greater mobility of deep mantle structures than previously recognized. We hypothesize that the mobile Perm Anomaly could be linked to the Emeishan volcanics, in contrast to the previously proposed Siberian Traps. PMID:28098137

  2. Origin of r-Process Elements and Galactic Chemodynamical Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathews, Grant J.; Shibagaki, Shota; Kajino, Toshitaka

    It has been known for more than half a century that about half of the elements heavier than iron are produced via rapid neutron capture in the r-process. Indeed, the basic physical conditions for the r-process are well constrained by simple nuclear physics. In spite of this simplicity, however, the unambiguous identification of the site for the r-process nucleosynthesis has remained elusive. Parametrically, one can divide current models for the r-process into three scenarios roughly characterized by the number of neutron captures per seed nucleus (n/s). This parameter, in turn is the consequence of a variety of conditions such as time-scale, baryon density, average charge per baryon, and entropy. Here, we summarize various proposed sites for the r-process along with their short comings. Insights from a variety of nuclear physics measurements, astronomical observations, and models for galactic chemo-dynamical evolution are summarized. A paradigm is proposed whereby one may be able to quantify the relative contributions of each astrophysical site.

  3. Origin and evolution of the deep thermochemical structure beneath Eurasia.

    PubMed

    Flament, N; Williams, S; Müller, R D; Gurnis, M; Bower, D J

    2017-01-18

    A unique structure in the Earth's lowermost mantle, the Perm Anomaly, was recently identified beneath Eurasia. It seismologically resembles the large low-shear velocity provinces (LLSVPs) under Africa and the Pacific, but is much smaller. This challenges the current understanding of the evolution of the plate-mantle system in which plumes rise from the edges of the two LLSVPs, spatially fixed in time. New models of mantle flow over the last 230 million years reproduce the present-day structure of the lower mantle, and show a Perm-like anomaly. The anomaly formed in isolation within a closed subduction network ∼22,000 km in circumference prior to 150 million years ago before migrating ∼1,500 km westward at an average rate of 1 cm year(-1), indicating a greater mobility of deep mantle structures than previously recognized. We hypothesize that the mobile Perm Anomaly could be linked to the Emeishan volcanics, in contrast to the previously proposed Siberian Traps.

  4. Diversity and evolution of multiple orc/cdc6-adjacent replication origins in haloarchaea

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background While multiple replication origins have been observed in archaea, considerably less is known about their evolutionary processes. Here, we performed a comparative analysis of the predicted (proved in part) orc/cdc6-associated replication origins in 15 completely sequenced haloarchaeal genomes to investigate the diversity and evolution of replication origins in halophilic Archaea. Results Multiple orc/cdc6-associated replication origins were predicted in all of the analyzed haloarchaeal genomes following the identification of putative ORBs (origin recognition boxes) that are associated with orc/cdc6 genes. Five of these predicted replication origins in Haloarcula hispanica were experimentally confirmed via autonomous replication activities. Strikingly, several predicted replication origins in H. hispanica and Haloarcula marismortui are located in the distinct regions of their highly homologous chromosomes, suggesting that these replication origins might have been introduced as parts of new genomic content. A comparison of the origin-associated Orc/Cdc6 homologs and the corresponding predicted ORB elements revealed that the replication origins in a given haloarchaeon are quite diverse, while different haloarchaea can share a few conserved origins. Phylogenetic and genomic context analyses suggested that there is an original replication origin (oriC1) that was inherited from the ancestor of archaea, and several other origins were likely evolved and/or translocated within the haloarchaeal species. Conclusion This study provides detailed information about the diversity of multiple orc/cdc6-associated replication origins in haloarchaeal genomes, and provides novel insight into the evolution of multiple replication origins in Archaea. PMID:22978470

  5. The Origins and Evolution of Molecules in Icy Solids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, Reggie L.; Moore, Marla H.

    2010-01-01

    Astronomical observations of the past few decades have revealed the existence of a variety of molecules in extraterrestrial ices. These molecules include H2O, CO, and CO2, and organics such as CH4, CH30H, and C2H6. Some ices are dominated by polar molecules, while non-polar species appear to dominate others. Observations, mainly in the radio and IR regions, have allowed the inference of other solid-phase molecules whose formation remains difficult to explain by gas-phase chemistry alone. Several laboratory research groups have reported on extensive experiments on the solid-phase reaction chemistry of icy materials, generally as initiated by either ionizing radiation or vacuum-UV photons. These experiments not only permit molecular identifications to be made from astronomical observations, but also allow predictions of yet unidentified molecules. This laboratory approach has evolved over more than 30 years with much of the earliest work focusing on complex mixtures thought to represent either cometary or interstellar ices. Although those early experiments documented a rich solid-state photo- and radiation chemistry, they revealed few details of reactions for particular molecules, partly due to the multi-component nature of the samples. Since then, model systems have been examined that allow the chemistry of individual species and specific reactions to be probed. Reactions involving most of the smaller astronomical molecules have now been studied and specific processes identified. Current laboratory work suggests that a variety of reactions occur in extraterrestrial ices, including acid-base processes, radical dimerizations, proton transfers, oxidations, reductions, and isomerizations. This workshop presentation will focus on chemical reactions relevant to solar system and interstellar ices. While most of the work will be drawn from that to which the speaker has contributed, results from other laboratories also will be included. Suggestions for future studies will be

  6. Insights into the Origin and Evolution of the Plant Hormone Signaling Machinery1

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chunyang; Liu, Yang; Li, Si-Shen; Han, Guan-Zhu

    2015-01-01

    Plant hormones modulate plant growth, development, and defense. However, many aspects of the origin and evolution of plant hormone signaling pathways remain obscure. Here, we use a comparative genomic and phylogenetic approach to investigate the origin and evolution of nine major plant hormone (abscisic acid, auxin, brassinosteroid, cytokinin, ethylene, gibberellin, jasmonate, salicylic acid, and strigolactone) signaling pathways. Our multispecies genome-wide analysis reveals that: (1) auxin, cytokinin, and strigolactone signaling pathways originated in charophyte lineages; (2) abscisic acid, jasmonate, and salicylic acid signaling pathways arose in the last common ancestor of land plants; (3) gibberellin signaling evolved after the divergence of bryophytes from land plants; (4) the canonical brassinosteroid signaling originated before the emergence of angiosperms but likely after the split of gymnosperms and angiosperms; and (5) the origin of the canonical ethylene signaling pathway postdates shortly the emergence of angiosperms. Our findings might have important implications in understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying the emergence of land plants. PMID:25560880

  7. Insights into the origin and evolution of the plant hormone signaling machinery.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chunyang; Liu, Yang; Li, Si-Shen; Han, Guan-Zhu

    2015-03-01

    Plant hormones modulate plant growth, development, and defense. However, many aspects of the origin and evolution of plant hormone signaling pathways remain obscure. Here, we use a comparative genomic and phylogenetic approach to investigate the origin and evolution of nine major plant hormone (abscisic acid, auxin, brassinosteroid, cytokinin, ethylene, gibberellin, jasmonate, salicylic acid, and strigolactone) signaling pathways. Our multispecies genome-wide analysis reveals that: (1) auxin, cytokinin, and strigolactone signaling pathways originated in charophyte lineages; (2) abscisic acid, jasmonate, and salicylic acid signaling pathways arose in the last common ancestor of land plants; (3) gibberellin signaling evolved after the divergence of bryophytes from land plants; (4) the canonical brassinosteroid signaling originated before the emergence of angiosperms but likely after the split of gymnosperms and angiosperms; and (5) the origin of the canonical ethylene signaling pathway postdates shortly the emergence of angiosperms. Our findings might have important implications in understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying the emergence of land plants.

  8. Evolution in fossil lineages: paleontology and The Origin of Species.

    PubMed

    Hunt, Gene

    2010-12-01

    Of all of the sources of evidence for evolution by natural selection, perhaps the most problematic for Darwin was the geological record of organic change. In response to the absence of species-level transformations in the fossil record, Darwin argued that the fossil record was too incomplete, too biased, and too poorly known to provide strong evidence against his theory. Here, this view of the fossil record is evaluated in light of 150 years of subsequent paleontological research. Although Darwin's assessment of the completeness and resolution of fossiliferous rocks was in several ways astute, today the fossil record is much better explored, documented, and understood than it was in 1859. In particular, a reasonably large set of studies tracing evolutionary trajectories within species can now be brought to bear on Darwin's expectation of gradual change driven by natural selection. An unusually high-resolution sequence of stickleback-bearing strata records the transformation of this lineage via natural selection. This adaptive trajectory is qualitatively consistent with Darwin's prediction, but it occurred much more rapidly than he would have guessed: almost all of the directional change was completed within 1,000 generations. In most geological sequences, this change would be too rapid to resolve. The accumulated fossil record at more typical paleontological scales (10(4)-10(6) years) reveals evolutionary changes that are rarely directional and net rates of change that are perhaps surprisingly slow, two findings that are in agreement with the punctuated-equilibrium model. Finally, Darwin's view of the broader history of life is reviewed briefly, with a focus on competition-mediated extinction and recent paleontological and phylogenetic attempts to assess diversity dependence in evolutionary dynamics.

  9. Science as a (TRANSITORY?) Phase in Human Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leibowitz, Elia

    One of the key elements of human knowledge in the last 150 years is the recognition that the universe, as well as each of its components, are in a permanent stage of evolution. Mankind and human affairs are of course no exceptions. Human beings owe their biological supremacy to the possession of a form of inheritance quite unlike that of other animals: exogenetic heredity. They have a non genetic channel for transmitting information from one generation to another, namely, the entire apparatus of culture. As information is correlated with brain structure, culture is a non genetic means to create patterns in human brains. It therefore plays a major role in human evolution. This apparatus by itself is however also undergoing a process of evolution. Using examples of astronomical, cosmological and other cultural concepts and argumentations, I shall show that throughout recorded human history, 4 distinct phases can be recognized in the evolution of this non genetic apparatus. The latest phase, the beginning of which is symbolized by the life and work of Galileo, is the "scientific" era. At the turn of the millenium, humankind is possibly at a transition state, from the "scientific" towards a new phase that may be termed a "public relation" or "propaganda" era. Causes for this transition can be found among recent developments in mass media and communications. These, in turn, are correlated with modern, 20th century trends in economy, technology and sociology that are other dominants factors in this transition. The apparent decline of the "scientific" culture may have profound consequences on the future evolution of mankind.

  10. The Origin and Evolution of Deep Plasmaspheric Notches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallagher, D. L.; Adrian, M. L.; Liemohn, M.

    2004-01-01

    Deep plasmaspheric notches can extend over more than 2 RE in radial distance and 3 hours MLT in the magnetic equatorial plane. They appear to be among the largest evacuated features in the exterior plasmaspheric boundary. They can last for days and exhibit varying structure. It appears that low-density channels resulting from the entrainment of the plasmaspheric convection plume during storm-time recovery share the same origin as notches. Notches rather than channels result from differences in storm- time conditions. Strong convection tends to result in low-density channels, while weaker convection and limited erosion results in notches. Eighteen events in 2000 have been analyzed. Among these events, notches were found to drift as slowly as 72% of corotation. In only one case was a notch found to drift at the corotation rate within measurement error. On average, notches drift at about 2 1.5 hours per day or 90% of the co-rotational rate. Notches also sometimes exhibit an interior structure that appears as an extended prominence of dense plasma, which forms a W-like feature in IMAGEEUV images when viewed from Earth-center. Modeling suggests such features may be caused by small-scale potential structures that result from the localized injection of ring current plasma. Plasma filling rates during recovery and drainage during a minor storm are reported.

  11. Origin, evolution and present thermal state of the moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanks, T. C.; Anderson, D. L.

    1972-01-01

    The relative absence of lunar volcanism in the last 3 b.y. and the Apollo 15 heat flow measurement suggest that present-day temperatures in the moon are approximately steady state to depths of 100 km. An exponential distribution of heat sources with depth is scaled by equating the surface heat flow to the integrated heat production of this exterior shell. Presumed present-day interior temperatures and the present-day surface heat flow of 30 ergs/cm2-sec are obtained. The estimated homogeneous concentrations of U, the chemistry of the lunar surface material and inferences to modest depth, and the short accretion time of the moon necessary to provide large-scale differentiation at 4.6 AE suggest that the moon had its origin in the rapid accretion of compounds first condensing from the protoplanetary nebula. The present thermal state of the moon may involve at least some partial melting through all the lunar interior deeper than 200 km. Such a thermal configuration is inconsistent neither with temperatures inferred from electrical conductivity studies nor with the nonhydrostatic shape of the moon.

  12. Origin and evolution of the Earth's atmosphere and hydrosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Akbari, G.E.

    1984-01-01

    The composition of the outgassed fluid has been a point of serious debate. A model developed by Melton and Giardini has been used. In this model, the fluid inclusions in diamonds have been taken as original samples of the outgassed fluids. The model uses first order kinetics of the degassing processes of H2, CH4, N2, CO and Ar, and zero order kinetics for the degassing processes of H2O and CO2. Samples with compositions similar to the fluid included in diamonds were exposed to electric discharge, UV radiation and gamma radiation to formulate the equilibrium composition of the Earth's atmosphere. Small amounts of organic and inorganic compounds were formed in the samples by the radiation. The Melton/Giardini model was used to calculate the composition and pressure of primitive atmosphere of the Earth as a function of time, beginning 4.5 b.y. ago. Since light gases such as H2 and He escape from the Earth, and other degassed material undergoes numerous chemical and physical reactions, the Earth's atmosphere was quite different from the predicted composition using the uncorrected Melton/Giardini model.

  13. Human enterobiasis in evolution: origin, specificity and transmission.

    PubMed

    Hugot, J P; Reinhard, K J; Gardner, S L; Morand, S

    1999-09-01

    The co-evolutionary pathway seems to be the most plausible hypothesis for the explanation of the origin of human pinworms. Of the two modes of transmission of oxyurids among humans which have been documented, the direct oral/anal route is also observed in other Primates and seems to have been favoured by selection. As indirect air-borne transmission has also been shown for human enterobiasis, the question of "How this alternative to the standard transmission method could have arisen" is examined. The results of comparative studies of prevalence of Enterobius in human coprolites, in villages of Neolithic age of the arid west of North America, show that a higher prevalence of pinworms is correlated with the lower total amount of air-exchange in caves relative to other structures. The air-borne route of transmission of pinworms among humans is interpreted as an innovation in the human/Enterobius pair. This mode of transfer could have been favoured during the time when humans changed their behaviour from a hunting-gathering to a more sedentary existence, initially associated with cave habitats.

  14. Origins and Evolution of the Etruscans’ mtDNA

    PubMed Central

    Ghirotto, Silvia; Tassi, Francesca; Fumagalli, Erica; Colonna, Vincenza; Sandionigi, Anna; Lari, Martina; Vai, Stefania; Petiti, Emmanuele; Corti, Giorgio; Rizzi, Ermanno; De Bellis, Gianluca; Caramelli, David; Barbujani, Guido

    2013-01-01

    The Etruscan culture is documented in Etruria, Central Italy, from the 8th to the 1st century BC. For more than 2,000 years there has been disagreement on the Etruscans’ biological origins, whether local or in Anatolia. Genetic affinities with both Tuscan and Anatolian populations have been reported, but so far all attempts have failed to fit the Etruscans’ and modern populations in the same genealogy. We extracted and typed the hypervariable region of mitochondrial DNA of 14 individuals buried in two Etruscan necropoleis, analyzing them along with other Etruscan and Medieval samples, and 4,910 contemporary individuals from the Mediterranean basin. Comparing ancient (30 Etruscans, 27 Medieval individuals) and modern DNA sequences (370 Tuscans), with the results of millions of computer simulations, we show that the Etruscans can be considered ancestral, with a high degree of confidence, to the current inhabitants of Casentino and Volterra, but not to the general contemporary population of the former Etruscan homeland. By further considering two Anatolian samples (35 and 123 individuals) we could estimate that the genetic links between Tuscany and Anatolia date back to at least 5,000 years ago, strongly suggesting that the Etruscan culture developed locally, and not as an immediate consequence of immigration from the Eastern Mediterranean shores. PMID:23405165

  15. Developmental evolution and the origins of phenotypic variation.

    PubMed

    Lickliter, Robert

    2014-08-01

    Because of the variability of relevant developmental resources across different environments, and because only a portion of the genome is expressed in any individual organism as a result of its specific developmental context and experience, what is actually realized during the course of individual development represents only one of many possibilities. One conclusion to be drawn from this insight is that the origin of phenotypic traits and their variation can be traced to the process of development. In this conceptual overview, I briefly explore how recent efforts to integrate genetic, epigenetic, and environmental levels of analysis through a developmental lens is advancing our understanding of the generation of the stability and variability of phenotypic outcomes observed within and across generations. A growing body of evidence indicates that phenotypes are the outcomes of the whole developmental system, comprised of the organism, with its particular genetic and cellular make-up in its specific physical, biological, and social environments. I conclude that the emergent products of development are epigenetic, not just genetic, and evolutionary explanation cannot be complete without a developmental mode of analysis.

  16. Origins and evolution of the Etruscans' mtDNA.

    PubMed

    Ghirotto, Silvia; Tassi, Francesca; Fumagalli, Erica; Colonna, Vincenza; Sandionigi, Anna; Lari, Martina; Vai, Stefania; Petiti, Emmanuele; Corti, Giorgio; Rizzi, Ermanno; De Bellis, Gianluca; Caramelli, David; Barbujani, Guido

    2013-01-01

    The Etruscan culture is documented in Etruria, Central Italy, from the 8(th) to the 1(st) century BC. For more than 2,000 years there has been disagreement on the Etruscans' biological origins, whether local or in Anatolia. Genetic affinities with both Tuscan and Anatolian populations have been reported, but so far all attempts have failed to fit the Etruscans' and modern populations in the same genealogy. We extracted and typed the hypervariable region of mitochondrial DNA of 14 individuals buried in two Etruscan necropoleis, analyzing them along with other Etruscan and Medieval samples, and 4,910 contemporary individuals from the Mediterranean basin. Comparing ancient (30 Etruscans, 27 Medieval individuals) and modern DNA sequences (370 Tuscans), with the results of millions of computer simulations, we show that the Etruscans can be considered ancestral, with a high degree of confidence, to the current inhabitants of Casentino and Volterra, but not to the general contemporary population of the former Etruscan homeland. By further considering two Anatolian samples (35 and 123 individuals) we could estimate that the genetic links between Tuscany and Anatolia date back to at least 5,000 years ago, strongly suggesting that the Etruscan culture developed locally, and not as an immediate consequence of immigration from the Eastern Mediterranean shores.

  17. The principle of cooperation and life's origin and evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oro, J.; Armangue, G.; Mar, A.

    1986-01-01

    In simple terms a living entity is a negentropic system that replicates, mutates and evoluves. A number of suggestions have been made, such as directed panspermia, atmospheric photosynthesis, genetic overtaking from inorganic processes, etc., as alternative models to the accepted Oparin-Haldane-Urey model of the origin of life on Earth. This has probably occurred because in spite of tremendous advances in the prebiotic synthesis of biochemical compounds, the fundamental problem of the appearance of the first life--a primordial replicating cell-ancestral to all other forms of extant life, has remained elusive. This is indeed a reflection on the different fundamental nature of the problem involved. Regardless of which were the fundamental processes which occurred on the primitive Earth, it has to end up with the fundamental characteristics of an ancestral protocell. The problem of the emergence of the first ancestral cell was one of synergistic macromolecular cooperation, as it has been discussed by authors recently (COSPAR XXV Plenary Meeting). An analogous situation must have occurred at the time of the appearance of the first eucaryotic organism. Procaryotic life appeared probably during the first 600 million years of Earth history when the Earth was sufficiently cool and continually bombarded (in the late accretion period) by comets and minor bodies of the solar system, when the sea had not yet acquired its present form.

  18. Evolution of striated muscle: jellyfish and the origin of triploblasty.

    PubMed

    Seipel, Katja; Schmid, Volker

    2005-06-01

    The larval and polyp stages of extant Cnidaria are bi-layered with an absence of mesoderm and its differentiation products. This anatomy originally prompted the diploblast classification of the cnidarian phylum. The medusa stage, or jellyfish, however, has a more complex anatomy characterized by a swimming bell with a well-developed striated muscle layer. Based on developmental histology of the hydrozoan medusa this muscle derives from the entocodon, a mesoderm-like third cell layer established at the onset of medusa formation. According to recent molecular studies cnidarian homologs to bilaterian mesoderm and myogenic regulators are expressed in the larval and polyp stages as well as in the entocodon and derived striated muscle. Moreover striated and smooth muscle cells may have evolved directly and independently from non-muscle cells as indicated by phylogenetic analysis of myosin heavy chain genes (MHC class II). To accommodate all evidences we propose that striated muscle-based locomotion coevolved with the nervous and digestive systems in a basic metazoan Bauplan from which the ancestors of the Ctenophora (comb jellyfish), Cnidaria (jellyfish and polyps), as well as the Bilateria are derived. We argue for a motile tri-layered cnidarian ancestor and a monophyletic descent of striated muscle in Cnidaria and Bilateria. As a consequence, diploblasty evolved secondarily in cnidarian larvae and polyps.

  19. Universal genome in the origin of metazoa: thoughts about evolution.

    PubMed

    Sherman, Michael

    2007-08-01

    Recent advances in paleontology, genome analysis, genetics and embryology raise a number of questions about the origin of Animal Kingdom. These questions include:(1) seemingly simultaneous appearance of diverse Metazoan phyla in Cambrian period, (2) similarities of genomes among Metazoan phyla of diverse complexity, (3) seemingly excessive complexity of genomes of lower taxons and (4) similar genetic switches of functionally similar but non-homologous developmental programs. Here I propose an experimentally testable hypothesis of Universal Genome that addresses these questions. According to this model, (a) the Universal Genome that encodes all major developmental programs essential for various phyla of Metazoa emerged in a unicellular or a primitive multicellular organism shortly before the Cambrian period; (b) The Metazoan phyla, all having similar genomes, are nonetheless so distinct because they utilize specific combinations of developmental programs. This model has two major predictions, first that a significant fraction of genetic information in lower taxons must be functionally useless but becomes useful in higher taxons, and second that one should be able to turn on in lower taxons some of the complex latent developmental programs, e.g., a program of eye development or antibody synthesis in sea urchin. An example of natural turning on of a complex latent program in a lower taxon is discussed.

  20. The principle of cooperation and life's origin and evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oro, J.; Armangue, G.; Mar, A.

    1986-01-01

    In simple terms a living entity is a negentropic system that replicates, mutates and evoluves. A number of suggestions have been made, such as directed panspermia, atmospheric photosynthesis, genetic overtaking from inorganic processes, etc., as alternative models to the accepted Oparin-Haldane-Urey model of the origin of life on Earth. This has probably occurred because in spite of tremendous advances in the prebiotic synthesis of biochemical compounds, the fundamental problem of the appearance of the first life--a primordial replicating cell-ancestral to all other forms of extant life, has remained elusive. This is indeed a reflection on the different fundamental nature of the problem involved. Regardless of which were the fundamental processes which occurred on the primitive Earth, it has to end up with the fundamental characteristics of an ancestral protocell. The problem of the emergence of the first ancestral cell was one of synergistic macromolecular cooperation, as it has been discussed by authors recently (COSPAR XXV Plenary Meeting). An analogous situation must have occurred at the time of the appearance of the first eucaryotic organism. Procaryotic life appeared probably during the first 600 million years of Earth history when the Earth was sufficiently cool and continually bombarded (in the late accretion period) by comets and minor bodies of the solar system, when the sea had not yet acquired its present form.

  1. Complexation and phase evolution at dimethylformamide-Ag(111) interfaces

    DOE PAGES

    Song, Wentao; Leung, Kevin; Shao, Qian; ...

    2016-09-15

    The interaction of solvent molecules with metallic surfaces impacts many interfacial chemical processes. We investigate the chemical and structure evolution that follows adsorption of the polar solvent dimethylformamide (DMF) on Ag(111). An Ag(DMF)2 coordination complex forms spontaneously by DMF etching of Ag(111), yielding mixed films of the complexes and DMF. Utilizing ultrahigh vacuum scanning tunneling microscopy (UHV-STM), in combination with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and density functional theory (DFT) computations, we map monolayer phases from the 2-D gas regime, consisting of a binary mixture of DMF and Ag(DMF)2, through the saturation monolayer limit, in which these two chemical species phasemore » separate into ordered islands. Structural models for the near-square DMF phase and the chain-like Ag(DMF)2 phase are presented and supported by DFT computation. Interface evolution is summarized in a surface pressure-composition phase diagram, which allows structure prediction over arbitrary experimental conditions. In conclusion, this work reveals new surface coordination chemistry for an important electrolyte-electrode system, and illustrates how surface pressure can be used to tune monolayer phases.« less

  2. Origin and Evolution of Dengue Virus Type 3 in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Romero, Hector; Nogueira, Rita Maria Ribeiro

    2012-01-01

    The incidence of dengue fever and dengue hemorrhagic fever in Brazil experienced a significant increase since the emergence of dengue virus type-3 (DENV-3) at the early 2000s. Despite the major public health concerns, there have been very few studies of the molecular epidemiology and time-scale of this DENV lineage in Brazil. In this study, we investigated the origin and dispersion dynamics of DENV-3 genotype III in Brazil by examining a large number (n = 107) of E gene sequences sampled between 2001 and 2009 from diverse Brazilian regions. These Brazilian sequences were combined with 457 DENV-3 genotype III E gene sequences from 29 countries around the world. Our phylogenetic analysis reveals that there have been at least four introductions of the DENV-3 genotype III in Brazil, as signified by the presence of four phylogenetically distinct lineages. Three lineages (BR-I, BR-II, and BR-III) were probably imported from the Lesser Antilles (Caribbean), while the fourth one (BR-IV) was probably introduced from Colombia or Venezuela. While lineages BR-I and BR-II succeeded in getting established and disseminated in Brazil and other countries from the Southern Cone, lineages BR-III and BR-IV were only detected in one single individual each from the North region. The phylogeographic analysis indicates that DENV-3 lineages BR-I and BR-II were most likely introduced into Brazil through the Southeast and North regions around 1999 (95% HPD: 1998–2000) and 2001 (95% HPD: 2000–2002), respectively. These findings show that importation of DENV-3 lineages from the Caribbean islands into Brazil seems to be relatively frequent. Our study further suggests that the North and Southeast Brazilian regions were the most important hubs of introduction and spread of DENV-3 lineages and deserve an intense epidemiological surveillance. PMID:22970331

  3. Bladed Terrain on Pluto: Possible Origins and Evolutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Jeffrey M.; Howard, Alan D.; Umurhan, Orkan M.; White, Oliver; Schenk, Paul M.; Beyer, Ross A.; McKinnon, William B.; Spencer, John R.; Singer, Kelsi N.; Grundy, William M.; Nimmo, Francis; Young, Leslie; Stern, S. Alan; Weaver, Harold A.; Olkin, Catherine B.; Ennico, Kimberly; Collins, Geoffrey; New Horizons Science Team

    2016-10-01

    Pluto's Bladed Terrain (centered roughly 20°N, 225°E) covers the flanks and crests of the informally named Tartarus Dorsa with numerous roughly aligned blade-like ridges oriented ~North-South; it may also stretch considerably farther east onto the non-close approach hemisphere but that inference is tentative. Individual ridges are typically several hundred meters high, and are spaced 5 to 10 km crest to crest, separated by V-shaped valleys. Many ridges merge at acute angles to form Y-shape junctions in plan view. The principle composition of the blades themselves we suspect is methane or a methane-rich mixture. (Methane is spectroscopically strongly observed on the optical surfaces of blades.) Nitrogen ice is very probably too soft to support their topography. Cemented mixtures of volatile and non-volatile ices may also provide a degradable but relief supporting "bedrock" for the blades, perhaps analogous to Callisto. Currently we are considering several hypotheses for the origins of the deposit from which Bladed Terrain has evolved, including aeolian disposition, atmospheric condensation, updoming and exhumation, volcanic intrusions or extrusions, crystal growth, among others. We are reviewing several processes as candidate creators or sculptors of the blades. Perhaps they are primary depositional patterns such as dunes, or differential condensation patterns (like on Callisto), or fissure extrusions. Or alternatively perhaps they are the consequence of differential erosion (such as sublimation erosion widening and deepening along cracks), variations in substrate properties, mass wasting into the subsurface, or sculpted by a combination of directional winds and solar isolation orientation. We will consider the roles of the long-term increasing solar flux and short periods of warm thick atmospheres. Hypotheses will be ordered based on observational constrains and modeling to be presented at the conference.

  4. Bladed Terrain on Pluto: Possible Origins and Evolutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Jeffrey M.; Howard, Alan D.; Umurhan, Orkan M.; White, Oliver L.; Schenk, Paul; Beyer, Ross A.; McKinnon, William B.; Spencer, John R.; Singer, Kelsi N.; Grundy, William N.; hide

    2016-01-01

    Pluto's Bladed Terrain (centered roughly 20 deg N, 225 deg E) covers the flanks and crests of the informally named Tartarus Dorsa with numerous roughly aligned blade-like ridges oriented approx. North-South; it may also stretch considerably farther east onto the non-close approach hemisphere but that inference is tentative. Individual ridges are typically several hundred meters high, and are spaced 5 to 10 km crest to crest, separated by V-shaped valleys. Many ridges merge at acute angles to form Y-shape junctions in plan view. The principle composition of the blades themselves we suspect is methane or a methane-rich mixture. (Methane is spectroscopically strongly observed on the optical surfaces of blades.) Nitrogen ice is very probably too soft to support their topography. Cemented mixtures of volatile and non-volatile ices may also provide a degradable but relief supporting "bedrock" for the blades, perhaps analogous to Callisto. Currently we are considering several hypotheses for the origins of the deposit from which Bladed Terrain has evolved, including aeolian disposition, atmospheric condensation, updoming and exhumation, volcanic intrusions or extrusions, crystal growth, among others. We are reviewing several processes as candidate creators or sculptors of the blades. Perhaps they are primary depositional patterns such as dunes, or differential condensation patterns (like on Callisto), or fissure extrusions. Or alternatively perhaps they are the consequence of differential erosion (such as sublimation erosion widening and deepening along cracks), variations in substrate properties, mass wasting into the subsurface, or sculpted by a combination of directional winds and solar isolation orientation. We will consider the roles of the long-term increasing solar flux and short periods of warm thick atmospheres. Hypotheses will be ordered based on observational constrains and modeling to be presented at the conference.

  5. Phosphotyrosine phosphatase R3 receptors: Origin, evolution and structural diversification.

    PubMed

    Chicote, Javier U; DeSalle, Rob; García-España, Antonio

    2017-01-01

    Subtype R3 phosphotyrosine phosphatase receptors (R3 RPTPs) are single-spanning membrane proteins characterized by a unique modular composition of extracellular fibronectin repeats and a single cytoplasmatic protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) domain. Vertebrate R3 RPTPs consist of five members: PTPRB, PTPRJ, PTPRH and PTPRO, which dephosphorylate tyrosine residues, and PTPRQ, which dephosphorylates phophoinositides. R3 RPTPs are considered novel therapeutic targets in several pathologies such as ear diseases, nephrotic syndromes and cancer. R3 RPTP vertebrate receptors, as well as their known invertebrate counterparts from animal models: PTP52F, PTP10D and PTP4e from the fruitfly Drosophila melanogaster and F44G4.8/DEP-1 from the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, participate in the regulation of cellular activities including cell growth and differentiation. Despite sharing structural and functional properties, the evolutionary relationships between vertebrate and invertebrate R3 RPTPs are not fully understood. Here we gathered R3 RPTPs from organisms covering a broad evolutionary distance, annotated their structure and analyzed their phylogenetic relationships. We show that R3 RPTPs (i) have probably originated in the common ancestor of animals (metazoans), (ii) are variants of a single ancestral gene in protostomes (arthropods, annelids and nematodes); (iii) a likely duplication of this ancestral gene in invertebrate deuterostomes (echinodermes, hemichordates and tunicates) generated the precursors of PTPRQ and PTPRB genes, and (iv) R3 RPTP groups are monophyletic in vertebrates and have specific conserved structural characteristics. These findings could have implications for the interpretation of past studies and provide a framework for future studies and functional analysis of this important family of proteins.

  6. Origin and evolution of dengue virus type 3 in Brazil.

    PubMed

    de Araújo, Josélio Maria Galvão; Bello, Gonzalo; Romero, Hector; Nogueira, Rita Maria Ribeiro

    2012-01-01

    The incidence of dengue fever and dengue hemorrhagic fever in Brazil experienced a significant increase since the emergence of dengue virus type-3 (DENV-3) at the early 2000s. Despite the major public health concerns, there have been very few studies of the molecular epidemiology and time-scale of this DENV lineage in Brazil. In this study, we investigated the origin and dispersion dynamics of DENV-3 genotype III in Brazil by examining a large number (n=107) of E gene sequences sampled between 2001 and 2009 from diverse Brazilian regions. These Brazilian sequences were combined with 457 DENV-3 genotype III E gene sequences from 29 countries around the world. Our phylogenetic analysis reveals that there have been at least four introductions of the DENV-3 genotype III in Brazil, as signified by the presence of four phylogenetically distinct lineages. Three lineages (BR-I, BR-II, and BR-III) were probably imported from the Lesser Antilles (Caribbean), while the fourth one (BR-IV) was probably introduced from Colombia or Venezuela. While lineages BR-I and BR-II succeeded in getting established and disseminated in Brazil and other countries from the Southern Cone, lineages BR-III and BR-IV were only detected in one single individual each from the North region. The phylogeographic analysis indicates that DENV-3 lineages BR-I and BR-II were most likely introduced into Brazil through the Southeast and North regions around 1999 (95% HPD: 1998-2000) and 2001 (95% HPD: 2000-2002), respectively. These findings show that importation of DENV-3 lineages from the Caribbean islands into Brazil seems to be relatively frequent. Our study further suggests that the North and Southeast Brazilian regions were the most important hubs of introduction and spread of DENV-3 lineages and deserve an intense epidemiological surveillance.

