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Sample records for phase noise measurements

  1. Olympus receiver evaluation and phase noise measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Richard L.; Wang, Huailiang; Sweeney, Dennis

    1990-01-01

    A set of measurements performed by the Michigan Tech Sensing and Signal Processing Group on the analog receiver built by the Virginia Polytechnic Institute (VPI) and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) for propagation measurements using the Olympus Satellite is described. Measurements of local oscillator (LO) phase noise were performed for all of the LOs supplied by JPL. In order to obtain the most useful set of measurements, LO phase noise measurements were made using the complete VPI receiver front end. This set of measurements demonstrates the performance of the receiver from the Radio Frequency (RF) input through the high Intermediate Frequency (IF) output. Three different measurements were made: LO phase noise with DC on the voltage controlled crystal oscillator (VCXO) port; LO phase noise with the 11.381 GHz LO locked to the reference signal generator; and a reference measurement with the JPL LOs out of the system.

  2. A Gaussian measure of quantum phase noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schleich, Wolfgang P.; Dowling, Jonathan P.

    1992-01-01

    We study the width of the semiclassical phase distribution of a quantum state in its dependence on the average number of photons (m) in this state. As a measure of phase noise, we choose the width, delta phi, of the best Gaussian approximation to the dominant peak of this probability curve. For a coherent state, this width decreases with the square root of (m), whereas for a truncated phase state it decreases linearly with increasing (m). For an optimal phase state, delta phi decreases exponentially but so does the area caught underneath the peak: all the probability is stored in the broad wings of the distribution.

  3. Phase Noise Measurement in PEP II and the Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Getaneh, Mesfin

    2003-09-05

    The Goal of this project is to provide a measurement of the phase of the radio frequency (RF) relative to electron beam traveling down the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). Because the Main Drive Line (MDL) supplies the RF drive and phase reference for the entire accelerator system, the phase accuracy and amount of phase noise present in the MDL are very critical to the functionality of the accelerator. Therefore, a Phase Noise Measurement System was built to measure the phase noise in the liner accelerator (Linac) and PEP II. The system was used to determine the stability of the PEP II RF reference system. In this project a low noise Phase Locked Loop system (PLL) was built to measure timing jitter about sub picoseconds level. The phase noise measured in Master Oscillator using PLL indicates that phase noise is low enough for PEP II to run.

  4. Study on low-phase-noise optoelectronic oscillator and high-sensitivity phase noise measurement system.

    PubMed

    Hong, Jun; Liu, An-min; Guo, Jian

    2013-08-01

    An analytic model for an injection-locked dual-loop optoelectronic oscillator (OEO) is proposed and verified by experiments in this paper. Based on this theoretical model, the effect of injection power on the single-sideband phase noise of the OEO is analyzed, and results suggest that moderate injection is one key factor for a balance between phase noise and spur for OEO. In order to measure superlow phase noise of OEOs, a cross-correlation measurement system based on the fiber delay line is built, in which high linear photodetector and low-phase-noise amplifier are used to improve systematic sensitivity. The cross-correlation measurement system is validated by experiments, and its noise floor for the X band is about -130 dBc/Hz at 1 kHz and -168 dBc/Hz at 10 kHz after a cross correlation of 200 times.

  5. Phase-Noise and Amplitude-Noise Measurement of Low-Power Signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubiola, Enrico; Salik, Ertan; Yu, Nan; Maleki, Lute

    2004-01-01

    Measuring the phase fluctuation between a pair of low-power microwave signals, the signals must be amplified before detection. In such cases the phase noise of the amplifier pair is the main cause of 1/f background noise of the instrument. this article proposes a scheme that makes amplification possible while rejecting the close in 1/f (flicker) noise of the two amplifiers. Noise rejection, which relies upon the understanding of the amplifier noise mechanism does not require averaging. Therefore, our scheme can also be the detector of a closed loop noise reduction system. the first prototype, compared to a traditional saturated mixer system under the same condition, show a 24 dB noise reduction of the 1/f region.

  6. The effect of AM noise on correlation phase-noise measurements.

    PubMed

    Rubiola, Enrico; Boudot, Rodolphe

    2007-05-01

    We analyze the phase-noise measurement methods in which correlation and averaging is used to reject the background noise of the instrument. All the known methods make use of a mixer, used either as a saturated-phase detector or as a linear-synchronous detector. Unifortunately, AM noise is taken in through the power-to-dc-offset conversion mechanism that results from the mixer asymmetry. The measurement of some mixers indicates that the unwanted amplitude-to-voltage gain is of the order of 5-50 mV, which is 12-35 dB lower than the phase-to-voltage gain of the mixer. In addition, the trick of setting the mixer at a sweet point--off the quadrature condition--where the sensitivity to AM nulls, works only with microwave mixers. The HF-VHF mixers do not have this sweet point. Moreover, we prove that if the AM noise comes from the oscillator under test, it cannot be rejected by correlation. At least not with the schemes currently used. An example shows that at some critical frequencies the unwanted effect of AM noise is of the same order-if not greater--than the phase noise. Thus, experimental mistakes are around the corner.

  7. A novel phase noise measurement of phase modulation microwave photonic links

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Quanyi; Gao, Yingjie; Yang, Chun

    2016-07-01

    Microwave photonic links can provide many advantages over traditional coaxial due to its low loss, small size, lightweight, large bandwidth and immunity to external interference. In this paper, a novel phase noise measurement system is built, since the input signal and the power supply noise can be effectively cancelled by a two-arm configuration without the phase locking. Using this approach, the phase noise performance of the 10-GHz phase modulation photonic link has been measured for the first time, evaluated the values of -124 dBc/Hz at 1 kHz offset and -132 dBc/Hz at 10 kHz offset is obtained. Theoretical analysis on the phase noise measurement system calibration is also discussed.

  8. Experimental clean combustor program noise measurement addendum, phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emmerling, J. J.

    1975-01-01

    The test results of combustor noise measurements taken with waveguide probes are presented. Waveguide probes were shown to be a viable measurement technique for determining high sound pressure level broadband noise. A total of six full-scale annular combustors were tested and included the three advanced combustor designs: swirl-can, radial/axial, and double annular.

  9. Local oscillator phase noise limitation on the resolution of acoustic delay line wireless passive sensor measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chrétien, N.; Friedt, J.-M.; Martin, G.

    2014-06-01

    The role of the phase noise of a local oscillator driving a pulsed-mode RADAR used for probing surface acoustic wave sensors is investigated. The echo delay, representative of the acoustic velocity, and hence the physical quantity probed by the sensor, is finely measured as a phase. Considering that the intrinsic oscillator phase fluctuation defines the phase noise measurement resolution, we experimentally and theoretically assess the relation between phase noise, measurement range, and measurand resolution.

  10. Frequency-resolved noise figure measurements of phase (in)sensitive fiber optical parametric amplifiers.

    PubMed

    Malik, R; Kumpera, A; Lorences-Riesgo, A; Andrekson, P A; Karlsson, M

    2014-11-17

    We measure the frequency-resolved noise figure of fiber optical parametric amplifiers both in phase-insensitive and phase-sensitive modes in the frequency range from 0.03 to 3 GHz. We also measure the variation in noise figure due to the degradation in pump optical signal to noise ratio and also as a function of the input signal powers. Noise figure degradation due to stimulated Brillouin scattering is observed.

  11. Experimental clean combustor program; noise measurement addendum, Phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emmerling, J. J.; Bekofske, K. L.

    1976-01-01

    Combustor noise measurements were performed using wave guide probes. Test results from two full scale annular combustor configurations in a combustor test rig are presented. A CF6-50 combustor represented a current design, and a double annular combustor represented the advanced clean combustor configuration. The overall acoustic power levels were found to correlate with the steady state heat release rate and inlet temperature. A theoretical analysis for the attenuation of combustor noise propagating through a turbine was extended from a subsonic relative flow condition to include the case of supersonic flow at the discharge side. The predicted attenuation from this analysis was compared to both engine data and extrapolated component combustor data. The attenuation of combustor noise through the CF6-50 turbine was found to be greater than 14 dB by both the analysis and the data.

  12. Measurement of precision oscillator phase noise using the two-oscillator coherent down-conversion technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pagnanelli, Christopher J.; Cashin, William F.

    1992-01-01

    The characterization of precision frequency standard phase noise and spurious outputs is addressed, using the two-oscillator coherent downconversion technique. Focus is on techniques for making accurate measurements of phase noise and spurious outputs within 100 KHz of a carrier. Significant sources of measurement error related to hardware design problems and inadequate measurement procedures are discussed: measurement errors resulting from system noise sources, phase-locked loop effects, and system bandwidth limitations. In addition, methods and design considerations for minimizing the effects of such errors are presented. Analytic discussions and results are supplemented with actual test data and measurements made using measurement hardware developed at the Ball Corporation, Efratom Division.

  13. Measurement of Allan variance and phase noise at fractions of a millihertz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conroy, Bruce L.; Le, Duc

    1990-01-01

    Although the measurement of Allan variance of oscillators is well documented, there is a need for a simplified system for finding the degradation of phase noise and Allan variance step-by-step through a system. This article describes an instrumentation system for simultaneous measurement of additive phase noise and degradation in Allan variance through a transmitter system. Also included are measurements of a 20-kW X-band transmitter showing the effect of adding a pass tube regulator.

  14. Measured aperture-array noise temperature of the Mark II phased array feed for ASKAP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chippendale, A. P.; Brown, A. J.; Beresford, R. J.; Hampson, G. A.; Shaw, R. D.; Hayman, D. B.; Macleod, A.; Forsyth, A. R.; Hay, S. G.; Leach, M.; Cantrall, C.; Brothers, M. L.; Hotan, A. W.

    2015-11-01

    We have measured the aperture-array noise temperature of the first Mk. II phased array feed that CSIRO has built for the Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder telescope. As an aperture array, the Mk. II phased array feed achieves a beam equivalent noise temperature less than 40 K from 0.78 GHz to 1.7 GHz and less than 50 K from 0.7 GHz to 1.8 GHz for a boresight beam directed at the zenith. We believe these are the lowest reported noise temperatures over these frequency ranges for ambient-temperature phased arrays. The measured noise temperature includes receiver electronics noise, ohmic losses in the array, and stray radiation from sidelobes illuminating the sky and ground away from the desired field of view. This phased array feed was designed for the Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder to demonstrate fast astronomical surveys with a wide field of view for the Square Kilometre Array.

  15. Measuring Noise Temperatures of Phased-Array Antennas for Astronomy at CSIRO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chippendale, A. P.; Hayman, D. B.; Hay, S. G.

    We describe the development of a noise-temperature testing capability for phased-array antennas operating in receive mode from 0.7 GHz to 1.8 GHz. Sampled voltages from each array port were recorded digitally as the zenith-pointing array under test was presented with three scenes: (1) a large microwave absorber at ambient temperature, (2) the unobstructed radio sky, and (3) broadband noise transmitted from a reference antenna centred over and pointed at the array under test. The recorded voltages were processed in software to calculate the beam equivalent noise temperature for a maximum signal-to-noise ratio beam steered at the zenith. We introduced the reference-antenna measurement to make noise measurements with reproducible, well-defined beams directed at the zenith and thereby at the centre of the absorber target. We applied a detailed model of cosmic and atmospheric contributions to the radio sky emission that we used as a noise-temperature reference. We also present a comprehensive analysis of measurement uncertainty including random and systematic effects. The key systematic effect was due to uncertainty in the beamformed antenna pattern and how efficiently it illuminates the absorber load. We achieved a combined uncertainty as low as 4 K for a 40 K measurement of beam equivalent noise temperature. The measurement and analysis techniques described in this paper were pursued to support noise-performance verification of prototype phased-array feeds for the Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder telescope.

  16. A simple technique for high resolution time domain phase noise measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinhardt, V. S.; Donahoe, T.

    1977-01-01

    A new time domain phase comparator is described. The device uses a novel technique to allow time domain phase measurements to be made with period and time interval counters without the use of offset reference oscillators. The device uses a single reference oscillator and allows measurements with a phase resolution greater than the noise floor of the reference. Data is presented showing a phase resolution of 0.02ps at 5 MHz with a crystal reference. The device has application in measuring the phase stability of systems where approximate phase quadrature can be maintained.

  17. Low noise buffer amplifiers and buffered phase comparators for precise time and frequency measurement and distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eichinger, R. A.; Dachel, P.; Miller, W. H.; Ingold, J. S.

    1982-01-01

    Extremely low noise, high performance, wideband buffer amplifiers and buffered phase comparators were developed. These buffer amplifiers are designed to distribute reference frequencies from 30 KHz to 45 MHz from a hydrogen maser without degrading the hydrogen maser's performance. The buffered phase comparators are designed to intercompare the phase of state of the art hydrogen masers without adding any significant measurement system noise. These devices have a 27 femtosecond phase stability floor and are stable to better than one picosecond for long periods of time. Their temperature coefficient is less than one picosecond per degree C, and they have shown virtually no voltage coefficients.

  18. Phase noise measurement of wideband microwave sources based on a microwave photonic frequency down-converter.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Dengjian; Zhang, Fangzheng; Zhou, Pei; Pan, Shilong

    2015-04-01

    An approach for phase noise measurement of microwave signal sources based on a microwave photonic frequency down-converter is proposed. Using the same optical carrier, the microwave signal under test is applied to generate two +1st-order optical sidebands by two stages of electro-optical modulations. A time delay is introduced between the two sidebands through a span of fiber. By beating the two +1st-order sidebands at a photodetector, frequency down-conversion is implemented, and phase noise of the signal under test can be calculated thereafter. The system has a very large operation bandwidth thanks to the frequency conversion in the optical domain, and good phase noise measurement sensitivity can be achieved since the signal degradation caused by electrical amplifiers is avoided. An experiment is carried out. The phase noise measured by the proposed system agrees well with that measured by a commercial spectrum analyzer or provided by the datasheet. A large operation bandwidth of 5-40 GHz is demonstrated using the proposed system. Moreover, good phase noise floor is achieved (-123  dBc/Hz at 1 kHz and -137  dBc/Hz at 10 kHz at 10 GHz), which is nearly constant over the full measurement range.

  19. Laser phase and frequency noise measurement by Michelson interferometer composed of a 3 × 3 optical fiber coupler.

    PubMed

    Xu, Dan; Yang, Fei; Chen, Dijun; Wei, Fang; Cai, Haiwen; Fang, Zujie; Qu, Ronghui

    2015-08-24

    A laser phase and frequency noise measurement method by an unbalanced Michelson interferometer composed of a 3 × 3 optical fiber coupler is proposed. The relations and differences of the power spectral density (PSD) of differential phase and frequency fluctuation, PSD of instantaneous phase and frequency fluctuation, phase noise and linewidth are derived strictly and discussed carefully. The method obtains the noise features of a narrow linewidth laser conveniently without any specific assumptions or noise models. The technique is also used to characterize the noise features of a narrow linewidth external-cavity semiconductor laser, which confirms the correction and robustness of the method.

  20. Phased Array Noise Source Localization Measurements Made on a Williams International FJ44 Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Podboy, Gary G.; Horvath, Csaba

    2010-01-01

    A 48-microphone planar phased array system was used to acquire noise source localization data on a full-scale Williams International FJ44 turbofan engine. Data were acquired with the array at three different locations relative to the engine, two on the side and one in front of the engine. At the two side locations the planar microphone array was parallel to the engine centerline; at the front location the array was perpendicular to the engine centerline. At each of the three locations, data were acquired at eleven different engine operating conditions ranging from engine idle to maximum (take off) speed. Data obtained with the array off to the side of the engine were spatially filtered to separate the inlet and nozzle noise. Tones occurring in the inlet and nozzle spectra were traced to the low and high speed spools within the engine. The phased array data indicate that the Inflow Control Device (ICD) used during this test was not acoustically transparent; instead, some of the noise emanating from the inlet reflected off of the inlet lip of the ICD. This reflection is a source of error for far field noise measurements made during the test. The data also indicate that a total temperature rake in the inlet of the engine is a source of fan noise.

  1. Phase noise measurements of the 400-kW, 2.115-GHz (S-band) transmitter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boss, P.; Hoppe, D.; Bhanji, A.

    1987-01-01

    The measurement theory is described and a test method to perform phase noise verification using off-the-shelf components and instruments is presented. The measurement technique described consists of a double-balanced mixer used as phase detector, followed by a low noise amplifier. An FFT spectrum analyzer is then used to view the modulation components. A simple calibration procedure is outlined that ensures accurate measurements. A block diagram of the configuration is presented as well as actual phase noise data from the 400 kW, 2.115 GHz (S-band) klystron transmitter.

  2. Passive coherent discriminator using phase diversity for the simultaneous measurement of frequency noise and intensity noise of a continuous-wave laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michaud-Belleau, V.; Bergeron, H.; Light, P. S.; Hébert, N. B.; Deschênes, J. D.; Luiten, A. N.; Genest, J.

    2016-10-01

    The frequency noise and intensity noise of a laser set the performance limits in many modern photonics applications and, consequently, must often be characterized. As lasers continue to improve, the measurement of these noises however becomes increasingly challenging. Current approaches for the characterization of very high-performance lasers often call for a second laser with equal or higher performance to the one that is to be measured, an incoherent interferometer having an extremely long delay-arm, or an interferometer that relies on an active device. These instrumental features can be impractical or problematic under certain experimental conditions. As an alternative, this paper presents an entirely passive coherent interferometer that employs an optical 90° hybrid coupler to perform in-phase and quadrature detection. We demonstrate the technique by measuring the frequency noise power spectral density of a highly-stable 192 THz (1560 nm) fiber laser over five frequency decades. Simultaneously, we are able to measure its relative intensity noise power spectral density and characterize the correlation between its amplitude noise and phase noise. We correct some common misconceptions through a detailed theoretical analysis and demonstrate the necessity to account for normal imperfections of the optical 90° hybrid coupler. We finally conclude that this passive coherent discriminator is suitable for reliable and simple noise characterization of highly-stable lasers, with bandwidth and dynamic range benefits but susceptibility to additive noise contamination.

  3. Quantum phase slip noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semenov, Andrew G.; Zaikin, Andrei D.

    2016-07-01

    Quantum phase slips (QPSs) generate voltage fluctuations in superconducting nanowires. Employing the Keldysh technique and making use of the phase-charge duality arguments, we develop a theory of QPS-induced voltage noise in such nanowires. We demonstrate that quantum tunneling of the magnetic flux quanta across the wire yields quantum shot noise which obeys Poisson statistics and is characterized by a power-law dependence of its spectrum SΩ on the external bias. In long wires, SΩ decreases with increasing frequency Ω and vanishes beyond a threshold value of Ω at T →0 . The quantum coherent nature of QPS noise yields nonmonotonous dependence of SΩ on T at small Ω .

  4. Noise and Phase Transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhi; Yu, Clare C.

    2006-03-01

    Noise is present in many physical systems and is often viewed as a nuisance. Yet it can also be a probe of microscopic fluctuations. There have been indications recently that the noise in the resistivity increases in the vicinity of the metal-insulator transition. But what are the characteristics of the noise associated with well-understood first and second order phase transitions? It is well known that critical fluctuations are associated with second order phase transitions, but do these fluctuations lead to enhanced noise? We have addressed these questions using Monte Carlo simulations to study the noise in the 2D Ising model which undergoes a second order phase transition, and in the 5-state Potts model which undergoes a first order phase transition. We monitor these systems as the temperature drops below the critical temperature. At each temperature, after equilibration is established, we obtain the time series of quantities characterizing the properties of the system, i.e., the energy and magnetization per site. We apply different methods, such as the noise power spectrum, the Detrended Fluctuation Analysis (DFA) and the second spectrum of the noise, to analyze the fluctuations in these quantities.

  5. Measurement of Integrated Low Frequency Flux Noise in Superconducting Flux/Phase Qubits

    SciTech Connect

    Mao Bo; Qiu Wei; Han Siyuan

    2008-11-07

    We measured the integrated low frequency flux noise ({approx}1 m{phi}{sub 0}) of an rf SQUID as a flux qubit by fitting the resonant peaks from photon assistant tunneling (PAT). The energy relaxation time Tl between the ground and first excited states in the same potential well, measured directly in time domain, is 3 ns. From these results we identified low frequency flux noise as the dominant source of decoherence. In addition, we found that the measured values of integrated flux noise in three qubits of various sizes differ more than an order of magnitude.

  6. Experimental clean combustor program, phase 3: Noise measurement addendum. [CF6-50 high bypass turbofan engine noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doyle, V. L.

    1978-01-01

    The acoustic characteristics of the double annular combustor in a CF6-50 high bypass turbofan engine were investigated. Internal fluctuating pressure measurements were made in the combustor region and in the core exhaust. The transmission loss across the turbine and nozzle was determined from the measurements and compared to previous component results and present theory. The primary noise source location in the combustor was investigated. Spectral comparisons of test rig results were made with the engine results. The measured overall power level was compared with component and engine correlating parameters.

  7. Investigation of ferroelectric phase transitions of water in nanoporous silicates in simultaneous electrical noise and calorimetric measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bordonskiy, G. S.; Orlov, A. O.

    2014-08-01

    The phase transitions of water in the nanoporous silicate materials SBA-15 and MCM-41 with an ordered system of cylindrical pores have been investigated. Measurements of low-frequency electrical noises (Barkhausen noises) in the frequency range of 1-100 Hz have been performed simultaneously with relative calorimetric measurements. It has been found that the voltage of electrical fluctuations increases approximately 100 times in the temperature range from -30 to -50°C, which is associated with the first-order and second-order ferroelectric phase transitions. It has been assumed that the ferroelectric ice XI can be formed in capillary pores of the materials under investigations.

  8. Modeling phase noise in multifunction subassemblies.

    PubMed

    Driscoll, Michael

    2012-03-01

    Obtaining requisite phase noise performance in hardware containing multifunction circuitry requires accurate modeling of the phase noise characteristics of each signal path component, including both absolute (oscillator) and residual (non-oscillator) circuit contributors. This includes prediction of both static and vibration-induced phase noise. The model (usually in spreadsheet form) is refined as critical components are received and evaluated. Additive (KTBF) phase noise data can be reasonably estimated, based on device drive level and noise figure. However, accurate determination of component near-carrier (multiplicative) and vibration-induced noise usually must be determined via measurement. The model should also include the effects of noise introduced by IC voltage regulators and properly discriminate between common versus independent signal path residual noise contributors. The modeling can be easily implemented using a spreadsheet.

  9. Two-receiver measurements of phase velocity: cross-validation of ambient-noise and earthquake-based observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kästle, Emanuel D.; Soomro, Riaz; Weemstra, Cornelis; Boschi, Lapo; Meier, Thomas

    2016-12-01

    Phase velocities derived from ambient-noise cross-correlation are compared with phase velocities calculated from cross-correlations of waveform recordings of teleseismic earthquakes whose epicentres are approximately on the station-station great circle. The comparison is conducted both for Rayleigh and Love waves using over 1000 station pairs in central Europe. We describe in detail our signal-processing method which allows for automated processing of large amounts of data. Ambient-noise data are collected in the 5-80 s period range, whereas teleseismic data are available between about 8 and 250 s, resulting in a broad common period range between 8 and 80 s. At intermediate periods around 30 s and for shorter interstation distances, phase velocities measured from ambient noise are on average between 0.5 per cent and 1.5 per cent lower than those observed via the earthquake-based method. This discrepancy is small compared to typical phase-velocity heterogeneities (10 per cent peak-to-peak or more) observed in this period range.We nevertheless conduct a suite of synthetic tests to evaluate whether known biases in ambient-noise cross-correlation measurements could account for this discrepancy; we specifically evaluate the effects of heterogeneities in source distribution, of azimuthal anisotropy in surface-wave velocity and of the presence of near-field, rather than far-field only, sources of seismic noise. We find that these effects can be quite important comparing individual station pairs. The systematic discrepancy is presumably due to a combination of factors, related to differences in sensitivity of earthquake versus noise data to lateral heterogeneity. The data sets from both methods are used to create some preliminary tomographic maps that are characterized by velocity heterogeneities of similar amplitude and pattern, confirming the overall agreement between the two measurement methods.

  10. The Autonomous Cryocooled Sapphire Oscillator: A Reference for Frequency Stability and Phase Noise Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giordano, V.; Grop, S.; Fluhr, C.; Dubois, B.; Kersalé, Y.; Rubiola, E.

    2016-06-01

    The Cryogenic Sapphire Oscillator (CSO) is the microwave oscillator which feature the highest short-term stability. Our best units exhibit Allan deviation σy (τ) of 4.5x10-16 at 1s, ≈ 1.5x10-16 at 100 s ≤ t ≤ 5,000 s (floor), and ≤ 5x10-15 at one day. The use of a Pulse-Tube cryocooler enables full two year operation with virtually no maintenance. Starting with a short history of the CSO in our lab, we go through the architecture and we provide more details about the resonator, the cryostat, the oscillator loop, and the servo electronics. We implemented three similar oscillators, which enable the evaluation of each with the three- cornered hat method, and provide the potential for Allan deviation measurements at parts of 10-17 level. One of our CSOs (ULISS) is transportable, and goes with a small customized truck. The unique feature of ULISS is that its σy (τ) can be validated at destination by measuring before and after the roundtrip. To this extent, ULISS can be regarded as a traveling standard of frequency stability. The CSOs are a part of the Oscillator IMP project, a platform dedicated to the measurement of noise and short-term stability of oscillators and devices in the whole radio spectrum (from MHz to THz), including microwave photonics. The scope spans from routine measurements to the research on new oscillators, components, and measurement methods.

  11. Phased Array Noise Source Localization Measurements of an F404 Nozzle Plume at Both Full and Model Scale

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Podboy, Gary G.; Bridges, James E.; Henderson, Brenda S.

    2010-01-01

    A 48-microphone planar phased array system was used to acquire jet noise source localization data on both a full-scale F404-GE-F400 engine and on a 1/4th scale model of a F400 series nozzle. The full-scale engine test data show the location of the dominant noise sources in the jet plume as a function of frequency for the engine in both baseline (no chevron) and chevron configurations. Data are presented for the engine operating both with and without afterburners. Based on lessons learned during this test, a set of recommendations are provided regarding how the phased array measurement system could be modified in order to obtain more useful acoustic source localization data on high-performance military engines in the future. The data obtained on the 1/4th scale F400 series nozzle provide useful insights regarding the full-scale engine jet noise source mechanisms, and document some of the differences associated with testing at model-scale versus fullscale.

  12. Development and Calibration of a Field-Deployable Microphone Phased Array for Propulsion and Airframe Noise Flyover Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphreys, William M., Jr.; Lockard, David P.; Khorrami, Mehdi R.; Culliton, William G.; McSwain, Robert G.; Ravetta, Patricio A.; Johns, Zachary

    2016-01-01

    A new aeroacoustic measurement capability has been developed consisting of a large channelcount, field-deployable microphone phased array suitable for airframe noise flyover measurements for a range of aircraft types and scales. The array incorporates up to 185 hardened, weather-resistant sensors suitable for outdoor use. A custom 4-mA current loop receiver circuit with temperature compensation was developed to power the sensors over extended cable lengths with minimal degradation of the signal to noise ratio and frequency response. Extensive laboratory calibrations and environmental testing of the sensors were conducted to verify the design's performance specifications. A compact data system combining sensor power, signal conditioning, and digitization was assembled for use with the array. Complementing the data system is a robust analysis system capable of near real-time presentation of beamformed and deconvolved contour plots and integrated spectra obtained from array data acquired during flyover passes. Additional instrumentation systems needed to process the array data were also assembled. These include a commercial weather station and a video monitoring / recording system. A detailed mock-up of the instrumentation suite (phased array, weather station, and data processor) was performed in the NASA Langley Acoustic Development Laboratory to vet the system performance. The first deployment of the system occurred at Finnegan Airfield at Fort A.P. Hill where the array was utilized to measure the vehicle noise from a number of sUAS (small Unmanned Aerial System) aircraft. A unique in-situ calibration method for the array microphones using a hovering aerial sound source was attempted for the first time during the deployment.

  13. Oscillator With Low Phase Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleinberg, Leonard L.

    1987-01-01

    Phase errors cancelled for high frequency stability. Radio-frequency oscillator achieves high stability of frequency through parallel, two-amplifier configuration in which effects cause phase noise tend to cancel each other. Circuit includes two amplifiers with resonating elements, each constitutes part of feedback loop of other. Generate same frequency because each circuit provides other with conditions necessary for oscillation.

  14. Microwatt shot-noise measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacon, A. M.; Zhao, H. Z.; Wang, L. J.; Thomas, J. E.

    1995-08-01

    We report a simple scheme for sensitive measurements of optical-noise spectra. Optical noise is separated from electronic noise when the output of an analog spectrum analyzer is real-time squared and then lock-in detected. This method directly yields the desired mean-square noise voltage, i.e., the power spectrum of the optical noise on a linear scale. To demonstrate this technique, the mean-square shot noise of a laser beam is measured and found to vary linearly with the laser power from several milliwatts down to one microwatt, in excellent quantitative agreement with predictions.

  15. Phase Noise in Photonic Phased-Array Antenna Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Logan, Ronald T., Jr.; Maleki, Lute

    1998-01-01

    The total noise of a phased-array antenna system employing a photonic feed network is analyzed using a model for the individual component noise including both additive and multiplicative equivalent noise generators.

  16. Cosmological flux noise and measured noise power spectra in SQUIDs.

    PubMed

    Beck, Christian

    2016-06-20

    The understanding of the origin of 1/f magnetic flux noise commonly observed in superconducting devices such as SQUIDs and qubits is still a major unsolved puzzle. Here we discuss the possibility that a significant part of the observed low-frequency flux noise measured in these devices is ultimately seeded by cosmological fluctuations. We consider a theory where a primordial flux noise field left over in unchanged form from an early inflationary or quantum gravity epoch of the universe intrinsically influences the phase difference in SQUIDs and qubits. The perturbation seeds generated by this field can explain in a quantitatively correct way the form and amplitude of measured low-frequency flux noise spectra in SQUID devices if one takes as a source of fluctuations the primordial power spectrum of curvature fluctuations as measured by the Planck collaboration. Our theoretical predictions are in excellent agreement with recent low-frequency flux noise measurements of various experimental groups. Magnetic flux noise, so far mainly considered as a nuisance for electronic devices, may thus contain valuable information about fluctuation spectra in the very early universe.

  17. Cosmological flux noise and measured noise power spectra in SQUIDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, Christian

    2016-06-01

    The understanding of the origin of 1/f magnetic flux noise commonly observed in superconducting devices such as SQUIDs and qubits is still a major unsolved puzzle. Here we discuss the possibility that a significant part of the observed low-frequency flux noise measured in these devices is ultimately seeded by cosmological fluctuations. We consider a theory where a primordial flux noise field left over in unchanged form from an early inflationary or quantum gravity epoch of the universe intrinsically influences the phase difference in SQUIDs and qubits. The perturbation seeds generated by this field can explain in a quantitatively correct way the form and amplitude of measured low-frequency flux noise spectra in SQUID devices if one takes as a source of fluctuations the primordial power spectrum of curvature fluctuations as measured by the Planck collaboration. Our theoretical predictions are in excellent agreement with recent low-frequency flux noise measurements of various experimental groups. Magnetic flux noise, so far mainly considered as a nuisance for electronic devices, may thus contain valuable information about fluctuation spectra in the very early universe.

  18. Cosmological flux noise and measured noise power spectra in SQUIDs

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Christian

    2016-01-01

    The understanding of the origin of 1/f magnetic flux noise commonly observed in superconducting devices such as SQUIDs and qubits is still a major unsolved puzzle. Here we discuss the possibility that a significant part of the observed low-frequency flux noise measured in these devices is ultimately seeded by cosmological fluctuations. We consider a theory where a primordial flux noise field left over in unchanged form from an early inflationary or quantum gravity epoch of the universe intrinsically influences the phase difference in SQUIDs and qubits. The perturbation seeds generated by this field can explain in a quantitatively correct way the form and amplitude of measured low-frequency flux noise spectra in SQUID devices if one takes as a source of fluctuations the primordial power spectrum of curvature fluctuations as measured by the Planck collaboration. Our theoretical predictions are in excellent agreement with recent low-frequency flux noise measurements of various experimental groups. Magnetic flux noise, so far mainly considered as a nuisance for electronic devices, may thus contain valuable information about fluctuation spectra in the very early universe. PMID:27320418

  19. Signal with Flat Phase Noise Using a Carrier and the Power Spectral Density of White Noise for Phase Noise Standards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watabe, Ken-ichi; Yanagimachi, Shinya; Ikegami, Takeshi; Iida, Hitoshi; Shimada, Yozo

    2012-01-01

    We have realized a phase noise standard of a signal with a -100 dBc/Hz flat phase noise at 10 MHz for Fourier frequencies of 1 Hz to 100 kHz, which ensures traceability to the International System of Units (SI). The flat phase noise signal is produced using a carrier combined with white noise. To ensure traceability, both the flat phase noise signal power and the power spectral density of white noise are determined with a calibrated power meter and the noise standard, respectively. The flatness of the phase noise standard is within ±0.7 dB.

  20. Prediction, simulation, and verification of the phase noise in 80-MHz low-phase-noise crystal oscillators.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xianhe; Chen, Pingping; Fu, Wei; Jiao, Junjie

    2015-09-01

    To predict the phase noise in an 80-MHz crystal oscillator, on the basis of the classical Leeson model, we analyzed and selected the oscillator noise figure F and transistor corner frequency fc reasonably, and then calculated the loaded Q (QL) value of the oscillator according to the parameters in the selected Butler oscillation circuit. Thus, we obtained the predicted phase noise in an 80-MHz crystal oscillator according to the Leeson phase noise formula. Next, the simulation curve of the phase noise in this 80-MHz low-phase-noise crystal oscillator was obtained by establishing a transistor nonlinear model using commercial design software. Then, we debugged the 80-MHz low-phase-noise crystal oscillator prototype under the guidance of the prediction and simulation results and tested it. The measured results show that the phase noise predicted after selecting reasonable parameters for the Leeson model and the ADS simulation curve of the phase noise obtained by using the nonlinear transistor model are both close to the actual measured result. This result may be beneficial in simplifying the design process for low-phase-noise crystal oscillators.

  1. Low Noise Performance Perspectives Of Wideband Aperture Phased Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woestenburg, E. E. M.; Kuenen, J. C.

    2004-06-01

    A general analysis of phased array noise properties and measurements, applied to one square meter tiles of the Thousand Element Array (THEA), has resulted in a procedure to define the noise budget for a THEA-tile (Woestenburg and Dijkstra, 2003). The THEA system temperature includes LNA and receiver noise, antenna connecting loss, noise coupling between antenna elements and other possible contributions. This paper discusses the various noise contributions to the THEA system temperature and identifies the areas where improvement can be realized. We will present better understanding of the individual noise contributions using measurements and analysis of single antenna/receiver elements. An improved design for a 1-m2 Low Noise Tile (LNT) will be discussed and optimized low noise performance for the LNT is presented. We will also give future perspectives of the noise performance for such tiles, in relation to the requirements for SKA in the 1 GHz frequency range.

  2. Phase noise in RF and microwave amplifiers.

    PubMed

    Boudot, Rodolphe; Rubiola, Enrico

    2012-12-01

    Understanding amplifier phase noise is a critical issue in many fields of engineering and physics, such as oscillators, frequency synthesis, telecommunication, radar, and spectroscopy; in the emerging domain of microwave photonics; and in exotic fields, such as radio astronomy, particle accelerators, etc. Focusing on the two main types of base noise in amplifiers, white and flicker, the power spectral density of the random phase φ(t) is Sφ(f) = b(0) + b(-1)/f. White phase noise results from adding white noise to the RF spectrum in the carrier region. For a given RF noise level, b(0) is proportional to the reciprocal of the carrier power P(0). By contrast, flicker results from a near-dc 1/f noise-present in all electronic devices-which modulates the carrier through some parametric effect in the semiconductor. Thus, b(-1) is a parameter of the amplifier, constant in a wide range of P(0). The consequences are the following: Connecting m equal amplifiers in parallel, b(-1) is 1/m times that of one device. Cascading m equal amplifiers, b(-1) is m times that of one amplifier. Recirculating the signal in an amplifier so that the gain increases by a power of m (a factor of m in decibels) as a result of positive feedback (regeneration), we find that b(-1) is m(2) times that of the amplifier alone. The feedforward amplifier exhibits extremely low b(-1) because the carrier is ideally nulled at the input of its internal error amplifier. Starting with an extensive review of the literature, this article introduces a system-oriented model which describes the phase flickering. Several amplifier architectures (cascaded, parallel, etc.) are analyzed systematically, deriving the phase noise from the general model. There follow numerous measurements of amplifiers using different technologies, including some old samples, and in a wide frequency range (HF to microwaves), which validate the theory. In turn, theory and results provide design guidelines and give suggestions for CAD and

  3. Phase Noise Reduction of Laser Diode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, T. C.; Poizat, J.-Ph.; Grelu, P.; Roch, J.-F.; Grangier, P.; Marin, F.; Bramati, A.; Jost, V.; Levenson, M. D.; Giacobino, E.

    1996-01-01

    Phase noise of single mode laser diodes, either free-running or using line narrowing technique at room temperature, namely injection-locking, has been investigated. It is shown that free-running diodes exhibit very large excess phase noise, typically more than 80 dB above shot-noise at 10 MHz, which can be significantly reduced by the above-mentioned technique.

  4. Microwave Oscillator Would Have Reduced Phase Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dick, G. John; Saunders, Jon

    1991-01-01

    Microwave oscillators of proposed new type incorporate suppressed-carrier/negative-feedback feature to reduce phase noise near their carrier frequencies. Concept results in phase noise less than achievable by cryogenically stabilized microwave components or by room-temperature oscillators stabilized by quartz crystals. Implemented in three different versions.

  5. Measurement of noise from toys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altkorn, Robert; Milkovich, Scott M.; Rider, Gene

    2005-09-01

    Noise from toys is an issue receiving increasing attention in the toy and consumer product safety communities. Concern over loud toys is motivated both by reports of increasing hearing loss among children (the U.S. CDC estimated in 2001 that 12.5% of U.S. children 6 to 19 years old have permanent or temporary noise induced threshold shift in one or both ears) and by technological advances enabling sound and noise producing toys of increased play value at lower and lower cost. Consumer watchdog groups such as PIRG routinely identify excessively loud toys in their yearly lists of most dangerous toys. In 2003 ASTM revised its toy safety standard (F963-03) to include A and C weighted sound pressure level measurements and specific play or use dependent measurement geometries. RAM Consulting measures noise from toys as part of a comprehensive product safety program. Sound measurement equipment, geometries, and procedures used at RAM for different types of toys will be discussed. Unusual problems in noise measurement will be considered, as will the appropriateness of A and C weighting for the youngest age groups.

  6. Vehicle Noise Measurements.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-04-01

    TEST: ’? REC. FREQ. SPEC. INRL. BW ENGINE SPEED ANTENNI S TI)N 71 MHz 30 kH: 1500 RPM 0 dog. 3 N. MEASURED APD VALUES: PoiMt P b. PCo S . C&I . RMS Vb.,g...PROBiM8 IL ITY F8 S TEST CO’DE 11 .6881 sew6 .681 .01 .02 805 1 .2 .3 .4 Apo osuv v) ERs1 .s F~oeABIL1TY FR eW TEST CODE 2 5 4 40 .0001 am68 .681 .61 .62

  7. Phase noise suppression through parametric filtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassella, Cristian; Strachan, Scott; Shaw, Steven W.; Piazza, Gianluca

    2017-02-01

    In this work, we introduce and experimentally demonstrate a parametric phase noise suppression technique, which we call "parametric phase noise filtering." This technique is based on the use of a solid-state parametric amplifier operating in its instability region and included in a non-autonomous feedback loop connected at the output of a noisy oscillator. We demonstrate that such a system behaves as a parametrically driven Duffing resonator and can operate at special points where it becomes largely immune to the phase fluctuations that affect the oscillator output signal. A prototype of a parametric phase noise filter (PFIL) was designed and fabricated to operate in the very-high-frequency range. The PFIL prototype allowed us to significantly reduce the phase noise at the output of a commercial signal generator operating around 220 MHz. Noise reduction of 16 dB (40×) and 13 dB (20×) were obtained, respectively, at 1 and 10 kHz offsets from the carrier frequency. The demonstration of this phase noise suppression technique opens up scenarios in the development of passive and low-cost phase noise cancellation circuits for any application demanding high quality frequency generation.

  8. Phase Noise Comparision of Short Pulse Laser Systems

    SciTech Connect

    S. Zhang; S. V. Benson; J. Hansknecht; D. Hardy; G. Neil; Michelle D. Shinn

    2006-12-01

    This paper describes the phase noise measurement on several different mode-locked laser systems that have completely different gain media and configurations including a multi-kW free-electron laser. We will focus on the state of the art short pulse lasers, especially the drive lasers for photocathode injectors. A comparison between the phase noise of the drive laser pulses, electron bunches and FEL pulses will also be presented.

  9. Multipurpose exciter with low phase noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conroy, B.; Le, D.

    1989-01-01

    Results of an effort to develop a lower-cost exciter with high stability, low phase noise, and controllable phase and frequency for use in Deep Space Network and Goldstone Solar System Radar applications are discussed. Included is a discussion of the basic concept, test results, plans, and concerns.

  10. Noise in phase-preserving linear amplifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Pandey, Shashank; Jiang, Zhang; Combes, Joshua; Caves, Carlton M.

    2014-12-04

    The purpose of a phase-preserving linear amplifier is to make a small signal larger, so that it can be perceived by instruments incapable of resolving the original signal, while sacrificing as little as possible in signal-to-noise. Quantum mechanics limits how well this can be done: the noise added by the amplifier, referred to the input, must be at least half a quantum at the operating frequency. This well-known quantum limit only constrains the second moments of the added noise. Here we provide the quantum constraints on the entire distribution of added noise: any phasepreserving linear amplifier is equivalent to a parametric amplifier with a physical state σ for the ancillary mode; σ determines the properties of the added noise.

  11. Dual correlated pumping scheme for phase noise preservation in all-optical wavelength conversion.

    PubMed

    Anthur, Aravind P; Watts, Regan T; Shi, Kai; Carroll, John O'; Venkitesh, Deepa; Barry, Liam P

    2013-07-01

    We study the effect of transfer of phase noise in different four wave mixing schemes using a coherent phase noise measurement technique. The nature of phase noise transfer from the pump to the generated wavelengths is shown to be independent of the type of phase noise (1 / f or white noise frequency components). We then propose a novel scheme using dual correlated pumps to prevent the increase in phase noise in the conjugate wavelengths. The proposed scheme is experimentally verified by the all-optical wavelength conversion of a DQPSK signal at 10.7 GBaud.

  12. Low phase noise digital frequency divider

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lutes, G. F., Jr. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A low phase noise frequency divider composed of a grating arrangement is disclosed. The grating arrangement supplies selected portions of an input reference signal to be divided to a tuned circuit without any phase noise due to the grating action. The arrangement which in one embodiment consists of an FET is connected to the tuned circuit input to short out the input except when the input reference signal amplitude crosses ground level in a positive direction and a gate enabling signal is present at the gate electrode of the FET. The gate enabling signal alone does not decouple the tuned circuit input from ground, therefore phase noise, due to the leading and trailing edges of each gate-enabling signal, is substantially eliminated.

  13. Qubit Metrology of Ultralow Phase Noise Using Randomized Benchmarking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Malley, P. J. J.; Kelly, J.; Barends, R.; Campbell, B.; Chen, Y.; Chen, Z.; Chiaro, B.; Dunsworth, A.; Fowler, A. G.; Hoi, I.-C.; Jeffrey, E.; Megrant, A.; Mutus, J.; Neill, C.; Quintana, C.; Roushan, P.; Sank, D.; Vainsencher, A.; Wenner, J.; White, T. C.; Korotkov, A. N.; Cleland, A. N.; Martinis, John M.

    2015-04-01

    A precise measurement of dephasing over a range of time scales is critical for improving quantum gates beyond the error correction threshold. We present a metrological tool based on randomized benchmarking capable of greatly increasing the precision of Ramsey and spin-echo sequences by the repeated but incoherent addition of phase noise. We find our superconducting-quantum-interference-device-based qubit is not limited by 1 /f flux noise at short time scales but instead observe a telegraph noise mechanism that is not amenable to study with standard measurement techniques.

  14. Should helicopter noise be measured differently from other aircraft noise? A review of the psychoacoustic literature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Molino, J. A.

    1982-01-01

    A review of 34 studies indicates that several factors or variables might be important in providing a psychoacoustic foundation for measurements of the noise from helicopters. These factors are phase relations, tail rotor noise, repetition rate, crest level, and generic differences between conventional aircraft and helicopters. Particular attention was given to the impulsive noise known as blade slap. Analysis of the evidence for and against each factor reveals that, for the present state of scientific knowledge, none of these factors should be regarded as the basis for a significant noise measurement correction due to impulsive blade slap. The current method of measuring effective perceived noise level for conventional aircraft appears to be adequate for measuring helicopter noise as well.

  15. 14 CFR 36.801 - Noise measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Noise measurement. 36.801 Section 36.801 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT NOISE STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT TYPE AND AIRWORTHINESS CERTIFICATION Helicopters § 36.801 Noise measurement. For primary,...

  16. 14 CFR 36.801 - Noise measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Noise measurement. 36.801 Section 36.801 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT NOISE STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT TYPE AND AIRWORTHINESS CERTIFICATION Helicopters § 36.801 Noise measurement. For primary,...

  17. 14 CFR 36.801 - Noise measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Noise measurement. 36.801 Section 36.801 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT NOISE STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT TYPE AND AIRWORTHINESS CERTIFICATION Helicopters § 36.801 Noise measurement. For primary,...

  18. 14 CFR 36.801 - Noise measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Noise measurement. 36.801 Section 36.801 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT NOISE STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT TYPE AND AIRWORTHINESS CERTIFICATION Helicopters § 36.801 Noise measurement. For primary,...

  19. Broadband phase noise suppression in a Yb-fiber frequency comb.

    PubMed

    Cingöz, A; Yost, D C; Allison, T K; Ruehl, A; Fermann, M E; Hartl, I; Ye, J

    2011-03-01

    We report a simple technique to suppress high-frequency phase noise of a Yb-based fiber optical frequency comb using an active intensity noise servo. Out-of-loop measurements of the phase noise using an optical heterodyne beat with a cw laser show suppression of phase noise by ≥7 dB out to Fourier frequencies of 100 kHz with a unity-gain crossing of ∼700 kHz. These results are enabled by the strong correlation between the intensity and phase noise of the laser. Detailed measurements of intensity and phase noise spectra, as well as transfer functions, reveal that the dominant phase and intensity noise contribution above ∼100 kHz is due to amplified spontaneous emission or other quantum noise sources.

  20. Engine Validation of Noise and Emission Reduction Technology Phase I

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weir, Don (Editor)

    2008-01-01

    This final report has been prepared by Honeywell Aerospace, Phoenix, Arizona, a unit of Honeywell International, Inc., documenting work performed during the period December 2004 through August 2007 for the NASA Glenn Research Center, Cleveland, Ohio, under the Revolutionary Aero-Space Engine Research (RASER) Program, Contract No. NAS3-01136, Task Order 8, Engine Validation of Noise and Emission Reduction Technology Phase I. The NASA Task Manager was Dr. Joe Grady of the NASA Glenn Research Center. The NASA Contract Officer was Mr. Albert Spence of the NASA Glenn Research Center. This report is for a test program in which NASA funded engine validations of integrated technologies that reduce aircraft engine noise. These technologies address the reduction of engine fan and jet noise, and noise associated with propulsion/airframe integration. The results of these tests will be used by NASA to identify the engineering tradeoffs associated with the technologies that are needed to enable advanced engine systems to meet stringent goals for the reduction of noise. The objectives of this program are to (1) conduct system engineering and integration efforts to define the engine test-bed configuration; (2) develop selected noise reduction technologies to a technical maturity sufficient to enable engine testing and validation of those technologies in the FY06-07 time frame; (3) conduct engine tests designed to gain insight into the sources, mechanisms and characteristics of noise in the engines; and (4) establish baseline engine noise measurements for subsequent use in the evaluation of noise reduction.

  1. Removing Background Noise with Phased Array Signal Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Podboy, Gary; Stephens, David

    2015-01-01

    Preliminary results are presented from a test conducted to determine how well microphone phased array processing software could pull an acoustic signal out of background noise. The array consisted of 24 microphones in an aerodynamic fairing designed to be mounted in-flow. The processing was conducted using Functional Beam forming software developed by Optinav combined with cross spectral matrix subtraction. The test was conducted in the free-jet of the Nozzle Acoustic Test Rig at NASA GRC. The background noise was produced by the interaction of the free-jet flow with the solid surfaces in the flow. The acoustic signals were produced by acoustic drivers. The results show that the phased array processing was able to pull the acoustic signal out of the background noise provided the signal was no more than 20 dB below the background noise level measured using a conventional single microphone equipped with an aerodynamic forebody.

  2. Flyover-noise measurement and prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peart, Noel A.

    1991-01-01

    Details are presented for the measurement and prediction of aircraft flyover noise to be used for certification, research and development, community noise surveys, airport monitors, and pass fail criteria. Test details presented are applicable to all types of aircraft, both large and small, and the use of Federal Aviation Regulations (FAR) Part 36 (ref. 1) is emphasized. Accuracy of noise measurements is important. Thus, a pass-fail criterion should be used for all noise measurements. Finally, factors which influence the sound propagation and noise prediction procedures, such as atmospheric and ground effects, are also presented.

  3. Optical Heterodyne With Lower Phase Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Logan, Ronald T.

    1994-01-01

    Proposed improvement enhances utility of optical-heterodyne apparatus used to generate radio signal at chosen frequency between 1 and 1,000 GHz. Two lasers injection-locked to third, mode-locked laser. Beat-frequency heterodyne output contains much less phase noise if generated from outputs of two independent lasers, and phase-coherent with reference signal. Potential applications include phased-array radar, fiber-optic communication systems, fiber-optic stabilized oscillators, and other applications involving conversions between optical and millimeter-wave signals.

  4. General Aviation Interior Noise. Part 3; Noise Control Measure Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Unruh, James F.; Till, Paul D.; Palumbo, Daniel L. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The work reported herein is an extension to the work accomplished under NASA Grant NAG1-2091 on the development of noise/source/path identification techniques for single engine propeller driven General Aviation aircraft. The previous work developed a Conditioned Response Analysis (CRA) technique to identify potential noise sources that contributed to the dominating tonal responses within the aircraft cabin. The objective of the present effort was to improve and verify the findings of the CRA and develop and demonstrate noise control measures for single engine propeller driven General Aviation aircraft.

  5. Psychophysical measurement of night vision goggle noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glasgow, Rachael L.; Marasco, Peter L.; Havig, Paul R.; Martinsen, Gary L.; Reis, George A.; Heft, Eric L.

    2003-09-01

    Pilots, developers, and other users of night-vision goggles (NVGs) have pointed out that different NVG image intensifier tubes have different subjective noise characteristics. Currently, no good model of the visual impact of NVG noise exists. Because it is very difficult to objectively measure the noise of a NVG, a method for assessing noise subjectively using simple psychophysical procedures was developed. This paper discusses the use of a computer program to generate noise images similar to what an observer sees through an NVG, based on filtered white noise. The images generated were based on 1/f (where f is frequency) filtered white noise with several adjustable parameters. Adjusting each of these parameters varied different characteristics of the noise. This paper discusses a study where observers compared the computer-generated noise images to true NVG noise and were asked to determine which computer-generated image was the best representation of the true noise. This method was repeated with different types of NVGs and at different luminance levels to study what NVG parameters cause variations in NVG noise.

  6. Confidence estimates in simulation of phase noise or spectral density.

    PubMed

    Ashby, Neil

    2017-02-13

    In this paper we apply the method of discrete simulation of power law noise, developed in [1],[3],[4], to the problem of simulating phase noise for a combination of power law noises. We derive analytic expressions for the probability of observing a value of phase noise L(f) or of any of the onesided spectral densities S(f); Sy(f), or Sx(f), for arbitrary superpositions of power law noise.

  7. Automated Signal-to-Noise Ratio Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pineda, J. E.

    1986-01-01

    Computer-controlled spectrum analysis gives rapid results for communication systems. Locates carrier signal in intermediate-frequency band and measures both carrier amplitude and amplitude of noise in several channels near carrier frequency. Computer then computes ratio of signal to average noise. Because measurements and calculations are rapid, system used in fading communication channels.

  8. Low Noise Borehole Triaxial Seismometer Phase II

    SciTech Connect

    Kerr, James D; McClung, David W

    2006-11-06

    This report describes the preliminary design and the effort to date of Phase II of a Low Noise Borehole Triaxial Seismometer for use in networks of seismic stations for monitoring underground nuclear explosions. The design uses the latest technology of broadband seismic instrumentation. Each parameter of the seismometer is defined in terms of the known physical limits of the parameter. These limits are defined by the commercially available components, and the physical size constraints. A theoretical design is proposed, and a preliminary prototype model of the proposed instrument has been built. This prototype used the sensor module of the KS2000. The installation equipment (hole locks, etc.) has been designed and one unit has been installed in a borehole. The final design of the sensors and electronics and leveling mechanism is in process. Noise testing is scheduled for the last quarter of 2006.

  9. Robust terahertz self-heterodyne system using a phase noise compensation technique.

    PubMed

    Song, Hajun; Song, Jong-In

    2015-08-10

    We propose and demonstrate a robust terahertz self-heterodyne system using a phase noise compensation technique. Conventional terahertz self-heterodyne systems suffer from degraded phase noise performance due to phase noise of the laser sources. The proposed phase noise compensation technique uses an additional photodiode and a simple electric circuit to produce phase noise identical to that observed in the terahertz signal produced by the self-heterodyne system. The phase noise is subsequently subtracted from the terahertz signal produced by the self-heterodyne system using a lock-in amplifier. While the terahertz self-heterodyne system using a phase noise compensation technique offers improved phase noise performance, it also provides a reduced phase drift against ambient temperature variations. The terahertz self-heterodyne system using a phase noise compensation technique shows a phase noise of 0.67 degree in terms of a standard deviation value even without using overall delay balance control. It also shows a phase drift of as small as approximately 10 degrees in an open-to-air measurement condition without any strict temperature control.

  10. Landing approach airframe noise measurements and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lasagna, P. L.; Mackall, K. G.; Burcham, F. W., Jr.; Putnam, T. W.

    1980-01-01

    Flyover measurements of the airframe noise produced by the AeroCommander, JetStar, CV-990, and B-747 airplanes are presented for various landing approach configurations. Empirical and semiempirical techniques are presented to correlate the measured airframe noise with airplane design and aerodynamic parameters. Airframe noise for the jet-powered airplanes in the clean configuration (flaps and gear retracted) was found to be adequately represented by a function of airplane weight and the fifth power of airspeed. Results show the airframe noise for all four aircraft in the landing configuration (flaps extended and gear down) also varied with the fifth power of airspeed, but this noise level could not be represented by the addition of a constant to the equation for clean-configuration airframe noise.

  11. Noise Propagation in Region Of Interest Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Michael S.; Inati, Souheil J.; Kellman, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this work was to develop and validate a technique for predicting the standard deviation associated with thermal noise propagation in region of interest measurements. Theory and Methods Standard methods for error propagation estimation were used to derive equations for the standard deviations of linear combinations of complex, magnitude, or phase pixel values. The equations were applied to common imaging scenarios where the image pixels were correlated due to anisotropic pixel resolutions and parallel imaging. All standard deviation estimates were evaluated efficiently using only vector-vector multiplications and Fourier transforms. The estimated standard deviations were compared to standard deviations obtained using repeated experiments and pseudo replica reconstructions. Results The proposed method was able to predict region of interest standard deviations in all the tested analysis scenarios. Positive and negative noise correlations caused by different parallel imaging aliasing point spread functions were accurately predicted and the method predicted the confidence intervals of time-intensity curves for in vivo cardiac perfusion measurements. Conclusions An intuitive technique for region of interest confidence intervals was developed and validated using phantom experiments and in vivo data. PMID:24634307

  12. A Low Power Low Phase Noise Oscillator for MICS Transceivers.

    PubMed

    Li, Dawei; Liu, Dongsheng; Kang, Chaojian; Zou, Xuecheng

    2017-01-12

    A low-power, low-phase-noise quadrature oscillator for Medical Implantable Communications Service (MICS) transceivers is presented. The proposed quadrature oscillator generates 349~689 MHz I/Q (In-phase and Quadrature) signals covering the MICS band. The oscillator is based on a differential pair with positive feedback. Each delay cell consists of a few transistors enabling lower voltage operation. Since the oscillator is very sensitive to disturbances in the supply voltage and ground, a self-bias circuit for isolating the voltage disturbance is proposed to achieve bias voltages which can track the disturbances from the supply and ground. The oscillation frequency, which is controlled by the bias voltages, is less sensitive to the supply and ground noise, and a low phase noise is achieved. The chip is fabricated in the UMC (United Microelectronics Corporation) 0.18 μm CMOS (Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor) process; the core just occupies a 28.5 × 22 μm² area. The measured phase noise is -108.45 dBc/Hz at a 1 MHz offset with a center frequency of 540 MHz. The gain of the oscillator is 0.309 MHz/mV with a control voltage from 0 V to 1.1 V. The circuit can work with a supply voltage as low as 1.2 V and the power consumption is only 0.46 mW at a 1.8 V supply voltage.

