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Sample records for phase ii antioxidant

  1. Emerging Roles of Nrf2 and Phase II Antioxidant Enzymes in Neuroprotection

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Meijuan; An, Chengrui; Gao, Yanqin; Leak, Rehana K.; Chen, Jun; Zhang, Feng

    2013-01-01

    Phase II metabolic enzymes are a battery of critical proteins that detoxify xenobiotics by increasing their hydrophilicity and enhancing their disposal. These enzymes have long been studied for their preventative and protective effects against mutagens and carcinogens and for their regulation via the Keap1 (Kelch-like ECH associated protein 1) / Nrf2 (Nuclear factor erythroid 2 related factor 2) / ARE (antioxidant response elements) pathway. Recently, a series of studies have reported the altered expression of phase II genes in postmortem tissue of patients with various neurological diseases. These observations hint at a role for phase II enzymes in the evolution of such conditions. Furthermore, promising findings reveal that overexpression of phase II genes, either by genetic or chemical approaches, confers neuroprotection in vitro and in vivo. Therefore, there is a need to summarize the current literature on phase II genes in the central nervous system (CNS). This should help guide future studies on phase II genes as therapeutic targets in neurological diseases. In this review, we first briefly introduce the concept of phase I, II and III enzymes, with a special focus on phase II enzymes. We then discuss their expression regulation, their inducers and executors. Following this background, we expand our discussion to the neuroprotective effects of phase II enzymes and the potential application of Nrf2 inducers to the treatment of neurological diseases. PMID:23025925

  2. Wheat bran feruloyl oligosaccharides modulate the phase II detoxifying/antioxidant enzymes via Nrf2 signaling.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huijuan; Wang, Jing; Liu, Yingli; Sun, Baoguo

    2015-03-01

    The antioxidant activities of wheat bran feruloyl oligosaccharides (FOs) were determined in rats by determining the activities and mRNA expression levels of phase II detoxifying/antioxidant enzymes such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) in rat organs. FOs was given by gavage at doses of 0.25, 0.5, and 0.75 mmol/kg body weight every day for 15 days. Compared with the control group, the activities of SOD, CAT, and GSH-Px in FOs treatment groups significantly (P<0.05) increased in heart, liver, and kidney. All the FOs treatment also significantly (P<0.05) increased the glutathione (GSH) contents in heart (28-58%), liver (32-71%), and kidney (31-73%) compared with the control. FOs up regulated the mRNA expression levels of SOD, CAT, and HO-1 in organs. Moreover, the immunoblot analysis revealed increased nuclear factor-E2-related factor (Nrf2) protein expression levels in organs and there were positive correlations between the mRNA expression of phase II detoxifying/antioxidant enzymes and the expressions of Nrf2 protein, which demonstrated FOs treatment could modulate the detoxifying/antioxidant enzymes via Nrf2 signaling. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Lipoamide Acts as an Indirect Antioxidant by Simultaneously Stimulating Mitochondrial Biogenesis and Phase II Antioxidant Enzyme Systems in ARPE-19 Cells.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lin; Liu, Zhongbo; Jia, Haiqun; Feng, Zhihui; Liu, Jiankang; Li, Xuesen

    2015-01-01

    In our previous study, we found that pretreatment with lipoamide (LM) more effectively than alpha-lipoic acid (LA) protected retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells from the acrolein-induced damage. However, the reasons and mechanisms for the greater effect of LM than LA are unclear. We hypothesize that LM, rather than the more direct antioxidant LA, may act more as an indirect antioxidant. In the present study, we treated ARPE-19 cells with LA and LM and compared their effects on activation of mitochondrial biogenesis and induction of phase II enzyme systems. It is found that LM is more effective than LA on increasing mitochondrial biogenesis and inducing the expression of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) and its translocation to the nucleus, leading to an increase in expression or activity of phase II antioxidant enzymes (NQO-1, GST, GCL, catalase and Cu/Zn SOD). Further study demonstrated that mitochondrial biogenesis and phase II enzyme induction are closely coupled via energy requirements. These results suggest that LM, compared with the direct antioxidant LA, plays its protective effect on oxidative damage more as an indirect antioxidant to simultaneously stimulate mitochondrial biogenesis and induction of phase II antioxidant enzymes.

  4. Schisandra Chinensis Baillon regulates the gene expression of phase II antioxidant/detoxifying enzymes in hepatic damage induced rats

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Han I; Do, Gyeong-Min; Lee, Hye Min; Ok, Hyang Mok; Shin, Jae-Ho

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES This study investigated the antioxidant activities and hepatoprotective effects of Schisandra chinensis Baillon extract (SCE) against tert-butyl hydroperoxide (t-BHP)-induced oxidative hepatic damage in rats. MATERIALS/METHODS Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were pretreated with SCE (300, 600, and 1,200 mg/kg BW) or saline once daily for 14 consecutive days. On day 14, each animal, except those belonging to the normal control group, were injected with t-BHP (0.8 mmol/kg BW/i.p.), and all of the rats were sacrificed 16 h after t-BHP injection. RESULTS Although no significant differences in AST and ALT levels were observed among the TC and SCE groups, the high-dose SCE group showed a decreasing tendency compared to the TC group. However, erythrocyte SOD activity showed a significant increase in the low-dose SCE group compared with the TC group. On the other hand, no significant differences in hepatic total glutathione (GSH) level, glutathione reductase (GR), and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activities were observed among the TC and SCE groups. Hepatic histopathological evaluation revealed that pretreatment with SCE resulted in reduced t-BHP-induced incidence of lesions, such as neutrophil infiltration, swelling of liver cells, and necrosis. In particular, treatment with a high dose of SCE resulted in induction of phase II antioxidant/detoxifying enzyme expression, such as glutathione S-transferase (GST) and glutamate-cysteine ligase catalytic subunit (GCLC). CONCLUSIONS Based on these results, we conclude that SCE exerts protective effects against t-BHP induced oxidative hepatic damage through the reduction of neutrophil infiltration, swelling of liver cells, and necrosis. In addition, SCE regulates the gene expression of phase II antioxidant/detoxifying enzymes independent of hepatic antioxidant enzyme activity. PMID:24944771

  5. Phase II antioxidant enzyme activities in brain of male and female ACI rats treated chronically with estradiol.

    PubMed

    Stakhiv, Timothy M; Mesia-Vela, Sonia; Kauffman, Frederick C

    2006-08-09

    Activities of Phase II antioxidant enzymes, including NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1), glutathione S-transferase (GST), UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT), and phenol sulfotransferase 1A1 (SULT1A1) were measured in brain of August-Copenhagen Irish (ACI) rats exposed chronically to low doses of estradiol (E(2)). ACI rats were selected for study because this strain is highly responsive to treatment with low doses of E(2) as indexed by a high incidence of E(2)-induced mammary tumors compared to other strains. Rats were exposed chronically to 3 mg E(2) contained in cholesterol pellets implanted subcutaneously for 6 weeks. This treatment increased activities of all four enzymes in the striatum of male but not female ACI rats. Blood E(2) levels at time of sacrifice correlated closely with activities of striatal NQO1, GST, and SULT1A1, but not with striatal UGT. NQO1, GST, and SULT1A1 activities in other brain regions including the cortex, cerebellum, and hippocampus were less sensitive to chronic E(2) treatment. NQO1 was primarily localized in vascular elements and neurons and SULT1A1 primarily in neurons and neuropil of control and E(2)-treated rats. Collectively, these results suggest that enhanced expression of NQO1, GST, and SULT1A1 may contribute to the antioxidant effects of E(2) in the striatum, an area of the brain that may be particularly prone to oxidative stress because of its high content of catecholamines.

  6. Gum Arabic as novel anti-oxidant agent in sickle cell anemia, phase II trial.

    PubMed

    Kaddam, Lamis; Fadl-Elmula, Imad; Eisawi, Omer Ali; Abdelrazig, Haydar Awad; Salih, Mohammed Abdelraman; Lang, Florian; Saeed, Amal M

    2017-01-01

    Sickle cell anemia patients suffer from oxidative stress due to chronic inflammation and self-oxidation of sickle hemoglobin (Hb S). Chronic oxidative stress contributes to endothelial dysfunction, inflammation and multiple organ damage in sickle cell disease (SCD). Thus, antioxidant medication may favorably influence the disease. Gum Arabic (GA), edible, dried, gummy exudates from Acacia Senegal tree, has been claimed to act as an anti-oxidant and cytoprotective agent, protecting against experimental hepatic, renal and cardiac toxicities in rats. We hypothesized that regular intake of GA increases anti-oxidant capacity and reduce oxidative stress. Forty-seven patients (5-42 years) carrying hemoglobin SS were recruited. Patients received 30 g/day GA for 12 weeks. Total anti-oxidant capacity (TAC), malondialdehyde (MDA) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) levels were measured by spectrophotometric methods before and after GA intake. Complete blood count was measured by sysmex. Gum Arabic significantly increased TAC level P < 0.001and decreased the oxidative markers MDA (P < 0.05) and H2O2 (P < 0.005). GA has potent anti- oxidative properties in sickle cell anemia. The anti-oxidant effect of GA may thus favorably influence the clinical condition of this and further diseases characterized by oxidative stress. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02467257. Registered 3rd June 2015. Retrospective registration.

  7. Non-thermal Plasma Activates Human Keratinocytes by Stimulation of Antioxidant and Phase II Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Anke; Dietrich, Stephan; Steuer, Anna; Weltmann, Klaus-Dieter; von Woedtke, Thomas; Masur, Kai; Wende, Kristian

    2015-01-01

    Non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma provides a novel therapeutic opportunity to control redox-based processes, e.g. wound healing, cancer, and inflammatory diseases. By spatial and time-resolved delivery of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, it allows stimulation or inhibition of cellular processes in biological systems. Our data show that both gene and protein expression is highly affected by non-thermal plasma. Nuclear factor erythroid-related factor 2 (NRF2) and phase II enzyme pathway components were found to act as key controllers orchestrating the cellular response in keratinocytes. Additionally, glutathione metabolism, which is a marker for NRF2-related signaling events, was affected. Among the most robustly increased genes and proteins, heme oxygenase 1, NADPH-quinone oxidoreductase 1, and growth factors were found. The roles of NRF2 targets, investigated by siRNA silencing, revealed that NRF2 acts as an important switch for sensing oxidative stress events. Moreover, the influence of non-thermal plasma on the NRF2 pathway prepares cells against exogenic noxae and increases their resilience against oxidative species. Via paracrine mechanisms, distant cells benefit from cell-cell communication. The finding that non-thermal plasma triggers hormesis-like processes in keratinocytes facilitates the understanding of plasma-tissue interaction and its clinical application. PMID:25589789

  8. Novel sulfoglycolipid IG20 causes neuroprotection by activating the phase II antioxidant response in rat hippocampal slices.

    PubMed

    Punzón, Eva; García-Alvarado, Fernanda; Maroto, Marcos; Fernández-Mendívil, Cristina; Michalska, Patrycja; García-Álvarez, Isabel; Arranz-Tagarro, Juan Alberto; Buendia, Izaskun; López, Manuela G; León, Rafael; Gandía, Luis; Fernández-Mayoralas, Alfonso; García, Antonio G

    2017-04-01

    Compound IG20 is a newly synthesised sulphated glycolipid that promotes neuritic outgrowth and myelinisation, at the time it causes the inhibition of glial proliferation and facilitates exocytosis in chromaffin cells. Here we have shown that IG20 at 0.3-10 μM afforded neuroprotection in rat hippocampal slices stressed with veratridine, glutamate or with oxygen plus glucose deprivation followed by reoxygenation (OGD/reox). Excess production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) elicited by glutamate or ODG/reox was prevented by IG20 that also restored the depressed tissue levels of GSH and ATP in hippocampal slices subjected to OGD/reox. Furthermore, the augmented iNOS expression produced upon OGD/reox exposure was also counteracted by IG20. Additionally, the IG20 elicited neuroprotection was prevented by the presence of inhibitors of the signalling pathways Jak2/STAT3, MEK/ERK1/2, and PI3K/Akt, consistent with the ability of the compound to increase the phosphorylation of Jak2, ERK1/2, and Akt. Thus, the activation of phase II response and the Nrf2/ARE pathway could explain the antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects and the ensuing neuroprotective actions of IG20. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. The activation of the Nrf2/ARE pathway in HepG2 hepatoma cells by phytochemicals and subsequent modulation of phase II and antioxidant enzyme expression.

    PubMed

    Krajka-Kuźniak, Violetta; Paluszczak, Jarosław; Szaefer, Hanna; Baer-Dubowska, Wanda

    2015-06-01

    Previous studies have shown that naturally occurring phytochemicals, indole-3-carbinol, phenethyl isothiocyanate, protocatechuic acid, and tannic acid increased the activity and protein level of hepatic phase II enzymes in animal models. In order to further explore the mechanism of this activity, we investigated the effect of these compounds on the activation of nuclear factor erythroid-2-related factor 2 (Nrf2)-regulated transcription in human hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 cells. Treatment with all the tested compounds resulted in the translocation from the cytosol and nuclear accumulation of active phosphorylated Nrf2. Furthermore, phenethyl isothiocyanate and indole-3-carbinol increased the transcript and protein levels of GSTA, GSTP, GSTM, GSTT, and NQO1. On the other hand, protocatechuic and tannic acids enhanced only the expression of GSTA, GSTM, and GSTT. The expression of genes encoding antioxidant enzymes CAT, SOD, GR, and GPx was increased after the treatment with all the tested phytochemicals. These results indicate that isothiocyanates/indoles and protocatechuic and tannic acids induce phase II and antioxidant gene expression in HepG2 cells through the Nrf2-Keap1-ARE signaling pathway. Moreover, the results of this study confirmed that the degradation products of glucosinolates are more effective inducers of phase II and antioxidant enzymes than protocatechuic and tannic acids.

  10. Fisetin inhibits osteoclastogenesis through prevention of RANKL-induced ROS production by Nrf2-mediated up-regulation of phase II antioxidant enzymes.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Eiko; Shimada-Sugawara, Megumi; Yamaguchi, Yu; Sakamoto, Hiroshi; Fumimoto, Reiko; Fukuma, Yutaka; Nishishita, Kazuhisa; Okamoto, Kuniaki; Tsukuba, Takayuki

    2013-01-01

    Osteoclasts (OCLs) are multinucleated bone-resorbing cells that are differentiated by stimulation with receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL) and macrophage colony-stimulating factor. We recently demonstrated that regulation of heme-oxygenase 1 (HO-1), a stress-induced cytoprotective enzyme, also functions in OCL differentiation. In this study, we investigated effects of fisetin, a natural bioactive flavonoid that has been reported to induce HO-1 expression, on the differentiation of macrophages into OCLs. Fisetin inhibited the formation of OCLs in a dose-dependent manner and suppressed the bone-resorbing activity of OCLs. Moreover, fisetin-treated OCLs showed markedly decreased phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase, Akt, and Jun N-terminal kinase, but fisetin did not inhibit p38 phosphorylation. Fisetin up-regulated mRNA expression of phase II antioxidant enzymes including HO-1 and interfered with RANKL-mediated reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. Studies with RNA interference showed that suppression of NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), a key transcription factor for phase II antioxidant enzymes, rescued fisetin-mediated inhibition of OCL differentiation. Furthermore, fisetin significantly decreased RANKL-induced nuclear translocation of cFos and nuclear factor of activated T cells cytoplasmic-1 (NFATc1), which is a transcription factor critical for osteoclastogenic gene regulation. Therefore, fisetin inhibits OCL differentiation through blocking RANKL-mediated ROS production by Nrf2-mediated up-regulation of phase II antioxidant enzymes.

  11. Phase II-inducing, polyphenols content and antioxidant capacity of corn (Zea mays L.) from phenotypes of white, blue, red and purple colors processed into masa and tortillas.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Martinez, Leticia X; Parkin, Kirk L; Garcia, Hugo S

    2011-03-01

    White, blue, red and purple corns (Zea mays L.) were lime-cooked to obtain masa for tortillas. The total phenolics and anthocyanins content, antioxidant activity expressed as total reducing power (TRP), peroxyl radical bleaching (PRAC), total antioxidant activity (TAA) and quinone reductase (QR) induction in the murine hepatoma (Hepa 1 c1c7 cell line) as a biological marker for phase II detoxification enzymes were investigated. Among the extracts prepared from raw corn varieties the highest concentration of total phenolics, anthocyanins, antioxidant index and induction of QR-inducing activity were found in the Veracruz 42 (Ver 42) genotype. The nixtamalization process (masa) reduced total phenolics, anthocyanins and antioxidant activities and the ability for QR induction when was compared to raw grain. Processing masa into tortillas also negatively affected total phenolics, anthocyanin concentration, antioxidant activities, and QR induction in the colored corn varieties. The blue variety and its corresponding masa and tortillas did not induce QR. Ver 42 genotype and their products (masa and tortilla) showed the greatest antioxidant activity and capacity to induce QR.

  12. Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics of Phase II Drug Metabolizing/Antioxidant Enzymes Gene Response by Anti-cancer Agent Sulforaphane in Rat Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hu; Khor, Tin Oo; Yang, Qian; Huang, Ying; Wu, Tien-yuan; Saw, Constance Lay-Lay; Lin, Wen; Androulakis, Ioannis P.; Kong, Ah-Ng Tony

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE This study assesses the pharmacokinetics (PK) and pharmacodynamics (PD) of Nrf2-mediated increased expression of Phase II drug metabolizing enzyme (DME) and antioxidant enzymes which represents an important component of cancer chemoprevention in rat lymphocytes following intravenous (i.v.) administration of an anti-cancer phytochemical sulforaphane (SFN) METHODS SFN was administered intravenously to four groups of male Sprague-Dawley JVC rats each group comprising four animals. Blood samples were drawn at selected time points. Plasma were obtained from half of the blood samples and analyzed using a validated LC-MS/MS method. Lymphocytes were collected from the remaining blood samples using Ficoll-Paque™ Plus centrifuge medium. Lymphocyte RNAs were extracted, converted to cDNA, and quantitative real-time PCR analyses were performed and fold changes were calculated against those at time zero for the relative expression of Nrf2-target genes of phase II DME/antioxidant enzymes. PK-PD modeling was conducted based on Jusko’s indirect response model (IDR) using GastroPlus™ and Bootstrap Method. RESULTS SFN plasma concentration declined biexponentially and the pharmacokinetic parameters were generated. Rat lymphocyte mRNA expression levels showed no change for GSTM1, SOD, NF-κB, UGT1A1, or UGT1A6. Moderate increases (2-5 folds) over the time zero were seen for HO-1, Nrf2, and NQO1, and significant increase (> 5 folds) for GSTT1, GPx1, and Maf. PK-PD analyses using GastroPlus™ and Bootstrap method provided reasonable fitting for the PK and PD profiles and parameter estimates. CONCLUSION Our present study shows that SFN could induce Nrf2-mediated phase II DME/antioxidant mRNA expression for NQO1, GSTT1, Nrf2, GPx, Maf, and HO-1 in rat lymphocytes after i.v. administration, suggesting that Nrf2-mediated mRNA expression in lymphocytes may serve as surrogate biomarkers. The PK-PD IDR model simultaneously linking the plasma concentrations of SFN and the PD

  13. Long term effect of curcumin in restoration of tumour suppressor p53 and phase-II antioxidant enzymes via activation of Nrf2 signalling and modulation of inflammation in prevention of cancer.

    PubMed

    Das, Laxmidhar; Vinayak, Manjula

    2015-01-01

    Inhibition of carcinogenesis may be a consequence of attenuation of oxidative stress via activation of antioxidant defence system, restoration and stabilization of tumour suppressor proteins along with modulation of inflammatory mediators. Previously we have delineated significant role of curcumin during its long term effect in regulation of glycolytic pathway and angiogenesis, which in turn results in prevention of cancer via modulation of stress activated genes. Present study was designed to investigate long term effect of curcumin in regulation of Nrf2 mediated phase-II antioxidant enzymes, tumour suppressor p53 and inflammation under oxidative tumour microenvironment in liver of T-cell lymphoma bearing mice. Inhibition of Nrf2 signalling observed during lymphoma progression, resulted in down regulation of phase II antioxidant enzymes, p53 as well as activation of inflammatory signals. Curcumin potentiated significant increase in Nrf2 activation. It restored activity of phase-II antioxidant enzymes like GST, GR, NQO1, and tumour suppressor p53 level. In addition, curcumin modulated inflammation via upregulation of TGF-β and reciprocal regulation of iNOS and COX2. The study suggests that during long term effect, curcumin leads to prevention of cancer by inducing phase-II antioxidant enzymes via activation of Nrf2 signalling, restoration of tumour suppressor p53 and modulation of inflammatory mediators like iNOS and COX2 in liver of lymphoma bearing mice.

  14. Phase II enzyme-inducing and antioxidant activities of beetroot (Beta vulgaris L.) extracts from phenotypes of different pigmentation.

    PubMed

    Wettasinghe, Mahinda; Bolling, Bradley; Plhak, Leslie; Xiao, Hang; Parkin, Kirk

    2002-11-06

    Free-radical scavenging, reducing, and phase II enzyme-inducing activities of aqueous and 5% aqueous ethanol extracts of freeze-dried root tissue of four beet (Beta vulgaris L.) strains (red, white, orange, and high-pigment (red) phenotypes) were determined. Aqueous and ethanolic tissue extracts of the regular and high-pigment red phenotypes were most capable of inhibiting metmyoglobin/H(2)O(2)-mediated oxidation of 2-2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS) and 2,2'-azobis-(2-amidinopropane) dihydrochloride (AAPH)-mediated bleaching of beta-carotene. These same extracts were also most efficient at reducing ABTS radical cation and inducing quinone reductase in murine hepatoma (Hepa 1c1c7) cells in vitro.

  15. Modulatory effect of henna leaf (Lawsonia inermis) on drug metabolising phase I and phase II enzymes, antioxidant enzymes, lipid peroxidation and chemically induced skin and forestomach papillomagenesis in mice.

    PubMed

    Dasgupta, Trisha; Rao, A R; Yadava, P K

    2003-03-01

    Henna leaf (Lawsonia inermis), commonly known as Mehndi is cultivated throughout India and is a very popular natural dye to color hand and hair. It is an integral part of indigenous culture, and is also known for its medicinal value. The effect of 200 and 400 mg/kg body weight of 80% ethanolic extract of the fresh leaves of Lawsonia inermis were examined on drug metabolizing phase-I and phase-II enzymes, antioxidant enzymes, glutathione content, lactate dehydrogenase and lipid peroxidation in the liver of 7 weeks old Swiss albino mice. Also anticarcinogenic potential of Henna leaf extract was studied adopting the protocol of benzo(a)pyrene induced forestomach and 7,12 dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA)-initiated and croton oil-promoted skin papillomagenesis. Our primary findings reveal the 'duel-acting' nature of henna leaf as deduced from its potential to induce only the phase-II enzyme activity, associated mainly with carcinogen detoxification in liver of mice and inhibit the phase I enzyme activities. The hepatic glutathione S-transferase and DT-diaphorase specific activities were elevated above basal (p < 0.005) level by Lawsonia inermis extract treatment. With reference to antioxidant enzymes the investigated doses were effective in increasing the hepatic glutathione reductase (GR), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase activities significantly (from p < 0.05 to p < 0.005) at both the dose levels. Reduced glutathione (GSH) measured as non-protein sulphydryl was found to be significantly elevated in liver (p < 0.005) and in all the extrahepatic organs studied (from p < 0.05 to p < 0.005). Among the extrahepatic organs examined (forestomach, kidney and lung) glutathione S-transferase and DT-diaphorase level were increased in a dose independent manner (from p < 0.05 to p < 0.005). Chemopreventive response was measured by the average number of papillomas per mouse (tumor burden) as well as percentage of tumor bearing animals and tumor multiplicity. There was a

  16. Phase II Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Schuknecht, Nate; White, David; Hoste, Graeme

    2014-09-11

    The SkyTrough DSP will advance the state-of-the-art in parabolic troughs for utility applications, with a larger aperture, higher operating temperature, and lower cost. The goal of this project was to develop a parabolic trough collector that enables solar electricity generation in the 2020 marketplace for a 216MWe nameplate baseload power plant. This plant requires an LCOE of 9¢/kWhe, given a capacity factor of 75%, a fossil fuel limit of 15%, a fossil fuel cost of $6.75/MMBtu, $25.00/kWht thermal storage cost, and a domestic installation corresponding to Daggett, CA. The result of our optimization was a trough design of larger aperture and operating temperature than has been fielded in large, utility scale parabolic trough applications: 7.6m width x 150m SCA length (1,118m2 aperture), with four 90mm diameter × 4.7m receivers per mirror module and an operating temperature of 500°C. The results from physical modeling in the System Advisory Model indicate that, for a capacity factor of 75%: The LCOE will be 8.87¢/kWhe. SkyFuel examined the design of almost every parabolic trough component from a perspective of load and performance at aperture areas from 500 to 2,900m2. Aperture-dependent design was combined with fixed quotations for similar parts from the commercialized SkyTrough product, and established an installed cost of $130/m2 in 2020. This project was conducted in two phases. Phase I was a preliminary design, culminating in an optimum trough size and further improvement of an advanced polymeric reflective material. This phase was completed in October of 2011. Phase II has been the detailed engineering design and component testing, which culminated in the fabrication and testing of a single mirror module. Phase II is complete, and this document presents a summary of the comprehensive work.

  17. Options Study - Phase II

    SciTech Connect

    R. Wigeland; T. Taiwo; M. Todosow; W. Halsey; J. Gehin

    2010-09-01

    The Options Study has been conducted for the purpose of evaluating the potential of alternative integrated nuclear fuel cycle options to favorably address the issues associated with a continuing or expanding use of nuclear power in the United States. The study produced information that can be used to inform decisions identifying potential directions for research and development on such fuel cycle options. An integrated nuclear fuel cycle option is defined in this study as including all aspects of the entire nuclear fuel cycle, from obtaining natural resources for fuel to the ultimate disposal of used nuclear fuel (UNF) or radioactive wastes. Issues such as nuclear waste management, especially the increasing inventory of used nuclear fuel, the current uncertainty about used fuel disposal, and the risk of nuclear weapons proliferation have contributed to the reluctance to expand the use of nuclear power, even though it is recognized that nuclear power is a safe and reliable method of producing electricity. In this Options Study, current, evolutionary, and revolutionary nuclear energy options were all considered, including the use of uranium and thorium, and both once-through and recycle approaches. Available information has been collected and reviewed in order to evaluate the ability of an option to clearly address the challenges associated with the current implementation and potential expansion of commercial nuclear power in the United States. This Options Study is a comprehensive consideration and review of fuel cycle and technology options, including those for disposal, and is not constrained by any limitations that may be imposed by economics, technical maturity, past policy, or speculated future conditions. This Phase II report is intended to be used in conjunction with the Phase I report, and much information in that report is not repeated here, although some information has been updated to reflect recent developments. The focus in this Options Study was to

  18. Randomized phase II clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Jung, Sin-Ho; Sargent, Daniel J

    2014-01-01

    Traditionally, Phase II trials have been conducted as single-arm trials to compare the response probabilities between an experimental therapy and a historical control. Historical control data, however, often have a small sample size, are collected from a different patient population, or use a different response assessment method, so that a direct comparison between a historical control and an experimental therapy may be severely biased. Randomized Phase II trials entering patients prospectively to both experimental and control arms have been proposed to avoid any bias in such cases. The small sample sizes for typical Phase II clinical trials imply that the use of exact statistical methods for their design and analysis is appropriate. In this article, we propose two-stage randomized Phase II trials based on Fisher's exact test, which does not require specification of the response probability of the control arm for testing. Through numerical studies, we observe that the proposed method controls the type I error accurately and maintains a high power. If we specify the response probabilities of the two arms under the alternative hypothesis, we can identify good randomized Phase II trial designs by adopting the Simon's minimax and optimal design concepts that were developed for single-arm Phase II trials.

  19. Combustion 2000: Phase II

    SciTech Connect

    Unknown

    1999-11-01

    The goals of the program are to develop a coal-fired high performance power generation system (HIPPS) that is capable of: thermal efficiency (HHV) {ge} 47%; NOx, SOx, and particulates {le} 10% NSPS (New Source Performance Standard); coal providing {ge} 65% of heat input; all solid wastes benign; and cost of electricity {le} 90% of present plants. Phase 1, which began in 1992, focused on the analysis of various configurations of indirectly fired cycles and on technical assessments of alternative plant subsystems and components, including performance requirements, developmental status, design options, complexity and reliability, and capital and operating costs. Phase 1 also included preliminary R and D and the preparation of designs for HIPPS commercial plants approximately 300 MWe in size. This Phase, Phase 2, had as its initial objective the development of a complete design base for the construction and operation of a HIPPS prototype plant to be constructed in Phase 3. As part of a descoping initiative, the Phase 3 program has been eliminated and work related to the commercial plant design has been ended. The rescoped program retained a program of engineering research and development focusing on high temperature heat exchangers, e.g. HITAF development (Task 2); a rescoped Task 6 that is pertinent to Vision 21 objectives and focuses on advanced cycle analysis and optimization, integration of gas turbines into complex cycles, and repowering designs; and preparation of the Phase 2 Technical Report (Task 8). This rescoped program deleted all subsystem testing (Tasks 3, 4,and 5) and the development of a site-specific engineering design and test plan for the HIPPS prototype plant (Task 7). Work reported herein is from: Task 2.1 HITAF Combustors; Task 2.2 HITAF Air Heaters; and Task 6 HIPPS Commercial Plant Design Update.

  20. A phase II study with antioxidants, both in the diet and supplemented, pharmaconutritional support, progestagen, and anti-cyclooxygenase-2 showing efficacy and safety in patients with cancer-related anorexia/cachexia and oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Mantovani, Giovanni; Macciò, Antonio; Madeddu, Clelia; Gramignano, Giulia; Lusso, Maria Rita; Serpe, Roberto; Massa, Elena; Astara, Giorgio; Deiana, Laura

    2006-05-01

    To test the efficacy and safety of an integrated treatment based on a pharmaconutritional support, antioxidants, and drugs, all given orally, in a population of advanced cancer patients with cancer-related anorexia/cachexia and oxidative stress. An open early-phase II study was designed according to the Simon two-stage design. The integrated treatment consisted of diet with high polyphenols content (400 mg), antioxidant treatment (300 mg/d alpha-lipoic acid + 2.7 g/d carbocysteine lysine salt + 400 mg/d vitamin E + 30,000 IU/d vitamin A + 500 mg/d vitamin C), and pharmaconutritional support enriched with 2 cans per day (n-3)-PUFA (eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid), 500 mg/d medroxyprogesterone acetate, and 200 mg/d selective cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor celecoxib. The treatment duration was 4 months. The following variables were evaluated: (a) clinical (Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status); (b) nutritional [lean body mass (LBM), appetite, and resting energy expenditure]; (c) laboratory [proinflammatory cytokines and leptin, reactive oxygen species (ROS) and antioxidant enzymes]; (d) quality of life (European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer QLQ-C30, Euro QL-5D, and MFSI-SF). From July 2002 to January 2005, 44 patients were enrolled. Of these, 39 completed the treatment and were assessable. Body weight increased significantly from baseline as did LBM and appetite. There was an important decrease of proinflammatory cytokines interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and a negative relationship worthy of note was only found between LBM and IL-6 changes. As for quality of life evaluation, there was a marked improvement in the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer QLQ-C30, Euro QL-5D(VAS), and multidimensional fatigue symptom inventory-short form scores. At the end of the study, 22 of the 39 patients were "responders" or "high responders." The minimum required was 21; therefore, the

  1. Influence of bacterial N-acyl-homoserine lactones on growth parameters, pigments, antioxidative capacities and the xenobiotic phase II detoxification enzymes in barley and yam bean.

    PubMed

    Götz-Rösch, Christine; Sieper, Tina; Fekete, Agnes; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe; Hartmann, Anton; Schröder, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria are able to communicate with each other and sense their environment in a population density dependent mechanism known as quorum sensing (QS). N-acyl-homoserine lactones (AHLs) are the QS signaling compounds of Gram-negative bacteria which are frequent colonizers of rhizospheres. While cross-kingdom signaling and AHL-dependent gene expression in plants has been confirmed, the responses of enzyme activities in the eukaryotic host upon AHLs are unknown. Since AHL are thought to be used as so-called plant boosters or strengthening agents, which might change their resistance toward radiation and/or xenobiotic stress, we have examined the plants' pigment status and their antioxidative and detoxifying capacities upon AHL treatment. Because the yield of a crop plant should not be negatively influenced, we have also checked for growth and root parameters. We investigated the influence of three different AHLs, namely N-hexanoyl- (C6-HSL), N-octanoyl- (C8-HSL), and N-decanoyl- homoserine lactone (C10-HSL) on two agricultural crop plants. The AHL-effects on Hordeum vulgare (L.) as an example of a monocotyledonous crop and on the tropical leguminous crop plant Pachyrhizus erosus (L.) were compared. While plant growth and pigment contents in both plants showed only small responses to the applied AHLs, AHL treatment triggered tissue- and compound-specific changes in the activity of important detoxification enzymes. The activity of dehydroascorbate reductase in barley shoots after C10-HSL treatment for instance increased up to 384% of control plant levels, whereas superoxide dismutase activity in barley roots was decreased down to 23% of control levels upon C6-HSL treatment. Other detoxification enzymes reacted similarly within this range, with interesting clusters of positive or negative answers toward AHL treatment. In general the changes on the enzyme level were more severe in barley than in yam bean which might be due to the different abilities of the plants to

  2. Influence of bacterial N-acyl-homoserine lactones on growth parameters, pigments, antioxidative capacities and the xenobiotic phase II detoxification enzymes in barley and yam bean

    PubMed Central

    Götz-Rösch, Christine; Sieper, Tina; Fekete, Agnes; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe; Hartmann, Anton; Schröder, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria are able to communicate with each other and sense their environment in a population density dependent mechanism known as quorum sensing (QS). N-acyl-homoserine lactones (AHLs) are the QS signaling compounds of Gram-negative bacteria which are frequent colonizers of rhizospheres. While cross-kingdom signaling and AHL-dependent gene expression in plants has been confirmed, the responses of enzyme activities in the eukaryotic host upon AHLs are unknown. Since AHL are thought to be used as so-called plant boosters or strengthening agents, which might change their resistance toward radiation and/or xenobiotic stress, we have examined the plants’ pigment status and their antioxidative and detoxifying capacities upon AHL treatment. Because the yield of a crop plant should not be negatively influenced, we have also checked for growth and root parameters. We investigated the influence of three different AHLs, namely N-hexanoyl- (C6-HSL), N-octanoyl- (C8-HSL), and N-decanoyl- homoserine lactone (C10-HSL) on two agricultural crop plants. The AHL-effects on Hordeum vulgare (L.) as an example of a monocotyledonous crop and on the tropical leguminous crop plant Pachyrhizus erosus (L.) were compared. While plant growth and pigment contents in both plants showed only small responses to the applied AHLs, AHL treatment triggered tissue- and compound-specific changes in the activity of important detoxification enzymes. The activity of dehydroascorbate reductase in barley shoots after C10-HSL treatment for instance increased up to 384% of control plant levels, whereas superoxide dismutase activity in barley roots was decreased down to 23% of control levels upon C6-HSL treatment. Other detoxification enzymes reacted similarly within this range, with interesting clusters of positive or negative answers toward AHL treatment. In general the changes on the enzyme level were more severe in barley than in yam bean which might be due to the different abilities of the plants to

  3. [Coordination mechanism and antioxidant activity of L-hydroxyproline zinc(II)].

    PubMed

    Zuo, Rui-Ya; Zhou, Xiao-Hua; Du, Shou-Ying

    2007-07-01

    The coordination compound of L-hydroxyproline (Hyp)-Zn (II) was synthesized with Hyp and zinc sulfate as raw materials in water medium, coordination Synthesizing Mechanism and Antioxidant Activity of Hyp-Zn(II) coordination compound has been researched. Compared with Hyp, the infrared spectrogram of Hyp-Zn (II) coordination compound emerge a new absorption peak at 1100 cm(-1). Conclusion could be obtained that there exists a coordination effect between Hyp and ZnSO4; TG and DSC curve of Hyp and Hyp-Zn(II) coordination compound were analysed. Compared with Hyp, the peak of Hyp-Zn(II) disappear at 290 degrees C and 375 degrees C. This phenomenon confirmed the front conclusion; At the NMR graph of Hyp-Zn(II) coordination compound, the disappearance of the alpha-carboxyl-hydrogen and alpha-hydroxyl-hydrogen's peak at 3.5-3.9 ppm could indicate that combination's position of Hyp is alpha-carboxyl and alpha-hydroxyl; Structure of Hyp-Zn(II) coordination compound were exosyndrome by the Atomic Force microscopy. It is showed that centr-atom Zn(II) was surrounded by several Hyp at Hyp-Zn(II) coordination compound's phase diagram; The proportion of Hyp-Zn(H) coordination compound was determined by dialysis experiment, the proportion is 4:1; Above-mentioned determination and exosyndrome indicated that the molecular formula of Hyp-Zn (II) coordination compound is Zn(Hyp)4.H2O. The results indicated that the Hyp-Zn(II) coordination compound can inhibit hydroxyl free radicals of Zn(II), and the Percentage of Inhibition is 75.5%; the total antioxidant activities of Hyp-Zn(II) coordination compound is 80.167 u/mL, the anti-superoxide activities of Hyp-Zn (II) coordination compound is 53.19 u/mL.

  4. Geology of the Phase II System

    SciTech Connect

    Laney, R.; Laughlin, A. William

    1980-11-19

    This is a report on the analysis of EE-2 cuttings and thin sections, geologic characterization of the Phase II system, comparison with Phase 1, and geologic speculations and recommendations concerning Phase II. The EE-2 litholog has been included in the pocket.

  5. Sample Exchange Evaluation (SEE) Report - Phase II

    SciTech Connect

    Winters, W.I.

    1994-09-28

    This report describes the results from Phase II of the Sample Exchange Evaluation (SEE) Program, a joint effort to compare analytical laboratory performance on samples from the Hanford Site`s high-level waste tanks. In Phase II, the program has been expanded to include inorganic constituents in addition to radionuclides. Results from Phase II that exceeded 20% relative percent difference criteria are identified.

  6. Upgrades for GERDA Phase II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heisel, Mark

    2014-09-01

    The Germanium Detector Array (GERDA) experiment is searching for the neutrinoless double beta decay (0 νββ) of 76Ge. It is a process that violates lepton number conservation and is predicted to occur in extensions of the standard model of particle physics. GERDA is located underground in the Gran Sasso National Laboratory (LNGS), Italy. An array of bare high-purity germanium detectors enriched in 76Ge is operated in a cryostat with 64 m3 of liquid argon supplemented by a 3 m thick shield of water. The experiment aims at exploring the 0 νββ decay up to a half life of 2 .1026 yr in two phases: Phase I of the experiment has been concluded last year. No signal is observed and the so far best limit is derived for the half life of the 0 νββ decay of 76Ge, T1/20ν <= 2 . 1 .1025 yr (90% C.L.), after an exposure of 21 . 6 kg .yr. The result refutes an earlier claim of discovery with high probability. The background index of 1 .10-2 cts/(keV .kg .yr) is lower by about one order of magnitude compared to previous experiments. At present the experiment is being upgraded to Phase II. The aim is to collect an exposure of 100kg .yr and further reduce the background by another order of magnitude to a level of <=10-3 cts/(keV .kg .yr). The detector mass will be increased by ~20 kg of new Broad Energy Germanium (BEGe) detectors from enriched 76Ge, which exhibit superior pulse shape discrimination and hence background rejection power. Low mass detector holders, cold front-end electronics, contacting and cabling schemes are redesigned for ultra low mass and radiopurity. In addition, a retractable liquid argon veto will be installed to efficiently suppress background events that induce scintillation in the liquid argon. A hybrid solution of photomultiplier tubes and silicon photomultipliers coupled to scintillating fibres was chosen. This talk gives an account of the results and these challenging modifications to meet our design goals. The Germanium Detector Array (GERDA

  7. Centrifuge workers study. Phase II, completion report

    SciTech Connect

    Wooten, H.D.

    1994-09-01

    Phase II of the Centrifuge Workers Study was a follow-up to the Phase I efforts. The Phase I results had indicated a higher risk than expected among centrifuge workers for developing bladder cancer when compared with the risk in the general population for developing this same type of cancer. However, no specific agent could be identified as the causative agent for these bladder cancers. As the Phase II Report states, Phase I had been limited to workers who had the greatest potential for exposure to substances used in the centrifuge process. Phase II was designed to expand the survey to evaluate the health of all employees who had ever worked in Centrifuge Program Departments 1330-1339 but who had not been interviewed in Phase I. Employees in analytical laboratories and maintenance departments who provided support services for the Centrifuge Program were also included in Phase II. In December 1989, the Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU), now known as Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE), was contracted to conduct a follow-up study (Phase II). Phase H of the Centrifuge Workers Study expanded the survey to include all former centrifuge workers who were not included in Phase I. ORISE was chosen because they had performed the Phase I tasks and summarized the corresponding survey data therefrom.

  8. Small Business Innovation Research GRC Phase I, Phase II, and Post-Phase II Opportunity Assessment for 2015

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Hung D.; Steele, Gynelle C.

    2016-01-01

    This report outlines the 2015 Small Business Innovation Research/Small Business Technology Transfer (SBIR/STTR) Phase I, Phase II, and Post-Phase II opportunity contract award results associated with NASA's Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate (ARMD), Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate (HEOMD), Science Mission Directorate (SMD), and Space Technology Mission Directorate (STMD) for NASA Glenn Research Center. The report also highlights the number of Phase I, Phase II, and Post-Phase II contracts awarded by mission directorate. The 2015 Phase I contract awards to companies in Ohio and their corresponding technologies are also discussed.

  9. MIME: Microprogrammable Minicomputer Emulator. Phase II. Volume II.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-12-01

    unlimited. — ~~~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~ —- , — - - _I _ ~~ ~~ j”— -~j~~$,’ 4~4 AFIT/GCS/EE/79_11 MIME MICROPROGRAMMAB LE MINICOMPUTER EMULATOR PHASE II VOLUME... II THESIS Presented to the Faculty of the School of Engineering of the Air Force Institute of Technology Air University (ATC) in Partial Fulfillment...L— ~—~-__— -- _ _ _ _ -~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ onterit~- Volume II Appendix A

  10. SLUDGE BATCH 6 PHASE II FLOWSHEET SIMULATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Koopman, D.; Best, D.

    2010-03-30

    Two Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) runs were used to demonstrate that a fairly wide window of acid stoichiometry was available for processing SB6 Phase II flowsheet simulant (Tank 40 simulant) while still meeting the dual goals of acceptable nitrate destruction and controlled hydrogen generation. Phase II was an intermediate flowsheet study for the projected composition of Tank 40 after transfer of SB6/Tank 51 sludge to the heel of SB5. The composition was based on August 2009 projections. A window of about 50% in total acid was found between acceptable nitrite destruction and excessive hydrogen generation.

  11. BEATRIX-II, phase II: Data summary report

    SciTech Connect

    Slagle, O.D.; Hollenberg, G.W.

    1996-05-01

    The BEATRIX-II experimental program was an International Energy Agency sponsored collaborative effort between Japan, Canada, and the United States to evaluate the performance of ceramic solid breeder materials in a fast-neutron environment at high burnup levels. This report addresses the Phase II activities, which included two in situ tritium-recovery canisters: temperature-change and temperature-gradient. The temperature-change canister contained a Li{sub 2}O ring specimen that had a nearly uniform temperature profile and was capable of temperature changes between 530 and 640{degrees}C. The temperature-gradient canister contained a Li{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3} pebble bed operating under a thermal gradient of 440 to 1100{degrees}C. Postirradiation examination was carried out to characterize the Phase II in situ specimens and a series of nonvented capsules designed to address the compatibility of beryllium with lithium-ceramic solid-breeder materials. The results of the BEATRIX-II, Phase II, irradiation experiment provided an extensive data base on the in situ tritium-release characteristics of Li{sub 2}O and Li{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3} for lithium burnups near 5%. The composition of the sweep gas was found to be a critical parameter in the recovery of tritium from both Li{sub 2}O and Li{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3}. Tritium inventories measured confirmed that Li{sub 2}O and Li{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3} exhibited very low tritium retention during the Phase II irradiation. Tritium inventories in Li{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3} after Phase II tended to be larger than those found for Li{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3} in other in situ experiments, but the larger values may reflect the larger generation rates in BEATRIX-II. A series of 20 capsules was irradiated to determine the compatibility of lithium ceramics and beryllium under conditions similar to a fusion blanket. It is concluded that Li{sub 2}O and Li{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3} should remain leading candidates for use in a solid-breeder fusion-blanket application.

  12. 47 CFR 90.711 - Processing of Phase II applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Processing of Phase II applications. 90.711... 220-222 MHz Band § 90.711 Processing of Phase II applications. (a) Phase II applications for... accordance with the provisions of § 90.173. (c) Phase II applications for authorization on all non-Government...

  13. Antioxidant activity and ACE-inhibitory of Class II hydrophobin from wild strain Trichoderma reesei.

    PubMed

    Khalesi, Mohammadreza; Jahanbani, Raheleh; Riveros-Galan, David; Sheikh-Hassani, Vahid; Sheikh-Zeinoddin, Mahmoud; Sahihi, Mehdi; Winterburn, James; Derdelinckx, Guy; Moosavi-Movahedi, Ali Akbar

    2016-10-01

    There are several possible uses of the Class II hydrophobin HFBII in clinical applications. To fully understand and exploit this potential however, the antioxidant activity and ACE-inhibitory potential of this protein need to be better understood and have not been previously reported. In this study, the Class II hydrophobin HFBII was produced by the cultivation of wild type Trichoderma reesei. The crude hydrophobin extract obtained from the fermentation process was purified using reversed-phase liquid chromatography and the identity of the purified HFBII verified by MALDI-TOF (molecular weight: 7.2kDa). Subsequently the antioxidant activities of different concentrations of HFBII (0.01-0.40mg/mL) were determined. The results show that for HFBII concentrations of 0.04mg/mL and upwards the protein significantly reduced the presence of ABTS(+) radicals in the medium, the IC50 value found to be 0.13mg/mL. Computational modeling highlighted the role of the amino acid residues located in the conserved and exposed hydrophobic patch on the surface of the HFBII molecule and the interactions with the aromatic rings of ABTS. The ACE-inhibitory effect of HFBII was found to occur from 0.5mg/mL and upwards, making the combination of HFBII with strong ACE-inhibitors attractive for use in the healthcare industry. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. AGOR 27/28 Phase II

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-05-01

    Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 AGOR 27/28 Phase II Progress Report ( Technical ) S. Zoltan Kelety, SIO Marine Superintendent...of May 2016. 2. Shipyard Representative biweekly reports and this report were delivered. 3. The work accomplished included Scripps technical review... technical standards. 4. SIO participated in Phase III mission system installation during April and May. Report of this activity will be made by separate

  15. Zeaxanthin induces Nrf2-mediated phase II enzymes in protection of cell death

    PubMed Central

    Zou, X; Gao, J; Zheng, Y; Wang, X; Chen, C; Cao, K; Xu, J; Li, Y; Lu, W; Liu, J; Feng, Z

    2014-01-01

    Zeaxanthin (Zea) is a major carotenoid pigment contained in human retina, and its daily supplementation associated with lower risk of age-related macular degeneration. Despite known property of Zea as an antioxidant, its underlying molecular mechanisms of action remain poorly understood. In this study, we aim to study the regulation mechanism of Zea on phase II detoxification enzymes. In normal human retinal pigment epithelium cells, Zea promoted the nuclear translocation of NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) and induced mRNA and protein expression of phase II enzymes, the induction was suppressed by specific knockdown of Nrf2. Zea also effectively protected against tert-butyl hydroperoxide-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and apoptosis. Glutathione (GSH) as the most important antioxidant was also induced by Zea through Nrf2 activation in a time- and dose-dependent manner, whereas the protective effects of Zea were decimated by inhibition of GSH synthesis. Finally, Zea activated the PI3K/Akt and MAPK/ERK pathway, whereas only PI3K/Akt activation correlated with phase II enzymes induction and Zea protection. In further in vivo analyses, Zea showed effects of inducing phase II enzymes and increased GSH content, which contributed to the reduced lipid and protein peroxidation in the retina as well as the liver, heart, and serum of the Sprague–Dawley rats. For the first time, Zea is presented as a phase II enzymes inducer instead of being an antioxidant. By activating Nrf2-mediated phase II enzymes, Zea could enhance anti-oxidative capacity and prevent cell death both in vivo and in vitro. PMID:24810054

  16. First results from GERDA Phase II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agostini, M.; Allardt, M.; Bakalyarov, A. M.; Balata, M.; Barabanov, I.; Baudis, L.; Bauer, C.; Bellotti, E.; Belogurov, S.; Belyaev, S. T.; Benato, G.; Bettini, A.; Bezrukov, L.; Bode, T.; Borowicz, D.; Brudanin, V.; Brugnera, R.; Caldwell, A.; Cattadori, C.; Chernogorov, A.; D’Andrea, V.; Demidova, E. V.; Di Marco, N.; Domula, A.; Doroshkevich, E.; Egorov, V.; Falkenstein, R.; Frodyma, N.; Gangapshev, A.; Garfagnini, A.; Gooch, C.; Grabmayr, P.; Gurentsov, V.; Gusev, K.; Hakenmüller, J.; Hegai, A.; Heisel, M.; Hemmer, S.; Hofmann, W.; Hult, M.; Inzhechik, L. V.; Janicskó Csáthy, J.; Jochum, J.; Junker, M.; Kazalov, V.; Kihm, T.; Kirpichnikov, I. V.; Kirsch, A.; Kish, A.; Klimenko, A.; Kneißl, R.; Knöpfle, K. T.; Kochetov, O.; Kornoukhov, V. N.; Kuzminov, V. V.; Laubenstein, M.; Lazzaro, A.; Lebedev, V. I.; Lehnert, B.; Liao, H. Y.; Lindner, M.; Lippi, I.; Lubashevskiy, A.; Lubsandorzhiev, B.; Lutter, G.; Macolino, C.; Majorovits, B.; Maneschg, W.; Medinaceli, E.; Miloradovic, M.; Mingazheva, R.; Misiaszek, M.; Moseev, P.; Nemchenok, I.; Palioselitis, D.; Panas, K.; Pandola, L.; Pelczar, K.; Pullia, A.; Riboldi, S.; Rumyantseva, N.; Sada, C.; Salamida, F.; Salathe, M.; Schmitt, C.; Schneider, B.; Schönert, S.; Schreiner, J.; Schulz, O.; Schütz, A.-K.; Schwingenheuer, B.; Selivanenko, O.; Shevchik, E.; Shirchenko, M.; Simgen, H.; Smolnikov, A.; Stanco, L.; Vanhoefer, L.; Vasenko, A. A.; Veresnikova, A.; von Sturm, K.; Wagner, V.; Wegmann, A.; Wester, T.; Wiesinger, C.; Wojcik, M.; Yanovich, E.; Zhitnikov, I.; Zhukov, S. V.; Zinatulina, D.; Zuber, K.; Zuzel, G.

    2017-09-01

    Gerda is designed for a background-free search of 76Ge neutrinoless double-β decay, using bare Ge detectors in liquid Ar. The experiment was upgraded after the successful completion of Phase I to double the target mass and further reduce the background. Newly-designed Ge detectors were installed along with LAr scintillation sensors. Phase II of data-taking started in Dec 2015 with approximately 36 kg of Ge detectors and is currently ongoing. The first results based on 10.8 kg· yr of exposure are presented. The background goal of 10‑3 cts/(keV· kg· yr) is achieved and a search for neutrinoless double-β decay is performed by combining Phase I and II data. No signal is found and a new limit is set at T1/20ν > 5.3 \\cdot {1025} yr (90% C.L.).

  17. {sup 129}I Interlaboratory comparison: phase I and phase II

    SciTech Connect

    Caffee, M W; Roberts, M L

    1999-09-30

    An interlaboratory comparison exercise for {sup 129}I was organized and conducted. Nine laboratories participated in the exercise to either a full or limited extent. In Phase I of the comparison, 11 samples were measured. The suite of samples contained both synthetic ''standard type'' materials (i.e., AgI) and environmental materials. The isotopic {sup 129}I/{sup 127}I ratios of the samples varied from 10{sup {minus}8} to 10{sup {minus}14}. In this phase, each laboratory was responsible for its own chemical preparation of the samples. In Phase I, the {sup 129}I AMS measurements for prepared AgI were in good agreement. However, large discrepancies were seen in {sup 129}I AMS measurements of environmental samples. Because of the large discrepancies seen in the Phase I {sup 129}I intercomparison, a subsequent study was conducted. In Phase II of the {sup 129}I intercomparison, three separate laboratories prepared AgI from two environmental samples (IAEA 375 soil and maples leaves). Each laboratory used its own chemical preparation method with each of the methods being distinctly different. The resulting six samples (two sets of three) were then re-distributed to the participating {sup 129}I AMS facilities and {sup 129}I/{sup 127}I ratios measured. Results and discussion of both the Phase I and Phase II interlaboratory comparison are presented.

  18. Laparoscopic Radiofrequency Fibroid Ablation: Phase II and Phase III Results

    PubMed Central

    Pemueller, Rodolfo Robles; Garza Leal, José Gerardo; Abbott, Karen R.; Falls, Janice L.; Macer, James

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives: To review phase II and phase III treatments of symptomatic uterine fibroids (myomas) using laparoscopic radiofrequency volumetric thermal ablation (RFVTA). Methods: We performed a retrospective, multicenter clinical analysis of 206 consecutive cases of ultrasound-guided laparoscopic RFVTA of symptomatic myomas conducted on an outpatient basis under two phase II studies at 2 sites (n = 69) and one phase III study at 11 sites (n = 137). Descriptive and exploratory, general trend, and matched-pair analyses were applied. Results: From baseline to 12 months in the phase II study, the mean transformed symptom severity scores improved from 53.9 to 8.8 (P < .001) (n = 57), health-related quality-of-life scores improved from 48.5 to 92.0 (P < .001) (n = 57), and mean uterine volume decreased from 204.4 cm3 to 151.4 cm3 (P = .008) (n = 58). Patients missed a median of 4 days of work (range, 2–10 days). The rate of possible device-related adverse events was 1.4% (1 of 69). In the phase III study, approximately 98% of patients were assessed at 12 months, and their transformed symptom severity scores, health-related quality-of-life scores, mean decrease in uterine volume, and mean menstrual bleeding reduction were also significant. Patients in phase III missed a median of 5 days of work (range, 1–29 days). The rate of periprocedural device-related adverse events was 3.5% (5 of 137). Despite the enrollment requirement for patients in both phases to have completed childbearing, 4 pregnancies occurred within the first year after treatment. Conclusions: RFVTA does not require any uterine incisions and provides a uterine-sparing procedure with rapid recovery, significant reduction in uterine size, significant reduction or elimination of myoma symptoms, and significant improvement in quality of life. PMID:24960480

  19. 129I interlaboratory comparison: phase I and phase II results

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, M.I.; Caffee, M.W.; Proctor, I.D.

    1997-07-01

    An interlaboratory comparison exercise for 129I was organized and conducted. A total of nine laboratories participated in the exercise to either a full or limited extent. In Phase I of the comparison, a suite of 11 samples were measured. The suite of samples contained both synthetic `standard type` materials (i.e., AgI) and environmental materials. The isotopic 129I/127I ratios of the samples varied from 10`-8 to 10`-14. In this phase, each laboratory was responsible for its own chemical preparation of the environmental samples. The 129I AMS measurements obtained at different laboratories for prepared AgI were in good agreement. However, large discrepancies were seen in 129I AMS measurements of environmental samples. Because of the large discrepancies seen in the Phase I intercomparison, a subsequent study was conducted. In Phase II of the comparison, AgI was prepared from two environmental samples (IAEA 375 soil and maples leaves) by three separate laboratories. Each laboratory used its own chemical preparation method with each of the methods being distinctly different. The resulting six samples (two sets of three) were then redistributed to the participating 129I AMS facilities and 129I/127I ratios measured. Results and discussion of both the Phase I and Phase II interlaboratory comparison are presented.

  20. The Long Valley Well: Phase II operations

    SciTech Connect

    Finger, J.T.

    1992-01-01

    Phase II of the Long Valley Exploratory Well was completed to a depth of 7588 feet in November 1991. The drilling comprised two sub-phases: (1) drilling 17-1/2 inch hole from the Phase I casing shoe at 2558 feet to a depth of 7130 feet, plugging back to 6826 feet, and setting 13-3/8 inch casing at 6825 feet, all during August--September 1991; and (2) returning in November to drill a 3.85-inch core hole deviated out of the previous wellbore at 6868 feet and extending to 7588 feet. Ultimate depth of the well is planned to be 20,000 feet, or at a bottomhole temperature of 500{degrees}C, whichever comes first. Total cost of this drilling phase was approximately $2.3 million, and funding was shared about equally between the California Energy Commission and the Department of Energy. Phase II scientific work will commence in July 1992 and will be supported by DOE Office of Basic Energy Sciences, DOE Geothermal Division, and other funding sources.

  1. The Long Valley Well - Phase II Operations

    SciTech Connect

    Finger, John T.

    1992-03-24

    Phase II of the Long Valley Exploratory Well was completed to a depth of 7588 feet in November 1991. The drilling comprised two sub-phases: (1) drilling 17-1/2 inch hole from the Phase I casing shoe at 2558 feet to a depth of 7130 feet, plugging back to 6826 feet, and setting 13-3/8 inch casing at 6825 feet, all during August-September 1991; and (2) returning in November to drill a 3.85-inch core hole deviated out of the previous wellbore at 6808 feet and extending to 7588 feet. Ultimate depth of the well is planned to be 20,000 feet, or at a bottomhole temperature of 500 C, whichever comes first. Total cost of this drilling phase was approximately $2.3 million, and funding was shared about equally between the California Energy Commission and the Department of Energy. Phase II scientific work will commence in July 1992 and will be supported by DOE Office of Basic Energy Sciences, DOE Geothermal Division, and other funding sources.

  2. Preliminary CALS Phase II Architecture. Volume 19

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-07-03

    IDEF ICAM Definition Languages 5 IDEFO ICAM Definition Language: Activity Modeling IDEFIX ICAM Definition Language: Data Modeling 3 IDS Integrated Design...level. At the Conceptual Description level, data are defined by an integrated semantic data model, such as those produced using the IDEFIX modeling...Architecture with the dominate focus on the data dictionary for the IWSDB, represented by an IDEFIX semantic data model. It is at this level that CALS Phase II

  3. Gas and liquid phase acidity of natural antioxidants.

    PubMed

    Leopoldini, Monica; Russo, Nino; Toscano, Marirosa

    2006-04-19

    The gas phase and in solution absolute and relative acidities of nine natural systems contained in red and white wines were determined through theoretical B3LYP/6-311++G** calculations. The aim was to correlate these thermodynamic quantities to the ability that some of these compounds show in chelating metals ions to carry out an antioxidant action following a mechanism recently reported in the literature. Results indicated that both absolute and relative values are affected by molecular features such as electronic delocalization and conjugation and intramolecular hydrogen bonds. Polyphenols characterized by the ortho-dihydroxy functionality were found to be good candidates to act as metal cation chelating ligands. Some differences in absolute acidities values were encountered in going from vacuum to water solution.

  4. Robotic dry stripping of airframes - Phase II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pauli, Robert A.; Wittenberg, Art M.

    1989-03-01

    This paper describes a program for the development of a dust-free closed-cycle robotic system for dry stripping of airframes, designed to insure dust-free work environment and reduce plastic-media loss, the contamination risk, and the media inventory requirement. Phase I of the program involved building a prototype of the proposed robotic arm and its dust enclosure to prove basic automation concepts, showing reasonable paint removal rate from a curved surface, and establishing that the process is dust-free and recovers plastic media in a closed-cycle fashion. This paper contains calculations on the effect of different blasting parameters in order to determine optimum values required for the completion of Phase I. Also presented is the progress achieved by the Phase II of the program, which is to prove the total concept by building the complete system and demonstrating its capability.

  5. 47 CFR 90.711 - Processing of Phase II applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Processing of Phase II applications. 90.711 Section 90.711 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO... 220-222 MHz Band § 90.711 Processing of Phase II applications. (a) Phase II applications for...

  6. 47 CFR 90.711 - Processing of Phase II applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Processing of Phase II applications. 90.711 Section 90.711 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO... 220-222 MHz Band § 90.711 Processing of Phase II applications. (a) Phase II applications for...

  7. 47 CFR 90.711 - Processing of Phase II applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Processing of Phase II applications. 90.711 Section 90.711 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO... 220-222 MHz Band § 90.711 Processing of Phase II applications. (a) Phase II applications for...

  8. 47 CFR 90.711 - Processing of Phase II applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Processing of Phase II applications. 90.711 Section 90.711 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO... 220-222 MHz Band § 90.711 Processing of Phase II applications. (a) Phase II applications for...

  9. Status of the GERDA Phase II upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, Victoria

    2016-06-21

    The GERDA experiment is designed to search for neutrinoless double beta (0νββ) decay of {sup 76}Ge. In Phase I of the experiment a background index of 10{sup −2} cts/(keV·kg·yr) was reached. A lower limit on the half-life of the 0νββ decay of {sup 76}Ge was set to 2.1·10{sup 25} yr (at 90% C.L.). The aim of Phase II is to reach a sensitivity of the half-life of about 10{sup 26} yr. To increase the exposure thirty new Broad Energy Germanium (BEGe) detectors have been produced. These detectors are distinct for their improved energy resolution and enhanced pulse shape discrimination of signal from background events. Further background reduction will be reached by a light instrumentation to read out argon scintillation light. In April 2015 the light instrumentation together with eight BEGe detectors has been successfully deployed in the GERDA cryostat. In a commissioning run it was shown that two of the major background components, external γ-rays from {sup 214}Bi and {sup 208}Tl decays, were suppressed up to two orders of magnitude. We are confident to reach a background index of 10{sup −3} cts/(keV·kg·yr) which is the design goal for GERDA Phase II.

  10. Status of the GERDA Phase II upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Victoria

    2016-06-01

    The GERDA experiment is designed to search for neutrinoless double beta (0νββ) decay of 76Ge. In Phase I of the experiment a background index of 10-2 cts/(keV.kg.yr) was reached. A lower limit on the half-life of the 0νββ decay of 76Ge was set to 2.1.1025 yr (at 90% C.L.). The aim of Phase II is to reach a sensitivity of the half-life of about 1026 yr. To increase the exposure thirty new Broad Energy Germanium (BEGe) detectors have been produced. These detectors are distinct for their improved energy resolution and enhanced pulse shape discrimination of signal from background events. Further background reduction will be reached by a light instrumentation to read out argon scintillation light. In April 2015 the light instrumentation together with eight BEGe detectors has been successfully deployed in the GERDA cryostat. In a commissioning run it was shown that two of the major background components, external γ-rays from 214Bi and 208Tl decays, were suppressed up to two orders of magnitude. We are confident to reach a background index of 10-3 cts/(keV.kg.yr) which is the design goal for GERDA Phase II.

  11. Measurement of antioxidant activity and antioxidant compounds under versatile extraction conditions: II. The immuno-biochemical antioxidant properties of black sour cherry (Prunus cerasus) extracts.

    PubMed

    Haddad, John J; Ghadieh, Rana M; Hasan, Hiba A; Nakhal, Yasmine K; Hanbali, Lama B

    2013-01-01

    Retrospectively, we have measured the antioxidant activity and a variety of antioxidant compounds under versatile extraction conditions of sweet cherry (Prunus avium) extracts. Further in this study, in order to understand the biochemical constituents and antioxidant activities of a variety of extracts of black sour cherries (P. cerasus), a related species, antioxidant compounds, including L-ascorbic acid (vitamin C), phenols, flavonoids, and anthocyanins, and the total antioxidant activity were simultaneously measured under varying extraction conditions (mild heating and brief microwave exposure) for: i) whole juice extracts (WJE), ii) methanol-extracted juice (MEJ), iii) ddH2O-extracted pomace (dPOM), and iv) methanol-extracted pomace (mPOM). The antioxidant activity for WJE was substantially increased with mild and prolonged exposure to either heating or microwave, such that the % inhibition against 2,2-diphenyl-1-bspicrylhydrazyl (DPPH) followed a positive correlation (heating, 5-20 min.; microwave, 1-2 min.), insignificant with MEJ and dPOM, whereas with mPOM there was sharp downregulation. L-Ascorbic acid content was not affected with mild to prolonged heating or microwave exposure (WEJ and mPOM), except a mild increase with MEJ and dPOM. Similarly, total phenols assessed showed no significant variations, as compared with control extracts, except a mild decrease with exposure for mPOM. In a manner similar to L-ascorbic acid, total flavonoid content was increased under varying conditions for WEJ and MEJ, and slightly decreased for dPOM and mPOM. On the other hand, anthocyanins showed differential variations with exposure (up- and downregulation). Assessment of extraction means as compared with WJE revealed sharp increase in the antioxidant activity for MEJ, dPOM and mPOM, significant increase in L-ascorbic acid, total phenol, and flavonoid contents for MEJ, dPOM and mPOM, and mild decrease in anthocyanin contents for MEJ, dPOM, and mPOM. These results

  12. Spray Forming Aluminum - Final Report (Phase II)

    SciTech Connect

    D. D. Leon

    1999-07-08

    The U.S. Department of Energy - Office of Industrial Technology (DOE) has an objective to increase energy efficient and enhance competitiveness of American metals industries. To support this objective, ALCOA Inc. entered into a cooperative program to develop spray forming technology for aluminum. This Phase II of the DOE Spray Forming Program would translate bench scale spray forming technology into a cost effective world class process for commercialization. Developments under DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC07-94ID13238 occurred during two time periods due to budgetary constraints; April 1994 through September 1996 and October 1997 and December 1998. During these periods, ALCOA Inc developed a linear spray forming nozzle and specific support processes capable of scale-up for commercial production of aluminum sheet alloy products. Emphasis was given to alloys 3003 and 6111, both being commercially significant alloys used in the automotive industry. The report reviews research performed in the following areas: Nozzel Development, Fabrication, Deposition, Metal Characterization, Computer Simulation and Economics. With the formation of a Holding Company, all intellectual property developed in Phases I and II of the Project have been documented under separate cover for licensing to domestic producers.

  13. Pretest Predictions for Phase II Ventilation Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Yiming Sun

    2001-09-19

    The objective of this calculation is to predict the temperatures of the ventilating air, waste package surface, and concrete pipe walls that will be developed during the Phase II ventilation tests involving various test conditions. The results will be used as inputs to validating numerical approach for modeling continuous ventilation, and be used to support the repository subsurface design. The scope of the calculation is to identify the physical mechanisms and parameters related to thermal response in the Phase II ventilation tests, and describe numerical methods that are used to calculate the effects of continuous ventilation. The calculation is limited to thermal effect only. This engineering work activity is conducted in accordance with the ''Technical Work Plan for: Subsurface Performance Testing for License Application (LA) for Fiscal Year 2001'' (CRWMS M&O 2000d). This technical work plan (TWP) includes an AP-2.21Q, ''Quality Determinations and Planning for Scientific, Engineering, and Regulatory Compliance Activities'', activity evaluation (CRWMS M&O 2000d, Addendum A) that has determined this activity is subject to the YMP quality assurance (QA) program. The calculation is developed in accordance with the AP-3.12Q procedure, ''Calculations''. Additional background information regarding this activity is contained in the ''Development Plan for Ventilation Pretest Predictive Calculation'' (DP) (CRWMS M&O 2000a).

  14. Upregulation of phase II enzymes through phytochemical activation of Nrf2 protects cardiomyocytes against oxidant stress.