  7. Phosphotyrosine phosphatase R3 receptors: Origin, evolution and structural diversification

    PubMed Central

    Chicote, Javier U.; DeSalle, Rob; García-España, Antonio

    2017-01-01

    Subtype R3 phosphotyrosine phosphatase receptors (R3 RPTPs) are single-spanning membrane proteins characterized by a unique modular composition of extracellular fibronectin repeats and a single cytoplasmatic protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) domain. Vertebrate R3 RPTPs consist of five members: PTPRB, PTPRJ, PTPRH and PTPRO, which dephosphorylate tyrosine residues, and PTPRQ, which dephosphorylates phophoinositides. R3 RPTPs are considered novel therapeutic targets in several pathologies such as ear diseases, nephrotic syndromes and cancer. R3 RPTP vertebrate receptors, as well as their known invertebrate counterparts from animal models: PTP52F, PTP10D and PTP4e from the fruitfly Drosophila melanogaster and F44G4.8/DEP-1 from the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, participate in the regulation of cellular activities including cell growth and differentiation. Despite sharing structural and functional properties, the evolutionary relationships between vertebrate and invertebrate R3 RPTPs are not fully understood. Here we gathered R3 RPTPs from organisms covering a broad evolutionary distance, annotated their structure and analyzed their phylogenetic relationships. We show that R3 RPTPs (i) have probably originated in the common ancestor of animals (metazoans), (ii) are variants of a single ancestral gene in protostomes (arthropods, annelids and nematodes); (iii) a likely duplication of this ancestral gene in invertebrate deuterostomes (echinodermes, hemichordates and tunicates) generated the precursors of PTPRQ and PTPRB genes, and (iv) R3 RPTP groups are monophyletic in vertebrates and have specific conserved structural characteristics. These findings could have implications for the interpretation of past studies and provide a framework for future studies and functional analysis of this important family of proteins. PMID:28257417

  8. Bladed Terrain on Pluto: Possible Origins and Evolutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, J. M.; Howard, A. D.; Umurhan, O. M.; White, O. L.; Schenk, P.; Beyer, R. A.; McKinnon, W. B.; Spencer, J. R.; Singer, K. N.; Grundy, W. M.; Nimmo, F.; Young, L. A.; Stern, A.; Weaver, H. A., Jr.; Olkin, C.; Ennico Smith, K.; Collins, G. C.

    2016-12-01

    Pluto's Bladed Terrain (centered roughly 20°N, 225°E) covers the flanks and crests of the informally named Tartarus Dorsa with numerous roughly aligned blade-like ridges oriented North-South; it may also stretch considerably farther east onto the non-close approach hemisphere but that inference is tentative. Individual ridges are typically several hundred meters high, and are spaced 5 to 10 km crest to crest, separated by V-shaped valleys. Many ridges merge at acute angles to form Y-shape junctions in plan view. The principle composition of the blades themselves we suspect is methane or a methane-rich mixture. (Methane is spectroscopically strongly observed on the optical surfaces of blades.) Nitrogen ice is very probably too soft to support their topography. Cemented mixtures of volatile and non-volatile ices may also provide a degradable but relief supporting "bedrock" for the blades, perhaps analogous to Callisto. Currently we are considering several hypotheses for the origins of the deposit from which Bladed Terrain has evolved, including aeolian disposition, atmospheric condensation, updoming and exhumation, volcanic intrusions or extrusions, crystal growth, among others. We are reviewing several processes as candidate creators or sculptors of the blades. Perhaps they are primary depositional patterns such as dunes, or differential condensation patterns (like on Callisto), or fissure extrusions. Or alternatively perhaps they are the consequence of differential erosion (such as sublimation erosion widening and deepening along cracks), variations in substrate properties, mass wasting into the subsurface, or sculpted by a combination of directional winds and solar isolation orientation. We will consider the roles of the long-term increasing solar flux and short periods of warm thick atmospheres. Hypotheses will be ordered based on observational constrains and modeling to be presented at the conference.

  9. Mathematical Methods for the Analysis of Polycrystal Phase Evolutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zlokazov, V. B.; Bobrikov, I. A.; Balagurov, A. M.

    2016-02-01

    Two methods for an automatic analysis of the temporal evolution of a multiphase polycrystalline sample are described: The Upeak method, analyzing the spectra formally, i.e., carrying the peak search in them, and so describing the evolution in terms of spectral peaks, or having made additionally the autoindexing of the found peaks, preparing the crystallographic information for the Rietveld analysis. The Rietveld method, using an already available crystallographic information about the phase reflections, and describing the unit cell and atomic characteristics of each phase, and the mutual phase contributions to the total intensity for each item of the analyzed sequence of neutron scattering spectra. The paper describes difficulties of an automatic analysis securing the convergence of a non-linear and at the same time non-stationary fitting. The evolution of the polycrystalline compound CuFe2O4 with the temperature T in the range from 300 to 500 degrees Celsius illustrates the performance of the methods.

  10. Orbital Evolution of Mass-transferring Eccentric Binary Systems. I. Phase-dependent Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dosopoulou, Fani; Kalogera, Vicky

    2016-07-01

    Observations reveal that mass-transferring binary systems may have non-zero orbital eccentricities. The time evolution of the orbital semimajor axis and eccentricity of mass-transferring eccentric binary systems is an important part of binary evolution theory and has been widely studied. However, various different approaches to and assumptions on the subject have made the literature difficult to comprehend and comparisons between different orbital element time evolution equations not easy to make. Consequently, no self-consistent treatment of this phase has ever been included in binary population synthesis codes. In this paper, we present a general formalism to derive the time evolution equations of the binary orbital elements, treating mass loss and mass transfer as perturbations of the general two-body problem. We present the self-consistent form of the perturbing acceleration and phase-dependent time evolution equations for the orbital elements under different mass loss/transfer processes. First, we study the cases of isotropic and anisotropic wind mass loss. Then, we proceed with non-isotropic ejection and accretion in a conservative as well as a non-conservative manner for both point masses and extended bodies. We compare the derived equations with similar work in the literature and explain the existing discrepancies.

  11. Genome increase as a clock for the origin and evolution of life

    PubMed Central

    Sharov, Alexei A

    2006-01-01

    Background The size of non-redundant functional genome can be an indicator of biological complexity of living organisms. Several positive feedback mechanisms including gene cooperation and duplication with subsequent specialization may result in the exponential growth of biological complexity in macro-evolution. Results I propose a hypothesis that biological complexity increased exponentially during evolution. Regression of the logarithm of functional non-redundant genome size versus time of origin in major groups of organisms showed a 7.8-fold increase per 1 billion years, and hence the increase of complexity can be viewed as a clock of macro-evolution. A strong version of the exponential hypothesis is that the rate of complexity increase in early (pre-prokaryotic) evolution of life was at most the same (or even slower) than observed in the evolution of prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Conclusion The increase of functional non-redundant genome size in macro-evolution was consistent with the exponential hypothesis. If the strong exponential hypothesis is true, then the origin of life should be dated 10 billion years ago. Thus, the possibility of panspermia as a source of life on earth should be discussed on equal basis with alternative hypotheses of de-novo life origin. Panspermia may be proven if bacteria similar to terrestrial ones are found on other planets or satellites in the solar system. Reviewers This article was reviewed by Eugene V. Koonin, Chris Adami and Arcady Mushegian. PMID:16768805

  12. Origin and Evolution of Limestone Caves of Chhattisgarh and Orissa, India: Role of Geomorphic, Tectonic and Hydrological Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gautam, P. K.; Allu, N. C.; Ramesh, R.; Yadava, M. G.; Panigrahi, C. P.

    2014-12-01

    Carbonate rocks undergo karstic process and karst morphology is a key to understand the nature and genesis of caves. The primary energy source for the formation of karst landforms is hydrological cycle. Geomorphic features along with hydrological characteristics provide important information not only on karst formation but also climate and environmental conditions. In this paper, we present the tectonic and geomorphic features that played a role in evolution of caves located in Chhattisgarh and Orissa States of India. The geomorphic and tectonic aspects of Kotumsar, Kailash, and Gupteshwar caves are discussed in relation to the origin and evolution of these caves. Caves are located near the water falls. The area is folded and faulted along the Eastern Ghat Mobile Belt (EGMB) due to tectonic reactivation. Shaly-limestone beds exhibit vertical dipping near Gupteshwar cave, and steeply inclined near Kotumsar and Kailash caves. Indrāvati and Sabari/Kolab tributaries of the Godavari River drain the area. The landscape evolution and the origin of caves in the region is a multistage process, where the lithology, orogeny, fluvial action, and monsoon are the main agents, which is similar to the four state model (Ford and Ewers, 1978). The river basin evolution and regional tectonism also caused the initiation of karstification in the region. The evolution of caves is believed to have taken place in Pre-Pliocene under more humid conditions that coincided with the initiation of monsoon in India. Further, during the Quaternary wet-dry/cold-warm phases altered physical and chemical weathering of limestone rocks. Contrasting relief features of Bastar plateau have also helped the extensive cave formation in the region. The dissolution along weak planes initiated the openings of caves, further enlarged by geomorphic agents. Both monsoon and tectonics have caused fluctuations in water levels along river courses, which acted as active agents in evolution of caves.

  13. Independent origins and rapid evolution of the placenta in the fish genus Poeciliopsis.

    PubMed

    Reznick, David N; Mateos, Mariana; Springer, Mark S

    2002-11-01

    The evolution of complex organs is a source of controversy because they require the contributions of many adaptations to function properly. We argue that placentas are complex, that they have evolved multiple times in Poeciliopsis, and that there are closely related sister taxa that have either no placentas or intermediate stages in the evolution of a placenta. Furthermore, placentas can evolve in 750,000 years or less, on the same time scale as suggested by theoretical calculations for the evolution of complex eyes. Independent origins of such complexity, accompanied by sister taxa that either lack or have intermediate stages in the evolution of the trait, present an opportunity to study the evolution of novelty and complexity from a comparative, evolutionary perspective.

  14. Origin and evolution of Sariñena Lake (central Ebro Basin): A piping-based model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castañeda, Carmen; Javier Gracia, F.; Rodríguez-Ochoa, Rafael; Zarroca, Mario; Roqué, Carles; Linares, Rogelio; Desir, Gloria

    2017-08-01

    The origin and nature of the numerous lakes in the central Ebro Basin have been interpreted according to the prevailing arid or semiarid conditions, the easily-eroded materials and the solubility of the gypsum- and/or carbonate-rich Tertiary/Cenozoic substratum, involving important dissolution (karstic) and/or aeolian deflation. However, the origin of Sariñena Lake, the largest in the central Ebro Basin, remains unknown since the typical lake-generating processes in the region are not applicable. This work provides significant clues to the genesis and evolution of Sariñena Lake in a regional context. The combination of geomorphological mapping and high resolution LiDAR data together with sedimentological observations, the characterisation of soils and sediments around the lake, and the application of high-resolution geophysical techniques suggest that piping is the major genetic process driving the evolution of the Sariñena depression and lake. Field evidence demonstrates that piping is, at present, the most important erosive process in the region, generating significant collapse and surface lowering. Sariñena Lake is located within a deep endorheic depression excavated from Na-rich Tertiary materials. This work hypothesises that once an early, fluvially-originated palustrine area had developed, the progressive lowering of the regional water table linked to regional fluvial incision favoured the establishment of a hydrological gradient high enough to trigger piping processes within the claystones and siltstones underlying the original palustrine area. The Quaternary evolution of the Sariñena lacustrine basin was then controlled by successive water table fluctuations, linked to different phases of incision and alluvial deposition in the surrounding fluvial systems. All the evidence supporting a piping-related origin for this lake, together with examples of lakes generated by similar processes in different contexts, is used to propose a new genetic type of

  15. On the microscopic origin of the temperature evolution of isosteric heat for methane adsorption on graphite.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lumeng; Zhang, Han; Do, D D; Nicholson, D; Liu, Junjie

    2017-10-02

    Understanding methane adsorption is fundamental to understanding gas storage and gas separation technologies. Detailed analyses of methane adsorption on non-porous substrates are pivotal for understanding the intrinsic interactions between the methane molecule and the adsorbent. In this paper, we particularly address the isosteric heat, which is a crucial parameter that characterizes the energetics of such systems. We have used grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations to study methane adsorption on graphite over a range of temperatures (from 50 K to 110 K). Our simulation results show good agreement with experimental data for the 2D phase transition, the 2D triple and critical points in the first layer obtained from low energy electron diffraction, neutron scattering and heat capacity measurements. On the basis of this agreement, we present a detailed microscopic picture of isosteric heat and its evolution with temperature. Our results show that the origin of the cusp and spike in the isosteric heat curve and their shift with temperature are associated with the balance of entropic and enthalpic contributions between the first and second layer.

  16. Unresolved problems on the origin and early evolution of land plants.

    PubMed

    Bennici, Andrea

    2007-01-01

    The origin of land plants or embryophytes from the Charophyceae is generally accepted today by the botanists. In fact, numerous morphological, cytological, ultrastructural, biochemical and molecular characters are shared in these organisms. A fundamental problem is still constituted by the evolution of the sporophyte, i.e. the appearance of two different phase cycles (gametophyte/sporophyte alternance), although two theories ("antithetic" and "homologous") try to explain this evolutionary event.However, another phylogenetic dilemma is represented, in my opinion, either by the formation of bryophytes or by the transition from these first land plants to the pteridophytes, considering them at whole organism level. The bryophyte gametophyte is the most elaborate of the land plants. It presents several complex characters, principally the growth developmental form, the appearance of multicellular sex organs, antheridia and archegonia. Also the sporophyte shows a complicated structure that is not found in the other land plants or tracheophytes. The sporangium, in particular, exhibits some intricate morphological traits such as the peristome of true mosses for spore dispersion, the elaters of liverworts and the indeterminate growth in the hornworts. The pteridophytes are represented especially by their dominant sporophyte. This latter has the capacity to produce multiple sporangia and, in many cases, two kinds of spores which develop in male and female gametophyte (heterosporous pteridophytes). Another important characteristic of this sporophyte is its ability to become independent of the gametophyte. However, one of the most innovative character is the formation of true vascular elements (xylem and phloem). All these very large evolutionary jumps are discussed on the basis of the phyletic gradualistic neo-Darwinian theory and the punctuated equilibrium theory of Eldredge and Gould. In this context other genetic evolutionary mechanisms are also considered.Nevertheless, the

  17. The 1st Symposium on Chemical Evolution and the Origin and Evolution of Life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Devincenzi, D. L. (Editor); Pleasant, L. G. (Editor)

    1982-01-01

    This symposium provided an opportunity for all NASA Exobiology principal investigators to present their most recent research in a scientific meeting forum. Papers were presented in the following exobiology areas: extraterrestrial chemistry primitive earth, information transfer, solar system exploration, planetary protection, geological record, and early biological evolution.

  18. A phylogenomic data-driven exploration of viral origins and evolution

    PubMed Central

    Nasir, Arshan; Caetano-Anollés, Gustavo

    2015-01-01

    The origin of viruses remains mysterious because of their diverse and patchy molecular and functional makeup. Although numerous hypotheses have attempted to explain viral origins, none is backed by substantive data. We take full advantage of the wealth of available protein structural and functional data to explore the evolution of the proteomic makeup of thousands of cells and viruses. Despite the extremely reduced nature of viral proteomes, we established an ancient origin of the “viral supergroup” and the existence of widespread episodes of horizontal transfer of genetic information. Viruses harboring different replicon types and infecting distantly related hosts shared many metabolic and informational protein structural domains of ancient origin that were also widespread in cellular proteomes. Phylogenomic analysis uncovered a universal tree of life and revealed that modern viruses reduced from multiple ancient cells that harbored segmented RNA genomes and coexisted with the ancestors of modern cells. The model for the origin and evolution of viruses and cells is backed by strong genomic and structural evidence and can be reconciled with existing models of viral evolution if one considers viruses to have originated from ancient cells and not from modern counterparts. PMID:26601271

  19. Complex quantum network geometries: Evolution and phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianconi, Ginestra; Rahmede, Christoph; Wu, Zhihao

    2015-08-01

    Networks are topological and geometric structures used to describe systems as different as the Internet, the brain, or the quantum structure of space-time. Here we define complex quantum network geometries, describing the underlying structure of growing simplicial 2-complexes, i.e., simplicial complexes formed by triangles. These networks are geometric networks with energies of the links that grow according to a nonequilibrium dynamics. The evolution in time of the geometric networks is a classical evolution describing a given path of a path integral defining the evolution of quantum network states. The quantum network states are characterized by quantum occupation numbers that can be mapped, respectively, to the nodes, links, and triangles incident to each link of the network. We call the geometric networks describing the evolution of quantum network states the quantum geometric networks. The quantum geometric networks have many properties common to complex networks, including small-world property, high clustering coefficient, high modularity, and scale-free degree distribution. Moreover, they can be distinguished between the Fermi-Dirac network and the Bose-Einstein network obeying, respectively, the Fermi-Dirac and Bose-Einstein statistics. We show that these networks can undergo structural phase transitions where the geometrical properties of the networks change drastically. Finally, we comment on the relation between quantum complex network geometries, spin networks, and triangulations.

  20. Origin and evolution of metabolic sub-cellular compartmentalization in eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Gabaldón, Toni; Pittis, Alexandros A

    2015-12-01

    A high level of subcellular compartmentalization is a hallmark of eukaryotic cells. This intricate internal organization was present already in the common ancestor of all extant eukaryotes, and the determination of the origins and early evolution of the different organelles remains largely elusive. Organellar proteomes are determined through regulated pathways that target proteins produced in the cytosol to their final subcellular destinations. This internal sorting of proteins can vary across different physiological conditions, cell types and lineages. Evolutionary retargeting - the alteration of a subcellular localization of a protein in the course of evolution - has been rampant in eukaryotes and involves any possible combination of organelles. This fact adds another layer of difficulty to the reconstruction of the origins and evolution of organelles. In this review we discuss current themes in relation to the origin and evolution of organellar proteomes. Throughout the text, a special focus is set on the evolution of mitochondrial and peroxisomal proteomes, which are two organelles for which extensive proteomic and evolutionary studies have been performed.

  1. Origin and evolution of metabolic sub-cellular compartmentalization in eukaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Gabaldón, Toni; Pittis, Alexandros A.

    2015-01-01

    A high level of subcellular compartmentalization is a hallmark of eukaryotic cells. This intricate internal organization was present already in the common ancestor of all extant eukaryotes, and the determination of the origins and early evolution of the different organelles remains largely elusive. Organellar proteomes are determined through regulated pathways that target proteins produced in the cytosol to their final subcellular destinations. This internal sorting of proteins can vary across different physiological conditions, cell types and lineages. Evolutionary retargeting – the alteration of a subcellular localization of a protein in the course of evolution – has been rampant in eukaryotes and involves any possible combination of organelles. This fact adds another layer of difficulty to the reconstruction of the origins and evolution of organelles. In this review we discuss current themes in relation to the origin and evolution of organellar proteomes. Throughout the text, a special focus is set on the evolution of mitochondrial and peroxisomal proteomes, which are two organelles for which extensive proteomic and evolutionary studies have been performed. PMID:25869000

  2. Evolution of electron phase space holes in inhomogeneous magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzichev, I. V.; Vasko, I. Y.; Agapitov, O. V.; Mozer, F. S.; Artemyev, A. V.

    2017-03-01

    Electron phase space holes (EHs) are electrostatic solitary waves that are widely observed in the space plasma often permeated by inhomogeneous magnetic fields. Understanding of the EH evolution in inhomogeneous magnetic fields is critical for accurate interpretations of spacecraft data. To study this evolution, we use 1.5-D gyrokinetic electrostatic Vlasov code (magnetized electrons and immobile ions) with periodic boundary conditions. We find that EHs propagating into stronger (weaker) magnetic field are decelerated (accelerated) with deceleration (acceleration) rate dependent on the magnetic field gradient. Remarkably, decelerating EHs are reflected at the magnetic field dependent only on EH parameters (independent of the magnetic field gradient). A magnetic field inhomogeneity results in development of a net potential drop along EHs. Our simulations suggest that slow EHs recently observed in the plasma sheet boundary layer can appear due to braking of initially fast EHs by magnetic field gradients and that a large number of even fast EHs can contribute to macroscopic parallel potential drops.

  3. Brief Note on the Origins, Evolution, and Meaning of the Qualitative Research Concept "Thick Description"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ponterotto, Joseph G.

    2006-01-01

    The origins, cross-disciplinary evolution, and definition of "thick description" are reviewed. Despite its frequent use in the qualitative literature, the concept of "thick description" is often confusing to researchers at all levels. The roots of this confusion are explored and examples of "thick description" are provided. The article closes with…

  4. Chemical evolution and the origin of life: cumulative keyword subject index 1970-1986.

    PubMed

    Roy, A C; Powers, J V

    1990-01-01

    This cumulative subject index encompasses the subject indexes of the bibliographies on Chemical Evolution and the Origin of Life that were first published in 1970 and have continued through publication of the 1986 bibliography supplement. Early bibliographies focused on experimental and theoretical material dealing directly with the concepts of chemical evolution and the origin of life, excluding the broader areas of exobiology, biological evolution, and geochemistry. In recent years, these broader subject areas have also been incorporated as they appear in literature searches relating to chemical evolution and the origin of life, although direct attempts have not been made to compile all of the citations in these broad areas. The keyword subject indexes have also undergone an analogous change in scope. Compilers of earlier bibliographies used the most specific term available in producing the subject index. Compilers of recent bibliographies have used a number of broad terms relating to the overall subject content of each citation and specific terms where appropriate. The subject indexes of these 17 bibliographies have, in general, been cumulatively compiled exactly as they originally appeared. However, some changes have been made in an attempt to correct errors, combine terms, and provide more meaningful terms.

  5. Chemical evolution and the origin of life: cumulative keyword subject index 1970-1986

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roy, A. C.; Powers, J. V.; Rummel, J. D. (Principal Investigator)

    1990-01-01

    This cumulative subject index encompasses the subject indexes of the bibliographies on Chemical Evolution and the Origin of Life that were first published in 1970 and have continued through publication of the 1986 bibliography supplement. Early bibliographies focused on experimental and theoretical material dealing directly with the concepts of chemical evolution and the origin of life, excluding the broader areas of exobiology, biological evolution, and geochemistry. In recent years, these broader subject areas have also been incorporated as they appear in literature searches relating to chemical evolution and the origin of life, although direct attempts have not been made to compile all of the citations in these broad areas. The keyword subject indexes have also undergone an analogous change in scope. Compilers of earlier bibliographies used the most specific term available in producing the subject index. Compilers of recent bibliographies have used a number of broad terms relating to the overall subject content of each citation and specific terms where appropriate. The subject indexes of these 17 bibliographies have, in general, been cumulatively compiled exactly as they originally appeared. However, some changes have been made in an attempt to correct errors, combine terms, and provide more meaningful terms.

  6. Chemical evolution and the origin of life: cumulative keyword subject index 1970-1986

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roy, A. C.; Powers, J. V.; Rummel, J. D. (Principal Investigator)

    1990-01-01

    This cumulative subject index encompasses the subject indexes of the bibliographies on Chemical Evolution and the Origin of Life that were first published in 1970 and have continued through publication of the 1986 bibliography supplement. Early bibliographies focused on experimental and theoretical material dealing directly with the concepts of chemical evolution and the origin of life, excluding the broader areas of exobiology, biological evolution, and geochemistry. In recent years, these broader subject areas have also been incorporated as they appear in literature searches relating to chemical evolution and the origin of life, although direct attempts have not been made to compile all of the citations in these broad areas. The keyword subject indexes have also undergone an analogous change in scope. Compilers of earlier bibliographies used the most specific term available in producing the subject index. Compilers of recent bibliographies have used a number of broad terms relating to the overall subject content of each citation and specific terms where appropriate. The subject indexes of these 17 bibliographies have, in general, been cumulatively compiled exactly as they originally appeared. However, some changes have been made in an attempt to correct errors, combine terms, and provide more meaningful terms.

  7. Understanding Freedom of Speech in America: The Origin & Evolution of the 1st Amendment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnes, Judy

    In this booklet the content and implications of the First Amendment are analyzed. Historical origins of free speech from ancient Greece to England before the discovery of America, free speech in colonial America, and the Bill of Rights and its meaning for free speech are outlined. The evolution of the First Amendment is described, and the…

  8. First Steps in Eukaryogenesis: Physical Phenomena in the Origin and Evolution of Chromosome Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chela-Flores, Julian

    1998-04-01

    Our present understanding of the origin and evolution of chromosomes differs considerably from current understanding of the origin and evolution of the cell itself. Chromosome origins have been less prominent in research, as the emphasis has not shifted so far appreciably from the phenomenon of primeval nucleic acid encapsulation to that of the origin of gene organization, expression, and regulation. In this work we discuss some reasons why preliminary steps in this direction are being taken. We have been led to examine properties that have contributed to raise the ancestral prokaryotic programmes to a level where we can appreciate in eukaryotes a clear departure from earlier themes in the evolution of the cell from the last common ancestor. We shift our point of view from evolution of cell morphology to the point of view of the genes. In particular, we focus attention on possible physical bases for the way transmission of information has evolved in eukaryotes, namely, the inactivation of whole chromosomes. The special case of the inactivation of the X chromosome in mammals is discussed, paying particular attention to the physical process of the spread of X inactivation in monotremes (platypus and echidna). When experimental data is unavailable some theoretical analysis is possible based on the idea that in certain cases collective phenomena in genetics, rather than chemical detail, are better correlates of complex chemical processes.

  9. A Comparison of Manual and Computer Searches of the Chemical Evolution and Origin of Life Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gill, Elizabeth Deas

    Parallel machine and manual literature searches on the subject of chemical evolution and the origin of life were compared on six characteristics: (1) precision, (2) recall, (3) novelty, (4) uniqueness, (5) time cost per citation, and (6) dollar cost per citation. The manual search outperformed the machine on precision, novelty, uniqueness, and…

  10. [Human origin and evolution. A review of advances in paleoanthropology, comparative genetics, and evolutionary psychology].

    PubMed

    Markov, A V

    2009-01-01

    In his main work, "On the origin of species", Darwin has refrained from discusion of the origin of man; be only mentioned that his theory would "throw light" on this problem. This famous Darwin's phrase turned out to be one of the most succesful scientific predictions. In the present paper some of the most important recent adavnces in paleoanthroplogy, comparative genetics and evolutionary psychology are reviewed. These three disciplines currently contribute most to our knowledge of anthropogenesis. The review demonstrates that Darwin's ideas not only "threw light" on human origin and evolution; they provided a comprehensive framework for a great variety of studies concerning different aspects of anthropogenesis.

  11. Origins of evolution: non-acquired characters dominates over acquired characters in changing environment.

    PubMed

    Gaucherel, Cédric; Jensen, Henrik Jeldtoft

    2012-07-07

    Natural Selection is so ubiquitous that we never wonder how it appeared as the evolution rule driving Life. We usually wonder how Life appeared, and seldom do we make an explicit distinction between Life and natural selection. Here, we apply the evolution concept commonly used for studying Life to evolution itself. More precisely, we developed two models aiming at selecting among different evolution rules competing for their supremacy. We explored competition between acquired (AQ) versus non-acquired (NAQ) character inheritance. The first model is parsimonious and non-spatial, in order to understand relationships between environmental forcings and rule selection. The second model is spatially explicit and studies the adaptation differences between AQ and NAQ populations. We established that NAQ evolution rule is dominating in case of changing environment. Furthermore, we observed that a more adapted population better fits its environmental constraints, but fails in rapidly changing environments. NAQ principle and less adapted populations indeed act as a reservoir of traits that helps populations to survive in rapidly changing environments, such as the ones that probably Life experienced at its origins. Although perfectible, our modeling approaches will certainly help us to improve our understanding of origins of Life and Evolution, on Earth or elsewhere. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Microstructure evolution and densification of alumina in liquid phase sintering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Weimin

    The microstructure evolution and densification of alumina during liquid phase sintering were quantified. Quantification included the evolution of pore-size distribution, the redistribution of liquid phase, the densification kinetics, and the fraction of closed and open pores. The results revealed that the small and large pores were filled simultaneously. This is inconsistent with Shaw's model in which liquid fills preferentially the smaller low-coordination-number pores in order to reach a low-energy configuration. The results also recommended that the pressure build-up of the trapped gases in pores due to the closure of open pores might have a significantly negative contribution to the driving force, and consequently cause the termination of the densification of alumina. To demonstrate whether the trapped gases played an important role in the microstructure evolution and the densification of alumina during liquid phase sintering, the following two experiments have been conducted. First, alumina preforms containing artificial pores were penetrated by glass. The results indicated that the trapped gases in pores had a considerable influence on the pore filling process, and ultimately caused the termination of the densification of the alumina preforms. Second, alumina compacts containing different amount of glass were sintered in vacuum. The alumina compact containing 20 vol. % reached full density during vacuum sintering, indicating that the pressure build-up of the trapped gases in pores was the main factor causing the termination of the densification of alumina in the final stage of liquid phase sintering. The limiting relative densities of compacts were calculated theoretically on the basis of a comprehensive analysis of the variation of the capillary pressure and gas pressure in pores with pore size and pore number. The capillary pressure and gas pressure in alumina compact during liquid phase sintering were analyzed on the basis of the above theoretical models

  13. Phase nucleation and evolution mechanisms in heterogeneous solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udupa, Anirudh

    Phase nucleation and evolution is a problem of critical importance in many applications. As the length scales are reduced, it becomes increasingly important to consider interfacial and micro-structural effects that can be safely ignored at larger length scales owing to randomness. The theory of phase nucleation has been addressed usually by the classical nucleation theory, which was originally derived for single component fluid systems, after making an assumption of equilibrium. The criterion has not been rigorously derived for solids, which are far from equilibrium due to dissipation by multiple physical drivers. In this thesis, a thermodynamically sound nucleation criterion is derived for systems with multiple interacting physical phenomena and multiple dissipating mechanisms. This is done, using the tools of continuum mechanics, by determining the change in free energy upon the introduction of a new nucleus into the system. The developed theory is demonstrated to be a generalization of the classical nucleation theory (CNT). The developed theory is then applied to the problem of electromigration driven void nucleation, a serious reliability concern for the microelectronics industry. The void grows and eventually severs the line making the chip nonfunctional. There are two classes of theories at present in the electromigration literature to address the problem of void nucleation, the vacancy supersaturation theory and the entropic dissipation theory, both of which are empirical and based on intuition developed from experimental observations. When the developed theory was applied to the problem of electromigration, it was found to be consistent with the vacancy supersaturation theory, but provided the correct energetic quantity, the chemical potential, which has contribution from both the vacancy concentration as well as the hydrostatic stress. An experiment, consisting of electromigration tests on serpentine lines, was developed to validate the developed

  14. Influence of phase transformation on stress evolution during growth of metal thin films on silicon.

    PubMed

    Fillon, A; Abadias, G; Michel, A; Jaouen, C; Villechaise, P

    2010-03-05

    In situ stress measurements during two-dimensional growth of low mobility metal films on amorphous Si were used to demonstrate the impact of interface reactivity and phase transformation on stress evolution. Using Mo1-xSix films as examples, the results show that the tensile stress rise, which develops after the film has become crystalline, is correlated with an increase in lateral grain size. The origin of the tensile stress is attributed to the volume change resulting from the alloy crystallization, which occurs at a concentration-dependent critical thickness.

  15. Phase Evolution During the Carbothermic Reduction Process of Ilmenite Concentrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gou, Hai-Peng; Zhang, Guo-Hua; Chou, Kuo-Chih

    2014-09-01

    The phase evolution during the carbothermic reduction process of Panzhihua ilmenite concentrate was investigated under argon atmosphere. The Panzhihua ilmenite concentrate briquette with graphite powder was reduced at 1473 K, 1573 K, 1673 K, and 1773 K (1200 °C, 1300 °C, 1400 °C, and 1500 °C) respectively, with the molar ratios of C to FeTiO3 being 4:1 and 5:1. The phase transformation of the briquette reduced at different temperatures was investigated by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscope. During the carbothermic reduction process from 1473 K to 1773 K (1200 °C to 1500 °C), it was found that main phases were Fe, Ti3O5, Ti2O3, and TiC x O y . The lowest temperature for the generation of TiC x O y was 1573 K (1300 °C) for both kinds of briquettes with different C contents. The rate controlling step for the carbothermic reduction above 1573 K (1300 °C) obeyed the diffusion model. The reduction degree of the ilmenite was increased by increasing the temperature. With the increase of reaction temperature and reaction time, TiC x O y phase would be reduced to TiC phase.

  16. Phase Evolution During the Carbothermic Reduction Process of Ilmenite Concentrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gou, Hai-Peng; Zhang, Guo-Hua; Chou, Kuo-Chih

    2015-02-01

    The phase evolution during the carbothermic reduction process of Panzhihua ilmenite concentrate was investigated under argon atmosphere. The Panzhihua ilmenite concentrate briquette with graphite powder was reduced at 1473 K, 1573 K, 1673 K, and 1773 K (1200 °C, 1300 °C, 1400 °C, and 1500 °C) respectively, with the molar ratios of C to FeTiO3 being 4:1 and 5:1. The phase transformation of the briquette reduced at different temperatures was investigated by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscope. During the carbothermic reduction process from 1473 K to 1773 K (1200 °C to 1500 °C), it was found that main phases were Fe, Ti3O5, Ti2O3, and TiC x O y . The lowest temperature for the generation of TiC x O y was 1573 K (1300 °C) for both kinds of briquettes with different C contents. The rate controlling step for the carbothermic reduction above 1573 K (1300 °C) obeyed the diffusion model. The reduction degree of the ilmenite was increased by increasing the temperature. With the increase of reaction temperature and reaction time, TiC x O y phase would be reduced to TiC phase.