  13. A Low Power Low Phase Noise Oscillator for MICS Transceivers

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dawei; Liu, Dongsheng; Kang, Chaojian; Zou, Xuecheng

    2017-01-01

    A low-power, low-phase-noise quadrature oscillator for Medical Implantable Communications Service (MICS) transceivers is presented. The proposed quadrature oscillator generates 349~689 MHz I/Q (In-phase and Quadrature) signals covering the MICS band. The oscillator is based on a differential pair with positive feedback. Each delay cell consists of a few transistors enabling lower voltage operation. Since the oscillator is very sensitive to disturbances in the supply voltage and ground, a self-bias circuit for isolating the voltage disturbance is proposed to achieve bias voltages which can track the disturbances from the supply and ground. The oscillation frequency, which is controlled by the bias voltages, is less sensitive to the supply and ground noise, and a low phase noise is achieved. The chip is fabricated in the UMC (United Microelectronics Corporation) 0.18 μm CMOS (Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor) process; the core just occupies a 28.5 × 22 μm2 area. The measured phase noise is −108.45 dBc/Hz at a 1 MHz offset with a center frequency of 540 MHz. The gain of the oscillator is 0.309 MHz/mV with a control voltage from 0 V to 1.1 V. The circuit can work with a supply voltage as low as 1.2 V and the power consumption is only 0.46 mW at a 1.8 V supply voltage. PMID:28085107

  14. Speckle phase noise in coherent laser ranging: fundamental precision limitations.

    PubMed

    Baumann, Esther; Deschênes, Jean-Daniel; Giorgetta, Fabrizio R; Swann, William C; Coddington, Ian; Newbury, Nathan R

    2014-08-15

    Frequency-modulated continuous-wave laser detection and ranging (FMCW LADAR) measures the range to a surface through coherent detection of the backscattered light from a frequency-swept laser source. The ultimate limit to the range precision of FMCW LADAR, or any coherent LADAR, to a diffusely scattering surface will be determined by the unavoidable speckle phase noise. Here, we demonstrate the two main manifestations of this limit. First, frequency-dependent speckle phase noise leads to a non-Gaussian range distribution having outliers that approach the system range resolution, regardless of the signal-to-noise ratio. These outliers are reduced only through improved range resolution (i.e., higher optical bandwidths). Second, if the range is measured during a continuous lateral scan across a surface, the spatial pattern of speckle phase is converted to frequency noise, which leads to additional excess range uncertainty. We explore these two effects and show that laboratory results agree with analytical expressions and numerical simulations. We also show that at 1 THz optical bandwidth, range precisions below 10 μm are achievable regardless of these effects.

  15. Low-noise phase/frequency detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCorkle, J. W.

    1985-09-01

    The purpose of the research reported on in this thesis, is to demonstrate the effectiveness of a new circuit technique proposed by the author to eliminate the dead-zone anomaly in a digital phase/frequency detector. In addition to demonstrating the elimination of the dead zone, a new loop filter is described. The filter takes advantage of the new phase detector circuit technique so as to simultaneously provide both low-level reference sidebands and a lock-up time of one cycle of the reference. Phase detectors are used in control systems to measure the phase of one signal relative to the phase of another signal. Control systems of this type are usually referred to as Phase-Locked-Loops (PLL). Development of phase detectors has occurred because of the PLL application. A new phase detector is described in this paper.

  16. Frequency-temporal resolution of hearing measured by rippled noise.

    PubMed

    Supin AYa; Popov, V V; Milekhina, O N; Tarakanov, M B

    1997-06-01

    Frequency-temporal resolution of hearing was measured in normal hearers using rippled noise stimulation in conjunction with a phase-reversal test. The principle of the test was to interchange peak and trough positions (the phase reversal) and to find the highest ripple density at which such interchange is detectable depending on reversal rate. The measurements were made using narrow-band noises with center frequencies of 0.5-4 kHz. The ripple-density resolution limits were constant at phase-reversal rates below 2-3/s and diminished at higher phase-reversal rates. A model is proposed to explain the data based on the envelope fluctuations inherent in noise; these fluctuations are supposed to limit detection of frequency-temporal sound patterns.

  17. Internal noise of a phase-locked receiver with a loop-controlled synthesizer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenhall, C. A.

    1979-01-01

    A local oscillator design that uses a digitally programmed frequency synthesizer instead of an analog VCO was proposed. The integral of the synthesizer input, the digital phase, is a convenient measure of integrated Doppler. The internal noise of such a receiver was examined. At high carrier margin, the local oscillator phase noise equals that of the Block IV receiver, about 2 deg rms at S-band, whereas the digital phase noise is about 0.5 deg rms.

  18. Phase-Locked Loop Noise Reduction via Phase Detector Implementation for Single-Phase Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Thacker, Timothy; Boroyevich, Dushan; Burgos, Rolando; Wang, Fei

    2011-01-01

    A crucial component of grid-connected converters is the phase-locked loop (PLL) control subsystem that tracks the grid voltage's frequency and phase angle. Therefore, accurate fast-responding PLLs for control and protection purposes are required to provide these measurements. This paper proposes a novel feedback mechanism for single-phase PLL phase detectors using the estimated phase angle. Ripple noise appearing in the estimated frequency, most commonly the second harmonic under phase-lock conditions, is reduced or eliminated without the use of low-pass filters, which can cause delays to occur and limits the overall performance of the PLL response to dynamic changes in the system. The proposed method has the capability to eliminate the noise ripple entirely and, under extreme line distortion conditions, can reduce the ripple by at least half. Other modifications implemented through frequency feedback are shown to decrease the settling time of the PLL up to 50%. Mathematical analyses with the simulated and experimental results are provided to confirm the validity of the proposed methods.

  19. Understanding the amplitudes of noise correlation measurements

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tsai, Victor C.

    2011-01-01

    Cross correlation of ambient seismic noise is known to result in time series from which station-station travel-time measurements can be made. Part of the reason that these cross-correlation travel-time measurements are reliable is that there exists a theoretical framework that quantifies how these travel times depend on the features of the ambient noise. However, corresponding theoretical results do not currently exist to describe how the amplitudes of the cross correlation depend on such features. For example, currently it is not possible to take a given distribution of noise sources and calculate the cross correlation amplitudes one would expect from such a distribution. Here, we provide a ray-theoretical framework for calculating cross correlations. This framework differs from previous work in that it explicitly accounts for attenuation as well as the spatial distribution of sources and therefore can address the issue of quantifying amplitudes in noise correlation measurements. After introducing the general framework, we apply it to two specific problems. First, we show that we can quantify the amplitudes of coherency measurements, and find that the decay of coherency with station-station spacing depends crucially on the distribution of noise sources. We suggest that researchers interested in performing attenuation measurements from noise coherency should first determine how the dominant sources of noise are distributed. Second, we show that we can quantify the signal-to-noise ratio of noise correlations more precisely than previous work, and that these signal-to-noise ratios can be estimated for given situations prior to the deployment of seismometers. It is expected that there are applications of the theoretical framework beyond the two specific cases considered, but these applications await future work.

  20. Analysis of phase noise in a spin torque oscillator stabilized by phase locked loop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamaru, Shingo; Kubota, Hitoshi; Yakushiji, Kay; Fukushima, Akio; Yuasa, Shinji

    2016-05-01

    This study analyses phase noise in a spin torque oscillator (STO) stabilized by phase locked loop (PLL). Time domain measurement showed that phase error of the 6.996 GHz signal generated by a STO, which exhibited a random-walk type fluctuation under free running, was suppressed within a standard deviation of 0.408 rad by the PLL. Power spectrum under phase locked oscillation indicated that the PLL had a loop bandwidth of approximately 16 MHz, thus effectively suppressing phase error below 10 MHz. However, it was also found that power spectrum of the residual phase error was distributed much higher than the loop bandwidth.

  1. An analytical formulation for phase noise in MEMS oscillators.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Deepak; Seshia, Ashwin

    2014-12-01

    In recent years, there has been much interest in the design of low-noise MEMS oscillators. This paper presents a new analytical formulation for noise in a MEMS oscillator encompassing essential resonator and amplifier nonlinearities. The analytical expression for oscillator noise is derived by solving a second-order nonlinear stochastic differential equation. This approach is applied to noise modeling of an electrostatically addressed MEMS resonator-based square-wave oscillator in which the resonator and oscillator circuit nonlinearities are integrated into a single modeling framework. By considering the resulting amplitude and phase relations, we derive additional noise terms resulting from resonator nonlinearities. The phase diffusion of an oscillator is studied and the phase diffusion coefficient is proposed as a metric for noise optimization. The proposed nonlinear phase noise model provides analytical insight into the underlying physics and a pathway toward the design optimization for low-noise MEMS oscillators.

  2. A study on phase-noise reduction method in phase-locked loop systems.

    PubMed

    Takagi, Keiji

    2003-09-01

    Experimental studies are carried out on phase noise and the correlation coefficient between the phase and average current noises of voltage-controlled oscillator in phased-locked loop (PLL) systems. The precise phase stabilization technique is discussed, and new methods to reduce the phase noise are described in PLL systems, using the correlation.

  3. Effect of measurement noise on Granger causality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nalatore, Hariharan; N, Sasikumar; Rangarajan, Govindan

    2014-12-01

    Most of the signals recorded in experiments are inevitably contaminated by measurement noise. Hence, it is important to understand the effect of such noise on estimating causal relations between such signals. A primary tool for estimating causality is Granger causality. Granger causality can be computed by modeling the signal using a bivariate autoregressive (AR) process. In this paper, we greatly extend the previous analysis of the effect of noise by considering a bivariate AR process of general order p . From this analysis, we analytically obtain the dependence of Granger causality on various noise-dependent system parameters. In particular, we show that measurement noise can lead to spurious Granger causality and can suppress true Granger causality. These results are verified numerically. Finally, we show how true causality can be recovered numerically using the Kalman expectation maximization algorithm.

  4. Effect of measurement noise on Granger causality.

    PubMed

    Nalatore, Hariharan; Sasikumar, N; Rangarajan, Govindan

    2014-12-01

    Most of the signals recorded in experiments are inevitably contaminated by measurement noise. Hence, it is important to understand the effect of such noise on estimating causal relations between such signals. A primary tool for estimating causality is Granger causality. Granger causality can be computed by modeling the signal using a bivariate autoregressive (AR) process. In this paper, we greatly extend the previous analysis of the effect of noise by considering a bivariate AR process of general order p. From this analysis, we analytically obtain the dependence of Granger causality on various noise-dependent system parameters. In particular, we show that measurement noise can lead to spurious Granger causality and can suppress true Granger causality. These results are verified numerically. Finally, we show how true causality can be recovered numerically using the Kalman expectation maximization algorithm.

  5. Optical signal to noise ratio improvement through unbalanced noise beating in phase-sensitive parametric amplifiers.

    PubMed

    Malik, R; Kumpera, A; Olsson, S L I; Andrekson, P A; Karlsson, M

    2014-05-05

    We investigate the beating of signal and idler waves, which have imbalanced signal to noise ratios, in a phase-sensitive parametric amplifier. Imbalanced signal to noise ratios are achieved in two ways; first by imbalanced noise loading; second by varying idler to signal input power ratio. In the case of imbalanced noise loading the phase-sensitive amplifier improved the signal to noise ratio from 3 to 6 dB, and in the case of varying idler to signal input power ratio, the signal to noise ratio improved from 3 to in excess of 20 dB.

  6. Noise measurements on the helicopter BK 117 design. Weighted noise levels and influence of airspeed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Splettstoesser, Wolf R.; Anders, Klaus P.; Spiegel, Karl-Heinz

    1986-11-01

    Noise measurements on the prototype helicopter BK 117 were performed in strict compliance with the proposed international Civil Aviation Organization regulations for noise certification of helicopters. Measurement procedure, noise data acquisition, analysis and reduction as well as applied correction procedures are described. Effective perceived noise levels (EPNL) and other noise descriptors were evaluated and related to the proposed noise limits. Additional level flyover tests with variable airspeed were conducted to investigate the resulting effect on the EPNL and other noise measures.

  7. Reduction of Classical Measurement Noise via Quantum-Dense Metrology.

    PubMed

    Ast, Melanie; Steinlechner, Sebastian; Schnabel, Roman

    2016-10-28

    Quantum-dense metrology constitutes a special case of quantum metrology in which two orthogonal phase space projections of a signal are simultaneously sensed beyond the shot-noise limit. Previously, it was shown that the additional sensing channel that is provided by quantum-dense metrology contains information that can be used to identify and to discard corrupted segments from the measurement data. Here, we propose and demonstrate a new method in which this information is used for improving the sensitivity without discarding any measurement segments. Our measurement reached sub-shot-noise performance, although initially strong classical noise polluted the data. The new method has high potential for improving the noise spectral density of gravitational-wave detectors at signal frequencies of high astrophysical relevance.

  8. Reduction of Classical Measurement Noise via Quantum-Dense Metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ast, Melanie; Steinlechner, Sebastian; Schnabel, Roman

    2016-10-01

    Quantum-dense metrology constitutes a special case of quantum metrology in which two orthogonal phase space projections of a signal are simultaneously sensed beyond the shot-noise limit. Previously, it was shown that the additional sensing channel that is provided by quantum-dense metrology contains information that can be used to identify and to discard corrupted segments from the measurement data. Here, we propose and demonstrate a new method in which this information is used for improving the sensitivity without discarding any measurement segments. Our measurement reached sub-shot-noise performance, although initially strong classical noise polluted the data. The new method has high potential for improving the noise spectral density of gravitational-wave detectors at signal frequencies of high astrophysical relevance.

  9. Common mode noise rejection properties of amplitude and phase noise in a heterodyne interferometer.

    PubMed

    Hechenblaikner, Gerald

    2013-05-01

    High precision metrology systems based on heterodyne interferometry can measure the position and attitude of objects to accuracies of picometer and nanorad, respectively. A frequently found feature of the general system design is the subtraction of a reference phase from the phase of the position interferometer, which suppresses low frequency common mode amplitude and phase fluctuations occurring in volatile optical path sections shared by both the position and reference interferometer. Spectral components of the noise at frequencies around or higher than the heterodyne frequency, however, are generally transmitted into the measurement band and may limit the measurement accuracy. Detailed analytical calculations complemented with Monte Carlo simulations show that high frequency noise components may also be entirely suppressed, depending on the relative difference of measurement and reference phase, which may be exploited by corresponding design provisions. While these results are applicable to any heterodyne interferometer with certain design characteristics, specific calculations and related discussions are given for the example of the optical metrology system of the LISA Pathfinder mission to space.

  10. Phase noise characterization of sub-hertz linewidth lasers via digital cross correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Xiaopeng; Bouchand, Romain; Nicolodi, Daniele; Lours, Michel; Alexandre, Christophe; Le Coq, Yann

    2017-04-01

    Phase noise or frequency noise is a key metrics to evaluate the short term stability of a laser. This property is of a great interest for the applications but delicate to characterize, especially for narrow line-width lasers. In this letter, we demonstrate a digital cross correlation scheme to characterize the absolute phase noise of sub-hertz line-width lasers. Three 1,542 nm ultra-stable lasers are used in this approach. For each measurement two lasers act as references to characterize a third one. Phase noise power spectral density from 0.5 Hz to 0.8 MHz Fourier frequencies can be derived for each laser by a mere change in the configuration of the lasers. This is the first time showing the phase noise of sub-hertz line-width lasers with no reference limitation. We also present an analysis of the laser phase noise performance.

  11. Noise performance of phase-insensitive frequency multicasting in parametric mixer with finite dispersion.

    PubMed

    Tong, Zhi; Wiberg, Andreas O J; Myslivets, Evgeny; Huynh, Chris K; Kuo, Bill P P; Alic, Nikola; Radic, Stojan

    2013-07-29

    Noise performance of dual-pump, multi-sideband parametric mixer operated in phase-insensitive mode is investigated theoretically and experimentally. It is shown that, in case when a large number of multicasting idlers are generated, the noise performance is strictly dictated by the dispersion characteristics of the mixer. We find that the sideband noise performance is significantly degraded in anomalous dispersion region permitting nonlinear noise amplification. In contrast, in normal dispersion region, the noise performance converges to the level of four-sideband parametric process, rather than deteriorates with increased sideband creation. Low noise generation mandates precise dispersion-induced phase mismatch among pump and sideband waves in order to control the noise coupling. We measure the noise performance improvement for a many-sideband, multi-stage mixer by incorporating new design technique.

  12. Nonlinear phase noise in coherent optical OFDM transmission systems.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xianming; Kumar, Shiva

    2010-03-29

    We derive an analytical formula to estimate the variance of nonlinear phase noise caused by the interaction of amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) noise with fiber nonlinearity such as self-phase modulation (SPM), cross-phase modulation (XPM), and four-wave mixing (FWM) in coherent orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) systems. The analytical results agree very well with numerical simulations, enabling the study of the nonlinear penalties in long-haul coherent OFDM systems without extensive numerical simulation. Our results show that the nonlinear phase noise induced by FWM is significantly larger than that induced by SPM and XPM, which is in contrast to traditional WDM systems where ASE-FWM interaction is negligible in quasi-linear systems. We also found that fiber chromatic dispersion can reduce the nonlinear phase noise. The variance of the total phase noise increases linearly with the bit rate, and does not depend significantly on the number of subcarriers for systems with moderate fiber chromatic dispersion.

  13. Alpha phase determines successful lexical decision in noise.

    PubMed

    Strauß, Antje; Henry, Molly J; Scharinger, Mathias; Obleser, Jonas

    2015-02-18

    Psychophysical target detection has been shown to be modulated by slow oscillatory brain phase. However, thus far, only low-level sensory stimuli have been used as targets. The current human electroencephalography (EEG) study examined the influence of neural oscillatory phase on a lexical-decision task performed for stimuli embedded in noise. Neural phase angles were compared for correct versus incorrect lexical decisions using a phase bifurcation index (BI), which quantifies differences in mean phase angles and phase concentrations between correct and incorrect trials. Neural phase angles in the alpha frequency range (8-12 Hz) over right anterior sensors were approximately antiphase in a prestimulus time window, and thus successfully distinguished between correct and incorrect lexical decisions. Moreover, alpha-band oscillations were again approximately antiphase across participants for correct versus incorrect trials during a later peristimulus time window (∼500 ms) at left-central electrodes. Strikingly, lexical decision accuracy was not predicted by either event-related potentials (ERPs) or oscillatory power measures. We suggest that correct lexical decisions depend both on successful sensory processing, which is made possible by the alignment of stimulus onset with an optimal alpha phase, as well as integration and weighting of decisional information, which is coupled to alpha phase immediately following the critical manipulation that differentiated words from pseudowords. The current study constitutes a first step toward characterizing the role of dynamic oscillatory brain states for higher cognitive functions, such as spoken word recognition.

  14. Measured Noise from Small Unmanned Aerial Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cabell, Randolph; McSwain, Robert; Grosveld, Ferdinand

    2016-01-01

    Proposed uses of small unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), including home package delivery, have the potential to expose large portions of communities to a new noise source. This paper discusses results of flyover noise measurements of four small UAVs, including an internal combustion-powered model airplane and three battery-powered multicopters. Basic noise characteristics of these vehicles are discussed, including spectral properties and sound level metrics such as sound pressure level, effective perceived noise level, and sound exposure level. The size and aerodynamic characteristics of the multicopters in particular make their flight path susceptible to atmospheric disturbances such as wind gusts. These gusts, coupled with a flight control system that varies rotor speed to maintain vehicle stability, create an unsteady acoustic signature. The spectral variations resulting from this unsteadiness are explored, in both hover and flyover conditions for the multicopters. The time varying noise, which differs from the relatively steady noise generated by large transport aircraft, may complicate the prediction of human annoyance using conventional sound level metrics.

  15. Measurement and analysis of gyro noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosgra, J. A.; Reumers, J. J.

    1983-01-01

    Noise was measured on two identical space-qualified gyroscopes of the floated rate-integrating type (Ferranti Type 125) in an analog rebalance-loop configuration of selectable loop bandwidth, running under space representative conditions in the frequency range 0.005 to 50 Hz. Results were processed into statistical parameters. Through a fast Fourier transform, auto and cross power spectra were determined together with auto and cross variance functions. Using transfer function polynomials, equivalent gyro open loop power spectra were computed from the closed loop results and compared with directly measured, open-loop spectra. The results allow a noise propagation analysis to be made when designing and analyzing satellite attitude-control systems with the Type 125 as a strapdown sensor. For systems using estimators and a combination of inertial and optical sensors, the results allow the derivation and application of a realistic noise model for this type of gyro.

  16. The Advanced Noise Control Fan Baseline Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McAllister, Joseph; Loew, Raymond A.; Lauer, Joel T.; Stuliff, Daniel L.

    2009-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center s (NASA Glenn) Advanced Noise Control Fan (ANCF) was developed in the early 1990s to provide a convenient test bed to measure and understand fan-generated acoustics, duct propagation, and radiation to the farfield. As part of a complete upgrade, current baseline and acoustic measurements were documented. Extensive in-duct, farfield acoustic, and flow field measurements are reported. This is a follow-on paper to documenting the operating description of the ANCF.

  17. Noise measurement in wind tunnels, workshop summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hickley, D. H.; Williams, J.

    1982-01-01

    In reviewing the progress made in acoustic measurements in wind tunnels over the 5-yr span of the workshops, it is evident that a great deal of progress has occurred. Specialized facilities are now on line, special measurement techniques were developed, and corrections were devised and proven. This capability is in the process of creating a new and more correct data bank on acoustic phenomena, and represents a major step forward in acoustics technology. Additional work is still required, but now, rather than concentrating on facilities and techniques, researchers may more profitably concentrate on noise-source modeling, with the simulation of propulsor noise source (in flight) and of propulsor/airframe airflow characteristics. Promising developments in directional acoustic receivers and other discrimination/correlation techniques should now be regularly exploited, in part for model noise-source diagnosis, but also to expedite extraction of the lone source signal from any residual background noise and reverberation in the working chamber and from parasitic noise due to essential rigs or instrumentation inside the airstream.

  18. Transportable setup for amplifier phase fidelity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tröbs, M.; Bogan, C.; Barke, S.; Kühn, G.; Reiche, J.; Heinzel, G.; Danzmann, K.

    2015-05-01

    One possible laser source for the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) consists of an Ytterbium-doped fiber amplifier originally developed for inter-satellite communication, seeded by the laser used for the technology demonstrator mission LISA Pathfinder. LISA needs to transmit clock information between its three spacecraft to correct for phase noise between the clocks on the individual spacecraft. For this purpose phase modulation sidebands at GHz frequencies will be imprinted on the laser beams between spacecraft. Differential phase noise between the carrier and a sideband introduced within the optical chain must be very low. We report on a transportable setup to measure the phase fidelity of optical amplifiers.

  19. Supersonic Coaxial Jets: Noise Predictions and Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dahl, Milo D.; Papamoschou, Dimitri; Hixon, Ray

    1998-01-01

    The noise from perfectly expanded coaxial jets was measured in an anechoic chamber for different operating conditions with the same total thrust, mass flow, and exit area. The shape of the measured noise spectrum at different angles to the jet axis was found to agree with spectral shapes for single, axisymmetric jets. Based on these spectra, the sound was characterized as being generated by large turbulent structures or fine-scale turbulence. Modeling the large scale structures as instability waves, a stability analysis was conducted for the coaxial jets to identify the growing and decaying instability waves in each shear layer and predict their noise radiation pattern outside the jet. When compared to measured directivity, the analysis identified the region downstream of the outer potential core, where the two shear layers were merging, as the source of the peak radiated noise where instability waves, with their origin in the inner shear layer, reach their maximum amplitude. Numerical computations were also performed using a linearized Euler equation solver. Those results were compared to both the results from the instability wave analysis and to measured data.

  20. EDFA-based coupled opto-electronic oscillator and its phase noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salik, Ertan; Yu, Nan; Tu, Meirong; Maleki, Lute

    2004-01-01

    EDFA-based coupled opto-electronic oscillator (COEO), an integrated optical and microwave oscillator that can generate picosecond optical pulses, is presented. the phase noise measurements of COEO show better performance than synthesizer-driven mode-locked laser.

  1. Laser Phase Noise Reduction for Industrial Interferometric Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubois, Marc; Burr, Kent C.; Drake, Thomas E.

    2004-08-01

    Laser ultrasound is a technique used for the ultrasonic inspection of composites during manufacturing of advanced jet fighters. With this technique laser interferometry is used to detect ultrasonic displacements generated by a laser. In theory, the signal-to-noise ratio is proportional to the square root of the collected detection light. In practice, laser phase noise limits the signal-to-noise ratio above a certain collected light level. Two techniques are presented to decrease effects due to laser noise. In one technique the dual-cavity Fabry-Perot currently used is replaced by an interferometer based on a photorefractive crystal. The other technique has a high-finesse Sagnac cavity that filters the phase noise from the detection laser. Experimental results demonstrate that these two techniques significantly reduce limitations due to laser noise.

  2. Method for suppressing noise in measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carson, Paul J. (Inventor); Madsen, Louis A. (Inventor); Leskowitz, Garett M. (Inventor); Weitekamp, Daniel P. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    Techniques of combining separate but correlated measurements to form a second-order or higher order correlation function to suppress the effects of noise in the initial condition of a system capable of retaining memory of an initial state of the system with a characteristic relaxation time. At least two separate measurements are obtained from the system. The temporal separation between the two separate measurements is preferably comparable to or less than the characteristic relaxation time and is adjusted to allow for a correlation between two measurements.

  3. Identification of Noise Sources and Design of Noise Reduction Measures for a Pneumatic Nail Gun.

    PubMed

    Jayakumar, Vignesh; Kim, Jay; Zechmann, Edward

    An experimental-analytical procedure was implemented to reduce the operating noise level of a nail gun, a commonly found power tool in a construction site. The procedure is comprised of preliminary measurements, identification and ranking of major noise sources and application of noise controls. Preliminary measurements show that the impact noise transmitted through the structure and the exhaust related noise were found to be the first and second major contributors. Applying a noise absorbing foam on the outside of the nail gun body was found to be an effective noise reduction technique. One and two-volume small mufflers were designed and applied to the exhaust side of the nail gun which reduced not only the exhaust noise but also the impact noise. It was shown that the overall noise level could be reduced by as much as 3.5 dB, suggesting that significant noise reduction is possible in construction power tools without any significant increase of the cost.

  4. Processing of noised residual stress phase maps by using a 3D phase unwrapping algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viotti, Matias R.; Fantin, Analucia V.; Albertazzi, Armando; Willemann, Daniel P.

    2013-07-01

    The measurement of residual stress by using digital speckle pattern interferometry (DSPI) combined with the hole drilling technique is a valuable and fast tool for integrity evaluation of civil structures and mechanical parts. However, in some cases, measured phase maps are badly corrupted by noise which makes phase unwrapping a difficult and unsuccessful task. By following recommendations given by the ASTM E837 standard, 20 consecutive hole steps should be performed for the measurement of non-uniform stresses. As a consequence, 20 difference phase maps along the hole depth will be available for the DSPI technique. An adaptive phase unwrapping algorithm could be used in order to unwrap images following paths localized along well modulated pixels and performing two dimensional phase unwrapping (following paths inside a difference phase map corresponding to a hole step) or 3D phase unwrapping (similar to a temporal phase unwrapping following paths located at well-modulated pixels in a previous or a subsequent hole image). Non-corrupted and corrupted hole-drilling tests were processed with a traditional phase unwrapping algorithm as well as with the proposed 3D approach. Comparisons between unwrapped phase maps and simulated ones have shown that the proposed method gave results with best accordance than 2D results.

  5. Quantitative appraisal for noise reduction in digital holographic phase imaging.

    PubMed

    Montresor, Silvio; Picart, Pascal

    2016-06-27

    This paper discusses on a quantitative comparison of the performances of different advanced algorithms for phase data de-noising. In order to quantify the performances, several criteria are proposed: the gain in the signal-to-noise ratio, the Q index, the standard deviation of the phase error, and the signal to distortion ratio. The proposed methodology to investigate de-noising algorithms is based on the use of a realistic simulation of noise-corrupted phase data. A database including 25 fringe patterns divided into 5 patterns and 5 different signal-to-noise ratios was generated to evaluate the selected de-noising algorithms. A total of 34 algorithms divided into different families were evaluated. Quantitative appraisal leads to ranking within the considered criteria. A fairly good correlation between the signal-to-noise ratio gain and the quality index has been observed. There exists an anti-correlation between the phase error and the quality index which indicates that the phase errors are mainly structural distortions in the fringe pattern. Experimental results are thoroughly discussed in the paper.

  6. Noise Measurements of the VAIIPR Fan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mendoza, Jeff; Weir, Don

    2012-01-01

    This final report has been prepared by Honeywell Aerospace, Phoenix, Arizona, a unit of Honeywell International, Inc., documenting work performed during the period September 2004 through November 2005 for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Glenn Research Center, Cleveland, Ohio, under the Revolutionary Aero-Space Engine Research (RASER) Program, Contract No. NAS3- 01136, Task Order 6, Noise Measurements of the VAIIPR Fan. The NASA Task Manager was Dr. Joe Grady, NASA Glenn Research Center, Mail Code 60-6, Cleveland, Ohio 44135. The NASA Contract Officer was Mr. Albert Spence, NASA Glenn Research Center, Mail Code 60-6, Cleveland, Ohio 44135. This report focuses on the evaluation of internal fan noise as generated from various inflow disturbances based on measurements made from a circumferential array of sensors located near the fan and sensors upstream of a serpentine inlet.

  7. Measuring Acoustic Noise around Kahoolawe Island.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-10-01

    NAVAL OCEAN SYSTEMS CENTER SAN DIEGO, CALIFORNIA 92152 C y 2 .V ANAVAL OCEAN SYSTEMS CENTER, SAN DIEGO, CA 92152 AN ACTIV IT Y OF THE NAVAL... Ocean Systems Center (NOSC), Code 512, on NSAP Project TH-1 -80, "Measurement of Acoustic Noise Around Kahoolawe". CDR J. W. Carlmark, USN, COMTHIRDFLT N...Bioacoustics & Bionics Division Biosciences Department ,or -.. .- ?---1 1 : ’" " "’ .... .-j UNCLASSIFIED SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF THIS PAGE (When Data

  8. Rescuing a Quantum Phase Transition with Quantum Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Gu; Novais, E.; Baranger, Harold U.

    2017-02-01

    We show that placing a quantum system in contact with an environment can enhance non-Fermi-liquid correlations, rather than destroy quantum effects, as is typical. The system consists of two quantum dots in series with two leads; the highly resistive leads couple charge flow through the dots to the electromagnetic environment, the source of quantum noise. While the charge transport inhibits a quantum phase transition, the quantum noise reduces charge transport and restores the transition. We find a non-Fermi-liquid intermediate fixed point for all strengths of the noise. For strong noise, it is similar to the intermediate fixed point of the two-impurity Kondo model.

  9. Development of rotorcraft interior noise control concepts. Phase 3: Development of noise control concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoerkie, Charles A.; Gintoli, P. J.; Ingraham, S. T.; Moore, J. A.

    1986-01-01

    The goal of this research is the understanding of helicopter internal noise mechanisms and the development, design, and testing of noise control concepts which will produce significant reductions in the acoustic environment to which passengers are exposed. The Phase 3 effort involved the identification and evaluation of current and advanced treatment concepts, including isolation of structure-borne paths. In addition, a plan was devised for the full-scale evaluation of an isolation concept. Specific objectives were as follows: (1) identification and characterization of various noise control concepts; (2) implementation of noise control concepts within the S-76 SEA (statistical energy analysis) model; (3) definition and evaluation of a preliminary acoustic isolation design to reduce structure-borne transmission of acoustic frequency main gearbox gear clash vibrations into the airframe; (4) formulation of a plan for the full-scale validation of the isolation concept; and (5) prediction of the cabin noise environment with various noise control concepts installed.

  10. Generalized phase-shifting algorithms: error analysis and minimization of noise propagation.

    PubMed

    Ayubi, Gastón A; Perciante, César D; Di Martino, J Matías; Flores, Jorge L; Ferrari, José A

    2016-02-20

    Phase shifting is a technique for phase retrieval that requires a series of intensity measurements with certain phase steps. The purpose of the present work is threefold: first we present a new method for generating general phase-shifting algorithms with arbitrarily spaced phase steps. Second, we study the conditions for which the phase-retrieval error due to phase-shift miscalibration can be minimized. Third, we study the phase extraction from interferograms with additive random noise, and deduce the conditions to be satisfied for minimizing the phase-retrieval error. Algorithms with unevenly spaced phase steps are discussed under linear phase-shift errors and additive Gaussian noise, and simulations are presented.

  11. Spectral density measurements of gyro noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Truncale, A.; Koenigsberg, W.; Harris, R.

    1972-01-01

    Power spectral density (PSD) was used to analyze the outputs of several gyros in the frequency range from 0.01 to 200 Hz. Data were accumulated on eight inertial quality instruments. The results are described in terms of input angle noise (arcsec 2/Hz) and are presented on log-log plots of PSD. These data show that the standard deviation of measurement noise was 0.01 arcsec or less for some gyros in the passband from 1 Hz down 10 0.01 Hz and probably down to 0.001 Hz for at least one gyro. For the passband between 1 and 100 Hz, uncertainties in the 0.01 and 0.05 arcsec region were observed.

  12. Seismometer Self-Noise and Measuring Methods

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ringler, Adam; R. Sleeman,; Hutt, Charles R.; Gee, Lind S.

    2014-01-01

    Seismometer self-noise is usually not considered when selecting and using seismic waveform data in scientific research as it is typically assumed that the self-noise is negligibly small compared to seismic signals. However, instrumental noise is part of the noise in any seismic record, and in particular, at frequencies below a few mHz, the instrumental noise has a frequency-dependent character and may dominate the noise. When seismic noise itself is considered as a carrier of information, as in seismic interferometry (e.g., Chaput et al. 2012), it becomes extremely important to estimate the contribution of instrumental noise to the recordings.

  13. Ultralow-phase-noise oscillators based on BAW resonators.

    PubMed

    Li, Mingdong; Seok, Seonho; Rolland, Nathalie; Rolland, Paul; El Aabbaoui, Hassan; de Foucauld, Emeric; Vincent, Pierre; Giordano, Vincent

    2014-06-01

    This paper presents two 2.1-GHz low-phase noise oscillators based on BAW resonators. Both a single-ended common base structure and a differential Colpitts structure have been implemented in a 0.25-μm BiCMOS process. The detailed design methods including the realization, optimization, and test are reported. The differential Colpitts structure exhibits a phase noise 6.5 dB lower than the single-ended structure because of its good performance of power noise immunity. Comparison between the two structures is also carried out. The differential Colpitts structure shows a phase noise level of -87 dBc/Hz at 1-kHz offset frequency and a phase noise floor of -162 dBc/Hz, with an output power close to -6.5 dBm and a core consumption of 21.6 mW. Furthermore, with the proposed optimization methods, both proposed devices have achieved promising phase noise performance compared with state-of-the-art oscillators described in the literature. Finally, we briefly present the application of the proposed BAW oscillator to a micro-atomic clock.

  14. Noise Diode Stability Measurements Using a 4.3 GHz Laboratory Radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scherner, M. J.; Lawrence, R. W.

    1997-01-01

    The need for passive microwave radiometry using aperture synthesis and phased arrays for large apertures requiring more stability has generated several studies. The in-flight calibration and, therefore, the stability of such systems is an important design consideration. A 4.3 GHz laboratory radiometry operating in a balanced Dicke mode has been developed for making precise brightness (noise) temperature measurements. The stability of the noise diode source used in the noise-injection loop is of interest. A statistical Allan variance method to characterize the stability of the radiometer and the noise diode is presented in this paper. Noise measurements which demonstrate this approach are also included.

  15. Final Report on DE-FG02-04ER46107: Glasses, Noise and Phase Transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Clare C.

    2011-12-31

    We showed that noise has distinct signatures at phase transitions in spin systems. We also studied charge noise, critical current noise, and flux noise in superconducting qubits and Josephson junctions.

  16. Noise correlations and SNR in phased-array MRS.

    PubMed

    Martini, N; Santarelli, M F; Giovannetti, G; Milanesi, M; De Marchi, D; Positano, V; Landini, L

    2010-01-01

    The acquisition of magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) signals by multiple receiver coils can improve the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) or alternatively can reduce the scan time maintaining a reliable SNR. However, using phased array coils in MRS studies requires efficient data processing and data combination techniques in order to exploit the sensitivity improvement of the phased array coil acquisition method. This paper describes a novel method for the combination of MRS signals acquired by phased array coils, even in presence of correlated noise between the acquisition channels. In fact, although it has been shown that electric and magnetic coupling mechanisms produce correlated noise in the coils, previous algorithms developed for MRS data combination have ignored this effect. The proposed approach takes advantage of a noise decorrelation stage to maximize the SNR of the combined spectra. In particular Principal Component Analysis (PCA) was exploited to project the acquired spectra in a subspace where the noise vectors are orthogonal. In this subspace the SNR weighting method will provide the optimal overall SNR. Performance evaluation of the proposed method is carried out on simulated (1)H-MRS signals and experimental results are obtained on phantom (1)H-MR spectra using a commercially available 8-element phased array coil. Noise correlations between elements were generally low due to the optimal coil design, leading to a fair SNR gain (about 0.5%) in the center of the field of view (FOV). A greater SNR improvement was found in the peripheral FOV regions.

  17. Analysis Of Noise In Optical Phase-Locked Loop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Win, Moe Z.; Chen, Chien C.; Scholtz, Robert A.

    1993-01-01

    Report presents theoretical and experimental analysis of noise in coherent optical phase-locked loop. Optical phase-locked loop being considered for use in heterodyne reception of binary pulse-position modulation at data rate of 100 Kb/s in optical communication system in which transmitter also includes frequency-stabilized laser.

  18. Noise addendum experimental clean combustor program, phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sofrin, T. G.; Ross, D. A.

    1975-01-01

    The development of advanced CTOL aircraft engines with reduced exhaust emissions is discussed. Combustor noise information provided during the basic emissions program and used to advantage in securing reduced levels of combustion noise is included. Results are presented of internal pressure transducer measurements made during the scheduled emissions test program on ten configurations involving variations of three basic combustor designs.

  19. Measurement with verification of stationary signals and noise in extremely quiet environments: measuring below the noise floor.

    PubMed

    Ellingson, Roger M; Gallun, Frederick J; Bock, Guillaume

    2015-03-01

    It can be problematic to measure stationary acoustic sound pressure level in any environment when the target level approaches or lies below the minimum measureable sound pressure level of the measurement system itself. This minimum measureable level, referred to as the inherent measurement system noise floor, is generally established by noise emission characteristics of measurement system components such as microphones, preamplifiers, and other system circuitry. In this paper, methods are presented and shown accurate measuring stationary levels within 20 dB above and below this system noise floor. Methodology includes (1) measuring inherent measurement system noise, (2) subtractive energy based, inherent noise adjustment of levels affected by system noise floor, and (3) verifying accuracy of inherent noise adjustment technique. While generalizable to other purposes, the techniques presented here were specifically developed to quantify ambient noise levels in very quiet rooms used to evaluate free-field human hearing thresholds. Results obtained applying the methods to objectively measure and verify the ambient noise level in an extremely quiet room, using various measurement system noise floors and analysis bandwidths, are presented and discussed. The verified results demonstrate the adjustment method can accurately extend measurement range to 20 dB below the measurement system noise floor, and how measurement system frequency bandwidth can affect accuracy of reported noise levels.

  20. Method for suppressing noise in measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carson, Paul L. (Inventor); Madsen, Louis A. (Inventor); Leskowitz, Garett M. (Inventor); Weitekamp, Daniel P. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    Methods for suppressing noise in measurements by correlating functions based on at least two different measurements of a system at two different times. In one embodiment, a measurement operation is performed on at least a portion of a system that has a memory. A property of the system is measured during a first measurement period to produce a first response indicative of a first state of the system. Then the property of the system is measured during a second measurement period to produce a second response indicative of a second state of the system. The second measurement is performed after an evolution duration subsequent to the first measurement period when the system still retains a degree of memory of an aspect of the first state. Next, a first function of the first response is combined with a second function of the second response to form a second-order correlation function. Information of the system is then extracted from the second-order correlation function.

  1. Recommendations for field measurements of aircraft noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marsh, A. H.

    1982-01-01

    Specific recommendations for environmental test criteria, data acquisition procedures, and instrument performance requirements for measurement of noise levels produced by aircraft in flight are provided. Recommendations are also given for measurement of associated airplane and engine parameters and atmospheric conditions. Recommendations are based on capabilities which were available commercially in 1981; they are applicable to field tests of aircraft flying subsonically past microphones located near the surface of the ground either directly under or to the side of a flight path. Aircraft types covered by the recommendations include fixed-wing airplanes powered by turbojet or turbofan engines or by propellers. The recommended field-measurement procedures are consistent with assumed requirements for data processing and analysis.

  2. Frequency domain phase noise analysis of dual injection-locked optoelectronic oscillators.

    PubMed

    Jahanbakht, Sajad

    2016-10-01

    Dual injection-locked optoelectronic oscillators (DIL-OEOs) have been introduced as a means to achieve very low-noise microwave oscillations while avoiding the large spurious peaks that occur in the phase noise of the conventional single-loop OEOs. In these systems, two OEOs are inter-injection locked to each other. The OEO with the longer optical fiber delay line is called the master OEO, and the other is called the slave OEO. Here, a frequency domain approach for simulating the phase noise spectrum of each of the OEOs in a DIL-OEO system and based on the conversion matrix approach is presented. The validity of the new approach is verified by comparing its results with previously published data in the literature. In the new approach, first, in each of the master or slave OEOs, the power spectral densities (PSDs) of two white and 1/f noise sources are optimized such that the resulting simulated phase noise of any of the master or slave OEOs in the free-running state matches the measured phase noise of that OEO. After that, the proposed approach is able to simulate the phase noise PSD of both OEOs at the injection-locked state. Because of the short run-time requirements, especially compared to previously proposed time domain approaches, the new approach is suitable for optimizing the power injection ratios (PIRs), and potentially other circuit parameters, in order to achieve good performance regarding the phase noise in each of the OEOs. Through various numerical simulations, the optimum PIRs for achieving good phase noise performance are presented and discussed; they are in agreement with the previously published results. This further verifies the applicability of the new approach. Moreover, some other interesting results regarding the spur levels are also presented.

  3. Interferometric phase velocity measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kintner, P. M.; Labelle, J.; Kelley, M. C.; Cahill, L. J., Jr.; Moore, T.; Arnoldy, R.

    1984-01-01

    Phase velocities of plasma waves near the lower hybrid frequency were measured with an interferometer composed of two spatially separated electron-density probes. The plasma waves were produced in the F-region ionosphere by an argon ion beam. By calculating the normalized cross spectrum of the plasma waves a coherency of .98 was estimated along with a maximum phase difference of pi/3 radians between the two probes. This implies that the wavelength was 6 meters compared to an O(+) gyroradius of 3.8 meters, and that the phase velocity was 45 km/sec compared to an ion-beam velocity of 12.4 km/sec. These numbers compare favorably with recent predictions of a nonresonant mode produced by a dense ion beam.

  4. Jet-Surface Interaction Test: Phased Array Noise Source Localization Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Podboy, Gary G.

    2012-01-01

    An experiment was conducted to investigate the effect that a planar surface located near a jet flow has on the noise radiated to the far-field. Two different configurations were tested: 1) a shielding configuration in which the surface was located between the jet and the far-field microphones, and 2) a reflecting configuration in which the surface was mounted on the opposite side of the jet, and thus the jet noise was free to reflect off the surface toward the microphones. Both conventional far-field microphone and phased array noise source localization measurements were obtained. This paper discusses phased array results, while a companion paper discusses far-field results. The phased array data show that the axial distribution of noise sources in a jet can vary greatly depending on the jet operating condition and suggests that it would first be necessary to know or be able to predict this distribution in order to be able to predict the amount of noise reduction to expect from a given shielding configuration. The data obtained on both subsonic and supersonic jets show that the noise sources associated with a given frequency of noise tend to move downstream, and therefore, would become more difficult to shield, as jet Mach number increases. The noise source localization data obtained on cold, shock-containing jets suggests that the constructive interference of sound waves that produces noise at a given frequency within a broadband shock noise hump comes primarily from a small number of shocks, rather than from all the shocks at the same time. The reflecting configuration data illustrates that the law of reflection must be satisfied in order for jet noise to reflect off of a surface to an observer, and depending on the relative locations of the jet, the surface, and the observer, only some of the jet noise sources may satisfy this requirement.

  5. Use of coherence and phase data between two receivers in evaluation of noise environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piersol, A. G.

    1978-01-01

    For certain types of noise control problems, where transducers cannot be mounted on suspected sources, valuable information can often be obtained by comparing the coherence and phase data measured between two closely spaced microphones with analytical models deduced from the physics of the problem. However, the application of such analysis techniques must be pursued with care, particularly when the measurements are made in a reverberant area. A simple illustration is presented where the acoustic field in the test section of a wind tunnel is evaluated by modelling the field as a combination of diffuse noise due to the boundary layer turbulence in the test section and propagating noise generated by the tunnel fan and possible flow disturbances outside the test section. The coherence and phase between two closely spaced microphones in the tunnel test section are predicted for various ratios of diffuse to propagating noise contributions and compared to actual measurements under several different tunnel operating conditions.

  6. Phase noise reveals early category-specific modulation of the event-related potentials.

    PubMed

    Németh, Kornél; Kovács, Petra; Vakli, Pál; Kovács, Gyula; Zimmer, Márta

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have found that the amplitude of the early event-related potential (ERP) components evoked by faces, such as N170 and P2, changes systematically as a function of noise added to the stimuli. This change has been linked to an increased perceptual processing demand and to enhanced difficulty in perceptual decision making about faces. However, to date it has not yet been tested whether noise manipulation affects the neural correlates of decisions about face and non-face stimuli similarly. To this end, we measured the ERPs for faces and cars at three different phase noise levels. Subjects performed the same two-alternative age-discrimination task on stimuli chosen from young-old morphing continua that were created from faces as well as cars and were calibrated to lead to similar performances at each noise-level. Adding phase noise to the stimuli reduced performance and enhanced response latency for the two categories to the same extent. Parallel to that, phase noise reduced the amplitude and prolonged the latency of the face-specific N170 component. The amplitude of the P1 showed category-specific noise dependence: it was enhanced over the right hemisphere for cars and over the left hemisphere for faces as a result of adding phase noise to the stimuli, but remained stable across noise levels for cars over the left and for faces over the right hemisphere. Moreover, noise modulation altered the category-selectivity of the N170, while the P2 ERP component, typically associated with task decision difficulty, was larger for the more noisy stimuli regardless of stimulus category. Our results suggest that the category-specificity of noise-induced modulations of ERP responses starts at around 100 ms post-stimulus.

  7. Measurement by phase severance

    SciTech Connect

    Noyes, H.P.

    1987-03-01

    It is claimed that the measurement process is more accurately described by ''quasi-local phase severance'' than by ''wave function collapse''. The approach starts from the observation that the usual route to quantum mechanics starting from the Hamilton-Jacobi equations throws away half the degrees of freedom, namely, the classical initial state parameters. To overcome this difficulty, the full set of Hamilton-Jacobi equations is interpreted as operator equations acting on a state vector. The measurement theory presented is based on the conventional S-matrix boundary condition of N/sub A/ free particles in the distant past and N/sub B/ free particles in the distant future and taking the usual free particle wave functions, multiplied by phase factors.

  8. Jet-Surface Interaction Test: Phased Array Noise Source Localization Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Podboy, Gary

    2012-01-01

    Subsonic jets are relatively simple. The peak noise source location gradually moves upstream toward the nozzle as frequency increases. 2) Supersonic jets are more complicated. The peak noise source location moves downstream as frequency increases through a BBSN hump. 3) In both subsonic and supersonic jets the peak noise source location corresponding to a given frequency of noise moves downstream as jet Mach number increases. 4) The noise generated at a given frequency in a BBSN hump is generated by a small number of shocks, not from all the shocks at the same time. 5) Single microphone spectrum levels decrease when the noise source locations measured with the phased array are blocked by a shielding surface. This consistency validates the phased array data and the stationary monopole source model used to process it. 6) Reflecting surface data illustrate that the law of reflection must be satisfied for noise to reflect off a surface toward an observer. Depending on the relative locations of the jet, the surface and the observer only some of the jet noise sources may satisfy this requirement. 7) The low frequency noise created when a jet flow impinges on a surface comes primarily from the trailing edge regardless of the axial extent impacted by the flow.

  9. Ranking of Reactions Based on Sensitivity of Protein Noise Depends on the Choice of Noise Measure

    PubMed Central

    Gokhale, Sucheta; Gadgil, Chetan

    2015-01-01

    Gene expression is a stochastic process. Identification of the step maximally affecting noise in the protein level is an important aspect of investigation of gene product distribution. There are numerous experimental and theoretical studies that seek to identify this important step. However, these studies have used two different measures of noise, viz. coefficient of variation and Fano factor, and have compared different processes leading to contradictory observations regarding the important step. In this study, we performed systematic global and local sensitivity analysis on two models of gene expression to investigate relative contribution of reaction rate parameters to steady state noise in the protein level using both the measures of noise. We analytically and computationally showed that the ranking of parameters based on the sensitivity of the noise to variation in a given parameter is a strong function of the choice of the noise measure. If the Fano factor is used as the noise measure, translation is the important step whereas for coefficient of variation, transcription is the important step. We derived an analytical expression for local sensitivity and used it to explain the distinct contributions of each reaction parameter to the two measures of noise. We extended the analysis to a generic linear catalysis reaction system and observed that the reaction network topology was an important factor influencing the local sensitivity of the two measures of noise. Our study suggested that, for the analysis of contributions of reactions to the noise, consideration of both the measures of noise is important. PMID:26625133

  10. Noise-enhanced phase locking in a chemical oscillator system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyakawa, Kenji; Isikawa, Hironobu

    2002-05-01

    Dynamical responses of a chemical oscillator to an external electric field were investigated in the Belousov-Zabotinsky reaction system with the catalyst Ru(bpy)2+3 [tris-(2,2'-bipyridine) ruthenium (II)] immobilized in cation exchange beads. Periodic forcing above the threshold induced phase locking, whose synchronization region has a shape similar to the Arnold tongue. When a certain amount of noise together with a subthreshold periodic signal was imposed on the chemical oscillator, 1:1 phase locking to the periodic signal occurred. Its degree passed through a maximum with increase in the noise intensity, a manifestation of stochastic resonance in the form of noise-enhanced phase locking. The experimentally observed features were reproduced in a numerical simulation with a forced Oregonator reaction-diffusion model.

  11. Low bitrate system design in the presence of phase noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haugli, Hans-Christian

    1995-01-01

    There are a number of interesting mobile satellite applications that require the transmission of short packets of data. In the design of such systems one of the challenges is often to minimize the transmitted power to reduce cost, which implies using power efficient low bit-rate modulation and coding methods. PSK systems can be very power efficient, but at low bit-rates the carrier recovery circuits can be sensitive to oscillator phase noise. In this paper we address the problem of determining the lowest bit-rate that can be supported using PSK for a given level of system phase noise. The classical formulas are reviewed, and a method is derived to calculate the minimum C/N(sub 0) required to recover the carrier for CW, BPSK and QPSK signals for a given phase noise level.

  12. Phase-unwrapping algorithm for images with high noise content based on a local histogram.

    PubMed

    Meneses, Jaime; Gharbi, Tijani; Humbert, Philippe

    2005-03-01

    We present a robust algorithm of phase unwrapping that was designed for use on phase images with high noise content. We proceed with the algorithm by first identifying regions with continuous phase values placed between fringe boundaries in an image and then phase shifting the regions with respect to one another by multiples of 2pi to unwrap the phase. Image pixels are segmented between interfringe and fringe boundary areas by use of a local histogram of a wrapped phase. The algorithm has been used successfully to unwrap phase images generated in a three-dimensional shape measurement for noninvasive quantification of human skin structure in dermatology, cosmetology, and plastic surgery.

  13. Phase-unwrapping algorithm for images with high noise content based on a local histogram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meneses, Jaime; Gharbi, Tijani; Humbert, Philippe

    2005-03-01

    We present a robust algorithm of phase unwrapping that was designed for use on phase images with high noise content. We proceed with the algorithm by first identifying regions with continuous phase values placed between fringe boundaries in an image and then phase shifting the regions with respect to one another by multiples of 2pi to unwrap the phase. Image pixels are segmented between interfringe and fringe boundary areas by use of a local histogram of a wrapped phase. The algorithm has been used successfully to unwrap phase images generated in a three-dimensional shape measurement for noninvasive quantification of human skin structure in dermatology, cosmetology, and plastic surgery.

  14. 14 CFR 36.101 - Noise measurement and evaluation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Noise measurement and evaluation. 36.101... AIRCRAFT NOISE STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT TYPE AND AIRWORTHINESS CERTIFICATION Transport Category Large Airplanes and Jet Airplanes § 36.101 Noise measurement and evaluation. For transport category large...

  15. Determination of parameters of a nuclear reactor through noise measurements

    DOEpatents

    Cohn, C.E.

    1975-07-15

    A method of measuring parameters of a nuclear reactor by noise measurements is described. Noise signals are developed by the detectors placed in the reactor core. The polarity coincidence between the noise signals is used to develop quantities from which various parameters of the reactor can be calculated. (auth)

  16. Mitigating the effect of noise in the hybrid input-output method of phase retrieval.

    PubMed

    Trahan, Russell; Hyland, David

    2013-05-01

    Here a modification to the hybrid input-output (HIO) method of phase retrieval is presented which aides in mitigating the negative effects of low signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs). Various type of interferometers measure diffraction patterns which are used to determine the Fourier transform modulus of an objective. Interferometry often suffers from very low SNRs making phase retrieval difficult because of the sensitivity of most phase retrieval algorithms to local minima. Here we analyze the effect of noise on the HIO method. The result is used as a rationale for the proposed modification to the HIO method. The algorithm presented here introduces a filtering scheme which removes much of the Fourier modulus noise. Examples are shown and the results are compared to the HIO method with and without the proposed modification. Comparisons are also made to other methods of filtering the Fourier modulus noise.

  17. A low-noise delta-sigma phase modulator for polar transmitters.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Bo

    2014-01-01

    A low-noise phase modulator, using finite-impulse-response (FIR) filtering embedded delta-sigma (ΔΣ) fractional-N phase-locked loop (PLL), is fabricated in 0.18 μ m CMOS for GSM/EDGE polar transmitters. A simplified digital compensation filter with inverse-FIR and -PLL features is proposed to trade off the transmitter noise and linearity. Experimental results show that the presented architecture performs RF phase modulation well with 20 mW power dissipation from 1.6 V supply and achieves the root-mean-square (rms) and peak phase errors of 4° and 8.5°, respectively. The measured and simulated phase noises of -104 dBc/Hz and -120 dBc/Hz at 400-kHz offset from 1.8-GHz carrier frequency are observed, respectively.

  18. 14 CFR 36.101 - Noise measurement and evaluation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Section 36.101 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT NOISE STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT TYPE AND AIRWORTHINESS CERTIFICATION Transport Category Large Airplanes and Jet Airplanes § 36.101 Noise measurement and evaluation. For transport category large...

  19. Review of Subcritical Source-Driven Noise Analysis Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Valentine, T.E.

    1999-11-01

    Subcritical source-driven noise measurements are simultaneous Rossia and randomly pulsed neutron measurements that provide measured quantities that can be related to the subcritical neutron multiplication factor. In fact, subcritical source-driven noise measurements should be performed in lieu of Rossia measurements because of the additional information that is obtained from noise measurements such as the spectral ratio and the coherence functions. The basic understanding of source-driven noise analysis measurements can be developed from a point reactor kinetics model to demonstrate how the measured quantities relate to the subcritical neutron multiplication factor.

  20. Effects of Phase Noise and Thermal Noise upon Coherent PSK Demodulation and Their Impact on Phase Noise Specifications for Terminals of the Phase II DSCS.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-08-01

    TDMA With PLL Noise Bandwidth of 100 Hz. Operation With Possible Phase 11 DS (S Noise Contributors and With Soft Decision (3-biti, Rate 1 2, Constraint...vith a fixed s )lh, lQ :t 11’ , it is tossilil t () ’ause the cairrier referen ce total phase error \\:i’lnt(c it) int’.cr S , ds e crease, or renain...Mod.F17 JF Lof-E(701) LOSF(’TH) LOSS(TOr) LOS1THi T/f CFF ) crp) (DB) (DB 71377k>6 >6 15rI . 7f-3 A.877PP >6 >6 300 P. 9A704 S. f7 ORd >6 >6 S,),3. 791

  1. Reduction of phase noise to amplitude noise conversion in silicon waveguide-based phase-sensitive amplification.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yonghua; Liu, Hongjun; Sun, Qibing; Huang, Nan; Wang, Zhaolu

    2016-04-20

    We use a vector phase sensitive amplification (PSA) scheme, which can eliminate the inherent phase noise (PN) to amplitude noise (AN) conversion in a conventional PSA process. A dispersion-engineered silicon strip waveguide is used to investigate the vector PSA scheme at the telecom wavelengths. The phase-dependent gain and phase-to-phase transfer functions as well as constellation diagram at different signal polarization states (SPSs) are numerically analyzed. It is found that the PN to AN conversion is completely suppressed when the SPS is identical to one of the pump polarization states. Moreover, the binary phase shift keying signal is regenerated by the proposed vector PSA scheme, and the error vector magnitude is calculated to assess the regeneration capacity. Our results have potential application in all-optical signal processing.