    PubMed

    Reuland, Danielle J; Khademi, Shadi; Castle, Christopher J; Irwin, David C; McCord, Joe M; Miller, Benjamin F; Hamilton, Karyn L

    2013-03-01

    Increased production of reactive oxygen species has been implicated in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease (CVD), and enhanced endogenous antioxidants have been proposed as a mechanism for regulating redox balance. Nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2) is a transcriptional regulator of phase II antioxidant enzymes, and activation of Nrf2 has been suggested to be an important step in attenuating oxidative stress associated with CVD. A well-defined combination of five widely studied medicinal plants derived from botanical sources (Bacopa monniera, Silybum marianum (milk thistle), Withania somnifera (Ashwagandha), Camellia sinensis (green tea), and Curcuma longa (turmeric)) has been shown to activate Nrf2 and induce phase II enzymes through the antioxidant response element. The purpose of these experiments was to determine if treatment of cardiomyocytes with this phytochemical composition, marketed as Protandim, activates Nrf2, induces phase II detoxification enzymes, and protects cardiomyocytes from oxidant-induced apoptosis in a Nrf2-dependent manner. In cultured HL-1 cardiomyocytes, phytochemical treatment was associated with nuclear accumulation of Nrf2, significant induction of phase II enzymes, and concomitant protection against hydrogen peroxide-induced apoptosis. The protection against oxidant stress was abolished when Nrf2 was silenced by shRNA, suggesting that our phytochemical treatment worked through the Nrf2 pathway. Interestingly, phytochemical treatment was found to be a more robust activator of Nrf2 than oxidant treatment, supporting the use of the phytochemicals as a potential treatment to increase antioxidant defenses and protect heart cells against an oxidative challenge. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Antioxidants

    MedlinePlus

    Antioxidants are man-made or natural substances that may prevent or delay some types of cell damage. Antioxidants are found in many foods, including fruits and ... are also available as dietary supplements. Examples of antioxidants include Beta-carotene Lutein Lycopene Selenium Vitamin A ...

  16. Induction of Phase 2 Antioxidant Enzymes by Broccoli Sulforaphane: Perspectives in Maintaining the Antioxidant Activity of Vitamins A, C, and E

    PubMed Central

    Boddupalli, Sekhar; Mein, Jonathan R.; Lakkanna, Shantala; James, Don R.

    2012-01-01

    Consumption of fruits and vegetables is recognized as an important part of a healthy diet. Increased consumption of cruciferous vegetables in particular has been associated with a decreased risk of several degenerative and chronic diseases, including cardiovascular disease and certain cancers. Members of the cruciferous vegetable family, which includes broccoli, Brussels sprouts, cauliflower, and cabbage, accumulate significant concentrations of glucosinolates, which are metabolized in vivo to biologically active isothiocyanates (ITCs). The ITC sulforaphane, which is derived from glucoraphanin, has garnered particular interest as an indirect antioxidant due to its extraordinary ability to induce expression of several enzymes via the KEAP1/Nrf2/ARE pathway. Nrf2/ARE gene products are typically characterized as Phase II detoxification enzymes and/or antioxidant (AO) enzymes. Over the last decade, human clinical studies have begun to provide in vivo evidence of both Phase II and AO enzyme induction by SF. Many AO enzymes are redox cycling enzymes that maintain redox homeostasis and activity of free radical scavengers such as vitamins A, C, and E. In this review, we present the existing evidence for induction of PII and AO enzymes by SF, the interactions of SF-induced AO enzymes and proposed maintenance of the essential vitamins A, C, and E, and, finally, the current view of genotypic effects on ITC metabolism and AO enzyme induction and function. PMID:22303412

  17. Monorail bridge conveyor. Phase II report

    SciTech Connect

    Gonski, J

    1982-04-30

    This report covers the second phase of a four-phase contract to develop and test a roof hung monorail bridge conveyor coal haulage system working behind a continuous miner. Phase II covers the fabrication and assembly of all the components in making up the Monoral Bridge Conveyor System. The original concept presented had to be analyzed before final design could proceed. The analysis revealed that 24 ft. long bridge conveyor segments were the optimum length; the suspension system must have the vertical hinge point between bridges, the impact point of the coal transfer point and the suspension point itself, coincidental. The propulsion system is such that each bridge is self propelled in order to minimize side loading on the monorail. The conveyor belt drive is simple since it only has to drive one single 24 ft. conveyor. The entire assembly of twelve conveyors has been pre-tested in our Murfreesboro, Tennessee, shop. The electric circuit proved successful to operate from a manual control or automatically, and successfully proved the cycle of sequential strating and stopping.

  18. Low Noise Borehole Triaxial Seismometer Phase II

    SciTech Connect

    Kerr, James D; McClung, David W

    2006-11-06

    This report describes the preliminary design and the effort to date of Phase II of a Low Noise Borehole Triaxial Seismometer for use in networks of seismic stations for monitoring underground nuclear explosions. The design uses the latest technology of broadband seismic instrumentation. Each parameter of the seismometer is defined in terms of the known physical limits of the parameter. These limits are defined by the commercially available components, and the physical size constraints. A theoretical design is proposed, and a preliminary prototype model of the proposed instrument has been built. This prototype used the sensor module of the KS2000. The installation equipment (hole locks, etc.) has been designed and one unit has been installed in a borehole. The final design of the sensors and electronics and leveling mechanism is in process. Noise testing is scheduled for the last quarter of 2006.

  19. Busted Butte Phase II Excavation Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    J.W. Keifer

    2000-11-29

    The purpose of this analysis is to provide an engineering excavation and ground support design for the Busted Butte phase II mine back. The analysis will apply engineering practices and previous proven design methods for pillar design and ground support in accordance with applicable Integrated Safety Management principles and functions. The scope of this analysis is limited to the Busted Butte Test Facility. The intended use of this analysis is to provide testing excavation boundaries, ground support and pillar design input to drawing(s) to support test operations implementation. This design activity has been prepared under ''Technical Work Plan For Test Facilities Design FY01 Work Activities'' (TWP) (CRWMS M&O 2000b). No deviations from the TWP have been necessary for this analysis.

  20. The VRT gas turbine combustor - Phase II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melconian, Jerry O.; Mongia, Hukam C.; Nguyen, Hung L.

    1992-01-01

    An innovative annular combustor configuration is being developed for aircraft and other gas turbine engines. This design has the potential of permitting higher turbine inlet temperatures by reducing the pattern factor and providing a major reduction in NO(x) emission. The design concept is based on a Variable Residence Time (VRT) technique which allows large fuel particles adequate time to completely burn in the circumferentially mixed primary zone. High durability of the combustor is achieved by dual-function use of the incoming air. In Phase I, the feasibility of the concept was demonstrated by water analogue tests and 3D computer modeling. The flow pattern within the combustor was as predicted. The VRT combustor uses only half the number of fuel nozzles of the conventional configuration. In Phase II, hardware was designed, procured, and tested under conditions simulating typical supersonic civil aircraft cruise conditions to the limits of the rig. The test results confirmed many of the superior performance predictions of the VRT concept. The Hastelloy X liner showed no signs of distress after nearly six hours of tests using JP5 fuel.

  1. MesoNAM Verification Phase II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Leela R.

    2011-01-01

    The 45th Weather Squadron Launch Weather Officers use the 12-km resolution North American Mesoscale model (MesoNAM) forecasts to support launch weather operations. In Phase I, the performance of the model at KSC/CCAFS was measured objectively by conducting a detailed statistical analysis of model output compared to observed values. The objective analysis compared the MesoNAM forecast winds, temperature, and dew point to the observed values from the sensors in the KSC/CCAFS wind tower network. In Phase II, the AMU modified the current tool by adding an additional 15 months of model output to the database and recalculating the verification statistics. The bias, standard deviation of bias, Root Mean Square Error, and Hypothesis test for bias were calculated to verify the performance of the model. The results indicated that the accuracy decreased as the forecast progressed, there was a diurnal signal in temperature with a cool bias during the late night and a warm bias during the afternoon, and there was a diurnal signal in dewpoint temperature with a low bias during the afternoon and a high bias during the late night.

  2. Antimalarial compounds in Phase II clinical development.

    PubMed

    Held, Jana; Jeyaraj, Sankarganesh; Kreidenweiss, Andrea

    2015-03-01

    Malaria is a major health problem in endemic countries and chemotherapy remains the most important tool in combating it. Treatment options are limited and essentially rely on a single drug class - the artemisinins. Efforts are ongoing to restrict the evolving threat of artemisinin resistance but declining sensitivity has been reported. Fueled by the ambitious aim of malaria eradication, novel antimalarial compounds, with improved properties, are now in the progressive phase of drug development. Herein, the authors describe antimalarial compounds currently in Phase II clinical development and present the results of these investigations. Thanks to recent efforts, a number of promising antimalarial compounds are now in the pipeline. First safety data have been generated for all of these candidates, although their efficacy as antimalarials is still unclear for most of them. Of particular note are KAE609, KAF156 and DSM265, which are of chemical scaffolds new to malaria chemotherapy and would truly diversify antimalarial options. Apart from SAR97276, which also has a novel chemical scaffold that has had its development stopped, all other compounds in the pipeline belong to already known substance classes, which have been chemically modified. At this moment in time, there is not one standout compound that will revolutionize malaria treatment but several compounds that will add to its control in the future.

  3. The SIMPLE Phase II dark matter search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felizardo, M.; Girard, T. A.; Morlat, T.; Fernandes, A. C.; Ramos, A. R.; Marques, J. G.; Kling, A.; Puibasset, J.; Auguste, M.; Boyer, D.; Cavaillou, A.; Poupeney, J.; Sudre, C.; Carvalho, F. P.; Prudêncio, M. I.; Marques, R.; Simple Collaboration

    2014-04-01

    Phase II of SIMPLE (Superheated Instrument for Massive ParticLe Experiments) searched for astroparticle dark matter using superheated liquid C2ClF5 droplet detectors. Each droplet generally requires an energy deposition with linear energy transfer (LET) ≳150 keV/μm for a liquid-to-gas phase transition, providing an intrinsic rejection against minimum ionizing particles of order 10-10, and reducing the backgrounds to primarily α and neutron-induced recoil events. The droplet phase transition generates a millimetric-sized gas bubble that is recorded by acoustic means. We describe the SIMPLE detectors, their acoustic instrumentation, and the characterizations, signal analysis and data selection, which yield a particle-induced, "true nucleation" event detection efficiency of better than 97% at a 95% C.L. The recoil-α event discrimination, determined using detectors first irradiated with neutrons and then doped with alpha emitters, provides a recoil identification of better than 99%; it differs from those of COUPP and PICASSO primarily as a result of their different liquids with lower critical LETs. The science measurements, comprising two shielded arrays of fifteen detectors each and a total exposure of 27.77 kgd, are detailed. Removal of the 1.94 kgd Stage 1 installation period data, which had previously been mistakenly included in the data, reduces the science exposure from 20.18 to 18.24 kgd and provides new contour minima of σp=4.3×10-3 pb at 35 GeV /c2 in the spin-dependent sector of astroparticle dark matter-proton interactions and σN=3.6×10-6 pb at 35 GeV /c2 in the spin-independent sector. These results are examined with respect to the fluorine spin and halo parameters used in the previous data analysis.

  4. Sample size planning for phase II trials based on success probabilities for phase III.

    PubMed

    Götte, Heiko; Schüler, Armin; Kirchner, Marietta; Kieser, Meinhard

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, high failure rates in phase III trials were observed. One of the main reasons is overoptimistic assumptions for the planning of phase III resulting from limited phase II information and/or unawareness of realistic success probabilities. We present an approach for planning a phase II trial in a time-to-event setting that considers the whole phase II/III clinical development programme. We derive stopping boundaries after phase II that minimise the number of events under side conditions for the conditional probabilities of correct go/no-go decision after phase II as well as the conditional success probabilities for phase III. In addition, we give general recommendations for the choice of phase II sample size. Our simulations show that unconditional probabilities of go/no-go decision as well as the unconditional success probabilities for phase III are influenced by the number of events observed in phase II. However, choosing more than 150 events in phase II seems not necessary as the impact on these probabilities then becomes quite small. We recommend considering aspects like the number of compounds in phase II and the resources available when determining the sample size. The lower the number of compounds and the lower the resources are for phase III, the higher the investment for phase II should be.

  5. 40 CFR 790.52 - Phase II test rule.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Phase II test rule. 790.52 Section 790... Modification of Test Rules § 790.52 Phase II test rule. (a) If EPA determines that the proposed study plan described in § 790.50(a)(2) complies with § 790.50(c), EPA will publish a proposed Phase II test rule in the...

  6. Global phase diagram of disordered type-II Weyl semimetals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yijia; Liu, Haiwen; Jiang, Hua; Xie, X. C.

    2017-07-01

    With electron and hole pockets touching at the Weyl node, type-II Weyl semimetal is a newly proposed topological state distinct from its type-I cousin. We numerically study the localization effect for tilted type-I as well as type-II Weyl semimetals and give the global phase diagram. For disordered type-I Weyl semimetal, an intermediate three-dimensional quantum anomalous Hall phase is confirmed between Weyl semimetal phase and diffusive metal phase. However, this intermediate phase is absent for disordered type-II Weyl semimetal. Besides, along the direction of tilt, comparing to its type-I cousin, type-II Weyl semimetal typically possesses longer normalized localization length and therefore it is more robust against disorder. Near the phase boundary between the type-I and the type-II Weyl semimetals, infinitesimal disorder will induce an insulating phase so that, in this region, the concept of Weyl semimetal is meaningless for real materials.

  7. Melatonin ameliorates angiotensin II-induced vascular endothelial damage via its antioxidative properties.

    PubMed

    Nakao, Tomoko; Morita, Hiroyuki; Maemura, Koji; Amiya, Eisuke; Inajima, Tsukasa; Saito, Yuichiro; Watanabe, Masafumi; Manabe, Ichiro; Kurabayashi, Masahiko; Nagai, Ryozo; Komuro, Issei

    2013-10-01

    Melatonin is well known to have a beneficial effect on the cardiovascular system, but it remains to be elucidated whether melatonin has a therapeutic effect on the vascular damage induced by the potential vasoactive substance angiotensin II (Ang II). In this study, the effects of melatonin on Ang II-induced vascular endothelial damage were investigated. In cultured vascular endothelial cells, Ang II stimulation increased ROS generation and inhibited eNOS phosphorylation (Ser1177), both of which were clearly restored by pretreatment with melatonin. The translocation of p47(phox) subunit of NADPH oxidase from the cytosol to plasma membrane was promoted in Ang II-treated vascular endothelial cells, which was canceled by melatonin pretreatment. In Ang II-infused rats, increased ROS generation in the aortic wall and impaired endothelial function of the aortic ring were observed, which were rescued by coadministration of melatonin. In vasculature, melatonin receptor agonist ramelteon had the antioxidative effect in the same manner as melatonin by itself. These findings suggest that melatonin directly ameliorates Ang II-induced vascular endothelial damage partly via its antioxidative properties, providing with us the potential rationale for clinical application of melatonin to the prevention from cardiovascular diseases. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. A Novel Bayesian Seamless Phase I/II Design

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zuoren; Wang, Ling; Li, Chanjuan; Xia, Jielai

    2013-01-01

    This paper proposes a novel bayesian phase I/II design featuring using a hybrid mTPI method in phase I for targeting the MTD level and a randomization allocation schema for adaptively assigning patients to desirable doses in phase II. The mechanism of simultaneously escalating dose in phase I and expanding promising doses to phase II is inherited from a design proposed in literature. Extensive simulation studies indicate that our proposed design can vastly save sample size and efficiently assign more patients to optimal dose when compared to two competing designs. PMID:24023809

  9. 78 FR 30951 - SBIR/STTR Phase I to Phase II Transition Benchmarks

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-23

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION SBIR/STTR Phase I to Phase II Transition Benchmarks AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice for Small Business Innovation Research Program Phase I to Phase II Transition...

  10. Phase II Final Scientific/Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Grigg, Reid; McPherson, Brian; Lee, Rober

    2011-08-01

    The Southwest Regional Partnership on Carbon Sequestration (SWP) one of seven regional partnerships sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (USDOE) carried out five field pilot tests in its Phase II Carbon Sequestration Demonstration effort, to validate the most promising sequestration technologies and infrastructure concepts, including three geologic pilot tests and two terrestrial pilot programs. This field testing demonstrated the efficacy of proposed sequestration technologies to reduce or offset greenhouse gas emissions in the region. Risk mitigation, optimization of monitoring, verification, and accounting (MVA) protocols, and effective outreach and communication were additional critical goals of these field validation tests. The program included geologic pilot tests located in Utah, New Mexico, Texas, and a region-wide terrestrial analysis. Each geologic sequestration test site was intended to include injection of a minimum of ~75,000 tons/year CO{sub 2}, with minimum injection duration of one year. These pilots represent medium- scale validation tests in sinks that host capacity for possible larger-scale sequestration operations in the future. These validation tests also demonstrated a broad variety of carbon sink targets and multiple value-added benefits, including testing of enhanced oil recovery and sequestration, enhanced coalbed methane production and a geologic sequestration test combined with a local terrestrial sequestration pilot. A regional terrestrial sequestration demonstration was also carried out, with a focus on improved terrestrial MVA methods and reporting approaches specific for the Southwest region.

  11. Current Phase II investigational therapies for insomnia.

    PubMed

    Zisapel, Nava

    2015-03-01

    Insomnia is typified by a difficulty in sleep initiation, maintenance and/or quality (non-restorative sleep) resulting in significant daytime distress. This review summarizes the available efficacy and safety data for drugs currently in the pipeline for treating insomnia. Specifically, the authors performed MEDLINE and internet searches using the keywords 'Phase II' and 'insomnia'. The drugs covered target GABAA (zaleplon-CR, lorediplon, EVT-201), orexin (filorexant, MIN-202), histamine-H1 (LY2624803), serotonin 5-HT2A (ITI-007), melatonin/serotonin5-HT1A (piromelatine) and melatonin (indication expansions of prolonged-release melatonin and tasimelteon for pediatric sleep and circadian rhythm disorders) receptors. Low-priced generic environments and high development costs limit the further development of drugs that treat insomnia. However, the bidirectional link between sleep and certain comorbidities may encourage development of specific drugs for comorbid insomnia. New insomnia therapies will most likely move away from GABAAR receptors' modulation to more subtle neurological pathways that regulate the sleep-wake cycle.

  12. Antioxidant promotion of tyrosine nitration in the presence of copper(II).

    PubMed

    Qiao, Liang; Liu, Baohong; Girault, Hubert H

    2013-06-01

    Copper(II) is known to catalyze the generation of reactive nitrogen species in the presence of hydrogen peroxide, nitrite or nitric oxide, leading to tyrosine nitration, a biomarker for free radical species associated diseases. Here, we find that biological antioxidants such as ascorbic acid can promote tyrosine nitration in the presence of copper(II) and nitrite under aerobic and weak acidic conditions. Tyrosine nitration is demonstrated on both the β-amyloid peptide and angiotensin I. These studies show that (i) ascorbic acid works as a pro-oxidant in the presence of copper(II) to induce oxidation and nitration on peptides, (ii) both free and coordinated copper(II) can catalyze peptide oxidation and nitration, (iii) nitration occurs under mild acidic conditions (pH = 6.0-6.5).

  13. Design of Phase II Non-inferiority Trials.

    PubMed

    Jung, Sin-Ho

    2017-09-01

    With the development of inexpensive treatment regimens and less invasive surgical procedures, we are confronted with non-inferiority study objectives. A non-inferiority phase III trial requires a roughly four times larger sample size than that of a similar standard superiority trial. Because of the large required sample size, we often face feasibility issues to open a non-inferiority trial. Furthermore, due to lack of phase II non-inferiority trial design methods, we do not have an opportunity to investigate the efficacy of the experimental therapy through a phase II trial. As a result, we often fail to open a non-inferiority phase III trial and a large number of non-inferiority clinical questions still remain unanswered. In this paper, we want to develop some designs for non-inferiority randomized phase II trials with feasible sample sizes. At first, we review a design method for non-inferiority phase III trials. Subsequently, we propose three different designs for non-inferiority phase II trials that can be used under different settings. Each method is demonstrated with examples. Each of the proposed design methods is shown to require a reasonable sample size for non-inferiority phase II trials. The three different non-inferiority phase II trial designs are used under different settings, but require similar sample sizes that are typical for phase II trials.

  14. Phase Noise Measurement in PEP II and the Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Getaneh, Mesfin

    2003-09-05

    The Goal of this project is to provide a measurement of the phase of the radio frequency (RF) relative to electron beam traveling down the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). Because the Main Drive Line (MDL) supplies the RF drive and phase reference for the entire accelerator system, the phase accuracy and amount of phase noise present in the MDL are very critical to the functionality of the accelerator. Therefore, a Phase Noise Measurement System was built to measure the phase noise in the liner accelerator (Linac) and PEP II. The system was used to determine the stability of the PEP II RF reference system. In this project a low noise Phase Locked Loop system (PLL) was built to measure timing jitter about sub picoseconds level. The phase noise measured in Master Oscillator using PLL indicates that phase noise is low enough for PEP II to run.

  15. 40 CFR 72.44 - Phase II repowering extensions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) PERMITS REGULATION Acid Rain Compliance Plan and Compliance Options § 72.44 Phase II repowering... the requirements of paragraph (a)(1)(i) of this section may include in the unit's Phase II Acid Rain... authority shall issue the Acid Rain portion of the operating permit including: (A) The approved repowering...

  16. 40 CFR 72.44 - Phase II repowering extensions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) PERMITS REGULATION Acid Rain Compliance Plan and Compliance Options § 72.44 Phase II repowering... the requirements of paragraph (a)(1)(i) of this section may include in the unit's Phase II Acid Rain... authority shall issue the Acid Rain portion of the operating permit including: (A) The approved repowering...

  17. 40 CFR 72.44 - Phase II repowering extensions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) PERMITS REGULATION Acid Rain Compliance Plan and Compliance Options § 72.44 Phase II repowering... the requirements of paragraph (a)(1)(i) of this section may include in the unit's Phase II Acid Rain... authority shall issue the Acid Rain portion of the operating permit including: (A) The approved repowering...

  18. 40 CFR 72.44 - Phase II repowering extensions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) PERMITS REGULATION Acid Rain Compliance Plan and Compliance Options § 72.44 Phase II repowering... the requirements of paragraph (a)(1)(i) of this section may include in the unit's Phase II Acid Rain... authority shall issue the Acid Rain portion of the operating permit including: (A) The approved repowering...

  19. 40 CFR 72.44 - Phase II repowering extensions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) PERMITS REGULATION Acid Rain Compliance Plan and Compliance Options § 72.44 Phase II repowering... the requirements of paragraph (a)(1)(i) of this section may include in the unit's Phase II Acid Rain... authority shall issue the Acid Rain portion of the operating permit including: (A) The approved repowering...

  20. Final Report on Phase II; Study of Academic Library Consortia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cuadra, Carlos A.; And Others

    Phase II involves a case-study analysis of 15 selected consortia to help determine the usefulness and effectiveness of academic library consortia. The two major products resulting from the project are the "Directory of Academic Library Consortia" and the "Guidelines for the Development of Academic Library Consortia." The Phase II report presents…

  1. Antioxidative effects of cinnamomi cortex: A potential role of iNOS and COX-II

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Jin-Won; Kim, Jeong-Jun; Kim, Sung-Jin

    2011-01-01

    Background: Cinnamomi cortex has wide varieties of pharmacological actions such as anti-inflammatory action, anti-platelet aggregation, and improving blood circulation. In this study, we tested to determine whether the Cinnamomi cortex extract has antioxidant activities. Materials and Methods: Antioxidative actions were explored by measuring free radical scavenging activity, NO levels, and reducing power. The mechanism of antioxidative action of Cinnamomi cortex was determined by measuring iNOS and COX-II expression in lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulated Raw cells. Results: Seventy percent methanolic extract of Cinnamomi cortex exerted significant 1,1-diphenyl--2--picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) free radicals and NO scavenging activities in a dose-dependent manner. More strikingly, the Cinnamomi cortex extract exerted dramatic reducing power activity (13-fold over control). Production of iNOS induced by LPS was significantly inhibited by the Cinnamomi cortex extract, suggesting that it inhibits NO production by suppressing iNOS expression. Additionally, COX-2 induced by LPS was dramatically inhibited by the Cinnamomi cortex extract. Conclusion: These results suggest that 70% methanolic extract of Cinnamomi cortex exerts significant antioxidant activity via inhibiting iNOS and COX-II induction. PMID:22262934

  2. Antioxidative properties of defatted dabai pulp and peel prepared by solid phase extraction.

    PubMed

    Khoo, Hock Eng; Azlan, Azrina; Ismail, Amin; Abas, Faridah

    2012-08-14

    Solid phase extraction (SPE) using Sep-Pak® cartridges is one of the techniques used for fractionation of antioxidant compounds in waste of dabai oil extraction (defatted dabai parts). The aim of this study was to determine the phenolic compounds and antioxidant capacity in crude extracts and several SPE fractions from methanolic extract of defatted dabai pulp and peel. Based on SPE, Sep-Pak® cyanopropyl and C₁₈ cartridges were used to fractionate the antioxidant-rich crude extracts into water and methanolic fractions. Analyzed using LC-MS, flavonoids, anthocyanins, saponin derivatives and other unknown antioxidative compounds were detected in the defatted dabai crude extracts and their SPE fractions. Anthocyanins were the major phenolic compounds identified in the defatted dabai peel and detected in most of the SPE fractions. Methanolic fractions of defatted dabai parts embraced higher total phenolics and antioxidant capacity than water fractions. This finding also revealed the crude extracts of defatted dabai peel have the most significant antioxidant properties compared to the methanolic and water fractions studied. The crude extract of defatted dabai parts remain as the most potent antioxidant as it contains mixture of flavonoids, anthocyanins and other potential antioxidants.

  3. Phase II enzyme induction by a carotenoid, lutein, in a PC12D neuronal cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Miyake, Seiji; Kobayashi, Saori; Tsubota, Kazuo; Ozawa, Yoko

    2014-04-04

    Highlights: • Lutein reduced ROS levels in a PC12D neuronal cell line. • Lutein induced mRNAs of phase II antioxidative enzymes in PC12D neuronal cells. • Lutein increased protein levels of HO-1, SOD2, and NQO-1 in PC12D neuronal cells. • Lutein had no effect on intranuclear Nrf2 levels in PC12D neuronal cells. • Lutein did not activate potential upstream Nrf2 nuclear translocation pathways. - Abstract: The mechanism by which lutein, a carotenoid, acts as an antioxidant in retinal cells is still not fully understood. Here, lutein treatment of a neuronal cell line (PC12D) immediately resulted in reduced intracellular ROS levels, implying that it has a direct role in ROS scavenging. Significantly, lutein treatment also induced phase II antioxidative enzyme expression, probably via a nuclear factor-like 2 (Nrf2) independent pathway. This latter mechanism could explain why lutein acts diversely to protect against oxidative/cytotoxic stress, and why it is physiologically involved in the human neural tissue, such as the retina.

  4. Rethinking Phase II Clinical Trial Design in Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Lavine, Kory J.; Mann, Douglas L.

    2014-01-01

    The incidence and economic burden of heart failure continue to rise worldwide, despite implementation of a number of effective heart failure therapies. Although there have been a number phase I–II studies of potential novel heart failure therapies over the past decade, none of these new compounds have been successful in phase III clinical trials. While there are likely a number of reasons for this failure, one of the problems that has become increasingly apparent is the inability of phase II trials to correctly identify novel therapies that will be successful in phase III clinical trials. In the following review, we will discuss the some of the problems inherent with current phase II heart failure clinical trials, as well as discuss possible ways to rethink phase II development of new therapies for heart failure. PMID:25343020

  5. Using phase II data for the analysis of phase III studies: An application in rare diseases.

    PubMed

    Wandel, Simon; Neuenschwander, Beat; Röver, Christian; Friede, Tim

    2017-06-01

    Clinical research and drug development in orphan diseases are challenging, since large-scale randomized studies are difficult to conduct. Formally synthesizing the evidence is therefore of great value, yet this is rarely done in the drug-approval process. Phase III designs that make better use of phase II data can facilitate drug development in orphan diseases. A Bayesian meta-analytic approach is used to inform the phase III study with phase II data. It is particularly attractive, since uncertainty of between-trial heterogeneity can be dealt with probabilistically, which is critical if the number of studies is small. Furthermore, it allows quantifying and discounting the phase II data through the predictive distribution relevant for phase III. A phase III design is proposed which uses the phase II data and considers approval based on a phase III interim analysis. The design is illustrated with a non-inferiority case study from a Food and Drug Administration approval in herpetic keratitis (an orphan disease). Design operating characteristics are compared to those of a traditional design, which ignores the phase II data. An analysis of the phase II data reveals good but insufficient evidence for non-inferiority, highlighting the need for a phase III study. For the phase III study supported by phase II data, the interim analysis is based on half of the patients. For this design, the meta-analytic interim results are conclusive and would justify approval. In contrast, based on the phase III data only, interim results are inconclusive and require further evidence. To accelerate drug development for orphan diseases, innovative study designs and appropriate methodology are needed. Taking advantage of randomized phase II data when analyzing phase III studies looks promising because the evidence from phase II supports informed decision-making. The implementation of the Bayesian design is straightforward with public software such as R.

  6. Adsorption characteristics of adsorbent resins and antioxidant capacity for enrichment of phenolics from two-phase olive waste.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhihong; Wang, Chengzhang; Yuan, Jiaojiao; Zhang, Changwei

    2017-01-01

    In this study, the adsorption properties of nine resins including polyamide resin (30-60), polyamide resin (60-100) AB-8, S-8, D-101, NKA-9, NKA-II, XDA-1 and XDA-4 for enrichment phenolics of the olive waste were investigated. XDA-1 and NKA-II were chosen for further study due to their outstanding adsorption and desorption capacity. XDA-1 and NKA-II had similar adsorption and desorption behaviors for phenolics of olive waste. The adsorption mechanism could be better explained by pseudo second-order kinetics model and Freundlich isotherm model, and the adsorption processes were spontaneously and exothermic. The experiment of gradient elution were carried out through treated XDA-1 resins column, the result indicated the total phenolics were mainly obtained from the 40% and 60% ethanol fraction. The order of antioxidant capacity by DPPH  , ABTS(+) radical and FRAP assay was similar with the content of phenolics from fraction elution. The compositions of phenolics from different elution fractions were determined by reversed phase-HPLC-DAD method. Gallic acid, hydroxytyrosol, tyrosol and ferulic acid were the major constituent in the fraction elute, and the content of hydroxytyrosol reached to the 41.69mg/g. The above results revealed the synergistic effects of the different phenolics contribute to the antioxidant capacity.

  7. Synthesis, characterization, and antioxidant/cytotoxic activity of new chromone Schiff base nano-complexes of Zn(II), Cu(II), Ni(II) and Co(II)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saif, M.; El-Shafiy, Hoda F.; Mashaly, Mahmoud M.; Eid, Mohamed F.; Nabeel, A. I.; Fouad, R.

    2016-08-01

    A chromone Schiff base complexes of Zn(II) (1), Cu(II) (2), Ni(II) (3) and Co(II) (4) were successfully prepared in nano domain with crystalline or amorphous structures. The spectroscopic data revealed that the Schiff base ligand behaves as a monoanionic tridentate ligand. The metal complexes exhibited octahedral geometry. Transmission electron microscope (TEM) analysis showed that Cu(II) complex have aggregated nanospheres morphology. The obtained nano-complexes were tested as antioxidant and antitumor agents. The H2L and its Cu(II) complex (2) were found to be more potent antioxidant (IC50(H2L) = 0.93 μM; IC50(Cu(II) complex) = 1.1 μM than standard ascorbic acid (IC50 = 2.1 μM) as evaluated by DPPH• method. The H2L and its complexes (1-4) were tested for their in vitro cytotoxicity against Ehrlich Ascites Carcinoma cell line (EAC). The Cu(II) nano-complex (2) effectively inhibited EAC growth with IC50 value of 47 μM in comparison with its parent compound and other prepared complexes. The high antioxidant activity and antitumor activity of Cu(II) nano-complex (2) were attributed to their chemical structure, Cu(II) reducing capacity, and nanosize property. The toxicity test on mice showed that Zn(II) (1) and Cu(II) (2) nano-complex have lower toxicity than the standard cis-platin.

  8. Phase Transformations and Microstructural Evolution: Part II

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, Amy Jean

    2015-10-30

    The activities of the Phase Transformations Committee of the Materials Processing & Manufacturing Division (MPMD) of The Minerals, Metals & Materials Society (TMS) are oriented toward understanding the fundamental aspects of phase transformations. Emphasis is placed on the thermodynamic driving forces for phase transformations, the kinetics of nucleation and growth, interfacial structures and energies, transformation crystallography, surface reliefs, and, above all, the atomic mechanisms of phase transformations. Phase transformations and microstructural evolution are directly linked to materials processing, properties, and performance. In this issue, aspects of liquid–solid and solid-state phase transformations and microstructural evolution are highlighted. Many papers in this issue are highlighted by this paper, giving a brief summary of what they bring to the scientific community.

  9. Phase Transformations and Microstructural Evolution: Part II

    DOE PAGES

    Clarke, Amy Jean

    2015-10-30

    The activities of the Phase Transformations Committee of the Materials Processing & Manufacturing Division (MPMD) of The Minerals, Metals & Materials Society (TMS) are oriented toward understanding the fundamental aspects of phase transformations. Emphasis is placed on the thermodynamic driving forces for phase transformations, the kinetics of nucleation and growth, interfacial structures and energies, transformation crystallography, surface reliefs, and, above all, the atomic mechanisms of phase transformations. Phase transformations and microstructural evolution are directly linked to materials processing, properties, and performance. In this issue, aspects of liquid–solid and solid-state phase transformations and microstructural evolution are highlighted. Many papers in thismore » issue are highlighted by this paper, giving a brief summary of what they bring to the scientific community.« less

  10. South Bay Salt Pond Tidal Wetland Restoration Phase II Planning

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Information about the SFBWQP South Bay Salt Pond Tidal Wetland Restoration Phase II Planning project, part of an EPA competitive grant program to improve SF Bay water quality focused on restoring impaired waters and enhancing aquatic re

  11. Planning Targets for Phase II Watershed Implementation Plans

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    On August 1, 2011, EPA provided planning targets for nitrogen, phosphorus and sediment for the Phase II Watershed Implementation Plans (WIPs) of the Chesapeake Bay TMDL. This page provides the letters containing those planning targets.

  12. Sears Point Tidal Marsh Restoration Project: Phase II

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Information about the SFBWQP Sears Point Tidal Marsh Restoration Project: Phase II, part of an EPA competitive grant program to improve SF Bay water quality focused on restoring impaired waters and enhancing aquatic resources.

  13. South Bay Salt Pond Restoration, Phase II at Ravenswood

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Information about the South Bay Salt Pond Restoration Project: Phase II Construction at Ravenswood, part of an EPA competitive grant program to improve SF Bay water quality focused on restoring impaired waters and enhancing aquatic resources.

  14. Demonstration of Spray Booth Recirculation and Partitioning - Phase II

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-01-01

    electrostatic paint spray enclosures, such as the high volume, low pressure ( HVLP ) systems employed at Barstow MCLB, a minimum linear velocity of 100 fpm must be...SUBTITLE 5. FUNDING NUMBERS Demonstration of Spray Booth Recirculation and Partitioning - Phase II N/A 6. AUTHOR(S) D. Proffitt, R.K. Clayton, & J...ANSI Std. Z39-18 298-102 * , 85-1996 Demonstration of Spray Booth Recirculation and Partitioning - Phase II David Proffitt and Russell K. Clayton

  15. Military Family Coping Project - Phase II

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-05-01

    anxiety. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Soldier, Intimate Significant Other, Parents, Deployment, Stress, Depression, Anxiety, Life Satisfaction, Addiction , Trauma...Anxiety, Life Satisfaction, Addiction , Trauma 4 The Military Family Coping Project reflects two phases. The first consisted of a series of focus

  16. Modular microfluidic system for emulation of human phase I/phase II metabolism.

    PubMed

    Kampe, Thomas; König, Anna; Schroeder, Hendrik; Hengstler, Jan G; Niemeyer, Christof M

    2014-03-18

    We present a microfluidic device for coupled phase I/phase II metabolic reactions in vitro. The chip consists of microchannels, which are used as packed bed reactor compartments, filled with superparamagnetic microparticles bearing recombinant microsomal phase I cytochrome P450 or phase II conjugating enzymes (UDP-glucuronosyltransferase). Online coupling of the microfluidic device with LC/MS enabled the quantitative assessment of coupled phase I/phase II transformations, as demonstrated for two different substrates, 7-benzyloxy-4-trifluoromethylcoumarin (BFC) and dextromethorphan (DEX). In contrast, conventional sequential one-pot incubations did not generate measurable amounts of phase II metabolites. Because the microfluidic device is readily assembled from standard parts and can be equipped with a variety of recombinant enzymes, it provides a modular platform to emulate and investigate hepatic metabolism processes, with particular potential for targeted small-scale synthesis and identification of metabolites formed by sequential action of specific enzymes.

  17. Design, synthesis and characterization of macrocyclic ligand based transition metal complexes of Ni(II), Cu(II) and Co(II) with their antimicrobial and antioxidant evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gull, Parveez; Malik, Manzoor Ahmad; Dar, Ovas Ahmad; Hashmi, Athar Adil

    2017-04-01

    Three new complexes Ni(II), Cu(II) and Co(II) were synthesized of macrocyclic ligand derived from 1, 4-dicarbonyl-phenyl-dihydrazide and O-phthalaldehyde in the ratio of 2:2. The synthesized compounds were characterized by elemental analyses, molar conductance, magnetic susceptibility measurements, FTIR, UV-Vis., Mass and 1H NMR spectral studies. The electronic spectra of the metal complexes indicate a six coordinate octahedral geometry of the central metal ion. These metal complexes and the ligand were evaluated for antimicrobial activity against bacteria (E. coli, B. subtilis, S. aureus) and fungi (A. niger, A. flavus, C. albicans) and compared against standard drugs chloramphenicol and nystatin respectively. In addition, the antioxidant activity of the compounds was also investigated through scavenging effect on DPPH radicals.

  18. Phoenix Violence Prevention Initiative, Phase II Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waits, Mary Jo; Johnson, Ryan; Kornreich, Toby; Klym, Mark; Leland, Karen

    In 1996, drawing from religious, educational, social services, media, neighborhoods, nonprofits, and health-providing sectors of the community, the Phoenix Violence Prevention Initiative (PVPI) was conceived. During Phase One of the initiative, the following seven points regarding prevention and prevention design strategies were assembled: (1)…

  19. Digitizing Images for Curriculum 21: Phase II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Alice D.

    Although visual databases exist for the study of art, architecture, geography, health care, and other areas, readily accessible sources of quality images are not available for engineering faculty interested in developing multimedia modules or for student projects. Presented here is a brief review of Phase I of the Engineering Visual Database…

  20. H2O2 preconditioning modulates phase II enzymes through p38 MAPK and PI3K/Akt activation.

    PubMed

    Angeloni, Cristina; Motori, Elisa; Fabbri, Daniele; Malaguti, Marco; Leoncini, Emanuela; Lorenzini, Antonello; Hrelia, Silvana

    2011-06-01

    Ischemic preconditioning is a complex cardioprotective phenomenon that involves adaptive changes in cells and molecules and occurs in a biphasic pattern: an early phase after 1-2 h and a late phase after 12-24 h. While it is widely accepted that reactive oxygen species are strongly involved in triggering ischemic preconditiong, it is not clear if they play a major role in the early or late phase of preconditioning and which are the mechanisms involved. The present study was designed to investigate the mechanisms behind H(2)O(2)-induced cardioprotection in rat neonatal cardiomyocytes. We focused on antioxidant and phase II enzymes and their modulation by protein kinase signaling pathways and nuclear-factor-E(2)-related factor-1 (Nrf1) and Nrf2. H(2)O(2) preconditioning was able to counteract oxidative stress more effectively in the late than in the early phase of adaptation. In particular, H(2)O(2) preconditioning counteracted oxidative stress-induced apoptosis by decreasing caspase-3 activity, increasing Bcl2 expression and selectively increasing the expression and activity of antioxidant and phase II enzymes through Nrf1 and Nrf2 translocation to the nucleus. The downregulation of Nrf1 and Nrf2 by small interfering RNA reduced the expression level of phase II enzymes. Specific inhibitors of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt and p38 MAPK activation partially reduced the cardioprotection elicited by H(2)O(2) preconditioning and the induction and activity of phase II enzymes. These findings demonstrate, for the first time, a key role for Nrf1, and not only for Nrf2, in the induction of phase II enzymes triggered by H(2)O(2) preconditioning.

  1. [Prolonged phase II neuromuscular blockade following succinylcholine administration].

    PubMed

    Jurkolow, G; Fuchs-Buder, T; Lemoine, A; Raft, J; Rocq, N; Meistelman, C

    2014-03-01

    Patients who are given a single dose of succinylcholine normally undergo a short-acting depolarizing phase I neuromuscular block but rarely a phase II block. Prolonged neuromuscular blockade occurs after a single dose of succinylcholine in case of genetically determined abnormal plasma butyrylcholinesterase activity. It is mandatory to use monitoring to detect this side effect. We report a case of a patient with abnormal plasma butyrylcholinesterase activity undergoing a six-hour prolonged neuromuscular phase II block, after a single dose of succinylcholine.

  2. Interactive Digital Image Processing Investigation. Phase II.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-04-01

    International Business Machines Corporation WORK UNIT NUMBERS La Federal Systems Division 18100 Frederick Pike naltber b _rg Maryland 2Q760 11...Radiance Versus Wavelength X. 6.2-2 Operation of a Scanning Sensor 6-6 6.2-3 Multispectral Scanner Measurements - Channel 1 6-7 6.2-4 Multispectral...contains recommendations for further work based on the results S of the present study. L. Ii tii iU 1- -i - " - • I1 --. LI I J-- - ----- t [ [ Section 2

  3. Automated Air Information Production System - Phase II.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-10-01

    Center (DMAAC). The scope of this effort encompassed the analysis , design, specification, implementation, and test and evaluation of all hardware and...and the implementation of a PILOT system. The scope of the Phase I effort encompassed the analysis , design, and specification of all hardware and...division multiplexors, and 2 Government furnished KG-34 encrypt/decrypt units and Mosler safes. The Publishing subsystem hardware configuration (reference

  4. Direct phasing in femtosecond nanocrystallography. II. Phase retrieval.

    PubMed

    Chen, Joe P J; Spence, John C H; Millane, Rick P

    2014-03-01

    X-ray free-electron laser diffraction patterns from protein nanocrystals provide information on the diffracted amplitudes between the Bragg reflections, offering the possibility of direct phase retrieval without the use of ancillary experimental diffraction data [Spence et al. (2011). Opt. Express, 19, 2866-2873]. The estimated continuous transform is highly noisy however [Chen et al. (2014). Acta Cryst. A70, 143-153]. This second of a series of two papers describes a data-selection strategy to ameliorate the effects of the high noise levels and the subsequent use of iterative phase-retrieval algorithms to reconstruct the electron density. Simulation results show that employing such a strategy increases the noise levels that can be tolerated.

  5. Single-arm Phase II cancer survival trial designs.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jianrong

    2016-01-01

    The current practice for designing single-arm Phase II trials with time-to-event endpoints is limited to using either a maximum likelihood estimate test under the exponential model or a naive approach based on dichotomizing the event time at a landmark time point. A trial designed under the exponential model may not be reliable, and the naive approach is inefficient. The modified one-sample log-rank test statistic proposed in this article fills the void. In general, the proposed test can be used to design single-arm Phase II survival trials under any parametric survival distribution. Simulation results showed that it preserves type I error well and provides adequate power for Phase II cancer trial designs with time-to-event endpoints.

  6. Nucleoside-2',3'/3',5'-bis(thio)phosphate antioxidants are also capable of disassembly of amyloid beta42-Zn(ii)/Cu(ii) aggregates via Zn(ii)/Cu(ii)-chelation.

    PubMed

    Hevroni, Bosmat Levi; Major, Dan Thomas; Dixit, Mudit; Mhashal, Anil Ranu; Das, Susanta; Fischer, Bilha

    2016-05-18

    Currently, there is an urgent need for biocompatible metal-ion chelators capable of antioxidant activity and disassembly of amyloid beta (Aβ)-aggregates as potential therapeutics for Alzheimer's disease (AD). We recently demonstrated the promising antioxidant activity of adenine/guanine 2',3' or 3',5'-bis(thio)phosphate analogues, 2'-dA/G3'5'PO/S and A2'3'PO/S, and their affinity to Zn(ii)-ions. These findings encouraged us to evaluate them as agents for the dissolution of Aβ42-Zn(ii)/Cu(ii) aggregates. Specifically, we explored their ability to bind Cu(ii)/Zn(ii)-ions, the geometry and stoichiometry of these complexes, Cu(ii)/Zn(ii)-binding-sites and binding mode, and the ability of these analogues to dissolve Aβ42-Zn(ii)/Cu(ii) aggregates, as well as their effect on the secondary structure of those aggregates. Finally, we identified the most promising agents for dissolution of Aβ42-Zn(ii)/Cu(ii) aggregates. Specifically, we observed the formation of a 1 : 1 complex between 2'-dG3'5'PO and Cu(ii), involving O4 ligands. Zn(ii) was coordinated by both thiophosphate groups of 2'-dA3'5'PS and A2'3'PS involving O2S2 ligands in a 1 : 1 stoichiometry. A2'3'PS dissolves Aβ42-Zn(ii) and Aβ42-Cu(ii) aggregates as effectively as, and 2.5-fold more effectively than EDTA, respectively. Furthermore, 2'-dG3'5'PS and A2'3'PS reverted the Aβ42-M(ii) structure, back to that of the free Aβ42. Finally, cryo-TEM and TEM images confirmed the disassembly of Aβ42 and Aβ42-M(ii) aggregates by A2'3'PS. Hence, 2'-dG3'5'PS and A2'3'PS may serve as promising scaffolds for new AD therapeutics, acting as both effective antioxidants and agents for solubilization of Aβ42-Cu(ii)/Zn(ii) aggregates.

  7. Adaptive Processing Experiment (APE) Phase II

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-05-01

    52,bs egos.0 64, **WOiS *-1 mTh.ls -Silos 1010 woosS logo 0 .0p 11% 93 *.u44 *38.5’ 04b 109 11,t Soo? 3s,0 mono 󈧏 Ou3 0,~ 36’sq w44S*83 1160 *to...02 =Soo b5,0 614 0,02 40002 wool 041,4Ib -6201’ ’.21 so? logo Ilk W.06 woos 󈧄 .41,74 059,13 w943 t0% 75,0 e5o w(n4 *,0’q Soi -37,A0 .$goes 0044 .10...CURR.C T -1 F I PL I fR Prik kFC ~jv,1Y I AND) PI VITH It, 7AP’SA Fk)~o AtA PACjmC, Ur $(jfA40f sk~ FHo PHASE AMPI ’LTUDE IflTAt. FILTFR FILTER~ Fo.FR

  8. Optical investigations of He II two phase flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Muoio, E.; Jager, B.; Puech, L.; Rousset, B.; Thibault, P.; van Weelderen, R.; Wolf, P. E.

    2002-05-01

    We describe the optical techniques we used to detect droplets in the HeII two phase flow of the Cryoloop experiment. These include quantitative light scattering, imaging, and laser phase sensitive anemometry and granulometry (PDPA). We demonstrate that droplets appear for vapor velocities larger than 5 m/s, and that they progressively invade the entire pipe cross section as the vapor velocity is increased. Estimates are given for the droplet size and density.

  9. Phase II trial of CoQ10 for ALS finds insufficient evidence to justify Phase III

    PubMed Central

    Kaufmann, Petra; Thompson, John L.P.; Levy, Gilberto; Buchsbaum, Richard; Shefner, Jeremy; Krivickas, Lisa S.; Katz, Jonathan; Rollins, Yvonne; Barohn, Richard J.; Jackson, Carlayne E.; Tiryaki, Ezgi; Lomen-Hoerth, Catherine; Armon, Carmel; Tandan, Rup; Rudnicki, Stacy A.; Rezania, Kourosh; Sufit, Robert; Pestronk, Alan; Novella, Steven P.; Heiman-Patterson, Terry; Kasarskis, Edward J.; Pioro, Erik P.; Montes, Jacqueline; Arbing, Rachel; Vecchio, Darleen; Barsdorf, Alexandra; Mitsumoto, Hiroshi; Levin, Bruce

    2010-01-01

    Objective Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a devastating, and currently incurable, neuromuscular disease in which oxidative stress and mitochondrial impairment are contributing to neuronal loss. Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10), an antioxidant and mitochondrial cofactor, has shown promise in ALS transgenic mice, and in clinical trials for neurodegenerative diseases other than ALS. Our aims were to choose between two high doses of CoQ10 for ALS, and to determine if it merits testing in a Phase III clinical trial. Methods We designed and implemented a multi-center trial with an adaptive, two-stage, bias-adjusted, randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind, Phase II design (n=185). The primary outcome in both stages was decline in the ALS Functional Rating Scale-revised (ALSFRSr) score over 9 months. Stage 1 (dose selection, 35 participants per group) compared CoQ10 doses of 1,800 and 2,700 mg/day. Stage 2 (futility test, 75 patients per group) compared the dose selected in Stage 1 against placebo. Results Stage 1 selected the 2,700 mg dose. In Stage 2, the pre-specified primary null hypothesis that this dose is superior to placebo was not rejected. It was rejected, however, in an accompanying pre-specified sensitivity test, and further supplementary analyses. Pre-specified secondary analyses showed no significant differences between CoQ10 at 2,700 mg/day and placebo. There were no safety concerns. Interpretation CoQ10 at 2,700 mg daily for 9 months shows insufficient promise to warrant Phase III testing. Given this outcome, the adaptive Phase II design incorporating a dose selection and a futility test avoided the need for a much larger conventional Phase III trial. PMID:19743457

  10. Continuous fiber ceramic composites. Phase II - Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Bird, James

    1997-10-31

    This report documents Atlantic Research Corporation's (ARC) Phase 11 effort on the Department of Energy's (DOE) Continuous Fiber Ceramic Composite (CFCC) program. This project is supported by the DOE cooperative agreement DE-FCO2-92CE40998. Such DOE support does not constitute an endorsement of the views expressed in this report. ARC'S CFCC Phase II effort began during October 1993 and was suspended in March of 1997 when, for business considerations, ARC closed the Amercom operation. This report covers progress from Phase II program inception through Amercom closure. ARC'S Phase II effort built upon the results of the Phase I Applications Assessment and Process Engineering developments to produce CFCC test components for end-user evaluation. Initially, the Phase 11 effort planned to develop and produce three CFCC components: CFCC compression rings for stationary diesel engines, CFCC hot gas fans for industrial furnace applications, and CFCC hot gas filters for current and advanced coal fired power cycles. As the program progressed, the development effort for the diesel engine piston rings was suspended. This decision was based on technical issues, cost factors and reduced program funding; the status of CFCC diesel engine piston ring development will be discussed in detail in section 2.2.1.

  11. Alberta Education Energy Conservation Project. Phase II: Internal Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sundmark, Dana

    This report is based on the Alberta Education Energy Conservation Project - Phase II. The project was a follow-up to an earlier study, extending from June 1980 to June 1983, in which government funding and engineering manpower were used to conduct an energy management program in 52 selected pilot schools in 5 areas of the province. The report…

  12. Phase II cancer clinical trials with heterogeneous patient populations.

    PubMed

    Jung, Sin-Ho; Chang, Myron N; Kang, Sun J

    2012-01-01

    The patient population for a Phase II trial often consists of multiple subgroups in terms of risk level. In this case, a popular design approach is to specify the response rate and the prevalence of each subgroup, to calculate the response rate of the whole population by the weighted average of the response rates across subgroups, and to choose a standard Phase II design such as Simon's optimal or minimax design to test the response rate for the whole population. In this case, although the prevalence of each subgroup is accurately specified, the observed prevalence among the accrued patients to the study may be quite different from the expected one because of the small sample size, which is typical in most Phase II trials. The fixed rejection value for a chosen standard Phase II design may be either too conservative (i.e., increasing the false rejection probability of the experimental therapy) if the trial accrues more high-risk patients than expected, or too anti-conservative (i.e., increasing the false acceptance probability of the experimental therapy) if the trial accrues more low-risk patients than expected. We can avoid such problems by adjusting the rejection values, depending on the observed prevalence from the trial. In this paper, we investigate the performance of the flexible designs compared with the standard design with fixed rejection values under various settings.

  13. Probability of success for phase III after exploratory biomarker analysis in phase II.

    PubMed

    Götte, Heiko; Kirchner, Marietta; Sailer, Martin Oliver

    2017-02-23

    The probability of success or average power describes the potential of a future trial by weighting the power with a probability distribution of the treatment effect. The treatment effect estimate from a previous trial can be used to define such a distribution. During the development of targeted therapies, it is common practice to look for predictive biomarkers. The consequence is that the trial population for phase III is often selected on the basis of the most extreme result from phase II biomarker subgroup analyses. In such a case, there is a tendency to overestimate the treatment effect. We investigate whether the overestimation of the treatment effect estimate from phase II is transformed into a positive bias for the probability of success for phase III. We simulate a phase II/III development program for targeted therapies. This simulation allows to investigate selection probabilities and allows to compare the estimated with the true probability of success. We consider the estimated probability of success with and without subgroup selection. Depending on the true treatment effects, there is a negative bias without selection because of the weighting by the phase II distribution. In comparison, selection increases the estimated probability of success. Thus, selection does not lead to a bias in probability of success if underestimation due to the phase II distribution and overestimation due to selection cancel each other out. We recommend to perform similar simulations in practice to get the necessary information about the risk and chances associated with such subgroup selection designs.

  14. Synthesis, characterization, molecular modeling and antioxidant activity of (1E,5E)-1,5-bis(1-(pyridin-2-yl)ethylidene)carbonohydrazide (H2APC) and its zinc(II), cadmium(II) and mercury(II) complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Gammal, O. A.; Abu El-Reash, G. M.; Ghazy, S. E.; Radwan, A. H.

    2012-08-01

    A new series of Zn(II), Cd(II) and Hg(II) complexes of (1E,5E)-1,5-bis(1-(pyridin-2-yl)ethylidene)carbonohydrazide (H2APC) have been prepared and characterized by elemental analyses, spectral (IR, UV-visible, mass and 1H NMR) as well as magnetic and thermal measurements. The data revealed that the ligand acts a monobasic hexadentate, neutral tri- and monodentate in Zn(II), Cd(II) and Hg(II) complexes, respectively. An octahedral geometry is proposed for Zn(II) complex, a trigonal bi-pyramid for Cd(II) complex and a tetrahedral one for Hg(II) complex. The bond length, bond angle, HOMO, LUMO and charges on the atoms have been calculated to confirm the geometry of the ligand and the investigated complexes using material studio program. Kinetic parameters were determined for each thermal degradation stage of some complexes using Coats-Redfern and Horowitz-Metzger methods. The antioxidant, anti-hemolytic, and cytotoxic activities of the compounds have been screened. H2APC showed moderate antioxidant activity using ABTS and DPPH methods. With respect to erythrocyte hemolysis and in vitro Ehrlich ascites assay, H2APC exhibited the potent antioxidative activity followed by Cd(II) and Zn(II) complexes while Hg(II) complex showed very weak activity.

  15. Dietary chemoprevention strategies for induction of phase II xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes in lung carcinogenesis: A review

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Xiang-Lin; Spivack, Simon D.

    2013-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer mortality for men and women in the United States and is a growing worldwide problem. Protection against lung cancer is associated with higher dietary intake of fruits and vegetables, according to recent large epidemiologic studies. One strategy for lung cancer chemoprevention focuses on the use of agents to modulate the metabolism and disposition of tobacco, environmental and endogenous carcinogens through upregulation of detoxifying phase II enzymes. We summarize the substantial evidence that suggests that induction of phase II enzymes, particularly the glutathione S-transferases, plays a direct role in chemoprotection against lung carcinogenesis. The engagement of the Keap1–Nrf2 complex regulating the antioxidant response element (ARE) signaling pathway has been identified as a key molecular target of chemopreventive phase II inducers in several systems. Monitoring of phase II enzyme induction has led to identification of novel chemopreventive agents such as the isothiocyanate sulforaphane, and the 1,2-dithiole-3-thiones. However, no agents have yet demonstrated clear benefit in human cell systems, or in clinical trials. Alternative strategies include: (a) using intermediate cancer biomarkers for the endpoint in human trials; (b) high-throughput small molecule discovery approaches for induced expression of human phase II genes; and (c) integrative approaches that consider pharmacogenetics, along with pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics in target lung tissue. These approaches may lead to a more effective strategy of tailored chemoprevention efforts using compounds with proven human activity. PMID:19185948

  16. Dietary chemoprevention strategies for induction of phase II xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes in lung carcinogenesis: A review.

    PubMed

    Tan, Xiang-Lin; Spivack, Simon D

    2009-08-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer mortality for men and women in the United States and is a growing worldwide problem. Protection against lung cancer is associated with higher dietary intake of fruits and vegetables, according to recent large epidemiologic studies. One strategy for lung cancer chemoprevention focuses on the use of agents to modulate the metabolism and disposition of tobacco, environmental and endogenous carcinogens through upregulation of detoxifying phase II enzymes. We summarize the substantial evidence that suggests that induction of phase II enzymes, particularly the glutathione S-transferases, plays a direct role in chemoprotection against lung carcinogenesis. The engagement of the Keap1-Nrf2 complex regulating the antioxidant response element (ARE) signaling pathway has been identified as a key molecular target of chemopreventive phase II inducers in several systems. Monitoring of phase II enzyme induction has led to identification of novel chemopreventive agents such as the isothiocyanate sulforaphane, and the 1,2-dithiole-3-thiones. However, no agents have yet demonstrated clear benefit in human cell systems, or in clinical trials. Alternative strategies include: (a) using intermediate cancer biomarkers for the endpoint in human trials; (b) high-throughput small molecule discovery approaches for induced expression of human phase II genes; and (c) integrative approaches that consider pharmacogenetics, along with pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics in target lung tissue. These approaches may lead to a more effective strategy of tailored chemoprevention efforts using compounds with proven human activity.

  17. Antioxidant protective effect of flavonoids on linoleic acid peroxidation induced by copper(II)/ascorbic acid system.

    PubMed

    Beker, Bilge Yıldoğan; Bakır, Temelkan; Sönmezoğlu, Inci; Imer, Filiz; Apak, Reşat

    2011-11-01

    Antioxidants are compounds that can delay or inhibit lipid oxidation. The peroxidation of linoleic acid (LA) in the absence and presence of Cu(II) ion-ascorbate combinations was investigated in aerated and incubated emulsions at 37°C and pH 7. LA peroxidation induced by copper(II)-ascorbic acid system followed first order kinetics with respect to hydroperoxides concentration. The extent of copper-initiated peroxide production in a LA system assayed by ferric thiocyanate method was used to determine possible antioxidant and prooxidant activities of the added flavonoids. The effects of three different flavonoids of similar structure, i.e. quercetin (QR), morin (MR) and catechin (CT), as potential antioxidant protectors were studied in the selected peroxidation system. The inhibitive order of flavonoids in the protection of LA peroxidation was: morin>catechin≥quercetin, i.e. agreeing with that of formal reduction potentials versus NHE at pH 7, i.e. 0.60, 0.57 and 0.33V for MR, CT, and QR, respectively. Morin showed antioxidant effect at all concentrations whereas catechin and quercetin showed both antioxidant and prooxidant effects depending on their concentrations. The structural requirements for antioxidant activity in flavonoids interestingly coincide with those for Cu(II)-induced prooxidant activity, because as the reducing power of a flavonoid increases, Cu(II)-Cu(I) reduction is facilitated that may end up with the production of reactive species. The findings of this study were evaluated in the light of structure-activity relationships of flavonoids, and the results are believed to be useful to better understand the actual conditions where flavonoids may act as prooxidants in the preservation of heterogeneous food samples containing traces of transition metal ions.

  18. Effects of ethylene on photosystem II and antioxidant enzyme activity in Bermuda grass under low temperature.

    PubMed

    Hu, Zhengrong; Fan, Jibiao; Chen, Ke; Amombo, Erick; Chen, Liang; Fu, Jinmin

    2016-04-01

    The phytohormone ethylene has been reported to mediate plant response to cold stress. However, it is still debated whether the effect of ethylene on plant response to cold stress is negative or positive. The objective of the present study was to explore the role of ethylene in the cold resistance of Bermuda grass (Cynodon dactylon (L).Pers.). Under control (warm) condition, there was no obvious effect of the ethylene precursor 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) or the antagonist Ag(+) of ethylene signaling on electrolyte leakage (EL) and malondialdehyde (MDA) content. Under cold stress conditions, ACC-treated plant leaves had a greater level of EL and MDA than the untreated leaves. However, the EL and MDA values were lower in the Ag(+) regime versus the untreated. In addition, after 3 days of cold treatment, ACC remarkably reduced the content of soluble protein and also altered antioxidant enzyme activity. Under control (warm) condition, there was no significant effect of ACC on the performance of photosystem II (PS II) as monitored by chlorophyll α fluorescence transients. However, under cold stress, ACC inhibited the performance of PS II. Under cold condition, ACC remarkably reduced the performance index for energy conservation from excitation to the reduction of intersystem electron acceptors (PI(ABS)), the maximum quantum yield of primary photochemistry (φP0), the quantum yield of electron transport flux from Q(A) to Q(B) (φE0), and the efficiency/probability of electron transport (ΨE0). Simultaneously, ACC increased the values of specific energy fluxes for absorption (ABS/RC) and dissipation (DI0/RC) after 3 days of cold treatment. Additionally, under cold condition, exogenous ACC altered the expressions of several related genes implicated in the induction of cold tolerance (LEA, SOD, POD-1 and CBF1, EIN3-1, and EIN3-2). The present study thus suggests that ethylene affects the cold tolerance of Bermuda grass by impacting the antioxidant system

  19. Bayesian approach to two-stage phase II trial.

    PubMed

    Pepple, P A; Choi, S C

    1997-05-01

    Consider the situation in which there are several different therapeutic agents. It is desired to select the best agent and to examine its efficacy relative to the control. Too often clinical trials terminate with negative outcomes in part due to inadequate phase II studies. A two-stage phase II based on a Bayesian approach is considered in order to reduce such likelihood. The first stage consists of selecting the best agent and the second stage consists of examining the relative efficacy of the selected agent compared to the control. A formal phase III clinical trial can be initiated when the particular agent is shown to be promising on the basis of the proposed phase II study. The Bayesian approach employed uses an ad hoc likelihood due to the fact that the exact likelihood is complex and intractable. In this sense the proposed approach is thus an approximation. A simulation study is conducted to investigate the performance of the proposed Bayesian approach and compared to two fixed-sample-size approaches. Due to the fact that the procedure is approximate, the simulation study is essential to assess the usefulness of the procedure. The study suggests that the Bayesian approach is an attractive alternative to fixed-sample-size approaches.

  20. Synthesis, spectroscopic, molecular structure, antioxidant, antimicrobial and antitumor behavior of Mn(II), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II) complexes of O2N type tridentate chromone-2-carboxaldehyde Schiff's base ligand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ammar, Reda A.; Alaghaz, Abdel-Nasser M. A.; Zayed, Mohamed E.; Al-Bedair, Lamia A.

    2017-08-01

    Tridentate Schiff's base (HL) ligand was synthesized via condensation of salicylaldehyde and 3-hydroxypyridin-2-yliminomethyl-4H-chromen-4-one and their corresponding Mn(II), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II) complexes have been synthesized. The isolated solid complexes were characterized by elemental analyses, molar conductance, spectral (IR, UV-Vis, 1H NMR), magnetic moment, EPR, and thermal measurements. The IR spectra showed that HL was coordinated to the metal ions in tridentate manner with O2N donor sites of the azomethine N, deprotonated phenolic-OH and carbonyl-O. The activation of thermodynamic parameters are calculated using Coast-Redfern and Horowitz-Metzger (HM). The octahedral geometry of the complexes is confirmed using DFT method from DMOL3 calculations, UV-Vis and magnetic moment measurements, ESR and ligand field parameters. Antioxidant activities have also been performed for all the compounds. The investigated ligand and metal complexes were screened for their in-vitro antimicrobial activities against different types of fungal and bacterial strains. The resulting data assert on the inspected compounds as a highly promising bactericides and fungicides. The antitumor activities of all inspected compounds were evaluated towards human liver Carcinoma (HepG2) cell line.

  1. Steam generator tube integrity program: Phase II, Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Kurtz, R.J.; Bickford, R.L.; Clark, R.A.; Morris, C.J.; Simonen, F.A.; Wheeler, K.R.

    1988-08-01

    The Steam Generator Tube Integrity Program (SGTIP) was a three phase program conducted for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). The first phase involved burst and collapse testing of typical steam generator tubing with machined defects. The second phase of the SGTIP continued the integrity testing work of Phase I, but tube specimens were degraded by chemical means rather than machining methods. The third phase of the program used a removed-from-service steam generator as a test bed for investigating the reliability and effectiveness of in-service nondestructive eddy-current inspection methods and as a source of service degraded tubes for validating the Phase I and Phase II data on tube integrity. This report describes the results of Phase II of the SGTIP. The object of this effort included burst and collapse testing of chemically defected pressurized water reactor (PWR) steam generator tubing to validate empirical equations of remaining tube integrity developed during Phase I. Three types of defect geometries were investigated: stress corrosion cracking (SCC), uniform thinning and elliptical wastage. In addition, a review of the publicly available leak rate data for steam generator tubes with axial and circumferential SCC and a comparison with an analytical leak rate model is presented. Lastly, nondestructive eddy-current (EC) measurements to determine accuracy of defect depth sizing using conventional and alternate standards is described. To supplement the laboratory EC data and obtain an estimate of EC capability to detect and size SCC, a mini-round robin test utilizing several firms that routinely perform in-service inspections was conducted.

  2. Study of phase I NOx control: Lessons learned for phase II NOx control strategies

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, B.

    1996-12-31

    Title IV of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (CAAA) is concerned with lowering the levels of acid rain in the USA. One of the contributions to acid rain is nitric oxides referred to as NO{sub x}. Title IV seeks NO{sub x} reductions from two groupings of utility steam generators. The first group, known as Phase I, was to have their reductions made by January 1, 1996. The purpose of this paper is to look back at Phase I to see what one can learn for use in Phase II compliance planning. Phase II units are scheduled to be in compliance by January 1, 2000. As such, this paper looks to answer four questions about Phase I units.

  3. OSAS Surgery and Postoperative Discomfort: Phase I Surgery versus Phase II Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Gasparini, Giulio; Pelo, Sandro; Foresta, Enrico; Boniello, Roberto; Romandini, Mario; Cervelli, Daniele; Azzuni, Camillo; Marianetti, Tito Matteo

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. This study aims to investigate the reasons that discourage the patients affected by OSAS to undergo orthognathic surgery and compares the postoperative discomfort of phase I (soft tissue surgery) and phase II (orthognathic surgery) procedures for treatment of OSAS. Material and Methods. A pool of 46 patients affected by OSAS was divided into two groups: “surgery patients” who accepted surgical treatments of their condition and “no surgery patients” who refused surgical procedures. The “surgery patients” group was further subdivided into two arms: patients who accepted phase I procedures (IP) and those who accepted phase II (IIP). To better understand the motivations behind the refusal of II phase procedures, we asked the patients belonging to both the IP group and “no surgery” group to indicate the main reason that influenced their decision to avoid II phase procedures. We also monitored and compared five parameters of postoperative discomfort: pain, painkiller assumption, length of hospitalization, foreign body sensation, and diet assumption following IP and IIP procedures. Results. The main reason to avoid IIP procedures was the concern of a more severe postoperative discomfort. Comparison of the postoperative discomfort following IP versus IIP procedures showed that the former scored worse in 4 out of 5 parameters analyzed. Conclusion. IIP procedures produce less postoperative discomfort. IIP procedures, namely, orthognathic surgery, should be the first choice intervention in patients affected by OSAS and dentoskeletal malformation. PMID:25695081

  4. PWR steam generator chemical cleaning. Phase II. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    Two techniques believed capable of chemically dissolving the corrosion products in the annuli between tubes and support plates were developed in laboratory work in Phase I of this project and were pilot tested in Indian Point Unit No. 1 steam generators. In Phase II, one of the techniques was shown to be inadequate on an actual sample taken from an Indian Point Unit No. 2 steam generator. The other technique was modified slightly, and it was demonstrated that the tube/support plate annulus could be chemically cleaned effectively.