  17. Introduction to ‘Origin and evolution of the nervous system’

    PubMed Central

    Strausfeld, Nicholas J.; Hirth, Frank

    2015-01-01

    In 1665, Robert Hooke demonstrated in Micrographia the power of the microscope and comparative observations, one of which revealed similarities between the arthropod and vertebrate eyes. Utilizing comparative observations, Saint-Hilaire in 1822 was the first to propose that the ventral nervous system of arthropods corresponds to the dorsal nervous system of vertebrates. Since then, studies on the origin and evolution of the nervous system have become inseparable from studies about Metazoan origins and the origins of organ systems. The advent of genome sequence data and, in turn, phylogenomics and phylogenetics have refined cladistics and expanded our understanding of Metazoan phylogeny. However, the origin and evolution of the nervous system is still obscure and many questions and problems remain. A recurrent problem is whether and to what extent sequence data provide reliable guidance for comparisons across phyla. Are genetic data congruent with the geological fossil records? How can we reconcile evolved character loss with phylogenomic records? And how informative are genetic data in relation to the specification of nervous system morphologies? These provide some of the background and context for a Royal Society meeting to discuss new data and concepts that might achieve insights into the origin and evolution of brains and nervous systems. PMID:26554035

  18. Dynamical Phase Transition in a Model for Evolution with Migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waclaw, Bartłomiej; Allen, Rosalind J.; Evans, Martin R.

    2010-12-01

    We study a simple quasispecies model for evolution in two different habitats, with different fitness landscapes, coupled through one-way migration. Our key finding is a dynamical phase transition at a critical value of the migration rate, at which the time to reach the steady state diverges. The genetic composition of the population is qualitatively different above and below the transition. Using results from localization theory, we show that the critical migration rate may be very small—demonstrating that evolutionary outcomes can be very sensitive to even a small amount of migration.

  19. Phase coexistence and pressure-temperature phase evolution of VO2(A ) nanorods near the semiconductor-semiconductor transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samanta, Sudeshna; Li, Quanjun; Cheng, Benyuan; Huang, Yanwei; Pei, Cuiying; Wang, Qinglin; Ma, Yanzhang; Wang, Lin

    2017-01-01

    A comprehensive understanding of the physical origins of the phase transition behaviors of transition metal oxides is still complex due to the interplay among competing interactions of comparable strengths tuning their nature. Widespread interest in such phase transitions has motivated explorations of nanocrystalline vanadium dioxide (VO2) in various forms and a long-running debate persists over the roles played by electron-electron correlation with lattice distortion. External stimuli like pressure and temperature have strong effects on the appearance, stability, and spacial distribution of the high-resistive (HR) and low-resistive (LR) phases accompanying their structural modification. Our comprehensive experiments establish the pressure-induced and thermally driven evolution of phase coexistence in VO2(A ) nanorods. Our experimental evidence supports coexisting HR and LR phases, where compression suppressed coexistence at ˜7 GPa, followed by a semiconductor-semiconductor transition at around ˜10 GPa with the absence of pressure-induced metallization. X-ray diffraction revealed lattice distortion with local microscopic strain inhomogeneity in the nanorods, without any discontinuity in the pressure-volume data. We further investigated the vibrational modes and relaxations of the samples related to their thermal expansions. We also found that the pressure-dependent hierarchy of microstructural densification contributed significantly to the resulting transport properties.

  20. Perspective: is human cultural evolution Darwinian? Evidence reviewed from the perspective of the Origin of Species.

    PubMed

    Mesoudi, Alex; Whiten, Andrew; Laland, Kevin N

    2004-01-01

    The claim that human culture evolves through the differential adoption of cultural variants, in a manner analogous to the evolution of biological species, has been greeted with much resistance and confusion. Here we demonstrate that as compelling a case can now be made that cultural evolution has key Darwinian properties, as Darwin himself presented for biological evolution in The Origin of Species. Culture is shown to exhibit variation, competition, inheritance, and the accumulation of successive cultural modifications over time. Adaptation, convergence, and the loss or change of function can also be identified in culture. Just as Darwin knew nothing of genes or particulate inheritance, a case for Darwinian cultural evolution can be made irrespective of whether unitary cultural replicators exist or whether cultural transmission mechanisms are well understood.

  1. Phase-space evolution of x-ray coherence in phase-sensitive imaging.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xizeng; Liu, Hong

    2008-08-01

    X-ray coherence evolution in the imaging process plays a key role for x-ray phase-sensitive imaging. In this work we present a phase-space formulation for the phase-sensitive imaging. The theory is reformulated in terms of the cross-spectral density and associated Wigner distribution. The phase-space formulation enables an explicit and quantitative account of partial coherence effects on phase-sensitive imaging. The presented formulas for x-ray spectral density at the detector can be used for performing accurate phase retrieval and optimizing the phase-contrast visibility. The concept of phase-space shearing length derived from this phase-space formulation clarifies the spatial coherence requirement for phase-sensitive imaging with incoherent sources. The theory has been applied to x-ray Talbot interferometric imaging as well. The peak coherence condition derived reveals new insights into three-grating-based Talbot-interferometric imaging and gratings-based x-ray dark-field imaging.

  2. SPHEREx: Understanding the Origin and Evolution of Galaxies Through the Extragalactic Background Light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zemcov, Michael B.; SPHEREx Science Team

    2016-01-01

    The near IR extragalactic background light (EBL) encodes the integrated light production over cosmic history, so traces the total emission from all galaxies along the line of sight up to ancient first-light objects present during the epoch of reionization (EOR). The EBL can be constrained both through direct photometric measurements and through measurements of anisotropies in the EBL which take advantage of the fact that extragalactic populations produce fluctuations with distinct spatial and spectral characteristics from local foregrounds. Because the amplitude of the linear clustering signal is proportional to the total photon emission, large-scale EBL anisotropies are an important tracer of star formation history. In particular, EBL anisotropies trace the underlying clustering of faint emission sources, such as low mass objects present during the EOR, dwarf galaxies, and intra-halo light (IHL), all of which are components not readily detected in point source surveys. The fluctuation amplitude measured independently by a number of recent experiments exceeds that expected from the large-scale clustering of known galaxy populations, indicating the presence of a large integrated brightness from these faint and diffuse components. SPHEREx, a mission in NASA's Small Explorer (SMEX) program that was selected for Phase A in July 2015, is an all-sky survey satellite designed to address all three science goals in NASA's astrophysics division: to probe the origin and destiny of our Universe; to explore whether planets around other stars could harbor life; and to explore the origin and evolution of galaxies. SPHEREx will produce extremely deep maps of the ~200 square degrees around the celestial poles in lambda/d lambda~40 bins. These will be ideal for EBL anisotropy measurements, either by averaging into broad spectral bands, or as a possible science enhancement option, by performing tomography of cosmic large scale structure using line tracers such as Lya, Ha, Hb, O

  3. Evolution of angiosperm seed disperser mutualisms: the timing of origins and their consequences for coevolutionary interactions between angiosperms and frugivores.

    PubMed

    Eriksson, Ove

    2016-02-01

    The origins of interactions between angiosperms and fruit-eating seed dispersers have attracted much attention following a seminal paper on this topic by Tiffney (1984). This review synthesizes evidence pertaining to key events during the evolution of angiosperm-frugivore interactions and suggests some implications of this evidence for interpretations of angiosperm-frugivore coevolution. The most important conclusions are: (i) the diversification of angiosperm seed size and fleshy fruits commenced around 80 million years ago (Mya). The diversity of seed sizes, fruit sizes and fruit types peaked in the Eocene around 55 to 50 Mya. During this first phase of the interaction, angiosperms and animals evolving frugivory expanded into niche space not previously utilized by these groups, as frugivores and previously not existing fruit traits appeared. From the Eocene until the present, angiosperm-frugivore interactions have occurred within a broad frame of existing niche space, as defined by fruit traits and frugivory, motivating a separation of the angiosperm-frugivore interactions into two phases, before and after the peak in the early Eocene. (ii) The extinct multituberculates were probably the most important frugivores during the early radiation phase of angiosperm seeds and fleshy fruits. Primates and rodents are likely to have been important in the latter part of this first phase. (iii) Flying frugivores, birds and bats, evolved during the second phase, mainly during the Oligocene and Miocene, thus exploiting an existing diversity of fleshy fruits. (iv) A drastic climate shift around the Eocene-Oligocene boundary (around 34 Mya) resulted in more semi-open woodland vegetation, creating patchily occurring food resources for frugivores. This promoted evolution of a 'flying frugivore niche' exploited by birds and bats. In particular, passerines became a dominant frugivore group worldwide. (v) Fleshy fruits evolved at numerous occasions in many angiosperm families

  4. Exploration of the origin and evolution of globular proteins by mRNA display.

    PubMed

    Yanagawa, Hiroshi

    2013-06-04

    The questions of how proteins first appeared on the primitive earth and how they evolved into functional proteins are fundamental. If we can understand the origins and evolution of proteins, we should be able to create novel functional proteins. Evolutionary protein engineering or directed protein evolution has been used to create artificial proteins with novel functions by repeated mutation, selection, and amplification, mimicking Darwinian evolution in the laboratory. For this purpose, display technology, such as mRNA display, to link genotype with phenotype is extremely important. Here I focus on three hypotheses regarding the origin and evolution of proteins. First, Eigen's GNC hypothesis proposes that the early genetic code began from the directionless codons GNC and GNN, where N denotes U, C, A, or G. Second, Ohno's gene duplication theory proposes that gene duplication produces two functionally redundant, paralogous genes, of which one retains the original function, leaving the second free to evolve adaptively. Third, Gilbert's exon shuffling theory proposes that new genes are formed through shuffling of small segments corresponding to exons. I then review various experimental approaches to evolutionary protein engineering using mRNA display, such as the creation of functional proteins from random sequences with limited sets of amino acids, randomly mutated folded proteins, and block-shuffled sequence proteins, and I discuss the results in relation to these three hypotheses.

  5. Structure evolution and phase transition in odd-mass nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bucurescu, D.; Zamfir, N. V.

    2017-01-01

    The evolution of level structures due to the unique parity orbitals g9 /2, h11 /2, and i13 /2 in odd-mass nuclei from Zn to Am is studied within a unified framework, by correlations between ratios of excitation energies in both odd-mass nuclei and their even-even core nuclei. These plots reveal regularities that can be understood in terms of the particle-plus-rotor model, as evolutions along its three limiting coupling schemes: weak coupling, decoupling, and strong coupling, and transitions between them. Peculiar transitions between the decoupling and strong coupling schemes are found in both i13 /2 structures of neutron-odd nuclei and h11 /2 structures of proton-odd nuclei, at neutron numbers around 90 and 70, respectively. These are correlated with the critical shape phase transitions from vibrator to rotor from the even-even nuclei in the same regions and are characterized as critical phase transitions too. This behavior is corroborated with a nonmonotonic behavior of the differential variation of the two-neutron separation energies in the same nuclear regions.

  6. Fabrication, chemical composition change and phase evolution of biomorphic hydroxyapatite.

    PubMed

    Qian, Junmin; Kang, Yahong; Zhang, Wei; Li, Zhe

    2008-11-01

    Biomorphous, highly porous hydroxyapatite (HA) ceramics have been prepared by a combination of a novel biotemplating process and a sol-gel method, using natural plants like cane and pine as biotemplates. A HA sol was first synthesized from triethylphosphate and calcium nitrate used as the phosphorus and calcium precursors, respectively, and infiltrated into the biotemplates, and subsequently they were sintered at elevated temperatures to obtain porous HA ceramics. The microstructural changes, phase and chemical composition evolutions during the biotemplate-to-HA conversion were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), and Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. The XRD and FT-IR analysis revealed that the dominant phase of the product was HA, which contained a small amount of mixed A/B-type carbonated HA, closely resembling that of human bone apatite. Moreover, the appearance of a small amount of secondary phase CaCO(3) seemed unavoidable. The HA was not transformed to the other calcium phosphate phases up to 1400 degrees C, but it contained a trace amount of CaO when sintered at above 1100 degrees C. The possible transformation mechanism was proposed. The SEM observation and mechanical property test showed that as-produced HA ceramics retained the macro-/micro-porous structures of the biotemplates with high precision, and possessed acceptable mechanical strength, which is suggested to be potential scaffolds for bone tissue engineering.

  7. Morphology and crystal phase evolution of GeO 2 in liquid phase deposition process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Chengbin; Sun, Wei; Wang, Wei; Li, Yi; Chu, Junhao

    2012-01-01

    Morphology and crystal phase evolution of GeO 2 in liquid phase deposition (LPD) process is investigated. Rod-like solid phases precipitate out of solution ahead of truncated cube-like phases. SEM, XRD and TEM analyses reveal that the two sorts of solid phases are tetragonal GeO 2 and hexagonal GeO 2, respectively. The tetragonal GeO 2 phases start to experience a re-dissolving process as soon as the hexagonal phases come into being. The prior precipitation of the rod-like phase arises from a relatively low solute saturation of tetragonal GeO 2. Fast growth of a tetragonal GeO 2 phase along [111] direction leads to development of a rod-like shape. The re-dissolving phenomenon does not agree with the classic growth kinetics of crystals but is strongly favored by our calculations based on thermodynamics. The GeO 2 solutes are released in a fluctuant way by germanate ions, which promotes the occurrence of the re-dissolution phenomenon. The current researches open a door for room-temperature LPD growth of not only the hexagonal GeO 2 particles and film but also the one-dimensional tetragonal GeO 2 product.

  8. Tempo and mode of performance evolution across multiple independent origins of adhesive toe pads in lizards.

    PubMed

    Hagey, Travis J; Uyeda, Josef C; Crandell, Kristen E; Cheney, Jorn A; Autumn, Kellar; Harmon, Luke J

    2017-07-26

    Understanding macroevolutionary dynamics of trait evolution is an important endeavor in evolutionary biology. Ecological opportunity can liberate a trait as it diversifies through trait space, while genetic and selective constraints can limit diversification. While many studies have examined the dynamics of morphological traits, diverse morphological traits may yield the same or similar performance and as performance is often more proximately the target of selection, examining only morphology may give an incomplete understanding of evolutionary dynamics. Here, we ask whether convergent evolution of pad-bearing lizards has followed similar evolutionary dynamics, or whether independent origins are accompanied by unique constraints and selective pressures over macroevolutionary time. We hypothesized that geckos and anoles each have unique evolutionary tempos and modes. Using performance data from 59 species, we modified Brownian motion (BM) and Ornstein-Uhlenbeck (OU) models to account for repeated origins estimated using Bayesian ancestral state reconstructions. We discovered that adhesive performance in geckos evolved in a fashion consistent with Brownian motion with a trend, whereas anoles evolved in bounded performance space consistent with more constrained evolution (an Ornstein-Uhlenbeck model). Our results suggest that convergent phenotypes can have quite distinctive evolutionary patterns, likely as a result of idiosyncratic constraints or ecological opportunities. © 2017 The Author(s). Evolution © 2017 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  9. The Evolution of Stellar Rotation and the Origin of Be Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsuta, Yutaka; Okazaki, Atsuo T.; Fujimoto, Masayuki Y.

    2013-06-01

    The evolution of rotation rate of stars is caused by the structural changes in the stellar interior as well as by the gain and loss of angular momentum through mass loss and accretion. The stellar rotation rate is determined by the stellar moment of inertia for a given angular momentum. The variation in the internal moment of inertia due to expansion and/or contraction of shells may produce differential rotation in the interior. From the study of hydrodynamical stability, however, it is predicted that instabilities prevail in differentially rotating stars and resultant turbulent viscosity may effectively eliminate the differential rotation to bring the stellar interior into more or less uniform rotation. Under the uniform rotation, the internal distribution of angular momentum is determined solely by that of moment of inertia. In this paper, we analyze the evolutionary characteristics of stellar moment of inertia, in particular, focusing on the variation with the surface radius and discuss the influence on the evolution of stellar rotation and the relevance to the origin of Be stars. As stars evolvefrom main sequence, their central region contracts, whereas the outer parts expand first due to the difference in the mean molecular weight produced by the central nuclear burning, and then, due to the entropy difference produced by shell burning. The stellar moment of inertia, I, also augments with the surface radius R, and yet, the increase rate of I with R differs according to the evolutionary stages because of changes in the characteristic of stellar structure; the increase of I is slower than R^{1.5} during the early stage of expansion while it is accelerated to be greater than the latter in the later stage of expansion due to shell burning. Accordingly, the ratio of stellar rotation rate to the surface critical rotation rate augments during the early phase, while it turns to decrease during the shell burning phase. Consequently, the stellar rotation rate may reach

  10. 3R phase of MoS2 and WS2 outperforms the corresponding 2H phase for hydrogen evolution.

    PubMed

    Toh, Rou Jun; Sofer, Zdeněk; Luxa, Jan; Sedmidubský, David; Pumera, Martin

    2017-03-09

    Herein, we compare the bulk, 2H and 3R phases of two most prevalent TMD materials: MoS2 and WS2. The 3R phase outperforms its 2H phase counterpart in hydrogen evolution reaction catalysis and is even comparable with the exfoliated, 1T phase in the case of MoS2.

  11. Transition to the radiative phase in supernova remnant evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, Eric Boyd

    1999-11-01

    The evolution of a supernova remnant (SNR) through the transition from an adiabatic Sedov-Taylor blastwave to a radiative pressure-driven snowplow phase is studied through a series of one-, two- and three-dimensional hydrodynamic (HD) and magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations. This transition is marked by a catastrophic collapse of the postshock gas, forming a thin, dense shell behind the forward shock. Previous studies have shown that the thin, dense shell of gas present during this transition is susceptible to both radiative and dynamical instabilities. One-dimensional HD studies indicate the presence of a radial oscillation between the forward shock and the thin shell, due to the rapid cooling of the gas in the immediate postshock region. Two-dynamical HD simulations of this transition indicate the presence of violent dynamical instabilities that alter the initially spherical morphology of the blastwave, specifically, the Pressure-driven Thin Shell Overstability (PDTSO) and the Non-linear Thin Shell Instability (NTSI). Hydrodynamical simulations, by their very nature, ignore the effects of magnetic forces on moving fluids. In general, interstellar magnetic fields will be weak enough that their effects may be safely ignored. However, the transition to the radiative phase in SNR evolution is often triggered when the blastwave interacts with dense clouds of gas in the interstellar medium (ISM). The resulting compression of the gas during the transition also compresses the magnetic fields in the cloud, possibly enhancing the field sufficiently to play a role in the further evolution of the SNR. To better understand the role of the NTSI during the transition, and to study the effects of magnetic fields on the instability itself, we performed idealized two- and three-dimensional MHD simulations. The results of the two-dimensional simulations were found to depend strongly on the orientation of the ambient magnetic field when the postshock field is dynamically

  12. Tracing the origin and evolution of plant TIR-encoding genes.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiaoqin; Pang, Hui; Li, Mimi; Chen, Jianqun; Hang, Yueyu

    2014-08-10

    Toll-interleukin-1 receptor (TIR)-encoding proteins represent one of the most important families of disease resistance genes in plants. Studies that have explored the functional details of these genes tended to focus on only a few limited groups; the origin and evolutionary history of these genes were therefore unclear. In this study, focusing on the four principal groups of TIR-encoding genes, we conducted an extensive genome-wide survey of 32 fully sequenced plant genomes and Expressed Sequence Tags (ESTs) from the gymnosperm Pinus taeda and explored the origins and evolution of these genes. Through the identification of the TIR-encoding genes, the analysis of chromosome positions, the identification and analysis of conserved motifs, and sequence alignment and phylogenetic reconstruction, our results showed that the genes of the TIR-X family (TXs) had an earlier origin and a wider distribution than the genes from the other three groups. TIR-encoding genes experienced large-scale gene duplications during evolution. A skeleton motif pattern of the TIR domain was present in all spermatophytes, and the genes with this skeleton pattern exhibited a conserved and independent evolutionary history in all spermatophytes, including monocots, that followed their gymnosperm origin. This study used comparative genomics to explore the origin and evolutionary history of the four main groups of TIR-encoding genes. Additionally, we unraveled the mechanism behind the uneven distribution of TIR-encoding genes in dicots and monocots. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Oxygen and animal evolution: did a rise of atmospheric oxygen "trigger" the origin of animals?

    PubMed

    Mills, Daniel B; Canfield, Donald E

    2014-12-01

    Recent studies challenge the classical view that the origin of animal life was primarily controlled by atmospheric oxygen levels. For example, some modern sponges, representing early-branching animals, can live under 200 times less oxygen than currently present in the atmosphere - levels commonly thought to have been maintained prior to their origination. Furthermore, it is increasingly argued that the earliest animals, which likely lived in low oxygen environments, played an active role in constructing the well-oxygenated conditions typical of the modern oceans. Therefore, while oxygen is still relevant to understanding early animal evolution, the relationships between the two might be less straightforward than previously thought.

  14. The Lingula genome provides insights into brachiopod evolution and the origin of phosphate biomineralization

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Yi-Jyun; Takeuchi, Takeshi; Koyanagi, Ryo; Yamada, Lixy; Kanda, Miyuki; Khalturina, Mariia; Fujie, Manabu; Yamasaki, Shin-ichi; Endo, Kazuyoshi; Satoh, Noriyuki

    2015-01-01

    The evolutionary origins of lingulid brachiopods and their calcium phosphate shells have been obscure. Here we decode the 425-Mb genome of Lingula anatina to gain insights into brachiopod evolution. Comprehensive phylogenomic analyses place Lingula close to molluscs, but distant from annelids. The Lingula gene number has increased to ∼34,000 by extensive expansion of gene families. Although Lingula and vertebrates have superficially similar hard tissue components, our genomic, transcriptomic and proteomic analyses show that Lingula lacks genes involved in bone formation, indicating an independent origin of their phosphate biominerals. Several genes involved in Lingula shell formation are shared by molluscs. However, Lingula has independently undergone domain combinations to produce shell matrix collagens with EGF domains and carries lineage-specific shell matrix proteins. Gene family expansion, domain shuffling and co-option of genes appear to be the genomic background of Lingula's unique biomineralization. This Lingula genome provides resources for further studies of lophotrochozoan evolution. PMID:26383154

  15. Interhemispheric interaction and beliefs on our origin: degree of handedness predicts beliefs in creationism versus evolution.

    PubMed

    Niebauer, Christopher Lee; Christman, Stephen D; Reid, Scott A; Garvey, Kilian J

    2004-10-01

    It has been suggested that strongly handed individuals have attenuated systems for updating beliefs compared to mixed handers (Niebauer, Aselage, & Schutte, 2002). The current research extended this theory to individual differences in updating beliefs concerning our origins. Although the theory of evolution has gained overwhelming success in the sciences, a significant percentage of the population believes in biblical creationist accounts of human origins that are inconsistent with accepted, contemporary scientific views. If strongly handed individuals possess attenuated systems for updating beliefs, they might be more likely to believe in creationism. In two studies, strongly handed participants were more likely to believe in creationism while mixed-handed participants were more likely to believe in evolution. A model of how interhemispheric interaction functions in maintaining and updating beliefs is discussed. Specifically, mixed-handedness seems to be associated with a lower threshold for updating beliefs.

  16. The origins of the Acheulean: past and present perspectives on a major transition in human evolution

    PubMed Central

    de la Torre, Ignacio

    2016-01-01

    The emergence of the Acheulean from the earlier Oldowan constitutes a major transition in human evolution, the theme of this special issue. This paper discusses the evidence for the origins of the Acheulean, a cornerstone in the history of human technology, from two perspectives; firstly, a review of the history of investigations on Acheulean research is presented. This approach introduces the evolution of theories throughout the development of the discipline, and reviews the way in which cumulative knowledge led to the prevalent explanatory framework for the emergence of the Acheulean. The second part presents the current state of the art in Acheulean origins research, and reviews the hard evidence for the appearance of this technology in Africa around 1.7 Ma, and its significance for the evolutionary history of Homo erectus. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Major transitions in human evolution’. PMID:27298475

  17. The Lingula genome provides insights into brachiopod evolution and the origin of phosphate biomineralization.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yi-Jyun; Takeuchi, Takeshi; Koyanagi, Ryo; Yamada, Lixy; Kanda, Miyuki; Khalturina, Mariia; Fujie, Manabu; Yamasaki, Shin-ichi; Endo, Kazuyoshi; Satoh, Noriyuki

    2015-09-18

    The evolutionary origins of lingulid brachiopods and their calcium phosphate shells have been obscure. Here we decode the 425-Mb genome of Lingula anatina to gain insights into brachiopod evolution. Comprehensive phylogenomic analyses place Lingula close to molluscs, but distant from annelids. The Lingula gene number has increased to ∼34,000 by extensive expansion of gene families. Although Lingula and vertebrates have superficially similar hard tissue components, our genomic, transcriptomic and proteomic analyses show that Lingula lacks genes involved in bone formation, indicating an independent origin of their phosphate biominerals. Several genes involved in Lingula shell formation are shared by molluscs. However, Lingula has independently undergone domain combinations to produce shell matrix collagens with EGF domains and carries lineage-specific shell matrix proteins. Gene family expansion, domain shuffling and co-option of genes appear to be the genomic background of Lingula's unique biomineralization. This Lingula genome provides resources for further studies of lophotrochozoan evolution.

  18. Evolution of social learning does not explain the origin of human cumulative culture.

    PubMed

    Enquist, Magnus; Ghirlanda, Stefano

    2007-05-07

    Because culture requires transmission of information between individuals, thinking about the origin of culture has mainly focused on the genetic evolution of abilities for social learning. Current theory considers how social learning affects the adaptiveness of a single cultural trait, yet human culture consists of the accumulation of very many traits. Here we introduce a new modeling strategy that tracks the adaptive value of many cultural traits, showing that genetic evolution favors only limited social learning owing to the accumulation of maladaptive as well as adaptive culture. We further show that culture can be adaptive, and refined social learning can evolve, if individuals can identify and discard maladaptive culture. This suggests that the evolution of such "adaptive filtering" mechanisms may have been crucial for the birth of human culture.

  19. The origin and evolution of the sexes: Novel insights from a distant eukaryotic linage.

    PubMed

    Mignerot, Laure; Coelho, Susana M

    2016-01-01

    Sexual reproduction is an extraordinarily widespread phenomenon that assures the production of new genetic combinations in nearly all eukaryotic lineages. Although the core features of sexual reproduction (meiosis and syngamy) are highly conserved, the control mechanisms that determine whether an individual is male or female are remarkably labile across eukaryotes. In genetically controlled sexual systems, gender is determined by sex chromosomes, which have emerged independently and repeatedly during evolution. Sex chromosomes have been studied in only a handful of classical model organism, and empirical knowledge on the origin and evolution of the sexes is still surprisingly incomplete. With the advent of new generation sequencing, the taxonomic breadth of model systems has been rapidly expanding, bringing new ideas and fresh views on this fundamental aspect of biology. This mini-review provides a quick state of the art of how the remarkable richness of the sexual characteristics of the brown algae is helping to increase our knowledge about the evolution of sex determination.

  20. Origin and Evolution of a Chimeric Fusion Gene in Drosophila subobscura, D. madeirensis and D. guanche

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Corbin D.; Custer, Andrew W.; Begun, David J.

    2005-01-01

    An understanding of the mutational and evolutionary mechanisms underlying the emergence of novel genes is critical to studies of phenotypic and genomic evolution. Here we describe a new example of a recently formed chimeric fusion gene that occurs in Drosophila guanche, D. madeirensis, and D. subobscura. This new gene, which we name Adh-Twain, resulted from an Adh mRNA that retrotransposed into the Gapdh-like gene, CG9010. Adh-Twain is transcribed; its 5′ promoters and transcription patterns appear similar to those of CG9010. Population genetic and phylogenetic analyses suggest that the amino acid sequence of Adh-Twain evolved rapidly via directional selection shortly after it arose. Its more recent history, however, is characterized by slower evolution consistent with increasing functional constraints. We present a model for the origin of this new gene and discuss genetic and evolutionary factors affecting the evolution of new genes and functions. PMID:15781692

  1. The case for planetary sample return missions - Origin and evolution of the moon and its environment

    SciTech Connect

    Ryder, G.; Spudis, P.D.; Taylor, G.J. USGS, Flagstaff, AZ New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque )

    1989-11-01

    The most important questions concerning the origin and evolution of the moon and its environment are reviewed, and the ways that studying lunar samples could help answer them, are discussed. Recommendations are made about methods for obtaining samples and the best lunar sites for obtaining them using simple, unmanned sample returners. Lunar geologic field sites that require intensive field work with human interaction are also considered. 16 refs.

  2. Ferroelectric domains and phase evolution in (Fe:) KTa1-xNbxO3 crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Hongyang; Cai, Kang; Fan, Ziran; Huang, Zhideng; Ma, Zhibin; Jia, Tingting; Kimura, Hideo; Yang, Yuguo; Matsumoto, Takao; Tohei, Tetsuya; Shibata, Naoya; Ikuhara, Yuichi

    2017-08-01

    The domain structures and phase evolution in mixed ferroelectric (Fe): KTa1-xNbxO3 (KTN) crystals were investigated. Temperature dependent Raman spectra show that Curie temperatures of KTN and Fe: KTN are far below room temperature, but the ferroelectric domain switching was still visualized by scanning probe microscopy at room temperature. These observed domains origin from the nano-regions near the grain boundaries. In addition, the intrinsic domains (triangle for KTN and straight line/stripe for Fe: KTN) could only be observed at low temperature by transmission electron microscopy. Three phase transitions in Fe: KTN crystals were found by Raman spectroscopy and dielectric testing: 175 K for Rhombohedral-to-Orthorhombic (R-O), 210 K for Orthorhombic-to-Tetragonal (O-T) and 250 K for Tetragonal-to-Cubic (T-C), which is consistent with the domain behavior.

  3. The spatial and temporal organization of origin firing during the S-phase of fission yeast

    PubMed Central

    Nurse, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Eukaryotes duplicate their genomes using multiple replication origins, but the organization of origin firing along chromosomes and during S-phase is not well understood. Using fission yeast, we report the first genome-wide analysis of the spatial and temporal organization of replication origin firing, analyzed using single DNA molecules that can approach the full length of chromosomes. At S-phase onset, origins fire randomly and sparsely throughout the chromosomes. Later in S-phase, clusters of fired origins appear embedded in the sparser regions, which form the basis of nuclear replication foci. The formation of clusters requires proper histone methylation and acetylation, and their locations are not inherited between cell cycles. The rate of origin firing increases gradually, peaking just before mid S-phase. Toward the end of S-phase, nearly all the available origins within the unreplicated regions are fired, contributing to the timely completion of genome replication. We propose that the majority of origins do not fire as a part of a deterministic program. Instead, origin firing, both individually and as clusters, should be viewed as being mostly stochastic. PMID:25650245

  4. Origin and Evolution of Eukaryotic Large Nucleo-Cytoplasmic DNA Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Koonin, Eugene V.; Yutin, Natalya

    2010-01-01

    Background/Aims The nucleo-cytoplasmic large DNA viruses (NCLDV) constitute an apparently monophyletic group that consists of 6 families of viruses infecting a broad variety of eukaryotes. A comprehensive genome comparison and maximum-likelihood reconstruction of NCLDV evolution reveal a set of approximately 50 conserved genes that can be tentatively mapped to the genome of the common ancestor of this class of eukaryotic viruses. We address the origins and evolution of NCLDV. Results Phylogenetic analysis indicates that some of the major clades of NCLDV infect diverse animals and protists, suggestive of early radiation of the NCLDV, possibly concomitant with eukaryogenesis. The core NCLDV genes seem to have originated from different sources including homologous genes of bacteriophages, bacteria and eukaryotes. These observations are compatible with a scenario of the origin of the NCLDV at an early stage of the evolution of eukaryotes through extensive mixing of genes from widely different genomes. Conclusions The common ancestor of the NCLDV probably evolved from a bacteriophage as a result of recruitment of numerous eukaryotic and some bacterial genes, and concomitant loss of the majority of phage genes except for a small core of genes coding for proteins essential for virus genome replication and virion formation. PMID:20551680

  5. Exobiology, the study of the origin, evolution and distribution of life within the context of cosmic evolution: a review.

    PubMed

    Horneck, G

    1995-01-01

    The primary goal of exobiological research is to reach a better understanding of the processes leading to the origin, evolution and distribution of life on Earth or elsewhere in the universe. In this endeavour, scientists from a wide variety of disciplines are involved, such as astronomy, planetary research, organic chemistry, palaeontology and the various subdisciplines of biology including microbial ecology and molecular biology. Space technology plays an important part by offering the opportunity for exploring our solar system, for collecting extraterrestrial samples, and for utilizing the peculiar environment of space as a tool. Exobiological activities include comparison of the overall pattern of chemical evolution of potential precursors of life, in the interstellar medium, and on the planets and small bodies of our solar system; tracing the history of life on Earth back to its roots; deciphering the environments of the planets in our solar system and of their satellites, throughout their history, with regard to their habitability; searching for other planetary systems in our Galaxy and for signals of extraterrestrial civilizations; testing the impact of space environment on survivability of resistant life forms. This evolutionary approach towards understanding the phenomenon of life in the context of cosmic evolution may eventually contribute to a better understanding of the processes regulating the interactions of life with its environment on Earth.