  2. Suppression of amplitude-to-phase noise conversion in balanced optical-microwave phase detectors.

    PubMed

    Lessing, Maurice; Margolis, Helen S; Brown, C Tom A; Gill, Patrick; Marra, Giuseppe

    2013-11-04

    We demonstrate an amplitude-to-phase (AM-PM) conversion coefficient for a balanced optical-microwave phase detector (BOM-PD) of 0.001 rad, corresponding to AM-PM induced phase noise 60 dB below the single-sideband relative intensity noise of the laser. This enables us to generate 8 GHz microwave signals from a commercial Er-fibre comb with a single-sideband residual phase noise of -131 dBc Hz(-1) at 1 Hz offset frequency and -148 dBc Hz(-1) at 1 kHz offset frequency.

  3. Noise properties of grating-based x-ray phase contrast computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Koehler, Thomas; Juergen Engel, Klaus; Roessl, Ewald

    2011-05-15

    Purpose: To investigate the properties of tomographic grating-based phase contrast imaging with respect to its noise power spectrum and the energy dependence of the achievable contrast to noise ratio. Methods: Tomographic simulations of an object with 11 cm diameter constituted of materials of biological interest were conducted at different energies ranging from 25 to 85 keV by using a wave propagation approach. Using a Monte Carlo simulation of the x-ray attenuation within the object, it is verified that the simulated measurement deposits the same dose within the object at each energy. Results: The noise in reconstructed phase contrast computed tomography images shows a maximum at low spatial frequencies. The contrast to noise ratio reaches a maximum around 45 keV for the simulated object. The general dependence of the contrast to noise on the energy appears to be independent of the material. Compared with reconstructed absorption contrast images, the reconstructed phase contrast images show sometimes better, sometimes worse, and sometimes similar contrast to noise, depending on the material and the energy. Conclusions: Phase contrast images provide additional information to the conventional absorption contrast images and might thus be useful for medical applications. However, the observed noise power spectrum in reconstructed phase contrast images implies that the usual trade-off between noise and resolution is less efficient for phase contrast imaging compared with absorption contrast imaging. Therefore, high-resolution imaging is a strength of phase contrast imaging, but low-resolution imaging is not. This might hamper the clinical application of the method, in cases where a low spatial resolution is sufficient for diagnosis.

  4. SNR Degradation in Undersampled Phase Measurement Systems

    PubMed Central

    Salido-Monzú, David; Meca-Meca, Francisco J.; Martín-Gorostiza, Ernesto; Lázaro-Galilea, José L.

    2016-01-01

    A wide range of measuring applications rely on phase estimation on sinusoidal signals. These systems, where the estimation is mainly implemented in the digital domain, can generally benefit from the use of undersampling to reduce the digitizer and subsequent digital processing requirements. This may be crucial when the application characteristics necessarily imply a simple and inexpensive sensor. However, practical limitations related to the phase stability of the band-pass filter prior digitization establish restrictions to the reduction of noise bandwidth. Due to this, the undersampling intensity is practically defined by noise aliasing, taking into account the amount of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) reduction caused by it considering the application accuracy requirements. This work analyzes the relationship between undersampling frequency and SNR reduction, conditioned by the stability requirements of the filter that defines the noise bandwidth before digitization. The effect of undersampling is quantified in a practical situation where phase differences are measured by in-phase and quadrature (I/Q) demodulation for an infrared ranging application. PMID:27783033

  5. Frequency noise measurement of diode-pumped Nd:YAG ring lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Chien-Chung; Win, Moe Zaw

    1990-01-01

    The combined frequency noise spectrum of two model 120-01A nonplanar ring oscillator lasers was measured by first heterodyne detecting the IF signal and then measuring the IF frequency noise using an RF frequency discriminator. The results indicated the presence of a 1/f-squared noise component in the power-spectral density of the frequency fluctuations between 1 Hz and 1 kHz. After incorporating this 1/f-squared into the analysis of the optical phase tracking loop, the measured phase error variance closely matches the theoretical predictions.

  6. Ultra-low noise optical phase-locked loop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayotte, Simon; Babin, André; Costin, François

    2014-03-01

    The relative phase between two fiber lasers is controlled via a high performance optical phase-locked loop (OPLL). Two parameters are of particular importance for the design: the intrinsic phase noise of the laser (i.e. its linewidth) and a high-gain, low-noise electronic locking loop. In this work, one of the lowest phase noise fiber lasers commercially available was selected (i.e. NP Photonics Rock fiber laser module), with sub-kHz linewidth at 1550.12 nm. However, the fast tuning mechanism of such lasers is through stretching its cavity length with a piezoelectric transducer which has a few 10s kHz bandwidth. To further increase the locking loop bandwidth to several MHz, a second tuning mechanism is used by adding a Lithium Niobate phase modulator in the laser signal path. The OPLL is thus divided into two locking loops, a slow loop acting on the laser piezoelectric transducer and a fast loop acting on the phase modulator. The beat signal between the two phase-locked lasers yields a highly pure sine wave with an integrated phase error of 0.0012 rad. This is orders of magnitude lower than similar existing systems such as the Laser Synthesizer used for distribution of photonic local oscillator (LO) for the Atacama Large Millimeter Array radio telescope in Chile. Other applications for ultra-low noise OPLL include coherent power combining, Brillouin sensing, light detection and ranging (LIDAR), fiber optic gyroscopes, phased array antenna and beam steering, generation of LOs for next generation coherent communication systems, coherent analog optical links, terahertz generation and coherent spectroscopy.

  7. A low phase noise microwave source for atomic spin squeezing experiments in 87Rb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zilong; Bohnet, Justin G.; Weiner, Joshua M.; Thompson, James K.

    2012-04-01

    We describe and characterize a simple, low cost, low phase noise microwave source that operates near 6.800 GHz for agile, coherent manipulation of ensembles of 87Rb. Low phase noise is achieved by directly multiplying a low phase noise 100 MHz crystal to 6.8 GHz using a nonlinear transmission line and filtering the output with custom band-pass filters. The fixed frequency signal is single sideband modulated with a direct digital synthesis frequency source to provide the desired phase, amplitude, and frequency control. Before modulation, the source has a single sideband phase noise near -140 dBc/Hz in the range of 10 kHz-1 MHz offset from the carrier frequency and -130 dBc/Hz after modulation. The resulting source is estimated to contribute added spin-noise variance 16 dB below the quantum projection noise level during quantum nondemolition measurements of the clock transition in an ensemble 7 × 105 87Rb atoms.

  8. A low phase noise microwave source for atomic spin squeezing experiments in {sup 87}Rb

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Zilong; Bohnet, Justin G.; Weiner, Joshua M.; Thompson, James K.

    2012-04-15

    We describe and characterize a simple, low cost, low phase noise microwave source that operates near 6.800 GHz for agile, coherent manipulation of ensembles of {sup 87}Rb. Low phase noise is achieved by directly multiplying a low phase noise 100 MHz crystal to 6.8 GHz using a nonlinear transmission line and filtering the output with custom band-pass filters. The fixed frequency signal is single sideband modulated with a direct digital synthesis frequency source to provide the desired phase, amplitude, and frequency control. Before modulation, the source has a single sideband phase noise near -140 dBc/Hz in the range of 10 kHz-1 MHz offset from the carrier frequency and -130 dBc/Hz after modulation. The resulting source is estimated to contribute added spin-noise variance 16 dB below the quantum projection noise level during quantum nondemolition measurements of the clock transition in an ensemble 7 x 10{sup 5} {sup 87}Rb atoms.

  9. A low phase noise microwave source for atomic spin squeezing experiments in 87Rb.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zilong; Bohnet, Justin G; Weiner, Joshua M; Thompson, James K

    2012-04-01

    We describe and characterize a simple, low cost, low phase noise microwave source that operates near 6.800 GHz for agile, coherent manipulation of ensembles of (87)Rb. Low phase noise is achieved by directly multiplying a low phase noise 100 MHz crystal to 6.8 GHz using a nonlinear transmission line and filtering the output with custom band-pass filters. The fixed frequency signal is single sideband modulated with a direct digital synthesis frequency source to provide the desired phase, amplitude, and frequency control. Before modulation, the source has a single sideband phase noise near -140 dBc/Hz in the range of 10 kHz-1 MHz offset from the carrier frequency and -130 dBc/Hz after modulation. The resulting source is estimated to contribute added spin-noise variance 16 dB below the quantum projection noise level during quantum nondemolition measurements of the clock transition in an ensemble 7 × 10(5) (87)Rb atoms.

  10. Noise-enhanced phase synchronization in time-delayed systems.

    PubMed

    Senthilkumar, D V; Shrii, M Manju; Kurths, J

    2012-02-01

    We investigate the phenomenon of noise-enhanced phase synchronization (PS) in coupled time-delay systems, which usually exhibit non-phase-coherent attractors with complex topological properties. As a delay system is essentially an infinite dimensional in nature with multiple characteristic time scales, it is interesting and crucial to understand the interplay of noise and the time scales in achieving PS. In unidirectionally coupled systems, the response system adjust all its time scales to that of the drive, whereas both subsystems adjust their rhythms to a single (main time scale of the uncoupled system) time scale in bidirectionally coupled systems. We find similar effects for both a common and an independent additive Gaussian noise.

  11. Conversion of Laser Phase Noise to Amplitude Noise in a Resonant Atomic Vapor: The Role of Laser Linewidth

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    fiber optic sensors ; atomic frequency standards, applied laser spectroscopy, laser chemistry, atmospheric propagation and beam control, LIDAR/LADAR...SMC-TR-99-11 AEROSPACE REPORT NO. TR-98(8555)-14 Conversion of Laser Phase Noise to Amplitude Noise in a Resonant Atomic Vapor: The Role of Laser ...1999 3. REPORT TYPE AND DATES COVERED 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Conversion of Laser Phase Noise to Amplitude Noise in a Resonant Atomic Vapor: The Role

  12. Phased Array Radiometer Calibration Using a Radiated Noise Source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srinivasan, Karthik; Limaye, Ashutoch S.; Laymon, Charles A.; Meyer, Paul J.

    2010-01-01

    Electronic beam steering capability of phased array antenna systems offer significant advantages when used in real aperture imaging radiometers. The sensitivity of such systems is limited by the ability to accurately calibrate variations in the antenna circuit characteristics. Passive antenna systems, which require mechanical rotation to scan the beam, have stable characteristics and the noise figure of the antenna can be characterized with knowledge of its physical temperature [1],[2]. Phased array antenna systems provide the ability to electronically steer the beam in any desired direction. Such antennas make use of active components (amplifiers, phase shifters) to provide electronic scanning capability while maintaining a low antenna noise figure. The gain fluctuations in the active components can be significant, resulting in substantial calibration difficulties [3]. In this paper, we introduce two novel calibration techniques that provide an end-to-end calibration of a real-aperture, phased array radiometer system. Empirical data will be shown to illustrate the performance of both methods.

  13. Evaluation of noise pollution in urban traffic hubs—Noise maps and measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Fiedler, Paulo Eduardo Kirrian; Zannin, Paulo Henrique Trombetta

    2015-02-15

    A study was made of some of the main traffic hubs in a Latin American metropolis, in order to determine the presence or absence of noise by means of noise measurements and acoustic mapping. To characterize noise in the evaluated road stretches, 232 measurements were taken at different points. The Predictor software package was used for the noise mapping calculations. Noise sensitive areas, e.g., hospitals, were identified in the evaluated road stretches. Noise maps were calculated for two hospitals, showing the current levels of noise that reach their facades. Hypothetical scenarios were simulated by making changes in the composition of traffic and total number of vehicles, and an assessment was made of the potential influence of these modifications in reducing the noise levels reaching the facades of the buildings in question. The simulations indicated that a 50% reduction in total traffic flow, or a 50% reduction in heavy vehicle traffic flow, would reduce the noise levels by about 3 dB(A). - Highlights: • Evaluation of noise pollution in urban traffic hubs • Street systems • Environmental noise impacts • Noise mapping.

  14. Laser phase noise effects on the dynamics of optomechanical resonators

    SciTech Connect

    Phelps, Gregory A.; Meystre, Pierre

    2011-06-15

    We investigate theoretically the influence of laser phase noise on the cooling and heating of a generic cavity optomechanical system. We derive the back-action damping and heating rates and the mechanical frequency shift of the radiation-pressure-driven oscillating mirror, and derive the minimum phonon occupation number for small laser linewidths. We find that, in practice, laser phase noise does not pose serious limitations to ground-state cooling. Additionally, we explore the regime of parametric amplification where coherent oscillations of the mirror are realizable. It is found that heating from laser phase noise is of significance and can cause the onset of instabilities. We then consider the effects of laser phase noise in a parametric cavity driving scheme that minimizes the back-action heating of one of the quadratures of the mechanical oscillator motion. Laser linewidths, narrow compared to the decay rate of the cavity field, do not pose any significant problems in an experimental setting, but broader linewidths limit the practicality of this back-action evasion method.

  15. Tanlock loop noise reduction using an optimised phase detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-kharji Al-Ali, Omar; Anani, Nader; Al-Qutayri, Mahmoud; Al-Araji, Saleh

    2013-06-01

    This article proposes a time-delay digital tanlock loop (TDTL), which uses a new phase detector (PD) design that is optimised for noise reduction making it amenable for applications that require wide lock range without sacrificing the level of noise immunity. The proposed system uses an improved phase detector design which uses two phase detectors; one PD is used to optimise the noise immunity whilst the other is used to control the acquisition time of the TDTL system. Using the modified phase detector it is possible to reduce the second- and higher-order harmonics by at least 50% compared with the conventional TDTL system. The proposed system was simulated and tested using MATLAB/Simulink using frequency step inputs and inputs corrupted with varying levels of harmonic distortion. A hardware prototype of the system was implemented using a field programmable gate array (FPGA). The practical and simulation results indicate considerable improvement in the noise performance of the proposed system over the conventional TDTL architecture.

  16. Stability and phase noise tests of two cryo-cooled sapphire oscillators.

    PubMed

    Dick, G J; Wang, N T

    2000-01-01

    A cryocooled compensated sapphire oscillator (CSO), developed for the Cassini Ka-band Radio Science experiment, and operating in the 7 K-10 K temperature range, was demonstrated to show ultra-high stability of sigma(y)=2.5x10(-15) for measuring times 200 seconds noise receivers. We have made initial phase noise and Allan deviation measurements that show more than 10 times stability improvement over the hydrogen maser for measuring times 1 second measuring times from 10 to 1000 seconds. Phase noise is reduced by 20 to 28 dB over the design offset frequency range from 1 Hz to 40 Hz. Receiver design is also discussed.

  17. Contribution of off-resonant states to the phase noise of quantum dot lasers.

    PubMed

    Wang, Cheng; Zhuang, Jun-Ping; Grillot, Frédéric; Chan, Sze-Chun

    2016-12-26

    The phase noise of quantum dot lasers is investigated theoretically by coupling the Langevin noise sources into the rate equations. The off-resonant populations in the excited state and in the carrier reservoir contribute to the phase noise of ground-state emission lasers through the phase-amplitude coupling effect. This effect arises from the optical-noise induced carrier fluctuations in the off-resonant states. In addition, the phase noise has low sensitivity to the carrier scattering rates.

  18. Phase calibration unwrapping algorithm for phase data corrupted by strong decorrelation speckle noise.

    PubMed

    Xia, Haiting; Montresor, Silvio; Guo, Rongxin; Li, Junchang; Yan, Feng; Cheng, Heming; Picart, Pascal

    2016-12-12

    Robust phase unwrapping in the presence of high noise remains an open issue. Especially, when both noise and fringe densities are high, pre-filtering may lead to phase dislocations and smoothing that complicate even more unwrapping. In this paper an approach to deal with high noise and to unwrap successfully phase data is proposed. Taking into account influence of noise in wrapped data, a calibration method of the 1st order spatial phase derivative is proposed and an iterative approach is presented. We demonstrate that the proposed method is able to process holographic phase data corrupted by non-Gaussian speckle decorrelation noise. The algorithm is validated by realistic numerical simulations in which the fringe density and noise standard deviation is progressively increased. Comparison with other established algorithms shows that the proposed algorithm exhibits better accuracy and shorter computation time, whereas others may fail to unwrap. The proposed algorithm is applied to phase data from digital holographic metrology and the unwrapped results demonstrate its practical effectiveness. The realistic simulations and experiments demonstrate that the proposed unwrapping algorithm is robust and fast in the presence of strong speckle decorrelation noise.

  19. Nonlinear phase noise mitigation in phase-sensitive amplified transmission systems.

    PubMed

    Olsson, Samuel L I; Karlsson, Magnus; Andrekson, Peter A

    2015-05-04

    We investigate the impact of in-line amplifier noise in transmission systems amplified by two-mode phase-sensitive amplifiers (PSAs) and present the first experimental demonstration of nonlinear phase noise (NLPN) mitigation in a modulation format independent PSA-amplified transmission system. The NLPN mitigation capability is attributed to the correlated noise on the signal and idler waves at the input of the transmission span. We study a single-span system with noise loading in the transmitter but the results are expected to be applicable also in multi-span systems. The experimental investigation is supported by numerical simulations showing excellent agreement with the experiments. In addition to demonstrating NLPN mitigation we also present a record high sensitivity receiver, enabled by low-noise PSA-amplification, requiring only 4.1 photons per bit to obtain a bit error ratio (BER) of 1 × 10(-3) with 10 GBd quadrature phase-shift keying (QPSK) data.

  20. Core noise measurements on a YF-102 turbofan engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reshotko, M.; Karchmer, A. M.; Penko, P. F.; Mcardle, J. G.

    1977-01-01

    Core noise from a YF-102 high bypass ratio turbofan engine was investigated through the use of simultaneous measurements of internal fluctuating pressures and far field noise. Acoustic waveguide probes, located in the engine at the compressor exit, in the combustor, at the turbine exit, and in the core nozzle, were employed to measure internal fluctuating pressures. Spectra showed that the internal signals were free of tones, except at high frequency where machinery noise was present. Data obtained over a wide range of engine conditions suggest that below 60% of maximum fan speed the low frequency core noise contributes significantly to the far field noise.

  1. Noise in NC-AFM measurements with significant tip–sample interaction

    PubMed Central

    Lübbe, Jannis; Temmen, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    The frequency shift noise in non-contact atomic force microscopy (NC-AFM) imaging and spectroscopy consists of thermal noise and detection system noise with an additional contribution from amplitude noise if there are significant tip–sample interactions. The total noise power spectral density D Δ f(f m) is, however, not just the sum of these noise contributions. Instead its magnitude and spectral characteristics are determined by the strongly non-linear tip–sample interaction, by the coupling between the amplitude and tip–sample distance control loops of the NC-AFM system as well as by the characteristics of the phase locked loop (PLL) detector used for frequency demodulation. Here, we measure D Δ f(f m) for various NC-AFM parameter settings representing realistic measurement conditions and compare experimental data to simulations based on a model of the NC-AFM system that includes the tip–sample interaction. The good agreement between predicted and measured noise spectra confirms that the model covers the relevant noise contributions and interactions. Results yield a general understanding of noise generation and propagation in the NC-AFM and provide a quantitative prediction of noise for given experimental parameters. We derive strategies for noise-optimised imaging and spectroscopy and outline a full optimisation procedure for the instrumentation and control loops. PMID:28144538

  2. Charting environmental pollution. [by noise measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halpert, E.; Bizo, F.; Karacsonyi, Z.

    1974-01-01

    It is found that areas affected by different noxious agents are within the limits traced for high noise level areas; consequently, it is suggested that high noise pressure levels should be used as the primary indication of environmental pollution. A complex methodology is reported for charting environmental pollution due to physical, chemical and biological noxious agents on the scale of an industrial district.

  3. Jet Noise Source Localization Using Linear Phased Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agboola, Ferni A.; Bridges, James

    2004-01-01

    A study was conducted to further clarify the interpretation and application of linear phased array microphone results, for localizing aeroacoustics sources in aircraft exhaust jet. Two model engine nozzles were tested at varying power cycles with the array setup parallel to the jet axis. The array position was varied as well to determine best location for the array. The results showed that it is possible to resolve jet noise sources with bypass and other components separation. The results also showed that a focused near field image provides more realistic noise source localization at low to mid frequencies.

  4. Design of phase-only, binary phase-only, and complex ternary matched filters with increased signal-to-noise ratios for colored noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, B. V. K. V.; Juday, Richard D.

    1991-01-01

    An algorithm is provided for treating nonwhite additive noise in determining regions of support for phase-only filters, binary phase-only filters, and complex ternary matched filters. It is analytically shown to be optimal in the signal-to-noise ratio sense. It extends earlier research that assumed white noise.

  5. 14 CFR 36.1101 - Noise measurement and evaluation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Noise measurement and evaluation. 36.1101 Section 36.1101 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... measurement and evaluation. For tiltrotors, the noise generated must be measured and evaluated under...

  6. Analysis of EEG Phase Property with Pulse and Noise Stimuli in Visual Cortex (V1)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, Yutaro; Takeno, Shohei; Kotani, Kiyoshi; Jimbo, Yasuhiko

    Event Related Potential (ERP) of brain EEG (Electroencephalogram) activity plays an important role in EEG phase synchronization and/or hemodynamic responses measured by fMRI (functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging). However, the specific mechanism of ERP generation is still unclear. In this study, pulse and noise type visual stimuli are administered to subjects. Then the phase response of the EEG in α-waves is analyzed. As a result, the magnitudes of the phase response are varied by the stimulus administered phase and no power increase is observed. These results indicate that the ERP in α-waves is generated by the phase resetting of brain activity.

  7. Phase noise optimization in temporal phase-shifting digital holography with partial coherence light sources and its application in quantitative cell imaging.

    PubMed

    Remmersmann, Christian; Stürwald, Stephan; Kemper, Björn; Langehanenberg, Patrik; von Bally, Gert

    2009-03-10

    In temporal phase-shifting-based digital holographic microscopy, high-resolution phase contrast imaging requires optimized conditions for hologram recording and phase retrieval. To optimize the phase resolution, for the example of a variable three-step algorithm, a theoretical analysis on statistical errors, digitalization errors, uncorrelated errors, and errors due to a misaligned temporal phase shift is carried out. In a second step the theoretically predicted results are compared to the measured phase noise obtained from comparative experimental investigations with several coherent and partially coherent light sources. Finally, the applicability for noise reduction is demonstrated by quantitative phase contrast imaging of pancreas tumor cells.

  8. Noise radar using random phase and frequency modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Axelsson, Sune R. J.

    2004-01-01

    Pulse compression radar is used in a great number of radar applications. Excellent range resolution and high ECCM performance can be achieved by wide-band modulated long pulses, which spread out the transmitted energy in frequency and time. By using random noise as waveform, the range ambiguity can be suppressed as well. The same limit in doppler resolution is achieved as for a coherent doppler radar when the time compression of the reference is tuned to that of the target. Mostly, the random signal is transmitted directly from a noise generating HF-source. A sine wave, which is phase or frequency modulated by random noise, is an alternative giving similar performance but higher transmitted mean power when peak-limited transmitters are applied. A narrower modulation noise bandwidth can also be applied to generate the same output bandwidth. For phase modulation, the bandwidth amplifying factor is simply the rms value of the phase modulation, and for a frequency modulating waveform the output rms bandwidth equals the rms value of the frequency modulation. The results also show that the range sidelobes can be highly suppressed compared with the sidelobes of the modulating signal. The mean and variance of the correlation integral are derived in terms of the autocorrelation function of the modulation. Finally, random bi-phase modulation and the effects of low-bit ADC at the correlation processing are analyzed and described. The advantages of low range sidelobes and enhanced range resolution make frequency and phase modulation attractive for a great number of applications.

  9. Fast measurement of temporal noise of digital camera's photosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheremkhin, Pavel A.; Evtikhiev, Nikolay N.; Krasnov, Vitaly V.; Rodin, Vladislav G.; Starikov, Rostislav S.; Starikov, Sergey N.

    2015-10-01

    Currently photo- and videocameras are widespread parts of both scientific experimental setups and consumer applications. They are used in optics, radiophysics, astrophotography, chemistry, and other various fields of science and technology such as control systems and video-surveillance monitoring. One of the main information limitations of photoand videocameras are noises of photosensor pixels. Camera's photosensor noise can be divided into random and pattern components. Temporal noise includes random noise component while spatial noise includes pattern noise component. Spatial part usually several times lower in magnitude than temporal. At first approximation spatial noises might be neglected. Earlier we proposed modification of the automatic segmentation of non-uniform targets (ASNT) method for measurement of temporal noise of photo- and videocameras. Only two frames are sufficient for noise measurement with the modified method. In result, proposed ASNT modification should allow fast and accurate measurement of temporal noise. In this paper, we estimated light and dark temporal noises of four cameras of different types using the modified ASNT method with only several frames. These cameras are: consumer photocamera Canon EOS 400D (CMOS, 10.1 MP, 12 bit ADC), scientific camera MegaPlus II ES11000 (CCD, 10.7 MP, 12 bit ADC), industrial camera PixeLink PLB781F (CMOS, 6.6 MP, 10 bit ADC) and video-surveillance camera Watec LCL-902C (CCD, 0.47 MP, external 8 bit ADC). Experimental dependencies of temporal noise on signal value are in good agreement with fitted curves based on a Poisson distribution excluding areas near saturation. We measured elapsed time for processing of shots used for temporal noise estimation. The results demonstrate the possibility of fast obtaining of dependency of camera full temporal noise on signal value with the proposed ASNT modification.

  10. A new balanced-path heterodyne I/Q-interferometer scheme for low environmental noise, high sensitivity phase measurements for both reflection and transmission geometry.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Seunghyun; Park, Youngkyu; Cho, Kyuman

    2013-09-09

    A new heterodyne interferometer scheme which has open accesses to both the geometrically balanced probe beam (PB) and reference beam (RB) paths, for which, depending on the nature of a specific sensing mechanism, a transmission geometry or a reflection geometry can be employed, is presented. We will show that, because of a small separation between the short length PB and RB running parallel to each other our newly proposed optical arrangement allows high rejection of unlocalized environmental perturbations. In fact, the geometrically balanced optical arrangement provides 19 dB rejection of any vibrations parallel to the direction of beam propagation, which cannot be achieved in a conventional interferometer scheme. Applications of this new interferometer scheme are discussed. As an example, we will show that our newly proposed interferometer scheme can be applied for high sensitivity measurements of concentration dependent refractive indexes in various solutions.

  11. The role of amplitude-to-phase conversion in the generation of oscillator flicker phase noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hearn, C. P.

    1985-01-01

    The role of amplitude-to-phase conversion as a factor in feedback oscillator flicker phase noise is examined. A limiting stage consisting of parallel-connected opposite polarity diodes operating in a circuit environment contining reactance is shown to exhibit amplitude-to-phase conversion. This mechanism coupled with resistive upconversion provides an indirect route for very low frequency flicker noise to be transferred into the phase of an oscillator signal. It is concluded that this effect is more significant in the lower frequency regimes where the onlinear reactances associated with active devices are overwhelmed by linear reactive elements.

  12. Phase noise reduction of a semiconductor laser in a composite optical phase-locked loop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satyan, Naresh; Sendowski, Jacob; Vasilyev, Arseny; Rakuljic, George; Yariv, Amnon

    2010-12-01

    The bandwidth and residual phase noise of optical phase-locked loops (OPLLs) using semiconductor lasers are typically constrained by the nonuniform frequency modulation response of the laser, limiting their usefulness in a number of applications. It is shown in this work that additional feedback control using an optical phase modulator improves the coherence between the master and slave lasers in the OPLL by achieving bandwidths determined only by the propagation delay in the loop. A phase noise reduction by more than a factor of two is demonstrated in a proof-of-concept experiment using a commercial distributed feedback semiconductor laser.

  13. Polarization-induced phase noise in fiber optic Michelson interferometer with Faraday rotator mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yuefeng; Li, Fang; Zhang, Wentao; Xiao, Hao; Liu, Yuliang

    2008-11-01

    Polarization-induced phase noise in Michelson interferometer with imperfect Faraday rotator mirrors was investigated. This kind of noise generates from the rotation angle errors of Faraday rotator mirrors and external polarization perturbation. The conversion factor κ, representing the magnitude conversion ability from polarization-noise to polarization induced phase-noise, have been theoretically evaluated and experimentally investigated.

  14. Noise robust linear dynamic system for phase unwrapping and smoothing.

    PubMed

    Estrada, Julio C; Servin, Manuel; Quiroga, Juan A

    2011-03-14

    Phase unwrapping techniques remove the modulus ambiguities of wrapped phase maps. The present work shows a first-order feedback system for phase unwrapping and smoothing. This system is a fast sequential unwrapping system which also allows filtering some noise because in deed it is an Infinite Impulse Response (IIR) low-pass filter. In other words, our system is capable of low-pass filtering the wrapped phase as the unwrapping process proceeds. We demonstrate the temporal stability of this unwrapping feedback system, as well as its low-pass filtering capabilities. Our system even outperforms the most common and used unwrapping methods that we tested, such as the Flynn's method, the Goldstain's method, and the Ghiglia least-squares method (weighted or unweighted). The comparisons with these methods shows that our system filters-out some noise while preserving the dynamic range of the phase-data. Its application areas may cover: optical metrology, synthetic aperture radar systems, magnetic resonance, and those imaging systems where information is obtained as a demodulated wrapped phase map.

  15. Laser phase noise effects on the dynamics of optomechanical resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phelps, Gregory; Meystre, Pierre

    2011-05-01

    We present a theoretical analysis of the effects of laser phase noise on the sideband cooling of opto-mechanical oscillators, demonstrating how it limits the minimum occupation number of the phonon mode being cooled and how it modifies optical cooling rate and mechanical frequency shift of the mechanical element. We also comment on the effects of laser phase noise on coherent oscillations of the mechanical element in the blue detuned regime and on the back-action evasion detection method where an additional drive is used to prevent heating of one quadrature of motion of the oscillator. This work was supported by the US Office of Naval Research, the US National Science Foundation, the US Army Research Office and the DARPA ORCHID program through a grant from AFOSR.

  16. Exact probability-density function for phase-measurement interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Keang-Po; Kahn, Joseph M.

    1995-09-01

    Conventional analyses of the accuracy of phase-measurement interferometry derive a figure of merit that is either a variance or a signal-to-noise ratio. We derive the probability-density function of the phase-measurement output, so that the measurement confidence interval can be determined. We include both laser phase noise and additive Gaussian noise, and we consider both unmodulated interferometers and those employing phase or frequency modulation. For both unmodulated and modulated interferometers the confidence interval can be obtained by numerical integration of the probability-density function. For the modulated interferometer we derive a series summation for the confidence interval. For both unmodulated and modulated interferometers we derive approximate analytical expressions for the confidence interval, which we show to be extremely accurate at high signal-to-noise ratios.

  17. DAMAS Processing for a Phased Array Study in the NASA Langley Jet Noise Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooks, Thomas F.; Humphreys, William M.; Plassman, Gerald e.

    2010-01-01

    A jet noise measurement study was conducted using a phased microphone array system for a range of jet nozzle configurations and flow conditions. The test effort included convergent and convergent/divergent single flow nozzles, as well as conventional and chevron dual-flow core and fan configurations. Cold jets were tested with and without wind tunnel co-flow, whereas, hot jets were tested only with co-flow. The intent of the measurement effort was to allow evaluation of new phased array technologies for their ability to separate and quantify distributions of jet noise sources. In the present paper, the array post-processing method focused upon is DAMAS (Deconvolution Approach for the Mapping of Acoustic Sources) for the quantitative determination of spatial distributions of noise sources. Jet noise is highly complex with stationary and convecting noise sources, convecting flows that are the sources themselves, and shock-related and screech noise for supersonic flow. The analysis presented in this paper addresses some processing details with DAMAS, for the array positioned at 90 (normal) to the jet. The paper demonstrates the applicability of DAMAS and how it indicates when strong coherence is present. Also, a new approach to calibrating the array focus and position is introduced and demonstrated.

  18. Delay, noise and phase locking in pulse coupled neural networks.

    PubMed

    Haken, H

    2001-01-01

    This paper studies the effect of several delay times and noise on the stability of the phase-locked state in the lighthouse model and the integrate and fire model of a pulse coupled neural network. The coupling between neurons may be arbitrary. In both models the increase of delay times leads to a weakening of the stability and to the occurrence of relaxation oscillations.

  19. Distributions of Conductance and Shot Noise and Associated Phase Transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Vivo, Pierpaolo; Majumdar, Satya N.; Bohigas, Oriol

    2008-11-21

    For a chaotic cavity with two identical leads each supporting N channels, we compute analytically, for large N, the full distribution of the conductance and the shot noise power and show that in both cases there is a central Gaussian region flanked on both sides by non-Gaussian tails. The distribution is weakly singular at the junction of Gaussian and non-Gaussian regimes, a direct consequence of two phase transitions in an associated Coulomb gas problem.

  20. Jet-Surface Interaction Test: Phased Array Noise Source Localization Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Podboy, Gary G.

    2013-01-01

    An experiment was conducted to investigate the effect that a planar surface located near a jet flow has on the noise radiated to the far-field. Two different configurations were tested: 1) a shielding configuration in which the surface was located between the jet and the far-field microphones, and 2) a reflecting configuration in which the surface was mounted on the opposite side of the jet, and thus the jet noise was free to reflect off the surface toward the microphones. Both conventional far-field microphone and phased array noise source localization measurements were obtained. This paper discusses phased array results, while a companion paper (Brown, C.A., "Jet-Surface Interaction Test: Far-Field Noise Results," ASME paper GT2012-69639, June 2012.) discusses far-field results. The phased array data show that the axial distribution of noise sources in a jet can vary greatly depending on the jet operating condition and suggests that it would first be necessary to know or be able to predict this distribution in order to be able to predict the amount of noise reduction to expect from a given shielding configuration. The data obtained on both subsonic and supersonic jets show that the noise sources associated with a given frequency of noise tend to move downstream, and therefore, would become more difficult to shield, as jet Mach number increases. The noise source localization data obtained on cold, shock-containing jets suggests that the constructive interference of sound waves that produces noise at a given frequency within a broadband shock noise hump comes primarily from a small number of shocks, rather than from all the shocks at the same time. The reflecting configuration data illustrates that the law of reflection must be satisfied in order for jet noise to reflect off of a surface to an observer, and depending on the relative locations of the jet, the surface, and the observer, only some of the jet noise sources may satisfy this requirement.

  1. 14 CFR 36.101 - Noise measurement and evaluation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Noise measurement and evaluation. 36.101 Section 36.101 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... and Jet Airplanes § 36.101 Noise measurement and evaluation. For transport category large...

  2. 14 CFR 36.101 - Noise measurement and evaluation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Noise measurement and evaluation. 36.101 Section 36.101 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... and Jet Airplanes § 36.101 Noise measurement and evaluation. For transport category large...

  3. 14 CFR 36.101 - Noise measurement and evaluation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Noise measurement and evaluation. 36.101 Section 36.101 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... and Jet Airplanes § 36.101 Noise measurement and evaluation. For transport category large...

  4. Automatic measuring device for octave analysis of noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Memnonov, D. L.; Nikitin, A. M.

    1973-01-01

    An automatic decoder is described that counts noise levels by pulse counters and forms audio signals proportional in duration to the total or to one of the octave noise levels. Automatic ten fold repetition of the measurement cycle is provided at each measurement point before the transition to a new point is made.

  5. Noise levels near streets, effectiveness and cost abatement measures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lang, J.

    1980-01-01

    During the years 1975-1978, research was carried concerning the current noise levels near streets, the annoyance felt by the population, possible noise abatement measures for these streets, and the economic impact of such measures. The results of the research are summarized.

  6. Rescuing a Quantum Phase Transition with Quantum Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Gu; Novais, Eduardo; Baranger, Harold

    We show that placing a quantum system in contact with an environment can enhance non-Fermi-liquid correlations, rather than destroying quantum effects as is typical. The system consists of two quantum dots in series with two leads; the highly resistive leads couple charge flow through the dots to the electromagnetic environment (noise). The similarity to the two impurity Kondo model suggests that there will be a quantum phase transition between a Kondo phase and a local singlet phase. However, this transition is destabilized by charge tunneling between the two leads. Our main result is that sufficiently strong quantum noise suppresses this charge transfer and leads to stabilization of the quantum phase transition. We present the phase diagram, the ground state degeneracy at the four fixed points, and the leading temperature dependence of the conductance near these points. Partially supported by (1) the U.S. DOE, Division of Materials Sciences and Engineering, under Grant No. DE-SC0005237 and (2) FAPESP (BRAZIL) under Grant 2014/26356-9.

  7. Characterization of a DFG comb showing quadratic scaling of the phase noise with frequency.

    PubMed

    Puppe, Thomas; Sell, Alexander; Kliese, Russell; Hoghooghi, Nazanin; Zach, Armin; Kaenders, Wilhelm

    2016-04-15

    We characterize an Er:fiber laser frequency comb that is passively carrier envelope phase-stabilized via difference frequency generation at a wavelength of 1550 nm. A generic method to measure the comb linewidth at different wavelengths is demonstrated. By transferring the properties of a comb line to a cw external cavity diode laser, the phase noise is subsequently measured by tracking the delayed self-heterodyne beat note. This relatively simple characterization method is suitable for a broad range of optical frequencies. Here, it is used to characterize our difference frequency generation (DFG) comb over nearly an optical octave. With repetition-rate stabilization, a radiofrequency reference oscillator limited linewidth is achieved. A lock to an optical reference shows out-of-loop linewidths of the comb at the hertz level. The phase noise measurements are in excellent agreement with the elastic tape model with a fix point at zero frequency.

  8. Thermodynamics aspects of noise-induced phase synchronization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinto, Pedro D.; Oliveira, Fernando A.; Penna, André L. A.

    2016-05-01

    In this article, we present an approach for the thermodynamics of phase oscillators induced by an internal multiplicative noise. We analytically derive the free energy, entropy, internal energy, and specific heat. In this framework, the formulation of the first law of thermodynamics requires the definition of a synchronization field acting on the phase oscillators. By introducing the synchronization field, we have consistently obtained the susceptibility and analyzed its behavior. This allows us to characterize distinct phases in the system, which we have denoted as synchronized and parasynchronized phases, in analogy with magnetism. The system also shows a rich complex behavior, exhibiting ideal gas characteristics for low temperatures and susceptibility anomalies that are similar to those present in complex fluids such as water.

  9. Thermodynamics aspects of noise-induced phase synchronization.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Pedro D; Oliveira, Fernando A; Penna, André L A

    2016-05-01

    In this article, we present an approach for the thermodynamics of phase oscillators induced by an internal multiplicative noise. We analytically derive the free energy, entropy, internal energy, and specific heat. In this framework, the formulation of the first law of thermodynamics requires the definition of a synchronization field acting on the phase oscillators. By introducing the synchronization field, we have consistently obtained the susceptibility and analyzed its behavior. This allows us to characterize distinct phases in the system, which we have denoted as synchronized and parasynchronized phases, in analogy with magnetism. The system also shows a rich complex behavior, exhibiting ideal gas characteristics for low temperatures and susceptibility anomalies that are similar to those present in complex fluids such as water.

  10. Experimental measurements and noise analysis of a cryogenic radiometer

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, S. M.; Woods, S. I.; Jung, T. M.; Carter, A. C.; Datla, R. U.

    2014-07-15

    A cryogenic radiometer device, intended for use as part of an electrical-substitution radiometer, was measured at low temperature. The device consists of a receiver cavity mechanically and thermally connected to a temperature-controlled stage through a thin-walled polyimide tube which serves as a weak thermal link. With the temperature difference between the receiver and the stage measured in millikelvin and the electrical power measured in picowatts, the measured responsivity was 4700 K/mW and the measured thermal time constant was 14 s at a stage temperature of 1.885 K. Noise analysis in terms of Noise Equivalent Power (NEP) was used to quantify the various fundamental and technical noise contributions, including phonon noise and Johnson-Nyquist noise. The noise analysis clarifies the path toward a cryogenic radiometer with a noise floor limited by fundamental phonon noise, where the magnitude of the phonon NEP is 6.5 fW/√(Hz) for the measured experimental parameters.

  11. Numerical generation of laser-resonance phase noise for optical communication simulators.

    PubMed

    Ó Dúill, Seán P; Anthur, Aravind P; Huynh, Tam N; Naimi, Sepideh T; Nguyen, Lim; Venkitesh, Deepa; Barry, Liam P

    2015-04-10

    We generate random numerical waveforms that mimic laser phase noise incorporating laser-resonance enhanced phase noise. The phase noise waveforms are employed in system simulators to estimate the resulting bit error rate penalties for differential quadrature phase shift keying signals. The results show that baudrate dependence of the bit error rate performance arises from laser-resonance phase noise. In addition, we show with supporting experimental results that the laser-resonance phase noise on the pumps in four-wave-mixing-based wavelength converters is responsible for large bit error rate floors.

  12. Noise suppression properties of an interferometer-based regenerator for differential phase-shift keying data.

    PubMed

    Elschner, Robert; de Melo, Alessandro Marques; Bunge, Christian-Alexander; Petermann, Klaus

    2007-01-15

    We studied the amplitude and phase noise suppression properties of an all-optical regenerator for differential phase-shift keying data. A detailed analytical investigation is performed and compared with numerical simulations for different working points. The results show that both amplitude and phase can be regenerated. However, simultaneous amplitude and phase noise suppression is possible only if the phase degradation is stronger than the amplitude degradation, for instance, due to nonlinear phase noise.

  13. Sound quality measures for speech in noise through a commercial hearing aid implementing digital noise reduction.

    PubMed

    Ricketts, Todd A; Hornsby, Benjamin W Y

    2005-05-01

    This brief report discusses the affect of digital noise reduction (DNR) processing on aided speech recognition and sound quality measures in 14 adults fitted with a commercial hearing aid. Measures of speech recognition and sound quality were obtained in two different speech-in-noise conditions (71 dBA speech, +6 dB SNR and 75 dBA speech, +1 dB SNR). The results revealed that the presence or absence of DNR processing did not impact speech recognition in noise (either positively or negatively). Paired comparisons of sound quality for the same speech in noise signals, however, revealed a strong preference for DNR processing. These data suggest that at least one implementation of DNR processing is capable of providing improved sound quality, for speech in noise, in the absence of improved speech recognition.

  14. Airframe noise measurements by acoustic imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kendall, J. M.

    1977-01-01

    Studies of the noise produced by flow past wind tunnel models are presented. The central objective of these is to find the specific locations within a flow which are noisy, and to identify the fluid dynamic processes responsible, with the expectation that noise reduction principles will be discovered. The models tested are mostly simple shapes which result in types of flow that are similar to those occurring on, for example, aircraft landing gear and wheel cavities. A model landing gear and a flap were also tested. Turbulence has been intentionally induced as appropriate in order to simulate full-scale effects more closely. The principal technique involves use of a highly directional microphone system which is scanned about the flow field to be analyzed. The data so acquired are presented as a pictorial image of the noise source distribution. An important finding is that the noise production is highly variable within a flow field and that sources can be attributed to various fluid dynamic features of the flow. Flow separation was not noisy, but separation closure usually was.

  15. What Do Contrast Threshold Equivalent Noise Studies Actually Measure? Noise vs. Nonlinearity in Different Masking Paradigms.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, Alex S; Baker, Daniel H; Hess, Robert F

    2016-01-01

    The internal noise present in a linear system can be quantified by the equivalent noise method. By measuring the effect that applying external noise to the system's input has on its output one can estimate the variance of this internal noise. By applying this simple "linear amplifier" model to the human visual system, one can entirely explain an observer's detection performance by a combination of the internal noise variance and their efficiency relative to an ideal observer. Studies using this method rely on two crucial factors: firstly that the external noise in their stimuli behaves like the visual system's internal noise in the dimension of interest, and secondly that the assumptions underlying their model are correct (e.g. linearity). Here we explore the effects of these two factors while applying the equivalent noise method to investigate the contrast sensitivity function (CSF). We compare the results at 0.5 and 6 c/deg from the equivalent noise method against those we would expect based on pedestal masking data collected from the same observers. We find that the loss of sensitivity with increasing spatial frequency results from changes in the saturation constant of the gain control nonlinearity, and that this only masquerades as a change in internal noise under the equivalent noise method. Part of the effect we find can be attributed to the optical transfer function of the eye. The remainder can be explained by either changes in effective input gain, divisive suppression, or a combination of the two. Given these effects the efficiency of our observers approaches the ideal level. We show the importance of considering these factors in equivalent noise studies.

  16. What Do Contrast Threshold Equivalent Noise Studies Actually Measure? Noise vs. Nonlinearity in Different Masking Paradigms

    PubMed Central

    Baldwin, Alex S.; Baker, Daniel H.; Hess, Robert F.

    2016-01-01

    The internal noise present in a linear system can be quantified by the equivalent noise method. By measuring the effect that applying external noise to the system’s input has on its output one can estimate the variance of this internal noise. By applying this simple “linear amplifier” model to the human visual system, one can entirely explain an observer’s detection performance by a combination of the internal noise variance and their efficiency relative to an ideal observer. Studies using this method rely on two crucial factors: firstly that the external noise in their stimuli behaves like the visual system’s internal noise in the dimension of interest, and secondly that the assumptions underlying their model are correct (e.g. linearity). Here we explore the effects of these two factors while applying the equivalent noise method to investigate the contrast sensitivity function (CSF). We compare the results at 0.5 and 6 c/deg from the equivalent noise method against those we would expect based on pedestal masking data collected from the same observers. We find that the loss of sensitivity with increasing spatial frequency results from changes in the saturation constant of the gain control nonlinearity, and that this only masquerades as a change in internal noise under the equivalent noise method. Part of the effect we find can be attributed to the optical transfer function of the eye. The remainder can be explained by either changes in effective input gain, divisive suppression, or a combination of the two. Given these effects the efficiency of our observers approaches the ideal level. We show the importance of considering these factors in equivalent noise studies. PMID:26953796

  17. Characterization of semiconductor-laser phase noise and estimation of bit-error rate performance with low-speed offline digital coherent receivers.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Kazuro

    2012-02-27

    We develop a systematic method for characterizing semiconductor-laser phase noise, using a low-speed offline digital coherent receiver. The field spectrum, the FM-noise spectrum, and the phase-error variance measured with such a receiver can completely describe phase-noise characteristics of lasers under test. The sampling rate of the digital coherent receiver should be much higher than the phase-fluctuation speed. However, 1 GS/s is large enough for most of the single-mode semiconductor lasers. In addition to such phase-noise characterization, interpolating the taken data at 1.25 GS/s to form a data stream at 10 GS/s, we can predict the bit-error rate (BER) performance of multi-level modulated optical signals at 10 Gsymbol/s. The BER degradation due to the phase noise is well explained by the result of the phase-noise measurements.

  18. Thermo-elastic induced phase noise in the LISA Pathfinder spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibert, F.; Nofrarias, M.; Karnesis, N.; Gesa, L.; Martín, V.; Mateos, I.; Lobo, A.; Flatscher, R.; Gerardi, D.; Burkhardt, J.; Gerndt, R.; Robertson, D. I.; Ward, H.; McNamara, P. W.; Guzmán, F.; Hewitson, M.; Diepholz, I.; Reiche, J.; Heinzel, G.; Danzmann, K.

    2015-02-01

    During the on-station thermal test campaign of the LISA Pathfinder, the diagnostics subsystem was tested in nearly space conditions for the first time after integration in the satellite. The results showed the compliance of the temperature measurement system, obtaining temperature noise around {{10}-4} K H{{z}-1/2} in the frequency band 1-30 mHz. In addition, controlled injection of heat signals to the suspension struts anchoring the LISA Technology Package (LTP) core assembly to the satellite structure allowed us to experimentally estimate, for the first time, the phase noise contribution through thermo-elastic distortion of the LTP interferometer, the satellite's main instrument. Such contribution was found to be at {{10}-12} mH{{z}-1/2}, a factor of 30 below the measured noise at the lower end of the measurement bandwidth (1 mHz).

  19. A novel crystal-analyzer phase retrieval algorithm and its noise property.

    PubMed

    Bao, Yuan; Wang, Yan; Li, Panyun; Wu, Zhao; Shao, Qigang; Gao, Kun; Wang, Zhili; Ju, Zaiqiang; Zhang, Kai; Yuan, Qingxi; Huang, Wanxia; Zhu, Peiping; Wu, Ziyu

    2015-05-01

    A description of the rocking curve in diffraction enhanced imaging (DEI) is presented in terms of the angular signal response function and a simple multi-information retrieval algorithm based on the cosine function fitting. A comprehensive analysis of noise properties of DEI is also given considering the noise transfer characteristic of the X-ray source. The validation has been performed with synchrotron radiation experimental data and Monte Carlo simulations based on the Geant4 toolkit combined with the refractive process of X-rays, which show good agreement with each other. Moreover, results indicate that the signal-to-noise ratios of the refraction and scattering images are about one order of magnitude better than that of the absorption image at the edges of low-Z samples. The noise penalty is drastically reduced with the increasing photon flux and visibility. Finally, this work demonstrates that the analytical method can build an interesting connection between DEI and GDPCI (grating-based differential phase contrast imaging) and is widely suitable for a variety of measurement noise in the angular signal response imaging prototype. The analysis significantly contributes to the understanding of noise characteristics of DEI images and may allow improvements to the signal-to-noise ratio in biomedical and material science imaging.

  20. A novel binaural pitch elicited by phase-modulated noise: MEG and psychophysical observations.

    PubMed

    Witton, Caroline; Hillebrand, Arjan; Furlong, Paul L; Henning, G Bruce

    2012-06-01

    Binaural pitches are auditory percepts that emerge from combined inputs to the ears but that cannot be heard if the stimulus is presented to either ear alone. Here, we describe a binaural pitch that is not easily accommodated within current models of binaural processing. Convergent magnetoencephalography (MEG) and psychophysical measurements were used to characterize the pitch, heard when band-limited noise had a rapidly changing interaural phase difference. Several interesting features emerged: First, the pitch was perceptually lateralized, in agreement with the lateralization of the evoked changes in MEG spectral power, and its salience depended on dichotic binaural presentation. Second, the frequency of the pure tone that matched the binaural pitch lay within a lower spectral sideband of the phase-modulated noise and followed the frequency of that sideband when the modulation frequency or center frequency and bandwidth of the noise changed. Thus, the binaural pitch depended on the processing of binaural information in that lower sideband.

  1. Phase noise of whispering gallery photonic hyper-parametric microwave oscillators.

    PubMed

    Savchenkov, Anatoliy A; Rubiola, Enrico; Matsko, Andrey B; Ilchenko, Vladimir S; Maleki, Lute

    2008-03-17

    We report on the experimental study of phase noise properties of a high frequency photonic microwave oscillator based on four wave mixing in calcium fluoride whispering gallery mode resonators. Specifically, the oscillator generates approximately 8.5 GHz signals with -120 dBc/Hz at 100 kHz from the carrier. The floor of the phase noise is limited by the shot noise of the signal received at the photodetector. We argue that the performance of the oscillator can be significantly improved if one uses extremely high finesse resonators, increases the input optical power, supersaturates the oscillator, and suppresses the residual stimulated Raman scattering in the resonator. We also disclose a method of extremely sensitive measurement of the integral dispersion of millimeter scale dielectric resonators.

  2. Prediction of Landing Gear Noise Reduction and Comparison to Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lopes, Leonard V.

    2010-01-01

    Noise continues to be an ongoing problem for existing aircraft in flight and is projected to be a concern for next generation designs. During landing, when the engines are operating at reduced power, the noise from the airframe, of which landing gear noise is an important part, is equal to the engine noise. There are several methods of predicting landing gear noise, but none have been applied to predict the change in noise due to a change in landing gear design. The current effort uses the Landing Gear Model and Acoustic Prediction (LGMAP) code, developed at The Pennsylvania State University to predict the noise from landing gear. These predictions include the influence of noise reduction concepts on the landing gear noise. LGMAP is compared to wind tunnel experiments of a 6.3%-scale Boeing 777 main gear performed in the Quiet Flow Facility (QFF) at NASA Langley. The geometries tested in the QFF include the landing gear with and without a toboggan fairing and the door. It is shown that LGMAP is able to predict the noise directives and spectra from the model-scale test for the baseline configuration as accurately as current gear prediction methods. However, LGMAP is also able to predict the difference in noise caused by the toboggan fairing and by removing the landing gear door. LGMAP is also compared to far-field ground-based flush-mounted microphone measurements from the 2005 Quiet Technology Demonstrator 2 (QTD 2) flight test. These comparisons include a Boeing 777-300ER with and without a toboggan fairing that demonstrate that LGMAP can be applied to full-scale flyover measurements. LGMAP predictions of the noise generated by the nose gear on the main gear measurements are also shown.

  3. Infinite-noise criticality: Nonequilibrium phase transitions in fluctuating environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vojta, Thomas; Hoyos, José A.

    2015-11-01

    We study the effects of time-varying environmental noise on nonequilibrium phase transitions in spreading and growth processes. Using the examples of the logistic evolution equation as well as the contact process, we show that such temporal disorder gives rise to a distinct type of critical points at which the effective noise amplitude diverges on long time scales. This leads to enormous density fluctuations characterized by an infinitely broad probability distribution at criticality. We develop a real-time renormalization-group theory that provides a general framework for the effects of temporal disorder on nonequilibrium processes. We also discuss how general this exotic critical behavior is, we illustrate the results by computer simulations, and we touch upon experimental applications of our theory.

  4. Infinite-noise criticality: Nonequilibrium phase transitions in fluctuating environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vojta, Thomas; Hoyos, Jose

    We study the effects of time-varying environmental noise on nonequilibrium phase transitions in spreading and growth processes. Using the examples of the logistic evolution equation as well as the contact process, we show that such temporal disorder gives rise to a distinct type of critical points at which the effective noise amplitude diverges on long time scales. This leads to enormous density fluctuations characterized by an infinitely broad probability distribution at criticality. We develop a real-time renormalization-group theory that provides a general framework for the effects of temporal disorder on nonequilibrium processes. We also discuss how general this exotic critical behavior is, we illustrate the results by computer simulations, and we touch upon experimental applications of our theory. Supported by the NSF under Grant No. DMR-1205803, by Simons Foundation, by FAPESP under Grant No. 2013/09850-7, and by CNPq under Grant Nos. 590093/2011-8 and 305261/2012-6.

  5. Noise in x-ray grating-based phase-contrast imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, Thomas; Bartl, Peter; Bayer, Florian; Durst, Juergen; Haas, Wilhelm; Michel, Thilo; Ritter, Andre; Anton, Gisela

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: Grating-based x-ray phase-contrast imaging is a fast developing new modality not only for medical imaging, but as well for other fields such as material sciences. While these many possible applications arise, the knowledge of the noise behavior is essential. Methods: In this work, the authors used a least squares fitting algorithm to calculate the noise behavior of the three quantities absorption, differential phase, and dark-field image. Further, the calculated error formula of the differential phase image was verified by measurements. Therefore, a Talbot interferometer was setup, using a microfocus x-ray tube as source and a Timepix detector for photon counting. Additionally, simulations regarding this topic were performed. Results: It turned out that the variance of the reconstructed phase is only dependent of the total number of photons used to generate the phase image and the visibility of the experimental setup. These results could be evaluated in measurements as well as in simulations. Furthermore, the correlation between absorption and dark-field image was calculated. Conclusions: These results provide the understanding of the noise characteristics of grating-based phase-contrast imaging and will help to improve image quality.

  6. Design optimizations of phase noise, power consumption and frequency tuning for VCO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nan, Chen; Shengxi, Diao; Lu, Huang; Xuefei, Bai; Fujiang, Lin

    2013-09-01

    To meet the requirements of the low power Zigbee system, VCO design optimizations of phase noise, power consumption and frequency tuning are discussed in this paper. Both flicker noise of tail bias transistors and up-conversion of flicker noise from cross-coupled pair are reduced by improved self-switched biasing technology, leading to low close-in phase noise. Low power is achieved by low supply voltage and triode region biasing. To linearly tune the frequency and get constant gain, distributed varactor structure is adopted. The proposed VCO is fabricated in SMIC 0.18-μm CMOS process. The measured linear tuning range is from 2.38 to 2.61 GHz. The oscillator exhibits low phase noise of -77.5 dBc/Hz and -122.8 dBc/Hz at 10 kHz and 1 MHz offset, respectively, at 2.55 GHz oscillation frequency while dissipating 2.7 mA from 1.2 V supply voltage, which well meet design specifications.

  7. Effect of noise on modulation amplitude and phase in frequency-domain diffusive imaging

    PubMed Central

    Kupinski, Matthew A.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract. We theoretically investigate the effect of noise on frequency-domain heterodyne and/or homodyne measurements of intensity-modulated beams propagating through diffusive media, such as a photon density wave. We assumed that the attenuated amplitude and delayed phase are estimated by taking the Fourier transform of the noisy, modulated output data. We show that the estimated amplitude and phase are biased when the number of output photons is small. We also show that the use of image intensifiers for photon amplification in heterodyne or homodyne measurements increases the amount of biases. Especially, it turns out that the biased estimation is independent of AC-dependent noise in sinusoidal heterodyne or homodyne outputs. Finally, the developed theory indicates that the previously known variance model of modulation amplitude and phase is not valid in low light situations. Monte-Carlo simulations with varied numbers of input photons verify our theoretical trends of the bias. PMID:22352660

  8. Chaotic analysis of electrochemical noise measured on stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Legat, A.; Dolecek, V.