  5. Microbial Dark Matter Phase II: Stepping deeper into unknown territory

    SciTech Connect

    Jarett, Jessica; Dunfield, Peter; Peura, Sari; Wielen, Paul van der; Hedlund, Brian; Elshahed, Mostafa; Kormas, Konstantinos; Stott, Andreas Teske8, Matt; Birkeland, Nils-Kare; Zhang, Chuanlun; Rengefors, Karin; Lindemann, Stephen; Ravin, Nikolai V.; Spear, John; Hallam, Steven; Crowe, Sean; Steele, Jillian; Goudeau, Danielle; Malmstrom, Rex; Kyrpides, Nikos; Stepanauskas, Ramunas; Woyke, Tanja

    2014-10-27

    Currently available microbial genomes are of limited phylogenetic breadth due to our historical inability to cultivate most microorganisms in the laboratory. The first phase of the Microbial Dark Matter project used single-cell genomics to sequence 201 single cells from uncultivated lineages, and was able to resolve new superphyla and reveal novel metabolic features in bacteria and archaea. However, many fundamental questions about the evolution and function of microbes remain unanswered, and many candidate phyla remain uncharacterized. Phase II of the Microbial Dark Matter project will target candidate phyla with no sequenced representatives at a variety of new sites using a combination of single-cell sequencing and shotgun metagenomics approaches.

  6. Small Business Innovation Research, Post-Phase II Opportunity Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Hung D.; Steele, Gynelle C.

    2015-01-01

    This report outlines current Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Post-Phase II opportunity contract award results for the SBIR technology program from 2007 to 2011 for NASA's Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate (ARMD), Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate (HEOMD), Science Mission Directorate (SMD), and Space Technology Mission Directorate (STMD). The report provides guidelines for incorporating SBIR technology into NASA programs and projects and provides a quantitative overview of the post-Phase II award patterns that correspond with each mission directorate at NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC). In recent years, one of NASA's goals has been to not only transfer SBIR technologies to commercial industries, but to ensure that NASA mission directorates incorporate SBIR technologies into their program and project activities. Before incorporating technologies into MD programs, it is important to understand each mission directorate structure because each directorate has different objectives and needs. The directorate program structures follow.

  7. Urban Integrated Industrial Cogeneration Systems Analysis. Phase II final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    Through the Urban Integrated Industrial Cogeneration Systems Analysis (UIICSA), the City of Chicago embarked upon an ambitious effort to identify the measure the overall industrial cogeneration market in the city and to evaluate in detail the most promising market opportunities. This report discusses the background of the work completed during Phase II of the UIICSA and presents the results of economic feasibility studies conducted for three potential cogeneration sites in Chicago. Phase II focused on the feasibility of cogeneration at the three most promising sites: the Stockyards and Calumet industrial areas, and the Ford City commercial/industrial complex. Each feasibility case study considered the energy load requirements of the existing facilities at the site and the potential for attracting and serving new growth in the area. Alternative fuels and technologies, and ownership and financing options were also incorporated into the case studies. Finally, site specific considerations such as development incentives, zoning and building code restrictions and environmental requirements were investigated.

  8. Study of the GERDA Phase II background spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agostini, M.; Allardt, M.; Bakalyarov, A. M.; Balata, M.; Barabanov, I.; Baudis, L.; Bauer, C.; Bellotti, E.; Belogurov, S.; Belyaev, S. T.; Benato, G.; Bettini, A.; Bezrukov, L.; Bode, T.; Borowicz, D.; Brudanin, V.; Brugnera, R.; Caldwell, A.; Cattadori, C.; Chernogorov, A.; D’Andrea, V.; Demidova, E. V.; Di Marco, N.; Domula, A.; Doroshkevich, E.; Egorov, V.; Falkenstein, R.; Frodyma, N.; Gangapshev, A.; Garfagnini, A.; Gooch, C.; Grabmayr, P.; Gurentsov, V.; Gusev, K.; Hakenmüller, J.; Hegai, A.; Heisel, M.; Hemmer, S.; Hofmann, W.; Hult, M.; Inzhechik, L. V.; Janicskó Csáthy, J.; Jochum, J.; Junker, M.; Kazalov, V.; Kihm, T.; Kirpichnikov, I. V.; Kirsch, A.; Kish, A.; Klimenko, A.; Kneißl, R.; Knöpfle, K. T.; Kochetov, O.; Kornoukhov, V. N.; Kuzminov, V. V.; Laubenstein, M.; Lazzaro, A.; Lebedev, V. I.; Lehnert, B.; Liao, H. Y.; Lindner, M.; Lippi, I.; Lubashevskiy, A.; Lubsandorzhiev, B.; Lutter, G.; Macolino, C.; Majorovits, B.; Maneschg, W.; Medinaceli, E.; Miloradovic, M.; Mingazheva, R.; Misiaszek, M.; Moseev, P.; Nemchenok, I.; Palioselitis, D.; Panas, K.; Pandola, L.; Pelczar, K.; Pullia, A.; Riboldi, S.; Rumyantseva, N.; Sada, C.; Salamida, F.; Salathe, M.; Schmitt, C.; Schneider, B.; Schönert, S.; Schreiner, J.; Schulz, O.; Schütz, A.-K.; Schwingenheuer, B.; Selivanenko, O.; Shevzik, E.; Shirchenko, M.; Simgen, H.; Smolnikov, A.; Stanco, L.; Vanhoefer, L.; Vasenko, A. A.; Veresnikova, A.; von Sturm, K.; Wagner, V.; Wegmann, A.; Wester, T.; Wiesinger, C.; Wojcik, M.; Yanovich, E.; Zhitnikov, I.; Zhukov, S. V.; Zinatulina, D.; Zuber, K.; Zuzel, G.

    2017-09-01

    The Gerda experiment, located at the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso (LNGS) of INFN in Italy, searches for the neutrinoless double beta (0νββ) decay of 76Ge. Gerda Phase II is aiming to reach a sensitivity for the 0νββ half life of 1026 yr in ∼ 3 years of physics data taking with 100 kg·yr of exposure and a background index of ∼ 10‑3 cts/(keV·kg·yr). After 6 months of acquisition a first data release with 10.8 kg·yr of exposure is performed, showing that the design background is achieved. In this work a study of the Phase II background spectrum, the main spectral structures and the background sources will be presented and discussed.

  9. Water ice phases II, III, and V - Plastic deformation and phase relationships

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durham, W. B.; Boro, C. O.; Kirby, S. H.; Stern, L. A.; Heard, H. C.

    1988-01-01

    The ordinary water phase I was transformed to the ice phases that are known to exist in the interiors of large ice moons, such as Ganymede and Callisto for the purpose of investigating plastic deformation behavior of these ices. Ices II, III, and V were prepared using an apparatus and techniques similar to those described by Durham et al. (1983) and subsequently deformed in a gas deformation apparatus, and their deformation data were obtained. It was found that ice II was the strongest of the high-pressure phases, with a strength that was comparable to that of ice I; ice III was very weak, with the flow rate 100 to 1000 times higher than that of ice II at the same levels of stress. It was also found that ices III and V can exist metastably within the ice II field and that they may be deformed plastically within much of the metastable region without reverting to ice II. It is suggested that the weakness of the ice III phase may have profoundly influenced the evolution and the present-day behavior of the icy moons.

  10. Water ice phases II, III, and V - Plastic deformation and phase relationships

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durham, W. B.; Boro, C. O.; Kirby, S. H.; Stern, L. A.; Heard, H. C.

    1988-01-01

    The ordinary water phase I was transformed to the ice phases that are known to exist in the interiors of large ice moons, such as Ganymede and Callisto for the purpose of investigating plastic deformation behavior of these ices. Ices II, III, and V were prepared using an apparatus and techniques similar to those described by Durham et al. (1983) and subsequently deformed in a gas deformation apparatus, and their deformation data were obtained. It was found that ice II was the strongest of the high-pressure phases, with a strength that was comparable to that of ice I; ice III was very weak, with the flow rate 100 to 1000 times higher than that of ice II at the same levels of stress. It was also found that ices III and V can exist metastably within the ice II field and that they may be deformed plastically within much of the metastable region without reverting to ice II. It is suggested that the weakness of the ice III phase may have profoundly influenced the evolution and the present-day behavior of the icy moons.

  11. Cannabidiol Post-Treatment Alleviates Rat Epileptic-Related Behaviors and Activates Hippocampal Cell Autophagy Pathway Along with Antioxidant Defense in Chronic Phase of Pilocarpine-Induced Seizure.

    PubMed

    Hosseinzadeh, Mahshid; Nikseresht, Sara; Khodagholi, Fariba; Naderi, Nima; Maghsoudi, Nader

    2016-04-01

    Abnormal and sometimes severe behavioral and molecular symptoms are usually observed in epileptic humans and animals. To address this issue, we examined the behavioral and molecular aspects of seizure evoked by pilocarpine. Autophagy can promote both cell survival and death, but there are controversial reports about the neuroprotective or neurodegenerative effects of autophagy in seizure. Cannabidiol has anticonvulsant properties in some animal models when used as a pretreatment. In this study, we investigated alteration of seizure scores, autophagy pathway proteins, and antioxidant status in hippocampal cells during the chronic phase of pilocarpine-induced epilepsy after treatment with cannabidiol. Cannabidiol (100 ng, intracerebroventricular injection) delayed the chronic phase of epilepsy. Single administration of cannabidiol during the chronic phase of seizure significantly diminished seizure scores such as mouth clonus, head nodding, monolateral and bilateral forelimb clonus and increased the activity of catalase enzyme and reduced glutathione content. Such a protective effect in the behavioral scores of epileptic rats was also observed after repeated administrations of cannabidiol at the onset of the silent phase. Moreover, the amount of Atg7, conjugation of Atg5/12, Atg12, and LC3II/LC3I ratio increased significantly in epileptic rats treated with repeated injections of cannabidiol. In short, our results suggest that post-treatment of Cannabidiol could enhance the induction of autophagy pathway and antioxidant defense in the chronic phase of epilepsy, which could be considered as the protective mechanisms of cannabidiol in a temporal lobe epilepsy model.

  12. Type II Collagen and Gelatin from Silvertip Shark (Carcharhinus albimarginatus) Cartilage: Isolation, Purification, Physicochemical and Antioxidant Properties

    PubMed Central

    Jeevithan, Elango; Bao, Bin; Bu, Yongshi; Zhou, Yu; Zhao, Qingbo; Wu, Wenhui

    2014-01-01

    Type II acid soluble collagen (CIIA), pepsin soluble collagen (CIIP) and type II gelatin (GII) were isolated from silvertip shark (Carcharhinus albimarginatus) cartilage and examined for their physicochemical and antioxidant properties. GII had a higher hydroxyproline content (173 mg/g) than the collagens and cartilage. CIIA, CIIP and GII were composed of two identical α1 and β chains and were characterized as type II. Amino acid analysis of CIIA, CIIP and GII indicated imino acid contents of 150, 156 and 153 amino acid residues per 1000 residues, respectively. Differing Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra of CIIA, CIIP and GII were observed, which suggested that the isolation process affected the secondary structure and molecular order of collagen, particularly the triple-helical structure. The denaturation temperature of GII (32.5 °C) was higher than that of CIIA and CIIP. The antioxidant activity against 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radicals and the reducing power of CIIP was greater than that of CIIA and GII. SEM microstructure of the collagens depicted a porous, fibrillary and multi-layered structure. Accordingly, the physicochemical and antioxidant properties of type II collagens (CIIA, CIIP) and GII isolated from shark cartilage were found to be suitable for biomedical applications. PMID:24979271

  13. Type II collagen and gelatin from silvertip shark (Carcharhinus albimarginatus) cartilage: isolation, purification, physicochemical and antioxidant properties.

    PubMed

    Jeevithan, Elango; Bao, Bin; Bu, Yongshi; Zhou, Yu; Zhao, Qingbo; Wu, Wenhui

    2014-06-27

    Type II acid soluble collagen (CIIA), pepsin soluble collagen (CIIP) and type II gelatin (GII) were isolated from silvertip shark (Carcharhinus albimarginatus) cartilage and examined for their physicochemical and antioxidant properties. GII had a higher hydroxyproline content (173 mg/g) than the collagens and cartilage. CIIA, CIIP and GII were composed of two identical α1 and β chains and were characterized as type II. Amino acid analysis of CIIA, CIIP and GII indicated imino acid contents of 150, 156 and 153 amino acid residues per 1000 residues, respectively. Differing Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra of CIIA, CIIP and GII were observed, which suggested that the isolation process affected the secondary structure and molecular order of collagen, particularly the triple-helical structure. The denaturation temperature of GII (32.5 °C) was higher than that of CIIA and CIIP. The antioxidant activity against 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radicals and the reducing power of CIIP was greater than that of CIIA and GII. SEM microstructure of the collagens depicted a porous, fibrillary and multi-layered structure. Accordingly, the physicochemical and antioxidant properties of type II collagens (CIIA, CIIP) and GII isolated from shark cartilage were found to be suitable for biomedical applications.

  14. Designing Phase II B trials in sarcopenia: the best target population.

    PubMed

    Pahor, M; Cesari, M

    2011-08-01

    Despite the existing limitations and controversies regarding the definition of sarcopenia and its clinical consequences, the current scientific evidence strongly suggests that muscle decline is a primary determinant of the disabling process (and likely of other major health-related events). In fact, the muscle loss (in terms of mass as well as strength) occurring with aging has been growingly associated with mobility impairment and disability in older persons. Unfortunately, current evidence is mainly from observational studies. Times are mature to begin testing interventions aimed at modifying the sarcopenia process through the design and development of specific clinical trials. Considering the emergence of many promising interventions towards this age-related condition (e.g., physical exercise [in particular, resistance training], testosterone, antioxidant supplementations), the need for Phase II trial designs is high. In the present report, we discuss which are the major issues related to the design of Phase II clinical trials on sarcopenia with particular focus on the participant's characteristics to be considered as possible inclusion and exclusion criteria.

  15. Emerging drugs for antipsychotic-induced tardive dyskinesia: investigational drugs in Phase II and Phase III clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Lockwood, Jonathan Tomas; Remington, Gary

    2015-09-01

    Antipsychotic drugs (APs) represent the mainstay of treatment for schizophrenia and other forms of psychosis. Tardive dyskinesia (TD) is a motor disorder associated with the ongoing use of APs and is characterized by involuntary, repetitive movements that are potentially irreversible. Current treatment is wanting, due in part to our limited understanding of the mechanisms underlying TD. Risk of TD associated with APs appears linked to continuous blockade of dopamine D2 receptors in the basal ganglia. Proposed mechanisms include increased dopamine activation of D2 receptors caused by supersensitivity and neurodegeneration of dopamine-producing neurons due to biochemical changes incurred by ongoing AP exposure. Existing treatments are designed to reverse or prevent the neurochemical/biological changes caused by dopamine D2 receptor blockade and include vesicular monoamine transporter (VMAT) inhibitors, antioxidants, compounds with serotonin receptor agonism as well as antagonism, GABA agonists and cholinergic agents. Randomized, controlled trials in Phase II and Phase III (ClinicalTrials.org/ClinicalTrialsRegister.eu) are summarized and discussed. Effective adjunctive treatment for the symptoms of TD will depend on gaining a better understanding of the neurological changes induced by chronic dopamine D2 receptor antagonism from APs.

  16. Anti-oxidant, in vitro, in vivo anti-inflammatory activity and antiproliferative activity of mefenamic acid and its metal complexes with manganese(II), cobalt(II), nickel(II), copper(II) and zinc(II).

    PubMed

    Kovala-Demertzi, Dimitra; Hadjipavlou-Litina, Dimitra; Staninska, Malgorzata; Primikiri, Alexandra; Kotoglou, Chronis; Demertzis, Mavroudis A

    2009-06-01

    Some new complexes of mefenamic acid with potentially interesting biological activity are described. The complexes of mefenamic acid [Mn(mef)(2)(H(2)O)(2)], 1, [Co(mef)(2)(H(2)O)(2)], 2, [Ni(mef)(2)(H(2)O)(2)], 3, [Cu(mef)(2)(H(2)O)](2), 4 and [Zn(mef)(2)], 5, were prepared by the reaction of mefenamic acid, a potent anti-inflammatory drug with metal salts. Optical and infrared spectral data of these new complexes are reported. Monomeric six-coordinated species were isolated in the solid state for Mn(II), Ni(II) and Co(II), dimeric five-coordinated for Cu(II) and monomeric four-coordinated for Zn(II). In DMF or CHCl(3) solution the coordination number is retained and the coordinated molecules of water are replaced by solvent molecules. The anti-oxidant properties of the complexes were evaluated using the 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl, DPPH, free radical scavenging assay. The scavenging activities of the complexes were measured and compared with those of the free drug and vitamin C. We have explored their ability to inhibit soybean lipoxygenase, beta-glucuronidase and trypsin- induced proteolysis. The complex [Mn(mef)(2)(H(2)O)(2)] exhibits the highest antioxidant activity and the highest inhibitory effect against the soybean lipogygenase (LOX), properties that are not demonstrated by mefenamic acid. Their inhibitory effects on rat paw edema induced by Carrageenan was studied and compared with those of mefenamic acid. The complex [Zn(mef)(2)] exhibited a strong inhibitory effect at 0.1 mmol/Kg B.W. (81.5 +/- 1.3% inhibition), superior to the inhibition induced by mefenamic acid at the same dose (61.5 +/- 2.3% inhibition). Mefenamic acid and its metal complexes have been evaluated for antiproliferative activity in vitro against the cells of three human cancer cell lines: MCF-7 (human breast cancer cell line), T24 (bladder cancer cell line), A-549 (non-small cell lung carcinoma) and a mouse fibroblast L-929 cell line. The copper(II) complex displays against T24, MCF-7

  17. Does the oxidative stress theory of aging explain longevity differences in birds? II. Antioxidant systems and oxidative damage.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, Magdalene K; Buttemer, William A; Hulbert, A J

    2012-03-01

    The oxidative damage hypothesis of aging posits that the accumulation of oxidative damage is a determinant of an animal species' maximum lifespan potential (MLSP). Recent findings in extremely long-living mammal species such as naked mole-rats challenge this proposition. Among birds, parrots are exceptionally long-living with an average MLSP of 25 years, and with some species living more than 70 years. By contrast, quail are among the shortest living bird species, averaging about 5-fold lower MLSP than parrots. To test if parrots have correspondingly (i) superior antioxidant protection and (ii) lower levels of oxidative damage compared to similar-sized quail, we measured (i) total antioxidant capacity, uric acid and reduced glutathione (GSH) levels, as well as the activities of enzymatic antioxidants (superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase and catalase), and (ii) markers of mitochondrial DNA damage (8-OHdG), protein damage (protein carbonyls) and lipid peroxidation (lipid hydroperoxides and TBARS) in three species of long-living parrots and compared these results to corresponding measures in two species of short-living quails (average MLSP=5.5 years). All birds were fed the same diet to exclude differences in dietary antioxidant levels. Tissue antioxidants and oxidative damage were determined both 'per mg protein' and 'per g tissue'. Only glutathione peroxidase was consistently higher in tissues of the long-living parrots and suggests higher protection against the harmful effects of hydroperoxides, which might be important for parrot longevity. The levels of oxidative damage were mostly statistically indistinguishable between parrots and quails (67%), occasionally higher (25%), but rarely lower (8%) in the parrots. Despite indications of higher protection against some aspects of oxidative stress in the parrots, the pronounced longevity of parrots appears to be independent of their antioxidant mechanisms and their accumulation of oxidative damage.

  18. Mercury Oxidation via Catalytic Barrier Filters Phase II

    SciTech Connect

    Wayne Seames; Michael Mann; Darrin Muggli; Jason Hrdlicka; Carol Horabik

    2007-09-30

    In 2004, the Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory awarded the University of North Dakota a Phase II University Coal Research grant to explore the feasibility of using barrier filters coated with a catalyst to oxidize elemental mercury in coal combustion flue gas streams. Oxidized mercury is substantially easier to remove than elemental mercury. If successful, this technique has the potential to substantially reduce mercury control costs for those installations that already utilize baghouse barrier filters for particulate removal. Completed in 2004, Phase I of this project successfully met its objectives of screening and assessing the possible feasibility of using catalyst coated barrier filters for the oxidation of vapor phase elemental mercury in coal combustion generated flue gas streams. Completed in September 2007, Phase II of this project successfully met its three objectives. First, an effective coating method for a catalytic barrier filter was found. Second, the effects of a simulated flue gas on the catalysts in a bench-scale reactor were determined. Finally, the performance of the best catalyst was assessed using real flue gas generated by a 19 kW research combustor firing each of three separate coal types.

  19. Preliminary Exploratory Study of Different Phase II Collimators

    SciTech Connect

    Lari, L.; Assmann, R.W.; Bertarelli, A.; Bracco, C.; Brugger, M.; Cerutti, F.; Dallocchio, A.; Ferrari, A.; Mauri, M.; Roesler, S.; Sarchiapone, L.; Vlachoudis, Vasilis; Doyle, J.E.; Keller, L.; Lundgren, S.A.; Markiewicz, Thomas W.; Smith, J.C.; Lari, L.; /LPHE, Lausanne

    2011-11-02

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) collimation system is installed and commissioned in different phases, following the natural evolution of the LHC performance. To improve cleaning efficiency towards the end of the low beta squeeze at 7TeV, and in stable physics conditions, it is foreseen to complement the 30 highly robust Phase I secondary collimators with low impedance Phase II collimators. At this stage, their design is not yet finalized. Possible options include metallic collimators, graphite jaws with a movable metallic foil, or collimators with metallic rotating jaws. As part of the evaluation of the different designs, the FLUKA Monte Carlo code is extensively used for calculating energy deposition and studying material damage and activation. This report outlines the simulation approach and defines the critical quantities involved.

  20. DNA interaction, antioxidant activity, and bioactivity studies of two ruthenium(II) complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Bing-Jie; Jiang, Guang-Bin; Yao, Jun-Hua; Li, Wei; Wang, Ji; Huang, Hong-Liang; Liu, Yun-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Two new ruthenium(II) polypyridyl complexes [Ru(dmb)2(dcdppz)](ClO4)2 (1) and [Ru(bpy)2(dcdppz)](ClO4)2 (2) were prepared and characterized. The crystal structure of the complex 2 was solved by single crystal X-ray diffraction. The complex crystallizes in the monoclinic system, space group P21/n with a = 12.9622(14) Å, b = 17.1619(19) Å, c = 22.7210(3) Å, β = 100.930(2)°, R = 0.0536, Rω = 0.1111. The DNA-binding constants for complexes 1 and 2 were determined to be 1.92 × 105 (s = 1.72) and 2.24 × 105 (s = 1.86) M-1, respectively. The DNA-binding behaviors showed that complexes 1 and 2 interact with DNA by intercalative mode. The antioxidant activities of the ligand and the complexes were performed. Ligand, dcdppz, has no cytotoxicity against the selected cell lines. Complex 1 shows higher cytotoxicity than complex 2, but lower than cisplatin toward selected cell lines. The apoptosis and cell cycle arrest were investigated, and the apoptotic mechanism of BEL-7402 cells was studied by reactive oxygen species (ROS), mitochondrial membrane potential and western blot analysis. Complex 1 induces apoptosis in BEL-7402 cells through ROS-mediated mitochondrial dysfunction pathway and by regulating the expression of Bcl-2 family proteins.

  1. DNA interaction, antioxidant activity, and bioactivity studies of two ruthenium(II) complexes.

    PubMed

    Han, Bing-Jie; Jiang, Guang-Bin; Yao, Jun-Hua; Li, Wei; Wang, Ji; Huang, Hong-Liang; Liu, Yun-Jun

    2015-01-25

    Two new ruthenium(II) polypyridyl complexes [Ru(dmb)2(dcdppz)](ClO4)2 (1) and [Ru(bpy)2(dcdppz)](ClO4)2 (2) were prepared and characterized. The crystal structure of the complex 2 was solved by single crystal X-ray diffraction. The complex crystallizes in the monoclinic system, space group P21/n with a=12.9622(14)Å, b=17.1619(19)Å, c=22.7210(3)Å, β=100.930(2)(°), R=0.0536, Rω=0.1111. The DNA-binding constants for complexes 1 and 2 were determined to be 1.92×10(5) (s=1.72) and 2.24×10(5) (s=1.86)M(-1), respectively. The DNA-binding behaviors showed that complexes 1 and 2 interact with DNA by intercalative mode. The antioxidant activities of the ligand and the complexes were performed. Ligand, dcdppz, has no cytotoxicity against the selected cell lines. Complex 1 shows higher cytotoxicity than complex 2, but lower than cisplatin toward selected cell lines. The apoptosis and cell cycle arrest were investigated, and the apoptotic mechanism of BEL-7402 cells was studied by reactive oxygen species (ROS), mitochondrial membrane potential and western blot analysis. Complex 1 induces apoptosis in BEL-7402 cells through ROS-mediated mitochondrial dysfunction pathway and by regulating the expression of Bcl-2 family proteins. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. 48 CFR 1852.219-81 - Limitation on subcontracting-SBIR Phase II program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... subcontracting-SBIR Phase II program. 1852.219-81 Section 1852.219-81 Federal Acquisition Regulations System... CLAUSES Texts of Provisions and Clauses 1852.219-81 Limitation on subcontracting—SBIR Phase II program. As prescribed in 1819.7302(b), insert the following clause: Limitation on Subcontracting—SBIR Phase II Program...

  3. 48 CFR 1852.219-81 - Limitation on subcontracting-SBIR Phase II program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... subcontracting-SBIR Phase II program. 1852.219-81 Section 1852.219-81 Federal Acquisition Regulations System... CLAUSES Texts of Provisions and Clauses 1852.219-81 Limitation on subcontracting—SBIR Phase II program. As prescribed in 1819.7302(b), insert the following clause: Limitation on Subcontracting—SBIR Phase II Program...

  4. 48 CFR 1852.219-81 - Limitation on subcontracting-SBIR Phase II program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... subcontracting-SBIR Phase II program. 1852.219-81 Section 1852.219-81 Federal Acquisition Regulations System... CLAUSES Texts of Provisions and Clauses 1852.219-81 Limitation on subcontracting—SBIR Phase II program. As prescribed in 1819.7302(b), insert the following clause: Limitation on Subcontracting—SBIR Phase II Program...

  5. 48 CFR 1852.219-81 - Limitation on subcontracting-SBIR Phase II program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... subcontracting-SBIR Phase II program. 1852.219-81 Section 1852.219-81 Federal Acquisition Regulations System... CLAUSES Texts of Provisions and Clauses 1852.219-81 Limitation on subcontracting—SBIR Phase II program. As prescribed in 1819.7302(b), insert the following clause: Limitation on Subcontracting—SBIR Phase II Program...

  6. 47 CFR 90.765 - Licenses term for Phase II licenses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Licenses term for Phase II licenses. 90.765... 220-222 MHz Band Policies Governing the Licensing and Use of Phase II Ea, Regional and Nationwide Systems § 90.765 Licenses term for Phase II licenses. Nationwide licenses authorized pursuant to § 90.717...

  7. Leaching of Phase II Mercury Control Technology By-Products

    SciTech Connect

    Hesbach, P.A.; Kachur, E.K.

    2007-07-01

    The U.S. EPA has issued a final regulation for control of mercury from coal-fired power plants. An NETL research, development and demonstration program under DOE/Fossil Energy Innovations for Existing Plants is directed toward the improvement of the performance and economics of mercury control from coal-fired plants. The current Phase II of the RD&D program emphasizes the evaluation of performance and cost of control technologies through slip-stream and full scale field testing while continuing the development of novel concepts. One of the concerns of the NETL program is the fate of the captured flue gas mercury which is transferred to the condensed phase by-product stream. These adulterated by-products, both ashes and FGD material, represent the greatest challenge to the DOE goal of increased utilization of by-products. The degree of stability of capture by-products and their potential for release of mercury can have a large economic impact on material sales or the approach to disposal. One of the considerations for mercury control technology is the potential trade-off between effective but temporary mercury capture and less effective but more permanent sequestration. As part of a greater characterization effort of Phase II facility baseline and control technology sample pairs, NETL in-house laboratories have performed aqueous leaching procedures on a select subset of the available sample pairs. This report describes batch leaching results for mercury, arsenic, and selenium.

  8. A new approach to designing phase I-II cancer trials for cytotoxic chemotherapies.

    PubMed

    Bartroff, Jay; Lai, Tze Leung; Narasimhan, Balasubramanian

    2014-07-20

    Recently, there has been much work on early phase cancer designs that incorporate both toxicity and efficacy data, called phase I-II designs because they combine elements of both phases. However, they do not explicitly address the phase II hypothesis test of H0 : p ≤ p0 , where p is the probability of efficacy at the estimated maximum tolerated dose η from phase I and p0 is the baseline efficacy rate. Standard practice for phase II remains to treat p as a fixed, unknown parameter and to use Simon's two-stage design with all patients dosed at η. We propose a phase I-II design that addresses the uncertainty in the estimate p=p(η) in H0 by using sequential generalized likelihood theory. Combining this with a phase I design that incorporates efficacy data, the phase I-II design provides a common framework that can be used all the way from the first dose of phase I through the final accept/reject decision about H0 at the end of phase II, utilizing both toxicity and efficacy data throughout. Efficient group sequential testing is used in phase II that allows for early stopping to show treatment effect or futility. The proposed phase I-II design thus removes the artificial barrier between phase I and phase II and fulfills the objectives of searching for the maximum tolerated dose and testing if the treatment has an acceptable response rate to enter into a phase III trial.

  9. The PICASSO Dark Matter Experiment - Getting Ready for Phase II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krauss, Carsten B.; Picasso Collaboration

    2011-12-01

    PICASSO is a dark matter search experiment that uses the superheated droplet technique to find spin-dependently interacting WIMPs. A set of 1 l detectors with a total active mass of 19.4 g was used to prove the validity of the technique. The data from this run disfavors WIMP-proton cross sections larger than 1.3 pb for a WIMP mass of 29 GeV. Currently phase II of PICASSO is getting started. It will consist of 32 4.5 l detectors with a projected active mass of 2.5 kg and improved detectors.

  10. Physics Detector Simulation Facility Phase II system software description

    SciTech Connect

    Scipioni, B.; Allen, J.; Chang, C.; Huang, J.; Liu, J.; Mestad, S.; Pan, J.; Marquez, M.; Estep, P.

    1993-05-01

    This paper presents the Physics Detector Simulation Facility (PDSF) Phase II system software. A key element in the design of a distributed computing environment for the PDSF has been the separation and distribution of the major functions. The facility has been designed to support batch and interactive processing, and to incorporate the file and tape storage systems. By distributing these functions, it is often possible to provide higher throughput and resource availability. Similarly, the design is intended to exploit event-level parallelism in an open distributed environment.

  11. Polarization Mechanisms in Phase II Poly(Vinylidene Fluoride) Films.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-11-12

    34 OdRO a mnk W) Poly(Vinylidene Fluoride), x-rays, piezelectricity, polarization, poling FAWWRmCT ffls~ -ew nam 9 Uf"Oo me..Mv £*mM NOWsA Unoriented...phase II films were poled with fields up to 3.2 MV/cm at room o) temperature. A determination of the piezoelectric strain coefficient provided a measure...sT. VW OtU.4LF-41U.4" ". . -. I u CIImVP CLAI IaICATIOM OV- VPI PU.I (Ul... O111 111..41 the poling field and different polarization mechanisms appear

  12. Reservoir modeling of the Phase II Hot Dry Rock System

    SciTech Connect

    Zyvoloski, G.

    1984-01-01

    The Phase II system has been created with a series of hydraulic fracturing experiments at the Fenton Hill Hot Dry Rock site. Experiment 2032, the largest of the fracturing operations, involved injecting 5.6 million gallons (21,200m/sup 3/) of water into wellbore EE-2 over the period December 6-9, 1983. The experiment has been modeled using geothermal simulator FEHM developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The modeling effort has produced strong evidence of a large highly fractured reservoir. Two long term heat extraction schemes for the reservoir are studied with the model.

  13. First Results of the Phase II SIMPLE Dark Matter Search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felizardo, M.; Morlat, T.; Fernandes, A. C.; Girard, T. A.; Marques, J. G.; Ramos, A. R.; Auguste, M.; Boyer, D.; Cavaillou, A.; Sudre, C.; Poupeney, J.; Payne, R. F.; Miley, H. S.; Puibasset, J.

    2010-11-01

    We report results of a 14.1kgd measurement with 15 superheated droplet detectors of total active mass 0.208 kg, comprising the first stage of a 30kgd Phase II experiment. In combination with the results of the neutron-spin sensitive XENON10 experiment, these results yield a limit of |ap|<0.32 for MW=50GeV/c2 on the spin-dependent sector of weakly interacting massive particle-nucleus interactions with a 50% reduction in the previously allowed region of the phase space, formerly defined by XENON, KIMS, and PICASSO. In the spin-independent sector, a limit of 2.3×10-5pb at MW=45GeV/c2 is obtained.

  14. First Results of the Phase II SIMPLE Dark Matter Search

    SciTech Connect

    Felizardo, M.; Morlat, T.; Girard, T. A.; Fernandes, A. C.; Marques, J. G.; Ramos, A. R.; Auguste, M.; Boyer, D.; Cavaillou, A.; Sudre, C.; Poupeney, J.; Payne, R. F.; Miley, H. S.; Puibasset, J.

    2010-11-19

    We report results of a 14.1 kg d measurement with 15 superheated droplet detectors of total active mass 0.208 kg, comprising the first stage of a 30 kg d Phase II experiment. In combination with the results of the neutron-spin sensitive XENON10 experiment, these results yield a limit of |a{sub p}|<0.32 for M{sub W}=50 GeV/c{sup 2} on the spin-dependent sector of weakly interacting massive particle-nucleus interactions with a 50% reduction in the previously allowed region of the phase space, formerly defined by XENON, KIMS, and PICASSO. In the spin-independent sector, a limit of 2.3x10{sup -5} pb at M{sub W}=45 GeV/c{sup 2} is obtained.

  15. Standards Improvement Project-Phase II. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2005-01-05

    The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) through this final rule is continuing to remove and revise provisions of its standards that are outdated, duplicative, unnecessary, or inconsistent, or can be clarified or simplified by being written in plain language. The Agency completed Phase I of the Standards Improvement Project in June 1998. In this Phase II of the Standards Improvement Project, OSHA is again revising or removing a number of health provisions in its standards for general industry, shipyard employment, and construction. The Agency believes that the changes streamline and make more consistent the regulatory requirements in OSHA health and safety standards. In some cases, OSHA has made substantive revisions to requirements because they are outdated, duplicative, unnecessary, or inconsistent with more recently promulgated health standards. The Agency believes these revisions will reduce regulatory requirements for employers without reducing employee protection.

  16. Identification of 14 quercetin phase II mono- and mixed conjugates and their formation by rat and human phase II in vitro model systems.

    PubMed

    van der Woude, Hester; Boersma, Marelle G; Vervoort, Jacques; Rietjens, Ivonne M C M

    2004-11-01

    In this study, the HPLC, UV-vis, LC-MS, and 1H NMR characteristics of 14 different phase II mono- and mixed conjugates of quercetin were determined, providing a useful tool in the identification of quercetin phase II metabolite patterns in various biological systems. Using these data, the phase II metabolism of quercetin by different rat and human liver and intestine in vitro models, including cell lines, S9 samples, and hepatocytes, was investigated. A comparison of quercetin phase II metabolism between rat and human liver and intestinal cell lines, S9, and hepatocytes showed considerable variation in the nature and ratios of quercetin conjugate formation. It could be established that the intestine contributes significantly to the phase II metabolism of quercetin, especially to its sulfation, that organ-dependent phase II metabolism in rat and man differ significantly, and that human interindividual variation is higher for quercetin sulfation than for glucuronidation or methylation. Furthermore, quercetin conjugation by different in vitro models from corresponding origins may differ significantly. The identification of the various mono- and mixed quercetin phase II conjugates revealed significant differences in phase II conjugation by a variety of in vitro models and led to the conclusion that none of the in vitro models converted quercetin to a phase II metabolite mixture similar to the in vivo plasma metabolite pattern of quercetin. Altogether, the identification of a wide range of phase II metabolites of quercetin as presented in this study allows the determination of quercetin phase II biotransformation patterns and opens the way for a better-funded assessment of the biological activity of quercetin in a variety of biological systems.

  17. Er:YAG clinical results on hard tissue: phase II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cozean, Colette D.; Powell, G. L.

    1998-04-01

    Objective: In Phase I, we demonstrated the safety and efficacy of the pulsed 2.94 micron Er:YAG laser for caries removal, cavity preparation and laser etching utilizing in vivo teeth scheduled for removal to quantitatively verify the safety of the product for up to one year following treatment. Phase II was a continuation of this study evaluating in vivo teeth to verify the safety and efficacy of the Er:YAG in a long-term follow-up study. Methods: We randomly divided the patients into two groups: a laser group and a control group, which employed the high speed drill. The investigators rated clinical efficacy by several criteria, evaluated pain and measured pulpal vitality up to two years following treatment. This phase consisted of 512 procedures that made up the laser group and 357 procedures that made up the control group. Conclusions: The results from this phase showed that the Er:YAG laser was able to perform as well as, if not better than, the drill in caries removal, cavity preparation, and acid etching alone. Use of the laser virtually eliminated the need for anesthesia. The Er:YAG laser is safe and efficacious for removal of caries, cavity preparation and etching prior to acid etching.

  18. Phase I Report, US DOE GRED II Program

    SciTech Connect

    Fairbank Engineering Ltd.

    2003-04-23

    Noramex Corporation Inc, a Nevada company, owns a 100% interest in geothermal leases at the Blue Mountain Geothermal Area, Humboldt County, Nevada. The company is exploring the site for a geothermal resource suitable for development for electric power generation or In the spring of 2002, Noramex drilled the first geothermal observation hole at Blue Mountain, under a cost-share program with the U.S Department of Energy (DOE), under the DOE's Geothermal Exploration and Resource Definition (GRED) program, (Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC04-00AL66972). DEEP BLUE No.1 was drilled to a total depth of 672.1 meters (2205 feet) and recorded a maximum temperature of 144.7 C (292.5 F). Noramex Corporation will now drill a second slim geothermal observation test hole at Blue Mountain, designated DEEP BLUE No.2. The hole will be drilled under a cost-share program with the DOE, under the DOE's Geothermal Exploration and Resource Definition II (GRED II) program, (Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC04-2002AL68297). This report comprises Phase I of Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC04-2002AL68297 of the GRED II program. The report provides an update on the status of resource confirmation at the Blue Mountain Geothermal Area, incorporating the results from DEEP BLUE No.1, and provides the technical background for a second test hole. The report also outlines the proposed drilling program for slim geothermal observation test hole DEEP BLUE No.2.

  19. Bayesian adaptive phase II screening design for combination trials

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Chunyan; Yuan, Ying; Johnson, Valen E

    2013-01-01

    Background Trials of combination therapies for the treatment of cancer are playing an increasingly important role in the battle against this disease. To more efficiently handle the large number of combination therapies that must be tested, we propose a novel Bayesian phase II adaptive screening design to simultaneously select among possible treatment combinations involving multiple agents. Methods Our design is based on formulating the selection procedure as a Bayesian hypothesis testing problem in which the superiority of each treatment combination is equated to a single hypothesis. During the trial conduct, we use the current values of the posterior probabilities of all hypotheses to adaptively allocate patients to treatment combinations. Results Simulation studies show that the proposed design substantially outperforms the conventional multiarm balanced factorial trial design. The proposed design yields a significantly higher probability for selecting the best treatment while allocating substantially more patients to efficacious treatments. Limitations The proposed design is most appropriate for the trials combining multiple agents and screening out the efficacious combination to be further investigated. Conclusions The proposed Bayesian adaptive phase II screening design substantially outperformed the conventional complete factorial design. Our design allocates more patients to better treatments while providing higher power to identify the best treatment at the end of the trial. PMID:23359875

  20. Mammalian Toxicity of Munitions Compounds. Phase II. Effects of Multiple Doses Part II. 2,4-Dinitrotoluene

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-11-01

    II: Effects of Multiple Doses Part !I: 2,4-T)initrotoiuene I Progres Report No. 3 oNovember 1978 by 3I Cheng-Chun Lee U Hirty V. Ellis, III Jo.,n J...Sciences Division November 1978 vii :. •I~~~~AMMALIAN TOXICITY OF MUNITIONS COMPOUNDS ... ... PHASE IIz Effects of Multiple Doses m . ............... PART...161 xi MAMOMALIAN TOXICITY OF MUNITION COMPOUNDS PHASE II: Effects of Multiple Dones PART II: 2,4

  1. Isac Sc-Linac Phase-II Helium Refrigerator Commissioning and First Operational Experience at Triumf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekachev, I.; Kishi, D.; Laxdal, R. E.

    2010-04-01

    ISAC Phase-II is an upgrade of the radioactive isotope superconducting linear accelerator, SC-linac, at TRIUMF. The Phase-I section of the accelerator, medium-beta, is operational and is cooled with a 600 W helium refrigerator, commissioned in March 2005. An identical refrigerator is being used with the Phase-II segment of the accelerator; which is now under construction. The second refrigerator has been commissioned and tested with the Phase-I section of the linac and is used for Phase-II linac development, including new SC-cavity performance tests. The commissioning of the Phase-II refrigeration system and recent operational experience is presented.

  2. Randomized Phase II Trial of Sulindac for Lung Cancer Chemoprevention

    PubMed Central

    Limburg, Paul J.; Mandrekar, Sumithra J.; Aubry, Marie Christine; Ziegler, Katie L. Allen; Zhang, Jun; Yi, Joanne E.; Henry, Michael; Tazelaar, Henry D.; Lam, Stephen; McWilliams, Annette; Midthun, David E.; Edell, Eric S.; Rickman, Otis B.; Mazzone, Peter; Tockman, Melvyn; Beamis, John F.; Lamb, Carla; Simoff, Michael; Loprinzi, Charles; Szabo, Eva; Jett, James

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Sulindac represents a promising candidate agent for lung cancer chemoprevention, but clinical trial data have not been previously reported. We conducted a randomized, phase II chemoprevention trial involving current or former cigarette smokers (≥ 30 pack-years) utilizing the multi-center, inter-disciplinary infrastructure of the Cancer Prevention Network (CPN). Methods At least 1 bronchial dysplastic lesion identified by fluorescence bronchoscopy was required for randomization. Intervention assignments were sulindac 150 mg bid or an identical placebo bid for six months. Trial endpoints included changes in histologic grade of dysplasia (per-participant as primary endpoint and per lesion as secondary endpoint), number of dysplastic lesions (per-participant), and Ki67 labeling index. Results Slower than anticipated recruitment led to trial closure after randomizing participants (n = 31 and n = 30 in the sulindac and placebo arms, respectively). Pre- and post-intervention fluorescence bronchoscopy data were available for 53/61 (87%) randomized, eligible participants. The median (range) of dysplastic lesions at baseline was 2 (1-12) in the sulindac arm and 2 (1-7) in the placebo arm. Change in dysplasia was categorized as regression:stable:progression for 15:3:8 (58%:12%:31%) subjects in the sulindac arm and 15:2:10 (56%:7%:37%) subjects in the placebo arm; these distributions were not statistically different (p=0.85). Median Ki67 expression (% cells stained positive) was significantly reduced in both the placebo (30 versus 5; p = 0.0005) and sulindac (30 versus 10; p = 0.0003) arms, but the difference between arms was not statistically significant (p = 0.92). Conclusions Data from this multi-center, phase II squamous cell lung cancer chemoprevention trial do not demonstrate sufficient benefits from sulindac 150 mg bid for 6 months to warrant additional phase III testing. Investigation of pathway-focused agents is necessary for lung cancer chemoprevention

  3. Randomized phase II trial of sulindac for lung cancer chemoprevention.

    PubMed

    Limburg, Paul J; Mandrekar, Sumithra J; Aubry, Marie Christine; Ziegler, Katie L Allen; Zhang, Jun; Yi, Joanne E; Henry, Michael; Tazelaar, Henry D; Lam, Stephen; McWilliams, Annette; Midthun, David E; Edell, Eric S; Rickman, Otis B; Mazzone, Peter; Tockman, Melvyn; Beamis, John F; Lamb, Carla; Simoff, Michael; Loprinzi, Charles; Szabo, Eva; Jett, James

    2013-03-01

    Sulindac represents a promising candidate agent for lung cancer chemoprevention, but clinical trial data have not been previously reported. We conducted a randomized, phase II chemoprevention trial involving current or former cigarette smokers (≥30 pack-years) utilizing the multi-center, inter-disciplinary infrastructure of the Cancer Prevention Network (CPN). At least 1 bronchial dysplastic lesion identified by fluorescence bronchoscopy was required for randomization. Intervention assignments were sulindac 150mg bid or an identical placebo bid for 6 months. Trial endpoints included changes in histologic grade of dysplasia (per-participant as primary endpoint and per lesion as secondary endpoint), number of dysplastic lesions (per-participant), and Ki67 labeling index. Slower than anticipated recruitment led to trial closure after randomizing participants (n=31 and n=30 in the sulindac and placebo arms, respectively). Pre- and post-intervention fluorescence bronchoscopy data were available for 53/61 (87%) randomized, eligible participants. The median (range) of dysplastic lesions at baseline was 2 (1-12) in the sulindac arm and 2 (1-7) in the placebo arm. Change in dysplasia was categorized as regression:stable:progression for 15:3:8 (58%:12%:31%) subjects in the sulindac arm and 15:2:10 (56%:7%:37%) subjects in the placebo arm; these distributions were not statistically different (p=0.85). Median Ki67 expression (% cells stained positive) was significantly reduced in both the placebo (30 versus 5; p=0.0005) and sulindac (30 versus 10; p=0.0003) arms, but the difference between arms was not statistically significant (p=0.92). Data from this multi-center, phase II squamous cell lung cancer chemoprevention trial do not demonstrate sufficient benefits from sulindac 150mg bid for 6 months to warrant additional phase III testing. Investigation of pathway-focused agents is necessary for lung cancer chemoprevention. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights

  4. Ghrelin Protects against Renal Damages Induced by Angiotensin-II via an Antioxidative Stress Mechanism in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Fujimura, Keiko; Wakino, Shu; Minakuchi, Hitoshi; Hasegawa, Kazuhiro; Hosoya, Koji; Komatsu, Motoaki; Kaneko, Yuka; Shinozuka, Keisuke; Washida, Naoki; Kanda, Takeshi; Tokuyama, Hirobumi; Hayashi, Koichi; Itoh, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    We explored the renal protective effects by a gut peptide, Ghrelin. Daily peritoneal injection with Ghrelin ameliorated renal damages in continuously angiotensin II (AngII)-infused C57BL/6 mice as assessed by urinary excretion of protein and renal tubular markers. AngII-induced increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels and senescent changes were attenuated by Ghrelin. Ghrelin also inhibited AngII-induced upregulations of transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), ameliorating renal fibrotic changes. These effects were accompanied by concomitant increase in mitochondria uncoupling protein, UCP2 as well as in a key regulator of mitochondria biosynthesis, PGC1α. In renal proximal cell line, HK-2 cells, Ghrelin reduced mitochondria membrane potential and mitochondria-derived ROS. The transfection of UCP2 siRNA abolished the decrease in mitochondria-derived ROS by Ghrelin. Ghrelin ameliorated AngII-induced renal tubular cell senescent changes and AngII-induced TGF-β and PAI-1 expressions. Finally, Ghrelin receptor, growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHSR)-null mice exhibited an increase in tubular damages, renal ROS levels, renal senescent changes and fibrosis complicated with renal dysfunction. GHSR-null mice harbored elongated mitochondria in the proximal tubules. In conclusion, Ghrelin suppressed AngII-induced renal damages through its UCP2 dependent anti-oxidative stress effect and mitochondria maintenance. Ghrelin/GHSR pathway played an important role in the maintenance of ROS levels in the kidney. PMID:24747517

  5. Synergism between soluble and dietary fiber bound antioxidants.

    PubMed

    Çelik, Ecem Evrim; Gökmen, Vural; Skibsted, Leif H

    2015-03-04

    This study investigates the synergism between antioxidants bound to dietary fibers (DF) of grains and soluble antioxidants of highly consumed beverages or their pure antioxidants. The interaction between insoluble fractions of grains containing bound antioxidants and soluble antioxidants was investigated using (i) a liposome-based system by measuring the lag phase before the onset of oxidation and (ii) an ESR-based system by measuring the reduction percentage of Fremy's salt radical. In both procedures, antioxidant capacities of DF-bound and soluble antioxidants were measured as well as their combinations, which were prepared at different ratios. The simple addition effects of DF-bound and soluble antioxidants were compared with measured values. The results revealed a clear synergism for almost all combinations in both liposome- and ESR-based systems. The synergism observed in DF-bound-soluble antioxidant system paints a promising picture considering the role of fiber in human gastrointestinal (GI) tract health.

  6. Effect of Carbon Ion Radiotherapy for Sacral Chordoma: Results of Phase I-II and Phase II Clinical Trials

    SciTech Connect

    Imai, Reiko; Kamada, Tadashi; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Sugawara, Shinji; Serizawa, Itsuko; Tsujii, Hirohiko; Tatezaki, Shin-ichiro

    2010-08-01

    Purpose: To summarize the results of treatment for sacral chordoma in Phase I-II and Phase II carbon ion radiotherapy trials for bone and soft-tissue sarcomas. Patients and Methods: We performed a retrospective analysis of 38 patients with medically unresectable sacral chordomas treated with the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba, Japan between 1996 and 2003. Of the 38 patients, 30 had not received previous treatment and 8 had locally recurrent tumor after previous resection. The applied carbon ion dose was 52.8-73.6 Gray equivalents (median, 70.4) in a total of 16 fixed fractions within 4 weeks. Results: The median patient age was 66 years. The cranial tumor extension was S2 or greater in 31 patients. The median clinical target volume was 523 cm{sup 3}. The median follow-up period was 80 months. The 5-year overall survival rate was 86%, and the 5-year local control rate was 89%. After treatment, 27 of 30 patients with primary tumor remained ambulatory with or without supportive devices. Two patients experienced severe skin or soft-tissue complications requiring skin grafts. Conclusion: Carbon ion radiotherapy appears effective and safe in the treatment of patients with sacral chordoma and offers a promising alternative to surgery.

  7. Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM) Phase II Demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Freshley, M.; Hubbard, S.; Flach, G.; Freedman, V.; Agarwal, D.; Andre, B.; Bott, Y.; Chen, X.; Davis, J.; Faybishenko, B.; Gorton, I.; Murray, C.; Moulton, D.; Meyer, J.; Rockhold, M.; Shoshani, A.; Steefel, C.; Wainwright, H.; Waichler, S.

    2012-09-28

    quality assurance. The Platform and HPC capabilities are being tested and evaluated for EM applications through a suite of demonstrations being conducted by the Site Applications Thrust. In 2010, the Phase I Demonstration focused on testing initial ASCEM capabilities. The Phase II Demonstration, completed in September 2012, focused on showcasing integrated ASCEM capabilities. For Phase II, the Hanford Site Deep Vadose Zone (BC Cribs) served as an application site for an end-to-end demonstration of ASCEM capabilities on a site with relatively sparse data, with emphasis on integration and linkages between the Platform and HPC components. Other demonstrations included in this Phase II report included addressing attenuation-based remedies at the Savannah River Site F-Area, to exercise linked ASCEM components under data-dense and complex geochemical conditions, and conducting detailed simulations of a representative waste tank. This report includes descriptive examples developed by the Hanford Site Deep Vadose Zone, the SRS F-Area Attenuation-Based Remedies for the Subsurface, and the Waste Tank Performance Assessment working groups. The integrated Phase II Demonstration provides test cases to accompany distribution of the initial user release (Version 1.0) of the ASCEM software tools to a limited set of users in 2013. These test cases will be expanded with each new release, leading up to the release of a version that is qualified for regulatory applications in the 2015 time frame.

  8. Antioxidation of Cerium Oxide Nanoparticles to Several Series of Oxidative Damage Related to Type II Diabetes Mellitus In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Zhai, Jing-hui; Wu, Yi; Wang, Xiao-ying; Cao, Yue; Xu, Kan; Xu, Li; Guo, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Background It is well known that cerium oxide nanoparticles (CeNPs) have intense antioxidant activity. The antioxidant property of CeNPs are widely used in different areas of research, but little is known about the oxidative damage of Cu2+ associated with Type II diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Material/Methods In our research, the function of CeNPs was tested for its protection of β-cells from the damage of Cu2+ or H2O2. We detected hydroxyl radicals using terephthalic acid assay, hydrogen peroxide using Amplex Ultra Red assay, and cell viability using MTT reduction. Results We found that CeNPs can persistently inhibit Cu2+/H2O2 evoked hydroxyl radicals and hydrogen peroxide in oxidative stress of β-cells. Conclusions CeNPs will be useful in developing strategies for the prevention of T2DM. PMID:27752033

  9. PHASE II VAULT TESTING OF THE ARGONNE RFID SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Willoner, T.; Turlington, R.; Koenig, R.

    2012-06-25

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) (Environmental Management [EM], Office of Packaging and Transportation [EM-45]) Packaging and Certification Program (DOE PCP) has developed a Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) tracking and monitoring system, called ARG-US, for the management of nuclear materials packages during transportation and storage. The performance of the ARG-US RFID equipment and system has been fully tested in two demonstration projects in April 2008 and August 2009. With the strong support of DOE-SR and DOE PCP, a field testing program was completed in Savannah River Site's K-Area Material Storage (KAMS) Facility, an active Category I Plutonium Storage Facility, in 2010. As the next step (Phase II) of continued vault testing for the ARG-US system, the Savannah River Site K Area Material Storage facility has placed the ARG-US RFIDs into the 910B storage vault for operational testing. This latest version (Mark III) of the Argonne RFID system now has the capability to measure radiation dose and dose rate. This paper will report field testing progress of the ARG-US RFID equipment in KAMS, the operability and reliability trend results associated with the applications of the system, and discuss the potential benefits in enhancing safety, security and materials accountability. The purpose of this Phase II K Area test is to verify the accuracy of the radiation monitoring and proper functionality of the ARG-US RFID equipment and system under a realistic environment in the KAMS facility. Deploying the ARG-US RFID system leads to a reduced need for manned surveillance and increased inventory periods by providing real-time access to status and event history traceability, including environmental condition monitoring and radiation monitoring. The successful completion of the testing program will provide field data to support a future development and testing. This will increase Operation efficiency and cost effectiveness for vault operation. As the next step (Phase

  10. DNA interaction, antimicrobial, antioxidant and anticancer studies on Cu(II) complexes of Luotonin A.

    PubMed

    Kesavan, M P; Vinoth Kumar, G G; Dhaveethu Raja, J; Anitha, K; Karthikeyan, S; Rajesh, J

    2017-02-01

    Luotonin A (L), a novel natural cytotoxic and anti-inflammatory alkaloid, chelated with copper(II) to improve its cytotoxic effect against the cancer cells. The complexes [Cu(L)H2OCl]Cl (1) and [Cu(L)2]Cl2 (2) are prepared by using copper(II) chloride and L with ligand/metal molar ratio of 1:1 and 2:1 respectively. A solution of complexes 1 &2 are characterized by physical spectroscopic methods using Ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) spectrophotometer, Fourier Transform-Infra red (FT-IR) spectroscopy, Electron Para magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (EPR) and by electrochemical methods. The interaction of these complexes 1 &2 with calf thymus (CT-DNA) have been investigated by physical methods to propose the modes of DNA binding with the complexes 1 &2. Absorption spectral titration studies of complex 1 with CT-DNA shows a red-shift of 5nm with the DNA binding affinity of Kb, 8.65×10(3)M(-1), but complex 2does not show any red-shift with binding constant Kb, 7.32×10(3)M(-1) reveals that the complex 1 binding with DNA strongly than complex 2 and the binding occurs in between the base pairs of DNA as intercalation. Strong interactions of the two complexes 1 & 2 with CT-DNA have also been confirmed by fluorescence spectral titration studies. The evaluated values of KSV and Kass shows that, the complexes 1 &2 interact with DNA through the intercalation, coincide with other partial intercalators strongly than the free ligand L. Complex 1 exhibits potent antioxidant activity with SC50 value of 23.9±0.69μM is evaluated by DPPH radical scavenging assay and which has potent antimicrobial activity against pathogens than 2 and L. The anticancer activity of L, complexes 1 &2 against human breast cancer cell line (MCF-7) and cervical cancer cell line (HeLa) has also been studied by using fluorescence staining method. The IC50 values of L, complexes 1&2 against MCF-7 and HeLa cell lines with the incubation time intervals of 24hrs are 1 (5.0±0.25, 12.0±0.30μM)<2 (6.5±0.27, 15.0

  11. Lunar Quest in Second Life, Lunar Exploration Island, Phase II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ireton, F. M.; Day, B. H.; Mitchell, B.; Hsu, B. C.

    2010-12-01

    Linden Lab’s Second Life is a virtual 3D metaverse created by users. At any one time there may be 40,000-50,000 users on line. Users develop a persona and are seen on screen as a human figure or avatar. Avatars move through Second Life by walking, flying, or teleporting. Users form communities or groups of mutual interest such as music, computer graphics, and education. These groups communicate via e-mail, voice, and text within Second Life. Information on downloading the Second Life browser and joining can be found on the Second Life website: www.secondlife.com. This poster details Phase II in the development of Lunar Exploration Island (LEI) located in Second Life. Phase I LEI highlighted NASA’s LRO/LCROSS mission. Avatars enter LEI via teleportation arriving at a hall of flight housing interactive exhibits on the LRO/ LCROSS missions including full size models of the two spacecraft and launch vehicle. Storyboards with information about the missions interpret the exhibits while links to external websites provide further information on the mission, both spacecraft’s instrument suites, and related EPO. Other lunar related activities such as My Moon and NLSI EPO programs. A special exhibit was designed for International Observe the Moon Night activities with links to websites for further information. The sim includes several sites for meetings, a conference stage to host talks, and a screen for viewing NASATV coverage of mission and other televised events. In Phase II exhibits are updated to reflect on-going lunar exploration highlights, discoveries, and future missions. A new section of LEI has been developed to showcase NASA’s Lunar Quest program. A new exhibit hall with Lunar Quest information has been designed and is being populated with Lunar Quest information, spacecraft models (LADEE is in place) and kiosks. A two stage interactive demonstration illustrates lunar phases with static and 3-D stations. As NASA’s Lunar Quest program matures further

  12. Small Business Innovation Research. Abstracts of Phase II awards, 2000

    SciTech Connect

    2000-12-01

    The SBIR program enables DOE to obtain effective, innovative solutions to important problems through the private sector, which has a commercial incentive to pursue the resulting technology and bring it to the marketplace. The growing number of awardees, many of them started in business in response to SBIR solicitations, is becoming a significant resource for the solution of high risk, high technology problems for the Department. As detailed below, this publication describes the technical efforts and commercialization possibilities for SBIR Phase II awards in Fiscal Year (FY) 2000. It is intended for the educated layman, and maybe of particular interest to potential investors who wish to get in on the ground floor of exciting opportunities.

  13. Miniature vibration isolation system for space applications: Phase II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, Jack H.; Ross, James A.; Hadden, Steve; Gonzalez, Mario; Rogers, Zach; Henderson, B. Kyle

    2004-07-01

    In recent years, there has been a significant interest in, and move towards using highly sensitive, precision payloads on space vehicles. In order to perform tasks such as communicating at extremely high data rates between satellites using laser cross-links, or searching for new planets in distant solar systems using sparse aperture optical elements, a satellite bus and its payload must remain relatively motionless. The ability to hold a precision payload steady is complicated by disturbances from reaction wheels, control moment gyroscopes, solar array drives, stepper motors, and other devices. Because every satellite is essentially unique in its construction, isolating or damping unwanted vibrations usually requires a robust system over a wide bandwidth. The disadvantage of these systems is that they typically are not retrofittable and not tunable to changes in payload size or inertias. During the Phase I MVIS program, funded by AFRL and DARPA, a hybrid piezoelectric/D-strut isolator was built and tested to prove its viability for retroffitable insertion into sensitive payload attachments. A second phase of the program, which is jointly funded between AFRL and Honeywell, was started in November of 2002 to build a hexapod and the supporting interface electronics and do a flight demonstration of the technology. The MVIS-II program is a systems-level demonstration of the application of advanced smart materials and structures technology that will enable programmable and retrofittable vibration control of spacecraft precision payloads. This paper describes the simulations, overall test plan and product development status of the overall MVIS-II program as it approaches flight.

  14. Elk velvet antler in rheumatoid arthritis: phase II trial.

    PubMed

    Allen, Marion; Oberle, Kathleen; Grace, Michael; Russell, Anthony

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this phase II clinical trial was to examine safety of elk velvet antler taken concurrently with rheumatoid arthritis medications and to determine efficacy by dose to enable sample size estimation and dose standardization for a larger study. Forty patients with stage II rheumatoid arthritis were randomly assigned to 1 of 4 arms of 10 patients each. One group received placebo and the other 3 groups received 2, 4, or 6 capsules (215 mg) of elk velvet antler with appropriate placebos to total 6 capsules daily. All subjects continued to take their arthritis medications. Outcome variables were reported adverse events and health status. At 1 month, there were no significant differences between groups in number of adverse events or health status. The greatest improvement was in the 6 elk velvet antler group, the least was in the placebo group. Differences were not statistically significant. It was concluded that elk velvet antler can be taken safely in conjunction with a number of rheumatoid arthritis medications and should be studied further to assess efficacy.

  15. Effects of blueberry (Vaccinium ashei) on DNA damage, lipid peroxidation, and phase II enzyme activities in rats.

    PubMed

    Dulebohn, Rachel V; Yi, Weiguang; Srivastava, Anita; Akoh, Casimir C; Krewer, Gerard; Fischer, Joan G

    2008-12-24

    Blueberry extracts have high antioxidant potential and increase phase II enzyme activities in vitro. This study tested the hypothesis that blueberries would reduce DNA damage and lipid peroxidation and increase phase II enzyme activities in vivo. Young, healthy male Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 8 per group) were fed control AIN-93 diets or AIN-93 diets supplemented with blueberries or blueberry extracts for 3 weeks. Diets were supplemented with 10% freeze-dried whole blueberries, blueberry polyphenol extract and sugars to match the 10% blueberry diet, or 1 and 0.2% blueberry flavonoids, which were primarily anthocyanins. Liver and colon mucosa glutathione-S-transferase (GST), quinone reductase, and UDP-glucuronosyltransferase activities in colon mucosa and liver were not significantly increased by freeze-dried whole blueberries or blueberry fractions. Liver GST activity, however, was approximately 25% higher than controls for the freeze-dried whole blueberry, blueberry polyphenol, and 1% flavonoid groups. DNA damage was significantly lower than control only in the liver of animals fed the 1% flavonoid diet. The level of urinary F(2)-isoprostanes, a measure of lipid peroxidation, was unaffected. In summary, in healthy rats, short-term supplementation with freeze-dried whole blueberries, blueberry polyphenols, or blueberry flavonoids did not significantly increase phase II enzyme activities. However, supplementation with 1% blueberry flavonoids did decrease oxidative DNA damage in the liver.

  16. Analysis of SBIR phase I and phase II review results at the National Institutes of Health.

    PubMed

    Vener, K J; Calkins, B M

    1991-09-01

    A cohort of phase I and phase II summary statements for the SBIR grant applications was evaluated to determine the strengths and weaknesses in approved and disapproved applications. An analysis of outcome variables (disapproval or unfunded status) was examined with respect to exposure variables (strengths or shortcomings). Logistic regression models were developed for comparisons to measure the predictive value of shortcomings and strengths to the outcomes. Disapproved phase I results were compared with an earlier 1985 study. Although the magnitude of the frequencies of shortcomings was greater in the present study, the relative rankings within shortcoming class were more alike than different. Also, the frequencies of shortcomings were, with one exception, not significantly different in the two studies. Differences in the summary statement review may have accounted for some differences observed between the 1985 data and results of the present study. Comparisons of Approved/Disapproved and Approved-Unfunded/Funded yielded the following observations. For phase I applicants, a lack of a clearly stated, testable hypothesis, a poorly qualified or described investigative team, and inadequate methodological approaches contributed significantly (in that order) to a rating of disapproval. A critical flaw for phase II proposals was failure to accomplish objectives of the phase I study. Methodological issues also dominate the distinctions in both comparison groups. A clear result of the data presented here and that published previously is that SBIR applicants need continuing assistance to improve the chances of their success. These results should serve as a guide to assist NIH staff as they provide information to prospective applicants focusing on key elements of the application. A continuing review of the SBIR program would be helpful to evaluate the quality of the submitted science.

  17. What Works in Oklahoma Schools: A Comprehensive Needs Assessment of Oklahoma Schools. Phase II State Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marzano Research Laboratory, 2010

    2010-01-01

    Phase II provides a more detailed examination of classroom variables important to achievement in Oklahoma schools. Where Phase I addressed all nine of the Oklahoma essential elements using survey data, Phase II focuses on what occurs in Oklahoma classrooms primarily using data from principal interviews, classroom observations (on-site), and video…

  18. The Development of New Measures of Cognitive Variables in Elementary School Children (Phase II). Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asher, J. William; And Others

    This report covers Phase II of a two-phase project concerned with the development of new measures of cognitive variables in elementary school children. The four tasks undertaken in Phase II were: (1) prepare, revise and describe instruments designed to measure the cognitive variables categorized as concept formation, language development, logical…

  19. Cruciferous vegetable phytochemical sulforaphane affects phase II enzyme expression and activity in rat cardiomyocytes through modulation of Akt signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Leoncini, Emanuela; Malaguti, Marco; Angeloni, Cristina; Motori, Elisa; Fabbri, Daniele; Hrelia, Silvana

    2011-09-01

    The isothiocyanate sulforaphane (SF), abundant in Cruciferous vegetables, is known to induce antioxidant/detoxification enzymes in many cancer cell lines, but studies focused on its cytoprotective action in nontransformed cells are just at the beginning. Since we previously demonstrated that SF elicits cardioprotection through an indirect antioxidative mechanism, the aim of this study was to analyze the signaling pathways through which SF exerts its protective effects. Using cultured rat cardiomyocytes, we investigated the ability of SF to activate Akt/protein kinase B (PKB) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) signaling pathways, which are implicated in cardiac cell survival, and to increase the phosphorylation of Nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) and its binding to the antioxidant response element. By means of specific inhibitors, we demonstrated that the Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt pathway represents a mechanism through which SF influences both expression and activity of glutathione reductase, glutathione-S-transferase, thioredoxin reductase, and NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase-1, analyzed by western immunoblotting and spectrophotometric assay, respectively, and modulates Nrf2 binding and phosphorylation resulting in a cytoprotective action against oxidative damage. Results of this study confirm the importance of phase II enzymes modulation as cytoprotective mechanism and support the nutritional assumption of Cruciferous vegetables as source of nutraceutical cardioprotective agents. © 2011 Institute of Food Technologists®

  20. Parallel induction of heme oxygenase-1 and chemoprotective phase 2 enzymes by electrophiles and antioxidants: regulation by upstream antioxidant-responsive elements (ARE).

    PubMed Central

    Prestera, T.; Talalay, P.; Alam, J.; Ahn, Y. I.; Lee, P. J.; Choi, A. M.