  6. Evolution of molecular crystal optical phonons near structural phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michki, Nigel; Niessen, Katherine; Xu, Mengyang; Markelz, Andrea

    Molecular crystals are increasingly important photonic and electronic materials. For example organic semiconductors are lightweight compared to inorganic semiconductors and have inexpensive scale up processing with roll to roll printing. However their implementation is limited by their environmental sensitivity, in part arising from the weak intermolecular interactions of the crystal. These weak interactions result in optical phonons in the terahertz frequency range. We examine the evolution of intermolecular interactions near structural phase transitions by measuring the optical phonons as a function of temperature and crystal orientation using terahertz time-domain spectroscopy. The measured orientation dependence of the resonances provides an additional constraint for comparison of the observed spectra with the density functional calculations, enabling us to follow specific phonon modes. We observe crystal reorganization near 350 K for oxalic acid as it transforms from dihydrate to anhydrous form. We also report the first THz spectra for the molecular crystal fructose through its melting point.

  7. Evolution of electron phase space holes in inhomogeneous plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasko, I. Y.; Kuzichev, I. V.; Agapitov, O. V.; Mozer, F. S.; Artemyev, A. V.; Roth, I.

    2017-06-01

    Electron phase space holes or vortices (EHs) are electrostatic solitary waves with a bipolar parallel (magnetic field-aligned) electric field. They are formed in a nonlinear stage of electron streaming type instabilities and exist due to electrons trapped within the EH electrostatic potential. The background plasma density gradients, characteristic for both space and laboratory plasmas, can affect the evolution of EHs. In this paper, we use a one-dimensional electrostatic Vlasov-Ampère code (ions are immobile) with periodic boundary conditions to study the evolution of a single EH in inhomogeneous plasmas. We find that the EH propagating along a positive (negative) plasma density gradient is accelerated (decelerated) and narrowed (widened). EH propagating along a positive density gradient results in the acceleration of a relatively small population of trapped electrons to suprathermal energies. Interestingly, a decelerating EH is reflected at the point with the plasma density value dependent only on EH parameters, but independent of the average density gradient in the system. We show that the density gradients result in the development of a unipolar parallel electric field in a vicinity of the EH. A theoretical estimate of the corresponding potential drop along the EH is derived. The results are discussed in the light of EH observations in space plasma.

  8. Origin and dynamical evolution of Neptune Trojans - II. Long-term evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lykawka, P. S.; Horner, J.; Jones, B. W.; Mukai, T.

    2011-03-01

    Following our earlier work studying the formation of the Neptunian Trojan population during the planet's migration, we present results examining the eventual fate of the Trojan clouds produced in that work. A large number of Trojans were followed under the gravitational influence of the giant planets for a period of at least 1 Gyr. We find that the stability of Neptunian Trojans seems to be strongly correlated to their initial post-migration orbital elements, with those objects that survive as Trojans for billions of years, displaying negligible orbital evolution. The great majority of these survivors began the integrations with small eccentricities (e < 0.2) and small libration amplitudes (A < 30°-40°). The survival rate of 'pre-formed' Neptunian Trojans [which in general survived on dynamically cold orbits (e < 0.1, i < 5°-10°)] varied between ˜5 and 70 per cent, depending on the precise detail of their initial orbits. In contrast, the survival rate of 'captured' Trojans (on final orbits spread across a larger region of the e-i element space) was markedly lower, ranging between 1-10 per cent after 4 Gyr. Taken in concert with our earlier work and the broad i-distribution of the observed Trojan population, we note that planetary formation scenarios, which involve the slow migration (a few tens of millions of years) of Neptune from an initial planetary architecture that is both resonant and compact (aN < 18 au), provide the most promising fit of those we considered to the observed Trojan population. In such scenarios, we find that the present-day Trojan population would number ˜1 per cent of that which was present at the end of the planet's migration (i.e. survival rate of ˜1 per cent), with the bulk being sourced from captured, rather than pre-formed objects. We note, however, that even those scenarios still fail to reproduce the presently observed portion of the Neptune Trojan population moving on orbits with e < 0.1 but i > 20°. Dynamical integrations of

  9. Magnetotail and Ionospheric Evolution during the Substorm Growth Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, M.; Otto, A.

    2013-12-01

    The growth phase of geomagnetic substorms is characterized by the equatorward motion of the growth phase arc close to or even into the region of diffuse aurora characteristic for a dipolar magnetic field. The presented results use a model of current sheet thinning based on midnight magnetic flux depletion (MMFD) in the near-Earth tail which is caused by sunward convection to replenish magnetic flux that is eroded on the dayside by magnetic reconnection during periods of southward IMF. The results use a three-dimensional mesocale MHD simulation of the near-Earth tail. This paper examines the changes of the near-Earth magnetotail region mapped into the ionopshere. Of specific interest are the changes in magnetic flux, flux tube entropy, field-aligned currents, convection, and the size and location of the respective ionospheric footprints of the magnetotail structure and properties. The mapping method is based on the Tsyganenko [1996] magnetic field model combined with magnetic flux conservation. It is found that the mapped magnetotail properties move equatorward by about 2 to 3 degrees during the growth phase. The removal of magnetic flux in the near-Earth tail causes a contraction of the ionospheric footprints of this tail region such that all of the mapped magnetotail structures move equatorward. The thin current is mapped into the region where magnetic flux is strongly depleted, and in close proximity with strong and narrow region 1 and 2 sense field-aligned currents. Our ionospheric maps also show a sharp transition between the dipole and stretched magnetic field and an evolution of thinning and convergent motion of field-aligned currents in the late growth phase.

  10. Rapid evolution of stability and productivity at the origin of a microbial mutualism

    SciTech Connect

    Hillesland, Kristina L.; Stahl, David A.

    2009-12-01

    Mutualistic interactions are taxonomically and functionally diverse. Despite their ubiquity, the basic ecological and evolutionary processes underlying their origin and maintenance are poorly understood. A major reason for this has been the lack of an experimentally tractable model system. We examine the evolution of an experimentally imposed obligate mutualism between sulfate-reducing and methanogenic microorganisms that have no known history of prior interaction. Twenty-four independent pairings (cocultures) of the bacterium Desulfovibrio vulgaris and the archaeon Methanococcus maripaludis were established and followed for 300 community doublings in two environments, one allowing for the development of a heterogeneous distribution of resources and the other not. Evolved cocultures grew up to 80percent faster and were up to 30percent more productive (biomass yield per mole substrate) than the ancestors. The evolutionary process was marked by periods of significant instability leading to extinction of two of the cocultures, but resulted in more stable, efficient, and productive mutualisms for most replicated pairings. Comparisons of evolved cocultures with those assembled from one evolved and one ancestral mutualist showed that evolution of both species contributed to improved productivity. Surprisingly, however, overall improvements in growth rate and yield were less than the sum of individual contributions, suggesting antagonistic interactions between mutations from the coevolved populations. Physical constraints on the transfer of metabolites in the evolution environment affected the evolution of M. maripaludis but not D. vulgaris. Together, these results show that challenges can imperil nascent obligate mutualisms and demonstrate the evolutionary responses that enable their persistence and future evolution.

  11. Co-option and dissociation in larval origins and evolution: the sea urchin larval gut.

    PubMed

    Love, Alan C; Lee, Abigail E; Andrews, Mary E; Raff, Rudolf A

    2008-01-01

    The origin of marine invertebrate larvae has been an area of controversy in developmental evolution for over a century. Here, we address the question of whether a pelagic "larval" or benthic "adult" morphology originated first in metazoan lineages by testing the hypothesis that particular gene co-option patterns will be associated with the origin of feeding, indirect developing larval forms. Empirical evidence bearing on this hypothesis is derivable from gene expression studies of the sea urchin larval gut of two closely related but differently developing congenerics, Heliocidaris tuberculata (feeding indirect-developing larva) and H. erythrogramma (nonfeeding direct developer), given two subsidiary hypotheses. (1) If larval gut gene expression in H. tuberculata was co-opted from an ancestral adult expression pattern, then the gut expression pattern will remain in adult H. erythrogramma despite its direct development. (2) Genes expressed in the larval gut of H. tuberculata will not have a coordinated expression pattern in H. erythrogramma larvae due to loss of a functional gut. Five structural genes expressed in the invaginating archenteron of H. tuberculata during gastrulation exhibit substantially different expression patterns in H. erythrogramma with only one remaining endoderm specific. Expression of these genes in the adult of H. erythrogramma and larval gut of H. tuberculata, but not in H. erythrogramma larval endoderm, supports the hypothesis that they first played roles in the formation of adult structures and were subsequently recruited into larval ontogeny during the origin and evolution of feeding planktotrophic deuterostome larvae.

  12. Damage Evolution in Complex-Phase and Dual-Phase Steels during Edge Stretching

    PubMed Central

    Pathak, Nikky; Butcher, Cliff; Worswick, Michael James; Bellhouse, Erika; Gao, Jeff

    2017-01-01

    The role of microstructural damage in controlling the edge stretchability of Complex-Phase (CP) and Dual-Phase (DP) steels was evaluated using hole tension experiments. The experiments considered a tensile specimen with a hole at the center of specimen that is either sheared (sheared edge condition) or drilled and then reamed (reamed edge condition). The damage mechanism and accumulation in the CP and DP steels were systematically characterized by interrupting the hole tension tests at different strain levels using scanning electron microscope (SEM) analysis and optical microscopy. Martensite cracking and decohesion of ferrite-martensite interfaces are the dominant nucleation mechanisms in the DP780. The primary source of void nucleation in the CP800 is nucleation at TiN particles, with secondary void formation at martensite/bainite interfaces near the failure strain. The rate of damage evolution is considerably higher for the sheared edge in contrast with the reamed edge since the shearing process alters the microstructure in the shear affected zone (SAZ) by introducing work-hardening and initial damage behind the sheared edge. The CP microstructures were shown to be less prone to shear-induced damage than the DP materials resulting in much higher sheared edge formability. Microstructural damage in the CP and DP steels was characterized to understand the interaction between microstructure, damage evolution and edge formability during edge stretching. An analytical model for void evolution and coalescence was developed and applied to predict the damage rate in these rather diverse microstructures. PMID:28772707

  13. Damage Evolution in Complex-Phase and Dual-Phase Steels during Edge Stretching.

    PubMed

    Pathak, Nikky; Butcher, Cliff; Worswick, Michael James; Bellhouse, Erika; Gao, Jeff

    2017-03-27

    The role of microstructural damage in controlling the edge stretchability of Complex-Phase (CP) and Dual-Phase (DP) steels was evaluated using hole tension experiments. The experiments considered a tensile specimen with a hole at the center of specimen that is either sheared (sheared edge condition) or drilled and then reamed (reamed edge condition). The damage mechanism and accumulation in the CP and DP steels were systematically characterized by interrupting the hole tension tests at different strain levels using scanning electron microscope (SEM) analysis and optical microscopy. Martensite cracking and decohesion of ferrite-martensite interfaces are the dominant nucleation mechanisms in the DP780. The primary source of void nucleation in the CP800 is nucleation at TiN particles, with secondary void formation at martensite/bainite interfaces near the failure strain. The rate of damage evolution is considerably higher for the sheared edge in contrast with the reamed edge since the shearing process alters the microstructure in the shear affected zone (SAZ) by introducing work-hardening and initial damage behind the sheared edge. The CP microstructures were shown to be less prone to shear-induced damage than the DP materials resulting in much higher sheared edge formability. Microstructural damage in the CP and DP steels was characterized to understand the interaction between microstructure, damage evolution and edge formability during edge stretching. An analytical model for void evolution and coalescence was developed and applied to predict the damage rate in these rather diverse microstructures.

  14. Evolution of the proto-lunar disk and the origin of the Moon's material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charnoz, Sebastien; Michaut, Chloe

    2014-11-01

    The Earth’s Moon is thought to have accreted from an impact generated disk. Whereas many works have studied the impact itself, the evolution of the disk that gave birth to the Moon is largely unknown and in particular its dynamical evolution and coolingtimescale. These are important parameters as they control the onset of the gravitational instability that triggers satellite formation. In particular, the chemical and isotopical composition of the Earth’s moon is thought to be largely inherited from the protolunar disk (formed after an impact on the proto-earth). However, for the moon to form, the disk must cool down first. During this cooling phase, major dynamical, chemical and isotopical restructuration may happen in the disk, and thus, the material that will get ultimately incorporated in the protomoon may be largely different from the average composition of the Earth or its impactor.We have developed a viscous model of a two-phase protolunar disk, including phase transition, gravitational instability and Kelvin Helmoltz instability (KH) to investigate the evolution of this disk on several 10^4 years, from the impact up to its ultimate cooling and assembling into a protomoon. We show that the protolunar disk forms rapidly a dense and compact disk below 2 earth radii, with a high density. This high density promotes long cooling timescales, about 10^4 to 10^5 years. During this phase the material hasenough time to equilibrate isotopicaly. In addition if the disk is turbulent then the gas phase is very mobile an cand efficiently separate from the liquid phase and lead to an incomplete condensation of the disk material, which is a good candidate to explain the today moon devolatilisation with respect to Earth material. Extension of this work to the formation of Ice giant planet's satellites will be also presented.

  15. Molecular Origins of Mesoscale Ordering in a Metalloamphiphile Phase

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Controlling the assembly of soft and deformable molecular aggregates into mesoscale structures is essential for understanding and developing a broad range of processes including rare earth extraction and cleaning of water, as well as for developing materials with unique properties. By combined synchrotron small- and wide-angle X-ray scattering with large-scale atomistic molecular dynamics simulations we analyze here a metalloamphiphile–oil solution that organizes on multiple length scales. The molecules associate into aggregates, and aggregates flocculate into meso-ordered phases. Our study demonstrates that dipolar interactions, centered on the amphiphile headgroup, bridge ionic aggregate cores and drive aggregate flocculation. By identifying specific intermolecular interactions that drive mesoscale ordering in solution, we bridge two different length scales that are classically addressed separately. Our results highlight the importance of individual intermolecular interactions in driving mesoscale ordering. PMID:27163014

  16. Texture evolution during nitinol martensite detwinning and phase transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, S.; Schaffer, J. E.; Ren, Y.; Yu, C.

    2013-12-01

    Nitinol has been widely used to make medical devices for years due to its unique shape memory and superelastic properties. However, the texture of the nitinol wires has been largely ignored due to inherent complexity. In this study, in situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction has been carried out during uniaxial tensile testing to investigate the texture evolution of the nitinol wires during martensite detwinning, variant reorientation, and phase transformation. It was found that the thermal martensitic nitinol wire comprised primarily an axial (1¯20), (120), and (102)-fiber texture. Detwinning initially converted the (120) and (102) fibers to the (1¯20) fiber and progressed to a (1¯30)-fiber texture by rigid body rotation. At strains above 10%, the (1¯30)-fiber was shifted to the (110) fiber by (21¯0) deformation twinning. The austenitic wire exhibited an axial (334)-fiber, which transformed to the near-(1¯30) martensite texture after the stress-induced phase transformation.

  17. Evolution of a phase separated gravity independent bioreactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villeneuve, Peter E.; Dunlop, Eric H.

    The evolution of a phase-separated gravity-independent bioreactor is described. The initial prototype, a zero head-space manifold silicone membrane based reactor, maintained large diffusional resistances. Obtaining oxygen transfer rates needed to support carbon-recycling aerobic microbes is impossible if large resistances are maintained. Next generation designs (Mark I and II) mimic heat exchanger design to promote turbulence at the tubing-liquid interface, thereby reducing liquid and gas side diffusional resistances. While oxygen transfer rates increased by a factor of ten, liquid channeling prevented further increases. To overcome these problems, a Mark III reactor was developed which maintains inverted phases, i.e., media flows inside the silicone tubing, oxygen gas is applied external to the tubing. This enhances design through changes in gas side driving force concentration and liquid side turbulence levels. Combining an applied external pressure of four atmospheres with increased Reynolds numbers resulted in oxygen transfer intensities of 232 mmol O2/l/h (1000 times greater than first prototype and comparable to a conventional fermenter). A 1.0 liter Mark III reactor can potentially deliver oxygen supplies necessary to support cell cultures needed to recycle a 10 astronaut carbon load continuously.

  18. Texture evolution during nitinol martensite detwinning and phase transformation

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, S.; Schaffer, J. E.; Ren, Y.

    2013-12-09

    Nitinol has been widely used to make medical devices for years due to its unique shape memory and superelastic properties. However, the texture of the nitinol wires has been largely ignored due to inherent complexity. In this study, in situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction has been carried out during uniaxial tensile testing to investigate the texture evolution of the nitinol wires during martensite detwinning, variant reorientation, and phase transformation. It was found that the thermal martensitic nitinol wire comprised primarily an axial (1{sup ¯}20), (120), and (102)-fiber texture. Detwinning initially converted the (120) and (102) fibers to the (1{sup ¯}20) fiber and progressed to a (1{sup ¯}30)-fiber texture by rigid body rotation. At strains above 10%, the (1{sup ¯}30)-fiber was shifted to the (110) fiber by (21{sup ¯}0) deformation twinning. The austenitic wire exhibited an axial (334)-fiber, which transformed to the near-(1{sup ¯}30) martensite texture after the stress-induced phase transformation.

  19. Evolution of a phase separated gravity independent bioreactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Villeneuve, Peter E.; Dunlop, Eric H.

    1992-01-01

    The evolution of a phase-separated gravity-independent bioreactor is described. The initial prototype, a zero head-space manifold silicone membrane based reactor, maintained large diffusional resistances. Obtaining oxygen transfer rates needed to support carbon-recycling aerobic microbes is impossible if large resistances are maintained. Next generation designs (Mark I and II) mimic heat exchanger design to promote turbulence at the tubing-liquid interface, thereby reducing liquid and gas side diffusional resistances. While oxygen transfer rates increased by a factor of ten, liquid channeling prevented further increases. To overcome these problems, a Mark III reactor was developed which maintains inverted phases, i.e., media flows inside the silicone tubing, oxygen gas is applied external to the tubing. This enhances design through changes in gas side driving force concentration and liquid side turbulence levels. Combining an applied external pressure of 4 atm with increased Reynolds numbers resulted in oxygen transfer intensities of 232 mmol O2/l per hr (1000 times greater than the first prototype and comparable to a conventional fermenter). A 1.0 liter Mark III reactor can potentially deliver oxygen supplies necessary to support cell cultures needed to recycle a 10-astronaut carbon load continuously.

  20. Evolution of a phase separated gravity independent bioreactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Villeneuve, Peter E.; Dunlop, Eric H.

    1992-01-01

    The evolution of a phase-separated gravity-independent bioreactor is described. The initial prototype, a zero head-space manifold silicone membrane based reactor, maintained large diffusional resistances. Obtaining oxygen transfer rates needed to support carbon-recycling aerobic microbes is impossible if large resistances are maintained. Next generation designs (Mark I and II) mimic heat exchanger design to promote turbulence at the tubing-liquid interface, thereby reducing liquid and gas side diffusional resistances. While oxygen transfer rates increased by a factor of ten, liquid channeling prevented further increases. To overcome these problems, a Mark III reactor was developed which maintains inverted phases, i.e., media flows inside the silicone tubing, oxygen gas is applied external to the tubing. This enhances design through changes in gas side driving force concentration and liquid side turbulence levels. Combining an applied external pressure of 4 atm with increased Reynolds numbers resulted in oxygen transfer intensities of 232 mmol O2/l per hr (1000 times greater than the first prototype and comparable to a conventional fermenter). A 1.0 liter Mark III reactor can potentially deliver oxygen supplies necessary to support cell cultures needed to recycle a 10-astronaut carbon load continuously.

  1. Phase transitions in the evolution of gene regulatory networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skanata, Antun; Kussell, Edo

    The role of gene regulatory networks is to respond to environmental conditions and optimize growth of the cell. A typical example is found in bacteria, where metabolic genes are activated in response to nutrient availability, and are subsequently turned off to conserve energy when their specific substrates are depleted. However, in fluctuating environmental conditions, regulatory networks could experience strong evolutionary pressures not only to turn the right genes on and off, but also to respond optimally under a wide spectrum of fluctuation timescales. The outcome of evolution is predicted by the long-term growth rate, which differentiates between optimal strategies. Here we present an analytic computation of the long-term growth rate in randomly fluctuating environments, by using mean-field and higher order expansion in the environmental history. We find that optimal strategies correspond to distinct regions in the phase space of fluctuations, separated by first and second order phase transitions. The statistics of environmental randomness are shown to dictate the possible evolutionary modes, which either change the structure of the regulatory network abruptly, or gradually modify and tune the interactions between its components.

  2. Origin and Evolution of Sedimentary Basins and Their Energy and Mineral Resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, Raymond A.

    The International Lithosphere Program was launched in 1981 as a ten-year project of interdisciplinary research in the solid earth sciences. It is a natural outgrowth of the Geodynamics Program of the 1970's, and of its predecessor, the Upper Mantle Project. The Program — "Dynamics and Evolution of the Lithosphere: The Hazards"—is concerned primarily with the current state, origin and development of the lithosphere, with special attention to the continents and their margins. One special goal of the program is the strengthening of interactions between basic research and the applications of geology, geophysics, geochemistry and geodesy to mineral and energy resource exploration and development, to the mitigation of geological hazards, and to protection of the environment; another special goal is the strengthening of the earth sciences and their effective application in developing countries. The origin and evolution of sedimentary basins is an obvious focus of the International Lithosphere Program because it is fundamentally a problem in the dynamics and evolution of the lithosphere, and moreover, it provides special opportunities for strengthening the interactions between basic research and the applications of geology, geophysics, geochemistry and geodesy to mineral and energy exploration and development. Accordingly, at both the XXVIIth International Geological Congress in Moscow, in 1984, and at the XIXth General Assembly of the International Union of Geodesy and Geophysics in Vancouver, in 1987, the International Lithosphere Program convened special symposia on the subject of the origin and evolution of sedimentary basins and their mineral and energy resources. This special volume presents some of the principal results of those symposia.

  3. Origins and plasticity of neural crest cells and their roles in jaw and craniofacial evolution.

    PubMed

    Trainor, Paul A; Melton, Kristin R; Manzanares, Miguel

    2003-01-01

    The vertebrate head is a complex assemblage of cranial specializations, including the central and peripheral nervous systems, viscero- and neurocranium, musculature and connective tissue. The primary differences that exist between vertebrates and other chordates relate to their craniofacial organization. Therefore, evolution of the head is considered fundamental to the origins of vertebrates (Gans and Northcutt, 1983). The transition from invertebrate to vertebrate chordates was a multistep process, involving the formation and patterning of many new cell types and tissues. The evolution of early vertebrates, such as jawless fish, was accompanied by the emergence of a specialized set of cells, called neural crest cells which have long held a fascination for developmental and evolutionary biologists due to their considerable influence on the complex development of the vertebrate head. Although it has been classically thought that protochordates lacked neural crest counterparts, the recent identification and characterization of amphioxus and ascidian genes homologous to those involved in vertebrate neural crest development challenges this idea. Instead it suggests thatthe neural crest may not be a novel vertebrate cell population, but could have in fact originated from the protochordate dorsal midline epidermis. Consequently, the evolution of the neural crest cells could be reconsidered in terms of the acquisition of new cell properties such as delamination-migration and also multipotency which were key innovations that contributed to craniofacial development. In this review we discuss recent findings concerning the inductive origins of neural crest cells, as well as new insights into the mechanisms patterning this cell population and the subsequent influence this has had on craniofacial evolution.

  4. Evolving Ideas on the Origin and Evolution of Flowers: New Perspectives in the Genomic Era.

    PubMed

    Chanderbali, Andre S; Berger, Brent A; Howarth, Dianella G; Soltis, Pamela S; Soltis, Douglas E

    2016-04-01

    The origin of the flower was a key innovation in the history of complex organisms, dramatically altering Earth's biota. Advances in phylogenetics, developmental genetics, and genomics during the past 25 years have substantially advanced our understanding of the evolution of flowers, yet crucial aspects of floral evolution remain, such as the series of genetic and morphological changes that gave rise to the first flowers; the factors enabling the origin of the pentamerous eudicot flower, which characterizes ∼70% of all extant angiosperm species; and the role of gene and genome duplications in facilitating floral innovations. A key early concept was the ABC model of floral organ specification, developed by Elliott Meyerowitz and Enrico Coen and based on two model systems,Arabidopsis thalianaandAntirrhinum majus Yet it is now clear that these model systems are highly derived species, whose molecular genetic-developmental organization must be very different from that of ancestral, as well as early, angiosperms. In this article, we will discuss how new research approaches are illuminating the early events in floral evolution and the prospects for further progress. In particular, advancing the next generation of research in floral evolution will require the development of one or more functional model systems from among the basal angiosperms and basal eudicots. More broadly, we urge the development of "model clades" for genomic and evolutionary-developmental analyses, instead of the primary use of single "model organisms." We predict that new evolutionary models will soon emerge as genetic/genomic models, providing unprecedented new insights into floral evolution. Copyright © 2016 by the Genetics Society of America.

  5. Evolving Ideas on the Origin and Evolution of Flowers: New Perspectives in the Genomic Era

    PubMed Central

    Chanderbali, Andre S.; Berger, Brent A.; Howarth, Dianella G.; Soltis, Pamela S.; Soltis, Douglas E.

    2016-01-01

    The origin of the flower was a key innovation in the history of complex organisms, dramatically altering Earth’s biota. Advances in phylogenetics, developmental genetics, and genomics during the past 25 years have substantially advanced our understanding of the evolution of flowers, yet crucial aspects of floral evolution remain, such as the series of genetic and morphological changes that gave rise to the first flowers; the factors enabling the origin of the pentamerous eudicot flower, which characterizes ∼70% of all extant angiosperm species; and the role of gene and genome duplications in facilitating floral innovations. A key early concept was the ABC model of floral organ specification, developed by Elliott Meyerowitz and Enrico Coen and based on two model systems, Arabidopsis thaliana and Antirrhinum majus. Yet it is now clear that these model systems are highly derived species, whose molecular genetic-developmental organization must be very different from that of ancestral, as well as early, angiosperms. In this article, we will discuss how new research approaches are illuminating the early events in floral evolution and the prospects for further progress. In particular, advancing the next generation of research in floral evolution will require the development of one or more functional model systems from among the basal angiosperms and basal eudicots. More broadly, we urge the development of “model clades” for genomic and evolutionary-developmental analyses, instead of the primary use of single “model organisms.” We predict that new evolutionary models will soon emerge as genetic/genomic models, providing unprecedented new insights into floral evolution. PMID:27053123

  6. Experimental measurements of the origin of self-phasing in passively coupled fiber lasers.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Hung-Sheng; Nilsson, Johan; Sahu, Jayanta; Leger, James R

    2015-03-15

    We have directly measured the intensity distribution, gain, and induced phase shift between two fiber lasers that are coherently combined by a Dammann grating. The induced phase shift between the lasers has been shown to approximately cancel out any applied phase error introduced into the cavity, allowing the combined resonator to operate at an efficient low-loss state. We show that the origin of this self-phasing stems from a redistribution of power between the two lasers. The resulting difference in circulating intensity produces a differential change in saturated gain, which in turn produces a differential Kramers-Kronig phase shift that effectively cancels the applied phase error.

  7. A hypothesis on the biological origins and social evolution of music and dance

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tianyan

    2015-01-01

    The origins of music and musical emotions is still an enigma, here I propose a comprehensive hypothesis on the origins and evolution of music, dance, and speech from a biological and sociological perspective. I suggest that every pitch interval between neighboring notes in music represents corresponding movement pattern through interpreting the Doppler effect of sound, which not only provides a possible explanation for the transposition invariance of music, but also integrates music and dance into a common form—rhythmic movements. Accordingly, investigating the origins of music poses the question: why do humans appreciate rhythmic movements? I suggest that human appreciation of rhythmic movements and rhythmic events developed from the natural selection of organisms adapting to the internal and external rhythmic environments. The perception and production of, as well as synchronization with external and internal rhythms are so vital for an organism's survival and reproduction, that animals have a rhythm-related reward and emotion (RRRE) system. The RRRE system enables the appreciation of rhythmic movements and events, and is integral to the origination of music, dance and speech. The first type of rewards and emotions (rhythm-related rewards and emotions, RRREs) are evoked by music and dance, and have biological and social functions, which in turn, promote the evolution of music, dance and speech. These functions also evoke a second type of rewards and emotions, which I name society-related rewards and emotions (SRREs). The neural circuits of RRREs and SRREs develop in species formation and personal growth, with congenital and acquired characteristics, respectively, namely music is the combination of nature and culture. This hypothesis provides probable selection pressures and outlines the evolution of music, dance, and speech. The links between the Doppler effect and the RRREs and SRREs can be empirically tested, making the current hypothesis scientifically

  8. A hypothesis on the biological origins and social evolution of music and dance.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tianyan

    2015-01-01

    The origins of music and musical emotions is still an enigma, here I propose a comprehensive hypothesis on the origins and evolution of music, dance, and speech from a biological and sociological perspective. I suggest that every pitch interval between neighboring notes in music represents corresponding movement pattern through interpreting the Doppler effect of sound, which not only provides a possible explanation for the transposition invariance of music, but also integrates music and dance into a common form-rhythmic movements. Accordingly, investigating the origins of music poses the question: why do humans appreciate rhythmic movements? I suggest that human appreciation of rhythmic movements and rhythmic events developed from the natural selection of organisms adapting to the internal and external rhythmic environments. The perception and production of, as well as synchronization with external and internal rhythms are so vital for an organism's survival and reproduction, that animals have a rhythm-related reward and emotion (RRRE) system. The RRRE system enables the appreciation of rhythmic movements and events, and is integral to the origination of music, dance and speech. The first type of rewards and emotions (rhythm-related rewards and emotions, RRREs) are evoked by music and dance, and have biological and social functions, which in turn, promote the evolution of music, dance and speech. These functions also evoke a second type of rewards and emotions, which I name society-related rewards and emotions (SRREs). The neural circuits of RRREs and SRREs develop in species formation and personal growth, with congenital and acquired characteristics, respectively, namely music is the combination of nature and culture. This hypothesis provides probable selection pressures and outlines the evolution of music, dance, and speech. The links between the Doppler effect and the RRREs and SRREs can be empirically tested, making the current hypothesis scientifically

  9. Phase Evolution of the Crab Pulsar between Radio and X-Ray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, L. L.; Ge, M. Y.; Yuan, J. P.; Zheng, S. J.; Lu, F. J.; Tuo, Y. L.; Tong, H.; Zhang, S. N.; Lu, Y.; Han, J. L.; Du, Y. J.

    2017-08-01

    We study the X-ray phases of the Crab pulsar utilizing the 11-year observations from the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer, 6-year radio observations from Nanshan Telescope, and the ephemeris from Jodrell Bank Observatory. It is found that the X-ray phases in different energy bands and the radio phases from the Nanshan Telescope show similar behaviors, including long-time evolution and short-time variations. Such strong correlations between the X-ray and radio phases imply that the radio and X-ray timing noises are both generated from the pulsar spin that cannot be well described by the the monthly ephemeris from the Jodrell Bank observatory. When using the Nanshan phases as references to study the X-ray timing noise, it has a significantly smaller variation amplitude and shows no long-time evolution, with a change rate of (‑1.1 ± 1.1) × 10‑7 periods per day. These results show that the distance of the X-ray and radio emission regions on the Crab pulsar has no detectable secular change, and it is unlikely that the timing noises resulted from any unique physical processes in the radio or X-ray emitting regions. The similar behaviors of the X-ray and radio timing noises also imply that the variation of the interstellar medium is not the origin of the Crab pulsar’s timing noises, which is consistent with the results obtained from the multi-frequency radio observations of PSR B1540‑06.

  10. Origin of the hungry caterpillar: Evolution of fasting in slug moths (Insecta: Lepidoptera: Limacodidae).

    PubMed

    Zaspel, J M; Weller, S J; Epstein, M E

    2016-01-01

    Studies of caterpillar defense strategy evolution typically focus on aposematic coloration, gregarious behavior, and/or chemical defense. In the slug moth family Limacodidae, the evolution of chemical defense is coupled to the life history trait of first instar feeding behaviors. In nettle caterpillars, the first instars fast and molt into a second instar that feeds. In contrast, gelatines and monkey slug larval forms feed in the first instar. This study focused on whether the evolution of fasting associated with the nettle morphology was a derived trait of single or multiple origins. Twenty-nine species of Limacodidae (including one Chrysopolominae) representing 27 genera and four outgroup species with known first and final instar morphologies and behaviors were included. Four out-group species representing Megalopygidae (1 sp), Dalceridae (1 sp) and Aididae (2 sp) were included. These were sequenced for three molecular markers for a total of 4073 bp, mitochondrial COI (∼1500 bp), 18S (∼1900 bp) and the D2 region of 28S (approximately 670 bp). Maximum likelihood and Bayesian analyses were conducted. The resulting phylogeny and comparative analysis of feeding strategy revealed that the nettle caterpillar morphology and behavior of larval fasting may have a single origin. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Origin and evolution of metal P-type ATPases in Plantae (Archaeplastida)

    PubMed Central

    Hanikenne, Marc; Baurain, Denis

    2013-01-01

    Metal ATPases are a subfamily of P-type ATPases involved in the transport of metal cations across biological membranes. They all share an architecture featuring eight transmembrane domains in pairs of two and are found in prokaryotes as well as in a variety of Eukaryotes. In Arabidopsis thaliana, eight metal P-type ATPases have been described, four being specific to copper transport and four displaying a broader metal specificity, including zinc, cadmium, and possibly copper and calcium. So far, few efforts have been devoted to elucidating the origin and evolution of these proteins in Eukaryotes. In this work, we use large-scale phylogenetics to show that metal P-type ATPases form a homogenous group among P-type ATPases and that their specialization into either monovalent (Cu) or divalent (Zn, Cd…) metal transport stems from a gene duplication that took place early in the evolution of Life. Then, we demonstrate that the four subgroups of plant metal ATPases all have a different evolutionary origin and a specific taxonomic distribution, only one tracing back to the cyanobacterial progenitor of the chloroplast. Finally, we examine the subsequent evolution of these proteins in green plants and conclude that the genes thoroughly characterized in model organisms are often the result of lineage-specific gene duplications, which calls for caution when attempting to infer function from sequence similarity alone in non-model organisms. PMID:24575101

  12. Origin and evolution of the Notch signalling pathway: an overview from eukaryotic genomes

    PubMed Central

    Gazave, Eve; Lapébie, Pascal; Richards, Gemma S; Brunet, Frédéric; Ereskovsky, Alexander V; Degnan, Bernard M; Borchiellini, Carole; Vervoort, Michel; Renard, Emmanuelle

    2009-01-01

    Background Of the 20 or so signal transduction pathways that orchestrate cell-cell interactions in metazoans, seven are involved during development. One of these is the Notch signalling pathway which regulates cellular identity, proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis via the developmental processes of lateral inhibition and boundary induction. In light of this essential role played in metazoan development, we surveyed a wide range of eukaryotic genomes to determine the origin and evolution of the components and auxiliary factors that compose and modulate this pathway. Results We searched for 22 components of the Notch pathway in 35 different species that represent 8 major clades of eukaryotes, performed phylogenetic analyses and compared the domain compositions of the two fundamental molecules: the receptor Notch and its ligands Delta/Jagged. We confirm that a Notch pathway, with true receptors and ligands is specific to the Metazoa. This study also sheds light on the deep ancestry of a number of genes involved in this pathway, while other members are revealed to have a more recent origin. The origin of several components can be accounted for by the shuffling of pre-existing protein domains, or via lateral gene transfer. In addition, certain domains have appeared de novo more recently, and can be considered metazoan synapomorphies. Conclusion The Notch signalling pathway emerged in Metazoa via a diversity of molecular mechanisms, incorporating both novel and ancient protein domains during eukaryote evolution. Thus, a functional Notch signalling pathway was probably present in Urmetazoa. PMID:19825158

  13. The origin and early evolution of birds: discoveries, disputes, and perspectives from fossil evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Zhonghe

    2004-10-01

    The study of the origin and early evolution of birds has never produced as much excitement and public attention as in the past decade. Well preserved and abundant new fossils of birds and dinosaurs have provided unprecedented new evidence on the dinosaurian origin of birds, the arboreal origin of avian flight, and the origin of feathers prior to flapping flight. The Mesozoic avian assemblage mainly comprises two major lineages: the prevalent extinct group Enantiornithes, and the Ornithurae, which gave rise to all modern birds, as well as several more basal taxa. Cretaceous birds radiated into various paleoecological niches that included fish- and seed-eating. Significant size and morphological differences and variation in flight capabilities, ranging from gliding to powerful flight among early birds, highlight the diversification of birds in the Early Cretaceous. There is little evidence, however, to support a Mesozoic origin of modern avian groups. Controversy and debate, nevertheless, surround many of these findings, and more details are needed to give a better appreciation of the significance of these new discoveries.