    1995-06-01

    Corrosion reactions spontaneously generate fluctuations of the corrosion potential and corrosion current, known as electrochemical noise. In certain cases good correlation between electrochemical noise and corrosion rates and types can be achieved by means of spectral analysis. However, due to the chaotic nature of corrosion processes, a special kind of mathematical treatment may be needed. In this paper, the correlation dimension and the maximum Lyapunov exponent of electrochemical noise measured on stainless steel have been examined in order to characterize the mechanism of this noise. The relationship between the different types of corrosion and the chaotic characteristics of electrochemical noise have been also established. It has been shown that the general corrosion rate has no influence on the fractal dimensions of the noise. It is concluded that localized corrosion is generated by a deterministic chaotic process, whereas uniform corrosion is a random process.

  9. Problems associated with noise measurements in the mining industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Eric R.; Vipperman, Jeffrey S.

    2002-05-01

    In response to the continuing problem of noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) among mine workers, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) has been conducting numerous noise- and hearing-loss research efforts in the mining industry. Research is underway to determine worker noise exposure, equipment noise, hearing loss and hearing protection use, and to evaluate engineering controls. Issues that are peculiar to the mining industry have complicated these efforts. A few of the issues that must be overcome to conduct meaningful research include constantly moving equipment, changing work environments, confined space, varying production rates, multiple noise sources, and electronic permissibility of instrumentation. This presentation will address the factors that affect the measurement and analysis of noise in the mining industry and how these factors are managed. In addition, some examples of research results will be included.

  10. Aeroacoustic wind tunnel measurements on propeller noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grosche, F. R.; Stiewitt, H.

    1985-02-01

    Model tests were conducted in a low speed wind tunnel to determine the sound radiation of 5 propellers with different blade designs including variations of thickness ratios, blade profiles, blade planforms and blade tip configurations. The diameter of the propellers was 0.9 m, the propeller speed was kept constant. The tip Mach number was M sub I = 0.66 and the helical tip Mach number varied between 0.66 and 0.69. The main objectives were to investigate the effects of blade geometry on near field and far field noise and to locate the dominant sound sources in the propeller plane, radiating to the observer, by means of a highly directional microphone system. The results include: (1) comparisons of noise spectra of different propeller configurations; (2) near field sound pressures as function of axial distance from the propeller plane; and (3) directivity of sound radiation from the moving blades.

  11. Measurement of Noise Level in Enumeration Station in Rubber Industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizkya, I.; Syahputri, K.; Sari, R. M.; Siregar, I.

    2017-03-01

    This research was conducted in companies engaged in the production of crumb rubber. In the rubber industry, the potential noise occurs in the enumeration station. Stations enumeration use machine and equipment that potentially generated noise. Noise can be defined as an unwanted sound because it does not fit the context of space and time so that may interfere with the comfort and human health. The noise level measured at random during the initial observation station enumeration is 101.8 dB. This value has exceeded the Threshold Limit Value (TLV) Kep-51 / MEN / 1999 and SNI No. 16-7063-2004 so research must be done to measure the level of noise in the enumeration station. Quantitative methods used in the study. Observations made with the calculation method of equivalent noise level. Observations were made on six measurement points for one shift for three days. The results showed the noise level over the Threshold Limit Value is equal to 85 dBA/8 hours. Based on the measurement results, the whole point of observation was far above the threshold Limit Value (TLV). The highest noise level equivalent is in the observation point 6 with a value of 102, 21 dB.

  12. Fundamental Noise-Limited Optical Phase Locking at Femtowatt Light Levels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dick, John; Tu, Meirong; Birnbaum, Kevin; Strekalov, Dmitry; Yu, Nan

    2008-01-01

    We describe an optical phase lock loop (PLL) designed to recover an optical carrier at powers below one picowatt in a Deep Space optical transponder. Previous low power optical phase lock has been reported with powers down to about 1 pW. We report the demonstration and characterization of the optical phase locking at femtowatt levels. We achieved a phase slip rate below one cycle-slip/second at powers down to 60 femtowatts. This phase slip rate corresponds to a frequency stability of 1 10(exp -14) at 1 s, a value better than any frequency standard available today for measuring times equal to a typical two-way delay between Earth and Mars. The PLL shows very robust stability at these power levels. We developed simulation software to optimize parameters of the second order PLL loop in the presence of laser flicker frequency noise and white phase (photon) noise, and verified the software with a white phase noise model by Viterbi. We also demonstrated precise Doppler tracking at femtowatt levels.

  13. Correction of phase velocity bias caused by strong directional noise sources in high-frequency ambient noise tomography: a case study in Karamay, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kai; Luo, Yinhe; Yang, Yingjie

    2016-05-01

    We collect two months of ambient noise data recorded by 35 broad-band seismic stations in a 9 × 11 km area (1-3 km station interval) near Karamay, China, and do cross-correlation of noise data between all station pairs. Array beamforming analysis of the ambient noise data shows that ambient noise sources are unevenly distributed and the most energetic ambient noise mainly comes from azimuths of 40°-70°. As a consequence of the strong directional noise sources, surface wave components of the cross-correlations at 1-5 Hz show clearly azimuthal dependence, and direct dispersion measurements from cross-correlations are strongly biased by the dominant noise energy. This bias renders that the dispersion measurements from cross-correlations do not accurately reflect the interstation velocities of surface waves propagating directly from one station to the other, that is, the cross-correlation functions do not retrieve empirical Green's functions accurately. To correct the bias caused by unevenly distributed noise sources, we adopt an iterative inversion procedure. The iterative inversion procedure, based on plane-wave modeling, includes three steps: (1) surface wave tomography, (2) estimation of ambient noise energy and biases and (3) phase velocities correction. First, we use synthesized data to test the efficiency and stability of the iterative procedure for both homogeneous and heterogeneous media. The testing results show that: (1) the amplitudes of phase velocity bias caused by directional noise sources are significant, reaching ˜2 and ˜10 per cent for homogeneous and heterogeneous media, respectively; (2) phase velocity bias can be corrected by the iterative inversion procedure and the convergence of inversion depends on the starting phase velocity map and the complexity of the media. By applying the iterative approach to the real data in Karamay, we further show that phase velocity maps converge after 10 iterations and the phase velocity maps obtained using

  14. Recommended procedures for measuring aircraft noise and associated parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marsh, A. H.

    1977-01-01

    Procedures are recommended for obtaining experimental values of aircraft flyover noise levels (and associated parameters). Specific recommendations are made for test criteria, instrumentation performance requirements, data-acquisition procedures, and test operations. The recommendations are based on state-of-the-art measurement capabilities available in 1976 and are consistent with the measurement objectives of the NASA Aircraft Noise Prediction Program. The recommendations are applicable to measurements of the noise produced by an airplane flying subsonically over (or past) microphones located near the surface of the ground. Aircraft types covered by the recommendations are fixed-wing airplanes powered by turbojet or turbofan engines and using conventional aerodynamic means for takeoff and landing. Various assumptions with respect to subsequent data processing and analysis were made (and are described) and the recommended measurement procedures are compatible with the assumptions. Some areas where additional research is needed relative to aircraft flyover noise measurement techniques are also discussed.

  15. Review of Subcritical Source-Driven Noise Analysis Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Valentine, T.E.

    1999-11-24

    Subcritical source-driven noise measurements are simultaneous Rossi-{alpha} and randomly pulsed neutron measurements that provide measured quantities that can be related to the subcritical neutron multiplication factor. In fact, subcritical source-driven noise measurements should be performed in lieu of Rossi-{alpha} measurements because of the additional information that is obtained from noise measurements such as the spectral ratio and the coherence functions. The basic understanding of source-driven noise analysis measurements can be developed from a point reactor kinetics model to demonstrate how the measured quantities relate to the subcritical neutron multiplication factor. More elaborate models can also be developed using a generalized stochastic model. These measurements can be simulated using Monte Carlo codes to determine the subcritical neutron multiplication factor or to determine the sensitivity of calculations to nuclear cross section data. The interpretation of the measurement using a Monte Carlo method is based on a perturbation model for the relationship between the spectral ratio and the subcritical neutron multiplication factor. The subcritical source-driven noise measurement has advantages over other subcritical measurement methods in that reference measurements at delayed critical are not required for interpreting the measurements. Therefore, benchmark or in-situ subcritical measurements can be performed outside a critical experiment facility. Furthermore, a certain ratio of frequency spectra has been shown to be independent of detection efficiency thereby making the measurement more robust and unaffected by drifts or changes in instrumentation during the measurement. Criteria have been defined for application of this measurement method for benchmarks and in-situ subcritical measurements. An extension of the source-driven subcritical noise measurement has also been discussed that eliminates the few technical challenges for in-situ applications.

  16. Improving the accuracy of smart devices to measure noise exposure.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Benjamin; Kardous, Chucri; Neitzel, Richard

    2016-11-01

    Occupational noise exposure is one of the most frequent hazards present in the workplace; up to 22 million workers have potentially hazardous noise exposures in the U.S. As a result, noise-induced hearing loss is one of the most common occupational injuries in the U.S. Workers in manufacturing, construction, and the military are at the highest risk for hearing loss. Despite the large number of people exposed to high levels of noise at work, many occupations have not been adequately evaluated for noise exposure. The objective of this experiment was to investigate whether or not iOS smartphones and other smart devices (Apple iPhones and iPods) could be used as reliable instruments to measure noise exposures. For this experiment three different types of microphones were tested with a single model of iPod and three generations of iPhones: the internal microphones on the device, a low-end lapel microphone, and a high-end lapel microphone marketed as being compliant with the International Electrotechnical Commission's (IEC) standard for a Class 2-microphone. All possible combinations of microphones and noise measurement applications were tested in a controlled environment using several different levels of pink noise ranging from 60-100 dBA. Results were compared to simultaneous measurements made using a Type 1 sound level measurement system. Analysis of variance and Tukey's honest significant difference (HSD) test were used to determine if the results differed by microphone or noise measurement application. Levels measured with external microphones combined with certain noise measurement applications did not differ significantly from levels measured with the Type 1 sound measurement system. Results showed that it may be possible to use iOS smartphones and smart devices, with specific combinations of measurement applications and calibrated external microphones, to collect reliable, occupational noise exposure data under certain conditions and within the limitations of the

  17. Measurement of Trailing Edge Noise Using Directional Array and Coherent Output Power Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutcheson, Florence V.; Brooks, Thomas F.

    2002-01-01

    The use of a directional (or phased) array of microphones for the measurement of trailing edge (TE) noise is described and tested. The capabilities of this method arc evaluated via measurements of TE noise from a NACA 63-215 airfoil model and from a cylindrical rod. This TE noise measurement approach is compared to one that is based on thc cross spectral analysis of output signals from a pair of microphones placed on opposite sides of an airframe model (COP method). Advantages and limitations of both methods arc examined. It is shown that the microphone array can accurately measures TE noise and captures its two-dimensional characteristic over a large frequency range for any TE configuration as long as noise contamination from extraneous sources is within bounds. The COP method is shown to also accurately measure TE noise but over a more limited frequency range that narrows for increased TE thickness. Finally, the applicability and generality of an airfoil self-noise prediction method was evaluated via comparison to the experimental data obtained using the COP and array measurement methods. The predicted and experimental results are shown to agree over large frequency ranges.

  18. Real Time Phase Noise Meter Based on a Digital Signal Processor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angrisani, Leopoldo; D'Arco, Mauro; Greenhall, Charles A.; Schiano Lo Morille, Rosario

    2006-01-01

    A digital signal-processing meter for phase noise measurement on sinusoidal signals is dealt with. It enlists a special hardware architecture, made up of a core digital signal processor connected to a data acquisition board, and takes advantage of a quadrature demodulation-based measurement scheme, already proposed by the authors. Thanks to an efficient measurement process and an optimized implementation of its fundamental stages, the proposed meter succeeds in exploiting all hardware resources in such an effective way as to gain high performance and real-time operation. For input frequencies up to some hundreds of kilohertz, the meter is capable both of updating phase noise power spectrum while seamlessly capturing the analyzed signal into its memory, and granting as good frequency resolution as few units of hertz.

  19. Noise levels from a model turbofan engine with simulated noise control measures applied

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, David G.; Woodward, Richard P.

    1993-01-01

    A study of estimated full-scale noise levels based on measured levels from the Advanced Ducted Propeller (ADP) sub-scale model is presented. Testing of this model was performed in the NASA Lewis Low Speed Anechoic Wind Tunnel at a simulated takeoff condition of Mach 0.2. Effective Perceived Noise Level (EPNL) estimates for the baseline configuration are documented, and also used as the control case in a study of the potential benefits of two categories of noise control. The effect of active noise control is evaluated by artificially removing various rotor-stator interaction tones. Passive noise control is simulated by applying a notch filter to the wind tunnel data. Cases with both techniques are included to evaluate hybrid active-passive noise control. The results for EPNL values are approximate because the original source data was limited in bandwidth and in sideline angular coverage. The main emphasis is on comparisons between the baseline and configurations with simulated noise control measures.

  20. Signal-to-Noise Ratio Analysis of a Phase-Sensitive Voltmeter for Electrical Impedance Tomography.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Ethan K; Takhti, Mohammad; Skinner, Joseph; Halter, Ryan J; Odame, Kofi

    2017-04-01

    In this paper, thorough analysis along with mathematical derivations of the matched filter for a voltmeter used in electrical impedance tomography systems are presented. The effect of the random noise in the system prior to the matched filter, generated by other components, are considered. Employing the presented equations allow system/circuit designers to find the maximum tolerable noise prior to the matched filter that leads to the target signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the voltmeter, without having to over-design internal components. A practical model was developed that should fall within 2 dB and 5 dB of the median SNR measurements of signal amplitude and phase, respectively. In order to validate our claims, simulation and experimental measurements have been performed with an analog-to-digital converter (ADC) followed by a digital matched filter, while the noise of the whole system was modeled as the input referred at the ADC input. The input signal was contaminated by a known value of additive white Gaussian noise (AWGN) noise, and the noise level was swept from 3% to 75% of the least significant bit (LSB) of the ADC. Differences between experimental and both simulated and analytical SNR values were less than 0.59 and 0.35 dB for RMS values ≥ 20% of an LSB and less than 1.45 and 2.58 dB for RMS values < 20% of an LSB for the amplitude and phase, respectively. Overall, this study provides a practical model for circuit designers in EIT, and a more accurate error analysis that was previously missing in EIT literature.

  1. Phased-Array Study of Dual-Flow Jet Noise: Effect of Nozzles and Mixers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soo Lee, Sang; Bridges, James

    2006-01-01

    A 16-microphone linear phased-array installed parallel to the jet axis and a 32-microphone azimuthal phased-array installed in the nozzle exit plane have been applied to identify the noise source distributions of nozzle exhaust systems with various internal mixers (lobed and axisymmetric) and nozzles (three different lengths). Measurements of velocity were also obtained using cross-stream stereo particle image velocimetry (PIV). Among the three nozzle lengths tested, the medium length nozzle was the quietest for all mixers at high frequency on the highest speed flow condition. Large differences in source strength distributions between nozzles and mixers occurred at or near the nozzle exit for this flow condition. The beamforming analyses from the azimuthal array for the 12-lobed mixer on the highest flow condition showed that the core flow and the lobe area were strong noise sources for the long and short nozzles. The 12 noisy spots associated with the lobe locations of the 12-lobed mixer with the long nozzle were very well detected for the frequencies 5 KHz and higher. Meanwhile, maps of the source strength of the axisymmetric splitter show that the outer shear layer was the most important noise source at most flow conditions. In general, there was a good correlation between the high turbulence regions from the PIV tests and the high noise source regions from the phased-array measurements.

  2. Nonlinear Noise in SiGe Bipolar Devices and its Impact on Radio-Frequency Amplifier Phase Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gribaldo, S.; Cibiel, G.; Llopis, O.; Graffeuil, J.

    2005-08-01

    The nonlinear behavior of different microwave SiGe bipolar transistors has been studied and models have been extracted. The phase noise of an amplifier is computed, taking into account the microwave additive noise floor and the up-converted 1/f noise. The simulation technique is a combination of different approaches available in a commercial CAD software. Theoretical results are then compared to the experiment.

  3. Design and analysis of a K-band low-phase-noise phase-locked loop with subharmonically injection-locked technique.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Yen-Liang; Chang, Hong-Yeh

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, we present design and analysis of a K-band (18 to 26.5 GHz) low-phase-noise phase-locked loop (PLL) with the subharmonically injection-locked (SIL) technique. The phase noise of the PLL with subharmonic injection is investigated, and a modified phase noise model of the PLL with SIL technique is proposed. The theoretical calculations agree with the experimental results. Moreover, the phase noise of the PLL can be improved with the subharmonic injection. To achieve K-band operation with low dc power consumption, a divide-by-3 injection-locked frequency divider (ILFD) is used as a frequency prescaler. The measured phase noise of the PLL without injection is -110 dBc/Hz at 1 MHz offset at the operation frequency of 23.08 GHz. With the subharmonic injection, the measured phase noises at 1 MHz offset are -127, -127, and -119 dBc/Hz for the subharmonic injection number NINJ = 2, 3, and 4, respectively. Moreover, the performance of the proposed PLL with and without SIL technique can be compared with the reported advanced CMOS PLLs.

  4. Data Quality Assurance for Supersonic Jet Noise Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Clifford A.; Henderson, Brenda S.; Bridges, James E.

    2010-01-01

    The noise created by a supersonic aircraft is a primary concern in the design of future high-speed planes. The jet noise reduction technologies required on these aircraft will be developed using scale-models mounted to experimental jet rigs designed to simulate the exhaust gases from a full-scale jet engine. The jet noise data collected in these experiments must accurately predict the noise levels produced by the full-scale hardware in order to be a useful development tool. A methodology has been adopted at the NASA Glenn Research Center s Aero-Acoustic Propulsion Laboratory to insure the quality of the supersonic jet noise data acquired from the facility s High Flow Jet Exit Rig so that it can be used to develop future nozzle technologies that reduce supersonic jet noise. The methodology relies on mitigating extraneous noise sources, examining the impact of measurement location on the acoustic results, and investigating the facility independence of the measurements. The methodology is documented here as a basis for validating future improvements and its limitations are noted so that they do not affect the data analysis. Maintaining a high quality jet noise laboratory is an ongoing process. By carefully examining the data produced and continually following this methodology, data quality can be maintained and improved over time.

  5. 1/f noise and effort on implicit measures of bias.

    PubMed

    Correll, Joshua

    2008-01-01

    Phenomena that vary over time can often be represented as a complex waveform. Fourier analysis decomposes this complex wave into a set of sinusoidal component waves. In some phenomena, the amplitude of these waves varies in inverse relation to frequency. This pattern has been called 1/f noise and, unlike white noise, it reflects nonrandom variation. Latencies in simple computer tasks typically reveal 1/f noise, but the magnitude of the noise decreases as tasks become more challenging. The current work hypothesizes a correspondence between 1/f noise and effort, leading to the prediction that increasing effort will reduce 1/f noise. In 2 studies, the author examined the relationship between an individual's attempts to avoid bias (measured in Study 1, manipulated in Study 2) and 1/f noise in implicit measures of stereotyping and prejudice. In each study, participants who made an effort to modulate the use of racial information showed less 1/f noise than did participants who made less effort. The potential value of this analytic approach to social psychology is discussed.

  6. Improved Measurement of Coherence in Presence of Instrument Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merceret, Francis J.

    2003-01-01

    A method for correcting measured coherence spectra for the effect of incoherent instrument noise has been developed and demonstrated. Coherence measurements are widely used in engineering and science to determine the extent to which two signals are alike. The signals may come from two different sources or from the same source at different times. The coherence of time-lagged signals from a single source is an excellent indication of the effective lifetime of the signal components as a function of their frequency. Unfortunately, incoherent instrument noise will bias the measurement to lower values and may lead the user of the data to false conclusions about the longevity of significant features. The new method may be used whenever both the signal and noise power spectra are known and the noise is incoherent both with the signal and with itself at the applicable time delays. It provides a corrected coherence spectrum given the measured coherence and power spectra. For powerlaw signal spectra and instrumental white noise, the correction formula takes a particularly simple and explicit form. Since many geophysical signals exhibit powerlaw behavior and most instrument noise spectra approach white noise, the simplified form should be widely applicable in meteorology, oceanography, geology, and planetary geophysics.

  7. Geometric phase of a qubit driven by a phase noise laser under non-Markovian dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Berrada, K.

    2014-01-15

    Robustness of the geometric phase (GP) with respect to the environmental effects is a basic condition for an effective quantum computation. Here, we study quantitatively the GP of a two-level atom system driven by a phase noise laser under non-Markovian dynamics in terms of different parameters involved in the whole system. We find that with the change of the damping coupling, the GP is very sensitive to its properties exhibiting long collapse and revival phenomena, which play a significant role in enhancing the stabilization and control of the system dynamics. Moreover, we show that the GP can be considered as a tool for testing and characterizing the nature of the qubit–environment coupling. Due to the significance of how a system is quantum correlated with its environment in the construction of a scalable quantum computer, the entanglement dynamics between the qubit with its environment under external classical noise is evaluated and investigated during the time evolution. -- Highlights: •Geometric phase under noise phase laser. •Dynamics of the geometric phase under non-Markovian dynamics in the presence of classical noise. •Solution of master equation of the system in terms atomic inversion. •Nonlocal correlation between the system and its environment under non-Markovianity.

  8. Phase noise mitigation of QPSK signal utilizing phase-locked multiplexing of signal harmonics and amplitude saturation.

    PubMed

    Mohajerin-Ariaei, Amirhossein; Ziyadi, Morteza; Chitgarha, Mohammad Reza; Almaiman, Ahmed; Cao, Yinwen; Shamee, Bishara; Yang, Jeng-Yuan; Akasaka, Youichi; Sekiya, Motoyoshi; Takasaka, Shigehiro; Sugizaki, Ryuichi; Touch, Joseph D; Tur, Moshe; Langrock, Carsten; Fejer, Martin M; Willner, Alan E

    2015-07-15

    We demonstrate an all-optical phase noise mitigation scheme based on the generation, delay, and coherent summation of higher order signal harmonics. The signal, its third-order harmonic, and their corresponding delayed variant conjugates create a staircase phase-transfer function that quantizes the phase of quadrature-phase-shift-keying (QPSK) signal to mitigate phase noise. The signal and the harmonics are automatically phase-locked multiplexed, avoiding the need for phase-based feedback loop and injection locking to maintain coherency. The residual phase noise converts to amplitude noise in the quantizer stage, which is suppressed by parametric amplification in the saturation regime. Phase noise reduction of ∼40% and OSNR-gain of ∼3  dB at BER 10(-3) are experimentally demonstrated for 20- and 30-Gbaud QPSK input signals.

  9. Robust detection scheme on noise and phase jump for phase maps of objects with height discontinuities--theory and experiment.

    PubMed

    Weng, Jing-Feng; Lo, Yu-Lung

    2011-02-14

    This paper proposes a robust noise and phase jump detection scheme for noisy phase maps containing height discontinuities. The detection scheme has two primary functions, namely to detect the positions of noise and to locate the positions of the phase jumps. Generally speaking, the removal of noise from a wrapped phase map causes a smearing of the phase jumps and therefore leads to a loss of definition in the unwrapped phase map. However, in the proposed scheme, the boundaries of the phase jump regions are preserved during the noise detection process. The validity of the proposed approach is demonstrated using the simulated and experimental wrapped phase maps of a 3D object containing height discontinuities, respectively. It is shown that the noise and phase jump detection scheme enables the precise and efficient detection of three different types of noise, namely speckle noise, residual noise, and noise at the lateral surfaces of the height discontinuities. Therefore, the proposed scheme represents an ideal solution for the pre-processing of noisy wrapped phase maps prior to their treatment using a filtering algorithm and phase unwrapping algorithm.

  10. Limitations of Phased Array Beamforming in Open Rotor Noise Source Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horvath, Csaba; Envia, Edmane; Podboy, Gary G.

    2013-01-01

    Phased array beamforming results of the F31/A31 historical baseline counter-rotating open rotor blade set were investigated for measurement data taken on the NASA Counter-Rotating Open Rotor Propulsion Rig in the 9- by 15-Foot Low-Speed Wind Tunnel of NASA Glenn Research Center as well as data produced using the LINPROP open rotor tone noise code. The planar microphone array was positioned broadside and parallel to the axis of the open rotor, roughly 2.3 rotor diameters away. The results provide insight as to why the apparent noise sources of the blade passing frequency tones and interaction tones appear at their nominal Mach radii instead of at the actual noise sources, even if those locations are not on the blades. Contour maps corresponding to the sound fields produced by the radiating sound waves, taken from the simulations, are used to illustrate how the interaction patterns of circumferential spinning modes of rotating coherent noise sources interact with the phased array, often giving misleading results, as the apparent sources do not always show where the actual noise sources are located. This suggests that a more sophisticated source model would be required to accurately locate the sources of each tone. The results of this study also have implications with regard to the shielding of open rotor sources by airframe empennages.

  11. Theory of thermal phase noise in Michelson and Sagnac fiber interferometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wanser, Keith H.

    1994-09-01

    The intrinsic thermal phase noise spectra of the Michelson, Michelson with phase conjugate mirrors, and Sagnac fiber optic interferometers are presented. The thermal phase noise is maximum at dc and zero at the loop frequency for the Michelson with ordinary mirrors. Thermal phase noise eliminates the factor of two transducer phase sensitivity advantage of the Michelson over a comparable length Mach Zehnder. The Michelson with two phase conjugate mirrors exhibits identical noise to a Sagnac interferometer with the same total fiber length. The Sagnac exhibits common mode phase noise rejection at low frequencies and a broad maximum in the phase noise at the loop frequency of approximately 1 (mu) rad rms/(root)Hz for a 1 km fiber loop at 1319 nm.

  12. Prediction of helicopter rotor noise from measured blade surface pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Succi, G. P.; Brieger, J. T.

    The current techniques of helicopter rotor noise prediction attempt to describe the details of the noise field precisely and remove the empiricisms and restrictions inherent in previous methods. These techniques require detailed inputs of the rotor geometry, operating conditions, and blade surface pressure distribution. The purpose of this paper is to review those techniques in general and the Farassat/Nystrom analysis in particular. The predictions of the Farassat/Nystrom noise computer program, using both measured and calculated blade surface pressure data, are compared to measured noise level data. This study is based on a contract from NASA to Bolt Beranek and Newman Inc. (BBN) with measured data from the AH-lG Helicopter Operational Loads Survey flight test program supplied by Bell Helicopter Textron.

  13. Noise characteristics of heterodyne/homodyne frequency-domain measurements

    PubMed Central

    Kupinski, Matthew A.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract. We theoretically develop and experimentally validate the noise characteristics of heterodyne and/or homodyne measurements that are widely used in frequency-domain diffusive imaging. The mean and covariance of the modulated heterodyne output are derived by adapting the random amplification of a temporal point process. A multinomial selection rule is applied to the result of the temporal noise analysis to additionally model the spatial distribution of intensified photons measured by a charge-coupled device (CCD), which shows that the photon detection efficiency of CCD pixels plays an important role in the noise property of detected photons. The approach of using a multinomial probability law is validated from experimental results. Also, experimentally measured characteristics of means and variances of homodyne outputs are in agreement with the developed theory. The developed noise model can be applied to all photon amplification processes. PMID:22352646

  14. Optical signal to noise ratio monitoring using variable phase difference phase portrait with software synchronization.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yi; Yu, Changyuan

    2015-05-04

    In this paper, a novel optical signal to noise ratio (OSNR) monitoring method using 2-dimension (2-D) phase portrait is proposed and demonstrated, which is generated by using a single low-speed sampling channel with software synchronization technique. Moreover, variable phase difference is proposed to generate the X-Y pairs, which increases the tolerance of synchronization accuracy significantly. This method is a cost effective solution with simple system setup.

  15. A bootstrapped, low-noise, and high-gain photodetector for shot noise measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Haijun; Yang, Wenhai; Li, Zhixiu; Li, Xuefeng; Zheng, Yaohui

    2014-01-15

    We presented a low-noise, high-gain photodetector based on the bootstrap structure and the L-C (inductance and capacitance) combination. Electronic characteristics of the photodetector, including electronic noise, gain and frequency response, and dynamic range, were verified through a single-frequency Nd:YVO{sub 4} laser at 1064 nm with coherent output. The measured shot noise of 50 μW laser was 13 dB above the electronic noise at the analysis frequency of 2 MHz, and 10 dB at 3 MHz. And a maximum clearance of 28 dB at 2 MHz was achieved when 1.52 mW laser was illuminated. In addition, the photodetector showed excellent linearities for both DC and AC amplifications in the laser power range between 12.5 μW and 1.52 mW.

  16. A low phase noise and low spur PLL frequency synthesizer for GNSS receivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sen, Li; Jinguang, Jiang; Xifeng, Zhou; Jianghua, Liu

    2014-01-01

    A low phase noise and low spur phase locked loop (PLL) frequency synthesizer for use in global navigation satellite system (GNSS) receivers is proposed. To get a low spur, the symmetrical structure of the phase frequency detector (PFD) produces four control signals, which can reach the charge pump (CP) simultaneously, and an improved CP is realized to minimize the charge sharing and the charge injection and make the current matched. Additionally, the delay is controllable owing to the programmable PFD, so the dead zone of the CP can be eliminated. The output frequency of the VCO can be adjusted continuously and precisely by using a programmable LC-TANK. The phase noise of the VCO is lowered by using appropriate MOS sizes. The proposed PLL frequency synthesizer is fabricated in a 0.18 μm mixed-signal CMOS process. The measured phase noise at 1 MHz offset from the center frequency is -127.65 dBc/Hz and the reference spur is -73.58 dBc.

  17. Noise in two-color electronic distance meter measurements revisited

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Langbein, J.

    2004-01-01

    Frequent, high-precision geodetic data have temporally correlated errors. Temporal correlations directly affect both the estimate of rate and its standard error; the rate of deformation is a key product from geodetic measurements made in tectonically active areas. Various models of temporally correlated errors are developed and these provide relations between the power spectral density and the data covariance matrix. These relations are applied to two-color electronic distance meter (EDM) measurements made frequently in California over the past 15-20 years. Previous analysis indicated that these data have significant random walk error. Analysis using the noise models developed here indicates that the random walk model is valid for about 30% of the data. A second 30% of the data can be better modeled with power law noise with a spectral index between 1 and 2, while another 30% of the data can be modeled with a combination of band-pass-filtered plus random walk noise. The remaining 10% of the data can be best modeled as a combination of band-pass-filtered plus power law noise. This band-pass-filtered noise is a product of an annual cycle that leaks into adjacent frequency bands. For time spans of more than 1 year these more complex noise models indicate that the precision in rate estimates is better than that inferred by just the simpler, random walk model of noise.

  18. Uncovering signals from measurement noise by electro mechanical amplitude modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Droogendijk, H.; Sanders, R. G. P.; Krijnen, G. J. M.

    2013-05-01

    We present an electromechanical parametric scheme to improve the low-frequency signal-to-noise ratio of energy buffering type transducers. The method is based on periodic modulation of the stiffness in the sensory system which produces upconverted replicas of the signals of interest at frequencies where measurement is less troubled by noise or other detrimental effects. We demonstrate this principle by means of capacitive biomimetic hair flow sensors, where we modulate the rotational spring stiffness by periodic electrostatic spring softening, such that a replica of the original signal is formed around the modulation frequency. Using this replica we gain up to a 25-fold improvement of the low-frequency signal-to-noise ratio and sensing threshold. For transient measurements we demonstrate that tiny signals, which are below the noise-levels in the base-band, are revealed well when upconverted to higher frequencies.

  19. CEAREX Ambient Noise Data Measured Northeast of Svalbard

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-03-01

    system "self noise" level of about 72 dB (re APa 2/Hz) was measured when the hydrophone was disconnected from the rest of the ambient noise...om da ilIy int e r:) cIta . positional i nfr-r mar~ that smoothed all high" -freal-,enocy oscillations. All o2-.scerr and i4ce direotiun-_r_ dat-a wr

  20. JPL pulsar timing observations. IV - Excess phase noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Downs, G. S.; Krause-Polstorff, J.

    1986-01-01

    Previously published tables of geocentric arrival times for 24 pulsars covering a 12 year span are extended here to 14.5 years. The list of pulsars is extended by nine, most of which were observed for about 4 years. Known positins of these new objects are confirmed, and limits on the proper motions are obtained. Large phase excursions in PSR 0525 + 21 are found. The orbital parameters of the binary pulsar 0820 + 02 are tentatively confirmed. Short-term timing noise in excess of that expected from receiver considerations alone is established. Variations in the timing residuals for the original 24 pulsars are analyzed for correlations with other observable parameters. Little significant correlation with changes in pulse shape or energy or with the drift correction is found on time scales of 500 pulses or longer.

  1. Structureborne noise measurements on a small twin-engine aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cole, J. E., III; Martini, K. F.

    1988-01-01

    Structureborne noise measurements performed on a twin-engine aircraft (Beechcraft Baron) are reported. There are two overall objectives of the test program. The first is to obtain data to support the development of analytical models of the wing and fuselage, while the second is to evaluate effects of structural parameters on cabin noise. Measurements performed include structural and acoustic responses to impact excitation, structural and acoustic loss factors, and modal parameters of the wing. Path alterations include added mass to simulate fuel, variations in torque of bolts joining wing and fuselage, and increased acoustic absorption. Conclusions drawn regarding these measurements are presented.

  2. Structureborne noise measurements on a small twin-engine aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, J. E., III; Martini, K. F.

    1988-06-01

    Structureborne noise measurements performed on a twin-engine aircraft (Beechcraft Baron) are reported. There are two overall objectives of the test program. The first is to obtain data to support the development of analytical models of the wing and fuselage, while the second is to evaluate effects of structural parameters on cabin noise. Measurements performed include structural and acoustic responses to impact excitation, structural and acoustic loss factors, and modal parameters of the wing. Path alterations include added mass to simulate fuel, variations in torque of bolts joining wing and fuselage, and increased acoustic absorption. Conclusions drawn regarding these measurements are presented.

  3. Equalization-enhanced phase noise for coherent-detection systems using electronic digital signal processing.

    PubMed

    Shieh, William; Ho, Keang-Po

    2008-09-29

    In coherent optical systems employing electronic digital signal processing, the fiber chromatic dispersion can be gracefully compensated in electronic domain without resorting to optical techniques. Unlike optical dispersion compensator, the electronic equalizer enhances the impairments from the laser phase noise. This equalization-enhanced phase noise (EEPN) imposes a tighter constraint on the receive laser phase noise for transmission systems with high symbol rate and large electronically-compensated chromatic dispersion.

  4. Effect of phase noise on the generation of stationary entanglement in cavity optomechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Abdi, M.; Barzanjeh, Sh.; Tombesi, P.; Vitali, D.

    2011-09-15

    We study the effect of laser phase noise on the generation of stationary entanglement between an intracavity optical mode and a mechanical resonator in a generic cavity optomechanical system. We show that one can realize robust stationary optomechanical entanglement even in the presence of non-negligible laser phase noise. We also show that the explicit form of the laser phase noise spectrum is relevant, and discuss its effect on both optomechanical entanglement and ground-state cooling of the mechanical resonator.

  5. Low-phase-noise frequency synthesizer for the trapped atom clock on a chip.

    PubMed

    Ramirez-Martinez, Fernando; Lours, Michel; Rosenbusch, Peter; Reinhard, Friedemann; Reichel, Jakob

    2010-01-01

    We report on the realization of a 6.834-GHz synthesis chain for the trapped atom clock on a chip (TACC) that is being developed at LNE-SYRTE. The chain is based on the frequency multiplication of a 100-MHz reference signal to obtain a signal at 6.4 GHz. It uses a comb generator based on a monolithic GaAs nonlinear transmission line. This is a novelty in the fabrication of high-stability microwave synthesizers. Measurements give a low flicker phase noise of -85 dBrad(2)/Hz at 1-Hz offset frequency and a white phase noise floor < -115 dBrad(2)/Hz. Based on these results, we estimate that the performance of the synthesizer is at least one order of magnitude better than the stability goal of TACC. This ensures that the synthesizer will not be limiting the clock performance.

  6. Noise Measurements of High Aspect Ratio Distributed Exhaust Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bridges, James

    2015-01-01

    This paper covers far-field acoustic measurements of a family of rectangular nozzles with aspect ratio 8, in the high subsonic flow regime. Several variations of nozzle geometry, commonly proposed for embedded exhaust systems, are explored, including bevels, slants, single broad chevrons and notches, and internal septae. Far-field acoustic results, presented previously for the simple rectangular nozzle, showed that increasing aspect ratio increases the high frequency noise, especially directed in the plane containing the minor axis of the nozzle. Detailed changes to the nozzle geometry generally made little difference in the noise, and the differences were greatest at low speed. Having an extended lip on one broad side ('bevel') did produce up to 3dB more noise in all directions, while extending the lip on the narrow side ('slant') produced up to 2dB more noise, primarily on the side with the extension. Adding a single, non-intrusive chevron, made no significant change to the noise, while inverting the chevron ('notch') produced up to 2dB increase in the noise. Having internal walls ('septae') within the nozzle, such as would be required for structural support or when multiple fan ducts are aggregated, reduced the noise of the rectangular jet, but could produce a highly directional shedding tone from the septae trailing edges. Finally, a nozzle with both septae and a beveled nozzle, representative of the exhaust system envisioned for a distributed propulsion aircraft with a common rectangular duct, produced almost as much noise as the beveled nozzle, with the septae not contributing much reduction in noise.

  7. Noise Measurements of High Aspect Ratio Distributed Exhaust Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bridges, James E.

    2015-01-01

    This paper covers far-field acoustic measurements of a family of rectangular nozzles with aspect ratio 8, in the high subsonic flow regime. Several variations of nozzle geometry, commonly found in embedded exhaust systems, are explored, including bevels, slants, single broad chevrons and notches, and internal septae. Far-field acoustic results, presented previously for the simple rectangular nozzle, showed that increasing aspect ratio increases the high frequency noise, especially directed in the plane containing the minor axis of the nozzle. Detailed changes to the nozzle geometry generally made little difference in the noise, and the differences were greatest at low speed. Having an extended lip on one broad side (bevel) did produce up to 3 decibels more noise in all directions, while extending the lip on the narrow side (slant) produced up to 2 decibels more noise, primarily on the side with the extension. Adding a single, non-intrusive chevron, made no significant change to the noise, while inverting the chevron (notch) produced up to 2decibels increase in the noise. Having internal walls (septae) within the nozzle, such as would be required for structural support or when multiple fan ducts are aggregated, reduced the noise of the rectangular jet, but could produce a highly directional shedding tone from the septae trailing edges. Finally, a nozzle with both septae and a beveled nozzle, representative of the exhaust system envisioned for a distributed electric propulsion aircraft with a common rectangular duct, produced almost as much noise as the beveled nozzle, with the septae not contributing much reduction in noise.

  8. Automated Measurement of Noise Violations in the Therapeutic Workplace

    PubMed Central

    Sigurdsson, Sigurdur Oli; Aklin, William; Ring, Brandon M; Needham, Mick; Boscoe, James; Silverman, Kenneth

    2011-01-01

    The present analysis was conducted to validate an automated measurement system of noise violations by participants in the therapeutic workplace, which is a model workplace that offers paid employment and vocational training programs to illicit drug users. We collected data on dB levels via an electronic dB meter in a computer classroom with many different sound sources, and defined noise violations as sounds exceeding 55 dB. Human observers recorded whether staff or participants were responsible for violations, the types of events that resulted in violations, and whether these events were a result of participant behavior. Our analyses revealed that participants caused the majority of noise violations. These results suggest that the automated measurement system collects valid data on participant behavior that contributes to noise violations. Our results also suggest that these behaviors can in principle be modified to reduce the frequency of noise violations. Suggestions for replication in other settings and interventions designed to reduce behaviors leading to noise violations involving feedback and incentives are discussed. PMID:22532903

  9. Phase noise analysis of voltage controlled oscillator used in cesium atomic clock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhi, Menghui; Tang, Liang; Qiao, Donghai

    2017-03-01

    Coherent population trapping (CPT) cesium frequency standard plays a significant role in precision guidance of missile and global positioning system (GPS). Low noise 4.596 GHz voltage controlled oscillator (VCO) is an indispensable part of microwave signal source in cesium frequency standard. Low-phase noise is also the most important and difficult performance indicator of VCO. Starting from phase noise analysis method proposed by Leeson, the formulas about the relationship between phase noise of output signal of oscillator feedback model and phase fluctuation spectrum of amplifier, phase noise of oscillator are derived in this paper. Finally, the asymptote model of microwave oscillator is proposed based on the formula derivation. The experiment shows that when the reverse bias voltage of variode is 1.8 V, the designed oscillation frequency of VCO is 4.596 GHz, the power is ‑1 dBm and the DC power consumption is 19.6 mW. The tendency of phase noise simulation curve and actual test curve conform to asymptote model. The phase noise in 1 and 10 kHz is, respectively, ‑60.86 and ‑86.58 dBc/Hz. The significance of the paper lies in determining the main factors influencing oscillator phase noise and providing guiding direction for the design of low-phase noise VCO.

  10. Switching Correlation and Noise Level in Pr3+:YSO Crystal via Dressing Nonlinear Phase

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Irfan; Zhang, Zhaoyang; Wen, Feng; Zhang, Da; Li, Changbiao; Wang, Ruimin; Zhang, Yanpeng

    2016-01-01

    We propose and experimentally demonstrate that the intensity noise correlation and the noise level of intensity-difference and intensity-sum in Stokes and anti-Stokes channel can be well controlled by the relative nonlinear phase in spontaneous parametric four-wave mixing process. By modulating the relative nonlinear phase, including self-phase modulation and cross-phase modulation, switching the correlation into anti-correlation and the relative intensity noise level between the intensity-difference and intensity-sum are realized. We also show that the variation tendencies of the relative intensity noise level and the corresponding intensity fluctuations correlation are in accordance with each other. PMID:27650423

  11. Switching Correlation and Noise Level in Pr(3+):YSO Crystal via Dressing Nonlinear Phase.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Irfan; Zhang, Zhaoyang; Wen, Feng; Zhang, Da; Li, Changbiao; Wang, Ruimin; Zhang, Yanpeng

    2016-09-21

    We propose and experimentally demonstrate that the intensity noise correlation and the noise level of intensity-difference and intensity-sum in Stokes and anti-Stokes channel can be well controlled by the relative nonlinear phase in spontaneous parametric four-wave mixing process. By modulating the relative nonlinear phase, including self-phase modulation and cross-phase modulation, switching the correlation into anti-correlation and the relative intensity noise level between the intensity-difference and intensity-sum are realized. We also show that the variation tendencies of the relative intensity noise level and the corresponding intensity fluctuations correlation are in accordance with each other.

  12. Alleviation of additional phase noise in fiber optical parametric amplifier based signal regenerator.

    PubMed

    Jin, Lei; Xu, Bo; Yamashita, Shinji

    2012-11-19

    We theoretically and numerically explain the power saturation and the additional phase noise brought by the fiber optical parametric amplifier (FOPA). An equation to calculate an approximation to the saturated signal output power is presented. We also propose a scheme for alleviating the phase noise brought by the FOPA at the saturated state. In simulation, by controlling the decisive factor dispersion difference term Δk of the FOPA, amplitude-noise and additional phase noise reduction of quadrature phase shift keying (QPSK) based on the saturated FOPA is studied, which can provide promising performance to deal with PSK signals.

  13. Transition from double coherence resonances to single coherence resonance in a neuronal network with phase noise.

    PubMed

    Jia, Yanbing; Gu, Huaguang

    2015-12-01

    The effect of phase noise on the coherence dynamics of a neuronal network composed of FitzHugh-Nagumo (FHN) neurons is investigated. Phase noise can induce dissimilar coherence resonance (CR) effects for different coupling strength regimes. When the coupling strength is small, phase noise can induce double CRs. One corresponds to the average frequency of phase noise, and the other corresponds to the intrinsic firing frequency of the FHN neuron. When the coupling strength is large enough, phase noise can only induce single CR, and the CR corresponds to the intrinsic firing frequency of the FHN neuron. The results show a transition from double CRs to single CR with the increase in the coupling strength. The transition can be well interpreted based on the dynamics of a single neuron stimulated by both phase noise and the coupling current. When the coupling strength is small, the coupling current is weak, and phase noise mainly determines the dynamics of the neuron. Moreover, the phase-noise-induced double CRs in the neuronal network are similar to the phase-noise-induced double CRs in an isolated FHN neuron. When the coupling strength is large enough, the coupling current is strong and plays a key role in the occurrence of the single CR in the network. The results provide a novel phenomenon and may have important implications in understanding the dynamics of neuronal networks.

  14. Radiometric absolute noise-temperature measurement system features improved accuracy and calibration ease

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, W.; Ewen, H.; Haroules, G.

    1970-01-01

    Radiometric receiver system, which measures noise temperatures in degrees Kelvin, does not require cryogenic noise sources for routine operation. It eliminates radiometer calibration errors associated with RF attenuation measurements. Calibrated noise source is required only for laboratory adjustment and calibration.

  15. Geometric phase of a qubit driven by a phase noise laser under non-Markovian dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berrada, K.

    2014-01-01

    Robustness of the geometric phase (GP) with respect to the environmental effects is a basic condition for an effective quantum computation. Here, we study quantitatively the GP of a two-level atom system driven by a phase noise laser under non-Markovian dynamics in terms of different parameters involved in the whole system. We find that with the change of the damping coupling, the GP is very sensitive to its properties exhibiting long collapse and revival phenomena, which play a significant role in enhancing the stabilization and control of the system dynamics. Moreover, we show that the GP can be considered as a tool for testing and characterizing the nature of the qubit-environment coupling. Due to the significance of how a system is quantum correlated with its environment in the construction of a scalable quantum computer, the entanglement dynamics between the qubit with its environment under external classical noise is evaluated and investigated during the time evolution.

  16. Measurement and prediction of Energy Efficient Engine noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lavin, S. P.; Ho, P. Y.; Chamberlin, R.

    1984-01-01

    The NASA/GE Energy Efficient Engine (E3) static noise levels were measured in an acoustic arena on the Integrated Core and Low Spool Test System. These measured levels were scaled to the appropriate size to power four study aircraft and were projected to flight for evaluation of noise levels relative to FAR36, Stage III limits. As a result of these evaluations, it is predicted that the NASA/GE E3 engine with a wide spacing cut-on blade/vane ratio fan and a forced mixer nozzle can meet FAR36 Stage III limits with sufficient design margin.

  17. Measurement of noise and vibration in Canadian forces armoured vehicles.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Ann M; Borland, Matthew J; Abel, Sharon M

    2007-04-01

    Noise and whole-body vibration measurements were made in the following Canadian Forces vehicles: LAV III, Bison and M113A2 ADATS (air defence anti-tank system). Measurements were made at different crew positions while the vehicles were driven at different speeds over rough terrain and paved roads. The participants completed a questionnaire at the end of each measurement session on their reactions to the noise and vibration. Noise levels were as high as 115 dBA in the ADATS, 102 dBA in the Bison and 96 dBA in the LAV III, exceeding the Canada Labour Code exposure limit of 87 dBA for 8 h(1)). A communications headset was found to be sufficient to reduce the noise exposure to safe levels in most cases. The vector sum vibration magnitudes for the LAV III and Bison were relatively low during highway driving (0.3 m/s(2) for both vehicles) compared to rough terrain (0.71 and 1.36 m/s(2), respectively). The ADATS vibration increased with driving speed (0.62 m/s(2) at 8 km/h and 1.26 m/s(2) at 32 km/h). The questionnaire responses indicated that half the crewmembers had difficulty communicating in vehicle noise, but were generally unaffected physically by vibration. The latter result may have been due to the relatively short exposure duration.

  18. Accurate multipixel phase measurement with classical-light interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Mandeep; Khare, Kedar; Jha, Anand Kumar; Prabhakar, Shashi; Singh, R. P.

    2015-02-01

    We demonstrate accurate phase measurement from experimental low photon level interferograms using a constrained optimization method that takes into account the expected redundancy in the unknown phase function. This approach is shown to have significant noise advantage over traditional methods, such as balanced homodyning or phase shifting, that treat individual pixels in the interference data as independent of each other. Our interference experiments comparing the optimization method with the traditional phase-shifting method show that when the same photon resources are used, the optimization method provides phase recoveries with tighter error bars. In particular, rms phase error performance of the optimization method for low photon number data (10 photons per pixel) shows a >5 × noise gain over the phase-shifting method. In our experiments where a laser light source is used for illumination, the results imply phase measurement with an accuracy better than the conventional single-pixel-based shot-noise limit that assumes independent phases at individual pixels. The constrained optimization approach presented here is independent of the nature of the light source and may further enhance the accuracy of phase detection when a nonclassical-light source is used.

  19. Measurements of the tonal component of cavity noise and comparison with theory. [aircraft noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Block, P. J. W.

    1977-01-01

    The frequency of the tonal noise generated by a flow-excited rectangular cavity was measured using Mach numbers ranging from 0.05 to 0.40, and cavity length-to-depth ratios varying from 0.1 to 8. The data are used to evaluate a current prediction method, and good agreement is shown. Measurements of the minimum streamwise cavity length required for oscillation were also made.

  20. Adaptive anisotropic diffusion for noise reduction of phase images in Fourier domain Doppler optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Xia, Shaoyan; Huang, Yong; Peng, Shizhao; Wu, Yanfeng; Tan, Xiaodi

    2016-08-01

    Phase image in Fourier domain Doppler optical coherence tomography offers additional flow information of investigated samples, which provides valuable evidence towards accurate medical diagnosis. High quality phase images are thus desirable. We propose a noise reduction method for phase images by combining a synthetic noise estimation criteria based on local noise estimator (LNE) and distance median value (DMV) with anisotropic diffusion model. By identifying noise and signal pixels accurately and diffusing them with different coefficients respectively and adaptive iteration steps, we demonstrated the effectiveness of our proposed method in both phantom and mouse artery images. Comparison with other methods such as filtering method (mean, median filtering), wavelet method, probabilistic method and partial differential equation based methods in terms of peak signal-to-noise ratio (PSNR), equivalent number of looks (ENL) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) showed the advantages of our method in reserving image energy and removing noise.

  1. Adaptive anisotropic diffusion for noise reduction of phase images in Fourier domain Doppler optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Shaoyan; Huang, Yong; Peng, Shizhao; Wu, Yanfeng; Tan, Xiaodi

    2016-01-01

    Phase image in Fourier domain Doppler optical coherence tomography offers additional flow information of investigated samples, which provides valuable evidence towards accurate medical diagnosis. High quality phase images are thus desirable. We propose a noise reduction method for phase images by combining a synthetic noise estimation criteria based on local noise estimator (LNE) and distance median value (DMV) with anisotropic diffusion model. By identifying noise and signal pixels accurately and diffusing them with different coefficients respectively and adaptive iteration steps, we demonstrated the effectiveness of our proposed method in both phantom and mouse artery images. Comparison with other methods such as filtering method (mean, median filtering), wavelet method, probabilistic method and partial differential equation based methods in terms of peak signal-to-noise ratio (PSNR), equivalent number of looks (ENL) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) showed the advantages of our method in reserving image energy and removing noise. PMID:27570687

  2. Mitigating the effects of measurement noise on Granger causality

    SciTech Connect

    Nalatore, Hariharan; Ding Mingzhou; Rangarajan, Govindan

    2007-03-15

    Computing Granger causal relations among bivariate experimentally observed time series has received increasing attention over the past few years. Such causal relations, if correctly estimated, can yield significant insights into the dynamical organization of the system being investigated. Since experimental measurements are inevitably contaminated by noise, it is thus important to understand the effects of such noise on Granger causality estimation. The first goal of this paper is to provide an analytical and numerical analysis of this problem. Specifically, we show that, due to noise contamination (1) spurious causality between two measured variables can arise and (2) true causality can be suppressed. The second goal of the paper is to provide a denoising strategy to mitigate this problem. Specifically, we propose a denoising algorithm based on the combined use of the Kalman filter theory and the expectation-maximization algorithm. Numerical examples are used to demonstrate the effectiveness of the denoising approach.

  3. Analysis and reduction of errors caused by Poisson noise for phase diversity technique.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hongli; Yang, Chengliang; Xu, Zihao; Zhang, Peiguang; Xu, Huanyu; Cao, Zhaoliang; Mu, Quanquan; Xuan, Li

    2016-09-19

    An effective method for reducing the sensitivity of phase diversity (PD) technique to Poisson noise is proposed. The denoising algorithm based on blocking-matching and 3D filtering is first introduced in the wavefront sensing field as a preprocessing stage. Then, the PD technique is applied to the denoised images. Results of the numerical simulations and experiments demonstrate that our approach is better than the traditional PD technique in terms of both the root-mean-square error (RMSE) of phase estimates and the structural similarity index metrics (SSIM). The RMSEs of phase estimates on synthetic data are decreased by approximately 40% across noise levels within the range of 58.7-18.8 dB in terms of peak signal-to-noise ratio (PSNR). Meanwhile, the overall decline range of SSIM is significantly decreased from 49% to 9%. The experiment and simulation results are in good agreement. The approach may be widely used in various domains, such as the measurements of intrinsic aberrations in optical systems and compensations for atmospheric turbulence.

  4. Possibility of measuring weak noise in nonlinear systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surovyatkina, Elena D.

    2004-05-01

    The possibility of measuring weak noise in nonlinear systems on the basis of the phenomenon of prebifurcation noise amplification is proposed. This phenomenon is shortly outlined with special emphasis on the transition from linear regime to the regime of nonlinear saturation of fluctuation amplification. Estimates of the fluctuation variance are obtained both for the linear (away from the bifurcation threshold) and for the nonlinear regime (in the vicinity of the bifurcation threshold). These estimates have proved to be efficient for two simple bifurcation models: period doubling bifurcation and bifurcation of spontaneous symmetry breaking. Theoretical estimates have proved to be in good agreement with the results of numerical simulation. It is shown, that in the saturation regime, fluctuation variance is proportional to the square root of external noise variance, whereas in linear regime, fluctuation variance is proportional to noise variance. The approach to weak noise measuring is based on comparison of maximal fluctuation variance at the bifurcation threshold with variance away from that threshold. The applicability of this approach is limited by the necessity to perform rather long-term observations.

  5. SEMICONDUCTOR INTEGRATED CIRCUITS: A 0.8 V low power low phase-noise PLL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Han; Xiao, Liang; Haifeng, Zhou; Yinfang, Xie; Waisum, Wong

    2010-08-01

    A low power and low phase noise phase-locked loop (PLL) design for low voltage (0.8 V) applications is presented. The voltage controlled oscillator (VCO) operates from a 0.5 V voltage supply, while the other blocks operate from a 0.8 V supply. A differential NMOS-only topology is adopted for the oscillator, a modified precharge topology is applied in the phase-frequency detector (PFD), and a new feedback structure is utilized in the charge pump (CP) for ultra-low voltage applications. The divider adopts the extended true single phase clock DFF in order to operate in the high frequency region and save circuit area and power. In addition, several novel design techniques, such as removing the tail current source, are demonstrated to cut down the phase noise. Implemented in the SMIC 0.13 μm RF CMOS process and operated at 0.8 V supply voltage, the PLL measures a phase noise of-112.4 dBc/Hz at an offset frequency of 1 MHz from the carrier and a frequency range of 3.166-3.383 GHz. The improved PFD and the novel CP dissipate 0.39 mW power from a 0.8 V supply. The occupied chip area of the PFD and CP is 100 × 100 μm2. The chip occupies 0.63 mm2, and draws less than 6.54 mW from a 0.8 V supply.

  6. A Low Phase Noise Fully Monolithic 6 GHz Differential Coupled NMOS LC-VCO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moalla, Dorra Mellouli; Cordeau, David; Mnif, Hassene; Paillot, Jean-Marie; Loulou, Mourad

    2016-01-01

    A fully monolithic 6 GHz low-phase noise Voltage-Controlled-Oscillator (VCO) is presented in this paper. It consists in two LC-NMOS differential VCOs coupled through a resistive network and is implemented on a 0.25 µm BiCMOS SiGe process. This proposed integrated VCO can be used also for phased-array applications to steer the beam over the entire spatial range. In this case, the radiation pattern of the phased antenna array is steered in a particular direction by establishing a constant phase progression in the oscillator chain which can be obtained by detuning the free-running frequencies of the two oscillators in the array. At 2.5 V power supply voltage and a power dissipation of 62.5 mW, the coupled VCO array features a measured worst case phase noise of -102.4 dBc/Hz and -125.64 dBc/Hz at 100 kHz and 1 MHz frequency offset respectively from a 6 GHz carrier. The tuning range is about 400 MHz, from 5.85 to 6.25 GHz, for a tuning voltage varying from 0 to 2.5 V.

  7. Experimental demonstration of a noise-tunable delay line with applications to phase synchronization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pessacg, F.; Taitz, A.; Patterson, G. A.; Fierens, P. I.; Grosz, D. F.