    1995-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Heme oxygenase (HO; EC 1.14.99.3) catalyzes the conversion of heme to biliverdin, which is reduced enzymatically to bilirubin. Since bilirubin is a potent antioxidant and heme a pro-oxidant, HO may protect cells against oxidative damage. HO-1 is highly inducible by diverse chemical agents, resembling those evoking induction of phase 2 enzymes (i.e., Michael reaction acceptors, heavy metals, trivalent arsenicals, and sulfhydryl reagents). Phase 2 enzymes (glutathione transferases; NAD (P)H:quinone reductase; glucuronosyltransferases) are regulated by antioxidant-responsive elements (ARE), and their induction protects against chemical carcinogenesis. Is HO-1 regulated by chemical agents and enhancer elements similar to those controlling phase 2 enzymes? MATERIALS AND METHODS: Induction of HO-1 by phorbol ester and heavy metals is transcriptionally controlled through a 268-bp SX2 fragment, containing two phorbol ester-responsive (TRE) sites (TGAC/GT C/AA) which overlap ARE consensus sequences (TGACNNNGC). Therefore, mutations of the SX2 element designed to distinguish ARE from TRE were inserted into chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) reporter plasmids, and the response of the CAT activity of murine hepatoma cells stably transfected with these constructs was examined with a wide range of inducers of phase 2 enzymes. RESULTS: All compounds raised HO-1 mRNA and CAT expression constructs containing wild-type SX2. When the SX2 region was mutated to alter TRE consensus sequences without destroying the ARE consensus, full inducibility was preserved. Conversely, when the ARE consensus was disturbed, inducibility was abolished. CONCLUSION: Induction of heme oxygenase-1 is regulated by several chemically distinct classes of inducers (mostly electrophiles), which also induce phase 2 enzymes, and these inductions are mediated by similar AREs. These findings support the importance of HO-1 as a protector against oxidative damage and suggest that HO-1 induction is

  1. Easier Phase IIs: Recent Improvements to the Gemini User Tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Bryan; Nuñez, A.

    2013-01-01

    During 2011 and 2012 Gemini Observatory undertook a significant project to improve the software tools used by investigators to propose for and prepare observations. The main goal was to make the definition of observation details (the Phase II process) easier and faster. The main initiatives included rewriting the observing proposal tool (Phase I Tool) and making several major improvements to the Observing Tool, including automatic settings for arc and flat exposures, automatic guide star selection for all instruments and wavefront sensors, and more complete initial template observations with capabilities for simultaneous editing of many observations. This poster explains these major changes as well as outlines future development plans. The Gemini Observatory is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under a cooperative agreement with the NSF on behalf of the Gemini partnership: the National Science Foundation (United States), the Science and Technology Facilities Council (United Kingdom), the National Research Council (Canada), CONICYT (Chile), the Australian Research Council (Australia), Ministério da Ciência, Tecnologia e Inovação (Brazil), and Ministerio de Ciencia, Tecnología e Innovación Productiva (Argentina).

  2. Overview of SBIR Phase II Work on Hollow Graphite Fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stallcup, Michael; Brantley, Lott W. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Ultra-Lightweight materials are enabling for producing space based optical components and support structures. Heretofore, innovative designs using existing materials has been the approach to produce lighter-weight optical systems. Graphite fiber reinforced composites, because of their light weight, have been a material of frequent choice to produce space based optical components. Hollow graphite fibers would be lighter than standard solid graphite fibers and, thus, would save weight in optical components. The Phase I SBIR program demonstrated it is possible to produce hollow carbon fibers that have strengths up to 4.2 GPa which are equivalent to commercial fibers, and composites made from the hollow fibers had substantially equivalent composite strengths as commercial fiber composites at a 46% weight savings. The Phase II SBIR program will optimize processing and properties of the hollow carbon fiber and scale-up processing to produce sufficient fiber for fabricating a large ultra-lightweight mirror for delivery to NASA. Information presented here includes an overview of the strength of some preliminary hollow fibers, photographs of those fibers, and a short discussion of future plans.

  3. Overview of SBIR Phase II Work on Hollow Graphite Fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stallcup, Michael; Brantley, Lott W. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Ultra-Lightweight materials are enabling for producing space based optical components and support structures. Heretofore, innovative designs using existing materials has been the approach to produce lighter-weight optical systems. Graphite fiber reinforced composites, because of their light weight, have been a material of frequent choice to produce space based optical components. Hollow graphite fibers would be lighter than standard solid graphite fibers and, thus, would save weight in optical components. The Phase I SBIR program demonstrated it is possible to produce hollow carbon fibers that have strengths up to 4.2 GPa which are equivalent to commercial fibers, and composites made from the hollow fibers had substantially equivalent composite strengths as commercial fiber composites at a 46% weight savings. The Phase II SBIR program will optimize processing and properties of the hollow carbon fiber and scale-up processing to produce sufficient fiber for fabricating a large ultra-lightweight mirror for delivery to NASA. Information presented here includes an overview of the strength of some preliminary hollow fibers, photographs of those fibers, and a short discussion of future plans.

  4. Rooftop PV system. Final technical progress report, Phase II

    SciTech Connect

    1995-08-01

    Under this four-year PV:BONUS Program, ECD and United Solar are developing and demonstrating two new lightweight flexible building integrated Photovoltaic (BIPV) modules specifically designed as exact replacements for conventional asphalt shingles and standing seam metal roofing. These modules can be economically and aesthetically integrated into new residential and commercial buildings, and address the even larger roofing replacement market. The modules are designed to be installed by roofing contractors without special training which minimizes the installation and balance of system costs. The modules will be fabricated from high-efficiency, multiple-junction a-Si alloy solar cells developed by ECD and United Solar. Under the Phase I Program, which ended in March 1994, we developed two different concept designs for rooftop PV modules: (1) the United Solar overlapping (asphalt shingle replacement) shingle-type modules and (2) the ECD metal roof-type modules. We also developed a plan for fabricating, testing and demonstrating these modules. Candidate demonstration sites for our rooftop PV modules were identified and preliminary engineering designs for these demonstrations were developed; a marketing study plan was also developed. The major objectives of the Phase II Program, which started in June 1994 was (1) to develop, test, and qualify these new rooftop modules; (2) to develop mechanical and electrical engineering specifications for the demonstration projects; and (3) to develop a marketing/commercialization plan.

  5. Phase II drugs under investigation for allergic conjunctivitis.

    PubMed

    Baiula, Monica; Spampinato, Santi

    2014-12-01

    Ocular allergies comprise a spectrum of conditions that are underreported and underdiagnosed, and are frequently associated with rhinoconjunctivitis. Although allergic conjunctivitis is often not a sight-threatening condition, it could have a significant impact on a person's quality of life, morbidity and productivity. A variety of agents are available for the treatment of allergic conjunctivitis, including antihistamines, mast-cell stabilizers, dual action agents, glucocorticoids, calcineurin inhibitors and immunotherapy. The goal of this review is to investigate new therapeutic strategies for the treatment of ocular allergy. Within, the authors analyze the pharmacological management of allergic conjunctivitis and highlight Phase II clinical trial studies. Recent findings about the pathophysiology of allergic conjunctivitis have enabled us to gain a better understanding of the molecular and cellular mechanisms of ocular disease. This, in turn, has led to the identification of novel targets, which, in turn, has led to the development of new therapeutic agents that are currently under evaluation in the first phases of clinical development. The most interesting agents, under development, are the new topical glucocorticoids, leukotriene receptor antagonists, resolvins, interleukin-1 receptor antagonists and integrin antagonists. The authors now await promising results, which can confirm the therapeutic value of these novel emerging drugs for treating allergic conjunctivitis.

  6. Alternate Reductant Cold Cap Evaluation Furnace Phase II Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, F. C.; Stone, M. E.; Miller, D. H.

    2014-09-03

    Savannah River Remediation (SRR) conducted a Systems Engineering Evaluation (SEE) to determine the optimum alternate reductant flowsheet for the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). Specifically, two proposed flowsheets (nitric–formic–glycolic and nitric–formic–sugar) were evaluated based upon results from preliminary testing. Comparison of the two flowsheets among evaluation criteria indicated a preference towards the nitric–formic–glycolic flowsheet. Further research and development of this flowsheet eliminated the formic acid, and as a result, the nitric–glycolic flowsheet was recommended for further testing. Based on the development of a roadmap for the nitric–glycolic acid flowsheet, Waste Solidification Engineering (WS-E) issued a Technical Task Request (TTR) to address flammability issues that may impact the implementation of this flowsheet. Melter testing was requested in order to define the DWPF flammability envelope for the nitric-glycolic acid flowsheet. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) Cold Cap Evaluation Furnace (CEF), a 1/12th scale DWPF melter, was selected by the SRR Alternate Reductant project team as the melter platform for this testing. The overall scope was divided into the following sub-tasks as discussed in the Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP): Phase I - A nitric–formic acid flowsheet melter test (unbubbled) to baseline the CEF cold cap and vapor space data to the benchmark melter flammability models; Phase II - A nitric–glycolic acid flowsheet melter test (unbubbled and bubbled) to: Define new cold cap reactions and global kinetic parameters in support of the melter flammability model development; Quantify off-gas surging potential of the feed; Characterize off-gas condensate for complete organic and inorganic carbon species. After charging the CEF with cullet from Phase I CEF testing, the melter was slurry-fed with glycolic flowsheet based SB6-Frit 418 melter feed at 36% waste

  7. Flavonoids from Heliotropium subulatum exudate and their evaluation for antioxidant, antineoplastic and cytotoxic activities II.

    PubMed

    Singh, Bharat; Sahu, Pooran M; Sharma, Ram A

    2017-02-01

    The flavonoids are the largest group of phenolic compounds isolated from a wide range of higher plants. These compounds work as antimicrobials, anti-insect agents and protect plants from other types of biotic and abiotic stresses. Various researchers have suggested that flavonoids possessed antioxidant, antineoplastic and cytotoxic activities. The main objective of this study was to test dichloromethane fraction of resinous exudate of Heliotropium subulatum for their antioxidant, antineoplastic and cytotoxic activities, as well as to search new antioxidant and antineoplastic agents for pharmaceutical formulations. Five flavonoids were isolated from resinous exudate of this plant species and screened for their in vitro and in vivo antioxidant models (DPPH radical scavenging, reducing power, superoxide anion scavenging, metal chelating scavenging systems, catalase and lipid peroxidation), antineoplastic (Sarcoma 180), and cytotoxic (Chinese hamster V79 cells) activities. Tricetin demonstrated maximum antioxidant activity against both in vitro and in vivo experimental systems while galangin exhibited maximum inhibition (78.35%) at a dose of 10 µg/kg/day against Sarcoma 180. Similarly, it was found that galangin also showed highest activity (21.1 ± 0.15%) at a concentration of 70 µg/ml to Chinese hamster V79 cells. The observed results suggest that tricetin has a potential to scavenge free radicals in both in vitro and in vivo models while the galangin could be considered as antitumor and cytotoxic agent.

  8. MHD seed recovery and regeneration, Phase II. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-10-01

    This final report summarizes the work performed by the Space and Technology Division of the TRW Space and Electronics Group for the U.S. Department of Energy, Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center for the Econoseed process. This process involves the economical recovery and regeneration of potassium seed used in the MHD channel. The contract period of performance extended from 1987 through 1994 and was divided into two phases. The Phase II test results are the subject of this Final Report. However, the Phase I test results are presented in summary form in Section 2.3 of this Final Report. The Econoseed process involves the treatment of the potassium sulfate in spent MHD seed with an aqueous calcium formate solution in a continuously stirred reactor system to solubilize, as potassium formate, the potassium content of the seed and to precipitate and recover the sulfate as calcium sulfate. The slurry product from this reaction is centrifuged to separate the calcium sulfate and insoluble seed constituents from the potassium formate solution. The dilute solids-free potassium formate solution is then concentrated in an evaporator. The concentrated potassium formate product is a liquid which can be recycled as a spray into the MHD channel. Calcium formate is the seed regenerant used in the Econoseed process. Since calcium formate is produced in the United States in relatively small quantities, a new route to the continuous production of large quantities of calcium formate needed to support an MHD power industry was investigated. This route involves the reaction of carbon monoxide gas with lime solids in an aqueous medium.

  9. Preparation, Identification and Antioxidant Properties of Black-Bone Silky Fowl (Gallus gallus domesticus Brisson) Iron(II)-Oligopeptide Chelate.

    PubMed

    Pan, Huanglei; Song, Shasha; Ma, Qiuyue; Wei, Hui; Ren, Difeng; Lu, Jun

    2016-06-01

    Black-bone silky fowl iron(II)-oligopeptide chelate was synthesized from iron(II) solution and the black-bone silky fowl oligopeptide, which was extracted from the muscle protein of black-bone silky fowl (Gallus gallus domesticus Brisson). Orthogonal array analysis was used to determine the optimal conditions for the iron(II)-oligopeptide chelate preparation. Ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) spectroscopy, electron microscopy, and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy were used to identify the structure of iron(II)-oligopeptide chelate. 2-Diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) and superoxide radical scavenging assays were performed to compare the antioxidant abilities of the black-bone silky fowl oligopeptide and iron(II)-oligopeptide chelate. The optimal conditions for iron(II)-oligopeptide chelate preparation were 4% of the black-bone silky fowl oligopeptide and a ratio of the black- -bone silky fowl oligopeptide to FeCl2·4H2O of 5:1 at pH=4. Under these conditions, the chelation rate was (84.9±0.2) % (p<0.05), and the chelation yield was (40.3±0.1) % (p<0.05). The structures detected with UV-Vis spectroscopy, electron microscopy and FTIR spectra changed significantly after chelation, suggesting that Fe(II) ions formed coordinate bonds with carboxylate (-RCOOŻ) and amino (-NH2) groups in the oligopeptides, confirming that this is a new oligopeptide-iron chelate. The iron(II)-oligopeptide chelate had stronger scavenging activity towards DPPH and superoxide radicals than did the black-bone silky fowl oligopeptide.

  10. Preparation, Identification and Antioxidant Properties of Black-Bone Silky Fowl (Gallus gallus domesticus Brisson) Iron(II)-Oligopeptide Chelate

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Huanglei; Song, Shasha; Ma, Qiuyue; Wei, Hui; Ren, Difeng; Lu, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Summary Black-bone silky fowl iron(II)-oligopeptide chelate was synthesized from iron(II) solution and the black-bone silky fowl oligopeptide, which was extracted from the muscle protein of black-bone silky fowl (Gallus gallus domesticus Brisson). Orthogonal array analysis was used to determine the optimal conditions for the iron(II)-oligopeptide chelate preparation. Ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) spectroscopy, electron microscopy, and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy were used to identify the structure of iron(II)-oligopeptide chelate. 2-Diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) and superoxide radical scavenging assays were performed to compare the antioxidant abilities of the black-bone silky fowl oligopeptide and iron(II)-oligopeptide chelate. The optimal conditions for iron(II)-oligopeptide chelate preparation were 4% of the black-bone silky fowl oligopeptide and a ratio of the black- -bone silky fowl oligopeptide to FeCl2·4H2O of 5:1 at pH=4. Under these conditions, the chelation rate was (84.9±0.2) % (p<0.05), and the chelation yield was (40.3±0.1) % (p<0.05). The structures detected with UV-Vis spectroscopy, electron microscopy and FTIR spectra changed significantly after chelation, suggesting that Fe(II) ions formed coordinate bonds with carboxylate (-RCOOŻ) and amino (-NH2) groups in the oligopeptides, confirming that this is a new oligopeptide-iron chelate. The iron(II)-oligopeptide chelate had stronger scavenging activity towards DPPH and superoxide radicals than did the black-bone silky fowl oligopeptide. PMID:27904406

  11. Investigational drugs in phase I and phase II clinical trials for thalassemia.

    PubMed

    Motta, Irene; Scaramellini, Natalia; Cappellini, Maria Domenica

    2017-07-01

    Regular transfusion and iron chelation are the current treatment of severe forms of thalassemia. As a consequence of this demanding supportive treatment, there are several unmet therapeutic needs. Due to a deeper understanding in the pathophysiology of thalassemia, new therapeutic strategies have been developed that are now in pre-clinical and clinical trials. Areas covered: Activin receptor ligand traps (luspatercept and sotatercept), drugs targeting ineffective erythropoiesis, showed encouraging results in Phase I and II clinical trials. A phase III clinical trial is currently ongoing. Ruxolitinib, a Jak2 inhibitor, has been tested to limit stress erythropoiesis in a phase II clinical trial. In addition, improvement in iron chelation has been developed. Moreover, several trials of gene therapy are currently active in different countries with different lentiviral vectors. Expert opinion: The most promising molecules are the activin receptor ligand traps. Together with gene therapy these could be an alternative to bone marrow transplant, aiming towards a curative strategy. The main limit to gene therapy seems to be the conditioning regimen, thus an in vivo gene therapy would be more suitable. At pre-clinical level gene editing is showing extremely encouraging results.

  12. Synthesis, antioxidant activities of the nickel(II), iron(III) and oxovanadium(IV) complexes with N2O2 chelating thiosemicarbazones.

    PubMed

    Bal-Demirci, Tülay; Sahin, Musa; Ozyürek, Mustafa; Kondakçı, Esin; Ulküseven, Bahri

    2014-05-21

    The nickel(II), iron(III) and oxovanadium(IV) complexes of the N2O2 chelating thiosemicarbazones were synthesized using 4-hydroxysalicyladehyde-S-methylthiosemicarbazone and R1-substitute-salicylaldehyde (R1: 4-OH, H) in the presence of Ni(II), Fe(III), VO(IV) ions by the template reaction. The structures of the thiosemicarbazone complexes were characterized by FT-IR, (1)H NMR, elemental, ESI-MS and APCI-MS analysis. The synthesized compounds were screened for their antioxidant capacity by using the cupric reducing antioxidant capacity (CUPRAC) method. Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC) of iron(III) complex, 1c, was measured to be higher than that of the other complexes. Other parameters of antioxidant activity (scavenging effects on •OH, O2(•-) and H2O2) of these compounds were also determined. All the compounds have shown encouraging ROS scavenging activities.

  13. Phased Retrofits in Existing Homes in Florida Phase II: Shallow Plus Retrofits

    SciTech Connect

    Sutherland, K.; Parker, D.; Martin, E.; Chasar, D.; Amos, B.

    2016-02-03

    The BAPIRC team and Florida Power and Light (FPL) electric utility pursued a pilot phased energy-efficiency retrofit program in Florida by creating detailed data on the energy and economic performance of two levels of retrofit - simple and deep. For this Phased Deep Retrofit (PDR) project, a total of 56 homes spread across the utility partner's territory in east central Florida, southeast Florida, and southwest Florida were instrumented between August 2012 and January 2013, and received simple pass-through retrofit measures during the period of March 2013 - June 2013. Ten of these homes received a deeper package of retrofits during August 2013 - December 2013. A full account of Phase I of this project, including detailed home details and characterization, is found in Parker et al, 2015 (currently in draft). Phase II of this project, which is the focus of this report, applied the following additional retrofit measures to select homes that received a shallow retrofit in Phase I: a) Supplemental mini-split heat pump (MSHP) (6 homes); b) Ducted and space coupled Heat Pump Water Heater (8 homes); c) Exterior insulation finish system (EIFS) (1 homes); d) Window retrofit (3 homes); e) Smart thermostat (21 homes: 19 NESTs; 2 Lyrics); f) Heat pump clothes dryer (8 homes); g) Variable speed pool pump (5 homes).

  14. Phase I and phase II objective response rates are correlated in pediatric cancer trials: an argument for better clinical trial efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, Jonathan C.; Huang, Peng; Cohen, Kenneth J.

    2016-01-01

    While many phase I trials report tumor response, formal analysis of efficacy is deferred to phase II. We reviewed paired phase I and II pediatric oncology trials to ascertain the relationship between phase I and II objective response (OR%). Single-agent phase I trials were paired with corresponding phase II trials (comparable study drug, dosing schedule, and population). Phase I trials without efficacy data or a matching phase II trial were excluded. OR% was tabulated for all trials, and phase II authors' subjective conclusions regarding efficacy were documented. 35 pairs of trials were analyzed. The correlation between phase I and II OR% was 0.93. Between phase II studies with a “positive” conclusion versus a “negative” one, there was a statistically significant difference in mean phase I OR% (32.0% vs. 4.5%, p < 0.001). Thirteen phase II studies were undertaken despite phase I OR% of 0%; only one had a “positive” conclusion, and none exceeded OR% of 15%. Objective response rates are highly correlated between phase I and II pediatric oncology trials. Though not a formal measure of drug efficacy, phase I OR% may provide an estimate of phase II response, inform phase II study design, and should be given greater consideration. PMID:27164535

  15. Antioxidant defence system during exponential and stationary growth phases of Phycomyces blakesleeanus: response to oxidative stress by hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    de Castro, Cristina; del Valle, Pilar; Rúa, Javier; García-Armesto, María Rosario; Gutiérrez-Larraínzar, Marta; Busto, Félix; de Arriaga, Dolores

    2013-04-01

    An analysis of the components of the antioxidant defence system in exponential and stationary growth phases of filamentous fungus Phycomyces blakesleeanus and the response to the oxidative stress hydrogen peroxide were performed. There is a strong positive correlation between mycelial antioxidant capacity and the contents of gallic acid, d-erythroascorbate (d-EAA) or d-erythroascorbate monoglucoside (d-EAAG). These secondary metabolites are specifically synthesized by this fungus and reach maximal values in the stationary growth phase, suggesting that they can play some role in the antioxidant defence system of this fungus. There is a differential expression of the two more notable antioxidant activities, catalase (CAT) and superoxide dismutase (SOD), depending of the growth stage of P. blakesleeanus, CAT being expressed in the exponential and SOD in the stationary phase. Phycomyces blakesleeanus showed a high resistance to the oxidative stress caused by H2O2 (50 and 200 mM) which was higher in exponential phase. This higher resistance can be explained by the presence of CAT, glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and the probable contribution of glutathione-S-transferase (GST) and high levels of reduced form of glutathione (GSH). The transition to stationary phase was accompanied with a higher physiological oxidative damage illustrated by the higher protein carbonylation. In this growth stage the resistance of the fungus to the oxidative stress caused by H2O2 could be explained by the presence of SOD, GPx, and the probable contribution of GST as well as of secondary metabolites, mainly d-EAA and d-EAAG. These results highlight a specific response to oxidative stress by H2O2 depending on the growth phase of P. blakesleeanus.

  16. Mercury Phase II Study - Mercury Behavior in Salt Processing Flowsheet

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, V.; Shah, H.; Bannochie, C. J.; Wilmarth, W. R.

    2016-07-25

    Mercury (Hg) in the Savannah River Site Liquid Waste System (LWS) originated from decades of canyon processing where it was used as a catalyst for dissolving the aluminum cladding of reactor fuel. Approximately 60 metric tons of mercury is currently present throughout the LWS. Mercury has long been a consideration in the LWS, from both hazard and processing perspectives. In February 2015, a Mercury Program Team was established at the request of the Department of Energy to develop a comprehensive action plan for long-term management and removal of mercury. Evaluation was focused in two Phases. Phase I activities assessed the Liquid Waste inventory and chemical processing behavior using a system-by-system review methodology, and determined the speciation of the different mercury forms (Hg+, Hg++, elemental Hg, organomercury, and soluble versus insoluble mercury) within the LWS. Phase II activities are building on the Phase I activities, and results of the LWS flowsheet evaluations will be summarized in three reports: Mercury Behavior in the Salt Processing Flowsheet (i.e. this report); Mercury Behavior in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Flowsheet; and Mercury behavior in the Tank Farm Flowsheet (Evaporator Operations). The evaluation of the mercury behavior in the salt processing flowsheet indicates, inter alia, the following: (1) In the assembled Salt Batches 7, 8 and 9 in Tank 21, the total mercury is mostly soluble with methylmercury (MHg) contributing over 50% of the total mercury. Based on the analyses of samples from 2H Evaporator feed and drop tanks (Tanks 38/43), the source of MHg in Salt Batches 7, 8 and 9 can be attributed to the 2H evaporator concentrate used in assembling the salt batches. The 2H Evaporator is used to evaporate DWPF recycle water. (2) Comparison of data between Tank 21/49, Salt Solution Feed Tank (SSFT), Decontaminated Salt Solution Hold Tank (DSSHT), and Tank 50 samples suggests that the total mercury as well as speciated

  17. NRF2 and the Phase II Response in Acute Stress Resistance Induced by Dietary Restriction

    PubMed Central

    Hine, Christopher M.; Mitchell, James R.

    2013-01-01

    Dietary restriction (DR) as a means to increase longevity is well-established in a number of model organisms from yeast to primates. DR also improves metabolic fitness and increases resistance to acute oxidative, carcinogenic and toxicological stressors - benefits with more immediate potential for clinical translation than increased lifespan. While the detailed mechanism of DR action remains unclear, a conceptual framework involving an adaptive, or hormetic response to the stress of nutrient/energy deprivation has been proposed. A key prediction of the hormesis hypothesis of DR is that beneficial adaptations occur in response to an increase in reactive oxygen/nitrogen species (ROS). These ROS may be derived either from increased mitochondrial respiration or increased xenobiotic metabolism in the case of some DR mimetics. This review will focus on the potential role of the redox-sensing transcription factor NF-E2-related factor 2 (NRF2) and its control of the evolutionarily conserved antioxidant/redox cycling and detoxification systems, collectively known as the Phase II response, in the adaptive response to DR. PMID:23505614

  18. Effect of a misspecification of response rates on type I and type II errors, in a phase II Simon design.

    PubMed

    Baey, Charlotte; Le Deley, Marie-Cécile

    2011-07-01

    Phase-II trials are a key stage in the clinical development of a new treatment. Their main objective is to provide the required information for a go/no-go decision regarding a subsequent phase-III trial. In single arm phase-II trials, widely used in oncology, this decision relies on the comparison of efficacy outcomes observed in the trial to historical controls. The false positive rate generally accepted in phase-II trials, around 10%, contrasts with the very high attrition rate of new compounds tested in phase-III trials, estimated at about 60%. We assumed that this gap could partly be explained by the misspecification of the response rate expected with standard treatment, leading to erroneous hypotheses tested in the phase-II trial. We computed the false positive probability of a defined design under various hypotheses of expected efficacy probability. Similarly we calculated the power of the trial to detect the efficacy of a new compound for different expected efficacy rates. Calculations were done considering a binary outcome, such as the response rate, with a decision rule based on a Simon two-stage design. When analysing a single-arm phase-II trial, based on a design with a pre-specified null hypothesis, a 5% absolute error in the expected response rate leads to a false positive rate of about 30% when it is supposed to be 10%. This inflation of type-I error varies only slightly according to the hypotheses of the initial design. Single-arm phase-II trials poorly control for the false positive rate. Randomised phase-II trials should, therefore, be more often considered.

  19. Photosystem II functionality and antioxidant system changes during leaf rolling in post-stress emerging Ctenanthe setosa exposed to drought.

    PubMed

    Terzi, Rabiye; Saruhan, Neslihan; Sağlam, A; Nar, Hatice; Kadioğlu, A

    2009-12-01

    We studied the changes in antioxidant system and chlorophyll fluorescence parameters in post-stress emerging Ctenanthe setosa (Rosc.) Eichler (Marantaceae) plants (PSE plants) having reduced leaf area under drought stress causing leaf rolling and re-watering. PSE plants were compared to primary stressed plants (PS) in previous studies. The parameters were measured at different visual leaf rolling scores from 1 to 4 (1 is unrolled, 4 is tightly rolled and the others is intermediate form). Water potentials and stomatal conductance of leaves were gradually decreased during leaf rolling. Similarly, maximum quantum efficiency of open PS II center and quantum yield of PS II decreased during the rolling period. Non-photochemical quenching of chlorophyll fluorescence decreased at score 2 then increased while photochemical quenching did not change during leaf rolling. Electron transport rate decreased only at score 4 but approximately reached to score 1 level after re-watering. Superoxide dismutase activity was not constant at all leaf rolling scores. Ascorbate peroxidase, catalase and glutathione reductase activities generally tended to increase during leaf rolling. Lipid peroxidation and H 2 O 2 content increased at score 2 but decreased at the later scores. On the other hand, O 2 .- production increased during the rolling period. After re-watering of the plants having score 4 of leaf rolling, antioxidant enzyme activities were lower than those of score 1. Other physiological parameters also tended to reach the value of score 1. The results indicated that PSE plants gained drought tolerance by reducing leaf area effectively induced their antioxidant systems and protected the photosynthesis under drought stress similar to PS plants.

  20. The role of technology in reducing health care costs. Phase II and phase III.

    SciTech Connect

    Cilke, John F.; Parks, Raymond C.; Funkhouser, Donald Ray; Tebo, Michael A.; Murphy, Martin D.; Hightower, Marion Michael; Gallagher, Linda K.; Craft, Richard Layne, II; Garcia, Rudy John

    2004-04-01

    In Phase I of this project, reported in SAND97-1922, Sandia National Laboratories applied a systems approach to identifying innovative biomedical technologies with the potential to reduce U.S. health care delivery costs while maintaining care quality. The effort provided roadmaps for the development and integration of technology to meet perceived care delivery requirements and an economic analysis model for development of care pathway costs for two conditions: coronary artery disease (CAD) and benign prostatic hypertrophy (BPH). Phases II and III of this project, which are presented in this report, were directed at detailing the parameters of telemedicine that influence care delivery costs and quality. These results were used to identify and field test the communication, interoperability, and security capabilities needed for cost-effective, secure, and reliable health care via telemedicine.

  1. An Overview of 2014 SBIR Phase I and Phase II Materials Structures for Extreme Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Hung D.; Steele, Gynelle C.; Morris, Jessica R.

    2015-01-01

    NASA's Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program focuses on technological innovation by investing in development of innovative concepts and technologies to help NASA mission directorates address critical research needs for Agency programs. This report highlights nine of the innovative SBIR 2014 Phase I and Phase II projects that emphasize one of NASA Glenn Research Center's six core competencies-Materials and Structures for Extreme Environments. The technologies cover a wide spectrum of applications such as high temperature environmental barrier coating systems, deployable space structures, solid oxide fuel cells, and self-lubricating hard coatings for extreme temperatures. Each featured technology describes an innovation, technical objective, and highlights NASA commercial and industrial applications. This report provides an opportunity for NASA engineers, researchers, and program managers to learn how NASA SBIR technologies could help their programs and projects, and lead to collaborations and partnerships between the small SBIR companies and NASA that would benefit both.

  2. Clean Air Act Title IV: Lessons learned from Phase I; getting ready for Phase II

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, M.J.

    1997-12-31

    The 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments have required significant reductions in SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} emissions from fossil fuel-fired power plants in the US. This paper examines some of the key technical lessons learned in Phase I following retrofit of low NO{sub x} systems, FGD systems, and continuous emissions monitors. Some of the key problems encountered have been waterwall wastage as a result of low NO{sub x} burner retrofits; high LOI (carbon) ash as a result of low NO{sub x} operation; high O&M costs associated with CEMs; and the heat rate discrepancy which has arisen between CEMs and conventional heat rate calculations. As Phase II approaches, EPRI and the electric utility industry are investigating improvements in FGD systems (e.g., clear liquor scrubbing), advances in NO{sub x} control technologies, more robust CEM systems, and tools to help in the technology decision-making process.

  3. Characterization of Phase I and Phase II Hepatic Metabolism and Reactive Intermediates of Larrea nitida Cav. and Its Lignan Compounds.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Hyesoo; Kim, Soolin; Lee, Jimin; Park, Jin Young; Zhou, Wenmei; Liu, Xiyuan; Kim, So Dam; Song, Yun Seon; Jang, Chang-Young; Oh, Sei-Ryang; Choi, Sangho; Chang, Minsun

    2017-01-01

    Larrea nitida Cav. (LNC), which belongs to the family Zygophyllaceae, is widely indigenous and used in South America to treat various pathological conditions. It contains the antioxidant and antiinflammatory but toxic nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA) as well as O-methylated metabolite of NDGA (MNDGA) as bioactive compounds. The hepatic metabolism-based toxicological potential of extracts of LNC (LNE), NDGA, and MNDGA has not previously been reported. The present study aimed to characterize the phase I and phase II hepatic metabolism and reactive intermediates of LNE, NDGA, and MNDGA and their effects on the major drug-metabolizing enzymes in vitro and ex vivo. A methanol extract of LNC collected from Chile as well as NDGA and MNDGA isolated from LNE were subjected to metabolic stability assays in liver microsomes in the presence of the cofactors reduced nicotinamide dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) and/or uridine 5'-diphosphoglucuronic acid (UDPGA). Cytochrome P450 (CYP) inhibition assays were performed using CYP isozyme-specific model substrates to examine the inhibitory activities of LNE, NDGA, and MNDGA, which were expressed as % inhibition and IC50 values. Ex vivo CYP induction potential was investigated in the liver microsomes prepared from the rats intraperitoneally administered with LNE. Glutathione (GSH) adduct formation was monitored by LC-MS(3) analysis of the microsomal incubation samples with either NDGA or MNDGA and an excess of GSH to determine the formation of electrophilic reactive intermediates. Both NDGA and MNDGA were stable to NADPH-dependent phase I metabolism, but labile to glucuronide conjugation. LNE, NDGA, and MNDGA showed significant inhibitory effects on CYP1A2, 2C9, 2D6, and/or 3A4, with IC50 values in the micromolar range. LNE was found to be a CYP1A2 inducer in ex vivo rat experiments, and mono- and di-GSH adducts of both NDGA and MNDGA were identified by LC-MS(3) analysis. Our study suggests that hepatic clearance is the major

  4. Characterization of ToxCast Phase II compounds disruption of ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The development of multi-well microelectrode array (mwMEA) systems has increased in vitro screening throughput making them an effective method to screen and prioritize large sets of compounds for potential neurotoxicity. In the present experiments, a multiplexed approach was used to determine compound effects on both neural function and cell health in primary cortical networks grown on mwMEA plates following exposure to ~1100 compounds from EPA’s Phase II ToxCast libraries. On DIV 13, baseline activity (40 min) was recorded prior to exposure to each compound at 40 µM. DMSO and the GABAA antagonist bicuculline (BIC) were included as controls on each mwMEA plate. Changes in spontaneous network activity (mean firing rate; MFR) and cell viability (lactate dehydrogenase; LDH and CellTiter Blue; CTB) were assessed within the same well following compound exposure. Activity calls (“hits”) were established using the 90th and 20th percentiles of the compound-induced change in MFR (medians of triplicates) across all tested compounds; compounds above (top 10% of compounds increasing MFR), and below (bottom 20% of compounds decreasing MFR) these thresholds, respectively were considered hits. MFR was altered beyond one of these thresholds by 322 compounds. Four compound categories accounted for 66% of the hits, including: insecticides (e.g. abamectin, lindane, prallethrin), pharmaceuticals (e.g. haloperidol, reserpine), fungicides (e.g. hexaconazole, fenamidone), and h

  5. The phase II ATLAS Pixel upgrade: the Inner Tracker (ITk)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flick, T.

    2017-01-01

    The entire tracking system of the ATLAS experiment will be replaced during the LHC Phase II shutdown (foreseen to take place around 2025) by an all-silicon detector called the ITk (Inner Tracker). The pixel detector will comprise the five innermost layers, and will be instrumented with new sensor and readout electronics technologies to improve the tracking performance and cope with the HL-LHC environment, which will be severe in terms of occupancy and radiation. Several layout options are being investigated. All of these include a barrel part and ring-shaped supports in the endcap regions. All structures will be based on low mass, highly stable and highly thermally conductive carbon-based materials cooled by evaporative carbon dioxide. Different designs of planar, 3D, and CMOS sensors are being investigated to identify the optimal technology for the different pixel layers. While the RD53 Collaboration is developing the new readout chip, the pixel off-detector readout electronics will be implemented in the framework of the general ATLAS trigger and DAQ system. A readout speed of up to 5 Gbit/s per data link (FE-chip) will be needed in the innermost layers going down to 640 Mbit/s for the outermost. This paper presents an overview of the different components of the ITk and the current status of the developments.

  6. A Neutron Scattering Kernel of Solid Methane in phase II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Yunchang; Snow, William Michael; Liu, Cnen-Yu; Lavelle, Christopher M.; Baxter, David V.

    2008-04-01

    A neutron scattering cross section model of solid methane was studied for the cold neutron moderator of Low Energy Neutron Source (LENS) at IUCF/Indiana University especially in temperature range of 20.4 4K. The analytical scattering kernel was adapted from Ozaki.et al .[1][2] to describe molecular rotation in this temperature range. This model includes a molecular translation and intra-molecular vibration as well as the rotational degree of freedom in effective ways. For more broad applications into monte carlo simulations, neutron scattering libraries for MCNP were produced from the frequency spectrums using NJOY code. We have tested this newly- developed scattering kernels for phase II solid methane by calculating the neutron spectral intensity expected from the methane moderator at the LENS neutron source using MCNP. The predictions are compared to the measured energy spectra. The simulations agree with the measurement data at both temperatures. The simulation results show good agreement with measurement data in different temperatures. [1] Y. Ozaki, Y. Kataoka, and T. Yamamoto, The Journal of Chemical Physics 73, 3442 (1980). [2] Y. Ozaki, Y. Kataoka, K. Otaka, and T. Yamamoto, Can. J. Physics. 59, 275 (1981).

  7. Part 3: Pharmacogenetic Variability in Phase II Anticancer Drug Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Deenen, Maarten J.; Cats, Annemieke; Beijnen, Jos H.

    2011-01-01

    Equivalent drug doses may lead to wide interpatient variability in drug response to anticancer therapy. Known determinants that may affect the pharmacological response to a drug are, among others, nongenetic factors, including age, gender, use of comedication, and liver and renal function. Nonetheless, these covariates do not explain all the observed interpatient variability. Differences in genetic constitution among patients have been identified to be important factors that contribute to differences in drug response. Because genetic polymorphism may affect the expression and activity of proteins encoded, it is a key covariate that is responsible for variability in drug metabolism, drug transport, and pharmacodynamic drug effects. We present a series of four reviews about pharmacogenetic variability. This third part in the series of reviews is focused on genetic variability in phase II drug-metabolizing enzymes (glutathione S-transferases, uridine diphosphoglucuronosyl transferases, methyltransferases, sulfotransferases, and N-acetyltransferases) and discusses the effects of genetic polymorphism within the genes encoding these enzymes on anticancer drug therapy outcome. Based on the literature reviewed, opportunities for patient-tailored anticancer therapy are proposed. PMID:21659608

  8. Background rejection of n+ surface events in GERDA Phase II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehnert, Björn

    2016-05-01

    The GERDA experiment searches for neutrinoless double beta (0vββ) decay in 76Ge using an array of high purity germanium (HPGe) detectors immersed in liquid argon (LAr). Phase II of the experiment uses 30 new broad energy germanium (BEGe) detectors with superior pulse shape discrimination capabilities compared to the previously used semi-coaxial detector design. By far the largest background component for BEGe detectors in GERDA are n+-surface events from 42K β decays which are intrinsic in LAr. The β particles with up to 3.5 MeV can traverse the 0.5 to 0.9 mm thick electrode and deposit energy within the region of interest for the 0vββ decay. However, those events have particular pulse shape features allowing for a strong discrimination. The understanding and simulation of this background, showing a reduction by up to a factor 145 with pulse shape discrimination alone, is presented in this work.

  9. Yakima River Basin Phase II Fish Screen Evaluations, 2002

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, Jessica A.; McMichael, Geoffrey A.; Chamness, Mickie A.

    2003-03-01

    In 2002, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory evaluated 23 Phase II fish screen sites in the Yakima River Basin as part of a multi-year project for the Bonneville Power Administration on the effectiveness of fish screening devices. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory collected data to determine whether velocities in front of the screens and in the bypasses met National Marine Fisheries Service criteria to promote safe and timely fish passage and whether bypass outfall conditions allowed fish to safely return to the river. In addition, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory conducted underwater video surveys to evaluate the environmental and operational conditions of the screen sites with respect to fish passage. Based on evaluations in 2002, PNNL concluded that: (1) In general, water velocity conditions at the screen sites met fish passage criteria set by the National Marine Fisheries Service. (2) Conditions at most facilities would be expected to provide for safe juvenile fish passage. (3) Conditions at some facilities indicate that operation and/or maintenance should be modified to increase safe juvenile fish passage. (4) Automated cleaning brushes generally functioned properly; chains and other moving parts were typically well greased and operative. (5) Removal of sediment buildup and accumulated leafy and woody debris should be improved at some sites.

  10. Yakima River Basin Phase II Fish Screen Evaluations, 2003

    SciTech Connect

    Vucelick, Jessica A.; McMichael, Geoffrey A.; Chamness, Mickie A.

    2004-05-01

    In 2003, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) evaluated 23 Phase II fish screen sites in the Yakima River Basin as part of a multi-year project for the Bonneville Power Administration on the effectiveness of fish screening devices. PNNL collected data to determine whether velocities in front of the screens and in the bypasses met the Nation Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Fisheries (NOAA Fisheries, formerly the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS)) criteria to promote safe and timely fish passage. In addition, PNNL conducted underwater video surveys to evaluate the environmental and operational conditions of the screen sites with respect to fish passage. Based on evaluations in 2003, PNNL concluded that: (1) In general, water velocity conditions at the screen sites met fish passage criteria set by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Fisheries. (2) Conditions at most facilities would be expected to provide for safe juvenile fish passage. (3) Conditions at some facilities indicate that operation and/or maintenance should be modified to improve juvenile fish passage conditions. (4) Automated cleaning brushes generally functioned properly; chains and other moving parts were typically well greased and operative. (5) Removal of sediment buildup and accumulated leafy and woody debris could be improved at some sites.

  11. Synthesis, structural characterization, fluorescence, antimicrobial, antioxidant and DNA cleavage studies of Cu(II) complexes of formyl chromone Schiff bases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavitha, P.; Saritha, M.; Laxma Reddy, K.

    2013-02-01

    Cu(II) complexes have been synthesized from different Schiff bases, such as 3-((2-hydroxy phenylimino)methyl)-4H-chromen-4-one (HL1), 2-((4-oxo-4H-chromen-3-yl)methylneamino) benzoicacid (HL2), 3-((3-hydroxypyridin-2-ylimino)methyl)-4H-chromen-4-one (HL3) and 3-((2-mercaptophenylimino)methyl)-4H-chromen-4-one (HL4). The complexes were characterized by analytical, molar conductance, IR, electronic, magnetic, ESR, thermal, powder XRD and SEM studies. The analytical data reveal that metal to ligand molar ratio is 1:2 in all the complexes. Molar conductivity data indicates that all the Cu(II) complexes are neutral. On the basis of magnetic and electronic spectral data, distorted octahedral geometry is proposed for all the Cu(II) complexes. Thermal behaviour of the synthesized complexes illustrates the presence of lattice water molecules in the complexes. X-ray diffraction studies reveal that all the ligands and their Cu(II) complexes have triclinic system with different unit cell parameters. Antimicrobial, antioxidant and DNA cleavage activities indicate that metal complexes exhibited greater activity as compared with ligands.

  12. Synthesis, structural characterization, fluorescence, antimicrobial, antioxidant and DNA cleavage studies of Cu(II) complexes of formyl chromone Schiff bases.

    PubMed

    Kavitha, P; Saritha, M; Laxma Reddy, K

    2013-02-01

    Cu(II) complexes have been synthesized from different Schiff bases, such as 3-((2-hydroxy phenylimino)methyl)-4H-chromen-4-one (HL(1)), 2-((4-oxo-4H-chromen-3-yl)methylneamino) benzoicacid (HL(2)), 3-((3-hydroxypyridin-2-ylimino)methyl)-4H-chromen-4-one (HL(3)) and 3-((2-mercaptophenylimino)methyl)-4H-chromen-4-one (HL(4)). The complexes were characterized by analytical, molar conductance, IR, electronic, magnetic, ESR, thermal, powder XRD and SEM studies. The analytical data reveal that metal to ligand molar ratio is 1:2 in all the complexes. Molar conductivity data indicates that all the Cu(II) complexes are neutral. On the basis of magnetic and electronic spectral data, distorted octahedral geometry is proposed for all the Cu(II) complexes. Thermal behaviour of the synthesized complexes illustrates the presence of lattice water molecules in the complexes. X-ray diffraction studies reveal that all the ligands and their Cu(II) complexes have triclinic system with different unit cell parameters. Antimicrobial, antioxidant and DNA cleavage activities indicate that metal complexes exhibited greater activity as compared with ligands.

  13. Antioxidant icariside II combined with insulin restores erectile function in streptozotocin-induced type 1 diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lin; Xu, Yongde; Li, Huixi; Lei, Hongen; Guan, Ruili; Gao, Zhezhu; Xin, Zhongcheng

    2015-05-01

    Erectile dysfunction (ED) worsens in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) despite good control of blood glucose level with insulin. Recent studies imply that diabetic vascular stresses (e.g. oxidative stress) persist in spite of glucose normalization, which is defined as metabolic memory. Studies suggest that the interaction between advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and their receptor (RAGE) mediates the development of metabolic memory. To investigate the effects of the antioxidant icariside II plus insulin on erectile function in streptozotocin (STZ)- induced type 1 diabetic rats. Fifty 8-week-old Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly distributed into five groups: normal control, diabetic, insulin-treated diabetic, icariside II-treated diabetic, and insulin plus icariside II-treated diabetic. Diabetes was induced by a single intraperitoneal injection of STZ. Eight weeks after induction of diabetes, icariside II was administered by gastric lavage once a day (5 mg/kg) for 6 weeks; and 2-6 units of intermediate-acting insulin were given to maintain normal glycemia for 6 weeks. The main outcome measures were the ratio of intracavernous pressure (ICP) to mean arterial pressure (MAP); histology of penile endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells; neural nitric oxide synthase, AGEs and RAGE expression; malondialdehyde concentration; superoxide dismutase activity; and apoptosis index. Diabetic rats demonstrated a significantly lower ICP/MAP ratio, reduced penile endothelial cells, reduced smooth muscle cells, increased AGEs and RAGE, and increased apoptosis. Insulin and icariside II monotherapy partially restored erectile function and histological changes. However, the combination therapy group showed significantly better erectile parameters, cytological components and biochemistry, similar to those in the normal control group. These results suggest that, although insulin can effectively control glycemic levels, it does not completely alter the pathological changes in

  14. Artwork: Johnson Space Center U.S./International Cooperation Phase II -- This is a representation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Artwork: Johnson Space Center U.S./International Cooperation Phase II -- This is a representation illustrating the United States' international cooperation in space. Phase II of the International Space Station is depicted with elements provided by the United States and Russia comprising the Human Tended Space Station. The scene was produced by John Frassanito and Associates. (JSC ref: S94-30086)

  15. Investing in Our Nation's Youth. National Youth Anti-Drug Media Campaign: Phase II (Final Report).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of National Drug Control Policy, Washington, DC.

    This publication presents the findings from an evaluation of Phase II of the National Youth Anti-Drug Media Campaign. The number one goal of the campaign was to educate youth to reject illegal drugs. This report evaluates Phase II and focuses on the effect of paid television advertising on awareness of anti-drug messages among youth, teens, and…

  16. A steerable/distance enhanced penetrometer delivery system: Phase II. Topical report

    SciTech Connect

    Amini, A.; Shenhar, J.; Lum, K.D.

    1996-05-01

    This report summarizes the phase II work on the Position Location Device (POLO) for penetrometers. Phase II was carried out to generate an integrated design of a full-scale steerable/distance enhanced penetrometer delivery system. Steering provides for the controlled and directional use of the penetrometer, while vibratory thrusting can provide greater penetration ability.

  17. 7 CFR 3403.8 - Proposal format for phase II applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Collection. Each Phase II applicant will be required to provide information to the Tech-Net Database System... applicants into Tech-Net: (i) Any business concern or subsidiary established for the commercial application... conducted under each Phase II award; and (iv) Updates to information in the Tech-Net database for any...

  18. 7 CFR 3403.8 - Proposal format for phase II applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Collection. Each Phase II applicant will be required to provide information to the Tech-Net Database System... applicants into Tech-Net: (i) Any business concern or subsidiary established for the commercial application... conducted under each Phase II award; and (iv) Updates to information in the Tech-Net database for any...

  19. 7 CFR 3403.8 - Proposal format for phase II applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Collection. Each Phase II applicant will be required to provide information to the Tech-Net Database System... applicants into Tech-Net: (i) Any business concern or subsidiary established for the commercial application... conducted under each Phase II award; and (iv) Updates to information in the Tech-Net database for any...

  20. Artwork: Johnson Space Center U.S./International Cooperation Phase II -- This is a representation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Artwork: Johnson Space Center U.S./International Cooperation Phase II -- This is a representation illustrating the United States' international cooperation in space. Phase II of the International Space Station is depicted with elements provided by the United States and Russia comprising the Human Tended Space Station. The scene was produced by John Frassanito and Associates. (JSC ref: S94-30086)

  1. 48 CFR 1852.219-81 - Limitation on subcontracting-SBIR Phase II program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 true Limitation on... CLAUSES Texts of Provisions and Clauses 1852.219-81 Limitation on subcontracting—SBIR Phase II program. As prescribed in 1819.7302(b), insert the following clause: Limitation on Subcontracting—SBIR Phase II Program...

  2. 40 CFR 72.74 - Federal issuance of Phase II permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) PERMITS REGULATION Acid Rain Phase II Implementation § 72.74 Federal issuance of Phase II permits. (a)(1) The Administrator will be responsible for administering and enforcing Acid Rain... and enforcing Acid Rain permits for such sources under § 72.73(a). (2) After and to the extent the...

  3. 40 CFR 72.74 - Federal issuance of Phase II permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) PERMITS REGULATION Acid Rain Phase II Implementation § 72.74 Federal issuance of Phase II permits. (a)(1) The Administrator will be responsible for administering and enforcing Acid Rain... and enforcing Acid Rain permits for such sources under § 72.73(a). (2) After and to the extent the...

  4. 40 CFR 72.73 - State issuance of Phase II permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) PERMITS REGULATION Acid Rain Phase II Implementation § 72.73 State issuance of Phase II permits... permit program under part 70 of this chapter and that has a State Acid Rain program accepted by the Administrator under § 72.71 shall be responsible for administering and enforcing Acid Rain permits effective in...

  5. 40 CFR 72.73 - State issuance of Phase II permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) PERMITS REGULATION Acid Rain Phase II Implementation § 72.73 State issuance of Phase II permits... permit program under part 70 of this chapter and that has a State Acid Rain program accepted by the Administrator under § 72.71 shall be responsible for administering and enforcing Acid Rain permits effective in...

  6. 40 CFR 72.74 - Federal issuance of Phase II permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) PERMITS REGULATION Acid Rain Phase II Implementation § 72.74 Federal issuance of Phase II permits. (a)(1) The Administrator will be responsible for administering and enforcing Acid Rain... and enforcing Acid Rain permits for such sources under § 72.73(a). (2) After and to the extent the...

  7. 40 CFR 72.74 - Federal issuance of Phase II permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) PERMITS REGULATION Acid Rain Phase II Implementation § 72.74 Federal issuance of Phase II permits. (a)(1) The Administrator will be responsible for administering and enforcing Acid Rain... and enforcing Acid Rain permits for such sources under § 72.73(a). (2) After and to the extent the...

  8. 40 CFR 72.73 - State issuance of Phase II permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) PERMITS REGULATION Acid Rain Phase II Implementation § 72.73 State issuance of Phase II permits... permit program under part 70 of this chapter and that has a State Acid Rain program accepted by the Administrator under § 72.71 shall be responsible for administering and enforcing Acid Rain permits effective in...

  9. 40 CFR 72.73 - State issuance of Phase II permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) PERMITS REGULATION Acid Rain Phase II Implementation § 72.73 State issuance of Phase II permits... permit program under part 70 of this chapter and that has a State Acid Rain program accepted by the Administrator under § 72.71 shall be responsible for administering and enforcing Acid Rain permits effective in...

  10. 40 CFR 72.74 - Federal issuance of Phase II permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) PERMITS REGULATION Acid Rain Phase II Implementation § 72.74 Federal issuance of Phase II permits. (a)(1) The Administrator will be responsible for administering and enforcing Acid Rain... and enforcing Acid Rain permits for such sources under § 72.73(a). (2) After and to the extent the...

  11. 40 CFR 72.73 - State issuance of Phase II permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) PERMITS REGULATION Acid Rain Phase II Implementation § 72.73 State issuance of Phase II permits... permit program under part 70 of this chapter and that has a State Acid Rain program accepted by the Administrator under § 72.71 shall be responsible for administering and enforcing Acid Rain permits effective in...

  12. TNX GeoSiphon Cell (TGSC-1) Phase II Single Cell Deployment/Demonstration Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Phifer, M.A.

    1999-04-15

    This Phase II final report documents the Phase II testing conducted from June 18, 1998 through November 13, 1998, and it focuses on the application of the siphon technology as a sub-component of the overall GeoSiphon Cell technology. [Q-TPL-T-00004

  13. Potent induction of cellular antioxidants and phase 2 enzymes by resveratrol in cardiomyocytes: protection against oxidative and electrophilic injury.

    PubMed

    Cao, Zhuoxiao; Li, Yunbo

    2004-04-05

    Resveratrol is known to be protective against oxidative cardiovascular disorders. However, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. This study was undertaken to determine if resveratrol could increase endogenous antioxidants and phase 2 enzymes in cardiomyocytes, and if such increased cellular defenses could provide protection against oxidative and electrophilic cell injury. Incubation of cardiac H9C2 cells with low micromolar resveratrol resulted in a significant induction of a scope of cellular antioxidants and phase 2 enzymes in a concentration- and/or time-dependent fashion. To investigate the protective effects of the resveratrol-induced cellular defenses on oxidative and electrophilic cell injury, H9C2 cells were first incubated with resveratrol, and then exposed to xanthine oxidase (XO)/xanthine, 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal or doxorubicin. We observed that resveratrol pretreatment afforded a marked protection against the above agent-mediated cytotoxicity in H9C2 cells. Moreover, the resveratrol pretreatment led to a great reduction in XO/xanthine-induced intracellular accumulation of ROS. Taken together, this study demonstrates that resveratrol induces antioxidants and phase 2 enzymes in cardiomyocytes, which is accompanied by increased resistance to oxidative and electrophilic cell injury.

  14. Synthesis, spectral, antitumor, antioxidant and antimicrobial studies on Cu(II), Ni(II) and Co(II) complexes of 4-[(1H-Benzoimidazol-2-ylimino)-methyl]-benzene-1,3-diol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-wakiel, Nadia; El-keiy, Mai; Gaber, Mohamed

    2015-08-01

    A new Schiff base of 2-aminobenzimidazole with 2,4-dihydroybezaldehyde (H3L), and its Cu(II), Ni(II) and Co(II) complexes have been synthesized and characterized by elemental analyses, molar conductance, thermal analysis (TGA), inductive coupled plasma (ICP), magnetic moment measurements, IR, EI-mass, UV-Vis. and ESR spectral studies. On the basis of spectral studies and analytical data, it is evident that the Schiff base acts as dibasic tridentate ligand coordinating via deprotonated OH, NH and azomethine nitrogen atom. The results showed that Co(II) and Ni(II) complexes have tetrahedral structure while Cu(II) complexes has octahedral geometry. The kinetic and thermodynamic parameters of the thermal decomposition stages have been evaluated. The studied complexes were tested for their in vitro antimicrobial activities against some bacterial strains. The anticancer activity of the ligand and its metal complexes is evaluated against human liver Carcinoma (HEPG2) cell. These compounds exhibited a moderate and weak activity against the tested HEPG2 cell lines with IC50 of 9.08, 18.2 and 19.7 μg/ml for ligand, Cu(II) and Ni(II) complexes, respectively. In vitro antioxidant activity of the newly synthesized compounds has also been evaluated.

  15. Transcriptional up-regulation of antioxidant genes by PPAR{delta} inhibits angiotensin II-induced premature senescence in vascular smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hyo Jung; Ham, Sun Ah; Paek, Kyung Shin; Hwang, Jung Seok; Jung, Si Young; Kim, Min Young; Jin, Hanna; Kang, Eun Sil; Woo, Im Sun; Kim, Hye Jung; Lee, Jae Heun; Chang, Ki Churl; Han, Chang Woo; Seo, Han Geuk

    2011-03-25

    Research highlights: {yields} Activation of PPAR{delta} by GW501516 significantly inhibited Ang II-induced premature senescence in hVSMCs. {yields} Agonist-activated PPAR{delta} suppressed generation of Ang II-triggered ROS with a concomitant reduction in DNA damage. {yields} GW501516 up-regulated expression of antioxidant genes, such as GPx1, Trx1, Mn-SOD and HO-1. {yields} Knock-down of these antioxidant genes abolished the effects of GW501516 on ROS production and premature senescence. -- Abstract: This study evaluated peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) {delta} as a potential target for therapeutic intervention in Ang II-induced senescence in human vascular smooth muscle cells (hVSMCs). Activation of PPAR{delta} by GW501516, a specific agonist of PPAR{delta}, significantly inhibited the Ang II-induced premature senescence of hVSMCs. Agonist-activated PPAR{delta} suppressed the generation of Ang II-triggered reactive oxygen species (ROS) with a concomitant reduction in DNA damage. Notably, GW501516 up-regulated the expression of antioxidant genes, such as glutathione peroxidase 1, thioredoxin 1, manganese superoxide dismutase and heme oxygenase 1. siRNA-mediated down-regulation of these antioxidant genes almost completely abolished the effects of GW501516 on ROS production and premature senescence in hVSMCs treated with Ang II. Taken together, the enhanced transcription of antioxidant genes is responsible for the PPAR{delta}-mediated inhibition of premature senescence through sequestration of ROS in hVSMCs treated with Ang II.

  16. Utility response to Phase I and Phase II acid rain legislation - an economic analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Keeth, R.J.; Ireland, P.A.; Radliffe, P.

    1995-06-01

    Electric utility companies in the U.S. have already implemented their plans for compliance with the Phase I Acid Rain legislation contained in the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990. Out of the 261 units located at 110 power plants affected by Phase I legislation (all located in the midwest and east), FGD systems were installed on only 13,500 MW of capacity, a total of only 14 plants on 25 units. This paper will summarize the total installed capital cost experience for these facilities, which included a variety of FGD processes, vendors, designs and performance requirements. Costs for other recent FGD installations will also be presented. In addition, potential compliance plan options for Phase II legislation requirements will be discussed, providing a description of the decision making process and the plant characteristics that would lead to installation of SO{sub 2} control technology. The paper finishes with an update on the results of the latest FGD economic evaluations that have been completed recently. Brief process descriptions are followed by the operating and capital cost estimate comparisons with commercial technology.

  17. Ultrafiltration of Kraft Black Liquor: Phase II, Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, M.K.

    1987-09-01

    The major justification for examining ultrafiltration was to lower the viscosity of the Kraft Black Liquor by recovering it as an ultrafiltration permeate from which the highest MW lignin had been removed. The liquor could then be concentrated to a higher percentage solids before firing into the recovery boiler. Consequent energy savings for the 1000 ton/day pulp mill would be 2.05 x 10 Btu/y for each percentage increase in TDS (total dissolved solids) to the recovery boiler. This Phase II report gives data on viscosity with percentage solids of KBL permeates. Another favorable effect of ultrafiltration on the permeate properties is disproportionate removal of multivalent ions including the major scaling ion CaS . If this high-viscosity high-Ca retentate could be treated to lower its viscosity and to release the Ca in a non-scaling form, this would enhance the possibility that ultrafiltration might be useful in a mill situation. Included in this report are data on the results of treating the retentate fraction. Other justifications for this program included further information in KBL properties: lignin MW in the KBL at high pH; elemental and sugar analyses; and differential properties of lignins in the retentate and the permeate fractions. A preliminary economic analysis of ultrafiltration is contained in this report. These analyses indicate that with flux rates now attainable, ultrafiltration would not be economically justified at this time if the only justification is to lower KBL viscosity. For certain situations where high Ca liquors present a scaling problem, especially in an evaporator-limited mill, the economics are more favorable. There are also unsolved problems relating to the use of the high viscosity retentate.

  18. A phase II study of axitinib in advanced neuroendocrine tumors

    PubMed Central

    Strosberg, J R; Cives, M; Hwang, J; Weber, T; Nickerson, M; Atreya, C E; Venook, A; Kelley, R K; Valone, T; Morse, B; Coppola, D; Bergsland, E K

    2016-01-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) are highly vascular neoplasms overexpressing vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) as well as VEGF receptors (VEGFR). Axitinib is a potent, selective inhibitor of VEGFR-1, -2 and -3, currently approved for the treatment of advanced renal cell carcinoma. We performed an open-label, two-stage design, phase II trial of axitinib 5 mg twice daily in patients with progressive unresectable/metastatic low-to-intermediate grade carcinoid tumors. The primary end points were progression-free survival (PFS) and 12-month PFS rate. The secondary end points included time to treatment failure (TTF), overall survival (OS), overall radiographic response rate (ORR), biochemical response rate and safety. A total of 30 patients were enrolled and assessable for toxicity; 22 patients were assessable for response. After a median follow-up of 29 months, we observed a median PFS of 26.7 months (95% CI, 11.4–35.1), with a 12-month PFS rate of 74.5% (±10.2). The median OS was 45.3 months (95% CI, 24.4–45.3), and the median TTF was 9.6 months (95% CI, 5.5–12). The best radiographic response was partial response (PR) in 1/30 (3%) and stable disease (SD) in 21/30 patients (70%); 8/30 patients (27%) were unevaluable due to early withdrawal due to toxicity. Hypertension was the most common toxicity that developed in 27 patients (90%). Grade 3/4 hypertension was recorded in 19 patients (63%), leading to treatment discontinuation in six patients (20%). Although axitinib appears to have an inhibitory effect on tumor growth in patients with advanced, progressive carcinoid tumors, the high rate of grade 3/4 hypertension may represent a potential impediment to its use in unselected patients. PMID:27080472

  19. Mechanical and Thermal Prototype Testing for a Rotatable Collimator for the LHC Phase II Collimation Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Jeffrey Claiborne; Doyle, Eric; Keller, Lewis; Lundgren, Steven; Markiewicz, Thomas Walter; /SLAC

    2010-08-26

    The Phase II upgrade to the LHC collimation system calls for complementing the robust Phase I graphite collimators with high Z, low impedance Phase II collimators. The design for the collimation upgrade has not been finalized. One option is to use metallic rotatable collimators and testing of this design will be discussed here. The Phase II collimators must be robust in various operating conditions and accident scenarios. A prototype collimator jaw has been tested for both mechanical and thermal compliance with the design goals. Thermal expansion bench-top tests are compared to ANSYS simulation results.

  20. Antitumoral, antihypertensive, antimicrobial, and antioxidant effects of an octanuclear copper(II)-telmisartan complex with an hydrophobic nanometer hole.

    PubMed

    Islas, María S; Martínez Medina, Juan J; López Tévez, Libertad L; Rojo, Teófilo; Lezama, Luis; Griera Merino, Mercedes; Calleros, Laura; Cortes, María A; Rodriguez Puyol, Manuel; Echeverría, Gustavo A; Piro, Oscar E; Ferrer, Evelina G; Williams, Patricia A M

    2014-06-02

    A new Cu(II) complex with the antihypertensive drug telmisartan, [Cu8Tlm16]·24H2O (CuTlm), was synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis and electronic, FTIR, Raman and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. The crystal structure (at 120 K) was solved by X-ray diffraction methods. The octanuclear complex is a hydrate of but otherwise isostructural to the previously reported [Cu8Tlm16] complex. [Cu8Tlm16]·24H2O crystallizes in the tetragonal P4/ncc space group with a = b = 47.335(1), c = 30.894(3) Å, Z = 4 molecules per unit cell giving a macrocyclic ring with a double helical structure. The Cu(II) ions are in a distorted bipyramidal environment with a somewhat twisted square basis, cis-coordinated at their core N2O2 basis to two carboxylate oxygen and two terminal benzimidazole nitrogen atoms. Cu8Tlm16 has a toroidal-like shape with a hydrophobic nanometer hole, and their crystal packing defines nanochannels that extend along the crystal c-axis. Several biological activities of the complex and the parent ligand were examined in vitro. The antioxidant measurements indicate that the complex behaves as a superoxide dismutase mimic with improved superoxide scavenger power as compared with native sartan. The capacity of telmisartan and its copper complex to expand human mesangial cells (previously contracted by angiotensin II treatment) is similar to each other. The antihypertensive effect of the compounds is attributed to the strongest binding affinity to angiotensin II type 1 receptor and not to the antioxidant effects. The cytotoxic activity of the complex and that of its components was determined against lung cancer cell line A549 and three prostate cancer cell lines (LNCaP, PC-3, and DU 145). The complex displays some inhibitory effect on the A549 line and a high viability decrease on the LNCaP (androgen-sensitive) line. From flow cytometric analysis, an apoptotic mechanism was established for the latter cell line. Telmisartan and CuTlm show

  1. Bioactive compounds extracted from Indian wild legume seeds: antioxidant and type II diabetes-related enzyme inhibition properties.

    PubMed

    Gautam, Basanta; Vadivel, Vellingiri; Stuetz, Wolfgang; Biesalski, Hans K

    2012-03-01

    Seven different wild legume seeds (Acacia leucophloea, Bauhinia variegata, Canavalia gladiata, Entada scandens, Mucuna pruriens, Sesbania bispinosa and Tamarindus indica) from various parts of India were analyzed for total free phenolics, l-Dopa (l-3,4 dihydroxyphenylalanine), phytic acid and their antioxidant capacity (ferric-reducing antioxidant power [FRAP] and 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl [DPPH] assay) and type II diabetes-related enzyme inhibition activitiy (α-amylase). S. bispinosa had the highest content in both total free phenolics and l-Dopa, and relatively low phytic acid when compared with other seeds. Phytic acid content, being highest in E. scandens, M. pruriens and T. indica, was highly predictive for FRAP (r = 0.47, p < 0.05) and DPPH (r = 0.66, p < 0.001) assays. The phenolic extract from T. indica and l-Dopa extract from E. scandens showed significantly higher FRAP values among others. All seed extracts demonstrated a remarkable reducing power (7-145 mM FeSO4 per mg extract), DPPH radical scavenging activity (16-95%) and α-amylase enzyme inhibition activity (28-40%).

  2. Phase II experiment test plan: solar photovoltaic/thermal residential experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Sheldon, D. B.

    1980-01-23

    The Solar Photovoltaic/Thermal Energy Project being carried out by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Lincoln Laboratory under US Department of Energy funding requires a Phase II test plan for its Solar Energy Research Facility (SERF) located at the University of Texas at Arlington. This Phase II test plan is provided. The purpose of the research being conducted at the SERF is reviewed, and references describing Phase I work are listed.

  3. Nitrosonifedipine ameliorates angiotensin II-induced vascular remodeling via antioxidative effects.

    PubMed

    Sakurada, Takumi; Ishizawa, Keisuke; Imanishi, Masaki; Izawa-Ishizawa, Yuki; Fujii, Shoko; Tominaga, Erika; Tsuneishi, Teppei; Horinouchi, Yuya; Kihira, Yoshitaka; Ikeda, Yasumasa; Tomita, Shuhei; Aihara, Ken-ichi; Minakuchi, Kazuo; Tsuchiya, Koichiro; Tamaki, Toshiaki

    2013-01-01

    Nifedipine is unstable under light and decomposes to a stable nitroso analog, nitrosonifedipine (NO-NIF). The ability of NO-NIF to block calcium channels is quite weak compared with that of nifedipine. Recently, we have demonstrated that NO-NIF reacts with unsaturated fatty acid leading to generate NO-NIF radical, which acquires radical scavenging activity. However, the effects of NO-NIF on the pathogenesis related with oxidative stress, such as atherosclerosis and hypertension, are unclear. In this study, we investigated the effects of NO-NIF on angiotensin II (Ang II)-induced vascular remodeling. Ang II-induced thickening and fibrosis of aorta were inhibited by NO-NIF in mice. NO-NIF decreased reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the aorta and urinary 8-hydroxy-20-deoxyguanosine. Ang II-stimulated mRNA expressions of p22(phox), CD68, F4/80, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, and collagen I in the aorta were inhibited by NO-NIF. Moreover, NO-NIF inhibited Ang II-induced cell migration and proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). NO-NIF reduced Ang II-induced ROS to the control level detected by dihydroethidium staining and lucigenin chemiluminescence assay in VSMCs. NO-NIF suppressed phosphorylations of Akt and epidermal growth factor receptor induced by Ang II. However, NO-NIF had no effects on intracellular Ca(2+) increase and protein kinase C-δ phosphorylation induced by Ang II in VSMCs. The electron paramagnetic resonance spectra indicated the continuous generation of NO-NIF radical of reaction with cultured VSMCs. These findings suggest that NO-NIF improves Ang II-induced vascular remodeling via the attenuation of oxidative stress.

  4. Cadmium induces alpha(1)collagen (I) and metallothionein II gene and alters the antioxidant system in rat hepatic stellate cells.