  14. Constructive Approaches for Understanding the Origin of Self-Replication and Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Ichihashi, Norikazu; Yomo, Tetsuya

    2016-01-01

    The mystery of the origin of life can be divided into two parts. The first part is the origin of biomolecules: under what physicochemical conditions did biomolecules such as amino acids, nucleotides, and their polymers arise? The second part of the mystery is the origin of life-specific functions such as the replication of genetic information, the reproduction of cellular structures, metabolism, and evolution. These functions require the coordination of many different kinds of biological molecules. A direct strategy to approach the second part of the mystery is the constructive approach, in which life-specific functions are recreated in a test tube from specific biological molecules. Using this approach, we are able to employ design principles to reproduce life-specific functions, and the knowledge gained through the reproduction process provides clues as to their origins. In this mini-review, we introduce recent insights gained using this approach, and propose important future directions for advancing our understanding of the origins of life. PMID:27420098

  15. The origin and early evolution of birds: discoveries, disputes, and perspectives from fossil evidence.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhonghe

    2004-10-01

    The study of the origin and early evolution of birds has never produced as much excitement and public attention as in the past decade. Well preserved and abundant new fossils of birds and dinosaurs have provided unprecedented new evidence on the dinosaurian origin of birds, the arboreal origin of avian flight, and the origin of feathers prior to flapping flight. The Mesozoic avian assemblage mainly comprises two major lineages: the prevalent extinct group Enantiornithes, and the Ornithurae, which gave rise to all modern birds, as well as several more basal taxa. Cretaceous birds radiated into various paleoecological niches that included fish- and seed-eating. Significant size and morphological differences and variation in flight capabilities, ranging from gliding to powerful flight among early birds, highlight the diversification of birds in the Early Cretaceous. There is little evidence, however, to support a Mesozoic origin of modern avian groups. Controversy and debate, nevertheless, surround many of these findings, and more details are needed to give a better appreciation of the significance of these new discoveries.

  16. Abrupt deceleration of molecular evolution linked to the origin of arborescence in ferns.

    PubMed

    Korall, Petra; Schuettpelz, Eric; Pryer, Kathleen M

    2010-09-01

    Molecular rate heterogeneity, whereby rates of molecular evolution vary among groups of organisms, is a well-documented phenomenon. Nonetheless, its causes are poorly understood. For animals, generation time is frequently cited because longer-lived species tend to have slower rates of molecular evolution than their shorter-lived counterparts. Although a similar pattern has been uncovered in flowering plants, using proxies such as growth form, the underlying process has remained elusive. Here, we find a deceleration of molecular evolutionary rate to be coupled with the origin of arborescence in ferns. Phylogenetic branch lengths within the “tree fern” clade are considerably shorter than those of closely related lineages, and our analyses demonstrate that this is due to a significant difference in molecular evolutionary rate. Reconstructions reveal that an abrupt rate deceleration coincided with the evolution of the long-lived tree-like habit at the base of the tree fern clade. This suggests that a generation time effect may well be ubiquitous across the green tree of life, and that the search for a responsible mechanism must focus on characteristics shared by all vascular plants. Discriminating among the possibilities will require contributions from various biological disciplines,but will be necessary for a full appreciation of molecular evolution.

  17. Human development x: Explanation of macroevolution--top-down evolution materializes consciousness. The origin of metamorphosis.

    PubMed

    Hermansen, Tyge Dahl; Ventegodt, Søren; Merrick, Joav

    2006-12-15

    In this paper, we first give a short discussion of the macroevolution viewing life as information-directed, complex, dynamic systems. On this basis, we give our explanation of the origin of life and discuss the top-down evolution of molecules, proteins, and macroevolution. We discuss these subjects according to our new holistic biological paradigm. In view of this, we discuss the macroevolution of the organism, the species, the biosphere, and human society. After this, we discuss the shift in evolution from natural selection to a new proposed process of nature called the "metamorphous top-down" evolution. We discuss the capability of the evolutionary shift to govern some of the processes that lead to the formation of new species. We discuss the mechanisms we think are behind this proposed shift in evolution and conclude that this event is able to explain the huge biological diversity of nature in combination with evolutionary natural selection. We also discuss this event of nature as an isolated, but integrated, part of the universe. We propose the most important genetic and biochemical process that we think is behind the evolutionary shift as a complicated symbiosis of mechanisms leading to metamorphosis in all biological individuals, from bacteria to humans. The energetic superorbital that manifests the consciousness governs all these processes through quantum chemical activity. This is the key to evolutionary shift through the consciousness, and we propose to call this process "adult human metamorphosis".

  18. A variable fork rate affects timing of origin firing and S phase dynamics in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Supady, Adriana; Klipp, Edda; Barberis, Matteo

    2013-10-20

    Activation (in the following referred to as firing) of replication origins is a continuous and irreversible process regulated by availability of DNA replication molecules and cyclin-dependent kinase activities, which are often altered in human cancers. The temporal, progressive origin firing throughout S phase appears as a characteristic replication profile, and computational models have been developed to describe this process. Although evidence from yeast to human indicates that a range of replication fork rates is observed experimentally in order to complete a timely S phase, those models incorporate velocities that are uniform across the genome. Taking advantage of the availability of replication profiles, chromosomal position and replication timing, here we investigated how fork rate may affect origin firing in budding yeast. Our analysis suggested that patterns of origin firing can be observed from a modulation of the fork rate that strongly correlates with origin density. Replication profiles of chromosomes with a low origin density were fitted with a variable fork rate, whereas for the ones with a high origin density a constant fork rate was appropriate. This indeed supports the previously reported correlation between inter-origin distance and fork rate changes. Intriguingly, the calculated correlation between fork rate and timing of origin firing allowed the estimation of firing efficiencies for the replication origins. This approach correctly retrieved origin efficiencies previously determined for chromosome VI and provided testable prediction for other chromosomal origins. Our results gain deeper insights into the temporal coordination of genome duplication, indicating that control of the replication fork rate is required for the timely origin firing during S phase. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Origin and evolution of transporter substrate specificity within the NPF family.

    PubMed

    Jørgensen, Morten Egevang; Xu, Deyang; Crocoll, Christoph; Ramírez, David; Motawia, Mohammed Saddik; Olsen, Carl Erik; Nour-Eldin, Hussam Hassan; Halkier, Barbara Ann

    2017-03-03

    Despite vast diversity in metabolites and the matching substrate specificity of their transporters, little is known about how evolution of transporter substrate specificities is linked to emergence of substrates via evolution of biosynthetic pathways. Transporter specificity towards the recently evolved glucosinolates characteristic of Brassicales is shown to evolve prior to emergence of glucosinolate biosynthesis. Furthermore, we show that glucosinolate transporters belonging to the ubiquitous NRT1/PTR FAMILY (NPF) likely evolved from transporters of the ancestral cyanogenic glucosides found across more than 2500 species outside of the Brassicales. Biochemical characterization of orthologs along the phylogenetic lineage from cassava to A. thaliana, suggests that alterations in the electrogenicity of the transporters accompanied changes in substrate specificity. Linking the evolutionary path of transporter substrate specificities to that of the biosynthetic pathways, exemplify how transporter substrate specificities originate and evolve as new biosynthesis pathways emerge.

  20. Origin and Evolution of the Uranian and Neptunian Satellites: Some Dynamical Considerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dermott, S. F.

    1984-01-01

    The satellite system of Neptune is so irregular that some formation mechanism or subsequent dynamical evolution that sets it apart from the other, more regular, satellite systems is obviously indicated. McKinnon argued that satellite capture is the most likely possibility and has shown that tidal circularization of Triton's presumably highly eccentric initial orbit probably resulted in melting of the satellite's interior. The satellite system of Uranus, although somewhat bland, also has a number of special features that indicate an interesting dynamical history. These include the anomalously high orbital inclination of Miranda and the probable coexistence of small satellites and narrow rings inside the plant's Roche limit. The possibility that orbital evolution due to tidal dissipation is involved in both of these phenomena is discussed. Other topics discussed are: the origin of rings; the formation of coorbital satellites; the lack of stable orbit-orbit resonances in the Uranian satellite system; and chaos, tidal heating and the shapes of Miranda and Ariel.

  1. Origin and evolution of transporter substrate specificity within the NPF family

    PubMed Central

    Jørgensen, Morten Egevang; Xu, Deyang; Crocoll, Christoph; Ramírez, David; Motawia, Mohammed Saddik; Olsen, Carl Erik; Nour-Eldin, Hussam Hassan; Halkier, Barbara Ann

    2017-01-01

    Despite vast diversity in metabolites and the matching substrate specificity of their transporters, little is known about how evolution of transporter substrate specificities is linked to emergence of substrates via evolution of biosynthetic pathways. Transporter specificity towards the recently evolved glucosinolates characteristic of Brassicales is shown to evolve prior to emergence of glucosinolate biosynthesis. Furthermore, we show that glucosinolate transporters belonging to the ubiquitous NRT1/PTR FAMILY (NPF) likely evolved from transporters of the ancestral cyanogenic glucosides found across more than 2500 species outside of the Brassicales. Biochemical characterization of orthologs along the phylogenetic lineage from cassava to A. thaliana, suggests that alterations in the electrogenicity of the transporters accompanied changes in substrate specificity. Linking the evolutionary path of transporter substrate specificities to that of the biosynthetic pathways, exemplify how transporter substrate specificities originate and evolve as new biosynthesis pathways emerge. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.19466.001 PMID:28257001

  2. Evolution and the eye: the Darwin bicentennial and the sesquicentennial of the origin of species.

    PubMed

    Fishman, Ronald S

    2008-11-01

    Evolution is an essential concept for anyone who considers science to be the best way to understand the natural world. It is as fully established as any scientific principle can be and is the great unifying theme in all of biology, as integral to understanding life-forms as gravity is to understanding the cosmos. On the bicentennial of the birth of Charles Darwin in 1809, and 150 years after the publication of On the Origin of Species by Means of Natural Selection in 1859, we should remember the main features of eye evolution and the prominent place the eye holds in the development and refinement of evolutionary theory. A few highlights include the antiquity of rhodopsin, the ready capacity of an eye to evolve, the effect of eyes on the diversification of life-forms, and the promising influence of genetics on developmental and evolutionary biology.

  3. The origin and early evolution of whales: macroevolution documented on the Indian subcontinent.

    PubMed

    Bajpai, S; Thewissen, J G M; Sahni, A

    2009-11-01

    The origin of whales (order Cetacea) from a four-footed land animal is one of the best understood examples of macroevolutionary change. This evolutionary transition has been substantially elucidated by fossil finds from the Indian subcontinent in the past decade and a half. Here, we review the first steps of whale evolution, i.e. the transition from a land mammal to obligate marine predators, documented by the Eocene cetacean families of the Indian subcontinent: Pakicetidae, Ambulocetidae, Remingtonocetidae, Protocetidae, and Basilosauridae, as well as their artiodactyl sister group, the Raoellidae. We also discuss the influence that the excellent fossil record has on the study of the evolution of organ systems, in particular the locomotor and hearing systems.

  4. Towards a theory of modern human origins: geography, demography, and diversity in recent human evolution.

    PubMed

    Lahr, M M; Foley, R A

    1998-01-01

    The origins of modern humans have been the central debate in palaeoanthropology during the last decade. We examine the problem in the context of the history of anthropology, the accumulating evidence for a recent African origin, and evolutionary mechanisms. Using a historical perspective, we show that the current controversy is a continuation of older conflicts and as such relates to questions of both origins and diversity. However, a better fossil sample, improved dates, and genetic data have introduced new perspectives, and we argue that evolutionary geography, which uses spatial distributions of populations as the basis for integrating contingent, adaptive, and demographic aspects of microevolutionary change, provides an appropriate theoretical framework. Evolutionary geography is used to explore two events: the evolution of the Neanderthal lineage and the relationship between an ancestral bottleneck with the evolution of anatomically modern humans and their diversity. We argue that the Neanderthal and modern lineages share a common ancestor in an African population between 350,000 and 250,000 years ago rather than in the earlier Middle Pleistocene; this ancestral population, which developed mode 3 technology (Levallois/Middle Stone Age), dispersed across Africa and western Eurasia in a warmer period prior to independent evolution towards Neanderthals and modern humans in stage 6. Both lineages would thus share a common large-brained ancestry, a technology, and a history of dispersal. They differ in the conditions under which they subsequently evolved and their ultimate evolutionary fate. Both lineages illustrate the repeated interactions of the glacial cycles, the role of cold-arid periods in producing fragmentation of populations, bottlenecks, and isolation, and the role of warmer periods in producing trans-African dispersals.

  5. Origin and Evolution of Water Oxidation before the Last Common Ancestor of the Cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Cardona, Tanai; Murray, James W; Rutherford, A William

    2015-05-01

    Photosystem II, the water oxidizing enzyme, altered the course of evolution by filling the atmosphere with oxygen. Here, we reconstruct the origin and evolution of water oxidation at an unprecedented level of detail by studying the phylogeny of all D1 subunits, the main protein coordinating the water oxidizing cluster (Mn4CaO5) of Photosystem II. We show that D1 exists in several forms making well-defined clades, some of which could have evolved before the origin of water oxidation and presenting many atypical characteristics. The most ancient form is found in the genome of Gloeobacter kilaueensis JS-1 and this has a C-terminus with a higher sequence identity to D2 than to any other D1. Two other groups of early evolving D1 correspond to those expressed under prolonged far-red illumination and in darkness. These atypical D1 forms are characterized by a dramatically different Mn4CaO5 binding site and a Photosystem II containing such a site may assemble an unconventional metal cluster. The first D1 forms with a full set of ligands to the Mn4CaO5 cluster are grouped with D1 proteins expressed only under low oxygen concentrations and the latest evolving form is the dominant type of D1 found in all cyanobacteria and plastids. In addition, we show that the plastid ancestor had a D1 more similar to those in early branching Synechococcus. We suggest each one of these forms of D1 originated from transitional forms at different stages toward the innovation and optimization of water oxidation before the last common ancestor of all known cyanobacteria. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  6. The Origin and Evolution of Halo Bias in Linear and Nonlinear Regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kravtsov, Andrey V.; Klypin, Anatoly A.

    1999-08-01

    attribute the strong antibias observed in the halo correlation function and power spectrum to these effects. The results of this study show that despite the apparent complexity, the origin and evolution of bias can be understood in terms of the processes that drive the formation and evolution of dark matter halos. These processes conspire to produce a halo distribution quite different from the overall distribution of matter, yet remarkably similar to the observed distribution of galaxies.

  7. [The evolution of the origin and connotation of the word Ma Zhui ("anesthesia")].

    PubMed

    Li, Chun-yu; Guo, Bin; Jia, Jin-tai

    2009-09-01

    It has been a long time since people recognized the word "Ma Zhui (anesthesia)" which was also recorded in the medical literature of past generations, for example: anesthesia powder, the magic prescription of toad powder of Huatuo, magic sleeping powder, 'knock-out' drops etc. In 1846, etherization was applied in clinic successfully, since then modern anesthesiology has had a process of more than 150 years during which the concept of the word "anesthesia" changed constantly. Reviewing the evolution of the origin and the concept of the word "anesthesia" can be of benefit to recognize and understand the concept and nature of "anesthesia" to improve clinical anesthesia.

  8. Origin of the Directed Movement of Protocells in the Early Stages of the Evolution of Life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melkikh, Alexey V.; Chesnokova, Oksana I.

    2012-08-01

    The origin of the directed motion of protocells during the early stages of evolution was discussed. The expenditures for movement, space orientation, and reception of information about the environment were taken into consideration, and it was shown that directed movement is evolutionarily advantageous in the following cases: when opposite gradients of different resources (for example, matter and energy) are great enough and when there is a rapid change in environmental parameters. It was also shown that the advantage of directed movement strategies depends greatly on how information about the environment is obtained by a protocell.

  9. New Insights Into the Origin and Evolution of the Hikurangi Oceanic Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoernle, Kaj; Hauff, Folkmar; Werner, Reinhard; Mortimer, Nicholas

    2004-10-01

    Oceanic plateaus and continental flood basalts, collectively referred to as large igneous provinces (LIPs), represent the most voluminous volcanic events on Earth. In contrast to continental LIPs, relatively little is known about the surface and internal structure, range in age and chemical composition, origin, and evolution of oceanic plateaus, which occur throughout the world's oceans. One of the major goals of the R/V Sonne SO168 ZEALANDIA expedition (deport Wellington, 3 December 2002, return Christchurch, 15 January 2003) was to investigate the Hikurangi oceanic plateau off the east coast of New Zealand.

  10. Speculations on the origin and evolution of the Utopia-Elysium lowlands of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frey, Herbert V.; Schultz, Richard A.

    1990-01-01

    This paper proposes a qualitative model for the origin of the Utopia-Elysium northern lowlands on eastern Mars in terms of the long-term evolution of two large overlapping impact basins. The model, which is consistent with both the observed geologic constraints and more quantitative results obtained by numerical modeling of smaller (Orientale-size) impact basins, is shown to qualitatively account for the major topographic variation seen in the Utopia-Elysium region, including the overall 'lowness' of the area and localized depressions.

  11. Supernovae from yellow, blue supergiants: origin and consequences for stellar evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meynet, Georges; Georgy, Cyril; Saio, Hideyuki; Kudritzki, Rolf-Peter; Groh, Jose

    2015-08-01

    A few core collapse supernovae progenitors have been found to be yellow or blue supergiants. We shall discuss possible scenarios involving single and close binary evolution allowing to explain this kind of core collapse supernova progenitors. According to stellar models for both single and close binaries, blue supergiants, at the end of their nuclear lifetimes and thus progenitors of core collapse supernovae, present very different characteristics for what concerns their surface compositions, rotational surface velocities and pulsational properties with respect to blue supergiants in their core helium burning phase. We discuss how the small observed scatter of the flux-weighted gravity-luminosity (FWGL) relation of blue supergiants constrains the evolution of massive stars after the Main-Sequence phase and the nature of the progenitors of supernovae in the mass range between 12 and 40 solar masses. The present day observed surface abundances of blue supergiants, of their pulsational properties, as well as the small scatter of the FWGL relation provide strong constraints on both internal mixing and mass loss in massive stars and therefore on the end point of their evolution.

  12. The analysis of translation-related gene set boosts debates around origin and evolution of mimiviruses

    PubMed Central

    Colson, Philippe; La Scola, Bernard

    2017-01-01

    The giant mimiviruses challenged the well-established concept of viruses, blurring the roots of the tree of life, mainly due to their genetic content. Along with other nucleo-cytoplasmic large DNA viruses, they compose a new proposed order—named Megavirales—whose origin and evolution generate heated debate in the scientific community. The presence of an arsenal of genes not widespread in the virosphere related to important steps of the translational process, including transfer RNAs, aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and translation factors for peptide synthesis, constitutes an important element of this debate. In this review, we highlight the main findings to date about the translational machinery of the mimiviruses and compare their distribution along the distinct members of the family Mimiviridae. Furthermore, we discuss how the presence and/or absence of the translation-related genes among mimiviruses raises important insights to boost the debate on their origin and evolutionary history. PMID:28207761

  13. Origin, evolution, and genotyping of emergent porcine epidemic diarrhea virus strains in the United States.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yao-Wei; Dickerman, Allan W; Piñeyro, Pablo; Li, Long; Fang, Li; Kiehne, Ross; Opriessnig, Tanja; Meng, Xiang-Jin

    2013-10-15

    Coronaviruses are known to infect humans and other animals and cause respiratory and gastrointestinal diseases. Here we report the emergence of porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) in the United States and determination of its origin, evolution, and genotypes based on temporal and geographical evidence. Histological lesions in small intestine sections of affected pigs and the complete genomic sequences of three emergent strains of PEDV isolated from outbreaks in Minnesota and Iowa were characterized. Genetic and phylogenetic analyses of the three U.S. strains revealed a close relationship with Chinese PEDV strains and their likely Chinese origin. The U.S. PEDV strains underwent evolutionary divergence, which can be classified into two sublineages. The three emergent U.S. strains are most closely related to a strain isolated in 2012 from Anhui Province in China, which might be the result of multiple recombination events between different genetic lineages or sublineages of PEDV. Molecular clock analysis of the divergent time based on the complete genomic sequences is consistent with the actual time difference, approximately 2 to 3 years, of the PED outbreaks between China (December 2010) and the United States (May 2013). The finding that the emergent U.S. PEDV strains share unique genetic features at the 5'-untranslated region with a bat coronavirus provided further support of the evolutionary origin of PEDV from bats and potential cross-species transmission. The data from this study have important implications for understanding the ongoing PEDV outbreaks in the United States and will guide future efforts to develop effective preventive and control measures against PEDV. The sudden emergence of porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV), a coronavirus, for the first time in the United States causes significant economic and public health concerns. Since its recognition in May 2013, PEDV has rapidly spread across the United States, resulting in high mortality in piglets

  14. The cytochrome P450 genesis locus: the origin and evolution of animal cytochrome P450s

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, David R.; Goldstone, Jared V.; Stegeman, John J.

    2013-01-01

    The neighbourhoods of cytochrome P450 (CYP) genes in deuterostome genomes, as well as those of the cnidarians Nematostella vectensis and Acropora digitifera and the placozoan Trichoplax adhaerens were examined to find clues concerning the evolution of CYP genes in animals. CYP genes created by the 2R whole genome duplications in chordates have been identified. Both microsynteny and macrosynteny were used to identify genes that coexisted near CYP genes in the animal ancestor. We show that all 11 CYP clans began in a common gene environment. The evidence implies the existence of a single locus, which we term the ‘cytochrome P450 genesis locus’, where one progenitor CYP gene duplicated to create a tandem set of genes that were precursors of the 11 animal CYP clans: CYP Clans 2, 3, 4, 7, 19, 20, 26, 46, 51, 74 and mitochondrial. These early CYP genes existed side by side before the origin of cnidarians, possibly with a few additional genes interspersed. The Hox gene cluster, WNT genes, an NK gene cluster and at least one ARF gene were close neighbours to this original CYP locus. According to this evolutionary scenario, the CYP74 clan originated from animals and not from land plants nor from a common ancestor of plants and animals. The CYP7 and CYP19 families that are chordate-specific belong to CYP clans that seem to have originated in the CYP genesis locus as well, even though this requires many gene losses to explain their current distribution. The approach to uncovering the CYP genesis locus overcomes confounding effects because of gene conversion, sequence divergence, gene birth and death, and opens the way to understanding the biodiversity of CYP genes, families and subfamilies, which in animals has been obscured by more than 600 Myr of evolution. PMID:23297357

  15. Reconstructing the Origin of Oxygenic Photosynthesis: Do Assembly and Photoactivation Recapitulate Evolution?

    PubMed Central

    Cardona, Tanai

    2016-01-01

    Due to the great abundance of genomes and protein structures that today span a broad diversity of organisms, now more than ever before, it is possible to reconstruct the molecular evolution of protein complexes at an incredible level of detail. Here, I recount the story of oxygenic photosynthesis or how an ancestral reaction center was transformed into a sophisticated photochemical machine capable of water oxidation. First, I review the evolution of all reaction center proteins in order to highlight that Photosystem II and Photosystem I, today only found in the phylum Cyanobacteria, branched out very early in the history of photosynthesis. Therefore, it is very unlikely that they were acquired via horizontal gene transfer from any of the described phyla of anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria. Second, I present a new evolutionary scenario for the origin of the CP43 and CP47 antenna of Photosystem II. I suggest that the antenna proteins originated from the remodeling of an entire Type I reaction center protein and not from the partial gene duplication of a Type I reaction center gene. Third, I highlight how Photosystem II and Photosystem I reaction center proteins interact with small peripheral subunits in remarkably similar patterns and hypothesize that some of this complexity may be traced back to the most ancestral reaction center. Fourth, I outline the sequence of events that led to the origin of the Mn4CaO5 cluster and show that the most ancestral Type II reaction center had some of the basic structural components that would become essential in the coordination of the water-oxidizing complex. Finally, I collect all these ideas, starting at the origin of the first reaction center proteins and ending with the emergence of the water-oxidizing cluster, to hypothesize that the complex and well-organized process of assembly and photoactivation of Photosystem II recapitulate evolutionary transitions in the path to oxygenic photosynthesis. PMID:26973693

  16. Association between the Dynamics of Multiple Replication Origins and the Evolution of Multireplicon Genome Architecture in Haloarchaea

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Zhenfang; Yang, Haibo; Liu, Jingfang; Wang, Lei; Xiang, Hua

    2014-01-01

    Haloarchaeal genomes are generally composed of multiple replicons, and each replicon has a single or multiple replication origin(s). The comparative genomic analysis of replication origins from closely related species can be used to reveal the evolutionary mechanisms that account for the development of multiple origin systems. Multiple replication origins have been in silico and experimentally investigated in Haloarcula hispanica, which raise the possibility for comparisons of multiple replication origins in Haloarcula species. Thus, we performed a comparison of H. hispanica replication origins with those from five additional Haloarcula species. We demonstrated that the multiple replication origins in the chromosome were evolved independently multiple times from the oriC1-dependent ancestral chromosome. Particularly, the two origins oriC1 and oriC2 were conserved in location, and both of them were adjacent to an rRNA operon, suggestive of correlations in replication and expression of surrounding genes that may promote the conservation of these two origins. Some chromosomal variable regions were used as hotspots for origin evolution in which replication origins were continually being acquired, lost, and disrupted. Furthermore, we demonstrated that autonomously replicating sequence plasmids with H. hispanica minichromosomal replication origins were extremely unstable. Because both organization and replication origins of minichromosomes were not conserved, we proposed an association between the evolution of extrachromosomal replicons and origin variation. Taken together, we provided insights into the evolutionary history of multiple replication origins in Haloarcula species, and proposed a general model of association between the dynamics of multiple replication origins and the evolution of multireplicon genome architecture in haloarchaea. PMID:25281843

  17. Origins Space Telescope: Galaxy and Black Hole Evolution over Cosmic Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pope, Alexandra; Origins Space Telescope Study Team

    2017-01-01

    The Origins Space Telescope (OST) is the mission concept for the Far-Infrared Surveyor, a study in development by NASA in preparation for the 2020 Astronomy and Astrophysics Decadal Survey. Origins is planned to be a large aperture, actively-cooled telescope covering a wide span of the mid- to far-infrared spectrum. Its imagers and spectrographs will enable a variety of surveys of the sky that will discover and characterize the most distant galaxies, Milky-Way, exoplanets, and the outer reaches of our Solar system. Origins will enable flagship-quality general observing programs led by the astronomical community in the 2030s. The Science and Technology Definition Team (STDT) would like to hear your science needs and ideas for this mission. The team can be contacted at firsurveyor_info@lists.ipac.caltech.edu. This presentation will provide a summary of the science case related to galaxy formation and evolution. Origins will investigate the connection between black hole growth and star formation, understand the role of feedback from supernovae and active galactic nuclei, probe the multiphase interstellar medium, and chart the rise of metals over cosmic time.

  18. The Role of Transposable Elements in the Origin and Evolution of MicroRNAs in Human

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Sheng; Jin, Ping; Zhou, Xue; Chen, Liming; Ma, Fei

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are crucial regulators of gene expression at the post-transcriptional level in eukaryotes via targeting gene 3'-untranslated regions. Transposable elements (TEs) are considered as natural origins of some miRNAs. However, what miRNAs are and how these miRNAs originate and evolve from TEs remain unclear. We identified 409 TE-derived miRNAs (386 overlapped with TEs and 23 un-overlapped with TEs) which are derived from TEs in human. This indicates that the TEs play important roles in origin of miRNAs in human. In addition, we found that the proportions of miRNAs derived from TEs (MDTEs) in human are more than other vertebrates especially non-mammal vertebrates. Furthermore, we classified MDTEs into three types and found that TE head or tail sequences along with adjacent genomic sequences contribute to generation of human miRNAs. Our current study will improve the understanding of origin and evolution of human miRNAs. PMID:26115450

  19. Effect of Phase Contiguity and Morphology on the Evolution of Deformation Texture in Two-Phase Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurao, N. P.; Suwas, Satyam

    2017-02-01

    Deformation texture evolution in two-phase xFe- yNi-(100- x- y)Cr model alloys and Ti-13Nb-13Zr alloy was studied during rolling to develop an understanding of micro-mechanisms of deformation in industrially relevant two-phase FCC-BCC steels and HCP-BCC titanium alloys, respectively. It was found that volume fraction and contiguity of phases lead to systematic changes in texture, while morphology affects the strength of texture. There was a characteristic change in texture from typical Brass-type to a weaker Copper-type texture in the austenite phase accompanied with a change from alpha fiber to gamma fiber in ferrite phase for Fe-Ni-Cr alloys with increase in fraction of harder ferrite phase. However, similar characteristic texture evolution was noted in both α and β phase irrespective of the different initial morphologies in Ti-13Nb-13Zr alloy. Viscoplastic self-consistent simulations with two-phase scheme were able to qualitatively predict texture evolution in individual phases. It is proposed that the transition from iso-strain-type behavior for equiaxed microstructure at low strain to iso-stress-type behavior at higher strain is aided by the presence of higher volume fraction of the second phase and increasing aspect ratio of individual phases in two-phase alloys.

  20. Tracing the origin of functional and conserved domains in the human proteome: implications for protein evolution at the modular level.

    PubMed

    Pal, Lipika R; Guda, Chittibabu

    2006-11-07

    The functional repertoire of the human proteome is an incremental collection of functions accomplished by protein domains evolved along the Homo sapiens lineage. Therefore, knowledge on the origin of these functionalities provides a better understanding of the domain and protein evolution in human. The lack of proper comprehension about such origin has impelled us to study the evolutionary origin of human proteome in a unique way as detailed in this study. This study reports a unique approach for understanding the evolution of human proteome by tracing the origin of its constituting domains hierarchically, along the Homo sapiens lineage. The uniqueness of this method lies in subtractive searching of functional and conserved domains in the human proteome resulting in higher efficiency of detecting their origins. From these analyses the nature of protein evolution and trends in domain evolution can be observed in the context of the entire human proteome data. The method adopted here also helps delineate the degree of divergence of functional families occurred during the course of evolution. This approach to trace the evolutionary origin of functional domains in the human proteome facilitates better understanding of their functional versatility as well as provides insights into the functionality of hypothetical proteins present in the human proteome. This work elucidates the origin of functional and conserved domains in human proteins, their distribution along the Homo sapiens lineage, occurrence frequency of different domain combinations and proteome-wide patterns of their distribution, providing insights into the evolutionary solution to the increased complexity of the human proteome.

  1. Restriction and recruitment-gene duplication and the origin and evolution of snake venom toxins.

    PubMed

    Hargreaves, Adam D; Swain, Martin T; Hegarty, Matthew J; Logan, Darren W; Mulley, John F

    2014-08-01

    Snake venom has been hypothesized to have originated and diversified through a process that involves duplication of genes encoding body proteins with subsequent recruitment of the copy to the venom gland, where natural selection acts to develop or increase toxicity. However, gene duplication is known to be a rare event in vertebrate genomes, and the recruitment of duplicated genes to a novel expression domain (neofunctionalization) is an even rarer process that requires the evolution of novel combinations of transcription factor binding sites in upstream regulatory regions. Therefore, although this hypothesis concerning the evolution of snake venom is very unlikely and should be regarded with caution, it is nonetheless often assumed to be established fact, hindering research into the true origins of snake venom toxins. To critically evaluate this hypothesis, we have generated transcriptomic data for body tissues and salivary and venom glands from five species of venomous and nonvenomous reptiles. Our comparative transcriptomic analysis of these data reveals that snake venom does not evolve through the hypothesized process of duplication and recruitment of genes encoding body proteins. Indeed, our results show that many proposed venom toxins are in fact expressed in a wide variety of body tissues, including the salivary gland of nonvenomous reptiles and that these genes have therefore been restricted to the venom gland following duplication, not recruited. Thus, snake venom evolves through the duplication and subfunctionalization of genes encoding existing salivary proteins. These results highlight the danger of the elegant and intuitive "just-so story" in evolutionary biology.