    2015-05-01

    In this paper we propose and demonstrate a discrete circuit capable of generating arbitrary time delays dependent on noise, either added externally or already present in the signal of interest due to a finite signal-to-noise ratio. We then go on to demonstrate an application to phase locking of signals by means of a standard Phase-Locked Loop (PLL) design, where the usual Voltage-Controlled Oscillator (VCO) is replaced by the noise-tunable delay line.

  8. General quantum constraints on detector noise in continuous linear measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Haixing

    2017-01-01

    In quantum sensing and metrology, an important class of measurement is the continuous linear measurement, in which the detector is coupled to the system of interest linearly and continuously in time. One key aspect involved is the quantum noise of the detector, arising from quantum fluctuations in the detector input and output. It determines how fast we acquire information about the system and also influences the system evolution in terms of measurement backaction. We therefore often categorize it as the so-called imprecision noise and quantum backaction noise. There is a general Heisenberg-like uncertainty relation that constrains the magnitude of and the correlation between these two types of quantum noise. The main result of this paper is to show that, when the detector becomes ideal, i.e., at the quantum limit with minimum uncertainty, not only does the uncertainty relation takes the equal sign as expected, but also there are two new equalities. This general result is illustrated by using the typical cavity QED setup with the system being either a qubit or a mechanical oscillator. Particularly, the dispersive readout of a qubit state, and the measurement of mechanical motional sideband asymmetry are considered.

  9. Sediment-generated noise (SGN): Laboratory determination of measurement volume

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Passive acoustic technology has the potential to allow continuous measurement of bedload moving through streams by recording Sediment-Generated Noise (SGN) from interactions between coarse bedload particles. The technology is relatively economical and is amenable to automated operation. While the ...

  10. New phase unwrapping method and its application in shape measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Xiaoyuan; Kang, Xin

    2002-05-01

    A new phase unwrapping algorithm is proposed in this paper. This algorithm, based on the global continuity of the physical information being measured, is shown to be reliable by experimental results. Unlike the brunch-cut method, this new algorithm needs not placing brunch cuts but ratifying the errors in the initial unwrapped phase map obtained by the conventional method using the least difference of phase-cross-section. It is suitable for unwrapping phase map in the presence of errors such as noise, phase discontinuity more than (pi) and insufficient sampling. In addition, the new method is simple and requires little computing time.

  11. Sequence dependence of phase-induced intensity noise in optical networks that employ direct modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tur, M.; Legg, P. J.; Shabeer, M.; Andonovic, I.

    1995-02-01

    Phase-induced intensity noise in optical networks that employ directly modulated laser sources is observed to be bit-sequence dependent. This dependence is explained by optical frequency variations that are due to the heating history of the laser chip and is accurately modeled. This effect may permit suppression of phase-induced intensity noise in many types of fiber system with multipaths.

  12. Imaging resolution signal-to-noise ratio in transverse phase amplification from classical information theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    French, Doug; Huang, Zun; Pao, Hsueh-Yuan; Jovanovic, Igor

    2009-03-01

    A quantum phase amplifier operated in the spatial domain can improve the signal-to-noise ratio in imaging beyond the classical limit. The scaling of the signal-to-noise ratio with the gain of the quantum phase amplifier is derived from classical information theory.

  13. Phase measurement system using a dithered clock

    DOEpatents

    Fairley, C.R.; Patterson, S.R.

    1991-05-28

    A phase measurement system is disclosed which measures the phase shift between two signals by dithering a clock signal and averaging a plurality of measurements of the phase differences between the two signals. 8 figures.

  14. Measurements of nuclear spin dynamics by spin-noise spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ryzhov, I. I.; Poltavtsev, S. V.; Kozlov, G. G.; Zapasskii, V. S.; Kavokin, K. V.; Glazov, M. M.; Vladimirova, M.; Scalbert, D.; Cronenberger, S.; Lemaître, A.; Bloch, J.

    2015-06-15

    We exploit the potential of the spin noise spectroscopy (SNS) for studies of nuclear spin dynamics in n-GaAs. The SNS experiments were performed on bulk n-type GaAs layers embedded into a high-finesse microcavity at negative detuning. In our experiments, nuclear spin polarisation initially prepared by optical pumping is monitored in real time via a shift of the peak position in the electron spin noise spectrum. We demonstrate that this shift is a direct measure of the Overhauser field acting on the electron spin. The dynamics of nuclear spin is shown to be strongly dependent on the electron concentration.

  15. Reduction of phase noise in nanowire spin orbit torque oscillators.

    PubMed

    Yang, Liu; Verba, Roman; Tiberkevich, Vasil; Schneider, Tobias; Smith, Andrew; Duan, Zheng; Youngblood, Brian; Lenz, Kilian; Lindner, Jürgen; Slavin, Andrei N; Krivorotov, Ilya N

    2015-11-23

    Spin torque oscillators (STOs) are compact, tunable sources of microwave radiation that serve as a test bed for studies of nonlinear magnetization dynamics at the nanometer length scale. The spin torque in an STO can be created by spin-orbit interaction, but low spectral purity of the microwave signals generated by spin orbit torque oscillators hinders practical applications of these magnetic nanodevices. Here we demonstrate a method for decreasing the phase noise of spin orbit torque oscillators based on Pt/Ni80Fe20 nanowires. We experimentally demonstrate that tapering of the nanowire, which serves as the STO active region, significantly decreases the spectral linewidth of the generated signal. We explain the observed linewidth narrowing in the framework of the Ginzburg-Landau auto-oscillator model. The model reveals that spatial non-uniformity of the spin current density in the tapered nanowire geometry hinders the excitation of higher order spin-wave modes, thus stabilizing the single-mode generation regime. This non-uniformity also generates a restoring force acting on the excited self-oscillatory mode, which reduces thermal fluctuations of the mode spatial position along the wire. Both these effects improve the STO spectral purity.

  16. Reduction of phase noise in nanowire spin orbit torque oscillators

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Liu; Verba, Roman; Tiberkevich, Vasil; Schneider, Tobias; Smith, Andrew; Duan, Zheng; Youngblood, Brian; Lenz, Kilian; Lindner, Jürgen; Slavin, Andrei N.; Krivorotov, Ilya N.

    2015-01-01

    Spin torque oscillators (STOs) are compact, tunable sources of microwave radiation that serve as a test bed for studies of nonlinear magnetization dynamics at the nanometer length scale. The spin torque in an STO can be created by spin-orbit interaction, but low spectral purity of the microwave signals generated by spin orbit torque oscillators hinders practical applications of these magnetic nanodevices. Here we demonstrate a method for decreasing the phase noise of spin orbit torque oscillators based on Pt/Ni80Fe20 nanowires. We experimentally demonstrate that tapering of the nanowire, which serves as the STO active region, significantly decreases the spectral linewidth of the generated signal. We explain the observed linewidth narrowing in the framework of the Ginzburg-Landau auto-oscillator model. The model reveals that spatial non-uniformity of the spin current density in the tapered nanowire geometry hinders the excitation of higher order spin-wave modes, thus stabilizing the single-mode generation regime. This non-uniformity also generates a restoring force acting on the excited self-oscillatory mode, which reduces thermal fluctuations of the mode spatial position along the wire. Both these effects improve the STO spectral purity. PMID:26592432

  17. Measurement noise 100 times lower than the quantum-projection limit using entangled atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosten, Onur; Engelsen, Nils J.; Krishnakumar, Rajiv; Kasevich, Mark A.

    2016-01-01

    Quantum metrology uses quantum entanglement—correlations in the properties of microscopic systems—to improve the statistical precision of physical measurements. When measuring a signal, such as the phase shift of a light beam or an atomic state, a prominent limitation to achievable precision arises from the noise associated with the counting of uncorrelated probe particles. This noise, commonly referred to as shot noise or projection noise, gives rise to the standard quantum limit (SQL) to phase resolution. However, it can be mitigated down to the fundamental Heisenberg limit by entangling the probe particles. Despite considerable experimental progress in a variety of physical systems, a question that persists is whether these methods can achieve performance levels that compare favourably with optimized conventional (non-entangled) systems. Here we demonstrate an approach that achieves unprecedented levels of metrological improvement using half a million 87Rb atoms in their ‘clock’ states. The ensemble is 20.1 ± 0.3 decibels (100-fold) spin-squeezed via an optical-cavity-based measurement. We directly resolve small microwave-induced rotations 18.5 ± 0.3 decibels (70-fold) beyond the SQL. The single-shot phase resolution of 147 microradians achieved by the apparatus is better than that achieved by the best engineered cold atom sensors despite lower atom numbers. We infer entanglement of more than 680 ± 35 particles in the atomic ensemble. Applications include atomic clocks, inertial sensors, and fundamental physics experiments such as tests of general relativity or searches for electron electric dipole moment. To this end, we demonstrate an atomic clock measurement with a quantum enhancement of 10.5 ± 0.3 decibels (11-fold), limited by the phase noise of our microwave source.

  18. Noise reduction in differential phase extraction of dual atom interferometers using an active servo loop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiow, Sheng-wey; Williams, Jason; Yu, Nan

    2016-01-01

    Differential measurements using simultaneous atom interferometers provide unprecedented precision and stability for explorations on the scientific frontiers. Phase extraction between two atom interferometers, however, imposes additional limitations on the overall instrument performance due to nonlinear multiparameter fit and associated reduced data rate and sensitivity. We propose an active differential phase extraction method, which is self-calibratable and yields the theoretical performance of differential measurement for uncorrelated errors, and demonstrate the scheme on a transportable gravity gradiometer. The gravity gradient sensitivity of the instrument is improved by a factor of 3 with the implementation of the technique, which is in consistent with independently measured detection noise. We also demonstrate the accuracy and applicability of the scheme with 33-kg test masses, and achieve 1 E uncertainty after 4000 s.

  19. Phase noise estimation and mitigation for DCT-based coherent optical OFDM systems.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chuanchuan; Yang, Feng; Wang, Ziyu

    2009-09-14

    In this paper, as an attractive alternative to the conventional discrete Fourier transform (DFT) based orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM), discrete cosine transform (DCT) based OFDM which has certain advantages over its counterpart is studied for optical fiber communications. As is known, laser phase noise is a major impairment to the performance of coherent optical OFDM (CO-OFDM) systems. However, to our knowledge, detailed analysis of phase noise and the corresponding mitigation methods for DCT-based CO-OFDM systems have not been reported yet. To address these issues, we analyze the laser phase noise in the DCT-based CO-OFDM systems, and propose phase noise estimation and mitigation schemes. Numerical results show that the proposal is very effective in suppressing phase noise and could significantly improve the performance of DCT-based CO-OFDM systems.

  20. SPECTRON, a neutron noise measurement system in frequency domain

    SciTech Connect

    Izarra, G. de; Jammes, C. Destouches, C.; Geslot, B.; Di Salvo, J.

    2015-11-15

    This paper is dedicated to the presentation and validation of SPECTRON, a novel neutron noise measurement system developed at CEA Cadarache. The device is designed for the measurement of the β{sub eff} parameter (effective fraction of delayed neutrons) of experimental nuclear reactors using the Cohn-α method. An integrated electronic system is used to record the current from fission chambers. Spectra computed from measurement data are processed by a dedicated software in order to estimate the reactor transfer function and then the effective fraction of delayed neutrons as well as the prompt neutron generation time. After a review of the pile noise measurement method in current mode, the SPECTRON architecture is presented. Then, the validation procedure is described and experimental results are shown, supporting the proper functioning of this new measurement system. It is shown that every technical requirement needed for correct measurement of neutron noise is fulfilled. Measurements performed at MINERVE and EOLE, two experimental nuclear reactors at CEA Cadarache, in real conditions allowed us to validate SPECTRON.

  1. Noise measurement flight test of five light helicopters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rickley, Edward J.; Jones, Kenneth E.; Keller, Amanda S.; Fleming, Gregg G.

    1993-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Transportation, Federal Aviation Administration, (U.S.DOT/FAA), along with the U.S.DOT, Research and Special Programs Administration, Volpe National Transportation Systems Center (RSPA/Volpe Center) conducted a helicopter noise measurement flight test in Champaign, Illinois, during the period 22-26 July 1991. The primary objective of the study was to obtain the field data necessary to examine the feasibility of a simplified helicopter-noise-certification procedure (screening test). Acoustic data were measured by and stored on a hand-held sound-level meter (on-line processing) and recorded on digital tape for later off-line processing. A comparison of the measured on-line acoustic data with the acoustic data processed off-line provided the foundation necessary to evaluate the feasibility of the proposed screening test. In addition to acoustic measurements, meteorological data and helicopter tracking and performance data were also obtained.

  2. Critical phenomena and noise-induced phase transitions in neuronal networks.

    PubMed

    Lee, K-E; Lopes, M A; Mendes, J F F; Goltsev, A V

    2014-01-01

    We study numerically and analytically first- and second-order phase transitions in neuronal networks stimulated by shot noise (a flow of random spikes bombarding neurons). Using an exactly solvable cortical model of neuronal networks on classical random networks, we find critical phenomena accompanying the transitions and their dependence on the shot noise intensity. We show that a pattern of spontaneous neuronal activity near a critical point of a phase transition is a characteristic property that can be used to identify the bifurcation mechanism of the transition. We demonstrate that bursts and avalanches are precursors of a first-order phase transition, paroxysmal-like spikes of activity precede a second-order phase transition caused by a saddle-node bifurcation, while irregular spindle oscillations represent spontaneous activity near a second-order phase transition caused by a supercritical Hopf bifurcation. Our most interesting result is the observation of the paroxysmal-like spikes. We show that a paroxysmal-like spike is a single nonlinear event that appears instantly from a low background activity with a rapid onset, reaches a large amplitude, and ends up with an abrupt return to lower activity. These spikes are similar to single paroxysmal spikes and sharp waves observed in electroencephalographic (EEG) measurements. Our analysis shows that above the saddle-node bifurcation, sustained network oscillations appear with a large amplitude but a small frequency in contrast to network oscillations near the Hopf bifurcation that have a small amplitude but a large frequency. We discuss an amazing similarity between excitability of the cortical model stimulated by shot noise and excitability of the Morris-Lecar neuron stimulated by an applied current.

  3. Impact of laser phase and amplitude noises on streak camera temporal resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Wlotzko, V.; Uhring, W.; Summ, P.

    2015-09-15

    Streak cameras are now reaching sub-picosecond temporal resolution. In cumulative acquisition mode, this resolution does not entirely rely on the electronic or the vacuum tube performances but also on the light source characteristics. The light source, usually an actively mode-locked laser, is affected by phase and amplitude noises. In this paper, the theoretical effects of such noises on the synchronization of the streak system are studied in synchroscan and triggered modes. More precisely, the contribution of band-pass filters, delays, and time walk is ascertained. Methods to compute the resulting synchronization jitter are depicted. The results are verified by measurement with a streak camera combined with a Ti:Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} solid state laser oscillator and also a fiber oscillator.

  4. Bayesian flaw characterization from eddy current measurements with grain noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMahan, Jerry A.; Aldrin, John C.; Shell, Eric; Oneida, Erin

    2017-02-01

    The Bayesian approach to inference from measurement data has the potential to provide highly reliable characterizations of flaw geometry by quantifying the confidence in the estimate results. The accuracy of these confidence estimates depends on the accuracy of the model for the measurement error. Eddy current measurements of electrically anisotropic metals, such as titanium, exhibit a phenomenon called grain noise in which the measurement error is spatially correlated even with no flaw present. We show that the most commonly used statistical model for the measurement error, which fails to account for this correlation, results in overconfidence in the flaw geometry estimates from eddy current data, thereby reducing the effectiveness of the Bayesian approach. We then describe a method of modeling the grain noise as a Gaussian process (GP) using spectral mixture kernels, a type of non-parametric model for the covariance kernel of a GP This provides a broadly applicable, data-driven way of modeling correlation in measurement error. Our results show that incorporation of this noise model results in a more reliable estimate of the flaw and better agreement with the available validation data.

  5. Characterisation of ultrasonic structural noise in multiple scattering media using phased arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bedetti, T.; Dorval, V.; Jenson, F.; Derode, A.

    2013-08-01

    The ultrasonic inspection of multiple scattering media gives rise to structural noise which makes it difficult to detect potential damage or crack inside the component. In order to predict the performances of ultrasonic inspection over such complex media, scattering models can be used. Such models rely on specific key parameters describing the multiple scattering process, which can be determined by specific measurements and post-processing techniques. Such experiments were carried out on stainless steel plates using linear phased-arrays. They consist in recording the response matrix constituted by impulse responses between all the elements of the array. By conducting post-processing on this matrix, we measure the elastic mean free path le and the correlation distance dc of the recorded noise. Additionally, the dynamic behaviour of the coherent backscattering effect was studied in order to measure the diffusion constant D. Plane-wave beamforming has been applied to the response matrix to improve the angular resolution and the signal-to-noise ratio of the backscattered intensity. Details of postprocessing techniques will be shown.

  6. Extracting Earth's Elastic Wave Response from Noise Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snieder, Roel; Larose, Eric

    2013-05-01

    Recent research has shown that noise can be turned from a nuisance into a useful seismic source. In seismology and other fields in science and engineering, the estimation of the system response from noise measurements has proven to be a powerful technique. To convey the essence of the method, we first treat the simplest case of a homogeneous medium to show how noise measurements can be used to estimate waves that propagate between sensors. We provide an overview of physics research—dating back more than 100 years—showing that random field fluctuations contain information about the system response. This principle has found extensive use in surface-wave seismology but can also be applied to the estimation of body waves. Because noise provides continuous illumination of the subsurface, the extracted response is ideally suited for time-lapse monitoring. We present examples of time-lapse monitoring as applied to the softening of soil after the 2011 Tohoku-oki earthquake, the detection of a precursor to a landslide, and temporal changes in the lunar soil.

  7. A jet engine noise measurement and prediction tool.

    PubMed

    Frendi, Abdelkader; Dorland, Wade D; Maung, Thein; Nesman, Tom; Wang, Ten-See

    2002-11-01

    In this paper, the authors describe an innovative jet engine noise measurement and prediction tool. The tool measures sound-pressure levels and frequency spectra in the far field. In addition, the tool provides predicted results while the measurements are being made. The predictions are based on an existing computational fluid dynamics database coupled to an empirical acoustic radiation model based on the far-field approximation to the Lighthill acoustic analogy. Preliminary tests of this acoustic measurement and prediction tool produced very encouraging results.

  8. Phase-noise-induced resonance in arrays of coupled excitable neural models.

    PubMed

    Xiaoming Liang; Liang Zhao

    2013-08-01

    Recently, it is observed that, in a single neural model, phase noise (time-varying signal phase) arising from an external stimulating signal can induce regular spiking activities even if the signal is subthreshold. In addition, it is also uncovered that there exists an optimal phase noise intensity at which the spiking rhythm coincides with the frequency of the subthreshold signal, resulting in a phase-noise-induced resonance phenomenon. However, neurons usually do not work alone, but are connected in the form of arrays or blocks. Therefore, we study the spiking activity induced by phase noise in arrays of globally and locally coupled excitable neural models. We find that there also exists an optimal phase noise intensity for generating large neural response and such an optimal value is significantly decreased compared to an isolated single neuron case, which means the detectability in response to the subthreshold signal of neurons is sharply improved because of the coupling. In addition, we reveal two new resonance behaviors in the neuron ensemble with the presence of phase noise: there exist optimal values of both coupling strength and system size, where the coupled neurons generate regular spikes under subthreshold stimulations, which are called as coupling strength and system size resonance, respectively. Finally, the dependence of phase-noise-induced resonance on signal frequency is also examined.

  9. Analytical estimation of laser phase noise induced BER floor in coherent receiver with digital signal processing.

    PubMed

    Vanin, Evgeny; Jacobsen, Gunnar

    2010-03-01

    The Bit-Error-Ratio (BER) floor caused by the laser phase noise in the optical fiber communication system with differential quadrature phase shift keying (DQPSK) and coherent detection followed by digital signal processing (DSP) is analytically evaluated. An in-phase and quadrature (I&Q) receiver with a carrier phase recovery using DSP is considered. The carrier phase recovery is based on a phase estimation of a finite sum (block) of the signal samples raised to the power of four and the phase unwrapping at transitions between blocks. It is demonstrated that errors generated at block transitions cause the dominating contribution to the system BER floor when the impact of the additive noise is negligibly small in comparison with the effect of the laser phase noise. Even the BER floor in the case when the phase unwrapping is omitted is analytically derived and applied to emphasize the crucial importance of this signal processing operation. The analytical results are verified by full Monte Carlo simulations. The BER for another type of DQPSK receiver operation, which is based on differential phase detection, is also obtained in the analytical form using the principle of conditional probability. The principle of conditional probability is justified in the case of differential phase detection due to statistical independency of the laser phase noise induced signal phase error and the additive noise contributions. Based on the achieved analytical results the laser linewidth tolerance is calculated for different system cases.

  10. Microwave oscillator with reduced phase noise by negative feedback incorporating microwave signals with suppressed carrier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dick, G. J.; Saunders, J.

    1989-01-01

    Oscillator configurations which reduce the effect of 1/f noise sources for both direct feedback and stabilized local oscillator (STALO) circuits are developed and analyzed. By appropriate use of carrier suppression, a small signal is generated which suffers no loss of loop phase information or signal-to-noise ratio. This small signal can be amplified without degradation by multiplicative amplifier noise, and can be detected without saturation of the detector. Together with recent advances in microwave resonator Qs, these circuit improvements will make possible lower phase noise than can be presently achieved without the use of cryogenic devices.

  11. Correlated speckle noise in white-light interferometry: theoretical analysis of measurement uncertainty

    SciTech Connect

    Hering, Marco; Koerner, Klaus; Jaehne, Bernd

    2009-01-20

    The partial coherent illumination of the specimen, which is required for white-light interferometric measurements of optically rough surfaces, directly leads to speckle. The electric field of such speckle patterns strongly fluctuates in amplitude and phase. This spatially correlated noise influences the accuracy of the measuring device. Although a variety of noise sources in white-light interferometry has been studied in recent years, they do not account for spatial correlation and, hence, they cannot be applied to speckle noise. Thus, we derive a new model enabling quantitative predictions for measurement uncertainty caused by speckle. The model reveals that the accuracy can be attributed mainly to the degree of spatial correlation, i.e., the average size of a speckle, and to the coherence length of the light source. The same parameters define the signal-to-noise ratio in the spectral domain. The model helps to design filter functions that are perfectly adapted to the noise characteristics of the respective device, thus improving the accuracy of postprocessing algorithms for envelope detection. The derived expressions are also compared to numerical simulations and experimental data of two different types of interferometers. These results are a first validation of the theoretical considerations of this article.

  12. 23 CFR 772.9 - Analysis of traffic noise impacts and abatement measures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Analysis of traffic noise impacts and abatement measures... AND ENVIRONMENT PROCEDURES FOR ABATEMENT OF HIGHWAY TRAFFIC NOISE AND CONSTRUCTION NOISE § 772.9 Analysis of traffic noise impacts and abatement measures. (a) The highway agency shall determine...

  13. 23 CFR 772.9 - Analysis of traffic noise impacts and abatement measures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Analysis of traffic noise impacts and abatement measures... AND ENVIRONMENT PROCEDURES FOR ABATEMENT OF HIGHWAY TRAFFIC NOISE AND CONSTRUCTION NOISE § 772.9 Analysis of traffic noise impacts and abatement measures. (a) The highway agency shall determine...

  14. A low phase noise microwave frequency synthesis for a high-performance cesium vapor cell atomic clock

    SciTech Connect

    François, B.; Boudot, R.; Calosso, C. E.; Danet, J. M.

    2014-09-15

    We report the development, absolute phase noise, and residual phase noise characterization of a 9.192 GHz microwave frequency synthesis chain devoted to be used as a local oscillator in a high-performance cesium vapor cell atomic clock based on coherent population trapping (CPT). It is based on frequency multiplication of an ultra-low phase noise 100 MHz oven-controlled quartz crystal oscillator using a nonlinear transmission line-based chain. Absolute phase noise performances of the 9.192 GHz output signal are measured to be −42, −100, −117 dB rad{sup 2}/Hz and −129 dB rad{sup 2}/Hz at 1 Hz, 100 Hz, 1 kHz, and 10 kHz offset frequencies, respectively. Compared to current results obtained in a state-of-the-art CPT-based frequency standard developed at LNE-SYRTE, this represents an improvement of 8 dB and 10 dB at f = 166 Hz and f = 10 kHz, respectively. With such performances, the expected Dick effect contribution to the atomic clock short term frequency stability is reported at a level of 6.2 × 10{sup −14} at 1 s integration time, that is a factor 3 higher than the atomic clock shot noise limit. Main limitations are pointed out.

  15. A low phase noise microwave frequency synthesis for a high-performance cesium vapor cell atomic clock.

    PubMed

    François, B; Calosso, C E; Danet, J M; Boudot, R

    2014-09-01

    We report the development, absolute phase noise, and residual phase noise characterization of a 9.192 GHz microwave frequency synthesis chain devoted to be used as a local oscillator in a high-performance cesium vapor cell atomic clock based on coherent population trapping (CPT). It is based on frequency multiplication of an ultra-low phase noise 100 MHz oven-controlled quartz crystal oscillator using a nonlinear transmission line-based chain. Absolute phase noise performances of the 9.192 GHz output signal are measured to be -42, -100, -117 dB rad(2)/Hz and -129 dB rad(2)/Hz at 1 Hz, 100 Hz, 1 kHz, and 10 kHz offset frequencies, respectively. Compared to current results obtained in a state-of-the-art CPT-based frequency standard developed at LNE-SYRTE, this represents an improvement of 8 dB and 10 dB at f = 166 Hz and f = 10 kHz, respectively. With such performances, the expected Dick effect contribution to the atomic clock short term frequency stability is reported at a level of 6.2 × 10(-14) at 1 s integration time, that is a factor 3 higher than the atomic clock shot noise limit. Main limitations are pointed out.

  16. A low phase noise microwave frequency synthesis for a high-performance cesium vapor cell atomic clock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    François, B.; Calosso, C. E.; Danet, J. M.; Boudot, R.

    2014-09-01

    We report the development, absolute phase noise, and residual phase noise characterization of a 9.192 GHz microwave frequency synthesis chain devoted to be used as a local oscillator in a high-performance cesium vapor cell atomic clock based on coherent population trapping (CPT). It is based on frequency multiplication of an ultra-low phase noise 100 MHz oven-controlled quartz crystal oscillator using a nonlinear transmission line-based chain. Absolute phase noise performances of the 9.192 GHz output signal are measured to be -42, -100, -117 dB rad2/Hz and -129 dB rad2/Hz at 1 Hz, 100 Hz, 1 kHz, and 10 kHz offset frequencies, respectively. Compared to current results obtained in a state-of-the-art CPT-based frequency standard developed at LNE-SYRTE, this represents an improvement of 8 dB and 10 dB at f = 166 Hz and f = 10 kHz, respectively. With such performances, the expected Dick effect contribution to the atomic clock short term frequency stability is reported at a level of 6.2 × 10-14 at 1 s integration time, that is a factor 3 higher than the atomic clock shot noise limit. Main limitations are pointed out.

  17. Measurement of Acceptable Noise Level with Background Music

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Hyun-Jung; Bahng, Junghwa

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives Acceptable noise level (ANL) is a measure of the maximum background noise level (BNL) that a person is willing to tolerate while following a target story. Although researchers have used various sources of target sound in ANL measures, a limited type of background noise has been used. Extending the previous study of Gordon-Hickey & Moore (2007), the current study determined the effect of music genre and tempo on ANLs as possible factors affecting ANLs. We also investigated the relationships between individual ANLs and the familiarity of music samples and between music ANLs and subjective preference. Subjects and Methods Forty-one participants were seperated into two groups according to their ANLs, 29 low-ANL listeners and 12 high-ANL listeners. Using Korean ANL material, the individual ANLs were measured based on the listeners' most comfortable listening level and BNL. The ANLs were measured in six conditions, with different music tempo (fast, slow) and genre (K-pop, pop, classical) in a counterbalanced order. Results Overall, ANLs did not differ by the tempo of background music, but music genre significantly affected individual ANLs. We observed relatively higher ANLs with K-pop music and relatively lower ANLs with classical music. This tendency was similar in both low-ANL and high-ANL groups. However, the subjective ratings of music familiarity and preference affected ANLs differently for low-ANL and high-ANL groups. In contrast to the low-ANL listeners, the ANLs of the high-ANL listeners were significantly affected by music familiarity and preference. Conclusions The genre of background music affected ANLs obtained using background music. The degree of music familiarity and preference appears to be associated with individual susceptibility to background music only for listeners who are greatly annoyed by background noise (high-ANL listeners). PMID:26413573

  18. Analysis of a Shock-Associated Noise Prediction Model Using Measured Jet Far-Field Noise Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dahl, Milo D.; Sharpe, Jacob A.

    2014-01-01

    A code for predicting supersonic jet broadband shock-associated noise was assessed using a database containing noise measurements of a jet issuing from a convergent nozzle. The jet was operated at 24 conditions covering six fully expanded Mach numbers with four total temperature ratios. To enable comparisons of the predicted shock-associated noise component spectra with data, the measured total jet noise spectra were separated into mixing noise and shock-associated noise component spectra. Comparisons between predicted and measured shock-associated noise component spectra were used to identify deficiencies in the prediction model. Proposed revisions to the model, based on a study of the overall sound pressure levels for the shock-associated noise component of the measured data, a sensitivity analysis of the model parameters with emphasis on the definition of the convection velocity parameter, and a least-squares fit of the predicted to the measured shock-associated noise component spectra, resulted in a new definition for the source strength spectrum in the model. An error analysis showed that the average error in the predicted spectra was reduced by as much as 3.5 dB for the revised model relative to the average error for the original model.

  19. Noise texture and signal detectability in propagation-based x-ray phase-contrast tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, Cheng-Ying; Anastasio, Mark A.

    2010-01-15

    Purpose: X-ray phase-contrast tomography (PCT) is a rapidly emerging imaging modality for reconstructing estimates of an object's three-dimensional x-ray refractive index distribution. Unlike conventional x-ray computed tomography methods, the statistical properties of the reconstructed images in PCT remain unexplored. The purpose of this work is to quantitatively investigate noise propagation in PCT image reconstruction. Methods: The authors derived explicit expressions for the autocovariance of the reconstructed absorption and refractive index images to characterize noise texture and understand how the noise properties are influenced by the imaging geometry. Concepts from statistical detection theory were employed to understand how the imaging geometry-dependent statistical properties affect the signal detection performance in a signal-known-exactly/background-known-exactly task. Results: The analytical formulas for the phase and absorption autocovariance functions were implemented numerically and compared to the corresponding empirical values, and excellent agreement was found. They observed that the reconstructed refractive images are highly spatially correlated, while the absorption images are not. The numerical results confirm that the strength of the covariance is scaled by the detector spacing. Signal detection studies were conducted, employing a numerical observer. The detection performance was found to monotonically increase as the detector-plane spacing was increased. Conclusions: The authors have conducted the first quantitative investigation of noise propagation in PCT image reconstruction. The reconstructed refractive images were found to be highly spatially correlated, while absorption images were not. This is due to the presence of a Fourier space singularity in the reconstruction formula for the refraction images. The statistical analysis may facilitate the use of task-based image quality measures to further develop and optimize this emerging

  20. Phase stability in fMRI time series: effect of noise regression, off-resonance correction and spatial filtering techniques.

    PubMed

    Hagberg, Gisela E; Bianciardi, Marta; Brainovich, Valentina; Cassara, Antonino Mario; Maraviglia, Bruno

    2012-02-15

    Although the majority of fMRI studies exploit magnitude changes only, there is an increasing interest regarding the potential additive information conveyed by the phase signal. This integrated part of the complex number furnished by the MR scanners can also be used for exploring direct detection of neuronal activity and for thermography. Few studies have explicitly addressed the issue of the available signal stability in the context of phase time-series, and therefore we explored the spatial pattern of frequency specific phase fluctuations, and evaluated the effect of physiological noise components (heart beat and respiration) on the phase signal. Three categories of retrospective noise reduction techniques were explored and the temporal signal stability was evaluated in terms of a physiologic noise model, for seven fMRI measurement protocols in eight healthy subjects at 3T, for segmented CSF, gray and white matter voxels. We confirmed that for most processing methods, an efficient use of the phase information is hampered by the fact that noise from physiological and instrumental sources contributes significantly more to the phase than to the magnitude instability. Noise regression based on the phase evolution of the central k-space point, RETROICOR, or an orthonormalized combination of these were able to reduce their impact, but without bringing phase stability down to levels expected from the magnitude signal. Similar results were obtained after targeted removal of scan-to-scan variations in the bulk magnetic field by the dynamic off-resonance in k-space (DORK) method and by the temporal off-resonance alignment of single-echo time series technique (TOAST). We found that spatial high-pass filtering was necessary, and in vivo a Gaussian filter width of 20mm was sufficient to suppress physiological noise and bring the phase fluctuations to magnitude levels. Stronger filters brought the fluctuations down to levels dictated by thermal noise contributions, and for 62

  1. An intelligent subsurface buoy design for measuring ocean ambient noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bing; Wang, Lei

    2012-11-01

    A type of ultra-low power subsurface buoy system is designed to measure and record ocean ambient noise data. The buoy utilizes a vector hydrophone (pass band 20Hz-1.2kHz) and a 6-element vertical hydrophone array (pass band 20Hz-2kHz) to measure ocean ambient noise. The acoustic signals are passed through an automatically modified gain, a band pass filter, and an analog-to-digital (A/D) conversion module. They are then stored in high-capacity flash memory. In order to identify the direction of noise source, the vector sensor measuring system has integrated an electric-magnetic compass. The system provides a low-rate underwater acoustic communication system which is used to report the buoy state information and a high-speed USB interface which is used to retrieve the recorded data on deck. The whole system weighs about 125kg and can operate autonomously for more than 72 hours. The system's main architecture and the sea-trial test results are provided in this paper.

  2. Coherent noise reduction in digital holographic phase contrast microscopy by slightly shifting object.

    PubMed

    Pan, Feng; Xiao, Wen; Liu, Shuo; Wang, FanJing; Rong, Lu; Li, Rui

    2011-02-28

    A method to reduce coherent noise in digital holographic phase contrast microscopy is proposed. By slightly shifting the specimen, a series of digital holograms with different coherent noise patterns is recorded. Each hologram is reconstructed individually, while the different phase tilts of the reconstructed complex amplitudes due to the specimen shifts are corrected in the hologram plane by using numerical parametric lens method. Afterward, the lateral displacements of the phase maps from different holograms are compensated in the image plane by using digital image registration method. Thus, all phase images have same distribution, but uncorrelated coherent noise patterns. By a proper averaging procedure, the coherent noise of phase contrast image is reduced significantly. The experimental results are given to confirm the proposed method.

  3. Influence of laser phase noise on Brillouin optical time-domain analysis sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minardo, A.; Zeni, L.

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents a numerical study of the phase noise from the laser in Brillouin Optical Time-Domain analysis (BOTDA) sensors. Due to laser phase noise, the phase shift cumulated by pump and probe beams during interaction in a generic fiber position is a stochastic variable, with zero mean and variance increasing with pulse duration. For negligibly small pulse leakage, the induced noise is independent of fiber length; otherwise, it increases with fiber length as long as the laser coherence length is longer than fiber.

  4. Biomagnetic measurement system for supine subjects with expanded sensor array and real-time noise reduction.

    PubMed

    Adachi, Yoshiaki; Kawabata, Shigenori; Sasano, Tetsuo; Oyama, Yasuhiro Haruta Daisuke; Uehara, Gen; Sekihara, Kensuke

    2015-01-01

    A biomagnetic measurement system was developed, suitable for the detection of magnetospinogram (MSG) and magnetocardiogram (MCG) signals from the dorsal surface of supine subjects. It is effective for noninvasively observing the electric activity of the spinal cord and/or heart. These biomagnetic signals are extremely weak, and magnetic flux sensors based on superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) are necessary to detect them. However, highly sensitive magnetic field measurement often suffers from ultra low-band circumstance noise mainly caused by transportation in urban areas. We applied reference sensors for monitoring the circumstance noise, and their outputs multiplied by appropriate weight coefficients were directly input to the feedback coil of a SQUID gradiometer. Synthesized in-phase components reduced the ultra low-band noise by approximately 90%. Both the MSG and MCG signals were successfully detected in a moderately magnetically shielded room. Even though the MCG signal band overlapped the ultra low-band noise, the signal-to-noise ratio was improved.

  5. Geostatistic applied to seismic noise measurements for hydrothermal basin characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boaga, Jacopo; Trevisani, Sebastiano; Agostini, Laura; Galgaro, Antonio

    2016-04-01

    We present a geo-statistical analysis applied to seismic noise measurements in the framework of a thermal basin characterization. The site test is located in the N-E part of Italy (Caldiero, Verona Province) where more than 100 passive single station seismic noise measurements were conducted. The final aim was the characterization of an important hydrothermal basin, which is exploited since the Roman Period. The huge amount of measurements offers high density cover, since the measurements point has average spacing of 100 m for a total area investigated of ca 100ha. The HVSR (Horizontal to Vertical Spectral Ratio) is a geophysical passive technique used to retrieve fundamental resonance frequency of the subsoil. The measurement consists in passive recording of seismic noise with 3 components broadband receivers. From the spectral analysis of the recorded data, we can retrieve the resonance frequency of soil and hence information about depth and mechanical properties of soil covers. Since HVSR is a punctual measurement, 2d map of the results are usually extracted with interpolation procedure, as common kriging or natural neighbor techniques. Despite this accurate statistical procedure are rarely adopted for HVSR analysis, limiting the real significance of the dataset. As a matter of fact, rigorous statistical approach of the spatial distribution is neglected in common HVSR geophysical prospecting. Here we present the use of advanced spatial-statistic technique (e.g. cross-validation, residual distribution etc.) applied to HVSR data. Our results show as critic data scrubbing, joined to rigorous statistical approach for data interpolation, are mandatory to assure meaningful structural interpretation of microtremor HVSR survey. The maps obtained are compared with boreholes data, reflection seismic prospecting, and geological information. The proposed procedure highlighted the potential of these quick passive measurements, if correctly treated from the statistical point

  6. Use of a Microphone Phased Array to Determine Noise Sources in a Rocket Plume

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panda, J.; Mosher, R.

    2010-01-01

    A 70-element microphone phased array was used to identify noise sources in the plume of a solid rocket motor. An environment chamber was built and other precautions were taken to protect the sensitive condenser microphones from rain, thunderstorms and other environmental elements during prolonged stay in the outdoor test stand. A camera mounted at the center of the array was used to photograph the plume. In the first phase of the study the array was placed in an anechoic chamber for calibration, and validation of the indigenous Matlab(R) based beamform software. It was found that the "advanced" beamform methods, such as CLEAN-SC was partially successful in identifying speaker sources placed closer than the Rayleigh criteria. To participate in the field test all equipments were shipped to NASA Marshal Space Flight Center, where the elements of the array hardware were rebuilt around the test stand. The sensitive amplifiers and the data acquisition hardware were placed in a safe basement, and 100m long cables were used to connect the microphones, Kulites and the camera. The array chamber and the microphones were found to withstand the environmental elements as well as the shaking from the rocket plume generated noise. The beamform map was superimposed on a photo of the rocket plume to readily identify the source distribution. It was found that the plume made an exceptionally long, >30 diameter, noise source over a large frequency range. The shock pattern created spatial modulation of the noise source. Interestingly, the concrete pad of the horizontal test stand was found to be a good acoustic reflector: the beamform map showed two distinct source distributions- the plume and its reflection on the pad. The array was found to be most effective in the frequency range of 2kHz to 10kHz. As expected, the classical beamform method excessively smeared the noise sources at lower frequencies and produced excessive side-lobes at higher frequencies. The "advanced" beamform

  7. Influence of perturbative phase noise on active coherent polarization beam combining system.

    PubMed

    Ma, Pengfei; Zhou, Pu; Wang, Xiaolin; Ma, Yanxing; Su, Rongtao; Liu, Zejin

    2013-12-02

    In this manuscript, the influence of perturbative phase noise on active coherent polarization beam combining (CPBC) system is studied theoretically and experimentally. By employing a photo-detector to obtain phase error signal for feedback loop, actively coherent polarization beam combining of two 20 W-level single mode polarization-maintained (PM) fiber amplifiers are demonstrated with more than 94% combining efficiency. Then the influence of perturbative phase noise on active CPBC system is illustrated by incorporating a simulated phase noise signal in one of the two amplifiers. Experimental results show that the combining efficiency of the CPBC system is susceptible to the frequency or amplitude of the perturbative phase noise. In order to ensure the combining efficiency of the unit of CPBC system higher than 90%, the competence of our active phase control module for high power operation is discussed, which suggests that it could be worked at 100s W power level. The relationship between residual phase noise of the active controller and the normalized voltage signal of the photo-detector is developed and validated experimentally. Experimental results correspond exactly with the theoretically analyzed combining efficiency. Our method offers a useful approach to estimate the influence of phase noise on CPBC system.

  8. Reducing coherent noise in interference systems using the phase modulation technique.

    PubMed

    Cui, Ji-Wen; Tao, Zhang; Liu, Zhao-Bo; Tan, Jiu-Bin

    2015-08-20

    The phase modulation technique is adopted to reduce the coherent noise that arises from spurious interference. By choosing an appropriate driving signal, the method can reduce the coherent function of coherent noise to a great degree while keeping the coherent function of a coherent signal nearly unchanged. Simulation results show that for the grating interferometer, the phase error caused by coherent noise is reduced by 81.53% on average. For the Twyman interferometer, the fringe quality and contrast deteriorated by coherent noise are significantly improved. Furthermore, an experiment is set up in the phase-modulated Twyman interferometer to verify the feasibility of the principle. It is concluded that the method is effective to reduce the coherent noise in interference systems.

  9. Ambient noise interferes with auscultatory blood pressure measurement during exercise.

    PubMed

    Lightfoot, J T; Tuller, B; Williams, D F

    1996-04-01

    This study was designed to investigate whether the acoustical characteristics of the Korotkoff sounds (K-sounds) were altered during exercise and/or masked by the ambient noise. After signing informed consent, 11 subjects (8 females, 3 males; 27 +/- 2 yr; 166.2 +/- 3.2 cm; 62 +/- 5 kg; means +/- SD) underwent a cycle ergometer exercise test that increased in workload by 30 W every 3 min until volitional fatigue. Heart rate, auscultatory systolic (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP), and oxygen consumption were monitored 1 and 2 min into each work stage. The auscultatory K-sounds were recorded with a microphone mounted in a stethoscope tube for later frequency (Hz) and sound pressure level (dB SPL) analysis. Frequency and SPL of ambient noise (99 +/- 13 Hz and 64 +/- 1 db at maximum, respectively) increased during the exercise test to magnitudes similar to the SBP and DBP K-sounds (166 Hz, 66 db; and 128 Hz, 69 db, respectively). Additionally, the ambient noise was responsible for a significant damping of the frequency and SPL of the measured blood pressure K-sounds and a rise in the measured frequency of the SBP K-sounds. Furthermore, we observed "inaudible" K-sounds at lower frequencies than adjoining audible K-sounds (100 Hz vs 126 Hz), supporting the known underestimation of SBP by auscultation. The increase in ambient noise during exercise testing dampens and may mask the auscultatory K-sounds, thus making detection of the proper K-sounds during exercise difficult at best. Furthermore, the presence of inaudible K-sounds may further explain the published discrepancies between auscultatory and intraarterial blood pressure measurements during exercise.

  10. Analyses and Measures of GPR Signal with Superimposed Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chicarella, Simone; Ferrara, Vincenzo; D'Atanasio, Paolo; Frezza, Fabrizio; Pajewski, Lara; Pavoncello, Settimio; Prontera, Santo; Tedeschi, Nicola; Zambotti, Alessandro

    2014-05-01

    The influence of EM noises and environmental hard conditions on the GPR surveys has been examined analytically [1]. In the case of pulse radar GPR, many unwanted signals as stationary clutter, non-stationary clutter, random noise, and time jitter, influence the measurement signal. When GPR is motionless, stationary clutter is the most dominant signal component due to the reflections of static objects different from the investigated target, and to the direct antenna coupling. Moving objects like e.g. persons and vehicles, and the swaying of tree crown, produce non-stationary clutter. Device internal noise and narrowband jamming are e.g. two potential sources of random noises. Finally, trigger instabilities generate random jitter. In order to estimate the effective influence of these noise signal components, we organized some experimental setup of measurement. At first, we evaluated for the case of a GPR basic detection, simpler image processing of radargram. In the future, we foresee experimental measurements for detection of the Doppler frequency changes induced by movements of targets (like physiological movements of survivors under debris). We obtain image processing of radargram by using of GSSI SIR® 2000 GPR system together with the UWB UHF GPR-antenna (SUB-ECHO HBD 300, a model manufactured by Radarteam company). Our work includes both characterization of GPR signal without (or almost without) a superimposed noise, and the effect of jamming originated from the coexistence of a different radio signal. For characterizing GPR signal, we organized a measurement setup that includes the following instruments: mod. FSP 30 spectrum analyser by Rohde & Schwarz which operates in the frequency range 9 KHz - 30 GHz, mod. Sucoflex 104 cable by Huber Suhner (10 MHz - 18 GHz), and HL050 antenna by Rohde & Schwarz (bandwidth: from 850 MHz to 26.5 GHz). The next analysis of superimposed jamming will examine two different signal sources: by a cellular phone and by a

  11. How to Address Measurement Noise in Bayesian Model Averaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schöniger, A.; Wöhling, T.; Nowak, W.

    2014-12-01

    When confronted with the challenge of selecting one out of several competing conceptual models for a specific modeling task, Bayesian model averaging is a rigorous choice. It ranks the plausibility of models based on Bayes' theorem, which yields an optimal trade-off between performance and complexity. With the resulting posterior model probabilities, their individual predictions are combined into a robust weighted average and the overall predictive uncertainty (including conceptual uncertainty) can be quantified. This rigorous framework does, however, not yet explicitly consider statistical significance of measurement noise in the calibration data set. This is a major drawback, because model weights might be instable due to the uncertainty in noisy data, which may compromise the reliability of model ranking. We present a new extension to the Bayesian model averaging framework that explicitly accounts for measurement noise as a source of uncertainty for the weights. This enables modelers to assess the reliability of model ranking for a specific application and a given calibration data set. Also, the impact of measurement noise on the overall prediction uncertainty can be determined. Technically, our extension is built within a Monte Carlo framework. We repeatedly perturb the observed data with random realizations of measurement error. Then, we determine the robustness of the resulting model weights against measurement noise. We quantify the variability of posterior model weights as weighting variance. We add this new variance term to the overall prediction uncertainty analysis within the Bayesian model averaging framework to make uncertainty quantification more realistic and "complete". We illustrate the importance of our suggested extension with an application to soil-plant model selection, based on studies by Wöhling et al. (2013, 2014). Results confirm that noise in leaf area index or evaporation rate observations produces a significant amount of weighting

  12. Decoherence of entangled states by colored noise: application to precision measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andre, Axel; Sorensen, Anders; Lukin, Mikhail; van der Wal, Caspar

    2003-05-01

    Controlled manipulation of quantum systems can lead to a number of exciting new applications in quantum information science, from quantum computation to applications in precision measurements. In many such applications, decoherence is a key factor to take into account and ultimately determines the feasibility or usefulness of the proposal. The decoherence of quantum mechanical degrees of freedom is usually modeled through their interaction with a bath consisting of a large number of harmonic oscillators. The separation of energy scales between the energy of the oscillators and the interaction energy leads to separation of time scales so that the decoherence process can be modeled effectively by a markovian process (infinitely short reservoir correlation time). Low-lying state are long-lived and are therefore ideally suited for storage of quantum information and long-lived quantum memory. Due to their long lifetime, these states are sensitive to the low frequency noise of the environment. In particular 1/f noise is dominating at low frequencies and this changes the form of the decoherence. In this case, non-exponential decay is to be expected so that the importance of decoherence depends on the time-scale. We consider the accuracy of frequency measurements using the Ramsey technique when the ensemble of atoms is subject to colored noise during the measurement. It has been shown that the use of entangled states of atomic ensembles (so-called spin squeezed states) may lead to an improvement in the accuracy of frequency measurements when the system is noiseless [1]. To assess the usefulness in a real setup decoherence has to be taken into account. It has been shown that for white noise spectra the net improvement is very small [2], this conclusion is however changed significantly when the system is influenced by colored noise. We study phase noise of the reference oscillator in frequency measurements and show that for non-white noise spectra (e.g. when the noise power

  13. Application of MEMS Microphone Array Technology to Airframe Noise Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphreys, William M., Jr.; Shams, Qamar A.; Graves, Sharon S.; Sealey, Bradley S.; Bartram, Scott M.; Comeaux, Toby

    2005-01-01

    Current generation microphone directional array instrumentation is capable of extracting accurate noise source location and directivity data on a variety of aircraft components, resulting in significant gains in test productivity. However, with this gain in productivity has come the desire to install larger and more complex arrays in a variety of ground test facilities, creating new challenges for the designers of array systems. To overcome these challenges, a research study was initiated to identify and develop hardware and fabrication technologies which could be used to construct an array system exhibiting acceptable measurement performance but at much lower cost and with much simpler installation requirements. This paper describes an effort to fabricate a 128-sensor array using commercially available Micro-Electro-Mechanical System (MEMS) microphones. The MEMS array was used to acquire noise data for an isolated 26%-scale high-fidelity Boeing 777 landing gear in the Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University Stability Tunnel across a range of Mach numbers. The overall performance of the array was excellent, and major noise sources were successfully identified from the measurements.

  14. Simulations & Measurements of Airframe Noise: A BANC Workshops Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choudhari, Meelan; Lockard, David

    2016-01-01

    Airframe noise corresponds to the acoustic radiation due to turbulent flow in the vicinity of airframe components such as high-lift devices and landing gears. Since 2010, the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics has organized an ongoing series of workshops devoted to Benchmark Problems for Airframe Noise Computations (BANC). The BANC workshops are aimed at enabling a systematic progress in the understanding and high-fidelity predictions of airframe noise via collaborative investigations that integrate computational fluid dynamics, computational aeroacoustics, and in depth measurements targeting a selected set of canonical yet realistic configurations that advance the current state-of-the-art in multiple respects. Unique features of the BANC Workshops include: intrinsically multi-disciplinary focus involving both fluid dynamics and aeroacoustics, holistic rather than predictive emphasis, concurrent, long term evolution of experiments and simulations with a powerful interplay between the two, and strongly integrative nature by virtue of multi-team, multi-facility, multiple-entry measurements. This paper illustrates these features in the context of the BANC problem categories and outlines some of the challenges involved and how they were addressed. A brief summary of the BANC effort, including its technical objectives, strategy, and selective outcomes thus far is also included.

  15. Aerodynamic Performance Measurements for a Forward Swept Low Noise Fan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fite, E. Brian

    2006-01-01

    One source of noise in high tip speed turbofan engines, caused by shocks, is called multiple pure tone noise (MPT's). A new fan, called the Quiet High Speed Fan (QHSF), showed reduced noise over the part speed operating range, which includes MPT's. The QHSF showed improved performance in most respects relative to a baseline fan; however, a partspeed instability discovered during testing reduced the operating range below acceptable limits. The measured QHSF adiabatic efficiency on the fixed nozzle acoustic operating line was 85.1 percent and the baseline fan 82.9 percent, a 2.2 percent improvement. The operating line pressure rise at design point rotational speed and mass flow was 1.764 and 1.755 for the QHSF and baseline fan, respectively. Weight flow at design point speed was 98.28 lbm/sec for the QHSF and 97.97 lbm/sec for the baseline fan. The operability margin for the QHSF approached 0 percent at the 75 percent speed operating condition. The baseline fan maintained sufficient margin throughout the operating range as expected. Based on the stage aerodynamic measurements, this concept shows promise for improved performance over current technology if the operability limitations can be solved.

  16. Noise and aliases in off-axis and phase-shifting holography.

    PubMed

    Gross, M; Atlan, M; Absil, E

    2008-04-10

    We have compared the respective efficiencies of off-axis and phase-shifting holography in terms of noise and aliases removal. The comparison is made by analyzing holograms of a USAF target backlit with laser illumination, recorded with a charge-coupled device camera. We show that it is essential to remove the local oscillator beam noise, especially at low illumination levels.

  17. Comments on 'Square-wave correlation phase detector with VLF atmospheric noise'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroenert, J. T.

    1980-11-01

    Calculated sine wave response data from Raab's paper (1979) are used to develop an algorithm for converting the outputs of a squarewave correlator into estimates of signal phase that is valid for all signal-to-noise ratios. The proposed algorithm is considerably simpler than three separate schemes suggested for low, intermediate, and high signal-to-noise ratio regions.

  18. A neural network for the identification of measured helicopter noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cabell, R. H.; Fuller, C. R.; O'Brien, W. F.

    1991-01-01

    The results of a preliminary study of the components of a novel acoustic helicopter identification system are described. The identification system uses the relationship between the amplitudes of the first eight harmonics in the main rotor noise spectrum to distinguish between helicopter types. Two classification algorithms are tested; a statistically optimal Bayes classifier, and a neural network adaptive classifier. The performance of these classifiers is tested using measured noise of three helicopters. The statistical classifier can correctly identify the helicopter an average of 67 percent of the time, while the neural network is correct an average of 65 percent of the time. These results indicate the need for additional study of the envelope of harmonic amplitudes as a component of a helicopter identification system. Issues concerning the implementation of the neural network classifier, such as training time and structure of the network, are discussed.

  19. Prediction, Measurement, and Suppression of High Temperature Supersonic Jet Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seiner, John M.; Bhat, T. R. S.; Jansen, Bernard J.

    1999-01-01

    The photograph in figure 1 displays a water cooled round convergent-divergent supersonic nozzle operating slightly overexpanded near 2460 F. The nozzle is designed to produce shock free flow near this temperature at Mach 2. The exit diameter of this nozzle is 3.5 inches. This nozzle is used in the present study to establish properties of the sound field associated with high temperature supersonic jets operating fully pressure balanced (i.e. shock free) and to evaluate capability of the compressible Rayleigh model to account for principle physical features of the observed sound emission. The experiment is conducted statically (i.e. M(sub f) = 0.) in the NASA/LaRC Jet Noise Laboratory. Both aerodynamic and acoustic measurements are obtained in this study along with numerical plume simulation and theoretical prediction of jet noise. Detailed results from this study are reported previously by Seiner, Ponton, Jansen, and Lagen.

  20. Analysis of a Shock-Associated Noise Prediction Model Using Measured Jet Far-Field Noise Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dahl, Milo D.; Sharpe, Jacob A.

    2014-01-01

    A code for predicting supersonic jet broadband shock-associated noise was assessed us- ing a database containing noise measurements of a jet issuing from a convergent nozzle. The jet was operated at 24 conditions covering six fully expanded Mach numbers with four total temperature ratios. To enable comparisons of the predicted shock-associated noise component spectra with data, the measured total jet noise spectra were separated into mixing noise and shock-associated noise component spectra. Comparisons between predicted and measured shock-associated noise component spectra were used to identify de ciencies in the prediction model. Proposed revisions to the model, based on a study of the overall sound pressure levels for the shock-associated noise component of the mea- sured data, a sensitivity analysis of the model parameters with emphasis on the de nition of the convection velocity parameter, and a least-squares t of the predicted to the mea- sured shock-associated noise component spectra, resulted in a new de nition for the source strength spectrum in the model. An error analysis showed that the average error in the predicted spectra was reduced by as much as 3.5 dB for the revised model relative to the average error for the original model.

  1. Phase noise analysis of a 10-GHz optical injection-locked vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser-based optoelectronic oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coronel, Juan; Varón, Margarita; Rissons, Angélique

    2016-09-01

    The optical injection locking (OIL) technique is proposed to reduce the phase noise of a carrier generated for a vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL)-based optoelectronic oscillator. The OIL technique permits the enhancement of the VCSEL direct modulation bandwidth as well as the stabilization of the optical noise of the laser. A 2-km delay line, 10-GHz optical injection-locked VCSEL-based optoelectronic oscillator (OILVBO) was implemented. The internal noise sources of the optoelectronic oscillator components were characterized and analyzed to understand the noise conversion of the system into phase noise in the oscillator carrier. The implemented OILVBO phase noise was -105.7 dBc/Hz at 10 kHz from the carrier; this value agrees well with the performed simulated analysis. From the computed and measured phase noise curves, it is possible to infer the noise processes that take place inside the OILVBO. As a second measurement of the oscillation quality, a time-domain analysis was done through the Allan's standard deviation measurement, reported for first time for an optoelectronic oscillator using the OIL technique.