    PubMed

    del Carmen, Escobar Ma; Souza, Verónica; Bucio, Leticia; Hernández, Elizabeth; Damián-Matsumura, Pablo; Zaga, Verónica; Gutiérrez-Ruiz, Ma Concepción

    2002-01-15

    The mechanism of cadmium-mediated hepatotoxicity has been the subject of numerous investigations, principally in hepatocytes. Although, some uncertainties persist, sufficient evidence has emerged to provide a reasonable account of the toxic process in parenchymal cells. However, there is no information about the effect of cadmium in other hepatic cell types, such as stellate cells (fat storing cells, Ito cells, perisinusoidal cells, parasinusoidal cells, lipocytes). Hepatic stellate cells (HSC) express a quiescent phenotype in a healthy liver and acquire an activated phenotype in liver injury. These cells play an important role in the fibrogenic process. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of a 24 h treatment of low Cd concentrations in glutathione content, lipid peroxidation damage, cytosolic free Ca, antioxidant enzyme activities: glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase, superoxide dismutase and catalase along with the capacity of this heavy metal to induce metallothionein II and alpha(1)collagen (I) in an hepatic stellate cell line (CFSC-2G). Cd-treated cells increased lipid peroxidation and the content of cytosolic free calcium, decreased glutathione content and superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase and catalase activity. Cd was able to induce the expression of the metallothionein II and alpha(1)collagen (I) gene, that was not described in this cell type. Cadmium may act as a pro-fibrogenic agent in the liver probably by inducing oxidative damage by enhancing lipid peroxidation and altering the antioxidant system of the cells. Although, the exact role metallothionein induction plays in this process is unknown, it probably, provides a cytosolic pool of potential binding sites to sequester ionic Cd, thereby decreasing its toxicity.

  5. Use of Expansion Cohorts in Phase I Trials and Probability of Success in Phase II for 381 Anticancer Drugs.

    PubMed

    Bugano, Diogo D G; Hess, Kenneth; Jardim, Denis L F; Zer, Alona; Meric-Bernstam, Funda; Siu, Lillian L; Razak, Albiruni R A; Hong, David S

    2017-08-01

    Purpose: Evaluate the association between the use of phase I expansion cohorts (ECs) and drug performance in phase II as well as time to approval by the FDA.Experimental Design: We performed a systematic search of MEDLINE for single-agent dose-finding adult oncology phase I trials published in 2006 to 2011 and subsequent phase II trials. Successful phase II trials were those that met their primary endpoints. Dates of approval were obtained from the Drugs@FDA website in April 2014. A logistic regression model was used to determine the associations between variables and success in phase II.Results: We identified 533 phase I trials evaluating 381 drugs; 112 drugs had at least one phase I trial with an expansion cohort. Phase I trials with expansion cohorts of two to 20 patients were associated with a higher rate of successful phase II trials than those with no expansion cohort [48% vs. 27%; OR, 2.1; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.1-4.0; P = 0.037]. Phase II success rates were the same for expansion cohort with two to 20 and more than 20 patients (48% vs. 52%). Other positive associations were disease-specific trials (OR, 1.7; 95% CI, 1.0-2.9; P = 0.037), industry sponsorship (OR, 2.9; 95% CI, 1.5-5.7; P = 0.0024), and response rate of 6% to 20% (OR, 2.89; 95% CI, 1.6-5.2; P = 0.0007). Drugs tested in phase I trials with expansion cohorts had a higher rate of 5-year approval (19% vs. 5%; HR, 4.4; 95% CI, 2.2-8.8; P < 0.001).Conclusions: The use of expansion cohorts in phase I trials was associated with success of subsequent phase II trials. However, confounders may play a role in this association. Clin Cancer Res; 23(15); 4020-6. ©2017 AACR. ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  6. Experimental and DFT characterization, antioxidant and anticancer activities of a Cu(II)-irbesartan complex: structure-antihypertensive activity relationships in Cu(II)-sartan complexes.

    PubMed

    Islas, María S; Luengo, Alicia; Franca, Carlos A; Merino, Mercedes Griera; Calleros, Laura; Rodriguez-Puyol, Manuel; Lezama, Luis; Ferrer, Evelina G; Williams, Patricia A M

    2016-10-01

    The coordination compound of the antihypertensive ligand irbesartan (irb) with copper(II) (CuIrb) was synthesized and characterized by FTIR, FT-Raman, UV-visible, reflectance and EPR spectroscopies. Experimental evidence allowed the implementation of structural and vibrational studies by theoretical calculations made in the light of the density functional theory (DFT). This compound was designed to induce structural modifications on the ligand. No antioxidant effects were displayed by both compounds, though CuIrb behaved as a weak 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radical (DPPH(·)) scavenger (IC50 = 425 μM). The measurements of the contractile capacity on human mesangial cell lines showed that CuIrb improved the antihypertensive effects of the parent medication. In vitro cell growth inhibition against prostate cancer cell lines (LNCaP and DU 145) was measured for CuIrb, irbesartan and copper(II). These cell lines have been selected since the angiotensin II type 1 (AT1) receptor (that was blocked by the angiotensin receptor blockers, ARB) has been identified in them. The complex exerted anticancer behavior (at 100 μM) improving the activity of the ligand. Flow cytometry determinations were used to determine late apoptotic mechanisms of cell death. Experimental and DFT characterization of an irbesartan copper(II) complex has been performed. The complex exhibits low scavenging activity against DPPH(·) and significant growth inhibition of LNCaP and DU 145 prostate cancer cell lines. Flow cytometry determinations were used to determine late apoptotic mechanisms of cell death. This compound improved the antihypertensive effect of irbesartan. This effect was observed earlier for the mononuclear Cu-candesartan complex, but not in structurally modified sartans forming dinuclear or octanuclear Cu-sartan compounds.

  7. Metabolism of methandrostenolone in the horse: a gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric investigation of phase I and phase II metabolism.

    PubMed

    McKinney, A R; Ridley, D D; Suann, C J

    2001-12-05

    The phase I and phase II metabolism of the anabolic steroid methandrostenolone was investigated following oral administration to a standardbred gelding. In the phase I study, metabolites were isolated from the urine by solid-phase extraction, deconjugated by acid catalysed methanolysis and converted to their O-methyloxime trimethylsilyl derivatives. GC-MS analysis indicated the major metabolic processes to be sequential reduction of the A-ring and hydroxylation at C6 and C16. In the phase II study, unconjugated, beta-glucuronidated and sulfated metabolites were fractionated and deconjugated using a combination of liquid-liquid extraction, enzyme hydrolysis, solid-phase extraction and acid catalysed methanolysis. Derivatization followed by GC-MS analysis revealed extensive conjugation to both glucuronic and sulfuric acids, with only a small proportion of metabolites occurring in unconjugated form.

  8. Biomarker-Guided Adaptive Trial Designs in Phase II and Phase III: A Methodological Review

    PubMed Central

    Antoniou, Miranta; Jorgensen, Andrea L; Kolamunnage-Dona, Ruwanthi

    2016-01-01

    Background Personalized medicine is a growing area of research which aims to tailor the treatment given to a patient according to one or more personal characteristics. These characteristics can be demographic such as age or gender, or biological such as a genetic or other biomarker. Prior to utilizing a patient’s biomarker information in clinical practice, robust testing in terms of analytical validity, clinical validity and clinical utility is necessary. A number of clinical trial designs have been proposed for testing a biomarker’s clinical utility, including Phase II and Phase III clinical trials which aim to test the effectiveness of a biomarker-guided approach to treatment; these designs can be broadly classified into adaptive and non-adaptive. While adaptive designs allow planned modifications based on accumulating information during a trial, non-adaptive designs are typically simpler but less flexible. Methods and Findings We have undertaken a comprehensive review of biomarker-guided adaptive trial designs proposed in the past decade. We have identified eight distinct biomarker-guided adaptive designs and nine variations from 107 studies. Substantial variability has been observed in terms of how trial designs are described and particularly in the terminology used by different authors. We have graphically displayed the current biomarker-guided adaptive trial designs and summarised the characteristics of each design. Conclusions Our in-depth overview provides future researchers with clarity in definition, methodology and terminology for biomarker-guided adaptive trial designs. PMID:26910238

  9. Microgrid Design, Development and Demonstration - Final Report for Phase I and Phase II

    SciTech Connect

    Bose, Sumit; Krok, Michael

    2011-02-08

    This document constitutes GE’s final report for the Microgrid Design, Development and Demonstration program for DOE’s Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, Award DE-FC02-05CH11349. It contains the final report for Phase I in Appendix I, and the results the work performed in Phase II. The program goal was to develop and demonstrate a Microgrid Energy Management (MEM) framework for a broad set of Microgrid applications that provides unified controls, protection, and energy management. This project contributed to the achievement of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Renewable and Distributed Systems Integration Program goals by developing a fully automated power delivery microgrid network that: - Reduces carbon emissions and emissions of other air pollutants through increased use of optimally dispatched renewable energy, - Increases asset use through integration of distributed systems, - Enhances reliability, security, and resiliency from microgrid applications in critical infrastructure protection, constrained areas of the electric grid, etc. - Improves system efficiency with on-site, distributed generation and improved economic efficiency through demand-side management.

  10. The Phase-II ATLAS ITk pixel upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terzo, S.

    2017-07-01

    The entire tracking system of the ATLAS experiment will be replaced during the LHC Phase-II shutdown (foreseen to take place around 2025) by an all-silicon detector called the ``ITk'' (Inner Tracker). The innermost portion of ITk will consist of a pixel detector with five layers in the barrel region and ring-shaped supports in the end-cap regions. It will be instrumented with new sensor and readout electronics technologies to improve the tracking performance and cope with the HL-LHC environment, which will be severe in terms of occupancy and radiation levels. The new pixel system could include up to 14 m2 of silicon, depending on the final layout, which is expected to be decided in 2017. Several layout options are being investigated at the moment, including some with novel inclined support structures in the barrel end-cap overlap region and others with very long innermost barrel layers. Forward coverage could be as high as |eta| <4. Supporting structures will be based on low mass, highly stable and highly thermally conductive carbon-based materials cooled by evaporative carbon dioxide circulated in thin-walled titanium pipes embedded in the structures. Planar, 3D, and CMOS sensors are being investigated to identify the optimal technology, which may be different for the various layers. The RD53 Collaboration is developing the new readout chip. The pixel off-detector readout electronics will be implemented in the framework of the general ATLAS trigger and DAQ system. A readout speed of up to 5 Gb/s per data link will be needed in the innermost layers going down to 640 Mb/s for the outermost. Because of the very high radiation level inside the detector, the first part of the transmission has to be implemented electrically, with signals converted for optical transmission at larger radii. Extensive tests are being carried out to prove the feasibility of implementing serial powering, which has been chosen as the baseline for the ITk pixel system due to the reduced

  11. Yakima River Basin Phase II Fish Screen Evaluations, 2001.

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, J.A.; McMichael, Geoffrey A.; Chamness, M.A.

    2002-01-01

    In the summer and fall of 2001 the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) evaluated 23 Phase II fish screen sites in the Yakima River Basin as part of a multi-year study for the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) on the effectiveness of fish screening devices. Data were collected to determine if velocities in front of the screens and in the bypasses met current National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) criteria to promote safe and timely fish passage and whether bypass outfall conditions allowed fish to safely return to the river. Based on our studies in 2001, we concluded that: in general, water velocity conditions at the screen sites met fish passage criteria set forth by the NMFS; most facilities efficiently protected juvenile fish from entrainment, impingement, or migration delay; automated cleaning brushes generally functioned properly; chains and other moving parts were well greased and operative; and removal of sediment build-up and accumulated leafy and woody debris are areas that continue to improve. Continued periodic screen evaluations will increase the effectiveness of screen operation and maintenance practices by confirming the effectiveness (or ineffectiveness) of screen operating procedures at individual sites. Where procedures are being followed and problems still occur, evaluation results can be used to suggest means to better protect fish at screening facilities. There has been a progressive improvement in the maintenance and effectiveness of fish screen facilities in the Yakima River Basin during the last several years, in part, as a result of regular screen evaluations and the rapid feedback of information necessary to improve operations and design of these important fish protection devices. Continued periodic screen evaluations will increase the effectiveness of screen operation and maintenance practices by confirming the effectiveness (or ineffectiveness) of screen operating procedures at individual sites. Where procedures are being

  12. Thymostimulin in advanced hepatocellular carcinoma: A phase II trial

    PubMed Central

    Dollinger, Matthias M; Behrens, Christa M; Lesske, Joachim; Behl, Susanne; Behrmann, Curd; Fleig, Wolfgang E

    2008-01-01

    Background Thymostimulin is a thymic peptide fraction with immune-mediated cytotoxicity against hepatocellular carcinoma in vitro. In a phase II trial, we investigated safety and efficacy including selection criteria for best response in advanced or metastasised hepatocellular carcinoma. Methods 44 patients (84 % male, median age 69 years) not suitable or refractory to conventional therapy received thymostimulin 75 mg subcutaneously five times per week for a median of 8.2 months until progression or complete response. 3/44 patients were secondarily accessible to local ablation or chemoembolisation. Primary endpoint was overall survival, secondary endpoint tumor response or progression-free survival. A multivariate Cox's regression model was used to identify variables affecting survival. Results Median survival was 11.5 months (95% CI 7.9–15.0) with a 1-, 2- and 3-year survival of 50%, 23% and 9%. In the univariate analysis, a low Child-Pugh-score (p = 0.01), a low score in the Okuda- and CLIP-classification (p < 0.001) or a low AFP-level (p < 0.001) were associated with better survival, but not therapy modalities other than thymostimulin (p = 0.1) or signs of an invasive HCC phenotype such as vascular invasion (p = 0.3) and metastases (p = 0.1). The only variables independently related to survival in the Cox's regression model were Okuda stage and presence of liver cirrhosis (p < 0.01) as well as response to thymostimulin (p < 0.05). Of 39/44 patients evaluable for response, two obtained complete responses (one after concomitant radiofrequency ablation), five partial responses (objective response 18%), twenty-four stable disease (tumor control rate 79%) and eight progressed. Median progression-free survival was 6.4 months (95% CI 0.8–12). Grade 1 local reactions following injection were the only side effects. Conclusion Outcome in our study rather depended on liver function and intrahepatic tumor growth (presence of liver cirrhosis and Okuda stage) in addition

  13. Structural mechanisms of the Ih–II and II → Ic transitions between the crystalline phases of aqueous ice

    SciTech Connect

    Zheligovskaya, E. A.

    2015-09-15

    Structural mechanisms are proposed for experimentally observed phase transitions between crystalline modifications of aqueous ice, Ih and II, as well as II and Ic. It is known that the Ih–II transition occurs with the conservation of large structural units (hexagonal channels) common for these ices. It is shown that the Ih → II transition may occur with the conservation of 5/6 of all hydrogen bonds in crystal, including all hydrogen bonds in the retained channels (3/4 of the total number of bonds in crystal) and 1/3 of the bonds between these channels (1/12 of the total number). The transformation of other hydrogen bonds between the retained channels leads to the occurrence of proton order in ice II. A structural mechanism is proposed to explain the transformation of single crystals of ice Ih either into single crystals of ice II or into crystalline twins of ice II with c axes rotated by 180° with respect to each other, which is often observed at the Ih → II transition. It is established that up to 7/12 of all hydrogen bonds are retained at the irreversible cooperative II → Ic transition.

  14. Chitosan film loaded with silver nanoparticles-sorbent for solid phase extraction of Al(III), Cd(II), Cu(II), Co(II), Fe(III), Ni(II), Pb(II) and Zn(II).

    PubMed

    Djerahov, Lubomir; Vasileva, Penka; Karadjova, Irina; Kurakalva, Rama Mohan; Aradhi, Keshav Krishna

    2016-08-20

    The present study describes the ecofriendly method for the preparation of chitosan film loaded with silver nanoparticles (CS-AgNPs) and application of this film as efficient sorbent for separation and enrichment of Al(III), Cd(II), Cu(II), Co(II), Fe(III), Ni(II), Pb(II) and Zn(II). The stable CS-AgNPs colloid was prepared by dispersing the AgNPs sol in chitosan solution at appropriate ratio and further used to obtain a cast film with very good stability under storage and good mechanical strength for easy handling in aqueous medium. The incorporation of AgNPs in the structure of CS film and interaction between the polymer matrix and nanoparticles were confirmed by UV-vis and FTIR spectroscopy. The homogeneously embedded AgNPs (average diameter 29nm, TEM analysis) were clearly observed throughout the film by SEM. The CS-AgNPs nanocomposite film shows high sorption activity toward trace metals under optimized chemical conditions. The results suggest that the CS-AgNPs nanocomposite film can be feasibly used as a novel sorbent material for solid-phase extraction of metal pollutants from surface waters.

  15. Solid-phase extraction of Mn(II), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), Cd(II) and Pb(II) ions from environmental samples by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS).

    PubMed

    Duran, Celal; Gundogdu, Ali; Bulut, Volkan Numan; Soylak, Mustafa; Elci, Latif; Sentürk, Hasan Basri; Tüfekci, Mehmet

    2007-07-19

    A new method using a column packed with Amberlite XAD-2010 resin as a solid-phase extractant has been developed for the multi-element preconcentration of Mn(II), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), Cd(II), and Pb(II) ions based on their complex formation with the sodium diethyldithiocarbamate (Na-DDTC) prior to flame atomic absorption spectrometric (FAAS) determinations. Metal complexes sorbed on the resin were eluted by 1 mol L(-1) HNO3 in acetone. Effects of the analytical conditions over the preconcentration yields of the metal ions, such as pH, quantity of Na-DDTC, eluent type, sample volume and flow rate, foreign ions etc. have been investigated. The limits of detection (LOD) of the analytes were found in the range 0.08-0.26 microg L(-1). The method was validated by analyzing three certified reference materials. The method has been applied for the determination of trace elements in some environmental samples.

  16. U.S.-China Strategic Dialogue, Phase II

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-04-12

    Chinese Presentation 12:00-1:30p Lunch – Hibiscus Suite (Kalia Tower-2nd floor) 1:30p Panel II: Crisis Escalation in Theory and History Paper...Lunch Hibiscus Suite (Kalia Tower-2nd floor) 1:30p Panel IV: Nuclear Weapons Safety and Security: Comparing national approaches and discussing... Hibiscus Suite (Kalia Tower-2nd floor) 25 APPENDIX II: CONFERENCE PARTICIPANTS 26 China Rear Admiral Yang Yi Director Institute of

  17. Single-arm phase II trial design under parametric cure models.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jianrong

    2015-01-01

    The current practice of designing single-arm phase II survival trials is limited under the exponential model. Trial design under the exponential model may not be appropriate when a portion of patients are cured. There is no literature available for designing single-arm phase II trials under the parametric cure model. In this paper, a test statistic is proposed, and a sample size formula is derived for designing single-arm phase II trials under a class of parametric cure models. Extensive simulations showed that the proposed test and sample size formula perform very well under different scenarios. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Single-Arm Phase II Trial Design Under Parametric Cure Models

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jianrong

    2015-01-01

    The current practice of designing single-arm phase II survival trials is limited under the exponential model. Trial design under the exponential model may not be appropriate when a portion of patients are cured. There is no literature available for designing single-arm phase II trials under the parametric cure model. In this article, a test statistic is proposed, and a sample size formula is derived for designing single-arm phase II trials under a class of parametric cure models. Extensive simulations showed that the proposed test and sample size formula perform very well under different scenarios. PMID:25846141

  19. The synergistic upregulation of phase II detoxification enzymes by glucosinolate breakdown products in cruciferous vegetables.

    PubMed

    Nho, C W; Jeffery, E

    2001-07-15

    Cruciferous vegetables contain secondary metabolites termed glucosinolates that break down to products that upregulate hepatic detoxification enzymes. We have previously shown that a mixture of four major glucosinolate breakdown products from Brussels sprouts interact to produce synergistic induction of phase II detoxification enzymes. Here we tested the hypothesis that this synergism is at the level of transcription and is due to the interaction between the oral bifunctional inducer, indole-3-carbinol (I3C), and monofunctional inducer, crambene (1-cyano 2-hydroxy 3-butene). Adult male rats were treated by gavage with either corn oil (vehicle); crambene (50 mg/kg), I3C (56 mg/kg), or a mix of crambene and I3C at the doses shown. Given orally, I3C alone and crambene with I3C caused significant induction of CYP1A activity and CYP1A1 mRNA levels, whereas crambene alone had no significant effect on CYP1A activity or mRNA levels. Crambene and I3C individually caused induction of glutathione S-transferase (GST) and quinone reductase (QR) activity. The mixture of crambene and I3C caused induction of GST and QR that was significantly greater than the sum of the induction by individual treatments. Upregulation of total GST activity was not as great as that of QR, possibly because some subunits did not show this effect. GST Ya2 mRNA showed a synergistic upregulation by crambene and I3C, while Yc1 and Yc2 showed only an additive response. We speculate that this different regulation is partly due to differences in gene sequences within the antioxidant response element and xenobiotic response element in the regulatory region of GST Ya2 compared to those within the regulatory region of the Yc1/Yc2 subunits. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  20. Ni(II), Pd(II) and Pt(II) complexes of (1H-1,2,4-triazole-3-ylimino)methyl]naphthalene-2-ol. Structural, spectroscopic, biological, cytotoxicity, antioxidant and DNA binding.

    PubMed

    Gaber, M; El-Ghamry, H A; Fathalla, S K

    2015-03-15

    Metal complexes of the general formula [ML(H2O)Cl]nH2O; n=1 for M=Ni and Pt and n=2 for M=Pd, L=Schiff base (HL) derived from the condensation of 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole and 2-hydroxy-1-naphthaldehyde, were prepared. The synthesized ligand and its metal complexes were characterized on the basis of elemental analyses, spectral and magnetic studies as well as thermal analysis. The IR spectra revealed that the ligand is coordinated to the metal ions in bidentate manner via the N-atom of the azomethine group and the phenolic OH group. Square planar geometry was proposed for Pd(II) and Pt(II) complexes and tetrahedral for Ni(II) complex. The ligand and its metal complexes were screened against the sensitive organisms Escherichia coli as Gram-negative bacteria, Staphylococcus aureus as Gram-positive bacteria, Aspergillus flavus and Candida albicans as fungi. Moreover, the anticancer activity of the ligand and its metal complexes was evaluated in liver carcinoma (HEPG2) cell line. The results obtained indicated that the Schiff base ligand is more effective than its metal complexes towards the tested cell line. Ni(II), Pd(II) and Pt(II) complexes as well as the free Schiff base ligand were tested for their antioxidant activities. The DNA-binding properties of the studied complexes have been investigated by electronic absorption and viscosity measurements.

  1. Ni(II), Pd(II) and Pt(II) complexes of (1H-1,2,4-triazole-3-ylimino)methyl]naphthalene-2-ol. Structural, spectroscopic, biological, cytotoxicity, antioxidant and DNA binding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaber, M.; El-Ghamry, H. A.; Fathalla, S. K.

    2015-03-01

    Metal complexes of the general formula [ML(H2O)Cl]nH2O; n = 1 for M = Ni and Pt and n = 2 for M = Pd, L = Schiff base (HL) derived from the condensation of 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole and 2-hydroxy-1-naphthaldehyde, were prepared. The synthesized ligand and its metal complexes were characterized on the basis of elemental analyses, spectral and magnetic studies as well as thermal analysis. The IR spectra revealed that the ligand is coordinated to the metal ions in bidentate manner via the N-atom of the azomethine group and the phenolic OH group. Square planar geometry was proposed for Pd(II) and Pt(II) complexes and tetrahedral for Ni(II) complex. The ligand and its metal complexes were screened against the sensitive organisms Escherichia coli as Gram-negative bacteria, Staphylococcus aureus as Gram-positive bacteria, Aspergillus flavus and Candida albicans as fungi. Moreover, the anticancer activity of the ligand and its metal complexes was evaluated in liver carcinoma (HEPG2) cell line. The results obtained indicated that the Schiff base ligand is more effective than its metal complexes towards the tested cell line. Ni(II), Pd(II) and Pt(II) complexes as well as the free Schiff base ligand were tested for their antioxidant activities. The DNA-binding properties of the studied complexes have been investigated by electronic absorption and viscosity measurements.

  2. Spectroscopic characterization, antioxidant and antitumour studies of novel bromo substituted thiosemicarbazone and its copper(II), nickel(II) and palladium(II) complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jagadeesh, M.; Lavanya, M.; Kalangi, Suresh K.; Sarala, Y.; Ramachandraiah, C.; Varada Reddy, A.

    2015-01-01

    A new, slightly distorted octahedral complex of copper(II), square planar complexes of nickel(II) and palladium(II) with 2,4‧-dibromoacetophenone thiosemicarbazone (DBAPTSC) are synthesized. The ligand and the complexes are characterized by FT-IR, FT-Raman, powder X-ray diffraction studies. The IR and Raman data are correlated for the presence of the functional groups which specifically helped in the confirmation of the compounds. In addition, the free ligand is unambiguously characterized by 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopy while the copper(II) complex is characterized by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy (EPR). The g values for the same are found to be 2.246 (g1), 2.012 (g2) and 2.005 (g3) which suggested rhombic distortions. The HOMO-LUMO band gap calculations for these compounds are found to be in between 0.5 and 4.0 eV and these compounds are identified as semiconducting materials. The synthesized ligand and its copper(II), nickel(II) and palladium(II) complexes are subjected to antitumour activity against the HepG2 human hepatoblastoma cell lines. Among all the compounds, nickel(II) complex is found to exert better antitumour activity with 57.6% of cytotoxicity.

  3. N-((5-chloropyridin-2-yl)carbamothioyl)furan-2-carboxamide and its Co(II), Ni(II) and Cu(II) complexes: Synthesis, characterization, DFT computations, thermal decomposition, antioxidant and antitumor activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeşilkaynak, Tuncay; Özpınar, Celal; Emen, Fatih Mehmet; Ateş, Burhan; Kaya, Kerem

    2017-02-01

    N-((5-chloropyridin-2-yl)carbamothioyl)furan-2-carboxamide (HL: C11H8ClN3O2S) and its Co(II), Ni(II) and Cu(II) complexes have been synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, FT-IR,1H NMR and HR-MS methods. The HL was characterized by single crystal X-ray diffraction technique. It crystallizes in the monoclinic system. The HL has the space group P 1 21/c 1, Z = 4, and its unit cell parameters are a = 4.5437(5) Å, b = 22.4550(3) Å, c = 11.8947(14) Å. The ligand coordinates the metal ions as bidentate and thus essentially yields neutral complexes of the [ML2] type. ML2 complex structures were optimized using B97D/TZVP level. Molecular orbitals of both HL ligand were calculated at the same level. Thermal decomposition of the complexes has been investigated by thermogravimetry. The complexes were screened for their anticancer and antioxidant activities. Antioxidant activity of the complexes was determined by using the DPPH and ABTS assays. The anticancer activity of the complexes was studied by using MTT assay in MCF-7 breast cancer cells.

  4. Preparation, spectroscopic, thermal, antihepatotoxicity, hematological parameters and liver antioxidant capacity characterizations of Cd(II), Hg(II), and Pb(II) mononuclear complexes of paracetamol anti-inflammatory drug

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Megharbel, Samy M.; Hamza, Reham Z.; Refat, Moamen S.

    2014-10-01

    Keeping in view that some metal complexes are found to be more potent than their parent drugs, therefore, our present paper aimed to synthesized Cd(II), Hg(II) and Pb(II) complexes of paracetamol (Para) anti-inflammatory drug. Paracetamol complexes with general formula [M(Para)2(H2O)2]·nH2O have been synthesized and characterized on the basis of elemental analysis, conductivity, IR and thermal (TG/DTG), 1H NMR, electronic spectral studies. The conductivity data of these complexes have non-electrolytic nature. Comparative antimicrobial (bacteria and fungi) behaviors and molecular weights of paracetamol with their complexes have been studied. In vivo the antihepatotoxicity effect and some liver function parameters levels (serum total protein, ALT, AST, and LDH) were measured. Hematological parameters and liver antioxidant capacities of both Para and their complexes were performed. The Cd2+ + Para complex was recorded amelioration of antioxidant capacities in liver homogenates compared to other Para complexes treated groups.

  5. Preparation, spectroscopic, thermal, antihepatotoxicity, hematological parameters and liver antioxidant capacity characterizations of Cd(II), Hg(II), and Pb(II) mononuclear complexes of paracetamol anti-inflammatory drug.

    PubMed

    El-Megharbel, Samy M; Hamza, Reham Z; Refat, Moamen S

    2014-10-15

    Keeping in view that some metal complexes are found to be more potent than their parent drugs, therefore, our present paper aimed to synthesized Cd(II), Hg(II) and Pb(II) complexes of paracetamol (Para) anti-inflammatory drug. Paracetamol complexes with general formula [M(Para)2(H2O)2]·nH2O have been synthesized and characterized on the basis of elemental analysis, conductivity, IR and thermal (TG/DTG), (1)H NMR, electronic spectral studies. The conductivity data of these complexes have non-electrolytic nature. Comparative antimicrobial (bacteria and fungi) behaviors and molecular weights of paracetamol with their complexes have been studied. In vivo the antihepatotoxicity effect and some liver function parameters levels (serum total protein, ALT, AST, and LDH) were measured. Hematological parameters and liver antioxidant capacities of both Para and their complexes were performed. The Cd(2+)+Para complex was recorded amelioration of antioxidant capacities in liver homogenates compared to other Para complexes treated groups.

  6. Orthodontists' perceptions of the impact of phase 1 treatment for Class II malocclusion on phase 2 needs.

    PubMed

    King, G J; Wheeler, T T; McGorray, S P; Aiosa, L S; Bloom, R M; Taylor, M G

    1999-11-01

    The most appropriate timing for the treatment of Class II malocclusions is controversial. Some clinicians advocate starting a first phase in the mixed dentition, followed by a phase 2 in the permanent dentition. Others see no clear advantage to that approach and recommend that the entire treatment be done in the late mixed or early permanent dentition. This study examines how orthodontists, blinded to treatment approach, perceive the impact of phase 1 treatment on phase 2 needs. The sample consisted of 242 Class II subjects, aged 10 to 15, who had completed phase 1 or observation in a randomized clinical trial (RCT). For each subject, video orthodontic records, a questionnaire, a fact sheet, and a cephalometric tracing were sent to five randomly selected reviewing orthodontists blinded to subject group and study purpose. Reviewing orthodontists were asked to assess treatment need, general approach, need for extractions, priority, difficulty, and determinants. Orthodontists agreed highly on treatment need (95%) and moderately on treatment approach (84%) and extraction need (80%). They did not perceive differences in need, approach, or extractions between treated and control groups. Treated subjects were judged as less difficult (p = 0.0001) and to have a lower treatment priority (p = 0.0001) than controls. In ranking problems that affect treatment decisions, the orthodontists ranked dental Class II (p = 0.005) and skeletal relationships (p = 0.004) more highly in control than in treated patients. These data indicate that orthodontists do not perceive phase 1 treatment for Class II as preventing the need for a second phase or as offering any particular advantage with respect to preventing the need for extractions or other skeletal treatments in that second phase. They do view early Class II treatment as an effective means of reducing the difficulty of and priority for phase 2.

  7. Microwaves and cellular immunity. II. Immunostimulating effects of microwaves and naturally occurring antioxidant nutrients.

    PubMed

    Novoselova, E G; Fesenko, E E; Makar, V R; Sadovnikov, V B

    1999-10-01

    The effect of 8.15-18 GHz (1 Hz within) microwave radiation at a power density of 1 microW/cm2 on the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) production and immune response was tested. A single 5 h whole-body exposure induced a significant increase in TNF production in peritoneal macrophages and splenic T cells. The mitogenic response in T lymphocytes increased after microwave exposure. The activation of cellular immunity was observed within 3 days after exposure. The diet containing lipid-soluble nutrients (beta-carotene, alpha-tocopherol and ubiquinone Q9) increased the activity of macrophages and T cells from irradiated mice. These results demonstrate that irradiation with low-power density microwaves stimulates the immune potential of macrophages and T cells, and the antioxidant treatment enhances the effect of microwaves, in particular at later terms, when the effect of irradiation is reduced.

  8. Status of trace elements and antioxidants in premenopausal and postmenopausal phase of life: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Ansar, Sabah; Alhefdhi, Tayef; Aleem, Ansari M

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the extent of free radical damage in the form of oxidative stress, the antioxidant status and correlate with trace element levels in postmenopausal females as compared to premenopausal females. Participants between the ages of 30-60 years were recruited for the study and status of antioxidant enzymes and trace metals level was determined. The serum Calcium (Ca) levels after menopause was higher than that of the premenopausal group (P<0.001). The changes in copper (Cu) and Zinc (Zn) between the groups were not significant (p>0.05). In postmenopausal women, antioxidant enzymes like superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GPX), catalase (CAT) significantly decreased (P<0.001) in postmenopausal women showing oxidative stress in the cells. Concentrations of vitamin-C pointed out a significant decrease (P<0.05) in postmenopausal women when compared with premenopausal women.

  9. Status of trace elements and antioxidants in premenopausal and postmenopausal phase of life: a comparative study

    PubMed Central

    Ansar, Sabah; Alhefdhi, Tayef; Aleem, Ansari M

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the extent of free radical damage in the form of oxidative stress, the antioxidant status and correlate with trace element levels in postmenopausal females as compared to premenopausal females. Participants between the ages of 30-60 years were recruited for the study and status of antioxidant enzymes and trace metals level was determined. The serum Calcium (Ca) levels after menopause was higher than that of the premenopausal group (P<0.001). The changes in copper (Cu) and Zinc (Zn) between the groups were not significant (p>0.05). In postmenopausal women, antioxidant enzymes like superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GPX), catalase (CAT) significantly decreased (P<0.001) in postmenopausal women showing oxidative stress in the cells. Concentrations of vitamin-C pointed out a significant decrease (P<0.05) in postmenopausal women when compared with premenopausal women. In conclusion. PMID:26770597

  10. SELDI Validation Study Phase II — EDRN Public Portal

    Cancer.gov

    This project –A Comprehensive Program for the Validation of Prostate Cancer Early Detection with Novel Protein Identification Techniques -- is divided into three phases. The goal of Phase I was to assess the reproducibility and portability of Surface-Enhanced Laser Desorption and Ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (SELDI-TOF-MS) using protein profiles generated from serum. Phase I was recently successfully completed at six institutions using a single source of pooled sera.

  11. Hydroxytyrosol protects against oxidative damage by simultaneous activation of mitochondrial biogenesis and phase II detoxifying enzyme systems in retinal pigment epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Lu; Liu, Zhongbo; Feng, Zhihui; Hao, Jiejie; Shen, Weili; Li, Xuesen; Sun, Lijuan; Sharman, Edward; Wang, Ying; Wertz, Karin; Weber, Peter; Shi, Xianglin; Liu, Jiankang

    2010-11-01

    Studies in this laboratory have previously shown that hydroxytyrosol, the major antioxidant polyphenol in olives, protects ARPE-19 human retinal pigment epithelial cells from oxidative damage induced by acrolein, an environmental toxin and endogenous end product of lipid oxidation, that occurs at increased levels in age-related macular degeneration lesions. A proposed mechanism for this is that protection by hydroxytyrosol against oxidative stress is conferred by the simultaneous activation of two critically important pathways, viz., induction of phase II detoxifying enzymes and stimulation of mitochondrial biogenesis. Cultured ARPE-19 cells were pretreated with hydroxytyrosol and challenged with acrolein. The protective effects of hydroxytyrosol on key factors of mitochondrial biogenesis and phase II detoxifying enzyme systems were examined. Hydroxytyrosol treatment simultaneously protected against acrolein-induced inhibition of nuclear factor-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor coactivator 1 alpha (PPARGC1α) in ARPE-19 cells. The activation of Nrf2 led to activation of phase II detoxifying enzymes, including γ-glutamyl-cysteinyl-ligase, NADPH (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate)-quinone-oxidoreductase 1, heme-oxygenase-1, superoxide dismutase, peroxiredoxin and thioredoxin as well as other antioxidant enzymes, while the activation of PPARGC1α led to increased protein expression of mitochondrial transcription factor A, uncoupling protein 2 and mitochondrial complexes. These results suggest that hydroxytyrosol is a potent inducer of phase II detoxifying enzymes and an enhancer of mitochondrial biogenesis. Dietary supplementation of hydroxytyrosol may contribute to eye health by preventing the degeneration of retinal pigment epithelial cells induced by oxidative stress. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Antioxidant/prooxidant effects of α-tocopherol, quercetin and isorhamnetin on linoleic acid peroxidation induced by Cu(II) and H2O2.

    PubMed

    Bakır, Temelkan; Sönmezoğlu, Inci; Imer, Filiz; Apak, Reşat

    2014-03-01

    The peroxidation of linoleic acid (LA) in the presence of copper(II) (Cu(II)) ions alone and with α-tocopherol (α-TocH) was investigated in aerated and incubated emulsions at 37 °C and pH 7. Additionally, the effects of quercetin (QR) and its O-methylated derivative, isorhamnetin (IR), as potential antioxidant protectors were studied in the (Cu(II) + TocH)-induced LA peroxidation system. Cu(II)-induced LA peroxidation followed pseudo-first-order kinetics with respect to primary (hydroperoxides) and secondary (aldehydes- and ketones-like) oxidation products, which were determined by ferric thiocyanate and thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances methods, respectively. As opposed to the concentration-dependent (at 0.6 and 10.0 µM) prooxidative action of α-TocH in the absence of QR and IR, the latter two compounds showed antioxidant effect over TocH. The peroxidation of LA in the presence of Cu(II)-H(2)O(2) combination alone and with TocH, QR and IR were also investigated in aerated and incubated emulsions, where the latter three compounds exhibited antioxidant effects.

  13. HLW Salt Disposition Alternatives Preconceptual Phase II Summary Report

    SciTech Connect

    Piccolo, S.F.

    1999-07-09

    The purpose of the report is to summarize the process used to identify the Short List alternatives that will be evaluated during Phase III and to document the results of the selection process. The Phase III evaluation will result in the determination of the preferred alternative(s) to be used for final disposition of the HLW salt to a permitted waste form.

  14. Public Library Information and Referral Project, Phase II. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Childers, Thomas; Krauser, Cheri

    This study is the second of a two-phase survey of public library information and referral (I&R) service. In this phase, seven public libraries offering I&R services were studied in depth to provide descriptions of their operations, organizational factors, and the reactions of their users. Organizational factors and operations were studied through…

  15. Fire Fighter Trainer Environmental Considerations. Phase II. Appendixes.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-07-31

    background ana is an expert in traceI I I BAH PERSONNEL LOCATIONS DURING TESTS LDQ I Scenario M. Halpern Control room G. McLennan Mobile to exterior of...stack-roof level Case Tech II Outside - LDQ I UDQ II M. Halpern Control room G. McLennan Mobile to exterior of facility where needed S. Armentrout Control...Generation of Aerosols, 1980. 1 79. Work Breakdown Structure for Advanced Fire Fighter Trainer, Work Order AT-784, Advanced TechnologyI Systems

  16. Antioxidant activity of cysteine, tryptophan, and methionine residues in continuous phase beta-lactoglobulin in oil-in-water emulsions.

    PubMed

    Elias, Ryan J; McClements, D Julian; Decker, Eric A

    2005-12-28

    Proteins dispersed in the continuous phase of oil-in-water emulsions are capable of inhibiting lipid oxidation reactions. The antioxidant activity of these proteins is thought to encompass both free radical scavenging by amino acid residues and chelation of prooxidative transition metals; however, the precise mechanism by which this occurs remains unclear. In this study, the oxidative stability of cysteine, tryptophan, and methionine residues in continuous phase beta-lactoglobulin (beta-Lg) in a Brij-stabilized menhaden oil-in-water emulsion was determined. The presence of low concentrations of continuous phase beta-Lg (250 and 750 microg/mL) significantly inhibited lipid oxidation as determined by lipid hydroperoxides and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances analysis. It was observed that cysteine oxidized before tryptophan in beta-Lg, and both residues oxidized before lipid oxidation could be detected. No oxidation of the methionine residues of beta-Lg was observed despite its reported high oxidative susceptibility. It is conceivable that surface exposure of amino acid residues greatly affects their oxidation kinetics, which may explain why some residues are preferentially oxidized relative to others. Further elucidation of the mechanisms governing free radical scavenging of amino acids could lead to more effective applications of proteins as antioxidants within oil-in-water food emulsions.

  17. Phase II clinical trials on Investigational drugs for the Treatment of Pancreatic Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Edward J.; Semrad, Thomas J.; Bold, Richard J.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Despite some recent advances in treatment options, pancreatic cancer remains a devastating disease with poor outcomes. In a trend contrary to most malignancies, both incidence and mortality continue to rise due to pancreatic cancer. The majority of patients present with advanced disease and there are no treatment options for this stage that have demonstrated a median survival greater than 1 year. As the penultimate step prior to phase III studies involving hundreds of patients, phase II clinical trials provide an early opportunity to evaluate the efficacy of new treatments that are desperately needed for this disease. Areas Covered This review covers the results of published phase II clinical trials in advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma published within the past 5 years. The treatment results are framed in the context of the current standards of care and the historic challenge of predicting phase III success from phase II trial results. Expert opinion Promising therapies remain elusive in pancreatic cancer based on recent phase II clinical trial results. Optimization and standardization of clinical trial design in the phase II setting, with consistent incorporation of biomarkers, is needed to more accurately identify promising therapies that warrant phase III evaluation. PMID:25809274

  18. Mixed-ligand copper(II) phenolate complexes: Synthesis, spectral characterization, phosphate-hydrolysis, antioxidant, DNA interaction and cytotoxic studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurumoorthy, Perumal; Mahendiran, Dharmasivam; Prabhu, Durai; Arulvasu, Chinnasamy; Rahiman, Aziz Kalilur

    2015-01-01

    A series of phenol-based mixed-ligand copper(II) complexes of the type [CuL1-4(diimine)] (1-8), where L1-4 = N1,N2-bis(5-substituted-2-hydroxybenzylidene)-1,2-ethylene/phenylenediimine and diimine = 2,2‧-bipyridyl (bpy) or 1,10-phenanthroline (phen), have been isolated and fully characterized by analytical and spectral techniques. Electronic spectra of complexes suggest Cu(II) cation has a d9 electronic configuration, adopting distorted octahedral geometry with axial elongation, due to Jahn-Teller effect. Electrochemical studies of complexes evidenced one-electron irreversible reduction wave in the cathodic region. The observed rate constant (k) values for the hydrolysis of 4-nitrophenylphosphate (4-NPP) are in the range of 0.25-3.82 × 10-2 min-1. The obtained room temperature magnetic moment values (1.79-1.90 BM) lies within the range observed for octahedral copper(II) complexes. Antioxidant studies revealed that these complexes possess considerable radical scavenging potency against DPPH. The binding studies of complexes with calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) revealed intercalation with minor-groove binding, and the complex 4 exhibits highest binding activity than the other complexes. The cleavage activity on supercoiled pBR322 DNA revealed the involvement of hydroxyl radical and singlet-oxygen as reactive oxygen species, and complexes encourage binding to minor-groove. Further, the cytotoxicity of complex 4 on human hepatocellular liver carcinoma HepG2 cell line implies the cell death through apoptosis.

  19. High-Lift Flight Tunnel - Phase II Report. Phase 2 Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lofftus, David; Lund, Thomas; Rote, Donald; Bushnell, Dennis M. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The High-Lift Flight Tunnel (HiLiFT) concept is a revolutionary approach to aerodynamic ground testing. This concept utilizes magnetic levitation and linear motors to propel an aerodynamic model through a tube containing a quiescent test medium. This medium (nitrogen) is cryogenic and pressurized to achieve full flight Reynolds numbers higher than any existing ground test facility world-wide for the range of 0.05 to 0.50 Mach. The results of the Phase II study provide excellent assurance that the HiLiFT concept will provide a valuable low-speed, high Reynolds number ground test facility. The design studies concluded that the HiLiFT facility is feasible to build and operate and the analytical studies revealed no insurmountable difficulties to realizing a practical high Reynolds number ground test facility. It was determined that a national HiLiFT facility, including development, would cost approximately $400M and could be operational by 2013 if fully funded. Study participants included National Aeronautics and Space Administration Langley Research Center as the Program Manager and MSE Technology Applications, Inc., (MSE) of Butte, Montana as the prime contractor and study integrator. MSE#s subcontractors included the University of Texas at Arlington for aerodynamic analyses and the Argonne National Laboratory for magnetic levitation and linear motor technology support.

  20. Functional design criteria for project W-252, phase II liquid effluent treatment and disposal. Revision 2

    SciTech Connect

    Hatch, C.E.

    1995-05-01

    This document is the Functional Design Criteria for Project W-252. Project W-252 provides the scope to provide BAT/AKART (best available technology...) to 200 Liquid Effluent Phase II streams (B-Plant). This revision (Rev. 2) incorporates a major descoping of the project. The descoping was done to reflect a combination of budget cutting measures allowed by a less stringent regulatory posture toward the Phase II streams

  1. Rosetta Phase II: Measuring and Interpreting Cultural Differences in Cognition

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-07-31

    Behavior respectively. A separate report combining data from all Rosetta II investigators, is being prepared by Dr. Helen Klein, under a separate...similarities and differences. We used the data from the three samples at International Islamic University: Arabs, Malaysians , and Indonesians. All...www.armedforcesjournal.com/2006/07/1866019. During multinational interchanges, we need to understand regional behaviors , values, social roles, and

  2. [Effect of melatonin on antioxidant state under type ii diabetes at rat].

    PubMed

    Agarkov, A A; Popova, T N; Matasova, L V

    2013-01-01

    The effect of melatonin on the intensity of free radical processes and activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD, EC 1.15.1.1.) and catalase (EC 1.11.1.6) has been investigated in liver and blood serum of rats with diabetes mellitus type II. The development of diabetes was accompanied by the increase in biochemiluminescence parameters and the enzyme activities studied. Melatonin administration changed the parameters studied towards control values.

  3. Upgrades for the Project 8 Phase II Apparatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pettus, Walter; Project 8 Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    Project 8 employs the Cyclotron Radiation Emission Spectroscopy (CRES) technique towards the ultimate goal of a high precision tritium endpoint measurement. Following the successful first demonstration of CRES, the collaboration has pursued a number of improvements to the apparatus and has recently commissioned its second phase. A new cell design and gas handling system will allow the first measurement of molecular tritium with this setup. New data acquisition systems have been implemented providing greater trigger flexibility and scalability towards future multi-antenna phases. We will highlight the hardware and instrumentation advances defining this new experimental phase of Project 8.

  4. River Protection Project Integrated safety management system phase II verification report, volumes I and II - 8/19/99

    SciTech Connect

    SHOOP, D.S.

    1999-09-10

    The Department of Energy policy (DOE P 450.4) is that safety is integrated into all aspects of the management and operations of its facilities. In simple and straightforward terms, the Department will ''Do work safely.'' The purpose of this River Protection Project (RPP) Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS) Phase II Verification was to determine whether ISMS programs and processes are implemented within RFP to accomplish the goal of ''Do work safely.'' The goal of an implemented ISMS is to have a single integrated system that includes Environment, Safety, and Health (ES&H) requirements in the work planning and execution processes to ensure the protection of the worker, public, environment, and federal property over the RPP life cycle. The ISMS is comprised of the (1) described functions, components, processes, and interfaces (system map or blueprint) and (2) personnel who are executing those assigned roles and responsibilities to manage and control the ISMS. Therefore, this review evaluated both the ''paper'' and ''people'' aspects of the ISMS to ensure that the system is implemented within RPP. Richland Operations Office (RL) conducted an ISMS Phase I Verification of the TWRS from September 28-October 9, 1998. The resulting verification report recommended that TWRS-RL and the contractor proceed with Phase II of ISMS verification given that the concerns identified from the Phase I verification review are incorporated into the Phase II implementation plan.

  5. First results of GERDA Phase II and consistency with background models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agostini, M.; Allardt, M.; Bakalyarov, A. M.; Balata, M.; Barabanov, I.; Baudis, L.; Bauer, C.; Bellotti, E.; Belogurov, S.; Belyaev, S. T.; Benato, G.; Bettini, A.; Bezrukov, L.; Bode1, T.; Borowicz, D.; Brudanin, V.; Brugnera, R.; Caldwell, A.; Cattadori, C.; Chernogorov, A.; D'Andrea, V.; Demidova, E. V.; Di Marco, N.; Domula, A.; Doroshkevich, E.; Egorov, V.; Falkenstein, R.; Frodyma, N.; Gangapshev, A.; Garfagnini, A.; Gooch, C.; Grabmayr, P.; Gurentsov, V.; Gusev, K.; Hakenmüller, J.; Hegai, A.; Heisel, M.; Hemmer, S.; Hofmann, W.; Hult, M.; Inzhechik, L. V.; Janicskó Csáthy, J.; Jochum, J.; Junker, M.; Kazalov, V.; Kihm, T.; Kirpichnikov, I. V.; Kirsch, A.; Kish, A.; Klimenko, A.; Kneißl, R.; Knöpfle, K. T.; Kochetov, O.; Kornoukhov, V. N.; Kuzminov, V. V.; Laubenstein, M.; Lazzaro, A.; Lebedev, V. I.; Lehnert, B.; Liao, H. Y.; Lindner, M.; Lippi, I.; Lubashevskiy, A.; Lubsandorzhiev, B.; Lutter, G.; Macolino, C.; Majorovits, B.; Maneschg, W.; Medinaceli, E.; Miloradovic, M.; Mingazheva, R.; Misiaszek, M.; Moseev, P.; Nemchenok, I.; Palioselitis, D.; Panas, K.; Pandola, L.; Pelczar, K.; Pullia, A.; Riboldi, S.; Rumyantseva, N.; Sada, C.; Salamida, F.; Salathe, M.; Schmitt, C.; Schneider, B.; Schönert, S.; Schreiner, J.; Schulz, O.; Schütz, A.-K.; Schwingenheuer, B.; Selivanenko, O.; Shevzik, E.; Shirchenko, M.; Simgen, H.; Smolnikov, A.; Stanco, L.; Vanhoefer, L.; Vasenko, A. A.; Veresnikova, A.; von Sturm, K.; Wagner, V.; Wegmann, A.; Wester, T.; Wiesinger, C.; Wojcik, M.; Yanovich, E.; Zhitnikov, I.; Zhukov, S. V.; Zinatulina, D.; Zuber, K.; Zuzel, G.

    2017-01-01

    The GERDA (GERmanium Detector Array) is an experiment for the search of neutrinoless double beta decay (0νββ) in 76Ge, located at Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso of INFN (Italy). GERDA operates bare high purity germanium detectors submersed in liquid Argon (LAr). Phase II of data-taking started in Dec 2015 and is currently ongoing. In Phase II 35 kg of germanium detectors enriched in 76Ge including thirty newly produced Broad Energy Germanium (BEGe) detectors is operating to reach an exposure of 100 kg·yr within about 3 years data taking. The design goal of Phase II is to reduce the background by one order of magnitude to get the sensitivity for T1/20ν = O≤ft( {{{10}26}} \\right){{ yr}}. To achieve the necessary background reduction, the setup was complemented with LAr veto. Analysis of the background spectrum of Phase II demonstrates consistency with the background models. Furthermore 226Ra and 232Th contamination levels consistent with screening results. In the first Phase II data release we found no hint for a 0νββ decay signal and place a limit of this process T1/20ν > 5.3 \\cdot {1025} yr (90% C.L., sensitivity 4.0·1025 yr). First results of GERDA Phase II will be presented.

  6. Truck design optimization project. Phase II: Type II Truck test results report. Technical report Apr-Dec 80

    SciTech Connect

    Peacock, R.A.; Gibson, D.W.

    1981-12-01

    The purpose of the Type II Truck Test Program was to obtain performance data on several Type II (or premium) freight car trucks in order to characterize their operational behavior. Data were acquired in the performance regimes of curve negotiation, lateral stability, trackability, and ride quality. Tests were also conducted to obtain rolling resistance data as part of the fuel consumption study. Data on the Longitudinal coupler forces were used to compare the relative ability of various trucks to reduce rolling resistance and flanging forces, thus improving fuel consumption. The test program was designed to provide direct comparison measurements, wherever possible, with the Type I Truck tested earlier in TDOP Phase II. Seven Type II trucks were tested over the same test zones used during Type I testing. This report documents the changes to the instrumentation and equipment developed for Type I testing which were made for testing Type II trucks. Descriptions of the testing of each truck are presented, as are the procedures for data acquisition and reduction. Additionally, the report contains five appendices: Wheelset Calibration Data, Bearing Adapter Calibration Data, Type II Truck Test Plan and Procedure, Data Reduction Equations, and Transducer Location Measurement Data. The performance data gathered during testing will be used to formulate performance specifications for Type II trucks.

  7. Signal Processor for Unattended Radar (SPUR) Phase II.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-08-01

    Phase I effort and revised early in Phase 11, is described below. The results described in Section 4, Validation Results, are based on the reduced...Risks* Risk Reduction Approach Analog and A/D Processing Function . Automatic Testing and Calibration of Early Conversion to Digital Domain Processor...special importance. This risk has been minimized in the optimum SPUR by converting to the digital domain as early as possible and by specifying calibration

  8. Benzocaine polymorphism: pressure-temperature phase diagram involving forms II and III.

    PubMed

    Gana, Inès; Barrio, Maria; Do, Bernard; Tamarit, Josep-Lluís; Céolin, René; Rietveld, Ivo B

    2013-11-18

    Understanding the phase behavior of an active pharmaceutical ingredient in a drug formulation is required to avoid the occurrence of sudden phase changes resulting in decrease of bioavailability in a marketed product. Benzocaine is known to possess three crystalline polymorphs, but their stability hierarchy has so far not been determined. A topological method and direct calorimetric measurements under pressure have been used to construct the topological pressure-temperature diagram of the phase relationships between the solid phases II and III, the liquid, and the vapor phase. In the process, the transition temperature between solid phases III and II and its enthalpy change have been determined. Solid phase II, which has the highest melting point, is the more stable phase under ambient conditions in this phase diagram. Surprisingly, solid phase I has not been observed during the study, even though the scarce literature data on its thermal behavior appear to indicate that it might be the most stable one of the three solid phases. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Supplementing antioxidants to pigs fed diets high in oxidants: II. Effects on carcass characteristics, meat quality, and fatty acid profile.

    PubMed

    Lu, T; Harper, A F; Dibner, J J; Scheffler, J M; Corl, B A; Estienne, M J; Zhao, J; Dalloul, R A

    2014-12-01

    concentration of DHA in backfat (P<0.001); switching the diet on d 83 resulted in HO pigs having a similar fatty acid profile to SC at d 118 pigs. Vitamin E concentration in plasma and muscle was greater in HO and SC than VE, AOX, and VE+AOX on d 118. Feeding the high oxidant diet caused a series of changes in carcass characteristics and meat quality. Addition of antioxidant blend attenuated many of these, whereas the protective effects of supplemental vitamin E at 11 IU/kg were minimal during the finisher phase of the study.

  10. Phase II Audit Report - Energy & Water Audits of LLNL Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Horst, B I; Jacobs, P C; Pierce, S M

    2005-08-03

    This report describes Phase II of a project conducted for the Mechanical Utilities Division (UTel), Energy Management Program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) by Architectural Energy Corporation (AEC). The overall project covers energy efficiency and water conservation auditing services for 215 modular and prefabricated buildings at LLNL. The primary goal of this project is to demonstrate compliance with DOE Order 430.2A, Contractor Requirements Document section 2.d (2) Document, to demonstrate annual progress of at least 10 percent toward completing energy and water audits of all facilities. Although this project covers numerous buildings, they are all similar in design and use. The approach employed for completing audits for these facilities involves a ''model-similar building'' approach. In the model-similar building approach, similarities between groups of buildings are established and quantified. A model (or test case) building is selected and analyzed for each model-similar group using a detailed DOE-2 simulation. The results are extended to the group of similar buildings based on careful application of quantified similarities, or ''extension measures''. This approach leverages the relatively minor effort required to evaluate one building in some detail to a much larger population of similar buildings. The facility wide energy savings potential was calculated for a select set of measures that have reasonable payback based on the detailed building analysis and are otherwise desirable to the LLNL facilities staff. The selected measures are: (1) HVAC Tune-up. This is considered to be a ''core measure'', based on the energy savings opportunity and the impact on thermal comfort. All HVAC units in the study are assumed to be tuned up under this measure. See the Appendix for a detailed calculation by building and HVAC unit. (2) HVAC system scheduling. This is also considered to be a ''core measure'', based on the energy savings opportunity and

  11. Installation Restoration Program. Phase II. Confirmation/Quantification Stage I.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-02-24

    level below ground: vmA Temp. Addres Fahr . * Teat delivery.: pm _________________________________or -- - r Pump’ _7 Ral= _ Owner’s...esapletLea Or abadomat Of the 11." W= OWEI is oft drlled ole: - Tota2- Ii-e ,1 . p of well: at ag wter lev below O-0 Temp. Fahr . M eat er...Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH). In addition, UBTL is currently licensed by the Center for Disease Control (CDC) to perform

  12. Peripheral Inflammatory Markers and Antioxidant Response during the Post-Acute and Chronic Phase after Severe Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Licastro, Federico; Hrelia, Silvana; Porcellini, Elisa; Malaguti, Marco; Di Stefano, Cristina; Angeloni, Cristina; Carbone, Ilaria; Simoncini, Laura; Piperno, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a mechanical insult to the brain caused by external forces and associated with inflammation and oxidative stress. The patients may show different profiles of neurological recovery and a combination of oxidative damage and inflammatory processes can affect their courses. It is known that an overexpression of cytokines can be seen in peripheral blood in the early hours/days after the injury, but little is known about the weeks and months encompassing the post-acute and chronic phases. In addition, no information is available about the antioxidant responses mediated by the major enzymes that regulate reactive oxygen species levels: superoxide dismutase, catalase, peroxidases, and GSH-related enzymes. This study investigates the 6-month trends of inflammatory markers and antioxidant responses in 22 severe TBI patients with prolonged disorders of consciousness, consecutively recruited in a dedicated neurorehabilitation facility. Patients with a high degree of neurological impairment often show an uncertain outcome. In addition, the profiles of plasma activities were related to the neurological recovery after 12 months. Venous peripheral blood samples were taken blindly as soon as clinical signs and laboratory markers confirmed the absence of infections, 3 and 6 months later. The clinical and neuropsychological assessment continued up to 12 months. Nineteen patients completed the follow-up. In the chronic phase, persistent high plasma levels of cytokines can interfere with cognitive functioning and higher post-acute levels of cytokines [interferon (IFN)-γ, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, IL1b, IL6] are associated with poorer cognitive recoveries 12 months later. Moreover, higher IFN-γ, higher TNF-α, and lower glutathione peroxidase activity are associated with greater disability. The results add evidence of persistent inflammatory response, provide information about long-term imbalance of antioxidant activity, and suggest that

  13. Peripheral Inflammatory Markers and Antioxidant Response during the Post-Acute and Chronic Phase after Severe Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Licastro, Federico; Hrelia, Silvana; Porcellini, Elisa; Malaguti, Marco; Di Stefano, Cristina; Angeloni, Cristina; Carbone, Ilaria; Simoncini, Laura; Piperno, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a mechanical insult to the brain caused by external forces and associated with inflammation and oxidative stress. The patients may show different profiles of neurological recovery and a combination of oxidative damage and inflammatory processes can affect their courses. It is known that an overexpression of cytokines can be seen in peripheral blood in the early hours/days after the injury, but little is known about the weeks and months encompassing the post-acute and chronic phases. In addition, no information is available about the antioxidant responses mediated by the major enzymes that regulate reactive oxygen species levels: superoxide dismutase, catalase, peroxidases, and GSH-related enzymes. This study investigates the 6-month trends of inflammatory markers and antioxidant responses in 22 severe TBI patients with prolonged disorders of consciousness, consecutively recruited in a dedicated neurorehabilitation facility. Patients with a high degree of neurological impairment often show an uncertain outcome. In addition, the profiles of plasma activities were related to the neurological recovery after 12 months. Venous peripheral blood samples were taken blindly as soon as clinical signs and laboratory markers confirmed the absence of infections, 3 and 6 months later. The clinical and neuropsychological assessment continued up to 12 months. Nineteen patients completed the follow-up. In the chronic phase, persistent high plasma levels of cytokines can interfere with cognitive functioning and higher post-acute levels of cytokines [interferon (IFN)-γ, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, IL1b, IL6] are associated with poorer cognitive recoveries 12 months later. Moreover, higher IFN-γ, higher TNF-α, and lower glutathione peroxidase activity are associated with greater disability. The results add evidence of persistent inflammatory response, provide information about long-term imbalance of antioxidant activity, and suggest that

  14. The STAR beam energy scan phase II physics and upgrades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Videbaek, Flemming; STAR Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    The second phase of the Beam Energy Scan at RHIC will occur in 2019-2020 and will explore with precision measurements in the part of the QCD phase diagram where baryon densities are high. The program will examine energy regime of interest and turn the trends observed in phase-I into conclusions. This will be discussed in context of some of the key measurements, kurtosis of net-protons that could pinpoint the position of a critical point, measurements of directed flow of baryons vs. energy that might prove a softening of the EOS , and chiral restoration in the di-lepton channel. The measurements will be possible with an order of magnitude better statistics thanks to the electron cooling upgrade of RHIC, and the addition of the iTPC, Event Plane, and endcap TOF upgrades to STAR. Office of Nuclear Physics within the U.S. DOE Office of Science.

  15. Grassmann phase space methods for fermions. II. Field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalton, B. J.; Jeffers, J.; Barnett, S. M.

    2017-02-01

    In both quantum optics and cold atom physics, the behaviour of bosonic photons and atoms is often treated using phase space methods, where mode annihilation and creation operators are represented by c-number phase space variables, with the density operator equivalent to a distribution function of these variables. The anti-commutation rules for fermion annihilation, creation operators suggests the possibility of using anti-commuting Grassmann variables to represent these operators. However, in spite of the seminal work by Cahill and Glauber and a few applications, the use of Grassmann phase space methods in quantum-atom optics to treat fermionic systems is rather rare, though fermion coherent states using Grassmann variables are widely used in particle physics. This paper presents a phase space theory for fermion systems based on distribution functionals, which replace the density operator and involve Grassmann fields representing anti-commuting fermion field annihilation, creation operators. It is an extension of a previous phase space theory paper for fermions (Paper I) based on separate modes, in which the density operator is replaced by a distribution function depending on Grassmann phase space variables which represent the mode annihilation and creation operators. This further development of the theory is important for the situation when large numbers of fermions are involved, resulting in too many modes to treat separately. Here Grassmann fields, distribution functionals, functional Fokker-Planck equations and Ito stochastic field equations are involved. Typical applications to a trapped Fermi gas of interacting spin 1/2 fermionic atoms and to multi-component Fermi gases with non-zero range interactions are presented, showing that the Ito stochastic field equations are local in these cases. For the spin 1/2 case we also show how simple solutions can be obtained both for the untrapped case and for an optical lattice trapping potential.

  16. Military Interoperable Digital Hospital Testbed (MIDHT) Phase II

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-07-01

    0.00058 -0.00388 -0.01639 -0.01833 P o r t a g e N O R C A M -0.02550 -0.01126 -0.00370 -0.05563 -0.00681 -0.00417 -0.01754 9 Survey opportunities...satisfaction results are much lower than those reported by DesRoches et al2 regarding a 2008 national survey of physicians on EHR’s. Only 34% of CMMC...71020, 70450) by time period is presented below: P O S T P R E (baseline) Phase 1 Phase 2 2008 2009 2010 July through December January through

  17. An Experimental Evaluation of Hyperactivity and Food Additives. 1977-Phase II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harley, J. Preston; And Others

    Phase II of a study on the effectiveness of B. Feingold's recommended diet for hyperactive children involved the nine children (mean age 9 years) who had shown the "best" response to diet manipulation in Phase I. Each child served as his own control and was challenged with specified amounts of placebo and artificial color containing food…

  18. DEMONSTRATION OF FUEL CELLS TO RECOVER ENERGY FROM LANDFILL GAS: PHASE II. PRETREATMENT SYSTEM PERFORMANCE MEASUREMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report describes Phase II of a demonstration of the utilization of commercial phosphoric acid fuel cells to recover energy from landfill gas. This phase consisted primarily of the construction and testing of a Gas Pretreatment Unit (GPU) whose function is to remove those impu...

  19. A Unified Approach to Career Guidance Development in Secondary Schools. Phase II. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Welle, Jan

    Reporting the effectiveness of Phase II of Portland's Career Guidance and Counseling project, this document presents the summative data documenting the goals, objectives, and participant attitudes toward the project. (Phase I centered on strategies to improve counseling staff involvement in cooperative efforts to upgrade career guidance and…

  20. Proteomic comparison of phase I and II coxiella burnetii cells reveals potential virulence biomarkers

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Coxiella burnetii, a category B biological warfare agent, causes several worldwide outbreaks of zoonotic disease each year. In order to identify C. burnetii virulence factors, the virulent phase I and avirulent phase II variants of the Nine Mile RSA strains, were propagated in embryonated hen eggs ...

  1. 40 CFR 76.8 - Early election for Group 1, Phase II boilers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) ACID RAIN NITROGEN OXIDES EMISSION REDUCTION PROGRAM § 76.8 Early election for Group 1... plan and: (i) If a Phase I Acid Rain permit governing the source at which the unit is located has been... chapter to include the early election plan; or (ii) If a Phase I Acid Rain permit governing the source at...

  2. 40 CFR 76.8 - Early election for Group 1, Phase II boilers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) ACID RAIN NITROGEN OXIDES EMISSION REDUCTION PROGRAM § 76.8 Early election for Group 1... plan and: (i) If a Phase I Acid Rain permit governing the source at which the unit is located has been... chapter to include the early election plan; or (ii) If a Phase I Acid Rain permit governing the source at...

  3. 40 CFR 76.8 - Early election for Group 1, Phase II boilers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) ACID RAIN NITROGEN OXIDES EMISSION REDUCTION PROGRAM § 76.8 Early election for Group 1... plan and: (i) If a Phase I Acid Rain permit governing the source at which the unit is located has been... chapter to include the early election plan; or (ii) If a Phase I Acid Rain permit governing the source at...

  4. 40 CFR 76.8 - Early election for Group 1, Phase II boilers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) ACID RAIN NITROGEN OXIDES EMISSION REDUCTION PROGRAM § 76.8 Early election for Group 1... plan and: (i) If a Phase I Acid Rain permit governing the source at which the unit is located has been... chapter to include the early election plan; or (ii) If a Phase I Acid Rain permit governing the source at...

  5. 40 CFR 76.8 - Early election for Group 1, Phase II boilers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) ACID RAIN NITROGEN OXIDES EMISSION REDUCTION PROGRAM § 76.8 Early election for Group 1... plan and: (i) If a Phase I Acid Rain permit governing the source at which the unit is located has been... chapter to include the early election plan; or (ii) If a Phase I Acid Rain permit governing the source at...

  6. Forensic relevance of glucuronidation in phase-II-metabolism of alcohols and drugs.

    PubMed

    Kaeferstein, Herbert

    2009-04-01

    Forensic toxicology means detecting toxic or pharmacologically active substances in body fluids and organs and the evaluation and judgement of the respective results. In the legal judgement, not only the taken in active drugs, but also their metabolites are to be included. Regarding metabolism one distinguishes phase-I- and phase-II-metabolism. In the phase-I-metabolism, active substances are converted by oxidation, reduction or hydrolysis, but influencing the polarity of more lipophilic substances often not decisively. The pharmacological activity is often preserved or even increased. In phase-II-metabolism a highly hydrophilic substance--mostly glucuronic acid--is coupled to the active substances or the respective phase-I-metabolites. This reaction step decisively increases hydrophilicity of lipophilic substances, thus enhancing renal elimination and often also abolishing pharmacologically and/or toxicologically effects. Nevertheless the interaction of different drugs and alcohols in glucuronidation and the glucuronides of phase-II-metabolism still do not play a substantial role in the forensic-toxicological analysis and interpretation of results so far. However, in vitro investigations since 1999 in our lab show that such interactions are not unlikely. For valid interpretation of complex cases in the future it may become necessary not only to quantify drugs and the phase-I-metabolites but also the phase-II-metabolites and discuss possible interactions in the metabolism.