  2. Restriction and Recruitment—Gene Duplication and the Origin and Evolution of Snake Venom Toxins

    PubMed Central

    Hargreaves, Adam D.; Swain, Martin T.; Hegarty, Matthew J.; Logan, Darren W.; Mulley, John F.

    2014-01-01

    Snake venom has been hypothesized to have originated and diversified through a process that involves duplication of genes encoding body proteins with subsequent recruitment of the copy to the venom gland, where natural selection acts to develop or increase toxicity. However, gene duplication is known to be a rare event in vertebrate genomes, and the recruitment of duplicated genes to a novel expression domain (neofunctionalization) is an even rarer process that requires the evolution of novel combinations of transcription factor binding sites in upstream regulatory regions. Therefore, although this hypothesis concerning the evolution of snake venom is very unlikely and should be regarded with caution, it is nonetheless often assumed to be established fact, hindering research into the true origins of snake venom toxins. To critically evaluate this hypothesis, we have generated transcriptomic data for body tissues and salivary and venom glands from five species of venomous and nonvenomous reptiles. Our comparative transcriptomic analysis of these data reveals that snake venom does not evolve through the hypothesized process of duplication and recruitment of genes encoding body proteins. Indeed, our results show that many proposed venom toxins are in fact expressed in a wide variety of body tissues, including the salivary gland of nonvenomous reptiles and that these genes have therefore been restricted to the venom gland following duplication, not recruited. Thus, snake venom evolves through the duplication and subfunctionalization of genes encoding existing salivary proteins. These results highlight the danger of the elegant and intuitive “just-so story” in evolutionary biology. PMID:25079342

  3. Origin of a major infectious disease in vertebrates: The timing of Cryptosporidium evolution and its hosts.

    PubMed

    Garcia-R, Juan C; Hayman, David T S

    2016-11-01

    Protozoan parasites of the genus Cryptosporidium infect all vertebrate groups and display some host specificity in their infections. It is therefore possible to assume that Cryptosporidium parasites evolved intimately aside with vertebrate lineages. Here we propose a scenario of Cryptosporidium-Vertebrata coevolution testing the hypothesis that the origin of Cryptosporidium parasites follows that of the origin of modern vertebrates. We use calibrated molecular clocks and cophylogeny analyses to provide and compare age estimates and patterns of association between these clades. Our study provides strong support for the evolution of parasitism of Cryptosporidium with the rise of the vertebrates about 600 million years ago (Mya). Interestingly, periods of increased diversification in Cryptosporidium coincides with diversification of crown mammalian and avian orders after the Cretaceous-Palaeogene (K-Pg) boundary, suggesting that adaptive radiation to new mammalian and avian hosts triggered the diversification of this parasite lineage. Despite evidence for ongoing host shifts we also found significant correlation between protozoan parasites and vertebrate hosts trees in the cophylogenetic analysis. These results help us to understand the underlying macroevolutionary mechanisms driving evolution in Cryptosporidium and may have important implications for the ecology, dynamics and epidemiology of cryptosporidiosis disease in humans and other animals.

  4. The Origin and Evolution of Interstellar Dust in the Local and High-Redshift Universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dwek, Eliahu

    2011-01-01

    In this talk I will begin by reviewing our current state of knowledge regarding the origin and evolution of dust in the local solar neighborhood. Using chemical evolution models, I will discuss their many different input parameters and their uncertainties. An important consequence of these models is the delayed injection of dust from AGB stars, compared to supernova-condensed dust, into the interstellar medium. I will show that these stellar evolutionary effects on dust composition are manifested in the infrared spectra of local galaxies. The delayed production of dust in AGB stars has also important consequences for the origin of the large amount of dust detected in high-redshift galaxies, when the universe was less that - 1 Gyr old. Supernovae may have been the only viable dust sources in those galaxies. Recent observations of SN1987a show a significant mass of dust in the ejecta of this SN. Is that production rate high enough to account for the observed dust mass in these galaxies? If not, what are the alternative viable sources of dust, and how do they depend on the nature of the galaxy (starburst or AGN) and its star formation history.

  5. The Origin and Evolution of Interstellar Dust in the Local and High-redshift Universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dwek, Eliahu

    2012-01-01

    In this talk I will begin by reviewing our current state of knowledge regarding the origin and evolution of dust in the local solar neighborhood. using chemical evolution models, I will discuss their many different input parameters and their uncertainties. An important consequence of these models is the delayed injection of dust from AGB stars, compared to supernova-condensed dust, into the interstellar medium. I will show that these stellar evolutionary effects on dust composition are manifested in the infrared spectra of local galaxies. The delayed production of dust in AGB stars has also important consequences for the origin of the large amount of dust detected in high-redshift galaxies, when the universe was less that approx. 1 Gyr old. Supernovae may have been the only viable dust sources in those galaxies. Recent observations of sN1987a show a significant mass of dust in the ejecta of this SN. Is that production rate high enough to account for the observed dust mass in these galaxies? If not, what are the alternative viable sources of dust, and how do they depend on the nature of the galaxy (starburst or AGN) and its star formation history .

  6. Phase transitions as the origin of large scale structure in the universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turok, Neil

    1989-01-01

    A review of the formation of large scale structure through gravitational growth of primordial perturbations is given. This is followed by a discussion of how symmetry breaking phase transitions in the early universe might have produced the required perturbations, in particular through the formation and evolution of a network of cosmic strings.

  7. Phase transitions as the origin of large scale structure in the universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turok, Neil

    1989-01-01

    A review of the formation of large scale structure through gravitational growth of primordial perturbations is given. This is followed by a discussion of how symmetry breaking phase transitions in the early universe might have produced the required perturbations, in particular through the formation and evolution of a network of cosmic strings.

  8. Investigating the Origin and Evolution of Venus with In Situ Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trainer, M. G.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Brinckerhoff, W. B.; Johnson, N. M.; Glaze, L. S.

    2014-01-01

    The exploration of Venus continues to be a top priority of planetary science. The Planetary Decadal Survey goals for inner-planet exploration seek to discern the origin and diversity of terrestrial planets, understand how the evolution of terrestrial planets relates to the evolution of life, and explore the processes that control climate on Earth-like planets [1]. These goals can only be realized through continued and extensive exploration of Venus, the most mysterious of the terrestrial planets, remarkably different from the Earth despite the gross similarities between these twin planets. It is unknown if this apparent divergence was intrinsic, programmed during accretion from distinct nebular reservoirs, or a consequence of either measured or catastrophic processes during planetary evolution. Even if the atmosphere of Venus is a more recent development, its relationship to the resurfacing of the planets enigmatic surface is not well understood. Resolving such uncertainties directly addresses the hypothesis of a more clement, possibly water-rich era in Venus past as well as whether Earth could become more Venus-like in the future.

  9. Investigating the Origin and Evolution of Venus with In Situ Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trainer, M. G.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Brinckerhoff, W. B.; Johnson, N. M.; Glaze, L. S.

    2015-01-01

    The exploration of Venus continues to be a top priority of planetary science. The Planetary Decadal Survey goals for inner-planet exploration seek to discern the origin and diversity of terrestrial planets, understand how the evolution of terrestrial planets relates to the evolution of life, and explore the processes that control climate on Earth-like planets. These goals can only be realized through continued and extensive exploration of Venus, the most mysterious of the terrestrial planets, remarkably different from the Earth despite the gross similarities between these "twin planets". It is unknown if this apparent divergence was intrinsic, programmed during accretion from distinct nebular reservoirs, or a consequence of either measured or catastrophic processes during planetary evolution. Even if the atmosphere of Venus is a more "recent" development, its relationship to the resurfacing of the planet's enigmatic surface is not well understood. Resolving such uncertainties directly addresses the hypothesis of a more clement, possibly water-rich era in Venus' past as well as whether Earth could become more Venus-like in the future.

  10. CRevolution 2—Origin and evolution of the Colorado River system, workshop abstracts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    : Beard, L. Sue; Karlstrom, Karl E.; Young, Richard A.; Billingsley, George H.

    2011-01-01

    A 2010 Colorado River symposium, held in Flagstaff, Arizona, involved 70 participants who engaged in intense debate about the origin and evolution of the Colorado River system. This symposium, built upon two previous decadal scientific meetings, focused on forging scientific consensus, where possible, while articulating continued controversies regarding the Cenozoic evolution of the Colorado River System and the landscapes of the Colorado Plateau-Rocky Mountain region that it drains. New developments involved hypotheses that Neogene mantle flow is driving plateau tilting and differential uplift and new and controversial hypotheses for the pre-6 Ma presence and evolution of ancestral rivers that may be important in the history and birth of the present Colorado River. There is a consensus that plateau tilt and uplift models must be tested with multidisciplinary studies involving differential incision studies and additional geochronology and thermochronology to determine the relative importance of tectonic and geomorphic forces that shape the spectacular landscapes of the Colorado Plateau, Arizona and region. In addition to the scientific goals, the meeting participants emphasized the iconic status of Grand Canyon for geosciences and the importance of good communication between the research community, the geoscience education/interpretation community, the public, and the media. Building on a century-long tradition, this region still provides a globally important natural laboratory for studies of the interactions of erosion and tectonism in shaping the landscape of elevated plateaus.

  11. Simulating the origins of life: The dual role of RNA replicases as an obstacle to evolution.

    PubMed

    Szostak, Natalia; Synak, Jaroslaw; Borowski, Marcin; Wasik, Szymon; Blazewicz, Jacek

    2017-01-01

    Despite years of study, it is still not clear how life emerged from inanimate matter and evolved into the complex forms that we observe today. One of the most recognized hypotheses for the origins of life, the RNA World hypothesis, assumes that life was sparked by prebiotic replicating RNA chains. In this paper, we address the problems caused by the interplay between hypothetical prebiotic RNA replicases and RNA parasitic species. We consider the coexistence of parasite RNAs and RNA replicases as well as the impact of parasites on the further evolution of replicases. For these purposes, we used multi-agent modeling techniques that allow for realistic assumptions regarding the movement and spatial interactions of modeled species. The general model used in this study is based on work by Takeuchi and Hogeweg. Our results confirm that the coexistence of parasite RNAs and replicases is possible in a spatially extended system, even if we take into consideration more realistic assumptions than Takeuchi and Hogeweg. However, we also showed that the presence of trade-off that takes into the account an RNA folding process could still pose a serious obstacle to the evolution of replication. We conclude that this might be a cause for one of the greatest transitions in life that took place early in evolution-the separation of the function between DNA templates and protein enzymes, with a central role for RNA species.

  12. Investigating the Origin and Evolution of Venus with in Situ Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trainer, M. G.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Brinckerhoff, W. B.; Johnson, N. M.; Glaze, L. S.

    2016-01-01

    The exploration of Venus continues to be a top priority of planetary science. The Planetary Decadal Survey goals for inner-planet exploration seek to discern the origin and diversity of terrestrial planets, understand how the evolution of terrestrial planets relates to the evolution of life, and explore the processes that control climate on Earth-like planets. These goals can only be realized through continued and extensive exploration of Venus, the most mysterious of the terrestrial planets, remarkably different from the Earth despite the gross similarities between these "twin planets". It is unknown if this apparent divergence was intrinsic, programmed during accretion from distinct nebular reservoirs, or a consequence of either measured or catastrophic processes during planetary evolution. Even if the atmosphere of Venus is a more "recent" development, its relationship to the resurfacing of the planet's enigmatic surface is not well understood. Resolving such uncertainties directly addresses the hypothesis of a more clement, possibly water-rich era in Venus' past as well as whether Earth could become more Venus-like in the future.

  13. [Role of transposons in origin and evolution of plant XY sex chromosomes].

    PubMed

    Shufen, Li; Sha, Li; Chuanliang, Deng; Longdou, Lu; Wujun, Gao

    2015-02-01

    The XY sex-determination system is crucial for plant reproduction. However, little is known about the mechanism of the origin and evolution of the XY sex chromosomes. It has been believed that a pair of autosomes is evolved to produce young sex chromosomes (neo-X chromosome and neo-Y chromosome) by loss of function or gain of function mutation, which influences the development of pistil or stamen. With the aggravation of the recombination suppression between neo-X and neo-Y and consequent expanding of the non-recombination region, the proto-sex chromosomes were finally developed to heteromorphic sex chromosomes. Accumulation of repetitive sequences and DNA methylation were probably involved in this process. Transposons, as the most abundant repetitive sequences in the genome, might be the initial motivation factors for the evolution of sex chromosome. Moreover, transposons may also increase heterochromatin expansion and recombination suppression of sex chromosome by local epigenetics modification. In this review, we summarize the function of transposon accumulation and the relationship between transposon and heterochromatization in the evolution of plant sex chromosome.

  14. Clonal origins and parallel evolution of regionally synchronous colorectal adenoma and carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, Je-Keun; Jung, Seung-Hyun; Lee, Sung Hak; Baek, In-Pyo; Kim, Min Sung; Lee, Sug Hyung; Chung, Yeun-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Although the colorectal adenoma-to-carcinoma sequence represents a classical cancer progression model, the evolution of the mutational landscape underlying this model is not fully understood. In this study, we analyzed eight synchronous pairs of colorectal high-grade adenomas and carcinomas, four microsatellite-unstable (MSU) and four -stable (MSS) pairs, using whole-exome sequencing. In the MSU adenoma-carcinoma pairs, we observed no subclonal mutations in adenomas that became fixed in paired carcinomas, suggesting a ‘parallel’ evolution of synchronous adenoma-to-carcinoma, rather than a ‘stepwise’ evolution. The abundance of indel (in MSU and MSS pairs) and microsatellite instability (in MSU pairs) was noted in the later adenoma- or carcinoma-specific mutations, indicating that the mutational processes and functional constraints operative in early and late colorectal carcinogenesis are different. All MSU cases exhibited clonal, truncating mutations in ACVR2A, TGFBR2, and DNA mismatch repair genes, but none were present in APC or KRAS. In three MSS pairs, both APC and KRAS mutations were identified as both early and clonal events, often accompanying clonal copy number changes. An MSS case uniquely exhibited clonal ERBB2 amplification, followed by APC and TP53 mutations as carcinoma-specific events. Along with the previously unrecognized clonal origins of synchronous colorectal adenoma-carcinoma pairs, our study revealed that the preferred sequence of mutational events during colorectal carcinogenesis can be context-dependent. PMID:26336987

  15. Saltatory evolution of the ectodermal neural cortex gene family at the vertebrate origin.

    PubMed

    Feiner, Nathalie; Murakami, Yasunori; Breithut, Lisa; Mazan, Sylvie; Meyer, Axel; Kuraku, Shigehiro

    2013-01-01

    The ectodermal neural cortex (ENC) gene family, whose members are implicated in neurogenesis, is part of the kelch repeat superfamily. To date, ENC genes have been identified only in osteichthyans, although other kelch repeat-containing genes are prevalent throughout bilaterians. The lack of elaborate molecular phylogenetic analysis with exhaustive taxon sampling has obscured the possible link of the establishment of this gene family with vertebrate novelties. In this study, we identified ENC homologs in diverse vertebrates by means of database mining and polymerase chain reaction screens. Our analysis revealed that the ENC3 ortholog was lost in the basal eutherian lineage through single-gene deletion and that the triplication between ENC1, -2, and -3 occurred early in vertebrate evolution. Including our original data on the catshark and the zebrafish, our comparison revealed high conservation of the pleiotropic expression pattern of ENC1 and shuffling of expression domains between ENC1, -2, and -3. Compared with many other gene families including developmental key regulators, the ENC gene family is unique in that conventional molecular phylogenetic inference could identify no obvious invertebrate ortholog. This suggests a composite nature of the vertebrate-specific gene repertoire, consisting not only of de novo genes introduced at the vertebrate origin but also of long-standing genes with no apparent invertebrate orthologs. Some of the latter, including the ENC gene family, may be too rapidly evolving to provide sufficient phylogenetic signals marking orthology to their invertebrate counterparts. Such gene families that experienced saltatory evolution likely remain to be explored and might also have contributed to phenotypic evolution of vertebrates.

  16. Saltatory Evolution of the Ectodermal Neural Cortex Gene Family at the Vertebrate Origin

    PubMed Central

    Feiner, Nathalie; Murakami, Yasunori; Breithut, Lisa; Mazan, Sylvie; Meyer, Axel; Kuraku, Shigehiro

    2013-01-01

    The ectodermal neural cortex (ENC) gene family, whose members are implicated in neurogenesis, is part of the kelch repeat superfamily. To date, ENC genes have been identified only in osteichthyans, although other kelch repeat-containing genes are prevalent throughout bilaterians. The lack of elaborate molecular phylogenetic analysis with exhaustive taxon sampling has obscured the possible link of the establishment of this gene family with vertebrate novelties. In this study, we identified ENC homologs in diverse vertebrates by means of database mining and polymerase chain reaction screens. Our analysis revealed that the ENC3 ortholog was lost in the basal eutherian lineage through single-gene deletion and that the triplication between ENC1, -2, and -3 occurred early in vertebrate evolution. Including our original data on the catshark and the zebrafish, our comparison revealed high conservation of the pleiotropic expression pattern of ENC1 and shuffling of expression domains between ENC1, -2, and -3. Compared with many other gene families including developmental key regulators, the ENC gene family is unique in that conventional molecular phylogenetic inference could identify no obvious invertebrate ortholog. This suggests a composite nature of the vertebrate-specific gene repertoire, consisting not only of de novo genes introduced at the vertebrate origin but also of long-standing genes with no apparent invertebrate orthologs. Some of the latter, including the ENC gene family, may be too rapidly evolving to provide sufficient phylogenetic signals marking orthology to their invertebrate counterparts. Such gene families that experienced saltatory evolution likely remain to be explored and might also have contributed to phenotypic evolution of vertebrates. PMID:23843192

  17. Evolution of dinoflagellate unigenic minicircles and the partially concerted divergence of their putative replicon origins.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhaoduo; Cavalier-Smith, Thomas; Green, Beverley R

    2002-04-01

    Dinoflagellate chloroplast genes are unique in that each gene is on a separate minicircular chromosome. To understand the origin and evolution of this exceptional genomic organization we completely sequenced chloroplast psbA and 23S rRNA gene minicircles from four dinoflagellates: three closely related Heterocapsa species (H. pygmaea, H. rotundata, and H. niei) and the very distantly related Amphidinium carterae. We also completely sequenced a Protoceratium reticulatum minicircle with a 23S rRNA gene of novel structure. Comparison of these minicircles with those previously sequenced from H. triquetra and A. operculatum shows that in addition to the single gene all have noncoding regions of approximately a kilobase, which are likely to include a replication origin, promoter, and perhaps segregation sequences. The noncoding regions always have a high potential for folding into hairpins and loops. In all six dinoflagellate strains for which multiple minicircles are fully sequenced, parts of the noncoding regions, designated cores, are almost identical between the psbA and 23S rRNA minicircles, but the remainder is very different. There are two, three, or four cores per circle, sometimes highly related in sequence, but no sequence identity is detectable between cores of different species, even within one genus. This contrast between very high core conservation within a species, but none among species, indicates that cores are diverging relatively rapidly in a concerted manner. This is the first well-established case of concerted evolution of noncoding regions on numerous separate chromosomes. It differs from concerted evolution among tandemly repeated spacers between rRNA genes, and that of inverted repeats in plant chloroplast genomes, in involving only the noncoding DNA cores. We present two models for the origin of chloroplast gene minicircles in dinoflagellates from a typical ancestral multigenic chloroplast genome. Both involve substantial genomic reduction and

  18. Phase field modeling of the defect evolution and failure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Yuesong

    The plastic recovery processes in ultrafine and nano grained metals and the yield criteria and failure mechanisms in polymer matrix composite are the two major topics in this work. In the first part of the work, a phase field dislocation dynamics (PFDD) approach is introduced, which tracks the evolution of the dislocations in ultrafine and nano grained metals and takes into account the elastic interaction between dislocations, obstacles and the applied resolved shear stress on a single slip plane. Two phenomena, the reverse plastic strain during cyclic loading and plastic strain recovery upon unloading, are studied. One major finding of our simulations is that these two plastic recovery processes are related to the formation of dislocation structures during loading, and additional grain size inhomogeneity will increase the amount of plastic strain recovered. In the second part of the work, a phase field damage model (PFDM) is presented to study the onset of yielding and crack propagation in polymer matrix composite. The effect of two damage parameters, the fracture toughness Gc and crack length scale parameter l0, are first investigated. The former is shown to determine the energy needed during crack propagation and the latter is observed to control the crack nucleation process. Moreover, two asymmetric damage models are compared regarding their yield surfaces and it is found that the model of Miehe et al. leads to a linear pressure modified von Mises relation. Next, the PFDM reveals that the yield criterion in amorphous polymers should be described in terms of local stress and strains fields and cannot be extended directly from applied stress field values. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that the same damage model can be used to study the failure under shear yielding and crazing conditions. And if local defects in the samples such as voids are included explicitly in the simulations, the PFDM is able to explain the breakdown of the pressure modified von Mises

  19. Unraveling the origins of electromechanical response in mixed-phase Bismuth Ferrite

    SciTech Connect

    Vasudevan, Rama K; Okatan, M. B.; Liu, Y. Y.; Jesse, Stephen; Yang, J.-C.; Liang, W. -I.; Chu, Ying-Hao; Li, J. Y.; Kalinin, Sergei V; Valanoor, Nagarajan V

    2013-01-01

    The origin of giant electromechanical response in a mixed-phase rhombohedral-tetragonal BiFeO3 thin film is probed using sub-coercive scanning probe microscopy based multiple-harmonic measurements. Significant contributions to the strain arise from a second-order harmonic response localized at the phase boundaries. Strain and dissipation data, backed by thermodynamic calculations suggest that the source of the enhanced electromechanical response is the motion of phase boundaries. These findings elucidate the key role of labile phase boundaries, both natural and artificial, in achieving thin films with giant electromechanical properties.

  20. Origin and Evolution of Water Oxidation before the Last Common Ancestor of the Cyanobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Cardona, Tanai; Murray, James W.; Rutherford, A. William

    2015-01-01

    Photosystem II, the water oxidizing enzyme, altered the course of evolution by filling the atmosphere with oxygen. Here, we reconstruct the origin and evolution of water oxidation at an unprecedented level of detail by studying the phylogeny of all D1 subunits, the main protein coordinating the water oxidizing cluster (Mn4CaO5) of Photosystem II. We show that D1 exists in several forms making well-defined clades, some of which could have evolved before the origin of water oxidation and presenting many atypical characteristics. The most ancient form is found in the genome of Gloeobacter kilaueensis JS-1 and this has a C-terminus with a higher sequence identity to D2 than to any other D1. Two other groups of early evolving D1 correspond to those expressed under prolonged far-red illumination and in darkness. These atypical D1 forms are characterized by a dramatically different Mn4CaO5 binding site and a Photosystem II containing such a site may assemble an unconventional metal cluster. The first D1 forms with a full set of ligands to the Mn4CaO5 cluster are grouped with D1 proteins expressed only under low oxygen concentrations and the latest evolving form is the dominant type of D1 found in all cyanobacteria and plastids. In addition, we show that the plastid ancestor had a D1 more similar to those in early branching Synechococcus. We suggest each one of these forms of D1 originated from transitional forms at different stages toward the innovation and optimization of water oxidation before the last common ancestor of all known cyanobacteria. PMID:25657330

  1. Phylogeny of Opuntia s.s. (Cactaceae): clade delineation, geographic origins, and reticulate evolution.

    PubMed

    Majure, Lucas C; Puente, Raul; Griffith, M Patrick; Judd, Walter S; Soltis, Pamela S; Soltis, Douglas E

    2012-05-01

    The opuntias (nopales, prickly pears) are not only culturally, ecologically, economically, and medicinally important, but are renowned for their taxonomic difficulty due to interspecific hybridization, polyploidy, and morphological variability. Evolutionary relationships in these stem succulents have been insufficiently studied; thus, delimitation of Opuntia s.s. and major subclades, as well as the biogeographic history of this enigmatic group, remain unresolved. We sequenced the plastid intergenic spacers atpB-rbcL, ndhF-rpl32, psbJ-petA, and trnL-trnF, the plastid genes matK and ycf1, the nuclear gene ppc, and ITS to reconstruct the phylogeny of tribe Opuntieae, including Opuntia s.s. We used phylogenetic hypotheses to infer the biogeographic history, divergence times, and potential reticulate evolution of Opuntieae. Within Opuntieae, a clade of Tacinga, Opuntia lilae, Brasiliopuntia, and O. schickendantzii is sister to a well-supported Opuntia s.s., which includes Nopalea. Opuntia s.s. originated in southwestern South America (SA) and then expanded to the Central Andean Valleys and the desert region of western North America (NA). Two major clades evolved in NA, which subsequently diversified into eight subclades. These expanded north to Canada and south to Central America and the Caribbean, eventually returning back to SA primarily via allopolyploid taxa. Dating approaches suggest that most of the major subclades in Opuntia s.s. originated during the Pliocene. Opuntia s.s. is a well-supported clade that includes Nopalea. The clade originated in southwestern SA, but the NA radiation was the most extensive, resulting in broad morphological diversity and frequent species formation through reticulate evolution and polyploidy.

  2. Phylogenetic approach for inferring the origin and functional evolution of bacterial ADP-ribosylation superfamily.

    PubMed

    Chellapandi, P; Sakthishree, S; Bharathi, M

    2013-09-01

    Bacterial ADP-ribosyltransferases (BADPRTs) are extensively contributed to determine the strain-specific virulence state and pathogenesis in human hosts. Understanding molecular evolution and functional diversity of the BADPRTs is an important standpoint to describe the fundamental behind in the vaccine designing for bacterial infections. In the present study, we have evaluated the origin and functional evolution of conserved domains within the BADPRTs by analyzing their sequence-function relationship. To represent the evolution history of BADPRTs, phylogenetic trees were constructed based on their protein sequence, structure and conserved domains using different evolutionary programs. Sequence divergence and genetic diversity were studied herein to deduce the functional evolution of conserved domains across the family and superfamily. The results of sequence similarity search have shown that three hypothetical proteins (above 90%) were identical to the members of BADPRTs and their functions were annotated by phylogenetic approach. Phylogenetic analysis of this study has revealed the family members of BADPRTs were phylogenetically related to one another, functionally diverged within the same family, and dispersed into closely related bacteria. The presence of core substitution pattern in the conserved domains would determine the family-specific function of BADPRTs. Functional diversity of the BADPRTs was exclusively distinguished by Darwinian positive selection (diphtheria toxin C and pertussis toxin S) and neutral selection (arginine ADP-ribosyltransferase, enterotoxin A and binary toxin A) acting on the existing domains. Many of the family members were sharing their sequence-specific features from members in the arginine ADP-ribosyltransferase family. Conservative functions of members in the BADPRTs have shown to be expanded only within closely related families, and retained as such in pathogenic bacteria by evolutionary process (domain duplication or

  3. Progressive and Biased Divergent Evolution Underpins the Origin and Diversification of Peridinin Dinoflagellate Plastids.

    PubMed

    Dorrell, Richard G; Klinger, Christen M; Newby, Robert J; Butterfield, Erin R; Richardson, Elisabeth; Dacks, Joel B; Howe, Christopher J; Nisbet, Ellen R; Bowler, Chris

    2016-11-04

    Dinoflagellates are algae of tremendous importance to ecosystems and to public health. The cell biology and genome organization of dinoflagellate species is highly unusual. For example, the plastid genomes of peridinin-containing dinoflagellates encode only a minimal number of genes arranged on small elements termed "minicircles". Previous studies of peridinin plastid genes have found evidence for divergent sequence evolution, including extensive substitutions, novel insertions and deletions, and use of alternative translation initiation codons. Understanding the extent of this divergent evolution has been hampered by the lack of characterized peridinin plastid sequences. We have identified over 300 previously unannotated peridinin plastid mRNAs from published transcriptome projects, vastly increasing the number of sequences available. Using these data, we have produced a well-resolved phylogeny of peridinin plastid lineages, which uncovers several novel relationships within the dinoflagellates. This enables us to define changes to plastid sequences that occurred early in dinoflagellate evolution, and that have contributed to the subsequent diversification of individual dinoflagellate clades. We find that the origin of the peridinin dinoflagellates was specifically accompanied by elevations both in the overall number of substitutions that occurred on plastid sequences, and in the Ka/Ks ratio associated with plastid sequences, consistent with changes in selective pressure. These substitutions, alongside other changes, have accumulated progressively in individual peridinin plastid lineages. Throughout our entire dataset, we identify a persistent bias toward non-synonymous substitutions occurring on sequences encoding photosystem I subunits and stromal regions of peridinin plastid proteins, which may have underpinned the evolution of this unusual organelle.

  4. Identification, size classification and evolution of Laves phase precipitates in high chromium, fully ferritic steels.

    PubMed

    Lopez Barrilao, Jennifer; Kuhn, Bernd; Wessel, Egbert

    2017-10-01

    To fulfil the new challenges of the German "Energiewende" more efficient, sustainable, flexible and cost-effective energy technologies are strongly needed. For a reduction of consumed primary resources higher efficiency steam cycles with increased operating parameters, pressure and temperature, are mandatory. Therefore advanced materials are needed. The present study focuses on a new concept of high chromium, fully ferritic steels. These steels, originally designed for solid oxide fuel cell applications, provide favourable steam oxidation resistance, creep and thermomechanical fatigue behaviour in comparison to conventional ferritic-martensitic steels. The strength of this type of steel is achieved by a combination of solid-solution hardening and precipitation strengthening by intermetallic Laves phase particles. The effect of alloy composition on particle composition was measured by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and partly verified by thermodynamic modelling results. Generally the Laves phase particles demonstrated high thermodynamic stability during long-term annealing up to 40,000h at 600°C. Variations in chemical alloy composition influence Laves phase particle formation and consequently lead to significant changes in creep behaviour. For this reason particle size distribution evolution was analysed in detail and associated with the creep performance of several trial alloys. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Electronic phase separation transition as the origin of the superconductivity and pseudogap phase of cuprates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Mello, E. V. L.; Kasal, R. B.; Passos, C. A. C.

    2009-06-01

    To deal with the physics of cuprate superconductivity we propose an electronic phase separation transition that segregates the holes into high and low density domains. The calculated grain boundary potential favors the development of intragrain superconducting amplitudes. The zero resistivity transition arises only when the intergrain Josephson coupling EJ is of the order of the thermal energy and phase locking takes place among the superconducting grains. We show that this approach explains the pseudogap and superconducting phases and it also reproduces some recent scanning tunneling microscopy data.

  6. Electronic phase separation transition as the origin of the superconductivity and pseudogap phase of cuprates.

    PubMed

    de Mello, E V L; Kasal, R B; Passos, C A C

    2009-06-10

    To deal with the physics of cuprate superconductivity we propose an electronic phase separation transition that segregates the holes into high and low density domains. The calculated grain boundary potential favors the development of intragrain superconducting amplitudes. The zero resistivity transition arises only when the intergrain Josephson coupling E(J) is of the order of the thermal energy and phase locking takes place among the superconducting grains. We show that this approach explains the pseudogap and superconducting phases and it also reproduces some recent scanning tunneling microscopy data.

  7. Playing with extremes: Origins and evolution of exaggerated female forelegs in South African Rediviva bees.

    PubMed

    Kahnt, Belinda; Montgomery, Graham A; Murray, Elizabeth; Kuhlmann, Michael; Pauw, Anton; Michez, Denis; Paxton, Robert J; Danforth, Bryan N

    2017-10-01

    Despite close ecological interactions between plants and their pollinators, only some highly specialised pollinators adapt to a specific host plant trait by evolving a bizarre morphology. Here we investigated the evolution of extremely elongated forelegs in females of the South African bee genus Rediviva (Hymenoptera: Melittidae), in which long forelegs are hypothesised to be an adaptation for collecting oils from the extended spurs of their Diascia host flowers. We first reconstructed the phylogeny of the genus Rediviva using seven genes and inferred an origin of Rediviva at around 29MYA (95% HPD=19.2-40.5), concurrent with the origin and radiation of the Succulent Karoo flora. The common ancestor of Rediviva was inferred to be a short-legged species that did not visit Diascia. Interestingly, all our analyses strongly supported at least two independent origins of long legs within Rediviva. Leg length was not correlated with any variable we tested (ecological specialisation, Diascia visitation, geographic distribution, pilosity type) but seems to have evolved very rapidly. Overall, our results indicate that foreleg length is an evolutionary highly labile, rapidly evolving trait that might enable Rediviva bees to respond quickly to changing floral resource availability. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Revising the Taxonomic Distribution, Origin and Evolution of Ribosome Inactivating Protein Genes

    PubMed Central

    Lapadula, Walter J.; Sánchez Puerta, María Virginia; Juri Ayub, Maximiliano

    2013-01-01

    Ribosome inactivating proteins are enzymes that depurinate a specific adenine residue in the alpha-sarcin-ricin loop of the large ribosomal RNA, being ricin and Shiga toxins the most renowned examples. They are widely distributed in plants and their presence has also been confirmed in a few bacterial species. According to this taxonomic distribution, the current model about the origin and evolution of RIP genes postulates that an ancestral RIP domain was originated in flowering plants, and later acquired by some bacteria via horizontal gene transfer. Here, we unequivocally detected the presence of RIP genes in fungi and metazoa. These findings, along with sequence and phylogenetic analyses, led us to propose an alternative, more parsimonious, hypothesis about the origin and evolutionary history of the RIP domain, where several paralogous RIP genes were already present before the three domains of life evolved. This model is in agreement with the current idea of the Last Universal Common Ancestor (LUCA) as a complex, genetically redundant organism. Differential loss of paralogous genes in descendants of LUCA, rather than multiple horizontal gene transfer events, could account for the complex pattern of RIP genes across extant species, as it has been observed for other genes. PMID:24039805

  9. Revising the taxonomic distribution, origin and evolution of ribosome inactivating protein genes.

    PubMed

    Lapadula, Walter J; Sánchez Puerta, María Virginia; Juri Ayub, Maximiliano

    2013-01-01

    Ribosome inactivating proteins are enzymes that depurinate a specific adenine residue in the alpha-sarcin-ricin loop of the large ribosomal RNA, being ricin and Shiga toxins the most renowned examples. They are widely distributed in plants and their presence has also been confirmed in a few bacterial species. According to this taxonomic distribution, the current model about the origin and evolution of RIP genes postulates that an ancestral RIP domain was originated in flowering plants, and later acquired by some bacteria via horizontal gene transfer. Here, we unequivocally detected the presence of RIP genes in fungi and metazoa. These findings, along with sequence and phylogenetic analyses, led us to propose an alternative, more parsimonious, hypothesis about the origin and evolutionary history of the RIP domain, where several paralogous RIP genes were already present before the three domains of life evolved. This model is in agreement with the current idea of the Last Universal Common Ancestor (LUCA) as a complex, genetically redundant organism. Differential loss of paralogous genes in descendants of LUCA, rather than multiple horizontal gene transfer events, could account for the complex pattern of RIP genes across extant species, as it has been observed for other genes.