  2. Optimized phase gradient measurements and phase-amplitude interplay in optical coherence elastography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaitsev, Vladimir Y.; Matveyev, Alexander L.; Matveev, Lev A.; Gelikonov, Grigory V.; Sovetsky, Aleksandr A.; Vitkin, Alex

    2016-11-01

    In compressional optical coherence elastography, phase-variation gradients are used for estimating quasistatic strains created in tissue. Using reference and deformed optical coherence tomography (OCT) scans, one typically compares phases from pixels with the same coordinates in both scans. Usually, this limits the allowable strains to fairly small values < to 10-3, with the caveat that such weak phase gradients may become corrupted by stronger measurement noises. Here, we extend the OCT phase-resolved elastographic methodology by (1) showing that an order of magnitude greater strains can significantly increase the accuracy of derived phase-gradient differences, while also avoiding error-phone phase-unwrapping procedures and minimizing the influence of decorrelation noise caused by suprapixel displacements, (2) discussing the appearance of artifactual stiff inclusions in resultant OCT elastograms in the vicinity of bright scatterers due to the amplitude-phase interplay in phase-variation measurements, and (3) deriving/evaluating methods of phase-gradient estimation that can outperform conventionally used least-square gradient fitting. We present analytical arguments, numerical simulations, and experimental examples to demonstrate the advantages of the proposed optimized phase-variation methodology.

  3. A Ka-band monolithic low phase noise coplanar waveguide oscillator using InAlAs/InGaAs HBT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Delong; Hsu, Shawn; Pavlidis, Dimitris; Chin, Patrick; Block, Tom

    2002-02-01

    A Ka-band oscillator has been designed, fabricated and tested using InAlAs/InGaAs HBTs. Coplanar waveguide technology has been employed to improve the Q-factor of the circuit. An output power of 2.6 dBm with DC to RF conversion efficiency of 7.8% was measured at 31.7 GHz. Low phase noise of -87 and -112 dBc/Hz were achieved at an offset frequency of 100 kHz and 1 MHz respectively. These low phase noise values can be attributed to the low 1/ f noise of the InAlAs/InGaAs HBT devices and the coplanar design used for the circuit.

  4. Continuous Stern-Gerlach effect: Noise and the measurement process

    PubMed Central

    Dehmelt, Hans

    1986-01-01

    This paper resumes the discussion of the continuous Stern-Gerlach effect, a method to continuously and nondestructively determine the spin state of the same individual electron, quasipermanently confined in a Penning trap in ultrahigh vacuum at liquid helium temperatures. Here the focus is on limitations to spin-state detection due to thermal and zero-point noise and on the quantum-mechanical measurement process. Illustrations of the continuous spin measurement process in the presence of selected perturbations are provided. The alteration of the spin state brought about by the frequency measurement process is exhibited. To resolve Zeno's paradox in a specific example, a slow resonant spin flip is discussed, when interrupted by frequent spin-state measurements. The continuous Stern-Gerlach effect is shown to be a near-ideal example for the quantum mechanical measurement process, for which all steps may be followed in quantitative detail. PMID:16593696

  5. Neutron noise measurements at the Delphi subcritical assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Szieberth, M.; Klujber, G.; Kloosterman, J. L.; De Haas, D.

    2012-07-01

    The paper presents the results and evaluations of a comprehensive set of neutron noise measurements on the Delphi subcritical assembly of the Delft Univ. of Technology. The measurements investigated the effect of different source distributions (inherent spontaneous fission and {sup 252}Cf) and the position of the detectors applied (both radially and vertically). The evaluation of the measured data has been performed by the variance-to-mean ratio (VTMR, Feynman-{alpha}), the autocorrelation (ACF, Rossi-{alpha}) and the cross-correlation (CCF) methods. The values obtained for the prompt decay constant show a strong bias, which depends both on the detector position and on the source distribution. This is due to the presence of higher modes in the system. It has been observed that the {alpha} value fitted is higher when the detector is close to the boundary of the core or to the {sup 252}Cf point-source. The higher alpha-modes have also been observed by fitting functions describing two alpha-modes. The successful set of measurement also provides a good basis for further theoretical investigations including the Monte Carlo simulation of the noise measurements and the calculation of the alpha-modes in the Delphi subcritical assembly. (authors)

  6. Phase-noise limitations in continuous-variable quantum key distribution with homodyne detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corvaja, Roberto

    2017-02-01

    In continuous-variables quantum key distribution with coherent states, the advantage of performing the detection by using standard telecoms components is counterbalanced by the lack of a stable phase reference in homodyne detection due to the complexity of optical phase-locking circuits and to the unavoidable phase noise of lasers, which introduces a degradation on the achievable secure key rate. Pilot-assisted phase-noise estimation and postdetection compensation techniques are used to implement a protocol with coherent states where a local laser is employed and it is not locked to the received signal, but a postdetection phase correction is applied. Here the reduction of the secure key rate determined by the laser phase noise, for both individual and collective attacks, is analytically evaluated and a scheme of pilot-assisted phase estimation proposed, outlining the tradeoff in the system design between phase noise and spectral efficiency. The optimal modulation variance as a function of the phase-noise amount is derived.

  7. GMTI Direction of Arrival Measurements from Multiple Phase Centers.

    SciTech Connect

    Doerry, Armin W.; Bickel, Douglas L.

    2015-03-01

    Ground Moving Target Indicator (GMTI) radar attempts to detect and locate targets with unknown motion. Very slow-moving targets are difficult to locate in the presence of surrounding clutter. This necessitates multiple antenna phase centers (or equivalent) to offer independent Direction of Arrival (DOA) measurements. DOA accuracy and precision generally remains dependent on target Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR), Clutter-toNoise Ratio (CNR), scene topography, interfering signals, and a number of antenna parameters. This is true even for adaptive techniques like Space-Time-AdaptiveProcessing (STAP) algorithms.

  8. A study of GPS measurement errors due to noise and multipath interference for CGADS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Axelrad, Penina; MacDoran, Peter F.; Comp, Christopher J.

    1996-01-01

    This report describes a study performed by the Colorado Center for Astrodynamics Research (CCAR) on GPS measurement errors in the Codeless GPS Attitude Determination System (CGADS) due to noise and multipath interference. Preliminary simulation models fo the CGADS receiver and orbital multipath are described. The standard FFT algorithms for processing the codeless data is described and two alternative algorithms - an auto-regressive/least squares (AR-LS) method, and a combined adaptive notch filter/least squares (ANF-ALS) method, are also presented. Effects of system noise, quantization, baseband frequency selection, and Doppler rates on the accuracy of phase estimates with each of the processing methods are shown. Typical electrical phase errors for the AR-LS method are 0.2 degrees, compared to 0.3 and 0.5 degrees for the FFT and ANF-ALS algorithms, respectively. Doppler rate was found to have the largest effect on the performance.

  9. Effect of noise on Frequency-Resolved Optical Gating measurements of ultrashort pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Fittinghoff, D.N.; DeLong, K.W.; Ladera, C.L.; Trebino, R.

    1995-02-01

    We study the effects of noise in Frequency-Resolved Optical Gating measurements of ultrashort pulses. We quantify the measurement accuracy in the presence of additive, muliplicative, and quantization noise, and discuss filtering and pre-processing of the data.

  10. Phase noise management of spin-wave delay-line oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drozdovskii, A. V.; Ustinov, A. B.

    2015-12-01

    A phase noise of microwave oscillators having an active ring circuitry with a spin- wave delay line is theoretically and experimentally investigated. The delay line was made with yttrium iron garnet (YIG) film epitaxially grown on gadolinium gallium garnet substrate. Obtained results demonstrate a management of the oscillator phase noise with a variation of the distance between antennas used for excitation and reception of spin waves in the YIG film.

  11. Measurement of Model Noise in a Hard-Wall Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soderman, Paul T.

    2006-01-01

    Identification, analysis, and control of fluid-mechanically-generated sound from models of aircraft and automobiles in special low-noise, semi-anechoic wind tunnels are an important research endeavor. Such studies can also be done in aerodynamic wind tunnels that have hard walls if phased microphone arrays are used to focus on the noise-source regions and reject unwanted reflections or background noise. Although it may be difficult to simulate the total flyover or drive-by noise in a closed wind tunnel, individual noise sources can be isolated and analyzed. An acoustic and aerodynamic study was made of a 7-percent-scale aircraft model in a NASA Ames 7-by-10-ft (about 2-by-3-m) wind tunnel for the purpose of identifying and attenuating airframe noise sources. Simulated landing, takeoff, and approach configurations were evaluated at Mach 0.26. Using a phased microphone array mounted in the ceiling over the inverted model, various noise sources in the high-lift system, landing gear, fins, and miscellaneous other components were located and compared for sound level and frequency at one flyover location. Numerous noise-alleviation devices and modifications of the model were evaluated. Simultaneously with acoustic measurements, aerodynamic forces were recorded to document aircraft conditions and any performance changes caused by geometric modifications. Most modern microphone-array systems function in the frequency domain in the sense that spectra of the microphone outputs are computed, then operations are performed on the matrices of microphone-signal cross-spectra. The entire acoustic field at one station in such a system is acquired quickly and interrogated during postprocessing. Beam-forming algorithms are employed to scan a plane near the model surface and locate noise sources while rejecting most background noise and spurious reflections. In the case of the system used in this study, previous studies in the wind tunnel have identified noise sources up to 19 d

  12. Noise robustness of the incompatibility of quantum measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinosaari, Teiko; Kiukas, Jukka; Reitzner, Daniel

    2015-08-01

    The existence of incompatible measurements is a fundamental phenomenon having no explanation in classical physics. Intuitively, one considers given measurements to be incompatible within a framework of a physical theory, if their simultaneous implementation on a single physical device is prohibited by the theory itself. In the mathematical language of quantum theory, measurements are described by POVMs (positive operator valued measures), and given POVMs are by definition incompatible if they cannot be obtained via coarse-graining from a single common POVM; this notion generalizes noncommutativity of projective measurements. In quantum theory, incompatibility can be regarded as a resource necessary for manifesting phenomena such as Clauser-Horne-Shimony-Holt (CHSH) Bell inequality violations or Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen (EPR) steering which do not have classical explanation. We define operational ways of quantifying this resource via the amount of added classical noise needed to render the measurements compatible, i.e., useless as a resource. In analogy to entanglement measures, we generalize this idea by introducing the concept of incompatibility measure, which is monotone in local operations. In this paper, we restrict our consideration to binary measurements, which are already sufficient to explicitly demonstrate nontrivial features of the theory. In particular, we construct a family of incompatibility monotones operationally quantifying violations of certain scaled versions of the CHSH Bell inequality, prove that they can be computed via a semidefinite program, and show how the noise-based quantities arise as special cases. We also determine maximal violations of the new inequalities, demonstrating how Tsirelson's bound appears as a special case. The resource aspect is further motivated by simple quantum protocols where our incompatibility monotones appear as relevant figures of merit.

  13. Comparative effects of optical-correlator signal-dependent and signal-independent noise on pattern-recognition performance with the phase-only filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terrillon, Jean-Christophe

    1995-11-01

    The comparative effects of optical-correlator signal-dependent and additive signal-independent noise on correlation-filter performance are analyzed by three different performance measures. For an identical value of the signal-to-noise ratio imposed on each type of noise in a binary input image, computer simulations performed with the phase-only filter show (i) that additive Gaussian signal-independent noise yields a much larger correlation-performance degradation than signal-dependent noise and (ii) that the different types of signal-dependent noise lead to similar correlation results because of similar effects on the input image that are inherent to the nature of the noise.

  14. Application of phase stretch transform to plate license identification under blur and noise conditions (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asghari, Hossein; Hadar, Ofer; Jalali, Bahram

    2016-09-01

    This paper deals with implementing a new algorithm for edge detection based on the Phase Stretch Transform (PST) for purposes of car plate license recognition. In PST edge detection algorithm, the image is first filtered with a spatial kernel followed by application of a nonlinear frequency-dependent phase. The output of the transform is the phase in the spatial domain. The main step is the 2-D phase function which is typically applied in the frequency domain. The amount of phase applied to the image is frequency dependent with higher amount of phase applied to higher frequency features of the image. Since sharp transitions, such as edges and corners, contain higher frequencies, PST emphasizes the edge information. Features can be further enhanced by applying thresholding and morphological operations. Here we investigate the influence of noise and blur on the ability to recognize the characters in the plate license, by comparison of our suggested algorithm with the well known Canny algorithm. We use several types of noise distributions among them, Gaussian noise, salt and paper noise and uniform distributed noise, with several levels of noise variances. The simulated blur is related to the car velocity and we applied several filters representing different velocities of the car. Another interesting degradation that we intend to investigate is the cases that Laser shield license plate cover is used to distort the image taken by the authorities. Our comparison results are presented in terms of True positive, False positive and False negative probabilities.

  15. Jet transport noise - A comparison of predicted and measured noise for ILS and two-segment approaches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, K. C.; Bourquin, K. R.

    1974-01-01

    Centerline noise measured during standard ILS and two-segment approaches in DC-8-61 aircraft were compared with noise predicted for these procedures using an existing noise prediction technique. Measured data is considered to be in good agreement with predicted data. Ninety EPNdB sideline locations were calculated from flight data obtained during two-segment approaches and were compared with predicted 90 EPNdB contours that were computed using three different models for excess ground attenuation and a contour with no correction for ground attenuation. The contour not corrected for ground attenuation was in better agreement with the measured data.

  16. Entanglement, number fluctuations and optimized interferometric phase measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Q. Y.; Vaughan, T. G.; Drummond, P. D.; Reid, M. D.

    2012-09-01

    We derive a phase-entanglement criterion for two bosonic modes that is immune to number fluctuations, using the generalized Moore-Penrose inverse to normalize the phase-quadrature operator. We also obtain a phase-squeezing criterion that is immune to number fluctuations using similar techniques. These are used to obtain an operational definition of relative phase-measurement sensitivity via the analysis of phase measurement in interferometry. We show that these criteria are proportional to the enhanced phase-measurement sensitivity. The phase-entanglement criterion is the hallmark of a new type of quantum-squeezing, namely planar quantum-squeezing. This has the property that it squeezes simultaneously two orthogonal spin directions, which is possible owing to the fact that the SU(2) group that describes spin symmetry has a three-dimensional parameter space of higher dimension than the group for photonic quadratures. A practical advantage of planar quantum-squeezing is that, unlike conventional spin-squeezing, it allows noise reduction over all phase angles simultaneously. The application of this type of squeezing is to the quantum measurement of an unknown phase. We show that a completely unknown phase requires two orthogonal measurements and that with planar quantum-squeezing it is possible to reduce the measurement uncertainty independently of the unknown phase value. This is a different type of squeezing compared to the usual spin-squeezing interferometric criterion, which is applicable only when the measured phase is already known to a good approximation or can be measured iteratively. As an example, we calculate the phase entanglement of the ground state of a two-well, coupled Bose-Einstein condensate, similarly to recent experiments. This system demonstrates planar squeezing in both the attractive and the repulsive interaction regime.

  17. Challenges and Techniques in Measurements of Noise, Cryogenic Noise and Power in Millimeter-Wave and Submillimeter-Wave Amplifiers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samoska, Lorene

    2014-01-01

    We will present the topic of noise measurements, including cryogenic noise measurements, of Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuit (MMIC) and Sub-Millimeter-Wave Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuit (S-MMIC) amplifiers, both on-wafer, and interfaced to waveguide modules via coupling probes. We will also present an overview of the state-of-the-art in waveguide probe techniques for packaging amplifier chips, and discuss methods to obtain the lowest loss packaging techniques available to date. Linearity in noise measurements will be discussed, and experimental methods for room temperature and cryogenic noise measurements will be presented. We will also present a discussion of power amplifier measurements for millimeter-wave and submillimeter-wave amplifiers, and the tools and hardware needed for this characterization.

  18. Farfield inflight measurements of high-speed turboprop noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balombin, J. R.; Loeffler, I. J.

    1983-01-01

    A flight program was carried out to determine the variation of noise level with distance from a model high-speed propeller. Noise measurements were obtained at different distances from a SR-3 propeller mounted on a JetStar aircraft, with the test instrumentation mounted on a Learjet flown in formation. The propeller was operated at 0.8 m flight Mach number, 1.12 helical tip Mach number and at 0.7 flight Mach number, 1.0 helical tip Mach number. The instantaneous pressure from individual blades was observed to rise faster at the 0.8 flight speed, than at the 0.7 M flight speed. The measured levels appeared to decrease in good agreement with a 6 dB/doubling of distance decay, over the measurement range of approximately 16 m to 100 m distance. Further extrapolation, to the distances represented by a community, would suggest that the propagated levels during cruise would not cause a serious community annoyance.

  19. Farfield inflight measurement of high-speed turboprop noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balombin, J. R.; Loeffler, I. J.

    1982-01-01

    A flight program was carried out to determine the variation of noise level with distance from a model high speed propeller. Noise measurements were obtained at different distances from a SR-3 propeller mounted on a JetStar aircraft, with the test instrumentation mounted on a Lear jet flown in formation. The propeller was operated at 0.8 flight Mach number, 1.12 helical tip Mach number and at 0.7 flight Mach number, 1.0 helical tip Mach number. The instantaneous pressure from individual blades was observed to rise faster at the 0.8 M flight speed, than at the 0.7 M flight speed. The measured levels appeared to decrease in good agreement with a 6 dB/doubling of distance decay, over the measurement range of approximately 16 m to 100 m distance. Further extrapolation, to the distances represented by a community, would suggest that the propagated levels during cruise would not cause a serious community annoyance.

  20. Farfield inflight measurement of high-speed turboprop noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balombin, J. R.; Loeffler, I. J.

    A flight program was carried out to determine the variation of noise level with distance from a model high speed propeller. Noise measurements were obtained at different distances from a SR-3 propeller mounted on a JetStar aircraft, with the test instrumentation mounted on a Lear jet flown in formation. The propeller was operated at 0.8 flight Mach number, 1.12 helical tip Mach number and at 0.7 flight Mach number, 1.0 helical tip Mach number. The instantaneous pressure from individual blades was observed to rise faster at the 0.8 M flight speed, than at the 0.7 M flight speed. The measured levels appeared to decrease in good agreement with a 6 dB/doubling of distance decay, over the measurement range of approximately 16 m to 100 m distance. Further extrapolation, to the distances represented by a community, would suggest that the propagated levels during cruise would not cause a serious community annoyance.

  1. Impact of plasma noise on a direct thrust measurement system.

    PubMed

    Pottinger, S J; Lamprou, D; Knoll, A K; Lappas, V J

    2012-03-01

    In order to evaluate the accuracy and sensitivity of a pendulum-type thrust measurement system, a linear variable differential transformer (LVDT) and a laser optical displacement sensor have been used simultaneously to determine the displacement resulting from an applied thrust. The LVDT sensor uses an analog interface, whereas the laser sensor uses a digital interface to communicate the displacement readings to the data acquisition equipment. The data collected by both sensors show good agreement for static mass calibrations and validation with a cold gas thruster. However, the data obtained using the LVDT deviate significantly from that of the laser sensor when operating two varieties of plasma thrusters: a radio frequency (RF) driven plasma thruster, and a DC powered plasma thruster. Results establish that even with appropriate shielding and signal filtering the LVDT sensor is subject to plasma noise and radio frequency interactions which result in anomalous thrust readings. Experimental data show that the thrust determined using the LVDT system in a direct current plasma environment and a RF discharge is approximately a factor of three higher than the thrust values obtained using a laser sensor system for the operating conditions investigated. These findings are of significance to the electric propulsion community as LVDT sensors are often utilized in thrust measurement systems and accurate thrust measurement and the reproducibility of thrust data is key to analyzing thruster performance. Methods are proposed to evaluate system susceptibility to plasma noise and an effective filtering scheme presented for DC discharges.

  2. Extremely low frequency band station for natural electromagnetic noise measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fornieles-Callejón, J.; Salinas, A.; Toledo-Redondo, S.; Portí, J.; Méndez, A.; Navarro, E. A.; Morente-Molinera, J. A.; Soto-Aranaz, C.; Ortega-Cayuela, J. S.

    2015-03-01

    A new permanent ELF measurement station has been deployed in Sierra Nevada, Spain. It is composed of two magnetometers, oriented NS and EW, respectively. At 10 Hz, their sensitivity is 19 μV/pT and the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is 28 dB for a time-varying signal of 1 pT, the expected field amplitude in Sierra Nevada. The station operates for frequencies below 24 Hz. The magnetometers, together with their corresponding electronics, have been specifically designed to achieve such an SNR for small signals. They are based on high-resolution search coils with ferromagnetic core and 106 turns, operating in limited geometry configuration. Different system noise sources are considered, and a study of the SNR is also included. Finally, some initial Schumann resonance measurements are presented in order to validate the performance of the measurement station, including 1 h length spectra, daily variations of resonance amplitudes and frequencies for the different seasons, and a 3 day spectrogram.

  3. Coherent Noise Rejection in a Three-Phase Power Inverter

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-01

    DC value that has the same amplitude as the sine wave. The power inverter uses an optimal form of pulse-width modulation ( PWM ), called space vector...subtracted from the control input to compensate for the disturbance. 14. SUBJECT TERMS Pulse Width Modulation ( PWM ), Linear Quadratic Regulator (LQR...uses an optimal form of pulse-width modulation ( PWM ), called space vector modulation, which causes the harmonic noise. In order to reject the

  4. Temporal phase mask encrypted optical steganography carried by amplified spontaneous emission noise.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ben; Wang, Zhenxing; Shastri, Bhavin J; Chang, Matthew P; Frost, Nicholas A; Prucnal, Paul R

    2014-01-13

    A temporal phase mask encryption method is proposed and experimentally demonstrated to improve the security of the stealth channel in an optical steganography system. The stealth channel is protected in two levels. In the first level, the data is carried by amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) noise, which cannot be detected in either the time domain or spectral domain. In the second level, even if the eavesdropper suspects the existence of the stealth channel, each data bit is covered by a fast changing phase mask. The phase mask code is always combined with the wide band noise from ASE. Without knowing the right phase mask code to recover the stealth data, the eavesdropper can only receive the noise like signal with randomized phase.

  5. Extended Kalman filtering for joint mitigation of phase and amplitude noise in coherent QAM systems.

    PubMed

    Pakala, Lalitha; Schmauss, Bernhard

    2016-03-21

    We numerically investigate our proposed carrier phase and amplitude noise estimation (CPANE) algorithm using extend Kalman filter (EKF) for joint mitigation of linear and non-linear phase noise as well as amplitude noise on 4, 16 and 64 polarization multiplexed (PM) quadrature amplitude modulation (QAM) 224 Gb/s systems. The results are compared to decision directed (DD) carrier phase estimation (CPE), DD phase locked loop (PLL) and universal CPE (U-CPE) algorithms. Besides eliminating the necessity of phase unwrapping function, EKF-CPANE shows improved performance for both back-to-back (BTB) and transmission scenarios compared to the aforementioned algorithms. We further propose a weighted innovation approach (WIA) of the EKF-CPANE which gives an improvement of 0.3 dB in the Q-factor, compared to the original algorithm.

  6. Experimental observation of excess noise in a detuned phase-modulation harmonic mode-locking laser

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Shiquan; Bao Xiaoyi

    2006-09-15

    The intracavity phase-modulated laser can work in two distinct stages: 1) phase mode-locking when the applied modulation frequency is equal to the cavity's fundamental frequency or one of its harmonics, and 2) the FM laser oscillation at a moderate detuned modulation frequency. In this paper, we experimentally studied the noise buildup process in the transition from FM laser oscillation to phase mode-locking in a phase-modulated laser. We found that the relaxation oscillation frequency varies with the modulation frequency detuning and the relaxation oscillation will occur twice in the transition region. Between these two relaxation oscillations, the supermode noise can be significantly enhanced, which is evidence of excess noise in laser systems. All of these results can be explained by the theory of Floquet modes in a phase-modulated laser cavity.

  7. JT8D-100 turbofan engine, phase 1. [noise reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The JT8D turbofan engine, widely used in short and medium range transport aircraft, contributes substantially to airport community noise. The jet noise is predominant in the JT8D engine and may be reduced in a modified engine, without loss of thrust, by increasing the airflow to reduce jet velocity. A configuration study evaluated the effects of fan airflow, fan pressure ratio, and bypass ratio on noise, thrust, and fuel comsumption. The cycle selected for the modified engine was based upon an increased diameter, single-stage fan and two additional core engine compressor stages, which replace the existing two-stage fan. Modifications were also made to the low pressure turbine to provide the increased torque required by the larger diameter fan. The resultant JT8D-100 engine models have the following characteristics at take-off thrust, compared to the current JT8D engine: Airflow and bypass ratio are increased, and fan pressure ratio and engine speed are reduced. The resultant engine is also longer, larger in diameter, and heavier than the JT8D base model, but these latter changes are compensated by the increased thrust and decreased fuel comsumption of the modified engine, thus providing the capability for maintaining the performance of the current JT8D-powered aircraft.

  8. JOHNSON NOISE THERMOMETRY FOR DRIFT-FREE MEASUREMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Britton Jr, Charles L; Ezell, N Dianne Bull; Roberts, Michael; Holcomb, David Eugene; Wood, Richard Thomas

    2014-01-01

    In order for Johnson Noise Thermometry (JNT) to be beneficial to SMR designers, it must offer advantages beyond the current state-of-the-art technology. Comparisons to traditional RTDs and thermocouples will involve life-cycle costs, installation footprint, reliability, and accuracy. With JNT, there is additional equipment beyond what is required for the traditional RTD measurement. Therefore, the JNT-RTD system will involve additional complexity and this additional complexity must be justified. Operators will want to know that the measurement is reliable and trustworthy. It is also important that the sensor involve little, if any, additional ongoing maintenance work and that it has a low probability of causing any malfunction of the primary measurement channel. If these features can be successfully demonstrated, the JNT-RTD system could potentially save money and increase plant reliability.

  9. Measuring a Small Hydraulic Gradient in the Presence of Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McElwee, C. D.; Devlin, J. F.

    2004-12-01

    recording data at a high frequency over an extended period of time. The amplitude of the noise in the area was found to be larger than the head differences measured between wells; subsequently, techniques for extracting the usable signal were employed and found to be successful. This paper presents the results of our measurement of the natural gradient in the presence of noise, points out some of the pitfalls to avoid when measuring small gradients, and quantifies the uncertainties in flow velocity (magnitude and direction) that can result from gradient measurements in the presence of noise.

  10. ICI mitigation in concurrent multi-band receiver due to the phase noise and IQ imbalance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hui-Kyu; Ryu, Heung-Gyoon

    2012-06-01

    For the next generation long-term evolution (LTE) advanced mobile communication system, 100 MHz bandwidth and 1 Gbit/s data speed are needed. However, there is not enough and wide vacant frequency band. Therefore, spectrum aggregation method has been studied to extend available frequency bands. Frequency synthesiser and power amplifier of transceiver should cover this wide bandwidth. The phase noise and In-phase and quadrature (IQ) imbalance would increase, which would be a serious problem in this transceiver. Also, signal-to-noise ratio becomes degraded because of nonlinearity and the quantisation noises of the Analog-to-digital conversion (ADC) in the receiver. Uplink of LTE-advanced uses Aggregated DFT-spread (NxDFT-S) orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) signals. Since the effect of the phase noise and IQ imbalance are more serious in the multi-band Discrete Fourier transform (DFT)-spreading OFDM system, we like to analyse the effect of inter-carrier interference in frequency domain of receiver and the degradation of bit error rate (BER) performance. Also, by the channel response in frequency domain of the uplink system, we separate phase noise and IQ imbalance effect. Finally, we like to propose a compensation method that estimates the channel exactly and removes IQ imbalance and phase noise. Simulation result shows that the proposed method achieves the 2 dB performance gain of BER = 10-4.

  11. Phase noise in pulsed Doppler lidar and limitations on achievable single-shot velocity accuracy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcnicholl, P.; Alejandro, S.

    1992-01-01

    The smaller sampling volumes afforded by Doppler lidars compared to radars allows for spatial resolutions at and below some sheer and turbulence wind structure scale sizes. This has brought new emphasis on achieving the optimum product of wind velocity and range resolutions. Several recent studies have considered the effects of amplitude noise, reduction algorithms, and possible hardware related signal artifacts on obtainable velocity accuracy. We discuss here the limitation on this accuracy resulting from the incoherent nature and finite temporal extent of backscatter from aerosols. For a lidar return from a hard (or slab) target, the phase of the intermediate frequency (IF) signal is random and the total return energy fluctuates from shot to shot due to speckle; however, the offset from the transmitted frequency is determinable with an accuracy subject only to instrumental effects and the signal to noise ratio (SNR), the noise being determined by the LO power in the shot noise limited regime. This is not the case for a return from a media extending over a range on the order of or greater than the spatial extent of the transmitted pulse, such as from atmospheric aerosols. In this case, the phase of the IF signal will exhibit a temporal random walk like behavior. It will be uncorrelated over times greater than the pulse duration as the transmitted pulse samples non-overlapping volumes of scattering centers. Frequency analysis of the IF signal in a window similar to the transmitted pulse envelope will therefore show shot-to-shot frequency deviations on the order of the inverse pulse duration reflecting the random phase rate variations. Like speckle, these deviations arise from the incoherent nature of the scattering process and diminish if the IF signal is averaged over times greater than a single range resolution cell (here the pulse duration). Apart from limiting the high SNR performance of a Doppler lidar, this shot-to-shot variance in velocity estimates has a

  12. Stability and Phase Noise Tests of Two Cryo-Cooled Sapphire Oscillators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dick, G. John; Wang, Rabi T.

    1998-01-01

    A cryocooled Compensated Sapphire Oscillator (CSO), developed for the Cassini Ka-band Radio Science experiment, and operating in the 8K - 10K temperature range was previously demonstrated to show ultra-high stability of sigma(sub y) = 2.5 x 10 (exp -15) for measuring times 200 seconds less than or equal to tau less than or equal to 600 seconds using a hydrogen maser as reference. We present here test results for a second unit which allows CSO short-term stability and phase noise to be measured for the first time. Also included are design details of a new RF receiver and an intercomparison with the first CSO unit. Cryogenic oscillators operating below about 10K offer the highest possible short term stability of any frequency sources. However, their use has so far been restricted to research environments due to the limited operating periods associated with liquid helium consumption. The cryocooled CSO is being built in support of the Cassini Ka-band Radio Science experiment and is designed to operate continuously for periods of a year or more. Performance targets are a stability of 3-4 x 10 (exp -15) (1 second less than or equal to tau less than or equal to 100 seconds) and phase noise of -73dB/Hz @ 1Hz measured at 34 GHz. Installation in 5 stations of NASA's deep space network (DSN) is planned in the years 2000 - 2002. In the previous tests, actual stability of the CSO for measuring times tau less than or equal to 200 seconds could not be directly measured, being masked by short-term fluctuations of the H-maser reference. Excellent short-term performance, however, could be inferred by the success of an application of the CSO as local oscillator (L.O.) to the JPL LITS passive atomic standard, where medium-term stability showed no degradation due to L.O. instabilities at a level of (sigma)y = 3 x 10 (exp -14)/square root of tau. A second CSO has now been constructed, and all cryogenic aspects have been verified, including a resonator turn-over temperature of 7.907 K

  13. Bandwidth of non-contact vital sign detection with a noise suppression phase locked loop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Zongyang; Zhang, Ying

    2016-04-01

    In a dual-carrier vital sign detection system, we have designed a noise suppression scheme that uses phase locked loop (PLL) to automatically suppress the noise induced by range correlation and transmission paths. The system uses two microwave carriers at 5.6 and 5.68 GHz generated by two phase locked signal generators to extract the noise and vital sign respectively. The feedback microwave signals are mixed with local 5.68-GHz signal to transfer to the vial sign signal and low frequency intermediate frequency (IF) signal. When the IF signal corresponding to 5.68 GHz microwave signal is locked to a highly stable low noise reference, the noises of IF signal and vital sign signal are suppressed as their corresponding microwave signals are highly correlated. In this system, the noise suppression performance is related to the bandwidth of the PLL, which needs to be carefully designed. Through the theoretical analysis, initial bandwidth is chosen to be 200 Hz. Then the charge pump current is changed to adjust the bandwidth and the corresponding noise suppression performance is evaluated using experiments. The results show the system with a charge pump current 0.625 mA, which corresponds to about 50 Hz bandwidth, exhibits a better noise performance. In addition, at different bandwidth, the vital sign detection system is compared with a design scheme with unlocked PLL and demonstrates superior performance at all bandwidths.

  14. Laboratory studies of scales for measuring helicopter noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ollerhead, J. B.

    1982-01-01

    The adequacy of the effective perceived noise level (EPNL) procedure for rating helicopter noise annoyance was investigated. Recordings of 89 helicopters and 30 fixed wing aircraft (CTOL) flyover sounds were rated with respect to annoyance by groups of approximately 40 subjects. The average annoyance scores were transformed to annoyance levels defined as the equally annoying sound levels of a fixed reference sound. The sound levels of the test sounds were measured on various scales, with and without corrections for duration, tones, and impulsiveness. On average, the helicopter sounds were judged equally annoying to CTOL sounds when their duration corrected levels are approximately 2 dB higher. Multiple regression analysis indicated that, provided the helicopter/CTOL difference of about 2 dB is taken into account, the particular linear combination of level, duration, and tone corrections inherent in EPNL is close to optimum. The results reveal no general requirement for special EPNL correction terms to penalize helicopter sounds which are particularly impulsive; impulsiveness causes spectral and temporal changes which themselves adequately amplify conventionally measured sound levels.

  15. Improved noise-immune phase-unwrapping algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cusack, R.; Huntley, J. M.; Goldrein, H. T.

    1995-02-01

    An algorithm for unwrapping noisy phase maps has recently been proposed, based on the identification of discontinuity sources that mark the start or end of a 2 pi phase discontinuity. Branch cuts between sources act as barriers to unwrapping, resulting in a unique phase map that is independent of the unwrapping route. We investigate four methods for optimizing the placement of the cuts. A modified nearest neighbor approach is found to be the most successful and can reliably unwrap unfiltered speckle-interferometry phase maps with discontinuity source densities of 0.05 sources pixel-1.

  16. Demonstration of all-optical phase noise suppression scheme using optical nonlinearity and conversion/dispersion delay.

    PubMed

    Chitgarha, Mohammad Reza; Khaleghi, Salman; Ziyadi, Morteza; Mohajerin-Ariaei, Amirhossein; Almaiman, Ahmed; Daab, Wajih; Rogawski, Devora; Tur, Moshe; Touch, Joseph D; Langrock, Carsten; Fejer, Martin M; Willner, Alan E

    2014-05-15

    We propose and demonstrate an all-optical phase noise reduction scheme that uses optical nonlinear mixing and tunable optical delays to suppress the low-speed phase noise induced by laser linewidth. By utilizing the phase conjugate copy of the original signal and two narrow-linewidth optical pumps, the phase noise induced by laser linewidth can be reduced by a factor of ∼5 for a laser with 500-MHz phase noise bandwidth. The error-vector-magnitude can be improved from ∼30% to ∼14% for the same laser linewidth for 40-Gbit/s quadrature phase shift keying signal.

  17. Effects of background noise on inter-trial phase coherence and auditory N1-P2 responses to speech stimuli.

    PubMed

    Koerner, Tess K; Zhang, Yang

    2015-10-01

    This study investigated the effects of a speech-babble background noise on inter-trial phase coherence (ITPC, also referred to as phase locking value (PLV)) and auditory event-related responses (AERP) to speech sounds. Specifically, we analyzed EEG data from 11 normal hearing subjects to examine whether ITPC can predict noise-induced variations in the obligatory N1-P2 complex response. N1-P2 amplitude and latency data were obtained for the /bu/syllable in quiet and noise listening conditions. ITPC data in delta, theta, and alpha frequency bands were calculated for the N1-P2 responses in the two passive listening conditions. Consistent with previous studies, background noise produced significant amplitude reduction and latency increase in N1 and P2, which were accompanied by significant ITPC decreases in all the three frequency bands. Correlation analyses further revealed that variations in ITPC were able to predict the amplitude and latency variations in N1-P2. The results suggest that trial-by-trial analysis of cortical neural synchrony is a valuable tool in understanding the modulatory effects of background noise on AERP measures.

  18. Effect of Directional Array Size on the Measurement of Airframe Noise Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooks, Thomas F.; Humphreys, William M., Jr.

    1999-01-01

    A study was conducted to examine the effects of overall size of directional (or phased) arrays on the measurement of aeroacoustic components. An airframe model was mounted in the potential core of an open-jet windtunnel, with the directional arrays located outside the flow in an anechoic environment. Two array systems were used; one with a solid measurement angle that encompasses 31.6 deg.of source directivity and a smaller one that encompasses 7.2 deg. The arrays, and sub-arrays of various sizes, measured noise from a calibrator source and flap edge model setups. In these cases, noise was emitted from relatively small, but finite size source regions, with intense levels compared to other sources. Although the larger arrays revealed much more source region detail, the measured source levels were substantially reduced due to finer resolution compared to that of the smaller arrays. To better understand the measurements quantitatively, an analytical model was used to define the basic relationships between array to source region sizes and measured output level. Also, the effect of noise scattering by shear layer turbulence was examined using the present data and those of previous studies. Taken together, the two effects were sufficient to explain spectral level differences between arrays of different sizes. An important result of this study is that total (integrated) noise source levels are retrievable and the levels are independent of the array size as long as certain experimental and processing criteria are met. The criteria for both open and closed tunnels are discussed. The success of special purpose diagonal-removal processing in obtaining integrated results is apparently dependent in part on source distribution. Also discussed is the fact that extended sources are subject to substantial measurement error, especially for large arrays.

  19. Reduction of phase-induced intensity noise in a fiber-based coherent Doppler lidar using polarization control.

    PubMed

    Rodrigo, Peter John; Pedersen, Christian

    2010-03-01

    Optimization of signal-to-noise ratio is an important aspect in the design of optical heterodyne detection systems such as a coherent Doppler lidar (CDL). In a CDL, optimal performance is achieved when the noise in the detector signal is dominated by local oscillator shot-noise. Most modern CDL systems are built using rugged and cost-efficient fiber optic components. Unfortunately, leakage signals such as residual reflections inherent within fiber components (e.g. circulator) can introduce phase-induced intensity noise (PIIN) to the Doppler spectrum in a CDL. Such excess noise may be a few orders of magnitude above the shot-noise level within the relevant CDL frequency bandwidth--corrupting the measurement of typically weak backscattered signals. In this study, observation of PIIN in a fiber-based CDL with a master-oscillator power-amplifier tapered semiconductor laser source is reported. Furthermore, we experimentally demonstrate what we believe is a newly proposed method using a simple polarization scheme to reduce PIIN by more than an order of magnitude.

  20. Implementation of the EU environmental noise directive: lessons from the first phase of strategic noise mapping and action planning in Ireland.

    PubMed

    King, E A; Murphy, E; Rice, H J

    2011-03-01

    The first phase of noise mapping and action planning in Ireland, in accordance with EU Directive 2002/49/EC, is now complete. In total this included one agglomeration, one airport and approximately 600 km of major roads outside the agglomeration. These noise maps describe the level of noise exposure of approximately 1.25 million people. The first phase of noise mapping was dealt with by five noise mapping bodies while 26 action planning authorities were involved in the development of the associated action plans. The second phase of noise mapping, due to be completed in 2012, sees a reduction in the defined thresholds describing the required agglomerations, roads and railways that have to be mapped. This will have a significant impact on the extent of mapping required. In Ireland this will result in an increased number of local authorities being required to develop strategic noise maps for their area along with the further development of associated action plans. It is appropriate at this point to review the work process and results from the first phase of noise mapping in Ireland in order to establish areas that could be improved, throughout the noise mapping project. In this paper a review of the implementation procedures focussing on (dominant) road traffic noise is presented. It is identified that more standardisation is needed and this could be achieved by the establishment of a national expert steering group.

  1. Analysis of Measured Environmental Noise Levels: An Assessment of the Effects of Airbase Operational Model Variables on Predicted Noise Exposure Levels

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-06-01

    measured noise data was used in an effort to quantify the complicating factors relevant to airbase enviromental noise prediction. These factors are...were used to optimize the operational profiles influencing the noise predictions at that location. Some marginal benefit from this effort was realized...Records The McChord measured noise data was originally recorded on printed paper tapes. The measured noise events’ data were entered into the

  2. The influence of underwater turbulence on optical phase measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redding, Brandon; Davis, Allen; Kirkendall, Clay; Dandridge, Anthony

    2016-05-01

    Emerging underwater optical imaging and sensing applications rely on phase-sensitive detection to provide added functionality and improved sensitivity. However, underwater turbulence introduces spatio-temporal variations in the refractive index of water which can degrade the performance of these systems. Although the influence of turbulence on traditional, non-interferometric imaging has been investigated, its influence on the optical phase remains poorly understood. Nonetheless, a thorough understanding of the spatio-temporal dynamics of the optical phase of light passing through underwater turbulence are crucial to the design of phase-sensitive imaging and sensing systems. To address this concern, we combined underwater imaging with high speed holography to provide a calibrated characterization of the effects of turbulence on the optical phase. By measuring the modulation transfer function of an underwater imaging system, we were able to calibrate varying levels of optical turbulence intensity using the Simple Underwater Imaging Model (SUIM). We then used high speed holography to measure the temporal dynamics of the optical phase of light passing through varying levels of turbulence. Using this method, we measured the variance in the amplitude and phase of the beam, the temporal correlation of the optical phase, and recorded the turbulence induced phase noise as a function of frequency. By bench marking the effects of varying levels of turbulence on the optical phase, this work provides a basis to evaluate the real-world potential of emerging underwater interferometric sensing modalities.

  3. Low frequency wind noise contributions in measurement microphones.

    PubMed

    Raspet, Richard; Yu, Jiao; Webster, Jeremy

    2008-03-01

    In a previous paper [R. Raspet, et al., J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 119, 834-843 (2006)], a method was introduced to predict upper and lower bounds for wind noise measured in spherical wind-screens from the measured incident velocity spectra. That paper was restricted in that the predictions were only valid within the inertial range of the incident turbulence, and the data were from a measurement not specifically designed to test the predictions. This paper extends the previous predictions into the source region of the atmospheric wind turbulence, and compares the predictions to measurements made with a large range of wind-screen sizes. Predictions for the turbulence-turbulence interaction pressure spectrum as well as the stagnation pressure fluctuation spectrum are calculated from a form fit to the velocity fluctuation spectrum. While the predictions for turbulence-turbulence interaction agree well with measurements made within large (1.0 m) wind-screens, and the stagnation pressure predictions agree well with unscreened gridded microphone measurements, the mean shear-turbulence interaction spectra do not consistently appear in measurements.

  4. Low phase noise oscillator using two parallel connected amplifiers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleinberg, Leonard L.

    1987-01-01

    A high frequency oscillator is provided by connecting two amplifier circuits in parallel where each amplifier circuit provides the other amplifier circuit with the conditions necessary for oscillation. The inherent noise present in both amplifier circuits causes the quiescent current, and in turn, the generated frequency, to change. The changes in quiescent current cause the transconductance and the load impedance of each amplifier circuit to vary, and this in turn results in opposing changes in the input susceptance of each amplifier circuit. Because the changes in input susceptance oppose each other, the changes in quiescent current also oppose each other. The net result is that frequency stability is enhanced.

  5. High Resolution Viscosity Measurement by Thermal Noise Detection.

    PubMed

    Sandoval, Felipe Aguilar; Sepúlveda, Manuel; Bellon, Ludovic; Melo, Francisco

    2015-11-03

    An interferometric method is implemented in order to accurately assess the thermal fluctuations of a micro-cantilever sensor in liquid environments. The power spectrum density (PSD) of thermal fluctuations together with Sader's model of the cantilever allow for the indirect measurement of the liquid viscosity with good accuracy. The good quality of the deflection signal and the characteristic low noise of the instrument allow for the detection and corrections of drawbacks due to both the cantilever shape irregularities and the uncertainties on the position of the laser spot at the fluctuating end of the cantilever. Variation of viscosity below 0:03mPa·s was detected with the alternative to achieve measurements with a volume as low as 50 µL.

  6. Analysis of a first order phase locked loop in the presence of Gaussian noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blasche, P. R.

    1977-01-01

    A first-order digital phase locked loop is analyzed by application of a Markov chain model. Steady state loop error probabilities, phase standard deviation, and mean loop transient times are determined for various input signal to noise ratios. Results for direct loop simulation are presented for comparison.

  7. On estimating the phase of periodic waveform in additive Gaussian noise, part 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauch, L. L.

    1984-11-01

    Motivated by advances in signal processing technology that support more complex algorithms, a new look is taken at the problem of estimating the phase and other parameters of a periodic waveform in additive Gaussian noise. The general problem was introduced and the maximum a posteriori probability criterion with signal space interpretation was used to obtain the structures of optimum and some suboptimum phase estimators for known constant frequency and unknown constant phase with an a priori distribution. Optimal algorithms are obtained for some cases where the frequency is a parameterized function of time with the unknown parameters and phase having a joint a priori distribution. In the last section, the intrinsic and extrinsic geometry of hypersurfaces is introduced to provide insight to the estimation problem for the small noise and large noise cases.

  8. Digital coherent superposition of optical OFDM subcarrier pairs with Hermitian symmetry for phase noise mitigation.

    PubMed

    Yi, Xingwen; Chen, Xuemei; Sharma, Dinesh; Li, Chao; Luo, Ming; Yang, Qi; Li, Zhaohui; Qiu, Kun

    2014-06-02

    Digital coherent superposition (DCS) provides an approach to combat fiber nonlinearities by trading off the spectrum efficiency. In analogy, we extend the concept of DCS to the optical OFDM subcarrier pairs with Hermitian symmetry to combat the linear and nonlinear phase noise. At the transmitter, we simply use a real-valued OFDM signal to drive a Mach-Zehnder (MZ) intensity modulator biased at the null point and the so-generated OFDM signal is Hermitian in the frequency domain. At receiver, after the conventional OFDM signal processing, we conduct DCS of the optical OFDM subcarrier pairs, which requires only conjugation and summation. We show that the inter-carrier-interference (ICI) due to phase noise can be reduced because of the Hermitain symmetry. In a simulation, this method improves the tolerance to the laser phase noise. In a nonlinear WDM transmission experiment, this method also achieves better performance under the influence of cross phase modulation (XPM).

  9. Purity loss and degradation of qubit-field correlations and entanglement due to phase noise in nonlinear interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hessian, H. A.; Mohamed, A.-B. A.

    2014-09-01

    Numerical simulations and calculation of both the total entropy and the sub-entropies are used to investigate the purity loss in nonlinear interaction of a qubit with coherent field. While, the mutual entropy is used as a measure of the total correlations and the negativity as a measure to the entanglement. We show that the purity and entanglement behave different for standard energy dissipation as compared to an energy preserving phase noise coupling as introduced by Milburn. It is found that a very strong sensitivity of the degradation both total correlation with entanglement to the amount of phase damping and the chosen coupling. In particular for a coherent initial field state the maximum obtainable correlation is strongly reduced even for very weak noise.

  10. Noise and measurement errors in a practical two-state quantum bit commitment protocol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loura, Ricardo; Almeida, Álvaro J.; André, Paulo S.; Pinto, Armando N.; Mateus, Paulo; Paunković, Nikola

    2014-05-01

    We present a two-state practical quantum bit commitment protocol, the security of which is based on the current technological limitations, namely the nonexistence of either stable long-term quantum memories or nondemolition measurements. For an optical realization of the protocol, we model the errors, which occur due to the noise and equipment (source, fibers, and detectors) imperfections, accumulated during emission, transmission, and measurement of photons. The optical part is modeled as a combination of a depolarizing channel (white noise), unitary evolution (e.g., systematic rotation of the polarization axis of photons), and two other basis-dependent channels, namely the phase- and bit-flip channels. We analyze quantitatively the effects of noise using two common information-theoretic measures of probability distribution distinguishability: the fidelity and the relative entropy. In particular, we discuss the optimal cheating strategy and show that it is always advantageous for a cheating agent to add some amount of white noise—the particular effect not being present in standard quantum security protocols. We also analyze the protocol's security when the use of (im)perfect nondemolition measurements and noisy or bounded quantum memories is allowed. Finally, we discuss errors occurring due to a finite detector efficiency, dark counts, and imperfect single-photon sources, and we show that the effects are the same as those of standard quantum cryptography.

  11. Measurement of the thermal noise of a proton beam in the NAP-M storage ring

    SciTech Connect

    Dement'ev, E.M.; Dikanskii, N.S.; Medvedko, A.S.; Parkhomchuk, V.V.; Pestrikov, D.V.

    1980-08-01

    Measurements of the spectra and power of the noise of uncooled and cooled proton beams in the NAP-M storage ring are reported. Features of the noise of the cooled beam due to particle interaction are analyzed.

  12. Broad-band Rayleigh wave phase velocity maps (10-150 s) across the United States from ambient noise data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Kaifeng; Luo, Yinhe; Xie, Jun

    2017-02-01

    In this study, we demonstrate the feasibility of imaging broad-band (10-150 s) Rayleigh wave phase velocity maps on a continental scale using ambient noise tomography (ANT). We obtain broad-band Rayleigh waves from cross-correlations of ambient noise data between all station pairs of USArray and measure the dispersion curves from these cross-correlations at a period band of 10-150 s. The large-scale dense USArray enables us to obtain over 500 000 surface wave paths which cover the contiguous United States densely. Using these paths, we generate Rayleigh wave phase velocity maps at 10-150 s periods. Our phase velocity maps are similar to other reported phase velocity maps based on ambient noise data at short periods (<50 s) and based on earthquake data at intermediate/long periods (50-90 s). This study extends ANT from short/intermediate periods (<50 s) to long periods up to 150 s in a continental scale of the USA. These broad-band phase velocity maps from ANT can be used to construct 3-D lithospheric and asthenospheric velocity structures.

  13. Noise-and delay-induced phase transitions of the dimer-monomer surface reaction model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Chunhua; Wang, Hua

    2012-06-01

    The effects of noise and time-delayed feedback in the dimer-monomer (DM) surface reaction model are investigated. Applying small delay approximation, we construct a stochastic delayed differential equation and its Fokker-Planck equation to describe the state evolution of the DM reaction model. We show that the noise can only induce first-order irreversible phase transition (IPT) characteristic of the DM model, however the combination of the noise and time-delayed feedback can simultaneously induce first- and second-order IPT characteristics of the DM model. Therefore, it is shown that the well-known first- and second-order IPT characteristics of the DM model may be viewed as noise-and delay-induced phase transitions.

  14. Phase-shifting interferometry corrupted by white and non-white additive noise.

    PubMed

    Servin, M; Quiroga, J A; Estrada, J C

    2011-05-09

    The standard tool to estimate the phase of a sequence of phase-shifted interferograms is the Phase Shifting Algorithm (PSA). The performance of PSAs to a sequence of interferograms corrupted by non-white additive noise has not been reported before. In this paper we use the Frequency Transfer Function (FTF) of a PSA to generalize previous white additive noise analysis to non-white additive noisy interferograms. That is, we find the ensemble average and the variance of the estimated phase in a general PSA when interferograms corrupted by non-white additive noise are available. Moreover, for the special case of additive white-noise, and using the Parseval's theorem, we show (for the first time in the PSA literature) a useful relationship of the PSA's noise robustness; in terms of its FTF spectrum, and in terms of its coefficients. In other words, we find the PSA's estimated phase variance, in the spectral space as well as in the PSA's coefficients space.

  15. Clinical Trials: D-Methionine to Reduce Noise-Induced Hearing Loss. Phase 3

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-03-01

    placebo-controlled Phase 3 clinical trial of oral D-met to reduce noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) and tinnitus . The goal of the study is to...primary objective of this study is to determine the efficacy of D-Met in preventing NIHL or reducing tinnitus secondary to a minimum of 500 rounds...an oral, orange flavored suspension of D-methionine can prevent noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) and tinnitus in our troops. Hypotheses

  16. Unscented Kalman filters for polarization state tracking and phase noise mitigation.

    PubMed

    Jignesh, Jokhakar; Corcoran, Bill; Zhu, Chen; Lowery, Arthur

    2016-09-19

    Simultaneous polarization and phase noise tracking and compensation is proposed based on an unscented Kalman filter (UKF). We experimentally demonstrate the tracking under noise-loading and after 800-km single-mode fiber transmission with 20-Gbaud QPSK and 16-QAM signals. These experiments show that the proposed UKF outperforms both conventional blind tracing algorithms and a previously proposed extended Kalman filter, at the cost of higher complexity. Additionally, we propose and test modified Kalman filter algorithms to reduce computational complexity.

  17. Noise-Induced Phase Locking and Frequency Mixing in an Optical Bistable System with Delayed Feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misono, Masatoshi; Miyakawa, Kenji

    2011-11-01

    The interplay between stochastic resonance (SR) and coherence resonance (CR) is experimentally studied in an optical bistable system with a time-delayed feedback loop. We demonstrate that the phase of the noise-induced motion is locked to that of the periodic input when the ratio of their frequencies is a simple rational number. We also demonstrate that the interplay between SR and CR generates frequency-mixed modes, and that the efficiency of frequency mixing is enhanced by the optimum noise.

  18. An integrated low phase noise radiation-pressure-driven optomechanical oscillator chipset

    PubMed Central

    Luan, Xingsheng; Huang, Yongjun; Li, Ying; McMillan, James F.; Zheng, Jiangjun; Huang, Shu-Wei; Hsieh, Pin-Chun; Gu, Tingyi; Wang, Di; Hati, Archita; Howe, David A.; Wen, Guangjun; Yu, Mingbin; Lo, Guoqiang; Kwong, Dim-Lee; Wong, Chee Wei

    2014-01-01

    High-quality frequency references are the cornerstones in position, navigation and timing applications of both scientific and commercial domains. Optomechanical oscillators, with direct coupling to continuous-wave light and non-material-limited f × Q product, are long regarded as a potential platform for frequency reference in radio-frequency-photonic architectures. However, one major challenge is the compatibility with standard CMOS fabrication processes while maintaining optomechanical high quality performance. Here we demonstrate the monolithic integration of photonic crystal optomechanical oscillators and on-chip high speed Ge detectors based on the silicon CMOS platform. With the generation of both high harmonics (up to 59th order) and subharmonics (down to 1/4), our chipset provides multiple frequency tones for applications in both frequency multipliers and dividers. The phase noise is measured down to −125 dBc/Hz at 10 kHz offset at ~400 μW dropped-in powers, one of the lowest noise optomechanical oscillators to date and in room-temperature and atmospheric non-vacuum operating conditions. These characteristics enable optomechanical oscillators as a frequency reference platform for radio-frequency-photonic information processing. PMID:25354711

  19. An integrated low phase noise radiation-pressure-driven optomechanical oscillator chipset.

    PubMed

    Luan, Xingsheng; Huang, Yongjun; Li, Ying; McMillan, James F; Zheng, Jiangjun; Huang, Shu-Wei; Hsieh, Pin-Chun; Gu, Tingyi; Wang, Di; Hati, Archita; Howe, David A; Wen, Guangjun; Yu, Mingbin; Lo, Guoqiang; Kwong, Dim-Lee; Wong, Chee Wei

    2014-10-30

    High-quality frequency references are the cornerstones in position, navigation and timing applications of both scientific and commercial domains. Optomechanical oscillators, with direct coupling to continuous-wave light and non-material-limited f × Q product, are long regarded as a potential platform for frequency reference in radio-frequency-photonic architectures. However, one major challenge is the compatibility with standard CMOS fabrication processes while maintaining optomechanical high quality performance. Here we demonstrate the monolithic integration of photonic crystal optomechanical oscillators and on-chip high speed Ge detectors based on the silicon CMOS platform. With the generation of both high harmonics (up to 59 th order) and subharmonics (down to 1/4), our chipset provides multiple frequency tones for applications in both frequency multipliers and dividers. The phase noise is measured down to -125 dBc/Hz at 10 kHz offset at ~400 μW dropped-in powers, one of the lowest noise optomechanical oscillators to date and in room-temperature and atmospheric non-vacuum operating conditions. These characteristics enable optomechanical oscillators as a frequency reference platform for radio-frequency-photonic information processing.

  20. Relative phase noise induced impairment in M-ary phase-shift-keying coherent optical communication system using distributed fiber Raman amplifier.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jingchi; Tang, Ming; Fu, Songnian; Shum, Perry Ping; Liu, Deming

    2013-04-01

    We show for the first time, to the best of our knowledge, that, in a coherent communication system that employs a phase-shift-keying signal and Raman amplification, besides the pump relative intensity noise (RIN) transfer to the amplitude, the signal's phase will also be affected by pump RIN through the pump-signal cross-phase modulation. Although the average pump power induced linear phase change can be compensated for by the phase-correction algorithm, a relative phase noise (RPN) parameter has been found to characterize pump RIN induced stochastic phase noise. This extra phase noise brings non-negligible system impairments in terms of the Q-factor penalty. The calculation shows that copumping leads to much more stringent requirements to pump RIN, and relatively larger fiber dispersion helps to suppress the RPN induced impairment. A higher-order phase-shift keying (PSK) signal is less tolerant to noise than a lower-order PSK.

  1. Real-time full bandwidth measurement of spectral noise in supercontinuum generation

    PubMed Central

    Wetzel, B.; Stefani, A.; Larger, L.; Lacourt, P. A.; Merolla, J. M.; Sylvestre, T.; Kudlinski, A.; Mussot, A.; Genty, G.; Dias, F.; Dudley, J. M.