  7. Nematogenic Aromatic Block Copolymers of Rigid and Flexible Units. II. Phase Equilibria.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-11-06

    Phase Equilibria 12 PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) -W_ R_ Krinhaum- 7- Shuf~in-. Prpdnn- A (’ifiarri anri r. rnnin 13a 1,TAPOF -EPORT 113b TIME COVERED 14. DATE...and Flexible Units. II. Phase Equilibria by W. R. Krigbaum, Z. Shufan, Jack Preston, A. Ciferri and G. Conio q Prepared for Publication in the

  8. SH-2F LAMPS Instructional Systems Development: Phase II. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibbons, Andrew S.; Hymes, Jonah P.

    This project was one of four aircrew training development projects in a continuing study of the methodology, effectiveness, and resource requirements of the Instructional Systems Development (ISD) process. This report covers the Phase II activities of a two-phase project for the development of aircrew training for SH-2F anti-submarine warfare…

  9. An Experimental Evaluation of Hyperactivity and Food Additives. 1977-Phase II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harley, J. Preston; And Others

    Phase II of a study on the effectiveness of B. Feingold's recommended diet for hyperactive children involved the nine children (mean age 9 years) who had shown the "best" response to diet manipulation in Phase I. Each child served as his own control and was challenged with specified amounts of placebo and artificial color containing food…

  10. DEMONSTRATION OF FUEL CELLS TO RECOVER ENERGY FROM LANDFILL GAS: PHASE II. PRETREATMENT SYSTEM PERFORMANCE MEASUREMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report describes Phase II of a demonstration of the utilization of commercial phosphoric acid fuel cells to recover energy from landfill gas. This phase consisted primarily of the construction and testing of a Gas Pretreatment Unit (GPU) whose function is to remove those impu...

  11. Implementation of a Proficiency-Based Diploma System in Maine: Phase II--District Level Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silvernail, David L.; Stump, Erika K.; McCafferty, Anita Stewart; Hawes, Kathryn M.

    2014-01-01

    This report describes the findings from Phase II of a study of Maine's implementation of a proficiency-based diploma system. At the request of the Joint Standing Committee on Education and Cultural Affairs of the Maine Legislature, the Maine Policy Research Institute (MEPRI) has conducted a two-phased study of the implementation of Maine law…

  12. Nickel (II) Oxide Solubility and Phase Stability in High Temperature Aqueous Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    SE Ziemniak; MA Goyette

    2004-06-17

    A platinum-lined, flowing autoclave facility was used to investigate the solubility behavior of nickel(II) oxide (NiO) in deoxygenated ammonium and sodium hydroxide solutions between 21 and 315 C. Solubilities were found to vary between 0.4 and 400 nmol kg{sup -1}. The measured nickel ion solubilities were interpreted via a Ni(II) ion hydroxo-and amino-complexing model and thermodynamic functions for these equilibria were obtained from a least-squares analysis of the data. Two solid phase transformations were observed: at temperatures below 149 C, the activity of Ni(II) ions in aqueous solution was controlled by a hydrous Ni(II) oxide (theophrastite) solid phase rather than anhydrous NiO (bunsenite); above 247 C, Ni(II) activities were controlled by cubic rather than rhombohedral bunsenite.

  13. Evaluation in Adult Literacy Research. Project ALERT. Phase II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ntiri, Daphne Williams, Ed.

    This document contains an evaluation handbook for adult literacy programs and feedback from/regarding the evaluation instruments developed during the project titled Adult Literacy and Evaluation Research Team (also known as Project ALERT), a two-phase project initiated by the Detroit Literacy Coalition (DLC) for the purpose of developing and…

  14. Window Treatment Phase I and Other Energy II Conservation Measures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donohue, Philip E.

    Six different energy-saving treatments for large window areas were tested by Tompkins-Cortland Community College (TCCC) to coordinate energy saving with building design. The TCCC building has an open space design with 33,000 square feet of external glass and other features causing heating problems and high energy costs. Phase I of the…

  15. Window Treatment Phase I and Other Energy II Conservation Measures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donohue, Philip E.

    Six different energy-saving treatments for large window areas were tested by Tompkins-Cortland Community College (TCCC) to coordinate energy saving with building design. The TCCC building has an open space design with 33,000 square feet of external glass and other features causing heating problems and high energy costs. Phase I of the…

  16. Phase-II trials in osteosarcoma recurrences: A systematic review of past experience.

    PubMed

    Omer, Natacha; Le Deley, Marie-Cécile; Piperno-Neumann, Sophie; Marec-Berard, Perrine; Italiano, Antoine; Corradini, Nadège; Bellera, Carine; Brugières, Laurence; Gaspar, Nathalie

    2017-04-01

    The most appropriate design of Phase-II trials evaluating new therapies in osteosarcoma remains poorly defined. To study consistency in phase-II clinical trials evaluating new therapies for osteosarcoma recurrences with respect to eligibility criteria, response assessment, end-points, statistical design and reported results. Systematic review of clinical trials registered on clinicaltrials.gov, clinicaltrialsregister.eu and French National Cancer Institute website or referenced in PubMed and American Society of Clinical Oncology websites, between 2003 and 2016, using the following criteria: (osteosarcoma OR bone sarcoma) AND (Phase-II). Among the 99 trials identified, 80 were Phase-II, 17 I/II and 2 II/III, evaluating mostly targeted therapy (n = 40), and chemotherapy alone (n = 26). Results were fully (n = 28) or partially (abstract, n = 6) published. Twenty-four trials were dedicated to osteosarcoma, 22 had an osteosarcoma stratum. Twenty-eight out of 99 trials refer to the age range observed at recurrence (28%). Overall, 65 trials were run in multicentre settings, including 17 international trials. Only 9 trials were randomised. The primary end-point was tumour response in 71 trials (response rate, n = 40 or best response, n = 31), with various definitions (complete + partial ± minor response and stable disease), mainly evaluated with RECIST criteria (n = 69); it was progression-free survival in 24 trials and OS in 3. In single-arm trials evaluating response rate, the null hypothesis tested (when available, n = 12) varied from 5% to 25%. No robust historical data can currently be derived from past efficacy Phase-II trials. There is an urgent need to develop international randomised Phase-II trials across all age ranges with standardised primary end-point. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Antioxidant properties and neuroprotective effects of isocampneoside II on hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative injury in PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Si, Chuan-Ling; Shen, Ting; Jiang, Yun-Yao; Wu, Lei; Yu, Guo-Jing; Ren, Xiao-Dan; Xu, Guang-Hui; Hu, Wei-Cheng

    2013-09-01

    Oxidative stress has been considered as a major cause of cell damage in various neurodegenerative disorders. One of the reasonable strategies for delaying the disease's progression is to prevent reactive oxygen species (ROS) mediated cellular injury by dietary or pharmaceutical augmentation of free radical scavengers. Isocampneoside II (ICD) is an active phenylethanoid glycoside isolated from the medicinal hardwood genus Paulownia. This study was designed to explore free radical scavenging potential of ICD in different in vitro systems and its protective role in hydrogen peroxide (H₂O₂)-induced oxidative stress and apoptotic death in cultured rat pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells. The results showed ICD eliminated approximately 80.75% superoxide radical at the concentration of 0.1mg/ml and inhibited metal chelating by 22.07% at 8 mg/ml. Additionally, ICD showed a strong ability on reducing power and provided protection against oxidative protein damage induced by hydroxyl radicals. Pretreatment of PC12 cells with ICD prior to H₂O₂ exposure elevated cell viability, enhanced activity of superoxide dismutase and catalase, and decreased levels of malondialdehyde and intracellular ROS. Furthermore, ICD inhibited cell apoptosis and Bax/Bcl-2 ratio induced by H₂O₂. These findings suggested ICD may be considered as a potential antioxidant agent and should encourage for further research in neurodegenerative diseases. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Syntheses, crystal structures and antioxidant study of Zn(II) complexes with morin-5'-sulfonic acid (MSA).

    PubMed

    Pieniążek, Elżbieta; Kalembkiewicz, Jan; Dranka, Maciej; Woźnicka, Elżbieta

    2014-12-01

    The study of modified synthetic procedure of water soluble morin-5'-sulfonic acid sodium salt (NaMSA) involving less aggressive chemicals and carried out at mild conditions was described. The NaMSA salt is a convenient source of anionic morin-5'-sulfonic ligand (MSA) in ion exchange reactions. The coordination ability of MSA ligand towards the zinc cations was investigated in aqueous solution and in solid state. Novel zinc complexes of morin-5'-sulfonate were obtained by a reaction of Zn(NO3)2 with morin-5'-sulfonate in water. Resulting compounds were characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis, as well as spectral and thermal methods. The coordination interaction, hydrogen bond and π-π stacking lead to the formation of a 1D chain or 3D coordination polymers. The antioxidant activity of the Zn(II)-MSA complexes was evaluated by means of 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging method. In this work, we have shown that the studied compounds are more effective free radical scavengers than the natural flavonoids like plain morin.

  19. Biological Impact of Pd (II) Complexes: Synthesis, Spectral Characterization, In Vitro Anticancer, CT-DNA Binding, and Antioxidant Activities

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Nitin Kumar; Ameta, Rakesh Kumar; Singh, Man

    2016-01-01

    A new series of Pd (II) complexes of methyl substituted benzylamine ligands (BLs) has been synthesized and characterized via spectroscopic techniques such as UV/Vis. FTIR, LCMS, 1H, and 13C NMR. The UV/Vis study in DMSO, DMSO + water, and DMSO + PBS buffer (pH = 7.2) confirmed their molecular sustainability in liquids. Their in vitro anticancer activity against breast cancer cell lines such as MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 makes them interesting for in vivo analysis. Their stronger DNA binding activity (DBA) compared with free ligand suggested them as a good DNA binder. DBA was further confirmed by physicochemical studies such as surface tension and viscosity of complex + DNA which inferred the disruption of DNA and intercalation of complexes, respectively. Their % binding activity, % disruption of DNA base pairs (DNABP), and % intercalating strength are reported in this paper for the first time for better understanding of DNA binding mechanism. Along with this, their scavenging activity (SA) determined through DPPH free radical and the results indicate good antioxidant behaviour of complexes. PMID:26989511

  20. Phase relations between total solar irradiance and the Mg II index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, K. J.; Xu, J. C.; Xiang, N. B.; Feng, W.

    2016-01-01

    The Mg II index is usually used to represent the brightening contribution to total solar irradiance (TSI) by solar bright structures, such as faculae and network. In order to understand variations of TSI, phase relations of TSI and the chromospheric Mg II index is investigated on time-scales of one year and longer. The NOAA daily Mg II index at the time interval of November 17, 1978-October 24, 2007 is utilized to carry out correlation analyses respectively with the daily ACRIM and PMOD composites of TSI. The Mg II index is found to lead TSI by about one solar rotation period for time-scales of one year and longer. Correlation of TSI with the Mg II index on the time-scale of one year is sometimes significantly positive, sometimes statistically insignificant, and sometimes even significantly negative. When sunspot darkening is dominant, the correlation between TSI and Mg II is either negative or not significant. When TSI is backward shifted vs the Mg II index by about one rotation period, correlation between them becomes significantly positive in all years. Thus, it is after about one rotation period that a more prominent intensification is inferred to be contributed to TSI than that immediately, by bright constructions, which is represented by the Mg II index. We propose an explanation for the phase relationship of TSI and the Mg II index.

  1. Design of a Rotatable Copper Collimator for the LHC Phase II Collimation Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Jeffrey Claiborne; Doyle, Eric; Keller, Lewis; Lundgren, Steven; Markiewicz, Thomas Walter; Lari, Luisella; /LPHE, Lausanne

    2010-02-15

    The Phase II upgrade to the LHC collimation system calls for complementing the robust Phase I graphite collimators with high Z, low impedance Phase II collimators. The design for the collimation upgrade has not been finalized. One option is to use metallic rotatable collimators and this design will be discussed here. The Phase II collimators must be robust in various operating conditions and accident scenarios. Design issues include: (1) Collimator jaw deflection and sagitta due to heating must be small when operated in the steady state condition, (2) Collimator jaws must withstand transitory periods of high beam impaction with no permanent damage, (3) Jaws must recover from accident scenario where up to 8 full intensity beam pulses impact on the jaw surface and (4) The beam impedance contribution due to the collimators must be small to minimize coherent beam instabilities.

  2. Technical Analysis of the Hydrogen Energy Station Concept, Phase I and Phase II

    SciTech Connect

    TIAX, LLC

    2005-05-04

    patterns would be most viable for an energy station, TIAX developed several criteria for selecting a representative set of technology configurations. TIAX applied these criteria to all possible technology configurations to determine an optimized set for further analysis, as shown in Table ES-1. This analysis also considered potential energy station operational scenarios and their impact upon hydrogen and power production. For example, an energy station with a 50-kWe reformer could generate enough hydrogen to serve up to 12 vehicles/day (at 5 kg/fill) or generate up to 1,200 kWh/day, as shown in Figure ES-1. Buildings that would be well suited for an energy station would utilize both the thermal and electrical output of the station. Optimizing the generation and utilization of thermal energy, hydrogen, and electricity requires a detailed look at the energy transfer within the energy station and the transfer between the station and nearby facilities. TIAX selected the Baseline configuration given in Table ES-1 for an initial analysis of the energy and mass transfer expected from an operating energy station. Phase II The purpose of this technical analysis was to analyze the development of a hydrogen-dispensing infrastructure for transportation applications through the installation of a 50-75 kW stationary fuel cell-based energy station at federal building sites. The various scenarios, costs, designs and impacts of such a station were quantified for a hypothetical cost-shared program that utilizes a natural gas reformer to provide hydrogen fuel for both the stack(s) and a limited number of fuel cell powered vehicles, with the possibility of using cogeneration to support the building heat load.

  3. Immunological and biological characterization of Coxiella burnetii, phases I and II, separated from host components.

    PubMed Central

    Williams, J C; Peacock, M G; McCaul, T F

    1981-01-01

    Coxiella burnetii, phase I and II, cells cultivated in the yolk sac of chicken embryos were separated from host cell components by two cycles of isopycnic Renografin gradient centrifugation. Initial steps in the purification of viable C. burnetii involved differential centrifugation and sedimentation through an aqueous solution of 30% sucrose and 7.6% Renografin. After the first, but not the second, cycle of Renografin gradient centrifugation, the cells were passed through microfilter glass filters which facilitated the removal of host components. The integrity of morphologically different cell variants was maintained during purification procedures by suspending highly purified C. burnetii in phosphate-buffered saline-sucrose solutions. C. burnetii, phases I and II, obtained by these methods appeared to be free from host cell components by serological methods while retaining morphological integrity and infectivity for yolk sacs and experimental animals. Average yields of C. burnetii were 2.83, 1.5, and 0.84 mg (dry weight) per yolk sac of the Ohio strain (phase I), 9 Mile strain (phase I), and 9 Mile strain (phase II), respectively. Recovery of phase I cells averaged about 70%, whereas the recovery of phage II cells was approximately 40%. The temporal sequence of phase I and II antibody response was demonstrated in infected and vaccinated animals. Also, no antibody response in mice and guinea pigs to yolk sac antigens was detectable after two injections of vaccine or viable cells. Importantly, this is the first report of the separation of viable phase II cells of C. burnetii free of host components. Images PMID:7251150

  4. Analysis of the Yield of Phase II Combination Therapy Trials in Medical Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Maitland, Michael L.; Hudoba, Christine; Snider, Kelly L.; Ratain, Mark J.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Phase II clinical studies screen for treatment regimens that improve patient care, but screening combination regimens is especially challenging. We hypothesized that recognized flaws of single arm trials could be magnified in combination treatment studies, leading to many reported positive phase II trials but a low fraction resulting practice-changing phase III trials. Experimental Design We searched medline and identified 363 combination chemotherapy clinical trials published in 2001 and 2002. Studies were rated as positive, negative, or inconclusive based on standardized review of abstract and text. The Web of Science Index (Thomson Reuters, NY, NY) was searched for all articles published between 2003 and October 2007 that cited at least one of these 363 published trials. Results Of 363 published phase II combination chemotherapy trials, 262 (0.72) were declared to be positive. Among 3760 unique subsequent citing papers, 20 reported randomized phase III trials of the same combination in the same disease as the source paper, and 10 of these resulted in improved standards of care. Estimating from these data, the likelihood that a published, positive phase II combination chemotherapy trial will result in a subsequent trial demonstrating an improvement in standard of care within five years was 0.038 [95% confidence interval- 0.016, 0.064]. Conclusions The contributory value of combination chemotherapy phase II trials performed by 2001-02 standards is low despite the participation of more than 16,000 subjects. Future phase II studies of combination regimens require better methods to screen for treatments most likely to improve standards of care. PMID:20837695

  5. Maximizing return on socioeconomic investment in phase II proof-of-concept trials.

    PubMed

    Chen, Cong; Beckman, Robert A

    2014-04-01

    Phase II proof-of-concept (POC) trials play a key role in oncology drug development, determining which therapeutic hypotheses will undergo definitive phase III testing according to predefined Go-No Go (GNG) criteria. The number of possible POC hypotheses likely far exceeds available public or private resources. We propose a design strategy for maximizing return on socioeconomic investment in phase II trials that obtains the greatest knowledge with the minimum patient exposure. We compare efficiency using the benefit-cost ratio, defined to be the risk-adjusted number of truly active drugs correctly identified for phase III development divided by the risk-adjusted total sample size in phase II and III development, for different POC trial sizes, powering schemes, and associated GNG criteria. It is most cost-effective to conduct small POC trials and set the corresponding GNG bars high, so that more POC trials can be conducted under socioeconomic constraints. If δ is the minimum treatment effect size of clinical interest in phase II, the study design with the highest benefit-cost ratio has approximately 5% type I error rate and approximately 20% type II error rate (80% power) for detecting an effect size of approximately 1.5δ. A Go decision to phase III is made when the observed effect size is close to δ. With the phenomenal expansion of our knowledge in molecular biology leading to an unprecedented number of new oncology drug targets, conducting more small POC trials and setting high GNG bars maximize the return on socioeconomic investment in phase II POC trials. ©2014 AACR.

  6. Archaeological Investigations in the Upper Tombigbee Valley, Mississippi: Phase II.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-01-01

    previous year. Stripping allowed quick access to a cemented manganese | stratum which effectively sealed the Early Archaic component beneath it. A...I investigators (IV; Bense 1982: Chapter 10, * Figure 10.6), and judged to contain the sealed , intact early Archaic cultural deposits. During the...phase. Feature 4: a historic trash dumping area near what had been the southwest area of the ’old house. Mixed in with plastic, glass , nails, crockery

  7. Phase transitions in tumor growth: II prostate cancer cell lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llanos-Pérez, J. A.; Betancourt-Mar, A.; De Miguel, M. P.; Izquierdo-Kulich, E.; Royuela-García, M.; Tejera, E.; Nieto-Villar, J. M.

    2015-05-01

    We propose a mechanism for prostate cancer cell lines growth, LNCaP and PC3 based on a Gompertz dynamics. This growth exhibits a multifractal behavior and a "second order" phase transition. Finally, it was found that the cellular line PC3 exhibits a higher value of entropy production rate compared to LNCaP, which is indicative of the robustness of PC3, over to LNCaP and may be a quantitative index of metastatic potential tumors.

  8. Parasite Lactate Dehydrogenase for Diagnosis of Plasmodium Falciparum. Phase II.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-04-01

    Diagnosis of Plasmodium Falciparum PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Robert C. Piper, Ph.D. CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Flow, Incorporated Portland, Oregon 97201...Phase 11 (24 Mar 95 - 23 Mar 97) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5. FUNDING NUMBERS Parasite Lactate Dehydrogenase for Diagnosis of Plasmodium Falciparum DAMD...that infected patients become ill. Four species of Plasmodium infect humans. P. falciparum accounts for -85 % of the world’s malaria. P. falciparum is

  9. Apoptosis Induction by Polygonum minus is related to antioxidant capacity, alterations in expression of apoptotic-related genes, and S-phase cell cycle arrest in HepG2 cell line.

    PubMed

    Mohd Ghazali, Mohd Alfazari; Al-Naqeb, Ghanya; Krishnan Selvarajan, Kesavanarayanan; Hazizul Hasan, Mizaton; Adam, Aishah

    2014-01-01

    Polygonum minus (Polygonaceae) is a medicinal herb distributed throughout eastern Asia. The present study investigated antiproliferative effect of P. minus and its possible mechanisms. Four extracts (petroleum ether, methanol, ethyl acetate, and water) were prepared by cold maceration. Extracts were subjected to phytochemical screening, antioxidant, and antiproliferative assays; the most bioactive was fractionated using vacuum liquid chromatography into seven fractions (F1-F7). Antioxidant activity was measured via total phenolic content (TPC), 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH), and ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) assays. Antiproliferative activity was evaluated using 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Most active fraction was tested for apoptosis induction and cell cycle arrest in HepG2 cells using flow cytometry and confocal microscopy. Apoptotic-related gene expression was studied by RT-PCR. Ethyl acetate extract was bioactive in initial assays. Its fraction, F7, exhibited highest antioxidant capacity (TPC; 113.16 ± 6.2 mg GAE/g extract, DPPH; EC50: 30.5 ± 3.2 μg/mL, FRAP; 1169 ± 20.3 μmol Fe (II)/mg extract) and selective antiproliferative effect (IC50: 25.75 ± 1.5 μg/mL). F7 induced apoptosis in concentration- and time-dependent manner and caused cell cycle arrest at S-phase. Upregulation of proapoptotic genes (Bax, p53, and caspase-3) and downregulation of antiapoptotic gene, Bcl-2, were observed. In conclusion, F7 was antiproliferative to HepG2 cells by inducing apoptosis, cell cycle arrest, and via antioxidative effects.

  10. Apoptosis Induction by Polygonum minus Is Related to Antioxidant Capacity, Alterations in Expression of Apoptotic-Related Genes, and S-Phase Cell Cycle Arrest in HepG2 Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Mohd Ghazali, Mohd Alfazari; Al-Naqeb, Ghanya; Krishnan Selvarajan, Kesavanarayanan; Hazizul Hasan, Mizaton; Adam, Aishah

    2014-01-01

    Polygonum minus (Polygonaceae) is a medicinal herb distributed throughout eastern Asia. The present study investigated antiproliferative effect of P. minus and its possible mechanisms. Four extracts (petroleum ether, methanol, ethyl acetate, and water) were prepared by cold maceration. Extracts were subjected to phytochemical screening, antioxidant, and antiproliferative assays; the most bioactive was fractionated using vacuum liquid chromatography into seven fractions (F1–F7). Antioxidant activity was measured via total phenolic content (TPC), 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH), and ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) assays. Antiproliferative activity was evaluated using 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Most active fraction was tested for apoptosis induction and cell cycle arrest in HepG2 cells using flow cytometry and confocal microscopy. Apoptotic-related gene expression was studied by RT-PCR. Ethyl acetate extract was bioactive in initial assays. Its fraction, F7, exhibited highest antioxidant capacity (TPC; 113.16 ± 6.2 mg GAE/g extract, DPPH; EC50: 30.5 ± 3.2 μg/mL, FRAP; 1169 ± 20.3 μmol Fe (II)/mg extract) and selective antiproliferative effect (IC50: 25.75 ± 1.5 μg/mL). F7 induced apoptosis in concentration- and time-dependent manner and caused cell cycle arrest at S-phase. Upregulation of proapoptotic genes (Bax, p53, and caspase-3) and downregulation of antiapoptotic gene, Bcl-2, were observed. In conclusion, F7 was antiproliferative to HepG2 cells by inducing apoptosis, cell cycle arrest, and via antioxidative effects. PMID:24955361

  11. Phase-space structures - II. Hierarchical Structure Finder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maciejewski, M.; Colombi, S.; Springel, V.; Alard, C.; Bouchet, F. R.

    2009-07-01

    A new multidimensional Hierarchical Structure Finder (HSF) to study the phase-space structure of dark matter in N-body cosmological simulations is presented. The algorithm depends mainly on two parameters, which control the level of connectivity of the detected structures and their significance compared to Poisson noise. By working in six-dimensional phase space, where contrasts are much more pronounced than in three-dimensional (3D) position space, our HSF algorithm is capable of detecting subhaloes including their tidal tails, and can recognize other phase-space structures such as pure streams and candidate caustics. If an additional unbinding criterion is added, the algorithm can be used as a self-consistent halo and subhalo finder. As a test, we apply it to a large halo of the Millennium Simulation, where 19 per cent of the halo mass is found to belong to bound substructures, which is more than what is detected with conventional 3D substructure finders, and an additional 23-36 per cent of the total mass belongs to unbound HSF structures. The distribution of identified phase-space density peaks is clearly bimodal: high peaks are dominated by the bound structures and show a small spread in their height distribution; low peaks belong mostly to tidal streams, as expected. However, the projected (3D) density distribution of the structures shows that some of the streams can have comparable density to the bound structures in position space. In order to better understand what HSF provides, we examine the time evolution of structures, based on the merger tree history. Given the resolution limit of the Millennium Simulation, bound structures typically make only up to six orbits inside the main halo. The number of orbits scales approximately linearly with the redshift corresponding to the moment of merging of the structures with the halo. At fixed redshift, the larger the initial mass of the structure which enters the main halo, the faster it loses mass. The difference in

  12. Synthesis and Evaluation of In Vitro DNA/Protein Binding Affinity, Antimicrobial, Antioxidant and Antitumor Activity of Mononuclear Ru(II) Mixed Polypyridyl Complexes.

    PubMed

    Putta, Venkat Reddy; Chintakuntla, Nagamani; Mallepally, Rajender Reddy; Avudoddi, Srishailam; K, Nagasuryaprasad; Nancherla, Deepika; V V N, Yaswanth; R S, Prakasham; Surya, Satyanarayana Singh; Sirasani, Satyanarayana

    2016-01-01

    The four novel Ru(II) complexes [Ru(phen)2MAFIP](2+) (1) [MAFIP = 2-(5-(methylacetate)furan-2-yl)-1 H-imidazo[4,5-f] [1, 10]phenanthroline, phen = 1,10-Phenanthroline], [Ru(bpy)2MAFIP](2+) (2) (bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine) and [Ru(dmb)2MAFIP](2+) (3) (dmb = 4,4'-dimethyl-2,2'-bipyridine) and [Ru(hdpa)2MAFIP](2+) (4) (hdpa = 2,2-dipyridylamine) have been synthesized and fully characterized via elemental analysis, NMR spectroscopy, EI-MS and FT-IR spectroscopy. In addition, the DNA-binding behaviors of the complexes 1-4 with calf thymus DNA were investigated by UV-Vis absorption, fluorescence studies and viscosity measurement. The DNA-binding experiments showed that the complexes 1-4 interact with CT-DNA through an intercalative mode. BSA protein binding affinity of synthesized complexes was determined by UV/Vis absorption and fluorescence emission titrations. The binding affinity of ruthenium complexes was supported by molecular docking. The photoactivated cleavage of plasmid pBR322 DNA by ruthenium complexes 1-4 was investigated. All the synthesized compounds were tested for antimicrobial activity by using three Gram-negative (Escherichia coli, Salmonella typhi and Pseudomonas aeruginosa) and three Gram-positive (Micrococcus luteus, Bacillus subtilis and Bacillus megaterium) organisms, these results indicated that complex 3 was more activity compared to other complexes against all tested microbial strains while moderate antimicrobial activity profile was noticed for complex 4. The antioxidant activity experiments show that the complexes exhibit moderate antioxidant activity. The cytotoxicity of synthesized complexes on HeLa cell lines has been examined by MTT assay. The apoptosis assay was carried out with Acridine Orange (AO) staining methods and the results indicate that complexes can induce the apoptosis of HeLa cells. The cell cycle arrest investigated by flow cytometry and these results indicate that complexes 1-4 induce the cell cycle arrest at G0/G1

  13. A new approach for simultaneous determination of Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Pd(II) using 2-thiophenaldehyde-3-thiosemicarbazone as reagent by solid phase microextraction-high performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Varinder; Aulakh, Jatinder Singh; Malik, Ashok Kumar

    2007-11-05

    A new method is proposed herein for the sorption, separation and simultaneous determination of Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Pd(II) using 2-thiophenaldehyde-3-thiosemicarbazone (TPTS) as a reagent by solid phase microextraction-high performance liquid chromatography-UV detection. The method is based upon the sorption of metal complexes on polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) fiber from aqueous solution followed by desorption in the desorption chamber of solid phase microextraction-high performance liquid chromatography (SPME-HPLC) interface. Reversed phase high performance liquid chromatography using acetonitrile:water (65:35) as an eluent on a C18 column has been used to achieve the separation. The effects of agitation, addition of salts, extraction time and desorption time are examined to obtain optimized conditions. The detection limits for Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Pd(II) are 9, 6, 1 and 7 ng L(-1) based on 3sigma of blank response. The precision is calculated to be less than 3.5% (R.S.D.) for all species. A 10 time enhancement in the signal is observed for SPME when compared with direct analysis. The method is successfully applied to several synthetic mixtures without interference from other common metal ions such as Mo(VI), V(V), Ag(I), Sn(IV), Cd(II), Zn(II), Pb(II), Cr(III) and Cr(VI). The proposed method is tested for the determination of Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Pd(II) in alloys and water samples spiked with these metal ions.

  14. Silica gel-immobilized-dithioacetal derivatives as potential solid phase extractors for mercury(II).

    PubMed

    Mahmoud, M E; Gohar, G A

    2000-01-24

    Dithioacetal derivatives with different para-substituents, XH, CH(3), OCH(3), Cl and NO(2) were synthesized and chemically immobilized on the surface of silica gel for the formation of five newly synthesized silica gel phases (I-V). Characterization of the silica gel surface modification by the organic compounds was accomplished by both the surface coverage determination as well as the infrared spectroscopic analysis. The metal sorption properties of the silica gel phases were studied to evaluate their performance toward metal-uptake, extraction and selective extraction processes of different metal ions from aqueous solutions based on examination of the various controlling factors. The studied and evaluated factors are the pH effect of metal ion solution on the metal capacity values (mmol g(-1)), equilibration shaking time on the percent extraction as well as the structure and substituent (X) effects on the determined mmol g(-1) values. The results of these studies revealed a general rule of excellent affinity of these silica gel phases-immobilized-dithioacetal derivatives for selective extraction of mercury(II) in presence of other interfering metal ions giving rise to a range of 94-100% extraction of the spiked mercury(II) in the metal ions mixture. The potential application of the newly synthesized silica gel phases (I-V) for selective extraction of mercury(II) from two different natural water samples, namely sea and drinking tap water, spiked with 1.0 and 10.0 ng ml(-1) mercury(II) were also studied by column technique followed by cold vapour atomic absorption analysis of the unretained mercury(II). The results indicated a good percent extraction and removal (90-100+/-3%) of the spiked mercury(II) by all the five silica gel phases. In addition, insignificant contribution by the matrix effect on the processes of selective solid phase extraction of mercury(II) from natural water samples was also evident.

  15. Brassinosteroids improve photosystem II efficiency, gas exchange, antioxidant enzymes and growth of cowpea plants exposed to water deficit.

    PubMed

    Lima, J V; Lobato, A K S

    2017-01-01

    Water deficit is considered the main abiotic stress that limits agricultural production worldwide. Brassinosteroids (BRs) are natural substances that play roles in plant tolerance against abiotic stresses, including water deficit. This research aims to determine whether BRs can mitigate the negative effects caused by water deficiency, revealing how BRs act and their possible contribution to increased tolerance of cowpea plants to water deficit. The experiment was a factorial design with the factors completely randomised, with two water conditions (control and water deficit) and three levels of brassinosteroids (0, 50 and 100 nM 24-epibrassinolide; EBR is an active BRs). Plants sprayed with 100 nM EBR under the water deficit presented significant increases in ΦPSII, qP and ETR compared with plants subjected to the water deficit without EBR. With respect to gas exchange, PN, E and gs exhibited significant reductions after water deficit, but application of 100 nM EBR caused increases in these variables of 96, 24 and 33%, respectively, compared to the water deficit + 0 nM EBR treatment. To antioxidant enzymes, EBR resulted in increases in SOD, CAT, APX and POX, indicating that EBR acts on the antioxidant system, reducing cell damage. The water deficit caused significant reductions in Chl a, Chl b and total Chl, while plants sprayed with 100 nM EBR showed significant increases of 26, 58 and 33% in Chl a, Chl b and total Chl, respectively. This study revealed that EBR improves photosystem II efficiency, inducing increases in ΦPSII, qP and ETR. This substance also mitigated the negative effects on gas exchange and growth induced by the water deficit. Increases in SOD, CAT, APX and POX of plants treated with EBR indicate that this steroid clearly increased the tolerance to the water deficit, reducing reactive oxygen species, cell damage, and maintaining the photosynthetic pigments. Additionally, 100 nM EBR resulted in a better dose-response of cowpea plants

  16. Analysis of antioxidants from orange juice obtained by countercurrent supercritical fluid extraction, using micellar electrokinetic chromatography and reverse-phase liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Simó, Carolina; Ibañez, Elena; Señoráns, Francisco J; Barbas, Coral; Reglero, Guillermo; Cifuentes, Alejandro

    2002-11-06

    Antioxidants from orange juice were determined by the combined use of countercurrent supercritical fluid extraction (CC-SFE) prior to reverse-phase liquic chromatography (RP-LC) or micellar electrokinetic chromatography (MEKC). The separation of antioxidants found in the SFE fractions was achieved by using a new MEKC method and a published LC procedure, both using diode array detection. The characterization of the different antioxidants was further done by LC-mass spectrometry. Advantages and drawbacks of LC and MEKC for analyzing the antioxidants found in the different orange extracts are discussed. Although LC yields higher peak area and slightly better reproducibility than MEKC, the latter technique provides information about the CC-SFE extracts in analysis times 7 times faster than by LC. This analysis advantage can be used for the quick adjustment of CC-SFE conditions, thus providing a fast way to obtain orange fractions of specific composition.

  17. Comparing two tetraalkylammonium ionic liquids. II. Phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lima, Thamires A.; Paschoal, Vitor H.; Faria, Luiz F. O.; Ribeiro, Mauro C. C.; Ferreira, Fabio F.; Costa, Fanny N.; Giles, Carlos

    2016-06-01

    Phase transitions of the ionic liquids n-butyl-trimethylammonium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide, [N1114][NTf2], and methyl-tributylammonium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide, [N1444][NTf2], were investigated by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements, and Raman spectroscopy. XRD and Raman spectra were obtained as a function of temperature at atmospheric pressure, and also under high pressure at room temperature using a diamond anvil cell (DAC). [N1444][NTf2] experiences glass transition at low temperature, whereas [N1114][NTf2] crystallizes or not depending on the cooling rate. Both the ionic liquids exhibit glass transition under high pressure. XRD and low-frequency Raman spectra provide a consistent physical picture of structural ordering-disordering accompanying the thermal events of crystallization, glass transition, cold crystallization, pre-melting, and melting. Raman spectra in the high-frequency range of some specific cation and anion normal modes reveal conformational changes of the molecular structures along phase transitions.

  18. Comparing two tetraalkylammonium ionic liquids. II. Phase transitions.

    PubMed

    Lima, Thamires A; Paschoal, Vitor H; Faria, Luiz F O; Ribeiro, Mauro C C; Ferreira, Fabio F; Costa, Fanny N; Giles, Carlos

    2016-06-14

    Phase transitions of the ionic liquids n-butyl-trimethylammonium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide, [N1114][NTf2], and methyl-tributylammonium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide, [N1444][NTf2], were investigated by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements, and Raman spectroscopy. XRD and Raman spectra were obtained as a function of temperature at atmospheric pressure, and also under high pressure at room temperature using a diamond anvil cell (DAC). [N1444][NTf2] experiences glass transition at low temperature, whereas [N1114][NTf2] crystallizes or not depending on the cooling rate. Both the ionic liquids exhibit glass transition under high pressure. XRD and low-frequency Raman spectra provide a consistent physical picture of structural ordering-disordering accompanying the thermal events of crystallization, glass transition, cold crystallization, pre-melting, and melting. Raman spectra in the high-frequency range of some specific cation and anion normal modes reveal conformational changes of the molecular structures along phase transitions.

  19. Mineralizing urban net-zero water treatment: Phase II field ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Net-zero water (NZW) systems, or water management systems achieving high recycling rates and low residuals generation so as to avoid water import and export, can also conserve energy used to heat and convey water, while economically restoring local eco-hydrology. However, design and operating experience are extremely limited. The objective of this paper is to present the results of the second phase of operation of an advanced oxidation-based NZW pilot system designed, constructed, and operated for a period of two years, serving an occupied four-person apartment. System water was monitored, either continuously or thrice daily, for routine water quality parameters, minerals, and MicroTox® in-vitro toxicity, and intermittently for somatic and male-specific coliphage, adenovirus, Cryptosporidium, Giardia, emerging organic constituents (non-quantitative), and the Florida drinking water standards. All 115 drinking water standards with the exception of bromate were met in this phase. Neither virus nor protozoa were detected in the treated water, with the exception of measurement of adenovirus genome copies attributed to accumulation of inactive genetic material in hydraulic dead zones. Chemical oxygen demand was mineralized to 90% in treatment. Total dissolved solids were maintained at ∼500 mg/L at steady state, partially through aerated aluminum electrocoagulation. Bromate accumulation is projected to be controlled by aluminum electrocoagulation with separate dispo

  20. Investigation of high velocity separator for particle removal in coal gasification plants. Phase II report

    SciTech Connect

    Linhardt, H.D.

    1980-01-15

    This report summarizes the results of Phase II of the High Velocity Particle Separator Program performed under Contract EF-77-C-01-2709. This high velocity wedge separator has the potential to reduce equipment size and cost of high temperature and pressurized particulate removal equipment for coal derived gases. Phase II has been directed toward testing and detailed conceptual design of an element suitable for a commercial scale high temperature, high pressure particle separator (HTPS). Concurrently, Phase IA has been conducted, which utilized the ambient analog method (AAM) for aerodynamic and collection performance investigation of each HTPS configuration prior and during hot testing. This report summarizes the results of Phase IA and II. The AAM effort established correlation of theoretical analysis and experiment for HTPS pressure drop, purge flow ratio and collection efficiency potential. Task I defined the initial test conditions to be the contract design point of 1800/sup 0/F and 350 psia. The 1800/sup 0/F, 350 psia testing represents the main high temperature testing with coal-derived particulates in the 2 to 10 micron range. Phase IA and Phase II have demonstrated efficient particle collection with acceptable pressure drop. In view of these encouraging results, it is reasonable to apply the developed technology toward future hot gas particulate cleanup requirements.

  1. Generation of phase II in vitro metabolites using homogenized horse liver.

    PubMed

    Wong, Jenny K Y; Chan, George H M; Leung, David K K; Tang, Francis P W; Wan, Terence S M

    2016-02-01

    The successful use of homogenized horse liver for the generation of phase I in vitro metabolites has been previously reported by the authors' laboratory. Prior to the use of homogenized liver, the authors' laboratory had been using mainly horse liver microsomes for carrying out equine in vitro metabolism studies. Homogenized horse liver has shown significant advantages over liver microsomes for in vitro metabolism studies as the procedures are much quicker and have higher capability for generating more in vitro metabolites. In this study, the use of homogenized liver has been extended to the generation of phase II in vitro metabolites (glucuronide and/or sulfate conjugates) using 17β-estradiol, morphine, and boldenone undecylenate as model substrates. It was observed that phase II metabolites could also be generated even without the addition of cofactors. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of the successful use of homogenized horse liver for the generation of phase II metabolites. It also demonstrates the ease with which both phase I and phase II metabolites can now be generated in vitro simply by using homogenized liver without the need for ultracentrifuges or tedious preparation steps. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Association of Functional Variants of Phase I and II Genes with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease in a Serbian Population

    PubMed Central

    Stanković, Marija; Nikolić, Aleksandra; Tomović, Andrija; Mitić-Milikić, Marija; Nagorni-Obradović, Ljudmila; Petrović-Stanojević, Nataša; Radojković, Dragica

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a complex disorder characterized by increased oxidative stress. Functional genetic variants of phase I and II genes are implicated in oxidants–antioxidants imbalance and may be involved in COPD development. In this study, we aimed to investigate the role of cytochrome P450 (CYP), glutathione S-transferase (GST) and microsomal epoxide hydrolase (mEH) functional variants in the pathogenesis of COPD in a Serbian population. Methods The genotypes of 122 COPD patients and 100 controls with normal lung function were determined for CYP1A1 *1A/*2A, CYP2E1 *1A/*5B, GSTM1 null, GSTT1 null GSTP1 Ile105Val, mEH Tyr113His and mEH His139Arg gene variants. Results Results obtained showed that GSTM1 null variant was significantly more represented in COPD patients than in controls (61.5% vs. 47.0%; OR=1.80; p=0.042). Also, a significant difference was observed for combinations of GSTM1 null and GSTP1 105Val/(Val) (38.5% vs. 24.0%; OR=1.98; p=0.029), as well as for CYP1A1 *1A/*2A, GSTM1 null and mEH 113His/(His) genotypes (7.4% vs. 1.0%; OR=7.88; p=0.025). Conclusions These are the first data concerning the analysis of the variants of phase I and II genes in the pathogenesis of COPD in a Serbian population. Results obtained in this study open up the possibility for thorough analyses of the role of genetic factors in COPD on larger cohorts. Also, they implicate the importance of previously described genetic associations with COPD in our population, as well as reveal a new one, not reported so far. PMID:28356833

  3. Optical spectroscopic and reverse-phase HPLC analyses of Hg(II) binding to phytochelatins.

    PubMed Central

    Mehra, R K; Miclat, J; Kodati, V R; Abdullah, R; Hunter, T C; Mulchandani, P

    1996-01-01

    Optical spectroscopy and reverse-phase HPLC were used to investigate the binding of Hg(II) to plant metal-binding peptides (phytochelatins) with the structure (gammaGlu-Cys)2Gly, (gammaGlu-Cys)3Gly and (gammaGlu-Cys)4Gly. Glutathione-mediated transfer of Hg(II) into phytochelatins and the transfer of the metal ion from one phytochelatin to another was also studied using reverse-phase HPLC. The saturation of Hg(II)-induced bands in the UV/visible and CD spectra of (gammaGlu-Cys)2Gly suggested the formation of a single Hg(II)-binding species of this peptide with a stoichiometry of one metal ion per peptide molecule. The separation of apo-(gammaGlu-Cys)2Gly from its Hg(II) derivative on a C18 reverse-phase column also indicated the same metal-binding stoichiometry. The UV/visible spectra of both (gammaGlu-Cys)3Gly and (gammaGlu-Cys)4Gly at pH 7.4 showed distinct shoulders in the ligand-to-metal charge-transfer region at 280-290 mm. Two distinct Hg(II)-binding species, occurring at metal-binding stoichiometries of around 1.25 and 2.0 Hg(II) ions per peptide molecule, were observed for (gammaGlu-Cys)3Gly. These species exhibited specific spectral features in the charge-transfer region and were separable by HPLC. Similarly, two main Hg(II)-binding species of (gammaGlu-Cys)4Gly were observed by UV/visible and CD spectroscopy at metal-binding stoichiometries of around 1.25 and 2.5 respectively. Only a single peak of Hg(II)-(gammaGlu-Cys)4Gly complexes was resolved under the conditions used for HPLC. The overall Hg(II)-binding stoichiometries of phytochelatins were similar at pH 2.0 and at pH 7.4, indicating that pH did not influence the final Hg(II)-binding capacity of these peptides. The reverse-phase HPLC assays indicated a rapid transfer of Hg(II) from glutathione to phytochelatins. These assays also demonstrated a facile transfer of the metal ion from shorter- to longer-chain phytochelatins. The strength of Hg(II) binding to glutathione and phytochelatins followed the

  4. Reverse-phase HPLC separation of hemp seed (Cannabis sativa L.) protein hydrolysate produced peptide fractions with enhanced antioxidant capacity.

    PubMed

    Girgih, Abraham T; Udenigwe, Chibuike C; Aluko, Rotimi E

    2013-03-01

    Hemp seed protein hydrolysate (HPH) was produced through simulated gastrointestinal tract (GIT) digestion of hemp seed protein isolate followed by partial purification and separation into eight peptide fractions by reverse-phase (RP)-HPLC. The peptide fractions exhibited higher oxygen radical absorbance capacity as well as scavenging of 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl, superoxide and hydroxyl radicals when compared to HPH. Radical scavenging activities of the fractionated peptides increased as content of hydrophobic amino acids or elution time was increased, with the exception of hydroxyl radical scavenging that showed decreased trend. Glutathione (GSH), HPH and the RP-HPLC peptide fractions possessed low ferric ion reducing ability but all had strong (>60 %) metal chelating activities. Inhibition of linoleic acid oxidation by some of the HPH peptide fractions was higher at 1 mg/ml when compared to that observed at 0.1 mg/ml peptide concentration. Peptide separation resulted in higher concentration of some hydrophobic amino acids (especially proline, leucine and isoleucine) in the fractions (mainly F5 and F8) when compared to HPH. The elution time-dependent increased concentrations of the hydrophobic amino acids coupled with decreased levels of positively charged amino acids may have been responsible for the significantly higher (p < 0.05) antioxidant properties observed for some of the peptide fractions when compared to the unfractionated HPH. In conclusion, the antioxidant activity of HPH after simulated GIT digestion is mainly influenced by the amino acid composition of some of its peptides.

  5. Project 8 Phase II: Improved beta decay electrons reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guigue, Mathieu; Project 8 Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The Project 8 collaboration aims to measure the absolute neutrino mass scale using a cyclotron radiation emission spectroscopy technique on the beta decays of tritium. The second phase of the project will measure a differential spectrum of tritium beta decays and extract the tritium endpoint value with an eV or sub-eV scale precision. Monoenergetic electrons emitted by gaseous 83mKr atoms can be used to determine the coefficient between the cyclotron frequency and the electron energy and to optimize the instrument configuration for the tritium measurement. We present the progress on the processing of the electron cyclotron radiation signal to reconstruct the beta decay spectrum of krypton and tritium.

  6. Silica Waste Utilisation Phase II - Preliminary Laboratory Results

    SciTech Connect

    Lund, J.W.; Boyd, T.L.

    1995-01-01

    A second phase of laboratory testing is being performed on waste silica from the Cerro Prieto geothermal field in Mexico. The main objective is to produce mixes of various combinations of hydrated lime, portland cement, and plastic fibers with the waste silica from disposal ponds to determine their suitability for use as insulating bricks in low cost housing. Silica-cement mixtures appear to have the highest flexural strength and resistance to weathering. Silica-lime mixtures appear to have the best insulating properties (lowest thermal conductivity). The addition of plastic fibers to the silica-lime mixture appears to improve both strength and weather resistance. Work is still in progress and will be completed in 1996 with the construction of various test walls in the Mexicali, Mexico area.

  7. Identification of Phase II Metabolites of Thiol-conjugated [6]-Shogaol in Mouse Urine Using High-Performance Liquid Chromatography Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Huadong; Sang, Shengmin

    2012-01-01

    Ginger is frequently consumed as a spice and has numerous medicinal properties. Extensive research has characterized the anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and antitumor activities of ginger. Previously, we reported the mercapturic acid pathway as a major metabolic route of [6]-shogaol in mice and the thiol conjugates of [6]-shogaol existed in the glucuronidated and sulfated forms in mouse urine. However, their structures are still unknown. In the present study, we further investigated the phase II metabolism of thiol-conjugated [6]-shogaol in mouse urine, in which we identified sixteen phase II metabolites of thiol-conjugated [6]-shogaol: 5-cysteinyl-[6]-shogaol glucuronide (9), 5-N-acetylcysteinyl-[6]-shogaol glucuronide (10), 5-cysteinylglycinyl-[6]-shogaol glucuronide (11), 5-methylthio-[6]-shogaol glucuronide (12), 5-cysteinyl-M6 glucuronide (13 and 14), 5-cysteinyl-M6 sulfate (15 and 16), 5-N-acetylcysteinyl-M6 glucuronide (17 and 18), 5-cysteinylglycinyl-M6 glucuronide (19 and 20), 5-cysteinylglycinyl-M6 sulfate (21 and 22), and 5-methylthio-M6 glucuronide (23 and 24) using liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry. The structures of these metabolites were confirmed by analyzing their MSn (n =1! 4) spectra as well as comparing with the tandem mass spectra of authentic standards. To our knowledge, this is the first report involving identification of phase II urinary metabolites of [6]-shogaol in mice. PMID:23031413

  8. Hope-X high speed flight demonstration program phase II - a CNES/NAL/NASDA cooperation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venel, S.; Faucon, P.; Yanagihara, M.; Miyazawa, Y.; Akimoto, T.; Sagisaka, M.

    2004-01-01

    In the frame of its cooperation with the National Space Development Agency of Japan (NASDA), the CNES French Space Agency takes part in the High Speed Flight Demonstration (HSFD) Phase II. The HSFD program is planned as part of the National Aerospace Laboratory (NAL) and NASDA joint research for the H-II Orbiting Plane Experiment (HOPE-X), an unmanned re-entry vehicle project. The program consists of two phases, and the purpose of HSFD Phase II is to estimate the HOPE-X transonic aerodynamic characteristics: a sub-scaled vehicle will be lifted to high altitude by a stratospheric balloon, from where it will be released and will accelerate into free fall to transonic region. The CNES Balloon Division is responsible for the balloon system, the launch operation, and the recovery of the vehicle after touch down. Six flights are planned between May and August 2003.

  9. Installation Restoration Program. Phase II. Confirmation/Quantification. Stage I. Tyndall Air Force Base, Florida.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-08-01

    interferences is not currently available in the literature . TOX data at Tyndall AFB are insufficient to quantify positive TOX inter- ference. Inspection of...Virginia 22314 II. °9 - -. Z Z Z S IN INSTALLATION RESTORATION PROGRAM PHASE II - CONFIRMATION/qUANTIFICATION 9. STAGE I FINAL REPORT FOR TYNDALL ...AIR FORCE BASE TYNDALL AIR FORCE BASE, FLORIDA r TACTICAL AIR COMMAND * -LANGLEY AIR FORCE BASE, VIRGINIA 23665 AUGUST 1984 PREPARED BY WATER AND AIR

  10. Measured Sensitivity of the First Mark II Phased Array Feed on an ASKAP Antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chippendale, A. P.; Brown, A. J.; Beresford, R. J.; Hampson, G. A.; Macleod, A.; Shaw, R. D.; Brothers, M. L.; Cantrall, C.; Forsyth, A. R.; Hay, S. G.; Leach, M.

    2015-09-01

    This paper presents the measured sensitivity of CSIRO's first Mk. II phased array feed (PAF) on an ASKAP antenna. The Mk. II achieves a minimum system-temperature-over-efficiency T_{sys}/η of 78 K at 1.23 GHz and is 95 K or better from 835 MHz to 1.8 GHz. This PAF was designed for the Australian SKA Pathfinder telescope to demonstrate fast astronomical surveys with a wide field of view for the Square Kilometre Array (SKA).

  11. Phase Equilibria and Transition in Mixtures of a Homopolymer and a Block Copolymer. II.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-01-26

    AD-A124 929 PHASE EQUILIBRIA AND TRANSITION IN MIXTURES OF A In- NOMOPOLYMER AND’A BLOCK..(U) CINCINNATI UNJY ON DEPT OF MATERIALS SCIENCE AND...REPORT NO. 7 v2 L Phase Equilibria and Transition in Mixtures of a Homopolymer and a Block Copolymer II. The Phase Diagram by R. J. Roe and W. C. Zin...homopolymers as in our systems. The phase equilibria at temperatures above the "pseudo-triple point" BCD can be interpreted in terms of the free energy of

  12. Syntheses, crystallographic, mass-spectroscopic determination and antioxidant studies of Co(II), Ni(II) and Cu(II) complexes of a new imidazol based Schiff base.

    PubMed

    Demir, Serkan; Güder, Aytaç; Yazıcılar, Turan K; Çağlar, Sema; Büyükgüngör, Orhan

    2015-01-01

    A new imidazole-based Schiff base, 2-((1H-imidazol-4-yl)methyleneamino)benzylalcohol (HL) and corresponding analogous bis(2-((1H-imidazol-4-yl)methyleneimino)benzylalcohol)metal(II) perchlorates (M: Co(1), Ni(2), Cu(3)) have prepared and characterized by elemental analyses, ESI-MS, IR, UV-Vis spectroscopies and conductivity measurements. X-ray single crystal structures of 1 and 2 have been also determined. Elemental analyses, spectroscopic and conductance data of 3 demonstrated similar structural features with these of crystallographically characterized complexes and based upon this relevances, HL ligands are neutrally coordinated to metal(II) ions in tridentate mode and all complexes are isostructural, dicathionic, contain perchlorate anions as complementary ions and, are in octahedral geometry with the formulae of [M(HL)2](ClO4)2 (for 3) and [M(HL)2](ClO4)2·H2O (for 1 and 2). Radical scavenging activities of the complexes have been evaluated by using DPPH, DMPD(+), and ABTS(+) assays. SC50 values (μg/mL) of the complexes and standards on DPPH, DMPD(+), ABTS(+) follow the sequences, BHA (9.06±0.33)>CMPD3 (15.62±0.52)>CMPD2 (17.43±0.29)>Rutin (21.65±0.60)>CMPD1 (25.67±0.51)>Trolox (28.57±0.37), Rutin>BHA>CMPD3>CMPD2>Trolox>CMPD1, and Trolox>BHA>CMPD3>CMPD2>Rutin>CMPD1 respectively. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Antioxidant and photosystem II responses contribute to explain the drought-heat contrasting tolerance of two forage legumes.

    PubMed

    Signorelli, Santiago; Casaretto, Esteban; Sainz, Martha; Díaz, Pedro; Monza, Jorge; Borsani, Omar

    2013-09-01

    Identification of metabolic targets of environmental stress factors is critical to improve the stress tolerance of plants. Studying the biochemical and physiological responses of plants with different capacities to deal with stress is a valid approach to reach this objective. Lotus corniculatus (lotus) and Trifolium pratense (clover) are legumes with contrasting summer stress tolerances. In stress conditions, which are defined as drought, heat or a combination of both, we found that differential biochemical responses of leaves explain these behaviours. Lotus and clover showed differences in water loss control, proline accumulation and antioxidant enzymatic capacity. Drought and/or heat stress induced a large accumulation of proline in the tolerant species (lotus), whereas heat stress did not cause proline accumulation in the sensitive species (clover). In lotus, Mn-SOD and Fe-SOD were induced by drought, but in clover, the SOD-isoform profile was not affected by stress. Moreover, lotus has more SOD-isoforms and a higher total SOD activity than clover. The functionality and electrophoretic profile of photosystem II (PSII) proteins under stress also exhibited differences between the two species. In lotus, PSII activity was drastically affected by combined stress and, interestingly, was correlated with D2 protein degradation. Possible implications of this event as an adaption mechanism in tolerant species are discussed. We conclude that the stress-tolerant capability of lotus is related to its ability to respond to oxidative damage and adaption of the photosynthetic machinery. This reveals that these two aspects should be included in the evaluation of the tolerance of species to stress conditions.

  14. RadSTraM: Radiological Source Tracking and Monitoring, Phase II Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, Tracy A; Walker, Randy M; Hill, David E; Gross, Ian G; Smith, Cyrus M; Abercrombie, Robert K

    2008-12-01

    This report focuses on the technical information gained from the Radiological Source Tracking and Monitoring (RadSTraM) Phase II investigation and its implications. The intent of the RadSTraM project was to determine the feasibility of tracking radioactive materials in commerce, particularly International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Category 3 and 4 materials. Specifically, Phase II of the project addressed tracking radiological medical isotopes in commerce. These categories of materials are susceptible to loss or theft but the problem is not being addressed by other agencies.

  15. OCCIDENTAL VERTICAL MODIFIED IN SITU PROCESS FOR THE RECOVERY OF OIL FROM OIL SHALE. PHASE II

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Reid M.

    1980-09-01

    The progress presented in this report covers the period June 1, 1980 through August 31, 1980 under the work scope for.Phase II of the DOE/Occidental Oil Shale, Inc. (OOSI) Cooperative Agreement. The major activities at OOSI 1s Logan Wash site during the quarter were: mining the voids at all levels for Retorts 7, 8 and 8x; completing Mini-Retort (MR) construction; continuing surface facility construction; tracer testing the MR 1 s; conducting Retorts 7 & 8 related Rock Fragmentation tests; setting up and debugging the Sandia B-61 trailer; and preparing the Phase II instrumentation plan.

  16. A Custom Made Skeletal Class II Corrector Appliance in Late Adolescent Phase

    PubMed Central

    Tripathi, Tulika; Rai, Priyank; Kalra, Shilpa; Neha

    2017-01-01

    Skeletal Class II correction in deceleration phase of growth is both a challenge and dilemma with choice between extraction and myofunctional therapy. With marginal growth remaining the convenient choice is extraction for camouflage of the skeletal discrepancy. On the other hand, the treatment with Fixed Functional Appliances (FFAs) helps in resolution of the problem without sacrificing the dentition. However, the conventional FFAs requires a phase of alignment which results in further loss of time to utilize any remaining growth. The present report proposes the use of a novel custom made functional appliance for Class II skeletal correction which is simple to fabricate and convenient to use. PMID:28571289

  17. LYSIS OF T4 PHAGE BY THE SPECIFIC LIPOCARBOHYDRATE OF PHASE II SHIGELLA SONNEI

    PubMed Central

    Jesaitis, Margeris A.; Goebel, Walther F.

    1955-01-01

    When the specific lipocarbohydrate of Phase II Sh. sonnei and T4 phage react in vitro, the virus is rapidly inactivated and the content of the viral membrane is released into the surrounding medium. The reaction between phage and lipocarbohydrate proceeds only in the presence of a lipide constituent which can be extracted from the polysaccharide, rendering the latter inactive, and which can be replaced by certain fatty acids. It has been suggested that the lipocarbohydrate is the receptor substance of the Phase II bacillus which specifically combines with and brings about disintegration of the virus when the latter infects the host cell. PMID:13271686

  18. MHD coal combustor technology. Final report, phase II

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-09-01

    The design, performance, and testing of a 20-MW coal combustor for scaleup to 50 MW for use in an MHD generator are described. The design incorporates the following key features: (1) a two-stage combustor with an intermediate slag separator to remove slag at a low temperture, thus minimizing enthalpy losses required for heating and vaporizing the slag; (2) a first-stage pentad (four air streams impinging on one coal stream) injector design with demonstrated efficient mixing, promoting high carbon burnout; (3) a two-section first-stage combustion chamber; the first stage using a thin slag-protected refractory layer and the second section using a thick refractory layer, both to minimize heat losses; (4) a refractory lining in the slag separator to minimize heat losses; (5) a second-stage combustor, which provided both de-swirl of the combustion products exiting from the slag separator and simple mixing of the vitiated secondary air and seed; (6) a dense-phase coal feed system to minimize cold carrier gas entering the first-stage combustors; (7) a dry seed injection system using pulverized K/sub 2/CO/sub 3/ with a 1% amorphous, fumed silicon dioxide additive to enhance flowability, resulting in rapid vaporization and ionization and ensuring maximum performance; and (8) a performance evaluation module (PEM) of rugged design based on an existing, successfully-fired unit. (WHK)

  19. The pixel detector for the CMS phase-II upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinardo, M. E.

    2015-04-01

    The high luminosity phase of the Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC) requires a major pixel detector R&D effort to develop both readout chip and sensor that are capable to withstand unprecedented extremely high radiation. The target integrated luminosity of 3000 fb-1, that the HL-LHC is expected to deliver over about 10 years of operation, translates into a hadron fluence of 2×1016 1 MeV eq.n. / cm2, or equivalently 10 MGy of radiation dose in silicon, at about 3 cm from the interaction region where the first layer of the pixel detector could be located. The CMS collaboration has undertaken two baseline sensor R&D programs on thin n-on-p planar and 3D silicon sensor technologies. Together with the ATLAS collaboration it has also been established a common R&D effort for the development of the readout chip in the 65 nm CMOS technology. Status, progresses, and prospects of the CMS R&D effort are presented and discussed in this article.

  20. Design of Training Systems, Phase I Final Report Appendices, Volume II of II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bellamy, Harold J.; And Others

    A series of five appendixes presents details related to Phase I of the three-stage project "Design of Training Systems" (DOTS). The first appendix discusses strategic assumptions and processes, while the second reviews mathematical models and data bases operational within the navel education and training command. The third appendix…

  1. Application of Bayesian hierarchical models for phase I/II clinical trials in oncology.

    PubMed

    Yada, Shinjo; Hamada, Chikuma

    2017-03-01

    Treatment during cancer clinical trials sometimes involves the combination of multiple drugs. In addition, in recent years there has been a trend toward phase I/II trials in which a phase I and a phase II trial are combined into a single trial to accelerate drug development. Methods for the seamless combination of phases I and II parts are currently under investigation. In the phase II part, adaptive randomization on the basis of patient efficacy outcomes allocates more patients to the dose combinations considered to have higher efficacy. Patient toxicity outcomes are used for determining admissibility to each dose combination and are not used for selection of the dose combination itself. In cases where the objective is not to find the optimum dose combination solely for efficacy but regarding both toxicity and efficacy, the need exists to allocate patients to dose combinations with consideration of the balance of existing trade-offs between toxicity and efficacy. We propose a Bayesian hierarchical model and an adaptive randomization with consideration for the relationship with toxicity and efficacy. Using the toxicity and efficacy outcomes of patients, the Bayesian hierarchical model is used to estimate the toxicity probability and efficacy probability in each of the dose combinations. Here, we use Bayesian moving-reference adaptive randomization on the basis of desirability computed from the obtained estimator. Computer simulations suggest that the proposed method will likely recommend a higher percentage of target dose combinations than a previously proposed method.

  2. A phase I/II clinical trial of enzyme replacement therapy in mucopolysaccharidosis II (Hunter syndrome).

    PubMed

    Muenzer, Joseph; Gucsavas-Calikoglu, Muge; McCandless, Shawn E; Schuetz, Thomas J; Kimura, Alan

    2007-03-01

    To evaluate the safety and explore the efficacy of idursulfase (recombinant human iduronate-2-sulfatase) treatment for mucopolysaccharidosis II (MPS II). Twelve patients were enrolled into a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial for 24 weeks followed by an open-label extension study. Three groups of 4 patients were enrolled sequentially, with 3 patients in each group receiving idursulfase and 1 patient receiving placebo. The first group received idursulfase at 0.15 mg/kg infused every other week with the 2nd and 3rd groups receiving 0.5 and 1.5 mg/kg, respectively. After 24 weeks the placebo-treated patients were changed to idursulfase at the dose of their group. The primary endpoint was a change from baseline in urinary excretion of glycosaminoglycans. Results were pooled for analysis by ANOVA and compared to baseline. Urinary glycosaminoglycans were reduced within 2 weeks of initiating idursulfase and were decreased 49% after 48 weeks of treatment (P<0.0001). Both liver and spleen volume were decreased at 24 weeks (P<0.01) and 48 weeks (P<0.001). The 6-minute walk test distance increased an average of 48 meters after 48 weeks (P=0.013). Six patients in the higher dose groups developed IgG antibodies that did not influence the clinical effects of idursulfase. This study describes the first experience with enzyme replacement therapy for the treatment of patients with MPS II. Idursulfase was generally well tolerated and was associated with reductions in urine glycosaminoglycans levels and organ size, as well as an increased 6-minute walk test distance.

  3. Ruthenium(II) carbonyl complexes containing pyridine carboxamide ligands and PPh3/AsPh3/Py coligands: Synthesis, spectral characterization, catalytic and antioxidant studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramachandran, Rangasamy; Viswanathamurthi, Periasamy

    2013-02-01

    New ruthenium(II) carbonyl complexes bearing pyridine carboxamide and triphenylphosphine/triphenylarsine/pyridine have been prepared by direct reaction of ruthenium(II) precursors with some pyridine carboxamide ligands, N,N-bis(2-pyridinecarboxamide)-1,2-ethane (H2L1), N,N-bis(2-pyridinecarboxamide)-1,2-benzene (H2L2) and N,N-bis(2-pyridinecarboxamide)-trans-1,2-cyclohexane (H2L3). The organic ligands offering two Namide and two Npyridine donor sites to the metal centre. They have been characterized by elemental analyses, FT-IR, UV-Visible, NMR (1H, 13C and 31P) and ESI-MS techniques. Based on the above data, an octahedral structure has been assigned for all the complexes. The catalytic efficiency of the complexes in transfer hydrogenation of ketones in the presence of iPrOH/KOH and N-alkylation of amine in the presence of tBuOK was examined. Furthermore, the antioxidant activity of the ligands and its ruthenium(II) complexes were determined by DPPH radical, nitric oxide radical, hydroxyl radical and hydrogen peroxide scavenging methods, which indicates that the ruthenium(II) complexes exhibit more effective antioxidant activity than the ligands alone.

  4. One more health benefit of blood donation: reduces acute-phase reactants, oxidants and increases antioxidant capacity.

    PubMed

    Yunce, Muharrem; Erdamar, Husamettin; Bayram, Nezihe Asli; Gok, Sumeyye

    2016-11-01

    One of the most important problems in finding blood donors is the inadequacy of volunteer number. To overcome this problem, one of the solutions we suggest is innovating new health benefits of blood donation. The aim of the present study is to investigate the effects of blood donation on oxidative status markers and acute-phase reactants. A total of 96 healthy volunteers were recruited into the study. Blood samples were withdrawn 5 min before and 24 h after the blood donation. Serum nitric oxide, malondialdehyde levels, and activity of superoxide dismutase and myeloperoxidase were measured spectrophotometrically. Serum levels of high-sensitive C-reactive protein and pentraxin-3 as acute-phase reactants were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kits. We found statistically significant lower pentraxin-3 and high-sensitive C-reactive protein levels and higher superoxide dismutase activity and nitric oxide level 24 h after blood donation in serum of blood donor when compared with before blood donation. These findings suggest that blood donation affected oxidative status and acute-phase reactants in donors. Blood donation removes oxidants and decreases oxidative stress by elevating antioxidant enzyme such as superoxide dismutase. This is one more health benefit or reason why we should donate blood. Further large-scale studies should evaluate this mechanism and compare the same effect of wet cupping therapy.

  5. Stable Low Cloud Phase II: Nocturnal Event Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauman, William H., III; Barrett, Joe, III

    2007-01-01

    This report describes the work done by the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) in developing a database of nights that experienced rapid (< 90 minutes) low cloud formation in a stable atmosphere, resulting in ceilings at the Shuttle Landing Facility (TTS) that violated Space Shuttle Flight Rules (FR). This work is the second phase of a similar AMU task that examined the same phenomena during the day. In the first phase of this work, the meteorological conditions favoring the rapid formation of low ceilings include the presence of any inversion below 8000 ft, high relative humidity (RH) beneath the inversion and a clockwise turning of the winds from the surface to the middle troposphere (-15000 ft). The AMU compared and contrasted the atmospheric and thermodynamic conditions between nights with rapid low ceiling formation and nights with low ceilings resulting from other mechanisms. The AMU found that there was little to discern between the rapidly-forming ceiling nights and other low ceiling nights at TTS. When a rapid development occurred, the average RH below the inversions was 87% while non-events had an average RH of 79%. One key parameter appeared to be the vertical wind profile in the Cape Canaveral, FL radiosonde (XMR) sounding. Eighty-three percent of the rapid development events had veering winds with height from the surface to the middle troposphere (-15,000 ft) while 61% of the non-events had veering winds with height. Veering winds indicate a warm-advection regime, which supports large-scale rising motion and ultimately cloud formation in a moist environment. However, only six of the nights (out of 86 events examined) with low cloud ceilings had an occurrence of rapidly developing ceilings. Since only 7% rapid development events were observed in this dataset, it is likely that rapid low cloud development is not a common occurrence during the night, or at least not as common as during the day. In the AMU work on the daytime rapid low cloud development (Case

  6. Measured aperture-array noise temperature of the Mark II phased array feed for ASKAP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chippendale, A. P.; Brown, A. J.; Beresford, R. J.; Hampson, G. A.; Shaw, R. D.; Hayman, D. B.; Macleod, A.; Forsyth, A. R.; Hay, S. G.; Leach, M.; Cantrall, C.; Brothers, M. L.; Hotan, A. W.