  10. Comparative Mitogenomic Analyses of Praying Mantises (Dictyoptera, Mantodea): Origin and Evolution of Unusual Intergenic Gaps

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hong-Li; Ye, Fei

    2017-01-01

    Praying mantises are a diverse group of predatory insects. Although some Mantodea mitogenomes have been reported, a comprehensive comparative and evolutionary genomic study is lacking for this group. In the present study, four new mitogenomes were sequenced, annotated, and compared to the previously published mitogenomes of other Mantodea species. Most Mantodea mitogenomes share a typical set of mitochondrial genes and a putative control region (CR). Additionally, and most intriguingly, another large non-coding region (LNC) was detected between trnM and ND2 in all six Paramantini mitogenomes examined. The main section in this common region of Paramantini may have initially originated from the corresponding control region for each species, whereas sequence differences between the LNCs and CRs and phylogenetic analyses indicate that LNC and CR are largely independently evolving. Namely, the LNC (the duplicated CR) may have subsequently degenerated during evolution. Furthermore, evidence suggests that special intergenic gaps have been introduced in some species through gene rearrangement and duplication. These gaps are actually the original abutting sequences of migrated or duplicated genes. Some gaps (G5 and G6) are homologous to the 5' and 3' surrounding regions of the duplicated gene in the original gene order, and another specific gap (G7) has tandem repeats. We analysed the phylogenetic relationships of fifteen Mantodea species using 37 concatenated mitochondrial genes and detected several synapomorphies unique to species in some clades. PMID:28367101

  11. Age, origin and evolution of Antarctic debris-covered glaciers: Implications for landscape evolution and long-term climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackay, Sean Leland

    Antarctic debris-covered glaciers are potential archives of long-term climate change. However, the geomorphic response of these systems to climate forcing is not well understood. To address this concern, I conducted a series of field-based and numerical modeling studies in the McMurdo Dry Valleys of Antarctica (MDV), with a focus on Mullins and Friedman glaciers. I used data and results from geophysical surveys, ice-core collection and analysis, geomorphic mapping, micro-meteorological stations, and numerical-process models to (1) determine the precise origin and distribution of englacial and supraglacial debris within these buried-ice systems, (2) quantify the fundamental processes and feedbacks that govern interactions among englacial and supraglacial debris, (3) establish a process-based model to quantify the inventory of cosmogenic nuclides within englacial and supraglacial debris, and (4) isolate the governing relationships between the evolution of englacial /supraglacial debris and regional climate forcing. Results from 93 field excavations, 21 ice cores, and 24 km of ground-penetrating radar data show that Mullins and Friedman glaciers contain vast areas of clean glacier ice interspersed with inclined layers of concentrated debris. The similarity in the pattern of englacial debris bands across both glaciers, along with model results that call for negligible basal entrainment, is best explained by episodic environmental change at valley headwalls. To constrain better the timing of debris-band formation, I developed a modeling framework that tracks the accumulation of cosmogenic 3He in englacial and supraglacial debris. Results imply that ice within Mullins Glacier increases in age non-linearly from 12 ka to ˜220 ka in areas of active flow (up to >> 1.6 Ma in areas of slow-moving-to-stagnant ice) and that englacial debris bands originate with a periodicity of ˜41 ka. Modeling studies suggest that debris bands originate in synchronicity with changes in

  12. Rotation in the Pleiades with K2. III. Speculations on Origins and Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stauffer, John; Rebull, Luisa; Bouvier, Jerome; Hillenbrand, Lynne A.; Collier-Cameron, Andrew; Pinsonneault, Marc; Aigrain, Suzanne; Barrado, David; Bouy, Herve; Ciardi, David; Cody, Ann Marie; David, Trevor; Micela, Giusi; Soderblom, David; Somers, Garrett; Stassun, Keivan G.; Valenti, Jeff; Vrba, Frederick J.

    2016-11-01

    We use high-quality K2 light curves for hundreds of stars in the Pleiades to better understand the angular momentum evolution and magnetic dynamos of young low-mass stars. The K2 light curves provide not only rotational periods but also detailed information from the shape of the phased light curve that was not available in previous studies. A slowly rotating sequence begins at {(V-{K}{{s}})}0 ˜ 1.1 (spectral type F5) and ends at {(V-{K}{{s}})}0 ˜ 3.7 (spectral type K8), with periods rising from ˜2 to ˜11 days in that interval. A total of 52% of the Pleiades members in that color interval have periods within 30% of a curve defining the slow sequence; the slowly rotating fraction decreases significantly redward of {(V-{K}{{s}})}0 = 2.6. Nearly all of the slow-sequence stars show light curves that evolve significantly on timescales less than the K2 campaign duration. The majority of the FGK Pleiades members identified as photometric binaries are relatively rapidly rotating, perhaps because binarity inhibits star-disk angular momentum loss mechanisms during pre-main-sequence evolution. The fully convective late M dwarf Pleiades members (5.0 < {(V-{K}{{s}})}0 < 6.0) nearly always show stable light curves, with little spot evolution or evidence of differential rotation. During pre-main-sequence evolution from ˜3 Myr (NGC 2264 age) to ˜125 Myr (Pleiades age), stars of 0.3 {M}⊙ shed about half of their angular momentum, with the fractional change in period between 3 and 125 Myr being nearly independent of mass for fully convective stars. Our data also suggest that very low mass binaries form with rotation periods more similar to each other and faster than would be true if drawn at random from the parent population of single stars.

  13. [Human retrovirus HTLV-1: descriptive and molecular epidemiology, origin, evolution, diagnosis and associated diseases].

    PubMed

    Gessain, A

    2011-08-01

    Human T-cell leukemia/lymphoma virus type 1 (HTLV-1) was the first oncogenic human retrovirus discovered in 1980. It is estimated that around 10-20 million people are infected with HTLV-1 worldwide. However, HTLV-1 is not a ubiquitous virus. Indeed, HTLV-1 is present throughout the world with clusters of high endemicity including mainly southern Japan, the Caribbean region, parts of South America and intertropical Africa, with foci in the Middle East and Australia. The origin of this puzzling geographical repartition is probably linked to a founder effect in certain human groups. In the high endemic areas, 0.5 to 50% of the people have antibodies against HTLV-1 antigens. HTLV-1 seroprevalence increases with age, especially in women. HTLV-1 has 3 modes of transmission: mother to child, mainly through prolonged breastfeeding (> 6 months); sexual, mainly but not exclusively occurring from male to female; and by blood products contaminated by infected lymphocytes. HTLV-1 is mainly the etiological agent of two very severe diseases: a malignant T CD4+ cell lymphoproliferation of very poor prognosis, named adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL), and a chronic neuro-myelopathy named tropical spastic paraparesis/HTLV-1-associated myelopathy (TSP/HAM). HTLV-1 is also associated with rare anterior uveitis, infective dermatitis and myositis in some high HTLV-1 endemic areas. The repartition of the different molecular subtypes or genotypes is mainly linked to the geographical origin of the infected persons but not to the associated pathology. HTLV-1 possesses a remarkable genetic stability probably linked to viral amplification via clonal expansion of infected cells rather than by reverse transcription. This stability can be used as a molecular tool to gain better insights into the origin, evolution and modes of dissemination of HTLV-1 and infected populations. HTLV-1 originated in humans through interspecies transmission from STLV-1, a very closely related retrovirus, highly

  14. Chromatographic separation as selection process for prebiotic evolution and the origin of the genetic code.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, U

    1985-01-01

    A model for the evolution of a translation apparatus has been suggested where oligonucleotides in a hairpin conformation act as primordial adapters. Specifically activated amino acids are assumed to be attached to these hairpin molecules. For the specific activation, a chromatographic separation of, e.g. ala and CMP from gly and GMP can be accomplished on silica (e.g. of volcanic origin) with aqueous salt solutions. Other adsorbents like clays (kaolin, bentonite, montmorillonite), different silicates (florisil, magnesium trisilicate, calcium silicate, talc), hydroxyapatite, barium sulfate, calcium carbonate, calcium fluoride and titanoxide have been examined as model systems for the separation of nucleotides, nucleosides and amino acids on mineral surfaces. The possible role of chromatographic separation of amino acids for the formation of proteinoids, composed of selected amino acids, is also considered.

  15. Origin and Initial Evolution of Coronal Mass Ejections Observed by SDO, STEREO, and IRIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Xin

    2016-07-01

    Magnetic flux rope (MFR) is a coherent magnetic structure with all magnetic field lines wrapping around its central axis. It has been supposed to exist in various celestial circumstances like the magnetotail of the Earth, the ionosphere of Venus, the Nebula, and the black hole system. In the solar atmosphere, the MFR is even believed to be a fundamental structure of coronal mass ejections, existing prior to and driving the solar eruptions. In this talk, I will present the observational signature of MFR; discuss its origin through analyzing EUV images, 3D magnetic field configurations, and thermal structures of associated active regions. Furthermore, the kinematic evolution of MFR and its role in the early dynamic process of coronal mass ejections are also included.

  16. Diversity in the origins of proteostasis networks- a driver for protein function in evolution

    PubMed Central

    Powers, Evan T.; Balch, William E.

    2013-01-01

    Although a protein’s primary sequence largely determines its function, proteins can adopt different folding states in response to changes in the environment, some of which may be deleterious to the organism. All organisms, including Bacteria, Archaea and Eukarya, have evolved a protein homeostasis network, or proteostasis network, that consists of chaperones and folding factors, degradation components, signalling pathways and specialized compartmentalized modules that manage protein folding in response to environmental stimuli and variation. Surveying the origins of proteostasis networks reveals that they have co-evolved with the proteome to regulate the physiological state of the cell, reflecting the unique stresses that different cells or organisms experience, and that they have a key role in driving evolution by closely managing the link between the phenotype and the genotype. PMID:23463216

  17. Present State of the Coacervate-Incoacervate Theory - Origin and Evolution of Cell Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novak, Vladimir J. A.

    1984-12-01

    In agreement with the views of Oparin, Fox, Dose etc., the theory assumes that coacervation of protein-like polyaminoacids began with their accumulation along the coasts of the Archaic water basins. Unlike the above authors, however, the present author views the original coacervates as a suitable “culture medium” from which the first polynucleotides orginated and their partial replication started. Their base sequence was not fortuitous, but determined by the proteinoids on the basis of their mutual affinity. The polyfunctional enzymic activity of the proteinoids catalyzed their replication as well as other activities. Around the replicating DNA molecules secondary coacervates (coacervates in coacervates) accumulated which developed gradually to the first prokaryotic cells. Their most probable evolution to the first eukaryotic organisms is discussed on the basis of the modified Studitsky's synbacteriogenesis theory.

  18. Accelerated protein evolution and origins of human-specific features: Foxp2 as an example.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jianzhi; Webb, David M; Podlaha, Ondrej

    2002-12-01

    Genes responsible for human-specific phenotypes may have been under altered selective pressures in human evolution and thus exhibit changes in substitution rate and pattern at the protein sequence level. Using comparative analysis of human, chimpanzee, and mouse protein sequences, we identified two genes (PRM2 and FOXP2) with significantly enhanced evolutionary rates in the hominid lineage. PRM2 is a histone-like protein essential to spermatogenesis and was previously reported to be a likely target of sexual selection in humans and chimpanzees. FOXP2 is a transcription factor involved in speech and language development. Human FOXP2 experienced a >60-fold increase in substitution rate and incorporated two fixed amino acid changes in a broadly defined transcription suppression domain. A survey of a diverse group of placental mammals reveals the uniqueness of the human FOXP2 sequence and a population genetic analysis indicates possible adaptive selection behind the accelerated evolution. Taken together, our results suggest an important role that FOXP2 may have played in the origin of human speech and demonstrate a strategy for identifying candidate genes underlying the emergences of human-specific features.

  19. Interstitial telomeric sequences in vertebrate chromosomes: Origin, function, instability and evolution.

    PubMed

    Bolzán, Alejandro D

    2017-07-01

    By definition, telomeric sequences are located at the very ends or terminal regions of chromosomes. However, several vertebrate species show blocks of (TTAGGG)n repeats present in non-terminal regions of chromosomes, the so-called interstitial telomeric sequences (ITSs), interstitial telomeric repeats or interstitial telomeric bands, which include those intrachromosomal telomeric-like repeats located near (pericentromeric ITSs) or within the centromere (centromeric ITSs) and those telomeric repeats located between the centromere and the telomere (i.e., truly interstitial telomeric sequences) of eukaryotic chromosomes. According with their sequence organization, localization and flanking sequences, ITSs can be classified into four types: 1) short ITSs, 2) subtelomeric ITSs, 3) fusion ITSs, and 4) heterochromatic ITSs. The first three types have been described mainly in the human genome, whereas heterochromatic ITSs have been found in several vertebrate species but not in humans. Several lines of evidence suggest that ITSs play a significant role in genome instability and evolution. This review aims to summarize our current knowledge about the origin, function, instability and evolution of these telomeric-like repeats in vertebrate chromosomes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. The Origin and Evolution of G Protein-Coupled Receptor Kinases

    PubMed Central

    Mushegian, Arcady; Gurevich, Vsevolod V.; Gurevich, Eugenia V.

    2012-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) kinases (GRKs) play key role in homologous desensitization of GPCRs. GRKs phosphorylate activated receptors, promoting high affinity binding of arrestins, which precludes G protein coupling. Direct binding to active GPCRs activates GRKs, so that they selectively phosphorylate only the activated form of the receptor regardless of the accessibility of the substrate peptides within it and their Ser/Thr-containing sequence. Mammalian GRKs were classified into three main lineages, but earlier GRK evolution has not been studied. Here we show that GRKs emerged at the early stages of eukaryotic evolution via an insertion of a kinase similar to ribosomal protein S6 kinase into a loop in RGS domain. GRKs in Metazoa fall into two clades, one including GRK2 and GRK3, and the other consisting of all remaining GRKs, split into GRK1-GRK7 lineage and GRK4-GRK5-GRK6 lineage in vertebrates. One representative of each of the two ancient clades is found as early as placozoan Trichoplax adhaerens. Several protists, two oomycetes and unicellular brown algae have one GRK-like protein, suggesting that the insertion of a kinase domain into the RGS domain preceded the origin of Metazoa. The two GRK families acquired distinct structural units in the N- and C-termini responsible for membrane recruitment and receptor association. Thus, GRKs apparently emerged before animals and rapidly expanded in true Metazoa, most likely due to the need for rapid signalling adjustments in fast-moving animals. PMID:22442725

  1. Evolution and the origin of the visual retinoid cycle in vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Kusakabe, Takehiro G.; Takimoto, Noriko; Jin, Minghao; Tsuda, Motoyuki

    2009-01-01

    Absorption of a photon by visual pigments induces isomerization of 11-cis-retinaldehyde (RAL) chromophore to all-trans-RAL. Since the opsins lacking 11-cis-RAL lose light sensitivity, sustained vision requires continuous regeneration of 11-cis-RAL via the process called ‘visual cycle’. Protostomes and vertebrates use essentially different machinery of visual pigment regeneration, and the origin and early evolution of the vertebrate visual cycle is an unsolved mystery. Here we compare visual retinoid cycles between different photoreceptors of vertebrates, including rods, cones and non-visual photoreceptors, as well as between vertebrates and invertebrates. The visual cycle systems in ascidians, the closest living relatives of vertebrates, show an intermediate state between vertebrates and non-chordate invertebrates. The ascidian larva may use retinochrome-like opsin as the major isomerase. The entire process of the visual cycle can occur inside the photoreceptor cells with distinct subcellular compartmentalization, although the visual cycle components are also present in surrounding non-photoreceptor cells. The adult ascidian probably uses RPE65 isomerase, and trans-to-cis isomerization may occur in distinct cellular compartments, which is similar to the vertebrate situation. The complete transition to the sophisticated retinoid cycle of vertebrates may have required acquisition of new genes, such as interphotoreceptor retinoid-binding protein, and functional evolution of the visual cycle genes. PMID:19720652

  2. [Evolution of monoamine receptors and the origin of motivational and emotional systems in vertebrates].

    PubMed

    Vincent, J D; Cardinaud, B; Vernier, P

    1998-01-01

    The evolving vertebrate nervous system was accompanied by major gene duplication events generating novel organs and a sympathetic system. Vertebrate neural pathways synthesizing catecholamine neurotransmitters (dopamine and noradrenaline), were subsequently recruited to process increased information demands by mediating psychomotor functions such as selective attention/predictive reward and emotional drive via the activation of multiple G-protein linked catecholamine receptor subtypes. Here we show that the evolution of these receptor-mediated events were similarly driven by forces of gene duplication, at the cephalochordate/vertebrate transition. In the cephalochordate Amphioxus, a sister group to vertebrates, a single catecholamine receptor gene was found, which based on molecular phylogeny and functional analysis formed a monophyletic group with both vertebrate dopamine D1 and beta adrenergic receptor classes. In addition, the presence of dopamine but not of noradrenaline was assayed in Amphioxus. In contrast, two distinct genes homologous to jawed vertebrate dopamine D1 and beta adrenergic receptor genes were extant in representatives of the earliest craniates, lamprey and hagfish, paralleling high dopamine and noradrenaline content throughout the brain. These data suggest that a D1/beta receptor gene duplication was required to elaborate novel catecholamine psychomotor adaptive responses and that a noradrenergic system specifically emerged at the origin of vertebrate evolution.

  3. The molecular origin and evolution of dim-light vision in mammals.

    PubMed

    Bickelmann, Constanze; Morrow, James M; Du, Jing; Schott, Ryan K; van Hazel, Ilke; Lim, Steve; Müller, Johannes; Chang, Belinda S W

    2015-11-01

    The nocturnal origin of mammals is a longstanding hypothesis that is considered instrumental for the evolution of endothermy, a potential key innovation in this successful clade. This hypothesis is primarily based on indirect anatomical inference from fossils. Here, we reconstruct the evolutionary history of rhodopsin--the vertebrate visual pigment mediating the first step in phototransduction at low-light levels--via codon-based model tests for selection, combined with gene resurrection methods that allow for the study of ancient proteins. Rhodopsin coding sequences were reconstructed for three key nodes: Amniota, Mammalia, and Theria. When expressed in vitro, all sequences generated stable visual pigments with λMAX values similar to the well-studied bovine rhodopsin. Retinal release rates of mammalian and therian ancestral rhodopsins, measured via fluorescence spectroscopy, were significantly slower than those of the amniote ancestor, indicating altered molecular function possibly related to nocturnality. Positive selection along the therian branch suggests adaptive evolution in rhodopsin concurrent with therian ecological diversification events during the Mesozoic that allowed for an exploration of the environment at varying light levels.

  4. Introduction: CRevolution 2: origin and evolution of the Colorado River System II

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Karlstrom, Karl E.; Beard, L. Sue; House, Kyle; Young, Richard A.; Aslan, Andres; Billingsley, George; Pederson, Joel

    2012-01-01

    A 2010 Colorado River symposium held in Flagstaff, Arizona, in May 2010, had 70 participants who engaged in intense debate about the origin and evolution of the Colorado River system. This symposium, built on two previous decadal scientific meetings, focused on forging scientific consensus where possible, while also articulating continued controversies regarding the Cenozoic evolution of the Colorado River System and the landscapes of the Colorado Plateau–Rocky Mountain region that it drains. New developments involved hypotheses that Neogene mantle flow is driving plateau tilting and differential uplift, with consensus that multidisciplinary studies involving differential incision studies and additional geochronology and thermochronology are needed to test the relative importance of tectonic and geomorphic forcings in shaping the spectacular landscapes of the Colorado Plateau region. In addition to the scientific goals, the meeting participants emphasized the iconic status of Grand Canyon for geosciences, and the importance of good communication between the research community, the geoscience education/interpretation community, the public, and the media. Building on a century-long tradition, this region still provides a globally important natural laboratory for studies of the interactions of erosion and tectonism in the shaping landscape of elevated plateaus.

  5. Reassortment Networks and the evolution of pandemic H1N1 swine-origin influenza.

    PubMed

    Bokhari, Shahid H; Pomeroy, Laura W; Janies, Daniel A

    2012-01-01

    Prior research developed Reassortment Networks to reconstruct the evolution of segmented viruses under both reassortment and mutation. We report their application to the swine-origin pandemic H1N1 virus (S-OIV). A database of all influenza A viruses, for which complete genome sequences were available in Genbank by October 2009, was created and dynamic programming was used to compute distances between all corresponding segments. A reassortment network was created to obtain the minimum cost evolutionary paths from all viruses to the exemplar S-OIV A/California/04/2009. This analysis took 35 hours on the Cray Extreme Multithreading (XMT) supercomputer, which has special hardware to permit efficient parallelization. Six specific H1N1/H1N2 bottleneck viruses were identified that almost always lie on minimum cost paths to S-OIV. We conjecture that these viruses are crucial to S-OIV evolution and worthy of careful study from a molecular biology viewpoint. In phylogenetics, ancestors are typically medians that have no functional constraints. In our method, ancestors are not inferred, but rather chosen from previously observed viruses along a path of mutation and reassortment leading to the target virus. This specificity and functional constraint render our results actionable for further experiments in vitro and in vivo.

  6. The twin-arginine subunit C in Oscarella: origin, evolution, and potential functional significance.

    PubMed

    Pett, Walker; Lavrov, Dennis V

    2013-09-01

    The twin-arginine translocation (Tat) pathway is a protein transport system that moves completely folded proteins across lipid membranes. Genes encoding components of the pathway have been found in the genomes of many Bacteria, Archaea, and eukaryotic organelles including chloroplasts, plant mitochondria, and the mitochondria of many protists. However, with a single exception, Tat genes are absent from the mitochondrial genomes of all animals. The only exception comes from the homoscleromorph sponges in the family Oscarellidae, whose mitochondrial genomes encode a gene for tatC, the largest subunit of the complex. Here, we explore the origin and evolution of the mitochondrial tatC gene in Oscarellidae, and use bioinformatic approaches to evaluate its functional significance. We conclude that tatC in Homoscleromorpha sponges was likely inherited from the ancestral proto-mitochondrial genome, implying multiple independent losses of the mitochondrial Tat pathway during the evolution of opisthokonts. In addition, bioinformatic evidence suggests that tatC comprises the entire Tat pathway in Oscarellidae, and that the Rieske Fe/S protein of mitochondrial complex III is its likely substrate.

  7. Stochastic Chemical Evolution of Sub-Halos and the Origin of r-Process Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ojima, Takuya; Ishimaru, Yuhri; Wanajo, Shinya; Prantzos, Nikos

    The main origin of r-process elements is still uncertain, but recent nucleosynthesis studies show that neutron star mergers (NSMs) are capable of naturally explaining the solar r-process abundance. Though, previous chemical evolution models hold conflict with the NSM scenario because the long NSM coalescence timescale causes an [r/Fe] enhancement at higher metallicity compared to the observed Galactic halo stars in the [r/Fe] vs [Fe/H] plane. However, it is not the case if assuming the formation of the Galactic halo by clusterings of sub-halos with varying star formation histories. We construct a chemical evolution model of sub-halos, where NSM occurring in each sub-halos are computed stochastically. Our results are in good agreement with the Galactic halo stars, explaining the observed dispersion and trend. Also, the abundance ratio pattern of the low mass sub-halos is in consistency with Reticulum II, a dwarf galaxy that might have been contaminated by a single r-process event.

  8. Colony Size Evolution and the Origin of Eusociality in Corbiculate Bees (Hymenoptera: Apinae)

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Serrano, Enrique; Inostroza-Michael, Oscar; Avaria-Llautureo, Jorge; Hernandez, Cristian E.

    2012-01-01

    Recently, it has been proposed that the one of the main determinants of complex societies in Hymenoptera is colony size, since the existence of large colonies reduces the direct reproductive success of an average individual, given a decreased chance of being part of the reproductive caste. In this study, we evaluate colony size evolution in corbiculate bees and their relationship with the sociality level shown by these bees. Specifically i) the correlation between colony size and level of sociality considering the phylogenetic relationship to evaluate a general evolutionary tendency, and ii) the hypothetical ancestral forms of several clades within a phylogeny of corbiculate bees, to address idiosyncratic process occurring at important nodes. We found that the level of social complexity in corbiculate bees is phylogenetically correlated with colony size. Additionally, another process is invoked to propose why colony size evolved concurrently with the level of social complexity. The study of this trait improves the understanding of the evolutionary transition from simple to complex societies, and highlights the importance of explicit probabilistic models to test the evolution of other important characters involved in the origin of eusociality. PMID:22808274

  9. Parent-of-origin growth effects and the evolution of hybrid inviability in dwarf hamsters.

    PubMed

    Brekke, Thomas D; Good, Jeffrey M

    2014-11-01

    Mammalian hybrids often show abnormal growth, indicating that developmental inviability may play an important role in mammalian speciation. Yet, it is unclear if this recurrent phenotype reflects a common genetic basis. Here, we describe extreme parent-of-origin-dependent growth in hybrids from crosses between two species of dwarf hamsters, Phodopus campbelli and Phodopus sungorus. One cross type resulted in massive placental and embryonic overgrowth, severe developmental defects, and maternal death. Embryos from the reciprocal cross were viable and normal sized, but adult hybrid males were relatively small. These effects are strikingly similar to patterns from several other mammalian hybrids. Using comparative sequence data from dwarf hamsters and several other hybridizing mammals, we argue that extreme hybrid growth can contribute to reproductive isolation during the early stages of species divergence. Next, we tested if abnormal growth in hybrid hamsters was associated with disrupted genomic imprinting. We found no association between imprinting status at several candidate genes and hybrid growth, though two interacting genes involved in embryonic growth did show reduced expression in overgrown hybrids. Collectively, our study indicates that growth-related hybrid inviability may play an important role in mammalian speciation but that the genetic underpinnings of these phenotypes remain unresolved. © 2014 The Author(s). Evolution © 2014 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  10. Evolution and the origin of the visual retinoid cycle in vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Kusakabe, Takehiro G; Takimoto, Noriko; Jin, Minghao; Tsuda, Motoyuki

    2009-10-12

    Absorption of a photon by visual pigments induces isomerization of 11-cis-retinaldehyde (RAL) chromophore to all-trans-RAL. Since the opsins lacking 11-cis-RAL lose light sensitivity, sustained vision requires continuous regeneration of 11-cis-RAL via the process called 'visual cycle'. Protostomes and vertebrates use essentially different machinery of visual pigment regeneration, and the origin and early evolution of the vertebrate visual cycle is an unsolved mystery. Here we compare visual retinoid cycles between different photoreceptors of vertebrates, including rods, cones and non-visual photoreceptors, as well as between vertebrates and invertebrates. The visual cycle systems in ascidians, the closest living relatives of vertebrates, show an intermediate state between vertebrates and non-chordate invertebrates. The ascidian larva may use retinochrome-like opsin as the major isomerase. The entire process of the visual cycle can occur inside the photoreceptor cells with distinct subcellular compartmentalization, although the visual cycle components are also present in surrounding non-photoreceptor cells. The adult ascidian probably uses RPE65 isomerase, and trans-to-cis isomerization may occur in distinct cellular compartments, which is similar to the vertebrate situation. The complete transition to the sophisticated retinoid cycle of vertebrates may have required acquisition of new genes, such as interphotoreceptor retinoid-binding protein, and functional evolution of the visual cycle genes.

  11. Origin and evolution of eukaryotic chaperonins: phylogenetic evidence for ancient duplications in CCT genes.

    PubMed

    Archibald, J M; Logsdon, J M; Doolittle, W F

    2000-10-01

    Chaperonins are oligomeric protein-folding complexes which are divided into two distantly related structural classes. Group I chaperonins (called GroEL/cpn60/hsp60) are found in bacteria and eukaryotic organelles, while group II chaperonins are present in archaea and the cytoplasm of eukaryotes (called CCT/TriC). While archaea possess one to three chaperonin subunit-encoding genes, eight distinct CCT gene families (paralogs) have been characterized in eukaryotes. We are interested in determining when during eukaryotic evolution the multiple gene duplications producing the CCT subunits occurred. We describe the sequence and phylogenetic analysis of five CCT genes from TRICHOMONAS: vaginalis and seven from GIARDIA: lamblia, representatives of amitochondriate protist lineages thought to have diverged early from other eukaryotes. Our data show that the gene duplications producing the eight CCT paralogs took place prior to the organismal divergence of TRICHOMONAS: and GIARDIA: from other eukaryotes. Thus, these divergent protists likely possess completely hetero-oligomeric CCT complexes like those in yeast and mammalian cells. No close phylogenetic relationship between the archaeal chaperonins and specific CCT subunits was observed, suggesting that none of the CCT gene duplications predate the divergence of archaea and eukaryotes. The duplications producing the CCTdelta and CCTepsilon subunits, as well as CCTalpha, CCTbeta, and CCTeta, are the most recent in the CCT gene family. Our analyses show significant differences in the rates of evolution of archaeal chaperonins compared with the eukaryotic CCTs, as well as among the different CCT subunits themselves. We discuss these results in light of current views on the origin, evolution, and function of CCT complexes.

  12. The origin and evolution of the surfactant system in fish: insights into the evolution of lungs and swim bladders.

    PubMed

    Daniels, Christopher B; Orgeig, Sandra; Sullivan, Lucy C; Ling, Nicholas; Bennett, Michael B; Schürch, Samuel; Val, Adalberto Luis; Brauner, Colin J

    2004-01-01

    Several times throughout their radiation fish have evolved either lungs or swim bladders as gas-holding structures. Lungs and swim bladders have different ontogenetic origins and can be used either for buoyancy or as an accessory respiratory organ. Therefore, the presence of air-filled bladders or lungs in different groups of fishes is an example of convergent evolution. We propose that air breathing could not occur without the presence of a surfactant system and suggest that this system may have originated in epithelial cells lining the pharynx. Here we present new data on the surfactant system in swim bladders of three teleost fish (the air-breathing pirarucu Arapaima gigas and tarpon Megalops cyprinoides and the non-air-breathing New Zealand snapper Pagrus auratus). We determined the presence of surfactant using biochemical, biophysical, and morphological analyses and determined homology using immunohistochemical analysis of the surfactant proteins (SPs). We relate the presence and structure of the surfactant system to those previously described in the swim bladders of another teleost, the goldfish, and those of the air-breathing organs of the other members of the Osteichthyes, the more primitive air-breathing Actinopterygii and the Sarcopterygii. Snapper and tarpon swim bladders are lined with squamous and cuboidal epithelial cells, respectively, containing membrane-bound lamellar bodies. Phosphatidylcholine dominates the phospholipid (PL) profile of lavage material from all fish analyzed to date. The presence of the characteristic surfactant lipids in pirarucu and tarpon, lamellar bodies in tarpon and snapper, SP-B in tarpon and pirarucu lavage, and SPs (A, B, and D) in swim bladder tissue of the tarpon provide strong evidence that the surfactant system of teleosts is homologous with that of other fish and of tetrapods. This study is the first demonstration of the presence of SP-D in the air-breathing organs of nonmammalian species and SP-B in actinopterygian

  13. The origin of the incommesurate phase in the spin Peierls compound TiOCl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobry, Ariel; Mastrogiuseppe, Diego; Gazza, Claudio

    2011-03-01

    TiOX (X=Cl,Br) are recently characterized Spin-Peierls compounds. They are unusual due to the appearance of an intermediate incommensurate phase between the dimerized and the uniform ones. We show that the incommensurate phase is stabilized by a linear dependency of the phononic dispersion near the dimerized mode. A model based on antiferromagnetic chains with position dependent exchanges accounts for the evolution of the atomic coordinates with temperature within the incommensurate phase. The magnetic gap closes in the intermediate phase. Finally, we find that the magnetic static structure factor has incommensurate peaks situated at twice the wave vector of the structural ones. These peaks could be found in future elastic neutron scattering measurements.