    2012-01-01

    The ability to measure real-time fluctuations of ultrashort pulses propagating in optical fiber has provided significant insights into fundamental dynamical effects such as modulation instability and the formation of frequency-shifting rogue wave solitons. We report here a detailed study of real-time fluctuations across the full bandwidth of a fiber supercontinuum which directly reveals the significant variation in measured noise statistics across the spectrum, and which allows us to study correlations between widely separated spectral components. For two different propagation distances corresponding to the onset phase of spectral broadening and the fully-developed supercontinuum, we measure real time noise across the supercontinuum bandwidth, and we quantify the supercontinuum noise using statistical higher-order moments and a frequency-dependent intensity correlation map. We identify correlated spectral regions within the supercontinuum associated with simultaneous sideband generation, as well as signatures of pump depletion and soliton-like pump dynamics. Experimental results are in excellent agreement with simulations. PMID:23193436

  2. Improving Phase Measurement Procedures for Pump-Probe Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, Cara P.; /Merrimack Coll. /SLAC

    2011-06-22

    Pump-probe experiments use a visible laser to excite an atom or molecule, while an X-ray pulse measures its shape. The phases and pulse times of each beam are used to calculate the object's positing at a given time - a moving picture of the chemical reaction. Currently, the fastest X-ray pulses can travel a time-length of five femtoseconds. However, present-day phase measurements can only be done as quickly as 50 femtoseconds. The purpose of this research is to explore ways in which phase-timing measurements can be improved. Three experiments are undergone to find the key factors in phase-timing. Different frequency mixers, the radio frequency (RF) components used for phase measurement, are tested for the highest sensitivity. These same mixers are then tested using two different power splitters for the lowest noise-to-sensitivity ratio. Lastly, the temperature dependency of phase is explored by testing each component at a range of temperatures to see how the phase is affected. This research demonstrated that certain mixers were more sensitive than others; on average, one mixer performed the best with a sensitivity of 0.0230 V/ps. The results also showed that same mixer combined with one splitter gave the best noise-to-sensitivity ratio overall with an average of 6.95E-04 fs/{radical}(Hz). All the components tested exhibited a temperature-dependent phase change (ranging from 1.69 to 81.6 fs/{sup o}C); the same mixer that performed at the highest sensitivity with the least noise had a significantly greater phase change than the other two. In conclusion, the experiments showed that a temperature-controlled environment is most appropriate for phase measurement. They also demonstrated that mixers are not significantly noisy and that certain types of mixers may perform better than others, which could be accounted for in their construction. The results of this research encourage further investigation into the study of different mixers and other RF components used in pump

  3. Errors and uncertainties in the measurement of ultrasonic wave attenuation and phase velocity.

    PubMed

    Kalashnikov, Alexander N; Challis, Richard E

    2005-10-01

    This paper presents an analysis of the error generation mechanisms that affect the accuracy of measurements of ultrasonic wave attenuation coefficient and phase velocity as functions of frequency. In the first stage of the analysis we show that electronic system noise, expressed in the frequency domain, maps into errors in the attenuation and the phase velocity spectra in a highly nonlinear way; the condition for minimum error is when the total measured attenuation is around 1 Neper. The maximum measurable total attenuation has a practical limit of around 6 Nepers and the minimum measurable value is around 0.1 Neper. In the second part of the paper we consider electronic noise as the primary source of measurement error; errors in attenuation result from additive noise whereas errors in phase velocity result from both additive noise and system timing jitter. Quantization noise can be neglected if the amplitude of the additive noise is comparable with the quantization step, and coherent averaging is employed. Experimental results are presented which confirm the relationship between electronic noise and measurement errors. The analytical technique is applicable to the design of ultrasonic spectrometers, formal assessment of the accuracy of ultrasonic measurements, and the optimization of signal processing procedures to achieve a specified accuracy.

  4. Phase noise effects on turbulent weather radar spectrum parameter estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jonggil; Baxa, Ernest G., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    Accurate weather spectrum moment estimation is important in the use of weather radar for hazardous windshear detection. The effect of the stable local oscillator (STALO) instability (jitter) on the spectrum moment estimation algorithm is investigated. Uncertainty in the stable local oscillator will affect both the transmitted signal and the received signal since the STALO provides transmitted and reference carriers. The proposed approach models STALO phase jitter as it affects the complex autocorrelation of the radar return. The results can therefore by interpreted in terms of any source of system phase jitter for which the model is appropriate and, in particular, may be considered as a cumulative effect of all radar system sources.

  5. Background noise measurements on prototype of SNR 300 steam generator at Hengelo

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, D.A.; Meyer, G.J.A.M.; Ahlgren, F.F.; Van Westerbrugge, J.K.

    1980-01-01

    Acoustic noise amplitudes were measured in a 50 MW helical coil prototype of a steam generator mounted in the Hengelo test facility in a joint technical program betwen GE/DOE and TNO/NERATOOM. Background noise measurements were completed with test conditions ranging from quiescent (with no sodium or water flow) to high thermal power transfer from the sodium circuit to the water circuit. The acoustic noise pressure on the vessel wall was measured using externally mounted accelerometers. Data were obtained for the effect of sodium flow rate on the acoustic noise amplitude. A preliminary correlation was derived for the acoustic noise generated by nucleate boiling. Leak detection and location were demonstrated.

  6. Adaptive multidirectional frequency domain filter for noise removal in wrapped phase patterns.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guixiong; Chen, Dongxue; Peng, Yanhua; Zeng, Qilin

    2016-08-01

    In order to avoid the detrimental effects of excessive noise in the phase fringe patterns of a laser digital interferometer over the accuracy of phase unwrapping and the successful detection of mechanical fatigue defects, an effective method of adaptive multidirectional frequency domain filtering is introduced based on the characteristics of the energy spectrum of localized wrapped phase patterns. Not only can this method automatically set the cutoff frequency, but it can also effectively filter out noise while preserving the image edge information. Compared with the sine and cosine transform filtering and the multidirectional frequency domain filtering, the experimental results demonstrate that the image filtered by our method has the fewest number of residues and is the closest to the noise-free image, compared to the two aforementioned methods, demonstrating the effectiveness of this adaptive multidirectional frequency domain filter.

  7. A 3 to 5 GHz low-phase-noise fractional-N frequency synthesizer with adaptive frequency calibration for GSM/PCS/DCS/WCDMA transceivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaohua, Pan; Niansong, Mei; Hu, Chen; Yumei, Huang; Zhiliang, Hong

    2012-01-01

    A low-phase-noise Σ—Δ fractional-N frequency synthesizer for GSM/PCS/DCS/WCDMA transceivers is presented. The voltage controlled oscillator is designed with a modified digital controlled capacitor array to extend the tuning range and minimize phase noise. A high-resolution adaptive frequency calibration technique is introduced to automatically choose frequency bands and increase phase-noise immunity. A prototype is implemented in 0.13 μm CMOS technology. The experimental results show that the designed 1.2 V wideband frequency synthesizer is locked from 3.05 to 5.17 GHz within 30 μs, which covers all five required frequency bands. The measured in-band phase noise are -89, -95.5 and -101 dBc/Hz for 3.8 GHz, 2 GHz and 948 MHz carriers, respectively, and accordingly the out-of-band phase noise are -121, -123 and -132 dBc/Hz at 1 MHz offset, which meet the phase-noise-mask requirements of the above-mentioned standards.

  8. Novel Rx IQ mismatch compensation considering laser phase noise for CO-OFDM system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Xiurong; Ding, Zhaocai; Li, Kun; Wang, Xiao

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, a novel compensation scheme for receiver (Rx) in-phase/quadrature (IQ) mismatch is proposed in coherent optical orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (CO-OFDM) system in the presence of laser phase noise. In this scheme, laser phase noise and channel distortion were combined as a new channel transfer factor, the IQ mismatch factor and initial channel transfer factor can be estimated independently based on the relationship of IQ mismatch factors. And the channel transfer factor can be updated on a symbol-by-symbol basis which retrieves an estimation of the phase noise value by extracting and averaging the phase drift of all OFDM sub-channels. Numerical results indicate that when the phase and amplitude mismatch are 10° and 2 dB respectively, a 1.6 dB optical signal-to noise ratio is improved at laser linewidth of 60 kHz. Furthermore, the complexity of the proposed method is analyzed in terms of the number of required complex multiplications per bit.

  9. Nonlinear phase noise separation method for on-off keying transmission system modeling with non-Gaussian noise generation in optical fibers.

    PubMed

    Vanin, Evgeny; Jacobsen, Gunnar; Berntson, Anders

    2007-06-15

    We propose a novel method for effective simulation of optical fiber transmission system performance with nonlinear interaction between the amplified spontaneous emission noise and the modulated optical signal employing on-off keying. The method enables a standard analytical description of the receiver operation even when the detected optical field obeys non-Gaussian statistics with a substantial amount of nonlinear phase noise accumulated along the fiber link due to strong signal-noise interaction.

  10. Procedure for Separating Noise Sources in Measurements of Turbofan Engine Core Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miles, Jeffrey Hilton

    2006-01-01

    The study of core noise from turbofan engines has become more important as noise from other sources like the fan and jet have been reduced. A multiple microphone and acoustic source modeling method to separate correlated and uncorrelated sources has been developed. The auto and cross spectrum in the frequency range below 1000 Hz is fitted with a noise propagation model based on a source couplet consisting of a single incoherent source with a single coherent source or a source triplet consisting of a single incoherent source with two coherent point sources. Examples are presented using data from a Pratt & Whitney PW4098 turbofan engine. The method works well.

  11. Extracting fingerprint of wireless devices based on phase noise and multiple level wavelet decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Weichen; Sun, Zhuo; Kong, Song

    2016-10-01

    Wireless devices can be identified by the fingerprint extracted from the signal transmitted, which is useful in wireless communication security and other fields. This paper presents a method that extracts fingerprint based on phase noise of signal and multiple level wavelet decomposition. The phase of signal will be extracted first and then decomposed by multiple level wavelet decomposition. The statistic value of each wavelet coefficient vector is utilized for constructing fingerprint. Besides, the relationship between wavelet decomposition level and recognition accuracy is simulated. And advertised decomposition level is revealed as well. Compared with previous methods, our method is simpler and the accuracy of recognition remains high when Signal Noise Ratio (SNR) is low.

  12. Dissemination stability and phase noise characteristics in a cascaded, fiber-based long-haul radio frequency dissemination network.

    PubMed

    Gao, C; Wang, B; Zhu, X; Yuan, Y B; Wang, L J

    2015-09-01

    To study the dissemination stability and phase noise characteristics of the cascaded fiber-based RF dissemination, we perform an experiment using three sets of RF modulated frequency dissemination systems. The experimental results show that the total transfer stability of the cascaded system can be given by σ(T)(2)=∑(i=1)(N)σ(i)(2) (σ(i) is the frequency dissemination stability of the ith segment and N is the quantity of segments). Furthermore, for each segment, the phase noise of recovered frequency signal is also measured. The results show that for an N-segment, cascaded dissemination system, its stability degrades only by a factor of N. This sub-linear relation makes the cascaded, RF-dissemination method a very attractive one for long-haul, time and frequency dissemination network.

  13. A low-phase-noise ring oscillator with coarse and fine tuning in a standard CMOS process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haijun, Gao; Lingling, Sun; Xiaofei, Kuang; Liheng, Lou

    2012-07-01

    A low-phase-noise wideband ring oscillator with coarse and fine tuning techniques implemented in a standard 65 nm CMOS process is presented. Direct frequency modulation in the ring oscillator is analyzed and a switched capacitor array is introduced to produce the lower VCO gain required to suppress this effect. A two-dimensional high-density stacked MOM-capacitor was adopted as the switched capacitor to make the proposed ring VCO compatible with standard CMOS processes. The designed ring VCO exhibits an output frequency from 480 to 1100 MHz, resulting in a tuning range of 78%, and the measured phase noise is -120 dBc/Hz @ 1 MHz at 495 MHz output. The VCO core consumes 3.84 mW under a 1.2 V supply voltage and the corresponding FOM is -169 dBc/Hz.

  14. An Analysis of FM Jamming and Noise Quality Measures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-12-01

    sequel, 3 this cae will be referred to as NBFM/N became of the corepondece to the rough definition of narrowband FM (29). A full discussion of the... definition of noise quality (30)) actually shows an increase in noise quality with a decrease in peak frequency deviation from WBFM/N towards NBFM/N. An...of the behavior of FM/N from a theoretical standpoint and the provision of further motivation for a standard definition of noise quality which

  15. Noise generated by quiet engine fans. 2: Fan A. [measurement of power spectra and sideline perceived noise levels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montegani, F. J.; Schaefer, J. W.; Stakolich, E. G.

    1974-01-01

    A significant effort within the NASA Quiet Engine Program has been devoted to acoustical evaluation at the Lewis Research Center noise test facility of a family of full-scale fans. This report, documents the noise results obtained with fan A - a 1.5-pressure-ratio, 1160-ft/sec-tip-speed fan. The fan is described and some aerodynamic operating data are given. Far-field noise around the fan was measured for a variety of configurations pertaining to acoustical treatment and over a range of operating conditions. Complete results of 1/3-octave band analysis of the data are presented in tabular form. Included also are power spectra and sideline perceived noise levels. Some representative 1/3-octave band data are presented graphically, and sample graphs of continuous narrow-band spectra are also provided.

  16. Long-term effects of noise reduction measures on noise annoyance and sleep disturbance: the Norwegian facade insulation study.

    PubMed

    Amundsen, Astrid H; Klæboe, Ronny; Aasvang, Gunn Marit

    2013-06-01

    The Norwegian facade insulation study includes one pre-intervention and two post-intervention surveys. The facade-insulating measures reduced indoor noise levels by 7 dB on average. Before the intervention, 43% of the respondents were highly annoyed by noise. Half a year after the intervention, the proportion of respondents who were highly annoyed by road traffic noise had been significantly reduced to 15%. The second post-intervention study (2 yr after the first post-intervention study) showed that the proportion of highly annoyed respondents had not changed since the first post-intervention study. The reduction in the respondents' self-reported sleep disturbances (due to traffic noise) also remained relatively stable from the first to the second post-intervention study. In the control group, there were no statistically significant differences in annoyance between the pre-intervention and the two post-intervention studies. Previous studies of traffic changes have reported that people "overreact" to noise changes. This study indicated that when considering a receiver measure, such as facade insulation, the effect of reducing indoor noise levels could be predicted from exposure-response curves based on previous studies. Thus no evidence of an "overreaction" was found.

  17. Sound-Level Measurements of a Light Airplane Modified to Reduce Noise Reaching the Ground

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vogeley, A W

    1949-01-01

    An Army liaison-type airplane, representative of personal airplanes in the 150 to 200 horsepower class, has been modified to reduce propeller and engine noise according to known principles of airplane-noise reduction. Noise-level measurements demonstrate that, with reference to an observer on the ground, a noisy airplane of this class can be made quiet -- perhaps more quiet than necessary. In order to avoid extreme and unnecessary modifications, acceptable noise levels must be determined.

  18. A fully integrated W-band push-push CMOS VCO with low phase noise and wide tuning range.

    PubMed

    Wang, To-Po

    2011-07-01

    A circuit topology suitable for a low-phase-noise wide-tuning-range push-push voltage-controlled oscillator (VCO) is proposed in this paper. By applying varactors connected between drain and source terminations of the cross-coupled pair, the tuning range is effectively increased and the phase noise is improved. Moreover, a small capacitor is inserted between the VCO core and testing buffer to reduce loading effects on the VCO core. Furthermore, the enhanced second-harmonic output signal is extracted at middle of the varactors, leading to the elimination of RF choke at VCO's second-harmonic output port and a reduced chip size. Based on the proposed architecture, this VCO fabricated in 0.18-μm CMOS exhibits a measured 6.35% tuning range. Operating at a supply voltage of 1.2 V, the VCO core consumes 7.5-mW dc power, and the measured phase noise is -75 dBc/Hz and -91.5 dBc/Hz at 100-kHz and 1-MHz offsets from the 77.8-GHz carrier, respectively. Compared with previously published silicon-based VCOs over 70 GHz, this work can simultaneously achieve low phase noise, wide tuning range, and low dc power consumption, leading to a superior figure of merit (FOM), and better figure of merit considering the tuning range (FOM(T)). In addition, this fully integrated VCO also demonstrates the highest operation frequency among previously published 0.18-μm CMOS VCOs.

  19. High Resolution DOA Estimation Using Unwrapped Phase Information of MUSIC-Based Noise Subspace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichige, Koichi; Saito, Kazuhiko; Arai, Hiroyuki

    This paper presents a high resolution Direction-Of-Arrival (DOA) estimation method using unwrapped phase information of MUSIC-based noise subspace. Superresolution DOA estimation methods such as MUSIC, Root-MUSIC and ESPRIT methods are paid great attention because of their brilliant properties in estimating DOAs of incident signals. Those methods achieve high accuracy in estimating DOAs in a good propagation environment, but would fail to estimate DOAs in severe environments like low Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR), small number of snapshots, or when incident waves are coming from close angles. In MUSIC method, its spectrum is calculated based on the absolute value of the inner product between array response and noise eigenvectors, means that MUSIC employs only the amplitude characteristics and does not use any phase characteristics. Recalling that phase characteristics plays an important role in signal and image processing, we expect that DOA estimation accuracy could be further improved using phase information in addition to MUSIC spectrum. This paper develops a procedure to obtain an accurate spectrum for DOA estimation using unwrapped and differentiated phase information of MUSIC-based noise subspace. Performance of the proposed method is evaluated through computer simulation in comparison with some conventional estimation methods.

  20. Some aspects of sound discomfort caused by streetcar traffic. [noise intensity measurements and health aspects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ursoniu, C.; Puca, N.; Dankner, A.; Moise, G.; Sirbu, A.

    1974-01-01

    Streetcar noise was investigated on different lines and inside different types by sonometer measurements. The results showed variations of the total noise intensity between 88-97 db. In some squares with heavy traffic the total noise intensity reached 106 db. Noise intensity measurements inside different types of streetcars brought to light high values between 101-106 db, while in the case of the new silent type of streetcar the values were 86-87 db. The importance of the sound discomfort produced by streetcar traffic is emphasized, inasmuch as the noise intensity exceeds by far the values recommended by communal hygiene.

  1. Measurement-based auralization methodology for the assessment of noise mitigation measures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Pieter; Wei, Weigang; Van Renterghem, Timothy; Botteldooren, Dick

    2016-09-01

    The effect of noise mitigation measures is generally expressed by noise levels only, neglecting the listener's perception. In this study, an auralization methodology is proposed that enables an auditive preview of noise abatement measures for road traffic noise, based on the direction dependent attenuation of a priori recordings made with a dedicated 32-channel spherical microphone array. This measurement-based auralization has the advantage that all non-road traffic sounds that create the listening context are present. The potential of this auralization methodology is evaluated through the assessment of the effect of an L-shaped mound. The angular insertion loss of the mound is estimated by using the ISO 9613-2 propagation model, the Pierce barrier diffraction model and the Harmonoise point-to-point model. The realism of the auralization technique is evaluated by listening tests, indicating that listeners had great difficulty in differentiating between a posteriori recordings and auralized samples, which shows the validity of the followed approaches.

  2. Comparison of the polynomial model against explicit measurements of noise components for different mammography systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monnin, P.; Bosmans, H.; Verdun, F. R.; Marshall, N. W.

    2014-10-01

    Given the adverse impact of image noise on the perception of important clinical details in digital mammography, routine quality control measurements should include an evaluation of noise. The European Guidelines, for example, employ a second-order polynomial fit of pixel variance as a function of detector air kerma (DAK) to decompose noise into quantum, electronic and fixed pattern (FP) components and assess the DAK range where quantum noise dominates. This work examines the robustness of the polynomial method against an explicit noise decomposition method. The two methods were applied to variance and noise power spectrum (NPS) data from six digital mammography units. Twenty homogeneously exposed images were acquired with PMMA blocks for target DAKs ranging from 6.25 to 1600 µGy. Both methods were explored for the effects of data weighting and squared fit coefficients during the curve fitting, the influence of the additional filter material (2 mm Al versus 40 mm PMMA) and noise de-trending. Finally, spatial stationarity of noise was assessed. Data weighting improved noise model fitting over large DAK ranges, especially at low detector exposures. The polynomial and explicit decompositions generally agreed for quantum and electronic noise but FP noise fraction was consistently underestimated by the polynomial method. Noise decomposition as a function of position in the image showed limited noise stationarity, especially for FP noise; thus the position of the region of interest (ROI) used for noise decomposition may influence fractional noise composition. The ROI area and position used in the Guidelines offer an acceptable estimation of noise components. While there are limitations to the polynomial model, when used with care and with appropriate data weighting, the method offers a simple and robust means of examining the detector noise components as a function of detector exposure.

  3. Review of subjective measures of human response to aircraft noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cawthorn, J. M.; Mayes, W. H.

    1976-01-01

    The development of aircraft noise rating scales and indexes is reviewed up to the present time. Single event scales, multiple event indexes, and their interrelation with each other, are considered. Research requirements for further refinement and development of aircraft noise rating quantification factors are discussed.

  4. Resolving small signal measurements in experimental plasma environments using calibrated subtraction of noise signals

    SciTech Connect

    Fimognari, P. J. Demers, D. R.; Chen, X.; Schoch, P. M.

    2014-11-15

    The performance of many diagnostic and control systems within fusion and other fields of research are often detrimentally affected by spurious noise signals. This is particularly true for those (such as radiation or particle detectors) working with very small signals. Common sources of radiated and conducted noise in experimental fusion environments include the plasma itself and instrumentation. The noise complicates data analysis, as illustrated by noise on signals measured with the heavy ion beam probe (HIBP) installed on the Madison Symmetric Torus. The noise is time-varying and often exceeds the secondary ion beam current (in contrast with previous applications). Analysis of the noise identifies the dominant source as photoelectric emission from the detectors induced by ultraviolet light from the plasma. This has led to the development of a calibrated subtraction technique, which largely removes the undesired temporal noise signals from data. The advantages of the technique for small signal measurement applications are demonstrated through improvements realized on HIBP fluctuation measurements.

  5. Magnetic Barkhausen Noise Measurements Using Tetrapole Probe Designs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNairnay, Paul

    A magnetic Barkhausen noise (MBN) testing system was developed for Defence Research and Development Canada (DRDC) to perform MBN measurements on the Royal Canadian Navy's Victoria class submarine hulls that can be correlated with material properties, including residual stress. The DRDC system was based on the design of a MBN system developed by Steven White at Queen's University, which was capable of performing rapid angular dependent measurements through the implementation of a flux controlled tetrapole probe. In tetrapole probe designs, the magnetic excitation field is rotated in the surface plane of the sample under the assumption of linear superposition of two orthogonal magnetic fields. During the course of this work, however, the validity of flux superposition in ferromagnetic materials, for the purpose of measuring MBN, was brought into question. Consequently, a study of MBN anisotropy using tetrapole probes was performed. Results indicate that MBN anisotropy measured under flux superposition does not simulate MBN anisotropy data obtained through manual rotation of a single dipole excitation field. It is inferred that MBN anisotropy data obtained with tetrapole probes is the result of the magnetic domain structure's response to an orthogonal magnetization condition and not necessarily to any bulk superposition magnetization in the sample. A qualitative model for the domain configuration under two orthogonal magnetic fields is proposed to describe the results. An empirically derived fitting equation, that describes tetrapole MBN anisotropy data, is presented. The equation describes results in terms of two largely independent orthogonal fields, and includes interaction terms arising due to competing orthogonally magnetized domain structures and interactions with the sample's magnetic easy axis. The equation is used to fit results obtained from a number of samples and tetrapole orientations and in each case correctly identifies the samples' magnetic easy axis.

  6. Acoustic Environment of Admiralty Inlet: Broadband Noise Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Jinshan; Deng, Zhiqun; Martinez, Jayson J.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Myers, Joshua R.; Weiland, Mark A.; Jones, Mark E.

    2011-09-30

    Admiralty Inlet has been selected as a potential tidal energy site. It is located near shipping lanes, is a highly variable acoustic environment, and is frequented by the highly endangered southern resident killer whale (SRKW). Resolving environmental impacts is the first step to receiving approval to deploy tidal turbines at Admiralty Inlet. Of particular concern is the potential for blade strike or other negative interactions between the SRKW and the tidal turbine. A variety of technologies including passive and active monitoring systems are being considered as potential tools to determine the presence of SRKW in the vicinity of the turbines. Broadband noise level measurements are critical for the determination of design and operation specifications of all marine and hydrokinetic energy capture technologies. Acoustic environment data at the proposed site was acquired at different depths using a cabled vertical line array (VLA) with four calibrated hydrophones. The sound pressure level (SPL) power spectrum density was estimated based on the fast Fourier transform. This study describes the first broadband SPL measurements for this site at different depths with frequency ranging from 10 kHz to 480 kHz in combination with other information. To understand the SPL caused by this bedload transport, three different pressure sensors with temperature and conductivity were also assembled on the VLA to measure the conditions at the hydrophone deployment depth. The broadband SPL levels at frequency ranges of 3 kHz to 7 kHz as a function of depth were estimated. Only the hydrophone at an average depth of 40 m showed the strong dependence of SPL with distance from the bottom, which was possibly caused by the cobbles shifting on the seabed. Automatic Identification System data were also studied to understand the SPL measurements.

  7. Potential Misidentification of Love-Wave Phase Velocity Based on Three-Component Ambient Seismic Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zongbo; Xia, Jianghai; Luo, Yinhe; Cheng, Feng; Pan, Yudi

    2016-04-01

    People have calculated Rayleigh-wave phase velocities from vertical component of ambient seismic noise for several years. Recently, researchers started to extract Love waves from transverse component recordings of ambient noise, where "transverse" is defined as the direction perpendicular to a great-circle path or a line in small scale through observation sensors. Most researches assumed Rayleigh waves could be negligible, but Rayleigh waves can exist in the transverse component when Rayleigh waves propagate in other directions besides radial direction. In study of data acquired in western Junggar Basin near Karamay city, China, after processing the transverse component recordings of ambient noise, we obtain two energy trends, which are distinguished with Rayleigh-wave and Love-wave phase velocities, in the frequency-velocity domain using multichannel analysis of surface waves (MASW). Rayleigh waves could be also extracted from the transverse component data. Because Rayleigh-wave and Love-wave phase velocities are close in high frequencies (>0.1 Hz), two kinds of surface waves might be merged in the frequency-velocity domain. Rayleigh-wave phase velocities may be misidentified as Love-wave phase velocities. To get accurate surface-wave phase velocities from the transverse component data using seismic interferometry in investigating the shallow geology, our results suggest using MASW to calculate real Love-wave phase velocities.

  8. Analysis of satellite measurements of terrestrial radio noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bakalyar, G.; Caruso, J. A.; Vargas-Vila, R.; Ziemba, E.

    1974-01-01

    Worldwide distributions of terrestrial radio noise as monitored by Radio Astronomy Explorer 1 (RAE 1) generated and compared with CCIR predictions. These contour maps show the global morphology of radio noise at 6.55 and 9.18 MHz for fall, winter, spring and summer during the local time blocks of 00-08 LT and 16-24 LT. These computer produced maps show general agreement with CCIR predictions over large land masses. The RAE and CCIR maps diverge at high latitudes over Asia and frequently over ocean regions. Higher noise levels observed by RAE at high latitudes are attributed to magnetospheric emission while higher noise levels observed by RAE over Asia are attributable to high power transmitters. Analysis of RAE noise observations in conjunction with various geophysical phenomena showed no obvious correlation.

  9. Critical exponent of quantum phase transitions driven by colored noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagy, D.; Domokos, P.

    2016-12-01

    We demonstrate that criticality in a driven-dissipative system is strongly influenced by the spectral properties of the bath. We study the open-system realization of the Dicke model, where a bosonic cavity mode couples to a large spin formed by two motional modes of an atomic Bose-Einstein condensate. The cavity mode is driven by a high-frequency laser and it decays to a Markovian bath, while the atomic mode interacts with a colored bath. We reveal that the soft mode fails to describe the characteristics of the criticality. We calculate the critical exponent of the superradiant phase transition and identify an inherent relation to the low-frequency spectral density function of the colored bath. We show that a finite temperature of the colored bath does not modify qualitatively this dependence on the spectral density function.

  10. Integrated quasi-phase-matched second-harmonic generator and electro-optic phase modulator for low-noise phase-sensitive amplification.

    PubMed

    Enbutsu, Koji; Umeki, Takeshi; Tadanaga, Osamu; Asobe, Masaki; Takenouchi, Hirokazu

    2015-07-15

    We propose a quasi-phase-matched second-harmonic generator integrated with an electro-optic phase modulator in a directly bonded LiNbO3 (DB-LN) waveguide to obtain high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) pump light for a phase-sensitive amplifier (PSA). This integrated device exhibits 1-MHz modulation and 1-W second-harmonic-generation properties sufficient for phase-locking between the signal and pump and for PSA gain, respectively. A novel PSA configuration based on the high-input-power tolerance of the device helps to suppress the noise from the erbium-doped fiber amplifier used for pump-light generation and leads to an improvement of the SNR of the pump light. The SNR improvement was confirmed by comparing the noise figure of a PSA employing the DB-LN waveguide with that of a PSA using a Ti-diffused LN waveguide modulator.

  11. Contrast-to-noise ratio optimization for a prototype phase-contrast computed tomography scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Mark; Yaroshenko, Andre; Velroyen, Astrid; Bech, Martin; Tapfer, Arne; Pauwels, Bart; Bruyndonckx, Peter; Sasov, Alexander; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2015-12-01

    In the field of biomedical X-ray imaging, novel techniques, such as phase-contrast and dark-field imaging, have the potential to enhance the contrast and provide complementary structural information about a specimen. In this paper, a first prototype of a preclinical X-ray phase-contrast CT scanner based on a Talbot-Lau interferometer is characterized. We present a study of the contrast-to-noise ratios for attenuation and phase-contrast images acquired with the prototype scanner. The shown results are based on a series of projection images and tomographic data sets of a plastic phantom in phase and attenuation-contrast recorded with varying acquisition settings. Subsequently, the signal and noise distribution of different regions in the phantom were determined. We present a novel method for estimation of contrast-to-noise ratios for projection images based on the cylindrical geometry of the phantom. Analytical functions, representing the expected signal in phase and attenuation-contrast for a circular object, are fitted to individual line profiles of the projection data. The free parameter of the fit function is used to estimate the contrast and the goodness of the fit is determined to assess the noise in the respective signal. The results depict the dependence of the contrast-to-noise ratios on the applied source voltages, the number of steps of the phase stepping routine, and the exposure times for an individual step. Moreover, the influence of the number of projection angles on the image quality of CT slices is investigated. Finally, the implications for future imaging purposes with the scanner are discussed.

  12. Contrast-to-noise ratio optimization for a prototype phase-contrast computed tomography scanner.

    PubMed

    Müller, Mark; Yaroshenko, Andre; Velroyen, Astrid; Bech, Martin; Tapfer, Arne; Pauwels, Bart; Bruyndonckx, Peter; Sasov, Alexander; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2015-12-01

    In the field of biomedical X-ray imaging, novel techniques, such as phase-contrast and dark-field imaging, have the potential to enhance the contrast and provide complementary structural information about a specimen. In this paper, a first prototype of a preclinical X-ray phase-contrast CT scanner based on a Talbot-Lau interferometer is characterized. We present a study of the contrast-to-noise ratios for attenuation and phase-contrast images acquired with the prototype scanner. The shown results are based on a series of projection images and tomographic data sets of a plastic phantom in phase and attenuation-contrast recorded with varying acquisition settings. Subsequently, the signal and noise distribution of different regions in the phantom were determined. We present a novel method for estimation of contrast-to-noise ratios for projection images based on the cylindrical geometry of the phantom. Analytical functions, representing the expected signal in phase and attenuation-contrast for a circular object, are fitted to individual line profiles of the projection data. The free parameter of the fit function is used to estimate the contrast and the goodness of the fit is determined to assess the noise in the respective signal. The results depict the dependence of the contrast-to-noise ratios on the applied source voltages, the number of steps of the phase stepping routine, and the exposure times for an individual step. Moreover, the influence of the number of projection angles on the image quality of CT slices is investigated. Finally, the implications for future imaging purposes with the scanner are discussed.

  13. Contrast-to-noise ratio optimization for a prototype phase-contrast computed tomography scanner

    SciTech Connect

    Müller, Mark Yaroshenko, Andre; Velroyen, Astrid; Tapfer, Arne; Bech, Martin; Pauwels, Bart; Bruyndonckx, Peter; Sasov, Alexander; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2015-12-15

    In the field of biomedical X-ray imaging, novel techniques, such as phase-contrast and dark-field imaging, have the potential to enhance the contrast and provide complementary structural information about a specimen. In this paper, a first prototype of a preclinical X-ray phase-contrast CT scanner based on a Talbot-Lau interferometer is characterized. We present a study of the contrast-to-noise ratios for attenuation and phase-contrast images acquired with the prototype scanner. The shown results are based on a series of projection images and tomographic data sets of a plastic phantom in phase and attenuation-contrast recorded with varying acquisition settings. Subsequently, the signal and noise distribution of different regions in the phantom were determined. We present a novel method for estimation of contrast-to-noise ratios for projection images based on the cylindrical geometry of the phantom. Analytical functions, representing the expected signal in phase and attenuation-contrast for a circular object, are fitted to individual line profiles of the projection data. The free parameter of the fit function is used to estimate the contrast and the goodness of the fit is determined to assess the noise in the respective signal. The results depict the dependence of the contrast-to-noise ratios on the applied source voltages, the number of steps of the phase stepping routine, and the exposure times for an individual step. Moreover, the influence of the number of projection angles on the image quality of CT slices is investigated. Finally, the implications for future imaging purposes with the scanner are discussed.

  14. Motion compensation and noise tolerance in phase-shifting digital in-line holography.

    PubMed

    Stenner, Michael D; Neifeld, Mark A

    2006-05-15

    We present a technique for phase-shifting digital in-line holography which compensates for lateral object motion. By collecting two frames of interference between object and reference fields with identical reference phase, one can estimate the lateral motion that occurred between frames using the cross-correlation. We also describe a very general linear framework for phase-shifting holographic reconstruction which minimizes additive white Gaussian noise (AWGN) for an arbitrary set of reference field amplitudes and phases. We analyze the technique's sensitivity to noise (AWGN, quantization, and shot), errors in the reference fields, errors in motion estimation, resolution, and depth of field. We also present experimental motion-compensated images achieving the expected resolution.

  15. Repeat Measurements of Seismic Noise at the Waiotapu Geothermal Area, North Island, NZ

    SciTech Connect

    Whiteford, P.C.

    1995-01-01

    The amplitudes of seismic ground noise were remeasured at 66 sites in the Waiotapu and Reporoa geothermal areas in 1995 to determine whether amplitudes had changed since the first survey in 1970. In both 1995 and 1970 high levels of seismic noise occurred in two localities, one at Waiotapu and one at Reporoa. The elevated levels of seismic noise at most sites are thought to be caused by surface or near-surface geothermal activity. At seven sites in the Waiotapu area seismic noise levels were almost the same in 1995 as in 1970, indicating no change in the intensity of the source of the geothermal seismic noise. At most other sites the 1995 seismic noise levels were different to those measured in 1970, although at sites with high levels of seismic noise the differences were usually less than at sites with low levels of seismic noise.

  16. Far-field errors due to random noise in cylindrical near-field measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romeu, Jordi; Jofre, Luis; Cardama, Angel

    1992-01-01

    A full characterization of the far-field noise obtained from cylindrical near- to far-field transformation, for a white Gaussian, space stationary, near-field noise is derived. A possible source for such noise is the receiver additive noise. The noise characterization is done by obtaining the autocorrelation of the far-field noise, which is shown to be easily computed during the transformation process. Even for this simple case, the far-field noise has complex behavior dependent on the measurement probe. Once the statistical properties of the far-field noise are determined, it is possible to compute upper and lower bounds for the radiation pattern for a given probability. These bounds define a strip within the radiation pattern with the desired probability. This may be used as part of a complete near-field error analysis of a particular cylindrical near-field facility.

  17. Protecting a quantum state from environmental noise by an incompatible finite-time measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Brasil, Carlos Alexandre; Castro, L. A. de; Napolitano, R. d. J.

    2011-08-15

    We show that measurements of finite duration performed on an open two-state system can protect the initial state from a phase-noisy environment, provided the measured observable does not commute with the perturbing interaction. When the measured observable commutes with the environmental interaction, the finite-duration measurement accelerates the rate of decoherence induced by the phase noise. For the description of the measurement of an observable that is incompatible with the interaction between system and environment, we have found an approximate analytical expression, valid at zero temperature and weak coupling with the measuring device. We have tested the validity of the analytical predictions against an exact numerical approach, based on the superoperator-splitting method, that confirms the protection of the initial state of the system. When the coupling between the system and the measuring apparatus increases beyond the range of validity of the analytical approximation, the initial state is still protected by the finite-time measurement, according with the exact numerical calculations.

  18. Noise and disturbance of qubit measurements: An information-theoretic characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbott, Alastair A.; Branciard, Cyril

    2016-12-01

    Information-theoretic definitions for the noise associated with a quantum measurement and the corresponding disturbance to the state of the system have recently been introduced [F. Buscemi et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 050401 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.112.050401]. These definitions are invariant under relabeling of measurement outcomes, and lend themselves readily to the formulation of state-independent uncertainty relations both for the joint estimate of observables (noise-noise relations) and the noise-disturbance tradeoff. Here we derive such relations for incompatible qubit observables, which we prove to be tight in the case of joint estimates, and present progress towards fully characterizing the noise-disturbance tradeoff. In doing so, we show that the set of obtainable noise-noise values for such observables is convex, whereas the conjectured form for the set of obtainable noise-disturbance values is not. Furthermore, projective measurements are not optimal with respect to the joint-measurement noise or noise-disturbance tradeoffs. Interestingly, it seems that four-outcome measurements are needed in the former case, whereas three-outcome measurements are optimal in the latter.

  19. Intensity noise reduction in semiconductor lasers by amplitude-phase decorrelation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vahala, Kerry J.; Newkirk, Michael A.

    1990-01-01

    Detuned operation of a laser results in coupling of field amplitude and phase fluctuations. In a semiconductor laser, this coupling is known to be very large. Here it is demonstrated that it can be used to significantly reduce intensity noise below its intrinsic limit.

  20. The Deep Space Network: Noise temperature concepts, measurements, and performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stelzried, C. T.

    1982-01-01

    The use of higher operational frequencies is being investigated for improved performance of the Deep Space Network. Noise temperature and noise figure concepts are used to describe the noise performance of these receiving systems. The ultimate sensitivity of a linear receiving system is limited by the thermal noise of the source and the quantum noise of the receiver amplifier. The atmosphere, antenna and receiver amplifier of an Earth station receiving system are analyzed separately and as a system. Performance evaluation and error analysis techniques are investigated. System noise temperature and antenna gain parameters are combined to give an overall system figure of merit G/T. Radiometers are used to perform radio ""star'' antenna and system sensitivity calibrations. These are analyzed and the performance of several types compared to an idealized total power radiometer. The theory of radiative transfer is applicable to the analysis of transmission medium loss. A power series solution in terms of the transmission medium loss is given for the solution of the noise temperature contribution.

  1. Measurement resolution of noise directivity patterns from acoustic flight tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conner, David A.

    1989-01-01

    The measurement resolution of noise directivity patterns from acoustic flight tests was investigated. Directivity angle resolution is affected by the data reduction parameters, the aircraft velocity and flyover altitude, and by deviations of the aircraft from the desired flight path. Equations are developed which determine bounds for the lateral and longitudinal directivity angle resolution as a function of the nominal directivity angle. The equations are applied to a flight test data base and the effects of several flight conditions and data reduction parameters on the directivity angle resolution are presented. The maximum directivity angle resolution typically occurs when the aircraft is at or near the overhead position. In general, directivity angle resolution improves with decreasing velocity, increasing altitude, increasing sampling rate, decreasing block size, and decreasing block averages. Deviations from the desired ideal flight path will increase the resolution. For the flight experiment considered in this study, an average of two flyovers were required at each test condition to obtain an acceptable flight path. The ability of the pilot to maintain the flight track improved with decreasing altitude, decreasing velocity, and practice. Due to the prevailing wind conditions, yaw angles of as much as 20 deg were required to maintain the desired flight path.

  2. Investigation of ground reflection and impedance from flyover noise measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapkis, R. L.; Marsh, A. H.

    1978-01-01

    An extensive series of flyover noise tests was conducted for the primary purpose of studying meteorological effects on propagation of aircraft noise. The test airplane, a DC 9-10, flew several level-flight passes at various heights over a taxiway. Two microphone stations were located under the flight path. A total of 37 runs was selected for analysis and processed to obtain a consistant set of 1/3 octave band sound pressure levels at half-second intervals. The goal of the present study was to use the flyover noise data to deduce acoustical reflection coefficients and hence, acoustical impedances.

  3. Ultra-low phase-noise microwave generation using a diode-pumped solid-state laser based frequency comb and a polarization-maintaining pulse interleaver.

    PubMed

    Portuondo-Campa, Erwin; Buchs, Gilles; Kundermann, Stefan; Balet, Laurent; Lecomte, Steve

    2015-12-14

    We report ultra-low phase-noise microwave generation at a 9.6 GHz carrier frequency from optical frequency combs based on diode-pumped solid-state lasers emitting at telecom wavelength and referenced to a common cavity-stabilized continuous-wave laser. Using a novel fibered polarization-maintaining pulse interleaver, a single-oscillator phase-noise floor of -171 dBc/Hz at 10 MHz offset frequency has been measured with commercial PIN InGaAs photodiodes, constituting a record for this type of detector. Also, a direct optical measurement of the stabilized frequency combs' timing jitter was performed using a balanced optical cross correlator, allowing for an identification of the origin of the phase-noise limitations in the system.

  4. 14 CFR Appendix A to Part 36 - Aircraft Noise Measurement and Evaluation Under § 36.101

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... processing the noise signals (preferably recorded) through an analysis system with the following... normal flight instrumentation such as radar tracking, theodolite triangulation, or photographic scaling... to the noise recorded at the noise measurement locations by means of synchronizing signals over...

  5. 14 CFR Appendix A to Part 36 - Aircraft Noise Measurement and Evaluation Under § 36.101

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... processing the noise signals (preferably recorded) through an analysis system with the following... normal flight instrumentation such as radar tracking, theodolite triangulation, or photographic scaling... to the noise recorded at the noise measurement locations by means of synchronizing signals over...

  6. Mechanical modulation method for ultrasensitive phase measurements in photonics biosensing.

    PubMed

    Patskovsky, S; Maisonneuve, M; Meunier, M; Kabashin, A V

    2008-12-22

    A novel polarimetry methodology for phase-sensitive measurements in single reflection geometry is proposed for applications in optical transduction-based biological sensing. The methodology uses altering step-like chopper-based mechanical phase modulation for orthogonal s- and p- polarizations of light reflected from the sensing interface and the extraction of phase information at different harmonics of the modulation. We show that even under a relatively simple experimental arrangement, the methodology provides the resolution of phase measurements as low as 0.007 deg. We also examine the proposed approach using Total Internal Reflection (TIR) and Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) geometries. For TIR geometry, the response appears to be strongly dependent on the prism material with the best values for high refractive index Si. The detection limit for Si-based TIR is estimated as 10(-5) in terms Refractive Index Units (RIU) change. SPR geometry offers much stronger phase response due to a much sharper phase characteristics. With the detection limit of 3.2*10(-7) RIU, the proposed methodology provides one of best sensitivities for phase-sensitive SPR devices. Advantages of the proposed method include high sensitivity, simplicity of experimental setup and noise immunity as a result of a high stability modulation.

  7. Simultaneous all-optical phase noise mitigation and automatically locked homodyne reception of an incoming QPSK data signal.

    PubMed

    Mohajerin-Ariaei, Amirhossein; Ziyadi, Morteza; Almaiman, Ahmed; Cao, Yinwen; Alishahi, Fatemeh; Chitgarha, Mohammad Reza; Fallahpour, Ahmad; Yang, Jeng-Yuan; Bao, Changjing; Liao, Peicheng; Shamee, Bishara; Akasaka, Youichi; Sekiya, Motoyoshi; Touch, Joseph D; Tur, Moshe; Langrock, Carsten; Fejer, Martin M; Willner, Alan E

    2016-10-15

    Simultaneous phase noise mitigation and automatic phase/frequency-locked homodyne reception is demonstrated for a 20-32 Gbaud QPSK signal. A phase quantization function is realized to squeeze the phase noise of the signal by optical wave mixing of the signal, its third-order harmonic, and their corresponding delayed variant conjugates, converting the noisy input into a noise-mitigated signal. In a simultaneous nonlinear process, the noise-mitigated signal is automatically phase- and frequency-locked with a "local" pump laser, avoiding the need for feedback or phase/frequency tracking for homodyne detection. Open eye-diagrams are obtained for in-phase and quadrature-phase components of the signal and ∼2  dB OSNR gain is achieved at BER 10-3.

  8. A low-phase-noise 18 GHz Kerr frequency microcomb phase-locked over 65 THz

    PubMed Central

    Huang, S.-W.; Yang, J.; Lim, J.; Zhou, H.; Yu, M.; Kwong, D.-L.; Wong, C. W.

    2015-01-01

    Laser frequency combs are coherent light sources that simultaneously provide pristine frequency spacings for precision metrology and the fundamental basis for ultrafast and attosecond sciences. Recently, nonlinear parametric conversion in high-Q microresonators has been suggested as an alternative platform for optical frequency combs, though almost all in 100 GHz frequencies or more. Here we report a low-phase-noise on-chip Kerr frequency comb with mode spacing compatible with high-speed silicon optoelectronics. The waveguide cross-section of the silicon nitride spiral resonator is designed to possess small and flattened group velocity dispersion, so that the Kerr frequency comb contains a record-high number of 3,600 phase-locked comb lines. We study the single-sideband phase noise as well as the long-term frequency stability and report the lowest phase noise floor achieved to date with −130 dBc/Hz at 1 MHz offset for the 18 GHz Kerr comb oscillator, along with feedback stabilization to achieve frequency Allan deviations of 7 × 10−11 in 1 s. The reported system is a promising compact platform for achieving self-referenced Kerr frequency combs and also for high-capacity coherent communication architectures. PMID:26311406

  9. Noise-reduction measurements of stiffened and unstiffened cylindrical models of an airplane fuselage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willis, C. M.; Mayes, W. H.

    1984-01-01

    Noise-reduction measurements are presented for a stiffened and an unstiffened model of an airplane fuselage. The cylindrical models were tested in a reverberant-field noise environment over a frequency range from 20 Hz to 6 kHz. An unstiffened metal fuselage provided more noise reduction than a fuselage having the same sidewall weight divided between skin and stiffening stringers and ring frames. The addition of acoustic insulation to the models tended to smooth out the interior-noise spectrum by reducing or masking the noise associated with the structural response at some of the resonant frequencies.

  10. Robust shot-noise measurement for continuous-variable quantum key distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunz-Jacques, Sébastien; Jouguet, Paul

    2015-02-01

    We study a practical method to measure the shot noise in real time in continuous-variable quantum key distribution systems. The amount of secret key that can be extracted from the raw statistics depends strongly on this quantity since it affects in particular the computation of the excess noise (i.e., noise in excess of the shot noise) added by an eavesdropper on the quantum channel. Some powerful quantum hacking attacks relying on faking the estimated value of the shot noise to hide an intercept and resend strategy were proposed. Here, we provide experimental evidence that our method can defeat the saturation attack and the wavelength attack.

  11. Removal of correlated noise online for in situ measurements by using multichannel magnetic resonance sounding system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Tingting; Zhang, Siyuan; Zhang, Yang; Wan, Ling; Lin, Jun

    2017-01-01

    Compared with the other geophysical approaches, magnetic resonance sounding (MRS) technique is direct and nondestructive in subsurface water exploration. It provides water content distribution and estimates hydrogeological properties. The biggest challenge is that MRS measurement always suffers bad signal-to-noise ratio, and it can be carried out only far from sources of noise. To solve this problem, a series of de-noising methods are developed. However, most of them are post-processing, leading the data quality uncontrolled for in situ measurements. In the present study, a new approach that removal of correlated noise online is found to overcome the restriction. Based on LabVIEW, a method is provided to enable online data quality control by the way of realizing signal acquisition and noise filtering simultaneously. Using one or more reference coils, adaptive noise cancellation based on LabVIEW to eliminate the correlated noise is available for in situ measurements. The approach was examined through numerical simulation and field measurements. The correlated noise is mitigated effectively and the application of MRS measurements is feasible in high-level noise environment. The method shortens the measurement time and improves the measurement efficiency.

  12. Jet Measurements for Development of Jet Noise Prediction Tools

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bridges, James E.

    2006-01-01

    The primary focus of my presentation is the development of the jet noise prediction code JeNo with most examples coming from the experimental work that drove the theoretical development and validation. JeNo is a statistical jet noise prediction code, based upon the Lilley acoustic analogy. Our approach uses time-average 2-D or 3-D mean and turbulent statistics of the flow as input. The output is source distributions and spectral directivity.

  13. Objective Measures of Listening Effort: Effects of Background Noise and Noise Reduction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sarampalis, Anastasios; Kalluri, Sridhar; Edwards, Brent; Hafter, Ervin

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: This work is aimed at addressing a seeming contradiction related to the use of noise-reduction (NR) algorithms in hearing aids. The problem is that although some listeners claim a subjective improvement from NR, it has not been shown to improve speech intelligibility, often even making it worse. Method: To address this, the hypothesis…

  14. Nonlinear complex diffusion approaches based on a novel noise estimation for noise reduction in phase-resolved optical coherence tomography (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Shaoyan; Huang, Yong; Tan, Xiaodi

    2016-03-01

    Partial differential equation (PDE)-based nonlinear diffusion processes have been widely used for image denoising. In the traditional nonlinear anisotropic diffusion denoising techniques, behavior of the diffusion depends highly on the gradient of image. However, it is difficult to get a good effect if we use these methods to reduce noise in optical coherence tomography images. Because background has the gradient that is very similar to regions of interest, so background noise will be mistaken for edge information and cannot be reduced. Therefore, nonlinear complex diffusion approaches using texture feature(NCDTF) for noise reduction in phase-resolved optical coherence tomography is proposed here, which uses texture feature in OCT images and structural OCT images to remove noise in phase-resolved OCT. Taking into account the fact that texture between background and signal region is different, which can be linked with diffusion coefficient of nonlinear complex diffusion model, we use NCDTF method to reduce noises of structure and phase images first. Then, we utilize OCT structure images to filter phase image in OCT. Finally, to validate our method, parameters such as image SNR, contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), equivalent number of looks (ENL), and edge preservation were compared between our approach and median filter, Gaussian filter, wavelet filter, nonlinear complex diffusion filter (NCDF). Preliminary results demonstrate that NCDTF method is more effective than others in keeping edges and denoising for phase-resolved OCT.

  15. Self-Stabilizing Measurement of Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinjanampathy, Sai

    2014-05-01

    Measuring phase accurately constitutes one of the most important task in precision measurement science. Such measurements can be deployed to measure everything from fundamental constants to measuring detuning and tunneling rates of atoms more precisely. Quantum mechanics enhances the ultimate bounds on the precision of such measurements possible, and exploit coherence and entanglement to reduce the phase uncertainty. In this work, we will describe a method to stabilize a decohering two-level atom and use the stabilizing measurements to learn the unknown phase acquired by the atom. Such measurements will employ a Bayesian learner to do active feedback control on the atom. We will discuss some ultimate bounds employed in precision metrology and an experimental proposal for the implementation of this scheme. Financial support from Ministry of Education, Singapore.

  16. Automated measurement of CT noise in patient images with a novel structure coherence feature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chun, Minsoo; Choi, Young Hun; Hyo Kim, Jong

    2015-12-01

    While the assessment of CT noise constitutes an important task for the optimization of scan protocols in clinical routine, the majority of noise measurements in practice still rely on manual operation, hence limiting their efficiency and reliability. This study presents an algorithm for the automated measurement of CT noise in patient images with a novel structure coherence feature. The proposed algorithm consists of a four-step procedure including subcutaneous fat tissue selection, the calculation of structure coherence feature, the determination of homogeneous ROIs, and the estimation of the average noise level. In an evaluation with 94 CT scans (16 517 images) of pediatric and adult patients along with the participation of two radiologists, ROIs were placed on a homogeneous fat region at 99.46% accuracy, and the agreement of the automated noise measurements with the radiologists’ reference noise measurements (PCC  =  0.86) was substantially higher than the within and between-rater agreements of noise measurements (PCCwithin  =  0.75, PCCbetween  =  0.70). In addition, the absolute noise level measurements matched closely the theoretical noise levels generated by a reduced-dose simulation technique. Our proposed algorithm has the potential to be used for examining the appropriateness of radiation dose and the image quality of CT protocols for research purposes as well as clinical routine.

  17. Phase-noise reduction in surface wave oscillators by using nonlinear sustaining amplifiers.

    PubMed

    Avramov, Ivan D

    2006-04-01

    Nonlinear sustaining amplifier operation has been investigated and applied to high-power negative resistance oscillators (NRO), using single-port surface transverse wave (STW) resonators, and single-transistor sustaining amplifiers for feedback-loop STW oscillators (FLSO) stabilized with two-port STW devices. In all cases, self-limiting, silicon (Si)-bipolar sustaining amplifiers that operate in the highly nonlinear AB-, B-, or C-class modes are implemented. Phase-noise reduction is based on the assumption that a sustaining amplifier, operating in one of these modes, uses current limiting and remains cut off over a significant portion of the wave period. Therefore, it does not generate 1/f noise over the cut-off portion of the radio frequency (RF) cycle, and this reduces the close-in oscillator phase noise significantly. The proposed method has been found to provide phase-noise levels in the -111 to -119 dBc/Hz range at 1 KHz carrier offset in 915 MHz C-class power NRO and FLSO generating up to 23 dBm of RF-power at RF versus dc (RF/dc) efficiencies exceeding 40%. C-class amplifier design techniques are used for adequate matching and high RF/dc efficiency.

  18. Circuit models and experimental noise measurements of micropipette amplifiers for extracellular neural recordings from live animals.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chang Hao; Pun, Sio Hang; Mak, Peng Un; Vai, Mang I; Klug, Achim; Lei, Tim C

    2014-01-01

    Glass micropipettes are widely used to record neural activity from single neurons or clusters of neurons extracellularly in live animals. However, to date, there has been no comprehensive study of noise in extracellular recordings with glass micropipettes. The purpose of this work was to assess various noise sources that affect extracellular recordings and to create model systems in which novel micropipette neural amplifier designs can be tested. An equivalent circuit of the glass micropipette and the noise model of this circuit, which accurately describe the various noise sources involved in extracellular recordings, have been developed. Measurement schemes using dead brain tissue as well as extracellular recordings from neurons in the inferior colliculus, an auditory brain nucleus of an anesthetized gerbil, were used to characterize noise performance and amplification efficacy of the proposed micropipette neural amplifier. According to our model, the major noise sources which influence the signal to noise ratio are the intrinsic noise of the neural amplifier and the thermal noise from distributed pipette resistance. These two types of noise were calculated and measured and were shown to be the dominating sources of background noise for in vivo experiments.

  19. Circuit Models and Experimental Noise Measurements of Micropipette Amplifiers for Extracellular Neural Recordings from Live Animals

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chang Hao; Pun, Sio Hang; Mak, Peng Un; Vai, Mang I; Klug, Achim; Lei, Tim C.

    2014-01-01

    Glass micropipettes are widely used to record neural activity from single neurons or clusters of neurons extracellularly in live animals. However, to date, there has been no comprehensive study of noise in extracellular recordings with glass micropipettes. The purpose of this work was to assess various noise sources that affect extracellular recordings and to create model systems in which novel micropipette neural amplifier designs can be tested. An equivalent circuit of the glass micropipette and the noise model of this circuit, which accurately describe the various noise sources involved in extracellular recordings, have been developed. Measurement schemes using dead brain tissue as well as extracellular recordings from neurons in the inferior colliculus, an auditory brain nucleus of an anesthetized gerbil, were used to characterize noise performance and amplification efficacy of the proposed micropipette neural amplifier. According to our model, the major noise sources which influence the signal to noise ratio are the intrinsic noise of the neural amplifier and the thermal noise from distributed pipette resistance. These two types of noise were calculated and measured and were shown to be the dominating sources of background noise for in vivo experiments. PMID:25133158

  20. Measurements and predictions of flyover and static noise of a TF30 afterburning turbofan engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burcham, F. W., Jr.; Lasagna, P. L.; Oas, S. C.

    1978-01-01

    The noise of the TF30 afterburning turbofan engine in an F-111 airplane was determined from static (ground) and flyover tests. A survey was made to measure the exhaust temperature and velocity profiles for a range of power settings. Comparisons were made between predicted and measured jet mixing, internal, and shock noise. It was found that the noise produced at static conditions was dominated by jet mixing noise, and was adequately predicted by current methods. The noise produced during flyovers exhibited large contributions from internally generated noise in the forward arc. For flyovers with the engine at nonafterburning power, the internal noise, shock noise, and jet mixing noise were accurately predicted. During flyovers with afterburning power settings, however, additional internal noise believed to be due to the afterburning process was evident; its level was as much as 8 decibels above the nonafterburning internal noise. Power settings that produced exhausts with inverted velocity profiles appeared to be slightly less noisy than power settings of equal thrust that produced uniform exhaust velocity profiles both in flight and in static testing.

  1. Optimized tracking of RF carriers with phase noise, including Pioneer 10 results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vilnrotter, V. A.; Hurd, W. J.; Brown, D. H.