    2015-11-01

    We have measured the aperture-array noise temperature of the first Mk. II phased array feed that CSIRO has built for the Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder telescope. As an aperture array, the Mk. II phased array feed achieves a beam equivalent noise temperature less than 40 K from 0.78 GHz to 1.7 GHz and less than 50 K from 0.7 GHz to 1.8 GHz for a boresight beam directed at the zenith. We believe these are the lowest reported noise temperatures over these frequency ranges for ambient-temperature phased arrays. The measured noise temperature includes receiver electronics noise, ohmic losses in the array, and stray radiation from sidelobes illuminating the sky and ground away from the desired field of view. This phased array feed was designed for the Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder to demonstrate fast astronomical surveys with a wide field of view for the Square Kilometre Array.

  7. Synthesis, characterization, DNA interaction, antioxidant and anticancer activity of new ruthenium(II) complexes of thiosemicarbazone/semicarbazone bearing 9,10-phenanthrenequinone.

    PubMed

    Anitha, Panneerselvam; Chitrapriya, Nataraj; Jang, Yoon Jung; Viswanathamurthi, Periasamy

    2013-12-05

    A new series of octahedral ruthenium(II) complexes supported by tridentate ligands derived from phenanthrenequinone and derivatives of thiosemicarbazide/semicarbazide and other co-ligands have been synthesized and characterized. DNA binding experiments indicated that ruthenium(II) complexes can interact with DNA through non-intercalation and the apparent binding constant value (Kb) of [RuCl(CO)(PPh₃)(L₃)] (3) at room temperature was calculated to be 2.27 × 10(3)M(-1). The DNA cleavage studies showed that the complexes have better cleavage of pBR 322 DNA. Antioxidative activity proved that the complexes have significant radical scavenging activity against free radicals. Cytotoxic activities showed that the ruthenium(II) complexes exhibited more effective cytotoxic activity against selected cancer cells.

  8. Changes in hepatic phase I and phase II biotransformation enzyme expression and glutathione levels following atrazine exposure in female rats.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, Arthur D; Breckenridge, Charles B; Yi, Kun D; Sawhney Coder, Pragati; Wanders, Desiree; Judd, Robert L; Foradori, Chad D

    2017-10-05

    1. To determine the effects of repeated atrazine (ATR) treatment on hepatic phase I and II enzymes, adult female rats were treated with vehicle or 100 mg/kg of ATR for 1, 2, 3 or 4 days. Glutathione-s-transferases (GST) mRNA expression, protein levels (mu, pi, alpha, omega), and activity (cytosolic and microsomal), along with bioavailable glutathione (GSH) were assayed. 2. GST expression, concentrations and activity were increased, along with GSH levels, in animals treated with ATR for 3 and 4 days. 3. A subsequent study was performed with animals treated with vehicle, 6.5, 50 or 100 mg/kg/day for 4, 8 or 14 days. Expression of hepatic phase I CYP 450 enzymes was evaluated in conjugation with GST expression, protein and activity. Nineteen of the 45 CYP enzymes assayed displayed increased mRNA levels after eight days of treatment in animals treated with 50 or 100 mg/kg/day. After 14 days of treatment, all CYP expression levels returned to control levels except for CYP2B2, CYP2B3, CYP2C7, CYP2C23, CYP2E1, CYP3A9, CYP4A3 and CYP27A1, which remained elevated. 4. Results indicate that there may be a habituation or adaptation of liver phase I and phase II expression following repeated ATR treatment.

  9. Degradation of cellulose at the wet-dry interface. II. Study of oxidation reactions and effect of antioxidants.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Myung-Joon; Dupont, Anne-Laurence; de la Rie, E René

    2014-01-30

    To better understand the degradation of cellulose upon the formation of a tideline at the wet-dry interface when paper is suspended in water, the production of chemical species involved in oxidation reactions was studied. The quantitation of hydroperoxides and hydroxyl radicals was carried out in reverse phase chromatography using triphenylphosphine and terephthalic acid, respectively, as chemical probes. Both reactive oxygen species were found in the tideline immediately after its formation, in the range of micromoles and nanomoles per gram of paper, respectively. The results indicate that hydroxyl radicals form for the most part in paper before the tideline experiment, whereas hydroperoxides appear to be produced primarily during tideline formation. Iron sulfate impregnation of the paper raised the production of hydroperoxides. After hygrothermal aging in sealed vials the hydroxyl radical content in paper increased significantly. When aged together in the same vial, tideline samples strongly influenced the degradation of samples from other areas of the paper (multi-sample aging). Different types of antioxidants were added to the paper before the tideline experiment to investigate their effect on the oxidation reactions taking place. In samples treated with iron sulfate or artificially aged, the addition of Irgafos 168 (tris(2,4-ditert-butylphenyl) phosphate) and Tinuvin 292 (bis(1,2,2,6,6-pentamethyl-4-piperidyl) sebacate and methyl 1,2,2,6,6-pentamethyl-4-piperidyl sebacate) reduced the concentration of hydroperoxides and hydroxyl radicals, respectively. Tinuvin 292 was also found to considerably lower the rate of cellulose chain scission reactions during hygrothermal aging of the paper.

  10. Specific threonine-4 phosphorylation and function of RNA polymerase II CTD during M phase progression

    PubMed Central

    Hintermair, Corinna; Voß, Kirsten; Forné, Ignasi; Heidemann, Martin; Flatley, Andrew; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Imhof, Axel; Eick, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic phosphorylation of Tyr1-Ser2-Pro3-Thr4-Ser5-Pro6-Ser7 heptad-repeats in the C-terminal domain (CTD) of the large subunit coordinates progression of RNA polymerase (Pol) II through the transcription cycle. Here, we describe an M phase-specific form of Pol II phosphorylated at Thr4, but not at Tyr1, Ser2, Ser5, and Ser7 residues. Thr4 phosphorylated Pol II binds to centrosomes and midbody and interacts with the Thr4-specific Polo-like kinase 1. Binding of Pol II to centrosomes does not require the CTD but may involve subunits of the non-canonical R2TP-Prefoldin-like complex, which bind to and co-localize with Pol II at centrosomes. CTD Thr4 mutants, but not Ser2 and Ser5 mutants, display severe mitosis and cytokinesis defects characterized by multipolar spindles and polyploid cells. We conclude that proper M phase progression of cells requires binding of Pol II to centrosomes to facilitate regulation of mitosis and cytokinesis in a CTD Thr4-P dependent manner. PMID:27264542

  11. 78 FR 5765 - Wireline Competition Bureau Releases Connect America Phase II Cost Model Virtual Workshop...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-28

    ...] Wireline Competition Bureau Releases Connect America Phase II Cost Model Virtual Workshop Discussion Topics... Competition Bureau releases for discussion a number of virtual workshop topics related to the development and... comments. Virtual Workshop: In addition to the usual methods for filing electronic comments, the...

  12. 7 CFR 3403.8 - Proposal format for phase II applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... FOOD AND AGRICULTURE SMALL BUSINESS INNOVATION RESEARCH GRANTS PROGRAM Preparation of Proposals § 3403... of the innovation. (iii) Market. Milestone, target dates, analyses of market size, and estimated... Collection. Each Phase II applicant will be required to provide information to the Tech-Net Database...

  13. 40 CFR 125.91 - What is a “Phase II Existing Facility”?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...? 125.91 Section 125.91 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER... Applicable to Cooling Water Intake Structures for Phase II Existing Facilities Under Section 316(b) of the...: (1) It is a point source. (2) It uses or proposes to use cooling water intake structures with a...

  14. 40 CFR 125.91 - What is a “Phase II Existing Facility”?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...? 125.91 Section 125.91 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER... Applicable to Cooling Water Intake Structures for Phase II Existing Facilities Under Section 316(b) of the...: (1) It is a point source. (2) It uses or proposes to use cooling water intake structures with a...

  15. 40 CFR 125.91 - What is a “Phase II Existing Facility”?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...? 125.91 Section 125.91 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER... Applicable to Cooling Water Intake Structures for Phase II Existing Facilities Under Section 316(b) of the...: (1) It is a point source. (2) It uses or proposes to use cooling water intake structures with a...

  16. 40 CFR 125.91 - What is a “Phase II Existing Facility”?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...? 125.91 Section 125.91 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER... Applicable to Cooling Water Intake Structures for Phase II Existing Facilities Under Section 316(b) of the...: (1) It is a point source. (2) It uses or proposes to use cooling water intake structures with a...

  17. 40 CFR 125.91 - What is a “Phase II Existing Facility”?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...? 125.91 Section 125.91 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER... Applicable to Cooling Water Intake Structures for Phase II Existing Facilities Under Section 316(b) of the...: (1) It is a point source. (2) It uses or proposes to use cooling water intake structures with a...

  18. 7 CFR 3403.8 - Proposal format for phase II applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... provide information to the Tech-Net Database System (http://technet.sba.gov) per OMB No. 3245-03356. The following are examples of the data to be entered by applicants into Tech-Net: (i) Any business concern or... information in the Tech-Net database for any prior Phase II award received by the small business concern. (b)...

  19. Career Options Research and Development. Materials From Phase II Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    YMCA of Metropolitan Chicago, IL. Career Options Research and Development (CORD).

    The Social Service Aide Project for the training and education of paraprofessionals is a part of the Career Options Research and Development project of the Young Men's Christian Association of Chicago. These materials from the Phase II Final Report include: (1) Fourth Quarterly Progress Report (July-September 1970)," (2) "Systems…

  20. NATO/CCMS PILOT STUDY CLEAN PRODUCTS AND PROCESSES (PHASE II) 2003 ANNUAL REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The 6th annual meeting of the NATO CCMS Pilot Study, Clean Products and Processes, was held in Cetraro, Italy, from May 11 to 15, 2003. This was also the first meeting of its Phase II study. 24 country representatives attended this meeting. This meeting was very ably run by th...

  1. 40 CFR 76.7 - Revised NOX emission limitations for Group 1, Phase II boilers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Revised NOX emission limitations for Group 1, Phase II boilers. 76.7 Section 76.7 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) ACID RAIN NITROGEN OXIDES EMISSION REDUCTION PROGRAM § 76.7 Revised NOX...

  2. 40 CFR 76.7 - Revised NOX emission limitations for Group 1, Phase II boilers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Revised NOX emission limitations for Group 1, Phase II boilers. 76.7 Section 76.7 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) ACID RAIN NITROGEN OXIDES EMISSION REDUCTION PROGRAM § 76.7 Revised NOX...

  3. 40 CFR 76.7 - Revised NOX emission limitations for Group 1, Phase II boilers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Revised NOX emission limitations for Group 1, Phase II boilers. 76.7 Section 76.7 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) ACID RAIN NITROGEN OXIDES EMISSION REDUCTION PROGRAM § 76.7 Revised NOX...

  4. 40 CFR 76.7 - Revised NOX emission limitations for Group 1, Phase II boilers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Revised NOX emission limitations for Group 1, Phase II boilers. 76.7 Section 76.7 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) ACID RAIN NITROGEN OXIDES EMISSION REDUCTION PROGRAM § 76.7 Revised NOX...

  5. 40 CFR 76.7 - Revised NOX emission limitations for Group 1, Phase II boilers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Revised NOX emission limitations for Group 1, Phase II boilers. 76.7 Section 76.7 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) ACID RAIN NITROGEN OXIDES EMISSION REDUCTION PROGRAM § 76.7 Revised NOX...

  6. 76 FR 55947 - Industrial Relations Promotion Project, Phase II in Vietnam

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-09

    ... of the Secretary Industrial Relations Promotion Project, Phase II in Vietnam AGENCY: Bureau of... funded.. DAI, through its Industrial Relations Promotion Project (IRRP), is the only organization that... disputes and sound industrial relations by developing approaches in cooperation with trade unions/worker...

  7. A Feasibility Study on the Model Elementary Teacher Education Program. Phase II, Vol. I. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Massachusetts Univ., Amherst.

    The first volume of the study contains a 25-page overview of the complete feasibility study (Phase II), including sections on pedagogical feasibility, management feasibility, economic feasibility, simulation modeling, client acceptability, inservice design, evaluation and research, and maintaining relevance of the model for teacher education in…

  8. Webcam Delivery of the Camperdown Program for Adolescents Who Stutter: A Phase II Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carey, Brenda; O'Brian, Sue; Lowe, Robyn; Onslow, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: This Phase II clinical trial examined stuttering adolescents' responsiveness to the Webcam-delivered Camperdown Program. Method: Sixteen adolescents were treated by Webcam with no clinic attendance. Primary outcome was percentage of syllables stuttered (%SS). Secondary outcomes were number of sessions, weeks and hours to maintenance,…

  9. Analysis of thermophilic fungal populations during phase II of composting for the cultivation of Agaricus subrufescens.

    PubMed

    Souza, Thiago Pereira; Marques, Simone Cristina; da Silveira e Santos, Débora Marques; Dias, Eustáquio Souza

    2014-09-01

    The composition and genetic diversity of fungal populations during phase II of compost production for the cultivation of Agaricus subrufescens was determined using culture-dependent and -independent methods on days 3, 6, 10, 12, and 14 of phase II composting. The isolates were morphologically characterized and subsequently analyzed using repetitive extragenic palindromic sequences (rep-PCR), and the intergenic region was sequenced to genetically identify the isolates. Changes on in the filamentous fungi population were analyzed using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE), and the resulting bands were sequenced. The population did not significantly change from day 3 to 10 (2.55 x 10(5) -6 x 10(5) CFU g(-1)), and maximum counts on day 14 of phase II composting (6.92 log CFU g(-1)). In the morphological characterization, Scytalidium thermophilum, Thermomyces lanuginosus, and Thermomyces ibadanensis were the most abundant identified species. The 26 most abundant isolates identified by morphological analysis were characterized using rep-PCR. A significant amount of genetic diversity was detected among the isolates of all three studied species. Based on the DGGE analysis, the diversity of the fungi was reduced during phase II composting, and S. thermophilum was the predominant species identified throughout the entire process. Thus, this study presents the first report of the involvement of T. ibadanensis in the production of compost for Agaricus mushroom cultivation.

  10. 78 FR 8184 - DEEPWATER HORIZON Oil Spill; Final Phase II Early Restoration Plan and Environmental Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-05

    ... DEEPWATER HORIZON Oil Spill; Final Phase II Early Restoration Plan and Environmental Review AGENCY: Interior... Addressing Injuries Resulting from the DEEPWATER HORIZON Oil Spill (Framework Agreement), notice is hereby... services injured or lost as a result of the DEEPWATER HORIZON oil spill, which occurred on or about April...

  11. One-week administration of hydroxytyrosol to humans does not activate Phase II enzymes.

    PubMed

    Crespo, Maria Carmen; Tomé-Carneiro, Joao; Burgos-Ramos, Emma; Loria Kohen, Viviana; Espinosa, Maria Isabel; Herranz, Jesus; Visioli, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    The notion that (poly)phenols act as direct free radical scavengers is being challenged by mere chemical and biochemical considerations such as bioavailability and intracellular concentrations. An alternative hypothesis that is gaining considerable traction is that (poly)phenols are processed by the body as xenobiotics via the Keap1/Nrf2/ARE signaling axis, leading to the induction of Phase II enzymes. However, there are no solid human data to confirm this interesting supposition. In this study, we tested the activities of hydroxytyrosol (HT) on Phase II enzymes' expression in a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled study. We tested two HT doses, i.e. 5 and 25mg/d, vs. placebo following a Latin square design. We report that HT is well tolerated but does not significantly modify Phase II enzyme expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Moreover, we were unable to record significant effects on a variety of surrogate markers of cardiovascular disease such as lipid profile and inflammation and oxidation markers. Available evidence indicates that the "hormesis hypothesis" that (poly)phenols activate Phase II enzymes requires solid human confirmation that might be provided by future trials. This study is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov (identifier: NCT02273622). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Definition of the Semisubmersible Floating System for Phase II of OC4

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, A.; Jonkman, J.; Masciola, M.; Song, H.; Goupee, A.; Coulling, A.; Luan, C.

    2014-09-01

    Phase II of the Offshore Code Comparison Collaboration Continuation (OC4) project involved modeling of a semisubmersible floating offshore wind system as shown below. This report documents the specifications of the floating system, which were needed by the OC4 participants for building aero-hydro-servo-elastic models.

  13. Washington Phase II Fish Diversion Screen Evaluations in the Yakima River Basin, 1998.

    SciTech Connect

    Blanton, S.L.; McMichael, Geoffrey A.; Neitzel, D.A.

    1999-12-01

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) evaluated 19 Phase II screen sites in the Yakima River Basin as part of a multi-year study for the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) on the effectiveness of fish screening devices. The sites were examined to determine if they were being effectively operated and maintained to provide fish a safe, efficient return to the Yakima River.

  14. Webcam Delivery of the Camperdown Program for Adolescents Who Stutter: A Phase II Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carey, Brenda; O'Brian, Sue; Lowe, Robyn; Onslow, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: This Phase II clinical trial examined stuttering adolescents' responsiveness to the Webcam-delivered Camperdown Program. Method: Sixteen adolescents were treated by Webcam with no clinic attendance. Primary outcome was percentage of syllables stuttered (%SS). Secondary outcomes were number of sessions, weeks and hours to maintenance,…

  15. Project Care Phase II: A Case Study in the Evaluation of Communication and Learning Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Frederick; And Others

    Phase II was a field evaluation of a communication and learning system package of films, simulation games, discussion questions, and posters designed to promote career awareness in junior high school children. It was proposed that this evaluation serves as a prototype for the assessment of the effects of learning systems on the affective and…

  16. Phase II: Resource and Referral Service, Research and Development Exchange. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hull, William L.

    Activities of the Resource and Referral Service (RRS), a central service contractor to the Research and Development Exchange (RDx), are documented for the period between March 1, 1977, when Phase II was funded, to November 30, 1977. Product outputs from RRS are described and related to project objectives. The objectives, which correspond to…

  17. NATO/CCMS PILOT STUDY CLEAN PRODUCTS AND PROCESSES (PHASE II) 2003 ANNUAL REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The 6th annual meeting of the NATO CCMS Pilot Study, Clean Products and Processes, was held in Cetraro, Italy, from May 11 to 15, 2003. This was also the first meeting of its Phase II study. 24 country representatives attended this meeting. This meeting was very ably run by th...

  18. Emotional Intelligence and Implications for Counseling Self-Efficacy: Phase II

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Easton, Crystal; Martin, William E.; Wilson, Sheilah

    2008-01-01

    The authors present Phase II of a 9-month study of the relationship between emotional intelligence and counseling self-efficacy. One-hundred eighteen counselors-in-training and professional counselors completed the Counseling Self-Estimate Inventory (COSE) and Emotional Judgment Inventory (EJI). There was a significant correlation between 2 of the…

  19. 40 CFR 300.305 - Phase II-Preliminary assessment and initiation of action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Phase II-Preliminary assessment and...—Preliminary assessment and initiation of action. (a) The OSC is responsible for promptly initiating a preliminary assessment. (b) The preliminary assessment shall be conducted using available information...

  20. Pharmacologically significant complexes of Mn(II), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II) of novel Schiff base ligand, (E)-N-(furan-2-yl methylene) quinolin-8-amine: Synthesis, spectral, XRD, SEM, antimicrobial, antioxidant and in vitro cytotoxic studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakir, M.; Hanif, Summaiya; Sherwani, Mohd. Asif; Mohammad, Owais; Al-Resayes, Saud I.

    2015-07-01

    A novel series of metal complexes of the types, [ML2(H2O)2]Cl2 and [ML2]Cl2 [M = Mn(II), 1; Co(II), 2; Ni(II), 3; Cu(II), 4; and Zn(II), 5] were synthesized by the interaction of ligand, L (E)-N-(furan-2-yl methylene) quinolin-8-amine, derived from the condensation of 2-furaldehyde and 8-aminoquinoline. The synthesized ligand and its metal complexes were characterized on the basis of results obtained from elemental analysis, ESI-MS, XRD, SEM, TGA/DTA, FT-IR, UV-Vis, magnetic moment and 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopic studies. EPR parameters were recorded in case of complex 4. The comparative in-vitro antimicrobial activities against various pathogens with reference to known antibiotics and antioxidant activity against standard control at variable concentrations revealed that the metal complexes show enhanced antimicrobial and free radical scavenging activities in general as compared to free ligand. However, the complexes 1 and 5 have shown best antioxidant activity among all the metal complexes. Furthermore, comparative in-vitro antiproliferative activity on ligand and its metal chelates performed on MDA-MB-231 (breast carcinoma), KCL22 (blood lymphoid carcinoma), HeLa (cervical carcinoma) cell lines and normal cells (PBMC) revealed that metal chelates show moderate to good activity as compared to ligand where as complex 1 seems to be the most promising one possessing a broad spectrum of activity against all the selected cancer cell lines with IC50 < 2.10 μM.

  1. Development and Validation of Methodology to Model Flow in Ventilation Systems Commonly Found in Nuclear Facilities - Phase II

    SciTech Connect

    Strons, Philip; Bailey, James L.; Davis, John; Grudzinski, James; Hlotke, John

    2016-03-01

    In this report we present the results of the Phase II analysis and testing of the flow patterns encountered in the Alpha Gamma Hot Cell Facility (AGHCF), as well as the results from an opportunity to expand upon field test work from Phase I by the use of a Class IIIb laser. The addition to the Phase I work is covered before proceeding to the results of the Phase II work, followed by a summary of findings.

  2. Inactivation of human pathogens during phase II composting of manure-based mushroom growth substrate.

    PubMed

    Weil, Jennifer D; Cutter, Catherine N; Beelman, Robert B; LaBorde, Luke F

    2013-08-01

    Commercial production of white button mushrooms (Agaricus bisporus) requires a specialized growth substrate prepared from composted agricultural by-products. Because horse and poultry manures are widely used in substrate formulations, there is a need to determine the extent to which the composting process is capable of eliminating human pathogens. In this study, partially composted substrate was inoculated with a pathogen cocktail (log 10⁶ to 10⁸ CFU/g) containing Listeria monocytogenes, Escherichia coli O157:H7, and Salmonella. Pathogen and indicator-organism reductions were followed at temperatures that typically occurred during a standard 6-day phase II pasteurization and conditioning procedure. Controlled-temperature water bath studies at 48.8, 54.4, and 60°C demonstrated complete destruction of the three pathogens after 36.0, 8.0, and 0.5 h, respectively. Destruction of L. monocytogenes and E. coli O157:H7 at 54.4°C occurred more slowly than E. coli, total coliforms, Enterobacteriaceae, and Salmonella. Microbial reductions that occurred during a standard 6-day phase II pasteurization and conditioning treatment were studied in a small-scale mushroom production research facility. After phase II composting, E. coli, coliforms, and Enterobacteriaceae were below detectable levels, and inoculated pathogens were not detected by direct plating or by enrichment. The results of this study show that a phase II composting process can be an effective control measure for eliminating risks associated with the use of composted animal manures during mushroom production. Growers are encouraged to validate and verify their own composting processes through periodic microbial testing for pathogens and to conduct studies to assure uniform distribution of substrate temperatures during phase II.

  3. Solid-phase microextraction for qualitative and quantitative determination of migrated degradation products of antioxidants in an organic aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Burman, Lina; Albertsson, Ann-Christine; Höglund, Anders

    2005-07-08

    Low molecular weight aromatic substances may migrate out from plastic packaging to their contents, especially if they consist of organic aqueous solutions or oils. It is, therefore, extremely important to be able to identify and quantify any migrated substances in such solutions, even at very low concentrations. We have in this work investigated and evaluated the use of solid-phase microextraction for the specific task of extraction from an organic aqueous solution such as a simulated pharmaceutical solution consisting of 10 vol.% ethanol in water. The goal was furthermore to investigate the possibility of simultaneously identifying and quantifying the substances in spite of differences in their chemical structures. Methods were developed and evaluated for extraction both with direct sampling and with headspace sampling. Difficulties appeared due to the ethanol in the solution and the minute amounts of substances present. We have shown that a simultaneous quantification of migrated low molecular weight degradation products of antioxidants using only one fibre is possible if the extraction method and temperature are adjusted in relation to the concentration levels of the analytes. Comparions were made with solid-phase extraction.

  4. Phase I and II feasibility study report for the 300-FF-5 operable unit

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    The purpose of this Phase I/II feasibility study is to assemble and screen a list of alternatives for remediation of the 300-FF-5 operable site on the Hanford Reservation. This screening is based on information gathered in the Phase I Remedial Investigation (RI) and on currently available information on remediation technologies. The alternatives remaining after screening provide a range of response actions for remediation. In addition, key data needs are identified for collection during a Phase II RI (if necessary). This Phase I/II FS represents a primary document as defined by the Tri-Party Agreement, but will be followed by a Phase III FS that will further develop the alternatives and provide a detailed evaluation of them. The following remedial action objectives were identified for the 300-FF-5 operable unit: Limit current human exposure to contaminated groundwater in the unit; Limit discharge of contaminated groundwater to the Columbia River; Reduce contaminant concentrations in groundwater below acceptable levels by the year 2018.

  5. Hexagonal and nematic phases of chains. I - Correlation functions. II - Phase transitions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Selinger, Jonathan V.; Bruinsma, Robijn F.

    1991-01-01

    The statistical mechanics of a system of semiflexible chains, which can represent polymer liquid crystals, long-chain biomolecules, stiff wormlike micelles, or columns of discotic liquid crystals, are examined. A continuum theory is used to calculate static correlation functions in the hexagonal and nematic phases. Two correlation functions are considered: (1) the structure factor which describes fluctuations in the density; and (2) the director fluctuation spectrum, which describes fluctuations in the local optical axis. In addition, a model is developed for the phase transitions of a system of infinitely long, semiflexible chains which interact through a steric, excluded-volume repulsion. The model yields generic phase diagrams in terms of pressure or density vs. persistence length or temperature.

  6. Evaluation of hydrothermal resources of North Dakota. Phase II. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, K.L.; Howell, F.L.; Winczewski, L.M.; Wartman, B.L.; Umphrey, H.R.; Anderson, S.B.

    1981-06-01

    This evaluation of the hydrothermal resources of North Dakota is based on existing data on file with the North Dakota Geological Survey (NDGS) and other state and federal agencies, and field and laboratory studies conducted. The principal sources of data used during the Phase II study were WELLFILE, the computer library of oil and gas well data developed during the Phase I study, and WATERCAT, a computer library system of water well data assembled during the Phase II study. A field survey of the shallow geothermal gradients present in selected groundwater observation holes was conducted. Laboratory determinations of the thermal conductivity of core samples is being done to facilitate heat-flow calculations on those hole-of-convenience cased.

  7. Proposal for a "phase II" multicenter trial model for preclinical new antiepilepsy therapy development.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Terence J; Ben-Menachem, Elinor; Bertram, Edward H; Collins, Stephen D; Kokaia, Merab; Lerche, Holger; Klitgaard, Henrik; Staley, Kevin J; Vaudano, Elisabetta; Walker, Matthew C; Simonato, Michele

    2013-08-01

    There is a pressing need to address the current major gaps in epilepsy treatment, in particular drug-resistant epilepsy, antiepileptogenic therapies, and comorbidities. A major concern in the development of new therapies is that current preclinical testing is not sufficiently predictive for clinical efficacy. Methodologic limitations of current preclinical paradigms may partly account for this discrepancy. Here we propose and discuss a strategy for implementing a "phase II" multicenter preclinical drug trial model based on clinical phase II/III studies designed to generate more rigorous preclinical data for efficacy. The goal is to improve the evidence resulting from preclinical studies for investigational new drugs that have shown strong promise in initial preclinical "phase I" studies. This should reduce the risk for expensive clinical studies in epilepsy and therefore increase the appeal for funders (industry and government) to invest in their clinical development.

  8. Phased Retrofits in Existing Homes in Florida Phase II. Shallow Plus Retrofits

    SciTech Connect

    K. Sutherland; Parker, D.; Martin, E.; Chasar, D.; Amos, B.

    2016-02-01

    The BAPIRC team and Florida Power and Light (FPL) electric utility pursued a pilot phased energy-efficiency retrofit program in Florida by creating detailed data on the energy and economic performance of two levels of retrofit - simple and deep. For this Phased Deep Retrofit (PDR) project, a total of 56 homes spread across the utility partner's territory in east central Florida, southeast Florida, and southwest Florida were instrumented between August 2012 and January 2013, and received simple pass-through retrofit measures during the period of March 2013 - June 2013. Ten of these homes received a deeper package of retrofits during August 2013 - December 2013.

  9. 7-Methylsulfinylheptyl and 8-methylsulfinyloctyl isothiocyanates from watercress are potent inducers of phase II enzymes.

    PubMed

    Rose, P; Faulkner, K; Williamson, G; Mithen, R

    2000-11-01

    Watercress is an exceptionally rich dietary source of beta-phenylethyl isothiocyanate (PEITC). This compound inhibits phase I enzymes, which are responsible for the activation of many carcinogens in animals, and induces phase II enzymes, which are associated with enhanced excretion of carcinogens. In this study, we show that watercress extracts are potent inducers of quinone reductase (QR) in murine hepatoma Hepa 1c1c7 cells, a widely adopted assay for measuring phase II enzyme induction. However, contrary to expectations, this induction was not associated with PEITC (which is rapidly lost to the atmosphere upon tissue disruption due to its volatility) or a naturally occurring PEITC-glutathione conjugate, but with 7-methylsulfinyheptyl and 8-methylsulfinyloctyl isothiocyanates (ITCs). While it was confirmed that PEITC does induce QR (5 microM required for a two-fold induction in QR), 7-methylsulfinyheptyl and 8-methylsulfinyloctyl ITCs were more potent inducers (0.2 microM and 0.5 microM, respectively, required for a two-fold induction in QR). Thus, while watercress contains three times more phenylethyl glucosinolate than methylsulfinylalkyl glucosinolates, ITCs derived from methylsulfinylalkyl glucosinolates may be more important phase II enzyme inducers than PEITC, having 10 - to 25-fold greater potency. Analysis of urine by liquid chromatography-mass spectroscopy (LC-MS) following consumption of watercress demonstrated the presence of N:-acetylcysteine conjugates of 7-methylsulfinylheptyl, 8-methylsulfinyloctyl ITCs and PEITC, indicating that these ITCs are taken up by the gut and metabolized in the body. Watercress may have exceptionally good anticarcinogenic potential, as it combines a potent inhibitor of phase I enzymes (PEITC) with at least three inducers of phase II enzymes (PEITC, 7-methylsulfinylheptyl ITC and 8-methylsulfinyloctyl ITC). The study also demonstrates the application of LC-MS for the detection of complex glucosinolate-derived metabolites in

  10. Site Characterization of the Source Physics Experiment Phase II Location Using Seismic Reflection Data

    SciTech Connect

    Sexton, Emily; Snelson, Catherine M; Chipman, Veraun D; Emer, Dudley; White, Bob; Emmit, Ryan; Wright, Al; Drellack, Sigmund; Huckins-Gang, Heather; Mercadante, Jennifer; Floyd, Michael; McGowin, Chris; Cothrun, Chris; Bonal, Nedra

    2013-12-05

    An objective of the Source Physics Experiment (SPE) is to identify low-yield nuclear explosions from a regional distance. Low-yield nuclear explosions can often be difficult to discriminate among the clutter of natural and man-made explosive events (e.g., earthquakes and mine blasts). The SPE is broken into three phases. Phase I has provided the first of the physics-based data to test the empirical models that have been used to discriminate nuclear events. The Phase I series of tests were placed within a highly fractured granite body. The evolution of the project has led to development of Phase II, to be placed within the opposite end member of geology, an alluvium environment, thereby increasing the database of waveforms to build upon in the discrimination models. Both the granite and alluvium sites have hosted nearby nuclear tests, which provide comparisons for the chemical test data. Phase III of the SPE is yet to be determined.

  11. The Prediction of Success in Nursing Education: Phase I and Phase II, 1959-1967.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thurston, John R.; And Others

    This study concerned the development and testing of an instrument designed to provide nursing schools with meaningful information about the personalities and potential problems of their students. In Phase I, the instrument--the Luther Hospital Sentence Completions (LHSC)--was constructed along with a Nursing Education Scale (NES) which provided…

  12. 40 CFR 73.10 - Initial allocations for phase I and phase II.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... State name Plant name Boiler Column A final phase 1 allocation Column B auction and sales reserve... 15227 411 Vermilion 2 9735 263 Indiana Bailly 7 12256 331 8 17134 463 Breed 1 20280 548 Cayuga 1 36581... Plant name Unit Allowances for 2000 through 2009column (A) Allowances for 2010 and thereaftercolumn (B...

  13. A 2-stage phase II design with direct assignment option in stage II for initial marker validation.

    PubMed

    An, Ming-Wen; Mandrekar, Sumithra J; Sargent, Daniel J

    2012-08-15

    Biomarkers are critical to targeted therapies, as they may identify patients more likely to benefit from a treatment. Several prospective designs for biomarker-directed therapy have been previously proposed, differing primarily in the study population, randomization scheme, or both. Recognizing the need for randomization, yet acknowledging the possibility of promising but inconclusive results after a stage I cohort of randomized patients, we propose a 2-stage phase II design on marker-positive patients that allows for direct assignment in a stage II cohort. In stage I, marker-positive patients are equally randomized to receive experimental treatment or control. Stage II has the option to adopt "direct assignment" whereby all patients receive experimental treatment. Through simulation, we studied the power and type I error rate of our design compared with a balanced randomized two-stage design, and conducted sensitivity analyses to study the effect of timing of stage I analysis, population shift effects, and unbalanced randomization. Our proposed design has minimal loss in power (<1.8%) and increased type I error rate (<2.1%) compared with a balanced randomized design. The maximum increase in type I error rate in the presence of a population shift was between 3.1% and 5%, and the loss in power across possible timings of stage I analysis was less than 1.2%. Our proposed design has desirable statistical properties with potential appeal in practice. The direct assignment option, if adopted, provides for an "extended confirmation phase" as an alternative to stopping the trial early for evidence of efficacy in stage I.

  14. Fenofibrate Therapy Restores Antioxidant Protection and Improves Myocardial Insulin Resistance in a Rat Model of Metabolic Syndrome and Myocardial Ischemia: The Role of Angiotensin II.

    PubMed

    Ibarra-Lara, Luz; Sánchez-Aguilar, María; Sánchez-Mendoza, Alicia; Del Valle-Mondragón, Leonardo; Soria-Castro, Elizabeth; Carreón-Torres, Elizabeth; Díaz-Díaz, Eulises; Vázquez-Meza, Héctor; Guarner-Lans, Verónica; Rubio-Ruiz, María Esther

    2016-12-28

    Renin-angiotensin system (RAS) activation promotes oxidative stress which increases the risk of cardiac dysfunction in metabolic syndrome (MetS) and favors local insulin resistance. Fibrates regulate RAS improving MetS, type-2 diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. We studied the effect of fenofibrate treatment on the myocardic signaling pathway of Angiotensin II (Ang II)/Angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1) and its relationship with oxidative stress and myocardial insulin resistance in MetS rats under heart ischemia. Control and MetS rats were assigned to the following groups: (a) sham; (b) vehicle-treated myocardial infarction (MI) (MI-V); and (c) fenofibrate-treated myocardial infarction (MI-F). Treatment with fenofibrate significantly reduced triglycerides, non-high density lipoprotein cholesterol (non-HDL-C), insulin levels and insulin resistance index (HOMA-IR) in MetS animals. MetS and MI increased Ang II concentration and AT1 expression, favored myocardial oxidative stress (high levels of malondialdehyde, overexpression of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase 4 (NOX4), decreased total antioxidant capacity and diminished expression of superoxide dismutase (SOD)1, SOD2 and catalase) and inhibited expression of the insulin signaling cascade: phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/protein kinase B (PkB, also known as Akt)/Glut-4/endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS). In conclusion, fenofibrate treatment favors an antioxidant environment as a consequence of a reduction of the Ang II/AT1/NOX4 signaling pathway, reestablishing the cardiac insulin signaling pathway. This might optimize cardiac metabolism and improve the vasodilator function during myocardial ischemia.

  15. K2[HCr2AsO10]: redetermination of phase II and the predicted structure of phase I.

    PubMed

    Weakley, T J R; Ylvisaker, E R; Yager, R J; Wu, P; Photinos, P; Abrahams, S C

    2004-12-01

    Our prediction that phase II of dipotassium hydrogen chromatoarsenate, K(2)[HCr(2)AsO(10)], is ferroelectric, based on the analysis of the atomic coordinates by Averbuch-Pouchot, Durif & Guitel [Acta Cryst. (1978), B34, 3725-3727], led to an independent redetermination of the structure using two separate crystals. The resulting improved accuracy allows the inference that the H atom is located in the hydrogen bonds of length 2.555 (5) angstroms which form between the terminal O atoms of shared AsO(3)OH tetrahedra in adjacent HCr(2)AsO(10)(2-) ions. The largest atomic displacement of 0.586 angstroms between phase II and the predicted paraelectric phase I is by these two O atoms. The H atoms form helices of radius approximately 0.60 A about the 3(1) or 3(2) axes. Normal probability analysis reveals systematic error in seven or more of the earlier atomic coordinates.

  16. Beginning Teacher Evaluation Study: Phase II, 1973-74, Final Report: Volume V.3. Historical Data Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wheeler, Patricia; Elias, Patricia J.

    The Beginning Teacher Evaluation Study (BTES), Phase II, was a research project on effective teaching behavior--what teachers do that significantly affects what and how pupils learn. The purposes of Phase II were to (1) develop an assessment system for measuring teacher and pupil behaviors and other factors which could influence each of them and…

  17. 78 FR 76791 - Availability of Version 4.0 of the Connect America Fund Phase II Cost Model; Adopting Current...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-19

    ... COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 54 Availability of Version 4.0 of the Connect America Fund Phase II Cost Model... the Connect America Cost Model (CAM v4.0) will be available shortly. The Bureau seeks comment on... cost in price cap areas for implementing Connect America Phase II. DATES: Comments are due on or before...

  18. A Fire Safety Certification System for Board and Care Operators and Staff. SBIR Phase II: Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Bonnie L.

    This report describes Phase II of a project which developed a system for delivering fire safety training to board and care providers who serve adults with developmental disabilities. Phase II focused on developing and pilot testing a "train the trainers" workshop for instructors and field testing the provider's workshop. Evaluation of…

  19. 76 FR 3624 - Milford Wind Corridor Phase II, LLC; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market-Based Rate Filing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-20

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Milford Wind Corridor Phase II, LLC; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market... supplemental notice in the above-referenced proceeding Milford Wind Corridor Phase II, LLC's application...

  20. Characterization of 2,3-diarylxanthones by electrospray mass spectrometry: gas-phase chemistry versus known antioxidant activity properties.

    PubMed

    Silva, Eduarda M P; Barros, Cristina M R F; Santos, Clementina M M; Barros, António S; Domingues, M Rosário M; Silva, Artur M S

    2016-10-30

    Xanthones (XH) are a class of heterocyclic compounds widely distributed in nature that hold numerous noteworthy biological and antioxidant activities. Therefore, it is of utmost importance to achieve relevant detailed structural information to understand and assist prediction of their biological properties. The potential relationship between radical-mediated xanthone chemistry in the gas phase and their promising antioxidant activities has not been previously explored. Protonated xanthones XH1-9 were generated in the gas phase by electrospray ionization (ESI) and the main fragmentation pathways of the protonated XH1-9 formed due to collision-induced dissociation (CID) were investigated. In the CID-MS/MS spectra of [M+H](+) ions of XH1, XH2 and XH4 the product ions formed due to H2 O elimination corresponding to the base peak of the spectra. For the remaining six xanthones (XH3, XH5-9), showing the most promising biological profile, the product ion produced with the highest relative abundance (RA) corresponded to the one formed through concomitant loss of H2 O plus CO. Indicative of an inexistent or lower biological activity is the combined loss of CO plus O unique to the CID-MS/MS spectra of XH1, XH2, XH4, and XH5. The product ion formed by loss of 64 Da (concomitant loss of two molecules of H2 O plus CO) is only observed for xanthones containing a catechol unit (XH3 and XH6-9). This product ion has the highest RA for the most potent scavenger of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species XH9 that contains two of these catechol moieties. A strong relationship between some of the biological activities of the studied 2,3-diarylxanthones and their ESI-MS/MS fragmentation spectra was found. The multivariate statistical analysis results suggest that the selected MS features are related to the important biological features. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Evaluation of Phase II glass formulations for vitrification of Hanford Site low-level waste

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, X.; Hrma, P.R.; Schweiger, M.J.

    1996-03-01

    A vendor glass formulation study was carried out at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), supporting the Phase I and Phase II melter vendor testing activities for Westinghouse Hanford Company. This study is built upon the LLW glass optimization effort that will be described in a separate report. For Phase I vendor melter testing, six glass formulations were developed at PNL and additional were developed by Phase I vendors. All the doses were characterized in terms of viscosity and chemical durability by the 7-day Product Consistency Test. Twelve Phase II glass formulations (see Tables 3.5 and 3.6) were developed to accommodate 2.5 wt% P{sub 2}O{sub 5} and 1.0 wt% S0{sub 3} without significant processing problems. These levels of P{sub 2}O{sub 5} and SO{sub 3} are expected to be the highest possible concentrations from Hanford Site LLW streams at 25 wt% waste loading in glass. The Phase H compositions formulated were 6 to 23 times more durable than the environmental assessment (EA) glass. They melt within the temperature range of 1160{degrees} to 1410{degrees}C to suit different melting technologies. The composition types include boron-free for volatilization sensitive melters; boron-containing glasses for coId-cap melters; Zr-containing, glasses for enhanced Iong-term durability; and Fe-containing glasses for reducing melting temperature and melt volatility while maintaining chemical durability.

  2. Phasing the mirror segments of the Keck telescopes II: the narrow-band phasing algorithm.

    PubMed

    Chanan, G; Ohara, C; Troy, M

    2000-09-01

    In a previous paper, we described a successful technique, the broadband algorithm, for phasing the primary mirror segments of the Keck telescopes to an accuracy of 30 nm. Here we describe a complementary narrow-band algorithm. Although it has a limited dynamic range, it is much faster than the broadband algorithm and can achieve an unprecedented phasing accuracy of approximately 6 nm. Cross checks between these two independent techniques validate both methods to a high degree of confidence. Both algorithms converge to the edge-minimizing configuration of the segmented primary mirror, which is not the same as the overall wave-front-error-minimizing configuration, but we demonstrate that this distinction disappears as the segment aberrations are reduced to zero.

  3. Study of Acoustic Ultra-High Energy Neutrino Detection Phase II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurahashi, N.

    The Study of Acoustic Ultra-high energy Neutrino Detection has started its second phase (SAUND II). Although the general location of the hydrophones has not changed, SAUND II uses a new hydrophone array that uses a fiber-optic cable to connect to shore. Changes associated with the new hydrophone array as well as a new DAQ system that incorporates multiprocessor computing and accurate GPS timestamping are reported. Initial data of lightbulb calibration conducted in March 2005, and a future plan for a more accurate calibration are also presented.

  4. An evaluation of a Simon 2-Stage phase II clinical trial design incorporating toxicity monitoring.

    PubMed

    Ray, H E; Rai, S N

    2011-05-01

    Phase II clinical trials are usually designed to measure efficacy but patient safety is also a very important aspect. Previous authors suggested a methodology that allows one to monitor the cumulative number of toxic events after each patient is treated, which is also known as continuous toxicity monitoring. In this work we describe how to combine the continuous toxicity monitoring methodology with the Simon 2-Stage design for response. Then we investigate through simulation the combined procedure's type I and type II error rates under various combinations of design parameters. We include the underlying relationship between toxicity and response in our examination of the error rates.

  5. Functional design criteria for Project W-252, Phase II Liquid Effluent Treatment and Disposal: Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Hatch, C.E.

    1994-11-10

    This document provides the functional design criteria required for the Phase 2 Liquid Effluent Treatment and Disposal Project, Project W-252. Project W-252 shall provide new facilities and existing facility modifications required to implement Best Available Technology/All Known, Available, and Reasonable Methods of Prevention, Control, and Treatment (BAT/AKART) for the 200 East Phase II Liquid Effluent Streams. The project will also provide a 200 East Area Phase II Effluent Collection System (PTECS) for connection to a disposal system for relevant effluent streams to which BAT/AKART has been applied. Liquid wastestreams generated in the 200 East Area are currently discharged to the soil column. Included in these wastestreams are cooling water, steam condensate, raw water, and sanitary wastewaters. It is the policy of the DOE that the use of soil columns to treat and retain radionuclides and nonradioactive contaminants be discontinued at the earliest practical time in favor of wastewater treatment and waste minimization. In 1989, the DOE entered into an interagency agreement with Ecology and EPA. This agreement is referred to as the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement). Project W-252 is one of the projects required to achieve the milestones set forth in the Tri-Party Agreement. One of the milestones requires BAT/AKART implementation for Phase II streams by October 1997. This Functional Design Criteria (FDC) document provides the technical baseline required to initiate Project W-252 to meet the Tri-Party Agreement milestone for the application of BAT/AKART to the Phase II effluents.

  6. A varying-stage adaptive phase II/III clinical trial design.

    PubMed

    Dong, Gaohong

    2014-04-15

    Currently, adaptive phase II/III clinical trials are typically carried out with a strict two-stage design. The first stage is a learning stage called phase II, and the second stage is a confirmatory stage called phase III. Following phase II analysis, inefficacious or harmful dose arms are dropped, then one or two promising dose arms are selected for the second stage. However, there are often situations in which researchers are in dilemma to make 'go or no-go' decision and/or to select 'best' dose arm(s), as data from the first stage may not provide sufficient information for their decision making. In this case, it is challenging to follow a strict two-stage plan. Therefore, we propose a varying-stage adaptive phase II/III clinical trial design, in which we consider whether there is a need to have an intermediate stage to obtain more data, so that a more informative decision could be made. Hence, the number of further investigational stages in our design is determined on the basis of data accumulated to the interim analysis. With respect to adaptations, we consider dropping dose arm(s), switching another plausible endpoint as the primary study endpoint, re-estimating sample size, and early stopping for futility. We use an adaptive combination test to perform final analyses. By applying closed testing procedure, we control family-wise type I error rate at the nominal level of α in the strong sense. We delineate other essential design considerations including the threshold parameters and the proportion of alpha allocated in the two-stage versus three-stage setting.

  7. Novel therapies for resistant focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FONT) phase II clinical trial: study design

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The lack of adequate randomized clinical trials (RCT) has hindered identification of new therapies that are safe and effective for patients with primary focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS), especially in patients who fail to respond to corticosteroids and immunosuppressive therapies. Recent basic science advances have led to development of alternative treatments that specifically target aberrant pathways of fibrosis which are relevant to disease progression in FSGS. There is a need for a flexible Phase II study design which will test such novel antifibrotic strategies in order to identify agents suitable for phase III testing. Methods/Design The Novel Therapies for Resistant Focal Segmental Glomerulosclerosis (FONT) project is a multicenter Phase I/II RCT designed to investigate the potential efficacy of novel therapies for resistant FSGS. Adalimumab and galactose will be evaluated against conservative therapy consisting of the combination of lisinopril, losartan and atorvastatin. The sample size is defined to assure that if one of the treatments has a superior response rate compared to that of the other treatments, it will be selected with high probability for further evaluation. Comparison of primary and secondary endpoints in each study arm will enable a choice to be made of which treatments are worthy of further study in future Phase III RCT. Discussion This report highlights the key features of the FONT II RCT including the two-step outcome analysis that will expedite achievement of the study objectives. The proposed phase II study design will help to identify promising agents for further testing while excluding ineffective agents. This staged approach can help to prevent large expenditures on unworthy therapeutic agents in the management of serious but rare kidney diseases Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT00814255 PMID:21310077

  8. Synthesis, structural characterization and antioxidant activity of some vanadium(IV), Mo(VI)/(IV) and Ru(II) complexes of pyridoxal Schiff base derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elsayed, Shadia A.; Noufal, Aya M.; El-Hendawy, Ahmed M.

    2017-09-01

    New complexes containing vanadium(IV), Mo(VI)/(IV) and Ru(II) derived from Schiff base of pyridoxal and S-benzyldithiocarbazate (H2pysb) or p-toluidine (Hpytol) have been prepared. The structures of the described compounds were elucidated by elemental analyses, spectroscopic techniques (IR, 1H NMR, UV-Vis and EPR) magnetism, molar conductivity and thermal analysis measurements. Their redox behaviors were also studied by cyclic voltammetry. The ligand H2pysb showed coordination to the metal ions in a dibasic tridenate manner through deprotonated phenolate oxygen, azomethine nitrogen and thiolate sulfur, while Hpytol behaved as monobasic bidentate through phenolate oxygen and azomethine nitrogen. The complexes were tested for their antioxidant activity by 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radical (DPPH) and the data obtained revealed that the scavenging activity of the complexes towards DPPH is high for the oxovanadium(IV) complexes with lower IC50 values which are comparable to ascorbic acid as a standard antioxidant. The EC50 concentration ratio together with other antioxidant parameters are also reported.

  9. Clinical Utility of Metrics Based on Tumor Measurements in Phase II Trials to Predict Overall Survival Outcomes in Phase III Trials by Using Resampling Methods

    PubMed Central

    An, Ming-Wen; Han, Yu; Meyers, Jeffrey P.; Bogaerts, Jan; Sargent, Daniel J.; Mandrekar, Sumithra J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Phase II clinical trials inform go/no-go decisions for proceeding to phase III trials, and appropriate end points in phase II trials are critical for facilitating this decision. Phase II solid tumor trials have traditionally used end points such as tumor response defined by Response Evaluation Criteria for Solid Tumors (RECIST). We previously reported that absolute and relative changes in tumor measurements demonstrated potential, but not convincing, improvement over RECIST to predict overall survival (OS). We have evaluated the metrics by using additional measures of clinical utility and data from phase III trials. Methods Resampling methods were used to assess the clinical utility of metrics to predict phase III outcomes from simulated phase II trials. In all, 2,000 phase II trials were simulated from four actual phase III trials (two positive for OS and two negative for OS). Cox models for three metrics landmarked at 12 weeks and adjusted for baseline tumor burden were fit for each phase II trial: absolute changes, relative changes, and RECIST. Clinical utility was assessed by positive predictive value and negative predictive value, that is, the probability of a positive or negative phase II trial predicting an effective or ineffective phase III conclusion, by prediction error, and by concordance index (c-index). Results Absolute and relative change metrics had higher positive predictive value and negative predictive value than RECIST in five of six treatment comparisons and lower prediction error curves in all six. However, differences were negligible. No statistically significant difference in c-index across metrics was found. Conclusion The absolute and relative change metrics are not meaningfully better than RECIST in predicting OS. PMID:26503199

  10. Equilibrium and kinetic modelling of cadmium (II) biosorption by Dried Biomass Aphanothece sp. from aqueous phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Awalina; Harimawan, A.; Haryani, G. S.; Setiadi, T.

    2017-05-01

    The Biosorption of cadmium (II) ions on dried biomass of Aphanothece sp.which previously grown in a photobioreactor system with atmospheric carbon dioxide fed input, was studied in a batch system with respect to initial pH, biomass concentration, contact time, and temperature. The biomass exhibited the highest cadmium (II) uptake capacity at 30ºC, initial pH of 8.0±0.2 in 60 minute and initial cadmium (II) ion concentration of 7.76 mg/L. Maximum biosorption capacities were 16.47 mg/g, 54.95 mg/g and 119.05 mg/g at range of initial cadmium (II) 0.96-3.63 mg/L, 1.99-8.10 mg/L and 6.48-54.38 mg/L, respectively. Uptake kinetics follows the pseudo-second order model while equilibrium is best described by Langmuir isotherm model. Isotherms have been used to determine thermodynamic parameter process (free energy change, enthalpy change and entropy change). FTIR analysis of microalgae biomass revealed the presence of amino acids, carboxyl, hydroxyl, sulfhydryl and carbonyl groups, which are responsible for biosorption of metal ions. During repeated sorption/desorption cycles, the ratio of Cd (II) desorption to biosorption decreased from 81% (at first cycle) to only 27% (at the third cycle). Nevertheless, due to its higher biosorption capability than other adsorbent, Aphanothece sp appears to be a good biosorbent for removing metal Cd (II) ions from aqueous phase.

  11. Phase effects in guided mode resonances II: measuring the angular phase of a surface plasmon polariton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theisen, M. J.; Brown, T. G.

    2015-02-01

    We show how the phase of a resonant interaction between a focused beam and a guided mode can be directly observed in a pupil imaging experiment, in which the irradiance leaving the pupil of a standard microscope is relayed to an image sensor through a combination Wollaston prism, calcite beam splitter and polarizer. We apply the method to the observation of a surface plasmon polariton resonance excited in a corrugated silver film fabricated using electron beam lithography. We discuss how this particular imaging configuration could be adapted for applications in plasmonic optical sensing.

  12. Two-Phase Nozzle Theory and Parametric Analysis. Phase II. Parametric Analysis and Optimization.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-07-01

    Dekker, Inc., 1969. 4. Netzer, D . W.: Calculations of Flow Characteristics for Two-Phase Flow in Annular Converging-Diverging Nozzles. Report No. TM-62-3...Astronautica Acta, Vol. 11, No. 3, pp. 207-216, 1965. 6. Crowe, C. T., M. P. Sharma and D . E. Stock: The Particle-Source-In Cell (PSI-Cell) Model for...Dispersed Droplet-in-Vapor Flows Including Normal Shock Waves. ASME J. of Fluids Eng’g., pp. 355-362, 1978. 8. Elliott, D . G.: "Theoretical and

  13. Effect of Calendula officinalis Flower Extract on Acute Phase Proteins, Antioxidant Defense Mechanism and Granuloma Formation During Thermal Burns

    PubMed Central

    Chandran, Preethi K.; Kuttan, Ramadasan

    2008-01-01

    Effect of Calendula officinalis flower extract was investigated against experimentally induced thermal burns in rats. Burn injury was made on the shaven back of the rats under anesthesia and the animals were treated orally with different doses of the flower extract (20 mg, 100 mg and 200 mg/kg body weight). The animals treated with the extract showed significant improvement in healing when compared with the control untreated animals. The indicators of the wound healing such as collagen-hydroxyproline and hexosamine contents were significantly increased in the treated group indicating accelerated wound healing in the treated animals. The acute phase proteins—haptoglobin and orosomucoid which were increased due to burn injury were found to be decreased significantly in 200 mg/kg body weight extract treated animals. The antioxidant defense mechanism, which was decreased in the liver during burn injury, was found to be enhanced in treated animals. The lipid peroxidation was significantly lowered in the treated group when compared to control animals. Tissue damage marker enzymes- alkaline phosphatase, alanine and aspartate transaminases were significantly lowered in the treated groups in a dose dependant manner. The histopathological analyses of skin tissue also give the evidence of the increased healing potential of the extract after burn injury. PMID:18818737

  14. Effect of Calendula officinalis Flower Extract on Acute Phase Proteins, Antioxidant Defense Mechanism and Granuloma Formation During Thermal Burns.

    PubMed

    Chandran, Preethi K; Kuttan, Ramadasan

    2008-09-01

    Effect of Calendula officinalis flower extract was investigated against experimentally induced thermal burns in rats. Burn injury was made on the shaven back of the rats under anesthesia and the animals were treated orally with different doses of the flower extract (20 mg, 100 mg and 200 mg/kg body weight). The animals treated with the extract showed significant improvement in healing when compared with the control untreated animals. The indicators of the wound healing such as collagen-hydroxyproline and hexosamine contents were significantly increased in the treated group indicating accelerated wound healing in the treated animals. The acute phase proteins-haptoglobin and orosomucoid which were increased due to burn injury were found to be decreased significantly in 200 mg/kg body weight extract treated animals. The antioxidant defense mechanism, which was decreased in the liver during burn injury, was found to be enhanced in treated animals. The lipid peroxidation was significantly lowered in the treated group when compared to control animals. Tissue damage marker enzymes- alkaline phosphatase, alanine and aspartate transaminases were significantly lowered in the treated groups in a dose dependant manner. The histopathological analyses of skin tissue also give the evidence of the increased healing potential of the extract after burn injury.

  15. Antibiotics Increase Gut Metabolism and Antioxidant Proteins and Decrease Acute Phase Response and Necrotizing Enterocolitis in Preterm Neonates

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Pingping; Jensen, Michael Ladegaard; Cilieborg, Malene Skovsted; Thymann, Thomas; Wan, Jennifer Man-Fan; Sit, Wai-Hung; Tipoe, George L.; Sangild, Per Torp

    2012-01-01

    Background The appropriate use of antibiotics for preterm infants, which are highly susceptible to develop necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC), is not clear. While antibiotic therapy is commonly used in neonates with NEC symptoms and sepsis, it remains unknown how antibiotics may affect the intestine and NEC sensitivity. We hypothesized that broad-spectrum antibiotics, given immediately after preterm birth, would reduce NEC sensitivity and support intestinal protective mechanisms. Methodology/Principal Findings Preterm pigs were treated with antibiotics for 5 d (oral and systemic doses of gentamycin, ampicillin and metrodinazole; AB group) and compared with untreated pigs. Only the untreated pigs showed evidence of NEC lesions and reduced digestive function, as indicated by lowered villus height and activity of brush border enzymes. In addition, 53 intestinal and 22 plasma proteins differed in expression between AB and untreated pigs. AB treatment increased the abundance of intestinal proteins related to carbohydrate and protein metabolism, actin filaments, iron homeostasis and antioxidants. Further, heat shock proteins and the complement system were affected suggesting that all these proteins were involved in the colonization-dependent early onset of NEC. In plasma, acute phase proteins (haptoglobin, complement proteins) decreased, while albumin, cleaved C3, ficolin and transferrin increased. Conclusions/Significance Depressed bacterial colonization following AB treatment increases mucosal integrity and reduces bacteria-associated inflammatory responses in preterm neonates. The plasma proteins C3, ficolin, and transferrin are potential biomarkers of the colonization-dependent NEC progression in preterm neonates. PMID:23028687

  16. V-shaped ligand 1,3-bis(1-ethylbenzimidazol-2-yl)-2-thiapropane and manganese(II), cobalt(II) and copper(II) complexes: Synthesis, crystal structure, DNA-binding properties and antioxidant activities.

    PubMed

    Wu, Huilu; Yang, Zaihui; Wang, Fei; Peng, Hongping; Zhang, Han; Wang, Cuiping; Wang, Kaitong

    2015-07-01

    A V-shaped ligand 1,3-bis(1-ethylbenzimidazol-2-yl)-2-thiapropane (bebt) and its transition metal complexes, [Mn(bebt)(pic)2]·CH3OH (pic=picrate) 1, [Co(bebt)2](pic)22 and [Cu(bebt)2](pic)2·2DMF 3, have been synthesized and characterized. The coordinate forms of complexes 1 and 2 are basically alike, which can be described as six-coordinated distorted octahedron. The geometric structure around Cu(II) atom can be described as distorted tetrahedral in complex 3. The DNA-binding properties of the ligand bebt and complexes have been investigated by electronic absorption, fluorescence, and viscosity measurements. The results suggest that bebt and complexes bind to DNA via an intercalative binding mode and the order of the binding affinity is 1<2<3antioxidant activity against superoxide and hydroxyl radicals, and the scavenging effects of it are stronger than standard mannitol and vitamin C.

  17. ENGINEERING DEVELOPMENT OF COAL-FIRED HIGH PERFORMANCE POWER SYSTEMS PHASE II AND III

    SciTech Connect

    1998-09-30

    This report presents work carried out under contract DE-AC22-95PC95144 "Engineering Development of Coal-Fired High Performance Systems Phase II and III." The goals of the program are to develop a coal-fired high performance power generation system (HIPPS) that is capable of: à thermal efficiency (HHV) >47%; à NOx, SOx, and particulates <10% NSPS (New Source Performance Standard); à coal providing >65% of heat input; à all solid wastes benign; à cost of electricity <90% of present plants. Phase I, which began in 1992, focused on the analysis of various configurations of indirectly fired cycles and on technical assessments of alternative plant subsystems and components, including performance requirements, developmental status, design options, complexity and reliability, and capital and operating costs. Phase I also included preliminary R&D and the preparation of designs for HIPPS commercial plants approximately 300 MWe in size. This phase, Phase II, involves the development and testing of plant subsystems, refinement and updating of the HIPPS commercial plant design, and the site selection and engineering design of a HIPPS prototype plant. Work reported herein is from: à Task 2.2 HITAF Air Heaters; à Task 6 HIPPS Commercial Plant Design Update.

  18. A liquid/gas phase separator for He-I and He-II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirron, P. J.; Zahniser, J. L.; Dipirro, M. J.

    A liquid/gas phase separator has been developed which separates both liquid He-I and He-II from their vapor. The phase separator was designed for the Superfluid Helium On Orbit Transfer (SHOOT) Flight Demonstration both to cool the liquid He after launch (at temperatures between 2.8 and 4.3 K) to the operating temperature of 1.4 K and as a low rate vent on orbit to maintain operating temperature. The phase separator is made of high-purity copper disks held apart by 6 micron Kevlar fibers. It works on the principle of conducting heat from within the dewar to vaporize liquid as it is throttled in the slits to efficiently cool the remaining liquid. Laboratory tests have demonstrated perfect phase separation for both He at its saturated vapor pressure from 1.2 to 4.3 K and for He-II at 2.13 K at pressures from 4.6 to 112 kPa. The performance of this phase separator during lab testing as well as expected performance in space is discussed.

  19. Soft recovery of polytetrafluoroethylene shocked through the crystalline phase II-III transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, E. N.; Trujillo, C. P.; Gray, G. T.; Rae, P. J.; Bourne, N. K.

    2007-01-01

    Polymers are increasingly being utilized as monolithic materials and composite matrices for structural applications historically reserved for metals. High strain-rate applications in aerospace, defense, and the automotive industries have lead to interest in the shock response of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) and the ensuing changes in polymer structure due to shock prestraining. We present an experimental study of crystalline structure evolution due to pressure-induced phase transitions in a semicrystalline polymer using soft-recovery, shock loading techniques coupled with mechanical and chemical postshock analyses. Gas-launched, plate impact experiments have been performed on pedigreed PTFE 7C, mounted in momentum trapped, shock assemblies, with impact pressures above and below the phase II to phase III crystalline transition. Below the phase transition only subtle changes were observed in the crystallinity, microstructure, and mechanical response of PTFE. Shock loading of PTFE 7C above the phase II-III transition was seen to cause both an increase in crystallinity from 38% to ˜53% (by differential scanning calorimetry) and a finer crystalline microstructure, and changed the yield and flow stress behavior.

  20. Rigid Polyurethane Foam (RPF) Technology for Countermines (Sea) Program Phase II

    SciTech Connect

    WOODFIN,RONALD L.; FAUCETT,DAVID L.; HANCE,BRADLEY G.; LATHAM,AMY E.; SCHMIDT,C.O.

    1999-10-01

    This Phase II report documents the results of one subtask initiated under the joint Department of Energy (DOE)/Department of Defense (DoD) Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) for Countermine Warfare. The development of Rigid Polyurethane Foams for neutralization of mines and barriers in amphibious assault was the objective of the tasking. This phase of the program concentrated on formation of RPF in water, explosive mine simulations, and development of foam and fabric pontoons. Field experimentation was done primarily at the Energetic Materials Research and Testing Center (EMRTC) of the New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology, Socorro, NM between February 1996 and September 1998.

  1. Free-Piston Stirling Power Conversion Unit for Fission Power System, Phase II Final Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, J. Gary; Stanley, John

    2016-01-01

    In Phase II, the manufacture and testing of two 6-kW(sub e)Stirling engines was completed. The engines were delivered in an opposed 12-kW(sub e) arrangement with a common expansion space heater head. As described in the Phase I report, the engines were designed to be sealed both hermetically and with a bolted O-ring seal. The completed Phase II convertor is in the bolted configuration to allow future disassembly. By the end of Phase II, the convertor had passed all of the final testing requirements in preparation for delivery to the NASA Glenn Research Center. The electronic controller also was fabricated and tested during Phase II. The controller sets both piston amplitudes and maintains the phasing between them. It also sets the operating frequency of the machine. Details of the controller are described in the Phase I final report. Fabrication of the direct-current to direct-current (DC-DC) output stage, which would have stepped down the main controller output voltage from 700 to 120 V(sub DC), was omitted from this phase of the project for budgetary reasons. However, the main controller was successfully built, tested with the engines, and delivered. We experienced very few development issues with this high-power controller. The project extended significantly longer than originally planned because of yearly funding delays. The team also experienced several hardware difficulties along the development path. Most of these were related to the different thermal expansions of adjacent parts constructed of different materials. This issue was made worse by the large size of the machine. Thermal expansion problems also caused difficulties in the brazing of the opposed stainless steel sodium-potassium (NaK) heater head. Despite repeated attempts Sunpower was not able to successfully braze the opposed head under this project. Near the end of the project, Glenn fabricated an opposed Inconel NaK head, which was installed prior to delivery for testing at Glenn. Engine

  2. Underground Test Area Subproject Phase I Data Analysis Task. Volume II - Potentiometric Data Document Package

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-01

    Volume II of the documentation for the Phase I Data Analysis Task performed in support of the current Regional Flow Model, Transport Model, and Risk Assessment for the Nevada Test Site Underground Test Area Subproject contains the potentiometric data. Because of the size and complexity of the model area, a considerable quantity of data was collected and analyzed in support of the modeling efforts. The data analysis task was consequently broken into eight subtasks, and descriptions of each subtask's activities are contained in one of the eight volumes that comprise the Phase I Data Analysis Documentation.

  3. Analytical data from phases I and II of the Willamette River basin water quality study, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harrison, Howard E.; Anderson, Chauncey W.; Rinella, Frank A.; Gasser, Timothy M.; Pogue, Ted R.

    1995-01-01

    The data were collected at 50 sites, representing runoff from agricultural, forested, and urbanized subbasins. In Phase I, water samples were collected during high and low flows in 1992 and 1993 to represent a wide range of hydrologic conditions. Bed-sediment samples were collected during low flows in 1993. In Phase II, water samples were collected in the spring of 1994 after the first high-flow event following the application of agricultural fertilizers and pesticides and in the fall during the first high-flow events following the conclusion of the agricultural season.

  4. An FPGA-based trigger for the phase II of the MEG experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldini, A.; Bemporad, C.; Cei, F.; Galli, L.; Grassi, M.; Morsani, F.; Nicolò, D.; Ritt, S.; Venturini, M.

    2016-07-01

    For the phase II of MEG, we are going to develop a combined trigger and DAQ system. Here we focus on the former side, which operates an on-line reconstruction of detector signals and event selection within 450 μs from event occurrence. Trigger concentrator boards (TCB) are under development to gather data from different crates, each connected to a set of detector channels, to accomplish higher-level algorithms to issue a trigger in the case of a candidate signal event. We describe the major features of the new system, in comparison with phase I, as well as its performances in terms of selection efficiency and background rejection.

  5. Designing phase II studies in cancer with time-to-event endpoints.

    PubMed

    Owzar, Kouros; Jung, Sin-Ho

    2008-01-01

    The primary clinical endpoint in many phase II studies in cancer is a time-to-event outcome subject to potential censoring. The decision in favor of abandoning or continuing investigation of the protocol regimen is typically based on the amount of statistical evidence suggesting an improvement compared to a given historical control. The primary statistical endpoint would typically be the median of the time-to-event distribution of the clinical endpoint. For the purpose of sample size or power calculations, software implementing parametric and nonparametric median tests, is freely available. The main assumptions are those of Exponential survival and a Uniform right-censoring mechanism. The performance of the parametric and nonparametric methods is compared to that of using a binomial endpoint based on dichotomizing the event time at a clinically relevant landmark. As sufficient details on the various methods and related designs for phase II clinical design with survival endpoints are provided, this article should also serve as a comparative reference on these three methods for designing phase II studies in cancer with time-to-event endpoints. The statistical performance, by virtue of considering the type I and II error rates, of the three methods is compared by carrying out a comprehensive simulation study. The parametric method may fail to control the type I error rate if the underlying survival distribution is not Exponential, while the nonparametric method may fail to control the type I error rate as the sample sizes for phase II studies are typically small. Both of these methods may be sensitive to the distribution of the censoring variable. The results provided in this article are mostly discussed in the framework of specific examples and by using specific implementations of the tests. As such the results may not be universally generalizable. The recommended method has some drawbacks if patients are censored before the landmark of interest. A method that should

  6. Enantiomeric separations of ruthenium (II) polypyridyl complexes using HPLC with cyclofructan chiral stationary phases.