  14. Constrained lability in floral evolution: counting convergent origins of hummingbird pollination in Penstemon and Keckiella.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Paul; Wolfe, Andrea D; Armbruster, W Scott; Thomson, James D

    2007-01-01

    In the clade of Penstemon and segregate genera, pollination syndromes are well defined among the 284 species. Most display combinations of floral characters associated with pollination by Hymenoptera, the ancestral mode of pollination for this clade. Forty-one species present characters associated with hummingbird pollination, although some of these ornithophiles are also visited by insects. The ornithophiles are scattered throughout the traditional taxonomy and across phylogenies estimated from nuclear (internal transcribed spacer (ITS)) and chloroplast DNA (trnCD/TL) sequence data. Here, the number of separate origins of ornithophily is estimated, using bootstrap phylogenies and constrained parsimony searches. Analyses suggest 21 separate origins, with overwhelming support for 10 of these. Because species sampling was incomplete, this is probably an underestimate. Penstemons therefore show great evolutionary lability with respect to acquiring hummingbird pollination; this syndrome acts as an attractor to which species with large sympetalous nectar-rich flowers have frequently been drawn. By contrast, penstemons have not undergone evolutionary shifts backwards or to other pollination syndromes. Thus, they are an example of both striking evolutionary lability and constrained evolution.

  15. Origin and evolution of the integumentary skeleton in non-tetrapod vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Sire, Jean-Yves; Donoghue, Philip C J; Vickaryous, Matthews K

    2009-04-01

    Most non-tetrapod vertebrates develop mineralized extra-oral elements within the integument. Known collectively as the integumentary skeleton, these elements represent the structurally diverse skin-bound contribution to the dermal skeleton. In this review we begin by summarizing what is known about the histological diversity of the four main groups of integumentary skeletal tissues: hypermineralized (capping) tissues; dentine; plywood-like tissues; and bone. For most modern taxa, the integumentary skeleton has undergone widespread reduction and modification often rendering the homology and relationships of these elements confused and uncertain. Fundamentally, however, all integumentary skeletal elements are derived (alone or in combination) from only two types of cell condensations: odontogenic and osteogenic condensations. We review the origin and diversification of the integumentary skeleton in aquatic non-tetrapods (including stem gnathostomes), focusing on tissues derived from odontogenic (hypermineralized tissues, dentines and elasmodine) and osteogenic (bone tissues) cell condensations. The novelty of our new scenario of integumentary skeletal evolution resides in the demonstration that elasmodine, the main component of elasmoid scales, is odontogenic in origin. Based on available data we propose that elasmodine is a form of lamellar dentine. Given its widespread distribution in non-tetrapod lineages we further propose that elasmodine is a very ancient tissue in vertebrates and predict that it will be found in ancestral rhombic scales and cosmoid scales.

  16. Early sexual origins of homeoprotein heterodimerization and evolution of the plant KNOX/BELL family.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae-Hyeok; Lin, Huawen; Joo, Sunjoo; Goodenough, Ursula

    2008-05-30

    Developmental mechanisms that yield multicellular diversity are proving to be well conserved within lineages, generating interest in their origins in unicellular ancestors. We report that molecular regulation of the haploid-diploid transition in Chlamydomonas, a unicellular green soil alga, shares common ancestry with differentiation pathways in land plants. Two homeoproteins, Gsp1 and Gsm1, contributed by gametes of plus and minus mating types respectively, physically interact and translocate from the cytosol to the nucleus upon gametic fusion, initiating zygote development. Their ectopic expression activates zygote development in vegetative cells and, in a diploid background, the resulting zygotes undergo a normal meiosis. Gsm1/Gsp1 dyads share sequence homology with and are functionally related to KNOX/BELL dyads regulating stem-cell (meristem) specification in land plants. We propose that combinatorial homeoprotein-based transcriptional control, a core feature of the fungal/animal radiation, may have originated in a sexual context and enabled the evolution of land-plant body plans.

  17. Large-scale gas dynamical processes affecting the origin and evolution of gaseous galactic halos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shapiro, Paul R.

    1991-01-01

    Observations of galactic halo gas are consistent with an interpretation in terms of the galactic fountain model in which supernova heated gas in the galactic disk escapes into the halo, radiatively cools and forms clouds which fall back to the disk. The results of a new study of several large-scale gas dynamical effects which are expected to occur in such a model for the origin and evolution of galactic halo gas will be summarized, including the following: (1) nonequilibrium absorption line and emission spectrum diagnostics for radiatively cooling halo gas in our own galaxy, as well the implications of such absorption line diagnostics for the origin of quasar absorption lines in galactic halo clouds of high redshift galaxies; (2) numerical MHD simulations and analytical analysis of large-scale explosions ad superbubbles in the galactic disk and halo; (3) numerical MHD simulations of halo cloud formation by thermal instability, with and without magnetic field; and (4) the effect of the galactic fountain on the galactic dynamo.

  18. Early Origin and Evolution of the Angelman Syndrome Ubiquitin Ligase Gene Ube3a

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Masaaki

    2017-01-01

    The human Ube3a gene encodes an E3 ubiquitin ligase and exhibits brain-specific genomic imprinting. Genetic abnormalities that affect the maternal copy of this gene cause the neurodevelopmental disorder Angelman syndrome (AS), which is characterized by severe mental retardation, speech impairment, seizure, ataxia and some unique behavioral phenotypes. In this review article, I highlight the evolution of the Ube3a gene and its imprinting to provide evolutionary insights into AS. Recent comparative genomic studies have revealed that Ube3a is most phylogenetically similar to HECTD2 among the human HECT (homologous to the E6AP carboxyl terminus) family of E3 ubiquitin ligases, and its distant evolutionary origin can be traced to common ancestors of fungi and animals. Moreover, a gene more similar to Ube3a than HECTD2 is found in a range of eukaryotes from amoebozoans to basal metazoans, but is lost in later lineages. Unlike in mice and humans, Ube3a expression is biallelic in birds, monotremes, marsupials and insects. The imprinting domain that governs maternal expression of Ube3a was formed from non-imprinted elements following multiple chromosomal rearrangements after diversification of marsupials and placental mammals. Hence, the evolutionary origins of Ube3a date from long before the emergence of the nervous system, although its imprinted expression was acquired relatively recently. These observations suggest that exogenous expression and functional analyses of ancient Ube3a orthologs in mammalian neurons will facilitate the evolutionary understanding of AS. PMID:28326016

  19. Golden jubilee year of Stanley Miller experiment and chemical evolution and origin of life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakrabarti, Sandip K.

    2013-06-01

    I give a brief review of how some of the major players in the subject approached the problem of the origin of pre-biotic molecules on Earth. For paucity of space, I will start with the developments starting with Stanley Miller's experiment on abiotic synthesis of amino acids till the most recent work on numerical simulation of hydro-chemical processes of collapsing clouds and the evolution of complex bio-molecules. We are evidently far away from actually solving the problem of origin of life. What is clear, however, is that the formation of complex amino acids in interstellar region is indeed possible, independently, in many star forming regions inside protostellar disks. Possibly, the delivery of these important ingredients to the earth was done by comets and meteorites. Finally, I conclude that since only a small part of the universe is involved for a relatively short time to create the present life-form, far more complex and possibly 'super-civilized' systems are possible in this universe, and could even be present elsewhere.

  20. Origin and evolution of the integumentary skeleton in non-tetrapod vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Sire, Jean-Yves; Donoghue, Philip C J; Vickaryous, Matthews K

    2009-01-01

    Most non-tetrapod vertebrates develop mineralized extra-oral elements within the integument. Known collectively as the integumentary skeleton, these elements represent the structurally diverse skin-bound contribution to the dermal skeleton. In this review we begin by summarizing what is known about the histological diversity of the four main groups of integumentary skeletal tissues: hypermineralized (capping) tissues; dentine; plywood-like tissues; and bone. For most modern taxa, the integumentary skeleton has undergone widespread reduction and modification often rendering the homology and relationships of these elements confused and uncertain. Fundamentally, however, all integumentary skeletal elements are derived (alone or in combination) from only two types of cell condensations: odontogenic and osteogenic condensations. We review the origin and diversification of the integumentary skeleton in aquatic non-tetrapods (including stem gnathostomes), focusing on tissues derived from odontogenic (hypermineralized tissues, dentines and elasmodine) and osteogenic (bone tissues) cell condensations. The novelty of our new scenario of integumentary skeletal evolution resides in the demonstration that elasmodine, the main component of elasmoid scales, is odontogenic in origin. Based on available data we propose that elasmodine is a form of lamellar dentine. Given its widespread distribution in non-tetrapod lineages we further propose that elasmodine is a very ancient tissue in vertebrates and predict that it will be found in ancestral rhombic scales and cosmoid scales. PMID:19422423

  1. Origin of the cilium: novel approaches to examine a centriolar evolution hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Alliegro, Mark C; Satir, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Recently, a new hypothesis was proposed regarding the evolution of the cilium from an enveloped RNA virus (Satir et al., 2007, Cell Motil. Cytoskeleton 64, 906). The hypothesis predicts that there may be specific centriolar or basal body RNAs with sequences reminiscent of retroviruses, and/or that the nuclear genes for certain centriole-specific proteins would have viral origins. Four independent laboratories have reported the existence of centrosomal RNA (cnRNA). Methods for studying cnRNA are described. We analyzed evidence of relatedness of known full-length cnRNAs to extant viral molecules. Out of 14 cnRNAs studied, 12 have similarity to entries in viral databases, all but one of these with E-values of < or = 1e(-4). Some centrosomal, and possibly uniquely centriolar, proteins also have relatives in viral databases that meet the criteria accepted to indicate a relationship by descent. Nine general cytoskeleton proteins exhibited no significant similarity to viral proteins. The speculation that centrioles are invaders of RNA viral origin in the evolving eukaryotic cell is strengthened by these findings. 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Genome wide exploration of the origin and evolution of amino acids

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Even after years of exploration, the terrestrial origin of bio-molecules remains unsolved and controversial. Today, observation of amino acid composition in proteins has become an alternative way for a global understanding of the mystery encoded in whole genomes and seeking clues for the origin of amino acids. Results In this study, we statistically monitored the frequencies of 20 alpha-amino acids in 549 taxa from three kingdoms of life: archaebacteria, eubacteria, and eukaryotes. We found that the amino acids evolved independently in these three kingdoms; but, conserved linkages were observed in two groups of amino acids, (A, G, H, L, P, Q, R, and W) and (F, I, K, N, S, and Y). Moreover, the amino acids encoded by GC-poor codons (F, Y, N, K, I, and M) were found to "lose" their usage in the development from single cell eukaryotic organisms like S. cerevisiae to H. sapiens, while the amino acids encoded by GC-rich codons (P, A, G, and W) were found to gain usage. These findings further support the co-evolution hypothesis of amino acids and genetic codes. Conclusion We proposed a new chronological order of the appearance of amino acids (L, A, V/E/G, S, I, K, T, R/D, P, N, F, Q, Y, M, H, W, C). Two conserved evolutionary paths of amino acids were also suggested: A→G→R→P and K→Y. PMID:20230639

  3. The Atmospheres of the Terrestrial Planets:Clues to the Origins and Early Evolution of Venus, Earth, and Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baines, Kevin H.; Atreya, Sushil K.; Bullock, Mark A.; Grinspoon, David H,; Mahaffy, Paul; Russell, Christopher T.; Schubert, Gerald; Zahnle, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    We review the current state of knowledge of the origin and early evolution of the three largest terrestrial planets - Venus, Earth, and Mars - setting the stage for the chapters on comparative climatological processes to follow. We summarize current models of planetary formation, as revealed by studies of solid materials from Earth and meteorites from Mars. For Venus, we emphasize the known differences and similarities in planetary bulk properties and composition with Earth and Mars, focusing on key properties indicative of planetary formation and early evolution, particularly of the atmospheres of all three planets. We review the need for future in situ measurements for improving our understanding of the origin and evolution of the atmospheres of our planetary neighbors and Earth, and suggest the accuracies required of such new in situ data. Finally, we discuss the role new measurements of Mars and Venus have in understanding the state and evolution of planets found in the habitable zones of other stars.

  4. Origin and Evolution of Magnetic Field in PMS Stars: Influence of Rotation and Structural Changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emeriau-Viard, Constance; Brun, Allan Sacha

    2017-09-01

    During stellar evolution, especially in the pre-main-sequence phase, stellar structure and rotation evolve significantly, causing major changes in the dynamics and global flows of the star. We wish to assess the consequences of these changes on stellar dynamo, internal magnetic field topology, and activity level. To do so, we have performed a series of 3D HD and MHD simulations with the ASH code. We choose five different models characterized by the radius of their radiative zone following an evolutionary track computed by a 1D stellar evolution code. These models characterized stellar evolution from 1 to 50 Myr. By introducing a seed magnetic field in the fully convective model and spreading its evolved state through all four remaining cases, we observe systematic variations in the dynamical properties and magnetic field amplitude and topology of the models. The five MHD simulations develop a strong dynamo field that can reach an equipartition state between the kinetic and magnetic energies and even superequipartition levels in the faster-rotating cases. We find that the magnetic field amplitude increases as it evolves toward the zero-age main sequence. Moreover, the magnetic field topology becomes more complex, with a decreasing axisymmetric component and a nonaxisymmetric one becoming predominant. The dipolar components decrease as the rotation rate and the size of the radiative core increase. The magnetic fields possess a mixed poloidal-toroidal topology with no obvious dominant component. Moreover, the relaxation of the vestige dynamo magnetic field within the radiative core is found to satisfy MHD stability criteria. Hence, it does not experience a global reconfiguration but slowly relaxes by retaining its mixed stable poloidal-toroidal topology.

  5. Model for resistance evolution in shape memory alloys including R-phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brammajyosula, Ravindra; Buravalla, Vidyashankar; Khandelwal, Ashish

    2011-03-01

    The electrical resistance behavior of a shape memory alloy (SMA) wire can be used for sensing the state of an SMA device. Hence, this study investigates the resistance evolution in SMAs. A lumped parameter model with cosine kinetics to capture the resistance variation during the phase transformation is developed. Several SMA materials show the presence of trigonal or rhombohedral (R) phase as an intermediate phase, apart from the commonly recognized austenite and martensite phases. Most of the SMA models ignore the R-phase effect in their prediction of thermomechanical response. This may be acceptable since the changes in thermomechanical response associated with the R-phase are relatively less. However, the resistivity related effects are pronounced in the presence of the R-phase and its appearance introduces non-monotonicity in the resistivity evolution. This leads to additional complexities in the use of resistance signal for sensing and control. Hence, a lumped model is developed here for resistance evolution including the R-phase effects. A phase-diagram-based model is proposed for predicting electro-thermomechanical response. Both steady state hysteretic response and transient response are modeled. The model predictions are compared with the available test data. Numerical studies have shown that the model is able to capture all the essential features of the resistance evolution in SMAs in the presence of the R-phase.

  6. Phase competition and anomalous thermal evolution in high-temperature superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Zuo-Dong; Zhou, Yuan; Yin, Wei-Guo; Lin, Hai-Qing; Gong, Chang-De

    2017-07-01

    The interplay of competing orders is relevant to high-temperature superconductivity known to emerge upon suppression of a parent antiferromagnetic order typically via charge doping. How such interplay evolves at low temperature—in particular at what doping level the zero-temperature quantum critical point (QCP) is located—is still elusive because it is masked by the superconducting state. The QCP had long been believed to follow a smooth extrapolation of the characteristic temperature T* for the strange normal state well above the superconducting transition temperature. However, recently the T* within the superconducting dome was reported to unexpectedly exhibit back-bending likely in the cuprate Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8 +δ . Here we show that the original and revised phase diagrams can be understood in terms of weak and moderate competitions, respectively, between superconductivity and a pseudogap state such as d -density or spin-density wave, based on both Ginzburg-Landau theory and the realistic t -t'-t''-J -V model for the cuprates. We further found that the calculated temperature and doping-level dependence of the quasiparticle spectral gap and Raman response qualitatively agrees with the experiments. In particular, the T* back-bending can provide a simple explanation of the observed anomalous two-step thermal evolution dominated by the superconducting gap and the pseudogap, respectively. Our results imply that the revised phase diagram is likely to take place in high-temperature superconductors.

  7. Phase competition and anomalous thermal evolution in high-temperature superconductors

    DOE PAGES

    Yu, Zuo-Dong; Zhou, Yuan; Yin, Wei-Guo; ...

    2017-07-12

    The interplay of competing orders is relevant to high-temperature superconductivity known to emerge upon suppression of a parent antiferromagnetic order typically via charge doping. How such interplay evolves at low temperature—in particular at what doping level the zero-temperature quantum critical point (QCP) is located—is still elusive because it is masked by the superconducting state. The QCP had long been believed to follow a smooth extrapolation of the characteristic temperature T * for the strange normal state well above the superconducting transition temperature. However, recently the T * within the superconducting dome was reported to unexpectedly exhibit back-bending likely in themore » cuprate Bi 2 Sr 2 CaCu 2 O 8 + δ . We show that the original and revised phase diagrams can be understood in terms of weak and moderate competitions, respectively, between superconductivity and a pseudogap state such as d -density or spin-density wave, based on both Ginzburg-Landau theory and the realistic t - t ' - t ' ' - J - V model for the cuprates. We further found that the calculated temperature and doping-level dependence of the quasiparticle spectral gap and Raman response qualitatively agrees with the experiments. Particularly, the T * back-bending can provide a simple explanation of the observed anomalous two-step thermal evolution dominated by the superconducting gap and the pseudogap, respectively. These results imply that the revised phase diagram is likely to take place in high-temperature superconductors.« less

  8. Are Petals Sterile Stamens or Bracts? The Origin and Evolution of Petals in the Core Eudicots

    PubMed Central

    Ronse De Craene, Louis P.

    2007-01-01

    Background The aim of this paper is to discuss the controversial origins of petals from tepals or stamens and the links between the morphological expression of petals and floral organ identity genes in the core eudicots. Scope I challenge the widely held classical view that petals are morphologically derived from stamens in the core eudicots, and sepals from tepals or bracts. Morphological data suggest that tepal-derived petals have evolved independently in the major lineages of the core eudicots (i.e. asterids, Santalales and rosids) from Berberidopsis-like prototypes, and that staminodial petals have arisen only in few isolated cases where petals had been previously lost (Caryophyllales, Rosales). The clear correlation between continuous changes in petal morphology, and a scenario that indicates numerous duplications to have taken place in genes controlling floral organ development, can only be fully understood within a phylogenetic context. B-gene expression plays a fundamental role in the evolution of the petals by controlling petaloidy, but it does not clarify petal homology. Conclusions An increased synorganization of the flower in the core eudicots linked with the establishment of floral whorls restricts the petaloid gene expression to the second whorl, reducing the similarities of petals with tepals from which they were originally derived. An increased flower size linked with secondary polyandry or polycarpelly may lead to a breakdown of the restricted gene expression and a reversal to ancestral characteristics of perianth development. An altered ‘sliding boundary’ hypothesis is proposed for the core eudicots to explain shifts in petaloidy of the perianth and the event of staminodial petals. The repetitive changes of function in the perianth of the core eudicots are linked with shifts in petaloidy to the outer perianth whorl, or losses of petal or sepal whorls that can be secondarily compensated for by the inclusion of bracts in the flower. The origin

  9. Comparative genomics, evolution and origins of the nuclear envelope and nuclear pore complex.

    PubMed

    Mans, Ben J; Anantharaman, Vivek; Aravind, L; Koonin, Eugene V

    2004-12-01

    The presence of a distinct nucleus, the compartment for confining the genome, transcription and RNA maturation, is a central (and eponymous) feature that distinguishes eukaryotes from prokaryotes. Structural integrity of the nucleus is maintained by the nuclear envelope (NE). A crucial element of this structure is the nuclear pore complex (NPC), a macromolecular machine with over 90 protein components, which mediates nucleo-cytoplasmic communication. We investigated the provenance of the conserved domains found in these perinuclear proteins and reconstructed a parsimonious scenario for NE and NPC evolution by means of comparative-genomic analysis of their components from the available sequences of 28 sequenced eukaryotic genomes. We show that the NE and NPC proteins were tinkered together from diverse domains, which evolved from prokaryotic precursors at different points in eukaryotic evolution, divergence from pre-existing eukaryotic paralogs performing other functions, and de novo. It is shown that several central components of the NPC, in particular, the RanGDP import factor NTF2, the HEH domain of Src1p-Man1, and, probably, also the key domains of karyopherins and nucleoporins, the HEAT/ARM and WD40 repeats, have a bacterial, most likely, endosymbiotic origin. The specialized immunoglobulin (Ig) domain in the globular tail of the animal lamins, and the Ig domains in the nuclear membrane protein GP210 are shown to be related to distinct prokaryotic families of Ig domains. This suggests that independent, late horizontal gene transfer events from bacterial sources might have contributed to the evolution of perinuclear proteins in some of the major eukaryotic lineages. Snurportin 1, one of the highly conserved karyopherins, contains a cap-binding domain which is shown to be an inactive paralog of the guanylyl transferase domain of the mRNA-capping enzyme, exemplifying recruitment of paralogs of pre-exsiting proteins for perinuclear functions. It is shown that

  10. Speculations on the origin and evolution of the Utopia-Elysium lowlands of Mars

    SciTech Connect

    Frey, H.V.; Schultz, R.A. )

    1990-08-30

    The origin of the overall low and variable topographic character of the northern plains is a fundamental aspect of the Martian crustal dichotomy. A model for the development of the Utopia-Elysium lowlands in eastern Mars in terms of the long-term evolution of large, overlapping impact basins is presented. The effects of relaxation of basin topography, volcanic flooding and loading of the basins with subsequent subsidence and downwarping, and the growth of a long-lived major tectonovolcanic center in the overlap region between the proposed Utopia and Elysium impact basins are qualitatively described. In an early hot, thin (<50 km thick) lithosphere with low mantle viscosity (<10{sup 22} P), relaxation of topographic relief was probably rapid (<10{sup 4} years) by comparison with the likely time between the two largest impacts (>10{sup 6} years). The later Utopia Basin impact drastically altered the structure of the earlier Elysium Basin, uplifting portions of what had been the central depression. The heating and fracturing due to the impacts was most intense in the region of overlap, which probably provided an easy conduit for volcanic eruptions in this area. Loading by Early Hesperian and older basin volcanic caused widespread subsidence which may have extended beyond the basin rim and which was responsible for the generally low character of the northern plains, despite the minimum 2-3 km volcanic fill present there. Prolonged volcanism would likely keep the overlap region hotter longer, opposing later general subsidence of the impact basin floor where it had cooled. The authors suggest this model may be applicable to the origin of the northern lowlands elsewhere on Mars and that overlapping large impacts may be important in the establishment of the fundamental topographic and crustal dichtomy and the origin of major tectonovolcanic complexes on the planet.

  11. Evolution of Modern Birds Revealed by Mitogenomics: Timing the Radiation and Origin of Major Orders

    PubMed Central

    Pacheco, M. Andreína; Battistuzzi, Fabia U.; Lentino, Miguel; Aguilar, Roberto F.; Kumar, Sudhir; Escalante, Ananias A.

    2011-01-01

    Mitochondrial (mt) genes and genomes are among the major sources of data for evolutionary studies in birds. This places mitogenomic studies in birds at the core of intense debates in avian evolutionary biology. Indeed, complete mt genomes are actively been used to unveil the phylogenetic relationships among major orders, whereas single genes (e.g., cytochrome c oxidase I [COX1]) are considered standard for species identification and defining species boundaries (DNA barcoding). In this investigation, we study the time of origin and evolutionary relationships among Neoaves orders using complete mt genomes. First, we were able to solve polytomies previously observed at the deep nodes of the Neoaves phylogeny by analyzing 80 mt genomes, including 17 new sequences reported in this investigation. As an example, we found evidence indicating that columbiforms and charadriforms are sister groups. Overall, our analyses indicate that by improving the taxonomic sampling, complete mt genomes can solve the evolutionary relationships among major bird groups. Second, we used our phylogenetic hypotheses to estimate the time of origin of major avian orders as a way to test if their diversification took place prior to the Cretaceous/Tertiary (K/T) boundary. Such timetrees were estimated using several molecular dating approaches and conservative calibration points. Whereas we found time estimates slightly younger than those reported by others, most of the major orders originated prior to the K/T boundary. Finally, we used our timetrees to estimate the rate of evolution of each mt gene. We found great variation on the mutation rates among mt genes and within different bird groups. COX1 was the gene with less variation among Neoaves orders and the one with the least amount of rate heterogeneity across lineages. Such findings support the choice of COX 1 among mt genes as target for developing DNA barcoding approaches in birds. PMID:21242529

  12. Tracing the origin of functional and conserved domains in the human proteome: implications for protein evolution at the modular level

    PubMed Central

    Pal, Lipika R; Guda, Chittibabu

    2006-01-01

    Background The functional repertoire of the human proteome is an incremental collection of functions accomplished by protein domains evolved along the Homo sapiens lineage. Therefore, knowledge on the origin of these functionalities provides a better understanding of the domain and protein evolution in human. The lack of proper comprehension about such origin has impelled us to study the evolutionary origin of human proteome in a unique way as detailed in this study. Results This study reports a unique approach for understanding the evolution of human proteome by tracing the origin of its constituting domains hierarchically, along the Homo sapiens lineage. The uniqueness of this method lies in subtractive searching of functional and conserved domains in the human proteome resulting in higher efficiency of detecting their origins. From these analyses the nature of protein evolution and trends in domain evolution can be observed in the context of the entire human proteome data. The method adopted here also helps delineate the degree of divergence of functional families occurred during the course of evolution. Conclusion This approach to trace the evolutionary origin of functional domains in the human proteome facilitates better understanding of their functional versatility as well as provides insights into the functionality of hypothetical proteins present in the human proteome. This work elucidates the origin of functional and conserved domains in human proteins, their distribution along the Homo sapiens lineage, occurrence frequency of different domain combinations and proteome-wide patterns of their distribution, providing insights into the evolutionary solution to the increased complexity of the human proteome. PMID:17090320

  13. Phase-Field Models for Simulating Physical Vapor Deposition and Microstructure Evolution of Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, James A., Jr.

    The focus of this research is to develop, implement, and utilize phase-field models to study microstructure evolution in thin films during physical vapor deposition (PVD). There are four main goals to this dissertation. First, a phase-field model is developed to simulate PVD of a single-phase polycrystalline material by coupling previous modeling efforts on deposition of single-phase materials and grain evolution in polycrystalline materials. Second, a phase-field model is developed to simulate PVD of a polymorphic material by coupling previous modeling efforts on PVD of a single-phase material, evolution in multiphase materials, and phase nucleation. Third, a novel free energy functional is proposed that incorporates appropriate energetics and dynamics for simultaneous modeling of PVD and grain evolution in single-phase polycrystalline materials. Finally, these phase-field models are implemented into custom simulation codes and utilized to illustrate these models' capabilities in capturing PVD thin film growth, grain and grain boundary (GB) evolution, phase evolution and nucleation, and temperature evolution. In general, these simulations show: grain coarsening through grain rotation and GB migration such that grains tend to align with the thin film surface features and GBs migrate to locations between these features so that each surface feature has a distinct grain and orientation; the incident vapor flux rate controls the density of the thin film and the formation of surface and subsurface features; the substrate phase distribution initially acts as a template for the growing microstructure until the thin film becomes sufficiently thick; latent heat released during PVD increases the surface temperature of the thin film creating a temperature gradient within the thin film influencing phase evolution and nucleation; and temperature distributions lead to regions within the thin film that allow for multiple phases to be stable and coexist. Further, this work shows

  14. Study on the opinion of university students about the themes of the origin of Universe and evolution of life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Souza, Rogério F.; de Carvalho, Marcelo; Matsuo, Tiemi; Zaia, Dimas A. M.

    2010-04-01

    This paper reports the results of a questionnaire administered to university students, about several questions involving the origin of the Universe and life and biological evolution, as well as questions related to more common scientific themes. As few as between 2.4% (philosophy students) and 14% (geography students) did not accept the theory of evolution, because they believed in creation as described in the Bible. However, between 41.5% (philosophy students) and 71.3% (biology students) did not see any conflict between religion and evolution. About 80% of the students believed that the relationship between lung cancer and smoking is well established by science, but this number falls to 65% for biological evolution and 28.9% for the big bang theory. It should be pointed out that for 24.5% and 7.4% of the students the big bang theory and biological evolution, respectively, are poorly established by science. The students who self-reported being Christian but not Roman Catholic are more conservative in the acceptance of biological evolution and the old age of Earth and the Universe than are other groups of students. Other factors, such as family income and the level of education of parents, appear to influence the students' acceptance of themes related to the origin of the Universe and biological evolution.

  15. Structural evolution of calcite at high temperatures: Phase V unveiled

    PubMed Central

    Ishizawa, Nobuo; Setoguchi, Hayato; Yanagisawa, Kazumichi

    2013-01-01

    The calcite form of calcium carbonate CaCO3 undergoes a reversible phase transition between Rc and Rm at ~1240 K under a CO2 atmosphere of ~0.4 MPa. The joint probability density function obtained from the single-crystal X-ray diffraction data revealed that the oxygen triangles of the CO3 group in the high temperature form (Phase V) do not sit still at specified positions in the space group Rm, but migrate along the undulated circular orbital about carbon. The present study also shows how the room temperature form (Phase I) develops into Phase V through an intermediate form (Phase IV) in the temperature range between ~985 K and ~1240 K. PMID:24084871

  16. Origins.

    PubMed

    Weinberg, S

    1985-10-04

    The farthest of the galaxies that can be seen through the large ground-based telescopes of modern astronomy, such as those on La Palma in the Canary Islands, are so far away that they appear as they did close to the time of the origin of the universe, perhaps some 10 billion years ago. Much has been learned, and much has still to be learned, about the young universe from optical and radio telescopes, but these instruments cannot be used to look directly at the universe in its first few hundred thousand years. Instead, they are used to search the relatively recent past for relics of much earlier times. Together with experiments planned for the next generation of elementary particle accelerators, astronomical observations should continue to extend what is known about the universe backward in time to the Big Bang and may eventually help to reveal the origins of the physical laws that govern the universe.

  17. Acrobat ants go global--origin, evolution and systematics of the genus Crematogaster (Hymenoptera: Formicidae).

    PubMed

    Blaimer, Bonnie B

    2012-11-01

    This study unravels the evolution and biogeographic history of the globally distributed ant genus Crematogaster on the basis of a molecular phylogeny, reconstructed from five nuclear protein-coding genes and a total of 3384 bp of sequence data. A particular emphasis is placed on the evolutionary history of these ants in the Malagasy region. Bayesian and likelihood analyses performed on a dataset of 124 Crematogaster ingroup taxa lend strong support for three deeply diverging phylogenetic lineages within the genus: the Orthocrema clade, the Global Crematogaster clade and the Australo-Asian Crematogaster clade. The 15 previous subgenera within Crematogaster are mostly not monophyletic. Divergence dating analyses and ancestral range reconstructions suggest that Crematogaster evolved in South-East Asia in the mid-Eocene (40-45 ma). The three major lineages also originated in this region in the late Oligocene/early Miocene (~24-30 ma). A first dispersal out of S-E Asia by an Orthocrema lineage is supported for 22-30 ma to the Afrotropical region. Successive dispersal events out of S-E Asia began in the early, and continued throughout the late Miocene. The global distribution of Crematogaster was achieved by subsequent colonizations of all major biogeographic regions by the Orthocrema and the Global Crematogaster clade. Molecular dating estimates and ancestral range evolution are discussed in the light of palaeogeographic changes in the S-E Asian region and an evolving ocean circulation system throughout the Eocene, Oligocene and Miocene. Eight dispersal events to/from Madagascar by Crematogaster are supported, with most events occurring in the late Miocene to Pliocene (5.0-9.5 ma). These results suggest that Crematogaster ants possess exceptional dispersal and colonization abilities, and emphasize the need for detailed investigations of traits that have contributed to the global evolutionary success of these ants. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. The origin and evolution of human glutaminases and their atypical C-terminal ankyrin repeats.

    PubMed

    Pasquali, Camila Cristina; Islam, Zeyaul; Adamoski, Douglas; Ferreira, Igor Monteze; Righeto, Ricardo Diogo; Bettini, Jefferson; Portugal, Rodrigo Villares; Yue, Wyatt Wai-Yin; Gonzalez, Ana; Dias, Sandra Martha Gomes; Ambrosio, Andre Luis Berteli

    2017-07-07

    On the basis of tissue-specific enzyme activity and inhibition by catalytic products, Hans Krebs first demonstrated the existence of multiple glutaminases in mammals. Currently, two human genes are known to encode at least four glutaminase isoforms. However, the phylogeny of these medically relevant enzymes remains unclear, prompting us to investigate their origin and evolution. Using prokaryotic and eukaryotic glutaminase sequences, we built a phylogenetic tree whose topology suggested that the multidomain architecture was inherited from bacterial ancestors, probably simultaneously with the hosting of the proto-mitochondrion endosymbiont. We propose an evolutionary model wherein the appearance of the most active enzyme isoform, glutaminase C (GAC), which is expressed in many cancers, was a late retrotransposition event that occurred in fishes from the Chondrichthyes class. The ankyrin (ANK) repeats in the glutaminases were acquired early in their evolution. To obtain information on ANK folding, we solved two high-resolution structures of the ANK repeat-containing C termini of both kidney-type glutaminase (KGA) and GLS2 isoforms (glutaminase B and liver-type glutaminase). We found that the glutaminase ANK repeats form unique intramolecular contacts through two highly conserved motifs; curiously, this arrangement occludes a region usually involved in ANK-mediated protein-protein interactions. We also solved the crystal structure of full-length KGA and present a small-angle X-ray scattering model for full-length GLS2. These structures explain these proteins' compromised ability to assemble into catalytically active supra-tetrameric filaments, as previously shown for GAC. Collectively, these results provide information about glutaminases that may aid in the design of isoform-specific glutaminase inhibitors. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  19. Origin and Evolution of Titan's Nitrogen Atmosphere - A Cassini-Huygens Perspective

    NASA Astro