    1987-01-01

    The ability to track very weak signals from distant spacecraft is limited by the phase instabilities of the received signal and of the local oscillator employed by the receiver. These instabilities ultimately limit the minimum loop bandwidth that can be used in a phase-coherent receiver, and hence limit the ratio of received carrier power to noise spectral density which can be tracked phase coherently. A method is presented for near real time estimation of the received carrier phase and additive noise spectrum, and optimization of the phase locked loop bandwidth. The method was used with the breadboard Deep Space Network (DSN) Advanced Receiver to optimize tracking of very weak signals from the Pioneer 10 spacecraft, which is now more distant that the edge of the solar system. Tracking with bandwidths of 0.1 Hz to 1.0 Hz reduces tracking signal threshold and increases carrier loop signal to noise ratio (SNR) by 5 dB to 15 dB compared to the 3 Hz bandwidth of the receivers now used operationally in the DSN. This will enable the DSN to track Pioneer 10 until its power sources fails near the end of the century.

  2. High phase noise tolerant pilot-tone-aided DP-QPSK optical communication systems.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xu; Pang, Xiaodan; Deng, Lei; Zibar, Darko; Monroy, Idelfonso Tafur; Younce, Richard

    2012-08-27

    In this paper we experimentally demonstrate a novel, high phase-noise tolerant, optical dual polarization (DP) quadrature phase-shift keying (QPSK) communication system based on pilot-tone-aided phase noise cancellation (PNC) algorithm. Vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSELs) with approximate 300 MHz linewidth are used as transmitters and local oscillators for coherent detection of optical DP-QPSK signals. The proposed system, with central wavelength at 1540.68 nm, operates at 40 Gb/s over 80 km single mode fiber (SMF) as part of a passive optical network (PON). The deployment of pilot-tone-aided PNC algorithm guarantees a bit error rate (BER) performance below the forward error correction (FEC) threshold. Moreover, we also evaluate a novel digital signal processing (DSP) algorithm for adaptive pilot tone detection.

  3. Low phase noise GaAs HBT VCO in Ka-band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ting, Yan; Yuming, Zhang; Hongliang, Lü; Yimen, Zhang; Yue, Wu; Yifeng, Liu

    2015-02-01

    Design and fabrication of a Ka-band voltage-controlled oscillator (VCO) using commercially available 1-μm GaAs heterojunction bipolar transistor technology is presented. A fully differential common-emitter configuration with a symmetric capacitance with a symmetric inductance tank structure is employed to reduce the phase noise of the VCO, and a novel π-feedback network is applied to compensate for the 180° phase shift. The on-wafer test shows that the VCO exhibits a phase noise of -96.47 dBc/Hz at a 1 MHz offset and presents a tuning range from 28.312 to 28.695 GHz. The overall dc current consumption of the VCO is 18 mA with a supply voltage of -6 V The chip area of the VCO is 0.7 × 0.7 mm2.

  4. [Noise level measurements of the air noise during drilling and grinding on the fresh isolated temporal bone (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Paulsen, K; Vietor, K

    1975-10-01

    Aerial sound measurements with different drilling instruments were performed during dry running and preparations of the bone. Registered were the values of the small drilling instruments Sirona, Dentatus-Air, and Electro-Torque-Ritter. Also tested were the KaVo-Technique-machine, the Hall-machine, the Air-Orbit-turbine, and the Sirona-turbine. During dry running most of them already reached the allowed marginal value of noise nuisance for the ear of 85 dB (A) at a distance of 35 cm. Only the Air-Orbit-machine showed a slightly lower value of 80 dB (A). The level increases with the used handpieces. Normal handpieces 1:1 exert only a minimal influence, gear handpieces 2:1, however, markedly increase the level. The verticity is of no importance in the range of normal rotations between 10,000 r/min. and 80,000 r/min. Only rotations in the lower frequency range of 2,000 r/min. markedly decrease the noise level. During bone drilling, the kind and size of the drilling bit have an influence on the intensity of the noise level. Quadruple wing milling cutters create a very high noise level (at a distance of 15 cm still above 110 dB [A!]), big rose cutters (R 16) create noise levels of 95 dB (A) and above, and only diamond round bits create less noise (approximately 88 db [A]). Small drilling bits make such a faint noise, that it is overroared by the drilling instrument. The turbines create only slightly higher levels than during dry running. Larger drilling bits cannot be employed here on principle. Wing milling cutters can lead to persistent damages of the inner ear. The frequent use of dental drilling instruments for bone preparations can also lead to a hearing loss of the operator in the long run.

  5. Controlling phase noise in oscillatory interference models of grid cell firing.

    PubMed

    Burgess, Christopher P; Burgess, Neil

    2014-04-30

    Oscillatory interference models account for the spatial firing properties of grid cells in terms of neuronal oscillators with frequencies modulated by the animal's movement velocity. The phase of such a "velocity-controlled oscillator" (VCO) relative to a baseline (theta-band) oscillation tracks displacement along a preferred direction. Input from multiple VCOs with appropriate preferred directions causes a grid cell's grid-like firing pattern. However, accumulating phase noise causes the firing pattern to drift and become corrupted. Here we show how multiple redundant VCOs can automatically compensate for phase noise. By entraining the baseline frequency to the mean VCO frequency, VCO phases remain consistent, ensuring a coherent grid pattern and reducing its spatial drift. We show how the spatial stability of grid firing depends on the variability in VCO phases, e.g., a phase SD of 3 ms per 125 ms cycle results in stable grids for 1 min. Finally, coupling N VCOs with similar preferred directions as a ring attractor, so that their relative phases remain constant, produces grid cells with consistently offset grids, and reduces VCO phase variability of the order square root of N. The results suggest a viable functional organization of the grid cell network, and highlight the benefit of integrating displacement along multiple redundant directions for the purpose of path integration.

  6. Bilateral filtering using the full noise covariance matrix applied to x-ray phase-contrast computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allner, S.; Koehler, T.; Fehringer, A.; Birnbacher, L.; Willner, M.; Pfeiffer, F.; Noël, P. B.

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this work is to develop an image-based de-noising algorithm that exploits complementary information and noise statistics from multi-modal images, as they emerge in x-ray tomography techniques, for instance grating-based phase-contrast CT and spectral CT. Among the noise reduction methods, image-based de-noising is one popular approach and the so-called bilateral filter is a well known algorithm for edge-preserving filtering. We developed a generalization of the bilateral filter for the case where the imaging system provides two or more perfectly aligned images. The proposed generalization is statistically motivated and takes the full second order noise statistics of these images into account. In particular, it includes a noise correlation between the images and spatial noise correlation within the same image. The novel generalized three-dimensional bilateral filter is applied to the attenuation and phase images created with filtered backprojection reconstructions from grating-based phase-contrast tomography. In comparison to established bilateral filters, we obtain improved noise reduction and at the same time a better preservation of edges in the images on the examples of a simulated soft-tissue phantom, a human cerebellum and a human artery sample. The applied full noise covariance is determined via cross-correlation of the image noise. The filter results yield an improved feature recovery based on enhanced noise suppression and edge preservation as shown here on the example of attenuation and phase images captured with grating-based phase-contrast computed tomography. This is supported by quantitative image analysis. Without being bound to phase-contrast imaging, this generalized filter is applicable to any kind of noise-afflicted image data with or without noise correlation. Therefore, it can be utilized in various imaging applications and fields.

  7. Bilateral filtering using the full noise covariance matrix applied to x-ray phase-contrast computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Allner, S; Koehler, T; Fehringer, A; Birnbacher, L; Willner, M; Pfeiffer, F; Noël, P B

    2016-05-21

    The purpose of this work is to develop an image-based de-noising algorithm that exploits complementary information and noise statistics from multi-modal images, as they emerge in x-ray tomography techniques, for instance grating-based phase-contrast CT and spectral CT. Among the noise reduction methods, image-based de-noising is one popular approach and the so-called bilateral filter is a well known algorithm for edge-preserving filtering. We developed a generalization of the bilateral filter for the case where the imaging system provides two or more perfectly aligned images. The proposed generalization is statistically motivated and takes the full second order noise statistics of these images into account. In particular, it includes a noise correlation between the images and spatial noise correlation within the same image. The novel generalized three-dimensional bilateral filter is applied to the attenuation and phase images created with filtered backprojection reconstructions from grating-based phase-contrast tomography. In comparison to established bilateral filters, we obtain improved noise reduction and at the same time a better preservation of edges in the images on the examples of a simulated soft-tissue phantom, a human cerebellum and a human artery sample. The applied full noise covariance is determined via cross-correlation of the image noise. The filter results yield an improved feature recovery based on enhanced noise suppression and edge preservation as shown here on the example of attenuation and phase images captured with grating-based phase-contrast computed tomography. This is supported by quantitative image analysis. Without being bound to phase-contrast imaging, this generalized filter is applicable to any kind of noise-afflicted image data with or without noise correlation. Therefore, it can be utilized in various imaging applications and fields.

  8. New technique for the direct measurement of core noise from aircraft engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krejsa, E. A.

    1981-01-01

    A new technique is presented for directly measuring the core noise levels from gas turbine aircraft engines. The technique requires that fluctuating pressures be measured in the far-field and at two locations within the engine core. The cross-spectra of these measurements are used to determine the levels of the far-field noise that propagated from the engine core. The technique makes it possible to measure core noise levels even when other noise sources dominate. The technique was applied to signals measured from an AVCO Lycoming YF102 turbofan engine. Core noise levels as a function of frequency and radiation angle were measured and are presented over a range of power settings.

  9. Measuring PET scanner sensitivity; Relating count rates to image signal-to-noise ratios using noise equivalent counts

    SciTech Connect

    Strother, S.C. ); Casey, M.E. ); Hoffman, E.J. . Nuclear Medicine Lab.)

    1990-04-01

    Sensitivity parameters derived from a plot of a scanner's true coincidence count (TCC) rates as a function of activity in a 20 cm cylindrical phantom have no direct link to image quality. Noise equivalent count (NEC) rate curves, which incorporate the noise effects of subtracting the randoms and scatter count components provide a direct link between image signal-to-noise ratios and the scatter, randoms and trues coincidence count rates. The authors have measured TCC and NEC curves with a standardized 20 cm diameter nylon cylinder for five different PET scanners with several scanner-collimator combinations. In addition, the authors have compared TCC and NEC curves on one scanner with those from an Alderson brain phantom.

  10. Phase Noise Investigation of Maximum Likelihood Estimation Method for Airborne Multibaseline SAR Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magnard, C.; Small, D.; Meier, E.

    2015-03-01

    The phase estimation of cross-track multibaseline synthetic aperture interferometric data is usually thought to be very efficiently achieved using the maximum likelihood (ML) method. The suitability of this method is investigated here as applied to airborne single pass multibaseline data. Experimental interferometric data acquired with a Ka-band sensor were processed using (a) a ML method that fuses the complex data from all receivers and (b) a coarse-to-fine method that only uses the intermediate baselines to unwrap the phase values from the longest baseline. The phase noise was analyzed for both methods: in most cases, a small improvement was found when the ML method was used.

  11. Results of the noise measurement program on a standard and modified OH-6A helicopter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, H. R.; Peegg, R. J.; Hilton, D. A.

    1973-01-01

    A field noise measurement program has been conducted on a standard OH-6A helicopter and one that had been modified by reducing the rotor speed, altering rotor tip shape, and treating the engine exhaust and inlet to reduce the external noise levels. The modifications consisted of extensive aircraft design changes resulting in substantial noise reductions following state-of-art noise reduction techniques. The purpose of this study was to document the ground noise characteristics of each helicopter during flyover, hover, landing, and take-off operations. Based on an analysis of the measured results, the average of the overall on-track noise levels of the final modified helicopter was approximately 14 db lower than that for the standard helicopter. Narrow-band-spectra data of the hovering helicopter show a reduction in the overall noise due to the reductions achieved for the lifting main and antitorque tail rotor, engine exhaust, and gear box noise for the modified helicopter. The noise results of the test program are found to correlate generally with noise measurements made previously on this type of aircraft.

  12. “Buzz-saw” noise: A comparison of measurement with prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAlpine, A.; Fisher, M. J.; Tester, B. J.

    2006-03-01

    Accurate prediction of "buzz-saw" noise in a turbofan inlet duct necessitates consideration of nonlinear acoustics, modelling a complete fan blade set, modelling an acoustic liner, and calculations at high frequencies. A recent series of papers has described new work concerning the application of one-dimensional propagation models to the prediction of buzz-saw noise. A numerical model, termed the frequency domain numerical solution or FDNS, has been developed. It can be used to calculate the nonlinear propagation of the rotor-alone pressure field in either a rigid or acoustically-lined inlet duct. From this the in-duct noise level of the buzz-saw tones can be determined. In previous work, validation of this method by comparison with in-duct noise measurements has been limited to rigid inlet ducts, because of the lack of availability of suitable measurements from lined ducts. In this article new measurements of buzz-saw noise in an acoustically-lined inlet duct are utilized. A comparison of measurements of buzz-saw noise in a lined inlet duct, and noise predictions from numerical simulations by the FDNS is presented. The detailed measurements reveal the effect of an acoustic liner on buzz-saw noise. The suitability of the numerical model to be used to provide realistic noise predictions for supersonic ducted fans is also examined.

  13. Application of the noise power spectrum in modern diagnostic MDCT: part I. Measurement of noise power spectra and noise equivalent quanta.

    PubMed

    Boedeker, K L; Cooper, V N; McNitt-Gray, M F

    2007-07-21

    Dose reduction efforts in diagnostic CT have brought the tradeoff of dose versus image quality to the forefront. The need for meaningful characterization of image noise beyond that offered by pixel standard deviation is becoming increasingly important. This work aims to study the implementation of the noise power spectrum (NPS) and noise equivalent quanta (NEQ) on modern, multislice diagnostic CT scanners. The details of NPS and NEQ measurement are outlined and special attention is paid to issues unique to multislice CT. Aliasing, filter design and effects of acquisition geometry are investigated. While it was found that both metrics can be implemented in modern CT, it was discovered that NEQ cannot be aptly applied with certain non-traditional reconstruction filters or in helical mode. NPS and NEQ under a variety of conditions are examined. Extensions of NPS and NEQ to uses in protocol standardization are also discussed.

  14. Accuracy improvement in dissipated energy measurement by using phase information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiozawa, D.; Inagawa, T.; Washio, T.; Sakagami, T.

    2017-04-01

    In this paper, a technique for improving the accuracy of a dissipated energy measurement based on the phase information—called the phase 2f lock-in infrared method—is proposed. In the conventional 2f lock-in infrared method, the dissipated energy is obtained as the double frequency component of the measured temperature change. In this work, a phase analysis of the double frequency component has been conducted. It is found that the double frequency component includes the influence of the energy dissipation and harmonic vibration of the fatigue testing machine, and the phase difference between the thermoelastic temperature change and the double frequency component is a specific value. The phase 2f lock-in method utilizes a specific phase of the dissipated energy and is effective for removing the noise component such as the thermoelastic temperature change due to the harmonic vibration of fatigue testing machine. This method provides an improvement in the accuracy of the fatigue-limit estimate and the detection of future crack initiation points based on the dissipated energy.

  15. On the use of mobile phones and wearable microphones for noise exposure measurements: Calibration and measurement accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumoulin, Romain

    Despite the fact that noise-induced hearing loss remains the number one occupational disease in developed countries, individual noise exposure levels are still rarely known and infrequently tracked. Indeed, efforts to standardize noise exposure levels present disadvantages such as costly instrumentation and difficulties associated with on site implementation. Given their advanced technical capabilities and widespread daily usage, mobile phones could be used to measure noise levels and make noise monitoring more accessible. However, the use of mobile phones for measuring noise exposure is currently limited due to the lack of formal procedures for their calibration and challenges regarding the measurement procedure. Our research investigated the calibration of mobile phone-based solutions for measuring noise exposure using a mobile phone's built-in microphones and wearable external microphones. The proposed calibration approach integrated corrections that took into account microphone placement error. The corrections were of two types: frequency-dependent, using a digital filter and noise level-dependent, based on the difference between the C-weighted noise level minus A-weighted noise level of the noise measured by the phone. The electro-acoustical limitations and measurement calibration procedure of the mobile phone were investigated. The study also sought to quantify the effect of noise exposure characteristics on the accuracy of calibrated mobile phone measurements. Measurements were carried out in reverberant and semi-anechoic chambers with several mobiles phone units of the same model, two types of external devices (an earpiece and a headset with an in-line microphone) and an acoustical test fixture (ATF). The proposed calibration approach significantly improved the accuracy of the noise level measurements in diffuse and free fields, with better results in the diffuse field and with ATF positions causing little or no acoustic shadowing. Several sources of errors

  16. Some effects of the atmosphere and microphone placement on aircraft flyover noise measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hosier, R. N.; Hilton, D. A.

    1975-01-01

    The effects of varying atmospheric conditions on certification-type noise measurements were studied. Tests were made under various atmospheric conditions at two test sites, Fresno, California, and Yuma, Arizona, using the same test aircraft, noise, and weather measuring equipment, and operating personnel. Measurements were made to determine the effects of the atmosphere and of microphone placement on aircraft flyover noise. The measurements were obtained for characterization of not only the acoustic signature of the test aircraft, but also specific atmospheric characteristics. Data are presented in the form of charts and tables which indicate that for a wide range of weather conditions, at both site locations, noise data were repeatable for similar aircraft operating conditions. The placement of microphones at ground level and at 1.2 m over both spaded sand and concrete illustrate the effects of ground reflections and surface impedance on the noise measurements.

  17. Calibration and Characterization of Autonomous Recorders Used in the Measurement of Underwater Noise.

    PubMed

    Hayman, Gary; Robinson, Stephen; Lepper, Paul

    2016-01-01

    The use of autonomous recorders is motivated by the need to monitor underwater noise, such as in response to the requirements of the European Union Marine Strategy Framework Directive. The performance of these systems is a crucial factor governing the quality of the measured data, providing traceability for future underwater noise-monitoring programs aimed at the protection of the marine environment from anthropogenic noise. In this paper, a discussion is presented of measurement methodologies for the key acoustic performance characteristics of the recorders, including self-noise, dynamic range, and the absolute sensitivity as a function of frequency of the hydrophone and recorder system.

  18. Accurate measurement of spatial noise portraits of photosensors of digital cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheremkhin, P. A.; Evtikhiev, N. N.; Krasnov, V. V.; Kulakov, M. N.; Starikov, R. S.

    2016-08-01

    Method of measurement of accurate portraits of light and dark spatial noise of photosensors is described. The method consists of four steps: creation of spatially homogeneous illumination; shooting light and dark frames; digital processing and filtering. Unlike standard technique, this method uses iterative creation of spatially homogeneous illumination by display, compensation of photosensor dark spatial noise portrait and improved procedure of elimination of dark temporal noise. Portraits of light and dark spatial noise of photosensors of a scientific digital camera were found. Characteristics of the measured portraits were compared with values of photo response and dark signal non-uniformities of camera's photosensor.

  19. Measurement of noise and its correlation to performance and geometry of small aircraft propellers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Štorch, Vít; Nožička, Jiří; Brada, Martin; Gemperle, Jiří; Suchý, Jakub

    2016-03-01

    A set of small model and UAV propellers is measured both in terms of aerodynamic performance and acoustic noise under static conditions. Apart from obvious correlation of noise to tip speed and propeller diameter the influence of blade pitch, blade pitch distribution, efficiency and shape of the blade is sought. Using the measured performance data a computational model for calculation of aerodynamic noise of propellers will be validated. The range of selected propellers include both propellers designed for nearly static conditions and propellers that are running at highly offdesign conditions, which allows to investigate i.e. the effect of blade stall on both noise level and performance results.

  20. Suboptimal filtering of 1/ƒ;-noise in detector charge measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gatti, E.; Manfredi, P. F.; Sampietro, M.; Speziali, V.

    1990-12-01

    Processing of {1}/{tf}- noise by suboptimal filters in detector charge measurements is considered. The achievable values of equivalent noise charge are compared to those provided by the optimum filter. Some aspects of filters processing {1}/{tf}- noise, like the degradation in the accuracy of charge measurements due to a bipolar or to a unipolar, flat-topped weighting function are described. Several conclusions are expected to be useful in the design of analog processors for radiation detectors when the front-end {1}/{tf}- noise is not negligible.

  1. Phase measurements of EUV mask defects

    DOE PAGES

    Claus, Rene A.; Wang, Yow-Gwo; Wojdyla, Antoine; ...

    2015-02-22

    Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) Lithography mask defects were examined on the actinic mask imaging system, SHARP, at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Also, a quantitative phase retrieval algorithm based on the Weak Object Transfer Function was applied to the measured through-focus aerial images to examine the amplitude and phase of the defects. The accuracy of the algorithm was demonstrated by comparing the results of measurements using a phase contrast zone plate and a standard zone plate. Using partially coherent illumination to measure frequencies that would otherwise fall outside the numerical aperture (NA), it was shown that some defects are smaller than themore » conventional resolution of the microscope. We found that the programmed defects of various sizes were measured and shown to have both an amplitude and a phase component that the algorithm is able to recover.« less

  2. Phase measurements of EUV mask defects

    SciTech Connect

    Claus, Rene A.; Wang, Yow-Gwo; Wojdyla, Antoine; Benk, Markus P.; Goldberg, Kenneth A.; Neureuther, Andrew R.; Naulleau, Patrick P.; Waller, Laura

    2015-02-22

    Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) Lithography mask defects were examined on the actinic mask imaging system, SHARP, at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Also, a quantitative phase retrieval algorithm based on the Weak Object Transfer Function was applied to the measured through-focus aerial images to examine the amplitude and phase of the defects. The accuracy of the algorithm was demonstrated by comparing the results of measurements using a phase contrast zone plate and a standard zone plate. Using partially coherent illumination to measure frequencies that would otherwise fall outside the numerical aperture (NA), it was shown that some defects are smaller than the conventional resolution of the microscope. We found that the programmed defects of various sizes were measured and shown to have both an amplitude and a phase component that the algorithm is able to recover.

  3. Using phase information to enhance speckle noise reduction in the ultrasonic NDE of coarse grain materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lardner, Timothy; Li, Minghui; Gachagan, Anthony

    2014-02-01

    Materials with a coarse grain structure are becoming increasingly prevalent in industry due to their resilience to stress and corrosion. These materials are difficult to inspect with ultrasound because reflections from the grains lead to high noise levels which hinder the echoes of interest. Spatially Averaged Sub-Aperture Correlation Imaging (SASACI) is an advanced array beamforming technique that uses the cross-correlation between images from array sub-apertures to generate an image weighting matrix, in order to reduce noise levels. This paper presents a method inspired by SASACI to further improve imaging using phase information to refine focusing and reduce noise. A-scans from adjacent array elements are cross-correlated using both signal amplitude and phase to refine delay laws and minimize phase aberration. The phase-based and amplitude-based corrected images are used as inputs to a two-dimensional cross-correlation algorithm that will output a weighting matrix that can be applied to any conventional image. This approach was validated experimentally using a 5MHz array a coarse grained Inconel 625 step wedge, and compared to the Total Focusing Method (TFM). Initial results have seen SNR improvements of over 20dB compared to TFM, and a resolution that is much higher.

  4. Turbulent phase noise on asymmetric two-way ground-satellite coherent optical links

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robert, Clélia; Conan, Jean-Marc; Wolf, Peter

    2015-10-01

    Bidirectional ground-satellite laser links suffer from turbulence-induced scintillation and phase distortion. We study how turbulence impacts on coherent detection capacity and on the associated phase noise that restricts clock transfer precision. We evaluate the capacity to obtain a two-way cancellation of atmospheric effects despite the asymmetry between up and down link that limits the link reciprocity. For ground-satellite links, the asymmetry is induced by point-ahead angle and possibly the use, for the ground terminal, of different transceiver diameters, in reception and emission. The quantitative analysis is obtained thanks to refined end-to-end simulations under realistic turbulence and wind conditions as well as satellite cinematic. Simulations make use of the reciprocity principle to estimate both down and up link performance from wave-optics propagation of descending plane waves. These temporally resolved simulations allow characterising the coherent detection in terms of time series of heterodyne efficiency for different system parameters. We show Tip/Tilt correction on ground is mandatory at reception for the down link and as a pre-compensation of the up link. Good correlation between up and down phase noise is obtained even with asymmetric apertures of the ground transceiver and in spite of pointing ahead angle. The reduction to less than 1 rad2 of the two-way differential phase noise is very promising for clock transfer.

  5. Using phase information to enhance speckle noise reduction in the ultrasonic NDE of coarse grain materials

    SciTech Connect

    Lardner, Timothy; Gachagan, Anthony; Li, Minghui

    2014-02-18

    Materials with a coarse grain structure are becoming increasingly prevalent in industry due to their resilience to stress and corrosion. These materials are difficult to inspect with ultrasound because reflections from the grains lead to high noise levels which hinder the echoes of interest. Spatially Averaged Sub-Aperture Correlation Imaging (SASACI) is an advanced array beamforming technique that uses the cross-correlation between images from array sub-apertures to generate an image weighting matrix, in order to reduce noise levels. This paper presents a method inspired by SASACI to further improve imaging using phase information to refine focusing and reduce noise. A-scans from adjacent array elements are cross-correlated using both signal amplitude and phase to refine delay laws and minimize phase aberration. The phase-based and amplitude-based corrected images are used as inputs to a two-dimensional cross-correlation algorithm that will output a weighting matrix that can be applied to any conventional image. This approach was validated experimentally using a 5MHz array a coarse grained Inconel 625 step wedge, and compared to the Total Focusing Method (TFM). Initial results have seen SNR improvements of over 20dB compared to TFM, and a resolution that is much higher.

  6. Audio-band coating thermal noise measurement for Advanced LIGO with a multimode optical resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gras, S.; Yu, H.; Yam, W.; Martynov, D.; Evans, M.

    2017-01-01

    In modern high precision optical instruments, such as in gravitational wave detectors or frequency references, thermally induced fluctuations in the reflective coatings can be a limiting noise source. This noise, known as coating thermal noise, can be reduced by choosing materials with low mechanical loss. Examination of new materials becomes a necessity in order to further minimize the coating thermal noise and thus improve sensitivity of next generation instruments. We present a novel approach to directly measure coating thermal noise using a high finesse folded cavity in which multiple Hermite-Gaussian modes coresonate. This method is used to probe surface fluctuations on the order 10-17 m /√{Hz } in the frequency range 30-400 Hz. We applied this technique to measure thermal noise and loss angle of the coating used in Advanced LIGO.

  7. Flight-test measurement of the noise reduction of a jet transport delayed flap approach procedure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, J. D.; Lasagna, P. L.

    1976-01-01

    A delayed flap approach procedure was flight tested using the NASA CV-990 airplane to measure and analyze the noise produced beneath the flight path. Three other types of landing approaches were also flight tested to provide a comparison of the noise reduction benefits to the delayed flap approach. The conventional type of approach was used as a baseline to compare the effectiveness of the other approaches. The decelerating approach is a variation of the delayed flap approach. A detailed comparison of the ground perceived noise generated during the approaches is presented. For this comparison, the measured noise data were normalized to compensate for variations in aircraft weight and winds that occurred during the flight tests. The data show that the reduced flap approach offers some noise reduction, while the delayed flap and decelerating approaches offer significant noise reductions over the conventional approach.

  8. Practical quantum random number generator based on measuring the shot noise of vacuum states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yong; Tian, Liang; Zou, Hongxin

    2010-06-01

    The shot noise of vacuum states is a kind of quantum noise and is totally random. In this paper a nondeterministic random number generation scheme based on measuring the shot noise of vacuum states is presented and experimentally demonstrated. We use a homodyne detector to measure the shot noise of vacuum states. Considering that the frequency bandwidth of our detector is limited, we derive the optimal sampling rate so that sampling points have the least correlation with each other. We also choose a method to extract random numbers from sampling values, and prove that the influence of classical noise can be avoided with this method so that the detector does not have to be shot-noise limited. The random numbers generated with this scheme have passed ent and diehard tests.

  9. Method to Measure Total Noise Temperature of a Wireless Receiver During Operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Lawrence E. (Inventor); Turbiner, Dmitry (Inventor); Esterhuizen, Stephan X. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    An electromagnetic signal receiver and methods for determining the noise level and signal power in a signal of interest while the receiver is operating. In some embodiments, the signal of interest is a GPS signal. The receiver includes a noise source that provides a noise signal of known power during intervals while the signal of interest is observed. By measuring a signal-to-noise ratio for the signal of interest and the noise power in the signal of interest, the noise level and signal power of the signal of interest can be computed. Various methods of making the measurements and computing the power of the signal of interest are described. Applications of the system and method are described.

  10. Phase transitions in the majority-vote model with two types of noises

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieira, Allan R.; Crokidakis, Nuno

    2016-05-01

    In this work we study the majority-vote model with the presence of two distinct noises. The first one is the usual noise q, that represents the probability that a given agent follows the minority opinion of his/her social contacts. On the other hand, we consider the independent behavior, such that an agent can choose his/her own opinion + 1 or - 1 with equal probability, independent of the group's norm. We study the impact of the presence of such two kinds of stochastic driving in the phase transitions of the model, considering the mean field and the square lattice cases. Our results suggest that the model undergoes a nonequilibrium order-disorder phase transition even in the absence of the noise q, due to the independent behavior, but this transition may be suppressed. In addition, for both topologies analyzed, we verified that the transition is in the same universality class of the equilibrium Ising model, i.e., the critical exponents are not affected by the presence of the second noise, associated with independence.

  11. Measurement of Sub-Shot-Noise Correlations of Spatial Fluctuations in the Photon-Counting Regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanchet, Jean-Luc; Devaux, Fabrice; Furfaro, Luca; Lantz, Eric

    2008-12-01

    We have measured sub-shot-noise quantum correlations of spatial fluctuations in the far-field image of the parametric fluorescence created in a type I beta-barium-borate nonlinear crystal. Imaging is performed at very low light level (0.15 photons per pixel) with an electron multiplying charge coupled device camera. Experimental results overcome the standard quantum limit shot-noise level without subtraction of the variance of the detection noise.

  12. Research of the suppression of the phase noise in DFB fiber laser by self-injection locking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Jianfeng; Zhang, Yinfa; Yu, Zhenglong; Xiong, Shuidong; Ma, Lina

    2016-11-01

    The intrinsic phase noise of distributed feedback (DFB) fiber laser greatly reduces the signal to noise ratio (SNR) of unbalance interferometric fiber sensor system, which has a negative influence on the demodulation of tiny signal. In order to suppress the phase noise of DFB fiber laser (DFB-FL), a self-injecion locking DFB-FL was presented. Result of experiment demonstrated that the phase noise can be suppressed by the self-injection locking structure and the effect of suppression was improved with the increase of the length of locking ring. When the length of locking ring is two meters, the phase noise above 500Hz decreases by 8 dB / √Hz demodulated by an one meter optical path difference asymmetric Michelson Interference, and the mode is not hoping in eight hours. Contrast with the unlocked DFB-FL, the pump efficiency of self-injection locking DFB-FL is increased by 30%.

  13. Measurements of liquid-phase turbulence in gas-liquid two-phase flows using particle image velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xinquan; Doup, Benjamin; Sun, Xiaodong

    2013-12-01

    Liquid-phase turbulence measurements were performed in an air-water two-phase flow loop with a circular test section of 50 mm inner diameter using a particle image velocimetry (PIV) system. An optical phase separation method--planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) technique—which uses fluorescent particles and an optical filtration technique, was employed to separate the signals of the fluorescent seeding particles from those due to bubbles and other noises. An image pre-processing scheme was applied to the raw PIV images to remove the noise residuals that are not removed by the PLIF technique. In addition, four-sensor conductivity probes were adopted to measure the radial distribution of the void fraction. Two benchmark tests were performed: the first was a comparison of the PIV measurement results with those of similar flow conditions using thermal anemometry from previous studies; the second quantitatively compared the superficial liquid velocities calculated from the local liquid velocity and void fraction measurements with the global liquid flow rate measurements. The differences of the superficial liquid velocity obtained from the two measurements were bounded within ±7% for single-phase flows and two-phase bubbly flows with the area-average void fraction up to 18%. Furthermore, a preliminary uncertainty analysis was conducted to investigate the accuracy of the two-phase PIV measurements. The systematic uncertainties due to the circular pipe curvature effects, bubble surface reflection effects and other potential uncertainty sources of the PIV measurements were discussed. The purpose of this work is to facilitate the development of a measurement technique (PIV-PLIF) combined with image pre-processing for the liquid-phase turbulence in gas-liquid two-phase flows of relatively high void fractions. The high-resolution data set can be used to more thoroughly understand two-phase flow behavior, develop liquid-phase turbulence models, and assess high

  14. The application of wavelet shrinkage denoising to magnetic Barkhausen noise measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, James

    2014-02-18

    The application of Magnetic Barkhausen Noise (MBN) as a non-destructive method of defect detection has proliferated throughout the manufacturing community. Instrument technology and measurement methodology have matured commensurately as applications have moved from the R and D labs to the fully automated manufacturing environment. These new applications present a new set of challenges including a bevy of error sources. A significant obstacle in many industrial applications is a decrease in signal to noise ratio due to (i) environmental EMI and (II) compromises in sensor design for the purposes of automation. The stochastic nature of MBN presents a challenge to any method of noise reduction. An application of wavelet shrinkage denoising is proposed as a method of decreasing extraneous noise in MBN measurements. The method is tested and yields marked improvement on measurements subject to EMI, grounding noise, and even measurements in ideal conditions.

  15. Cruise noise measurements of a scale model advanced ducted propulsor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dittmar, James H.; Hughes, Christopher E.; Bock, Lawrence A.; Hall, David G.

    1993-01-01

    A scale model Advanced Ducted Propulsor (ADP) was tested in NASA Lewis Research Center's 8- by 6-Foot Wind Tunnel to obtain acoustic data at cruise conditions. The model, designed and manufactured by Pratt & Whitney Division of United Technologies, was tested with three inlet lengths. The model has 16 rotor blades and 22 stator vanes, which results in a cut-on condition with respect to rotor-stator interaction noise. Comparisons of the noise directivity of the ADP with that of a previously tested high-speed, unducted propeller showed that the ADP peak blade passing tone was about 30 dB below that of the propeller, and therefore, should not present a cabin or enroute noise problem. The maximum blade passing tone first increased with increasing helical tip Mach number, peaked, and then decreased at a higher Mach number. The ADP tests with the shortest inlet showed more noise in the inlet arc than did tests with either of the other two inlet lengths.

  16. Cruise noise measurements of a scale model advanced ducted propulsor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dittmar, James H.; Hughes, Christopher E.; Bock, Lawrence A.; Hall, David G.

    1993-10-01

    A scale model Advanced Ducted Propulsor (ADP) was tested in NASA Lewis Research Center's 8- by 6-Foot Wind Tunnel to obtain acoustic data at cruise conditions. The model, designed and manufactured by Pratt & Whitney Division of United Technologies, was tested with three inlet lengths. The model has 16 rotor blades and 22 stator vanes, which results in a cut-on condition with respect to rotor-stator interaction noise. Comparisons of the noise directivity of the ADP with that of a previously tested high-speed, unducted propeller showed that the ADP peak blade passing tone was about 30 dB below that of the propeller, and therefore, should not present a cabin or enroute noise problem. The maximum blade passing tone first increased with increasing helical tip Mach number, peaked, and then decreased at a higher Mach number. The ADP tests with the shortest inlet showed more noise in the inlet arc than did tests with either of the other two inlet lengths.

  17. Analysis of VIIRS TEB noise using solar diffuser measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Taeyoung; Cao, Changyong; Weng, Fuzhong

    2015-09-01

    The Soumi-NPP Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) was launched on October 28th, 2011 and its Sensor Data Record (SDR) product reached maturity status in March of 2014. Although the VIIRS SDR products are declared at the validated maturity level, there remain issues such as residual stripings in some thermal bands along with the scan direction. These horizontal striping issues in the Thermal Emissive Bands (TEB) were reflected in the sea surface temperature (SST) products. The observed striping magnitude can reach to 0.2 K, especially at the band M14 and M15. As an independent source of calibration, the Solar Diffuser (SD) is utilized in this study. The SD is originally designed for the Reflective Solar Band (RSB), however, it is assumed to be thermally stable at the time of SD observation. For each detector, a linear slope is developed by Integrated Calibration and Validation System (ICVS), which is applied on converting digital number (DN) to radiance unit. After the conversion, detector based noise analyses in VIIRS band M15 and M16 are performed on in-scan and scan-by-scan SD responses. Since SD radiance varies within an orbit, the noise calculation must be derived from the neighborhood Allan deviation. The noise derived Allan deviation shows that detector 1 and 2 in band M15 and detector 9 in band M16 have higher noise content compared to other detectors.

  18. Study of noise sources in a subsonic fan using measured blade pressures and acoustic theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanson, D. B.

    1975-01-01

    Sources of noise in a 1.4 m (4.6 ft) diameter subsonic tip speed propulsive fan running statically outdoors are studied using a combination of techniques. Signals measured with pressure transducers on a rotor blade are plotted in a format showing the space-time history of inlet distortion. Study of these plots visually and with statistical correlation analysis confirms that the inlet flow contains long, thin eddies of turbulence. Turbulence generated in the boundary layer of the shroud upstream of the rotor tips was not found to be an important noise source. Fan noise is diagnosed by computing narrowband spectra of rotor and stator sound power and comparing these with measured sound power spectra. Rotor noise is computed from spectra of the measured blade pressures and stator noise is computed using the author's stator noise theory. It is concluded that the rotor and stator sources contribute about equally at frequencies in the vicinity of the first three harmonics of blade passing frequency. At higher frequencies, the stator contribution diminishes rapidly and the rotor/inlet turbulence mechanism dominates. Two parametric studies are performed by using the rotor noise calculation procedure which was correlated with test. In the first study, the effects on noise spectrum and directivity are calculated for changes in turbulence properties, rotational Mach number, number of blades, and stagger angle. In the second study the influences of design tip speed and blade number on noise are evaluated.

  19. On-road and wind-tunnel measurement of motorcycle helmet noise.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, J; Carley, M; Walker, I; Holt, N

    2013-09-01

    The noise source mechanisms involved in motorcycling include various aerodynamic sources and engine noise. The problem of noise source identification requires extensive data acquisition of a type and level that have not previously been applied. Data acquisition on track and on road are problematic due to rider safety constraints and the portability of appropriate instrumentation. One way to address this problem is the use of data from wind tunnel tests. The validity of these measurements for noise source identification must first be demonstrated. In order to achieve this extensive wind tunnel tests have been conducted and compared with the results from on-track measurements. Sound pressure levels as a function of speed were compared between on track and wind tunnel tests and were found to be comparable. Spectral conditioning techniques were applied to separate engine and wind tunnel noise from aerodynamic noise and showed that the aerodynamic components were equivalent in both cases. The spectral conditioning of on-track data showed that the contribution of engine noise to the overall noise is a function of speed and is more significant than had previously been thought. These procedures form a basis for accurate experimental measurements of motorcycle noise.

  20. SEMICONDUCTOR INTEGRATED CIRCUITS: An enhanced close-in phase noise LC-VCO using parasitic V-NPN transistors in a CMOS process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peijun, Gao; J, Oh N.; Hao, Min

    2009-08-01

    A differential LC voltage controlled oscillator (VCO) employing parasitic vertical-NPN (V-NPN) transistors as a negative gm-cell is presented to improve the close-in phase noise. The V-NPN transistors have lower flicker noise compared to MOS transistors. DC and AC characteristics of the V-NPN transistors are measured to facilitate the VCO design. The proposed VCO is implemented in a 0.18 μm CMOS RF/mixed signal process, and the measurement results show the close-in phase noise is improved by 3.5-9.1 dB from 100 Hz to 10 kHz offset compared to that of a similar CMOS VCO. The proposed VCO consumes only 0.41 mA from a 1.5 V power supply.

  1. Phase 3 Clinical Trials: D-Methionine to Reduce Noise-Induced Hearing Loss

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    Phase 3 clinical trial of oral D-met to reduce noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) and tinnitus . The goal of the study is to develop a safe, oral...this study is to determine the efficacy of D- Met in preventing NIHL or reducing tinnitus secondary to a minimum of 500 rounds of M-16 weapons training...and tinnitus in our troops. Hypotheses: Primary Hypothesis: Administration of oral D-methionine prior to and during weapons training will

  2. On estimating the phase of a periodic waveform in additive Gaussian noise, part 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rauch, L. L.

    1991-01-01

    Motivated by advances in signal processing technology that support more complex algorithms, researchers have taken a new look at the problem of estimating the phase and other parameters of a nearly periodic waveform in additive Gaussian noise, based on observation during a given time interval. Parts 1 and 2 are very briefly reviewed. In part 3, the actual performances of some of the highly nonlinear estimation algorithms of parts 1 and 2 are evaluated by numerical simulation using Monte Carlo techniques.

  3. Ultra-stable, low phase noise dielectric resonator stabilized oscillators for military and commercial systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mizan, Muhammad; Higgins, Thomas; Sturzebecher, Dana

    1993-01-01

    EPSD has designed, fabricated and tested, ultra-stable, low phase noise microwave dielectric resonator oscillators (DRO's) at S, X, Ku, and K-bands, for potential application to high dynamic range and low radar cross section target detection radar systems. The phase noise and the temperature stability surpass commercially available DROs. Low phase noise signals are critical for CW Doppler radars, at both very close-in and large offset frequencies from the carrier. The oscillators were built without any temperature compensation techniques and exhibited a temperature stability of 25 parts per million (ppm) over an extended temperature range. The oscillators are lightweight, small and low cost compared to BAW & SAW oscillators, and can impact commercial systems such as telecommunications, built-in-test equipment, cellular phone and satellite communications systems. The key to obtaining this performance was a high Q factor resonant structure (RS) and careful circuit design techniques. The high Q RS consists of a dielectric resonator (DR) supported by a low loss spacer inside a metal cavity. The S and the X-band resonant structures demonstrated loaded Q values of 20,300 and 12,700, respectively.

  4. An acoustic range for the measurement of the noise signature of aircraft during flyby operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilton, D. A.; Henderson, H. R.

    1978-01-01

    The remotely operated multiple array acoustic range (ROMAAR), which has been developed to give direct measurement and display of aircraft noise in several measurement units during takeoff, landing, and flyby operations, is described. The ROMAAR, which provides information on the ground noise signature of aircraft, represents a unique combination of state-of-the-art digital and analog noise-recording methods, computer-controlled digital communication methods, radar tracking facilities, quick-look weather (profile) capabilities, and sophisticated data handling routines and facilities. The ROMAAR, which is operated by NASA, allows direct data feedback to the NASA Aircraft Noise Prediction Office. As many as 38 simultaneous noise measurements can be made for each aircraft overflight.

  5. Two-channel interferometric detection for the compensation of phase fluctuation noise in nonlinear infrared microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, E. S.; Lee, S. W.; Park, J. H.; Lee, J. Y.

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate an interferometric implementation of nonlinear optical infrared microscopy in which a probe beam interrogates the refractive index change of samples that is induced by molecular vibrational absorption of an infrared pump beam. To compensate for the phase noise caused by the ambient airflow and external vibration, we configure two coupled Mach-Zehnder interferometers sharing a single microscope setup in the sample arm. Proper control over the phase between the two interference channels allows two simultaneous quadrature mode outputs. The validity of our method is proven by imaging polystyrene bead aggregates and comparing the images with the conventional single-channel results.

  6. Phase noise from aircraft motion: Compensation and effect on synthetic aperture radar images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gabriel, Andrew K.; Goldstein, Richard M.

    1986-01-01

    Image degradation of airborne SAR imagery caused by phase errors introduced in the received signal by aircraft motion is discussed. Mechanical motion has a small bandwidth and does not affect the range signal, where the total echo time is typically 60 microsec. However, since the aperture length can be several seconds, the synthesized azimuth signal can have significant errors of which phase noise is the most important. An inertial navigation system can be used to compensate for these errors when processing the images. Calculations to evaluate how much improvement results from compensation are outlined.

  7. Shape anomaly detection under strong measurement noise: An analytical approach to adaptive thresholding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasichkov, Alexander S.; Grigoriev, Eugene B.; Bogachev, Mikhail I.; Nifontov, Eugene M.

    2015-10-01

    We suggest an analytical approach to the adaptive thresholding in a shape anomaly detection problem. We find an analytical expression for the distribution of the cosine similarity score between a reference shape and an observational shape hindered by strong measurement noise that depends solely on the noise level and is independent of the particular shape analyzed. The analytical treatment is also confirmed by computer simulations and shows nearly perfect agreement. Using this analytical solution, we suggest an improved shape anomaly detection approach based on adaptive thresholding. We validate the noise robustness of our approach using typical shapes of normal and pathological electrocardiogram cycles hindered by additive white noise. We show explicitly that under high noise levels our approach considerably outperforms the conventional tactic that does not take into account variations in the noise level.

  8. Interior noise and vibration measurements on operational military helicopters and comparisons with various ride quality criteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clevenson, S. A.; Leatherwood, J. D.; Hollenbaugh, D. D.

    1983-08-01

    The results of physical measurements of the interior noise and vibration obtained within eight operational military helicopters are presented. The data were extensively analyzed and are presented in the following forms: noise and vibration spectra, overall root-mean-square acceleration levels in three linear axes, peak accelerations at dominant blade passage frequencies, acceleration exceedance data, and overall and ""A'' weighted sound pressure levels. Peak acceleration levels were compared to the ISO 1-hr reduced comfort and fatigue decreased proficiency boundaries and the NASA discomfort criteria. The ""A'' weighted noise levels were compared to the NASA annoyance criteria, and the overall noise spectra were compared to MIL-STD-1294 (""Acoustical Noise Limits in Helicopters''). Specific vibration components at blade passage frequencies for several aircraft exceeded both the ISO reduced comfort boundary and the NASA passenger discomfort criteria. The ""A'' weighted noise levels, corrected for SPH-4 helmet attenuation characteristics, exceeded the NASA annoyance threshold for several aircraft.

  9. Interior noise and vibration measurements on operational military helicopters and comparisons with various ride quality criteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clevenson, S. A.; Leatherwood, J. D.; Hollenbaugh, D. D.

    1983-01-01

    The results of physical measurements of the interior noise and vibration obtained within eight operational military helicopters are presented. The data were extensively analyzed and are presented in the following forms: noise and vibration spectra, overall root-mean-square acceleration levels in three linear axes, peak accelerations at dominant blade passage frequencies, acceleration exceedance data, and overall and ""A'' weighted sound pressure levels. Peak acceleration levels were compared to the ISO 1-hr reduced comfort and fatigue decreased proficiency boundaries and the NASA discomfort criteria. The ""A'' weighted noise levels were compared to the NASA annoyance criteria, and the overall noise spectra were compared to MIL-STD-1294 (""Acoustical Noise Limits in Helicopters''). Specific vibration components at blade passage frequencies for several aircraft exceeded both the ISO reduced comfort boundary and the NASA passenger discomfort criteria. The ""A'' weighted noise levels, corrected for SPH-4 helmet attenuation characteristics, exceeded the NASA annoyance threshold for several aircraft.

  10. Psychophysical measurement of night vision goggle noise using a binocular display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reis, George A.; Marasco, Peter L.; Havig, Paul R.; Heft, Eric L.

    2004-09-01

    Users of night vision goggles (NVGs) have reported differences in perceived noise across various NVGs. To understand these differences, we need to measure NVG noise in a psychophysical context. In the precursory study, subjects attempted to characterize NVG noise by examining choices across different parameters of filtered white noise generated on a computer monitor. Subjects adjusted parameters of the filtered noise to match the noise for each combination of two goggles and two luminance levels. Significant differences were found between luminance levels, NVG type, and parameter relationships. Concerns from the previous experiment have yielded this study to better understand if this characterization process has merit. In the previous study, the parameter sequence was constant across trials. We increased the number of trials and subjects, and we included an accounting for parameter sequence. In addition, we used a modified Wheatstone stereoscope to simulate NVG tube independence. We discuss our results in terms of luminance levels, parameter sequence, subject variability, and relationships between parameters.

  11. White light Fourier spectrometer: Monte Carlo noise analysis and test measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoykova, Elena; Ivanov, Branimir

    2007-06-01

    This work reports on investigation of the sensitivity of a Fourier-transform spectrometer to noise sources based on Monte-Carlo simulation of measurement of a single spectrum. Flexibility of this approach permits easily to imitate various noise contaminations of the interferograms and to obtain statistically reliable results for widely varying noise characteristics. More specifically, we evaluate the accuracy of restoration of a single absorption peak for the cases of an additive detection noise and the noise which adds a fluctuating component to the carrier frequency in the source and the measurement channel of the interferometer. Comparison of spectra of an etalon He-Ne source calculated from more than 200 measured interferograms with the true spectrum supports a hypothesis that the latter fluctuations have characteristics of a coloured noise. Taking into account that the signal-to-noise ratio in the Fourier spectroscopy is constantly increasing, we focus on limitations on the achievable accuracy of spectrum restoration that are set by this type of noise which modifies the shape of the recorded interferograms. We present also results of the test measurements of the spectrum of a laser diode chosen as a test source using a three-channel Fourier spectroscopic system based on a white-sourced Michelson interferometer realized with the Twyman-Green scheme. The obtained results exhibit that fluctuations in the current displacement of the movable mirror of the interferometer should remain below 20 nm to restore the absorption spectrum with acceptable accuracy, especially at higher frequency bandwidth of the fluctuations.

  12. AGARD flight test techniques series. Volume 9: Aircraft exterior noise measurement and analysis techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heller, H.

    1991-04-01

    Testing and analysis techniques to measure aircraft noise primarily for purposes of noise certification as specified by the 'International Civil Aviation Organization', ICAO are described. The relevant aircraft noise certification standards and recommended practices are presented in detail for subsonic jet aircraft, for heavy and light propeller-driven aircraft, and for helicopters. The practical execution of conducting noise certification tests is treated in depth. The characteristics and requirements of the acoustic and non-acoustic instrumentation for data acquisition and data processing are discussed, as are the procedures to determine the special noise measures - effective perceived noise level (EPNL) and maximum overall A-weighted noise level (L sub pA,max) - that are required for the noise certification of different types of aircraft. The AGARDograph also contains an extensive, although selective, discussion of test and analysis techniques for more detailed aircraft noise studies by means of either flight experiments or full-scale and model-scale wind tunnel experiments. Appendices provide supplementary information.

  13. Laboratory measurements of modal noise on optical fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iuzzolino, M.; Sanna, N.; Tozzi, A.; Oliva, E.

    Many scientific instruments are nowadays coupled to the telescope through optical fibers. This is also the case of the current configuration of GIANO, the high resolution near infrared echelle spectrograph installed at the TNG telescope. As experienced and frequent users of the IR optical fiber, the GIANO building team decided to go deep in the characterization of the optical fiber in the IR band, and in particular to understand and analyze the fiber modal noise. This work is also a preparatory study for the future HIRES@E-ELT instrument design. This paper consists in the description of the fiber laboratory tests, and in the explanation of the results. The whole job defines a wider comprehension of the modal noise, and demonstrates the existence of two aspects influencing this noise. The first one, well known in literature, refers to the interferences between the fiber modes at the exit endface of the fiber, and it can be mitigated by mechanical scrambling techniques. The second one, unknown before, is entirely dependent on the way in which light is injected at the entrance of the fiber, and no mitigation have been observed with any classical scrambling technique (e.g. double-scramblers). These considerations apply to both ZBLAN or fused silica optical fiber, and to both circular and octagonal core shape.

  14. Measurement and Characterization of Helicopter Noise at Different Altitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watts, Michael E.; Greenwood, Eric; Stephenson, James

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of a flight test campaign performed at different test sites whose altitudes ranged from 0 to 7000 feet above mean sea level (AMSL) between September 2014 and February 2015. The purposes of this campaign were to: investigate the effects of altitude variation on noise generation, investigate the effects of gross weight variation on noise generation, establish the statistical variability in acoustic flight testing of helicopters, and characterize the effects of transient maneuvers on radiated noise for a medium-lift utility helicopter. In addition to describing the test campaign, results of the acoustic effects of altitude variation for the AS350 SD1 and EH-60L aircraft are presented. Large changes in acoustic amplitudes were observed in response to changes in ambient conditions when the helicopter was flown at constant indicated airspeed and gross weight at the three test sites. However, acoustic amplitudes were found to scale with ambient pressure when flight conditions were defined in terms of the non-dimensional parameters, such as the weight coefficient and effective hover tip Mach number.

  15. Phase Noise Enhancement of the GaAs High Electron Mobility Transistors Using Micromachined Cavity Resonators at Ka-band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Insang; Kim, Chungwoo; Kwon, Youngwoo; Cheon, Changyul; Song, Cimoo

    1999-06-01

    We introduce a new structure of the micromachined cavity resonator coupled GaAs-based oscillator to enhance the phase noise and the frequency stability. The oscillator and the cavity are designed for Ka-band applications. Compared to the free running oscillator, the cavity resonator coupled oscillator showed the phase noise enhancement of about 20 dB. The phase noises of about -110 and -85 dBc/Hz are obtained at 1 MHz and 100 kHz offset frequency, respectively. The frequency pushing for the gate bias of the cavity coupled oscillator is about two order of magnitude less than that of the free running oscillator.

  16. Phase noise tolerance study in coherent optical circular QAM transmissions with Viterbi-Viterbi carrier phase estimation.

    PubMed

    Zafra, Sebastian Ortega; Pang, Xiaodan; Jacobsen, Gunnar; Popov, Sergei; Sergeyev, Sergey

    2014-12-15

    We present a performance evaluation of a non-conventional approach to implement phase noise tolerant optical systems with multilevel modulation formats. The performance of normalized Viterbi-Viterbi carrier phase estimation (V-V CPE) is investigated in detail for circular m-level quadrature amplitude modulation (C-mQAM) signals. The intrinsic property of C-mQAM constellation points with a uniform phase separation allows a straightforward employment of V-V CPE without the need to adapt constellation. Compared with conventional feed-forward CPE for square QAM signals, the simulated results show an enhanced tolerance of linewidth symbol duration product (ΔνTs) at a low sensitivity penalty by using feed-forward CPE structure with C-mQAM. This scheme can be easily upgraded to higher order modulations without inducing considerable complexity.

  17. Phase-noise characteristics of a 25-GHz-spaced optical frequency comb based on a phase- and intensity-modulated laser.

    PubMed

    Ishizawa, Atsushi; Nishikawa, Tadashi; Mizutori, Akira; Takara, Hidehiko; Takada, Atsushi; Sogawa, Tetsuomi; Koga, Masafumi

    2013-12-02

    We investigated phase-noise characteristics of both a phase/intensity-modulated laser with 25-GHz mode spacing and a mode-locked fiber laser with carrier-envelope-offset (CEO) locking. As the separation from the frequency of the continuous wave (CW) laser diode (LD) for a seed light source increases, the integrated phase noise of each comb mode of both the phase/intensity-modulated laser and supercontinuum light originating from it increases with the same slope as a function of mode number. The dependence of the integrated phase noise on mode number with the phase/intensity-modulated laser is much larger than with the mode-locked fiber laser of the CEO locking. However, the phase noise of the phase/intensity-modulated laser is extremely lower than that of the mode-locked fiber laser with CEO locking in the frequency region around the CW LD. The phase noise of the phase/intensity-modulated laser with 25-GHz mode spacing and that of the mode-locked fiber laser with the CEO locking could be estimated and were found to be almost the same at the wavelengths required in an f-to-2f self-referencing interferometer. Our experimental results indicate the possibility of achieving an offset-frequency-locked frequency comb with the phase/intensity-modulated laser.

  18. Phase transition phenomenon: A compound measure analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Bo Soo; Park, Chanhi; Ryu, Doojin; Song, Wonho

    2015-06-01

    This study investigates the well-documented phenomenon of phase transition in financial markets using combined information from both return and volume changes within short time intervals. We suggest a new measure for the phase transition behaviour of markets, calculated as a return distribution conditional on local variance in volume imbalance, and show that this measure successfully captures phase transition behaviour under various conditions. We analyse the intraday trade and quote dataset from the KOSPI 200 index futures, which includes detailed information on the original order size and the type of each initiating investor. We find that among these two competing factors, the submitted order size yields more explanatory power on the phenomenon of market phase transition than the investor type.

  19. Spectral Discrete Probability Density Function of Measured Wind Turbine Noise in the Far Field

    PubMed Central

    Ashtiani, Payam; Denison, Adelaide

    2015-01-01

    Of interest is the spectral character of wind turbine noise at typical residential set-back distances. In this paper, a spectral statistical analysis has been applied to immission measurements conducted at three locations. This method provides discrete probability density functions for the Turbine ONLY component of the measured noise. This analysis is completed for one-third octave sound levels, at integer wind speeds, and is compared to existing metrics for measuring acoustic comfort as well as previous discussions on low-frequency noise sources. PMID:25905097

  20. Spectral discrete probability density function of measured wind turbine noise in the far field.

    PubMed

    Ashtiani, Payam; Denison, Adelaide

    2015-01-01

    Of interest is the spectral character of wind turbine noise at typical residential set-back distances. In this paper, a spectral statistical analysis has been applied to immission measurements conducted at three locations. This method provides discrete probability density functions for the Turbine ONLY component of the measured noise. This analysis is completed for one-third octave sound levels, at integer wind speeds, and is compared to existing metrics for measuring acoustic comfort as well as previous discussions on low-frequency noise sources.