    PubMed

    Shu, Yang; Breitbach, Zachary S; Dissanayake, Milan K; Perera, Sirantha; Aslan, Joseph M; Alatrash, Nagham; MacDonnell, Frederick M; Armstrong, Daniel W

    2015-01-01

    The enantiomeric separation of 21 ruthenium (II) polypyridyl complexes was achieved with a novel class of cyclofructan-based chiral stationary phases (CSPs) in the polar organic mode. Aromatic derivatives on the chiral selectors proved to be essential for enantioselectivity. The R-napthylethyl carbamate functionalized cyclofructan 6 (LARIHC CF6-RN) column proved to be the most effective overall, while the dimethylphenyl carbamate cyclofructan 7 (LARIHC CF7-DMP) showed complementary selectivity. A combination of acid and base additives was necessary for optimal separations. The retention factor vs. acetonitrile/methanol ratio plot showed a U-shaped retention curve, indicating that different interactions take place at different polar organic solvent compositions. The separation results indicated that π-π interactions, steric effects, and hydrogen bonding contribute to the enantiomeric separation of ruthenium (II) polypyridyl complexes with cyclofructan chiral stationary phases in the polar organic mode.

  7. A Bayesian design for phase II clinical trials with delayed responses based on multiple imputation

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Chunyan; Liu, Suyu; Yuan, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Interimmonitoring is routinely conducted in phase II clinical trials to terminate the trial early if the experimental treatment is futile. Interim monitoring requires that patients’ responses be ascertained shortly after the initiation of treatment so that the outcomes are known by the time the interim decision must be made. However, in some cases, response outcomes require a long time to be assessed, which causes difficulties for interim monitoring. To address this issue, we propose a Bayesian trial design to allow for continuously monitoring phase II clinical trials in the presence of delayed responses. We treat the delayed responses as missing data and handle them using a multiple imputation approach. Extensive simulations show that the proposed design yields desirable operating characteristics under various settings and dramatically reduces the trial duration. PMID:24817556

  8. System Integral Test by BWR Drywell Cooler Applied as Phase-II Accident Management

    SciTech Connect

    Nagasaka, Hideo; Tobimatsu, Toshimi; Tahara, Mika; Yokobori, Seiichi; Akinaga, Makoto

    2002-07-01

    This paper deals with the system interaction performance using the BWR drywell local cooler (DWC) in combination with containment spray as a Japanese Phase-II accident management (AM). By using almost full height simulation test facility (GIRAFFE-DWC) with scaling ratio of 1/600, the system integral tests simulating BWR low pressure vessel failure sequence were accomplished during about 14 hours. In case of DWC application, the containment pressure increase was found milder due to DWC heat removal performance. Initial spray timing was delayed about 3 hours and each spray period was reduced almost by half. It was concluded that the application of a BWR DWC to Phase-II AM measure is quite promising from the point of delaying or preventing the containment venting. (authors)

  9. Performance of the Tile PreProcessor Demonstrator for the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter Phase II Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrió, F.; Moreno, P.; Valero, A.

    2016-03-01

    The Tile Calorimeter PreProcessor demonstrator is a high performance double AMC board based on FPGA resources and QSFP modules. This board has been designed in the framework of the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter Demonstrator project for the Phase II Upgrade as the first stage of the back-end electronics. The TilePPr demonstrator has been conceived to receive and process the data coming from the front-end electronics of the TileCal Demonstrator module, as well as to configure it. Moreover, the TilePPr demonstrator handles the communication with the Detector Control System to monitor and control the front-end electronics. The TilePPr demonstrator represents 1/8 of the final TilePPr that will be designed and installed into the detector for the ATLAS Phase II Upgrade.

  10. Phase Transition of a Structure II Cubic Clathrate Hydrate to a Tetragonal Form.

    PubMed

    Takeya, Satoshi; Fujihisa, Hiroshi; Yamawaki, Hiroshi; Gotoh, Yoshito; Ohmura, Ryo; Alavi, Saman; Ripmeester, John A

    2016-08-01

    The crystal structure and phase transition of cubic structure II (sII) binary clathrate hydrates of methane (CH4 ) and propanol are reported from powder X-ray diffraction measurements. The deformation of host water cages at the cubic-tetragonal phase transition of 2-propanol+CH4 hydrate, but not 1-propanol+CH4 hydrate, was observed below about 110 K. It is shown that the deformation of the host water cages of 2-propanol+CH4 hydrate can be explained by the restriction of the motion of 2-propanol within the 5(12) 6(4) host water cages. This result provides a low-temperature structure due to a temperature-induced symmetry-lowering transition of clathrate hydrate. This is the first example of a cubic structure of the common clathrate hydrate families at a fixed composition.

  11. New Round of Studies Begin in Phase 0/I/II Cancer Prevention Clinical Trials Program | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The NCI Division of Cancer Prevention’s Phase 0/I/II Cancer Prevention Clinical Trials Program, also known as the Consortia for Early Phase Prevention Trials, is beginning a new round of studies in the effort toward systematic early clinical development of promising preventive agents for people at increased risk of developing cancer. Infographic Highlight New Round of Studies Begin in Phase 0/I/II Cancer Prevention Clinical Trials Program |

  12. Effect of garlic (Allium sativum) on nickel II or chromium VI induced alterations of glucose homeostasis and hepatic antioxidant status under sub-chronic exposure conditions.

    PubMed

    Das Gupta, Amrita; Dhara, Prakash C; Dhundasi, Salim A; Das, Kusal K

    2009-01-01

    Garlic (Allium sativum) has a profound effect in reducing plasma glucose and increasing serum insulin in diabetic rats. We studied the effect of a garlic extract on nickel- or chromium-induced alteration of plasma glucose and hepatic glycogen levels and anti-oxidant status in rats. Adult male albino rats (n=36) divided into six groups of six animals each were treated as follows: Group I, untreated controls; Group II, fresh aqueous homogenate of garlic; Group III, nickel sulfate; Group IV, nickel sulfate + garlic; Group V, potassium dichromate; Group VI, potassium dichromate + garlic. In Groups IV and VI, the simultaneous administration of garlic abrogated a significant nickel- or chromium-induced increase in plasma glucose and decrease in liver glycogen. Nickel and chromium alone also increased lipid peroxide (LPO) and decreased glutathione levels, as well as the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase, and glutathione peroxidase. Simultaneous garlic administration significantly reduced the LPO level and remarkably improved SOD activity. Hence, we postulate that the administration of garlic can prevent nickel II- or chromium VI-induced alterations in blood glucose homeostasis while exerting a hepatoprotective effect on glycogen levels and antioxidant status in male albino rats.

  13. Role of antioxidant treatment on DNA and lipid damage in the brain of rats subjected to a chemically induced chronic model of tyrosinemia type II.

    PubMed

    Streck, Emilio L; De Prá, Samira D T; Ferro, Paula Ronsani; Carvalho-Silva, Milena; Gomes, Lara M; Agostini, Jotele F; Damiani, Adriani; Andrade, Vanessa M; Schuck, Patrícia F; Ferreira, Gustavo C; Scaini, Giselli

    2017-05-25

    Tyrosine levels are abnormally elevated in tissues and body fluids of patients with inborn errors of tyrosine metabolism. Tyrosinemia type II, which is caused by tyrosine aminotransferase deficiency, provokes eyes, skin, and central nervous system disturbances in affected patients. However, the mechanisms of brain damage are still poorly known. Considering that studies have demonstrated that oxidative stress may contribute, along with other mechanisms, to the neurological dysfunction characteristic of hypertyrosinemia, in the present study we investigated the effects of antioxidant treatment (NAC and DFX) on DNA damage and oxidative stress markers induced by chronic administration of L-tyrosine in cerebral cortex, hippocampus, and striatum of rats. The results showed elevated levels of DNA migration, and thus DNA damage, after chronic administration of L-tyrosine in all the analyzed brain areas, and that the antioxidant treatment was able to prevent DNA damage in cerebral cortex and hippocampus. However, the co-administration of NAC plus DFX did not prevent the DNA damage in the striatum. Moreover, we found a significant increase in thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBA-RS) and DCFH oxidation in cerebral cortex, as well as an increase in nitrate/nitrite levels in the hippocampus and striatum. Additionally, the antioxidant treatment was able to prevent the increase in TBA-RS levels and in nitrate/nitrite levels, but not the DCFH oxidation. In conclusion, our findings suggest that reactive oxygen and nitrogen species and oxidative stress can play a role in DNA damage in this disorder. Moreover, NAC/DFX supplementation to tyrosinemia type II patients may represent a new therapeutic approach and a possible adjuvant to the current treatment of this disease.

  14. Inhibitory role of peroxiredoxin II (Prx II) on cellular senescence.

    PubMed

    Han, Ying-Hao; Kim, Hyun-Sun; Kim, Jin-Man; Kim, Sang-Keun; Yu, Dae-Yeul; Moon, Eun-Yi

    2005-08-29

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) were generated in all oxygen-utilizing organisms. Peroxiredoxin II (Prx II) as one of antioxidant enzymes may play a protective role against the oxidative damage caused by ROS. In order to define the role of Prx II in organismal aging, we evaluated cellular senescence in Prx II(-/-) mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF). As compared to wild type MEF, cellular senescence was accelerated in Prx II(-/-) MEF. Senescence-associated (SA)-beta-galactosidase (Gal)-positive cell formation was about 30% higher in Prx II(-/-) MEF. N-Acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC) treatment attenuated SA-beta-Gal-positive cell formation. Prx II(-/-) MEF exhibited the higher G2/M (41%) and lower S (1.6%) phase cells as compared to 24% and 7.3% [corrected] in wild type MEF, respectively. A high increase in the p16 and a slight increase in the p21 and p53 levels were detected in PrxII(-/-) MEF cells. The cellular senescence of Prx II(-/-) MEF was correlated with the organismal aging of Prx II(-/-) mouse skin. While extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and p38 activation was detected in Prx II(-/-) MEF, ERK and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) activation was detected in Prx II(-/-) skin. These results suggest that Prx II may function as an enzymatic antioxidant to prevent cellular senescence and skin aging.

  15. Defense Small Business Innovation Research Program (SBIR). Abstracts of Phase II Awards 1983.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-01-01

    INCREASE THE BANDWIDTH OF THE BAND-9 ALQ-99 TOPIC: 94 OFFICE: SPAWAR THIS IS A PHASE II SBIR PROPOSAL. IT DESCRIBES A PPM HELIX TWT DEVELOPMENT FOR THE...THE PROPOSED TWT WILL EMPLOY A BRAZED COPPER HELIX DESIGN TO OVERCOME THE HEAT DISSIPA- TION LIMITATION IN PAST HELIX DERIVED CIRCUIT TUBES. IT WILL...SUBMITTED BY DEPT ASTRON CORPORATION ARMY P.O. BOX 1047 SPRINGFIELD, VA 22151 JOSEPH R. JAHODA TITLE: BROADBAND TRANSMITTING ANTENNA TOPIC: id OFFICE

  16. Electro-Optic Fabrics for the Warrior of the 21st Century - Phase II

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    is to certify that the evaluation described herein was designed and executed by personnel of Contech Research, Inc . It was performed in concurrence...submitted by the test sponsor, Foster Miller, for the evaluation to be performed by Contech Research, Inc .. USB Proprietary cable 2. The test...FOR THE WARRIOR OF THE 21ST CENTURY PHASE II by Patricia Nguyen and Jeremiah Slade Foster-Miller, Inc . Waltham, MA 02451-1196

  17. Phase I-II study of isotopic immunoglobulin therapy for primary liver cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Ettinger, D.S.; Order, S.E.; Wharam, M.D.; Parker, M.K.; Klein, J.L.; Leichner, P.K.

    1982-02-01

    A phase I-II study of isotopic immunoglobulin therapy was performed in 18 patients with primary liver cancer; 14 were evaluable for toxicity. The patients received a dose of 37-157 millicuries of 131I-labeled antibody. The dose-limiting factor appears to be hematologic toxicity, especially thrombocytopenia. An objective antitumor effect was seen in six of nine patients who were evaluable for response. Present results suggest that further clinical studies with isotopic immunoglobulin are indicated.

  18. Development and Testing of a Jet Assisted Polycrystalline Diamond Drilling Bit. Phase II Development Efforts

    SciTech Connect

    David S. Pixton

    1999-09-20

    Phase II efforts to develop a jet-assisted rotary-percussion drill bit are discussed. Key developments under this contract include: (1) a design for a more robust polycrystalline diamond drag cutter; (2) a new drilling mechanism which improves penetration and life of cutters; and (3) a means of creating a high-pressure mud jet inside of a percussion drill bit. Field tests of the new drill bit and the new robust cutter are forthcoming.

  19. Recruitment Early Warning System and Accession Contingency Planning Process. Phase II. Part 1.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-11-01

    RD-A154 613 RECRUITMENT EARLY WARNING SYSTEM AND ACCESSION i/7 CONTINGENCY PLANNING PROCE..(U) ECONOMIC RESEARCH LAB INC RESTON YA L GOLDBERG ET AL...11 TITLE (include Security Classification) Recruitment Early Warning System and Accession Contingency Planning Process Phase II, Part 1 Final Report...GROUP Early Warning System, Forecasting, Manpower Planning LV &V WA&Vm 19. ABSTRACT (Continue on reverse if necessary and identify by block ny.1ber

  20. Influence of testosterone on phase II metabolism and availability of soy isoflavones in male Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Soukup, Sebastian T; Müller, Dennis R; Kurrat, Anne; Diel, Patrick; Kulling, Sabine E

    2017-04-01

    Genistein and daidzein are the main isoflavones in soy. Their potential beneficial or adverse effects in males like the prevention of prostate cancer or the impact on reproductive functions are controversially discussed. Major determinants of their bioactivity are the absorption and biotransformation of isoflavones. In this study, we focused on the influence of testosterone on plasma availability and phase II metabolism of isoflavones. Male Wistar rats, receiving an isoflavones rich diet, were randomized into three groups: Two groups were orchiectomized (ORX) at postnatal day (PND) 80 and treated for 11 days with testosterone propionate (TP) (ORX TP group) or a vehicle (ORX group) after a 7 days lasting hormonal decline. The third group served as control and remained intact. Rats were sacrificed at PND 98. ORX rats had reduced isoflavones plasma levels. Differently regulated mRNA expressions of transporters relevant for transport of phase II metabolites in liver and kidney may be responsible for this reduction, more precisely Slc10a1 and Slc21a1 in kidney as well as Slc22a8 in liver. While main phase II metabolites in intact rats were disulfates and sulfoglucuronides, the amount of sulfate conjugates was significantly diminished by ORX. In accordance with that, mRNA expression of different sulfotransferases was reduced in liver by ORX. The observed effects could be almost restored by TP treatment. In conclusion, testosterone, and likely further androgens, has a huge impact on phase II metabolism and availability of isoflavones by influencing the expression of different sulfotransferases and transporters.

  1. Bayesian design of single-arm phase II clinical trials with continuous monitoring.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Valen E; Cook, John D

    2009-06-01

    Bayesian designs are increasingly used to conduct phase II clinical trials. However, stopping boundaries in most Bayesian designs are defined from posterior credible intervals. The use of designs based on posterior credible intervals results in a loss of efficiency when compared to formal stopping rules based on Bayesian hypothesis tests. Such designs also introduce an unnecessary element of subjectivity in the interpretation of trial results. We derive a new class of Bayesian designs based on formal hypothesis tests. The prior densities used to define the alternative hypotheses in these tests assign no mass to parameter values that are consistent with the null hypotheses and are called nonlocal alternative prior densities. We show that Bayesian designs based on hypothesis tests and nonlocal alternative prior densities are more efficient than common Bayesian designs based on posterior credible intervals and common frequentist designs. In contrast to trial designs based on Bayesian credible intervals, we demonstrate that the mis-specification of the prior densities used to describe the anticipated effect of the experimental treatment in designs based on hypothesis tests cannot increase the expected weight of evidence in favor of the trial agent. Extension of test-based designs to phase I-II designs and randomized phase II designs remains an open research question. Phase II single-arm trials designed using Bayesian hypothesis tests with nonlocal alternatives provide better operating characteristics, use fewer patients per correct decision, and provide more directly interpretable results than other commonly used Bayesian and frequentist designs. Because the mis-specification of the prior density on the effect of the experimental agent decreases the expected weight of evidence that is collected in favor of the experimental treatment, the use of Bayesian hypothesis tests to design clinical trials also eliminates a potential source of bias often associated with trials

  2. Iron (FeII) Chelation, Ferric Reducing Antioxidant Power, and Immune Modulating Potential of Arisaema jacquemontii (Himalayan Cobra Lily)

    PubMed Central

    Sudan, Rasleen; Bhagat, Madhulika; Singh, Jasvinder; Koul, Anupurna

    2014-01-01

    This study explored the antioxidant and immunomodulatory potential of ethnomedicinally valuable species, namely, Arisaema jacquemontii of north-western Himalayan region. The tubers, leaves, and fruits of this plant were subjected to extraction using different solvents. In vitro antioxidant studies were performed in terms of chelation power on ferrous ions and FRAP assay. The crude methanol extract of leaves was found to harbour better chelating capacity (58% at 100 μg/mL) and reducing power (FRAP value 1085.4 ± 0.11 μMFe3+/g dry wt.) than all the other extracts. The crude methanol extract was thus further partitioned with solvents to yield five fractions. Antioxidant study of fractions suggested that the methanol fraction possessed significant chelation capacity (49.7% at 100 μg/mL) and reducing power with FRAP value of 1435.4 μM/g dry wt. The fractions were also studied for immune modulating potential where it was observed that hexane fraction had significant suppressive effect on mitogen induced T-cell and B-cell proliferation and remarkable stimulating effect on humoral response by 141% and on DTH response by 168% in immune suppressed mice as compared to the controls. Therefore, it can be concluded that A. jacquemontii leaves hold considerable antioxidant and immunomodulating potential and they can be explored further for the identification of their chemical composition for a better understanding of their biological activities. PMID:24895548

  3. MICS-Asia II: The model intercomparison study for Asia Phase II methodology and overview of findings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmichael, G. R.; Sakurai, T.; Streets, D.; Hozumi, Y.; Ueda, H.; Park, S. U.; Fung, C.; Han, Z.; Kajino, M.; Engardt, M.; Bennet, C.; Hayami, H.; Sartelet, K.; Holloway, T.; Wang, Z.; Kannari, A.; Fu, J.; Matsuda, K.; Thongboonchoo, N.; Amann, M.

    Results from the Model Intercomparison Study Asia Phase II (MICS-Asia II) are presented. Nine different regional modeling groups simulated chemistry and transport of ozone (O 3), secondary aerosol, acid deposition, and associated precursors, using common emissions and boundary conditions derived from a global model. Four-month-long periods, representing 2 years and three seasons (i.e., March, July, and December in 2001, and March in 2002), are analyzed. New observational data, obtained under the EANET (the Acid Deposition Monitoring Network in East Asia) monitoring program, were made available for this study, and these data provide a regional database to compare with model simulations. The analysis focused around seven subject areas: O 3 and related precursors, aerosols, acid deposition, global inflow of pollutants and precursor to Asia, model sensitivities to aerosol parameterization, analysis of emission fields, and detailed analyses of individual models, each of which is presented in a companion paper in this issue of Atmospheric Environment. This overview discusses the major findings of the study, as well as information on common emissions, meteorological conditions, and observations.

  4. North Atlantic simulations in Coordinated Ocean-ice Reference Experiments phase II (CORE-II). Part I: Mean states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danabasoglu, Gokhan; Yeager, Steve G.; Bailey, David; Behrens, Erik; Bentsen, Mats; Bi, Daohua; Biastoch, Arne; Böning, Claus; Bozec, Alexandra; Canuto, Vittorio M.; Cassou, Christophe; Chassignet, Eric; Coward, Andrew C.; Danilov, Sergey; Diansky, Nikolay; Drange, Helge; Farneti, Riccardo; Fernandez, Elodie; Fogli, Pier Giuseppe; Forget, Gael; Fujii, Yosuke; Griffies, Stephen M.; Gusev, Anatoly; Heimbach, Patrick; Howard, Armando; Jung, Thomas; Kelley, Maxwell; Large, William G.; Leboissetier, Anthony; Lu, Jianhua; Madec, Gurvan; Marsland, Simon J.; Masina, Simona; Navarra, Antonio; George Nurser, A. J.; Pirani, Anna; y Mélia, David Salas; Samuels, Bonita L.; Scheinert, Markus; Sidorenko, Dmitry; Treguier, Anne-Marie; Tsujino, Hiroyuki; Uotila, Petteri; Valcke, Sophie; Voldoire, Aurore; Wang, Qiang

    2014-01-01

    Simulation characteristics from eighteen global ocean-sea-ice coupled models are presented with a focus on the mean Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC) and other related fields in the North Atlantic. These experiments use inter-annually varying atmospheric forcing data sets for the 60-year period from 1948 to 2007 and are performed as contributions to the second phase of the Coordinated Ocean-ice Reference Experiments (CORE-II). The protocol for conducting such CORE-II experiments is summarized. Despite using the same atmospheric forcing, the solutions show significant differences. As most models also differ from available observations, biases in the Labrador Sea region in upper-ocean potential temperature and salinity distributions, mixed layer depths, and sea-ice cover are identified as contributors to differences in AMOC. These differences in the solutions do not suggest an obvious grouping of the models based on their ocean model lineage, their vertical coordinate representations, or surface salinity restoring strengths. Thus, the solution differences among the models are attributed primarily to use of different subgrid scale parameterizations and parameter choices as well as to differences in vertical and horizontal grid resolutions in the ocean models. Use of a wide variety of sea-ice models with diverse snow and sea-ice albedo treatments also contributes to these differences. Based on the diagnostics considered, the majority of the models appear suitable for use in studies involving the North Atlantic, but some models require dedicated development effort.

  5. New challenges in beamline instrumentation for the ESRF Upgrade Programme Phase II.

    PubMed

    Susini, Jean; Barrett, Raymond; Chavanne, Joel; Fajardo, Pablo; Götz, Andy; Revol, Jean Luc; Zhang, Lin

    2014-09-01

    Although beamline instrumentation is by nature driven by science, some recent examples serve as reminders that new technologies also enable new science. Indeed, exploiting the full scientific potential of forthcoming new storage rings with unprecedented source characteristics will, in many cases, require the development and implementation of novel instrumentation. In comparison with present synchrotron radiation facilities, the majority of beamlines should reap immediate performance benefits from the improved source emittance, principally through increased flux and/or horizontal beam size reduction at the sample. Instrumentation will have to develop along similar quantitative and qualitative trends. More speculative and more challenging is anticipating instrumentation that will be required by the new science made possible thanks to the unique coherence properties of diffraction-limited storage rings (DLSRs). ESRF has recently carried out a detailed feasibility study for a new ultra-low-emittance 6 GeV hybrid multibend storage ring, identified as ESRF Upgrade Programme Phase II. Although its performance is not expected to be equivalent to a DLSR source, the successful implementation of the ESRF Phase II project has to address scientific instrumentation issues that are also common to DLSRs. This article aims at providing a comprehensive review of some of the challenges encountered by the ESRF, in the context of the preparation of Phase II of its upgrade programme.

  6. Potential clinical applications of epothilones: a review of phase II studies.

    PubMed

    Larkin, J M G; Kaye, S B

    2007-07-01

    Epothilones are cytotoxic macrolides that share a similar mechanism of action with the taxanes but demonstrate antitumor activity in taxane-resistant settings. Six epothilones are in early clinical trials for cancer treatment. This review summarizes data from phase II clinical studies of the epothilones ixabepilone (BMS-247550), patupilone (EPO906), and KOS-862. Data were identified by searches of PubMed and of the proceedings of the American Society of Clinical Oncology annual meetings and the Federation of European Cancer Societies biennial conference for the period 2000-2006. Studies were included if safety and efficacy data were available for at least 10 patients with a given tumor type in a standard phase II design. Epothilones have demonstrated activity in lung, ovarian, breast, prostate, and renal carcinomas and in non-Hodgkin's lymphoma in phase II studies. Little or no evidence of clinical activity has been reported in studies of epothilones in other tumor types. Preliminary data indicate that epothilones can be combined safely with other cytotoxic agents such as carboplatin. The epothilones may play a role as an alternative to taxanes if activity in resistant settings can be confirmed together with an acceptable toxicity profile. Randomized studies are awaited to investigate the utility of epothilones in single-agent and combination regimens.

  7. Evaluation of Beam Loss and Energy Depositions for a Possible Phase II Design for LHC Collimation

    SciTech Connect

    Lari, L.; Assmann, R.; Bracco, C.; Brugger, M.; Cerutti, F.; Doyle, E.; Ferrari, A.; Keller, L.; Lundgren, S.; Markiewicz, Thomas W.; Mauri, M.; Redaelli, S.; Sarchiapone, L.; Smith, J.; Vlachoudis, V.; Weiler, T.; /CERN

    2011-11-07

    The LHC beams are designed to have high stability and to be stored for many hours. The nominal beam intensity lifetime is expected to be of the order of 20h. The Phase II collimation system has to be able to handle particle losses in stable physics conditions at 7 TeV in order to avoid beam aborts and to allow correction of parameters and restoration to nominal conditions. Monte Carlo simulations are needed in order to evaluate the behavior of metallic high-Z collimators during operation scenarios using a realistic distribution of losses, which is a mix of the three limiting halo cases. Moreover, the consequences in the IR7 insertion of the worst (case) abnormal beam loss are evaluated. The case refers to a spontaneous trigger of the horizontal extraction kicker at top energy, when Phase II collimators are used. These studies are an important input for engineering design of the collimation Phase II system and for the evaluation of their effect on adjacent components. The goal is to build collimators that can survive the expected conditions during LHC stable physics runs, in order to avoid quenches of the SC magnets and to protect other LHC equipments.

  8. Evaluation of Beam Losses And Energy Deposition for a Possible Phase II Design for LHC Collimation

    SciTech Connect

    Lari, L.; Assmann, R.W.; Bracco, C.; Brugger, M.; Cerutti, F.; Ferrari, A.; Mauri, M.; Redaelli, S.; Sarchiapone, L.; Vlachoudis, Vasilis; Weiler, Th.; Doyle, J.E.; Keller, L.; Lundgren, S.A.; Markiewicz, Thomas W.; Smith, J.C.; Lari, L.; /LPHE, Lausanne

    2011-11-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) beams are designed to have high stability and to be stored for many hours. The nominal beam intensity lifetime is expected to be of the order of 20h. The Phase II collimation system has to be able to handle particle losses in stable physics conditions at 7 TeV in order to avoid beam aborts and to allow correction of parameters and restoration to nominal conditions. Monte Carlo simulations are needed in order to evaluate the behavior of metallic high-Z collimators during operation scenarios using a realistic distribution of losses, which is a mix of the three limiting halo cases. Moreover, the consequences in the IR7 insertion of the worst (case) abnormal beam loss are evaluated. The case refers to a spontaneous trigger of the horizontal extraction kicker at top energy, when Phase II collimators are used. These studies are an important input for engineering design of the collimation Phase II system and for the evaluation of their effect on adjacent components. The goal is to build collimators that can survive the expected conditions during LHC stable physics runs, in order to avoid quenches of the SC magnets and to protect other LHC equipments.

  9. Flexible designs for phase II comparative clinical trials involving two response variables.

    PubMed

    Bersimis, S; Sachlas, A; Papaioannou, T

    2015-01-30

    The aim of phase II clinical trials is to determine whether an experimental treatment is sufficiently promising and safe to justify further testing. The need for reduced sample size arises naturally in phase II clinical trials owing to both technical and ethical reasons, motivating a significant part of research in the field during recent years, while another significant part of the research effort is aimed at more complex therapeutic schemes that demand the consideration of multiple endpoints to make decisions. In this paper, our attention is restricted to phase II clinical trials in which two treatments are compared with respect to two dependent dichotomous responses proposing some flexible designs. These designs permit the researcher to terminate the clinical trial when high rates of favorable or unfavorable outcomes are observed early enough requiring in this way a small number of patients. From the mathematical point of view, the proposed designs are defined on bivariate sequences of multi-state trials, and the corresponding stopping rules are based on various distributions related to the waiting time until a certain number of events appear in these sequences. The exact distributions of interest, under a unified framework, are studied using the Markov chain embedding technique, which appears to be very useful in clinical trials for the sample size determination. Tables of expected sample size and power are presented. The numerical illustration showed a very good performance for these new designs.

  10. Historical controls for phase II surgically based trials requiring gross total resection of glioblastoma multiforme.

    PubMed

    Butowski, Nicholas; Lamborn, Kathleen R; Berger, Mitchel S; Prados, Michael D; Chang, Susan M

    2007-10-01

    New treatments for patients with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) are frequently tested in phase II surgically based clinical trials that require gross total resection (GTR). In order to determine efficacy in such single-arm phase II clinical trials, the results are often compared to those from a historical control group that is not limited to patients with GTR. Recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) can define risk groups within historical control groups; however, RPA analyses to date included patients irrespective of whether a patient had a GTR or not. To provide a more appropriate historical control group for surgically based trials requiring a GTR, we sought to determine survival for a group of patients with newly diagnosed GBM, all of who underwent GTR and were treated on prospective clinical trials. GTR was defined as removal of >90% of the enhancing mass, determined by postoperative magnetic resonance imaging. Of 893 patients with GBM treated during these trials, 153 underwent GTR. The median survival for the GTR group was 71 weeks (95% CI 65-76) which was better than those who did not have a GTR. Within the GTR group, the median age was 54 years (range 25-77 years), and median Karnofsky Performance Score was 90 (range 60-100). Considering only patients with GTR, age at diagnosis continued to be a statistically significant prognostic factor. Patients treated during surgically based phase II studies should be matched with a historical control group restricted to patients with similar pretreatment variables, including GTR.

  11. Analysis of the antioxidant butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) in water by means of solid phase extraction combined with GC/MS.

    PubMed

    Fries, Elke; Püttmann, Wilhelm

    2002-05-01

    The antioxidant 3,5-di-tert-butyl-4-hydroxy-toluene (BHT) is widely used as an additive to increase the tenability of food and plastics. BHT is degraded to 3,5-di-tert-butyl-4-hydroxybenzaldehyde (BHT-CHO) in mammals, as well as in the natural environment such as in water and soils. BHT-CHO has been studied extensively in terms of their potential toxicities. The present investigation was carried out to quantify BHT and BHT-CHO in river, ground, rain and drinking water obtained from several locations in Germany. Apart from the compounds mentioned above, 1,2-bis-(3,5-di-tert-butyl-4-hydroxyphenyl)ethane (2-BHT), which is a dimer of BHT, was also detected in the extracts of some ground water samples. The applied analytical method is based on solid phase extraction (SPE) to concentrate trace compounds from water samples followed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) of the extracts. A total of 51 of the respective water samples were used for extraction purposes and analyte recoveries were all > or = 80%. The determination limit for BHT was 5 ng l(-1) and for BHT-CHO 16 ng l(-1). The standard deviations for the analytical procedure were 6% for BHT and 10% for BHT-CHO. The use of the antioxidant BHT in Germany has resulted in water concentrations of 7-791 ng l(-1) in the rivers Rhine, Elbe, Main, Oder, Nidda and Schwarzbach. The degradation product BHT-CHO was also detected in the river water samples at concentrations between 29 and 223 ng l(-1). The concentrations of BHT measured in German rivers are lower compared to values measured in the USA and Japan 20 years ago. In ground water, levels for BHT varied from non-detectable up to 2156 ng l(-1) and for BHT-CHO from non-detectable up to 674 ng l(-1). Both compounds were also detected in rain water in Frankfurt/Main at a concentration of 1797 ng l(-1) for BHT and 59 ng l(-1) for BHT-CHO.

  12. Solar Ethanol Demonstration Plant: report of Phase I, technology assessment and Phase II, concept selection

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-01-01

    The solar ethanol demonstration plant is a most versatile facility for demonstrating the feasibility of on-farm, small scale ethanol production using solar energy as the primary heat source. This facility will be capable of processing the full range of feed stocks - not only the sugar and starch crops but also the cellulose feedstocks on which little data have been collected. This plant is unique in that it will be designed to permit the addition of modules (needed for the processing of cellulose and/or the demonstration of the continuous cycle) and the interchange of components such as fermenters, distillation columns, and molecular sieves which will enable comparative performance data among specific components. The feasibility of solar energy in ethanol production and the utilization of cascaded waste heat for other on-farm uses are also major design features. Engineering and cost analysis was performed to formulate a preliminary design for a unique solar ethanol demonstration plant for on-farm use. Energy requirements were calculated for a variety of starches, simple sugars, and cellulose. These requirements, in increasing order of Btu's required per gallon of ethanol produced, were simple sugars (low), grains (moderate), and cellulose (high). A complete listing of all feedstocks examined is presented. Chapter II provides the design requirements and the detailed process plant design information with flow, layout and performance information. Chapter III provides the results of the ethanol feedstock energy requirements study and chapter IV contains supporting details of the solar collector selection process. The three appendixes which follow address the ethanol fermentation process, the range of cellulose-ethanol production processes, and a detailed description of the Solar Collector performance model.

  13. National Geoscience Data Repository System, Phase II. Final report, January 30, 1995--January 28, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    1998-04-01

    The American Geological Institute (AGI) has completed Phase II of a project to establish a National Geoscience Data Repository System (NGDRS). The project`s primary objectives are to preserve geoscience data in jeopardy of being destroyed and to make that data available to those who have a need to use it in future investigations. These data are available for donation to the public as a result of the downsizing that has occurred in the major petroleum and mining companies in the United States for the past decade. In recent years, these companies have consolidated domestic operations, sold many of their domestic properties and relinquished many of their leases. The scientific data associated with those properties are no longer considered to be useful assets and are consequently in danger of being lost forever. The national repository project will make many of these data available to the geoscience community for the first time. To address this opportunity, AGI sought support from the Department of Energy (DOE) in 1994 to initiate the NGDRS Phase I feasibility study to determine the types and quantity of data that companies would be willing to donate. The petroleum and mining companies surveyed indicated that they were willing to donate approximately five million well logs, one hundred million miles of seismic reflection data, millions of linear feet of core and cuttings, and a variety of other types of scientific data. Based on the positive results of the Phase I study, AGI undertook Phase II of the program in 1995. Funded jointly by DOE and industry, Phase II encompasses the establishment of standards for indexing and cataloging of geoscience data and determination of the costs of transferring data from the private sector to public-sector data repositories. Pilot projects evaluated the feasibility of the project for transfer of different data types and creation of a Web-based metadata supercatalog and browser.

  14. Gainful Employment in Home Economics, Phase II; Seminar on Gainful Employment in Home Economics, July 1, 1967--June 30, 1968.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ridley, Agnes Fenster

    Phase II of this three-phase study was a seminar held to inform teachers of information obtained in Phase I, a survey of 483 Florida businesses. During the course of the seminar 59 home economics teachers and supervisors participated in 3 weeks of intensive in-service education. Pre- and post-tests were made of participants' knowledge, attitudes,…

  15. Summary - National Dissemination and the Five Target States, Part 3, Final Report for Phase II--Dissemination, Rural Shared Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Northern Montana Coll., Havre.

    The dissemination phase (Phase II) of the Rural Shared Services Project is reported in this document. Efforts of the dissemination phase were concentrated in 5 target states: Vermont, Georgia, Wyoming, Montana, and New Mexico; national dissemination was limited to attendance at national conferences, the U. S. Office of Education PREP materials for…

  16. Polyphenon E, Non-futile at Neuroprotection in Multiple Sclerosis but Unpredictably Hepatotoxic: Phase I Single Group and Phase II Randomized Placebo-Controlled Studies

    PubMed Central

    Lovera, Jesus; Ramos, Alexander; Devier, Deidre; Garrison, Virginia; Kovner, Blake; Reza, Tara; Koop, Dennis; Rooney, William; Foundas, Anne; Bourdette, Dennis

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Phase I (PhI): assess the safety of Polyphenon E in people with multiple sclerosis (MS) and determine the futility of Polyphenon E as a neuroprotective agent. Correlate plasma levels of EGCG with neuroprotective effects. Phase II (PhII): Further assess safety and confirm the neuroprotective effects of Polyphenon E. Design PhI: single group futility study. PhII: parallel group randomized double-blind placebo-controlled study. Participants Recruitment area (both studies) LSU MS Center, New Orleans, LA and general public from surrounding areas. Inclusion criteria (both studies) 1) MS per 2005 McDonald criteria; 2) relapsing remitting or secondary progressive MS; 3) stable for six months prior to enrollment on either no therapy or glatiramer acetate (GA) for the PhI study and on either on GA or Interferon β for the PhII study. Exclusion criteria (both studies) 1) complete bone marrow ablation or alentuzumab use at any time; 2) mitoxantrone, cyclophosphamide, natalizumab or fingolimod use in the prior nine months; 3) liver problems or significant medical problems. Interventions PhI: Polyphenon E, a green tea extract containing 50% of the antioxidant Epigallocatechin-gallate (EGCG), two capsules twice daily (200 mg of EGCG per capsule; total daily dose 800mg) for six months. PhII: Polyphenon E or matching placebo capsules, same dose for one year. Only the research pharmacist knew treatment assignment and she randomized participants (one-to-one, stratified by GA or Interferon β, blocks of 4 or 6). Outcome evaluators did not discuss side effects with participants. Outcome measures PhI: 1) adverse events (AE); 2) futility: decrease in N-acetyl aspartate (NAA) from baseline to six months of 10% or more; 3) association between EGCG plasma levels and change in NAA. PhII: 1) AEs; 2) difference in the rate of change of NAA-levels over twelve months. We measured NAA using a point resolved magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging sequence (TE30/TR2000) on a 10cm × 10

  17. Antioxidant effects of green tea

    PubMed Central

    FORESTER, SARAH C.; LAMBERT, JOSHUA D.

    2013-01-01

    Consumption of green tea (Camellia sinensis) may provide protection against chronic diseases, including cancer. Green tea polyphenols are believed to be responsible for this cancer preventive effect, and the antioxidant activity of the green tea polyphenols has been implicated as a potential mechanism. This hypothesis has been difficult to study in vivo due to metabolism of these compounds and poor understanding of the redox environment in vivo. Green tea polyphenols can be direct antioxidants by scavenging reactive oxygen species or chelating transition metals as has been demonstrated in vitro. Alternatively, they may act indirectly by up-regulating phase II antioxidant enzymes. Evidence of this latter effect has been observed in vivo, yet more work is required to determine under which conditions these mechanisms occur. Green tea polyphenols can also be potent pro-oxidants, both in vitro and in vivo, leading to the formation of hydrogen peroxide, the hydroxyl radical, and superoxide anion. The potential role of these pro-oxidant effects in the cancer preventive activity of green tea is not well understood. The evidence for not only the antioxidant, but also pro-oxidant, properties of green tea are discussed in the present review. PMID:21538850

  18. Synthesis, Spectral Characterization, DNA/ Protein Binding, DNA Cleavage, Cytotoxicity, Antioxidative and Molecular Docking Studies of Cu(II)Complexes Containing Schiff Base-bpy/Phen Ligands.

    PubMed

    Anupama, Berelli; Aruna, Airva; Manga, Vijjulatha; Sivan, Sreekanth; Sagar, Madamsetty Vijay; Chandrashekar, Ravula

    2017-05-01

    Ternary Cu(II) complexes [Cu(II)(L)(bpy)Cl] 1, [Cu(II)(L)(Phen)Cl] 2 [L = 2,3-dimethyl-1-phenyl-4(2 hydroxy-5-methyl benzylideneamino)-pyrazol-5-one, bpy = 2,2(') bipyridine, phen =1,10 phenanthroline) were synthesized and characterized by elemental analyses, UV-Visible, FT-IR, ESR, Mass, thermogravimetric and SEM EDAX techniques. The complexes exhibit octahedral geometry. The interaction of the Cu(II) with cailf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) was explored by using absorption and fluorescence spectroscopic methods. The results revealed that the complexes have an affinity constant for DNA in the order of 10(4) M(-1) and mode of interaction is intercalative mode. The DNA cleavage study showed that the complexes cleaved DNA without any external agent. The interaction of Cu(II) complexes with bovine serum albumin (BSA) was also studied using absorption and fluorescence techniques. The cytotoxic activity of the Cu(II) complexes was probed in HeLa (human breast adenocarcinoma cell line), B16F10 (Murine melanoma cell line) and HEPA1-6 celllines, complex 1 has good cytotoxic activity which is comparable with the doxarubicin drug, with IC50 values ranging from 3 to 12.6 μM. A further molecular docking technique was employed to understand the binding of the complexes towards the molecular target DNA. Investigation of the antioxidative properties showed that the metal complexes have significant radical scavenging activity potency against DPPH radical.

  19. Yakima River Basin Fish Passage Phase II Fish Screen Construction, Project Completion Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Hudson, R. Dennis

    2008-01-01

    On December 5, 1980, Congress passed the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act (Public Law 96-501). The Act created the Northwest Power Planning Council (now the Northwest Power and Conservation Council). The Council was charged with the responsibility to prepare a Regional Conservation and Electric Power Plan and to develop a program to protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife including related spawning grounds and habitat on the Columbia River and its tributaries. The Council adopted its Fish and Wildlife Program on November 15, 1982. Section 800 of the Program addresses measures in the Yakima River Basin. The Yakima measures were intended to help mitigate hydroelectric impacts in the basin and provide off-site mitigation to compensate for fish losses caused by hydroelectric project development and operations throughout the Columbia River Basin. The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) was designated as a major source of funding for such off-site mitigation measures and was requested to initiate discussions with the appropriate Federal project operators and the Council to determine the most expeditious means for funding and implementing the program. The primary measures proposed for rapid implementation in the Yakima River basin were the installation of fish passage and protective facilities. Sec. 109 of The Hoover Power Plant Act of 1984, authorized the Secretary of the Interior to design, construct, operate, and maintain fish passage facilities within the Yakima River Basin. Under Phase I of the program, improvements to existing fish passage facilities and installation of new fish ladders and fish screens at 16 of the largest existing diversion dams and canals were begun in 1984 and were completed in 1990. The Yakima Phase II fish passage program is an extension of the Phase I program. In 1988, the Yakama Nation (YN) submitted an application to amend Sections 803(b) and 1403(4.5) of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council

  20. PHASE II CALDERON PROCESS TO PRODUCE DIRECT REDUCED IRON RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT PROJECT

    SciTech Connect

    Albert Calderon

    2001-07-23

    This project was initially targeted to the making of coke for blast furnaces by using proprietary technology of Calderon in a phased approach, and Phase I was completed. The project was then re-directed to the making of iron units. U.S. Steel teamed up with Calderon for a joint effort which will last 30 months to produce directly reduced iron with the potential of converting it into molten iron (hot metal) consistent with the Roadmap recommendations of 1998 prepared by the Steel Industry in cooperation with the Department of Energy. The work which is labeled as Phase II will take place at two levels; namely, the bench scale level and the process development unit level. During the past quarter approval for the re-direction took place and work was initiated at both levels.

  1. PHASE II CALDERON PROCESS TO PRODUCE DIRECT REDUCED IRON RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT PROJECT

    SciTech Connect

    Albert Calderon

    2002-01-22

    This project was initially targeted to the making of coke for blast furnaces by using proprietary technology of Calderon in a phased approach, and Phase I was completed. The project was then re-directed to the making of iron units. U.S. Steel teamed up with Calderon for a joint effort which will last 30 months to produce directly reduced iron with the potential of converting it into molten iron (hot metal) consistent with the Roadmap recommendations of 1998 prepared by the Steel Industry in cooperation with the Department of Energy. The work which is labeled as Phase II will take place at two levels; namely, the bench scale level and the process development unit (PDU) level.

  2. On the polymorphism of benzocaine; a low-temperature structural phase transition for form (II).

    PubMed

    Chan, Eric J; Rae, A David; Welberry, T Richard

    2009-08-01

    A low-temperature structural phase transition has been observed for form (II) of benzocaine (BZC). Lowering the temperature doubles the b-axis repeat and changes the space group from P2(1)2(1)2(1) to P112(1) with gamma now 99.37 degrees. The structure is twinned, the twin rule corresponding to a 2(1) screw rotation parallel to a. The phase transition is associated with a sequential displacement parallel to a of zigzag bi-layers of ribbons perpendicular to b*. No similar phase transition was observed for form (I) and this was attributed to the different packing symmetries of the two room-temperature polymorphic forms.

  3. Developmental and seed aging mediated regulation of antioxidative genes and differential expression of proteins during pre- and post-germinative phases in pea.

    PubMed

    Yao, Zhen; Liu, Lingwei; Gao, Feng; Rampitsch, Christof; Reinecke, Dennis M; Ozga, Jocelyn A; Ayele, Belay T

    2012-10-15

    Enzymatic antioxidant system plays an important role in maintaining seed vigor and regulating plant growth and development. It involves a number of enzymes that scavenge excessive reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced during seed aging and also modulate the level of these compounds during plant developmental processes. This study investigated the transcriptional regulation of enzymatic antioxidative capacity in pea during the pre- and post-germinative phases and in response to seed aging by analyzing the spatio-temporal expression of five antioxidative genes: PsAPX, PsSOD, PsGRcyt, PsGRcm and PsCAT. Transcripts of all these genes were found in mature dry seeds, embryo axes and cotyledons of germinating seeds, and cotyledons, roots and shoots of young seedlings. However, PsAPX and PsSOD were predominant and exhibited developmental regulation, suggesting that these genes play important roles in controlling the intracellular homeostasis of ROS for promoting cell elongation, and thereby embryo axis expansion and early seedling growth in pea. Accelerated aging of pea seeds led to reduction in seed viability and seedling growth, and this effect was correlated with substantial decrease in the transcriptional activation of the prominent antioxidative genes. Furthermore, our proteomic analysis indicated the association of seed aging with changes in the abundance of specific proteins, revealing additional mechanisms underlying seed aging in pea.

  4. Polyphenon E, non-futile at neuroprotection in multiple sclerosis but unpredictably hepatotoxic: Phase I single group and phase II randomized placebo-controlled studies.

    PubMed

    Lovera, Jesus; Ramos, Alexander; Devier, Deidre; Garrison, Virginia; Kovner, Blake; Reza, Tara; Koop, Dennis; Rooney, William; Foundas, Anne; Bourdette, Dennis

    2015-11-15

    Phase I (PhI): assess the safety of Polyphenon E in people with multiple sclerosis (MS) and determine the futility of Polyphenon E as a neuroprotective agent. Correlate plasma levels of EGCG with neuroprotective effects. Phase II (PhII): Further assess safety and confirm the neuroprotective effects of Polyphenon E. PhI: single group futility study. PhII: parallel group randomized double-blind placebo-controlled study. Recruitment area (both studies): LSU MS Center, New Orleans, LA and general public from surrounding areas. Inclusion criteria (both studies): 1) MS per 2005 McDonald criteria; 2) relapsing remitting or secondary progressive MS; 3) stable for six months prior to enrollment on either no therapy or glatiramer acetate (GA) for the PhI study and on either on GA or Interferon β for the PhII study. Exclusion criteria (both studies): 1) complete bone marrow ablation or alentuzumab use at any time; 2) mitoxantrone, cyclophosphamide, natalizumab or fingolimod use in the prior nine months; 3) liver problems or significant medical problems. PhI: Polyphenon E, a green tea extract containing 50% of the antioxidant Epigallocatechin-gallate (EGCG), two capsules twice daily (200mg of EGCG per capsule; total daily dose 800mg) for six months. PhII: Polyphenon E or matching placebo capsules, same dose for one year. Only the research pharmacist knew treatment assignment and she randomized participants (one-to-one, stratified by GA or Interferon β, blocks of 4 or 6). Outcome evaluators did not discuss side effects with participants. PhI: 1) adverse events (AE); 2) futility: decrease in N-acetyl aspartate (NAA) from baseline to six months of 10% or more; 3) association between EGCG plasma levels and change in NAA. PhII: 1) AEs; 2) difference in the rate of change of NAA-levels over twelve months.We measured NAA using a point resolved magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging sequence (TE30/TR2000) on a 10cm×10cm×1cm volume of interest (VOI) located just superior to the

  5. Structure and compressibility of the high-pressure molecular phase II of carbon dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datchi, Frédéric; Mallick, Bidyut; Salamat, Ashkan; Rousse, Gwenaëlle; Ninet, Sandra; Garbarino, Gaston; Bouvier, Pierre; Mezouar, Mohamed

    2014-04-01

    The structure and equation of state of the crystalline molecular phase II of carbon dioxide have been investigated at room temperature from 15.5 to 57.5 GPa using synchrotron x-ray diffraction methods. The CO2 samples were embedded in neon pressure medium in order to provide quasihydrostatic conditions. The x-ray diffraction patterns of phase II are best described by a tetragonal structure, with space group P42/mnm and 2 molecules per unit cell, in accordance with a previous study [Yoo et al., Phys. Rev. B 65, 104103 (2002), 10.1103/PhysRevB.65.104103]. There is however a large (15%) difference in the intramolecular C=O bond length between the present study, 1.14(3) Å, and the latter work (1.329-1.366 Å). The present value is similar to that of the free molecule and is in very good agreement with predictions based on density functional theory. The compressibility of CO2-II determined here also disagrees with the previous study: our value for the zero-pressure bulk modulus, B0=8.5(3) GPa [with B0'=(∂B/∂P)0=6.29], is 15.5 times smaller. These findings oppose the view that CO2-II is an intermediate state between the low-pressure molecular phases and the high-pressure nonmolecular forms, consistent with our previous results for phase IV [Datchi et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 185701 (2009), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.103.185701]. The x-ray diffraction patterns of CO2-II above 15 GPa indicate the presence of a large orthorhombic microstrain. Carrying out density functional theory calculations of the elastic tensor and stress-strain relation, we interpret this as due to the softness of the crystal against deviatoric stress in the [110] and symmetry-related directions. Unlike the other dioxides of the group-14 elements, there is however no mechanical or dynamical instability of the P42/mnm structure in CO2 up to 57.5 GPa at 295 K, and therefore no symmetry lowering to Pnnm.

  6. Zinc(II) oxide solubility and phase behavior in aqueous sodium phosphate solutions at elevated temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Ziemniak, S.E.; Jones, M.E.; Combs, K.E.S.

    1990-02-01

    A platinum-lined, flowing autoclave facility is used to investigate the solubility/phase behavior of zinc(II) oxide in aqueous sodium phosphate solutions at temperatures between 290 and 560 K. ZnO solubilities are observed to increase continuously with temperature and phosphate concentration. At higher phosphate concentrations, a solid phase transformation to NaZnPO{sub 4} is observed. NaZnPO{sub 4} solubilities are retrograde with temperature. The measured solubility behavior is examined via a Zn(II) ion hydrolysis/complexing model and thermodynamic functions for the hydrolysis/complexing reaction equilibria are obtained from a least-squares analysis of the data. The existence of two new zinc(II) ion complexes is reported for the first time: Zn(OH){sub 2}(HPO{sub 4}){sup 2{minus}} and Zn(OH){sub 3}(H{sub 2}PO{sub 4}){sup 2{minus}}. A summary of thermochemical properties for species in the systems ZnO-H{sub 2}O and ZnO-Na{sub 2}O-P{sub 2}O{sub 5}-H{sub 2}O is also provided. 21 refs., 10 figs., 7 tabs.

  7. Phase I and Phase II Therapies for Acute Ischemic Stroke: An Update on Currently Studied Drugs in Clinical Research

    PubMed Central

    Reis, Cesar; Akyol, Onat; Ho, Wing Mann; Araujo, Camila; Huang, Lei; Applegate II, Richard

    2017-01-01

    Acute ischemic stroke is a devastating cause of death and disability, consequences of which depend on the time from ischemia onset to treatment, the affected brain region, and its size. The main targets of ischemic stroke therapy aim to restore tissue perfusion in the ischemic penumbra in order to decrease the total infarct area by maintaining blood flow. Advances in research of pathological process and pathways during acute ischemia have resulted in improvement of new treatment strategies apart from restoring perfusion. Additionally, limiting the injury severity by manipulating the molecular mechanisms during ischemia has become a promising approach, especially in animal research. The purpose of this article is to review completed and ongoing phases I and II trials for the treatment of acute ischemic stroke, reviewing studies on antithrombotic, thrombolytic, neuroprotective, and antineuroinflammatory drugs that may translate into more effective treatments. PMID:28286764

  8. Phase I and Phase II Therapies for Acute Ischemic Stroke: An Update on Currently Studied Drugs in Clinical Research.

    PubMed

    Reis, Cesar; Akyol, Onat; Ho, Wing Mann; Araujo, Camila; Huang, Lei; Applegate, Richard; Zhang, John H

    2017-01-01

    Acute ischemic stroke is a devastating cause of death and disability, consequences of which depend on the time from ischemia onset to treatment, the affected brain region, and its size. The main targets of ischemic stroke therapy aim to restore tissue perfusion in the ischemic penumbra in order to decrease the total infarct area by maintaining blood flow. Advances in research of pathological process and pathways during acute ischemia have resulted in improvement of new treatment strategies apart from restoring perfusion. Additionally, limiting the injury severity by manipulating the molecular mechanisms during ischemia has become a promising approach, especially in animal research. The purpose of this article is to review completed and ongoing phases I and II trials for the treatment of acute ischemic stroke, reviewing studies on antithrombotic, thrombolytic, neuroprotective, and antineuroinflammatory drugs that may translate into more effective treatments.

  9. Modeling of fluidized-bed combustion of coal: Phase II, final reports. Volume II. Detailed description of the model

    SciTech Connect

    Louis, J.F.; Tung, S.E.

    1980-10-01

    This document is the second of a seven volume series of our Phase II Final Report. This volume deals with detailed descriptions of the structure of each program member (subroutines and functions), the interrelation between the members of a submodel, and the interrelation between the various submodels as such. The systems model for fluidized bed combustors (FBC-II) consists of a systematic combination of the following interrelated areas: fluid mechanics and bubble growth, char combustion and associated kinetics for particle burnout, sulfur capture, NO/sub x/ formation and reduction, freeboard reactions, and heat transfer. Program outline is shown in Figure 1.1. Input variables (supplied by the user are inspected to check that they lie inside the allowed range of values and are input to the various routines as needed. The necessary physical and fluid mechanical properties are calculated and utilized in estimating char combustion and sulfur capture in the bed and the freeboard. NO/sub x/ and CO emissions are estimated by taking into account all relevant chemical reactions. A material and energy balance is made over the bed. Figure 1.1 shows a block diagram of the systems program. In this diagram, the overall structure of the FBC program is illustrated in terms of the various submodels that together constitute the systems program. A more detailed outline of the systems program is shown in Figure 1.2. In this figure, all important subroutine members of the FBC program are shown, and their linkage to each other, as well as to the main program is indicated. A description of the exact sequence in which these various routines are called at time of program execution is provided in Chapter 8 under the executive routine MAIN.

  10. 37 GHz METHANOL MASERS : HORSEMEN OF THE APOCALYPSE FOR THE CLASS II METHANOL MASER PHASE?

    SciTech Connect

    Ellingsen, S. P.; Breen, S. L.; Sobolev, A. M.; Voronkov, M. A.; Caswell, J. L.; Lo, N.

    2011-12-01

    We report the results of a search for class II methanol masers at 37.7, 38.3, and 38.5 GHz toward a sample of 70 high-mass star formation regions. We primarily searched toward regions known to show emission either from the 107 GHz class II methanol maser transition, or from the 6.035 GHz excited OH transition. We detected maser emission from 13 sources in the 37.7 GHz transition, eight of these being new detections. We detected maser emission from three sources in the 38 GHz transitions, one of which is a new detection. We find that 37.7 GHz methanol masers are only associated with the most luminous 6.7 and 12.2 GHz methanol maser sources, which in turn are hypothesized to be the oldest class II methanol sources. We suggest that the 37.7 GHz methanol masers are associated with a brief evolutionary phase (of 1000-4000 years) prior to the cessation of class II methanol maser activity in the associated high-mass star formation region.

  11. Casein Kinase 1 Coordinates Cohesin Cleavage, Gametogenesis, and Exit from M Phase in Meiosis II.

    PubMed

    Argüello-Miranda, Orlando; Zagoriy, Ievgeniia; Mengoli, Valentina; Rojas, Julie; Jonak, Katarzyna; Oz, Tugce; Graf, Peter; Zachariae, Wolfgang

    2017-01-09

    Meiosis consists of DNA replication followed by two consecutive nuclear divisions and gametogenesis or spore formation. While meiosis I has been studied extensively, less is known about the regulation of meiosis II. Here we show that Hrr25, the conserved casein kinase 1δ of budding yeast, links three mutually independent key processes of meiosis II. First, Hrr25 induces nuclear division by priming centromeric cohesin for cleavage by separase. Hrr25 simultaneously phosphorylates Rec8, the cleavable subunit of cohesin, and removes from centromeres the cohesin protector composed of shugoshin and the phosphatase PP2A. Second, Hrr25 initiates the sporulation program by inducing the synthesis of membranes that engulf the emerging nuclei at anaphase II. Third, Hrr25 mediates exit from meiosis II by activating pathways that trigger the destruction of M-phase-promoting kinases. Thus, Hrr25 synchronizes formation of the single-copy genome with gamete differentiation and termination of meiosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. [Orthodontics in general practice 3. Angle Class II/1 malocclusion: one-phase treatment treatment preferred to two-phase treatment].

    PubMed

    Kuijpers, M A R; Kuijpers-Jagtman, A M

    2008-01-01

    With regard to the optimal treatment timing for children with an Angle Class II division 1 malocclusion, there is an ongoing controversy on the effectiveness of a two-phase or a one-phase therapy. Two-phase treatment involves a first phase to correct the jaw relationship starting at the age of 7 to 9 years, and, when all permanent teeth are present, a second phase of treatment by fixed appliances. A one-phase treatment involves treatment of the jaw relationship and the dental malocclusion simultaneously or consecutively, starting during the early adolescence period. In recent years, several randomized controlled clinical trials have been performed on this topic. More recently, a Cochrane meta-analysis of these trials has been published. The results show that early treatment of an Angle Class II division 1 malocclusion followed by a second phase of treatment does not have any advantages over treatment that is started later and finished in one phase. One-phase treatment is as effective as two-phase treatment, while the time needed for treatment is shorter and, as a consequence, total costs are lower. Dentists should take into account this information, when treating children with an Angle Class II division 1 malocclusion or referring them to an orthodontist.

  13. Catalytic conversion of light alkanes phase II. Topical report, January 1990--January 1993

    SciTech Connect

    1998-12-31

    The Topical Report on Phase II of the project entitled, Catalytic Conversion of Light Alkanes reviews work done between January 1, 1990 and September 30, 1992 on the Cooperative Agreement. The mission of this work is to devise a new catalyst which can be used in a simple economic process to convert the light alkanes in natural gas to oxygenate products which can either be used as clean-burning, high octane liquid fuels, as fuel components or as precursors to liquid hydrocarbon transportation fuel. This Topical Report documents our efforts to design, prepare, characterize and test novel catalysts for the mild selective reaction of light hydrocarbons with air or oxygen to produce alcohols directly. These catalysts are designed to form active metal oxo (MO) species and to be uniquely active for the homolytic cleavage of the carbon-hydrogen bonds in light alkanes producing intermediates which can form alcohols. Research on the Cooperative Agreement is divided into three Phases relating to three molecular environments for the active catalytic species that we are trying to generate. In this report we present our work on catalysts which have oxidation-active metals in polyoxoanions (PHASE II).

  14. Turnable Semiconductor Laser Spectroscopy in Hollow Optical Waveguides, Phase II SBIR

    SciTech Connect

    Gregory J. Fetzer, Ph.D.

    2001-12-24

    In this study a novel optical trace gas sensor based on a perforated hollow waveguide (PHW) was proposed. The sensor has been given the acronym ESHOW for Environmental Sensor using Hollow Optical Waveguides. Realizations of the sensor have demonstrated rapid response time (<2s), low minimum detection limits (typically around 3 x 10-5 absorbance). Operation of the PHW technology has been demonstrated in the near-infrared (NIR) and mid0infrared (MIR) regions of the spectrum. Simulation of sensor performance provided in depth understanding of the signals and signal processing required to provide high sensitivity yet retain rapid response to gas changes. A dedicated sensor electronics and software foundation were developed during the course of the Phase II effort. Commercial applications of the sensor are ambient air and continuous emissions monitoring, industrial process control and hazardous waste site monitoring. There are numerous other applications for such a sensor including medical diagnosis and treatment, breath analysis for legal purposes, water quality assessment, combustion diagnostics, and chemical process control. The successful completion of Phase II resulted in additional funding of instrument development by the Nations Institute of Heath through a Phase I SBIR grant and a strategic teaming relationship with a commercial manufacture of medical instrumentation. The purpose of the NIH grant and teaming relationship is to further develop the sensor to monitor NO in exhaled breath for the purposes of asthma diagnosis.

  15. Predicted Geology of the Pahute Mesa-Oasis Valley Phase II Drilling Initiative

    SciTech Connect

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2009-04-20

    Pahute Mesa–Oasis Valley (PM-OV) Phase II drilling will occur within an area that encompasses approximately 117 square kilometers (45 square miles) near the center of the Phase I PM-OV hydrostratigraphic framework model area. The majority of the investigation area lies within dissected volcanic terrain between Pahute Mesa on the north and Timber Mountain on the south. This area consists of a complex distribution of volcanic tuff and lava of generally rhyolitic composition erupted from nearby calderas and related vents. Several large buried volcanic structural features control the distribution of volcanic units in the investigation area. The Area 20 caldera, including its structural margin and associated caldera collapse collar, underlies the northeastern portion of the investigation area. The southern half of the investigation area lies within the northwestern portion of the Timber Mountain caldera complex, including portions of the caldera moat and resurgent dome. Another significant structural feature in the area is the west-northwest-trending Northern Timber Mountain moat structural zone, which bisects the northern portion of the investigation area and forms a structural bench. The proposed wells of the UGTA Phase II drilling initiative can be grouped into four generalized volcanic structural domains based on the stratigraphic distribution and structural position of the volcanic rocks in the upper 1,000 meters (3,300 feet) of the crust, a depth that represents the approximate planned total depths of the proposed wells.

  16. Long-Term Column Leaching of Phase II Mercury Control Technology By-Products

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, K.T.; Cardone, C.R.; White, Fredrick; Rohar, P.C.; Kim, A.G

    2007-07-01

    An NETL research, development and demonstration program under DOE/Fossil Energy Innovations for Existing Plants is directed toward the improvement of the performance and economics of mercury control from coal-fired plants. The current Phase II of the RD&D program emphasizes the evaluation of performance and cost of control technologies through slip-stream and full scale field testing while continuing the development of novel concepts. One of the concerns of the NETL program is the fate of the captured flue gas mercury which is transferred to the condensed phase by-product stream. The stability of mercury and any co-captured elements in the by-products could have a large economic impact if it reduced by-product sales or increasing their disposal costs. As part of a greater characterization effort of Phase II facility baseline and control technology sample pairs, NETL in-house laboratories have performed continuous leaching of a select subset of the available sample pairs using four leachants: water (pH=5.7), dilute sulfuric acid (pH=1.2), dilute acetic acid (pH=2.9), and sodium carbonate (pH=11.1). This report describes results obtained for mercury, arsenic, and selenium during the 5-month leaching experiments.

  17. Design of Phase II cancer trials for evaluation of cytostatic/cytotoxic agents.

    PubMed

    Kocherginsky, Masha; Cohen, Ezra E W; Karrison, Theodore

    2009-01-01

    For experimental anticancer agents that may have both cytostatic and cytotoxic effects, assessment of response rates alone may not capture the full impact of the treatment. Oncologists are therefore interested in assessing both response and stable disease rates in early phase clinical trials of such therapies. We describe the design of a single-arm, Phase II clinical trial for the simultaneous evaluation of objective response and stable disease (lack of early tumor progression) rates using standard RECIST criteria. Demonstration of a sufficiently high rate for either of these endpoints will lead to rejection of the null hypothesis and a conclusion that the treatment warrants further study. A design is chosen that satisfies the desired type I error constraint and has sufficient statistical power at several selected points within the alternative hypothesis space using a restricted search algorithm. An early stopping rule for lack of efficacy is incorporated. The method is illustrated by the design of a Phase II clinical trial in head and neck cancer.

  18. Early investigational therapeutics for gastrointestinal motility disorders: from animal studies to Phase II trials.

    PubMed

    Valentin, Nelson; Acosta, Andres; Camilleri, Michael

    2015-06-01

    The most common gastrointestinal disorders that include evidence of dysmotility include: gastroparesis, the lower functional gastrointestinal disorders associated with altered bowel function (such as chronic [functional] diarrhea, chronic idiopathic constipation) and opioid-induced constipation. These conditions, which are grouped as gastrointestinal motility and functional disorders, are characterized by abnormal motor, sensory or secretory functions that alter bowel function and result in a significant disease burden, since currently available treatments do not completely alleviate symptoms. New drugs are being developed for these disorders, targeting mechanisms involved in the pathophysiology of these diseases, specifically, motor function, intestinal secretion and bile acid modulation. The article provides a brief overview of motility disorders and the drugs approved and currently available for these indications. It also provides an evaluation of the efficacy, safety and possible mechanisms of the drugs currently under investigation for the treatment of gastroparesis, chronic diarrhea, chronic idiopathic constipation and opioid-induced constipation, based on animal to Phase II studies. Medications with complete Phase III trials are excluded from this discussion. Treatment of gastrointestinal motility disorders requires the understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms, biomarkers to identify subgroups of these disorders and robust pharmacological studies from animal to Phase II studies. These are prerequisites for the development of efficacious medications and individualizing therapy in order to enhance the treatment of these patients.

  19. BWR Full Integral Simulation Test (FIST) Phase II test results and TRAC-BWR model qualification

    SciTech Connect

    Sutherland, W A; Alamgir, M; Findlay, J A; Hwang, W S

    1985-10-01

    Eight matrix tests were conducted in the FIST Phase I. These tests investigated the large break, small break and steamline break LOCA's, as well as natural circulation and power transients. There are nine tests in Phase II of the FIST program. They include the following LOCA tests: BWR/6 LPCI line break, BWR/6 intermediate size recirculation break, and a BWR/4 large break. Steady state natural circulation tests with feedwater makeup performed at high and low pressure, and at high pressure with HPCS makeup, are included. Simulation of a transient without rod insertion, and with controlled depressurization, was performed. Also included is a simulation of the Peach Bottom turbine trip test. The final two tests simulated a failure to maintain water level during a postulated accident. A FIST program objective is to assess the TRAC code by comparisons with test data. Two post-test predictions made with TRACB04 are compared with Phase II test data in this report. These are for the BWR/6 LPCI line break LOCA, and the Peach Bottom turbine trip test simulation.

  20. Performance characterization and ground testing of an airborne CO2 differential absorption lidar system (phase II)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senft, Daniel C.; Fox, Marsha J.; Hamilton, Carla M.; Richter, Dale A.; Higdon, N. S.; Kelly, Brian T.

    1999-05-01

    The Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) Active Remote Sensing Branch has developed the Laser Airborne Remote Sensing (LARS) system for chemical detection using the differential absorption lidar (DIAL) technique. The system is based on a high-power CO2 laser which can use either the standard 12C16O2 or the 13C16O2 carbon dioxide isotopes as the lasing medium, and has output energies of up to 5 J on the stronger laser transitions. The lidar system is mounted on a flight-qualified optical breadboard designed for installation into the AFRL Argus C- 135E optical testbed aircraft. The Phase I ground tests were conducted at Kirtland AFB in 1997, prior to the LARS flight tests performed in September 1997 at Kirtland AFB and the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The Phase II ground tests were conducted in 1998 to determine the optimum performance of the LARS system, after the incorporation of modification and improvements suggested by the flight test results. This paper will present some of the chemical detection and radiometric results obtained during the Phase II ground tests.